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LELAND STANFORD JUNIOR UNIVERSTIY PUBUCAITONS 
1922 TRUSTEES' SERIES No. 38 



AN^aJAL REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT 
OF STANFORD UNIVERSITY 



FOR THE THIRTY.FIRST ACADEKOC YEAR 
ENDING AUGUST 31, 1922 



THS nSING THB haNETBENTH REPORT SUBMTTTBD.TO WHICH 
ARE APPENDED THE ANNUAL REPORTS OF THE 
TREASURER AND COMPTROLLER 



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LELAND STANFORD JUNIOR UNIVERSITY PUBUCATIONS 
1922 TRUSTEES' SERIES No. 33 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT 
OF STANFORD UNIVERSITY 



FOR THE THIRTY-HRST ACADEMIC YEAR 
ENDING AUGUST 31, 1922 



THIS BEING THE NINETEENTH REPORT SUBMITTED, TO WHICH 

ARE APPENDED THE ANNUAL REPORTS OF THE 

TREASURER AND COMPTROLLER 



DEPAKY?. ;■ :.V (M 
F.lHJCAildX 



LELAND .'-'i^.-ii i"i. • 

JUNIOR UNI^ ••:: "I 



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STANFORD UNIVERSITY^ CALIFORNIA 
PUBLISHED BY THE UNIVERSITY 

1922 



STANFORD UNIVERSITY PUBLICATIONS 
TRUSTEES' SERIES 

NO. DATE 

1. The Leland Stanford Junior University. A pamphlet of 

information (No date) 

2. Address of Jane Lathrop Stanford to the Board of 

Trustees February 1 1, 1897 

3. Address of Jane Lathrop Stanford to the Board of 

Trustees June 1, 1897 

4. Address of Jane Lathrop Stanford to the Board of 

Trustees May 31, 1899 

5. Address of Jane Lathrop Stanford to the Board of 

Trustees October 3, 1902 

6. Address on "The Right of Free Speech," by Jane Lathrop 

Stanford to the Board of Trustees April 25, 1903 

7. Petition filed in proceedings to establish and construe 

University Trusts June 16, 1903 

8. Decree in proceedings to establish and construe Univer- 

sity Trusts July 3, 1903 

9. Inaugural address of Jane Latlirop Stanford as President 

of the Board of Trustees July 6, 1903 

10. Organization of the Faculty of the University March 31, 1904 

11. Report of the Organization Committee of the Trustees upon 

the Organization of the University Faculty March 31, 1904 

12. First Annual Report of the President December 31, 1905 

13. Second Annual Report of the President April 30, 1906 

14. Third Annual Report of the President ~ December 31, 1906 

15. Fourth Annual Report of the President December 31, 1907 

16. Trustees* Manual November 1, 1908 

17. Fifth Annual Report of the President December 31, 1908 

18. Sixth Annual Report of the President December 31, 1909 

19. Seventh Annual Report of the President December 31, 1910 

20. Eighth Annual Report of the President December 31, 1911 

21. Ninth Annual Report of the President December 31, 1912 

22. Addresses of Timothy Hopkins, Emmet Rixford, and David 

Starr Jordan at the Dedication of the Lane Medical 

Library Building January 1, 1913 

23. Tenth Annual Report of the President July 31, 1913 

24. Addresses at the installation of John Casper Branner, 

LL. D., as President of the University October 1, 1913 

25. The Perfecting of the Promise, a sermon by Rev. Francis 

G. Peabody, D. D., March 1, 1914, commemorating the 
ninth anniversary of the death of Jane Lathrop Stan- 
ford; The Founders of the University, an address by 
Hon. William W. Morrow, LL. D., Founders* Day, 
March 9, 1914 July 31, 1914 

26. Eleventh Annual Report of the President October 30, 1914 

27. The Foundation Ideals of Stanford University, an ad- 

dress by Chancellor David Starr Jordan, LL. D., on 

March 9, 1915 June 1, 1915 

28. Trustees' Manual (2d edition) August 1,1915 

29. Twelfth Annual Report of the President December 3, 1915 

30. Addresses at the Installation of Ray Lyman Wilbur, M. D., 

as President of the University January 22, 1916 

31. Thirteenth Annual Report of the President December 31, 1916 

32. Fourteenth Annual Report of the President December 1, 1917 

33. Fifteenth Annual Report of the President December 1, 1918 

34. Sixteenth Annual Report of the President. December 31, 1919 

35. Trustees' Manual (3d edition) August 1,1920 

36. Seventeenth Annual Report of the President December 31, 1920 

37. Eighteenth Annual Report of the President December 31, 1921 

38. Nineteenth Annual Report of the President December 31, 1922 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

PAGE 

Buildings : 

Stanford Union 1 

Stanford School of Nursing 1 

Basketball Pavilion 2 

Encina Dining Halls 2 

Residence Halls for Men 2 

Board of Athletic Control Dormitory Plan 3 

Stanford Stadium 3 

Grand Opera in the Stadium 3 • 

Memorial Hall 3 

Food Research Institute 5 

Hoover War Library 8^ 

Barkan Library of the History of Medicine 9 

Faculty Housing 9 

Hotel Site 15 

Stanford Home for Convalescent Children 15 

Endowment Campaigns 16 

The First Million for Stanford 19 

The Second Million for Stanford 19 

The Third Million for Stanford 21 

The President's Statement 21 

Botulism 22 

Athletics 23 

Department of Classical Literature 23 

Stanford Inn 24 

School of Biology 24 

Medical Curriculum 24 

Medical Education of the Present and Near Future ... 24 

Memorial Church 34 

Museum 34 

Game Refuge 35 

U. S. Department of Agriculture 35 

Future of the University 35 

Faculty : 

Absences 41 

Resignations 42 

Promotions 42 

New Appointments 42 

Retirements 43 

Deaths 43 

Summer Quarter 43 

Summer Quarter Appointments 48 

Students : 

Student' Welfare 49 



CONTENTS 

PAGE 

Attendance 50 

Intelligence Tests 51 

Selection of New Students 54 

Increased Freedom for Students of Ability 56 

Scholarship Honors: 

Lower Division Honors 56 

Stanford Scholars ......... 56 

With the Bachelor's Degree 57 

Nurses Loan Fund 57 

Diet Kitchen 58 

Cooperative Agreement for Training Schools for Nurses . 58 

Gifts 59 

Report of the Treasurer 60 

Report of the Comptroller . .84 

APPENDICES 

I. Gifts to the University . 123 

II. Departmental Reports: 

Anatomy 129 

Applied Mathematics 130 

Bacteriology and Experimental Pathology 130 

Botany . . . L32 

Chemistry 135 

Civil Engineering 138 

Classical Literature 138 

Economics 139 

Education 140 

Graphic Art 143 

Electrical Engineering 144 

English 146 

Food Research Institute 149 

Geology 149 

Germanic Languages 151 

History 152 

Hoover War Library 155 

Hopkins Marine Station 156 

Law 158 

Mathematics 158 

Mechanical Engineering 159 

Medical School 161 

Stanford University Hospitals 162 

Medicine 165 

Obstetrics and Gynecology 169 

Pathology 171 

Pharmacology 172 

Surgery 174 

Military Science and Tactics 177 



Lmsj 005 ^ I 2197 



CONTENTS 

PAGE 

Mining and Metallurgy 179 

Philosophy 179 

Physical Education and Personal Hygiene : 

Roblc Gymnasium 179 

Medical Adviser of Women 182 

Physics 184 

Physiology 185 

General Biology 187 

Political Science 188 

Romanic Languages . 189 

Zoology 191 

Entomology 192 

III. Committee Reports: 

Athletics 195 

Board of Athletic Control 195 

Women's Athletics 198 

Lower Division Administration 199 

Public Exercises 200 

Public Health 202 

Research 203 

Scholarship 204 

Student Affairs 212 

Vocational Guidance 212 

IV. Administrative Reports: 

Librarian 213 

Hoover War Library 218 

Lane Medical Library 222 

Dean of Men 223 

Dean of Women 228 

Alumni Secretary 232 

Appointment Secretary 23S 

Memorial Church : 

Chaplain 251 

Organist 253 

Director of Museum and Art Gallery 254 

Registrar 257 

V, Publications of the Faculty 273 



REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT 



To THE Honorable Board of Trustees : 

Gentlemen : Herewith is submitted my report as President of 
the University for the academic year 1921-22. 

BUILDINGS 
Stanford Union 

The completion of the Stanford Union has given the University 
one of its most important and useful buildings. The building was 
opened for use April 1, 1922. 

The residence quarters were immediately occupied and the 
dining rooms used to their capacity. Miss Etta Handy was selected 
as Director and has installed a modern and most satisfactory plan 
for handling the always difficult dining room problem of students. 
From its first day the Union has fitted into the life of the University 
and has been of service to faculty, students, and guests of the 
University, as well as to transient visitors. Through the remark- 
able work of the University gardener the inner court was trans- 
formed in a few days from a rubbish pile into a beautiful garden. 
The Union has made possible for the first time a series of social 
events which have brought all of the elements of the University life 
together. This was signalized by the dinner given by the Trustees 
to the faculty on May 27, 1922. 

The provision of quarters for guests of the University has been 
of signal advantage. 

Stanford School of Nursing 

The Stanford School of Nursing was opened with formal exer- 
cises on March 31, 1922. Addresses were given by Mr. W. Mayo 
Newhall, President of the Board of Trustees, Dr. Ray Lyman 
Wilbur, President of the University, and Mrs. Helen Hoy Greeley, 
of Washington, D. C. 

The building has already proved its unique adaptability to the 
special needs of the training and housing of nurses. The combina- 
tion of living quarters with class rooms, laboratories, and an assem- 
bly hall suitable for all sorts of public programs, as well as social 



2 Stanford University 

diversions, is a very happy one. It is a difficult thing to provide 
ideal surroundings for the young women in a nurses' training 
school, which must necessarily be located in a large city. 

Basketball Pavilion 

The Basketball Pavilion was completed and formally opened 
on January 13, 1922. 

It has been found most satisfactory for its purposes. It made 
possible the bringing together at the time of the Home-Coming 
Day of the alumni on May 20th of the largest number of returning 
students and alumni that has ever been held al^ Stanford. A din- 
ner was served from the kitchens, which form a most useful part 
of the plan. A temporary stage was constructed and a general en- 
tertainment given. This building is suitable not only for basket- 
ball games, but for student dances, rallies, and entertainments of 
various sorts. 

Encina Dining Halls 

Late in August the ground was broken for the erection of the 
dining halls so much needed for the men living in Encina Hall. 
The erection of these halls, providing kitchen and dining room 
facilities for about five hundred men, will remove a most trouble- 
some handicap from the residents of this building. For years 
they have had to go considerable distance in order to obtain their 
meals. The plans promise a structure harmonious with the archi- 
tecture of the hall and the rest of the University buildings. Com- 
pletion is expected early in the year 1923. 

Residence Halls for Men 

The first unit of the new residence halls, which have been 
long projected, was started in August just to the east of Encina 
Hall. The first building is to accommodate about one hundred and 
thirty men. It is built in four wings uniting in a common central 
lobby associated immediately with a large social hall. The dining 
rooms and kitchen are not being constructed at the present time. 
This first unit is of the new type which offers a combination of 
the advantages of the ordinary college dormitory, and frater- 
nity house and something of the college hall system cliaracteristic 
of such institutions as Oxford and Cambridge in England. The 
plan is most elastic and with the si^ecial social rooms provided 



Report of the President 3 

with each wing it is possible to house up to four distinct living 
units. 

The Board of Athletic Control Dormitory Plan 

One of the most striking results coming from the construction 
of the new Stanford Stadium has been the proposal from the 
Board of Athletic Control to have the University erect a residence 
hall, costing $450,000, and to have it paid for, principal and in- 
terest, over a series of years from the surplus earnings of the 
Stadium. Plans are practically completed for this structure 
which, upon the request of the Board of Athletic Control, is to 
house about one hundred and thirty students and to be modeled 
upon present Sequoia Hall, which was considered by the Board 
the most successful of the residence halls for students on the 
campus. 

Stanford Stadium 

The Stanford Stadium has fully lived up to the expectations of 
its originators. The annual California-Stanford game held on 
November 19th demonstrated the unique advantages of the Sta- 
dium. Not only was a large crowd of approximately 55,000 
spectators provided with satisfactory seats for the game, but the 
methods of handling transportation made possible by the arrange- 
ment of roads, highways, street cars, and railroads, met with 
universal praise and satisfaction. 

Grand Opera in the Stadium 

The unique acoustic qualities of the Stanford Stadium made 
it possible for a series of open-air evening performances of *'r Pa- 
gliacci," **Carmen," and "Faust" to be given by an excellent com- 
pany selected by Gaetano Merola. While the results were not 
satisfactory from a financial standpoint, they were in every other 
particular. The temporary stage which was constructed for the 
opera can lie readily erected for similar performances at any 
time. It seems probable that open-air entertainments will become a 
spring feature of the Stadium. 

Memorial Hall 

. Hollowing is the report of Professor Emeritus John ^laxson 
Stillman, chairman of the committee in charge of collecting funds 
lor the Stanford War Service Memorial: 



4 Stanford University 

For the information of subscribers and the University public generally* 
a report of the condition of the fund to date is herewith submitted. It has 
already been stated that efforts to enlarge our subscription list were sus- 
pended during the campaign for the Stadium and the Endowment cam- 
paign. Payments of amounts already promised have, however, progressed 
steadily and the report as of November 1, 1922, is here submitted. 

Funds invested in U. S. Victory Notes and in a small amount of other 
Liberty Bonds were, upon the approaching call for Victory Bonds, sold, 
for a sum in excess over cost of $492.67. On the recommendation of the 
Committee on Finance, appointed by the Committee of Fifty, it was 
decided to re-invest these funds with the approval of the Treasurer of the 
Board of Trustees, and all investments since have been so invested. 

On November 1, 1922, the receipts from all sources were as follows: 

Total receipts from subscribers $ 51,756.30 

Interest on U. S. bonds and savings, collected 4,022.73 

Profit on sale of Victory bonds, etc., 492.67 

Interest on bonds with Union Trust Co., collected to date 412.50 

$ 56,784.20 
Less total expenses to date 2,930.59 

Net receipts $ 53,753.61 

Total assets now on hand: 

Bonds (with Union Trust Co.) cost $ 45,600.75 

Savings bank (Bank of Palo Alto) 5,186.48 

Cash (awaiting investment. Union Trust Co.) 2,836.72 

Commercial acct. Bank of Palo Alto 129.66 



$ 53,753.61 
Funds subscribed to the Memorial Fund by Stadium subscribers, to 
be paid from Stadium receipts, as reported already pledged 

to Memorial $ 8,100.00 

From new subscribers 7,698.61 

$ 15,798.61 

Guarantee of 10 N. Y. alumni for N. Y. Al $ 10,000.00 

Less amount received from N. Y., ca 500.00 

$ 9,500.00 
Still due on amounts pledged $ 21,597.00 

Total nominal assets to date $100,648.22 

Received, but expended for cost's of campaign, as above 2,930.00 

Total received or promised $103,578.22 



Report of the President 5 

A Greater Memorial Hall 

Subscribers and Stanford people generally will be pleased to hear that 
President Wilbur contemplates making the Stanford War Memorial Build- 
ing a greater and worthier memorial than the Committee of Fifty had 
seen their way to achieve. I have asked him to communicate his plans in 
his own words and his letter follows : 

Dr. J. M. Stillman, 

Stanford University, Cal. 

Dear Dr. Stillman: Your report on the Memorial Hall fund is most 
gratifying. 

Since the conception of the Memorial Hall idea there has been a great 
development in the future plans of the University. With the success of the 
First Million campaign and our entrance upon the Second Million, which is 
to be for buildings, it has been necessary for us to look ahead. 

You no doubt are familiar with the building scheme which has been 
published in one of the folders issued in connection with the Endowment 
Campaign. It is evident that for proper architectural harmony there should 
be a key building in the outer quadrangle to the west placed so as to offset 
the library building in the outer quadrangle to the east and of a size and 
character similar to that of the library and the Memorial Church. It seems 
to be most fitting that this building should be the Memorial Hall. 

The University is very much in need of an assembly hall of beautiful 
proportions and dignity in its decoration. We have also some rape war 
treasures to house, particularly the new statue of Isis received by the 
University from the people of Belgium as a tribute to Mr. Hoover. At 
present costs it seems to me that it will be desirable to have available a 
building fund of between $400,000 and $500,000 to ensure the erection of 
a monumental building. The opportunity is unique and we should take full 
advantage of it. 

My hope is that upon the completion of the $3,000,000 campaign we can 
elicit public assistance and add to the existing fund a sufficient amount to 
bring about this result. I can assure you that it will be my every effort to 
round out the splendid pioneer effort of you and your associates in collecting 
the Stanford War Memorial fund. 

Very sincerely yours, 

Ray Lyman Wilbur, 

President 

Food Research Institute 

There has been a rapid progress in the plans of the Food Re- 
search Institute. Perhaps the best summary that can be given is 
contained in the statement sent out by the Directors under date 
of March 20, 1922. 

The Food Research Institute of Stanford University was founded in 
February, 1921, by the Carnegie Corporation of New York in conjunction 



6 Stanford University 

with the Trustees of Letand Stanford Junior University, California. It is 
organized for the purpose of intensive scientific study of the problems 
of the production, distribution, and consumption of food. The Institute 
grew out of a suggestion offered by Mr. Herbert Hoover, and its location 
at Stanford University was due partly to the fact that this University pos- 
sesses, in the Hoover War Library, a large and unique collection of docu- 
mentary material relating to the food problems and other economic aspects 
of the Great War. The Carnegie Corporation guarantees stated funds for 
the work for a period of ten years. Stanford University provides quarters 
and facilities and has appointed the directors of the Institute to positions 
on the Stanford faculty. 

The control of its policies and the active direction of the work of the 
Institute are entrusted to three joint directors. The plan of the founders 
called for the selection of an expert in agriculture and food manufacture, 
an expert in economics and food distribution, and an expert in the physiology 
and chemistry of nutrition. In accordance with this plan, the following 
directors were appointed in April, 1921 : Carl L. Alsberg, M. D., Joseph S. 
Davis, Ph. D., and Alonzo E. Taylor, M. D. At the same time an Advisory 
Committee was appointed comprising the presidents of Carnegie Corporation 
and Stanford University, ex -officio, and the following additional members: 
Hon. Herbert Hoover, Secretary of Commerce; Dr. James C. Merriam, 
President of the Carnegie Institution of Washington; Mr. Julius Barnes, 
formerly President of the U. S. Grain Corporation ; Dr. William M. Jardine, 
President of the Kansas State Agricultural College; Mr. J. R. Howard, 
President of the American Farm Bureau Federation ; Miss Sarah Louise 
Arnold, Dean Emerita of Simmons College, and Mr. George Roeding, 
formerly of the California Horticultural Commission. 

The founding of the Food Research Institute is an outgrowth of war 
experience. During the late war, i)ossibly for the first time in history, food 
production and distribution, nutrition and dietetics had to be considered by 
governments as national and even internatinoal problems. In determining 
policies required to meet the emergency, food administrators sought certain 
scientific information, from agriculturists, economists, physiologists, and 
physicians. Many valuable data were readily furnished. On the other hand, 
much of the desired information was not in existence, not because, given 
time, it would have been difficult to obtain, but because no one l)efore the 
war had asked these questions or attempted to reach an adequate answer. 
Nutrition and dietetics had been studied mainly as individual problems, not 
as mass problems. The food supply had seldom been examined with ade- 
quate reference to its international aspects and to the particular commodities 
entering into it. Marketing problems had received mainly local investi- 
gation. There had been little coordination of studies in several important 
fields, and serious gaps were numerous. In many instances, therefore, the 
lack of essential information led to action more or less in the dark. 

The founders of the Food Research Institute were convinced that the 
scientific study of such problems, from a broad national and international 
viewpoint, was important in peace no less than in war. While recognizing the 



Report of the President 7 

essential services which research work in federal and state agricultural de- 
partments and colleges had rendered and will continue to render, they con- 
sidered that a non-governmental organization with university affiliations 
could have advantages in attacking certain kinds of problems without the 
limitations which apply to these agencies. 

The Institute proposes, therefore, to investigate significant food problems 
from the standpoint of their bearing upon national economy and well-being, 
to deal with them as mass problems, and to emphasise the commodity and 
international aspects. While it will frequently study data of individual 
businesses, it will do this not in order to serve as a business adviser, but 
primarily in order to discover principles of general importance. 

The precise program of the Institute will be developed gradually. Its 
exact form will be determined partly by the readiness with which essential 
data on particular subjects can be assembled, and by the work which is already 
in progress elsewhere. In the course of its activity the Institute will concern 
itself with such subjects as the food elements in actual and normal standards 
of living, and the physiological and social aspects of sub-nutrition; the 
sources, production, marketing, and utilization of important staple food- 
stuffs, such as wheat; the financing of farm operations and the manufac- 
ture and marketing of food products; the analysis of important food indus- 
tries and the problems which they present; the technology of food manu- 
facture, and the desirable scope of public control thereof; and the ele- 
ments in a sound national policy with respect to food production, internal 
distribution, and international trade. 

Numerous existing organizations are already conducting research into 
food problems, from one angle or another, notably the Department of Agri- 
culture, state bureaus of markets, agricultural colleges and experiment sta- 
tions ; research organizations of banks, business houses, trade and marketing 
associations; and university departments, committees, or individuals. It will 
be the policy of the Institute to avoid, so far as possible, any serious over- 
lapping of the work of established research organizations, public or private. 
It will endeavor rather to enlist the aid of existing organizations in the 
prosecution of researches in which there is a common interest, in which 
essential data are already collected or in process of collection, or in which 
another organization is in a better posifion to perform a portion of the 
research. Moreover, in numerous instances the Institute will consider its 
purpose accomplished if methods which it may develop, or sample studies 
which it may make, can be utilized by public or private agencies in under- 
taking similar investigations on a far more extended scale. 

The research work will be done, for the most part, at Stanford University. 
In general, subjects for investigation will be selected which do not necessi- 
tate extensive field work,, or in which the results of field investigations con- 
ducted by other competent organizations can be utilized. It is recognized, 
however, that certain investigations which the Institute can undertake will 
require more or less field work by the directors, fellows, or assistants, and 
for these necessary provision will be made. 

The Institute is organized as an integral part of Stanford University, 



8 Stanford University 

with the status of a department for the purpose of directing research and 
recommending degrees. For the year 1922-23 it has established four fellow- 
ships for graduate study in the field of food research. The directors will 
guide the work of these fellows, and occasionally a few other well-qualified 
graduate students, in studies which fall within the scope outlined above 
and which will frequently constitute a specific part of a piece of research 
which the Institute has in process. Such individual research will ordi- 
narily form a part of the work toward a higher degree at Stanford Uni- 
versity, and will be supplemented by such work in other departments of 
the University as may be necessary to fulfill tlie usual requirements for 
degrees. 

While the Institute does not contemplate undertaking extensive experi- 
mental work on its own account, the University's established facilities for 
experimental research on foods, nutrition, etc., are available to graduate 
students, and to a limited extent the directors of the Institute will cooperate 
in the direction of research in these fields. In addition, the directors will 
occasionally offer courses of instruction in other departments of the Uni- 
versity. 

In part the results of researches will be published through established 
technical journals. Where circumstances render this undesirable, the re- 
sults will usually appear in a series of publications to be issued by the 
Food Research Institute. In cases where certain lines of research are of 
interest to specific groups of readers, other or additional channels of 
publication will be sought in order to reach those concerned. 

The first year of the Institute has been largely occupied with the estab- 
lishment at Stanford, the determination of general policies, the organiza- 
tion of a small staff, enlarging the collection of data which will be re- 
quired for research, and making certain preliminary surveys and investiga- 
tions designed to furnish the basis for more intensive studies. The work 
will be fully under way by the autumn of 1922. 

A considerable number of research workers have been added 
to the original staff and most satisfactory progress is being made. 

Hoover War Library 

There has been a constant growth in the size of this remarkable 
library. Professor Colder has spent most of the year in Russia 
continuing his collections for the library and his work with the 
American Relief Administration. Material is still coming in from 
various sources. We feel justified in the expectation that this col- 
lection will grow into one of the best of its kind in existence. The 
Hoover War Library has been definitely located in two of the lower 
floors of the stacks of the University Library. A suitable reading 
room has been provided on the ground floor to the right of the 
main entrance. The cataloging of the library is going ahead so 



Report of the President 9 

tfiat it will become increasingly accessible to the students of the 
Food Research Institute and of the various departments of the 
University. 

Barkan Library on the History of Medicine 

Through the generosity of Dr. Adolph Barkan, Professor of 
Structure and Diseases of Eye, Ear, and Larynx, Emeritus, and 
his personal efforts in Europe, the Lane Medical Library secured 
the Seidl Library on the history of medicine. This collection, com- 
bined with the other purchases of Dr. Barkan and the existing 
resources of the Library, gives Stanford one of the best collec- 
tions on the history of medicine in this country. Further additions 
are being made under the personal guidance of Dr. Barkan. 
It is anticipated that with time this library will form a notable addi- 
tion to our library resources. 

Faculty Housing 

The inauguration of the plan for faculty housing has proved 
most successful. During the course of the year nine houses 
were either erected or construction was begun, two of which were 
built on a loan plan. 

The lease forms for members of the faculty should form a 
part of this record. 

This Lease and Agreement made and executed this day of 

, 19 , by and between The Board of Trustees of the 

Leland Stanford Junior University^ a body having corporate powers un- 
der the laws of the State of California, the party of the first part, and 

the part of the second part ; the party of the first part being hereinafter 

designated as the Lessor and the party or parties of the second part as the 
Lessee, the singular number only being used, the same including the plural, 
and the masculine gender including the feminine, Witnesseth: 

That the Lessor for and in consideration of the covenants hereinafter 
expressed, and the rents reserved, does by these presents, hereby demise and 
lease unto the Lessee, for and during the full term of twenty (20) years, 

commencing on the .day of , 19 , and ending on the 

.day of...- , 19 , that certain lot or parcel of land 

situate on the lands known as the "Palo Alto Farm" and being the grounds 
of the Leland Stanford Junior University, in the County of Santa Clara, 
State of California, and more particularly described as follows: 

The Lessee covenants and agrees to pay to the Lessor at its Business 
Office, or wheresoever else Lessor may designate, the annual ground rent 



10 Stanford University 

or sum of One Hundred ($100.00) Dollars, payable in equal monthly in- 
stallments in advance on the first day of each month of the term hereby 
created. 

The Lessee is hereby given the right to erect on said demised premises 
a building suitable for a residence and to use and occupy the same as a resi- 
dence, and not for any other purpose; also to erect the usual outbuildings 
and other improvements on said premises, it being specially understood and 
agreed, however, that no stable or other buildings, structures or enclosures 
for animals or birds shall ever be built on said premises except with the 
written consent of the Lessor. 

The Lessee hereby covenants and agrees to commence and complete said 
residence and other improvements within the period of one year from the 
commencement of the term of this lease, the said residence to cost not less 
than $ , the same and all modifications and all other improve- 
ments to comply with the building ordinances of the City and County of 
San Francisco. 

The Lessee covenants and agrees before the commencement of any im- 
provements, to deliver to the Lessor a complete set of plans and specifications 
of all improvements proposed to be erected or made on said premises, and 
not to erect or commence work on any of the same until the proposed im- 
provements and their location upon said land shall have been first approved 
by the Lessor. The Lessor shall have the right at all times during the 
erection or construction of all improvements to examine and inspect the 
same to see if they are being erected or constructed in strict accordance 
with the said plans and specifications, and if not being so erected or con- 
structed. Lessor shall have the right, at its option, to forthwith cancel and 
annul this Lease and terminate the term hereby created. After completion 
of said residence and improvements no alteration or addition thereto shall 
thereafter be made unless the same shall conform to said building ordinances 
and unless the consent of the Lessor in writing to the making of said alter- 
ations or additions be first had and obtained; and the construction or erec- 
tion of said alterations or additions shall be subject to the same inspec- 
tion and limitations. 

Every building contract entered into by said Lessee, by recital or by 
reference to this Lease, shall show the extent of the interest of the Lessee in 
the said premises, and the Lessee covenants and agrees to hold harmless 
the Lessor of and from, and protect the demised premises against, any and 
all liens occasioned by the erection of said buildings or improvement's thereon. 
Before work on any such building or improvements is commenced the 
Lessor may require that the Lessee and the Contractor or other person 
erecting the same, or either of them, give, and they shall give, a good and 
sufficient bond protecting the Lessor and the demised premises against 
all mechanics' and other liens growing out of or incident to, the erection or 
making of such improvement, but the Lessor may waive the giving of such 
bond or bonds. The Lessor shall have the right at all times during the 
erection of improvements thereon to post and maintain on said demised 
premises or on the improvements in course of ^ erection thereon sych notice or 
notices of non-liability as it may desire to post thereon. 



Report of the President 11 

Said Lessee shall before any such building or improvement is com- 
menced take out and maintain in force and effect Compensation insurance 
with an insurance carrier, covering the liability of the Lessor for com- 
pensation to any persons injured during the erection of such building or im- 
provements, or his dependents, under the present or any future acts or laws 
which shall or may impose liability upon the Lessor for such injuries ; and in 
the event of the Lessee*s failure so to do the Lessor may take out and main- 
tain such insurance and in such event the Lessee agrees to repay to Lessor 
the full amount of premium which it shall pay to such insurance carrier. 

The Lessee is hereby given the right to connect with all sewer and water 
mains where necessary, all connections to be made under the supervision 
of the Lessor. 

The Lessee hereby covenants, promises and agrees that he will not let or 
underlet the whole or any part of said premises, nor sell, assign or transfer 
this Lease or any part or portion of the term hereby created, or the im- 
provements on said premises, without first having obtained the consent in 
writing of the Lessor, and that in case any such permission or consent is 
given, no subsequent letting, underletting, sale, transfer, or assignment 
can be made without again obtaining the consent of the Lessor thereto; it 
being understood and agreed, however, that said lessor will at any and all 
times give its consent provided the proposed subtenant, vendee, assignee 
or transferee be a Trustee, professor or instructor or member of the admin- 
istrative staff of said University and that he shall first agree to be bound by 
all the conditions and covenants of this Lease. 

Provided further that in the event that said proposed subtenant, vendee, 
assignee or transferee be not a Trustee, professor, instructor or member 
of the administrative staff of said University, then, before such leasehold 
shall be assigned or such improvements sold, the Lessor shall have the 
option to terminate said Lease and agreement and to repurchase said im- 
provements, upon the payment to the Lessee of a sum to be agreed upon, or 
determined by arbitration in the manner hereinafter provided for in case 
the parties in interest can not agree upon the same; such sum not to ex- 
ceed, however, the original cost of such house, plus the cost of permanent 
improvements subsequently added by the Lessee, less a reasonable allow- 
ance for depreciation of not to exceed 2j/4% per annum; such option by the 
Lessor to be exercised within ten days after written notice by the Lessee 
of his intention to sell said lease and improvements; but' nothing in this para- 
graph contained shall be construed to make it obligatory on the part of the 
Lessor to terminate this Lease or pay any sum of money unless it elects 
to do so. 

It is specially covenanted and agreed, anything to the contrary herein 
contained notwithstanding, that if the Lessee is now collected with any de- 
partment of said University as a professor, emeritus professor, instructor, 
or member of the administrative staff, and such connection shall be hereafter 
dissolved by death, resignation or dismissal, or otherwise, then and in snch 
event, the Lessor shaJl have the right to terminate this Lease and agree- 
ment and to purchase the improvements situate on said premises, -upon* the 



12 Stanford University 

payment to the Lessee, or his heirs, executors or administrators, of a sum 
to be agreed upon or determined by arbitration in the manner -hereinafter 
provided for, in case the parties in interest can not agree upon the same; 
provided, however, that the sum to be paid shall not exceed the original 
cost of said house plus the cost of permanent improvements subsequently 
made by the Lessee, less a reasonable allowance for depreciation of not to 
exceed 2^% per annum from date hereof ; and 

Provided further, however, that in the event that said Lessee leaves a 
husband or wife surviving, the option herein granted shall not be exercised 
so long as such survivor continues to occupy said premises as his or her per- 
manent place of residence, but upon the death of such survivor, or upon the 
abandonment by such survivor of said property as a residence, said option 
shall become effective ; and 

Provided further that nothing herein shall be construed as limiting the 
right of such survivor to lease said property, with the University's con- 
sent", for terms of not to exceed one year, said option to become effective 
at the end of the term of any such lease or leases. 

It is expressly covenanted, agreed and understood that no malt, spirituous 
or intoxicating liquors of any kind shall ever at any time be sold on the 
demised premises, and upon a violation of this covenant the Lessor may ter- 
minate this lease and end the tenancy of the Lessee. 

The Lessee and all occupants of the premises hereby demised holding 
under or through him or with his consent shall at all times during the term 
hereof be subject to all the rules of discipline and other regulations of every 
kind prescribed or adopted by the Lessor or other University authorities; 
and if any occupant or occupants of said premises shall be objectionable to 
the Lessor or other authorities of said University, or if said occupant or 
occupants shall permit or allow any disorderly or objectionable conduct on 
said premises or in any of the buildings erected thereon, the Lessee shall and 
will on demand^ cause all such persons to be forthwith evicted and removed 
from said premises, and a failure so to evict and remove shall constitute a 
breach of the covenants hereof. 

The Lessee further covenants and agrees, in addition to said annual rental 
purchase price to pay any and all assessments and taxes which may be levied 
or assessed upon any and all improvements upon said demised premises and 
also to pay for all electric current, gas and water used upon said premises 
during the term hereof, or any extension thereof. 

In case of the partial or total destruction of the improvements on said 
premises by fire, earthquake or other action of the elements, the Lessee shall 
restore or replace the same by other improvements of a similar nature and 
value within one year after such destruction, in default of which the Lessor 
may cancel and annul this Lease, at its option, at the expiration of said year 
after such destruction. Any such restoration or replacement shall be under 
the same conditions and limitations as hereinabove provided for the original 
erection or construction of said improvements. 

The Lessee agrees at all times during the continuation of the term hereof 
to keep and maintain said premises and all buildings erected thereon in good 



Report of the President 13 

order and condition, and neat and clean in appearance, and to allow no weeds 
to grow or rubbish or debris to accumulate upon the premises, or any nuisance 
to be maintained thereon, and in case of a breach of any of the covenants in 
this paragraph contained the Lessor may enter upon said premises and build« 
ings and perform any work in its judgment necessary to comply with said 
covenants and charge the expense thereof to the Lessee and the Lessee 
hereby agrees to repay to the Lessor the cost thereof on demand. 

In order to erect and complete on said premises the residence hereinbefore 
referred to, it is anticipated that it may be necessary for the Lessee to borrow 
a sum of money and, in consideration of the premises, the Lessor hereby 
agrees that after the Lessee has actually paid out and expended the sum of 
$ — for labor and materials done and used in the building of said resi- 
dence, and upon the presentation to it of receipts showing the expenditure 
of said sum of money for said purpose and proper certificate showing that 
there are no mechanics' or materialmen's liens or claims against said 
premises, or any unpaid and outstanding bills incurred for labor or material 
for which liens could be filed, it will, if so requested by Lessee, upon presenta- 
tion to it of certificates signed by the architect of the Lessee, or other proof 
satisfactory to the Lessor, showing that labor has thereafter been actually 
performed or material actually furnished for and used in the construc- 
tion of said building, make payments for account of said Lessee up to but 

not exceeding the sum of $ , all of which shall be evidenced by 

the promissory note or notes of the Lessee, payable in monthly 

installments after date, without interest if paid at maturity, but with interest 

at the rate of per cent net per annum on all overdue installments, 

it being understood that Lessee shall have the privilege of making additional 
payments on account of the principal at any time, provided no interest be 
in arrears, all of said note or notes to be secured by a mortgage upon the 
leasehold of the Lessee hereby created, which mortgage shall be in such 
form as the Lessor shall determine and shall contain a stipulation that the 
Lessee shall at all times keep the said improvements insured against fine at his 
own expense, in a sum at least equal to the amount secured by said mortgage, 
with loss payable to the Lessor; the policies of insurance to be obtained 
from companies satisfactory to the Lessor and to be deposited with it 

It is understood that for a violation by the Lessee of any of the terms, 
covenants or conditions of this Lease, the same and the term hereby created 
shall, at the option of the Lessor, terminate and become void ; and that upon 
the expiration by lapse of time of the term hereby created, or of any extension 
hereof, or the termination of this Lease for any reason, the Lessor may 
reenter upon said premises, take possession of the same and remove all 
parties therefrom; and a failure of the Lessor to terminate this lease for 
the violation of any covenant or condition thereof shall not be, or be con- 
strued to be, a waiver of the right to terminate the same for a continuation 
or repetition of such violation, or for a 'violation of any other covenant or 
condition. 

It is agreed that no part of the lands known as the "Palo Alto Farm" 
now used for the purpose of travel thereon (commonly called roads, streets, 



14 Stanford University 

avenues, alleys, lanes and paths), or hereafter to be so used, is or ever lias 
been dedicated to public use, by user or otherwise; and the Le>sor hereby 
specially reserves the right at any and all times to close any of said lands 
^o travel, to erect and maintain gates at any point thereon, and to regulate 
or prevent traffic of any and every kind thereon, prescribe the method of 
use thereof, and to maintain complete dominion over the same, including 
the right to prescribe the kind or kinds of vehicles that may travel the same 
or any part thereof ; and that the Lessor is and shall be under no obligation 
whatever to install water or sewer pipes or drains, or to open up or grade any 
of the lands delineated on any map of the University grounds, or any part 
thereof, as streets, roads, avenues, lanes, alleys or paths, or to subject the 
^me to use for purposes of travel thereon or thereover, or for any other 
purpose. 

The Lessor covenants that the Lessee, paying the said rent and observing 
and fulfilling the said conditions and covenants on his part to be paid, ob- 
served and fulfilled, shall and may peaceably hold, possess and enjoy said 
premises during the continuance of this Lease without let. molestation or 
hindrance. 

The Lessor covenants and agrees to and with the Lessee, his heirs, execu- 
tors, administrators, successors and assigns, that the Lessee, his heirs, execu- 
tors, administrators, successors and assigns, paying the said rent and faith- 
fully observing and fulfilling the said conditions and covenants to be by him 
and them paid, observed, kept and performed, and paying all of said note or 
notes and interest thereon when and as due and payable, shall, upon the 
expiration of this lease by the lapse of the term of twenty years hereby 
created, have the option of renewing the same for an additional term of 
twenty years upon giving to said Lessor notice in writing at least three 
months before the expiration of said term of twenty years, the extended 
term to be upon all the same terms, conditions and covenants herein con- 
tained excepting only as to the original construction of the said residence; 
and upon the expiration of said second term of twenty years the Lessee, his 
heirs, executors, administrators, successors and assigns, shall upon the same 
terms, conditions and limitations have the option of further renewing said 
lease for a third term of twenty years upon aH the same terms, conditions 
and covenants; and upon the expiration of said third term of twenty years 
the Lessee, his heirs, executors, administrators, successors and assigns, shall 
upon the same terms, conditions and limitations have the option of further 
renewing said lease for a fourth and final term of twenty years upon all the 
same terms, conditions and covenants. 

The Lessor covenants and agrees that it will, at all times during the term 
hereof, supply and furnish to the Lessee, all water reasonably necessary for 
irrigation and domestic use on the demised premises, all necessary connections 
with existing water pipes or mains to be made at the expense of the Lessee. 

It is further understood and agreed that any arbitration herein provided 
for shall be conducted in the following manner : Each party shall choose and 
designate one person to serve and act as arbitrator, and in case the two arbi- 
trators so chosen can not agree, these two shall select an umpire, and the 
decision of any two of them shall be binding on all parties. 



Report of the President 15 

It is specially covenanted, agreed and understood by and between the par- 
ties hereto that in case the Lessee shall be adjudged* bankrupt, or if his lease- 
hold, or said improvements, or his equity therein, shall be subjected to at- 
tachment or execution, same or either of the same shall be and be taken to 
be a breach of the covenants hereof, and the Lessor may thereupon enter upon 
and take possession of said premises and oust all persons therefrom and this 
Lease and agreement shall be terminated and at an end ; and in such event 
the Lessor shall pay to the persons who may be by law entitled to receive the 
same, the value of said improvements or the value of the equity of the Lessee 
therein, same to be fixed and determined in the manner hereinbefore pro- 
\'ided in case of the death, resignation or removal of the Lessee. 

This Lease shall bind the heirs, executors, administrators, successors and 
assigns of the respective parties hereto. 

Ix Witness Whereof, the Lessor has caused its name to be subscribed 
and its seal to be afHxed by its President and its Secretary, or its Comptroller 
acting therefor, theretmto duly authorized by resolution of said Board, and 
the Lessee has hereunto set his hand and seal, this day of , 192 

The Board of Trustees of the 
Leland Stanford Junior Universitv 

Witness By 



President — Comptroller 



Witness By 

Secretary 

Witness (Seal) 

(Seal) 



Hotel Site 

Following a careful series of studies the Board of Trustees 
have granted a lease to a hotel company in Palo Alto of a site oppo- 
site the railroad station for the erection of a hotel at a cost of alx)ut 
$250,000 to $300,000. When constructed this hotel will meet a 
long felt need. It will make possible the provision of good accom- 
modations for visitors to the University, for returning alumni 
and the parents of students, as well as for tourists. For years the 
University has suffered greatly because of its inability ^o house its 
guests or to care for those participating in conventions or society 
meetings that should be held in University buildings. 

Stanford Home for Convalescent Children 

Steady progress has been made in the development of this insti- 
tution. It is winning its way into the hearts of the community. 



16 Stanford University 

Not only has the endowment campaign under Mrs. Timothy Hop- 
kins collected some $80,000.00, but there has been a constant 
support for maintenance from a large number of residents in 
the community and the Children's Circus in Menlo Park has been 
established as an annual institution for the provision of funds 
for the Home. There is promise of endowment for additional 
buildings and that the Home will also become a member of 
the projected Community Chest of San Francisco. 

Endowment Campaigns 

The most striking feature of the year 1921-22 was the satis- 
factory completion of the First Million For Stanford endowment 
campaign. The endowment committee appointed last year, con- 
sisting of W. Mayo Newhall, Timothy Hopkins, Thomas T. C. 
Gregory, John Thomas Nourse, Ray Lyman Wilbur, and Almon 
Edward Roth, with the help of Mr. Lyman L. Pierce, of the firm 
of Ward, Pierce, Wells & Company, and a large volunteer group 
of alumni and friends of the University, inaugurated a series of 
active campaigns among the alumni in different parts of the 
United States. 

The first step in bringing new endowment to the Univer- 
sity came from the students. After a short and intensive cam- 
paign the President received pledges totaling $105,965.00 from 
the President of the Associated Students in an open meeting held 
February 3, 1922, on the front steps of the Outer Quadrangle. 
This was not only an impressive start for the endowment cam- 
paign, but also was a striking augury for the future of the Uni- 
versity. The future growth of Stanford is assured when the 
student body of today has joined the alumni. That sense of sup- 
port which has been kindled in undergraduate days is sure to come 
to the constant assistance of the University. 

Representative alumni from all parts of the country were 
brought together for a two-day conference at the University on 
December 9th and 10th. About ninety were present. During the 
conference they heard a discussion of the needs of the Univer- 
sity and were shown over the campus and through the Medical 
School in San Francisco. The result of that conference was a reso- 
lution passed unanimously by the delegates recognizing the needs 
of Stanford and pledging support to the University in its campaign 
to satisfy those needs. The resolution adopted reads as follows: 



Report of the President 17 

Whereas, Stanford University has reached the point in its affairs where 
it is necessary to lower the standards or increase its resources ; and 

Whereas, This condition has been clearly demonstrated to us after a 
careful examination of the University and its financial affairs; now, there- 
fore, be it 

Resolved, That the representation of the alumni organizations throughout 
the country here assembled endorses unanimously the plan outlined by the 
Trustees and the University authorities to sectu-e the required resources, and 
pledges its enthusiastic support of the same. 

Following the action of the students there was a gift from 
the Chamber of Commerce of Palo Alto and of others in the imme- 
diate neighborhood of the University. Meetings were held in 
San Francisco, Los Angeles, Portland, Spokane, Chicago, New 
York, and elsewhere, with the result that we were able to announce 
the subscription of the $700,000 required in order to meet the gift 
of $300,000 from the General Education Board, to complete 
the First MiUion For Stanford, the income from which is to be 
used for the salaries of the professors. It is anticipated that with 
the continuance of the present spirit and giving among the alumni 
and present campaign efforts a total of $1,000,000 in subscriptions 
will be secured from students and alumni towards the $3,000,000 
program, which was set as the present immediate goal. 

The following statement issued in connection with this cam- 
paign is worthy of record : 

To the Men and Women of Stanford: 

During the past five years the Trustees of Stanford University, in com- 
mon with the management of every college and university in the land, 
have confronted serious problems. At the outbreak of the war, university 
programs generally were based on the use of every available dollar of re- 
sources. Pre-war conditions and pre-war prices were not more than 50 per 
cent of present prioes. The result is that for practical purposes the re- 
sources of every college and university were cut in half. It is not surpris- 
ing, therefore, for us to be confronted now by a situation wherein the 
available resources of the University are not adequate to meet our growing 
needs. Stanford University has been fortunatie in being able to proceed for 
so long without facing the dangers of radical curtailment in its plans. 

Our efforts to meet our problems by tuition fees and other added re- 
sources have partially but by no means entirely provided what is necessary. 
The time has come when we must materially increase the resources of the 
University or curtail those plans which we believe are dear to every Stan- 
ford man and woman and which are placing our University in the very front 
rank of the world's institutions of higher education. 

You are doubtless familiar with the recent movement among the Amer- 



18 Stanford University 

ican colleges and universities in which one after another, even the most 
securely financed, have faced and met similar situations. Before the war. 
Harvard had no expectation that she would require the $12,000,000 that 
has recently been added to her resources. Yale, despite the Sterling bequest 
of $11,000,000, would face an annual deficit of about half a million dollars 
but for the great activity and devotion of her alumni. Cornell has been 
compelled to undertake the raising of a fund of $10,000,000; Vassar 
$3,000,000; Smith $4,000,000; Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
$8,000,000; Rutgers $1,000,000; Weslcyan $3,000,000; Princeton $14,000,000; 
New York University $6,500,000 ; Hamilton $1,000,000, and scores of otlier 
institutions established through a long period of accumulating resources 
and repeated fund-raising efforts have, through the cooperation of their 
loyal friends, achieved results which are almost unbelievable. 

The Trustees have proceeded with great deliberation and possibly with 
unnecessary caution in making their decision. We applied the acid test when 
we invited the General Education Board to make a thorough investigation 
of the Stanford situation. This body, the most unemotional and most 
exacting of its kind in existence, which has made similar studies of prac- 
tically every collegiate institution on the continent and which has some- 
times approved but often disapproved their claims, made a similar exhaustive 
study of our requirements. 

This investigation by tlie General Education Board resulted in an offer 
of $300,000 toward our first one million dollars of added endowments, the 
proceeds to be applied by their stipulation to the very pressing problems 
related to salary adjustments in the faculty of the College of Arts and 
Sciences. 

As we look ahead we foresee the necessity for cultivating the interested 
public in meeting our requirements for still further funds. Among these 
are the following : 

One million dollars to supplement our building funds in order that the 
University may provide the absolutely necessary residence halls and other 
buildings required for the present student body. 

Other increases to our endowment funds to maintain the high stand- 
ards of Stanford and to keep pace with the universal advance among the 
American colleges. 

At least $1,000,000 as a partial endowment of the Stanford Hospital for 
its research and gratuitous service. We have reason to hope that the major 
part of this will be provided by the people of San Francisco, although the 
high type of our research work and its general value makes of this a more- 
far-reaching appeal than simply to the San Francisco public. 

The Trustees have decided to present the Stanford claims to those asso- 
ciated with the University and through them to the public also. We want 
you to help in interesting the giving public in our needs. We have recently 
sought the counsel and advice of those who have been selected by you as 
the officers of your Alumni Aissociations throughout" the country. These 
alumni have heartily endorsed an immediate campaign for $^00,000 to meet 
the offer of the General Education Board and tl>e program for the whole 
$3,000,000 now required. We have assumed that the intimate friends of the 



Report of the President 19 

University are the ones who will from the outset be most in sympathy 
with its needs and who can doubtless best cooperate in presenting the appeal. 

We have retained as members of the staff of the board Mr. Lyman 
L Pierce and his associates, who wilt act with us in directing the enter- 
prise and who will give us the advantage of their wide and successful ex- 
perience in matters of this kind. Mr. Pierce is a Stanford man by adop- 
tion. He lives near the University, and two members of his immediate 
family are Stanford students. 

You are already familiar with the initial steps in the plan which will be 
followed. It is our purpose to begin at the geographical center of the 
University constituency and work outward from that center as rapidly as 
seems to be feasible. As soon as it is possible to do so, a conference will 
be arranged with you and those who reside in your vicinity. In the mean- 
time we call on all Stanford men and women to assist and cooperate as occa- 
sion requires and to look forward in sympathetic anticipation of an- 
other opportunity to express their loyalty to the University. 

The Board of Trustees, 
Leland Stanford Junior University 

The First Million For Stanford 

The First Million For Stanford is to provide an annual income of $40,000 
to $50,000 to be added to the salary roll of the faculties ordinarily embraced 
in the so-called "College of Liberal Arts and Sciences." This sum of money 
is to be spent annually in perpetuity for brains, the one great distinguishing 
characteristic of universities. Not only will this income make it possible 
to provide more adequate salaries for the members of the teaching staff who 
have served long and faithfully at Stanford and for the necessary promo- 
tions of the younger members of the staff, but it will permit Stanford to fill 
the places of its pioneer faculty when they retire with men of equal dis- 
tinction. Certainly there is no way in which the alumni and friends of the 
University can serve Stanford in its mission of higher education more 
effectively than in making it possible to increase the salary roll. While the 
University needs financial assistance in many directions, this is the one 
essential need in which immediate aid is necessary and, in fact, indispensable. 

The Second Million For Stanford 

The Second Million For Stanford is needed for the construction of cer- 
tain buildings upon the campus for which there is special need. It is true, 
as indicated in the President's Report of 1918-19, that a large number of 
buildings will eventually be required to provide for the development of 
the University. We need at once the following : 

1. Law School $ 200,000 

2. Residence Halls for 360 men 250,000 

3. Biology Group (rearrangement with housing of 
scientific collections) 400,000 

4. Gymnasium for Women! 150,000 



$1,000,000 



20 Stanford University 

1. Law School. The present Law School is housed in two of the original 
buildings of the Inner Quadrangle. The class rooms are inadequate in size, 
the present offices are badly arranged, and in these buildings, which are not 
fireproof, is housed one of the best law libraries in the West. The plan is 
to construct a separate building for Law, with a fireproof library attached, 
probably in the Eastern Quadrangle. 

2. Residence Halls for 360 Men. At the present time we lack ade- 
quate accommodations on the campus for about 480 men. Because of this, 
many students are now living three and four in a room in Encina and Sequoia 
Halls, and others are occupying unsatisfactory quarters off the campus in 
Palo Alto and elsewhere at great disadvantage. We wish to provide now 
sufficient accommodations, so that' with the existing residence halls and 
fraternity houses all students will be housed in a respectable manner. It is 
hoped that we will be able to build soon the first dormitory near Encina for 
120 men from the University's building fund. The quarter of a million for 
residence halls for men is a minimum figure. Five hundred thousand dollars 
is actually required for the building. If necessary, half of the cost of these 
buildings could be handled as an investment, the necessary interest and 
maintenance charges being met by rentals, without making the charges to 
students higher than they are at present. 

3. Biology Group. It is urgently necessary to provide a new arrange- 
ment and new buildings for departments in the Biology Group. This is neces- 
sary in order to bring about certain economies and convenience in handling 
Biology, such as a common library, common storeroom and common building 
for the scientific collections. At the present time invaluable books in the 
departmental libraries and invaluable collections are housed in existing build- 
ings which are not fireproof, with a marked ^yaste in expense, both for main- 
tenance and for heating, lighting, etc. A simple fireproof building of the 
museum type for scientific collections is an urgent necessity. It should form 
part of a Biology Building scheme. 

Stanford University has a number of priceless collections now housed 
in classroom buildings, unsatisfactorily cared for, and unprotected from 
fire. Among these are; 

The Dudley Herbarium, in the Department of Botany, consisting of about 
60,000 specimens; the Harvey Herbarium of about 75,000 specimens; the 
Rattan Herbarium of about 15,000 specimens. The Department also has 
about 5,000 specimens from the Cmigdon Herbarium, and the Harkness col- 
lection of hypogeous fungi. These are herbaria containing many type 
specimens and are exceedingly rich in both old and new world flora. 

Our Entomological Collection contains specimens in all of the insect 
orders and the most important existing collection of North American Mallo- 
phaga, comprising the types of four-fifths of all the species so far described 
from North America and the Pacific Islands ; an unusually large collection 
of Coccidae (scale insects) and many valuable series of specimens from the 
Galapagos Islands and the Philippine Islands. 

In the Department of Geology, closely allied to the Biological Group, 
there is a wonderful collection of fossils of the West Coast and the Oldroyd 



Report of the President 21 

collection of living shells. The paleontological collections are especially good 
in Recent, Tertiary, Cretaceous, Jurassic, and Triassic materials. The Ar- 
nold collection of West Coast Tertiary and Recent material and the Law, 
Streator, and Hemphill collections of shells are also included. 

The Zoological Museum contains a very full representation of the fishes 
of North America. It Includes among others a valuable series of deep- 
water fishes of the Pacific, and large collections from the West Indies, the 
Hawaiian Islands, Bering Sea, Japan, the coasts of Mexico and Central 
America, and the Galapagos Islands. This collection is one of the greatest 
in the country. The museum has also a large representation of the rep- 
tiles, batrachians, birds, and mammals of California and adjoining states. 
The collection of marine invertebrates is particularly rich in Pacific echino- 
derms and Crustacea. The series of deep-sea forms is especially valuable. 

With this 'provision for almost priceless collections, space will be released 
which will help to meet pressing classroom needs. 

4. Gymnasium for Women. Several years ago the Board of Trustees 
included a new gymnasium for women in its building program. So far 
sufficient funds have not been available to meet the present need. At present 
the women have an open-air swimming pool surrounded by temporary dress- 
ing rooms and the old original frame building that has been in existence 
since the opening of the University. It is an imperative necessity to construct 
a modem, well-lighted, well-heated, and well-arranged building in imme- 
diate association with the outdoor swimming pool so that the women may 
have accommodations approximating those now available for all the men 
of the University. 

The Third Million For Stanford 

The Third Million For Stanford is to be used as a partial endowment 
of the Medical School and of the Stanford Hospitals to aid in instruction, 
research and in payment for the gratuitous clinical services rendered in 
the Medical School clinics and clinical wards of the hospitals. It is antici- 
pated that this stxm will be derived from the public, particularly in the San 
Francisco Bay region, in recognition of the public services of the Medical 
School and Hospitals. It is anticipated that the alumni and students will be 
helpful in interesting the public in the needs of the Medical School. This 
appeal for the third million will no doubt interest many friends of the Uni- 
versity and of the sick who would not care to subscribe to the first or second 
million. 

The President's Statement 

Stanford University is making a new decision which will determine 
its future for all time. The University has reached the limit made possible 
by the Stanford fortune. If it is to go forward and upward it can only do 
so through the support of every member of the Stanford family and of the 
public in general. Stanford now takes its place among the great natioQ^' 
universities of this country. 

Its future does not rest with the tax-payers of any given state but 



22 Stanford University 

with its friends. Through the sale of the ranches, the improvement in the 
earning power of the endowment funds, and the tuition fees, we have been 
able to go through the troublesome war period with all of its intricate 
problems without losing our stride. We have faced the problems of a fifty- 
cent dollar, of the need of increasing the salaries, of increased taxation, and 
general expenses, the development of a pension fund, and with our ten-year 
program, we can see our way to steady progress, provided we obtain cer- 
tain additions to our salary roll and certain new buildings. . 

The future of Stanford is in the hands of the students of today and of 
the alumni of the days that have gone before. 

Independent, self-contained, apparently rich, the University has gone 
its way to the best of its ability, making limitations in various ways, including 
the number of students accepted, so that the work done could be kept on a 
satisfactory plane. Not to grow is in part to die. The University must 
have increased facilities, more buildings, more advantages, must keep step 
with educational progress, just as a growing boy must have new clothes, 
and new facilities as his capacity to do more increases with age. 

We have at present two undeveloped sources of financial strength, one 
is the Palo Alto Farm and the other assistance from the members of the 
great' Stanford family and the public. There are no other possible sources 
of increased income that are of any particular consequence. As much of 
the burden as is reasonable has been shifted to the shoulders of those receiv- 
ing the benefit through the tuition fee. Our needs are many if we are 
to become the institution that every Stanford man and every Stanford 
woman hopes for. 

There is every reason to anticipate that we can obtain the same help 
that has come to similar institutions elsewhere. Stanford is the one great 
privately endowed university west of St Louis. Certainly from this vast 
territory there will come the interest and help that is needed. 

Through this endowment campaign the University will obtain wide- 
spread publicity, gain new friends and bring to the attention of all the 
real situation. We have nothing to conceal. We have made our financial 
records public. We think that there is public appreciation of our services 
and of our need. Every student and alumnus can become a center of in- 
formation and can advance the interest of the University in a hundred ways. 

If we can work together for Stanford and Stanford's progress we can 
rest assured that within another generation no institution in the country will 
have better facilities, a better reputation, or achieve better results in education. 

Ray Lyman Wilbur, President. 

We are completing our plans for the continuation of the cam- 
paigns for the Second and Third Millions with every reasonable 
prospect of early success. 

Botulism 

The studies on botulism, which have been going on for several 
years in the Medical School under the charge of Professor E. C. 



Report of the President 23 

Dickson, with the financial assistance of the National Canners 
Association, were completed during the course of the year. With 
the information gained by these studies and similar ones carried 
on at the University of California, the canning industry is now 
in a position to protect its products from contamination by the 
bacillus boiulinus. The services rendered by these investigations 
to the canning industry and to California are of unusual value. 
This work is typical of the opportunity which the University offers 
to the public in the solution of the numerous technical and scien- 
tific problems which are yet unsolved. 

Athletics 

The policies established some years ago at the time of the in- 
auguration of the Board of Athletic Control are now being real- 
ized. There has been a considerable readjustment in the personnel 
and arrangement of the staff of Encina Gymnasium. Prac- 
tically all of the athletic staff is now on full time appointment for 
a period of years. This insures stability. It was inevitable that 
during and following the war transient plans had to be accepted. 
Dr. W. H. Barrow has been appointed as Professor of Physical 
Training and Medical Adviser of Men, and a staff of well-qualified 
men in the different fields of sport makes it possible for mental 
and physical training to proceed harmoniously. Only those who 
are real educators and who understand thoroughly the elements 
of the sport in which they give instruction are capable of training 
men or of coaching teams. There is every reason for installing 
the same standards of efficiency in this field as exist in the rest 
of the University. 

Department of Classical Literature 

During the year the Departments of Greek and Latin have 
been combined into a common department known as the Depart- 
ment of Classical Literature. This is an important step since 
it makes certain economies of time which make it possible to offer 
courses of a general character to the students. With the decrease 
in interest in the study of Latin and Greek there is the growing 
danger that our University students will lose contact with the 
remarkable civilizations of the Greeks and the Romans. It is 
hoped that, even though the languages may not be studied as 
much as formerly, a large proportion of our students can become 



24 Stanford University 

interested in the life and achievements of these great nations 
that laid the basis of much of our civilization. 

Stanford Inn , 

This wooden building, which has had many vicissitudes, was, 
with the completion of the dining halls of the Stanford Union, 
transferred to the east of Encina Gymnasium for the officers and 
headquarters of the Field Artillery Unit of the R. O. T. C. 

School of Biology 

As indicated in the program for the Second Million campaign 
there has been constant growth in the scientific collections of the 
University. These have been inadequately housed. There has 
also been a failure in coordination in the work of the various bio- 
logical departments. This has been markedly improved by the 
course in General Biology given to students in the Lower Division 
largely by the faculties of the Departments of Physiology, Zoology, 
and Botany. Following the resolution of the Board of Trustees 
steps for the inauguration of a School of Biology are now being 
undertaken. 

Medical Curriculum 

The projected plan for the campaign for the Third Million 
for the Medical School brings to the front the growing importance 
of medical education. The following excerpts from an address 
given by me before the State Medical Society of California on 
May 16th on Medical Education of the Present and Near Future 
indicate some of the tendencies in this field. 

Medical Education of the Present and Near Future 

The present generation has witnessed a complete transformation of 
medical education in America. The apprentice method was followed by the 
lecture system with demonstrations in anatomy, pathology, and various 
clinical subjects. This in turn has been more recently supplanted by the 
laboratory, the small bedside clinic and various forms of hospital work, in- 
cluding in some institutions a required interne year. A study of much of 
our present medical practice shows that it is based largely upon pathology 
rather than physiology. This has been a natural outgrowth of the develop- 
ment' in the use of the microscope, the study of autopsy evidence and the 
growth of the science of bacteriology. In brief, as a result of our methods 
of training we can say that the art of medicine has been largely based upon 
the use of drugs and that the art of surgery has been likewise based upon 



Report of the President 25 

pathology removable by the knife. Because of the importance laid upon 
anafomy and pathology in the training of medical men and the general 
desire for perfection or one hundred per cent result, which is characteristic 
of the American, we have gone through a stage in which there has 
been an insistence upon the part of the surgeon and gynecologist 
that his patient should be brought up to the standard of a so-called 
normal topographical anatomy. By surgical means there has been 
a very definite attempt to see that all organs were located in definite 
positions rather than to make a careful study of the physiology of the or- 
gans, which is, of course, of outstanding importance. Anyone who will 
look over the text books of gynecology of a decade ago cannot help but be 
impressed with the pedantic insistence of the gynecologists as to the so- 
called normal position of the uterus. Fortunately in this sphere normality 
of function is being recognized as the final test. 

Particularly since the enlightening and epoch-making work of Louis 
Pasteur there has been an enormous growth of medical knowledge. Sci- 
ence in every field has made rapid strides forward and many of the ad- 
vances made have been brought by the medical profession into the field of 
diagnosis or of therapeusis. While there has been an increase in the time 
required for the course leading up to the degree of Doctor of Medicine and 
while preliminary subjects, such as physics, chemistry, biology, and lan- 
guages, have been insisted upon, there has been a constant stuffing of the 
medical curriculum with all of the new methods and facts so that we can say 
that at the present time the curriculum and courses of the medical school 
have been inclusive in so far as possible. 

The time has now come for the curriculum to be studied from the 
standpoint of selection and exclusion rather than from that of inclusion. 
In one way or another we must reduce the actual amount of time consumed 
in obtaining a medical education and we must reduce the content of the med- 
ical course by the most rigid selection of that which is fit to survive and that 
which is necessary in order to turn out a safe practitioner. The efforts of the 
last decade in medical education have been directed towards fewer and better 
medical schools, better fundamental work and the gathering together of the 
necessary funds for the large expense involved with the bringing of the 
laboratory and the bedside clinic into the medical school. There has been by 
one process or another, largely because of increasing requirements on the 
part of the individual medical school, a limitation of medical students which 
has almost reached the danger line of providing too few skilled and trained 
men for the service of the public. When we realize that it takes at least 
twenty-five years, practically half of a man's life, to prepare himself for 
medicine and that there is a vast amount of energy and expense involved in 
each individual case, it becomes of vital importance for us to see that there 
is no waste either of money or of energy in obtaining the result 

One of the most troublesome tendencies of present medical education 
has been associated with the rapid development of the various specialties. 
There has been a marked refinement of technique and a great increase 
in the technical appliances in all of these specialties. They have been more 



26 Stanford University 

and more crowded into the medical curriculum until they have seriously inter- 
fered with the necessary development of the basic subjects of medicine, 
surgery, obstetrics, and gynecology in the clinical years. In fact the 
result has been that many students have done considerable work along spe- 
cial lines before they have received the degree of Doctor of Medicine. 

We must return to the basic idea that the granting of the degree of 
Doctor of Medicine means that a student is capable of handling the ordin- 
ary problems of general practice. This is certainly necessary before he 
can be safely trusted to advance in any special field. In the ordinary small 
community we find the general merchandise store. One can obtain there 
the essentials of human life in ordinary existence. If one wants any special 
appliance or something unusual it takes time to obtain delivery and one must 
either send or go to a larger field. This illustrates general practice and 
also tlie requirements for every medical man. In our larger centers we 
have the department store, where there is a marked extension of every- 
thing represented in a general merchandise store with experts in charge of 
each department. Medicine, likewise, is handled in this way where spe- 
cialists in various lines are available. In the general merchandise store 
the proprietor knows everything that he has on hand and how to guide his 
customer to get promptly the essential things that he needs. In the gen- 
eral department store much is left to the customer himself. Without guid- 
ance he may over-purchase in a single department when his real needs lie in 
another. It is inevitable that there shall be these two forms of organization. 
One of the ways to protect the person who deals largely with specialists is 
to have the specialist understand thoroughly the essentials of general med- 
ical practice. 

The bringing of the university spirit into medicine, which has accom- 
panied the development of the laboratory, has not been without its defects. 
That very accuracy which is required for scientific work of a university 
grade has been inclined to make us somewhat too pedantic and to seek for 
impossible accuracy. It has also been inclined to make the medical pro- 
fession poor psychologists. We have been so intent* upon the actual chem- 
ical and other processes involved in the care of our patients tliat we have 
neglected the mental reactions of the individual concerned. It has been 
hard for us to realize that the man with syphilis needs healing of the mind 
as well as the giving of arsenical preparations to kill the spirochaetae invad- 
ing his body. We have also been neglectful of the fact that the sick man 
out of a job needs light work and mental repose as well as diet and nitro- 
glycerine for his high blood pressure. The cold scientific turn of thought 
that must necessarily go with the laboratory method needs the leavening 
effect of intimate association of all medical teachers with all classes of 
ailing humanity. 

The experiment of bringing the so-called full-time academic teacher 
into medicine has been successful where the full-time teacher lias liad the 
privileges of the ordinary academic professor of mapping out his program 
of life for himself. We cannot expect a satisfactory development of 
medical teachers if we overemphasize the protection of the lalx>ratory and 



Report of the President 27 

the clinic ward to such an extent that a man does not have to develop the 
proper psychological and mental attitude required for the art of medicine. 
One reason why we have been losing our grip to some extent upon our 
patients is that we have lost the personal touch and the feeling of respon- 
sibility for the individual's life in all its phases. 

It seems quite clear that it is impossible for us to grant more time for 
the preparation of medical students, so that we must modify to a marked 
degree our present curriculum and see that there is a definite selection of 
subjects and courses. Witb these points in mind, what shall be the pro- 
gram for the development of medical students in the near future ? 

In the first place, it is evident that the basic work must be the same. 
No man can hope to enter the medical field who is not' thoroughly familiar 
with physics, chemistry, and biology. He must also have that general 
knowledge that any good citizen who is to be a leader requires. He must 
likewise have familiarity with at least one foreign language, so that he may 
come in contact with the medical spirit and medical literature of another 
nation. Beyond this we must recognize that the profession of medicine is 
definitely committed to : 

1. Preventive medicine, 

2. Relief of the sick, and that all of its work is based primarily on : 

1. Etiology, 

2. Perverted or pathological physiology, 

3. Diagnosis, 

4. All known forms of relief. 

We must recognize that preventive medicine as fostered by the medical 
profession has completely changed the practice of medicine. 

In the early days in Philadelphia the medical practitioners had to deal 
with jail fever or typhus, smallpox, cholera, and yellow fever. Modern sani- 
tary practice and engineering have changed our relationship to many diseases 
common a few years ago. Typhoid is an excellent example. I saw an autopsy 
on a case of typhoid fever in Munich which attracted the attention of the 
whole profession of Bavaria because such a thing was a rarity, and yet 
some of the greatest studies upon typhoid fever were made in Mimich 
because it was a constant focus of infection, as were many of the cities 
of Europe. A rearrangement of the water supply was responsible largely 
for the change. 

The type of practice of a decade ago permitted much symptomatic 
treatment. Diseases were allowed to run their course. The doctor was, in 
a way, the protector and nurse and comforter of the patient. The marked 
advances made in preventive medicine make it inevitable that the medical 
student of today and tomorrow must study the normal more than the ab- 
normal and that he must be familiar with the incipient stages of all disease 
processes and recognize the first perversions from normal physiology and 
the first signs of abnormal pathology. The old easy practice of medicine 
has gone never to return. Great skill in the recognition of the early stages 
of disease means pre-eminence in medicine in the future. It is unforttmate | 

that these periods of the beginning of disease are most susceptible to quack- | 



28 Stanford University 

ery and to deceit We are all f amiliaf with the phrase "threatened with 
pneutnonia" or "threatened with disease." It is also inevitable that the 
very fact that we are able to relieve patients in the early stages of their 
diseases will in a way interfere with their;intekpretation of our success. 

The man who has an early operation lor appendicitis often has such an 
easy time following his operation and during his convalescence that he 
sometimes wonders whether the operation was necessary. There is still 
great respect for the doctor who lets the patient go so far that he is only 
able to save him by the most energetic and persistent attention. This need 
not interfere with sound medicine and an increase in the respect on the part 
of the public for medicine. There is a gradually rising level of intelligence 
among our people, and more and more of them are getting some biological 
understanding of life. 

In particular, we must prepare the medical student for practice among 
the children who are now growing up in our schools, where they are ob- 
taining considerable knowledge of nutrition, physical training, the general 
facts of biology and many of the facts of preventive medicine. The child 
who is being weighed and measured at the school and told what it is desirable 
for him to eat in order that he may grow will have very different ideas from 
those of us who have grown up in the present generation, for our child- 
hood was full of health precepts, the development' of so-called health foods, 
and we were certainly influenced by the period of quack advertisement 
represented by Lydia £. Pinkham and the lost manhood group. 

Our physician in the near future must have new conceptions of disease 
and its effects upon collective human living. He must be a social leader 
and must recognize that the one great possession of the human race is its 
germ plasm. This germ plasm needs guardianship from disease and other 
malign influences, for if it deteriorates a family or a race soon dies out. The 
profession of medicine has been most advanced in its willingness to accept 
new facts and to use them at once for the relief of the sick. At the same 
time the traditions of the profession have been very powerful and there 
has been a constant tendency to look backward as well as to look well to 
the front. We cannot fail to recognize that we have been over-enthusiastic 
many times in the reception we have given to apparent' discoveries. Fortu- 
nately, these waves of interest soon die out and leave, for the most part, a 
firm residue of fact and truth behind. We are fortunate now in seeing the 
unsavoriness of Freudianism replaced by endocrinology. Just what the 
next thing will be, it is hard to say, but it will soon be upon us. Like all 
human beings, we keep reaching out for the final panacea in the hope that we 
can give general relief to everyone. Our whole history tells us that we 
must build our medical structure slowly brick by brick. 

With the complexity of modern life many new forces have been added 
to those of the doctor in handling the sick. We must readjust our curriculum 
so that the young physician can be trained for the leadership of his lieu- 
tenants : 

1. The trained nurse. 

2. The physiotherapist. 



Report of the President 29 

3. The dietitian. 

4. The radiologist. 

5. The laboratory worker. 

6. The social service worker. 

The control of lieutenants means that some administrative training is 
requisite for the physician. 

It seems to me that' in making the new adjustments in the medical course 
we should proceed along the following lines : 

1. Squeeze out the non-essentials. 

2. Bring in hygiene and preventive medicine as working assets. 

3. Make the graduate a general practitioner, not an expert in any particu- 
lar field. 

4. Direct a tangible, earnest study of all recognized methods of treatment, 
not seek for panaceas, but give relief from suffering. 

5. Have actual practical work in the clinics and laboratories, which must 
be brought closely together. 

6. Develop mental clinics and the study of psychology. 

The doctor of medicine in the future must' be the master in the field of 
the prevention of and the relief from the ills that beset mankind. He 
must be versed in : 

1. The anatomy, physiology, chemistry, and pathology of the human body. 

2. He must be thoroughly familiar with the life histories of and the 
effects produced by the parasites that live in us and cause most of our ills. 

3. He must know individual and group psychology. 

4. He must know something of our social organization and economic life. 

5. He must be an expert diagnostician of the early stages of disease and 
a personal tberapeutist selecting and using all known and tried methods of 
relief. 

The medical man who is unwilling to obtain this necessary fundamental 
training and to see that a specific service is rendered to the patient by him 
or by some one of his appointed lieutenants should take up some form of 
medical work which does not require contact with the patient. Each one 
of the lieutenants of a doctor has taken away from him a certain amount 
of his contact with the patient He can at least secure intimate association 
with the patient through a most careful physical examination. This, with 
the history, should establish that intimate feeling between the patient and the 
doctor that is requisite for confidence and success. 

We must frankly recognize the fact that, as a profession, we are thought 
of too much in terms of drugs and the knife and that we have become some- 
what isolated from the sick patient because of the machinery that we have 
built up. The success of the illy trained individual who deals with the sick 
comes largely from his direct contact with the patient and the mental effect 
produced therefrom. Each one of the various cults has some element of 
fact as its basis, often of a purely psychological nature. 

We should study every field of therapeusis with our scientific methods and 
extract from each field the things that are serviceable and worth while. The 
medical profession should set the battlefields of the future in the matter 



30 Stanford University 

of therapeusis rather than have them set for them, as is the case today. 
The only cure for the quack who now adds so much to the sum of human 
woe is to train our medical students to do their work so well and to get 
the medical profession to imite so thoroughly in their administration of pre- 
vention and relief that every member of our human society gets his share. 
We cannot afford to take care of only the very poor who appeal to our 
sympathies and of the well-to-do who can pay us well for our services. We 
must organize the medical services of our community so that all may be 
offered the advantiages of modern medical science. We must remember 
that the sick man is a social unit. He needs help for himself physically 
and mentally and for his family. We must establish the proper rela- 
tionship of the sick individual to the community and be the connecting link in 
this relationship. Finances is only a small portion, although the most 
obvious one, of this relationship. We have the knowledge, we have the 
organization, we have the traditions of prevention and treatment. The 
problem is in our hands. I think that we can rely upon the medical students 
now in our medical schools, if they are given the proper guidance. Their 
quality is excellent. I doubt if there is any better aggregation of brains 
in the country. The training required for the degree of Doctor of Medicine 
in a first-class medical school today exceeds that for the degree of Doctor 
of Philosophy. These men and women are capable of meeting the prob- 
lems along the lines suggested, in the near future, if we will lay the basis now. 
The physician who cares for the individual and foresees and prevents the 
disasters that involve his body and mind and the engineer who lays the basis 
for safe and economic life will be the leaders in the years ahead. 

It is imperative that there should be from time to time a re- 
study of every feature of the curriculum of the University. This 
is particularly true in connection with a subject that is moving 
forward as rapidly as is medicine. The undergraduate medical 
curriculum has been the subject of much discussion of late. I feel 
that the Stanford Medical School should take a prominent part 
in the changes that are necessary and inevitable. It seems to me 
that the essential aim of the undergraduate medical curriculum is 
to provide clinical training to a student already versed in labora- 
tory methods so that he will know how to "practice medicine." 
The degree of Doctor of Medicine should mean that its recipient 
has a large fund of immediately available anatomical, physio- 
logical, and clinical information with which he can aid and guide 
a patient after his well-trained sense organs have gathered to- 
gether as many facts as possible and his brain has given them an 
orderly relationship. The development of the power of observation 
and of rapid, honest, unbiased reasoning, based on ascertained 
facts, is the specific problem before the medical student. Watch 



Report of the PREsroENT 31 

a trained clinician ienter the sick room. He is as keen as a bird 
dog on the scent. Every sense is alert. His eye takes in at a 
glance the surroundings of the patient, the evidences of care or 
lack of care, anxiety, repose, syanosis, jaundice, and a hundred 
other conditions. His ear tells him of voice changes, types of 
breathing. His nose adds its share and when he touches the patient 
or percusses the chest a combination of all the senses helps him to 
build up a mental picture of the processes going on inside of the 
human body which years of training have taught him to know so 
well. All of the time his mind is busily at work arranging the 
facts ascertained, calling up former experiences, measuring values, 
reaching conclusions, mapping out plans for additional methods of 
seeking information and preparing a method of treatment. When 
well done such a visit represents the height of ordinary human 
achievement, and at times it seems to bear the evidences of genius. 

In the undergradaute medical years we are seeking to lay the 
basis for such work in medical practice. We can call it the art of 
medicine or the science of medicine, as we will. The two merge 
into one in real medical work and a skilled technician must be the 
result. 

The main reason why the present undergraduate course often 
fails is because we have tried to force into four short years the 
enormous and constantly growing fund of medical knowledge. I 
am reminded of the professor I heard lecture years ago, who spent 
twenty minutes of a lecture hour in a general course in a carefully 
digested description of a very rare medical condition and who 
closed by saying, "Now I want you to remember this because 
when you get out into practice I want you to be able to say, no 
matter what kind of a case you may meet, that I covered it in 
my lectures." 

The other great weakness of the present curriculum is that it 
was built up at a time when clinical teachers had no confidence in 
the basic training of the student, and they felt impelled to repeat 
fundamentals and reorient students in each so-called "course." 
There are few medical schools even today where the medical 
student is not taught the general phenomena of inflammation by 
three to fifteen different teachers in different subjects. Repeti- 
tion of elementary work, duplication and lack of coordination, too 
much informational material, rigid legal hour requirement, and the 



32 Stanford University 

dead hand have made the present medical school a place where 
only those who can gorge can expect to come out "well trained." 
In short, we have built up such a wonderful intricate mechanism 
of hours, schedules, lectures, courses, that it has become scram- 
bled, mixed up, unwieldy and inefficient. Why not scramble it 
entirely, look carefully over the mess, pick out the fundamentals 
and get a fresh start. 

Our students come to us now after a good preliminary train- 
ing which has eliminated many of the unfit. The strain of the first 
year or two in the medical school is too much now for those not 
endowed with a good mind and body and capable of continuous in- 
dustry. They already know some laboratory technique and are 
conscious of the fact that they cannot hope to cover the whole 
field of medical thought or knowledge. They have had a training in 
the basic sciences and are able to do an increasing amount of inde- 
pendent and thoughtful work. 

The fundamentals with which they must concern themselves 
are: 

(1) Sound basic training in methods of thought, memory, and 
honest reasoning. 

(2) The ability to observe. 

(3) The ability to use books and the tools of the profession. 

(4) The retention of a sound body with acute trained senses. 

(5) The mental accumulation of essential facts immediately 
available for use. 

Recognizing the fact that the medical man is merely beginning 
a career of constant study and experience when he graduates, and 
that we can only hope to make him reasonably competent at the 
best, what are we to do with his four medical years ? How can we 
best combine the old apprentice system with the modern labora- 
tory in his training? Our first duty it seems to me is knock our 
prejudices in the head — a hard but a necessary prescription for 
us all if we are to get out of our present jumble. We will have 
to stop fighting for our particular courses and stop adjusting 
schedules on personal idiosyncrasies. We need not now seek a 
common standardized course for all medical schools. The time 
for that once necessary procedure has passed. If the student 
learns how to thoroughly examine a single patient he will have the 
principal tools and information required. 



Report of the President 33 

The specialties, taught as they are at the present time, belong 
outside of the undergraduate medical curriculum. They can be 
included in the medical curriculum when they are taught by men 
who can range over the body instead of having their vision limited 
largely to body orifices. Such men can come in and form part of 
the teaching staff of any one of the three great divisions of clin- 
ical medicine. It would not be so absurd to spend one whole 
schedule hour of an undergraduate medical class on the technique 
of an operation on the inner ear, if other more important things 
to the student, perhaps not to the professor, were not so pressing. 
We must remember though that any complete observation and 
any piece of highly skilled work has its value in instruction and 
in stimulating the emulation of students. 

I do not propose to elaborate new standard schedules. Per- 
haps the best we can do for the present is to reduce the hours 
accorded the specialties and make the specialists all unhappy. I 
think it would be a cleaner piece of work to promote them all up- 
stairs to the graduate school, asking them to join in the teaching 
of the main clinical branches by presenting cases, giving lectures, 
or. better still, by demonstrating their field of work on patients 
already familiar to the students. 

Pediatrics is not a specialty. It is general medicine with an 
age limit and offers the most important source of training for the 
medical student in physical examination, nutrition, therapeutics, 
and hygiene. 

Without details, my ideas are : 

(1) Push some clinical work as far back into the medical 
course as is physically possible to heighten the interest of the stu- 
dent and give him a sense of professional training. 

(2) Divide up the last two years between the following sub- 
jects: 

General Medicine and Pediatrics, including 

Mental diseases 40% 

General Surgery 30% 

Obstetrics and Gynecology 10% 

Hygiene and Public Health 5 to 10% 

Optional work : Special work along general lines 
— thesis, work in special fields, medical juris- 
prudence, history of medicine, etc 15 to 10% 



34 Stanford University 

(3) Bring the laboratories into immediate conjunction with 
the clinics so that the eye of the student still bearing the image of 
the anaemic appearance of a patient may see his red blood cells. 

(4) Have the clinician cross over freely into the domains now 
sacred to the specialists bringing in the specialists to help him. 

(5) Have a committee on coordination of course content with 
regular reports of the ground covered by teachers to avoid dupli- 
cation and to see that each class is exposed to a sufficient amount of 
well balanced and selected information. 

(6) Make hospital experience with responsibility a require- 
ment for graduation either by the interne year or some other de- 
vice. One responsibility well met, no matter what the pathological 
condition, is of more value in medical training than a dozen care- 
fully dehydrated lectures. 

(7) Since all medical practice is of the nature of research and 
medicine is constantly growing, keep the spirit of research active 
all along the line in the medical course. 

Memorial Church 

The Memorial Church has won a place for itself in the life of 
all members of the University community. Its influence is evi- 
denced in many ways. Perhaps most significant is the return to 
the Church of former Stanford graduates at the time of marriage. 

The ordinary plan for church organization has not applied to 
the Memorial Church. Many have offered the suggestion that it 
would be desirable to establish some form of membership in this 
University church in order to increase its support from all of the 
elements of University life. At present the Chaplain stands alone 
in his responsibility and the church is conducted somewhat as are 
the departments of the University. Further suggestions as to 
the future of the church are needed. 

Museum 

The collections in the Museum have now been classified and 
arranged for exhibition, so that our existing material can be seen 
to very good advantage. There are no special funds available 
for the acquisition of further collections, so that necessarily the 
situation is a static one. It is not probable that funds can be found 
from the existing resources of the University for the development 



Report of the President 35 

of the Museum. We receive from the public donations of various 
objects for exhibition purposes. In every community there is a 
certain number of people who are interested in museums. We 
hope that some of them can be brought in contact with our ad- 
vantages and that we may eventually become the custodian of pri- 
vate collections of value and receive endowment funds ensuring 
the future of the Museum as a great educational force. This 
museum project was very dear to Senator and Mrs. Stanford. 
They rightly viewed it as one of the important avenues for the 
extension of University influence. 

Game Refuge 

Following the repeated requests of the Zoology Club formal 
resolution was passed by the Trustees indicating willingness to 
have a game refuge established on the lands adjoining the Uni- 
versity. So far this plan has not been accepted by the officials 
of the State. There has been an increasing amount of shooting 
and trespassing upon University lands and a consequent reduction 
in the wild life. We are peculiarly favored in our situation, to- 
pography, and plant and tree growth. With the increase in the 
population in this part of California the campus as a bird and 
animal refuge will be of increasing value and significance. 

U. S. Department of Agriculture 

Because of our advantages of land, water and climate the U. S. 
Department of Agriculture has made a lease of twenty acres in 
order to make certain studies on fruit trees, particularly the pear 
tree. This indicates the possibilities open to parts of the University 
campus and to the Palo Alto Farm for all sorts of scientific work. 

Future of the University 

I can perhaps best outline the future plans that are being 
thought of in connection with the University by including here a 
portion of the statement issued by the Endowment Committee to 
interest possible donors to make gifts to the University. It seems 
wise to quote directly the whole of the third circular issued by the 
Committee, since it gives not only the information desired but 
also indicates the spirit in which help has been requested. 

Because I am a University, I can speak frankly. 

A University is dedicated to the generations. Its appeals are on behalf 
of civilization itself. 



36 Stanford University 

Therefore I» as one of the country's great Universities, shall speak out 
without embarrassment and without reticence. For I have a question to 
propose, and it is this : 

What will become of some name, dear to you, when its owner dies? 
What provision do you care to make for its earthly immortality ? 

Because I am a University, I am given to thinking in terms of public 
service, with my eyes turned ever on the future. Therefore I say : 

What will become of this beloved name of one who, perhaps, has 
already completed his life on earth? Have you ever considered the feasi- 
bility of attaching it to some sotmd work that will continue on and on 
indefinitely? A work, that is, for the good of all humanity; a work that 
will be administered by competent stewards; a work that will survive 
many of the blasts of time, and perpetuate that memory as a benediction? 

Then this, very frankly, is an offer in partnership. For I am a Uni- 
versity, and may speak. 

My name is Stanford University. I am located close to the Pacific, at 
the northern end of the Santa Clara Valley of Gilifomia. I am one of the 
most westerly of the great privately endowed universities. 

Santa Clara Valley is one of the world's orchards. It is a sun-bathed 
valley, a fragrant valley, a valley that knows nothing of heat, lightning or 
blizzard. 

In this lovely orchard-valley of California I too have my garden — a gar- 
den of young men and young women. 

From my pleasant campus they go forth to do the work of the world. 
They go forth engineers, lawyers, teachers, mathematicians, doctors, useful 
men and useful women. Eighteen thousand young men and women have 
been cultivated in my garden since my inception thirty-one years ago. 

I am justly proud of these products. I am proud that my campus, close 
to the Pacific, has been sought out by others also— clear-thinking men and 
women who devote their lives to research and scholarship after graduation. 

This research is of fundamental importance. The Carnegie and Rocke- 
feller Foundations have sought me out and entrusted me with funds, that 
such research may continue. Other important trusts have been deeded to 
me. I expend on education over $1,300,000 annually. I give this figure to 
show that I am of responsible stewardship. 

My endowment has been reputed large, and it is large. For a long time it 
seemed, in the public mind, larger than it actually was. Nor has it dimin- 
ished. My stewards have conserved it well. But it is, after all, merely a 
nucleus. I know that many of my friends, even my own graduates, have 
not regarded it in this light. There foi*e I seize this opportunity for a straight- 
forward statement of the facts. 

Frankly, I feel that there is an opportunity, a partnership in the doing of 
great good, which many Californians, many residents of the Pacific Slope, 
and many citizens of the United States east of the Rocky Mountains will 
be glad to share with me when they know how urgently I want them to 
share in it. 



Report of the President 37 

And I do want you to share in it» citizens of the Far W>est and of all the 
world. With all my heart and soul I want your comradeship. 

I want your help in this work of conducting research and of educating 
youth. I want buildings, scholarships, and funds of many kinds. 

I hope I am making this uttefly clear. I Want help, financial help, in the 
erection of buildings, scholarships, and funds of many kinds; and I ask the 
privilege of extending a measure of immortality to those in whose names 
bequests or direct gifts are made. For I know that such a name, dear to you, 
will become a grateful tradition on my campus. 

Here, as I see it, is my program of expansion during the next few 
years. A small portion of this will be financed out of my present income. 
The great bulk of it must come as direct gifts to the cause of education. 

1. First and foremost, I need a group of four new buildings. These are 
a Women's Gymnasium, a Residence Hall for men, a Law Building with 
adequate library facilities, and a Biological Building. These four buildings 
are described further on in this pamphlet. If I could anticipate simply the 
million dollars that their erection will require, I would say "these four build- 
ings first." But I shall list my other needs also, for I am soliciting your 
partnership, and there may be other needs of mine that specifically appeal 
to you. 

Z I need new dormitories for my women. There should be two units, 
each for 100 women, at a cost of $250,000 per unit. 

3. Dormitories and Dining Hall fcCcilities for 750 of my 2,500 students. 
Such facilities, with suitable endowment, will require $2,000,000 and upward. 

4. Mining Building— $200,000 to $300,000. 

5. Building to house Anatomy, Physiology, and Bacteriology — $250,000. 

6. Laboratory for Physical Chemistry and Industrial Chemistry — 
$200,000. 

7. Student Hospital on my campus, with suitable endowment — $100,000 
to $250,000. 

8. My Department of Medicine is becoming increasingly important. Most 
of its activities center in San Francisco, where I have Medical School, Hos- 
pitals, and Training School for Nurses. In association with my Medical 
School in San Francisco I should have a Woman's Hospital with suitable 
endowment— $250,000 to $1,000,000; Hospital for Children with suitable 
endowment— $250,000 to $1,000,000; Out-patient or Clinical Building— 
$150,000; Orthopedic Hospital with suitable endowment— $250,000 to 
$1,000,000; Psychopathic Hospital with suitable endowment— $100,000 to 
$750,000; and a liberal endowment for my existing Stanford University Hos- 
pital and Lane Hospital. 

9. Sums in any amount for research. In particular : Industrial Chemis- 
try— $20,000 per year; Bacteriology-^ 1,000 to $20,000 per year; other Med- 
ical Research— $1,000 to $50,000 per year; Mining Engineering and Metal- 
lurgy— $1,000 to $30,000 per year; Aviation Engineering— $1,000 to $30,000 
per year; Marine Engineering— $1,000 to $30,000 per year; Metabolism Lab- 
oratory— $10,000 to $30,000 per year. 

10. There is room for a large number of graduate and undergraduate 



38 



Stanford University 



Stanford University 

Existing Buildings 

and Proposed 

Extensions 



KEY 

Shaded — Existing build- 
ings. 

Black — ^Buildings now un- 
der construction or im- 
mediately required. 

1 — Residence hall for men 
(now building). 

2 — Encina Dining Hall for 
men (now building). 

3^Law. 

4— Women's Gymnasium. 

5 — Biology. 

6 — Memorial Hall. 

Outline — Buildings con- 
templated when funds 
become available. 

7 — Residence halls for men 
(group No. 1). 

8 — Residence halls for men 
(group No. 2). 

9 — Residence halls for men 
(group No. 3). 

10 — Stores. 

1 1 — Post office. 

12 — Engineering extension. 

13— Journalism and press. 

14— Unassigned. 

15 — English. 

16 — Faculty Club. 

17 — Women's Clubhouse. 

18 — Unassigned laboratories. 

19 — Park area, 

20 — Bacteriology, anatomy and 
physiology. 

21 — Laboratory for physical and 
industrial chemistry. 

22 — Mining and geology. 

23 — Women's residence hall. 




-PLAN- or- 
EXISTING -AND- Pitopo.»a>-jicnLrfN< 

• STANFOigO • UKIVEI^SnY- 



Report of the President 




40 Stanford University 

scholarships and fellowships, and traveling fellowships, in every department. 
The amounts vary from $250 to $1,000 per year. 

11. I wotdd like to extend my departments. The personnel of my Fac- 
ulty makes the following extensions advisable, depending, however, upon 
additional endowment or income: Marine Engineering, income of $10,000 
to $30,000 per year ; Aviation Engineering, $10,000 to $30,000 ; development 
of the Hygiene Division of the Medical School, $10,000 to $25,000 per year ; 
development of my Educational Laboratory for special mental tests, $10,000 
to $20,000 per year; instruction in Oriental and Slavic Languages, $5,000 to 
$15,000 per year; Social Service, $10,000 to $50,000 per year; Public Health 
Nursing and School for Nurses, $10,000 to $40,000 per year. 

12. Books and endowment in any sums for my Stanford Library on the 
campus or my Lane Medical Library in San Francisco. 

13. A large endowment, $2,000,000 to $5,000,000, for the instruction of 
additional women students. 

14. Special lectureships in almost any line of thought or science, $250 to 
$2,000 per year each. 

15. An endowment for my University Press, permitting of more Univer- 
sity publications, $5,000 to $100,000 a year. 

16. Development of an Arboretum in this favored locality would be of 
inestimable value and service. Annual income of $1,000 to $20,000 would 
be required. 

17. Scientific expeditions, and scientific and other collections, particularly 
in Botany, Zoology, and Geology, could use any sum from $500 to $10,000 
per year. 

18. My School of Journalism would develop notably under an income 
of $5,000 to $20,000. 

19. Special schools, or special professorships particularly in the schools 
of Medicine, Law, and Education are desirable. 

20. Particularly worthy is the Memorial Building to be erected in honor 
of my many sons and daughters who served in the Great War. $100,000 has 
been already subscribed but' $400,000 more is desired. 

Such is a survey of my opportunities for further service. My need for 
the four buildings first mentioned is, however, acute. They are not only 
absolutely essential to my further growth, but they are absolutely essential 
to my continued work even if it ^ould have to be work without growth. 
They represent needs that must be met now, at once, lest some very precious 
things be endangered. 

They are, to repeat, the suitable gymnasium for my young women; the 
new housing unit for my young men ; the fireproof library for my law books ; 
and the fireproof, adequately arranged structure for my immense and very 
valuable/ botanical, zoological, and entomological collections. 

The residence hall for my young men will require $250,000 in new endow- 
ment. The law library should cost $200,000. The new hall for my biological 
group should cost $400,000. The gymnasium for young women must cost 
$150,000. All told, therefore, the immediate investment required is a million. 

I must neither have my young men crowded three and four in a room, 



Report of the President 41 

as at present; nor my valuable law library housed in an inflammable struc- 
ture; nor my great collections of natural specimens similarly hazarded; 
nor my young women's physical well-being neglected any longer. 

The structures are very definite in my mind, as is the longer catalogue 
o{ requirements that I have listed. But for each structure, and each of the 
many other needs a fund is lacking. 

There are those who shall walk with me long down the corridors of time. 
Names, either their own or beloved in their memories, should describe scholar- 
ships, professorships, special funds or structures brought into existence as 
a result of this appeal. Bequests are unquestionably desirable. Direct, im- 
mediate gifts are even more desirable, and give the donor greater pleasure 
in this life. 

I am happy to lay this case before the public, for it is the public that I 
serve. 

I shall be serving that public, gathering, storing, and disbursing knowl- 
edge, long after this transient generation has disappeared. 

FORM OF BEQUEST 

/ giie and bequeath to The Board of Trustees of the Leland 

Stanford Junior Vniversity the sum of $ , the income 

of which is to be used for on behalf of the University, 

Faculty 

Absences. — Sabbatical leaves for the academic year 1922-23 
Iiave been granted to the following : Associate Professor Henry 
David Gray, of the Department of English ; Associate Professor 
Stanley Astredo Smith, of the Department of Romanic Langtiages. 

During the academic year 1921-22 the following members of 
the faculty were on leave: Miss Margery Bailey, Instructor in 
English, was studying at Yale ; Miller L. McClintock, Instructor 
in English, was studying at Harvard ; Assistant Professor Yamato 
Ichihashi, of the Department of History, during the fall and win- 
ter quarters served as Secretary to the Japanese Delegation at the 
Conference on Limitation of Armaments at Washington, D. C. ; 
Associate Professor Edgar Eugene Robinson, of the Department 
of History, spent the latter part of the fall quarter in Washington 
attending the Conference on the Limitation of Armaments; Dr. 
William Fitch Cheney, Clinical Professor of Medicine, was 
granted leave of absence for one year, beginning January 1, 1922; 
Dr. Hans Barkan, Assistant Clinical Professor of Surgery, spent 
eight months in Europe; Professor Charles Henry Gilbert, of the 
Department of Zoology, was absent during the fall quarter. 

Leaves of absence have been granted to the following members 
of the facult}' for the academic year 1922-23 : Gordon A. Davis, 



42 Stanford University 

Instructor in English and Dramatics, for travel in the Orient ; Pro- 
fessor Augustus Taber Murray, of the Department of Greek, to 
teach in the American School of Classical Studies at Athens. 

Resignations. — The following resignations have been received 
and accepted : Dr. Edgar Davidson Congdon, Assistant Professor 
of Anatomy; Mr. Florian A. Cajori, Instructor in Chemistry; 
Major Richard H. Power, Assistant Professor of Military Sci- 
ence and Tactics ; Mrs. Hazel C. Smith, Assistant Superintendent 
of Nurses; Mr. Walter D. Powell, Director of Physical Education 
for Men; Dr. Alfred David Browne, Medical Adviser of Men; 
Mr. Charles Selwyn Botsford, Director of Intramural Athletics. 

« 

Promotions. — The following promotions take effect with the 
beginning of the academic year 1922-23: Assistant Professors 
Lawrence E. Cutter, in Mechanical Engineering, and Stanley A. 
Smith, in Romanic Languages, to the rank of associate professor ; 
Instructor Laurence Becking, in Botany, to the rank of assistant 
professor, in Physiology; Lecturer Edward L. Beach, in Military 
and Naval History, to the rank of acting assistant professor. 

New Appointments. — The following appointments take effect 
with the beginning of the academic year 1922-23: Professors 
Eliot Blackwelder, in Geology; Austin Tappan Wright (acting, 
fall quarter), and Leslie J. Ayer (acting, winter quarter), in Law; 
William Hulbert Barrow, in Physical Education ; and Walter Rich- 
ard Miles, in Experimental Psychology; Associate Professor 
Charles Haskell Danforth, in Anatomy; Assistant Professors 
Ralph D. Reed, in Geology (acting, fall quarter), and Calvin P. 
Stone, in Psychology; Instructors Robert Nicolas Wenzel, in 
Applied Mathematics; Theodore Harding Morgan, in Electrical 
Engineering (acting, fall and winter quarters) ; Merrill H. Ben- 
nett, Richard C. Bentinck (acting, fall and winter quarters) and 
George Pope Shannon, in English ; Sarah G. White, in Theory of 
Nursing, and Mary Walsh, in Practice of Nursing; Glenn S. 
Warner, Advisory Coach, Andrew Kerr, Coach, and Claude E. 
Thornhill, Assistant Coach in Football; Ernest Paul Hunt, and 
Charles W. Davis, in Physical Education; John Armstrong Sell- 
ards, in Romanic Languages; Lecturers Samuel Bonsall Parish, 
in Botany; John Conrad Almack, in Education; Roy Parmelee 
McLaughlin, in Oil Technology and Petroleum Engineering, and 
Harry Wheeler Morse, in the Hydro-metallurgy of Copper, Lead, 



Report of the President 43 

and Zinc; John L. Simpson, Associate, and Franklin D. Schurz, 
Junior Associate, Food Research Institute. 

Retirements, — ^With the close of the academic year 1921-22 
Professor Frank Angell, head of the Department of Psychology, 
retired on Carnegie Pension. Professor Angell has been connected 
with the University since 1892. 

Professor Bailey Willis, of the Department of Geology, was 
retired at the close of the academic year 1921-22. He has been 
connected with the University since 1915. 

Dr. Charles Miner Cooper, Clinical Professor of Medicine, 
retired at the close of the academic year 1921-22 because of ill 
health. He has been connected with the Medical School since 1918. 

Deaths. — 

Dr. Branner's Death 

It is my painful duty to report the death on March 1, 1922, 
of President Emeritus John Casper Branner. Stanford University 
shows on every hand tl^ influence of this great educator, scientist, 
and scholar. We are indeed grateful that we have the Branner 
Geological Library to serve as a fitting memorial. 

I think that the statement of his colleague, our beloved John 
Maxson Stillman, forms the best record of his achievements. This 
Mras embodied by the Academic Council in its resolution of April 
7, 1922. 

In the death on March first of President Emeritus John Casper Branner, 
Stanford University loses one of its most distinguished scholars, one of its 
greatest teachers, and most respected and beloved personalities. 

Dr. Branner was born in New Market, Tennessee, on July 4, 1850. He 
attended school at Maury Academy in Dandridge, Tennessee, and later en- 
rolled at Maryvilk College. At the age of eighteen he entered Cornell Uni- 
versity, where he received his bachelor's degree. 

While still an undergradtiate he was selected (1875) by Professor Charles 
F. Hartt to assist him in a geological survey of Brazil, which occasioned 
several years of work in Brazilian geology, so that his degree of B. S. 
was granted by Corivell in 1882. In 1882 he was again commissioned by the 
United States Government to go to South America to investigate insects in- 
jurious to cotton and sugar-cane industries. From 1883 to 1885 he was en- 
gaged by the Pennsylvania Geological Survey to make a topographic map of 
the Lackawanna Valley. 

When Dr. David Starr Jordan became president of the University of 
Indiana in 1885, he appointed his Cornell College and fraternity mate to 
the professorship of Geology at that institution, a position he held until he 
was again called by Dr. Jordan to the similar chair in Stanford University. 



44 Stanford University 

In the meantime, however, he acted (1887-1892) as State Geologist of 
Arkansas, while retaining his chair at Indiana. 

From 1891 until his retirement from the University in 1915. Dr. Branner 
occupied the headship of the Department of Geology and Mining, while 
holding the office of Vice-President of the University from 1898 to 1913. 
Upon the creation of the title of Chancellor for Dr. Jordan, in 1913, Pro- 
fessor Branner was elected President, a position which he held until January, 
1916, when he also retired under the age limit established by the University, 
and became President Emeritus. During his years of service at Stanford. 
Dr. Branner found occasion to direct or participate in professional missions, 
such as his expedition to Brazil under the patronage of Alexander Agassiz in 
1899, and again in 1907^1908. He was also one of the special Government 
Commissioners on the Panama Canal, and on the California Earthquake 
of 1906. 

The scientific service of Professor Branner has been widely recognized. 
He was a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American 
Philosophical Society, was President (1904) of the American Geological 
Society, Vice-President (1890) of the American Association for the Ad- 
vancement of Science, held membership in the Geological Societies .of Lon- 
don, Edinburgh, France, was President (1911) of the American Seismo- 
logical Society, and was a member of Geologic ^d Geographic societies of 
several Brazilian states and other countries. 

He has received the degrees of Ph. D. from Indiana University in 1885, 
of LL. D. from the University of Arkansas in 1897, from Maryville College 
in 1909, and from the University of California in 1915, and the degree of 
Sc. D. from the University of Chicago in 1916. 

His publications are numerous and, while the great majority are on 
geology, many evidence the breadth of his active interests in botany, ento- 
mology, and other lines of natural sciences. His grammar of the Portu- 
guese language (now in its fourth edition) grew out of his Brazilian ex- 
perience. His bibliography of Clays and Ceramics, an important compila- 
tion; the "How and Why Stories," a charming collection of southern negro 
dialect myths (1921); his genealogy of "Casper Branner of Virginia and 
His Descendants"; and his recently completed but as yet unpublished trans- 
lation from the Portuguese of Alexandre Herculano's Establishment of 
the Inquisition in Portugal, all evidence his breadth of interests and his 
tireless energy. 

As a teacher Professor Branner exerted upon his students an influence 
which inspired them to their best efforts. His broad experience, his own sys- 
tematic and untiring research, his realization of the supreme importance 
of practical experience as the final test of all theories, were well calculated 
to stimulate the ability and energy of his students, while his simple, sincere, 
and s>Tnpathetic personality attached them to him with a rare devotion. 
The distinguished careers of so many of his students evidence the efficiency 
of his teaching. His ideals of the geologist's training were high. They 
demanded breadth of culture, history, philosophy, a good reading ability in 
Latin, French, and German, mathematics, and the foundations of chera- 



Report of the President 45 

istry and engineering. In a wholly admirable address on "The Training 
of a Geologist" given before the Indiana Academy of Sciences in 1889, he 
says: "The man who goes into Geology because there is money in it, will 
in nine cases out of ten make a failure of it — he will get neither the money 
nor the geology. To be sure, a living must be had. but he who has the 
right training and the right interest in his work will never lack for lucrative 
employment for any considerable length of time. . . . The world is too 
full of problems of a scientific interest for any man having a scientific 
spirit to stand idle for a single day or a single hour, and no one having 
such a spirit will stand idle." Again he says : "The man who has no notion 
of accepting the results of his reasoning would just as well not' reason 
at all, while the man who undertakes to reason within certain limits 
insults his intelligence. All honest men are seeking the truth and is it 
not our duty to help others in this search when we can? We may be sure 
that if we wait till all the world thinks alike, the world will never care 
what we think." 

These public addresses of Dr. Branner — none too many of them are 
published— contain much that is autobiographical, and always are expressive 
of the man himself, for I know no one who spoke more directly and 
sincerely from his own experiences and personality. 

In an address at the Centennial of his boyhood's school — Maury Academy 
at Dandridge, Tennessee — ^are passages such as these: "In those times 
we boys used to have codes of honor that were not without interest and not 
without their uses. These codes had some features that were foolish and 
childish enough, but they also had this which has probably not been im- 
proved upon: 'A gentleman must honor women, and he must never lie, 
cheat, or steal.' I leave it to any fair-minded person to say whether or 
not boys who have such a code, and who try faithfuUy to live up to it, 
have in them the stuflf out of which fine men otight' to be made." 

"Whatever success I have attained in this world I attribute to a desire 
that has always been strong in me to help everyone who needs my help." 
"Another statement I must ask you to accept on faith is that I never in 
my life gave or ever intend to give advice to others that I do not regard as 
being for the best interests of those to whom it is given." And in this same 
address, pleading for free opportunities for education of the young men 
and women, he says : 

*'If you would have your sons and daughters honor and bless your mem- 
ory after you are gone, help them up — ^up into the clearer light, where they can 
^ce and feel aright and appreciate fully the efforts you make for them. 
There will be your great reward. You cannot lead your children to think 
ill of you by educating them, but if you educate them not, they may feel 
justified in thinking ill of you, and if out of unworthy motives you fail to do 
your duty by your children, there is reserved for you a hell whose horrors 
have never yet been told." 

A very dominant ideal of Dr. Branner was his concept and practice of loy- 
alty. In an address to the students of Stanford in 1908, he took "Loyalty" 
for his subject. It is a well- formulated expression of the self-respecting 



46 Stanford University 

and consistent' loyalty that marked his relation to institutions and to asso- 
ciates. Space permits of but brief quotations : 

''Without making any fine distinctions, I start with the proposition that 
loyalty is the most valuable attainment, if we may call it an attainment, 
or a most valuable trait of character, if that is a better name, that any man 
or any people can have in this life. And I challenge any one who ques- 
tions this theory to put the matter to any test he chooses to apply from 
the highest moral standards down to the lowest commercial ones." 

"You may fairly ask what is to become of loyalty when the conditions 
make it impossible. One always has a remedy in his own hands ; he can quit, 
and carry with him a gentleman's self-respect, for without that there can 
be no loyalty worthy of the name." 

"Remember too that loyalty, like charity, begins at home. When can 
one see a finer sight than that of a family that stands compactly together, 
helping and encouraging one another within, and defending each other 
from without." 

"Loyalty is one of the big and far-reaching virtues; it makes trust- 
worthy men and great men; as a national virtue it makes a people great. 
For if it is love that makes the world go round, it is loyalty that holds the 
world together." 

In an address to the Stanford student body in September, 1905, full of 
excellent counsel, I can but cite two illustrations, as pertinent to these times 
as to that in which he was speaking : 

"Whatever you may make your major subject, I want to commend to 
every one of you the daily use and cultivation of the English langua^. To 
that end speak the best English you can at all times. I would not have you 
a lot of affected prigs, but neither would I have you cultivate the conversa- 
tional style of a Bowery tough." 

"Young women and young men, extravagance is vulgar; it is bad form, 
bad policy, bad manners, and bad morals. It' is demoralizing to you per- 
sonally, unjust to your parents, offensive to your fellow students, and it 
hardens against you and against young people generally the hearts of men 
and women who would otherwise be benefactors of mankind." 

These sayings of Dr. Branner, and they might be multiplied, are of great 
significance to all who knew him well because they express his own life. 

In October, 1913, at a dinner given in San Francisco by the Stanford 
Alumni and friends in honor of the accession of Dr. Branner to the Presi- 
dency of the University, it was my privilege to be the faculty representa- 
tive speaker. In the course of my remarks I said: "Therefore I may 
safely omit on this occasion any attempt at personal characterization and 
simply remind you that twenty-two years of loyal, devoted, and distin- 
guished service to Stanford University, a life-time of high ideals, of in- 
tegrity, and purity of life, of character without a cloud, entitle him to the 
loyal support of all Stanford men and women. You know him, we all know 
him, we know his strength and gentleness, his firmness and kindliness, his 
courage, his patience, his sincerity, his earnestness, and his genial humor." 
The years succeeding have to me but added a deeper significance to the words 



Report of the President 47 

then spoken. Dr. Branner's life is a great heritage for Stanford University, 
for Gilifornia, and for the Nation. 

On July 19th, the University community was again saddened 
by the sudden death of Charles Andrews Huston, Dean of the 
Law School. He was in many ways the most valuable man on our 
Faculty. 

The following resolutions were passed by the Academic Coun- 
cil, October 6, 1922 : 

On the 19th day of last July the hand of death was laid on Charles 
Andrews Huston, Dean of the Law School, and for the last sixteen year$ 
a member of the Stanford Faculty. He left us in the very prime of life, 
beloved by all who knew him, and holding a high place in the University 
and in the community at large. 

Dean Huston was born in 1876 at Stratford, Ontario, Canada. His 
elementary education was obtained in Canadian schools. As the family 
resources were slender, five years were spent teaching country schools in 
Manitoba. This experience gave him a vital interest in problems of school 
administration, which he retained throughout his life. He attended the Uni- 
versity of Manitoba for one year and then transferred to the University 
of Chicago to complete his education. He had to support himself while a 
student, and this he did almost entirely by teaching in the University. 
He was a Fellow in Economics, an Instructor in Rhetoric, and the Debating 
Coach of the University, while attending to his own studies with such suc- 
cess as to be a constant recipient of university scholarships. 

Mr. Huston graduated from the university in 1902 and from its Law 
School in 1906, as one of the foremost members of one of the most 
brilliant classes ever graduated from it. He came to Stanford as an instruc- 
tor in the Law School in the fall after his graduation. His success as a 
teacher was immediate and his advance steady. He was made a professor 
in 1911, and in 1916, upon the resignation of Dean Woodward, he was the 
unanimous choice of the Law Faculty for the position of Dean. His work 
as Dean has fully justified the confidence which the President and the 
Faculty had in him. In addition to his regular teaching at Stanford, he 
has been constantly in demand for summer session work at other universi- 
ties, including Chicago, Yale, and Columbia. 

During the sixteen years at Stanford, Professor Huston has been a 
frequent contributor to legal magazines and encyclopedias. He spent a 
year on sabbatical leave at the Harvard Law School, and received the degree 
of Doctor of Scientific Jurisprudence from that institution in 1913. At 
this time he also completed his monograph on "The Enforcement of Decrees 
in Equity/' which was published in a substantial volume and received wit^i 
praise by reviewers. Mr. Justice Holmes of the United States Supreme 
Court has given it the stamp of his approval by commending it from the 
bench of that at^^ust tribunal to an advocate at the bar. 

In 1916 Mr. Huston was honored by being invited by his Alma Mater 
to give the Convocation address. He was the first Chicago alumnus thus 



48 Stanford University 

to be hoSnored. His address on "Canada, Our Nearest Neighbor'* was 
a real contribution to the maintenance of our much-prized friendly rela- 
tions with the Dominion. 

When the United States entered the World War, Mr. Huston was called 
to Washington. At .first connected with the War Trade Board, he was 
later placed in charge of the Bureau of Enemy Trade. As a result of his 
intense devotion to this task, he <;uflFered a partial nervous breakdown, but 
after some months' rest was able to resume work, this time connected with 
the office of the Provost Marshal General. 

As an administrator, both in the Law School itself and in the larger field 
of the University, Dean Huston has been a tower of strength. He was 
never quite content with what seemed good if something better was possible. 
On the other hand, he could move slowly and patiently toward his goal 
when necessary. -He was an adept in harmonizing apparently inconsistent 
views. We who worked with him are well aware of how much we owed 
to his suggestion and advice. No task was too small or too burdensome for 
him to undertake, if it came in the line of opportunity or duty. His interests 
were not confined to the University alone but found expression in many 
lines 6f service to the larger community. As a member of the Library 
Bokrd of the City of Palo Alto, of the Committee on Education of the 
Commonwealth Club of San Francisco, to which was assigned the im- 
portant question of the reorganization of the Teachers Colleges of Cali- 
fornia, he put into concrete form his high ideals of civic duty. Not the 
least of his community activities which claimed his undivided attention for 
years was the leadership of a large group of men in Bible Study in one 
of the local churches. 

Today the University faces a new academic year weakened by the loss 
of one whom it could not afford to spare. Yet it is stronger, its standards 
higher, its influence wider, because of Mr. Huston's work among us. His 
wise counsel, his scholarly ideals, and his devotion as a teacher have touched 
and enriched every phase of the University's life and work and will be a 
source of inspiration for years to come. We. the members of the Academic 
Council, deeply conscious of our loss, desire to pay affectionate tribute to 
him as colleague and friend. 

Summer Quarter 

The total registration for the summer quarter of 1922 was 914. 

The following members of other faculties formed a part of the 
summer quarter faculty: 

Summer Qiiarter Appointments, — The following were ap- 
pointed for the summer quarter, 1922. As Acting Professors: 
Bradley Moore Davis, of the University of Michigan, in Botany, 
at the Hopkins Marine Station ; Harley L. Lutz, of Oberlin Col- 
lege, in Economics; John Oscar Creager, of the University of 
Arizona, and Calvin Olin Davis, of the University of Michigan, 



Report of the President 49 

in Education; Karl Young, of the University of Wiscortsin,. irt 
English; Solon Shedd, of the State College of Washington, in G^l- 
ogy ; Bemadotte Everly Schmitt, of Western Reserve University; ih. 
History; Ralph William Aigler, of the University of Michigan, 
Frederic Campbell Woodward, of the University of Chicago,: and 
Austin Tappan Wright, of the University of California, in Law', 
Francis William Coker, of Ohio State University, in Political 
Science. As Acting Assistant Professors: J. Harold Williams, 
of Whittier State School, and Ben D. Wood, of Columbia Col- 
lege, in Education ; Charles Louis Helminge, of the University of 
Washington, and Felipe Morales de Setien, of the University of 
Southern California, in Romanic Languages; Charles Vincent 
Taylor, of the University of California, in Zoology, at the Hojv* 
kins Marine Station. As Acting Instructors : Heinrich Wilhelm 
Brinkmann, in Mathematics; Howard Ray and Frederick Rand 
Rogers, in Physical Education for Men; Alice Burdett, Gertrude 
Bradley Manchester, Dr. Elsie Reed Mitchell, Marion Hartwell 
Wallace, and Catherine Winslow, in Physical Education for 
Women ; Thomas Leon Patterson, of the Detroit College of Medi- 
cine and Surgery, in Physiology, at the Hopkins Marine Station. 
As Lecturers: George David Birkhoff, of Harvard University, 
in Mathematics; Anna C. Jamme, and Helen Wood, in Special 
Course in Nursing; Knight Dunlap, of Johns Hopkins University, 
and Bernard C. Ewer, of Pomona College, in Psychology. 

Students 
student welfare 

The year 1921-22 was marked by the high quality of student 
leadership that developed. In every field of student endeavor 
men and women of excellent ability and good ideals won places of 
importance. A demonstration has been given that student govern- 
ment under such auspices can be a distinct success. Like all demo- 
cratic institutions eternal watchfulness and vigilance form the 
only possible safeguard. 

The University community has been agitating the subject of 
student automobiles. It is quite clear that no student living on 
the campus requires an automobile and that the presence of a num- 
ber of such automobiles leads to abnormal student life, too much 
diversion and brings out the dollar mark somewhat too clearly. I 



50 Stanford University 

have the strong hope that eventually the students themselves 
will see the necessity of some form of control on their part of the 
abuse of the automobile. This year, as last, the greatest obstacle 
to the welfare of a considerable portion of our students has come 
from over-indulgence on the part of parents who provide more 
funds than are necessary for simple student living on the Stan- 
ford campus. 

ATTENDANCE 

The total enrollment for the year was 3,459, including summer 
registration, 20 more than in 1920-21. By major departments 
these were distributed as follows : 

Anatomy 3 

Applied Mathematics 1 

Bacteriology and Experimental Pathology 5 

Botany 18 

Chemistry 140 

Economics 385 

Education — | 227 
— Graphic Art j 

Engineering — Civil 71 

— Electrical 15 

— Mechanical 156 

English 131 

Geology 160 

Germanic Languages 4 

Greek 6 

History 98 

Latin 19 

Law — Professional ) 214 
— Pre-Legal j[ 

Lower Division , 1393 

Mathematics 22 

Medicine 138 

Mining and Metallurgy .' 27 

Nursing 2 

Pharmacology 1 

Philosophy 14 

Physics 6 

Physiology and Histology 32 

Political Science 39 

Pre-Qinical 16 

Pre-Medical 27 

Pre-Nursing 4 



Report of the President 51 

Ps>xhology 14 

Romanic Languages — French } o^ 

— Spanish j 

Zoology — 31 

— Entomology 15 

Total ♦3527 

* From this total, deduct 68 registered as majors in two departments and therefore 
counted twice. 

Intelligence Tests 

The adoption of intelligence tests for members of the Lx)wer 
Division after admission to the University is of significance. While 
through the work of Professor Terman Stanford has been some- 
thing of a pioneer in mental testing, the attitude of the Stanford 
faculty has been one of careful study of results before the adop- 
tion of the intelligence test as part of the requirements for admis- 
sion to the University. A series of observations are being made 
comparing the intelligence tests with the records obtained by the 
students in the University. Within a few years enough material 
will be developed so that a definite plan can be adopted. In the 
meantime intelligence tests have proved of great value in connection 
with the students who have shown deficiencies in scholarship and 
also in the admission and handling of special students. In this 
connection most illuminating work has been done by Professor 
William Martin Proctor. His conclusions following a series of 
studies made with Federal Board students are of interest and are 
here quoted in part from a paper which appeared in School and 
Society, October 21, 1922. 

Intelligence Tests as a Means of Admitting Special Students 

TO Colleges and Universities 

Stanford has adopted a plan which does not discriminate between disabled 
veterans and other students. Any special student, admitted by the committee 
on admission and advanced standing, can graduate by making the required 
scholarship rating in not' less than 225 quarter hours of work. The require- 
ment for students with full entrance is 180 units for graduation. This means 
that a special student is permitted to graduate in one extra year. Since 
the institution is on the quarter basis and three qtiarters constitute an aca- 
demic year, a special student by attending four quarters each calendar year 
can secure his degree in 15 quarters, or three and three- fourths calendar years. 

The advantage of giving the special student the opportunity of grad- 
uating by working an extra year in the University itself rather than re- 
quiring him to complete secondary preparation before entering should be 



52 Stanford University 

obvious. These special students are assumed to be persons over 21 years 
of age. They would feel out of place in a high school and most of them 
would be unable to adapt themselves to conditions found in the average high 
school, but if admitted to the University they feel more at home, and will 
put forth every ounce of energy to make good. This is shown by Table II. 
where 13 regular students who made A-plus scores on the Alpha test are 
compared with the 13 special students who made scores of A-plus on the 
Alpha scale. The 13 regular students whose scholarship ratings are shown 
in this table are also trainees of the Veterans' Bureau, having their tuition, 
book expenses and a maintenance allowance for living expenses, paid by the 
U. S. government. This group of 13 had all completed four years of high 
school at the time of entering training at Stanford, and constitute the 13 
having the highest scores in the intelligence test, of all the Veterans* Bureau 
trainees having regular standing. Each group in the table is arranged in 
rank order beginning at the lowest. The range of scores for the regular 
group is from 170 to 186, and for the special group from 155 to 183, on the 
Alpha scale. 

It is unsafe, of course, to give undue weight to data covering so few 
cases, but it is at least rather significant that the 13 special students making 
the highest scores in intelligence examinations should have made a scholarship 
rating of 1.93, while the 13 regular students making the highest scores on 
the same scale made a scholarship rating of 1.78, or 15 points lower; 
also that the average for all specials (1.45) is 7 points higher than the 
average for all the regular trainees of the U. S. Veterans' Bureau. The 
presumption is at least strong that given superior intelligence, maturity, and 
a well defined life purpose a man can successfully carry university work, even 
though he may lack the customary four years of preparatory work. 

There are educators who seem to be concerned lest mental tests become 
the excuse for a new doctrine of infant damnation*. They hold that it is 
unsafe to admit, even if probably true, that some of us are intellectually 
pint cups and others gallon measures. It is just possible that their alarm 
is premature. It is a poor rule that will not work both ways. Perhaps 
too much emphasis has been put upon the revelations that tests have made 
of mental deficiencies, often on the basis of a single group test. Sweeping 
generalizations, based on unreliable or insufficient data, to the effect that 
47 per cent of the white men taken in the draft were of moron grade of intel- 
ligence', tend to discredit the whole testing program. But such errors are 
merely the by-products of a great forward movement in education. Mental 
tests are here to stay, and on all sides are indications that the positive uses 
to which such tests may be put are being stressed. 

One of the most hopeful signs pointing toward the positive, as opposed to 
the negative use of mental tests, is the attitude of colleges and universities 
in the matter of admitting special students who have made high scores in 
intelligence tests, after the manner above described. University doors that 

' Bapley, F. C: "Educational Determinism; or Democracy and the I. Q." School 
and Soctety, Vol. 15, No. 380, April 8, 1922, pp. 373 ff. 

'Cannon, Cornelia James: "Democracy in Question: I. American Misfrivinirs " 
Atlantic Monthly, February, 1922, pp. 145 ff. • » - 



Report of the President 



53 



Otherwise would have remained shut have been caused to open for a great 
many capable men in the past' few years. These men are demonstrating their 
ability to profit by the opportunities thus made available, and the results tlius 
far attained amply justify the experiment. 

' n ' y 

TABLE II 

Comparing 13 A-plus special Veterans* Bureau trainees with the 13 regular V. B. trainees 
who made toe highest scores in the Alpha ti*st, as to scholarship ratings in 

university work. 



13 ALPHA A-P1.US SPECIALS 



CaM 


Hours 1 


Honor 


Scholarship 


So. 


AtteoiDted ' 

1 


Points 


Rating 


1 


29 


60 


2.07 


2 


^ ! 


17 


2.13 


3 


41 


71 


1.74 


4 


10 


10 


1.00 


5 


09 


166 


2.22 





16 


40 


2.50 


m 
t 


S3 


63 


1.90 


8 


as 


67 


1.86 


9 


23 ; 


39 


1.70 


10 


17 


34 


2.00 


11 


63 


111 


1.76 


12 


58 


104 


1.80 


13 


39 


93 


2.13 


Totals 


442 


864 


Ave. 1.93 



Range of Alpha scores of special group 
from 155 to 183. Median, 166. 

Average scholarship rating of all spe- 
cials, not counting the 3 C-plus cases, 
who were "may-attends," is 1.45. 



13 A- PLUS REGULARS (HIGHEST) 



Case 


Hours 


Honor 


Scholarship 


No. 


Attempted 


Points 


Rating 


1 


158 


228 


1.44 


2 


106 


112 


1.06 


3 


142 


264 


1.79 


4 


156 


233 


1.66 


5 


96 


124 


1.80 


6 


64 


73 


1.14 


7 


91 


188 


2.06 


8 


106 


318 


3.00 


9 


98 


172 


1.85 


10 


79 


208 


2.63 


11 


82 


179 


2.19 


12 


40 


22 


0.55 


13 


81 


193 


2.38 


Totals 


1,292 


2.304 


lAve.'l.78 

1 



Range of Alpha scores of regular group 
from 170 to 186. Median, 174. 

Average scholarship rating of all regu- 
lar Veterans' Bureau trainees, covering 
six quarters, is 1.38. 



SUMMARY AND CONXLUSIONS 

1. The practically universal requirement of four years of high school 
for college entrance, coupled with pressure for admission, tends more and 
more to exclude from higher educational opportunities, men and women 
who, although capable and mature, lack entrance requirements. The species 
special student is in danger of becoming extinct. 

2. The world war caused many institutions to open their doors to special 
students who had been disabled in the military service, on the basis of mental 
ability, maturity, and vocational experience. 

3. Records of 41 such special Veterans* Bureau trainees at Stanford indi- 
cate that their success in university work has been in direct ratio of their 
scores on the Army Alpha intelligence scale. Also that the highest 13 men- 
tally of the specials made an average scholarship rating 15 points higher 
than the highest 13 of the regular Veterans* Bureau trainees. All specials 
averaged higher in scholarship than all regulars. 

4. In the light of such results it should become the practice of colleges 
and universities to reserve a definite proportion of registrations for men 
and women of maturity, proved mentality, and definite employment objec- 
tive, regardless of entrance deficiencies. The case of one man who was 
admitted with fifth grade education and made better than a "B" average in 



54 Stanford University 

two quarters of work will become classic as an illustration of what special 
students of this type are capable of doing. 

5. Not only should special students be admitted on passing satisfactory 
mental examinations, but they should be allowed to graduate on a minimum 
of one extra year of university work without being compelled to make up 
traditional entrance requirements. 

Selection of New Students 

Much study is constantly being given to devise plans that will 
help to make it possible to choose the best material from the can- 
didates seeking admission. Scholarship records are naturally the 
best index of mental ability, punctuality, reliability and consistent 
power of application, but other information is needed in making 
choices during the adolescent period. At present the Committee 
on Admission is using a form of personal rating blank that seems 
to promise well. It is as follows : 

PERSONAL RATING BLANK 

There is a limit upon the total number of women students, and upon the 
number of entering men (in first-year standing and with less than eighty 
units advanced credit). The regulations provide that certain candidates ful- 
filling minimum requirements shall be automatically certified for admission 
(see Information Bulletin) ; from other candidates fulfilling minimum 
requirements selection is made on the basis of superior fitness (Preferred 
List). 

In the case of women (with an arbitrary limit of five hundred in attend- 
ance as students at one time), tbe number of candidates fulfilling minimum 
requirements for undergraduate standing is so large that only about one 
in four or one in five can hope to be admitted. To be placed on the Pre- 
ferred List means that the candidate is regarded as quite exceptional in 
scholarship, ability, force of character, seriousness of purpose, and other 
qualities which give promise of decided success in university studies. 

In the case of men, the competition (within the limited ^roup) is less 
severe. Other things b<^ing equal, a candidate fulfilling minimum require- 
ments, who is in the upper fifth (presumably is in the upper third) of his 
graduating class (or in the case of transfers, whose collep^e work has been 
thoroughly satisfactory) is practically assured of admission, provided cre- 
dentials are in hand at the time the lists are made up (see Information Bul- 
letin). 

The Cottimittee on Admission is desirous of having confidential inforuw- 
tion regarding candidates for admission^ particularly as to the qualities and 
characteristics listed belotv. from high school principals, teachers, college 
officers, and others qualified to judge. The committee does not expect that 
information will tiecessarily be giz*en by any one person on all t/ie points 
mentioned. The information received zvill be regarded as an important part 
of the candidate's record. 

Name of candidate School (or College) attended 



PleaHc use as a standard of comparison the graduating classes of secondary schools 
(or college classes) as you have known or observed them. Put a cross (X) in the 
appropriate spaces to indicate your rating of the candidate in the several qualities named. 



Report of the President 



00 



t. Scholarship 



2. Penonality 
(Personal strength and attractiveness, 
impression on others, capacity as a 

mixer, appearance and manner) 



3. Indnstry 

(Energy, perseverance, application to 
work and interest in it) 



4. Judgment and Common Sense 
(Soundness of judj^ment, ability to size 

up situations, fair-mindedness, tact) 

5. ReliabiUty 

(Consistency, dependability, promptness, 
accuracy, reliability of his word) 



ABOVK THE AVKKAGE 

Mark- Dis- Doubt- 
edly tinctly fully 



6. Initiative 

(Creative ability, imagination, self-ini- 
tiative, originality, enterprise, 
resourcefulness) 

7. Codpcration 

(Willingness to heli> and cooperate with 
others, loyalty, ability to understand 
people) 



BELOW THE AVEKAGE 

Doubt- Dis- Mark- 
fully tinctly edly 



ft. Native Ability 
(Inborn capacity, intellectual ability, 
keenness, capacity to learn) 



9. Leadership 
(Ability to inspire and lead others, to 
command the loyalty of others, to mas- 
ter a difficult situation, to make things go) 






Underline the qualities or characteristics named below which you think 
particularly applicable to the candidate: 

Alertness Honesty Fondness for out-door 

Gmunon sense Self-control sports 

Dependability Seriousness of purpose Consideration for others 

Courage High standard of personal Physical vigor 

conduct' Good manners 

What positions (offices) of responsibility and honor has the candidate 
held (in school or out) ? 

(To Principals and high school teachers:) If others have applied for 
admission from the same school, and you had the selection to make, how 
would you rank the candidates in order of merit (first, second, third, etc.) ? 
Please give names and order. 

Brief statement as to why, and in what particulars, the candidate is (or 
is not) regarded as exceptionally qualified for successful college work and 
entitled to consideration on the basis of superior fitness. 



[Signed] ;.... 

Date [Position] 

(As it is desired to keep this information strictly confidential, please send 
this blank, when duly filled out, to The Registrar, Stanford University, Cali- 
fornia.) 

The great problem is to balance out the results of wide diversi- 
ties of judgment shown by those making recommendations. 



56. Stanford University 

Increased Freedom for Students of Ability 

Under date of January 6, 1922, the Academic Council passed 
the following regulation : 

Students with an average record in the University of B or above may reg- 
ister for as many units in excess of eighteen as shall be approved by the Lower 
Division Committee, or the major department, respectively; students with 
less than a B average may not register for more than eighteen units, unless, 
in exceptional cases, permission to register for additional units is granted by 
the Committee on Registration in advance. 

Scholarship Honors 

The following regulations, adopted by the Scholarship Com- 
mittee for the administration of Scholarship Honors, were ap- 
proved by the Academic Council under date of February 10, 1922 : 

1. Lower Division Honors. 

These are to be awarded to the upper tenth of students having between 
72 and 90 units of credit, including incompletes with a grade attached, at the 
beginning of any quarter. The upper tenth to be determined entirely by grade 
point average. Courses marked + to be omitted in the reckoning of the 
average. Courses in Physical Education, Military Training, and Music also 
to be omitted except that recitation or lecture courses involving two hours 
of outside preparation for each hour of class work and in which final writ- 
ten examinations are held will be included. 

Honors will be announced in the spring quarter and the names of those 
receiving honors will be printed in the Commencement program, the Register 
and Directory. 

2. Stanford Scholars. 

These are to be selected as follows : 

(a) About thirty students a year who have between 75 and 165 units of 
credit at the beginning of the spring quarter. These are to be distributed 
approximately according to registration. 

(b) A minimum grade point average of 2.40 is required. The same lira* 
itation on the use of courses marked + and on courses in Physical Education, 
Military Training, and Music as that stated above for Lower Division Hon- 
ors shall be applied. 

(c) Recommendations by the various departments of students they con- 
sider deserving special recognition will be requested. Such a recommenda- 
tion may be considered as raising the student's grade point average not more 
than .10 points. 

(d) Names of Stanford Scholars will be printed in the Commencement 
program, the Register and Directory. 



Report of the President 57 

3. With the Bachelor's Degree. 

These are to be awarded as follows : 

(a) The degree will be granted "with distinction" to about one-tenth of 
the graduating class. A minimum grade point average of 2.00 will be re- 
quired. 

(b) The degree will be granted "with great distinction" to about one- 
twentieth of the graduating class. A minimum grade point' average of 2.40 
will be required. 

(c) The two groups selected under (a) and (b) above are to be exclusive 
of each other. 

(d) The grade point average will be reckoned on the work of the five 
quarters preceding the quarter of graduation. Residence at Stanford for 
at least two of these quarters is required. Grades obtained elsewhere will 
be evaluated to conform with Stanford standards. 

(e) During the five quarters mentioned in (d) the student must have com- 
pleted forty units of work listed as advanced undergraduate or graduate work. 

(f) Degrees "with distinction" and "with great distinction" are to be 
distributed among the five groups of departments approximately according 
to registration. 

(g) In determining the grade point average courses marked + and courses 
in Physical Education, Military Training, and Music will be treated the same 
as in determining Lower Division Honors. 

(h) Recommendations from departments will be requested and used as 
in the case of Stanford Scholars. 

(i) Each department will be requested to offer in the eighth week of each 
quarter a comprehensive examination on the undergraduate work of the de- 
partment if there are applicants for such an examination. Any record 
made in this way will be considered by the Committee in making recom- 
mendations for degrees "with distinction" or "with great distinction." 

(j) That the degree was granted "with distinction" or "with great dis- 
tinction" will be indicated in all lists of the graduating class and it will 
appear on the diploma given. 

Nurses Loan Fund . 
On May 26, 1922, the Trustees passed the following resolution : 

"That the University accept for administration the sum of $306.50 and 
"^« aggregating $155.00, a total of $461.50, representing the principal of 
a fund to be known as the Nurses Loan Fund, and that Dr. George B. Somers, 
Physician Superintendent of the Hospitals, be delegated to administer the 
fund, the provisions of which are as follows : 

** 'Loans are available in amounts of $25.00 to $100.00 to worthy students 
who would not be able without this financial assistance to finish training. 
The loans are non-interest bearing and must be paid within three to five 
months from the day of graduation. In case of withdrawal from the School, 
a student to whom a loan has been made is required to return promptly the 
amount of the loan.' " 



58 Stanford University 

Diet Kitchen 

Upon the recommendation of the President of the University 
that it is desirable to establish a diet kitchen for the use of diabetics 
and similar patients, the Trustees under date of June 30, 1922, 
recommended that the basement of the house on the northeast 
corner of Webster and Clay Streets be used for this purpose. The 
estimated cost of alterations is $2,500.00, which advance is to be 
repaid at approximately $100.00 a month by the patients using it. 

Cooperative Agreement for Training Schools for Nurses 

Under date of June 30, 1922, the proposed agreement between 
the University of California, the Leland Stanford Junior Uni- 
versity, and the City and County of San Francisco, through its 
Board of Health, to provide a cooperative arrangement between 
their respective Training Schools for Nurses, which will permit of 
broader training for nurses and economy in the handling of the 
problems involved, was approved. 

The agreement is as follows : 

This agreement made and entered into this 22nd day of June, 1922, by 
and between the University of California, Leland Stanford Junior Uni- 
versity, and the City and County of San Francisco by the Board of Health. 

This agreement may be terminated at the option of any party concerned 
upon one year's notice duly given in writing by the party desiring to ter- 
minate the agreement to the other parties thereto. The purpose of this 
agreement is to provide the training schools for nurses concerned, namely, 
the University of California School of Nursing, Stanford School of Nurs- 
ing, and the San Francisco Hospital School of Nursing with a broader and 
larger field for the training of nurses. 

It is further agreed that the advantages offered for the training of 
nurses in each of the institutions which are parties to this agreement 
be open to the other parties concerned, provided that nothing in this agree- 
ment shall be construed as requiring any institution concerned accepting 
students without its consent. 

For the purpose of carrying out the terms of this agreement a committee 
to be known as the Advisory Committee shall be appointed by the Board of 
Health and shall consist of Dr. George B. Somers, Chairman, Dr. Jas. 
W. Ward, Dr. A. P. O'Brien, Mr. Lawrence Arnstein, Dr. Wm. Ophuls, 
Dean Stanford School of Medicine, Dr. L. S. Schmitt, Asst. Dean Uni- 
versity of California School of Medicine, Dr. E. B. Frick, Superintendent 
San Francisco Hospital, and Dr. William C Hassler, Health Officer. 

Its duties are of an advisory nature and concerned solely with the man- 
agement and standards of the San Francisco Hospital School of Nursing. 
It shall appoint such standing and sub-committees as shall be necessary. 



Report of the President 59 

There shall also be a Committee on School of Nursing. This com- 
mittee shall consist of the superintendents of the schools of nursing of the 
three schools, parties to this agreement, with the superintendent of nurses 
of the San Francisco Hospital School as chairman. 

Subject to the approval of the Advisory Committee, this committee shall 
determine the general policy relative to instruction in the theory and prac- 
tice of nursing at the San Francisco Hospital School of Nursing. It shall 
recommend the instructing staff and the standards and formulate the rules 
and regulations governing the school. It shall also arrange that' the oppor- 
tunities afforded at the various institutions concerned in this agreement be 
made known to the other members who have subscribed hereto. 

There shall also be a Committee on Publicity, the members of which shall 
include the members of the Committee on School of Nursing, the Chair- 
man of the Hospital Committee and the Health Officer, who shall be Chair- 
man. This Committee shall act subject to the Advisory Committee. 

The Board of Health of the City and County 

OF San Francisco, 
(Signed) By Arthur H. Barendt, President. 
(Signed) Edward M. Coffey, Secretary. 
The Board of Trustees of the Leland Stanford Junior 

University. 
(Signed) By W. Mayo Newhall, President, 
(Signed) T. T. C. Gregory, Secretary, 
The Regents of the University of California. 
(Signed) By Wm. D. Stephens, 

Cvovernor of the State of California and ex- 
Officio President of the Regents of the Uni- 
versity of California. 
(Signed) By C. J. Struble, 

Ass't. Secretary of the Regents of the Uni- 
versity of (California. 

Gifts 

In the name of the University I wish here to record our grate- 
ful appreciation of the many and valuable gifts which it has been 
our privilege to receive during the year. They are listed under a 
separate heading. 

The departmental and other special reports follow. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Ray Lyman Wilbur, 

President. 
I>k:ember 31, 1922. 



60 Stanford University 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER 

OF STANFORD UNIVERSITY FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 

ENDING AUGUST 31, 1922. 

To THE Honorable Board of Trustees 
OF Stanford University : 

Herewith is submitted a detailed financial statement of the resources of 
the University. There has been a gratifying increase in the University's 
assets. The report of the Comptroller contains the details. 

The success of the Endowment Campaign, particularly among the alumni 
of Stanford, has been notable. The early payments upon the subscriptions 
towards the First Million are indicative of the solid financial support which 
will eventually come to the University from the alumni and former students. 
The custodianship of such funds is a privilege to the Treasurer. 

Timothy Hopkins, 
February 1, 1923. Treasurer. 



Report of the Treasurer 



61 



Index to Treasurer's and Comptroller's Financial Tables 



Schedule 

Assets — Investment — Analysis of E 

Balance Sheet — Consolidated A 

Balance Sheet — Divisional Al 

Balance Sheet — Current A2 

Bonds— Detail — Schedule of S 

Capital Increase Since Endowment — Analysis N 

Corporate Stock — Schedule of T 

Dividends T 

Expenditures — Analysis of I 

Educational Plant Assets — Detail of L 

Endowments and Restricted Funds — Schedule of M 

Gifts — Received and/or Expended P 

Hospitals — Income and Expenditures G 

Income — Analysis of • F 

Income — Summary of Expend, and Surplus — Current B 

Income from Special Funds — Schedule of P 

Investment — Lands, Buildings, Equipment O 

Lands, Buildingrs and Equipment — Investment O 

Medical Division, S. F. — Income and Expenditures... G 

Operations of Miscellaneous Income Units Jl 

Press — Departmental Operations Jl 

Plant Investment L 

Real Estate and Improvements O 

Scholarships P 

Securities S 

Stocks T 

Student Loans— Schedule of X 

Surplus B 



Page 
66,67 

62, 63; 92, 93 

64. 65; 94, 95 

96,97 

73^82 

71 

83 

83 

10;^107 

110-114 

68-70 

115-120 

102 

100. 101 

98,99 

115-120 

72 

n 

102 
108,109 

108 

110-114 

72 

115-120 

83 

121 

98,99 



62 



Stanford University 



SCHEDULE A 
ConioUdated Balance Sheet «t at August 31. 1922 



DESCRIPTION 



Detail 



Total 



ASSETS 



Cash Assets 

Current Funds ... 
Investment Funds 



Accounts Receivable Assets 
Accounts Receivable ... 

Rents Receivable 

Interest Accrued 



$00,318.06 
326,054.50 



182,124.67 
2,4n.OO 
315,402.47 , 



Bonds— Pension Fund (Schs. A-2, pp. 96, 97, and S, pp. 73-82) 

Bonds— Students* Hospital Fund (Sch. S, pp. 78-82) 

Bonds— Employers' Liability Insurance Fund (Schs. A-1, pp. 

64, 65, and S, pp. 73-82) 

Securities cSch. E, pp. 66, 67) _ $22,458,346.30 

Less: Contra— Loans— Building Fund 

Faculty Housing Fund $193,027.43 



$387,272.53 



400,004.14 

113,865.^ 
7,680.00 

62,630.27 



Educational Plant 406,282.23 



601,309.06 21,857,096.64 



913,309.07 
175,692.20 



Contracts of Sale. _ _._ 

Contracts of Sale— Faculty Housing Fund I 

Lands, Buildings and Equipment 

Investment (Schs. E, pp. 66, 67, and O, p. 72) $1,161,871.18 i 

Educ. Plant (Schs. A-1, pp. 64, 65, and L, pp. 110-114).. 9,252,193.30 ' 

Income Section Educational Plant 1,237,131.40 11,661,196.88 



Other Assets 

Bonds as Deposits... 

Investment (Sch. E, pp. 66, 67). 



Working Assets (Sch. A-2, pp. 96, 97) 

Deferred Charges to Operations (Sch. A-2, pp. 96, 97). 

Total _ 



$250.00 
74,361.96 



74,611. V)6 

'i 
' 157,438.24 

10,273.10 
. $35,800,499.91 



Report of the Treasurer 



63 



SCHEDULE A 
Conaolidatsd Balance Sheet «■ at August 31, 1922 



DESCRIPTION 



I Detail 



LIABILITIES 
iDuxMdltte Demanda for Caah (Sob. A-2, pp. 96, 97).. 
Othw Liabilitlea 

Cntppropriated Inoome (Scb. P, pp. 115-120) 

Loan and Belief Fonda (Sch. X, p. 121) 

Hofpltal and Special Funds (Sch. P, pp. 115-120). 

Cndaimed Depoaits - 

Deferred and Contingent.-. 



Total Liabilitlea. 



RESERVES (Sch. A.2, pp. 96, 97) 
Reeerre for Deferred Chargea to Operations. 
Other Reserrea 



$46,429.64 

9,179.60 

877.29 

3,266.83 

90.516.97 



ENDOWMENTS (Sch. M, pp. 6»-70) 
Endowment Funds Borrowed— Expended on Educational 

PUnt $408,282.23 

Uniettrlcted Endowments 

Bertricted Endowments _ 

R«trlct«J Special Funds $328,028.70 

Less: Contra— Faculty Housing Fund 193,027.43 



Capital Increase Since Endowment. 
Endowments— Educational Plant 



$10,273.10 
214.334.14 



Contra 

$21,297,207.91 
1,197,930.76 

134,999.27 

8,908,116.74 
4,280.414.21 



SURPLUS 

Current Surplus (Schs. A-1, pp. 64, 66, and B, pp. 98, 99) ' — $32,606.21 

Surplus Income Expended on Educational Plant 4,554,496.86 



TotaL. 



Total 



$76,544.31 



149,788.82 



$226,333.13 



$224,607.24 



30,827.6($8.80 



4,521,890.66 



$86,800,499.91 



64 



Stanford University 



SCHEDULE Aa 
Divisional Balance Sheet ai at Auguit 31, 1922 



OUBBENT ASSETS (Sch. A-2, pp. 96, 97) 



Cash on Hand and in Bank.. 

Accounts Receivable 

Other Assets 

Working Assets 

Deferred Charges to Operation 



Total. 



Total 



160,318.03 
400,004.14 
173,916.15 
157.438.24 
10.273.10 



1801.949. C6 



INVESTMENT ASSETS (Sch. E, pp. 66, 67) 



Securities (Sch. 8, pp. 78-82) 

Lands, Buildings and Equipment (Sch. O, p. 72) 

Contracts of Sale— Faculty Housing Fund 

Contracts of Sale 

Due from Current Funds — 

Cash in Banks 

Other Assets — - 

Income Section— Educational Plant 

Total 



EDUCATIONAL PLANT ASSETS 



Total 



$22,458,346.30 

1,161,871.18 

175.602.20 

913,309.07 

383.615.50 

326.964.50 

74,361.96 

1,237,131.40 



126,731,282.11 



Land — - — 

Buildings and Structures - 

Equipment 

Improvements 

Unsogregated 

TotaL 

Less: Educational Plant Assets Transferred to Investment Section 

(Soh. L. pp. 110-114) Total _ 



Total 



$18,633.66 
7,369.781.93 
1,985.409.36 

579.931.66 
1,411,473.03 



$11,966,229.64 
2.113,036.34 



$0,252,198.30 



Report of the Treasurer 



65 



SOHXDULE A-1 
Diyinoiwl Balance Sheet ai at August 31, 1922 



CURRENT LIABILITIES (Sch. A-2, pp. 96, 97) 



Total 



Immfdlite Demands lor Cash j. 

Doe to Investmeat Funds — .^— — 

OtJjer LtabOltles _. ' 

B««erT« (Sch. A-2, pp. 98, 97) • 

Comnt SurpluB 

Casb In Exeeas of Immediate Demands for Cash ~$ia,i26.28 

AccountB Beeelvable In Excess of 

Doe to Investment Funds and Other Liabilities 197,964.21 



Lm: Reterre Other than that for Deferred Charges. 
Total 



$76,544.31 
383,616.60 
149v78B.82 
224,607.24 



1181,727.93 
214,334.14 —32,606.21 



9801,949.06 



INVESTMENT ENDOWMENTS 



Total 



Cnrestricted Endowments (Sch. M. 68-70) $21,297,207.91 

B«strict«d Endowments (Sch. M, pp. 68-70) 1,197,930.76 

Bwtrieted Special Funds (Sch. M, pp. 68-70) , 328,026.70 

Capital Incrsase Since Endowment (Sch. N, p. 71) 3,908,116.74 



Total $2(5,731,282.11 



PLANT ENDOWMENTS AND SURPLUS INCOME EXPENDED 



Total 



Endowments-Educational Plant (Sch. M, pp. 68-70) $4,289,414.21 

Surplus Income Expended on Educational Plant — 4,554,496.8(5 

Eadovment Funds Borrowed Expended on Educational Plant _ 408,282.23 



Total _ __.. $;),252,193..30 



66 



Stanford University 



SCHEDULE E 
Analyaii of Inveitment AmcU u ftt AufuM 31, 1922 



DESCRIPTION 



SECURITIES— UNRESTRICTED 
Bonds (Sch. S, pp. 78-82) 

Railway 

Street and Interurban 

Other Public Utility 

Federal State and Municipal 

Other Bonds — 



Corporate Stocks (Sch. T, p. 83). 

Mortgage lx>an»— Real Estate 

City 

Country — — 

Campus 



Loans— Building Fund. 
Unsecured Loans 



Total Unrestricted. 



SECURITIES— RESTRICTED (Sch. S, pp. 78-82) 
Bonds— L. C. Lane Medical Library Fund 

Railway 

Other Public Utility 

Other Bonds 




Bonds— £. C. Converse Endowment Fund 

Other Public Utility 

Bonds— T. W. Stanford Endowment Fund 

Railway 

Bond»— Leon SIoss Endowment Fund 

Railway 

Bonds— Dr. Julia P. Larsen Endowment Fund 

Federal, State, and Municipal 

Mortgage Loans— Real Estate— L. C. Lane Med. Library Fd. 

Country - 



Totsl 



$14,068,700.00 

618,000.00 

l,881p000.00 

601,150.00 

1,743,701.00 



$1,382,082.06 

508,812.23 

74,226.71 



$19,307,561.00 



60,301.00 



$31,000.00 
57,000.00 
26,000.00 



1,946,021.00 

026,614.22 
*98,550.08 

$22,129,046.30 



Total Restricted. 



Total Securities. 



$114,000.00 

61,000.00 

150,000.00 

5,000.00 

750.00 

8,550.00 



$329,800.00 



I $22,458,346.30 



»Board of Athletic Control— Basketball Pavilion 6% Int $04,882.88 

Sequoia Club 6% Int - 256.25 

Palo Alto Stock Farm 5% Int 896.46 

Palo Alto Hospital 6% Int.— Principal $2,500.00 

Interest 26.00 2,525.00 $08,559.08 



r 



Report of the Treasurer 



67 



8CHBDULB B (Concluded) 
is of Investments as at August 31, 1922 



DESCRIPTION 


Detan 


Total 


imjS, BUILDINGS AND EQUIPMENT— UNRESTRICTED 
R^>) CM^Atf and fmnrovfvn^ntA _. _ __ 




|l,167p4e6.20 




Total Uorestrlcted 




$1,167,406.20 


LANDS, BUILDINGS AND EQUIPMENT— RESTRICTED 
Seal Estate and ImproTements 

L. G. Lane Medical Library Lands.. 




14,406.98 


Total Restricted _ _. 




14,406.98 


Total Lands, BuikHnss and Equipment (Sch. O, p. 72) 




H^oi^n.is 


ContrtcU ol Sale 




1918,800.07 


Contracts of Sale— Faculty Housing Fund 




$176,002.20 


Dw from Current Funds 




$888,016.50 


OARH IN BANK— UNRESTRICTED 
Caih In Bank— Commercial 

Union Trust Company— Special Account 

tnlon Trust Company— New Endowment. 




$17,076.46 
16,817.81 


Total Unrestricted .- 




$88,803.77 


CASH IN BANK— RESTRICTED 
Cub in Btnk-SaTlngs 

Kociiib, Scottish and Australian Bank— Melbourne 

Union Tniflt Ban^ — ^Nnnuks' Hoiha Funds _ _ 




$202,800.00 
9A0.7S 




1 


Total Restricted ~ 


, . $296,000.78 


Total Cash in Bank 


1826.964. 60 






<>"W Aiiets (Sch. 8, pp. 73-82) 

Bond Pranlum and Discount— General — 

Bond Premium and Discount— L. C. Lane Medical 
^'sry Fund 




$100,004.06 
-2,182.10 


Bond Premium and Discount— E. C. Converse Fund 

Bond Premium and Discount— 1'. W. Stanford Fund 

Bond Premium and Discount— Dr. Julia P. Larson Fund. 
Jeiwto 

Biieonnt on Mortrsfres 


— 1,471.96 

— 16,150.00 

— 70.57 

6,792.60 

— 14,800.00 







ToUl Other Assets. 



$74,861 .96 



68 



Stanford University 



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Report of the Treasurer 



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Report of the Treasurer 



71 



SCHEDULE N 
Detail! of Capital Increaac Since Badowmcnt for Year Ended August 31, 1922 



Balance August 31, 1981. 



INCREASE 
Froita on Sale of 

BoDda 

Corporste Stot^ 

Real Estate 

LtquMation DlTldends 



13,744.149.62 



' 1100,942.42 
J 1,527.60 > 

24,490.74 
88,608.45 



Total Inerease lor Tear 1165,584.11 | 



DECREASE 

Loai on Removal of ImproTements $1,516.09 

Nominal vuhae of 8^000 shares of lone Coal A Iron 
Co. Stock written off, as flnal liquidation divi- 



dend received 



100.00 



Xct Inerease lor Year - _ 

Total for Year Ended Aug. 31, 1922 (Sch. A« pp. 62, 63).. > 



1,616.90 



168,967.12 



13,906,116.74 



72 Stanford University 

schbdulb o 

Landi, Buildinffi,' and Bquipment— Invettment Real BsUte and Improvenicnts for 

Year Bnded August 31, 1922 

UNRESTRICTED , Total 



City Property 

San Francisco I 9236,d66.74 

Buckley Property, 122^1232 Market St. 
Unlrerslty Club Lot, Powell and California Sts. 
University Club Building and Improvements, Powell ' 
and California Sts. 

Alameda — 18,664.00 

LleweUyn Tract, 2 Blocks on Marsh 

Versailles Tract i 

Country Property — 1 | 008,244.46 

Marin County I 

Undivided third Interest in Shatter Ranch 
Colusa, Glenn and Madera Counties 

Pacific Improvement Company 5/28ths Tract 
Santa Clara and San Mateo Counties 
Adjacent to Palo Alto Farm 

Spring Valley Searsvllle Lake, 286.006 Acres ' 

Folger Tract SearsviUe Lake, 5.88 Acres 

Water Development— Searsvllle, etc. 

Nash Field Lot 78 

Lot 76 Strip between County Road and S. P. 

Co. Tracks 
Half of Lot 89, P. A. Farm 
Lot 16 and a portion of Lot 16 of Stanford 

Week-End Acres 
Coon Tract 
Felt Tract 
Scale Tract Lot 30 
Felt Reservoir 
• P. A. Farm and Improvements, Less $200,000 

Valuation on Campus ' 



Total Unrestrictea $1,157,465.20 



RESTRICTED , , 

L. C. Lane Medical Library Lot— San Francisco |4,4Q5.0S 



Total Lands, Buildings and Equipment— Investment Section 
(Schs. A, pp. 62, 63, and A-1, pp. 64, 65, and E, pp. 66, 67)..' $1,161,871.19 



Report of th& Treasurer 



73 




> 

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tt o 



Q 



p O 
p4 O 



♦» 2 "C 

S - 5 

o x: 2 

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Report of the Treasurer 



83 



SCHEDULE T 
Corporate Stocks for Y«ar Ended August 31, 1922 



Chlcafo, Rock Island A Pacific Railway Co. 

4f» shares 7% Preferred 

1000 shares ConunoD 



American Cotton Company 

250 shares Preferred 

125 shares Common 



CbeTy Chase Land Company 
187 shares 



lone Coal ft Iron Co. (Written off as final 
Liquidation Dividend Received) 
800O shares 



Osklsnd Water Front Company 
7274 shares 



Pacifle Improvement Company 
12.500 shares 



Standard Oil Company of New Jersey 
1000 shares 7% (sold Dec.. 1921) Cumu- 
lative 

(Schedule E. pp. 66, 67) 

(Schedule F. pp. 100. 101) 

(Schedule N. p. 71) 



Book Value 



$40,000.00 
20.000.00 



1.00 



100.00 



100.00 



100.00 



9(K).301.0O 



Dividends 
from Earn- 
ings Received 
During Tear 
1021-22 



' Liquidation 
Dividends 
i Received 



12.800.00 



8,500.00 



$6,300.00 



11.122.00 



87.572.00 



*$38.094.00 



'Closed to Capital Increase Since Endowment. 



84 Stanford University 



REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER 



To the Honorable Board of Trustees of Stanford University, and to the 
President of the University : 

The Comptroller herewith submits the following report covering the 
University's financial operations for the period beginning September 1, 1921, 
and ending August 31, 1922 : 

BUDGET EXPENDITURES 

The total budget income of the University for the year ending August 
31, 1922, was $1,907,025.77, derived from the following sources : 

Income 

Percentage 

Securities and other interest income $1,098,111.39 57.10 

Real estate 55,052.71 2.86 

Net income from income section of educational piant. 

consisting of dormitories, residences, and other income 

producing property on the campus, and the Stanford 

Hospital 37,681.69 2.00 

Rock crusher, discounts on purchases, Assembly Hall 

rentals, miscellaneous 8,431.86 .44 

Income from academic sources: 

From tuition fees $ 432,551.34 

From all other students' fees 107.487.28 

Total from all fees 540.038.62 28.10 

Medical School income: 

From profits on dispensary sales, and fees paid by 

clinical patients 26,825.71 1.40 

Miscellaneous income from fines. Museum admissions, 

sale of schedules, etc 17.879.64 .93 

Scholarships 6,258.50 .32 

Research and fellowship funds 130,702.75 6.80 

Gifts for hospital free beds 1,003.02 .05 

$1,921,975.89 100.00 

Less — Restricted income added to principal of funds.... 14,950.12 

$1,907,025.77 

Increase in budget income over the previous year amounted to $212,429.71. 

The largest single item of increase is that of income from gifts for spe- 
cial purposes. Income from this source for the year ending August 31, 1922. 

amounted to $130,702.75 

as against $39,229.23 

for the previous year, or an increase of $91,473.52 

Income from securities and other interest income shows a 
gain of $62,421.07 

Income from fees of all kinds, including tuition, incidental fees, laboratory 
fees, and gymnasium fees, shows a gain of $80,518.35 over the previous year. 



Report of the Comptroller 85 

and constitutes 28 1/10 per cent of the total budget income as against 27 1/10 
per cent for the previous year. 

The gain from fees is accounted for chiefly by the fact that students enter- 
ing the University after October 1, 1920, are paying $75 per quarter tuition as 
against $40 per quarter paid by students matriculating before that date. 

The total budget expenditures for the year amounted to $1,886,746.49 

showing an increase over the previous year of 153,310.57 

and after returning 9,549.28 

to Unappropriated Income of Special Endowments unexpended 

during the year, budget operations resulted in a surplus of 10,730.00 

as against an operating deficit for the previous year of 51,297.54 

After crediting this year's gain and making certain surplus adjust- 
ments arising from transactions carried over from previous years, the 
University still faces an accumulated deficit of $32,606.21 which it is hoped 
can be largely, if not entirely, liquidated during the coming year. 

The total budget expenditures were distribut-ed according to the purposes 
for which used, as follows : 

Tkeasitru's Office — 

Rent (Board of Trustees* and Treasurer's Detail Total 

Oflice) ^ $ 1,800.00 

Salaries, Qerks, Stenographers (Treasurer 

and Trustees receive no salaries) 5,190.81 

Expense 549.83 

Ugal Expense 2.917.55 

Audit Expense 1,626.72 

Taxes and Exp. Outside Properties 5,505.34 

Union Trust Co. — Custodian of Securities, 

2 years 7,020.00 



Total Budget Expenditures — 
Treasurer's Office $ 24,610.25 

CoMmotxEt's Office — 

Salaries (aside from those charged to ex- 
pense of operating income units, such as 
dormitories, etc.): 

Comptroller's Office $34,386.01 

Purchasing Office 2,527.75 

Engineer's Office 6,170.58 $ 43,084.34 



Supplies and Expense: 

Comptroller's Office $ 3,706.93 

Purchasing Office 833.08 

Engineer's Office 904.97 5,444.98 



Care and Maintenance of Educational 
Plant: 
Minor Repairs and Maintenance of 
Buildings: 

Campus $23,313.30 

Medical School— S. F 4.886.59 

Hopkins Marine Sution 334.63 

Lane Medical Library— S. F 84.94 28,619.46 



86 Stanford University 



Janitor Expense: 

Campus and Hopkins Marine Station. ...$22,463.09 

Lane Medical Library — S. F 2,334.10 

Medical School— S. F 5,208.53 30,005.72 

Heating Expense: 

Campus $56,757.19 

Medical School— S. F 5,770.40 

Lane Medical Library— S. F 1,924.32 

Hopkins Marine Station 68.80 64,520.71 

Maintenance of Grounds: 

General $34,665.98 

Streets, Walks and Roads (maint.) 2,494.40 37,160.38 

Light, Gas, Telephone (undistributed) : 

Light and Gas $ 5,301.71 

Telephone and Telegraph : 

Salaries $2,148.09 

W Service 675.59 2,823.68 8,125.39 

Insurance (undistributed) , 7,229.86 

Taxes on Campus and S. F. Educational 8,882,19 

Watchmen 6,627.06 

Electric Light System 814.57 

New Roads, Sewers, etc.: ^ 

Under Ground Telephone $ 105.22 

Water Supply System 28.01 

New Roads 3,670.01 

Buildings 115.00 

Electric Lighting System 273.49 4,191.73 

General Equipment and Furniture 4,243.68 

Payment of Interest and Principal on Bldg. 

Loan Fund 100,000.00 

Amortization of Bond Premiums 6,562.64 

General Expenses 3,964.51 

Palo Alto Farm — Taxes and Expense 23,553.73 

Stores Keeping 6,650.43 

Corporation Yard (Undistr. Overhead) 1,479.90 

Fire Department Exp. and Minor Equip 5,039.08 

New Fire Engine 10,412.93 

Constructing Women's Athletic Field 727.03 

Contribution towards Construction of Bas- 
ketball Pavilion 2,500.00 



Total Budget Expenditures — 

Comptroller 409.840.32 

Academic Expenditu«es — 

Academic Departments (Salaries, Equip- 
ment, and Expense) $1,438,015.92 

Pension Funds 11,780.00 

Contributed to Basketball Pavilion 2.500.00 



Total Budget Expenditures — 

Academic 1,452,295.92 



Total Budget Expenditures $1,886,746.49 



Report of the Comptroller 87 

The total sum of $1,452,295.92 expended through the academic adminis- 
trative offices and departments, for salaries, equipment, and expense, was 
distributed as follows : 

Admikistbative and Othek General Offices 

President's Office $ 30,033.55 

Registrar's Office 41,761.50 

Appointment Secretary 10,121.30 

Publications Committee 1,034.55 

Public Exercise Committee 2,050.39 

Dean of Men 6,081.76 

Dean of Women 5,227.68 

Lower Division 614.22 

Alumni Secretary 9,288.25 

Research Committee 2,008.01 

Graduate Study Committee 8,500.00 $116,721.21 

Gexual Accounts — 

Publicity $ 1,784.79 

University Scholarships 6,066.55 

Gift Scholarships 6,258.50 

Pension Fund 11,780.00 

Convention Traveling Expenses and 

Membership Dues 7,398.15 

Gifts, Fellowships 800.05 

Loss on Operation of Lane Hospital 51,763.81 

Basketball Pavilion Contribution 2,500.00 88.351.85 

LtDEPEMDEST DePAKT's AND DIVISIONS — 

University Libraries $ 87,737.46 

Une Medical Library— S. F 14,508.11 

Encina Gymnasium 36,414,22 

Roble Gymnasium 18,971.80 

University Museum 8.558.51 

Hopkins Marine Station 2,458.22 

Memorial Church 13,682.49 

Military Training 3,108.33 

Mimeograph and Stenog. Bureau — 442.37 

Mechanician Shop —65.18 184,931.59 $ 390.004.65 



I^STHVCTION AND RESEARCH SCHOOLS 

AND DePAXTMBNTS — 

School of Medicine: 

Medical School, San Francisco $141,140.23 

Medical School — Gifts for Specific 
Research 18.092.30 $159,232.53 

School of Uw 45,747.09 

Schod of Education 50,010.42 

Engineering Grcnip: 

Civil Engineering $ 34,651.06 

Electrical Engineering 17,806.93 

Mechanical Engineering 50,427.70 

Mining and Metallurgy 30,721.66 

<i«ology 32,333.08 165,940.43 



88 Stanford University 

Biological Group: 

Bacteriology $ 23,650.23 

BoUny 26,191.03 

Entomology 1,216.57 

Zoology 36,215.77 

Anatomy 32,466.09 

Physiology 25,260.10 144.999.79 

Languages — Ancient and Modern: 

English $ 62,952.93 

German 16,442.39 

Greek 10,909.86 

Latin 14.208.47 

Romanic 36,356.47 

Slavic 2,041.43 142,911.55 

History, Economics, and Pol. Sci.: 

History $ 38,658.26 

Economics 42,265.72 

Political Science 14,578.33 95,502.31 

Mathematics, Physics, and Chem.: 

Applied Mathematics $ 23,412.91 

Mathematics 15,406.00 

Physics 34,504.50 

Chemistry 70,061.00 143.384.41 

Psychology and Philosophy: 

Psychology $ 18,290.51 

Philosophy 9.056.57 27,347.08 975,075.61 

Endowsifnt Income Restrictei^^ 

Expended: 

Lane Medical Lectures $ 1,600.00 

West Memorial Lecture Fund 1,343.64 2,943.64 

Food Research Institute 51.399.88 

Special Contributions for Specific 
Research — 

Education : 

Stanford-Whitticr Fund $ 6,407.54 

Stanford-State Fund 3,889.59 

Commonwealth Fund 16,965.93 

Japanese Fund 4,679.61 $ 31,942.67 

Electrical Engineering: 

N. E. L. A. Insulator Test Fund $ 70.10 

1916 Insulator Test Fund 76.20 146.30 

Mining and Metallurgy: 

Oil Industry 783.17 32,872.14 

$1,452,295.92 

The total assets of the University, as of August 31. 1922, amounted to 
$35,800,499.91 an increase for the year of $687,870.43. 



Report of the Comptroller 89 

The principal increases in assets are as follows : 

Restricted endowments and special funds $210,525.31 

Endowments for plant 46,807.73 

Capital increase in existing endowment 163,967.12 

The capital increase being derived from : 

Profit from sale of securities $102,469.92 

Liquidation dividends on corporate stock 38,693.45 

Profit from sale of real estate 24,420.74 

$165,584.11 

Less decreases : 

Abandonment and removal of 530 feet 

of electric railway spur $ 1,516.99 

Write off of 8,000 shares lone Coal & 

Iron stock 100.00 1,616.99 

$163,967.12 

Attention should be called to the splendid work of Mr. Timothy Hop- 
kins, Treasurer, and the Investment Committee of the Board of Trustees, 
under whose direction transactions in investment securities during the year 
resulted in a gain of over $100,000 in endowments. The great bulk of the 
endowment is invested in long term, low-interest rate securities, which 
were turned over to the University as a part of the original Foundation. 
Over $10,800,000 of these securities bear 4 per cent or less, interest; and 
of this amount $4,550,000 bear 3j^ or less. The majority of the issues 
are of long maturity, ranging from thirty to ninety-nine years, and many 
issues were included in the original Foundation at a premium. The oppor- 
tunity for re -investment, therefore, is very limited, and the problem of 
increasing the average rate of return is a difficult one. Mr. Hopkins and 
the Investment Committee have made an exhaustive study of the securities 
and have devoted a great deal of time and energy to this problem. 

The average return on investments, as of August 31, 1922, was 4.3075 
per cent, as compared with 4.307 per cent for the previous year and 4.26 
per cent for 1920. 

SALE AND DEVELOPMENT OF REAL ESTATE 

Land values in the vicinity of the University have reached the point 
where it is good business for the University to sell such lands as can be 
disposed of and to invest the proceeds in securities. The University pays 
taxes on all its real property, except' 100 acres, exempted by law, but it 
does not pay taxes on its personal property and securities. It is, there- 
fore, to the advantage of the University to convert its land assets 
into securities whenever a good price can be obtained. While the Palo 
Alto Stock Farm proper, consisting of approximately 7,000 acres, is inalien- 
able under the terms of the Foundation Grant, there are certain other 
tracts adjoining the Stock Farm and comprising a total of approximately 
1.300 acres, which can be sold. Some of these tracts are detached from 
the Stanford Campus and are of no value from the standpoint of future 
development of the Campus. 



90 Stanford University 

The property sold during the past year consisted of a tract of forty 
acres lying between the State Highway and the railroad track, adjoining 
the Palo Alto Union High School on the south and the Town of Mayfield 
on the north. This property has been laid out as a high-class residence 
tract. The other parcel sold consisted of 2.66 acres lying between the 
State Highway and the railroad track and adjoining the Town of Menlo 
Park. 

About 100 acres of land belonging to the University is included within 
the corporate limits of the Town of Mayfield. With the improvement of 
the main street in Mayfield there has been a marked increase in the demand 
for Mayfield property. While this land is inalienable, there is no reason 
why it cannot be leased on long-term leases, and the Comptroller accord- 
ingly has been authorized to subdivide and lease this land on fifty-year- 
term leases at a rental which will yield the University 6 per cent net on a 
valuation to be determined upon. If this experiment proves successful, 
it is planned to subdivide additional acreages adjoining the town into one^ 
acre lots. 

ACCOUNTING AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

During the past year considerable time has been devoted to the installa- 
tion of an accounting system at the New Union, and the organization of 
a system of business management; also to the supervision of the account- 
ing and purchasing at the Palo Alto Hospital, which is owned by the City 
of Palo Alto, but managed by the University. 

Purchasing for the new Union dining halls, and for the Palo Alto 
Hospital has been handled by the Purchasing Agent at the Stanford Hos- 
pitals in San Francisco. The pooling of these purchases gives an added 
buying power and has resulted in considerable saving in the cost of sup- 
plies at the Union and at the Hospital. These new responsibilities, the 
handling of the endowment subscriptions and collections, and the normal 
growth in the University's various activities, have resulted in a tremendous 
increase in the work of the Comptroller's department. Some indication 
of this increase is found in the increase in the number of purchasing orders 
issued through the Campus Purchasing Department during the jear. In 
1920, 3,103 orders were issued, as against 5,000 in 1922, or a gain of approxi- 
mately 60 per cent. The increase in the number of purchasing orders 
issued through the Hospital Purchasing Department has been even greater. 

Detailed statements covering the University's assets and its financial 
operations for the year ending August 31, 1922, will be found in the tables 
appended to the Treasurer's and Comptroller's reports. 

A E. Roth, 

Comptroller. 



Report of the Comptroller 



91 



Index to Treasurer's and Comptroller's Financial Tables 



Schedule 

Assets— Investment — Analysis of E 

Balance Sheet — Consolidated A 

Balance Sheet — Divisional Al 

Balance Sheet — Current A2 

Bonds— Detail — Schedule of ...,. S 

Capital Increase Since Endowment — Analysis N 

Corporate Stock — Schedule of T 

Dividends T 

Expenditures — Analysis of I 

Educational Plant Assets — Detail of L 

Endowments and Restricted Funds — Schedule of M 

Gifts— Received and/or Expended P 

Hospitals — Income and Expenditures G 

Income — Analysis of F 

Income — Summary of Expend, and Surplus — Current B 

Income from Special Funds — Schedule of P 

Investment — Lands, Buildings, Equipment O 

Lands, Buildings and Equipment — Investment O 

Medical Division, S. F. — Income and Expenditures.... G 

Operations of Miscellaneous Income Units Jl 

Press — Departmental Operations Jl 

Plant Investment L 

Real Estate and Improvements O 

Scholarships P 

Securities S 

Stocks T 

Student Loans — Schedule of X 

Surplus ^ B 



Page 
66,67 

62. 63 ; 92, 93 

64, 65 ; 94. 95 

96,97 

73-82 

71 

83 

83 

103-107 

110-114 

68-70 

115-120 

102 

100, 101 

98,99 

115-120 

72 

72 

102 

108,109 

108 

110-114 

72 

llS-120 

73-82 

83 

121 

98,99 



[ 



Gifts to the University 123 



APPENDIX I 



GIFTS TO THE UNIVERSITY 



GENERAL 



From Mr. Cyril F. El well ('07), of London, England, $500 for the mainte- 
nance of the Cyril F. Elwell Scholarship in Electrical Engineering for 
the academic year 1921-22. 

From Mr. George E. Crothcrs (*95), of San Francisco, $200 for the mainte- 
nance of the Crothers Law Scholarship for the academic year 1922-23. 

From Miss Elizabeth M. Braly (ex-'%), of Pasadena, $300 for the mainte- 
nance of the Bertha Hyde Braley (*97) Scholarship for the academic 
year 1921-22. 

From Mrs. Alice Nagel McDowell C07), of Los Altos, $150 to maintain the 
Roble Qub Scholarship for the academic year 1921-22. 

From Mrs. Dorothy Davy Gross ('16), of San Jose, $150 to maintain the 
Wilmer J. Gross C16) Scholarship for the academic year 1921-22. 

From Miss Gertrude M. Gardiner, of Stanford University, $200 for the 
maintenance of the Gertrude M. (jardiner Scholarship for tlie academic 
year 1921-22. 

From Mrs. Lillian C. Metz, of Sherman, Texas, $20010 maintain the Dorothy 
M^ ('17) Scholarship for the academic year 1921-22. 

From Mr. and Mrs. Allan Love, of Prescott, Arizona, $150 for the mainte- 
nance of the Ernest A. Love (48) Scholarship for the academic year 
1921-22. 

From Miss Ray Weaver ('13), of Turlock, $150 for the maintenance of the 
William Irvin Weaver ('13) Scholarship for the academic year 1921-22. 

From Mme. Jeanne R. Rouiller, of Palo Alto, $160 to maintain the Marcelle 
Hcnriette Rouiller Calley ('16) Scholarship for the academic year 
1921-22. 

From Mr. Ira S. Lillick ('97), of San Francisco, $500 to maintain the Ira 
S. Lillick Scholarship in Law for the academic year 1921-22. 

From Mrs. Ira S. Lillick, of San Francisco, $500 for the maintenance of the 
Mrs. Ira S. Lillick Scholarship in Law for the academic year 1921-22. 

From Miss Emma Louise Martin ('97) and her sister, of New York City, 
$500 for the maintenan^ of the Mabel Hyde Cory ('96) Scholarship in 
History for the academic year 1921-22. 

From Professor Lionel Remond Lenox, of Stanford University, $600 to 
establish the Lionel Remond Lenox Fellowship in Chemistry for the 
academic year 1921-22. 



124 Stanford University 

From Associated Students, San Mateo Union High School, $300 for the 
maintenance of the San Mateo Union High School Regional Scholarship 
for the academic year 1921-22. 

From Mr. W. D. Fisk, of Green Bay, Wisconsin, $5000 for the endowment 
of the Hiram C. Fisk ('10) Scholarship. ^ 

From Mr. Henry G. Dodds, of San Jose, $3000 for the establishment and en- 
dowment of the Henry G. Dodds Scholarship. 

From Mrs. Bertha G. Sloss, of San Francisco, $5000 for the establishment 
and maintenance of the Leon Sloss Fund. 

From Mr. Herbert C. Hoover ('95), additional material for the Hoover 
War Library. The total amount now received on this gift is 
$53,483.34. 

From 1921 Senior Class, provision of fund of $50,000 by insurance of mem- 
bers, to be given to the University at the 25th anniversary of the gradua- 
tion of the class. 

From 1922 Senior Class, $878.15 for the erection of a fountain in the Stan- 
ford Union court. 

From the Seagrave Company, through it's Branch Manager, Mr. J. F. Crib- 
bins, of San Francisco, chassis and body of a Webb combination chem- 
ical and hose wagon. 

For the First Million of the Three Million For Stanford Campaign, 
$715,227.43 pledged, $87,361.85 received. 

For the Second Million, $710.00 pledged, $360.00 received. 

For the Third Million, $1,050.00 pledged, $350.00 received. 



BOTANY 



From Parke, Davis Company, of Detroit, Michigan, 70 boxes of crude drugs 

and crude vegetable dyes. 
From the Laboratory of Economic Botany, Technical College of Delft, 

Holland, standard collection of 75 specimens of crude fibres, sent by the 

Director, Dr. Van Iterson. 

Gifts to the Dudley Herbarium were as follows: 

Dr. L. R. Abrams, 125 specimens of California plants. 

Mr. Rimo Bacigalupi, Z7 specimens of California plants. 

J!)r. J. P. Baumberger, 1 specimen from Mojave, California. 

Mr. R. V. Bradshaw, 7 specimens, including 1 from Oregon and 6 culti- 
vated plants. 

Mr. Hale Burger, 1 specimen from Mendocino County. 

Mr. J. C. Chamberlin, 21 specimens from Bear Lake, Idaho. 

Mr. L. R. Cody, 18 specimens, including 4 from Mt. Lassen, 6 from Alaska 
and 8 cultivated plants. 

Mr. F. R. Cole, 1 specimen from the San Bernardino Mountains. 

Dr. A. Davidson, 9 specimens from Southern California. 

Mr. Tiochi Domoto, 3 specimens of cultivated plants. 

Mr. Carl D. Duncan, 300 specimens from the northern coast counties of 
California. 

Mrs. Roxana S. Ferris, 150 specimens of local plants. 



Gifts to the University 125 

Mr. B. F. Hake, 11 specimens from Lower California. 

Dr. W. L. Jepson, 43 specimens of California plants. 

Miss Edith Lang, 5 specimens of local plants. 

Mr. I. M. Johnson, 2 specimens from Southern California. 

Prof. J. I. W. McMurphy, 1 local plant. 

Mr. H. L. Mason, 160 specimens of California plants. 

Dr. P. A. Munz, 2 specimens of Southern California plants. 

Mr. W. E. Rankin, 8 specimens from Mt. Hamilton. 

Mrs. Bertha Rice, 3 plants from San Diego County. 

Mr. W. H. Rich, 1 specimen from Shasta County. 

Prof. C. P. Smith, 400 specimens from eastern United States. 

Miss Editha Vincent, 1 specimen from Sisters, Oregon. 

Miss Ruth Whitaker and Mr. Phimister Proctor, 1 local species of fungus. 

Mr. S. N. WyckoflF, 1 specimen from the Santa Lucia Mountains. 

Gifts to the Arboretum were as follows : 

Mr. John MacLaren. 125 trees and shrubs, representing about 50 exotic 
species. 

United States Department of Agriculture, Office of Seed and Plant Intro- 
duction, 18 species of exotic trees and shrubs. 



CHEMISTRY 

From Dr. William Freeman Snow ('96), of New York City, $150 for de- 
partmental needs. 



EDUCATION 



From Professor E. P. Cubberley, of Stanford University, $250, the third 
instalment in the maintenance of the research fellowship in problems re- 
lating to school administration. 

From Professor L. M. Terman, of Stanford University, $250, the third 
instalment in the maintenance of the research fellowship in the study 
of psychological and educational problems relating to gifted children. 

From Mrs. J. A. Sinclair, of San Francisco, and others, $36 for Dr. Terman's 
work on gifted children. 

From The Commonwealth Fund, $14,000 additional for the study of gifted 
childrea 

From Professor L. M. Terman, $20 for the study of gifted children. 

From the Japanese Association of America, $10,000 for a psychological and 
anthropological study of Japanese school children in California, under 
the direction of Professor Terman. 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

Anonymous gift of $735, for equipment. 

From the Colin B. Kennedy Company, of San Francisco, through Dr. L. F. 
Fuller, Ph. D. '19, and Mr. Harry J. Rathbun, . E. E. '20, a Universal 
radio receiving set with Two-stage amplifier, valued at $335. 



126 Stanford University 

GEOLOGY 

From the heirs of the late Orestes St. John, his collection of books, fossils, 
and rocks, including about 400 bound volumes and several thousrind 
specimens. 

From Mr. Henry C. Marcus, of San Francisco, mineralogical specimens and 
apparatus. 



LIBRARY 

From Mr. J. C. Cebrian, of San Francisco, 67 volumes of Spanish books. 
From the National University, Mexico City, Mexico, through Sr. Pedro 

Henriquez Urena, Director, 39 volumes. 
From Mr. Henry C. Marcus, of San Francisco, 120 volumes on mining and 

metallurgy. 
From Mrs. Grace Davis Booth (ex-'96), of San Francisco, $100 for the 

purchase of folders for the display and protection of the collection of 

Belgian War posters recently given by Mr. and Mrs. Booth. 
From the Estate of Thomas Welton Stanford, 256 volumes. 
From the Brazilian Minister of Foreign Affairs, collection of annual reports 

of the Minister of Foreign Affairs covering most of the period from 

1862-1920, 51 volumes, together with 169 volumes and pieces of other 

important documents. 
From the Carnegie Institution, Washington, D. C, publications purchased by 

the late Dr. George Hempl with fuhds provided by the Institution for 

assistance in his researches. 
From the Italian Society of America, at the instigation of Mr. Luigi Carno- 

vali, a volume reproducing the celebrated Codice Trivulziano, published 

in Milan under the official supervision of the Dante Society of Italy, 

valued at $500. 



MEDICAL SCHOOL 

From the National Canners' Association, $16,350 for the further study of 

botulism under the direction of Dr. E. C. Dickson. 
From the Canners' League of California, $500 for Dr. Dickson's study of 

botulism. 
From Mr. Mortimer R. Proctor, of Los Angeles, $100 for the work of Dr. 

A. B. Spalding in the Department of Gynecology. 
From Mr. Peter C. Bryce, of Santa Barbara, $1000 to the Free Bed account 

of the obstetrical ward. 
From Mrs. Sadie Dernham Patek ('11), of Stanford University, $10,000 to 

establish a loan fund for medical students, to be known as the Dr. Robert 

Patek Memorial Fund. 



ZOOLOGY 
Entomology and Bionomics 
From Sperry Flour Company, of San Francisco, $350 for the maintenance 
of the Sperry Scholarship for the academic year 1921-22. 



Gifts to the University 127 

MUSEUM 

From Mrs. Ewald Fliigel, of Berkeley, collection of plaster casts. 
From Mrs. George Hempl, of Palo Alto, Indian relics from Michigan. 
From Mr. M. S. Wilson, of San Francisco, fossils from Canada, ancient 

stone images from Mexico, and ancient jar from Peru. 
From Mrs. Harris J. Ryan, of Palo Alto, collection of early Pennsylvania 

articles. 
From Mr. A. M. Cleveland, of Camptonville, set of snowshoes for horses. 



APPOINTMENT OFFICE 

Gifts to the permanent equipment fund were as follows : 
Miss Eileen M. Roxburgh, of Gilroy, $1.50. 
Miss Lisette E. Fast, of Stanford University, $25. 
Senior students in the Department of Chemistry, $17. 

From Mr. Edwin Willimami, of Oakland, $25 for the endowment fund of 
the office. 



DEAN OF MEN'S LOAN FUND 

From Mr. J. D. Grant, of San Francisco, $50. 
From Mr. Henry G. Dodds, of San Jose, $100. 
Anonymous, $1300. 



LANE MEDICAL LIBRARY 

From California Organization for Federal Recognition of Women Physicians 
and others, through Dr. Louise B. Deal, of San Francisco, $700 to estab- 
lish an endowment fund to be known as the Dr. Julia P. Larson Memorial 
Section of the Lane Medical Library. 

From Dr. Adolph Barkan, $1,000, which is the third instalment on his gift 
of $1,000 per year for three years for the purchase of books dealing 
with the history of medicine. 

The Lane Medical Library is in receipt of a considerable number of books 
and reprints from members of the profession. Particularly noteworthy 
are the books and reprints received from Dr. Adolph Barkan, Dr. Fred 
R. De Lappe, Dr. H. C. McClenahan, Dr. Mary C. Taylor of Berkeley, 
and from various members of the Medical Faculty. 



LAW LIBRARY 

From the Juris Doctor 1911 Fund, purchase of 75 volumes on the subject 
of legal history. 



Departmental Reports 129 



APPENDIX II 



DEPARTMENTAL REPORTS 



ANATOMY 



During the academic year 1921-22 the teaching staff of the department 
consisted of Professors Frank Mace MacFarland, Arthur William Meyer, 
and Robert Bennett Bean, Acting Professor, during the spring quarter; 
Associate Professor Clara S. Stoltenberg, and Edward Allen Boyden, Acting 
Associate Professor during the winter and spring quarters. Assistant Pro- 
fessor Edgar Davidson Congdon was absent on sabbatical leave at the Car- 
negie Laboratory of Embryology, where he was engaged upon a study of 
the development of the human aortic arches. 

The added teaching consequent upon the increased enrollment in all 
branches of the department not only very materially reduced the time 
available for research but overburdened some of the staff with excessive 
hours and reduced the effectiveness of the teaching. This happened in spite 
of the fact that the department utilized a number of the abler students 
as teaching assistants, especially during the fall quarter. Although it is 
unlikely that an adequate staff can be secured for the coming year it is hoped 
that considerable relief can be obtained through some increase in the 
teaching force and, if necessary, by a wise selection and limitation of 
students. 

It is with the greatest pleasure that I report the donation by Professor 
S. S. Seward of the University of Sections 3 and 6, Stereoscopic Studies, Edin- 
burgh Anatomy, by Cunningham & Watt'erson. A Philippine skull was 
presented to the department by Professor Frank E. Blaisdell of our Medical 
School ; a disarticulated skull by Dr. Robert Alton Jones, and a very inter- 
esting Indian mandible by Mr. Francisco Leopoldo Gonzales, alumni of Stan- 
ford. It also is a great satisfaction to add that local and other physicians 
have continued to donate embryological specimens to the laboratory. 

The only animal experimentation done during the course of the year 
was in connection with investigations pursued by Miss Clark and Messrs. 
Kinney and Wood. These operations were done with every care under the 
customary conditions, upon guinea pigs, and have led to some additions to 
our knowledge of the various subjects under investigation. None but slightly 
untoward effects were encountered and these only in a few animals. Hence 
it is evident that there should be no cause for criticism of this work, upon 
humanitarian grounds. All of it was done only with the express permis- 
sion of the undersigned. 

Arthur William Meyer, 

Professor of Anatomy. 



130 Stanford University 

APPLIED MATHEMATICS 

The regular teaching staff of the department for the year consisted of 
Professors Leander Miller Hoskins, William Albert Manning, Halcott 
Cadwalader Moreno, and Sidney Dean Townley; and Instructor Leo Greg- 
ory Gianini. Class instruction was also given by Frederick Emmons Terman 
during the autumn and winter quarters and by Horace Edward Wheeler 
during the autumn, winter and summer quarters. 

The work of the department during the yesir has consisted mainly, as 
heretofore, in the conduct of courses constituting the basal mathematical 
preparation of student's intending to take engineering. These courses are now 
given according to a schedule which permits the student to enter upon this 
basal work in either the autumn or the winter quarter. 

During the summer classes were conducted in courses la, 2a and 2b, 
the numbers enrolled being 12, 19 and 36 as compared with 36, 14 and 12 for 
the preceding summer. Course 3b was also given with an attendance of 18. 
Some part of the demand for this summer work has undoubtedly been due to 
temporary conditions, so that it is still uncertain what permanent policy is 
desirable regarding the offering of summer courses. 

Leander Miller Hoskins, 
Professor of Applied Mathematics. 



BACTERIOLOGY AND EXPERIMENTAL PATHOLOGY 

The teaching staff for the academic year 1921-22 consisted of Professor 
Wilfred Hamilton Manwaring, Associate Professors William Ludlow HoU 
man and Edwin William Schultz. Technical Assistant, Doris E. Anderson ; 
Janitorial Assistant, J. Estes ; and the following part-time assistants : Alberta 
Marx, Selling Brill, and Wilfred S. Clark. 

Professor Manwaring, who has devoted his entire time to research, re- 
ports as follows: 

Field of Research : The application of physiological methods to im- 
munity problems. 

A. The following papers are now in press : 

1. W. H. Manwaring and Selling Brill : Vaso-motor reactions in the 

isolated canine liver. 

2. W. H. Manwaring and T. B. Williams: Reactions of the isolated 

rabbit heart to cobra venom. 

3. W. H. Manwaring and William Fritschen : Study of microbic-t issue 

affinity by perfusion methods. 

4. W. H. Manwaring, Selling Brill and Walter H. Boyd : The hepatic 

mechanical factor in peptone shock. 

5. W. H. Manwaring and Walter H. Boyd : Extra-hepatic mechanical 

reactions in peptone shock. 

B. The following papers are in preparation, experimental work to be com- 
pleted about November 1st : 

1. W. H. Manwaring and Wilfred S. Clark: The dominant reacting 
tissues in peptone shock. 



Departmental Reports 131 

2. W. H. Manwaring and William O. French : Reactions of the capil- 

lary endothelium in peptone shock. 

3. W. H. Manwaring and Walter H. Boyd: The endotheliotoxin of 

vibrio cholerae. 

4. W. H. Manwaring and Walter H. Boyd : The hemagglutmin and 

cardiotoxin of streptococcus hemolyticus. 

5. W. H. Manwaring and Walter H. Boyd: Serological and fixed- 

tissue adaptations to the streptococcus cardiotoxin. 

6. W. H. Manwaring and Haig M. Hosepian : Volumetric parenchy- 

matous reactions in peptone shock. 

7. W. H. Manwaring and S. Okami : The cardiotoxin of B. pyocyaneus. 
C. The following work is planned for the coming academic year : 

1. Physiological action of primarily toxic sera on isolated tissues and 

organs. 

2. Physiological analysis of the anaphylactic reaction in dogs. 

3. Study of bacterial toxins by means of isolated tissues and organs. 

4. Study of the antibacterial and antitoxic action of fixed tissues. 

The balance of the research conducted in the department during the year 
was as follows : 

W. L Holman and R. E. Miller : Relation of high blood sugar content 
to infection with certain bacteria. 

W. L. Holman and W. S. Clark : A very small gas forming anaerobe 
found normally in the mouth and in one case associated with gas in tissue. 

W. L. Holman and F. L. Gonzales : Study of Indol production and the 
use of the oxalic acid test based on the Gnezda reaction. 

W. L Holman and Dr. T. H. T. Wight of the Veterans' Hospital : The 
use of multiple indicators in the triple sugar medium. 

W. L Holman and C. A. Fernish: The feeding of guinea pigs with 
ipores of B. anthracis and the length of time the spores can be recovered 
from the feces. 

W. L Holman and W. J. Allexsaht : The factors which determine the 
nunimal lethal dose of B. anthracis. Probable importance of capsule forma- 
tion. 

W. L Holman and W. O. French : The effect of feeding lactose and B. 
acidophilus on the protozoal content of the intestines of white rats. 

W. 0. French and Dr. T. H. T. Wight of the Veterans' Hospital : Study 
of the cultural requirements of a ciliate easily confused with Balantidium 
minuttim. 

W. L Holman and W. S. Clark: Study of certain mechanical factors 
w determining the conditions for Anaerobic growth. 

W. L Holman : A modification of Hall's Anaerobic culture tube. J. A. 
M.A., 1922, 78, 1803. 

W. L Holman: Device for tubing cooked meat medium. (In press.) 

E- W. Schultz : Studies on regeneration of the liver. 

£. W. Schultz : Studies on Councilmania lafleuri (Kofoid). 

E. W. Schultz : On the pseudospirochaete derived from red blood cells. 



132 Stanford University 

E. W. Schultz: Studies on the etiology of Hodgkin's disease (Mayo 
Clinic). 

Dr. Schultz has spent the spring and summer quarters at the Mayo 
Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. 

WnxiAM Ludlow Holm an. 

Associate Professor of Bacteriology and 
Experimental Pathology. 



BOTANY 



During the last academic year the personnel of the Department of Botany 
has consisted of Professors Douglas Houghton Campbell, who has been on 
sabbatical leave, George James Peirce, LeRoy Abrams, Associate Professor 
Leonas Launcelot Burlingame, Assistant Professor James Ira Wilson Mc- 
Murphy, Instructor Lawrence Becking, and Assistants Mrs. Roxana Stinch- 
field Ferris, in the Herbarium, Miss Hester Davis and Herbert Mason in 
instruction. In addition to the usual courses a Seminar, attended by the 
staff and by the advanced student's, has been given, with the result that all 
have become more familiar with the various pieces of work going on in 
the department and with botanical literature and problems, and interest has 
been broadened and quickened. 

The department has been particularly fortunate in being able to secure the 
cooperation of Dr. Bradley Moore Davis, Stanford '92, Professor of Botany 
at the University of Michigan, who has given a course on the marine algae 
at the Hopkins Marine Station during the summer quarter. When an under- 
graduate. Dr. Davis made a very considerable collection of seaweeds at 
Pacific Grove. Specimens from this collection still form the principal and 
most valuable part of the preserved material at that Laboratory, and some 
specimens are in the collection on the campus. 

The first part of Professor Campbell's sabbatical year — from July to 
January — was spent in Australia, New Zealand, and Tahiti. Three months 
were spent in Australia, during which he visited most of the coastal region 
from North Queensland to West Australia, making a study of the vegeta- 
tion in connection with his studies of the distribution of the Pacific floras. 
The North and South Islands of New Zealand were also visited, with very 
satisfactory results in the way of specimens, photographs, and valuable notes. 
Comparatively little was done in Tahiti, owing to the great difficulty of get- 
ting about in the island. On his return Professor Campbell spent two 
months at the University, putting his notes into shape, and then he went east 
for three months. Some botanical work was done in Southern Florida, and 
in Washington he attended the annual meeting of the National Academy of 
Sciences, reading a paper on the Australian flora. He also went to Phila- 
delphia for the annual meeting of the American Philosophical Society. He 
has completed and sent forward two of a series of three papers on the dis- 
tribution of the Australian vegetation, to appear shortly in the American 
Journal of Botany. Another, more general, paper on the same subject, has 
just been completed for the Scientific Monthly. A paper on the develop- 



Departmental Reports 133 

ment of Botrychitxm simplex is now in press and will appear in the Annals 
of Botany. 

Professor Peirce has written several chapters in the forthcoming "Gen- 
eral Biology/' published by Holt & Company, of which Messrs. Burlingame, 
Heath, Martin, and Peirce are joint authors. This book will serve as a text- 
book for the course in General Biology given by them and others in the 
Lower Division, and it is hoped that it will be accepted elsewhere as a step 
in advance of the elementary instruction in biological subjects now offered. 
He has proceeded with the preparation of his book on the physiology of 
plants, and has done some minor writing otherwise. 

Professor Abrams has continued his preparation of an Illustrated Flora 
of the Pacific States. During the summer quarter he conducted a class of 
ad\'anced students on a field trip through nort(iern California, Oregon and 
Washington. Special studies were made of the principal forest trees, and 
about 6.000 herbarium specimens were obtained. As a member of the 
Committee on Nomenclature of the Botanical Society of America he has 
helped prepare a code that is now being used as a basis for a new international 
code of botanical nomenclature. 

Professor Abrams reports also, as Curator of the Dudley Herbarium, 
that it has been the recipient of gifts from twenty-seven former students 
and friends. These gifts total 1,328 specimens. Valuable additions were 
made tu the herbarium by a collecting expedition to the arid southwest 
Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Ferris and Mr. Carl D. Duncan spent eleven weeks in 
the field, bringing back approximately 4,000 herbarium specimens, and seeds 
of a number of trees and shrubs for the arboretum. The mounted collections 
have been increased by 10,232 specimens and now total 123,626, exclusive of 
the cryptogamic collections. 

Through the cooperation of the Comptroller's Office and the Depart- 
ment of Botany a comprehensive planting plan is being developed for the 
Arboretum and university grounds. The value of a working plan is already 
obvious in the improved appearance of the campus. Considerable material of 
exotic and native species has been added to the nursery stock, and planting 
has been undertaken especially in the area about the Mausoleum. One of the 
most interesting planting operations has been the successful moving of 
thirty five-year-old live oaks from the Arboretum to the Stanford Union 
and the President's House. 

Mr. W. F. Wight*, who is in charge of fruit breeding and taxonomic in- 
vestigations for the United States Department of Agriculture, has been 
granted a tract of land on the campus. Mr. Wight will make Stanford his 
headquarters and is preparing to undertake extensive fruit breeding experi- 
ments with the cooperation of the Department of Botany. 

Associate Professor Burlingame has continued his experimental work with 
Clarkia elegans with the assistance of Miss Hester Davis, Mr. Harry Borth- 
wick, and Mr. L. S. Baker. With Miss Davis a study of mitosis in the root 
tip has been carried out, a part of the results of which have be^en submitted 
by Miss Davis as a Master of Arts thesis. A fuller account of the work, 
with her collaboration, is shortly to appear in "Science." In the experi- 



134 Stanford University 

mental garden, with the assistance of Messrs. Borthwick and Baker, about 
5,000 plants have been grown and studied. The results have added further 
confirmation to those already obtained in respect to the inheritance of the al- 
ready known mutations and have added two new mutants. These results 
show that all the genes so far studied belong to two linkage groups, which 
is in conformity with the c3rtologicaI results, where the investigations so far 
carried out have disclosed but two pairs of chromosomes. The experimental 
data gathered in the garden during the past five years will presently be pub- 
lished as a monograph. In addition to these researches and the regular 
teaching schedule he has directed the work in General Biology, has acted as 
editor for the text in General Biology under the joint authorship of Pro- 
fessors Burlingame, Heath, Martin, and Peirce. This text will appear this 
fall from the press of Henry Holt & Co., New York. 

Assistant Professor McMurphy has continued his study of the local 
fungi and plant diseases, and has made some additions to the mycological and 
ph3rtopathological collections. At the meeting of the Pacific Division of the 
American Phytopathological Society in Salt Lake City in June he presented 
a paper on Synchytrium. In his part of the experimental garden he is cul- 
tivating, as laboratory material and otherwise, as many as possible of the 
local plant diseases, so that the causative organisms may be studied alive 
and the methods of prevention, treatment, and cure worked out by his 
students. 

Dr. Becking was on leave of absence during the fall quarter, which he 
spent in Holland. In October he obtained the degree of Doctor of Science, 
cum laude, from the University of Utrecht, his thesis subject being "Radia- 
tion and Vital Phenomena.'* While in Holland he lectured before the Botan- 
ical Society on Measurements of Enzym Activity; at the Annual Meeting 
of the Science Society of Holland on Physiological Physics; at the joint 
meeting of the Botanical and Zoological Societies on the Chromosome Theory 
of Heredity. His Stanford thesis for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy, 
on Botrychium, appeared in the Recueil des Travaux Botaniques Neer- 
landaises. On his way back to Stanford he visited the Royal Botanical 
Gardens at Kew and obtained seed lists from several other European Botan- 
ical Gardens. During the winter quarter, while giving a course on the fresh 
water algae (Botany 2) he and his class studied the microflora of Searsville 
Lake. Through the cooperation of Mr. Roth, the Comptroller, a collapsi- 
ble boat was obtained, thus making possible the effective study of this res- 
ervoir which proves to be particularly rich in plants and animals of bio- 
logical interest. Dr. Becking's own studies have resulted in a paper on 
"Sulphur bacteria in fresh water and in brine," which was read at the Salt 
Lake City Meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of 
Science and affiliated societies. Another paper, on enzyme determination, 
appeared in the Journal of General Physiology. 

Three members of this department, Messrs. Abrams, Burlingame, and 
Peirce, have cooperated with others in the conduct of the new course in 
General Biology. This course, based on the idea of studying living organ- 
isms alive, and including in its range man as well as the other constituents of 



Departmental Reports 135 

Nature, represents an attempt to present to the minds of educated and in- 
telligent persons true general conceptions as to themselves and other living 
things. 

The advanced students of the department have worked on the following 
subjects : 

Mrs. Roxana S. Ferris, Assistant in the Dudley Herbarium, has con- 
tinued her studies of the local flora and has classified the collection which 
she and Professor Ferris of the Division of Entomology made last summer 
in the arid southwest. 

Olenus Lee Sponsler presented as a Doctor's thesis a paper on his study 
of the structure of starch grains as shown by applying X-ray photography 
to the problem. He passed the examination for the degree in December and 
has continued his studies throughout the year, aided by appointment as Uni- 
versity Fellow. He leaves us to go to the Southern Branch of the University 
of California, in Los Angeles, as Instructor in Botany. 

Robert Vernon Bradshaw has completed a paper on the Pacific G>ast spe- 
cies of Lathyrus. 

Helen Lois Dale has continued her studies of the Caryophyllacae. 

Dr. Sponsler and Harry A. Borthwick continued their work on the salt 
requirements of cultivated plants, especially wheat, with results which will 
be published later. 

Leland Stanford Baker finished a thesis for the degree of Master of 
Arts, "A Preliminary Study of the Growth of Green Algae." Hilarian S. 
Silayan has begun a study of tlie conditions of germination of rice and its 
usual associates in California, and will pursue his enquiries further both in the 
field and in this laboratory. 

George James Peirce, 
Professor of Botany and Plant Physiology. 



CHEMISTRY 



The teaching staff of the department for the present academic year con- 
sisted of Edward Curtis Franklin, Lionel Remond Lenox, John Pearce 
Mitchell, Robert Eckles Swain, Stewart Woodford Young, professors; Al- 
bert Frederick Germann and William Henry Sloan, assistant professors; 
Florian Anton Cajori, Charles Doak Lowry, Jr., George Sutton Parks, 
Norris Watson Rakestraw, and John Russell, instructors; and Alanson 
Wood McDermoth and Robert Nicholas Wenzel, Teaching Fellows. 

Francis William Bergstrom (Ph. D. 1921) has pursued research work 
under a research fellowship awarded him by the National Research Council. 
The Lionel Remond Lenox Fellowship has been held by Robert John Cross 
(A.B. 1911; A.M. 1920) ; the John Maxson Stillman Scholarship by Francis 
Albert Smith (A.B. June, 1922) ; and the William Irvin Weaver Scholar- 
ship by Charles Drabkin (A.B. Jan. 1922). 

Professor Franklin has in progress work of research on dicyanamide 
with Mr. W. L. Burdick; and on chaulmoogra oil with Mr. T. Hashimoto. 
Papers covering investigations on hydrocyanic acid, an ammono carbonous 



136 Stanford University 

acid, and an ammono formaldehyde are in manuscript; and one on the am- 
mono carbonic acids has been published during the year. He has in 
preparation a book on the ammonia system of compounds, which will be 
issued as a series of monographs on chemistry by the American Chemical 
Society. Professor Franklin has been elected President of the Pacific 
Division of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and 
Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Science. He has been under 
appointment as Acting Professor of Chemistry at the University of Chi- 
cago for the second term of the summer quarter. 

Professor Young has completed with Miss I. P. Baughman an investiga- 
tion of the tannin-gelatine reaction; and has undertaken work of research 
with Messrs. A. W. McDermoth and R. A. Montague on the corrosion of ad- 
miralty metal ; with Mr. L. J. Pierce on the chemistry of a high-frequency 
arc; with Mr. W. A. Craig on the thermal decomposition of sodium nitrate: 
with Messrs. E. L. Harker and C. O. Blackburn on.the distillation of Nevada 
oil shales; with Mr. Duncan Stewart on the setting of plaster of paris; 
with Mr. O. W. Johnson on the rate of combustion of alcohol-air mixtures ; 
with Mr. M. K. Rouse on the system lead oxide-lead chloride; with Mr. E. 
F. Demond on the vapor pressure of gasoline blends; with Mr. K. T. Iseri 
on Sorel cements ; with Mr. C. W. Starkey on the electrolytic production of 
basic nickel sulphate; with Mr. P. M. Merncr on the clarification of fruit 
juices; and with Mr. L. H. Cook on the electrolytic conductivity of boiler 
waters. 

Professor Swain, in collaboration with Mr. Rakestraw, assisted by Mr. T. 
P. Hughes, concluded this summer a study of the composition of the body 
fluids of the stellar sea lions of Ano Nuevo Island; with Mr. R. J. Cross 
has made a comparative study of the amino acid content of flood fibrin from 
the whale and sea lion; and with Miss Adella Cook and Mr. F. B. Fitch 
has studied the composition of the ash of various marine and land animals. 
He attended the semiannual meetings of the American Chemical Society at 
.New York and Birmingham and has served as a member of the Committee 
on Progress in Society Procedure and on the Adoption of the Metric Sys- 
tem of the national organization. He has been appointed by Columbia Uni- 
versity to give the annual lecture for 1922 under the William Frederick 
Chandler Foundation. 

Professor Sloan has begun a comprehensive study of the composition of 
the well waters of the San Francisco Bay region, more especially with rela- 
tion to seasonal variations. 

Professor Germann has in progress an investigation of the properties of 
phosgene, in active cooperation with the United States Chemical Warfare 
Service. 

Mr. Cajori has published during the year two papers on the nutritive 
properties of nuts, and during the spring quarter worked in the Coastal 
Laboratory of the Carnegie Institution of Washington at Carmel in col- 
laboration with Dr. H. A. Spoehr on a method for determining individual 
sugars when several sugars occur in small amounts, as in leaf extracts. 
The problem and the results obtained are of much importance in connection 
with the study of the photosynthetic process in plants. 



Departmental Reports 137 

Mr. Parks has continued his work on the specific heat of organic com- 
pounds at various temperatures for use, in combination with heats of com- 
bustion, in calculating the free energies of these compounds. With Mr. J. 
R. Schwenck he has made an investigation of the properties of mixtures of 
ethyl and propyl alcohols, and with Mr. M. A. Bird has determined the melt- 
ing points of a number of organic compounds which freeze at low tempera- 
tures. 

Mr. Rakestraw has developed a method for the determination of phenol 
in connection with his work on the composition of the blood. During the win- 
ter and spring quarters, at the invitation of the San Jose Teachers College, 
he undertook the organization and general direction of their instruction in 
chemistry; and in the last three-quarters gave* at the State Teachers College 
in San Francisco a course of lectures, convening one evening weekly, on 
special topics in the physical sciences. 

Mr. Russell, with the assistance of Mr. W. E. Sullivan, has in progress 
a scries of investigations of the physical properties of binary mixtures, with 
a view to applying more rigid tests to the laws of concentrated solutions. 

Mr. Bergstrom, in collaboration with Professor Franklin, has continued 
through the year his work as Research Fellow of the National Research Coun- 
cil, studying particularly reactions of salts, and of cobalt and iron, in liquid 
ammonia, the double cyanides of aluminium and manganese with mercury, 
and the acid properties of ammonium salts dissolved in liquid ammonia. 

At the close of the last academic year Professor Lenox founded a fel- 
lowship in Chemistry to be awarded upon the nomination of the Depart- 
ment Faculty to any graduate of Stanford University, or to a graduate of 
any University of recognized rank who has completed at least one year of 
graduate work in Chemistry at Stanford University. The appointee must 
be a candidate for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Chemistry, of good 
moral character, and excellent scholarship. This fellowship has been desig- 
nated by the University as the Lionel Remond Lenox Fellowship. It is 
appropriate to mention in connection with this generous gift that with the 
present year Professor Lenox has concluded his thirtieth year of continuous 
service as a member of the staff of this department. 

I wish here to make appreciative acknowledgment of a gift of $150 from 
Dr. William Freeman Snow of the class of '96, in addition to his generous 
contributions of the past two years. Following the expressed desire of the 
donor, this was set aside for the support of the extended studies Dr. Still- 
nun is making on the early history of Chemistry. 

I regret to have to record the resignation of Dr. F. A. Cajori. Instructor 
in Biochemistry, who leaves to accept a position as research chemist in the 
Presbyterian Hospital in Philadelphia. 

During the winter quarter, at the invitation of this department, Dr. Carl 
L Alsbcrg of the Food Research Institute gave a lecture course on the 
Chemistry of Nutrition. Lectures were also given during the year on 
various subjects by Dr. Arthur Lachman of the University of California; 
Dr. Ludwig Rosenstein of the Western Electrochemical Company ; Dr. Harry 
W. Morse (Stanford '97), Consulting Chemist of San Francisco; Mr. 



138 Stanford University 

Zeno Ostenberg (Stanford '13), of the Caltex Company, San Jose; and by 
Dr. George R. Cowgill (Stanford '15), Instructor in Biochemistry at Yale. 

Robert Eckles Swain, 
Professor of Chemistry. 



CIVIL ENGINEERING 

The work of the department of Civil Engineering during the year 
1921-22 has followed its normal course. The faculty has consisted of Pro- 
fessors Marx, Wing and Fish, Associate Professor Cutter, who 'has liandted 
the work in Descriptive (Geometry, and Assistant Professors Moser and 
Thomas, with a number of student assistants. 

No addition to the teaching staff was found necessar>% and the allot- 
ment for maintenance of our material equipment was sufficient. We are 
now well supplied with instruments for teaching the courses required of 
our undergraduates, especially as there has been a falling off in the number of 
students registering in civil engineering. This is due no doubt to the lack 
of employment, during the past two years, of the members of the profes- 
sion in actual practice, and we probably will see a change as times change 
for the better. The students, as in former years, have been earnest and in- 
terested in their work and, while there is this decrease in numbers, there is 
no decrease in the quality of the graduates. 

Charles David Marx, 
Professor of Civil Engineering. 



CLASSICAL LITERATURE 

The merging of the two departments of Greek and Latin was effected 
during the past year. The faculty in Greek consisted of Augustus Taber 
Murray, professor; Ernest Whitney Martin, associate professor, and Mrs. 
Hallie Watters and Miss Hazel Hansen, assistants in instruction. The 
faculty in Latin consisted of Henry Rushton Fairclough, professor ; Jeffer- 
son Elmore and Benjamin Oliver Foster, associate professors, and F. L. 
Hadsel and Mrs. Mary W. Kraemer, assistants in instruction. Mr. Hadsel 
is professor of Latin in Miami College, Ohio, and came to Stanford for 
the year to get graduate instruction in Latin. Mrs. Kraemer came to take 
similar work in the summer quarter, and also gave some important courses 
of instruction. 

Dr. Murray was absent in the third quarter in order to complete his 
work on Homer for the Loeb Classical Library before proceeding to 
Greece, where he was to act as annual professor in the American School 
of Classical Studies. Dr. Foster was absent on leave during the first 
quarter; Dr. Elmore during the second; Dr. Fairclough during the third. 
The summer work was conducted by Dr. Martin in Greek and Dr. Fair- 
clough in Latin, with the assistance of Mrs. Kraemer. 

In regard to scholarly work which has been engaged in by members of 
the department, besides Professor Murray's work on Homer, I should men- 



Departmental Reports 139 

tion the important contribution made by Professor Elmore on "The Pur- 
pose of the Decern viral Legislation/' published in Classical Philology, 
April, 1922. Professor Elmore has endeavored to show that the so-<:alled 
Law of the Twelve Tables was really the municipal charter of the city of 
Rome, an idea which has never before been advanced, and which will 
probably be widely accepted by historians. Dr. Elmore is also working in 
collaboration with Professor Oliver M. Johnston on a French Grammar, 
of which the first part, now nearly complete, is intended for schools and 
colleges, while the second part, intended for teachers, will contain the 
results of considerable research. Inasmuch as French syntax is unques- 
tionably for the most part an outgrowth of Latin syntax, this grammar 
will be an excellent illustration of the way in which allied departments 
in a university may cooperate. Professor Foster is now reading the proof 
of the third volume of his "Livy," appearing in the Loeb Classical Library, 
which covers the Seventh Book of Livy's Histories. He is also engaged 
in preparation of the fourth volume. Professor Fairclough has been 
invited to prepare the second volume of /'Horace" in the same series, and 
also to prepare a volume in the series known as "Our Debt to Greece and 
Rome," published by the Marshall Jones Company, Boston, Massachusetts. 

In regard to the summer quarter, I would urge that more publicity be 
given to the work done by Stanford at this time. It seems to me that 
here we have an opportunity to emphasize research work, which I should 
like to see promoted among graduate students. Our classes in the recent 
summer quarter, though small, were of excellent material, and I was very 
glad that we were able to offer a course in Latin Grammar in its relation 
to Spanish, which I hope will be continued in the next summer session. 

The merging of the two departments of Greek and Latin will result 
in more concentration and will enable each instructor to follow up his 
own interests in ancient civilization without regard to a more or less 
artificial division into Greek and Latin. 

Henky Rushton Fairclough, 
Professor of Classical Literature. 



ECONOMICS 



Daring the year just closed the instructing staff in Economics consisted of 
Murray Shipley Wildman, Albert Conser Whitaker, Walter Greenwood 
Beach, professors; Eliot Grinnell Mears (winter and spring), Harley L. 
Lutz (summer) y acting professors; Alonzo Englehert Taylor, director of 
food research; John Bennet Canning, assistant professor; Margaret Mul- 
ford Lothrop, Nathaniel Sanders, instructors; Francis W. Hirst, lecturer; 
Clinton Fisk Wells, Susan Sophia Burr, Edward H. Van Winkle, teaching 
assistants. 

In the autumn quarter Mr. Francis W. Hirst, of London, gave a course 
of lediares on the financial conditions of European nations following the 
war. The course was open for credit to advanced students of all depart- 
inents and was largely attended by the general public. 



140 Stanford University 

Mr. Eliot G. Mears gave courses during the winter and spring quarters 
on the subjects of economic resources, marketing, and foreign trade. He has 
been engaged to give similar courses next' year. 

• During the summer of 1922 Professor Harley L. Lutz of Oberlin Col- 
lege gave courses in public finance and financial history of the United States. 

Arrangements have been made by which qualified graduate students of 
this department may conduct investigations under the direction of the Food 
Research Institute and members of that organization will give courses to 
which our students will be admitted for credit. Similar cooperative arrange- 
ments have been made with the California Juvenile Research Bureau which 
is conducted in connection with the Whittier State School for delinquent 
children. Students preparing for social service will have an exceptionally 
good opportunity to work under joint direction of members of this depart- 
ment and officers of the Whittier school with laboratory conditions. 

Mr. Jones was appointed a member of the National Council of the 
National Economic League. 

Mr. Beach has been engaged in an investigation of the alien popula- 
tion of San Francisco at the request of the United States Bureau of Natu- 
ralization. 

Mr. Canning was appointed by the California State Board of Account- 
ancy to make the official solutions of problems in the state examinations 
for Certified Public Accountant. 

Miss Lothrop was appointed to prepare schedules for the state super- 
visor of attendance in the study of the children of migratory workers; 
also in the registration of minors in California. She also assisted the 
Social Service Commission of San Mateo County in an investigation of 
sanitary and home conditions. 

Mr. Mears was elected director-at-large of the American Chamber of 
Commerce for the Levant; also National Councillor of the National Eco- 
nomic League. He was selected as a specialist in marketing in the conduct 
of extension courses by the American Institute of Agriculture. 

Mr. Wildman was appointed on the Land Settlement Advisory Com- 
mittee of the California Development Association; also on the Advisory 
Committee of the Peninsular Bureau of Chambers of Commerce. He con- 
tinues service on the Committee on Statistics and Standards of the United 
States Chamber of Commerce. 

Publications of members of the department are listed in another place. 

Murray Shipley Wildman, 

Professor of Economics. 



EDUCATION 



During the year 1921-22 instruction was given by Ell wood Patterson 
Cubberley, Truman Lee Kelley, Jesse Brundage Sears, and Lewis Madison 
Terman, professors; Percy Erwin Davidson and William Martin Proctor, 
associate professors ; and Giles Murrel Ruch, instructor. During the summer 
quarter additional assistance in instruction was given by John Oscar Creager, 



Departmental Reports 141 

Dean of the School of Education of the University of Arizona, and Calvin 
Olio Davis, professor of secondary education in the University of Michigan, 
as acting professors ; J. Harold Williams, editor of the Journal of Delin- 
quency and Director of the California Bureau of Juvenile Research, and 
Ben D. Wood, assistant to the Dean of Columbia College, as acting assist- 
ant professors; and Melvin Lloyd Darsie, of the Southern Branch of the 
University of California, and Giles Murrel Ruch of the University of Ore- 
Z^ Ron as instructors. Miss Dorothy Putnam continued as Secretary of the 
School of Education, and also, with the assistance of Mrs. David Evans, 
as departmental librarian. 

During the year Albert S. Raubenheimer served as fellow on the Buckel 
Foundation, Giles Murrel Ruch as research fellow in the study of excep- 
tional children, and John Conrad Almack as teaching fellow in school ad- 
ministration. 

During the spring and summer quarters, as well as the autumn quarter 
of the coming year. Professor Kelley has been absent on leave for study, 
spending the time in Lx>ndon working with Karl Pearson, and during the 
summer quarter Professor Proctor taught at Harvard University. At the 
close of the year Professor Terman was made professor of psychology at 
Stanford, succeeding Professor Angell, and was transferred to that de- 
partment The courses in educational psychology and intelligence testing 
which he formerly gave in the education department will still be listed 
and counted as work in education as well as in psychology. 

During the year Professor Cubberley made two trips to New York to 
attend meetings of the National Finance Inquiry Commission, of which he is 
a member, and at the same time attended meetings of the Advisory Com- 
mittee on Educational Research of the Commonwealth Fund, of which he 
is also a member. At the second of these meetings an additional grant of 
$14,000 was made by the Commonwealth Fund to Stanford University for 
the continuation of the research on superior children, being carried on un- 
der the direction of Professor Terman. During one of these trips Pro- 
fessor Cubberley also made addresses before conventions of teachers in 
Florida. Virginia, Springfield, Mass., and Detroit, Michigan, and to edu- 
cational conferences at Teachers College, New York, and the University of 
Illinois. He also met with the Educational Code Commission for Illinois 
for three days as adviser on educational legislation. Professor Cubberley 
during the year completed work on a book on The School Principal, and 
made revisions of two of his previous educational textbooks. , 

Professor Terman devoted a large proportion of his time for the year 
in the direction, with the assistance of Professor Kelley, of three researches 
financed by special grants to the university. The study of gifted children, 
for which $20,300, was received from the Commonwealth Fund, was continued 
throughout the year. Approximately 1,000 very superior children were 
located by field assistants, and a large amount of educational and mental 
test data were secured for the greater number of these. The task of sum- 
marizing this material was begun on July 1, 1922, and will continue for sev- 
eral months. An additional grant of $14,000 has been made to the univer- 



142 Stanford University 

sity by the Directors of the Commonwealth Fund for the purpose of extend- 
ing this investigation so as to permit the collection of medical, anthropo- 
metic, and more complete psychological data on the subjects already located. 
Stanford University has agreed to supplement this second grant by $8,000 
in money and $6,000 in services. The two years of work will therefore 
involve the expenditure of $42,500 in money, of which $34,300 has been con- 
tributed from the Commonwealth Fund. Research assistants in this work 
for 1922-23 include Mr. A. S. Raubenheimer, Miss Florence Goodenough. 
Miss Helen Marshall, Mrs. Jennie B. Wyman, Miss Catharine Cox, and 
Miss Lela Gillan. The study has attracted wide attention. 

Under the direction of Professors Terman and Kelley, and with the 
cooperation of Dr. J. Harold Williams, work continued throughout the year 
on the study of character traits predisposing to juvenile delinquency. This 
research was made possible by a grant of $10,000 from the United States 
Interdepartmental Social Hygiene Board. It is being carried out by Mr. 
Vernon L. Cady, and will be completed by December, 1922. The most 
important result of the study is a series of four mental tests which have 
been demonstrated to have a certain amount of validity in identifying children 
who tend to become delinquent. 

The investigational methods in social hygiene, mentioned in last year's 
report, and made possible by another grant of $10,000 from the United States 
Interdepartmental Social Hygiene Board, was practically completed by the 
end of the academic year. The work was under the general direction of 
Professor Terman. One division of it involved the giving of brief courses 
by Mrs. Bertha Chapman Cady in four of the California Teachers Colleges 
for the purpose of demonstrating methods of social hygiene instruction. 
Another division involved the preparation of an extended personal hygiene 
syllabus by Mr. Clark Hetherington, for use in the public schools. 

Through the cooperation of the Japanese Association of America, a fund 
of approximately $5,000 was made available for study of the intelligence of 
Japanese school children. Under the direction of Professor Terman, and 
assisted by a number of field workers, Mr. M. L. Darsie gave the greater 
part of his time to this research from January 1 to August 31, 1922. Ex- 
tensive data were secured for approximately 600 unselected Japanese children, 
ages 11 to 14, in various parts of California. The report of the study 
will be completed early in 1923. 

During the year Professors Kelley and Terman, assisted by Mr. G. M. 
Ruch, arranged, validated and prepared for publication the Stanford Ackin*e- 
vient Test. This is a standardized "educational test," designed for use in 
the classification of school children, of grades 2 to 8, for purposes of in- 
struction. The task was made possible by the financial assistance of Caspar 
W. Hodgson, of the World Book Company. 

In December Professor Terman attended the Princeton meeting of the 
American Psychological Association, of which he is councillor. In April 
he attended the regular meeting of the National Research Council, as mem- 
ber of the Division of Anthropology and Psychology. While in the east at 
that time he gave two lectures before the graduate school at Ohio State 



Departmental Reports 143 

University, three before the Iowa Educational Conference, at the University 
of Iowa, two before the teachers of Denver, Colorado. In June he lec- 
tured for one week at the State Agricultural College, Logan, Utah, and 
for two weeks at the State Teachers College, Greeley, Colorado. 

The transfer of Professor Ternian to the headship of the department of 
psychology, which occurred at the close of the academic year, will insure 
the effective cooperation of the departments of psychology and education in 
training gradtiate students for educational research and for academic posi- 
tions in education and psychology. 

Professor Sears returned to work at the university in January, after an 
absence of more than a year as visiting professor at the University of Min- 
nesota. During the autumn of 1921 he served as special research assistant 
there to President Coffman in the conduct of a survey of the income, ex- 
penditures, educational service, and needs of the University of Minnesota, 

* 

that detailed and accurate answers to the inquiries of a state legislative 
commission might be made. Professor Sears conducted the inquiry and pre- 
pared three volumes in answer to the questions enumerated above. 

During the year Professor Proctor continued in part to act as co-ordina- 
tor for the Federal Board for Vocational Education at the University, 
though in process of turning this work over to one of the graduate stu- 
dents in education, Mr. Thomas W. MacQuarrie, to handle in the future. 
During the summer quarter Professor Proctor conducted courses in the 
School of Education of Harvard University. 

During the year 1921-22 graduate students in Education were granted 
27 of the 76 degrees of Master of Arts conferred by the University. Of 
the 27, but 5 had received the A.B. degree here, and 17 of the 27 had come 
from outside California to Stanford for graduate study. 

In' the summer quarter of 1922 more advanced students were enrolled 
in the work in Education than in any preceding summer, as the following 
comparative table will show : 

STUDENTS REGISTERED IN EDUCATION 

(Not including Graphic Arts.) 

1920 1921 1922 

Total number 101 142 136 

Held the A.B. degree 54 65 92 

Held the A.M. degree 9 16 24 

The steady increase in the number of students of graduate standing is 
gratifying. A good number of those coming for summer quarter work re- 
main for the regular work of the following year. 

Ellwood Patterson Cubberley, 

Professor of Education 
and Dean of the School of Education. 



Division of Graphic Art 

The teaching staff for the year consisted of Arthur Bridgman Clark, 
professor, Mrs. Chloe Lesley Starks, assistant professor, Mr. Emil Grebs, 
lecturer, and Miss Janice Dunker, student assistant in practise teaching. 



144 Stanford University 

Art teaching throughout the public schools of the country has been en- 
riched notably in recent years, and while the work of this division in 
Stanford has been marked by no notable achievement during the year it has, in 
each course of instruction offered, attained growth and enrichment. This 
has been notiably evident in Professor Starks's courses in color design and its 
applications in both textile decorations and in landscape drawing; also in 
Professor Qark's course for intending teachers of art, in which the class 
conducted a partial survey of art instruction in the public schools of the 
Bay region. 

For the third successive year a class in commercial art has been con- 
ducted through a unique arrangement. Mr. Emil Grebs, the art director of a 
well known commercial art firm, has given direction and criticisms one day a 
wieek, the class working under a student teacher for the balance of the time. 
Work of nearly professional quality resulted in many cases. 

Arthur Bridgman Clark, 
Professor of Education, 

Division of Graphic Art. 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

The department faculty comprised the following: 

Harris Joseph Ryan, professor; James Cameron Clark, associate pro- 
fessor; Henry Harrison Henline, assistant professor; Ward B. Kindy, in- 
structor; (with the cooperation of Professor Moreno of the Department 
of Applied Mathematics.) 

Instruction was given in the course as published in the Announcement of 
Courses of Instruction for 1921-22. The corresponding class registration 
numbers have been reported to the Registrar. Although the faculty men 
in the department were increased from three to four through the appoint- 
ment of Instructor Kindy, instruction consumed more time and energy 
per instructor than in previous years, because of increased registration in 
the electrical engineering classes. The graduate students who majored 
in electrical engineering numbered 12, i. e. double the highest number in 
preceding years. Two of these held fellowships from abroad for the study 
of high voltage phenomena and problems encountered in the development 
of hydro-electric power. The department gave 1,069 student-units of in- 
struction to undergraduates, and 303 to graduate students, — an aggregate of 
1,372 and an increase of 25 per cent over the corresponding aggregate in- 
struction given during 1920-21, which had exceeded the highest previous 
record by 38 per cent. 

Research work was undertaken as follows: 

I. Mr. Ryan continued his studies of the transient crest meter and 
brought its development virtually to a state of initial completion. Spe- 
cial forms were developed for application in particular studies. One of 
these is adapted to field uses without the constant presence of an observer 
to facilitate the discovery of the origin and cause of unaccounted for power 
transmission line flash-overs. 



Departmental Reports 145 

II. Mr. Ryan and Mr. Henline (in cooperation with J. P. Jollyman. Stan- 
ford '03, J. Mini, Stanford '05, and R. Wilkins, University of Kansas *09, 
Hydroelectric Division of the Engineering Department, Pacific Gas and 
Electric Co.) made a cathode ray cyclographic field study of the voltage 
waves of the Drum to Newark, 110 kilovolt power transmission line at 
Stockton and of the corresponding Stanislaus River to San Francisco line 
at Manteca in a preliminary study to determine the cause of unaccounted 
for flash-overs. 

III. Mr. Clark has : (a) Continued his study of losses of power through 
the atmosphere by "Corona" from high voltage power transmission conduc- 
tors of large diameters, rope-laid, with highly irregular surfaces and "lock- 
wire" with smooth surfaces; 

(b) Taken up the experimental and analytical fundamentals of com- 
posite three-phase power transformer action in which further exact knowl- 
edge is required for instruction and practice. 

IV. A group of graduate students directed by Ryan and Clark under- 
took the study of parts of the major problem of high voltage power trans- 
mission line support and insulation as follows : 

(a) Fred E. Terman, A.B. Stanford 71. 

(1) Study of the integrity characteristics of the transient crest 
meter referred to in I. (A paper by Mr. Terman based on the re- 
sults of this work was read before the San Francisco Section of the 
American Institute of Electrical Engineers in May, 1922.) 

(2) Determination by the transient crest meter of the voltage- 
distance relation in transient oscillating flash-over discharges through 
long (JOO centimeter) air columns. 

(3) Field study of the crest values of transient voltages present in 
long distance power transmission lines in sections where unaccounted 
for flash-overs occur. 

(b) Eugene D*Hooghe, E.E. University of Liege: The influence of 
frequency on corona discharges. 

(c) Shungo Furui (with the facilities of the Aerodynamic Labora- 
tory and direction of Professor E. P. Lesley of the Mechanical En- 
gineering Department) : An experimental investigation of wind press- 
ure upon overhead electrical conductors. (Mr. Furui's paper based 
upon the results of this work has been accepted by the American In- 
stitute of Electrical Engineers.) 

(d) V. M. Marquis: Resonance in long transmission lines. (A 
brief paper based upon the results of this work was, by invitation, 
read at the May meeting of the San Francisco Section of the A. I. 
E E. as a contribution to the discussion of the papers by Terman 
and Wilkins.) 

(e) D. P. Dinapoli and A. H. Thayer: The availability of models 
for the study of high voltage line insulators. 

(f) A. L. Williams: Cement as a factor in the deterioration of sus- 
pension insulators. 



146 Stanford University 

High voltage laboratory try-out tests were made for the Pacific Gas 
and Electric Company and the Southern California Edison Company of the 
final forms of insulators adopted for their Pit River-to-San Francisco and 
Big Creek-to-Los Angeles 220,000 volt' power transmissions. 

In 1916 fifteen hundred suspension insulator units were assembled and 
the study of their durability characteristics was begun and completed in all 
respects except the "yard test" which has been continued to the present and 
probably will be continued for some years to come. 

The following university cooperation activities were engaged in by fac- 
ulty men of the department : 

Mr. Clark served as chairman of the San Francisco Section of the 
American Welding Society; and as a member of the important Meetings 
and Papers Committee of the A. I. E. £. (national body). 

Mr. Henline served as chairman of the program committee of the San 
Francisco Section of the A. I. E. E. 

Mr. Ryan served as a member of the Insulator Division of the Engineering 
Committee of the A. I. E. K 

Mr. Ryan and Mr. Clark served as members of the Insulator Durability 
division of fhe Overhead Committee of the Technical National Section of the 
National Electric Light Association. 

Summer Term Positions in the Electrical Industries held by faculty men 
for practical experience : 

Henline: Testing Department, Heavy Electrical Machinery Section, 
Schenectady Works, General Electric Co. 

Kindy: Underground Cable Department, Bureau of Power and Light, 
City of Los Angeles. 

Harris Joseph Ryan, 
Professor of Electrical Engineering. 



ENGLISH 



The staff of this department for the year 1921-22 consisted of Raymond 
Macdonald Alden,^ Lee Emerson Basset't,^ John S. P. Tatlock,^ professors; 
William Dinsmore Briggs,^ Henry David Gray,^ Samuel Swayze Seward.^ 
Everett Wallace Smith,* Mary Yost (Dean of Women), associate pro- 
fessors; Elisabeth Lee Buckingham, James Gordon Emerson,* Howard 
Judson Hall,' Edith Ronald Mirrielees,* assistant professors; Alexander 
Brede, Paul Hibbert Clyde,* Gordon Arthur Davis,* Lawrence Bergmann 
Wallis,* instructors; Leonard Aho, William M. Michael, Ralph S. Scott, 
Claire Soule Seay, George P. Shannon, B. F. Sisk, assistants in instruc- 
tion. ' The superior numbers indicate quarters of absence on vacation. Pro- 
fessor Carruth and Assistant Professor Kennedy were absent on sabbatical 
leave, and Miss Margery Bailey was on continued leave of absence, complet- 
ing her course for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy at Yale University. 
Professor Karl Young of the University of Wisconsin served as acting pro- 
fessor during the summer quarter. 



Departmental Reports 147 

The number of major students enrolled in the department was 131. 
of whom 41 were graduates. Thirty-five were recommended for the de- 
gree of A.B. (6 of them in the Division of Journalism) ; 9 for the degree 
of A.M. Candidates for the Master's degree presented acceptable theses 
as follows : William Ashworth, *'Ibsen's influence on English drama" ; Miss 
Frances E. Baumert. "Browning's treatment of tragedy"; Miss Helen D. 
Campbell, "The authorship of the songs in the Beaumont and Fletcher 
plays"; Mrs. Beryl B. Collett, "The California Indian as portrayed in 
California literature"; Harvey A. Eagleson, "Certain influences on the 
work of Jane Austen" ; William C. Maxwell, "Four Problems in Chaucer's 
Troilus and Creseyde' " ; Miss Laura £. Simpson. "Studies in characteriza- 
tion in the Canterbury Talcs" ; Clarence E. Walton, "The ethical and social 
philosophy of George Bernard Shaw" ; Miss Edith A. Wray, "The Marcellus 
theory of the First Quarto Hamlet." 

Mr. Alden has published, during the year, the volume on Shakespeare 
in the series called "Master Spirits of Literature." At the annual meeting 
of the Philological Association of the Pacific Coast he read a paper entitled 
"Notes on so-called trochaic metres." By invitation of the Department 
of English of the University of California he gave two courses in the 
Intersession of that University. 

Mr. Bassett also served as acting professor during the University of Cal- 
ifornia Intersession. During the year he gave addresses before the Central 
and the Northern Sections of the California Teachers* Association, various 
local institutes in Los Angeles County, and the Forum and Browning Clubs 
in San Francisco. 

Mr. Tatlock spent the autumn quarter in Europe, and represented the 
University at the Dante Centenary in Ravenna. On his return he attendetl 
the meeting of the Modern Language Association at Baltimore, where he 
was chairman of the English section. He has published various articles and 
reviews in the University of California Chronicle (of which he is one of the 
editors), School and Society, Studies in Philology, and other journals. 
Work on the Chaucer Concordance, under his editorship, has been some- 
what retarded by Mr. Kennedy's absence in Europe, but has proceeded with 
the efficient aid of Miss P. M. Carbaugh and Mr. Gilbert Knipmeyer. One 
of Mr. Tatlock's purposes in Europe was to collect variant readings from 
manuscript collations in the hands of the Carnegie Trust in Edinburgh; 
these have been embodied in the Concordance. Little now remains to do 
except pasting the 225,000 slips, and the work should be completed in a 
few months. 

Mr. Gray gave a course of lectures on Modern Novelists before the 
Association of American University Women in San Jose, and other lectures 
on literary subjects in Sacramento and Stockton; he has also occupied the 
Unitarian Church pulpit in Palo Alto, San Jose, and Sacramento. As a 
member of the National Committee for Better Films he has addressed a 
convention of the State Federation of Women's Clubs. He has been 
elected to the advisory committee of the Reform Spelling Board. He has 
published a number of book reviews in the San Jose Mercury-Herald. At 



148 Stanford University 

the annual meeting of the Pacific Coast Philological Association he read a 
paper on "Beaumont and the Two Noble Kinsmen." During the summer 
he served as acting professor in the Iowa State University. 

Mr. Seward has prepared a handbook of Reference Sheets for the use of 
students in the composition courses under his direction, which has been 
printed by the University Press. 

Mr. Smith attended the annual conference of the American Association 
of Teachers of Journalism* and was elected president of the Association. 
He is also vice-president of the American Association of College News 
Bureaus. During the summer he directed the department of Journalism in 
the Southern Branch of the University of California. 

Mr. Emerson gave a course of lectures on public speaking for members 
of the San Mateo Chamber of Commerce. 

Mr. Hall read before the Philological Association a paper on "The 
first native-born American poet," and before the Stanford Research Club 
one on "American Colonial Bibliography." 

Mrs. Russell gave two courses in the summer session of the San Diego 
State Teachers' College. During the year she contributed articles on hazing 
and similar student problems to the Stanford Illustrated Review and the 
Pictorial, and an essay and a poem to the faculty number of the Cardinal. 

Mr. Davis represented the dramatic work of the University at the annual 
convention of the Drama League of America, at Chicago, and was elected 
chairman of the college section of the League. 

The members of the department, by invitation of the student editors of 
The Cardinal, took cliarge of the February number of that periodical. . Mr. 
Alden contributed an editorial on the subject, "Do Stanford Students 
Think?", and several other members of the department made contribu- 
tions. It gave the temporary editors great pleasure to make this number 
uf The Cardinal commemorative of the completion and publication of 
Emeritus Professor Anderson's translation of Dante's Divina Commedia, 
which was issued in New York during the winter. 

As a further evidence of their interest in the literary work of stu- 
dents, the members of the department established an annual prize of fifty dol- 
lars, to be awarded to the best piece of literary work submitted for the pur- 
pose by an undergraduate member of the University. For the first year 
the contest was limited to poems, and it brought out a gratifyingly large and 
creditable group of competing manuscripts. Similar prizes, for work in 
dramatic composition and public speaking, were offered respectively by the 
Dramatic Council and the Division of Public Speaking. 

Again the department wishes to express its obligation to Mr. John J. 
Cuddy of San Francisco for his assistance in the course in Advertising con- 
ducted by the Division of Journalism, and to those members of the faculty 
and the Library staff who graciously conducted sections of the course in Free 
Reading. 

Raymond Macdonald Aldex, 

Professor of English. 



Departmental Reports 149 

THE FOOD RESEARCH INSTITUTE 

The Directors of the Food Research Institute selected the undersigned to 
serve as Executive Secretary for the first year. The work of the Institute 
since July 1, 1921, has consisted largely in organization. The quarters pro- 
vided by the University, namely rooms 30-35 on the Inner Quadrangle, 
have proved entirely satisfactory to the present needs of the Institute. The 
quarters have been furnished with office equipment, secured through the 
Comptroller of the University. Typewriters, computing api)arat'us and the 
necessary recording and reproducing devices required for the work of the 
Institute have been gradually installed. 

The staff of the Institute consists of the directors, secretaries, statistical 
clerks, investigators and fellows. As of August first, the staff consists of 
four secretaries, three statistical clerks and four investigators. Five fellow- 
ships have been established for the coming academic year. 

Two courses of instruction were offered during the year by Director 
C. L Alsberg and Director A. E. Taylor. The lectures of Dr. Alsberg 
were held in the Department of Chemistry. The lectures of Dr. Taylor 
were held in the Depatrmcnf of Economics. The total enrollment in these 
courses was 109. 

The work of the Institute during the first year has been largely concerned 
with laying the foundations for the interpretative studies that are being 
undertaken on various aspect's of wheat. 

For the coming year Dr. Alsberg has been elected to serve as Executive 
Secretary. 

Aloxzo Englebert Taylor, 

Executive Secretary. 



GEOLOGY 



The faculty of the Department of Geology, for the year 1921-22. con- 
sisted of : 

James Perrin Smith (paleontolog>'), Austin Flint Rogers (mineralogy), 
Cyrus Fisher Tolman (economic geology). Bailey Willis (geology), pro- 
fessors; Solon Shedd, acting professor of geology for the autumn quar- 
ter 1921, and the summer quarter 1922; and Mr. and Mrs. T. S. Oldroyd. 
curators of conchology. 

Mr. Willis has carried on studies and field investigations of the struc- 
tural geology of the Coast Ranges of California, particularly with ref- 
erence to the mechanics of thrust faults and earthquakes, in cooperation with 
the Carnegie Institution. 

He is also occupied in writing a manual of Structural Geology for pub- 
lication, and has in press in the Bulletin of the (jcol. Soc. of America an 
article on the Role of Isostasy, a contribution to a symposium on Isostasy. 

Mr. Willis retires at the end of the present academic year, after seven 
years of service. He has been an inspiring teacher, and a source of great 
strength to the Department of (ieology. His work will be continued by 
Eliot Blackwelder, of the University of Illinois. 



150 Stanford University 

During the year microscopic studies of ores were continued along the 
lines initiated with the foundation of the laboratory of economic geologj'. 
Mr. Tolman presented some results of these studies to the LeConte Club. 

In the fall quarter Mr. Tolman made an examination of a group of ore 
deposits at Alamo, Baja California. The scientific results were presented 
to the Cordilleran Section of the Geological Society of America, April 
Meeting, 1922. 

The summer geological survey under the direction of Mr. Tolman was 
conducted in San Benito, Santa Clara, Alameda and Contra Costa coun- 
ties. This completes eight quadrangles of the U. S. Geological Survey. 

Mr. H. V. Dodd has completed his experimental work on the effect 
of hydraulic pressure on the migration of oil. The results will appear 
in Economic Geology. 

Mr. Rogers attended the meetings of the Mineralogical Society and of 
the Geological Society held at Amherst, Mass., and presented several papers. 
He has been elected to membership in the American Academy of Arts and 
Sciences. 

Investigations by Mr. Rogers : 

An investigation of the mineralogy and petrography of fossil bone 
has been completed, for the Williston Memorial Volume. 

A new type of metamorphic rock has been described from Imperial 
County, California. 

New American occurrences of the rare silica minerals have been 
studied. 

In addition to his duties of teaching and administration, Mr. Smith has 
been engaged in the preparation of a monograph on the Permian and 
Lower Triassic Ammonoidea of Timor; also on a report on the rela- 
tions of the Tertiary fossil floras of the West Coast to the Recent floras of 
the same region. 

Mr. T. S. Oldroyd has prepared a paper on the lower San Pedro 
fauna of Nob Hill, California, to be published by the U. S. Geological Sur- 
vey. Mrs. T. S. Oldroyd has prepared a monograph on the Mollusca of 
Puget Sound, 350 pages with 40 plates, now in press with the Publications 
of the Puget Sound Biological Station, University of Washington, 1922. 

Mr. Henry V. Howe has completed a monograph on the Lower Miocene 
Faunas of Oregon, for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy, now in press 
in the California Academy of Sciences. 

Mr. L. A. Faustino has been engaged in a study of Recent and fossil 
corals of the Philippine Islands, as a thesis for the degree of Master of 
Arts. This work is to be published by the Philippine Bureau of Science. 

Mr. D. D. Hughes has been engaged in preparing for publication a re- 
vision of the Recent and fossil pectens of the West Coast. 

The dei)artment has been enriclied by the gift of the collection of Recent 
and fossil shells of the late Rev. G. W. Taylor of Vancouver, B. C. This 
collection, containing 5.500 species, adds 500 species to our existing concho- 
logical equipment, and makes it second to none in America for research and 
instruction in Tertiary and Recent conchology. 



Departmental Reports 151 

The geological library of the late Mary J. Gates of Mountain View, Cali- 
fornia, has been presented by her family to the Branner Library. 

During the summer of 1922 the heirs of the late Orestes St. John, a dis- 
tinjfuished pioneer geologist of the west, gave to the Department of Geology 
his collctioen of books, fossils and rocks. The books contain about 400 
bound volumes, chiefly on geology and paleontology, many rare works. The 
fossils and rocks include several thousand specimens, uncatalogued, with 
much original material from the early western surveys and explorations. It 
add:» greatly to our material from the east slope of the Rocky Mountains 
and the Intermountain region. 

James Perrix Smith, 

Professor of Paleontology. 



GERMANIC LANGUAGES 

The tlepartment faculty for the year 1921-22 consisted of William Alpha 
Cooper. Karl Gustav RendtorflF, professors; Bruno Boezinger, associate pro- 
fe^^o^; Catharine Morris Cox, instructor; Helena May Nye, assistant in 
instruction. 

Mr. Boezinger was absent, in Europe, during the autumn quarter; Mr. 
Rendtorff was away from the University during the winter quarter; the 
other members of the teaching staff had their regular vacations during the 
summer quarter. 

Shortly before the opening of the academic year Dr. George Hempl 
died. In memory of his life and services to scholarship and the University 
the following minute was adopted at a special meeting of the department 
staff held on August 25, 1921 : « 

In the death of Dr. George Hempl the Department of Germanic Lan- 
guages has suffered an irreparable loss, a loss that will be deeply felt, not 
only by his colleagues and the University community, but also by philologists 
throughout the world. 

As Professor of Germanic Philology at Stanford since 1906, as Executive 
Head of our Department for eleven years, as research scholar and teacher. 
Dr. Hempl, through tlie furtherance of science and the training of young men 
and women, has made a great and permanent contribution to the achieve- 
ment of the University. 

Up to the year 190^-09 Dr. Hempl's contributions to knowledge were 
in English and Germanic philology and general linguistics. Since that time 
his research has been directed toward deciphering Etruscan, Hittite and other 
inscriptions of the Mediterranean region. Here his mastery of phonetics 
and the history of alphabetic writing has enabled him to make discoveries 
that, we believe, will assure him a permanent place in the history of ancient 
philology. But the full significance of these discoveries, which promise to 
be the most important work of his life, can not yet be estimated, for the 
larger part of his work is still in manuscript. We look forward with keen 
interest to the recognition which the publication of these manuscripts will 
hring. regretting that the author can not know with us the satisfaction of 
complete acceptance of the results of his studies. 

Wide learning and breadth of interest were combined in this rare scholar 
with a remarkable intuitive sense and finely balanced judgment. His gift 
as a teacher enabled him to open to his students fields of intricate philo- 
logical science arousing their answering enthusiasm. The clearness and 



152 Stanford Universitv 

simplicity of his exposition was the outward expression of his forceful and 
direct mind. His wealth of learning, his mastery of the wisdom of many 
men and many ages were the marvel of his pupils and his associates. 

As members of the Faculty of the Department of Germanic Languages 
we feel most truly the loss of our distinguished colleague and friend, a man of 
wide and kindly sympathy, who never stinted in sharing with us. as with 
others, the treasures of his richly stored mind and generous heart. 

We wish, therefore, to express to Mrs. Hempl and the other members 
of Dr. Hempl's family our true sympathy in their great loss and to assure 
them that we shall cherish the memory of our one-time colleague and be- 
loved friend with sincere appreciation and enduring affection. 

The number of major students registered in the department was four, 
of whom three were graduate students. The degree of Master of Arts was 
conferred upon Grace Martha Swithenbank, whose thesis bore the title, 
"Relation of the Text of Gounod's 'Fausf to Goethe's 'Faust'." 

William Alpha Cooper, 

■ 

Professor of German. 



HISTORY 



The faculty of the department for the year consisted of : Ephraim 
Douglass Adams, Payson Jackson Treat, professors; Frank Alfred Golder, 
Edward Maslin Hulme, Ralph Haswell Lutz, Percy Alvin Martin. Edgar 
Eugene Robinson, associate professors; Yamato Ichihashi, Reginald George 
Trotter, assistant professors; Edward Latimer Beach, lecturer. These 
constituted the regular staff of the department. In addition instruction 
was given by Henry Barrett Learned, acting associate professor (win- 
ter, spring and summer quarters) ; and Bernadotte Everly Schmitt. (West- 
ern Reserve University) lecturer, (summer quarter). 

Courses in history were also given by Professors Elmore and Martin 
of the department of Classical Literature, and Rendtorff of the department of 
Germanic Languages. 

The student assistants during the year were: Herbert B. Alexander, 
Richard H. Barker, Robert C. Binkley, Stuart R. Carswell, Herman H. 
Chrisman, Oscar J. Falnes, Flora M. Fearing, (joss S. Grablc, Rowland 
H. Harvey, Charles R. Hicks, Robert L. Jones, Raymond H. Leach, John 
P. Pritchett, Lucy Wilcox. 

Professor Golder's leave of absence in connection with the work of gath- 
ering materials in Europe for the Hoover War Library was continued for the 
academic year. His courses were carried during the winter, spring and 
summer quarters by Acting Associate Professor H. Barrett Learned, who 
thus returned to Stanford for the third successive year and contributed 
much by his scholarship and by his skill as a teacher to the work of the 
department. 

A new and experimental departure in the work of the department w^as 
instituted by the acceptance of a proposal from Captain Edward Latimer 
Beach, U. S. N. (Retired) to offer courses in American Naval History. 
Captain Beach was graduated from the U. S. Naval Academy in 1888 and 
served continuously in the Navy until 1921. Always deeply interested in the 



Departmental Reports 153 

histon' of the service, he has written many books descriptive of its activities 
and frequefUly was appointed to posts of international importance when 
the Navy department undertook duties of a semi-diplomatic nature, as in 
connection with American activities in Mexico, Haiti and San Domingo. 
At the time of his voluntary early retirement from the Navy he was com- 
mandant of the Navy yard and station, Mare Island, California. During 
the academic year he has given lecture courses on American naval history, 
American army history, and seminar courses in the history of the Spanish- 
American war, with such success that he is to return for 1922-23 as acting 
assistant professor. 

Mr. Adams and Mr. Lutz. Directors of the Hoover War Library, have 
continued active work in gathering materials. Details of the organization 
of the Library and of progress in collection are included in the report of the 
President of the University. 

Mr. Adams gave public lectures during the year to the High Schools 
of San Mateo. Los Angeles. San Pedro, Hanford, Wasco, and the Poly- 
technic High School of Los Angeles; to the Teachers' College of San Jose, 
the county institutes of San Mateo and Fresno counties, and to various 
private schools and history clubs. He taught in the summer session of the 
University of California at Berkeley. He was chairman of a committee of 
^ve educators appointed by the State Board of Education to examine Amer- 
ican history texts used in the High Schools, Junior Colleges, and Junior 
High Schools of California with instructions to report whether any text was 
"unpatriotic" or "disloyal," or failed to inculcate "the best patriotism of 
the American tradition.'* This report was transmitted to the State Board 
of Education in July. 

Mr. Treat, on sabbatical leave, during the fall and winter quarters, 
1921-22. visited Japan on invitation of Viscount Shibusawa and the Japan- 
America Society to give lectures on Japanese-American relations at four of 
the universities in Tokyo. These lectures, later published, have since been 
translated into Japanese, by Dr. Kenjo Murakawa, Professor of European 
History in the Imperial University, Tokyo. (Tokyo, Yubunkwan, 1922.) 
Mr. Treat afterwards travelled in China, and at the request of Dr. Wilbur 
visited several universities there in connection with a proposed scheme of 
university cooperation. He has continued to act as Contributing Editor 
Journal of International Relations. In November, 1921, he was elected 
President of the Pacific Coast Branch of the American Historical Asso- 
ciation. 

Mr. Colder was absent on leave throughout the year acting as chief 
European agent of the Hoover War Library. Most of this time was spent 
in Russia, where he also was able to render valuable services to the 
American Relief Administration, European Children's Fund, in its work 
in famine areas. 

Mr. Hulme gave eight public lectures before various organizations and 
was the principal speaker at the Dante Commemoration services. State 
Teachers College, San Jose. During the summer he conducted three 
regular courses in the State Teachers College, San Francisco. 



154 Stanford Uxiversitv 

Mr. Lutz attended the meeting of the Pacific Coast Branch of the Amer- 
ican Historical Association at Portland, Oregon, in November and rt-ad a 
paper on "The Manuscript Material on Eastern Europe in the Htwver 
War Library." He also addressed the Portland Business Men's Club on 
"Contemporary Europe." Throughout the year he was chairman of the 
International Relations Section of the Commonwealth Club of San Fran- 
cisco, which held weekly meetings, and he organized the general meeting of 
the Club at which was discussed, by President Barrows (University of 
California) and Professor Robinson (History Department, Stanford Uni- 
versity) the results of the Washington Disarmament Conference. 

Mr. Martin continued to serve on the editorial board of the Hispanic 
American Historical Review. In November he represented the University 
and the History Department at the meeting of the Pacific Coast Branch of the 
American Historical Association held at Portland, Oregon, and read a paper 
on "South American Histories and Historians." 

Mr. Robinson was sent in the fall to Washington, D. C, to secure for the 
Hoover War Library records of the Conference on the Limitation of Arma- 
ment. At Stanford be continued direction of the Calendar of the Stephen 
M. White Papers. Public lectures were given by him in many places on the 
Pacific Coast and before many types of organizations. Thus on a trip 
to Reed College, Oregon, to lecture on the Disarmament Conference, he 
made thirteen addresses before the University of Washington, the Uni- 
versity of Oregon, Willamette University, the Seattle Teachers Association, 
the City Club of Portland, etc. In California addresses were given, among 
others, at San Diego, Mills College, Monterey, and before the Commonwealth 
Club of San Francisco. 

Mr. Ichihashi's leave of absence, begun in 1919, came to an end in Octo- 
ber, 1921', when he returned to assume the duties of the chair of Japanese 
history and civilization, endowed last year by a group of Japanese donors 
headed by Baron Shibusawa. During his residence in Europe. Mr. Ichi- 
hashi represented the Japanese Association at the assembly of the League of 
Nations Association held at Geneva in June, 1921, and lectured before the 
Universife Internationale, Brussels, in August. On his return to Stan- 
ford in October a request from the Japanese government for his services 
at the Disarmament Conference in Washington led to a further extension 
of leave of absence, and he proceeded to Washington, where he acted as 
secretary and adviser to Baron Kato, the Japanese senior delegate to the 
Conference. Active teaching was resumed at Stanford in March, since 
when he has given various public lectures : — the Commonwealth Club of 
San Francisco, the Palo Alto Chamber of Commerce, the Unitarian Club 
of Oakland, the "Little Theatre," etc. 

Mr. Trotter spent a part of the fall quarter, on vacation, in research 
in the Canadian Archives at Ottawa. He attended the meetings of the 
American Historical Association at St. Louis, in December. 

The summer quarter work of 1922 was carried by Mr. Robinson (acting 
executive head), Mr. Hulme, Mr. Trotter, Mr. Learned (first six weeks) 
and Mr. Schmitt of Western Reserve University (second six weeks). Mr. 



Departmental Reports 155 

Schmitt is an associate Professor at Western Reserve. He graduated at 
the University of Tennessee, 1904; was a Rhodes Scholar at Oxford, taking 
the degree of M.A. in 1908; and received his Ph.D. from Wisconsin Univer- 
sity in 1910. He served as 2d Lt. Field Arty., U. S. Army, Sept-Dec, 1918. 
At Stanford he gave a lecture course in Modern European History, and 
guided research in the Hoover War Library. 

For the year 1921-22 the Mabel Hyde Cory scholarship of $500 for a 
woman student in the department of History was held by Miss Virginia 
B. Lowers. 

The number of major students registered in the department was: Au- 
tumn quarter, undergraduates 57, graduates 15; winter quarter, undergradu- 
ates, 50, graduates 15; spring quarter, undergraduates 51, graduates 19; 
summer quarter, undergraduates 21, graduates 18. 

The Master of Arts degree was conferred in June, 1922, upon: Helena 
May Dolfin, thesis, 'The Establishment of the British Mandate for Meso- 
potamia;" Oscar Julius Falnes, thesis, "British War-time Propaganda in 
Denmark and Norway;" Charles Roger Hicks, thesis, "The Shantung 
Question;" Esther Ruth Miller, thesis, "The Aaland Islands;" Shizuma 
Nara. thesis, "Relations between the Philippines and Japan;" Ruth Arlene 
Olson, thesis, "British Imperial Unity;" John Perry Pritchctt, thesis, 
"Canada and the Red River: Some Phases of Their Relations;" Luis Jose 
de Souza, thesis, "Brazil in the Great War." 

Ephraim Douglass Adams. 

Professor of History. 



Hoover War Library 

During the year the Hoover War Library has been established in excellent 
quarters in the University Library, with a study ropm at the front of the 
building on the ground floor at" the right Back of this room the entire floor 
of library stacks is reserved for the book, document, pamphlet, and manu- 
script materials of the collection, with a special grill for the confldential 
and reserved materials. The basement floor of stacks below is reserved for 
Hoover collection newspapers, now being organized and bound. Miss Mil- 
dred Davis is in charge of the study room and of the general organization of 
the collections, and Miss Nina Almond of cataloguing. Both are University 
Library employees. The expense of this organization is borne by the 
University. 

The work of collecting materials remains in the hands of the Directors, 
Professors Adams and Lutz of the History Department, and for them the 
University Library provides an accession and oflice room, communicating 
with the collection stacks. Mr. A. Zvenigrad is clerk in charge of mate- 
rials as they are received and after checking transfers them to the University 
staff. The expense of the accession room, as of all the work of collection, 
is borne bv Mr. Hoover. 

The collection itself has continued to grow rapidly. Estimated at, ap- 
proximately, eighty thousand items, in March, 1921, it now probably con- 
tains one hundred and ten thousand. The additions continue to be made 
along the selected lines of government documents, newspapers, published 



156 Stanford University 

books, pamphlets, and manuscripts: Notably large acquisitions have resulted 
from Professor Golder's work in Russia throughout the last year. One 
shipment alone from Russia consisted of 102 packing cases, and 23 others 
are now on their way. Mr. Colder also made special purchases and secured 
gifts in Berlin, Warsaw, Prague, Geneva, and other important European 
centers, and the agents appointed by him in south-eastern Europe have 
been active. The Italian government, through the courtesy of the Italian 
Minister in Washington, has presented much documentary material of value. 
Mr. Hoover has sent, in 87 cases, the Rotterdam and London files of the 
Commission for Relief in Belgium and these are to be organized and set 
up, in October, by the expert formerly in charge of the London files. The 
New York files are now being prepared for shipment. Professor Robinson 
secured from the secretary of the Disarmament Conference in Washington 
files of the minutes of the Plenary Sessions and of the more important 
committee meetings, as well as some materials from delegations present in 
Washington during the Conference. 

The work of organizing for research the vast mass of materials in the 
collection is necessarily slow and will require several years, even for that al- 
ready received. Nevertheless steady progress is being made and in certain 
lines is already so far advanced that the Hoover War Library research room 
is in constant use by graduate students and by others investigating some 
special "war problem." The Library, save for reserved and confidential 
material, is open to any qualified researcher. 



HOPKINS MARINE STATION 

The Director continued during the year his study of the Asteriidae, a 
family of sea stars. The autumn quarter was spent in the east, where all 
pertinent material in the U. S. National Museum was examined, as well as 
that in the Museum of Comparative Zoology, Cambridge, and in the Yale 
Museum, New Haven. Bibliographic work was done at the libraries of the 
Philadelphia Academy of Sciences and of the U. S. National Museum. In 
September he served as a delegate from the University to the Third Inter- 
national Eugenics Congress, New York. The Zoological Laboratories of the 
University of Toronto, and of Harvard, Yale, Columbia, Princeton and 
Chicago Universities and of Smith and Wellesley Colleges were visited. 

Daily records of the temperature and salinity of the sea have been con- 
tinued through the year. 

Dr. J. P. Baumberger, of the Department of Physiology, investigated the 
causes of the changes in osmotic pressure in crabs during the molt cycle. 
The osmotic pressure had been shown to change, by Drs. Bauml>ergcr and 
J. M. D. Olmsted, in the summers of 1920 and 1921. 

Dr. Bradley Moore Davis, of the University of Michigan, while giving 
a course on the morphology of algae, began a study of the life history of 
the kelp, Alaria lanccolaia. This involved the germination of zoospores, 
and cultures in the laboratory of the succeeding sexual generation, a matter 
of some technical difficulty covering a number of weeks. Material was also 
collected for a cytological study of the reduction divisions preceding spore 



Departmental Reports 157 

formation. Dr. Davis made substantial additions to and entirely rearranged 
the collection of algae belonging to the station. 

Dr. Caswell Grave, Professor of Zoology, Washington University, St. 
Louis, made a brief reconnaissance of the compound ascidian fauna. 

Dr. Bertil Hanstrom, Landskrona, Sweden, spent six weeks during the 
spring quarter in studying comparatively the finer structure, of the brains of 
various crustaceans. 

Dr. Libbie H. Hyman. Department of Zoology, University of Chicago, in- 
vestigated, during May, changes at fertilization in sea urchin and sea star 
tggs; regeneration in the hydroid, Tubularia; effect of hydrochloric acid on 
the oxygen consumption of invertebrates ; water content of sea anemones at' 
x-arious sizes. 

Dr. A. Pringle Jameson investigated during May the myxosporid para- 
sites of various local species of fishes. 

Dr. Ha raid Kyi in. University of Lund, Sweden, spent two weeks during 
July in studying and collecting marine algae, principally Rhodophyceae. 

Dr. T. L. Patterson, of the Detroit College of Medicine and Surgery, 
while teaching during the summer quarter, made observations on the move- 
ments of the empty stomach in the abalone (Haliotis rufcscens), with a 
study of certain extra- and intra-gast'ric stimuli on the inhibitory control of 
its neuro-muscular mechanism. Preliminary studies along similar lines were 
made on the great chiton (Cryptochiton sfeiieri) and on the hagfish {Poli- 
stotrcma stotiti.) 

Mr. \V. L. Scofield, of the California Fish and Game Commission, con- 
tinued during the year investigation of the life history of the sardine. 

Dr. C. y. Taylor, of the department of Zoology, University of Califor- 
nia, while teaching during the summer quarter, procured embryological ma- 
terial and reared larvae of several marine animals. 

Dr. Gertrude Van Wagenen, of the department of Anatomy, University 
of California, spent two weeks in August studying parasites of sea anemones. 

Mr. I^wrence Irving, a graduate student, continued with Dr. Baumber- 
ger, an investigation of the digestive process in the sea star. The study 
of the problem was begun last summer by Mr. Irving. This year the regu- 
lation oi the hydrogen ion concentration of the digestive juices and the end 
products of digestion were studied. The titration of the buffer action of sea 
water was commenced and will be continued. 

Mr. J. A. Craig, a student, worked with Dr. Baumberger on the rate of 
penetration of strong and weak acids at different hydrogen ion concentra- 
tions. The effect of the acids on the ciliated cells of the mussel gill was 
used as a criterion. 

Messrs. W. P. Farber, John F. Kessel, Gordon H. Ball, and E. Van 
Slyke. graduate students of the department of Zoology, University of Cali- 
fornia, studied various marine invertebrates. 

Mr. W. S. Wallace, general assistant at the Station, continued studies of 
the local hydroid fauna. 

Walter Kenrick Fisher, 
Associate Professor of Zoology, and Director. 



158 Stanford University 

LAW 

During the year the faculty of the Law School has consisted of Charles 
Andrews Huston, professor and dean; Arthur Martin Cathcart, Joseph 
VV^alter Bingham, Clarke Butler Whittier, Chester Garfield Vernier. Marion 
Rice Kirkwood, professors; William Brownlee Owens, associate professor; 
Oscar Kennedy Cushing of the San Francisco bar, Henrie Granville Hill of 
the San Jose bar, Leonard Saxton Lyon of the Los Angeles bar, lecturers. 

The faculty for the summer quarter was composed of Professors Cath- 
cart. Bingham, Whittier and Vernier from the regular faculty: Professor 
Ralph William Aigler of the University of Michigan Law School. Professor 
Frederic Campbell Woodward of the University of Chicago Law School, 
Professor Austin Tappan Wright of the University of California School of 
Jurisprudence. Professor Cathcart taught during the first term of this 
quarter at' the University of Chicago Law School. 

The total registration of students in the I-aw School was 223, of 
whom 66 were graduate student's, 154 were undergraduates, and 3 were 
specials. 

The attendance during the summer quarter of 1922 was 82. This is an 
increase of 4 over the registration for the summer quarter of 1921. 

Outside of the regular professional curriculum members of the law 
faculty gave the following courses in the University: Introduction to the 
Study of Law, Professor Huston and Associate Professor Owens; Med- 
ical Jurisprudence lectures, Professors Huston, Cathcart, Whittier. and 
V'ernier; Business Law, for non-law majors chiefly from the Econ miics and 
Engineering Departments, Associate Professor Owens. 

During the year Professor Cathcart has continued to serve as Mayor 
of Palo Alto, and Professor Kirkwood as a member of the Palo Alto 
School Board. 

Upon July 19, 1922, the Law School sustained an irreparable loss in the 
sudden death of its dean, Charles Andrews Huston. A ripe scholar, an in- 
spiring teacher, an able executive, he endeared himself to his colleagues 
and to his students by rare qualities of mind and heart. His death was a 
shock to the whole University community. The loss falls heaviest uixin 
those who knew him best. 

Arthur Martin Cathcart. 

Professor of Law. 



MATHEMATICS 

Professor Rufus Lot Green was absent on leave during the year. 
This limited the teaching staff to the following members: — Robert Edgar 
Allardice, Hans Frederik Blichfeldt, professors; Dorothy Rose Crever, 
Whittier Worthington Wallace, teaching assistants; the latter for the 
autumn and winter quarters only. During the summer quarter the teach- 
ing was carried on by Professor William Albert Manning of the Depart- 
ment of Applied Mathematics, and Heinrich Wilhelm Brinkmann. acting 
instructor. In addition, Professor George David Birkhoff of Harvard Uni- 



Departmental Reports 159 

versity g^vc, during the summer, a course of four lectures on the problem of 
>i bodies (mathematical astronomy), and a course of eight lectures on 
the theory of relativity. Both courses appealed to a very general class of 
students, as attested by the large attendance. 

In addition to teaching, Messrs. Allardice and Blichfeldt engaged in 
the study of certain domains of mathematics, namely the singularities of 
plane curves and diophantine analysis, respectively. 

Seven students received the degree of A.B., and one the degree of A.M. 

Haxs Frederick Blichfeldt. 

Professor of Mathematics. 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

The teaching force in the department for the year 1921-22 was as fol- 
lows: Guido Hugo Marx, professor of machine design; William Rankinc 
Eckhart, professor of experimental engineering; Everett Parker Lesley, 
professor oS industrial engineering; Charles Norman Cross, associate pro- 
fessor of mechanical engineering; Lawrence Edminster Cutter, assistant 
professor of drawing; Horatio Stebbins, assistant professor of experimental 
engineering; Edward John Stanley, teaching specialist in pattern making: 
James Bennett Liggett, teaching specialist in foundry; Theron James 
Palmateer, teaching specialist in machine shop; Robert Henry Harcourt. 
teaching specialist in forge shop; Boynton Morris Green, instructor in 
drawing. 

William Frederick Durand, professor of mechanical engineering, was 
granted sabbatical leave for the year, which he spent in Europe and North 
Africa. In his absence Professor G. H. Marx has been acting executive 
head- At the close of the year Mr. Cutter was promoted to an associate- 
professorship. 

While there was an apparent' falling off in registrants from the pre- 
ceding year, this was not actually the case, the figures representing merely 
the working out of the shift to the Lower Division system, leaving only 
upper classmen and graduate students registered in the department. The 
actual classes, almost universally, have been larger. This situation — and 
the complete taking over of the work in descriptive geometry — has been met 
in part by the appointment of Mr. Green. Further additions to the staff are 
becoming pressingly necessary, and extensions in scope could well be made 
were adequate funds available. 

While Professor Durand's absence has, of course, been much felt the 
work of the department, generally, has gone forward smoothly. A 
valuable innovation was the introduction, in cooperation with the Law 
School, of a course of lectures on patent law by one of our alumni, Mr. 
L S. Lyon of Los Angeles, himself a practicing patent attorney. The lec- 
tures were well attended and appreciated, and constituted a form of sup- 
plementary work which might, profitably, be continued in succeeding years. 

In the way of equipment, considerable additions were made through 
purchase of certain machine tools from the U. S. Salvage Board. The 



160 Stanford University 

department desires also to acknowledge a series of generous gift's, among 
them being: a vattiable cabinet of small tools from the Pratt & Whitney 
Company of Hartford, Connecticut; from the Timkin Bearing Company, 
a series of their roller bearings and a set of large photographic charts 
suitable for class-room purposes; from the Henry Vogt Machine Co. of 
Louisville, Kentucky, a plaque mounted with illustrative solid forged 
fittings; from the Worthington Company, Inc., through their San Fran- 
cisco office, 18-24"x36" blue-prints of various pumps and pumping *en- 
gines, and sufficient copies of "Sugar House Pumping Machinery*' and 
"Duplex Piston Pattern Pumps" for distribution to the class in pumping 
machinery. Other firms donating valuable catalogs and bulletins in quan- 
tities for class distribution were: The Vacuum Oil Co., The Wellman, 
Seaver, Morgan Co., The Babcock & Wilcox Co., Wheeler Condenser Co., 
Chicago Bridge & Iron Works, and California Hydraulic and Supply Co. 
The C. F. Braun Engineering Company has made a number of important 
donations in recent years, including a feed-water heater, an oil-cooler, 
seven singk-tube heat exchangers and a steam flow-meter, all of which 
have been valuable in a series of investigations of heat transfer being 
carried on in our laboratories, chiefly under the direction of Professor 
Eckart. 

The year has been rather notable for the number of interesting in- 
vestigations worked upon both by members of the staff and by graduate 
students. 

Professor Durand, in addition to contributions to technical journals, 
lias published certain of his investigations in a volume: The Hydraulics 
of Pipe Lines. \ 

Professor G. H. Marx has contributed to three engineering reference 
books and has supervised the investigations by Messrs. Young and Marx 
of steel belting and compressed spruce pulleys, and by Mr. Roberts of 
friction phenomena. 

Professor Eckart has supervised some of the work of Mr. Hubbard 
on heat transfer, of Mr. Kallam on conductivity of liquids, of Mr. Uta- 
hara on hydraulic rams, and has carried on extended experimental investi- 
gations, in the field, dealing with the development of new apparatus for 
fractional distillation of petroleum and of a steam still or evaporator 
for absorption oil plants. 

Professor Lesley has continued his researches on air-plane propellers 
for the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics. 

Professor Stebbins, with Mr. Hubbard, continued his investigation of 
heat losses from pipes carrying superheated steam. He also did some con- 
sultation work on allied subjects, and directed Mr. Tisne's study of the 
Conradson carbon residue test apparatus. 

Professor Cutter has been working on a descriptive geometry text which 
will be brought out this summer by one of the chief technical publishing 
houses. 

GuiDo Hugo Marx, 
Professor of Machine Design. 



Departmental Reports 161 

MEDICAL SCHOOL 

The registration of medical students for the year was as follows: 
First-year students, 51; second-year students, 39; third-year students, 29; 
fourth-year students, 22; fifth-year students, internes, 29; total, 170. One 
student was granted the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Experimental 
Medicine. Twenty-nine students (25 men and 4 women) were granted the 
degree of Doctor of Medicine during the year. Fifteen special workers 
were registered during the year. 

The attendance in the Out- Patient Clinics was as follows: New pa- 
tients, 12,308; old patients, 72,982; referred and transferred, 6,634; total 
number of visits, 91,838. 

The Popular Medical Lectures for 1921-22 were delivered by Dean Wil- 
liam Ophuls ; Miss Katherine Foley, State Teacher of the Blind ; Dr. Arthur 
L Fisher, Dr. E. C. Dickson, Mr. Ernest H. Baynes, General Manager of 
the Meriden Bird Club, Meriden, New Hampshire, and Dr. W. Edward 
ChambeMain. 

The Jordan Medical Scholars for the year were Arthur F. Warren. 
October 1, 1921, to March 24, 1922; Charles A. Love, Jr., April 3, 1922, to 
June 19, 1922; Archibald W. Warnock for the entire year. 

In 1921 Mrs. Sadie Dernham Patek (Stanford, '11) established the Dr. 
Robert Patek Memorial Loan Fund in memory of her husband. Dr. Robert 
Patek. This fund, principal and interest, is to be loaned to medical students 
to assist them in completing their medical course. A student who has once 
received a loan from the fund is entitled to continue to get additional loans 
until his graduation. The loans granted to students are to bear no interest 
for six years, and then to have an interest rate of six per cent until paid. 

The Colloquia at the San Francisco Hospital, which were inaugurated by 
the San Francisco Polyclinic, have been continued by the Stanford Medical 
School. Those on Thursday mornings are devoted to surgical subjects, 
while those on Friday mornings are devoted to medical subjects. These 
Colloquia are open to graduates in medicine as well as to medical students. 
In addition there have been offered at the Medical School daily mid-day clin- 
ics, which are likewise open to the medical profession. It is felt, however, 
that the Medical School renders the greatest service towards educating the 
medical profession in offering opportunities for voluntary workers in its 
clinics, hospitals and laboratories. A special effort is made to encourage 
medical graduates who care to do this type of work. 

The Stanford Clinics Auxiliary and San Francisco Maternity have con- 
tinued their good work in the clinics. Under the direction of Miss Mar- 
guerite Wales the Social Service Department is rapidly growing, particu- 
larly through the addition of voluntary workers. These women assist 
the regular social service workers in their relief work and in the proper 
disposition of the indigent sick. This service is of the highest value to our 
clinic patients. 

During the past year the medical curriculum has been revised so as to 
consolidate some of the classes and make the course more uniform. Stu- 
dents are now permitted to transfer from Stanford to San Francisco only 



162 Stanford University 

at the beginning of the spring quarter. The work taken in San Francisco 
is prescribed along the lines outlined by the American Medical Association, 
with a total of 4,000 hours in the curriculum. As a result of this revision, 
comparatively little regular undergraduate medical work will be offered 
during the summer quarter and opportunity will be given at that time to 
oflFer special and advanced courses, particularly for research students or for 
graduates in medicine. 

The historical section of the Lane Medical Library, which was pur- 
chased with money contributed by Dr. Adolph Barkan and by the University, 
will be a very valuable addition to the Medical Library. This Library has 
been selected by Professor SudhoflF of Leipzig and will probably be one of 
the best collections of historical medical books in this country. 

During the past year a new committee on student standing and promo- 
tion has been elected, for the purpose of dealing with questions relating 
to student standing in San Francisco. 

At the close of the war, the Stanford Naval Base Hospital Unit was 
disbanded, and the individual members of this unit have, for the most part 
permitted their enrollments to lapse. A new effort is now being made to re- 
enroll the medical personnel for a Reserve Naval Hospital for the Stan- 
ford Medical School. This re-enrollment is in charge of Dr. Stanley 
Stillman. 

Albion Walter Hewlett, 

Acting I>ean. 



Stanford University Hospitals 

The number of patient days for Lane Hospital including infants was 
45,666 and for Stanford University Hospital 37,962, making a total of 
83,628 for both as against 88,035 for last year. The falling off over last year 
is largely due to a smaller number of war risk insurance and industrial 
accident cases in the Stanford wards and a smaller number of private and 
obstetric cases in Lane. 

The decrease in ward patients in Stanford was coincident with a raise in 
rates. An examination of the income statement for Stanford however shows 
that the increased charges resulted in a slightly larger income in spite of the 
smaller number of patient days. Steps have been taken to increase the num- 
ber of ward patients by making a small concession to industrial accident cases. 

In Lane the smaller attendance is due to falling off in the number of 
clinic patients. This situation has been met by a reorganization of the 
service whereby a representative of the hospital is placed in both the medical 
and surgical clinics. The positions of Resident in Surgery and Resident in 
Medicine have been created largely for this purpose. 



Departmental Reports 163 



ADMISSIONS 

Thi« Year Last Year 

Private : 3,984 3.975 

Clinic _ 4,923 4,925 

Free IktIs 180 212 

S. F. Maternity 39 45 

Infants born 490 514 



Total 9,616 9.571 

Patients died 250 225 

Autopsies 54 63 

PATIENT DAYS 

Lane Hospital 45,666 47.290 

Stanford University Hospital 37,962 40,745 



Total 83.628 88,035 

Stanford — 

Rooms 22.032 19,451 

Wards 12,529 18,126 

Infants 3,401 3,168 



Total (Stanford) 37,962 40,745 

Lane — 

Private 9,628 12,223 

Medical 10,735 10.028 

Surgical 11,026 10,242 

Gynecological 4,239 3,986 

Qinic <! Obstetrics 2,615 3,272 

Infants 2,516 3,037 

Chfldren (Pr. & CI.) 4,907 4,502 



Total (Lane) 45,666 47,290 

PATIENTS ADMITTED 

Stanford — 

Rooms : 1,923 1,595 

Ward* 1,138 1.239 

Infants 261 246 

Lane — 

Private 923 1.141 

Clinic (including infants) 5,371 5,350 



Total 9,616 9.571 

AVERAGE PATIENTS PER DAY 

Stanford 103.93 110.08 

Lane 122.85 130.09 



Total 226.78 240.17 

GENERAL STATISTICS 

Resident staflF 21 18 

Daily average number employees 275 212 

Daily average number pupil nurses 124 128 

Daily average number instructing nurses ^7 17 



164 Stanford University 



This Year Last Year 

Daily average graduate nurses on general duty 11 

Greatest number of patients (Feb. 23, 1922)...: 286 287 

Smallest number of patients (Sept. 4, 1921) 170 ^ 171 

Number of private operations 2,230 "2,288 

Number of clinic operations 1,561 1,597 

Number of radiographs, clinic 10,205 

Number of dental films 9,358 

Number of radiographs, private 6,599 

Number of dental films 4,585 

Number of electrotherapy treatments 2,518 2.471 

Number of hydrotherapy treatments 3,030 2,897 

Number of electrocardiograph examinations 865 363 

Occupancy (315) 70% 77% 

Occupancy, Stanford (132) 76^ 87% 

Occupancy, Lane (183) 65% 71% 

MEALS SERVED 

Lane Hospital (patient^ nurses, help), (per mo.) 40,371 37,493 

Stanford Hospital (patients), (per mo.) 8,666 8,468 

COST PER MEAL 

Cost per meal, Lane 2157 .1831 

Cost per meal, Stanford 8608 .8230 

Food cost per meal. Lane 1536 .1484 

Food cost per meal, Stanford 6111 .4927 

Cost per patient day, Lane 4.85 

Cost per patient day, Stanford 7.85 

SCHOOL OF NURSING 

As successor to Miss Elizabeth Hogue (Mrs. H. Staats Moore), Miss 
Maude Landis was appointed Superintendent of Nurses taking effect August 
1, 1921. Miss Landis was formerly Director of Nurses of the New Haven 
Hospital connected with the medical department' of Yale University. 

The chief event of the year was the opening of the new nurses home. 
The opening exercises took place March 31, 1922, at 2 p. m., with the fol- 
lowing program. Invocation by Reverend David Charles Gardner; pres- 
entation of building on behalf of Board of Trustees by William Mayo 
Newhall; acceptance by President Ray Lyman Wilbur; address by Mrs. 
Helen Hoy Greeley, of Washington, D. C. 

The building has attracted a great deal of attention both locally and outside 
the' State and is generally acknowledged to meet the utmost requirements 
of a nurses home and school. 

STAFF 

During the past' year Dr. H. G. Mehrtens served as House Physician, Dr. 
W. Mills as first assistant House Physician and Dr. D. Coll as second assist- 
ant. Dr. H. von Geldern served as Resident in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

INTERNES 

The Senior Internes for the year were G. W. Nagel and D. E. Shei)ard- 
son in Medicine and Pediatrics ; Chas. F. Sebastian in Obstetrics and Gyne- 
cology; J. W. Jones in Surgery, and Rea Ashley in Eye, Ear, Nose, and 
Throat. 



Departmental Reports 165 

The Junior Internes were Frank E. Blaisdell, S. v. Chrisfierson, R. J. 
Dixon. R. F. Flood, J. George, R. T. Haig, J. K. Lewis, H. Miller, and 
K. E. Smiley. 

COMMISSARY DEPARTMENT 

Plans have been formulated for the opening of an out patient Diet 
Kitchen for the purpose of supplying diabetic, nephritic, ulcer and anti-fat 
diets and specially prepared food for home consumption. The approval of 
the President and Board of Trustees has been obtained for the project and 
it is expected that tlie enterprise will be started in October. 

STOREROOMS 

The storeroom remains in charge of Mr. E. L. Slack. The importance of 
this department has been considerably increased by placing it in charge of 
all purchases for the Palo Alto Hospital and of all Commissary supplies 
for the new Stanford Union. An extra stenographer and clerk have been 
added to cover the increased work. 

BUSINESS OFFICE 

The volume of business handled for tbe past year amounted to $534,343.08. 
The record of collections showed a loss through uncollectable accounts 
amounting to $1,480.01 or .0027 per cent. 

PALO ALTO HOSPITAL 

The report on this institution has been made the subject for considera- 
tion in a separate communication which has been already forwarded. A 
report on its organization will be published in the annual report of Stanford 
University Hospitals. 

George Burbank Somers. 

Physician Superintendent. 



Medicine 

The teaching and clinical staff of the department for 1921-22 consisted 
of: Albion Walter Hewlett (Executive), Thomas Addis, professors; Harry 
Everett Alder son, William Fitch Cheney, Charles Miner Cooper, Harold Phil- 
lips Hill, Walter Frank Schaller, clinical professors; Ernest Charles Dick- 
son, Harold Kniest Faber, associate professors; Walter Whitney Board- 
man, Julian Wolf son, associate clinical professors ; W. Edward Chamberlain, 
Henry George Mehrtens, Herbert Yerington, assistant professors; George 
De Forest Barnett, William R. P. Clark, Millicent Cosgrave, Thomas George 
Inman, Harry Reeves Oliver, Alfred Cummings Reed, Roland B. Tupper, 
assistant clinical instructors ; Robert Reid Newell, Harry Alphonso Wyckoff , 
instnirtors; Clement Harrise Arnold, Joseph H. Catton, Norbert J. Gott- 
brath. Maude N. Haven, William Kenney, Mary Layman, Arthur A. 
O'Neill, Philip Hale Pierson, Jay Marion Read, Chester D. Sewall, clinical 
instructors; Wallace H. Barnes, Mabel Bennett, John Graves, James A. 
Guilfoil, Frank A. Kinslow, Frederick W. Kroll, Mary Jones Mentzer, 
Henry T. Rooney, Hermann Schussler, Jr., Harry Spiro, assistants; Ade- 



166 . Stanford University 

laide Brown, lecturer on Child Hygiene; Guy Stevens Farrington, lecturer 
on Speech Defects; Morton Gibbons, lecturer on Medical Aspects of In- 
surance; Arthur John Ritter, lecturer on Mental Deficiency. 

The following is a partial summary of investigations carried out during 
the past year by members of the Medical Department: 

Dr. Hewlett has continued his studies on the mechanism of the action 
of quinidine in auricular fibrillation. With Dr. N. R. Jackson he has com- 
pleted and published a statistical study of the variability of vital capacity in 
young normal adults. Dr. Spiro has continued his studies on the size and 
form of the heart in various cardiac abnormalities, using the instrument 
he has constructed for constructing a pattern of the heart shadow as ob- 
tained with the orthodiagraph. Dr. Wells has completed a special study of 
the deviations from the normal in the size and shape of the left auricle in 
mitral stenosis. Dr. J. Marion -Read has determined in 300 individuals, in- 
cluding patients who show a wide range of variation in rate of metabolism, 
the relation between the rate of basal metabolism and the rate of circula- 
tion as measured by the pulse pressure and pulse rate under basal condi- 
tions. He is at present engaged on a study of the effect of hypersensitive- 
ness to adrenalin on the pulse pressure and pulse rate. Dr. A. C. Reed is 
working in collaboration with Dr. Ely and Dr. Wyckoff, on the relation 
between amebic infections and arthritis deformans. A special room has been 
set aside for this work on the third floor of the college building. Dr. Wyckoff 
and Dr. Reed are also studying the incidence and clinical relationships of 
protozoal infections in general, and Dr. Wyckoff is collecting data on the 
wider subject of the incidence of all intestinal parasitic infections. Dr. 
Reed is the editor of the publications on medical matters which appear 
daily in the San Francisco Examiner under the Auspices of the League for 
the Conservation of Public Health. Dr. Binkley completed an investigation 
into the changes in the conjunctional arterioles which can be detected by a 
direct examination in patients with arteriosclerosis of the retinal arteries. 
Dr. Schussler is trying to work out a convenient plan for the administra- 
tion of digitalis in auricular fibrillation. In the gastro-intestinal clinic Dr. 
Boardman is carrying out a control study of the Meltzer-Lyon method for 
the diagnosis and treatment of gall bladder disease, particular attention being 
given to the bacteriology of the mouth, stomach and duodenum. Dr. Lut- 
trell is collecting data bearing on the possible relationship between infec- 
tion of the teeth and tonsils and the occurrence of gall bladder disease. 
Dr. Pierson is making a combined clinical X-ray and pathological study 
of the significance of certain incompletely understood deviations from the 
normal sometimes seen in X-ray plates in cases of pulmonary tuberculosis. 

In the laboratory for the study of metabolic diseases Dr. Addis, Dr. 
Drury and Mrs. Shevky are working together on the diagnosis and progno- 
sis of Bright's disease. Dr. Niebel has collected and classified the records 
of the laboratory in regard to the classification of cases of Bright's disease, 
and Dr. Tooker and Miss Lamson are now engaged on similar work in 
connection with the question of prognosis. In collaboration with Dr. 
Spalding, data bearing on the extent and nature of the renal lesion in 



Departmental Reports 167 

pregnancy toxemia were collected by Dr. Addis and Mrs. Shcvky and 
provisional conclusions in regard to prognosis were reached. This work 
will be continued next year on a larger scale. Mr. Meyer and Dr. Addis 
completed a study of the action of thyroxin on the capacity for urea 
excretion by the kidney. Dr. Fletcher Taylor, Mrs. Shevky and Dr. Addis 
found a direct* relation between the weight of the kidneys in rabbits of 
widely varying size and the magnitude of the ratio between the amount 
of urea in the urine and the blood. Dr. Drury, Mrs. Shevky and Dr. Addis 
also completed an investigation into the effect of the removal of one kidney 
in rabbits on the urea ratio and tlie urea concentration capacity and in 
collaboration with Dr. Jean Oliver correlated the functional findings with 
the loss of weight of renal tissue, taking into account the compensatory hy- 
pertrophy which occurred in the remaining kidney. Mr. Nakada is taking 
up a systematic study of the methods for the quantitative determination of 
diastase in urine and blood. Mr. MyeVs, Miss Mayer, Mrs. Shevky. and 
Mr. Stafford are studying the relationship between phosphate and urea ex- 
cretion in rabbits after feeding with urea and with phosphate. Mr. Stafford 
has undertaken an investigation of the effect on H ion concentration of the 
urine of rabbits before and after the production of a renal lesion by the 
injection of uranium. Dr. Tooker and Dr. Addis have been studv-ing the 
factors which influence the number of casts in the urine in cases of 
Bright's disease and this investigation is now being extended by work on 
animals. Dr. Drury and Dr. Addis have completed an attempt to determine 
the chemical nature of casts. Mrs. Shevky has finished a study of the 
methods for the rapid quantitative determination of the protein in the 
urine of cases of B right's disease and has succeeded in evolving a simple 
method which promises to be useful in clinical work. Dr. Drury obtained 
some very interesting results on the rate of urea excretion at different levels 
of blood urea concentration in rabbits after intravenous injection of varying 
concentrations of urea by means of a Woodyatt pump. He plans to extend 
these experiments so as to obtain data on the question of chloride excretion 
by the kidney. 

In the laboratory of Experjmental Medicine the investigation of Botu- 
lism has been carried on under the direction of Dr. Dickson. Mr. Richard 
Shevky has continued his study of the effect of the toxin of Bacillus botulinus 
upon the body. Mrs. Gieorgina S. Burke has made interesting observations on 
the biology of bacterial spores. Miss Lois Park has continued her experi- 
ments on the specificity of the botulinus antitoxin for the toxin of different 
strains of the Bacillus Astulinus, and Misses Dorthy Beck, Jean Johnston 
and Zelda Lindblom have continued the investigation of the factors which 
influence the thermal death time of the spores of Bacillus botulinus. The 
financial agreement with the National Canners Association, the Canners 
I-cague of California and the California Olive Association terminated June 
30, 1922, and the intensive study of botulism closed at that time. The results 
of the investigation are being assembled and prepared for publication at an 
early date. One minor report on a method of testing the thermal death 
time of spores was published during the year. 



168 Stanford University 

In the laboratory of clinical pathology Dr. Wyckoff is investigating 
various methods |or the production of antigens. An attempt is being 
made to extend the scope of dark-field examination of spirochetes. Special 
attention is being paid to the incidence of tropical diseases in San Francisco. 

In the Neurological subdivision Dr. Schaller is completing an analysis of 
spinal cord tumor cases. A serial section study of a tumor of the cerebellum 
has been finished and is now ready for study and interpretation. Another 
cerebellar and mid-brain specimen is in course of preparation. Data in re- 
gard to the intraspinal treatment of neurosyphilis, and the symptomatology 
of acute poliomyelitic paralysis, and of chronic epidemic encephalitis have 
been collected and published. Dr. Wolfsohn has been engaged on a study 
of the pathology of chorea and lethargic encephalitis. Dr. Catton is carrying 
out a neuropsychiatric investigation on criminals in the San Francisco City 
and County jails. He is also studying the relative importance of psycho- 
genic and somatogenic factors in the causation of mental disease, and the 
mechanism and tlierapy of the post-traumatic neuroses. Dr. Mehrtens is 
attempting to differentiate, by means of the Pupiloscope, those cases of lues 
which are destined to develop tabes, and by this means to secure a diagnosis 
at a time when it will be possible to obtain a higher percentage of cures. 
By means of this instrument it is hoped that it will be possible to learn the 
exact time of onset of the Argyll-Robertson pupil. 

In the subdivision of Pediatrics Dr. Faber has reached certain conclusions 
in regard to the food requirements of the new-born derived from ex- 
tensive data collected in the past' few years. With Dr. Melcher data were 
obtained in regard to the surface area of new-born infants which have led 
to a modification of the DuBois height-weight formula. The applicability 
of the Pirquet system of nutrition to American conditions has been dis- 
cussed on the basis of results obtained with other methods. Measurements 
have also been published in connection with the question of the value of the 
sitting height as an index to nutrition. Data on the relation between 
sitting height and body surface are now being collected. At present the 
height, weight, sitting height and the nutrition index by the Wood scale 
of 8,600 children are being obtained. An exponential formula for average 
systolic and diastolic pressures in relation to body weight has been worked 
out. Dr. Faber and Miss Hadden are at present studying the buffer values 
of milk and various infant foods. They are also making a comparative study 
of wool, cotton, silk, and linen fabrics used in infants' clothing. Miss 
Klingberg has compared the results obtained in children by the breath- 
holding test with those given by measurements of vital capacity. Dr. Takc- 
yama investigated the effect of the sediment which settles out from prepara- 
tions of antitoxin, and Miss Anderson has studied methods of immuniza- 
tion to diphtheria toxin. Dr. Schussler has continued his work on the treat- 
ment of hereditary syphilis and is obtaining promising results. 

In the subdivision of Dermatology Dr. Alderson has extended his studies 
of poison oak dermatitis and of the specific treatment by various methods 
of administration of poison oak extracts. Special investigations on tlie 
thyroid treatment of onychauxis, the value of tests with commercial luetin. 



Departmental Reports 169 

on acnitis, and on cutis verticis geyrata have been completed. Dr. Becker 
and Dr. Coe have joined the staff of the subdivision and night clinics for the 
many patients who cannot leave their work in the morning have been 
started and already are largely attended. 

In the department of Roentgenology, Dr. Chamberlain and Dr. Newell 
have made a special study of sacro-iliac subluxations and a new method of 
X-ray diagnosis has been worked out. It has also been found that in cases of 
pregnancy in which the fetus has died there is an overriding of the bones of the 
skull, a point which will be of considerable value in obstetrical work. 
During the past year data on the measurement of the internal diameters of 
the pelvis from plate measurements have been collected. 

Instruction was given in the medical wards of the Lane and San Fran- 
cisco Hospitals, in the children's ward of Lane Hospital, in the tuberculosis 
wards at the San Francisco Hospital, in the Isolation Hospital, in the 
various out-patient clinics, and in the X-ray department of Lane Hospital. 

Instruction in the medical wards of Lane Hospital was given by Doc- 
tors Hewlett, Cheney, Addis, Dickson, and Boardman in Medicine; by 
Doctors Schaller, Inman, and Mehrtens in Neurology; by Dr. Mehrtens in 
Psychiatry, and by Dr. Alderson in Skin Diseases and Syphilis. 

The Medical Service at the San Francisco Hospital was in charge of 
Dr. H. P. Hill, assisted by Doctors Kenney, Read, and Lee. The Tuber- 
culosis Service at the San Francisco Hospital was in charge of Dr. W. R. 
P. Clark, assisted by Dr. W- E. Glaeser. 

The number of admissions during the year to the Medical Clinic ward 
(men's) at Lane Hospital was \fi22. 

The following table gives the number of patients who have been treated 
in the Out-patient clinics attached to the Medical Department : 

Out-Patient Oinic New Old Refers and Total 

1921-22 Patients Patients Transfers Visits 

Medical 1.376 8,518 185 10,079 

Children's 1,805 6,055 162 8,022 

Skin 672 7,786 986 9,444 

Neurological 557 10,396 489 11,442 

Chest 95 1,543 285 1,923 

Dental „_ 1,013 1,253 2,266 

Albion Walter Hewlett, 

Professor of Medicine. 



Obstetrics and Gynecology 

The teaching staff of the past year has consisted of Alfred Baker 
Spalding, professor; Ludwig Augustus Kmge, assistant professor; Henry 
Walter Gibbons, Frank Robert Girard, Henry Augustus Stephenson, Wil- 
liam E. Stevens, assistant' clinical professors; Chester Biven Moore, Albert 
Victor Pettit, Karl Ludwig Schaupp, clinical instructors; Harry E. Clay, 
Hans von Geldern, Peter N. Jacobson, Lewis Michelson, Arthur Lee 
Mungcr, assistants. Drs. Wilder P. Ellis, Willis H. Hall, and S. S. 
Vamada assisted in the Women's Clinic as special workers. 



170 Stanford University 

There has been a continuous reduction in the number of deliveries con- 
ducted in the Obstetrical ward for the past three years. At the present time 
the number of deliveries at Lane Hospital is only slightly more than twenty- 
five per cent of what is considered a minimum need for a class A medical 
school. This state of affairs is due to the small amount of money provided 
for the care of free patients by the obstetrical budget. 

To correct these needs, an appeal was made to a small number of indi- 
viduals interested in the department, with the result that Mr. Peter C. Brice 
contributed $1,000 to the free bed account for the care of obstetrical patients. 
To meet the immediate urgent needs of the department the sum of at least 
$250,000 should be raised for the free bed account in obstetrics. 

There is need, also, for a Women's Hospital which would provide a closer 
contact of the teaching rooms with the laboratory, clinic, and wards. 

In spite of the cramped quarters in the laboratory and clinic and the 
small number of patients in the obstetrical ward, several important investi- 
gations have been conducted during the past year. In cooperation with the 
Department of Medicine, normal and toxic patients have been studied with 
the idea of determining the amount of renal damage caused by the toxemias 
of pregnancy. To further this investigation during the present year, Mr. M. 
R. Proctor has contributed $100. In cooperation with the Department of 
Roentgenology investigations have been made to determine the value of 
X-ray measurements of the pelvis and a study has been made on changes 
in the foetal skull as demonstrated by X-ray in certain cases of intra- 
uterine death. Also considerable material has accumulated and some steps 
have been made to determine the histological changes produced by radium 
in certain cases of carcinoma of the uterus. 

The following papers have been published: "Prolapse of the Uterus 
with Rectocele and Cystocele," "Tuberculosis of the Cervix, with Case 
Report," "A Pathognomonic Sign of Intrauterine Death" and "The Cause 
and Cure of High Rectocele" by Dr. A. B. Spalding ; "Biological Factors of 
Benzyl Benzoate Therapy" and "Notes on the Study of Mitochondria in the 
Human Amnion" by Dr. L. A, Emge; "Ovarian ^utotransplantations'* by 
F. R. Girard; "Treatment of the Infected and Lacerated Cervix Uteri" by 
Dr. A. V. Pettit; "Stricture of the Urethra in Women" by Dr. Wm. E. 
Stevens. 

The following papers are in print, "Pelvic Measurements by X-ray" 
and "The Extent of the Renal Lesion in the Toxemias of Pregnancy" by 
Dr. A. B. Spalding; "Posterior Vaginal Drainage with Description of New 
Instrument Used as a Vaginal Pelvic Guide" by Dr. F. R. Girard; "Car- 
diac Decompensation in Pregnancy and Labor" by Dr. K. L. Schaupp; 
"Rational Glandular Therapy in Gynecology" by Dr. A. L. Munger and 
"Diagnosis and Surgical Treatment of Malignant Tumors of the Kidney" 
by Dr. W. E. Stevens. 

The following papers are ready for the press: "Immediate Trachelor- 
rhaphy," "The Effect of Antibody Formation" and "The Effect of Benzyl- 
Benzoate on the Leucocyte Count" by Dr. L. A. Emge; "The Relation of 
Benzyl Benzoate to the Urinary Phenols" by Dr. J. P. Jenson and "Ade- 
noma of the Appendix" by Mr. C. B. Cowan. 



Departmental Reports 171 

The following students have completed their theses for this department: 
"Adenoma of the Appendix" by C. B. Cowan ; "The Relation of the Height 
of the Amniotic Epithelial Cells to the Length of Labor" by J. R. Johnston ; 
"The Value of White and Differential Leucocyte Counts in Gynecological 
Disturbances" by G. F. Jones, and "The Bacteriological Picture of Vaginal 
and Cervical Smears in Suspected Gonorrhoea" by A. F. Warren. 

At Lane Hospital the Obstetrical and Gynecological wards have been 
supervised by Dr. Spalding, assisted by Dr. Emge and Dr. Pettit. At the 
San Francisco Hospital the Gynecological ward has been supervised by Dr. 
Girard, assisted by Dr. Schaupp, and the Obstetrical ward has been super- 
vised by Dr. Schaupp, assisted by Dr. Munger. 

The Women's Clinic has been in charge of Dr. Pettit, 7,476 patients 
having been treated. In- the Gynecological ward at Lane Hospital ZZl patients 
have been treated and in the Obstetrical ward 241 have been cared for. 
In the Gynecological ward at San Francisco Hospital 286 have been taken 
care of and in the Obstetrical ward 279 have been attended. In the 
laboratory for the Division of Obstetrics and Gynecology 824 specimens 
have been studied. 

Miss M. Greninger has continued as secretary of the division and Miss 
G. Boyer has worked as technician in the laboratory. Miss R. Cook has 
supervised the nursing in the Women's Clinic and the Out-patient Obstetrics, 
assisted by Miss A. Witton. 

The work of the Social Service department has been of great value to 
us and aided greatly in spending justly and economically our meager 
budget •They have also obtained aid from other agencies for needy patients 
and have assisted the doctors in following the after-care of many patients 
operated upon in Lane Hospital. 

Volunteer aid has been given as clinical clerks by Miss E. Briesen, Mrs. 
Harry Durbrow, Mrs. A. Fisher, Miss V. Lilienthal, Miss Meyer, Miss 
Pringle, Mrs. R. Thayer, Mrs. Cyril Tobin, Mrs. M. R. Robbins, Miss 
Wepper, and Mrs. H. Wolff. 

The division has continued to hold monthly meetings and all have derived 
a great deal of mutual benefit from the clinical and divisional discussions. 

Alfred Baker Spalding, 
Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 



Pathology 

The personnel of this department was made up of William Ophiils, pro- 
fessor; Jean Redman Oliver, associate professor; Miss Ethel Douglas and 
George Stevens, technical assistants. 

Dr. Ophiils has commenced work on a general statistical survey of the 
results of the post mortem examinations in this department during the last 
twenty years. 

The study of biological reactions of arsphenamine is being continued by 
Or. Oliver and Miss Douglas. Two articles were completed by them during 
the year and are now in press : IV. The Effect of Arsphenamine on the 



172 Stanford University 

Coagulation of the Blood, and V. The Reactions of Arsphenamine with 
Plasma Colloids. Dr. Yamada and Dr. Oliver also published a preHniinar>' 
report on the effect of hydrophile colloids on the toxicity of arsphenamine. 
Further studies are being made on the excretion, storage, toxicity and thera- 
peutic efficiency of certain modifications of arsphenamine by Dr. Oliver and 
Miss Douglas, assisted by Frank Kolos and Rex ford McBride. 

Dr. Yoshu Fukuda is studying the method of the excretion of hemoglobin 
by damaged kidneys. A study of this excretion under normal conditions 
was completed by him during the year and is now in the course of publication. 

The number of autopsies performed during the year was 150, and 918 
bacteriological and pathological specimens were examined. 

William Ophuls, 

Professor of Pathology. 



Pharmacology 

The staff of the department for the year consisted of Paul John 
Hanzlik, professor; Floyd De Eds, instructor, and Elizabeth Presho, assist- 
ant and secretary. Miss Presho devoted one-half time to assistance in re- 
search. As a result of the revision of the medical curriculum, the number 
of hours assigned to this department has been increased from 154 to 232. 
Therapeutics was transferred from the Department of Medicine to this de- 
partment, whose title was changed to Department of Pharmacology and 
Therapeutics. During the past year the course in therapeutics was con- 
ducted by Professor Hewlett of the Department of Medicine, but here- 
after will be given by Clinical Instructor Russell Van Arsdale Lee, who re- 
tains his connection with the San Francisco City Hospital in order to facili- 
tate teaching in this subject. Mr. Maurice L. Tainter of the fourth year class 
was appointed assistant in pharmacology from September, 1922. 

The staff was considerably occupied with the reorganization of the de- 
partment in several directions. The quarters were rearranged and are de- 
voted entirely to research, offices for the staff and technician's quarters which 
also serve for stock materials- and small animals. The total lack of teach- 
ing laboratories necessitated the use of the research quarters for students 
in chemical pharmacology. Laboratory instruction in pharmacodynamics 
could not be given to students for lack of space, although completely new 
equipment for students' use has been provided for both pharmacodynamics 
and chemical pharmacology. Under the conditions the best that could 
be given was a series of demonstrations in pharmacodynamics. Research 
equipment was increased along physical -chemical lines and for carrying 
out modern biochemical methods. Some special physiological apparatus 
was also added. 

The duties of the department are conceived along three main lines: (I) 
Teaching, in order to acquaint students with pharmacological phenomena and 
analysis of drug action along fundamental lines so that as physicians they 
may use various agents intelligently and rationally in the alleviation of 
suffering and the prevention, treatment, and cure of disease. This includes 



Departmental Reports 173 

work along chemical and physiological lines, beginning with laboratory 
instruction followed by a systematic presentation of the subject with more 
extensive discussions of drugs and functions influenced by these, together 
with dosage, toxicology and therapeutic indications. Finally, the entire 
subject is presented from the standpoint of disease in the course on gen- 
eral therapeutics with emphasis on principles of treatment and class drills 
in prescription writing. 

(2) Research: The department aims to cover problems for development 
nf the subject of pharmacology itself ; observations of various remedies and 
therapeutic measures in patients, and testing of claims for new and promising 
agents in various ways so as to combat fraud and unwarranted claims, 
acquainting, in this way, the medical profession of what is desirable and 
what is not. During the year the following papers were published or arc 
in press : 

"The pharmacology of some phenylenediamins," by P. J. Hanzlik. 

"The toxicity and actions of the normal butylamins," by P. J. Hanzlik. 

*The comparative stimulant' efficiency of some local and systemic agents 
on normal and depressed respiration, and irritant efficiency of some agents," 
by P. J. Hanzlik. 

"A simple apparatus for continuous extraction of liquids by solvents 
lighter than water," by Floyd De Eds. 

"A convenient automatic apparatus for experiments with excised or- 
gans," by P. J. Hanzlik and Floyd De Eds. 

"Sudden death in two patients following the intravenous injections of 
acacia," by R. V. A. Lee. 

The following preliminary contributions were published : 

"Experimental plumbism: therapeutic efficiency of some agents and 
comparative toxicity of other metals," by P. J. Hanzlik, Mary Mclntyre, 
and Elizabeth Presho. 

"Further observations on anaphylactoid phenomena from different 
agents," by P. J. Hanzlik and Howard T. Karsner. 

"Urinary excretion of salicyl after the administration of salicylate and 
salicyl esters," by P. J, Hanzlik, Floyd De Eds, and Elizabeth Presho. 

"Influence of various factors on the excretion and decomposition of 
hexamethylenamin," by P. J. Hanzlik and Floyd De Eds. 

The data for some of these researches had been obtained, in part, else- 
where. 

Three of the preliminary contributions were presented by Dr. Hanzlik 
at the meetings of the Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Thera- 
peutics at Yale University, December 28-30, 1921. Dr. Hanzlik was appointed 
one of the Associate Editors of the Journal of Pharmacology and Experi- 
mental Therapeutics, reelected to the Council of the Society for Pharma- 
cology and Experimental Therapeutics in December, and elected vice- 
chairman of the Section of Pharmacology and Therapeutics of the Amer- 
ican Medical Association, at St. Louis in May, 1922. He also continued as 
Consultant to the Council of Pharmacy and Chemistry for the American 
Medical Association and rendered several reports on various remedies and 



174 Stanford University 

served in other capacities for the Journal of the American Medical Asso- 
ciation. Assistance was also given to the League for the Conservation of 
Public Health to indicate the scientific basis for drug therapy, etc. 

(3) Training of teachers and assistants: Mr. De Eds is rounding out 
his training in pharmacology by completing the subjects of the regular 
medical curriculum, this being deemed necessary as a part of the general 
training for one who would consider himself well qualified to conduct 
teaching and research in the medical sciences, including pharmacology. 

Paul John Hanzlik, 
Professor of Pharmacology and Therapeutics. 



Surgery 

The teaching and clinical staff of the division for the year 1921-22 was 
as follows: Stanley Stillman, Emmet Rixford, professors; Rufus Lee 
Rigdon, Albert Brown McKee, Edward Cecil Sewall, clinical professors; 
Frank Ellsworth Blaisdell, John Francis Cowan, Leonard Wheeler Ely, 
associate professors; Leo Eloesser, Phillip Kingsnorth Oilman, Harring- 
ton Bidwell Graham, Harvard Young McNaught, Caroline B. Palmer, 
Melville E. Rumwell, associate clinical professors; Edward B. Towne, as- 
sistant professor; John Adolph Bacher, Hans Barkan, John Robert Bur- 
rows. Edmund Butler, James Root Dillon, Arthur L. Fisher, Harry Leslie 
Langnecker, assistant clinical professors; Otto Barkan, Harold Augustus 
Fletcher, Ross Wallace Harbaugh, Roderic O'Connor, Lloyd Robinson 
Reynolds, Chester Howard Woolsey, clinical instructors; Rea Ernest Ash- 
ley, Hubert W. Dudley, William C. Hobdy, Josiah H. Kirk, Harry Staats 
Moore, Merton James Price, Lorruli Anna Rethwilm, Edward Solomon, 
Jphn Philip Strickler, Wilber Frank Swett, Sigurd von Christierson. 
Fredrick L. Wright, August Henry Rosburg, HaroW John Cooper, assist- 
ants; Sterling Bunnell, Henry A. L. Ryfkogel, George W. Hartman, Al- 
fred J. Zobel, lecturers, and S. Nicholas Jacobs, assistant lecturer. 

Instruction in general surgery in the Out-patient clinic and at Lane 
Hospital has been given by Drs. Stillman, Cowan, Blaisdell, Gilman, Rum- 
well, and Towne. 

Instruction in general surgery at the San Francisco Hospital has been 
given by Drs. Rixford, Eloesser, Harbaugh, and Butler. 

The Out-patient Surgical Clinic has been under the supervision of Dr. 
M. E. Rumwell, assisted by Drs. E. B. Towne, W. C. Hobdy, J. P. Strickler. 
and H. J. Cooper, and Mrs. C. M. Doyle, clerk of clinic. The total num- 
ber of visits to the clinic during the year was 7,621, of which 1,054 were 
made by new patients, 5,758 by old patients, and 809 by referred and trans- 
ferred patients. One hundred and eighty-two patients were transferred to 
Lane Hospital and 70 to the surgical service at the San Francisco Hospital. 
Many of the minor surgical operations formerly sent to the hospital are now 
performed in the operating room of the Out-patient clinic. During the year 
382 operations were performed by members of the Surgical staff in the clinic 
operating rooms of Stanford Hospital. 



Departmental Reports 175 

In the Genito-Urinary clinic the teaching and clinical work have been 
under the supervision of Dr. R. L. Rigdon. with Dr. James R. Dillon, chief 
of clinic, assisted by Drs. Lloyd R. Reynolds, C. H. Woolsey, and Edward 
Solomon; Mr. B. F. Jones, technical assistant, and Mrs. J. Morrille George, 
clerk of clinic. The total number of visits to the clinic during the year 
was 12,750. Of these 11,621 were by old patients, 752 by new patients and 
yjl by referred and transferred patients. Ninety-one patients were trans- 
ferred to Lane Hospital and 34 to the San Francisco Hospital. Drs. Dillon 
and Hartman have been in charge of the Urological Service at San Fran- 
cisco Hospital. Two hundred and eighty-seven operations were performed 
by members of the staff in the clinic operating rooms of Stanford Hospital 
and 56 operations were performed at the San Francisco Hospital. In the 
Out-patient clinic 861 diagnoses were made and 162 operations, including 
cystoscopy, endoscopy, and fulguration were performed. 

In Opthalmology the clinic has been under the supervision of Dr. A. B. 
McKee, assisted by Drs. Hans Barkan, Otto Barkan, W. F. Swett, H. W. 
Dudley, V. d'Ercole and Mr. J. H. Brunnings, optician. The total number 
of visits to the clinic during the year was 6,202. Of these 1,286 were made 
by new patients, 3,924 by old patients and 782 by referred and transferred 
patients. 

Dr. R<x3eric O'Connor has had charge of the work at the San Fran- 
cisco Hospital. Dr. Hans Barkan has spent the latter part of the year 
in study abroad. 

In Otolog>% Rhinology and Laryngology, the clinic and instruction have 
been under the supervision of Dr. Edward Cecil Sewall, Dr. John Bacher, 
chief of clinic, assisted by Drs. Harvard Y. McNaught, Rea E. Ashley, 
Josiah H. Kirk, Harold S. Moore, Merton J. Price, Lorruli A. Rethwilm and 
S. von Christ ier son, and Miss Elsa Cook, clerical assistant. Mrs. Theo- 
dora Poindexter and Miss Coralie N. Kenfield have had charge of the 
Lip Reading clinic for adults. 

The total number of visits to the clinic during the year was 11.421, of 
which 1.3fi3 were made by new patients, 8,443 by old patients, and 1.615 by 
referred and transferred patients. Nine hundred and seventy-three opera- 
tions were performed in the Out-patient clinic and 639 operations were per- 
formed in the clinic operating rooms of Stanford Hospital. 

In the fall of 1919 a free class in Lip-reading was started in the Medical 
School, where opportunities for coming in contact with tbe deaf adult arc 
numerous. Through the courtesy of the Dean the use of a clinic room 
was set aside for this class. During the two and a half years that the 
class has been in existence 12 pupils have applied for lessons, yet the classes 
liave been held regularly, for tbe few members of the class who have been 
faithful students have warranted the continuation of the work. Because of 
the importance of this work. Dr. Sewall has made the Lip-reading class a 
part of the subdivision of Otology — ^and in consequence of this, it is hoped 
that the scope of the work will extend, for the Lip-reading is a first aid and 
^A. the last resort for the deaf adult, no matter how slight the impairment 
of hearing may be. We look to the Social Service Department of the 



176 Stanford University 

Medical School and the Stanford Clinics Auxiliary for cooperation, trusting 
that all deaf adults who pass through these departments will be urged to 
take up the study of Lip-reading. With this cooperation in view we have 
submitted to the Social Service Department data regarding occupational 
work for the deaf, consisting of a list of occupations in which the deaf 
have been successful and proved the equal of the worker with normal hearing. 
The problem of the remunerative employment for the deaf adult is a vital 
one, and deserves the greatest attention on the part of all social workers. 
The Philocophus Club, the officers and active members of which are deaf 
adults, looks out for the social welfare of the Stanford Clinic Lip-reading 
Class and gives its members a pleasant afternoon once a month. 

In the Subdivision of Orthopaedics, the clinic work and instruction 
have been under the supervision of Dr. Leonard W. Ely, assisted by Dr. 
Arthur L. Fisher and Miss Helen C. Wallach, clerical assistant. Dr. H. L. 
Langnecker has been in charge of the postural work. The total number of 
visits to the clinic during the year was 3,191, of which 965 were made by new 
patients, including referred and transferred patients, and 2,226 by old 
patients. 

Dr. Ely has continued his studies on his "Second Great Type of Chronic 
Arthritis," and upon the "Healing of Experimental Fracture.^." His new 
book on "Inflammation in Bones and Joints" is at present in the hands of 
the publisher. 

In the Laboratory- of Surgical Pathology, the work has been conducted 
by Dr. F. E. Blaisdell, Sr., with Mr, John Kratsch, technical assistant, and 
Mrs. Irene Mullin, assistant technician. During the year, 844 specimens of 
tissue from the Operating Rooms of the Hospital and College Clinics liave 
been examined. 

The following papers have been published or completed by members of 
the division : 

Dr. E. B. Towne : The Value of Ventriculograms in the Localization of 
Intracranial Lesions. The So-called Permanent Polyuria of Experimental 
Diabetes Insipidus. The Diagnosis and Treatment of Intracranial Hemor- 
rhage of the New-Born. (Report of a case.) 

Dr. F. E. Blaisdell, Sr. : Fracture of the Tibial Spine. ( An experi- 
mental study, completed and accepted by the Archives of Surgery.) De- 
scription of a Pathological Human Embryo 3 mm. in length. (Completed.) 

Dr. J. F. Cowan: Enterolith with Case Report. 

Dr. S. L. Haas: Function in Relation to Transplanted Bone (Apr. '22. 
Vol. 10, Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery). Fractures in Transplanted 
Bone. (Submitted for Warren Prize, Apr. *22.) Fractures in Transplanted 
Bone. (Under preparation.) Relation of Periosteum and Endosteum to 
Fractures in Transplanted Bone. (Under preparation.) Survival of Bone 
After Removal from Animal. (Under preparation.) Further Studies on 
Regeneration of Bone from Periosteum. (Under preparation.) 

Drs. F. E. Blaisdell, Sr., and J. F. Cowan: Experimental Studies of 
Green-Stick Fractures in a Series of Kittens. 

Dr. L. W. Ely: Chronic Arthritis. The Treatment of Joint Tubercu- 
losis. The Great Second Type of Chronic Arthritis. (Further studies.) 



Departmental Reports 177 

Drs. L. W. Ely, A. C. Reed, H. A. Wyckoff: The Amoeba as the 
Cause of the Second Great' Type of Chronic Arthritis. 

Mr. Matsuta Takahashi, a senior student, has been working in the 
Laboratory in the preparation of his theses on the following subject: On 
the Value of Cerebral Pneumography in the Diagnosis and Localization of 
Intro-Cerebral Lesions. 

The following experimental work has been carried on in the Laboratory 
during the year : 

Dr. S. L. Haas : Healing of Fractures in Transplanted Bone. 

Dr. Leonard Ely : Studies in Buned Bone. (Continued.) Experimental 
Infection of Cats with Amoeba Histolytica in an Attempt to Produce 
Chronic Arthritis, Type II. 

Dr. F. £. Blaisdell: Experimental Injuries of the Epiphyseal Line in 
Young Rabbits to Determine tlie Effect on Longitudinal Growth. 

Dr. J. F. Cowan : Healing of Fractures of the Patella. 

Dr. E. B. Towne: Experimental Production of Diabetes Insipidus by 
Separation of the Stalk of the Pituitary Gland. (Hypophysis.) 

The following theses were completed by senior students : 

Mr. F. E. Blaisdell, Jr.: Changes in Smooth Muscle Following Physio- 
logical Rest with the Blood Supply and Nerve Supply Intact. 

Mr. Cordes W. Ankele: An Experimental Study on the Uses of 
Free and Pedunculated Fescial Flaps in Surgery. 

Mr. Alfred Wepfer : The Histogenesis of Smooth Muscle in Diemictylis 
Torrosus. (Water dog.) 

Mr. E W. Wells : The Study of the Heart in Topographical Relation of 
the Chest of the Cadaver. (As Bearing Upon His Thesis Problem.) 

Stanley Stillman, 

Professor of Surgery. 



MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS 

The following report for the year 1921-22 is submitted: 
1. Personnel: The only change which has taken place in the de- 
partment during the year is the relief from duty and return to a retired 
status of Major Richard H. Power, Veterinarian, Retired. This was done 
contrary to the recommendation of the department, because of the saving 
which would result in R. O. T. C. expenses. The course in Horses and 
Stable Management given by Dr. Power and the stable supervision have 
been taken over by Major Collins. Especially good work has been done by 
the regular army enlisted detiachment to date. These men, some of whom 
have been here since the Field Artillery Unit was started three years ago, 
have conducted themselves in a way to bring credit to the University and 
to the regular army and no small part of the success of the department is 
attributable to the long hours of conscientious effort given by them'. Not a 
single case of wrong doing has occurred in that time to mar the cordial 
relations existing between the men on the one hand and the students and 
University generally on the other. It is suggested that a letter from 



178 Stanford University 

the President to the War Department would have a desirable effect and 
would be a fitting recognition of the good work done by the men. 

2. Students and Instruction : The attitude of the students toward 
their work has been good. There were 331/3% more students under instruc- 
tion this year than last. A comparison made at Camp Knox last summer 
indicates that the instruction given in our course is the equal of, and in 
some cases is superior to, that given in any other college. It is expected tliat 
the rearrangement of the course under the advice of the President and the 
Faculty Military Committee will convince a greater proportion of the stu- 
dents of the desirability of voluntarily undertaking the course with the idea 
of fitting themselves to become reserve officers. Many men come to Stan- 
ford with previous service in junior R. O. T. C. units in high schools and 
junior colleges and some of them take the military courses here. They 
are given some credit for former work. California is strong in its high 
school military instruction, but it is evident that the belief on the part of 
the majority of entering students, that the course is merely a repetition of the 
methods and courses used in high schools, works against the department in 
the students' minds. For the first time it has been deemed necessary to 
continue a course during the summer quarter and this will be done. 

3. Buildings: The temporary buildings erected by the University 
three years ago have been kept in good repair. Painting them has been an 
expense justified in every way. The moving of the old inn about to be done, 
to a position near the barracks and other buildings, will furnish office, museum 
and class room. On account of convenience to students and adequate facili- 
ties it has been the practice to hold all theoretical classes in the quadrangle 
in rooms belonging to other departments but not used at desired hours. It 
would be better if the R. O. T. C. offices also were located on the quad. 
It is therefore recommended that, as soon as such can be done, four rooms — 
three for class rooms and one for office — ^be assigned to the military de- 
partment. 

The Board of Athletic Control has very generously given the old football 
training quarters, at present used as the department office, to the de- 
partment to be moved to the new polo field for a clubhouse and visitors' use. 

4. Miscellaneous: Gratitude is expressed to the newly formed faculty 
military committee for the zeal and earnestness with which they have taken 
up their work and for the assistance already rendered. 

Polo has been more successful this year than before. A first-class team 
has been developed with which it was hoped to inaugurate intercollegiate 
polo in the West by playing a series of games with Oregon Agricultural 
College. After the preliminary arrangements had been made, Oregon felt 
it necessary to cancel them but if promises to play us in the fall. 

The equitation classes for the faculty and girl students which were started 
last year were continued during the present one. 

Leroy Pierce Collins, 
Major, Field Artillery (D. O. L.), 
Professor of Military Science and Tactics. 



Departmental Reports 179 

MINING AND METALLURGY 

The faculty of this department for its third year consisted of: Pro- 
fessors Theodore Jesse Hoover and James MacDonald Hyde; Associate 
Professors Waldcmar Fenn Dietrich, Welton Joseph Crook, and Frederick 
George Tickell; Assistants S. Myron Zandmer and Paul Frederick Bos- 
well; Lecturer Louis David Mills. 

The registration of graduate students in the department was twenty- 
seven. 

The degree of Engineer was granted to Harold V. Dodd, James D. 
McPherson, John A. Potter, and R. G. Whealton, 

Research work was continued throughout the year by all of the 
faculty, but was of a preliminary nature and will be reported on in detail 
in the year to come. 

Our preliminary work on the economic minerals of the vicinity of the 
University has shown that the old "Hermit Mine" can be made a valuable 
adjunct to the instruction in Mining and Metallurgy. While the ore body 
is not large, it contains values in lead, zinc, and silver. 

Theodore Jesse Hoover, 
Professor of Mining and Metallurgy. 



PHILOSOPHY 



The departmental faculty for 1921-22 consisted of Henry Waldgrave 
Stuart, professor, and Harold Chapman Brown, associate professor. 

During the latter part of the winter quarter and in the spring quarter, Dr. 
Brown finished two courses in the second semester at the University of 
California in the unforeseen absence of Professor Richer and also conducted 
two courses during the Inter-session at that institution. 

The total number of registrations in the department was 508. Of tbese. 
16 represent graduate students of this and other departments enrolled in 
courses 20 and 25 (Seijiinary) which are classed as ''advanced and gradu- 
ate." Three candidates for the doctorate in other departments were en- 
rolled for a minor in Philosophy and one graduate student of this department 
was engaged in work looking to the degree of Master of Arts. 

Henry Waldgrave Stuart, 

Professor of Philosophy, 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND PERSONAL HYGIENE 

Roble Gymnasium 

The staflF of Roble Gymnasium for the year 1921-22 consisted of Helen 
Masters Bunting, Director; Clelia Duel Mosher, Medical Adviser, assist- 
ant professors ; Greta Johannsen Brandsten, Lois Marjorie Kendall, instruc- 
tors; Edith Pasmore, assistant in instruction; Georgina Meyer Burk, 
assistant in instruction and secretary. The following were also on the 
staff for the first half of the summer quarter only, giving special courses for 
teachers of Physical Education : Elsie Reed Mitchell, M.D. ; Alice Martin 



180 Stanford University 

Burdett, Marion Hart well Wallace, Gertrude Bradley Manchester, Catlierine 
Winslow, Christine Fabb, and Doris Stevenson, 

The aim of the department is to serve the best interests of the health of 
the women students by providing systematic exercise adapted to their indi- 
vidual needs and by furnishing wholesome recreation as an antidote to the 
sedentary hours incident to academic pursuits. The department further 
aims to develop a spirit of democracy, good sportsmanship, and solidarity 
among the women students by providing a wide range of sport activities, 
and by cooperating with the Women's Athletic Association in arranging 
athletic competitions between the University classes on our own campus 
and those of the University of California and Mills College. 

At the opening of each quarter medical and physical examinations were 
given to all new students taking work in this department. One hundred 
sixty-two (162) such examinations were given. In addition fifty-one (51) 
or more medical examinations were given to new students not taking work in 
the department and to old students returning to the University after an ab- 
sence of one or more quarters. One hundred sixteen (116) additional 
posture examinations were given to students whose posture nedeed especial 
attention. When any of these examinations showed that the student was in 
need of remedial work she was assigned to a special class, limited in num- 
ber, provided for the removal of remedial handicaps. All students taking 
required work in the department were re-examined at the close of the spring 
quarter, 292 such examinations having been given. The total number of 
examinations given during the year was six hundred twenty-one (621). In 
addition all students in the special clinics and all students needing special 
observation were re-examined frequently during the year. The. examinations 
were given by the Medical Adviser, the Director of the Department, and 
two other members of the staff. 

Courses were given in the autumn quarter in elementary and advanced 
archery, dancing, hockey, personal hygiene, remedial gymnastics, elementary, 
intermediate and advanced swimming, elementary, intermediate, and advanced 
diving, elementary and intermediate tennis. Courses were given in the winter 
quarter in elementary and advanced archery, baskt ball, dancing, equitation 
(through the courtesy of the Military Training Department), personal hy- 
giene, remedial gymnastics, Swedish gymnastics, elementary, intermediate 
and advanced swimming and diving, and advanced tennis. Courses were 
given in the spring quarter in elementary, intermediate and advanced archery, 
elementary, intermediate, and advanced dancing, equitation (through the 
courtesy of the Military Training Department), remedial gymnastics, ele- 
mentary, intermediate, and advanced swimming and diving, and elementary 
and intermediate teimis. Courses were given in the summer quarter in ele- 
mentary, intermediate, and advanced swimming and diving, and in profes- 
sional subjects as follows : Organization and adaptation of activities in 
high schools, organization and adaptation of activities in elementary schools, 
playground administration, playground and school room activities, principles 
of physical education, history of physical education, growth and development 
of the child, hygiene teaching, physical inspection, health supervision, and 
child pathology, anatomy, physiological effects of muscular activity, kinesi- 



Departmental Reports 181 

o\ogy, {ormal activities, aesthetic and folk dancing* general course in ath- 
letics, methods and technique of teaching swimming. 

The total number of students registered in the department in 1921-22 
(exclusive of the summer quarter, in which 248 students were registered) 
was 1,085, making an average registration per quarter of 361.6 students. This 
includes 53 graduate students, who paid a special fee for the privileges of 
the department. The average registration per quarter in 1911-12 was 214.5. 
We have had, therefore, an increased registration of almost 609^r during the 
last decade. The gymnasium erected in the first year of the University is 
still the only gymnasium that Stanford women have. We can scarcely ex- 
pect further growth in the department until more adequate equipment is 
provided. 

No additions have been made to the athletic fields or physical education 
buildings during the year 1921-22. 

The urgent need for a hew gymnasium for the women was set forth in 
detail in last year's report. Conditions have not changed since that time, 
except that the equipment is still more inadequate and out-of-date, and the 
temporary building around the swimming pool is in need of repair and paint. 
It seems unwise to put any more money in this temporary building. 

The new gymnasium, which ought to be provided at once, should contain 
provision for: 1. The regular work of the University classes. 2. Spe- 
cial clasess in remedial work. 3. Space for the activities of the Women's 
Athletic Association. 4. Adequate dressing room and shower accommoda- 
tions. 5. Suitable and sufficient office space. 6. Lecture rooms, labora- 
tories, library, etc., for the use of professional students in physical education. 

The athletic fields should be improved to include two more hockey 
fields, four more tennis courts, and a running track and jumping pits to satisfy 
the urgent request of the women for track and field sports. 

Professional courses in physical education, consisting of a three-year 
major superimposed upon the Lower Division work, should be added to the 
curriculum of the department at once, in order to help supply the demand 
of the state for intelligenjtly trained teachers of physical education, and to 
provide such training for the students who are constantly applying for it. 

The department worked in close cooperation with the Women's Athletic 
Association and most friendly and mutually helpful relations existed 
throughout the year. The Director of the Department served as faculty 
member of the Executive Board of the Women's Athletic Association. All 
coaching of the sports of the association and all training for the dancing 
of the Spring Pageant were furnished by the department staff without ex- 
pense to the association. 

The Director of the Department served as Chairman of the Faculty 
Committee on Women's Athletics, which is appointed yearly by the Presi- 
dent of the University. 

The Medical Adviser served on the Committee on Public Health, which 
is appointed yearly by the President of the University, and also on the 
Committee on Women's Athletics. 

The Director of tlie Department attended the conference of the Western 



182 Stanford University 

Section of College Directors of Physical Education for Women held at the 
University of Oregon May 12th and 13th, and was re-elected secretary- 
treasurer of the society to serve for a period of two years. An invitation 
extended to the society to hold its next meeting at Stanford University was 
cordially accepted, and accordingly the conference will be held on our 
campus next spring. 

The Director was faculty representative of the Won*en*s Athletic 
Association to the conference of the Western Section of the Athletic Con- 
ference of American College Women which was held at the University of 
Oregon on May 12th and 13th. She attended all meetings to which the fac- 
ulty representatives were eligible. The student conference voted to hold its 
future conferences at the same time and place as the conferences of the 
Western Section of College Directors of Physical Education for Women, 
and accordingly the Western Section of the Athletic Conference of American 
College Women will be held at Stanford next spring. The Stanford repre- 
sentative was elected President of the Conference. 

The Director served on the National Committee on Women's Athletics of 
the American Physical Education Association, and attended tlie conference 
on basket ball rules held at the University of Oregon on ^ay 11th. 

Helen Masters Bunting, 
Director Physical Exlucation of Women. 



Medical Adviser of Women 

More effective administration of the work of the Medical Adviser of 
Women has been made possible by a closer cooperation with the Chairman 
of the Public Health Committee, the Dean of Women, and the Registrar, 
while at the same time there has been maintained the close relation with the 
Department of Physical Education. 

The three-hour course in Personal Hygiene was given in the autumn 
quarter and repeated in the winter quarter. 

A study of conditions convinced the medical adviser that the too frequent 
break-downs among the selected group of women admitted to Stanford 
University were due to certain fundamental faults in their personal hygiene. 

With the approval of the Chairman of the Public Health Committee and 
in cooperation with the Registrar there was added to the registration book a 
card which must be handed in person to the Medical Adviser of Women. 
This gave an opportunity for the medical adviser to see, at the begin- 
ning of the quarter, each woman enrolled in the University. Not only were 
contacts established, but an opportunity was afforded to select for further 
interviews and observation those women whose condition was obviously not up 
to the standard. 

At the opening of the winter quarter these questions were asked : 
How many hours did you sleep on the average last quarter? 
How many glasses of water did you drink per day ? 
Were you constipated? 

To each woman individually a brief statement was made of the reasons 
for sleeping nine hours per night, drinking from eight to a dozen glasses 



Departmental Reports 183 

of water per day, and the importance of perfect elimination. The response 
M'as so interesting and suggestive that a new method of teaching Personal 
Hygiene was evolved. 

With the cooperation of the Dean of Women cards for the recording of 
the individual girl's personal habits for a week in regard to these items were 
sent out three tii^^^ during the quarter: one card during mid-terms, one 
during the interval between mid-terms and finals, and one during final exam- 
inations. Thus not only did each individual woman enrolled in the Univer- 
sity consciously think of her own habits of sleeping, water-drinking, and 
elimination for a week, but also the community consciousness of these things 
was aroused. This followed the calling of individual attention to the 
proper habits and the reasons. The keeping of these cards was purely vol- 
untar>'. The interest in the matter is well shown by the return of 
365 of the first series 
350 of the second series 
325 of the third series 

These observations are being tabulated and will be reported in a joint 
paper by the Dean of Women and the Medical Adviser. 

Daily office hours have been maintained. The medical adviser has been 
in her ofHce five days a week from 10-12 and 1-5 and Saturday from 10-12, 
although the scheduled office hours have been from 4-5 five days a week 
and Saturday from 10-11. 

The study of the height of women has been continued. A second paper 
entitled The Height of College Women was published in November. This 
paper showed the Stanford women to represent a cross-section of the col- 
lege women of the United States and not a localized group. The birthplaces 
represented every state in the union with the exception of Delaware and 
Xorth Carolina. 

The correctness of the Stanford findings in regard to the increase in the 
height of women has been confirmed by the Vassar study of more than 7,000 
students and by Smith college of over 10,000. The medical adviser's state- 
ment that increasing physical activity of women was probably one of the 
factors in the increased height has received some statistical confirmation 
from the Vassar study: there being 26.5% of the earlier group of women 
who had no physical activity while the later group shows but 0.6% who had 
no physical activity before entering college. The final paper on the Height 
of College Women is nearly ready for publication. 

It is recommended that regular inspection of the drinking fountains be 
made to see that they are constantly in order and that a survey be made 
to see where additional fountains should be installed. 

The medical adviser having been on duty six quarters consecutively was 
absent during the spring quarter and her work for the department of Physi- 
cal Education of Women was carried on by Dr. Elsie Reed Mitchell 
during the spring and summer quarters. 

Clelia Dufx Mosher, 
Assistant Professor of Personal Hygiene, and 
Medical Adviser of Women. 



184 Stanford University 

PHYSICS 

The faculty of the department included : David Locke Webster, professor ; 
Frederick John Rogers, associate professor; Joseph Grant Brown, Elmer 
Reginald Drew, Perley Ason Ross, assistant professors; George Russell 
Harrison, instructor; Mildred Lucille Frarier. assistant. 

For several years the elementary physics classes have been divided into 
two groups, one of prospective engineers and the other of nrm-engineering 
students. In the latter group, whose mathematical preparation is meager, 
there has been a growing need for a text-book that would explain more 
fully the aims and methods of analytical reasoning, even at the cost of 
omitting many topics covered by the engineers. At the same time the need 
for a fuller treatment of modern physics has been shown by the success of 
the new course on that' subject, introduced last year and modified to some 
extent this year. Professors Webster and Drew, with the collaboration of 
Professor Farwell, of Columbia, have therefore devoted a considerable part 
of the year to the preparation of such a text 

In research. Professor Emeritus Sanford and Professor Brown have 
been collecting further data on the diurnal variations of earth currents and 
related effects. 

Professor Webster has continued his work on the origin of the con- 
tinuous spectra in X-rays, with special reference this year to the spectrum 
of molybdenum. In this work he has been very ably assisted by Professor 
A. E. Hennings, of the University of British Columbia, who spent the sum- 
mer here. 

Professor Ross has extended his work on X-rays of the M series, and 
is investigating the fainter lines produced by the outer electrons of the atom. 

Dr. Harrison has completed his Ph.D. thesis on the absorption of light 
by sodium vapor and its relation to Bohr's theory of atomic structure, and 
is continuing work on that line. 

The high tension apparatus, installed last year for these researches, has 
also proved valuable to Dr. Sponsler, of the Department of Botany, for 
some very important work on the crystal structure of starch, as disclosed by 
X-rays. It is now being used likewise by Mr. P. F. Kerr, of the Department 
of Geology, for some work he has recently begun on the identification of 
minerals. 

Messrs. Morris Taylor and C. E. Weaver have also used this apparatus 
for preliminary tests of an X-ray spectrograph, designed at the request of 
Dr. J. M. Rehfisch, of St. Luke's Hospital, San Francisco, for the analysis 
of the very penetrating rays used by him in cancer treatment. This work 
is being continued by Mr. Weaver and Mr. W. W. Nicholas, who expect on 
its completion to analyze the rays used in cancer treatment at other hos- 
pitals. Mr. Nicholas is also working on a theory of the structure of atomic 
nuclei, which may prove of considerable importance. 

David Locke Webster. 

Professor of Phvsics. 



DEPART.\rEXTAL REPORTS 185 

PHYSIOLOGY 

The staff of the Department of Physiology consisted of Professor Ernest 
Gale Martin. Associate Profes<K)r Frank Walter Weymouth, Assistant Pro- 
fessors James Percy Baumberger, James Rollin Slonaker, and Arthur Gib- 
son Vestal; Instructor George Daniel Shafer, Acting Instructor for the 
summer quarter Thomas Leon Patterson, professor of Physiology in the 
Detroit College of Medicine ; Assistants in Instruction Percy Nicol Annand 
and Harrv Alfred Borthwick. Of these, Assistant Professor Vestal and 
Assistants Annand and Borthwick gave their time wholly to the work in 
general biology (See Report on General Biology). 

The modified plan of instruction in physiology referred to in last year's 
report' was in effect in entirety during this year. So far as can be judged, 
the reaction of the students to the change in character of instruction was 
favorable, and the results as a whole appear to justify the departure from 
the traditional plan of teaching physiology. 

Mr. Lawrencf Irving, a candidate for the Ph. D. degree in physiology, 
continued work on his thesis during the year. He is carrying on his in- 
vestigations under the immediate supervision of Professor Baumberger. 

Three graduate students, Mr. Harold Light Averill, Miss Edith Edwina 
Pasmore. and Miss Ina Moseitus Pocock, completed tlie requirements for 
the Master's degree; Mr. Averill and Miss Pasn^ore worked under the 
supervision of Professor Weymouth, Miss Pocock under the direction of 
Professor Martin. 

Other advanced students working in the department were: Mr. J. E. 
Burke, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree in entomology. Miss Emily E. 
Andersen, and Messrs. William John Allexsaht, Reo B. Armitstead, 
Joseph Allen Craig, and Blake Colburn Wilbur. 

Investigations were carried on by members of the staff, as follows : 

Acting Instructor T. L. Patterson, working at the Hopkins Marine Sta- 
tion during the summer quarter, studied the movements of the empty stom- 
ach in the abalone (Haliotis rufcsc<nis), together with the effect of certain 
stimuli on the inhibitory control of the neuro-muscular mechanism in this 
same form. He also made an investigation on Cryptochiton st^Ueri and 
some preliminary observations on the hagfish {Polistotrema 'stouti). 

Instructor George D. Shafer continued his observations on the growth 
of dragon-fly nymphs at the time of molt and between molts. The results 
of his observations to date are in course of preparation for publication. 
Dr. Shafer also continued his study of the factors which govern mating 
in the honey-bee, and in collaboration with Professor Martin devised a sim- 
ple method of demonstrating the secretory functions of the glomeruli and 
tubules in the kidney. 

Assistant Professor Baumberger completed and prepared for publication 
papers as follows : On the nicotine content of tobacco smoke ; On the carbon 
monoxide c(»ntent of tobacco smoke and its absorption on inhaling; and A 
comparison of the absorption of tobacco smoke in puffing and inhaling as dc- 
termiiK-tl by electrical precipitation. He also continued his investigation 
of the cause of the change in osmotic pressure during the molting cycle in 



186 Stanford University 

the crab; and in collaboration with J. M. D. Olmsted prepared for publica- 
tion a paper on The changes in osmotic pressure in crabs during the molting 
cycle. 

Under Professor Baumberger's direction, Mr. J. E. Burke investigated 
the tropisms of the telephone-cable beetle, a problem of some interest in view 
of the injury done to telephone cables as a result of the attacks of this beetle. 
J. A. Craig studied the penetration of the hydrogen-ions when acids of various 
strengths were applied to ciliated gill filaments. Lawrence Irving studied, 
with the aid of the hydrogen electrode, the relation of hydrogen-ion con- 
centration to digestion. 

Professor Baumberger attended during the latter part of May, 1922, 
the California Conference of Social Workers at San Diego, where he de- 
livered a paper on The effect of alternating occupations on working ca- 
pacity. 

Assistant Professor Slonaker has completed and now has ready for 
publication the results of his eight years* experiments on the effect of a re- 
stricted diet on the fecundity, the young, and on succeeding generations of 
the albino rat. During the past year he carried on an experiment to show 
the effect" of oestruation on the voluntary activity of the albino rat. The 
present year he will continue this experiment and extend it to include the 
effect of gestation on the voluntary activity of this animal. 

Associate Professor Weymouth completed during the year work un- 
dertaken for the California Fish and Game Commission on the life- 
history of the Pismo clam, a species of economic importance now show- 
ing evidence of marked depletion. A paper, embodying a detailed study of 
the growth of this organism, is ready for the press. He also published a 
note in Science on decerebration in birds. 

During the year Miss Emilie E. Andersen completed an investigation, 
which she had been carrying on under Professor Weymouth's direction, 
on the binocular judgment of distance. Mr. Harold L. Averill carried out 
a study of the effects of eye-movements on visual acuity. As a result of these 
two related studies, both of which will shortly be published, a new view 
of the relation of the retinal mosaic to visual perception has been developed. 
Miss Edith E. Pasmore made, under Professor Weymouth's direction, an 
analysis of anthropometric data obtained from the records of the Roble 
Gymnasium on vital capacity as related to height and weight in women. A 
paper dealing with the results will shortly be published. 

Under the joint direction of Professor Coover of the Department of 
Psychology and Professor Weymouth, Mr. F. S. Fearing has undertaken a 
reexamination of certain psychological and physiological features of the 
knee-jerk. 

Professor Martin completed and sent to press his joint investigation 
with Mr. R. B. Armitstead on The effect of adrenalin on various excised tis- 
sues; he continued, in cooperation with Mr. Blake C. Wilbur, the study of 
salt antagonism in Artemia, and during the spring quarter embarked with 
Professor Heath and Mr. Wilbur on an elaborate comparative study of the 
brine-inhabiting crustacean, Artemia, and the extraordinarily similar fresh- 
water form, Branchipus. 



Departmental Reports 187 

In collaboration with Professors Burlingame, Heath, and Peirce, Pro- 
fessor Martin was engaged in the preparation of a Textbook on General 
Biology. 

During the Christmas holidays Professor Martin attended the meet- 
ing of the American Physiological Society in New Haven, Conn., where he 
reported the results of investigations made the previous year by Mr. M. L. 
Tainter on a remarkable inhibitory effect following decerebration in dogs, 
and certain studies by Messrs. A. H. Beede and H. S. Wells on the signifi- 
cance of the Pignet strength formula. He also presented before the same 
society the method of demonstrating kidney function worked out by Dr. 
Shafer and himself. 

In June, 1922, Professor Martin attended the meeting of the Pacific Divi- 
sion of the American Association for the Advancement of Science held in 
Salt Lake City. At this meeting he reported some of the observations 
made by Mr. Wilbur and himself on Artemia. 

Ernest Gale Martin, 

Professor of Physiology. 



General Biology 

The courses in General Biology were administered during their second 
year by the same committee that organized and conducted them during their 
first year. This committee consisted of Leonas Lancelot Burlingame, Har- 
old Heath. George James Peirce, and Ernest Gale Martin, Chairman. 
Professor Burlingame again acted as executive director. The committee 
owes much to his untiring activities. 

Lectures were given by the members of the committee, assisted by the 
following members of the Faculty, to all of whom the committee is deeply 
indebted : 

President Ray Lyman Wilbur 7 lectures 

Leroy Abrams 2 lectures 

Carl Lucas Alsberg 1 ^lecture 

Rennie Wilbur Doane 2 lectures 

Walter K. Fisher 2 lectures 

Lewis Madison Terman 2 lectures 

Arthur Gibson Vestal 4 lectures 

The lecture courses, although designed primarily for Lower Division 
students, were attended by a fairly large proportion from the Upper Division, 
indicating an appreciation on the part of these students of the opportunity 
afforded to survey the general field of biology. 

The laboratory course, which was given five times during the year, 
was again in charge of Assistant Professor Arthur Gibson Vestal, who con- 
tinued to display the marked industry and devotion which characterized his 
first year of service. Professor Vestal was assisted throughout the year by 
Percy Nicol Annand and Harry Alfred Borthwick, Assistants in Instruc- 
tion ; also by the following advanced students who served as voluntary assist- 
ants in connection with their professional biological preparation, to the 
great benefit of the course : 



188 Stanford University 

Helen Lois Dale, winter and spring quarters: 

Dorothy Marston, spring quarter ; 

Catherine Verona Rockwell, winter quarter; 

Mary Caldwell Sloan, spring quarter. 

Both the lecture and laboratory courses appear to have benefited from 
the experience of the former year. It is the expectation of the committee 
that with further experience these courses will continue to show improve- 
ment 

During the year, the members of the committee assembled the subject- 
matter of the lecture courses into a Textbook of General Biology. This 
book is now in press. 

Ernest Gale Martix, 

Chairman. 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 

The regular teaching staff in Political Science for the year consisted of 
Victor J. West and Edwin Angell Coftrell, professors, and Amelia Louise 
Hedges, research assistant. Professor Francis William Coker, of Ohio State 
University, served as acting professor during the summer quarter, giving 
courses in parliamentary government and contemporary political theory. 
Mrs. Flora May Fearing, formerly instructor in political science at Vassar 
College, was appointed instructor for the spring quarter and gave courses in 
municipal administration and American political theory. The assistants in 
citizenship were George Hurach Cloud and Marguerite Pendleton Drew. 

Mr. Cottrell, absent on vacation during the winter and spring quarters, 
filled an appointment as visiting lecturer in government at Harvard Uni- 
versity for the spring semester, and delivered a number of lectures at various 
places in the east.- During the fall term he addressed a number of meetings 
devoted to the study of the Washington Conference on the Limitation of 
Armaments. He delivered six lectures on municipal government at the 
National School for Commercial Secretaries, at Evanston, 111., August 21 
to 26. He has continued to act in an advisory capacity to a number of 
civic organizations in California, jiarticularly in connection with charter 
drafting. Mr. West spoke on the national budget at several public meetings 
during the year. He served the city of Palo Alto as a member of its Library 
Board, and both he and Mr. Cottrell are members of the Palo Alto Advisory 
Commission on Commercial Amusements. Mr. Cottrell continued as chair- 
man of the committee on prizes of the National Municipal League and as 
a member of its Executive Council. Mr. West was elected to the Executive 
Council of the American Political Science Association at its meeting in 
December. 1921. 

The research activities of the members of the department were as fol- 
lows: Mr. West continued his study of election laws and practices par- 
ticularly with respect to (1) laws designed to control the expenditure of 
money in political campaigns, and (2) the operation of the direct primary 
in California. He also continued the gathering of material on the foreign 



Departmental Reports 189 

policy of Woodrow Wilson, and on the relation between administrative effi- 
denc>' and congressional organization and practice. Mr. Cottrell has nearly 
completed his work on municipal budgets. Miss Frances Elizabeth Willis, 
university fellow in political science, carried on the study of legislative 
procedure in Belgium begun while she was C.R.B. fellow at the University 
of Brussels, her intention being to write her doctoral dissertation in this field. 
Candidates for the A.M. degree were working on the following topics : the 
initiative and referendum in California; the political theory of the Pro- 
gressive Party; the government of Alaska; procedure in the California 
legislature ; the city manager in Sacramento ; state reorganization schemes. 

The experiment of the school for community leadership conducted at the 
University during the summer of 1921, under the joint auspices of the depart- 
ment and the American City Bureau, was so successful that it will be repeated 
in September, 1922. In connection with this school the League of California 
Municipalities will hold its annual convention at Stanford University. 

The total number of majors in the department for the year was forty- 
four, of whom five received the A.B. degree. There were eleven candidates 
for advanced degrees. 

Victor J. West, 
Professor of Political Science. 



ROMANIC LANGUAGES 

The staff of the department for the year 1921-22 consisted of Oliver 
Martin Johnston, Clifford Gilmore Allen, Aurelio Macedonio Espinosa, 
professors; Stanley Astredo Smith, Alfred Coester, assistant professors; 
Charles Louis Helmlinge, Felipe Morales de Setien, acting assistant pro- 
fessors (summer quarter) ; Frederick Anderson, William Leonard 
Schwartz, instructors; Ida Stauf, Elizabeth Dana Woodbridge, Jessie 
Edna Smith. Helene Marie Hall, Gertrude Marian Peters, Laurence D. 
r.ailiff, Mary Edna Campbell, Dorothy Ellen Donaldson, Anita Maria 
Osuna, Katharine Page, Luis Jose de Sousa, assistants in instruction. 

During the first term of the summer quarter, Professor Felipe Morales 
dc Setien, of the University of Southern California, served as acting 
assistant professor of Spanish, and Assistant Professor Charles Louis 
Helmlinge, of the University of Washington, served as acting professor 
of French. 

Mr. Smith has been promoted to the rank of associate professor. 

The number of major students enrolled in the department was 90, of 
whom 51 were majors in French, and 39 majors in Spanish. Twenty-four 
students received the degree of A. B. 

The number of graduate students enrolled in the department was 27. 
The degree of Master of Arts was conferred upon : Eugenio de Luca, 
thesis, "La donna nel Teatro di Roberto Bracco"; Helen Eugenia Haist, 
thesis. "A study of the Cid in Spanish literature"; Helen Marie Hall, 
thesis. **A study of the men of Juan Ruir de Alarcon y Mendoza" ; Ivan 
Kush Messenger, thesis, "A comparative study of the Don Juan legend 



190 Stanford University 

in Spanish literature" ; Katharine Page, thesis, "Bodin's de la Republiquc" ; 
Gertrude Marian Peters, thesis, "The men and women of Tirso de Molina" ; 
Ernest Hall Templin, thesis, "The romantic nostalgia of Pierre Loti"; 
Marguerite Caroline Waite, thesis, "The women of Paul Bourget." 

. The degree of Doctor of Philosophy was conferred upon Leo George 
Lacombe, thesis, "The place of modernism in French thought, with special 
reference to Alfred Loisv." 

In collaboration with J. Reinhold of Cracow, Me., Mr. Johnston is pre- 
paring a critical edition of the Old French poem entitled Floirc ct 
Blanchcflor, The three known manuscripts of this text are in the 
Bibliotheque Nationale in Paris. The edition of the poem will be based 
on a comparison of these three manuscripts, together with a careful 
examination of the ten or twelve translations and imitations of the French 
text found in medieval literature. In collaboration with Professor Elmore 
of the Latin department, Mr. Johnston is preparing a French grammar for 
use in colleges and secondary schools. Mr. Johnston taught during the 
summer quarter at the University of Chicago. He served as a memlier of 
the National Dante Committee appointed to promote a national recogni- 
tion of the six hundredth anniversary of Dante's death. 

Mr. Allen is continuing the preparation for publication of Ms. No, 
14864 of the Biblioteca Nacional at Madrid. 

Mr. Espinosa has continued his researches in Spanish versification, 
especially synalepha in Old Spanish. His study of a group of folk-talcs 
on the Infantes de Lara appeared in the April, 1921, number of the 
Romanic Review. He is continuing his comparative study of the 300 
Spanish folk-tales which he collected in Spain two years ago. under the 
auspices of the American Folk-lore Society. An account of the expedi- 
tion and of the folk-tales was published in the April, 1921, numlier of the 
Journal of American Folk-lore. The folk-tales, with comparative notes, 
will be published in the University Series, and will make three volumes of 
about 250 pages each. 

Mr. Espinosa has been engaged during the year in the preparation of 
a large collection of Porto Rican folk-lore for the Journal of American 
Folk-lore, of which he is associate editor. Part I of this material was 
published in this journal in the April, 1921, number, the Picaresque Tales. 
He has also been engaged in the preparation of various text-books in 
Spanish. His edition of Martinez Sierra, Cancion de Cuna, published by 
Heath & Co., appeared during the year. His book, Primer of Spanish 
Pronunciation, prepared in collaboration with the Spanish phonetician, 
Navarro Tomas of the Centro de Estudios Historicos, Madrid, is now 
in press, and his book, Espana y los Espanoles, prepared in collaboration 
with Professor Garcia Solalinde of the same institution, is now in course 
of preparation. He has continued his work as editor of Hispania, as 
associate editor of the Journal of American Folk-lore, and as a meml>er 
of the international editorial board of Inter- America. He has served as 
chairman of a group of Stanford and University of California professors, 
who have been helping the sisters of the Menlo Park Convent to organize 



Departmental Reports 191 

a college course. During the summer quarter he taught at the University 
of California. 

In February, 1922, Mr. Espinosa was decorated by the King of Spain 
with the title of Knight Commander of the Royal Order of Isabella the 
Catholic for his distinguished work in Spanish language and literature. 

Mr. Smith has continued his study on the theater of Giuseppe Giocosa. 
He taught during the summer quarter at the University of California. 

Mr. Coester has been engaged in the study of Argentine literature. 

Mr. Anderson is still engaged in preparing for publication the manu- 
scripts left by the late Professor George Hempl. 

Mr. Schwartz has been studying China in the Nineteenth Century 
French Writers, the "Japonisme" of the Goncourt Brothers, and the 
origins of "vers libre." He read a paper on the "Romancinema" before 
the Modern Language Association at Baltimore. 

Clifford Gilmore Allen*. 
Professor of Romanic Languages. 



ZOOLOGY 



The department faculty for the year 1921-22 consisted of Charles 
Henry Gilbert, George Clinton Price, Harold Heath, professors; John 
Otterbein Snyder, Walter Kenrick Fisher, associate professors ; and Edwin 
Chapin Starks, assistant professor. 

Professor Gilbert continued his investigations of scientific and practical 
problems concerned with the salmon of Alaska and the administration 
of the fisheries. During the summer of 1921, he cooperated with the 
U. S. Bureau of Fisheries in carrying out important experiments in the 
Karluk and Chignik rivers in Alaska and, during the winter, participated 
in the conduct of public hearings and the formulation of administrative 
measures, especially in connection with the newly-instituted Fisheries 
Reservation of the Alaska peninsula. He completed a report, which has 
hetn accepted for publication, on the life history of the salmon of the 
Yukon river, and another containing an analysis of the runs of sockeye 
salmon in 1920 and 1921 to the principal rivers of British Columbia. 

Professor Heath, in collaboration with Dr. Ernest G. Martin and Mr. 
Blake C. Wilbur, investigated the life history of Artemia franciscorum. 
the brine shrimp. He also completed a study of the later development of 
the chitons. 

Associate Professor Snyder continued his investigations relating to 
the life history of salmon and trout. The work has been prosecuted under 
the authority of the State Fish and Game Commission. With the aid of 
assistants, some of whom are university students, observations have been 
made at many points where salmon appear. It is presumed that the 
results of these studies may be utilized to advantage in the conservation 
of some of the best food fishes of the state. 

Assistant Professor Starks, having been placed in charge of an investi- 
gation of marine mammals by the California Fish and Game Commission, 



192 Stanford University 

>pent part of the summer of 1921 studying the Pacific whales and modern 
whaling methods at the whaling station at Moss Landing, Monterey Bay. 
During the year, considerable time was devoted to the preparation of a 
report on the history of California coast whaling, past and present. In 
this work clippings and manuscripts preserved in the Bancroft Library 
were found to be particularly valuable. The report considered whaling 
methods, old and new, destructive practices, rapidly decreasing abundance 
of whales, a short history of each of the old stations, kinds of whales 
of the coast, and their conservaition and protection. Some time was 
devoted to the preparation of a report on the former abundance of the 
Guadalupe fur seal on the California coast. 

Papers published : 

An inconsistency in taxonomy. Science. Septeml)er 9, 1921. 

Vol, LIV. 

Notes on the sea lions. California Fish and Game. October. 

1921. Vol. 7. No. 4. 

The specific differences between the chub mackerels of the 

Atlantic and Pacific oceans. Copeia. No. 103. February 15. 1922. 

Associate Professor Fisher, in charge of the Hopkins Marine Station, 
continued his work on a monograph of North Pacific sea stars. 

Dr. Oliver P. Jenkins presented a large collection of Hawaiian fishes 
to the department. The collection was made in 1889 by the donor, 
assisted by Mr. George C. Price and Mr. Oscar Vaught, then students of 
De Paw University. It served as the basis of several published reports, 
which appeared as bulletins of the U. S. Fish Commission in 1903. The 
collection contains many types, paratypes. and other representatives of 
rare and interesting species. 

George Clinton Price. 
Professor of Zoology. 



Division* of Entomology 

The faculty of the department was composed of Rennie Wilbur Doanc, 
associate professor; Mary Isabel McCracken and Gordon Floyd Ferris, 
assistant professors. 

In connection with Dr. Swain of the Chemistry department, Mr. Doane 
carried on a series of feeding tests with cattle to determine whether insect- 
infested copra cakes were detrimental to cattle. With Mr. Pitts, he 
carried on further studies in relation to insects infesting stored food 
products. About two months of the summer of 1922 he spent in the 
East continuing the studies on the condition of vegetation around indus- 
trial plants and making a study of the effect and efllkiency of certain 
fungicides and insecticides in the orcliards in Vermont and New Jersey. 
A short time was spent in New Orleans conferring with the city health 
officer there, in regard to mosquito control in that city. 

Dr. McCracken has continued her work on the Cynipids, and has in 
press a paper dealing with that group. She has also continued her work 
with the silkworms, using them in her research concerning certain prob- 



Departmental Reports 193 

Icms in genetics. In April, she presented a paper before the State Bee- 
keepers' Association, and in May read a paper before the Association of 
University Women on the subject of heredity. During the summer of 
1922 she conducted two teachers* courses in biology at the State Teachers' 
College in San Francisco. 

Mr. Ferris has continued his work on the Coccidae, paying particular 
attention to the enormous collection of these insects that he collected 
(luring the summer of 1921. He has published two papers on the Coccidae, 
two on the Anoplura, one on the Aphididae, one on Mallophaga, and one 
on Hippoboscidae, and has in press other papers on work done during 
this year. 

In June, Mr. Frank R. Cole completed his work for his doctor's degree, 
having for his thesis the subject of "Terminal abdominal segments of 
male Diptera." During the year two other students have been registered 
for their doctor's degree but have not yet completed their work. One 
student completed her work for her master's degree, and three under- 
graduate students have completed papers which are already published 
or are in press. 

Several accessions to the collections of the divisions have been made 
through purchase or exchange. Notable among these are the valuable 
collection of paratypes of Cynipidae, which was sent to us by Dr. Alfred 
Kinsey of Indiana Universfty, and a small but very interesting collection 
of Coccidae from New Zealand. 

Rennie Wilbur Doane, 
Associate Professor of Entomology. 



Committee Reports 193 



APPENDIX III 



COMMITTEE REPORTS 



ATHLETICS 



The Faculty Athletic Committee for the year 1921-22 consisted of the 
following: Augustus Taber Murray, John Pearce Mitchell, Halcott 
Cadwalader Moreno, Walter Daniel Powell, Everett Wallace Smith. 

The Committee was not active during the year, and dealt only with 
the routine determination of the eligibility of students for intercollegiate 
competition. During the spring quarter, Professor Murray was given 
leave of absence from the University, and Professor Mitchell served as 
acting chairman for the remainder of the year. 

John Pearce Mitchell, 

Acting Chairman. 



BOARD OF ATHLETIC CONTROL 

The members of the Board for the year 1921-22 were: 

Faculty: A. T. Murray, Walter Powell, J. P. Mitchell. 

Alumni: L. W. Cutler, R. W. Barrett, T. M, Williams. 

Students: D. W. Evans (throughout the year), J. C. Patricks. F. A. 
Belts. J. K. Lilly, and P. F. Neer (each for a portion of the year) 

Officers: T. M. Williams, Chairman; J. P. Mitchell, Secretary- 
Treasurer; W. D. Fletcher, Graduate Manager. 

The important events to record during the year were the completion 
of the Stadium and the Basketball Pavilion, the presentation of grand 
opera in the Stadium, the gift of a dormitory building to the University, 
and a complete rearrangement in the staff for the following year. 

The Stadium was completed during October in accordance with the 
original plans, and was used for the first time for the football game with 
the University of California in November. It proved to be entirely 
satisfactory in every respect. During the winter the embankment settled 
a little, causing only minor displacements of a few rows of seats, which 
were easily corrected. In the spring work was started on the track, and 
this was carried on slowly during the summer, and was completed in 
October, 1922. It is an excellent track. The sum received from sub- 
scriptions to the Stadium exceeded expectations, and the necessary loan 
was $80,000.00 instead of the $100,000.00 anticipated. 

The Basketball Pavilion was finished during the autumn months, and 
was used for the games during the winter. It has also been used for 
dances and alumni gatherings with great success. 



196 Stanford University 

In June the Stadium was rented to Mr. G. Merola for the production 
of Grand Opera. The Board of Athletic Control built a large, movable 
stage as part of the Stadium equipment. The casts, stage settings, and 
orchestra all set a high artistic standard, and the acoustics of the Stadium 
proved to be remarkably good. This enterprise was a great success 
artistically and aroused much enthusiasm among the friends of the Uni- 
versity. It did not succeed financially, and the Board had to advance 
some of its funds to carry it through to completion. However, it is 
hoped that the way has been opened for future productions that will \ye 
beneficial to the community and will justify the expenditure. 

On May 2, 1922, the Board appointed a committee to draw up a plan 
under which it would give a dormitory building to the University, using 
a portion of its gate receipts each year for the purpose. After some cor- 
respondence with the President of the University, the Secretary was 
instructed on June 22 to make a formal offer to the Trustees to give a 
residence hall unit to the University, subject to the following arrange- 
ments : 

(1) The preliminary estimate of the cost of the unit is not to exceed 
$450,000.00. 

(2) Plans and specifications to be prepared by the University archi- 
tects, to be submitted to the Board of Athletic Control for its final 
approval, and construction planned with the intention that the building 
shall be complete and ready for occupancy in October, 1923. 

(3) The cost of construction to be covered by a loan from the Trustees 
to the Board of Athletic Control, repayable in installments with interest 
at 5 per cent per year. 

(4) The Board of Athletic Control to receive all net income from the 
building during the period of repayment of the loan as a credit toward 
interest and principal. 

(5) The Board of Athletic Control to undertake to pay not less than 
$50,000.00 during the three academic years 1923-24, 1924-25, 1925-26; and 
thereafter not less than $25,000.00 during each academic year, such pay- 
ments to apply on current and accrued interest and the principal of 
the loan. 

(6) The Board of Athletic Control to have the privilege of making 
additional payments upon the loan from time to time as funds may be 
available. 

Early in the spring Dr. A. D. Browne resigned his position as Medical 
Adviser, and Mr. Walter Powell resigned the directorship of Encina 
Gymnasium. The President decided to restore the original arrangements 
for these positions, and appointed Dr. W. H. Barrow Medical Adviser 
and Director of the Gymnasium for the coming year. Other appointments 
of importance were those of Mr. Glenn Warner in an advisory capacity 
in connection with football, Mr. Andrew Kerr for football and basketball, 
and Mr. E. P. Hunt for freshman sports — all these appointments being 
for periods of more than one year. This marks the end of a period of 
shifting personnel. 



Committee Reports 197 

The results of the year's operations are best recorded in the following 
extracts from the Treasurer's report, which is printed in full in the 
appendix to the University publication covering the Students' Organiza- 
tions Fund: 

Fiscal Ybai 1921-22 
Receipts 

Fees $ 34,972.43 

Gate receipts 143,780.35 

Store at Gymnaaium, net gain 644.15 

Miscellaneous 5,026.61 



$184,423.54 



Expenditures 

Athletic iields, repairs, maintenance, and improvements $ 10,893,62 

Gymnasium expenses, including proctors, laundry and towels 11,334.14 

Intercollegiate sports, supplies, equipment and all expenses 53.491.99 

Intermural expenses 959.96 

SaUries - 38,523.39 

Basket-ball Pavilion payment 7,500.00 

Stadium payment 55,000.00 

All other expenditures 7,951.92 

Total $185,655.02 

Less operating loss charged against surplus 1,231.48 



\ 



$184,423.54 

Balance Sheet — August 31, 1932 
Assets 

Accounts receivable $ 2,802.14 

Bank of Palo Alto, open account 2,802.41 

Bank of Palo Alto, savings account 1.00 

Charges prepaid 333.31 

Farm inventory, including equipment 1,502.88 

Wood (from Stadium lot, for sale) 2,110.75 

Insurance prepaid 1,154.00 

Store inventory 769.07 

Sheep inventory 1,850.64 

Stadium. Balance not refunded 175,321.35 

Suspense account 33.88 

Total $188,681.43 

Liabilities 

Accounts payable $ 7,221.12 

Board of Trustees, current account 6,391.77 

Stadium note 80,000.00 

Stadium subscriptions 94,795.65 

Surplus 272.89 



Total $188,681.43 

SuKPLus Account 
1921 

Sept. 30 Surplus on hand $1,504.37 

Less operating loss 1921-22 1,231.48 



1922 
Aug. 31 Balance forward .~. ^.^ ....^...~........» $272.89 



198 Stanford University 

Loss AND Gain fok Ybar on Various Spoits 

Loss Gain 

Baseball $ 2,611. 23 

Basket-^iall 434.10 

Boxing 966.03 

Fencing 46.85 

Football $107,875.49 

Intermural 459.96 

Minor 185.10 

Polo 500.00 

Rugby 1,156.60 

Soccer 932.72 

Swimming 2,076.93 

Tennis 686.24 

Track 1,022.20 

Stadium Account 

Dr. Cr. 

Receipts from subscriptions $ 94,795.65 

Balance original Stadium Fund 2,744.43 

Charged against 1921-22 income 55,000.00 

Notes 80,000.00 

Advanced from current funds 513.70 

Cost of construction, planting and including cost of destruc- 
tion of old bleachers above salvage value $211,346.21 

Fencing old fields 2,362.20 

Track construction to date (about three-fourths total) 12,053.55 

Interest to August 31, 1922 3,298.96 

Stage (permanent and movable) 3,992.85 

$233,053.77 $233,053.77 
Basket-ball Pavilion 

Total cost of construction $115,337.2? 

Interest to August 31, 1922 3.958.14 

Total outlay $119,295.42 

Payments from: 

Board of Athletic Control $ 7,500.00 

President and Comptroller's budget 5,000.00 

Special student fee 11.913.04 

Total payments $24,413.04 

Balance unpaid $94,882.38 

Average annual rate of liquidation of loan $18,500.00 

John Pearce Mitchell, 

Secretarv-Treasurcr. 



WOMEN'S ATHLETICS 

The Faculty Committee on Women's Athletics continued its established 
policy of sanctioning interclass competitions in all sports, and interclass- 
intercollegiate competitions between the class teams of Stanford University, 
the University of California and Mills College. 

Schedules for competitions were approved and played as follows : 
Interclass tournaments in archery, basketball, field hockey, and tennis, 
and class and interclass meets in swimming. (2) Interclass-intercollegiate 



Committee Reports 199 

competitions with the University of California: two games in hockey, 
two games in basketball were scheduled, but not played on account of 
rain ; a swimming meet in which all four classes from each institution met, 
and eight tennis matches, one singles and one doubles team competing 
from each of the four classes. (3) Interclass-intercollegiate competitions 
with Mills College; two games in hockey, two games in basketball and 
an archery tournament in which all four classes from each institution 
competed. 

The Committee approved the revision of the eligibility rules as recom- 
mended by the Women's Athletic Association. 

Helen Masters Bunting. 

Chairman. 



LOWER DIVISION ADMINISTRATION 

The members of the Committee on Lower Division Administration 
for the year 1921-22 were : J. P. Mitchell, B. O. Foster, Harold Heath, 
E. P. Lesley, E. W. Martin, H. C. Moreno, E. E. Robinson, V. J. West, 
M. S. Wildman, and Miss Mary Yost. 

The number of students registered in the Lower Division during the 
year by quarters were 1,097 in the autumn, 1,049 in the winter, 933 in the 
spring, and 257 in the summer. A total of 1,393 individuals were regis- 
tered in the Lower Division during the year. 

The above figures indicate the growth which has taken place. During 
the year the office space first used proved inadequate and inconvenient, 
and a general rearrangement of offices in the Administration building 
resulted. Space was found for the Lower Division beside the Registrar's 
Office, with the result that adequate and convenient arrangements were 
made. This should result in economies for both offices. Meanwhile the 
office work had become much too heavy for one person to handle, and 
the services of Mrs. A. H. Puhara were secured to assist Miss E. Fordyce, 
who has had charge of the Lower Division office from the 1)eginning. 

The various devices adopted last year to expedite the work of regis- 
tration, such as seat cards, advance registration, etc., have proved useful 
and have become established. The plan of making out study-lists in 
December for the winter quarter, and in March for the spring quarter, 
has been found very satisfactory. 

In June, 1922. two hundred and ninety-one students completed six 
quarters registration in the Lower Division. Of these 168, or 58%, com- 
pleted all requirements and were transferred to the upper division ; 49, 
or 17%. were taking engineering courses that require three years to com- 
plete the requirements; and 74, or 25%, were held over. These latter 
were chiefly cases where through inadvertence, inexperience, or failure 
to pass courses, some minor requirement remained unfulfilled. They were 
sent for advice to the department in which they expect to enroll, and held 
technically in the Lower Division until all the requirements are completed. 

John Pearce Mitchell, 

Chairman. 



200 Stanford University 

PUBLIC EXERCISES 

The Committee on Public Exercises consisted of Professors William 
A. Cooper, Edwin A. Cottrell, Marion R. Kirkwood, Arthur W. Meyer, 
John S. P. Tatlock, Edgar E. Robinson, chairman. 

In addition to the occasional assemblies called by the president of the 
Student Body, with the approval of the Committee, the following 
University Assemblies have been held: 

University Assemblies 

October 6. Assembly of Welcome. Addresses of welcome were made 

by President Ray Lyman Wilbur, Dean Mary Yost, Dean George B. 

Culver, and the Rev. D. Charles Gardner, 
December 7, Dr. Alonzo E. Taylor, Director of the Food Research 

Institute, and Dr. Anna Cox Brinton, of Mills College, on "European 

Students' Friendship Fund." 
January 30. President Ray Lyman Wilbur on "The Endowment 

Campaign." 
April 6. — Professor Payson J. Treat, of Stanford "University, on "Recent 

Observations in Japan." 
April 19. Mr. J. H. Schively, Mr. J. W. Stevens, of the National Board 

of Fire Underwriters, on "Fire Prevention." 
April 25. Mr. William W. Ellsworth, formerly president of the Century 

Company, on "The Joy of Writing." 
May 1. Mr. Whiting Williams, formerly vice-president Hydraulic Steel 

Company, Cleveland. 
May 9. Hon. John Barrett, former Director-General Pan-American 

Union. 

Tuesday Evening Meetings 
The Tuesday Evening Meetings were held regularly throughout the 

year, either in the Little Theatre, the Assembly Hall, or in the Memorial 

Church. The program for the year follows : 

October 4. Dr. Masaharu Anesaki, Professor of Imperial University of 
Tokyo, on "The Religious and Social Problems of the Orient." 

October 11. Professor E. C. Home, University of Patna, India, on 
"Political Reforms and Political Problems in British India." 

October 18. Dr. Charles Tenney, formerly of the American Diplomatic 
Service in China, on "The Chinese Republic." 

October 25. Professor George J. Peirce, of Stanford University, on 
"Intellectual Curiosity." 

November 8. Miss Marie Bashian, costume recital. 

November 15. Mr. John G. Neihardt, a lectyre. 

January 17. Professor Emeritus Fernando Sanford, of Stanford Uni- 
versity, on "The Study of Physics." 

January 31. Miss Dorothea Spinney, reading, "Antigone." 

February 14. Mrs. Gertrude Workman Furman, lecture-recital. 

February 21. Film — "Julius Caesar." 

February 28. Dr. Henry Lanz, lecture-recital on Russian music. 



Committee Reports 201 

March 7. Mr. Ernest H. Baynes, on "Our Animal Allies in the World 

War." 
\farch 14. Mr. J. Earl Baker, Statistical Adviser, Ministry of Com- 
munications, Peking, China, "The Work of the Chinese Delegation 

at the Washington Conference." 
March 21. Mr. Norman Angell, London, on "The Lessons of Versailles 

and Washington." 
April 4. Dr. Yamato Ichihashi, of Stanford University, member of 

staff, Japanese Delegation at Washington Conference, on "Some Aspects 

of the Washington Conference." 
April 11. Professor W. A. Craigie. of Oxford, on "The Oxford 

Dictionary." 
April 25. A. Capella Choir, College of the Pacific, sacred concert. 
May 2. Stanford Music Club, concert. 
May 9. Professor Bailey Willis, of Stanford University, on "Chinese 

Scenery and Peoples." 
May 16. Dr. Carl L. Alsberg, Director of Food Research Institute, on 

"Reorganization in the Federal Service." 
May 23. Professor Edward M. Hulme, of Stanford University, on "Life 

in a Medieval University." 
June 6. The Rev. Hugh Black, D. D., Union Theological Seminary, New 

York, on i" America Through Scottish Spectacles." 
June 27. Professor Edward T. Williams, of University of California, 

on "National Rivalries in the Pacific Islands." 
July 11. James Harvey Robinson, formerly Professor of History, Colum- 
bia University, on "How the Mind Looks to a Student of History." 
July 18. Frederick MacMurray, violinist, recital 
August 1. John A. Lomax, "Negro Spirituals." 
August 8. E. Harold Geer. organist, Vassar College, organ recital. 
August 15. Mr. E. K. Broadus, "Pioneer Days in a Canadian Far Western 

University." 
August 22. Professor An>ert L. Guerard, of Rice Institute, on "The 

International Language Problem." 

Special Lectures 

The following special lectures were presented under the auspices of 
the Committee: 
February 13. Henry W. Luce, vice-president of Peking University, and 

Professor William Hung, of Peking University, on "Problems of the 

Pacific." 
F^'ebruary 15. Mr. Alfred E. Zimmern, London, on "Liberal England." 
August 14. Dr. Richard C. Cabot, of Boston, on "Ethics of Spying on 

Our Neighbors in Time of Peace." 
August 16, 23, 30. Dr. David Starr Jordan, on "Evolution." 

In addition to the above addresses given under the auspices of the 
Committee, the following, given under the auspices of various depart- 
ments, came to the attention of the Committee: 



202 Stanford University 

October 10, 12, 14. Professor E. C. Home, University of Patna, India, 
on "Constitutional Developments in British India." Under the aus- 
pices of the Department of History. 

October 10, 17. 24, 31 ; November 7, 14, 21, 28. Mr. Francis Hirst, of 
London, on "Developments in Europe." Under the auspices of the 
Departments of Economics and Political Science. 

February 27. Miss Dorothea Spinney, reading of "Hamlet." Under the 
auspices of the English Department and the other literary departments. 

March 16. Professor Jose Maria Galvez, Professor of English, University 
of Santiago, Chile, on "Contemporary Social and Political Conditions 
in Chile." Under the auspices of the Department of History. 

July 17. James Harvey Robinson, formerly of Columbia University, on 
"What Is the Use of History?" Under the auspices of the Department 
of History. 

Founders' Day 
The Committee voted to make Founders* Day, March 9. a University 
holiday. An assembly was called for 11 o'clock in the morning and the 
Hon. Chester Rowell was the speaker, taking as his subject, "Education 
and the State." In the evening a sacred concert was given in the Memorial 
Church by the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra. 

Dante Sexcentennial 
The Committee, with the cooperation of the Department of Romanic 
Languages, arranged a meeting for the evening of November 1. Professor 
Oliver M. Johnston presided, and spoke, as did Dr. Aurelia Henry Rein- 
hardt. President of Mills College. Professor Lee E. Bassett read portions 
from the Anderson translation of the Divine Comedy. Mrs. E. C. Hughes 
played a Liszt Sonata, and Mr. Redtield Sears sang two selections from 
"La Vita Nuova." Mr. Warren D. Allen acted as accompanist. 

West Memorial Lectures 
The seventh series of the West Memorial Lectures was given by Pro- 
fessor Irving Babbitt of Harvard University during the third week of 
April. The subject was "The Ethical Basis of Democracy." 

Commencement 
The thirty-first annual commencement was held on June 19, 1922. The 
Reverend Hugh Black. D. D., of the Union Theological Seminary, deliv- 
ered the Baccalaureate sermon on the preceding Sunday. The commence- 
ment address was given by Dr. Alonzo E. Taylor. The address to the 
graduating class was made by President Ray Lyman Wilbur. 

Edgar E. Robinson. 

Chairman. 



PUBLIC HEALTH 

The members of the Public Health Committee for the year 1921-22 
were John Pearce Mitchell, Dr. Alfred David Browne. George Bliss 
Culver, Dr. Clelia Duel Mosher. Miss Mary Yost. 



Committee Reports 203 

During the year the Committee dealt with the regular routine work 
only, and this consisted chiefly in the enforcement of the University re- 
quirement regarding vaccination. The health of the student body as a 
whole was unusually good, and there were very few cases of any of the 
usual contagious diseases. 

John Pearce Mitchell, 

Chairman. 



RESEARCH 



The membership of the Committee on Research for the academic year 
1921-22 included W. D. Briggs, E. C. Franklin. A. W. Meyer, W. Ophiils, 
T. J. Hoover. J. S. P. Tatlock, D. L. Webster, R. L. Wilbur. 

For the general purpose of fostering research in the University and with 
the especial object in view of giving aid to individual investigators whose 
needs may not have been provided for in the annual departmental appro- 
priations, the President, with the approval of the Board of Trustees, set 
aside a sum of two thousand dollars ($2,000) to be allotted by the 
Committee to applicants whose projects appealed to the Committee as most 
meritorious. 

During the year appropriations to individuals have been made as follows : 

Recipient of Grant Purpose Amount 

I>r. Thomas Addis Technical assistance $ 200.00 

H. F. Blichfeldt .Assistance In the preparation of paper on 

Geometry of numbers 200.00 

J. C. Clark Purchase of a three phase core type trans- 
former for studying interference between 
parallel systems of overhead conductors.... 200.00 

W. A, Cooper Assistance in preparation for publication of 

manuscripts of George Hempl 100.00 

W. K. Fisher Traveling expenses in connection with a 

study of the Asteroidea of the North 

Pacific 300.00 

T. J. Hoover Purchase of an electrolytic outfit for use 

in studies in metallurgical analysis 300.00 

E- M. Hulme Material for monograph on Lelio Socini 100.00 

£. G. Martin and Harold Heath.. ..Technical assistance 100.00 

P. A Martin Technical assistance 50.00 

Dr. J, R, Oliver Apparatus and materials used in a study of 

arsphenamine 200.00 

A. F. Rogers Chemical analysis and illustrations for study 

of a new metamorphic rock type 100.00 

^- J. Peirce ^ Constant temperature 100.00 

J. R. Slonaker Materials for a study of effect of estruation 

and gestation on the voluntary activity of 

the albino rat 135.00 

Gertrude M. Trace Electric wiring of piano for research on re- 
lation of memory of time to melody 150.00 

^*- J. West Bibliographic materials 35.00 

^- A. B. Spalding Apparatus and material for research in 

Gynecology and Obstetrics 200.00 

$2,470.00 



204 Stanford Uxiversitv 

Financial Statement 

Receipts 

Appropriation $2,000.00 

Balance unexpended year 1920-21 128.63 

$2,128.63 

Expenditures 
Sixteen allotments, itemized above $2,470.00 

Deficit $ 341.37 

Edward Curtis Franklin, 

Chairman. 



SCHOLARSHIP 



The Committee for the year 1921-22 consisted of George B. Culver, 
Orrin L. Elliott, John C. L. Fish, Percy A. Martin, Lewis M. Terman. 
Mary Yost, and Clarke B. Whittier, chairman. Marian McKendry acted 
as secretary. 

During the year five matters, involving more than changes in detail, 
were investigated, discussed, and acted upon by the committee. 

1. The granting of honors by the University for exceptional scholar- 
ship had been limited to the selecting of fifteen Stanford scholars each 
year. It was decided to broaden this university recognition of high 
attainment. The Stanford scholars were increased to thirty, to be chosen 
from undergraduates who have completed the Lower Division work. At 
the same time Lower Division honors will be granted to the highest tenth 
of the students completing the work of the Lower Division each year. 
The most important innovation, however, is the granting of the bachelor's 
degree "with great distinction" to the upper twentieth and "with distinction*' 
to the next tenth of the graduating class. It is hoped that this increased 
recognition of excellence will induce our more gifted students to put forth 
their best efforts. 

2. At the suggestion of the Committee on Scholarship, intelligence 
tests are now given to all entering undergraduates. Professor Terman is 
the chairman of the new sub-committee on the Investigation of Student 
Ability. The Committee on Scholarship is beginning in a conservative 
way to make use of the results of the tests. In case of doubt more leniency 
is shown to those who test high and less to those who test low. Other 
committees have also found the data furnished by the tests to be of utility. 

3. The Committee prepared and published foj the information of 
the faculty a statement of the distribution of scholarship grades 
(A, B, C. etc.) by the individual instructors, and also by departments and 
groups of departments and by the entire University. The purpose was 
to take stock of what we are doing, with a view to modifications on the 
part of any instructor who is convinced that he is varying too far from 
the normal. 

4. So many colleges and universities located near us have recently 
changed their regulations so as to refuse admittance to our disqualified 



Committee Reports 205 

students that some adjustment on our part became necessary. Formerly 
we required as a prerequisite to reinstatement an excellent record in 
another institution. Many disqualified students are not incapable of 
profiting by a college education. About half of the disqualified students 
reinstated at Stanford in recent years have had acceptable records after 
reinstatement. That disqualification at one institution' should forever 
preclude the student from obtaining an education would be most unfortu- 
nate. The Committee therefore now normally reinstates students who 
have been out twelve months, and who have during that time been doing 
a man's or a woman's work with diligence and success. 

5. Some increase in our scholarship funds has enabled the Committee 
for the first time to assign a few scholarships to students who are com- 
mencing their work at Stanford. These are much to be desired. Their 
purpose is to enable brilliant students of slender means to enter the 
University and make the most of their talents. 

During the past year Dean Mary Yost has given much time to adminis- 
tering the new system of honors. Likewise Professor Martin has been 
handling the administrative details of the award of scholarships. Much 
detailed work has fallen upon the chairman. The Committee is fortunate 
in having now secured the assistance of Mrs. Charles A. Huston, who is 
to take charge of all such work. 



Student Scholarship 

The usual tables indicating the scholarship of the student body for 
the past year follow: 

Disabilities Incurred 3y Students 
Tabulated According to Character of Disability 

Autumn Winter Spring Summer Total 

Disqualifications 97 49 49 10 205 

Probation ^ 325 305 244 64 938 



Totals ^. 422 354 293 74 1,143 

The total number of disabilities incurred by all students is substantially 
the same as it was last year. As was expected, the number disqualified 
has somewhat increased, and the number on probation has decreased. 
The total number disqualified during each of the last three years was, 
respectively: 158. 166, 205. The total number of probations each year 
was: 724, 958, 938. Not infrequently the same student incurs probation 
two, three, or even four times. 



206 



Stanford University 



Disabilities Incurred by Students 
Tabulated According to Residence 



• 


Autumn 


Wi 


ater 


Spring 

1 


Summer 

1 


WOMEN 


No. 

in 

Group 


Per 

cent 

deflcrt 


No. 

In 

Group 


Per 

cent 

deflri't 


No. Per 
In cent 

Group dellcrt 

1 


No. 1 Per 

in ' ornt 

Group defld't 

1 


University R<'b. Hall: Hobte 

Sororities ...... . — .. 


208 
126 

118 

23 


3.88 
7.14 

2.54 

4.35 


204 
124 

126 

19 


4.41 
9.66 

2.38 

5.26 


1 

211 
120 

126 

15 


6.65 
7.98 

10.30 

0.00 


154 

89 
22 


3.23 


Other locally resident students.. 
Commuters 


3.37 
0.00 


Total Women. 


473 

1 
1 

751 
480 
32 
756 
135 


4.44 

17.81 
21.06 
15.66 
19.07 
14.07 


473 

724 
516 
27 
645 
126 


5.29 

15.00 
21.70 
7.40 
13.49 
11.90 


472 

731 
466 
21 
513 
106 


7.42 

11.35 
17.90 
9.52 
13.25 
20.75 


265 

178 

106 

2 

228 

56 


3.02 


MEN 




U. Res. Halls: Encina, Sequoia, 
Union - 


9.S2 


Fraternities — 

Clubs 

Other locally resident stndentii.. 
Commuters 


14.80 
0.00 

10.00 
0.00 






Total Men ...... ._*.._. ^ 


2,162 


18.55 


2.038 


16.14 


1,827 


14.07 


582 


11.34 






Total University 


2,635 


16.01 


2,511 


14.10 


2,299 


12.70 


847 


8.74 







Some averages and comparisons may be interesting. The percentage 
of students deficient for the entire University has increased slightly, from 
13.81 to 14.27. This calculation excludes the summer quarter. There was 
considerable improvement this summer over last, due no doubt to the 
large number of first-year students who registered last summer to avoid 
the increased tuition fees. If the fraternities and sororities had improved 
this past year as did the University residence halls, we should have had 
a marked advance for the entire University. The following figures speak 
for themselves : Roble Hall : Last year. 5.57 ; this year, 4.98. Sororities : 
Last year, 3.84; this year, 8.27. Men's halls: Last year, 16.69; this year, 
14.75. Fraternities: Last year, 17.44; this year, 20.22. It may be that 
these figures are affected by the fact that this year the fraternity averages 
are based only on the records of those living in the fraternity houses 
instead of on the total membership of the fraternities. The same is true 
of sorority averages. The change was made so that residence and not 
membership may be the criterion in all cases. 



Committee Reports 



207 



Ratios of Grade Points to Registered Units for the Various 
Undergraduate Student Groups for the Year 1921-22 

GENERAL 



Ayerage Ratio of Grade Points to 
Registered Units 



University 

Women 

lien 

Non-sorority 

Sorority 

Kon-fratemity 

Fraternity 



Average 
Number 
Students 



Tear 



2111 
301 

17S0 
279 
112 

1271 
440 



1.466 
1.706 
1.411 
1.756 
1.S80 
1.445 
1.818 



Autumn 
Quarter 



1.482 
1.786 
1.367 
1.841 
1.661 
1.880 
1.286 



Winter 
Quarter 



1.480 
1.726 
1.425 
1.786 
1.566 
1.470 
1.806 



Spring 
Quarter 



1.489 
1.608 
1.460 
1.682 
1.586 
1.502 
1.348 



classification by residence 



WOIMEN 

University Residence 
Hall 

ISRoble 

Sororities 
5 Gamma Phi B<»ta 

13 Delta Delta Delta 

14 PI Beta Phi 

21 1 Sigma Kappa 

SSJAlpha Phi 

39 Chi Omega 

41|Delta Gamma 

49|Kappa Sappa Qamma 

SO, Alpha Omlcron PI 

S4 



Kappa Alpha Tbeta. 



Other Locally Resident 

Students — Homes 

I and Approved Houses 

10 Palo Alto and Mayileld 

17 On the Campus 

1 

^ Commuters — Homes 
and Approved Houses 

20 8. Francisco, San Jose, etc. 

MEN 

University Residence 
Halls 

^Sequoia 

53 Encfna 

Cnion ("Sp. qu. only) 



Average 
No. in 
Group 




196 . 



8 



16 



1 
2 
8 



Average Ratio of Grade Points to 
Registered Units 



7 


4 


8 


5 


14 


6 


12 


7 


13 


8 


11 


9 


14 


10 


66 


1 


16 


2 


12 




185 


1 


606 


2 


•52 


8 



I Autumn 
Year Quarter 



Winter ^ Spring 
Quarter Quarter 



1.757 



1.898 
1.756 
1.716 
1.668 
1.604 
1.510 
1.406 
1.464 
1.449 
1.424 



1.789 
l.ODO 



1.672 



1.548 
1.425 



1.835 



1.846 
1.885 
1.861 
1.642 
1.806 
1.710 
1.543 
1.543 
1.421 
1.421 



1.797 



2.061 
1.666 
1.520 
1.660 
1.538 
1.504 
1.463 
1.456 
1.489 
1.504 



1.686 



1.796 
1.783 
1.757 
1.666 
1.496 
1.291 
1.489 
1.350 
1.442 
1.323 



1.964 


1.889 


1.813 


1.714 


1.516 


1.678 


1.528 


1.534 


1.367 


1.450 



1.599 
1.519 



1.948 



1.587 
1.47& 
1.380 



208 



Stanford University 



CLASSIFICATION BY RESIDENCE 



Fraternities 

87 Theta XI 

40 Delta Upsilon 

66 Alpha Kappa Lambda — 
66 Delta Ohl 

68 Sigma Alpha Epsllon 

69 Beta Theta PI 

62 Alpha Tau Omega 

63 Ohl Pal 

64 Kappa Alpha 

66 Sigma Nu 

66 Delta Kappa Epallon 

67 Phi Delta Theta 

68 Alpha Delta Phi 

60 Phi Gamma Delta 

70 Phi Kappa Sigma 

71iSlgma Chi 

72| Kappa Sigma 

73|Theta Delta Chi 

75lTheta Chi 

76lAlpha Sigma Phi 

77lphl Kappa Pal 

79'DeIta Tau Delta 



SlZeta Pal 

Clubs 
32 Japanese Students* Ass'n. 
74 Chinese Club 



Other Locally Resident 
Students 

48!On the Campus 

62 Palo Alto and Mayfleld.. 



43 



Commutera 

S. Franolwo, San Jew, etc. 



Average 
No. in 
Group 



17 
23 
9 
18 
28 
23 
21 
18 
17 
22 
17 
80 
24 
16 
20 
18 
22 
17 
14 
19 
24 
19 
19 



14 
9 



68 
433 



96 



Rank 
within 
Group 



1 

2 

8 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

18 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 

28 



2 



Average Ratio of Grade Points to 
Registered Units 



Year 



1.526 
1.504 
1.402 
1.882 
1.878 
1.878 
1.861 
1.367 
1.844 
1.842 
1.831 
1.828 
1.802 
1.272 
1.260 
1.266 
1.265 
1.257 
1.246 
1.287 
1.221 
1.177 
1.084 



1.560 
1.254 



1 I 1.400 

2 ' 1.428 



1.492 



Autumn : Winter 1 Spring 
Quarter ' Quarter ' Quarter 



1.662 
1.426 
1.496 
1.888 
1.253 
1.896 
1.458 
1.867 
1.898 
1.888 
1.288 
1.885 
1.283 
1.240 
1.906 
1.249 
1.142 
1.201 
1.880 
1.150 
1.189 
1.155 
.9664 



I 



1.468 
1.079 



1.487 I 
1.848 



1.469 



1.543 
1.412 
1.2S7 
1.242 
1.325 
1.486 
1.822 
1.851 
1.299 
1.211 
1.373 
1.269 
1.435 
1.204 
1.267 
1.446 
1.314 
1.305 
1.187 
1.341 
1.238 
1.167 
1.090 



1.640 
1.237 



I 



1.445 
1.462 



1..522 



1.4S6 
1.698 
1.420 
1.665 
1.681 
1.275 
1.802 
1.363 
1.840 
1.680 
1.817 
1.884 
1.225 
1.402 
1.827 
1.061 
1.953 
1.263 
1.218 
1.214 
1.231 
1.220 
1.102 



1.531 
1.543 



1.51G 
1.519 



1.4R7 



Committee Reports 



209 



STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 



Honor and Professional 
Societies 

1 Phi B«ts Kappa 

2 Phi Lam. Up. (M-Chein.)- 
lEncliBh Chib 

STbeta Sig. Phi (Wom.-Jr.). 
15SIK. Delta Chi (Men. Jr.)—. 

16 Phi Alpha Delta (Law) 

S3 Alpha Chi Sig. (M.-Cbem.). 
2> Electrical Engineers 

30 Phi Kappa Tau (Military).. 
Zi Mechanical Engineers 

42 Phi Delta Phi (Law) 

ei'ooloir & Mining Society.. 

Debating Societies 

3 Wranglers (Women) 

6 Delta Sigma Rbo (Men) 

TEnphronla (Men) 

IdNestoria (Men) 

Dramatic Clubs 
35 Sword and Sandals (Men).. 

46 Rsm*8 Head Society (Men). 

Musical Organizations 

11 Stanford Music Club 

IS Schubert Club (Women) — 
24SUntord Orchestra 

31 Stanford Choir 

51 Stanford Band 

Publications 
22 Quad 

25 Stanford Press Club (Men). 

27 Dally Palo Alto — 

35 Chaparral 

Athletic Teams 
25 Fmhman Basketball 

43 Varsity BasketbaU 

47 Varsity Track 

fiO Varsity Football 

79 Varsity Baseball 

SO Freshman Track 

82 Freshman Football 

! Student Honor Societies 

9 Cap and <^wn (Women) 

SClrclp "S** Society (Men)... 

44 Quadrangle dub (Men) 

67 Skull and Snakes (Men) 



Average 
No. in 
Group 



6 
17 
21 

7 
18 
19 

84 

17 
86 
13 
24 



11 
10 
S4 
27 



11 
28 



18 
84 
17 
41 
52 



15 
12 
50 

17 



5 

11 
17 
22 
19 
8 
10 



Rank 
within 
Group 



1 
2 
8 
4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 



1 
2 



Average Ratio of Grade Points to 
Registered Units 



Year 



2.644 
2.228 
1.902 
1.828 
1.702 
1.000 
1.642 
1.504 
1.677 
1.636 
1.498 
1.866 



1 1.945 

2 ! 1.888 
8 I 1.866 
4 ! 1.676 



1.584 
1.474 



1 I 1.786 

2 j 1.681 
8 ! 1.640 

4 I 1.576 

5 1.446 



1 I 1.652 

2 I 1.606 
8 1.604 
4 I 1.530 



5 
6 
7 



1 


1.614 


« 


1.483 


« 


1.461 


4 


1.807 



1.207 
1.181 
.9909 



10 


1 


1.818 ! 


21 


2 


1.516 


9 


8 


1.491 


18 


* 


1.881 



Autumn 
Quarter 



2.402 
2.212 
1.864 
2.029 
1.570 
1.620 
1.668 
1.414 
1.566 
1.827 
1.419 
1.«18 



1.882 
1.827 
1.866 
1.644 



1.500 
1.461 



1.755 
1.758 
1.604 
1.686 
1.386 



1.437 I 
1.689 
1.638 
1.510 



Winter 
Quarter 



1.849 
1.406 
1.S31 
l.J 



2.811 
2.068 
1.966 
1.822 
1.865 
1.825 
1.647 
1.006 
1.546 
1.667 
1.540 
1.488 



2.008 
1.947 
1.840 
1.736 



1.666 
1.601 



1.989 
1.766 
1.644 
1.684 
1.470 



1.702 
1.782 
1.678 

I. my 



1.750 


1.402 


1.461 


1.640 


1.461 


1.488 


1.277 


1.860 


1.150 


1.248 


1.830 


1.186 


.9160 


.9204 



1.727 
1.581 
1.649 
1.520 



Spring 
Quarter 



2.750 
2.441 
1.904 
1.608 
1.684 
1.629 
1.780 
1.669 
1.623 
1.687 
1.542 
1.290 



1.840 
1.908 
1.869 
1.645 



1.833 
1.341 



1.669 
1.586 
1.690 
1.567 

1.495 



1.720 
1.469 

1.489 
1.4.»<8 



1.631 
1.840 
1.424 
1.498 
1.211 
.9904 
.9712 



1.891 
1.567 
1.480 
1.480 



210 



Stanford University 



These comments may be made upon the above tabulation: (a) If 
there has been any improvement in scholarship over the preceding year 
it does not appear in the grade point ratio. It is possible that the mem- 
bers -of the faculty have required more of their classes, and that the 
students have maintained the same grade point ratio despite these demands ; 
but of this there is no available evidence, (b) The men have somewhat 
improved, while the women have retrograded slightly as compared with 
last year. The men have improved very considerably in two years — 
1.29 to 1.41. The women are still much ahead of the men. (c) The 
sororities have declined in scholarship each of the last two years. The 
fraternities did not improve this last year as they did the previous year. 

(d) Women in Roble average higher than any but one sorority. Men in 
Sequoia excel any fraternity, and men in Encina excel all but two. 

(e) The Japanese Club excels any fraternity, (f) Phi Beta Kappa in- 
creased its ratio from 2.40 to 2.64. (g) The freshman basketball team 
had a ratio of 1.61, fifteen points above the average for men. The fresh- 
man football team had a ratio of .93, fifty-three points below the average 
for all men. 

Scholarships 

The following table indicates the scholarships awarded during the year, 
and the students to whom awarded. In selecting the holders of scholar- 
ships the Committee considers both scholastic attainment and need. Those 
not administered by the Committee are indicated. 



Name 



Leland Stanford Junior Memorial. 
Alumni Jordan* — 



Established 



Alumni Jordan* 

W. J. Dickey 

Brodie J. Hlgley (^W) j 

Bertha Hyde Braly ! 

Mrs. J. £. McDoweU (R(ft>le Club).. 
John Maxon Stlllman (Chemistry) f.. 

Oeorge E. Crothers (Law)f 

Cyril P. ElweliroT) (Elec. Bng.)f 

Wllmer J. Qross 

Gertrude Gardiner _ 

Maroelle Henrlette Rouiller 

William Irwin Weaver (Chemistry)t. 

Dorothy Mets ('17) ., 

Ernest A. Love OS) 

Hiram C. PIsk ('10)* 

Ira 8. Linickt 

Mrs. Ira 8. Lllllckt 



University Graduate 

(fray's Harbor Regional.. 
Mabel Hyde Cory 



E. C. Converse. 



T>eon Sloss 



1900 

1912 

1912 
1914 
1915 
1916 
1910 
1917 

1917 

1918 
1919 
1919 
1919 
1919 
1920 
1920 
1920 
1920 
1920 

1920 

1921 
1921 



1921 



1922 



Amount 



9300 

150 

150 
300 
150 
275 
150 
150 

200 

600 

150 
200 
IfiO 
150 
200 
1.50 
180 
500 
500 
200) 
} each 5 
800 
500 



f 



f 250) 
( each j 



230 



Holder, l:*21-22 



R. C. Binkley 
( Charles A. LoTe 
(Arthur P. Warren 

Archibald W. Warnock 

Algot J. Peterson 

CfTll H. Balmat 

Mary L. Cornes 

Ruth M. Morri9 

Prancls A. Smith 
fA. W. Leeds 
(H. W. Patterson 

Arthur L. Williams 

Dell T. Lundquist 

Ellen E. BraUsford 

Henry E. Geyer 

Charles Drabkin 

H. I. Gregersen 

C-ecIl R. Brolyer 

Anna P. Ramsey 

William B. Barklund 

Harold Shepherd 

See holders listed below 

R. E. Blackburn 
Virginia B. Lowers 
i P. W. Bachman 
Wilson Craven 
Walter G. Hay* 
George 8. Mizota 
Faye J. Hunt 



*Not subject to Committee approval. 

tNomlnated by the department and approved by the Committee. 



Committee Reports 211 

There are thirty of the University graduate scholarships. These 
scholarships were held for one or more quarters of the year 1921-22 by 
the following students: 

Ankele, Cordes W. Jennings, Gertrude E. 

Armitstead, Reo B. Kallam, Floyd L. 

Barooshian, Stephen M. Kerr, Paul F. 

Benson, Robert R. Kildale, Malcolm B. 

Carlson, Everett Lund, Henry J. 

Clark. Philip C. McPherson, James D. 

Clark. Wilfred S. Nesbit. Reed M. 

Dale, Helen L. Nethercut, Ruth A. 

Edwards, Muriel E. Pritchett, John P. 

Gobar, Franklin H. Simpson, Matthew C. 

Hadley, Edwin M. Somerfield, Harry A. 

Hall, Ernest M. dc Souza, Luis J. 

Heflfeman. John J. Tainter, Maurice L. 

Heron, Ivan C. Van Polen. Herman 

Hicks, Charles R. Walton, Clarence E. 

Ireland, Anna S. Wells, Herbert S. 

There is a very real need for additional scholarships, especfally for enter- 
ing students and undergraduates. The addition to these groups made possible 
by the gift of $50,000 from Mr. Edmund C. Converse was most useful. It 
is hoped that others will in like manner enable the University to assist able 
students of limited means in increasing numbers. 

Honors 

Lower division honors were awarded to twenty-six students. Thirty 
Stanford Scholars were chosen from the upper division of undergraduates. 
Twenty-one students received tlie degree of Bachelor of Arts "with great 
distinction" and forty-one "with distinction." The names of those receiving 
lower division honors and of the Stanford Scholars are found in the quar- 
terly directories and in the annual register. The names of those receiving 
degrees with distinction are found in the commencement program and in 
the annual register. 

Loans 

The loan fund for women students is administered by the Dean of 
Women. The other loan fuxids are administered by the Dean of Men under 
the general supervision of the committee. Schedule X, p. 121, of the Comp- 
troller's Financial Tables, printed in connection with the President's report, 
shows the use made of these funds during the year. 

Clarke Butler Whittier. 

Chairman. 



212 Stanford University 

STUDENT AFFAIRS 

The Committee for the academic year consisted of Professors Henry 
Harrison Henline. William Brownlee Owens, Robert Eckles Swain, Mur- 
ray Shipley Wildman, and Harold Heath, chairman. 

In the administration of its business this Committee has continued along 
the lines established in previous years, acting in an advisory capacity to the 
President of the University in regard to matters of general policy and 
legislation affecting student affairs. A few changes in the University regu- 
lations have been modified at the suggestion of the Students Council, but 
these are largely matters of detail intended to facilitate the work of stu- 
dent control. 

Harold Heath. 

Chairman. 



VOCATIONAL GUIDANCE 

The Committee for the past year consisted of Joseph G. Brown, chair- 
man; George B. Culver, William R. Eckart, Cliarles A. Huston, Elizabeth 
B. Snell. and Mary Yost. 

Conferences with students were carried on chiefly by Deans Culver and 
Yost. 

The edition of the Bulletin of Vocational Information being exhausted, 
plans were completed for revising the Bulletin and issuing a new edition. 

Joseph Grant Brown, 

Chairman. 



Administrative Reports 213 



APPENDIX IV 



ADMINISTRATIVE REPORTS 



LIBRARIAN 

The Growth of the Library 
Elizabeth Hadden, chief of Order division 

Stanford University — 

Volumes in library September 1, 1921 284,970 

Added by purchase 5,410 

Added by gift and exchange 3,068 

Added by binding 2,070 

Total volumes added \0,S4» 

Less volumes withdrawn 522 

Net increase 10,026 

Volumes in library August 31, 1922 294.996 

Lane Medical Library — 

Volumes in library September 1, 1921 51,211 

Added by purchase 1,007 

Added by gift and exchange 240 

Added by binding 844 

Total volumes added 1.851 

Volumes in library August 31, 1922 53.062 

Total volumes in University Library August 31, 1922 348,058 

Included in the foregoing statement are the 578 volumes added to the 
Law library, making a total of 24,846 volumes now in that collection. The 
statement, however, does not include the Hoover War library. 

Following are some of the more noteworthy items acquired : 

Archivio per lo studio delle tradizioni popolari, v. 1-22, Palermo, 1882-1903. 

Biblioteca de autores Mejicanos, v. 1-78. 1896-1911. 

U Critica, v. 1-17, Napoli, 1903-1919. 

France. Conseil d'etat. Collection complete des lois, decrets, ordcmnances. 

reglemens. . . ed. J. B. Duvergier. 1788-1852, 1854-1919. 125v. 
Guide delle Colonne. Historia destructionis Trojae. 1481. 
Kicner, L.. C. Species general et iconographie des coquilles vivantcs. 

Paris, 1834-1880. 12v. 
Martini & Chemnitz. Neues systematisches conchylien cabinet, v. 1-12. pt. 1. 

Numberg, 1769^-1829. 
Mclusine; recueil de mythologie, littcrature populaire, traditions ct usages. 

V. 1-11. Paris, 1878-1912. 



214 Stanford University 

Naval history society. Publications, v. 1-8. N. Y. 

Novitates zoologica. (Tring museum) v. 1-28. London. 

II Propugnatore, v. 1-26. Bologna, 1968-1893. 

Revista Lusitana. v. 1-22. Lisboa, 1887-1919. 

Revue de Thistoire des religions, v. 1-12, 14-36. Paris, 1880-1897. 

Revue des traditions populaires. v. 1-34. Paris, 1886-1919. 

T'oung Pao; archives pour servir a Tetude de I'histoire, des langues, de la 

geographic et de I'ethnographie de TAsie orientale. . . Ser. 1, v. 1-10; 

Ser. 2, v. 1-19. Leide. 1890-1920. 
Westermann's illustrierte deutsche monatshefte. v. 1-115. Braunschweig, 

1856-1914. 
The Picavet collection, numbering about three thousand volumes, con- 
sisting largely of works on philosophy, was also purchased and received 
during the year. 

Among the noteworthy gifts of the year are the following: 
Dante Alighieri. II codice Trivulziano 1080 della Divina Commedia. 

Milano, 1921. Given by the Italians of the United States on the initia- 
tive of Luigi Carnovale. 
Dante Alighieri. The Divine Comedy; a line for line translation in the 

rime form of the original by Melville Best* Anderson. N. Y. 1921. 

Presented by Professor Emeritus M. B. Anderson. 
Brazil. Minister of foreign affairs. Relatorio. . . 1862-1920 (with some 

years missing) 51v. in 30. Other books and pamphlets, about 89 in 

all, were also received from the government of Brazil. 
Connecticut. Acts and laws of the state of Connecticut. 1786. Received 

from F. B. Brown. 
Heylyn. Pater. Cosmographie in foure bookes. London, 1670. Received 

from Charles L. Watson. 
From Mr. J. C. Cebrian 66 volumes were received; from Mrs. Ewald 
Fliigel, 633 pamphlets and 2 books ; from Professor P. A. Martin 10 
volumes of Nicaraguan documents, and from Mr. Timothy Hopkins several 
hundred volumes chiefly fiction. Mr. Henry C. Marcus presented the 
library with a number of text books and works on mining and metallurgy, 
and Harold D. Swett gave us 50 volumes. A collection of 89 volumes was 
presented by Mrs. Arthur L. Adams. To Chancellor Emeritus David Starr 
Jordan the library is indebted for a collection of about 500 pamphlets, and 
to Dr. John M. Stillman for another lot of about 200. The Universidad 
Nacional de Mexico sent a collection of 39 volumes. On exchange from 
the Hoover War Library we have received this year a large number of 
works on Finland and a collection of Russian books from the Helsingfors 
library. 

EXPENDITURES 

The expenditures for books, periodicals and binding, according to the 
Comptroller's statements, are as follows : 

Stanford University — 

Books and periodicals: 

On account Jewel fnnd $20,819.37 

On account Law fees 3,321.72 



Administrative Reports 215 

On account Syllabus fees 1,216.57 

On account of Lathrop fund 70.64 

Binding 5.591.99 

Lane Medical Library — 

Books and periodicals: 

On account L. C. Lane and other funds 6,023.12 

On account Medical History fund 1,324.08 

On account Barkan fund 415.86 

On account Gibbons fund 120.36 

Binding 1 2,445.88 



Total ^ - , $41,349.59 

Lest comparison be made between these figures and those showing the 
numbers of books added, it should be noted that neither the Picavet collec- 
tion of more than 3,000 volumes purchased for the General library, nor the 
Seidel collection of 4,000 volumes or more acquired for the Lane Medical 
library is counted with the accessions although payments on both are 
included in the above expenditures. 

Catalogue Division 
Helen B. Sutliff, Chief cataloguer 

Number of volumes added to the shelf-list and the catalogue: 

New accessions.! 9,598 

(1586 of these being in the Hoover War library) 

Old stock , , 511 

Continuations from bindery , 1,387 

Unoound continuations 966 

12.462 

Recatalogued ^ 966 

United States documents 2,155 (titles) 

British documents 303 (titles) 

Theses (unclassed) 719 

Number of cards added to the catalogue: 

Typed cards J. 39,242 

Typed cards (blue temporary) 1,758 

Printed cards ~ 24,876 

65,876 
Cards withdrawn and refiled 3,800 

Cards and slips added to the union catalogue: 

Library of Congress 38,000 (estimated; 

Harvard College Library 4.800 

University of Chicago 6.928 

British Museum ,. 4,000 (estimated) 

Copy for 281 titles was sent to the Library of Congress and accepted 
for printing. 

Loan Division 
Charles V. Park, Assistant librarian 
The routine work of the division kept the staff busy during the four 
quarters of the school vear. Our records show that we issued 126,276 



.1 



216 Staxforu Universitv 

books over the loan desk in the course of the year. This number exceeds 
the circulation of last year by 11,857. 

This year we placed in the Reserved book room books for Lower division 
courses only. Since that room will accommodate only a small part of 
our reserves, it seems best to restrict its use to the Lower division. This 
plan permits the concentration of all Upper division reserves at the Loan 
desk, and leaves the Main reading room for the use of Upper class students. 
When this division of reserves is understood, students should not be in 
doubt as to where to inquire for books. 

The expansion of the library as a concomitant of removal to the new 
building with an. increased complexity of organization made it more than 
ever essential that systematic instruction as to its i\;ise be given to new 
students. Accordingly, for the past two years through the hearty cooperation 
of the Chairman of the Lower division each new student registering for 
the fqll quarter has been handed a card requesting him to report at the 
library at a stated hour on the day following. From 80 to 100 students 
were assembled at each of five periods. After a general explanation of 
the library, its organization and arrangement, and the reciprocal obligations 
devolving upon it and its users by the Librarian, and a detailed statement 
by Mr. Park as to the methods practiced in the circulation of books, each 
class was subdivided in four smaller groups and personally conducted 
about the library. Miss Sutliff and her assistants gave minute instruction 
on the use of the card catalogue while Miss Hays and her assistants 
explained the resources of the Reference and Periodical rooms. The 
results of this preliminary instruction already observed are convincinff of 
the desirability of continuing the practice. 

Reference Division 
Alice N. Hays, Reference librarian 

The increased registration of students is always reflected in the work 
of the reference division and the demands made upon periodicals, indices, 
maps and reference books has been very heavy. The summer quarter, 
though not so large in registration, brings less relief than m*ght be 
expected because of its greater proportion of older people who have 
difficulties in adjusting themselves to new routines, and once adjusted 
v.'ork much harder. 

An interesting new feature of the library this year has been the install- 
ing of exhibition cases, one being filled with Hoover material, the other 
reserved for the regular collection. 

In February we placed an exhibit of incunabula in the glass case 
in the right corridor. The interest of this collection was heightened 
hy its comparison with two volumes of MSS., one, of Virgil, 12th century, 
in the Italian bookhand, the other. Historia Trojana of the LSth century, 
lent hy Dr. Fairclough and Dr. Tatlock respectively, to both of whom 
grateful acknowledgment is here made. 

In June a selected lot of book plates replaced the exhibit of incunabula. 
The later exhibit brought in its train the necessity for an entire ntw cata- 
logue of our collection, with cards for designer and engraver, a-^ well as 



Administrative Reports 217 

owner and motto. With this fuller equipment it will be possible now to 
enlarge our collection more intelligently, and to make use of our duplicates 
in exchange. 

The Stanford collection is of growing importance, and should have 
more time spent on its accession and development than we are yet able 
to give. The care of the department syllabi is a good deal of an under- 
taking, but it seems to be necessary to have it done by some central body. 
Miss Hyde estimates that about 2,000 sheets are filed during the year, with 
the labor incidental to keeping a file complete, and finally arranging it for 
the shelves. 

The appearance of the Timothy Hopkins room has been improved by 
a ver>' suitable and beautiful oil painting, Le Bibliophile, by Gaisser, the 
gift of Mr. Timothy Hopkins, and the empty shelves have been filled for 
the present with our bound foreign periodicals. 

The maiJ has brought us some interesting questions to answer, and 
buying lists and bibliographies to make out for both individuals and insti- 
tutions. The Faculty bibliography is an important part of the October 
routine. In the Spring, the preparation of our list of current periodicals 
for printing proved a more lengthy task than usual, because of changes in 
title or place or irregularities in appearance since the war which involved 
the inspection of almost every title. 

Miss Gale*s report for her room is appended, but I feel that she has 
not emphasized strongly enough the amount of time consumed in checking 
outside lists, nor did she mention the list's of bound magazines furnished to 
departments, which, although quite in the line of duty, was a big task. 

The Serial section, under the immediate supervision of Miss Gale, has 
checked and filed 22.939 pieces of mail received currently. Completed 
volumes of periodicals to the number of 1,860 have been collated and sent 
to the bindery, as have also 540 other books, making a total of 2.600 
volumes handled and despatched to the bindery. There have been returned 
from the bindery during the year, 2,616 volumes bound at a charge of 
S5,591.09. 

Document Division 

Minna Stillman. Document librarian 

During the past year the Document division has been enlarged by the 
etiuipment of an adjacent room with stacks to form a much needed annex. 

The accessions for the year include, 9,100 United States documents. 
1.160 foreign, and 2.445 state and municipal documents. Most of this is 
free or subscription material, as few sets have been purchased during the 
year. Worthy of note are the journals with appendices of the House of 
Assembly of Upper Canada, 11 vols, between 1835-1840: a set of the 
reports of the Bureau of Archives of Ontario containing the early unpub- 
lished Journals of the Parliament of Upper Canada, and the Memoirs of the 
Archives Department of British Columbia. We also received from the 
Chief Secretary of Queensland, the Queensland parliamentary papers from 
^915 to 1920, completing our set from 1906. and from the Department of 
Toreijjn Relations of Brazil a set of their reports from 1862 to 1900 and 
1^12 to 1920. 



218 Stanford University 

Efforts are being made to get all important current hearings of U. S. 
Congressional committees, and thanks to our Congressman, Mr. Free, and 
the committee chairmen, we have been very successful. Previous to the 
fall of 1919, we have very few of these hearings and as many of them 
are out of print, our only hope of procuring copies is through gifts of 
alumni or friends. < 

No changes have been introduced in the routine of the checking and 
reference work of the division. A subject catalogue is a much felt need 
but cannot be undertaken with the present staft. 

Hoover War Library 
Nina Almond, Librarian 

The origin and early history of the Hoover War library has been 
definitively set forth by Professor E. D. Adams in his interesting and illum- 
inating pamphlet: "The Hoover War Collection at Stanford University." 
It will be sufficient therefore in this report to take up the history of the 
collection at the time it was turned over to the Stanford Library for adminis- 
tration and cataloguing in November, 1921, in accordance with President 
Wilbur's letter which is here included as a matter of record. 

November 22, 1921. 
"Dear Mr. Clark: 

In response to a letter from Professor Adams under date of November 
18th in regard to the Hoover War Collection, I wish to indicate the method 
of handling this collection. I am attaching copy of a letter sent to the 
Board of Trustees under date of January 6, 1920, and copy of the minutes 
of the Board meeting of January 30, 1920, concerning this collection. 

In the administration of the collection, will you kindly observe the 
following points : 

1. The collection should be taken over by the Library and preserved 
as a distinct entity. 

2. Appropriate books now in the Library bearing upon the Great War 
should be transferred to the Hoover War Collection and books now in the 
collection not bearing upon the general period of the war should be trans- 
ferred in turn to the General Library. 

3. The collection of the material will be carried on along the lines 
already arranged for, that is to say. money given for this purpose by 
Mr. Hoover is transferred to Professors Adams and Lutz. They will deter- 
mine what expenses are justifiable in connection with securing materials, 
will arrange all the details, and deliver the materials to the Library. 
When once delivered, they come into the hands of the library staff for 
cataloging and administration and are no longer under the administrative 
control of Professors Adams and Lutz. The cataloging and general assem- 
bling of the Hoover War Collection, which is to be arranged for as already 
planned on one of the lower stacks in association with the front reading 
room, will be under the control and direction of you as Librarian. 

There is also to be added to the Hoover War Collection materials of 
interest to the Food Research Institute. Gifts obtained from Mr. Hoover 
or through members of the Institute will be added directly to the Hoover 
War Collection. Books purchased by the funds of the Food Research 
Institute are to be jassembled with the Hoover War Collection, provided 
they are appropriate to the purpose of the collection. 

In cataloging this collection it is anticipated that the Directors of the 
Food Research In.stitute and Professors Adams and Lutz will In? brought 



Admixistilvtive Reports 219 

into consultation, so that the material will be handled in the way decided 
upon as best after consultation. 

If there is anything in this arrangement that is not clear or if you have 
suggestions to offer, I should be glad to hear from you. 

Very truly yours, 

(Signed) Ray Lyman Wilbur, 

Presidents 

At this point it should be mentioned that with Mr. Hoover*s approval, 
the name of the library was changed from the Hoover War Collection to 
the Hoover War Library. 

In accordance with the plan as outlined above the convenient and 
pleasant room to the right of the main entrance pn the ground floor of the 
library building was set apart for the Hoover War Library Reading Room. 
The stack immediately back of this room was made available for the col- 
lection, which consisted at that time of some one hundred thousand items. 
A small portion of this stack was enclosed to form a room for the preserva- 
tion of the exceedingly rare and valuable portions of the collection such as 
the Gazette des Ardennes, The United States National War Labor Board 
Docket and the British Foreign Office's confidential weekly summary of 
labor and industry in the enemy countries. 

In January, 1922, the Reading Room was opened to the public with 
Miss Almond in charge. In February the staff was augmented by the 
arrival of Miss Mildred Davis as Reference librarian. 

The difficulty of the task which confronted Miss Davis, to make 
available to the university public this vast collection without the aid of a 
catalogue, can readily be appreciated. The workable scheme of classification 
used in placing the material in the stack, the check list of acquisitions main- 
tained in the Directors* office and the cooperation of the Directors and 
especially of Mr. Abraham Svenigrad materially aided in making her 
achievement possible. 

During the past year the use of the library has been largely confined to 
seminar and other advanced students in the History Department. As the 
contents of the collection become better known it is earnestly to be hoped 
that its clientele will widen and that those departments of the university 
which are interested in social, political and economic problems will avail 
themselves of the wealth of material to be found there. 

Simultaneously with the opening of the Reading Room began the stu- 
pendous task of cataloguing and classifying the collection. In widely 
diverse languages and composed of many unique items for which the usual 
bibliographical tools were valueless, the library presented problems of 
considerable difficulty to the cataloguer. 

Miss Edith Bickham, an able linguist and cataloguer, was secured to 
carry on this important work under the general supervision of Miss Helen 
Sutliff. the head cataloguer of the General Library. The librarian also 
devoted a considerable portion of her time to cataloguing and classifying. 
In April Miss Bickham resigned and will be succeeded in October by Miss 
I-ouisc Kat7. a cataloguer of wide and successful experience. 

Although the Dewey Decimal system is the classification used by the 



220 Stanford University 

General Library, it was felt to be advantageous to adopt the Lil)rary oi 
Congress scheme for the Hoover library. There were several reasons for 
this decision ; chief among them was the fact that the Library of Congress 
war collection rivals the Hoover Collection in size and scope. Therefore it 
was evident that the Library of Congress scheme of classification for the 
war would be more likely to meet the demands of the Hoover Colltction 
than a classification based on a smaller and less diversified library. 

m 

At the end of the academic year L8J8 volumes had been classiticd. cata- 
logued and placed in the stack. These books and pamphlets were for the 
most part English, German and French miscellaneous material ; 5,327 
Library of Congress cards and 1,123 typed cards had been filed in the 
Hoover Library catalogue. The Hoover catalogue is also represented in 
the catalogue of the General Library. The unusual fact that the number 
of Library of Congress cards greatly exceeds the number of typed cards 
may be explained partly by the similarity between the two collections and 
partly by the great amount of copy sent by the Stanford Library and 
accepted and printed by the Library of Congress. 

During the past year the Hoover Reading Room was open to the public 
on week days from 1 P. M. to 5 :30 P. M. and from 7 P. M. to 10 P, M. 
except on Saturdays when it was open from 8:30 A. M. to 12 M. It was 
closed on Sundays. Owing to the fact that the room was used largely by 
advanced research students who did not require the constant presence of an 
attendant this arrangement proved fairly satisfactory, inasmuch as all those 
]}ersons provided with general stack permits were permitted the use of the 
room during the hours when the General Library was open. A proper 
supervision, however, of such valuable materials as are contained in the 
Hoover Library requires the constant presence of an attendant and a more 
ideal arrangement has been adopted for the coming year with an increase 
in the number of open hours for the Reading Room. 

The preservation of the collection of two thousand posters is>ued by 
the Germans at Brussels during their occupation, the gift of Mr. and Mrs. 
F. E. Booth, has received the careful attention of the library. The posters 
have been identified, arranged and numbered to conform to the order in 
which they appear in "Les Avis. Proclamations and Nouvelles de guerre 
Allemands Affiches a Bruxelles Pendant TOccupation," a Belgian work in 
36 volumes, and have been filed in suitable cases made for the purpose. 
In this way the books will serve as an index to the posters and unneces- 
sary handling of them will be avoided. 

The carload of unbound newspapers covering the war period received 
by exchange from the Library of Congress is gradually being collated and 
bound. The papers printed in the United States have received first atten- 
tion. Since these newspapers are valuable to the Hoover Library prin- 
cipally as a reflection of public opinion in various parts of the country 
during the war the completeness of the files is of relatively small importance. 
No attempt therefore has been made to secure the missing numbers. Some of 
the files are fairly complete, others show wide gaps. Of this group 251 
volumes have been collated, bound and catalogued. These include the ^^c7c 



Administrative Reports 221 

York American, the Nctv York Journal, the Boston Post, The Boston 
Daily Globe, The Sun and the Evening Sun. 

The files of foreign papers, mostly German and Austrian, are also in 
process of being collated and will ultimately be bound. The poor quality 
of print paper used in newspapers during the war makes it problematical 
how long these papers will survive even the lightest use. 

In accordance with the original agreement the General Library has turned 
over to the Hoover Library approximately 975 volumes bearing on the war. 
Most of these books were classed and catalogued and were a part of the 
General Library. They have not yet been reclassed and they are represented 
only in the main catalogue. They are, however, shelved with the Hoover 
books. 

Of the Finnish collection sent to the Hoover library approximately 700 
volumes, dealing with the life and culture of Finland, have been trans- 
ferred to the main library. 

Of the extensive collection of Belgian government documents numerous 
items not concerned with the war have been transferred to the main library. 
Since the Hoover library is still receiving material from the Belgian 
government it is certain that many more items will ultimately find their 
way to the main library shelves. . 

The binding of unbound books in the library has proceeded rather 
slowly owing to the fact that it has been found most satisfactory for full 
cataloguing to precede binding. This is not true of pamphlets, however, 
and 1.311 pamphlets have been bound in pamphlet binders awaiting cata- 
loguing. These are very largely German miscellaneous material. This 
pamphlet binding will proceed as rapidly as the time of the assistant engaged 
in the work will permit. 

At various times during the year the following persons have been 
cfmnected with the library as student assistants : Ruth Davis, Mary 
McCarty. Pauline Ratzell. Rachael Beach, Anna Ramsey, Lysle Blythe, 
Gerald Edwards, Franklin Starkins, Leonard Lundquist and Ruby Walser. 
Miss Lilian Todd has had charge of the pamphlet binding. 

The Hoover library needs most of all a larger cataloguing force. When 
one considers that there are over 100.000 items now in the library and that 
it is constantly growing by leaps and bounds, the impossibility of one or 
two cataloguers keeping pace with its growth can readily be seen. During 
the past year the work has been retarded by several circumstances. The 
one full-time cataloguer resigned in April. Her successor begins her 
work in October. The librarian has been occupied with problems of 
adm'nistration so that the time she could devote to cataloguing has been 
much less than she could have wished. But even under the most favorable 
circumstances the cataloguing to be efficient and reliable must Ik* slow. Only 
by a material increase in the cataloguing force can we hope to produce 
results that will adequately represent the great collection to interested 
scholars. 



222 Stanford University 

Lane Medical Library 
Louise Ophiils, Medical librarian 

As previously stated, 1,851 volumes liave been added during the year, 
making a total of 53,062 volumes accessioned. The checking of the Seidel 
collection acquired for the library of medical history as mentioned in the 
report for last year, is still in progress and since the books arc therefore 
yet to be accessioned they are not included in this total. The largest gift 
received this year is the one from Dr. H. C. McClenahan comprising all 
the books and journals belonging to the Gardner Sanatorium at Belmont. 
This collection has many good monographs on psychology and psychiatry, 
and some early periodicals. It has been sorted and checked but not acces- 
sioned. Notable gifts of books and journals have been received also from 
Dr. Mary C. Taylor of Berkeley and from Dr. Fred R. DcLappe of 
Modesto. The San Francisco County Medical Society has again turned 
over to us its duplicate books and journals. From Dr. Louise B. Deal and 
associates was received the sum of seven hundred dollars, the income of 
which is to be used for the purchase of books on anesthetics or on the 
surgery of childhood, or both, for the Julia B. Larson memorial section. 

More shipments of books for. the Medical History collection have been 
received, being further purchases made by Dr. Barkan while abroad. Now 
that he has returned to America the selection and purchase of material will 
be continued by Dr. Karl Sudhoff of Leipzig than whom no one is more 
conversant with the subject. 

The cataloguers have kept up with the current accessions, but the time 
required on the Seidel collection and on the other large collections received 
as gifts has made it impossible to accomplish much on the uncatalog^ed 
material inherited from the Cooper Medical College. 

library staff 

Not more than the ordinary number of changes have taken place in the 
library staff. We were so fortunate as to secure the return of Miss 
Louise M. Katz after an absence of a year, to fill a vacancy in our Catalogue 
division. The transfer of Miss Almond, one of the most valued members 
of the division to the librarianship of the Hoover War library created 
another vacancy filled by the appointment of Miss Ina F. Nelson from 
Miami University. Miss Edith Bickham. who had been specially employed 
to catalogue the Seismological collection continued as cataloguer in the 
Hoover War library until the end of April. Miss Mildred Davis, assistant 
reference librarian of the Library Association of Portland, came to us in 
February as Reference librarian of the Hoover War library. 

Miss SutliflF, chief cataloguer, represented this library at the annual 
meeting of the American Library Association at Detroit and afterward 
visited the larger libraries of the east for the purpose of observing their 
methods. The annual meeting of the California Library Association, held 
at Coronado, was attended by Mr. Clark and the Misses StiUman, Craij?, 
Stillson and Alderton from the Stanford library. 

The library staflF comprised George Thomas Clark, librarian : Charles V. 
Park, assistant librarian; Helen Binninger Sutliff, head of cata1og:ue 



Administrative Reports 223 

division; Alice Newman Hays, reference librarian; Elizabeth Hadden, head 
of order division; Minna Stillman, document librarian; Nina Almond, 
librarian, Hoover War library; Louise Ophiils, medical librarian; Gilbert H. 
Jertberg, law librarian; Barbara Alderton, assistant, catalogue division; 
Susan Beach, assistant, loan desk, April through August; Edith Bickham, 
cataloguer. Hoover War library; Edith M. Cook, assistant, order division, 
September through December; Florence M. Craig, cataloguer; Ruth Cran- 
dall, assbtant, loan desk, September through March; Ruth Cary Crutcher, 
secretary, September through December ; Mildred Davis, reference librarian, 
Hoover War library; Ruth M. Davis, assistant, order division; Helen 
Avery Gale, serial sec|ion; Lillian Hyde, assistant, reference division; 
Louise Katz, cataloguer; Dorothy Kelley, assistant, serial division; Gilbert 
Knipmeyer, assistant, loan desk ; Edith Meers, assistant, serial division ; 
Ina F. Nelson, cataloguer; William Owens, assistant, loan desk; Margaret 
Potter, cataloguer, Lane Medical library ; Ruth Richards, secretary ; Ruth E. 
Scibird, assistant, serial section ; Pearl Seeker, cataloguer ; Grace Elizabeth 
Stillson, cataloguer; Gladys Swacker, assistant, loan desk; L. Tum Suden. 
assistant. Lane Medical library; Georgia Thompson, assistant, loan desk, 
April through August; Hannah Lilian Todd, assistant, order division; 
Florence L. Wickes, cataloguer, Lane Medical library. 

George Thomas Clark, 

Librarian. 



DEAN OF MEN 

The office of the Dean of Men reports with satisfaction a splendid tone 
among our Stanford men during the last year. They have individually and 
collectively shown not only constructive initiative but also a very helpful 
spirit of cooperation with university authorities. No one could ask to be 
associated with a finer body of young men. 

Sophomore-Freshman Baseball Fight 

The abolition of the Sophomore- Freshman spring baseball tigfit and 
the elimination of extravagant and useless expenditures in connection with 
campus dances were two of the important problems which this office set 
about to help solve during the year. 

At the outset it seemed best that any direct action or legislation in 
connection with the above activities should come from the students them- 
selves. Talks with leading men among the undergraduates, published inter- 
views in which that of the President played a very helpful part, all had 
their effect. Skull and Snakes was a potent factor in backing up the execu- 
tive committee of the Associated Students which, shortly after the dis- 
graceful fight of last spring, voted to do away with the contest entirely. 

The baseball fight was a more or less recent innovation in undergraduate 
activities and was in recent times always a brutal exhibition fraught with 
real danger to the combatants. It seemed to exist simply as a spectacle for 
the enjoyment of certain upper-classmen. 



224 Stanford University 

Extravagance in the Cost of Dances 

As a beginning of the campaign against extravagance in the cost of 
dances this office gathered and published last year data concerning the cost 
of various dances. 

Skull and Snakes was an active sponsor of the movement which resulted 
in a very marked decrease in the matter of expense as to decorations and 
costly favors. 

Student Body Officers 

It is not going too far to state that throughout practically the whole year 
there was an almost ideal set of officers in the various positions of student 
body trust. The student body president was a mam of unusual force and 
fine character and much of the success of the year was due to his good work 
in connection with the Executive Committee. For the first time in a number 
of years the office of student body manager became what the name implies 
instead of a political sinecure without reference to fitness or the proper 
discharge of official duties. 

The Stanford Union 

The general student body election at the close of the spring quarter 
witnessed an encouraging break away from the old geographical political 
groupings — a situation which makes it more possible for the really able men 
to hold office. In this respect the New Union is proving all that had been 
hoped for it. The close association of men from all parts of the campus — 
heretofore perhaps a bit distrustful of each other or at least not well 
enough acquainted to appreciate fully the other's point of view, has been 
very beneficial. 

When three seniors^-one the president of the Student Body for years 
a resident of Encina, the other the president of the Interfraternity Con- 
ference and the third a fraternity man and president of the Men's Council — 
r(?om together in one suite it becomes quite evident that there is bound to be 
a mutual exchange of ideas. With thoughtful men this is apt to prove of ben- 
efit toward a general understanding and good feeling among students at large. 

More and more there is a tendency for seniors from all parts of the 
campus to apply for rooms in the Union. They are especially desirous of 
living in suites where all the occupants are majoring in the same course. 
This seems particularly true as to law and medicine. It may indicate the 
desirability of grouping men of similar scholastic or professional interests. 

In many respects, both practical and aesthetic, the Union has proved 
itself a most notable addition to the worth-while life of the University. 

Athletics 

Although it is not the province of this office to attempt to dictate any 
athletic policy for the University it is felt to be well within the functions 
of the office to discuss those matters which vitally effect cordial and helpful 
relationships between the faculty and students. Personally the Dean of 
Men believes that athletics as conducted at the University form an exceed- 
ingly valuable unit in our educational scheme. There is, however, a very 
decided opinion in many quarters that it is unwise to send our track teams 
to the I. C. A. A. A. A. meet held on the Atlantic seaboard. Coming as 



Administrative Reports 225 

the meet does before the close of the quarter it seriously interferes with 
classroom work. As a result many men who went east took out leaves of 
absence for the remainder of the quarter, thus losing a whole quarter's 
work. It put a premium on athletics and left a bad impression all around 
both in the minds of students as well as the faculty. 

If the track team goes east at all it seems more reasonable for it to 
enter the Western Championships. The Chicago meet is more opportune 
both as to time and location. 

Mkn's COLNCIL 

It is gratifying to report that the Men's Council during the present 
year seems to have established itself firmly in the student mind as one of 
the most important organizations in their scheme of self government. Our 
Student Body president upon his return from a conference of such officials 
held in Oregon stated that he came back with a realization that our Men's 
Council was the most important body of men in the Student Body — greater 
even than the executive committee. As a result of this attitude on the part 
of our undergraduates there was a very carefully selected group of candi- 
dates nominated for Men's Council. Those elected give indication of being 
an especially strong group of men who command the respect, good will and 
admiration of the students at large. 

The following summary shows in condensed form the nature of the 
various cases coming before the Council and the disposition made thereof : 

Student Council Report 1921-1922 



Charge No. cases Sentence 

Stealing 2 1 expelled 

1 ca»e dismissed 

Drunkenness and disorderly conduct. .. 5 3 suspended for two quarters 

1 case dismisseil 

1 JO hours added to graduation re<|uirc- 
inents 

Violation of honor system 14 3 suspended for one quarter and no credit 

in course 

6 cases dismissed 

5 had hours added to graduation require- 
ments 

Miscellaneous 2 2 had hours added to graduation ret|uire- 

ments 



Number of students expelled 1 

Number of students suspended 6 

Number of students placed on probation as to conduct 1 

Number of students having hours added to graduation retiuirements 7 

Number of cases dismissed 8 



Total number of cases constdere<l 23 

It will be observed that a large majority of the cases reviewed had to d(» 
with phases of the honor system. There probably would have bten more 
such cases if students would more fully realize their responsibilities in the 
matter of reporting breaches of the honor system. Practically all the cases 
of cheating that come before the Council are reported by the faculty or 
those directly connected with the correction of examination papers. 



226 Stanford University 

Drinking 

Contrary to the experience of many other universities there has been 
comparatively little trouble from drinking or drunkenness so far as the 
campus itself is concerned. Conditions in San Mateo County as touched 
upon in the last report have not improved so far as the suppression of boot- 
legging is concerned. Menlo Park is apparently not too much interested in 
making it difficult to procure liquor. There have also reached this office 
many complaints concerning a Chinese gambling house located at Menlo 
Park, near the railroad tracks. It is also quite evident that various road houses 
in and about the La Honda region are more or less "wide open." All these 
places are made easily accessible on account of the large and increasing num- 
ber of student automobiles. 

"Tubbing" 

While "tubbing" has been practically eliminated in the dormitories, it has 
not entirely disappeared from a large majority of the fraternity houses. 
Taking place in such locations it becomes difficult to secure the information 
necessary for successful handling by the Men*s Council. It appears to this 
office that it might be well to have in all fraternity house leases a penalty 
clause relating to tubbing, somewhat similar to the one concerning tlie 
possession or consumption of liquor on such premises. 

AUTX)M0BILES 

The constantly increasing number of student owned or driven automobiles 
on the campus is a problem which seems to demand action along the line of 
restricting the use of automobiles to those students who actually need them 
as commuters. It seems safe to say that practically 90^{, of the student 
controlled cars serve no really useful purpose on the campus. They arc 
time wasters, money wasters and moral wasters. They create false stand- 
ards and false ideas as to individual merit and worth. 

Student Checks 

In a former report reference was made to an element of carelessness or 
indeed willful deceit in conection with student checks. This year seemed 
to mark an increase of complaints in connection with such checks. The 
greatest abuse arises when students pay laundry bills or somewhat similar 
accounts to student agents. Although the Accounting office attaches an 
arbitrary fine of two dollars when such delinquencies occur, other firms or 
individuals have no such redress. Hereafter this office proposes to turn 
over to the Men's Council all such checks sent in by merchants or indi- 
viduals for collection. 

Fraternity Pledging 

It is to be regretted that the inter fraternity conference was unable to 
agree upon a three-quarter non-pledging regulation as regards new students. 
It is believed, however, that the agitation and discussion concerning such a 
system was not without benefit. 

When the University has adequate dormitory facilities there is reason to 
believe that every one will see the wisdom and advisability of at least a 
three-quarters dormitory residence for all new men. 



Administrative Reports 227 

Spring Carnival 

It is a pleasure to report that the Spring Carnival, for several seasons a 
disagreeable exhibition of uncontrolled hilarity, was this year clean, whole- 
some and enjoyable. This was true not only as to the performances but 
there was also a noticeable change in the conduct of certain types of visitors 
which in former years made trouble. This very satisfactory condition of 
affairs was brought about by a system of policing, purely voluntary, and in 
charge of a well-known upper -classman. 

Tuition Notes and Loan Funds 

Tuition notes and cash loans proved of wonderful assistance to many of 
our students during the year. The system of administrating these funds 
seems sound and in most cases serves to give those who take advantage of 
them an added sense of appreciation for what Stanford offers to worth-while 
men. 

The Dean of Men's Loan Fund 'is an especially useful sum as it helps 
out students in all sorts of financial emergencies. Herewith is submitted a 
more detailed statement dealing with tuition notes and loan funds. 

Applications for Tuition Notes 1921-1922 

Quarter Fall Winter 

New applications 76 86 

Renewals 233 254 



Spring 


Summer 


Total 


58 


22 


242 


277 


64 


828 



Tojals 309 340 335 86 1070 

No. of applications by non-fraternity 

students 238 262 255 61 818 

No. of applications by fraternity students.... 71 78 80 25 252 

No. applications by first year men 13 31 41 10 95 

No. applications by second year men 39 63 60 10 172 

No. applications by third year men 75 77 83 IS 250 

No. applications by fourth year men 156 136 119 25 436. 

No. applications by graduates 26 33 32 26 117 



Totals ^ 309 340 335 86 1070 

Representing a total of $50,902.00 

Cash payments 3,384.20 

Cash Loan Funds 1921-22 

Balance Notes Notes Balance No. 

Loan Fund 1921 Given Paid 8-31-22 Loans 

Graduate Student $ 140.00 $ 100.00 $ 10.00 $ 50.00 1 

Wm. Burton Barber 2,326.60 4,382.00 3,587.00 1,531.60 85 

Horace Davis 1,007.52 963.00 613.00 657.52 17 

Associated Students 175.00 75.00 250.00 .... 

Sunford Alumni Assn 420.00 100.00 520.00 .... 

Dean of Men 382.96 1,927.00 2,403.67 796.63 41 

John M. Switzer 50.00 SOO.OO* 450.00 1 

Hr. Robert Patek 600.00 4.000.00* 3.400.00 2 

• New loan funds established during the year. 

George Bliss Culxtr, 

Dean of Men. 



228 Stanford University 

DEAN OF WOMEN 

The work of the Dean of Women this first year of her connectit^n with 
Stanford has been primarily a study of the academic and social conditions 
in the University, especially as they affected the women. Every possible 
opportunity for gaining a knowledge of University policy and practice has 
been given to her. As a member of the Academic Council through her 
connection with the English Department, she has been present when 
academic policies have been discussed and modified. As a member of the 
Lower Division Committee, of the Scholarship Committee, and in the last 
part of the year, of the Committee on Admission and Advanced Standing, 
she has come in touch with the academic standards and seen their applica- 
tion. In her capacity of Academic Adviser to the women of the Lower 
Division, she has been able to study the needs of the individual student and 
to estimate the degree in which the student understands and appreciates the 
aims of the University. Also, as a teacher in the English Department, she 
has come in touch with the academic work of the students, both men and 
women. Her knowledge of the social conditions has been gained from her 
connection with the Organized Women of Stanford and from innumerable 
talks, both official and unofficial, with the men and women students. In 
order to understand the situation in the summer quarter as well as in the 
regular terms, she remained on duty until the seventh of August, and 
during this time was Acting Chairman of the Scholarship Committee. 
Everywhere, — from committees and individuals, from faculty and students, — 
she has met with quick and thoughtful c(M)peration in her endeavor to under- 
stand the problems and needs of the University, especially as thty concern 
the women. In this report, she wishes to present some results of her 
study in the hope that they will furnish a good foundation for later work. 

Academic Work for Women 

During the past year the women have maintained their usual academic 
standing, a standing above that of the level of the University. Not only 
have very few women been put on probation or been disqualified but they 
also have showed well in the list of those gaining Graduation and Lower 
Division honors. In many cases, however, the Dean of Women has thought 
that the women were content to do their second best work since their second 
best kept them well above the average of the class and since they did not 
feel the need of using their full intellectual equipment. Too many students 
entering with high intellectual ideals and ambition lost some at least, of 
these and gave their best interest and too much time to the non-academic 
activities. This fact seems to be due not to too low minimum standards 
but to a focusing of attention merely on meeting the requirements rather 
than on the value and genuine pleasure which are gained from thorough 
academic work. The action of the Scholarship Committee establishing 
Lower Division and Graduate Honors, however, will, it is hoped, shift the 
attention for the best students. It is believed that frequent and public 
explanations of the aim and purpose of the Lower Division requirements 
would further the interest of the younger students in and secure their more 
willing coc>peration with these requirements. How fully the courses offered 



Administr^vtive Reports 229 

in the curriculum meet the legitimate demands of the women in view of 
their possible vocations and occupations after graduation, is still a question 
of study. 

Admission of Women 

The limitation of the number of women to 500 makes a distinctly com- 
plex problem of their selection. While it gives the opportunity for some 
interesting experiments in methods of selecting the best material, it tends 
to establish a higher entrance standard for the women than for the men; 
and the fact of the women's better preparation is, perhaps, one factor in 
making the intellectual environment not as stimulating for the best of the 
women as coul|jl be desired. However, with the limitation in numbers, the 
competition within the group should be as free as possible. For this reason 
the closing of the numbered list seems a wise step to have taken but the 
discrimination in favor of the daughters of the alumni is viewed with 
concern. While this discrimination may gain the support of some alumni, 
alumni support is not dependent on such a policy, as other institutions have 
shown ; and it does not encourage support from the general public or from 
other institutions. Much criticism of this policy has come to, the Dean of 
Women from the schools and from the parents. In last year's report, the 
former Dean called attention to certain social disadvantages rising from the 
limitation of the number of women and the consequent disproportion between 
the men and women in the University. The recommendation, therefore, of 
the former Dean that additional endowment be raised as soon as possible 
in order to allow more women to attend the University, receives the cordial 
support of the present Dean. 

Health of the Women 

The general health of the women has been good. In the winter there 
was a slight epidemic of mild influenza, but most of the ill students were 
in the hospital not more than three or four days, although the after effects 
of this illness were ratlier long drawn out. However, lack of observing 
the simple principles of hygienic living in regard to sleep, diet and so forth, 
has caused an unwarranted loss of time and of energy by too large a number 
of the community. It was to try to check this source of waste that the 
Women's Medical Adviser with the help of the Dean of Women instituted 
the educational campaign described in her report. This work will be con- 
tinued this coming year. The Dean of Women also strongly recommends 
that, as soon as possible, a house on the campus be made into an Infirmary 
or Rest House for women. With such a house, much loss of time from 
classes could be saved and often serious breakdowns averted. This recom- 
mendation is based on experience with such houses in other institutions. 

In the summer quarter, as Dr. Mosher was away, the services of Dr. 
Elsie Mitchell, who was here in connection with the Normal Course in 
Physical Training, were secured for three office hours a week. The work she 
did with the older women who were here for special study, many of whom 
were worn out with their year of teaching, was very helpful. It is hoped 
that there will be some medical adviser for the women on the campus every 



230 Stanford University 

summer quarter. The value of having one for each of the regular quarters 
does not need to be stated. 

Housing 

There are several changes which should be made in Roble Hall in order 
to increase the comfort and promote the physical well-being of the women 
who live there. The lack of ventilation in most of the rooms, due to there 
being no transoms in the doors, is serious. While it might be impossible now 
to put transoms above the doors, it should be possible to put them in the 
panels. Such transoms were put in the dormitory at Barnard College and 
the ventilation was greatly improved. Last winter it was found that there 
was a need for drinking fountains of coot water throughout the liall. It was 
impossible at the time to put these in since the hot and cold pipes enter 
the house so close together that there is no cool water, and there was no 
way of cooling the water after it had entered the house. The Dean of 
Women asks that this matter be given careful study so that a good supply 
of drinking water, so necessary to the health of the women, can be had. 
The attractiveness of the hall can be enhanced by completing the plans for 
the planting which have been made and by putting in beds of flowers in the 
rear, which can be cut for the table. To promote the social life of the hall, 
the changes suggested in the last report of the former Dean would be help- 
ful. Also some change should be made in the entrance to the building. 
It is extremely embarrassing to many a youthful caller to be ushered direc'tly 
into the living room of the house where twenty-five or more young ladies 
may be gathered. And this fact puts Roble at a social disadvantage. 
Several suggestions, which seem possible and practical, have been made for 
remedying this defect. 

It has been possible to have all of the undergraduate women not living 
at home housed in Roble or in the sorority houses, but it has been possible 
to take care of only a few of the graduate women. Some have gone to 
Madrono; others have had to live in town. As was stated in the report of 
the office last year this fact is serious when considered from the point of 
view both of the comfort and convenience of the graduate women now here, 
and of the effect it may have on our getting the best material from other 
universities. 

Student Activities 

The work of the Women's Organization showed growth and progress 
in two directions. The Council and Conference attacked constructively the 
problem of adjusting the social regulations to the needs of the community, 
with the result that they modified, with the consent of the President and the 
Committee on Student Affairs, the Highway Regulation so that it receives a 
stronger support from public opinion than formerly and can be enforced 
more efficiently. They also enlarged the house privileges of graduate 
women not living in Roble or in the sorority houses. In enforcing the 
regulations, the Council showed courage, fair-mindedness, and a keen sense 
of its obligation towards the University and Organized Women. The 



Administrative Reports 231 

second line of progress was in the direction of developing a sense of 
common interests and common responsibility among the women as a whole. 
This spirit was fostered by full discussions of the change in the social 
regulations, by having a women's assembly, by the preparation and presenta- 
tion of a women's Spring Pageant, and by getting recognition for the 
women's work in the campus publications and in the endowment campaign. 
Other things, too, contributed towards this result. The student leaders last 
year were strong ; the athletic association was active in getting and holding 
the women's interest and developing a team spirit; and the Y. W. C. A. 
gave needed opportunity for social service work both on and off the campus. 
Perhaps one of the most promising events of the year was the adoption by 
Pan-hellenic, with the coc>peration of the University, of a new system by 
which members are bid to the sororities. This system eliminates formal 
rushing and postpones bidding until the middle of May. Since the new 
contract promotes the interest of both the sorority members and the inde- 
pendent women by making possible a more normal relation between them 
than was possible under the system of early quarter bidding, there seems 
to be every hope of developing a more democratic University spirit and a 
higher scholastic standard in the coming years than was possible before. 

The women's activities, therefore, seem to be in a healthy condition and 
to promise much for the future. What is most needed now is more active 
cooperation between tbe men's and women's organizations for the promotion 
of their common interests. The social standards formulated by the women 
are not for their benefit merely but for that of the whole community, and, 
therefore, they should have the collective and individual support of the men. 
It is very difHcult for the women to enforce the Highway Regulation, for 
example, if the men ridicule it or help them to evade it. On the other 
hand, the women, through their organizations and their influence as indi- 
viduals, should encourage the men in maintaining the University ideals. In 
one other way during the coming year, the men's and women's organizations 
could render an invaluable service to the University. There has l^en much 
discussion of the number of student activities which we have and the amount 
of time which they take. Some of these activities are valuable and some 
are not; many overlap in an unnecessary and wasteful manner. If a survey 
could be made by the students of these activities, a start might be made 
towards simplifying them so that nothing really valuable would be lost and 
yet the students' energy and time could be conserved and a chance given for 
initiative in starting new lines of interest. 

Tuition Notes 

The tuition notes, the loan fund, and the scholarships did good service 
in helping worthy students in this past year. The value which the tuition 
note is to the student working her way through college cannot be over-esti- 
mated, and the generosity of the University in giving these notes is genuinely 
appreciated by the students. But we need more scholarships than we have 
now. A statement of the financial condition of the Women's Loan Fund to 
September 1 follows: 



232 Stanford University 

Receipts : 

Balance forward September 1, 1921 $54. IS 

Repayment of loans, September 1, 1921, to September 1, 1922 200.00 

Interest 11.00 

Total $265.00 

Disbursements: 

Loaned September 1, 1921, to September 1, 1922 $100.00 

Balance forward, Septeml>er 1, 1922 $165.18 

Unpaid loans 1,337.00 

Total in fund $1,502.18 

Chance in Office Arrangements 

During the year the Dean of Women*s office was removed to what was 
the Comptroller's office. Now the office is convenient to the Lower 
Division and the Registrar's offices, with both of which the Dean must 
work constantly. Some changes were made in refurnishing the office this 
summer and that work, it is hoped, will be completed early in the current 
year. Then the offices will be not only convenient and comfortable for work 
but pleasant to the many women who use them daily. During the year, the 
"Jiumber coming to the office and the amount of work necessary in order to 
respond to the various calls made it necessary to ask for a full time 
secretary, who was not necessarily an expert stenographer, but who could 
be in the office all day. 

Besides being both academic adviser to the Lower Division women, and 
general official and unofficial adviser to all the women both in their organiza- 
tions and individually, and teaching one section of the required English 
Composition course, the Dean of Women has been called upon to speak 
many times outside the University on educational and social questions. 
This part of her work has given her a chance to get in close touch with 
many schools, with some of the colleges and universities of the state, and 
to meet and know men and women engaged in educational and social work. 
Especially has she welcomed these calls when they meant meeting Stanford 
alumni and alumnse. 

Mary Yost. 
Dean of Women. 



ALUMNI SECRETARY 

The total number of new alumni at the close of the year 1921-22 is 

indicated in the following brief table of statistics : 

Men Women Total 

Bachelor of Arts 393 141 534 

Bachelor of Laws 3 3 

Advanced Degrees 50 2i 73 

446 164 610 



Administrative Reports 233 

The following table contains a summary of degrees granted from 1892 
to June, 1922, inclusive : 

Men Women Total 

Bachelor of Arts 4,418 2,624 7,042 

Bichelor of Laws 82 82 

Advanced Degrees 1,032 493 1,525 

5,532 3,117 8,649 

Deduct duplicates 755 307 1.062 

4,777 2,810 7,587 

During the year the Alumni Secretary has been advised of the death 
of the following alumni and former students : 

Milton P. Baker, '16 

Charles J. C. Bennett, *96 

Alfred Bernardin, ex-'04 

John Kester Bonnell, *03 i 

Albert J. Brown, '92 

Lyman V. Brown, *96 

Margaret Caskey, ex-*19 

Dr. John E. Chapin, '00 

C. Leroy Chi Ids, ex-'07 

Mrs. David Coleman (Helen Gober, *14) 

Charles H. Connelly, ex-*23 

Mrs. Lydia B. Cox, gr. 

William F. Doherty, ex-'05 

Mrs. Jacob De Haas (Hazel Carus, *16) 

Mrs. Elmer Grainger (Aurora Peterson. '05) 

Irene Hardy, gr. 

John A. Kauke, ex-* 17 

Earl Russell Leib. '13 

Calvin T. Littleton, ex-'21 

Robert M. Loeser, gr. 

Allan P. Mc Far land, '09 

Mrs. Robert A. MacFarlane (Mildred Gilbert, *14) 

A. Duncan McLeish, ex-*20 

Carl M. Melon, gr. 

Margaret Merrill, '16 

William Henry Schultc, '95 

Stansmore D. Sillers, '11 

Gerald Schellenbach, ex-'20 

Frank Sloman, ex-'20 

Chauncey Smith, '13 

John D. Spreckels, Jr., ex-'04 • 

Robert F. Stever, ex-'13 

Alice Williams, '19 

There has been a wholesome, healthy attitude shown by the alumni 
"^ay during the present year. This condition can be attributed in part 



234 Stanford University 

at least to the endowment campaign, which has brought the University 
authorities in close personal touch with large groups of alumni through- 
out the countr>% while others who have not visted the campus, .nor per- 
sonally met representatives of the University, have, through numerous 
letters, circulars, and pamphlets, had an opportunity to become more 
thoroughly acquainted with our immediate affairs and problems. 

The Stanford Illustrated Re\*iew 

Efforts have been made to maintain the usual high standard with the 
Illustrated Review, the official organ of the Alumni Association, which 
attempts not only to convey each month to its readers all important news 
of the University, but also to interpret the University to the alumni. 

That the Review meets with approval and fills a much-needed place in 
the life of Stanford, is evidenced by the many letters of commendation, 
and also by the rapidly increased circulation among students and alumni. 

Great credit for the high editorial standard of the RezHew is due Mr. 
Paul Clyde, *20, Instructor in Journalism, who, at considerable personal 
effort and sacrifice of time, has served as editor. 

The Alumni Secretary, who has served as business manager, presents 
the following brief financial report: 

Receif*ts 

Balance on hand $ 100.00 

Subscriptions and sales for 1921-22 4,286.62 

Advertisements for 1921-22 4,395.43 $8,782.05 

Disbursements 

Printing $5,685.31 

Commercial Art Company 859.32 

Postmaster 510.00 

Equipment (typewriter and addressograph) 70.00 

Commissions, labor and salaries 1.265.04 

Miscellaneous expenses 142.20 

Dividend to Alumni Association 50.18 

Balance on hand 200.00 $8,782.05 



Alumni Clubs « 

The increased activity on the part of our alumni is already indicated 
by the new alumni clubs which are being formed throughout the country. 
With twelve new organizations founded during the year, there are now 
a total of fifty-two active clubs. The new clubs are as follows: Eureka, 
Long Beach. Monrovia, Monterey County, Sacramento County. Santa 
Barbara-Ventura Counties. Sonoma County, Tulare-Kings Counties. 
Hawaiian Islands, Boise, Idaho; Reno, Nevada; and El Paso, Texas. 

In several other localities clubs are being formed during the year, and 
the ambition of the officers of the Alumni Association is to have organ- 
ized during the next year a Stanford club in every place where any con- 
siderable number of alumni are located. 

Compared with the alumni activities of other institutions, as gathered 
from exchange publications, the showing made by Stanford alumni is 



Administrative Reports 235 

most gratifying. Few, if any, colleges and universities compare with 
Stanford in the number of active clubs. 

The Alumni Secretary has always been ready to encourage and assist 
in the organization of clubs, but there must be an incentive, and at least 
one or two enthusiastic, self-sacrificing individuals in the community, or 
no permanent results can be accomplished. 

University Day 

University Day, May 20, 1922, as stated by Mrs. Hazel Pedlar Faulkner, 
'06, in an Illustrated Review account of the affair, "was more than an event — 
it was and is a state of mind, which needed to be experienced to be 
comprehended." 

Many efforts have been made to establish a recognized day for the 
return of "old grads," and following the precedent established by other 
universities, a day has always been set aside during Commencement Week 
for "Alumni Day." For a time, Founders' Day was also selected as a 
desirable date to bring the alumni back to the Farm, but neither time 
has proved successful. 

Last year a committee of alumni decided to choose a day in the spring 
while the University was in "full swing," and although arranged on short 
notice, the affair proved a success, over three hundred and fifty alumni 
returning to the campus for the first "University Day." 

This year nearly one thousand graduates and former students came 
I)ack, "as shareholders, not beneficiaries," as President Wilbur stated in 
his address of welcome, delivered at the luncheon. 

University Day in the spring is now an established custom, and will 
1>e an annual event. Alumni Day in June should and will be observed 
for class reunions and for the accommodation and enjoyment of alumni 
returning for Commencement, but the play time for alumni will be 
University Day. 

Xo effort has been made to revive the annual Founders* Day dinner, 
which was suspended during the period of the war, but instead, alumni 
clubs have been encouraged to observe this date by holding club dinners. 
This year the following clubs held successful meetings: Portland (Ore.), 
N'ew York. Boston. Stockton, Sonoma County, Fresno County, San Fran- 
cisco, Oakland, and Reno. 

President Wilbur was the guest of honor at the New York meeting. 
Professor Robert E. Swain, *99, met with the alumni of Sonoma County 
at Santa Rosa. Professor Everett W. Smith, 99, was the guest of the 
Fresno County Club. T. T. C. Gregory, '99; attended the meeting of the 
Stockton club as guest of honor, and the Alumni Secretary journeyed to 
Portland, Oregon, to meet with the Portland club. 

The Alumni Directory and Ten-Year Book 

In October, 1921, the Alumni Directory and Ten- Year Book was pub- 
lished, and advance orders totaling 1,845 copies were delivered. Unfortu- 
nately, the later demand has been very small, and at present 1,500 copies 
remain unsold. A special price has been made to alumni who pay annual 



236 Stanford University 

dues, and a complimentary copy is offered to those who pay dues in 
advance for five years. These special offers have stimulated the sale of 
the Directory. 

Although every possible effort was made to secure the biographical 
data of every graduate and former student the Directory was published 
with ninety- four graduates and 4,903 former students numbered amongst 
the "lost souls." 

During the present year, as a result of diligent search, thirteen of the 
graduates and 428 of the former students have been located, and there 
are now over 12.000 names on the addressograph mailing list in the alumni 
office. These lists have been of great value to the Endowment Committee, 
the Board of Athletic Control, and other organizations and committees 
who have desired to communicate with the alumni. 

Service Bureau for Alumni and Student Organizations 

Last year the Alumni Secretary announced a desire to organize a 
service bureau for the University community, and offered the equipment 
and information of the office for faculty, alumni, and students, indi- 
vidually or as organizations, for all legitimate purposes. 

Many undergraduate societies, clubs, and fraternities, also numerous 
alumni clubs, have taken advantage of this service to secure complete 
and accurate lists of their members. 

The Dramatic Council has made the Alumni Office headquarters for 
the sale of tickets, and at the close of each year this office serves as a 
bureau for all senior class activities. This department can and should 
be made one of the most important features of the Alumni Office, and 
every effort will be made in the future to increase its efficiency. 

Biographical Data 

In connection with the Service Bureau, the office has secured the 
necessary files and equipment, and will next year Itegin collecting bio- 
graphical data of all students and alumni. This will be done through the 
preservation in individual folders of all available information, gathered 
through correspondence, clippings, and other sources. The assistance of 
faculty, alumni, and students in this work will be greatly appreciated. 

The work that can be accomplished in this field and in the service 
department is unlimited, provided sufficient funds are available; and the 
Alumni Secretary is hopeful that alumni interested in these activitie> 
will assist in financing the work. 

Alumni Endowment Funds 

During recent years, several universities, notably Yale, Harvard. 
Columbia, and Michigan, have established Alumni Endowment' Funds, 
through which organizations considerable sums of money have lieen se- 
cured. In 1921 over nine thousand graduates of Yale contributed over 
$408,000 to the Yale University Fund, this sum being applied to meet the 
deficit incurred that year. Reporting this result, the editor of the Yale 
Alumni Weekly writes: "This great result of the efforts of the Alumni 



Administrative Reports 237 

Fund directors deserves to be placed high among the achievements of 
Yale organized support of the institution." 

Few alumni are aware that in 1913, through the efforts of Mr. Newton 
Cleaveland, '99, a Stanford Alumni Fund was established, the purpose of 
the organization being to accumulate, hold, and manage a fund raised by 
individual subscription or gifts made by our alumni. 

As a result of the war, and the need immediately following of raising 
funds for the War Memorial, the Stadium, and the Endowment Fund, no 
active effort has ever been made to raise money for the Stanford Alumni 
Fund. As a result, the only money received, except certain scholarship 
funds which have passed through this account, is a contribution of $3,000 
from Mr. Newton Cleaveland, which was made first in the form of a loan to 
assist in the erection of the Eating Clubs. The principal and interest from 
this loan is being paid regularly into the Alumni Fund 

The Alumni Secretary believes that with the completion of the cam- 
paign for the Endowment Fund, active work on the Alumni Fund should 
))egin. and a recommendation to that effect is being made to the Board 
of Directors. 

The financial report of the Alumni Endowment Fund to date follows: 

Receipts 

Interest, Newton Cleaveland, '99, loan to Eating Clubs $ 967.50 

Principal, Newton Cleaveland, '99, loan to Eating Clubs 700.00 

Contribution 5.00 

Total Receipts $1,672.50 

Financial Report of the Alumni Secretary, 1921-1922 

Receipts 

Balance on hand from 1920-21 $ 313.46 

IHvidend on Illustrated Review, 1920-21 261.45 

Balance from Football Dinner 40.00 

Refund H. S. Crocker Co., Plates 7.84 

A. J. Hettinger, Debating a/c 25.53 

Due«, 1921-22, (79 at $1.25, 3,475 at $1.50) 5,311:25 

Interest from Alumni Association Savings a/c 410.11 $6,369.64 

Disbursements 

July 31/21 Backus, F. W., Rental dishes $ 2.85 

Aug. 15 Fortune Taxi Co., May reunion 4.50 

Sept. 10 Postage 25.00 

Sept. 18 Stanford Univ. 1,156 Directories 1.156.00 

^^^- 15 Freeman, E. R., Framing pictures 24.03 

Oct. 21 Ramona Cafe, Refresh., Prom, Concert 8.00 

l^^*c- 5 Sunford Bookstore 3.25 

March 20 Morrill, J. L.. Membership Association of Alumni 

Secretaries 10.00 

April 16 Stanford Univ. share in new addres.sing machine 25.00 

May 17 Stanford Bookstore 11.00 

Printing, letterheads, envelopes, etc 139.60 

Stanford Illustrated Rexiew, for subscriptions 4,087.10 



238 Stanford University 



Clerical work and commissions 573.62 

Rapid Add. Mch. Co.. Filing trays and stencils 42.10 

Balance on hand 257.59 $6,369.64 

Adfance Subscription Fund 

Cash on hand, advance subscriptions, Sept. U 1922.... $5,656.00 

Interest 1 18.16 $5,774.16 



John Ezra McDowfeLL, 

Alumni Secretary. 



APPOINTMENT SECRETARY 

Teaching 

The Stanford University Appointment Office, during the year 1921-22, 
received 1,424 requests for teachers. A record by months follows: 

September 22 

October - 9 

November 10 

December 43 

January 48 

February — 64 

March 89 

April _ 309 

May - 288 

June 314 

July 158 

August 70 

Total : 1,424 

Of these 59 were for school executives. A classified list of these 
requests follows: 

President university 1 

President private college 1 

Normal school president 1 

Principal training school 3 

State director vocational education 1 

City superintendent 2 

High school principal 20 

High school vice-principal _ 4 

Junior high school principal 2 

Junior high school vice-principal 2 

Intermediate school supervisor ^ 2 

Grade principal ! 13 

Principal rural grade school 4 

Rural supervisor 1 

Supervisor primary and elementary 1 

.Supervisor primary and kindergarten 1 

Total 59 

While it is true that there should have been many more than 59 orders 
for school executives, it is encouraging to compare this year's report with 



Administrative Reports 239 

last, there having been an increase of 24 orders. It is, however, clearly 
evident that some means must be taken of educating boards of trustees 
to the desirability of asking the universities for nominations when they 
are in need of school executives. It is also clearly evident that so long 
as the present methods are continued, the tenure of office and the pro- 
fessional standing of school executives will be more or less in jeopardy. 
This condition is probably the one which at the present time is most 
seriously affecting the personnel of the school system. It is certainly 
the condition which is causing the appointment secretaries the most concern. 
In the case of 131 of the 1,424 orders received for teachers, it was 
necessary to report "no candidate." Of the remaining 1,293 orders, the 
Appointment Office filled 141 positions. The summary of the orders for 
teachers for which we had no candidates follows: 

Education and psychology 3 

Executive 5 

History and economics 2 

Languages 23 

Mathematics 5 

Music and art 13 

Physical education (men 8, women 4) 12 

Sciences 10 

Vocational 45 

General — 

Grade teachers 5 

Junior high school, small, rural 1 

Junior high school, fill-in work 1 

Kindergarten 1 

Primary teacher 1 

Rural teachers 4 

Total 13 

Grand total 131 

One of the questions frequently asked when questionnaires are sent to 
appointment secretaries is whether the office is serving only recent gradu- 
ates or whether it is serving older alumni as well. While it was known 
positively that the office has been serving many generations of alumni, it 
was deemed advisable for the purpose of having accurate records to 
classify the registrants this season according to the year that they obtained 
their A. B. degree. No record was. however, kept as to the institution 
from which this degree was obtained. The results of the investigation 
follow : 



240 



Stanford University 



Year 
Obtai 
1882 . 


A.B. 
ned 


New 


Registrants 
Men 


TSA( 

Women 


:hing 

Re-Regtst rants 

Men H 

2 


1888 - - 


1 


1889 . 








... 1 




1890 . 












1891 . 

1892 . 






1 




1 


1893 












1896 . 








... 1 




1897 . 






. 1 




2 


1898 


3 


1899 . - 


1 


1900 . 






2 




3 


1901 . 


J 


1902 . 






1 


. 2 . . 


4 


1903 


4 


1904 . 






3 




3 . 


1905 . 


2 




6 


1906 . 










6 . 


1907 . 






4 




S . . 


1908 . 




... 4 


3 


1909 . 






2 


... 3 


7 ... . 


1910 . 








8 


1911 . 






3 


... 3 

... 1 

... 3 


6 


1912 . 






2 


: 13 


1913 . 






3 


3 


1914 . 






7 


7 


1915 . 






6 




3 


1916 . 






5 


... 3 

... 2 


13 .... 


1917 . 






6 


11 


1918 . 






3 


... 5 


6 . 


1919 . 






6 


... 3 

... 9 


24 . 


1920 . 






10 

19 


28 . 


1921 


.. 28 


15 


1922 






15 


... 45 


7 . .. 


Undergraduates .. 
Totals 


5 

106 


... 1 
114 


202 



Women 



1 

» 

« 

o 
9 

4 

3 

6 

5 

10 

10 

4 

9 

6 

10 

14 

14 

13 

17 

16 

IS 

18 

25 

27 

4 



25! 

Total number of men 308 

Total number of women 365 

Total number of all registrants for teaching positions 673 

It is noted that there is a rather startling difference between the total 
number of registrants for teaching positions during the year 1920-21 (288) 
and the total number for the year 1921-22 (673). This is, however, more 
apparent than real, an improved method of recording the number of 
registrants being responsible. During previous years only those were 
counted who were applicants for positions of which the Appointment 
Office might notify them. This year everyone who asked for tlie services 
of the office was included, even those who wanted records sent only to 
some one place. As usual, many teachers already quite satisfactorily cm- 
ployed registered so that they would be notified of exceptional opportuni- 
ties, or should a position in some particular locality materialize. 



Administrative Reports 



241 



NoN -Teach INC 

Undcrr this heading are included all orders for full-time permanent 
positions <3ther than teaching. The growth in the number of orders has 
hetn healthy, but not exceptional — ^210, as compared with 167 last year. A 
classified list follows: (By general order is meant that the office was 
asked liy the employer to supply as many men as possible.) 



Specific . General 

Kind of Work Orders Orders 

Accountant 1 

Adjuster, auto insurance 1 

Advertising 3 

Bond salesman - 1 

Bookkeeper 6 1 

Business 1 2 

Caretaker - 2 

Chemists 8 

Clerical 7 

Clinical laboratory, in charge of 1 

Companion J 

Computer . . . ~~.- 1 

Credit manager 1 

Designer ot radio frequency circuit 1 

Drafting 1 

Editor (as<i!i!>tant), medical articles 1 

Jj^nginecrs <not specified) 27 4 

Engineers — chemical 5 

Engineers — civil ^ 4 

Engineers — commercial 1 

Engineers — electrical 12 3 

Engineers — mechanical 3 

Engineers — telephone 3 

Engineer and economics man 1 

Filing clerk 1 

Foreman — mine 1 

Lecturer on costume design 1 

Managerial position 2 2 

Matron — nurses' home 1 

Mercantile work 1 

Personnel worker 1 

Playground director 2 

Rehabilitation assistant 1 

Rfsearcb work 4 

Salesmen 26 1 

Seaman 1 

Secretary ^ 15 

Shipping clerk 1 

Social s.ervice 3 

Solicitors 1 2 

Statisticians 2 

Stenographers 26 1 

Stenofcrapher — linguist 1 

Snperintendent of parks 1 

Surgeon — oral 1 

Siirreyirtg 3 1 



No. of times 
no candidates 
available 



3 
1 



3 

1 



242 Stanford University 

No. of times 
Specific General no- candidates 

Kind of Work Orders Orders available 

Telephone operator ^ 1 

Traffic inspector 1 



Totals 191 19 2Z 

Total number of specific orders 191 

Total number of general orders 19 



Grand Total number of orders 210 

A record of the non-teaching placements follows: 

Placements Non-Teaching 

Indirect Direct 

Business 22 11 

Technical 10 21 

Miscellaneous 1 3 

Scientific * 7 

Secretarial 3 11 

Social service 1 



Totals i7 55 

Total number of placements non-teaching 92 

It will be noted that these are divided into two groups, direct and 
indirect. The direct placements resulted from orders received by the 
office; the indirect placements from assisting applicants to secure positions 
of which they had learned from other sources. In both business and 
technical positions this has been found to be a most important service. 
Compared with 1920-21 an encouraging comment is that the number of 
placements for 1921-22 is almost double the number of placements for 
1920-21, there having been a total of 92 placements this year and only 
48 during the 1920-21 season. A record of the number of candidates who 
registered for technical positions and for other kinds of positions that do not 
involve teaching follows : 

Rbgistkants for Technical Positions 

New Registrants — 

Men 85 

Women 5 

Re-Registrants — 

Men 89 

Women 3 



Total 182 

Registrants for Non-Teac^iing Positions 
(Other than technical) 
New Registrants — 

Men 76 

Women 22 

Re-Registrants — 

Men 69 

Women 42 



Total 209 



Total number of non-teaching registrants 391 

Increase over previous year 144 



Administrative Reports 



243 



The classili cation according to the year the candidate obtained his A. B. 
degree or its equivalent which follows shows that even in the case of 
applicants for technical and business positions the office is serving many 
of the older alumni. 



Nom-Teaching Recistkants for Technical Positions 



i'ear A.B. 
Obtained 

1901 

1902 

1909 

1910 

1911 

1912 

19U 

1914 

1915 

1916 

1917 

1918 

1919 

1920 

1921 

1922 

1923 



New Registrants 



Men 



Women 



1 



RC'Regist rants 

Men 

2 



Women 



1 
11 



2 
2 
2 

14 

49 

1 

83 



1 

1 


1 


2 


1 i: 


i 



4 
2 

1 

•» 
J 

5 
5 
9 
14 
35 
4 



89 



2 
1 



Totals 

Total number of men 174 

Total number of women 8 

Total number of all registrants for technical positions 182 

Rbcisteants for Non-Tkaching Positions 
(Other than technical) 



Women 



»ar A.B. 
Obtained 
1896 .. 


New Registrants 
Men 


Women 


Re-Registrants 

Men n 

1 


1>"99 .... 




1900 .. . . 




1903 




J90« 




1909 




1912 . 


9 


1913 




1914 .. 




1915 .... 


4 


1916 ... 


3 




-> 


1917 


J 




6 


1918 


3 

18 

51 


... 1 


2 


1919 


... 1 


,.... O 


1920 ... . 


... 2 


14 


1921 . 


... 7 


27 


1922 


... 11 


3 


Totals 


76 


22 


69 



1 
1 

1 

3 
1 

3 

4 
1 
2 

1 
2 
10 
7 
2 

42 



Total number of men 145 

Total number of women 64 

Total number of registrants for non-teaching positions other than technical 209 



244 Stanford University 

Student Employment 

During the year 1921-22 457 men and 82 women, or a total of 539 
students, registered with the Appointment Office for part-time \vc»rk which 
would enable them to earn some or all of their expenses while attending 
the University. The majority wished to earn their board or its equivalent. 
There were only a few who needed simply a little extra money. A goodly 
proportion were earning all of their own funds. Almost every student 
was given at least some assistance. 

It will be noted that there have been fewer applicants for this type of 
work this year than last. Two reasons are evident. First and most im- 
portant, many students who applied for work last year through the office 
were so satisfactorily located that they returned to their positions and 
did not need additional help. This condition is clearly due to the fact that 
the training, experience, and general qualifications of the students were 
taken into account in recommending them for work. The use of the 
Robinson Findex record cards makes this grade of service possii)le with a 
minimum amount of effort and time. The other reason for there being 
fewer registrants is probably that many self-supporting students felt it 
necessary to take full-time temporary positions so as to have a larger 
cash reserve before continuing their college education. 

There was a decided drop in the registration of self-supporting students 
at the beginning of the spring quarter. As a result it was difficult to 
find suitable candidates for much of the work available during that quarter. 
It seems advisable, accordingly, for self-supporting students who can 
afford to spend only two quarters at the University during a year to plan 
to be in -attendance during the spring term. It is also advisable that 
those who can so arrange their work and finances as to be at the University 
all three quarters, plan to take as heavy a course as possible in the winter 
quarter, when there is a scarcity of employment due to the rainy season, 
and as light a course as possil)le in the spring quarter, when there is an 
abundance of work. 

Every quarter the students registering in the University are required 
to till out a card record regarding self-help, which is placed on tile in the 
Appointment Office for statistical purposes. In a comparative study of 
the living groups at the University made in connection with an economics 
course by Ross C. Fisher and Frederic T. Shipp from these cards which 
were filed during the winter quarter, it was learned that the i>crcentagcs 
of self-supporting men during that term were as follows: 

Non-Fraternity 50.068 

Fraternity 41.337 

All Men 47.577 

It must be borne in mind that these percentages undoubtedly vary from 
quarter to quarter. They make, nevertheless, an interesting study. The 
living group that had the highest percentage of self-supporting students. 
77.779t, was one of the fraternities. In all, six of the fraternities exceeded 
the non-fraternity average of 50.068%. The lowest average of self- 



Administrative Reports 245 

supporting students in a fraternity group was 12.05%. Despite this ex- 
treme variation, from 12.05% to 77,77%, the difference between the 
fraternity and non-fraternity groups is less than 9%. Of the 550 men 
residing at Encina Hall 53% were assisting themselves. 

The percentage of women who assisted themselves during the winter 
quarter was as follows: 

Non-Sorority 22.32 

Sorority 8.57 

All Women 18.27 

In one of the sororities 37.5% of the Women were earning part or all 
of their own expenses. 

The average for all students assisting themselves was 40.92%. Since 
the records of the Appointment Office show that last year 21.887% of the 
students enrolled in the University applied to the office for help, it is 
evident that 19.033% secured help on their own initiative or continued to 
work in positions secured through the Appointment Office the previous 
year. 

Only 11 women out of the entire body of 500, or 2.02%. stated that 
they were earning all of their own funds, as compared with 142 men out 
of approximately 2100, or 6.76%. It is known positively that these per- 
centages are far too low, as many who filled out the card by stating "Yes," 
which might indicate that they were earning either part or all of their 
expenses, are definitely known to be entirely self-supporting. 

An interesting comment in this connection is that several of the 
students who graduated with distinction and who were elected to honorary 
scholarship societies were self-supporting in full or in part. 

During the year the office received 1754 orders for student help; 508 
of these orders were opportunities for employment that would be con- 
tinued throughout the quarter; 1246 were for strictly temporary work. A 
classified record follows : 



246 



Stanford University 



Part-Time Employment 



PERMANENT 



Kind of Work Palo Alto Campus Outside 



5 
3 
1 
3 



Art work 6 

Athletic coach 3 

Bookkeeper 5 

Care of Children 3 

Carpenter 3 

Chauffeur 4 

Clerical 

Clerk 

Collector 

Companion 

Cooking 11 

Dishwashing U 

Drafting -. 

Farm Work 5 

Fruit picking _ — 

(>ardenlng _— 14 

Housework for cash 19 

Housework for meals 3 

Housework for room 14 

Housework for r . ft b . 34 

Housework for b.r.c. 8 

Janitor - 3 

Lab. Technician 

Library 

Manual — 3 

Mimeographing 

Miscellaneous 28 

Model 

Music - 4 

Painting — 

Paper route 

Playground work... 3 

Pruning trees... 

Reading aloud 

Selling, soliciting... 1» 

Sewing 3 

Stenographer 7 

Walters 26 



Teaching, part-time 
Teaching, substitute 
Telei^one operator 

Translating 

Tutoring 

Typing 







Totals «0 



1 
2 



1 



11 
%i 

3 



15 

7 

4 

13 

3 

1 

1 
5 

13 



•> 



1 
2U 



TEMPORARY 



I Amount 

Palo Alto Campus Outside Total Earned 



1 
1 
1 



3 
1 



31 



«. «. 


. _ 


14 


1 


10 


G 


3 


4 


2 


-- 


2 


4 


4 


-- 


185 


63 



o 

A* 

20 

13 

1 

3 

1 



4 

3 

9 

6 

134 

138 



20G 

o 

17 



1 
3 
1 
2 
7 
6 
20 
2 
1 



24 
2 



634 



1 

15 
3 
3 

48 



2 

10 

2 



18 

67 

3 

1 

1 

102 
14 

5 

14 



1 

52 
35 



3 

1 

8 

107 



517 



2 

1 
1 
1 

1 
1 



3 
4 

26 



26 

9 

2 
1 



3 
2 



10 
05 



5 

3 

9 

42 

20 

11 

64 

5 

2 

7 

25 

54 

8 

14 

8 

185 

258 

6 

18 

52 

6 

5 

1 

1 

842 

19 

70 

5 

7 

17 

3 

6 

S 

3 

81 

11 

8S 

106 

18 

3 

5 

1 

50 

113 



$278.00 
225.00 
251.95 
785.00 
179.00 

2,191.46 
327.00 
S50.00 
81.00 
706.00 
68S.S 
967.00 
105.00 
33.% 

1.748.73 

1.094.15 
216.00 
660.00 

2,710.00 
606.00 
143.00 



270.00 

2,406.06 

147.36 

3,078.60 

63.50 

60.00 

206.25 

220.00 

554.50 

15.00 

29.00 

909.45 

24.00 

2.800.32 

8,840.15 

2,755.00 

123.00 

470.00 

l.S20.l^ 
1.678.54 



1,754 $39,270.5S 



For 115 of these 1754 part-time positions, the office had to report "no 
candidate;" 224 of the orders were cancelled; 1415 were filled, an increase 
of 267 over the number filled the previous year. 

The total amount earned, $39,270.58, is very much smaller than the 
total of the previous year, largely because there were more temporary and 
fewer permanent positions filled. A partial study of the orders for perm- 



Administrative Reports 247 

anent part-time employees that came to the office during the year 1920-21 
and which were not repeated during the year 1921-22 shows that in many 
instances the students who accepted work during 1920-21 retained 
their positions the following year. Another cause for the smaller 
tctakl is that last year the money earned during the Christmas and Easter 
vacations was included. This year it was made a part of the full-time 
temporary report. 

The appreciation of the students who are helped is extremely gratifying. 
Employers are likewise making favorable reports to the office. Due to the 
care which is exercised in selecting the right man for the right place, there 
is being built for the students of the future a reputation for reliability that 
will undoubtedly greatly increase the opportunities for self-support at the 
University. Those who are not acquainted with the standards maintained 
would be surprised if they could know hgw many forms of helpfulness the 
office takes; for instance, attention to health, character development, habits 
that interfere with vocational success, and encouragement during dark 
hours. The results certainly justify the financial and moral support of all 
who believe in helping worthy students help themselves. 

Full-Time Temporary Employment 

During the year 1921-22, 369 men (4 of them residents of the com- 
munity not connected with the University) and 122 women (54 of them 
were not Stanford students but practically all were the sisters, wives, or 
mothers of self-supporting Stanford students) registered for full-time 
temporary work. Nearly all the Stanford women wished employment only 
during the vacation periods, Thanksgiving, Christmas, Easter and summer. 
Almost all the other women wished full-time work for the year. These 
latter women were permitted to register because helping them was found to 
be a very practical way of assisting the students in whom they were 
interested. 

A classified record of the orders for men follows : 

Full-Time Temporary 

Men 

Amount Orders Placement^ 

Attendant (State hospital) $ 300.00 1 1 

Box factory 1,455.00 4 G 5 

Canneries 4.230.00 3 G 10 

Carpenter 345.00 2 2 

Chauffeur (cancelled) 1 

Clerical 400.00 12 G 10 

Companion 520.00 2 2 

Engineering » 3,644.00 23 12 

Farm work 817.85 23 G 28 

Fire guard 400.00 2 2 

Gardening 178.00 4 4 

Housework 40.00 2 2 

Miscellaneous (cancelled) 3 

Playground 1 

Post-oftce 30.00 1 1 

Riding instructor 1 



248 Stanford University 



Service station 

Soliciting 

Summer resort work 
Tutor (cancelled) ... 



Amount 


Orders 


Placement i 


6»375.00 


28 


21 


5.921.40 


112G 


20 


1.530.00 


6 


6 




1 










Total! $26,186.25 232 126 

Total amount earned - - $26,186.25 

Average amount earned 207.825 

The letter "G" under "Orders" in the above table indicates a general 
order, i. e., a request for as many candidates as could be furnished. The 
figure in front of the letter "G" indicates the number of companies that 
asked for men. 

A comparison of this table with the orders received for the same kitid 
of work the previous year will reveal that there has been a healthy 
growth in business, but that there is quite a difference in the kinds of 
employment. 

A classified record of the orders for the services of women follows: 

FuLL-TiME Temporary 
WoMiai 

Bookkeeper $ 

Care of children 

Clerical 

Companion 

Housework 

Library 

Xur&ing .- 

Playground 

Secretary ^ , 

Soliciting 

Summer resort work 

Swimming teacher 

Typing 

Totals $6,696.50 45 21 

Total amount earned $6,696.50 

Average amount earned 318.88 

• 

The total number of orders and the total number of placements are both 
smaller than the totals for the year 1920-21. 

Summary of Fuix-Time Orders and Placements 

O rders Placemen ts 

Men 232 126 

Women 45 21 



Amount 


Orders 


Placements 


$ 200.00 


1 


1 


400.00 


6 


2 


699.00 


8 


4 


160.00 


1 


I 


1,300.00 


9 


2 




1 
1 





420.00 


1 


150.00 


1 


1 


1,950.00 


4 


3 




6G 
5 





1.020.00 


4 


W7.50 


1 


1 


200.00 


1 


1 



Both men and women 277 147 

The total amount earned by all full-time temporary workers is 
$32,882.75. This makes a grand total earned in part-time and temporary 
work, principally by undergraduates, of $72,153.33. 



Administilxtive Reports 249 

General Report 

During the year the appointment secretary attended the following 

annual conventions : 

fl 

The City, District and County School Superintendents of Cali- 
fornia — San Diego. 

State High School Principals — Pasadena. 

The San Francisco District of California Federation of Women's 
Clubs — San Rafael. 

The Appointment Secretaries of California — Berkeley. 

The National Association of Deans of Women — Chicago. 

The appointment secretaries of the state were called together for the 
first time by Mrs. May L. Cheney, appointment secretary of the University 
of California, for the purpose of considering methods of improving the 
teacher-placement service in California. The cooperation between the 
various offices which resulted helped to locate several Stanford graduates in 
very satisfactory positions as teachers. In the future when the idea has 
been better developed, such meetings will undoubtedly prove to be an 
important factor in solving the problems that aflfect the personnel of the 
teaching profession. 

The appointment secretaries were invited to attend the National Con- 
ference of Deans of Women because that part of the program which was 
under the supervision of the national committee of the Bureaus of Occupa- 
tion was especially applicable to the work of appointment offices. 

At this meeting a committee of appointment secretaries was named to 
organize all the appointment secretaries of the United States, it being 
recognized that this type of service is national in scope and that success 
can h)e5t be attained by having appointment secretaries study as a body the 
many problems involved. Your appointment secretary was made chairman 
<n* this c<>mmittee. 

Lfcally, your appointment secretary served as chairman of legislation on 
the executive board of the Parent-Teachers Association and as a member 
of the faculty committee on vocational guidance. 

During the year your appointment secretary addressed several local club 
meetings, lectured on invitation to a group of seniors in the chemistry 
department on "Vocational Opportunities in Chemistry and the Proper Use 
of the Appointment Office" and spoke to high school seniors on the subject 
of "You and Your Vocation." On invitation of the students she also wrote 
an article on the use of the appointment office for publication in the annual 
dircctor>- of the civil engineering graduates of Stanford University. 

In the spring quarter an advisory committee of students prominent in 
campus activities, of which Mr. Myron N. Reed was chairman, was 
appointed by the president of the student body for the purpose of developing 
a better understanding of the ideals of the appointment office among the 
student b<Kly and of cooperating with the appointment secretary in improv- 
ing the services rendered The committee made a good beginning in its 
imp<jrtant functions by collecting from the members of the student body 



250 Stanford University 

approximately 200 text books to be loaned without charge to students 
enrolled in the appointment office for part-time employment. 

Several small gifts ranging from $1.00 to $25.00 were received by the 
appointment office during the year. It is significant that these gifts came 
from senior students who realized the importance to them of the work 
being done and from recent alumni who appreciated the aid they had been 
given. 

The great need of the appointment office is an endowment of not less 
than $250,000.00. With the interest on such a fund to supplement the money 
furnished by the University and earned by the office, a skilled clerical 
staff of a size sufficient to insure prompt service even in crises could be 
maintained; valuable vocational information could be collected and kept in 
a form readily accessible to interested alumni; a well organized system of 
vocational advice for undergraduates and records of the advice given could 
be installed and kept; and a careful vocational survey that would be useful 
in developing loyalty and that would aid materially in locating specially 
trained men during periods of del)ression could be made of all Stanford 
alumni. Such a study would have been invaluable during the past year to 
the new alumni trained in chemistry and geology. In short, constant 
research is the foundation upon which an appointment office must be built 
if it is to fulfill its obligations, and research, unfortunately, docs not 
directly pay for itself. 

Recapitulation 

The daily records kept by the appointment office during the year have 
resulted in the following interesting data : 

1921-22 1920-21 

Total number of Teaching Registrants 673 288 

Total number of Non-Teaching, business, etc. registrants 209 ) 

Total number of Non-Teaching, technical registrants 182 j 

Total number of Full-Time Temporary Registrants 433 601 

Total number of Part-Time Registrants 539 780 

Total number of Non-Stanford Registrants 58 85 



Cirand Total of Registrants for the year 2,094 2,001 

SuMMAiY OF Total Nt'MBERb of Orders and Placements 

Orders Placements 

Teaching 1,424 141 

Non-Teaching 210 92 

Full-Time Temporary 277 147 

Part-Time 1.754 1,415 



Grand Total 3,665 1,795 

Total amount earned in part-time and temporary work $72,153.33 

Month Visitors Letters Blanks Mailed 

September 1,083 651 192 

October 1,252 271 424 

November 866 809 366 

December 1,176 178 641 

January 2,304 393 633 



Administrative Reports 251 

Month Visitors Letters Blanks Mailed 

February 1,251 442 1,921 

March 550 597 563 

April _ 1,10J 834 491 

May „ - 1.296 927 572 

June ^ 1.818 2,138 487 

July 484 844 279 

August 265 976 102 

Totals for year 13,448 9,060 6.701 

Average per month 1.120-f 755 558 

Increase over last year 4,738 1.399 524 

Elizabeth Burritt Snell, 

Appointment Secretary. 



MEMORIAL CHURCH 
Report of the Chaplain 

Public Worship. During the autumn, winter and spring quarters morn- 
ing chapel has been held each day at 7 :50 in the Memorial Church with an 
address by the chaplain or an invited speaker. The attendance has averaged 
about 30 students daily, the men being in the majority. The largest 
attendance on any one day was 75. 

Sunday morning service at 11:00 has developed during the past year, 
the presence of distinguished strangers adding to the dignity and usefulness 
of that service. The following named clergymen were invited to preach 
in the Memorial Church during the past academic year: 

Autumn Quarter: 

Bishop Moreland, Sacramento, Episcopalian. 

Rev. F. J. Van Horn, D. D., Oakland, Episcopalian. 

Rev. Robert Freeman, Pasadena, Presbyterian. 

Winter Quarter: 

Rev. Stitt Wilson, Chicago, Methodist. 
Rev. C. S. S. Dutton, San Francisco, Unitarian. 
Rev. Leslie Learned, Pasadena, Episcopalian. 
Rev. A. W. Palmer, Honolulu, Congregational ist. 
Rev. E. F. Daugherty, Los Angeles. Christian. 
President Reinhart, Mills College, Unitarian. 
Rev. H. D. French, Los Angeles, Congregationalist. 
Rev. Lynn T. White, San Anselmo, Presbyterian. 
Dr. Devine, New York, Social Service Expert. 

Spring Quarter: 

Rev. A. W. Vernon, Northfield, Minnesota, Congregationalist (Two 

Sundays ) . 
Rev. Carl Patton, D. D., Los Angeles, Congregationalist. 
Rev. Sydney Snow, Montreal, Canada, Unitarian. 
Bishop Stevens. Los Angeles, Episcopalian (Two Sundays). 
Rev. Hugh Black, D. D., New York, Presbyterian (Three Sundays). 



252 Stanford University 

Summer Quarter: 

Rev. John H. Lathrop, Brooklyn, New York (Three Sundays). 

Rev. C. R. Brown, D, D., Yale University, Congregational ist (Three 

Sundays). 
Rev. C. P. Deems, San Francisco, Episcopalian. 
Rev. Merle Smith, Pasadena, Methodist. 
Rabbi Martin Meyer, San Francisco, Hebrew. 

Church Preference of Students, The following tables exhibit the 
church preferences of students entering the University in the autumn, winter 
and spring quarters: 

Men Students 

Preference Autumn Winter Storing 

Baptist 19 6 5 

Catholic 42 11 7 

Christian 21 1 I 

Christian Science 21 2 3 

Congregational 34 7 3 

Episcopalian 56 6 ,4 

Friends 10 

Jewish - 6 3 3 

Lutheran 6 3 3 

Methodist 89 18 7 

Presbyterian 83 8 6 

Protestant 11 14 2 

Unitarian 14 2 1 

Miscellaneous 3 2 1 

415 83 46 

None 86 18 20 

501 101 66 

Per cent with preference 82.8 82.2 69.7 

Per cent without preference 17.2 17.8 30.J 

Women Students 

Preference Autumn Winter Sfring 

Baptist 5 

Catholic 8 4.. 

Christian 11.. 

Christian Science 13 4 1 

Congregational 9 5 4 

Episcopal 20 10 3 

Friends 3 

Jewish 1 1 1 

Lutheran 3 .. 1 

Methodist 18 I 1 

Miscellaneous 12 1 

Presbyterian 14 5 3 

Unitarian 6 .. - 

102 33 15 

None 19 3 3 

121 .^6 IS 

Per cent with preference 84.3 91.7 83.3 

Per cent without preference 15.7 8.3 1^-6 



Administrative Reports 253 

Of 833 students entering the University in 1921-22, 674 (or 81%) were 
members of churches or had some preference. 

Teaching. The Chaplain has given three courses of lectures in the 
University, as follows: 

Autumn Quarter: 

The Religion of the Jew — A study of Old Testament religion and 
ethics. 

Winter Quarter: 

The Life of Christ — A history of the life and times of Jesus. 

Spring Quarter: 

The Ethics of Christ — An analysis of Christian Ethics as disclosed in 
the gospels. The application of Christ's teaching to modem life. 

Social Scrtncc. The Chaplain has continued to act as President of the 
Board of Directors of the Stanford Home for Convalescent Children. 
This charity has involved the raising of about $6000 for the year for the 
Maintenance Fund. By this effort students, faculty and alumni are bound 
together in a perpetual memorial of one of the founders of the University. 

David Charles Gardner, 

Chaplain. 



Report of the Organist 

organ recitals 

Eighty-four programs of organ music were given at 113 recitals during 
the year on Sunday, Tuesday and Thursday afternoons. Tuesday's program 
is usually a repetition of the one played on Sunday. The recitals average a 
half-hour in length. Assisting soloists appeared at seven recitals. 

Two recitals were given by guest organists as follows : 

April 15. Mr. Arthur Hitchcock of Pomona College. 

August 8. Mr. E. Harold Gecr of Vassar College. 

On April 25th the A. Capella Choir, College of the Pacific, gave a 
concert, assisted by the Organist. 

On Memorial Day a special program was rendered, with five solo 
artists. 

THE CHOIR 

The average enrollment has been seventy voices, not counting the small 
choir for the summer quarter. The attendance of others not enrolled for 
credit has brought the average Sunday attendance to a still higher figure. 

Two special musical services were given by the Choir and University 
Orchestra, as follows: 

December 21. The Dream of Mary — Horatio Parker — Choir, Soloists, 
Orchestra, with Miracle Play performed in the chancel. 

Apr!: 14. The Seven Last Words — Dubois — Choir, Soloists, and organ. 



254 Stanford University 

STUDENT MUSICAL ORGANIZATIONS 

The Glee Club made a tour of Northern California during the Easter 
recess, and received much favorable comment on account of the improved 
standards which the Club is striving to maintain. The Club also appeared 
in San Jose, San Francisco, and on the campus, with Mrs. W. D. Allen 
as assisting soloist. 

The Schubert Club made several local appearances and included about 
thirty of the best women's voices in the University. 

The University Orchestra has done exceptionally good work, and 
promises to be one of the best musical assets of the institution. 

SYMPHONY AND FESTIVAL CONCERTS 

Three concerts by the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra under Alfred 
Hertz were successfully managed by the Symphony Committee. The final 
concert in the Memorial Church on Founders' Day again contributed a 
great musical stimulus. 

Warren D. Allen. 

Organist 



DIRECTOR OF THE MUSEUM 

The Stanford Museum has been open to the public every day through 
the year, including the vacation period, from 10 a. m. until 5 p. m.. excepting 
the principal holidays. 

The year's work has consisted of receiving, delivery, listing, and cata- 
loging donations and loans of exhibits, treating of materials tor preserva- 
tion, varnishing pictures, displaying of exhibitions, entertaining visitors and 
general upkeep. 

A textile room has been opened to the public, showing Early American, 
Mexican, American Indian, European, Turkish East Indian. Oriental and 
Russian Textiles. Additions will be made to this room, for some time, 
from material that is being classified. 

A number of original Tanagra Figurines and some ancient vases which 
had been badly broken at the time of the earthquake have been repaired 
and placed on display as was also the Fire Engine and Hose Cart pur- 
chased by Leiand Stanford, Jr., in 1882 while in New York, for use on 
the Palo Alto Stock Farm. This engine was taken to San Francisco to 
the 50th International Convention of Fire Engineers, to be displayed there 
and represented Stanford and Palo Alto in the parade of August 15, 1922, 
after which it was replaced in the Pioneer Room. 

Other articles have been added to the Pioneer Room as follows : 

Collection of Colonial Furniture, donated by Mr. and Mrs. T. S. 
Oldroyd of Stanford University, consisting of tables, chairs, secre- 
tary, melodian, chest of drawers, clock, etc. 
Early Pennsylvania articles, from Mrs. H. J. Ryan of Palo Alto. 



Administrative Reports 255 

Revolutionary and Early California articles, including a Telescope 
belonging to Gen. John C. Fremont and Musket with the year 1775 
and the name of Rodger Bull engraved on it. This collection is 
loaned by Acton Meek Cleveland, a Stanford student, and William 
Bull Meek, for an indefinite period. 
Other donations to the Museum are as follows: 

Medallion from Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts and Letters 
commemorating their 50th anniversary. Received from the Presi- 
dent's Office. 
Plaster casts from Mrs. Ewald Flugel, as follows: Life-size bas- 
relief, portrait of Ruskin, Heroic size bust in the round of Zeus 
and Egyptian decoration of papyrus plant and birds, in low-relief. 
Large collections of paintings with some wood carvings and statues, 

from the late Thomas Welton Stanford of Australia. 
Fossil Trilobites from Canada, Small Clay< images from Toltec 
Pyramid and a Jar from ancient Inca grave ih Peru, from Mr. 
Mount ford S. Wilson. ' -. ^ . 

Articles from Michigan Indian g];gve/d!' about the year 1800 ; Toma- 
hawk, knife, pipe and manicuring articles n\a4e from flint; from 
the collection belonging tcrJ^Xsttc Prof.- George Hempl. 
Old dagger, from Mrs. J. E:*Roelkey. 
Hand-knitted BjfSL& Bag about 200 years old, from Miss C. S. Stolten- 

berg, of the^tanford faculty. 
A collection of Stanford Views of 1906 earthquake time was pur- 
chased from the estate of the late Frank Davey. Also a collection 
of New Mexico Indian Pottery and Weavings, secured by Pedro 
J. Lemos while in New Mexico. 
Three pieces of the original Atlantic cable were located in the 
Museimi basement store-rooms, and put on display in the Pioneer 
Room. These pieces were presented to the Stanford Museum by 
R. M. Green in January, 1899. 
The large collection of Fish Fossils donated by Dr. David Starr 
Jordan during the previous year, have been covered with a 
preparation by air pressure, which will protect the surfaces as well 
as improve the appearance and clarify the detail. 
The attendance at the Museum was 6560 visitors at 25 cents each, making 
a total of $1640.00 and 1500 Monday or free-day visitors, besides groups 
of visitors, such as classes from a number of schools, students from the 
California University Summer School, clubs and associations. In some 
cases talks have been given to these groups by the director in connection 
with the exhibitions at the Museum, 

A good share of the attendance has been composed of members of the 
faculty and students of Stanford. The Museum is pleased to notice the 
increase in attendance of the Stanford students and the manner in which 
the various university departments are making use of the correlation 
possibilities of the museum materials. This is in harmony with the wide- 



256 Stanford University 

spread national movement to make the many museums of the United States 
function as a live and active part of educational and community activities. 
The director is always willing to cooperate with schools, clubs, and 
other organizations in rendering services that will help further the progress 
and appreciation of good art as related to everyday life. 

Pedro J. Lemos, 

Director. 



THOMAS WELTON STANFORD ART GALLERY 

The Thomas Welton Stanford Art Gallery has been open to the public 
from 10 a. m. to 5 p. m., every day, incltxling the vacation period, except a 
few of the holidays. 

During this time the Gallery has given a program of changing art 
exhibitions of various characters ; sometimes as many as four different 
exhibitions being on display at the same time and lasting from two weeks 
to a month. 

These exhibitions covered a wide range of subjects. Among these were: 
Oil Paintings, Water Colors, Pastels, Wood-block Prints, Etchings, Litho- 
graphs, Artistic Photographs, Illuminations and special exhibitions of 
School Art Work. 

In some cases lectures were given to the public in connection with the 
exhibitions, such as Dr. Stillman's talk on Japanese Prints and the 
demonstration and talk on Etchings and their printing, by Pedro J. Lemos, 
Publicity matter in the form of information and data for these exhibi- 
tions was printed in fifteen different newspapers, principally those of the 
peninsula and bay regions. 

Catalogues giving the title of each picture and their authors were 
furnished for the individual use of those visiting the gallery. 

Although these collections arc displayed entirely for educational pur- 
poses, quite a number of the pictures were sold to visitors, many of whom 
were Easterners. 

These exhibitions have come from many parts of. the world. Those 
from whom they have been obtained, have expressed their pleasure and 
satisfaction in the way their exhibits were displayed and handled. 
The list of exhibitions follows : 
September : 

Thomas Welton Stanford collection of Paintings originally in Stan- 
ford Museum. 
October : 

Exhibition of Oil Paintings. 
Exhibition of Water Colors. 
Exhibition of Monochrome Water Colors. 

The above three exhibitions from Thomas Welton Stanford Collec- 
tion from Australia. 
November : 

Three exhibitions of previous month continued. 



Administrative Reports 257 

December : 

Paintings by J. V. Cannon. 

Paintings by W. H. CI a pp. 

Art Work by New York High Schools. 
January: 

Etchings and Paintings by Women Artists of California. 
February : 

Etchings by Baroness Gobanz. 

Japanese Wood-block Prints from Dr. Stillman's Collection 
March : 

Stillman Collection of Japanese Block Prints. 

Etchings by John Winkler. 

Wood-block Prints by William S. Rice. 

Design and Color by Students at Stanford University. 
April : 

Oil Paintings by Artists at Carmel and Monterey. 

Tempera Landscapes by M. I>e Neale Morgan. 

Pastel Landscapes by Pedro J. Lemos. 
May: 

Oil Paintings by various noted artists. loaned by vicinity residents, 
under the auspices of the Palo Alto Art Club. 

French Etchings and Lithographs. 

Portrait Miniatures by Rosa Hooper Lyon. 

Illuminations by George W. Paulus. 

Artistic Photographs by Dr. Carl Wilsoft. 
June : , 

Paintings by Artists of Laguna Beach Art Association. 

Artistic Photographs by Laura Gilpin. 

Japanese Wood-block Prints by Mr. Hasui of Japan and Alice Miller 
in Korea. 
July : 

Thomas Welton Stanford Collection of Paintings and Wood Carv- 
ings, a number exhibited for the first time in America. 
August : 

Continuation of previous month's exhibitions. 

Pedro J. Lemos, 

Director. 



REGISTRAR 



The total number of students registering in 1921-22 (including the 
itununer quarter) was 3459. Of these 2388 had previously been in attend- 
ance; 1071 were new students. As compared with 1920-21, there was an 
increase in old students of 462, a decrease in new students of 442, leaving 
a net increase of 20. Both increase and decrease, however, were ab- 
normal and are explained by the increased tuition fees, which were made 



258 Stanford University 

applicable to all students matriculating in and after October, 1921. In 
order to take advantage of the smaller fee schedule, a large number of 
undergraduates who would ordinarily have matriculated in October, entered 
for the summer quarter. These consequently count as new students for 
1920-21 and as old students for 1921-22, whereas under normal conditions 
they would have counted as new students for 1921-22 and would have been 
omitted entirely from the 1920-21 roll. Since, under the limitations upon 
attendance imposed by the University, growth (except for the summer 
quarter) is a matter of upper division and graduate students, the figures 
for 1922-23 ought to show fewer old students and more new students, but 
(unless there should be a marked increase in the summer quarter) a total 
registration not very different from that of 1921-22. 

The fifth summer quarter under the four-quarter system shows a total 
registration of 914, an increase of 229 over 1920, but a decrease of 218 
over 1921. The abnormal registration in 1921 is explained in the preceding^ 
paragraph. Detailed statistics of attendance covering the five summer 
quarters are given in the pages following. These show the steady growth 
in attendance, the increased appeal to advanced and graduate students, and 
the preponderance of regular Stanford students over those entering for 
the summer quarter only. Unfortunately, few active teachers can spend 
the whole quarter at the University, and it has been felt necessary to make 
a nominal division of the quarter into two halves. Of the total registra- 
tion (914) in 1922, 694 were in attendance both halves, 187 for the first 
half only and 33 for the second half only. 

Admission of Men 

In 1916 the Trustees of the University imposed a limitation upon the 
number of entering men, and in that year a small number who had 
fulfilled the usual requirements for admission were excluded. The follow- 
ing year, under war conditions, the limit was not reached. In 1918 the 
limit was temporarily waived in favor of war service men assigned to the 
University by the Federal Board, and later by the Veterans' Bureau. Even 
with this concession it became necessary, particularly in 1919, to refuse 
admission to a large number of men who had presented acceptable cre- 
dentials. 

The machinery of selection adopted by the Academic Council in 1916 
divided Lower Division candidates into two groups. The first consisted 
of recommended candidates from approved schools, presenting 15 units 
all of recommending grade. These were assured of admission before the 
next group could be considered. The second group consisted of candidates 
fully recommended by the school, with 15 units of completed work, but 
not all of these of recommending grade. At first, candidates with as many 
as 9 units of recommending grade were placed in this group. With the 
increasing pressure, this number was raised to 12, and beginning with 
1921-22 the second group was entirely eliminated, acceptable candidates 
being required to present 15 units of recommending grade, provision also 
being made for credit on examination through the College Entrance 



Administrative Rkports 259 

Examination Board. It was further provided that when it became neces- 
sary to discriminate among acceptable candidates with 15 units of recom- 
mending grade, selection should be made "on the basis of superior fitness, 
taking into account exceptional qualifications of any kind, including scholar- 
ship, force of character, qualities of leadership, influence exerted among 
>choolmates and associates, physical vigor, and the like." However, due to 
various -causes, business depression, increase in tuition fees, etc., the 
pressure for admission has diminished to such an extent that in the last two 
years, 1921 and 1922, the limited group has not been filled by the first 
uf August (the date at which discrimination, if necessary, is to be made 
oil the exceptional qualification basis). After August 1st the plan has been 
to allot unfilled places to acceptable candidates in the order in which 
complete credentials are received. In both these years the limited group 
has not actually been filled until shortly before reg[istration, and it has not 
been necessary for the Committee to discriminate among candidates ful- 
filling minimum requirements. 

It has been questioned whether, under present circumstances, it would 
not be better to lower the scholarship requirements and give consideration 
to all high school graduates who are recommended by their principals, 
whatever may be the number of units of certificate grade. It is evident 
of course that certain candidates may fail to come up to the rigid scholastic 
requirements in individual subjects, and still be desirable material. Again, 
other candidates who technically fulfill the requirement of 15 units of 
recommending grade, may be inferior in other respects and distinctly less 
desirable. A definite percentage value might be assigned to scholarship, and 
likewise to each of the other desirable qualities above enumerated. The 
Admissions Committee would then assign to each set of credentials the 
ratings which they seemed to deserve, and the matter of selection would then 
become a mathematical operation. The highest percentage valuL* would 
naturally be given to scholarship, and in most cases, therefore, scholarship 
would be the determining factor; but in particular cases high ratings 
assigned to other qualities might result in the selection of candidates who 
would be left out on a purely scholarship basis. This is the method at 
present in actual operation (though not with mechanical ratings) in the 
case of women. It is to be noted, however, that no methcxi of admission 
will invariably select the most desirable students. There must be a 
minimum scholarship standard, and so definite that applicants and school 
priiKipals may know just what it is and when it is reached. Women have 
met the requirement of 15 units of recommending grade for years ; so 
have the great majority of men. and certainly there is no one with the 
mental equipment requisite for success in college who cannot meet this 
test. If it is failure in an individual subject at a given time, the subject 
may be repeated, or an entrance examination (through the College En- 
trance Examination Board) may be taken. It is for the candidate to meet 
the requirements laid down by the University, and no one who is earnestly 
desirous of the privileges of the University is likely to be deterred by the 
minimum requirements set up. I venture to believe that, as soon as the 



260 Stanford University 

present scholarship requirement is fairly understood, it will occasion no 
more difficulty or comment than has been the case with women candidates 
for admission. It will remain a fact that the scholarship test does not 
invariably select the best. But it is not scholarship alone that determines 
selection, even where only minimum requirements are concerned. Every 
acceptable candidate comes to the University recommended by his prin- 
cipal '*as of good moral character, serious of purpose, and, in the judgment of 
the principal, prepared to undertake college sttxlies with good prospect of suc- 
cess." This means a very considerable selection on the part of principals, with 
due regard to qualities other than mere scholarship. It is no doubt true 
that principals at times recommend with some mental reservations, or with 
incomplete knowledge of an applicant's mental and moral outfit, but some- 
one's judgment must be trusted and, under the accrediting system, prin- 
cipals have, in general, fulfilled this trust with a high degree of con- 
scientiousness. Whenever there are more candidates fulfilling minimum 
requirements than there are places, the Admissions Committee will neces- 
sarily supplement the discrimination made by principals as is provided in 
our present regulations. 

Admission of Women 

In the admission of women the Committee is still carrying out the old 
provision which based admission (in part) on priority of application. No 
names have been added to the priority list since February 21. 1921, and in 
the natural course of events the list will be practically exhausted in a few 
years. Faculty and alumni daughters fulfilling minimum requirements are 
now automatically certified for admission. This group of candidates 
is not large at present, but is increasing each year and will eventually 
displace all other candidates if the situation remains unchanged. For the 
present, the majority of young women are admitted through the Preferred 
List on the basis of superior fitness. In discriminating among candidates, 
the Committee is bound (as hypothetical ly in the case of men) to consider 
other qualities than scholarship. In the case of women only one in four 
or one in five of those who fulfill minimum requirements can be admitted. 
Because of this severe competition the Admissions Committee has always, 
consciously or unconsciously, taken account of qualifications other than 
scholarship. Beginning with the selection made in July, 1921, the Com- 
mittee has definitely had in mind the qualities particularly named by the 
Academic Council in the revised statement of admission requirements. In 
departing from the exclusive scholarship standard, the Committee has been 
conservative, partly because it has been found that leadership and the 
other desirable qualities mentioned generally go along with a high scholar- 
ship record. In the case of two candidates, however, the Committee, in 
July. 1921. definitely allowed a merely fair scholarship record (1 A and 
14 B's in one case: 4^2 A's and IV/2 B's in the other) to be offset by 
extraordinarily high recommendations in other respects ; and this action was 
considered at the time as experimentally significant. In both these cases 
the results have been disappointing. One of these young women made the 



Administrative Reports 261 

lowest score of all the women who took the Thomdike Intelligence Test 
in October; the record of the other was almost as low. In the first case, 
the University record has been better than the intelligence test promised, 
but not up to the high school scholarship standing, the record for the three 
quarters being measurably below a C average. In the second case a leave 
of absence was taken out before the end of the autumn quarter (on grounds 
of illness) and the student has not since returned to the University. These 
cases are, of course, not conclusive, but succeeding experiments of the 
same sort will be noted with great interest. 

Special statistics of the women matriculating in 1921-22 are given in 
the pages following. For purposes of comparison the scholarship averages 
are given both in percentages and under the point system, and these are 
compared again with the intelligence test ratings. In making up the 
percentage ratings arbitrary numerical values have been assigned to the 
letters A, B, Q D, and the plus mark has been disregarded (i. e., has been 
rated as the average of all the other grades). Under the point system, each 
unit of A counts 3 points, B 2 points, C and *+' 1 point each, D, condition, 
and failure, zero points. No account is taken of *+' or '-' added to a grade 
(B+, B-, etc.). The point rating is found by dividing the sum of grade 
points by the number of registered units. Under the percentage rating, 
arbitrary values are assigned to the different recorded grades, as follows : 

A+, 97 B-I-, 87 C-I-, n D+, 67 it. 50 

A, 94 B, 84 C, 74 D. 64 (— ), 25 
A—, 90 B— -. 80 C— , 70 D— , 60 

COMPARATIVE REGISTRATION, 1918-22 

1918-19 1919-20 1920-21 1921-22 

Old students 1,214 1,798 1,926 2,388 

Xew students 1,053 1,151 1.513 1,071 

Totals 2,267 2,949 3,439 3,459 

Pet. of returning students 63.7 79.2 65.3 69.4 

From California 1,728 2,123 2,477 2.497 

From other states and countries 539 826 962 962 

Pet. outside California 21.1 28 27.9 27.8 

AVERAGE AGE OF MATRICULATES 

1918-19 1919-20 1920-21 1921-22 

Graduates 30.0 30.30 29.92 28.95 

Advanced standing 23.8 23.08 22.98 22.52 

Freshmen 19.6 19.46 18.91 18.47 

Specials 25.1 25.72 26.47 29.47 

AGE OF FRESHMEN AT MATRICULATION 

1918-19 1919-20 1920-21 1921-22 

Under 17 years 19 Zl 51 26 

17-18 years 87 81 164 84 

I»-19 years 239 205 278 246 

19-20 years 173 123 159 44 

Over 20 years » 145 170 135 40 

Totals 663 616 787 440 



262 



Stanford University 



DISTRinUTION OF ENTERING CLASS 

1918-19 1919-20 
From Colleges — 

Ciraduates 80 

With advanced standing 221 

Without advanced standing 6 



1920-21 1921-22 



Totals 307 

From Normal Schools 26 

From High School Junior Colleges 37 

From Preparatory Schools- - 

On recommendation 659 

On examination 

Special students 24 



146 


196 


204 


290 


355 


249 




17 


3 


436 


568 


456 


34 


64 


51 


17 


36 


30 


614 


800 


437 


3 


3 


3 


47 


42 


94 



Totals 1.053 



1.151 



1.513 



1,071 



SUMMER QUARTER STATISTICS 

1918 

01«l students 269 

New students 



Totals 366 

(iraduate standing 

Undergraduates 



Totals 

(iraduate 
New Advancc<l 
Freshman 
S|>ecia] 

Totals 



1918 


1919 


1920 


1921 


1922 


269 


411 


528 


636 


683 


97 


110 


157 


496 


231 


366 


521 


685 


1,132 


914 


137 


169 


247 


277 


304 


229 


352 


438 


855 


610 


366 


521 


685 


1,132 


914 


36 


38 


55 


72 


80 


45 


43 


63 


189 


70 


13 


23 


32 


220 


41 


3 


6 


7 


15 


40 



97 



110 



157 



496 



SCHOLARSHIP OF NEW MEN 

No. of 
Status Students 

Graduates (of other colleges) 139 

.Vdvanced standing (from other colleges) 225 

S|)ecials 59 

Freshmen 356 

Average of all groups 771 

Freshmen — 

From puhlic schools ...311 

From private schools 45 



231 



Average 
Grade 
1.664 
1.382 
1.118 
1.291 
1.311 

1.313 
1.152 



SCHOLARSHIP OF NEW WOMEN 

(This list does not include summer students of 1921 as in the table below, but doc& 
coiiMiler summer students of 19J2, omitted below.) 

No. of Average 

Status Students Grade 

Graduates 73 1.886 

.Advance<i standing 108 1.643 

Freshmen 84 1.730 

.Specials (summer) 35 1.440 

.\verage of all groups 300 1.730 

Frrshmeii - 

From private schools 11 1.783 

From public schools 73 1.694 



Administrative Reports 263 

No. of Average 

Status Students Grade 

Advanced standing- - 

Preferred lJ*t 26 1.975 

Numbered list 33 1.429 

Summer 49 1.514 

Average 300 1.730 

Freshmen — 

Preferred list 59 1.851 

Numbered list 16 1.302 

Summer 9 1.401 

NEW WOMEN, 1921-22 
Scholarship Statistics for October. January, and April Matriculates 

COMBINED autumn, WINTER. AND SPRING RATINGS 

(Inc]ude«i October matriculates (usually 3 quarters' record), January matriculates 
(usually 2 quarters' record), /Iprii matriculates (usually 1 quarter's record). Women 
registering in previous summer quarters only are also included. The number of students 
in each table is indicated in parentheses at the left of the column.) 

I. T. Rating % Rating CM. Pt. Rating 

1. Preferred List 

Freshmen (51) 71.4 

.\dvance.l (23) 77.9 

Average , (74) 73.4 

2. .-I/nwimi Daughters 

Freshmen (5) 65.4 

Advance*! (1) 77.2 

Average (6) 67.4 

i. Faculty Daughters 

Freshmen (4) 75. 

Advanced (1) 52.6 

Average (5) 70.5 

4. \' umbered List 

Freshmen (13) 62.9 

•Vlvanceil (i2) 65.5 

Average (45) 64.7 

2-S-A. \on-Cotnfetitive (56; 65.5 

1-23-4. I'ndcrgrad. av (130) 70. 

(iraduate » 

Highest and Lowest Ratings 

Highest Lowest 

I. T. rating I. T. rating 

Preferred! list 112.2 33.7 

Alumni daughters 81.9 52.5 

Faculty daughters 89.4 47.9 

Numbered list 86.7 41.5 

Graduate 

SCHOLARSHIP STANDING 
School Distribution Form 

1. Total number of students registering in University for first time during 

1921-22 (autumn, winter, spring quarters) 1,071 

2. Total number of the above number who withdrew before making any record.. 27 

3. Total number remaining 1,044 

4. Distribution as follows: 

Total Total .\verage 

No, of No. of No. Lv. Scholar- 

Sch<N>U ^ Students of .Abs. ship Grd. 

26 Normal Schools and Teachers Colls 51 1 1.69 

14 Foreign Universities and Colleges 15 1 1.21 

130 Universities and Colleges 449 12 1.61 



(58) 


81.88 


1.87 


(28) 


84.64 


2.01 


(86) 


82.70 


1.93 


(7) 


75.27 


1.40 


(2) 


80.75 


1.79 


(9) 


76.54 


1.49 


(5) 


80.76 


1.87 


(2) 


76.47 


1.42 


(7) 


79.29 


1.72 


(25) 


73.65 


1.27 


(35) 


77.20 


1.45 


(60) 


75.42 


1.37 


(76) 


75.97 


1.48 


(162) 


79.73 


1.78 


(49) 


85.02 


1.91 




Highest % 


Lowest % 


ig 


rating 


rating 




93.79 


61.58 




86.10 


59.80 




90.74 


70.77 




91.86 


46.56 




93.20 


69.41 



264 



Stanford University 



No. of 
Schools 
218 
16 



Total 
No. of 
Students 

Preparatory Schools 429 

Junior Colleges 30 

Exam. Boards. Specials, etc 97 



Total 


.\veraife 


No. Lv. 


Scholar- 


of Abs. 


ship (ird. 


6 


1.25 


2 


1.46 


5 


i.isr 



1,071 



27 



Average of all. 



1.34 



RECORD OF ENTERING CLASS, 1921-22 

From Colleges, Etc. 

(The statistics on the distribution of the entering class include the students who 
entered in the autumn, winter, spring, and summer quarters of 1921-22. Schools 
marked with * tied for place indicated. Students' work which averages 1.00 or above 
is considered satisfactory.) 



No. of 
Rank Name of School Students 

57 Agricultural & Mechanical College 

of Texas 1 

• 42 Bates College 1 

4 Beloit College 1 

• 59 Boston University 3 

• 59 Brigham Young University 1 

• 47 Brown University 3 

• 45 California Inst, of Tech 5 

9 Carleton College 1 

ii Christian College (Mo.) 1 

• 44 Coe College 1 

.U Colby College 1 

•82 College of Holy Names (Oakland) ... 1 

• 44 College of Idaho 2 

• 44 College of the Pacific 10 

• 82 College of Puget Sound 1 

3 College of Agriculture (Colo.) 1 

• 79 Colorado College 2 

• 42 Columbia University 7 

• 42 Cornell University 3 

• 45 Dartmouth College 3 

75 Drexel Institute 1 

Earlham College 1 

• 61 Franklin College (Ind.) 2 

• 91 Georgetown University 2 

5 Gonzales University 1 

60 (Voucher College 2 

• 14 Hamilton College 1 

8 Harvard University 4 

• 13 Haverford College 1 

• 74 Johns Hopkins University 1 

23 Indiana University I 

85 Iowa State College 1 

• 25 Knox College 1 

• 38 Lafayette College I 

4 Lake Forest College 1 

78 Marietta College 1 

1 Massachusetts .\gric. College 1 

49 Miami University 3 

Middlebury College 1 

• 52 Mills College- 12 





No. of Students 


Sch'ship 


Whose Work was 


Rating 


Satis. 


Unsati*. 


1.33 


1 




1.53 


1 




2.66 


1 
1 




1.31 


2 


1 


1.31 


I 




1.47 


3 




1.49 


4 


1 


2.n 


1 




1.69 


1 




1.50 


1 




1.68 


1 




.60 




1 


1.50 


2 




1.50 


6 


4 


.60 




1 


2.66 


I 




.80 


1 


1 


1.53 


5 


2 


1.53 


3 




1.49 


3 




.96 




1 


1.28 


2 


\ 


.00 




1 ( 


2.50 






1.30 




1 


2.18 






2.35 






2.2i 






1.00 






1.93 






.46 




1 


1.86 






1.63 






2.60 






.85 




1 


2.87 


1 




1.45 


3 





(1 Lv. Abs.) 
(1 Lv.Abs.) 



(1 Lv.Abs.) 



1.40 



10 



Administrative Reports 



265 



Rank 

• 79 
62 
M 
24 

• 16 

• 28 
76 

• 25 
35 

• 14 

• 55 
8« 

• 48 
17 
10 
83 
68 
37 
29 

• 50 

51 

• 32 
12 

• 52 
89 
73 

7 
90 

• 38 
63 

• 48 

• 42 

6 
26 

• 50 
70 

• 28 

• 91 

39 

• 50 

• 65 
22 

• 47 

• 80 
71 

• 48 
30 

• 65 
56 
87 

• 53 

• 32 
58 

• 25 



No. of 
Name of School Students 

Mississippi College 1 

Missouri School of Mines 2 

Monmouth College 1 

Montana Wcsleyan College 1 

Mt. Holyokc College 1 

Nebraska VVesleyan University 2 

New Mexico College of Agric. & 

Industrial Arts 1 

New York University 1 

Northwestern University 3 

Oberlin College 2 

Occidental College 10 

Olivet College 1 

Oregon State Agric. College 9 

Pacific University 2 

Park College 1 

Pennsylvania State College 2 

Phillips University 1 

Pomona College 7 

Reed College 6 

Scton Hall (Orange, N. J.) 1 

Smith College 1 

South Dakota School of Mines 2 

Southern Methodist University 2 

Southwestern College (Kans.) 1 

St. Ignatius College 1 

St. Mary's College (Calif.) 2 

St. Mary's University (Md.) 2 

St. Olafs College 1 

St. Patrick's Seminary 1 

State College of Washington 10 

Stout Institute 1 

Swarthniore College 1 

Syracuse University 2 

Trinity College 1 

Tufts College 2 

Tulane University 1 

Union College 1 

U. S. Naval Academy 1 

University of Calif. Farm School 

(Davis, Cal.) 1 

University of Arizona 11 

University of California 70 

University of Cal., So. Branch 5 

University of Chicago 10 

University of Colorado 9 

University of Denver 1 • 

University of Florida 1 

University of Hawaii 1 

University of Idaho 3 

University of Illinois 4 

University of Iowa 2 

University of Kansas 1 

University of Michigan 9 

University of Minnesota 9 

University of Missouri 6 

University of Montana 1 





No. o 


f Students 




Sch'ship 


Whose Work was 




Rating 


Satis. 


Unsatis. 




.80 




1 






1.27 


1 


1 






1.72 


1 








1.90 


1 








2.U 


1 








1.80 


2 








.94 




1 






1.86 


1 








1.67 


3 








2.18 


2 








1.37 


7 


3 






.36 




1 






1.46 


9 








2.10 


2 








2.27 


1 








.56 




2 






1.18 


1 








1.65 


6 


1 






1.76 


4 


1 


(1 


Lv. Abs.) 


1.43 


1 




(1 


Lv. Abs.) 


1.42 


2 








1.70 


2 








2.22 


1 








1.40 


1 








.35 




2 






1.06 


2 








2.42 


1 








.23 




1 






1.63 


8 


1 


(1 


Lv. Aba.) 


1.24 


1 








1.46 


1 








1.53 


2 








2.47 


1 








1.84 


1 


1 






1.43 


1 








1.13 


1 








1.80 


1 








.00 




1 






1.57 


10 


1 






1.43 


54 


16 






1.22 


4* 


1 






1.95 


8 


1 


(1 


Lv. Abs.) 


1.47 


7 








.79 




1 






1.11 


1 








1.46 


1 








1.74 


3 








1.22 


3 


1 






1.34 


2 








.40 




1 






1.39 


7 


2 






1.70 


9 








1.32 


5 


1 






1.86 


1 









266 



Staxforh University 



Rank 

n 

• 28 

• 53 

n 

66 
46 
19 

• 41 
84 
40 

• 64 
36 
21 

• 74 
43 

• 38 

• 47 
72 
15 
86 

• 20 

• 16 

81 
2 

69 
67 
27 
18 

• 55 

• 28 

• 53 

• 13 

• 61 
54 

8 
3 
9 

11 
12 

5 

4 

1 



10 

7 



13 

16 

9 



No. of Students 

No. of Sch'ship Whose Work wa;* 

Name of School Students Rating Satis. Unsatis. 

University of Nebraska 3 .91 2 1 

University of Nevada 3 1.80 3 

ITniversity of New Mexico 2 1.39 1 (1 Lv. Abs.) 

University of North Dakota 2 2.25 2 

University of Ohio 4 1.21 2 2 

University of Oklahoma 5 1.48 4 1 

University of Oregon 9 2.01 8 (ILv. Abs.) 

University of Pennsylvania 4 1.53 3 (1 Lv. Abs.) 

University of Pittsburgh 2 .50 1 (1 Lv. Abs.) 

University of Redlands 3 1.54 2 1 

University of Santa Clara 4 1.23 2 2 

University of So. California 19 1.66 16 3 

University of South Dakota 1 1.98 1 

University of Texas 2 1.00 1 (ILv. Abs.^ 

University </f Utah 9 1.52 7 2 

University of Washington 7 1.63 6 1 

University of Wisconsin 11 1.47 9 2 

University of Wyoming 2 1.09 1 1 

Upper Iowa LTniversity 3 2.14 3 

Valparaiso University 1 .41 1 

Vanderbilt University 1 2.00 1 

Vassar College 5 2.11 5 

Wabash College 1 .76 1 

Washburn College 1 2.7S 1 

deorge Washington LTniversity 4 1.14 3 1 

Washington & Jefferson College.... 1 1.20 1 

Wellesley College 2 1.83 2 

Wells College 1 2.07 1 

Wesleyan University 2 1.37 2 

Western Reserve University 3 1.80 3 

Whitman College 3 1.39 3 

Whittier College 1 2.23 1 

Willamette University 1 1.28 1 

Vale University 5 1.38 4 1 

Foi(F.iGN Colleges 

Canton Christian College 2 1.17 2 

Classical Lyceum (Aseldoorn) 1 1.69 1 

Harbin (Russia) (lymnasium 1 .84 1 

Imperial L'niversity (Odessa) 1 (1 Lv. Abs.) 

Imperial University (Tokyo) 1 .62 1 

Keiogyuka University (Tokyo) 1 .43 1 

Pei Yang University 1 1.38 1 

Peter the (treat Cadet Academy 

(Petrograd) ' 1 1.45 1 

Universitc <le Liege 1 2.02 1 

University of Otago 1 2.00 1 

ITniversity of Philippines. College 

of Agriculture 1 2.00 1 

University of Zurich 1 .84 1 

Van .Sureton Horticultural School 

(Holland) 1 1.23 1 

West China Union University 1 1.33 1 

State Normal and Teachers Colleges 

Chico State Normal School 3 1.68 3 

Colorado .State Teachers Coll 4 1.55 3 (1 Lv. Abs.) 

Illinois State Normal School 2 1.83 2 



Admixistrativk Repi)K'i> 267 



No. of Sch'ship 
Rank Name of Scliool Students Rating 

15 Iowa State Teachers CcHlege 2 1.60 

• 11 Kansas State Norma! School 5 1.76 

5 Los Angeles State Normal Sch 3 2.10 

24 Michigan State Normal College 1 .00 

4 Nebraska State Normal School 1 2.3i 

20 New Mexico Normal University 1 1.10 

19 New Mexico State Normal Sch 1 1.21 

10 Pittsburgh (Kansas) State Manual 

Training Normal School 1 1.80 

7 San Diego State Normal School 6 1.93 

12 San J<»sc State Normal School 7 1.75 

8 San Francisco State Normal School 2 1.91 

14 Santa Uarbara State Normal Sch... 1 1.66 

1 Southern Illinois St. Norm. Sch 1 2.79 

17 S. VV. Missouri Teachers Coll 1 l.SO 

• 31 S. W. Trxas State Normal School.. 1 1.00 1 i 

• 21 St. Oou.l (Minn.) State Normal 

Sch.M)I 1 1.00 1 

2.? Statf Teachers Coll. (Fresno) 1 .47 

6 State Teachers College (Warrens- 

burg. Mo.) 1 2.00 1 

• II Temi»e (Ariz.) Normal School 1 1.76 1 

2 VanciAiver Normal School 1 2.66 1 

22 Wcbtr Normal College (Ogden) 1 .71 

15 VVf.st Kansas State Normal Sch 1 1.44 1 

i Willimantic (Conn.) Normal Sch 1 2.22 1 

Junior Colleges 

13 Uakitxii-ltl Junior College 1 .26 

8 Chaffey Junior College 1 1.50 1 

n Eureka Junior College 1 .75 



No. o 


f .Students 


Whose Work was 


Satis. 


Unsatis. 


2 




5 




3 






1 


1 




1 




1 




1 




4 


2 


6 


I 


1 


1 


1 




1 




1 




1 





Evcrttt (Wn.) Junior College .... 1 (1 Lv. Abs.) i 

7 Frttno Junior College 5 1.62 4 (1 Lv. Abs.) 

5 HpIv Names Junior College I 1.68 1 j 

9 IIo{]ywoi)4i Junior College 2 1.47 1 I 

' 11 Los Angiles Poly. Junior Coll 1 .75 1 | 

12 M.Hlesto Junior College 1 .50 1 i 

3 Plujenix (Ariz.) Junior College.... .. 1 1.77 1 

6 Principia (St. Louis) Jr. Coll 1 1.66 1 j 

10 Riwrs-ide Junior College 4 1.19 3 1 | 

4 San Diego Junior College 2 1.70 2 

1 Santa Ana Junityr College 3 2.05 2 1 

3 Santa llTarbara Junior College 1 1.77 1 , 

2 Turlock Junior College 4 1.97 4 

Preparatory Scho<jls 

' 83 .\btr.leen (Wn.) H. S 1 1.08 1 

^ 2} Akron (Ohio) So. H. S 1 2.10 1 

• 54 Alhambra City H. S 1 1.45 1 

•114 .Xlaincila 11. S 2 .64 2 

•85 Amarillo (Tex.) IL S. 1 1.06 1 

• 89 American Falls (Ida.) II. S 1 1.00 1 

• 89 Anna Head School (Berkeley) 1 1.00 1 

(Private) 

•91 Areata Union IL S 1 .97 1 ! 

• 72 .Uhland (Ore.) H. S 1 1.24 1 

• 93 .Vshvillc (N. C.) School (Priv.).... 1 .95 1 



268 



Stanford University 



Rank 

• 63 

• 30 
131 

• 63 
•134 

16 

• 93 



• 89 


•122 


77 


• 18 


• 94 


• 72 


• 28 


• 46 


21 


• 88 


25 


• 41 


27 


•120 


118 


•100 


53 


94 


• 87 


• 98 


• 51 


• 78 


119 


•105 


115 


2 


• 31 


• 48 


14 


•106 


• 69 


71 


1 


42 


117 


• 29 


• 51 


34 


• 44 


• 18 


9 



No. of 
Name of School Students 

Athens (Ohio) H. S 1 

Baker (Ore.) H. S 2 

Battle Creek (Mich.) H. S 1 

Berkeley H. S 2 

Bertrand (Neb.) H. S ' 1 

The Bishop's School (T^ Jolla) 

(Private) 1 

Blake School (Minneapolis) (Pri- 
vate) 1 

Bloomingdale (Mich.) H. S 1 

Boise (Ida.) H. S 1 

Boulder Creek Un. H. S 1 

Miss Burke's School (San Fran- 
cisco) (Private) 1 

Calgary (Canada) H. S.. 2 

Calif. School of Mech. Art (San 

Francisco) (Private) 5 

Calistoga Jet. Un. H. S 1 

Castilleja School (Palo Alto) 

(Private) 3 

Cattaraugus (N. Y.) H. S 1 

Central (Oklahoma City) H. S 2 

Central (St. Joseph, Mo.) H. S 1 

Central Sevier (Richfield, U.) H.S. 1 

Citrus Un. H. S 1 

Cloverdale H. S 1 

Coalinga Un. H. S 2 

Colorado Springs (Colo.) H. S 1 

Coronado H. S 2 

The Country Day School (Kansas 

City, Mo.) (Private) 1 

Courtland Un. II. S 1 

Covina Un. H. S 1 

Creston (Iowa) H. S 1 

Davenport (Iowa) H. S 1 

Dawson Co. (Mont.) H. S. 1 

Dowagiac (Mich.) II. S 1 

Durango (Colo.) II. S 1 

Kast Side (Denver, Coli/.) H. .S. 1 



El Ccntro Un. H. S 

Fallbrook Un. H. S... 
Fargo (N. D.) H. S. . 
Franklin (Los Angeles) 
Fremont (Oakland) II. 

Fresno II. S 

Friends* Select School 



H. S. 

S 



1 
1 
1 
1 
3 

7 



(Philadel- 



phia) (Private) 1 

Fullerton (La Ilabra) l^n. II. S. . . 2 

Fruita H. S 1 

(lallatin Co. II. S. (Hozeman, 

Mont.) 1 

C.lendale Un. H. S 1 

(Ilenville (Ohio) H. S. 2 

Cilroy H. S. 2 

GirU (San Francisco) H. S 1 

Ciirls (Riverside) H. S 1 



Sch'ship 
Rating 

1.36 
1.90 

.17 
1.36 

.00 

2.36 

.95 
1.00 

.44 
1.17 

2.31 
.93 

1.24 
1.92 

1.64 
2.18 
1.03 
2.07 
1.76 
1.95 

.50 

.56 

.85 
1.47 

.93 
1.04 

.88 
1.50 
1.13 

.53 

.77 

.63 
2.89 
1.89 
1.60 
2.39 

.76 
1.28 
1.25 

3.00 

1.70 

.60 

1.91 
1.50 
1.85 
1.67 
2.31 
2.56 



No. of Students 
Whose Work was 
Satis. Unsatiii. 

1 
2 

1 
2 

1 



1 

1 

1 

1 
1 

2 
1 

3 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 



1 
1 
1 
1 

2 
1 

1 
2 



1 
3 



1 
2 
1 
1 



Administrative Reports 



269 



Rank 

129 

• 51 

111 
19 
20 
84 

• 89 

• 24 

• 52 

• 89 

• 89 

• 66 
' 51 

127 

109 

99 

• 57 
•120 

44 

• 96 

• 85 
102 

•110 

• 46 
70 

• 41 

• 96 
107 

38 
80 

• 73 

• 51 

• 69 

• 89 

• 24 

• 40 

• 61 
56 
47 
58 

• 85 

• 57 

• 66 
130 

• 17 
45 



No. of 
Name of School Students 

r.lenn Co. H. S 1 

Glcnwood Sanatorium Training 

School for Nurses 1 

Grants Pass (Ore.) H. S 1 

Greeley (Colo.) H. S 1 

Gresham (Ore.) Un. H. S 1 

Hagerman (Ida.) H. S 1 

Hanford Un. H. S 1 

Mis«t Harker's School (Palo Alto) 

(Private) 1 

Harvard School (Los Angeles) 

(Private) 6 

Hayward Un. H.- S. 1 

Hebron (Neb.) H. S 1 

Helena (Mont.) H. S 1 

High River (Alberta. Can.) H. S. . 2 
I Till Military Academy (Portland, 

Ore.) (Private) 2 

Hitchcock Military Academy (San 

Rafael) (Private) 2 

HollywtXKl H. S 10 

Hociuiam (Wn.) H. S 1 

Huntington lleach Un. H. S I 

Hughes (Cincinnati, O.) H. S 1 

Hughson H. S I 

Hutchinson (Kans.) H. S 1 

Inglewood Un. H. S > I 

Jefferson (Portland, Ore.) H. S 4 

John (Portland, Ore.) H. S 1 

Keeney School (Sacramento) (Pri- 
vate) 1 

Kemper Military Academy (Boon* 

ville. Mo.) (Private) 1 

Kern Co. Un. H. S 4 

Klamath Falls (Ore.) H. S 1 

Kingsburg Joint Un. H. S 1 

Kiskiminestas Springs School 

(Saltsburg. Pa.) (Private) 1 

La Verne (Bonita Un.) H. S 1 

Lawrenceville School (New Jersey) 

(Private) 1 

Libby (Mont.) H. S 1 

Lincoln Un. H. S 1 

Lindsay H. S 2 

Edward Little (Auburn, Me.) H. S. 1 

Livermore Un. H. S 2 

Lo<li Un. H. S 4 

Long Beach H. S 11 

Los Angeles H. S 20 

Los Angeles Poly. H. S 9 

Los Gatos H. S 1 

Lowell (San Francisco) H. S 18 

Mc/UIen (Texas) H. S 1 

McKinley (Honolulu) H. S I 

Manual Arts (Los Angeles) H. S.. 2 





No.o 


f Students 


Sch*ship 


Whose Work was 


Rating 


Satis. 


Unsatis. 


.23 




1 


1.50 


1 




.69 


• 


1 


2.28 


1 




2.20 


1 




1.07 


1 




1.00 


1 





2.08 



1.06 


2 


1.00 


1 


1.00 


1 


1.31 


1 


1.50 


2 



.29 

.72 
.87 

1.42 
.50 

1.67 
.91 

1.06 
.81 
.70 

1.64 

1.26 



2 
6 

1 

1 

1 
J 



1.76 








.91 




3 




.75 




1 




1.80 








1.11 








1.23 








1.50 








1.28 








1.00 








2.08 




1 




1.77 








1.38 




1 




1.43 




2 




1.62 




3 




1.41 


13 


6 


(1 Lv. Abs.) 


1.06 




5 




1.42 








1.31 


11 


6 


(1 Lv.Abs.) 


.20 




1 




2.ii 


1 






1.66 


2 







270 



Stanford University 



Rank 

•116 

• 89 

• 85 

• 79 

• 30 
39 

• 79 
68 

133 
104 

124 

•134 

•114 

•106 

12 

128 

• 24 
86 
10 

•106 

•103 

121 

• 52 

•17) 

• 18 

• 40 
15 

7 

• 83 
•132 

• 90 

• 43 

• 61 
•103 

3 
113 

• 81 

• 2.^ 

• 31 
60 

• 72 

• 92 

• 95 

• 28 

•126 

5 

• 95 



No. of 
Name of SchofJ Students 

Marathon (Iowa) H. S 1 

Marengo (111.) H. S 1 



Marysville H. S. .. 
Mendocino Un. H. 
Merced H. S 



S.. 






26 
43 
36 



2 

1 

2 

Mission (San Francisco) H. S I 

Missoula (Mont.) H. S 1 

Modesto H. S 2 

Morenci (Ariz.) H. S 2 

Montezuma School (Los Gatos) 

(Private) 2 

Mt. Tamalpais Military .\cad. (San 

Rafael) (Private) 

Napa II. S 

Natrona Co. H. S. (Casper, Wyo.) 
Nazareth Acad. (Concordia, Kans.) 

Nettle Creek (Ind.) H. S 

Nevada City II. S 

Normal (Terre Haute, Ind.) II. S. 
North CentraK Spokane. Wn.)II.S. 

Norwich (Conn.) Free .Xcademy 

Oakdale II. S 

Oakland H. S 4 

Oakland Technical H. S. 

Ocheyedon (la.) H. S 

Ogden (Utah) H. S 

Olympia (Wn.) H. S 

Omaha (Neb.) Central II. S. 

Orange (N. J.) II. S 

Orange Un. H. S 

Oregon City (Ore.) H. S. 

Oroville Un. H. S 

Oxnard H. S. 

Palo Alto H. S 23 

Pasatlena II. S 8 

Pasccy (Wn.) H. S 

Payette (Ida.) H. S 

Phoenix (.\riz.) II. S 

Placer Un. H. S. (Auburn) 

Poly. Coll. of Engineering (Oak- 
land) (Privatf) 

Polytechnic (San Francisto) H. S. 3 

Pontiac (Mich.) H. S 

Port Norris (N. J.) 11. S 

Portervillc Un. H. S 2 

The Potter .School (.San Fran- 
cisco) (Private) 9 

Prossti Preparatory "School (Hous- 
ton. Tex.) (Private) I 

guetn City (Mo.) H. S 1 

Radnor (Wayne, Pa.) H. S 1 

Ramona Convent of Holy Names 

(.Mhambra) (Private) 1 

Red Bluff H. S 1 

Redlands II. S 1 

Reno (Nev.) II. S 1 



Sch'ship 
Rating 

.61 

1.00 
1.06 
1.12 
1.90 
1.78 
1.12 
1.29 
.02 

.78 

.42 

.00 

.64 

.76 
2.46 

.26 
2.08 
1.05 
2.53 

.76 

.80 

.45 
1.48 

.44 
2.31 
1.77 
2.38 
2.64 
1.08 

.07 

.98 
1.67 
1.38 

.80 
2.85 

.67 
1.10 

2.10 
1.89 
1.39 
1.24 
.96 

.92 

1.92 

.37 

2.76 

.92 
1.97 
1.68 
1.83 



No. of Students 
Whose Work was 
Satis. Unsatis. 

1 



1 



20 
6 

1 

1 

1 
3 
1 
1 
1 

3 

1 

1 



I 
1 
1 



1 
3 
1 



1 
1 
2 
1 
1 



1 
6 



(1 Lv. Abi.) 
(1 Lv. Ab$.) 



Administrative Rkports 



271 



Rank 

76 
MOO 

• 90 

• 50 

• 81 

• 50 
55 

101 

• 89 
•105 



32 

123 

75 

• 78 
67 

•125 

• 62 

• 64 

• 89 

• 52 

• 59 

M20 
M16 

• 49 
II 
3J 



• 96 
' 62 

8 

• 22 
•125 

• 54 

• 89 
13 

• 41 

6 

• 31 
74 

• 26 

• 22 

• 24 

*]i2 

108 

112 
35 

• 66 



Name of School 
Riverside Poly. H. S.. 



No. of 
Students 

3 

1 

1 

6 

1 

3 

2 

1 
1 



Santa 
Santa 
Santa 
Santa 
Santa 



Riverdale Un. H. S 

Round Valley (Cc/velo) Un. H. S... 

Sacramento H. S. 

Salt Lake (Utah) Coll. Inst. (PH.) 

Salt Lake (Utah) H. S 

Salt Lake (Utah) East H. S 

San Bernardino H. S 

San Diego H. S 

San Diego Army & Navy .Academy 

(Private) 1 

St. Ignatius If. S. (San Francisco) 

(Private) 1 

San Jose 11. S 11 

San Juan (Fairoaks) H. S 1 

San Mateo 11. S 5 

Santa Ana II. S 3 

Cruz H. S 4 

Maria Un. II. S 1 

Monica H. S 6 

Paula H. S 2 

Rosa H. S 3 

St. Anthony (Ida.) H. S 1 

St. Mary's Hall (Faribault. Minn.) 

(Private) 1 

St. Paul (Minn.) Central II. S 1 

Sapulpa (Okla.) H. S 1 

Schurz (Chicago. 111.) M. S 1 

Scott (Toledo, Ohio) H. S 1 

Seale -Academy (Palo Alto) (Pri- 
vate) 1 

Shattuck School (Faribault. Minn.) 

(Private) 1 

Sherman Co. (Kans.) H. .S 1 

Saguache Co. (Colo.) H. S. 1 

Sparks (Nev.) H. S 1 

Stadium (Tacoma, Wn.) II. S 2 

Star of the Sea School (San Fran- 
cisco) (Private) 1 

Stockton H. S 4 

Sutter H. S 1 

John Swett (Crockett) Un. H. S... 1 

Taft n. S 2 

Tennessee Military Institute 

(Sweetwater, Tenn.) (Private) 1 

Township (Robinsog, 111.) II. S 1 

Pt. Townsend (Wn.) H. S 1 

Trenton (N. J.) H. S 1 

Truckee (Meadow Lake) Un. H. S. 1 

Turlock Un. H. S 2 

Ukiah Un. H. S 1 

University School (San Francisco) 

(Private) 1 

Union Polytechnic (Venice) 11. S... 1 

University (Oakland) II. S 1 

Vancouver (Wn.) H. S 1 



Sch'ship 
Rating 

1.19 

.85 

.98 
1.56 
1.10 
1.56 
1.54 

.84 
1.00 

.77 



1.88 
.43 
1.20 
1.13 
1.30 
..38 
1.37 
1.35 
1.00 
1.48 

1.40 

.50 

.61 

1.58 

2.51 

1.87 

2.80 

.91 

1.37 

2.57 
2.12 

.38 
1.45 
1.00 
2.42 
1.76 

2.66 
1.89 
1.22 
1.97 
2.12 
2.08 
.07 

.73 

.68 

1.84 

1.31 



No. of Students 
Whose Work was 
Satis. Unsatis. 

2 1 

1 

1 
4 2 

1 

2 1 

2 



4 
2 
3 

4 



2 



1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 



1 
3 



(1 Lv. Abs.) 



(1 Lv. Abs.) 



272 



Stanford University 



Rank 

•126 

• 88 

• 43 

• 64 

• 24 
•98 

82 

• 17 

• 89 
•110 

37 
65 

• 91 
97 



No. of 
Name of School Students 

Viaalia H. S 1 

William Warren School (Menlo 

Park) (Private) 4 

Washington (Portland, Ore.) H. S. 1 

Watsonville Un. H. S 2 

Wcatherwax (Aberdeen, Wn.) H. S. 1 

Webster Groves (Mo.) 11. S 1 

Whittier Un. 11. S 7 

Wichita (Kans.) H. S 1 

Williams (Arii.) H. S I 

Wolcott School (Denver, Colo.) 

(Private) 1 

Woodland H. S • 2 

Worth (Worcester. Mass.) H. S 1 

Yakima (Wn.) II. S I 

Yuma (Arir.) Un. H. S 1 





No. o 


f Students 


Sch'ship 


Whose Work was 


Rating 


Satis. 


Unsatis. 


.37 




1 


1.03 


2 


2 


1.68 


1 




1.35 


2 




2.08 


1 




.88 




1 


1.09 


3 


4 


2J3 


1 




1.00 


1 




.70 




1 


1.82 


2 




1.32 


1 




.97 




1 


.90 




1 



STATISTICS OF GRADUATION 

The total number of degrees conferred in 1921-22 (October, January, April, 
June) was 712, distributed as follows: 

Ph.D. M.D. J.D. A.M. Eng'r LL.E. 

Racteriology and Exfierim'l Pathology 

Rotany 1 

Chemistry 1 5 12 

Classical Literature .... .... 5 

Economics .... .... 3 

Education 2 26 

Education (Graphic Art) 

School of Education .... .... 1 

Engineering — 

Electrical 9 

Mechanical .... .... .... 7 

English 

English (Journalism) 

Entomology 1 1 

Geology 1 .... .... 3 

Germanic Languages .... 1 

History .... .... 8 

History (Journalism) 

Prc-legal 

Law .... 25 

Mathematics 

Medicine 1 28 

Mining and Metallurgy 

Philosophy 

Physics 1 

Physiology 

Political Science 

Pre-Clinical 

Psychology 

Romanic Languages I .... .... 8 

Surgery .... .... 1 

Zoology 



and 

A.B. 
3 
4 

53 

4 

134 

15 

6 

1 

21 

36 

29 
6 
3 

59 

27 
1 

35 



6 
34 

6 
24 

11 



Totals ; 9 



J8 



25 



76 



34 



534 



Publications of Faculty 273 



APPENDIX V 



PUBLICATIONS OF THE FACULTY 

September 1, 1921— August 31, 1922 
(Compiled in the Reference Division of the Library) 



David Starr Jordan, Chancellor Emeritus : 

Alumni must keep Indiana in the procession: Indiana alumnus, vol. 1, 

December 7, 1921 
Armament cut will be wide and deep: San Francisco call, October 29, 

1921 
Birth control : Is it moral ? Birth control rn'icw, vol. 6, February, 1922 
The California poppy: Science, n. s. vol. 56, August 11, 1922 
The color of trout flesh : American angler, vol. 6, December, 1921 
Democracy and individual freedom : Unity, vol. 88, February 9, 1922 
Description of deep-sea fishes from the coast of Hawaii, killed by lava 

flow from Mauna Loa : U. S. National museum. Proceedings, vol. 

59, 1921 
Description of a new species of fossil herring: American journal of 

science, vol. 3, April, 1922 
The dynastic state: San Francisco journal. May 25, 1922 
High school military training dangerous to youth of nation: Ibid., June 

4, 1922 
The inbred descendents of Charlemagne: a glance at the scientific side 

of genealogy : Scientific monthhly, vol. 13, D^ember, 1921 
The isolation plan: University of California chronicle, vol. 24, Janu- 
ary, 1922 
John Casper Branner: Science, n. s. vol. 55, March 31, 1922 
Jordan backs Darwin: San Francisco journal, June 25, 1922 
Latitude and vertebrae : Science, n. s. vol. 54, November 18, 1921 
Miocene shore-fishes of California : Scientific monthly, vol. 13, November 

21, 1921 
Prefatory note : Burbank, Luther. How plants are trained to tvork for 

man. 8 vol. N. Y. 192L P. F. Collier & Son 
President Wilson's policies: Survey, vol. 47, February 18, 1922 
Second introduction : Klyce, S. Universe. Winchester, Mass. 1921 
Some sharks teeth from the California pliocene: American journal of 

science, vol. 3, May, 1922 
Stanford spirit in the making: Stanford illustrated rez'ietv, vol. 23, 

May. 1922 



274 Stanford University 

To the men and women of Stanford: Welcome home to Stanford. 

May 20, 1922 
Trend toward peace : San Francisco journal, February 12, 1922 
Unarmed and unafraid: Unity, vol. 88, December 22. 1921 

Ray Lyman Wilbur, President : 

Alumni and the university : Stanford quad. 1923 

Annual report of the president . . . for the thirtieth academic year 
ending August 31, 1921 : Leland Stanford Junior University publica- 
tions. Trustees series. No. 37, 1921 

Discussions : Concerted action toward full support of scholarly publica- 
tions; Organizations of Freshman year; Policy of institutions of the 
association regarding fees of students holding international fellow- 
ships: Association of American universities. Journal of proceed- 
ings . . . of the annual conference, 1921 

John Casper Branner : Science, n. s. vol. 55, May 19. 1922 

Medical education of the present and near future : California state jour- 
nal of medicine, vol. 20. July, 1922; American medical association. 
Bulletin, vol. 16. May 15. 1922 

Medicine — A look ahead . . . Rush medical college . . . First John 
M. Dodson lecture : Rush medical college alumni association. Bulle- 
tin, vol. 17, August. 1922 

Public health: American city bureau. Western summer school of 
community leadership. Proceedings. Stanford university, 1921 

Self-starters, Commencement address Stanford university, June 20, 1921 : 
School and society, vol. 14. September 10, 1921 ; Stanford illustrated 
revieiv, vol. 23, October. 1921 

Stanford accomplishments: Ibid., vol. 23, October, 1921 

Stanford of the past and the present. The story of the growth of a 
great university as told to alumni at the Conference of December 9 and 
10: Ibid., vol. 23, January. 1922 

Universities helping ^to solve industrial problems : San Francisco busi- 
ness, vol. 4, February 24, 1922 

The university of the future — A recruiting and training for the public 
health professions : ( '. S. Public health sennce. Public health bulle- 
tin No. 126. 1922 

COMPTROLLER 

Almon E. Roth : 

Managing the university trust. How the board of trustees looks after 
the interests of Stanford : Stmtford illustrated m'ietv, vol. 23, Jan- 
uary, 1922 

REGISTRAR 

Orrin Leslie Elliott : 

How can I get into Stanford ? An exposition of entrance requi^eme!lt^. 

Stanford illustrated rericzv, vol. 23, December, 1921 
Probation and scholarship : Ibid., vol. 23, October, 1921 



Publications of Faculty 275 

ALUMNI SECRETARY 

John Ezra McDowell: 

Stanford alumni association — what the organization of Stanford men and 
women is doing : Stanford illustrated ret'ictv, vol. 23, January, 1922 

DEAN OF WOMEN 

Mary Yost: 

The need of the community-mind : Stanford illustrated revieiv, vol. 23, 
December, 1921 

ANATOMY 

Art h u r W i lli a m M ever : 

Further observations upon the use destruction in joints : Journal of bone 
and joint surgery, vol. 14, July, 1922 

Frank Mace McFarland: 

Some simplifications of microscopical technique : Science, n. s. vol. 56, 
July 14, 1922 

APPLIED MATHEMATICS 

Sidney De.\n Townley: 

John Casper Branner: Seismological society of America. Bulletin, 
vol. 12, March, 1922 
Editor, Seismological society of America. Bulletin. 

BACTERIOLOGY 

WiLLL^M Ludlow Holman : 

A modification of Hall's anaerobic culture tube : American medical asso- 
ciation. Journal, vol. 78, June 10, 1922 

Edwin William Schultz: 

The relationship between the hydrogen-ion concentration and the bac- 
terial content of commercial milk. (With Alberta Marx and H. J. 
Beaver) : Journal of dairy science, vol. 5, July, 1922 

BOTANY 

Douglas Houghton Campbell: 

The gametophyte and embryo of Botrychium obliquum Miihl : Annals of 
botany, vol. 35, April, 1921 [Issued after August, 1921] 

Laurens Gerhard Marinus Baas Becking: 

Radiation and vital phenomena. Utrecht, 1921. [Ph.D. thesis. Utrecht 
university. | 

CHEMISTRY 

John Maxson Stillman. Emeritus: 

Falsifications in the early history of chemistry : Scientific monthly, vol. 

14, June, 1922 
John Casper Branner: An appreciation of Stanford's second president: 

Stanford illustrated revieti', vol. 23, March, 1922 
The Stanford memorial : Ibid., vol. 23, October, 1921 



276 Stanford University 

Edward Curtis Franklin : 

The ammono carbonic acids: Atticrican chemical society. Journal, vol. 
44, March, 1922 

Florian a. Cajori : 

A globulin as the principle protein of the pecan nut. Its chemical and 

nutritive properties: Society of experimental biology. Proceedings. 

vol. 19, 1922 
Some nutritive properties of nuts. II. The pecan nut as a source of 

adequate protein : Joitntal of biological chemistry, vol. 49, 1921 

CLASSICAL LITERATURE 

Henry Rushton Fairclough : 

The art and archaeology of the Dalmation coast": Art ami archaeology, 

vol. 14, August. 1922 
Associate editor, Art and archaeology. 

Jefferson Elmore: 

A new view of some Stanford history — What mind visualized Stanford 

architecture? Stanford illustrated review, vot 23, December, 1921 
The purpose of the decemviral legislation : Classical philology, vol. 17, 

April, 1922 

ECONOMICS 

Murray Shipley Wildman : 

The assumption of treasury functions by the Federal reserve banks: 

American academy of political and social science. Annals, vol. 99, 

January. Publication No. 1569. 
The bank as an instrument of re-adjustment: Dalhousie rcznexv, vol. 1, 

January, 1922 
Marketing and prices: American city bureau. Western summer school 

of community leadership. Proceedings. Stanford university, 1921 

Albert Conser Whitaker: 

Methods to be used in restoring gold basis. Three plans for the restoring 
of exchange stability : Journal of commerce and Manchester guar- 
dian. World reconstruction supplement, No. 1, April 24, 1922 

Walter Greenwood Beach : 

Poverty and child work : Journal of applied sociology, vol. 6. April. 1922 

Eliot Jones : 

The trust problem in the United States. N. Y., 1921. Macmillan Co. 
598 p. 

EDUCATION 

Ell WOOD Patterson Cubberley : 

Changing conceptions of the secondary school : Detroit journal of edu- 
cation, vol. 2, September, 1921 

Education in the United States : Watson, Iu)ster, editor, Encyclopedia 
and dictionary of education, vol. 4, 1922 

Finance, the key to the system: Detroit journal of education, vol. 2, No- 
vember, 1921 



Publications of Faculty 277 

Public school administration. 2d edition revised. Boston, 1922, Hough- 
ton Mifflin, 479 p. (Riverside textbooks in education) 

Rural life and education. Rev. and enl. ed. Boston 1922, Houghton, Mifflin. 
377 p. (Riverside textbooks in education) 

Some larger aspect's of the problem of citizenship training: Teachers 
college record, vol. 23, March, 1922 

Editor, Riverside textbooks in education. Houghton Mifflin Co. Stone, 
C. R., Silent and oral reading. Boston. 1922. 306 p. Thomas, F. W., 
Training for eflFeotive study. Boston. 1922. 251 p. 

Lewis Madison Terman : 

Adventures in stupidity : A partial analysis of the intellectual inferiority 

of a college student : Seientific monthly, January, 1922 
Intelligence tests and school reorganization. (With Virgil Dickson) 

Yonkers, World book Co. 1922. Ill p. 
Mental growth and the IQ : Journal of educational psychology, vol. 12, 

September-October, 1921 
Mental measurement work . . . Address given at the University day 

luncheon at the president's home on May 20th: Stanford illustrated 

review, vol. 23. June, 1922 
A new approach to the study of genius: Psychological rei^iew, vol. 29, 

July, 1922 
The psychological determinist; or. Democracy and the IQ: Journal of 

educatiopial research, vol. 6. June, 1922 
Suggestions for children's reading; with special reference to the interests 

of gifted children. Stanford University Press. 1921. 27 p. 
Suggestions for the education and training of gifted children. Stanford 

university Press, 1921. 16 p. 
The Terman group test. Forms A & B, with manual of directions. 

Yonkers. World Book Co.. 1921 
Associate editor. Journal of applied psychology, Journal of educatioftal 

psychology. Journal of educatioftal research, Journal of personnel re- 
search. Journal of juvenile delinquency. 

Jesse Brundage Sears : 

The Arlington school survey. Report. (With others) Minnesota Uni- 
versity. General extension division. Bulletin, vol. 24, No. 28, August, 
1921 

Introductory note : iMugvick, Clare — A survey — The growth of teachers 
in service. Minneapolis, Minn. 1921 

The instructional service of the university. Report of the Survey com- 
mission. Part IV: Minnesota. University. Bulletin, vol. 25, April 
10, 1922 

The measurement of teaching efficiency : Journal of educational research. 
vol. 4, September, 1921 

Teacher participation in school administration: American school board 
journal, vol. 63, October. 1921 

The university income; The university expenditures. Report of the Sur- 



278 Stanford University 

vey commission. Part V : Minnesota. Vnivcrsity. Bulletin. yiA. 25, no. 
7, April 20, 1922 

Truman Lee Kelly: 

Certain properties of index numbers: Amcriean statist ieal associaticn. 
Quarterly publication, vol. 17, September, 1921 

ENGINEERING. CIVIL 

Charles David Marx : 

Irrigation: American city bureau. Western summer school of com- 
munity leadership. Proceedings. Stanford university. 1921 

Charles Benjamin Wing: 

An engineering triumph. Stanford's new stadium complete in record 
time : Stanford illustrated re%*iew, vol. 2Z, October, 1921 

ENGINEERING, ELECTRICAL 
Harris J. Ryan : 

Flashovers of insulators for 220 Kv lines. (With H. H. Henline and 
F. F. Evenson) Condensed from a paper delivered before the San 
Francisco section of the American institute of electrical engineers. May 
27, 1921 : Electrical ivorld, vol. 78. September, 1921 

On durability of susi)ension type insulators. (With members of a sub- 
committee of the N. E. L. A.— Overhead systems committee.) : National 
electric liyht association. Proceedings of the forty-fifth conjfcntioii. 
Atlantic (Tity, N. J. May 15-19. 1922 

Research cooperation between universities and utilities: Electrical 
world, vol. 79. January, 1922 

The University day hoax : Stanford illustrated rcznctc. vol. 23. June, 1922 

Henry Harrison Henline: 

Flashovers of insulators for 220 Kv lines. (With H. J. Ryan and F. F. 
Evenson) Condensed from a paper delivered before the San Francisco 
section of the American institute of electrical engineers. May 27, 
1921 : Electrical xvorld, vol. 78. September, 1921 

ENGINEERING, MECHANICAL 

William Frederick Durand: 

Application of the law of kinematic similitude to tlie surge-chamber 
problem : Mechanical engineering, vol. 43, October, 1921 

Hydraulics of pipe lines. N. Y.. 1921. Van Nostrand. 271 p. (Glasgow 
textbooks of civil engineering. ) 

Tests on air propellors in yaw. (With E. P. Lesley) ('. S. Xational ad- 
visory committee for aeronautics. Report no. 113. 1921 

GuiDo H. Marx : 

Data sheet 11-633, Strength of gear teeth: Lefax. Philadelphia, Lcfax 

Inc. 
Machine design. (With A. W. Smith) Ed. 4 rev. N. Y. Wiley & Sons 
Inc. 



Publications of Faculty 279 

E. P. Lesley: 

Tests on air propellers in yaw. (With W. F. Durand) : U. S. National 
advisory committee for aeronautics. Report no. 113. 1921 

ENGLISH 

Raymond Macdonald Alden : 

Do Stanford students think? Stanford cardinal, vol. 31. February, 1922 
Oscar Wilde's "Portrait of Mr. W. H." : Literary review , vol. 2, De- 
cember 3, 1921 
Shakespeare. N. Y. 1922. Duffield & Co. (Master spirits of literature.) 

John S. P. Tatlock : 

College honors and success in life; School and society, vol. 15. June 10, 

1922 
The intellectual interests of undergraduates: University of California 

ehromcle, vol. 23, October, 1921. American association of university 

professors. Bulletin, vol. 8, May, 1922 
Phrontistery : University of California chronicle, vol. 24, July. 1922 
The source of the Legend and other Chauceriana : Studies in philology, 

vol. 18, October, 1921 
"Under the sonne": Modern language notes, vol. 27, June. 1922 

Samuel Swayze Seward, Jr. : 

Reference sheets for English composition. Stanford university press, 
October, 1921 

Frances Theresa Russell : 

The manly art of hazing: Stanford illustrated rcinciv, vol. 23. Febru- 
ary, 1922 

Margery Bailey : 

Dear Ally Croaker — A note on Boswell's Life of Johnson : Xotcs and 

queries, vol. 10, April 8, 1922 
The little man with one shoe. Boston. 1921. Little Brown 

Miller L. McClintock : 

Luncheon and forum speaking: American city bureau, l^ est em sum- 
mer school of community leadership. Proceedings. Stanford university. 
1921 

Paul Hibbert Clyde: 

Alumni pledge support to Stanford. Problems of the University ex- 
plained at conference of Dec. 9 and 10: Stanford illu.Ktratcd reviciv, 
vol. 23, December, 1921 

The football problem is solved; Stanford has stopped juggling with 
coaches : Ibid., vol. 23, February, 1922 

The new attitude toward Stanford — An interview with President Wilbur 
upon his return from Washington: Ibid., vol. 23, November, 1921 

We are shareholders in Stanford : Ibid., vol. 23, June, 1922 

Editor, Stanford illustrated review 



280 Stanford University 

FOOD RESEARCH INSTITUTE 

Joseph Stancliffe Davis: 

Charles Rist on Germany's war finances : Quarterly jourtml of economics, 
vol. 36, November, 1921 

Bread distribution; a subject for research: Bakers weekly, vol. 32. Octo- 
ber 29, 1921 

The European economic developments : Harvard eccntomic serincc. 
Weekly letter, vol. 1, August 12, 1922 

The European economic situation: Hansard economic service. Weekly 
letter, vol. 1. April 8, 1922 

Index numbers of foreign exchange: Quarterly journal of economics, 
vol. 36. May, 1922 

Recent developments in world finance: Han*ard eccntomic service. Re- 
victv of economic statistics. Preliminary, vol. 4, April, 1922 

GEOLOGY 

Bailey Willis : 

Aerial observations of earth-quake rifts: Science, n. s. vol. 54, Septem- 
ber 23, 1921 
Geology of the Colorado river basin with reference to engineering 
problems : Science, n. s. vol. 56, August 18, 1922 

Austin Flint Rogers: 

Collophane, a much neglected mineral : American journal of science, 

vol. 3, April, 1922 
Delafossite from Kimbcrly, Nevada: Anu^rican mineralogist, vol. 7, 

June, 1922 
Introduction to the study of minerals and rocks. 2d ed. N. Y. 1921. 

McGraw Hill 
A new occurrence of cristol)alite in California : Journal of geoloyy, vol. 

30, April-May, 1922 

HISTORY 

Ephraim Douglass Auams: 

California's story. (With H. C. Bolton) Boston. 1922. Allyn and 
Bacon. 216 p. 

Payson Jackson Treat: 

Far East and Australia: U. S. Bureau of education. Bulletin no. 27. 
1921. Washington. 1922 

Japan and the United States, 1853-1921. Boston, 1921. Houghton, Mif- 
flin. Same. Translated into Japanese by K. Murakawa. Tokyo. 1922. 
Yubunkwan 

Japanese in Manchuria: Nezv York ei'ening post. December 21. 1921 

The Japanese question in California: Woman citizen, November 19. 
1921 

Professor Treat gives America's view of the Japanese: Japan times 

and mail. Weekly edition, vol. 42, November, 1921 

The Shantung question : Pacific rez'iew, vol. 2, September, 1921 



Publications of Faculty 281 

Edgar Eugene Robinson : 

An observer's impressions of the Washington conference: CoHimon- 

zvealth club of California. Transactions, vol. 17, April, 1922 
The Washington conference: Stanford cardinal, vol. 31, January, 1922 

Percy Alvin Martin : 

Labor conditions in Mexico: Mexican yearbook, 1920-1921. Los Angeles, 
1922 

Ralph Has well Lutz : 

History acquisitions: Stanford illustrated mncxv, vol. 23, November, 

1921 
Washington conference — Report" of the section on international relations : 

Comtnonwealth club of California. Transactions, vol. 17, April, 1922 

Edwin Maslin Hulme: 

Translator, Gebhart, Emile. Mystics and heretics in Italy at the end of 
the Middle Ages. London. 1922. Allen and Unwin 

Yamato Ichihashi: 

Admiral Baron Kato, new premier of Japan: Japan, vol. 11. August, 

1922 
Results — ^What was accomplished for the United States and Japan at 

the Washington conference: Japan, vol. 11, July, 1922 

Reginald George Trotter : 

Lord Monck and the great coalition of 1864 : Canadian historical rcz'iciv, 
vol. 3. June. 1922 

LAW 

Arthur M. Cathcart: 

Welcome. [Opening address] : American city bureau . H'cstern summer 
school of community leadership. Proceedimjs. Stanford university. 
1921 

Chester Garfield Vernier: 

Recent criminal cases: American institute of criminal law. Journal, vol. 
12. November, February; vol. 13, May, August, 1921-1922 

Clarke B. Whittier: 

Regional scholarships for women: Stanford illustrated revietv, vol. 23, 

February, 1922 
What are regional scholarships? Ibid, vol. 23, November, 1921 

MATHEMATICS 

Hans Frederick Blichfeldt: 

On the approximate solutions in integers of a set of linear equations: 
National academy of sciences. Proceedings, vol. 7, November. 1921 

MEDICINE 

William Ophuls: 

Arteriosclerosis: Northwest medicine, vol. 20, November. 1921 
Report of the section on public health: Commonxvealth club of Cali- 
fornia. Transactions, vol. 16, September, 1921 



282 Stanford University 

Albion Walter Hewlett : 

A case showing bundle branch block with extra-systoles originating in 

the ventricular septum : Heart, vol. 9, December, 1921 
Effect of massage, heat, and exercise on the local circulation: Califor- 
nia state journal of medieine, vol. 20, August, 1922 
' The quinidin treatment of auricular fibrillation. (With J. P. Sweeny) : 
Americmi medical association. Journal, vol. 77, December 3, 1921 
The vital capacity in a group of college students. (With N. R. Jackson) : 
Archives of internal medicine, vol. 29, April, 1922 

Alfred Baker Spalding: 

The cause and cure of high rectocele: American medical association. 

Journal, vol. 79. August 26, 1922 
A pathnognomonic sign of intrauterine death : Sur<fery, gynecology and 

obstetrics, vol. 34, June, 1922 
Prolapse of the uterus, with rectocele and crystocele: California state 

journal of medicine, vol. 20, January, 1922 
Tuberculosis of the cervix, with case report : Surgical clinics of North 

America, vol. 2, April, 1922 

Paul John Hanzlik : 

Kxperimental plumbism. Therapeutic efficiency of some agents and com- 
parative toxicity of other metals. (With Mary Mclntyre and Eliza- 
beth Presho) : Society for experimental biology and medicine. Pro- 
ceedings, vol. 19, 1922 

Eurthcr observations on anaphylactoid phenomena from different agcnt^. 
(With H. T. Karsner) : Society for experimental biology and medicine. 
Proceedings, vol. 19, 1922 

Influence of various factors on the excretion and decomposition of 
hexamethylenaminc. (With Floyd De Eds) : Jourtuil of pharmacology 
and experimental therapeutics, vol. 19, April, 1922 

Urinary excretion of salicyl after the administration of salicylate and 
salicylate esters. (With Floyd De Eds and Elizabeth Presho) : Soci- 
ety of experimental biology and medicine. Proceedings, vol. 19, 1922 

Thomas Addis : 

Blood pressure and pulse rate levels: Archives of internal medicine. v<»l. 

29, April, 1922 
Blood pressure and pulse rate reactions: Archives of internal medicine. 

vol. 30, August, 1922 
Determination of the extent and nature of the renal lesion in Bright'> 

disease : California j(tate journal of medicine, vol. 20, March, 1922 

Maide Landis: 

The Stanford school for nursing: Stanford illustrated rrt'irxc, vol. 23. 
April, 1922 

Hknrv Evkkett Alderson : 

Acnitis — Report of a case: Archives of dermatology and syphilology. 
vol. 6, July. 1922 



Pi;i5i-icATi()Ns OF I'acultv 283 

Onychauxis and thyroid therapy. Report of a case: Archives of derma' 

tology and syphilohgy, vol. 5, May, 1922 
Treatment of oak dermatitis caused by Rhus diversiloba : California 

state journal of medicine, vol. 20, May, 1922 
Value of tests with commercial luetin: Archi^rs of dermatology and 

sy philology, vol. 5, May. 1922 

Ernest Charles Dickson : 

Botulism. A method for determining the thermal death time of spores 
of Bacillus botulinus. (With G. S. Burke) : Society for experimental 
biology atul medicine. Proceedings, vol. 19, 1921 

Leonard Wheeler Ely : 

The amoeba as the cause of the second great type of chronic arthritis. 

(With A. C. Reed and H. A. WyckoflF) : California state journal of 

medicine, vol. 20, February, 1922 
Chronic arthritis: Medical record, vol. 10, February, 1922 
Chronic arthritis of the knee: Surgical clinics of North America, vol. 

2, April, 1922 • 

The treatment of joint tuberculosis: American jountal of surgery, vol. 

35, September, 1921 

Harold Kniest Faber : 

The diagnosis and treatment of intracranial hemorrhage of the new- 
born. Report of a case. (With E. B. Towne) : California state 
journal of medicine, vol. 20, January, 1922 

Food requirements in new-born infants. A study of the spontaneous 
intake: American journal of diseases of children, vol. 24, July. 1922 

A modification of the DuBois height-weight formula for surface areas 
of new-born infants. (With M. Melcher) : Society for experimental 
biology and medicine. Proceedings, vol. 19, 1921-1922 

The Pirquet system of nutrition and its applicability to American condi- 
tions: American medical association. Journal, vol. 77. December 3, 
1921 
Leo Eloesser : 

Leg ulcer: Surgical clinics of North America, vol. 2, April, 1922 
Some notes on plastic operations : Surgery, gynecology and obstetrics, 
vol. 34, April, 1922 

Philip Kingsnorth Gilman : 

Surgical complications of amebiosis : Surgical clinics of North America, 
vol. 2, April, 1922 

LuDwic Augustus Emge: 

Biological facts about benzyl benzoate therapy: California state journal 

of medicine, vol. 19, September, 1921 
Notes on the study of mitochondria in the human amnion : Anatomical 

record, vol. 22, December, 1921 

Edward Bancroft Towne: 

The diagnosis and treatment of intracranial hemorrhage of the new- 
born. Report of a case. (With H. K. Faber) : California state journal 
of medicine, vol. 20, January, 1922 



284 Stanford University 

The so-called permanent polyuria of experimental diabetes insipidus : 
Society for experimental biology and medicine. Proceedings, vol. 19, 
1922 

The value of ventriculograms in the localization of intracranial lesions : 
Archiz'cs of surgery, vol. 5, July, 1922 

Henry Herbert Yerington : 

Diarrhoea in infants in relation to certain food intolerances: California 
state journal of medicine, vol. 20, March, 1922 

John Adolph Backer: 

Styloid process in tonsillectomy : California state journal of medicine, 
vol. 20, March. 1922 

Thomas George In man : 

Neurological findings in one thousand group study classes : California 

state journal of medicine, vol. 19, November, 1921 
Some important factors in diseases of peripheral nerves : Medical revietv 

of revigtvs, vol. 28, February, 1922 

Russell V. Lee : 

Sudden death in two patients following intravenous injections of acacia : 
* American medical association. Journal, vol. 79, August, 1922 

Jay Marion Read : 

Correlation of basal metabolic rate with pulse rate and pulse pressure: 
American medical association. Jourtml, vol. 78, June 17, 1922 

Hermann Schussler: 

A plan for the intensive treatment of congenital syphilis : California 
state journal of medicine, vol. 20, August, 1922 

Harry Spiro: 

Cardiac dyspnoea, or rather, cardiac shortness of breath: California 
state journal of medicine, vol. 20, June, 1922 

MEMORIAL CHURCH 

David Charles Gardner : 

Easter, its meaning and its message: Overland monthly, vol. 79. April. 

1922 
Meaning of Easter: Pacific churchmcm, vol. 57, May, 1922 

Warren D. Allen : 

The Stanford university organ: Stanford illustrated revieti.\ vol. 23. 
November, 1921 

MILITARY TRAINING 

Leroy Pierce Collins: 

Stanford military men in action: Stanford illustrated rci*iezv, vol. 23, 
June, 1922 

MINING AND METALLURGY 

Waldemar Fenn Dietrich : 

Time studies in metallurgical analysis : Mining and scientific press, vol. 
123, November. 1921 



Publications of Faculty 285 

Welton Joseph Crook : 

Basal standards in iron and steel analysis: Lefax, Philadelphia, 1922, 
Lefax, Inc. 

MUSEUM 

Pedro J. Lemos : 

The animal in art. Worcester, Mass. 1922. Davis Press. (Portfolio 

and monograph) 
Animals in gesso relief : School arts fnagacine, vol. 21, January, 1922 
Color cement for the garden: Ibid., vol. 21, May, 1922 
Color cement handicraft. Worcester, Mass. 1922 
A correlation in color: School arts magasine, vol. 21, March, 1922 
Illuminated lettering : Ibid., vol. 21, September, 1921 
The lost art of drawing : Ibid., vol. 21, June, 1922 
The making of block prints for school annuals: Ibid., vol. 21, April, 

1922 
Modeled cement tiles: Ibid., vol. 21, February, 1922 
New methods of modeled leather : Ibid., vol. 21, February, 1922 
Of what conceivable value is drawing: Ibid., vol. 21, February, 1922 
A pilgrimage to Pilgrim land: Ibid., vol. 21, November, 1921 
The seaside in art. Worcester, Mass. 1922. Davis Press. (Portfolio and 

monograph) 
Why American art hops along on one leg: School arts niagasinc, vol. 21, 

January, 1922 
Editor, School arts magasme 

PHILOSOPHY 

Harold Chapman Brown : 

An adventure in the literature of success: Vnwersity of California 
chronicle, vol. 23, October, 1921 

Philosophy : Civilisation in the United States, an inquiry by 30 Ameri- 
cans, edited by H. Steam. N. Y. 1922. Harcourt Brace 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Medical Adviser — Men 
Alfred David Browne: 

Keeping fit: American city bureau. Western summer school of com- 
munity leadership. Proceedings. Stanford university, 1921 

Medical Adviser — Women 
Clelia Duel Mosher : 

The height of college women : Medical tvoman's jounwl, vol. 28, Novem- 
ber, 1921 
A spring song : Ibid., vol. 28, September, 1921 

PHYSICS 

Fernando San ford. Emeritus: 

Earth-currents and the sun's induction. (Abstract) : Physical re%*iew, 
vol. 18, October, 1921 



286 Stanford University 

An electrical effect of the aurora : Science, n. s. vol. 54, December, 1921 
The ether theories of electrification : Scinttific monthly, vol. 14, June, 1922 
How to study. Illustrated through physics. N. Y. 1922. Macmillan. 

(How to study series) 56 p. 
A lunar diurnal variation in earth potential and in earth-currents : Physi- 
cal rei'tetv, vol. 19, May, 1922 
The moon's electric charge : Ibid., vol. 18, October, 1921 
On the displacement of the north magnetic pole of the earth from the 

north geographic pole. (Abstract) : Ibid., vol. 19, May, 1922 
Origin of the electrical fluid theories : Scientific monthly, vol. 13, Novem- 
ber, 1921 

David Locke Webster: 

A device for timing ionization currents accurately: Physical revinv, 

vol. 19, May, 1922 
A general survey of the present status of the atomic structure problem. 

Part I. The present conception of atomic structure : National research 

council. Bulletin, vol. 2, July, 1921 
The penetration of cathode rays in molybdenum and its effect on the 

X-ray spectrum : Physical re^'ieiv, vol. 19, May, 1922 
Some X-ray isochromats : Ibid., vol. 18, October, 1921 

Joseph Grant Brown : 

The reaction of iron with nitric acid : Physical re7*ieu\ vol. 18, October, 
1921 

• 

Frederick John Rogers: 

The sun's charge. A criticism of methods: Physical rexnew, vol. 18, 
October, 1921 

Ason Perlev Ross : 

Preliminary report on the critical potentials of the M lines in the X-ray 
spectrum of lead : Physical rex'ieiv, vol. 18, October, 1921 

George Russell Harrison : 

The absorption of light by sodium vapor : Physical retneiv, vol. 20, 

August, 1922 
The absorption of light by sodium and potassium vapors : National 
academy of science. Proceedings, vol. 8, August, 1922 

PHYSIOLOGY 

Oliver Peebles Jenkins, Emeritus: 

Interesting neighbors. Philadelphia, [c. 1922] P. Blakiston's Son & Co. 

Ernest Gale Martin : 

The application of the "all or nothing" principle of nervous conduction to 

the interpretation of vasomotor reflexes: American journal of physi- 
ology, vol. 59, February, 1922 

The influence of adrenalin on metabolism in isolated skeletal muscle 
(With R. B. Armitstead) : Ibid., vol. 59, February, 1922 

The inhibition of erection by decerebration. (With M. L. Tainter) : Ibid., 
vol. 59, February, 1922 



Publications of I'^aculty 287 

X'^asoconst ruction from warmth stimulation. (With L. A. Jacoby) : 
Ibid., vol. 59. February. 1922 

Fraxk Walter Weymouth : 

Decerebration in birds : Science, n. s. vol. 55, May 19. 1922 

James Percy Baumberger: 

Fatigue and error in a mental occui>ation : Journal of indttstrwl hygiene, 

vol. 3, September, 1921 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Victor J. West: 

1921 Legislation respecting elections: Atnerican political science rri'ietv, 

vol. 16, August, 1922 

Edwin A. Cottrell: 

Municipal charters : American city bureau. H'estern summer school of 

community leadership. Proceedings. Stanford university. 1921 

PSYCHOLOGY 

LiLUEN J. Martin, Emeritus: 

Pedagogical hints from the results of a survey of a San Francisco pub- 
lic school for delinquent boys: Martin mental hygiene publication, no. 
5, 1921 

John Edgar Coover: 

The kinaesthetic method of learning typing. (With E. G. Wiese) : Busi- 
ness educator, vol. 27, May. 1922 

Maud A. Merrill : 

The relation of intelligence to ability in the "Three R's" in the case of 

retarded children: Pedagogical seminary, vol. 28, September. 1921 

ROMANIC LANGUAGES 
Oliver Martin Johnson : 

Note on por ce que, par ce que and pour que : Afodrrn language notes, 
vol. 37, May. 1922 

AuRELio Macedonio Espinosa : 

On the teaching of Spanish : Hispania, vol. 4, December, 1921 

Viajes por Espana. III. La fuente del Ebro: Ibid., vol. 4, October. 
1921; IV. Castilla la vieja: Ibid., vol. 4. November. 1921; V. El 
castizo humorismo castellano : Ibid., vol. 5. February. 1922; VI. Burgos 
cabexa de Castilla: Ibid., vol. 5, March, 1922; VII. 'I^ leyenda de 
Los infantes de Lara : Ibid., vol. 5, May, 1922 

Editor, Hispania, Stanford university 

Advisory editor. Inter- America, N. Y. 

Associate editor, Journal of American folk lore, Boston 

AuREo Coester: 

Amado Nervo: Hispania, vol. 4, December, 1921 
Recent Argentine poets: Ibid., vol. 5, May, 1922 

Editor, American association of teachers of Spanish. Handbook. Stan- 
ford press. 1922 



288 Stanford University 

ZOOLOGY 

Walter Kendrick Fisher: 

The Hopkins marine station of Stanford university : Inteniot'wnale revue 
der gesamten hydrobiologie und hydrographie, vol. 10, June. 1922 

Edwin Chapin Starks: 
* An inconsistency in taxonomy : Science, n. s. vol. 54, September 29. 1921 
Notes on the sea lions : California fish and game, vol. 7, October, 1921 
Records of the capture of fur seals on land in California: California 

fish and game, vol. 8, July, 1922 
The specific diflPerences between the chub mackerels of the Atlantic and 
Pacific oceans : Copeia, no. 103, February 5, 1922 

ENTOMOLOGY AND BIONOMICS DIVISIONS 

Mary Isabel McCracken : 

California gall-making Cynipidae. (With Dorothy Egbert) : Stanford 
university publications, Uniz*ersity series. Biological sciences » vol. 3, 
1922 

Gordon Floyd Ferris: 

Coccidae of Ceylon : Science, n. s. vol. 54, October 7, 1921 

Concerning lice : Journal of mammalogy, vol. 3, February, 1922 

A contribution to the knowledge of the Hippoboscidae (Diptera, Pupi^ 

para) (With F. R. Cole) : Parasitology, vol. 14, June, 1922 
Contributions toward a monograph of the sucking lice, Parts II-III : 

Stanford university, Publications. Biological sciences, vol. 2, pt. 2-3, 

1921-22 
The mallophagan family Trimenoponidae : Parasitology, vol. 14. April, 

1922 
A new species in the H ormaphidinae (Hemiptera, Aphididae) : Ento^ 

mological news, vol. 32, December, 1921 
Some Coccidae from Eastern Asia : Bulletin of entomological research, 

vol. 12, November, 1921 



UNIVERSITY BULLETINS 

Report of the President. Published in January. 

Information. Published in February. 

Announcement of the Hopkins Marine Station. Published in March. 

Announcement of the Summer Quarter. Published in March. 

Announcement of the School of Law. Published in April. 

Announcement of Courses of Instruction for 1923-24 with Pre- 
liminary Time Schedule. Published in May. 

Announcement of the School of Medicine. Published in May.' 

Announcement of Graduate Study. Published in June. 

Announcement of the School of Education. Published in June. 

Lower Division Manual. Published in July. 

The University Register. Published in August. 

Vocational Training. Published in October. 

Address, THE REGISTRAR, 

Stanford University, California. 



Directory of Officers and Students. Published in October, January, 
April, and July. [On sale at the Comptroller's Office. 15c] 

Time Schedule of Lectures and Laboratory Work. Printed in Sep- 
tember, December, March, and June, for the next succeeding quarter. 
[On sale at the Comptroller's Office. 10c.] 

Alumni Directory, 1891-1920. Issued September, 1921. Price, cloth, $6, 
paper $5, prepaid. [On sale at the Office of the Alumni Secretary.] 



UNIVERSITY PUBLICATIONS 

University Series 

Monographs and other papers embodying the results of original research 
in the various departments of University activity. 

Contributions to Biology 
Reprinted from the Proceedings of the California Academy of Sciences. 

Other Publications 
Monographs issued 1892-95. 

Address, THE LIBRARY, 

Stanford University, California. 



STANFORD UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

JANUARY, 1924 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT 
OF STANFORD UNIVERSITY 



FOR THE THIRTY^ECOND ACADEMIC YEAR 

ENDING AUGUST 31, 1923 



THIS BEING THE TWENTIETH REPORT SUBMITTED, TO WHICH 

ARE APPENDED THE ANNUAL REPORTS OF THE 

TREASURER AND COMPTROLLER 



STANFORD UNIVERSITY, CALIFORNIA 

PUBLISHED BY THE UNIVERSITY 

1924 



Stanford University 
Press 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

PAGE 

Trustees 1 

Buildings 1 

Residence Halls for Men 1 

Encina Dining Halls 1 

Stanford National Board 2 

Hoover War Library 3 

Endowment Campaign ^ . . . 4 

Citizenship Course 5 

Development of the Engineering Departments .... 6 

Lane Medical Library 7 

Hopkins Marine Station 7 

Home for Chancellor Emeritus David Starr Jordan ... 8 

Branner Memorial Association 8 

Memorial Hall 8 

Stanford Home for Convalescent Children 9 

Lmtiative Measure Opposed to Animal Experimentation 10 

School of Biology ' 11 

Memorandum on the Relationship of Physiology to the School 

of Biology 13 

Value of the Collection of Fishes 17 

Present Required Course in Biology 19 

Research 20 

Faculty 20 

Absences 20 

Resignations 21 

Promotions 21 

New Appointments 21 

Retirement 22 

One or Two Quarter Appointments 22 

Retirement of Professor Charles David Marx .... 23 

Summer Quarter 23 

Summer Quarter Appointments 23 

Students 24 

Student Welfare 24 

Methods of Admission 24 

Attendance 27 

Inter-Fraternity Agreement 28 

Statement of the Inter-Fraternity Council 28 

Scholarships 29 

Tuition Scrip 30 

William Roberts Eckart Research Fund for Mechanical Engi- 
neering 30 

Gifts 31 

Report of the Treasurer 37 

Report of the Comptroller 65 



CONTENTS 
APPENDICES 

PAGE 

I. Departmental Reports : 

Anatomy Ill 

Applied Mathematics 112 

Bacteriology and Experimental Pathology 113 

Botany 114 

Chemistry 115 

Civil Engineering 117 

Qassical Literature 118 

Economics 120 

Education 121 

Graphic Art 124 

Electrical Engineering 124 

English 126 

Food Research Institute 128 

Geology . 131 

Germanic Languages 133 

History 133 

Hoover War Library . , 136 

Hopkins Marine Station 139 

Law 141 

Mathematics 143 

Mechanical Engineering 143 

Medical School 144 

Stanford University Hospitals 148 

Palo Alto Hospital 150 

Medicine 153 

Obstetrics and Gynecology 157 

Pathology 159 

Pharmacology and Therapeutics 160 

Surgery 162 

Military Science and Tactics 165 

Mining and Metallurgy 166 

Philosophy 166 

Physical Education : 

Encina Gymnasium 167 

Medical Adviser of Men 168 

Roble Gymnasium 169 

Medical Adviser of Women 171 

Physics 173 

Physiology 176 

General Biology 179 

School of Biology . 180 

Political Science 182 

Psychology 184 

Romanic Languages 189 

Zoology 191 

Entomology 192 



CONTENTS 

PAGE 

II. Committee Reports: 

Athletics 195 

Board of Athletic Control 196 

Women's Athletics 198 

Lower Division Administration 199 

Public Exercises 200 

Public Health . . ' 204 

Research 204 

Scholarship 206 

Student Affairs 214 

U. S. Veterans' Bureau 214 

^ Vocational Guidance 216 

III. Administrative Reports : ' 

Librarian 217 

Dean of Men 225 

Dean of Women 228 

Alumni Secretary 233 

Appointment' Secretary 239 

Memorial Church: 

Chaplain 245 

Organist 247 

Director of Museum and Art Gallery 248 

Registrar 250 

IV. Publications of the Faculty 265 



REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT 



To THE Honorable Board of Trustees: 

Gentlemen : Herewith is submitted my report as President of 
the University for the academic year 1922-23. 

Trustees 

May I record here the satisfaction of the University in the 
reelection of Trustees Frank Anderson, Herbert Hoover and W. 
Mayo Newhall upon the completion of their first ten-year term of 
service to Stanford. 

I wish also to express our deep regret at the resignation of 
Mr. W. B. Bourn because of ill health, of Mr. S. F. Leib because 
of his inability to take an active part in the affairs of the Univer- 
sity, and of Mr. C. P. Eells, who felt that he could no longer serve 
after twenty years of devoted attention to the University's welfare. 

The following have been elected to the Board to serve for a 
term of ten years: Mr. Harry Chandler, of Los Angeles; Mr. 
Ira S. Lillick, '97, of San Francisco; and Mr. C. O. G. Miller, 
also of San Francisco. 

Buildings 
Residence Halls for Men 

Toyon Hall, the first unit of the new residence halls, will be 
ready for occupancy with the opening of the autumn quarter of 
1923. It is anticipated that Branner Hall, the second unit, the cost 
of erection of which is being financed by the Board of Athletic 
Control, will be completed with the opening of the winter quarter. 
The completion of these two units will relieve in large measure 
the over-crowding in Encina Hall, which has been unavoidable 
for the past few years due to inadequate housing facilities. 

Encina Dining Halls 

The Encina Dining Halls will be completed with the opening 
of the autumn quarter of 1923. They will provide kitchen and 
dining room facilities for the men living in Encina Hall. 



•2 Stanford University 



Stanford National Board 



The national significance of privately endowed universities 
has been brought out clearly in the last few years, particularly by 
the various endowment campaigns. The distinction betw^een the 
state university, supported by taxes, and the privately endowed 
university, depending upon the income from endowment funds, 
tuition fees*, and voluntary public support, has become increas- 
ingly evident. While these two types of institutions cover the same 
field educationally, their approach is essentially diflferent. No 
state university can be legitimately maintained independent of the 
wishes of the citizens of the state as expressed through the Legis- 
lature, the Governor or in other ways. The privately endowed 
institutions are in a position to adopt new educational policies, to 
take perhaps unpopular positions for the time being, and to try 
necessary experiments in order to bring about the ultimate advance 
of education. It is mos^t fortunate for American university life 
that these two types of educational institutions are firmly rooted 
in American tradition. Privately endowed institutions, while often 
local in support, have been national in their student bodies for 
many years. 

Our experience at Stanford has been similar to that of Yale, 
Princeton, Cornell, and Harvard in that our students, while 
. drawn largely from the immediate locality, in their entirety 
embrace every state and all parts of the world. There is great 
value to the student in being a member of a student body made 
up of all types and varieties of men and women from all kinds of 
communities. Provincialism is a widespread American character- 
istic. The nationalization of our universities does much to give 
breadth to our national thought. 

In order to bring to the management of Stanford University 
the advantages of active contact with leading men from all parts 
of the country the Board of Trustees has organized a Stanford 
National Board under the following general provisions : 

A. The Stanford National Board 

The Stanford National Board is to be made up of 30 members elected 
by the Board of Trustees for a three-year term on a geographical basis. 

Of the 30 members elected in 1924, 10 will be elected for one year, 10 
for two years, 10 for three years. 

Twenty of these members are to be selected by the Board of Trustees 



Report of the President 3 

from lists submitted by the Advisory Board of the Stanford Alumni 
Association, representative of certain geographical units. 

The list of names submitted for election for any individual vacancy on 
the Stanford National Board shall contain not less than two names. 

Ten members of the Stanford National Board are to be selected either 
from those who have been directly associated with Stanford University or 
from those interested in its development. 

All elections are to be by ballot. Eight affirmative votes^ of Trustees 
are required for election. 

Not more than 11 members of those nominated by the Advisory Board 
of the Alumni Association are to be chosen from the State of California. 

The President of the Stanford Alumni Association is an ex officio mem- 
ber of the Stanford National Board. 

B. Geographical Location 

Twenty candidates nominated by the Advisory Board of the Alumni 
Association are to be selected from parts of the United States (1) the 
Pacific Northwest, (2) the Southwest, (3) Central Mountain States, (4) 
Middle West, (5) Lake Region, (6) New England, (7) New York, (8) 
Middle Atlantic States, (9) the South, and in California, a representative 
from each Congressional district. 

The Stanford National Board is to hold one or two meetings at the 
University each year with the Board of Trustees for a discussion of 
University problems and policies. 

The province of the Stanford National Board and of its members as 
individuals is to bring to the attention of the Board of Trustees from time 
to time for their consideration matters of interest to the University, but 
no publicity shall be given to their activities except through the official and 
ordinary channels of publicity in the University. 

All University publications and a brief digest of the important actions of 
the Board of Trustees shall be sent to the members of the Stanford Na- 
tional Board so that they will be fully and confidentially informed at all 
times as to University affairs. 

The Presiding Officer of the Board of Trustees shall be the Presiding 
Officer of the Stanford National Board. ^ 

It is anticipated that the first meeting will be held some time 

during the early part of the next academic year. There has been 

no attempt to define definitely just what the activities of the 

National Board shall be. Experience and common interest will 

soon bring this about. 

Hoover War Library 

The importance of a thorough-going and analytical study of 
history is being more and more appreciated in every field of human 
endeavor. The records of past experience properly collected and 
digested by scholars are of vital importance in future development. 



4 Stanford University 

One of the main efforts in the so-called campaign of Americaniza- 
tion in this country has been to bring about proper application of 
history and its significance in the development of enthusiastic 
patriotism among our young citizens. The Great World War with 
all of its mass of human woe and its complexity of human expe- 
rience will offer for generations to come the greatest source of 
study as to the behavior of the human race. 

Through the establishment of the Hoover War Library at the 
University a unique opportunity has been given Stanford to take 
a position of leadership in historical studies. At the present time 
the Hoover War Library contains over 125,000 titles. It is being 
rapidly organized, catalogued and bound, so that it can be readily 
used by students. Already several important studies, including 
'*The German Revolution, 1918-1919," by Associate Professor 
Ralph Haswell Lutz, have been written. 

With the records of the Commission for Relief in Belgium, of 
the American Relief Administration, and of the other great relief 
organizations, headed by Mr. Hoover, together with the collection 
of government documents and publications of all sorts and the 
presence of the Food Research Institute, it is inevitable that many 
scholars will turn to Stanford in the future. It seems probable 
that we have the greatest collection on Russia, outside of that 
country, and certainly one of the three other great collections upon 
the war. The development of the Hoover War Library emphasizes 
the rapid growth at Stanford of those research studies which are 
the finest expression of university life. 

Endowment Campaign 

Steady but slow progress has been made in carrying out the 
Three-Million Dollar program of university endowment. Pledges 
totaling $1,189,787.42 have been received up to September 1, 1923, 
and actual payments made totaling $439,522.03. Of this $221,- 
680.85 is for the First Million. This gives us assurance that at the 
end of the five-year period we shall be able to claim the whole 
$300,000 generously offered by the General Education Board and 
have the First Million complete, with all of the expenses of the 
campaign fully met. 

Some progress is being made on the Second Million, which is 
to erect the following buildings : 



Report of the President 5 

1. Law School $ 200000 

2. Residence Halls for men. 250,000 

3. Biology Group (rearrangement with housing * 
of scientific collections) 400,000 

4. Gymnasium for Women 150,000 

$1,000,000 

It will be necessary to take up each of these buildings separately 
and to enlist the support of interested groups in carrying on the 
campaign for funds. 

Two hundred and twelve thousand one hundred sixty-nine 
dollars and fifty-eight cents has been collected for the endowment 
of the Medical School. The campaign to have one-half million 
pledged in San Francisco was carried through with unusual inter- 
est and enthusiasm under the leadership of Mr. Paul Shoup, with 
Messrs. George M. Rolph, Milton H. Esberg, and C. H. Bentley 
as chief lieutenants. Representatives of business life in San 
Francisco and the alumni, together with women members of the 
Auxiliary Board of the Stanford Clinics, all contributed time and 
much enthusiasm. 

I think that this is the first instance where a city has definitely 
raised practically half a million dollars for the endowment of 
medical instruction, medical research and hospital service. This 
campaign was not a hospital appeal primarily, but an educational 
appeal. It is hoped that to this initial sum, of which the above sum 
has now been paid in cash, additional funds can be obtained from 
other sources, so that the Medical School will be placed upon a 
permanently sound endowment basis. 

Citizenship Course 

At the time of the adoption of the Lower Division a university 
requirement of a course in Citizenship was inaugurated. We have 
now had several years of experience and as a result have deter- 
mined to set up a special course in Citizenship under the super- 
vision of a Director cooperating with the faculties of the various 
departments, rather than to have courses given by individual de- 
partments. The outline of the plan is as follows : 

Director, Edgar E. Robinson. 

Secretary, Lisette E. Fast. 

Advisory Committee: Harold Chapman Brown (Philosophy), Walter 



6 Stanford University 

Greenwood Beach (Social Science), Edwin Angell Cottrell (Political 
Science), Marion Rice Kirkwood (Law), Victor J. West (Political 
Science), Albert Conser Whitaker (Economics). 

Lecturers: Ephraim Douglass Adams (History), Walter Greenwood Beach 
(Social Science), Eliot Blackwelder (Geology), Harold Chapman Brown 
(Philosophy), Edwin Angell Cottrell (Political Science), William Fred- 
erick Durand (Mechanical Engineering), Edward Maslin Hulme (His- 
tory), Eliot Jones (Economics), David Starr Jordan (Chancellor, 
Emeritus), Edgar Eugene Robinspn (History), Jesse Brundage Sears 
(Education), Graham Henry Stuart (Political Science), Lewis Madison 
Terman (Psychology), Victor J. West (Political Science), Ray Lyman 
Wilbur (President). 

Instructors: Margaret Elaine Bennett, Flora May Fearing, Henry Stow 
Anderson, Joseph Gregory Maytin. 

The following is a statement of the content of the course: 

Problems of Citizenship is designed to present the salient features in 
the bases and background of present-day society, to consider the place of 
education in modern life and the political equipment of the citizen, and to 
examine in detail the fundamental political, social, and economic problems of 
the American people. 

Attention will be given the following: (1) Bases of Civilization, includ- 
ing such subdivisions as Physical Environment of Modern Man, Man's 
Cooperation with Nature, Science and the Scientific Method, Fundamental 
Social Institutions, Races of Mankind; (2) Historical Development of 
American Society, including such subdivisions as European Expansion, and 
Exploration of the Americas, Migrations of Peoples, Beginnings and 
Development of an American People, National States of the Modern 
Period; (3) Political Equipment of the Citizen, including such subdivisions 
as Place of Education in Modern Life, Individual and Political Liberty, 
Origin and Development of Democracy, Public Opinion, Popular Control in 
Government ; (4) Political Institutions and Problems, including such subdi- 
visions as the Nature of State and Government, Political Parties, Colo- 
nialism, Local -Government, Problems of Popular Control and Efficiency; 
(5) Economic and Social Institutions and Problems, including such subdi- 
visions as Industrial Combinations, Regulation of Public Utilities, Foreign 
Trade, Conservation, Immigration; (6) Education for Citizenship, includ- 
ing such subdivisions as Agencies for Publicity, the Development of Com- 
munity Life, Opportunities of an Individual in a Democracy. 

Development of the Engineering Departments 

Professor Charles D. Marx, of the Department of Civil Engi- 
neering, Professor William F. Durand, of the Department of 
Mechanical Engineering, Professor Harris J. Ryan, of the Depart- 
ment of Electrical Engineering, and Professor Theodore J. 
Hoover, of the Department of Mining and Metallurgy, upon re- 



Report of the President 7 

quest from the President, presented a joint report upon the funds 
needed for the proper advance of engineering at Stanford in the 
next fifteen or twenty years, including buildings, equipment, and 
additional staff. 

By departments, these prospective requirements are as follows : 

Civil Engineering $2,500,000 

Mechanical Engineering 1,555,000 

Electrical Engineering 1,000,000 

Mining Engineering 1,250,000 

$6,305,000 

In round numbers, and including a reasonable estimate for 
Chemical Engineering, an additional endowment of $7,000,000 will 
thus be needed if Stanford is to maintain its present high status 
in the field of Engineering. With the united support of all of the 
engineers who have been trained at Stanford, many of whom have 
reached the fullest productive period of life, this goal should be 
gradually attained. 

Lane Medical Library 

The Sutro Library belonging to the State of California has 
been removed from the third floor of the Lane Medical Library 
Building to the shelves of the San Francisco Public Library. With 
the accumulated funds obtained from the rental received this space 
will now be remodeled as an extension of the library. Exhibit 
cases and a suitable reading room are to be provided so that the 
Barkan Library on the History of Medicine will be made readily 
accessible and its most interesting and valuable volumes suitably 
exhibited. This collection, made possible through the generosity 
and services of Professor Adolph Barkan, emeritus, has, particu- 
larly under the advice and assistance of Professor Karl Sudhoff, 
become of notable proportions. 

Hopkins Marine Station 

The Hopkins Marine Station was occupied to capacity during 
the summer quarter. It is of significant importance in our biologi- 
cal work. The purchase of some of the neighboring land about the 
Station now gives us full control of the whole of China Point 
with a small harbor suitable for a short wharf, and space enough 
for the five or six additional buildings required to adequately 



8 Stanford University 

prepare the Station for that unique service in economic marine 
biology and in pure research for which it is fitted. 

Home for. Chancellor Emeritus David Starr Jordan 

By action of the Board of Trustees plans have been prepared 
for a home for Dr. and Mrs. Jordan to be used by them during 
their lifetimes. This house will belong to the Pension Fund and 
is being erected near and attached to the garden of Xazmin House, 
which will become the property of the University. 

This home ensures the University that it is to have the con- 
tinued advantages and deep satisfactions of having the first Presi- 
dent of the University and his helpmate through all of the early 
years of the institution as a part of our community life. 

Branner Memorial Association 

The Branner Memorial Association has been organized with 
an Executive Committee made up of C. F. Tolman, E. B. Kim- 
ball and T. J. Hoover, with D. M. Folsom as chairman of the 
Branner Memorial Committee, to raise a sum of $100,000 to be 
devoted to the maintenance and continued growth of the geological 
library founded by Dr. John Casper Branner. "This memorial is 
to represent the aflfection and high regard of his boys and will 
definitely connect the work of the great teacher with the educa- 
tion of future Stanford geologists." 

Memorial Hall 

The present status of this fund is shown by the following letter 
from John M. Stillman to the President of the University: 

It will be recalled, as stated in the President's Report for the year 
ending in the autumn of 1922, that all efforts to enlarge the subscription 
list were suspended during the campaigns for the Stadium and the Endow- 
ment. The reasons then controlling have still held valid during the past 
year. The additions to the fund are, therefore, from unsolicited subscrip- 
tions and from accretions from funds invested or in savings banks deposits. 

On October 2, 1923, the condition was as follows : 

Total receipts from subscribers $53,489.05 

Interest on bonds and savings account 7,118.18 

Profit on sale of Victory bonds, etc 492.67 

$61,099.90 
Less total expenses, 1919-23 $ 2.950.59 

Net Receipts $58,149,31 



RErORT OF THE PRESIDENT 9 

Total Assets : 

Bonds at cost with Union Trust Co $50,399.23 

Savings Bank account, Bank of Palo Alto 5,396.00 

Savings Bank account, Union Trust Co 1,691.67 

Conunercial Account, Bank of Palo Alto 662.41 

Total in Charge of Custodian .$58,149.31 

Additional subscriptions to Memorial Fund by subscribers to the 
Stadium, yet in hands of Board of Athletic Control, eventually 
payable to War Service Memorial, as reported $15,798.61 

Subscriptions not yet received, including the $10,000.00 under- 
written by the New York Alumni for the New York Alumni.... 30,500.00 

And expenses thus far incurred and paid 2,950.59 

Total Received or Pledged. $107,396.52 

In view of the suggestion made in your letter published in last year's 
report, and the larger Memorial Hall this would call for, the present 
Chairman of the Committee anticipates calling at an early date a meeting 
of the Committee to consider the problem connected with the continuation 
of the campaign for the Memorial Hall, for which the sum of about 
$60,000.00 has been paid and some $45,000.00 more pledged. 

The Chairman also considers that, as his services as custodian of the 
collections have now exceeded the four years originally estimated for the 
completion of the campaign, some arrangement may advantageously be 
made by which some other custodian may assume the task of receiving 
and investing the funds collected and to be collected for this purpose. 

Professor John M. Stillman, emeritus, whose devoted and 
untiring services have been largely responsible for the accumula- 
tion of this amount, has asked that this sum be placed with the 
Comptroller and that he be relieved of immediate responsibility for 
it. The collection of the rest of the funds required for the erection 
of the proposed Memorial building will now be merged with other 
campaigns for endowment. 

St.\nford Home for Convalescent Children 

Supplementary to the extension of hospital service in our cities 
the convalescent home has been introduced in various parts of 
the country. It permits of better and less expensive care, particu- 
larly of children, than can be given under city conditions. The 
increase in such homes is one of the ways to reduce the cost of 
hospital expense and to increase the value of existing hospital 
endowments and beds. 



10 .Stanford University 

Through the gift of $40,000 of Mrs. Henry Crocker a unit for 
twenty beds is being constructed near the Stanford residence now 
in use as a convalescent home. This unit with the income of about 
$100,000, which has been raised for endowment, will be of the 
greatest value. 

Initiative Measure Opposed to Animal Experimentation 

Again during this year the scientific work of the state was 
threatened by an initiative measure (No. 28), the passage of 
which would have most seriously hampered the University. By 
joint action of the Board of Regents of the University of Cali- 
fornia and the Board of Trustees of Stanford University authority 
was given the Presidents of the two universities to join in the 
following public statement : 

The advance of sanitation, modern medicine and physiology, nutrition, 
the teaching of biology, and the protection of our industries and agriculture 
all rest upon animal experimentation. The control of the epidemic diseases 
of man and animals, the management of surgical operations and of childbirth 
and the certification of milk, food and water supplies would be impossible 
without the knowledge gained by such studies. In fact, the present day 
protection of the public from diseases, which is vital to our community 
life, rests upon animal experimentation. The University of California and 
Stanford University are vitally interested in the defeat of this initiative 
measure, since its passage would be a statewide calamity. 

Not only would it stop the research work now going on in their medical 
schools, hospitals and laboratories and in the Bureau of Animal Industry, 
but it would damage the market for most of California's food products 
and markedly reduce the confidence of visitors coming into the state. 
If California could not certify to its food and water supplies, could not 
guarantee protection against contagious diseases, could not provide certified 
milk, the effect upon agriculture and industry in the state would be 
disastrous. The near collapse of the olive industry, due to the poisoning 
of a few people in eastern states, and the way in which the industry was 
saved by the researches carried on in the laboratories of the two universities 
indicates the imperative necessity of freedom for the universities in animal 
experimentation. California food, instead of being looked to as an example 
of purity, would be shunned. 

The initiative measure would make it impossible to test with birds for 
deadly gases in the mines of the state. It would stop the manufacture of 
serum for the prevention of hog cholera, the preparation of vaccine for 
anthrax, and the various other products required for the protection of our 
industries in agriculture and that annually save millions of dollars and 
prevent great mortality among domestic animals. Under the act operations 
on various farm animals could be carried on without anaesthetics to increase 



Report of the President 11 

the palatability of foods, but no animals could be used in experimental work 
if the information obtained is for the benefit of a person or of the human 
race. 

We feel that no worse attack on the welfare of the state and on the 
right of the universities to seek and teach the truth could be made. Every 
man, woman, and child, every unborn babe, every domestic animal in the. 
state would be affected if this measure becomes a law. It strikes at all. 
It is unnecessary special legislation, due to prejudice and misinformation. 
No one will tolerate cruelty to animals. The present laws of the state are 
drastic and sufficient to control any abuse. We know that there is no 
cruelty to animals in the laboratories of the universities. They are in 
charge of men and women of the highest character who are unselfishly 
working to better the lot of their fellow men and to advance the interests 
of their community and of the state. Anaesthetics are always used for 
animals in the laboratory in exactly the same way that they are used by 
surgeons in the operating rooms. 

We urge upon the citizens of the state the imperative necessity of 
defeating this initiative measure. 

(Signed) The Regents of the University of California, by 
David P. Barrows, President of the University. 

The Board of Trustees of Stanford University, by 
Ray Lyman Wilbur, President of the University. 

Fortunately the initiative was defeated by a vote of two to one. 

School of Biology 

The significance of biology in universal education is becoming 
more evident each year. For years biology was viewed largely 
from the standpoint of the dissection of the frog or the crayfish 
and in the university it seemed to have no particular bearing upon 
human life. The exhaustion of some of our apparently unbounded 
national resources in animal and plant life has emphasized the 
great national importance of careful biological studies. For in- 
stance, during the past year Professor C. H. Gilbert, of the De- 
partment of Zoology, has spent the summer in Alaska making a 
study of the distribution of the salmon in order to assist in the 
promulgation of regulations to save the future of the salmon indus- 
try. Associate Professor F. W. Weymouth, of the Department of 
Physiology, has been working on the life history of certain clams 
of the Alaskan beaches, which are being exhausted. The signifi- 
cance of the importance of the biological point of view in the 
study of medicine and on the reactions of human life in all its 
manifestations is now the subject of constant concern and discus- 



12 Stanford Uxiversitv 

sion in educational circles. Studies on the biological aspects of 
environment, heredity, and psychology have modified our view- 
point of many human relationships. Undoubtedly within a com- 
paratively few years the teaching of biology in some form will be 
practically universal. In no other way can the human being find 
safety in a complex community life regulated by a majority vote. 

The Stanford School of Biology has been organized of 
the following departments, so that all of the biological resources 
of the University could be grouped: Anatomy, Bacteriology and 
Experimental Pathology, Biochemistry, Botany, Entomology, 
Food Research Institute, Hopkins Marine Station, Paleontology, 
Physiology, Psychology, and Zoology. It will also make possible 
the proper organization of a scientific museum of the University 
from the scattered and most valuable collections now housed in 
various departments. 

The faculty of the School of Biology has worked out a pro- 
gram leading to the degree of A.B. along the following lines: 
Sixty units of work in Biology, so chosen that there shall be fifteen 
units from each of three departments of the School. Provision is 
made for modifying the fifteen unit departmental requirement to 
the effect that upon completion of ten units in any department the 
student may substitute work in another department upon securing 
the consent of the departments concerned and of his adviser in the 
School. The general program must be properly approved. Stu- 
dents are urged to include a summer quarter of work at the Hop- 
kins Marine Station. 

This scheme gives equal recognition in the biological field to 
these departments. Formerly training in biology was largely 
thought to mean botany and zoology. Now a student can receive 
the A.B. degree from Stanford in Biology if trained in entomology, 
bacteriology, and physiolog>% or in anetomy, biochemistry, and 
zoology, etc. 

The Hopkins Marine Station gives Stanford a unique oppor- 
tunity in the biological field. More and more the need of research 
in marine forms of life is becoming evident to the scientist, the 
economist and the commercial fisherman. 

Because of their importance I am including here a letter from 
Professor E. G. Martin on the relationship of physiology to the 
School of Biology and one from Professor J. O. Snyder on the 
value of the collection of fishes. 



Report of the President 13 

Memorandum on the Relationship of Physiology to the 

School of Biology 

The student of current tendencies in British and American thought 
cannot fail to notice the extent to which the biological viewpoint has come 
to the fore in recent important writings. Such books as Wells* "Outline 
of History" and Robinson's "Mind in the Making," to mention only two 
outstanding examples, frankly base their arguments on biological consider- 
ations. There is an increasing appreciation on the part of progressive 
thinkers of the fact that human civilization is a biological phenomenon, and 
therefore of the importance of applying biological principles and the 
biological viewpoint to the interpretation of history K a sound and just 
interpretation is to be had. Hand in hand with the acceptance of this 
principle, and directly correlated with it, is the recognition of the fact that 
the future course of civilization will be determined largely by the extent 
to which its leaders are informed in and able to make use of biological 
conceptions as aids to the interpretation of current events and as guides 
to plans for events that are to come. 

The acceptance by educational institutions of the principle that civiliza- 
tion is a biological phenomenon brings them face to face with the necessity 
of shouldering an additional burden in the course of preparing leaders for 
the civilization of the future, by including in their plans of instruction 
training in biology for citizenship. Stanford University, through the adop- 
tion of its lower division biological requirement, and through the estab- 
lishment of courses in general biology, is in the forefront of the movement 
to give to future leaders of civilization that grasp of biological principles 
so essential to them. 

Training in biology for citizenship calls for emphasis on human behavior 
as the manifestation of the reactions of the most highly organized living 
things to the whole world of nature, animate and inanimate, and involves : 
(a) making clear the essential features of animal behavior, with the 
structural, functional, and ancestral bases therefor; and (b) setting forth 
convincingly the inherent relationships of man with the lower orders of 
nature, thus enabling human behavior to be interpreted biologically. 

Of fundamental importance in establishing man's position in nature is 
an understanding of protoplasm as the basic living substance: this under- 
standing can be better had through the cooperation of botanists than with- 
out it. 

For the historical or ancestral background those portions of botany and 
geolog>' which deal with evolution are nteded. 

For the environment, as influential in the activities of man, botany, 
zoology, bacteriology, medicine, and geography have contributions of impor- 
tance to make. 

For a just appraisal of the relative significance in human affairs of 
heredity and environment, work in genetics is essential. 

The study of the actual machinery of behavior belongs to the physiologist. 

Man as a self-sustaining mechanism, adjusting himself successfully to 



14 Stanford University 

various and often difficult surroundings is, I believe, interpreted more justly 
from the physiological point of view than from any other. 

Thus I hold that while training in biology for citizenship can best be 
had through the united efforts of specialists in the various fields of biology, 
the basic principle which comes to bind all the parts into a harmonious and 
logical whole, is of necessity physiological. This means that in the organi- 
zation and conduct of such training physiologists must be intimately con- 
cerned. In the course in General Biology at Stanford the departments of 
animal and plant physiology are deeply involved, and properly so. So far 
as these courses are concerned they have worked from the first as a single 
department. The affect of this unity of purpose and of effort upon the 
individual members of the two departments has been a much clearer 
appreciation on the part of each of the fundamental unity of the phenomena 
with which both deal, and a much greater understanding of the benefit each 
may derive from close association with the other. 

In a somewhat less degree, perhaps, but still noticeably, a similar sense 
of unity of purpose and of the fundamental identity of the phenomena dealt 
with has developed in the minds of the botanists and zoologists who have 
cooperated closely with the physiologists in the work of General Biology. 

The School of Biology at Stanford is a logical outgrowth of the 
cooperative undertaking represented by the courses in General Biology. 
If I interpret correctly the spirit in which it is being organized, it seeks 
to extend to all the biological work of the University such opportunities 
for benefit as may inhere in the cooperative pursuit of aims that have a 
fundamental basis in common. 

The practical function of the School of Biology is to promote investi- 
gation and teaching in the various fields of biology. Since unlimited means 
are not available the fields to be particularly stressed are obviously those 
now well established here, or such others as conditions at Stanford indicate, 
there being recognition and acceptance of the principle that it is part of a 
University's duty to society to take advantage of any special facilities, 
either of location, material, or personnel, tlrat it may possess. 

Investigation in a university is best promoted by obtaining competent 
men, affording them sufficient time, adequate facilities, and a stimulating 
atmosphere, and then leaving them entirely free to follow whatever line 
they wish. The School of Biology may contribute to research in all these 
directions. I consider it entirely reasonable to suppose that a well organized 
and efficient School of Biology will achieve prestige to an extent that will 
enable the University to attract men whom otherwise it might be unable to 
secure. The pooled resources of all the biological departments, if efficiently 
administered, should provide conveniences in aid of research that cannot now 
be afforded. That the atmosphere of a whole biological group working in 
unity and close cooperation is likely to be more stimulating to research 
than is that of individual departments, goes without saying. 

The teaching functions of the School of Biology group themselves under 
three main heads: (a) non-professional, or cultural, of which training 
for citizenship is an important part; (b) professional, the training of 



Report of the President 15 

teachers and investigators, of physicians, of nurses, of bacteriologists, of 
consulting psychologists; (c) economic or industrial, the training of ento- 
mologists, of economic botanists, of fishery experts, of industrial psy- 
chologists. 

All these lines of training should be based on a foundation of certain 
elementary biological principles. Since these principles are the same which- 
ever of the various fields of biology they serve to introduce, it would appear 
to be no more than simple common sense to avoid wasteful duplication by 
presenting them to all students in a single course or series of courses. In 
addition to being efficient, this plan has the advantage of bringing home to 
all students of biol(^y what otherwise they are likely to miss, namely, that 
they are all dealing with the same fundamental phenomena, however diverse 
these may come to appear in the course of the development of highly 
specialized points of view. 

In considering the relationships that should exist among the various 
departments making up the School of Biology, it seems to me highly impor- 
tant that there be recognition of the fact that the group as a whole subdi- 
vides naturally into several sub-groups, although the boundaries of these 
subgroups overlap more or less. Among these subgroups we have first 
that which has direct responsibility for the teaching of biological funda- 
mentals. This group includes the departments of botany, physiology 
(animal and plant), and zoology, with biochemistry, in theory although 
perhaps not in practice, closely associated. 

A second important subgroup is that which has to do with preclinical 
medical training, and includes the recognized preclinical departments on 
the campus. 

A third subgroup, including neurology, physiology, and psychology, 
might well concern itself with such phases of professional or industrial 
training in psychology as can properly come within the scope of the School 
of Biology. 

Other subgroups having to do with training for specialized careers in 
various fields of biology will suggest themselves. 

If the department of physiology be conceded to include plant physiology, 
as I assume for the purpose of this discussion, with the knowledge and 
approbation of Professor Peirce, to be the case, it is clear, I think, that 
physiology occupies an exceptionally important position relative to the 
various subgroups of the School of Biology, just as it does relative to 
training in biology for citizenship. While I consider it both unnecessary 
and undesirable that public stress be laid upon this point, I believe that its 
tacit recognition is essential to the most successful organization and con- 
duct of the school. In writing the above paragraph I recognize that I am 
laying myself open to the charge of being prejudiced in tavor of my own 
particular field of biology, yet I believe my attitude to be in accordance 
with fact, irrespective of my personal bias. I should state, further, that 
my position is sustained by prominent biologists who are not profes- 
sional physiologists (for example, see Raymond Pearl, Trends of Modern 
Biology, Science, Nov. 24, 1922). 



16 Stanford University 

The School of Biology is just entering upon its most critical develop- 
mental period, inasmuch as plans are maturing for its housing during the 
next thirty or more years if not during the life of the University. Every- 
thing else pertaining to the School is subject to modification from time to 
time as experience reveals the need therefor, but the physical relationships 
that are to exist among the various divisions of the School must be estab- 
lished in the immediate future, and when so established cannot be radically 
altered, except at great and probably unjustifiable expense. It is of vital 
importance, therefore, that the parts to be played in future years by the 
various divisions of the School be visualized as clearly as possible now, 
and that the physical groupings necessary to enable these parts to b** 
played properly be provided for. 

It is my opinion, already expressed verbally to you, that the ideal 
housing scheme is based on a biological quadrangle, with all the biological 
interests of the University (save those pertaining to the Medical School in 
San Francisco) in direct intercommunication. The announced plans for 
biological construction, so far as I have .seen them in the endowment cam- 
paign literature, stress the museum building and make no particular mention 
of other units. It is fairly evident that the cost of building and equipping a 
complete biological quadrangle would considerably exceed the amount men- 
tioned in the above literature. In the event that such a quadrangle is deemed 
inexpedient, for reasons of cost or for other reasons, and the policy of the 
University is to be the distribution of the divisions of the School among 
several non -connecting buildings, the question of how the various divisions 
are to be grouped becomes vitally important. 

Although I have general ideas relative to desirable groupings of the 
various divisions of the School, my immediate concern is with the relation- 
ships that are to be established for physiology. I have already emphasized 
my conviction that the affiliations of physiology are wider than are those 
of the other biological subjects. It is perhaps on this account that the 
idea of a biological quadrangle appeals to me so strongly. If choice must 
l)e made among various affiliations it seems to me imperative that funda- 
mental relationships be given preference. For physiology, the fundamental 
relationships are with those departments that deal with principles rather 
than those that deal with applications. In practice, this means that the very 
close relations now existing between animal arid plant physiology should be 
perpetuated, and the increasingly important affiliations of physiology with 
other botanical and zoological subjects should be encouraged by incorporat- 
ing the three departments, as at present, under one roof, or at least within 
one quadrangle. If it were feasible to incorporate biochemistry with the 
others, the 'group would be strengthened. Our present experience shows 
that this is not absolutely essential, and the Stanford organization of 
Chemistry probably rules out the possibility. 

Close cooperation l>ctween physiology and psychology, and between 
physiology and the other preclinical medical subjects, should be promote 
by bringing them into as intimate physical relationships as possible, sub- 
ject to the more vital affiliations sketched above. All divisions of the 



Report of the President 17 

School are agreed upon the desirability of a common library, and, within 
limits, common stockroom facilities and technical services. All these 
advantages depend, in large measure, on reasonably adjacent locations; 
especially with avoidance qi wide intervening stretches of lawn and traffic- 
laden streets. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Ernest Gale Martin. 



Value of the Collection of Fishes 

In answer to your general request for suggestions relating to organization 
and building in the proposed School of Biology, I wish to ask permission to 
submit the following comments relating to the collections. 

What I wish to say relates almost entirely to the collection of fishes, 
although remarks of a similar nature would in a measure apply to the 
plants, fossils and insects. 

The collection of fishes is the finest in this country, the second largest, 
and one of the most valuable. It may be termed the finest because it has 
been assembled in the orderly course of investigation, nearly every specimen 
having had some contact with a published report Also, many species are 
represented by carefully selected series which illustrate sex, color variation, 
geographic peculiarities, etc. It has not received gifts of any account which 
might stand out as special units independent of the whole, but on the con- 
trar>', its peculiar growth has insured a compact entity bound and held 
together by threads of investigation. Although largely assembled through 
studies in geographic distribution, its group representation is ample in many 
cases for studies in relationships. There are included in the collection 
something over 1450 types, cotypes, paratypes, and topotypes of species. 
Now a type is an object that is just as important to a systematist, whether 
a botanist or zoologist, as an original manuscript is to a research student in 
history. It is the specimen which stands behind the first description of a 
species, and it is frequently the last resort in the correct determination of 
a species. 

I have commented on the value of the collection. To my mind its value 
may be best estimated by the application of two measuring sticks, so to 
speak. The first is its part in a contribution to scientific knowledge; the 
second is its relation to the general welfare. 

As an application of the first criterion, the mere mention of the relation 
of the collection to the recent ichthyology of the Pacific Ocean, may appear 
sufficient to some of us. But for those not familiar with its history, a 
short resume of its growth may be of interest. Coincident with the opening 
of the University, a small collection of fishes was brought from Indiana 
University by Doctors Jordan and Gilbert, and installed in the Department 
of Zoology. This consisted mostly of fishes representing the faunas of 
California, Alaska, and the streams of the Mississippi Valley. The first 
notable additions resulted from explorations along the Mexican coast, those 
of Central America, California, and Washington, and in the streams of the 



18 Stanford University 

western slopes of the continent. Our knowledge of the ichthyolog>' of 
these regions rests pretty largely upon investigations made at that time, 
and descriptions and comments relating to many species were based on 
specimens now contained in the collection. The Galapagos Islands, the coast 
of Alaska and the Aleutian Islands were partially explored, and specimens 
which furnished the background of published investigations are in store. 
Extensive explorations were conducted by Stanford men under the authority 
of the United States Government in the Hawaiian Islands and the neighbor- 
ing deep sea, and two expeditions were made to Japan, one of which 
extended from Kamchatka to Okinawa. A very complete knowledge of 
the ichthyology of Hawaii resulted from the first. At the time of the first 
trip to Japan, less than 650 species were known to the fauna of the country, 
while since that time, and almost entirely due to work centering at Stanford, 
more than 580 species have been added. This enumeration of species is only 
inten^led as a rough indicator of the advance made, for problems of rela- 
tionship, distribution, habits, and the commercial importance of species were 
involved. These expeditions gave us the best collection of Japanese fishes 
extant. The fishes of the Philippine Islands, Samoa, and other Pacific 
localities are well represented. Substantial contributions to the fluvial 
ichthyology of Mexico and the western states have been made, and parts of 
collections assembled in the course of that work are stored here. 

In short, several hundred monographs, revisions, faunal lists, and shorter 
papers are based largely on material contained in the Stanford collection of 
fishes. 

The relation of the collection to the general welfare is closely bound up 
with its scientific contributions, for any approach to the study of economic 
ichthyology, where dependable results are required, must lead from a sound 
scientific knowledge of the species dealt with. 

The necessity of conserving what may be termed our natural food sup- 
plies, has been recognized in recent years, and the ocean with its fishes has 
been looked upon as our greatest hope. Stanford has materially contributed 
to investigations concerned with the conservation of fish, and the collection 
is appealed to almost daily as an aid in the solution of problems of conser- 
vation. Both the nation and state are more than casually interested in 
investigations which are carried on from this place, and both instructors 
and students are engaged from time to time in the study of the life history 
of species of commercial importance. 

The collection serves in another way, for a reference to some of its 
contents frequently imparts information of a general or technical nature to 
anglers, sportsmen and others. 

The possible future growth of the collection is worth considering. Its 
past growth has resulted from the orderly progress of exploration and 
research. Investigations have extended westward until they have come 
within sight of the Indian Ocean and the interior of Asia ; southward along 
the American coast beyond the isthmus ; down the middle of the Pacific 
until they are in touch with the south seas and their innumerable islands; 
and over the river basins of the western slope of America. With this in 



Report of the President 19 

mind, I should not hesitate to submit that the future growth of the collec- 
tion should follow an advance or exploration in one of these directions. 
Results of great scientific importance will certainly follow where such a 
broad foundation has been carefully laid. 

The largest unknown field, speaking in terms of ichthyology, is em- 
braced in the rivers and lakes of Asia. The collection has several entering 
wedges here in the shape of specimens from the streams of Japan, China, 
and Siberia. The fish fauna of the west slopes of South America, the 
coast, and the deep waters beyond are little known. Our collections would 
render indispensable aid in a study of this fauna. The collection is rich in 
specimens from the reefs and deep water of the Pacific north of the 
equator which would be of value for comparison with a southern fauna. 
Studies in western river basins will continue, as funds for that purpose are 
usually available. 

I believe that the growth of the museum in so far as it is concerned 
with vertebrate zoology should be largely in the field of ichthyology, this 
belief apparently needing no further verbal support. The growth of any 
collection in the museum should be a growth that results through use and 
the activities of investigators. A storehouse for miscellaneous gifts is of 
doubtful value. 

The collections have grown to such proportions that they should soon 
be brought under regular curatorial care, to insure safe preservation, careful 
labeling, systematic cataloguing, and such arrangement as will render their 
contents available for reference. 

Respectfully submitted, 

John O. Snyder. 



The Present Required Course in Biology 

Administrative Committee: Leonas Lancelot Burlingame (Executive Di- 
rector), Harold Heath, Ernest Gale Martin, George James Peirce. 

These courses attempt to present to beginners by means of lectures, 
illustrations, demonstrations, and laboratory exercises the fundamentals of 
Biology in its broadest sense. They include a study of : ( 1 ) Protoplasm, 
the common living substance of all plants and animals ; (2) The organization 
of cells and their combination into multicellular organisms; (3) The role 
of green plants in the manufacture of foods; (4) The transformation of 
foods into the living substance of plants and animals; (5) The liberation 
and utilization of the chemical energy of foods, chiefly by animals ; (6) The 
sensitivity of protoplasm and its role in correlating the internal processes of 
the organism on the one hand and relating and adjusting it to its environ- 
ment on the other; (7) Disease and death of organisms; (8) The enrich- 
ment of the soil through the decomposition of organic remains and nitrogen 
fixation; (9) The perpetuation of the species through reproduction; (10) 
The laws and mechanism of heredity; (11) Evolution and adaptation of 
organisms; (12) The factors controlling the ecological and geographical 
distribution of organisms; and (13) Man's place in nature. 



20 ' Stanford University 

In the laboratory course representative one-celled and many-celled plants 
and animals are studied with special emphasis on the nature and organiza- 
tion of protoplasm. The organism is examined in its character of chemical 
machine, synthesizing complex compounds, as in green plants, and decom- 
posing them with liberation of energy, as in animals. Finally the relations 
of living things to their non-living environment and to each other arc 
considered. 

No prerequisites, and required of all Lower Division students who do 
not present a high -school equivalent or elect an equal amount of work in 
one of the biological departments. 



Research 



The presence in the Stanford faculty of a number of men of 
national and international reputation in the fields of research is 
having an increasing importance in the life of the institution. 
From the beginning noted scholars in various lines have con- 
tributed to the reputation of Stanford. The addition of three men 
of established attainments in research as the Directors of the 
Food Research Institute under the endowment of the Carnegie 
Corporation has given fresh impetus to the research work of the 
faculty of the University. A study of the various titles of the 
publications, listed separately elsewhere, for the year indicates the 
wide field covered by the faculty. It is noteworthy, too, that there 
is a considerable body of research work along lines that are of 
immediate practical significance, economically and otherwise. 

The faculty of Stanford has always been well represented in 
the scientific organizations of the country. It is of particular 
interest to note that during the academic year the following mem- 
bers of the faculty were selected as heads of national organiza- 
tions: Professor Edward C. Franklin, American Chemical So- 
ciety ; Professor Harris J. Ryan, American Institute of Electrical 
Engineers ; Professor Lewis M. Terman, American Psychological 
Association; Dr. Ray Lyman Wilbur, American Medical Asso- 
ciation. 

Faculty 

Absences. — Sabbatical leaves for the academic year 1923-24 
have been granted to the following: Associate Professor William 
Martin Proctor, of the Department of Education ; Professor Ray- 
mond Macdonald Alden, of the Department of English ; Professor 



Report of the President 21 

Clarke Butler Whittier, of the Law School; Professor Everett 
Parker Lesley and Teaching Specialist Robert Henry Harcourt, of 
the Department of Mechanical Engineering ; Associate Professor 
Waldemar Fenn Dietrich, of the Department of Mining and 
Metallurgy. 

Leave of absence for the academic year 1923-24 has been 
granted to Instructor Norris Watson Rakestraw, of the Depart- 
ment of Chemistry, for study in Europe. 

Resignations. — The following resignations have been received 
and accepted: Dr. William Ludlow Holman, Associate Professor 
of Bacteriology and Experimental Pathology; Mr. John Russell> 
Instructor in Analytical Chemistry ; Major Leroy Pierce Collins, 
Professor of Military Science and Tactics ; Miss Lois M. Kendall, 
Instructor in Physical Education for Women ; Dr. George Russell 
Harrison, Instructor in Physics. 

Promotions. — The following promotions take effect with the 
beginning of the academic year 1923-24; Associate Professors 
Charles H. Danforth, in Anatomy, Percy A. Martin and Edgar 
E. Robinson, in History, William B. Owens, in Law, Ernest 
C. Dickson and Harold K. Faber, in Medicine, Frank E. Blais- 
dell, John F. Cowan and Leonard W. Ely, in Surgery, to the rank 
of professor; Assistant Professors William H. Sloan, in Chem- 
istry, Charles Moser, in Civil Engineering, John C. Almack, in 
Education, James G. Emerson, in English, Horatio W. Stebbins, 
in Mechanical Engineering, W. Edward Chamberlain and Henry 
G. Mehrtens, in Medicine, Ludwig A. Emge, in Obstetrics and 
Gynecology, Elmer R. Drew, in Physics, and Clelia D. Mosher, in 
Personal Hygiene, to the rank of associate professor ; Instructors 
Robert R. Newell, in Medicine, and Frederick Anderson, in 
Romanic Languages, to the rank of assistant professor; Helena 
M. Nye, Teaching Assistant in German, and Albert V. Pettit, 
Qinical Instructor in Obstetrics and Gynecology, to the rank of 
instructor. 

New Appointments. — The following appointments take effect 
with the beginning of the academic year 1923-24: Professors 
Leon Benedict Reynolds, in Civil Engineering, Harley Leist Lutz, 
in Economics, George Philip Krapp, in English (acting, winter 
and spring quarters), George Edward Osborne, in Law, and 
Major William D. Geary, in Military Science and Tactics ; Asso- 



22 Stanford University 

ciate Professors Harl R. Douglass, in Education (acting), Benja- 
min Leroy Holland (acting) and Harold Shepherd, in Law; and 
Edward K. Strong, in Psychology (acting) ; Assistant Professors, 
Buford O. Brown, in Journalism, and Graham Henry Stuart, in 
Political Science; Instructors Kenneth K. Kelley, in Applied 
Mathematics, John Edward Blair, in Bacteriology, Connell Clif- 
ford, in Economics (acting, autumn and spring quarters), Robert 
N. Wenzel, in Chemistry, Henry S. Anderson, Margaret E. Ben- 
nett, Flora M. Fearing and Joseph G. Maytin, in Citizenship, Ed- 
ward W. Farmer, in -Education (Graphic Art) (acting, autumn 
and spring quarters), Frederick Lape, in English, Paul F. Kerr, 
in Mineralogy (acting, autumn quarter), Isabel Capps, in Physical 
Education for Women, and Frank S. Fearing, in Psychology. 

Retirement. — With the close of the academic year 1922-23 
Professor Charles David Marx, head of the Department of Civil 
Engineering, retired on Carnegie Pension. Professor Marx ha? 
been at Stanford since the opening of the University in 1891. 

One or Two Quarter Appointments. — The following were ap- 
pointed to serve for one or two quarters during the academic year 
1922-23: As Acting Professors: James Kendall, of Columbia 
University, in Chemistry (spring quarter) ; John M. Clark, of 
the University of Chicago, in Economics (spring quarter) ; Tom 
Peete Cross, of the University of Chicago, in English (spring 
quarter) ; Leslie J. Ayer, of the University of Washington (winter 
and spring quarters), and Austin T. Wright, of the University of 
California (autumn quarter), in Law. As Acting Assistant Pro- 
fessor: Ralph D. Reed, of the University of Oklahoma, in 
Geology (autumn quarter). As Acting Instructors: Richard C. 
Bentinck, in English (autumn and winter quarters) ; Theodore H. 
Morgan, in Electrical Engineering (autumn and winter quar- 
ters). As Lecturers : Marie Reimer, of Barnard College, in Chem- 
istry (spring quarter) ; Rudolph Schaeffer, in Education (Graphic 
Art) (winter quarter). 

During the academic year 1922-23 the following members of 
the faculty were on leave: Professor Robert E. Swain, of the 
Department of Chemistry, spent the winter and spring quarters 
traveling in Europe ; Professor Augustus T. Murray, of the De- 
partment of Classical Literature, spent the year in Athens at the 
American School of Classical Studies ; Professor Murray S. Wild- 



Report of the President 23 

man, of the Department of Economics, spent the winter, spring, 
and summer quarters in European travel; Instructor Gordon A. 
Davis, of the Department of English, spent the year in the Orient. 

Retirement of Professor Charles David Marx 

Another of our great figures at Stanford has joined that group 
of emeritus professors which mellows and inspires our whole 
community. Happily most of the retiring members of our faculty 
have continued on among us taking some part in the life of the 
University and serving always to stimulate students and faculty 
alike to greater service to Stanford. 

Professor C. D. Marx was one of the Pioneers. Daddy Marx 
of loved name and fame retired September 1, 1923. I wish to 
record here my deep appreciation of his many administrative 
services, particularly when called upon to serve as Acting Presi- 
dent. 

Summer Quarter 

Each year shows a steady increase in the number of students 
attending the summer quarter, in the quality of work offered and 
in the number of students pursuing advanced studies. The total 
for the summer of 1923 was 983. 

The climate of the Santa Clara Valley is unusually good in the 
summer months. Besides the increasing number of the faculty 
offering courses a number of distinguished scholars and teachers 
are coming to Stanford from other universities. There is a broad- 
ening influence from these visitors, which is added to by the grow- 
ing numbers of our staff who are able to visit other parts of the 
United States or the world due to the vacations possible under the 
quarter system. 

Summer Quarter Appointments 

The following members of other faculties formed a part of the 
summer quarter faculty : As Acting Professors : James E. LeRos- 
signol, of the University of Nebraska, in Economics ; William W. 
Kemp, of the San Jose State Teachers' College, in Education; 
Tucker Brooke, of Yale University, in English ; Charles E. Car- 
penter, of the University of Oregon, George P. Costigan, of the 
University of California, Evans Holbrook, of the University of 
Michigan, and Floyd R. Mechem, of the University of Chicago, 



24 Stanford University 

in Law ; George H. Sabine, of the University of Missouri, in 
Philosophy; Charles W. Greene, of the University of Missouri, 
in Physiology, at the Hopkins Marine Station; Cephas D. Allin, 
of the University of Minnesota, in Political Science; David H. 
Carnahan, of the University of Illinois, and Antonio G. Solalinde, 
of the Centro de Estudios Historicos, Madrid, in Romanic Lan- 
guages. As Acting Assistant Professor: Irving E. Miller, of the 
State Normal School, Bellingham, Wash., in Education. As Act- 
ing Assistant Professors: J. Harold Williams, of Whittier State 
School, in Education ; Russell S. Knappen, of the University of 
Kansas, in Geology ; James T. Matthews, of Wllliamette Univer- 
sity, in Mathematics; Arthur J. Dempster, of the University of 
Chicago, in Physics ; Charles V, Taylor, of the University of Cali- 
fornia, in Zoology, at the Hopkins Marine Station. As Acting 
Instructor : Ralph W. Swetman, in Education. As Lecturers : 
Richard A. Bolt, of the American Child Hygiene Association, in 
Education ; Carolyn E. Gray, of Western Reserve L'niversity, in 
Special Course in Nursing. 

Students 

"Student M^elfarc 

Student life during the year has shown less of the war effects 
noticeable in the past few years and has been of a primarily healthy 
tone. Through the sturdy efforts of Mr. Tom Irwin and some of 
his student associates a marked change in sentiment regarding 
various practices of coercion of the underclassmen has been estab- 
lished. The blunting of the initiative of the entering student, 
which has cost us dear in many fields, will cease by common 
consent and agreement. With the housing together of the new 
women in Roble Hall and all of the new men in Encina, there 
will again be offered at Stanford the chance of common association 
and acquaintance during the formative first year. 

Methods of Admission 

The whole question of admission to the University at Stanford 
as elsewhere is in a somewhat unsatisfactory state. We have had 
considerable experience over a period of years in admitting candi- 
dates to a student body of limited size because of the practical 
application of the five hundred limitation placed upon the women 
of the University by Mrs. Stanford. In general three methods of 
entering the University can be considered. 



Report of the President 25 

1. That of recommendation by the school principal or head of 
the preparatory school upon the record made by the student and 
without examination. 

2. That of entrance examination either given by the University 
or by the College Entrance Examination Board, this latter exam- 
ination being either in individual subjects or in the form of a com- 
prehensive examination in four subjects. 

3. That of intelligence tests. 

Some institutions use one of these to the exclusion of the 
others. At the present time at Stanford most of our students enter 
on the first plan. In general it has proved satisfactory. The new 
rating blank upon which a report was made last year, asking for 
information regarding character, leadership, physical ability, and 
the general relationship of the qualities of the student in compari- 
son with those of the other members of his class, has been found 
valuable. The great difficulty in the recommendation plan»is that 
the standards of different schools and of different principals differ 
so much that the man who may be a leader in one school is well 
below the educational standard of the middle third of the class in 
another institution. With the improvement in the high schools of 
the west this is not so evident as it has been in the past, but it will 
be a constant variable factor in any plan of admission. 

Special opportunities for admission have been offered to stu- 
dents who are willing to take the comprehensive examinations. 
These undoubtedly are difficult tests of a student's capacity and, if 
passed with credit, insure satisfactory preparation for university 
work. 

The use of intelligence tests for admission, either exclusively 
or in addition to other tests, may eventually be the way out. At 
the present time at Stanford we are giving the intelligence tests 
to students after admission and are making a study of the records 
so obtained together with the scholarship record made in the 
University. The Academic Council has not as yet felt that suffi- 
cient information is available to make the intelligence test a part 
of the admission requirement. So far as we have gone the intelli- 
gence test has been used largely by the Scholarship Committee in 
making decisions as to the wisest procedure in the case of students 
who for one reason or another are showing deficiencies in their 
scholarship. In general it has been found that students with a 



26 Stanford Uxiversitv 

high intelligence test can with special incentive make up deficient 
records where others with similar records and a less satisfactory 
intelligence rating find it impossible to do so. 

In connection with the whole problem of admissions the follow- 
ing statement from Registrar Elliott as to the situation in the 
summer of 1923 may be of interest. 

Of the 500 women in attendance for a given year, the Committee 
estimates that 360 will return in October, leaving 140 places for new women 
students. Thirty-five of these are assigned to gradtiate women and, so long 
as the numbered list is continued, 35 are assigned on the priority basis. 
This leaves 70 to be chosen on the basis of special fitness or as faculty and 
alumni daughters. This year the number of faculty daughters is 3, and 
of alumni daughters 25, the latter showing an increase of 8 over the 
previous year. 

The Committee counts on a shrinkage of 20%. It has therefore placed 
45 women on the graduate preferred list. 45 on the safe numbered Hst and 
would nominally put about 95 on the superior fitness list. The number 
actually selected is 78, the faculty and alumni daughters being supposed to 
take up the shrinkage in this list. A few more than usual were put on 
the special fitness list, since a year ago, on the same prognostication, only 
488 women actually appeared for registration. 

Another element which had to be taken into consideration was the fact 
that 14 less degrees were conferred upon women in June, 1923, than on the 
previous Commencement. 

This year there were in all 550 candidates for the 105 undergraduate 
places, as against 457 a year ago. Eight candidates made a place on the 
preferred list through the College Entrance Board examinations, the other 
70 being selected after a canvass of the entire group. 

The competition has become so severe that candidates with gilt-edged 
credentials arc by no means assured of admission. On my first reading 
of the credentials I found 118 candidates who seemed to be of the very first 
order of merit. Another member of the Committee found 150. The process 
of reducing these numbers to 70 seemed to the Committee more difficult 
than at any previous selection. 

The women candidates for graduate standing numbered 63* as against 
65 on September 1, 1922. (The selection was made a month earlier this 
year.) A count of the men on August 1st showed 452 accepted candidates 
for the limited group, as against 361 at the same date last year. In the 
case of the limited group for men, a shrinkage of 20% is also allowed for, 
the eligible list reaching to 550. This means that the list for the coming 
October will be filled much earlier than last year, possibly by September 
1st at the latest. [As a matter of fact, the limit was reached August 16th. 
except for the 25 places which were by faculty regulation saved until after 
the September examinations.] 



Report of the President 27 

Attendance 

The total enrolment for the year was 3,503, including summer 
registration, 44 more than in 1921-22. By major departments 
these were distributed as follows: 

Anatomy 

Applied Mathematics 2 

Bacteriology and Experimental Pathology 6 

Biology, School of 2 

Botany 20 

Chemistry 126 

Gassical Literature. 30 

Economics 346 

Education — J 232 
— Graphic Art \ 

Engineering — Civil 52 

— Electrical 15 

— Mechanical 115 

English 132 

Food Research 4 

Geology 109 

Germanic Languages 8 

History 106 

Law — Professional | 250 
— Pre -Legal J 

Lower Division r: 1527 

Mathematics 23 

Medicine 139 

Military Science and Tactics 1 

Mining and Metallurgy 45 

Philosophy 11 

Physics 12 

Physiology and Histology 20 

Political Science 35 

Pre-Clinical 23 

Pre-Medical 29 

Pre-Nursing 3 

Psychology 30 

Romanic Languages — French | oc 

— Spanish J 

Zoology — 18 

— Entomology 8 



Total ^3564 



* From this total, deduct 61 registered as majors in two departments and therefore 
counted twice. 



28 Stanford University 

* Inter- Fraternity Agreement 

The construction of Branner Hall under the plan financed by 
the Board of Athletic Control, together with that of Toyon and 
the Encina Dining Halls, has brought up clearly during the year 
the question of putting into full operation the first year residence 
rule, which has been a policy of the University for some years. 
In the past it has not been possible for all entering students to live 
in the dormitories because of the increase in the number of stu- 
dents and the presence of a considerable number of Federal Voca- 
tional Board students admitted beyond the ordinary limitation as 
to number. This has made the crowding of three men in many of 
the dormitory rooms inevitable. The fraternity houses located 
on the university campus have housed several hundred men for a 
number of years. 

The Inter-Fraternity Council, which is made up of representa- 
tives of all resident fraternities, has been carefully considering the 
method of selection of new members so that the different chapters 
could better coordinate their activities with those of the Univer- 
sity. The selection of first year students by fraternities during the 
first few days or weeks of their college course has proved most 
unsatisfactory. To select members of a perman€;nt organization 
upon short notice and before these new members have established 
their position in the community has brought about a large problem 
for the fraternities and has had much to do with the fact that the 
average fraternity scholarship standard is lower than that of the 
general student body of the University. 

The Inter-Fraternity Council, after careful analysis, has come 
to an agreement to make elections of members of the first year 
class during the third quarter at a time when both new and old 
students have a good knowledge of each other and when the new 
student has established his scholarship record and shown that he 
can stay in the University. Following out this plan Encina Hall 
has been made a dormitory for new students. With the beginning 
of the next academic year the plan of the Board of Trustees of 
some years ago will thus for the first time go into full effect. This 
will provide a good room for each new student upon arrival, to- 
gether with satisfactory eating facilities. 

Statement of the Inter- Fraternity Council 
The principal points in the new rushing system are two closed periods — 



Report of the President 29 

the entire autumn quarter and most of the spring quarter — limited rushing 
during the winter quarter, and pledging at the end of the second week of the 
spring quarter. 

The isolation periods of the accepted rushing system will be closed to all 
dating and rushing ; natural contact on the Quad will be allowed only. The 
intention is to make winter quarter rushing as simple as possible. Freshmen 
can be rushed Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday noons and nights, and Sun- 
day noon. This will allow the freshman seven dates a week. The period 
will continue through to the second Saturday of the spring quarter. No 
silent period will follow ; bidding will be conducted by the fraternity lawyer 
the next day, Sunday. The system embraces new freshmen and transfers 
with less than eighty hours of credit. 

The scheme is based on the assumption that it will be of benefit to the 
University and all concerned if the freshmen live together during the first 
months without interference of fraternity rushing and house duties. This, 
the Council believes, can be accomplished without harm to the fraternities. 
The long system of rushing will work in greatest harmony with the Uni- 
versity's new plan for the housing of freshmen in Encina. The fraternities 
believe that this system will not only be to the best advantage of the Uni- 
versity, but will stimulate freshmen to work harder than under a short 
scheme. The freshman who desires to join a fraternity will naturally realize 
that he will have to go on more than his prep school reputation. This in- 
centivfl should be of value to athletics and other campus activities. 

The purpose of bidding in the early spring quarter is to keep fraternities 
from rushing hard near finals, which would follow if pledging occurred at 
the end of the winter quarter. Spring pledging also gives the freshman an 
opportunity to make up his mind at leisure, and affords the chance of talk- 
ing matters over with his family. 

This rushing system will be explained at an assembly in Encina next 
year to the new freshman class. Responsibility for the observance of rules 
will rest with every freshman as well as with every fraternity; the fresh- 
man who violates any regulation will be held to account. 

Scholarships 

The following scholarships were established during the year: 

E. W. Hopkins Scholarships. Through the gift of Mr. Hop- 
kins, of San Francisco, of the sum of $25,000, five scholarships 
of $250 each are made available for needy students, beginning 
with the fall of 1923. 

Journalism Scholarship. By the anonymous gift of $250, a 
scholarship in journalism was maintained during two quarters of 
the academic year 1922-23. 

Alumni Scholarship. Through the gift of a group of alumni 
of the sum of $500, an alumni scholarship is available for the 
academic year 1923-24. The donors are to nominate the holder of 
the scholarship. 



30 Stanford University 

Charles Andrews Huston Memorial Scholarship. In memory 
of her husband Mrs. Margaret Huston has established a scholar- 
ship of $150, to be known as the Charles Andrews Huston Me- 
morial Scholarship. This scholarship is open to law students. 

Tuition Scrip 

By action of the Board of Trustees, under date of March 30, 
1923, the President of the University was authorized to issue 
tuitiqn scrip to supervising school teachers at the rate of $25.00 
per half year per practice student supervised. This tuition scrip is 
to be available for use at any time, provided entrance to the 
University is secured on the usual basis. This scrip is not to be 
transferable. 

The William Roberts Eckart Research Fund for 

Mechanical Engineering 

This fund, which for the academic year 1923-24 is to yield 
$600, was established by Professor W. R. Eckart, of the Depart- 
ment of Mechanical Engineering, together with his mother, two 
brothers and sisters, as a memorial to his father, William Roberts 
Eckart, to foster and encourage experimental research in mechan- 
ical engineering and to interest, assist and inspire young men who 
have shown ability to conduct such work. 

The fund is to be administered by a committee consisting of 
the full professors of the Department of Mechanical Engineering, 
with the executive head of the department as chairman ; and to be 
devoted to the following purposes : 

1. The purchase of special apparatus, equipment, or tools 
necessary for the purpose of any investigations or researches, par- 
ticularly those of students. All such apparatus to become the prop- 
erty of the Mechanical Engineering Department and to be added 
to the research equipment of the department and to be reserved 
for that purpose only. 

2. For any necessary and legitimate expenses required for the 
successful conduct of any investigation, of which the committee 
may approve. In this connection it is not the intention or purpose 
to apply it towards any living or other personal expenses of the 
investigators or as a recompense for them for work carried out in 
the conduct of the research, as it is desired to emphasize as much 
as possible the spirit of doing such work for the reward which 



Report of the President 31 

conies to one from the knowledge of a completed investigation, 
well done. 

Besides this fund, Professor Eckart and the members of his 
family have presented to the Department of Mechanical Engineer- 
ing the engineering tools and instruments used by his father, who 
was an engineer of note. This equipment contains a precision lathe, 
a mifling machine for small work, together with a complete set of 
attachments and a large number of special tools for work of 
extreme precision. These tools are to be housed in a special room 
and reserved for the use of such graduate students or members of 
the faculty of the department as may be engaged upon researches 
of such a nature as to require the need of these tools for the 
construction of special apparatus. 

Gifts 

On behalf of the University I wish to record here our grateful 
appreciation of the many and valuable gifts which it has been our 
privilege to receive during the year. They are listed below. , 

GENERAL ^ ,-. 

For Endowment Fund : 

For the First Million, $764,431.92 pledged, $221,680.85 received. 

For the Second Million, $15,439.00 pledged, $4,761.60 received. 

For the Third Million, $407,481.50 pledged, $212,169.58 received. 

Unassigned, $2,435.00 pledged, $910.00 received. 
From Mr. Herbert Hoover ('95), of Washington, D. C, additional material 

for the Hoover War Library. The total amount now received on this 

gift is $58,629.17. 
From Mr. Caspar W. Hodgson ('96), of New York City, bronze bust of 

Dr. Jordan, by Cartaino Scarpitta. 
From the people of Belgium, in appreciation of Mr. Hoover's work in 

connection with the Commission for Relief of Belgium, statue of Isis. 



y 



FELLOWSHIPS AND SCHOLARSHIPS 

From Mr. E. W. Hopkins, of San Francisco, $25,000 for the establishment 

of the E. W. Hopkins Scholarships. 
From Mr. John T. Cooper ('04), of Los Angeles, $900 to be added to the 

Memorial Scholarship fund. 
From Mr. Carl A. Lantz (ex-'08), of Pachuca, Hidalgo, Mexico, $600 to 

be added to the Memorial Scholarship fund. 
From Professor Lionel Remond Lenox, of Stanford University, $600 for 

the maintenance of the Lionel Remond Lenox Fellowship in Chemistry 

for the academic year 1922-23. 



\ 



32 Stanford University 

From Mr. Ira S. Lillick (*97), of San Francisco, $500 for the maintenance 
of the Ira S. Lillick Scholarship in Law for the academic year 1922-23. 

From Mrs-. Ira S. Lillick, of San Francisco, $500 to maintain the Mrs. 
Ira S. Lillick Scholarship in Law for the academic year 1922-23. 

From Miss Emma Louise Martin ('97) and her sister, of New York City, 
$500 for the maintenance of the Mabel Hyde Cory ('96) Scholarship in 
History for the academic year 1922-23. 

From Miss Elizabeth M. Braly (ex-'96), of Pasadena, $300 to maintain 
the Bertha Hyde Braly ('97) Scholarship for the academic year 1922-23. 

From an anonymous donor, $250 for a Scholarship in Journalism for the 
academic year 1922-23. 

From a group of alumni^ $250, the first instalment of a scholarship of $500 
to be known as an Alumni Scholarship, available for the academic year 
1923-24. 

From Mrs. Lillian C. Metz. of Sherman, Texas, $200 for the maintenance 
of the Dorothy Metz ('17) Scholarship for the academic year 1922-23. 

From Miss Gertrude M. Gardiner, of Stanford University, $200 to maintain 
the (iertrude M. Gardiner Scholarship for the academic year 1922-23. 

From Mr. George E. Crothers ('95), of San Francisco, $200 for the main- 
tenance of the Crothers Law Scholarship. 

From Mme. Jeanne R. Rouiller, of Palo Alto, $160 to maintain the Marcelle 
Henriette Rouiller Calley (*16) Scholarship for the academic year 
1922-23. 

From Mrs. Ray Weaver Persson ('13), of Turlock, $150 for the main- 
tenance of the William Irvin Weaver (*13) Scholarship for the academic 
year 1922-23. 

From Mr. and Mrs. Allan Love, of Prescott, Arizona, $150 to maintain the 
Ernest A. Love ('18) Scholarship for the academic year 1922-23. 

From Mrs. Alice Nagel McDowell ('07), of Los Altos, $150 for the 
maintenance of the Roble Club Scholarship for the academic year 
1922-23. 

From Mrs. Margaret Huston, of Stanford University, $150 for the estab- 
lishment and maintenance of the Charles Andrews Huston Memorial 
Scholarship for the academic year 1923-24. 

From Mrs. Dorothy Davy Gross ('16), of San Jose, $150 for the main- 
tenance of the Wilmer J. Gross ('16) Scholarship for the academic 
year 1922-23. 



ALUMNI SECRETARY'S OFFICE 

From alumni $500 for expenses connected with the collection of biographical 
data. 



APPOINTMENT OFFICE 

From the estate of Mr. Robert F. Stever (ex-'13), $250 to assist the 
Appointment Office in obtaining positions for graduates and students of 
the University. 



Report of the President 33 

From Mrs. Charles M. Woods, of Menlo Park, $178 for the equipment fund. 
From Mrs. F. A. Zane, of Woodside, $20 for the equipment fund. 
From Mrs. Charles Bundschu, of San Francisco, $10 for the Robert F. 
Stever Loan Library. 



DEAN OF MEN'S OFFICE 
From alumni $525 for the Dean of Men's Alumni Fund. 



LANE MEDICAL LIBRARY 

From Dr. J. Underwood Hall, of San Francisco, 600 bound volumes and 

200 unbound volumes. 
From Dr. James W. Ward, of San Francisco, 1,775 bound volumes and 

2,200 unbound volumes. ' 



LAW LIBRARY 

From Stanford Law Association $2;525.78 in cash and pledges for the estab- 
lishment of the Charles Andrews Huston Memorial Book Fund. 

From Stanford Chapter, Delta Chi, 232 volumes law books, valued at $600. 

From the 1911 Juris Doctor Class Fund, purchase of 15 volumes on the 
subject of legal history. 

From Miss Frances E. Short (*02), of Palo Alto, 14 volumes law books. 

From Mr. W. H. Smith, of Palo Alto, 4 volumes law books. 



LIBRARY 

From Dr. David Starr Jordan, of Stanford University, 306 volumes on 

war and peace. 
From Mr. J. C. Cebrian, of San Francisco, 20 volumes of Spanish books. 
From an anonymous donor, $50 for the purchase of documents. 
From Mr. Caspar W. Hodgson ('96), of New York, de luxe edition of 

Dr. Jordan's "The Days of a Man." 
From Professor W. F. Durand, of Stanford University, binding in Morocco 

of 34 volumes of the documents of the Paris office of the Research 

Information Service, donated by him last year. 



MUSEUM 

From Mrs. Robert M. Loeser, of San Francisco, collection of etchings and 
prints to be known as the Robert M. Loeser Collection. 

From Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Oldroyd, of Stanford University, collection of 
Colonial furniture. 

From the estates of Este Coffinberry and Maria Coffinberry Richard, col- 
lection of 150 pieces of Dresden and Missem ware. 

From Mr. W. A. Mills, Indian articles. 

From Mrs. J. E. Roelkcy, old dagger. 



34 Stanford University 

From Miss Clara S. Stoltenberg, of Stanford University, hand-knitted bag 
two hundred years old. 

From Mrs. Samson, of San Francisco, old Japanese hand-woven silk hand- 
kerchief. 

From Assistant Professor Laurence Becking, of Stanford University, col- 
lection of plaster casts. 

From Miss Laura Harlow, of Oakland, piece of Plymouth Rock. 

From Mr. George F. Morell ('04), of Palo Alto, collection of California 
Indian stone mortars and pestles. 

From Mrs. C. A. Cowing, of Palo Alto, early American articles. 

From Mr. M. M. Wild, of Palo Alto, Civil War uniforms. 

From Mr. and Mrs. George Oldroyd Sillence, collection of American 
Colonial articles. 



BOTANY 

Gifts to the Dudley Herbarium were as follows : 
Mr. E. L Applegate, 2 specimens of Oregon plants. 
Dr. Baer, 5 specimens of California plants from Elsinore. 
Mr. Philip Baxter, 3 specimens from Tuolumne County. 
Mr. R, V. Bra<(shaw, 1 specimen of cultivated plant. 
Mr. Brighton C. Cain, 1 specimen from Utah. 
Mr. R, J. Dobbs, 2 specimens from Los Angeles County. 
Mr. Bryan Duncan, 155 specimens from Tulare County. 
Mr. Carl D. Duncan, 5 specimens of cultivated and local plants. 
Mr. R. S. Ferris, 150 miscellaneous California plants. 
Mrs. Adele Lewis Grant, 22 specimens of California mimuli. 
Mr. Magnus Gregersen, 6 specimens from Santa Barbara County. 
Mr. Leslie L. Haskin, 1 specimen from Brownsville, Oregon. 
Mr. R. L. Hamilton, 1 specimen from Northern Kern County. 
Dr. D. S. Jordan, 2 specimens from Japan. 
Mr. Leslie Kiler, 1 specimen of cultivated plant. 
Dr. P. A. Munz, 1 specimen from Southern California. 
Mrs. G. R. Purnell, 1 specimen from Butte County. 
Mrs. B. M. Rice, 1 specimen from San Diego. 

Mr. C. P. Smith, Zl miscellaneous plants from Oregon and Washington. 
Dr. O. L. Sponsler, 1 specimen of Pinus balfouriana from Mt. Whitney. 
Miss Margery Swabey, 3 specimens of local plants. 
Mr. Munch Van Wolbeck, 250 specimens of Mexican ferns. 
Miss Elsbeth E. Zschokke, 1 specimen of local plant. 



CIVIL ENGINEERING 

From the Central Foundry Company, of New York City, material for test 
purposes, valued at $150. 



CLASSICAL LITERATURE 

From Mr. H. W. Dunlop, of Palo Alto, small collection of Greek and 
Roman coins. 



Report of the President 35 

ECONOMIC BIOLOGY 

From the Botanical Institute of Berlin-Dahlem. representative collection of 
substitute fibres and dye plants. 



EDUCATION 

From Professor E. P. Cubberley, of Stanford University. $250, the fourth 
instalment in the maintenance of the research fellowship in problems relat- 
ing to school administration. 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

From an anonymous donor, $700 for equipment. 

From Mr. Frank G. Baum ('98), of San Francisco, $100 for equipment. 



ENGLISH 



From friends of the late Irene Hardy, $508.44 to establish the Irene Hardy 
prize for English verse. 



FOOD RESEARCH INSTITUTE 
Through Dr. A. E. Taylor, $2,000 for the book fund. 



GEOLOGY 



From Mrs. Gretchen Schulte, of San Francisco, collection of 5,000 specimens 
of shells, containing 969 species. 



HISTORY 



From the Colonial Dames of America, resident in the State of California, 
$100 for the Colonial Dames Scholarship awarded for work in Colonial 
Historv. 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

From Professor W. R. Eckart, of Stanford University, and the members 
of his family, the engineering tools and instruments, valued at $4,000, 
used by his father, William Roberts Eckart, and a fund of $600 per 
year to establish and maintain the William Roberts Eckart Research 
Fund in Mechanical Engineering. 

From C. F. Braun and Company, of Alhambra, evaporator of a special 
t}^^, valued at $2,000. 



36 Stanford University 

MEDICAL SCHOOL 

From Mr. John D. Rockefeller, Jr., of New York City, $10,000 for work 

on insulin. 
From an anonymous donor, $300 in support of a fellowship in physical 

therapy for the academic year 1923-24. 



PSYCHOLOGY 



From Professor L. M. Terman, of Stanford University, $250, the fourth 

instalment in the maintenance of the research fellowship in the study 

of psychological and educational problems relating to gifted children. 
Through Professor Terman, $1,600 for the study of gifted children, under 

the second grant from the Commonwealth Fund. 
From Mrs. J. O. Gantner, of San Francisco, $75 for the study of gifted 

children. 
From Mr. A. G. Tod, of Cloverdale, $25 for the study of gifted children. 
From the Carnegie Institution of Washington, special equipment used by 

Professor W. R, Miles at the Nutrition Laboratory. 
From the National Research Council, Washington, D. C, $300 for Dr. C. P. 

Stone's research work during the academic year 1922-23. f 
From the National Research Council, $900 for Dr. Stone's research work 

during the academic year 1923-24. 



ROBLE GYMNASIUM 
From an anonymous donor, $50 for Dr. Clelia D. Mosher's research work. 



ZOOLOGY 
Entomology and Bionomics 

From Sperry Flour Company, of San Francisco, $700 for the maintenance 

of the Sperry Scholarship for the academic years 1922-23 and 1923-24. 
From the Carnegie Institution of Washington, $500 a year for two years 

for Miss M. I. McCracken's investigations. 
From Mr. F. W. Nunenmacher, of Piedmont, 3,000 specimens of diptera 

and hymenoptera. 
From Mrs. Louisa Mueller and Mrs. J. M. Lalor, of San Mateo, 2,500 

specimens of butterflies and moths, with cases for same. 



The departmental and other special reports follow. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Ray Lyman Wilbur, 

President. 
December 31, 1923. 



Report of the Treasurer Z7 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER 

OF STANFORD UNIVERSITY FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 

ENDING AUGUST 31, 1923. 

To THE Honorable Board of Trustees 
OF Stanford University: 

The Treasurer herewith submits the following report for the period 
beginning September 1, 1922, and ending August 31, 1923. The statements 
in the attached tables give a complete picture of the financial condition of 
the University and show a gratifying development of the University's 
financial resources. 

During the year the Investment Committee has been making a careful 
study of the bonds held by the University with the plan of making sales 
and new purchases in such a way that the University's income and capital 
both may be increased. During this period there has been an addition of 
over $25,000.00 to the endowment capital of the University through these 
operations and an increase of several thousand dollars in the income. 

Timothy Hopkins, 
Treasurer. 
December 31, 1923. 



Report of the Treasurer 



39 



Index to Treasurer's and Comptroller's Financial Tables 



Schedule 

Assets — Investment — Analysis of E 

Balance Sheet — General A 

Balance Sheet — Divisional Al 

Balance Sheet — Current A2 

Bonds — Detail — Schedule of S 

Capital Increase Since Endowment — Analysis N 

Corporate Stock — Schedule of T 

Dividends T 

Expenditures — Analysis of I 

Educational Plant Assets — Detail of L 

Endowments and Restricted Funds — Schedule of M 

Gifts — Received and/or Expended P 

Hospitals — Income and Expenditures G 

Income — Analysis of F 

Income — Summary of Expend, and Surplus — Current B 

Income from Special Funds — Schedule of P 

Investment" — Lands, Buildings, Equipment O 

Lands, Buildings and Equipment — Investment O 

Medical Division, S. F. — Income and Expenditures ... G 

Operations of Miscellaneous Income Units Jl 

Press — Departmental Operations Jl 

Plant Investment L 

Real Estate and Improvements O 

Scholarships P 

Securities S 

Stocks T 

Student Loans — Schedule of X 

Surplus B 



Page 

44, 45, 46 

40, 41 ; 78, 79 

42, 43; 80, 81 

82,83 

52-63 

50 

64 

64 

89-94 

97-102 

47, 48, 49 

103-108 

88 

86,87 

84,85 

103-108 

51 

51 

88 

95,96 

95 

97-102 

51 

103-108 

52-63 

64 

109 

84,85 



40 



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Stanford University 



SCHEDULE A-l 
Divisional Balance Sheet as at August 31, 1923 



CURRENT ASSETS (Sch. A-2, pp. 82, 83) 



Cash 

AccouDtfl Receivable 

Securities 

Miscellaneous _ 



Total 



Total 



$325,234.53 
309,013.50 
182.374.83 
206,930.22 



$1,063,601. IC 



mVESTMENT ASSETS (Sch. E, pp. 44-46) 



Cash - 

Securities 

Lands, Buildings and Equipment (Sch. O, p. 51). 

Miscellaneous _— - 

Inter-Divisional Accounts 



Total 



$ 32,798.51 

23,265,394.73 

2,642,304.91 

11,716.85 

1.627,554.57 



Total _: - $27,579,760.57 



EDUCATIONAL PLANT ASSETS 



Total 



Land _ _ _ 

Buildings and Structures. 

Equipment 

Improvements ._- — . 

Unsegregated 



Total - 

Less: Investment Funds Assets Included In Educational Plant Assets. 



$ 125.121.54 
7,961.065.82 
2,064,841.74 
619,330.33 
1,274,278.70 

$12,044,628.1:1 
2,265,006.52 



(Sch. L, pp. 97-102) Total I $9.779,619.«1 



Report of the Treasurer 



43 



SCHEDULE A-l 
Diviiioiial Balance Sh«et as at August 31, 1923 



CURRENT LIABILITIES (Soh. A-2. pp. 82. 83) 



Current .— 

Oth<»r Liabilities 

Special Funds 

InterDlTislonal Accounts 
Current Funds Surplus — 



Total 



Total 



185,728.43 

17.591.24 

344,355.00 

625.656.80 

10,271.54 



fl.063,603.10 



INVESTMENT ENDOWMENTS 



Unrestrict^ Endowments (Scb. M, pp. 47-49) 

Restricted Endowments (Sch. M, pp. 47-49) 

Bestrtcted Special Funds (Sch. M, pp. 47-49) 

Capital Increase Since Endowment (Sch. N, p. 50). 



Total 



921,207,207.91 

1.912,689.97 

394,086.97 

3.975,784.72 



Total -- - - 127,579,769.57 



EDUCATIONAL PLANT FUNDS 



Total 



Educational Plant Capital Acquired Through 61ft (Sch. M. Dp. 47-49) I f4.289.814.21 

Educational Plant Capital, Derived from Current Funds i 4,487,907.(1^ 

Endowment Funds Borrowed Expended on Educational Plant ' 1,001,897.77 



Total 



19,779,610.61 



44 



Stanford University 



SCHEDULE E 
Analyats of Investment Atseta as at Aufust 31, 1923 



DESCRIPTION 



Total Unrestricted 



Total Cash In Bank. 



SECURITIES—UNRESTRICTED (Sch. S, pp. 52-63) 
Bonds 

Railway — 

Street and Intenirban 

Other Public Utility. 

Federal, State, and Municipal 

Other Bonds 



Total 

Bond Premium and Discount— General. 



Corporate Stocks (Sch. T, p. 64). 

Mortgage Loans— Real Bftate 

City — 

Country _ 

Campus 



Discounts on Mortgages. 



Loans ._. 

Contracts of Sale 

Contracts of Sale— Faculty Housing Fund. 



Total Securities Unrestricted. 



Detail 



Total 



CASH IN BANK— UNRESTRICTED 
Cash in Bank— Commercial 

Union Trust Company— New Endowment 



$ 32,796.31 



$ 32,796.51 



f 32,798.51 



I 

114,663,700.00 ' 

618,000.00 

1,662,000.00 

506,600.00 

1,792,251.00 



$19,042,451.00 I 

89,167.27 < $19,131,606.27 



1,270,369.60 

607,162.23 

92,519.70 



$1,870,061.63 
— 10,620.00 



1,869.481.53 

*269,8S6.03 
762,514.44 
237,823.08 

$22,321,413.35 



*Board of Athletic Control— BasketbaU Pavilion 6% Int $ 92,460.90 

Sequoia Club 6% Int 266.25 

Palo Alto Stock Farm 5% Int 747.06 

Palo Alto Hospital 6% Int. Principal, $2,500; Interest, $25 2,525.00 

Board of Athletic Control— Branner Hall 3% Int 178,837.83 $269,835.08 



Report of the Treasurer 



45 



SCHEDULE E 
Analysis of Investment Assets as at August 31, 1923 



DESCRIPTION 



SECURITIES— RESTRICTED (Sch. S, pp. 52-63) 
BoDds^L. C. Lane Medical Library Fund 

Railway 

Other Public UtIUty 

Other 



Premium and Discounts. 



Bonds— E. C. Converse Endowment Fund 

Other Public Utilities 

Other 



Premium and Discount. 



Bonds— T. W. Stanford Psychol, and Physic Endow. Fund 

Ralhray 

Other Public Utilities 

Federal, State, and Municipal 

Other 



Premiums and Discounts. 



Bonds— Leon Sloss Endowment Fimd 
Railway 



Bonds— Dr. Julia P. Larsen Memorial Fund 

Federal, State, and Municipal 

Premium and Discount. 



Bonds— Special Library Endowment 

Rallwsy 

Other 



Premium and Discount. 



Bonds— E. W. Hopkins Scholarship Endowment 

Other Public Utilities 

Premium and Discount 



Total Restricted 



Total Securities 



Detail 


Total 


$ 16,000.00 
70.000.00 
42,000.00 




$128,000.00 

— 3.i28.(rr 


$124,873.33 


$ 26,000.00 
25,000.00 




$ 51.000.00 
— 1,383.08 


49,616.92 


$200,000.00 

150,000.00 

400.00 

217,000.00 




$667,400.00 
— 26,318.10 


541,081.90 




6,000.00 


$ 750.00 
— 68.47 


$681.32 


$152^000.00 
50,000.00 




$202,000.00 
— 2,959.80 


199,040.20 


$ 25,000.00 
— 1.312.50 


23.687.50 


$943,981. a<) 




$23,265,394.73 



46 



Stanford University 



SCHEDULE B— Concluded 
Analytift of Investment Anets as at August 31, 1923 



DESCRIPTION 


Detail Total 

1 


LANDS, BUILDINGS AND EQUIPMENT— UNRESTRICTED 

Real Estate and ImproTements (Sob. 0, p. 51) 

Income Section Educational Plant - - 

Total Unrestricted 




$1,250,590.26 
1,387,368.67 




12,637,896.93 


LANDS, BUILDINGS AND EQUIPMENT— RESTRICTED 
Real Estate and Improvements 

L. C. Lane Medical Library Lands (Scb. O, p. 51) 

Total Restricted 




f 4,405.98 




t 4.40B.98 


• 

Total Lands, Buildings and Equipment u 


1 




$2,642,901.91 


MISCELLANEOUS 

Faculty House Construction 

Jewels 




$ 4,924.35 
6,792.50 






Total Miscellaneous 




$ 11,716.83 


INTER-DIVISIONAL ACCOUNTS 

Building Fund Loan - 

Due from Current Funds 

Due to Current Funds. 




$l,001.897.n 

628,642.02 

— 2.985.22 


Total Inter-DlTlsional 


1 

* 


$1,627,654.57 


Total Investment Assets.. 




$87,579,769.57 



Report of the Treasurer 



47 



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^ SCHEDULE N 

Deuils of Capital Increase Since Endowment for Year Ended August, 31, 1923 



Balance August 31, 1922. 



ADDITIONS 
Profits on Sale of 

Bonds _ 

Stock Liquidation Dividends 

Real Estate _ 

Adjustment of Bond Sales Profits 1922.. 



925,4$6.73 

8,737.88 

30,603.59 

2,959.78 



93,903,116.74 



Total A'dditions for Year 


167,767.98 
100.00 








DEDUCTIONS 
Nominal value of 7,274 shares of Oakland Water Front Devel- 
opment Co. Stock written off, as final liquidation dividend 
received _ _ . . _ - 








Net Inorease Durincr Year ..— . 




67,Wi7.9^ 






' Total for Year Ended Aug. 31, 1923 (Sch. A, pp. 40, 41).. 


13,975,784.72 



Report of the Treasurer 



51 



SCHEDULE O 
Lands. Building*, and Equipment— Invettment^Real Estate and Improvements for 

Year Ended August 31, 1923 



UNRESTRICTED 



Total 



City Property 
San Franciseo 

University Club Lot, Powell and California Sts. 
Univ. Club Bldg. and Improvemente, Powell and California St» 
Alameda 

Llewellyn Tract— 1 Block on Marsh 
Versailles Tract— 7 Blocks | 

Country Property 

Marin County I 

Undivided One-third interest In Shafter Ranch 
Colusa, Glenn and Madera Counties I 

Padllc Improvement Company 5/28th8 Tract j 

Butte and Tehama Counties i 

21,401.76 Acres Sheep Camp Unit 
640 Acres Section 34— Twp. 25 NRIE Tehama County 
Santa Clara and San Mateo Counties 
Adjacent to Palo Alto Farm 

Spring Valley Searsvilte Lake, 265.098 Acres 
Folger Tract Searsvllle Lake, 5.38 Acres 
Water Development— Sears viUe, etc. 
Nash Field Lot 78 

Lots 76 Strip between County Road and S. P. v.o. Tracks 
One-half of Lot 89, P. A. Farm 

.liSi Acres Lot 16 and Lot 15 of Stanford Week-end Acres 
Coon Tract 
Felt Tract 
Scale Tract Lot 39 
Felt Reservoir 

P. A. Farm and Improvements, Less $200,000 Valuation on 
Campus 

RESTRICTED 
Lane Medical Library Funds 

Folsom Street Lot— San Franciaco 
Total Lands, Bulkllngs and Equipment— Investment Section (Schs. 
A, pp. 40, 41, and A-1, pp. 42, 43, and E, pp. 44-40) 



$1,254,986.24 



52 



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64 



Stanford University 



SCHEDULE T 
Corporate Stocks for Ye«r Ended August 31, 1923 



Chicago, Rock Island A Paclflc Railway Go. 

400 Shares 7% Preferred 

1000 shares Common : 



American Cotton Company 

250 shares Preferred 

126 shares Common 



Chevy Chase Land Company 
187 shares ^ 



Oakland Water Front Company 

7,274 shares ..^.^..~ ~~.. 

Written off as final liquidation divi- 
dend received 



Paclflc Improvement Company 
2,500 shares 



Book Value 



$40,000.00 
20.000.00 



1.00 



100.00 



100.00 



160,201.00 



Dividends 

from Bam- 

ings Received 

During Year 

1922-23 



12300.00 



12,800.00 



Liquidation 

Dividends 

Received 



91,122.00 



7,«15.8S 



•18,787.88 



'Closed to Capital Increase Since Endowment. 



Report of the Comptroller 65 



REPORT of the COMPTROLLER 



To the Honorable Board of Trustees of Stanford University, and to the 
President of the University : 

The Comptroller herewith submits the following report covering the 
University's financial operations for the period beginning September 1, 1922, 
afid ending August 31, 1923: 

Detailed statements covering University assets and its financial operations 
for the year ending August 31, 1923, will be found in the tables hereinafter 
set forth. The following is a condensed statement of the more important 
schedules : 

Assets 

The total assets of the University, as of August 31, 1923, amounted 
to $36,815,43771. 

The total assets of the University may be classified as follows : 

Total Income Producing Assets » $26,134,589.85 

Qassified at follows: 

Cash (Excludes Current Division) $ 32,798.51 

Real Estate and Improvements 1,254,936.24 

Income Producing Educational Plant (Dormitories, 

HosptUls, etc.) 1,387,368.67 

Miscellaneous assets ~ „ 11,716.85 

Secukitibs: 

Railroad bonds 15,267,197.39 

Street and Interurban bonds 437,297.20 

Other Public Utilities 1 ,819,036.05 

Federal, State and Municipal 530,182.06 

Other bonds (Industrials, Foreign cities and • 

countries) 2,204,25 1 .80 

Stocks 60.201.00 

Contracts of Sale 1,000,337.52 

Mortgage Loans 1,859,431.53 

Unsecured Loans 269,835.03 



Total Current Division Assets $ 901,228.25 

including cash, accounts and interest receivable, etc., but excluding 
bonds of special funds that are included in income producing assets. 

Total Educational Plant Auets 9.779,619.61 

includes real estate, buildings, improvements, and equipment. 



ToUl Assets > $36,815,437.71 

Gains in investment funds for the year aggregate $779,700.57 of which 
the principal factors are summarized as follows : 

New Endowment, first million $137,876.84 

New Endowment, third million 182,492.79 

Special Library Endowment 200,000.00 

T. W. Stanford Endowment for Psychology and Psychic investigation 167,287.96 

Edward Whiting Hopkins Scholarship Endowment 24.531.25 



66 Stanford University 

9 

The average rate of return on all investments for the year ending 
August 31, 1923, was 4.39%. 

The average rates of return for the past seven years have been as 
follows : 

1917 3.876% 1921 4.307 

1918 4.13 1922 4.3075 

1919 4.35 1923 4.39 

1 920 4.26 

Financial Operations 

Total budget income for the year ending August 31, 1923, 

amounted to $2,048,968.91 

Total budget expenditures, exclusive of appropriations to the 
Building Loan Fund, Pension Fund, and other special funds, 
amounted to 1,885,589.83 

Resulting in a net income from operations of 163,379.08 

as compared with the previous year 94,358.14 

The appropriation to the Building Loan Fund Account from 

current income for the year ending August 31, 1922, was.... 100,000.00 
of which $24,706.96 represented interest and $75,293.04 
represented payment on account of principal. 

The appropriation for the Pension reserve for the same year was 8,220.00 

The net surplus from operations for the year ending August 

31, 1922, after making these appropriations was the sum of 2,510.00 

During the year ending August 31, 1923, the sum of $150,000.00, 
of which $40,419.97 represented interest and $109,580.03 pay- 
ment on account of principal, was appropriated to the liquida- 
tion of the Building Loan Fund Account, and the sum of 
$12,130.47 to the Pension Fund Reserve, leaving a net 
surplus from operations of 30,505.71 

Operations for the year ending August 31, 1921, resulted in a 

deficit of 41,211.45 

This was reduced to 32,606.21 

during the year ending August 31, 1922, and during this 
year has been fully liquidated. For the first time since 
1919 the University begins its annual operations with an 
accumulative surplus, which surplus amounts to 10,271.54 

Thus it will be seen that the University is now operating on a very sound 
financial basis, and that expenditures are being kept well within the available 
income, with a considerable margin to apply to the liquidation of the 
Building Loan Fund. 

The total budget income for the year ending Aug. 31, 1923, was 
derived from the following sources : 



Report of the Comptroller. 67 



Income Percentage 

Securities and other interest income $1,139,527.43 54.82 

Real EsUte 59,263.85 2.85 

Net income from income section of educational plant, 
consisting of dormitories, residences, and other in- 
come producing property on the campus, and the 

Stanford Hospital 50.307.32 2.42 

Rock crusher, discounts on purchases. Assembly Hall 

rentals, miscellaneous 9.410.40 .46 

Income from academic sources: 

From tuition fees $ 498,316.82 

From all other students' fees 131,856.62 



Total from all fees 630,173.44 30.31 

Student Guild Hospital 18,028.59 .87 

Medical School income: 

From profits on dispensary sales, and fees paid by 

clinical patients 36,165.81 1.74 

Miscellaneous income from fines. Museum admissions, 

sale of schedules, etc 10,585.66 .51 

Scholarships ^ 5,136.65 .25 

Research and fellowship funds 118.866.88 5.72 

Gifts for hospital free beds 1.14*9.73 .05 



$2,078,615.76 100.00 

Less — Restricted income added to principal of funds ... 29.646.85 



$2,048,968.91 

The total budget expenditures were distributed according to the purposes 
for which used, as follows : 

Tr£asukek's Office — 

Rent (Board of Trustees' and Treas- Detail T«>tnl 

urer's Office) $ l.SOO.On 

Salaries, Clerks, Stenographers (Treas- 
urer and Trustees receive no sal- 
aries) 4,565.00 

Expense 582.59 

Legal Expense 2,541.25 

Audit Expense - 1,665.99 

Taxes and Exp. Outside Properties 9.061.43 

Union Trust Co. — Custodian of Securities 3.500.00 



Total Budget Expenditures — 

Treasurer's Office $ 23.716.26 

Comptiollek's Office — 
Salaries (aside from those charged to 
expense of operating income units, 
such as dormitories, etc.): 
Accounting and General Staff....$ 37.470.04 

Purchasing Staff 2,860.00 

Engineer's Staff 5.764.41 $ 46,094.45 



Supplies and Expense: 

Accounting and General $ 4.554.07 

Purchasing 804.23 

Engineer's Office 1,024.55 $ 6.382.85 



68 . Stanford University 



Care and Maintenance of Educational 
Plant: 
Minor Repairs and Maintenance of 
Buildings: 

Campus ^ - $ 27.297.84 

Medical School— S. F ^ 3.027.26 

Hopkins Marine Sution 726.96 

Lane Medical Library— S. F 204.87 $ 31.256.93 

Janitor Expense: 

Campus and Hopkins Marine 

Sution $ 22,167.29^ 

Lane Medical Library— S. F 2.471.74 

Medical School— S .F 5.135.16 % 29.774.19 

Heating Expense: 

Campus % 43,845.61 

Medical School— S. F ! 4,544.02 

Lane Medical Library— S. F 1,523,99 

Hopkins Marine Station 110.56 % 50,024.18 

Maintenance of Grounds: 

General $ 35.283.97 

StreeU. Walks and Roads (Maim.) 4,238.52 % 39,522.49 

Light. Gas. Telephone (Undistributed): 

Light and Gas $ 2.885.88 

Telephone and Telegraph: 

Salaries $2, 1 70. 1 5 

Service 668.39 2.838.54 % 5.724.42 



Insurance (Undistributed) % 7.016.92 

Taxes on Campus and S. F. Educational 8,086.01 

Watchman 6.692.53 

Electric Light System 3.405.52 

New Plant Additions: 

Girls* Running Track $ 1,574.63 

New Roads 1,439.79 

University Library Shelving 3,508.06 

Lath House — Nursery 2,296.74 

Graphic Watt Meters at Sub- 
station »... 539.57 

Rectifier for Assembly Hall 

Projector 372.28 

Sunford Univ. Filling Station.... 2,226.11 

Sale of Old Stone —400.00 11,557.18 



(general Equipment and Furniture 1,948.69 

Payment of Interest Bldg. Loan Fund.. 40,419.97 

Amortization! of Bond Premiums 6,480.62 

General Expenses 3.307.74 

Palo Alto Farm. Taxes and Expense.... , 23,935.45 

Stores Keeping 7,306.20 

Corporation Yard (Undistributed Over- 
head) —1,138.36 

Fire Dept. Exp. and Minor Equip 7.597.02 

New Fire Engine 3.832.38 

Student Guild Hospital Expenses 13.197.79 



Total Budget Expenditures: 

Comptroller % 352,425.17 



Report of the Comptroller 69 



Academic Expenditures — 

Academic Departments (Salaries, Equip- 
ment and Expense) 1,509.448.40 

(Detailed below): 



Total Budget Expenditures...... $1,885,589.83 

AppEOPEiATioNS raoM Income — ^ 

Liquidation of Bldg. Fund Ix)an (Pay- 
ment on Principal) $ 109,580.03 

Basketball Pavilion Contribution 5.000.00 

Pension Fund 12,130.47 

Student Hospital Fund.... 4,830.80 

Reserved for New Press Equipment 1,332.07 

Total Appropriations from Income 132,873.37 



Total Expenditures and Appropria- 
tions $2,018,463.20 



Detail of Academic Expenoituees 

Administeative and Othee General Offices — 

President's Office $ 38,560.14 

Registrar's Office 40,650.34 

Appointment Secretary 10,990.75 

Publications Committee 4,352.00 

Public Exercise Committee 2,154.46 

Dean of Men 6,265.34 

Dean of Women 5,389.38 

Lower Division 387.09 

Alumni Secretary 7,007.50 

Research Committee 1,576.63 

Graduate Study Committee 5,000.00 122,333.63 



General Accoun 

Publicity $ 1,613.10 

University Scholarships 5,733.30 

Gift Scholarships... 9,017.35 

Pension Fund 17,869.53 

Convention Traveling Expenses and 

Membership Dues 7,929.08 

Gifts, Fellowships 600.00 

Loss on Operation of Lane Hospital 49,677.10 92,439.46 

Independent Departments and Divisions — 

University Libraries $ 96,062.82 

Lane Medical Library, S. F * 12,551.80 

Encina Gymnasium 46,1 18.74 

Roble Gymnasium 17,404.65 

University Museum 8,046.68 

Hopldns Marine Station 7,756.20 

Memorial Church 14.563.24 

Military Training 2.310.04 

Mimeograph and Stenog. Bureau — 388.06 

Mechanician Shop —399.75 204,026.36 $ 418,799.45 



70 ^ Stanford University 

Instruction and Rbseaich — Schools and Departments — 

School of Medicine 

Medical School, S. F $ 150,636.44 

Medical School — Gifts for 

Specific Research 4.019.10 154,655.54 

School of Law 48,306.49 

School of Education 46,555.37 

Engineering Group: 

Civil Engineering 35.294.43 

Electrical Engineering 21,134.73 

Mechanical Engineering 53,290.02 

Mining and Metallurgy 30,504.48 

Geology 34,776.31 174,999.97 

Biological Group: 

Bacteriology 23,369.65 

Botany 24,578.81 

Entomology 1,133.77 

Zoology 32,690.22 

Anatomy 30,889.32 

Physiology 28,789.93 141,451.70 

Languages — Ancient and Modern: 

English $ 68,870.15 

German 17,240.87 

Classical Literature 24,885.42 

Romanic 34,344.68 

Slavic 1,961.65 147,302.77 

History, Economics, Pol. Sci., and Cituenship: 

History $ 35,693.43 

Economics 40,898.49 

Political Science 14,729.83 

Citizenship 1,631.99 92,953.74 

Mathematics, Physics artd Chemistry: 

Applied Mathematics $ 22,843.30 

Mathematics 15,998.87 

Physics 34,754.38 

Chemistry 74,374.79 147,971.34 

Psychology and Philosophy: 

Psychology $ 40,118.22 

Philosophy 10,365.80 50,484.02 $1,004,680.94 

Food Reseakch Institute 62,662.63 

Special Contributions for Specific Research — 

Education : 

Stanford-Whittier Fund "..$ 2,285.07 

Stanford-State Fund 272.60 

Commonwealth Fund 17,694.01 

Japanese Fund 1.855.92 

Sex Research Fund 206.07 22,313.67 

Electrical Engineering: 

N. E. L. A. Insulator Test Fund .$ 18.00 

1916 Insulator Test Fund 7.00 25.00 

Mining and Metallurgy: 

Oil Industry 966.71 23.305.38 



Total Academic Budget $1,509,448.40 



Report of the Comptroller 71 

Grounds and Buildings 

New construction for the year has included the completion of Encina 
Dining Halls, Toyon Hall, and the partial construction of Branner Hall. 
The Encina Dining Halls consist of eight dining rooms grouped about a 
common kitchen and service room, and will accommodate 450 men. All 
freshmen will be required to eat here, and in addition some 100 upper 
classmen can be accommodated with club room service. The dining hall 
will be operated on a cooperative basis under the direction, of Miss Etta 
H. Handy, director of University dining halls, and a committee of students 
elected by the men who eat at the halls. Miss Handy will continue to act 
as director of the Stanford Union Dining rooms, and ultimately will have 
under her direction the dining halls at Branner and Roble Halls. At the 
beginning of the year 1923-24 the University will be operating Residence 
Hall dining rooms at Branner, Roble and Encina, with total accom- 
modations for 800 students. In addition to this the Stanford Union 
dining rooms, consisting of a public dining room and cafeteria, offer accom- 
modations for some 400 students and transients. 

Toyon Hall, with accommodations for 156 men, was completed in time 
for occupancy at the opening of the autumn quarter, October 1, 1923. and 
Branner Hall, with accommodations for 139 men, wiU be ready for occu- 
pancy January 1, 1924. 

Toyon Hall has no dining room. The men living in this hall will be 
accommodated at Encina Dining Halls and in the three cooperative eating 
clubs at the rear of Encina Hall. Upon the completion of Branner Hall, 
the University will have the following dormitory accommodations : 

For Women: Roble Hall, accommodating 208 

Old Jordan residence (for graduate women) 16 

Total 224 

For Men: 

Encina Hall, accommodating 456 

Sequoia, accommodating ISO 

Toyon, accommodating 156 

Branner, accommodating 139 

Stanford Union, accommodating 128 1,029 

Total ^ 1,253 

This number can be increased to 1,372 by continuing to accommodate 
some of the upper classmen in Encina Hall as is now being done. It is 
quite evident that even when Branner Hall is completed that the University 
will not have sufficient accommodations to house all men students, exclusive 
of fraternity men, for all the dormitories have waiting lists at present. 
For the present, therefore, it will be impossible to accommodate any of the 
men now living in fraternity houses, in any of the University dormitories. 

Stanford Union 

The Stanford Union, constructed at a total cost of $295,953.07, of 
which $100,000 was furnished by an anonymous donor, and the balance by the 
University, closed its first full year of operation on August 31, 1923, with 
a deficit for the year of $1,574.86. The following is a summary of items of 
income and expenses: 



72 Stanford University 

stanford union 

Statement of Income and Expenses 
Period Augubt 31, 1922, to August 31, 1923 
Income: 

Dining Rooms $142,149.85* 

Dormitories $ 14,857.94 

Shop Space 1,215.00 16,072.94 

Membership Dues 5,578.87 

Corporate Earnings: 

Fines 101.00 

Discounts 63.27 

Miscellaneous 23.24 

Store Earnings 9.84 197.35 

Total Income ! $163,999.01 

Expenses 

General $ 17.693.64 

Dining Rooms — 138,720.12 

Dormitories 9,160.11 

Total Expenses 165.574.87 

Net Loss $ 1,574.86 

Analysis of Peofit and Loss 
Net Loss from operation of Dining Rooma. . $10,074.82** 



»•• 



Net Gain from operation of Dormitories $ 2,723.74*^ 

Net Membership Dues 5.578.87 

Corporate Earnings 197.35 8.499.96 

Total Net Loss $ 1,574.86 

Notes : 

* Includes value of meals served employees. 

** Pfo rata of general expense $13,504.55. 

••• Pro rata of general expense $4,189.09. 

General expense includes four months' pro rata of change in building to accom- 
modate the cafeteria after removal from the original location in the old dormitory- 
building. 

Pursuant to the plan of concentrating all stores, and public eating places 
in the Union, the cigar and notion business formerly known as "Greens," 
has been taken over by tlie Union and is now operated in the front ground 
floor room of the old Union building. The lease held by Wilson's candy store 
and ice cream parlor also has been discontinued, and a modern, well-equipped 
ice cream parlor soon will be installed in the basement of the old Union. 
Both of these enterprises will be managed by the Board of Directors of 
the Stanford Union, and the profits derived from such business should 
enable the Stanford Union to show a profit during the coming year. 

Hospitals 

The Palo Alto Hospital, owned by and situated in the City of Palo 
Alto, is now being managed by the University for the City of Palo Alto. 
Dr. George B. Somers, Physician Superintendent of the Stanford Hospitals, 
is acting in a like capacity for the Palo Alto Hospital, and the accounting, 
maintenance of the physical plant and purchasing are handled by the 
Comptroller's office of the University. Many improvements to the plant 



Report of the Comptroller 73 

and service have been made and operations for the year ending June 50, 
1923, show a profit of $632.69. 

The advantage to the University of this arrangement is found in the 
fact that the Palo Alto Hospital gives special rates to Stanford students 
and relieves the University of the necessity of operating an infirmary, as 
IS done at most universities. 

The Isolation Hospital, situated at the rear of the Campus, is still 
maintained for the care of contagious cases. All students are charged a 
Guild fee of $2.00 per quarter, which is used partly to maintain the Isola- 
tion Hospital and partly to furnish a limited amount of medical and 
surgical services. The Guild Fund showed an operating gain of $4,830.80 
for the year, which amount has been credited to the Students' Guild 
Reserve Fund, which now amounts to $16,055.61, and is carried as a con- 
tingent reserve to meet emergencies due to a possible epidemic. 

The Stanford Hospitals made a greatly improved financial showing over 
the previous year, as will be seen from the following condensed statement 
of income and expenses: 

Staxfosd Hospital (Income Section) 

Income This Year Last Year 

Private Patients $378,638.46 $357,319.52 

Clinic Patients 30,645.70 23,863.15 

Nurses' Tuition Fees (50% of Total) 1,164.05 1,150.00 

Nurses* Alumnae Endowment 138.12 

Real Estate — 2209 Buchanan Street 690.00 



Total Income $411,276.33 $382,332.67 

Expenses 

Pro RaU— HospiUl Net Expenses $383,555.75 $382,047.16 

Income Over Expenses — Stanford Hospital 27,720.58 285.51 

Laxs Hospital 

Income 

Private Patients ....'...$ 47,789.05 $49,528.62 

ainic Patients 111.416.34 101,216.79 

Nurses* Tuition Fees (50% of Total) 1,164.05 1,150.00 

Nurses' Alumnae Endowment 74.38 

Special Diet Laboratory 15,752.55 

Real Estate — 2209 Buchanan Street 690.00 115.00 



Total Income $ 1 76,886. 37 $ 152,0 1 0.4 1 

Expenses 

Pro Rata HospiUl Net Expenses $222,951.05 $203,372.22 

Income Over Expenses — Lane Hospital . — $46,064.68 — $51,361.81 

Hospital Income Over Expenses — Combined . — $18,344.10 — $51,076.30 

University Press 

The University Press conducted a gross business of $111,393.50 for the 
year with a net profit of $5,315.52. Additional work for the Hoover War 
Library and the Food Research Institute has greatly increased the demands 
upon the bindery department and it is necessary that additional room be 
provided at once for this department. 



74 Stanford University 

Grounds 

During the past four years the University has been following a vcrj- 
definite scheme for the development of its grounds. The main features of 
the plan are as follows : 

1. Removal of the old bams, sheds and junk yard which centered chiefly 
in the area to the west and south of the Quad, and adjoining Roble Hall. 
In pursuance with this plan several barns and sheds of various de- 
scriptions have been removed, and during the past year the old Inn was 
moved from the corner at the right of the new library to the military' 
headquarters near the old football field, where it fits in nicely with the 
surroundings and has proven very useful. With the removal of the Inn. 
this phase of the plan has been completed. 

2. The planting of the areas immediately adjoining the University 
buildings, with shrubs and flowers and the planting of vines on some of the 
University buildings. The following items have been executed up to the 
present time: 

The barren space next to the ballustrades at the front of the Quad has 
been planted to cotoneaster and Crataegus and other shrubs which bear 
profuse clusters of orange and red berries, and which should make a 
splendid showing this fall. The grounds adjoining the Union, the front of 
the Library, the Bookstore corner, the front of the Art Gallery, and grounds 
adjoining Roble and Encina Halls, and the entrance to the campus, were all 
planted during the past two years. The space adjoining the clock tower, 
and the grounds around the Basketball Pavilion were planted during the 
past year. It is planned to improve the areas lying between the Quads and 
the Quad buildings by planting low-growing shrubs in the open spaces, 
thereby giving the effect of a green lawn without the expense incident to 
watering and caring for lawns. Material for all this planting has been 
raised in the University nurseries at a minimum cost, and all of the w^ork 
accomplished during the past three years has been carried out by Mr. Ivan 
Nyquist, University gardener and grounds foreman. 

3. The improvement of the area lying between the Quad buildings and 
the City of Palo Alto and commonly known as the Arboretum. Mr. 
Gardiner Dailey, a former Stanford student, and landscape architect, work- 
ing in cooperation with Professor LeRoy Abrams of our Botany depart- 
ment, and Mr. John McLaren, superintendent of Golden Gate Park, has 
completed detailed plans and sketches for a wonderful park and arboretum 
to be situated in this area. The many valuable trees already growing in the 
arboretum have been located and marked on accurate maps, and with these 
as a nucleus, all planting hereafter will be done scientifically and with a 
view both to the beautification of the grounds and to the development of a 
wonderful arboretum for scientific studies in botany and forestry. During 
the period when the areas immediately adjoining the buildings have been 
developed, the arboretum has been somewhat neglected. One advantage of 
the discontinuance of the intensive cultivation of the arboretum as formerly 
practiced, has been the renewal of beds of wild flowers which grew so 



Report of the Comptroller 75 

profusely in former years and which were practically eliminated by cultiva- 
tion. At present these flowers are being permitted to seed before the 
grass is cut as a fire- prevention measure. This year, for the first time in 
many years, large beds of lupines, Indian paint brushes, and other brightly 
colored flowers, made their reappearance.' Some of the half-dead fan palms 
along Palm avenue have been removed and it is planned to remove the 
remainder this year. Young live oaks are now being raised in the Univer- 
sity's nurseries and it is probable that some of these trees will be planted 
as avenue trees on Palm avenue in place of the fan palms. For the 
present, at least, the date palms will remain. It is hoped that some day 
there may be established at Stanford University in the area beginning at 
Palm avenue and continuing along the banks of San Francisquito Creek, to 
and including Searsville Lake, one of the greatest botanical gardens in the 
world. This area would have as a nucleus for such a garden our present 
arboretum, Lake Lagunita, Searsville Lake, an additional lake or reservoir 
yet to be constructed, and thousands of specimens of native trees, including 
redwoods, chaparrals, oaks, and laurels. Abundant water for such a garden 
could be obtained by the construction of a second reservoir below Searsville 
Lake. The soil conditions, with valley land, fertile hills, and even rugged, 
rocky mountains, would be ideal, and the climatic conditions unexcelled. 
The garden could be laid out along a highway running from the campus 
through the hills and along the banks of the lakes, connecting with the 
wonderful Skyline boulevard which is now being constructed along the 
ridge of the outer Coast Range from San Francisco to Santa Cruz. The 
whole scheme taxes the imagination, but it is entirely possible and feasible, 
provided funds can be found for its development. The project would be a 
wonderful asset to San Francisco and to the University, and would, no 
doubt, draw guests from all over the world. 

Accounting 

Under the direction of Mr. E. S. Erwin, University Accountant, the 
new accounting system has been further developed and improved and a 
more effective method of controlling and coordinating the various budgets 
has been devised. Monthly budget statements, covering the entire budget 
of the University and the various departmental budgets, have been rendered. 
Certain reductions in assessed valuations have been obtained which result 
in a saving of approximately $4,500.00 per year in taxes. Reduction in 
light and power rates also have been secured after considerable negotiation, 
and the University now enjoys the low rate of approximately .0121 per 
kilowat hour as against a former rate of .0212, resulting in a saving 
annually of approximately $9,000.00. A reduction in the price of fuel oil is 
reflected in the reduction of $11,500.54 in the cost of heating the University 
plant over the previous year. As a result of this, and other economies 
and savings, the actual expenditures under the Comptroller's budget were 
$21,860.52 less than the amount allowed in the budget. 

A. E. Roth, 

Comptroller, 



114 Stanford University 

BOTANY 

During the year classes have been conducted by Professors Abrams. 
Campbell and Peirce; Associate Professor Burlingame, and Assistant 
Professor McMurphy. 

Mr. Gardner A. Daily has prepared a planting plan of the Arboretum 
under the direction of Professor Abrams and Mr. Jchn McLaren. 

The Dudley Herbarium has been presented with 744 specimens by 
students, alumni, and friends. The mounted collections have been increased 
by 5,303 specimens and now total 128,929, exclusive of the Co'ptogamic 
collections. 

Professor Campbell has continued his studies on the Distribution of the 
Australasian Vegetation, some of the results having been published in a 
paper in the Scientific Monthly, and a series of papers in the American 
Journal of Botany. Further studies in plant distribution are being carried 
on, as well as embryological studies on a species of Equisetum, received 
from India. A paper on the development of a fern (Botrychium simplex) 
was published in the Annals of Botany. 

Professor Campbell has also directed the work of Miss Florence Billig. 
a graduate student, who is making a study of Eunnera material brought 
from New Zealand. This work is in preparation for a thesis for the Ph.D. 

Since finishing his part of the "General Biology," by Professors 
Burlingame, Heath, Martin, and Peirce, Professor Peirce has been occupied 
with his own "Physiology of Plants," which will also be published by 
Henry Holt & Company. Professor Peirce has also written reviews for 
"Botanical Abstracts," a cooperative enterprise of American botanists, 
which attempts to cover the current literature of the whole science. He 
also prepared for publication an essay of the late Professor Sedgwick of 
the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, on "Darwin and Pasteur," and 
wrote reviews and criticisms which have appeared in the usual journals. 
He has directed the work of students and revised for publication various 
technical papers by them and others. 

Professor Abrams has continued the preparation of an "Illustrated Flora 
of the Pacific States," the first volume of which was published during the 
year by the Stanford University Press. 

Associate Professor Burlingame has continued his genetical studies on 
Clarkia, a report of which was made to the section of Genetics at the 
meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 
Boston last December. During his stay in the east. Dr. Burlingame visited 
the genetics laboratories of the Universities of Michigan, Cornell, Columbia. 
Princeton and Cold Springs Harbor. 

Dr. Burlingame represented the Western Society of Naturalists at 
Boston. 

Besides classes in the Department of Botany, Dr. Burlingame has 
directed the course in General Biolc^gy, and has superintended the publication 
of the textbook on General Biology recently published. He has also ready 
for publication a textbook on "Elements of Practical Botany." 



Departmental Reports 115 

Assistant Professor James McMurphy has continued study of the local 
fungi and plant diseases, made additions to the mycological and phytopathoU 
ogical collections, and has started nursery stock that may be used in the 
study of diseases of Toyon, Evergreen Cherry and English Laurel, all of 
which have diseases similar to, if not identical with destructive diseases of 
orchard trees. 

Miss Flora Murray Scott has studied variegation in Vinca, etc. 

Miss Margaret Duff and Miss Marjorie Swabey worked on Bacterial 
gummosis of various trees, and have made a survey of the condition of the 
more important oaks on the campus, counting the annual growth-rings of 
such trees as opportunity afforded. 

Douglas Houghton Campbell, 
Professor of Botany. 



CHEMISTRY 



The teaching staff of the department for the present academic year 
consisted of Edward Curtis Franklin, Lionel Remond Lenox, John Pearce 
Mitchell, Robert Eckles Swain, Stewart Woodford Young, professors; 
Albert Frederick Germann, William Henry Sloan, assistant professors; 
Charles Doak Lowry, Jr., George Sutton Parks, Norris Watson Rake- 
straw, John Russell, instructors; and Ruth Vivia Fulton, Alanson Wood 
McDermoth, Laurence Francis Pratt, teaching fellows. Professor James 
Kendall of the Department of Chemistry of Columbia University was 
under appointment as Acting Professor of Chemistry here during the 
spring quarter, offering a lecture and a seminary course on advanced topics 
in inorganic chemistry. Professor Marie Reimer, head of the Department 
of Chemistry of Barnard College, was under appointment as Lecturer in 
Chemistry during the spring quarter, offering a lecture course in advanced 
organic chemistry. 

The Lionel Remond Lenox Fellowship was held by Oliver Wolcott 
Johnson (Stanford, A.B., '21, Engineer, *22) ; the John Maxson Stillman 
Scholarship, by Alan Campbell Richardson ; and the William Irvin Weaver 
Scholarship by Francis Albert Smith. 

The following brief reference is made to the research and other pro- 
fessional activities of the members of the staff, noting only those research 
topics in which substantial progress has been made during the year. 

Professor John Maxson Stillman, emeritus, has completed in manuscript 
form his extended studies on the Chemistry of the Ancients and has 
published a paper on "Petrus Bonus and Supposed Chemical Forgeries." 

Professor Lenox, with Miss A. R. Berger, has worked on the volumetric 
estimation of titanium in iron ores, slags, and steels. 

Professor Franklin has had in progress work of research on some 
ammono carbonic acids and their reactions in liquid ammonia, with W. L. 
Burdick; on carbonous nitrides, with R. N. Wenzel; on the molecular 
lowering of the freezing point in liquid ammonia solutions, with L. D. 
Elliott; on the fractionation of chaulmoogra oil, with T. Hashimoto; on 



116 Stanford University 

concentration cells in liquid ammonia, with Ruth V. Fulton; on hydrazoic 
acid as an oxidizing agent, with Qara Poppic; on the ammonolysis of 
mixed aquo ammonocarbonic acids, with J. S. Blair ; and on the preparation 
of carbonic anhydride and ammonide, with F. A. Smith. Professor Franklin 
was elected last autumn president of the American Chemical Society, a 
national organization of chemists with a membership at the present time 
of about fifteen thousand. In connection with his official duties, he has 
visited and lectured to most of the sections of the organization in this 
country during the past six months. He has also served this year as 
president of the Pacific Branch of the American Association for the 
Advancement of Science and as a member of the National Council of the 
association. 

Professor Young has undertaken work of research along various lines 
during the past year. Particular mention should be made of investigations 
with O. W. Johnson on the rate of combustion of gas mixtures ; with L. 
F. Pierce on a chemical study of the gases of an enclosed arc; with A. A. 
Patterson on the fusion of metals into metals; with W. A. Gilkey on the 
rate of calcination of limestone; with H. E. Likely on the oxidation of 
sodium sulphite; with C. O. Blackburn on high vacua distillation of oil 
shales ; and with K. S. Ritchie on the decolorizing power of sugar chars. 

Professor Swain completed papers for publication, in collaboration with 
Dr. Rakestraw, on the chemical composition of the milk and blood of the 
sea lion; and with R. J. Cross, on the distribution of amino acids in 
proteins of wheat and in blood fibrin from the whale, sea lion, and 
cryptochiton. He was lecturer and medallist at Columbia University under 
the Charles Frederick Chandler Foundation; served as a member of the 
Committees of the American Chemical Society on Progress in Society 
Procedure, and the Adoption of the Metric System, and as a member of 
the Commission on .Industrial Hygiene, created by the International Union 
of Pure and Applied Chemistry; and attended the Pasteur Centennial in 
Strasbourg, France, the centenary celebration of the Societe pour TEncour- 
agement de I'lndustrie de France in Paris as the representative of the 
American Chemical Society, and the International Congress of Chemistry 
at Cambridge, England, as a delegate of the National Research Council. 

Professor Sloan has studied, with L. H. Peirce, the reduction of barium 
sulphate on ignition ; and has continued his investigation of the underground 
waters of this peninsula, working with A. W. McDermoth and C. E. P. 
Gucrra on the relation between the electrical conductivity and the total solids 
in potable waters. 

Professor Germann has extended throughout the year the investigation 
of the properties of liquid phosgene, which was begun two years ago. He 
has studied with Q. W. Taylor its critical temperature and pressure; with 
K. A. Gagos the behavior of aluminum chloride and of other, compounds in 
liquid phosgene; and with L. R. Smith the limiting density of phosgene. 

Mr. Lowry spent the autumn quarter at Northwestern University continu- 
ing work already done at Harvard and here on the alkylation of delta 
ketonic nitrites and related pyridine derivatives. He has also studied with 



Departmental Reports 117 

F. Y. Chuck polyanthraquinonylamines and their derivatives; catalpa seed 
oil, with A. D. Livingston ; and limonene with Ruth D. T. Lee. 

Mr. Parks has continued his investigation of specific heats and heats 
of fusion, working especially on ethyl and iso-propyl alcohob. He has also 
undertaken work of research with J. R. Schwenck on some physical 
chemical properties of mixtures of ethyl and normal propyl alcohols ; with 
M. A. Bird on the melting point of organic liquids at low temperatures; 
with W. W. Winchester on some physical chemical properties of mixtures 
of normal and iso-propyl alcohols; and with Kenneth Kelley on the binary 
system: — ethyl and iso-propyl alcohols. 

Mr, Rakestraw has developed a new method for the quantitative estima- 
tion of phenols in blood, and has continued his work on the chemical factors 
in fatigue^ in addition to the work previously mentioned on the body fluids 
of the sea lion. With Florence O. Whittier, he has made a study of the 
biochemical effects of loss of sleep. Mr. Rakestraw has been granted a leave 
of absence for the next academic year for study at Yale University and 
abroad. 

Mr. Russell has undertaken work of research with W. E. Sullivan on 
the molecular volumes of certain binary systems with ether as one com- 
ponent ; with C. W. Rehfuss on the conductivity of solutions of hydro- 
bromic acid in ether; and with L. H. Peirce on the negative viscosity effect 
in salt solutions. 

It is with much regret that I record the resignation of Mr. Russell from 
his instructor ship here to accept an Assistant Professorship in Physical 
Chemistry at Western University, London, Canada. 

During the winter quarter Dr. Carl L. Alsberg of the Food Research 
Institute, at the request of this department, repeated the lecture course on the 
Chemistry of Nutrition which he had offered the previous year. 

Robert Eckles Swain, 

Professor of Chemistry. 



CIVIL ENGINEERING 

The work of the department of Civil Engineering has shown no marked 
changes over that of former years. The faculty has consisted of Professors 
Marx, Wing, and Fish, Associate Professor Cutter, who has handled the 
work in Descriptive Geometry, and Assistant Professors Moser and Thomas, 
with a number of student assistants. 

The decrease in the number of students in civil engineering, which was 
general in all technical schools last year and to which I formerly referred, 
seems to have been checked. 

As this is my last report as executive head of the department of Civil 
Engineering, I desire to thank you for the generous way in which you 
have always met the demands made upon you by the department. You 
have assisted us in solving our problems, both as ^regards teaching force 
and equipment, and have always consulted us in matters affecting the 
department. This broad policy has been appreciated by the present teaching 



118 Stanford University 

staff, and I am certain will be continued in the future to the advantage of 
all concerned. 

During the past year you called for a report from a special committee 
of the engineering faculties on the development of the engineering courses 
at Stanford University. This report, which represents the unanimous 
matured judgment of your committees, and which was carefully drafted 
after repeated conferences with the entire teaching force of all the depart- 
ments concerned (except that of Chemistry), was handed to you May 2» 
1923. It is our hope that it will be possible to follow the lines of develop- 
ment outlined in the report, and that financial support for this purpose can 
be had. 

Will you kindly express to the Board of Trustees, and accept for your- 
self my sincere thanks for what you have done for me personally* I regret 
that the official relation must end, but I shall always cherish the memory 
of our pleasant relations during so many years. 

Charles David Marx, 
Professor of Civil Engineering. 



CLASSICAL LITERATURE 

The faculty of this department consisted of Henry Rushton Fairclough 
and Augustus Taber Murray, professors; Jefferson Elmore, Benjamin 
Oliver Foster, Ernest Whitney Martin, associate professors; and Mildred 
Estus and Mrs. Hallie Watters, assistants in instruction. Mrs. Mary 
Webster Kraemer was assistant in instruction for the summer quarter. 

Dr. Murray has been absent on leave throughout the year in Athens, 
Greece, where he has served as Annual Professor in the American School 
of Classical Studies. Stanford University, being one of the institutions that 
contribute to the support of this School, enjoys the privilege of sending to 
it her graduates, without the imposition of fees, and Miss Hazel Dorothy 
Hansen (A.M., 1921) has been in attendance at Athens this year. She 
has recently been appointed to a fellowship in the School, and will therefore 
spend a second year of study in Athens. As Stanford enjoys similar 
privileges in the American Academy in Rome, where Dr. Fairclough was 
Annual Professor in 1910-11, graduate students from Stanford frequently 
spend a period of study there, and this year James Le Roy Dixon completed 
his work in Rome for the Stanford degree of Master of Arts, his thesis 
being "Development of the Trade Center of Ancient Rome." Another 
Stanford graduate, who has also spent a year in the American Academy 
in Rome, Miss Katharine Lummis (Ph.D., 1917) has recently been ap- 
pointed Dean of Women and Professor of Latin at Wells College, Aurora, 
New York. 

The successful merging of the two departments of Greek and Latin 
into a single department of Classical Literature enables the department 
faculty to pursue claslical work unhampered by artificial barriers unnec- 
essarily erected. Thus Professor Fairclough, whose chief study in earlier 
years was Greek rather than Latin, but who for some time past has been 



Departmental Reports 119 

Professor of Latin only, has during the past year conducted a Greek as 
well as a Latin seminary, and has lectured on Greek and Roman epics and 
Greek and Roman Archaeology as well as on New Testament Literature, 
Theocritus and Pindar. So, too, Professor Elmore, long identified with 
Latin alone, now gives courses in Greek History and Greek and Roman 
Aesthetics, while Professor Foster offers a course in Prose Fiction of 
the Greeks and Romans. Similarly Professor Martin, in such a course as 
Greek Myths, treats of the subject in Roman as well as in Greek literature. 
In thus recognizing the solidarity of Greek and Latin studies, the depart- 
ment is making an effort to interpret the spirit of ancient civilization and 
to exemplify its influence upon the modern world. And this effort is 
apparently appreciated, for though none of our courses are prescribed, but 
all are purely elective, we have had in the past year over twelve hundred 
students enrolled in our several classes. 

Professor Murray writes from abroad that he has completed his 
Homer for the Loeb Classical Library. This will make a work of four 
volumes of which Stanford may well be proud. Professor Foster is at 
work on the fourth volume of Livy for the same series. Professor 
Elmore is collaborating with Professor Oliver M. Johnston on a French 
Grammar in which the relations between French and Latin forms and 
syntax are discussed. Professor Fairclough, who attended the annual 
meetings of the American Philological Association and the Archaeological 
Institute of America last December at Yale University read papers before 
both organizations. One of these, The Poems of the Appendix Vergiliana, 
an outgrowth of the writer's Virgil in the Loeb Classical Library, has been 
published in the Transactions of the American Philological Association 
(vol. 53) and disproves the authenticity of these minor poems, which has 
recently been upheld by certain scholars. 

Professor Foster was honored by an invitation from the University of 
California to take charge of the Latin courses offered in their Summer 
Session this year. Our own summer work in Classical Literature was 
conducted by Professors Elmore and Martin, with the assistance of Mrs. 
Mary Webster Kraemer, who continued a course, first offered the previous 
summer, on Latin and Spanbh Forms and Syntax. The number of major 
students presenting themselves in the summer is steadily increasing, espe- 
cially for graduate work. For instance, Professor Elmore's seminary on 
Roman Municipal Institutions consisted of twelve graduate students, three 
of them being candidates for the Ph.D. degree, and one the holder of a 
Vassar Fellowship. 

Henry Rushton Fairclough, 

Professor of Classical Literature. 



120 Stanford University 

ECONOMICS 

During the academic year just closed the staff of the department has 
consisted of Murray Shipley Wildman, Walter Greenwood Beach, Eliot 
Jpnes and Albert Conser Whitaker, professors; John Maurice Clark 
(spring), Eliot Grinnell Mears (winter and spring), and James Edward 
LeRossignol (summer) acting professors; Joseph Stancliffe Davis and 
Alonzo Englebert Taylor, directors in the Food Research Institute; John 
Bennet Canning, assistant professor; Margaret Mulford Lothrop and 
Nathaniel Sanders, instructors; and W. Edwards Beach, Connell Clifford, 
Bernard F. Haley and Clinton Fiske Wells, teaching assistants. 

New appointments are announced of Harley Leist Lutz of Oberlin 
College, to a professorship, of Connell Clifford to an instructorship and 
of Philip M. Brown to an assistantship. Professor Lutz will offer instruc- 
tion in public finance, taxation, and economic and financial history. Mr. 
Clifford and Mr. Brown will offer courses in accountancy. 

The cooperative arrangements with the Food Research Institute and with 
the California Juvenile Research Bureau for the joint use of certain 
facilities by advanced students and for certain courses of instruction in 
common have yielded very gratifying results in their first year. Food 
Research Institute fellows and assistants may become candidates for 
advanced degrees in this department. For purposes of supervising thesis 
investigations and for passing upon the qualifications of such candidates 
Dr. Davis and Dr. Taylor are considered members of this department. 

During the spring quarter Professor J. M. Clark of the University of 
Chicago gave courses in economic theory and in overhead costs. These 
courses were for advanced students only. 

During the summer quarter Professor J. E. LeRossignol of the Univer- 
sity of Nebraska offered courses in economic problems and labor problems, 

Mr. Beach, with the aid of advanced students, has concluded an 
analytical study of the alien male population of San Francisco. This 
investigation, which has extended over a period of one and one-half years, 
was undertaken at the request of the United States Bureau of Naturalization. 
The results will be published by the Bureau. Mr. Beach has also given 
several professional addresses before public assemblages. 

Mr. Canning's engagement by the California State Board of Accountancy 
to prepare the official solutions of problems in the state examinations for 
Certified Public Accountant and to make recommendations for admission 
of applicants to practice has been continued. 

Mr. Jones represented the University at a meeting held in Portland, in 
December, to consider the advisability of organizing a Pacific Coast Associa- 
tion of Schools of Business and of Departments of Economics. He was 
chosen chairman of the executive committee of the Association. He has made 
several public addresses on professional subjects. 

Mr. Mears made several professional addresses before professional and 
public bodies. He was a member of the staff of the School of Community 
Leadership, Stanford, 1923. He was reelected director-at-large of the 



Departmental Reports 121 

American Chamber of Commerce for the Levant, Constantinople, Turkey. 
He also represented the University and the San Francisco Chamber of 
Commerce at the first* Pan-Pacific Commercial Conference, Pan- Pacific 
Union, Honolulu, T. H., October-November, 1922, and was elected perma- 
nent secretary of the Conference. 

Miss Lothrop has been elected a member of the Board of Directors 
of the California Sute Conference of Social Work for 1923-24, and is 
still a member of the Council of the Girl Scouts of Palo Alto. She has 
been in consultation with Miss Wales and Miss Landis with regard to the 
proposed Social Service Course at Lane Hospital. 

Dr. Wildman has been absent on sabbatical leave during the winter. 
spring, and summer quarters. He has spent this time in travel and profes- 
sional study in European countries. 

John Ben net Canning, 

Assistant Professor of Economics. 



EDUCATION 



During the year 1922-23 instruction was given by EUwood Patterson 
Cubberley, Truman Lee Kelley, Jesse Brundage Sears, professors; Percy 
Erwin Davidson and William Martin Proctor, associate professors; John 
Conrad Almack, lecturer; and Ralph Waldo Swetman, fellow. During the 
summer quarter additional assistance in instruction was given by William 
Webb Kemp, president of the State Teachers' College at San Jose, as 
acting professor; Irving Edgar Miller, professor of education in the State 
Normal School, at Bellingham, Wash., as acting associate professor; J. 
Harold Williams, director of the California Bureau of Juvenile Research, 
as acting assistant professor; Ralph Waldo Swetman, fellow in school 
administration, as acting instructor; and Richard Arthur Bolt, general 
director of the American Child Hygiene Association, as lecturer. Miss 
Dorothy Putnam continued as Secretary of the School of Education and 
Librarian; Mrs. David Evans acted as assistant departmental librarian 
during the first three quarters, and Miss Gwyneth A. Lewis acted as 
departmental librarian during the summer quarter. 

During the year, Mr. Howard R. Taylor, formerly superintendent of 
city schools at Port Townsend, Wash., and during the year a graduate 
student at Stanford, served as teaching assistant in charge of practice 
teaching; and Mr. Ralph Waldo Swetman served as Teaching Fellow in 
School Administration, and gave the new course (155) in California School 
System and Law. Dr. John Conrad Almack, of the University of Oregon, 
also served as lecturer, and during the year was given the usual appoint- 
ment as associate professor and thus retained at Stanford. During the 
winter quarter, Miss Vaal Stark, a certified national instructor in Girl 
Scout work, was given an appointment as teaching assistant and offered a 
two-unit course in Girl Scout work, under the supervision of the depart- 
ment. This work was taken by a total of twenty students, and was made 
possible by Mrs. Herbert Hoover. 



122 Stanford University 

Professor Kelley returned in January from a year's study in the 
Biometric Laboratory of the University of London, where he had been 
devoting himself to a study of statistical problems connected with the 
analysis of mental capacity and the organization of intellect. Professor 
Cubberley was absent during the summer quarter and will be absent until 
January, 1924. Professor Sears was designated as acting executive head 
during the absence of Professor Cubberley. 

During the year Professors Cubberley and Sears, assisted by a number 
of graduate students, have been at work on a study of the costs for educa- 
tion in California, as a part of the study being carried on under the 
Educational Finance Inquiry Commission, of which Professor Cubberley is 
a member. This commission has been supported by combined grants from 
the Commonwealth, Rockefeller, Carnegie, and Milbank Foundations, and 
has made a study of the costs for education in New York, Illinois, low^a, 
and California. Professor Sears has been in charge of the office work and 
the preparation of the report on the California study. In connection with 
the work of the commission. Professor Cubberley has made two trips to 
New York for meetings. The final report on the California study was 
completed at the close of the present academic year, and will be submitted 
to a meeting of the commission in October. Professor Cubberley has also 
attended one meeting in New York of the Research Committee of the 
Commonwealth Fund, of which he also is a member, and in April he 
attended, as the representative from Stanford, the exercises held by the 
University of Iowa in celebration of the 50th Anniversary of the founding of 
the first permanent chair of education in the United States. He made one 
of the addresses at the exercises, and was given the honorary degree of 
LL.D. by the University of Iowa. In July he supplied, in place of the 
United States Commissioner of Education Tigert, at an evening general 
session of the meeting of the National Education Association, giving a 
paper outlining a National Program in Education. During the year The 
School Principal, a book by Professor Cubberley appeared, and a material 
beginning has been made on a book on the principles of State School 
Administration. 

During the year Professor Kel ley's notable book on Statistical Method 
appeared, as did also the St?inford Achievement Tests, prepared by Pro- 
fessors Kelley, Terman, and Ruch. Professor Kelley has also assisted 
Professor Terman in a continuation of his work in the study of Gifted 
Children. Partly as a result of his work in London, Professor Kelley will 
next year offer a new advanced course dealing with the study of non- 
intellectual functions, under the title of Psychometry (no. 270). 

Professor Proctor has served as a member of the California Com- 
mittee of Fifteen for the study of the high school work in California, and 
as chairman of the sub-committee on vocational guidance. As a part of 
the work of the committee, he conducted a survey and made a report on 
moral and vocational guidance in California high schools, which will form 
a part of the main report of the committee. He prepared copy for a revised 
and enlarged edition of his book on Psychological Guidance of High 
School Pupils, which is to be issued soon. He has also served the City of 



Departmental Reports 123 

San Francisco as Stanford representative on the examination board, which 
conducts competitive examinations for teachers for the city schools. Pro- 
fessor Proctor will be absent during 1923-24 on sabbatical leave, and will 
act as half-time lecturer at Harvard University. 

Professor Almack has completed a number of studies during the year 
relating to the adaptation of school buildings to an efficient educational pro- 
gram, and a History of Oregon for junior high school classes. He has 
work under way, with Dr. Freeland, of the San Jose State Teachers' Col- 
lege, on a series of Social Science Readers, and with Professor De Voss 
on a California School Classification Test. 

The members of the department faculty have contributed the usual 
number of articles to the professional magazines, and all have been busy 
directing a steadily increasing number of graduate students in studies for 
the A.M. and Ph.D. degrees, as the following statistical table will show : 

Degrees granted 1920 1921 1922 1923 

A.B. in Education 13 13 16 11 

A.B. in School of Education 10 

A.B. in Graphic Arts 7 6 6 5 

A.M. in Education 9 17 26 27 

A.M. in School of Education 16 

A.M. in Graphic Arts 10 1 

Ph.D. Major 4 2 2 

Ph.D. Minor 10 4 

This table also shows the connstant shift of the work of the department 
from undergraduate to graduate work. This shift is even more evident in 
the table given below, covering summer quarter work. 

The summer quarter continues to increase in importance for the work 
in education, as the following comparative table will show: 

Students Registered in Education 

(Not Including the Division of Graphic Arts) 

1920 1921 1922 1923 

Total number 101 142 136 174 

HeW the A.B. degree 54 65 92 114 

Held the A.M. degree 9 16 24 30 

While the steady increase in the number of students of graduate 
standing is gratifying, the demands made on the teaching staff at present 
supplied, especially for special studies and research work, are rapidly 
increasing in weight. Apparently we can look forward to the summer 
quarter as bringing us a high grade of graduate student who needs careful 
direction in special studies as much as he does advanced courses in educa- 
tion. The new state law, requiring a supervisory certificate for school 
supervision in California, this to be based on advanced study of admin- 
istrative problems, means a further and continued increase in advanced 
students in education. 

The new requirements laid down by the State Board of Education for 
elementary, junior high, and high school certification, with the new special 



124 Stanford University 

courses in education and the additional units required, also mean increased 
work for the School of Education in the training of teachers, as well as 
the work in training school executives, which for long has been the impor- 
tant work of the department of education. 

Ellwood Patterson Cubberley, 
Professor of Education, and 
Dean of the School of Education. 



Division of Graphic Art 

During the year 1922-23 the teaching force of this division consisted of 
Professor Arthur Bridgman Clark, Assistant Professor Chloe Lesley 
Starks, and Rudolph P. Schaeffer and Estella Hoisholt, lecturers. 

For the first time in three years the department has offered work during 
the summer quarter and has found both in the number of students and in 
the quality of the students attending classes that the work was worth while. 
Possibly it has been best in accomplishment of the whole year. 

Mr. Rudolph P. Schaeffer of San Francisco who has formerly given 
courses in the department gave one course in Interior Decoration and 
one course in the Art of Stage Setting. Both of these courses were well 
attended. During the spring quarter, Professor Clark took an automobile 
trip through the eastern part of the United States and gathered valuable 
material in the shape of photographs of domestic architecture for use in 
his course of instruction in that subject. 

Arthur Bridgman Clark, 

Professor of Education, 
Division of Graphic Art. 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

Faculty: Harris Joseph Ryan, professor; James Cameron Clark, associate 
professor; Henry Harrison Henline, assistant professor; Ward B. Kindy, 
instructor ; Theodore Harding Morgan, instructor. 

Instruction was given in the courses as stated in the "Announcement of 
Courses of Instruction for 1922-23." To meet the heavy duty that the 
faculty men of the department had to encounter through increased attend- 
ance and the irregular load encountered through a year of changing sched- 
ules made generally necessary to accommodate the lower division require- 
ments Instructor Morgan was added to the personnel of the department to 
serve during the autumn and winter quarters. 

Research work was undertaken as follows : 

I. Ryan (a) developed a plan for a high voltage wattmeter to use 
direct connected to high voltage lines for a more effective study of the 
losses of power to the atmosphere; (b) in cooperation with Assistant 
Professor Henline began a study of the cyclic characteristics of energy 
losses to the atmosphere from high voltage power transmission lines; (c) 
and directed the graduate students of the department in their research work 



Departmental Reports 125 

s 

with the exception of Edwin K. Baum whose thesis research was directed by 
Associate Professor Clark. 

II. Clark (a) continued with the cooperation of F. F. Evenson (Stan- 
ford, '20) the studies of corona losses from high voltage power lines 
using conductors varying in diameters from .625 to 1.25 inches having among 
them boundary surfaces varying in roughness from that of smooth lock -wire 
to that of rope-laid cable, begun last year and continued with the aid of the 
high voltage wattmeter referred to above in I-a ; (b) directed the thesis of 
E. K. Baum, graduate student. 

III. Henline has continued his studies of the atmosphere begun last year; 
in cooperation with Ryan began the study stated above in I-b ; and assisted 
in the direction of the thesis research of Carpenter and Stauffer. 

IV. Theses were undertaken and completed by the graduate students of 
the department as follows : 

E. K. Baum, Effect of Tertiary Winding on Voltage and Exciting 
Current Wave-Shapes of a Three-Phase Core Type Transformer. 
E. M. Blakeslee and R. C. Connolly: Vibration as a Factor in 
Suspension Insulators. 

C. B. Carpenter and L. M. Stauffer: Power Losses in High Voltage 
Power Cables. 

P. C Clark and C. E. Miller : A 350,000- Volt Wattmeter. 
P. H. Davis : An Experimental Investigation of the Water Cooling 
of Turbo-Generators. 

H, E. Overacker: The Radio Telephone Transmitting Station. 
J. W. Robinson, Jr: The Cement Moisture Cycle as a Factor in the 
Deterioration of Cap and Pin Insulators. 
The following services for progress in the electrical applied sciences 
were rendered during the year by the personnel of the department: 

Ryan was elected president of the American Institute of Electrical 
Engineers, served as president-elect to August 1, 1923, and after that as 
president. He served on committees as follows: Standardization (insulator 
division) and Research Committees of the A. I. E. E. ; Insulator and 
220,000- Volt Power Transmission divisions of the Overhead Systems Com- 
mittee of the National Electric Light Association. 

Gark served on the Meetings and Papers Committee of the A. I. E. E. 
Henline served as chairman of the San Francisco section of the A. I. 
E. E. and as member of the Overhead Systems Committee of the Pacific 
Coast Electrical Association. 

For practical experience Instructor Kindy was employed by the Brown 
Hoist Company of Clevaland, Ohio, during the summer quarter. 

Instructor Morgan, whose return to the department has been made 
necessary by the continued increase of attendance in the classes conducted 
by the department, held a position in the engineering department of the 
Great Western Power Co., San Francisco, during the spring and summer 
quarters. 

Harris Joseph Ryan, 
Professor of Electrical Engineering. 



126 Stanford University 

ENGLISH 

• 

The staff of this department for the year 1922-23 consisted of Raymond 
Macdonald Alden,* Lee Emerson Bassett,* William Herbert Carruth,* John 
S. P. Tatlock,* professors; William Dinsmore Briggs,* Samuel Swayze 
Seward,' Everett Wallace Smith,* Mary Yost (Dean of Women), associate 
professors; Elisabeth Lee Buckingham,*** James Gordon Emerson, Howard 
Judson Hall,* Arthur Garfield Kennedy, Edith Ronald Mirrielees*, Frances 
Theresa Russell,'** assistant professors; Margery Bailey, Merrill K. Ben- 
nett,* Paul Hibbert Clyde,* George Pope Shannon, Lawrence Bergraann 
Wallis,* instructors; Richard C. Bentinck,* acting instructor; Mary Ander- 
son Hill, Claire Soule Seay, assistants in instruction. The superior ntimbers 
indicate quarters taken as vacation. Professor Tom Peete Cross of the 
University of Chicago served as acting professor during the spring quarter, 
and Professor Tucker Brooke of Yale University during the summer quar- 
ter. Professor Gray was absent on sabbatical leave, and Mr. Gordon Davis on 
special leave in order to accept an engagement for dramatic work in several 
Asiatic countries. Mr. Davis' work in dramatics was carried on by Mr. 
Bentinck. 

The number of major students enrolled in the department was 132, of 
whom 59 were graduates. Thirty-two were recommended for the degree 
of A.B. (5 of them in the Division of Journalism) ; 10 for the degree of 
A.M. Candidates for the Master's degree presented acceptable theses as 
follows: Miss Rita A. AUegrini, "A history of Bronte Criticism in the 
reviews of 1846 to 1879"; Miss Ruth J. Barber, "Certain elements of the 
structure of pre-Shakespearean dramatic blank verse"; Miss Ella G. Cook, 
"Tragedy in the modern novel and the modern drama of social circum- 
stance" ; Mrs. Mary A. Hill, "The Tragedy of Thomas Hardy" ; Miss 
Anne S. Ireland, "English periodical criticism of contemporary French 
literature from 1820 to 1850"; Miss Frances I. Price, "Literary culture in 
colonial Virginia"; George P. Shannon, "A historical survey of the 
metrical forms of English Protestant hymns"; Miss Althea M. Sheldon, 
"Chaucer's influence upon Masefield"; Miss Inez Specking, "John Payne 
Collier as editor of Shakespeare" ; Theodore W. Todd, "The development of 
bourgeois tragedy to the time of Ibsen." 

Mr. Alden represented the department at the meeting of the Modem 
Language Association at Philadelphia, during the Christmas holidays, and 
read a paper in the Metrical section. While in the East he gave lectures 
or addresses at Cornell University, the University of North Carolina, and 
Girard College. He is serving as a member of a committee of the Modern 
Language Association which is to report on the practicability of a uniform 
system of notation in prosody. He has published various reviews in the 
Literary Review and elsewhere, and a. volume of stories for children. 

Mr. Bassett gave lectures, during the year, at some twenty teachers' 
institutes in California, and also before various societies and clubs in or 
near San Francisco. During the summer quarter he served as acting 
professor in the University of Colorado. 



Departmental Reports 127 

Mr. Carruth has served as president of the Pacific Coast Unitarian 
Conference, and occupied the pulpits of various Unitarian churches. He 
has contributed articles and poems to the Springfield Republican, the 
Overland Monthly, the San Francisco Journal, etc. 

Mr. Tatlock has continued to give much time to the Chaucer Concordance, 
the manuscript of which has now been completed and was sent to the 
Carnegie Institution of Washington in April. This enterprise was begun 
in England in 1872, the present modification of it in 1919. Mr. Tatlock has 
also served as a member of a committee on Medieval Latin Culture, 
appointed by the American Council of Learned Societies ; of a committee of 
the American Association of University Professors on General Examina- 
tions for the A.B. degree; and of committees of the Modern Language 
Association on the reproduction of ancient texts and on a proposed Middle 
English Dictionary. He has published articles in the University of Cali- 
fornia Chronicle and in Stanford periodicals. 

Mr. Briggs, who has continued his biographical and critical studies in 
Marlowe, published another article on the subject in "Studies in Philology." 
He has given a course of lectures throughout the year to students of 
the Convent of the Sacred Heart at Menlo Park. 

Mr. Gray, during his sabbatical period spent in Europe, gave a course of 
lectures on "Later American Novelists" at University College, London, and 
conducted a conference course for a group of students in the subject He 
lectured also at Bedford College, at Durham College, before the American 
Women's Club*, and, tmder the auspices of the English-Dutch Association 
in Haarlem, Utrecht, Amhem, and Amsterdam. He represented Stanford 
University at the Jubilee Conference on Extra-Mural Teaching at Cam- 
bridge University in July, and spoke on behalf of "Foreign Universities" at 
the International University dinner at London. Mr. Gray has published 
articles on Elizabethan literature in the Philological Quarterly and other 
journals ; he has been invited to become a regular contributor on American 
subjects to the Literary Supplement of the London Times. 

Mr. Smith presided at the annual meeting of the American Association 
of Teachers of Journalism held at Northwestern University during the 
Christmas holidays. He again directed the work in journalism at the 
summer session of the University of California in Los Angeles. 

Mr. Hall contributed a paper on "An Early American Poet" to the 
annual meeting of the Pacific Coast Philological Association, and has been 
engaged jn the preparation of a poetic anthology. 

Mr. Kennedy, like Mr. Tatlock, was engaged in the completion of the 
Chaucer Concordance, and has continued his work on a bibliography of the 
English language. He is secretary of the Philological Association of the 
Pacific Coast 

Mrs. Russell, during two vacation quarters spent in Europe, worked on 
a bibliography of Utopian literature in the Bodleian Library, the British 
Museum, and the National Library of France. 

Mr. Clyde, who has done good service in the division of journalism, 
and at the same time as editor of the Stanford Illustrated Review, resigns to 



128 Stanford University 

accept a University fellowship in the Department of History and to devote 
his time to study for the doctor's degree. At the same time the division of 
journalism has been strengthened by the appointment of Mr. Buford O. 
Brown as assistant professor. Mr. Brown will devote himself primarily to 
the problems of the country weekly and the small city daily. He is a 
graduate of the School of Journalism of the University of Missouri, and 
was for three years a teacher of journalism in the University of Texas. 
He has gained practical experience in the community newspaper field 
through the successful editorial and business management of a number of 
papers in Texas, resigning from the Electra News to come to Stanford. 

The members of the department continued the prize which was estab- 
lished last year for the best literary performance by an undergraduate, 
offering it this year in the field of the short story. It will now be possible 
to confine this prize to the field of prose composition, owing to the estab- 
lishment of the Hardy prize in poetry. Miss Irene Hardy is remembered as 
a successful and well beloved teacher in the department in the early years 
of the University, as well as a poet of some distinction. After her death a 
fund of five hundred dollars, which had been given her by friends, was 
presented to the University for the establishment of a prize commemorative 
of her devotion to poetry and scholarship. 

Raymond Macdonald Alden, 
Professor of English. 



THE FOOD RESEARCH INSTITUTE 

The staff of the Food Research Institute for the year 1922-23 has 
consisted of Carl Lucas Alsberg, Joseph Standi ffe Davis, Alonzo Englebert 
Taylor, directors; Wilfred Eldred, John Lowry Simpson, associates; 
Franklin D. Schurz, junior associate; Susan S. Burr, Lisette E. Fast, 
Adelaide M. Hobe, Kathleen F. C. King, A. George Silverman, research 
assistants; Edith M. Hawley, James N. Holsen, Olaf S. Rask, VV. Blair 
Stewart, Conrad P. Wright, research fellows; Frances Blewett, Elizabeth 
Perry, Frances Perry, secretaries; and Laura C. Swabey, librarian. 

During the winter quarter Dr. Alsberg offered a course in the Chemistry 
of Nutrition, the lectures being given in the Department of Chemistry. In 
the absence of Professor Swain, Dr. Alsberg has directed the thesis work 
of two graduate students in Biochemistry. A course in statistics, announced 
under the title : "Statistics at Work," was given by Dr. Davis in the spring 
quarter in the Department of Economics. 

A weekly seminar in food research has been offered during the first 
three quarters. This was primarily a staff meeting, although a limited 
number of suitably qualified seniors and graduate students were allowed to 
attend. The meetings have consisted primarily of the presentation and 
discussion of research work in progress in the Institute. 

The research problems undertaken by members of the Institute staff dur- 
ing the year may be described briefly as follows : 



Departmental Reports 129 

Crop estimating and reporting methods in the United States and abroad 
are being studied by Dr. Alsberg and Miss Burr to determine how far 
past and current statistics of crops may be accepted as reliable, how far the 
bases upon which they are obtained are comparable, and in what ways the 
accuracy of crop forecasts and reports may be improved. 

Detailed farm cost data are being studied by Dr. Davis and Mr. Schurz 
in cooperation with the Kansas State Agricultural College in order to 
arrive at sound principles of cost analysis and effective means of inter-- 
preting these data. 

A study is being made by Dr. Taylor, Dr. Davis, Mr. Simpson, Mr. 
Silverman, and Miss Fast of statistics of wheat and flour production, 
domestic movements, and imports and exi)orts in their relation to prices. 
The objective is an interpretation of the world wheat position in the light 
of available statistics and other relevant facts. 

A study of the economic organization of the American baking industry 
and of the outstanding economic problems of this industry is being made by 
Dr. Eldred, under the general supervision of Dr. Davis. In this connection 
census statistics and other statistical data relating to the baking industry 
have been assembled and are being analyzed, with the special assistance of 
Miss Hobe. Within this general scope certain topics are receiving intensive 
investigation, with the cooperation of bakers and the counsel of a committee 
on economic research of the American Bakers' Association. The publication 
in 1923 of a pamphlet on "Stale Bread Loss as a Problem of the Baking 
Industry" is an outgrowth of this work. A study of household baking in 
relation to the baking industry and a study of the principles underlying the 
selection of bakery delivery equipment are under way. 

The holders of the Food Research Fellowships have been working 
upon the following subjects: 

Miss Hawley: The food elements in measures of standards of living. 

Mr. Holsen: The transportation of wheat and flour in the United 
States, with special reference to the development of the rate structure. 

Mr. Rask: Physical properties and chemical composition of flours in 
relation to their baking qualities. 

Mr. Stewart: Economic laws of productivity, with special reference to 
food production. 

Mr. Wright: Factors limiting the expansion of food production with 
the growth of population ; the recent history of German agriculture. 

Dr. Alsberg has completed and published during the year two studies 
carried on with others while he was Chief of the Bureau of Chemistry, 
U. S. Department of Agriculture, on "Chronic Intoxication by Small 
Quantities of Cadmium Chloride in the Diet" and "Studies on the Pharma- 
cology of Cadmium and Zinc with Particular Reference to Emesis." He 
has also published "Physical Chemistry as Applied to Foods" and "Pas- 
teur's Contribution to Chemistry," an address delivered before the San 
Francisco County Medical Society on January 9 as part of a Pasteur 
Centenary program. 



130 Stanford University 

Dr. Davis has continued to contribute to the Harvard Economic Service, 
having published during the year four of the unsigned Weekly Letters deal- 
ing with European economic and financial developments, and a signed 
article on "Economic and Financial Progress in Europe," which appeared in 
the April, 1923, issue of the Review of Economic Statistics. 

Dr. Taylor has written three articles for the Saturday Evening Post 
bearing on the European food situation, namely, "European Food Needs 
and American Agriculture," "Europe's Larger Food Needs and Smaller 
Means of Payment," and "A Nation Under Receivership." He has also 
published the following: "The Competitive Menace of the Tropics," an 
address delivered at the University of Wisconsin in January, 1922, at the 
celebration of the semi-centennial of the organization of the Wisconsin 
Dairymen's Association ; "The Decline in the Price of Cereals," appearing 
in the Journal of Farm Economics ; and "The Future of the United States 
as a Food Exporter," which was written for the Manchester Guardian 
Commercial. 

In the autumn of 1922 Dr. Taylor made a trip to Europe to investigate 
for the Rockefeller Foundation conditions among the universities and the 
intelligentsia in some of the Central European countries, the object of the 
investigation being to determine the extent of linancial aid needed by 
educational institutions in Europe. 

Mr. Schurz attended the meetings of the American Economic Associa- 
tion and of the American Farm Economic Association held in Chicago in 
December. Before returning to Stanford he visited the Kansas State 
Agricultural College in connection with the study of farming costs which 
he is making in cooperation with that college. 

During the spring quarter Dr. Alsberg spent several weeks in the East, 
collecting material for the Institute Library, making arrangements tor 
increasing the personnel of the Institute, and establishing and renewing 
contacts with agriculturists, heads of other research institutions, members 
of trade associations, and chiefs of various bureaus in the U. S. Depart- 
ments of Agriculture and Commerce. While in the East he addressed the 
General Meeting of the American Chemical Society in New Haven, 
(Subject: Food and Population) and delivered one of the De Lamar 
Lectures at Johns Hopkins University, (Subject: The Productivity of 
Labor in Agriculture). 

In November, 1922, Dr. Alsberg was appointed Chairman of the Com- 
mittee for the United States to study on behalf of the Union Internationale 
de la Chimie Pure et Appliquee the question of the preservation of food 
products by chemical substances. In June, 1923, he was made a member of 
a sub-committee of the' Commission d'Etude de la Conservation des Matieres 
Alimentaires which is expected to present a general report at the next 
meeting of the Union at Copenhagen in 1924. 

Dr. Taylor has been serving as a member of the Commission to Investi- 
gate Foreign Trade in Agricultural Products, appointed *by Secretary of 
Commerce Hoover in March, 1923. He was one of the speakers at the 
National Wheat Conference held in Chicago, June 19-20, (Subject: The 



Departmental Reports 131 

European Situation as AflFectirig Demand and Supply of Wheat) ; at the 
meeting of the American Medical Association in San Francisco, June 29, 
(Subject: The Complete Diet); and at the International Health Con- 
ference in San Francisco, June 30, (Subject: The Food Needs of the 
Nation in Relation to the Economic Resources). 

Carl Lucas Alsberg, 

Executive Secretary. 



GEOLOGY 



The staff of the department for the year 1922-23 consisted of Pro- 
fessors Eliot Blackwelder (geology), Austin Flint Rogers (mineralogy), 
James Perrin Smith (paleontology), Cyrus Fisher Tolman (economic 
geology) ; Russell S, Knappen, acting assistant professor (geology) for the 
summer quarter, 1923 ; Mr. and Mrs. T. S. Oldroyd, curators of conchology ; 
and Mr. Ralph Daniel Reed, teaching fellow in geology. 

Mr. Willis, (professor emeritus) spent th€ winter and spring in Chile 
for the purpose of studying the effects of the recent earthquakes along the 
Pacific Coast. This work was done under the auspices of the Carnegie 
Institution and the Chilean Government. Mr. Willis also sent to the 
publisher the manuscript of his new book on structural geology. 

Mr. Smith has been engaged in the preparation of a monograph on the 
Permian and Lower Triassic Ammonites of Timor. Under his direction, 
Mr. D.' D. Sparks has made a study of the Eocene Foraminifera of Cali- 
fornia; Mr. L. G. Hertlein has prepared a paper on the Tertairy Pectens 
of the Pacific Coast; Mr. A. B. Reagan has completed a work on the 
Cretaceous of Arizona, which is now being published by the Kansas Academy 
of Sciences; and Mr. L. A. Faustino has continued his study of the 
Recent and Fossil Corals of the Philippine Islands. 

Mr. Rogers has applied the theory of groups to a mathematical study 
of crystal symmetry and as a result has settled some doubtful points as to 
what the true elements of symmetry really are. In a forthcoming paper 
he also describes the morphological and optical properties of hydromag- 
nesite, a mineral described nearly a century ago, but one whose crystal 
system has up to this time been in doubt. He has discovered a new man- 
ganese mineral in the so-called meteorite of Alum Rock Park near San 
Jose, which is not a meteorite but simply a boulder of manganese ore 
rolled down from the surrounding hills. He has also devised a simple but 
practically new method of teaching geometrical crystallography. This 
method is based upon plans and elevations from which graphic determina- 
tions may be made with comparative ease. 

Mr. Rogers is now an associate editor of the American Mineralogist, a 
Councillor of the Mineralogical Society of America, and a member of the 
Committee on Nomenclature of the same society. 

Under his direction, Miss Lillian M. Dobbel has described euhedral 
magnesite cr>'stals with a new form from Orangedale, Nova Scotia. Mr. 



132 Stanford University 

Paul F. Kerr (fellow) has with the kind cooperation of the Physics Depart- 
ment constructed an X-ray diffraction outfit by means of which he has 
photographed the X-ray diffraction patterns of a number of opaque min- 
erals. It seems probable that these standard diffraction patterns will prove 
useful in the determination of opaque ore-minerals and may also settle 
some fundamental points in mineralogic work. 

In Mr. Tolman's laboratory, microscopic studies of ores were con- 
tinued along the lines laid down with the foundation of the laboratory of 
economic geology. Mr. Tolman carried on the studies of the Foothill 
Copper Belt, the publication of the results of which has been long delayed 
on account of the closing of some of the copper mines. In the fall quarter, 
he made an examination of a new type of oce deposits in the Yaqui River 
region, Sonora. Mr. R. C. Harris has been assisting Mr. Tolman in the 
laboratory study of these ores during the winter and spring quarters. Pre- 
liminary announcement of results has been made at the LeConte Qub. 
Mr. Tolman also made a preliminary examination of the Triassic coal fields 
of Sonora where metamorphism has produced extremely varied products 
including graphite, anthracite and natural coke. A preliminary report of 
these studies was also presented at the LeConte Club. 

Under the direction of Mr. Tolman, the Stanford Geological Survey was 
conducted in the region of the Sargent oil fields and an interesting geological 
map of that region has been prepared. 

Dr. Manjiro Watanabe, Assistant Professor of Economic Geology at 
the Imperial University at Sendai, Japan, returned from a year's sttidy in 
Europe under Professor Liesegang, where he investigated the phenomena of 
rhythmic precipitation and diffusion and its relation to the formation of 
ore deposits. During the spring quarter at Stanford, he completed his work 
on the application of his chemical studies to the formation of minerals and 
ores. In collaboration with Mr. W. R. Landwehr, he completed his descrip- 
tion of the interesting ore deposits at the Hitachi Mine, Japan. 

Mr. Michel P. H. Legrayp of the faculty of the University of Liege. 
Belgium, made a reconnaissance of a number of important ore deposits in 
Arizona and completed a creditable thesis involving the results of his work. 

Mr. Blackwelder • has been largely occupied with administrative and 
other matters incident to his coming to Stanford. During the winter he 
has prepared papers for the LeConte Club, the Geological Society of 
America and also the Branner Club of Los Angeles. He has also continued 
work on his studies of the Pre-Cambrian rocks of Wyoming with particular 
reference to the Medicine Bow Range. 

Mr. Reed has been carrying on microscopic studies of the rarer constit- 
uents of certain Tertiary formations of California, with the advice of Mr. 
Blackwelder and Mr. Tickell of the Department of Mining. The results of 
this work are important with reference to the geologic history of the 
region and also have an economic application in the exploration of oil fields. 

The department has received a gift of the Schulte collection of Recent 
shells from Mrs. Gretchen Schulte of San Francisco in memory of her 
husband, William Schulte, a former graduate of Stanford University. 



Departmental Reports 133 

During the year, the Branner Memorial Association, organized in 1922, 
has started to raise a fund for the endowment and enlargement of the 
Branner Library. Arrangements are also under way to provide the library 
with a qualified librarian in the near future. 

Eliot Blackwelder, 

Professor of Geology. 



GERMANIC LANGUAGES 

The department faculty for the year 1922-23 consisted of William Alpha 
Cooper and Karl Gustav Rendtorff, professors ; Bruno Boezinger, associate 
professor; Calharine Morris Cox, instructor; Helena May Nye, assistant 
in instruction. 

Mr. Cooper took his regular quarter vacation during the autumn, the 
other members of the staff during the summer, with the exception of Miss 
Nye, who was on duty all four quarters. Mr. Cooper joined his vacation 
of this year to that of the previous year and spent six months in Europe, 
studying particularly the economic conditions among the middle classes in 
Germany, and writing a paper on Goethe's Conception of the Poet's Calling 
for the annual meeting of the Modern Language Association of America. 
On his return to the University in January he accepted invitations to 
give several addresses, including the regular Tuesday evening lecture at the 
University, on conditions as he had found them in Germany. 

At the close of this academic year the department loses one of its most 
valued members through the resignation of Miss Cox, who is preparing to 
enter another field of work. Her unusual ability as a language teacher 
and her forceful personality are matters of too general knowledge about 
the University to need special emphasis here. 

After two years as teaching assistant Miss Nye is promoted to an 
instructorship, and Miss Ethel Taylor, of the modern language department 
of Oregon Agricultural College, is to be the teaching assistant for the 
coming year. 

As a matter of record, to show the influence of the war on the offerings 
of this department, the total numbers of registrations for each year since 
the inauguration of the four-quarter system in 1917 are here given : 671, 
414, 689, 761, 765, 788. The year 1918-19 marked the lowest ebb. The 
recovery has been rather slow, as was to be expected, as the official ban 
on German in the high schools was continued five years after the armistice, 
having remained in force in California till July, 1923. 

William Alpha Cooper, 

Professor of German. 



HISTORY 



The faculty of the department for the year consisted of : Ephraim 
Douglass Adams, Payson Jackson Treat, professors ; Frank Alfred Colder, 
Edwin Maslin Hulme, Ralph Haswell Lutz, Percy Alvin Martin, Edgar 



134 Stanford University 

Eugene Robinson, associate professors; Yamato Ichihashi, Reginald George 
Trotter, assistant professors; Captain Edward Latimer Beach, U. S. N. 
(Retired), acting assistant professor. Courses in history were also given 
by Professors Elmore and Martin of the Department of Classical Literature, 
and Rendtorff of the Department of Germanic Languages. 

The student assistants, serving for one or more quarters, were : Herbert 
B. Alexander, Robert C. Binkley, Angelina Burns, W. Henry Cooke, Lois 
Cottrell, Oscar Falnes, Goss M. Grable, Robert L. Jones, Raymond H. 
Leach, Erford A. McAllister, Mary J. Palmer, Helen Payne, Edith P. 
Stickney, and Edwin A. Wells. 

Soon after the autumn quarter began Mr. Adams asked to be relieved 
of his duties as department executive and Mr. Treat, a member of the 
department since 1905, was designated by the President to succeed him. 
Mr. Adams had served in this capacity fifteen years, succeeding Mr. Max 
Far rand in the summer of 1908. As his purpose in retiring from the 
direction of the department was to devote more time to the completion of 
his exhaustive study of British-American relations, his experience and 
judgment are still available when departmental problems demand solution. 

In November the University was honored by the visit of Professor 
Henri Pirenne, of the University of Ghent, first visiting professor on the 
Educational Foundation of the Commission for Relief in Belgium. Ar- 
rangements were made by the department for two public lectures, and in 
addition Professor Pirenne spoke at a meeting of the Pacific Coast 
Branch of the American Historical Association. In the following April 
Professor Pirenne presided at the Fifth International Congress of Historical 
Studies, in Brussels, where Stanford was represented by Dr. Henry Barrett 
Lcc^rned, a former member of t(iis department. 

The eighteenth meeting of the Pacific Coast Branch of the American 
Historical Association was held at Stanford during the Thanksgiving 
recess. Mr. Treat, as President of the Branch, presided at the several 
meetings and delivered the annual president's address. Papers were read by 
Captain Beach and Mr. Hulme, and Mr. Adams presided at the dinner. Mr. 
Lutz was elected secretary-treasurer for the coming year. 

The increasing number of graduate students registered in the department 
has called for various measures for bringing students and teachers together. 
At the beginning of each quarter the new candidates for higher degrees are 
invited to meet with the department faculty, so that the instructors may 
know all the candidates and the students may be assured of the readiness of 
all members of the department to assist them in their research. At the 
end of the year the graduate students were the guests of the department 
at a dinner at the Stanford Union. In the preceding thirty-two years only 
two degrees of Doctor of Philosophy in History were conferred at Stanford, 
but during the present academic year the number has been doubled and 
several other candidates are at work on doctors* theses. 

Mr. Adams was on vacation during the autumn quarter and served in 
the following summer. In December he made a trip to Washington and 



Departmental Reports 135 

other Eastern cities in the interest of the Hoover War Library. At this 
time he represented the department at the annual meeting of the American 
Historical Association at New Haven. During the year he gave several 
speeches or lectures before variotis high schools and organizations, notably 
the principal address at the banquet of the English Speaking Union in San 
Francisco in honor of Admiral Sims. He has also continued his services 
as chairman of a committee appointed by the State Board of Education to 
examine text-books in use in the junior high schools, high schools and 
junior colleges of California with the purpose of determining whether 
they treated any part of American history in a disloyal or unpatriotic 
manner. The report of this committee was published by the State Depart- 
ment of Education in September and given wide publicity. 

Mr. Treat served as president of the Pacific Coast Branch of the 
American Historical Association. He gave addresses on subjects connected 
with the Far East at Pasadena, San Francisco, and in the vicinity of the 
university. During the year he was elected a Fellow of the Royal Historical 
Society. 

Mr. Colder continued his services abroad as chief European agent of 
the Hoover War Library. Most of his time was spent in Russia, where he 
was also associated with the American Relief Administration in its work 
of famine relief. Historical material of the highest value has already been 
received in the Hoover War Library as the result of Mr. Golder's efforts. 

Mr. Hulme was away in the spring quarter, but in residence during 
the summer. He gave twelve public lectures, and throughout the year con- 
ducted courses in history at the State Teachers' College, San Francisco, 
on Friday evenings and Saturday mornings. 

Mr. Lutz gave several talks on **The Near Eastern Question and the 
Problem of the Ruhr." During the first half of the summer quarter he 
lectured at the University of Washington. He has been chosen secretary- 
treasurer of the Pacific Coast Branch of the American Historical Associa- 
tion for the coming year. 

Mr. Martin was on vacation in the winter and taught in the summer 
quarter. During the course of the year he delivered a number of public 
addresses on topics connected with the history of Latin America. 

Mr. Robinson gave nine addresses at Phoenix, Arizona, San Diego, 
Los Angeles, and other communities. Under his direction the compilation 
of the Calendar of Stephen M. White Papers has progressed. Two theses, 
based on these original materials, were presented by candidates for the 
Master's Degree this year. In April he was appointed director of the 
course in Problems of Citizenship which is to be required of all first year 
students in the University. 

Mr. Ichihashi was in residence for the four quarters. He has been 
engaged in organizing the historical material which he secured during his 
service as interpreter for Admiral Kato at the Washington Conference. 

Captain Beach also served for four quarters. He spent the spring and 
summer of 1922 in France, Belgium, and Germany, where he visited and 



136 Stanford University 

studied the major battle fields. His courses in military and naval history 
and the history of the Great War have proven of great interest to a 
large ntmiber of students. During the year Captain Beach has given 
nineteen public addresses before churches, clubs, fraternal organizations, 
patriotic societies and civic organizations, many of which were concerned 
with the World Court. He has also been active as the president of the 
Palo Alto branch of the Peoples* Movement for International Peace. 

Mr. Adams and Mr. Lutz, directors of the Hoover War Library, have 
devoted much of their time to the enlargement of this remarkable collection 
and to rendering available the material which is constantly being received. 
The number of advanced students who are using this library is steadily 
increasing and its value to students of history cannot be over-emphasized. 

The Mabel Hyde Cory scholarship of $500 for a woman student in the 
Department of History was held by Miss Edith Stickney, a graduate of 
Vassar College and candidate for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. 

During the year a scholarship in American Colonial History was 
established by the Colonial Dames of America resident in California, to 
be awarded to the student presenting the best essay on a subject in this 
field. The award was made to Miss Dorothy Shepard, 1924, for her essay 
on "The Frontier Woman." 

The number of major students registered in the department was : 
Autumn quarter, undergraduates 49, graduates 21, special 1 ; winter quarter, 
undergraduates 52, graduates 21, special 1 ; spring quarter, undergraduates 
54, graduates 15 ; summer quarter, undergraduates 20, graduates 20. 

On June 18, 1923, the degree of Bachelor of Arts in History was 
conferred on seventeen candidates, and in History-Journalism on two. The 
degree of Master of Arts was conferred upon the following: Herbert 
Bloom Alexander, thesis, "Present day South American attitude toward 
United States;" Herman Henry Chrisman, thesis, "English naval pre- 
paredness, 1558-1588, with special reference to its financial aspects ;" Paul 
Hibbert Clyde, thesis, "The Chinese coolie trade;" Lois Marie Cottrell. 
thesis, "The foreign policy of the Democratic party, 1900-1914;" Goss 
Silas Grable, thesis, "Saracenic civilization during the era of the Crusades ;" 
Elizabeth Lacombe, thesis, "Toulouse, as a center of new thought in the 
Twelfth, Thirteenth, and Fourteenth Centuries;" Wellford Duffy Seay. 
thesis, "American political parties and the European War, 1914-1917." All 
the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy were completed, 
during the summer quarter, by Rowland Hill Harvey and Robert L. Jones, 
but the degrees will not, of course, be conferred until June, 1924. 

Payson Jackson Treat, 

Professor of History, 



Hoover War Library 

Reorganization of the Library side of the staff of the Hoover War 
Library is reported in another place. On the Accession side, under the 
direction of Professors Adams and Lutz of the History Department, the 



Departmental Reports 137 

work of collection has been going steadily forward during the present year, 
and mainly upon the lines already established. There has been no change in 
the permanent staff of the Accession Division, except in the appointment of 
Miss Frances H. Williams as regular secretary and stenographer for 
the year 1923-24. 

Special effort has been given during this last year to the purchase from 
all sections of the world of the books now appearing upon the Great War 
and upon the reconstruction following the war. The flood of such books 
is so tremendous as to require great care in selection, since it would be 
inadvisable to buy many purely ephemeral works. Particularly notable 
additions have been received of French, Italian, Belgian, German, English 
and Russian books, though no country has been neglected. The largest 
single addition has been of French works, shipments received during the 
year amounting to approximately seven thousand volumes. This work of 
book purchase has constituted the burden of Professor Lutz's efforts during 
the year, although he has cared also for all regular correspondence in 
respect to the general work of the collection of materials. 

The chief agent of the Hoover War Library in Europe has been, as 
previously. Dr. Frank A. Golder of the History Department of Stanford 
University. Most of his time has been spent in Russia, though occasional 
journeys to western Europe have been necessary in furtherance of efforts of 
the Hoover War Library. He has thus visited Turkey, Greece, Bulgaria, 
Italy, Holland, Denmark, Sweden, Norway, Finland and Esthonia. In the 
work in the Baltic states Dr. Golder has been assisted by Professor 
Waldemar Westergaard of Pomona College, who has been spending the last 
year in Norway. Certain purchases have been made through the agency of 
Professor Westergaard. All of Dr. Golder's Russian materials have now 
been shipped and most of them are already received at Stanford University. 
They are not yet organized for work, and their proper arrangement will 
have to await Dr. Golder's return, which is expected to take place in 
September. 

The most notable single addition during the year has been that of the 
files from London containing the archives of the Commission for Relief in 
Belgium now organized and set up in the stacks and containing every- 
thing pertaining to the conduct of the business of the Commission for 
Relief in Belgium. The organization of this group of material by Mrs. 
Nina Eloesser of San Francisco, formerly chief filing clerk in London, is 
exactly that of its use in London. It is voluminous, and in addition to 
ordinary business archives it contains a wealth of materials on the relations 
of states and the attitude of rulers during the period of the war. The 
Rotterdam files, long since received in some twenty-six packing cases, 
have not yet been organized and will not be organized, presumably, until 
the New York files, the third great depository of the Commission for 
Relief in Belgium archives, have reached us. 

Less notable but still very valuable items received have been the Summary 
of Cases and Minutes of Hearings of the National War Labor Board. 
Their acquisition in connection with the Minutes of the Meetings of the 



138 Stanford University 

Executive Committee of the National War Labor Board, previously acquired, 
provides unique opportunity for studying American labor and industrial 
organization during the war. These were secured through the Bureau of 
Applied Economics, Washington, D. C, which has the only other complete 
set. 

A collection believed to be complete of the American Army of Occupa- 
tion at Coblentz archives since the war has just reached the Library. 

Connected with the American Relief Administration labors, but not 
directly a part of them, were certain technical missions to various countries 
in Europe, such as the technical mission to Poland under Colonel A. B. 
Barber. The archives of these various technical missions are cither now at • 
Stanford or on their way to the Hoover War Library as gifts by the men 
in charge of the various missions. From Washington has been received the 
minutes of meetings^ together with all materials of the Second Industrial 
Conference held under the administration of President Wilson. Dr. Alonzo 
Taylor has presented a splendid collection of materials originating with the 
United States Food Administration and especially valuable as containing the 
files of Division Heads. A small but interesting gift from William J. 
Burns of the Department of Justice at Washington consists of duplicates of 
seizures of radical literature made by the Department of Justice during 
the war. 

The work of gathering Government Documents of the period of war 
and since has been, continued for all nations. Since the Food Research 
Institute is also interested in this type of material an agreement has been 
entered into by which Government Documents bearing on food, industrj', 
and trade have been transferred from the Hoover War Library to the 
Document room of the General Library. For the future the Food Research 
Institute gathers Government Documents of this type while other docu- 
ments, such as those bearing on Foreign Relations, etc., are secured by the 
Hoover War Library. Among notable additions of the year are documents 
from the Irish Republic and from Italy, the latter a very comprehensive 
collection a part of which was lost at sea, hut which is now being replaced 
by the generosity of the Italian Government. The Belgian collection of 
documents, as also of books and newspapers, continues to have special 
attention with the purpose of securing everything in print about Belgium. 

These will indicate some of the types of material coming in to the 
Library, but a complete list of such acquisitions and gifts would be too 
long for this report. Many personal gifts have begun to come to the Library 
as men and women have become interested in the effort and desirous of 
placing with us items of value or even manuscripts and letter files. Some of 
these are given under strictest confidence and must remain with the confi- 
dential materials until released. Some are made immediately accessible. As 
illustration may be noted: (1) Monseignor Joseph Gleason, gift of volumes 
of Acta Apostolicae Sedis, 1914-21 ; (2) Professor J. S. P. Tatlock, gift of 
interesting materials relating to the organization and work of the Studeni 
Army Training Corps; Mrs. Karl Rendtorff, gift of German newspaper 



Departmental Reports 139 

files ; (4) Mrs. Hildegarde Fliigel Millar, gift of a collection of peace 
xhovement literature; (5) Mrs. Alexandra Anderson, gift of a card index 
used at Washington during the war. containing the names of all Americans 
and firms mobilized for service in the various governmental War Agencies. 
This is called the "War Service Index" and contains over 10,000 names 
with information respecting them and their activities. It was originally 
compiled by Mrs. Anderson for the use of the Information Division of 
the Food Administration. The effort to secure personal gifts of diaries, 
manuscripts, etc., is relatively recent, but is meeting with considerable 
success. This has been the special work of Professor Adams. 

Exchanges of duplicate material are being continued, especially with 
the Library of Congress and with the Library of the Music de la Guerre 
in Paris. The size of the collection is increasing so rapidly that it is 
evident that the space so generously allotted in the General Library, com- 
prising one and one-half floors of the stack tiers of the Library, will be 
before long fully occupied. Also the research room is even now inadequate 
for the use of research students desiring to use our materials. The problem 
will soon arise of sufficient room, both in the stacks and for researchers, and 
early consideration should be given to this problem. 

Ephraim Douglass Adams, 
Ralph Haswell Lutz, 

Directors Hoover War Library. 



HOPKINS MARINE STATION 

The Director was in residence throughout the year and continued his 
studies on North Pacific sea stars. A revision of the family Asteriidae is 
well under w^ay. A daily record of temperatures of sea water was continued, 
and samples of plankton were also taken daily for the Scripps Institution. 

Professor J. P. Baumberger, of the Department of Physiology, worked 
on the chemistry of the molt of crabs. 

Mrs. Anne B. Fisher investigated the effect of diet upon infections of 
Streptococcus haemolyticus. 

Mr. Henry W. Fowler, of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Phila- 
delphia, made a brief visit in February to study the collection of fishes 
belonging to the Station. 

Doctor Charles W. Greene, of the Department of Physiology, University 
of Missouri, while teaching during the summer quarter carried on the fol- 
lowing investigations: 

The "singing fish," Porichthys notatus, which spawns at tide water 
along the rocky coast of Monterey Bay, is unique in that (1) it has over 
700 phosphorescent organs, (2) it has a closed swim bladder, and (3) it 
makes a low resonant note. Data has been accumulated to clarify the 
functions of these structures. For the first time the act of giving off 
phosphorescent light was observed to occur on disturbing the fishes. 
Numerous analyses of swim bladder gases have shown an active separation 



140 Stanford University 

of the gas by a vascular-glandular mechanism, and the gas has been shown 
to consist largely of oxygen. Injected nitrogen is rapidly removed. The 
detailed structure of the vocal apparatus has been determined and the 
occasions of its natural use observed. 

An investigation of the amount and distribution of the fats in the 
different types of muscular tissue of the commercial mackerel-like fishes 
has been begun. Like the salmonoids these fishes have a sharp differentia- 
tion of the great lateral musculature. The "dark type" of muscle is unique 
in its content of intra-muscular fats, as has been shown for the salmon. 
No one has called attention to these facts in this new group, yet the 
scientific facts are probably in the last analysis the explanation of the 
difficulties in collecting and conserving this great food source. This problem 
is large in its physiological ramification and can be solved only on pro- 
longed study by the methods of histology and biochemistry. 

A minor activity to which some attention has been given is the adapta- 
bility of the common haglish, Bdelostoma stouti, to physiological laboratory 
teaching purposes. Its musculature, its circulation with three heart-like 
mechanisms and open blood-lymph spaces, and its respiratory adaptations to 
a blind and parasitic life are peculiarly available for advanced courses in 
the physiology of marine forms. Incidentally the interesting hagfish natural 
history has been further observed. 

Mr. Carl Hubbs, of the Zoological Museum, University of Michigan, 
studied the tide-pool fishes of the region as part of an extensive investigation 
covering the whole west coast. 

Mr. Lawrence Irving, a graduate student, during a brief visit in August 
continued work on the physiology of the sea star, Patiria. 

Doctor John Sterling Kingsley, Professor of Zoology Emeritus, Univer- 
sity of Illinois, spent the latter half of July at the Station and worked on 
a bibliography of invertebrates of the west coast. 

Doctor F. M. McFarland, Department of Anatomy, while teaching 
during the summer quarter, continued his. studies of the nudibranch molluscs 
of the Monterey region. 

Doctor Ernest Gale Martin during the summer quarter with Miss Helen 
H. Greene, research assistant, studied the influence of acids and alkalies 
upon the duration of life in Artemia salina and also made some observations 
bearing upon the influences of the size of the individuals on their ability to 
withstand submersion in highly concentrated brine. Miss Greene also 
carried on a series of experiments studying the reaction of Artemia to 
various stimuli, heat and light, the life cycle, the reaction to changing 
environment, the development of cysts and the physiology of the Artemia. 
Mr. Philip N. Baxter and Miss Greene carried on similar experiments with 
Copepods found in the splash pools located in the rocks on Cabrillo Point. 

Mr. E. G. Moberg, Scripps Institution, La Jolla, in December, investi- 
gated numerous samples of sea water to determine the daily range in 
hydrogen ion concentration. 

Doctor Sergius Morgulis, of Creighton University, made analyses of 
the blood of certain decapod crustaceans. 



Departmental Reports 141 

Doctor H. H. Newman, Department of Zoology, University of Chicago, 
in residence from March 29th, to June 15th, worked on the embryology of 
the sea star, Patiria miniata, and on the effects of temperature on the 
development of sea star and sea urchin eggs. 

Professor George J. Peirce (with Mr. Fremont Ballou), while teaching 
during the summer quarter, made a study of the kelps, especially the Giant 
Kelp, to ascertain certain features of its physiology and reproduction. 
Exploration of San Jose Caiion has disclosed the presence there of certain 
liverworts possessing extraordinary features of the vegetative and repro- 
ductive organs. 

Mr. W. L. Scofield and Mr. O. E. Sette, of the State Fish and Game 
Commission, continued work during the year on the life history of the 
Sardine. 

Professor J. O. Snyder of the Department of Zoology, while on the 
staff during the summer quarter, studied the ecology of tide-pool fishes. 

While teaching during the summer quarter Doctor C. V. Taylor under- 
took to culture and study some of the marine ciliates which occur in 
abundance in Monterey Bay and Elkhorn Slough. Several of the forms 
studied appeared to be new and so far as could be ascertained are probably 
not described. Of those tried out 18 different cases lived and multiplied 
vigorously in laboratory cultures. Stained slides on some of these were 
made for future study. Some attention was also given to the regeneration 
of the Hypotrichous ciliate Ur onychia. They were cut in various planes by 
means of a microdissection apparatus. The parts were then isolated in 
watch glasses containing water in which the animals were found thriving. 
In 11 out of 15 trials the nucleated parts regenerated normally, while all 
of the enucleated parts died. One apparently nucleated piece lived at least 
18 hours (from 3 p.m. until 10 a.m. the following day. At 2 p.m. on 
that following day the piece could not be found). 

Doctor D. H. Tennent, Department of Zoology, Bryn Mawr College, 
worked on problems of fertilization and development, using sea urchins' 
eggs. 

Walter Kenrick Fisher, 
Associate Professor of Zoology, and Director. 



LAW 

During the year the faculty of the Law School has consisted of Marion 
Rice Kirkwood, professor and acting dean ; Arthur Martin Cathcart, Joseph 
Walter Bingham, Clarke Butler Whittier, Chester Garfield Vernier, pro- 
fessors; William Brownlee Owens, associate professor; Austin Tappan 
Wright, of the University of California, acting professor in the fall 
quarter; Leslie James Ayer, of the University of Washington, acting 
professor in the winter and spring quarters; Oscar Kennedy Gushing, of 
the San Francisco bar, Henry Granville Hill, of the San Jose bar, and 
Leonard Saxton Lyon, of the Los Angeles bar, lecturers. 



142 Stanford University 

During the summer quarter the faculty consisted of Professors 
Cathcart, Kirkwood and Owens of the regular staff, and the following 
visitors : Professor Charles E. Carpenter, University of Oregon, Professor 
George Purcell Costigan, Jr., University of California, Professor Evans 
Holbrook, University of Michigan, Professor Floyd Russell Mechem, Uni- 
versity of Chicago. 

The registration of students during the fall, winter and spring quarters 
totaled 245, an increase of 22 over the number enrolled last year. During 
the summer quarter the attendance was 97, as compared with 82 for the 
summer of 1922. 

In addition to the regular professional curriculum, members of the Law 
faculty have given the following courses in the University : Introduction to 
the Study of Law, Professor Kirkwood; Business Law, Associate Pro- 
fessor Owens; Lectures on Medical Jurisprudence by Professors Cathcart, 
Whittier, Vernier, and Kirkwood. 

An important change in the professional curriculum is the extension of 
the work in Practice. The course is no longer limited to problems of 
practice in California but deals with matters of practice and procedure 
generally with special reference to the Western States. This is in keeping 
with the general policy of the school to serve the needs of students through- 
out the West. The amount of time devoted to this course has been doubled. 
After a few years of experimentation it is anticipated that the work in 
Practice will become one of the most valuable and attractive features of the 
Law curriculum. 

It has also seemed desirable to restore the course in Introduction to the 
Study of Law as it was given up to 1921. 

Members of the faculty have continued to carry their share of general 
University administration, as shown by the following memberships on 
University committees. Professor Cathcart has served as a member of the 
Advisory Board and the Executive Committee of the Academic Council. 
Professor Whittier has continued to serve as Chairman of the Scholarship 
Committee. Professor Vernier has been a member of the Committee on 
Admission and Advanced Standing, and during the summer quarter acted as 
Chairman of the Committee on Scholarship. Professor Owens is a member 
of the Committee on Student Affairs and is Chairman of the Board of 
Governors of the Stanford Union. Professor Kirkwood has served upon 
the Committee on Public Exercises, the Committee on Schedule and 
Examinations and the Advisory Committee for the course in Citizenship. 

Professor Cathcart has continued his services as Mayor of the City of 
Palo Alto, and Professor Kirkwood as a member of the Board of Educa- 
tion of the Palo Alto City School District. Professor Vernier has con- 
tinued as Associate Editor of the Journal of the Institute of Criminal 
Law. Professor Bingham has been a member of the faculty of the 
University of Michigan Law School during the summer. 

During the fall quarter the students of the Law School conceived the 
idea of raising a sum of money with which to endow a collection of law 
books in memory of the late Dean Charles Andrews Huston. Contributions 



Departmental Reports 143 

to this fund were made by members of the Law student body, the faculty, 
and graduates of the school. In a very quiet way about $2,500 was 
secured. The action of the students in raising this fund, as well as their 
g^enerous individual contributions to it, show more plainly than could words 
the high regard and affection in which Dean Huston was held by all who 
knew him. 

On June 1st the second annual dinner of the Stanford Law Association 
was held in the New Union. About one hundred persons, chiefly alumni, 
were present. Addresses were made by President Ray Lyman Wilbur and 
by the Honorable Curtis D. Wilbur, Chief Justice of the California Supreme 
Court. 

The normal increase in the size of the student body and in the number 
of books in the Law Library during the year has served to intensify the 
need of more adequate quarters for the school. At the present time we 
find it necessary to use remote class rooms in some instances, and it is 
possible to accommodate only a small part of the students in the reading 
room of the Law Library. The stack room is wholly insufficient In this 
latter connection temporary relief has been secured by making use of the 
basement of the Administration building and by adding to the height of 
certain stacks in the library. The general efficiency of the school will be 
g^reatly increased when proper quarters are available for its work. 

Marion Rice Kirkwood, 
Professor of Law, and Acting Dean. 



MATHEMATICS 

The usual courses were given during the first three quarters by Pro- 
fessor Robert Edgar Allardice, Professor Rufus Lot Green, Professor Hans 
Frederic Blichfeldt, and Miss Beatrice Fenner, teaching assistant 

The work of the summer quarter was entrusted to Professor William 
Albert Manning, who gave one advanced course, and to Acting Assistant 
Professor James T. Matthews. 

The number of students enrolled in each of the four quarters was 
53, 118, 85, and 50. A greater variety of courses might well be offered to 
the students who come for the summer session. 

William Albert Manning, 
• Professor of Applied Mathematics. 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

The teaching staff in the department for the year 1922-23 was as follows : 
W^illiam Frederick Durand, professor of Mechanical Engineering; Guido 
Hugo Marx, professor of Machine Design; William Rankine Eckart, pro- 
fessor of Experimental Engineering; Everett Parker Lesley, professor of 
Industrial Engineering and superintendent of Shops; Lawrence Edminster 
Cutter, associate professor of Mechanical Engineering; Charles Norman 



144 Stanford University 

Cross, associate professor of Mechanical Engineering ; Horatio Ward Steb- 
bins, assistant professor of Mechanical Engineering ; Boynton Morris Green, 
instructor in Machine Design ; Edward John Stanley, teaching specialist 
in Pattern Making; James Bennett Liggett, teaching specialist in Foundry; 
Theron James Palmateer, teaching specialist in Machine Shop; Robert 
Henry Harcourt, teaching specialist in Forge Shop. 

The work of the year has been carried on substantially as in former 
years. The increase in number since the close of the war period has occa- 
sioned some crowding and has definitely overtaxed the teaching personnel 
in certain subjects. Early relief from this condition is needed. I repeat 
again my reference of a year ago to the general age of much of our equip- 
ment in shops and laboratories and to the early need of replacement of parts 
of this equipment which are becoming either obsolete or outworn. The 
available appropriations for equipment during the past year have been 
expended for the most part in such replacements, leaving but small amounts 
for new equipment. Without increased appropriations, this must presumably 
remain the policy of the department for some time in the future. 

Researches by various members of the department have been carried on 
during the year on a variety of engineering problems. 

Professors Durand and Lesley have continued their work for the 
National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics on various problems con- 
nected with air propellers. 

Professor G. H. Marx has been occupied with a resumption of his 
researches in the wear of gear teeth. 

Professor W. R. Eckart has been occupied with further study of the 
phenomena of heat exchange through metal walls between liquids, v-apors, 
and gases. 

Professor C. N. Cross has been occupied with problems connected with 
power and power development. 

Professor L. E. Cutter has completed the preparation of his text on 
Descriptive Geometry which was published during the year. 

Professor H. W. Stebbins has been studying problems in heat insulation 
and ha^ served as member of a committee advisory to the State Accident 
Commission on the rules for boiler inspection. 

Instructor B. M. Green has been occupied with problems relating to 
engineering design, and with Professor G. H. Marx in a resumption of the 
research on the wear of gear teeth. 

William Frederick Durand. 

Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 



MEDICAL SCHOOL 

The registration of medical students for the year was as follows : First- 
year students, 46 ; second-year students, 47 ; third-year students. 24 : fourth- 
year students, 27; fifth-year students, internes, 22; total, 166. Two students 
received the degree of Master of Arts from the Division of Experimental 



Departmental Reports 145 

Medicine. Twenty-two students (20 men and 2 women) were granted the 
degree of Doctor of Medicine during the year. Twenty special workers 
were registered during the year. 

The attendance in the Out- Patient Clinics was as follows: New 
patients, 11,973; old patients, 95^277; referred and transferred, 8,778; 
total number of visits, 116,028. 

The Popular Medical Lectures for 1922-23 were delivered by Dr. Philip 
King Brown; Dr. Lewis M. Terman, Professor of Psychology; Mr. J. C. 
Astredo, Chief Probation Officer of the Juvenile Court. Miss Katherine 
Fclton, General Secretary, Associated Charities; Dr. Guy S. Millberry, 
Dean of the Dental School of the University of California; Dr. William C. 
Hassler, the Health Officer of the Department of Public Health of San 
Francisco; and Mrs. C. W. Hetherington, Director of Health Education, 
Board of Education, on the general subject of Child Hygiene. 

The Jordan Medical Scholar for the year was Charles A. Love, Jr. 

The most important event of the last year was the drive of the Univer- 
sity ior an endowment of $1,000,000, the income of which is to be devoted 
to the Medical School. The drive, which was limited to the Bay Cities, 
proved to be a great success, netting $407,481.50. Judging from the results 
it should not be difficult to raise the remainder of $1,000,000. 

The medical faculty decided not to continue the teaching of undergraduate 
students during the summer quarter because experience had shown that 
this arrangement seriously disarranged the curriculum of the medical stu- 
dents and also caused an unnecessary repetition of the courses in the 
medical school. It was decided instead to devote the summer months to 
special work for advanced medical students and practitioners of medicine. 
The idea is not so much to give graduate courses, but to open up the 
facilities of the clinics and laboratories to well qualified men for their 
improvement. 

A new course in emergency surgery was established in the medical 
school. This will give the medical students an opportunity to become familiar 
with this subject. The course is in charge of Assistant Clinical Professor 
Edmund Butler, who at the same time is the chief surgeon of the emergency 
service of the San Francisco Department of Public Health. 

At the request of the medical schools, the requirements for the medical 
curriculum in the state law governing the practice of medicine in California 
were altered in such a way as to give more elasticity to the medical 
curriculum. Instead of having the exact hours in the various subjects 
specified, the required hours are now stated in percentages as follows : 

Anatomy 14 to 18j/^7o 

Physiology 4^ to 6 % 

Biochemistry 3j^ to 4j/^% 

Pathology, Bacteriology, and Immunology 10 to 13 % 

Pharmacology, including Materia Medica and Toxicology 4 to 5 % 

Preventive Medicine and Hygiene 3 to 4 % 



146 Stanford University 

General Medicine, Neurology, and Psychiatry, Pediatrics, 

Dermatology and Syphilis 20 to 261470 

General Surgery, Orthopedic Surgery, Urology, Eye, Ear, 

Nose and Throat, Roentgenology 13 to U^^Tc 

Obstetrics and Gynecology 4 to 5 % 

The Stanford Clinics Auxiliary and San Francisco Maternity, a body 
of women who are conducting the social work in our clinics, has received 
recognition from the Community Chest and is now being supported by the 
Community Chest Funds. 

During the year an affiliation was perfected between the Nurses* School 
at the San Francisco Hospital, that of the University of California, and our 
own. As a result of this affiliation, the San Francisco Department of Public 
Health appointed an advisory committee to the Nurses' School at the San 
Francisco Hospital which consists of the President of the Board of 
Health, the Deans of the two universities, or their representatives, the 
Health Officer, the Superintendent of the San Francisco Hospital, and the 
members of the Hospital Committee of the Board of Health. It is hoped in 
this way to strengthen the training school at the San Francisco Hospital 
and also to afiFord the nurses at the University Hospitals facilities for 
training in infectious diseases and tuberculosis at the San Francisco 
Hospital. 

A great step in advance was taken by the establishment of a diet 
laboratory in connection with our hospital. It is located in the basement 
of the house on the northeast corner of Clay and Webster streets. The 
purposes of this laboratory are the following : 

(1) To prepare all special diets for the hospital. 

(2) To provide meals for patients who require special diets. For this 
purpose there is connected with the diet laboratory a public restaurant. At 
the present time this restaurant also furnishes ordinary meals to ambulator>' 
patients, their friends, medical students, and such members of the staff as 
may wish to avail themselves of this service at reasonable rates. 

(3) Special foods are prepared in the laboratory and are for sale to 
patients who require them. 

(4) The laboratory is used in the instruction of nurses and medical 
students. 

Thanks to the initiative of the Physician Superintendent and the intelli- 
gent cooperation of our dietitian, the laboratory has been an immediate 
success in filling a long felt need of our patients, in an educational way and 
also from a financial point of view. 

Through Dr. Simon Flcxner of the Rockefeller Foundation, Lane Hos- 
pital received $10,000 for the administration of insulin to clinic patients from 
Mr. John D. Rockefeller, Jr. This money may be used for purchase of 
insulin, for providing the necessary hospital beds, payment of salaries of 
technical assistants so far as they are necessary for this work among the 
clinic patients. One of the conditions of the gift is that instruction be 
given to physicians in the use of insulin. 



Departmental Reports 147 

The Medical Faculty permitted for this year the full second-year class 
to come to San Francisco to finish their sixth quarter. Only those students 
who had made one and one-third grade points in their required work in the 
Medical School were permitted to pass on into the third year. This reduced 
the number of students in the third year to 30. 

Dr. H. L. Langnecker has deposited with the President of the University 
a check of $150 in support of a fellowship in the Division of Physiotherapy. 
Dr. Langnecker reports that a similar sum of money will be turned over to 
the University by the anonymous donor on October 1st, to provide sufficient 
money for this fellowship for six months. This fund is to be known as the 
Rehabilitation Fund of the Medical School. 

Dr. E. C. Dickson has received assurance from Mr. R. I. Bentley of 
the California Packing Corporation of a grant of money of $1200, probably 
to be paid by the National Canners' Association, for the purpose of providing 
an assistant in order to carry on additional work on the nature of the 
poison of the Bacillus botulinus. 

The President and Comptroller of the University have authorized the 
construction of a teaching laboratory of pharmacology in the Amphitheater 
on the fifth floor of the Medical School Building. This laboratory is now 
in process of construction. It will provide adequate laboratory facilities for 
approximately fifty students. By the construction of this laboratory, the 
Amphitheater, which was entirely too large, will be reduced to a reasonable 
size and the erection of a partition to cut off the Amphitheater from the 
passage-way has also been allowed. 

During the summer there was a meeting of the American Medical 
Association in the Exposition Auditorium in the Civic Center which 
occurred on the following dates : June 25 to June 29, 1923. Several of our 
men presented papers in the various sections. The Pathological Laboratory, 
the Laboratory on Surgical Pathology, the Laboratory on Orthopedic 
Surgery participated in the Scientific Exhibit. There was also an exhibit 
of the Public Health Service which illustrated some of the work done on 
Botulism by Dr. E. C. Dickson and Professor Meyer of the Hooper 
Foundation of the University of California. 

A special invitation was extended to the physicians who attended this 
meeting to visit the Medical School Buildings on Friday afternoon, June 
29th from 2 to 4. At this time some of the rarer volumes belonging to our 
collection on the History of Medicine were placed on exhibition at the Lane 
Medical Library and a lantern slide demonstration on the History of 
Medicine was given by Dr. W. C. Alvarez of San Francisco. 

On September 1st the Sutro Library moved from the top floor of the 
Lane Library, making this space available for extension of * our Medical 
Library, particularly for the accommodation of our new collection on the 
History of Medicine and of the special library on Ophthalmology and 
Otolaryngology donated by Dr. A. Barkan. The new stacks and the furnish- 
ings for the new reading room have already been ordered and the installation 
will commence some time in October. 



148 Stanford University 

At the request of the Clinical Committee, arrangements have been made 
during the summer to bring the out-patient department into closer connec- 
tion with the clinic work at the hospital. It is the intention to have a 
separate Department on Clinics which will include both the in and out- 
patient clinical departments. Arrangements are being made in the books of 
the Medical School so that the accounts of the "Stanford Clinics" will be 
segregated from the rest of the expenses of the Medical School. It is hoped 
in this way to get a better presentation of the amount of free and part-pay 
work now being done in the clinic department. 

The business-office also has relieved the Social Service Department of 
the work of admission of free patients to the clinical wards and there is 
now in the out-patient department a special representative of the business- 
office who looks out for this work and other financial matters that are 
connected with the management of the clinics. 

In connection wtth the School of Nursing, for the last two- summers a 
course, for graduate nurses has been held at Stanford University. The 
course this year was in charge of Miss Carolyn Gray, Professor of Nursing 
at the University of Minnesota. The two summer courses have been well 
attended and have evidently filled a demand on the part of graduate 
nurses. The Clinical Committee has recommended that a similar course be 
given next year and has appointed a committee consisting of Dr. G. B. 
Somers, Professor Landis and Professor Stoltenberg to arrange the details 
with the University authorities. 

William Ophuls, 

Dean. 



Stanford University Hospitals 

A condensed statistical report of Lane and Stanford University Hos- 
pitals is given below to give a general idea of work done. A more detailed 
report will be given in the Annual Report of these institutions. 

admissions 

This Year Last Year 

Lane and Stanford 10,037 9,616 

Deaths 270 250 

Autopsies 76 54 

PATIENT DAYS 

Lane 52,046 45,666 

Stanford 36.675 37,762 

Total .' 88.721 83.428 

AVERA(iE PATIENTS PER DAY 

Stanford 101.26 103.93 

Lane 140.27 122.85 

Total 241.53 226.78 



Departmental Reports 149 

GENERAL STATISTICS 

Resident Staff 21 21 

Daily average number employees 226 275 

Daily average number pupil nurses 144 124 

Daily average number staff nurses. 43 48 

Greatest number of patients 290 286 

Smallest number of patients 190 170 

Number of private operations 2,536 2,230 

Number of clinio operations. 1,702 1,561 

X-Ray, private cases 3,469 3,151 

X-Ray, dinic cases 8,108 6,151 

X-Ray, total number of cases 11,577 9,305 

X-Ray, private units of service 13,113 12,772 

X-Ray, clinic units of service 27,187 22,636 

X-Ray, total units of service 40,300 35.408 

Number of electrotherapy treatments 2,988 2,518 

Number of hydrotherapy treatments 2,480 3,030 

Number of electrocardiograph examinations 1,215 865 

The decided increase in the number of patient days in Lane Hospital 
follows the plan mentioned in last year's report of placing a hospital 
resident in both the medical and surgical clinics. Dr. J. W. Jones for 
surgery and Dr. D. E. Shepardson for medicine worked hard to build up 
both the out-patient and in-patient clinics and their efforts were followed by 
very gratif3ring results. 

SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Miss Maude Landis, the Superintendent of Nurses, has accomplished a 
great deal during the year in perfecting her organization and in strengthen- 
ing the courses of instruction. The three year course which was adopted 
last year consisting of four months' probationary work, twenty-four months 
of routine and eight months of advanced or elective seems to be working 
out well but the students who will be ready for advanced courses will not 
begin them until October. The coming year will therefore be the real test 
of the plan. 

HOSPITAL STAFF 

Dr. H. G. Mehrtens served as House Physician, Dr. W. Mills as first 
assistant assigned to surgery and Dr. J. M. George as second assistant 
assigned to medicine. 

RESIDENTS 

Dr. D. E. Shepardson served as Resident in Medicine and Dr. J. W. 
Jones as Resident in Surgery. 

INTERNES 

The senior internes for the year were Dr. H. Miller, Medicine; Dr. 
Edith Boyd, Pediatrics; Dr. R. T. Haig, Surgery; Dr. Elizabeth Arthurs, 
Obstetrics and Gynecology; Dr. S. V. Christierson, Ear, Nose, and Throat, 
Dr. W. F. Swett, Eye. 

The junior internes were Drs. C. VV. Ankele, L. R. Chandler, I. V. 
Heron, F. R. Johnston, M. Maynard, D. K. Pischel, R. P. Seitz, A. F. 
Warren, J. O. Wilke. 



150 Stanford University 

COMMISSARY DEPARTMENT 

The Special Diet Laboratory for out-patients has had a very successful 
year and in conjunction with the establishment of Insulin treatments has 
proved a most useful aid to the medical staff. 

REPAIRS 

During the past year Lane Hospital has been almost entirely renovated 
by painting all wards and halls. Nearly all of the old system of steam 
radiators has also been replaced with the purpose of economizing steam and 
rendering the heating more efficient. 

X-RAY DEPARTMENT 

Extensive alterations and additions were carried out in this department 
during the past year together with the installation of much new apparatiis. 
The deep therapy machine specially designed by Dr. Chamberlain and Dr. 
Newell is now in place and rendering very satisfactory service. Altogether 
the changes have increased the capacity of the department by fully 50r<r 
and allow of the handling and treatment of the numerous patients with 
greatly increased facility and comfort. 

METABOLISM AND ELECTROCARDIOGRAPH 

The laboratory accommodating the apparatus for this work has been 
enlarged and shows a decided improvement in the amount and character of 
the work done. 

LAUNDRY 

This department was improved during the year by the installation of an 
additional tumbler. It is, however, working now to its full capacity and 
barely meets the demands of the institution. It is probable that one or 
two of the steam presses will need replacing during the coming year but 
otherwise the machinery is in good order. 

A very great saving in the department could be effected by the installa- 
tion of a water softening plant. It is hoped that steps may be taken in this 
direction during the coming year. 

George Burbank Somers, 

Physician Superintendent. 



Palo Alto Hospital 

Second annual report for the year ending June 30, 1923. 

The number of patient days for the year was 7068 as against 6379 for 
1922. This shows an increase of occupancy from 49% to SS% over the 
previous year. The census distribution is shown by the following table: 

CENSUS 

Total number patients admitted 1350 

Average number patients admitted per day 3.58 

Total number men 761 

Total nimiber women 544 



Departmental Reports 151 

Total number children 45 

Total number Palo Alto residents 493 

Total number non-residents 417 

Total number students 414 

Total number births .- 112 

Total number deaths 41 

Total number surgical operations 680 

Average number staff nurses employed 8.33 

Average number employees , 16.66 

Total number days special nursing 2658 

The income for the year was $69,790.43 showing a gain of $9,956.05 over 
the previous year. The expenses amounted to $69,157.74 showing an increase 
of $10,041.58, but leaving a net income of $632.69 as against $718.22 for 1922. 

Included in the expense account are a large amotmt of new equipment 
and certain extraordinary repairs such as a new hot water system and new 
sewer system costing a total of $5,969.67. This sum added to the net income 
gives a total of $6,602.06 as a normal operating gain but allowing a reason- 
able amount for depreciation the operating gain may be fairly placed 
at $4,102.06. 

ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE 

The business office has made a considerable improvement in collections 
over the same period last year. With the help of Mr. Erwin, the University 
Accountant, the system and methods of handling collections are in much 
better shape than formerly and are showing steady improvement in 
efficiency. 

The bad debt write-off for the year was about 1.165% of the gross 
income. This is considered a very good showing in hospital business. 

ACCIDENT CASES 

Many of the accident cases brought to the Palo Alto Hospital are unable 
or unwilling to pay for services rendered. The uncollected amotmt for such 
patients during the past year was $1,854.66. During the past year there were 
66 accident cases treated at the hospital or an average of 5.5 per month. 
Owing to the crowded condition of the highways the number of such cases 
is steadily increasing and there is a demand on the part of the visiting 
staff of the hospital that better facilities be provided for handling such 
patients. 

Whether emergency patients pay or not, humanity demands that proper 
provisions be made for their reception and care as a life-saving measure. To 
meet the situation plans have already been made for providing and equipping 
an emergency room on the first floor of the hospital and the improvement 
will be carried out at an early date. 

The cost of treating accident cases is not a fair charge against the 
hospital, for whatever expense is incurred along this line, which is largely 
for non-residents, retards the development of the hospital along the legiti- 
mate line of providing the best possible service for the community and the 



151 Stanford University 

local profession. Every community in proportion to requirements is morally 
obligated to provide for first aid to the injured. It is hoped that this 
problem which has already been placed before the City Council of Palo 
Alto will receive early attention and suitable solution. 

STAFF 

Mrs. M. E. Barry who served as superintendent of the hospital for 
nearly twelve years resigned. I wish to express a word of personal appre- 
ciation and make record of the appreciation shown by the visiting staff for 
the most excellent work rendered by Mrs. Barry during her administration. 

Miss Gladys Gilman, first assistant Superintendent of Nurses at Lane 
and Stanford University Hospitals was selected to fill the vacancy. She has 
given an excellent account of herself since assuming charge. 

Miss Imogene Calderwood who served as Dietitian for nearly two years 
was called back to Lane and Stanford University Hospitals to assume a 
more responsible position. Miss Haworth from the Stanford Diet Service 
was promoted to succeed Miss Calderwood. 

THE X-RAY LABORATORY 

Dr. Robert F. Powers has continued in charge of the X-Ray Department 

which has shown a steady increase in amount of business and of income. 

i The location of the laboratory is inconvenient as regards access. It is 

planned in the budget to provide a new entrance which will make the 

quarters much more desirable. 

CLINICAL LABORATORY 

Miss Beryl E. E. Nichols was appointed to succeed Miss Virginia Kelly 
in charge of this department. The laboratory has been financially success- 
ful from the beginning of Miss Nichols' service and each month has added 
a substantial sum to the hospital income. Miss Nichols has provided expert 
service in all lines of clinical laboratory work which, taken in conjunction 
with the tissue examinations made by Professor E. W. Schultz, gives the 
profession of Palo Alto a most excellent laboratory service. 

This laboratory does all the work for the Palo Alto and Mayfield Health 
Offices. During the year the number of units of work performed was as 
follows : 

Hospital and Out-patient 1317 

Public Health Work ^ 980 

MAINTENANCE OF GROUNDS 

The arrangement by which the City Gardener takes charge of the hospital 
grounds has proved very satisfactory. The grounds now present a very 
attractive appearance and show the addition of many new shrubs and 
plants. 

The automobile shed erected during the past year has proved a great 
convenience to the visiting staff as has also the large search light installed 
for the purpose of lighting the hospital court at night. 



Departmental Reports 153 

LAUNDRY 

A new washer and body ironer have been installed and the quarters 
enlarged by taking in an adjoining storeroom. The laundry is now in 
satisfactory condition and meeting all demands upon it. 

BUDGET AND FUTURE PLANS 

As mentioned above the equipment of an emergency room for reception 
and first aid treatment of accident cases is planned for. Considerable new 
furniture for wards, rooms, and office will be needed. In the kitchen a 
steam table and an incinerator are much needed and have been placed on the 
budget list. A request has been made that the hospital enlarge its supply of 
instruments which will be complied with as far as possible. 

It is planned to paint and renovate all rooms and wards because of their 
present poor condition and appearance. 

The financial report filed under separate cover by the University 
Accountant contains also the budget for the coming year. Therein is given 
in detail the list of proposed improvements and additions to equipment. 

At frequent intervals the hospital is run to full capacity and patients are 
often turned away. It is quite evident from the increasing percentage of 
occupancy that during the winter seasons and in case of epidemics the 
hospital will be unable to accommodate the demand for beds. 

To meet the present needs another wing large enough to accommodate 
about 30 beds should be added. 

The hospital grounds are admirably adapted for the proposed extension 
and are large enough to meet present demands. If, however, Palo Alto 
continues to grow at its present rate, it will be necessary to provide more 
room in the near future that all the public health activities of the city may 
be gathered together at a single center. If such action is to be taken it 
certainly should be determined upon at the earliest possible date in order 
to avoid any hardships or seeming injustice to owners or future purchasers 
of neighboring property and in order to forestall obstructions and opposi- 
tion to an act of public benefit 

No better location for the purpose could be selected than the block 
where the hospital now stands and it is suggested that the City Planning 
Commission take under serious consideration the question of declaring this 
location the future Health Center of the City. 

George Burbank Sokers, 

Physician Superintendent. 



Medio N£ 



The teaching and clinical staff of the department for 1922-23 consisted 
of Albion Walter Hewlett (Executive), Thomas Addis, Professors; Harry 
Everett Alderson. William Fitch Cheney, Harold Phillips Hill, Walter 
Frank Schaller, Clinical Professors; Ernest Charles Dickson, Harold 
Kniest Faber, Associate Professors; Walter Whitney Boardman, William 



154 Stanford University 

R. P. Clark, Alfred Cummings Reed, Julian Wolfsohn, Henry H. Yering- 
ton, Associate Clinical Professors; W. Edward Chamberlain, Henry George 
Mehrtens, Assistant Professors; George de Forest Bamett, Millicent Cos- 
grave, Thomas George Inman, Harry Reeves Oliver, Arthur A. O'Neill, 
Assistant Clinical Professors; Robert Reid Newell, Harry Alphonso 
WyckoflF, Instructors; Clement Harisse Arnold, Wallace H. Barnes, Joseph 
H. Catton, James A. Cutting, Norbert J. Gottbrath, Maude N. Haven, 
Thomas H. Kelly, William Kenney, Frank A. Kinslow, Frederick W. 
Kroll, Mary Layman, Peter H. Luttrell, Philip Hale Pierson, Jay Marion 
Read, Hermann Schussler, Jr., Harry Spiro, Clinical Instructors ; George H. 
Becker, Martin Benzinger, Harry C. Coe, W. E. Glaeser, James A. Guilfoil, 
Jay Jacobs, Robert F. Kile, Mary Jones Mentzer, Joseph A. Sampson, 
Dwight E. Shepardson, Edward F. Stadtherr, Assistants; Adelaide Brown, 
Lecturer on Child Hygiene; Guy Stevens Farrington, Lecturer on Speech 
Defects ; Arthur John Ritter, Lecturer on Mental Deficiency. 

The following is a partial summary of investigations carried out during 
the past year by members of the Medical Department: 

Dr. Hewlett, with the assistance of Miss Anna Franklin, Mr. Mark 
Gerstle, Jr., and Mr. J. R. Nakada, has been investigating the mechanism 
of the recovery from the hyperpnoea which accompanies muscular exertion. 
A series of observations on the effect of quinidin on auricular fibrillation 
has been made and the results published. The effect of this drug on the 
frequency of attacks of paroxysmal tachycardia has also been studied. The 
results of an investigation into the cause of the increase in vascular sounds 
after the injection of epinephrin have been assembled and published. 
Dr. Hewlett is also engaged in a statistical study of vital capacity measure- 
ments in patients with heart disease. The "Pathological Physiology of 
Internal Disease" has been revised and issued as a new edition. It has 
been necessary to give larger quarters for the laboratory where measure- 
ments of basal metabolism are carried out. This laboratory is under the 
direction of Dr. Hewlett and Dr. Shephardson. It has been recently fitted 
out with apparatus for special work on metabolism. Dr. J. Marion Read 
has continued his studies of the symptomatology and etiology of thyro- 
toxicosis. Papers on the diagnostic value of the Goetsch test and on the 
effect of X-Rays on some of the pathological manifestations of thyrotoxi- 
cosis have been published. A statistical study of the relationship between 
basal metabolic rate and the basal pulse rate — ^pulse pressure product is 
being prepared for publication. Dr. H. Spiro has completed a study of 
methods for the measurement of the descending aorta and has published 
results of measurements in patients with aortitis made by means of an 
angle finder. He has also been engaged in a fluoroscopic study of the heart 
in order to obtain data as to the quality of the heart muscle, and has pub- 
lished some preliminary observations on this matter. Dr. Schoonmakcr 
has been making observations on the rate of disappearance of phenyltetra- 
chlorphthalein and rose bengal from the plasma after the intravenous 
injection of these dyes. 



Departmental Reports 155 

In the Laboratory of Experimental Medicine the active work in botulism 
has been discontinued but the results obtained in the previous years have 
been assembled and a number of reports have been published or are in press. 
The facilities of the laboratory were made available to Dr. Otto Barkan 
and Mr. Roy F. Nelson of the Division of Ophthalmology for an investiga- 
tion of the active principles in Milk-Injection Therapy and the results of 
this investigation have been published. ^ There are a number of problems 
concerning the method of action of botulinus toxin and the treatment of 
botulism which demand investigation and it is hoped that the necessary 
funds for these investigations may be available for the coming year. 

In the laboratory for the study of metabolic diseases Dr. Addis and 
Miss Lockard are collecting data bearing on the prognosis of various 
forms of Bright's disease. The extension or recession of the renal lesion 
is being followed at appropriate intervals of time by measurements of the 
ratio between the urea content of the urine and the blood. Dr. Addis is 
continuing quantitative studies of the number and variety of casts and 
other formed elements in the urine, in order to obtain data which may 

• 

form the basis for an anatomical classification of Bright's disease. Dr. 
Lamson has assembled the data so far obtained on the question of prognosis. 
The work on the renal lesion in pregnancy toxemia which is being carried 
on in collaboration with the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology has 
been continued. Mr. Stafford and Dr. Addis completed a study of the 
methods for the determination of diastase in blood and urine which led to 
a modification of the Wohlgemuth method. It was used in a comparison of 
diastase and urea excretion in normal individuals and in patients with 
Brighfs disease. The results are given in a paper at present in the press. 
Mr. MacKay and Miss Lockard completed a large number of experiments 
on the effect of deprivation of water on renal function in rabbits. They 
have also been engaged during the past year in an examination of the 
methods for urea determination in whole blood and in plasma. This work 
is not yet finished. Observations made by Dr. Addis, Miss Foster, and 
Mrs. Shevky on the volume and specific gravity of the urine under certain 
conditions in normal individuals and in patients with Bright's disease have 
been published during the past year. Data previously obtained on the action 
of thyroxin on urea excretion and on the effect of the removal of one 
kidney on renal function are being assembled for publication. 

In the Division of Pediatrics, Dr. Faber and Miss Hadden have been 
observing the influence of changes in the H ion concentration and in the 
buffer value of foods on digestion. Dr. Faber has published a critique' of 
the Pirquet Feeding System. Observations have been made by Dr. Faber 
on the effect of addition of hydrochloric acid to milk in infant feeding, and 
Dr. Kingston and Dr. Faber have completed a preliminary report on the 
X-Ray treatment of whooping cough. Two cases of Leishmaniosis found 
in San Francisco have been studied and reported. Dr. Boyd is making a 
study of the incidence of positive tuberculin reactions in San Francisco 
children and on the value of bovine tuberculin. Dr. Schussler had con- 
tinued his study of the treatment of congenital syphilis. 



156 . Stanford University 

In the Division of Neurology Dr. Schaller is continuing his study of 
the relation between structure and function in Huntington's chorea and in 
cerebellar tumor by serial sections of the brains of patients whose signs 
and symptoms were noted during life, and in conjunction with Dr. 
Mehrtens has been observing the effect of the new arsenical compound, 
tryparsamid. Dr. Mehrtens is working at the differentiation, from psychic 
findings, of general paresis from the vascular and meningeal types of 
neuro-syphilis and is also investigating the etiology of hemiatrophy ivhen 
associated with sclerodermia. A study of the mechanism of the Argyll 
Robertson pupil is being continued. Dr. Catton is engaged in work on the 
medical aspect of Criminology. 

In the Division of Dermatology Dr. Alderson is investigating the action 
of various drugs on the skin by the removal and microscopic study of the 
skin at varying intervals of time after the application of the drugs. A 
special study is being made in this way of the action of drugs in psoriasis. 
The presence of yaws in California, the effect of heliotherapy in psoriasis 
and the uses of carbon tetrachloride in dermatology have been subjects of 
special study during the past year. Dr. Alderson and Dr. Coe have also 
investigated erythema induratum. Dr. Alderson has been collecting data 
on occupational dermatoses, especially rice workers* dermatoses. 

In the Division of Roentgenology Dr. Chamberlain and Dr. Newell have 
completed work on a new high voltage apparatus for the X-Ray treatment 
of disease. This investigation was commenced three years ago because it 
was found that it was not possible to attain sufficient accuracy in dosage by 
any of the devices which had hitherto been elaborated. The direct measure- 
ment of the X-Ray energy has been achieved in this apparatus by means of 
an ionization chamber. This was made possible through the cooperation of 
the Department of Physics, where instruments were built and galvano- 
meters and measuring equipments were tested and selected. Professor 
Webster made frequent visits to the X-Ray department to advise in the 
construction of the apparatus. An electrically driven series of worm 
gears, built by our mechanic, Mr. George Hayes, under the supervision of 
Mr. Saunders, shuts off the machinery at the expiration of the required 
period of X-Ray exposure. 

During the past three months the diabetic service has been reorganized. 
In June, 1923, the University was given a fund of ten thousand dollars by 
J. D. Rockefeller, Jr., to be used in the treatment of clinic patients suffering 
from diabetes mellitus and for the instruction of physicians in the newer 
methods of diabetic treatment with the aid of the new drug "insulin." 
Under this fund a special diabetic laboratory has been equipped to care 
efficiently for the increased number of diabetic patients seeking the insulin 
treatment. A laboratory technician and a dietitian have been secured. Class 
instruction for diabetic patients has been instituted and the cooperation of 
several volunteer workers, chiefly former patients, has been organized to 
aid in the dietary instruction. More than sixty patients have already obtained 
benefits from this fund. Commencing November 1st, three-weeks' courses 



Departmental Reports 157 

of post-graduate instruction will be offered to physicians who wish to 
study the modern methods of diabetic treatment. 

Instruction was given in the medical wards of the Lane and San 
Francisco Hospitals, in the children's ward of the Lane Hospital, in the 
tuberculosis wards at the San Francisco Hospital, in the Isolation Hospital, 
in the various out-patient clinics, and in the X-Ray department of Lane 
Hospital. 

Instruction in the Medical wards of Lane Hospital was given by Doctors 
Hewlett, Cheney, Addis, Dickson, and Reed in Medicine; by Doctors 
Schaller, Inman, and Mehrtens in Neurology; by Dr. Mehrtens in Psy- 
chiatry, and by Dr. Alderson in Skin Diseases and Syphilis. 

The Medical Service at the San Francisco Hospital was in charge of 
Dr. H. P. Hill, assisted by Doctors Kenney, Read, and Lee. The Tuber- 
culosis Service at the San Francisco Hospital was in charge of Dr. W. R. 
P. Clark, assisted by Dr. W. E. Glaeser. 

The number of admissions during the year to the Medical Clinic ward 
(men's) at Lane Hospital was 1,393. 

The following table gives the number of patients who have been treated 
in the out-patient clinics attached to the Medical Department : 

Out-Fatient Qinic New Old Refers and Total 

1922-23 Patients Patients Transfers Visits 

Medical 1.781 12,799 1,196 15,776 

Children's 1,687 8,601 94 10,382 

Skin 600 8,432 936 9,968 

Neurological 563 13,843 474 14,880 

Chest 56 1,347 273 1.676 

Dental 1,238 1,295 2.533 

Albion Walter Hewlett, 

Professor of Medicine. 



Obstetrics and Gynecology 

The teaching staff of the past year has consisted of Alfred Baker Spald- 
ing, professor; Ludwig Augustus Emge, assistant professor; Henry Walter 
Gibbons, Frank Robert Girard, Henry Augustus Stephenson, William E. 
Stevens, assistant clinical professors; Albert Victor Pettit, Karl Ludwig 
Schaupp, clinical instructors; Harry E. Clay, Hans vonGeldern, Lewis 
Michelson, Arthur Lee Munger, assistants. Drs. T. F. Bell, E. C. Carr, 
W. W. Cheney, Ethel Havenner, B. S. Herman, W. C. Hobdy. P. N. 
Jacobson, T. Kenney, J. McKenney, B. Minehart, J. Orobko, W. E. Smith, 
F. Taylor assisted in the Women's Clinic as special workers. 

Many conferences have been held during the year for the purpose of 
building up the out-patient obstetrical service. This service is of value not 
only to our undergraduate students but through the recent act of Congress 
enacting the Sheppard-Towner Bill, many demands have been made on us 
for the better training of social service workers and public health nurses. 
Miss Harriet Pomeroy is devoting practically all of her time to this depart- 



158 Stanford University 

ment. The prenatal clinic is very popular with the patients and once each 
week the pregnant patients receive not only careful medical supervision but 
are also instructed in the proper care of the newborn baby and the impor- 
tance of having the baby return to the Children's Qinic later for continued 
supervision. 

Steps have been taken with the assistance of Professor Stoltenberg to 
arrange a course for graduate nurses and social service workers w^hich will 
lead to the degree of Bachelor of Arts in these departments similar to the 
degree of Bachelor of Arts already offered certain of our undergraduate 
nurses. 

Miss Wales, Head Social Service Worker, and her successor, Miss 
Cummings, Dr. Adelaide Brown, Miss Landis, and Dr. Somers have given 
much of their time and assistance in the development of this department. 
The Auxiliary to the Stanford Clinics has assisted greatly in the financial 
support. The Clinical Committee has also recognized the need of this 
department to Lane Hospital and has provided for partial support of the 
nursing department. 

During the past summer several nurses and social service workers have 
worked in the clinic as partial requirement for their course in public health 
nursing. 

The greatest need of the department is for more free beds. This fact was 
very strongly emphasized by Dr. Emerson in his recent report to the 
Community Chest of San Francisco. 

We still hope that funds for a Women's Hospital, properly endowed, 
will soon be raised. 

The following papers have been published: "The Extent of the Renal 
Lesion in tfie Toxaemias of Pregnancy," "Pelvic Measurements by X-Ray,'' 
"Vesico- Vaginal Fistulae" and "Rupture of the Uterus after Operation for 
Uterine Suspension," by Dr. A. B. Spalding; "An Early Benign Adenoma 
of the Appendix," by Dr. L. A. Emge; "Posterior Vaginal Drainage, With 
Description of New Instrument Used as a Vaginal Pelvic Guide," by Dr. 
F. R. Girard; "Diagnosis and Surgical Treatment of Malignant Tumors of 
the Kidney" and "Malignant Tumors of the Suprarenal Gland" by Dr. 
W. E. Stevens; "Cardiac Decompensations in Pregnancy and Labor," by 
Dr. K. L. Schaupp. 

The following papers are in print, "The Incidence of Venereal Disease 
in Patients Suffering with Sterility" (Symposium on Sterility) and 
"Neonatal Mortality Due to Syphilis and Other Maternal Infections," by 
Dr. A. B. Spalding; "Repair of Birth Lacerations of the Cervix Uteri— I. 
Immediate Repair," "The Effect of Benzyl Benzoate on the Antebody 
Formation in the Rabbit," and "The Birthrate: A Factor in National 
Welfare (Symposium on Sterility), by Dr. L. A. Emge; "Urology in 
Women," by Dr. W. E. Stevens ; "The Significance of Cervical Pathology in 
Sterility" (Symposium on Sterility), by Dr. A. V. Pettit. 

The following students have completed their theses for this department: 
"Carcinoma of the Body of the Uterus," by J. J. Doyle; "Inflammatory 



Departmental Reports 159 

Variations in the Leucocyte Count in Inflammations of the Female Genera- 
tive Organs," by P. W. Frame ; "Maternal Mortality— Obstetrics," by C. A^ 
Love; "Gjrnecological Post-Operative Mortality," by R. McKenzie; "Ab- 
dominal Measurements in Pregnancy," by W. Murphy; and "Induction of 
Labor with Hydrostatic Bags," by L. Sanborn. 

At Lane Hospital the Obstetrical and Gynecological wards have been 
supervised by Dr. Spalding, assisted by Dr. Emge and Dr. Pettit. At the 
San Francisco Hospital the Gynecological ward has been supervised by 
Dr. Girard and Dr. Gibbons, assisted by Dr. Schaupp and Dr. von Geldern, 
and the Obstetrical ward has been supervised by Dr. Schaupp, assisted by 
Dr. Munger and Dr. von Geldern. 

The Women's Clinic has been in charge of Dr. Pettit, 8079 patients 
having been treated. In the Gynecological ward at Lane Hospital 375 
patients have been treated, and in the Obstetrical ward 269 patients have 
been cared for. In the G3mecoIogical ward at San Francisco Hospital 233 
have been taken care of, and in the Obstetrical ward 275 have been attended. 
In the laboratory for the Division of Obstetrics and Gynecology 921 speci- 
mens have been studied. 

Mrs. M. Steinbeck has continued as secretary of the division and Miss 
G. Boycr has worked as technician in the laboratory. Miss R. Cook, who 
supervised the nursing in the Women's Clinic and the Out-patient Obstetrics, 
assisted by Miss Zahn, resigned to take charge of a hospital at North- 
western, California. She was succeeded by Mrs. P. Kinney and Miss 
• Harriet Pomeroy. Mrs. A. Robinson has had charge of the Social Service 
in the Women's Qinic. • 

The work of the Social Service Department has been of great value to 
us and aided greatly in spending justly and economically our meager budget. 
They have also obtained aid from other agencies for needy patients and 
have assisted the physicians in following the after-care of many patients 
operated on or confined in Lane Hospital. 

Volunteer aid has been given as clinical clerks by Miss V. Lilienthal, 
Mrs. Phlager and Mrs. Seddon. 

The division has continued to hold monthly meetings and all have 
derived a great deal of mutual benefit from the clinical and divisional dis- 
cussions. 

Alfred Baker Spalding, 
Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 



Pathology 

The personnel of this department was made up of William Ophiils, 
professor; Jean Redman Oliver, associate professor; George Stevens, 
technical assistant. 

Dr. Ophiils has continued his work on a general statistical survey of 
the results of the post-mortem examinations in this department during the 
last twenty years. He also wrote an article on periarteritis nodosa. 



160 Stanford University 

Dr. Oliver continued his studies on the biological reactions of arsphcna- 
mine. 
' The number of autopsies performed during the year was 152, and 762 
bacteriological and pathological specimens were examined. 

William Ophuls, 

Professor of Pathology. 



Pharmacology and Therapeutics 

Staff: The staff of the department during the year consisted of P. J. 
Hanzlik, professor ; F. De Eds, instructor ; R. V. A. Lee, clinical instructor 
in therapeutics ; M. JL. Ta inter, assistant in instruction ; Miss N. E. Presho, 
assistant in research and secretary, and A. Dressel, technician. 

Teaching: The second year teaching was conducted, in part only, in the 
present research quarters, which had to be vacated during this time, or 
over a period of four months. The results were unsatisfactory to both the 
students and the staff. It was concluded that it was physically impossible 
to continue teaching of the second year work any longer under present 
circumstances. A new teaching laboratory, therefore, has been recommended 
to be constructed during the summer. It is to be located in the upper part of 
the large amphitheater on the fifth floor of the medical school building. 
The plans call for a combined chemical and pharmacodynamics teaching 
laboratory, with demonstration equipment, to accommodate 50 students. 

Research : The following problems have been under investigation during 
the year: ^ 

Disturbances in the physical and chemical equilibria of the blood and 
tissues in the reactions from a variety of agents injected intraven- 
ously, by Dr. Hanzlik and Messrs. De Eds, Tainter, and Somerfield. 
Clinical effects of the conjunctival administration of epinephrin, 
by R. V. A. Lee. 

Liberation of formaldehyde from and fate of hexamethylenamin in 
the blood, by Mr. De Eds. 

Liberation of salicyl from and excretion of salicyl esters, by Miss 
Presho. 

The edema of paraphenylenediamin, by Mr. Tainter. 
Pharmacology of American mistletoe, by Mr. French. 

Full papers on completed work were published as follows : 

"Hexamethylenamin as a Diuretic," by P. J. Hanzlik and H. O. Ruh. 

^'Experimental Plumbism in Pigeons from the Administration of Metallic 
Lead," by P. J. Hanzlik, contributed to the Festschrift in honor of Gehei- 
mrat Professor Dr. H. H. Meyer, Pharmacological Institute, University of 
Vienna. 

"Comparative Toxicity of Inorganic Lead Compounds and Metallic Lead 
for Pigeons," by P. J. Hanzlik and Elizabeth Presho. 

"Therapeutic Efficiency of Various Agents for Chronic Poisoning by 
Metallic Lead for Pigeons," by P. J. Hanzlik and Elizabeth Presho. 



Departmental Reports 161 

"Comparative Toxicity of Metallic Lead and Other Heavy Metals in 
Pigeons," by P. J. Hanzlik and Elizabeth Presho. 

"The Salicylates, XIV. Liberation of Salicyl from and Excretion of 
Acetylsalicylic Acid," by P. J. Hanzlik and Elizabeth Presho. 

The following preliminary reports of work in progress were published : 

"Disturbances in the Acid-Base Equilibrium of the Blood by Intravenous 
Injections," by P. J. Hanzlik, F. De Eds and M. L. Tainter. 

"Mechanism of Edema Production by Paraphenylenediamin," by P. J. 
Hanzlik and M. L. Tainter. 

"Increase in Number and Clumping of Thrombocytes (Platelets) in 
Pigeons by Agents Causing Anaphylactoid Reactions," by F. De Eds and 
H. A. Somerfield. 

Graduate and Summer Work : Mr. De Eds is registered for the Ph.D. 
degree in pharmacology during the summer quarter, and Mr. Tainter con- 
templates the A.M. degree. Volunteer workers at research were Mr. Somer- 
field throughout the academic year and Mr. French during the summer 
quarter. Requests for advanced work and training in teaching by an 
exchange fellow of the Prague Pharmacological Institute and by an instruc- 
tor in pharmacology of the University of Oregon were received, but are 
held in abeyance until proper teaching quarters are provided for the depart- 
ment. 

Miscellaneous : Dr. Hanzlik attended the meeting of the Federation of 
American Societies for Experimental Biology at Toronto during the 
Christmas holidays, and made a preliminary report of work on intravenous 
injections. The meetings of the American Medical Association at San 
Francisco were attended by all members of the staff. A lantern slide 
demonstration of "Dangers of Intravenous Therapy : Physical and Chemical 
Changes in the Blood," Messrs. De Eds and Tainter and Dr. Hanzlik, was 
given on three different days in the A. M. A. motion picture theater. Dr. 
R. V. A. Lee contributed a paper on "The Pharmacology of Mercury" to 
the Symposium on the Treatment of Syphilis held by the Sections on 
Pharmacology and Therapeutics and on Dermatology and Syphilis. A con- 
tribution to a Symposium on Allergy held by the San Francisco County 
Medical Society was given by Dr. Hanzlik. Dr. Hanzlik was reelected to 
the Council of the Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Thera- 
peutics, and elected chairman of the Section on Pharmacology and Thera- 
peutics of the American Medical Association. Assistance was given by 
Dr. Hanzlik to the Council of Pharmacy and Chemistry and to the Journal 
of the American Medical Association, and to the California State Journal 
of Medicine along various lines to promote rational therapy. 

Paul John Hanzlik, 
Professor of Pharmacology. 



162 Stanford University 

Surgery 

The teaching and clinical staff of the department for 1922-23 was as 
follows : Stanley Stillman and Emmet Rixford, professors ; Albert Brown 
McKee, Rufus Lee Rigdon, Edward Cecil Sewall, clinical professors; 
Frank Ellsworth Blaisdell, John Francis Cowan, Leonard Wheeler Ely, 
associate professors; Leo Eloesser, Philip Kingsnorth Gilman, Harrington 
Bidwell Graham, Harvard Young McNaught, Caroline B. Palmer, asscx:iate 
clinical professors ; Edward B. Towne, assistant professor ; John Adolf 
Bacher, Hans Barkan, John Robert Burrows, Edmund Butler, James Root 
Dillon, Arthur L. Fisher, Harry Leslie Langnecker, assistant clinical pro- 
fessors ; Otto Barkan, Harold Augustus Fletcher, Ross Wallace Harbaugh, 
Roderic O'Connor, Lloyd Robinson Reynolds, Chester Howard Woolsey, 
clinical instructors; Rea Ernest Ashley, Hubert W. Dudley, William C. 
Hobdy, Josiah H. Kirk, Harold Staats Moore, Merton James Price, Lornili 
Anna Rethwilm, Edward Solomon, John Philip Strickler, Wilbur Frank 
Swett, Sigurd von Christierson, Frederick L. Wright and J. Walter Jones, 
assistants; Sterling Bunnell, George W. Hartman, Henry A. L. Ryfkogel, 
Alfred J. Zobel, lecturers. 

Instruction in general surgery in the Out-patient clinic and at Lane 
Hospital has been given by Drs. Stillman, Cowan, Blaisdell, Gilman, and 
Towne. 

Instruction in general surgery at the San Francisco Hospital has been 
given by Drs. Rixford, Eloesser, Harbaugh, and Butler. 

The Out-patient Surgical Clinic has been under the supervision of Dr. 
J. W. Jones, assisted by Drs. W. C. Hobdy, J. P. Strickler, R. A. Ostroff. 
and a Junior Intern. Miss Kathleen McGeehan has been the nurse in 
charge, and Mrs. J. P. Sweeney, clerk of clinic. 

The total number of visits to this clinic was 13,237, of which 1,354 were 
made by new patients, 715 by referred and transferred patients, and 11.168 
by old patients. Four hundred and ninety-seven patients were sent to Lane 
Hospital and 123 to the Surgical Service of the San Francisco Hospital. 

During the year, 461 ^operations were performed by members of the 
staff in the operating rooms of Stanford Hospital. 

In the Genito- Urinary clinic the teaching and clinical work have been 
under the supervision of Drs. R. L. Rigdon; with Dr. James R. Dillon, 
chief of clinic, assisted by Drs. L. R. Rejmolds, Edward Solomon, Edgar 
C. Lee and C. H. Woolsey; Mr. B. F. Jones, technical assistant, and Mrs. 
J. Morrille George, clerical assistant. 

The total number of visits to the clinic during the year was 14,960. Of 
these, 13,742 were by old patients, 707 by new patients, and 511 by referred 
and transferred patients. One hundred and ten patients were sent to Lane 
Hospital and forty-two to San Francisco Hospital. One hundred and fifty- 
five operations were performed by members of the Clinic Staff in Stanford 
Hospital and seventy-three by members of the San Francisco Hospital Staff. 
One hundred and ninety- four operations were performed in the Out-patient 
Clinic. 



Departmental Reports 163 

In Ophthalmology, the clinic and instruction has been under the super- 
vision of Dr. A. B. McKee, assisted by Drs. H. Barkan, O. Barkan, 
W. D. Swett, H. W. Dudley, and R, S. Irvine, and Mr. John H. Brunnings, 
optician. 

The total number of visits to the clinic during the year was 8990. Of 
these, 1512 were made by new patients, 801 by referred and transferred 
patients, and 6677 by old patients. 

Seventy-three operations were performed in the Stanford Hospital by 
members of the staff, 30 patients were treated in Lane Hospital, and six 
patients were transferred to San Francisco Hospital. There has been a sub- 
stantial increase in the number of patients treated in the clinic during the 
past year, there being an increase of 2788 visits over the previous year. 

In Otology, Rhinology and Laryngology, the clinic and instruction have 
been under the supervision of Dr. E. C. Sewall with Dr. John A. Bacher, 
chief of clinic, and Drs. R. E. Ashley, S. von Christierson, J. H. Kirk, 
H. Y. McNaught, M. J. Price and L. A. Rethwilm. Miss Elizabeth R. 
Poindexter and Miss Coralie N. Kenfield have been in charge of the lip- 
reading clinic for adults. Miss Elsa Cook has been clerical assistant. 

The total number of visits to the clinic during the year was 11,699, of 
which 1,396 were made by new patients, 8,493 by old patients and 1,810 by 
referred and transferred patients. One thousand five hundred and six opera- 
tions were performed in the Out-patient department and 690 were performed 
in Stanford Hospital. 

During the past year we have begun the systematic instruction of Junior 
internes in our clinic. The month of their service is spent in technique of 
examinations, making diagnoses and prescribing treatment. 

In the subdivision of Orthopedics, the clinic work and instruction have 
been under the supervision of Dr. Leonard W. Ely, assisted by Dr. Arthur 
L. Fisher and Miss Helen C. Wallach, clerical assistant up to July 1st, when 
she resigned, Miss Louise Wildberg taking her place. Dr. H. L. Langnecker 
has been in charge of the postural work. The total number of visits to the 
clinic during the year was 3,261, of which 961 were made by new patients, 
including referred and transferred patients, and 2,300 by old patients. 

Dr. Ely has continued his studies on his "Great 2nd Type of Chronic 
Arthritis," and the "Experimental Study of Healing of Fractures." His 
new book on "Inflammation in Bones and Joints" was issued during the year. 

In the Laboratory of Surgical Pathology, the work has been conducted 
by Dr. F. E. Blaisdell, Sr., with Mr. John Kratsch, technical assistant, and 
Mrs. Irene Mullin, assistant technician. 

During the year the following student technicians have received instruc- 
tion and practical work; Miss Louise Wildberg, progressing sufficiently to 
toke charge of the technical work for the Division of Orthopedics, taking 
Miss Wallach's place. Mrs. Amanda Lundstrom has been preparing to 
take charge of the technical work for the Genito-Urinary Clinic. Mr. Pierre 
Lassegues, who is expecting to take charge of the technical work in the 
Laboratory of Gynecology and Obstetrics after sufficient practical work. 



164 Stanford University 

During the year, 2,166 specimens of tissue — including 1,098 pairs of 
tonsils from the Operating Rooms of the Hospital and College Qinics — 
have been examined.. 

The following . papers have been published or completed or are under 
preparation by members of the department: 

Dr. E. B. Towne: Fracture-Dislocations of the Carpal Bones. (Surg. 
Clinics N. A.) Cerebral Pneumograms in Localization of Brain Tumors. 
(Completed.) On Proliferation of Skull Over Brain Tumors. (Completed.) 
On Cystic and Calcified Gliomata. (Under preparation.) On Treatment of 
Diabetes Insipious by Radiation of Pituitary Gland. (Under preparation.) 

Dr. John F. Cowan: Excision of the Knee. (Surg. Clinics N. Amer.) 

Drs. F. E. Blaisdell and J. F. Cowan: Experimental Studies of Simple 
Fractures in a Series of Kittens. (Under preparation.) 

Dr. F. E. Blaisdell: Fracture of the Tibial Spine. An Experimental 
Study. (Arch, of Surg. Nov., 1922.) Experimental Injuries of the Epiphy- 
seal Line in Young Rabbits to Determine the Effect on Longitudinal Growth. 
(Under preparation.) 

Drs. F. E. Blaisdell and James R. Dillon: A Method of Mounting 
Certain Forms of Wax Models. (Under preparation.) 

Drs. James R. Dillon and F. E. Blaisdell: Surgical Pathology of the 
Seminal Vesicles. (Read before the Amer. Urolog. Assn., at Rochester, Minn., 
May 21, 1923.) Contracted Bladder Neck; Pathology, Diagnosis and Treat- 
ment. (Read before the Urolog. Section of S. F. C, Med. Soc., May 29, 
1923, and the St. Francis Hosp. Clinical Soc.) 

Dr. James R. Dillon : Experimental Obstruction of the Urethra in Dogs. 
A Study of the Remote and Local Effects. (Under preparation.) A Study 
of the Histology and Pathology of the Bladder Neck. (Under preparation.) 
Further Study of the Histology and Pathology of the Seminal Vesicles. 
(Under preparation.) 

Dr. S. L. Haas: Fractures in Transplanted Bone. (Surg. Gyn. and 
Obstet, June, 1923.) The Ideal Bone Graft as Determined by Experimental 
Investigation. (Surg. Clinics of N. Amer., June, 1923.) A Study of Viability 
of Bone after Removal from the Body. (Arch, of Surg., July, 1923.) The 
Importance of the Periosteum and Endosteum in the Repair of Trans- 
planted Bone. (Submitted for publication, Arch, of Surg.) Further Obser- 
vation on the Survival of Bone After Removal from the Body. (Submitted 
for publication. Jour. Amer. Med. Asso.) 

The following experimental work has been carried on in the laboratory 
during the year : 

Dr. S. L. Haas : Studies on Interstitial Growth of Bone. Culture and 
Growth of Bone. Study of Buried Bone Fragments. 

Dr. Leonard W. Ely: Studies on Buried Bone. (Under preparation.) 

Drs. F. E. Blaisdell and J. F. Cowan: Part Played by Osteoblasts and 
Osteoclasts in the Healing of Simple Fractures. Extent of Injury to the 
Cortex of Long Bones in the So-called Greenstick and Buckling Fractures. 



Departmental Reports 165 

Drs. W. W. Boardman and G. D. Schoonmaker : Experiment to Demon- 
strate That Phenaltetrachlorphthalein When Injected Intravenously is 
Excreted by the Liver and Finds its Way into the Gall-bladder, and in 
Sufficient Amounts to be Readily Recognized. 

The following theses were completed by senior students : 

Mr. Everett Carlson: Artificial Pneumothorax. 

Mr. John Knox Morris : Certain Factors Essential in the Healing of 
Fractures. 

Stanley Stillman, 

Professor of Surgery. 



MILITARY SQENCE AND TACTICS 

The department staflF for the year 1922-23 was as follows : Major Leroy 
P. Collins, F. A., professor; Captain Charles E. Boyle, F. A., and First 
Lieut. Harold A. Cooney, F. A., assistant professors; and Regt. Sergt. 
Major G. W. Moffitt, U. S. A., assistant. In addition to these, there was 
on duty a regular army detachment consisting of First Sergeant C. H. 
Pelton, Stable Sergeant Michael Sullivan and eighteen other enlisted men. 

A better understanding of the work being done has existed on the 
part of the faculty than in previous years, resulting in closer cooperation and 
more valuable support. This support is essential. In order that the number 
of students graduated and commissioned annually in the reserve officers' 
corps be as contemplated by the war department and as the size and import- 
ance of Stanford warrant there should be approximately 250 students under 
instruction. This number will assure an output of between thirty and forty 
reserve officers and would necessitate an increase of sixty per cent of the 
present number. The percentage of the students under instruction who 
receive commissions is higher than in any other non-military college. This 
year seventeen received commissions and two who were under age were 
given letters of eligibility entitling them to commissions on becoming of age. 

The following inspections of the R. O. T. C. were made at various times 
during the year: By the corps area commander, Major General C. G. 
Morton; by the inspector general of the army. Brig. General Eli A. 
Helmick; and by the representative of the chief of field artillery, Colonel 
A. Mclntyre. The results were satisfactory. Particular comment was made 
upon the suitability of Stanford for instruction in field artillery. 

Last summer the old inn was moved to its present location and re- 
modeled for use as a headquarters building. It is entirely satisfactory. 

The polo team, assisted by the athletic authorities, made a trip during 
April to the University of Arizona, where a tournament was held. This 
marks the beginning of intercollegiate polo on the Pacific coast. A larger 
tournament is planned for this year. Polo was made a first-class minor 
sport by the student executive committee. The annual horse show and 
military tournament was held on May 26. 

Leroy P. Collins, 
Major, Field Artillery, 
Professor of Military Science and Tactics. 



166 Stanford University 

MINING AND METALLURGY 

The faculty of this department for its fourth year consisted of : Pro- 
fessors Theodore Jesse Hoover and James MacDonald Hyde; Associate 
Professors Waldemar Fenn Dietrich, Welton Joseph Crook, and Frederick 
George Tickell ; Assistants S. Myron Zandmer and Jcrfm Branner Newsom ; 
Lecturers Louis David Mills, Harry Wheeler Morse, Roy Parmclec 
McLaughlin. 

The registration of graduate students in the department was 16. 

The degree of Engineer was granted to Everett Price Hurt, Paul 
Frederic Boswell, S. Myron Zandmer. 

Research work was continued throughout the year by all the faculty. 
Professor Dietrich has completed the apparatus for and begim the study of 
the decay of mine timbers. As Professor Dietrich will be on sabbatical 
leave next year this work will be suspended. 

Professor Crook has completed the preliminary work on a study of 
alloys used in the printing industry. With the assistance of Mr. Will A. 
Friend, Superintendent of the University Press, the groundwork has been 
formed for a valuable study. 

Professor Tickell, working under the Petroleum Research Fund, has 
actively begun a study of the oil-bearing sediments of this state and has 
already secured results of value, but has not yet reached any mature conclu- 
sions. 

The writer's research into the early utilization of metals by the 
different races of men can only be reported as progressing. 

The Hermit Mine was completely unwatered and the results of our 
study there will be embodied in a thesis by Merle M, Repass. 

Theodore Jesse Hoover, 
Professor of Mining and Metallurgy. 



PHILOSOPHY 



The faculty of the department for the academic year 1922-23 consisted 
of Henry Waldgrave Stuart, professor; Harold Chapman Brown, associate 
professor; and George Holland Sabine, of the University of Missouri, 
acting professor for the summer quarter. 

The total enrolment in all courses for the four quarters was 460. In 
the seminary, running through the first three quarters, and in two other 
courses also listed as "advanced and graduate," there was an aggregate 
enrolment of 35 students, of whom 17 were graduates. During the year 
three graduate students completed their work for the Doctor's degree with 
Philosophy as a minor subject, and one student was prosecuting his work 
for the degree of M.A. in Philosophy. 

Henry Waldgrave Stuart, 

Professor of Philosophy. 



Departmental Reports 167 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
Encina Gymnasium 

The departmental staff for the year 1922-23 was composed of the 
following members: 

William Hulbert Barrow, professor of physical education and director 
of the department; Henry Wilfred Maloney, director of minor sports and 
associate director of the department; Ernst Brandsten, director of water 
sports; Robert Lyman Templeton, director of track and field; Ernest Paul 
Hunt, director of freshman sports; Andrew Kerr, director of football and 
associate director of the department; Charles Wesley Davis, director of 
intramural sports; Harry E. Wolter, director of baseball; Glenn Scobey 
Warner, advisory coach in football; Claude E. Thornhill, assistant coach 
in football; Wellford Duffy Seay, assistant to the director of Encina 
Gymnasium ; William Daly Fletcher, graduate manager of athletics ; Wallace 
Denny, trainer. 

With the exception of Mr. Templeton, Mr. Warner, Mr. Thornhill, and 
Mr. Seay, all of the above named were full-time members of the staff. In 
accordance with the policy of the Board of Athletic Control, and of the 
University, it is intended as far as possible to have all of the personnel of 
the Physical Education Department on a full-time basis. The advantages 
of such a system are obvious. 

Eight of the men mentioned above are new members of the department, 
having taken up their duties at Stanford last fall or during the early winter. 
With this change of personnel, and with certain changes in policy and 
administration, the work of this year has involved considerable reorgani- 
zation. It is expected that, with the members of the staff well settled in their 
work, and established in the confidence of those connected with them, the 
coming year will show some constructive development in the work of the 
department. 

The Department of Physical Education for Men includes under its 
jurisdiction all of the recognized athletic activities of the men students of 
the University. It is the policy of the department to have the work so 
S^raded and arranged that every student, regardless of his ability, is enabled 
and encouraged to take active part in these activities. Close correlation is 
made between Varsity and Intra-mural sports, since it is felt that the inter- 
dependence of the two is vital to the general physical morale of the under- 
£^raduate, and to the health and sanity of Varsity competition. With this 
idea in mind, and in order to bridge the gap between the highly informal 
inter-group contests, which have been held in the past, inter-class sports 
have been organized during the past year in practically every activity repre- 
sented by a Varsity team. This inter-class competition, organized and man- 
aged by the students themselves, under the direction of members of this 
department, aroused considerable enthusiasm, and has proved to be a decided 
success. Plans have been accepted by the Students* Executive Council which 
place this form of activity on a permanent basis. 



168 Stanford University 

In order to satisfy the demand for the more serious study of athletics, 
several courses were oflFered during the spring quarter, by the members of the 
department, in the theory and practice of certain sports and physical 
training activities. These courses carried full University credit, and the 
reports of the instructors indicate that the men did good work, and gained 
considerable valuable knowledge which, due to the limitation in instruction 
on the field, would not otherwise have been available. In addition to this, 
two courses were given, one in Elementary Physiology and Hygiene, and 
another in General Hygiene and Preventive Medicine, which seemed to 
fill a need for an elementary course covering the essential subjects of per- 
sonal and community health. 

There is a real need for the establishment of a School of Physical 
Education at Stanford, where men can be qualified for positions as Physical 
Educators in elementary schools and colleges. The value of such a dei>art- 
ment to the University as well as to the individual is obvious, but it is felt 
that the work should not be undertaken until the means are at hand to 
make this department rank with similar departments in other universities, 
and with the regular Schools of Physical Education. It is hoped that in 
the near future funds may be available for the increase in personnel and 
equipment that the institution of such a department will call for. A large 
part of the work of the members of the staff at present consists in efforts 
here, and with the other institutions with which we come in contact, to 
maintain certain ideals in sport, and to place athletics on a plane beyond 
criticism. To be able to send out men who have been brought up under 
these ideals would be a tremendous help in carrying the work of the Uni>'er- 
sity beyond the limits of our own walls. 

William Hulbert Barrow, 
Professor of Physical Education, and Director. 



Medical Adviser of Men 

The office of the Medical Adviser of Men is maintained for a dual 
purpose: In the first place, to conduct physical examinations on all new 
students and on all men engaged in athletics ; and in the second place, to 
maintain a consultatibn service where the students may obtain advice in 
all matters pertaining to their health. With the exception of emergency 
first aid treatment, the Medical Adviser does not and cannot undertake to 
treat students. It is felt that the greatest good can be rendered by doing 
everything possible to arrive at a diagnosis of a man's condition, and then 
to have him referred to specialists for treatment, if such is indicated. That 
such a service is appreciated and of value is shown by the fact that during 
the past year there were 2,967 calls at the Medical Adviser's Office. 

On account of the lack of adequate personnel, it was impossible to give 
complete physical examinations to all the men who should have been 
examined. Examinations were made on 671 men during the course of the 
year. 



Departmental Reports 169 

The general health of the student body has been good, and there have 
been no epidemics worthy of note. Contagious disease was limited (among 
students) to one case of mumps, three of chickenpox, four of measles, 
and two of scarlet fever. An epidemic of measles occurred among the 
children of Palo Alto, which resulted in over 200 cases. Cases among 
children on the campus were limited to 11. 

In order to carry out the work of the Medical Adviser's Office as it 
should be carried out, the services of an additional doctor, and of a trained 
medical secretary, have been obtained for next year for a part-time work. 
This increase in personnel will make possible the following up of physical 
defects, and it is hoped give time for the working out of certain problems 
in student health and in conditions fotmd in young men of this age. It 
\irould seem that we should look forward to a time when a more active 
health service on the campus may be organized. There is a big field that 
has as yet been almost untouched here at Stanford as far as the men are 
concerned. 

The Isolation Hospital on the campus, on account of its remote situation, 
and on account of the expense of its upkeep, has always been a problem. 
It is hoped that in the near future funds will be available for the erection 
of a contagious wing in connection with the Palo Alto Hospital, where the 
treatment of contagious disease can be carried out more efficiently and at 
considerable less expense and inconvenience. 

William Hulbert Barrow, M.D., 

Medical Adviser of Men. 



RoBLE Gymnasium 

The staflF of the Department of Physical Education for Women for the 
year 1922-23 consisted of Helen Masters Bunting, director; Clelia Duel 
Mosher, medical adviser, assistant professors; Greta Johannsen Brandsten, 
Lois Marjorie Kendall, instriKtors ; Christine Fabb, assistant in instruction ; 
and Georgina Meyer Burk, assistant in instruction and secretary. 

The aim of the department is to raise the health level of Stanford 
women; to develop in them the highest ideals of community and private 
life; and to train them for future citizenship upon a high plane. In order 
to most eflFectively do its part in contributing to these educational ideals the 
department makes a careful physical examination of every entering student, 
and, by supplying a wide range of physical activities, tries to adapt the 
student's activities to her individual needs and capacities. 

The physical examination is given by the medical adviser, the director 
of the department, and two other members of the staflF, at the beginning 
of each quarter, to all new students entering the department, and at the 
close of the spring quarter to all students taking required work in the 
department. In addition frequent reexaminations are made of students 
whose physical condition indicates the need of special treatment or observa- 
tion. The total number of physical examinations given in the department 
during the year was 640. 



170 



Stanford University 



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Students whose physical examination showed the presence of posture 
defects or other remedial handicaps were assigned to work in the corrective 
classes, which are limited to small groups, and in which the work is almost 
entirely individual, each student being given the specific exercises indicated 
by her condition. 

Courses were given in corrective, remedial, and formal gymnastics; in 
aesthetic and interpretive dancing; and in sports as follows: archery-, 
tennis, hockey, basketball, swimming and diving, and track and field. In 
the summer quarter courses were given in swimming and diving only. 
Courses in personal hygiene were given by the medical adviser in the 
winter and spring quarters. 

During each quarter there have been special classes in swimming for 
the faculty, faculty children, and townspeople who may care to register. The 
total registration for the year was 163. There were also certain hours daily 
in which the pool was open to all swimmers, whether registered in classes 
or not. During the noon hour the pool has been open to members of the 
faculty and administrative staff of the University, and 31 people have availed 
themselves of this opportunity for all or part of the year. At the request 
of the local organization of Girl Scouts a class was conducted for their 
members during the summer quarter. A special reduced rate was made for 
this class. 

The total number of students registered in the department — exclusive 
of the summer quarter — was 1,057, making an average registration per 
quarter of 352.3. In the summer quarter the registration was 128; making 
a total registration for the year of 1,185 students. Of this numebr 55 were 
graduate students, who paid a special fee for the privileges of the depart- 
ment. 

An addition of a one-sixth mile oval running track, with a one hundred 
yard straight-away; was made to the athletic fields, with pits for the high 
jump and broad jump and space for other field events included within the 
oval. We need four more tennis courts and two more hockey fields. 

No changes or additions have been made to the buildings during the 
year. The urgent need for a new gymnasium has been set forth in detail 
in the last two annual reports, and is so well understood by all that it 
needs only to be referred to with the earnest hope that it may soon rise 
with the speed of the men*s basketball pavilion and the. stadium. 

The need for the establishment of a Major Department in Physical 
Education has also been outlined in the last two annual reports. The 
phenomenal growth in physical education activities throughout the countrj* 
since the war has greatly increased the demand (which was already in 
excess of the supply) for trained teachers of physical education. The 
department urges and earnestly hopes that such professional courses may 
be added at the time that the new gymnasium is built. 

The department continued to work in close cooperation with the 
Women's Athletic Association, and to furnish all of the coaching for its 
activities. The director of the department served as faculty member of the 
Executive Board of the Association; and was the faculty representative of 



Departmental Reports 171 

the association at the conference of the Western Section of the Athletic 
Conference of American College Women, which was held on our own 
campus in the spring quarter. The department did what it could to help 
the students to plan for the conference. Great praise is due the Executive 
Committee of the Women's Athletic Association for the manner in which 
they conducted a very successful student conference. The athletic activities 
of the campus closed for the year with the usual Annual Field Day activities. 

The director of the department was Chairman of the Faculty Commit- 
tee on Women's Athletics which is appointed yearly by the President, for 
the control of policy, eligibility, and schedule. 

The Western Society of College Directors of Physical Education for 
Women held its annual conference at Stanford University last spring quar- 
ter. Representatives attended from twelve universities and colleges, from 
four of the western states, making an exceedingly stimulating and valuable 
conference. 

The director of the department attended, in. addition to the two above 
conferences, the Conference on Athletics and Physical Recreation called 
by Mrs. Herbert Hoover, as vice-president of the National Amateur 
Athletic Federation of America, in Washington, D. C, April 6 and 7, and 
was twice upon the program of that conference, speaking- once upon 
"Organization and Administration of Physical Education Activities" and 
once upon *'Inter-school vs. Intra-mural Competitions." She was also a 
member of a small group meeting the day previous to the opening of the 
conference to formulate the final agenda and discuss details for the con- 
ference. 

The director of the department also attended the Conference of the 
Eastern Society of College Directors of Physical Education for Women, 
held at Wellesley College, April 9 and 10, and the Annual Convention of 
the American Physical Education Association, held at Springfield, Massa- 
chusetts, April 11-14. 

The director of the department was this year elected to the National 
Executive Council of the American Physical Education Association. She is 
also a member of the National Committee on Women's Athletics, and its 
sub-committee on basketball; both being committees of the above associ- 
ation. She is now serving her third year as secretary-treasurer of the 
Western Society of College Directors of Physical Education for Women; 
and she has been made Chairman of the Far West Committee of the Mary 
Hemenway Alumnae Association for raising funds for scholarships and a 
loan fund for the Department of Hygiene and Physical Education of 
Wellesley College. 

Helen Masters Bunting, 
Director Physical Education for Women. 



Medical Adviser of Women 

The work for the year has been as follows: Personal interviews with 
all of the women enrolled in the University have been held at time of 



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172 Stanford University 

registration at the beginning of each of the four quarters. Further inter- 
views have been arranged with those women who did not seem in perfect 
condition at entrance. 

The importance of the necessary amount of sleep continues to need 
emphasis, although much was accomplished in the study of the Dean of 
Women and Medical Adviser last year. The individual responsibility of 
women to see to the enforcement of the quiet rules, violation of which 
is one of the factors operating to prevent proper amount of sleep, has 
been emphasized as a part of student government. 

Certain objectionable features of the rushing season in relation to the 
subject of sleep have been pointed out to the women and also referred to 
the Dean of Women. ' 

The fact that nearly every case of influenza last winter occurred in 
women who had not been getting a normal amount of sleep at the time 
immediately preceding the attack has been called to the attention of the 
students. The lowered resistance apparently was due to the insufficient 
sleep, undue fatigue being one of the factors in predisposing the student to 
infection where the exposure was the same for all. Some physiological 
work under way promises to throw further light on this subject. 

The observations on sleep have served as a basis for talks given to the 
women students and to the Parent Teacher's Association. 

There is need not only for swimming, but for other courses in Physical 
Training to meet the requirements of the summer students. Work for im- 
proving posture and corrective work, especially for foot conditions, would 
be of the greatest service to teachers coming to the University in the sum- 
mer session. 

The necessity of just as thorough and complete physical examinations 
in the summer time as during the regular academic year has been demon- 
strated. It is not desirable to put students into the dormitories, unless a 
thorough examination has been given as a preventive health measure. It is 
therefore recommended that an acting medical adviser always be on duty 
in the absence of the Medical Adviser. 

Regular inspection of the drinking fountains to secure their perfect 
working is needed as a hygienic measure. 

The Medical Adviser has published one paper: "Some of the Casual 
Factors in the Increased Height of College Women." This paper shows 
that the modern college woman is more fully developed and more perfectly 
functioning than the woman of thirty years ago. This improvement is 
apparently due to more exercise and more hygienic clothing, factors which 
have resulted in her eating more. 

The records of the past year show still greater improvement in the 
functional health of the entering women. In 1894 19 per cent had no 
dysmenorrhea, in 1915 and in 1916 this desirable condition rose to 68 per 
cent; accurate records made last year show still greater improvement with 
about 73 per cent with no dysmenorrhea. May this not be accounted for by 
the fact that an increasing number of women are wearing hygienic clothing 
and exercising more each year? < 



Departmental Reports 173 

'^Woman's Physical Freedom," a book on personal hygiene for women, is 
in press. This is a revised and enlarged third edition of "Health and the 
Woman Movement," 

The course in personal hygiene has been given in the winter, spring, 
and summer quarters. 

The close relation with the work of the Physical Education Department 
has been maintained. Office hours have been held daily, including Saturday. 

The summer quarter work has been as extensive and taxing as the 
work of the fall quarter and has necessitated a secretary for the Medical 
Adviser. There have been almost as many examinations, owing to the large 
number of new women entering in the summer quarter, as there were during 
the other three quarters combined. This work to be effective must be 
done as promptly as possible. 

The Medical Adviser, having been on duty for four quarters this year, 
has been granted a leave of absence for the spring and summer quarters of 
the academic year, 1923-24. 

Clelia Duel Mosher, M.D., 
Assistant Professor of Personal Hygiene, and 

Medical Adviser of Women. 



PHYSICS 



The faculty of the department in the first three quarters consisted of 
David Locke Webster, professor; Frederick John Rogers, associate pro- 
fessor; Joseph Grant Brown, Elmer Reginald Drew, Perley Ason Ross, 
assistant professors; George Russell Harrison, instructor; Finley Farrand 
Neal, assistant. For the summer quarter we were very fortunate in securing 
the cooperation of Arthur Jeffrey Dempster, acting assistant professor, of 
the University of Chicago. In June the department was saddened by the 
unexpected death of Mrs. Clara E. Hill, the secretary, whom we all es- 
teemed most highly both as a collaborator and as a friend. 

An innovation of this year, that has already proved its value, is a general 
examination, part written and part oral, given to each graduate student in 
the first quarter of his graduate work. The purpose of this examination 
is to obtain reliable information on which the department advises the 
student as to his program. Thus each student whose preparation and 
standing are not up to those of a Stanford A.B. in Physics is told how 
much work he may expect to do before considering himself at the normal 
starting point for work toward the A.M. or Ph.D., and each student who 
applies for advanced standing on the basis of graduate study elsewhere has 
his claims critically examined. 

In December the Department of Physics called a conference of all 
departments interested in the teaching of phyiscs to students of engineering. 
It gave much valuable information, and resulted in a general reorganization 
of the curriculum in physics for those students. The course in mechanics, 
Physics 2a, which has heretofore been primarily experimental, was con- 



174 Stanford University 

solidaled with the more theoretical courses, Applied Mathematics 3a and 
3b, making a considerable saving of the students' time as well as an 
improvement in coordination of the experimental and theoretical work. The 
course in heat and light. Physics 2b, was split into two courses, the one on 
heat being considerably extended, at the request of the Departments of 
Engineering, and the one on light being made primarily a lecture course. 
These changes went into effect in the spring quarter. 

The courses for pre-medical and other n on -engineering students were 
also reorganized, after informal conferences during the winter with repre- 
sentatives of the other departments most concerned. Here, likewise, one 
of the chief changes was in splitting a composite course, Physics lb, on 
light and electricity. The part dealing with light is to be reduced in 1923-24 
to a one-unit laboratory course on lenses and their uses, planned primarily 
as a prerequisite to Physiology 103, and a few lectures inserted in the 
course on modern physics, while the part on electricity is to be considerably 
extended. 

These changes are in line with similar changes made more gradually in 
the preceding course of this curriculum, on mechanics, sound and heat, in 
which the sound and heat have been given a reduced time in recent years, 
to permit a more adeqttate treatment of mechanics. It is unfortunate that 
subjects as important as sound, heat and light should have to be slighted in 
this way ; but in view of the unprecedented advances of physics in the 
last two decades and the importance of these discoveries in all related 
sciences, and in view of the narrow time limits allowed for physics in the 
non -engineering curricula, the only alternative would be a more and more 
superficial treatment of all bratwhes of the science. Superficiality, however, 
is so fatal to the analytical, scientific spirit, the most important product of a 
physics course, that it is much better to reduce to mere outlines the treat- 
ment of the less important subjects, sound, heat and light, which are 
fortunately also the easiest for independent study, and in the time thus 
saved to concentrate attention on a thorough study of the more funda- 
mental subjects, mechanics, electricity and modem physics. 

In the Upper Division, the department is to offer two new courses, one 
on X-Rays and one on meteorology. 

The physics textbook, "General Physics for Colleges," on which Pro- 
fessors Webster and Drew, and Professor Farwell of Columbia, were 
working last year, was completed this winter and published by the Century 
Company in time for use in the autumn of 1924. Parts of it have already 
been used in a mimeograph edition, which made possible many improve- 
ments in the courses this year, especially in the spring quarter course in 
modern physics, a subject too new to have had adequate attention in any 
previous general college text. 

In research. Professor Emeritus Sanford and Professor Brown have 
jed their work on the diurnal variations of charge of an electro- 
r enclosed in a hollow conductor, a phenomenon whose cause is not 
latisfactorily determined. Professor Brown has also done a consid- 



Departmental Reports 175 

erable amount of consultation work on automobile lamps for the Prestolite 
Company. 

Professor A. E. HenningSi of the University of British Columbia, spent 
the summer at Stanford, working on the reflectiort of X-rays by crystals, 
with special reference to the precautions needed in obtaining X-ray spectra 
without contamination by stray reflections. His results will be of great 
value in such work as that of Professor Webster on the energy distribu- 
tions in continuous X-ray spectra, a research interrupted this year by the 
textbook writing and course reorganizations discussed above, but now being 
continued again. 

Professor Ross completed an investigation of the critical potentials of 
X-rays of the M series, determining thereby the exact subatomic "levels" 
of the electrons producing this series. He then began a research on a new 
method of studying the polarization of X-rays, but dropped this for work 
on. the shift of wave lengths of X-rays in scattering, a phenomenon just 
discovered by Compton, of Washington University, and of great theoretical 
importance because quite contrary to all accepted theories of scattering. 
Professor Ross has added to Compton's discovery the remarkable fact that 
rays scattered from any substance divide themselves into two groups, one 
having the shift of wave lengths, the other not. He has also found laws 
governing this effect that may be of great value in formulating a more 
satisfactory general theory of the scattering of radiant energy. 

Dr. Harrison continued his work on the absorption of light in metallic 
vapors; and as a part of it he devoted his attention this year to improve- 
ments in the photometry of ultraviolet spectra by photography. In this he 
was assisted in the summer by Mr. Cedric £. Hesthal. He is now continuing 
the investigation at Harvard, on a National Research Fellowship. 

Dr. P. F. Kerr, of the Department of Geology, completed his Ph.D. 
thesis on the identification of minerals by X-rays, using some of the X-ray 
apparatus of this laboratory; and Dr. O. L. Sponsler, whose thesis for the 
Department of Botany was completed here in 1922, used some of the same 
apparatus this summer to continue his work on the arrangements of atoms 
and molecules in vegetable materials. This has been extended from his 
thesis on starch to preliminary but definite results on cellulose. It will be 
continued at the University of California, Southern Branch. 

Mr. F. F. Neal completed a master's thesis on the fluctuations of poten- 
tial of a kenotron- rectified high-tension D. C. outfit, and was awarded 
the A.M. 

Mr. W. W. Nicholas made spectographic tests of X-rays used in cancer 
treatment at St. Luke's and Stanford Hospitals, in San Francisco, and 
found evidence of important differences with the very high-voltage 
machines between the effective peak voltages and the peak voltages indi- 
cated by spark-gap tests. He has also assisted in the construction of ioniza- 
tion chambers and other measuring apparatus for the standardization of 
X-ray treatments at these hospitals. 

David Locke Webster, 

Professor of Physics. 



176 Stanford University 

PHYSIOLOGY 

The staflF of the Department of Physiology consisted of Ernest Gale 
Martin, professor; Charles Wilson Greene, acting professor for summer 
quarter ; Frank Walter Weymouth, associate professor ; James Percy Baum- 
berger, Laurence Becking, James RoUin Slonaker. Arthur Gibson Vestal, 
assistant professors; George Daniel Shafer, instructor; Flora Murray Scott 
and Frederick Spruyt, assistants in instruction in General Biology. 

The teaching activities of the Department were in the main of a routine 
character. 

A number of advanced students carried on studies in the laboratory. 
These will be mentioned in connection with the reports of the activities of 
the professors under whose direction they worked. 

Acting Professor Greene, who was in residence at the Hopkins Marine 
Station during the summer quarter, studied the "singing fish" (Porichthys 
nota!us)j which spawns at tide water along the rocky coast of Monterey 
Bay and is unique in that (1) it has over 700 phosphorescent organs, (2) it 
has a closed swim bladder, and (3) it makes a low resonant note. Data 
have been accumulated to clarify the functions of these structures. For the 
first time the act of giving off phosphorescent light was observed to occur 
on disturbing the fishes. Numerous analyses of swim bladder gases have 
shown an active separation of the gas by a vascular-glandular mechanism 
and the gas has been shown to consist largely of oxygen. Injected nitrogen 
is rapidly removed. The detailed structure of the vocal apparatus has been 
determined and the occasions of its natural use observed. 

An investigation of the amount and distribution of the fats in the 
different types of muscular tissue of the commercial mackerel -like fishes 
was begun. Like the salmonoids these fishes have a sharp differentiation of 
the great lateral musculature. The "dark type" of muscle is unique in its 
content of intramuscular fats, as has been shown by Professor Greene, 
also, for the salmon. No one has called attention to these facts in this 
new group, yet the scientific facts are probably in the last analysis the 
explanation of the difficulties in collecting and conserving this great food 
source. This problem is large in its physiological ramifications and can be 
solved only on prolonjged study by the methods of histology and biochemistry', 

A minor activity to which some attention was given is the adaptability 
of the common hagfish (Bdelostomi stouti), to physiological laboratory 
teaching purposes. Its musculature, its circulation with three heartlike 
mechanisms and open blood-lymph spaces, and its respiratory adaptations 
to a blind and parasitic life are peculiarly available for advanced courses in 
the physiology of marine forms. Incidentally the interesting hagfish 
natural history was further observed. 

Doctor Shafer's chief activities were as follows : 

1. Completed a study of the growth of dragonfly nymphs at the moult and 
between moults. The resulting paper has been submitted for publication in 
the Biological Series of the University. 



I. Lontmued observations on tne activities ol drone noney-Dces in 
relation to the mating instinct. 

3. Sent a note to the American Bee Journal reporting observation of 
honey dew produced by an insect gall on the oak, Quercus lobata, and 
gathered by honey-bees in astonishing numbers. 

4. Began a comparative investigation of Rigor as induced either by heat 
or by chloroform in fatigued and non-fatigued muscle. 

Three lines of activity were followed by Assistant Professor Vestal, 
the first, based upon field work during three years and three additional 
summers, is a geographic study of vegetation in the eastern border of the 
Southern Rocky mountains, from central Wyoming to central New Mexico. 
During the summer new base maps showing topography and the geographic 
subdivisions, numbering more than sixty, have been constructed for Colorado 
and New Mexico, and a number of descriptions of districts have been 
completed. 

The second consists of field work, as opportunity aflorded, on plant 
geography of California, with the aim of constructing, in time, a detailed 
vegetation map of a new type for the State. 

The third is the completion of a brief report on native grassland or 
prairie-like vegetation of the vicinity of Palo Alto, for presentation at 
the Los Angeles meeting of the A. A. A. S. The manuscript is to be sent 
to the journal Ecology. 

Assistant Professor Becking has been engaged in organizing a working 
collection for a laboratory course in Economic Biology which will be 
given in the autumn of 1923, Several firms, both American and foreign, 
have cooperated to make the collection both representative and complete. 

Together with Associate Professor Moser, of the Department of Civil 
Engineering, he made a microscopic study of submerged timber, the 
results of which were reported by Professor Moser in a lecture before the 
Itesearch Club. 

A study on the growth of unbranchtd filamentous algae was com- 
pleted and submitted for publication. Studies on the sulphur cycle in 
nature were continued, A preliminary report was read before the Society 
for Experimental Biology and Medicine. Research on the influence of 
radiation on membrane-permeability was continued. During the summer 
quarter work was carried on, in .collaboration with Miss Flora M, Scott, on 
the autotrophous bacteria connected with the so-called "parafRti-dirt." a 
surface indication of oil in many of the I^stem slates. It is intended to 
publish the results of this study as a contribution from the laboratory for 
Economic Biology. 

A beginning has been made of a systematic collection of authentic 
samples of commercial lumber, tc^ether with microscopic slides. 

In May, 1923, Professor Becking was elected a member of the Provin- 
cial Academy of Arts and Sciences of Utrecht. 

Assistant Professor Baumberger spent the months of September, Oc- 
ber, November, and December as Teaching 'Fellow in Physiology ^ 



178 Stanford University 

• 

Harvard Medical School. While there he cooperated with Dr. Walter B. 
Cannon in a study of the iodine content of the thyroid gland, and also in 
an investigation of the volume change of the denervated limb upon 
stimulation of the splanchnic nerves. 

He attended the Christmas meetings of the Federation of American 
Societies for Experimental Biology at Toronto, Canada, and delivered a 
paper jointly with J. M. D. Olmsted before the American Physiological 
Society on "Increase in Size of Crabs at Moulting." 

He continued research on the rate of penetration of hydrogen ions and 
on .the cause of osmotic pressure changes accompanying moulting in 
crabs. He started a study of the physicochemical properties of lecithin. 

Mr. Laurence Irving, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree in Physiology, 
continued work on his thesis during the year. He is carrying on his 
investigation under the immediate supervision of Professor Baumberger. 

Assistant Professor Slonaker completed and published in a series of 
five papers his studies of the effect of restricted diet on growth, fecundity 
and longevity in albino rats. He also carried on studies of voluntary activity 
of albino rats in various periods of the oestrous cycle. 

Associate Professor Weymouth completed and published, in collabora- 
tion with Miss Emelie £. Anderson and Mr. Harold Averill, a series of 
studies of visual perception, particularly with reference to minute shifts in 
position of the objects observed. These studies have lead to a new theory 
of the function of the retina in making visual judgments of extreme acuity, 
which theory promises to be of interest and value. Professor Weymouth 
also completed his studies of the growth of the Pismo clam. He attended 
the Christmas meeting of the American Physiological Society at Toronto, 
and presented papers on both of the above topics. At the request of the 
United States Bureau of Fisheries IJrofessor Weymouth spent the months 
of July and August in Alaska investigating certain phases of the clam- 
canning industry. 

Professor Martin, with the cooperation of Mr. Blake C. Wilbur and 
Miss Helen H. Greene, continued the study of physiological aspects of the 
life history of the brine shrimp, Artemia salina. Mr. E. H. Brunquist was 
engaged under Professor Martin's direction in the examination of the 
effect upon excised muscle of the frog of slight changes in the environment. 
This work was carried on by Mr. Brunquist in partial fulfillment of the 
requirement for the Ph.D. degree. 

Mr. A. C. Ambler, working also under the direction of Professor Martin, 
made a preliminary survey of the serviceableness of the excised muscle of 
warm-blooded animals for purposes of investigation. In the course of these 
studies he made what may prove to be some significant observations upon 
the direct effect of Insulin on excised muscle tissue. 

In connection with studies of criteria of muscular efficiency which have 
been under way for several years, Mr. Max L. Poise carried on a series of 
tests of the strength of grip in male Stanford students. Also in connection 
with this general program, plans were completed for having a series of 



Departmental Reports 179 

strength tests made on school children in one of the San Francisco public 
schools. 

Professors Martin, Slonaker, and Vestal attended and read papers at 
the meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science 
in Los Angeles in September. 

Ernest Gale Martin, 
Professor of Physiology. 



General Biology 

As in previous years the administration of the courses in General 
Biology was in the hands of a committee consisting of Professors L. L. 
Burlingame, Harold Heath, E. G. Martin, and G. J. Peirce. Professor 
Burlingame acted again as executive director. The following additional 
members of the faculty again contributed markedly to the success of the 
course by giving lectures in their special fields : President Wilbur, Pro- 
fessors Abrams, Doane, Fisher, Marx. Terman, and Vestal. The textbook 
in General Biology in course of preparation by the members of the com- 
mittee at the time of the last report was issued in December, 1922, by the 
publishing house of Henry Holt and Company, New York, and so was 
available for the students in the course during the winter and spring 
quarters. 

It had become obvious from the experience of previous years that the 
conduct of the numerous laboratory sections was too heavy a burden for one 
man to carry unaided. Accordingly Doctor Lawrence Becking, instructor 
in Botany, was appointed assistant professor of Biology and assigned to 
the duty of cooperating with Professor Vestal in the conduct of the 
laboratory instruction. The arrangement worked out well. Both as a 
means of relieving the one in charge of the course from an undue teaching 
strain and for the sake of affording the course itself the benefit of the new 
point of view brought by Doctor Becking, the plan proved satisfactory. 
As the result of the experience of this and previous years there seems to 
be developing a definite tendency for the laboratory instruction to direct 
itself primarily toward the two-fold object of imparting to the students a 
first-hand acquaintance with selected aspects of nature and of awakening in 
them a love of nature. As a means of fulfilling this two-fold object the 
following general outline is in use : 

L Plant and animal structures. 

n. Plants and animals as media for interchanges of materials and 
energy. 

HL Living things in relation to their non-living environment. 

IV. Living things in relation to one another. 

Professors Vestal and Becking were capably assisted during the year 
by Miss Flora M. Scott and Mr. Frederic Spruyt, who were under appoint- 
ment as assistants in instruction. 

Ernest Gale Martin, 

Chairman. 



The first definite steps leading to the organiiation of the School ol 
Biology took place during the academic year of 1921-22. During that year 
President Wilbur held separate conferences with the staffs of the Depart- 
ments of Botany, Physiology and Zoology (including Entomology), and 
later a joint conference with the membersof these departments, together 
with representatives of Bio-chemistry from the Department of Chemistry. 
At this latter conference a committee was established to draw up pre- 
liminary plans tor a School of Biology. This committee prepared a report 
in which were set forth certain general principles which should govern the 
school. The report was adopted in principle by the departments concerned. 

While these activities were under way it became clear that the suggested 
School of Biology, if it were to fulfill its proper functions satisfactorily. 
should include, as nearly as possible, all the biological interests of the 
University. In accordance with this principle. President Wilbur, in April, 
1923, issued an invitation to all the members of the staffs of the Depart- 
ments of Anatomy. Bacteriology and Experimental Pathology, Botany. 
Hopkins Marine Station, Physiology, and Zoology (including Entomologyl, 
and lo those representatives of the Departments of Chemistry (Bio- 
chemistry), Food Research. Geology (Paleontology), and Psychology. 
whose interests are directly biological, to meet for the purpose of formu- 
laiing a definite plan of organization for the School of Biology. The 
individual members of the Stanford teaching staff included in this invitation 
were the following: L. R. Abrams, C. L. Alsberg, J. P. Baumberger. 
L. V. Becking. L. L. Burlingame. D. H. Campbell, C. H. Danforth. R. W. 
Doane. G. F. Ferris. W. K. Fisher. C. H. Gilbert. H. Heath. W. L. Hoi- 
man, W. H. Manwaring. E. G. Martin. M. L. McCraeken, F. M. McFar- 
land. J. I. W. McMurphy, A. W. Meyer, W. R. Miles. G. J. Peirce. G. C 
Price. N. W. Rakestraw. E. W. Schultz. G. D. Shafer. J. R. Slonaker. J. P 
Smith. J. O. Snyder, E. C. Starks, C. S. Stoltenburg, C. P. Stone, R. E. 
Swain, A. E. Taylor, L. M. Terman, A. G. Vestal. F. W. Weymouth. This 
group held several meetings, which lead to the adoption of the following 
articles of organization : 

(1) The School of Biology shall consist of the following department; 
or divisions in the University : Anatomy, Bacteriology and Experimental 
Pathology, Bio-chemistry, Botany, Entomology, Food Research, Hopkins 
Marine Station. Paleontology, Physiology. Psychology, Zoology. These 
shall constitute Departments of the School of Biology, but shall retain 
their present status in the University, with such control as they now exer- 
cise over separate budgets, courses of study, recommendations for degrees 
and over all matters which pertain to their internal administration. 

(2) The faculty of the school shall consist of all members of the teach- 
ing staff, except those below the rank of instructor; ihe right to vote 
being limited to those who are also members of the .Academic Council. 

(3) The members of the teaching staff shall be attached to existing 
departments, but in research or teaching may freely cross inter depart menial 
lines. All courses of study shall be scheduled under the departments of 
the school. 



(4) There shall be an Executive Committee representing the depart- 
ments of the school, one member to be elected by the faculty of each deparl- 
ment. One of the members thus elected shall be designated by the Presi- 
dent as Chairman of the Executive Committee. The members of the 
Executive Committee shall serve for the term of two years, except that 
five of the members (to be determined by lot) elected in 1923 shall serve 

(5) The Executive Committee shall act ad interim for the Faculty of 
the School of Biology. It shall perform such duties and exercise .such 
powers as may be delegated to it by the faculty of the school. It shall re- 
port to the faculty on matters of interest to the school, 

(6) The Secretary of the Executive Committee shall act as the Secre- 
tary of the School of Biology. The minutes of both the committee and the 
school shall be so kept as to be at all times accessible to members of ihe 
School of Biology, and following each session of the Executive Committee 
a brief of its minutes shall be mailed to the President of the University 
and to each member of the School of Biology. 

In accordance with the provisions contained in these articles an Execu- 
tive Committee was constituted with the following members : Professors 
Campbell. Doane, Fisher, Martin, McFarland, Miles, Schultz, J. P. Smith, 
Snyder, Swain, Taylor. By appointment of President Wilbur the under- 
signed was designated as Chairman. By election of the committee Pro- 
fessor J. O. Snyder was made Secretary. 

The Faculty of the School of Biology voted to offer a program leading 
to recommendation for the degree of Bachelor of Arts in Biology, this 
program to be supplementary to the departmental programs now offered. 
The requirement is as follows : Sixty units of work in Biology, so chosen 
that there shall be fifteen units from each of three departments of the 
school. Provision is made for modifying the fifteen-unit departmental 
requirement to the effect that upon completion of ten units in any depart- 
ment the student may substitute work in another department upon securing 
the consent of both concerned and of his adviser in the school. The gen- 
eral program must be properly approved. Students are urged to include 
a summer quarter of work at the Hopkins Marine Station. By vote of the 
faculty of the school the chairman of the school (to be appointed by the 
President) is to serve as adviser for the time being. 

The faculty of the school also voted to recommend the organization oi 
a Research Museum to care for and administer the targe and valuable 
biological collections now in the possession of the University, or to be 
hereafter acquired. The following general plan of organisation was recom- 
mended for adoption : 

Departmcntt. 1. Zoology with divisions of general zoology and 
entomology ; 2. Paleontology ; 3. Dudley Herbarium. 

Staff, a. Director or Chairman. 

b. ^urators. 

c. Assistant curators and aids. 



182 Stanford University 

The Director and Curators, together with the President of the University, 
are charged with the task of developing plans of action, preparing, allotting, 
and administering the budget, and determining matters of general policy. 
Professors Snyder and Abrams were appointed a committee to submit such 
detailed recommendations as are necessary to put the plan into effect. By 
vote of the faculty of the school a committee consisting of Professors 
Ferris, Abrams, and Danforth was established to consider and report upon 
the general topic of scientific publication in Biology as affecting members of 
the staff and advanced students in the various departments of the school. 
At the request of President Wilbur the undersigned gave, on Universit.. 
Pay, a brief talk before the assembled alumni, in which the plans and pur- 
poses of the School of Biology were briefly sketched. A manuscript cover 
ing the same topics was also prepared for publication in the Stanford 
Illustrated Review. E^^^^^ q^^e Martin. 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 

The staff of the Department of Political Science for the year consisted 
of Victor J. West and Edwin Angell Cottrell, professors, and Amelia Louise 
Hedges, research assistant. Professor Cephas Daniel Allin, of the Uni- 
versity of Minnesota, served as acting professor during the summer quarter, 
giving courses in the government and politics of the British Empire and 
political theory. The assistants in Citizenship III were George Hurach 
Cloud, Natalye Adelma Colfelt, Marguerite Pendleton Drew, Mrs. Flora 
May Fearing and Gilford Glenn Rowland. 

The total number of students majoring in the department was thirty- 
eight, of whom twelve received the A.B. degree. There were thirteen 
candidates for advanced degrees. The degree of Master of Arts was con- 
ferred upon the following: Natalye Adelma Colfelt, thesis, "The Political 
Philosophy of the Progressive Party"; Paul Mason, thesis, "Procedure in 
the California Legislature." 

The degree of Doctor of Philosophy was conferred upon Francis Eliza- 
beth Willis (A.B., Stanford, 1920), thesis, "The Belgium Parliamentary 
System." 

The research activities of the members of the department were as fol- 
lows: Mr. West has continued his study of election practices, particularly 
the financing of political parties and of candidates for public ofEce. This 
work, begun with the purpose of discovering the California experience, is 
now expanding to deal with the whole United States. The study of the 
operation of the California primary law was completed and the results 
published. Material on the foreign policy of Woodrow Wilson and on the 
relation between congressional organization and administrative efficiency is 
still being gathered. Miss Francis Elizabeth Willis and Mr. Frank Marion 
Russell, candidates for the Ph.D. degree, were engaged in the study, 
respectively, of the Belgian parliamentary system and the government of the 
Saar region. In connection with the latter Mr. Russell spent three months 
in Europe. Miss Natalye Adelma Colfelt, who made a preliminary study of 



Departmental Reports ' 183 

the political philosophy of the Progressive Party in connection with her 
work for the A.M. degree, has decided to write a doctoral dissertation on 
this subject. For this purpose she will spend the autumn quarter next year 
in Washington, New York, and Chicago. Candidates for the A.M. degree 
were working on the following topics : Procedure in the California legisla- 
ture ; the city manager in Sacramento ; the government of Alaska. 

Mr. Cottrell was Director of Research and Information of the Cali- 
fornia Development Association from October, 1922, to July, 1923, and 
during the year conducted an industrial survey of California. He again 
lectured on municipal government at the National School for Commercial 
Secretaries, at Evanston, 111., August 20, to September 1. He continued 
as a member of the Executive Council and chairman of the committee on 
prizes of the National Municipal League. He was elected to the Palo Alto 
City Council in May and continues as a member of the Palo Alto Advisory 
Commission on Commercial Amusements. Mr. West is also a member of 
that commission, as well as of the Palo Alto Library Board. Both Mr. 
Cottrell and Mr. West have delivered a number of public lectures during 
the year. 

The California Academy of Social Sciences met at Stanford, April 20 
and 21, as the guests of President Wilbur. There was an attendance of 
about fifty. Mr. West, as chairman of the executive committee, presided 
over the sessions, and Mr. Cottrell addressed the principal meeting on the 
subject of the revision of the California constitution. 

The Second Conference for Community Leadership, under the joint 
auspices of the department and the American City Bureau, was held at 
Stanford in September, 1922, in conjunction with the annual convention of 
the League of California Municipalities. The Third Conference was in 
session from July 29 to August 4, 1923, under the responsibility of the 
department and with the support of the California Association of Com- 
mercial Secretaries. Mr. Cottrell served as director of both of these con- 
ferences and has been largely responsible for their success. 

Dr. Graham Henry Stuart, assistant professor of political science at 
the University of Wisconsin, has been added to the staff of the department 
with the rank of assistant professor. He will begin his work with the 
academic year 1923-24. He is to have charge generally of the field of 
international relations and will give the following courses: "International 
Organization and Administration," "The Conduct of Foreign Relations," 
"Current International Politics," and "The League of Nations." Professor 
Stuart has the A.B. degree from Western Reserve University. His gradu- 
ate work was done at the Sorbonne, the University of Paris, the £cole Libre 
des Sciences Politiques, and the University of Wisconsin, from which he has 
the Ph.D. degree. He has been a member of the University of Wisconsin 
faculty for the last four years. He is the author of two books, "French 
Foreign Policy, 1898-1914," and "Latin America and the United States," as 
well as a number of articles on international affairs in various journals. 

Victor J. West, 
Professor of Political Science. 



The teaching staff of the department for the year 1922-23 consisted of 
Lewis Madison Terman and Walter Richard Miles, professors ; John Edgar 
Coover, associate professor and fellow in psychic research; Calvin Perry 
Stone, assistant professor; Gertrude May Trace and Maud Amanda Merrill, 
instructors ; Franklin Smith Fearing, assistant in instruction. The C. 
Annette Bucket Fellowship was held by Albert Sidney Raubenheimer. and 
graduate scholarships by Herbert Reynolds Laslett and (for one quarter) 
by Ellen B. Sullivan, 

The year saw the following changes in. and additions to, the depart- 
ment faculty. Professor Frank Angell, after thirty years of service as 
executive head of the department, retired at the end of 1921-22 and was 
succeeded by Lewis Madison Terman, who had been a member of the 
Department of Education at Stanford since 1910. The scope of the 
department's work has been greatly extended by the taking over of educa- 
tional psychology and by the appointment of Professor Walter Richard 
Miles and of Assistant Professor Calvin Perry Stone. Mr. Miles had been 
for eight years psychologist in the Carnegie Nutrition Laboratory, Boston, 
Massachusetts, and is widely known for his researches in physiological 
psychology. Mr, Stone's field is chiefly that of animal behavior. Before 
coming to us he was instructor in anatomy and psychology at the Univereily 
of Minnesota. Appointments for 1923-24 include Franklin Smith Fearing, 
who succeeds Gertrude May Trace as instructor ; and Edward Kellogg 
Strong, who comes as acting associate professor for the year to inaugurate 
courses in industrial psychology. Mr. Strong has been Professor of Voca- 
tional Education in the Carnegie Institute of Technology since 1919, and 
is the author of important researches in applied psychology, particularly 
in the psycholc^y of advertising and salesmanship. These additions to the 
faculty have made it possible to extend the course offerings to cover most 
of the important fields of psychological teaching and research. The work 
of Mr. Miles and Mr. Stone makes possible effective cooperation with the 
School of Biology, while the courses to be given by Mr. Strong should 
contribute in an important way to the training of students whose major 
interest is in the field of economics. 

The total number of major students enrolled in the department was 34. 
as compared with 14 the preceding year. The number of graduate majors 
was 19, as compared with three the preceding year. Much of this increase 
was due to the transfer of Educational Psychology to the Department ot 
Psychology. Six students completed their work for the degree of A.B., 
three for the degree of .\M., and two for the degree of Ph.D. Candidates 
for advanced degrees presented acceptable theses as indicated below. 

For the degree of Master of Arts: 

Anne Hardy (with Miss Trace) : .^ Quantitative Study of After 
Images. 



Departmental Reports 185 

Herbert Reynolds Laslett (with Mr. Miles and Mr. Terman of the 
Department of Psychology and Mr. Rakestraw of the Department of 
Chemistry), The Effects of Loss of Sleep on Mental Work. 

Ida May Lima (with Mr. Terman) : The Reading Interests of 
Gifted Children. 

For the degree of Doctor of Philosophy : 

Maud Amanda Merrill (with Mr. Terman and Mr. Coover of the 
Department of Psychology-, and Mr. Kelley of the Department of 
Education) : The Educational Achievements of Defective Children. 

Albert Sidney Raubenheimer (with* Mr. Terman and Mr. Kelley) : 
An Experimental Study of Some Behavior Traits of the Potentially 
Delinquent Boy. 

Mr. Terman devoted a considerable part of his time to the gifted 
children investigation which was undertaken in 1921. The work of the past 
year was made possible by an additional grant of $14,000 from the Com- 
monwealth Fund, supplemented by $8,000 from Stanford University. Of 
this $8,000, the sum of $3,000 came to the University as a gift from an 
individual interested in the success of the investigation. Each child in 
the experimental group has been given a medical examination, a series of 
thirty-six physical measurements, and a large number of psychological tests. 
The following served as part-time assistants in the investigation during the 
year: Truman Lee Kelley, assistant director; Florence L. Goodenough, 
chief assistant; Jennie Benson Wyman, interest tests; Albert Sidney 
Raubenheimer, character tests ; Dr. Bird T. Baldwin of the University of 
Iowa, anthropometric measurements; Dr. Albert H. Moore and Dr. Edith 
Bronson, medical examinations ; Ida May Lima, reading interests ; James C. 
DeVoss, specialization of abilities; Catherine Cox, Ruth Haines Livesay, 
and Lela Gillan, comparative biographical studies of eminent men; Helen 
Marshall, Alta May Williams, and Raymond L. Willoughby, general assist- 
ants. A report in two or three volumes will be completed during the coming 
year. 

Mr. Terman has also cooperated with Mr. Kelley in directing two other 
investigations made possible by special grants : A study of the mental 
abilities of Japanese children, and a study of potentially delinquent children. 
The former, which is being carried out by Marvin L. Darsie, was made 
possible by a grant of $7,0(X) from the Japanese Association of America. 
Approximately 700 Japanese children of California of the ages ten to 
fifteen were given a large number of standard psychological and educational 
measurements. The report will be ready for publication early in the coming 
year. The investigation of potentially delinquent children, made possible 
by a grant from the U. S. Interdepartmental Social Hygiene Board, was 
completed during the year and has been reported by Vernon S. Cady in a 
140-page monograph supplement to the Journal of Delinquency under the 
title, "The Estimation of Juvenile Incorrigibility." J. Harold Williams 
(Ph.D. Stanford, 1916), Director of the California Bureau of Juvenile 
Research, gave valuable assistance throughout this study. 



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I. 



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i 

k 



\ 



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186 Stanford University 



As chairman of the sub-committee for the investigation of student 

_ ability, Mr. Terman gave intelligence tests to all undergraduate students 

P ; ■ who matriculated during the year. A report of the tests given during 

\ I 1921-22 and 1922-23 is being prepared by the Committee for Investigation 

of Student Ability, of which Mr. Terman is chairman. 

The Stanford Achievement Test, a series of standardized measures of 
educational achievement in grades 2 to 8, was published in January by the 
World Book Company. It was prepared by Mr. Kelley, Mr. Ruch (Ph.D. 
Stanford, 1922), and Mr. Terman. During the year Mr. Terman undertook 
the editorial responsibility for a series of textbooks on mental and educa- 
tional measurements to be published by the World Book Company. The fir^t 
two books of the series appeared in July: "Measurement in Higher Educa- 
tion," by Ben D. Wood ; and "Mental Tests and the Classroom Teacher,'* by 
Virgil E. Dickson (Ph.D. Stanford, 1919). Other books for the series are 
in preparation. 

Mr. Terman is president, for 1923, of the American Psychological 
Association. In Junfr he made a trip to New York and Chicago in 
connection with a proposed extension of the gifted children study, and on 
his return trip lectured for one week in the Western Colorado College at 
Gunnison. Other lectures given by him during the year included one before 
the National Education Association and one in the Stanford Medical School. 
He served during the year as a member of various educational committees 
and as associate editor of the Journal of Applied Psychology, the Journal 
^ "3 I of Educational Psychology, the Journal of Educational Research, the 

•^ •! I Journal of Delinquency, and the Journal of Personnel Research. 

2E mm I The research activities of Mr. Miles were largely devoted to assembling 

S^ :t- 1 1 apparatus and organizing the research equipment of the laboratory. He 

g-^ **^<« J finished writing the report of an extensive investigation on alcohol and 

33 3 ? 1 human efficiency, which he carried out at the Nutrition Laboratory in 

Jg* ^ ] Boston. The report will be published as a monograph by the Carnegie 

S^ •• Institute of Washington. During the year he also published the results of 

IS researches on the following subjects: The comparative concentration . of 

pj alcohol in the human blood and urine at intervals after ingestion, psychologic 

tests applied to diabetic patients, and physical measurements of diabetic 
^ Z3 patients. A number of his students in the psychological laboratory pursued 

p^ r| independent research aside from their thesis problems. Maud A. Merrill 

C^ ^ and Catherine M. Cox made a comparative study of visual acuity thresh- 

holds measured by different methods. Mr. Franklin S. Fearing investigated 
the influence of certain factors on static equilibriutn, recording the swaying 
of adult subjects by an apparatus recently developed by Mr. Miles. Mr. 
George Brammer studied the problem of static equilibrium in relation to 
the training and practice of the aviator. Ellen B. Sullivan measured the 
motor coordination of a large group of subjects with the Pursuit Pendulum. 
Several tests of motor and mechanical ability were developed by Thomas 
W. MacQuarrie for use in vocational guidance. Under the direction of 
Mr. Miles, Mr. Coover, and Mr. Terman, Miss Sullivan completed an 
experimental work study of attitude in relation to learning. 



Departmental Reports 187 

Mr. Coover continued his researches on typewriting and published an 
article on the kinaesthetic method of learning typing. He also carried on 
researches in psychical phenomena and statistical methods. With ^e 
cooperation of Mr. Weymouth, of the Department of Physiology, he 
directed an investigation by Mr. Fearing on the relation between certain 
psychological processes and variability in the knee-jerk, with special 
reference to changes in the direction of attention. Mr. Coover is associate 
editor of the Psychological Bulletin. He gave two courses at the Colorado 
State Agricultural College in the summer session of 1923, and during the 
year delivered the following addresses: "Psychical Research," Graduate 
Seminar, University of California; "What is Psychology?" San Francisco 
Labor College; "Analysis of Expert Typing, and a New Method of Learn- 
ing," Stanford Science Association; "The Experimental Method in Psy- 
chology," joint meeting of the Stanford Psychology Oub and Tau Psi 
Epsilon of the University of California; "A Method of Teaching Typewrit- 
ing Based upon a Psychological Analysis of Expert Typing," National 
Education Association; "Spiritualism," Assembly, Colorado State Agricul- 
tural College, Fort Collins, Colorado. 

During the year Mr. Stone equipped the animal laboratory with a large 
number of cages and with apparatus for experimentation. Two grants, 
totaling $1,200, were made to the University by the National Research 
Council, to be expended imder Mr. Stone's direction in experimental 
investigation of instincts. Four of the studies thus made possible have 
either been published or are in press, and four others are under way. They 
are concerned chiefly with sensory, nutritional, and endocrine influences 
affecting specific types of instinctive behavior in white rats, rabbits, and 
guinea pigs. The results of the entire series will throw important light on 
the nature of instinctive behavior and on the mechanisms which determine it. 
Addresses delivered by Mr. Stone included one before the National Educa- 
tion Association and one before the San Francisco Neurological Society. 

Miss Merrill served during the year as member of the probation com- 
mittee and psychologist to the Santa Clara County Juvenile Court, and as 
director of the psychological clinic in connection with the Santa Clara 
County health center. In August she completed her work for the degree of 
Doctor of Philosophy. 

Mr. Fearing has in press an article on extra- intellectual factors in 
delinquency. His researches on equilibrium and on the knee-jerk have 
already been mentioned. 

Under the auspices of the Psychology Club a series of nine public 
lectures was given between March 1 and May 24. The main purpose of the 
series was to call attention to the relation of psychology to various other 
subjects. The dates, subjects, and lectures were as follows: 

March 1 : "The Needs of Political Science Which Psychology Might 
Supply." Mr. West of the Department of Political Science. 

March 15: "Some Social Implications of Intellectual Differences." Mr. 
Terman. 



Department of Botany. 

. April 19: "The Significance of Experimental Neurology to Psychology." 
Mr. Stone. 

April 26: "The Relation of Psychology to the Physiology of the Sense 
Organs," Mr. Weymouth of the Department of Physiology. 

May 3: "The Significanee of Recent Advances in Physiology to 
Psycholog}-." Mr. Miles. 

May 10: "Psychology and Physics." Professor Emeritus Angell. 

May 1?: "The Experimental Method in Psychology." Mr. Coover 

May 24: "The Relationship of Philosophy to Psychology." Mr. Stuart 
of the Department of Philosophy. 

Additional lectures are being arranged for next year on the relation o! 
psychology to education, medicine, and in the industries. 

In cooperation with the psychology students of the University of Cali- 
fornia, a psychological fraternity was organized during the spring quarter 
under the name of Tau Psi Epsilon. This society, which replaces the 
Psychology Club, is a strictly professional organization designed primarily 
to foster advanced psychological study and research. Its membership i$ 
confined to graduate and advanced undergraduate students who have taken 
a definite number of units of psychology and have maintained a high 
average scholarship record. 

At the beginning of the year the space available for laboratory instruction 
and research was considerably increased by alterations on the second and 
third floors. The additions include twelve small rooms for experimental 
purposes, and a room 30 x 50 feet for the study of animal behavior. How- 
ever, owing to increases in the faculty personnel, in the number of courses 
offered, and in the class enrolments, the space is stiti inadequate to the 
needs of the department. 

With the reorganization and enlargement of the department, it has 
been passible also to make very material additions to the research facilities 
o( the laboratory. Prominent among the items recently added are the follow- 
ing : - '--"- "•-■"" ~-i..-.^-N— .- .c. A_^_i„,_ _~i-i . \ir_i.-r._', — -.»,«. 

galv 



Nuti 
futu 
thus 



Departmental Reports 189 

psychology which were carried forward at the Nutrition Laboratory by Dr. 
W. R. Miles." 

The equipment referred to represents an initial cost of about $1,000. It 
comprises chiefly an assembly of instruments for photographically recording 
eye movements- and reflexes and for measuring certain visual phenomena. 
These instruments will be kept together as an equipment unit in the 
laboratory. We foresee an extended a;id fruitful research history for this 
gift from the Carnegie Institution. 

It is believed that the inclusion of the department in the new School of 
Biology will result in stimulating research at Stanford in the border field 
between psychology and the other biological sciences. During the year Mr. 
Miles served upon the Executive committee of the School of Biology and 
Mr. Terman assisted in the course in General Biology by giving a lecture 
each quarter on mental inheritance and by writing a chapter on mental 
inheritance for the text used. The close relations of the department with 
the Department of Education are sufficiently indicated by the researches 
which are under way in the field of educational psychology, most of which 
are being carried out under the joint supervision of Mr. Kelley and Mr. 
Terman. It is suggested that this relationship could be still .further 
strengthened by the appointment of Mr. Kelley as a member of both depart- 
ment faculties. 

The generous provision of Thomas Welton Stanford, whereby the 
University has come into possession of approximately six hundred thousand 
dollars for psychological purposes (the largest endowment of the kind ever 
made), should go far toward making Stanford University one of the leading 
centers of psychological research. Such, however, will only be the case if 
the new income thus provided be not to