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" AXTIQUITATES SEU HISTORIARUM RELIQUIAE BUNT TANQUAM TABULjE 
NAUFRAGII ; CUM, DEFICIENTE ET FERE SUBMERSA RERUM MEMORIA, 
NIIIILOMINUS HOMINES INDUSTRII ET SAGACES, PERTINACI QUADAM ET 
SCUUPULOSA DILIGENTIA. EX GENEALOGIIS, FASTIS, TITULIS, MONUMENTIS, 
NUMISMATIBUS, NOMINIBUS PROPRIIS ET STYLIS, VERBORUM ETYMOLOGIIS, 
PROVERBIIS. TRADITIONTBUS. ARCHIVIS, ET INSTRUMENTIS, TAM PUBLICIS 
QUAM PRIVATIS, HISTORIARUM FRAGMENTIS, LIBRORUM NEUTIQUAM HISTORI- 
CORUM LOCIS DISPERSIS.— EX HIS, INQUAM, OMNIBUS VEL AL1QUIBUS, 
NONNULLA A TEMPORIS DILUVIO ERIPIUNT ET CONSERVANT. RES SANE 
OPEROSA. SED MORTALIBUS GRATA ET CUM REVERENTIA QUADAM CON- 
JUNCT A.'' 

" ANTIQUITIES, OR REMNANTS OF HISTORY, ARE, AS WAS SAID, TANQUAM 
TABULAE NAUFRAGII ; WHEN INDUSTRIOUS PERSONS, BY AN EXACT AND 
SCRUPULOUS DILIGENCE AND OBSERVATION, OUT OF MONUMENTS, NAMES, 
WORDS, PROVERBS, TRADITIONS, PRIVATE RECORDS AND EVIDENCES, FRAG- 
MENTS OF STORIES, PASSAGES OF BOOKS THAT CONCERN NOT STORY, AND 
THE LIKE. DO SAVE AND RECOVER SOMEWHAT FROM THE DELUGE OF 
time." — Advancement of Learning, ii. 



girrtol^ia Cmitoa : 



TRANSACTIONS 



KENT ARCHAEOLOGICAL SOCIETY. 




VOLUME XX. 



ILontion : 
PR1NTE D F O II THE SOCIETY 



MITCHELL & HUGHES. 140 WAHDOUR STREET, OXFORD STREET. 

1898. 



The Council of the Kent Archaeological Society is not answerable 
for any opinions put forward in this Work. Each Contributor is alone 
responsible for his oxen remarks. 



THE GETTY RESEARCH 



CONTENTS. 



PAGR 



Lists of Officers, x — xiii ; Rules, xiv ; List of Members, xvi — xxxii 

Illustration Fund xxxiii 

Cash Account, 1892 xxxiv 

Proceedings aud Reports 1892 and 1893 xxxvii — li 

1. Kentish Administrations, 1604 — 1649. Edited by 

Lei and L. Duncan, F.S.A 1 

2. On " Romano-British " Fictile Vessels from Pres- 

ton, near Wingham. By G. Doivker 49 

3. The Kentish Family of Lovelace, No. II. By the Rev. 

A. J. Pear man, M.A 54 

4. Early Presentations to Kentish Benefices. By the 

Rev. T. S. Frampton, M.A., F.S.A 64 

5. On the Old Rectory at Northfleet. By George M. 

Arnold, F.S.A 71 

6. Pedigrees of Smythe of Ostenhanger, Kent ; of 

Smythe of Bidborough and Sutton-at-Hone, Kent ; 
AND of the Smythes, Viscounts Strangford, of 
Dromore, Ireland. By the late John J. StocJcer 76 

7. Sir Thomas Smythe, Knt. (a.d. 1558—1625). By 

J. F. Wadmore, A.B.I.B.A 82 

8. List of Forty-five Vicars of Tilmanstone. Com- 

piled, with Notes, by the Rev. Thomas Shipdem Framp- 
ton, M.A., F.S.A 104 

9. The Ancient Fabric of the Church of St. Mary the 

Virgin, Dover. By the Rev. Canon Puckle, M.A. ... 119 

10. Vestiges of Roman Dover, By the Rev. Canon Puckle 128 

11. Early Norman Churches in and near the Medwat 

Valley. By the Rev. Grevile M. Livett 137 

12. St. Martin's Church, New Romnfv : Records relat- 

ing to its Removal in a.d. 1550. Transcribed by 
Henry Bacheler Walker, J. P. ; Communicated by 
W. L. Button, F.S.A 155 



vi CONTENTS. 



PAC.l 



L3. Kent Pines, l 7 Edwabd III. (a.d. L327-1334). Edited 

by the late James Qreenstreet 101 

11. Fifty-eight Rectors of Trottescliffe. By the Rev. 

T. S. Framjpton, M.A., F.S.A 187 

15. The Ruined Chapel of St. Katiierine at Shobne, 

Kent. By George M. Arnold, F.S.A 195 

16. On the Parish Clerks and Sexton of Fayersham, 

a.d. 1506-1593. By F. F. Giraud (Town Clerk) 203 

17. Trottescliffe Church. By Canon Scott Robertson 211 

18. Eaversham : Regulations for the Town Porters, 

1448. By F. F. Giraud (Town Clerk) 219 

19. Extracts from the Account Books of Captain John 

Harvey, R.N., Mayor of Sandwich 1774-5. By 
Thomas Dorman 222 

20. Sandgate Castle, a.d. 1539-40. By William Loftie 

Button, F.S.A 228 

21. List of Incumbents of St. Peter's, Seal (with St. 

Mary's, Kemsing, until 1874). By the Rev. T. Ship- 
dem Frampton, M.A., F.S.A 258 

22. Burial-places of the Archbishops of Canterbury. 

By the Rev. Canon Scott Bobertson 276 

23. The old Church of St. Martin, at Dover. By Canon 

Scott Bobertson 295 



ILLUSTRATIONS. 



1. Map of part of Preston, next Wingham to face 49 

2. Roman Vessels (1 to 12) from Preston „ 52 

3. (13 to 24) „ 53 

4. Northfleet Old Rectory House, Front Elevation „ 71 

5. , Details „ 73 

6. Sir Thomas Smythe's Portrait, Arms, and Autograph „ 82 

7. Tomb „ 99 

8. Sutton-at-Hone Church ,, 100 

9. Dover ; Ruins of Church of St. Martin-le-Grand, No. 1 „ 120 
10. , No. 2, at lack 

of No. 1. 

11. ,No. 3 „ 121 

12. Dover; Tower of Church of St. Mary the Virgin „ 122 

13. ; Plan shewing Roman Dover „ 131 

14. Norman Ground Plans of Churches „ 150 

15. Ruined Chapel of St. Katherine at Shorne „ 196 

1G. Trottescliffe Church from the N.E „ 211 

17. fromtheSouth „ 212 

18. Sandgate Castle, from the S.E. and from the N.E. ... „ 228 

19. , Plan „ 251 

20. in 1735 (Buck's View) „ 252 

21. Keep, and two Doorways ,, 254 

22. Tomb of Archbishop Hubert Walter, opened in 1892 „ 283 

23. Chalice and Paten of the twelfth century, fouud in 

the coffin of Archbishop Hubert Walter ,, 287 



7 



3kent &rcf)aeologtcal i&octetj)* 



OFFICERS, RULES, AND MEMBERS. 
SEPTEMBER, 1893. 



VOL. XX. 



( x ) 

lunt ftrcljacolocjtcal i£>otitty. 



|3rcsttJrnt. 

THE EARL STANHOPE, F.S.A., Lord Lieutenant of Kent. 

HIS GRACE THE ARCHBISHOP OF CANTERBURY. 

THE MARQUESS CONYNGHAM. 

THE MARQUESS OF DUFFERIN. 

THE EARL AMHERST. 

THE EARL OF CRANBROOK. 

THE EARL OF DARNLEY. 

THE EARL OF RADNOR. 

THE EARL OF ROMNEY. 

THE EARL SONDES. 

THE EARL OF WINCHILSEA AND NOTTINGHAM. 

THE VISCOUNT HARDINGE. 

THE RIGHT REV. THE LORD BISHOP OF WINCHESTER. 

THE LORD ASHCOMBE. 

THE LORD DE L'ISLE AND DUDLEY. 

THE LORD HARRIS. 

THE LORD HOTHFIELD. 

THE LORD HILLINGDON. 

THE LORD SACKVILLE, G.C.M.G. 

THE RIGHT REV. THE LORD BISHOP OF DOVER. 

THE HONOURABLE J. M. O. BYNG. 

STR E. C. DERING, BART. 

SIR WYNDHAM KNATCHBULL, BART. 

SIR STUART KNILL, BART. 

SIR JOHN LUBBOCK, BART., M.P. 

SIR DAVID LIONEL SALOMONS, BART. 

THE VERY REV. THE DEAN OF CANTERBURY. 

THE VERY REV. THE DEAN OF ROCHESTER. 

THE RIGHT HON A. AKERS-DOUGLAS, M.P. 

F. S. W. CORNWALLIS, ESQ., M.P. 

COLONEL EDWIN HUGHES, M.P. 

JOHN GILBERT TALBOT, ESQ., M.P. 

THE ARCHDEACON OF MAIDSTONE. 

THE ARCHDEACON OF ROCHESTER. 

THE REV, CANON W. A. SCOTT ROBERTSON. 

3gonorarg Wtttaxn. 

Foe Vol. XX., REV. CANON SCOTT ROBERTSON, M.A. 

For Vol. XXL, REV. CANON C. F. ROUTLEDGE, M.A., F.S.A., 

St. Martins, Canterbury, 

&<morarg Skttvct&vp. 

GEORGE PAYNE, ESQ., F.S.A., F.L.S., The Precinct, Rochester. 
(ALL THESE GENTLEMEN ARE EX-OFFICIO MEMBERS OF THE COUNCIL.) 



LIST OF OFFICERS. XI 

(PIrctctr ittrmlicns of tt)c Council. 

Augustus A. Arnold, Esq., p.s.a Rochester. 

G. M. Arnold, Esq., j.p., p.s.a Gfravesend. 

E. F. Astley, Esq.. m.d., j.p Dover. 

Rev. J. A. Boodle, m.a BovgMon Blean. 

Wilfred J. Cripps, Esq., c.b., m.a., f.s.a., j.p. . . . Cirencester. 

George Dowker, Esq., p.g.s Ramsgate. 

Rev. T. S. Frampton, m.a., f.s.a St. Mary Piatt. 

F. F. Giraud, Esq FamrsTwm. 

Lieut.-Col. Hartley, m.a., ll.d., j.p Dartford. 

J. J. Howard, Esq., ll.d., f.s.a. {Maltravers Herald) . BlacTiheath. 

Rev. Canon R. C. Jenkins, m.a Lyminge. 

Granville Leveson-Gower, Esq., f.s.a., j.p Titsey. 

H. B. Mackeson, Esq., f.g.s., j.p Ilythe. 

Samuel Mercer, Esq Maidstone. 

W. T. Neve, Esq CrcmbrooTt. 

J. D. Norwood, Esq Ashford. 

Rev. A. J. Pearman, m.a Merstham. 

C. W. Powell, Esq., j.p Speldhurst. 

Rev. Canon C. F. Routledge, m.a., f.s.a Canterowry. 

FLAXMAN C. J. SPURRELL, ESQ., F.G.S Belvedere. 

Henry Stringer, Esq New Romney. 

J. F. Wadmore, Esq., f.r.i.b.a Tunbvidge. 

Kenyon Wood Wilkie, Esq., j.p Ramsgate. 

George Wilks, Esq Bythe. 

Clusters. 

The Earl Amherst. 
The Earl Stanhope. 
J. G. Talbot, Esq., m.p. 
Matthew Bell, Esq. 

&utJttors. 

Herbert Hordern, Esq., j.p. 
Captain Chas. F. Hooper, j.p. 

©|>«f Curator. 

George Payne, Esq., f.s.a., f.l.s. 

Bankers. 

Messrs. Wigan, Mercers, and Co., Maidstone. 
(London Correspondents, Messrs. Smith, Payne, and Smiths.) 

Messrs. Hammond and Co., Canterbury. 
(London Correspondents. Messrs. Glyn and Co.) 

b2 



( xii ) 
HONORARY LOCAL SECRETARIES. 



asfjfovti District. 

J. D. Norwood, Esq Ashford. 

tJIarhfiratf) anti Hctoisfjam District. 

Mr. W. Essington Hughes 140 Wardour Street, W. 

Bromlri? Distrirt. 
W. J. Nichols, Esq South Hill, Bromley. 

©antrrbun? Distrirt. 

( Sacombe Lodge, Harble- 
REV. H. G. Rolt | down, Canterbury. 

Cranfcroofc District. 
\V. T. Neve. Esq Cranbroolt. 

Dartforfc District. 
C. R. Holt-White, Esq Bexley, Kent. 

Deal anfc S23almer District. 

W. H. BURCH ROSHER, Esq Walmrr. 

Dobcr District. 
Edward Wickens Fry, Esq St. Martin's House, Dover. 

jfabersfjam District. 

F. F. Giraud, Esq Faversham. 

jfol&estotte District. 
Wm. Wightwick, Esq Folkestone. 

ffirabescnto District. 

G. M. Arnold, Esq Milton Hall, Gravesend. 

P?8tJje Distrirt. 
G. Wilks, Esq Ilythe. 

ILoiitrott. 
Mr. W. Essington Hughes 140 Wardour Street, w. 

iHaitrstone Distrirt. 
C. Boyce, Esq., m.d 29 Week Street, Maidstone. 

falling District. 
Miss Dudlow West Mailing. 

ifHargate District. 
Wm. Jno. Mercer, Esq 12 Marine Terrace, Margate. 

Iftamsgate J0t'strirt. 
Kenyon W. Wilkie, Esq Ellington, Ramsgate. 

Itiocficstcr District. 
George Payne, Esq The Precinct, Rochester. 

liomnej) Distrirt. 
Henry Stringer, Esq JYew Romney. 



SOCIETIES IN UNION. Xlll 

^antitoicf) District. 

Kev. Walker Flower Worth. 

^cbcnoafts Distrirt. 

George F. Carnell, Esq Sevenoalts. 

£fieppcr> District, 

John Copland, Esq Sheerness. 

JHttingfcourne District. 
G. E. Elliott, Esq Sittingboume. 

ftrntcrfccn District. 
J. Ellis Mace, Esq. Tenterden. 

STunbriugc District. 
J. F. Wadmore, Esq Tunbridge. 

JEunbrtlrge fflffiJcIIs District. 

( Speldhurst, Tmibridge 
Charles Watson Powell, Esq -j Wells. 

SliHrsterliam District. 
J. Board, Esq Westerham. 



SOCIETIES IN UNION. 

For Interchange of Publications, etc. 



The Society of Antiquaries, Burlington House, Piccadilly, TV. 

The Royal Archaeological Institute of Great Britain, 17 Oxford Mansions, Oxford 

Street, W. 
The British Archaeological Association, 32 Sackville Street, Piccadilly, W. 
The Society of Antiquaries of Scotland, Edinburgh. 
The Architectural Museum, 18 Tuft on Street, Westminster, 8.W. 
The Numismatic Society, 22 Albemarle Street, W. 

The London and Middlesex Archaeological Society, S Danes Inn. Strand, W.C. 
The Historic Society of Cheshire and Lancashire (R. B. Radcliffe, M.A., Sec, 

Royal Institution, Colquitt Street, Liverpool). 
The Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland. 
The Lincoln Diocesan Architectural Society. 
The Norfolk and Norwich Archaeological Society, Norwich. 
The Suffolk Institute of Archaeology (Rev. F. Haslewood, Hon. Sec, St. Mat- 

their's Rectory. Ipsrcich). 
The Surrey Archaeological Society, 8 Banes Inn, Strand, W.C. 
The Sussex Archaeological Society, Lewes Castle. 

The Wiltshire Archaeological and Natural History Society, Museum, Devizes. 
The Somersetshire Archaeological and Natural History Society, Taunton Castle. 
The Bristol and Gloucestershire Archaeological Society (Rev. W. Bazeley, 

Matson Rectory, Gloucester). 
The Cambridge Antiquarian Society (Br. Hardcastle, Downing College, 

Cambridge). 
The Derbyshire Archaeological Society (Arthur Cox, Esq., Mill Hill. Berby). 
The Povvysland Club (Morris C. Jones, Esq., Ghingrog, near Welshpool). 
The Cumberland and Westmoreland Archaeological Society (R. S. Ferguson, 

Esq., F.S.A., Carlisle). 
The Leicestershire Archaeological Society, 5 Gallon-tree Gate, Leicester. 
The Society of Antiquaries, Newcastle-upon-Tyne (R. Blair, Esq., South Shield*). 
The Shropshire Archaeological Society (Rev. W. G. Bimock Fletcher, St. 

MichaeVs Vicarage. Shrewsbury). 
Societe Archeologique de Dunkerque. 
R. Societa Romana di Storia Patria. Biblioteca Vallicelliana. Roma. 



lules of tlje |lcnt penological jsocictg. 



o 



1. The Society shall consist of Ordinary Members and Honorary 
Members. 

2. The affairs of the Society shall be conducted by a Council consist- 
ing of the President of the Society, the Vice- Presidents, the Honorary 
Secretary, and twenty-four Members elected out of the general body of 
the Subscribers : one-fourth of the latter shall go out annually in rotation, 
but shall nevertheless be re-eligible; and such retiring and the new elec- 
tion shall take place at the Annual General Meeting: but any intermediate 
vacancy, by death or retirement, among the elected Council, shall be filled 
up either at the General Meeting or at the next Council Meeting, which- 
ever shall first happen. Five Members of the Council to constitute a 
quorum. 

3. The Council shall meet to transact the business of the Society on 
the second Thursday in the months of March, June, September, and 
December, and at any other time that the Secretary may deem it expe- 
dient to call them together. The June Meeting shall always be held in 
London ; those of March, September, and December at Canterbury and 
Maidstone alternately. But the Council shall have power, if it shall 
deem it advisable, at the instance of the President, to hold its Meetings 
at other places within the county ; and to alter the days of Meeting, or to 
omit a Quarterly Meeting if it shall be found convenient. 

4. At every Meeting of the Society or Council, the President, or, in 
his absence, the Chairman, shall have a casting vote, independently of his 
vote as a Member. 

5. A General Meeting of the Society shall be held annually, in July, 
August, or September, at some place rendered interesting by its antiquities 
or historical associations, in the eastern and western divisions of the 
county alternately, unless the Council, for some cause to be by them 
assigned, agree to vary this arrangement ; the day and place of meeting 
10 be appointed by the Council, who shall have the power, at the instance of 
the President, to elect some Member of the Society connected with the 
district in which the meeting shall be held, to act as Chairman of such 
Meeting. At the said General Meeting, antiquities shall be exhibited, 
and papers read on subjects of archaeological interest. The accounts of 
the Society, having been previously allowed by the Auditors, shall be 
presented ; the Council, through the Secretary, shall make a Report on 
the state of the Society; and the Auditors and the six new Members of 
the Council for the ensuing year shall be elected. 

6. The Annual General Meeting shall have power to make such 
alterations in the Rules as the majority of Members present may approve: 
provided that notice of any contemplated alterations be given, in writing, 
to the Honorary Secretary, before June the 1st in the then current year, 
to be laid by him before the Council at their next Meeting; provided, 
also, that the said contemplated alterations be specifically set out in the 
notices summoning the Meeting, at least one month before the day 
appointed for it. 

7. A Special General Meeting may be summoned, on the written 
requisition of seven Members, or of the President, or two Vice-Presidents, 
which must specify the subject intended to be brought forward at such 
Meeting; and such subject alone can then be considered. 



RULES AND REGULATIONS. XV 

8. Candidates for admission must be proposed by one Member of the 
Society, and seconded by another, and be balloted for, if required, at any 
Meeting of the Council, or at a General Meeting, one black ball in five to 
exclude. 

9. Each Ordinary Member shall pay an Annual Subscription of Ten 
Shillings, due in advance on the 1st of January in each year; or £6 may 
at any time be paid in lieu of future subscriptions, as a composition for 
life. Any Ordinary Member shall pay, on election, an entrance fee of Ten 
Shillings, in addition to his Subscription, whether Annual or Life. Every 
Member shall be entitled to a copy of the Society's Publications ; but 
none will be issued to any Member whose Subscription is in arrear. The 
Council may remove from the List of Subscribers the name of any Mem- 
ber whose Subscription is two years in arrear, if it be certified to them 
that a written application for payment has been made by one of the 
Secretaries, and not attended to within a month from the time of applica- 
tion. 

10. All Subscriptions and Donations are to be paid to the Bankers of 
the Society, or to one of the Secretaries. 

11. All Life Compositions shall be vested in Government Securities, 
in the names of four Trustees, to be elected by the Council. The interest 
only of such funds to be used for the ordinary purposes of the Society. 

12. No cheque shall be drawn except by order of the Council, and 
every cheque shall be signed by two Members of the Council and the 
Honorary Secretary. 

13. The President and Secretary, on any vacancy, shall be elected by 
a General Meeting of the Subscribers. 

14. Members of either House of Parliament, who are landed pro- 
prietors of the county or residents therein, shall, on becoming Members 
of the Society, be placed on the list of Vice-Presidents, and with them 
such other persons as the Society may elect to that office. 

15. The Council shall have power to elect, without ballot, on the 
nomination of two Members, any lady who may be desirous of becoming 
a Member of the Society. 

16. The Council shall have power to appoint as Honorary Member 
any person likely to promote the interests of the Society. Such Honorary 
Member not to pay any subscription, and not to have the right of voting at 
any Meetings of the Society ; but to have all the other privileges of 
Members. 

17. The Council shall have power to appoint any Member Honorary 
Local Secretary for the town or district wherein he may reside, in order 
to facilitate the collection of accurate information as to objects and dis- 
coveries of local interest, and for the receipt of subscriptions. 

18. Meetings for the purpose of reading papers, the exhibition of 
antiquities, or the discussion of subjects connected therewith, shall be 
held at such times and places as the Council may appoint. 

19. The Society shall avoid all subjects of religious or political con- 
troversy. 

20. The Secretary shall keep a record of the proceedings of the 
Society, to be communicated to the Members at the General Meetings. 



( xvi ) 



HONORARY MEMBERS. 



Augustus W. Franks, Esq., C.B., LITT.D., P.S.A., British Museum, W.C. 

M. le Grande Reulandt, Membre Honoraire de la Societe d'Histoire de la Flandre 
Maritime de France, Membre Correspondant de la Societe Imperiale des 
Sciences de Lille, Controleur dans 1' Administration des Finances de 
Belgique, etc. 

J. B. Sheppard, Esq., ll.d., Canterbury. 

Rev. W. W. Skeat, M.A., litt.d. (Professor of Anglo-Saxon in the University of 
Cambridge), Salisbury Villas, Cambridge. 

The Right Rev. Edward Trollope, D.D., F.s.A., Bishop Suffragan of Nottingham, 
Leasingliam, Slcaford, Lincolnshire. 



( xvii ) 

MEMBERS. 

CORRECTED TO SEPTEMBER L893. 



THE * DENOTES LIFE COMPOUNDERS. 



Abernetky, James, Esq., C.E., Whiteness, Margate. 

*Ac\vorth, R. William Harrison, Esq., Ellora, Rochester. 

Adam, James, Esq., West Mailing Place, Maidstone. 

Adcock, W.j Esq., St. James Street, Dover. 

Akers-Douglas, Ritdit Hon. Aretas, m.p., Chilston Park, Maidstone. 

Alcock, Rev. John Price, m.a., Crayford Rector}', Kent. 

Alexander, Horace A., Esq., North Park, Eltham. 

♦Alexander, R. H., Esq., Brandfold, Goudhurst, Kent. 

Allen, Dr., Tonbridge. 

Allen, John L., Esq., Clover Street House, Chatham. 

♦Amherst, The Earl, Montreal, Sevenoaks. 

*Amherst of Hackney, The Right Hon. Lord, Didlington Hall, Brandon, 

Norfolk. 
Anderson, William Charles, Esq., Hill House, Keston, Beckenham. 
Arkcoll, Juo., Esq., Foley House, Maidstone. 
Arnold, Augustus A., Esq., f.s.a., The Precinct, Rochester. 
Arnold, E., Esq., Stoneleigh, Grove Road, Clapham Park, s.w. 
Arnold, G. M., Esq., f.s.a., Milton Hall, Gravesend. 
Ash, Rev. Jarvis Holland, d.c.l., 10 Hungershall Park, Tunbridge Wells. 
*Ashcombe, The Right Hon. Lord, Denbies, Dorking. 
Astley, Edward Ferrand, Esq., m.d., 29 Marine Parade, Dover. 
Athenteum Club, The, 107 Pall Mall, s.w. 
Athill, Charles H., Esq., f.s.a., Richmond Herald, College of Arms, London, E.c, 

and Eltham, Kent. 
*Austen, Francis, Esq., Capel Manor, Horsmonden, Staplehurst. 
Aveling, Stephen, Esq., Frindsbury, Rochester. 

Bailey, G. W. H., Esq., 9 Cavendish Place, w. 

Bailey, Rev. Canon Henry, D.D., Canterbury. 

Baker, Arthur, Esq., f.k.i.b.a., 21 Lower Phillimore Place, Kensington, w. 

Baker, F., Esq., C.E., Canterbury. 

Baker, Herbert, Esq., The Owletts, Cobham, Gravesend. 

Baker, T. H., Esq., The Owletts, Cobham, Gravesend. 

Baldock, Rev. William, B.A., Brookland, Folkestone. 

Baldwin, A. H., Esq., f.s.a., 212 Eglintou Road, Plumstead, s.E. 

♦Ball, William, Esq., Strood, Rochester. 

Balston, R. J., Esq., Springfield, Maidstone. 

Banks, Rev. E. G., d.d., Chatham House, Eamsgate. 

Banning, Rev. C. H.. m.a., St. Nicholas' Vicarage, Rochester. 

Barrett, J. P., Esq., 3 St. John's Villas, Margate. 

* Barron, Edward Jackson, Esq., f.s.a., 10 Endsleis^h Street. Tavistock Square, w.C. 

Barrow, John J., Esq., Holmvvood, Speldhurst, Tunbridge Wells. 

Bartlett, H. S., Esq., Sevendroog, Shooters' Hill, s.E. 



XV111 KENT ARCHAEOLOGICAL SOCIETY. 

♦Bartrani, Rev. II., m.a., Vicarage, Ramsgate. 

♦Bartram, Capt. (Royal Engineers), Tunbridge Wells. 

Bateman, William, Esq., 32 Albion Terrace. Sandgate Road, Folkestone. 

Batten, James, Esq., Eighfield, Bickley, Bromley, Kent. 

♦Baxter, Wynne E., Esq., 35 High Street, Lewes. 

Bayley, His Honour Judge, ii(! Cambridge Terrace, Hyde Park, w. 

Beach, Fletcher, Esq., m.b., Metropolitan Asylum, Darenth, Dartford. 

Beale, Gordon P. Tracy, Esq., Eastgate, Tenterden. 

Beale, Mrs., Hast -'ate, Tenterden. 

♦Beamish, Mr. 11. J., The Grove, Gravesend. 

* Beaumont, Charles, Esq., Tunbridge Road, Maidstone. 

Beeby, W. T., Esq., m.d., Bromley, Kent. 

Beechmg, Arthur T., Esq., Eerox Hall, Tunbridge. 

Belcher, H. T., Esq., Glenwood, Edgar Road, Clil'tonville, Margate. 

Belcher, W. D., Esq., 28 Harold Street, Camberwell, s.E. 

Bell, Matthew, Esq., f.g.s., Bourne Park, Canterbury. 

Bensted, Henry Thomas, Esq., Court Lodge, Teynham, Sittingbourne. 

Bensted, Hubert, Esq., Rockstow, Maidstone. 

*Berridge, Robert, Esq., Rossmoyne, Chase Green Avenue, Enfield. 

Berry, J. B., Esq., M.R.C.s., Ramsgate. 

Best, Major M. G., Park House, Boxlej T , Maidstone. 

Betts, Mrs., East Hill, Ashford, Kent. 

*Bevan, Arthur T., Esq., Bessels Green, Sevenoaks. 

*Bevan, F. L., Esq., Kippington, Sevenoaks. 

*Bicknell, A. S., Esq. (Goudhurst), 23 Onslow Gardens, s.w. 

Bingley, Rev. J. G., M.A., Snodland Vicarage, Rochester. 

Birch, Rev. C. G. R., ll.m., Brancaster Rectory, King's Lynn, Norfolk. 

Bird, Sidney J., Esq., 46 Leases Terrace, Leases Park, Newcastle-on-Tyne. 

Birmingham Central Free Library, Mr. J. I). Mullins (Librarian), Ratcliff Place, 

Birmingham. 
*Bishop, AVilliam W. H., Esq., 8 Prince of Wales Terrace, Kensington, w. 
*Blakiston, Rev. R. Milburn, f.s.a., 7 Dean's Yard, Westminster, s.w. 
Bligb, The Lady Isabel, Fatherwell House, West Mailing, Maidstone. 
Bliss, Rev. Canon, m.a., Betteshanger Rectory, Dover. 
Blogg, Rev. F. Babington, m.a., Vicarage, Walmer. 
Blomfield, Rev. G. J., m.a., Aldington Rectory, Hythe. 
Blore, Rev. Canon G. J., d.d., St. Stephen's, Canterbury. 
Bloxam, Richard, Esq., Eltham Court, Kent. 
Board, Major John, Springfield, Westerham, Edenbridge. 
Bodleian Library, The, Oxford. 
Body, W., Esq., Dunstall, Shoreham, Sevenoaks. 
Boissier, R. Allnutt, Esq., The Grove, Penshurst. 
Bolton, Mr. Joseph, King Street, Dover. 

*Boodle, Rev. John Adolphus, m.a.., Boughton Blean Vicarage, Faversham. 
Booth, AVilliam, Esq., Borstall Court, Rochester. 
Boston Public Librar}% Boston, United States (Messrs. Triibner, Paternoster 

House, Charing Cross Road, W.C.). 
Boswell, Dr. Irvine, East Street, Faversham. 
Bottle, Mr. Alexander, Dover. 
Bottle, Edward, Esq., St. Martin's Hill, Dover. 
Boulter, Mr. H., " Kent Argus" Office, Ramsgate. 
Bovvker, A. F., Esq., f.r.g.s., Hardres, Town Mailing. 
Bowyear, Rev. Thomas Kyrwood, m.a. 
Boyce, C, Esq., m.d., Maidstone. 

*Boys, Rev. H. J., m.a., Layer Marney Rectory, Kelvedon, Essex. 
Bramah, Mrs., Davington Prior}', Faversham. 

Brampton, W. E., Esq., 21 Culverden Park Road, Tunbridge Wells. 
Bramston, Rev. William, m.a., Vicar of Minster, Sheerness. 
Bramwell, Sir Frederick, Bart., d.c.l., f.s.a., Holmwood, Edenbridge. 
*Brent, Algernon, Esq., f.b.g.s., 19 Oxford Mansions, Oxford Street, w 



LIST OF MEMBERS. XIX 

•Brent, Cecil, Esq., F.S.A., 37 Palace Grove, Bromley, Kent. 

Brent, Francis, Esq., F.8.A., ('. Tuthill Avenue, St. Jude's, Plymouth. 

Bridge, J. II., Esq., 6 Brewer Street, Maidstone. 

Briggs, ('. A., Esq., 55 Lincoln's Inn Fields, W.C. 

Brightman, Edward W., Esq., Sheerness. 

Brindle, Thomas, Esq., North Hank, Tunbridge \\"<-lls. 

Bristow, William, Esq., The Woodlands. W'estcombc Fark, Blackheath, S.E. 

Broad, Mr. John, 5 Bank Street, Ashford, Kent. 

Brock, E. P. Loft us, Esq., f.s.a., 27 Soho Square, w. 

Brooke, Edward, Esq., UU'ord Place, Woodbridge, Suffolk. 

Brooke, John, Esq., Folkestone. 

Bros, Mr. W. L., Foots Cray, Kent. 

Brothers, Mr. John, Ashford, Kent. 

Browell, William Faulkner, Esq., Claytons, Tunbridge Wells. 

Brown, Alex., Esq., Hothfield, Ashford, Kent. 

* Brown, Charles George, Esq., F.K.G.S., Pine Ridge, Orpington. 

*Brown, James Roberts, Esq,, f.r.g.s.,44 Tregunter Road, South Kensington, s.w. 

* Broun, Robert Ross, Esq., Strood, Rochester. 
Brown, Viney, Esq., 15 King Street, Dover. 
Brown, Wm., Esq., Summerhurst, Tunbridge Wells. 
Browne, Rev. Alfred T., m.a., Postling Vicarage, Hythe. 

Bmwning, Arthur Giraud, Esq., Spencer Lodge, AVaudsworth Common, s.w. 

* Bruce, Mr. Justice Gainsford, Yewhurst, Bromley, Kent. 
Budden, Major, Castle Moat, Rochester. 

Bugler, John U., Esq., Stoke House, Ashford, Kent. 

Billiard, Thomas, Esq., 158 Burnt Ash Hill, Lee, Kent. 

♦Burgess, Major C. J., 94- King's Road, Brighton. 

Buna, James S., Esq., Ashford, Kent. 

Burra, Rev. T. F., M.A., Linton Vicarage, Maidstone. 

Burrows, A. J., Jim., Esq., Pluckley, Ashford, Kent. 

Bushell, Thomas Tomliu, Esq., 47 Castle Street, Dover. 

Butler, Mrs. Pierce, Ulcombedeu, Hawkhurst. 

*Buttanshaw, Rev. John, M.A., 22 St. James's Square, Bath. 

ByDg, The Honourable James M. O., Great Culverden, Tunbridge Wells. 

*Bywater, Witham M., Esq., m.r.inst., 5 Hanover Square, w. 

*Canterbury, His Grace the Archbishop of, d.d., Lambeth Palace, s.E. 

Canterbury, The Very Rev. the Dean of, The Precincts, Canterbury. 

Canterbury Municipal Library, The Museum, Canterbury. 

Carnell, George F., Esq., Sevenoaks. 

Carr, Rev. J. Haslewood, M.A., Adisham Rectory, Wingham. 

Carr, Rev. T. A., m.a., Vicarage, Marden, Staplehurst. 

Carr, Rev. T. W., m.a., Banning Rectory, Maidstone. 

Caswall, Walter R. Le Hardy, Esq., Wilmington Brewery, Dartford. 

(alts, Arthur, Esq., 12 York Terrace, Regent's Park, N.W. 

Cave-Browne, Rev. J., m.a., Detling Vicarage, Maidstone. 

*Cazalet, W. M., Esq., Fairlawn, Shipborne, Tunbridge. 

•Chalmers, David, Esq., f.k.s.e., f.s.a. scot., Redhall, Slateford, Midlothian. 

Chapman, A. D. B., Esq., Wood Street House, Bapchild, Sittiugbourne. 

Chapman, Ebenezer, Esq., The Limes, Ashford, Kent. 

♦Chapman, II. Mapleton, Esq., St. Martin's Priory, Canterbury. 

Charlesworth, P., Esq., East Hill, Bickley, Bromley, Kent. 

Cheetham, The Venerable Archdeacon, d.d., f.s.a., The Precinct, Rochester. 

Chignell, R., Esq., Castle Mount, Dover. 

Christian, Ewan, Esq., 8a Whitehall Place, s.w. 

Chubb, Hammond, Esq., Home Lee, Bickley, Bromley, Kent. 

Chute, Wm. Maoready, Esq., 3 Burlington Gardens, Chiswick, w. 

Clabon, J. Moxon, Esq., Clare Bank, Sevenoaks. 

Clapham, F. Dare. Esq., Hurst Lodge, Gravel Hill, Bexley. 

Clark, Rev. E. Travers, B.A., Chislet, Canterbury. 



XX KENT ARCHyEOLOGICAL SOCIETY. 

Clarke, ('has. Harwood, Esq., f.s.a., Westfield, Bromley, Kent. 
Claypole, II. T., E5sq., London and County Bank, 8ittingbourne 
Clifford, James, Esq., Maidstone. 

Clinch, (icorgc, Esq., 22 Nicholson Road, Addiscoinbe. 

Clukc, P., Esq., Eastry, Dover. 

*Clout, Richard, Esq., Bnnni' House, West Mailing, Maidstone. 

Coates, Mrs. Ann, Shorne Vicarage, Gravesend, Kent. 

Cobb, II. M., Esq., Iligham, Rochester. 

*Cobhain, Charles, Esq., The Shrubbery, Gravesend. 

Cobham, G. R., Esq., 1 Edwin Street, Gravesend. 

*Cock, Edwin, Esq., The Court Lodge, Appledore, Ashford, Kent. 

Cockburn, Edward, Esq., The Croft, Ellington Road, Ramsgate. 

Cockcroft, Thomas H., Esq., m.d., Manor Lodge, Chislehurst. 

Cockle, Major G., Truro Lodge, Ramsgate. 

*Cokayne, G. E., Esq., m.a., f.s.a., Norroy King of Arms, College of Arms, Queen 

Victoria Street, E.c. 
Coleman, William, Esq., The Shrubbery, Buckland, Dover. 
Collard, Edw. Maynard, Esq., 1 St. George's Terrace, Heme Bay. 
Collett, Rev. Anthony, m.a., Hastingleigh Rectory, Ashford, Kent. 
Collier, Rev. Cams V., b.a., Faversham. 
*Collins, Brenton H., Esq., Dunorlan, Tunbridge Wells. 
Collins, H. O., Esq., 14 Esmond Road, Bedford Park, Chiswick. 
Collis, Rev. Henry, m.a., St. Philip's Vicarage, Maidstone. 
Colpoj's, Arthur A. G., Esq., 33 Havelock Road, Hastings. 
Colson, Rev Canon Charles, m.a., Cuxton Rectory, Rochester. 
Congress Library, Washington, U.S.A. (per Mr. Allen, 23 Henrietta Street, 

Covent Garden, w.c). 
Conyngham, The Marquess, Bifrons Park, Canterbury, and Slane Castle, co. 

Meath, Ireland. 
Cooke, Henry, Esq., Thong, near Gravesend. 
Cooke, Rev. John Russell, b.a., Preston Vicarage, Faversham. 
Cooke, Richard, Esq., The Croft, Detling, Maidstone. 

Cooper, Rev. W. H. Windle, M.A., Warrior House, Dalby Square, Margate. 
Copland, John, Esq., Sheerness. 
Copland, Wm. Wallace, Esq., Sheerness. 
Cornfoot, David, Esq., Dry Hill House, Tunbridge. 
*Cornwallis, E. S. W., Esq., m.p., Linton Park, Maidstone. 
*Cotton, Dr. Charles, 40 Spencer Square, Ramsgate. 
Cotton, Horace, Esq., Quex Park, Birchington, Margate. 
Couchman, Mr. J. B., The Ferns, South-Eastern Road, Ramsgate. 
Court, Percy, Esq., Dover. 
Courthope, George, Esq., Hawkhurst. 

Cow, John, Esq., Montredon, Arkwright Road, Hampstead, N.w. 
*Cowell, George, Esq., f.r.c.s., 3 Cavendish Place, Cavendish Square, w. 
Cox, Frederick John, Esq., 7 Osberton Road, Lee, Kent. 
Cox, His Honour Judge, Marl Field House, Tunbridge. 
Cradock, Mrs. R. W., Myrtle Villa, Belvedere, Kent." 
Crafer, T. N., Esq., Hillside, Ravensbourne Road, Broinle}', Kent. 
Cramp, Mr. Clement, Cranbrook. 
Cranbrook, The Earl of, Hemsted, Cranbrook. 
Cranbrook Literary Institute, Cranbrook. 

Creswell, Sackville, Esq., New House, Mersham, Ashford, Kent. 
Crichton, Lionel, Esq., 2 Bolingbroke Road, West Kensington, w. 
Cripps, Wilfred Joseph, Esq., c.B., m.a., f.s.a., Cirencester. 
*Croft, Geo. C, Esq., 6 Stanhope Street, Hyde Park Gardens, w. 
Cronk, H. H., Esq., Emswiek, Tunbridge Wells. 
Crosse, Rev. T. G., Eastbridge Hospital, Canterbury. 
Crundall, Sir W. H., Mayor of Dover, Dover. 
Culleton, Leo, Esq., Bathville House, Hampstead, N.w. 
Curling, Major Henry, R a., Chilton Lodge, Ramsgate. 



LIST OF MEMBERS. \\l 

Curteis, Rev. T. S., m.a., f.s.a., The Rectory, Sevenoaks. 
Curl is, Charles, Esq., 28 Baker Street, Portinan Square, w. 
Cust, The Lady Elizabeth, 13 Eceleston Square, s.w. 

Dalison, Max. H., Esq., Hamptons, Tunbridge. 

Dampier, H. L., Esq., f.c.s., Strood, Kent. 

Darbishire, II. A., Esq., Oakdene, Edenbridge. 

Darnley, The Earl of, Cobham Hall, Gravesend. 

Davies, Rev. J. Sanger, St. Mary Brcdin Vicarage, Canterbury. 

Davis, Arthur Randall, Esq., Hythe, Kent. 

Deedes, Rev. Cecil, 2 Clifton Terrace, Brighton. 

Deedes, Mrs., Saltwood Castle, Hythe. 

De Mey, Mrs., " Rossway," St. Leonard's Road, Eastbourne. 

Deuce, J., Esq., Ruthven, Sevenoaks. 

Dering, Sir E. O, Bart., Pluckley, Ashford, Kent. 

Devas, Charles F., Esq., Pickhurst Green, Hayes, Beckenhani. 

Devavnes, Miss, Updovvn House, Margate. 

*De\vick, Rev. E. S., 26 Oxford Square, Hyde Park, \v. 

Dickeson, Sir Richard, Market Lane, Dover. 

Dickinson, C. E. Gildersome, Esq., 8 Morrison Street, s.w. 

Dickson, Rev. R. H., m.a., Eastchurch Rectory, Sheerness. 

Disniorr, J. S., Esq., Stewart House, Wrothaui Road, Gravesend. 

Dixon, Lieut. -Gen., Wood's Gate, Pembury, Tunbridge Wells. 

*Dodgson, W. II., Esq., Hayes Ford, Bromley, Kent. 

*Dodgson, W. O., Esq., Manor House, Sevenoaks. 

Donne, Rev. Charles Edward, m.a., The Vicarage, Faversham. 

Dorman, Thomas, Esq., Sandwich. 

Dover, The Lord Bishop of, The Precincts, Canterbury. 

Dover Proprietary Library, Castle Street, Dover. 

Dowker, George, Esq., f.g.s., 2 Laburnum Villas, South-Eastern Road, 

Ramsgate. 
Downe, Capt. W. Thornton, E.N., The Hawthorns, Tonbridge. 
Drake, Mr. Charles, Newton Road, Faversham. 
Drake, Mr. John, High Street, Rochester. 
Dudlow, Miss, West Mailing, Maidstone. 

Dufferin and Ava, The Marquess of, g.c.b., etc., Walmer Castle, Dover. 
Duncan, Leland L., Esq., Rosslair, Lingard's Road, Lewisham, s.E. 
*Durst, Rev. John, m.a., Thornham Vicarage, Maidstone. 
Dyke, Rev. John Dixon, m.a., 21 Holland Road, Brixton, s.w. 

Eastes, James S., Esq., Fairlawn, Ashford, Kent. 

*Eastgate, Rev. C. E., M.A., 31 Augusta Road, Ramsgate. 

Ebsworth, Rev. J. W., m.a., f.s.a., Molash Vicarage, Ashford, Kent. 

*Eden, Rev. Arthur, m.a., Ticehurst Vicarage, Hawkhurst. 

Edge, Rev. W. J., m.a., Upper Tooting, s.w. 

Edmeades, Major-General, Nurstead Court, Gravesend. 

Edwards, Mr. Thos., Ashford, Kent. 

Elers, W. S., Esq., 7 Dorset Square, N.w. 

*Elgar, J. F., Esq., Wingham Lodge, Rochester. 

Elgar, Mr. W. H., S.E.R. Station, Ashford. 

Elliott, Frank, Esq., New Hall, Dymchurch, Folkestone. 

Elliott, G. E., Esq., 13 Station Street, Sittingbourne. 

Elliott, Mr. Robert, Little Hothfield, Ashford, Kent. 

*Ellis, Rev. J. H., m.a., 29 Collingham Gardens, South Kensington, s.w. 

Elvin, Rev. C. R. S., m.a., Plantation House, Faversham. 

Elwes, Valentine E. H. Gary, Esq., f.s.a., Billing Hall, Northampton. 

Elwyn, Rev. Canon Richard, m.a., Master of the Charterhouse, Charterhouse 

Square, E.c. 
Elyard, S. Herbert, Esq., Holmwood, South Norwood Park, s.E. 
Essell, George Ketchley, Esq., The Precinct, Rochester. 



XX11 KENT ARCHAEOLOGICAL 800IETT. 

Evans, Francis O'Grady, Esq., Ramsgate. 

♦Evans, Sir John, d.c.l., f.k.s., i-.s.v., Nash Mills, Semel Hempstead. 

Eyton, Mrs. Wynne, Waldershare, Dover. 

Fagg, Jesse, Esq., 71 Lower Addiscombe Road, Croydon. 

Faraday, Rev. A., Brook House, Snodland. 

Farnall, II., Esq., r m.s., 47 Courtfiehl Road, s.w. 

*Faunthorpe, Rev. Jno. P., Elmfield, Bromley Common, Kent. 

Fellows, Frank P., Esq., 8 The Green, Hampstead, N.w. 

*Fergusson, Sir James Ranken, Bart., f.s.a. scot., Hever Court, Gravesend. 

♦Fergusson, Thos. Colyer, Esq., The Moat, Ightham, Sevenoaks. 

Field, George Hanbury, Esq., Ashurst Park, Tunbridge Wells. 

Field, Rev. T., King's School, Canterbury. 

Fielding, Rev. C. H., m.a., West Mailing. 

Finn, Arthur, Esq., Westbrook, Lydd, Folkestone. 

Firth, Charles, Esq., m.d., Gravesend. 

Fletcher, The Lady Frances, Kenward, Yalding. 

Fletcher, William, Esq., Bycliffe, Gravesend. 

♦Flower, Rev. Walker, m.a., Worth Vicarage, Dover. 

Fooks, E. J., Esq., Hillside, Milton, Gravesend. 

Fooks, Octavius E., Esq., Westcroft, Gravesend. 

Fooks, W. Cracroft, Esq., Q.c, Bowman's Place, Dartford. 

Foreman, Owen, Esq., Hunton, Maidstone. 

Forster, W. Samuel, Esq., 8 Lower Berkeley Street, Portman Square, w. 

Foulsham, Chester, Esq., 9 Caversham Road, Kentish Town, N.w. 

Fowler, Rev. Montague. 

Fox, T. Hamilton, Esq., Oak House, Farnborough. 

*Foyster, Rev. G. Alfred, m.a., All Saints' Rectory, Hastings. 

Frampton, Rev. T. Shipden, B.C.L., M.A., F.S.A., St. Mary's Piatt, Sevenoaks. 

Franklyn, Col. Thos. P., Maidstone. 

Fraser, Rev. Wm. Francis, m.a., Westbere Rectory, Canterbury. 

Fremantle, Rev. Canon the Honourable William Henry, m.a., The Precincts, 

Canterbury. 
Fremlin, R. J., Esq., Heathfield, Maidstone. 
French, Rev. H. D., m.a., St. George's Rectory, Canterbury. 
*Friend, Frederick, Esq., Woollett Hall, North Cray, Bexley. 
Friend, James Taddy, Esq., Northdown, near Margate. 
Fry, Edward Wickens, Esq., St. Martin's House, Dover. 
Fuller, Mr. Samuel, 38 Queen Street, Ramsgate. 
Furley, Edward, Esq., m.d., 43 Church Road, St. Leonard's-on-Sea. 
Furley, George, Esq., Canterbury. 
Furley, Walter, Esq., Canterbury. 
Fynmore, R. J., Esq., Wykeham House, Sandgate. 

Gardner, Alfred Henry, Esq., Folkestone. 

*Gardner, Saml., Esq., Oakhurst, Mount Park Road, Harrow-on-the-Hill. 

Gardner- Watermau, Rev. W., m.a., Bicknor Rectory, Maidstone. 

Garling, Henry B., Esq., Folkestone. 

Gibbons, Rev. W. H., m.a., Upton Pyne Rectory, Exeter. 

Gibson, F. G., Esq., Sittingbourne. 

Gibson, Geo., Esq., North Street, Ashford. 

Gilby, Mr. Rowland H., Acacia Villa, 29 Paiolo Road, Charlton, Woolwich. 

Gill, Rev. Howard, m.a., Vicarage, Tonbridge. 

Gilling, Rev. J. O, m.a., St. Mark's Vicarage, Rosherville, Gravesend. 

Giraud, F. F., Esq., Town Clerk, Faversham. 

*Giraud, Rev. R. E., 40 Great Smith Street, Westminster, s.w. 

Goddard, Rev. Canon G. F., m.a., Southfleet Rectory, Gravesend. 

*Godfrey-Faussett, Edmund G., Esq., Royal Engineers, Cuckfield. 



LIST OF MEMBERS. XXU1 

*Godfrey-Faussett, John Toke, Esq., The Friary, Lichfield. 

Godfrey-Faussett-Osborne, H. 13. G., Esq., Hartlip Place, Sittingbourne. 

Golding, Mrs. William, Leavers, lladlow. 

Goodhart, F. E., Esq. 

Goodman, Thomas Warner, Esq., 155 Haverstock Hill, N.w. 

Goodwin, Rev. Leslie E., M.A., St. Martin's, Canterbury. 

Gould, John, Esq., Gravesend. 

Grant, Rev. Canon Cyril P., M.A., Aylesford Vicarage, Maidstone. 

Grant, Thomas, Esq., Shirley House, Maidstone. 

*Graves, Robert Edmund, Esq., B.A., British Museum, w.c. 

Graves, W. T., Esq., Westfield, Canterbury. 

Gray, Mrs., Birchington Hall, Margate. 

Grayling, Francis, Esq., Sittingbourne. 

Grayling, John, Esq., m.d., High Street, Sittingbourne. 

Green, Henry H., Esq., Ashford, Kent. 

Green, Walter, Esq., Margate. 

Greig, Mrs., Clare House, Tunbridge. 

Gribbon, W. G., Esq., Combo Lea, Kingston Hill, Kingston-on-Thames. 

Ground, E., Esq., b.a., m.b., Gabriel's Hill, Maidstone. 

Grove, Rev. W. H., Cliffe Rectory, Gravesend. 

Gwatkin, Rev. W. H. T. Ashton, The Vicarage, Wye. 

Gwynn, Rev. E. T., St. Peter's, Thanet. 

*Gwynne, Rev. Gorges F. J. G. E., m.a., Potten Vicarage, Beds. 

*Hale, C. G., Esq., Ivy Hatch, Sevenoaks. 

*Hales, Rev. R. Cox, m.a., 27 Cambridge Road, Brighton. 

*Hales, Mrs. Ada Young, 27 Cambridge Road, Brighton. 

Hall, Miss F. C, Hunton, Yalding. 

Hall, Rev. T. G., m.a., Hythe Vicarage, Hythe. 

Hallward, Rev. T. W. O., m.a., Frittenden Rectory, Staplehurst. 

Hambrook, J., Esq., Dover. 

Hammer, G. M., Esq., Whitelands, Edenbridge. 

Hammond, Rev. H., Fernleigh, Luton Road, Chatham. 

Hammond, William Oxenden, Esq., St. Alban's Court, Wingham. 

Hankey, Herbert, Esq. 

Hannam, F., Esq., Jesmond, Blackheath Park, s.E. 

Hardcastle, Edward, Esq., New Lodge, Hawkhurst. 

Hardinge, Sir Edmund Stracey, Bart., Fowler's Park, Hawkhurst. 

Hardinge, The Viscount, South Park, Penshurst. 

Hardy, W. H., Esq., 5 Great Winchester Street, E.c. 

Harnett, Edward, Esq., Ivy Cottage, Mill Hill, Minster, Thanet. 

*Harris, The Lord, Belmont, Faversham. 

Harris, Dr., Minster, Ramsgate. 

Harrison, Rev. Alban Henry, m.a., Cranbrook Vicarage, Cranbrook. 

Harrison, Rev. Henry, m.a., Kilndown, Goudhurst, Staplehurst. 

Harrison, W. G. S., Esq., Town Clerk, Folkestone. 

Harrison, AY. H., Esq., Maidstone Road, Rochester. 

Hartley, Colonel Joseph, d.l., ll.d., The Old Downs, Hartley, Dartford. 

Harvey, James, Esq., Belgrave Villa, 49 Tufnell Park Road, N. 

*Haslewood, Rev. F. G., ll.d., d.c.l., Chislet Vicarage, Canterbury. 

*Haslewood, Rev. Francis, a.k.c, f.s.a., St. Matthew's Rectory, Ipswich. 

Hassell, Lewis, Esq., Clock House, Darenth, Dartford. 

*Hatfield, Capt. Charles, Hartsdown, Margate. 

*Hawkesbury, The Right Hon. Lord, 2 Carlton House Terrace, s.w. 

Hawley, Rev. C. C, m.a., Leybourne Rectory, Maidstone. 

Hayward, William Webb, Esq., Rochester. 

Head, Walter Geo., Esq., Ingress Cliff, Greenhithe, Dartford. 

Heale, Rev. J. N., M.A., Harbledown Vicarage, Canterbury. 

Heales, Major A., f.s.a., Leesons, Chislehurst. 



XXIV KENT ARCHAEOLOGICAL SOCIETY. 

Helliear, Rev. A. G., m.a., Bromley Vicarage, Kent. 

Hewlett, II. G., Esq., Shaw Hill, Addington, Maidstone. 

Hicks, Robert, Es<|., Ramsgate. 

Hile, 1). J., Esq., Cordwainers' Hall, 7 Cannon Street, E.c. 

Hill, Miss, Asby Lodge, Carlton Road, Putney Hill, s.w. 

Hill, R 11 , Esq., 4 ( t >iiccii Anno Avenue, Bromley. 

Hill, Samuel, Esq., 16 Russell Square, W.C. 

Ilillingdon, The Lord, Wildernesse Park, Sevenoaks. 

Hills, Miss E. M. 

Hills, Mr. W. II., 42 King Street, Ramsgate. 

Hilton, S. O., Esq., Ditton Place, Ditton, Maidstone. 

Hinds, Henry, Esq., Queen Street, Ramsgate. 

Hirst, Rev. Thomas, m.a., Bishopsbourne Rectory, Canterbury. 

Hoar, Edward, Esq., King Street, Maidstone. 

Hoblyn, Richard A., Esq., 79 Priory Road, "West Hampstead, n.w. 

Hodsoll, Charles M., Esq., Loose Court, Maidstone. 

Holland, Bernard, Esq., Harbledown Lodge, Canterbury. 

Holmes, Rev. J. R., m.a., Eastry House, near Sandwich. 

*Holt- White, C. R., Esq., Gravel Hill, Bexley. 

Homewood, Chas. E., Esq., Tnnstall, Sittingbourne. 

Homewood, Mr. William Joseph, 13 Harnier Street, Gravesend. 

Honey ball, Jas. F., Esq., New Gardens, Teynham, Sittingbourne. 

Hooker, Ayers, Esq., Lessness Heath, Kent. 

Hooper, Captain Charles P., Harewell House, Sheldwich, Paversham. 

Horan, Matthew, Esq., The Mount, Lamberhurst, Sussex. 

*Hordern, Herbert, Esq., Throwley House, Faversham. 

*Horner, Edward, Esq., May Place, Crayford. 

Horsley, Jno. Callcott, Esq., e.a., 1 High Row, Kensington, w. 

Horsley, Victor, Esq., m.b., f.e.s., 25 Cavendish Square, w. 

Horsnaill, A. B., Esq., Strood, Rochester. 

Horton, B., Esq., Seabrook House, Sandgate, Kent. 

Hothfield, The Lord, Hothfield, Ashford, Kent. 

*Hovenden, Robert, Esq., f.s.a., Heathcote, Park Hill Road, Croydon. 

Howard, Joseph Jackson, Esq., ll.d., f.s.a., Maltravers Herald Extraordinary. 

22 Dartmouth Row, Blackheath, S.E. 
Howe, Mr. A., Sheerness. 

Howell, G. O., Esq., 210 Eglinton Road, Plumstead. 
Hoyle, John, Esq., Cliff House, Gi-eenhithe, Kent. 
Hughes, Colonel Edwin, m.p., Oaklands, Plumstead Common. 
Hughes, W. Essington, Esq., 89 Alexandra Road, South Hampstead, N.w. 
Hughes-Hallett, Rev. James, Higham House, Canterbury. 
Hulburd, Mr. James, High Street, Sittingbourne. 
Humphery, John, Esq., New Romney, Folkestone. 
Hunt, Rev. Robert Shapland, m.a., Mark Beech, Edeubridge. 
Hussey, Arthur, Esq., Hill Side House, Wingham. 
Hussey, Edward, Esq., Scotney Castle, Lamberhurst, Sussex. 
*Hussey, Edward Law, Esq., f.e.c.s., 24 Winchester Road, Oxford. 
Hussey, Henr} r Law, Esq., Court Hayes, Limpsfield, Surrey. 
Huxley, Rev. Thomas Scott, m.a., Dane John, Canterbury. 

Jackson, Major, High Bank, Tunbridge. 

Jackson, John Flower, Esq., Bourne Place, Bexley. 

*Jacobs, J. A., Esq., Sandwich. 

Jacolette, M. J., Esq., Priory Hill, Dover. 

James, Francis, Esq., 190 Cromwell Road, s.w. 

James, J. B., Esq., London and County Bank, 21 Lombard Street, E.C. 

James, Mr. F. W., The Museum, Maidstone. 

Janson, E., Esq., Etherington, Speldhurst, Tunbridge Wells. 

Jasper, Henry Win., Esq., High Street, Chatham. 



LIST OF MEMBERS. XXV 

Jcaffreson, W. J., Esq. 

Jeffeoat, J. Henry, Esq., m.d., Deputy-Sur^eon-tieneral. 

•Jeffery, Counsell, Esq., 30 Tredegar Square, Bow, E. 

•Jeffreys, Rev. Canon H. A., M.A., The Vicarage, Iliwkhurst. 

Jemmett, George Blwick, Esq., Tunbridge. 

Jenkins, Rev. Canon R. C, M.A.., Lyminge Rectory, Ilythe. 

Jenkinson, P. J. H., Esq., m.a., 10 Brookside, Cambridge. 

Jenkinson, W. W., Esq., Roslin, Roupell Park, s.w. 

Jenncr, T. E., Esq., H.M. Dockyard, Chatham. 

Jenner, Mr. W. M, Sandgate, Folkestone. 

Jennings, W. J., Esq., The Oaks, Westbere. 

*Johnson, W. M., Esq., Claridge House, Sevenoaks. 

Johnston, P. Mainwaring, Esq., 27 Lombard Street, E.c. 

Johnston, Thos., Esq., Seal, Sevenoaks. 

*Jones, Arthur Goddard, Esq., 3 Talbot Place, Blackheath, s.E. 

Jones, Captain Edward, The Harbour House, Ramsgate. 

*Jones, Herbert, Esq., 15 Montpelier Row, Blackheath, s.E. 

Jones, Robert Hesketh, Esq., St. Augustine's, 51 Black water Road, Eastbourne. 

Jones, Rev. Win. Taylor, M.A., Heme House, Cliftonville, Margate. 

Joyce, Thomas Heath, Esq., Freshford, South Hill Park, Bromley, Kent. 

Kelly, G., Esq., f.r.g.s., 180 Sutherland Avenue, Maida Vale, \v. 

*Kempe, 0. E., Esq., Old Place, Lindfield, Sussex. 

Keunard, David, Esq., Wester Hill, Linton, Maidstone. 

Kennett, John, Esq., Nether Court Farm, Ramsgate. 

*Keyser, Charles E., Esq., The Warren House, Stanmore. 

Kibble, Thomas, Esq., Green Trees, Tunbridge. 

Kiddell, John Dawson, Esq., 48 Mark Lane, E.c. 

*Kidwell, Mr., The Banks, Rochester. 

King, S. H., Esq., Hilden Grange, Tunbridge. 

Kingsford, Montagu, Esq., Littlebourne, Sandwich. 

Kirkpatriek, Major John, Horton Park, Hythe. 

Knatchbull, Sir Wyndham. 15 irt., Mersham Hatch, Ashford, Kent. 

Knight, D., Esq., Junior Carlton Club, London. 

*Knill, John, Esq., South Vale House, Blackheath, s.E. 

*Knill, Sir Stuart, Bart., The Crosslets in the Grove, Blackheath, s.E. 

Knocker, Colonel E. W., Castle Hill House, Dover. 

♦Knyvett, Felix Sumner, Esq., Ashwellthorpe, Watford, Herts. 

*Lake, Lieut.-Col. Benjamin G., The Prior}', Orpington, Kent. 

Lake, James, Esq., Monkton, Ramsgate. 

Lambard, Multon, Esq., Beechmont, Sevenoaks. 

'Lambert, George, Esq., f.s.a., 11 Coventry Street, w. 

Lambert, Thomas J., Esq., Inglewood, Sevenoaks. 

Larking, Miss. 

Latham, Albert, Esq., Canterbury Road, Margate. 

Laurence, William, Esq., Maidstone. 

Laurie, Colonel R. P., c.B., Hardres Court, Canterbury. 

*Lavers, Nathaniel Wood, Esq., 22 Endell Street, Bloomsbury, vv.c. 

Law, Miss, Osborne House, Cliftonville, Margate. 

Lay ton, Captain, Folkestone. 

*Layton, Thos., Esq., 22 Kew Bridge Road, Kew Bridge, w. 

*Leathes, Rev. Stanley, d.d., Rector of Much Hadham, Herts. 

*Legg, J. Wickham, Esq., m.d., 47 Green Street, Park Lane, w. 

Legg, Rev. Wm., m.a., Hawkinge Rectory, Folkestone. 

Lentiard, Colonel Sir John Farnaby, Bart., West Wickham Court, Beckenham, 

*Leveson-Gower, Granville, Esq., f.s.a.. 1 itsey Place, Limpsfield, Surrey. 

*Levy, Lewis, Esq., 1 Essex Court, Temple, E.c. 

Lewes, Sir Samuel, 163 Lewisham High Road, S.E. 

TOL. XX. C 



XXV i KENT ARCH-ffiOLOGICAL SOCIETY. 

LewiB, Rev. Gerrard, K.A., St. Paul's Vicarage, Cliftonville, Margate. 

Lewis, R. W. M , 10s. |, n.v. Ivor House. Margate. 

Library of the Dean an. I Chapter, Canterbury. 

Liverpool Free Publio Library, Liverpool. 

Livett, Rev. Grevile M., b i., The Preoinot, Rochester. 

Lloyd, Rev. lorwerth Grey, ma., f.s.a., Bosherston Reotory, Pembroke. 

Loftie, Rev. W. .1., b.a., 3i Sheffield Terrace, Campden Hill, Kensington, w. 

London, The Librarian i/m, /«».) of the Corporation of the City of, Guildhall, B.C. 

London Library, The, L2 St. James's Square, s.w. 

" Lowndes, <;. Alan, Esq., Barrington Hall, Hatfield Broad Oak, Essex. 

*Lubbock, Sir John, Hart., bi.p., High Elms, Farnborough, Kent. 

Lucas, Rev. Arthur, m.a., Parkside, Tunbridge. 

Lucey, Rev. E. C, m.a., Mersham Rectory, Ashford. 

*Luck, F. G., Esq., The Olives, Wadhurst, Sussex. 

Mace, J. Ellis, Esq., Tenterden. 

Mace, Mrs. W. S., Tenterden. 

Mackeson, H. 13., Esq., f.g.s., Hillside House, Hythe. 

McLellan, Wm. Jno., Esq., Rochester. 

*] Malcolm, John, Esq., 7 Great Stanhope Street, Mayfair, w. 

Marshall, Dr., 13 Liverpool Street, Dover. 

Marsham, Rev. J. Jacob, M.A., Shorne Vicarage, Gravesend. 

♦Martin, ltichard Biddulph, Esq., The Common, Chislehurst. 

Mason, Rev. M. P., m.a., West Mailing. 

Master, Rev. G. S., m.a., Bourton Grange, Flax Bourton, Bristol. 

Maude, Dr. A., Winterton House, Westerham. 

May, William, Esq., Northfield, St. Mary Cray, Kent. 

Maylara, Percy, Esq., 10 Norman Street, Dover. 

Meadway, Mr. George, South Lawn, The Park, Cheltenham. 

Mercer, "Richard, Esq., Morhanger Park, Sandy, Beds. 

Mercer, Samuel, Esq., Sandling Place. Maidstone. 

Mercer, W. F., Esq., Detling, Maidstone. 

Mercer, W. J., Esq., 12 Marine Terrace, Margate. 

Mesham, Colonel Arthur, Pontryffyd, Trefnant, R.S.O., North Wales. 

Millard, Rev. F. M., Otham Rectory, Maidstone. 

Miller, S., Esq., 7 Red Cross Street, Cripplegate, E.c. 

Mills, George, Esq., 3 Old Jewry, E.c. 

Milne, Alexander, Esq., The Courtyard, Eltham. 

Mitchell, W. J., Esq., Surrey Lodge, Dulwich, s.E. 

*Molony, Rev. C. A., m.a., Winton House, Canterbury. 

Monckton, Herbert, Esq., Town Clerk, Northgate, Maidstone. 

Monckton, Walter, Esq., Basted, near Sevenoaks. 

Monins, John, Esq., Ringwould House, Dover. 

Moore, Joseph, Jun., Esq., The Mount, Sevenoaks. 

Morgan, Rev. E. K. B., Weald Vicarage, Sevenoaks. 

Morland, C. W., Esq., Elms Court, West Farleigh, Maidstone. 

Morris, Mr. J. W., 5 Market Street, Faversham. 

Mostyn, The Lady Augusta, Gloddaeth Hall, Conway. 

Mowll, Martin, Esq., Dover. 

Mullens, Robert Gordon, Esq., Fair View, Bromley, Kent. 

♦Murdoch, Henry Hunter, Esq., Calverley Lodge, Tunbridge Wells. 

Murray, Rev. Canon F. H, M.A., The Rectory, Chislehurst. 

Murton, Walter, Esq., Meadow Croft, Chislehurst. 

Mylne, Lieut.-Gen., Stangrove, Edenbridge. 

Nathan, B., Esq., Lorano, Atkins' Road, Clapham Park, s.w. 
National Portrait Gallery, per Messrs. Eyre and Spottiswpode, New Street, E.c. 
Navarro, Anthony F. de, Esq., 17 Ferndale Park, Tunbridge Wells. 
Ncame, Mrs. Edwin, Harfiold, Selling, Faversham. 



LIST OK MEMBERS. xxvii 

Neve, Herbert, Esq., Hole Park, Rolvenden. 

Neve, W. T., Esq., Cranbrook. 

Nevill, The Honourable Ralph, Birling Manor, Weal Mailing, Maidstone. 

•Newington, Alexander Thurlow, Esq., The Eighlands, Ticeburst, Eursl Green. 

Newman, P. T., Esq., L3 Guildhall Street, Folkestone. 

Newton, Mr. W. M., Summerhill Road, Dartford. 

•Nichols, Win. J., Esq., South Hill, Bromley, Kent. 

Nisbet, Eev. Canon M. A., m.a., Ringwould Rectory, Dover. 

*Noakes, J. T., Esq., Broeklev Hall, Brockley, s.e. 

Noel, Ered. A. D., Esq., 3 York Terrace, Regent's Park, n.w. 

*Norman, Gerard, Esq., Oakley, Bromley Common, Kent. 

*Norman, Philip, Esq., 43 Roland Gardens, South Kensington, s.w. 

♦Norwood, Edward, Esq., Charing, Ashf'ord, Kent. 

Norwood, John Dobree, Esq., Ashf'ord, Kent. 

*Nottidge, Albert James, Esq., Dry Hill Park, Tunbridge. 

*Nottidge, Miss Katharine, Dry Hill Park, Tunbridge. 

Nottidge, T., Esq., Ashford. 



Oakley, Christopher, Esq., 10 Waterloo Place, s.w. 

Ogden, Rev. E. E., Fordcomb, Tunbridge Wells. 

Oldfield, Captain Macartnej' Hume (late 53rd Regt.), Tunbridge Wells. 

*01iver, Edm. "Ward, Esq., 1 Corbet Court, Gracechurch Street, e.c. 

Oliver, Mr. H. C. Hewit, West Mailing. 

Orger, Rev. E. P., m.a., Hougham Vicarage, Dover. 

Orsbach, Rev. E. von, Mottingham House, Mottingham, Eltham. 

Osborne, A. G., Esq., m.r.c.s., 2 St. Martin's Place, Dover. 

Oxenham, E. H., Esq., f.r.s.l., Keston Villa, Rushey Green, Catford. 

Oyler, T. H., Esq., Langley Lodge, Sutton Valence, Staplehurst. 

Oyler, Mrs. T. H., Langley Lodge, Sutton Valence, Staplehurst. 



Packman, A. T. V., Esq., Surgeon, Strood, Rochester. 

Page, W. Gray, Esq., 2 Queen Street, Ramsgate. 

Paine, Mrs. Dunkle}', Cockshot Hill, Reigate. 

Palmer, G. T., Esq., 3 Victoria Crescent, Ramsgate. 

Park, Charles, Esq., Monkton Road, Minster, Thanet. 

Parkes, Mr. George T., Church Street, Dover. 

Partington, J. Edge, Esq., 7 Wellington Road, Eltham. 

Patterson, Rev. Robert, m.a., The Vicarage, Selhurst, s.e. 

Paxon, Arthur, Esq., 17 Claremont Road, Surbiton. 

Payne, Rev. Dr. Bruce, St. George's Vicarage, Deal. 

Payne, George, Esq., f.l.s., f.s.a., Honorary Secretary, The Precinct, Rochester. 

Payne, Mrs. George, The Precinct, Rochester. 

Peacock, T. F., Esq,, f.s.a., Fernlea, Main Road, Sidcup, Kent. 

Peake, H., Esq., Dover. 

Pearman, Rev. A. J., m.a., Merstham Rectory, Surrey. 

Pearne, Thomas, Esq., Carmel Cottage, Loose, Maidstone. 

Pearse, Rev. J. T., m.a., Chiddingstone Rectory, Kent. 

Pearson, Rev. Canon G. G, m.a., Canterbury. 

Peckham, Thomas Gilbert, Esq., Hall Place, Harbledown, Canterbury. 

* Pembroke, G. P. Amos, Esq., 11 King's Bench Walk, Inner Temple, e.c. 

•Penfold, Hugh, Esq., m.a., Rustington, Worthing. 

Pepper, Matthew. Esq., 47 High Street, Dover. 

Percy, Miss, Oak Lodge, Belvedere. Kent. 

Perks, R. W., Esq., Claverley, Chislehurst. 

*Phelps, Rev. L. R„ m.a., Oriel College, Oxford. 

Philpott, C, Esq., The Park. Tollbridge. 

Philpott, Rev. John, m.a., Hinxhill Rectory, Ashford, Kent. 

Pierson, Mrs., The Haven, SaUweod, llvthe, Kent. 

c2 



XXviii KENT ARCHAEOLOGICAL SOCIETY. 

Pittock, Dr., Margate. 

Piatt, Captain, Dene Park, Shipborne, Tunbridge. 

Plowden, Miss, The Cottage, Chislehurst, 

*Plowes, John Henry, Esq., :*<» York Terrace, Regent's Park, n w. 

Polhill, Rev. Henry W 0., m.\ . Aahursl Rectory, Tunbridge Wells. 

Poole, Mr. Henry, Sandgate Road, Folkestone. 

♦Porter, Frederick W., Esq., Moyle Tower, Hytbe, Kent. 

*Powell, C. Watson, Esq., Speldburst, Tunbridge Wells. 

l'nll, Richard, Esq., Town Clerk, Rochester, 

Pratt, The Lady Frances, The Grove, Seal, Sevenoaks. 

Prentis, Walter, Esq., Rainham, Sittingbourne. 

Prestwich, Professor .l<>s , d.c.l., f r.s , etc., Shoreham, Sevenoaks. 

*Prevost, Lieut. -Col., Elford's, Hawkhurst. 

Price, Miss, Hooper's Hill House, Margate. 

Prince, C. Leeson, Esq., The Observatory, Crowborough, Sussex. 

Pritchard, E., Esq., Ash Lane, Blackheath, s.E. 

Prosser, Mr. D., Sheerness. 

Puckle, Rev. Canon John, m.a., Victoria Park, Dover. 

Radnor, The Earl of, 52 Grosvenor Street, Grosvenor Square, w. 

Rammell, Rev. W. II., m.a., South Lodge, Rusthall, Tunbridge Wells. 

Randolph, Rev. C, m.a., Chartham, Canterbury. 

Raphael, Lewis, Esq., Parrock Hall, Gravesend. 

Rapkin, J. B., Esq., St. Martin's, Sidcup. 

Rawes, Mrs., 4 Hyde Park Mansions, Marylebone Road, W. 

*Rayden, Arthur R., Esq., Birchington. 

*Redpath, Peter, Esq., The Manor House, Chislehurst. 

Reeves, James Bowles, Esq., Danemore Park, Speldburst, Tunbridge Wells. 

Reid, Captain Francis, Buxford, Great Chart, Ashford, Kent. 

Reid, James, Esq., St. George's, Canterbury. 

Reynolds, Rev. G. "W., m.a., Elwick Hall, Castle Eden, Durham. 

Rice, Henry, Esq., Dane Court, Tilmanstone. 

Richards, Rev. F. J., m.a., Boxley Vicarage, Maidstone. 

Richardson, Walter R., Esq., Rookwood, Eltham. 

Richardson, The Venerable Archdeacon, St. Edmund's, Tulse Hill, s.w. 

Ricketts, Major E. Bengough, Manor House, Hollingbourne. 

Roberts, Colonel Howland, 31 Argyll Road, Kensington, w. 

Robertson, John C, Esq., Frier's, Keston, Beckenham. 

Robertson, Rev. Canon W. A. Scott, m.a., Honorary Editor of Vol. XX., Otter- 
den Rectory, Faversham. 

Robins, Rev. W. H., m.a., Gillingbam Vicarage, Chatham. 

Robinson, Geo., Esq., Solicitor, Strood, Rochester. 

Robinson, Rev. Thomas, m.a., Chart Sutton Vicarage, Maidstone. 

Rochester, The Very Rev. The Dean of, The Deanerj-, Rochester. 

Rogers, John Thornton, Esq., Riverhill, Sevenoaks. 

*Roget, John L., Esq., 5 Randolph Crescent, Maida Hill, w. 

Rolt, Rev. H. G., m.a., Sacombe Lodge, Harbledown, Canterbury. 

Romney, The Earl of, 4 Upper Belgrave Street, Belgrave Square, s.w. 

*Rosher, Alfred, Esq., The Grange, Rosherville, Gravesend. 

*Rosher, W. H. Burch, Esq., Wigmore, Walmer, Kent. 

Routledge, Rev. Canon C. F., m.a., f.s.a., Honorary Editor for Vol. XXI., 
St. Martin's, Canterbury. 

Rowe, Thomas Smith. Esq., m.d., Union Crescent, Margate. 

Royal Institution of Great Britain, The Library of, Albemarle Street, w. 

Ruck, F. "W., Esq., County Surveyor, Maidstone. 

Rutton, W. Loftie, Esq., f.s.a., 27 Elgin Avenue, w. 

Sackville, The Lord, g.c.m.g., Knole, Sevenoaks. 

Saint, Miss, Groombridge, Speldburst. 

St. John, Charles D., Esq., 74 Tollington Road, n. 



LIST OF MEMBERS. XXIX 

♦Salisbury, The Lord Bishop of, The Palace, Salisbury. 

♦Salomons, Sir David Lionel, Bart., Broom Hill, Tunbridge Wells. 

Sankey, Percy, Esq., 1 Chatham Place, Ramsgate. 

Saunders, Sibert, Esq., The Bank, Whitstable. 

Sayer, John, Esq., Pett Place, Charing, Ashford, Cent. 

Scott, Benj. J., Esq., 101 Addiseombc Road, Crovdon. 

Scott, Rev. P. T., m.a., Hythe, Kent. 

Scratton, John, Esq., Shorne, Gravesend. 

*Sebag-Montefiore, J., Esq., East Cliffe Lodge, Ramsgate. 

Sells, A., Esq., Eden Hill, Loudon Road, Tonbridge. 

Sewell, W. A., Esq., Holmesdale, Anson Road, Tut'nell Park, n. 

Sharland, George Edward, Esq., The Laurels, White Hill, Graveseud. 

Shepherd, Rev. C. W., m.a., Trottescliffe Rectory, Maidstone. 

Shirley, W. P., Esq., West Bank, Sutton Valence, Maidstone. 

Shorter, Hy., Esq., 8 Hilltop Road, West Hampstead, N.w. 

Shrivell, F. W., Esq., f.l.s., Thompson's, Golden Green, Tunbridge. 

Sibbald, J. G. E., Esq., Admiralty, Whitehall, s.w. 

Sikes, Rev. Thomas Burr, m.a., Warbleton Rectory, near Heathfield, Sussex. 

Simmons, G., Jun., Esq., Woburn Hill, Addlestone. 

Simpson, Mrs. Win., Milton Court, near Gravesend. 

Skarratt, Rev. T. C, Kemsing Vicarage, Sevenoaks. 

Slater, Frederick, Esq., Grays, Chislet, Canterbury. 

Smallwood, Rev. W. J., Stourmouth Rectory, Wingham. 

Smith, The Venerable Archdeacon B. F., The Precincts, Canterbury. 

Smith, Haskett, Esq., Trowswell, Goudhurst, Staplehurst. 

Smith, H. W., Esq., The Cottage, Belvedere, Kent. 

Smith, John William, Esq., Queen's Gate, Hyde Park, s.w. 

Smith, Rev. Robert Cox, m.a., 10 Calthorpe Street, Mecklenburgh Square, 

w.c. 
Smith, William E., Esq. 
Smyth, R. P., Esq., 7 Boley Hill, Rochester. 
Smythe, John, Esq., Fairview, Maidstone. 
*Soanes, Temple H., Esq., 7 Palace Gate, Kensington, w. 
Sondes, The Earl, Lees Court, Faversham. 
South, Rev. R. M., m.a., New Romney Vicarage. Folkestone. 
Southee, A. P., Esq., West Cliff School, Ramsgate. 
Sparke, C. E., Esq., Dover College, Dover. 
Sperling, C. F. D., Esq., Dynes Hall, Halstead, Essex. 
Spicer, Mr. W, 6 Garnault Place, Clerkenwell, E.c. 
Springett, Mrs., Ashfield, Hawkhurst, Kent. 
Springett, Rev. Dr. W. D., West Tarring Vicarage, Worthing. 
Spurred, F. C. J., Esq., Belvedere, Kent. 
Stamford, Dr., Collingwood House, Tunbridge Wells. 
Stanford, Joseph, Esq., Stanholme House, Edenbndge. 
*Stanhope, The Earl, f.s.a., Chevening Place, Sevenoaks. 
Stephens, A. F. W., Esq., Chatham. 
Stevens, W. R., Esq., Cannon Gate, Hythe, Kent. 
Stilvvell, James R., Esq., Dover. 
Stock, Henry, Esq., Folkestone. 
Stokes, C, Esq., New Romney. 
Stokes, John, Esq., Apsley House School, Margate. 
Stokes, Mr. Thomas Stanger, Cranbrook. 
Stone, Frank W., Esq., Tunbridge Wells. 
Streatfeild, Mrs. Champion, Chart's Edge, Edenbrid^e. 
*Streeter, E. W., Esq., f.r.g.s., 18 New Bond Street, w. 
Strickland, R. A., Esq., Hastings Villa, Bexley Road, Erith. 
*Stride, Edward Ernest, Esq., 31 Lingfield Road, Wimbledon. 
Stringer, Henry, Esq., New Romney, Folkestone. 
*Stroud, Rev. J., m.a., South Perrott Rectory, Crewkerne. 
*Stubbs, Henry, Esq., Danby, Ballyshannon, Donegal, Ireland. 



XXX KENT ARCHAEOLOGICAL SOCIETY. 

Stunt, Walter C, Esq., Lorenden, Faversham. 

♦Styan, Miss Anne, 7- Oxford Terrace, w. 

Style, AJberl P., Esq., Boxlej Bouse, Maidstone. 

Sutton, John, Esq., Holly Bouse, Hatherlej Road, Sidoup. 

Swanzy, Frank, Esq., Heathfield, Sevenoaks. 

Smnford, P., Esq., The Abbey, Minster, Thanet. 

Sydney, Free Public Library at (Triibner and Co., Paternoster House, Charinj 

Cross Road, w.c.). 
Sylve ter, C. P., Esq., Branksome, Godalming, Surrey. 
Syms, Mr. William, Rochester. 

Talbot, John Gilbert, Esq., m.p., Falconhurst, Edenbridge. 

Tasker, Henry, Esq., .Maidstone 

♦Tayler, W. EL, Esq., m.d., 13 Grosvenor Gardens, St. Leonard's-on-Sea. 

♦Taylor, R. Wright, Esq., m.a., ll.b., f.s.a., 8 Stone Buildings, Lincoln's 

Inn, w.c. 
♦Terry, John, Esq., The Grange, Piatt, Borougb Green, Sevenoaks. 
Terson, T. A., Esq., Castle Street, Dover. 
Thomas, Mrs., Eyhorne House, Holiingbourne, Maidstone. 
Thompson, Mr. George, Cranbrook. 
♦Tiarks, H. F., Esq., Foxbury, Chislehurst. 
Tillard, Rev. J., The Glebe, Penshurst. 
Timins, Rev. J. H., M.A., West Mailing, Maidstone. 
Tingey, Wm., Jun., Esq., Castle Moat, Rochester. 
Ted, Alexander, Esq., Walmer Lod^e, Walmer. 
Tolputt, J. B., Esq., Fishponds, Leybourne, West Mailing. 
*Tomson, Martin J. R., Esq., Brooklands, Ramsgate. 
Tonbridge Book Society (Rev. J. R. Little, Secretary). 
Tooth, Fred., Esq., Park Farm, Sevenoaks. 
Trist, John W., Esq., 62 Old Broad Street, E.C. 
Trollope, W. T., Esq., High Street, Tunbridge Wells. 
Tuffill, C, Esq., Rochester. 

Tuke, Rev. Francis E., m.a., Borden Vicarage, Sittingbourne. 
Tunbridge Wells Literary Society (Mr. H. H. Cronk). 
Turner, J. H., Esq., Kentish Bank, Maidstone. 
Turner, W. H., Esq., Maidstone. 

Tweddell, Ralph Hart, Esq., Meophara Court, Meopham. 
Twigg, Miss, 29 St. David's Hill, Exeter. 
Twopeny, E. M., Esq., Woodstock Park, Sittingbourne. 
Tylden-Pattenson, Captain, Biddenden, Staplehurst. 

Tyrwhitt, Rev. Beauchamp St. John, m.a., Holden House, Southborougb. 
*Tyssen, Amherst Daniel, Esq., 40 Chancery Lane, E.c. 

Upton, Rev. Archer, m.a., Stowting Rectory, Hythe, Kent. 

Vallance, W. H. Aymer, Esq., 7 Cambridge Street, w. 

Veasey, Mrs., Southborougb, Tunbridge Wells. 

Vickers, Rev. V. S., Crundale Rectory, Canterbury. 

Vincent, Thos. Wm., Esq., 189 Burrage Road, Plumstead. 

Vine, Rev. F. T., m.a., Eastington Rectory, Stonehouse, Gloucestershire. 

Vinten, Henry George, Esq., Elmside, The Elms, Ramsgate. 

Vinten, Isaac, Esq., Ramsgate. 

W r admore, James Foster, Esq., Dry Hill, Tunbridge. 
* "Wagner, Henry, Esq., f.s.a., 13 Half Moon Street, Piccadilly, w. 
Wakeford, George, Esq., Knightrider Street, Maidstone. 
Walker, Rev. T., m.a., Parkside, Tunbridge. 



LIST OF MEMBERS. XXXI 

Waller, II. VV., Esq., St. James's Road, Tunbridge Wells. 

Walter, Rev. John A., m.a., Berengrave, Rainham, Sittingbourne. 

Walton, F. W., Esq., 12 Beulah Road, Tunbridge Wells. 

Ward, Mr. Horatio, Fountain Hotel, Canterbury. 

*\\ "arde, Colonel C. M., Squerrves Court, Westerham. 

•Warner, Edmond, Esq., Southend House, Eltham. 

*Wastall, E. E., Esq., 5 Ellington Terrace, Ramsgate. 

Watson, Rev. Howard, Boughton Malherbe, Maidstone. 

Watts, Rev. A. H. 

Watts, Rev. J., m.a., Orlingbury Rectory, Wellingborough. 

Wauton, Charles J. M , Esq., Tonbridge Castle, Kent. 

Webb, George, Esq., Tunstall House, Sittingbourne. 

*Webb, Henry, Esq., 18 Campden Hill Road, Kensington, w. 

Webb, Sydney, Esq., Maidstone House, Dover. 

Weekes, Dr., Mansion House, Brompton, Chatham. 

Welldon, Rev. Canon James I., d.d., Kennington Vicarage, Ashford, Kent. 

*Wells, Edward J., Esq., Sandown House, Mallinson Road, Wandsworth 

Common, s.w. 
Wells, T., Esq., a.e.i.b.a., Randolphs, Biddenden. 
Weston, Lambert, Esq., Waterloo Crescent, Dover. 
Wharton, Rev. A. P., Rectory, Barham, Canterbury. 
Wheelwright, J., Esq., 7 Nevill Park, Tunbridge Wells. 
Winston, Rev. Robert, m.a., The Palace, Rochester. 
•White, Frederick, Esq., Q.c, 4 Paper Buildings, Temple, E.c. 
White, J. B., Esq., Street End House, Canterbury. 
*White, James G , Esq., St. Monica, Micheldever Road, Lee, s.e. 
♦White, Mrs. Thomas, 9 Grosvenor Mansions, 82 Victoria Street, s.w. 
White, R. E., Esq., 53 Whitworth Road, Plumstead, s.e. 

* White, T. Hamilton, Esq., Solicitor, Maidstone. 
AVhitehead, Rev. A., m.a., St. Peter's Vicarage, Ramsgate. 
*Whitehead, Charles, Esq., f.s.a., f.r.g.s., Barming House, Maidstone. 
Whitehead, Thomas Miller, Esq., 8 Duke Street, St. Jamss's, s.w. 
Whitelock, Rev. B., m.a., Groombridge, Tunbridge Wells. 

Whittle, Miss, Star Hill, Rochester. 

Wickins, H. W., Esq., Philpots, Hildenborough, Tunbridge. 

Wigan, Frederick, Esq., 15 Southwark Street, s.e. 

•Wigan, James, Esq., Cromwell House, Mortlake, Surrey, s.w. 

Wigan, Mrs., Luddesdown Rectory, Gravesend. 

*Wigan, P. F., Esq., Oakwood, Maidstone. 

Wightwick, Mrs., Dane John House, Canterbury. 

Wightwick, William, Esq., Hilden, Folkestone. 

Wightwick, W. N., Esq., Barton Fields, Canterbury. 

Wildish, Mr. William Thomas, St. Margaret's Bank, Rochester. 

Wilkie, Rev. Christopher Hales, m.a., Kingston Rectory, Canterbury. 

Wilkie, Kenyon AVood, Esq., Ellington, Ramsgate. 

AVilkius, Henry, Esq., Beaconsfield, Birchington, Margate. 

♦Wilkinson, F. Eachus, Esq., m.d., Dassett Magna Vicarage, Leamington. 

Wilks, G., Esq., Town Clerk, Hythe. 

Williams, S. Stanley, Ivy House, Edenbrid-v. 

Williamson, Rev. Joseph, m.a., Farningham Vicarage, Dartford. 

Willis, Charles, Esq., Borstal Road, Rochester. 

Willmott, Mr. J., 82 King Edward Road, South Hackney, n.e. 

Wills, W. H., Esq., 25 Hyde Park Gardens, W. 

*Wilmott, Edward W., Esq., Oxford and Cambridge Club, Pall Mall, s.w. 

"Wilson, Archibald, Esq., Last Lane, Dover. 

* Wilson, Cornelius Lea, Esq., The Cedars, Beckenham. 
Wilson, Thomas, Esq., Rivers Lodge, Harpenden, St. Alban's. 
Wilson, W., Esq., Stateuborough, Eastry, Dover. 
♦Winchester, The Lord Bishop of, Farnham Castle, Surrey. 

Winchilsea aud Nottingham, The Earl of, f.s.a., Haverholme Priory, Sleaford. 



wxn KENT ARCHAEOLOGICAL SOCIETY. 

Winder, ('< , Esq., Bomewood Ball, Sturry. 
Winham, Bev. Daniel, m.a.., Western Souse, Brighton. 
Winton, Edwin W . Esq., Etherton Bill, Speldhuret, Tunbridge Wells 
Wodehouse, Bev. Walker, v,.\., Elham Vicarage, Canterbury. 
Wolley, Bev. II. !•'.. m.\.. Shortlands Vicarage, Bromley, Kent. 
Wood, Humphrey, Esq., i'.s.a., Chatham. 
"Wood, John, Esq., Haiii|'lon Bouse, Chatham. 
Wood, Etev. Joseph, d.d., Tonbridge School. 
Wooder, W. W., Esq., 36 Cromwell Avenue, Highgate, n. 
Woodford, Mrs. II. I'., The Grove, Gravesend. 
•Woodhouse, Bev. B. ,1., m.a.. St. Luke's Vicarage, Bickley. 
♦Woodruff, Bev. C. E., m.a.. Bredhursl Vicarage, Chatham. 
Woodruff, ('. II., Esq., f.s.a., 5 Stone Buildings, Lincoln's Inn, w.c. 
Woods, Sir Albert, Garter King at Anns, College of Arms, Queen Victoria 
Street, i:.c. 

"Woods, Gilbert, Esq., f.r.g.s., Mayfield, Bromley, Kent. 

Woollett, Capt. W. ('., Royal Dockyard, Woolwich. 

"Worger, Miss Louisa, North Street, Ashford. 

AVorsfold, C, Esq., Lover. 

"Wright, B. McMurdo, Esq. 

♦Wright, Charles E. L., Esq., Burtonfields Hall, Stamford Bridge, York. 

Wright, Bev. Charles H., m.a., Keston Rectory, Haj^es, Kent. 

Wybrow, Wm., Esq., Highcliff, Dawlish, Levon. 

Wyndham, G., Esq., M.r. 

Youens, Mr. E. C, 17 Tower Road, Lartford. 



*** Should any errors, omissions of honorary distinctions, etc., be found 
in this List, it is requested that notice thereof may be given to the Secretary, 
George Payne, Esq., The Precinct, Rochester. 



ILLUSTRATION FUND. XXXlll 



CONTRIBUTIONS 



ILLUSTRATION FUND. 



SUBSCRIPTIONS. 



£ s. d. 

Akers-Douglas, Right Hon. A., M.P 1 10 

Clifford, Jas., Esq 110 

Cranbrook, Viscount 10 

Ereinantle, Rev. Canon the Hon. "W. H 10 

Hughes, W. E., Esq 10 

Hussey, H. Law, Esq 11 

Mercer, Samuel, Esq 10 

Morgan, Thos., Esq 10 

Northbourne, Lord 10 

DONATION. 

£ s. d. 

Brent, Algernon, Esq 500 



KENT ARCHAEOLOGICAL 
ftl>^ Cash Account from the 1st of 



1892. £ ». il. 

Jim. 1. Balance a1 the Bankers: — 

Wigan, Mercer, and Co £376 fi 1 

Hammond and Co 449 7 10 

825 13 11 

Dividends upon the Society's 2f per Cent. Stock 28 13 1 

Algernon Brent, Esq., Donation to the Illustration Fund 5 

Sale of the Society's Publications 9 18 6 

Subscriptions, Entrance Fees, and Life Compositions, remitted 
through the following Local Secretaries and Bankers: — 

J. D. Norwood, Esq. {Ashjord) £10 

J. Copland, Esq. {Sheppey) 3 17 6 

W. J. Nichols, Esq. {Bromley) 16 7 10 

W. T. Neve, Esq. (Cranbrook) 15 

K. Holt-White, Esq. {Bartford) 1110 

F. F. Giraud, Esq. {Faversham) 4 19 

G. M. Arnold, Esq. {Gravescnd) 12 10 

Geo. Wilks, Esq. {Hythe) 8 9 

Mr. W. E. Hughes {London) 113 6 G 

Mr. F. Bunyard {Maidstone) 21 19 

Miss Dudlow {Mailing) 8 10 6 

G. Payne, Esq. {Rochester, etc.) 35 10 6 

G. F. Carnell, Esq. {Sevcnoaks) 9 13 6 

G. E. Elliott, Esq. {Sittingbourne) 8 10 

J. E. Mace, Esq. {Tenterden) 2 

K. W. Wilkie, Esq. {Ramsgate) 13 

J. F. Wadmore, Esq. {Tunbridge) 10 10 

C. W. Powell, Esq. {Speldhurst) 19 10 

W. J. Mercer, Esq. {Margate) 25 10 6 

W. Wightwick {Folkestone) 12 

The Bankers : — Wigan, Mercer, and Co 48 1 G 

Hammond and Co 43 2 6 

453 17 10 

£1323 3 7 



SOCIETY. 

January to the ?>\st of December, 1 S92. CTf. 



1892. £ 5. d. 

Additional Payment on account of Arclicedlegia Cantiana, Vol. XIX. : 

Mitchell and Hughes 266 7 1 

Mitchell and Hughes, on account of Vol. XX £50 

0. F. Kell, Lithographer, ditto 12 12 6 

G2 12 G 

Annual Meeting Tickets, Printing and Stationery, 1891-2 11 6 

Chief Curator, from September 30, 1891, to December 31, 1892 62 10 

J. Lower, attending rooms ..... 6 12 

W. Keeley, Bookbinder 2 17 11 

Kent Fire Office, Insurance 2 5 

Subscription to Congress of Archaeological Societies, 1891-2 2 2 

W. T. Wildish, Printing 5 7 

E. VV. Fry, balance due on Dover Meeting 2 8 10 

Cheque Stamps 2 

Petty Cash for 1N92 (in addition to £3 7s. in hand from 1891) 10 

819 Stamps for Annual Meeting Circulars £3 10 9 

Expenses at Dover and St. Radegund's : Messrs. 

Payne and Livett 2 9 

Council Meeting Expenses 11 11 

Postage Stamps for the year, as per account 2 19 1 

Sundries 17 9 

Balance in hand 2 18 6 



£13 7 



Dec. 31. Balance at Bankers, viz. : — 

Wigan, Mercer, and Co £588 1 1 

Hammond and Co 300 12 2 



13 3 



£1323 3 7 



Examined, compared with Vouchers and Pass Books, and found to be correct. 

February 10, 1893. HERBERT HORDERN, » , ,.. 

•> ' ' ( Auditors. 

CHAS. F. HOOPER, ) 




Cfie 



ABSTRACT OF PROCEEDINGS, 1892-3. 

The Council met in London on the 20th of June 1892 at the house 
of the noble President in Grosvenor Place. The Earl Stanhope 
presided, there being twelve Members present. 

A printed proof of the Programme of the Annual Meeting at 
Dover was read and approved. 

Votes of thanks were passed to the Bev. Canon Puckle for his 
gift to the Library of his book, The Church and Fortress of Dover 
Castle ; and to G. M. Arnold, Esq., for the Life of Robert Pocock, 
edited by himself. 

"W. J. Nichols, Esq., was elected an Honorary Local Secretary 
for the Bromley district, and Henry Stringer, Esq., for the Eomney 
district. 

The Honorary Editor laid upon the table the first bound copy 
of the Genei*al Index. 

It was unanimously resolved that a special vote of thanks be 
accorded to Canon Scott Eobertson at the Annual Meeting for 
his indefatigable labours with regard to that Index. 

It was resolved that the spare coloured plates of the Sarre 
Antiquities, in stock at Maidstone, be bound up, as far as they 
will go, in complete sets, with the Catalogue of the Society's 
Collections, such special copies to be presented to the noble Pre- 
sident and the Council. 

Eive new members were elected. 



The Annual Meeting commenced at Dover on Tuesday, July 
19th, 1892. The Business Meeting was held in the Maison Dieu, 
the noble President, Earl Stanhope, in the Chair, supported by the 
Mayor of Dover (Sir W. H. Crundall), the Bishop of Dover, the 
Archdeacon of Maidstone, Dr. Astley, and others. After the Mayor 
had said a few words of welcome to the Society, the following 
Eeport was read by George Payne, Esq. (Hon. Sec.) : — 



xxxviii REPORT, 1802. 

REPORT. 

The Council has much pleasure in presenting to-day the Thirty-fifth Annual 
Report of your Sooiety, which shews thai it is still in a prosperous state, and lull 
of vitality. The Sooiety visited Dover for the first time in the year L860, and 
again in L875 in conjunction with the Royal Archaeological Institute, and the 
Council hopes thai the members will appreciate the opportunity afforded them 
on (lie |. resent occasion of a further examination of the antiquities of Dover and 
its vicinity. 

Since the last Annual Meeting the Society has lost by death ami other causes 
many old and valued members. Twenty-one new members have hcen elected 
during the pasl year, while ten await election at your hands to-day. 

The Council has the gratification of announcing that the Nineteenth Volume 
of Archceologia Cantiana has been issued to the various Local Secretaries, 
within the past few weeks, for distribution amongst the members. The volume 
contains a General Index to the Eighteen Volumes previously issued, together 
with a descriptive Catalogue of the Society's Collections at Maidstone, as well 
as a List of Books in our Library there. As the General Index has been 
sorely needed, its appearance will doubtless be hailed with satisfaction by every 
one. 

The Twentieth Volume of Archceologia Cantiana is passing through the 
Press, one hundred pages of it being already in type. The Council has to 
announce with profound regret that on the completion of that volume Canon 
Scott Robertson retires from the Editorship. The vast labour he has bestowed 
upon our Archceologia Cantiana, and the value of his past services as Honorary 
Secretary, cannot be over-estimated. The extraordinary ability he possesses for 
the work which he took in hand, was given to the Society to the fullest extent, 
and demands the grateful acknowledgment of every member, past and present. 
The members have twice testified to Canon Scott Eobertson, in a substantial 
manner, their recognition of the great value of his services to the Society : — Once 
in 1884, on the occasion of his marriage; and, secondlv, in 1890, on his retire- 
ment from the office of Honorary Secretary. The Council feel, however, that 
nothing could compensate Canon Scott Robertson for his devotion to the Society, 
and to the Science of Archaeology, better than the knowledge that the work he 
has accomplished remains not only for our instruction and benefit, but for 
that of future generations. 

The Council has much gratification in announcing that the Rev. Canon 
C. ¥. Routledge, M.A., F.S.A., has kindly undertaken the duties of Honorary 
Editor. His ability, energy, and enthusiasm are well known to the members of 
the Society, and the Council feel confident that in the hands of Canon Routledge 
Archceologia Cantiana will maintain its high standard of excellence. 

Through the kindness of some of our members several valuable additions, 
either as gifts or on loan, continue to be made to our Collections at Maidstone. 
Richard Cooke, Esq., of The Croft, Petling, has presented to the Library all the 
sheets of the one-inch Ordnance Map of Kent. These have been marked in 
colours with the sites of archaeological discoveries British and Roman roads, etc., 
by your Chief Curator. That these Maps may become of the utmost value, it is 
earnestly hoped that members, on becoming acquainted with any discovery of 
ancient remains, will com municate with the Honorary Secretary. They will 
thus enable him to keep the Maps up to date. 

Members are reminded that with the exception of Volumes I. and II., sets 
of the Society's Transactions ma}' be completed on application to the Honorary 
Secretary. 

The financial position of the Society leaves nothing to be desired, the balance 
at the Bankers being at the present moment £800. 9s. 5d. 

In conclusion, tbe Council ask for the hearty co-ope* ation of every individual 
member in the Society's endeavour to save, to preserve, and to reord. 

George Wilks, Esq., moved the adoption of the Report ; this 
was seconded by A. Eandall Davis, Esq., and carried unanimously. 



PROCEEDINGS, 1892. XXXLX 

It was moved by Earl Stanhope, seconded by J. F. Wadmore, 
Esq., and carried unanimously : — " That a special vote of thanks be 
accorded to Canon Scott Robertson for his past services as Honorary 
Editor of Arclnvologia Cantiana, and for his indefatigable exertions 
in promoting the welfare of the Society ; and that the deep sense 
of the Society's regret, at his retirement from the Editorship, be 
recorded." 

It was moved and carried : — " That the retiring members of 
Council and the Auditors be re-elected." 

Ten candidates were elected members of the Society. 

This concluded the business of the Meeting. 

The company, numbering about two hundred, then proceeded 
to St. Mary's Church, in the town of Dover, where a paper on its 
architecture and history, prepared by the Vicar, the Rev. Canon 
Puckle, was read by his Curate, the Rev. A. M. Collett. 

Dover Priory was next visited, under the guidance of Dr. 
Astley. 

On returning to the Town Hall the members were hospitably 
entertained, with light luncheon, by the Mayor. 

In the afternoon a visit was paid to the Castle, where the 
General commanding the South-Eastern District (Lord William 
Seymour) received the company in the historic Banquetting Hall 
of the Keep. Colonel O'Bi'ien, C.R.E., kindly acting as guide, led 
the members through the various apartments. The inclement state 
of the weather entirely prevented any examination of the exterior 
of the Keep, or other portions of the Castle. 

Some time, however, was spent in the ancient church of St. 
Mary-in-the-Castle, which was admirably described by E. P. Loftus 
Brock, Esq., F.S.A. (Honorary Secretary of the British Archaeo- 
logical Association). 

The Annual Dinner was served in the Connaught Hall, Dover, 
at 530 p M. The Earl Stanhope presided, being supported by the 
Mayor and Lady Crundall, Major-General Lord William Seymour, 
Mr. and Mrs. Bugler, Lieut. -Colonel Hartley, Mr. Wadmore, Mr. 
Loftus Brock, the Honorary Secretary, and about eighty other 
ladies and gentlemen. 

The various loyal and other toasts were proposed and responded 
to by the noble President, the Mayor, Lord William Seymour, 
Lieut. -Colonel Hartley, Rev. F. Babington Blogg, Mr. Wadmore, 
Mr. Bugler, Mr. G. E. Elliott, Mr. Alderman Fry, and Mr. B. 
Rosher. 

The Evening Meeting took place in the Maison Dieu, now the 
Town Hall, the Earl Stanhope presiding. 

Canon Puckle contributed a valuable paper on "Roman Dover," 
which was read in his absence by the Honorary Secretary, who 
followed with an address on the roads of the locality, and their 
relation to the discoveries which have been made around Dover. 

Mr. Alderman Fry then gave an account of his recent ex- 
cavations on the site of the destroyed church of St. Martin-le- 
Grand. 



xl PROCEEDINGS, 1892. 

Mr. Loftus Brock read a paper on Whitfield Church, which 
he believes to contain Saxon work. 

Votes of thanks were accorded for all these papers, on the 
proposition of the noble President, seconded by Lord William 
Seymour. 

On Wednesday, .Tidy 20th, while awaiting the arrival of the 
morning trains, those members who were already in Dover assem- 
bled in the Antiquity Boom of the Museum, when the Honorary 
Secretary gave a brief description of the more interesting objects 
in the Collection. 

At 11/30 a.m., the entire company started in carriages for St. 
Radegund's Abbey, where, under the able leadership of the Pre- 
centor of Rochester Cathedral (the Rev. Grevile M. Livett), an 
hour was spent in hearing a minute description of the ruins, and 
examining the remaining foundations. Mr. John Sayer, of Charing, 
the owner of the property, was present to welcome the party. 

Progress was then made to the Hall of the Co-operative Society 
at River, where luncheon was served. After luncheon, Temple 
Ewell Church was inspected under the guidance of the Vicar, the 
Rev. John Turnbull, M.A., some remarks being also offered by 
Mr. Loftus Brock. 

Alkham Church was next visited, the Vicar, the Rev. J. C. W. 
Valpy, M.A., receiving the company. The Honorary Secretary 
read a paper on the church by the Rev. W. F. Hobson, M.A., whose 
sad death occurred a fortnight before the Meeting. 

The Rev. Cr. M. Livett, who by the kindness of the Incumbent 
had been enabled to examine Alkham Church a few days previously, 
then drew attention to the features which marked its growth. The 
double respond in the arcade of the south aisle appeared to him, 
and to Mr. Brock, to point, not to a division of the church between 
the canons of St. Radegund's and the parishioners of Alkham, but 
merely to an eastward addition made to the original building, when 
the south aisle and arcade were built. Mr. Livett hopes to be able 
at some future date to contribute to ArcliceoJogia Cantiana a paper 
on this church. 

The church of Capel-le-Ferne was the last place visited. This 
also was described by the Rev. Cr. M. Livett, who has supplied the 
following short account for insertion here : — 

The church consists of a long, aisle-less nave, and square-ended chancel, 
with a western tower and a southern porch. The tower has heen rebuilt quite 
recently. The orignal tower-arch and western doorway, carefully preserved, 
shew that the tower was an addition to the church, in the Transition-Norman 
Period. The porch was a later addition. The walls of the nave and chancel, 
up to a certain height, are those of the first stone-church, built probably before 
or about a.d. 1100. The uppermost three or four feet of the walls were added 
to support a new roof, in the fourteenth century. Only one original Norman 
window remains ; it is in the north wall of the nave. Later windows have 
replaced those of the chancel and south wall of the nave. The principal feature 
of interest in the church is the arcade, of three arches, which supports the east 
wall of the nave, and serves for a chancel-screen, 'this was inserted in the 
fourteenth century, and no doubt succeeded a narrow Norman chancel-arch, in 



PROCEEDINGS, 1SD2. \li 

the same position. The Norman material is chiefly Caen-stone; thai of the 
screen-arcade and of the later windows is Kentish rag. Between the heads of 
the arches of the arcade there are grotesque corbel-heads, which at one time 
carried the brackets of a wooden rood-loft. Above the central arch, standing on 
the level of the rood-loft, is a round-arched opening in the wall, which at tirsi. 
sighl might be taken for Norman work. A closer examination proves that the 
wall was pierced and the arch inserted when the arcade was made. This upper 
arch is of two orders; the outer order plain-chamfered ; the inner order hollow- 
chamfered; both chamfers being dagger-stopped. The outer order is all of 
chalk, once painted. The punbs of the inner order are of Caen-stone, the 
squared blocks clearly shewing the diagonal axe-marks, except on the hollow 
chamfer. They must have come from the destroyed Norman chancel-arch. 
These jambs rest upon rude bases of Kentish rag. The voussoirs likewise are of 
Kentish rag, excepting the three voussoirs at the crown, which are of re-used 
Caen-stone. The purpose of this arch, in the minds of the builders, is obvious : 
it was meant to form a frame, so to speak, for the rood, its width and conse- 
quent round head being necessary to allow room for the figures of St. John and 
the Virgin, one on each side of the rood. The total height of the opening is 
6 feet ; the span is 5£ feet. 

A horizontal line drawn just above the head of the Norman window in the 
north wall of the nave would give the height of the Norman interior. Con- 
tinued eastwards this line would run just under a singular triangular window at 
the east end of the wall, made when the wall was raised. The purpose of this 
window was to give light to the gospeller reading from the rood-loft. The whole 
of these re-arrangements were probably carried out at one and the same time. 
Inside the south door there is something in the wall which possibly marks the 
position of a stoup for holy water. In the chancel are a curious sedile and 
a piscina. 

On the outside, the lines which mark the raising of the walls are clearly 
visible, all round the building. The original quoins are instructive: the lower 
quoin-stones are huge blocks of a purple-coloured ferruginous sandstone, while 
above them appear well-squared and properly-faced Caen-stone quoins. The 
change of material does not necessarily mean difference of date ; it more pro- 
bably marks the introduction of the Caen-stone into the country. The sand- 
stone seems to have been brought over from the coast near Hastings. The 
flint-walling is characteristic. 

On the proposition of W. H. B. Itosher, Esq., a cordial vote of 
thanks was given to Mr. G-eorge Payne for the admirable arrange- 
ments he had made for the instruction, pleasure, and comfort of 
members during the Meeting, to the Bev. Cr. M. Livett for his 
interesting descriptions, and to the Bev. Waterman Gardner- 
Waterman for his excellent arrangements connected with the 
carriages. 

A charming drive to Dover, along the Folkestone road, within 
view of the Channel, brought the Annual Meeting of 1N92 to a 
pleasant termination. 



The Council met on September 29th, 1892, in the Society's 
Booms at the Maidstone Museum. The Earl Stanhope presided, 
and nine members attended. 

The following votes of thanks, in connection with the Dover 
Meeting, were unanimously passed : — 

To the Mayor and Corporation of Dover, for the use of their 
Municipal Buildings. 

VOL. \'X. d 



\lii PROCEEDINGS, 1892. 

To the Mayor (Sir William Crundall), for kindly hospitality at 
the Town Hall. 

To Major- Genera] Lord William Seymour, Colonel O'Brien, 
Canon Puckle, the Rev. A. M. Collett, Rev. Gt. M. Livett, the Pre- 
sident and Council of Dover College, Dr. Astley, Rev. J. C. W. 
Valpy, Rev. John Turnbull, Mr. Alderman Pry (who kindly issued 
the Meeting tickets), and Mr. Loftus Brock, P.S.A., Bor much 
valuable help and hearty co-operation ; also to the Rev. \V G-ardner- 
Waterman for superintending the carriage arrangements. 

After due discussion, it was resolved to hold the next Annual 
Meeting at Edenbridgc. 

Votes of thanks were passed for the following gifts to the 
Society's Library: — 

To the Rev. J. Cave-Browne for his Poxley Parish. 

To J. F. Wadmore, Esq., for a volume of Kentish Plays ; and 
for three volumes of the Camden Society's Publications. 

To Richard Cooke, Esq., for the Anglo-Saxon Poems of Beowulf . 

To A. D. Weld French, Esq., for his Index Armorial. 

To Lieut.-General Pitt-Rivers, F.R.S., for his Excavations in 
Pokerly Dyke and Wansdyke, vol. iii. 

A special vote of thanks was passed to Algernon Brent, Esq., 
for his handsome donation of Five Pounds towards the Illustration 
Fund, Mr. Brent accompanying his gift with expressions of pleasure 
at the receipt of the Index Volume of Archceologia Gantiana. 

A special vote of thanks was passed to Dr. Astley on his relin- 
quishing the office of Honorary Local Secretary for the Dover 
district, after thirty years' valuable service to the Society. 

E. W. Fry, Esq., of St. Martin's House, Dover, was unani- 
mously elected to fill the vacant office. 

The Honorary Secretary reported that he had drawn the atten- 
tion of the military authorities at Chatham to the fact that dis- 
coveries of antiquities had been made during the construction of 
the forts, in the Thames and Medway divisions, and that the objects 
had been removed without the knowledge of the War Department. 
He appealed to Lieut.-General Goodenough, C.B., then in com- 
mand, to intercede that it should not occur again, at the same time 
asking that information might in future be sent to the Society's 
Secretary of any future discoveries. All this having been most 
carefully and systematically carried out by General Goodenough, 
it was unanimously resolved that a special vote of thanks be 
accorded to him for his valuable assistance, and that he be pre- 
sented with a copy of the Eleventh Volume of Archceologia Can- 
tiana, and a bound copy of the Catalogue of the Society's Museum. 

The Honorary Secret ay reported that, during building opera- 
tions connected with the Mathematical School at Rochester, the 
north tower of the ancient east-gate of the city had been laid bare. 
This he had, at the request of the Mayor of Rochester, opened up 
to a considerable extent, revealing the massive foundations of an 
earlier tower. Having suggested the desirability of keeping this 
interesting landmark of ancient Rochester permanently exposed, 



proceedings, 1892. xliii 

by means of a subway, it bad been intimated to him that the Cor- 
poration might be disposed to adopt the suggestion if half the cost 
of the work could be obtained elsewhere. The Council therefore 
resolved that Five Pounds be voted towards the fund in the event 
of such a scheme being carried out. 

A letter was read from the Rev. G. M. Livett, to the effect that 
Mailing Abbey had been sold to Miss Boyd for the residence of a 
Close Sisterhood of the Anglican Church, and, as alterations were 
contemplated, he suggested that an expert be appointed to measure 
up the existing building before anything was done. This was 
referred to the Honorary Secretary, who was directed to make 
further inquiries. 

A letter was read from the Eev. W. Gardner-Waterman with 
reference to the desecration of the ruined Church of the Blessed 
Virgin Mary at West Hythe, which was referred to Mr. George 
Wilks. 

Seven new members were elected. 



The Council met on December 22nd, 1S92, in the Cathedral 
Library at Canterbury, by the kindly permission of the Dean and 
Chapter. Canon W. A. Scott Robertson presided, and seven other 
members were present. The Honorary Secretary submitted his 
proposed Programme of the next Annual Meeting to be held at 
Edenbridfre, which was agreed to. 

C. W. Powell, Esq., J. P., of Speldhurst, was unanimously 
elected a member of the Council, in room of the Rev. E. H. Lee, 
deceased. 

Thanks were voted to George Wilks, Esq., for having given to 
the Society's Library his books, The Barons of the Cinque Ports and 
The Early History of Hythe, part i. 

The Honorary Secretary bad issued the following private 
circular to the members of the Council, explanatory of this question 
upon the agenda paper : " Can anything be done towards the pro- 
tection of the ancient monuments in Kent, and the preservation in 
Borough Museums of antiquities which may in future be found in 
the County ?" : — 

The Precinct, Rochester. 

December 19, 1892. 

Dear Sir, 

It seems to me that some special effort should be made, by the Corporate 
Towns possessing Museums iu Kent, to arrest the outgoing of the antiquities 
and other objects of local interest which are constantly being brought to light. 
The magnificent Collections formed by the late Bryan Faussett from East Kent 
passed away to Liverpool, the Gibbs Collection to S. Kensington, the Gold 
Treasures from Faversham are in half-a-dozen hands, and my own Collection is 
at the British Museum, having been declined by the town of Sittingbourne as a 
free gift. 

I propose to bring the matter before the Council of the Kent Archaeological 
Society on Thursday, asking the Society to initiate it, and at the same time to 



\li\ PROCEEDINGS, ls ( .)2. 

offer myself for the work if an adequate remuneration could be ensured. The 
following ideas have suggested themselves to rne as useful and practicable: — 

1. Examine periodically the historic monuments of each district and reporl 
on their condition and advise as to then' preservation. 

2. To assist ili<' Museum authorities to acquire the antiquities discovered 
around cadi oentre. 

:*. To advise as to the arrangement of Collections with a view to making 
them more educational. 

4. To conducl researches when called upon to do bo. 

5. To explore the districts and supply archaeological maps with the results 
marked thereon, and record the same in drchceologia Cantiana. 

<>. To give lectures occasionally in the Museums if necessary. 
7. To organize Public Meetings and Conversazioni once or twice a year in 
each Museum with a view to their popularization. 

J venture to hope that if this matter were brought under the notice of the 
Corporate Towns in Kent, where museums already exist or arc likely to be 
established, they would each contribute towards the annual cost of so valuable a 
work, of which they would reap, to a large extent, the benefit. 

I am, 

Yours faithfully, 

George Payne. 

Mr. Payne Btated that, during a conversation with the noble 
President, he (Mr. Payne) had mentioned that if the Society could 
vote £50 per annum towards the stipend of an Inspector, the 
Corporate Towns where museums exist might be asked to contribute 
£100 more per annum. 

The following letter from the noble President was read : — 

Chevening, Sevenoaks. 

December 15, 1892. 

Dear Mr. Payne, 

I am sorry that, owing to the late hour of the meeting, I cannot attend 
the next Council meeting at Canterbury. I should be glad to see an Inspector 
of Antiquities appointed for the County to assist in further explorations and to 
aid in the enumeration of new collections. 

If the Boroughs of the County would co-operate in the scheme and would 
contribute £100 or £150 a j r ear, there would be no person more fitting for the 
appointment than yourself. I think that in any case the Kent Archaeological 
Society would be very ready to augment your salary by £100 a year. 

With regard to the sale of surplus copies of Archceologia Cantiana, there 
can be no doubt that you should have authority to dispose of them at the rate 
of 10s. a volume. 

Yours very faithfully, 

Stanhope. 
George Payne, Esq., F.S.A. 

Letters more or less favouring the scheme had been received 
from Mr. Leveson-Gower, Lieut. -Colonel Hartley, Mr. Samuel 
Mercer, and Mr. Wadmore. 

After due deliberation the subject was adjourned for con- 
sideration at the next Council Meeting. 

The Chairman left, with Messrs. Boodle and Arnold, for an early 
train, at this stage of the proceedings, when the Archdeacon of 
Maidstone took the Chair. 

The subject of excavations at Pichborough was postponed. 



PROCEEDINGS, 181)2-3. xlv 

It was resolved thai in future the stock of back volumes of 
Archceoloqia Cantiana may be sold to members al t lie rate of ten 
shillings per volume, as there was so little call for them at the 
price of fifteen shillings hitherto charged to members who had not 
originally subscribed for the back volume desired. 



The Council met on March 25th, ISO:}, at Maidstone. Eleven 
members were present, presided over by the Earl Stanhope. 

Charles Boyce, Esq., M.D., was elected Honorary Local Secre- 
tary for the Maidstone District, vice Mr. F. Bunyard resigned. 

The subject of the Preservation of Antiquities and the Protec- 
tion of Ancient Monuments in Kent, which was adjourned at the 
last meeting, was further discussed. The Honorary Secretary 
explained that what he proposed to offer to do for the county was 
beyond the duties included in the Honorary Secretaryship, and it 
was for this additional work that he asked to be remunerated. The 
noble President read a draft letter, which he had prepared in con- 
nection with the scheme, to be sent to the Kentish Boroughs. The 
matter was debated in the absence of the Honorary Secretary. 
On being recalled to the room he was informed that the Council 
had resolved that the following letter should be lithographed and 
sent, as soon as completed, to the Mayors of all the Boroughs in 
Kent. 

Chevening, Sevenoaks. 

March 27, 1893. 
Sib, 

The Council of the Kent Archaeological Society, in the interest and 
furtherance of Antiquarian Research, have the honour to ask your co-operation 
for the following object. 

It appears to them very desirable that a competent Inspector should he 
appointed for the County, who should have full knowledge of its Antiquities 
and Archaeological Ilisior}'. 

Such an Inspector could, if invited, very well become responsible in advising 
as to the preservation of Ancient Monuments and Buildings, and as to under- 
taking fresh explorations. He could also assist as to the arrangement and 
Cataloguing of New or of existing Museums, and could deliver Lectures on 
Local Archaeology. 

The Council of the Kent Archaeological Society are prepared to recommend 
the Society to make a yearly contribution of £50 out of their funds for this 
objecr, provided that the County Boroughs will meet them with an annual grant 
in the whole of not less than One Hundred Pounds. The present Secretary of 
the Society, Mr. George Payne (Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries), possesses 
adequate experience and full knowledge, and is ready to undertake such duties. 

If you are willing to make a contribution towards this proposal out of your 
Public Library, Museum Fund, or County Technical Education Grant, your 
Corporation would be entitled to the services of the County Inspector, and 
would receive all future volumes of the Archceologia Cantiana. 

The Council of the Kent Archaeological Society trust that you will have the 
goodness to take this matter into your favourable consideration, and will kindly 
let me have a reply at an early opportunity. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient Servant, 
Stanhope, 
His Worship President K. A. Soviet//. 

The Mayor of 



xlvi PROCEEDINGS, L893. 

It was resolved to insure the property of the Society which 
illicit at any time be in the hands of the printers al £300. 

The Honorary Secretary was permitted to make use of certain 
wood blocks with which to illustrate liis Collectanea Cantiana. 

The following works wore ordered to be subscribed for: —Cow- 
per's Canterbury Marriage Licences; Duncan's Lewisham Church; 
Fielding's Memories of Mailing, 

A vuio of thanks was accorded to Sir John Evans, K.O.B., for 
his valuable gift of Richborough cuius from the Rolfe Collection. 

Nine new members were elected. 



The Council met on June 27th in London, at the house of the 
nohle President, in Grosvenor Place. The Earl Stanhope presided, 
and there were fourteen members present. 

The Programme (in proof) of the Annual Meeting to he held at 
Edenbridge in July was approved. 

The Earl Stanhope was elected a Trustee of the Society, vice 
Lord Brabourne, deceased. 

Keplies from several of the Boroughs were read with reference 
to the appointment of an Inspector of Antiquities for the County, 
to the effect that they were unable to vote any funds for such a 
purpose. After some discussion, it was moved by Mr. A. A. 
Arnold, seconded by Canon Scott Robertson, and carried, " That 
the Council, having heard the replies from the Boroughs respecting 
the appointment of a County Inspector, much regret that they can 
take no further action in the matter." 

It was resolved that the sums received from Life Compounders 
for membership, amounting to £100, shall forthwith be invested in 
Consols. 

It was resolved to subscribe twenty guineas towards the fund 
being raised for the purchase of the Roman castrum at Richborough. 

The Honorary Secretary laid upon the table the account of the 
Stock of Archceologia Cantiana at Maidstone, (not including copies 
in the hands of local Secretaries,) as follows : — 
No. of Volume. Royal Quarto. I 



I. 


None. 


II. 


1 


III. 


1 


IV. 


2 


V. 


2 


VI. 


— 


VII. 


— 


VIII. 


1 


IX. 


— 


X. 


3 


XI. 


— 


XII. 


— 


XIII. 


— 


XIV. 


— 


XV. 


— 


XVI. 


— 


XVII. 


— 


XVIII. 


— 


XIX. 


— 



Octavo. 


Octavo. 


[one. 


None. 





31 


— 


11 


1 


46 


7 


49 


15 


35 


13 


98 


12 


117 


15 


53 


13 


38 


7 


7 


3 


17 


2 


30 


5 


21) 


7 


25 


15 


56 


13 


51 


14 


116 



Total 10 112 809 



REPORT, 1S<); , ) . xlvii 

A vote of thanks was passed to the Kev. C. A. Molony, for his 
gift to the Library of Sim son's Historic Thanet. 
Three new members were elected. 



The Annual Meeting of the Society commenced at Edenbridge 
on Tuesday, July 25th, 1893. The Business Meeting was held in 
the Oddfellows' Hall, the noble President in the Chair. 

The Report was read by the Honorary Secretary (George 
Payne, Esq.) as follows : — 

REPORT. 

To-day, for the first time since its foundation, the Society visits Edenbridge ; 
a locality full of interest, and especially rich in un-restored examples of ancient 
domestic architecture. It is hoped that the visit of the Society on this occasion 
to some of these old houses may induce the owners to take steps to arrest the 
progress of their decay, so that they may stand for many long years as valuable 
illustrations of the architecture of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, as 
applied to the dwellings of the yeomen of the Weald at that period. 

In presenting this, the Thirty-sixth Animal Report, the Council with much 
pleasure draw attention to the continued prosperity of the Society. The Council 
have, however, to announce with the deepest regret the deaths during the past 
year of two of its distinguished Vice-Presidents, the Earl of Derby and the Lord 
Brabourne, the latter being also one of the Society's Trustees. 

Other valued members have passed away. Since the last Annual Meeting 
twenty-seven new members have been elected. The Society now numbers 
eight hundred and seventy-two members, while twelve await election at your 
hands to-day. 

Members will be gratified to learn that at the last meeting of the Council 
the Earl Stanhope, the noble President, consented to act as a Trustee of the 
Society in the room of Lord Brabourne, deceased. 

The Council having heard with gratification of a scheme for the purchase 
of the celebrated Roman castrurn at Richborough, recently voted the sum of 
twenty guineas towards the fund, which still needs about £300 to complete 
the purchase. The spirited manner in which the whole matter has been taken 
up renders the final protection and preservation of this grand national monu- 
ment an absolute certainty. 

It is anticipated that in the course of the next three or four months the 
Twentieth Volume of Archceologia Cantiana will be issued. The completion of 
this volume will bring to a close the editorship of Canon Scott Robertson. This 
lamentable fact has already been announced, but the Council feel that they 
must again express their extreme regret at the retirement of one who has done 
so much for the welfare of the Society, and their deep thankfulness to him for 
his long and able services. 

As you are aware, Canon C. F. Routledge, M.A., F.S.A., has most kindly 
taken over the duties of Honorary Editor, and to him therefore material for 
future volumes should be sent. 

Since the last Annual Meeting your Honorary Secretary, assisted by the 
Rev. G. M. Livett, has been prosecuting researches in connection with the 
ancient mural defences of the City of Rochester. The discoveries made are of 
the first importance, and shed an entirely new light on the history of the city 
walls. The results are now being prepared for publication in the Twenty-first 
Volume of Archceologia Cantiana. 

The Council note with considerable satisfaction the action of the Corporation 
of Rochester with respect to the repair of the fine Norman Castle-keep in that 
city. The much needed reparation of the interior having recently been taken 
in hand, the north side being already completed in an efficient and conservative 
manner. 



xlviii PROCEEDINGS, 1893. 

The financial position of the Society is still highly satisfactory; the balance 
at tho Bankers to-day being C7l"> L8s. Lid., although a sum of 6100 has been 
invested in Consols during the present month. 

In conclusion, the Council earnestly appeal to the members 1<> assisl in 
every way possible in the preservation of objects of antiquity or other material 
thai may serve to elucidate the history of their respective districts or of the 
county. 

Lieut. -Colonel Hartley moved the adoption of the Report; this 
was seconded by A. A. Arnold, Esq., and carried unanimously. 

It was moved and carried: — "That the Auditors be re-elected." 

It was moved and carried : — " That the retiring members of 
Council be re-elected." 

The Earl of Radnor was elected a member and Vice-President 
of the Society, and eleven other candidates were duly elected. 

The business being concluded, the company, which numbered 
some two hundred ladies and gentlemen, proceeded to Edenbridge 
Church, where they were welcomed by the Vicar, the Eev. F. C. 
Gore, M.A. John Oldrid Scott, Esq., F.S.A., described the church, 
the Secretary subsequently reading some interesting notes on the 
monuments, and curious extracts from wills relating to the church, 
which had been prepared by Granville Leveson-Gower, Esq., F.S.A. 

Members next adjourned to the Oddfellows' Hall for luncheon, 
and afterwards were conveyed in carriages to Hever Church, which 
the Rector, the Eev. E. C. Lathom Browne, kindly described. 

Hever Castle was then visited under the guidance of E. P. Loftus 
Brock, Esq., E.S.A. (Honorary Secretary of the British Archaeo- 
logical Association). After his valuable address in the quadrangle, 
the company, by the kind permission of Mr. E. Heard, inspected 
the rooms usually thrown open to the public. 

Progress was then made to Chiddingstone Church, where the 
members were met by the Rector, the Eev. J. T. Pearse, M.A. 
The Secretary read some brief notes on the church and ancient 
houses in the village, which had been kindly sent to him by Henry 
Taylor, Esq., of Braeside, Eusthall, Tunbridge Wells, who was 
unable to be present. 

Members were charmed with the picturesque village of Chid- 
dingstone, and before leaving it many paid a visit to the quaint 
old hostelry and other houses, as well as to the great mass of rock 
in rear of them, called the " Chiding-stone." 

The Annual Dinner took place in the Oddfellows' Hall at Eden- 
bridge, about 5*30 p.m. ; the Earl Stanhope presiding, supported by 
Sir Samuel Lewes, Lieut. -Colonel and Mrs. Hartley, the Eev. Salter 
Hartley, Eev. A. J. Pearman, Granville Leveson-Gower, Esq., 
George Wilks, Esq., J. Oldrid Scott, Esq., E. P. Loftus Brock, Esq., 
the Honorary Secretary and Mrs. George Payne. About eighty 
dined. 

The customary loyal and other toasts were proposed and 
responded to by the noble President, the Eev. W. H. Grove, Lieut.- 
Colonel Hartley, Mr. Leveson-Gower, and Mr. George Wilks. 

The Evening Meeting was held at 7'30 o'clock, the Earl Stan- 
hope again presiding, supported by the Eev. C. E. Gore, Lieut.- 



PROCEEDINGS, 1893. xllX 

Colonel Hartley, Mr. Leveson-Gower, Mr. Oldrid Scott, and the 
Honorary Secretary. 

Mr. Leveson-Gower read an interesting paper entitled, " Jot- 
tings about Edenbridge ;" after which Mr. C. E. Gildersome 
Dickinson contributed a paper on " Gavelkind ;" followed by a 
paper from the Honorary Secretary on the " Iron Trade of the 
Weald." 

The proceedings terminated with cordial thanks to the noble 
Chairman and to those who had kindly contributed papers. 



On Wednesday, July 26th, the members assembled in drenching 
rain, which, together with the lateness of the arrival of the trains, 
caused a slight delay at starting. At 11-45 a.m., however, the 
party, exceeding two hundred in number, left the town in twenty- 
one carriages, then the storm passed away, the weather remain- 
ing fine for the remainder of the day. It was decided to 
abandon the original intention of going to the ancient home of 
the Tichbornes at Crippenden, as the road to it for some distance 
is in wet weather impassable. Cowden was therefore the first place 
visited, where the Kector, the Rev. F. M. Burton, LL.D., F.S.A., 
cordially welcomed the company. Mr. Oldrid Scott gave an in- 
teresting description of the church, followed by Mr. Leveson-Gower, 
who contributed a large number of extracts from wills, and other 
particulars connected with the church and its monuments. 

Erom Cowden progress was made to Lingtield Mark Camp, 
which is situate on the borders of Kent and Surrey. The high 
position of this fine British oppidum renders it necessary to walk 
nearly a mile before the ramparts are reached. The whole party 
boldly and cheerfully faced the difficulty, and were rewarded on 
reaching the summit of the hill by seeing before them a vast ex- 
panse of the finest scenery to be met with in the south-east of 
England. On the green sward in front of the ramparts they found 
Beresford V. Melville, Esq., and Mrs. Melville, of Ford Manor, Surrey, 
awaiting their arrival. After greeting the members very cordially, 
they invited them to partake of a sumptuous luncheon which had 
been most hospitably prepared in a large marquee. After luncheon, 
and before the company left their seats, Mr. Leveson-Gower rose 
and warmly thanked Mr. and Mrs. Melville for the immense trouble 
they had taken to entertain the Society at such an interesting and 
delightful spot, in so kind and hospitable a manner. 

Mr. Melville, who was greeted with prolonged applause, replied 
in very pleasant terms, expressing a hope that he might be allowed 
to become a member of the Society. 

The company on dispersing were conducted by the Honorary 
Secretary to the magnificent tree, known as the " Mark Beech," 
which, at 3 feet 6 inches from the ground, measures 14 feet 2 inches 
in girth, and is growing upon the top of one of the ramparts. From 
this standpoint Mr. Payne gave an address on the camp, describing 
vol. xx. e 



1 PROCEEDINGS, 189^. 

its mode of construction, comparing it- with others in the immediate 
locality, and also referringto its position as related to the surround- 
ing fortified sites and earbj roads. 

No time could be allowed for a perambulation of the camp, the 
company therefore strolled down towards the carriages. 

A few persons only paid a visit at the foot of the hill to Bazing 
and Scarlett's farm-houses as a thunderstorm seemed approaching, 
and time was precious. 

A general advance was therefore made to Oakdene, Cowdcn, 
where II. A. Darbishire, Esq., and Mrs. Darbishire, received the 
company, and invited them to partake of tea and other refresh- 
ments, which had been hospitably prepared for them in a tent upon 
the lawn. During tea the Edenbridge brass band played selections 
of music. Before leaving the pretty grounds of Oakdene, J. G. 
Talbot, Esq., M.P., on behalf of the Society, thanked Mr. and Mrs. 
Darbishire for their hospitable reception, to which Mr. Darbishire 
replied in graceful terms. 



The Council met on the 2Sth of September, 1893, at Maidstone. 
Nine members were present, presided over by Canon W. A. Scott 
Eobertson. 

After some discussion it was decided that the next Annual 
Meeting shall be held at Faversham. Votes of thanks were passed 
to the following gentlemen, for much valuable help and hearty 
co-operation in connection with the meeting at Edenbridge, in July 
last — -Granville G. Leveson-Gow r er, Esq., F.S.A., J. Oldrid Scott, 
Esq., E.S.A., E. P. Loftus Brock, Esq., F.S.A., Eev. W. Gardner 
Waterman, Eev. E. Lathom Browne, Eev. P. M. Burton, LL.D., 
F.S.A., Eev. C. F. Gore, Eev. J. T. Pearse, Henry Taylor, Esq., 
Joseph Stanford, Esq., Mr. Shorter, Mr. Walder, Mr. Heard, Mr. 
Boddy, C. E. Gildersome Dickinson, Esq., Mr. G. Pullinger, Mr. 
F. G. Pullinger (for issuing the Tickets), and Mr. Benson. 

Special votes of thanks were also passed to Beresford V. Mel- 
ville, Esq., and Mrs. Melville for their unbounded hospitality and 
very great kindness, and to H. A. Darbishire, Esq., and Mrs. 
Darbishire for their kindness and hospitable reception at Oakdene. 

It was resolved : — " That the warmest thanks of the Society be 
tendered to the Eight Hon. the Lord Mayor of London for the 
kindly hospitality of his Lordship and the Lady Mayoress to its 
members at the Mansion House on the 12th of July, and that his 
Lordship be requested to accept the position of a Vice-President of 
the Society." 

W. H. Burch Eosher, Esq., was elected an Honorary Local 
Secretary for the Deal and Walmer District, vice the Eev. J. 
Branfill Harrison, deceased. 

Eesolved that from the surplus Anglo-Saxon antiquities of iron, 
in the Society's possession, about a dozen articles, including swords, 



PROCEEDINGS, 1893. li 

spears, knives, and umboes, shall be lent to the Corporation of 
Rochester for their City Museum. 

Resolved that a glass-case be provided for the better display of 
the Society's collection of sulphur casts from ancient seals. 

The following new Kentish Works were ordered to be purchased 
for the Library : — 

Elvin's History of Wahner and Walmer Castle. 

Cotton's History of the Church and Parish of St. Laurence, 
Thanet. 

Wilkie's Parish Registers of Kingston, near Canterbury. 

Barrett's History of Birchington. 

Cowper's Registers of St. Paul's, Canterbury. 

Six new members were elected. 



^rthmUftfa <toitan& 



KENTISH ADMINISTRATIONS, 1601—1649. 

EDITED BY LELAND L. DUNCAN, F.S.A. 

The Kentish Administration Grants already extracted from the Act Books of 
the Prerogative Court of Canterbury and printed in Archceologia Cantiana 
extend from 1559 (the first of the existing books) to 1603. To these are now- 
added all the Grants relating to the County for the reigns of James 1. and 
Charles I.— 1604 to 1649. 

Unless otherwise stated, the surname of the person to whom the adminis- 
tration was granted may always be taken to be the same as that of the 
deceased. 

In making the extracts the following translations have been adopted : — 
consanguineus, kinsman. 
prox. consang., next of kin. 
nepos exfratre, brother's son (or daughter). 
nepos ex sorore, sister's son (or daughter). 
nepos exjilio, grandson (or daughter) by the son. 
nepos exjilia, grandson (or daughter) by the daughter. 
nepos, where it occurs alone, has not been translated, as the relationship 
expressed thereby may either be nephew or grandson ; b., denotes that the 
deceased was a bachelor; iv., a widow ; * indicates that deceased died abroad. 

The arrangement of the years here followed is that of the New, or present, 
Style, but the Acts themselves are dated in the Old Style. 



N.B. The following Grant, accidentally omitted, should he added to those for 1600 : — Folio 
64. Administration granted 24 Nov. 1600 to Anne Lewyn, widow, mother, on the death of 
John Lewyn, late of Otterinden. 



Fol. Name of deceased. 


Parish. 


To whom granted. 


Date. 


207 Andrew alias Lashe, 

Thomas. 
198 Baines, Alice. 


Northfleet. 
Fevershain. 


Alice Andrew alias Lashe, relict. 
William Blackwell, son. 


1604. 
4 June. 

14 Apr. 



VOL. XX. 



KENTISH ADMINISTRATIONS, 1004, 1G05. 



Fol. 


Name of d ased. 


Parish. 


To whom granted. 


Dato. 










1604, 


212 


Box, Godfrey. 


Dartforde. 


Thomas Hawes, ex'or of Elizabeth 
l!(ix, deceased, relict of Godfrey 
Box ; during minority of Sara and 
Anne Box, dau'rs. 


19 July. 


214 


Box, Godfrey. 


Partford. 


Richard WCklin, guardian of Anne 
ami S.-irah Box, daughters. 


3 Aug. 


202 


BUSHRIDGE alias W el- 
dish, Elizabeth. 


Gravesend. 


John Nodeham, knt., next of kin. 


14 May. 


214 


Edgewoeth, Mar- 
garet. 


Crayford. 


Jane Edgeworth alias James, sister, 
by Jas. James her husband. 


1 Aug. 


203 


Edwards alias Bat- 
tell, Margaret. 


Brasted. 


Elizabeth Edwards a</a$Battell,dau'r. 


23 May. 


187 


Evekenden, Josias. 


Bouj, r hton 
Mnnchelsea. 


Josia Everenden, next of kin. 


10 Feb. 


207 


Gournet, Nicholas. 


Ashford. 


Thomazine, relict. 


20 June. 


205 


llAEL AKIN DEN, ZaC- 

heus. 


Tunstall. 


Catherine Trolop, grandmother. 


18 May. 


187 


IIeardson, Thomas. 


Folkstone. 


Fr' Heardson, son, Ric. Warner hav- 
ing died. (See April 1591.) 


lFeb. 


195 


Helby, Moyses. 


East Mailing. 


Mary, relict. 


30 Mar. 


183 


Johnson, Thomas. 


Rochester. 


William, brother. 


28 Jan. 


185 


Johnson, Thomas. 


Rochester. 


William, brother. 


28 Jan. 


223 


Kent, Henry. 


Grayne. 


Pionise, relict. 


2 Nov. 


224 


Kettle, John. 


Darenthe. 


Robert, son. 


7 Nov. 


220 


Kettle alias Villyers, 
Barbara. 


Horton, Dio. 
Canterbury. 


John Villiers, son. 


2 Oct. 


223 


King, John. 


Tenterden. 


Phebe, sister. 


9 Nov. 


224 


Knowles, Thomas. 


Sandwich. 


Isaac Goger, creditor. 


19 Nov. 


194 


Lewyn, Anna, w. 


Otterinden. 


Richard Luther, paternal uncle of 
Justinian, Anne, Catherine, and 
Judith Lewyn, her children. 


22 Mar. 


194 


Lewyn, John. 


Otterinden. 


Richard Luther, paternal uncle ; 
Anna the mother having died. 


22 Mar. 


187 


Paine, Edward. 


Bexlie. 


Edward, son. 


1 Feb. 


200 


Paine, John. 


Dartford. 


A^nes, relict. 


5 May. 


183 


Poulter, John. 


Peckham 
Magna. 


Nicholas, brother's son. 


10 Jan. 


223 


Segar, William. 


Charing, 


Elizabeth, daughter, and Ramburn 
Durham her husband. 


9 Nov. 


224 


Tassell, Thomas. 


Rodmersham. 


Agnes Tailer alias Tassell, sister. 


12 Nov. 


183 


Taylor, John. 


Earith, 


Elizabeth, relict. 


16 Jan. 


203 


Tuhke, Richard. 


Partford. 


Richard Oxenbridge, creditor. 


21 May. 


210 


Tyllden, Richard. 


Brenchley, 


Mary, relict. 


25 June. 


227 


Violat, William. 


Beckingham. 


Joan, relict. 


8 Dec. 


217 


Walker, John, senior. 


Lewsham. 


Joan Draper alias Walker, dau'r. 


28 Sept. 


203 


Warwick, John. 


Gillingham. 


Elizabeth Warwick alias Ashmore, 
relict. 


23 May. 


217 


Wells, John. 


Lidd. 


John, son. 


14 Sept. 
1605. 


2 


Browne, Thomas. 


Greenwich. 


James, brother. 


27 Apr. 


19 


Bryzes, John. 


Penshurst. 


Elizabeth Brizes, relict. 


4 Oct. 


1 


Cocke, Arthur. 


Milton next 
Sittingborne. 


John, brother. 


3 Apr. 


1 


Crowherst, Nicholas. 


East Mallinge. 


Susan, relict. 


19 Apr. 


237 


Fitzrichards, Joan. 


Cranbrook. 


Thomas, son. 


8 Mar. 



KENTISH ADMINISTRATIONS, 1605, 1606, 1607. 



Pol. 


Name of deceased. 


Parish. 


To whom granted. 


Date. 


5 


Lamparde, John. 


Staplehurste. 


Henry, son. 


11 May. 


231 


Makler, Edward. 


Craiford. 


Edward Jones, creditor. 


10 Jan. 


19 


Richman, Alexander. 


Dartforde. 


William, father; during minority of 
Alexander, William, Silvester, 
Rochell, and Richard, children of 
deceased. 


2 Oct. 


21 


Shorte, Thomas. 


Gillingham. 


Dorothy Nicholles alias Shorte. 


8 Nov. 

1606. 

21 July. 


46 


Baker alias Heath, 

Joan. 
Baker, Richard. 


Wrotham. 


Henry Baker alias Heath, son. 


44 


Gowdhurste. 


Richard, son. 


28 June. 


38 


Beverley, John. 


Swanscombe. 


Elizabeth, relict. 


22 May. 


56 


Brooke, William. 


East Peckham. 


Robert, son. 


10 Nov. 


38 


Ctjmbridge, Andrew. 


Penshurst. 


Sara, relict. 


20 May. 


59 


Pathers, Simon. 


Wrotham. 


Alice, relict. 


1 Dec. 


27 


Pirminger, David. 


Peversham. 


Gabriel Bexlie, creditor. 


25 Jan. 


32 


Gellibrand, Edward. 


Sandwich. 


Nicholas Kinge of Beckenham, yeo- 


12 Mar. 


57 


Hazard, Thomas. 


Rochester. 


man. 
Valentine Harrison, creditor. 


28 Nov. 


56 


Hull, Richard. 


Wolwich. 


John, brother. 


12 Nov. 


37 


Jaggkr alias Thom- 
son, Prancis. 


Canterbury. 


Thomas Jagger, brother. 


2 May. 


32 


Leston, William. 


Gravesend. 


Margery, relict. 


19 Mar. 


44 


Macklingon, Hugh. 


Greenwich. 


Catherine Flyn <>f Greenwich, widow, 
and Parroil O'Perrell. 


26 June. 


57 


Mynge, John. 


Romi.ey. 


Judith, relict. 


21 Nov. 


37 


Pratt alias, Bridget. 


Frinsbur} . 


Thomas Forman of Eastwood, Essex, 
yeoman ; during minority of Jere- 
miah Pratt, son. 


16 May. 


32 


Raven, William. 


Lee. 


Anne, relict. 


11 Mar. 


50 


Rivers, Edward. 


Leygh next 
Tunbridge. 


Dorothy, relict. 


23 Aug. 


57 


Ruse, Juliana. 


Nettlested. 


Thomas Ruse, husband. 


13 Nov. 


26 


Scott, Richard. 


Nettlested. 


Katherine Scott alias Sandes, relict. 


27 Jan. 


60 


Whitton, Thomas. 


Lamberhurst. 


Henry, son. 


19 Dec 

1607. 

30 Oct. 


92 


Beach alias Beare, 


Penshurst. 


William Beache, husband. 




Elizabeth. 








97 


Bradock, Thomas. 


Wittersham. 


Elizabeth, relict. 


19 Nov. 


88 


Clayborne, Thomas. 


Crayforde. 


William Wiseman of Grayes Inn, 
gent. ; Sara, relict, renouncing. 
In margin, vacnt. 


7 Aug. 


91 


Clayborne, Thomas. 


Crayford. 


Sara, relict {vide adm'on above). 


lOct. 


62 


Denwood, Stephen. 


Rochester. 


Fr' Denwood, brother. 


8 Jan. 


99 


Pathers, William. 


Tunbridge. 


Elizabeth Smyth, sister. Another 
grant Feb. 1610-11. 


23 Dec. 


84 


Peeld, Sil vesta, io. 


AHington, 


Richard, son. 


14 July. 


71 


Harborow, Robert. 


Westerham. 


Margaret, relict. 


18 Mar. 


70 


Jackson alias Wise- 
man, Aiulrea. 


Westerham. 


William Wiseman, brother. In mar- 
gin, "revoked." 


2 Mar. 


77 


Jackson alias Wise- 
man, Audrea. 


Westerham. 


Peter Jackson, husbnnd ; during mi- 
nority of George Jackson, son. 
(See former adm'on.) 


16 May. 


99 


Kempe, Sir Thomas, 


Olantigh in 


Dame Dorothy, relict. Further grants 


10 Dec. 




Knight, 


Wye. 


in June 1609 and Apr;l 1629, 





B 2 



1 



KENTISII ADMINISTRATIONS, 1G07, 1G08. 



Fol. 


Name of deceased. 


Parish. 


To whom granted. 


Date. 


71 


M l Mir i;st, Edward. 


1 leaver. 


Jane, relict. 


3 June. 


79 


Moyses, John. 


St. MaryHoo. 


Etose, relict. 


8 June. 


63 


Pelsant, George. 


Adiugtou. 


Thomas l'elsant of Market Bosworth, 
and John Aram of London. Former 
grant 1506. 


27 Jan. 


98 


ReTNOLDES, 'Richard. 


Hawkhurst. 


Elizabeth, relict, and Joseph, son. 


1 Nov. 


68 


Robson, Oswald. 


Rochester. 


Ellen, relief. 


25 Feb. 


7<i 


Seath, Thomas 


Sandwich. 


Peter, brother's son. 


15 May. 


82 


SHAWEj Thomas, clerk. 


Bobbinge. 


Elizabeth, relict. 


11 June. 


88 


Thomas, John. 


Greenwich. 


Anne, relict. 


15 Aug. 


86 


Tolaste, Thomas. 


Cranbrooke & 
Etching- 
ham. 


Stephen Tollaste, brother. 


12 Aug. 


91 


Vane, Tabitha. 


Sevenocke. 


Edward Vane of Sevenock, while 
Susan Withers, daughter, is a minor. 


30 Oct. 


DO 


Wheatly, Robert. 


Debtford. 


William, brother's son. 


6 Sept. 
1608. 
4 June. 


120 


Babbowe, Robert. 


Boughton 


Susan, relict. 






Ailuphe. 






109 


Bulkelie, Richard. 


Sele. 


Catherine, relict. 


24 Mar. 


107 


Cheston, Thomas. 


Gravesend. 


Dorothy, relict. 


25 Feb. 


111 


Compost, Thomas. 


Crayforde. 


John Skudd, creditor. 


4 Apr. 


117 


Cowdeay, William. 


Penshurst. 


Margaret Cowdray alias Harbert, 
relict. Former grant in 1595-6. 


7 May. 


135 


Ducke, Robert. 


Gillingham. 


Margaret, relict. 


11 Nov. 


120 


Fishee, Thomas. 


Boughton 
Monchelsea. 


Joan, relict. 


13 Jan. 


142 


Fletcheb, Thomas. 


East Maulling. 


Rose, relict. 


7 Dec. 


111 


Gillet, Alice. 


Lidging. 


Thomas Friday of St. Margaret's, 
Rochester, husbandman, and 
Thomas Roger of Chatham, hus- 
bandman ; during minority of 
William and Emanuel Gillet and 
William Roger. 


19 Apr. 


128 


Geeene alias Steres, 
Eleanor. 


Hawkhurst. 


James Green, son. 


13 Sept. 


101 


Haetejdge alias 
Sherington, Sarah. 


Debtford. 


Francis Downes of Mucking, Essex, 
gent., next of kin. Former grant 
1598. 


7 Jan. 


102 


Haewood, George. 


Horthfeeld. 


Thomas, brother. 


26 Jan. 


135 


Heedson, Thomas. 


Folkston. 


John, brother. Former grants in 
1591 and 1603. 


5 Nov. 


138 


Hilles, Thomas. 


Speldhurst. 


Evan Price, kinsman and creditor. 


4 Nov. 


115 


Hovenden, Richard. 


Cranbrooke. 


Robert, father. 


13 May. 


132 


Howe, Thomas. 


Meopham. 


Robert, brother. 


17 Oct. 


112 


Middleton, Nicholas. 


Milton by 
Gravesend. 


Elizabeth, relict. 


20 Apr. 


139 


Millee, Gregory. 


Cliffe. 


Mary, relict. 


15 Dec. 


108 


Netheesole, Edward. 


Canterbury. 


Elizabeth Calton, daughter. Former 
grant 1607 revoked. 


13 Feb. 


105 


Noedash alias North- 
ash, William. 


Meopham. 


Thomas Nordash, son. 


10 Feb. 


102 


Phillips, Walter. 


East Mailing. 


Alice, relict. 


29 Jan. 


120 


Pottee, Ambrose. 


Stansted. 


Ellen, relict. 


22 June. 


123 


Rogees, Simon, clerk. 


Stourmouth. 


Winifred, relict. 


14 June. 


139 


Stone, Laurence. 


Brenchley. 


Dorothy, relict. 


2 Dec. 



KENTISH ADMINISTRATIONS, 1608, 1609. 



Fol. 


Name of deceased. 


Parish. 


To whom granted. 


Date. 


132 


Watkins, John. 


How (Hoo). 


Susan, relict. 


17 Oct. 


120 


Weston, Margaret. 


Greenwich. 


Owen Haddock of London, cord- 
wayner ; during minority of Susan 
Weston, sister. 


15 June. 


123 


Wiles, William. 


Milton next 
Sittingborne. 


Anne Wyles, widow, sister. 


5 June. 
1609. 


178 


Adys, William. 


Greenwich. 


Helen Chitting, daughter. 


4 Nov. 


155 


Beeching, Thomas. 


Sandhurst. 


Richard, brother. 


18 May. 


179 


Bence, John. 


Gillingham. 


Joan, relict. 


5 Dec. 


174 


Beknet, Elea or 
Eleanor. 


Beckenham. 


Edmund Stile, next of kin. 


7 Oct. 


176 


Best, George. 


North Cray. 


Daniarae, relict. 


2 Nov. 


151 


Bettenham, Samuel. 


Plucklie. 


Peter, brother. 


7 Apr. 


177 


Boys, George. 


Hartlip. 


Robert, brother; during minority of 
Elizabeth, daughter. 


25 Nov. 


151 


Beowneige, Thomas. 


Debtford. 


Elizabeth Rayton alias Brownrige, 
next of kin. 


3 Apr. 


177 


Caetee, Thomas. 


Seplhurst(stc). 


John, son. 


18 Nov. 


180 


Chapman, Robert. 


Penshurst. 


George Rivers of Chaford in Pens- 
hurst. 


29 Dec. 


173 


Colliee, John. 


Iden, Dio. of 
Canterbury. 


Edith Ger, brother's child. 


13 Oct. 


151 


Deeinge, Richard. 


Maideston. 


George, brother. 


7 Apr. 


145 


Dttnscombe, Thomas. 


Kingsnothe. 


Susan, relict. 


20 Feb. 


160 


Eglesfeild, Chris- 
topher. 


Sutton at 
Hone. 


Elizabeth, relict. 


27 June. 


173 


Hunt, Henry. 


Hun ton alias 
Huntington. 


Henry, father. 


19 Oct. 


151 


Kettell, John. 


Crayford. 


Judith, relict. 


21 Apr. 


177 


Luffe, William. 


Bexley. 


Beatrice, relict. 


23 Nov. 


159 


Platt, Maria. 


Debtford. 


Richard Smith of Stratford, Essex, 
creditor. 


20 June. 


168 


Pubchin, Thomas. 


Rolvenden. 


Mildred, relict. A new grant in 
October. 


9 Aug. 


173 


Puechin, Thomas. 


Rolvenden. 


Anthony Wells of Benenden, yeo- 
man, creditor. 


27 Oct. 


177 


Rolfe, Augustus. 


Eynsford. 


John, brother. 


17 Nov. 


156 


Scott, Zaohariah. 


Halden, Dio. of 
Canterbury. 


Reginald May, next of kin, and 
creditor, for Margaret Scott, relict, 
and Reginald and Stephen Scott, 
sons, who renounce. 


31 May. 


159 


Smith, William. 


East Parley. 


Alice, relict. 


14 June. 


163 


Spencee, John. 


Ashe, Dio. of 
Rochester. 


Helen, relict. 


7 July. 


161 


Teeey, Mark.* 


Penshurst. 


Anne, daughter. 


27 June 


180 


Waeman, Thomas. 


Plomstead. 


Elizabeth Adams, sister's dau'r. 


22 Dec. 


151 


Waeben, Thomas. 


Hallen in 
Cuckston. 


Timothy, brother. 


3 Apr. 


174 


Wilkinson, Richard. 


Wateringbury. 


John, brother, for Bridget, relict, 
and William Wilkinson and AVil- 
loughby Wilkinson alias Shepard, 
children of deceased, who renounce. 


16 Oct. 


149 


Wood, Nicholas, clerk. 


All Saints in 
Hoo. 


Thomas, brother. 


24 Mar. 



KENTISH ADMINISTRATIONS, 100!), 1010, 1G11. 



Fol. Name (if deceased. 


Parish. 


To whom granted. 


Date. 


209 Baldwyn, Ralph. 


East Green- 


John Sherbournc ofOdiam; during 


12 Sept. 




wich. 


minority of Barbara, Elizabeth, 

Bridget, Milon,aiid Thomas Bald- 
wyn, children. 


1010. 

2!) June. 


100 Brasnell, Thomas. 


Greenwich. 


Margery, relict. 


187 Butcher, Henry. 


Penshurst. 


Mary, relict. 


8 Feb. 


185 Caedyn, Humphry. 


St. Thomas 
Harty. 


John, son. 


13 Feb. 


219 Chapman, Robert. 


Penshurst. 


Elizabeth Wells, sister. 


14 Nov. 


207 Christian, John. 


Leigh. 


Anne, relict. 


25 Aug. 


213 Fletcher, Phehe. 


Crayford. 


Nathaniel, brother. 


20 Oct. 


198 Gargrane, Christo- 


Chatham. 


Michael, father. 


9 June. 


pher. 








217 Gate, Stephen. 


Yalding. 


Catherine, relict. 


16 Nov. 


207 Gatford, Rose. 


North fleet. 


George, son. 


31 Aug. 


185 Gaylor, Thomas. 


Dartford. 


William, brother. 


22 Feb. 


199 Godfrey, Oliver. 


Wilmington. 


Edward, son. 


15 June. 


212 Hovenden, John. 


Cranbroke. 


Robert, father. 


11 Oct. 


217 Peare, Alice. 


Rochester. 


Margaret Cosen, sister. 


16 Nov. 


185 Pymble, Stephen. 


Tudley. 


Isaac Shelley of Tudley, yeoman; 
during minority of William Pym- 
ble, son. 


8 Feb. 


221 Rapkin, John. 


Etonbridge. 


Joan Heyward, sister. 


6 Dec. 


189 Reader, Margaret, 


Yalding. 


Helkiah, brother. 


30 Mar. 


widow. 








217 Rtjmney, Thomas. 


Otford. 


Anne, relict. 


16 Nov. 


187 Sabb, Thomas. 


Goudherst. 


Dorothy, relict. 


7 Feb. 


219 WiLSFORD,SirThomas, 


Kingston, Dio. 


Sir Thomas Wilsford, Kt., son. 


2-4 Nov. 


Knight. 


Rochester. 






187 Wilson, Edward. 


Feversham. 


Richard Castle of Davington in 
Kent, creditor. 


22 Feb. 

1611. 

18 Oct. 


33 Best, Alan. 


Horton Kirby. 


Francis Best, son. 


» 22 Brewer, Robert. 


Boxley. 


Thomas, son. A new grant in 1613. 


22 June 


1 Bulman, Anna, to. 


Penshurst. 


John, Sim. A new grant in 1633. 


21 Jan. 


28 Callis, Thomas. 


Rochester. 


Alice, relict. 


6 Aug. 


2 Cumbridge, John. 


Chiddingstone. 


Andrew, brother. 


25 Jan. 


18 Dryver, Thomas, b. 


Charthain. 


Samuel, brother. 


27 May. 


5 Edwards, William. 


St. Mary Hoo. 


Thomas, brother. 


18 Feb. 


5 Fathers, William. 


Tunbridge. 


Xp'ofer Plumley, sister's son. (For- 
mer grant 1607.) 


4 Feb. 


22 Franklin, Richard. 


Maideston. 


Mary, relict. 


13 June. 


39 Halfepenny, Ed- 


Dartford. 


Alice, relict. 


26 Nov. 


mund. 








87 Hall, Richard. 


Adington. 


Richard Hall of Stansted, father. 


7 Nov. 


29 Holmes, Richard. 


Greenwich. 


Anne, relict. 


21 Aug. 


1 Jeale, Richard, 


Wateringbury. 


Sara, relict. 


11 Jan. 


21 Knighte, Ursula, to. 


Sutton at Hone. 


John and Thomas, sons. 


4 June 


21 Marten, George. 


Wittersbam. 


Mercy, relict. 


1 June 


31 Moyse, Andrew. 


Yalding. 


Alice, relict. 


26 Sept. 



KENTISH ADMINISTRATIONS, 1611, 1612. 



Fol. Name of deceased. 


Parish. 


To whom granted. 


Date. 


5 Parsons, "William. 


Smarden. 


Alice, relict. 


11 Feb. 


1 Peomecke, Giles. 


Sandwich. 


James Wember of Sandwich ; during 
minority of Giles and John Pro- 
mecke, sons. 


15 Jan. 


25 Rockery, William. 


Feversham. 


Alice, relict. Probate of will of 
deceased to Alice 27 August last. 


1 July. 


26 Smithe, William. 


Plumstede. 


Humfry, son. 


31 July. 


28 Staple, Thomas. 


St. Mary Cray. 


Percival, son. 


6 Aug. 


19 Taylor, John. 


Strowde. 


Alice, relict. 


31 May. 


25 Younge, John. 


Raiuham. 


Jane, relict. 


17 July. 
1612. 


60 Adams, Henry. 


Gillingham. 


Margaret, relict. 


20 May. 


52 Allison, Robert. 


Hastingley. 


Elizabeth, relict. 


9 Mar. 


63 Ashdowne, John. 


Chiddingstone. 


Johan, relict. 


17 June. 


62 Aston, William. 


Patricksborne. 


Thomas Wetherall, creditor. 


5 May. 


73 Beecher, Henry. 


Chiddingstone. 


Joan, relict. 


10 Sept. 


49 Betts, John. 


Grayne. 


John Baker, kinsman. 


18 Feb. 


48 Blande, Thomas. 


Merworth. 


Xp'ofer, uncle. 


6 Feb. 


48 Bodyam, Richard. 


Marden. 


Stephen, brother. 


15 Feb. 


52 Bodyam, Richard. 


Marden. 


Martha, sister; Stephen, brother, 
being dead. 


5 Mar. 


73 Brent, Thomas. 


Willisborough. 


Anthony Deringe,knight,next of kin. 


12 Sept. 


64 Butcher, Nicholas. 


Penshurst. 


Anne, relict. 


26 J une. 


52 Cavell, John. 


Maidstone. 


Elizabeth, relict. 


12 Mar. 


53 Clerke, William. 


Wrotham. 


John, son. 


28 Mar. 


58 Clerke, Ralph. 


Milton next 
Gravesend. 


Margaret, relict. 


8 May. 


59 Colbecke, Philip. 


Debtford. 


Thomas Haile, sister's son. 


13 May. 


81 JDarcy, Sir Edward. 


Dartford. 


Sir Robert Darcy, son. 


G Nov. 


59 EATENDENa/iasTum- 


Dartford. 


John Eatenden alias Tumber, 


2 May. 


ber, John. 




brother. 




55 Edwards, Thomas. 


Ray n eh am. 


Mary, relict. 


1 Apr. 


49 Everest, Robert. 


Chiddingstone. 


Bennette, relict. 


20 Feb. 


70 Greene, Thomas. 


Debtford. 


Margaret, relict. 


12 Aug. 


50 Guldefoed, George. 


Hempsted. 


Henry Guldeford, Kt., next of kin. 


27 Feb. 


73 Howell, Mary. 


Gillingham. 


Eobert Ketle, brother ; during mi- 
nority of Elizabeth Howell, dau'r. 


7 Sept. 


47 Kinge, Arnold. 


Beckenham. 


Nicholas and William, sons. 


18 Jan. 


55 Kinge, Henry. 


Beckenham. 


Alice, relict. 


3 Apr. 


72 Lane, Thomas. 


Maidston. 


Anne, relict. 


4 Sept. 


76 Leaver, Richard, b. 


Staplehurst. 


Matthew Smith, next of kin. 


19 Oct. 


56 Lenthe, John. 


Pauls Cray. 


Anthony Lenthe, relict (sic). 


29 Apr. 


55 Myrian, John. 


Tudley. 


William, brother. 


9 Apr. 


52 Osborne, John. 


Hartlip. 


Edward, son ; Robert, brother, being 
deceased. 


19 Mar. 


52 Penny, Robert. 


Boxley. 


Alice, relict. 


7 Mar. 


76 Petty, Robert. 


Otford. 


Mary, relict. 


5 Oct. 


64 Phillipps, Thomas. 


Hayes. 


Ursula Burges alias Phillipps, dau'r. 


30 June 


48 Potter, Thomas. 


Westram. 


Dame Elizabeth Rivers, relict, and 
Dorothy Potter alias Rivers, dau'r. 


13 Feb. 


79 Potter, Ambrose. 


Stansted. 


Elizabeth Hurt alias Potter, next 
of kin ; Helen, relict, being dead. 


9 Nov. 


52 Pullinger, John. 


Strowde. 


Joseph Moise of Shorne. 


17 Mar. 


71 Pullinger, John. 


Halstow. 


Susan, relict. 


28 Aug. 


55 Seager, Thomas, b. 


Aylesford. 


Joan Hunt, sister. 


15 Apr, 



8 



KENTISH ADMINISTRATIONS, 1012, 1013, 1G14. 



Fol. 


Name of deceased. 


Parish. 


To whom granted. 


Date. 


C3 


SMITHS, Abraham. 


Gravesend. 


Laurence, brother; Ellen Smithe 
alias Gray, relict, not adminis- 
tering. 


13 June. 


60 


Tyndley, Anna. ( 
Tyndley, .Mildred. 1 


Maidston. 


Cornelius, brother. 


19 May. 


GO 


Tyndley, Mercy, w. 


Maideston. 


Cornelius, son. 


19 May. 


45 


Wellens, William. 


Houghton 
Aylofe. 


Margaret, relict. 


4 Jan. 


73 


Wise, Sarah. 


Hunton. 


Mary Dane, sister. 


30 Sept. 
1613. 


121 


Awger, Henry. 


Debt ford. 


Temperance, relict. 


27 Oct. 


121 


Blancke, Bernard. 


St. Margaret's, 
Rochester. 


Margaret, relict. 


30 Oct. 


91 


Bowhcher, Dame 
Frances. 


Sutton at 
Hone. 


John Pears of Warkley, Devon. 


6 Feb. 


110 


Boys, Edward. 


Birling. 


Thomas, brother. 


16 July. 


100 


Brewer, Robert. 


Boxley. 


Frances, relict; Thomas, son, re- 
nouncing. 


17 May. 


97 


Browne, John. 


Cliffe. 


Simon, brother. 


10 Apr. 


124 


Butler, John, b. 


Eltam. 


Alice, sister. 


6 Nov. 


117 


Collier, Henry. 


W rot ham. 


William, son. 


18 Sept. 


113 


Edwards, Henry. 


MerdeD. 


Walter, brother ; Gwenne, daughter, 
beintr a minor. 


14 Aug. 


98 


Halfpenny alias Ste- 
venson, Anna. 


Greenwich. 


John Halfpenny, father. 


26 Apr. 


100 


Hanson, Lancelot. 


Eltham. 


William Loe, sister's son. 


8 May. 


107 


Heyward, Peter. 


Cowden. 


Baruc Seale, creditor. 


22 June. 


120 


Lenthe, John. 


Pauls Cray. 


Harman Rikeman of All Saints, 
Thames Street, merchant; during 
minority of John, son of deceased. 


6 Oct. 


97 


Marten, Joan, to. 


Rye. 


Smalhope Bigge of Cranbrook, 
clothier (while Anne and Margaret, 
daughters, are minors.) 


22 Apr. 


128 


Meredith, William. 


Greenwich. 


Anne, relict. 


20 Nov. 


86 


Penros, John. 


Northfleet. 


Sara, daughter. 


9 Jan. 


124 


Pope, Andrew. 


Bromley. 


A mill, relict. 


18 Nov. 


113 


Rabbet, Thomas. 


Boughton, 
Monchelsea. 


Agnes, relict. 


16 Aug. 


89 


Senocke, George, b. 


Lamberherst. 


Alice Cheesman alias Senocke, sister. 


11 Feb. 


126 


Sherman, Edward. 


Bexley. 


Margaret, relict. 


24 Nov. 


120 


Staly, W r alter. 


Etonbridge. 


Joseph, son. 


6 Oct. 


117 


Thwaites, Anthony. 


Crayford. 


Jane, relict. 


28 Sept. 


124 


Wickendale, 
Arminal. 


Cowden. 


Bridget, sister. 


18 Nov. 
1614. 


151 


Aplebye, Thomas. 


St. Margaret's, 
Rochester. 


Anne, relict. 


25 June. 


155 


Barker, William. 


Debtford. 


Jane, relict. 


26 July. 


144 


Bathurst, Robert. 


Canterbury. 


Elizabeth, relict. 


18 Apr. 


154 


Beamont, Robert. 


Owre. 


Herbert Cadman of Northfleet ; 
Thomas, son, consenting. 


1 July. 


158 


Boughton, Richard. 


Plumsted. 


Anne, relict. 


18 July. 


135 


Cadwell, William. 


Halstowe. 


Roger Ancell of Hooe, while Edward, 
brother, is a minor. 


4 Feb. 


160 


Cheriden, John. 


Gillingham. 


Rebecca, relict. 


5 Aug. 


150 


Clegent, William. 


Gravesend, 


Peter, son. 


21 June. 



KENTISH ADMINISTRATIONS, 1014, 1615, 1G16. 



Pol. 


Name of deceased. 


Parish. 


To whom granted. 


Bate. 


156 


Clements, Christ'p'r. 


Beale. 


Elizabeth, relict. 


28 July. 


160 


Collison, George. 


< 'liatham. 


Agnes, relict. 


20 Aug. 


132 


Faierbrother, Joan, 


Chiddingstone. 


Thomas, son. 


7 Jan. 


137 


w. 

Horneblowe, Rich- 
ard. 

Kinge, Edward. 


Greenwich. 


Alexander Weller of Greenwich. 


24 Feb. 


151 


Crayford. 


Catherine, relict. 


18 June. 


172 


Ok well, George. 


Gillingham. 


Samuel Hey ward, creditor. See 1615. 


29 Nov. 


137 


Pcmfret, Thomas. 


Naplesteed. 


Sara Pumfret alias Cornell, sister. 


26 Feb. 


170 


Rhodes, Henry. 


Rochester. 


Sarah Binge, daughter. 


9 Nov. 


146 


Terry, Ralph. 


Gowdherst. 


Thomas, son. 


11 May. 


167 


Tucker alias Web, 
Walter, *. 


Kent. 


Agnes Tucker, mother of Agnes, 
Cecilie, Mary, Xtian, Judith, and 
John, children of Stephen Tucker 
alias Web, brother. 


1 Oct. 


166 


Turner, John. 


Cowden. 


Sara, relict. 


10 Oct. 


135 


Weston, John, b. 


Birling. 


Richard, brother. 


8 Feb. 


135 


Weston, Margaret. 


Greenwich. 


Susan Spence alias Weston, sister. 


10 Feb. 


141 


AVeston, Matthew. 


Ashford. 


Robert Newell, London, creditor. 


30 Mar. 
1615. 
5 Sept. 


34 


Bloome, Thomas. 


Greenwich. 


Catherine, relict. 


45 


Brymsted, Edward. 


Bebtford. 


Izan, relict. 


2 Bee. 


39 


Cripps, Thomas. 


North fleet. 


Thamar Greene alias Cripps, mother. 


2 Nov. 


32 


Benton, Sir Anthony. 


Tunbridge. 


Bame Elizabeth, relict. 


18 Sept. 


22 


Braper, Henry. 


Addington. 


Catherine, relict. 


20 June. 


9 


Fugate alias Cley- 
worth, Agnes, iv. 


Bebtford. 


John, brother's son. 


27 Mar. 


31 


Grombridge, Thomas. 


Speldhurst. 


Hellena, relict. 


12 Sept. 


1 


Grove, Matthew. 


Rochester. 


Catherine Cooke alias Grove, sister. 


14 Jan. 


20 


Hare, Robert. 


Brasted. 


Thomas, brother. 


13 June. 


22 


Holyerde, John. 


Bebtford. 


Andrew Hawes, London, creditor. 


28 June. 


32 


Lane, Richard. 


Rochester. 


Jane, relict. 


21 Sept. 


16 


Leveson, Sir John. 


Hallinge. 


Sir John Leveson, father. 


23 May. 


6 


Note, James. 


Maidston. 


John, brother. 


14 Jan. 


3 


Orwell, George. 


Gillingham. 


William Orwell, brother; earlier 
adm'on cancelled. 


31 Jan. 


8 


Phillips, Thomas. 


Eltham. 


Cecilia, sister. 


1 Mar. 


34 


Playford, George. 


Maideston. 


William, brother. 


6 Oct. 


20 


Rummynge, Alice. 


Barenthe. 


Thomas, son. 


14 June. 


14 


Sampson, Thomas. 


Eltham. 


Thomazine, relict. 


16 May. 


37 


Santacelia, Petron- 

ella. 
Scot, Thomas. 


Bexley. 


Thomas, son. 


17 Oct. 


8 


Sutton at 


George Scott of London, son ; 


3 Mar. 






Hone. 


Thomas and Nicholas, sons, not 
administering. (See 1587 and 
1590.) 




45 


Sherwood, John. 


Hawkherst. 


Petronella, relict. 


13 Bee. 


39 


SMALSHANKS,Edward, 

b. 
Smythe, Anthony. 


Gravesende. 


Bionisia Butcher, mother. 


8 Nov. 


31 


Snargate. 


Robert, son. 


9 Sept. 


8 


Thorne, Richard. 


Mereworth. 


John Howell of Wrotham, creditor. 


3 Mar. 


11 


Woodgate, John. 


Heaver. 


Susan, relict. 


17 Apr. 

1016. 
10 May. 


65 


Amyes, Thomas. 


Northfleet. 


Susan Cripps alias Amyes, relict. 


79 


Asplan, Humphry. 


Chatham. 


Lidia, relict. 


26 Aug. 


78 


Basden, John. 


Benenden. 


Walter, sou. 


9 Aug. 



10 



KENTISH ADMINISTRATIONS, 1G1C, 1017. 



Pol. 


Name of deceased. 


Parish. 


To whom granted. 


Date 


90 


Bubdett, Mary. 


Faldinge. 


Margaret Jorden, mother. 


5 Nov. 


83 


Bi bfobd, James. 


Lynton. 


Samuel, ron. 


26 Sept. 


70 


Casingall, Stephen. 


Lidging. 


Joan Dalton alias Casingall, dau'r, 


6 .1 mic. 


91 


DiCEEj Lord (Henry). 


Chevening. 


Richard, Lord Dacre, son. 


21 Nov. 


65 


FlSHCOCKB, Anne. 


Bobing. 


Jane Pishcocke alias Aoretey, mother. 


6 May. 


85 


PotJNTATNB, Hugh. 


Plumstede. 


Anne, relict. 


S Oct. 


70 


Hemnan, John. 


Murston. 


Joan Thurston alias Hemnan, sister ; 
adm'on of December 1615 revoked. 


26 June. 


91 


Heywarde, Biohard. 


Cudham. 


Mary, relict. 


27 Nov. 


84 


Homewood, Richard. 


\\ estram. 


Joan, relict. 


9 Sept. 


79 


Hovenden, John. 


Cranebrooke. 


William Hovenden, kinsman (ad- 
ministrator 1610 not having fully 
administered), while Robert, Rich- 
ard, John, and Mary, children, 
are minors. 


24 J uly. 


83 


Joyce, Robert. 


Maideston. 


Phillipps Joyce, brother. 


28 Sept. 


56 


Luce, John. 


Chatham. 


Elizabeth Jordane alias Luce, relict. 


13 Mar. 


90 


Man, Bartholomew. 


Rochester. 


John, son. 


11 Nov. 


65 


Moore, John. 


Bexley. 


Elizabeth, relict. 


3 May. 


58 


Mosse, John. 


Maidston. 


Mary Pilmer alias Mosse, daughter. 


29 Mar. 


86 


Pomfrey, Thomas. 


Debtford. 


Joan, relict. 


12 Oct. 


49 


Powell, Thomas. 


Milstead. 


John Veale, sister's son. 


22 June. 


79 


Rudston, John. 


Monks Horton. 


Anne Michell, widow ; sister (Wal- 
ter Rudston, consenting). 


26 Aug. 


91 


Skynner, Daniel. 


Wrotham. 


William, son. 


27 Nov. 


61 


Standen, George. 


Gowdherst. 


Sara, relict. 


7 Apr. 


82 


Stile, Bridget. 


Bromley. 


William, father. 


27 Sept. 


70 


Whitton, George, b. 


Gravesend. 


Bernard Pearson, husband of Anue, 
sister. 


11 June. 


59 


Wickinge, Francis. 


Cowden. 


Faith, relict. 


22 Mar. 


85 


Wiseman, Daniel, b. 


St. Mary in the 
Marsh. 


John, kinsman. 


15 Oct. 

1617. 

28 Sept. 


137 


Adgore, William. 


Darenth. 


Thomas and Prancis, brothers (while 








William and Bridget, children, are 










minors). 




141 


Ashdowne, John. 


Chiddingstone. 


John and Matthew, sons ; Joan, 
relict (see 1612), being dead. 


19 Nov. 


148 


Bell, Thomas. 


Raynebam. 


Elizabeth, relict. 


31 Dec. 


112 


Boote, John. 


Strowde. 


Thomas, brother. 


26 Apr. 


137 


Bryan, William. 


Gowtherst. 


Richard, brother. 


31 Oct. 


105 


Bynge, George. 


Wrotham. 


George, son. 


12 Feb. 


136 


Chowninge, Regi- 
nald. 


Debtford. 


Frances, relict. 


16 Oct. 


99 


Dorrell, Nicholas. 


Prendsbury. 


Joyce, relict. 


14 Jan. 


125 


Grove, Mary. 


Rochester. 


Anne Bulcher alias Grove, sister. 


7 July. 


108 


Harris, Elizabeth, w. 


Greenwich. 


John Hayward, son. 


18 Mar. 


121 


Kendall, Robert. 


Chatham. 


Susan, relict. 


23 June. 


118 


Larkyn, William. 


Gilliugham. 


Juliana, relict. 


9 May. 


136 


Mallet, John, b. 


Sittingborne. 


Thomas, brother. 


7 Oct. 


146 


Rootes, William. 


Tunbridge. 


Mary, relict. 


15 Dec. 


114 


Saxbie, Edmund. 


Brenchley. 


John, brother, while William, son, 
is a minor. 


8 May. 


120 


Scot, Reginald. 


Halden. 


John, paternal uncle. 


1 June. 


148 


Wood, John. 


Greenehive. 


Edward Chewe, nephew. 


30 Dec. 


114 


Younge, Peter, b. 


Gravesend. 


John, brother. 


5 May. 



KENTISH ADMINISTRATIONS, 1618, 1619. 



11 



Fol. 



Name of deceased. 




To whom granted. 



Date. 



206 Bayly, John. 

206 Blande, Mary, w. 
206 Brooke, James. 



200 Bruton, William.* 

175 Bvjrbidge, Thomas. 
(See 1620, Bus- 
bridge.) 

151 Clemence, William. 

188 Collet, William. 

159 Curde, John. 

175 Darcy, Sir Edward. 



161 Dixon, William, b. 

181 Ducke, Richard. 

168 Frenche, Robert. 

203 Gardiner, Richard. 



159 Garrett, Henry. 

210 Godfrey, William. 

206 Graves, James. 
175 Knowe, Roger. 
174 Maynard, Daniel. 
157 Parker, Thomas. 

207 Parrys, Peter. 
209 Patmore, Ralph. 

200 Peirson, Edward. 
151 Roche, John. 

156 Sherbrooke, John. 
206 Spracklinge, Joan. 
170 Stacy, Robert. 

151 Stanforde, George. 

201 Taylor, Richard. 

157 Warde, John. 



14 Averell, Thomas. 

26 Bachelor, Daniel. 
11 Baker, John. 

27 Britt, John. 

8 Brooke, James. 

(Grant 1618 not 
administered.) 

14 Browne, John. 



19 Chapman, Henry. 
39 Darcy alias Blower, 
Dame Mary. 



Gillingham. 

Sundriche. 
Spelhurst. 



Rochester. 
Bromley. 



Cranebroke. 
Greenwich. 
Tunbridge. 
Dartford. 



Tunbridge. 
Pembury. 
Seale. 
Dartford. 



Debtford. 

Seveuocke. 

Grenewich. 

Bexley. 

Speldhurst. 

Maidston. 

Mailing. 

Dartford. 

Greenwich. 

Gillingham. 

Gillingham. 

Canterbury. 

Westerham. 

Heaver. 

W. Mailing. 

Frendesbury. 

Ashe by 

Wrotham. 
Leigh. 
Chevenning. 
Westerham. 
Speldhurst. 



Cliffe. 



Westram. 
Tunbridge. 



Richard, brother, while Mary, 
daughter, is a minor. 

Edward Moody, sou. 

John, brother, while John, James, 
Thomas, Agnes, and Mary, chil- 
dren, are minors. See 1619. 

Margaret, relict. 

Stephen Batt of Bromley, while Eli- 
zabeth and Richard, children, are 
minors. 

John, brother. 

Sara, relict. 

Elizabeth, relict. 

Christopher, son ; Sir Robert Darcy, 
elder son, not having fully ad- 
ministered. See 1612. 

Humfrey, brother. 

Sara, relict. 

Agnes, relict. 

Joan Raynoldes, sister's daughter. 
Grant dated October 1618 not 
being fully administered. 

Elizabeth, relict. 

Elizabeth, relict. 

Richard Finch, creditor. 

Margaret, relict. 

Dorothy Coker alias Maynard, relict. 

Elizabeth, relict. 

Elizabeth, relict. 

Ellen, relict. 

Hester, relict. 

Isabella, relict. 

Jane, relict. 

Henry, father, and Sara, mother. 

Mary Wood alias Stacy, sister. 

John, brother. 

Anne, relict. 

Elizabeth, relict. 

Dorothy, relict. 

William, brother. 

Anne, relict. 

Anne, relict. 

Robert Berry of Staplehurst and 
Ellen Brooke, mother, while John, 
James, Thomas, Mary, and Agnes, 
children, are minors. 

Sara, relict of Simon Browne, brother, 
while John, Simon, Edward, and 
Elizabeth, children of Simon, are 
minors. 

Joan, relict. 

Mary Dixon alias B'ower, daughter. 



1618. 


27 Nov. 


27 Nov. 


18 Nov. 


2 Oct. 


13 June 


17 Jan. 


28 Sept. 
27 Feb . 


17 June. 


4 Mar. 


24 July. 
4 May. 
28 Oct. 


21 Feb. 


9 Dec. 


26 Nov. 


11 June 


9 June 


12 Feb. 


23 Nov. 


8 Dec. 


7 Oct. 


14 Jan. 


16 Feb. 


25 Nov. 


26 May. 

20 Jan. 


21 Oct. 


21 Feb. 


1619. 


21 Apr. 


22 June 


18 Mar. 


8 July. 
11 Feb. 



16 Apr. 



19 May. 

28 Oct. 



12 



KENTISH ADMINISTRATIONS, 1019, 1G20, 1621. 



Fol. 


Name of deceased. 


Parish. 


To whom granted. 


Date. 


39 


DAI i:, William. 


Cowdham. 


Alice, relict. 


21 Oot. 


7 


Hacks, Christ'r, h. 


Wollwich. 


Michael Tate, kinsman. 


28 Peb. 


26 


Hovenden, John. 
(Adm'on of 1616 

revoked.) 


Cranebrooke. 


Thomas, brother, while Robert, Rich- 
ard, John, and Mary, children, 
are minors. 


19 June. 


3 


Hawkins, John. 


Chiddingatone. 


Agnes, relict. 


26 Jan. 


30 


Keble, Soloman, l>. 


Il.idloe. 


Henry, brother. 


4 Aug. 


42 


Mediu'kst, Reginald. 


Eatonbridge. 


Alice, relict. 


3 Nov. 


43 


Mennes, Frances. 


Gillingham. 


Matthew, brother. 


11 Nov. 


2 


Phillips, Roger. 


Chatham. 


Joan, relict. 


19 Jan. 


28 


Rice, Richard,* b. 


Debtford. 


David, brother. 


28 Sept. 


49 


Ridge, Rolaud. 


Erith. 


Henry Fludd, London, creditor. 


31 Dec. 


24 


Say, Jane. 


Hadlowe. 


Anne White alias Say, mother. 


22 June. 


3 


Sheffeilde, Ursula, 
w. 


Gillingham. 


Lydia Lupo and Abigail Comey, 
daughters. 


22 Jan. 


47 


Starland, Marianne, 


Gillingham. 


W r illiam, son. 


8 Dec. 


43 


w. 
Terry, Samuel. 


Sevenocke. 


John Sole of Retherhead in Seven- 
ocke. 


17 Nov. 


8 


Tubman, Thomas. 


Eastchurch. 


Robert Haynes, Rochester, creditor. 


9 Feb. 


14 


Waggon alias Wag- 
horne, Edward. 


Hawkhurst. 


Joan Waggon alias W T aghome. 


21 Apr. 


19 


Walsingham, Nicho- 
las. 


High Hal- 

stowe. 


Elizabeth, relict. 


22 May. 


34 


Wardeger, Thomas. 


Rochester. 


George, son. 


25 Sept. 


14 


Wells, Walter. 


Chiddingstone. 


Silvester, relict. 


24 Apr. 


39 


W r iCKiNGE, Thomas. 


Cowden. 


Mary, relict. 


29 Oct. 


2 


W^oodgate, Thomas. 


Hadloe. 


Alice, relict. 


5 Jan. 
1620. 
5 Oct. 


87 


Borne, James. 


Sandhurst. 


Robert, brother, while James, Tho- 








mas, Henry, William, Edward, 










and Faintnot, children, are minors. 




63 


Bryan, Terrell. 


E. Greenwich. 


Judith, relict. 


24 Apr. 


77 


Busbridge, Thomas. 
(Adm'on 1618 re- 
voked.) 


Bromley. 


Elizabeth Busbridge alias Petley, 
daughter. 


8 July. 


54 


Gotely, Lawrence. 


Wye. 


Thomas, next of kin. 


9 Feb. 


51 


Greengrass, Giles. 


Hartey. 


Francis, brother. 


9 Jan. 


54 


Hawes, Robert. 


Sittingborne. 


Agnes, relict. 


Feb. 


83 


Little, William.* 


Debtford. 


John Beale, kinsman. 


8 Sept. 


94 


Milner, Olive. 


Wye. 


Anne Lovell alias Milner, mother. 


14 Nov. 


70 


Paramor, Henry. 


St. Nicholas, 
Tbanet. 


Thomas, son. 


12 May. 


56 


Peckham, Reginald. 


Wrotham. 


Margaret, relict. 


4 Feb. 


76 


Philpot alias Cob, 
Anne. 


Wittersham. 


Arthur Bachelor, sister's son. 


6 July. 


100 


Savage, Thomas. 


Crayforde. 


Anne, relict. 


10 Dec. 


61 


Shore alias Godfrey, 
Anne. 


Greyne. 


Thomas Shork, husband. 


30 Mar. 


76 


Taylor, Richard. 


W. Mailing. 


John, brother ; Anne, relict, having 
died October 1618. 


1 July. 


G3 


Walker, Richard. 


E. Greenwich. 
Strowde. 


Alice, relict. 

Margaret Morlande alias Atwood, 


12 Apr. 
1621. 
9 July. 


133 


Atwood, Anthony. 








mother. 




117 


Ball, Eleanor. 


Maidstone. 


John, husband. 


23 Apr. 



KENTISH ADMINISTRATIONS, 1621, 1022. 



13 



Fol. 


Name of deceased. 


Parish. 


To whom granted. 


Date. 


125 


Benet, Agnes. 


High Halstow. 


Nicholas, paternal uncle of Thomas 
and Edward Benet, children ; 
during their minority. 


1 June. 


136 


Bowrey, John. 


Debtford. 


Simon, brother. 


22 Aug. 


133 


Cranewell, alias 
Brice, Martha. 


Shorne. 


Edward Cranewell, brother's son. 


6 July. 


134 


Curtis, Edward. 


Tenterden. 


Nathaniel, brother. 


29 Aug. 


142 


Iden, Richard. 


Maidstone. 


Dorothy, relict. 


5 Oct. 


146 


Mercer, Robert. 


Chatham. 


John Castle, father of John and 
Richard Castle, half-brothers of 
deceased ; during their minority. 


12 Nov. 


146 


Nodes, John. 


Frendesbury. 


Mary, relict. 


20 Nov. 


102 


Pyle, John. 


Debtford. 


Alice, relict. 


12 Jan. 


140 


Pope, Laurence. 


Sandwich. 


Elizabeth, relict. 


9 Oct. 


145 


Price, Edward. 


Debtford. 


Joan, relict. 


2 Nov. 


145 


Reade, William. 


Canterbury. 


Thomas Heneage, maternal uncle of 
John, Robert, William, and Anne 
Reade, children ; during their 
minority. 


9 Nov. 


134 


Sadler, Nicholas. 


Debtford. 


Elizabeth, relict. 


29 Aug. 


141 


Scotchford, Thomas. 


Brenchley. 


William Hunt, Thomas Botting, and 
John Saxbie, sons-in-law. 


18 Oct. 


113 


Sheparde, Robert. 


Mere worth. 


Martin, son. 


6 Mar. 


103 


Tyler, Ambrose. 


Wrotham. 


Anne, relict. 


26 Jan. 


108 


Tyndall, John. 


Rochester. 


Elizabeth, relict. 


16 Feb. 
1622. 


161 


Adams, Margaret, w. 


Gillingham. 


John, son. 


5 Feb. 


189 


Albrooke, Richard. 


Woolwich. 


Jane Albrooke. 


29 July. 


161 


Austen, Margaret, w. 


Stone. 


John Robins, creditor. 


1 Feb. 


200 


Bourne, Stephen. 


Brasteed. 


Dorothy. 


8 Oct. 


206 


Brewer, Frances. 


Boxley. 


John, son. 


23 Nov. 


206 


Burridge, Robert. 


Marden. 


Catherine, relict. 


31 Nov. 


201 


Chambers, Thomas. 


Lewsham. 


Thomas, son. 


16 Oct. 


170 


Clapshawe, John, b. 


Canterbury. 


Nicholas Ashenden, creditor. 


2 Apr. 


180 


Crud, Anthony. 


Tunbridge. 


John, brother. 


14 June. 


156 


Goodinge, Stephen. 


Gravesend. 


John Rowe, creditor. 


23 Jan. 


194 


Goodson, Thomas. 


Northfleet. 


Margaret, relict. 


27 Aug. 


193 


Harvey, John.* 


Sandwich. 


Christopher Whitlawe, creditor ; 
Bennet, relict, renouncing. 


6 July. 


207 


Hedley, Robert. 


Cowden. 


Matthew Comber of Lynfield, 
maternal uncle of Elizabeth and 
Margaret Hedley, daughters ; 
during their minority. 


26 Nov. 


170 


Jordaine, William. 


Seale. 


Edmund Franche, husband of Doro- 
thy, daughter. 


6 Apr. 


211 


Jackson, Nicholas. 


Greenwich. 


Alice Jackson, relict. 


5 Dec. 


200 


Leech, Thomas. 


Newnden. 


Samuel, brother. 


10 Oct. 


180 


Master, Robert. 


New Romney. 


Selwyn Fray, creditor. 


4 June. 


188 


Norden, John. 


Chatham. 


Edward, brother. 


22 July. 


184 


Record, Abraham. 


Teston. 


John Pipe, creditor. 


4 June. 


156 


Spriver, Rosomond, 

IV. 


Chatham. 


Benedicts Spriver alias Browne, 
daughter. 


24 Jan. 


175 


Wickenden, Tho- 
mas. 


Heaver. 


John, kinsman, while Thomas, Wil- 
liam, Lucretia, and Margaret, 
children, are minors. 


29 May. 


181 


Worrall, Melchior.* 


Greenwich. 


Joan, relict. 


21 June. 



14 



KENTISH ADMINISTRATIONS, 1G22, 1G23, 1624 



Pol. 


Name of deceased. 


Parish. 


To whom granted. 


Date. 


156 


Younoe, Bartholo- 


Aslmrst. 


Rebecca, relict. 


17 .l.in. 




mew, 


Tiinbridge. 


Mary, relict. 


1623. 


2 


AyNSCOMBE, William. 


9 Jan. 


15 


Bartholomew, Tho- 


Chatham. 


Joan, relict. 


21 Mar. 


41 


mas. 

Beache, Richard. 


Milton by 
Gravesend. 


Susan Dowuislie alias Beache. 


8 Aug. 


35 


Brace, Riohard. 


Debtibrd. 


Ellen, relict. 


9 July. 


67 


Bkookkr, Alexander. 


Downe. 


Catherine Levet alias Brooker, sister. 


10 Dec. 


58 


Caswell, John. 


E. Greenwich. 


Catherine, daughter. 


6 Nov. 


29 


Gates, Thomas.* 


Ealden. 


Thomas, son. 


13 June. 


63 


Gunne, Peter. 


Lamberhurst. 


William Barham, creditor. 


15 Nov. 


43 


Kampsheise, Nicho- 


Greenwich. 


Frances, relict. 


29 Aug. 


67 


las. 
Hake, Oliver. 


Debtford. 


Alice, relict. 


15 Dec. 


53 


Holmden, Sarah. 


Tunbridge. 


Jane Jones alias Holmden, sister. 


28 Oct. 


2 


James, Daniel, b. 


Lid. 


Richard, brother. 


10 Jan. 


67 


Jenkins, Michael. 


Tunbridge. 


Frances, relict. 


31 Dec. 


8 


Luttenden, Henry. 


Heaver. 


Anne, relict. 


17 Feb. 


31 


Manynge, Bartholo- 


Downe. 


Mary, relict. 


28 June. 


13 


mew. 
Osborne, Edward. 


Stockbury. 


John, son. 


31 Mar. 


13 


Puleston, Roger. 


Cheveniug. 


Leonard, son. 


26 Mar. 


21 


Searle, John. 


Hastiugley. 


Lucretia, relict. 


12 May. 


28 


Shortred, Richard. 


Peushurst. 


Frances, relict. 


5 June. 


50 


Stanlake, Hum- 
phrey. 


London and 
Canterbury. 


Ralph, brother. 


9 Sept. 


44 


Tusten, Elizabeth. 


Gillingham. 


Thomas Dixon, brother. 


18 Aug. 


59 


Weller, John. 


Chelsfeld. 


James Style, maternal uncle of 
George, John, Mary, and Joan, 
children ; during their minority. 


8 Nov. 


36 


Yardlye, John. 


Greenwich. 
Greenwich. 


Margery, relict. 
Mary, relict. 


14 July. 
1624. 


90 


Andrews, John. 


19 Apr. 


89 


Berry, William. 


St. Pancras, 

Canterbury. 
Gravesende. 


Thomas, brother. 


27 Apr. 


70 


Cutter, William. 


Christopher Gooday, maternal uncle 


9 Jan. 








to Francis, William, and Mary, 










children ; during their minority. 




103 


Dyer, Richard. 


Eltham. 


Anne, relict. 


6 July. 


101 


Edenden, Humphry, 

b. 
Fuller, Meriell. 


Meopham. 


Francis, brother. 


2 June. 


109 


Sevenocke. 


Dorothy Pett, mother. 


27 Aug. 


119 


Grent, John. 


Debtford. 


William, son. 


8 Oct. 


101 


Haynes, Robert. 


Rochester. 


Elizabeth, relict. 


29 June. 


132 


Heath, Richard. 


St. Pancras. 
Canterbury. 


Jane, relict. 


8 Dec. 


112 


Hickman, Dorothy, 
w. 


Dartford. 


Judith Webbe alias Hickman, 
daughter. 


4 Sept. 


71 


Hukeley, Thomas. 


Debtford. 


Peter, brother. 


22 Jan. 


70 


Jenkins, Michael 
(Frances, relict, re- 
nounc s). 


Tunbridge. 


Adam Wilson, S.T.P., maternal 
uncle to Adam and Frances, chil- 
dren ; during their minority. 


8 Jan. 


101 


Man, Edward, b. 


Died abroad. 


Isabella Man, mother. 


30 June. 


121 


Oliver, Edward. 


Sevenocke. 


Jane Miller alias Oliver, sister. 


23 Oct. 



KENTISH ADMINISTRATIONS, 1624, 1G25. 



15 



Fol. 


Name of deceased. 


Parish. 


To whom granted. 


Date. 


lir, 


Pope, Sir William. 


Halsted. 


Dame Elizabeth, relict. 


21 Sept. 


121 


.Roberts, John. 


All Saints, 

Hoo. 
Lewsham. 


Elizabeth, relict. 


12 Oct. 


72 


Simonds, Bendin. 


Joan, relict. 


17 Jan. 


88 


Smith, Humphry 
(revoked in June). 


Plumsted. 


Edward Smith of Stratford ; during 
minority of Anne Smith, brother's 
child. 


20 Apr. 


102 


Smith, Humphry. 


Plumsted. 


Walter Price of Lambeth ; during 
minority of Agnes Price alias 
Smith, niece of deceased. 


2 June. 


115 


Stone, Michael. 


Chiselhurst. 


Elizabeth, relict. 


3 Sept. 


126 


Thomas, Richard. 


Chevening. 


Christopher, brother. 


25 Nov. 


108 


Walter, Richard. 


Sevenocke. 


Abigail, relict. 


6 Aug. 


86 


AVhite, John. 


St. Andrew's, 
Canterbury. 


Thomas Carter, creditor. 


7 Apr. 


135 


Wiietenhall, Fran- 
cis. 


E. Peckham. 


Thomas, brother. 


17 Dec. 

1625. 
12 Dec. 


37 


Andrews, Elizaheth. 


St. Margaret's, 


James Bereblock, nephew (nepos). 






Rochester. 






143 


Barghave, John. 


Patricksborn. 


Bernard Cliffe, creditor ; Jane, relict, 
and Robert, son, renouncing. 


11 Feb. 


165 


Billinge, Joseph. 


Dover. 


Humphry Clarke, creditor. 


25 May. 


143 


Bishop, Robert. 


Capell by Tun- 
bridge. 


Margaret, relict. 


3 Feb. 


23 


Booker, Elizabeth. 


Debtford. 


Margaret Booker alias Darling, 
sister. 


24 Oct 


23 


Booker, Mary. 


Debtford. 


Margaret Booker alias Darling, 
sister. 


24 Oct. 


23 


Davis, George. 


Woolwich. 


Cover, relict. 


29 Oct. 


27 


Edolph, Mary. 


Shorne. 


Priscilla Parker, sister. 


10 Nov. 


23 


Ellis, Samuel, b. 


St. Mary Cray. 


Robert, brother. 


25 Oct. 


29 


Eltonhead, Nicho- 
las. 
Flent, Edward, b. 


Woolwich. 


William, brother. 


26 Nov. 


41 


Milton next 


Robert, father. 


19 Dec. 






Gravesend. 






175 


Foster, Margaret. 


Burling. 


Mary Nightingale alias Foster, 
sister. 


7 July. 


170 


Godfrey, William. 


Grayne. 


Susan, relict. 


20 June 


22 


Hancrett, John. 


Chatham. 


Thomas Robins and Mary his wife, 
daughter. 


14 Oct. 


162 


Harlinge, Richard. 


Eatonbridge. 


Anne, relict. 


19 May. 


147 


Kinge, John. 


Yalding. 


Mary, relict. 


7 Feb. 


29 


Kinge, Robert. 


Rochester. 


Jane, relict. 


21 Nov. 


3 


Lanier, Innocent. 


Greenwich. 


Clement, brother. 


12 Aug. 


151 


Light, William. 


Northfleet. 


Mary, relict. 


19 Mar. 


143 


London, Richard. 


Chatham. 


John London, son ; earlier adminis- 
tration ceasing. 


5 Feb. 


151 


Marten, Thomas. 


Wilm} r ngton. 


Judith Cadman, mother. 


3 Mar. 


162 


Matson, Christopher. 


Debtford. 


Lydia, relict. 


17 May. 


177 


Newington, Thomas. 


Farningham. 


John, brother. 


18 July. 


161 


Page, Sir William. 


Shorne. 


Dame Ellianor, relict. 


12 May. 


175 


Phillips, Henry. 


Eltham. 


Jane Riggs alias Page, sister. 


7 July. 


13 


Phillipson, John. 


Eitham. 


Margaret, relict. 


20 Sept. 


152 


Pocock, John. 


Sevenocke. 


Joan, relict. 


28 Mar. 


37 


Pond, William. 


Rochester. 


Robert, brother. 


27 Dec. 



1G 



KENTISH ADMINISTRATIONS, 1025, 102G. 



Fol. 


Name of deceased. 


Parish. 


To whom granted. 


Date. 




[Petlie, Edward. 


Wandsworth, 
Surrey. 


Elizabeth, relict. 


16 Feb.] 


28 


Rogers, Anne. 


St. Mary 
Craye. 


Sir Thomas Farnefold and Dame 
Dorothy his wife, daughter. 


9 Nov. 


19 


Rundell, Edward. 


Northfleet. 


Nicholas Gricesen, creditor; Eli- 
zabeth Browne alias Rundell re- 
nouncing. 


10 Oct. 


147 


SaCET, Thomas.* 


Greenwich. 


Thomas, father. 


21 Feb. 


148 


Tharpe, Richard. 


Lamberhurst. 


Margery Tharpe, relict. 


20 Feb. 


27 


Tyse alias Rutton, 

Isaac. 
Vowe, George. 


Uigham. 


Mary, relict. 


10 Nov. 


37 


Detford. 


Joan, relict. 


16 Dec. 


176 


Walton, Henry. 


Bromley. 


Samuel, son. 


21 July. 


29 


Wombewell, Samp- 


Northfleet. 


Winifred, relict. 


29 Nov. 


151 


son. 
Wood, George. 


Eynsford. 


Elizabeth, relict. 


23 Mar. 

1626. 
27 June. 


87 


Barnesley, John. 


Gravesend. 


Dorothy, relict. 


103 


Brocke, Edward, b. 


Erith. 


Elizabeth White, sister's daughter. 


26 Sept. 


121 


Brown, John. (See 
1613 and 1619.) 


Cliffe. 


John Brown, brother's son. 


10 Nov. 


71 


Browne, Marian. 


Horton Kerby. 


Nicholas Graunt, creditor. 


17 Apr. 


97 


Browne, William, b. 


St. Mary Cray. 


Mary Clarke alias Browne, sister. 


5 .] uly. 


87 


Bullock, Thomas. 


Rochester. 


Martha Walter alias Bullock, sister. 


26 June. 


49 


Butcher, George.* 


Chatham. 


John Bayly, husband of Priseilla 
Bayly alias Hodierne, daughter 
of William Hodierne, Master 
(Magister) of deceased. 


21 Jan. 


59 


Cakebread, Thomas. 


Rochester. 


Mary, relict. 


27 Feb. 


78 


Carrier, Emma, w. 


Orpington. 


Valentine, son. 


15 May. 


49 


Cosen, Henry. 


Chatham. 


Edmund Beecher and his wife Joan, 
daughter. 


21 Jan. 


116 


Denton, Francis. 


Becknam. 


Susan, relict. 


15 Nov. 


71 


Duppa, John, b. 


Greenwich. 


Herbert Croft, sister's son. 


26 Apr. 


116 


Fairebbother, Tho- 


Eatonbridge. 


Anne, relict. 


17 Nov. 


78 


mas. 
Feilder, Henry. 


St. Margaret's, 
Rochester. 


Alice, relict. 


23 May. 


99 


Fitchett, Elizabeth. 


Bexley. 


William, brother. 


22 Aug. 


59 


Fludd, Bridget, to. 


Moreclake in 
Kent (sic). 


Anne Cotton alias Bolny, daughter. 


9 Feb. 


48 


Giles, German. 


Gillingham. 


Elizabeth Giles alias Goddyn, 
daughter. 


13 Jan. 


75 


Griefin, John* 


Debtford. 


Frances, relict. 


8 Mar. 


59 


Haggett alias Cray- 
ford, Dame Anne. 


Rochester. 


Sir Robert Crayford, husband. 


15 Feb. 


87 


Harris, Edward. 


Strowde. 


Catherine Pepper and Grace Hem- 
inge, sisters' children. 


9 June. 


47 


Haviland, Bartholo- 


Rochester. 


Robert, paternal uncle. 


24 Jan. 


59 


Hodsall, John, b. 


Itgham. 


Thomas, father. 


10 Feb. 


105 


Jones, Richard. 


Dover. 


John Collins, creditor. 


13 Sept. 


87 


Kinge, Henry. 


Cowden. 


Joan, relict. 


22 June. 


59 


Longstone, Thomas. 


Lewshani. 


Robert Jenner, son-in-law (Anna, 
relict, renouncing). 


10 Feb. 


59 


Leadbeter, Emanuel. 


Debtford. 


Mary, relict. 


14 Feb. 



KENTISH ADMINISTRATIONS, 1626, 1027. 



J7 



Fol. 


Name of deceased. 


Parish. 


To whom granted. 


Date. 


71 


Marten, Richard. 


Tonbridge. 


Judith, daughter. 


25 Apr. 


125 


Monox, Thomas. 


Rochester. 


Elizabeth [of Bully Hill], relict. 


20 Dec. 


49 


Newington, Thomas. 


Farningham. 


Thomas, son. 


27 Jan. 


58 


Payne, William. 


Bexley. 


Jane [of Welling], relict. 


1 Feb. 


87 


Pigeon, John. 


Debtford. 


Elizabeth, relict. 


8 June. 


78 


Pike, Edmund. 


Farnborowe. 


Martha, relict. 


10 May. 


95 


Reynes, Thomas. 


Aylesford. 


John Wood, creditor. 


10 July. 


61 


Sampson, William. 


Lewsham. 


Susan, relict. 


8 Feb. 


69 


SCANDRETT, TllOS., b. 


Greenwich. 


Stephen, brother's son. 


3 Apr. 


58 


Swan, Thomas. 


Hartley. 


Stephen Swan, father ; during 
minority of Edward and Hester, 
children. 


3 Feb. 


103 


Symes, Richard. 


Wolich. 


Hunting More, creditor. (Adminis- 
tration lapsed in November.) 


20 Sept. 


114 


Symmes, Richard. 


Woolwich. 


Richard, son. 


3 Nov. 


59 


Waller, William. 


Nockholt. 


William, son. 


8 Feb. 


65 


Williams, Thomas. 


Greenwich.* 


Margaret, relict. 


1 Afar. 


77 


Williams, Robert 
(Cecilia, relict, re- 
nounces). 


Eltham. 


Richard Batt, Eltham ; during 
minority of Robert and Anne, 
children. 


9 May. 


78 


Withers, Richard, b. 


Plumsted. 


William, father. 


2 May. 


61 


Wriothesley, Hen- 
ry- 


St. Margaret's, 
Rochester. 


Anne, relict. 


6 Feb. 
1627. 






165 


Archur, Thomas. 


Stroode. 


Lucy, relict. 


23 Aug. 


133 


A Streate, Richard. 


Gillingham. 


Sara Baylie alias A Streate, daiii<ht;>r. 


8 Feb. 


159 


Barker, Francis. 


Footscray. 


Elizabeth, relict. 


22 June. 


142 


Betts, Francis. 


Swanscoinbe. 


Jane Betts, relict. 


18 Apr. 


170 


Betts, William. 


Wouldham. 


Ellen, relict. 


28 Sept. 


148 


Bishopp, John. 


Stoke. 


Magdalen, relict. 


1 Mav. 


143 


Boys, Richard. 


Dover. 


Margaret, relict. 


18 Apr. 


158 


Brett, Thomas. 


Chidd ingstone. 


Edward Lant, kinsman. 


11 June. 


140 


Bromidge, Thomas. 


Swanscomb. 


Dorothy, relict. 


27 Mar. 


176 


Cleapoole, Eliz. 


Debtford. 


William, husband. 


20 Nov. 


184 


Corey, John. 


Eltham. 


Elizabeth, relict. 


21 Dec. 


177 


Dryland, John, arm. 


Wye. 


John Best, kinsman. 


26 Nov. 


175 


Freezer, Ingram. 


Eltham. 


Alice, daughter. 


30 Oct. 


135 


Gaunt, George (died 


St. Peter, Can- 


Nicholas, brother; Maria Carlett, 


21 Feb 




in London). 


terbury. 


sister, not adiiiinisteiang. 




128 


Godden, James. 


Burrham. 


Francis Cacott, creditor ; Susan, 
relict, renouncing. 


27 Jan. 


165 


Hare, William. 


l'lumstei. 


Grace Griffin alias Hare, relict. 


25 Au,'. 


161 


Iken, Anne. 


Swanscouibe. 


James, husband. 


10 Julv. 


158 


Monox, Roger. 


Rochester. 


Edward [of Bully Hill], son. 


13 Jim ■. 


138 


Newenden, Hugh. 


Headcorne. 


Alice Swan alias Newenden, mother 
of Hugh Newenden (a minor), 
nephew. 


30 Mar. 


177 


Newton, Robert. 


Charlton. 


James, brother. 


20 Nov. 


175 


Parker, John. 


Cliffe. 


Susan, relict. 


3 Oct. 


148 


Parker, Margaret. 


Frindsbury. 


Joan Clinte alias Parker, sister. 


21 May. 


158 


Raynes, Thomas. 


Aylisford. 


Thomas, sou ; John Wood, adminis- 
trator, being dead. 


22 June 


143 


Sea, William. 


Heme, Roches- 
ter Diocese. 


Thomas Kibbett, creditor. 


24 Apr. 


172 


Stacey, Robert. 


Maids ton. 


Lucy Joy alias Stacy, daughter. 


3 Oct. 


141 


Stile, Humphry. 


West ram. 


Elizabeth, relict. 


■A Apr. 



VOL. XX. 



18 



KENTISH ADMINISTRATIONS, 1G27, 1628. 



Fol. 


Name of deceased. 


Parish. 


To whom granted. 


Date. 


174 


Stone, Christopher. 


\V. Peokham. 


Debora, relict. 


1 Oct. 


177 


Tibbott, Robert, b. 


Urasted. 


Dionisia, mother. 


22 Nov. 


181 


Tompson, Michael. 


Chatham.* 


Anne, relict. 


15 Dec. 


148 


Trice, Walter. 


Sadlowe. 


Dorothy Pawley alias Trice, dau'r. 


1 May. 


165 


Wakd, William. 


Chatham. 


Elizabeth, relict. 


2 Aug. 


133 


Warson, Thomas. 


( 'hatham. 


Elizabeth, relict. 


5 Feb. 


161 


Wiiitton, Heury. 


Lamberhurst. 


Francis, brother. 


18 July. 

1628. 

29 Apr. 


19 


Beeching, Thomas. 


E. Mailing. 


Mary, relict. 


15 


BeEEj Edward. 


Dart ford. 


John Twiselton. 


28 Mar. 


17 


Bishop, Anna, to. 


Tunbridge. 


William, son. 


9 Apr. 


63 


Hkitt, Thomas. 


E. Mailing. 


Joan, relict. 


9 Dec. 


25 


Clarke, Martin. 


Rochester. 


Robert Rolles, creditor. 


23 May. 


19 


Clunn, Thomas. 


Chatham. 


Rebecca, relict. 


29 Apr. 


7 


Bat, Alice. 


Dartford, 


John, brother. 


1 Feb. 


7 


Dixon, John. 


Tunbridge. 


Humphrey, brother. 


9 Feb. 


17 


Denne, John. 


Sutton, Canter- 
bury Dio. 


Thomas Denne, brother. 


9 Apr. 


10 


Downe, David. 


Northfleete. 


John, brother. 


28 Feb. 


29 


Dyer, Walter. 


Chatham. 


Sara, relict. 


4 June 


22 


Ever en den, Mary, sp. 


Meopham. 


Elizabeth, sister. 


1 May. 


17 


Feider, Susanna, sp. 


Deptford. 


George, brother. 


3 Apr. 


18 


Girdler, Eichard, b. 


Biddenden. 


Samuel Wood, creditor. 


18 Apr. 


47 


Gleydell, Reginald. 


Greenwich. 


William Goldwell, creditor ; Judith, 
relict, renouncing. 


20 Sept. 


40 


Gurley, John. (See 
adm'on 1603.) 


Leigh. 


John Fordell, lately husband of Eli- 
zabeth, relict and administratrix. 


25 July. 


21 


Harbt/r, William. 


Dartford. 


Elizabeth, relict. 


12 Apr. 


54 


Marcy, Thomas. 


Frindsbury. 


John Reynolds, creditor. 


12 Nov. 


13 


May, Walter, b. 


Brenchley. 


Thomas, brother. 


9 Mar. 


4 


Pope, George. 


All St 9 , Hoo. 


Elizabeth, relict. 


25 Jan. 


38 


Prior, John. 


Marden. 


Richard Maplesden, creditor ; during 
minority of Joan and Mary, chil- 
dren. 


3 July. 


47 


Shepard, Thomas. 


Sheppey. 


Saunders Shepard, brother ; during 
minority of Anne, Dorothy, and 
Thomas, children. 


25 Sept. 


48 


Shorte, Margaret. 


Gillingham. 


John Shorte, son. 


20 Sept. 


10 


Stace, Esaias, I. 


Sandwich* 


W r alter, brother. 


25 Feb. 


21 


Streete alias A 
Streete, Richard. 


Gillingham. 


Mary Baker alias A Streete, sister. 


21 Apr. 


8 


SWARLAND, John 


Horton Kirby. 


John, son. 


13 Feb. 


10 


(vicar). 
Thornehurst, Sir 
Geoff ry. 


Allington 
Castle. 


Dame Susan, relict. 


28 Feb. 


50 


Trott alias Gibbons, 
Elizabeth. 


Teston. 


Robert Trot, husband. 


17 Oct. 


8 


Wiborne, William. 


Chatham. 


Richard Holborne, kinsman of Ben- 
jamin, William, Elizabeth, and 
Jane, children, during their 
minority. 


8 Feb. 


8 


Widger, William, b. 


Milton by 
Gravesend. 


Joan Widger alias Coule, sister. 


7 Feb. 


47 


W r ooD, Robert, b. 


Tenterden. 


Richard, brother. 


26 Sept. 



KENTISH ADMINISTRATIONS, 1629. 



10 



Fol. Name of deceased. 


Parish. 


To whom granted. 


Date. 








1629. 


93 Baynes, John. 


St. Pancras 
and Ch. Ch., 
Canterbury. 


Mary, relict. 


9 May. 


99 Blincoe, Mary, sp. 


Maidstone. 


Sir "William Parkhurst, kinsman. 


27 June. 


72 Bosvile, Rachael, sp. 


Beckenham. 


Sir Henry Bosvile, brother. 


10 Feb. 


97 Brent, William. 


Rochester. 


Elizabeth, relict. 


3 June. 


G6 Burrowes, William. 


Earith. 


John Lamprier, creditor. 


3 Jan. 


69 Castleden, Peter. 


Rolvenden. 


Anne, relict. 


3 Jan. 


97 Cockle, Thomas. 


Yaldinge. 


Alice, relict. 


5 June. 


116 Comy, Anthony. 


Greenwich. 


Abigail, relict. 


30 Sept. 


134 Davies alias Davids, 


Romney. 


Morgan Delahay, creditor. 


4 Dec. 


John, b. 








77 Davies, Thomazine. 


Eatonbridge. 


Richard Penny, late husband (vaeat 
in margin). 


28 Feb. 


126 East, Thomas. 


Chatham. 


Catherine Perch alias East, sister. 


10 Nov. 


93 Fetherby, Henry. 


Detford. 


Anne, relict. 


21 May. 


126 Goodwyn, Alice. 


Debtlinge. 


Robert, late husband ; during mi- 
nority of John, James, and Eliza- 
beth, children. 


17 Nov. 


Ill Hart, Richard, junior. 


Penshurst. 


Joan, relict. 


4 Aug. 


68 Hussey, John. 


Greenwich. 


J ohn, brother's son. Earlier adminis- 
tration cancelled. 


7 Mar. 


135 James, Martin, b. 


Smarden. 


Frances and Mary, sisters. 


7 Dec. 


85 Kempe, Sir Thomas. 


Olentighe. 


Sir Dudley Diggs, knight, husband 


20 Apr. 


(See 1607 ; relict, 




of Mary, daughter. 




now dead.) 








78 Kerlie, Thomas. 


Debtford. 


John, son. 


14 Feb. 


127 Knight, Walter. 


Strowde. 


Margaret, relict. 


19 Nov. 


98 Newman alias Lee, 


St. Margaret's, 


Richard Lee, husband. 


15 June. 


Dame Sibil. 


Rochester. 






136 Parks, Arthur. 


Debtford. 


Elizabeth, mother. 


21 Dec. 


128 Rawlens, John. 


Rochester. 


Elizabeth, relict. 


26 Nov. 


93 Saxby, John, junior. 


Tunbridge. 


Margaret, mother of Anne, Mildred, 
and Mary, daughters ; during 
their minority. 


29 May. 


112 See, William. 


Hearne. 


Mary, relict. 


29 Aug. 


112 Smith alias Clarke, 


Lewsham. 


James, son. 


28 Aug. 


Judith, w. 








73 Stephens, John, b. 


Died abroad. 


George Whiteheare, creditor. 


16 Feb. 


75 Stephens, Thomas 


Greenwich. 


Thomas Stevens, creditor. 


25 Feb. 


(relict, Catherine, 








renounces). 








117 Steven, Susan. 


Nockholt. 


Thomas and William, brothers. 


14 Sept. 


82 Stoner, Jeremiah. 


Dartford. 


Susan, relict. 


27 Mar. 


85 Taylor, William, b. 


Tenterdeu. 


Joseph, brother. 


14 Apr. 


104 Thaire, John. 


Sheppey. 


Mildred Sturgeon alias Thaire, sister. 


7 July. 


135 Weekes, Ralph (of 


Died at Leedes 


Thomas Smith, armiger, creditor. 


22 Dec. 


Wilts). 


Castle. 






98 White, George, b. 


Pembury. 


Isaac, brother. 


17 June. 


122 Willoughby, Ben- 


Penshurst. 


John, brother. 


28 Oct. 


nette. 








122 Willoughby, Chris- 


Penshurst. 


John, brother. 


28 Oct. 


topher. 








122 Willoughby, Mar- 


Penshurst. 


John, brother. 


28 Oct. 


garet. 









c 2 



20 



KENTISH ADMINISTRATION 8, 1G2 ( .), 1630. 



Fol. 


Name of deceased. 


Parish. 


To whom granted. 


Dale. 


77 


Wyi: alias Trcherno, 
Mary. 


Greenwich. 


< reorge Wye, husband. 


17 Feb. 

1630. 
10 Jan. 


146 


Barn e, Dame A nne, «>. 


Woolwich. 


Robert, son. 


156 


1! lrnes, Thomas, b. 


Woollwich. 


Robert, brother. 


L' i M;il\ 


165 


Bbechee, Henry. 


Spelhurst. 


Audry, relict. 


22 Apr. 


172 


Brafkiie, William. 


Babehilde. 


Catherine Aston, sister's daughter. 


5 June. 


140 


Chambers, William, 

b. 
Collins, George, w r . 


Barminge. 


Thomas, brother. 


14 Jan. 


208 


Ashurst. 


Thomas, son. 


22 Dec. 


166 


Deringe, George, b. 


Maydeston.f 


Sir Anthony Deringe, brother. 


4 May. 


142 


Drewry alias Drowly, 
Robert, b. 


Cobham. 


William Drewry alias Drowly, 
brother. 


28 Jan. 


192 


Duppa, Robert. 


Debtford. 


Clasey WadleraZ/asDuppa. daughter. 


14 Oct. 


166 


Foster, Richard (re- 
lict, Patience, re- 
nounces) . 


Biddeuden. 


John Bigge, maternal uncle of Mary, 
Hopestill, and John Foster, chil- 
dren, minors. 


3 May. 


197 


Frenche, Richard. 


Haies. 


Magdalen, relict. 


10 Nov. 


146 


Haffenden, Robert. 


Tenterden. 


John, brother. 


8 Feb. 


162 


Hay'TE, Christopher. 


Orpington. 


Mary Hayte alias Tirrell, re'ict. 


28 Apr. 


150 


Hopswood, George. 


Strood. 


Joan, relict. 


26 Feb. 


140 


Hosmer, Anne, w. 


Brenchley. 


John "Wood, brother, and Mary Big, 
sister ; during minority of Mary, 
daughter. 


11 Jan. 


172 


Knowles, Richard. 


Gravesend. 


Mary Sawyer, sister of Henry, James, 
and Agnes Knowles, children; 
during their minority. 


22 June. 


200 


Lisnet, John. 


Greenwich. 


Anne, relict. 


27 Nov. 


197 


Luttenden, Anne, w. 


Eatonbridge. 


Henry Stanford, brother; during 
minority of Anthony, Henry, 
Anne, and Edward Luttenden, 
children. 


5 Nov. 


205 


Mabsden, Thomas. 


Earith. 


Margaret, relict. 


9 Dec. 


152 


Maninge, George. 


Chiddingston. 


Elizabeth, mother. 


10 Feb. 


183 


Newenden, Hugh, b. 


Rochester. 


Alice Swan alias Newenden, mother. 


26 Aug. 


166 


Parr, Ralph. 


Woolwich. 


Joan Fennell, mother, and John her 
husbai.d. 


3 May. 


147 


Pett, Richard. 


Tunstall. 


Richard Grymes (daughter's son). 


17 Feb. 


147 


Place, Thomas, b. 


Chatham. 


Ruth Ford, mother. 


17 Feb. 


184 


Pym, Stephen. 


Cliffe next 
Bough ton. 


Robert Spencer of Boughton under 
Bleane, felmonger ; during mi- 
nority of William, son. 


24 Aug. 


188 


Randolph, Edmund. 


Burham. 


Anne, relict. 


20 Sept. 


155 


Seller, Anna, w. 


Canterbury. 


Michael, son. 


19 Mar. 


201 


Sutton, Edward (re- 
lict, Frances, re- 
nounces). 


Rochester. 


Edmund Latten, creditor ; during 
minority of Fiances and Jane, 

daughters. 


18 Nov. 


172 


Tilghman, Richard, b. 


Preston. 


Thomas Tilghman (vacat in margin). 


8 June. 


159 


Ward, Ricliard, b. 


Halliuge. 


John Lance and Susan Lance alias 
Walter, kinsfolk. 


2 Apr. 


146 


Williams, Elizabeth. 


Farnborough. 


Samuel, kinsman. 


10 Feb. 


170 


Williams, Elizabeth. 


Farnborough. 


Samuel, kinsman (in place of admin- 
istration in February). 


10 May. 



t Died at Dytton, Catnbs. 



KENTISH ADMINISTRATIONS, 1630, 1631. 



21 



Fol. Name of deceased. 



Parish. 



To whom granted. 



Date. 



193 Windsor, Frederick. 



44 Ashley, Ferdinand. 

46 Beswick, William. 

33 Bise, Thomas. 

70 Bolderyn, Francis. 

33 Cadwell, Thomas. 

67 Caebier, William, b. 

66 Codd, Catherine. 

52 Cozens, Robert. 

56 Delvek, Alice. 



24 Dohman, Millicent. 

9 Dromant, Andrew. 

35 Eltonheade, Ann, w. 

1 Fletcher, Anthony. 

41 Hadsoll, Thomas. 

1 Hamond, William. 

41 Harding alias Pope, 

Elizabeth. 

19 Hare, William. 



14 Hixon, Humphrey. 

1 Holloway, Henry. 

2 James, Richard. 

58 Keble alias Wick- 
ham, Mary. 

57 Kedward, John, b. 

24 Kinge, Eobert. 



13 Kirby, John. 

47 Lawrence, Edmund. 
1 Lisney, John. 



58 Mabsdon, Edward. 

7 NiCHOLSON,Thomas,£. 

15 Odyarne, Thomas. 
33 Reeve, Simon, b. 
24 Rice, David. 

16 Salake, John. 

51 Shobree, William. 

71 Spicer, Philip. 



Milton by 
Gravesend. 

Byrlinge. 

Spelmonden. 

Debtford. 

Leedes Castle. 

Rolvenden. 

Snodland. 

Leneham. 
Rochester. 
Earith. 



Cray ford. 

Greenwich. 

Charlton. 

Earith. 

Ightam. 

Canterbury. 
Gillingham. 

Phunsted. 



Greenwich. 
Woolwich. 
Sevenocke. 
Stroode. 

Lewsham. 

Rochester. 



Byrchington. 

Westerham. 
Meopham. 



Rochester. 

Otford. 

Wittersham.J 

Benenden. 

Greenwich. 

Greenwich. 

Cuxton. 

Rochester. 



Catherine, next of kin. 



Dorothy, relict. 

Arthur, son. 

Hester, relict. 

Anne, relict. 

Rebecca Kinge, daughter. 

Michael Colegate, sister's son (earlier 
administration revoked). 

William, husband. 

Mary, relict. 

Elizabeth Andrewes alias Dehor, 
relict of William Delver, son of 
deceased ; during minority of Rich- 
ard, John, and Alice Delver, chil- 
dren of said William, deceased. 



Mary, relict. 


15 May. 


Anne, relict. 


28 Feb. 


Ralph Eltonhed, son. 


28 June 


Giles, brother. 


13 Jan. 


William, son ; Dorothy, relict, re- 


5 July. 


nouncing. 




Dorcas, relict. 


5 Jan. 


Peter Harding, husband. 


11 July. 


Thomas Strowde, creditor ; Grace, 


22 Apr. 


Hare alias Griffin, relict and ad- 




ministratrix, having died. 




Mary, relict. 


15 Mar. 


Alice, relict. 


5 Jan. 


Susan, relict. 


11 Jan. 


William, husband. 


19 Oct. 



John, father. 

John Owseby, guardian of Mary 
Kinge, daughter ; Jane, relict and 
administratrix, having died. 

Robert White, husband of Susan, 
relict, who is a minor. 

Anne, relict. 

Thomas Lisney, brother, and Mar- 
garet Collard and Judith Wharton, 
sisters. 

Elizabeth, relict. 

William, brother. 

Thomas, son. 

George Apsley, creditor. 

Elizabeth, relict. 

Catherine Beale, widow, sister. 

Jane, relict. 

Joan, relict. 



26 Oct. 

1631. f 
26 July. 

7 July. 
14 June. 

8 Dec. 
4 June. 

14 Nov. 

29 Nov. 

19 Sept, 

6 Oct. 



12 Ocl. 

13 May. 

2 Mar. 



4 A Hi;-. 


7 Jan. 


15 Oct. 


1 Feb. 


24 Mar. 


17 June 


16 May. 


31 Mar. 


7 Sept. 


17 Dec. 



f The administrations for 1631, 1632, and 1633 are all in one volume. 
X Died in London, St. Bartholomew's the Great. 



22 



KENTISH ADMINISTRATIONS, 1(531, 1632. 



Fol. 


Name of deceased. 


Parisb. 


To whom granted. 


Date. 


13 


Tomi.yn, Eamon. 


Cliffe. 


Joan, relict. 


3 Mar. 


15 


TwuiGE, Ralph, w r . 


Westerham. 


Thomas Twigge ami Richard Daw- 
linge, creditors ; Elizabeth Beris- 
ford, daughter, renouncing. 


25 Mar. 


57 


Waller, Nicholas. 


Cudliam. 


John and Anthony, brotliers. 


5 Oct. 


63 


Warren, William. 


Ripley. 


( latherine, relict. 


3 Nov. 


72 


Wooden, Henry. 


Horton Kirby. 


Henry, son. 


23 Dec. 

1632. 

21 Nov. 


133 


Baker, George. 


Seale. 


John and Thomas, sons. 


132 


Baker, John Lewis. 


Hayes. 


Margaret Lewis (Lodowick), relict. 


3 Nov. 


138 


Blatcher, John. 


Haukherst. 


Thomas, brother. 


3 Dec. 


100 


Brisenden, William. 


Gowdherst. 


Joyce, relict. 


21 May. 


103 


Brooke, Robert. 


Earith. 


Alice, relict. 


4 June. 


132 


Bulford, Patrick, />. 


Died abroad. 


Richard Alleyn, S.T.P., of Stowtinge. 


12 Nov. 


93 


Burr, William. 


Eairefeild. 


Robert, brother. 


28 Apr. 


108 


Bueb, William. 


Fairefeild. 


Anne, relict ; new administration. 


29 June. 


77 


Castleton, Thomas. 


Ightam. 


Anne, relict. 


25 Jan. 


128 


Chapman, John. 


Ereudesbury. 


Elizabeth, relict. 


22 Oct. 


75 


Clarke, John, b. 


Offham. 


Anne Fisher, friend (revoked). 


5 Jan. 


79 


Clarke, John, b. 


Off ham. 


Charles Burges, guardian of Susan 
Burges, sister of deceased ; during 
her minority. 


26 Jan. 


80 


Cooper, Thomas, 


Cranebrook. 


Elizabeth, relict. 


6 Feb. 


122 


Dane alias Springett, 
Barbara. 


Pembur3 r . 


Robert Dane, husband. 


13 Sept. 


100 


Ducke, David. 


Gillingham. 


Mary, relict. 


29 May. 


86 


Fletcher, Henry. 


Cranebrooke. 


Mary Potter, sister. 


19 Mar. 


75 


Freer alias Clark, 
Joan. 


Sutton by 
Dover. 


Leonard Freer, brother. 


23 Jan. 


139 


Glover, John. 


Cudham. 


Mary, relict. 


12 Dec. 


103 


Goldock alias King, 
Jane. 


Raynham. 


Mary, daughter. 


5 June. 


132 


Hayes, Alice. 


Northfleete. 


Robert, husband. 


19 Nov. 


128 


Hest, William, b. 


Greenwich. 


Thomas, brother's son. 


14 Oct. 


80 


Hum fry, Peter. 


Northfleete. 


Thomas, brother. 


14 Feb. 


136 


Hunt, Richard. 


W. Farleigh. 


Mary, relict. 


17 Nov. 


92 


Johnson, William. 


Debtford. 


Thomas, brother. 


19 Apr. 


132 


Johnson, William. 


Cobham. 


Charles, brother. 


8 Nov. 


92 


Kedwall, John. 


Rolveudon. 


Joan Turner, sister; renounced in 
1633. 


21 Apr. 


103 


Kinge, Robert. 


Rochester. 


Mary, daughter, being now of age, 
and Jane Goldock alias Kinge, 
relict, being dead. 


5 June. 


119 


Kirkham, John, b. 


Great Peck- 
ham. 
Westram. 


Thomas, brother. 


23 Aug. 


121 


Kytely, John. 


William Hunt, sister's son. 


15 Aug. 


103 


Leedes, William, b. 


E. Sutton. 


Anne Bromfield alias Leedes, sister. 


1 June. 


82 


Page alias Shobre, 
Jane. 


Shorne. 


George Page, husband. 


27 Feb. 


109 


Parker, Lionel. 


Otford. 


William Children, kinsman ; during 
minority of Robert, John, Wil- 
liam, Margaret, and Jane, chil- 
dren of deceased. 


11 June. 


111 


Pattison, Catherine. 


Crayford. 


Thomas Fane, clerk, son. 


7 July. 


80 


Price, John. 


Brasted. 


Joan, relict. 


1 Feb. 


103 


Sayle, William. 


Debtford. 


Jane, relict. 


1 June. 



KENTISH ADMINISTRATIONS, 1632, 1633, 1634. 



23 



Fol. 



Name of deceased. 




To whom granted. 



Date. 



Ill Sondys, Sir Richard. 
80 Tyndall, Felix. 
92 Walton, Henry. 



171 Banister alias Bud- 

geon, Ann. 
170 Batherst, Richard. 
168 Bulman, Ann. 

166 Colethurst, John. 

178 Coppinger, John, b. 
148 Cbispe, William. 
207 Dabridgcourt alias 

Eltonhead, Eleanor. 
180 Dalton, James. 
159 Etherton, Richard, 

b. 
177 Garland, Ann, w. 
154 Hall, William. 
195 Hart alias Barham, 

Elizabeth, w. 
166 Herenden, Stephen. 

207 Holman, Nicholas 
(Emma, daughter, 
renounces). 



150 Knipe, James. 

178 Lee, John. 

154 Magewyn, John. 

166 May, Henry, b. 

201 Netter, Woollet, b. 

171 Nicholls, John. 

144 Puncheon, Thomas. 



192 Reade, Matthew, b. 

201 Rogers, Thomas. 

159 S.\yle, Jane, to. 

207 Saunders, Francis. 

189 Stanford, John. 

188 Swan, Meriel, sp. 

151 Tate, Michael. 

200 Thoms, Ann, w. 

185 Winter, John. 



46 Banister, John. 
26 Bankyn, Joan, to. 
70 Baylie, John. 



Throwle}'. 
Plumsted. 
Bromley. 



Westram. 

Gowdherst. 
Penshurst. 

High Hal- 

stowe. 
Stoke. 
Footescray. 
Plumsted. 

Bexley. 
Tenterden. 

Sittingborne. 

Chatham. 

Smeth. 

Staplehurst. 

Dartford. 



Debtford. 
Speldhurst. 
Chiselhurst. 
Eltham. • 
Wateringbury. 

Greenwich. 
Cliffe. 



Gowdhurst. 

Hunton. 

Debtford. 

Canterbury. 

Eatonbridge. 

Southfleete. 

Woolwich. 
Chevening. 
Wingham. 

Westerham. 
Dare nth. 
Off ham. 



Sir George Sondys, son. 
Susan, relict. 

Henry, next of kin ; Samuel, son, 
having died. 

Thomas Banister, husband. 

Elizabeth, relict. 

Martha Cotting, daughter ; John, 

son, administrator, now being dead. 
Elizabeth Raynes, mother of Anne 

Colethurst the relict, a minor. 
Frances Barnesley, sister. 
Nicholas, brother. 
John Eltonhead, husband. 

Elizabeth Wilcox alias Dalton. 
Nicholas Sendall, husband of Agnes, 

sister. 
Edward, son. 

Edward Billingsley, creditor. 
John Barham, son. 

Samuel Hales, husband of Martha, 
daughter. 

Richard Holman, paternal uncle, and 
William Chapman, maternal uncle 
of Mary, Anne, AVilliam, and Tho- 
mas Holman, children ; during 
their minority. 

Elizabeth Page alias Knipe, mother. 

Anne, relict. 
Anne, relict. 

Phillipp, brother. 

William_Brewer, maternal uncle of 
Richard Netter, brother, a minor. 

Richard Makyn of London, creditor. 

Edward Allen of Cliffe, miller ; 
during minority of Thomas, son of 
deceased. 

John, brother. 

Catherine Evorunden, daughter. 

Samuel, son. 

Thomas Collerd, creditor. 

John, brother's son. 

Sir Thomas Swan, brother. 

Richard Symes, creditor. 
Christopher Smith, daughter's son. 
Jane Dancy, daughter. 

Dorothy, relict. 

John, son. 

Anne, relict. Administration of 

goods unadmiuistered January 

1089. 



9 July. 

2 Feb. 
29 Apr. 

1633. 

3 June. 

28 May. 
27 May. 

13 May. 

3 July. 

8 Feb. 
3 Dec. 

9 July. 
19 Mar. 

6 May. 
25 Mar. 
17 Oct. 

17 May. 

13 Dec. 



20 Feb. 

1 July. 
23 Mar. 

3 May. 
22 Nov. 

20 June 
8 Jan. 



26 Sept. 
25 Nov. 

5 Apr. 
22 Dec. 

5 Sept. 
25 Aug. 

19 Feb. 
11 Nov. 

2 Aug. 

1634. 
18 Aug. 

14 May. 

15 Dec.. 



24 



KENTISH ADMINISTRATIONS, 1634, 1035. 



Fol. 


Name of deceased. 


Parish. 


To whom granted. 


Bate. 


31 


Brograve, MargS .v^. 


Bekenham. 


John, brother. 


26 June. 


69 


Bryan, Judith, w. 


< Ireenwioh. 


Thomas Howse, sister's son. 


2 Bee. 


26 


Clarke, John. 


Oll'ham. 


Susan Burges, sister, who is now of 
age (see 1631). 


13 May. 


23 


Coventry, Roger, f>. 


Charinge. 


Henry, brother. 


9 May. 


64 


Downe, Robert. 


Stoake. 


Rio., brother; during minority of 
Robert and Helen, children. 


13 Nov. 


62 


Eltonhead, Nicho- 
las. 


Woollwich. 


William, brother's son ; Wm. El ton - 
bead being now dead (see 1625). 


4 Nov. 


30 


Hetton, Richard. 


Greenwich. 


John Roane, creditor ; during mi- 
nority of Francis, Thomas, Sara, 
Anne, and Richard, children. 


21 June. 


68 


IIolman, Nicholas. 


Dartford. 


Samuel Chapman, guardian of Mary, 
Anne, William, and Thomas, chil- 
dren of deceased. Administration, 
granted in 1633, being renounced. 


14 Nov. 


59 


Hijrst, Anthony. 


Eltham. 


Jasper Bartnoll, creditor ; Mary, 
relict, renouncing. 


16 Oct. 


43 


Longe, Alice. 


Speldhurst. 


Margaret Hollamby alias Nicholas, 
mother. 


7 Aug. 


60 


Marlen, Francis. 


Milton by 
Gravesend. 


Susan, relict. 


28 Oct. 


56 


Momford, Henry. 


Bexley. 


Joan Knight, sister. 


8 Oct. 


62 


Norton alias White, 
Benjn., b. 


Pembury. 


Anthony Loveday, sister's son. 


11 Nov. 


28 


Nower, John. 


Ash ford. 


Edward Woodward, guardian of 
Baniel and John Nower, sons. 


31 May. 


27 


Paramore, Margaret. 


Thanet. 


Martin Neale of Curckbie, Lincoln, 
gent. 


20 May. 


7 


Punnet, Catherine, to. 


Strovvde. 


William Cartwright, brother. 


5 Feb. 


30 


Walter, Ann, w. 


Sevenock. 


Hester Streeter, daughter. 


21 June. 


20 


Woodden, Henry. 


Horton Kirby. 


Henry, son. 


21 Apr. 
1635. 
3 Aug. 


118 


Austen, Franois. 


Bebtford. 


Margery, relict. 


127 


Bagley, Nicholas. 


Bebtford. 


Elizabeth, relict. 


26 Sept. 


96 


Billio, John. 


Bexley. 


Elizabeth, relict. 


29 Apr. 


89 


Canterbury, Rich- 
ard, Archbishop of. 




John, Bishop of Oxford, kinsman; 
Richard Bancroft, executor, being 
dead. 


24 Mar. 


95 


Chambers, Margaret. 


Thornham. 


Edward, brother. 


16 Apr. 


85 


Bingens, John, b. 


Bebtford. 


Anne Parsons, creditor. 


13 Mar. 


87 


Bingens, John. 


Bebtford. 


John Caswell (husband of Mary Cas- 
well alias Bingens, sister). Ad- 
ministration to Anne Parsons 
being renounced. 


17 Mar. 


95 


Dowble, John. 


Seale. 


William, father (further grant in 
1G49). 


29 Apr. 


141 


Edlin, John. 


Stoke. 


Sarah, relict. 


15 Beo. 


79 


Everest alias Kinge, 
Joan. 


Cowden. 


John Bottiuge, creditor ; John Ever- 
est, husband, renouncing. 


14 Feb. 


107 


Everest alias Kinge, 
Joan. 


Cowden. 


John Everest, husband ; former ad- 
ministration being renounced. 


6 June. 


137 


Garland, Alexander. 


Sevenock. 


Joan, relict. 


26 Nov. 


88 


Hacket, James. 


Northfleet. 


Elizabeth, relict. 


23 Mar. 


110 


Kennard, Azariah. 


E. Mailing. 


Katherine, relict. 


22 July. 


139 


Kynge, Ellen. 


Bromley. 


Robert, brother. 


17 Nov. 



KtiNTISU ADMINISTRATIONS, 1635, 1636. 



25 



Fol. 


Name of deceased. 


Parish. 


To whom granted. 


Date. 


87 


Locke, Thomas. 


Brasted. 


George Hunt, creditor ; Mary, relict, 
renouncing. 


21 Mar. 


87 


Mayne, Lucy. 


Lynton. 


John, brother. 


27 Mar. 


135 


Netter, Woollet. 


Wateringburv. 


Richard, brother ; administration 
in 1633 being renounced. 


5 Nov. 


73 


PAYNTER alias Ailing- 
ton, Eleanor. 


Gillingham. 


William, husband. 


10 Jan. 


105 


Raven, Lambert. 


Tonbridge. 


John, son ; Mary, relict, renouncing. 


1 June. 


137 


Rawlins, Richard. 


Footescray. 


Bridgett, relict. 


19 Nov. 


131 


Stanley, Ann. 


W. Peck ham. 


Thomas, husband. (Another grant 
February 1638.) 


22 Oct. 


120 


Stapleton, Thomas. 


Otford. 


Joan, relict. 


21 Aug. 


132 


Still, Richard. 


Cowden. 


Richard, son. 


29 Oct. 


130 


Thompson, Robert. 


Greenwich. 


Anne, relict. 


19 Oct. 


136 


Waller, Daniel. 


Debtford. 


Joan, relict. 


16 Nov. 


125 


Watson, Lawrence, b. 


Sandwich. 


Richard, father. 


15 Sept. 


87 


Wayneman, Hum- 
phry, b. 


Bucklaud, 
Berks. 


James Gresham of Greenwich, gent. 


23 Mar. 


132 


Williams, Abraham, 

b. 
Willoitghby, Ann. 


Lullingstone. 


John Carpenter of Lullington, gent. 


24 Oct. 


127 


Eatonbridge. 


Martha, grandmother of William and 


21 Sept. 








Anne, children. 


1636. 
9 Mar. 


158 


Bankyn, Joan. 


Eynsford, 


Edward, son ; administration in 1634 






Darenth. 


is renounced. 




150 


Belke, John. 


Sheldwich. 


William, brother's son. 


6 Feb. 


150 


Bostocke, William. 


Rochester. 


Elizabeth, relict. 


1 Feb. 


150 


Bosvile, Sir Ralph. 


Bradborne. 


Sir Leonard Bosvile, son. 


8 Feb. 


25 


Cboyden, John. 


Gravesend. 


Johan, relict. 


20 Oct. 


18 


Collisne, Eleanor. 


Debtford. 


Elizabeth Ragley, sister. 


17 Sept. 


26 


Elmes, Robert. 


Greenwich. 


John Hubberd, guardian of John 
the son. 


18 Oct. 


25 


Falkener, Edward. 


Debtford. 


John, son. 


21 Oct. 


31 


French, Henry, b. 


Bromley. 


Elizabeth Wilcox alias French and 
Anne Brooker alias French, kins- 
folk. 

Stephen Curgingall, creditor; Mary, 


25 Nov. 


166 


Fynningle y, Francis. 


Debtford. 


13 May. 








relict, renounces. 




16G 


Garland alias Taps- 
field, Joan, w. 


Sevenock. 


Robert Tapesfield, her father, during 
minority of William, John, Timo- 
thy, Augustus, Alexander, and 
Joan, her children. 


16 May. 


19 


Gibbes, William, b. 


Debtford. 


Francis, brother. 


20 Sept. 


14 


Gransden, James. 


Hackington. 


Alice Hand alias Gransden, next of 

kin. 
Susanna, relict. 


22 Aug. 


158 


Halsnod, Robert. 


Bred gar. 


4 Mar. 


154 


Hynton, John. 


Byrchington. 


Jane Younge, sister. 


22 Mar. 


91 


Kirton, John. 


Feversham. 


William, brother. 


14 Feb. 


166 


Kynge, Jane. 


Rayneham. 


Agnes Goldock alias Kynge, sister. 


15 May. 


13 


Lord alias Naunton, 

Mary. 
Maundy, Henry. 


Gravesend. 


Robert, brother. 


1 Aug. 


32 


Sundrich. 


Levie, relict. 


17 Nov. 


3A 


Miller, Peter. 


Gravesend. 


Randal, son. 


17 Dec. 


34 


Pyner alias Wilson, 
Cicily. 


Woollwioh. 


John, husband. 


12 Dec. 


34 


Roe, John. 


Chatham. 


Jane, relict. 


9 Dec. 



26 



KENTISH ADMINISTRATIONS, 1636. L637. 



Pol. 


Name of deceased. 


Parish. 


To whom granted, 


Date. 


31 


Skuddf.h, Robert. 


Wiokham- 
breuz. 


Anne Burleton, sister; during mi- 
nority of Timothy, Anne, and 
Amy. children. 


15 Dec. 


32 


Stilt alias Anniston, 
Agnes. 


Sandwich. 


John, Nicholas, and Susan Lyons, 
kinsfolk. 


28 Nov. 


157 


Wilton alias Murky, 
Elizabeth. 


Greenwich. 


Philip Wilton, husband. 


31 Mar. 

1637. 
25 July. 


96 


Atnooke, Richard. 


Cliffe. 


Margaret, relict. 


69 


Austen, Jeffrey. 


Horsmonden. 


Elizabeth, relict. 


17 Apr. 


86 


Barnes, Jane. 


Earith. 


Phillip, son. 


5 June. 


48 


Beale, Catherine. 


Maidston. 


Ambrose, husband. 


23 Jan. 


108 


Boycott, Richard. 


Trotescliffe. 


Elizabeth, relict. 


2 Sept. 


115 


Callice, Joel. 


Tunbridge. 


James Tayler, father of Hannah, 
relict, who renounces ; during 
minority of William, Edward, 
John, Priscilla, Mary, and Eliza- 
beth, the children. 


7 Oct. 


82 


Chapman, Henry. 


Boughton 
Blean. 


Thomas Cobb, uncle of Alexander, 
the son. 


30 May. 


72 


Child, Thomas. 


Milton next 
Gravesend. 


John, brother. 


27 Apr. 


100 


Clarke, Edward. 


Greenwich.* 


Elizabeth Welby alias Clarke, daur. 


17 Aug. 


46 


Clarke, Thomas. 


Greenwich. 


Anne, relict. 


13 Jan. 


81 


Cooper, Samuel. 


Charleton. 


William, son. 


1 May. 


86 


Courtopp, Richard. 


Higham. 


Rose, relict. 


9 June 


126 


Davies, Augustine, b. 


Eriffe. 


John, brother. 


4 Nov. 


77 


Davies, Fulco. 


S. Mary Mag., 
Canterbury. 


Sara, relict. 


17 May. 


103 


Davies, Hugh. 


Cheveninge. 


Susan Bound, creditor. 


16 Aug. 


97 


Denne, John. 


Dover. 


James, brother ; during minority of 
Alice, Anne, Peter, and James, 
the children. 


20 July. 


96 


Drewe, Margery, w. 


S. Mary Cray. 


John, son. 


18 July. 


125 


Edmeds, Henry, b. 


Meopham. 


John, brother. 


27 Nov. 


109 


Gale, Francis. 


Sevenocke. 


John Stileman, guardian of Leonard, 
the son. 


22 Sept. 


70 


Geale, Dionis. 


Greenwich. 


Jane, relict. 


24 Apr. 


76 


Holman, Mary. 


Debtford. 


Samuel Chapman, uncle ; during 
minority of Anne, sister, and Wil- 
liam and Thomas, brothers. 


1 May. 


134 


Kinge, George. 


Lewsham. 


John Prentice, creditor; Anna, relict, 
renouncing. 


21 Dec. 


64 


Lee, John. 


Speldhurst. 


Francis Edwards and Joan Edwards, 
his wife, sister ; Anna Lee, relict, 
being now dead. 


2 Mar. 


115 


Newnam, Thomas. 


Sevenocke. 


Godwin Smith, creditor ; during 
minority of Henry, Mary, Eliza- 
beth, and Edward, the children ; 
Maria, relict, renouncing. 


9 Oct. 


120 


Oliver, John. 


St. Clement's, 
Sandwich. 


Mary Cord well alias Oliver, daughter. 


2 Nov. 


46 


Parker, Richard. 


Ifeild. 


Robert, brother, and Elizabeth Poul- 
ter alias Parker, sister ; during 
minority of Robert, Elizabeth, 
and Jane, the children. 


16 Jan. 



KENTISH ADMINISTRATIONS, 1637, 1638. 



27 



Fol. 


Name of deceased. 


Parish. 


To whom granted. 


Date. 


86 


Parsons, Ann. 


Debtford. 


Robert, son. 


5 June. 


44 


Phillipps, Thomas, b. 


Greyne. 


William Longe, next of kin. 


2 Jan. 


76 


Pickes, Alice, sp. 


Cray ford. 


Elianor, mother. 


5 May. 


94 


Pointee, John. 


Chatham. 


Elizabeth, relict. 


11 July. 


77 


Polley, Robert. 


Chatham. 


Alice, relict. 


8 May. 


109 


Pokter, John. 


Sittingborne.f 


Thomasine, mother. 


11 Sept. 


44 


Stapleton, John. 


Rochester. 


Mary, relict. 


3 Jan. 


88 


SWINNERTON, Josiall. 


Eastwell. 


Mary, relict. 


28 June. 


122 


Taylor, Thomas. 


Milton by Sit- 
tingbourne. 


Margaret, relict. 


20 Nov. 


60 


Thorpe, John. 


Woolhvich. 


Robert, brother (further grant in 
1639). 


3 Mar. 


122 


Thurston alias Mar- 
ten, Jane. 


Feversham. 


Thomas Weller, brother. 


10 Nov. 


108 


Turner, Richard. 


Cowden. 


Mary, relict. 


4 Sept. 


102 


Walsingham, Robert. 


Chatham. 


Margaret Eldredge, creditor. 


15 Aug. 


106 


White, John. 


Looze. 


Jane, relict. 


29 Aug. 

1638. 
12 Sept. 


204 


Acknorth, John. 


Debtford. 


Constance, relict ; pending claim of 








William, son. 




220 


Addison, Edward. 


Debtford. 


Joan, relict. 


10 Oct. 


215 


Beale, Margaret, to. 


Loose. 


Richard, son. 


10 Oct. 


178 


Bosvile, Sir Henry, 
kt. 


Eynsford. 


Thomas Bosvile, armiger ; Dame 
Isabella, relict, renouncing. 


18 May. 


155 


Buckley, Thomas. 


East Green- 
wich. 


Isabella, relict. 


17 Feb. 


236 


Burr, Thomas. 


Ashurst. 


Anne, relict. 


10 Dec. 


173 


Cage, Christopher. 


Plums ted.* 


Sarah, relict. 


18 May. 


224 


Chace, Matthew. 


Stone by Dart- 
ford. 


Elizabeth, relict. 


19 Nov. 


203 


Collard, Martha, w. 


Brooke. 


Thomas, son. 


13 Sept. 


167 


Collin, Israel, b. 


Greenwich. 


James, brother. 


30 Apr. 


168 


Cooper, Samuel. 


Charleton. 


Alice Cooper alias Pemberton, relict. 


23 Apr. 


224 


Cotes, Martin, jun. 


Frinsbury. 


Rebecca, relict. 


1 Nov. 


198 


Coulston, Thomas. 


Greenewich. 


Daniel Giles, creditor ; during mi- 
nority of Mary and James, chil- 
dren, Mar}-, relict, renounces. 


3 Aug. 


149 


Dalawne, Abraham. 
(Died in St. Anne's, 
Blackfriars.) 


Sharstede in 
Dunnington. 


Anne, relict. 


6 Feb. 


199 


Evans, William. 


Rotherhithe. 


Griffin, brother. 


25 Aug. 


224 


Faunce alias Jenkyn, 
Mary. 


Cliffe. 


Bonham Eaunce, husband. 


14 Nov. 


199 


Eiliier, Reginald. 


Crayford. 


Jane, relict. 


6 Aug. 


209 


Gilbourne, Thomas, 
Esq. 


Woolwich. 


Thomas, son; Martha, relict, re- 
nouncing. 


28 Sept. 


225 


Godwin, Nicholas. 


Wateringbury. 


Susan, relict. 


17 Nov. 


216 


Griffith, Edward. 


Debtford. 


John, brother's son. 


17 Oct. 


225 


Heatherington, Na- 
thaniel. 


Chatham. 


Mildred, relict. 


16 Nov. 


224 


Hodges, George. 


East Parley. 


Joan Wollard, sister. 


2 Nov. 


5 


Ingould, Robert. 


Debtford. 


Elizabeth, relict. 


21 Jan. 


171 


Kemsall, Ellen, w. 


Beckenham. 


Humfrey Violett, son. 


27 Apr. 



t Died at Maidstone. 



'2s 



KENTISH ADMINISTRATIONS. 163S. 



Fol. 


Name of deceased. 


Parish. 


To whom granted. 


Date. 


214 


Kipps, Stephen. 


Hartley. 


Thomas Bliddleton, father of Tho- 
mas, John, .loan, and Susan 
Middleton, sister's children. 


2 Oct. 


225 


I.iw i:s, William. 


Stroode. 


Elizabeth, relict. 


15 Nov. 


240 


Lloid, Griffiths, b. 


Chatham. 


John Lloyd ap Richard, brother 
(before Air. Richard Lloid, clerk). 


8 Dec. 


216 


Mann, Susanna, to. 


Rochester. 


Richard Ware, son. 


19 Oct. 


220 


Medhopp, Henry, b. 


Woolwich. 


.1 oh n, brother. 


24 Oct, 


113 


Mediiurst, Daniel. 


Brasted. 


Agnes, relict. 


10 Jan. 


144 


Moore, John. 


Chatham. 


Jane, relict. 


31 Jan. 


209 


Morrice, John. 


Chiddingstone. 


Mary, relict. 


18 Sept. 


186 


Morris, Richard, h. 


Yaldeinge. 


Henry and Thomas, brothers. 


19 June. 


23G 


Munn, Richard. 


Chatham. 


George Newsom, creditor ; Eliza- 
beth, relict, renouncing. 


11 Dec. 


175 


Newport, Elizabeth. 


Downe. 


Abraham, son. 


28 May. 


166 


Oliver, Mary. 


Sandwich. 


Sarah Harte alias Oliver, daughter. 


2 Apr. 


204 


Osborne, Thomas. 


Cowden. 


Joan, relict. 


17 Sept. 


240 


Oxinden, Mary. 


Deane in 
Wingham. 


Henry, husband. 


30 Dec. 


189 


Pawson, John. 


Chatham. 


Joan, relict. 


6 July. 


237 


Peabse, Mark. 


Feaversham. 


George Selby, creditor ; during mi- 
nority of Mary, daughter. 


27 Dec. 


155 


Peirson, Richard. 


E. Mailing. 


Winifred, relict. 


21 Feb. 


167 


Phillipps, John. 


Bexley. 


Margery, relict. 


20 Apr. 


203 


Pretty, Thomas. 


Westerham. 


Catherine, relict. 


1] Sept. 


149 


Rogers, Thomas. 


Tudeley. 


Joan, relict. 


22 Feb. 


224 


Salmon, William. 


Ash by 
Wrotham. 


Margaret, relict. 


10 Nov. 


192 


Scott, Zachariah. 


E. Peckham. 


Mary, relict. 


13 July. 


204 


Sell, Ralph. 


Shorne. 


Margaret, relict. 


19 Sept. 


186 


Shepard, Richard. 


Chillam. 


Cicilia, relict. 


27 June. 


224 


Shillitoe, Richard. 


Maidston. 


John Homes, creditor. 


14 Nov. 


175 


Shoolbridge, Eliza- 
beth. 


Eatonbridge. 


John Stretfeild, an overseer of the 
poor ; during minority of ... . 
and Elizabeth, the daughters. 


26 May. 


162 


Slowe, Bartholomew. 


Debtford. 


Susanna, relict. 


30 Mar. 


144 


Smith, Thomas. 


Sevenocke. 


Mary, relict. 


15 Jan. 


168 


Stonehouse, Wil- 
liam. 


Chatham. 


Catherine Stonehouse (wife of Nicho- 
las Stonehouse. brother) and Anne 
Stonehouse alias Skoone (wife of 
John Skoone), sister. 


2 Apr. 


225 


Thornhill, Timothy, 

b. 
Tilden, John. 


W. Lanydon. 


Richard, brother. 


22 Nov. 


149 


Sandwich. 


Hopestill Tilden, father and creditor ; 


16 Feb. 








during minority of Elizabeth, 










daughter of deceased (see next 










grant). 




179 


Tilden, John. 


Sandwich. 


Hopestill, father and creditor. The 
administration granted in February 
during minority of Elizabeth, 
daughter of deceased, expiring on 
her death. 


29 May. 


lfi6 


Tindell, Thomas. 


Sandwich. 


Thomazine Oliver, sister ; during mi- 
nority of Elizabeth, Mary, Susan, 
John, and Thomas, the children. 


2 Apr. 


220 


Vaughan, George. 


Debtford. 


Joan, relict. 


24 Oct. 



KENTISH ADMINISTRATIONS, 1038, 1039. 



29 



Fol. 



Name of deceased. 




To whom granted. 



Date. 



109 Vincent, John. 

216 Wakelin, James. 

215 Watebs, Elizabeth, w. 

214 Watte, Philip. 

167 Wick inge, Richard. 

180 Wilkinson, Bridget-. 

203 Wood, James. 



219 Wood, James. 

159 Woekenan, John. 

220 Younge, William. 



32 Austen alias Thomas, 
Elizabeth, to. 



32 Austen, Edward. 
4 Bacon, Margaret, w. 



56 Beechee, Jervase. 
37 Bennett, Edmund, b. 
83 Blechenden, Ann. 

9 Bowden, Robert. 
26 Bkadshawe, William, 
b. 

17 Bubton, Winifred. 

20 Cabbing ion, An drew, 

b. 
17 Cawsten, John. 



26 Chadburne, William. 

44 Chambeblayne, God- 

frey, b. 

73 Cooper, Samuel. 

21 Cotty, Ann. 

45 Bale, Christopher. 
53 Dujscke, Thomas, b. 

5 Dunscombe, Thomas. 



87 Findall, Thomas. 

83 Fowbeky, John. 

9 Goddabd, William, b. 

14 Goddabd, William, b. 



Canterbury. 

Southfleet. 

Chiddingstone. 

Ludsdowne. 

Seavenock. 

Horsmonden. 

Tuubridge. 



Tunbridge. 

Greenwich.* 

Penshurst. 

Horsemonden. 



Tenterden. 
Earith. 



Chiddingstone. 

Hadlowe. 

\\ r ednes- 

borough. 
Boxley. 
Dover. 



Bocton Mal- 
lard. 
Sissinghurst. 

Snodland. 



Feversham. 
Earith. 

Charlton by 

Woolwich. 
Ashert. 
Rocliester. 
Hawkehurst. 
Hawkehurst. 



Earith. 
Maidstone. 

Debtford. 
Debtforu. 



Dorothy, relict. 

Mary, relict. See 1640. 

John Reeve, son. 

Richard, son. 

Prudence [? relict]. 

Mary, relict. 

Richard, brother ; during minority 
of Richard, son of deceased. (See 
October.) 

Thomas, father ; during minority of 
Richard, son of deceased. (Ad- 
ministration in September revoked.) 

Robert Halsteede, creditor; Eliza- 
beth, relict, renouncing. 

Elizabeth, relict. 

Edmund Thomas, brother; during 
minority of John, Peter, Thomas, 
Elizabeth, and Joan Austen, chil- 
dren. 

Jane, relict. 

Thomas Humfry, father of Thomas, 
William, and Margaret, grand- 
children. 

Jane, mother. 

Thomas, brother. 

Thomas, husband. 

Mar}' Bowden alias Bell, daughter. 

Richard Phillipps, creditor ; adminis- 
tration to Nicholas Bradshawe, 20 
April, being renounced. 

John, brother. 

Edward, brother. 

Mary, daughter, who asserts she is 
executrix pending case between 
Anne, relict, and said Mary. 

Blanch, relict. 

Dorothy Bosworth, sister. A new 
grant in 1641. 

Thomas Pemberton, creditor ; Alice, 
relict, being dead. (Adm. 1638.) 

Joan Darknoll, mother. 

Anne, relict. 

John, brother. 

Duke Mawle, creditor, during mi- 
nority of Thomas and Joseph, sons ; 
Margaret, relict, renouncing. 

Anne, relict. 

Thomas Collett, creditor; during 
minority of Christian, daughter. 

John Bright, creditor. (Revoked.) 

Gervase Russell, creditor ; other 
administration revoked. 



22 Nov. 

8 Oct. 
16 Oct. 

9 Oct. 
16 Apr. 
21 June. 
13 Sept. 



9 Oct. 



12 Mar. 

23 Oct. 
1639. 
8 May. 



9 May. 
9 Jan. 



29 July. 
12 May. 
12 Nov. 

4 Feb. 
24 Apr. 



21 Mar. 
11 Mar. 
21 Mar. 



23 Apr. 
11 June. 

15 Oct. 

16 Mar. 
27 June. 

3 July. 
18 Jan. 



3 Dec. 
27 Nov. 

2 Feb. 
27 Feb. 



30 



KENTISH ADMINISTRATIONS, 1639. 



Fol. Name of deceased. 


Parish. 


To whom granted. 


Date. 


33 Goodgroome, AVil- 

liani, b. 
14 Greene, Robert, b. 


Hawkehurst. 


Thomas, brother. 


17 May. 


Sittingbourue. 


Elizabeth Chancey alias Greene, 


21 Feb. 






sister; administration in 1634 








revoked. 




60 Gretton, Daniel, h. 


Greenwich. 


Abraham, brother. 


23 Aug. 


14 Harden , Elizabeth, w. 


Cobham. 


John, son. 


28 Feb. 


33 Hayward, Frances. 


Gravesend. 


John, brother. 


24 May. 


9 Hodgkin, Daniel, b. 


Lamberhurst. 


Tin ii nas, brother. 


;, Feb. 


10 Hopkins, John. 


Southflcete. 


Margaret, relict. 


11 Feb. 


79 Hosmer, Anne, iv. 


Breuchley. 


William Neale (husband and guar- 
dian of Mary Hosmer, daughter) ; 
John Wood, brother, and .Mary 
Big, sister, being dead. (Adminis- 
tration 1629.) 


21 Nov. 


4 Hutchinson, Charles. 


Pembury. 


Anne, relict. 


12 Jan. 


58 Ifield, John. 


Ightam. 


Martha, relict. 


5 July. 


109 Judd, Thomas. 


E. Peckham. 


John Page, grandfather of Martha 
and Mary Judd, daughters. 


16 Mar. 


58 Lee, Alexander. 


Greenwich. 


Anne Bunnion alias Lee, sister. 


3 July. 


62 Masters, Thomas. 


Mepham. 


Henry, son. 


22 Aug. 


83 Matcott, Sir Cavalier. 


Dover. 


William Fowler, creditor. 


27 Nov. 


62 Middleton, Thomas, 

b. 
33 Milton, Thomas, 


Canterbury. 


Thomas, father. 


28 Aug. 


Gillingham. 


Thomas, son ; Maria, relict, renounc- 


16 May. 


senior, gent. 




ing. 




83 Nods, John. 


Milton, Dio. 
Rochester. 


Thomas Haughton, creditor. 


11 Nov. 


32 Pettenden, John, b. 


Borden. 


Edward Chambers, sister's son, and 
next of kin. 


15 May. 


32 Petter, John (who 


Bread, Sussex. 


Elizabeth, relict. 


15 Nov. 


died at Heaver). 








70 PlDGEON, Henry, b. 


Milton, Dio. 
Rochester. 


Joel, brother. 


11 Oct. 


71 Pidgeon, John, b. 


Gravesend. 


Joel, brother. 


11 Oct. 


83 Pope, William. 


Hawkeherst. 


John, brother; during the minority of 
John and Mary, children. 


25 Nov. 


5 Quintyne, Richard. 


Debtford.* 


Millicent, relict. 


28 Jan. 


24 Reynolds, William, b. 


Greenwich . 


John, father. 


10 Apr. 


66 Robinson, Robert. 


St. Mary Cray. 


Appolina Dickens alias Robinson, 
relict. 


30 Sept. 


10 Sakery, Agnes, iv. 


Dover. 


Robert Sakery and Agnes Arrington, 
children. 


12 Feb. 


10 Samson, Alexander. 


Hawkhurst.f 


George, brother. 


28 Feb. 


73 Saunders, William, b. 


Deale. 


Elizabeth, sister. 


11 Oct. 


4 Sewer, Peter. 


Dart ford. 


Robert Joseph, creditor ; Elizabeth, 
relict, renouncing. 


14 Jan. 


73 Smallpeece, Robert. 


Gillingham. 


William Ducke, creditor. 


18 Oct. 


4 Smith, Edward. 


Milton by 


Richard Cotes, father of Joan, Rich- 


11 Jan. 




Gravesend. 


ard, John, Sarah, and Martha 
Cotes, next of kin ; during their 








minority. 





f Died at Peasmursh, Sussex. 



KENTISH ADMINISTRATIONS, 1039, 1640. 



31 



Fol. Name of deceased. 


Parish. 


To whom granted. 


Date. 


82 


Smith, Edward. 


Milton, Dio. of 
Rochester. 


Richard, paternal uncle. Adminis- 
tration in January revoked. 


13 Nov. 


56 


Smith, Thomas, h. 


Gowdherst. 


Dorothy Blundell, next of kin. 


20 July. 


45 


Stevens, William, b. 


Nockholt. 


Anne Stevens alias Glover, mother. 


17 June. 


66 


SWAYSLAND, John. 


Cowden. 


Judith, relict. 


18 Sept. 


34 


Thorpe, John. 


Wollwich. 


Brian, brother's son ; Robert Thorpe 
(see 1636) being dead. 


13 May. 


16 


Thurstone, Thomas. 


Fever sham. 


Alice Pettyward, creditor. 


12 Mar. 


32 


Waggin, Sarah. 


Hawkeherst. 


Deborah Lee, brother's daughter. 


10 May. 


24 


Walker, William 
(died in London). 


Blackman- 
stone. 


William Allen, sister's son. 


8 Apr. 


17 


Weekes, Dionis. 


Seale. 


Susan Hill alias Weekes, daughter. 


18 Mar. 


33 


W r EEKS, Edward. 


Somerhill in 
Tunbridge. 


John Weekes. 


17 May. 


4 


Won ham, John. 


Tallworth in 
LongDitton, 
Dio. of 
Rochester. 


Frances, relict. 


16 Jan. 
1640. 


94 


Acketts, John. 


Northffleete. 


Elizabeth, relict. 


8 Jan. 


123 


Addams, Richard. 


Gillingham. 


Joane, relict. 


7 May. 


132 


Bishopp, Love, to. 


Shipborne. 


John, brother. 


22 June. 


153 


Bloome, George. 


Sevenocke. 


Sara, relict. 


2 Sept. 


102 


Bosvile, Sir Leonard. 


Bradborne. 


Sir William Bosvile and Dame Mar- 
garet Bosvile his wife, sister of 
deceased ; Anna, relict, renouncing. 


25 Feb. 


116 


Bull, Christopher, b. 


Stoke. 


Edward Reynolds ; creditor. 


22 Apr. 


152 


Burges, William. 


Dartford. 


Thomas Saunders, creditor, with con- 
sent of Mary, relict; Charleston, 
renouncing. 


9 Sept. 


171 


Chapman, Henry. 


Boughton 
Bleane. 


Thomas Osborne ; Thomas Cobb (see 
1637) being dead. 


2 Dec. 


171 


Colman, Peter. 


Gowdherst. 


Elizabeth, relict. 


2 Dec. 


145 


Coppinger, Anna, w. 


Greenwich. 


Henry Grove and Frances his wife, 
daughter. 


26 Aug. 


95 


Drought, John, b. 


Gravesend. 


W r illiam, kinsman. 


25 Jan. 


156 


Ducke, Mary. 


Gillingham. 


Joane Ducke, next of kin. 


9 Oct. 


132 


Egglesfield, Maria. 


St. Mary Cray. 


Francis Egglesfield and John Co- 
bery, guardians of Thomas, the son. 


24 June. 


156 


Ellis, Elizabeth. 


Eatonbridge. 


John, brother. 


15 Oct. 


100 


Findall alias Luck- 
ine, Ann, w. 


Earith. 


George Luckine, brother ; during mi- 
nority of Thomas and Geoffry, 
the sons. 


19 Feb. 


110 


Fitch, William. 


Eastfarly. 


Frognol, brother. 


20 Mar. 


164 


Gamage alias Rigden, 
Catherine. 


Frinsbury. 


Henry Gamage, husband. 


2 Nov. 


92 


Gold inge, John. 


W. Mailing. 


Anne, relict. 


9 Jan. 


165 


Goodfrey, Thomas. 


Grayne. 


Mar}', relict. 


16 Nov. 


124 


Haselden, William, b. 


Henfeild. 


Edward, brother. 


11 May. 


131 


Hill, Robert. 


W'esterham. 


Susan, relict. 


10 June 


139 


Hopswood, George. 


Strowde. 


John, son ; Joan, relict, being dead. 
(See 1629 ) 


13 July. 


109 


Hoskins, Thomas. 


Greenwich.* 


Acia, relict. 


24 Mar. 


144 


Muggins, Stephen. 


Eastfarly. 


Thomas Lucke, creditor ; Susan, 
relict, renouncing. 


5 Aug. 


124 


Haukins, W r illiam. 


Maydstone. 


Robert Panckhurst, creditor. 


16 May. 



32 



KENTISH ADMINISTRATIONS, 1640, Kill. 



Pol. Name of deceased. 


Parish. 


To whom granted. 


Date. 


1)2 


Hunt, Oliver, b. 


E. Peokham. 


Robert, brother. 


I Jan. 


131 


Lamhk, ( Ihristopher. 


Westerham. 


Thomas, brother; during minority 
of Man :■ m 1 Dorothy, daughters. 


1 1 J line. 


124 


Lkwis, Thomas. 


Penshurst. 


Elizabeth Hames, daughter of Eliza- 
beth dames ali as Lewis, relict. 


16 May. 


171 


Lightfoot, John, b. 


Aylsford. 


Thomas, brother. 


22 Dee. 


103 


Medley, .Mary, w. 


Loose. 


Thomas, son. 


28 Feb. 


1(55 


Medley, Richard. 


Maydstone. 


Thomas, brother. 


11 Nov. 


156 


Nettee, William. 


Lincksteed. 


Elizabeth, relict. 


23 Oct. 


132 


Noweb, John. 


Ashford. 


Daniel, son, now of age. (See 1034.) 


25 June. 


105 


Paenell, William. 


[ghtam. 


Hester, relict. 


10 Feb. 


103 


Reeve, Nathaniel. 


Stroude. 


Mary, relict. 


25 Feb. 


171 


Rogers, Thomas. 


Otford. 


William, brother. 


28 Dec. 


153 


Rowland, Nicholas, 

b. 
Stacy, Thomas, b. 


Fevershani. 


John Widgett, step-brother. 


15 Sept. 


139 


Dartford. 


John Stacy, brother. 


6 July. 


152 


Stanfoed, James, b. 


Eatonbridge. 


Andrew, brother. 


11 Sept. 


101 


Tolleb, Thomas. 


Westerham. 


Frances, relict. 


17 Feb. 


99 


Tubman, Joan, w. 


Bromley. 


Thomas Howes, guardian of Martha, 
daughter of deceased. 


1 Feb. 


100 


Wakelyn, James. 


Southfleete. 


Richard Harvell, brother of Benja- 
min Wakelyn, son ; Mary Wake- 
lyn (see 1638) being now dead. 


3 Feb. 


152 


Wallis, John. 


Chiddingstone. 


John, son. 


8 Sept. 


94 


Whaey alias Mason, 
Jane. 


Debtford. 


Thomas Whary, son. 


22 Jan. 
1641. 






91 


Allen alias Jacob, 
alias Spencer, Eliza- 
beth. 


Strowde. 


Henry Allen, husband. 


21 Dec. 


84 


Atkins, Humphry. 


Debtford. 


Humphry, son. 


2 Nov. 


44 


Atnoke, William. 


Clifle. 


Margaret, mother. 


3 June. 


87 


Betts, William. 


Wooldham. 


Thomas Somers, guardian of John, 
son ; Ellen, relict, being dead. 
(See 1627.) 


6 Nov. 


90 


Billiaed, Daniel. 


Dover. 


Anne Hart alias Billiard, daughter. 


2 Dec. 


15 


Binge, Robert. 


Deale Castle. 


Henry Binge, armiger, next of kin, 
pending case between him and 
Susan Andrewes, legatee in will of 
deceased. 


13 Feb. 


28 


Bouene, John (died 
at Woolwich). 


Stepny. 


Edward Kidden, maternal uncle of 
John and Mary, the children. 


12 Apr. 


CO 


Chambeblaine, God- 
frey. 


Earith. 


Ralph and Elizabeth Wilcoxon, his 
wife, sister of deceased ; Dorothy 
Bosworth being now dead. (See 
1639.) 


21 Aug. 


50 


Childe, Margaret. 


Bromly. 


Jeremiah Manninge, brother ; during 
minority of Elizabeth Manninge, 
daughter of deceased (sic). 


19 July. 


35 


Cox, William. 


Seale. 


Mary, relict. 


19 May. 


20 


Dacbe, Lady Avis. 


Greenwich. 


Mary Dacre, daughter. 


10 Mar. 


4 


Davies, Robert. 


Rochester. 


Thomas Atkinson, creditor. 


13 Jan. 


50 


Dawlinge, Thomas. 


Westerham. 


John, father ; Mary, relict, renounc- 


23 ,) uly. 


4 


Duffield, John. 


Debtford. 


ing. 
Magdalene, relict. 


16 Jan. 


45 


Finch, William. 


Teuterden. 


Elizabeth Bough ton alias Finch, dan. 


17 June. 



KENTISH ADMINISTRATIONS, 1611. 



33 



Fol. Name of deceased. 


Parish. 


To whom granted. 


Date. 


33 Gardner, Edward. 


Debtford. 


Thomas, father. 


5 May. 


26 George, Richard. 


Gillingham. 


Thomas Pashly, creditor. 


2 Apr. 


91 Goffe, John (died at 


White Chap- 


Joan, relict. 


16 Dec. 


Deal). 


pell in Mid- 
dlesex. 






G6 Gwynnupp, Nicho- 
las. 
20 Hayman, Sir Peter, 


Dover. 


Gartrude, relict. 


9 Sept. 


Sellinge. 


Henry Heyman, armiger, son. 


4 Mar. 


Knight. 








75 Holland, Anthony. 


Debtford. 


Mary, relict. 


9 Oct. 


16 Johnson, Mary, w. 


Asherst. 


Richard Fry and Anne Fry, his wife, 
sister ; during minority of Robert 
and Thomas Johnson, the sons. 


9 Feb. 


84 Larkin, Hester. 


Frensbury. 


Thomas, son. 


1 Nov. 


44 Lawrence, Abraham, 

b. 
51 Lenthall, Philip 


Earith. 


Joan Roote, creditor. 


23 June. 


St. Benet, 


John, brother. 


13 July. 


(died at Greenwich). 


Paul's 

Wharf. 






75 Mell, Leonard. 


Greenwich. 


Davies Mell, son. 


25 Oct. 


66 Messenger, Rev. 


Upchurch. 


John, son. 


IS Sept. 


John. 








69 Middleton, William. 


Eastchurch. 


Gregory, brother. 


11 Sept. 


44 Morton, Lady Ann. 


East Stewart 


George, son. 


23 June. 


45 Page, Edward. 


(sic). 
Rochester. 


Thomas, brother. 


28 June. 


27 Peirce, John (died in 


Hedcorne. 


Simon, brother. 


24 Apr. 


London). 








66 Pickard, Richard. 


Smarden. 


Joan Fairechilde, a friend ; during 
minority of Frances, Joseph, and 
Margaret, children. 


3 Sept. 


41 Priestly, John, b. 


Ludnam. 


Joseph, next of kin. 


5 June. 


27 Raven, John. 


Tonbridge. 


Mary, relict. 


21 Apr. 


15 Ryder, Humphry. 


Maydston. 


Robert Downes, creditor. 


4 Feb. 


4 Seager, George. 


Sittingburne. 


Elizabeth, relict. 


6 Jan. 


4 Smyth, Richard. 


Debtford.* 


Susan, relict. 


14 Jan. 


90 Sone, Paul. 


Northfleete. 


Thomas Cripps, creditor ; Dorothy, 
relict, renouncing. 


2 Dec. 


75 Springet, William. 


Goudherst. 


John, brother ; during minority of 
William, son. 


28 Oct. 


13 Taylor, Susanna. 


Mepham. 


William, husband. 


17 Feb. 


5 Towes, Stephen. 


Debtford. 


Henry Wildebore, creditor. 


26 Jan. 


20 Tresse, Hugh (died in 


Offham. 


Thomas, son ; Judith, relict, renounc- 


9 Mar. 


St. Peter's, Corn- 




ing. 




hill). 








60 Turke, John, b. 


Marden. 


John, brother's son, next of kin. 


11 Aug. 


84 Vaex, Francis (died 


Crayford. 


Jane, relict. 


8 Nov. 


at Earith). 








41 Waggon alias Wag- 


Hawkhurst. 


Robert Glasier, step-brother; Joan, 


10 June. 


home, Edward. 




relict, being now deceased. 




47 Wharton, George. 


Rootham. 


William Duckett of Gray's Iun.f 


8 June. 


26 Young, Nicholas. 


Thonge. 


Susan, relict. 


15 Apr. 



f Pending case between Anthony Crests, guardian of Anne, relict, and Bryers, son of 
deceased, of the one part, and Thomas Foster, executor of deceased's will, of the other part. 



VOL. XX. 



31 



KI.Mlsil ADMINISTRATIONS, 1642. 



Fol. 


Name of deceased. 


Parish. 


To h bom granted. 


Date. 








1642. 

L6 May. 


130 


Adcocb i'. John. 


Apledore. 


Francis Grove, creditor; BUzabeth, 








relict, renouncing. 




161 


A rn ins, Elizabeth. 


Greene ich. 


John Haslocke, brol her's son. 


6 8ept. 


152 


Bak be, Elowlandj «f. 


( rillingham. 


Robert Moore, creditor. 


ll Aug. 


L38 


Baldws n, Henry, /'. 


1 pchurch. 


.John Lilly, husband of Alice Lilly, 


23 June. 


] 45 


Bb ldiey, Sarah. 


Penshurst. 


I rienu. 
Thomas, father. 


1 July. 


168 


Bbickes, William. 


New ington. 


John Brockall, creditor. 


20 Oct. 


187 


Catchw vn, John. 


Debtford.* 


Jane, relict. 


23 .) ane. 


174 


CODDj John. 


Alderman of 
Rochester. 


John, son. 


9 Dec. 


177 


Cogger, Ambrose. 


Tenterden. 


Elizabeth, relict. 


20 Dec. 


146 


CooPEE, Richard. 


Debtford. 


Lidia, relict. 


2S July. 


114 


Death, Charles, b. 


Dartford. 


Thomas, father. 


2 Mar. 


119 


Deeson, William. 


Milton by 
Gravesend. 


Elenor, relict, pending case between 
her and Margery Cleere, sister of 
deceased. 


4 Apr. 


107 


Ducke, William. 


Pcckham Mag- 


William, brother. 


25 Feb. 


171 


Eaton, Richard, b. 


na. 
Dover. 


William, brother. 


17 Nov. 


129 


Fathees, John. 


W. Peckham. 


Anna, relict. 


6 May. 


175 


Finch, Sir John, Kt. 

(died at Farning- 

ham). 
Finch, Sir John. 


Inner Temple. 


Thomas Twisden,nextof kin (super- 
seded December 10). 


2 Dec. 


175 


Inner Temple. 


Hon. Francis Finch, armicjer, uncle 


10 Dec. 








on the father's side, and Thomas 










Twisden, armiger, kinsman. 




107 


Flashby, Alexander 


Deptford. 


John Hudson, creditor. 


16 Feb. 


141 


Gabdineb, Brian. 


Lewsham. 


Thomas Newell, executor in nuncu- 
pative will, pending case between 
him and William, son of deceased. 


23 June 


168 


Hellele, George. 


Strode. 


Henry Bonner and Thomas Kidder, 
creditors ; Rebecca, relict, renounc- 


14 Oct. 


145 


Keble, John. 


E. Peckham. 


ing. 
Susan, relict. 


4 July. 


146 


Lawbence, William. 


Chatham. 


Mary, relict. 


6 July. 


119 


Lince alias Spranger, 
Mary. 


Lewsham. 


William Spranger, husband. 


18 Apr. 


114 


Middleton, John, b. 


Cobham. 


William, brother. 


29 Mar. 


159 


Mounticleaee Ben- 
den. 
Fettus, William. 


Debtford.* 


Mary, relict. 


5 Sept. 


146 


Gillingham. 


Catherine, relict. 


12 July. 


129 


Pitman, Edward, b. 


Beokenham. 


William Holt, maternal uncle, next 
of kin. 


7 May. 


107 


Quested, Tobias. 


Houghton. 


Ada, relict. 


16 Feb. 


145 


Readee, Thomas. 


Smeeth. 


Richard, brother ; during minority 
of Richard, son. 


1 July. 


107 


Roper, Sir Anthony. 


Farnmgham. 


Henry, brother. A will proved in 
June 1657. 


18 Feb. 


153 


Samwat, Peter. 


Lewsham. 


Samuel Mico, creditor. 


5 Aug. 


168 


Taylor, Richard, b. 


Aynsford. 


John Barkett, husband of Elizabeth 
Barkett, nepos. 


26 Oct. 


107 


Thornehubst, Lady 
Barbara. 


Ulcombe. 


Anthony St. Leger, husband. 


14 Feb. 



KENTISH ADMINISTRATIONS, 1612, 1G13, 1015. 



35 



Fol. 



Name of deceased. 




To whom granted. 



Date. 



108 Towers, Stephen. 



114 Valey, Jane, io. 
129 Warren, Robert (died 
at Chatham). 

107 Way, Gilbert (died 

abroad). 

108 Webb, Robert, 

139 Wharton, George. 
105 Whitnall, George, b. 



129 Wilcocke, John. 
1-16 WELLINGTON, Ed- 
ward (died abroad). 

129 Wood, Nicholas. 

130 Wood, Nicholas. 



171 Wood, Robert. 
100 Woodgate, Andrew, 
b. 



9 BlDDENDEN, John, b. 

15 Browne, Thomas. 

22 Children, Thomas, b. 

25 Eglesfeild, Martha. 

15 Moulton, Deborah, 
sp. 

9 Peirce, Richard, b. 



9 
11 



Saxby, John. 

Swynnocke, Thomas. 



9 Tayler, John, b. 
21 Weekes, Ann. 



Cliffe. 



Dover. 
Ditchingly, 

Sussex. 
Crayford. 

Leigh next 

Tonbridge. 
Wrothani. 
E. Beckham. 



New Rumnv. 
Debtford. 

Penshurst. 
Penshurst. 



Braysteede. 
Westrani. 



Tonbridge. 
Bekeuham. 
Eatonbridge. 
St. Mary Cray 

Lewsham. 

Greenwich. 

Brenchley. 
Maydstone. 

Elmsteede. 
Bromly. 



William Blake and Joan Blake his 
wife, friend of Richard, William, 
and Dorothy, children of deceased, 
during their minority (before Tho- 
mas Allen, clerk). 

Charles, son. 

William Lashmore, husband of Anna, 
sister. 

Bridget, relict. 

Hester, relict. 

William Duckett of Gray's Inn. 

John Austen, guardian of Thomas, 
brother of deceased, during his mi- 
nority. Adm'on on 2 February 
(fol. 106) to John Austen, creditor, 
Henry and Anna Whetenhall, next 
of kin, renouncing, being annulled. 

Robert, brother. 

Elizabeth Willington alias Wilson, 
relict. 

Elizabeth, relict. 

Meuasses Jesopp and Thomas Bor- 
kett; during minority of Eliza- 
beth and Joane, daughters of de- 
ceased ; Elizabeth, relict, to whom 
administration on 9 May being 
now deceased. 

A nua, mother. 

Sarah Strealefeild alias Woodgate, 
sister. 

Thomas, kinsman, and next of kin. 
Ellen, relict. 

Mary Children, widow, mother. 
Thomas, son. Former grant June 

1640. 
Robert, father. 

William Parker, kinsman ; John, 
brother of deceased, renouncing. 

Catherine, relict. 

Robert, eldest son ; pending case be- 
tween John Swynnocke, clerk, son, 
and said Robert. 

Elizabeth Halke alias Taylor, sister. 

Edward, brother. 



1!) Feb. 



29 Mar. 
11 May. 

22 Feb. 

1 Feb. 

21 June. 
21 Feb. 



8 May. 

8 July. 

9 May. 
20 May. 



10 Nov. 
10 Jan. 

1643. 

16 Feb. 
2M Mar. 
20 Apr. 

4 May. 

25 Mar. 
3 Feb. 

17 Feb. 



25 Feb. 
29 Ai r. 

1644. 

"There were noe Administrac'ons graunted at London in An'o 1614 untill November that 
yeare, when there was a new seule made for this Office hy Authoritie of Parliament." 



47 Baker, Thomns. 
50 Baker, Thomas. 



Greenwich. 

Creeuwich. 



Elizabeth, relict . 
William Holland, creditor. 



1645. 

17 May, 

7 May 



J) 2 



36 



KENTISH ADMINISTRATIONS, 1645, 1646, 



Pol. 


.Vunc of deceased. 


Parish. 


To whom granted. 


Date. 


23 


Bisit iilinK Ashton, 
Dorothy, w. 


Westerham. 


( ie.ir.LCi' Asliton, son. 


28 Jan. 


49 


BoswELL (Bosvile), 
Sir Thomas, Kt. 
(died at Oxford). 


Eynsford. 


Nicholas Tooke, creditor. (A further 

grant in 1647.) 


16 May. 


33 


Beat, Thomas. 


Brenchley. 


Henry Bourne, and Thomas Bray, 


r.i Mar. 


24 


BUBE, Thomas. 


Asherst. 


son. 

Elizabeth, relict. 


27 Jan. 


39 


Btjshell, William. 


Debtford. 


Dorothy, relict. 


23 Apr. 


46 


Butlkk, Nathan. 


Greenwich. 


Susan, relict. 


4 May. 


23 


Clarke, Robert. 


Debtford. 


William Baldwin, creditor. In mar- 
gin " The latter nd'con issued forth 
in Octob. lt)57." 


27 Jan. 


49 


Day alias Mun, Doro- 
thy. 


Cranbrooke. 


Thomas Day, husband. 


19 May. 


21 


Dike, Thomas, Esq. 


Cranhrooke. 


John Flcsher, creditor. 


7 Jan. 


48 


Dixon, Henry. 


Tunbridge. 


Mar} r , relict. 


19 May. 


50 


Elphie, George. 


Maydstoue. 


Anne, relict. 


17 May. 


7G 


Greennill, Thomas. 


Meopham. 


John Street and John Hall, guardians 
of James Ha*l, " nepos ex fratre 
materno." 


5 Aug. 


20 


Halsnode, Stephen. 


Maidstone, 


Henry Norton, creditor. Adminis- 
tration to John Bridsell, creditor, 
revoked. 


7 Jan. 


51 


Hammond, Josephus. 


Ditton. 


Eliza, relict. 


26 May. 


20 


Kettle, Robert. 


Gillingham. 


Elizabeth Kettle alias Howell, 
sister's daughter and next of kin. 


28 Jan. 


41 


Miles, John. 


Boxley. 


Ann, relict. 


4 Apr. 


29 


Okwell, John. 


Rochester. 


John Orwell, junior, son. 


3 Feb. 


74 


Painter, Richard. 


Dartford. 


Mildred, relict. 


13 Aug. 


42 


Quittenden, John. 


Pelford. 


Martha Selby, Margaret Coggan, and 
Anne Knight, sisters. 


22 Apr. 


74 


Smyth, Richard. 


Seale. 


Samuel Selwood, creditor ; Susan, 
relict, renouncing. 


11 Aug. 


47 


Stephens, Henry, 5. 


South fleet. 


Thomas, brother. 


15 May. 


33 


Style, Humphry. 


Westram. 


Nicholas, brother. 


17 Mar. 


50 


Swann, William. 


Stroade. 


Joan, relict. 


6 May. 


27 


Weston, John, b. 


Speldhurst. 


Henry, brother. 


4 Feb. 


32 


Williams, Warham. 


Dover. 


Rebecca, relict. 


22 Mar. 
1646. 






40 


Ackworth, Elizabeth. 


Woolwich. 


William, husband. 


14 Apr. 


126 


Astley, Thomas, b. 


Mersham 
Hatch. 


Edward Harris, nepos. 


15 Oct. 


143 


Bates, John. 


Debtford. 


Abigail, relict. 


13 Nov. 


112 


Beard, Richard. 


Stroade alias 
Strowde. 


Jane Baker, friend and creditor. 


25 Sept. 


90 


Bewly, Elizabeth, sp. 


Rochester. 


James, brother. 


20 July. 


90 


Bewly, Elizabeth. 


St. Olave, 
South wark. 


James, son. 


20 July. 


128 


Brookes, Robert, b. 


Sevenocke. 


Richard, brother. 


23 Oct. 


84 


Carter, Robert, clerk. 


Stourmouth. 


Henry, brother. 


23 July. 


97 


Clapu am, William, vf. 


Crayford. 


William Chamberlaine, creditor ; 
Ralph, sou of deceased, not ad- 
ministering. 


7 Aug 


70 


Gosen, William. 


Woldham. 


John Lake and Marian Lake alias 
Cosen his wife, relict. 


30 June 



KENTISH ADMINISTRATIONS, 1G4G. 



37 



Fol. 



N;i me of deceased. 



Parish. 



To whom granted. 



Date. 



152 


Courthopp, Thomas. 


Cranbrooke. 


Walter, son. 


16 Dec. 


19 


Coventry, Thomas, b. 


Gravesend. 


Agnes Panton, creditor. 


23 Feb. 


140 


Cos, Susanna. 


Sundritch. 


John, brother. 


27 Nov. 


53 


Dixon, Henry. 


Tnnbridge. 


Edward, son ; Mary, widow, to whom 
administration in May 1645, not 

having fully administered. 


8 Apr. 


142 


Durham, Mary, w. 


Greenwich. 


Nicholas Annesley, son. 


17 Nov. 


77 


Easdat, John. 


Margett. 


Thomas Chaply, creditor. 


2" June 


143 


Edolph, Margaret, 

SJ). 


St. Rndigund's 
in Poulton. 


Simon, brother. 


12 Nov. 


45 


Fisher, Bennett. 


Deale. 


Thomas, husband. 


16 Apr. 


111 


FLAMSTEAD,Ed\vard,5. 


Chatham. 


Anne, mother. 


21 Sept. 


28 


Fkancklyn, Thomas. 


Hawly. 


Mary, relict. 


3 Mar. 


143 


Gaell, John. 


Chatham. 


Thomas Boyce and Anne Boyce alias 
Gaell, his wife, relict. 


28 Nov. 


128 


Griffin alias Griffith, 


Earith. 


Margaret Griffin alias Griffith, relict. 


22 Oct, 




Christopher. 








19 


Hardinge, Robert. 


Cobham. 


Elenora, relict. 


24 Jan. 


111 


Hawkins, James. 


Stroade. 


Grace, relict. 


14 Aug. 


57 


Hatwabd, John. 


Cudham. 


Michael Mills and Mary Mills alias 
Hayward, his wife, sister. 


18 May. 


158 


Hills, John, b. 


Feversham. 


William, brother. 


18 Deo. 


141 


Holmeden, Jasper. 


Eatonbridge. 


William Bartlett and Catherine Bart- 
lett alias Holmeden, his wife,sister. 


21 Nov. 


158 


Holmeden, Jasper. 


Eatonbridge. 


Mar}', mother. 


28 Dec. 


83 


Jacob, John, h. A 
will proved Novem- 
ber 1647. 


Dover. 


Alice, relict. 


13 July. 


83 


Jacob, John. 


Dover. 


Alice, mother. 


13 July. 


70 


Jewell, Dorothy. 


Debtford. 


John, paternal nncle. 


12 June 


4 


Kettle, Ann. 


Greenwich. 


John Worthington, grandson (by 
the son) and next of kin. 


7 Jan. 


83 


Lane, Thomas. 


Ashe, Roches- 
ter Dio. 


Ellen Lane, mother of Mary, Hestor, 
Thomas, and James Lane, grand- 
children (by the son) of deceased ; 
during their minority. 


11 July. 


109 


Lane, Thomas. 


Ashe, Roches- 
ter Dio. 


Walter Salmon and Joan his wife, 
granddau. Administration on 11 
July revoked. 


10 Aug. 


5 


Lewknoe, Joan, 
Dame. 


Delse Magna 
in St. Mar- 
garet's Ro- 
chester. 


Richard Lee, armiger, husband. 


23 Feb. 


111 


Milward, Rev. 

Matthew. 


Plumsted. 


John, son. 


17 Sept. 


140 


Mun, Joan. 


East Mauling. 


Anne Wilcox alias Mun, wife of 
William Wilcox, daughter. 


20 Nov. 


106 


Neale, Robert. 


Gillingham. 


Anne Neale, relict. 


10 Sept. 


71 


Pope alias Rumsey, 
Lydia. 


Rederiffe in 
Kent (sic). 


Joan Andrewes, sister. 


9 June. 


156 


Powte, James, b. 


Higham. 


Barnabe, brother. 


5 Dec. 


143 


Prend, Mary. 


St. Margaret's, 
Canterbury. 


Anne, mother. 


20 Nov. 


143 


Prende, William, b. 


Canterbury. 


Anne, mother. 


20 Nov. 


101 


Ramsey, Robert. 


Coolinge. 


David, brother ; Sarah, relict, re- 
nouncing. 


10 Aug. 



38 



KENTISH ADMINISTRATIONS, 1646, L647. 



Fol. 


N ime of deceased. 


Parish. 


To whom granted. 


Date. 


127 


Reynolds, Tobias. 


Debtford. 


Mary, relict. 


7 Oct. 


80 


Rich, Samuel, of Kent. 


St. Catherine 
by the Tower. 


Elizabeth, relict. 


10 July. 


13 


Richardson, David. 


Tunbridge. 


Martha, relief . 


3 Jan. 


111 


Roach, John. 


Rainham. 


Elizabeth, relict. 


L2 Nov. 


126 


Rose, Thomas (died 
abroad). 


Debtford. 


Winifred, mother. 


7 Oct. 


140 


Shrubsole, Christo- 
pher. 


Laysdowne, 
Sheppey. 


John Peckett, creditor. 


30 Nov. 


55 


Skeffington, John. 


Tunbridge. 


Jane, relict. 


L3 May. 


141 


Stanford, William. 


Heaver. 


George, brother. 


L6 Nov. 


1(H 


Stoneb, John. 


Greenwich. 


Catherine, relict. 


31 Aug. 


111 


Thomas, Robert. 


Gillingham. 


Joan, relict. 


17 Sept. 


7 


Turner, William. 


Oowden. 


Mary, relict. 


6 Jan. 


1 58 


Vereiee, Eichard. 


Feversham. 


Mary, relict. 


22 Dec. 


58 


Wall, Mary. 


Maydstone. 


John, son. 


15 May. 


108 


W il FOH d, Sir Thomas, 
Kt. 


Eylding. 


John Langston , creditor. (A further 
grant September 1(347.) 


10 Aug. 


142 


Wilkinson, Richard. 


Deale. 


Robert Browne, creditor; Susan, 
relict, renouncing. 


10 Nov. 


129 


Willoughy, Martha. 


Penshurst. 


Kenelm, son. (Further grant in 
April 1649.) 


22 Oct. 


111 


WlNCOTE, Jeremy, vf. 


Shorne. 


John, brother. 


4 Sept. 


56 


Wombwell, Wini- 
fred, w. 


Northfleete. 


Anne, daughter. 


23 May. 


101 


Woodward, Henry. 


Sutton at 
Hone. 


Thomas, brother. 


19 Aug. 


46 


Wythens, William. 


St. Mary Cray. 


Francis, relict. 


22 Apr. 
1647. 




146 


Allen, William. 


Stoke. 


John Silver, creditor. 


2 Oct. 


83 


Andrew, John. 


Swinfield. 


Daniel Wraight, creditor. 


19 June. 


29 


Ashdowne, Matthew, 
b. 


Leigh. 


Robert Ashdowne, brother of Susan 
Jesopp alias Ashdowne, sister, 
and John Swayland, " nepos." 


22 Feb. 


166 


Attawell, John. 


Chatham. 


Anne, relict. 


10 Nov. 


136 


Baily, John, clerk. 


Precincts of 
Ch. Ch., 
Canterbury. 


Anue Lyne, kinswoman ; during mi- 
nority of Thomas, son of deceased. 
(In place of above.) 


1 Sept. 


43 


Baker, Edward. 


Chatham. 


William Cubberly, husband of Jane 
Cubberly alias Baker, sister. 


17 Mar. 


169 


Barnacle, Thomas. 


Dover. 


Anue, relict. 


29 Nov. 


43 


Barnard, William. 


Rochester. 


Thomas Rawson, creditor. 


17 Mar. 


181 


Batt, Eichard. 


Southfleet. 


Henry Middletou and Anne his wife, 
daughter. 


28 Dec. 


129 


Bayly, John, clerk. 


Precincts of 
Ch. Ch., 

Canterbury. 


Anne Lyne ; during minority of Tho- 
mas, sou of deceased. (Brought 
in and revoked.) 


1 Sept. 


152 


Bekry, John, b. 


Egerton. 


Henry Wells, creditor. 


12 Oct. 


30 


Besbeech, John. 


Seaveuock. 


Richard, brother. 


11 Feb. 


43 


Birchett, John. 


Cranbrook. 


Joseph, brother. 


16 Mar. 


29 


Blake, Andrew. 


Stroud. 


John and Isaac, sous. 


22 Feb. 


15 


Bogherst, John. 


Northfleet. 


Parnell, relict. 


20 Jan. 


8- 


Bosvile, Sir Thomas 


Ayusford. 


Thomas Gilford, M.D., and Dame 


14 June 




(died at Oxford). 




Isabella Bosvile, his wife, mother 
of deceased. Administration in 
1645 to Edward Tooke revoked. 





KENTISH ADMINISTRATIONS, 1(317. 



3D 



Fol. 


Name of deceased. 


Parish. 


To whom granted. 


Date. 


21 


Bowateb, Humfry. 


Greenwich. 


Thomas, brother. 


16 Feb. 


119 


Brewer, Richard. 


Wolwich. 


Richard Dossett, creditor. 


11 Aug. 


42 


Budgen, Thomas, b. 


Ashhurst. 


Thomas Wynnifreth, creditor. 


1 Mar. 


43 


Buerell, Robert. 


Smeeth. 


Dorothy, relict. 


25 Mar. 


166 


Cartwright, Joseph. 


St. Nicholas in 
Ten net t. 


Mary, relict. 


8 Nov. 


119 


CiiAPMANa^'asLester, 
Anna. 


Woolwich. 


George Shorthooso, son. 


17 Aug. 


42 


Clark, William. 


Wittersham. 


Rebecca, relict. 


14 Mar. 


151 


Clarke, John. 


Frindsbury. 


Edith, relict. 


28 Oct. 


103 


CorjcHMAN alias At- 
nocke, Silvester, w. 


Stroode. 


James Cocke and Johan, his wife, 
daughter. 


14 July. 


146 


Crover, Francis (died 
abroad). 


Rederiffe in 
Kent (sic). 


Alice, relict. 


22 Oct. 


85 


Crup, John. 


IsleofSheppcy. 


Elizabeth, relict. 


9 June. 


13G 


Cuckoe, Juliana. 


Hadlowe. 


Stephen Pattenden and Ellen Pat- 
tenden alias Cuckoe, his wife, 
daughter. 


20 Sept, 


134 


Culling, William. 


Canterbury. 


Elizabeth, relict. 


6 Sept. 


181 


Day, Robert. 


Tuddly. 


Margaret, relict. 


17 Dec. 


86 


Dorley alias Mayd- 
man, Dorothy. 


Upchurch. 


Thomas Dorly, husband. 


17 June. 


72 


Dove, Andrew. 


Birchington. 


Rose, relict. 


6 May. 


168 


Ducke, David. 


Gillingham. 


Joan Edridge, daughter; Mary, relict, 
being now dead. (See May 1632.) 


9 Nov. 


165 


Dyer, John. 


Greenwich. 


Roger Dier and Robert Dyer, sons. 


10 Nov. 


70 


Essex, Henry. 


Dover. 


.Judith, sister. 


27 May. 


15 


Eversfield, Robert, 

b. 
Fielder, Mark. 


Leneham. 


Thomas Tayler, sister's son. 


11 Jan. 


72 


Darford. 


Thomas and Francis, sons. 


17 May. 


159 


Francois, James. 


Canterbury. 


James Hallouin, creditor. 


11 Nov. 


167' 


Feansoe, James. 


Canterbury. 


John Morris, guardian of James 
Fransoe, son of decease 1 ; during 
his minority. 


12 Nov. 


82 


Freeman, Richard. 


Canterbury. 


Edward Pyard, creditor. 


23 June. 


44 


Foster, Richard. 


Reculver. 


Mary, relict. 


8 Mar. 


42 


Garrett, John. 


Daren th. 


Thomas, son. 


16 Mar. 


72 


Glover, John. 


Woodchurch. 


Charles, brother. 


13 May. 


151 


Goldock, William. 


Upchurch. 


Alice, relict. 


23 Sept. 


85 


GUNSLEY alias Byug, 
Rebecca. 


St. Mary [in 

Hoo]. 


Dorothy Gunsley alias Phipps, sister. 


9 June. 


84 


Gunsley alias Tom- 
lin, Sarah. 


Cliffe. 


Dorothy Gunsley alias Phips, 

daughter. 


9 June. 


83 


Hanvill, Ely. 


Stacefeild(*('e). 


Thomas, son. 


29 June. 


31 


Harding, Robert. 


Cobhani. 


Edward Spooner, half-brother. Ad- 
ministration in February 1645 to 
Elianor, relict, now (? deceased — 
page cut). 


1 Mar. 


42 


Harris, W alter (died 
abroad). 


Dover. 


Anne, relict. 


4 Mar. 


56 


Hart, Francis. 


Hearne. 


James, brother. 


13 Apr. 


164 


Hartuidge, Thomas. 


Capell. 


Mary, relict. 


8 Nov. 


55 


Haeward, John. 


Marden. 


William Dawtry and Margaret his 
wife (? daughter— relation not 
shewn). 


9 Apr. 


137 


Harwood, John. 


Dover. 


William Tagell, creditor. 


| 23 Sept. 



Id 



KENTISH ADMINISTRATIONS, 1647. 



Fol. 


Name of deceased. 


Parish. 


To whom granted. 


Date. 


l n; 


11 u WAiiD, Michael. 


Sevenocke, 


James Robinson and Alice Robinson, 
alias 1 la\ ward, his wife. 


20 Oct. 


86 


HebbebTj John. 


St. Bartholo- 
mew next 

Sandwich. 


William, son. 


2.", June. 


131 


Higgons, Gabriel, l>. 


1 [unton. 


Theophilus, lather. 


li Sept. 


167 


lln.i., Walter. 


Debtford. 


William Stone, creditor; Jane, relict, 
renouncing. 


29 Nov. 


182 


Hills, Oliver, b. 


Ive Church or 
Brenzet. 


William j brother. 


2 Nov. 


84 


Hudsford, Richard. 


Box lev. 


Thomas Steevens and Ellen Steevens, 
his wife, sister's daughter. 


2 June. 


1S3 


llrc.HESrt/fVwUrricke, 
Dorothea. 


Maydstone. 


Alexander Hughes, husband. 


30 Nov. 


164 


Jessopp, John. 


Penshurst. 


Jane, sister. 


1 Nov. 


170 


Joblyn, Richard. 


Debtford. 


Elizabeth, relict. 


29 Nov. 


72 


Johnson, William. 


Deptford. 


Elizabeth, relict. 


S May. 


29 


JUGEB, John. 


Newington. 


William, brother. 


17 Feb. 


73 


Kendall, Nicholas. 


E. Greenwich. 


Mary, relict. 


1 May. 


167 


Kingsey, John (died 
abroad). 


Debtford. 


Edward Younge, creditor. 


11 Nov. 


72 


Kite, John, b. 


Lyminge. 


Richard Jenkin (relationship 
omitted) . 


31 May. 


56 


Lambert, Elizabeth. 


Hithe. 


John Phillipps, son. 


2 Apr. 


43 


Lowe, Richard, armi- 
ger (died at Green- 
wich). 


Inner Temple. 


Mary Pudsey, widow, sister. 


11 Mar. 


56 


Maetin, Edmund. 




Robert Martyn, paternal uncle and 
guardian. 


20 Apr. 


164 


Mathewes, Henry. 


Godmersham. 


Jasper Barber, creditor. 


22 Nov. 


116 


Mayer, Edward. 


Dover. 


Jane Maer alias Rogers, wife of 
Stephen Rogers, and relict of de- 
ceased. 


6 Aug. 


170 


Mersh, Stephen. 


Egerton. 


Elizabeth, relict. 


29 Dec. 


42 


Messingham, Rich- 
ard. 


Greenwich. 


Awdrie, relict. 


20 Mar. 


168 


Nethersole, Fran- 
ces, armiger, b. 


Nethersole. 


Jane Goddin, " consobr'. " 


12 Nov. 


42 


Omer, Andrew, b. 


Ashe. 


Martha Omer alias Dixon, sister. 


1 Feb. 


164 


Orwell, Nicholas. 


Gillingham. 


Elizabeth, relict. 


8 Nov. 


119 


Pantry, Thomas. 


Boughton 
Bleane. 


Anna, relict. 


28 Aug. 


108 


Parker, Sir Selwyn. 


Greenwich. 


Edward, brother. 


15 July. 


108 


Pearson, John (died 
abroad). 


Greenwich. 


Anna, relict. 


29 July. 


108 


Piper, Edward. 


Apledore. 


Susan, relict. 


7 July. 


136 


Plaister, James. 


Denton. 


Dorothy, relict. 


16 Aug. 


179 


Potten, Sarah. 


Lidd. 


Edward Athie, guardian of Elizabeth 
Potten, sister of deceased, a minor. 


27 Dec. 


73 


Poyner, Thomas. 


Greenwich. 


Anna Poyner alias Pitcher, relict. 


3 May. 


83 


Price, Ralph. 


Sittingborne. 


John Deeringe, creditor. 


3 July. 


56 


Provoe, John. 


Deale. 


Hester, relict. 


27 Apr. 


169 


Pullin, Henry. 


Gillingham. 


Thomas Gooden, " Gardian' eccl'ie 
de Gillingham"— to administer 
effects, etc., of deceased " in usum 
pauper 5 de Gillingham." 


19 Nov. 



KENTISH ADMINISTRATIONS, 164*7. 



41 



Pol. 


Name of deceased. 


Parish. 


To whom granted. 


Date. 


85 


R.uner, Margaret. 


Whitstaple. 


Patrick Golson, son. 


5 June. 


.30 


Reade, Nathaniel, b. 


Strode. 


Mary Brewer alias Read, mother. 


9 Feb. 


Uo 


Reeve, William. 


Chidingstone. 


MttrgnTetTrelict. 


28 Oct. 


29 


Richman, Elizabeth. 


Wye. 


Sarah Merry alias Richman, dau'r. 


25 Jan. 


15 


RoBUS, William. 


Salt wood. 


John, brother. 


30 Jan. 


43 


Rootes, John. 


Tewdly. 


Walter and John Marten, next of 

kin. 
Edward and Francis Drinkwater, 


16 Jan. 


24 


Russell alias Drink- 


Greenwich. 


19 Jan. 




water, Margaret. 




brothers. 




72 


Rye, Abraham. 


Feuersham. 


George Selby, creditor ; during mi- 
nority of Anna, Phoebe, Margaret, 
and Patience Bye, daughters. 


14 May. 


129 


Scott, Humfry. 


Conghurst. 


Dame Elizabeth, relict. 


13 Sept. 


136 


Scott, Humfry. 


Conghurst. 


Elizabeth, relict [ Yacatquia antea — 
in margin]. 


13 Sept. 


29 


Siieafe, Rbhard. 


Rolvenden. 


Sara, relict. 


26 Feb. 


107 


Shetterden, John. 


Chisellmrst. 


Frances, relict. 


2 July. 


183 


Slaytyer, William, 
S.T.P. 


Oterden. 


Sara, relict. 


14 Dec. 


30 


Slin, Elizabeth, sp. 


Eltham. 


Thomas, brother. 


5 Feb. 


135 


Smith, Francis. 


Bethersden. 


Brian, brother. 


13 Sept. 


55 


Smith, William. 


Heme Hill. 


Frances, relict. 


26 Apr. 


145 


Snode, Robert. 


Cliffe. 


Margaret Atnoke, creditor. 


16 Oct. 


56 


Solley, Joan. 


Ashe. 


Thomas, brother. 


1 Apr. 


151 


Spencer, John. 


Bonghton 
Bleane. 


Margaret, relict. 


2 Oct. 


166 


Spice, Rmert. 


Hawkhurst. 


Prioilla, relict. 


16 Nov. 


42 


Spkingate, Catherine, 


Langley. 


Herbert Springate, armiger, son. 


1 Mar. 


69 


Stafford, Benedict. 


Debtford. 


Alice, relict. 


24 May. 


178 


Stephenson alias 
Lane, Elizabeth. 


Debtford. 


John Stephenson, husband. 


7 Dec. 


169 


St. Nicholas, Eliza- 
beth. 


Hearne. 


Edward Milles and Elizabeth Milles 
alias St. Nicholas, his wife, and 
daughter of deceased. (A new ad- 
ministration 1618.) 


26 Nov. 


135 


Streatfield, Henry. 


Chiddingstone. 


Susan, relict. 


13 Sept. 


15 


Strughill, Peter. 


Lidd. 


John GwilHaras, creditor. 


15 Jan. 


58 


Swinoke, Thomas 


Maidstone. 


John, brother ; during minority of 


11 May. 




(died at Islington). 




Mary, daughter ; Margaret, relict, 
renounces. 




30 


Terrey, Richard. 


Westwell. 


Elizabeth Terrey alias Hopkins, sister. 


1 Feb. 


15 


Thompson, Elizabeth. 


Petham. 


Thomas Beliald and Clara, his wife, 
daughter. 


30 Jan. 


43 


Thompson, Elizabeth. 


Petham. 


Thomas Beliald, father of Elizabeth 
Thompson ; during minority of 
John Beliald, grandson. 


8 Mar. 


165 


Tidman, Henry. 


Leigh. 


Anne, relict. 


10 Nov. 


159 


Upton, John. 


St. Margaret 
at Cliffe. 


Anne, relict. [Another grant 1649.] 


22 Oct. 


103 


Verehanger, Paul. 


Dover. 


Jane, daughter. 


12 July. 


109 


Wallis, John. 


Howe (sic) 
(Hoo). 


Mary Brooker alias Wallis, daughter. 


10 Nov. 


182 


Webb, John. 


Heth. 


John, son. 


30 Dec. 


104. 


White, Anthony. 


Debtford. 


George Salter and Edward Nun, 
creditors. 


3 July, 



42 



KENTISH ADMINISTRATIONS, 1 17, 16 18. 



Pol. 


Name of deceased. 


Parish. 


To whom granted. 


Date. 


130 


Wilfoed, Sir Thomas, 

Kl. 


[ldinge. 


Pranois LanjfSton, creditor; John 
Langston, late administr itor, not 
having fully admin stered Septem- 
ber Kilt;).* 


30 Si i'i. 


130 


Wood, John (died 
abroad). 


E. Mallinge. 


Elizabeth, relict. 


30 Sept. 


85 


Yak k.n 8, ( lloyce. 


Dover. 


Richard Barly, creditor. 


1 June. 


30 


Young, John. 


Godmersham. 


Mildred, mother. 


13 felt. 

L648. 
13 May. 


61 


Abraham, Margaret. 


Boughton 


Reginald, husband. 






Bieane. 






50 


AcouilT alias Gardner, 
Matthew. 


Shoreham. 


John Acourt alias Gardner, son. 


17 Apr. 


43 


Amos, Manasses. 


Rochester. 


Anna, relict. 


19 Apr. 


77 


Andlove, William. 


Northflete. 


Robert Bristoe, creditor. 


(i .1 ttlie. 


61 


BAEEB alias Burton, 


Easthourne"iu 


William Eveleigh and Elizabeth Eve- 


23 May. 




Grace. 


com.Cantii." 


leigh alias Burton. 




47 


Baker, Richard. 


Woodchurch. 


Margaret, relict ; probate of will to 
Richard Rich, executor, 3 Febru- 
ary 1047, revoked. 


15 Apr. 


32 


Batt, Richard. 


Southfleete. 


Jane, relict; Henry Midleton and 
Anne, his wife, to whom adminis- 
tration 1647 renouncing. 


22 Mar. 


48 


Beecher, Edmund. 


Penshurst. 


Joan, relict. 


3 Apr. 


25 


Belcher alias Han- 
bury, Rachael. 


Ulcombe. 


William, husband. 


11 Pel). 


48 


Bexnett, Robert. 


Dover. 


Elia, relict. 


27 Apr. 


145 


Besbeech, Daniel. 


Sevenoke. 


Richard, brother. 


20 Dec. 


22 


Betterton, Alex- 
ander. 


Gillingham. 


Mary, relict. 


27 Feb. 


137 


Blii\ t coe, Stephen. 


Deale. 


Richard, son. 


28 Nov. 


- 95 


Brewer, Richard. 


Westlarleigh. 


Thomas Brewer, senior, and Thomas 
Brewer, junior, sons. 


29 Aug. 


18 


Brooks, Thomas. 


Maydstone. 


John, son. 


8Peb. 


25 


Bull, Grace. 


Harbledowne. 


Thomas, son. 


11 Peb. 


123 


Burgis, Henry. 


E. Mallinge. 


John, brother. 


30 Oct. 


32 


Burly, Henry. 


Northfleete. 


Elizibeth, relict. 


26 Mar. 


12 


Care, Thomas. 


Heaver. 


Mary, relict. 


IS Jan. 


C2 


Chauntler, Walter. 


Boughton 
Bieane. 


Elizabeth, relict. 


•20 May. 


32 


Cheesman, Thomas. 


E. Beckham. 


Thomas Cheeseman (in margin 
l ' Yacat "). 


27 Mar. 


39 


Cheeseman, Thomas. 


E. Peekham. 


Thomas, son. 


27 Mar. 


70 


Codd, Thomas. 


Lainham {sic). 


Robert Marriott and Martha Mar- 
riott alias Codd, his wife, sister. 


19 June 


22 


Coomber, Christo- 
pher. 


Maydestone. 


Joan, relict. 


24 Peb. 


35 


Cotes, Martin. 


Rochester. 


William Sheeles, next of kin, and 
administrator for Rebecca, relict 
and administratrix. 


23 Mar. 


35 


Coult, John. 


Deale. 


Alice, relict. 


29 Mar. 


22 


Covemey, Henry. 


Hether (sic). 


James Hobday, creditor ; during mi- 
nority of William, Thomas, Anne, 
and A^nes Coveney, grandchildren 
by the son. 


8 Peb. 


87 


Cruttall, Edward. 


Maidstone. 


Diua, relict. 


13 July. 



KENTISH ADMINISTRATIONS, 1648. 



43 



Fol. Name of deceased. 


Parish. 


To whom granted. 


Date. 


90 


Culveeden, Robert. 


Dover. 


Elizabeth, relict. 


3 July. 


120 


Curling, Henry. 


St. Peter's, 
Thanet. 


Brigitt Curling alias Harding, sister. 


14 Oct". 


139 


Cublinge, Henry. 


St. Peter's, 
Th net. 


John, brother. Adm'on to Brigitt, 
sister, brought in and renounced. 


22 Dec. 


48 


Curtis, Mary. 


Lvd. 


Norton, husband. 


6 Apr. 


119 


DEBIHGE, Sir Edward, 

Bart. 
Dominey, Edward. 


Pluckley. 


Sir Edward Deringe, bart , son. 


19 Oct: 


119 


Dover. 


Mary Dominey alias Steere, relict. 


9 Oct. 


92 


Doeinon, Paul. 


St. Alphage, 

Canterbury. 


Severania Lansell, guardian of John 
Dorinon, son of deceased, and 
during his minority. 


25 Sept. 


92 


Draper, Susanna. 


Greenewich. 


Anna Hall, sister. 


9 Sept. 


135 


Draper, Thomas. 


Greeuwich. 


Anna Hall, creditor. 


25 Dec. 


25 


Easterfield, John. 


Aldington. 


Mary, relict. 


15 Feb. 


90 


Easterfield, John. 


Aldington. 


Abraham, brother; Mary, relict (ad- 
ministration in February 1647-8), 
being dead. 


19 July. 


26 


Edmonds, John. 


Mepham. 


Anne, relict. 


3 Feb. 


43 


Edwards, John, b. 


Frensbury. 


Elizabeth Buxton, Mary Brett, and 
Rebecca Watson, next of kin. 


24 Apr. 


VI 


Ellis, Elizeus. 


Ottham. 


Sir Edward . . . ., and doctor of laws, 
executor of will of Henry Ellis, de- 
ceased,son of Elizeus Ellis, deceased. 


26 June. 


22 


Field, Angel. 


Heth. 


Augustine Greeneland, creditor. 


8 Feb. 


75 


Figg, Richard. 


Plumstead. 


Mary, sister. 


20 June. 


95 


Fleminge, Richard. 


Dover. 


Susan, relict. 


22 Aug. 


117 


Flinder, John. 


Dover. 


Mary Flinder alias Knight, relict. 


23 Oct. 


75 


Gardner, Christo- 
pher. 
Gardner, Thomas. 


E. Mailing. 


Alice, relict. 


12 June. 


22 


Gillingham. 


Alice, relict. 


18 Feb. 


50 


Gasson, "William. 


Heaver. 


Susan, relict. 


14 Apr. 


17 


Giles alias Haselden, 
Mary (died at East 

Greensted). 


Greenwich. 


Daniel Giles, husband. 


17 July. 


77 


Gladwyn, Thomas. 


Cray ford. 


Mary, relict. 


19 June 


12 


Godfrey, Catherine. 


Swanley. 


Mary Fryenson, sister's daughter. 


28 Jan. 


15 


Hadsall alias Adsall, 

Thomas. 


Duustall {sic). 


Elizabeth Langb'rd, sister. 


7 Jan. 


75 


Hartridge, James. 


Pembury. 


James, son. 


15 June 


137 


Hatcher, Henry. 


Stone. 


( "atherine, relict. 


2 Nov. 


31 


Hay, Alexander. 


Greenwich. 


Walter, next of kin. 


28 Mar. 


75 


Hicemott, John. 


Marden. 


John Hickmott, Anthony Hickruott, 
Francis Hickmott, and Elizabeth 
S . . . ., children, and Thomas 
Danne, husband of Alice Dinue, 
daughter. 


16 June. 


49 


Hodges, John. 


Woodchurch. 


Anne, relict. Further grant of goods 
unadministered May 1662. 


24 Apr. 


149 


HOLLUMHY alias 
Nicholas, Silvester. 


Chiddingstone. 


Dorothy Holumby alias Nicholas, 
relict. 


30 Dec. 


CO 


Holmden, Peter. 


Stone. 


Martin, brother. See administration 
in November. 


18 May. 


137 


Holmden, Peter. 


Stone. 


Alice, relict ; Martin, brother, to 
whom administration in May, being 
deceased . 


21 Nov. 


91 


Howtinge, Joseph, h. 


Gillingham. 


Richard, brother. 


19 July. 



II. 



KENTISH ADMINISTRATIONS, 1648. 



Pol. 


Name of deceased. 


Parish. 


'I'd whom granted. 


Date. 


32 


EtTETT alias Randall, 
Margaret. 


St. Nicholas, 
Thanet. 


William, son. 


16 Mar. 


90 


Humble, Thomas 
(died abroad). 


Debtford. 


James Webb, creditor. A new grant 

in ( October this year. 


18 July. 


12 


,1 mis, Andrew. 


Sevenock. 


Mary, relict. 


L'H Jan. 


1 is 


Jeffeey, John. 


Lye. 


Marl lia, relict. 


15 Dee. 


1-49 


Jeffeey, John. 


Leigh. 


William Treape and Anno, his wife, 
fi'ii ml of John and Elizabeth, the 
children; Martha, relict, being 

dead. 


28 Dec. 


31 


Jordan, David. 


All Saints, 
Hoo. 


John Bishopp and Mary Bishopp 

alias Jordan, his wile, daughter ; 
Jane, relict, renouncing. 


7 Mar. 


93 


Kktham, William, b. 


New Romney. 


William, father. 


19 Aug. 


137 


Knight, John. 


Cowden. 


Elizabeth Knight, grandmother, and 
John Tichbarne, maternal uncle of 
Richard, son ; Joan, relict, being 
now dead. 


is Nov. 


147 


Loriman, Martin. 


St. Martin's, 
Canterbury. 


Margaret, relict. 


11 Dec. 


r.o 


Lorkin, Thomas. 


E. Peckham. 


Susan, relict. 


1 7 Apr. 


75 


Lull, Joan. 


Hearue. 


Michael Wood, guardian of Emline, 
daughter. 


21 June. 


91 


Madox, Howard. 


Eltham. 


Dame Jane Garrard, guardian of Ben- 
jamin Madox, brother, during his 
minority. 


18 July. 


33 


Marston, Francis. 


Old Romney. 


Elizabeth, relict. 


31 Mar. 


35 


Marten, Joan. 


Kennin^ton. 


John, son. 


3 Mar. 


49 


Maylin, Edward. 


E. Mawling. 


Elizabeth, relict. 


25 Apr. 


76 


Munus alias Thorne, 
Philippa. 


Cliffe. 


William Hawkins and Mar} r Haw- 
kins alias Thorne, his wife, sister. 


3 J u ne. 


65 


Napleton, Joseph. 


Lusdowne, 
Sheppey. 
Marden. 


Dorothy, relict. 


10 May. 


119 


Nash, John. 


Grizill, relict. 


11 Oct. 


61 


Norman, William. 


Leasdowne, 

Sheppy. 
Mepham. 


Thomas Osborne, creditor. 


3 May. 


75 


Pemble, Stephen. 


Edward Dennis, creditor. 


21 June. 


88 


Perkins, John. 


Halden. 


Elizabeth, relict. 


31 July. 


25 


Perry, Dorothy. 


Lay n ham (sic). 


Elizabeth Pedley alias Perry, dau'r. 


9 Mar. 


25 


Perry, Elizabeth. 


Erittenden. 


Elizabeth Pedley alias Perry, kins- 
woman. 


9 Mar. 


25 


Phillipps, Hannah. 


Earnebrough. 


George Pearch and Joane Pearch 
alias Phillipps, his wife, daughter. 


11 Mar. 


32 


Read, John. 


Earith. 


John, son. 


20 Mar. 


37 


Rignell, John. 


North Cray. 


John, son. 


27 Mar. 


138 


Roberts, David. 


E. Mawling. 


Elizabeth, daughter. 


23 Nov. 


93 


Saunders, Henry. 


Salt wood. 


Anne, relict. 


24 July. 


137 


Slograve alias Darke, 
Catherine. 


Debtford. 


Anne Calvert, sister. 


7 Nov. 


35 


Smith, John. 


Goudhurst. 


Margery, relict. 


7 Mar. 


47 


Smyth, Robert. 


Dover. 


Margaret, relict. 


20 Apr. 


148 


Steed, Henry, w r . 


Dover. 


Catherine Goulder alias Steed, dau'r. 


14 Dec. 


76 


Stretfield, Susanna. 


Chiddingstone. 


Richard and Stephen, sons, Thomas 
Slayter and Anne his wife, dau'r. 


15 June. 


12 


Swayne, Edward. 


Standherst 
(sic). 


John, son. 


11 Jan. 


8 


Sweeting, Charles, h. 


Hiihe. 


Mary, sister. 


31 Jan. 



KENTISH ADMINISTRATIONS, IGiS, 1G41). 



45 



Fol. 


Name of deceased. 


Parish. 


To whom granted. 


Date. 


50 


Tamage, Robert. 


Dertford. 


Margaret, relict. 


19 Apr. 


32 


Tattington, William. 


Woolwich. 


John, brother. 


8 Mar. 


89 


Tun stall, William. 


Precincts of Ch. 
Ch. Canter- 
bury. 


Margery, relict. 


13 July. 


119 


Ward, "William. 


Dover. 


Jane, relict. 


10 Oct, 


34 


Wardegar, George. 


Rochester. 


George, son. 


24 Mar. 


89 


Wayte, John. 


Heith. 


Susan, relict. 


6 July. 


8 


Webb, Elizabeth, to. 


Hith. 


John Tods, brother. 


15 Jan. 


104 


Williams, Walter. 


" In servitio 
Parliamenti 
in partibus 
Cantii." 


Elizabeth, relict. 


29 Sept. 


109 


Winterton, George. 


Sandwich. 


Mary (? relict). 


7 Sept, 


90 


Woollett, Philip. 


Mavdstone. 


Elizabeth, relict. 


17 July. 


149 


Yarrow, Henry. 


Eriffe. 


Anne, relict. 


16 Dec. 
1G49, 


145 


Alberry, Richard. 


Hearnehill. 


Joan, relict. 


11 Nov. 


27 


Allen, William. 

[rine. 


St. Mary Mag., 
Canterbury. 


John Coveny, creditor. 


28 Mar. 


10 


Astley, Dame Cathe- 


Maydstone. 


John Bridges, kinsman. 


— Jan. 


63 


Ayler, George, b. 


Beckingham. 


Anne Garrett, Creditor. 


3 June. 


144 


Baker, John, vf. 


Marden. 


Thomas, son (vacat in margin). 


7 Nov. 


50 


Baker, Thomas. 


Hoe (sic). 


Anne, relict. 


28 May. 


143 


Barnham, Sir Martin. 


Maydstou. 


Thomas Reynolds, creditor. 


26 Nov, 


144 


Besant, George. 


Boughton. 


Richard Hamond, creditor. 


3 Nov. 


167 


Bland, Oliver. 


Crayford. 


Elizabeth, relict. 


28 Dec. 


144 


Bottin, Johanna, w. 


Smarden. 


William Weeks, son. 


8 Nov. 


62 


Bourne, Thomas. 


Chalke. 


Thomazine, relict. 


13 June. 


113 


Brett, Edward. 


Elham. 


Giles, brother. 


29 Oct. 


26 


Brissenden, Nicho- 
las. 


Flittenden 
^ (sic). 


Elizabeth, relict. 


12 Mar. 


1 


Brooke, Francis. 


Yalding. 


Sarah, mother. 


9 Jan. 


128 


Browne, Anne, w. 


St, Mary 
Northgate, 
Canterbury, 
or Precinct 
of St. Gre- 
gory. 


Paul Wiggins, brother of deceased, 
and uncle and guardian of Anna 
Browne, daughter, during her 
minority. 


19 Oct. 


144 


Buck, Peter. 


Lambeth in 
com. Cantii 
(sic). 


Margaret, daughter (vacat in mar- 
gin). 


12 Nov. 


59 


Burges, Nathaniel. 


Dover. 


Mary, relict. 


21 June. 


70 


Burges, William. 


Dertford. 


Charles, son. 


8 June. 


56 


Burton, Francis. 


Woodchurch. 


John Armestronge, creditor. 


14 May, 


19 


Btjskin, William. 


Loose. 


Ralf, brother. 


5 Mar. 


62 


Church, Faith, .y). 


Hearne. 


William Rucke, creditor. 


5 June. 


16(5 


Coates, William. 


Raineham. 


Hanna, relict. 


12 Dec. 


5 


Cole, Priscilla. 


Stroud. 


Henry Figgett, creditor. 


13 Jan. 


60 


Cole, Stephen. 


Hith. 


Anna, relict. 


10 June. 


1 


Cooper, Mary. 


Greenwich. 


John, brother. 


25 Jan. 


50 


Cooper, Thomas. 


Westerham. 


Robert Sappes, guardian of Darce 
Cooper, daughter. 


21 May. 


63 


Country, Nicholas 
(died abroad). 


Sandwich. 


Elizabeth, relict. 


27 June. 


C3 


CuLLlN, Edmund. 


Chalke. 


Elizabeth, relict. 


6 June, 



k; 



KENTISH ADMINISTRATIONS, 1649. 



Pol. 


Name of deceased. 


Parish. 


To whom granted. 


Date. 


58 


Danes, Thomas, 6. 


Eatonbndge. 


Robert Nightingale and Margaret, 
his wife, mother. 


1 June. 


168 


DANNE, ,1 allies. 


Burlinge. 


Edward Stretfeild, creditor ; Martha, 
relict, renouncing. 


22 Dec. 


Ml 


Denh lm, Thomas, 6. 


Plumsted. 


Thomas, lather. 


12 Nov. 


57 


Denton, Anne. 


Tunbridge. 


Arthur Denton and Brigett Denton 
alias Clay, son and daughter. 


13 Apr. 


37 


DOWBLE, .John, h. 


Scale. 


Robert Brooke and Thamar Brooke, 
his wife, sister ; William Dowble, 
lather, to whom administration in 
1635, being now deceased, and not 
having fully administered. 


10 Apr. 


144 


Edwards, Francis. 


Rochester. 


Johan, relict. 


2 Nov. 


8 


Ellis, Thomas. 


Milton. 


Mary, relict {vacat in margin). 


22 Jan. 


2L 


Ellis, Thomas. 


Birling. 


John Goodall, creditor. 


L6 Mar. 


28 


ELWOOD, Thomas. 


Sandwich. 


Lidia, daughter. 


6 Mar. 


59 


Evernden alias Barn- 
kin, Elizabeth. 


Warehorne. 


William Evernden, son. 


1 June. 


22 


Gibbon, Robert. 


Hawkhurst. 


William, brother ; during minority 
of Leonard, Arthur, and Susan, 
children of deceased. 


29 Mar. 


1 


Gibbons, Richard. 


Precinct of Ch. 
Ch., Canter- 
bury. 


Margaret, relict. 


18 Jan. 


160 


Gilham, John. 


Sandwich. 


William, son. Renounced, and 
another grant October 1650. 


26 Dec. 


14 


Gkat, Mary. 

[armiger. 


Eastchurch, 
Isle of Shep- 

py- 


Thomas Jackson, nepos. 


24 Feb. 


109 


Greene, Thomas, 


Greene wich. 


Robert Leycroft, creditor. 


6 Sept, 


37 


Green ewood, Sil- 
van us. 


Cowden. 


Dorothy, relict. 


14 Apr. 


127 


Harbettle, William. 


Chatham. 


Margaret Guilty, widow, nepos, and 
next of kin. 


24 Oct, 


109 


IIarling, George. 


Greenwich. 


Magdalen, relict. 


5 Sept. 


8 


Hay, Alexander. 


E. Greenwich. 


John Dixon, creditor ; administra- 
tion to Walter Hay brought in and 
renounced. This administration 
was revoked and a new grant made 
in 165G to John Hay, brother of 
deceased. 


22 Jan. 


39 


Hersey, Robert (died 
abroad) . 


Wolwich. 


Mary, relict. 


1G Apr. 


61 


IIindley, George. 


Borden. 


Mary, relict. 


27 June. 


144 


Holt, William. 


Chatham. 


Sara Holt alias Walker, wife of Isaac 
Walker, gent., mother. 


2 Nov. 


144 


Hopper, John. 


St. Andrew, 
Canterbury. 


Elizabeth, relict. 


1 Nov. 


14 


Howell, Edward, b. 


Strowd. 


Isaac Carter, creditor. 


16 Feb. 


128 


HiTCKSTErp, Natha- 
niel. 


Rolvenden. 


Joan, widow. 


18 Oct. 


19 


Hudson, George. 


Dover. 


Clara, relict. 


5 Mar. 


111 


Humphryes, Thomas. 


Erith. 


Humfrey Smith, creditor. 


19 Sept. 


20 


Hunt, James. 


Goodneston 
next Wing- 
ham. 


.... (name not given). 


14 Mar. 



KENTISH ADMINISTRATIONS, 1649. 



47 



Fol. Name of deceased. 


Parish. 


To whom granted. 


Date. 


39 


Ikeland, George. 


Rederiffe in 
com. Cant., 
dio. of Ro- 
chester («c). 


Mary, relict. 


24 Apr. 


169 


Jeffeey, John. 


Leigh. 


Jane Jeffery alias Hackett alias 
Treape, wife of Thomas Hacket, 
and mother of deceased ; during 
niinoriiy of John and Elizabeth, 
his children. 


12 Dec. 


37 


Jennings, William, 6. 


Newclmrch. 


Richard Raker, maternal uncle. 


23 Apr. 


7 


Jones, William. 


Canterbury. 


Moses Munday, creditor. 


9 Jan. 


10 


Jordan, Henry. 


Quinborough. 


Rose, relict. 


13 Jan. 


37 


Kingiiam, Joseph, h. 


Sandowne 

Castle. 
Wickliaui- 


Henry, brother. 


13 Apr. 


7S 


Kittiiam, John. 


Martha Joade, grandmother and 


5 July. 






breux. 


guardian of William, son ; during 
his minority. 




126 


Knight, Walter. 


Canterbury. 


Mary, relict. 


13 Oct. 


83 


Ladmore, Joan. 


Wrotham. 


John, husband. 


13 July. 


145 


Lake, Thomas. 


Bobbing. 


John, son. 


13 Nov. 


53 


Lambert, Edward. 


Tenham. 


Joan, relict. 


17 May. 


63 


Lovell, Edward. 


Dover. 


Theodore, brother. 


6 June. 


1 


Lunne, William. 


Dover. 


Joan, relict. 


15 Jan. 


110 


Mabb, Ralph. 


St. James in 
Isle of 
Grajmes. 


Anne, relict. 


14 Sept. 


95 


Maplesdf.n, Robert. 


Lidd. 


William Dakins, creditor ; during 
minority of Elizabeth, Man-, Peter, 
and Robert, children. 


16 Aug. 


57 


Maekewick, Thomas. 


Riarth (Ry- 


Mary, relict. 


1 Apr. 


49 


Marsh, Ann. 


arsii) . 
Crundell. 


Peter, husband. 


1 May. 


109 


Meeeiam, Henry. 


Sandwich. 


Judith, relict. 


10 Sept. 


5 


Miles, Nicholas, b. 


Eexley. 


William and John, next of kin. 


8 Jan. 


57 


Mills, Samuel. 


Deane in co. 
Kent. 


Robert Rescod, creditor. 


4 Apr. 


67 


Minchen, William. 


Debtford. 


Robert Thorowgood, creditor. 


12 June 


50 


Moegison, Edward. 


Hearnehill. 


Thomas Younge and Joan Younge 
alias Morgison, his wife, daughter. 


19 May. 


20 


Munne, Richard. 


Feversham. 


Anne, relict. 


3 Mar. 


67 


North, Nicholas. . 


St. James, 
Dover. 


Elizabeth, relict. 


20 June 


62 


Nowfll, Sarah. 


Ashford. 


John, son. 


18 June 


167 


Osborne, Philip. 


Gravesend. 


Arnold Bradly, creditor. 


29 Dec. 


50 


Paeamore, Mary, sj). 


Worth. 


Martha Winter, sister's daughter. 


30 May. 


128 


Parker, Edward, b. 


Woolich. 


Richard Wavell, creditor. 


10 Oct. 


55 


Parkhurst, Martha. 


St. Paul's, Can- 
terbury. 


Francis Kemvard, brother. Revoked 
11 June 1661, and a new adminis- 
tration granted to Robert Park- 
hurst. husband. 


12 May. 


145 


Piiillipps, Thomas. 


Feversham. 


Elizabeth, relict. 


9 Nov. 


21 


Pigeon, Robert. 


Cliffe. 


Jane, relict. 


29 Mar. 


128 


Piper, Thomas. 


Warehorne. 


Katheriue, relict. 


lOct. 


67 


Plumjier, Thomas. 


Woodchureh. 


Thomas, uncle on the father's side ; 
during minority of Margaret, 
John, Phebe, and Elizabeth, chil- 
dren of deceased. 


30 J une 



48 



KENTISH ADMINISTRATIONS, 1619. 



Pol. 



Name of deceased. 




To whom granted. 



Date. 



5 


Pows mi. Bridget, w. 


< lanterbury. 


127 


ReEve, Edward, h. 


Shoreham. 


DO 


B \\ NOLD8, John. 


Dover. 


7 


Russell, Bridgett. 


Feversham. 


38 


Salter, Thomas. 


Biddenden. 


62 


SAMEWAYS, Tobias. 


Levisham. 


37 


Sandys, Margaret, 
Dame. 


Hauling. 


14G 


Sappes, John. 


Condon (sic, 
? Covvden). 


45 


Sargeant, William. 


St. Mary 
Dover. 


28 


Saunders, Thomas. 


Cliffe. 


146 


Selhuhst, Shemias. 


Tenterden. 


tC6 


Shaklock, Jeremiah, 

b. 
Shipton, Thomas. 


llalden. 


91 


Maydstone. 


68 


Siviere, Catherine. 


Woodchurch. 


145 


Skeyle, Stephen. 


Rochester. 


29 


Smeale, Robert. 


Otford. 


27 


Spencer, William. 


Beneuden. 


20 


Stafford, Benedict. 


Debtford. 


144 


Stephenson, Robert. 


Westram. 


12 


St. Nicholas, Eliza- 
beth. 


Hearne. 


128 


Stoker, Richard, b. 


Woollwich. 


41 


Stroughill, Jane, to. 


Lidd. 


171 


Summers, William. 


Dartford. 


126 


Symons, James. 


Debtford. 


167 


Thompson, John. 


Ash. 


143 


Thunder, John. 


Crambrooke. 


5 


Turner, Roger. 


Gravesend. 


69 


Walker, Thomas. 


Wittersham. 


103 


Ward, Arthur, b. 
(died abroad). 


Isle of Thanet 


145 


Weller, John. 


Cranebrooke. 


46 


WeLls, Joseph. 


Greenwich. 


127 


White, Christopher. 


St. Andrew, 
Canterbury. 


71 


White, Margaret. 


Lamham (sic) 


144 


Wilkinson, Susanna, 


St. Martin, 




sp. 


Canterbury. 


37 


Willoughby, Mar- 
tha. 


Penshurst. 


50 


Wilsheire, Thomas, 

b. 
Witt, Robert. 


Rolvenden. 


167 


Egerton. 


1 


Wolsey, John. 


Greenwich. 


110 


AVood, William. 


Stroode. 



John, son. 

Joanna, sister. 

s trah, relict. 

Anno Russell aliae'M.uuTi, daughter. 

John Greene and Samuel \\ lute, 
creditors. 

.lane relict. 

Dame Christian Temple, grand- 
daughter (ex filia). 

Elizabeth, relict. 

Mary, relict. 

Agnes Saunders alias Wells, diu'r. 
Jane Austen, widow, daughter. 
Jeremiah, father. 

John, brother. 

Thomas Siveer, most lately (nuper- 
ime) husband. 

George Maplesden, creditor. 

William, brother. 

Mary, relict. 

Elizabeth Jacob, creditor ; Alice 
Stafford, to whom administration 
May 1647, being now deceased. 

Eliza, relict. 

Edward Mills, father and guardian of 
Elizabeth and Mary Mills, grand- 
daughters of deceased and during 
their minority. 

John Francis, maternal uncle. 

Thomas, son. 

Sara, relict. 

Margaret, relict. Further grants 1667 
and 1673. 

Henr} r Coleman, creditor. 

Joan, relict. 

Ellen, relict. 

Thomas, son. 

William Gorton, creditor. 

Bridget, relict (vacat in margin). 
Mary, relict. 
Anne, relict. 

Thomas, son. 

Anna Wilkinson alias Bingham, 
sister. 

William, son ; Kenelem, son (see Oc- 
tober 1646) being now dead. 

Elizabeth Wilsheire, mother of Mar- 
garet and Anne, sisters of deceased. 

William Curtis, creditor. 

Samuel Tynne, creditor. 

Mary, relict. 



12 Jan. 
9 Oct. 

1 An.. 
22 Jan. 
27 Apr. 

2 .lone. 
21 Apr. 

6 Nov. 
26 May. 

7 Mar. 
19 Nov. 
30 Dec. 

2!) Aug. 

6 June. 

14 Nov. 
29 Mar. 
IN .Mar. 
24 Mar. 



6 Nov. 
2 Jan. 



18 Oct. 
27 Apr. 
11 Deo. 
11 Oct. 

14 Dec. 
5 Nov. 

23 Jan. 
1 June. 

7 Sept. 

3 Nov. 
11 May. 

17 Oct. 

15 June. 

8 Nov. 

20 Apr. 

18 May. 

17 Dec. 

4 Jan. 
20 Sept. 



( 49 ) 



ON "ROMANO-BRITISH" FICTILE VESSELS 
FROM PRESTON NEAR WINGHAM. 

BY G. DOWKEU. 

In 1889 the late Mr. Charles Roach Smith wrote to me, " What 
evil genius hinders you from having engraved for your account of 
the Preston kiln the whole of the figures of the pottery, which 
should be given in clear outline ?" Since that account was printed, 
a number of Roman fictile vessels have at various times been found 
in the gravel pits in Preston parish. A notice of the Preston kiln 
appeared in 1872 in the twelfth volume of Arcliceologia Cantiana.* 
I think it will be interesting to give a more detailed account of the 
chief vessels found, and also of the neighbourhood in which they were 
so plentifully dispersed. 

Dearson Farm lies half a mile to the north-west of the parish 
road from Wingham to Preston, and about half a mile south-west 
from Preston Church. The gravel pit, wherein most of the pottery 
was found, is situated on a ridge of gravel bank that skirts the 
eastern valleys of the Lesser Stour, and near to a ford which crossed 
that river. Traces of the road may still be seen in dry seasons, 
crossing the marsh towards Ickham. At present the only roads near 
this gravel pit, or near the Preston Court gravel pit, are two harrow 
cart-ways, one from Dearson to the Preston and Wingham highway 
in the south by Heart's Delight, and another from Preston Court by 
Preston Church to the north at right angles to the parish road. A 
footpath, nearly parallel to the parish road from Wingham to Pres- 
ton, skirts the gravel ridge on which the pottery has been found, 
and it probably marks the site of the Roman way. Part of this 
from Dearson to Wenderton is still highway. I have been thus 
particular in describing this road, as not only at Dearson, where the 
first discovery of pottery was made, but at almost all intermediate 

* Some relics from Dearson are noted in Arcliceologia, xxxvi., 181. 
VOL. XX. E 



50 " IIOMAXO-BRITISD " FICTILE VESSELS 

spots between Dearson and Preston Church (nearl] half a mile in 
length) bhere bare been Bound, in the gravel, braces of Romano- 
British interments. At Preston Court, close to Preston Church, is 
a large gravel pit, in which quantities of broken pottery have been 
met with. At an exhibition of miscellaneous curiosities, held in the 
Preston schoolroom a twelvemonth ago, I found some Snmijr.11 
pottery which was exhibited by labourers who bad worked in this 
pit, and had preserved them as mantelpiece ornaments. I learned 
from these labourers that pottery had also frequently turned up in 
gravel excavated at Preston Porstal, at least Jt quarter of a mile 
north of Preston Court pit; so that upwards of three-quarters of a 
mile (in length) is marked by the discovery of Eoman pottery. 

It would seem then that the Dearson Cemetery was not a mere 
isolated one, but that the burials had been spread out along a con- 
siderable length of road. Near I ckham* other Roman vesselsbave been 
found beside this road. So we cannot regard the Dearson burial- 
ground as the cemetery of Roman "Wingham. Of the fictile vessels 
I have figured, it will be noted that the most perfect and interesting 
specimens were found in the Dearson gravel pit ; this, however, is 
partly owing to the care there taken to preserve the specimens entire 
when met with. I interested Mr. Goodson (the owner of the pro- 
perty), and he informed me whenever the disturbed state of the 
gravel, or traces of charcoal and fire, suggested the probjibility of a 
Roman interment having taken place at any spot. 

In the Preston Court gravel pit I have found a Roman Quern, 
traces of trenches in the gravel, and quantities of pottery generally 
in a broken condition. In one case burnt bones were found im- 
bedded in an oval mass of partly burnt clay, probably a rude 
imitation of a funeral urn. In most cases the pottery has been of a 
rude or common description, of blue smoulder kiln-baked, but all of 
good design, and comparable with most of the Upehurch pottery. 
Some of the Samian vessels, from long exposure in the porous, damp 
gravel, had their red enamel so injured as to crumble away on 
exposure, and their potters' marks obliterated. The pit at Dearson, 
which lies nearer to Wingham than the other pits, has yielded the 
greater number of the best specimens of fictile vessels. 

Mr. Roach Smith, in a note added to my paper in ArcTueologia 
Cantiana, vol. xii., p. 58, suggested that what I described as a 
Roman kiln at Dearson was probably a baked clay tomb, and referred 

* A Roman red clay bottle like No. 5, found by Mr. Minter, now in my 
collection. 



FROM PRESTON NEAR WING MAM. 51 

to some examples he gave in Arch&ologia Canfiana, vol. xi.. p. 115. 
Be this as it may, there appear to have been (nearer Preston 
Church) some rather curious cases in which a Dumber of vessels 
were found close together; in one grave seven or eight had been 
put with one interment, in a gravel pit near Dearson Wood (about 
a quarter of a mile distant). The pottery described as Up- 
church ware, found here, is all of a coarse kind. I have sev< ral 
specimens of a much better article found in Kent. Mr. F. (». Hilton 
Price described in the Journal of the Anthropological Institute, 
vol. v., p. 301, "a Romano-British" cemeterj at Seaford in Sussex, 
where similar pottery was found. Mr. Price remarks, "In some 
instances black patches were observed in which fragments of burnt 
pottery, flints, pieces of charcoal, and charred bones were found; 
most of these patches contained one or more iron nails, and these 
patches marked the spots where interments had been made." Mr. 
Price suggests that after the body had been burnt on the funeral 
pyre, the ashes were collected and placed on a cloth or in a napkin, 
and fastened with iron nails, as he supposes, marking the interments 
of the poorer class, whose friends were not in a position to afford 
the expense of a funeral urn. In several places in the Preston 
gravel pits I have met with somewhat similar instances, and it seems 
probable that interments had been made near the dwellings, and 
not collected in one cemetery ; if this is so, it may account for the 
interments having been scattered over so large an area. 

The examples I have figured are taken from the best preserved 
specimens, and only one example is given of each character. 
I have found in addition many duplicate specimens, and a great 
many fragments of others. In 1872, I made water-colour drawings 
of many of the best specimens from Mr. Goodson's gravel pit, and 
they are now in the possession of Mrs. Goodson of Cleve Court 
in the Isle of Thanet. That lady has the terra-cotta rabbit, and 
she had also a nice specimen of an entire glass vessel, about six 
inches in height, which I have not been able to figure ; it was of 
the usual square moulded form, with truncated neck, a small 
mouth, and small handle ; it would hold about one pint. Several 
pieces of iron, probably nails, and a bronze piece of a spur (or some- 
thing very like one) were found in the Dearson pit. 

1 will now describe the drawings which arc all made to one 
scale : — 

1. A fine oval blue vessel found in the Dearson pit ; it contained 
burnt bones. 

E 2 



52 " KOMANO-BRITISIi " FICTILE VESSELS 

2. A tall upright urn ornamented, and containing burnt bones; 
the colour was blue and the texture fine. Dearson I. 

'A. A large urn ornamented with cross lines below the centre 
and arched lines above, it likewise contained calcined human 
hones. D. 1. 

4. An elegant vessel of blue Upchurch ware. D. 1. 

5. A bottle of red ware. D. 1. 
G. Urn of coarse blue ware ; several like vessels were met with 

in the Dearson Cemetery, No. 1. D. 1. 

7. Small urn nearly black. D. 1. 

8. Small vessel nearly black. D. 1. 

9. Samian cup, red ware with leaf ornamentation, found with 
several others in one interment in Dearson Cemetery, No. 1. 

10. A somewhat similar vessel. D. 1. 

11. Samian j)atera. D. 1. 

12. Cup-shaped Samian patera. D. 1. 

13. Small glass unguent vessel of green glass from a large urn. 

D. 1. 

14. Urn of brown colour with lid, containing bones ; in Preston 
Court pit similar lids appear to have been used to cover wide-mouthed 
urns, but most of them had been broken. 

15. One of the largest urns met with, of rather coarse material 
and red. D. 1. 

16. This vessel, the only one of the sort met with, is unique not 
only in material but in ornamentation; it is of rather thick clay of a 
brown-blue colour, containing small angular fragments of flint, 
which calcined white in the burning. I found a fragment of a thick 
urn of precisely the same material in the Saxon Cemetery at Wick- 
ham-breux. The ornaments on this vessel consist of some rude forms, 
intended perhaps to represent geese, which seem to have been stuck 
on while the clay was soft ; these are on opposite sides of the vessel ; 
between them is the representation of a man having a sort of striped 
tunic over his shoulders, and with his arms brought across his stomach 
in a rather indecent way, the feet are turned, in, while the modelling 
of the whole is very rude. The head was broken off with the 
upper part of the urn. D. 1. 

17. A brown-blue patera. Preston Court. 

18. Upchurch ware. D. 1. 

19. Red ware earthen bottle. A similar but larger one was 
found at Preston Court and AVickham. D. 

20. Eed Samian patera. Preston. 

21. Small Samian patera. IX 




jgp 




FROM PRESTON NEAR WING1IAM. 53 

22. A yellow, thin vessel, probably Durobrivian ware. Dearson. 

23. A terra-eotta yellow vessel in the form of a rabbit, the ears 
are elevated, and form a support to a neck, wbieb is perforated 
down to the hollow body ; this neck forms the front part of the 
handle of the vessel. The mouth of the rabbit is likewise per- 
forated, the whole body forming a sort of jug. What could be the 
use of this singular Roman relic ? I would venture on the opinion 
that it was an infant's feeding-bottle ; it certainly would serve admir- 
ably for such a purpose. When filled with milk, if the thumb were 
placed over the neck of the vessel, it would very effectually stop its 
running out at the mouth ; while if the infant was sucking at the 
mouth of the vessel, and the upper part were left open, it would 
freely flow. 

24. A red terra-cotta vessel like a small teapot, probably like- 
wise a feeding-bottle. 

It may be noted by referring to the map, opposite, that these 
" Romano- British " cemeteries lie scattered along a way that must 
have been thickly populated in Roman times, and occupy an area 
adjoining the parish church, far from the village population, which 
now lives more to the north-east — " Preston Street." 

The Roman way must have continued past the church to the 
" Porstal," where pottery has been met with. The church has 
no feature I believe older than the thirteenth century, but just 
beyond its present churchyard " the rude forefathers of the hamlet 
sleep." 

Since this paper was written, a fresh batch of pottery has been 
met with in the Preston Court gravel pit, one item being a large red 
cemetery urn. 



( 54 ) 



THE KENTISH FAMILY OF LOVELACE. 

N,>. II. 
BV THE REV. A. J. PEAK MAX, M.A. 

Since my paper on tin appeared in our Tenth Volume* I 

bave obtained Further inform! o correcl a !Vu 

of my former statements, and to lifj the remainder. 

I expressed the opinion ' *e who died in 1 L98, 

a i (J whose sons possessed, the P. King Lown, and 

Maplescomb estates, was ;; son 'cer of London, 

and a brother of Sir Richard, tl ■. ! of John, 

1o whom his father bequeathed fch • i in r of Bay;' well as of 

Katharine, who inherited Hever. The proof thai this opinion is well 
founded is the record of a Writ, dated 20 December : n citing 

that in Cha.ncery, E. T. 2 Richard III., it was adjudged that 
" William Lovelas should make a sure and lawful estate unto his 
sister Katharine, wife of William Founteyn, and her lawful issue. 
of the manor of Hevyr in the parish of Kyndesdowne, co. Ken!.'' 
Katharine either died childless, or parted with her property to her 
brother, for at his death he left it to his son. This William, who 
had married Laura Peckham, was, I suppose, the "William Love- 
lesse of Kingsdowne," who was cited 29 December 1 172. on a charge 
of marrying his spiritual sister, i.e., a woman for whom his mother 
had acted as Sponsor, " qua' mat' tenuit' ad coniirmaco'em Epi'." 
Mr. A. A. Arnold kindly examined the records of the Rochester 
Consistory Court, and informs me that the accused appeared in the 
Parish Church of Dartford on the 6th (or 11th) January 1472-3, 
and "exhibited a dispensation" on which the proceedings were 
adjourned or referred " coram domino." and no further allusion to 
the case occurs. I imagine that the " William Lovelace of Merton, 
late of Bethersden," who was pardoned for his share in Cade's 
rebellion, was the same as he who died at Faversham in 1478, and 
not this William of KingsdownJ and Queenhithe. I refer to this 

* Arch. Cant., Vol X.. pp. 181—220. 

t Seager states in his Baronagivm tint, by deed of 10 Edward IV. (1 17!'), 
William Lovelarie and Kiohard his brother released the manors of B-ayford and 
Goodnestone to Sir Thomas Bourchier, Kt , and others, " quae nuper fuerunt 
liic. Lovelace patris n'ri et Johannis L. fratris n'ri." He als> says that John 
Lovelace, the (irst in the pedigree, had sisters or aunts named Mirien Shalke aud 
Elizabeth Gateman. 

X Thomas Honywood, Biron for Hvthe 31 Henry VI., who died temp. 
Edward IV., married "Thomasina Lovelace de Kingesdou" (Honywood 



THE KENTISH FAMILY OF LOVELACE. OO 

for the purpose of remarking that in the Paston Letters we hav< 
a proof of the active part taken by one of this family, be he who 
he may, in the insurrection. Payn, Sir John Past dlf's servant, 
relating his own experiences, writes: "The captain that same 
time let take me at the White Hart in Southwark and there com- 
manded Lovelace to despoil me out of mine array, and so he did ; and 
there he took a fine gown of muster-devillers furred with fine 
beaver, and one pair of brigandines covered with blue velvet and gilt 
nails, with leg harness ; the value of the gown and brigandines £8." 
This William of Eavcrsham, whose "lyvelod" was at Bethersden, 
was doubtless the person who, 1 October 1455, was supervisor of the 
will of Thomas Heth of Woolwich. He had two daughters, one of 
whom was in all probability the ancestress of Sir Simonds D'Ewes. 
Sir Simonds, speaking of his mother, says : " She was the sole 
daughter and heir of Richard Simon Is of Coxden, co. Dorset, Esq., 
yet was not born in the western parts, but at Eaversham in co. Kent, 
the 29 November (being Sunday), 2 afternoon, a.d. 1579. Her birth 
happened to be in this place because it had formerly been resided in 
by Johan her mother, being at the time her father married her 
widow of John Nethersole, Esq., being daughter also of a Stephens, 
a surname very ancient in that shire, but of small eminence in these 
days, yet she was nearly allied unto (if not descended from an 
inheritance of) the family of Lovelace."* And again, "Of my 
mother's family I can say little. She was sole daughter and heir of 
Eichard Simonds and of Johanna his wife, the daughter of William 
Stephens of Kent, and of Ellen his wife, the daughter and heir of 
a Lovelace (as hath been received by tradition), and that she was 
heir to the said Ellen, whence my grandfather did about 13 years 
since (1591) cause to be depicted over the chimney of his dining- 
room at Coxden his own coat armour impaled with Lovelace and 
Ensham quarterly, which may yet be seen. What be had to 

assert his assuming of them 1 know not." The dates, however, make 
it much more likely that (unless D*Ewes has omitted a generation) his 
ancestress was a daughter of William Lovelace, the son of the last 
mentioned, who, as we learn from the records of New Eomney, w r as 
born at Wickhambreaux, and " admitted to the franchise of Eomene 
on the 14th day of June 1 Eichard III.," having to give for his 
fine, paid beforehand, 6s. St/. " And if he remain without the liberty 
of the said town he shall give for his yearly contribution 20,7." 
Tliis seems to be the " cousin of Sir Eichard," noted by Seager in 
his Baronagium. I have not found when or where he died, but he 
appears to have left no son, and his property at Bethersden must 
have devolved on his relatives Sir Eichard and William of Kings- 
down, or one of them. 

Evidences— Topographer and Genealogist, vol ii., p. 268). Elsewhere she is 
called " Mary, daughter of William Lovelace of Bethersden, whose ancestor had 
married the heir of Broxl>>urne." 

* The Visitation, of Kent 1574 calls Alice, wife of William Lovelace of 
Bethersden, who died 1540, " daughter of Stivins." But her heir could not have 
been Simonds' wife, as she left a son, the Fuel's great-grandfather. 



oG THE KKNTlsif FAMILY OF LOVELACE. 

SlH Kit III Kl) LOTELACE- 

To what f have already written respecting Sir Richard, I can 
only add that, 11 February list;, he received a "grant, during 
pleasure, of an annuity of 50 marks oul of the Issues of the Town 

of ( 'a la is and the marches of the same" and i hat ten days afterwards 
a mandate was addressed to the "Treasurer of the Town of Calais 
1<> pay divers sums of money to Adrian ami Richard Lovelas which 
hail been heretofore granted to them by letters patent of Edward 
\\ . and Richard Ml., and which are confirmed to them by Henry 
VII." His nephews were unquestionably his heirs, A MS. in 
the Library of Queen's College, Oxford, contains a Confirmation, 
dated 2 December (5 Elizabeth (1563)j by E. ('(Mike, Clarencieux, 
'"of this Arises (Lovelace and Eynsham) quartered to William Love- 
lace of Canterbury, Esq., Seriante at Lawe, being one of the heires 
of S r Richard Louelace, Knt\, late Marshall of (alleys, deceased, 
according to the custome of GaueUkynde in Kent, which Richard 
died sans issue, after whose death the inheritance descended to J° 
Louelace of Kingsdowne Esq. and to William Louelace of Bothers- 
den Esq., sonnes of William Louelace Esq. brother unto the said 
Sir Richard, which William had issue the aforesaid Wm. Louelace, 
Seriante at Lawe. And the gift of the Creast is allowed unto 
William Lovelace Esq., and to all the heires and posteritie of the 
said Sir Richard and William Louelace grandfather to the said Wil- 
liam." 

Serjeant Lovelace. 

The Serjeant, to whom this " Confirmation " was given, and whose 
portrait, with those of his son, grandson, and great-grandson, is in 
the Dulwich Gallery, was a man of some eminence in his profession, 
and probably the person referred to by Mr. Riley, when in his note 
to the Fifth Rej^ort of the Historical MSS. Commission, he remarked : 
" The surname Lovelass is still remembered as that of a writer of 
authority upon Wills." I have already given a pretty full sketch of 
his career, but we are indebted for an interesting account of his 
labours in connection with the Commission of 1561 for the repair of 
Rochester Bridge, and for a facsimile of his writing, to the valuable 
paper by Mr. A. A. Arnold in Arch. Cantiana, Vol. XVII. From 
that account I note that in July 1561 he had " gon downe to his house 
in the Welde of Kent," i.e., to Lovelace Place in Bethersden, which 
at that time of year, when the roads were dry and the trees in leaf, 
would be a pleasant change from London and Canterbury, and that 
22 September he refers to his " greyhoundes," of which as a country 
gentleman he seems to have been fond. Two or three other items I 
have gathered respecting him. Eoxe, in his Acts and Monuments 
(vol. v'iii., p. 235, Church Historians of England), says: "I am 
credibly certified, that in the eighth year of Queen Elizabeth, certain 
scalps and other young infants' bones were found and taken out 
with a stick in the hole of a stone wall in Lenton Abbey, by certain 
gentlemen within the county of Nottingham (James Barusse, 



THE KENTISH FAMILY OF LOVELACE. 57 

Richard Loveit, and W. Lovelace) walking in the prior's chamber ; 
witness the said AV. Lovelace, with others which saw the bones 
aforesaid." The Serjeant is probably here referred to; having been, 
as we know, associated in 1559 with Jewel in a Commission for the 
Establishment of Religion. "With Lord Chief Baron Saunders he 
acted as Justice of Assize for Oxfordshire, 27th February 14 Eliza- 
beth, In 1574 Reynolde Scot published a black-letter pamphlet 
entitled a Per/He Platforme of a Hoppe Garden, and dedicated it to 
" "William Lovelace of Bethersden, Sergeaunt at the Lawe." It 
contains illustrations shewing that in earlier times the growers 
banked the earth high about the sets. In one of the cuts the 
"hills" appear about four feet high, rounded and smoothed like an 
inverted flower-pot. At the funeral of Archbishop Parker, 1575, 
Serjeant Lovelace walked in the procession with his old antagonist 
Chief Baron Manwood, and let us hope that salutary thoughts passed 
through the minds of both, as they followed their patron to the 
grave, In his History of the Star Chamber, Mr. Burns writes : " In 
a case (Michaelmas, 4 James I.), Egerton said he remembered in Sir 
N. Bacon's time, that a Demurrer was put into the Star Chamber 
unto a Bill, for that the Bill was for other offences than were 
contained in the Statutes of 1 and 3 Henry VII., to which Serjeant 
Lovelace being then a young man put his hand, and was sharply 
reproved. His excuse was that ' Mr. Plowden had put his hand 
unto it, and he supposed he might in anything follow St. Austin.' " 
From the entry of his burial in the Register of St. Alphage, Can- 
terbury, it appears, under the date of April 1, 1577, that " Sereiant 
Lovelas died the xxiij 4 ' day of Marche last past in London, and was 
buryed in the bodye of Christe Church in Caunturberye." 

I find that in my pedigree of the Bethersden Lovelaces I have 
made a -mistaken suggestion as to the death of the Serjeant's widow. 
I had thought that she was possibly the " Mrs. Lovelace, lately 
deceased," in 1591, " before whose pew in S* Alphege, Canterbury, 
Christopher Turner, Gent., was buried," but by her will proved 
29 April 1578 she desired to be buried at South "Warnborough, 
Hants. She mentions her previous husband Thomas Carell, her 
daughters Frances Carell and Mabel Lovelace, both under 21, her 
brothers Gabriell White, Steven White the elder, Steven White the 
younger, Anthony White, her sisters Barbara Oxenbridge and 
Frances Yeate, her " cosyn " Anne Yeate, daughter of Frances, her 
step-children William, Thomas, and Mary Lovelace. She leaves to 
Steven AVhite, Senior, " a ring of gold whereon are written these 
words, "The way to Lief is Death," and to Mary Lovelace " a little 
trencher salt which was her father's." 

Sir William Lovelace, Senior. 

I have nothing to add to what I have already said of Sir William 
Lovelace, Senior, the Serjeant's elder son, whose portrait is also at 
Dulwich, except that in 1007 he granted a lease for forty-one years 
to "Richard Long, of Bethersden, Wholkeemer (? Woolcomber), 



58 THE KENTISH l'\.MILV OF LOVELACE. 

of a tenement called Poulehurst," and I mention this Eor the sake 
of suggesting thai "Long's Corner," the poinl al which the road 
from Bethersden to Biddenden and Smarden divides, maj be called 
after this man. Perhaps Sir William, who was not knighted until 
L599, is the person mentioned in the letter of Lord Burghlej to Sir 
K. Cecil, 29 March 1594. " l!\ your letter and by the message of 
Mr. Loveless I perceive ber Majestj wold bave me come to the 
court to-morrow." 

Sir John Collimore, his son-in-law, was knighted as "of Kent" 
al the Tower, II March L604. His "Marriage Allegation" runs: 
•■ L60|, 17 Feb., John Collymore, Mercer, of S' Thomas Apostle, 
London, Bachelor, l".». and Mabel Lovelace, Maiden, is. of S 1 
Bride's, London, daughter of Sir William Lovelace, Knight, of the 
City of Canterbury, who consents; consent also of M 1 ' James Colly- 
more, of S 1 Thomas Apostle, .Merchant, father of said John; at s 1 
Thomas Apostle aforesaid." Their daughter Mabel died unmarried 
at Dr. llanle's house, and was buried in Canterbury Cathedral, L668. 

Lovelace the Poet. 

My next addition is one that sets at rest the question which has 
" exercised the minds " of some of his biographers, as to the amount 
of " Bail " required of Sir William's grandson the Poet, as a con- 
dition of his release from the imprisonment to which the House of 
Commons had condemned him for his share in the second presenta- 
tion of the Kentish Royalist Petition of 1642. Anthony "Wood gives 
it as £40,000. Following the, in this "instance, unfortunate guidance 
of Mr. Hazlitt, I wrote " it was ordered that he be forthwith bailed 
upon good security, probably for £4000." When I came to examine 
the Parliamentary Journals for myself, I found, under date 21 
June 1642, " That this House doth approve of William Clarke, 
Esq., of B/Ootham in Kent, and Thomas Flood, Esq., of Otton in 
Kent, to be bail for Captain Lovelace, £10,000 the Principal, 
£5000 apiece the Sureties." 

Thomas Flood, or Fludd, was of Gore Court in Otham. William 
Clarke, afterwards knighted, was of Ford in Wrotham, and fell in the 
skirmish at Cropredy Bridge, 29 June 1644. 

The Poet's mother was married to her second husband, Dr. 
Brown, at Greenwich, 20 January 1630. His sister Anne marrie L 
the Bev. John Gorsage, Rector of Walkern, Herts ; and his sister 
Elizabeth wedded Daniel Hayne of Kintbury Eaton, Berks, who at 
the time of the marriage, 28 March 1664, was thirty-seven years of 
age. 

Lovelaces of Kixgsdowx. 

John Lovelace of Hever in Kingsdown was in the Commission 
of the Peace for Kent, 20 May 1531. His son Thomas, who had 
been named in the will of his uncle William as " supervisor," seems 
to have been living at Lovelace Place in 1554, since in that year he 
is described as " of Bethersden " in the Commission empowering him, 
with others, to "bail and set at large such of the offenders in 



TIIE KENTISH FAMILY OF LOVELACE. 59 

"Wyatt's Rebellion as were in prison in Kent, and at their discretion 
to compound with them according to the nature of their offences." 
In .May L555 he was "Escheator" at the inquisition held at East 
Greenwich on the death of John Eitz, and in L560 was "Super- 
visor" of the will of Thomas Hurst, Gent., of Lewisham, who left 
land at Great Chart. 

Referring, no doubt, to Leonard Lovelace, the successor of 
Thomas. R. Whyte writes to Sir Robert .Sidney, L3 October 1597: 
'•Even now Mr. Lovelace of Kent came unto me and desired me to 
procure hym some answer from your Lordship to a Lettre he sent 
you: yt is about a colt he saves is unduly detained from hym in 
Oteford Park. His sute unto you is thai \ou wil direct your lettre 
to Sir Thomas Walsingham, Sir John Levison, Mr. Leonard, Mr. 
Sidley, or any two of them, to examine the cause. I promised to 
wryte unto you about yt, for he is one of them that gave you his 
voice in the Election, and I have thancked hym for yt." 

The Plymouth MSS. contain two or three letters addressed to 
Richard Lovelace, Leonard's brother and heir, which may be worth 
transcribing. 

" To worsliipfull my very good uncle Mr. Richard Lovelace give these. 

"Good Uncle. I in most humble manner do dedre to hear from you and my 
good aunt for I do account yon the cue of the dearest friends I have. Though 
we are separated from our friends, it will be a great comfort to hear from them, 
and if it will please yon to come this Summer into Kent we shall be as glad to 
see yon as any friend we have. Dear Uncle, I think that you would gladly hear 
how the case standeth with us, as I thank God we are all well and my father 
useth us kindly as we would desire, and thus with my duty to my good aunt and 
yourself I humbly take my leave, desiring God to send you health and my little 
cousin, from Ywilldershire. 

" Your loving neice to command till death. 

"Fbances Moninges. 

"I do purpose by the grace of God to follow your good counsel as near 
as I can." 

" To the right worsliipfull my very loving Brother Mr. Richard Lovelace 
Esq r '' be these delivered. 
" Good Brother, 

"I thank you very much for your care you have of my unhappy 
nephew's business in the Parliament, and there be so many of them that God be 
thanked 1 can hardly keep a penny in my purse for them, but howsoever I will 
disburse Twenty Pounds so that you will secure me that one of his children 
shall have it, but for his use I will give nothing: so leaving you to the probitie 
of J esus I rest ever, 

" Your lo : Sister, 

" Maugaret Clerke." 

Margaret, aunt of Sir John Molyneux of Notts, and widow of 
Leonard Lovelace, had married secondly Thomas Clerke of Hyde 
Abbey. Winchester. Her nephew was a prisoner for debt, and his 
affairs were in inextricable confusion. 

"To my especial good friend Mr. Richard Lovelace Esq" at Colham these. 
"Sir, 

"I desire to patronize both widows and fatherless, and if God hath 
made me a judge I should have condemned the widow's refusal of your kind offer 



(50 THE KENTISH FAMILY OF LOVELACE. 

and [deemed P] yourself a protector of her, but women, though they be widows 
mid have oeed enough, arc wilful and wedded to their own opinion, though to 
their own loss. L acquainted Mrs. Ellis how you bad offered her tin lor her 
corn, ami that you were willing to let my Fellow btobyns, or his sonne, or myself, 
have it of von again for t'!> 10*. Od. She told me von offered her bo much yet 
she sayeth it hath cost her 80». et modis and would have 61 1 for it, which I 
told her was impossible and BO lel'l her. I will acquaint her with your care in 

preparing the ham for her. ) must again leave it to her own answer for she is a 

woman and she hath good opinion of herown Thus much I must more make 

you acquainted withall that my fellow Ellis and I talking about the provision of 

money for my lady against her going to the haths with the Queen, lie told me 
my lady made acoompt that yon would furnish her with her rent some fortnight 
less or .... Lady-day with your own, which 1 will let you know when I hear it 

from herself, for she makes some .... of you. Mr man that was about to take 

your house, having talked with his carpenter touching the church, is not minded 
to proceed with you therein, for 1 think his wife is not willing and so he prayed 
me to let you know. This moving and meddling for the moveable creatures we 
find them change daily. I must entreat you not to think unkindness in me for 
being an instrument for him or her, but I, what shall prevail, my true love to 
you shall ever be firm and stable while I am mine own, God willing, to whoso 
protection I leave yon. 

" York House this last of January 1613. 

" Your poor troublesome and chargeable friend to command, 

" George Gosse. 

"I saw your brother to-day in ... . his .... saluting gentlewomen, whose 
courtesy I was loth to interrupt, but 1 saw lie was well and left him to his 
compliments." 

Richard Lovelace hired the manor house of Colham in the parish 
of Hillingdon, near Uxbridge, of Lord Chancellor Ellesmere, whose 
wife is the " my lady " referred to in the letter. He was also, I 
believe, agent for some of her property. His rent in 1616 amounted 
to £161 12*., of which £28 10s. was for "the great Park," £9 for 
" Hanger wood," and £19 for " Colham mill." 

The second wife of Richard Lovelace was, as I have said, Jane 
Monke, widow of Roger Day. It seems that, though not married 
until she had attained the mature age of forty-eight, she survived her 
wedding day not less than sixty years ! She was buried at Thorington 
Church, Suffolk, where, " on a small stone slab under the altar, 
removed from its original position," is the following inscription to 
her memory : " Here resteth ye body of Jane daugbter of Francis 
Monke Esq 1 ' first married to Roger l)ay Gent., and after his decease 
to Richard Lovelace of Kingsdowne in ye County of Kent Esq 1 ', 
whom she also overlived, but had not any childe by eyther of them. 
She was a godly sober and vertuous woman and lived (by ye blessing 
of God) until she was one hundred and eight yeares of age. In 
whose honour and memory Henry Coke Esq 1 ' and Margaret his 
wife (sole daughter and heire of ye said Richard Lovelace by Elizab. 
his former wife) have erected this monument. This Jane for y c 
affectionate love as well to hir husband Richard Lovelace, as to the 
said Henry and Margaret and their children, gave all her estate of 
Value to those children as by hir last will appeareth. She Christianly 
and peacibly passed out of this mortal life y e 12 day of June 1630 
in ye faviour of Crod and good men." The will gives £600 to 
Richard Coke, and £100 to Ciriar Coke, and the codicil all above 
£800 equally between Roger, Ciriar, Robert, Bridget, and Jane. 



THE KENTISH FAMILY OF LOVELACE. 61 

The old lady lived in the reigns of Henry VIII., Edward VI., 
Mary, Elizabeth, James L, and Charles I., and might have seen both 
Katharine of Arragon and Henrietta Maria as Queens Consort of 
England. 

If the above inscription is rightly given, Richard Lovelace's first 
wife could not have been Mary, daughter of Serjeant Lovelace, as 
on Hasted' s authority I have asserted. The Serjeant had no 
daughter Elizabeth, so far as I know. 

The marriage between Henry Coke (son of the Chief Justice) 
and Margaret Lovelace was solemnized at Hillingdon, Middlesex, 
24 August 1619.* 

Henry Lovelace. 

The second son of John Lovelace of Kingsdown who died in 
1546, Henry Lovelace, the ancestor of the Canterbury family, 
inherited " Snatts" in Kingsdown from his father. He was admitted 
a freeman of the Mercers' Company 1530, "by Servitude," having 
been apprenticed to Mr. Robert Chertsey. In his will, made 
1 August 1577, he describes himself as " Gentelman, of Chalke," 
near Gravesend, and left Snatts and lands in Kingsdown, Maples- 
comb, Woodland, and Shoreham to his eldest son Thomas, with 
remainder to his next son Launcelot (afterwards Recorder of 
Canterbury); mentioning "Margery" (nee Hamon), "his wife," 
and his " brother Edward," to whose " daughter Agnes, then a 
servant in his house," he bequeathed a legacy ; also his sister 
" Alice, and his sister Byrd of Chipstead ;" giving something to the 
poor of Chalke and of Kingsdown " where I was born," and 
desiring to be buried at Chalke. This last wish was not carried out. 
For not only do the Registers of Chalke contain no reference to him 
or his family, but Launcelot Lovelace of St. Botolph's without 
Aldersgate, who in 1573-4 was Collector for Kent of rents of sup- 
pressed Chantries, and whose account book, from 25 March 1584 to 
November 1586, is in the British Museum, by will, proved 21 June 
1605, directed that he should be buried at Kingsdown " near his 
brothers Thomas and Henry.' 1 '' 

Thomas Lovelace. 

Henry's elder son, Thomas, must be he of whom Stow, in his 
Annals, tells the following sad story : " The 11 th of Eeby 1585 
Thomas Lovelace was brought prisoner from the Tower of Lon- 

* The Visitation of Rutland in 1618-19, with Additions, as published by the 
Harleian Society, contains a statement which it seems impossible to reconcile 
■with the facts. On page 6 Walter Houghton of Kind's Cliff, Northampton, 
and afterwards (1630) of Kilthorpe in Rutland, is represented as having married 
as his second " wiffe Elizabeth, d. of Lovelace of Hillingdon in Com' Mid'sex." 
The Thorington inscription appears plainly to contradict this assertion. It is, 
however, possible that Richard Lovelace may have had a daughter Elizabeth, 
who died childless in her father's lifetime, and whose surviving sister Margaret 
was therefore spoken of as his " sole daughter and heir." The fact that wife 
and daughter are both called " Elizabeth " strengthens this supposition. The 
Register of St. Alphage, Canterbury, records the burial there, 12 April 1596, of 
" Elizabeth, daughter of Mr. Richard Lovelace, Gent." 



G2 THE KENTISH FAMILY OF LOVELACE. 

don to the Starre Chamber against whom heT Majestie's Attorney 
General did inform thai the same Lovelace, upon malice conceived 
againsl Leonard and Richard Lovelace his cousin germaines, bad 
falsely and devilishly contrived and counterfeited a very fcrayterous 
letter in the name of Thomas Lovelace, another brother of the said 
Richard and Leonard then resident beyond the seas, purporting thai 
the said Thomas should thereby incite and provoke the said Leonard 
to procure the Baid Richard t<> execute her BLighnesse destruction, 
with other circumstances of Treason. This letter he cast in an open 
highway, pretending thai upon the discovery thereof Ids said kinsmen 
Leonard and Richard should be draw ne in question t'oi' the treason- 
able matter againsl her Majeslie in thai bill contained, even In the 
highesl degree, for which offence her Majestie's attorney prayed the 
said Thomas, then prisoner, might receive condigne punishment. 
Whereupon the court adjudged that he should be carried on horse- 
back about Westminster Hall with his face to the horsetaile and a 
paper on Ins backe wherein to be written: 'For counterfeiting of 
false and treacherous letters against his owne kindred, containing 
most traiterous matter against her Majestie's person.' And from 
thence to be carried in that manner, and set on the pillorie in the 
Palace at Westminster and there to have one of his eares cut off ; 
also to be carried in like manner into London and set on the pillorie 
one market day in Cheape, with the like Paper. After that, carried 
into Kent and at the next assize there to be set on the Pillory with 
the like paper, and his other ear to be cut off. Also to be set on 
the Pillory one market day at Canterbury and another at Rochester 
in the like manner ; and at every the aforesaid places this order 
taken touching his offence to be openly read, the sentence whereof 
was duly executed in the Palace at Westminster, in Cheape, etc." 

Of course it was not he who went as "Pilgrim to Pome in 1583," 
as I suggested in the Pedigree, but Thomas, son of Thomas Lovelace 
of Kingsdown. I know nothing of his subsequent history. 

I can add but little to what I have already written concerning 
the Canterbury Lovelaces.* Mr. Hovenden informs me that from 
an indenture in his possession, dated 20 January 36 Elizabeth, it 
appears that Mary Cayser of Hollingbourne, wife of Lancelot Love- 
lace of Gray's Inn, had been previously married to Richard Rivers, 
and was the mother by him of a son named AVilliam, on whom by a 
deed of 10 November 1 Charles I. (1625) a portion of her property 
was settled. 

The Rivers Family were seated at Chafford in Penshurst. 

Leonard, the son of Lancelot and Mary, is described as "Woollen 
draper " of Canterbury. I refer to him for the sake of noticing 
what is undoubtedly a mistake in the Register of St. Mary Magda- 
len, Canterbury. Under date " 1635 Aprill the 7," we read, "was 

* To prevent mistakes it may be well to say that the Bethersden branch of 
the family had property in Canterbury, but that by the " Canterbury Love- 
laces " I mean Lancelot and his descendants, who lived and held municipal 
office in the city. 



THE KENTISH FAMILY OF LOVELACE. 



63 



baptized Lancelot Louelas sonne of Leonarde and Ingle his wife." 
But Leonard, 26 September 1632, married Martin, daughter of 
Alderman Whiting, by whom he had children born in 1637 and 
1639. The Alderman had a daughter Ingle, and the clergyman, no 
doubt, wrote the name of one sister for that of the other, forgetting, 
it may be, which of the Misses Whiting Mr. Lovelace had married. 
Mr. J. M. Cowper tells me that the name Ingle occurs as a surname 
in the Register of St. Paul's, Canterbury, and as a Christian name 
also, having been bestowed in 1599 on the daughter of James Chilton, 
one of the Pilgrim Lathers. 

John Lovelace of Bethersden, dead in 1417. 



William, of London ; 
d. 1-459. 



Robert, of 
Bethersden. 



Richard, of London, Kinssdown, 
and Sittin«-bourne ; d. 1466. 



William, of Favers- 
ham and Bethers- 
den ; d. 1473. 



John. William, of 

London and 
Kingsdown; 
d. 1496. 



Katherine 
Founteyne, 
of Kings- 
down. 



Sir Richard, of Calais, 
Bethersden, and Sit- 
tingbourne ; dead in 
1511. 



William, b. at Wiokham- 
Breanx. 



John, of Kingsdown ; 
d. 1546. 



William, of Bethersden - r 
d. 1540. 



Henry, of Chalke ; 
d. 1577. 



Thomas, of Kingsdown ; 
d. in 1605. 



I 
V, illiam, of Bethersden and 
Canterbury, Serjeant-at- 
Law ; d. 1577. 



1 

Thomas, 


Lancelot, 


pil- 


of Can- 


loried. 


terbury ; 




d. 1640. 




~r 



Thomas. 

Leonard, of Kings- 
down ; d. 1616. 



Richard, of Hil- 
lingdon and 
Kingsdown ; d. 
in 1630. 



Francis, of Canterbury ; 
d. 1664. 



Sir William, of 
Bethersden and 
Canterburj' ; d. 
1629. 



Margaret Coke, of 
Thorington. 



Sir William, of Woolwich ; 
d. 1628. 



Go'dwell, of Canterbury ; 
d. 1712. 



William, of Can- 
terbury ; d. 1656. 



Richard, the Poet, of Bethers- 
den ; d. 1658. 



William, of Canterbury: d. 1679. 



( 64 ) 



EARLY PRESENTATIONS TO KENTISH 
BENEEICES. 

BY KEV. T. S. FIIAMPTON, M.A. 

Letters of Presentation to Benefices from the Sovereign 
are of frequent occurrence throughout the Patent Rolls. 
They were generally given either by reason of the preferment 
being Crown patronage, or through a vacancy in the See, 
though there were other grounds for the exercise of the 
right. 

The Patent Rolls commence with the 3rd year of King 
John. Those for the 10th, 11th, and 12th years of his reign 
are unfortunately missing, which is all the more to be 
regretted by the student of Kentish Ecclesiastical History, 
as during the whole of that time the Temporalities of the 
See of Canterbury were in the King's hands, and he disposed 
of all preferments belonging to the Archbishop which 
happened to fall vacant. The Rolls for the 23rd and 24th 
years of King Henry III. are also missing. With these 
exceptions the series is complete throughout. 

The Patent Rolls for King John's reign were printed in 
verbal facsimile, and with admirable Indexes of Persons and 
Places, in the year 1835, under the direction of the Public 
Record Commissioners. Those for the reign of King 
Henry III. have not yet been so treated. 

The Presentations given below are valuable, as being 
earlier in date than any Institutions entered in the Registers 
of the Archbishops in Lambeth Palace Library, which 
commence with the accession of Archbishop Peckham in the 
year 1279. 

It may be useful to Compilers of Lists of Incumbents to 
mention that there is in the Public Record Office a MS. 
Calendar of Presentations to Benefices in various dioceses, 
including those of Canterbury and Rochester from 1 Edw. I. 
to 24 Edw. III. The volume contains presentations to 
more than two hundred benefices in Kent, and is well worth 
examination. There are also some well-preserved Sede 
Vacante Registers among the Cathedral Archives at Canter- 
bury, which, with the Calendar above mentioned, form a 
useful supplement to the better known Episcopal Registers. 



EARLY PRESENTATIONS TO KENTISH BENEFICES. 



King John's Eeign, 1199 — 1216. 



Reference. 


Presentee. 


Preferment. 


Letteks 
directed to. 


Date. 


Anno 












3 


m. 1. 


S., Well. Arckid's. 1 


Favereshasi. 


D'n'm Cant. 


[17 Maii.] 


4 


m. 6. 


Adam de Essex'. 


Capella S. Joh. 
de Stanes, in 
Tanet. 


D'n'm Cant. 


29 Dec. 


7 


m. 1. 


Adam de Essex'. 


Smereden'. 


Arch'd'o Cant. 


2 Dec. 


7 


m. 2. 


W. de Wrotham, 2 
Archid. Tanton. 


Wardon, in 
Scapeia. 


H., Archid'o Cant. 


13 Jan. 


7 


m. 3. 


Walter, de Gray, 3 Can- 


Prebenda de 


G., Roffens. Ep'o, 


23 Jan. 






cellar'. 


Mallinges. 


et Tho. de Hel- 
ham, Omc. Ar- 
chiep. Cant. 




7 


m. 4. 


Will, de Wroth., 
Archid. Tant'. 


Est Malling'. 4 


H., Archid. Cant., 
et Ep'o Roff. 


6 Marc. 


7 


m. 4. 


Petrus de Cornhull'. 


MlLSTEDE. 


H., Archid. Cant. 


[Marc] 


7 


m. 6. 


Joh'es de Birmingham. 


Colred'. 


H., Archid. Cant. 


[21 Apr.] 


7 


m. 6. 


Will's, capellanus. 5 


Colred', per- 
petua Vicaria. 


H., Archid. Cant. 


[21 Apr.] 


8 


m. 3. 


W., Archid. Tanton'. 


Keston'. 6 


Dec. de Orbinton'. 




8 


m. 2. 


Joh'es de Birmingeham, 
cap'llan. Hug., 
Archid. Well'. 


Edesham, per- 
petua Vicaria. 7 


H., Archid'o Cant. 


[Marc] 


8 


m. 2. 


W., Archid. Totton'. 8 


Saltewud'. 


Tho. de Elham, Of- 
fic.Archiep.Cant. 


[Marc] 


9 


m. 6. 


Wuluinus, clericus 


Bouhton', alias 


Archid'o Cant., et 


[Jun.] 






Com. Flandr'. 


BoCTON'. 


Thorn", de Elham. 




9 


m. 5. 


Sim. de Waltam. 


Colred'. 


Archid'o Cant., et 
Thorn, de Elham. 


[Jul.] 


14 


m. 1. 


Rob. filius Galfr'. 


S. Joh'is Bapt., in 
Thanito. 


Offic. Archiep'at. 
Cant. 


14 Marc. 


15 


m. 7. 


Guido, cl'icus Regin. de 
Cornhull'. 


Mildsted'. 


D'no S., Cant. 
Archiep'o. 9 


3 Nov. 


1 6 


linion Fitz-Robert, Archdeacon of "Wells, was also Provost of Beverley. Hubert Walter 



was at this time Archbishop of Canterbury. 

2 William de Wrotham was Archdeacon of Taunton in 1204, and in 1212. The Arch- 
deacon of Canterbury at this time was Henry de Saudford, who was subsequently Bishop of 
Rochester. 

3 He was Bishop of Worcester 1213-14, and translated to York in 1216. He died 1 May 
1255. The prebend to which he was now presented had previously been held by Hen. de 
Baiocis. 

4 Lately held by Baldewin de Ginnes. 

5 He was charged with an annual paj'nient of ten marks to John de Birmingeham. 

6 Lately held by Hen. de Baioc'. 

7 The Charter Roll of 7 John, m. 8, contains the following entries about Adisham : — 
"J. D'i gra., etc. Sciatis nos intuitu D'i concessisse, etc, H. de Well., Archid. Well., 
ecclesiam de Edeshani cum capella de Staph, etc., vacantem et de donatione nostra existent, 
r'one Archiep'at. Cant, vacantis et in manu nostra existentis .... Apud Bixle xxj Julij." 
" J. D'i gra., etc Sciatis nos intuitu D'i, et de consensu Hug. de Well., Archid. Well., persone 
ecclesie de Edesham, concessisse dilecto clerico nostro J. de Well, ecclesiam de Edesham, habend. 
et tenend. toto tempore rite sue cum capella de Staples et omnibus aliis pertin. suis in perpetuam 
vicariam sub annua pensione unius bisantii predicto H. Archid. ejusdem eccl. et successoribus 
suis persolvenda .... Apud Havering vij Aug." The same raeinb. contains the grant of the 
church of " Mavdenestane " to Will, de Cornhull', and that of Tenham to Gaul'r' de Bocland. 

8 Walter de Gray, Archdeacon of Totnes. 

9 Stephen Langton, consecrated 17 June 1207. He did not receive the temporalities until 1213. 
VOL. XX. F 



66 



EMILY PRESENTATIONS TO KKNTISII BENEFICES. 



Pbesentee. 



Preferment. 

OSPRENO '.'" 

17 m. 14. Phil, de Langeb[er]ge. S.utw'd. 



Reference. 

Anno. 

15 in. .">. Thorn, de Boues 



17 in. 6. Lucas, capellanus. 



Ospreng'. 



Lett i: us 
DIRECTED To. 



Date. 
[Jan.] 



D'noS., Caul. 

Arehiop'o.' J 
D'no Cant. Ar- 18 Oct. 

chiep'Oj i-t ejus 

Officialibus. 
Oflic. Archiep'i. s Marc 



King TIenky III.'s Reign, 1216—1272. 



5 


pfc. 


2, 


Adam Giffard. 


Bikenor'. 






6 Marc. 


6 


m. 
in. 


6. 


End res Hospitalis S. 
Marie, Dovor'. 


Sellinges. 






24 Aug. 


9 


m. 


7. 


Prior e1 Monachi S. 

Andr., Roil'ensis. 


Hertlep'. 




Archiep'o Cant. 


[12 Feb.] 


ID 


in. 


7. 


Tliimi. de Gillingham, 
clericus 11. de Burgo. 


War don'. 




S., Cantuar. Arch. 


[16 Marc] 


10 


in. 


6. 


Joh's de Gillingham. 


Wardon'. 1 




S., Cantuar. Arch. 


4 Maii. 


12 


in. 


1. 


Gileb[ertu]s Marrsral- 
lus. 


WlNGEHAM. 




S. de Langeton, Ar- 
chid. Cant. 


19 Sept. 


13 


in. 


12. 


Rami' Brito. 


BOCTON. 




Archid. Cant. 


31 Oct. 


13 


in. 


12. 


Henr. de Bissopeston. 2 


Sautwud'. 




Archid. Cant. 


lNov. 


13 


m. 


12. 


Hamo. 


Sautwud, 


per- 


Archid. Cant. 


1 Nov. 










petua Vicaria. 






13 


in. 


11. 


Rand's le Bretun. 


Cherring. 3 




Archid. Cant. 


[10 Dec] 


13 


in. 


10. 


Barthol. de Podio. 


Smeredenn 




Archid. Cant. 


10 Jan. 


13 


in. 


10. 


Alanns Poinant, clericus 
H. de Burg., Com. 
Kane'. 


S. Mich., 
ham. 


Pec- 


Archid. Cant. 


11 Feb. 


15 


HI. 


7. 


Phil.de Wigenhal, cleri- 
cus H. de Burg'. 


Wardon'. 




Archiep'o Cant. 


20 Nov. 


16 


111. 


10. 


Joh'es de Stowa. 


Audinton'. 




Offic. Archid. Cant. 


17 Nov. 


16 


111. 


10. 


Oddo, nepos J., Tit. S. 


Bissopesburn'. 


Oflic. Archid. Cant. 


24 Nov. 








Praxedis Presb. Card. 










16 


111. 


10. 


Petrus, fil. Petri Sara- 
cen i. 


Cranebroc' 




Oflic. Archid. Cant. 


24 Nov. 



10 Vacant by the resignation of Will, de Cornhull, Archdeacon of Huntingdon, who was 
consecrated Bishop of Coventry and Lichfield 25 January 1214-15. He died 20 August 1223. 
(See Le Neve's Fasfi, Edit. Hardy, vol. i., 546, and note 82.) Thomas de Boues had been 
appointed Archdeacon of Totnes 20 August 1213. 

1 Vacant by resignation of Thomas de Gillingham, brother of John. 

3 " Dominus Rex ad concessionem magistri Hamonis persone ecclesie de Sautwud' dedit 
magistro Henr. de Bissopeston' ecclesiam de Sautwud' vacantem et ad donationem Regis 
spectantem ratione Archiepiscopatus Cantuariensis vacantis, etc., percipiendo de ecclesia ilia 
nomine personatus aniiuam pensionem j Bisantii. Saluo predicto magistro Hamoni nomine 
perpetue vicarie toto residuo ejusdem ecclesie quoad vixerit. Et diriguntur litere Archid. Cant, 
quod ipsum magistrum Henricum ad eandem ecclesiam admittat, etc. Teste Regeapud Abbend' 
j. die Nov." " Idem magister Hamo babet literas de presentation ad vicariam ejusdem ecclesie 
vacantis, etc., percipiendo omnes proventus ejusdem ecclesie nomine perpetue vicarie excepta 
annua pensione, etc., ut supra." Two days later the King appointed Hen. de Bissopeston custos 
of the Bishopric of London, which had become vacant by the death of Eustace de Fauconberge. 

3 Lately held by Stephen de Eketon. On the same day Ralph Brito, or le Bretun, was 
presented to a prebend in Sirum, also lately held by Stephen de Eketon. On 7 December he 
was presented to a prebend in S. Paul's, lately held by Philip de Faucunberg, Archdeacon of 
Huntingdon. 



EARLY PRESENTATIONS TO KENTISH BENEFICES. 



67 



Reference. 


Presentee. 


Preferment. 


Letters 
directed to. 


Date. 


Anno, 












16 


m. 8. 


Ric's de S. Joh'e, capel- 
laims H. de Burgo. 


Archidiacona- 
tus Cant. 




28 Jan. 


16 


m. 8. 


Odo, nepos J. de Co- 

lumpna. 
Hereb's de Essewell'. 


Burn'. 


Omnibus. 


6 Feb. 


16 


m. 8. 


Eitham. 


Offic. Arcbid. Cant. 


20 Feb. 


16 


m. 7. 


Rog. fil. Galfri., nepos 
mag. Rob. de S. Al- 
bano. 


Wardon'. 


Offic. Archid. Cant. 


[18 Marc] 


16 


m. 3. 


Ernald. de Berkel'. 


S. Petri, Dovor'. 


Offic. Archid. Cant. 


[28 Julii.] 


16 


m. 1. 


Thomas de Shenefeld, 
phisicusdomini Regis. 


Wictrikesham. 


Offic. Archid. Cant. 


14 Oct. 


17 


m. 9. 


Petrus de Muntgom- 

[er]y. 


Eyneford'. 4 


Offic. Archid. Cant. 


[23 Nov.] 


17 


m. 8. 


Nich., nepos domini 
Pape. 


Eyneford'. 5 


Offic. Archid. Cant. 


15 Dec. 


17 


m. 3. 


Will, de Crioil. 


Wudeton'. 


Offic. Archid. Cant. 


[6 Aug.] 


17 


m. 2. 


Will, de Plesset'. 


Eyneford.' 


Offic. Archid. Cant. 


[16 Sept.] 


18 


m. 17. 


Nidi's de Berk., frater 
Em. de Berkel'. 6 


S. Petri, Dovor'. 


Offic. Archid. Cant. 


[2 Nov.] 


18 


m. 17. 


Will, de Wymar'. 


Herbaudon'. 


Offic. Archid. Cant. 


[23 Dec] 


25 


m. 11. 


Henr. de Secusia. 


Monekeston'. 


Archid. Cant. 


5 Dec 


25 


m. 9. 


Sampson de Saunford. 


Wudeton'. 


S., Archid. Cant. 


[22 Jan.] 


25 


m. 5. 


Henr. de Caumbray. 


Seuenhak'. 


Decano de Sorham, 
et Archid'o Can- 
tuar. 


[18 Julii.] 


25 


m. 2. 


Joh'es le Maunsel. 


Maidenestan. 


S. de Langeton, Ar- 
chid'o Cant. 


[10 Oct.] 


26 


pt. 1. 
m. 13. 
m. 9. 


Jeremias de Caxton. 


GODMERESHAM. 


Archid. Cant. 


17 Nov. 


26 


Petrus de Bedinton. 


Ospring'. 


Archid. Cant. 


28 Feb. 


26 


m. 9. 


W., capellanus Regine. 


IUICHIRCH. 


Archid. Cant. 


2 Marc. 


26 


m. 8. 


Walterus de Bradel'. 


lUECHIRCH. 


Archid. Cant. 


13 Marc. 


26 


m. 2. 


Rob. de Shatindon, 
alias Sotindon. 


Merscham. 7 


Archid. Cant. 


[6 Maii.] 


26 


pt. 2. 
m. 4. 


Walterus de Wautham, 
alias Waltham. 


Parva Chert. 


Archid. Cant. 


16 Julii. 


26 


m. 3. 


Ric. fil. Petri le Pey- 
tevyn. 


Iwad'. 


Archid. Cant. 


14 Julii. 


26 


m. 3. 


Rad. de Neketon. 


Otteford. 


Archid. Cant. 


18 Aug. 


27 


m. 4. 


Walter de Seleby. 


Wudeton'. 3 


S., Archid. Cantuar. 


15 Deo. 


27 


m. 4. 


Simon de Ofi'eham, capel- 
lanus domini Regis. 


Shorham. 


Decano de Shor- 
ham. 


21 Jan. 


27 


m. 4. 


Patricius de Karl'. 


Sundresch'. 


Decano de Shor- 
ham. 


21 Jan. 



4 Vacant by the resignation of Hen. de Cundicot. 

5 On 11 July a mandate issued to the Official of the Arohdeacon of Canterbury to induct 
Bonacursus, son of Engleski, and Amery Cose, or one of them, the nuncii of Nicholas, the 
Pope's nephew, into the church of Eyneford, in his name. 

6 On the resignation of his brother, who, on 28 January, was presented to " Aldermannes- 
cherch." 

7 Vacant by resignation of Ralph de Noers. 

8 " Rex concessit et quantum ad ipsum pertinet dedit Waltero de Seleby clerico duas 
marcas annui beneficii in Ecclesia de Wudeton' vacantis, et ad donationem Regis spectantis 
ratione Arch. Cantuar. vacantis et in manu Regis existentis. Et mandatum est magistro S., 
Archid. Cantuar. quatinus clericum ipsum per procuratorem suum in corporalem possessionem 
ejusdem beneficii inducat." 

F 2 



68 




1 \i;i,V PRESENTATIONS TO KENTISH BKNEFICES. 


Riii: 


i;i N 


CE. 


I'm m \ i i i , 


Peefbbment. 


Lettebs 
dibected to. 


Patk. 


Auno, 














-7 


in. 


3. 


Gwido de la Palude. 


Ts T EWl<:< IHBICHE, 


S. do Langeton, Ar- 

Chid. Cant. 


13 Maii. 


27 


m. 


3. 


Tli's do Sabaudia. 


I! woi.rrc. 


S.j An hiii. Cantoar. 


[19 Julii.] 


27 


in. 


3. 


Patricius de Karl'. 


SUNDBES'. 


Arohid. Cant. 


[23 Julii.] 


27 


in. 


2. 


Edwardus tie Westm'. 


1 ! 1 M ' 1 ) 1 N . 


Archid. ('ant. 


I'll Julii. ! 


27 No. 


88. 9 


Osbertus de Maidene- 


Estchi i;i ■ 1 1 '. 


s., Archid'o < !ant. 


24 Maii. J 




in. 


10. 


stan, capell. domini 
Regis. 








27 


in. 


10. 


l'h's de Sabaml'. 


Eacolue. 


S., Archid'o Cant. 


27 Maii. 


27 


m. 


10. 


( rwido de la Palude. 


Salt-nvidk. 


S., Archid'o Cant. 


27 Maii. 


27 


in. 


9. 


Gwido de la Palude. 


Lamheth', et 

Neuchirch. 


S., Archid'o Cant. 


12 Junii. 


27 


in. 


6. 


Gwido do Bussilun. 


Wrotham. 


S., Archid'o Cant. 


3 Julii. 


27 


in. 


2. 


Ph's de Sabaudia. 


WlNGHAM. 


S., Archid'o Cant. 


27 Sept. 


29 


m. 


8. 


Huldricus de Hove. 


Elham. 10 


H. de Mortuo Man, 
Offic. B., Ar- 
chiep'i Cantuar. 


11 Marc. 


30 


in. 


5. 


Hen. de Wingeham. 


Helham. 11 


11. de Mortuo Mari, 
Offic. B., Ar- 
chiep'i Cantuar. 


[20 Apr.] 


32 


m. 


12. 


Hen. de Wengham. 


MlLSTED. 


Offic. Cant. Ar- 
chiep'i. 


[25 Dec] 


36 


m. 


15. 


Hen. de Wengham. 


Hedecrume. 


Offic. Cant. Ar- 
chiep'i. 


[17 Dec] 


3(5 


m. 


15. 


Simon de OfPnm, capel- 
lanus domini Eegis. 12 


Pecham. 


L., Eoffens. Ep'o. 


[20 Dec] 


38 


m. 


4. 


Hen. de Wengham. 


MlLDESTED. 


B., Cantuar. Ar- 
chiep'o. 


[2 Feb.] 


39 


in. 


14. 


Gilbertus, fil. Alex'. 


MlLDESTED. 1H 


Offic. B., Cantuar. 
Archiep'i. 


[14 Feb.] 


40 


m. 


2 


Bic de "Wengham. 


Ecclesia Castki 
Dovor'. 


Const. Castri 
Dovor'. 


2 Oct. 


48 


m. 


4. 


Galfrid. de Haspal. 


ToNGES. 


B., Cantuar. Ar- 
chiep'o. 


4 Sept. 


49 


m. 


24. 


Thorn, de Childen'. 


Herietesham. 


Archiep'o Cant., vel 
ejus Offic. 


26 Jan. 


49 


ra. 


9. 


Alex, de la Knolle. 14 


KlNGESTON. 


B., Cantuar. Ar- 
chiep'o. 


[24 Aug.] 


51 


m. 


23. 


Will, de Wytham. 


Pekeham. 


Ep'o Eoff. 


[26 Marc] 


51 


m. 


13. 


Eic de Clifford. 


Pekham. 


Ep'o Eoff. 


[30 Junii.] 


52 


m, 


11. 


Eogerus de Croft. 


Pecham. 


Ep'o Eoff. 


[4 Julii.] 


53 


m. 


16. 


Walterus de Eudmerl. 


Geavesend. 


L., Ep'o Eoff. 


4 Maii. 



9 This is now numbered among the Charter Eolls. 

10 Vacant "per mortem Magistri G., quondam persone ejusdem ecclesie, et ad donationem 
Eegis spectantem ratioue terrarum que fuerunt A. comitisse Aug. in manu Eegis existentium." 

11 Vacant " per mortem rectoris ejusdem ecclesie, qui nuper obiit in partibus transmarinis." 
There appear to have been two clerics named Hen. de Wengham living at the same time. 
One, avIio was Chancellor of Exeter in 1258-9, Dean of S. Martin's, London, Chancellor of 
England, and consecrated Bishop of London 15 February 1259-60, died on 13 July 1262. The 
other, who was Archdeacon of Middlesex in 1266-7, died on 23 October 1267. 

12 He had a second presentation to the same church on 3 February following. 
la Vacant by the resignation of Hen. de Wengham. 

14 After the battle of Lewes the King, while in the power of Simon de Montfort, had 
unwillingly presented John the nephew of W., prior of S. Eadegund's ; that presentation he 
now revoked. 



EARLY PRESENTATIONS TO KENTISH BENEFICES. 



69 



Refeeence. 


Peesentee. 


Preferment. 


Letters 


Date. 


Anno 










DIRECTED TO. 




54 


m. 


4. 


Rad. de ffrenmgham. 


Esiie. 


Hug. de Mortuo 
Mari, Archid. 
Cant. 


8 Aug. 


54 


in. 


5. 


Will, de flrauuche- 
leynes. 


Cranebrok. 


Custodi Archiep'a- 
tus. 


[2 Sept.] 


55 


m. 


27. 


Ric. de Sarum. 


Midel'. 


H. de Mortuo Mari, 
Arch. Cant. 


4 Dec. 


55 


in. 


26. 


Egidius de Audenard. 


BOTON. 


H. de Mortuo Mari, 
Arch. Cant. 


[8 Dec] 


55 


in. 


20. 


Simon fil. Johannis. 15 


Capellania Cas- 
tri Dovor'. 




15 Feb. 


55 


m. 


16. 


Thidisius de Camilla. 


Wengham. 


H. de Mortuo Mari, 
Arch. Cant. 


20 Apr. 


55 


m. 


16. 


Galfridus Noreman. 


Mildele. 16 


H. de Mortuo Mari, 
Arch. Cant. 


22 Apr. 


55 


in. 


16. 


Rogerus de S. Albano. 


Newenton. 


H. de Mortuo Mari, 
Arch. Cant. 


24 Apr. 


55 


m. 


10. 


Galfr. Norman. 17 


Capellania in Ca- 
pella Castei 
Roffensis. 




20 Julii. 


55 


in. 


6. 


Reymundus de Bonis- 

vill. 
Will, de Wintreshull. 


Aldington. 


Archid. Cant. 


[12 Aug.] 


56 


ni. 


30. 


Chyvening. 


H.de Mortuo Mari, 


[3 Nov.] 












Archid. Cant. 




56 


in. 


29. 


Thedisius de Camill'. 


Esse. 18 


H. de Mortuo Mari, 
Arcbid. Cant. 


25 Nov. 


56 


in 


29. 


Thedisius de Camill'. 


Wengham. 




26 Nov. 


56 


m. 


26. 


Petrus de Abezun. 


Cerring. 19 


H. de Mortuo Mari, 
Archid. Cant. 


7 Jan. 


56 


in 


8. 


Laurencius de Line'. 


S. Jacobi, 
Dovor'. 


H. de Mortuo Mari, 
Archid. Cant. 


[5 Julii.] 


56 


in 


5. 


Walterus de Chile- 
cumbe. 


Parva Chert. 


H. de Mortuo Mari, 
Archid. Cant. 


[6 Aug.] 


56 


in 


2. 


Milo de Lillengestan. 


Tilemerston. 


H. de Mortuo Mari, 
Archid. Cant. 


[20 Oct.] 


57 


in 


2. 


Oto de Chaumpuent. 


Penecestre. 


H. de Mortuo Mari, 
Archid. Cant. 


30 Oct. 



Incidental mention of Kentish Clergy in the Patent Rolls of Henry III. 



Reference. 
Anno. 
14 pt. 2. 
m. 5. 
26 pt. 1. 
m. 13. 

40 m. M. 

41 m. 17. 
48 m. 21. 



Name. 

Johannes. 

Anselinus. 

Stephanus. 
Ric. Oliuer. 
Silvester. 



Mentioned as. 

Vicar of Tenham. 

Vicar of Wrotham. 

" parsona de Eseling." 
" parsona de Netlested." 

" Capellanus in Capella S. Thorn. Martiris de Sidig- 
burn." 



13 In place of Walterus le Prestre, lately deceased. The office was for life. 
10 Vacant by the resignation of Ric! de Sarum. 

17 In place of Martinus de Roil'., lately deceased. 

18 Vacant by the resignation of Rad. de ffreningham. 

19 Vacant by the death of John de Peraches. 



70 



EARLY PRESENTATIONS TO KENTISII BENEFICES. 



Refer km i 


Nami . 


Anno 






50 


m. 46. 


Ivicanlus. 


50 


in. 2:5. 


Silvester. 


50 


m. 18. 


Will, de Stokes. 1 


51 


in. 18. 


Edmundus. 


51 


m. 12. 


llcur. " 


51 


in. 12. 


Ric. Oliuer. 


51 


in. Zld. 


Stephanus. ' 


51 


in. 80d. 


Will. 


53 


m. 11. 


J oh. dc Stokes. ' 


53 


mm. 

20d.,7d. 


Will. 


54 


in. 8. 


Job. de Perouges. 


54 


in. 12d. 


lleremaimus. ' 


55 


m. 24. 


Petrus Alby. 


55 


m. 23. 


Galf'rus de Toucestre. ' 


55 


m. 19. 


Hugo de P»urgundia. ' 


56 


in. 29d. 


Petrus. 



Mentioned as. 

persona eccl. dc Keinesing." 

" Capellanus in Capella 8. Thome Martyria apud Sya- 

iiiclr, in paroohia de Sydingbum." 
having been presented to the ohuroh of Sutton. 
' persona eoel. de Oll'eliain." 
' persona ecol. de Stoting." 
' persona eeel. de Netllesteil." 
' Vic. eccl. S. Clemeut. Sandwic." 
■ persona eccl. de Chiselherst." 
' Vic. eccl. de Codebam." 
' persona eccl. S. Pauli, Cray." 

' persona eccl. de Charing." 

Vic. eccl. de Tenhain." 
' persona eccl'iarum de Wrothain et Lyminges." 
' persona eccl. de Wychelyng." 
' persona eccl. de Magna Chert." 

persona eccl. de Otteford." 



J 1 



«, u 









ll 









1 



M 

I 



i .1 



fflj 



Bra / I' Hi 



ii 



^ 



U I M 

|H i ii 



I i 



A. fM H .'ll 

I 



/ n - N.l ;i ij! 
<3 I sjlf! I 







o 



( 71 ) 



ON THE OLD RECTORY AT NORTHFLEET. 

BY GEORGE M. ARNOLD, F.S.A. 

This building, with about nine acres of land, came into my 
possession in 1890. I purchased it mainly with the object of strip- 
ping off its successive coats of exterior mortar, and of disclosing its 
ancient timber-framed construction. 

The architect to whom I entrusted the work (Mr. Herbert 
Baker) has kindly favoured me with a paper written from his pro- 
fessional standpoint, which I promised to preface by a few lines 
respecting the possible, if not probable, history of the building, but 
these lines I fear will be found to afford little in the way of identi- 
fication, and will leave large room for speculative views on the part 
of others. 

At the time when the great Norman Survey, Domesday, was 
taken, Northfleet Church and the manor belonged to the Metro- 
politan See of Canterbury. Archbishop Cranmer conveyed the 
manor and the advowson of the vicarage to King Henry VIII. by 
his deed of exchange of November 30th, 29 Henry VIII. The 
manor ultimately found its way into the Calcraft family. 

In the modern tithe apportionment of Northfleet the old rectory 
land is tithe-free, and is described as glebe. 

With the church of Northfleet, the saintly Anselm (who became 
Archbishop of Canterbury in a.d. 1093) endowed the Cathedral 
Priory of St. Andrew's, Eochester ; all its attendant lands, tithes, 
oblations, and appurtenances being included in his gift. A charter 
of Archbishop Eichard confirmed to the monks there, "Ecclesiam 
de Norfliete cum pertinentes ejus, cum decimis de Yfield (another 
manor in the parish) & de la Dune." 

Further confirmation followed under the authoi'ity of a Metro- 
politan Synod of Archbishop Baldwin in 1 Eichard I. : " Ecclesiam de 
Nortflete cum decimis de Hyffeld et de la Dune." 



72 ON THE <)U> RECTORY AT NORTH FLEET. 

Respecting benefactions to St. Andrew's. Rochester (Thorpe 
licq. Eqjff\, p. IK!)' Bituate within the Archdiocese, we read as 
follows: "Anselmus Archiepiscopus dedil ecclesiam de Northfliete. 
Eadulfus Archiepiscopus dedit decimam de Casfeld, de Wenivalle, 

dc Dune." 

In a charter of Archbishop Richard of March a.d. 1177, at the 
British Museum (Jiih. Co/ton Domitian A, x., 9), we find that 
out of his affection to the church of Rochester and the monks 
dwelling there, he confirmed them in the same possessions. 

Archbishop Ralph (JReg. liojf'., p. 113) in his confirmation 
charter made in the presence of Arnulph, Bishop of Rochester, 
includes: "Ecclesiam de Northflete quatn Anselmus dedit monachis 
in Roffa Deo famulantibus," and he adds, "et de meo dominico 
do eis imam acram terre iu mea propria cultura, in campo 
que dicitur Gudlesfelde ad edificandum domos sibi et suo capellano, 
ad opus predicte ecclesie et totam decimam de meo dominico 
& omnes decimas villanorun qui habent terram in Doune," etc., etc. 

Amongst the archives of the Dean and Chapter of Kochester 
Cathedral is contained a charter by Archbishop Hubert made at 
Canterbury (1 John), wherein the Archbishop speaks of the fore- 
going gifts (Ilegistrum Roff., p. 506) : " Cedent eciam libere & sine 
omni molestia in usus monachorum decirne de la Dune & decime 
de Wenifalle & de tenementis Nigelli & alie decime quas per loca 
diversa in parochia de Northflete, ex collacione fidelium ab antiquo 
percipere cousueverunt." The Archbishop in the name of the 
church of Canterbury renews and confirms the grant of Northfleet 
Church to the monastery of Rochester. Yet, from some unexplained 
reasons, he had presented to the rectory his own nominee, and the 
monks of Rochester never again enjoyed their former right to the 
church and its temporalities. In 29 Henry VIII. Archbishop 
Cranmer included iu his deed of exchange the rectory, the parsonage, 
and the glebe. 

Hasted* states that the reference to " "Wenifalle " denotes a 
well-known locality in the parish called Windfield-Bank. Tins 
"Windfield-Bank lies immediately south of and abuts upon the old 
rectory property, which may probably be comprised in the term 
" Dune." This hypothesis in its turn leads us to the derivation of 
the word Dune. The English form of the Latin "Duna" would 
suggest a situation by no means inapplicable to that occupied 
by the old rectory, viz., immediately under an abrupt and sudden 

* Folio ed., I., 44-5 ; octavo ed., iii., 316. 



ON THE OLD RECTORY AT NORTHFLEET. 73 

chalk hill or bank, at the base of which flows the spring which, 
taking its rise close to the building, runs into the Fleet that gives 
the parish its name. 

The farm house on the highway opposite the rectory is known 
as the Vale Farm House, indicative of the same hollow. 

Dr. Cowell (edition 1708) describes " Duna " as a bank of earth 
cast up, or the side of a ditch, and gives the following quotation : 
" Faciet fossatum adeo forte & bonum prout voluit, ita quod f un- 
dum a retro Dunae utriusque fossati sit in fundo 11 pedum." 
(Chartular, Glaston., MS., fo. 75.) 

There are traces of the foundation of outbuildings between 
the old rectory house and the high road, which is here known as 
" Snagg's Bottom," and it is conceivable that the present structure 
served as a residence for a clerk (capellanus) and as a receptacle 
for the grain and other tithe to which the Priory of St. Andrew was 
entitled, and wherein they could be garnered and stored until for- 
warded to the priory, or otherwise disposed of. 

The vicarage house is situated close to the parish church, and I 
have never heard of its existence at any other less convenient part 
of the parish. This old rectory house is nearly a mile from the 
church, and there is no very direct route connecting them. 



MR. HERBERT BAKER'S NOTE RESPECTING THE OLD 
RECTORY HOUSE AT NORTHFLEET. 

The present structure was built probably early in the sixteenth 
century (say circa 1510), and was constructed entirely of timber 
in the form of a parallelogram, as shewn in black on the plan. 

It contained a Hall, open from the ground to the roof ; two 
chambers on either side about 6 feet G inches high, with rooms or lofts 
over them ; and, at the north end of the building, a small chamber, 
which, like the hall itself, had no ceiling below the roof. 

This arrangement of high central hall, with low stories on either 
side, we find almost universally adopted at this period for cottages 
in the South of England, especially in the Weald of Kent and 
Sussex. Careful examination will in almost all cases reveal that 
the present floor over the central room or hall, and the chimney, 
were added about a century later. About the end of the sixteenth 



7i< ON THE OLD RECTORY AT NORTHFLEET. 

century, the primitive method of burning a fire in 1 lie centre o\ 
the hall began to die out, and fireplaces came into general use in 
the houses of the humbler classes. 

Such cottages, once the resiliences of the proverbially well-to-do 
yeomen, abound in Kent. One for example, by the churchyard 
at Headcorn, has the history of its internal changes clearly marked 
on its exterior. They are more rare in the chalk districts, but good 
examples can be seen near Northflect, at Sole Street, and at Luddes- 
down . 

The more common arrangement, of having side stories on the 
first floor projecting on overhanging timbers, is not followed at 
Northfieet Rectory, where the rudeness and absence of ornamen- 
tation and ordinary comforts (such as glass to the windows) denote 
that the building was not intended for any family of means or 
importance. This helps us to agree with the suggestion of Mr. 
Arnold, that it was somewhat austerely built for the temporary 
residence of the chaplain or steward appointed by St. Andrew's 
Priory to superintend the collection and transmission to Rochester 
of the grain and tithe from their lands at Northfieet. 

The internal re-arrangement of the hall, the new staircase and 
the additions at the back, all of which are shewn hatched on the 
plan, were made in the next century, and we are fortunate in being 
able to fix a date for them by the discovery (embedded in the ceiling 
plaster) of a token, dated 1656, of Edward Pashlowe (who was 
Mayor of the neighbouring town of Gravesend in 1653). 

Although much damage has been done to the old timber work, 
by the insertion of sash windows and the rebuilding of the decayed 
portions, sufficient has fortunately been preserved beneath the 
many coats of plaster, with which the whole building had been 
covered, to shew the character of the work, and to fix an approxi- 
mate date. The two original windows of the hall, wdiich were 
opposite to each other, east and west, have been brought to 
light. Their position proves that no upper floor could have existed 
at first. They are of very curious detail, the mullions being very 
close together and without groove, rebate, or any means of fixing 
glass. They probably had wooden shutters which opened or shut 
at will, to suit the conditions of light, weather, and smoke inside. 
Most of the other window openings are still more primitive, being 
filled in with square mullions placed close together and diagonally, 
after the manner of cellar windows in old houses. 

Only one old doorway remains inside, with moulded jambs 



ON THE OLD RECTORY AT NORTIIFLEET. 75 

and arched head, but there is sufficient evidence that the front 
external doorway was similar in character. 

The old floors are formed of oak joists, 7 inches by 5 inches, laid flat ; 
while the floor introduced later into the hall has small deep joists 
of a later style ; and that over the north room is quite modern. 

The roof is strongly framed in oak with curved wind braces, 
and appears substantial to our nineteenth century eyes, but is 
simple in comparison with existing masterpieces of carpentry of 
the sixteenth century. The timbers over the hall are black with a 
thick coating of soot from the smoke with which they must 
generally have been enveloped. Smoke could only have found its 
way out through the chinks of the tiles, there being no sign of any 
such louvred outlet as was usual in larger buildings. The unglazed 
windows would have kept the lower part of the hall sufficiently 
free from smoke to make it habitable. 

There was probably no staircase to the upper rooms originally, 
access being obtained to them by ladders from the hall ; by no 
means an uncommon way of going to bed in those days. 

The external framing of the timber work shews a curious 
disregard of design, the lower part being of the usual massive post 
and pan work, while, above, the curved braces are set back about 
lj inch from the face of the main posts and window frames. 
The original thick plaster, formed of marly clay and chopped straw, 
with which they were covered, can still be seen in places. The 
braces and uprights, where originally covered, are shewn in dotted 
lines on the drawing of the elevation. 

With the exception of the doors, the windows, and the main 
timbers of the hall, which are rudely chamfered or hollow moulded, 
there exists no moulding or carving of any sort. The builder had 
no object other than to erect a rude and solid but almost barn- 
like structure, and it is perhaps all the more interesting to us as 
shewing the strength and durability of the honest and simple 
craftsmanship of our ancestors. 

The thanks of all lovers of antiquity are due to Mr. Arnold, 
who, at great trouble and expense to himself, has rescued this 
building from imminent destruction, and preserved it, in a neigh- 
bourhood where such relics have for the most part disappeared. 



70 



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Sill THOMAS SMYTHE, KNT. 
(a.d. 1558—1025.) 

by j. p. wadmore, a.k.t.b.a. 

Thomas, the second surviving son of Thomas Smythe, Esq., of 
AVestenhanger, by dame Alice his Avife, the daughter of Sir Andrew 
Judde, was born probably in the parish of St. Dionis Backchurch, 
or Allhallows, Lombard Street, if not at AVestenhanger, circa 1558. 
Being one of thirteen children, he was early initiated into business 
by his father, and appears to have taken up his freedom and livery 
in the Haberdashers' Company by patrimony, as well as his freedom 
in the Skinners', in 1580 (see Court Books and Apprenticeships). 

It was in this year that the Merchant Adventurers of London 
fitted out an expedition to A 7 irginia, which was commanded by 
Philip Armados and Arthur Barlow, just eighty-eight years after 
the discovery of America by Columbus. Another expedition was 
equipped and fitted out at the expense of Sir A\ r alter Kaleigh, in 
the following year. Young Smythe was no idle spectator of these 
events ; his monument alludes to " that rich new-found world which 
westward lies," wherein he took so deep and lively an interest. 

He was thrice married : 1, to the daughter and heir of Richard 
Culverwell, but she died s.p. ; 2, to Joan, daughter of William 
Hobbs ; 3, to Sarah, daughter and heir of William Blount, Esq., 
who afterwards married Robert Sidney, first Earl of Leicester. 

He was nominated by Sir Nicholas Moseley, Lord Mayor, as 
one of the Sheriffs for London and Middlesex,. June 17, 1599 ; 
proclamation whereof was duly made at Paul's Cross Hustings in 
the presence of the Lord Mayor, Mr. Recorder, and the Alder- 
men, and he entered upon the office of Sheriff on the 6th of 
November 1599. 

In the following year he was seriously compromised, if not 
actually implicated, in the attempt which the Earl of Essex made 
to win the support of the citizens of London, against the Crown. 

The Earl anticipated that the City would stand for him, and 
that Mr. Sheriff Smythe, who commanded the Trained Bands, 
would provide as many men as he could to join him. On the 
8th February 160^, the Earl of Essex and his followers went on 
to Mr. Sheriff Smythe's house in Gracious Street. Mr. Smythe 
begged him not to enter, but he did so, and with many of his 
followers went up stairs. AVhile there Mr. Sheriff Smythe stepped 
out at the back gate to see the Lord Mayor. The Earl of Essex 
withdrew, intending probably to leave the City peaceably, but on 




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SIR THOMAS SMYTHE, KNT. S3 

reaching Ludgate, he found the gates shut, and the Bishop of 
London with a force to bark him ; several shots were fired, and 
Sir Christopher Blount was wounded. The reconnaissance had 
proved a failure ; so the Earl and his party embarked at Queenhythe, 
and got back to Essex House. After a vain attempt to fortify 
himself and a few of his more daring followers, he was prevailed 
upon to yield himself a prisoner to the Lord Admiral, and was 
confined in the Tower. His trial took place at Westminster on 
Februarv 19th, and his execution on February 25th 1600-1. 

Mr. Sheriff Smythe was more leniently dealt with ; he was 
examined before Lords Egerton, Buckhurst, and .Nottingham 
(Calendar of Domestic State Papers, 1000, p. 560). He affirmed 
that he had not previously spoken to the Earl for about nine years, 
nor had he had any letter from him, save one which Udal brought 
to his wife Sarah (daughter of William Blount) at church, which 
was a copy of one to the Queen, written in the Earl's own hand. 
He did not remember what passed between the Earl and John 
Smythe, after the Earl had left his house. John Smythe (his elder 
brother) was also examined at some length (Cal. D. S. P., 1600, 
p. 558). He said that his brother Thomas did not come home till 
11 p.m., when he was in bed. The Sheriff was very tired. The 
Earl of Essex and his followers came to the house in Gracious 
Street, and refusing to go to the Lord Mayor, the Earl thrust himself 
into the house. Thomas had told him that he laid hold of the 
horse's bridle, when Essex remarked, " You shall go with me, and 
send for your Company," to which Smythe replied that the sates 
were shut, and well manned, and the City in safety. " Would he 
yield himself to the Lord Mayor?" Essex replied, "If you fear 
God, love the Queen, and care for religion, look to yourself." 

Mr. Sheriff Smythe admitted that being with her Majesty she 
charged him with knowing of the Earl's going to the City by five 
o'clock on Sunday morning, through one Temple, but he protested 
to her that he never spoke to him, and so far, for the time, satis- 
fied the Queen as to receive her thanks for his carriage on the day 
of the tumult. But later on, the fact that the Earl had made a 
personal visit to his house in Gracious Street, drew down suspicion, 
so that he was discharged from his office of Sheriff; and the Livery 
were called together to elect another in his stead, which they did 
on Friday the 14th day of February 1600-1 (City Court Books ; 
Cal. D. S. P., 1600, p. 581). 

Some time after this both Mr. Smythe and Sarah his wife were 
in durance and in danger of punishment for misprision (Cal. 
H. S. P., 1600, p. 590). 

That Sheriff Smythe was seriously compromised there can be 
no doubt ; but on the decease of Queen Elizabeth, which occurred 
shortly afterwards, he was enabled to regain his popularity with 
his fellow citizens, and with her successor, James I., he rapidly rose 
into favour. He was knighted in 1603. 

In the following year he and his brother Bichard were 
appointed Beceivers for the Duchv of Cornwall (D. S. P., 1601, 

u 2 



84 THE RUSSIA (OB MUSCOVEY) COMPANY. 

p. 93). He at this time resigned, in favour of Rob. Middleton, the 
receiverships of Dorsel and Somersel (I). 8. I'., 1604, p. 114). 

As one of the inns! successful merchants of his time lie was 
more or less intimately connected with mosl of those grand mer- 
cantile companies which then competed with Spain and the Nether- 
lands for toe trade of the world. Some of these arc specially 
mentioned in his epitaph. A lew facts as to their formation, and 
as to Sir Thomas Smytbe's connection with them may not, I trust, 
be considered out of place. 

Tut: Russia (or Muscovey) Company. 

This Company is one of the many which grew out of that enter- 
prising body the Merchant Adventurers; it was incorporated in the first 
year of the reign of Queen Mary. The Charter of Incorporation was 
granted to the Marquis of Winchester, Lord High Treasurer, the Earls 
of Arundel, Bedford, and Pembroke, Lord Howard, Sebastian Cabot, 
ISir Thomas Gresham, Sir Andrew Judde, Sir Thomas White, and 
others ; the Corporation was to consist of a governor, two consuls, 
and twenty-four assistants (Hakluyt, p. 265). Through the interest 
of these members certain privileges and concessions for trade 
with Russia were granted to the Company by John Vasilovich, 
Emperor of Russia, Duke of Novogorode and Muscovey ; and in 1560 
the Emperor sent over two accredited ambassadors, Stephen 
Tiverdico and Theodore Pogrella, wdio had an audience with Queen 
Elizabeth, at Oatlands, when they presented their credentials and 
various gifts. She afterwards dispatched Master Thos. Randolph 
as her representative to the Court of Russia, where at this time the 
Company possessed two settlements — the Port of St. Nicholas and 
the Town of Colmagro (see State Papers, Russia, Bundle 2, No. 
141). 

In 1584 the Muscovey Company acquired from the Crown 
permission to trade with men and ships between the Equimo' and 
the North Pole, and to search for and discover the North-West 
Passage (Hakluyt, pp. 103, 104). London and Dunkerk were to 
be free ports, or staples, for a term of twenty years ; the Crown 
reserving to itself, as a royalty, one-fifth of all gold, silver, or 
pearls imported. Of this project Sir Thomas Smythe, in 1612, 
became the prime undertaker, speaking of it in these terms, " That 
noble design for the discovery of the North- West Passage " 
(Epitaph in Sutton at Hone Church). 

The increasing success and importance of the Russia Company's 
trade appears to have been viewed with ill-disguised jealousy by 
the Swedes, Danes, and Dutch, who disputed the monopoly claimed 
by the Company, and proceeded so far as virtually to close the 
Sound to English vessels (D. S. P., April 26, 1598). In 15y8 
these restrictions had become a serious grievance, sadly crippling 
the action of the Company, who found themselves handicapped in 
their own markets. This state of things is clearly set forth in the 
following unpublished MS. in the State Paper Office, touching the 
instructions jiiven to Sir Thos. Smythe. as Ambassador to Russia. 



SIR THOMAS SMYTHE, KNT. 85 

State Papers, Russia, Bundle 2, 1601-2 to 1618. 

N° 95. Instructions for S r Thomas Smith, knight, authorised by 
his Ma'J vnder the great Seale of England to repaire as 
Embassadour to the Emperour of Moscovye. 

Whereas his Ma'y hath given you commission to negociate w th 
the Emperour of Moscovye, and hath given you allso creditt by his 
l'res for any thinge you shall sav vnto him, I haue thought good 
for your further dyrection and carnage there to deliver you theise 
Instructions. 

ffirst in all your carriage to be carefull of the preservation 
of the honour and dignitye of his Ma tes person whom you doe 
represent, as well in your speaches, presentation of l'res, as in all 
other circumstances, as farr as it standeth w th the custome of those 
countreyes. 

Next to vse all the meanes you can to advance the trade of the 
Company, and to procure them all conditions of safetye and proffitt 
that you may. Wherein seing you are noe stranger to the nature 
of the traffique, I doe referr you to such informations and remem- 
brances as you shall in that behalf receaue of the Company. 

And because there hath been some imputations formerly layed 
vppon the late Q. Eliz., of famous memorye, agaynst the proceedinge 
of" the Agent at Constantyneople (All w ch hath been formerly 
ansvveared, as may appeare vnto you by dyrection given to Francys 
Cherrye,* and since to S r Kichard Lea, Knight, whereof you may 
take copyes for your better information) yet because it is the 
manner of the lluss' counsell to enter into repitition of thinges 
w cl ' haue been formerly mooued and answeared, You shall acquaynt 
your selfe w th the answeare formerly made to that matter, and 
make vse thereof as you shall haue occasion. 

And if any question shall be mooued whye his Ma ty doth 
contynew the residence of an Embass r in Constantyneople \v' h the 
Grand Segnior, you may answeare, that his Ma*? cloth noe other- 
wise therein then other Christian Princes and States as the ffrench 
Kinge, the state of Venice, and other states, All w ch for cause of 
entercourse and traffique only, have their Embassadours lodgers 
there and haue not otherwise to doe w th him. And soe vou'd the 
Kinge of Spayne doe if the Grand Signior would permitt him the 
trade of his countrey. 

Concerninge the matter of peace w th Spayne, if they be 
inquisitive of it you may say, that notw th standinge it pleased 
all mighty God to fynishe the dayes of her Ma')' the late Queen 
of famous memorye before there was any Accord between her and 
the Kinge of Spayne, agaynst whom He had ever soe much blessed 
her, as all the Actions of mutuall hostilitye, tourned still to her 
great honour and his preiudice yet that his Ma'y (her lyneall, 
lawfull, and naturall successeour) having lived in perfect peace 
and Amitye, \\ lh all Kinges and estates before, foreseeinge of how 

* Sir Francis Cherry, and his brother Sir Edward, supplied cordage to the 
Royal Navy ; they appear also to have been Merchant Adventurers. 



86 AMBASSADOR TO RUSSIA, A.D. 10') I. 

great consequence it is fco breake into a warr when peace maj 
be established, vppon iusl and honorable conditions, bath been 
contented to ioyne in n Treaty \\"' Spayne and the Archduke of 
Austria (husband of the Kinge of Spayne's sister and resilient bere 
in that part of the 17 Provinces w cu the Kinge her father gaue 
her), not only for the reconcilinge of former differences between 
the Kingdome of England and those Princes, hut for the perfect 
establishinge of such an Amitye hereafter as may woork a setteled 
and constant peace and safetye between the Territoryes and people 
of the Singes and Princes aforesayd. 

Il'or \\ ,h purpose you may lett him know that the Kinge of 
Spayne (the rather to wittnes his inward desyre to embrace all 
freindly Amitye w th the Kinge our Souverayne) begann first to 
congratulate w ,h him by an honorable Embass 1 ', as soone as he heard 
newes of his arrivall to the Emperiall Crcwnes of England, 
Scotland, France, and Ireland, And now since bath dyrected the 
counstable of Castyle* (one of his greatest suhiectes) purposely out 
of Spayne w th full power to him and his Embassadour to treate of 
all thin gee incident to the makinge of a sincere and durable peace, 
whoe fallinge sicke by the way (accordinge to the nature of his first 
commission) hath deputed some others to begynn the Treaty, w th 
purpose to follow after as soone as he is recovered, and soe baue 
the Archdukes done on their partes. Wherein because it may be 
that he wilbe desyrous to know how this agrees w ,h some of his 
Ma' 18 former conf'ederacyes w 111 this Kinge of Spayne's Enemyes, 
you may say that howsoever his Ma'? out of Cristian Charitye is 
naturally inclyned to live peaceably w th all Princes, yet it shall 
never appeare to be concluded vppon other conditions then such as 
shalbe for the honour and weale of his estates and people, and 
w th out preiudice to any of his former Allyes or confederates, 
towardes all whom he intendeth to carrye himself as all other free 
Princes doe in like cases ffor all thinges els eoncerninge bis Ma tcs 
Estate, because those Princes especially are most apt to seeke and 
mayntayne correspondencye w th greatest and mygtiest Princes 
whereof they make their perticuler iudgm ,es much by fame and 
reportes, their countreyes beeinge soe farr remoued from meanes to 
vnderstand them in more perticuler fashyon, you shall not forgett 
y e rather to draw on the constancye of his affection towardes you 
and your Trade to desturbe his Ma'>' and the constitution of his 
estate in this forme. 

Hirst that God hath not only sent to his Ma tes people and 
kyngdomes in his P'son a Kinge full of pietye and wisedome to 
rule over them, but hath alsoe blessed the same w tb a plentifull 
posteritye of greatest hope and espectation, the lacke whereof was 
a great discomfort to the former tyme. 

Secondly you may playnly declare vnto him that such is his 
reputation and authoritye w th all the Princes of Europe, as there 
is hardly any Prince or state w ch hath not sent him solemne 

* The Constable of Castile received many presents of plate from his Majesty 
on his return to Spain, 1604 (Cal. D. 8. P., vol. ix., p. L46). 



Sill THOMAS SMYTIIE, KNT. 87 

Embassages, w th offers of greatest freindshippe, and all thinges 
thereto belonginge. To \v ch circumstances of his gi*eatnes if you 
add the accesse of his power and strength by beeinge Souverayne 
of more bodyes of warlike men then most of the Princes of 
Christendome* concludinge all w th his happines to be not only 
absolutely obeyed, but vniversally beloued and admyred by all his 
people, there remayneth little more for me to deliver you at this 
tyme who haue so good discretion and iudgm 1 whensoever any 
present occasion shalbe offered you to make vse of the same for his 
Ma tes best service and their benefitt, for whom you are cheitely 
im ployed. 

State Papers, Russia, Bundle 2. 

N° 127. Iff the Russe Ambassado r doe vrge Priveledges to be 
graunted to the Emperors Subiectes for traffique to and from 
this Realme. Ttt seamethe (vnder correction) mete that ytt bee 
aunsweredd, that suche and so muche traade as the Emperor his 
Mr. specefyethe and demaundeth by his Priveledges grauutedd to 
the Company, shalbe ffreely grauntedd and favorably and friendlye 
bee permyttedd and maigneteigned to take good effecte. 

Theffecte of l'res requested to be directed to the 
Kinge of Denmarke. 

That ytt wolde please his highnes to suffer our xiiij shipps 
beinge on a voyage to the Narve quyetly to passe the Sounde w* 
suche goodes as bee in theme, wtout any stale otherwize than for a 
convenyent tyme wherein theye maye pave the duties of the Sounde. 

Also that the said Kinge forces vs not to paie any customes, 
toolles, nor any other ehardges than those w cb of late yeres he hathe 
taken of vs, or elles as attthe last tyme was paid for our shipps and 
goodes passingethroughe the Sounde bothe goynge and comynge to 
and frome the Narve. 

The effecte of l'res requested to be directed to the 
Kinge of Swethen. 

That his highnes directe his l'res to all his admyralles, viz., 
Admyralles, Capitanes, and others sarvinge hyme on the Seas, 
charginge theme that theye nor any of theme doe molest or troble 
any of o r xiiij shipps w ch nowe be fraighted to passe to the Narve, 
but that theye suffer theme quyetlie to passe thither bothe to 
fetche home suche o r m'chandizes as remayne there, and also to 
carry w l theme suche o r goodes as theye be laden w ,h , for to paie 
such debtes as arr owinge by vs there. 

Item yf by Chance any of o r shipps shoulde be brought by any 
of his subiectes into any parte of this Realme, that ytt maye please 
hyme to dischardge the same o 1 ' shipp or shipps w 4 out all troble 
and hynderance, and to suffer theme \\ l the goodes to departe vnto 
the porte for w ch theye were laden w*out all ympeschements or troble. 

Itt maye also please yo 1 ' honnor to move the said Ambassado r 
to procure Raulfe R utter, Xp'ofer Bennett, John Chappell, ffrannces 
hirkitt, and all other Englishe men disturbers of the trade in 



88 AMBASSADOR TO RUSSIA, A.D. 1604. 

Russia Musk oo, or at t the Narve, to be saulfly scute bether in the 
nc\tt' shipps thai shall retorne fro me thence. 

Endorsed. — Thambassador of Moscovia. 

In the British Museum Library I Bound a quarto volume 
(1056, g. 7) entitled, Sir Thos. Smithes Voiage and Entertainment 
in Russia with the Tragicall Ends of Two Emperors and our Empress 
within one month of his being there and the Miraculous preservation 
of the now Reigning Emperor esteemed dead for 18 years. Printed 
at London, 1005. Master John Mericke was then agent there. Sir 
Thos. Smythe Kt. a religious and discreet gentleman was thought 
fit to be chosen and commanded by his Majesty to go upon an 
Embassage to Russia. Accompanied by Sir Thos. Challenger and 
Sir William Wray Kts. Sir T. Smythe went to Court on the 10 th 
of June 1004, and was introduced by L d Salisbury to his Majesty. 
King James enquired how long they would be and was told xv 
months. Furnished with his commission and other instruction by 
L d Salisbury at Whitehall, Sir Thomas sailed on the 12'" of June 
from Gravesend — accompanied by Sir Valentine Kightly and Sir 
Francis Cherry. He landed at the Castle at Th'arkAngel 22 of 
July, & was met by the Agent Master John Mericke. He left in 
August and went to Colongro. Thence by boat on the river Dvina 
Soccana to Vologda — thence by post horses to the City of Yerri 
Slaue (Jaroslav) on the lh of Sep. — and lodged with Gregory 
Euannovich Nicolin late Ambassador to her Majesty in England. 

He was sent for by the Emperor in October and delivered the 
King's letter. 

He attended Court again on the 10 th of March and obtained a 
grant of GOO roubles and a grant of new privileges for the Company. 
On the 20 th of March he went to Moscow, and lodged there until 
May 6. On the 28 th of May he set sail for England. 

That the personal influence of Sir Thomas Smythe materially 
contributed to the prosperity of the Company there can be little 
doubt. The Earl of Northampton, in a letter addressed to His 
Majesty James I., in 1012, says the Muscovey Company have 
prospered strangely, and have succeeded in getting within nine 
degrees of the Pole (D. S. P., 1012, p. 140). 

This state of things unfortunately did not last long, trade and 
commerce suffered much at the hands of the Swedes and Danes, who 
had succeeded in crippling the Hansa League, and now turned 
their arms against other nations. To remedy this state of things 
contributions were exacted from the Muscovey and other companies 
by Sir William Eussell, Treasurer, and the Commissioners of H.M. 
Navy, for a fleet of six ships (D. S. P., 1021, p. 290). Notwith- 
standing this, we read of no less than fifty-seven sail being captured 
in one year (L). S. P., 1021, pp. 301-2). These adverse circumstances 
told heavily on the resources of the Company, and like others they 
fell into debt. Sir Thomas Smythe, besides several benefactions in 
his lifetime, bequeathed a sum of £503 to the Company by will. 

The following letter of Sir Thos. Smythe is exceedingly inte- 



SIR THOMAS SMYTH E, KNT. 89 

resting, and after it I will pass on to his connection with the 
Honourable East India Company. 

State Papers, Eussia, Bundle 2, a.d. 1G0I to 1609, No. 20G. 

Eight Hono ble , 

I haue receiued letters lately out of Moscouia (by a shipp that 
is nowe retourned from those partes) directed from M 1 ' Merrick* 
and M 1 ' Eussell (lately sent thether as yo r Lo p knovves), w ch do 
import that at their arrivall they vnderstood of a new election made 
for their Emperor of a yonge gentleman of the age of 18 yeares, 
sonne vnto the Metropolitans of that Laude. AVherevpon they 
directed a message vnto him signifying that they were sent from 
the Kings Ma tie of England about the setling of a peacable trade 
for his Subiectes in those Countries, and procureing some priviledges 
for the better manageing of their affaires (but discovered no other 
busines), And vnderstood (by letters sent directly backe againe 
vnto them from his Highnes) that he had a purpose to send an 
Ambassador into England, and was desireous of his Ma : freindshipp, 
as may appeare by that letter vnto them, a coppy whereof I haue 
herein sent inclosed vnto yo 1 ' Lo p , w ch Newes 1 do desire that yo r 
Lo p would be pleased to signifie vnto his Ma : for the present, and 
vpon retourne of M r Merrick and M r Eussel (w eh wee expect 
within a moneth or six weekes) yo r Lo p shall be further made 
acquainted with the success. And so humbly takeing my leaue 
do rest 

Euer ready to be disposed at yo 1 ' L ps service, 
Tieo. Smyth e. 
London, August 2S n \ 1613. 

Endorsed. — Eussia. S 1 ' Tho : Smyth to myself. 

The Honourable Ea.st India Company. 

The success of the Dutch East India Company, founded in 1594, 
led to a meeting of the London Merchant Adventurers, at Founders' 
Hall in Sept. 1599, to consider if it were desirable to open a direct 
line of communication with India round the Cape of Good Hope 
(D. S. P., Index to remembrances, 1570 to 1661, p. 291). One 
hundred and one of the principal merchants attended, and formed 
an association, with a subscribed capital of over £30,000. In the 
following year, they obtained a Charter (granted to the Earl of 
Cumberland and 215 knights, aldermen, and merchants), under the 
title of " The Governor and Company of Merchants Trading to the 
East Indies." The meetings of the Company were at this time held 
at a house on the south side of Leadenhall Street, which they rented 
of the Earl of Craven. It had lately been occupied by Sir William 
Craven. Stow describes it as "a large Building with Spacious 
Booms, very commodious for such a purpose, having a large Hall 

* Sir John Meyric was Ambassador to Eussia, with one Will Beecher as 
Secretary, in 1614, and returned in 1617. 



'.)<> GOVERNOR OF EAST INDIA COMPANY, 1607-21. 

and Couri Yard Eor the reception of people having business here, 
to attend on the Company, on Couri days. There is also a little 
Garden with Warehouses ai the back pari t wards Lime Streel to 
bring the Goods into the Warehouse" (Strype's Stow, vol. i., 

hook ii., p. 88). 

The name of Sir Thomas Smythe, Knt., stands Srsl in the record 
of a Couri of Committee held in Februarj L606 (Mas! India 
Company's Court Hooks), lie was named Governor at a General 
Court, held on the 1st of July iu the following year; with him 
were associated William Greenwell as Deputy-Governor, 'Thomas 
Parrington as Treasurer, and William Leighton, Secretary men 
deserving of all honour, to whoso Postering care we owe the founda- 
tion of England's greatness in India, and the development of her 
commerce iu the East. 

The privileges conferred by the Charter were exceptionally large, 
and extended not only to India, but to all the ports or harbours of 
Asia, Africa, and America, beyond the Cape of " Bona Esperanza " 
to the Straits of Magellan, to make laws for the politique government 
of themselves, their factors and mariners, with the power to 
punish in body or purse (London, by T. P. Malcomb, vol. i., 
pp. 73 and 74). For the first twelve months goods might be 
imported or exported duty free, if not otherwise illegal, including 
silver and gold, provided only that £6000 of it were first coined at 
the Mint. 

Six goodly ships, and the like number of pinnaces, manned and 
armed, were to set sail annually. Purchases (except by special 
licence) from Dutch Settlements were prohibited. 

This restriction, and the rising prosperity of the East India 
Company, naturally created strong feelings of jealousy between the 
English and the Dutch, which soon broke out into open acts of 
violence. The Dutch were accused of tampering with the English 
Company's servants, of acts of cruelty, and of laying an embargo 
on their goods, for complicity in which Sir Thomas Beswick was 
sent a prisoner to the Marshalsea (Cal. D. State Papers, 1618, 
p. 195). Another person named Braggs presented a petition to 
the Privy Council, bringing serious accusations against Sir Thomas 
Smythe and the other directors, against whom he preferred a 
claim for the sum of £6875 for goods and food supplied in a 
time of dearth to the Company's dependents in India (King's Lib. 
MSS. 17 B, vol. xvii. ; also Malcomb's London, vol. i., pp. 73-75). 
His mixture of shrewd sense and humour with Scriptural quota- 
tions is not unlike that of the Cromwellian period. For instance, 
he says : " And as for thirteen negroes or Indian people, the 
Estimation of these poor souls are not to be valued at any price, 
because the Lord Jesus has suffered much for them, as for us 
all, and therefore I will not recon the price of Xtians, for in 
time the Lord may call them to be Xtians." One claim is for 
providing 20 dogs and a great many cats, " which under God as by 
your Book "Writtin of late rid away and devoured all the rats in 
the Island which formerly ate up your corn and many blessed 



SIR THOMAS SMYTHE, KXT. 91 

fruits. For this I will demand £5 a piece and let the Cats goe." 
To Sir Thomas Smythe and the Directors he gives the following 
laconic parting shot: "And now, bretheren, in the name of our 
Lord Jesus X 1 see that ye be all of one minde and in one judge- 
ment, for it hath been declared unto ine that there are dissentions 
amongst you." 

The influence and character of kSir Thos. Smythe was notwith- 
standing sufficient for him to obtain the approval of his Sovereign, 
who wrote, in 1619, to the Directors requesting that he might be 
re-elected Governor for another seven years (D. S. P., 1G19). 

In 1616 Sir Thomas Smythe was residing at Deptford, pro- 
bably as a Commissioner of the Navy, and also to superintend 
the vessels dispatched by the Honourable East India Company to 
Virginia and other lands, when his house was unfortunately burned 
down. One of the vessels from the Indies arrived about this time, 
when the ship and its cargo were estimated at the value of £14,000 
(D. S. P., 1616, p. 379). As a set-off against this, another appears 
to have been lost between Gravesend and London, worth £16,0U0, 
to the great damage of the Company's credit ; and five others were 
picked up disabled by the Dutch Company (Cal. D. S. P., 1620, 
p. 131). The rivalry of the two Companies was productive of 
many disputes, and agreements appear to have had but little effect in 
checking host ilities. Each vessel was armed with culverines which 
cost the Company £9 apiece; and Sir Thos. Powe, in returning 
from the East Indies, reported that the Company's servants had 
retaliated on the Hollanders (Cal. D. S. P., 1619, p. 75). This led 
the King to appoint a commission, consisting of Sir Thos. Smythe, 
Lord Cranford, and several of the Council, to consult with the 
Commissioners of the States of Holland for a settlement of their 
differences (D. S. P, 1619, January 8). Unfortunately, the 
negotiations were broken off, because the States would not allow 
the Company a share in the management of their fortifications 
(Cal. D. S. P., 1621, p. 40), and the East India Company resolved 
to fit out a fleet to protect themselves against the Dutch, and 
threatened that if they did not get satisfaction they would retaliate 
on Dutch traders in the narrow seas. The Dutch responded by 
making a raid on the Company's fort at Amboyna, and killing 
Captain Powerson with other Englishmen (D. S. P., 1624, vol. 
ccxvii., p. 267). The English appear at this time to have had some- 
what the worst of it, and they presented a petition to the King for 
assistance, alleging that if it is not granted their trade would be 
ruined, as the plot was directly traceable to Amsterdam. In 
consequence of which, the Lord High Admiral was directed to seize 
some ships of the Dutch Company as a reprisal. 

In all these matters, Sir Thomas .Smythe as Governor took a 
prominent part up to 1621, when failing health compelled him to 
resign, and at a Court held in July 1621, Mr. Alderman Halliday was 
appointed to be his successor. 



( .)2 TREASURER OF THE VIRGINIA COMPANY, 1(500-20. 

The Virginia Company. 

Although many illustrious men had preceded him in the attempt, 
Sir Thomas Smythe had the satisfaction of successfully starting this 
Company. He obtained its Charter of Incorporation under the title 
of " The Treasurer and Company of Adventurers and Planters of 
the City of London," dated May23, L609 (Colonial Papers, L609, 
p. 8, lxxix., James I.), through the influence and patronage of his 
illustrious friends the Earls of Salisbury, Suffolk, Southampton, 
Pembroke, and Lincoln.* As he continued Treasurer of this 
Company for many years, it may not, I trust, be considered out of 
place if we pass in review some of its contemporary history. A 
graphic description of the newly-discovered country, as it was then 
called, is given by Captain Christopher Newport, in the form of a 
journal, commencing Thursday, 21st day of May l(j()7 (Colonial 
Papers, vol. i., p. 0). He describes the King as the Great Pawatan, 
who had twenty kingdoms under his dominion ; lie praises the 
general appearance of the inhabitants ; like all uncivilized nations, 
the men hunted and the women worked ; they dwelt in villages 
of 500 people or thereabouts ; they had many wives, and sacrificed 
to the sun, were witty and ingenious, expert thieves, and could take 
up anything with their toes while looking at one; nevertheless, a 
most kind and loving people (vide Map, 1008, engraved by Will 
Hole, discovered by Captain Smith). The adventurers who landed 
with Captain Newport constructed a small town or fort called 
James Town, and bartered with the inhabitants for wood, soap, 
ashes, pitch, tar, and certain unknown herbs, probably cochineal, 
silk-grass, and terra-lemnico. 

In May 1G09 a convoy of vessels, under the command of 
Sir Thomas Gates and Sir George Somers,f was fitted out for 
Virginia. During the voyage they experienced much rough weather, 
and about 100 leagues from Bermuda the fleet was scattered. 
Sir George's ship sprang a leak, and 100 men worked in gangs at 
the pumps night and day, when the vessel stranded at Bermuda ; 
fortunately all were saved. Here they managed to construct two 
small pinnaces; and 140 men and women arrived safely at James 
Town. Famine and pestilence had sadly decimated those who had 
arrived previously with Sir Thomas Gates. On their recovery they 
went down the river, and met the Governor, Lord He la Warr ; 
having nothing to trade with, they sent to the Bermudas for sup- 
plies of fish, hogs, and fowls. In the meantime they suffered much 
from want and sickness. Sir George Somers died Nov. 9, 1011, 
on his way to Bermuda to obtain supplies, but Lord De la Warr, 

* May 1,6 James I. Grant to Sir Thomas Crompton and Sir Thomas Smythe 
to minister an oath to all passengers that desire to pass over the seas at the Port 
of London, and to examine them. 

t Grant to Sir Thomas Gates and Sir George Somers, Knts., and others, by 
special licence, to make habitation and plantation, and to deduce a colony of 
people into that part of America called Virginia (Pat. 4 James I., p. 19). * To 
George, Duke of Buckingham, Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports, a similar 
grant was made, '2,2 James 1. 



SIR THOMAS SMYTH E, KNT. 93 

although suffering himself, maintained a cheerful hope for the 
future (Colonial Entry Book, p. 13). In 1612 a fresh Charter, 
with more ample privileges, was granted (Date of patent of 
Incorporation, 13 .lames I.). But this did not appease the dis- 
content of the colonists ; many who were weary of the settle- 
ment slipped away, and returned home, so that many of those who 
had been persuaded to underwrite their names for adventures flatly 
refused to pay. and were sued in the Court of Chancery, and the 
Company obtained judgment against them to the extent of some 
£3000 or £4000* (Colonial Entry Book, p. 14). 

The arrival of a ship from Virginia, with the news that the 
daughter of Powhattan had been captured by Captain Argol, cheered 
the flagging spirits of the Company somewhat. Three years later 
Sir Thomas Dale arrived from Virginia with a cargo of various 
articles, and ten or twelve natives, amongst whom was the celebrated 
Pocahontas, the daughter of Powhattan, who had married one Bolfe, 
an Englishman (Colonial Entry Book, 1613). Pocahontas and her 
attendants were duly presented at Court to King James, and invited 
to a maske, with which they were greatly pleased. She unfortun- 
ately fell a victim to small pox, and died off Gravesend on the eve 
of her departure for America (Colonial Entry Book, Jan. 1617). 

On the death of Lord De la Warr, in 1618, Sir Dudley Charlton 
was appointed Governor, who soon afterwards set sail with two ships 
and 300 men and boys for Virginia. Charlton was succeeded in the 
following year by Sir George Vardley ; and at a council, held in the 
chancel of the church at James Town, two councillors were elected 
Jiom each of the principal plantations, and a committee appointed 
to enquire into the Charter, and make laws for the guidance of the 
colonists. A tax of 1 lb. of tobacco was ordered to be levied on all 
males over sixteen years of age, to provide for the maintenance of 
the Speaker, the Clerk, and Sergeant of the Assembly. Laws 
were passed for Christianizing the Indians, and a site selected 
for a university and college. Mulberry plantations were started, 
and a regular system of cultivation introduced for vines, flax, 
and hemp. 

Ill 1619 the Treasurer (Sir Thomas Smythe) and Company had 
sent out no less than 1261 colonists within the year, the number 
of English alone, at this time, amouuted to some 2100 soulsf 
(Colonial Entry Book, 1619, p. 22). 

These results, creditable as they may appear to the success of 
the Company, did not escape the censure of some, who accused 

* From this incident the Bermudas or Somer Islands became a sister colony 
of the Virginia Company, and were afterwards known as the Somer Islands 
Company, although under the same management. Waller, in his " Battle in the 
Somer Islands," canto i., writes : 

" O how I long my careless limbs to lay 
Under the plantin's shade, and all the day, 
With amorous airs my fane} 7 entertain, 
Invoke the Muses, and improve my vein !" 
t A list of the muster of inhabitants is given by T. C. Hotten (Chatto and 
Windus, 1874) ; also by W. Boys, in his History of "Sandwich, 1792, p. 752. 



94 VIRGINIA AND THE SOMER islands. 

the Treasurer and his upholders of perpetually keeping down the 
prosperity of the Colony by enriching themselves. Sir Edwin 
Sandys appears to have been the chief accuser. H<\ writing to the 
Duke of Buckingham, affirmed thai he had done more for the 

Colony in one year, at an expenditure of 68000, than Sir Thomas 
Smythe had in twelve years at an expenditure of 680,000. The 
opposition was so far successful thai Sir Thomas Smythe wisely 
resigned the office of Treasurer, although he did not cease to take 
an interest in the affairs of the Company under the Earl of 
Southampton, who succeeded him (Colonial Entry Book, Nov. 3, 
1020, }>. 21). Ai tliis time a fresh patent was granted, to the Duke 
of Lenox and Marquis of Buckingham, of the whole of the 
Country of Virginia lying between the latitudes 40 to 48 north, 
which was called New England. 

The resignation of Sir Thomas Smythe was not, however, 
sufficient satisfaction. Many accusations were still brought against 
him. One John Bargrave affirmed that he was the first planter of 
a colony in Virginia, for which he obtained a patent from the 
Company, and that his estate had been violently taken away from 
him, and in doing this Sir Thomas Smythe, Alderman Johnson, and 
others, acted in contravention of their Charter ; they were also 
accused of encouraging the growtli of tobacco and sassafras, and 
neglecting other crops, so that eight or ten ships returned 
empty ; that the Company laid an embargo on his ships, and sold 
them for £6600 ; that the plantation consisted only of public 
servants, and was supported by lotteries ; instead of overhauling 
the accounts of the late Treasurer, he advises the creation of a 
public stock. 

The matter in dispute was referred to the Treasurer and Council 
of Virginia, w ho expressed themselves neither authorised nor qualified 
to reply to the complaint against Sir Thomas Smythe and others, as 
it was a business of great latitude, extending over many years. 
Whereupon the matter was again brought before the Privy Council, 
at which the King expressed an opinion that the plaintiff desired 
nothing more than to tarnish the reputation of Sir Thomas 
(Colonial Papers, July 16, 1622, Whitehall, p. 31 ; 1623, February, 
p. 38). At the same time the Governor and Council of Virginia 
addressed a memorial to his Majesty, which was signed by Sir 
Francis W r yatt AVest, and Sir George Yardley, condemning the 
accusations made by Butler as altogether false and slanderous, 
but reflecting severely on Sir Thomas Smythe. This appears to 
have caused a great division amongst the Home Directors, some 
siding with the Earl of Southampton, Lord Cavendish, and 
Sir Edward Sackville, others with the Earl of Warwick, Sir Thomas 
Smythe, Sir Henry Mildmay, and Alderman Johnson. And the 
matter came again before the King in Council, who appointed a 
Commission to enquire into the whole of the affairs of the Company, 
beginning from Sir Thomas Smythe's government. All the books, 
charters, and writings connected with the Plantation of Virginia 
and the Somer Islands, were to be laid before the Commissioners 



SIR THOMAS SMYTH E, KN'T. 95 

(Colonial Papers, IS April, 1623, p. 44). In the meantime the 
strife between the rival factions raged more furiously, so that at a 
Court of the Virginia and Bermudas Company recriminations 
passed and repassed between the Earl of Warwick and Lord 
Cavendish, and they adjourned to try their fortune in the way 
then only open to gentlemen of birth and breeding (Colonial 
Papers, 1623, p. 51). 

To silence this scandal, King James proposed that the Company 
should surrender their Charter, and accept a new one, with a 
Governor and twelve assistants sitting in England, and a Governor 
and twelve assistants in Virginia. This, at an extraordinary meeting 
of the Court, by a large majority, they refused to do (Colonial 
Papers, Oct. S, 1623, p. 52). Whereupon a commission of" quo 
warranto was issued, and meetings were held at Sir Thomas 
Smythe's own house every Thursday, when all charters and docu- 
ments were inspected (Colonial Papers, Nov. 21, 1623). 

The result vvas that a full and exhaustive enquiry was made 
by the Commission. The King cut the Grordian knot by judi- 
ciously granting the Incorporation of the former letters patent 
(Colonial Papers, May 13, 1625, p. 73). Both Companies were to be 
amalgamated into one empire or government depending on himself, 
and all officers were to be nominated by him. Wearied and en- 
feebled by the contention Sir Thomas Smythe died, but not before 
he had seen a glorious foundation laid for the prosperity of the 
plantations. 

If anything could be added to the uprightness and zeal with 
which he struggled through long years of his life to promote the 
welfare of these his beloved plantations, it may be found in his 
will, where, after mentioning several bequests to his coadjutors, 
" I give," said he, " to the Governor and Consuls of the Company 
for the plantation of the Colony in Virginia and Somer Islands and 
Bermudas, the sum of £100, to be equally divided between the two 
Companys, towards the Building of Two Churches, one for each 
Plantation." 

As a Commissioner of the Boyal Navy Sir Thomas Smythe took 
up his residence at Deptford, probably at a house known as Skinner's 
Place, purchased by his father,* with a garden, dove-cote, and 
orchard, and thirtv-four acres of land ; unfortunately burnt down on 
the 30th of January 161S-19 (D. S. P., 1616, p. 1; February 6, 
1618). In his capacity as a Commissioner of the Navy and also 
a Commissioner for the Suppression of Piracy on the Narrow 
Seas, he frequently resided there before he retired to Sutton at Hone. 
The cost of ships may be gathered from an agreement with one 
William Browell, to superintend the building of two ships of war 
of 650 and 450 tons each, at a cost of £8575 (D. S. P., 1616, p. 38). 
In 1620 the charges of the Commissioners amounted to the sum 
of £29,396 Os. U. (D. S. P., 1616, p. 121). This charge in- 
cluded not only the building and manning of ships, but also the 

* IS'ew Edition of Hasted's Kent, by H. H. Drake, p. 13, vide note ; Carew's. 
Letters, Camden Society, p. 13. 



96 OUTS TO TONBRIDGE SCHOOL. 

maintenance of the lighthouses (I). 8. I'., 1616, p. 12:}). In 1<'>'> ( .> 
His Majesty and his royal Consort went to Debtford to the Launch 
of a vessel constructed by the Commissioners, when he presented 
Sir Thomas Smythe with a gold chain and medal for his services 
(I). S. P., 1609, p. 576). 

Associated with Sir Thomas Smythe for the Suppression of 
Piracy on the Narrow Seas, were Sir Thomas Lowe and Sir 
William Cockayne,* and they were directed by the Council to 
collect the contributions of merchants and various companies 
for a fleet to be maintained for the suppression of piracy, which 
contribution was to be repaid by impositions of one per cent, on all 
imports and exports (D. S. P., Oct. 15, 1621, p. 299). For this 
purpose the sum of £0000 annually was required to fit out a fleet. 
Most of the companies expressed their willingness to comply with 
the request of the Council for the supply of five ships for three 
months or longer, if the French, Moscovia, and Trinity House 
Companies would do so (D. S. P., 1621, p. 96). The Merchant 
Adventurers offered £1000, but asked that £700 of it might be taken 
in gunpowder. 

In private life Sir Thomas Smythe was a large-hearted, kind, 
and charitable man, in the best acceptation of the word. If his means 
were ample and his fortune large, it was used by him to comfort and 
assist his poorer neighbours and dependants ; and that due provision 
might be made for continuing the benefits, we find him, on the 
18th of April 1619, writing thus to his good friends the Master and 
Wardens of the Skinners' Company :f 

" When I consider that it is the duty of every Christian in 
their several callings to be charitably minded towards the poor 
Servants of God, and that those especially of whom a plentiful 
measure of benefits and blessings are bestowed, ought in token of 
their thankfulness to dispose some part thereof towards the 
relief and maintenance of the poor and needy. 

" And calling to mind that my grandfather, Sir Andrew Judd, 
Knt., out of your own Society, the Skinners, founded the free 
School of Tonbridge, and gave a liberal benevolence (as times then 
were) unto the same, which he recommended by his will to your 
care, that it might be faithfully disposed according to his good 
purpose therein. In imitation of whom, and considering that what 
was in those tymes competent allowances, is now by reason of the 
alteration of times not sufficient to afford neccesarie maintenance 
to such as depend thereon. I have thought fit by my best 
endeavours to encourage the Schoole Master and Usher of this 
Schoole diligently to apply themselves to bringing up the Schollars 
under their charge in the fear of God and Knowledge of good 
learning by enlarging the present Stipends, and to give encourage- 

* A member of the Skinners' Company, and one of the deputation who 
settled the new plantation in Ulster. 

f Peter Bland, Master; Wardens: AVill m Stone, Rob. Edw Js , Dan Hills, 
John Ga3thorne. 



SIR THOMAS SMYTH E, KNT. 97 

ment to the Schollars, carefully to addict them to their studies by 
certain Exhibitions to be given yearly to the Schollars thereof, 
towards their maintenance at the TJniversitie. And to add unto 
the portion of the poor in the Parishes of Tonbridge, Bidborough, 
and Speldhurst in a weekly allowance of bread, according to a 
course which I have already settled in the Parish of Bidborough 
long since.* 

" The experience I have of your care to perform the Will of 
my Grandfather, and my confidence in your integrity inviteth me 
to add to your care and paynes in depositing a certain sum of money 
to such charitable purposes and uses, as I have herein lymited and 
set down. That is to say for this year I bestow upon the Schoole 
Master of the Free Schoole of Tonbridge the sum of Ten Pounds, 
upon the Usher five pounds, to be paid them when you do goe to visit 
the free Schoole at Tonbridge at the begining of May next.f At 
which tyme I desire that you would with the assistance of your 
Visitors^ elect one of the most forward and towardly Sehollars§ of 
that School, that may be sent to the Universitie, and such a one 
whose friends are not able of their own estate to afford competent 
maintenance to them there, to whom I give for the year the Sum of 
Ten Pounds towards his Exhibition at the Universitie, and my 
purpose is (Grod willing) to continue to that Schollar so elected 
the Sum of Ten Pounds yearly at the Universitie for the Space of 
Seven years from the time of his Election, if in the meantime he 
shall not be preferred. 

" I do also give to the Parish of Tonbridge toward the mainten- 
ance of the poor for the year insuing, Ten Pounds and 8s., with 
the direction that the Minister and Church Wardens of that Parish, 
or Some of them provide weekly twelve fourpenny loaves of good 
bread, and give it every Sabaoth day at the Church to twelve of the 
poorest and honestest, in their opinion, dwellers in the Parish, 
which doe frequent the Church to hear Divine Service and Sermons, 
and doe receive the Blessed Sacrament of the Lord's Supper, as the 
Laws of the Land doe appoint. And because the Parish of 
Tonbridge is of Large Extent and hath many poor inhabitants in it, 
I desire that my gift of bread in it may be distributed to four and 
twenty poor people, viz., to twelve of the poorest on the 1 st Sabaoth, 
and to olher twelve the next Sabaoth, and the first twelve the third 
day, and so interchangeably to continue from Sabaoth to Sabaoth ; 
wherein my request is that special regard be had to such poor 
bein<r honest and dwelling within my Manor of Southboro' in the 



* A note of this settlement is entered in the Parish Register, dated 10 lit, 
signed Thomas Smythe. 

f In accordance with Sir T. Smythe's wishes, letters were written by the 
Skinners' Company, informing the Master, Usher, and Churchwardens of the 
bequest, requesting them to bring some poor people with them at the Visitation. 

X The visitor evidently acted as a moderator in awarding these Exhibitions, 
according to the merits of the candidates. 

§ The first scholar elected was Joseph Medders, Mav 1620. Exeter Coll., 
Oxford. 

VOL. XX. II 



98 BENEFACTIONS. 

said Parish ofTonbridge. I do likewise give t < » the two Parishes of 
Bidboro' and Npeldhursl For one year from May nex< the Sum of Ten 
Pounds 8s., viz., Five Pounds I .v. to each Parish to be bj the Minister 
and Churchwardens bestowed weekly in twelve loaves, worth Four 
pence per loaf, Bix loaves For cither Parish, and to be given every 
Sabaoth day a1 the Church to six such poor of Either parish as are 
qualified as aforesaid, and for as much as there is usually allowed 
by the baker Vantage and Poundage, I consider it meet that it be 
bestowed upon the Parish Clerks and Sexton of Each Parish who 
are towerdly poor, -or otherwise as in your discretion, with the 
advice of the Several Ministers or Church Wardens, shall think fit. 
The several sums being Forty-five Pounds and L6s., and 20 nobles 
to defray part of the charge of your journey, and do earnestly pray 
you for your paynes to distribute the Same. 

"Accordingly I intend (God Permitting me life) the next year 
to Observe the same course. Or if it shall please God in the mean 
time to take mc to him, out of this World, 1 shall by my will 
express my further resolution and desire therein, which it may 
please you to enquire after, and see performed so far as toucheth 
the trust reposed in you. 

" It may be objected that I might have done all this and never 
have proclaimed it at your Court, which I confess I had rather 
undergoe that canvas than neglect to settle the course of business 
in my lifetyme for the better direction thereof afterwards, and the 
rather if any uncertainty be observed in this proceeding, it may be 
redressed before my death. 

" Thus presuming on your paynes to take in the performance of 
Worthy Charity, I bid you heartie farewell and rest. 

" Tour assured loving Friend, 

" Tno. Smytiie. 

" From my House in Philpot Lane 
this IS day of April 1619. 

" To my right Worthie & Very Worthie ffriends, 
the Master & Wardens of 

the Company of Skinners these." 

In accordance with the instructions of Sir Thomas Smythe, the 
Master and Wardens at their next visitation to Tonbridge, May 4, 
1619, paid the Rev. Michael Jenkins, at that time Master of the 
Free School, the sum of £10, and to the Usher, Thomas Swadling, 
£5, and likewise distributed the other benefactions before mentioned. 
In the following year Joseph Meadows was elected the first 
Exhibitioner, 1021. Sir Thomas again wrote to the Master and 
Wardens of the Skinners' Company, reminding them of his letter 
written in 1610, and encloses £02 9s. 4d. for distribution, to provide 
in addition six pens for the six best scholars who shall dispute in 
the Examinations. Four names only are given, viz., Thomas Smith, 
Queen's Coll., Cambridge, George Children, John Dixon, and 
Richard Ball. 




MONl'MENT OF 

SikTho'm.s smyth'l-' 

Kilt. 

Sutton «ttHon'e 

KENT. 
A.D. Mi>cccixxxix. 



filULfutlLf I V;- ^ | ^ = - == ^_ ^ -■ r . 

TOMB OF SIR THOMAS SMYTHE (BORN CIRCA 1558; DIED 1625) 



SIR THOMAS SMYTHE'S EPITAPH. 99 

In 1625 Sir Thomas Smythe died at Brooke Place alias Sutton 
Place, at Sutton at Hone, in Kent; Hasted Bays, "as is conjectured 
of the Plague, which raged greatly here at that time" (Hasted, 
vol. ii., p. 319). Pie left by his wife Sarah, the daughter and heir 
of William Blount, Esq., one only son John. His widow married 
again, in the following year, Robert Sidney, 2nd Earl of Leicester. 
At Lady Leicester's decease, her son, Sir John Smythe, became 
possessed of the Manor of Sutton at Hone, together with the bulk 
of his father's property not otherwise disposed of by his will. 

The monument of Sir Thomas Smythe in the south aisle, of the 
church at Sutton at Hone is a good specimen of the period when it whs 
erected. The effigy of Sir Thomas in alabaster is well and carefully 
executed, and exhibits a family likeness to that of his father, "the Cus- 
tomer," in Ashford Church. The features are those of a man of 
ability, firmness, and energy. He wears a short-peaked beard, and 
his hands are raised in the attitude of prayer. He is clothed in a 
doublet, vest, trunk hose, etc., and wears his aldermanic gown or 
furred robe. The effigy lies on a sarcophagus of black marble 
with bold trusses, beneath an arched canopy with enriched soffit, 
supported by two black marble columns with gilded capitals, 
with a broken pediment on which his arms are blazoned ; the 
quarterings are as follows : Smythe, Juclde, Chiche, Criol, Averenches, 
Crevecour, Chichele, and Stafford. Over the figure are two marble 
tablets, with the following inscriptions : 

" -M-S- To the glorie of GOD and to y e pious Memorie of the 
hon ble S 1 ' THOMAS SMITH, K*, late GOVERNOR of y e East 
Indian, Moscovia, French, & Sommer Hand Companies ; Treasurer 
for the Virginian PLANTATION, Prime VNUERTAKER (in the 
year 1612) for that noble Designe the Hescoverie of the NOETH 
WEST PASSAGE. Principal Commtssioxfk for the London ex- 
pedition against y e Pirates, & for a Voiage to y e Ryver SENEGA 
upon y e Coast of AFRICA. One of v e cheefe Commissioners for 
y e NAYIE ROIAL, & sometyme AMBASSADOVR from y Ma tie 
c/f Gr. Brit, to y e Emperovr and Great Duke of Rvssia & Moscovia 
&c. Who having judiciously conscionably, & with admirable facility 
managed many difficult & weighty Affaires to y e honour A; profit of 
this NATION, rested from his labour the 4 th day of Septem. 1625, 
and his Soul returning to Him that gave it, bis body was here 
laid up in y e hope of a blessed Resurrection." 

On a slab below : 

" Prom those large KINGDOMES where the SVNN doth rise, 
From that rich newe found world that Westward lies — 
From VOLGA to the flood of AMAZONS^ 
From under both the POLES, on all the ZONES^ 
From all the famous ryvers, landes & seas, 
Betwixt this PLACE and our ANTIPODES - 
He gott intelligence what might be found 
To give contentment through the massie ROVND. 
]>nt fiuding Earthly things did rather tire, 
His Longing SOVL, then answer her desire. 

u 2 



101) SIR THOMAS SMYTH l\ KNT. 

To this obscured VI LL ^.GE he withdreue, 

I'l.nn hi i '•■ Li- I [eavenlie VOIAG E did i ersue. 

Here summed up all, And when b 8 GAL 10 of 13 real h 

II , I h . Ucc I ii d n Ibe I ' HIT o Hi;.\ I'll 

The foul's i r tilt- 13AH k (and safelie I 

Wber FAITH his b'ACTOK and his HARBINGER, 

Made place before) he did no doubte obtaine 

Thai wealth w u lure on Earth we seek in vain."* 

Sir Thomas Smythe's will was proved by his executors in the 
Prerogative Court of Canterbury, Oct. 1.2, 1625 (Somersel Souse, 
Book Clarke, t'ol. 107). By it we find that ample provision 
was made for the charities which he continued to the time 

of his death, as slated in his letter to the Master and Wardens of 
the Skinners' Company on the INth day of April L019. After the 
usual preamble, he bequeathed to the Master, Wardens, and 
Commonality of the Mistery of the Skinners, all his houses, 
messuages, land, and tenements situate and being near Paul's Gate 
at the west-end of Watling Street, which he purchased of Sir Francis 
By rm an, as well as his messuage and tenements in Lyme Street, 
London, where Delaney then dwelt, adjoining Mr. John Clark's, 
Doctor of Phisiek, from year to year, and for ever to hold the same 
to such charitable uses and purposes hereafter declared. That is to 
say for the distribution of bread and cloth to the poor of the 
Parishes of Bidborougb, Tonbridge, Speldhursf, Sutton at Hone, 
and Darenth, or Durrant as it was spelt, in sundry small payments 
to the Vicars and Church Wardens of the said parishes, Ten Pound 
to the Master of the Free Grammar School, and five to the Usher 
yearly, 20 nobles to the Company, and six Exhibitions of £10 each 
to youthes to be chosen out of the Free School, who should prove 
themselves most capable and toweredly of learning, whose parents 
should not be able to afford a competent maintenance at the 
University ; who not misspending their time shall diligently apply 
to study, and principally to the Study of Divinity, so that when it 
might please God to call them to the Sacred profession of the 
Ministry, they should not forget to give God thanks in their prayer 
before the Sermon for His Mercy towards them, so that others 
might be stirred up to good and charitable works. 

In consequence of the increased value of this City pro- 
perty, which now produces a yearly rental of £1158 lis. 8^/., a 
scheme for the future management of the same was sanctioned by 
the Court of Chancery, in 1883, for Exhibitions at the Universities 
of not less than £20 or more than £10, and a Foundation Scholar- 
ship of £10 tenable by any boy in the School. Many new 
ecclesiastical districts have since been formed out of the original 
parish of Tollbridge, such as Hildenboro; St. Peter's Southboro' ; 
St. Stephen's Tonbridge; St. Thomas's Southboro'; Holy Trinity, 
Christ Church, St. John, St. James, St. Peter, and Rusthall, Tun- 
bridge Weils. Shorne in Kent, St. Augustine's, and St. Dionis 

* Under a plain slab of white marble lie the remains of Henry Smythe, Esq., 
great-grandson of Sir Thomas, who die 1, a'je rl °" '" 




o 5 



HIS WILL. 101 

Backchurch in London, are also benefited, so five trustees are now 
elected by the Skinners' Company, and one by eaeb of the parishes 
or ecclesiastical districts above named. These trustees meet on the 
second Wednesday in each quarter at Skinners' Hall, for the pur- 
pose of granting annuities, pensions, and loans under the will of 
Sir Thomas Smythe. 

With certain exceptions hereinafter mentioned, Sir Thomas 
Smytheleft the bulk of his property to be divided into two moieties, 
the one half to go to his widow Dame Sarah Smythe, and the other 
to his son John, and to his heirs male lawfully begotten, with the rever- 
sion of his mother's portion at her decease. In default of an heir 
in the male line, he directed that all his manors, messuages, lands, 
and houses situated in the parishes of Bidboro', Tonbridge, Speld- 
hurst, and Penshurst, which he had previously purchased of Sir. Dyke, 
were to pass to his nephew Thomas Smythe, of Ostenhanger, the 
son of his elder brother. His son John's marriage with Lady 
Isabella. Sidney, daughter of Robert, second Earl of Leicester, and 
the subsequent birth of a grandson, rendered this contingency void. 

To his nephew 7 Thomas Smythe, son of his brother Richard, and 
to John, the son of his brother Robert, and to Thomas Fanshaw, the 
son of his sister Joan, Lady Fanshaw, he bequeathed all his land, 
tenements, and hereditaments known as Otford Park, which he had 
recently purchased of the Duke of Leicester, to be equally divided 
between them. To the sons of his sister Ursula Butler, and to his 
nephew, Arthur Harris, he left the Cottingham Estate, which 
he had purchased of Mr. William Richardson, to be equally 
divided between them. 

To his favourite nephew, Fanshaw, he left, besides the third part 
of his share in the Otford property before mentioned, all his lands 
and tenements known by the name of " Saltangle," situate and being 
at Ringingham in the county of York, all his land and tenements 
in Essex, as well as those at Lewisham in the county of Kent, 
which latter he had purchased of Sir Richard Stoddard, Knt. ; and 
he further directed that the other properties which he possessed in 
the Parish of Tonbridge should be equally divided between Thomas 
and William Fanshaw, and his heirs male. 

The residue of his estate, consisting of goods, chattels, plate, 
jewelry, and household stuff, wheresoever and whatsoever, after the 
payments of his just debts and funeral expenses, he directs shall 
be divided into three parts, one third to go to his wife, as due and 
belonging to her by the customs of the City of London ; one third 
to Sir John Smythe, as due and belonging to him by the custom of 
the City, " seeing that neither before his marriage was he advanced 
by me." As regards the other third, he directs his executors to 
provide and distribute to the poor and needy as much good cloth as 
shall cost £100, to be given to poor people without respect of 
persons. 

Avoiding pomp and vain-glory in respect to his funeral, he 
directs that those in attendance at his burial may have mourning 
garments. To St. Bartholomew's Hospital he bequeathed a legacy 



L02 Ills WILL. 

of 640, t» Christ's Hospital 620, to St. Tl as'a Hospital £20, 

and to Bridewel] 620. To his household servants 20*. for every 
year they had been in his service, and Boon. Then follow Family 
bequests. To the children of his loving sister Lady Kanshaw CL20, 
and to each of them, Foraring, 65. To Richard Fanshaw his godson 
610, and bo Lady St. Ledger his goddaughter 620. To the children 
of his sister Ursula (.Mrs. Butler) 10*. each, for a ring, and to the 
children of his late Bister the Lady Catherine Heywood £5 each, 
for a ring. To the children of his late sister Lady A-lice £5 each. To 
Thomas, son of his late brother John of Ostenhauger, 6200 to buy 
a coach and coach-horses. To his nieces [Catherine and Lotty 
Baker, and Elizabeth, Lady Neville, 650 each. To the children of 
Henry Smythe 65 each. To Sir Richard 620. To his wife and 
sister the Lady Smythe £10 each. To his brother Richard £10, 
and to his children 65. To Sir David Watkins £20 to buy him a 
gelding. To ('apt. Edward Christian £10. To John Wood, Doctor 
in Divinity, as a remembrance of love to him and his wife, £10. 
To Mistress Eli/. Wood to buy her a ring for his sake £5. To bis 
loving friend Sir Humphry Stanford for a ring £5. To bis loving 
friend Edward Cooke, apothecary, £4. To Master Valentine 
Wearbam 40s. To Eichard Clifton, his wife, and bis sister, 40s. 
each for rings. To bis assured friend Sir Thomas Eoe £10 for 
a ring. To Robert Symmonds, dwelling in testator's bouse at 
Bidboro', 40s. To Thomas Heath, of London, merchant, £5 ; to 
George Stroud, for a ring, 40s. ; and to each of the children of Eliz. 
Cheekes, for a ring, 30s. To John Woodhall 40s. 

To the Governors and Committee of the Merchants of London, 
trading with the East Indies at the time of bis decease, the sum 
of £5 each. To the Deputy £4, and to the Treasurer £3, for 
rings, and to the other twenty-four Committee-men 40s. in remem- 
brance. Also to Mr. Andrew Caleen, Mr. Christopher Laming, 
Eichard Courtney, Eichard Fishere, and John Eoberts, servants of 
the said Company, as well as Widow Johnson, 30s. for a ring 
each. 

To the Company of Merchants in London for the Discovery of 
New Trades, commonly known by the name of "The Muscovia 
Company," who had testified of their love to him many years, the 
sum of £500, for and towards the payment of such debts as are due 
by the said Company upon the Old Eoyal Fort. 

To the Governor of the said Company £5, to the Consuls and 
Assistants of the same 40s each, to make them rings to wear as a 
token of love. 

To the Treasurer, Consuls, and Company for the Plantation of 
the Colony in Virginia and the Somer Islands, commonly called the 
Virginian Company and Bermudas Company, the sum of £100, to 
be equally divided between the two Companies, towards the building 
of two Churches, one for each Plantation. 

These last recited legacies fully bear out the statements before 
made as to his benevolence and large-hearted charity, but they 



SIR THOMAS SMYTIIE, KNT. 103 

prove also, that in the pursuit of commerce he was not unmindful of 
a duty which he owed to Christianity and civilization, that of 
spreading the glad tidings of the Gospel in foreign lands. 

On his executors, Dame Sarah Smythe, his son John Smythe, his 
brother Richard, Sir David Watkins. and Mr. Nicholas Swift, he 
further bestowed sums of £50 each, for their pains to be taken in 
and about his will, over and above the legacies before mentioned. 

Sir Thomas Smythe appears to have purchased a moiety of the 
Chapel of St. John's, with all the tithes, oblations, etc., belonging 
to it, and other lands in Sutton and Wilmiugton, of George Cole, 
Esq., of the Inner Temple (Hasted, vol. ii., p. 348). That part 
allotted to the Countess of Leicester and her son became a separate 
manor with a Court Baron appendant to it, and acquired the name 
of the "Manor of Sutton," and at the Countess's death came into 
the possession of Sir John, only son of Sir Thomas Smythe, who 
married Isabella, daughter of the Earl of AVarwiek, by whom 
he had issue one son Robert, and a daughter Isabella, married to 
John, Lord Robartes of Truro (Hasted, vol. ii., p. 3i9). 

Robert Smythe, Esq., of Bounds in Bidboro', and of Brook 
Place in Sutton, married the Countess of Sunderland, nee Lady 
Dorothy Sidney,* by whom he had one son Robert, who was 
Governor of Dover Castle, and died 1695, possessed of the Manor 
of Brook Place, leaving by Catherine his wife, daughter of William 
Stafford, of Blatherwick, in jVorthants, two sons, Henry and 
William, his heirs in gavelkind (Hasted, vol. ii., p. 350). 

In 1699 Mrs. Catherine Smythe obtained an Act of Parliament 
for vesting the estates in the hands of Trustees, with power to 
sell, who subsequently conveyed them to Sir John le Thieullier, who 
pulled down part of the mansion-house at Sutton at Hone (Hasted, 
vol. ii., p. 350). 

* Sacharissa, by Julia Cartwright (Mrs. Ady), Seeley and Co., London, 
1892, is a charming sketch of the history of Lady Dorottvy Sidney, and of her 
parents and their home, Penshurst Place, near Tonbridge. Her letters are printed 
in extenso ; and in one of them she speaks of " my son Smythe." 



I KM- ) 



LIST OF 
FORTY-FIVE VICARS OF TILMANSTONE.* 

COMPILED, WITH NOTES, BY REV. THOMAS SIIIPDEM 
FPvAMPTON, M.A., F.S.A. 

Vicars. Patrons. 

Milo be Lillefuestan, pres. 20 Oct. 1271. The King. 

(Pat. 56 Hen. III., m. 2.) l 
N. dk Ktsisingbir', iiist. 23 Dec. 12S0. (Kegist. The Archbishop. 

Peckham, £. 50 b.) ~ 

* It is on record that there was a church at Tilmanstone in the 
time of Baldwin, Archbishop of Canterbury, 1185-90. But certain 
architectural features in the present building — especially the south 
doorway — shew beyond doubt that it existed in the Norman, and 
not improbably also in the Saxon period. In the lime of Cardinal 
and Archbishop Stephen Langton, 1207-28, there were three 
claimants for the patronage of this church, the Knights Hospitallers 
of Jerusalem, who derived their claim indirectly from some of the 
Archbishop's predecessors ; Roger de Insula, clerk, who asserted 
that he had obtained it from Archbishop Baldwin ; and the Arch- 
bishop himself. The other contending parties agreed to submit to 
his decision, and he gave it in favour of the Hospitallers, retaining 
for himself and his successors the right of instituting the vicar. At 
the same time he settled the endowment, decreeing that the vicar 
should have the whole of the " altarage," and a moiety of all eccle- 
siastical tithes, except that of certain land which was the church's 
demesne ; also a certain messuage, which had been that of Alredus 
the clerk. The Archbishop likewise determined to what dues the 
vicar should be subject. (Lamb. Lib., Charted Miscell., vol. xi., 
No. 74.) 

1 Milo de Ltllengestan. He was presented by the King, the 

Archbishopric being vacant. On September 16 in the 
same year he had letters of presentation from the King to the 
vicarage of " Pageham," in Sussex, a Peculiar of the Arch- 
bishop of Canterbury. 

2 N. de Kysisingbir'. The date here given is really that of the 

Archbishop's mandate to the Dean of Sandwich to induct the 



FORL'Y-FIVE VICARS OF TILMA.NSTOME. 105 

Vicars. Patrons. 

Geoffrey ni<: Lewes, hist. 16 -I ill v 12S(>. {Ibid., The Archbishop. 

f. 31 a.) 8 
Walter, c. 1313. (Placita Corone, Kent. Ed. 

II., m. 31.) * 
Ralph de Hclcote, in 1336. (Hasted, iv., 

208.) 5 
WrLLTAM Elys, pres. 14 July 1349. (Pat. 23 The King. 

Ed. III., pt. ii., m. 23.) 
John de Beriiam, pres. 6 Oct. 1319. (Pat. 23 The King. 

Ed. III., pt. in., m. 30.) 

new vicar, but this was usually issued at the time of institu- 
tion. In this instance the Archbishop presented, and the 
same right was exercised by his successors until after the 
year 1449, notwithstanding Stephen Langton's decision in 
favour of the Hospitallers. 

3 Geoffrey de Lewes. In the Taxatio Ecclesiastica of P. Nicho- 

las IV., in 1291, the church of Tilmanstone is returned as 
worth £10. 

4 Walter. Mentioned only in connection with the untoward 

event which led to his retirement from the parish. The 
following is a literal translation of the account given in the 
Assize Poll: — "Walter, vicar of the church of Tyhnanstone, 
and Thomas, clerk of the said vicar, and Robert de Paundes, 
were together in the borough of Tyhnanstone, and a dispute 
having arisen between them, the aforesaid Pobert would have 
killed the aforesaid Walter, the vicar ; and seeing this the said 
Thomas, the clerk, both drew his knife and struck the afore- 
said Pobert in the back ; whereupon on the eighth da}' after 
he died therefrom. Afterwards it was found by the Coroner's 
Polls that Eleanor, who was the wife of Pobert de Paundes, 
who is dead, appealed in the County [Court] the aforesaid 
Walter, vicar of the church of Tylmanstone, and Thomas, clerk 
of the said Walter, touching the death of the aforesaid Pobert 
her husband, and followed up her appeal against them unto 
the fourth County [Court], at which the aforesaid appeal was 
removed by King's writ to the Court of our lord the King ; 
and the aforesaid Thomas was delivered up as a convicted 
clerk to the Bishop, and died in prison. And whereas nothing 
is known of the delivery of the aforesaid Walter, who is still 
remaining in the country, therefore let him be taken. After- 
wards the Sheriff testifies that the aforesaid Walter is not 
found, but has withdrawn himself. And the jurors suspect 
him touching the death of the aforesaid Pobert ; therefore 
let him be exacted and outlawed. He had no chattels." 

5 Palph de Htjlcote. In the Peport of Prior Philip de Thame 

to the Grand Master of the Knights Hospitallers, Elyan de 
Villanova, for the year 1338, the moiety of the church of 
Tilmanston is returned as ainountino- to £8. 



106 FORTY-FIVE VICARS 

VlCABB. Patbons. 

William Joedan, adm. 9 Oct. L349. (Eegist. The King. 

(J., Ch. Ch. Canl . !'. 6Sa.) 6 
Rogeb, exch. with the last, 6 Oct. L356. (Eegist. The Archbishop. 

[slep, I'. 272 b.) 
John Hamond, inst. 21 Dec. 1369. (Eegist. The Archbishop. 

Whittlesey, I'. 71/;.) 
Will, de Buktngham, inst. 28 Oct. 1372, on The Archbishop. 

resig. of the last. (Ibid.,f. 92 b.) 
Will. Hobicynu, exch. with the; last, 23 Mar. The Archbishop. 

1393-4. (Eegist. M. L). B. and C, £. 2L7 </.)< 
John Wynnek, inst. 2<S Dec. 1 102, on d. of the The Archbishop. 

last. (Kegist. Arundel, i., f. 286 a.) * 
William Swan, inst. 7 Feb. 1415-6, on d. of The Archbishop. 

the last vicar. (Kegist. Chichele, i., f. 71 a.) 
Thomas Wtstowe, inst. 31 Oct. 1410, on d. of The Archbishop. 

the last. (Ibid., f . 78 a.) 
Adam Skelton, exch. with the last, 30 Oct. The Archbishop. 

1417. (Ibid., f. 90 J.) 9 
KoiiKRT Ceham, inst. 10 June 1429. (Ibid., The Archbishop. 

f . 176 a.) 
Thomas Ktmberlee, inst. 15 Apr. 1431, on The Archbishop. 

resig. of the last. [Ibid., f. 190 a.) 
William Thomas, inst. 19 Mar. 1435-G. (Ibid., The Archbishop. 

f. 210 5.) 
Willtam Beemanangye, inst. 12 Dec. 1449. The Archbishop. 

(Eegist. Stafford, f. 101 b.) 
Thomas Makalan. 
John Okebouene, inst. 21 Nov. 146S, on resig. Prior of S. John 

of the last. (Eegist. Bourgchier, f. 99 5.) l0 of Jerusalem. 



6 William Joedan. The presentation of three clerics to Tilman- 

stone within as many months points only too plainly to the 
terrible pestilence known as the Black Death, which visited 
the country between July 134S and October 1349, and is com- 
puted to have carried oft' more than half the population. 
Jordan, after holding the vicarage seven years, exchanged 
with Eoger, rector of the neighbouring church of "Chil- 
lyngden." 

7 William Hobkyng. Previously vicar of " Siberteswald," then 

in the patronage of the Abbot and Convent of S. Eadegund. 

8 John Wynnee. Described as capellanus, as were also his 

two successors. 

9 Adam Skelton. Previously perpetual vicar of Glen Magna, in 

the diocese of Lincoln. 

10 John Okebouene. This is the earliest instance mentioned in 

the Episcopal Eegisters of the Prior of S. John of Jerusalem 
exercising the right of presentation. The will of Richard 
Harvv, 30 December 1471, throws a little light on church 



OF TILMANSTONE. 107 

Vicab. Patron. 

John Smale, inst. 24 May 1474, oa d. of the Prior of S. John 
last. (Ibid., f. 110 a.) 11 of Jerusalem. 

matters in the time of this vicar. He directed that his body 
should be buried in the graveyard of the church of S. Andrew, 
near " le Porche ;" to the high altar he left 3s. 4d. ; to the 
fabric of the church, to cover ' ; le churchrove," 40s. ; also to 
the same church a missal, and a new chalice. Testator like- 
wise arranged for a chaplain to hold memorial services in the 
church for a whole year, at a salary of ten marks. 
11 John Smale. Three extracts from an early Court Roll in the 
possession of L. L. Duncan, Esq., F.S.A., and kindly com- 
municated by him, reveal a curious picture of the relations 
existing between this vicar and his parishioners shortly after 
his appointment. Court held at Tilmanstone, 25 April 1476 : 
"Item [juratores] presentant quod Dominus Johannes Smale 
insultum fecit et traxit sanguinem super Willelmum servi- 
entem suum contra pacem domini Regis. Ideo in miseri- 
cordia — xxd." Court held there, 10 October 1476: "Item 
[juratores] presentant quod Dominus Johannes Smale, vicarius 
de Tilmaston, fecit insultum cum baculo contra Jacobum 
Medilton sissor' (scissorem) ibidem contra pacem domini 
Regis. Ideo ipse in misericordia — iijs. iiijd." Court held 
there, 19 October 1480 : " It'm the Ten a n'ts hath presentyd 
by there hothes that they have sworne that the vykeer Sir 
John Smale came to the alehous at mydnyght and his man 
w l hym seyng this wordy s to his man Go yn and geve a blowe. 
A pon the whyche wordys there was a fray and lykely to a 
bene manslawter. Ferd'more whan the man was hurt and 
lay in poynt of Dethe he said unto the vekery Corsyd be thu 
vykere thow art caws of my hurt and of this fray whei'fore 
thow art wordy to be hangyd for this mater. Ideo in miseri- 
cordia — xs." 

Thirteen Tilmanstone wills, now in the Archidiaconal Registry 
at Canterbury, but made during the forty-one years of Mr. Smale's 
incumbency, testify to the affection of the parishioners for their 
ancient church, and to their desire that its services should be upheld 
in a becoming manner. Among the numerous bequests the follow- 
ing may be noticed : John Hervy, of " Barfeld," 10 September 
1479, left to the high altar 3s. 4d. ; to the work of the church 
5 qrs. of barley ; also to the light called the " Hokeday light," and 
to the Torch light, L qr. of barley. Richard Knott by his will 
dated 10 April 1480, and proved 12 June 1198, besides leaving 
12d. to the high altar, made the bequest: "It'm to the reparation 

of the body of the seid churche xiid It'm I bequethe to the 

churche aforseid iij ewes and iij u wex to th'entent that the iij 1 ' wex 
may be maynteyned and light yerely over the sepulchre of our 
Lord at Estertyme." Matthew Selby, 25 March 1491, left to the 



10S FORTY-FIVB VICARS 

VlCAH. PatboW. 

John Ai.mwn, inst. 24 Oct. L515, on d. of the Prior of S. John 

last. (Regiet. Warham, f. 359 a.) of Jerusalem. 



high altar (>s. Nil. ; and to the Fabric of the church L3s. Id. Also 
for the supporl of the light of the Paschal Taper six wether sheep 
or one cow, as the churchwardens, or two other discreel parishioners, 
might think best. Also for the repair of the noisome ways leading 
to " Sandwyc," 6s. 8d., er twenty cart-loads of stone. John Pittok, 
1 October 111):}, left for 1 ho repair of the church 2 qrs. of barley. 
Richard Knott, 31 Augual L503, left to the high altar one sheep, 
and to the light called " llopdav light " a bushel of wheat. Tho. 
Gybbys, 28 February 1506-7, left to the "live autor" two bushels 
of " barle." " It'm 1 bequeith to the Hocday light in the seid 
cherche also ij busshellis of barle." Under special contingencies 
testator provided that certain of his lands and tenements were to be 
sold for the most profit, " and the money therof cumyng to be 
devided equally, half to bye keene for a stole to maynten' the lightes 
of the p'ishe chirche of Tylmanston, and the other half to repayre 
the fowule weys betuex Eastre and Sandwiche wher as is inoste 
nede." A witness to this will was " Sir John Congragh than beyng 
Curate." Mr. Smale was by this time probably too infirm to sway 
the rod of empire without assistance. Nicholas Pyttocke by his 
will, 4 May 1508, bequeathed "to the hygh auterof Seint Andrewe 
afoi'eseide viijd., also to the Rode lvght ij buschellys of barley." 
Michaell Cooke, 20 March 1508-9, left directions for his body to'be 
buried in the church " coram imagine Crucifixi." He also left 
6s. 8d. for the purchase of a missal ; a quarter of barley to the 
light of the Holy Cross ; also 40s. for the repairs of the church ; 
and a cow with six sheep for the light of S. Mary and 8. Nicholas. 
Hen. Hamond, 7 August 1509, left to the high altar and to the 
light of S. Andrew, severally, four bushels of barley ; also one 
bushel of barley to every other light in the church. This testator 
also left 12d. to the high altar of " Norborne," and provided that 
if his maidservant remained with his wife until Michaelmas 1510, 
she was to have a sheep, a lamb, four bushels of wheat and four of 
barley. Will of Thomas Churche, of " Thorneton," 5 June 1511 : 
"Also I bequeth to the buyng of a Coope (eope) a seine of whette. 
Also I bequethe to the Hokdaie light iiij ewes." One of the wit- 
nesses to the will of Tho. ffygge, 10 December 1514. was Sir John 
Clynston, curate. In the wills here cited mention is made of some 
half a dozen lights, which were formerly maintained in the church. 
With some of these would be connected minor altars, two of which 
were on either side of the chancel arch beneath the side windows 
in the north and south walls of the nave, which have every appear- 
ance of having been altar lights, and close to one of which the out- 
line of a piscina was discovered during the late Restoration. The 
Hockday Light may have been sustained by some local guild, which 
kept their annual fete at that season. Authorities are not agreed 



OF TI1.M AN STONE. 109 

Vicars. Pathons. 

Kalph Roger, inst. 15 Jan. L518-9, on d. of the Prior of S. John 

last. {Ibid ., f . 367 a.) 12 of Jerusalem. 

Henry Hudspeth, inst. 17 Feb. 1524-5, on d. The Archbishop. 

of the last viear. (Ibid., f. 383 b.) 1; 
James Nicholson, in 1535-6. (Valor Eccles.) u 
William Cockes, inst. 1 Mar. 1545-6, on d. of The Archbishop. 

the last. (Regist. Cranmer, f. 399 a.) l5 

as to the origin and meaning of the term, but the day seems to 
have been the third Tuesday after Easter, and in former times it 
was marked by collections made for church purposes. 

13 Ralph Roger. This vicar by his will, dated 13 July 1521, and 
proved four days later, left in reference to the place of his 
interment the following direction: " My body to be buried 
yn the chauncell afore Saynt Andrew there." This implies 
the existence of an image of S. Andrew, who was the Patron 
Saint, which was in accordance with a decree of Archbishop 
Winchelsea, ordering that the image of the saint in whose 
name the church was dedicated should be carefully preserved 
in the chancel of every parish church. Testator likewise 
gave directions, and left a bequest, for memorial services in 
the church. This is the earliest will of a vicar of Tilmanstone 
that has been found. 

13 Henry Hudspeth. The entry in Archbishop Warham's Register 

states that Hudspeth was instituted on the death of the last 
vicar, but unfortunately the name is not mentioned. There 
is no doubt, however, that he came next after Ralph Roger, 
as only a few months intervene between the death of the latter 
and Hudspeth's institution. Mr. Hudspeth had previously 
been rector of Shadoxhurst, to which he was instituted 7 Sep- 
tember 1523. By his will, dated on the Feast of S. Margaret, 
1530, he left directions for his body to be buried in the chancel 
of Tilmanstone Church, The supervisor of his will was John 
Solme, vicar of Xorthbourne, and the witnesses were Sir 
John Denby, parson of " Rypull," Sir James JNycolson, 
parson of " Schadockysherst," and William Kyrkbye. 

14 James Nicholson. The institution of this vicar seems never 

to have been entered in the Archbishop's Register. Like his 
predecessor, he was previously rector of Shadoxhurst, and 
the vacancy in that living caused by his resignation was filled 
up by the appointment of George Walvngiam, on 7 February 
1531-2. (Regist. Warhani, f. 414 b.) He held Tilmanstone 
till the time of his death, which probably occurred at the end 
of 1545, or early in the next year. 
13 William Cockes. He was already rector of Betteshanger, 
having been collated to that living by Archbishop Cranmer, 
11 April 1510. lie was a witness to the will, dated 9 March 
1546-7, of "Thomas Pyttocke th'eldre of the parishe oft' 



110 FORTY-FIVE VICAltS 

VlCAB. PaTBON. 

Thomas Lilfobd, inst. 29 May 1551, on depriv, The Queen, 
of the last. ( Regist. N., Ch. Ch. Cant., 
f. 68 a.) 16 

Tylmanston," who bequeathed to the "high aulter of the 
church aforesaide Eur my tythes Forgotten two ewes." Tes- 
tator likewise made provision Eor a memorial service in the 
church. On the accession of Queen Mary, William Cocttea 
was deprived of his living. 
lfl Thomas Lilfobd. He was presented to Tilmanstone by Queen 
Mary, In the vacancy of the Sec of Canterbury. A few wills 
yield some additional information about the church and 
[lavish during his incumbency. Will of John Den, 1 February 
1556-7 : "It'm I wyll have at myforthfare a trentall of masses 
wythe dyridge, at my monthes mynde as manye w l dyrydge, 
and at my twelvemouthes mynde lekewyse a trentall w 1 dyrge 
after the moste solempne fashyon vsyed in the churche. It'm 
I bequethe to the poore peple at my forthfare, monthes mynde, 
and twelve monthes mynde, at everye tyme xxs., and as for mete 
and drynke for the people I putt yt to the dyscretyon of my 

executors as they ma}*e be honest lye refreshed It'm I 

bequethe xl ewes to the poore people of this p'ishe of Tyl- 
maston after this sorte that the moste honest men of substans 
shall putt them owte to farme for the moste vantage for the 
poore w' the advysement of the vycar for the tyme beynge 
for ever. And the monye therof cumynge to be delyuered to 
the poore people at ij tymes in the yere (that ys to save) on 
Sainete Thomas Avynes daye before Christmas and on Good 
Frydaye, by even porcyons, these to be delyuered at Myghel- 
mas nexte after my decease." (Archd. Court, Cant., xxxii., 6.) 
Thomas Cockes by his will, dated 4 September 155S, and 
proved 10 March following, left these bequests: "Item I 
bequethe to the vicare of Tylmanston aforesaied for tythes 
and oblac'ons forgotten and necgligently w'houlden, if any 
suche be, in dyschardge of my soule and conscience xxs. ster- 

linge Item I give and bequethe towardes the pay ling' of 

the churche yarde of Tylmanston aforesaied xxs. sterlinge. 
.... Item I will that my executrix herafter named at her 
proper costes and charges euery yere during her lyfe naturall 
shall cause to be caried and layed in the highe waye btw'ne 
Sandw ch and Eastrye one hundrethe loads of stones." (P.C.C., 
55 Welles.) John Cullynge by his will, 27 July 1503, left 
to the " vycar of Tylmeston xiid.," to "the poore mens boxe 
xiid.," and to " the reparac'on of the churche xiid." Will. 
Boys, gent., by his will, 20 March 1572, left " to the poore of 
the parysshes of Nonington, Tylmanstone, Eastrey, and the 
Castell of Cantorburye, syxe quarters of wheate yerelye 
durynge three score yeares." Thomas Lylford, the vicar, by 
his will, 10 May 15S0, left directions for his body to be buried 



OF TILMANSTONE, 111 

Vicars. PItbons. 

Edward Mundy, M.A.., inst. 10 June 15^6, on The Archbishop. 

d. of the last. (Kegist. Whitgift, i., 

f. 471 A.) 17 
Francis Daltox, S.T.B., inst. 20 Dec. 1507, The Archbishop. 

on resig. of the last. {Ibid., iii., f. 246 a.) ] * 
John Boys, M.A.., inst. 11 Oct. 1599, on resig. The Archbishop. 

of the last. (Ibid.J. 254 «,) 1<J 

in the chancel of the church. He also left the following 
bequests: "Item I give to the poore of the said parrishe of 
Tvlmanstone xs., to be pd. w ,h in one whole yeare next after 
my decese. Item I give to the reparations of the said p'ishe 
churche of Tvlmanstone xxs. Item I give towardes the repa- 
rations of Bettishanger churche and there (their) bookes 
needet'ull for the same vjs. viijd. Item I give to the poore of 
St. Margarettes vs. Ite' I give to M r Mundy for a funerall 
sermon to be preached by him at myburyall a dubble duckett 

of gold And thus the Lord of his infinite greate mercye 

and grace receyue my soule into his blessed tuition, and the 
same to place amonge his electe children in his blessed king- 
dome of heaven : To whome be all laude praise and everlast- 
inge glory for ever and ever Amen." (Archd. Court., Cant., 
xlvi., 98 h.) The entry of the burial of this vicar occurs in 
the oldest Register, which commences in 1558, as follows : 
" 1586, Item the xvij 11 ' of May Thomas Liltorth vicar of the 
parishe of Tilmanstone was buried, whom the Lord of his 
mercie hath receyved into his kingdome." Mr. Lilford held 
for some years the rectory of Betteshanger, to which he was 
admitted 4 November 1564, on the presentation of William 
Boyse, Esq. 

17 Edward Mundy. According to Hasted he also held Bettes- 

hanger, and resigned it with Tilmanstone in 1597. 

18 Francis Dalton. He was rector of S. Dionis Backchurch, one 

of the Archbishop's Peculiars, 1592-6. In 1599, he resigned 
Tilmanstone; but some years elapsed before he obtained the 
rectory of Hope All Saints, to which he was instituted 27 
March 1606, on presentation by King James. He retained 
it only about two years. 

19 John Boys, lie was the son of Thomas Boys, Esq., of Evthorn, 

where he was born in 1571. He was probably educated at 
the King's School, Canterbury, whence he proceeded, in 1585 
to Corpus Christi Coll., Camb. He subsequently became a 
Fellow of Clare Hall. His first preferment was the rectory 
of Betteshanger, obtained for him by his uncle, John Boys, 
Esq., to which he was instituted 8 August 1597. Arch- 
bishop Whitgift gave him the Mastership of Eastbridge 
Hospital ; and, in 1599, the vicarage of Tilmanstone. In the 
year 1610 he was appointed by King James I. one of the 
Fellows of Chelsea College, then lately founded. Arch- 



112 FOKL'Y-FIVK VIC AILS 

Vic \ as. Pat nous. 

Wii.i.iam 'Pi uM'.it. .M.D., inst. 7 Nov. L618, on The Archbishop, 

resig. of the last. | Regist. Abbot, i., f. l-36a.) 
Moses Capell, M.A., inst. 30 Apr. L630, ou The Archbishop. 

resig. of the last. {Ibid., iii., f. L88A.) 3J 
Nicholas Billingsley, M.A., adin. 12 July The Parliament. 

Kill, on resig. of the lust. (Vide Hist. 

MSS. Comm., Keport \i.. pt. L, p. L8«.) ' 

bishop Abbot presented him with the sinecure rectory of 
Hollingbourne ; and, in 1618, with the rectory of Great 
Mongeham, on which he resigned Tilmanstone. On the 
dentil of Dr. ITotherby he was promoted by the King to the 
Deanery of Canterbury, and was installed 3 .May 1019. He 
held office a little more than six years, and died suddenly 
in his study 20 September 1625. He was buried in the 
Dean's Chapel in the Cathedral, where a handsome monu- 
ment was erected to his memory by his widow, Augela, 
daughter of Robert Bargrave, Esq., of Bridge. l)v. Boys 
was distinguished as a preacher. The same year that he 
obtained Tilmanstone he was called on to preach at S. Paul's 
Cross, though he was then only twenty-eight years of age. 
Two years later he again occupied the pulpit there. He 
then preached at S. Mary's, Cambridge; and on the 11th 
September 1G07 he occupied the pulpit at Ashford, when 
Archbishop Abbot held his primary visitation there. On l± 
June 102.3 he preached, as Dean in his Cathedral Church 
before King Charles I. and Henrietta Maria, who had landed 
two days previously at Dover. Dr. Boys's Commentaries, 
Expositions of the Liturgy, and Sermons, were most valuable 
contributions to the theological literature of the day, and 
are still regarded as standard works. The churches of 
Betteshanger and Tilmanstone w-ere formally united 11 
October 1599. (Regist. Whitgift, iii., f. 253 b.) 

20 Moses Capell. With this living he held the rectory of Bettes- 

hanger, to which he had been instituted 6 August 1028. The 
entries of numerous " domestic events " in the Tilmanstone 
Register shew that Mr. Capell was resilient throughout his 
incumbency here. In one of the entries, under 3 August 
1634, his wife's name is mentioned as Mary Boyse. 

21 Nicholas Billingsley. Previously Master of Faversham 

Grammar School, where he was succeeded, in 1044, by 
Penitence Nicholls. The Parish Register of Faversham con- 
tains the following baptismal entry: " 1033, 1 Nov. Nicholas 
son of Nicholas and Letitia Billingsley." His name occurs 
in the Parish Register of Tilmanstone under 10 October 
1047, when his daughter Lettice was buried. He held also 
the rectory of Betteshanger, which he resigned 4 July 1051, 
according to an entry in the Register of that parish. He 
probably resigned Tilmanstone at the same time. It appears 



OF TILMANSTONE. 113 

Vicars. Patrons. 
Humphry Drcus. ~ 2 

James BubVtlIi, B.A., inst. 6 Nov. 1675, on d. The Archbishop. 

of the last, (tiegist. Sheldon, f. 365 «.) 25 

Thomas Maunder, or Mandek, M.A., inst. The Archbishop. 



that he did not live many years after leaving Tilmanstone, as 
his son Nicholas in the introductory epistle to one of his 
literary productions, entitled The Infancy of the World, 
written in 1656, speaks of his late reverend father. 

Humphry Dicus. There seems no reason to doubt that he 
came next after Mr. Billingsley, though the date of his being 
admitted to the living has not been found. His name appears 
in the Parish Eegister under 7 June 1652, when his son 
Humphry was baptized. Entries of the baptism of five other 
of his children also occur in 1658, '60, '63 (two), and '68. 
The following entry in the Eegister refers to the replacing of 
the font, which had been removed in the Commonwealth 
period: "Mary the daughter of Christopher Ellis and Jane 
his wife was baptized Dec. 28th being Innocents Day 1662, 
and was the first child that was baptized in the font newly 
set up again." The entry of the burial of Sarah, wife of Mr. 
Dicus, occurs under 19 July 1673 ; and the entry of his own 
burial is given thus : " Mr. Humphry Dicus, minister of this 
parish, was buried 22nd of Oct. 1675." In MS. 1126, in 
Lambeth Palace Library, the following account is given of 
Mr. Dicus and of his parish, under date of October 1603 : 
"A man of good parts and principles, but in somethings 
indiscreet. He is tenuant to y e Arch. Bp. at £6 rent. Im- 
proued rent £50. Twenty Houses in y e Parish, but not aboue 
20 p'sons that come to y e Commun. Sr. Tho. Peyton, L d of y e 
Mannor. M 1 ' Eogge y e chiefe man in y e parish. W" 1 Neale 
taylor, John Ayres carpenter, notorious Anabaptists. Church 
much out of repayre. Chancell well. No Surplice." The 
value of the living is entered as £40, and as augmented by a 
like sum. Mr. Dicus also held "Beauxfeild alias Whitfeild," 
respecting which there is the entry: "About 30 Eamiiies 
in y e p'ish. Communicants about 60, but not aboue 10 last 
Easter. Church and Chancell in good repayre. A surplice 
in making." The Family Chronicle of Eiehard Fogge, of 
Dane Court, contains much interesting local information 
about this period (see Arch ceologia Cantiana, V., 112 — 132). 

James Burvill. Of Queen's Coll., Camb., B.A. in 1672. 
Entries of the baptism of five of Mr. Burvill's children indi- 
cate that he resided here. On the day of his institution he 
received a licence from the Archbishop to serve also the cure 
of " Whittfeild." The entry of his burial occurs under 6 A pr.l 
1697. 



Ill FORTY-FIVE VICARS 



Vicars. Patron. 



July 10!>7, on d. of the last. (Regist. 
Tenison, i , !'. 196J.) 81 
Nicholas Carter, M.A., inst. 2«> Apr. 171(5. The Archbishop, 
on .1 of the last. (Regist. Wake, i., f. 295 a.) -■'• 



"-* Thomas Mander. Of Magd. Coll., Ox., B.A. 1077. M.A. 1G79. 
On the day of his institution he also obtained the Arch- 
bishop's licence to serve the cure of Whitfield. He was 
domestic chaplain to Charles, Earl of Lauderdale; and, on 
25 November 17 14, lie obtained a dispensation to hold the 
rectory of Little Mongeham, value £10 per annum, with 
Tihnanstone, which was of the same value. The entry of the 
burial of his wife Anne occurs in the Register under 24 
October 1700 ; bis own burial took place on 1 April 1710. 
There is also in the Register the following interesting refer- 
ence to work done in the church during his incumbency : 
" Memorandum : That the Chancel of the parish Church of 
Tihnanstone was fully & wholly repaired in the year of our 
Lord 1 098 at the sole cost, and proper charge of Mrs. Jane 
Bray, widow, being the then owner and proprietor of all the 
Glebe Land belonging to, and lying in the said parish of Til- 
manstone : it being found to be an ancient custom, time out 
of mind, that the Proprietor, Owner, & Possessor of the 
Glebe Land lying in the said Parish of Tilmanstonedid always 
keep and maintain in due repair the whole Chancel of the 
said parish Church of Tilmanstone. Witness our hands — 
Tho. Mander vicarius ibidem. Richard Hills, churchwarden 
same year. Thomas Turner, John Wood, Thomas Mummery." 
The oldest existing portions of the communion plate date 
from the time of this vicar, the paten bearing marks which 
point to its manufacture in 1703-4, while the chalice appears 
to have been made in the following year. 

25 Nicholas Carter. Of Emman. Coll., Camb., B.A. 1710, M.A. 
1714, S.T.P. 1728. A few days after his collation to Tilman- 
stone he obtained the Archbishop's licence to serve the cure 
of Sutton, near Dover ; and about two years later he was 
appointed to the Perpetual Curacy of Deal Chapel, which he 
held for more than fifty years. In 1734 he obtained the rec- 
tory of Dam ; and on resigning Tilmanstone he was collated 
to the rectory of Woodchurch, which he held by dispensation 
with Ham. He was also one of the Six Preachers in Canter- 
bury Cathedral. He died at Deal, 23 October 1774, in the 
87th year of his age, and was buried at Ham. He was father 
of the celebrated and learned Mrs. Elizabeth Carter, whose 
" Memoirs," written by her nephew, the Rev. Montagu 
Pennington, rector of Northbourne, went through four edi- 
tions within a few years of her death, which took place in 
180G. In the year 1719 Mr. Carter obtained a licence to 



OF TILMANSTONE. 115 

Vicars. Patrons. 

John Jacob, M.A., inst. 23 Oct. 1755, on cess. The Archbishop. 

of the last. (Eegist. Herring, f. 308 a.) 2G 
Egerton Leigh, inst. 26 Jan. 1764, on d. of the The Archbishop. 

last. (Eegist. Seeker, f. 311 b.) 2 ? 

take down the old vicarage house at Tilmanstone, and erect a 
new one. An interesting plan of the new house is preserved 
in Archbishop Wake's Eegister, pt. i., f. 379 a. 

26 John Jacob. Of Univ. Coll, Ox, B.A. 1717, M. A. 1723. With 

this vicarage he held the living of S. John Baptist, Margate. 
He was also domestic chaplain to Selina, Dowager Countess 
Ferrers. He died 21 December 1763, and was buried at 
Margate. In the Library at Lambeth Palace are preserved 
Mr. Jacob's answers to the "Inquiries" of Archbishop 
Seeker, issued 1 May 1758. Speaking of residence and services, 
he says : " Besides Tilmanstone I have y e Living of Margate, 
where I reside, but have a curate at Tilmanstone always 
resident, & allow him 20 Pounds a Year & y e Surplice 
Pees ; he is in Priest's Orders. I go over at proper times as 
oft as conveniently I can. The curate is vicar of Walder- 
share y e adjoyn? Parish, where he has no House, & but 6 or 
7 Houses in y e Parish. The Living [of Tilmanstone] being 
but small, there has been for time im'emorial but Service 
once a Day & always a Sermon ; has been always supply 'd 
w Ul some other Church ; has no Weekly Prayers. There is 
no Chapel in y e Parish. The Children are always Catechis'd 
in Lent. The Sacram 1 is administred 4 Times in y e year, and 
generally between 20 & 30 Communicants." (MS. 1131*, 
vol. iv, p. 238.) 

27 Egerton Leigh. He was the son of the Eev. Thomas Leigh, 

patron and rector of Murston. He was of Emman. Coll, 
Camb, B.A. 1756. Deacon 18 December 1757, by James 
Johnson, Bishop of Gloucester. Priest 11 March 1759, by 
Thomas Seeker, Archbishop of Canterbury. The day fol- 
lowing his ordination as priest he was licensed to serve the 
perpetual curacy of Minster, in Shepey, at a salary of £10 per 
annum. On 24 August 1763 he was instituted to the vicar- 
age of S. Mary, Sandwich, which he appears to have resigned 
on being collated to Tilmanstone, as he was again instituted 
to the same on 4 February 1764. He finally resigned 
S. Mary's on succeeding his father as rector of Murston, to 
which he was instituted 12 October 1774. While vicar of 
S. Mary's, Sandwich, he presented to that church two hand- 
some service books, which have been in use for more than a 
century. To the church of Murston he gave a small silver 
chalice, which is still in use. It bears the inscription : " Ex 
Dono Eev di Egertoni Leigh Huj. Eccl. Eectoris, Oct 1 ' 12. 
1774." Mr. Leigh died 13 April 1788, at the age of 53, 
leaving a widow and four children, and was buried at Murston. 



]1() FORTY-FIVE 7ICARS 

VlCAKS. l'\ IKONS. 

Nkiikmimi Nishkit, inst. •_'.'{ May L788, on d. The Archbishop. 

of the last. (Eegist. Moore, f. 519 i 
Charles Baker, B.A., inst. lM Apr. L803, on The Archbishop. 

cess, of llic last. (Ibid., f. ."71 a.) "■' 
Robert Twigq, M.A., inst. 22 Oct. L842, <>u The Archbishop. 

el. of tlio last. (Lamb. Lib., Entry Book, 

xvi., 144.) 3° 

28 Ne HEM I AH NlSBKTT. Of Glasgow College, lie received priest's 
orders 2L December 1777, at the hands of the Bishop of 
Loudon, by letters dimissory from the Archbishop, and on the 
following day was licensed to the curacy of Eastry with 
Worth. On resigning Tilmanstone he was collated to the 
rectory of Tunstall, 21 December 1802. On the same day 
he resigned the perpetual curacy of Ash. With the rectory 
of Tunstall he also held the curacy of Newington next Sitting- 
bourne. The following entry in the Tilmanstone Register, 
made during Mr. Nisbett's incumbency, bears testimony to 
the loyaltv of the parishioners: "Memorandum. That the 
parish of Tilmanstone was illuminated on the 18th day of 
March 1789, in honour of His Majesty King George the 
3rd's recovery of his health." 

- 9 Charles Bakkr. Of Jesus Coll., Camb., B.A. 1800 ; subse- 
quently Fellow of Clare. M.A. 1803. Deacon 5 October 
1800, by Richard Beadon, Bishop of Gloucester ; Priest 
19 December 1802, by James Torke, Bishop of Ely. On 
G January 1803 he was instituted to the rectory of Charlton, 
near Dover, in the gift of John Monins, Esq. He also held 
the perpetual curacy of Ash, near Sandwich, and the rectory 
of Knowlton. In the year 1813 Mr. Baker added about 
2r. 19p. of land to the vicarage garden. A few years after 
his decease this w r as purchased of his representatives for the 
sum of £100, half of which was contributed by the Arch- 
bishop, and the remainder by the Rev. Robert Twigg, and 
permanently annexed to the vicarage. In the year 1816 the 
church bell was recast by T. Mears, of London. Mr. Baker 
died 22nd August 1842, and was interred in the church. A 
marble tablet to his memory is on the north wall of the nave. 

30 Robert Twigg. Of S. Peter's Coll., Camb., B.A. 1826, M.A. 
1830. In the year 1842 the east wall of the chancel was 
rebuilt at the expense of Edward Royd Rice, Esq., whose 
family have been liberal benefactors to this church. The 
communion plate was also restored, the old paten being 
enlarged at Mr. Rice's expense, and the chalice repaired; 
while a handsome silver flagon was presented by his daughter, 
Lady Winchilsea. In the year 1846 the church underwent 
extensive repairs, costing about £150, which sum was raised 
by voluntary subscriptions; and twelve years later the west 



OF TILMANSTONE. 117 

Vicar. Patron. 

.Tames Henry Jaquet, M.A., inst. 2G Aug. The Archbishop. 
1880, on d. of the last. (Ibid., xix., 220.) 31 



tower was heightened by the addition of a plain parapet. 
In 1870 Mr. Bice presented a piece of ground tor enlarg- 
ing the churchyard, which was consecrated by the Bishop 
of Dover on 3rd May. In the year 1872 the Ecclesiastical 
Commissioners augmented the value of the living by £30 
tithe rent charge on certain lands, and by annual tenths 
or payments, amounting to 15s. 7d., which had formerly been 
received by the Archbishop of Canterbury. Mr. Twigg died 
22 July 1880, and was buried in the churchyard, where a 
marble cross marks the place of his interment. A brass plate 
against the south wall, within the sanctuary, records his long 
labours in the parish, as well as the death of two sisters in 
the year 1874. 
31 J. H. Jaquet. Of Clare Coll., Camb., B.A. 18G4-, M,A. 1874. 
In the year 1881 the old vicarage house, which was the one 
built by Mr. Carter in 1719, was taken down, and a more 
commodious one erected on the same site, towards which the 
Ecclesiastical Commissioners, who are lay rectors and owners 
of the chancel, made a grant of £1500. In 1884 the church 
underwent a complete restoration, and was reopened for 
divine service on October 21st. Several features of the 
building in its earlier state were brought to light as the 
work progressed, among which were the priest's doorway in 
the chancel, a part of the rood screen, an arch with square- 
headed altar light, the impression of a piscina, the outline of 
some small and early windows, traces of fresco colouring, the 
impression of a stoup, or holy water basin, a small incised 
Maltese cross, which may have been one of the dedication 
crosses, and two Saxon tombstones, with a stone coffin lid, 
imbedded in the walls. The work of restoration included, 
among other things, the re-roofing of the chancel with oak, 
the introduction of choir-seats of the same material, and the 
paving of the floor with encaustic tiles. Also the entire 
re-seating of the nave with oak, and erection of an oak screen, 
separating the body of the church from the tower, which is 
now used as a vestry. The removal of the gallery, which was 
at the west end of the nave, displayed to view the fair pro- 
portions of the tower arch. The tine old Norman font, and 
the tympanum over the south door, of the same period, were 
also judiciously restored. The entire work was carried out 
under the direction of Mr. Ewan Christian. The Ecclesias- 
tical Commissioners undertook the restoration of the chancel, 
at an outlay of more than £328. The remainder of the work 
was effected at the cost of upwards of £870, which was raised 
by a grant from the Diocesan Church Building Society, and 



118 VICARS OF TILMAN8TONE. 

by subscriptions from numerous friends. In addition to 
which many costly u r il'ts were presented to the church, among 
them being the holy table, by Axlmiral Bice, in memory of his 
mother, a carved oafc lectern \>\ Mr. Foreman, with books for 
its use by Miss (\ Boteler, a Lich gate by Mrs. Cooper, a 
daughter of the late vicar, an oat font-cover, and other things, 

by the Hon. .Mrs. Somerset Warde. and a stained glass win- 
dow for the nave, representing the Holy Women at the 
Sepulchre, by the Dowager Countess of Winchilsea. On 
Thursday, 30 October 1890, a service was held to mark the 
completion of the reredos. The central ligure, in a setting of 
alabaster, representing the Saviour after His Resurrection, is 
from a design by a Florentine artist, Taddio Gaddi. The 
work was carried out by Messrs. Powell of Whitefriars, at 
the cost of about £114, which was defrayed by subscription. 



( 119 ) 



THE ANCIENT FABRIC OF THE CHURCH 
OF ST. MARY THE VIRGIN, DOVER, 

BY THE REV. CANON PUCKLE. 

Having, during the first year after my Institution to 
this ancient Vicarage, cleared away all parochial oppo- 
sition to any work of Church Restoration, I found 
myself free, in the middle of 1843, to seek Architect's 
advice. Such advice I obtained from Mr. John Chessell 
Buckler, sometime Consulting Architect to the Pre- 
sident and College of St. Mary Magdalene, Oxford. 
We agreed that our first step, with a view to Restora- 
tion, must he to examine and record every mark in the 
condition of the Fabric ; every sign by which evidence 
might tell its own story. And now, in response to the 
Secretary's request, for the information of our Archaeo- 
logical Society's Meeting, I do not know that I can do 
better than condense a few of my memoranda into 
connected form, from which an intelligent inquirer 
may draw his own conclusion. " If I give you the 
facts," says the Bishop of Manchester, "there is no 
need to give you the inferences ; you are as capable 
of drawing inferences as I am." 

We saw, at once, that the infirmities and dangers 
of the fabric lay more below, than above, the ground 
line. We found the floor honey-combed, almost 
from end to end, and from side to side. In many 
places the foundations had not been spared. Graves 
had been excavated, not only up to the bases, but 



120 THE ANCIKVT FABRIC OP THE CHURCH 

sometimes intruded under tlio substones, of the columns 
themselves. So reckless had been this treatment, and 

so lil tie care was taken to conceal it, thai we round 
pews in which there was nothing left, but the floor- 
boards, between their living occupants, and the remains 
in some neglected grave below. Marks of failure and 
subsidence were most visible at the west end of the 
church ; warning us that no trustworthy rebuilding 
could be ventured upon there. An additional cause 
for this soon became apparent. On laying open the 
foundations of the three western bays of the nave, and 
going down to an equable level of 4 to 5 feet on all 
sides, we found ourselves on a fine open space of 
Roman concrete, the bottom of a system of baths ; 
which, entering at the south-west, crossed the nave and 
both aisles, and passed out at the north side into the 
churchyard. 

After crossing Canon Street, and the corner of the 
Market Square, traces of these Roman Baths reap- 
peared at exactly the same level. They were un- 
covered in preparing for the foundations of the Carlton 
Club, on the west side of Market Square. The traces 
of Roman work discovered there were many and 
curious ; large portions of side retaining walls, in 
beautifully laid courses of boulder flints ; chambers 
and hypocausts ; and everywhere the same concrete 
floor as at St. Mary's. One relic of the luxury of the 
bath-loving Romans was a truncated statue of a 
"Water-nymph, beautifully sculptured in coarse Oolite 
stone. This is preserved in one of the ante-rooms of 
the Dover Museum, and two views of it are given in 
Archccolofjia Cantiana, XVIII., 202. Stone of the 
Oolite formation occurs continually in connection 
with Roman work, even in these parts of Kent, far 



sBm** 








RUINS OF THE OLD CHURCH OF S T MARTIN LE GRAND , DOVER ,( LOOKING WEST.j 

ANGLE OF CENTRAL TOWER , AND ORIGINAL LOW NORTH TRANSEPT; IN 1881, AFTER 1 HE DEMOLITION' 



\ 4;>.j. 




RUINS OF THE OLD CHURCH OF S T MARTIN LE GRAND, DOVER 

NORTH AISLE OF CHOIR BEFORE THE DEMOLITION IN 1881, LOOKING EASTWARD INTO THE MARKET SQUARE.) 



OF ST. MARY THE VIRGIN, DOVER, ] 21 

from the nearest known Oolite beds. It is found 
among the massive remains, on the west side of Dover 
Market-square, of buildings erected over the Roman 
Baths, which are believed to have formed part of the 
Collegiate Church of the Secular Canons of St. Martin, 
after their removal from the Romano-British Church 
in the Castle.* The fine spanned arch, opened out on 
the north side of this ruin of Old St. Martin's Church, 
proves to be built of such curious varieties of the 
Oolite formation, as to suggest that this mass of build- 
ing may originally have formed part of the great 
group of Roman Baths themselves. 

Having, then, at St. Mary's, the floor of the Baths, 
and the ruins of flues and heating chambers before us, 
and having determined, at whatever cost of opposition 
or labour, to retain " the simple Church our Saxon 
fathers raised," we had next to solve the difficulty of 
accomplishing this. There was only one way. We 
took out the bent and maimed tower arch ; threw a 
bearing arch over the gap ; secured eight timber- 
balks, for wooden legs, under it ; took down in like 
manner the six western nave columns and their arches ; 
numbered and stored carefully each stone ; so that, in 
due time, we had only to replace them in the order in 
which they were taken down. And thus the cement 
in the joints is literally the only thing in which the 
restored work is other than that which our Saxon 
fathers built. 

It was in examining the tower walls with a view 
to their safety, and that of the bell-chambers above, 
that the Architects ascertained a very remarkable 
feature ; viz., that St. Mary's Tower is strictly not one 
fabric, but two. Dividing the face of it roughly into 

* Ai'dueologia Cantiana, IV., 22-25. 



122 THE A.NCIENT FABRIC OF THE CHURCH 

five stages, viz., the basement, t he triple low arcade, 
and three slender shafted arcades above, ending with 
the bell chamber ; we find the string-course between 
the two lower and the three upper stages forms a 
division between two wholly different buildings. There 
is no continuity between the work below and that 
above this string-course. There is no identity of 
material, or of workmanship; no bonding, no means 
of holding together what had clearly been the walls of 
two periods. At what interval we cannot judge, but 
at some considerable interval certainly, the upper por- 
tion of the work has been superadded to the lower, 
for the difference of character and structure of course 
points to a corresponding difference in order of time. 
And we have to consider what must have been the 
approximate date of that member of a church tower, 
upon which three stages of an ornate but early Nor- 
man workmanship have been superimposed. 

One peculiarity in the tower arch at once attracted 
the wary eye of Mr. Buckler, viz., the very abnormal 
line of its curve ; he was thinking how he might so 
take it to pieces, as to be sure of being able to put it 
together again. This peculiarity is still visible. Not 
from any one centre, nor from any orderly set of cen- 
tres, could this curve have been struck. It is no 
segment of a semicircle ; has no relation to the ordi- 
nary Norman type. It has more of the Byzantine 
feeling and form ; that taste in structure and detail 
which gave its character to Eastern, and East-European, 
Architecture from the sixth to the tenth century ; and 
has affected so many of our Saxon and Pre-Norman 
Churches. It affords also a delicate example of the 
Oriental horseshoe form, in which the soffit is made 
to contract at, and below, the impost on each side. 




TOWER OF THE CHURCH OF S T MARY THE VIRGIN. AT DOVER. 

THE THREE UPPER COURSES ARE NOT SO ANCIENT AS THE TWO BENEATH THEM 



OF ST. MART THE VIRGIN, DOVER. 123 

The same thing is traceable in the three Western 
arches north and south of the Nave ; with the further 
peculiarity of the northern tier of arches being set 
at a foot and a half lower level than those on the 
south, for no discoverable purpose or reason. These 
same walls originally terminated with two massive 
piers, which at first formed the end of the Eabric east- 
ward ; they still remain, but are now made use of 
as columns. Adjoining their foundations the traces of 
a wall-return indicated where the primitive little 
fabric had probably ended with a small Eastern apse. 
These members, together with a low and shallow lean- 
to on each side, forming North and South Aisles, we 
take, in all fair probability, to have been the original 
little Parish Church of St. Mary the Virgin, Dover, 
about the century of Alfred the Great. 

I cannot but think that the care, and finish, and 
goodness of the work, rightly interpreted, support the 
likelihood of Alfred's period, rather than of a more 
rude and barbarous age. Such has been taken, by 
other competent judges, to be rather a note of those 
days. " It is a striking thought," says the late Bishop 
of Durham, in his Leaders of the Northern Church, 
" that God's signal mercy — in the hour of England's 
sorest need, when invaded by foreign foes, and when 
darkness, spiritual, intellectual, and social, was gather- 
ing thick upon it — raised up this great deliverer, 
pious and devout as he was great ; the noblest type of 
Englishman ! Who can say what England owes to 
the great and wise Alfred, — Poet, Scholar, Soldier, 
Legislator, ruling over this land ; the Eounder of our 
English Literature, the Unifier of our English Terri- 
tory, the chief author of our English Greatness !" 

The next stage, in the history of the building, was 



124 THE ANCtENT fabric of the church 

its enlargement as far eastward as the present place 
of the pulpit, by adding lour Norman hays to the 
Length of the church. Of these only two remain, 
one on each side, next to the piers terminating the 
original Nave. The other six arches were swept away 
about the end of the last century, pursuant to an 
order in Vestry that their removal was necessary for 
the sight and hearing- of the parishioners in church. 
The three arches of the north side were first pulled 
down, as an experiment; the three corresponding ones 
were ordered to follow (so it is recorded) for the 
sake of symmetry and uniformity. 

About this time, it would seem probable that the 
three upper stages of the Tower were built, on the 
w r alls of what had served as a Narthex to the earlier 
church. This western addition corresponded in extent 
and dignity to the eastward Norman addition, which 
had the character of a Nave or of a very extended 
chancel, whichever it might be more proper to call it. 
The Purbeck marble Font was probably a gift to the 
church about this time. I found this beautiful relic 
split in two fragments, coated with the paint of ages, 
and built deep into the western wall of the south 
lean-to, at the base of the Tower. One of our work- 
men, from the Temple Church in London, told mc 
that he had not there seen so fine a piece of marble. 

Perhaps the most graceful and serviceable enlarge- 
ment of the original fabric was that which followed 
(so the Architects concluded), about the reign of King 
John ; once more carrying eastward the limit of the 
Chancel, up to the present Sanctuary steps. It is 
marked by two fine four-centred arches which still 
remain, opening into the east end of the North 
Aisle. Opposite to them, high up on the south side, 



or ST. MARY THE VIRGIN, DOVER. 125 

is a transition Early English window, of a not very 
common type. It will remind a practised observer 
of forms and detail found in French Transitional 
work, as we see it on a great scale in the Choir and 
Transepts of Canterbury Cathedral. This window 
was a source of no small dispute and trouble. It 
had been among the works specified to be carefully 
taken to pieces, and restored in original place and 
condition, but it tried the skill and patience of our 
very intelligent masons. The foreman urged every 
kind of substitute instead of it, even a new chancel 
window of any design or cost we chose. But both 
Architects and Vicar insisted on receiving "the pound 
of flesh in the bond," as the only just and right thing. 
So the window was saved — much as the Purbeck Font 
had been — and it now remains as interesting an ex- 
ample, of its peculiar date and tone, as may be readily 
found in any part of the country. 

The arches opened into the North Aisle from the 
Early English Chancel, naturally caused the removal 
of the lean-to aisle, and the building of a new North 
Aisle. This new Aisle was made equal in length to the 
rest of the Church, from the West wall of the Tower to 
the East gable of the Chancel ; and its roof was carried 
np to the same pitch as the rest of the Church, the Aisle 
being made equal in width to the Nave. The capacity 
of the old Church was thus doubled ; but at a sacrifice 
of all symmetry of plan. The limits of the Chancel 
were also obscured by this erection, and were not 
recovered until the rebuilding, and the addition of 
the present Apsidal Sanctuary, in 1841. 

We searched in vain, from time to time, for any 
trace of the several side-chapels, or chantries, which 
have been mentioned in connection with St. Mary's ; 



12(5 TUB ANCIENT FABRIC OF THE CHURCH 

equally in vain did we seek for any sign of a Transept. 
There was Left no foundation or site of such fabrics, 
which must (one would think), if ever there, have left 
traces behind. We were obliged to uncover and relay, 
often to a depth of 15 feet of solid concrete, the 
foundations of this old church ; we believe therefore 
that any evidence of bygone work could hardly have 
escaped us. 

We need not extend this short elementary Paper, 
which is rather concerned with the growth of the 
fabric, than with the many curious historic episodes 
in the story of our ancient Parish Church. The 
building of the north aisle was the last point, we 
know of, to be noted in connection with it. Hence- 
forward it followed the too common routine of change 
and deterioration experienced by so many of our 
large town churches. Perhaps St. Mary's under- 
went more than an average share of indignities 
and sacrilege. After the suppression of the Religious 
Houses by Henry VIII., the parishioners undertook 
the suppression of their Parish Church, by the confisca- 
tion of everything of saleable value, — the closing of 
the doors for Divine Service, — the leaving the last 
three recorded Rectors without means of subsistence ; 
so that for all the years from their time to the middle 
of the last century we have no record of any regular 
or responsible parish priest for this ancient and im- 
portant Cure ! 

The material condition of the Church, as might 
well be supposed, fared no better ; even if the results 
were less disastrous. It passed through a succession of 
neglects, decays, and disfigurements, till it reached 
the condition from Avhich it was rescued, and rebuilt 
from the foundations, in 1SI3-14. Bv that time, everv 



OF ST. MARY THE VIRGIN 7 , DOVER. 127 

vestige of the Ancient Church had become destroyed, 
or hidden. The opening of the Tower Arch was filled in 
with solid white-washed timber. The three Western 
bays were turned into massive walls by choking the 
openings with brickwork, to carry mural monuments 
of every form, size, and material, including the rarity 
of a mural slab of cartridge paper, framed and glazed. 
And the whole was compacted (as it were) by a pro- 
digious west gallery and organ-loft, with an immense 
non-speaking French organ in it. Underneath all 
which, the original Church had been practically an 
" unknown quantity," whether to stranger or inhabi- 
tant, within any memory or tradition ! 



( 128 ) 



VESTIGES OF ROMAN DOVER. 

BY THE KEV. CANON PUCKLK. 

I almost regret having adopted the title of " Roman 
Dover " for the few memoranda I can lay before the 
Society ; there seems an over-ambitious ring and pre- 
tension about it. There is so little now remaining 
on the surface to which I ean point in ocular evi- 
dence of those Roman days, that I must ask my 
readers to bear with me while I put them in posses- 
sion of such facts and objects as I have been able to 
verify, telling us what little we know of the Dover of 
Roman days. 

Our obvious starting-point is the earth-work 
crowning the main summit of the Castle Hill, where 
the chalk cliff begins to fall sharply upon the shore ; 
one of the many minor marks of Roman intrench- 
ment which occur at frequent intervals along the coast 
between Dover and Lymne, — the Portus Lemanis, 
the strongest military station and harbour on this 
shore — with a Roman road striking across the hills 
direct upon Canterbury. The Pharos, built on this 
earth- work, is perhaps one of the most genuine ex- 
amples of Roman work of its rough and massive 
period. It makes us feel, at once, the presence of the 
Roman builder, in his accustomed use of his special 
materials, tufa, concrete of pounded brick, with 
abundant bonds and dressings of the unique Roman 
red- tile brick itself. This Pharos connects itself 



VESTIGES OF ROMAN DOVER. 129 

unmistakably with the foundation of a similar beacon- 
light, still visible in one of the casemates of the 
redoubt, on the opposite western hill ; as if a portion 
of the eastern Pharos had been transported there, 
tufa, concrete, tile brick, iron-stone, and all ; shewing 
that a double system of signal-lights was among the 
first features of the Roman haven at Dover — the first 
guardians of the navigation of these Channel waters. 

The primitive haven of Dover was of very different 
site and dimensions from the later harbour. It filled 
a small space bounded by the lower half of S. James 
Street, Dolphin Lane, and Russell Street, and the east 
end of Dolphin Lane, through which the waterfall 
of the Dour made its exit to the sea by about the line 
of Woolcomber Street and the Imperial Hotel. This 
space was partly uncovered in excavating for the new 
Russell Street gas-works, and brought to light many 
years ago the site and appliances of the old haven, — 
timbered quays, groins, warping gear, hawser rings, 
and other remains of a rough mariner's craft, shewing 
plainly enough where the life and calling of the earlier 
seafaring population of this ancient port had been. 

Connected with this, we find the largest and most 
important work whose traces the Roman colonists 
have left behind them. I mean the sea-wall, which 
protected the southern front of the Roman fortified 
town. This I have had opportunities of seeing and 
examining, when it was uncovered at several points in 
its extent from the corner of Upper Town Wall Street, 
to the corner-stone in Snargate Street, which marks the 
ancient site of the Snare Gate. The work lies at 
but few feet below the street level, and has been kept 
quite clear of the houses on the seaward side of the 
street. The material is peculiar ; simply water- worn 

VOL. XX. K 



1J50 VESTIGES OF ROMAN DOVER. 

fragments picked up as washed along the coast — flints 
of every size and form, boulders, and nuggets of iron- 
stone, Kentish ragj with no brick bonding; but the 
whole mass compacted together by grouting with hot 
lime, unmixed with anything but the finest possible 
sharps, sifted from the neighbouring beach. It is 
like no other material I ever met with, harder than 
any natural rock, and breaking or throwing off every 
wedge or tool put upon it. I remember seeing three 
men once employed for a fortnight in making an 
opening through it 3 feet deep, and wide enough for 
about a 10-inch drain pipe to pass through ! 

Speaking of the Roman Wall especially, as more 
or less at one with the later mediaeval Town Wall, 
the massive structure seems to have turned at the 
Snare Gate corner, and to have been carried up the 
hill to Hadrian's Gate, popularly known as " Above 
Wall," at the corner of Chapel Place ; then to have 
passed by the Cow Gate and St. Martin's Postern to 
Canon Street and S. Mary's Churchyard ; then to 
have turned south again to S. Helen's Gate by S tarn- 
brook; and then, passing by the future sites of the 
Fisherman's and Butchery Gates, to have formed the 
line of Town Wall Street till eastward of the Gate of 
Severus ; which was also known as the Gate of the 
Merchants' Bench, or the Beggars' Bench, giving the 
name to Bench Street, abutting on the centre of the 
southern wall. 

This rough outline agrees in position and con- 
figuration with the engraving of Dover in Roman 
times, belonging to the Mayor and Corporation, and 
hanging in the vestibule of the council chamber. 
Old engravings, as a rule, are quite untrustworthy, 
irreconcilable with verified facts ; and, in this instance, 



VESTIGES OF ROMAN DOVER. 131 

the presumed hill of the western redoubt, and the 
western Pharos upon it, bristle with difficulties in the 
way of imaginary localities and impossible perspectives. 
Still, taken in the rough, and as a quasi-bird's eye 
view, the approximate parallelogram shewn on that 
engraving, and marked on the reduced Ordnance plan 
opposite, may be accepted as fairly suggesting the 
site, figure, and extent of Dover within the Roman 
walls. I would suggest, as probably original, only the 
four gates of Roman nomenclature, at the cardinal 
points of the compass ; leading, according to rule, 
northward by the Great Road to London ; by St. 
Helen's Gate to the eastward ; by Severus' Gate to 
the haven and the shore ; by Hadrian's Gate to the 
hills and west country. 

It will be seen that the space thus enclosed was 
extremely small ; small even for the wants of a colo- 
nial settlement and port like this. The haven was 
ill-fitted for the wants of the smallest along-shore 
trading, for the rudest naval armament ; but there 
was even more to be compressed within the small open 
limits of the then existing town. The actual remains 
of the Roman baths, as we have explored them, shew 
the liberal scale and extent on which they were built 
for the use of the people, including all grades, occu- 
pying nearly all the available space between the 
lower foundations of S. Martin's le Grand, Canon 
Street, and S. Mary's. The public works would then 
have to follow (on a small scale) the palatial arrange- 
ments we see in the Castrum of Silchester, between 
Mortimer and Basingstoke, whether we regard it as a 
Roman, or an early British, city. 

Many things remain unchanged, in their sites and 
uses, since the Romans occupied the earth -works on 

K 2 



132 VESTIGES OF ROMAN DOVER. 

Dover heights; and so probably with the humble 
ways of the little Mailed town below. The daily uses 
of the Central Forum, or Roman Market, still partly 
survive in the common trade or occupations of our 
own Market Square — the site itself remaining the 
same. The Basilica, quite as often on a humble as 
on a stately scale, with its shops, and trades, and 
artificers, would be represented by the general com- 
mercial centres of trade continuing there as ever ; 
while the Municipal Offices, Courts of Justice, and 
Official Life, Mould have passed from the Basilica to 
the Old Guildhall, so many years the Municipal head- 
quarters, till it was removed to the present Town 
Hall. These, at all events, must have been the lead- 
ing features of the public M r orks and public life of 
Roman Dover, wdien it M r as a small fortified parallelo- 
gram, less than thirty-six chains by twenty-one (at a 
rough measurement) within the M r alls. 

The line of foot-M T ay communication, between the 
Pharos and the haven at the foot of the Hill, seems to 
have been at all times nearly identical with M r hat it 
is noM r . Whether there was any M T ay from the heights 
of the Deal Road, for getting material and traffic 
direct within the Castle earth-works, cannot now be 
determined. But certainly towards the decay of 
Roman occupation, after the end of the Diocletian 
persecution at the beginning of the fourth century, 
another and different step M r as taken in the primitive 
Dubrian fortification. There is good reason to think 
that the massive square tower, the central member of 
the Church of S. Mary at the Castle, M 7 as not origin- 
ally meant by its Romano-British builder as a church 
tower, but for purposes of military defence. The 
foundations Mere peculiarly laid, having no regard to 



VESTIGES OE ROMAN DOVER. 133 

intended openings for the four arches of nave, choir, 
and transepts, but being carried on, in one equal 
mass, under the whole square of the tower. The 
adaptation to a cruciform church was an afterthought ; 
the more immediate object and evident purpose being 
to construct a massive kind of donjon tower, as if to 
be a keep of the earth- work ; commanding, and hold- 
ing a last resource for, any threatened investment of 
the place. Defence was also clearly the purpose of 
that curious feature the double splay, inward and out- 
ward, of every window-opening in the building, except 
in the western gable, where the Pharos masks every 
possible approach from without. This I believe to 
have been the first intention of the Romano-British 
builders in what afterwards became one of the most 
striking cruciform churches, for character and associa- 
tion, in Christendom. And this simple form of the 
Lord's Cross bears witness to Rome's guardianship of 
her little colonial town ; while it tells more deeply of 
the Christianity of England in those early and turbu- 
lent days ! 

And now, having thus far dealt with the matter 
of localities, it remains that we note something of the 
means of locomotion, as afforded by the great imperial 
roads, which form a still conspicuous relic of old 
Roman Dover. The main highway north-west to 
London is a marked example of the principles of these 
most remarkable road-makers of the world. Starting 
from the great Northern (medisevally called Biggin) 
Gate, it pursues its way almost as straight as a line 
can be drawn, along the valley to the waterhead of 
the Dour ; then, scarce condescending to follow the 
curve of Lydden Hill, it strikes the high table-land 
towards Barham Downs ; passes straight, like an iron 



134 VESTIGES OF ROMAN DOVER. 

rule, over rise and fall, ridge and valley, just as they 
happen to cross the Line, to Canterbury, where it falls 
in with another great Roman road from the Portus 
Lemanis, which follows the high level route; by 
Lyrrme and Stone Street, and enters Canterbury at 
Wincheap. Thence the united Roman roads are iden- 
tical with the traditional and modern mail roads, 
going straight and unswerving to Shooter's Hill and 
Blackheath. The ordinary mail journey now (even 
by London, Chatham, and Dover llailway as far as 
Rochester) is still upon the old lines of Roman Dover 
in its day. 

There is yet another Roman road issuing from the 
Dover valley, and connecting it with Richborough. 
It is one of the very rare examples, we find, of 
a Roman road having been constructed with due 
regard to the difficulties of the ground, instead of 
being carried over all obstacles in direct line across 
the crest of the hill. This road leaves the valley at a 
junction near Barton Farm, passing under the Deal 
Railway, and entering a grassy amphitheatre in the 
hollow of the hill popularly known as the Cow 
Pastures. Thence it is carried along a green terrace 
on the side of the hill, rising by an equable gradient 
to a small depression, or cutting, through which an 
old occupation roadway passes towards Guston Church. 
At this point you command the whole line of the 
Eastward Road from Dover to Richborough ; even 
now, in spite of all surface changes, a direct and well- 
defined track, which from this high point can be well 
seen on a clear day, till it is partially lost in the 
covert about Eastry, to reappear on drawing nearer 
to Richborough; thus completing the w r ell-preserved 
lines of intercommunication which help us to realize 



VESTIGES OF ROMAN DOVER, 135 

what Dover and its adjacent country was, in days 
when Rutupian oysters were a delicacy of Imperial 
Rome ; when a Roman exquisite, or gastronome, was 
expected to discuss the special flavour of " Natives " 
of these British beds as far surpassing those of the 
Ostrearia of any other waters. 

We have now come practically to the limit of this 
paper, as concerned with the aspect and condition of 
Dover during the course proper of its Roman days. 
It is a vague uncertain question where that limit 
should be fixed. It is difficult to say where the purely 
Roman period ends, and the Romano-British begins. 
The masters of the colony did not part from their 
possession, and cease to possess military occupation of 
Britain, till towards the middle of the fifth century ; 
but the character of that occupation, with its arts, 
industries, habits, and common ways of life, had long 
ceased to be of the pure and original Roman type. 
I can only regret, as I said at first, my tentative and 
imperfect sketch of the earlier days — its poverty of 
illustration and detail. I have longed many a time 
to get at the wealth of instruction there must be 
lying a few feet beneath the surface even of the little 
parallelogram representing to us the site of the primi- 
tive Roman town ; to have seen the course and 
extent of the Sea Wall, the real plan and structure of 
the Public Baths, and the picturesque Estuary and 
Haven guarded by the two consort lights of the 
Castle and the Bredengstone hills. But excavations, 
upon any adequate scale, are ever costly things ; with 
which, moreover, one is seldom satisfied : the necessity 
as well as the appetite for them growing with what it 
feeds upon. 

I shall be thankful enough to have stirred anew 



130 VESTIGES OF ROMAN DOVER. 

any spirit of inquiry ; to have invited the attention 
of perhaps younger Members to some further study 
and pursuit of the more interesting branches of the 
subject, beyond what ever-pressing calls and duties 
permit me to follow out. There must be interest yet 
unexhausted in comparative views of this ancient 
town and port as it now is, and as it was from the 
first to the third century, as a settlement of Imperial 
Rome. 



( 137 ) 



EARLY-NORMAN CHURCHES IN AND NEAR 
THE MEDWAY VALLEY. 

BY THE REV. GREVILE M. LIVETT. 

I. Introductory : Materials, Style, and Plan. 

The early- Norman builders naturally made use of 
the stones which they found near at hand. In and 
about the Medway Valley they discovered tufa, chalk, 
flints, Kentish Rag, and Sarsen-boulders in abundance, 
as well as a smaller amount of iron-sandstone. Of all 
these materials that which may be looked upon as being 
most characteristic of the early-Norman buildings is 
calcareous tufa, called travertin by the older generation 
of geologists. It is what geologists would call a 
Recent deposit, and may be found wherever there are 
limestone rocks in any quantity. Rainwater carries 
with it into the earth a certain amount of carbonic 
acid gas ; and as the water percolates through lime- 
stone rocks the gas dissolves some of the carbonate of 
lime, which is carried along in solution until the 
water issues in springs from the ground. Then evapo- 
ration ensues, the gas escapes, and the freed carbonate 
of lime is deposited on the ground over which the 
water flows. This natural process, which is artificially 
produced in kettles and boilers when hard water is 
used, is constantly going on. It may be seen at Mat- 
lock in Derbyshire. In the olden times, before 
streams were diverted and fields cultivated by man's 
hand, in places where such springs issued in any 
quantity and spreading out flowed over a gentle slope, 



138 EARLY-NORMAN CHURCHES IN AND 

covered, perhaps, with moss and brushwood, the 
deposit formed an ever-growing crust of tufa, which 
grew sometimes to some feet in thickness. The tufa 
beds so formed were easily dug by our forefathers, 
and yielded a favourite and economical building-stone, 
very light and durable. When freshly dug it has the 
appearance of a white petrified sponge, being full of 
irregular holes, except that here and there it has 
streaks compact and crystalline. Great quantities of 
tufa are found in Italy and elsewhere,* but the idea 
that it was imported thence for use in this country 
must be abandoned. 

The Romans, like the Normans, used the mate- 
rials they found at their feet. They might import a 
valuable marble for ornamental purposes, but for 
rough work they used the tufa and Kentish Rag which 
abound in this part of the county. The Pharos at 
Dover is mainly built of tufa which the Romans dug 
in the Dour Valley at Buckland, a mile or two away, 
where the stuff still exists, f A bed of tufa has lately 
been discovered at East Mailing. There is also one at 
Leeds. A third is said to exist at Wateringbury. 
These are all upon the Lower Green sand. Doubtless 
there are other beds, but tufa has gone out of fashion 

* Described in Lyell's Principles of Geology, chap, xvii., 10th 
edition. 

t The Church and Fortress of Borer (1864), p. 11, by the Rev. 
J. Puekle. Mr. W. AVhitaker, F.R.S., has kindly sent me the fol- 
lowing note, made many years ago: " A light vesicular tufaeeous 
deposit occurs in the bottom of the Dour Valley, and may be seen 
on the high road a little E.S.E. of Buckland Church, above the 
flint-rubble." Mr. Whitaker tells me that he has more recently 
found considerable deposits in Hampshire, and that these have been 
mapped by the Geological Survey, in the valleys of the Test and of 
the Itchen. 



NEAR THE MEDWAY VALLEY. 139 

as a building-stone, and the sites of the deposits have 
long ago been forgotten. No perfect Roman building 
like the Pharos at Dover remains in our district, but 
the materials of destroyed buildings may be seen in 
the walls of our churches. Traces of Roman build- 
ings have been found near Snodland, and the walls of 
the churches of Snodland and Burham are full of tufa 
associated with Roman brick and pink mortar. In 
mediaeval buildings a clear distinction must be drawn 
between those in which tufa occurs associated with 
other Roman materials and those in which it occurs 
without a trace of such other materials. In the first 
case it may be taken for granted that the builders 
quarried from some Roman buildings hard by, and 
the material gives no clue to the date of the building 
in which they are now seen. In the latter case, in 
buildings, that is, in which tufa is found in quoins or 
windows without admixture of Roman brick and 
mortar in the walls, it may be assumed that the tufa 
was freshly dug, and a careful study proves that nearly 
all such buildings are early-Norman in date. It was 
occasionally dug at a later date, but then chiefly for 
the backing of stone vaults, for which it was especially 
suitable on account of its lightness. 

A clue to the fact that tufa was dug and used in 
great quantities by the early-Normans was obtained 
when it was noticed that Bishop Gundulf (1077 — 1108) 
used it for all the cut and faced work in his cathedral 
at Rochester and in the abbey at West Mailing. The 
knowledge of this fact led to a careful survey of several 
of the churches of the neighbourhood. The general 
results of the survey may be briefly stated. There 
are not a few churches which contain well-marked 
features of earlv-Norman date, and in every case that 



IK) EARLY-NORMAN CHURCHES IX AND 

I have yet seen tufa is the material used for cut and 
faced work. In a few churches, almost con lined to 
the strip of country where the "Folkestone Beds " crop 
out, a dark-red, ferruginous sandstone is used with the 
tufa : this may he seen at Ditton, Addington, and 
Leeds. Occasionally chalk is found on the inside of 
windows, as at Ryarsh. But tufa is always the chief 
material. Trottescliffe and West Farleigh are among 
the best examples of churches which arc decidedly 
early-Norman ; Leybournc, also, may he noted. Be- 
sides these there are many churches whose simplicity 
of plan suggests an early date, the more decided early- 
Norman features, such as windows and doors, having 
been swept away by later alterations or insertions. In 
such cases an early-Norman date is proved by the 
character of the walling or the material of the quoins. 
Addington is a case in point. There is yet another 
group of churches which must be assigned to an 
early-Norman foundation : those which have been 
so much altered by later additions that the original 
plan is lost to the eye, but in which a quantity of 
tufa is found in the walls. In these cases a careful 
scrutiny has been rewarded by the detection here and 
there of a voussoir or some other well-defined tell-tale 
stone. In such a case, again, if the church were 
measured up and plotted on paper, the early-Norman 
plan would probably reveal itself. Aylesford serves as 
an example. Sometimes, as at East Farleigh, the 
nave of which was entirely rebuilt a year or two ago, 
and at Hailing, a single quoin of tufa affords sufficient 
evidence of the date of the foundation of the first 
stone church. Thus in nearly all the churches of this 
district a nucleus of early-Norman date has been 
actually discovered, or its probability established. 



NEAR THE MED WAY VALLEY. Ill 

The early-Norman style suited the materials, and 
the materials suited the style. The materials were 
not adapted to highly finished work; the style was 
massive, rough, and singularly plain. The tufa, chalk, 
or other local material Avas dressed with axes, chisels 
being unknown to the Normans. The windows were 
placed as high in the walls as possible so that the 
draughts might be kept above the heads of worship- 
pers. The actual openings were small, because 
glazing was expensive and much light was not wanted. 
They were closed, when occasion required, with wooden 
shutters. The shutters sometimes swung on hooks, and 
fitted into a small rebate on the outside. More com- 
monly the openings were slightly chamfered on the 
outside and the shutters inserted from the inside and 
secured by slots near the outer surface. Internally 
the openings were often considerably splayed, and the 
sills rose up to them either with a slope or in steps. 
The arch was made quite plain, and there is one pecu- 
liar feature which is very constant, in the examples 
that remain — the springers of the arch on the inside 
are set back slightly from the plane of the jamb, so 
that there is an almost imperceptible set-off which 
dies away along the springing-line as it approaches 
the external opening. The general proportions of the 
windows strike a mean between the broader and lower 
windows of Saxon architecture and the taller and 
narrower windows of later Norman date. Examples 
are not at all uncommon, but they are seldom found 
in a perfect state. Most of the doorways and chancel- 
arches of the period have been swept away, but those 
that remain are fairly perfect. The chancel-arch at 
West Farleigh is of two plain square orders on the 
nave-side and of one order on the chancel-side. It is 



142 EARLY-NORMAN CHURCHES IN AND 

slightly stilted and has no impost or plinth. The head 
of a small chancel-door remains at Ditton. The im- 
posts are large square blocks which project about three 
inches from the jamb-plane, the lower angle being 
chamfered off. The western doorway at West Far- 
leisdi is more advanced in character. Internally it 
is quite plain and slightly splayed. Externally it has 
two orders. In the arch the recess is partly filled 
with a bold round which springs on each side from a 
rudely-cut cushion-cap and chamfered abacus. The 
jamb-shafts have disappeared, and there are no signs of 
base-mouldings. 

The walls of the early- Norman churches of our 
district are nearly all from 2 feet 10 inches to 3 feet 
in thickness. Sometimes the cross-walls are thicker 
than the side -walls. They are built either of flints 
or of Kentish Hagstones, set herringbone- wise and in 
fairly regular courses. They are seldom strengthened 
by the pilaster strips which the later Normans used. 
The foundations project 2 or 3 inches beyond the face 
of the wall, and sometimes this footing is formed of 
tufa-blocks. Stones of large size underlie the tufa- 
quoins and the jambs of doorways : huge blocks of 
Sarsen-stone are often seen in such positions. The 
mortar is usually of a light-brown colour and contains 
white specks of imperfectly-burnt lime. The walls 
were always plastered on the inside, and plastered and 
rough-cast on the outside. The persistent occurrence, 
throughout the district, of some of these features, 
notably the thickness of the walls and the character of 
the soft, sandy mortar, is most remarkable : it seems 
to suggest a band of masons going from place to place 
to build the churches. 

There are some very early towers in this district. 



NEAR THE MEDWAY VALLEY. 143 

They shew the same peculiarities of style and con- 
struction as the churches. One point only needs 
special notice : the lower windows are always more 
splayed internally than those higher up. In fact, in 
some cases, the jambs of the uppermost windows are 
not splayed at all. This variation of treatment is seen 
in buildings of later date, e.g., the keep at Kochester. 
The early-Norman tower at Dartford is almost & fac- 
simile of St. Leonard's tower at West Mailing. The 
walls are very thick, and the angles are strengthened 
by clasping buttresses. Tufa and rag were the mate- 
rials used in their construction. Gundulfs tower at 
Rochester, now in ruins, was very similar. Possibly 
all three were built under Gundulfs supervision. The 
towers of the churches of East and West Mailing 
belong to another group. The quoins are of rag- 
stone and the windows of tufa ; the angles have no 
buttresses. Aylesford church tower is unlike any of 
those I have mentioned. The walls are not so thick, 
and no tufa appears either in the quoins or in the 
windows. Originally wooden "luffers" were built 
into the ragstone jambs of the windows. They were 
destroyed by fire and the openings blocked at an early 
date. In a recent restoration the blocking was re- 
moved and free-stone jambs were inserted within the 
old jambs. The tower is probably the castellum noted 
in the Domesday Survey, built, may be, to guard the 
passage of the Medway while the Saxon wooden 
church was still standing. Perhaps when this tower 
was built the Normans had not yet discovered the 
local beds of tufa. 

Early-Norman churches should be classified accord- 
ing to their ground-plans. In our district the builders 
usually followed one of the two simplest types of plan. 



114 EARLY-NORMAN CHURCHES IN AND 

1. The simpler but less common plan is a plain ob- 
long or rectangle, without aisle, tower, porch, or 
chancel-arch.* The best example of this type I have 
yet seen is Banning church. The original plan may 
be easily traced, notwithstanding the insertion of a 
later chancel-arch and the addition of tower, south 
porch, and north aisle. Trottcscliffc also is a good 
example, but presents some difficulties which I have 
not yet solved. 2. The second and more common 
type has been thus described by Mr. J. T. Mickle- 
thwaitc in his paper on The Growth of English Parish 
Churches, read at the Lincoln Meeting of the Archaeo- 
logical Institute in the year 1880: " The simple nave 
and sanctuary, the square east end, and the narrow 
chancel arch." This towcrless, aisleless plan appears 
in all its unaltered simplicity in the ruined chapel of 
Dowd. It had nothing in common with the Italian 
or basilican type, with its apse and aisles, adopted by 
the builders of our abbeys and cathedrals. Both 
these types were common in Saxon times, and sur- 
vived the change of style at the coming in of the 
Normans. The plain rectangle was probably sug- 
gested by the Saxon wattle-churches; the second type 
was no doubt a survival of the simpler of the Saxon 
churches built with stone. 

A few more examples may be mentioned. Bicknor 
church was originally a simple rectangle in plan. The 
aisles and tower were middle-Norman additions. The 
tower is curiously placed at the west end of the south 

* Perhaps the veil or curtain served the purpose alone. Cf. 
Durandus (quoted by Bloxain iu his Principles of Gothic Ecclesias- 
tical Architecture, vol. ii., p. 35, note) : Notandum est quod triplex 
genus veli suspenditur in ecclesia, videlicet quod sacra operit 
quod sanctuarium a clero dividit, et quod clcrum a populo secernit. 



NEAlt THE MEDWAY VALLEY. 14-5 

aisle, west of the line of the west wall of the church. 
The church was restored many years ago by Mr. 
Bodley. The whole of the interior was then faced 
with chalk-ashlar ; and the exterior was rough-cast, 
so that the walling and quoins are hidden. The only 
sign that is left to view of the early-Norman work is 
the blocked western doorway : this is made of tufa 
with shallow imposts of chalk. The imposts are 
mutilated. The present incumbent, Mr. Gardner- 
Waterman, has a photograph or drawing of the west 
end, exterior, taken before the restoration, which 
shews the original north-western quoin, and affords 
additional and conclusive proof that the aisles were 
not coeval with the body of the church. Cut off the 
aisles and block up the arcades and we have the form 
of the early-Norman building. The striking features 
of these plain rectangular churches are the absence of 
chancel arch on the inside and the unbroken level of 
the external ridge of the roof. Hucking was originally 
built on the same plan, but its later additions are not 
so easily understood on account of an unsympathetic 
restoration. Tufa may be seen in some of the later 
windows, and also in the jambs of the remarkable 
semi-circular arch of large span in the original north 
wall inside the entrance. The materials of these 
jambs probably came from the original narrow door- 
way in the same wall. The cut- stone of the additions 
of one period was Caen -stone, of another, chalk, and 
of a third, ragstone. The proportions of these two 
small churches are remarkable for their great length 
compared with their breadth. 

Of the second kind of plan also a few examples may 
be mentioned. Padlesworth* is unaltered save for the 

* Near Snodland. Not the place of that name near Hythe. 
vol. xx. l 



1 16 EARLY-NORMAN CHURCHES IN AM) 

destruction of the narrow chancel-arch and the inser- 
tion of a wider, corbelled arch. The two churches of 
Padlesworth-cum-Dowd will be more fully described 

in a separate paper in a future volume. At Addington 
two chantry-chapels and a western tower have been 
added to the original structure, but the quoins of the 
latter are still visible. Ditton is a good example for 
the study of quoins. Buttresses have been built up 
against four of the six angles, and in each case some 
of the tufa-quoins were removed in the process to 
allow the new and old work to be bonded together. 
The tower is perpendicular; the vestry and the 
chancel-arch are modern. The church was restored 
in 18G9 by Sir G. G. Scott, who removed the original 
narrow chancel-arch. The recess in the north wall of 
the chancel, seen inside the vestry, was made at the 
time of the restoration, but the head of it is evidently 
that of an original doorway into the chancel, as proved 
by the block-capitals. These imposts have already been 
described. The semi-circular head is supposed to 
have been a window at some time ; if so, the door- 
way must have been blocked and the head glazed. 
The remains of a corresponding doorway exactly oppo- 
site this one and in the south wall of the chancel may 
be seen on the outside. In this case the head has 
been destroyed, and the lower part blocked. The jambs 
and block-capitals may be seen on close examination. 
Above them there is a later window. These facts 
yield a peculiar arrangement : a doorway to the west 
and a window to the east in each of the side walls of 
the original chancel. The original windows of the 
nave have disappeared. The tufa-footing is exposed 
at the bottom of the chancel- walls, and just above it 
on the south side a plain instance of herringbone 
masonry in iron-sandstone. Rvarsh church is another 



NEAR THE MED WAY VALLEY. 147 

good example. The chancel-walls shew herringbone 
masonry in Kentish Rag, two good tufa-quoins, a 
small window on the north side, and the remains of 
three openings in the east wall which were constructed 
with chalk on the inside. The perpendicular south 
aisle and the western tower are, of course, additions. 
The north wall of the nave is original, and contains 
one of its original windows. The tufa-quoin of the 
north-eastern angle of the nave has been rebuilt into 
the angle of the modern organ-chamber attached to 
the north side of the chancel. The upper part of 
north-western quoin is in situ, the lower part rebuilt 
into a buttress built up against the western face of the 
angle. The old chancel-arch was removed when the 
aisle was built. Another church worth notice is that 
of Leybourne. There the south wall is early-Norman, 
and its eastern quoin remains intact. The western 
quoin has been rebuilt lately, but one or two of the 
tufa-blocks of the old quoin may be detected in the 
walling hard by. The old chancel- Avails have been 
refaced throughout and angle buttresses added. The 
north aisle and tower are both additions to the original 
building. Yet another example exists at Deptling, 
where almost the whole of the south walls of the nave 
and chancel are early-Norman. A close scrutiny 
detects the jamb of one of the old windows. 

These examples suffice to shew how much early- 
Norman work remains in the neighbourhood, and to 
illustrate the additions made to the original buildings. 
Seldom or never, in mediaeval times, was a church 
pulled down and rebuilt on a larger scale for the sake 
of increased accommodation or of greater glory. In 
those days there were no schools to which the services 
might be transferred during rebuilding or alteration. 

l2 



IIS EARLY-NORMAN CHURCHES IN AND 

It was invariably so arranged that some part of the 
church was available for use. In some cases the only 
addition to a church has been that of a chantry- 
chapel on one side or both sides of the chancel. As a 
rule the first addition to a church was that of an aisle. 
This was generally built on tin; side of the nave away 
from the graveyard, through which ran the path lead- 
ing to the chief or only entrance. In a double-aisled 
church it is safe to assume that the aisle standing on 
part of the graveyard is later in date than its com- 
panion. The graveyard was usually placed on the 
south or sunny-side of the church. Mr. Micklethwaite 
tells us that western towers, as well as aisles and 
chapels, are usually additions to the earlier churches. 
There are many examples of this rule in our district. 
The early-Norman towers which have been mentioned 
above do not come under this rule. They appear to 
have been built, not as mere church-towers, as we are 
now used to consider them, but rather for defensive 
purposes and apart from the churches which stood 
near them.* 

In most of our churches, however many the addi- 
tions, whether they have been destroyed or still exist, 
the student who has some knowledge of Norman 
ground-plans, and of local building-stones and the 
periods at which the use was fashionable, may gene- 
rally succeed in tracing the original building and the 
history of the changes and additions which may have 
well-nigh absorbed it. 

* These early towers deserve more attention than they have 
received : a description of St. Leonard's tower and chapel at West 
Mailing is already in MS., but the illustrations cannot be finished 
in time for this Volume. 



NEAR THE MEDWAY VALLEY. 1 11) 



APPENDIX. 



In order to avoid distracting the reader's mind by frequent digres- 
sion and reference to footnotes, I have thrown some additional 
matter into an Appendix. This will serve to bring the results of 
the paper into line with facts drawn from a wider area and prevent 
the possibility of those results being applied too rigorously in a 
study of the churches of other districts. It would be absurd, for 
instance, to apply the tufa test to districts where tufa does not 
occur ; and it is not necessarily applicable wherever it does occur : 
all that has been asserted, and I think proved, is that this test is a 
faithful one in the district that has been under review. At the same 
time it seems that the study of local materials has not received the 
attention it deserves here or elsewhere : no description of a church 
can be considered complete unless it gives the names of the stones 
of which the church is built, and the sources, local, or otherwise, 
from which the stones were drawn. Again : it has been laid down 
as an axiom that most of our churches have a nucleus of early- 
Norman date, that is of late 11th century or very early 12th 
century date. Of course this period must have been extended had 
not the paper been treating of a particular district, and that dis- 
trict near the centre of Bishop (xundulf's influence. Under that 
influence the Saxon churches were rebuilt by the Normans at an 
early date after their coming into the country. The Normans found 
the parochial system well developed, and a church in every parish. 
As the Saxon churches in the great majority of cases were built of 
wood, the Normans, in rebuilding them in stone, had to find fresh 
material and felt themselves untrammelled in respect of plan and 
design. Still, there was a goodly number of Saxon churches built 
of stone, and these the Normans wisely refrained from destroying. 
Darenth and Wouldham, in our district, are undoubted examples of 
Saxon stone churches which the Normans left standing, and to 
which they made additions when they felt they were necessary. 

With regard to the plan, neither the Saxons nor their Norman 
successors restricted themselves to the two simple types of plan 
which I have described. Mr. Micklethwaite, who does not mention 
the oblong plan, speaking of the other — the plain nave and square- 



150 EARLY-NORMAN CHURCHES IN' AND 

ended chancel— tells us it remains in a perfecl stale in the Saxon 
church of Escomh in Durham, | and it is seen, with a' porch 
(originally, Mr. Irvine Bays, with two porches) at Brudford-on- 
Avon. lint at Stow in Lincolnshire the Saxon church was built 
on the fully-developed cruciform plan; and the Saxon churches 
of Deerhurst and Worth were likewise cruciform, though at 
Worth the transepts were small, and at Deerhursl they were 
separated from the nave by a solid wall. With such examples 
before them it is natural that the Normans sometimes used more 
complex forms. Occasionally, as at Melbourne in Derbyshire, 
a fully-developed monastic plan with aisles and apses was followed ; 
but the monastic influence was not often felt in country churches, 
which at first were remarkable merely for the square east-end and 
the absence of aisles to the nave. According to Mr. Micklethwaite 
the types which in some districts asserted themselves in Norman 
times side by side with the more simple and common types, are, 
firstly, nave and chancel with tower in the middle ; and, secondly, 
nave, transepts, and chancel, with central tower. The second will 
probably be found to have been a development from the first, the 
transepts supplying the necessary support to the tower as well as 
giving the cross form. Albury in Surrey is a good example of a 
plain, unbuttressed tower standing between chancel and nave. At 
Shiere, the next parish, the same plan was adopted, but the tower 
strengthened by deeply -projecting buttresses on the north and south 
sides. The space between the two buttresses on each side was 
thrown into the church, so that on the inside the cross form is sug- 
gested. It is easy to imagine the development of these wings into 
true transepts. 

The four types, then, of Norman ground-plans are these : 
1. The simple oblong ; 2. The simple nave and small sanctuary ; 

3. The more complex nave and sanctuary with tower between them ; 

4. The complete cruciform plan with central tower. With these 
four types in mind and some knowledge of local materials the student 
can seldom fail to discover in a church the original building amid 
later additions. Perhaps I may venture to say that, for a satis- 
factory solution on the one hand of the development of the original 
ground-plans of our country churches, and, on the other hand, of 
the puzzles presented by later additions in individual cases, there 
are these desiderata : separate descriptions of the remains of Saxon 
churches, and a master-mind to bring them together and discrimi- 
nate the styles and periods of Saxon architecture — a gigantic task ; 




l^m\f%g^ 




en 
< 






< 




NEAR Till-: MEDWAY VALLEY. 151 

and, a careful search for and comparative study* of original Xorinan 
churches in districts bounded by the limits of the different local 
building-stones — an easier task, towards which the foregoing paper 
is a slight contribution. The title of the paper implies a short 
series of papers in which I hope to describe in detail some of the 
early-Norman buildings of the Medway Valley. 
# * # # # 

The axe has been mentioned as the tool which the early-Normans 
used in dressing their ashlar-work. It continued in use for this 
purpose, until, as Grervase of Canterbury tells us, William of Sens 
introduced the chisel into the country in the year 1174. The late- 
Normaus used a drill to work out the deeper portions of their elabo- 
rate carving, but throughout the whole period they finished off even 
the most delicate work with the axe. This gives us a clue to the 
reason why Norman ornament is generally so shallow. The marks 
of the axe form a good test of Norman ashlar-work. Then, as 
nowadays, stones were squared and faced on the bench, the banker- 
man putting his banker-mark on each stone when he had finished it. 
In facing the stone the workman so handled his axe that its marks 
appear diagonally across it, not quite parallel, but radiating with 



* The need of comparative study may be well illustrated b} r the results it 
gives in the district around Guildford and Godalming. Here, as elsewhere, the 
plain nave and sanctuary, was the common type, but there are a few interesting 
churches which have grown from the cruciform plan with central tower. The 
influence may be traced to St. Mary's, Guildford. This church has grown up 
round a very curious Saxon tower which once stood by itself on the boundary of 
the enclosure in which, later on, the castle was built. The tower is built of 
flints and has on each side four pilaster strips of the same material, which are 
still visible above the roofs of the church, and some of them at the bottom of the 
tower inside the church. To the east of this tower a small oblong church was 
added in the early-Norman period. A few years later an aisleless nave and 
north and south transepts were added to the remaining sides of the tower, and, 
as these sides were far removed from being square with each other, and as each 
of the new arms was laid out at right-angles to the side of the tower to which it 
was attached, the result was a very irregular cross-church. The three added 
arms have been absorbed by later alterations and additions, but have been re- 
covered by careful measurement of the building. The influence of this cross- 
plan with central tower was felt at Godalming and elsewhere. At Godalming 
there was a plain nave and sand nary, perhaps of Saxon date. When additions 
were needed, instead of following the usual methods, the builders made the 
chancel the centre of a cruciform church. They kept the old nave, and added tran- 
septs and a new chancel to the three external sides of the old chancel. They also 
thickened these three sides of the old chancel and built a central tower on them. 
The original chancel arch with its wall was unaltered, the west wall of the tower 
resting on its gable. These examples no doubt suggested the fully-developed 
cruciform chapel (St. Martha's), of later Norman dale, which stands on the old 
Pilgrims' Way near Guildford. 



152 KAK1.Y-N0RMAN CHURCHES IN AM) 

the swills of the arm from the elbow as centre.] The diagonal marks 
are no1 easily seen on Buch a rough material as tufa, bul on the 
finer Caen-stone of the later Norman periods they arc unmistakeable 
and easily distinguished from the minks of the chisel used in the 
13th century. The Early English mnsons used both ((plain chisels 
and claw-tools, according to the nature of the stone they had to 
deal with, and moved them across the squared stones from aide to 
side, so that the marks always appear vertical. Thejiew tool had 
much influence in hastening the change of style: the shallow hol- 
lows of the Norman arch-mouldings immediately gave place bo the 
deep hollows which characterise the Early English art-lies and 
vaulting-ribs. The axe remained in use for rough work for many 
years, even for centuries, but seldom for finished work. These facts 
make it most desirable that in restoration or repairs the original face 

of mediaeval ashlar should not be tampered with. 

# * * * * 

The term middle-Norman calls for little explanation. It has 
been applied to what is sometimes merely called Norman, sometimes 
pure Norman, in distinction from early-Norman and transition- 
Norman. It is characterised by the finely-jointed and finely-faced 
ashlar which came into fashion during the early years of the 12th 
century, accompanied by scollopped capitals, moulded bases, and 
shallow zigzag and other heraldic-looking ornaments. The sub- 
division of the style into early, middle, and late-Norman seems 
natural and convenient. Later Norman is merely a relative expres- 
sion, applied to either middle or late- Norman, or to both together, 
according to the context. 

Mr % # # # 

A few words on Norman materials, as found in the district under 
discussion, will not be out of place. The deposit of tufa at East 
Mailing has lately been pierced by Mr. White, a builder of AVest 
Mailing. This discovery confirms the tradition noted by Mr. \V\ 
Topley, E.R.S., in his Geological Survey Memoir, The Geology of 
the Weald (1.875), p. 369 : " Calcareous tufa occurs at East Mailing, 
lying about in the fields ; it is no doubt derived from the Kentish 
Rag. There is no section shewing it now, but I am told that it 
runs in a line from the Rectory westwards. It has been dug in 
some quantity at one time, as large masses are built into the walls 
of East Mailing Church, and it has been much used in St. Leonard's 
tower. This tower is Earlg-Normim The arches are con- 
structed with tufa, whilst in later and more finished Norman work 



NEAlt THE MEDWAT VALLEY. 153 

(as the keep at Rochester Castle), Caen-stone is used for tin's pur- 
pose." Tins note is particularly interesting, shewing that a Groioyitt 
nearly twenty years ago, knew well that the keep at Rochester was 
built alter the time <>f Grundulf, to whom to this clay it is popularly 
ascribed. 

As the Norman builders gained experience in their art, feeling 
the need of a finer stone, they abandoned the use of tufa. Caen- 
stone took its place ; but it is not common in our district, for there 
was little building done here in the middle-Norman style, most 
of the parish churches having been only recently rebuilt. It is seen 
in the chapter-house and second Norman nave of Rochester Cathe- 
dral, which were built between 1115 and 1130. Frindsbury church 
was built or rebuilt about 1127, and the middle-Norman chancel 
of Caen-stone remains. The eastern part of the chancel of Darenth, 
added to the Saxon chancel (now destroyed) about the game time, 
is likewise of Caen-stone. The tower-arch at East Farleigh belongs 
to the same period and style. The chapel of St. John in the Tower 
of London, which was built by Bishop Gundulf at the King's com- 
mand, seems to belong to what may be called the transition from 
early-Norman to middle-Norman. The round pillars of the arcade 
are built of tufa and Caen-stone used indiscriminately. The tufa 
was carefully selected and dressed and does not shew its characteristic 
vesicular nature. The chapel may be dated about 1090, and pro- 
bably marks the introduction of Caen-stone into use in England by 
the king's architect. Padlesworth church (now dismantled) seems 
to illustrate the change of material in much the same way. In a 
few cases chalk was used in country churches at this time, as at 
Wouldham, where a north aisle was added : perhaps the Caen-stone 
was found too expensive. Caen-stone, however, was used in the 
tower, with its fine arch and doorway, at Borden and iu the similar 
doorway at Bredgar. 

In the late- Norman period, when the Normans had gained a 
fuller knowledge of the resources of the country, and aisles or 
chantry-chapels were being added to the churches, they introduced 
the use oijirestone quarried from the Upper Greensand at God- 
stone near Reigate The chantry-chapels at Gillingham and New- 
ington, and the destroyed chapel on the south of the old chancel at 
Darenth, of which the arcade still remains, maybe cited as examples 
of the early use of this stone. The more strictly local stone, chalk, 
was used in some cases, as at Burham and Wouldham. Firestone 
became very popular in the 13th and 14th centuries. The Early 



154 EARLY-NOKMAN CHURCHES, ETC. 

English choir and the transepts of Rochester Cathedral are built 
with this stone. In the L5th and Kith centuries Kentish Bag 
came into common use for ail cut and Faced work. 

It is thus seen that the district affords special advantages to 

those who care to study the growth of our parish churches. Burhain 
church is a remarkable example of changes. Originally there was 
the early-Norman church of the common plan. A century later 
a north aisle was added, to be followed shortly by a south aisle. 
Then, in the L3th century, a new chancel was built up round the 
old one, on a much larger scale, having side-chapels separated from 
it by arcades of two arches. Late in the 14th or early in the 15th 
century, a tower was built at the west end, and at the same time 
the aisles and side-chapels were demolished, their arcades blocked, 
the east wall rebuilt further west, and the whole church thus 
reduced to a plain rectangular plan with western tower and south 
porch. Tufa, chalk, firestone, Kentish Rag, were the materials 
used successively at these four periods. AVindows of each period 
exist either in their original positions or removed from some de- 
stroyed portion and placed in the blocking-walls. 

In conclusion, I have to express my thanks to Mr. J. T. 
Micklethwaite, F.S.A., for the loan of his paper on The Growth of 
English Parish Churches, which has given uie much help, and to 
Mr. AV\ AVhitaker, F.R.S., for scoring a few valuable notes on the 
MS. of this paper. 



( 155 ) 



ST. MARTIN'S CHURCH, NEW ROMNEY. 

EECORDS RELATING TO ITS REMOVAL IN A.D. 1550. 

TRANSCRIBED BY HENRY BACHELER WALKER, J. P. 
COMMUNICATED BY W. L. BUTTON, F.S.A. 

Petition from New Romney to Archbishop Cranmer. 

" In moste humble wyse .... showeth vnto your good grace 
your devout oratours the Baylie, Jurats, and John Cryse Vycar of 
Newe Romeny of y r Graces Dioces. That whereas there are in the 
same towne twoo parisshe Churches that is to sae the churche of 
Saincte Nicolas and the chapell of St. Marten annexed therevnto 
whiche are appropriated vnto the Colledge of all Sowles in the vni- 
versitie of Oxforde. 

" And for that the towne is not so populus, nor the devotions 
of the people so liberall in paying of personall tvthes as thei have 
been heretofore the proffittes of the same arr not sufficient nor 
liable to fynde twoo curates to serve bothe the sayd churches and 
thei vnited were but a competent and reasonable lyving for one 
lerned curate. The churches when thei were together and either 
of them hable and mete to receyve all the people of the .... and 
more and the keping vppe of theym bothe may .... parsonage as 
the inhabitants of the sayd twoo parisshes cannot .... well .... 
to come to any one of the sayd churches. It maye therefore please 
your grace to assign and appoynte by your l'tres directed vnto the 
hole towne one of the same churches whiche shall seme to your 
grace moste mete for thair parisshe churche willing and requiring 
the people to accepte the same for thair onelie parisshe. churche. 
And further that your grace will take order that certyn honest men 
maye be charged with the goodes comyng of the churche whvche 
shalbe desolated to be ymployed to the benifite and commoditie of 
the churche and towne so that thei maie stande bounde to yelde 
vnto yo r grace accompte of the same frome tyme to tyme when and 
as often as you shall require the same. In accomplishing wherof 
yo 1 ' grace's sayd oratours shalbe dailie bounde to praie to God for 
the long preservation of your good grace long to endure." 

The Archbishop's Answer. 

" To my lovyng ffrendes the Baylif, Jurats and parisshons of 
Newe Rumney. After my right hertie recomendation found Per- 
ceyvyng by your application that you cannot agree amonge your 



15G st. martin's church, new ROMNEY. 

Belfes whiche of your churches you ma\ take For your onlie parisshe 
churche, von havynge twoe churches either of them inch' tor your 
sole towne and by cause that l>\ no equytie nor without great con- 
Bid .... the people of the churche may come to the chapel] nor of 
the chapel] to the churche, these arc to ... . wylle you to take the 
churche of Scy nt Nycholas Eor your onlie parisshe churche. Ami 
that such as shall have or take the other churche and implements 
thereof shall before any alteration thereof be made be bounde by 
sufficient wrytynges obligatory before Peter Hayman my surveyor 
whom 1 have appoynted therevnto for the employnge of thc\ in and 
of the money thereof comynge, to the common poore and best 
proffyte of the towne and parisshe and to take a trewe accompt 
thereof .... as eyther an .... they, or any of them, shalbe 
thervnto requyred. Thus hartelie fare you welle ffrom Lam- 
betlie the xxvij daye of May 1549. 

" Your Lovinge ffrende, 

"T. Cant." 

Here aft r folow Ul the Eeceipte of the goodes of Saint Martens 
Church in New Eomeney as folowith. 

Inp'mis Beceyved of one Edenberie and of Will" 1 part- 
ridge of Eie ffor iiij thousand and Sixe hundreth 
of bell metall to them sold at x li. x s. le thousand xlviij li. iiij s. 

It'm Bee' of Eic' buntinge the iijde day of Ap'll Anno 
E' E' Edwardi vj dei gracia re'qui'to for c'ten lead 
to him sold at vj s. viij d. le hundreth vli. 

It'm Eec' of AVill 1 " tadlow for viij c. d. [d=|] of lead 
to him sold the xxiij th of Ap'll Anno p'dicto at vs. 
le C xli j 3- v j d. 

It'm Eec' of Willm Walter for v C. of lead to him sold 

at vs. le hundreth xxvs. 

It'm Eec' of Peter Wallishe ffor xij C. of lead to him 

sold at v s. le hundreth iij li. 

It'm Eec' of Eadulphe devonishe for x C. of lead to 

him sold at v s. le hundreth Is. 

It'm Eec' of John Whit ffor viij C. of lead to him sold 

at v s. le h undreth xl s. 

It'm Eec' of Thomas Pelland ffor vij C. of lead to him 

sold at v s. le C xxxv s. 

It'm Eec' of Nicolas ffan black Smith ffor iiij C. d. 

[d=|] of iron to him sold at vj s. viij d. le hundreth xxx s. 

It'm Eec' of the said Edenberie and partridge ffor x 

ffother of lead to them sold at vli. le ffother 1 li. [£50] 

\_Atfoot of MS. page.] Sm. on this side c xvij li. vj s. vj d. 

[£117 6s. 6d.] 

John hoonle [?] pr. thorn's hoonle Sm. grosse c xxxvi li. xvi s. x d. 

[£136 16s. 10d.] 

This sum gross or total is written (it the foot of the first MS. 
page, not at the end of (he account. 



RECORDS RELATING TO ITS REMOVAL IN A.I). 1550. 157 

Here ffolo\v th the iij billes specified in the Acompt grosse. 

ffirsl Rec' of gregorie holton ffor iiij pistes ijs. viij d. 

It'm Rec' of Richard buatiage ffor iiij gistes ijs. viijd. 

It'iii Rec' of Willin Walt 1 ' ffor viij gistes iiij s. xd. 

It'm Rec' of John cheseman ffor ij pistes xij d. 

1 1' in Rec' of pet 1- Wallishe ffor iiij gistes ijs. viijd. 

It'm Rec' of Robt galion ffor iiij pistes ijs. viijd. 

It'm Rec' of Willm dornell ffor iiij pistes ijs. viijd. 

It'm live' of John eurtes ffor one gist viijd. 

It'm Rec' of Marten padih'm ffor one gist viij d. 

It'm Rec' of John gorram ffor old wood ij d. 

It'm Rec' of Robt Snode ffor a bell fframe xij d. 

It'm Rec' of John curties ffor a bell fframe xvj d. 

It'm Rec' of Radulphe devonishe ffo r a bell ffra' xv jd. 

It'm Ree' of Thorn's parres ffor a beaine xvj d. 

It'm Rec' of peter Wallishe ffor a bell fframe xvj d. 

It'm Rec' of John Whit ffor ij C & viij li of lead x s. vj d. 

It'm Rec' of Thorn's parres ffor the great bell fframe... ij s. iiij d. 

It'm Rec' of Sand r Kepell ffor iiij gistes ijs. viijd. 

Thus endeth the ffirst bill. [These words, and those in the line 
following, have been erased.^ 

Here ffolovv 11 ' y e contentes of the second bill. 
It'm Rec' of Ric d bnntinge ffor c'rten paving tiles to 

him sold — Sm iiij s. 

It'm Rec' of the same Ric tl bunting ffor a tombstone ... vs. iiij d. 

It'm Rec' of gregorie holton ffor a tombstone ij s. viij d. 

It'm Rec' of Radulphe devonishe ffor c'ten paving tiell vj s. 

It'm Rec' of Richard buntinge ffor ij tombstones* viij s. 

It'm Rec' of John Morres ffor parte of the timbr of the 

ehaunsell* iiij s. 

It'm Rec' of Thorn's parres ffor the ffounte xij d. 

It'm Rec' of John b'rges ffor a table iiij d. 

It'm Rec' of gregorie holton ffor c'ten boordsf vs. 

It'm Rec' of Adrian M'den ffor the pulpit xij d. 

[At foot of MS. paqe.~\ Sm. on this side iiij li. ij d. [£i 0s. 2d.] 

It'm Rec' of Thorn's belomie ffor c'ten timbr iij s. viijd. 

It'm Rec' of Will'm Eppse ffor c'ten stones J iij s. iiij d. 

It'm Rec' of John berre ffor c'ten lime that was in y e 

church xviij d. 

It'm Rec' of John Morres fo r ye selinge ov r y e Rood 

loft iij s. iiij d. 

It'm Rec' of Robt galion ffor a q't of pavinge tiell iiij d. 

It'm Rec' of xpoffor cowchman fo r c'ten old timbr§ ... xij d. 

It'm Rec' of John padih'm ffor a fforme vj d. 

* In the chancel of " our Lad}'," saj's another copy of this MS. 

t From the back of the vestry. 

X The cross stone. § From an altar. 



158 ST. MARTIN'S CHURCH, NEW ROMNET. 

It'm Hoc' of Thorn's harnden ffor a benche of stone & 

ffor \j other great si ones is. 

1 1 'm Rec' of Symou padih'm ffor a prekel * iiij d. 

I t'ni Rec' of John elson fFor ;i prekot* vj d. 

It'm Rec' of 1 horn's belomie ffor the Bepulcre [frame t viij d. 

It'm Rec' of Kd1>( bedle ffor ij C brick xiiijd. 

It'm Rec' of Robt davie ffor xvj pavinge fcyles viij d. 

It'm Rec' of James cristean ffor x paving tielles vd. 

It'm Rec' of m'ten padih'm ffor xx paving tielles xd. 

It'm Rec' 1 of thorn's parres ffor e'ten paving tielles ... iiij d. 

It'm Rec' of gregorie holton ffor e'ten paving tielles ... x d. 

It'm Kec' of Will'm Epps ffor xxiiij paving stones viij s. 

Item Kec' of Kobart bedle ffor ij C d. of pavinge tielles iii s. iiij d. 
It'm Kec' of x'poffer cowcheman ffor the tomhe of y e 

sepulcre xij d. 

It'm Rec' of thorn's tadlow ffor e'ten stones xiiijd. 

It'm Kec' of oliver darbishire ffor e'ten old timhrj ... xxd. 
It'm Kec' of John padih'm and gregorie holton ffor 

bords iiij s. 

It'm Kec' of Symon padih'm Thorn's tadlow & Marten 

padih'm ffor the up r loft of the Steple x s. iiij d. 

It'm Kec' of Kobt brewer for ij pec's of timbr viij d. 

It'm Kec' of James cristean ffor e'ten bricke iiij d. 

It'm Kec' of Kic buntinge ffor a beame xvj d. 

It'm Kec' of Kic' Wallar ffor a beame xvj d. 

It'm Kec' of gregorie holton ffor a beame xvj d. 

It'm Kec' of Marten padh'm ffor ij pecs of timbr xjd. 

It'm Kec' of Raffe devonishe ffor iiij gistes ij s. viij d. 

It'm Rec' of Ric' AVallar for ij gistes xvj d. 

[At foot of MS. page.] Sin. on this side iij li. viij s. x d. 

[£3 8s. 10d.] 

It'm Rec' of John parker ffor viij gistes ij s. 

It'm Rec' of John drincker ffor one gist viij d. 

It'm Rec' of Robt davie ffor ij gistes xvj d. 

It'm Rec' of Ric Seed for iij gistes ij s. 

It'm Rec' of thorn's parres ffor one giste "v i Ij d . 

It'm Rec' of John gorram ffor an old Rotin gist [rotten 

joist] ijd. 

It'm Rec' of John clarke ffor ij gistes xvj d. 

It'm Rec' of John padih'm ffor iiij gistes ij s. viij d. 

It'm Rec' of Rich' geffray ffor one gist viij d. 

It'm Rec' of Thorn's tailor ffor a beame and ij small 

timbr peces ij s. ijd. 

It'm Rec' of Thorn's harnden§ ffor iij load of ruff stone ij s. vj d. 

It'm Rec' of Adrian m'den 1 1 ffor a stole vd. 

* A candlestick with pricket top. 
f Framework of the Easter Sepulchre. 
X Erom the porch. § Of Lydd. 

II Adrian Mardcn. a smith. 



RECORDS RELATING TO ITS REMOVAL IN A. I). 1550. 169 

Tt'in Eec' of Ric' bun tinge ffor a eowenter [? counter] iij s. iiij d. 

Tt'in Rec' of Thorn's pelland ffor iiij C. paring tile ... xvj d. 

It'm Rec' of Will'm dornell ffor iij old planckes viijd. 

It'm Rec' of Alex' Kepell ffor qt' paving tile iij d. 

It'm Rec' of Symon padih'm ffor m 1 * paving tile iij s. iiijd. 

It'm Rec' of Ric' buntinge ffor a ffortne viij d. 

It'm Rec' of Ric' garrard ffor a tombestone iij s. iiijd. 

It'm Rec' of Thorn's dod ffor iij C. of bricke xxj d. 

It'm Rec' of [in another copy Sir William] the p'son 

of hopef ffor a deske iij d. 

It'm Rec' of John curtes ffor a qt' of pavinge tile iiij d. 

It'm Rec' of Thorn's dod ffor c'ten stones xiiij d. 

It'm Rec' of Thorn's dod ffor c'ten pavinge tile x d. 

It'm Rec' of Thorn's parres ffor the bord of the ffountj ij d. 

It'm Rec' of John cheseman ffor a torehe xvj d. 

It'm Rec' of Thorn's dod ffor a torehe xvj d. 

It'm Rec' of John gorrom ffor a chist xiiij d. 

It'm Rec' of Thorn's dod for a longe settle iiij d. 

It'm Rec' of John Mores ffor c'ten timbr tiele & stone§ 

to him sold xx s. 

It'm Rec' of John Wells ffor c'ten old lathes viij d. 

It'm Rec' of James cristean ffor vj C. tile iij s. 

It'm Rec' of Alex' Kebell ffor old lathes iiij d. 

[At foot of JIS. page.'] Sm. on this side iij li. xxij d. [£3 Is. 10d.] 

It'm Rec' of will'm hacket ffor ij C. tile xij d. 

It'm Rec' of John bui'ges ffor lates vj d. 

It'm Rec' of oliver darbishire ffor lates ixd. 

It'm Rec' of Ric d buntinge ffor m 1 paving tile iij s. iiijd. 

It'm Rec' of M rs dod widdow ffor iij C. paving tiles ... xviij d. 

It'm Rec' of the glasiar of Rie ffor asshes viij d. 

It'm Rec' of Robt galion ffor vj C. tile ij s. vj d. 

It'm Rec' of oliver darbishire ffor ij C. of tiles xj d. 

It'm Rec' of Simon padih'm ffor a pec' of lead xiiij d. 

It'm Rec' of Ric' cheseman for one beame ij C. & d. of 

tile ij s. vd. 

It'm Rec' of Ric' buntinge ffor c'ten stones vj d. 

It'm Rec' of Ric' buntinge ffor a doore ij s. 

It'm Rec' of thorn's dod ffor p'te of the Ruffe of y e 

churche xij s. 

It'm Rec' of Robt galion ffor p'te of the Ruffe of the 

churche xij s. 

It'm Rec' of John padih'm ffor p'te of the said Ruffe xij s. 

It'm Rec' of will'm Walt r ffor parte of the same Roffe. . . xij s. 

It'm Rec' of Robt bedle ffor p'te of the same Roffe ... xij s. 

It'm Rec' of Ric' garrard ffor a beame xvj d. 

It'm Rec' of Will'm Walt 1 ' ffor vj C. tiles ij s. viij d. 

Thus endethe the second bill. [These words have been erased '.] 

* A thousand. t The rector of Hope, in Romney Marsh. 

1 Font cover. ^ Formicg the vestry. 



]()() ST. MARTIN'S CIIUKC1I, NEW ROMNET. 

It'm Rec 1 of W i IT in padih'm for c'ten old timbr & 

c'ten Stones vis. 

]t'm Rec' lit' leonard pomtes [? Pointes] ffo r iij but- 

tresse & A beame vjs. viijd. 

[At foot of MS. page. ~] Sm. Oil this Bide iiijli. xviijs. vijd. 

[£4 18s. 7d.] 

It'm "Rec' of Ric. Wallar ffor viij li. of lead iiij d. 

It'in Rec' of Adrean M'den ffor the stones that were 

in the churche porch iij s. iiij d. 

It'm Rec' of gregorie holton ffor a doore of the churche ij s. vd. 

It'm Rec' of w" 1 ilinche of hoope fo' - a looad ffree stone ij s. viijd. 

It'm Rec' of Rio' buntinge ffo 1 ' lialf a lood of tiles iij s. iiij d. 

It'm Rec' of M 1 ' Kempe ffor ij thousand a half of pav- 
ing tiles viij s. iiij d. 

It'm Rec' of M 1 ' Kempe ffor one stone xij d. 

It'm Rec' of Ric' Wallar ffor C. paving tiles iiij d. 

It'm Rec' of M'ten padih'm for iij C. tile xvj d. 

It'm Rec' of thorn's pelland ffor ij C. tile viij d. 

It'm Rec' of John Clarke ffor iiij C. tile • xxijd. 

It'm Rec' of Ric' Wallar ffor v C. tile ij s. iij d. 

It'm Rec' of George Rowse for C. & d. pavinge tile & 

vj corn 1 " tile viij d. 

It'm Rec' of thorn's parres ffor a load of tile vj s. viij d. 

It'm Rec' of John padih'm a thousand tiles iiij s. viij d. 

It'm Rec' of Raffe devonishe ffo 1 ' half a load, tile iij s. iiij d. 

It'm Rec' of John parker fo 1 ' half a lood tile iij s. iiij d. 

It'm Rec' of gregorie holton fo 1 ' half a load tiele iij s. iiij d. 

It'm Rec' of thorn's dod fo 1 ' vj C. tiele ij s. viij d. 

It'm Rec' of will'm dornell fo 1 ' half a load tiele iij s. iiij d. 

It'm Rec' of Robt bedell ffor a thousand pavinge tile. . iij s. vj d. 

It'm Rec' of Robt bedell ffor half a thousand tile ij s. iij d. 

It'm Rec' of thorn's parres ffor xxiv Rafters ix s. iiij d. 

It'm Rec' of thorn's dod ffor the Roode loft x s. 

[At foot of MS. page.'] Sm. on this side iiij li. xj d. [£4 Os. 1 Id.] 

£ s. d. 

117 G G 

4 2 

Recapitulation of sums at foot j 3 8 10 

of the MS. pages ] 3 1 10 

4 18 7 

4 11 

£136 1G 10 



In the MS. this total is noted on the first page of the account here 
concluded. Tide ut supra, p. 156, at foot. 



( 161 ) 
KENT PINES, 4—7 EDWARD III.* 

91. At "Westminster, Octaves of Holy Trinity A° 4 — Betw. 
William Kenewye and Joan his wife, pits., and Richard de North- 
folk and Sarra his wife, defts., of 1 mess., 20 acr. land, I rood of 
wood, and the 5th part of 1 mess., with appnrts., in Estfarlegh. 
Right of William ; for the admission he and Joan grant them to 
Richard and Sarra at the rent of a rose by the year. 

92. At Westminster, Quindene of Holy Trinity A 4 — Betw. 
Nicholas Horn, of Canterbury, pit., and Haraon de Ganvynton and 
Alice his wife, defts., of 1 mess., 1 acr. and \\ rood of land, with 
appurts., in Adesham. Right of Nicholas, who, for the admission, 
gave 20 marks. 

93. At Westminster, Quindene of Holy Trinity A 4 — Betw. 
Richard, son of Robert de Tylthe, pit., and William de Tylthe, 
deft., of 1 mess., 50 acr. land and 70 acr. wood, with appurts., in 
Cranebroke. Right of Richard, who, for the admission, gave 20 marks. 

94. At Westminster, Morrow of St. John the Baptist A 4 — 
Betw. John de Couinbe and Alice his wife, pits., and Thomas 
ffeysaunt, deft., of 1 mess., and 10 acr. land, with appurts., in the 
A r ill of St. Nicholas in the Isle of Thanet. Right of Thomas, who, 
for the admission, grants to John and Alice, and to the heirs 
of John. 

95. At Westminster, St. Michael in one month A 4 — Betw. 
Ralph, son of Godefridus atte Melne, and Isabella his wife (by 
Henry Wikwane in place of said Isabella), pits., and Godefridus 
atte Melne, deft., of 1 mess.. 1 mill, and 48 acr. land, with appurts., 
in Woteryngeburi. Right of Godefridus, who, for the admission, 
grants (by the service of 12 quarters of wheat, 5 quarters of barley, 
and 10 quarters of oats, yearly during the life of Godefridus) 
to Ralph and Isabella, and to the heirs of the body of Ralph; 
but if none, then after their deaths to remain to the right heirs 
of Ralph. 

Endorsed : — " Richard, son of Nicholas atte Melle, asserts his 
claim." 

96. At Westminster, Quinzaine of St. Michael A 4 — Betw. 
John Tannere, of Apuldre, pit., and Richard de Northwode and 
Matilda his wife, defts., of 1 mess., and 64 acr. land, w y ith appurts., 
in Bilsynton'. Richard and Matilda admit it to be the Right of 
John ; and, for themselves and the heirs of Matilda, grant to him 
and to his heirs, and receive 20Z. for the concession. 

97. At Westminster, Octave of St. Michael A 4— Betw. 
Isabella, who was the wife of Henry Aucher, of Lossenhamme, pit., 
and Agnes, daughter of Nicholas Aucher, deft., of 1 mess., 1 garden, 
115 acr. land, 11 acr. wood, 30s. rent, and rent of 2 cocks, IS hens, 
80 eggs, 1 lb. and a moiety of one grain of pepper, and a moiety of 
1 lb. of cummin, with appurts., in Roluyndenn'. Right of Agnes, 
who, for the admission, grants to Isabella for her life. After the 

* Continued from Yol. XVIII., p. 352. 
VOL. XX. M 



1G2 KENT FINKS, TEMP. EDWARD III. 

death of Isabella to remain to Ilenry her son, and to the heirs of 
his body ; but if none, then after hia death to remain to the right 
heirs of aforesaid Isabella. 

98. At "Westminster, Quinzaine of St. Martin A" 4 — Betw. 
Walter, son of William le Hore, pit., and Mabilla, who was the 
wife of William le Hore, deft., of 1 mess., 59 acr. land, 20 acr. 
pasture, 5 acr. wood, and 2 weirs, with appurts., in Maidenstane 
and Estfarlegh'. Right of Walter, who, for the admission, grants 
(by service of a rose at the Nativity of St. John Baptist) to Mabilla 
for her life. After her death to revert to Walter and to his heirs, 
quit of the heirs of Mabilla. 

99. At Westminster, Quinzaine of St. Michael A 3 — Betw. 
William de Clynton' and Juliana his wife, pits., and Walter de 
Leghton', parson of the Church of Leybourn', and Martin 
Archeboud', parson of the Church of Esshetesford', defts., of the 
Manor of Preston' next Wyngham, with appurts. And afterwards 
in the Octave of St. Michael A 4, between the aforesaid parties. 
Right of Walter ; for which admission Walter and Martin, for 
themselves and the heirs of Walter, grant that the said Manor, 
with appurts., which Idonia, who was the wife of Geoffrey de Say, 
holds for her life of the inheritance of said Walter, and which 
after her death to said Walter and Martin, and to the heirs of 
Walter reverts, shall after the death of Idonia remain to aforesaid 
William and Juliana, and to the heirs of Juliana. This agreement 
was made in the presence of said Idonia, who thereupon acknow- 
ledged her fealty to William and Juliana. 

100. At Westminster, Morrow of St. Martin A 4 — Betw. 
William de Thrillowe and Cecilia his wife, pit., and Benedict 
Dobbles and Joan his wife, defts., of 1 mess., with appurts., in 
Derteforde. Benedict and Joan admit it to be the Right of Cecilia, 
as that which William and Cecilia have of their gift, to hold to 
them and to the heirs of Cecilia. For which concession William 
and Cecilia, for themselves and the heirs of Cecilia, grant to 
Benedict and Joan an annuity of 4 marks during the life of Joan, 
with liberty to distrain for same when in arrear. After the death of 
Joan, William and Cecilia, and the heirs of Cecilia, to be quit 
of the payment of said annuity. 

101. At Westminster, Quinzaine of St. Michael A 4 — Betw. 
John Payforer, pit., and Robert le Mortymer and Alice his wife, 
William Gerneys and Isabella his wife, William de Sheryngton' 
and Johanna his wife, and John de ffageham and Margeria his 
wife, defts., of 1 mess., 25 acr. land, 2s. 3d. rent, and rent of 1 cock 
and 2 hens, with appurts., in Menstre, Isle of Shepeye. The 
deforciants admit it to be the Right of John P., and, for themselves 
and the heirs of Alice, Isabella, Johanna, and Margeria, grant to 
him and to his heirs, and receive 100 marks for the concession. 

102. At Westminster, St. Michael in one month A 4 — Betw. 
Walter atte Bregge, of Lambehethe, pit., and Alan Wodyn, deft., of 
1 mess., and 18 acr. land, with appurts., in Wrotham. Bight 
of Walter, who ; for the admission, grants (by service of Gd. yearly 



KENT FINES, TEMP. EDWARD III. 1G3 

at the Nativity of the Lord) to Alan for his life. After his death 
to revert to Walter and to his heirs, quit of the heirs of Alan. 

103. At Westminster, Morrow of St. Martin A 4— Betw. 
William Moraunt and Johanna his wife (by William de Waure in 
place of Johanna), pits., and John Joce, of Bradebomm', deft., of 
1 mess., 90 acr. land, 8 acr. meadow, 8 acr. wood, 10s. 3d. rent., 
and rent of 4 hens, with appurts., in Seuenoke, which John de 
Vieleston' holds for the terra of three years. John J. admits it to 
be the Bight of William ; and, for himself and his heirs, grants that 
the aforesaid tenements, with appurts., which John de V. holds for 
the term of three years of the inheritance of .John J., and which 
after said term to him and to his heirs revert, shall after said term 
remain to William and Johanna and to the heirs of William. 
John J. receives 100 marks for the concession. This agreement 
was made in the presence of John de V., who thereupon acknow- 
ledged his fealty to William and Johanna. 

104. At Westminster, St. Michael in one month A 4 — Betw. 
Bobert de Pesyndenne, pit., and Richard de Bourne and Johanna 
his wife, defts., of 30 acr. land, 6 acr. wood, \2d. rent, and a moiety 
of 1 mess., with appurts., in Wytrychyshainme. Richard and 
Johanna admit it to be the Right of Robert, and, for themselves 
and the heirs of Johanna, grant to him and to his heirs, and receive 
100 marks for the concession. 

105. At Westminster, St. Michael in one month A 4 — Betw. 
Stephen atte Berne and Johanna his wife, pits., and Roger atte 
Melle and Alice his wife, defts., of 1 mess., with appurts., in 
Maydenstan'. Roger and Alice admit it to be the Right of 
Stephen ; and Roger for himself and his heirs grants to Stephen 
and Johanna and to the heirs of Stephen. Roger and Alice receive 
10 marks for the concession. 

106. At Westminster, Morrow of St. Martin A 4— Betw. John 
Elys, of Demecherche, pit., and Henry Beaulowe and Johanna his 
wife, defts., of 5 acr. land, with appurts., in Borewaremershe. 
Henry and Johanna admit it to be the Right of John ; and, for 
themselves and the heirs of Johamia, remit and quit-claim to him 
and to his heirs, and receive for the remission, etc., 20 marks. 

107. At Westminster, St. Michael in one month A 4 — Betw. 
Laurence de Shorham, clerk, pit., and Richard de Wylhope 
and Mabilla his wife, defts., of 6-|- acr. land, with appurts., 
in Eastbregge next Romene. Richard and Mabilla admit it to be 
the Right of Laurence ; and, for themselves and the heirs of 
Mabilla, grant to him and to his heirs, and receive 10 marks for 
the concession. 

108. At Westminster, Morrow of St. Martin A 4 — Betw. 
Thomas atte Newehuse, pit., and Peter de Kyngesfelde and Matilda 
his wife, defts., of 1 mess., and 9 acr. land, with appurts., in 
Borewaremersh'. Peter and Matilda admit it to be the Right of 
Thomas ; and, for themselves and the heirs of Matilda, grant to him 
and to his heirs, and receive 20 marks for the concession. 

109. At Westminster, Morrow of Souls A° 4 — Betw. Hugh 

m2 



164 KENT FINES, TEMP. EDWARD III. 

Chaumpeneys and Isabella his wife, pits., and Nicholas Chaumpeneys 
and John le Bakere, chaplain, (lefts., of the Manors of Lynchefore 
and Parmestede, with appurts. Bight of Nicholas ; for which 
admission Nicholas and John grant to Hugh ami Isabella for their 
lives, with remainder after their deaths to Nicholas son of said 
Hugh, and to the heirs of his body; but if none, then after the 
death of Nicholas to remain to James his brother and to the heirs 
of his body ; but if none, then after the death of James to remain 
to the right heirs of aforesaid Isabella. 

110. At Westminster, Morrow of Souls A 4 — Betw. William 
de Keculure and Mary his wife, pits., and Michael de Heure and 
Katerina his wife, clefts., of a moiety of 200 acr. land, 3 acr. meadow, 

5 acr. pasture, 40 acr. wood, 60s. rent, and rent of 4 quarters 
of oats, 5 ploughshares, 10 cocks, 50 hens, and 500 eggs, with 
appurts., in Maydeustane, Nether Hardres, and Lyntone. Michael 
and Katerina admit it to be the Bight of Mary ; and, for themselves 
and the heirs of Katerina, remit and quit-claim to William and 
Mary and to the heirs of Mary, and receive for the remission, etc., 
100 marks. 

111. At Westminster, Quinzaine of St. Michael A°4— Betw. 
William Galeys, pit., and John de Esthall' senior and Matilda his 
wife, clefts., of 1 mess., 1 mill, 3 carucates of land, 11 acr. meadow, 
60 acr. wood, 11 marks rent, and rent of 80 hens, and 400 eggs, 
with appurts., in St. Mary Creye, Orpynton', Doune, Okholte, 
Pecham, ffrenyngham, Hese, Codham, and ffarnebergh'. John and 
Matilda admit it to be the Bight of William ; and John, for himself 
and his heirs, grants to William and to his heirs. John and 
Matilda receive 201. for the concession. 

112. At Westminster, Octave of St. Michael A 4 (Post Pine, 
made on the Morrow of St. Martin A 14 Edw r ard II.)— Betw. 
Thomas de Luda and Margaret his wife, pits., and John de Chelreye 
junior, deft., of 3 mess., 3 mills, 93 acr. land, 11-^ acr. meadow, 

6 marks and 5s. rent, pasturage for 8 oxen, and rent of 1 cock and 
4 hens, with appurts., in Derteford', Wylmynton, and Sutton'. 
Bight of John, who, for the admission, grants to Thomas and 
Margaret for their lives, with remainder after their deaths to Bobert 
their son and to the heirs of his body ; but if none, then after 
the death of Bobert to remain to the right heirs of aforesaid 
Thomas. 

113. At Westminster, Octave of St. Michael A 4 — Betw. John 
atte Castel and Isabella his wdfe, pits., and Martin Issely, of 
Sunderessh', deft., of 1 toft, 15 acr. land, and 4 acr. meadow, w r ith 
appurts., in Sunderessh'. Bight of Isabella ; for which admission 
John and Isabella grant (by service of a rose at the Nativity of 
St. John Baptist) to Martin for his life. After his death to revert 
to John and Isabella and to their heirs, quit of the heirs of Martin. 

114. At Westminster, Morrow of Souls A 4 — Betw. Hugh 
Chaumpeneys and Isabella his wife, pits., and Nicholas Chaumpeneys 
and John le Bakere, chaplain, defts., of the Manor of Wykham next 
Ledenne, with appurts. Bight of Nicholas ; for which admission 



KENT FINES, TEMP. EDWARD II T. 105 

Nicholas and John grant to Hugh and Isabella for their lives, with 
remainder after their deaths' to Nicholas son of said Hugh, and to 
the heirs of his body ; but if none, then after the death of Nicholas 
to remain to James his brother and to the heirs of his body ; but if 
none, then after the death of James to remain to the right heirs of 
aforesaid Hugh. 

115. At Westminster, Quinzaine of St. Michael A 4— Betw. 
Adam atte Noke, of Maydenstan, ffisshere, pit., and Nicholas atte 
Coulese and Juliana his wife, (lefts., of 1 mess., with appurts., in 
Maidenstane. Nicholas and Juliana admit it to be the Right of 
Adam ; and, for themselves and the heirs of Juliana, grant to him 
and to his heirs, and receive 100*. for the concession. 

116. At Westminster, Octave of St. Michael A 4— Betw. Peter 
de Pekham and William de Grofherst, pits., and Peter Godlok' and 
Alice his wife, defts., of 1 mess., with appurts., in Middelton'. Peter 
G-. and Alice admit it to be the Right of William ; and, for them- 
selves and the heirs of Alice, grant to Peter de P. and AVilliam, and 
to the heirs of William, and receive 100s. for the concession. 

117. At Westminster, Quinzaine of St. Michael A° 4— Betw. 
Salamon de Cornell', pit , and John, son of Maurice de Pette, and 
Margeria his wife, defts., of 1 mess., and 1 acre of land, with 
appurts., in Osprenge. John and Margeria admit it to be the Right 
of Salamon ; and, for themselves and the heirs of Margeria, grant 
to him and to his heirs, and receive 20 marks for the concession. 

118. At Westminster, Octave of St. Michael A 4— Betw. 
Thomas de Hoo and Johanna his wife, pits., and John, son of 
Nicholas de Ensyng', deft., of 1 mess., 20 acr. land, 8 acr. marsh, 
and Ti\d. rent., with appurts., in Monketon' in the Isle of Thauet. 
Right of John, who, for the admission, grants to Thomas and 
Johanna, and to the heirs of Thomas. 

119. At AVestminster, Quinzaine of St. Michael A 4— Betw. 
William Moraunt, pit., and William Herleston', deft., of os. 8d. rent, 
with appurts., in Chidynggeston'. William H. admits it to be the 
Right of William M. ; and, for himself and his heirs, grants 
to William M. and to his heirs, and receives 40s. for the concession. 

120. At Westminster, Quinzaine of St. Michael A 4 — Betw. 
Agnes, daughter of Martin Isely, of Sunderessh', pit., and Martin 
Isely, of Sunderessh', deft., of 1 mess., 60 acr. land, 4 acr. meadow, 
10 acr. pasture, and 8 acr. wood, with appurts., in Sunderessh'. 
Right of Agues, who, for the admission, grants (by service of a rose 
at the Nativity of St. John Baptist) to Martin for his life. After 
his death to revert to Agnes and to her heirs, quit of the heirs 
of Martin. 

121. At Westminster, Quinzaine of St. Michael A 4 — Betw. 
Stephen Sauuage, pit., and William le Hert' and Johanna his wife, 
defts., of 1 mess., with appurts., in Osprenge next ffaueresham. 
William and Johanna admit it to be the Right of Stephen ; and, for 
themselves and the heirs of Johanna, grant to him and to his heirs, 
and receive 10 marks for the concession. 

122. At Westminster, Octave of St. Michael A 4— Betw. 



1()() KENT FINKS, TEMP. EDWARD I IT. 

Simon Markes, pit., and John Markes ami Matilda his wife, deft 8., 
of 1 mess., and 2 acr. land, with appurts., in LedeS. Bight of 
Simon, who, for the admission, grants to John and Matilda and to 
Ins heirs by her; hut if none, then after their deaths to remain to 
the right heirs of John. 

ll>:j. At Westminster, Quin/aine of St. Michael A 4 — Betw. 
Thomas Chalke and Johanna Ins wife, pits., and Ifamo, son of Bobert 
Gladewyne and Johanna his wife, deft 8., of 1 mess., and I acre of 
land, with appurts., in Strode. Hamo and Johanna his wife admit 
it to he the Bight of Thomas ; and, for themselves and the heirs of 
Johanna, grant to Thomas and Johanna his wife and to her heirs, 
and receive 40s. for the concession. 

124. At Westminster, Octave of St. Michael A 4— Betw. 
Thomas de Kershrok', Parson of the Church of Stone in Oxene, 
pit., and John de Hortone, chaplain, deft., of 1 mess., 1 mill, 40 acr. 
land, 40 acr. pasture, 7 acr. wood, 20s. Hd. rent, and rent of 
2 cocks, 50 hens, and 500 eggs, with appurts., in Dauyntone next 
ffauersham. Right of John, who, for the admission, grants to 
Thomas and to the heirs of his hody ; but if none, then after his 
death to remain to Mabilla, who was the wife of John de Bix, and 
to her heirs. 

125. At Westminster, Morrow of the Purification of B. Virgin 
A 5 — Betw. Thomas Peny and Margaret his wife (by John, son of 
Nicholas de Ensyng, in place of Margaret), pits., and Nicholas de 
Ensynge, deft., of 1 mess., 20 acr. land, 2\ acr. meadow, 11 acr. 
marsh, 3s. rent, and rent of 4 hens, with appurts., in Ieham next 
Wyngham. Nicholas grants the aforesaid tenements to Thomas 
and Margaret and to his heirs by her ; but if none, then after their 
deaths to remain to the right heirs of Thomas. Nicholas receives 
for the concession 100Z. 

126. At Westminster, Morrow of the Purification of B. Virgin 
A 5 — Betw. John Ordmer and Alice his wife (by John, son of 
Nicholas de Ensyng', in place of Alice), pits., and Nicholas de 
Ensynge, deft., of 1 mess., 80 acr. land, 4 acr. meadow, 2 acr. wood, 
6s. rent, and rent of 2 cocks and 2 hens, with appurts., in Sellynge 
next Brabourne. Right of Nicholas, who, for the admission, 
grants to John and Alice for their lives, with remainder after their 
deaths to John son of the said John, and to the heirs of his body ; 
bnt if none, then after his death to remain to the right heirs of 
aforesaid John Ordmer. 

127. At Westminster, Quinzaine of St. Hilary A 5 — Betw. 
Thomas, son of Robert le Coupere, pit., and Robert le Coupere, of 
Littlebourne, and Cecilia his wife, defts., of 1 mess., 3 acr. and 
1 rood of land, and 1 acr. meadow, with appurts., in Littlebourne 
next Canterbury. Robert and Cecilia admit it to be the Right 
of Thomas ; and, for themselves and the heirs of Cecilia, remit 
and quit-claim to him and to his heirs, and receive 20 marks for 
the concession. 

128. At Westminster, Quinzaine of St. Hilary A 5 — Betw. 
John Eleys (sic) and Alice his wife, pits., and John de ffilethe, 



KENT FINES, TEMP. EDWARD III. 167 

deft., of I mess., 218 acr. land, 11 acr. wood, 2*. rent., and a 
moiety of 1 acre of meadow, with appurts., in Bokton' Malerbe, 
Olkumbe, and Hedicrone. Right of John de ffilethe, who, for the 
admission, grants to aforesaid John Elys and Alice and to his heirs 
by her ; but if none, then after the deaths of John and Alice to 
remain to the right heirs of said John Elys. 

129. At Westminster, Morrow of the Purification of B. Virgin 
A 5 — Betw. Henry de Douorr', of Westgate next Canterbury, 
ffullere, pit., and Henry, son of Robert atte Gayole, and Alice his 
wife, defts., of 1 mess., and 2 acr. land, with appurts., in Canterbury. 
The deforciants admit it to be the Right of Henry de D., and 
Henry son of Robert, for himself and his heirs, grants to Henry 
de D. and to his heirs, for which concession the deforciants receive 
10 marks. 

130. At Westminster, Morrow of the Pui-ification of B. Virgin 
A 5 — Betw. Thomas de Sandwico, knt., and Lucia his wife, pits., 
and Stephen de Grauesende, Bishop of London, deft., of the Manor 
of fflete next Saudwich, with appurts. Right of the Bishop, who, 
for the admission, grants to Thomas and Lucia, and to the heirs 
of Thomas. 

Endorsed : — " Nicholas, son of Thomas de Sandwyco, asserts 
his claim." 

131. At Westminster, Octave of the Purification of B. Virgin 
A 5 — Betw. William le ffrensshe, of Canterbury, pit., and John 
Lamb, of [? Stan]denne, and Clemencia his wife, defts., of 1 mess., 
and 10 acr. land, with appurts., in the suburbs of Canterbury. 
John and Clemencia admit it to be Right of William ; and, for them- 
selves and the heirs of Clemencia, grant to him and to his heirs, and 
receive 20 marks for the concession. 

132. At Westminster, Octave of the Purification of B. Virgin 
A 5 — Betw. John le Melewere, of Maydenstane, pit., and 
Stephen atte Berne, of Maydenstane, and Johanna his wife, defts., 
of 1 mess., with appurts., in Maydenstane. Stepheu and Johanna 
admit it to be the Right of John ; aud, for themselves and the heirs 
of Johanna, grant to him and to his heirs, and receive 10 marks for 
the concession. 

133. At Westminster, Morrow of the Purification of B. Virgin 
A 5 — Betw. Matilda, who was the wife of Bertinus de Welmestou', 
pit., and Roger Barbour and Alice his wife, and Henry de Douorr' 
and Emma his wife, defts., of 1 mess., and 6| acr. land, with 
appurts., in Elmerston', Stormouthe, and Preston' next Wyngeham. 
The deforciants admit it to be the Right of Matilda ; and, for them- 
selves and the heirs of Alice and Emma, grant to Matilda and to her 
heirs, and receive 20 marks for the concession. 

134. At Westminster, Octave of the Purification of B. Virgin 
A 5 — Betw. William de Dustentone, pit., and Henry de Chileham 
and Johanna his wife, defts., of 1 mess., with appurts., in Canter- 
bury. Henry and Johanna admit it to be the Rigbt of William ; 
and, for themselves and the heirs of Johanna, grant to him and to 
his heirs, and receive 20 marks for the concession. 



168 KENT FINES, TEMP. EDWARD JIT. 

135. At West minster, Octave of St. Hilary A 5 — Betw. John 
<lc Sandhurst and Katerina Ins wife, and William de Langele and 
Cristina his wife, pits., and Roger de Langedon' and John de 
Walsliam, defts., of the Manor of Knolton', with appurta. Right of 
Roger; for which admission the deforciants grant to the plaintiffs 
and to the heirs of William by Cristina; but it' none, then after 
the deaths of the plaintiffs to remain to the righl heirs of Katerina. 

136. At Westminster, Quinzaineof Master A 5 — Betw. William 
le Vans, pit., and Robert Grym and Albina his wife, defts., of 
4 mess., 22 acr. land, and 4 acr. and 1 rood of wood, with appurts., 
in Maydenstan. Robert and Albina admit it to be the Right of 
William ; and, for themselves and the heirs of Albina, grant to him 
and to his heirs, and receive 20 marks for the concession. 

137. At Westminster, Quinzaine of Easter A 5 — Betw. John 
Marberer and Benedicta his wife,pZfa., and Robert, son of William de 
Valoignes, and Margeria his wife, defts., of 1 toft, and 7^ acr. land, 
with appurts., in Maidestan. Robert and Margeria admit it to be 
the Right of John ; and Kobert, for himself and his heirs, grants to 
John and Benedicta and to the heirs of John. Kobert and Margeria 
receive for the concession 100s. 

138. At Westminster, Easter in three weeks A 5 — Betw. John 
Joce, of Bradeburn', and Margaret his wife (by John de Wynghain 
in place of said John), pits., and Thomas de Somersete, chaplain, 
deft., of 1 mess., 1 mill, 60 acr. land, 20 acr. pasture, and 40s. rent, 
with appurts., in Seuenok'. Thomas grants to John and Margaret 
and to his heirs by her ; but if none, then after their deaths to 
remain to John son of said John, and to the heirs of his body ; but 
if none, then after his death to remain to the right heirs of afore- 
said John Joce. 

139. At Westminster, Easter in one month A 5 — Betw. John 
de ffrenthstede and Johanna his wife (by John de Ensyng' in 
place of said John), pits., and Bartholomew Brounyng, deft., of 
1 mess., and 30 acr. land, with appurts., in Osprenge. Right of 
Bartholomew, who, for the admission, grants to John and Johanna, 
and to the heirs of John. 

140. At Westminster, Quinzaine of Easter A 5 — Betw. John 
atte Watere, of Maydenstan', pit., and Robert de Renham and 
Matilda his wife, defts., of 4 mess., 2 shops, 13^ acr. laud, and 
3s. rent, with appurts., in Maydenstan' and Boxle. Robert and 
Matilda admit it to be the Right of John ; and, for themselves and 
the heirs of Matilda, graut to him and to his heirs, and receive 
15 marks for the concession. 

141. At Westminster, Easter in one month A 5 — Betw. 
Andrew Crosse, of Westgate, pit., and Gilbert Waterbul and Agnes 
his wife, defts., of 1 mess., with appurts., in Canterbury. Gilbert 
and Agnes admit it to be the Right of Andre w r ; and, for themselves 
and the heirs of Agnes, remit and quit-claim to him and to his 
heirs, and receive for the remission, etc., 10 marks. 

142. At Westminster, Easter in one month A 5— Betw. John 
Kenewy and Alice his wife (by Bertram de Suthwerk' in place of 



KENT FINES, TEMP. EDWARD III. 169 

Alice), pits., and Robert Heyn and Cecilia his wife, defts., of 6 acr. 
land, with appurts., in West Farlegh' and Ealdyng'. Robert and 
Cecilia admit it to be the Right of Alice; and, for themselves and 
the heirs of Cecilia, grant to John and Alice and to the heirs of 
Alice, and receive 20 marks for the concession. 

143. At Westminster, Easter in one month A 5 — Betw. 
William le Yonge, of Newenton', and Cristina his wife, pits., and 
John Maghefeld', of ffauerisham, deft., of 13 acr. and 1 rood of 
land, with appurts., in ffauerisham, Osprenge, and Stone next 
ffauerisham. Right of John, who, for the admission, grants to 
William and Cristina, to have and to hold 4 acr. land, with 
appurts., in the Vill of ffauerisham, to them and to the heirs 
of William, and the whole residue of the aforesaid land with 
appurts., to them and to the heirs of Cristina. 

144. At Westminster, Easter in one month A 5 — Betw. 
Richard Buricche, pit., and Thomas le Hunte and Agnes his wife, 
defts., of 1 mess., with appurts., in the suburbs of Canterbury. 
Thomas and Agnes admit it to be the Right of Richard; and, for 
themselves and the heirs of Agues, grant to him and to his heirs, 
and receive 10 marks for the concession. 

145. At Westminster, Quinzaine of Easter A 5 — Betw. William 
de Leghe senior and Ann his wife, pits., and William de Leghe 
junior, deft., of 1 mess., 55 acr. land, and rent of 5 cocks and 40 hens, 
with appurts., in Esshe next Wyngeham. Right of William de L. 
junior, who, for the admission, grants to William de L. senior 
and Ann and to the heirs of William. 

140. At Westminster, Quinzaine of Easter A 5 — Betw. William 
le Baud' and Johanna his wife, pits., and Simon fflambard', Parson 
of the Church of Great Hadham, and John le Baud', Parson of the 
Church of Coryngham, defts., of the Manor of Horsmenden', with 
appurts. ; also of 15/. rent, and rent of 20 cocks, 100 hens, and 260 
eggs, and of a moiety of 1 mess., 2 tofts, 160 acr. land, and 16s. rent, 
wuth appurts., in Bocton Alulphi, Eastwell', Alkham, Wolurynton', 
Chilton', and Akhangre ; and of a moiety of the Manors of 
Terlyngham and Newenton', and the fourth part of the Hundred of 
ffolkestan, with appurts., and the advowsons of the Churches of the 
aforesaid Manor of Horsemenden' and Rouelyndon'. Right of 
Simon ; for which admission Simon and John grant to William and 
Johanna and to the heirs of Johanna. 

147. At Westminster, Easter in one month A 5 — Betw. John 
Hayne, of Canterbury, pit., and John, son of Peter Lambert', of 
Chaldane, and Cassandra his wife, defts., of 1 acre and 3 roods of 
land, with appurts., in the suburbs of Canterbury. John, son 
of Peter, and Cassandra admit it to be the Right of John H. ; and, 
for themselves and the heirs of Cassandra, grant to him and to his 
heirs, and receive 100s. for the concession. 

14S. At Westminster, Easter in one month A 5 — Betw. John 
Marays, of Tanynton', pit., and John atte Nelme and Alice his wife, 
defts., of 1\ acr. and 1 rood of land, with appurts., in Tanynton'. 
John atte N. and Alice admit it to be the Right of John M. ; and, 



170 KENT FINES, TEMP. EDWARD III. 

for themselves and the heirs of Alice, grant to him and to his heirs, 
and receive '_'() marks Eor the concession. 

11!). At Westminster, Easter ill three weeks A" 5 — Betw. 
Walter le Bcnere and Johanna his wife, /<//*., and John le .loeuene, 
of Hurabrichesho, and .Johanna his wife, defts., of 1 mess., 80 acr. 
land, 50 acr. marsh, and lO.v. rent, with appurts., in Chalk' and 
Shorne. Bight of Johanna wife of John; for which admission 
John and Johanna grant to Walter and Johanna his wife for their 
lives, they to render therefor every year of the first eight years 
a rose at the Nativity of St. John Baptist, and every succeeding 
year 201. After their deaths to revert to John and Johanna his 
wife and to the heirs of Johanna, quit of heirs of Walter and 
Johanna his wife. 

150. At Westminster, Quinzaine of the Holy Trinity A 5 — 
Betw. John de Welmeston', pit., and Gilbert de Brenle and 
Cristina his wife, defts., of 28 acr. land, and the third part of 
1 mess, and 6s. rent, with appurts., in Wengham. Gilbert and 
Cristina admit it to be the Bight of John ; and, for themselves and 
the heirs of Cristina, grant to John and to his heirs, and receive 
40 marks for the concession. 

151. At Westminster, Quinzaine of the Holy Trinity A 5 — 
Betw. Gilbert de Brenle and Cristina his wife, pits., and Bobert 
Broun, of Sandwich, deft., of 1 mess., and 28 acr. land, with 
appurts., in Bokton' under le Blen. Bight of Bobert, who, for the 
admission, grants to Gilbert and Cristina and to the heirs of 
Gilbert. 

152. At Westminster, Quinzaine of the Holy Trinity A 5 — 
Betw. John de Apeldrefelde and Johanna his wife, pits., and Simon 
atte Woghelete, deft., of 1 mess., 56 acr. land, 333 acr. pasture, 
1 acr. wood, and 15s. rent., with appurts., in Tonge and Elmele. 
Bight of Simon, who, for the admission, grants to John and Johanna 
and to his heirs by her ; but if none, then after their deaths to 
remain to the right heirs of John. 

Endorsed : — " Henry de Apuldrefelde, and Thomas and William 
brothers of the said Henry, assert their claim." 

153. At Westminster, Quinzaine of the Holy Trinity A 5 — 
Betw. William, son of William de Deen senior, pit., and Eichard de 
Bromfelde and Johanna his wife, defts., of 1 mess., 42 acr. land, 
10 acr. wood, 2s. Gd. rent, and rent of 1 cock, with appurts., in Est 
Mallyngg'. Bichard and Johanna admit it to be the Bight of 
William ; and Bichard, for himself and his heirs, grants to William 
and to his heirs ; for which concession Bichard and Johanna receive 
100 marks. 

154. At Westminster, Quinzaine of the Holy Trinity A 5 — 
Betw. William de Dungesell' and Leticiahis wife,^>/£s., and Geoffrey 
le Tayllour, of Chalneloke, and Agnes his wife, defts., of 13 acr. 
land, a moiety of 1 acre of wood, and a third part of 1 mess., with 
appurts., in Wornesell' and Milstede. Geoffrey and Agnes, for 
themselves and the heirs of Geoffrey, grant to William and Leticia 
and to his heirs by her; but if none, then after their deaths to 



KENT FINES, TEMP. EDWARD III. 171 

remain to the right heirs of William. Geoffrey and Agnes receive 
20 marks for the concession. 

155. At Westminster, Quinzaine of the Holy Trinity A 5 — 
Betw. Richard Duble, pit., and John Rundale and Matilda his wife, 
defts., of 3 acr. land, with appurts., in Northflete. John and Matilda 
admit it to be the Right of Richard ; and John, for himself and his 
heirs, grants to Richard and to his heirs ; lor which concession John 
and Matilda receive 100s. 

156. At Westminster, Qninzaiue of the Holy Trinity A 5 — 
Betw. Thomas de Aldham, of Strode, and Katherine his wife, pits., 
and Stephen Poteman, of Shorne, and Alice his wife, defts., of 
1 mess., with appurts., in Strode. Stephen and Alice admit it to he 
the Right of Thomas ; and, for themselves and the heirs of Alice, 
grant to Thomas and Katherine and to the heirs of Thomas, and 
receive 100s. for the concession. 

157. At Westminster, Octave of St. John Baptist A 5 — Betw. 
William atte House and Celestria his wife (by John de Wyngham 
in place of Celestria), pits., and Thomas de Ooseburne, deft., of 
1 mess., and 60 acr. land, with appurts., in Old Romeneye and the 
Villa of St. Clement and St. Martin. Right of Thomas, who, for 
the admission, grants (by service of a rose at the Nativity of 
St. John Baptist) to William and Celestria for their lives. After 
their deaths to revert to Thomas and to his heirs, quit of the heirs 
of William and Celestria. 

158. At Westminster, Quinzaine of the Holy Trinity A 5 — 
Betw. Edmund de Sancto Leodegario and Isabella his wife, pits., 
and John de Egeryndenn', chaplain, deft., of 1 mess., 100 acr. land, 
25 acr. pasture, and 8s. rent., with appurts., in Woden [esjberghe. 
Right of John, who, for the admission, grants to Edmund and 
Isabella for their lives, with remainder after their deaths to Thomas 
son of said Edmund, and to the heirs of his body ; but if none, then 
after the death of Thomas to remain to John his brother, and to the 
heirs of his body ; but if none, then after the death of John to 
remain to Henry his brother, and to the heirs of his body ; but if 
none, then after the death of Henry to remain to the right heirs of 
aforesaid Edmund. 

159. At Westminster, Octave of the Holy Trinity A 5 — Betw. 
William, son of Thomas de Welde, pit., and John de Tetlyngbery 
and Johanna his wife, defts., of 1 mess., 17^ acr. land, 2| acr. wood, 
5s. rent, and rent of 8 cocks and 40 eggs, with appurts., in Teudele. 
John and Johanna admit it to be the Right of William ; and John, 
for himself and his heirs, grants to William and to his heirs ; for 
which concession John and Johanna receive 20 marks. 

160. At Westminster, Octave of the Holy Trinity A 5 — Betw. 
John de Ifeld', pit., and William, son of Anselmus atte Ware, and 
Matilda his wife, defts., of 32 acr. land, with appurts., in " Villa 
Pontis Edulmi " [Edenbridge]. William and Matilda admit it to be 
the Right of John ; and, for themselves and the heirs of Matilda, 
grant to him and to his heirs, and receive 10 marks for the concession. 

161. At Westminster, Quinzaine of the Holy Trinity A 5 — 



172 KENT FINES, TEMP. EDWARD til. 

Betw. Robert Grym, pit., and Laurence le Wodour and Sara his 
wife, defts. ,oi 1 mess., and a moiety of 1 acre of land, with appurts., 
in Maidenstan and Bozle. Laurence and Sara admit it to Ik- the 
Right of Robert ; ami, for themselves and the heirs of Sara, granl 
to him and to his heirs, and receive I0().\\ for the concession. 

102. At Westminster, Morrow of St. John Baptist A 5 — Betw. 
John le Harbour, of Wrotham, pit., and John de Hanyton' and 
Margeria liis wife, defts., of 2 mess., and 3 acr. land, with appurts., 
in Wrotham. John de II. and Margeria admit it to be the Rigbl 
of John le B. ; and, for themselves and the heirs of Margeria, grant 
to him and to his heirs, and receive 20 marks for the concession. 

103. At Westminster, Quinzaine of St. John Baptist A 5 — 
Betw. William, son of William de Brampton', and Custancia, 
daughter of Peter Bard', pits., and Peter Bard', of Sandwich, cleft., 
of the Manor of Crongebury, with appurts., and 2 mess., 170 acr. 
land, 3 acr. meadow, 20 acr. pasture, 42 acr. wood, 13/. 3s. 4td. rent, 
and rent of 25 hens and 180 eggs, with appurts., in Detlyng' next 
Meidestan'. Bight of Peter, who, for the admission, grants to 
William and Custancia and to the heirs of William. 

104. At Westminster, Quinzaine of St. Michael A 5 — Betw. 
Richard, son of John Cericeaus, pit., and John de Sudbury and 
Johanna his wife, defts., of the Manor of Halwele, with appurts. 
Right of Richard, who, for the admission, for himself and his heirs, 
grants to John and Johanna during the life of Johanna an annuity 
of 20 marks, with liberty to distrain should the same be at any time 
in arrear. After the death of Johanna, Richard and his heirs to be 
quit of payment of said annuity. 

105. At Westminster, St. Michael in three weeks A 5 — Betw. 
William de Monte Acuto and Katherine his wife pits., and William 
Vaghan and Johanna his wife, Walter Heryng' and Margaret his 
wife, and John Chicche and Katherine his wife, defts., of 1 mess., 
1 mill, 300 acr. land, 20 acr. meadow, 00 acr. pasture, 40 acr. wood, 
and 20s. Sd. rent, with appurts., in Leuesham and Westgrenewich'. 
The deforciants admit it to be the Right of William de Monte 
Acuto, and render the same to him and Katherine his wife, to 
hold to them and to his heirs. The deforciants receive for the con- 
cession 100 marks. 

100. At Westminster, Morrow of Souls A 5 — Betw. John, 
son of John de Hope, and Isabella his wife (by Walter ffissh' in 
place of Isabella), pits., and John Wallere, deft., of 50 acr. land, 
45 acr. meadow, and 71. rent, with appurts., in Lyde, Hope, and 
Demechirche. Right of John W., who, for the admission, grants 
to John, son of John, and Isabella, and to his heirs by her; but if 
none, then after their deaths to remain to the right heirs of John 
son of John. 

107. At Westminster, Octave of St. Michael A 5— Betw. 
Richard de Nouo castro, pit., and Thomas Colkyn and Alina his 
wife, defts., of pasturage for 100 sheep, with appurts., in Wycham 
Brewose. Thomas and Alina admit it to be the Right of Richard; 



KENT FINES, TEMP. EDWARD III. 171 

and, for themselves and the heirs of Alina, grant to him and to his 
heirs, and receive 100s. for the concession. 

168. At Westminster, Octave of St. Michael A° 5— Betw. 
William de Clynton' and Juliana his wife, pits., and Henry de 
Leybourn', deft., of the Manor of Elham, and a moiety of the Manor 
of Godwynston', with appurts. Eight of Henry, who, for the 
admission, grants to William and Juliana, namely the Manor to 
them and to the heirs of Juliana, and the moiety to them and to 
the heirs of William. 

1G9. At Westminster, Morrow of St. Martin A 5 — Betw. John 
de Derby and Cristina his wife, pits., and John atte Mersshe, deft., 
of 1 mess., 1^ acr. land, and rent of 6 bushels of barley, with 
appurts., in Kenyntone. Eight of John atte M., who, for the 
admission, for himself and his heirs, grants to John de D. and 
Cristina and to his heirs by her ; but if none, then after their 
deaths to remain to the right heirs of said John de D. 

170. At Westminster, Octave of St. Martin A 5— Betw. 
William Pypel, of Petham, pit., and John, son of John Pypel, 
of Godmersham, and Cecilia his wife, deffs., of 10^ acr. land, with 
appurts., in Petham. John and Cecilia admit it to be the Eight of 
William ; and, for themselves and the heirs of Cecilia, grant to him 
and to his heirs, and receive 20 marks for the concession. 

171. At Westminster, Quinzaine of St. Martin A 5 — Betw. 
William de Cheny and Margeria his wife, pits., and Hugh de 
Dunham, chaplain, and Thomas Pynke, defts., of 5 mess., 400 acr. 
land, 30 acr. wood, 100s. rent, and rent of 30 quarters of barley, 
3 cocks, 40 hens, and 1000 eggs, with appurts., in Dodynton', 
Lyndestede, Kyngesdoune, Newenham, Tenham, and Osprenge. 
Eight of Hugh ; for which admission Hugh and Thomas grant to 
William and Margeria and to the heirs of William. 

172. At Westminster, Octave of St. Michael A 5— Betw. 
Eoger ffraunceys and Constance his wife, pits., and Osbert de 
Swanton', of Bradegare, deft., of 20 J acr. land, and a moiety of 
1 mess., with appurts., in Bradegare. Osbert, for himself and his 
heirs, grants to Eoger and Constance and to the heirs of the body 
of Constance ; but if none, then after their deaths to remain to 
Margeria sister of said Constance, and to her heirs. Osbert 
receives for the concession 20 marks. 

173. At Westminster, Octave of St. Michael A 5— Betw. 
Laurence de Strutton' and Margeria his wife, pits., and Osbert de 
Swanton', of Bradegare, deft., of 23^ acr. land, and a moiety oi 
1 mess., with appurts., in Bradegare. Osbert, for himself and his 
heirs, grants to Laurence and Margeria and to the heirs of the body 
of Margeria ; but if none, then after their deaths to remain to 
Constance sister of said Margeria, and to her heirs. Osbert receives 
for the concession 20 marks. 

174. At Westminster, Octave of St. Martin A 5 (Post Pine made 
at York in the Quinzaine of the Holy Trinity A 2) — Betw. Michael, 
son of Michael de Ponyng', pit., and Master Thomas de Northwode, 
deft., of a rent of 9 quarters of barley, with appurts., in Tenham, 



174 KENT FINES, TEMP. EDWAKD III. 

which Agues, who was the wife of John de Northwode, holds for 
her life. Master Thomas admits it to be the Etighl of Michael; 
and, Eor himself and his heirs, grants that the aforesaid rent, with 
appurts., which Agnes holds for her life of the demise of said 
Master Thomas, and which after her death to him and to his heirs 
reverts, shall after her deatli remain to Michael and to his heirs. 
Master Thomas receives 10 marks for the concession. 

175. At Westminster, Octave of St. Martin A 5 — Betw. 
Thomas de Hoke, of Canterbury, pU., and John, son of Walter le 
Chaloner, of Westgate, and Juliana his wife, defts., of a moiety 
of 1 mess., with appurts., in the suburbs of Canterbury. John and 
Juliana admit it to be the Eight of Thomas ; and, for themselves 
and the heirs of Juliana, grant to him and to his heirs, and receive 
10 marks for the concession. 

176. At Westminster, Morrow of Souls A 5 — Betw. Eichard, 
son of Simon Wyngold', and Alice his wife, pits., and Eichard Hegg', 
deft., of 1 mess., and 6 acr. land, with appurts., in Northflete. 
Eight of Eichard II., who, for the admission, grants to Eichard, 
son of Simon, and Alice, and to his heirs by her; but if none, 
then after their deaths to remain to the right heirs of Eichard, son 
of Simon. 

177. At Westminster, Octave of St. Michael A 5— Betw. John 
Sharnale, pit., and John Mounte and Margeria his wife, defts., of 
1 mess., and 1 garden, with appurts., in West Mallyng'. John M. 
and Margeria admit it to be the Eight of John 8., and, for them- 
selves and the heirs of Margeria, grant to him and to his heirs, and 
receive 10 marks for the concession. 

178. At Westminster, Octave of St. Martin A 5— Betw. 
William de Eeculure and Mary his wife, pits., and Michael de 
Heure and Katherine his wife, defts., of rent of 18 bushels of oats, 
3 cocks, 18 hens, 240 eggs, and 1 ploughshare, and a moiety of 
100 acr. land, 25 acr. wood, and 30s. rent, with appurts., in Nether- 
hardres. Michael and Katherine admit it to be the Eight of 
William ; and, for themselves and the heirs of Katherine, remit and 
quit-claim to William and Mary and to the heirs of William, and 
receive for the remission, etc., 100 marks. 

179. At Westminster, Morrow of Souls A 5 — Betw. Thomas, 
son of Eobert Dod, of ffauersham, and Johanna his wife (by John 
le fitz Thomas in place of Johanna), pits., and John, son of William 
Bullyng', and Alice his wife, defts., of 1 mess., and 12 acr. land, 
with appurts., in Sesaltre and Whitstaple. John and Alice admit 
it to be the Eight of Thomas ; and, for themselves and the heirs of 
Alice, grant to Thomas and Johanna and to the heirs of Thomas, 
and receive 20 marks for the concession. 

180. At Westminster, Morrow of Souls A 5 — Betw. Eobert, 
son of Peter le Botiller, of Blechyngleye, and Margeria his wife pits., 
and Eobert de Stangraue, Chyualer, and Johanna his wife defts., of 
1 mess., 42 acr. and 1^ roods of land, and 1 acr. wood, with 
appurts., in Seintemarycraye. Eobert de S. and Johanna admit it 
to be the Eight of Eobert son of Peter ; and grant to him and 



KENT FINES, TEMP. EDWAED III. 175 

Margeria aud to the heirs of his body ; but if none, then after their 
deaths to remain to Hugh de Audele and to his heirs. Eobertde S. 
and Johanna receive 100 marks for the concession. 

181. At Westminster, Octave of St. Michael A 5— Betw. 
Walter Chitecroft' and Margeria his wife, pits., and Thomas, son of 
Ralph Jud', deft., of 1 mess., 28 acr. land, aud 4 acr. wood, with 
appurts., in Pepyngbery. Right of Thomas, who, for the admission, 
grants to Walter and Margeria for their lives, with remainder after 
their deaths to Roger, son of said Walter, and Thomas his brother, 
and to the heirs of said Roger. 

182. At Westminster, Octave of St. Michael A 5— Betw. 
Thomas Godwot, pit., and Ralph Godwot and Alice his wife, defts., 
of 1 mess., and 10 acr. land, with appurts., in Borden' and 
Newenton'. Ralph and Alice admit it to be the Right of Thomas ; 
and, for themselves and the heirs of Alice, grant to him and to his 
heirs, and receive 20 marks for the concession. 

183. At Westminster, Octave of St. Michael A 5 — Betw. John 
de Elham, pit., and William Jolif, of Canterbury, and Johanna his 
wife, defts., of 1 mess., with appurts., in Canterbury. William and 
Johanna admit it to be the Right of John ; and, for themselves and 
the heirs of Johanna, grant to him and to his heirs, and receive 
100s. for the concession. 

184. At Westminster, Octave of St. Michael A 5 — Betw. 
Thomas, son of Walter Chitecroft', and Roger brother of said 
Thomas, pits., and Walter Chitecroft' aud Margeria his wife, defts., 
of 15 acr. land, and 1 acr. pasture, with appurts., in Pepyngbery. 
Walter and Margeria admit it to be the Right of Roger ; and, for 
themselves and the heirs of Margeria, grant to Thomas and Roger 
and to the heirs of Roger, and receive 20 marks for the concession. 

185. At Westminster, Octave of St. Michael A 5 — Betw. John, 
son of Letardus de Been, of Suthflete, pit., and John Brounyng', of 
Suthflete, and Sabina his wife, defts., of 1 mess., and 9 acr. land, 
with appurts., in Suthflete and Stone. John B. and Sabina admit 
it to be the Right of John son of Letardus ; and, for themselves 
and the heirs of Sabina, remit and quit-claim to him and to his 
heirs, and receive for the remission, etc., 101. 

186. At Westminster, Octave of St. Hilary A 5 (Post Fine 
made on the Morrow of Souls A 5) — Betw. Richard Colyns and 
Johanna his wife, pits., and John de Berners and Lora his wife, 
defts., of 1 toft, 9 acr. land, and 1 acr. wood, with appurts., in 
Otteham. John and Lora admit it to be the Right of Richard, as 
that which he and Johanna have of their gift, to hold to them 
aud to the heirs of Richard. John and Lora receive 20 marks for 
the concession. 

187. At Westminster, Octave of St. Hilary A 5 (Post Pine 
made in the Quiuzaine of St. Martin A 5) — Betw. John atte 
Watere,of Maydenestan',^., and Dionisia Heued',of Maydenestan', 
deft., of 2 mess., 5 shops, 12 acr. land, and 3s. rent., with appurts., 
in Maydenestan'. Dionisia admits it to be the Right of John ; and 
for herself and her heirs grants that 1 mess., shops, land, and rent, 



17(5 KENT FINES, TEMP. EDWARD II* 

with appurts., which Richard Baroun, chaplain, holds for his life, 
and also thai 1 mess., with appurts., which William Rage and 
Agatha hia wife hold Eor their lives of the inheritance of Dionisia 

in tlu' aforesaid Vill, and which after the deaths of Richard, and 
William and Agatha to her and to her heirs revert, shall alter their 
deaths remain to John and to his heirs. DlOnisifl receives for the 
concession 20 marks. This agreement was made in the presence of 
Richard, who thereupon acknowledged Ins fealty to John. 

188. At Westminster, Morrow of the Purification of B. Virgin 
A G (Post Fine made three weeks after St. Michael A 5) — Betw. 
Walter de Trendhust', of Eldyng', and Dionisia his wife (by John 
de Wyngham in their stead), plts. f and Richard atte Holdene, of 
Eldyng', and Matilda his wife, (lefts., of 16 acr. land, with appurts., 
in Eldyng'. Richard and Matilda admit it to be the Right of 
Walter ; and Richard, for himself and his heirs, grants to Walter 
and Dionisia and to the heirs of Walter, for which concession 
Richard and Matilda receive 20 marks. 

189. At Westminster, Octave of the Purification of B. Virgin 
A 6 (Post Fine made one month after St. Michael A 5) — Betw. 
Edmund de ffeyrefeld' and ffelieia his wife, pits., and William 
Friland', of Newecherche, deft., of 1 mess., 15 acr. land, and 7s. Gel. 
rent, with appurts., in Newecherch[e]. Bight of William, who, 
for the admission, grants to Edmund and ffelieia and to the heirs 
of Edmund. 

190. At Westminster, Quinzaine of St. Hilary A° G (Post Fine 
made in Octave of St. Martin A 5) — Betw. John Peny, of Esshe, 
and Amabilla bis wife (by John de Wyngham in place of Amabilla), 
pits., and John ffrig' and Johanna his wife, defts., of 1 mess., 6 acr. 
and 1 rood of land, with appurts., in Preston' next Wyngham. 
John ff. and Johanna admit it to be the Right of John P. ; and, 
for themselves and the heirs of Johanna, grant to John P. and 
Amabilla and to his heirs, and receive 20 marks for the concession. 

191. At Westminster, Morrow of the Purification of B. Virgin 
(Post Fine made in Quinzaine of St. Martin A 5) — Betw. James, 
son of Simon de Grilingham, pit., and Robert le Bettliscumbe and 
Cristina his wife, clefts., of 1 mess., 90 acr. land, 2 acr. meadow, 
20 acr. pasture, 1^ acr. wood, 90 acr. marsh, 12s. rent, and rent of 
8^ teal (" cercellorum ") and 2 hens, with appurts., in Gilingham. 
Robert and Cristina admit it to be the Right of James ; and, for 
themselves and the heirs of Cristina, grant to him and to his heirs, 
and receive 40Z. for the concession. 

192. At Westminster, Quinzaine of St. Hilary A 6 (Post Fine 
made in the Quinzaine of St. Martin A 5) — Betw. William le 
Vaus, of Maydenstane, pit., and Thomas, son of John le Clerk', of 
Tofeld', and Anastasia his wife, defts., of 1 toft, and 11 acr. land, 
with appurts., in Maidenstane. Thomas and Anastasia admit it to 
be the Right of William ; and, for themselves and the heirs of 
Anastasia, grant to him and to his heirs, and receive 10 marks for 
the concession. 

193. At Westminster, Quinzaine of St. Hilary A 6 (Post Fine 



KENT FIN T ES, TEMP. EDWARD III. 177 

made in the Octave of St. Martin A 5)— Betw. William Colier, of 
Sydynbourne, Barber, pit., and John Turnepet' junior and Matilda 
his wife, defts., of 2^ acr. land, with appurts., in Sydynbourne. John 
and Matilda admit it to be the Bight of William ; and, for themselves 
and the heirs of Matilda, grant to him and to his heirs, and receive 
100s. for the concession. 

191. At Westminster, Quinzaine of St. Hilary A 6 (Bost Fine 
made in the Quinzaine of St. Martin A 5) — Betw. Bichard Hamon, 
of Borden', pit., and Thomas Heniw, of Hallestowe, and Johanna 
his wife, clefts., of 1 acr. and 1 rood of land in Borden'. Thomas 
and Johanna admit it to be the Bight of Bichard ; and, for them- 
selves and the heirs of Johanna, grant to him and to his heirs, and 
receive 100s. for the concession. 

195. At Westminster, Quinzaine of St. Hilary A 6 (Bost Bine 
made in the Quinzaine of St. Martin A 5) — Betw. John le Taillour. 
of Bordene, pit., and Thomas Henry, of Hallestowe, and Johanna 
his wife, (lefts., of 1 acr. land, with appurts., in Borden'. Thomas 
and Johanna admit it to be the Bight of John ; and, for themselves 
and the heirs of Johanna, grant to him and to his heirs, and receive 
30s. for the concession. 

19G. At Westminster, Quinzaine of St. Hilary A 6 (Bost Bine 
made on the Morrow of St. Martin A 5)— Betw. Henry de 
Bettenham and Uionisia his wife (by William de Drax in place 
of Dionisia),^//s., and Thomas de Askelby, Parson of the Church of 
ffrythynden', deft., of 1 mess., 105 acr. land, and 6s. rent, with 
appurts., in ffrythynden' and Hedecrone. Bight of Thomas, who, 
for the admission, grants to Henry and Dionisia, and to the heirs 
of Henry. 

197. At Westminster, Morrow of the Burification of B. Virgin 
A G (Bost Fine made in the Octave of St. Martin A 5)— Betw. 
William ff reynshe, pit., and John ffreynshe and Sara his wife, defts., 
of 1 mess., with appurts., in the suburbs of Canterbury. John and 
Sara admit it to be the right of William ; and, for themselves and 
the heirs of Sara, grant to him and to his heirs, and receive 10 marks 
for the concession. 

198. At Westminster, Octave of St. Hilary A 6— Betw. John 
de Bordeneshalle and Katherine his wife, pits., and Idonia, who 
was the wife of Philip de Bordeneshalle, deft., of 50 acr. land, 8 acr. 
wood, 20s. rent, rent of 2 geese, 16 hens, and 100 eggs, and a 
moiety of 1 mess., with appurts., in Bordene, Sutton' Valence, 
and Newenton' next Bordene. Idonia admits it to be the Bight 
of John ; and, for herself and her heirs, grants to John and 
Katherine, and to the heirs of John, and receives 100 marks for 
the concession. 

199. At Westminster, Quinzaine of St. Hilary A 6— Betw. 
Bobert de Ely and Alice his wife, pits., and William de Elsyngg', 
deft., of 1 mess., 200 acr. land, 30 acr. pasture, 30 acr. wood, and 
21s. rent, with appurts., in Blumstede, Wolwych', Lesenes, and 
Wycham. Bight of William, who, for the admission, grants to 
Bobert and Alice and to the heirs of Bobert. 

vol. xx. n 



178 RENT JINKS, TEMP. EDWARD III. 

200. At Westminster, Morrow of the Purification of B. Virgin 
A 6 — Betw. G-eruasius Alard' and Agnes his wife (by William 
kriicwY iii place of Agnes), pits., and James de Cobham, deft., of 
1 mess., L25 acr. land, and 81. L3s. 4<7. rent, with appurts., in 
Snergate, IuechRrch'], Broklond', Middele, Vayrfeld', and Ealdero- 
mene, and of the advowson of the Hospital of 8S. Stephen and 
Thomas the Martyrs, for lepers, of Romene. Right of .lames, who, 
for the admission, grants to Geruasius and Agnes and to his heirs 
by her ; bu1 if none, then after their deaths to remain to the right 
heirs of Geruasius. 

201. At Westminter, Easter in one month A" (Post Fine 
made in the Octave of the Purification of B. Virgin A" (5) — Betw. 
William de Cheny, Chyualer, and Margeria his wife, pits., and Hugh 
de Dunham, chaplain, and Thomas Py|_nk], deft*., of 200 acr. land, 
20s rent, and rent of 10 quarters of barley and 20 hens, with 
appurts., in Norton 1 , Bakechild', Tonge, and Hodmersham. Bight 
of Hugh ; for which admission Hugh and Thomas grant to William 
and Margeria and to the heirs of William. 

202. At Westminster, Easter in five weeks A 6 (Post Fine 
made in the Octave of the Purification of B. Virgin A 6) — Betw. 
John Rolf, of Maydenstan', and Johanna his wife, pits., and Ralph 
de Maydenstan', Bakere, and Johanna his wife, clefts., of 1 mess., 
1 acr. and 3 roods of land, with appurts., in Maydenstan'. Ralph 
and Johanna his wife admit it to be the Right of John ; and Ralph, 
for himself and his heirs, grants to John and Johanna his wife and 
to the heirs of John ; for which concession Ralph and Johanna his 
wife receive 10 marks. 

203. At Westminster, Quinzaine of Easter A 6 (Post Fine 
made in the Octave of St. Hilary A° 5) — Betw. "William de Pende, 
of Holyngburn', and Lucia, daughter of John de Bettenham (by 
AV r illiam de Langele guardian of Lucia), pits., and John de 
Bettenham, deft., of 5 mess., 260 acr. land, 150 acr. pasture, 30 acr. 
wood, 42s. rent, and rent of 17 hens and 35 eggs, with appurts., in 
Holyngburn' and i.edes. Right of John, who, for the admission, 
grants (by service of a rose at the Nativity of St. John Baptist) to 
William and Lucia and to his heirs by her; but if none, then after 
their deaths to revert to John and to his heirs, quit of other heirs of 
William and Lucia. 

204. At Westminster, Easter in one month A G (Post Fine 
made in the Octave of the Purification of B. Virgin A 6) — Betw. 
Daniel de Tilmanstou', pit., and Richard ffrend' and Alice his wife, 
clefts., of 1 mess., and Q\ acr. land, with appurts., in Chistelet'. 
Right of Daniel, who, for the admission, grants to Richard and 
Alice and to his heirs by her ; but if none, then after their 
deaths to remain to Agnes daughter of the aforesaid Daniel, and 
to her heirs. 

205. At Westminster, Easter in five weeks A G (Post Fine 
made in the Octave of the Purification of B. Virgin A 6) — Betw. 
William de Cheny, Chyualer, and Margeria his wife, pits., and Hugh 
de Dunham, chaplain, and Thomas de Dakenham, defts., of the 



KENT TINES, TEMP. EDWARD II I. 179 

Manor of Shyrlande, with appurts., and 1 mill, 410 aer. land, 
10 acr. meadow, 700 aer. marsh, 10/. rent, and rent of 8 quarters of 
wheat, 40 quarters of barley, 10 quarters of oats, 150 cocks, 200 
hens, and 2000 eggs, with appurts., in Eastchirche, Menstre, 
Leysdon 1 , and Wardon' in the Isle of Shepeye. Right of Hugh ; 
for which admission Hugh and Thomas grant to William and 
Margeria and to the heirs of William. 

206. At Westminster, Easter in one month A 6 (Post Fine 
made in the Octave of the Purification of B. Virgin A 6) — Betw. 
Ralph de Pecchyngg', of Vlcumbe, chaplain, pit., and Bartholomew 
de iSancto Leodegario, deft., of the Manor of Vlcumbe, with appurts. 
Right of Ralph, who, for the admission, grants to Bartholomew for 
his life, with remainder after his death to Ralph de Sancto 
Leodegario and Johanna his wife and to his heirs by her; but 
if none, then after their deaths to remain to the right heirs of 
aforesaid Bartholomew. 

207. At Westminster, Quinzaine of Easter A 6 (Post Fine 
made in the Octave of St. Hilary A 5) — Betw. Alice, who was the 
wife of John Kenewy, pit., and John Kenewy and Margeria his 
wife, defts., of 38 acr. land, 1 acr. wood, 6s. Sd. rent, and a moiety 
of 1 mess., with appurts., in Eghteham. John and Margeria admit 
it to be the Right of Alice ; and, for themselves and the heirs 
of Margeria, grant to her and to her heirs, and receive 60 marks 
for the concession. 

208. At Westminster, Easter in three weeks A 6 (Post Fine 
made in the Quinzaine of St. Hilary A 6) — Betw. Hamo Courte- 
hosse and Alianora his wife (by John de Ensyngg' in place of 
Alianora), pits., and John de iflekkene and Katherine his wife, 
defts., of a moiety of 1 mess., 69 acr. land, 11 acr. wood, 60s. rent, 
and rent of 20 hens and 200 eggs, with appurts., in Lindestede, 
Tenham, Dodyngton', and Wychelyng. John and Katherine, for 
themselves and the heirs of Katherine, grant to Hamo and 
Alianora and to his heirs by her; but if none, then after their 
deaths to remain to the right heirs of Hamo. John and Katherine 
receive 100 marks for the concession. 

Endorsed : — " John Barry asserts his claim." 

209. At Westminster, Easter in one mouth A 6 (Post Fine 
made in the Octave of the Purification of B. Virgin A 6)— Betw. 
Thomas de Elmestede, pit., and Gilbert Coupere, of Canterbury, and 
Isabella his wife, defts., of 1 mess., with appurts., in Canterbury. 
Gilbert and Isabella admit it to be the Right of Thomas ; and, for 
themselves and the heirs of Isabella, grant to Thomas and to his 
heirs, and receive 10 marks for the concession. 

210. At Westminster, Octave of St. John Baptist A 6— Betw. 
William Claptus, pit., and Robert de Kelleseye, of London, deft., of 
1 mess., and 1 toft, with appurts, in Dertford', which Lucia, who 
was the wife of William ffouwys, holds for her life. Robert admits 
it to be the Right of William ; and, for himself and his heirs, 
grants that the aforesaid tenements which Lucia holds for her life 
of the inheritance of Robert, and which after her death to him and 

n 2 



ISO CENT FINKS, TEMP. EDWARD til. 

to his heirs revert, shall after her death remain to "William and to 
his heirs. Robert receives LOQs. for the concession. This agree- 
menl was made in the presence of Lucia, who thereupon acknow- 
ledged her feall \ to William. 

211. At Westminster, Octave of St. John Baptist A" 6 (Post 
Fine made on the Morrow of the Ascension of the I .«»r<l A. 6) 
Betw. Roger do Shirburn', pit., and Philip de Qrreby deft., of 
1 mess., 1 toft, 35 acr. land, 2\ acr. meadow, 3J acr. wood, and 
3d. rent, with appurts., in Penshirat, Chepsted', and Cumryg'. 
Philip admits it to be the Right of Roger; and, for himself and his 
heirs, grants to Roger and to bis heirs, and receives 30 marks fur 
the concession. 

212. At Westminster, Octave of the Holy Trinity A° G (Post 
Fine made in the Quinzaine of Easter A 6) — Betw. Thnrstan, son 
of William Uamfrey, of Heghham, and Johanna his wife, pits., and 
John de Bosegate, Vicar of the Church of Heghham, deft., of 
22 acr. land, 4 acr. and 1 rood of meadow, and 3 acr. marsh, with 
appurts., in Heghham and Merston'. Right of John, who, for the 
admission, grants to Thnrstan and Johanna and to his heirs by 
her ; but if none, then after their deaths to remain to the right 
heirs of Johanna. 

213. At Westminster, Octave of the Holy Trinity A G (Post 
Fine made in the Quinzaine of Easter A 6) — Betw. John Rudham, 
of Hierne, pit., and John le fferour and Petronilla his wife, defts., 
of 1 mess., 50 acr. land, 16 acr. marsh, with appurts., in the Parish 
of All Saints in the Isle of Thanet. John le ff. and Petronilla 
admit it to be the Right of John R. ; and, for themselves and the 
heirs of Petronilla, grant to him and to his heirs, and receive 
20 marks for the concession. 

2 14. At Westminster, Octave of the Holy Trinity A G (Post 
Fine made in the Quinzaine of Easter A 6) — Betw. John ftrere, of 
Strode, pit., and John, son of James [?de] Honebergh', and Alice 
his wife, defts., of 2 acr., with appurts., in ffrendesbury. John, son 
of James, and Alice admit it to be the Right of John ff. ; and, for 
themselves and the heirs of Alice, grant to him and to his heirs, and 
receive 40s. for the concession. 

215. At Westminster, Octave of the Holy Trinity A 6 (Post 
Fine made in the Quinzaine of Easter A G) — Betw. Thomas atte 
Newehouse, pit., and Peter de Lyngesfelde deft., of 4 acr. land 
("with appurts." omitted) in Borewaremershe next Romene. 
Peter admits it to be the Right of Thomas ; and, for himself and 
his heirs, grants to Thomas and to his heirs, and receives 10 marks 
for the concession. 

21G. At Westminster, Octave of the Holy Trinity A 6 (Post 
Fine made in the Quinzaine of Easter A 6) — Betw. Saer Bakere, 
of Strode, and Agatha his wife, pits., and Robert ffykeys, of 
Rochester, and Alice his wife, defts., of 1 mess., with appurts., in 
Strode. Robert and Alice admit it to be the Bight of Saer ; and, 
for themselves and the heirs of Alice, grant to Saer and Agatha and 
to the heirs of Saer, and receive 10 marks for the concession. 



KENT FINES, TEMP. EDWARD III. 181 

217. At Westminster, Quinzaine of St. John Baptist A° G — 
Betw. William, son of Peter de Makenhade, and Elizabeth, 
daughter of John de Maghefeld' (by John de Elsyng' in their 
stead), pits., and John de Maghefeld' and Isabella his wife, Jeffs., of 
1 mess, and 13|- acr. land, with appurts., in ffauersham. John 
and Isabella admit it to be the Eight of William ; and, for them- 
selves and the heirs of Isabella, grant to William and Elizabeth and 
to the heirs of William, and receive 20 marks for the concession. 

218. At Westminster, Quinzaine of the Holy Trinity A 6 (Post 
Eine made three weeks after Easter A 6) — Betw. John, son of 
John Bertelot', of Otteford', pit., and Walter Bety, of Oiteford', 
deft., of a moiety of 13 acr. land, and 1 acr. wood, and the moiety 
of a moiety of 1 acr. meadow, and 3s. rent, with appurts., in 
Otteford', w r hich Isabella Bertelot', of Otteford', holds for her life. 
Walter admits it to be the Eight of John ; and, for himself and his 
heirs, grants that the aforesaid moieties which Isabella holds for 
lite of the inheritance of Walter, aud which after her death to him 
and to his heirs revert, shall after her death remain to John and to 
his heirs. Walter receives 40 marks for the concession. This 
agreement w r as made in the presence of Isabella, who thereupon 
acknowledged her fealty to John. 

219. At Westminster, Octave of the Holy Trinity A G (Post 
Eine made in the Quinzaine of Easter A 6) — Betw. Robert Lapyn 
and William atte Baynore, of Cantei'bury, pits., and Thomas atte 
Gate and Cecilia his wife, clefts. , of 4 mess., 12 acr. land, and 
16s. Sd. rent, with appurts., in Canterbury, and in the suburbs of 
the said Vill. Eight of Eobert ; for which admission Eobert 
and William grant to Thomas and Cecilia and to his heirs by 
her 5 but if none, then after their deaths to remain to the right 
heirs of Thomas. 

220. At Westminster, Octave of the Holy Trinity A G (Post 
Eine made in the Quinzaine of Easter A 6) — Betw. Agnes, who 
was the wife of John son of John de Pette, of Bakechilde, pit., and 
William Hokyngionr and Johanna his wife, clefts., of 1 mess., 130 
acr. land, 2 acr. wood, 20s. rent, and rent of 5 quarters of barley, 
2 quarters and 6 bushels of salt, 2 cocks, and 18 hens, with 
appurts., in Bakechilde, Lyndestede, and Herteye. William and 
Johanna, for themselves and the heirs of Johanna, grant (by 
service of a rose at the Nativity of St. John Baptist) to Agnes for 
her life. After her death to revert to William and Johanna and to 
the heirs of Johanna, quit of the heirs of Agnes. AVilliam and 
Johanna receive for the concession 100 marks. 

221. At Westminster, Morrow of St. John Baptist A G (Post Fine 
made three weeks after Easter A G) — Betw. John de Briggeford' 
and Alice his wife, pits., and Geoffrey Joye, of Lesnes, deft., of 
1 mess., 30 acr. land, and 4 acr. meadow, with appurts., in Lesnes. 
Eight of Geoffrey, who, for the admission, grants to John and 
Alice for their lives ; with remainder after their deaths to Thomas 
son of said John for his life. And after the death of Thomas to 
remain to the right heirs of aforesaid Alice. 



182 KENT FINES, TEMP. EDWARD ITT. 

222. At Westminster, Octave of the Holy Trinity A. 6 (Posl 
Fine made in the Quinzaine of Easter A" 6)- -Betw. John le lladde 
and Johanna his wife, pits., and Robert, son of Robert le lladde, 
deft., of 1 mess., li) acr. Land, 2 acr. meadow, and 3 roods of wood, 
with appurts., in Boughtone Monchensy. Etoberl admits it to be 
the Right of John ; and, Eor himself and his heirs, grants to John 
and Johanna and to the heirs of .John, and receives lit) works for 
the concession. 

22:3. At Westminster, Octave of St. Michael A 6 (Post Fine 
made in the Octave of the Holy Trinity A° 0) — Betw. Clement de 
Tenhatn and Alianora his wife, pits., and Richard de Ehveryk' and 
.lames de Bokeland', defts., of 4 mess., 6L acr. land, GO acr. marsh, 
6s. 8d. rent, and rent of 12 hens and L cock, with appurts., in 
Tenham. Right of Richard, for which admission Richard and 
James grant to Clement and Alianora and to the heirs of Clement. 

224. At Westminster, Quinzaine of St. Michael A 6 (Post 
Fine made one month after Easter A 6) — Betw. Robert Remecorde 
and Matilda his wife, pits., and William de Pesendenne and Juliana 
his wife, (lefts., of 10 acr. land, with appurts., iu Wytryehesham. 
William and Juliana admit it to be the Right of Robert; and 
William, for himself and his heirs, grants to Robert and Matilda, 
and to the heirs of Robert. William and Juliana receive 20 marks 
for the concession. 

225. At Westminster, Octave of St. Michael A 6 (Post Fine 
made in the Octave of St. John Baptist A 6) — Betw. John de 
Bereford' and Alice his wife, pits., and Master John de Hudicote 
deft., of 2 mess., 500 acr. land, 8 acr. meadow, 300 acr. pasture, 
50 acr. wood, and 6 marks rent, with appurts., in Merdenne, 
Eldyng', Huntyngton', Stapelhurst', aud Horsmundenne. Right of 
Master John, who, for the admission, grants to John de B. and Alice 
and to the heirs of Alice. 

22G. At Westminster, Quinzaine of St. Michael A 6 (Post 
Fine made three weeks after Easter A 6) — Betw. John de Mere- 
worth' and Margeria his wife (by William de Waure senior in 
place of Margeria), pits., and Richard Whitswere and Beatrix his 
wife, and Thomas Eufemme and Alice his wife, defts., of a moiety 
of the Manor of Westpekham, with appurts. The deforciants admit 
it to be the Right of John and Margeria ; aud, for themselves and 
the heirs of Beatrix and Alice, grant to them and to their heirs, aud 
receive 100 marks for the concession. 

227. At Westminster, Octave of St. Michael A G (Post Fine 
made in the Octave of the Holy Trinity A 6) — Betw. John de 
Sandhurst' and Katherine his wife, and William de Langele and 
Cristina his wife (by John de Wyngeham in place of John, 
Katherine, and Cristina), pits., and Robert de Dedham and Emma 
his wife, defts., of a moiety of the Manor of Knolton', with appurts. 
Robert and Emma admit it to be the Right of William ; and, for 
themselves and the heirs of Emma, remit and quit-claim to the 
plaintiffs and to the heirs of William, and receive for the remission, 
etc., 100 marks. 



KENT FINES, TEMP. EDWARD III. 183 

22S. At Westminster, Octave of St. Michael A" 6 (Post Fine 
made in the Octave of the Holy Trinity A 6) — Betw. John, son of 
Michael de ffolesw ych', and Margeria his wife, pits., and William 
atte Wode, of ffaukeham, and Alice his wife, deft*., of 1 mess., and 
8^ acr. land, with appurts., in Derteford'. AV r illiam and Alice, for 
themselves and the heirs of Alice, grant to John and Margeria and 
to his heirs hy her; hut if none, then after their deaths to remain 
to the right heirs of John. William and Alice receive 10 marks 
for the concession. 

229. At Westminster, Quinzaine of St. Michael A 6 (Post Fine 
made on the Morrow of the Ascension of the Lord A 0) — Betw. 
Stephen de Bronston', pit., and Edmund Peyntour and Matilda his 
wife, defts., of 2 acr. land, a moie.ty of 1 mess., 3^ acr. meadow, and 
the fourth part of a mill, Gs. Qd. rent, and rent of 1 cock and 6 hens, 
with appurts., in tfauersham and Osprenge. Edmund and Matilda 
admit it to he the Bight of Stephen ; and, for themselves and the 
heirs of Matilda, grant to him and to his heirs, and receive 
40 marks for the concession. 

230. At Westminster, Morrow of Souls A 6 (Post Fine made 
in the Octave of the Holy Trinity A G) — Betw. Laurence le Ken 
and Gunnora his wife, pits., and William, son of Richard le Ken, 
and Mariota his wife, defts., of 23 acr. and 1 rood of land, 3 acr. 
pasture, and 20 acr. wood, with appurts., in Sundressh 1 . William 
and Mariota admit it to be the Bight of Laurence ; and, for 
themselves and the heirs of Mariota, grant to Laurence and 
(xunnora, and to the heirs of Laurence, and receive 100 marks for 
the concession. 

231. At Westminster, Quinzaine of St. Michael A 6 (Post 
Fine made on the Morrow of the Ascension A 6) — Betw. Bernard 
P[o]uche (?) and Johanna his wife, and John son of said Bernard 
(by William Lapyn in place of Bernard), pits., and Lapinus Rogeri, 
of fflorencia, and Johanna his wife, defts., of 1 mess., with appurts., 
in Canterbury. Lapinus and Johanna his wife admit it to be the 
Right of John; and Lapinus, for himself and his heirs, grants to 
Bernard and Johanna his wife, and John, and to the heirs of John. 
Lapinus and Johanna his wife receive 100*. for the concession. 

232. At Westminster, St. Michael in one month A (5 (Post Fine 
made on the Morrow of the Ascension A 6) — Betw. Richard 
Brounyng', of Plumstede, and Alice his wife, pits., and Thomas 
Reigner, of Est Wicham, and Juliana his wife, defts., of 1 mess., 
with appurts., in Plumstede. Thomas and Juliana admit it to be 
the Bight of Richard ; and, for themselves and the heirs of Juliana, 
grant to Richard and Alice, and to the heirs of Richard, and receive 
40s. for the concession. 

233. At Westminster, Morrow of Souls A 6 (Post Fine made 
in the Octave of St. John Baptist A 6) — Betw. Lapinus R^ger and 
Johanna his wife, pits., and Master Richard de Cudestede, deft., of 
the Manor of Esthalle, with appurts. Right of Master Richard, 
who, for the admission, grants to Lapinus and Johanna for their 
lives, with remainder after their deaths to James son of the said 



184 KENT FINKS, TEMP. EDWARD III. 

Lapinus, and t<> the heirs of his body ; but it' nunc, then after the 
death of .lames to remain to the righl heirs of f-apinus. 

234. At Westininster, St. .Michael in three weeks A" 6 (Posl 

Fine made one month after Easter A" 6) — Betw. John Ie Here ami 

Aliee his wife, pits., ami Robert de Preston', deft., of 1 mess., witli 

appurts , in Herbaldon'. Bight of Robert, who, for the admission, 

grants to John ami Aliee for their lives, with remainder after their 
deaths to John their son, and to the heirs of his body ; but if none, 
then after his death to remain to the right heirs of Alice. 

235. At Westminster, Morrow of Souls A G (Post Fine in tlio 
Octave of St. John Baptist A" 6)— Betw. William Besile, pit., and 
Roger Bounde and Beatrix his wife, defts., of the fourth part of 
I mess., with appurts., in Canterbury. Roger and Beatrix admit it 
to be the Right of William ; and, for themselves and the heirs of 
Beatrix, grapt to him and to his heirs, and receive 10 marks for 
the concession. 

236. At AVestmi nster, Morrow of St. Martin A 6 (Post Fine 
made in the Quinzaine of St. Michael A 6) — Betw. John, son of 
Martin atte Wode, of Esshe, and Juliana his wife (by Henry 
AVykkewane in place of Juliana), pits., and John Styward', of 
Wroteham, deft., of 12 acr. and 1 rood of land, a?id 3 acr. meadow, 
with appurts., in Nyghteham* and Wroteham. John S. admits it 
to be the Right of John son of Martin ; and, for himself and his 
heirs, grants to John son of Martin, and Juliana, and to the heirs 
of John, and receives 30 marks for the concession. 

237. At Westminster, Quinzaine of St. Martin A 6 (Post Fine 
made in the Quinzaine of St. John Baptist A 6) — Betw. John de 
Sellingge, pit., and Edmund atte Med' and Gerarda his wife, defts., 
of 1 mess., with appurts., in Canterbury. Edmund and Gerarda 
admit it to be the Eight of John ; and, for themselves and the heirs 
of Gerarda, grant to him and to his heirs, and receive 10 marks for 
the concession. 

238. At Westminster, Octave of St. Martin A G (Post Fine 
made three weeks after St. Michael A 6) — Betw. Thomas Corp', of 
London, pit., and John Edward', of Wengraue, deft., of 1 mess., 
210 acr. land, 4 acr. meadow, and 4 acr. wood, with appurts., in 
Eltham, which Idonia, who was the wife of William Edward', of 
Wengraue, holds for her life. John admits it to be the Right of 
Thomas ; and, for himself and his heirs, grants that the aforesaid 
tenements which Idonia holds for life of the inheritance of John, 
and which after her death to him and to his heirs revert, shall after 
her death remain to Thomas and to his heirs. John receives 
20 marks for the concession. 

239. At Westminster, Octave of St. Michael A 6 (Post Fine 
made on the Morrow of St. John Baptist A G) — Betw. John, son 
of William Combe, of Swanescompe, and Isabella his wife, pits., and 
John de Donestaple, clerk, deft., of 1 mess., 260 acr. land, 3 acr. 
meadow, 10 acr. marsh, and 20a*. rent, with appurts., in Swanes- 

* I.e. Iarhtham. 



KENT FINES, TEMP. EDWARD III. 185 

compe and Brynchesley. Eight of John de D., who, for- the 
admission, grants to John son of William, and Isabella, and to his 
heirs by her ; but if none, then after their deaths to remain to the 
right heirs of said John son of William. 

2i0. At Westminster, St. Michael in one month A 6 (Post 
Fine made in the Octave of St. John Baptist A 6) — Betw. William 
Prebbel and Johanna his wife, pits., and Nicholas, son of Bichard 
Shefkyng', of Strode, and Katherine his wife, defts., of 1 mess., 
with appurts., in Strode. Nicholas and Katherine admit it to be 
the Bight of William ; and, for themselves and the heirs of 
Katherine, grant to William and Johanna, and to the heirs of 
William, and receive 100a*. for the concession. 

241. At Westminster, St. Michael in one month A 6 (Post 
Pine made in the Octave of the Holy Trinity A 0) — Betw. John 
de Teppenese and Dionisia his wife, and John, son of John de 
Teppenese (by Bertram de Suthwerk' in place of Dionisia), pits., 
and John atte Welde, deft., of 1 mess., 50 acr. land, 3 acr. meadow, 
and 53 acr. wood, with appurts., in La Leghe. Bight of John 
atte W., who, for the admission, grants to John de T. and Dionisia, 
and John son of John, and to the heirs of John de T. 

242. At Westminster, Octave of St. Michael A G (Post Fine 
made in the Quinzaine of Easter A 6) — Betw. Hamo Cauel, of 
Estgrenewyche, pit., and John Boleserhe and Isabella his wife, defts., 
of 1 mess., and 30 acr. land, with appurts., in Estgrenewiche. John 
and Isabella admit it to be the Bight of Hamo ; and, for them- 
selves and the heirs of Isabella, grant to him and to his heirs, and 
receive 20 marks for the concession. 

243. At Westminster, Octave of St. Martin A 6 (Post Fine 
made three weeks after St. Michael A 6) — Betw. Master Hamo, 
son of William le Stokel, of Tunstalle, pit., and Thomas, son of 
Peter Touy, of Sydyngbourne, and Alice his wife, defts., of 16 acr. 
laud, 1 rood of wood, 4s. tfyd. rent, and rent of 8 hens, with 
appurts., in Tunstalle. Thomas and Alice admit it to be the Bight 
of Master Hamo ; and, for themselves and the heirs of Alice, grant 
to him and to his heirs, and receive 20 marks for the concession. 

244. At Westminster, Quinzaine of St. Martin A 6 (Post Fine 
made in Quinzaine of St. John Baptist A 6) — Betw. Paul atte 
"Wode, of Staple, and Johanna his wife, pits., and Lapinus Boger, 
deft., of 1 mess., and 3 acr. land, with appurts., in Staple. Bight of 
Lapinus, who, for the admission, grants to Paul and Johauna, and 
to the heirs of Johanna. 

245. At Westminster, Morrow of Souls A 6 (Post Fine made 
in the Octave of St. John Baptist A 6) — Betw. JohndeHyngeston', 
of London, goldsmith (" Orfeure"), and William Sporoun, of 
London, goldsmith, pits., and Gawynus de Suthorp', of London, 
goldsmith, and Cristina his wife, defts., of 1 mess., 53 acr. land, and 
acr. wood, with appurts., in Leuesham. Gawynus and Cristina 
admit it to be the Bight of John ; and Gawynus, for himself and 
his heirs, grants to John and William, and to the heirs of John. 
Gawynus and Cristina receive for the concession 20/. 



180 KENT FINES, TEMP. EDWARD III. 

246. At Westminster, Octave of St. Martin A" 6 (Post Fine 

made in the Octave of St. Michael A°6) -Betw. Roger de Hegham, 
Chivalcr, pit., and Adam de Brokton' and .Matilda his wife, defts.,o£ 
12 acr. land, with appurts., in Bobbynge next Middelton'. Adam 
and Matilda admit it to be the Right of Roger; and, for themselves 

and the heirs of Matilda, remit and quit-claim to him and to his 
heirs, and receive For the remission, etc., 20 marks. 

247. At Westminster, Easter in three weeks A°7 — Betw. Simon 
ffraunceys, of London, mercer, and Matilda his wife, />//*., and 
Robert ffraunceys, parson of the Church of St. Pancras, London, 
deft., of 1 mess., 827 acr. land, 15^ acr. meadow. 30 acr. wood, and 
117s. rent, with appurts., in Tyndale, Sutton' atte Hone, and 
Wylmynton' next Derteford'. Right of Robert, who, for the ad- 
mission, grants to Simon and Matilda, and to the heirs of Simon. 

248. At Westminster, Morrow of the Ascension of the Lord 
A 7 (Post Fine iu the Octave of St. Michael A 6) — Betw. Matilda, 
who was the wife of Thomas de Maryns (by John atte Brok' in her 
stead), pit., and Robert de Cheyne, deft., of the Manor of Vfteton', 
with appurts. Robert grants a moiety of the manor (by service of 
a rose at the Nativity of St. John Baptist) to Matilda for her life. 
Moreover, Robert, for himself and bis heirs, grants that the otber 
moiety of the manor, which Margeria, who was the wife of Robert 
de Shireland', holds in dower of the inheritance of Robert, and 
which, after her death, to him and to his heirs reverts, shall remain 
to Matilda for her life. After her death the entire manor to remain 
to Boger de Maryns and to the heirs of his body ; but if none, then 
after his death to revert to aforesaid Bobert and to his heirs, quit 
of the heirs of Matilda, and also of other heirs of Boger. Matilda 
gives Bobert for the concession 40 marks. 

249. At Westminster, Quinzaine of Easter A 7 — Betw. Andrew 
de Bukston', pit., and John Loue, of Tunstall', and Johanna his Avife, 
defts., of 1 mess., 16 acr. land, and a moiety of 1 acre of wood, with 
appurts., in Tunstall', Borden', and Sidyngburn'. John and Johanna 
admit it to be the right of Andrew, and John, for himself and his 
heirs, grants to Andrew and to his heirs, for which concession John 
and Johanna receive 20 marks. 

250. At Westminster, Morrow of the Ascension of the Lord 
A 7 (Post Pine made on the Morrow of the Ascension of the Lord 
A 4) — Betw. Thomas de Bourne, pit., and Richard Berhekre, deft., 
of the Manor of Ludenhain, with appurts., which Edmund Peuerel 
and Johanna his wife hold for the life of Johanna. Bichard admits 
it to be the right of Thomas, and, for himself and his heirs, grants 
that the aforesaid manor, with appurts., which Edmund and 
Johanna hold for the life of Johanna of the inheritance of Bichard, 
and which, after her death, to him and to his heirs reverts, shall 
remain after her death to Thomas and to his heirs. Bichard re- 
ceives 20 marks for the concession. 



( 187 ) 



FIFTY-EIGHT RECTORS OF TROTTESCLIFFE. 

BY REV. T. S. FRAMPTON, M.A. 

In the year 788, Offa, King of Mercia, gave a portion of his 
possessions called " Trottesclib," containing six ploughlands, to the 
Church of St. Andrew at Rochester, for religious purposes. In the 
course of the Danish invasions, which followed not long after, this 
gift was wrested from the church, and was not restored until the 
General Assembly held at Penenden Heath in 1076, when Lanfranc, 
Archbishop of Canterbury, having recovered this among other 
possessions of the church, gave it. back to Gundulf, Bishop of 
Rochester. In 1086, when Domesday Book was compiled, mention 
is made of a church at " Totesclive." From these facts it has been 
supposed that a church was built here either immediately after Offa's 
donation, or between 1076 and 1086. The wide-jointed masonry in 
the eastern portion of the structure seems to point rather to the 
earlier period, and, if this is so, Trottescliffe affords an example of a 
church erected in An»lo-Saxon times. 

1. Robert, c. 1176. (Thorpe's Resist. Roff., p. 11.) Witness 
to the Confirmation of a Grant made to the Monks of St. Andrew, 
by Walter, Bishop of Rochester, 1148-82. Another witness was 
Paris, Archdeacon of Rochester, who was admitted to that office 
about 1176. 

2. John, 1 185 X 1214. (Reg. Roff., p. 161.) Witness to a Grant 
made to the Prior and Convent of Leeds, by Gilbert de Glanville, 
Bishop of Rochester. 

3. James, 1238 x 1250. (Reg. Roff., p. 664.) Witness to a 
Grant made to the Prior and Canons of St. Mary Magdalene, 
Tonbridge, by Richard de Wendover, Bishop of Rochester. 

4. Nicholas de Rokelunde, c. 1256. (Reg. Roff., p. 321.) 
Mentioned as a Surety in a Notification by Richard, Abbot of 
Lesnes, in the time of Laurence de St. Martin, Bishop of Rochester, 
1251—74. 

5. Richard de London. 

6. John de Denyntox, instituted 1 Oct. 1332, on death of the 
last. (Rrgist. Hamo de Hethe, f. 153«.) On resigning Trottescliffe 
he was instituted Rector of Snodland, where he died. 

7. AVilli.ym de Miudeltone, inst. 9 Mar. 1337-8, on cession of 
the last. (Reg- Hethe, f. VJ2a.) Previously Vicar of Haddenham 
in the diocese of Lincoln. He was instituted Rector of Snodland on 
the death of Denvnton. 



188 FIFTY-EIGHT RECTORS OF TROTTESCLIFFE. 

8. John DE Evkrvno, inst. (5 May I'M], on cess, of the last. 

(Reg. Hethe, t'. L95a.) Bishop Ilamo de Hethe passed the whole of 
the year 1312 at TrottesclifEe, and caused the refectory, dormitory, 
and church to bo repaired, For the tnosl pari at liis own expense. 

(Wharton's Anglia Sacra, i., 375.) It is not improbable that he 
inserted the twodight windows in the X. and S. walls at this period. 
The one in the N. wall contains some early stained glass, which has 
been assigned to the fourteenth century. The eastern most window 
in the S. wall was also once tilled with stained glass, as is evident 
from fragments found outside. Trottescliffe was a very favourite 
place of retirement with this prelate, who not unfrequently passed 
Christinas and Easter here, and on two other occasions stayed 
throughout the year, the last time during the continuance of the 
terrible pestilence, known as the Black Death, in 1348-9. Succeeding 
Bishops, throughout the Mediaeval period, were also frequently 
here, and no fewer than Jive, were staying in the manor house, when 
they made their wills, while one, William Wells, died here, in the 
month of February 1443-4. 

9. John Gilbert, exch. with the last, 23 Jan. 1316-7. (Reg. 
Hethe, f. 2256.) Previously Vicar of Tenterden. 

10. John de Bradewey. 

11. John de Cranebourne, exch. with the last, 7 Oct. 1319. 
{Reg. Hethe, f. 2535.) Previously Hector of" Ichene " in the diocese 
of Winchester. 

12. ROBERT DE VaGHNE. 

13. Stephen Randulf, inst. 11 July 1355, on resig. of the last. 
(Regist. J. de Sheppey, f. 2836.) Subsequently Hector of Cowden. 
He was one of the three executors appointed by John de Sheppey 
in his will, 21 September 1360, and, in acknowledgment of under- 
taking the office, the Bishop bequeathed to him £20 in money, twelve 
silver platters, twelve salt-cellars, and two large dishes called 
" chargeours." (Regist. Islip, f. 169b.) 

14. John Wolfetche. 

15. William atte Dene, inst. 29 June 1301, on d. of the last. 
(Regist. Islip, f. 225b.) Previously of Stodham in the diocese of 
Chichester. He was collated by the Archbishop of Canterbury, the 
See of Rochester being vacant. 

16. Robert Fvnchecok, inst. 5 July 1361, on resig. of the last. 
(Reg. Islip, f. 225/;.) Like his predecessor, he was collated by the 
Archbishop ; for William Whittlesey, although elected 23 October 
1360, was not consecrated Bishop of Rochester until 6 February 
1361-2. 

17. John de Hanneye, inst. 2 Aug. 1361. (Reg. Islip, f. 225b.) 
He held the church in commendam by grant from the Archbishop. 
In 1375 he was prebendary of AVenlakesbarn. (Newcourt's 
Repertorium, i., 221.) 

18. John de Whytecherche, exch. with the last, 27 Oct. 
1369. (Regist. Trilleck, f. 3416.) Previously Rector of Lower 
llardres. 

19. John Cheyne, in 1400. On 2 October 1400 he obtained a 



FIFTY-EIGHT KECTORS OF TROTTESCLIFFE. 189 

licence to be non-resident for a year. (Reqist. J. Bottlesham, 
f. 1506.) 

20. John Putteneye, exch. with the last, 5 May 1413. (Regi.st. 
Arundel, ii., t\ 67a.) Previously Vicar of " Middylton " (Milton) 
in the diocese of Canterbury. 

21. Thomas Wale. 

22. John MANKYN,exch. with the last, 15 Feb. 1424-5. (Regist. 
Langdon, f. 30a.) Previously Rector of " Ffeccham " in the diocese 
of Winchester. 

23. Henry Adesham, exch. with the last, 24 Nov. 1425. (Reg. 
Langdon, f. 745.) Previously perpetual Vicar of " Wadeherst." 

24. Andrew Malton. 

25. Roger Haynes, exch. with the last, 23 Apr. 1434. {Reg. 
Langdon, f. 98a.) Previously Vicar of " Wokyng." By his will, 
dated 10 April 1430, and proved 22 April following, he gave directions 
for his body to be buried in the chancel of his churcb of " Trottes- 
clyue." He left 41bs. of wax to be burned about his body, and 6s. 8d. 
to be distributed to the poor on the day of his burial. To the fabric 
of the church he bequeathed 20s., and to the fabric of the church of 
" Sellak," Hereford, where he was born, 20s. and two books, viz., 
Legtnda Aurea and Communio Sanctorum. One of his executors 
w r as John Assheton, Rector of Snodland. (Regist. Wells, f. 142a.) 

26. Makmaduke Skei.ton, inst. 30 Sept. 1439, on d. of the last. 
(Regist. Wells, f. 147a.) Mentioned also as Rector, 8 June 1453, 
in the will of Thomas Dyne, Rector of Addington, who bequeathed 
to him a book called Pupilla Oculi, and appointed him one of his 
executors. (Lib. Test. Rofl\, i., f. 141a£.) Richard Rowse, by his 
will, 19 July 1451, left, among other bequests, a cow, value 8s., to 
be handed over to the churchwardens after the death of his wife 
Christina to find a taper to burn before the image of the Blessed 
Mary. Also two oxen to be sold, and the proceeds to be laid 
out in purchasing an antiphonarium . (Ibid., f. 105b.) Richard 
Chaunceler, by his will, 6 December 1455, left to the high altar, for 
tithes forgotten, 3s. 4d. ; to the light of St. Mary 6d. ; to the light 
of St. Christopher 4d. ; to the light of St. Nicholas 6d. ; and to the 
light of the Holy Cross 6d. Also he bequeathed to the Ale of 
St. Peter, in the aforesaid church, 4 qrs. of barley. (Ibid., ii., 
f. 32a&.) John Clyterowe, by his will, 8 May 1463, left to the 
High Altar 20d. ; to the "work" of the church 6d. ; to the rood 
light, St. Mary's and St. Christopher's, 6d. each ; and towards a 
cover for the" Pyx 12d. (Ibid., f. 259ab.) William Watton of 
Addington, by his will, 17 May 1463, left 6s. 8d. for a frontal for 
the high altar of " Trosclyff."' (P.C.C., 13 Godyn.) Robert Sym- 
coke alias Tournor, by his will, 7 November 1464, left, among other 
bequests, the sum of 6s. 8d. towards a new crucifix. (Lib. Test. 
Roff., ii., f. 29Sab.) John Tenaker, by his will, 7 October 1466, 
left to the high altar 2s. ; to the rood light and St. Mary's 6d. each ; 
to St. Christopher's and St. Nicholas' lights 4d. each ; also towards 
a new crucifix 6s. ; also for repairing the church, where most needed, 
20s. ; also for a torch for the church 6s. 8d. ; also for mending the 



190 FIFTY-EIGHT RECTORS OF TROTTESCLIFFE. 

road between the church nnd the village, where most needed, 3a. 4d. 
( Lib. Test.,iL, i.S76ab.) Will. William, bj bis will, 23 October I 170, 
left to the high altar :5s. Id. ; to 1 he rood fighl LOd. and a cow ; to 8t. 
Mary's light 8d. ; and to the lights of SS. Christopher and Nicholas 
6d. each, also one of his besl linen cloths for the high altar; also 

Inwards the new crucifix <>s. Id. ; and the residue of a debt, owed 

him by Walter Eastdowne, to the "work" of the church. (Ibid., 
iii., f. 63J.) 

27. John Bolun, in 1171-2. Mentioned as supervisor of the 
will of Joan Chaunceler, 15 March 1471-2, who left towards a chalice 

for the church 5s. ; also to the fabric 2ts. (kl. (Ibid., i\\, f. 85.) 

28. Richard Bonde. William Crofton, by his will, 9 March 
1483-4, left a silver-gilt chalice and two silver cruets to the church. 
Also to the high altar 13s. 4d. Also out of the proceeds of the sale 
of his land and tenements in " Trottesclyf " the sum of 20 marks for 
a commemorative service in Elsingspittle, London, for two years. 
(Ibid., v., f. 2ab.) The brass of this testator and his wife Margery, 
in excellent state of preservation, is immediately in front of the altar 
rails. He is represented in the costume of a civilian, with rosary 
and pouch attached to the girdle. The long gown, slightly turned 
back above the feet, shews the lining of fur. Her costume exhibits 
the horned head-dress, and collar and cuffs of fur. The inscription 
describes him as B.C.L., and of " Greys Tn." He died 18 March 
1483-4. The brass was placed during the wife's lifetime, and the 
spaces for the date of her death were never filled in. 

29. Thomas Cartewrigthe, inst. 8 June 1497, on resig. of the 
last. (Regist. Fitzjames, f. 195 ) 

30. Richard Carpinter, LL.D., inst. 30 Jan. 1499-1500, on 
d. of the last. (Ibid., f. 245.) 

31. Alexander Bueley, inst. 4 Oct. 1500, on resig. of the last. 
(Ibid., f. 245.) On 24 May 1499, he had been instituted to the 
rectory of Foots Cray. (Regist. Fitzjames, f. 235.) Alice Deysey of 
Addington, by her will, 8 June 1509, after giving directions to be 
buried at " Trottesclif," left to the church two altar cloths ; also, for 
the repair of the bell tower, a bullock ; and to the priest, for 30 
masses, 10s. (Lib. Test. Roff., vi., f. 250*5.) Will of William 
Bemonde of Addington, 3 October 1510, " also I owe to Trottiscliff 
for a Crosse iijs." (Ibid., f. 279*5.) 

32. Marmaduke Waldeby, M.A., inst. 1 Feb. 1513-14, on d. 
of the last. (Regist. Fisher, f. 7\a.) On 15 August 1520 he was 
instituted to the vicarage of Brenchley. (Regist. Fisher, f. 1035.) 

33. Thomas Schawe, inst. 14 Jan. 1514-15, on resig. of the last. 
(Ibid., f. 725.) In the will of this rector, dated 3 April 1543, and 
proved G July following, these bequests occur among others: — " Item 
I bequethe to the mendyng of the highe waye betwixt Clevett Well 
and the church of Trottisclyfe xxs. Item 1 geve to euery of my God- 
childern borne and christened within the parish churche of Trottis- 
clyfe aforesaid xxd. a pece. Item I bequeth to euery childe of Robert 
Brokes, Edmunde Woddes. John Goddens, and Thomas Coupers, 
that goith to scole iiijd. a pece. Item 1 bequethe to the parishe 



FIFTY-EIGHT RECTORS OF TROTTESCLIFFE. 191 

ehurche of Ravynstone Dale in Westmerlande towards the bcying 
of a Cope xls. Item I Deque the to the parish e ehurche of Trottis- 
clyfe aforaaid twoo Portesis." (P.C.C., 23 Spert.) The burial of 
this rector is entered under 5 April 1543, in the oldest Register 
Book, which begins in 1540. The Registers are perfect from this 
date, with the exception of a slight gap, 1550-60. On the fly-leaf 
of the earliest hook mention is made of a school at Trottescliffe, 
about the year 155)9, the master of which, William Wardroppe, was 
employed to transcribe entries from the original paper book into the 
parchment one, which every parish was required to provide in accord- 
ance with an ordinance passed in the year 1597. Will of Will. 
Wolleryge of " Troslyff," 2 August 1532, " It'm I bequeithe to y e 
lyght of ou 1 ' Lady and Saynt James in the same ehurche on' of my 
best keyn. It'm I bequeith to the ehurche of Troslyff xx marke to 
be put to y e most behove to y e seid ehurche y l it may be. Aud 
the residue of y e seide sale [of certain property] to go to y e 
hyght wayes by twen my house & the ehurche." One of the 
witnesses to this will was "Syr Henry Denton, cur." (Lib. Test. 
Roff., ix., f. 305.) 

34. Thomas Bull, S.T.B , inst. 13 Apr. 1543, on d. of the last. 
{Regist. Heath, f. 5a.) He was prebendary of the Sixth Stall in 
Rochester Cathedral. (LeiNeve's Fasti, Edit. Hardy, ii., 587.) On 
the day following his collation to Trottescliffe, Nich. Heath, Bishop of 
Rochester, conveyed the next presentation to the church to Henry 
Bowsfell, Notary Public, John Sibell, Esq., Thomas ffurnes, Merchant 
Tailor of London, and Thomas Bowsfell. {Regist. Heath, f . 2a.) Will 
of Henry Bowsfell, "Proctor of Th'arches," dated 8 September 
1544, and proved 20 September, " Item I bequethe to Barthilmew 
Bowsfell Th'advovvson of Trotysclyffe in Kent." (P.C.C., 14 Pyn- 
nyng.) 

35. Bartholomew Bowsfell, inst. 15 Aug. 1516, on d. of the 
last. {Regist. Holbeach, f. 43a.) Instituted on presentation by 
John Sibill, gent. He was deprived on the accession of Queen 
Mary, but restored when Elizabeth came to the throne. 

36. Robert Salisbury, collated 6 May 1551, on depriv. of the 
last. (Regist. Episc. Roff., f. 555.) Will of Jeffery Aprice, parson 
of Mereworth, 30 December 1559, " To my Cosyn Salisburye p'son 
of Trottisclif my best cloke." (Lib. Test. Roff., xii., f. 466^5.) 
Salisbury was also rector of Addington and Ryarsh, and pre- 
bendary of the Fifth Stall in Rochester Cathedral. 

37. Bartholomew Bowsfell, restored March 1560. {Regist. 
Gheast, f. 83as.) The interesting Elizabethan chalice dates from 
the time of this rector, having been made in 1576. 

38. Thomas Bowsfielde, inst. 22 Aug. 1578. {Regist. Young, 
f. 161 a.) Instituted on presentation by Edward Webb. 

39. Thomas Either, inst. 13 Dec. 1589. (Soc. Antiq. MS. 42.) 
Patron, the Chancellor, by lapse. (Lanscl. MS. 441.) 

40. Thomas Busfeild, M.A., in 1608. (Soc. Antiq. MS. 171, 
]). 185.) The patronage was now again in the hands of the Bishop of 
Rochester. Mention is made of John Allchin as " Minister," 



VJ'2 FIFTY-EIGHT RECTORS OF TROTTESCLIFFE. 

March 1609-10, in the Register Book, bui bis name does not occur 
elsewhere. 

11. Rdmund Jackson, S.T.P., in 1(521. {Lib. Cc»>p.) He was 
of St. John's Coll., Oxford, and was collated t<> tin- rectory of 
Norton, near Faversham, 23 Augusl 1(!17. lie took the degree 
of D.D., 25 June L618. No compounded f>or First Fruits with 
respect to Trottescliffe, is October 1(521. He was Chaplain to 
Dr. Buckeridge, Bishop of Rochester, and was instituted to the 
fifth prebend in Rochester Cathedral, 7 December 1624. (Bp's 
Certif.) His son Edmund was baptized at Trottescliffe 12 Novem- 
ber 1(52(3. Mention is made in the Register Hook of the burial of 
James Cleark, " Cleric," 3 July 1651, who may have been one of 
the " ministers," admitted by authority of Parliament. 

42. John Head, in 1(552. (Lib. Gomp.) He compounded for 
First Fruits 25 June 1652. Mentioned in the Register Book as 
" Minister " 29 June 1653 and 18 July 1658. He and his successor 
were, apparently, not episcopally instituted, as in the Bishop's 
Register, Archbold is spoken of as instituted on the death of Edmund 
Jackson . 

43. "William Woodward. 

44. Edward Archbold, M.A., inst. 8 Sept. 1652, on d. of Edm. 
Jackson. (Regist. Spir. Roff. F., f. 98ft.) By another authority, 
Soc. Antiq. MS. 170, p. 337, it is stated that Archbold was inducted 
to Trottescliffe on the deprivation of Woodward, 4 September 1666. 
On 12 December 1662, he had been inducted into the rectory of 
Kingsdown cum Maplescomb. He was Chaplain to the Bishop of 
Rochester. 

45. John Cooper, inst. 30 Apr. 1690, on d. of the last. (Regist. 
Tho. Spratt, f . 15a.) 

46. Edward Roman, M.A., inst. 27 Feb. 1691-2, on resig. of 
the last. (Reg. Spratt, f. 15ft.) In 1686 he was at Bromley. He 
also held the Perpetual Curacy of All Saints, Maidstone, for a short 
time previous to his death, in 1692. 

47. Thomas Brett, LL.B., inst. 16 Sept. 1692, on d. of the last. 
(Reg. Spratt, f. 22a.) He was born 3 September 1667 at Betshanger, 
and educated at Wye and Queen's Coll., Cambridge. He afterwards 
removed to Corpus Christi, where he proceeded to the degree of LL.B. 
in 1690, and LL.D. in 1697. Deacon 21 December 1690 ; Priest 20 
September 1691. Previous to his collation to Trottescliffe he served 
the cure of Folkestone, and on removing to London was chosen 
Lecturer at Islington 4 October 1691. Among other appointments 
in Kent, he held the curacies of Great Chart and AVye ; the rectory 
of Betshanger, 1703 ; the vicarage of Chislet ; and the rectory of 
Ruckinge, to which he was collated by Archbishop Tenison, 12 April 
1705. He resigned his two rectories in 1714, being unable to take 
the oaths required by Government, on the accession of George 1. 
He died 5 March 1743-4, and was buried in the family vault at Wye. 
He was one of the most learned of the Non-jurors, and was the 
author of a large number of essays and tracts. (See Nichols's 
Literary Anecdotes, i., pp. 407 — 412.) 



FIFTY-EIGHT RECTORS OF TROTTESCLIFFE. 193 

48. Jon\ Warren, M.A., inst. 4 June 1G95. {Reg. Spratt, 
f . 22b.) He was the eldest son of the Rev. Samuel Warren, who was 
Vicar of Ashford for forty-eight years. Of Queen's Coll., Camb., 
B.A., 1689; M.A., 1693; S.T.B., 1701; S.T.P., 1711; Deacon 
25 September 1692. Priest, 19 May 1695. Also Vicar of St. John's, 
Margate, 1703 — 1705. After leaving Trotteseliffe he was instituted 
to a prebend at Exeter 2 April 1709. He appears to have died in 
1736. The silver paten dates from the time of this rector, having 
the mark of the year 1699. Underneath are engraved the letters 
i» B A , which were the initials of Paul and Ann Baristow, by whom, 
most probably, it was presented. He was at one time curate in 
charge here, and his will shews that he was much attached to the 
parishioners. On 26 February 16S8-9 he was instituted to the 
vicarage of Graine. The entry of his wife's burial at Trotteseliffe 
occurs under 20 April 1705 ; that of his own under 23 February 
1715-16. 

49. Charles Lamb, B.A., inst. 23 Apr. 1709, on cess, of the last. 
{Reg. Spratt, f. 906.) Deacon, 21 September 1701. Priest, 20 Decem- 
ber 1702. On 12 August 1709 he obtained a faculty to pull down the 
E. end of the parsonage, 12 ft. broad and 20 ft. long, consisting of 
kitchen, brewhouse, and chamber, and to make a kitchen and brew- 
house out of the great hall, also to raise the roof of the great hall so 
as to build one or more chambers over it. {Regist. Spratt, f. QQb.) 
The entry in the Parish Register of several " domestic events " shews 
that Mr. Lamb was a resident Rector. The Rev. Paul Baristow or 
Bairstow, by his will, dated 31 March 1711, and proved 2 March 
1715-16, left £100 to purchase an estate, the rent of which should 
be applied to the instruction of poor children of Trotteseliffe in 
reading and the Church Catechism. (P.C.C.,44 Fox ) His execu- 
trix, Mary Goodwin or Crodwyn, added £50 for the same purpose. 

50. Bartholomew Hughes, M.A., inst, 27 May 1723, on cess, 
of the last. {Act Book, Rochest., f. 52.) Of Emmanuel Coll., 
Camb. Deacon 19 December 1708. Priest 24 May 1719. After 
leaving Trotteseliffe he became Vicar of Barnston and Laver Parva, 
Essex. He was Chaplain to Catherine, Dowager Duchess of 
Buckingham. 

51. Thomas Cockman, M.A., inst. 28 July 1724, on cess, of the 
last. {Act Book, Rochester, f. 56.) On 15 July 1724 he obtained a 
Dispensation to hold Trotteseliffe with his vicarage of East Mailing. 
He was a Fellow, and afterwards Master of University Coll., 
Oxford, being elected in the place of Dr. Charlett, after a contest 
with Mr. Dennison, extending over six years. He was elected 
Proctor for the Clergy in 1724. He was also Chaplain to the Rt. 
Hon. Elizabeth, Dowager Lady Barnard. He died at Oxford 1 
February 1744-5. 

52. John Elton, M.A., inst. 22 Mar. 1744-5, on d. of the last. 
{Ibid., f. 141.) Instituted to the rectory of Speldhurst 15 February 
1727-8. He died 5 April 1747. 

53. James Webb, M.A., inst. 29 May 1747, on d. of the last. 
{Ibid., f. 152.) On 22 December 1743 he was licensed to the 

vol. xx. o 



194 FIFTY-EIGHT RECTORS OF TEOTTESCLIFFB. 

curac] of West Mailing; and, 30 Augusl L 748, he was presented to 
thai vicarage by Sir Roger Twisden. 

54. l'i;\N('is Lloyd, M.A.., inst. 3 Oct. 17"»'.». on d. of the last. 
(Act Book, f. L92.) lie was buried here 2 October 177s. 

.")."). Francis Taynton, M.A., inst. 20 Jan. L779, on d. of the 
last. {Ibid., f. 230.) He was instituted Vicar of Frindsbury 24 
March 1764. Be also held, for fifteen years, the vicarage of Wesl 
Farleigh, where he died, 2 November 1 7" 1 > 1- , at the age of <>3. 

50. William Crawford, M.A., inst. L3 Nov. 1794, on d. of the 
last. (Ibid., f. 256.) OfTrinity Coll., Camb. Deacon I98eptember 
1773. Priest 25 April 177"). Examining Chaplain to Bishop Horsley. 
He was Archdeacon of Carmarthen from 11 October 170;} till his 
death. On 7 August 1797 he obtained a Dispensation to hold the 
rectory of Milton with his rectory of Trottescliffe. He died 1 1 April 
1827. The silver alms-dish bears the inscription : — " This Plate was 
presented to the Parish of Trotterscliffe by the Rev. W" Crawford, 
D.D., Kector, Sept. 11th 1S21." In October 1824 the church was 
repaired, and the pulpit was presented by the Dean and Chapter of 
Westminster, through James Seager, Esq. 

57. Edward John Shepherd, B.A., inst. 1 Oct. 1827, on d. of 
the last. (Act Book, Rochest., 1S24-67, f. 20.) Scholar of Trinity 
Coll., Camb. Deacon 1826. Priest 30 September 1827. Pre- 
sented by the Lord Chancellor. Kector of Luddesdown 1840-56. 
In the year 1841 the church was renovated, and the school 
buildings were erected. On Advent Sunday 1866, the present 
altar table was given by the Rector, and in the month of August 
1874 an addition was made to the churchyard, on the N. side. 
Mr. Shepherd died 26 November 1874, and was buried in the S.W. 
corner of the churchyard. Author: — The History of the Church 
of Borne to the end of the Episcopate of Damnsus, a.d. 384, London, 
1851. Letter to S. B. Maitland, etc., 1852. During Dr. Craw- 
ford's time the patronage of the living passed into the hands of the 
Bishop of Worcester, but about the year 1868 it was acquired by 
C. W. Shepherd, Esq., who was subsequently Kector. By an 
Order in Council, dated 8 August 1845, it was decreed that from 
1 January 1846 the deanery of Mailing should be transferred to the 
diocese of Canterbury, when Trottescliffe ceased to be in the 
Kochester diocese. 

58. Charles William Shepherd, M.A., inst. 1 Feb. 1875, on d. 
of the last. (Regist. Tait, ii., f. 603.) Of Trinity Coll., Camb. 
Deacon 1870. Priest 1871. Consecration of addition to the church- 
yard by the Bishop of Dover 15 July 1875. Insertion of E. win- 
dow in memory of the late Kector 1875. The easternmost light 
of the south window, next the tow r er, in memory of Francis Henry 
Hey man Shepherd, originally in Luddesdown church, was also 
inserted this year. Ten years later the W. window, by Messrs. 
Hughes and Ward, was put in at the cost of £148. And in 1887 
the westernmost window r in the N. wall, representing The Sower, 
by the same artists, was put in by the Kector in commemoration 
of the Queen's Jubilee. In the year 1885 the W. wall of the church 
was entirely rebuilt by the Kector, with carefully squared flints, 
set in cement, at the cost of about £800. 



( 105 ) 



THE RUINED CHAPEL OE ST. KATHERINE 
AT SHORNE, KENT. 

BY GEORGE M. ARNOLD, F.S.A. 

In February 1890 an advertisement in the Kentish newspapers 
announced the sale by auction of a freehold property at Shorne in 
Kent. It stated that " adjoining and in the rear is an ancient chapel 
supposed to have been formerly occupied by Monks, and visited by 

pilgrims on their way to the Shrine of Thomas a Becket The 

spot is rich in antiquarian interest, and the chapel is well known to 
Archaeologists." 

I instructed an agent to attend the sale and to purchase the 
property with the view of preserving this little mediaeval structure 
which had been used as a cowshed and stable. 

The first question arising as to the Shorne chapel, is whether it 
was a " libera capella," authorized by the Ordinary for the use of 
the lord and tenants of some local manor; or whether it was a cell 
or direct dependency upon the Priory of St. Saviour's, Bermondsey, 
in whom the church of Shorne, and the great tithes, and advowson 
of the vicarage were vested ; or whether it was a chantry chapel 
founded tor the saying of masses for some particular benefactor and 
his family, living or dead. 

In the first place (and this is an argument against its being a 
libera Capella) it does not appear to have had such a separate 
existence as to have paid tenths or first fruits, nor does it seem to 
have made the Chrism offering to the Bishop of the diocese yearly al 
Easter, and indeed the only indication I could for some time find 
of there being a separate priest besides the vicar in the parish of 
Shorne, arose from the circumstance that " Nicholas, chaplain of 
Shorne," is mentioned as one of the witnesses to a charter con- 
firming the appropriation of the churches of Cobham and of Shorne 
(by Walter, Bishop of Rochester), to the monks of St. Saviour's, 
Bermondsey. The Instrument of Appropriation, which is given in 
the Registrum Rqffense, p. 229, is attested as follows : " Hiis 
testibus Werieo abbate de Eeversham Ecclesie, Gervasio Decano 
Boffen., Boberto Capellano nostro, Nicholuo Capellano de Sorites, et 
aliis." 

The circumstance that neither in the Registrum Roffense, nor 
in any other Episcopal register, aught is to be found as to the insti- 
tution of any Clerk in Holy Orders to this chapel, is singular, and 
there is a complete absence of any record id' its consecration. 11 

o 2 



196 THE RUINED CHAPEL OF ST. CATHERINE 

would scarcely have been a Chapel i>t' Base under the control <>l" the 
Vicar, having regard in the probable population of Shorne, since 
it is within a quarter of a mile of the Parish Church, and upon a 

direct road, lull if il were, we should still have expected BOme 

evidence of its consecration, or of a licence for the celebration of 
the Divine Offices and Sacraments, with a more or less strict reserva- 
tion of the rights of the mother church. 

In 1 197, the inhabitants of the neighbouring village of G-ravesend 

built such a chapel of ease. They had largely migrated to the north 
end of their parish, nearer to the Thames, and complained of the 
distance of their parish church. So the Vicar- General of Richard. 
Bishop of Rochester, licensed for .Mass and the other divine ollices 
their new "basilica sive oratoriwm" provided it did no1 prejudice 
the parish church. 

Afterwards, in 1510, Cardinal Fisher Consecrated it, first protest- 
ing that the consecration was "not to lie in prejudice of the parish 
church, or as authorizing the burial of the dead, or the baptism of 
infants, nor the ministration of any other holy rite in such chapel 
except the consecration of the Lord's Body." 

It is also worthy of note that Hasted, in his great work, wholly 
overlooks this little chapel at IShorne, an omission which is noticed 
and commented upon by Thorpe, who, in his Custvmale Rojfense, 
\). 247, writes as follows : — 

" On the right hand of the road leading up to Shorne Street, and 
opposite Mr. Maplesden's house, stands an antient and fair chapel, 
or oratory ; which, with some additional building, is now used as a 
Malt house, and a small tenement erected against the east end of it 
inhabited by the Maltman. I was informed by an antient and 
creditable person there, that in digging the foundation of the new 
building, or lean to, a stone coffin and many human bones were 
disturbed. On the north side is a small orchard which probably 
was the cemetery to it. This edifice has not been mentioned by any 
writer, nor have I been able hitherto to meet with anything relative 
to its foundation and endowment. It is likely to have been raised 
by some of the eminent proprietors of the manors of Shorne and 
Pioundall, but this is merely conjectural. The measurement is as 
follows : Gable end, to the west, twenty -three feet six inches. North 
side, forty-three feet eight inches. The drawing was taken A 1774, 
and exhibits the north-west view of it. See Plate XX., fig. 3." 

Upon my architect's examination of the building, he detected 
certain indications of want of unity of date in the style of the 
walls (flint and stone work), and upon digging in consequence 
about one-third of the whole length from the east end, the base of a 
buttress was uncovered on the north side, and the same result 
attended a like excavation on the south, at a similar distance from 
the east end. He gathered from this that the original erection 
ended there, which gave an interior length of IS feet by a width of 
17 feet. This would suffice for a mere chantry, but at the end of 
another third of the length of the little edifice, in its present exten- 
sion, the base of another buttress was uncovered on the north side, 



Fw.3 . Norlh 11?// ffi'/r ,•/ '//if (Vume/, or ( rafory, /rf Sliorne. f> 24'/. 





Fig. 2 



Fig J 



RUINS OF THE CHAPEL OF S T KATHERINE.AT SHORNE 

WESTERN D00R=ARCH AND WINDOW 2 SEDIUA AND PIS-CINA 3, EXTERIOR IN I77+. 



AT SHORN E, KENT. 1 ( ,)7 

without any corresponding foundation appearing on the south side; 
and finally, &i the north and south angles of the west end. the bases 
of two large buttresses were exhumed, as was the case at the like 
angles of the east end. 

It is therefore possible that, after its first erection, the building 
was elongated upon two successive occasions, and as this could but 
have been for the purpose of affording increased accommodation for 
worshippers, it rather suggests the later use of the chapel as a place 
of worship, in the sense of a chapel of ease. 

The style of the eastern part of the building, where the east 
window has retained its old sill and jambs up to the springing, with 
the starting of two vertical mullions worked in the stone sill, is 
Decorated or Second Pointed, the window being like those at the east 
ends of Northfleet, Southfleet, and Dartford churches, and in the 
pair of side windows of one light each, next to the chancel, each head 
is ogeed, the other and westerly openings of the same size terminated 
with simple Gothic cusps. 

Perhaps the most interesting feature of the interior is the sedilia, 
of two seats, under one ogeed Decorated arch, with an adjacent 
piscina to the east. In the north wall, close to the east end, is a 
small aumbry. 

It is clear from the appearance of the remains that the chapel 
had been purposely destroyed, and the eastern (the only mullioned) 
window defaced. Its fragments were built up mixed with red 
Jacobean bricks. The wall-plates were at the same time removed, 
and the walls raised by a few courses in order that the building 
should thenceforth consist of two storeys. For the upper floor and 
its supports, the timber work of the old roof was freely laid under 
contribution, and cut as required. 

My architect, F. A. Walters, Esq., P.S.A., of 4 Great Queen 
Street, Westminster, S.W., reported as follows: "The chapel is 
52 feet 4 inches long by 17 feet 2 inches wide, the side walls being 
about 12 feet high from the floor. The walls are 2 feet 10 inches 
thick, and are built of flint and chalk, with window-quoins and other 
dressings of Kentish rag-stone. The eastern half of the building is 
the oldest, and is a good (although simple) example of late 
' Decorated ' work dating from about 1330. The double sedilia, the 
piscina, and the aumbry remain in a fairly perfect state, but all traces 
of the altar, the steps, and floor have been removed. The east 
window of three lights has also been destroyed, save the cill and 
jambs, which remain in position, while the four single light side 
windows remain in fair preservation. The western portion of the 
building is later and of inferior work in every respect, it dates probably 
from about 1450 or later." 

Opposite to the chapel, is situate a mansion house called "Pipe's 
Place," referred to by Thorpe as Mr. Maplesden's house, for 
many years the residence of the Maplesden family. It may, in some 
earlier condition, have belonged to William Pepyr, and the name of 
Pepyr's Place may have been converted into Piper's Place, and ulti- 
mately Pipe's Place. William Pepyr was a Vicar of Shorne, who died 



L98 THE RUINED CHAPEL OF ST. CATHERINE 

:!ls( January L468, and lies buried in the parish enure! under the 
following inscription: — "Hie jacel Dominus Willclnnis Pepyr 
quondam Vicarius bujus ecclesise <|iii obiil \.i>. 1 His ultimo cue 
Januarii. Cujus animse propicietur Deus. Amen." 

In connection with this Vicar it may be mentioned thai amongsl 
the Wills proved in the Archidiaconal Court of Rochester (Liber 
IV., 1171-7:5, In. 50, C. J.) occurs the following : — Shorne, 
'.27 January I 17<>. ""Willelmus Peper vicarius perpetuus ecclie 
parochialis de Shorne .... [tern lego successoribus meis Vicarijs 
messuagium tneum in quo inhabito sic quod non vexenl executores 
mens in reparacione vicarie." Thus, although Vicar, be apparently 
was not resident in the Vicarage-house, and might have occupied, or 
even built, Peper's Place (or Pipe's Place, if the latter could be 
fairly regarded as a corruption of the former designation), of which 
the present edifice is a later transformation. 

I was reluctant to rest content with this imperfect account of 
the chapel, and other searches having failed I consulted Mr. AVm. 
Boyd, who shortly referred me to a Commission as to concealed 
lands in the Counties of Kent and Sussex, dated April 28, 1581, of 
which the following is a translated copy, and subjoined to it I insert 
the Certificate returned by the Commissioners. 

No. 1. 

" Elizabeth by the Grace of God of England France and Ireland Queen 
Defender of the Faith & c to our very dear and faithful Sir Roland Clerke, 
Knight, Sir Thomas Shirley, Knight, George Harte, Esquire, Henry Mervyn, 
Esquire, Henry Palmer, Esquire, Anthony Lewkenour, Esquire, Samuel Hales, 
Esquire, and Michael Cobb, Esquire, greeting. Know ye that we, putting very 
great confidence in your fidelities and provident circumspections to act in our 
affairs, have assigned you eight, seven, six, five, four or three of you to examine 
inquire and investigate as well by the examinations, relations, testimonies or 
depositions of whatsoever trustworthy men, of our Counties of Kent and Sussex, 
or by all other ways, means or manners by which you shall the better know or 
shall be able, or seven, six, five, four or three of you shall the better know or shall be 
able concerning all and singular the lordships, manors, messuages, lands, tene- 
ments, rents, rectories, tithes and other possessions and hereditaments and 
emoluments whatsoever, in our aforesaid Counties of Kent and Sussex, which 
came or ought to come to our hands or to the hands of any of our late progenitors 
as well by reason of the dissolution, suppression, resignation, surrender, or 
forfeiture, of any late monasteries, abbeys, priories, colleges, chantries, free 
chapels, fraternities, guilds or such other like kinds of things, as by escheat or 
coming by reason of escheat in any manner whatsoever and by the Statute made 
and provided that lands and tenements are not to be put to Mortmain, and by 
reason of the attainder of any person or of any persons for high treasons felonies 
or murders, and being concealed withdrawn and unjustly withheld from us and 
our aforesaid progenitors, in any way soever, in the Counties aforesaid, by whom, 
when, how, and for how long, and who received and had the issues and profits of 
the premises in the meantime issuing, and as yet receive and have them, by what 
title, right or warrant, and how much they are worth by the year in all issues 
beyond reprises, also touching other articles and circumstances more fully con- 
cerning the truth of the premises in any way soever. And therefore we command 
you eight, seven, six, five, four or three of you, that you do not omit on account 
of any liberty, but that you enter into it, or three of you enter into it, and, at a 
day and place, or days and places, which you shall have provided for this, or 
three of you shall have provided for this, and you shall diligently inquire in 



AT SHOKNE, KENT. 199 

respect of and concerning the premises with their circumstances, and you shall 

do and execute those things, or three of you .shall do or execute them, with 
effect. So that the certificates, examinations, testimonies or depositions touching 

the premises distinctly and openly taken and bad before you (or three) of von, 
do you have, or three of you have, before the Barons of our Exchequer ;it West- 
minster, as quickly as you shall be able, and at the latest in three weeks from the 
day of If oly Trinity next to come, under your seals or the seals of three of you, 
and sealed with the seals of those by whom the premises shall have been made, 
remitting then and there this Commission. And also for the better execution 
we cive and commit full power and authority to you eight, seven, six, five, four, 
or three of you, to summon and procure to appear before you, eight, seven, six, 
five, four or three of you, at such time and [place] by you or three of you to be 
assigned, whatsoever persons whom you shall deem especially fitting for the 
testifying of the truth iu the premises according to your wise discretions. And 
in respect of and concerning the premises, the Holy Evangelists being first 
touched b} r them before you or three of you, to examine and inquire, and the 
examinations, testimonies, and relations, and your enquiries nnd notices or those 
of three of you, are to be set down on parchment, together with your Certificate 
or that of three of you thereupon taken, and to be written and verified with 
your hands, or (the hands) of three of you. Witness Sir Roger Manwood, 
Knight, at Westminster, on the 28"' day of April, in the 23 rd year of our reign 
[A.D. 1581]. 

" By the Roll of the Memoranda of this Easter Roll of Commissions and 
Letters Patent. 

" And by the Barons. 

" Tho. Fanshawe." 

No. 2. 

" The certificate of Sir Roland Clerke, Knight, Michael Cobb, Esquire, and 
Samuel Hales, Esquire, Commissioners of the most Illustrious Lady Elizabeth by 
the Grace of God of England France and Ireland Queen defender of the faith 
& c by virtue of a Commission of the said Lad}' the Queen to them amongst 
others directed and annexed to this certificate made on the 19 th day of May in 
the 23 rd year of the same Lady the Queen (a.d. 1581)." 

" We Certify to the Barons of the Exchequer of the said Lady the Queen by 
virtue of the Commission aforesaid aud according to the tenor force form and 
effect of the same. 

" That one parcel of land with the appurtenances commonly called Pandolfe's 
Grove, containing half an acre lying or being in the parish of Harbaldowne in 
the County of Kent now or late in the tenure of John Monger, formerly given, 
granted or appointed for the maintenance of an obit or anniversary or such other 
kind of superstitious use for ever, is worth clear by the year in all issues beyond 
reprises, 2 d ." 

" We Certify also that the Chapel of S' Katherine with a small croft or 
garden to the same adjacent containing half an acre lying or being within the 
parish of Shorne in the County aforesaid, is worth clear by the year in all issues 
beyond reprises, 2 d ." 

" And that all and singular the premises came and of right ought to come to 
the Crown of this kingdom of England by reason of an Act of Parliament made 
and provided in the 27 th year of the reign of the late King Henry the eighth, for 
the dissolution of monasteries, priories or such other kind of religious houses, or 
by force of a certain Act of Parliament made and provided in the 31 st year of 
the said late king, for the dissolution of abbeys, monasteries, priories, or such kind 
of religious houses, or by reason and pretext of a certain Statute made and pro- 
vided for the dissolution of colleges, chantries, free chapels, guilds, and such like 
kinds of (places), in the 1 st year of the reign of the late King Edward the sixth, 
or in any other lawful manner whatsoever, and are, nevertheless, as yet concealed, 



200 THE RUINED OHA.PEL OF 8T. CATHERINE 

withdrawn and unjustly withheld, as we have learnt by the relation <>i' divers 
trustworthy (men) and is given to us the aforesaid Commissioners t" be under- 
stood and informed, from the Crown aforesaid. 

" In witness wlion-of we t lie aforesaid Commissioners have set our Seals to 

this cuir presehl Certificate. 

" Dated the day and year above \\ ritten. 

(Signed) " 1!d. CLEBB B. 

M \i ii m i .1. COBBB. 

Swn i.i. II \i.i;s." 

Doubtless in must of such cases the information was largely 
collected and Becured beforehand, since, while the Commission is 
stated and proved to have been delivered to the Commissioners on 
the 28th of April 1581, the Certificate bears date but three weeks 
later. 

From this Certificate and especially from the low estimate of 
value that it records, it is clear that the chapel and land in 
Shorne were laid waste, the former probably being roofless, and it 
affords ground for the further conjecture that there had been no 
material endowment either of land or tithes annexed to it which 
might otherwise have led to its earlier discovery, seizure, and 
alienation. 

The Certificate is also valuable in that it reveals to us for the 
first time the dedication of the building, in honour of St. Katherine, 
a very interesting fact. 

Within six months from the date of the Certificate, followed the 
final alienation of the suppressed chantry, as evidenced by the Letters 
Patent, dated 2 November, 23 Elizabeth, a.d. 1581, of which the 
following are translated extracts : — 

" The Queen, to all to whom & c greeting, Know ye that we, as well in con- 
sideration of the good and faithful service upon us bestowed before this time by 
our late very dear and faithful servant Peter Grey, deceased, as for other good 
causes and considerations at present specially moving us, of our special grace and 
of our certain knowledge and mere motion, have given and granted and by these 
presents for us, our heirs and successors do give and grant to our very dear 
subjects Edmund Haselwood, of Lyneham in the County of Oxford, gentleman, 
and Edward Thomlynson, of Hiudon in our County of Wilts, gentleman, their 
heirs and assigns for ever, all those our two messuages or tenements, with the 
appurtenances, situate lying or being in Fryday Strete in the parish of S* 
Mathew within our City of London, now or late in the tenure or occupation of 
certain William Mownslowe and Cox formerly given bequeathed or appointed 
for the maintenance of an obit or anniversary or for the susteutation of a priest 
or chaplain to celebrate masses or at that time other divine services for ever 
and, after describing the land called Pandolfe's Grove at Harbledown amidst 
other Kentish lands, proceeds : — 

" And also All that our chapel of S' Katherine with a small croft or garden 
■o the same adjacent containing half an acre lying or being within the parish of 
>horne in the count}' aforesaid .... Which said premises came or ought to come 
o the Crown of this our Kingdom of England by force of a certain Statute made 
md provided for the dissolution of chantries and other similar [places] in the 
Parliament in the first year of our late dearest brother Edward the sixth late 
King of England. 

'• We give also and for us our heirs and successors for the consideration afore- 
said by these presents do grant to the aforesaid Edmund Haselwood and Edward 
Thomlynson their heirs and assigns all and all kinds of woods underwoods and 
other trees whatsoever of in and upon all and singular the premises above by these 



AT 8H0B.NE, KENT. 201 

presents before granted and growing and being of in and upon every or any 
parcel of t bo same. And the whole bind ground and soil of the same woods 
underwoods and trees. Also all and every kind of courts leet, views of frank- 
pledge, liberties, privileges and all things which certain or in future ought to 
belong to courts leet and views of frankpledge belonging or pertaining to the 
premises before granted and of every parcel thereof and our reversion and 
reversions, remainder and remainders whatsoever of all and singular the 
premises above specified and by these presents before granted and of every parcel 
thereof. Also the rents, services, revenues, conditions, agreements, forfeitures, 
commodities, emoluments, and annual profits whatsoever, reserved upon whatso- 
ever leases or grants in any manner made touching the premises before granted or 
touching any parcel thereof. And all and singular the premises with all their 
appurtenances as fully freely and entirely and in as ample manner and form as 
any abbot, abbess, prior, prioress, priest, warden, chaplain, chantry priest, 
incumbent, master, brother, governor or feoffor, or any abbots, abbesses, priors, 
prioresses, wardens, chaplains, chantry-priests, incumbents, masters, brothers, 
governors or feoffors, of the guild, hospital, lights, lamps, obits, anniversaries, and 
such like kind of things aforesaid, or any other or any others before this having 
possessing or being thereof seized, had, held or enjoyed the premises before 
granted, or any parcel thereof, or ought to have, hold, and enjoy, the same premises 
or any parcel thereof. And as fully freely and entirely and in as ample manner 
and form as those all and singular the premises before granted and every parcel 
thereof or parcels thereof or rents or other profits of the same or of any parcel 
thereof came or ought to come to our hands or to the hands of our dearest father 
Henry the eighth or of our brother Edward the sixth, late Kings of England, or 
to the hands of our dearest sister Mary, late Queen of England, or to hands of 
any others our progenitors b} r reason or pretext of any suppression dissolution 
forfeiture or surrender of the aforesaid abbeys, hospitals, chantries, chapels, gilds, 
fraternities, lights, obits, anniversaries, or such like kinds of things aforesaid, or by 
reason or pretext of any Act of Parliament or bj' escheat or escheats exchange or 
exchanges or by the attainder or attainders of any person or any persons, or by 
whatsoever other lawful manner right or title or now are or ought to be in our 
hands. 

" All and singular which said premises, with the appurtenances and every 
parcel thereof were up to this time, or until the 12 th da}' of February in the 
eighteenth year of our reign concealed withdrawn or unjustly witheld from us or 
from our said father brother or sister or of which the rents farms and profits of 
the same now or before the said 12"' day of February are or were not answered 
for and paid to us. 

" To have, hold and enjoy all the aforesaid chapels rectories tithes messuages 
lands tenements meadows feedings, pastures, woods underwoods hereditaments 
and other all and singular the premises above expressed and specified and by 
these presents before granted with all and singular their appurtenances to the 
aforesaid Edmund Huselwood and Edward Thomlynson their heirs and assigns 
to the only use and behoof of the said Edmund Haselwood and Edward Thom- 
lynson their heirs and assigns for ever. To hold of us our heirs and successors 
as of our manor of Estgrenewich in our County of Kent by fealty only in free and 
common socage and not in chief nor by Knight service And rendering annually 
to us our heirs and successors the several rents below named and specified. That 
is to say of and for the aforesaid parcel of land with the appurtenances called 
Pandolfe's grove four pence .... And of and for all that chapel of S' Kathe- 
rine with the aforesaid small croft or garden to the same adjacent two shillings. 

" In [witness] whereof & c . 

" Witness the Queen at (. . . .) on the second day of November." 

These records not only reveal the true dedication, but also con- 
firm the ecclesiastical status of the chapel as a chantry, and thus 
legally warrant and verify its civil suppression and dissolution, and 
they inform us of the true date and circumstances of its sale and 



202 CHAPEL OF ST. [CATHERINE AT SHORNE. 

diversion to Becular purposes, to which it remained appropriated (in 
tin.' Eorm of malting-nouse, stables, and cowhouse) lill the period of 
its re-sale and projected restoration in .\.n. L890, a cold shade of 
aeglecl of about 309 years' duration. 

Unfortunately such records convey no information as to the 
founder or as to the period and circumstances of the foundation. 

The stone coffin mentioned by Thorpe was dug up immediately 
to the cast of the chancel cud of the chapel, bul no remains of it 
can now be traced. In the interior I have made no excavation, 
being generally averse to any disturbance of human remains \>y 
way of speculative exploration, should any have been laid to rest 
within the walls. 



( 203 ) 



ON THE PARISH CLERKS AND SEXTON OF 
EAVERSHAM, A.D. 1506—1593. 

BY F. F. GIRAUD, TOWN CLERK OF FAVERSIIAM. 

Abbreviated copies of Documents Nos. 1 and 2 are contained in 
Jacob's History of Fewer sham (177-1). The date was misprinted by 
him as 22 Henry VIII., instead of 22 Henry VII. 

Complete copies, which have been carefully compared with the 
original entries in the Wardmote Book of the Corporation of Favers- 
ham, are now given. 

The "Articles" were enacted by the Mayor, Jurats, and Commons 
of Faversham, assembled in Wardmote, within whose civil juris- 
diction the parish church was situate. 

It appears by these regulations that the clerks acted as " servers " 
at the mass, and also as " Eectores Chori " or " Cantors," in which 
capacity they probably wore the copes of green bawdekyn which are 
mentioned in the Inventory printed in Archceologia Cantiana, 
XVIII., 108. When the choir men or boys sang out of tune, the 
clerks were to cease singing the " faux bourdon " or harmony, and 
to take up the " plain song " or melody until the choir got out of 
difficulty. 

They also had to attend to much of the cleaning of the church, 
which afterwards devolved on the sexton, and they or their deputy 
slept in the steeple, helped the sexton to ring, and each Sunday 
carried holy water to every house. 

The clerks' duties also included that of teaching children to read 
and sing in choir, and the instruction probably embraced that which, on 
the foundation of the Grammar School in 1527, was required of every 
child previous to admission thereto ; namely, to say and read matins, 
evensong, vn psalms, Latin dirige, and Commendations. 

The sexton or his deputy was also every night to sleep in the 
steeple. The mode of ringing curfew, nones, matins, masses, even- 
song, etc., was defined, and he was directed as to opening the church, 
lighting the lamps, tapers, and large candles, filling the holy water 
stoups, cleaning the church, and guarding the churchyard. 

These Articles do not appear to have been expressly repealed, 
but probably such customs as were repugnant to the letter or spirit 
of the new Book of Common Prayer ceased gradually to be observed. 

A succession of two clerks (as will be seen by Document No. 3) 
was continued until 1548, when the number was reduced to one. 
As long as two remained it is probable that they made as few 
alterations as possible in the routine of their duties, and were glad 
by a continuance of them to justify the payment of their accustomed 



201 ON THE PARISH CLERKS AND SEXTON OF 

Document No. I gives new regulations Eor the sexton in the 
thirty-fifth year of Queen Elizabeth. 

These several Orders were framed, Nbs. I and - in L506, when 
William Warham was Primate, and Henry VII. was King; No. 3 in 
lols, when Thomas Cranmer was Primate, and ESdward VI. was 
king; No. 4 in L593, when John WTiitgifl was Primate, and Eliza- 
bel li was Queen. 

No. 1. 

►J- The Articles of the Oflice of the Parish Clerks of the Parishe 
Churche of Faversham, by them to be fulfilled and executed by 
them as hereafter followeth, which Articles were made and enacted 
at a comon Wardmote holden at Faversham forsaid the Sonday next 
after the Fest of All Seynts the xxij lh yere of the reigne of Kyng 
Henry the VII th byfore me Eob* AVythiott Mayor of the same. 

I. cla. — Imprimis. The said Clarkys or one of theym dilygently 
shall intende upon the Vicar or his depute in mynystracion of the 
Sacrements and Sacrementallis at all tymes, both be daie and 
nyghte as oft as nede shall requyre, and to be dilygent and obedient 
to the Vicar or his depute in all suche lefull thynggs and comaund- 
ments as shall belong to their Office to be don. 

II. cla. — Item. The said Clerkis or one of theym shall daily 
intende in his rogett* at morowe masse,f and at high masse, apparel! 
the auters and to revest the prests syngyng the said masses and see 
that lighte or fire be contynually in the Chaunsell or Chirche before 
none every day, while their is any masse to be songe as of olde 
tyme hath be acustomed. 

III. cla. — Item. The said Clerkys or one of theym daily shall 
apparell the Auters wher any prests is to syng masse after the 
morowe masse and here and bryng to the Auters the chalice, masse 
boke and cruetts with wine and water, and here agayne to the vestry 
the same masse boke chalice and other ornaments wheche shalbe 
occupied at the said masses as of olde tyme hath be acustomed. 

IIII. cla. — Item. The said Clerkys at every masse be note shall 
syng the graylej at the upper dexte in the body of the quyer and 
the pistell§ and to be dylygent to syng all the office of the masses 
be note. And to be dilygent to syng and doo ther dute at all 
servyces to be songe be note. And to bryng forth suche bookis in 
to the quyer as shalbe necessarye as well for masses to be songe in 
the said chirche as any other service ther to be song be note. And 
to bryng forth in to the quyer att every pryncipall feste surplyces 
rochetts coopis and other ornaments as shall for the convenyent 

servyce accordyng to the solempnite of the fest and to ley the same 
books half on the oon side of the quyer and the other halff of theym 
on the other side. And at every pryncipal feste the said clarkys, 

* The rochet differs from the alhe, in reaching only to the knees, and from a 
surplice, in having straight sleeves, 
f The early morning mass. 

X The Graduate, a portion of a psalm following the Epistle. 
§ The Epistle. 



faveusiiam, A.D. 1506-1593. 205 

and every of theym shall dilygently come to the Wardeyns of the 
Wardeyns \jsic] of the said Chun-he for the tyme beyng and shewe 
theym wliat ornaments shalbe necessary to be occupied for the 
pryncipall fest. And theruppon to helpp theym to fett the same 
ornaments out of the treasour house on to the vestry and ther 
dilygently to gyve theym and order theym as of olde tyme hath he 
accustomed. And after the pryncipall fest is past to folde up the 
coopis* and other ornaments manerly and bryng theym agayne 
dilygently in to the said treasour house. 

V. cla. — Item. The said clarkis or one of theym at all tymes 
whanne ony servyce shalbe done by note, shall sett the quyer not 
after his owne brest, but as every man beyng a synger may synge 
convenyently his part. And wher playn songe fayleth one of them 
shall leave fabnrden and kepe the playne songe unto the tyme the 
quyer be sett agayne. 

VI. cla. — Item. The said clarkis or one of theym dayly shall 
sett and putt in to the cruetts freshe water for the prestis to synge 
with and see the said cruettis to be made clene within. 

VII. cla. — Item. The said clarkis or one of theym every weke 
shall make clene the quyer the Trynite chapell and specially over 
the Auters and about theym and brusshe away the cobwebbis as well 
over the Auters in the quyer and chappellis as over the wallis and 
windowes of the same and shall apparrell all the said Auters ayenst 
every pryncipall fest with suche apparrell as belongeth to theym. 

VIII. cla. — Item. The said clarkis or one of theym or a suffi- 
cient man for theym shall lye nyghtly in the churche stepill. And 
from All Hallowtide unto the fest of the Annunciaeion of our Lady 
they or one of theym or ther sufficient depute shalbe in the Churche 
every nyght by vn at clok and from the fest of the Annunciaeion of 
our Lady unto the Pest All Hallow the same clarks or one of 
theym or their sufficient depute shall nyghtly be in the said Churche 
by viii at clok at the forthest. 

IX. cla. — Item. The said clarkis and either of theym shall be 
obedyent to the Mayor Juratts and Comons of the said Towne and 
not to have no sklaunderous words ne make none occasion of debate 
in words nor in dede bitweue the curatt and parisshyns ne betwene 
parisshen and parisshen. 

X. cla. — Item. The said clarkis or one of theym as moche as in 
theym is shall endevour theymself to teche childern to rede and 
synge in the quyer and to do service in the churche as of olde tyme 
hath be accustomed thei takyng for their techyng as belongith 
therto. 

XL cla. — Item. The said clarkis and either of theym at all 
tymes whan the Sextayne of the said Churche shall lak helpp to 
ryng to evyn-song mateyns or masse thei and either of theym for 
lak of suche help shall helpp the said Sextayne as moche as in 
theym is to ryng for the spedynes of the service ther to be don. 

XII. cla. — Item. The said clarkys and either of theym or their 

* Cope, a vestment like a long cape or cloak worn in solemn services, pro- 
cessions, etc. 



20G ON THE PARISH CLERKS AND SEXTON OF 

Bufficienl depute every Sonday in the yere shall ber haly water to 
every tnannes house as « »1" olde fcyme bath be accustomed. A.nd it' 
the same clarkis or any of fcheym make defaute in bering of boly 
water in the said forme thanne be or fchei so makyng defaute shall 
Borfaite Eor every such defaute vmd. And this mony t<> b<- levied 
by the Churche Wardeyns for the tyme beyng to thuse of the said 
Churche. Provided alway if the said darks or any of theym be 
occupied with any besynes for the pariBshe or it' ther Eel! an\ 
principall Fest on the Sonday (hen the said ('larks and either of 
theym slial be excused in beryng of holy water the same pryncipall 
fest and discharged of their penalte for every suche pryncipall 
fest. 

XIII. cla. — Item. The said clarkis and every of them shalbe 
alway dilygent to the Church "Wardeyns of the same Churche for 
the tyme beyng and obedient to theym and dilygently do and 
execute all such lefull commaundements as to theym or to any of 
theym shall be commaunded by the said Wardeyns or any of theym 
for anythyng concernying the well of the said parishe and as shal 
belong to their office. 

XIIII. cla. — Item. The said clarkis and every of theym shall 
skoure and kepe clene the holy water stoppis of laton, and the 
basyn and ewer whoche be ordeigned for christenyng of childern 
and theym so kepe and skoure and make clene as often as nede shall 
requyre in that behalve. 

XV. cla. — Item. From hensforth every dark, when he is 
admytted to the office of the clerkshipp in the said chirche shall 
swer upon a booke that he on his behalf shall endevour hymself as 
moche as in hym is truly to fulfill and execute all the said articles 
and everyche of theym. 

No. 2. 

►J- The Articles of the office of the Sextayne of the parishe of 
Faversham by hym to be fulfillid and executed as hereafter 
followyth which Articles war made and enactid at a Comon Ward- 
mote holden at Faversham forsaid the Sonday next after the fest of 
the Epiphany of our Lorde the xxn th yere of the raigne of Kyng 
Henry the VII th by fore me Eobt Wythiott then beyng Mayor of 
the said Towne togeder with the Juratts and comons of the same 
Towne. 

I. cla. — In primis. The said sextayn or his sufficient depute 
every nyght shall lye in the said Churche stepill. 

II. cla. — Item. The said sextayn or his sufficient depute every 
nyght from All Hallowtide unto the fest of the Annunciacion of our 
Lady nyghtly shalbe in the said Churche or stepill by vn at clok in 
the evyn and ther shall contynue abyde and lye from that howre unto 
vn at clok on the next morowe and from the Annunciacion of our 
Lady unto All Hallowtide the same sextayn or his sufficient depute 
nyghtly shalbe in the Churche or stepill by viii at clok in the evyn 
and ther shall contynue and ly from that howre unto v at clok in 
next mornyng. And every nyght the same sextayn or his sufficient 



FAVERSHAM, A.D. 150G-1593. 207 

depute at vin at clok shall ryng couvrefewe by the space of oon 
quarter of an hour with suche a bell as of olde tyme hath be 
accustomed. 

III. ela. — Item. The said sextayne or his depute every day in 
the mornyng in somer sliall opeu the Churche doorea at v at clok, 
and in wynter at vi at clok. 

IIII. cla. — Item. The said sextayn or his depute every Saturdaie 
Seynts Evyns and pryncipall fests shall rynge noone with as many 
bells as shall be convenient for the Saturdaies Seynts Evyns and 
pryncipall fests and as shalbe longe accordyng to the tyme ; and at 
afternoone at everyche of the said daies ryng to evyn song, with as 
many bellys as belong to the tyme at a convenyent hour as of olde 
tyme hath be accustomed. And on the morowe of everyche of the said 
daies to ryng to matyns, and masse, and evyn song accordying as 
belongith, at convenyent hours, and as many peelys as of olde tyme 
hath be acustomed. And on the Werk daies to ryng every dale to 
masse at a convenyent hour, as shalbe requyred by the Vicar or his 
depute as of olde tyme hath be accustomed. 

V. cla. — Item. The said sextayn or his depute whan he shall 
ryng noone or to the first evyn song matyns masse and last evyn 
song or to any other service he and such persons as shall ryng with 
him, shall rynge in dewe ordour and in as good tyme, as they may or 
can and not to rynge to long tyme over to short tyme but as it is 
convenyent. 

VI. cla. — Item. The said sextayn or his depute every "VVerke 
day shall toll three tymes to the morow masse, with the iiij th bell at 
v of the clok in somer and at vi at clok in wynter ; and at the first 
tollyng he shall strike xxx strokis with the claper of the same bell ; 
at secund tollyng within a quarter of an hour after xv strokes ; and 
at the thirde tollyng vi strokis ; and after as sone as the parish dark 
hath rouge all in to the morowe masse with the litell bell, the same 
sextayn or his depute shall toll yn in strokis with the said fourth 
bell. And besidis this the same sextayn or his depute every AVerke 
day shall tolle to the sakeryng of the high masse with the furst bell 
and the iii d bell as hath be used of olde tyme. 

VII. cla. — Item. The same Sextayn or his depute every dale 
sliall make provision for the lightyng of the lampe in the quyer 
before any prest goo to masse and so to se it contynue as long as 
ony masse is to be songe ther. And besides this, the same Sextayn or 
his depute daily and nyghtly shall kepe the lampe in the quyer to 
brenne if he have oile therfore And if he lak oile thanne he or his 
depute diligently to complayne to the Churche Wardeyns for the 
tyme byng or to som of theym for the spedy reformacion therof. 

VIII. cla. — Item. The said Sextayn or his depute every holy 
evyn, at the first Evyn song, mattyns masse, and last evyn song, 
sliall light the tapers and bemys* accordyng to the solempnyte of 
the fest and custome of the said Churche he takyng for his labour 
for lightyng of every of the said bemys as of olde tyme hath be 
accustomed and used. 

* Lighted candles placed before the " beam " or "rood." 



208 ON THE PARISH CLERKS AND SEXTON OF 

IX. cla. — Item. The said Sextayn or bis depute every Saturday 

at i n i iic shall fell t he ho] y water stoppis in the body of the Churche 
with Eresshe water, and as often in the Weke as aede shall requj re, 
and every daj in the mornyng to see the Churche made clene for 

shomen Qg "!' doggB. 

X. cla. — Item. The said sextayn or his depute every weke shall 
make clcen the body of the Churche, and the cr0886 His. from dust 

or other filthes, and also on the evyn of every pryncipall lest, and 
brusshe away all the cobwebbis and make cleen over and aboul all 
the Auters, wallis and wyndowes in the body of the said Churche, as 
often fcymes as aede shall requyre. 

XL cla. — Item. If their com any lies) is into the chureheyerd by 
escape or non closure of the Churche Wallis thann the same ►Sextayn 
or his depute shall dryve theym out in as hasty tyme as he can. 
Ami if any person or persons of hiB or their wilful mynde putt any 
best into the said churche ycrd ther to pastur then the same .Sextayn 
or his depute in the namys of the Churche AVardeyns for the tyme 
beyng courtesly shall goo to the owners of the said bests and requyre 
theym to fett them away And if the same owner or owners uppon 
suche request refuse to do then the same sextayn or his depute 
immediatly after suche refusell made shall dryve the saidbestis to the 
lordis pounde and ther to remaigne unto the tyme the owner or 
owners of them have agreed with the Vicar or his depute for that 
offence the same Sextayn takyng for his labor for every best so 
offendyng and dryven to the pound i d. 

XII. cla. — Item. The said Sextayn and his depute shalbe 
diligent to the Vicar and his depute and diligently shall doo and 
observe all leful commaundements concernyng his office whoche to 
hym or his depute shall be commaunded by the said Vicar or his 
depute. 

No. 3. 
Anno 1518 E. vj u ij do tempore Thome Ardern* Maioris. 

" And whereas there hath bene tyme wherof no mannys mynde 
hath bene to the contrarye Twoo Clercks whiche have hadd at the 
equall charges of the Towne iiij 11 every of theym of whiche viij u 

* In 1537 Thomas Ardorne was one of the clerks of Edward North, Esq., 
Clerk of the Parliament, and received from the Treasurer of Augmentations 
£6 13*. id., " in recompense of such pains as he and his fellows have taken in 
and about the writing and making of certain books of Acts of Parliament for 
the King's Highness, concerning as well the suppressed lauds as the King's 
Highness' purchased lands." 

His subsequent career at Faversham and his murder there are described in an 
Essav on the Tragedy of Arden of Feventiam, by Rev. C. E. Donne, M.A., 
1873". 

By his wife Alice, daughter of Sir Edward North, he left issue an only child 
Margaret, who afterwards became the wife of John Bradborne. 

By Deed, 3 November 10 Elizabeth, Margaret widow of John Bradborne 
granted to Robert Eyre of Boughton-under-Blean, Esq., Richard Barrey of 
Barham, Esq., Richard Parrett of Sandwich, Esq., .and Robert Fagg of Favers- 
ham, gent., hereditaments in Abbey Street, the Church mead, the Abbey green. 



FAVERSHAM, a.d. 1506-1593. 209 

hath bone recowped atul taken toward the fynding of one Sexten 
\wi s viii' 1 for as moche as thise payments hath growen in con- 
sideracon of suche threat travayllas the Clerks heretofore susteynod 
inthexecuconoftheiroffi.ee, whiche travaills for asmoche as they 
be decreased and dymynisshed so the Inhabitants of the said towne 
having respect thereunto have thought it mete to abate not onely 
the clerks wages but the number of the Clerks And yet not mynd- 
ing to have the same somes so abated to be extincted and discharged 
But to remayne to good uses as the same did before, conclude, 
establisshe, and agree, that it shalbe ordeyned, and decreed, in 
manner and forme folowyng, That is to save, that there shalbe no 
moo Clercks then one, within the said parisshe churche, And that 
the same Clerk shall have for his wages yerely liij s iiij d , and that 
also there shalbe a Sexten within the said parisshe whiche said 
Sexten shall yerely have for his wages xxvj s viij d . And the other 
iiij" sterling shall yerly for ever be paid to and for the wages of the 
Comon carver before rehersed.* And every parisshoner to pave 
and make contribueon for the payment of the said viij 1 ' so appoynted 
to and for the payment of the parisshe Clerk, Sexten, and Carter, 
in lyke forme and after suehe severall porcions as here to fore they 
or any of theym have paid and bene assessed or taxed, when they 
hadd ij Clerkes and that it shalbe lawfull for the Mayor for the 
tyme beyng to commytt to warde every such person refusing to 
paye to the same as they have done before, there to remayne till 
they have paid ytt." 

No. 4. 

Faversham. Commune Concilium tentum ibidem die lime viz. 
xxix die Octobris anno regni domine nostre Elizabethe Dei Gratia 
Anglie Francie et Hibernie Regine fidei defensor etc. tricesimo quinto 
coram Roberto Banes maior ville predicte Nicholo Upton Roberto 
Lame Johanne Castelocke Johanne Upton Willielmo Sakar et 
Willielmo Tyllman juratis eiusdem ville Johanne Hallett Johanne 
Ellfrythe Thoma Pelham AVillielmo Chatbourne Georgio Cruttall 
Johanne Reve Ricardo Pyerce Ricardo Danyell Roberto Allen et 
Daniel Gyeles.f 

the Sextry, the washhouse croft, the Thome house, and meadows at Faversham, 
to the use of herself for life ; remainder to the use of Nicholas her son by said 
John Bradborne, and the heirs of his body in tail; remainder to the use of the 
heirs of the body of the said Margaret in tail ; remainder to the use of Thomas 
Northe, Esq., and Edward North his son, their heirs and assigns. 

* An order was made at the same "Wardmote for the appointment of a 
Common Carryer and avoider of all the mire, dung, and other contagious filths 
and refuse within every street of the town or their liberties, such refuse, etc., to 
be laid at such place as the Mayor and three Jurats should appoint, not more 
than half a mile out of the town, and to be carried twice a week. 

t Persons named in Document No. 4. 

Allen, Robert (Grocer), Chamberlain 1583-4; Commoner 1585 to 1595; 
Jurat 1595 to 1614; Mayor 1601. Buried at Faversham 1631. (See also 
Archceologia Cantiana, VI., 321.) He gave a house in Partridge Lane, Favers- 
ham, now made into two tenements, for poor widows. Arms: Gules, a cross 
ermine, on a chief three pellets. 

VOL. XX. P 



210 PARISll CLERKS AND SEXTON OP FAVERSHAM. 

An \i-i touchinge the Sexten of fclie Churche. 5T1 ye agreayd 
live the Eoreseide Maior Juratts & Comynaltye here assemhlyd & 

gatheryd together ili.it the Saxten Er benceforthe shall give 

attendance al the Churche & pynge to Servyce as heretofore of late 
tyeme bathe byn usyd within the same Towne A.nd bhal the same 
Sexten shall yerelye Eor bye wages have payed hym bye the Churche- 
Wardens of the Bame Towne For the heme lieintje \I s of lawful! 
inonvo.it' [nglande quarterlye at the Eower usual] Eeaste dayea of 
the yere viz. al the feaste daye of the Natyvytie of our Ionic God, 
the A nn n ncv. -icon of our ladye S 1 Marj e the V\ rg] n. the Natyvytye 
of S' John the Baptyste & >S l Mychaell t lie Archangel! bye evyn 
pore' ons and also thai the same Saxten shall lykewysse yerelye have 
paved bym bye the Chamberleyns of the same Towne for the yere 
beinge xl 9 of lawful! monye of [nglande at the foreseide feaste dayes 
live the lyke porc'ons for ringynge to sermons And further that the 
same Sexten shall have Ins accustomed fees for towlynge of the 
passinge bell ringinge of knelles ryngynge to buryalls makynge of 
Graves as well in the Churche as in the Churchyarde asys allreadyc 
sett downe in a Table now hangynge in the Churche for that purpose 
And moreover for the rynginge of the greate be!l to everye funerall 
sermon the some of vi s viii 1 ' Jn consyderacon of which hys foreseide 
wages & fees to be payed as aforeseide the seide Sexten shall dayelye 
throwgheout the whole yere rynge Curfewe with tlie fowreth hell at 
eyghte of the clocke in the evenynge bye the space & tyrne of one 
quarter of an hower And also that the same Saxten shall daylye 
thorowhe the whole yere rynge the fowerthe bell for a daye bell at 
fower of the elocke in the mornynge bye the lyke space & tyme. 

Banes, Robert, Jurat 1591 to 1600 ; Mayor 1593. 

Castelocke, John, Commoner 1580 ; Churchwarden 1584 ; Jurat 1584 to 
1613 ; Mayor 1588, 1603. Nephew of the last Abbot of St. Saviour's, Faversham. 
On a mural monument in Faversham Church : — " Here lieth John Caslock the 
elder late J urate and twice Mayor of this Towne and Captaine of the select band. 
Who died the 26 day of February 1613 being about tbe age of threescore and 
one ; and Alice his wife who died the third day of Marcb 1613 being about the 
age of threescore and nine ; they were married some fourty years and had issue 
fower sonnes John, Mayor at the time of their death, William, Daniel, Abraham, 
and two daughters Ben net and Elizabeth." 

Chatbourne, William, Churchwarden 1581 ; Commoner 1580 to 1611. 

Cruttall, George, Commoner 1587 to 1(300. 

Dani/ell, Richard, Commoner 1592 to 1596, when he died. 

Ellfrythe, John, Commoner 1573 to 1604. 

Gyeles, Daniel, Commoner 1592 to 1599. 

Halleit, John, Commoner 1584 to 1593; Jurat 1593 to 1598; Mayor 1596. 

Lame, Robert, Commoner 1565 ; Jurat 1574 ; Churchwarden 1585 ; Mayor 
1586, 1589. 

Pelham, Thomas, Commoner 1583 to 1593 ; Jurat 1593 to 1598. 

Pyerce, Richard, Commoner 1592 to 1599. 

Rem, John, Commoner 1592 to 1596, when he left Faversham. 

Sakar, William, Commoner 1567 ; Jurat 1587; Mayor 1590. By will, dated 
6 October 1585, he gave a rent charge from his lauds in Harty, viz., £10 for the 
poor, and £5 for a weekly lecture at Faversham. Arms : Sable, a bend engrailed 
between two bulls' heads erased or. 

Tollman, William, Commoner 1590; Jurat 1592; Mayor 1594. 

Upton, John, see Archceologia Cantiana, Vol. X., p. 230. 

Upton, Nicholas, see Archceologia Cantiana, Vol. X.,p. 230. 



( 211 ) 



TROTTESCLTFFE CHURCH. 

BY CANON SCOTT ROBERTSON. 

Tbottescltffe, or Trottesclyve, Manor was given to the See of 
Rochester by Off a, King of Mercia, in a.d. 78K. Probably a small 
church was built here soon after that date. 

The existing chancel was probably built by Grundulf, who 
was Bishop of Rochester from a.d. 1077 to 1108. The tower 
seems to have been added, by Bishop Glanville, late in the twelfth 
century, when perhaps the nave was rebuilt. The Decorated 
windows were inserted by Bishop Hamo de Hethe. 

As the Domesday Survey mentions a church here in or about 
a.d. 1085-6, we may say with tolerable certainty that the walls of 
this chancel are a little more than 800 years old. The church is 
dedicated to St. Peter and St. Paul. 

We observe in the east wall, and in the north wall, very wide 
joints between the separate stones of the masonry, and we notice 
the regular straight courses in which those very irregularly shaped 
stones are laid. Upon the south wall we cannot discern these 
peculiar features of the ancient masonry, because a thick coating of 
"roughcast" covers the whole wall. A similar coating covered the 
east, and north walls also, until the present rector, the Rev. C. \V. 
Shepherd, acting upon Sir (Jilhert Scott's advice, caused the rough- 
cast to be removed from them. Thanks to Mr. Shepherd's action, 
we can see also that an unusually large quantity of "tufa" or 
"travertine" was used in these; walls. All the coigns (or angles 
of the walls) are of tufa. The jambs and heads of the small Norman 
windows are of tufa. The tapering wall of the east gable was capped 
with tufa along the entire length of its top. At its apex we see 
much tufa built into the outer face of the wall. Some or all of this 
was originally used in capping the whole width of the tapering wall 
of the gable ; but the masons who rebuilt the apex of the gable (when 
the new east window was inserted) simply replaced the tufa upon the 
outer face of the tapering wall, not throughout its entire thickness. 

The plain flat appearance of the modern east window's sill and 
jambs was caused by the necessity of cutting away their mouldings, 
which were originally planned to fit the wall when it was faced with 
roughcast. On the removal of the roughcast these mouldings 
projected considerably beyond the surface of the ancient wall. So 
the mouldings wen- cut away. 

The Norman windows of the chancel are worthy of close examina- 
tion. Two in the north wall are in their original state on the 
exterior. There is no sill of ashlar to any <">f them. The small size 

p 2 



'2\2 TROTrESCLIFFB CIIURCIL. 

of the masonry used is noteworthy. Generally five stones are used 
in each Bhorl jamb, and their narrow round arched heads are turned 
Bometimes with eight stones, sometimes with nine stones, and in one 
case thirteen stones actually appear in the Little round arch of the 

small window in the south wall. All these stones are of tufa, 
which reseinhles grey sponge in appearance. 

It is difficult to discover in Kent any example of the earliest 
Norman walling and windows so well preserved and so unaltered as 
these in the chancel of Trotteacliffe Church, thanks to the care of 
Ihe rector, the Rev. C. W. Shepherd. 

The tower, built against the middle of the nave's south wall, 
retains very little trace of its early date. I believe that it was 
built in the time of Gilbert de Grlanville, who was Bishop of Rochester 
from 1185 to 1211. He rebuilt the episcopal manor house here, 
about a.d. 1187. At that period several Kentish towers were erected 
on the south side of the nave, as at Tong, Bapchild, Throwley, 
Preston by Faversham, and at Trottescliffe. 

The plan of the tower at base (according to measurements made 
by the Rev. C. W. Shepherd) may be said to be externally 20 feet 
square, and internally 12 feet square. The actual measurements 
are exterior 20 feet 3 inches by 19 feet 9 inches, and interior 12 feet 
1 inch by 11 feet 8 inches. The walls are 4 feet thick up to the 
first course where they batter to 3 feet, and they lessen in thickness 
as they rise higher. 

From the tower we enter the nave through a doorway of the 
Transition period (between Norman and Early English). West of 
that doorway, higher up in the south wall of the nave and north 
wall of the tower, is a pointed doorway, the sill of which is nearly on 
a level with the apex of the entrance doorw r ay. B} r means of 
wooden steps, or a ladder, access from the nave to the tower was 
afforded by this doorway. The aperture through the wall of the 
tower is roughly pierced, and contains no hewn stone. 

In the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries alterations were made 
in the tower. Its exterior buttresses w r ere added, probably, in 
1509 when repairs were going on, towards the cost of which Alice 
Deysey of Addington bequeathed a bullock. 

A vestry is formed in the south-west angle of the tower, and in 
the window of that vestry are two ancient quarries, or diamond 
panes of glass. One bears the sacred monogram \\) g, and the other 
a plain device conventional but somewhat floral. 

The plan of the church as it now exists was thus formed and 
completed, probably, before or very soon after a.d. 1200. For 690 
years that plan has remained the same. 

In the reign of Edward II., or in the early part of his son's reign, 
Bishop Hamo de Hethe altered and improved the interior of the 
church. In the north wall of the nave is a two-light window 
inserted by him, which contains portions of good coloured glass ; 
and on the south side of the chancel there is another similar window 
of the Decorated period. A piscina niche of that style likewise 
remains in the south wall. 




TROTTESCLIFFE CHURCH, 

FROM THE SOUTH. 



TROTTESCLIFFE CHURCH. 213 

As the resilience of Ilamo de Hethe and later Bishops of 
Rochester, in their manor house here, greatly affected this church 
during the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, it may be well to 
dwell upon this for a few minutes. At Trottesclyve and Hailing 
were manor houses of the Mediaeval Bishops of Rochester. Hailing 
Manor with its hamlet was worth £38 per annum, and Trottescliff 
£15, in 13G0. Hamo de Hethe, Bishop of Rochester (1319-52), 
was as much attached to Trottesclyve as an occasional residence, as 
he was to Hailing as his more permanent dwelling-place. In 1330, 
when Archbishop Mepham visited the diocese of Rochester, as Metro- 
politan, the local authorities at Rochester and Strood complained 
bitterly that their Bishop loved to remain at Hailing and Trottesclyve, 
not visiting the rest of his diocese as he was expected to do. The 
animus of the complaint is betrayed by their concluding remark that 
his mode of episcopal life " injures S* Andrew's Priory at Rochester 
and ruins Strood Hospital." He was at Trottesclyve in 1320, on 
22 November. 

Here, at Trottesclyve, the Bishop made use both of his own 
private chapel in the manor house and of this parish church. 

For example he held ordinations in this church on the 2nd of 
March 1324-5, when he ordained, to Deacon's Orders, Roger Digge, 
rector of Cukkelestane (Cuxton), who had been instituted to that 
rectory (but without full corporal possession thereof) on the 12th of 
December 1324.* The Bishop had spent his Christmas at HalliiiL r , 
and came hither in the spring. He held another ordination in this 
church on the 11th of April 1327. 

Here also was held a court of enquiry, respecting the non- 
residence of the rector of Mereworth, in May 1340. 

Nor was Bishop Hamo exceptional among the Bishops of Roches- 
ter in his use of this church. Nearly a century later, Bishop John 
Langdon summoned Thomas Halle of Rochester to appear before 
him in this church, and he did apj)ear here on the 25th of Sep- 
tember 1425, to clear himself from a charge of heretical teaching 
against veneration of images, against pilgrimages to holy relics, and 
similar doctrines. Sixteen sureties appeared as his compurgators, 
and the Bishop charged him not only to abjure all such doctrines, 
but to give information as to any who used or read English books 
teaching such heresies as he was accused of. Evidently Thomas 
Halle was a century in advance of his age ; and we to-day recognise 
that within the walls of this church one of the early English 
Reformers was tried for teaching doctrines which are now accepted 
by the Established Church of England. 

Later still, in 1439-40, Bishop William Wells ordained in this 
parish church four Acolites aud one Sub-deacon. The person who 
was here ordained Sub-deacon on that day, February 19th, 1439-40, 
was the rector of this parish, Marmaduke Skelton, who as an Acolite 
had been instituted to the benefice on the 30th of September 1439 

* He received nil the minor orders on the 16th of December 1321; was 
ordained Sub-deacon on the 22ud of that month ; became Deacon ou the 2nd of 
March, aud Priest on the 27th of May 132o. 



214 TROTTESCLIFFE CHUECH. 

— nearly five months before he became :i Sub-deacon. lie was 
ordained Deacon three weeks afterwards in Town Mailing parish 
church (on March 111, L 439-40). By mediaeval church law a man 
could nut he ordained Sub-deacon until he was twenty -one years old ; 

nor Deacon until some years alter that. 

[n the manor-house chapel more of the episcopal transactions 
took plare than were accomplished in Trottesclyve parish church. 
For instance, we read in Bishop llamo de Hethe's Register (folio 
174 b ), thai on the L6th of May L339 the Bishop himself celebrated 
]\hiss in his chapel, and then admitted to Holy Orders, as an Acolite, 
Robert de Brundissch, who had been instituted, to the rectory of 
Wolewych (Woolwich) nine days before. 

Another class of business done generally in the manor chapel, 
when any Bishop of Rochester was at TrottesclifEe, was the instil u1 ion 
to benefices. For example Bishop John de Shepey, in the manor 
chapel ou the 11th of April 1354, admitted, to the rectory of North 
Creye, John de Tychemersh, who was presented to that benefice 
by Sir Robert de Northwode (Shepey e's Keg., 2uT b ). 

On the 21st of December 1353, Bishop Shepey held an ordination 
in Trottesclyve manor chapel, when four youths received their 
"First Tonsure" (Register, folio 260 b ). From the date of this 
ordination we may infer that Bishop Shepey kept his Christmas at 
Trottesclyve in 1353. 

The rector of u Trosclyff " had to pay to Mailing Abbey ten 
shillings per annum out of the tithes. (See Dugdale's Munuaticon, 
iii., 381.) 

From "Wharton's Anglia Sacra we learn that Bishop Hamo 
de Hethe celebrated the Eastertide of 1322 at " Trottyscliff," and 
built there a new bakehouse and cowhouse or barton at a cost of £25. 
Summer and Whitsuntide were also spent here, because the hall of 
the manor house at Hailing was being rebuilt. The Christmas of 
1325 was spent here also. In 1327, during the second week in 
Lent, as the young King, Edward III., and his mother traversed 
Rochester diocese on their journey to Canterbury, they were met 
and welcomed by Bishop llamo, w r ho presented to the Queen two 
basins of silver worth £20 ; and then he returned at once to Trottes- 
cliffe. In 1328 and 1329 he spent twelve months at this place, 
arriving after the Feast of the Purification. This long period of 
residence he occupied with directing the erection of high walls 
around his court here, and also with rebuilding the Bishop's 
chamber, a kitchen, and a chamber for his clerical household. In 
1333, Bishop llamo spent all the autumn at Trottesclifie, whence he 
went to Mayfield to console Archbishop Mepham in his sadness ; 
returning again to Trottescliffe. In that year, to the disgust of the 
Rochester monks, he celebrated the Feast of their Patron, Saint 
Andrew, at Trottescliffe, and yet received the exennium or provision 
which (they said) was only payable when he celebrated St. Andrew's 
Feast at Rochester. In 1310 he dwelt much at Hailing and Trottes- 
cliffe. Two years later he spent twelve months here (in 1312), when 
he caused the church to be repaired, as well as his own dining hall and 



TROTTESCLIFFE CHURCH. 215 

dormitory. In the year of the " black death " (13 18) he was much 
at Hailing and Trotteseliffe, yet he lost thirty-two members of his 
household, who died of that terrible pestilence. During 24 Edward 
III. (1350) he was all the year at Trotteseliffe, being old and 
decrepit. Within two years he died. 

The coloured glass in Hamo de Hethe's nave window is worthy 
of close attention. It has all been well cleaned and refixed, by Ward 
and Hughes of London. In the heads of the two lights are elaborate 
canopies, well designed and well executed. 

Above, in the apex of the window, is a Mediaeval design which 
must be almost unique in a parish church. It represents the Holy 
Trinity. Contrary to Scriptural teaching, and to the orthodox 
teaching of the Church, God the Father (whom no man hath seen 
at any time) is represented as a man. The whole doctrine of the 
Incarnation of our Blessed Lord is evacuated of meaning by such a 
representation. Upon the knees of the old man, who is irreverently 
made to represent the Divine Person of God the Father, is a crucifix, 
to represent the sacrifice made by God the Son, over whose head 
appears the Sacred Dove, as the symbol of the third Person of the 
Blessed Trinity, the Holy Ghost breathed forth by God the Father. 
The sun, moon, and stars are represented as accessory details. 

As to the mediaeval furniture of the church, the wills of old 
parishioners, searched by the Rev. T. S. Frampton, afford a few 
hints. 

In 1451, an image of the Virgin Mary stood in this church, with 
a light burning before it, and towards the maintenance of this 
light Richard Rowse left a cow worth 8s. In 1455, Ric a Chaunceler 
bequeathed 6cl. to this light, as did John Clyterowe in 1163, and 
John Tenaker in 1166. The sum of 8d. was bequeathed to it in 
1470 by Wm. William. At a later date, in 1532, we find St. James 
coupled with St. Mary. Wm. Wolleryge then bequeathed one of his 
best kine to the light of our Lady and St. James. 

Before the Great Crucifix or Rood, a light was burned which 
several testators remembered in their wills. 

An image of St. Christopher was set up here, and also an image 
of St. Nicholas ; and before each of these images tapers were kept 
burning, by the money bequeathed by testators, and by the gifts of 
the living. 

Gifts for maintaining these lights or lamps in Trotteseliffe 
church were not confined to pence and cattle. Land was left for 
their maintenance also. Thorpe, in his Custumale Roffense, p. 38, 
extracted from the Registers of Presentments made at Visitations, 
mentions two garden plots (occupied by Mary Wade, widow) 
which were given to endow two lamps here, one to burn in the nave 
and the other in the chancel. He also mentions "another parcell of 
ground to find a lampe in the seyd chirche." 

The monumental brass in front of the communion rails com- 
memorates William Crofton and Margery his wife.* He seems to 

* The inscription shews that the brass was placed here by the widow during 
her lifetime. It runs thus: — "Hicjacet WilPm 8 Crofton Generos 8 bacallaur 9 



lM<> TROTTESOLIFFE CHURCH. 

have been a lawyer of Gray's Inn. and a graduate B.C.L., who 
owned laud in Trottescliffe. Ee died on the L8th of March 1 W3-4, 
and bequeathed to this church a silver gill chalice and two silver 

cruel s. 

The existing Communion cup was made in 1576. A paten upon 
a fool, made in L 699, was presented by the Rev. Paul Baristoweand 
Ann his wife. Mr. Baristowo had heen curate in charge of Trottes- 
cliffe, and here were buried hotli he (in L715-16) and Ids wife (in 
1705), but he was vicar of Qraine in the Hundred of Hoo (Feb. 
1688-9—1710). 

The silver alms-dish, now in use, was presented September 11th 
1S21 by the Rev. Dr. W. Crawford, rector. During his Incumbency 
the church was repaired, ami in October L824 thepulpil from West- 
minster A.bbey was presented by .lames Seager, Esq. (a London 
distiller). Its sounding-board is a handsome piece of inlaid wood- 
work, supported by a slight pillar of wdute wood, which is intended 
to represent a palm-tree. 

In 1844; some restorations were effected here by the curate in 
charge, Mr. Wigan, but unhappily one of the southern Norman 
window's was then entirely renewed. 

The present rector, the Rev. C. W. Shepherd, has expended 
large sums of money in draining and repairing the church. He spent 
£800 upon that excellent example of cut flint work, the west wall, 
which he rebuilt. The black flints used therein came from the 
"Wrotham chalk pits, most of the rest are from the Northfleet pits. 
The size of the squared flints diminishes as the courses rise, until 
those in the apex are quite small. The cross in the apex is of blue 
stones. 

The east window was inserted in 1875 by the present rector, in 
memory of his father. The west window was filled with stained 
glass in 1885. Its cost, £148, was defrayed from the proceeds of 
crewel embroidery done by girls in the parochial school. The artists 
were Ward and Hughes. 

The little north window was filled with coloured glass in memory 
of the Queen's Jubilee. 

In the two-light window, close to the entrance door, of one light 
(that to the east) the history is very singular. It formerly stood 
in Luddesdown church, of which Mr. Shepherd, senior, was rector. 
AVhen that church was restored the light, was sent here, but it was 
too narrow to fill the place where it now stands. The manufacturers 
therefore added a second border all round, and thus made it wide 
enough for the window here. It commemorates a brother of the 
present rector. Since it was sent here, another light has been filled 
in, to the memory of the late rector's mother. 

The only bell in the tower is of good size, 31 inches in diameter, 
and was made by William Hatch in 1639. 

In the churchyard (near the south-east angle of the chancel) is 

Juris Ciuilis & legis p'itus ac Collcga de Greysyn qui obiit xviij° die Marcii A° 
dni. 5i°cccc°lxxxiij & Margeria ux' ei s que obiit .... die .... A dni. M°cccc°lxxx 
.... q°r"' a'i'ab's p'pioiet' de s ." 



TROTTESCLIFFE CHURCH. 217 

an early altar-tomb commemorating James Atwode, who died in 
May L600. The parish registers are in very good condition, from 1510 
onward, but lack the entries between 1550 and 1560. The Eliza- 
bethan transcripts were made upon parchment about 1599, by one 
William Wardropper (or Wardroppe), who states that he was some- 
time (aliquando) master of the school in this parish. 

In one entry a baptism is said to have taken place on the day on 
which King Charles was beheaded. The present rector has fully 
indexed the whole of the parish registers in a very clear and able 

way- 

The oldest register contains memoranda of the sums collected in 
Trottescliffe upon four Briefs, during the years 1658 and 1059. 
Such entries are very unusual for those years. One of the Briefs 
is stated to have been issued by the Lord Fairfax. 

The Kev. T. S. Frampton has kindly favoured me with the fol- 
lowing transcripts from the Hegister, and with Notes thereon : — 

" By vertue of a breefe Granted by ye I/ 1 Protector to the 
Parishioners of Covvden there was Collected in y e parish of Trot- 
tescliff in Kent y e sum'e of seuen shillings & six pence vpon y e 
8 th day of August beinge y e L ds day in the year of oure L d 1058."* 

" Alsoe here hath beene Collected for the vse of Katherine Leke 
of Middlesex widow the sum'e of ffowre shillinges vpon the 5 th day 
of September in the same year of oure L d 1658. "f 

"Alsoe here hath beene Collected for Wappin, the Hermitage, & 

* Extract from Calendar of State Papers, Domestic Series, 1658-9. 
[Vol. clxxxi., p. 29.] 
[May 20] 1658. '"47. Petition of the inhabitants of Cowden, Kent, to the 
justices of peace at the assizes to be held at Maidstone 7 July 1657. On 1 May 
last at noon, a great and sudden fire broke out in our town, and was not put down 
till it had burned 8 houses, a warehouse, 2 stables, 2 barns and other outhouses, 
and the almshouse, with most of the goods therein, so that our damage was 
£1822, whereby we are, many of us, utterly ruined, and cann >t provide for our 
families. We beg you to obtain a patent for us for a public collection." 

" Order for a patent for them to take the alms of the well-disposed in cos. 
Kent, Essex, Surrey, Sussex, Norfolk, and Suffolk." P.R.O. 21 April 1892. 

f Extract from Calendar of State Papers, Domestic Series, 1658-9. 
[Vol. clxxxi, p. 62.] 

June 15, 1658. " 101. Petition of Katherine, widow of Ja«. Leeke, malster, 
of Chelsea, Rich. Bringest, Mat. Humphreys, and Lucretia Jefferies, widow, to 
the Protector. On 2-4 May 1653, Leeke lost his house, outhouses, and whole 
estate, and a great quantity of malt and barley, for which he was in debt 
to others, value £1945 I2.v., to his undoing. The justices of peace examined and 
estimated the losses at this sum, which Leeke was unable to sustain, and the 
other petitioners lost £100 at least. Be^ a patent for a Collection in London, 
Westminster, etc. With reference to Council, to give petitioners relief with the 
late sufferers by fire in London, 26 May 1655." [1 sheet.] 

" 101, 1. Certified by 12 justices of the peace to the truth of the petition, and 
the good character of the parties. Hicks' Hall, 12 July 1653, certified as a true 
copy, 28 June 165-1." [2 pages.] 

li 101, 11. Lords Commissioners Whiteloek and Lisle to ... . We commend 
this petition ; the certificate of the justices was in our hands, but is accidentally 



2 IS TB.OTTESCLIFFE CHU110H. 

Easl Smithfeild the like suin'e of EEowre Bhillinges rpon the 3 d day 
of October Mi"»s."* 

" Collected alsoe in this p'ish the 3 d daj of April] K'>">!> for the 
766 of Diuers Inhabitants oi Brides oeer Meet street London the 
surn'e of fEowre shillinges & Biz pence." 

lost. We were eye-witnesses of the fire, and therefore the more affected by it. 
We beg relief forthe petitioners, 12 May L655, Chelsea." [1 pa«e.] 

"June 15. Order thereon for a collection in London, Westminster, Middle- 
sex, Sussex, Surrey, Kent, and Essex, lor their relief." [I. 78, p. 685.] 

* Extract from Calendar of State Papers, Domestic Series, KJ57-8. 
[Vol. clxxx., p 350.] 
[March 30] 1(558. " 64. Petition of Boh. Tyler, Thoa. Gunner. Wm. Booth, 
and Abrahamltowe, Justices of Peace of Wapping, Middlesex, for the inhabitants 
there, to the Protector, for letters patent to allow them to appeal to the charitably 
disposed. 

"The inhabitants of Wapping, the Hermitage, and East Smithfield, to the 
number of 800 poor housekeepers, preferred a petition to us at the Quarter 
Sessions of Westminster, 5 Oct., showing that by an explosion of gunpowder on 

3 July, in powder houses at Wapping, many houses wen' blown down and 
shattered, to their damage of £9665 17*'. 6d., many people were lamed and 
maimed, and many have become miserably poor, having lost their kindred, and 
being destitute of their callings. On examination we found that S4G house- 
keepers had been losers to the amount of £9123 3s. 6d. ; that many of them are 
poor seamen, and all except 89 will fall into great want unless aided, llicks' 
Hall, 17 October 1657, 13 signatures. 

" With reference to Privy Council, 24 November 1657." [1 sheet.] 
" March 30. Order thereon in Council for a collection in London and "West- 
minster, cos. Middlesex, Herts, Kent, Surrey, and Sussex." [1. 78, p. 429.] 
P.R.O., 10 May 1892. 



( 219 ) 



FAVERSHAM. 

Regulations for the Town Porters, 1448. 
BY F. F. GIRAUH, TOWN CLERK. 

Few of the Faversham records of the reign of Henry VI. still 
remain. Some disconnected sheets of proceedings at Wardmotes 
are bound in a volume, containing accounts and miscellaneous docu- 
ments between the years 1448 and 1606, from which the following 
regulations are extracted. The Brewers appear to have taken a 
very prominent position iu the town. The powers of punishment 
claimed by the Mayor are worthy of notice. 

" Md. A comen "Wardmoth holden at Feversham the x day of 
Jule the xxvi yere of Kyng Harry the syxt by fore John Seyncler* 
mayer of the towue & port of Feversham and the Jurats and Co'es 
of the same towne, hyt was complayned uppon diverse contraversies 
and debates late growyn be twene the marchaunts brewers & vitalers 
of the said towne on that oon partie and the comen portours of the 
same towne on that other partye in As moche no certeyn Ruyle 
ordynaunce And apoyntyng be for thys tyme hath not be had in 
Wrytyng excepte A lytyll Eemembraunce in the olde quayer that 
was Neman at tongef of the Whych contravarsiez and debates the 
said mayor forth wyth the Avisse and assent of the Juratts and 
cominers by the assent of the forsaid parties hath ordeynyd and 
Awarded in maner and forme hereafter followyng that ys to say 
that vi porters shall be had in the said town of the strongest men 

* John Seyncler was Mayor of Faversham in 1443 and 1448. He was pro- 
bably a member of the family of St. Clere, who held the manor and seat of 
Aldham St. Clere in Ighthain from the reign of Edward II. to that of 
Henry VII. 

Sir Philip St. Clere of Ightham, in right of his wife Margaret, possessed the 
Manor of Ospringe next Faversliam, which descended to his son Thomas St. 
Clere, who left an only daughter and heiress Eleanor in 12 Edward IV., who 
married Sir John Gage, Knt. 

Sir Philip St. Clere had another son John, to whom descended the Manor of 
Penshurst and estates at Lyghe, which he sold to John, Puke of Bedford. 

Pardon under the Great Seal, 7 July, 28 Henry VI. (1450), was granted to 
John Seyncler of Faversham, " Esquire," and others therein named, and all 
others of Faversham concerned in John Mortyiner's (Cade's) rebellion. Cade was 
slain four days after the date of this pardon. 

Thomas Seyncler was owner of a garden in Faversham (Fine, 11 November, 
18 Edward IV.). 

f Seman at Tonge was Mayor in 1401 and 1103. 



220 FAVKKSIIA.M. 

and of good name and fame that cane be chosen by fche Baid mayre 
and \i (>!• iiij at fche teste of fche Juratta Aforesaid and before them 
)o make an oth by the wordys of fche gospel] ai soche fcyme as any 
of them ys chosen that they shall be ii-fw lyege men to tin- Cynge 
llan'\ the \ I Kyng of xyngland and to hys heyrya Kyngs of 
England and fco be redy to the mayors semauns or to hys lyeffcenaunt 
to do all maner and lefull comaundements and in especyall to do 
execusyon of the pyllyry* kukyng Btolef brekyng <>t' bakers ovens 
Scoolds ( 'nt pursy s and Bawdys. 

" For the whych Servysse duly to be don they shall of c\rvy 
Tonne Wyne that they Wynde up at the key and to seller age\ ae, 
xijd. And for selleryng only — for every barell heryng, Id. oh. 
Every heryng, ob. Every Bune Samon of straunger, ij d. 

Every quarter whete malte Barly or other cornys to be borne frome 
the howsyng off the kay syde unto the shy]), ob. And for every 
quarter off the forsaid graynes born from any other strete withyn 
the said Fraunchyse to the sliyj), 1 d. 

"Item for every chalder Colys, iij d. Every quarter salt, 1 d. ob. 
And for portage of all other Merehaundysse they to take after the 
rate of the weyght ther off. 

" Allso they furthyemore shall swere truly to here All ale & here 
that ys browyn to sale of the brewers of the said towne solde to 
tappysteris of the said Towne Bryngyng Ageyn to ye Brewers the 
vessells of the said ale & bere at soche tyme As they ben full 
spendyd yf they can fynde the said vessells in the said tappisters 
housys takyng of the Brewer for every barell for his labours, 1 d. 
And another peny of Tappyster. And also they shall not procure 
nor stei non of the said Tapysters from on Brewer tyll Another lie 
dyffame noo Brewers chaffer. And yt can be dwly provyd by com- 
playnt made by fore the said mayor or any other after corny ng 

that all or any of the said porters labour procurr' or styrr in A 
maner Above rehersyd than twoo tymys to be Amercyd. And the 
thyrde tyme to lesse hys offyce for a yere and a day and theye 
bodyys to be puny shed at the Mayer's Wyll. 

" More over they shall swere that withyn two dayes next after 
the Beryng day of the foresaid ale and bere to come to the Brewers 
house and ther offre them duly to tayll or score with them every 
Barrell Binne & kylderkyn that they have so born whedyr too whom 
in what place they have soo born. And yf yt kin aftyrward be 
duly provyd by the said Brewers or any of them by fore the sayd 
Mayer or any other Mayer herafter comyng that they gave they 
said Wessells of Ale and Bere to other personys contrary to the 
scooryng or Tayllyng. And yt so provyd twoo tymes to make A fyne 
of the double of every suche barell or kylderkyn that on parte to the 

* Au engine of wood for exposing offenders to public view and making them 
infamous. The punishment of the pillory was abolished by Stat. I. Viet. c. 23. 

f A seat at the end of a beam, used for ducking " common scolds.'' It was 
also a punishment inflicted on brewers and bakers transgressing the laws, who 
were ducked in stinking water. One formerly used at Fordwich may still be 
seen there. 



REGULATIONS FOR THE TOWN PORTERS, 1448. 221 

mayer and that other to i he party so grevyd. And the thyrd tyme 
to lese hys offyce of portershyp for ever. And yff yt happe thai 
yn defaute or neclygence of the said portouris or off any of them 
any vessell of wyne ale or here vitayll or maner of marchaundyse to 
be lost or consumyd that then they make Amendys to the partyes 
so grevyd As the mayer for the tyme beyng and hys said felesnyp 
woll awarde. And yf the said portours or sufficiant depute for 
them be not redy at warnyng resonable to bere the marchaundys 
goodys and Brewers Ale and Bere in tyme resonable off olde tyme 
acustomed that than that defaute in them so duly provyde twoo 
tymes to be amercyd and at the thyrde tyme to make a grevous 
fyne after the dyscressyon off the mayer. 

" Also it ys ordeynyd by the said Mayer and hys felowys yff any 
marchaunt or vytailler off the said towne on ther partye interypt 
let or breke any of the said Articules in the said ordinaunce com- 
prehendyd tociens quociens to pay to the said mayer, xx d. And yff 
any Brewer of the said towne breke any of the said Articules on 
ther partie everyche of them to pay tociens quociens to the said 
mayer, vj s. viij d. 

" Purthyemore yt ys ordeyned by the said Mayer & hys feleshyp 
after the dyssece of everyche off the portours or ells whan any off 
them woll sell or yeve their offyce that of the money so solde & 
reseyvyd, xld. there off to be paid to the use and profyte of the 
cominalte a forsaid and xx d. to be delyve' to the "Wardens of the 
chyrch worke. And also eche off the saide portours shall have 
resonable exkypson off — xl dayes in the hole yer by lycens off the 
Aldyrman to them yerly be the said Mayer assygned fyndyng a 
suffyciaunt depute in his absence." 



( 222 ) 



EXTRACTS FROM THE ACCOUNT BOOKS 
OF CAPTAIN JOHN HARVEY, R.N., 
MAYOR OF SANDWICH 1774-5. 

BY THOMAS DORMAN. 

The following accounts are extracted from papers in the possession 
of John James Harvey, Esq., of Woodlands, through whose kind 
permission I have been allowed to make this copy. They detail the 
expenses incurred by his great-grandfather Captain J. Harvey, R..V, 
on being elected first a Jurat, and subsequently Mayor of Sandwich, 
upwards of a century ago. Captain Harvey commanded the 
Brunswick on the glorious 1st of June 1794, and died on the 30th 
of the same month from wounds received in the battle, to the success 
of which he so materially contributed. 

The accounts are very interesting, as they not only give the 
prices of various articles of consumption at that date, but they 
enable us to form some idea of the proceedings upon such occasions. 
Captain Harvey was so precise in his accounts that he first charges 
himself with the value of the presents he received from his friends, 
and afterwards deducts it to shew the actual net cost, while his 
thrift is disclosed in the alteration of Mr. Wise's Jurat's gown 
to fit the new wearer. 

The tenders (attendants) on the newly-elected Jurat or Mayor; 
the band, consisting on the first occasion of four fiddles and two 
drummers ;* the women at sixpence a head strewing herbs in the 
path of the newly elected ; the ribbon for cockades ; the colourmen 
(men bearing flags) ; the freemen paid for their votes, even when 
absent from home ; and the winding up with a grand smash of 
broken windows, glasses, pots, and punch ladles, form altogether a 
vivid Hogarthian picture of the proceedings. 

The treats on election-day appear to have been given at some 
Inn, as there is a charge in the Mayor's account of £1 Is. for 
" use of the house where I gave the treat." But the dinners seem 
to have been held at the Mayor's private house, as there are only 
charges for bringing and carrying home the tables, etc., and 
gratuities to the servants of the Mayor's friends for " dressing the 
victuals." 

There is no mention of the number of guests for whom the two 
dinners, given by the Mayor, were provided. As the dinner, given 

* May we suggest that from the use of such bands as these the old saying is 
derived, " that is all fiddle and drum." 



A SANDWICH JURAT'S DINNER, 1772. 223 

on liis election as Jurat, to his brethren the Mayor and Jurats, 
thirteen in all, cost about one-fourth of the expense of the two 
later dinners, no doubt other friends and officials were also invited; 
otherwise the allowance on the first occasion, of twenty-two 
bottles of wine and twelve bottles of spirits, supposing the one 
bottle of common brandy to be for the mince-meat, would appear to 
be calculated on a most liberal scale, to say nothing of the three 
gallons of porter and one gallon of Dorsetshire ale. 

The various items give a good idea of the menu for a Corporation 
Banquet in Sandwich at that period, but I should like to point out 
that our ancestors appear to have anticipated the modern custom of 
commencing a dinner with oysters, as there were two gallons pro- 
vided upon each occasion, costing with carriage only 3*. lid. in 
all, and it should be noted also that the vegetables are conspicuous 
by their absence, only lOd. being allowed for greens, etc., on the 
first occasion and 5d. on the second. 



Account of Expences, etc., whex I was elected a Jurat on 
November y e 2L st 1772. 

£ s. d. 

To four half Ankers of Gin 4 13 

One half Anker & a piece of Ruin 1 16 

Two half Ankers of Brandy 2 8 

5 Doz 11 7 Bottles of Wine 5 10 

Four H dds of Beer, two from M rs Bradly & two from M r 

Stewart 10 16 

17^ of Sugar 11 10£ 

130 lb. Cheshire Cheese at 5 d i 2 5 0^ 

12 lb. Candles at 7/8 7 8 

25£ lb. Tobacco (12 Ib at 1/1 and y e rest at 1/6) 1 14 2 

20 Doz u Lemons 1 4 8 

63 Loafs (of half Gallon each) 1 19 6 

11 Doz" of Butter Rolls 4/7 Sack of Coals 1/6| 6 1£ 

18 lb. of Rump Beef at 34 5/3 Shoulder of Mutton 3/4 

for Tenders 8 7 

3 Doz. of 4 y ds of Ribbon for 40 Cockades 18 4 

Paid for Broken Glasses 8/ £0 8 

llPotsat6 d 5 6 

2 Pitcher 19 

2 do. Brown 10 

UPotsatS 4 7 

1 10 

Mending a Silver punch Ladle 4 6 

Paramor y e Carpenter fitting y e Tables &c. at y e house S 6 

Fowle y e Glazier mending y e Windows y l were broke . 110 

For cleaning the House and brooms 2 2 

To Four Fiddles 1* l 3 4 two Drummers 5 sh 1 6 

To 30 Women (Herb Strewers) a 6 d 15 

To Six Gross of Pipes 12 8 



224 mayor's dinner at sandwich, 1774. 

£ .v. </. 

To M r Stone as Manager & Tender 3 days LO 

ToM r Parlet3 days aB Tender at 2/6 7 <> 

To 7 Tenders 2 days at 2/6 1 15 () 

To Appleton one Day as Tender tho' not there 2/6 Ham- "1 {) ;} « 

mond as Doorkeeper y e day of the Choice 1 mend- > ( . - ( . 

ing a Silver Ladle of Roger Taylors broke 1 <> ..J 

To 3VI r Baker mending the draws thai were broke 1 

Colourmen at Sam. Ferriers 110 Ringers at Curlings 

110 2 2 

Handbells at Brothers 10 6 10 G 

Spent going about Town 4/ Chaise & Ex pence to Deal 

for Bum 8/ 12 



£45 15 4£ 

To new fitting the Jurats gown which belonged to M r "| 

Wise I i 7 r 

For Velvet 11 Yard at 16/ £1 4 f L 

Taylor 3 6 J 

To M r Gill Beadle standing at y e door day of Election 2 6 

At the Flour de Luce on the day 1 qualified &c 2 6 

Expence of the dinner to Mayor & Jurats Nov. 1773... 2 18 



Total Expence of being elected a Jurat £50 5 10i 



Account of Expences, in being Elected Mayor 
5 th Dec 1 ' 1774. 

£ *. d. 

1 Butt of Beer of 10S Gall" 8 from Bradly 5 8 

1 do. of 118 Gall 1 " from M r Stewart 5 18 

5 half Ankers of Gin at 15/ 3 15 

One half Anker and a half of Brandy 1 16 

6 Gallons of Bum at 5/ 1 10 

3| Doz n Port Wine at 19/ 3 6 6 

1 Doz" Lisbon at 17/ 17 

10 Bottles of Vidonia* 10 

13 lb Sugar at 8 d 8 8 

20 Doz n Lemons at 1/6 110 

24 lb Tobacco 1* 13 s 6 d 8 Gross of pipes 17/8 2 11 2 

62 half Gall. Loaves at 8 d £2 1 6, 11 Doz. Butter Bolls 

5/6 2 7 

15 lb Candles 9 

18 lb Bump of Beef 6/ 10| lb. Leg of Mutton 3/11 for 

the Tenders 9 11 

6 lb Coorse Sugar 2/10^2 Sacks of Coals 2/11 5 9£ 

106 lb Cheshire Cheese at 4i d 1 18 Of 

58 Vards of Bibbon for Cockades 19 

* A white wine from Teneriffe resembling Madeira, but inferior in quality, 
and of a tart flavour — Imp. Diet. 



mayor's dinner at sandwich, 1771. 225 

£ s. ,1. 

3 Drummers 7/6 6 Fiddlers & a Trumpeter £110 1 8 6 

Eingers (at y e George) £110 Handbells (at 3 Colts) 

10/6 1 11 6 

Colourmen at 3 Kings 1 1 1 6 

Beadle standing at y e Door 2/6 Two Constables at 

night5/ 7 6 

Laurence the Sergeant for Mayors stick 2 6 

M r Stone 10/6 Parlet 3 days 7/6 18 

Molland, Knight, Arden, Brown, Fennell, Saudwell, 

Gardner 2 days 5/ 1 15 

To Baker for the use of the House where I gave the 

treat 1 1 

To Fowle Glazier mending the Windows that were broke 8 9 
Broken Wine Glasses 3/6 Broken Pots 9/11 3 Doz" 

Bottles broke 7/6 1 11 

Herb Strewers 15/ 15 

Paramor Carpenter fitting up the House 14/ Women 

cleaning House 2/ 16 

Forfeit paid the first Court day 2 

To two Constables standing at the Door the day of 

Election 2 

£46 9 3 
To the Freemen for voting including 9 men absent in 

theHoys 13 18 

Total expence of Election the 5 th Dec r 1774 ... £60 7 3 



EXPENCE OP THE DINNER ON THURSDAY 8 th DEC r 1774 ENTERING 
ON THE OPPICE OP MAYOR. 

£ s. d, 

9 Bottles of Port at 19/ 13 9 

9 D° Sherry at 20/ 15 

7 D° Eum at 1/6 10 6 

4 D° Coniac Brandy at 2/3 9 

1 D° Common D° " a 1/3 13 

4 D° Vidonia Wine 4 

1 D° Gin 10 

3 Gall ns Porter 4/ 1 Gall Dorsetsh. 3/ 7 

7 Doz 11 Lemons a 1/6 10 6 

51b. Sugara8 d 3 4 

6 Coup* Fowls 13 

2 Geese 8 

2 Turkeys 9 

6 Pidgeons 16 

2 Hares at 1/6 3 

2 Pigs 6 6| 

1 Chine of Pork 18f lb. at 4f 6 11 

1 Neck of D° 10 lb a A\ 3 9 

1 Surloin of Beef 29^ lb includ. weigh meat 9 10 

VOL. XX. Q 



220 mayor's dinners at sandwich, 1774-5. 

€ i. d. 

L Leg of Veal 16| lb at 5 d G 11$ 

1 Bam 19| lb a 8 d & carriage 6 a 13 

I D° L2 lb 8 

7"' Fresh Butter at 7 d 4 1 

(J 1 " Salt D° a6 d 3 

2 lb Suet 8 

Apples] Preserves 1.0 1 Gull" Pears 8 d 3 2 

1 Call. Flour 1/2 Milk G d Rice 2"' O' 1 2 2 



Klb 







Cheese 2/ 3"» Mould Candles 2/ 4 

Biscuits 10 d Tea Coffee & Sugar 2/ 2 10 

Baking Tarts pyes & Puddings 2 G 

Almonds J lb 5 d 2 Gall Oysters & carriage 2/2 2 7 

Currants liaisons & sugar for Mince meat 1 9| 

40 Eggs for Puddings Ac 2 

Mince Meat 3 G 

7 Wine Glasses broke 19 

M rs Woodruff 4 days 4 

Tho s Woodruff G days 3 6 

Gave our own Servants 5 

Gave Matson Bradly Smithers & White's servants 

dressing victuals 4 

Fennel & Parlet bringing & carrying home of Tables &c. 2 

Mustard 5 d Greens &c 10 d 13 

half Gall n White Loaves at 8 d 4 

£11 3 M 

Received of the above in presents as under viz. : — 

From Barston 2 Coup Fowls £0 6 

Neck of Pork 12 lb. 4/6 2 Geese 8/ 1 Tur- 
key 4/6.... 17 

3 lb. Butter 1/9 Mince Meat 3/6 Brother 

Henry a Turkey 4/6 9 9 

M r Nairne a Hare 1/6 M rs Curling D° 1/6 3 
M 1 ' Hatch 6 Pidgeons 16 

Received in presents 1 17 3 



Nett expence of dinner £9 5 10f 



expence of the d inner on monday 4 dec r 1775 going out 
of Office of Mayor. 

£ s. d. 

13 Bottles of Port 19 

8 D° Sherry 13 

2 D° Vidonia 2 

3 H° Coniac Brandv 6 

5 D° of best Rum .". 7 6 

3 D° of Gin 3 

1 D° Common Brandy 1 6 

2 D° Common Rum 3 



mayor's dinner at sandwich, 1775. 227 

£ s. d. 

4 Gall" 3 Porter 5/ 4 4 D° Strong Beer 5/4 10 8 

6 Doz n & 2 Lemons 8 4£ 

4 lb. Sugar 2 6 

6 Couple of Fowls 13 

2 Geese 8 

2 Turkeys 9 

2 Hares 3 

2 Pigs 6 6 

1 Chine of Pork 19| lb 7 3^ 

1 D° 23| D° 8 7| 

Surloin of Beef including Weigh Meat 26 lb 8 8 

Leg of Veal 12| lb 5 1 

Mutton for Herico 6£ lb 2/5 Suet 2 lb 8 d 3 1 

1 Ham of 26 lb a 6 d 13 

1 D°ofl0 lb a8 d 6 8 

6 ib of Fresh Butter 3 9 

6 D° Salt 3 1| 

Apples 1/ preserves 1/6 Pears 3 d 2 9 

1| Gall Flour 1/4* Milk 6 d Rice 2 lb 6 d 2 4| 

6 lb Cheese 2/6 6 lb Mould Candles 4/ 6 6 

Mustard 5 d Greens &c. 5 d 12 Eggs 1/ 1 10 

6 half Gall White Loaves 2 9 

Biscuits 5 d Tea Coffee & Sugar 3/ 3 5 

Baking Tarts puddings pyes &c 2 7 

Almonds 5 d 2 Gall" Oysters & carriage 1/9 2 2 

Currants & Sugar for Mince Meat 1 5 

45 Eggs for pudds & pyes 2/6 2i lb Suet 10 d 3 4 

Sugar for puddings 9 d ^ lb wax tapers 9 d 1 6 

Sweatmeats & spices 1/ Tongue 1/6 2 6 

Pipes 2/6 Tobacco 1/4 3 10 

M rs Woodruff 4 days 4 

Cooks boy 2 days 2 

Bradly Servants 2/ Matson .... 3/ 050 

J. Matson 2/ Keeler 1/ Solly 1/ White 1/ Serv t9 5 

Smithers D° 10 

Debock bringing and carrying Home Tables 2 6 

Gave our own Servants 2/6 each 5 



Total Expence of Dinner £1116 9^ 

Received of the above in presents viz. : — 

From Barton 6 Coup. Fowls £0 13 

2 Geese 8 

2 Turkeys 9 

2 Pigs 6 6 

12 Eggs 10 

Broth 1 ' J. Matson 2 Hares 3 

Received in presents 2 6 



Expence of the Dinner £9 16 3i 



Q 2 



( 228 ) 



SANDGATE CASTLE, a.d. 1539-40. 

BY WILLIAM LOFTIE RUTTON, F.S.A. 

Among the Harleian Manuscripts at the British Museum happily 
survives the "Ledger" kept during the building of this fort or 
castle, one of several constructed by Henry VIII. for the defence 
of the southern coast. In it are found full particulars of the ex- 
penditure : — the cost of materials, and the sources from which they 
were derived; the wages of artisans and labourers, and the manner 
in which the money for their monthly pay was procured and 
brought to them at Sandgate ; the names and remuneration of the 
officers ; and the mention of parts and details of the building no 
longer existing. 

The ledger consists of two folio volumes, numbered respectively 
1647 and 1651 in the Harleian collection. "When the Index to 
these MSS. was printed in 1808, the twin volumes seem to have 
been in their original vellum covers, on which their titles in black 
letter were inscribed. Afterwards, however, the original covers 
were replaced by flimsy marble-papered " boards " with weak leather 
backs, and on the fly-leaves were pasted (to the detriment of the 
lettering which, apparently from the moisture, has been in part 
rendered illegible) the portion of the vellum inscribed with the titles. 
These run thus : On the first volume, " The Forst, the ii do , iii do , iiii th , 
v th , vi" 1 , vii th , viii" 1 , and the ix th boke of the leger of the workes of the 
Ki/nges Castell at Sandgate in the tyme of Thorns Cockes and Rychard 
Keys Esquyers Comyshoners there'''' \_etc. now illegible] ; and on the 
second volume, " The x th , the xi' 1 ', xii th , xiii lh , xiiii th , xv th , xvi lh , xvii ,h , 
xviii"', and the xix th boke of the leeger of the workes of the Kynges 
Castell e of Sandgate in Kent in the tyme of Reynold Scott Esquyer 
beyng snrveyour thereof and Richard Keys Esqnyer then beyng sole 
Paymaster of the said Workes." 

The two volumes together contain about 350 carefully written 
pages, and the clerk, Thomas Busshe, has embellished his pages with 
wonderfully elaborated initials, often showing considerable skill. 
Foliated scrollwork is the usual ornament, and in it human faces 
more or less grotesque are occasionally introduced ; one clever 
sketch, for instance, portrays an elderly goodwife wearing the 
head-dress proper to the Tudor times of the draughtsman. 

The arithmetic of the ledger, which is that of the time, is 
clumsy and inconvenient. The ".Roman numerals are used through- 
out, the impracticability of the system being very apparent when 
addition is required ; for instead of the orderly columns of units, 



SANDGATE CASTLE, A.D. 1539-40. 229 

tens, and hundreds to which we are accustomed, we have unequal 
files of numerals ; eight letters stand for 88, and two for 90. 
Addition thus becomes intolerable. The summa pagince — " Sm. 
Pagin " — at the foot of each page, is neither carried forward 
nor added to the sum of the next page, nor are the sums 
of the pages ever brought together and their total shown. On 
the last page of each month's account is found : " Sum of all this 
whole book of the th pay ;" to check which an auditor would 
have to gather together the sums of the pages and make the addition. 
Such a system of course conduces to error and facilitates fraud, 
but in this case, although I found occasional errors, and could not 
always make my addition agree with that of the clerk, the difference 
between us finally is but slight. One other difficulty to the un- 
initiated must be noticed, viz., such complications as " xii xx xvi li." 
for 12 score and 16 lbs. (=256 lbs.), or " xxvii li. and di. at \yl. 
oJ.," for 27-^ lbs. at 2\d. Throughout the two volumes, the Arabic 
numerals now universally used are found but once, viz., in the year 
date of an " empcion," or purchase, in the fifth month, " xn daye 
of Septembre An 1539." 

Having carefully examined the accounts, I have classified the 
information they afford, hoping thus to present it to my readers in 
the most convenient and intelligible form. But before giving atten- 
tion to the building of the Castle a few lines are, I think, demanded 
relative to antecedents at Sandgate. 

Hasted, as evidence of the existence of a castle preceding that 
built by Henry VIII., quotes a writ of Eichard II. (Rymer's 
Foedera, ed. 1709, viii., 49) directing the Captain of Sandgate 
Castle to admit Henry of Lancaster, Duke of Hereford (afterwards 
Henry IV.), then banished the realm, there to tarry with his family 
for six weeks. This writ, however, is accompanied and immediately 
preceded by another of same date (3 October 1398) and of like 
tenor, directed to the Captain of Calais, and considering the fact of 
there being a castle at Sangatte (in English documents written 
Sandgate) about nine miles from Calais on the French coast and 
within the English pale, the identity of date of the writs, and the 
improbability that the King when banishing his dangerous cousin 
should permit him to tarry six weeks on the Kentish coast, we can 
scarcely doubt that the Erench Saugatte was implied. This writ, of 
which the purport has been misunderstood, is the sole basis of belief 
in a mediaeval castle at Sandgate in Kent. But although dismissing 
as an error the existence of a castle prior to that which now con- 
ceims us, it is clear from the evidence adduced in the Archceologia 
(iii., 21-1), and in Philipot's Villare Cantianum, that from the 
earliest times the " gate " from the shore through the Kentish 
cliffs into the country had been the object of daily and nightly 
watch and ward ; yet no stronghold or watchtower is mentioned, 
nor in the record before us of the building of Henry VIII. 's Castle 
is there any mention of old foundations or old material ; on the 
contrary, without any such mention, we arc clearly informed of the 
founding of the new structure. 



230 SANDGATE CASTLE, A.I). 1539-40. 

The object of lli-nrv VIII. in erecting castles and bulwarks 
along the coaBl is thus quaintly given by Lambarde in bis Perambu- 
lation of Kent (1570): "Of this I bold me well assured, that 
King Henry VIII. having shaken off the intolerable yoke of the 
Popish tyranny, and espying that the Emperor was offended by 
the divorce of Queen Kathorine his wife, and that the French King 
had coupled the Dolphine his son to the Pope's niece, and married 
his daughter to the King of Scots, so that he mighl more justly 
suspect them all than safely trust any one, determined (by the aid of 
Q-oa) to stand upon his own guard and defence; and without sparing 
any cost lie builded castles, platforms, and blockhouses in all needful 
places of the Realm. And amongst other, fearing least the ease and ad- 
vantage of descending on land at this part [Deal] should give occasion 
or hardiness to the enemies to invade him, he erected near together 
three fortifications which might at all times keep* and beat [sic] the 
landing-place, that is to say, Sandow.n, Deal, and W aimer." 

Let us now learn from the ledger what it has to tell concerning 
the building of the Castle at Sandgate. In quoting the accounts I 
shall not always follow the spelling, as to do so would, I think, 
scarcely be to the reader's convenience ; for, denned orthography 
not having then been reached, the clerk apparently wrote as seemed 
good to him at the moment, among many variations sometimes even 
giving to the w r ord the form it now wears. The diction, however, 
will be preserved, with many examples of the old spelling. 

Commencement and Progress of the Work. — The second leaf of 
the first volume of the ledger is inscribed : " The building of the 
King's Castle of Sangate [sic] from Sunday, the 30th day of 
March, unto Sunday, the 27th day of April, by the space of one 
month ;" and on the reverse page : " Anno 30° & 31° Regni Regis 
Henrici Octavi." The Sundays though named are not, I think, 
included in the working month ; the masons, however, are each 
month described as " labouring their holy days and vigils," but 
there seems to have been general exemption from labour on Sundays, 
although certain overseers and clerks were paid for the week of 
seven days. 

The first page of the account for each month is headed in this 
manner : " Payments made and paid for Our Sovereign Lord the 
King's Grace, for his building there done of and by Master Thomas 
Cocks and Richard Keys, Commissioners of the said building, as 
well for all manner of empcions [purchases] necessary, and carriages, 
as also wages to all manner of artificers and labourers, purveyors, 
clerks, and overseers, that is to say, from Sunday, the 30th day of 
March, unto Sunday, the 27th day of April, by the space of one 
month." The masons of course come first in the lists, and the de- 
scription of their employment during the first month indicates the 
commencement of the Castle from its foundations. They are scap- 
pling, ?'.«?. roughly shaping the stone, and " laying it for the founda- 
tion and building of the foresaid Castle." The same indication 
appears in the work of the " scapplemen and rockbreakers," they 
are " digging and casting beach from the foundation of the Castle, 



SANDGATE CASTLE, A. 13. 1539-10. 231 

breaking rocks, carrying them from the sea, and loading earth and 
stone." There is nothing to suggest that any old foundations were 
dealt with. 

Here it may be well to notice the belief common at Sandgate 
that the Castle was built on a platform of timber resting on piles. 
This conjecture had its origin in the exposure of piles some years 
since, when, by the action of the sea, the southern section of 
the wall had been undermined and greatly damaged. As far as 
shown by excavations for sewers, etc., nothing but beach is to 
be met within a considerable depth ; " digging and casting of beach 
from the foundation of the Castle" is described as one of the first 
operations towards its erection, and this " casting of beach " is 
found in the accounts onward to the twelfth month. The ledger 
has no mention of pile driving, or of carpenters employed on a 
timber sub-structure ; indeed, during the first month four car- 
penters only are on the list, and their work is described as 
making barrows, hods, etc., and helving tools ; in the second month 
no carpenters appear to have worked at the Castle ; and not 
before the third month did they muster strongly, when 22 are 
returned in the account as, in addition to making necessary plant, 
framing timber (which I suppose to imply floors, roofs, doors, win- 
dows, etc.), and erecting a forge. I am inclined to think that 
the discovered piles had been driven for the defence of the walls in 
years subsequent to the building of the Castle, and after one of the 
many occasions when they had been injured by the sea, the assaults 
of which would no doubt have been more ably resisted had the 
foundations been originally laid securely at a greater depth. 

During the first month the total number of men receiving pay 
was 255 ; of these, 102 were masons building or getting stone ; 4 
were carpenters making the plant, viz., barrows of all kinds, hods, 
mortar bosses and tubs, and helving tools ; 4 sawyers ; 17 lime- 
burners ; 28 wood-fellers ; and the remainder, with 12 overseers 
and clerks, were carters of materials. The amount of the first pay 
was £130 8s. lQ^d., which, at the present time to appreciate, we 
may perhaps multiply by nine. 

The number of men was doubled in the second month, and 
their augmentation continued up to the sixth month — that ending 
14th September — when the accounts show that 843 men were em- 
ployed, and £469 19s. Of d. was spent ; this being the highest 
monthly pay in 1539. In regard to the number of men it must not 
be understood that the 843 worked the whole month through ; many 
were employed for only a part of the time, and the work of the 
carters was especially intermittent. Thus, for this month we should 
take 500 as about the average number working daily at the Castle 
or near at hand, and to this add an intermittent number of carters, 
chiefly of timber, the average of which cannot without a very trouble- 
some calculation be ascertained. The 500 may thus be classified : 
Masons and stonegetters, 74 ; bricklayers, 103 ; carpenters and saw- 
yers, 51; plumbers, 5; lime-burners, 16; labourers, 216; caiters of 
stone from the quarry, 21 ; overseers and clerks, 14. After the 



232 SANDGATE CASTLE, A.I). 1539-40. 

sixth month, and as the winter approached, the men decreased in 
number, until in the ninth month, ending 7th December, there were 
lmt L08 men on the list, the sum <>t' the pay being 657 Is. Wd. 
The tenth month then commenced, lmt was cut short on the 20th 
December, from which day there were Christmas holidays for three 
weeks, during which all work was suspended, three men oiilv being 
left to keep watch and ward over the rising Castle, the materials and 
stores. 

At this halting place, it is convenient to mention what is 
gathered touching the workmen's lodgings. Were there houses at 
Sandgate before the building of the Castle ? We hear of one only. 
In the accounts for the thirteenth month (not yet reached) there is 
mention of 20s. paid as a year's farm of a house hired of one AVilliam 
Jenkyn "to keep the King's money, and as a place to pay it out 
again;" also in the nineteenth and last month half a year's rent is 
paid for " the King's Pay House." In the valuable " Plan of Sand- 
gate Castle and parts adjacent," made in 1725 (one of a very interest- 
ing Kentish collection. Brit. Mus., King's Library, xvin., 48), 
there appears only one house with two or three outbuildings at- 
tached, close to the Castle on the Hythe side. Possibly this house, 
or one standing in 1539 on the same site, may have been that used 
as the King's pay house. Mr. Fynmore of Sandgate, to whom I am 
much indebted tor information, thinks the Fleur de Lis public- 
house may yet represent it. Nichols, the writer of the Royal 
Progresses, 1788, says that as lately as 1775 there were only two 
houses beside the fort, and with this evidence and that of the 1725 
plan we may safely conclude that in 1539 no existing buildings 
were found to shelter the workmen. They would therefore have 
had to find lodging at Folkestone or Hythe, respectively two and 
three miles distant ; but some temporary provision was made lor 
them near their work, for we have mention in the first month of 
" hales," or tents, and a " pavilion ;" the entries are so interesting 
that they must be fully given : — 

" For carriages and mending of two hales and a pavilion from 
London to Sandgate, and for the reparacions of the same : Paid to 
the Sergeant of the Tents for the mending of two hales and a 
pavilion, 14s. Paid for three baskets to carry the stakes and other 
stuff from the said place, 15d. Paid for carriage of hales and 
pavilion wth. the timber from the Sergeant's house to the ship at 
London, 20d. Paid for carriage of hales and pavilion from London 
to Sandgate, 7s. Paid for bringing a land [by land] of the said 
hales and pavilion from Dover to Folkestone, 2s. 4d. Paid for 10 
ells of canvas for mending of the pavilion, price of ell od., 4s. 2d. 
Paid more for 7 ells of canvas for reparacions of the said hales at 
5d. the ell, 2s. 6d." Afterwards other repairs of the canvas appear 
in the accounts, and in addition to the tents a " lodge " was built at 
the quarry, the men occupying it being called " lodge men." We 
read also of the inn (hoops for the "inne," and a new bolt for the 
"iyn," in the eighth and eleventh months), and as the word had 
then a wider meaning than now, it was probably applied to the 



SANDGATE CASTLE, A.D. 1539-40. 233 

lodge or some other temporary erection. In the second month were 
purchased " rushes for the hale," as bedding perhaps, and early in 
December, as the winter drew on, there is the cost of thatching 
with broom " the house at the quarry." 

The Work resumed and finished 1540. — The building of the 
Castle had been suspended on the eve of St. Thomas the Apostle 
(20 December 1539), and it was resumed on the 12th January 1510. 
A change of administration was then made, or rather this seems to 
have had effect during the tenth month, which comprised the four- 
teen days of December before the holidays, and fourteen days of 
January ending on the 25th. Thomas Cockes disappears as Com- 
missioner, and his late colleague, Richard Keys, is associated in the 
Commission, as Paymaster, with Remold Scott, Esq., who has now 
the chief charge as "Surveyor" or "Comptroller." Reinold or 
Reginald Scott was of Scott's Hall in Smeeth; on the completion 
of the Castle, or perhaps a little earlier, he was knighted, and in the 
next year, 1541, he became Sheriff of Kent. 

During the midwinter month, December-January, of course 
little work could be done ; 5 masons were employed in preparing 
stone, 7 carpenters or sawyers were kept at work, and 14 
labourers were employed in the quarry; only £16 Is. 4rf. was spent. 
The accounts of the next month show an increase in the number of 
men, but they made only short time ; in the twelfth month, ending 
March 21, there was further advance, and the labour and expen- 
diture increased until midsummer was reached. The fifteenth 
month, ending June 12, showed the largest pay-sheet; 900 men had 
been employed, and £518 spent. Deducting from the total of 900 
for intermittent labour, the daily average was about 630 men ; 
masons of various classes employed either on the building or in the 
quarry numbered 1S9 ; of carpenters and sawyers there were 66 ; 
lime-burners, 13 ; labourers, 319 ; carters of stone from the quarry, 
36; overseers and clerks, 7. This was a strong force to be employed 
on a building of such moderate size, and consequently the advance 
was rapid. After midsummer the numbers decrease, and in the 
accounts of each month onwards the approach to completion is 
more and more evident. 

In the seventeenth month preparation was made for crowning 
the edifice, the vanes appear, eight of them figure in the account 
at 5s. apiece, and " the great vane " cost 10s. ; painting and 
gilding are provided for ; the " go-jons " {gudgeons) for the draw- 
bridge are prepared ; the lantern is being completed ; 13s. 4</., a 
large price, is paid for the lock of " the utter gate ;" and the guns are 
fixed. In the eighteenth month, in addition to paviors, plumbers-, 
and calkers, who were at work in the previous month, we have 
now the painters ; and the heading of the nineteenth and last month's 
account thus refers to the completion of the building: " Payments 
made fully by Richard Keys, Esquire, Paymaster of the King's 
works of his Castle of Sandgate in the county of Kent, in the 
presence and by the surveying and oversight of Reynold Scott, 
Esquire, surveyor of the books of the said work, for the finishing, 



231 SAND GATE CASTLE, A.l). 1539-40. 

mending, and making of an end of the same Castle. Thai lb to say 
Eor making of certain doors, windows Eor the lantern, platforms of 
timber and hoards, and for paving of three rooms hired l>\ great 

[Jixed price]. Also certain hard lieu ers for to make holes for holts, 
hooks, and bars for windows; also making of gutters with other 
necessaries. Also certain Labourers to makeclean the countermures 

and to bear out the rubbish. Also certain painters hired by the 
day to paint places necessary for the said Castle, by the space of one 
whole month, that is to say from the 5th day of September unto 
the 2nd day of October." 

AVe will now gather the information afforded by the ledger in 
relation to each class of work executed. 

The Stone. — Reference has already been made to the quarry ; 
clearly it was near the Castle, though the exact position can scarcely 
now he defined. On the plan of 1725, before referred to, two 
quarries are marked, one of them GOO yards from the Castle towards 
Hythe, the other 900 yards distant towards Folkestone ; they are 
on the shore apparently at, low-water-mark, an awkward place 
for getting stone. Yet that such was the position is indicated in 
the accounts. In the first month " scapplemen and rockbreakers " 
are " breaking the rocks and carrying them from the sen ; " in the 
third month the " labourers pertaining to the rocks " are engaged 
" in carrying of stone, not only in lading of carts but also wading 
in the water for to lade the boats, giving attendance to the tides, 
and waiting on the carts ;" and in the same account appears the 
hire of boats " to carry stone into the King's Castle." The boats 
seem to have been laden with the stone, and, as the tide rose, they 
were floated to the building. Lyon's Hist, of Dover (1813), ii., 185, 
mentions a certain fisherman named Young, who in 153G, a few r years 
earlier than the building of Sandgate Castle, was rewarded by the 
King with a pension, for inventing a method of raising and trans- 
porting stone by tide-floated boats. At Sandgate, however, the 
boats do not seem to have answered, for they are mentioned in but 
one account, afterwards carts only were used. 

It is clearly evident from the accounts that "the quarry," often 
mentioned, continued to be the hard limestone rocks by the seaside. 
In the fourth and fifth months we find again the "labourers pertaining 
to the rocks carrying of stone, lading of carts, and giving atten- 
dance to the tides : " in the sixth month the beach is being cast, in 
order probably to get at the rock beneath ; the same occurs in the 
twelfth month, and in the thirteenth month's account the labourers 
are still " working at the rocks, carrying up stone from the water 
side for the edifying of the King's Castle." Thus throughout we 
find certainly that the rough hard stone for the castle walls was 
got from the rocks by the seaside, and though it cannot be said 
that the quarry was either of those marked on a map made nearly 
two centuries later, yet the plan of 1725 is evidence that in the 
reign of George I. building material was obtained from a quarry 
similarly situated to that used in the reign of Henry VIII. 

But the Kentish shore did not provide all the material for the 



SANDGATE CASTLE, A.D. 1530-40. 235 

fort ; much of the stone was of foreign origin, and had come, three 
centuries before, from that country against a possible attack from 
which it might now serve. It was in fact second-hand, and came 
to Sandgate from the Lately dismantled priories of St. Radegnnd, 
Horton, and Christ Church, Canterbury ; in the ledger it is called 
" cane stone," easily recognized as Caen stone. The total number 
of loads thus obtained — the load being reckoned as a ton weight — 
was 459, of which more than half, viz., 237, came from St. Badegunds, 
90 from Horton, 32 from Canterbury, 33 from Hythe, 57 from 
places in the Hundreds of Bircholt Franchise, Hayne, Stowting, 
and Street, and 10 came by sea from Sandwich. At St. Badegunds 
"the farmer" received for the stone 8d. a load ; at Horton nothing 
was paid; at Canterbury the Prior of Christ Church twice received 
4s. 8d. a ton, and afterwards " Mr. Byngham " had 3s., but it is not 
said that the stone came from the same site ; Michael Carver of 
Hythe was paid 5s. a ton for stone delivered at the Castle. 

The Caen stone was doubtless used in the jambs, lintels, parapets, 
and embrasures, and wherever the easily-worked freestone was 
preferable to the obdurate " Kentish Bag." Two special purchases 
of stone we find in the twelfth mouth, viz., six gravestones for the 
covering of six doors, 20s. (the place whence they came is not 
named), and a fair mantel stone for a chimney 10s. 

The Jlifsons. — These are variously designated according to the 
work in which they were engaged. The "freemasons" employed 
in " barking " [knocking off the surfaee~\, shaping, and dressing the 
freestone ; the hard-hewers (also called lodgemen from living in 
the lodge built for them at the quarry) got, broke, and shaped 
the hard limestone ; the scapplers roughly dressed the stone 
with scappling hammers ; the layers or builders ; aud the setters, 
Avho, from there being only two or three, I suppose to have had 
the setting of the lines for the masonry, and the duty of keeping it 
in proper form. Bobert Lynsted the warden or master-mason— 
who signs each month's account — gets 10c/. a day; Nicholas Bychard, 
the under-warden, and the setters, have 8d. a day ; the others are 
paid by the week at 3s. 8cl., or by the day at 8d. and 7d. ; and there 
were " prentices " at Gd. or 5d. a day ; all these could make extra 
time at Id. or \d. an hour, but we do not discover the number of 
hours reckoned in a day's work. 

Masons found within a circuit of fourteen miles were not suf- 
ficient ; they had to be brought from the distant " west country " 
of Somersetshire and Gloucestershire. In the second month, 43 
masons, there " pressed," received a bounty of 4s. a man, being Qd. 
for every score of miles they had travelled to reach Sandgate ; in 
the following month, June 1535), Thomas Busshe, Clerk of the 
Ledger, travelling with the same object, enlisted 51 masons ; and 
again in March 1540 a similar journey was made by Richard 
Tayler, with the result of procuring 71 men in the West and 43 
men nearer home. The itinerary is interesting and will be quoted 
afterwards with the officers' expenses. 

Bricks. — About 117,000 were conveyed to the Castle, the price 



230 SANDGATE CASTLE, A.D. 1539-10. 

being generally 4». 1*/. per 1000; the cost of transport, 2d. per 
mile per load of 500, was additional; the distance Bometimea 
being, as from Wye, L3 miles. The largest number came from 
Elham, and Clavertigh in Elham, 7 miles distant ; some came from 
Canterbury and "Cnartaro Court beside Canterbury," reckoned 
as 12 miles off; some were bought of "Mr. Hois of Denton;" 
other loads came from Waldershare and " Tylnstone j" the Hundreds 
of Stowting, Folkestone, Longbridge, and Hythe produced small 
quantities ; and 7000 came by water from Bye. 

Bricklayers. — Bricklayers were at work in the sixth month 
(August— September), numbering 84, and 10 prentices ; but I 
rather doubt whether bricklayers were not also masons ; there are 
but 15 in the seventh month, 13 in the eighth, and none later. 

Tiles.— 44,000 appear to have been used, all from the Hundred 
of \Vye, except 6000 from that of Bircholt Barony ; the price was 
4s. per thousand. Corner tiles at 13^. per hundred came from the 
same places. In the last month 200 paving tiles were brought from 
East Langdon beyond Dover, 10 miles distant. 

Lime. — During the first two months the lime came from St. 
Radegunds, wdiere a kiln had been made "to burn lime in, out of 
the main chalk ;" fuel was obtained from the neighbouring woods, 
and there is an account for 46 loads " pertaining to my Lord of 
Canterbury at St. Radegunds." But apparently the distance to 
Sandgate — six miles — was found too great, for this supply ceased 
after the second month ; 166 loads of lime seem to have been 
brought thence. In the meantime " the King's kiln at Swetton," 
his manor in Cheriton parish, had been made, and thence in future 
came the chief supply of lime ; it produced, as nearly as I can as- 
certain 949 loads, or rather more than half the quantity used ; its 
distance from the rising Castle was between two and three miles. 
The fuel was chiefly wood from Lyminge Park, Densall Minnis and 
Densall Bushes, Swingfield Forstall, Poulton, Northcourt, Stockham 
Bushes, Coppyns Bout, Terlingham, and Orgrove in the manor of 
Folkestone, places for the most part still knowm. About 1200 
loads of wood wei*e used in Swetton kiln, and about 54 tons of 
coal ; generally 15 limeburners were employed, at 6d. or Id. a day. 
Lime was also brought from kilns at Alkam, Swantou, Elham, 
Postling, and places in the Hundreds of Hayne, Stowting, Bridge, 
and Folkestone ; that at Folkestone is called " the limekiln above 
[and at] St. Eanswith's Chapel," a position seemingly near the parish 
church, but now difficult to identify. The total quantity of lime 
used at Sandgate Castle was, as well as can be gathered from the 
ledger, 1829 loads. 

Coal or Sea Coal (" See Coole' 1 '') makes its appearance in the 
second month (April — May 1539), and was brought to Hythe in two 
ships " The Nycolas of Sou'olde" and " The John of Down withe ;" 
Sonthwold and Dunwich are both ports on the Suffolk coast, but 
the ships hailing thence must have got the coal elsewhere. Again, 
in the next month, coal is bought of John Marcoll of Sowhold. The 
total quantity unshipped at Hythe and thence brought by boats to 



SANDGATE CASTLE, A.T). 1539-40. 237 

Sandgate was 96 chaldrons. Tlie chaldron, a varying and therefore 
ambiguous " dry-measure," is now at London taken to equal 25 V 
cwt., and the result of my own investigation is to put it (for 15:}!)) 
at nearly 23 cwt. Thus the whole quantity purchased I calculate 
to have been about 110 tons. From Hythe the coal was transported 
by boats to Sandgate, and thence 51 tons were carted to the lime- 
kiln at Swetton, while 5G tons were retained at Sandgate for the 
use of the forge, etc. The price paid at Hythe was 6#. 8d. a chal- 
dron = 5s. 10(7. a ton. 

Timber. — This material has a special interest on account of the 
many places named in connection with its supply ; it is surprising 
to find that it was necessary to go so far for it, in some instances 
even fourteen miles ; " the Weald " certainly was not nearer than 
eight miles from Sandgate, but there w r ere woods at less distance. 
In the accounts there is mention of oak, ash, and elm ; of beech 
we do not hear. The timber used in the building was as nearly as 
I can gather 979 loads or tons, the ton or load being taken to 
measure 50 cubic feet, as is yet the practice, and the bulk of it, 
doubtless, was oak. The ash, of which I fiud 46 loads, appears 
to have been used entirely for barrows and helves of tools ; it came 
chiefly from Hurst and " Roclands " in the parish of Street. Of 
elm in planks but little was used. 

Some items of the timber supply, noting occasionally the cost, 
follow ; the carriage was 2d. per mile per load : 

Oak. — Carriage of 36 tons [or loads] of the King's timber for 
his works at Sandgate, from Horton wood unto the sawstage, 
12s. 4id. — Hewed in Oxleys wood at Horton wood, beside the late 
Priory of Horton, 10 oaks containing 26 tons, price the hewing of 
every ton lOd. Sm. 21s. 8d. — Timber hewed in the parish of 
Horton, 25 great trees felled and hewed in Oxleis wood, containing 
38 tons ; and out of the same wood 30 small trees containing 14 
tons, price the ton 12d. Sm. 52s. — Felled in Master Scott's wood 
called " Comebe Woode " 7 trees containing 19 tons, Sm. 19s. — ■ 
For the hewing of 10 oaks in Mostock Wood, to William Knight 
of Sellinge, 28 tons, sm. 28s. — 71 Oaks from " Bonnings Hothes," 
£4 2s. 4i., and 36 oaks from " Hygh Fryght " or " Prytht " £3 
13s. 9d., both woods in the parish of Grreat Chart, price of the oaks 
from Is. to 2s., and the tops of same from 2d. to 4>d. — Carriage of 
47 loads of plank and board from same places, 13 miles, at 2d the 
mile or 2s. 2d. the load. Sm. £5 Is. lOd. — Timber from Mr. 
Darrell's and Mr. Hesnes' woods by the Hundred of Chart, 4 loads. 
— Timber from Sarles' land called Nacolt by the Hundred of Long- 
bridge, 10 miles, 24 loads. — Paid to Alexand. Jorwood for 40 trees 
taken upon the ground of Thomas Sarles the younger, which 
deceased late of Wye, at 2s. the tree. Sm. 80s. — Timber from John 
Wally's land at Bethersden, 14 miles, 13 loads. — To Andrew 
Mongeham in Harst [Hurst'] wood for hewing of 30 oaks containing 
38 tons, price the ton 12c?. Sm. 38s.— To Mr. Eaynolde Scott and 
Mr. Shelley for 37 oaks from Hurst wood, 2s. the oak. Sm. £3 14s. 
— Hewing of 5 tons 39 foot of timber in Master Selleng's wood 



238 SANDGATE CASTLE, A.l). 1539-40. 

from " Tylhast " [or " Tyle Host" in Hundred of Pfewchurch], 50 
foot the ton, price the ton hewing I0d.- Hewing 21.', ions of 
timber at "B-owstokks" [or "Bowse Stocks" now Hough Stocks, in 

Ruclcinqe], William Drew's land and John Drew's wood, and 
" May dens Way " in Hundred of Newchurch [10 miles cartage], — 
To William Webb of Warehorne for timber, 43 tons is feet ready 
squared at 2s. the ton. Sin. £4 6*. [1- miles cartage], — Timber and 

plank out of Cornewall's land. Hundred of Blackbourn, 14 miles, 
220 feet, 2s. 4>d. the load of 50 feet. — Timber from Boddenden wood 
in the parisli of AVoodchurch, carriage to Sandgate 14 miles, 21 
loads. — To Mr. Thomas Harlakenden of Woodchurch, for 30 oaks 
at 2s. the oak. Sm. £3. — Also oaks taken upon the lands of Sir 
William Kempe, Edward Phylyps of Thenderden [Tenterden], 
John Boll of Warehorne, John Drew of Kockenge [JRuckinge], 
John Cop of Blessyngton [Bilsington], and upon land sometime the 
prior's of Crychyrche [Christ Church] in Canterbury. To John 
Marble, carpenter, for felling and hewing of 56 trees at 5d. the 
tree. Sm. 23s. 4<d. 

Ash. — To " Bertylmewe Groddyn of Powltyn " [Ponlton], for 3 
loads of " Aschyn tymbir " spent in making of hand-barrows, helves 
for tools and mortar-beaters and other necessaries, at 2s. the load 
with carriage. Sm. 6s. — Carriage of " Ashe Tymber " from St. 
Badegunds to Sandgate [6 miles], 4 loads at 12d. ; paid for the ash 
4s. — " Ashe " from Horton 6 loads at lOd. and Wd. carriage. — 
Carriage of "Asche Timber" from "Harste" [Hurst] Wood to 
Sandgate, 6 miles, 5 loads at 12d. the load, Sm. 5s., and to Mr. 
Scott for the said 5 loads 2s. Gd. — Carriage of " assche tymbre " 
from Cheriton to Sandgate, for making helves for sledges and ham- 
mers, 2 loads at 4<d. Paid for said wood at lGd. the load. — Paid for 
felling 12 loads of " asshe timbir " in Bocland in the parisli of 
Street, price the load 2d. 

Elm. — To Stephen Ladde of Lyminge for 400 " elm planche 
borde " of him bought and employed in the King's use at 2s. the 
100. Sm. 8s. — Paid Master Nethersole of Dover for two loads of 
" elme " for scaffolding, 5s. — Carriage of " elmen tymbre " from 
Selyng Hort of Hartes land, 6 miles, 2 loads at 12d. 

Poles for scaffolding, amounting to 146 loads, came chiefly from 
the vicinity of Hortou Priory, the carriage 5 miles. 20 loads — Gd. 
a load, 2d. felling and Gd. carriage — were brought from "Sandlygs," 
probably Sandling, and " Brock Hill " 3 miles distant ; 16 loads 
came from the Bishop of Canterbury's wood in the parish of Bra- 
bourne, 7 miles, and 28 loads from Brabourne Pound ; 10s. for 6 
loads from the Hundred of Bewsborough were paid to John 
Lushyngton and one Home and Bobert Nethersole of Dover. 

Wattles were made use of, but in what manner does not appear; 
possibly in " wattle and dab " party- walls. Some of the entries 
follow: Provisions made for " watls " at " Lyckwood Oke in 
Ovyngstone Wood," 6 dozen there and 6 dozen in Bayls Wood. — 
Paid to Andrew Joncok and Wllyam. Turroll of Elham for 10 
dozen of " wattls," price the dozen lOd. — Paid to 3 men for felling 



SANDGATE CASTLE, A.D. 1539-40. 239 

of an acre of wood in Assholt Wood [Hundred of Folkestone] for 
" wattle," 4s. 4r/. — Two acres of wood felled to make " wattyls " 
within the parish of Newnton \_Newingtof£\, price the acre 15s., 
and for cutting down of the said two acres 4s. 4d. the acre. Sin. 
38s. Sd. — " Watls " made at Eayneden [Raindean], Cristoffer 
Wyddon for making of 10 dozen " watls " at lGd. the dozen, Sm. 
21s. 4?d. — To same for felling of 2 acres of wood at Rayneden at 
3s. 4d. the acre. Sm. 6s. 8d. — About 120 dozen seem to have been 
used, of which a third came from Raindean, carriage 4 miles. 

Wainscot. — There is repeated mention of wainscot, written 
" wenskotts " and " wayneskotts," etc. Thirty pieces are bought of 
James a Court of Hothfield, and 200 pieces, costing £11 Qs. Sd., 
come from London by ship to Dover Wyck, and thence to Sandgate. 
I find in all 258 pieces, costing with carriage £15 7s. Qd. ; the price 
generally I4d. the piece, of which, however, I do not find the 
measurement. 

Carpenters. — The work of the carpenters is described as hewing 
and squaring of timber, rearing building, framing of timber, making 
of wheelbarrows, handbarrows, bosses [short troughs for mortar], 
hods, and mortar tubs, helving mattocks, pickaxes, and hammers ; 
and in the last month John Pallmer, the master-carpenter, who has 
witnessed to the correctness of the accounts by signing every page 
of them, takes work " by the great," i.e. at the fixed sum of £4 
for the making of doors, windows, and other necessaries, and has 
12s. besides for making a " portall." The carpenters were not in 
force until the third month, when their number was 22, which 
increased to 33 in the fifth ; the strongest muster was 40, with 10 
apprentices, in the fifteenth, month ; their wage was 8d. and 7d. 
per diem; Pallmer the master or warden had lOd. and Eichard 
Smyth the under-warden, Qd. each day. 

Sawyers vary in number from 8 to 20, their daily wage being 
7d. They are mentioned in the third month's account as sawing 
and cutting timber boards for the frames, and planks for the 
stairs going up to the Castle walls, and for wheelbarrows, hods, etc. 
Besides the sawstages at Sandgate there were others in Harlaken- 
den's, Phillypps', and Hygh Fryght woods, where planks were sawn 
before being carted to Sandgate. 

Labourers. — These were engaged in digging and casting beach 
or " prebylls," in carrying water and slacking lime, making mortar, 
carrying it in bosses and stone in handbarrows to the masons, in 
moving and carrying timber and assisting the sawyers and carpen- 
ters, in working at the quarry and loading the carts there. Some 
of the labourers at the quarry were called " sledgemen," their work 
being to "break the rocks with great sledges, to rear the great stones 
with iron crows," and in short to get the stone for the hardhewers 
who prepared it for the masons. There were also " minders and 
diggers of cleaves," whose occupation was to search out and follow 
the clefts or fissures in the rocks, and "to dig out the myghthe " 
or rubbish, so that the masses of stone might be got at. In the 
description of the operations it is clearly evident how arduous was 



240 SANDGATE CASTLE, A.l). 1539-10. 

the labour of quarrying without gunpowder, which is not once men- 
tioned in the accounts. 

The best class of labourers, such as the sledgetnen and minders, 
had Gr/. a day, the others 5d., and like the masons they were paid 
for extra hours. The greatest number employed was 819 in the 
fifteenth month (May — June 1540), of which number 117 worked 
in the quarry. 

Carts. — Unlike other words written variously throughout the 
ledger, carts are uniformly " courts," an indication perhaps of local 
pronunciation at the time. It is not clearly gathered of what the 
ordinary cart and its team consisted ; for fiuding those working 
between the Castle and the quarry indifferently termed " courts " 
and " great courts," and reading in the first month's accounts of 
" great courts with six beestis " bringing lime from St. Badegunds 
(the only instance in which the team is defined), we ask if six oxen 
formed the usual team of carts, or of exceptionally large carts only ? 
As the recognized load, one ton, was not generally exceeded, I am 
inclined to think, even mindful of rough roads or no roads, that a 
pair of oxen would have sufficed for the ton load. Horses evidently 
w r ere used only for riding. 

Every month during the progress of the work, a large number of 
carts were hired to bring the stone from the quarry, and to convey 
other materials. The greatest number was 110 in the fourteenth 
month (April — May 1540), but these did not work all the four 
weeks, a certain number worked and were then relieved, 40 being 
the daily average. The carts were procured from all the country 
round ; for instance in the thirteenth month they came from places 
in the Hundreds of Folkestone, Street, Bircholt Franchise, Chart, 
Calehill, Wye, and the Liberty of Ashford : and in the other 
direction from the Hundreds of Hayne, Worth, St. Martin's, Long- 
port, Aloes Bridge, and the towns of Old Bomney, New Bomney, 
and Lydd. To whatever place the carts belonged, the hire for those 
working at Sandgate was 16c?. a day ; a number also were engaged 
in the transport of timber and lime, paid, as has been said, at the 
rate of 2d. a mile for the ton load. 

Sand and Pebble. — The carts at Sandgate in addition to convey- 
ing stone from the quarry had also to carry " Sande Bebyll" or 
" Sande and Frebill." The sand was of course for the mortar, the 
pebbles were probably used with the sand for concrete, or if large 
for filling up the bulk of masonry. 

Ironwork and Tools. — Much interest attaches to the monthly 
accounts of the " Ironwork made and delivered by Bichard Malyce, 
smith [for the greater part of the time] of the King's works at 
Sandgate," because of the particulars they afford in regard to the 
tools, and their mention of parts and fixtures of the Castle. 
The smith bought the iron and steel from the King at cost price, 
and had a price per lb., 2d. or 2\d. according to workmanship, for 
the tools or articles supplied by him; his monthly accounts also 
comprise his charges for the necessary repair of tools. 

Of iron — written "yerne," "yeron," and " yron "—I find the 



SANDGATE CASTLE, A.D. 1539-40. 241 

purchase of about 4^ tons; and of 11 sheaves and 9 burdens or 
bundles of steel, the equivalent of which in modern weight I cannot 
give ; the sheaf is priced at lOd. and 8d., the bundle or burden at 
4s., but the accounts only shew -lis. spent on steel. For the price 
of iron we have a few entries under the head of "empeions " or 
purchases, thus : Tn the first month, " To Master Thomson of 
Dover Town for 5 cwt. and 26 lbs. of iron .... at 0s. 8d. the ewt. 
[=£6 13s. 4(3?. per ton];" in the fifth month we find 3 tons and 
7 score lbs. bought of Thomas Bacon, salter, of London, for £18 Gs. 
8d. [=£6 per ton] ;. and there is another purchase the same month 
of 1 ton from Mr. Ager (place not stated) for £7 Gs. 8d., a much 
higher price than the preceding. 

I will now class together some examples of tools and ironwork ; 
they are chiefly gathered from the smith's monthly accounts, but 
some are found as " empeions " or purchases. Shovels and spades 
were bought at various places as the following entries show : 
To John Morton of Ashford 6 " schodde schovylls wth. stele " [or 
shod with steel] at (id. To Roberd Wylkyns of London for 2 
dozen of " scholvys " at 4d. To same for a dozen steeled spades 
at Gd. apiece. To Myghell Abel, smith of Canterbury, for 5 dozen 
and 4 shovels and spades, shod and steeled, at 6d. apiece. To 
Thomas Valentyne of Hythe for 2 dozen shovels and spades at Gd. 
apiece. To Thomas Hamon of Folkestone for 4 shovels unshod 2d. 
apiece. Trees for 8 " shovells " Is. 8d. This and the following 
from the smith's accounts : 4 digging mattocks weighing [together] 
19 lbs. at 2\d. the lb. Sm. 3s. \\\d. 4 mattocks for digging of 
stone at the quarry, 29 lbs. A mattock 8 lbs. 3 great pickaxes, 
54 lbs. at 2\d. the lb. 2 pickaxes 12 lbs. A pickaxe for the 
paviors 4 lbs. To Thomas Hamon of Folkestone for 2 crows of 
iron for breaking and digging out of rocks, 36.1 lbs. at \\d. the lb. 
Sm. 4s. 6d. 4 crows of iron, 75 lbs. 2 jacks, 7^ lbs. at 2d. the lb. 
A vice to bring great iron out of the fire in the smith's forge, 
13 lbs. at 2d. A great sledge [hammer] 20 lbs. at 2hd. 6 steeled 
sledges, 80 lbs. [13g- lbs. each]. 2 steeled hammers for breaking 
rocks 18 lbs. [9 lbs. each]. 5 hammers 22 lbs. [4| lbs. each]. 9 
laying hammers 36 lbs. [4 lbs. each]. 21 hammers 76 lbs. [85 lbs. 
each]. 2 " skales " to cleave stone 7 lbs. 3 wedges to cleave wood 
30 lbs. at \\d. Wedges 18 lbs. at \%d. Small wedges for to put 
in hewers' hammers 9^ lbs. A mason's axe 5 lbs. at 2hl. 2 brick 
axes 10 lbs. An axe for the plumber Is. 3d. 4 great bills to hew 
chalk 15 lbs. 2 small bills 51 lbs. 4 bills for the gunners to pick 
stones with, 2s. 2d. 2 steeled punches 4 lbs. at 2\d. 7 masons' 
points 15 lbs. 12 " poynts and chesellys " [points and chisels] to 
work hard stone 4d. apiece. Sm. 4s. 2 dozen points and the fells 
48 lbs. A mason's " checell " 2 lbs. "A hare chesel for the 
gonnes " [guns] 4 lbs. 6 masons' irons 15 lbs. " A pay re of 
pynsers " 3 lbs. A " shave " and 2 scappling hooks to draw plank 
with for the carpenters. 2 iron rakes lGd. 2 dozen " spykyns " 
[spikes] for the plumber 10 lbs. at 2d. 8 spikes 3 lbs. 26 spikes 
5 lbs. 30 great spikes 7 lbs. 3 bars 18 lbs. at 2d. 3 bars for a 

vol. xx. it 



2-1-2 SANDGATE CASTLE, A.D. 1530-10. 

window 34 lbs. 3 little bars for a window 12£ lbs. 32 ban for 

the lantern 25 I lbs. 5 bars for port holes 2T> lbs. greal bars tor 
"loops" [? loop-holes] 217 lbs. A great bar to lay across the 

mantel of the Deputy's chamber 73 lbs. A bar of iron for the 
"keehyn," to hang tin- hangers on, 58 lbs. 2 great bars for the 

" keehyn," to hang pots on, 2s lbs. 4 bars for the halt-moon 17 lbs. 
'2 hoops for the " lnne " [? the lodge at the quarry] 6 lbs. 2 hoops 
and 2 for the drawbridge 45 lbs. Hoops, staples, and bolts for the 
" lnne " 30 lbs. 2L pair of hooks for the "lopes" [? loop-holes] 
85 lbs. Great hooks for the Castle 44 lbs. A great book for the 
eastle door 2b' lbs. 3 hooks for castle doors 24^ lbs. 2 pair of 
books for the falling door 51 lbs. 3 hooks of iron to bear a 
" sestorne" [cistern] of lead 15 lbs. A pair of " rydes " 12 lbs. at 
2d. [" rydes" ' = hinges which ride on the hooks]. 2 pairs of 
"ryddes " 4 lbs. 34 pairs of rides and hooks 6 cwt. 53 lbs. [=725 
lbs.=2ll lbs. the pair] at 2d, the lb. Sm. £6 0s. lOrf. 19 pair of 
"rydes" for the loop-holes 103 lbs. [8\ lbs. the pair]. 10 pair of 
great " rydes " for the great doors 354 lbs. [3of lbs. the pair]. A 
great " ryde " 38 lbs. 2 great " ryds " for the castle gate 81 lbs. 
[40| lbs. each] at 2d, the lb. 3 " ryddys " for the great' gate 2 cwt. 
45 lbs. [269 lbs. = 89% lbs. each] at U. the lb. Sm. £4 9s. 8d. A 
" charnell " for the wicket 27 lbs. at 2d, [charnel is another word 
for hinge, of form different to the ride]. A pair of charnels 
lOd. Charnels and a lock for the great chest 6s. 8d. 2 uprights 
for a window in the Castle " tynned " [? coated with tin~] 11 lbs. at 
2\d. 8 uprights and 4 stay bars for windows 200 lbs. at 2d. 
Lockets and uprights 256 lbs. Lockets and bars for windows 1S2 
lbs. 6 lockets for windows 213 lbs. Bolts for small windows in 
the round towers 68 lbs. 6 bolts for the great gate and 2 doors in 
the ditch 62 lbs. 8 pair of clasps and staples for the lantern 
44 lbs. 16 clasps for the lantern and 32 staples 16 lbs. 3 staples 
for the " gonnes " [guns] 29 lbs. 8 lbs. of iron that was laid upon 
the "guns." " Lynche pyns and ry vetts " 38^ lbs. 8 "lying 
pynnes for the gonnes" 12 lbs. at 2d. 4 clamps for the bell 8 lbs. 
2 " go-jons " [gudgeons] for the drawbridge 34 lbs. 2 new chains 
for the drawbridge 1 cwt. 52 lbs. at 4<d. the lb. Sm. 54s. 8d. 3 
" stalys " [?] 5 lbs. 2 "rosses " for doors 1 cwt. 4 lb3. 2d. the lb. 
Sm. 19s. 4d. A sweep for a gate 68 lbs. 3 doz. " ryngles " for the 
doors 8s. the doz. 12 " ryngles " for the doors at 8d the " rengle." 
380 " roves " [discs of iron upon which the ends of nails tvere 
clinched, in this instance apparently studding the castle gate] 
162 lbs. at 3d. Roves 86 lbs. at 2d. Latches and catches for 6 
doors lQd. apiece. A lock for the store house door Gd, A lock and 
key for the store house of the westernmen [masons from the West] 
12d. A lpck and key for the store house for the limekiln above 
St. Eanswitb's Chapel 6d. 6 locks for the King's Castle 3s. 9d, 
2 plate locks for the Castle 25s. 3 stock locks for the Castle 10s. 8d. 
14 stock locks at 2s. One great stock lock Gs. 8d. A lock for the 
,l utter gate " 13s. 4d. A lock for a falling door 20d. A " skomer " 
[melting pan] for the plumber 7 lbs. A skomer for the plumbers 



SANDGATE CASTLE, A.D. 1539-40. 213 

10 lbs. at 2d. A knife for the plumber 4i. A casement 5s. 
5 casements 25s. 2 chambers for the "portyngale base" \_small gun] 
16 lbs. at 2d. Iron for " gostook " [?], the which the Adman [the 
German engineer, Yon Hashenperg] advised, 132iV lbs. A " harthe " 
for the chimney 10 lbs. A sweep 44 lbs. Crampets for the sweepes 
and staples 20 lbs. A sweep for a gate G8 lbs. 3 grates for the 
sinks 41 lbs. at 2d. A pair of tongs, a fire pan, a rake with 2 
andirons 37 lbs. at 2\d. Sm. 7s. 8\d. A frying pan 4 lbs. 6 
" takke-hooks for flesshe." 8 vanes at 5s. The great vane 10s. 

Repairs. — The smith in addition to supplying tools and the 
requisites for the Castle had, necessarily, to keep the tools in repair ; 
his monthly accounts — the highest of which amounts to £44 14s. 4c?. 
— are largely composed of items such as the following : Helving of 
hammers and axes; trees [handles] for shovels; mending of 
shovels ; trees and rydds [hinges] for the plumbers' pan 5s. ; shar- 
pening of 900 masons' irons, or points, at lOd. the 100, Sm. 7s. Gd. ; 
battering [i.e. forging] of 2 sledges [great hammers] 2s. ; battering 
of 5 score and 8 hammers at 2d., Sm. 18s. ; battering of masons' 
axes 2d. each ; steeling* 39 hammers at Qd. each. Steeling of 15 
masons' axes 3s. 9d. ; steeling 33 masons' irons or points at 3d. 
each ; " shettyng of a twybble " [sheeting, i.e. steeling of a twibill or 
mattock, which had one end like an axe, the other like an adze] 4<d. ; 
" shettyng" of a great bar, 4d. ; mending of a pair of " cobyerons " 
\_coh-irons] 5\ lbs. ; mending of 2 iron rakes for the limekiln at 
St. Eanswiths, 8d. ; mending of bolts for the ordnance Gd. ; repair- 
ing of the King's Artillery, that is to say 24 " sheff " of arrows at 
12d. the " sheff," 24s. 

JVails are so well represented that I accord them a special para- 
graph ; they are generally found as " empcions," or purchases, and 
were bought in London, at Wye fair, and other places, but the 
larger kiud are supplied by the smith. The following are among 
the many entries : 200 of " small tacke nayle " -id. ; 4 mil. [thou- 
sands] of " sprygg," bought at Hythe, 2s. 8d. ; 2 " some " [?] of 
"sprygg" 10s. ; 2 ditto at Wye fair, lis. 4<d. ; 1 ditto at London 
Gs. Sd. ; the prices following are per mil. : threepenny nails Is. Sd., 
2s. Sd., and 2s. Gd. ; fourpenny nails (spent in making wheel- 
barrows, bosses, and mortar tubs) 2s. Gd. and 2s. 8d. at London, 
2s. I0^d. at Wye ; fivepenny nails 4s. 26?. ; sixpenny nails 5s. and 
at London 2s. 8d. ; eightpenny nails made by the smith for the 
plumber 4s. 9d. ; single tenpenny nails at London 5s., at Wye fair 
4s. ; double tenpenny nails at London 10s., at Wye fair Ss. ; 
" latesse nayles " 2s. Gd. per 100 ; rivet nails 3s. 4?d. per 100 ; 50 
" great broddes " Qd. ; 100 " small broddes " 4-6?. ; great nails to 
nail the lead upon the wall 18 lbs. at 2d. ; 1000 " tyn nayles" 
[? tin-coated] Gs. 8d. per 100, Sm. £3 Gs. Sd. ; 500 " great tyn 
naylys " 285 lbs. at 4d., Sm. £4 15s. ; 500 ditto 252 lbs. at id., sm. 

* This steeling appears to have heen not merely tempering, but the welding 
or combining of steel with softer metal, for in the first month's accounts a bun- 
dle of steel is bought and "spent in hardening of hammers," and in the fourth 
month hammers and points are " battered and steeled with the King's steel." 

B 2 



214 SANDGATE CASTLE, A.D. 1539-40. 

£4 4*. ; " tynne nayles called fyve stroke navies " 145 lbs. at Rd., 
Sm. E I K!.s-. Hd. ; 427 " tynne nayle " for the eastle <_, r :>to 213 lbs. at 
4(1., Sm. £3 1 1*-. ; 730 great nails for the gate 3$ cwt. and 3 lbs. at 
■U. the lb., Sm. 66 11*. 8d. 

Tin. — We have above several instances of " tin nails" which 
seem to have been used in studding the principal gate or gates; in 
the smith's account we read also of two " uprights" for a window 
" tynned ;" and as there is a purchase of 75) lbs. of tin at 4d. it 
would seem that the great nails and uprights were coated with the 
white metal, for appearance sake, or to prevent corrosion. 

Hi~ass is mentioned four times : In the seventh month, William 
Ryve of Canterbury delivers to the clerk of the storehouse and to 
John Pallmer, master carpenter, 8 pieces of " brasses " for the draw- 
bridge, weight 2 cwt. 51 lbs. at 3M. the lb., Sm. £4 0s. 1\d. ; in the 
eighth month, 2 iron bolts weighing 9 lbs. are made for setting in 
brasses of the castle gate ; in the same month there is the purchase 
of 4 " shevers " \? pieces'] of brass weighing 44 lbs. at 8%d. ; and in 
the twelfth month, a kettle of brass weighing 6 lbs. at Id. is bought 
" to temper glue and rosin with." 

Lead, Solder, and the Plumbers. — In the third month's account 
4 cwt. of lead at 4*. 8d. the cwt. is purchased, where is not said ; 
but why should the King have bought the metal when at Horton 
Priory, which he had seized, he had it near at hand ? There was no 
buying of lead after this month. A record of spoliation is the ledger 
entry that 13 loads of lead — about 9£ tons — came from the dis- 
mantled Priory, carriage, only, paid ; part of it was carted all the 
five or six miles ; part to Hythe Haven only, and thence by boat 
conveyed to Sandgate. 

Thomas Hall, the chief plumber, and Stephen his servant, 
appear in the same third month, and use the lead to " yote " hooks 
in doors, loop hooks, and windows ; for the same purpose they also 
use " sowder " [solder], the price of which is Ad. the lb. In the 
sixth month Thomas Aeon — called Serjeant Kon in one account — 
is serjeant plumber, and is at work with 4 assistants ; 24 fodders 
of lead are cast, weighing nearly 12 cwt., for which the serjeant 
receives 3s. 3d. the fodder. The fodder seems here to have been a 
piece, neither measurement nor weight, though to-day the term 
implies 21 cwt. of lead ; in these accounts, 8 fodders in one place 
weigh more than 12 in another. In the seventh month, lead is 
prepared for three round towers. In the fifteenth month, solder 
is bought to solder the leads and the joiners' glue-pots. Cisterns of 
lead are mentioned, and in the eighteenth month lead is cast, and 
laid for the gate house and countermure, and for the lantern, 
taberts, pipes, and sules ; and in the same month as much as 292 
lbs. of solder is used or purchased. 

We have no further reference to the plumbers' work although 
during the last four months 3 or 4 were constantly employed; they 
had generally 7d. a day, the " serjeant," when not paid by the piece, 
had lOd. In the last month, they mended with solder " certain 
places in the lead where it was broken by reason of paving." 



SANDGATE CASTLE, A.D. 1539-40. 245 

Calkers. — There were also at work in the latter months 6 to 8 
calkers, who, besides 6d. a day, were allowed their meat and drink ; 
in the sixteenth month, there is this entry : paid to " John Broun 
vyttlar for mete and drynke for the calkers by the space of 12 
days at 2ld. the week." Sm. 19s. Qd. Tow also appears in the 
accounts; 40 quarters of tow to calk with, at 5d. the quarter, are 
bought at Hvthe, and 190 lbs. at Id. the lb. Bed lead is paid for 
at 2d. the lb." 

Plasterers. — Seven were at work during the final month ; their 
daily wage being Id. 

Laths came from Warehorne, Bromley Green, Ashford, and 
Canterbury, all 12 or 13 miles distant from Sandgate. The price 
was 4d. to (id. a hundred ; the best is called " harte " [? heart] 
lath ; 535 hundreds are entered in the accounts. 

Hair for plastering. Of this, G15 bushels at Id. were bought, 
chiefly at Canterbury. 

" Thromes " [weavers' waste] were bought to the amount of 8 
lbs. at l^d. from two weavers. 

Paviors were employed at a daily wage of 7d. during the last 
three months ; their work is not described further than that Thomas 
Lambert, pavior, is in the last month paid 20s. for paving three 
rooms " by great," i.e. fixed price. 

Painters. — Three painters are mentioned in the accounts of the 
last three months ; we should like to learn where they applied the 
many colours named, but the wish is not gratified. The materials 
and paints are generally, though perhaps not always recognizable, 
in the old spelling ; I give them as found : paynters' oyle, 2s. the 
galonne \_a great price'], whytte leade, redd leade, orkement, sprunse 
oker, generall, dorry, rossett, blank pin., byse [blue], vermylyon, 
verde-grese, bytnose, Spanysh white, blaeke, florey , py ngke, synaplake, 
sylver [leaf] 3s. the 100, fyne golde [leaf] 6s. the 100, with the 
latter we fancy the castle vanes made resplendent ; bought at 
Canterbury 35 bushels of glover's shreds at 3d. " to make size for 
the painters ;" 12 pots Qd. 

Glazing. — Of this there is mention only in the last account, 
viz., " payde to the glasyers for glasing of certen wyndowes w'n the 
castell, 35s." 

Empcions [purchases or disbursements]. — We have already 
drawn on this account, but there are yet interesting items which 
I will extract as concisely as possible : To John Swainton of 
Alkam for carriage from St. Badegunds of 4 loads of wheelbarrows, 
handbarrows, bosses, hods, and mortar-tubs, 4s. To Bychard 
Panter of Canterbury, smith, a sheaf of steel lOd. and a bundle 4s. 
To Thomas Fagg of Buckland for carriage of 2 loads of iron from 
Canterbury 4s. Baskets, generally bought in London (whence the 
purchases were brought by sea to Sandgate, Dover, or Hythe), for 
carrying lime, 4<i. each, small ditto 2^d. Crossbanded baskets 5c?. 
each. Long ditto Id. Tays for carrying chalk to the limekiln 4</. 
each. Pails 2d. and 4*d. each, and \&d. the dozen. Skopetts 
[skippct, a small round wooden vessel with long handle for 
ladling water] 2d. each. Forks for handles of bosses, 15</. a load. 



24<f> SANDGATE CASTLE, A.D. 1539-40. 

Sieves 2d. and Bd. each. A bushel to mete sea-coal 2QJ. 2 " great 
clyslys " [clists?] and a round " batt " [? vat] and 2 other 
"clystys " of ash 14c/. A great tub made of a malmusay [malmsey] 
butt 12c?. A casket to carry the Kind's money 4s. 2 cocks of 2 
cisterns 7s. 4 c?. A great rope for the Castle weighing SO lbs., at 1 \d. 
a lb., 10s. 2 hand ropes weighing 7'. lbs. at 1 !.<f. 66 ropes for scaf- 
folding 15s. Id. 40 pieces of scaffold ropes at 2|c?. A rope for the 
" f?y n " [engine, for raising guns] 6G lbs. at Ihd. Canvas for the 
" hale " [tent] 10 ells at 5rf. Lines for the hale and for the works to 
range them with, 18c?. A line of 80 fathoms and 10 for to mete the 
wall of the Castle 18 d. A line and thread for the pavilion 4d. 12 
" plombe-rewlys " [p>lumb-rnles] to plumb the walls with, at 2d. the 
plumb. 30 " plome rewles " 5s. Carriage of 3 doz. " trowells and 
plombe rewles with squyres " [squares] etc., from London to Sand- 
gate 2s. 12 squares 3s. A " grene stone " [grindstone] 2s. 4 
seams of fine lime and sand at Canterbury 16c?. To Thomas 
Edwards of London for " pytche " 53s. 4c?. 2 barrels of pitch at 
8s. Sd. 4 barrels of tar at 4s. 4a. 20 lbs. glue at 3£d. 3 cwt. 
of " roosen " [rosin] lis. 26 lbs. tallow at Id. 20 lbs. of 
" candell " at l^d. 4 stock brushes 2s. 4i. 4 hand brushes Is. 6c?. 
" Tnke, and papyr " 3s. 4c?. " Papre and ynk " 5s. 4 queyers of 
papir ryall " 2s. " A reyme of papyr " 2s. 8d. 10 " quyers of 
paper ryall" 5s. " Perchement " 4c?. 9 fardels of " velym " 
for coverings of the paper books [probably the original covers of 
the ledger] 2s. 8c?. 28 books bought of Thos. Cornell [London] by 
the great [fixed price] 50s. A large canvas bag to put books in, 6d. 

Officers, Clerks, and Expenses. — For the first nine months, 
Thomas Cocks and Eichard Keys were the Commissioners for the 
work, that is to say from the 30th March until the 7th December 
1539. These Commissioners do not sign the accounts which officially 
emanated from them ; every page of the ledger, during the nine 
months, bears the confirmatory signatures of Stephanus de Hashen- 
perg, ic, William Baker, Mayor [of Folkestone], Robert Lynsted, 
warden [master-mason], John Pallmer, carpent. [master-carpenter], 
Edward Inmyth, jurat, Thomas Medley, jurat, John Lambert, clerk 
of the check, and Thomas AVarren, clerk of the call. During the 
subsequent period so many signatures were not considered neces- 
sary. 

After the first nine months, and during the other ten, Cocks no 
longer appears as Commissioner. The ledger does not ehow his 
remuneration, nor that of the engineer Von Hashenperg, who 
perhaps received his pay direct from the King's minister. The 
salary of Richard Keys appears in the summary on the last page 
of the ledger. He claimed £110 8s., for 552 days' service, at the 
rate of 4s. per diem. 

Von Hashenperg, who wrote his name in the Latin form, w r as a 
German. As Steven von Hassenperg (and Hashenperg) he is men- 
tioned, as Master of the Works, in the accounts for the repair of 
the Castle at Carlisle in the year after the completion of Sandgate 
Castle. (Add. MSS. 6362 f. 3, and 5754 ff. 90—92, the latter 
reference is to three receipts for salary at 4s. a day). The let- 



SANDGATE CASTLE, A.I). 1539-10. 24-7 

ters, ic, following bis name, wore a puzzle to me, until interpreted 
by Mr. Bickley of the MSS. Dept. Brit. Mus., whose willing assist- 
ance in reading the old record I desire gratefully to acknowledge. 
By him the initials are read t: ic." for iconomus, which the GHossary 
of Du Cange mentions as in use for oeconomus, manager or director. 
Von Hashenperg is in this ledger twice referred to as " the Alman," 
and at Carlisle also he was called "Stephen the Alinayn." It is 
not probable that he remained at Sandgate after March 1540, when 
he ceased to sign the accounts; but his connection with the work 
seems to have been continued as " the devisor " or designer. In 
the twelfth month, the master-carpenter and the master-mason go 
to London " to know the devisor's mind concerning his work in 
the Castle of Sandgate ;" in the thirteenth mouth and subse- 
quently " the devisor's clerk " is mentioned ; and in the eighteenth 
month, we find certain expenses at Folkestone allowed to " Mr. 
Stephyn the devisor," the ledger clerk thus avoiding the difficulty 
of writing the foreign name. 

At the beginning of the tenth month, as has been noticed, 
Eeynold Scott, Esq., became Surveyor or Comptroller of the work, 
while Richard Keys continued to be Paymaster or Accomptant. 
On the last page of the ledger the Surveyor appears as Sir Reynold 
Scott, Knight, and is awarded a fee of £50. The accounts of the 
tenth month are signed by Scott, Von Hashenperg, Ballmer the 
master-carpenter, and Lynsted the master-mason ; after the twelfth 
month the German's signature drops out, but the other three are 
continued to the end. 

The overseers and clerks figure more numerously in the lists 
of the first period than in those of the second ; but this is owing 
merely to the transfer of some of their names to the lists of the 
workmen with whom their duty lay. In the twelfth month and 
onw T ards, we find six clerks and one purveyor; the latter, employed 
from the commencement of the work until its finish, was Thomas 
Elgar whose duty was to " make provision for timber, lime, carriages, 
and other necessaries for the King's Castle at Sandgate." The six 
clerks were John Lambert clerk of the check, Thomas Warren clerk 
of the call, Thomas Busshe clerk of the ledger, Francis Diggs the pay- 
master's clerk, John Shotford the devisor's clerk, and John Strogull 
" Mr. Scott's clerk for registering and writing of his books." John 
Strogull was a witness to Sir Reynold Scott's will, which gave him 
an annuity of £5. (Memoirs of Scott Family by J. R. Scott, 1S7G, 
pp. 179, 1S3). The clerk's pay generally was 'Sd. per diem. 

The " expenses " of the officers furnish us with a good deal of 
interesting information, especially in regard to the transport of 
the money to Sandgate for the monthly payments. I cannot do 
better than give some of the items under this head verbatim. 

In the second month, two horse hires from Folkestone to the 
Downs* for the Alman, at Vld. the horse. 

* The Downs arc mentionod three times in the ledger, it being evident that 
" the three castles that keep the Downs," viz., those of Walmer, Deal, and San- 
down, of which Mr. Elvin has lately given so good an account, were built at the 
same time as that of Sandgate. 



2 IS SANDGATE CASTLE, A.D. 1539-40. 

Tn the third month, Mr. Keys asketh allowance for himself and 
his three men for riding to Dover for money to pay the workmen 
and labourers by the space of a clay ami a night (is. tid. To Thomas 
Busshe for his expenses riding by the space of sixteen days, to press 
masons out of the West Country at 12</. the day, l(5.s\ 

In the fifth month, expense of William Baker of Folkestone, 
jurat, for certain business concerning the King's great works at 
Saudgate : A horse hire and for horse meat and man's meat riding 
to Chartham for trowels 12d. : Two times riding to the Downs to 
have certain communication with master-comptrollers there con- 
cerning the use and custom of freemasons and hard-hewers 2s., etc. 
Master Keys asketh allowance for riding to the King's Grace for 
money to Guildford and to Farnham, and there at the King's 
Grace's pleasure for the space of 23 days for him and his four 
horses, and for conducting the said money to the King's Castle of 
Dover, at 6s. 8d. the day, £7 13s. 4>d* Paid to John Colley for 
his expense for himself and his horse for carrying a letter unto 
the Lord Privy Seal [Thomas Cromwell] being at Grafton [Graf 'ton 
Royal, Northants] by the assignment of Mr. Cocks, the said John 
being out the space of 11 days, every day 12c?., lis. 

In the sixth month, Richard Keys asketh allowance for riding to 
the King's Grace for money to Grafton, and there at the King's 
pleasure by the space of 24 days for him and his three horses, and 
for conducting of the said money to the King's Castle of Dover 
at 6s. 8d. the day, £8. Carriage of a "gonue" [gun] from Dover 
to the King's Castle at Sandgate 6s. 

In the seventh month, Mr. Keys asketh allowance for riding to 
London to Master Bryan Tukef for money by the space of 11 
days for him and his three horses, and for conducting of the said 
money unto the King's Castle of Dover at 6s. 8d. the day, £3 
13s. id. 

In the eleventh month, for writing of the commission signed 
by the King's Grace 3s. 4<d. Paid to Cope, my Lord Chancellor's 
servant for writing and sealing of the commission 9s. 4d. Reynold 
Scott, Esquire, and Richard Keys, Commissioners, ask allowance for 
their costs riding for the King's money to the Castle of Dover 
with six men for one day, expenses 6s. 8d. Expenses by Eichard 
Tayler to press men in the West Country : First, horse-hire from 
Canterbury to Rochester 12 d. Item from Rochester to Gravesend 
4>d. Item from London to Basingstoke 40 miles 2s. 4c?. Item 
from Basingstoke to Andover 18 miles V2d. Item from Andover to 

* The inconvenience, waste of time, and cost of getting money at this hank- 
less period is here exemplified. The paymaster occupies 23 days in getting the 
cash, and his expenses amount to a sum which to-day would figure as about £70, 
or about 1| per cent, of that month's pay. 

t A similar journey was made by Mr. Keys in the eighth mouth. Sir 
"Bryan Tuke had been a Secretary of Cardinal Wolsey ; he was afterwards suc- 
cessively a Groom of the Chamber, Master of the Jewel House, and Ambassador 
to France. His daughter Mary became the second wife of Sir Reynold Scott. 
Memorials of the Family of Scott, p. 184. 



SANDGATE CASTLE, A.D. 1539-10. 249 

Nunney 33 miles 20d. Item for the hire of a horse there for the 
spare of six days 2s. 4rf. Item from Nunney to Salisbury, home- 
ward, I2d. Item From Salisbury to Andover lOd. Item from An- 
dover to Basingstoke 12d. Item from Basingstoke to Loudon 40 
miles 2s. 4dL Item from Gravesend to Canterbury 16d. Item his 
expenses by the space of 18 days at 6d., 9s. Sm. 24s. 2d. John 
Pallmer asketh allowance over and above his wages for going into 
the Weald to choose timber by the space of 7 days at Ad. the day 
2s. 4d, 

In the thirteenth month, Master Keys asketh allowance for his 
charges riding to London and thence to Hampton Court to obtain a 
warrant of the King's Grace for money for his works at Sandgate, 
and for the safe conducting of the said money to the said works 
by the space of 25 days for himself and his three servants with their 
horses at 5s. the day, £6 5s. 

In the fourteenth month, Nicholas Hunt asketh allowance for 
himself and his horse for riding into the Downs at the commandment 
of Master Keys and Master Scott for certain workmen 12d. John 
Colley asketh allowance for going from Sandgate to .Rochester with 
the King's letters 4s., and for 2 horse hire going with the King's 
prisoners* by the space of 3 days 4s. Paid to Thomas Warren for 
his costs and charges riding to London about the King's business for 
to buy certain stuff, that is to say nails, rosin, glue, scaffold ropes, 
with other necessaries for the Castle, for him and his horse by the 
space of 12 days over and above his wages at Qd. the day, 6s., and for 
riding to Dover at sundry times for to fetch stuff from the ships, 
and to provide carriage to carry the said stuff to the Castle of Sand- 
gate, 3s. 

In the fifteenth month, Mr. Keys again goes to the Lord Privy 
Seal at London for the money, and repeats the journey the next 
month ; and in the eighteenth month, Thomas Warren goes to Lon- 
don at the commandment of Master Scott to help to save-conduct 
the King's treasure. 

In the nineteenth and last month, paid to a poor man whose 
name is Thomas P'gate, for the hire of certain ground for to lay the 
King's timber, and also to make pits for sawstages with other 
necessaries for the space of one year and a half, 20s. 

The last page of the Ledger. — " The charge of Kycharde Keys, 
Paymaster of the Castle of Sandgate, £5368, contra quo the whole 
payment of the 2 books [shown in a summary of the amounts paid 
in each of the 19 months. The addition is] £5412 3s. 2fJ. whereof 
defalk [abate] £40 8s. for the riding costs of the said accomptant 
allowed in diverse particularities in the books of parcels because the 
same is allowed after in a special letter, etc. Q. Rem. £5371 15 2|" 

The necessary fees of the Paymaster Comptroller, 
Master Comptroller, and others : — 

"The fee of Kycharde Keys, Accomptant, being 
Paymaster, etc., from the 30th day of March Anno 

* Query workmen who had misconducted themselves. 



250 SANDGATE CASTLE, A.l). 15:39-40. 

30 mo unto the second day of October Anno 32 do by 
the space of 55li days both days included at 4s. the 
day 110 8 

The expenses of the same Rycbarde riding 8 
several times, taking For every time so riding 17s. as 
in the like cases is allowed unto Anthony Archer, 
Paymaster of the work of Dover G 16 

The fee of Sr. Eeynolde Scott, Knight, Comp- 
troller of the said work from the 7th day of Decem- 
ber Anno 31 m0 unto the said 2 nd day of October 
Anno 32 do by the space of 300 days inclusive, after 
the rate of 3s. 4d. the day 50 

The fee of Thomas Kolffe, Auditor 5 

£5543 19 21 



T5543 19 2f-| 
L.53G8 J 



And so he is in superplusage 175 19 2f 

pr. p. [probatur per~\ Walterum Mildemaje, 

Auditorem." 

The Castle. — The examination of the ledger has perhaps left 
with us the impression that the quantity of material used in the 
building was, in proportion to its size, great, and its cost excessive ; 
for bearing in mind the difference in money value, we mentally 
adapt the total of the account, £5544, to its present equivalent, 
and using nine as the multiple (which is, I think, rather under than 
over the mark), we have as an approximate equivalent £50,000. 
We remember, moreover, that tin's amount did not cover the whole 
value of the materials, for a portion of which, to wit the Caen 
stone and lead derived from the dismantled Priory of Horton, and 
the timber felled in its woods, the King did not pay. The Castle, 
however, exhibited a great deal of building in a contracted area, 
and was in fact a triple building ; while the masonry designed to 
resist an enemy's cannon was necessarily massive, the walls of the 
central tower, or keep, being eight feet thick, and the outside sur- 
rounding wall at least seven feet. The remnant of the edifice now 
casually seen, in appearance little more than a martello tower of 
somewhat greater bulk than its neighbours, and but the inner core 
of what once existed, fails to impress the passer-by with due ap- 
preciation of its former size and importance. And indeed it must 
be a matter of regret to the people of Sandgate and Folkestone, 
that a building which at the beginning of the century was the 
historical and picturesque object of the locality ; to Sandgate the 
venerable structure which had existed upwards of two centuries 
before the creation of the town, its one only edifice that possessed 
the dignity of age and the associations of history ; to Folkestone a 
feature which lent itself in no small degree to the beauty of the 



PLAN of SANDGATE CASTLE. 



SCALE of FEET. 



_i i i_ 




W L Button, Del 



SANDGATE CASTLE, A.D. 1539-40. 251 

western prospect as seen from " the Plain " overlooking Sandgate, 
should have been swept away, or reduced to a modernized frag- 
ment, at the present day commanding but little notice. It is 
my wish now, however, to represent the Castle as completed in 
October 1540. 

The ledger little helps imagination, though we are grateful for 
its mention of round towers, countermures, loopholes, portholes, 
casements, great gates, ditch, drawbridge, lantern, and vanes ; we 
must search for old illustrations, and happily they are not wanting. 
First, we have the map of 1725, before noticed, in which we get a 
plan of the Castle to the small scale of 200 feet to the inch, too small 
indeed to allow full delineation, yet advantageously affording us the 
environments to a considerable extent on either side. The solitary 
position retained by the Castle two centuries after its erection is 
here shown ; four little buildings only, forming perhaps but two 
tenements, appear fifty yards from the walls on the west ; while 
the Enbrook which supplied the fort with water, the " gate " or 
pass through the hills by which the inland country was approached, 
the lower track, now the turnpike road, along the margiu of the sea 
to Folkestone, and the demarcations of the tide clearly indicating 
the perilous situation occupied by the Castle, are the interesting 
features of this map. 

The plan of the building — which, enlarged and supplemented 
with details of the yet existing curious entrance-tower, I pre- 
sent — approached in some degree to a trefoil figure, although the 
outline of the walls had other curves than thus implied ; two foils 
or segments formed the base on the north or landward side, and one 
salient foil faced the south, i.e. seaward. The dimensions were 
about 200 feet north to south (the projecting entrance-tower not 
included), and about the same from east to west at the base or widest 
part, while the circumvallation measured about 650 feet; the area 
covered was about three-fifths of an acre. Vol. xi., Illustrations of 
Kent, Brit. Mus., Add. MSS., 32,363, contains, among other things, 
an interesting collection of Sandgate pictures, made both before 
and after the great alteration and demolition of the Castle in 1806. 
From this source we can fairly derive a knowledge of the building 
as it appeared on its completion, and thence down to its transforma- 
tion in the above year, and afterwards. There is no view in the 
collection older than one of 1735 from Buck's Antiquities; the 
next, of 1762, is from Grrose's Antiquities ; both these old drawings, 
and indeed the others met with, are probably best digested cum 
grano salis. Buck's picture imparts to the Castle an amount of 
sombre and venerable dignity, which we would fain hope is not 
exaggerated in the same degree as is certainly the site here repre- 
sented as an eminence of acute elevation above the sea, on which, 
and to this no exception can be taken, ride stately vessels flying 
their flags. Grose's view, smaller and less important than Buck's, 
shows the edifice standing, as the letterpress describes, on the edge 
of the beach, which, however, falling rapidly seaward, gives sufficient 
prominence to the position. Fortunately these two pictures are 



252 SANDGATE CASTLE, A.D. 1539-40. 

taken from opposite points, Buck's Erom X.lv, Grose's from N.W. 
Then there are two small engravings published in L801 by Edw. 
Earding, Pall Mall, both from easterly bul different points. One, 
taken from the Folkestone road descending into Sandgate, is prottj in 

both foreground and distance; an old post-chaise 01 L801 is travel- 
ling down the hill, and by the roadside sits, seemingly in defiance 
of vagrancy laws, the gipsy woman of the time boiling her pot on a 
blazing fire, while the Castle and hamlet appear indistinctly pic- 
turesque in the distance. Harding's other view bears a somewhat 
suspicious resemblance to Buck's, is taken from the same point, and 
with equal absurdity perches the Castle on an acute conical hill ; 
but showing clearly the parts of the building on its east side, this 
picture may with advantage be used for description conjointly 
with Buck's, while for the west side we must turn to that of 
Grose. 

To assist our inquiry we have also two valuable reported surveys 
of the Castle, made in 1610 and 1023, which name some of the 
apartments and enable us, partially at least, to conjecture their 
situation ; the first of these surveys is with the State Papers, the 
second is the Harleian MS. 1326. 

It was a triple building, or oue in appearance presenting three 
distinct tiers of increasing elevation, rising one within another, 
the walls of each tier being surmounted by a parapet crenellated 
for artillery ; in Harding's engraving the muzzles of the guns 
appear in the embrasures. The outer surrounding wall was at least 
seven feet in thickness, and with its crenellated parapet formed 
the first and lowest tier seen in the pictures. This outer wall, at a 
height not much above the level of the ground without, was pierced 
with openings (ten of which on the N.E. side are shown in the pic- 
tures), somewhat wide on the outside so as to afford range, but 
narrowed inwardly and then secured with iron bars, the making of 
which we notice in the ledger. These openings appear to be the 
" portholes " mentioned ; they probably lighted chambers used by 
the gunners or for stores, and above was a platform on which guns 
could be planted and fired through the embrasures of the parapet. 
Between the range of low buildings skirting the outer wall and the 
inner second tier of the Castle ran an open passage, apparently 
"the ditch" heard of in the ledger, into which opened doors from 
the basement of the building. This fosse or passage seems to have 
been cut short or crossed by a wall which terminated u the principal 
bulwark or battery" (so called in the report of 1623), forming the 
southern or seaward segment in the plan of the fort, the level of 
which battery was considerably above the lower range of building 
we have noticed. At the S.E. bend of the surrounding wall, where 
adjoined " the principal battery," or " gun-platform " as termed in 
the map of 1725, a turret rose, surmounted by a flag-staff, from 
which, in both pictures serving me for description, flies the National 
Ensign. The gun-platform, or ; ' mount upon the outward wall next 
the sea," is said in the report of 1616 to have been 100 feet in 
length and 18 feet in breadth ; in the plan of 1725 eight guns are 







ms ill to 



SANDGATE CASTLE, A.D. 1539-40. 253 

mounted on it. The western side of the Castle was doubtless 
much like the eastern side, which has had our attention. Grose's 
view of it shows the southern battery, the guns mounted and 
pointing to sea; he also shows a tall isolated shaft, which seems 
temptingly to offer itself as a mark to the guns of an enemy's ship, 
and may have been for ventilation and to carry off the smoke of 
artillery discharged in the lower chambers of the fort, as described 
by Mr. Elvin, Records of Walmer, etc., p. 162. In Buck's view 
several chimney-like erections appear above the roof of the keep. 

The inner buildings of the Castle rose high above the buildings 
which skirted the outer parapeted wall, and thus formed, as seen in 
the pictures, the second tier. The plan of this inner portion of the 
structure was triangular, the three sides outwardly convexed, the 
angles occupied by circular towers or bastions, the full diameter of 
those at N.W. and N.E. being about 29 feet, and of the S. tower 
about 32 feet. The survey of 1623 mentions the N.W. and N.E. 
" bulwarks," the roofs of which are covered with lead, and in the 
N.W. (probably in both) was a room used for gunners' lodgings, 
beneath which a " cellar." These " bulwarks " were perhaps the 
above-mentioned towers, of which the basements or " cellars " yet 
remain, with, in each case, a passage communicating with the 
basement of the keep ; but it may be more consistent with the 
nature of bulwarks to suppose them to have formed part of the 
outer wall at its N.W. and N.E. segments. On the flat roof of 
these towers, 20 feet diameter within the parapet, guns were pro- 
bably mounted, and we are shown by the plan of 1725 that at the 
bottom of the N.E. tower was a "well," fed by an underground 
conduit, 80 yards in length, from " a spring," probably the 
Enbrook, beyond the Castle walls. 

The second and inner tier (which encompassed and communi- 
cated with the third and innermost portion or keep) being of two 
stories had space for many apartments, the principal of which was 
doubtless "the Queen's Lodgings," thus designated in the survey 
of 1623, and in that of 1616 as " the Queen's Chamber," a sure 
proof of Queeu Elizabeth's visit, which will afterwards, as an im- 
portant event in the Castle's history, have our attention. Also are 
named "the Parler " and " a room going into it," the kitchen, the 
bakehouse, and the powder room; besides these there must have 
been several other chambers. To locate those mentioned and now 
not existing is impossible ; the situation of the Queen's Lodgings is 
only so far defined in the report as it is shown to have been under 
the leads, that is in the apparent second tier of the Castle. On the 
fiat roof of this second tier probably guus could be mounted and fired 
through the embrasures of the parapet ; and lighting the apart- 
ments Buck shows seven tall narrow windows, generally lancet- 
headed ; the windows, however, or rather the lighting of the several 
parts of the edifice, and more particularly the keep, to which we 
now come, is a subject of somewhat perplexing conjecture. 

The keep (as for distinction it is convenient to call the central 
core of the Castle, although as it was not isolated the term perhaps 



251 SANDGATE CASTLE, A.I). 1539-40. 

is questionable) is referred to in the survey of 1623 as " the Middle 
Tower." Rising considerably above the surrounding range of building 
it forms in the pictures the third and highest tier. It will be un- 
derstood that the keep consisted of three stories, two of them 
remain, the uppermost has been removed; the inner diameter was, 
and is, 30 feet, the thickness of wall 8 feet. Its middle story, 1he 
now existing upper stor} r , was, 1 think, Erom the indications afforded, 
"the Hall," named in the 1(516 survey; the area is now divided, 
but originally may have formed, one spacious circular apartment, 30 
feet in diameter, with doors opening from it into the surrounding 
chambers, now swept away. This 1 like to think was the hall of 
good proportions which received the Queen ; here she may have 
dined with her suite, or leaving it to them she may have retired to 
her lodgings opening therefrom. The upper story, now gone, I 
think, contained what in the survey is designated " the Great 
Chamber over the Hall;" modern accounts say it was here the 
commanding officer had his quarters. Both surveys mention its 
windows with ruined lintels (the twice-mentioned defect leading to 
the identification of the room referred to), and that of 1623 speaks 
of four windows in it, and of an equal number in the story below, 
i.e. the hall, if my conjecture be right. The lighting of the hall (or 
the apartment in the middle story whatever may have been the 
purpose it served) is, as I have already said, a perplexing question ; 
possibly open bays in the wall of the circular chamber may have 
admitted light from some of the tall lancet-headed windows we have 
noticed in the outer range or tier ; or perhaps the outer range of 
apartments did not entirely enclose the central chamber, which may 
thus have been lighted by windows on its southern side (of which we 
have no direct view) left unenclosed for that purpose. There is 
mention of a lantern " on the top of the Castle," which seems to have 
given light to " the Stairs ;" but though it may have served the top- 
most story of the keep, as well as the four windows mentioned, the 
lantern is not likely to have benefited the chamber below. The roof 
of the keep, surrounded by an embrasured parapet, was covered with 
lead, and on it was a timber platform for artillery. Allowing 10 feet 
for the story now removed, the original height of the Castle was 
probably about 50 feet. 

A turret, yet existing, 5^ feet inner diameter, and half pro- 
jecting from the wall of the keep on the north side, contained the 
stairs which afforded communication from the basement of the 
Castle to its summit. There may have been other stairs, and these 
perhaps in the square projecting building seen in the pictures at the 
entrance on the north, forming apparently a porch, and rising to a 
height now much below the top of the keep ; in each of the two 
walls visible (north and east) there is a window, and these windows 
being graduated in height seem as if they lighted a staircase which 
may have led directly from the entrance to the top story, and 
perhaps to the roof. 

It yet remains to notice the gate-tower and drawbridge on the 
northern and landward side ; the first is yet intact, and being 



? 




i: . i- WM 



U ! 






1 -Mm 




JiSJ 



^(V^^^^C^w^-T^ VCW^ jwvw Nj-A^ 




^J^rc^-^o S^W)> y$^**~4*>** i" *\X4 Cw£<<Wk>4, L^inH* 



SANDGATE CASTLE 

THE KEEP (FROM THE NORTH l.AND THE DOORS AND STAIRS AT THE ENTRANCE. 



SANDGATE CASTLE, A.I). 15-10 AND 1806. 255 

peculiar will be best understood by reference to the plan. The 
gate-tower is semicircular, projecting 11 yards forward from the 
Castle's outer wall, and its gate or door is not as might be expected 
in its front side to the north, but in the rear of the semicircle, and 
as it were round the corner. Here entering an arched door 4 feet 
wide we are in a small semicircular room, which, Avith a similar 
chamber above, constituted, I suppose, " the Porter's Lodge ;" and 
turning " right about face " we see a flight of steps, 13 in number 
and G feet wide, which ascending we traverse a landing 12 feet long, 
8^ feet broad, and reach a massive gate fronting the door into the 
keep, but 47 feet distant from it. Before proceeding we turn 
again to the staircase we have mounted and perceive a shallow 
recess in the wall, formed, there can be no doubt, to receive a 
"falling door," such as the ledger mentions, by which the stairs 
could be closed, the hooks for hinges yet remaining ; we see also 
the return-landing, 2\ feet wide, by which the porter reached his 
upper chamber in the gate-tower ; and again facing the Castle we 
discover the hooks of another gate now removed, inner to that yet 
existing. Of the space between the gate and the keep, now levelled 
up, we can scarcely tell how much of it was formerly open ditch 
across which fell the drawbridge ; the ditch may have been 20 or 25 
feet, but in an existing plan of Sandown Castle the drawbridge is no 
more than 11 feet in length. It appears, however, from the pictures 
and from the plan of 1725 that the walls were continued across the 
ditch from the gate to the keep, so that between the walls we 
imagine a pit spanned by the drawbridge when lowered. We may 
think the access to the Castle little befitting the dignity of the 
great Queen who visited it ; yet entering the small door in the base- 
ment of the gate-tower, ascending the toilsome staircase of 13 steps, 
passing through the great gate, and crossing the drawbridge, we 
must suppose Queen Elizabeth to have reached the Castle. She 
would then pass through the range of building now swept away, 
and by the yet existing door, only 3 feet wide, she would enter the 
central circular hall in the keep, an apartment of no mean dimen- 
sions ; or before reaching the hall her Majesty may have been 
conducted to her lodgings in the outer tier by a door to the left 
off the entrance-passage. 

A few references to the Plan will I hope assist the foregoing 
description. The Plan is drawn from that of 1725, and from the 
Ordnance Survey of 1851. The original portions of the. Castle 
yet remaining, viz., the Gate-Tower, the Keep, and the Outer 
Wall, are shown black. 

" A " The Gate-Tower, of two semicircular stories forming the 
Porter's Lodge, and entered by the Tudor-headed door " a "; ascent 
by stairs to the gate " b," yet in situ: "c" the outer wall re- 
maining, but lowered, the buildings formerly along it, and the 
parapet, now removed; the wall where now seen is 7 feet thick, 
but, doubtless, portions of it were stronger; its height on land side 
12 feet: "d" site of ditch between the outer wall and buildings 
and the portion of Castle "f" now demolished. " B " marks the 



25G SANDGATE CASTLE, A.l). 1510 AND 1806. 

original Gun Platform, considerably above the ditch, and probably 

reached by stairs, or from the Tower "S." Ai " i " seems to have 
been the turret and flag-Btaff shown in Duck's picture of 1 73."> : 
"e" shows where the drawbridge crossed the ditch now filled up: 
" f " buildings of two stories, now removed ; in the upper story were 

" the Queen's Lodgings," and other apartments, the flat root' forming 
a platform within the crenellated parapet. At " h," where the 
Castle was entered, the building appears in Buck's picture to have 
been carried higher, and perhaps contained a staircase. " K " marks 
the Keep, entered by a door 3 feet wide. 1 1 was of three stories, two 
of which remain, viz., the basement, and the story shown on Plan, 
with fireplace, two windows, and door into the circular stair-turret 
projecting from the wall of the keep. Queen Elizabeth may have 
dined in this apartment, which was 30 feet in diameter, but is 
now divided. Above it w r as the third story, now gone, the modern 
domed roof occupying its position, whereon remains the central 
iron pivot and circular traverse for a gun ; a parapet 8 feet thick, 
and 4 feet high, surrounds the present roof. From the basement 
chamber of the keep three passages, dotted on Plan, 34 .V feet 
long, 3 feet wide and 7 feet high, communicate with the Towers, 
N.W., N.E., and S., which towers may formerly have had doors 
into the ditch. Of the three towers only the lower portions now 
remain ; originally they rose as high as the buildings " f," but they are 
now reduced to the ground level under which they are vaulted, and 
in each is a pillar of masonry to carry the weight of a modern gun 
planted above. For the same purpose a pillar in the keep rises 
from the basement to the roof. The keep is at present 40 feet 
high, and allowing for the story removed it may have originally 
been about 50 feet. A dry fosse, 20 feet wide, and 10 feet deep, 
now surrounds the keep, occupying the site of the former buildings 
" f " ; a wooden bridge spans the fosse, and gives access to the old 
door into the keep. A dotted line to the north of the Castle 
indicates the underground conduit, possibly still existing, by which 
water was brought to a " well " or reservoir at base of the N.E. 
Tower. 

I have yet briefly to refer to the transformation of the Castle, 
involving its demolition to a great extent, which was effected in 
1806. 

The Castle demolished and transformed. The outside surround- 
ing walls were left standing but lowered, and the embattled parapet 
removed, the rebuilding of the damaged seaward segment causing 
some alteration in the contour. The central keep was spared but 
diminished in height by the removal of its uppermost story ; all the 
surrounding buildings were swept away, and the debris used in 
levelling the area between the outer walls and the keep ; round the 
latter a fosse 20 feet wide, spanned by a little wooden bridge, was 
left ; the three passages radiating from the keep to the three 
towers remain ; but these towers with the exception of their lowest 
and now underground portions are demolished. The ancient guns 
were replaced by more powerful ordnance to the number of ten 



SANDGATE CASTLE, A.l). 1800. *l~)~i 

pieces ; and these instead of being mounted only on the seaward 
segment of the wall were also placed at intervals along the S.E. 
and S.W. sides of the fort. In addition, a similar gun was mounted 
on the new roof of the keep, and to carry the gun a central pillar 
of masonry was built from the basement to the roof. An under- 
ground magazine, consisting of three arched chambers, was con- 
structed beneath the newly formed esplanade between the keep and 
the gate-tower, which latter, as already said, probably remains as in 
1540 ; the drawbridge, however, and the ditch it spanned are things 
of the past ; and the uninformed visitor walks on level ground from 
the gate to the old keep, which, diminished, he has perhaps taken 
to be merely one of the martello towers observed along the Kentish 
coast-line. These towers, indeed, were built at the time of the 
Castle's transformation, and its uniformity with them was evi- 
dently designed. 



I desire here to express 1113' obligations to Mr. R. J. Fvxmore of Sandgate 
for much valuable assistance in connection with the subject of this paper, and 
to Mr. E. Kennett for the sketches which accompany it. — W. L. E. 



TOL. XX. 



( 25S ) 



LIST OF ENCUMBENTS OF ST. PETER'S, SEAL. 

(held with ST. MARYS. KEMSING, rvnr, 1874.) 

BY REV. T. SHIPDEM FRAMPTON, M.A., F.S.A. 

Among the archives of Rochester Cathedral is a MS. volume 
entitled Textus Eojfoisis, compiled by Bishop Ernulf probably 
about the year 1120. Among its contents is a List of Churches in 
the diocese, with the dues they paid, to the Mother Church on 
receiving the sacred chrism. Tn the course of the List appears the 
entry — " Cimisinga rx. den," indicating that Kemsing paid the 
sum of nine pence. The word " Sela " has been added in the margin 
in smaller characters, and perhaps by a much later hand, but it 
would be impossible to say exactly when the addition was made. 
From the omission of the name from the text, as well as from the 
fact that no mention of it is made in the next chapter, which treats 
"de- Capellis," it may be inferred that there was not a capella at 
Seal at the time when the Textus Bojfensis was compiled. On 
3 August 1233, Eleanor, daughter of King John, and widow of 
the second Earl of Pembroke, obtained from her royal brother, 
Henry III., the grant of a weekly market on Wednesday, and of 
an annual fair on the vigil, day, and morrow of St. Edith, Virgin, 
to be held "apud manerium suum de Sele." (Charter Roll, 17 
Henry III., m. 2.) On 1 January 1284-5, Otho Grandison, who 
was then owner of the manor, obtained a similar grant from 
Edward I., of a weekly market on Monday, and of an annual fair 
on the vigil, the day, the morrow of the Apostles, Peter and Paul, 
and one day after, " apud manerium suum de la Sele juxta 
Kemesing." (Charter Roll, 13 Edward I., no. 127.) If it be 
borne in mind that fairs were originally instituted for the con- 
venience of parishioners who assembled to keep the Dedication 
Festival of their church, and that they were accordingly held on the 
day of the Patron Saint, the conclusion may seem justified that 
there was a capella at Seal in a.d. 1285, though not in a.d. 1233, — 
St. Edith being the Patron Saint of a neighbouring capella in 
Kemsing churchyard. Whether this was founded by the Countess 
Eleanor during her first widowhood, or in the course of her 
eventful life as consort of Simon de Montfort, it may not be 
possible to determine, but the earliest existing architectural details 
of the fabric seem to point to her as the founder rather than to 
Otho Grandison, who did not come into possession of the manor 
until late in the year 1283. (Close Roll, 11 Edward I., m. 3d.) 



INCUMBENTS OF KEMSTNG WITH SEAL. 25') 

Indeed, when we think of her first widowhood of more than six 
years passed in a religious community, and of her subsequent 
intercourse with sueli men as Grosstete, Bishop of Lincoln, who 
acted as tutor to her sons, and Adam de Marisco, who was 
frequently a guest of the de Montforts, and among whose letters, 
still extant in MS., is one which reflects their anxiety to secure a 
Buitable parish priest for Kemsing on a vacancy having occurred, 
the probability seems by no means remote that in the daughter of 
King John and Queen Isabella of Angouleme, the church of Seal 
found its " nursing mother." If, however, some date previous to 
1265 — when the Countess went into exile — is thought too early, we 
must look to Otho Grandison, and to the year 12S4. It is true that 
Roger Bigod, Earl of Norfolk, held the manor between 1279 and 
1283, but nothing has been met with tending to shew that he was 
the builder. The Grandison arms were formerly in one of the 
windows of the church, and, it is said, are still in safe keeping in 
the neighbourhood. 

Incumbents. Patrons, 

Richard de Kemesinge, in 1265. 

(Add. MS. 8877, Brit. Mus.) 1 
Jacobus Sinobaldi, in 1294. 

(Pat. 22 Edw. I., m. 5 d.) 2 

1 Richard. He was evidently the trusted friend and adviser of 

the Countess Eleanor at the time when political troubles 
were thickening round her husband Simon de Montfort, 
which were only terminated by his death at Evesham, 4 
August 1265. The interesting Household Roll of the 
Countess, recoixling the daily expenditure of her establish- 
ment from 19 February to 29 August 1265, makes frequent 
mention of Richard, " persona de Kemesiuge." We find him 
staying with her for two or three days together at Odiham, at 
Porchester, and then at Dover Castle, which was her last 
place of residence previous to quitting the country for the 
Dominican Convent of Montargis in Picardy, whither she 
retired within a few weeks of receiving the fatal tidings of 
Evesham, and where she ended the days of her second widow- 
hood nine years later. Under the date of Thursday, 4 June, 
mention is made of fodder for forty-five horses at Porchester, 
of which number four belonged to the parson of " Kerne- 
singe." It would appear that he afterwai'ds made his peace 
with the victorious party, as an entry on the Patent Rolls 
under 1 November 1265, records that Richard, " persona 
ecclesie de Kemesing," obtained the King's "protection." 
which was to continue for a year. (Pat. 50 Henry III., 
m. 46.) 

2 Jacobus Sinobaldi. His name appears in a list of rectors who 

obtained the King's "protection" in 1291, in return for 
granting half the value of their benefices to enable him to 

s 2 



200 ENCUMBENTS OP KEMSING WITH SEAL. 

INCUMBENTS. I'\ I BOSTB 

John db Dittone, in 1316-7. (Regist. 

Roff., p. 113.) 3 
Richard de Theukesbuby, inst. 5 Will, de Grandisono. 

Feb. 1326-7. (Regist. Ramo de 

Hethe, f. 71 />.) l 

RlCHARD DUBATTNT. 

Gilbert de Keleshill, exch. with Peter de Grandisono. 
the last, 28 Feb. 1338-9. (Ibid., 
£. 174 a.) 5 

Thomas de Hope, inst. 27 Mar. 1341, Peter de Grandisono. 
on death of the last. (Ibid., f. 
194 ft.) c > 

prosecute his war with France. In connection with this 
impost laid on the clergy by the King, the following note in 
the Annals of England will be read with interest: — "As the 
clergy did not meet his demands so readily as he expected, he 
sent one of his knights — John Havering — to their assembly 
in the refectory at Westminster, September 21, who in a loud 
and menacing voice delivered this very intelligible message : 
' Holy fathers, this is the demand of the King, — one half of all 
the annual revenues of your churches. If anyone objects to 
this let him stand forth that he may be taken note of, as 
unworthy of the King's peace.' Well may Matthew of West- 
minster add, ' When they heard this, all the prelates were 
disturbed in mind, and immediately they granted the King's 
demand.' " 

3 John de Dittone. He was a Canon of St. Paul's in the years 

1310 and 1326. On the death of Gilbert de Segrave, Bishop 
of London, in December 1316, he was sent with another 
member of the Chapter to notify the event to the King. In 
1321 his name occurs as Eector of Abberton, in Essex. He 
also held the rectory of Hollingbourne, in Kent. Thomas de 
Wouldham, Bishop of Rochester, appointed him one of the 
executors of his will, dated Sunday, 27 February 1316-7, and 
in recognition of his services in that capacity left him a 
bequest of 40s. 

4 Richard de Theukesbury. This Eector was presented by 

William Grandison, brother of Otho previously mentioned, 
who had died without children. With the commencement of 
the Episcopal Registers at Rochester in 1310, begins a fairly- 
connected chain of Patrons. 

6 Gilbert de Keleshill. Previously Rector of Merstham. On 
18 September 1339 he obtained the royal licence to accept 
from Robert ffremelyn of Kemesyng a rod of land lying 
adjacent to the rectory house, and to annex it thereto for 
the purpose of enlargement. (Pat. 13 Edward III., pt. 2, 
m. 21.) 

6 Thomas de Hope. He came from the Hereford diocese. His 



INCUMBENTS OF KEMSING WITH SEAL. 261 

Incumbents. Patrons. 

William de Penebrugge, inst. 8 Peter de Grandisono. 

Feb. 1347-8, on death of the last. 

(Ibid., f. 236 b.) 
John de Shippedham, ex'ch. with the 

last, 14 Mar. 1353-4. (Regist. John 

de Sheppey, f. 261 a.) 7 
Richard Mowys, in 1370. (Larking 

MSS., Maidstone Mus.) 8 
Richard Meanv, in 1370. (Regist. 

Trilled? , f. 345 a.) 9 
Thomas Perd', pres. 30 Aug. 1370. Tho. " Gramsom." 

(Ibid.) 
Richard Haneketon, alias Launs- 

TON. 10 

name is mentioned in a dispute about tithes with Richard 
"Waston of Seal, 17 December 1347. He must have died a 
few days after, as probate of his will was granted on Tuesday, 
8 January 1347-8. (Reg. Hamo de Hethe, f. 272 a.) His 
monumental brass representing in half-effigy a Priest in 
Eucharistic vestments, in admirable state of preservation, is 
in Kemsing Church within the altar rails. 

7 John de Shtppedham. Previously Rector of Kingestone, in the 

diocese of Hereford. 

8 Richard Mowts. This Rector, on 25 July 1370, leased the 

church of Kemsing, with the parsonage, tithes, oblations, etc., 
for two years to John Digges, clerk, and Robert de la Beche, 
clerk, for £30 per annum. The lessees were bound to provide 
at their own expense two parish Chaplains who were to serve 
" convenablement la eglise susditz & la chapele de la Seele, 
dnraunt le terme susdit." Robert atte Beche, probably the 
same person, was Rector of the adjoining parish of Ightham 
in 1368. 

9 Richard Meant. According to an entry in Bishop Trilleck's 

Register, under 30 August 1370, this cleric, who asserted 
that he was Rector, made an appeal to the Chancellor's 
Court against the presentation to the living by the Patron, 
Sir Tho. Gramsom (Grandison), of Tho. Perd, a Presbyter of 
the Exeter diocese. The entry has been made by an illiterate 
scribe, and possibly Meany is an error for " Mowys." Perhaps 
also the terms of the lease mentioned above were not 
altogether agreeable to the Patron. 

10 Richard Haneketon. Weever, in his Funeral Monuments, 

1631, speaking of Seal, says : — " In this church, upon a marble 
stone inlaid with brass, I found the portraiture of a Bishop ; 
and these words only remaining : Credo quod Redemptor mens 
vioit. And these figures, 13^9. Under which — as I gather 
by the date of the year of grace — Thomas Brenton, Bishop of 
Rochester, lieth intei'red, &c." In this conclusion, which 



2(12 [NCI M BENTS OF KEMSING Willi SKA I,. 

Incumbents. Pa i sons. 

Thomas Bidltngton, inst . L5 Oct. Adam de Motterum, fot 

L396, .hi death of the last. (Regist. thia turn. 
W. Bottlesham, I'. 90 a.) " 

appears to have been formed simply From coincidence of date, 
Weever was undoubtedly mistaken, foril is inconceivable thai 
with Rochester Cathedral so near, Bishop Brinton's last 
wishes indicating the exacl Bpol for his burial there, next the 
tomb of his immediate predecessor, Tho. Trilleck, should have 
been wholly disregarded. (Reg. Courtenay* f . 231 a.) As a 
matter of tart three ol her Bishops died in the same year, of whom 
two, Adam Houghton of St. David's, and Laurence Child of 
St. Asaph, left directions that they .should be buried In their 
respective cathedrals. The will of the third, Thomas Rushook, 
who was Confessor to King Richard II., and was successively 
Hishop of Llandaff, Chichester, and Triburna, or Kilmore, in 
Ireland, has not been found ; but the following account of him 
is given in Cotton's Fasti Eccleslce Ilibernicce, iii., 155, under 
the Diocese of Kilmore : — "1389, Thomas of Rushok, D.D., 
an English Dominican friar, became Bishop of Llandaff, and 
subsequently of Chichester. For political reasons he was 
banished to Ireland, where in this year the Pope appointed 
him Bishop of Triburna. He held this see for a very short 
time, dying (it is said, of grief) in England. He was buried 
at Seale, in Kent (Cole)." On referring to Cole's MSS., 
vol. xxviii., p. 17, in the British Museum, it will be noticed 
that that writer, after stating that " he died 1389, aud [was] 
buried at Seale in Kent," goes on to say — " If I maybe allowed 
to conjecture the Place of his Burial, I should judge it at 
Seale near Rochester in Kent." After all, therefore, only 
conjecture can be offered, but the latter seems much more 
reasonable than the former. In the absence of contemporary 
information it is difficult to account for the selection of Seal as 
the burial-place of the broken-hearted Bishop, unless he was 
staying there when overtaken by his last illuess, but it is a 
curious coincidence that his remains should have been laid to 
rest within sight of the spot which formed the threshold of his 
Episcopal life, for it was at Otford that he made his Profession 
of Obedience, 10 April 1383. In the year 1395 Sir William 
de Bryene, Lord of the manor of Kemsingand Seal, was buried 
in this church. His superb brass, in the most perfect state 
of preservation, is within the altar rails. The old 4th bell, 
which bears in Lombardic characters the inscription Sit Nomen 
Domini benedictum, is believed to have been cast by William 
Burford, of London, 1371—92. (Stahlschmidt's Church Bells 
of Kent.) 
11 Thomas Riulvxqton. In 1397 the advowson of the church 
of Kemsing was granted by Gruido Mone to the Prior and 
Convent of St. Saviour's, Bermondsev, and in the same year 



INCUMBENTS OF KKMS1NG WITH SEAL. 



203 



Incumbents. 
Adam Usk, LL.D., inst. 17 Nov. 1399. 

(Eegist. Arundel, i., f. 203 a.) u 
Eodelandus Kerbroke, inst. 27 Oct. 

1402. (Eegist, J. Bottleshain, f. 

180 b.) 13 
John Jordan, exch. with the last, 

14 Dec. 1417. (Eegist. Chichelev, 

i., f. 92 b.) u 
"William Mathew. 
Thomas Stowr, exch. with the last, 

14 Nov. 1422. (Eegist. Langdon, 

f. 19 J.) 15 
Stephen Porchet, inst. 6 Nov. 1426. 

{Ibid., f. 76 b.) u 
William Aldebarough. 
Thomas Well', inst. 7 Oct. 1433, on 

death of the last. (Ibid., f. 97 b.) 
Eichard Litelman, inst. 4 June, 

1437, on resig. of the last. (Eegist. 

Wells, f. 121 a.) 



Patrons. 
The Archbishop, jure de- 

voluto. 
Abbot and Convent of St. 

Saviour's, Bermondsey. 



Abbot and Convent of St. 
Saviour's, Bermondsey. 

Abbot and Convent of St. 

Saviour's, Bermondsey. 
Abbot and Convent of St, 

Saviour's, Bermondsev. 



they obtained licence to appropriate it, a pension of 6s. 8d. per 
annum being reserved to the Bishop of Eochester and his suc- 
cessors. (Pat. 2L Eichard II. , pt. 2, m. S.) 

l - Adam Usk. He was the last Rector of Kemsing and Seal. 
About two months before being collated to this living by the 
Archbishop, he had been instituted to the rectory of West Han- 
ingfield, in the London diocese. He also held at different 
times considerable preferment elsewhere, and "twice he narrowly 
escaped a bishopric, but his enemies were strong enough to 
keep him out of both Hereford and St. David's." He is well 
known as the writer of one of the early Chronicles, 1377 — 1404, 
in the course of which, under the year 1399, occurs the 
interesting entry : — " Hiis diebus, dictus dominus meus 
Cantuariensis contulit mihi bonam ecclesiam de Kemsynge, 
cum capella sua de Seol, in Cancia." (Add. MS. 10,101, Brit. 
Mus.) In the year 1399, the Priory of Bermondsey was 
erected into an Abbacy, and henceforth the Abbot and Con- 
vent presented succeeding Vicars until the time of the 
dissolution. 

,:! Kodelandus Kerbroke. On 12 October 1402, an endowment 
was made for a perpetual Vicar (Eeg. J. Bottlesham, f. 177 ft.), 
and a few days later Mr. Kerbroke was instituted the first 
Vicar of " Kemesyng cum capella de Sele." 

11 John Jordan. Previously Chaplain of the Chantry of Tenham. 

'•' Thomas Stow'r. He was before Eector of " fframyngham " in 
the diocese of Norwich. He is also mentioned as being Vicar 
in the year L420. 

!f ' Stephen Porchet. He appears to have also held the vicarage 



264 INCUMBENTS Ol KEMSING WITH SEAL. 

I.w tmio \ i- l'\ tiiiins 

John ( I-oesich, inst. 2:5 < ><-t. 1 138, on 

resig. of the last. {Ibid., I L38a.) w 
Henri Esthaw, inst. 28 Julj L 445, on 

resig. of the last. (Regist. Lowe, 

I". 203 a.) l8 
John \\ [LLaston, inst. 2 Oct. H">(>. Abbot and Conveul of St. 

on resig. of the last. {Ibid., f. Saviour's, Berinondsey. 

228 J.) 
RlCHABD CuTLEB, inst. 25 \ |»r. 1458, Abbot and Convent of St. 

on resig. of the last. {Ibid., f. Saviour's, Bermondsey. 

22.9 J.) 
William Englissh, inst. 3 Dec. 1400. 

(Ibid., f. 234 ft.) 19 
Richard Cutler, inst. 29 Jan. 1463-4, Abbot and Convent of St. 

on death of the last. {Ibid., f. Saviour's, Bermondsey. 

239 a.) » 



of Hailing. Mentioned as being Vicar also in the year 
1431. 

17 John CtORsich. He was Vicar of the neighbouring parish of 

Wrotham from 1428 to 1435, and then Rector of Norton, 
near Faversham, for three years. On his resignation of 
Kemsing, Roger Blendon was presented, 16 July 1415, but 
for some reason not stated he was not instituted. 

18 Henry Esthaw. He was at one time perpetual Vicar of East 

Peckhain, which he exchanged. 10 September 1436, for the 
rectory of Offham. He was Domestic Chaplain to William 
Wells, Bishop of Rochester, and was one of the witnesses to 
his will, 7 February 1443-4. On 21 October 1448 he was 
constituted Dean of Mailing. Sir James ffynes, Lord of Saye 
and Sele, by his will dated 12 April 1449, and proved 22 June 
1450, left to the tcorks of the churches of " Kemsynge " and 
" Selee," where most needed, the sum of twenty marks. He 
bequeathed similar sums to the churches of " Sevenoke " and 
"Merworth." (Reg. Stafford,!'. 190 ft.) John Partrieh by 
his will, 30 January 1454-5, left to William Phylpot and his 
wife Joan certain lands, of which one piece called "Pecottsole" 
was charged with the maintenance of a light valued at 3s. 4d. 
per annum, to burn coram summo patibulo ecclesie de Sele. 

19 William Englissh. Probate of his will was granted 9 January 

1463-4. Sir John, " Chaplain of the church of Sele," by his 
will, 20 July 1463. gave directions for his body to be buried 
in the graveyard of Sele, and left to the high altar 6d., and to 
the repair of the church 12d. 

20 Richard Cutler. William Phylpotte by his will, 14 August 

1466, after giving directions for his body to be buried "in 
the graveyard of the parish church of the Apostles Peter and 
Paul of Sele," left to the high altar there 12d., and to cover 
the church with " schynggylle," the sum of 6s. 8d. Richard 



INCUMBENTS OF KEMS1NG WITH SEAL. 265 

I NCUMBENTS. PATEONS. 

Robert Snowe, in 1477-8. (Will.) - 1 
William Sanson, in 1492. (Will.) 32 
William Lincoln, M.A., inst. 27 Hob. Reede, geat., for this 

Aug. 1508, on death of the last. turn. 
(Regist. Fisher, f. 50 5.) 
Nicholas Metecalf, inst. 31 Oct. Abbot and Convent of St. 
1509, on death of the last. {Ibid., Saviour's, Bermondsev. 
f . 52 b.) ~ ;i 

Genkyn, 7 July 1468, bequeathed to the high altar 12d., to 
the light of St. Peter a taper value 4d., and to the light of 
St. John Baptist a taper of the same value. 

21 Robert Snowe. He is first mentioned in the wills of John 
Blakchorle and Thomas Marche, dated Sunday, 15 February 
1477-8. Both appointed him " overseer " of their wills, the 
former bequeathing him 20d. for his labours in connection 
therewith. Thomas Marche left 12d. for the light befoi'e the 
image of St. Mary, and similar sums to the high altar, and 
the " fabric " of the church. In addition to these he left the 
following legacy: — "Also I wull yat ye Clerk of Sele bave 
iiij d. for his labor to me cumyng in my sikenes." Will of 
John Snosmer, 3 January 1486-7 : — " Also 1 bequeth to the 
Church of Sele a torche. Also to the ligth of Seynt John 
Baptiste in Sele ij quarters of Barley for the sustentacion 
and kepyng of a Taper of wax to bren before the sayde 

Saynte Also I bequeth to the byyug of a bell to the 

pariscb of Sele iij s. iiij d." Testator also left a contingent 
remainder of £8 to the church. On 9 October 1480 Mr. 
Snowe was constituted Dean of " Mallyng." 

82 William Yanson. Will of "John Tebold the elder of the 
parisshe of Sele," 9 September 1501 : — " My bodie to be buried 
in the church of the blessed Apostellis Petre & Paule of Sele 

aforesaide Also I bequeth to the high Aulter of the 

same church for my tithes forgoten & necbgently witholden 

x s Also I bequethe for a Cope to the Church of Sele 

vj li. xiij s. iiij d." (P.C.C., 5 Blamyr.) 

~' A Nicholas Metecalf. He was a native of Yorkshire, and was 
educated at Cambridge, where he graduated B.A. 1494, S.T.B. 
1504, and S.T.P. 1507. He was Domestic Chaplain to John 
Fisher, Bishop of Rochester, and was constituted Archdeacon 
of Rochester about the year 1515. On 13 July 1517 he was 
instituted to the rectory of AYoodham Ferrers in Fssex, and 
in the following year was elected Master of St. John's Coll., 
Cambridge. During his incumbency, William Olyver of 
'■ G-odden in the parisshe of Seele," 14 April 1516, left among 
his last wishes the following : — " My body to be buryed in the 

Chirche of Seele afor the High Rode there It'm I 

bequeth to the byeing of ij candilstikkes of latyn to stand 
afore the Hygh Awler in the Chauncevll xxvj s. viij d." 
(P.C.C.. 17 Holder.) 



266 INCUMBENTS OF KEMSING Willi MAI.. 

[NCI m iii N i>. Patrons. 

Richard Sharpe, inst. 27 Oct. L517, A.bbo1 and Convenl of st, 

on resig. of the last. (////</., f. Saviour's, Bermondsey. 

75 J.) 8 * 
Thomas Thebold, inst. - I Feb. 1524-5, Abbol and Convent of St. 
on resig. of the last. {Ibid., f. Saviour's, Bermondsey. 

125,'.)^ 

-' Richard Sharpe. Alice Olyver, widow, left in her will. 2!) 
January 1520-1, the following bequests: — " If in I bequeth 
to the Sacrament for forgoton tithes xx d. Also I bequeith to 
the Trendle ligth and otlier necessaries to the Churche behoof 
on' eowe prece xij s. Also I bequeth to the ffundac'on and 

makyng of tlie Steple of Sele xl s Also I bequeth to 

the amendyng of the foule ways betweene Mustre Oke and 

Smellet grene xs It'm 1 bequeith to the makyng of 

the Steple x s. whiehe is in the handes of ffurrars wyf of 

Otford It'rn I bequeth to on' torche vj s. viij d." The 

" Trendle " light, referred to above, was a length of small wax 
taper formed into a round or coil for greater convenience, 
and was often used in connection with shrines. 

25 Thomas Thebold. He was probably a native of Seal, and is 
described as " scolaris." He is also mentioned as Vicar 
under 20 October 1536. After leaving the neighbourhood he 
appears to have gone into the diocese of Sarum, as he speaks 
of his prebend of Dornford. By his will, 21 June 1550, he 
left the following bequests : — " Item I bequeathe to the Vicar 
of Seale aforesaide for my tithes necligentlye forgotten and 
withholden . . . . vj s. Item I will and bequeathe to the highe 
wayes of Seale and Kemsyng sixe poundes, to be delyvered 
w iu tw T o yeres after my deceas, unto th' order of the Vicar 
there or his deputie, and of sixe honest and substanciall men 
of either p'ishe, wherof foure poundes to the high wayes of 
Seale and fourtie shillinges to the high waves of Kemsyng. 
.... Item I give to the poore householders and p'ishoners of 
Seale and Kemsyng foure poundes to be distributed by myne 
Executours w* th' advyse of the Vicar there or his deputie and 

of foure honest men of either p'ishe Item to the poor 

p'ishoners of my prebend called Dornford in Wylshere three 

poundes Item 1 give to the Almes house of Seale to 

maynteyn some agyd bodye there by the space of tenne yeres 
after my deceas every Soundave iiij d. during the said terme 

to be paide monthely or wekely Item I give to Doctor 

ffryer tenne poundes and all my stuf that I left with hym 
with all my Laten bookes there saving a greate Byble in Laten 
whiehe I will my cosyn Sulyard shall have." (P.C.C., 19 
Coode.) Dirring his incumbency Will. Olyver of " ffalke in 
the parishe of Seele," left by his will, 2 January 1526-7, the 
following bequests: — "To the reparacious of the church of 
Seele aforsaid vj s. viij d Item 1 will there he bestowed at 



INCUMBENTS OF KEMSING WITH SEA.L. 2()7 

I NCX7M UK NTS. PATRONS. 

John Sknnockk, in 1542. (Lay Sub- 
sidies, Kent, No. U\.) ~ Y ' 

John Denman, LL.D., in 1545, and 
in L548. (Wills)" 7 



my burying in masses synging and in almes to poor people 

xl's Item I geve to William Olyver my son thre score 

wether shepe, price of every shepe xij d." (P.C.C., 16 Porch.) 
Thomas Hadlow by his will, 4 August 1527, left the following 
bequest :—" Also I bequeith a li. of wex to be thereof a taper 
perpetually everi yere to be made and to bren in the Eode 
Lofte before the Koode. And the sayde taper everi yere to 
be new made ageynst the eve of the Natyvite of our Lorde. 
And the same taper to be kepte at the costis &, charges^ of 
them which schall inheritt and occupie a pece of lande of iij 
acres called barneffelde. And for lak that and yf it fortune 
that the saide taper be not everi yere new made that then 1 
will the Churche Wardens of Seale schall stress and strayn 
for the saide som of money for the saide tapir." Another 
Seal parishioner, Maryon Olyver, inserted in her will, 2 July 
1532, the following clause: — "I bequeith to y e mayntenyng 
of y e lyght brynnyng of ij lattyn canstikes or stondors before 
y e bight aulter in Seale Churche xij d. by yere the space of iiij 
yeres immediatly after my deceasse." While " Jhon Porter'' 
among his last wishes, 22 May 1533, expressed himself 
thus :— " 1 will a taper of wex of y e weight of ij poundes be 
made & sett up byfore our Lady in y e Chauncell of our Lady 
in the seide churche of Seale and ther to burne & to be lyght 
at tymes convenyent so long as it shall endure. " Among the 
witnesses to the last two wills was " Syr Wylliam Damport 
cur. 1 ' (Curate). In Thebold's time the Valor Ecclesiasticus 
was drawn up, which states that the vicarage of Kemsynge 
with the chapel of Seale was valued at £26 6s. Sd., from 
which was to be deducted £6 13s. 4d., the stipend of the 
" Capellanus " who served Seal. 

26 John Sennocke. He is mentioned among other Kentish con- 
tributors to the Loan made to King Henry VIII. , in the year 
1542 : — " Joh'n Sennocke Vicar of Seele, v li." The next 
entry is : — " John Tibolt of Seele gent, vj li. xiij s. iiij d." (See 
Archieologiti Gantiana, XL, 402.) 

-" John Denman. He is mentioned as a witness in the will of 
" Johan Blatcher of Seale, wedowe," 26 December 1545. On 
leaving the neighbourhood he seems to have gone to London, 
having probably effected an exchange with Thomas Hicklyng, 
Vicar of St. Bartholomew the Less. He was also a Pre- 
bendary of Rochester. In his will, 1 February 1555-6, he 
makes the following bequests, among many others : — " My 
boddve to be buried in the churche of Selye, and there to be 



268 ENCUMBENTS OF KEMSING Willi SEAL. 

Encumbents. Pateons, 

Thomas ETicklyno, inst. 'J<"> Nov. 

L550. (Lib. Comp.) (?) Exch. 

with the last. (Newcourt's U'rpirt., 

i , 2980 s8 
Thomas Tatlloi u. inst. L8 Nov. L554, The Queen, 

on depriv. of the last. ( Regist. 

Episc, F. 57 h.) 29 
Thomas Dale, inst. 22 Dec. 1558, on The Queen. 

death of last Encumbent. (Regist. 

D. and C. Cant., £. 55 J.) :; " 



bestowed amonge prestes and poore people xx s. at the daie of 
my burial] .... and x s. to bye somme neee.ssarie ornamente 
to the maintenance of Godde's service." He also made 
provision for memorial services in Rochester Cathedral, con- 
cluding with the wish : — " I hartely desire master Deane to 
take the labors and paines to singe the Masse of Requiem, 
and to declare to the people by a littill brefe exortacion that 
praier and almes dedes proffettethe the sowles of them that be 
departed, and he to have for his paines xs." (P.C.C., 40 
More.) 

28 Thomas Hicklyng. He w r as one of the clergy who were 

deprived of their benefices on the accession of Queen Mary. 
The date of his deprivation was 26 April 1551. 

29 Thomas Tayllour. Also mentioned as Vicar in a will dated 18 

August 1557. In the year 1555 Queen Mary granted the 
rectory of Kemsing and Seal, valued at £9 13s. 4d. per annum, 
to Cardinal Pole, but on his death it reverted to the Crown. 
Queen Elizabeth granted it to Sir Peter Manwood, and she 
granted the advowson of the vicarage with the manor to Henry 
Carey, Lord Hunsdon. John Pelset by his will, 27 February 
1558-9, bequeathed an annuity ot'Gs. Sd., issuing from a certain 
tenement and lands in Leigh parish, and also another annuity 
of the. same value, issuing out of certain property in Seal, to 
the Minister and Churchwardens of the latter, for the use of 
the poor. In addition to this parish and that of Leigh, those 
of Penshurst, Chiddingstone, Cowden, and Town Mailing 
benefited by the will of John Pelset, who is spoken of as 
" servant & bailey to the Right Honorable the Lord Sydney." 
311 Thomas Dale. He was Rector of Holland Magna in Essex 
from 1539 to 1541. He is also mentioned as Vicar in the 
will, dated 29 November 1559, and proved 22 April 1500, of 
Thomas Mogier of Seal, who remembered his parish church 
and his poorer neighbours in the following bequests: " It'm 
1 give & bequeyth to be bestowed at my buriall iijs. iiijd. 
amongst the pore people of Seale afforesaid. It. I bequeyth 
to the amending of the Glasse windowes of the Church of 
Seale afforesaid iijs. iiijd." The transcript of this will and 



INCUMBENTS OF KEMSING WITH SEAL. 269 

Incumbents. Patrons. 

Gilbert Gennyns, or Jenyns, ir.st. 

31 Oct. 15G1. (Regist. Gheast, 

f. 94 a.) 31 
Richard Buckley, M.A., inst. 6 Jan. Roger Dodd and Nich. 

1602-3, on resig. of the last. (Re- Felton, for this turn. 

gist. Young, f. 191 b.) 
Robert Baker, M.A., inst. 20 Apr. Lord Hunsdon. 

1608, on death of the last. (Ibid., 

f. 203 b.)™ 
John Baker, in 1644. (Hasted's Kent, 

i., 334.) 
" Master " Marten, in 1649-50. 

(Pari. Surv., xix., 92.) S3 

of all those previously mentioned without a reference will be 
found in the Registers of Rochester AVills at Somerset 
House. 

31 Gilbert Gennyns. On 5 December 1570 he was instituted to 

the rectory of Sevenoaks, which he held for upwards of twenty 
years. He was also Vicar of St. Dunstan's in the West, and 
Rector of Little Parndon, Essex. His connection with Kem- 
sing and Seal, like that of two of his successors, extended 
over a period of more than forty years. 

32 Robert Baker. He is also mentioned as Vicar in the Bishop's 

Visitation Book under date of 27 September 1620. During 
his incumbency the old 5th bell w r as cast by Stephen Swan, 
in 1609, Will. Cox and John Raven being the Churchwardens. 

33 "Master" Marten. About this period Kemsing and Seal 

were made distinct parishes, " Master " Bartton being men- 
tioned as Incumbent of the former. In the year 1649-50 
the Parliament ordered a Survey to be taken of all ecclesias- 
tical benefices. The Commissioners drew up the following 
report of Seal : — " AVee answer That the Parishe of Seale is 
devided into Three Parsonages and one Viccaredge whereof 
one Parsonage and the Viccaredge belonges to the Parishe 
Church of Seale and is worth thirtie ffive poundes per annum 
and one little howse worth twentie shillings per annum. That 
the Cure is supplied with an able Minister and that Master 
Goodwyn is the Patron thereof and Master Marten the present 
Incumbent who receives this sixe and thirtie poundes per 
annum for his sallerye. Wee finde one other Parsonage 
beinge Impropriate belonginge to one Mr. Bunce in the 
occupac'on of William Kipps and is worth twentie pounds 
per annum. And the third Parsonage wee finde alsoe to be 
impropriate and belonging to Mistris Mary .Nicolson in the 
occupac'on of Mr. George Nicholson her ffather and is worth 
thirtie pounds per annum. Wee finde the Church con- 
veniently scituated without any union. That there is noe 
Chappell. And that this Church is sufficient for this 
Parishe." 



270 INCUMBENTS 01 CEMSING WITH SEAL. 

Incumbents. Pi i bona. 

John Stevens, or Stephens, MA, 
a.hn. 1 1. Sept. L654. (Lamb. Lib. 

MS. !) ( .)7, lib. ii., |». L90.) ;| 
Thomas Stevens, B.A., inst. 20 May Richard, Bar] of Dorset. 

L668, on resig. of the last. ( Kcgist. 

Spir. Eoff., F. £. L19 b.) 
John Tattkksai.l, M.A., inst. 12 Fob. Richard, Earl of Dorset. 

K;(iS-n, on death of the last. 

(Ibid.) 86 

84 Jonx Stevens. The earliest Eegister Book of Seal commences 
with the incumbency of this Vicar. Upon the first page 
occurs the following note : — " Memorandum that vpon a 
Certificate of diuerse of the Parish of Seale in Kent John 
Stevens Minister of the sayd Parish was elected Parish 
Eegister of the sayd parish by the greater part of the 
Parishioners then present on the twenty seaventh day of 
May in the yeere of o' Lord one thousand six hundred fifty 
& five, & sworne for the performance of the s a office before 
me, Ed. Ashe, October the fourth 1G55." By Act of Parlia- 
ment in August 1653, new officials called " Parish Registers " 
were created, whose duty it was to keep the Eegister Books, 
and make entries of publication of Banns, of Births, Burials, 
and Marriages, etc. They were chosen by the householders 
of a parish, and entered upon their duties after being sworn 
before a Justice of the Peace. The parishioners of Seal had 
the good taste to elect their own Incumbent, a proceeding 
which was rather the exception than the rule. After the 
memorandum mentioned above comes the entry : — " 1653, 
John Steuens Vicar. Books belonging to the Parish of Seale: 
1, Jewell's Apology for the Church of England ; 2, The first 
volumne of the Paraphrase of Erasmus vpon the new Testa- 
ment; 3, Homilyes for the Church of England." At a time 
when popular opinion was so decidedly anti-ecclesiastical, it 
is interesting to note that the good people of Seal had access 
to such sound literature in their parish Library. Bishop 
Jewel's Apology first appeared in the year 15G2. It was pub- 
lished with the formal approval of Queen Elizabeth and the 
consent of the Bishops, and was ordered to be placed in all 
the churches of England and Wales for the instruction of the 
people. The Paraphrase of Erasmus was printed in two folio 
volumes by Edw. Whytchurch in the year 1518-9, and was 
also appointed to be placed in all churches. The First Book 
of Homilies, which was published in 1547, had the following 
title : — " Certayne Sermous or Homilies, appointed by the 
Kynges Maiestie to be declared, and redde by all Persones, 
Vicars, or Curates, euery Sundaye in their Churches, where 
they have Cure." The old 1st and 2nd bells were cast by 
John Hodson in the year 1660. 

35 John Tattersall. It appears by an entry in the Eegister 



INCUMBENTS OF KEMSING WITH SKA I;. 271 

Incumbents. Patrons. 

Maximilian Buck, B.A., inst.29 Apr. Richard, Earl of Dorset. 

1674, on cess, of the last. (Soc. 

Antiq. MS. 170, p. 372.) 36 
Robert Parran, S.T.B., inst. 30 July Lionel, Duke of Dorset. 

1720, on death of the last. (Rochest. 

Act Book, 1713-1824, f. 45.) 37 

Rook, under 27 November 1667, that he was Curate to his 
predecessor Mr. Stevens, whose incumbency of a few months 
was terminated by death. 

3fi Maximilian Buck. An entry in the Register Book states that 
he was inducted 14 May 1674. His first care seems to have 
been to provide suitable Communion plate, both the older 
chalice and its paten cover being inscribed with his name, and 
the date 1674. On 9 August 1681 he married in Kemsing 
Church Rebecca Hallywell, who survived him seven years. 
In the Register Book, under Whitsunday 1709, occurs the 
entry : — " Memorandum That a New Bible in ffolio was given 
vnto & for the sole vse of Seale Church at the proper cost & 
charges only of Mrs. Rebecca Buck wife of Mr. Max. Buck, 
Yicar of Seal, D.D.DQ.D. Dominica Trinitatis." And a little 
further on, under the year 1718, occurs a second note : — 
" Memorandum : July 25, Mr. Max. Buck, Vicar, gave a 
Purple Velvett Pulpit Cloath & Cnssion, for the sole vse of 
Seale church, & a purple fringe & Tossells." The entry of 
his burial occurs under 21 April 1720. A mural tablet to 
his memory, which is now against the west wall of the south 
aisle, states that he was chaplain to the Duke of Dorset, to 
his father, and his grandfather. A useful memorial of Mrs. 
Buck's beneficence still remains in the form of a handsome 
brass chandelier with branches for fourteen candles, which 
depends from the centre of the nave roof, and bears the 
inscription: "The Gift of M s Rebecca Buck, 1725." The 
entry of her burial occurs under 17 June 1727. During Mr. 
Buck's incumbency John Porter, a native of Seal and citizen 
of London, devised an annuity of £12, arising from certain 
lands in Seal, to the Guardians of SeA r enoaks School, on 
condition that £10 should be paid to the Usher "for the 
educating of the youth of Kempsing & Seale in the know- 
ledge of Learning & Godliness," and the remaining sum of 
40s. was to be given to " the two most antient persons 
dwelling in the parish of Seale." 

37 Robert Parran. Fellow of Trin. Coll., Camb., B.A. 1701, 
M.A. 1705, S.T.B. 1712, and S.T.P. 1728, by virtue of the 
King's mandate. It seems probable that Dr. Parran was not 
always resident, as an entry in the Register under date of 
24th and 27th September 1729, states that two children were 
baptized "by Dr. Parran, Vic," as though such an occur- 
rence were unusual. On 13 March 1731-2, Francis Wood- 



27- INCUMBENTS OF CBMSING Willi SEAL. 

Incumbents. Pi i sons. 

Thomas (Ykteis, M.A., inst. L 8 June Lionel, Duke of Dorset. 
1739, on death of the last. | Ibid., 

f. lis.) - 
Grtcgobi Sharpe, LL.B., iusl. 1 3 Lionel, Duke of Dorset. 

Apr. 1711, on resig. of the last. 
{Ibid., I'. L38.) '■" 
< 'aksw i:i,i, Winder, M.A. , inat. 2 Oct. Lionel, Duke of Dorset. 
L761, on cess, of l be last. (ll>i<L, f. 
107.) I0 

gate, 13. A., was licensed to the curacy on an annual 
stipend of £30. During Dr. Parran's time Frances Bicker- 
staffe, daughter of Sir Charles Bickerstaffe, Bart., by her will 
dated 19 May 1731, devised to certain Trustees I line mes- 
suages in London, on condition that they should out of the 
profits pay £20 per annum for the education, maintenance, 
and clothing of eight poor girls at Seal. The second Register 
Book was commenced in 1735, and bears on its cover the 
names, — "Robert Parran, Vicar, Richard Hill, Henry Somers, 
Churchwardens." 

38 Thomas Cubteis. Of Jesus Coll., Camb., B.A. 1727, M.A. 

1731. Deacon 24 May 1730. Priest 17 June 1739. He 
held the living rather more than four years, resigning it 29 
November 1743, soon after which his patron the Duke of 
Dorset presented him to the vicarage of Rottingdean in 
Sussex. He succeeded his father in the sinecure rectory of 
Sevenoaks, being instituted 30 April 1747 ; and on 20 Decem- 
ber 1750 he was instituted to the vicarage of the same on the 
decease of Hugh Owen. On 8 May 1755 he was installed 
Canon in the Eleventh Prebend at Canterbury, on the pre- 
sentation of King George II. In the following year he was 
presented to the rectory of St. Dionis Back Church, a Peculiar 
of the Archbishop of Canterbury. He died 28 May 1775, at 
Sevenoaks, and was buried there. 

39 Gregory Shabpe. Of Trim Coll., Camb., LL.B. 1738, LL.D. 

1747. A few days before obtaining this living he was 
instituted to the vicarage of Birling, on presentation by Lord 
Abergavenny, which he retained until 10 June 1757. On 
1 February 1757, he was collated to the Prebend of Tet- 
minster Secunda at Salisbury ; and four years later he was 
iustituted to the vicarage of Purton in the same diocese, on 
presentation by the Earl of Shaftesbury, both which he held 
until his death. He was Master of the Temple; and dis- 
charged the duties of Director of the Society of Antiquaries. 
He was the author of several very learned works. He died 
8 January 1771, at the age of fifty-eight. During his in- 
cumbency the old 3rd bell was cast by Messrs. Lester and 
Pack of London, in 1758. 

40 Carswell Winder. Of Trim Coll., Ox., B.A. 1727, M.A. 1730. 



INCUMBKNTS OF KEMSING WITH SEAL. 273 

Incumbents. Patrons. 

William Humphry, inst. 31 Dec. 1770, John Frederick, Duke of 

on death of the last. {Ibid., f. Dorset. 

216.) « 

Gervas Whitehead, M.A., inst. 15 The Duchess Dowager of 

Aug. 1816, on death of the last. Dorset. 

(Ibid.,f. 321.) 42 



Deacon 7 January 1732-3, and Priest 23 September 1733, on 
which day he was licensed to the curacy of Keinsing and 
Seal, with an annual stipend of £35. Mr. Winder's connec- 
tion with the parish extended over nearly thirty-seven years, 
during twenty-eight of which he discharged the duties of 
curate. On 24 June 1742 he was instituted to the rectory of 
Halstead, on presentation by King George II. He, however, 
continued to hold the curacy of Kemsiug and Seal, obtaining 
the services of a curate for Halstead. He died 30 July 
1770. 

41 William Humphry. Of Magd. Hall, Ox., B.A. 1771, M.A. 

1773. He also held the vicarage of Birling, to which he was 
instituted 6 February 1782, on Lord Abergavenny's presenta- 
tion. His incumbency of Kemsing and Seal was within a few 
months of equalling in duration that of Max. Buck, nearly 
forty-six years. The entry of his burial appears under 19 
July 1816. A marble tablet affixed to the south wall of the 
south aisle records his decease, as well as that of his wife who 
survived him more than eighteen years. During his tenure of 
office William Baker left by his will in 1777, an annual rent- 
charge of 26s. for the use of the poor ; and Elenor Mortimer 
who died in 1803, left £5 annually to keep a vault and 
certain monuments in repair, with the proviso that the 
surplus should be distributed among the poor. 

42 Geryas Whitehead. Fellow of Jesus Coll., Camb., B.A. 1785, 

M.A. 1788, and B.D. He held for twenty-four years the 
Mastership of Sevenoaks Grammar School, in which he was 
succeeded by the Bev. J. T. Wilgress, 26 May 1813. Mr. 
Whitehead was also Vicar of All Saints, Cambridge. Owing 
to the unfitness of the Glebe house at Kemsing Mr. White- 
head obtained the Bishop's licence to reside at Seal. During 
his incumbency Seal Church underwent a restoration, as 
appeared by an inscription on the gallery which formerly 
occupied the west end of the nave: — "This Church was 
repaired at the charge of the parish, and was new-pewed and 
ornamented by voluntary contributions, a.d. 1828. Bev d G. 
Whitehead, Vicar, Thomas Thompson and William Cronk, 
Churchwardens." A mural tablet at the west end of the 
south aisle records the death of Mr. AVhitehead on 23 July 
1838, and makes mention of his distinguished classical attain- 
ments. 

VOL. XX. T 



'Ill TWO ENCUMBENTS OF REUSING WITH SEAL 

InCCMIUN I B, I' ,TI(ON8. 

Joux N. Il\i;w.\iu), MA., inst. 22 Mary, Countess Dowager 

Sept. 1838, on death of the last. of Plymouth. 

(Kochest. Regist. 1824-67, f. 71.) « 
Thomas (). Blackall, B.A., inst. 1 Earl Amherst. 

Aug. 18 16, on resig. of the last. 

(Regist. Howley, f. 790.) " 
Charles Edward Few, M.A., inst. Hon. Mortimer Sackville 

to New Vicarage of Seal 2 Oct. West. 

1874. (Eegist. Tait, ii., 598.) 45 

43 John N. Harward. Of Wore. Coll., Ox., B.A. 1818, M.A. 

1820. After an incumbency of rather less than eight years, 
Mr. Harward tendered his resignation, which was accepted 
23 June 1846. He was Domestic Chaplain to the Bishop of 
Rochester. By an Order in Council, dated 8 August 1845, 
it was decreed that from 1 January 1846 the deanery of 
Mailing should be transferred, with others, to the diocese of 
Canterbury, whereupon Kemsingand Seal ceased to be in the 
Rochester diocese. 

44 Thomas O. Blackall. Student of Ch. Ch., Ox., B.A. 1844, 

M.A. 1848. He was ordained Priest 7 June 1846, and 
licensed to the assistant curacy of Kemsing with Seal. In 
the year 1855 extensive alterations were effected in the church, 
when the west gallery was removed and the north aisle 
erected. An inscription on the inner wall, over the south 
porch door, records that, — " This Church was completely 
restored and the North Aisle erected by voluntary contribu- 
tions A D 1 1855. Thomas Offspring Blackall, Vicar, Mar- 
quess Camden, W. Cronk, junior, Churchwardens." At Whit- 
suntide 1863 a service of Communion Plate, consisting of 
chalice, paten, and flagon, was presented to the church by 
Capt. Francis Randolph, R.E., an old parishioner. A New 
District of St. Lawrence, Seal, was constituted by an Order 
in Council, dated 4 November 1867, and the Rev. B. P. 
Thompson, M.A., was appointed Incumbent, on the nomina- 
tion of Horace Wilkinson, Esq. St. Lawrence Church was 
consecrated in the month of June 1868. On 20 August 1869 
the churchyard of Seal was enlarged by an additional piece of 
ground being consecrated for burials. On 6 August 1874 
Seal was separated from Kemsing by an Order in Council, and 
a new Vicarage, of St. Peter's, Seal, was constituted. With the 
exception of a brief interval during the Commonwealth period, 
the two parishes of Kemsing and Seal had been united, and 
served by the same rector or vicar from very early times. 

45 Charles Edward Few. Of Ch. Ch., Ox., B.A. 1864, M.A. 1868. 

In the year following his institution Mr. Few added greatly to 
the picturesque appearance of Seal churchyai'd by erecting a 
handsome and useful lich gate at the entrance on the south 
side ; and in the year 1878 the ancient vestry underwent 
by his exertions considerable alteration, which has rendered 
it much more convenient both for choir and parish purposes 



AND ONE VICAR OF ST. PETER'S, SEAL. 275 

On 23 October 1877, the District Chapelry of St. Margaret, 
Under River, was constituted a new vicarage by an Order in 
Council, and the Rev. Geo Morley, M.A., was instituted 
Vicar 5 February 1878, on presentation by the Rt. Hon. 
Baron Sackville of Knole, the patron. In the year 1879 the 
north aisle of the nave of Seal Church was extended eastward 
to form a chamber for an organ, built the previous year by 
Messrs. Forster and Andrews of Hull. A brass label bears 
the following inscription in black-letter characters: — " To the 
Glory of God, and in memory of a beloved Wife, and devoted 
Mother, who loved to worship there, this Organ was given to 
the Parish Church of St. Peter, Seal, Kent, March 21 st , 
1878." In the year 1886 the old 5th bell was recast, the 
original inscription being judiciously preserved, and the 
following words added : — " Recast by John Warner & Sons, 
London, 1886. C. E. Few, Vicar, F. A. Forbes, G. T. Brown, 
Ch. Wardens." At the same time a new bell was given which 
bears the inscription: — "This bell was presented to the 
Church of St. Peter, Seal, by Charles Henry Mills, on the 
occasion of the marriage of his son Charles William Mills 
with the Honorable Alice Harbord, April 1886." During 
Mr. Few's incumbency numerous other offerings have been 
made to the church, among which may be briefly mentioned 
two elegant sanctuary candle standards, both which bear the 
inscription : — " In memory of John Charles, Marquis Camden, 
born June 30 th 1840, died May 4 th 1872. Given by his 
Brothers and Sisters." Also a handsome decorated oak 
screen, placed between the north aisle and the organ chamber, 
which bears the inscription : — "To the Glory of God, and in 
Memory of a beloved Father, this screen was given a.d. 1890 
by Francis Augustine Forbes, Churchwarden." In addition 
to parochial bequests already mentioned the Benefaction 
Tables in the south aisle record that : — " The Lord of the 
Manor of Knole agrees to give annually 500 fagots to the 
Poor of the Parish of Seal." Also that: — "The Possessor 
of Wildernesse Park agrees to give annually 100 fagots to the 
Poor of the Parish of Seal." Also on a metal tablet against 
the west wall of the same aisle is the following memoran- 
dum of " The Randolph Annuity," — "Frances Randolph, of 
Godden Green, In memory of her deceased husband, Captain 
Francis Randolph, R.E., has appropriated the sum of 
£323. 14. 10 in Consolidated 3 per cent. Annuities, the 
interest of which is to be paid by the Vicar of Seal, to a 
widow nominated by him. The widow must have resided at 
least 5 years in the Ecclesiastical Parish of Seal, without 
having received Parish relief, and must not be under 50 years 
of age. Full particulars are entered in the Parish Vestry 
Book. June 1878." During the tenure of office of the 
present Incumbent and his immediate predecessoiv, many 
memorial windows in stained-glass have been inserted, which 
have contributed to render this church singularly rich in 
colour and artistic design. 

T 2 



( 276 ) 



BURIAL-PLACES OF THE ARCHBISHOPS OF 
CANTERBURY. 

BY CANON SCOTT ROBERTSON. 

Archbishop Benson is the 93rd actual occupant of the Primatial 
See of Canterbury, but Roger Walden, who was intruded into 
Archbishop Arundel's throne, for a few years, is not usually counted 
as one of the Primates ; so that we reckon only 91 predecessors of 
the present Primate as legitimate Archbishops. Another prelate 
(Reginald Fitzjoceline, Bishop of Bath) was elected to the Primacy, 
but he died before he could be enthroned. John de Ufford (Lord 
Chancellor) died before he could be consecrated. Of the 91 pre- 
decessors of Archbishop Benson, the ashes of 
5S lie in Canterbury ; but all of these lived and died before the 

accession of Queen Elizabeth. 
7 were buried at Lambeth, in or beside the parish church there 

(viz., Parker, Bancroft, Tenison, Hutton, Secker, Corn- 

wallis, and Moore). 
6 were interred at Croydon (viz., Grindal, AVhitgift, Sheldon, 

Wake, Potter, and Herring). 
5 are buried at Addington (viz., Manners-Suttoh, *Howlet, 

*Sumner, Longley, and *Tait). 
3 mingled with the dust at Oxford. (I) Cranmer was burned 

therein 155|. (2) Laud, after his execution in 164£, was 

buried at Barking All Hallows, but in 1663 his remains 

were carried to the Chapel of St. John's College, Oxford. 

(3) Juxon (who, when Bishop of London, attended Charles I. 

upon the scaffold) was also interred at Oxford, in the Chapel 

of St. John's College, in 1663. 
1 lies in London at the Church of St. Lawrence, Jewry. I mean 

John Tillotson, who died 23rd November 1691. 
1 has a fine tomb in Westminster Abbey ; viz., Cardinal Langham, 

* For Howley, Sumner, and Tait there are memorial cenotaphs in Canter- 
bury Cathedral. 



BURIAL-PLACES OF THE PRIMATES. 277 

who died at Avignon, on the 22nd of July 1376, but was 
removed to Westminster in 1379. He had resigned the 
Archiepiscopal See upon being created Cardinal Priest of 
St. Sixtus in 1368. His tomb stands on the north side of the 
Choir of Westminster Abbey. 
2 Pre-Normau Archbishops (Elsin (or Alfsin) and Stigand) were 

buried at Winchester. 
1 Kobert (a Pre-Norman Primate) lies at Gemetica (Jumieges) in 

Normandy. 
1 St. Edmund of Pontigny (a native of Abingdon) lies at Pontigny. 
1 Archbishop Baldwin, dying at the Crusade, was buried at Tyre. 
1 Archbishop Kilwardby was interred at Viterbo. 
1 Boniface (a Savoyard) was buried in Savoy. 
1 Bichard Wethkrshed or Grant lies at St. Gemma in Italy. 
1 Archbishop Sancroft lies at Fressingfield. 
1 Archbishop Abbot was buried at Guildford, his native place. 

Of the 58 Primates who were interred at Canterbury, 11 were 
buried at the Abbey called St. Augustine's ; and 47 were interred 
at Christ Church. Of these 47, we find that 19 died before the 
Norman Conquest and 28 died after the Conquest. 

To St. Augustine's Abbey were brought Archbishop Augustine 
and his 9 immediate successors (Lawrence, Mellitus, Justus, 
Honorius, Deusdedit, Theodore, Brithwald, Tatwin, and 
Nothelm). Another Saxon Primate, Jambert (who had been 
Abbot of St. Augustine's), was subsequently interred in the Chapter 
House of that Abbey in 790. These eleven Primates are comme- 
morated now in St. Augustine's College in the little windows of the 
Crypt Chapel. 

Intra-mural interment was much objected to by the Eomans 
and by the Saxons. Consequently the burial-ground for all Can- 
terbury during several centuries was at St. Augustine's, which 
stands outside the City walls. 

Archbishop Cuthbert was the first who broke through the old 
custom, and in defiance of the claims of St. Augustine's Abbey, he 
was buried at his own Cathedral Church in a.d. 758, within a chapel 
dedicated by himself to St. John the Baptist ; wherein several of 
his successors were afterwards interred. Gervase records that in 
a.d. 1180* his remains w r ere carried to the North-east Transept, and 
laid on the south side of the Altar of St. Stephen. His successor 

* The most accessible tianslation of Gervase's description of the positions in 
which the i-einains of Archbishops were deposited in a.d. 1180 is found in Pro- 
fessor Willis's Architectural History of Canterbury Cathedral, pp. 55 — 58. 



'J7 S SAXON ARCHBISHOPS OF CANTERBURY. 

Bregwin was likewise translated at the same time (a.d. llso)to 
the South-easl Transept, and was there re-interred at St. Gregory's 

Altar. 

Seventeen Pre-Norman Primates were interred at Christ Church 
after Cuthberl and Bregwin, many of them in the Chapel of St. 
John Baptist, which Cuthbert had built. Of these we know, from 

Gervasc, that — 

VTHELARD was translated in a.d. 1 ISO to the north of St. Stephen's 
A It nr in the new Choir's North Transept. 

Wtuuii) was likewise translated, in 11 SO, to the North-east Tran- 
sept, hut was laid on the south side of St. Martin's Altar. 

Feoloeld, Ceolkotf, and Atiielrkd are not mentioned by 
(Jervase. 

Plegmund was translated to St. Gregory's Altar. 

Am elm and Wlfhelm are not noticed by Gervase. 

Odo, who >vas placed behind the Altar of the Trinity in Ernulph's 
and Conrad's Retro-choir, was brought to St. Dunstan's Altar 
in 1180, and in the fourteenth century was moved to the 
south side of the Corona. 

St. Dunstan, in 1180, was brought to an altar and shrine on the 
south side of the High Altar in the new Choir, and there his 
body rested until the Reformation. His shrine was opened 
in 1508, on the 20th of April, when his body was found 
therein. 

Ethelgar was, in 1180, removed to St. John the Evangelist's Altar 
in the South-east Transept. 

Siric's translation is not mentioned by Grervase. 

jElfric, who was interred at Abingdon in 1006, was brought later 
to Canterbury, and in 1180 was removed, like Ethelgar, to 
St. John's Altar in the South-east Transept. 

St. Elphege, who was murdered in 1012 by the Danes at Green- 
wich, on the site where the parish church of St. Elphege now 
stands, after burial in St. Paul's, London, was carried to 
Canterbury eleven years later, King Canute himself following 
the coffin to the bank of the Thames. In 1180, the Saint's 
remains were brought to a shrine on the north side of the 
High Altar in the new Choir, and an altar was erected to his 
honour. More than two centuries later, Archbishop Courte- 
nay, in memory of St. Elphege, filled with glass a window in 
the new Nave of the Cathedral, at a cost of £20. 

Living (ob. 1020) was placed north of St. Martin's Altar, in the 
North-eastern Transept, in 1180. 



primates' tombs destroyed or defaced. 279 

Agelnoth and Eadst were buried in their Cathedral, but Gervase 
does not mention the removal of their remains in a.d. 1180. 
The Tombs op 12 Post-Norman Primates, who were buried 

in their Cathedral, have nearly, or wholly disappeared. 

Lanfranc (ob. 28 May 1089) was buried on the south side of the 
High Altar in the old Trinity Chapel. In 1180 he was trans- 
lated to the south side of the Altar of St. Martin in the North- 
east Transept, where this Archbishop's name, scratched upon 
the south wall, is still visible. 

St. Anselm was buried at the head of Lanfranc in 1109, but was 
removed to the Chapel of St. Peter and St. Paul, and was 
buried behind the High Altar thereof. The chapel has ever 
since borne his name, as St. Anselm's Chapel. 

Ralph de Turbine, or D'Escures (ob. 1122) was interred near the 
Altar of St. Benedict. 

Wm. Corboil (ob. 1136) was buried near the Altar of St. Benedict, 
in the Martyrdom. 

Theobald (ob. 1161) was first buried at the east end of Conrad's 
Trinity Chapel on its north side, but in 11S0 was removed to 
the front of the Altar of St. Mary in the north aisle of the 
Nave. His remains were found there in 1786. (See Hasted's 
History of Kent, xii., 326 note.) 

Thomas Becket was murdered in 1170. No trace of his tomb 
in the Crypt remains, but representations of it abound in the 
ancient glass (about 670 years old) in the north-east windows 
of the Retro-choir, or Trinity Chapel, wherein are represented 
various miraculous cures which were said to have been wrought 
at the tomb of St. Thomas. 

Richard (once Prior of Dover) was buried in the Lady Chapel in 
the Nave's north aisle, and his remains were found in 1735-40 
while a grave was being dug. 

Simon Islip was buried in April 1366, at midnight, in the Nave's 
middle aisle, at its eastern end. When the Nave was rebuilt, 
about twenty years later, his monumental brass was removed 
to the North side of the Nave, and placed between two pillars 
of the north arcade. In 1786, when the Nave was newly 
paved, his memorial stone, robbed of its brass, was carried 
probably into the Chapter House, where one similar to it may 
now be seen in the floor. Dart gives an engraving of Islip's 
tomb on p. 151 of his History of the Cathedral of Canterbury. 

William Wittleset, nephew of Archbishop Islip, was buried 
opposite his uncle, in June 1374, between two pillars of the 



280 TOMB OF ARCHBISHOP 

south arcade of tbe Nave. His memorial slab has entirely 
disappeared. Hart engraved il on p. L55 of hie History. In 
17sO, when the Nave was repaved, his skeleton was found 
entire. His body Beemed fco have been lard in wood ashes. 
Thomas Arundkl during his lifetime founded for himself chantries 
in the Nave of Canterbury Cathedral, and in Maidstone 
Church. Pope Gregory XII. gave his formal approval of 
both, on June 1, 1408. The matrix of Archbishop Arundel's 
memorial brass is said to have remained in the Nave of the 
Cathedral until 1786, but his chantry on the north side was 
pulled down at the Reformation. 
John Stafford was buried in the Martyrdom, in July 1452, and 

there still remains the matrix of his monumental brass. 
Henry Dene was buried in the Martyrdom in 1508, and the matrix 
of his monumental brass remains there, in the floor of the 
North-west Transept adjacent to, and south of, that of Arch- 
bishop Stafford. It is north of the matrix of the monumental 
brass of Prior Finch. 
Of 16 Primates' Tombs still visible in Canterbury Cathedral, 
the earliest is that about which so much was lately heard — I mean 
that of Hubert Walter, who died in 1205, and was buried beside 
a window on the south side of the Retro-choir, called Trinity Chapel. 
The tomb is shrine-like, with no effigy, but it bears six carvings of 
heads, four of which are seen in Dart's engravings upon pp. 123, 
150, of his History. These heads are differently attired. On two 
of them are mitres, which suggest that the prelate here com- 
memorated held only two sees in succession, as Hubert AV alter did. 
He was elevated to the Primacy in 1193 from the See of Salisbury 
(to which he had been consecrated in 1189). A third head wears 
a cap, which may be that of a Dean or Canon, as Hubert Walter 
had been Dean of York from 1168 to 1188. As he had been a Judge 
or Justiciary in the reign of Henry II. ; the Chief Justiciary of 
England under King Richard I. ; and Lord Chancellor under King 
John (who, like his brother Richard, was crowned by Hubert 
Walter), the other three heads may have represented him in these 
dignities. 

It is strange that tradition should have attributed this tomb to 
Archbishop Theobald, who, dying in a.d. 1160, was buried on the 
north side of the old Trinity Chapel, and whose body and tomb 
were in ad. 1180 transferred to the Nave, and laid near the Altar 
of St. Mary the Virgin. The mistake was pointed out in a.d. 1610 
by Somner (Antiquities of Canterbury, p. 123 of Battely's edition) 



HUBERT WALTER. 281 

Somner traces the error to Bishop Godwyn, and says that none 
before Godwyn had authorized the report that this was Theobald's 
tomb. Dart, in a.d. 1726, likewise drew attention to the falsity of 
this report. Yet it continued to be repeated, and believed, until 
our own time. Professor Willis says {Architectural History of 
Christ Church, Canterbury, p. 128) of this tomb, " It is usually 
attributed to Archbishop Theobald, but without reason ; and it is 
too late in style." 

The position of Hubert "Walter's tomb is mentioned accurately 
and distinctly in only one of the extant manuscript records of the 
burial-places of Archbishops of Canterbury. A monk of Christ 
Church, writing circa a.d. 1532, says, respecting Hubert W alter, 
" Sepultus est in Ecclesia Christi Cantuar, juxta feretrum Sancti 
Thonitv.'"* In the outer margin of the MS. are written, by another 
hand, these words, " aliter sub fenestra in parte australi," which 
seem to complete the identification of the site of this tomb (some- 
time called Theobald's), which I mentioned, in the year 1881, as 
the probable burial-place of Archbishop Hubert Walter, t Tre- 
foil ed arches such as we find in the arcading which ornaments this 
tomb w r ere unknown in England until they were used by the archi- 
tect, William of Sens, w r ho commenced the rebuilding of the Choir 
of Canterbury Cathedral, after the great fire in the twelfth century. 
Ten windows (broad and low), which he introduced, above the 
great windows of the Choir, have such trefoiled arches. These 
windows were inserted during a.d. 1177-8, and still remain; five 
on the north side, and five on the south. J The tomb itself stands 
near the site of Becket's shrine, and near the tomb of the Black Prince. 

* Parker MS. No. ccxcviii, 5 (at Corpus Christi College, Cambridge), folio 
106. This manuscript record was unknown to Professor Willis. In 1844-5, 
he wrote: "No record of a monument on this spot is preserved, and if, as is 
probable, it has been removed from its original site, all clue to its history is 
gone." The opening of this tomb, in March 1892, enabled many questions to 
be settled and set at rest. Mr. W. H. St. John Hope, and every expert who 
examined the interior of the tomb, decided without doubt that this tomb was 
in its original position, and that its contents had never before been disturbed. 

It may be useful to mention other MSS. which record the burial-places of 
Archbishops of Canterbury :— Harleian MS. No. 63'! {circa A.D. 1313), Polls- 
torie del Eylise de Christ de Caunterbyre ; MS. Galba E. iv. (circa A.D. 1321), 
printed in Dart's History of Canterbury Cathedral, Appendix xiii ; in Lambeth 
Palace Library, Wharton's MS. Collections for his Anglia Sacra include a later 
copy of the Parker MS. (by a monk of Christ Church, a.d. 1532) in MS. No. 585. 
Very faulty, but of some little use, is Harleian MS. 1360, Richard Scarlett's 
record of what he saw in Canterbury Cathedral, especially tbe heraldic blazon- 
ing on tombs, as Scarlett was an heraldic painter, or coach-painter. 

f Arehaologia Cantiana, XIV., 284. 

X They are shewn on two plates opposite pp. 74 and 77 of Professor Willis's 
Architectural History of Canterbury Cathedral. 



282 TOMB OF ARCHBISHOP 

It is placed beside the south wall of fcbe Retro-choir (called Trinity 
Chapel), which was rebuilt during the years 1181-84, but was not 
roofed in until a.d. 1184. Every one can therefore sec the truth and 

cogency of Professor Willis's remark (p. 128 of his Architectural 
History of Cant. Oath.), " The style seems a little later than the com- 
pletion of the Trinity Chapel." After the completion of Trinity 
Chapel, the first Primate who was interred at Canterbury was Hubert 
AValter. He was buried there on the 13th of July 1205. His suc- 
cessor, Stephen Langton (who was not consecrated until 1207, when 
he became Primate), was buried, as all records testify, in St. Michael's 
Chapel, in a.d. 1228, before the altar; and when that chapel was 
rebuilt (about 175 or 180 years later), the monk who circa 1532 wrote 
the Parker MS. distinctly tells us that the coffin of Stephen Langton 
was placed beneath* the Altar of St. Michael, in the rebuilt chapel. 
The position in which we see it, now, exactly accords with this 
statement. When the Altar of St. Michael was removed at the 
Reformation, the head of the coffin of Stephen Langton would be 
exposed to view, as it now appears. Thus, before the interior of 
this tomb (falsely called Theobald's) was examined, the testimony 
of the old monk's manuscript, and the evidence of date afforded by 
the architectural details of the tomb, both rendered it tolerably 
certain that the occupant of the tomb must be Hubert Walter. 

When the tomb was opened on March 10, 1892, and the stone 
coffin was found to contain the remains of a prelate whose sacred 
vessels with their inscriptions, whose jewels, and whose vestments 
were all clearly of a date not later than a.d. 1199, it became indis- 
putably certain that this prelate must have been Hubert Walter, 
who was Bishop of Salisbury from a.d. 1189 to 1193, and Arch- 
bishop of Canterbury from 1193 to 1205. 

It remains to notice the fact that, for two or three centuries, an 
altar-tomb in the south aisle of the Choir has been invariably desig- 
nated the tomb of Hubert Walter. We may trace this error to 
Archbishop Parker's words. He says that Hubert Walter was 
buried " in chori pariete ad austrum." His description of the site 
of Walter Reynolds's tomb is " in australi chori muro." The tomb 
so long ascribed to Hubert Walter stands but a few feet to the east 
of Walter Reynolds's tomb. The architectural details of both these 
tombs prove that they w r ere erected early in the fourteenth cen- 
tury ; more than one hundred years after the death of Hubert 
Walter. Professor Willis had observed this architectural contra- 

* Lambeth MS. 585, p. 8(>, " in capella Sancti Michaelis sub altare." 




The Tomb before it was opened. 




The Tomb as opened March, 10 th 1890. 



— The Tomb of Archbishop Hubert Walter, at Canterbury. 



HUBERT WALTER (a.D. 1205). 283 

diction of the truth of the tradition, and mentions it. Another 
fact might also have prevented experts from falling into the error of 
supposing that this altar-tomb could be the burial-place of Hubert 
Walter. Can any one point to an altar-tomb, anywhere, which was 
built so early as 1205 ? The earliest altar-tombs in Canterbury 
Cathedral commemorate two worthies who died in a.d. 1292, viz., 
the Countess of Athol and Archbishop Peckham. When Archbishop 
Hubert Walter died, altar-tombs had not been introduced into our 
churches. It becomes now a crux, for experts to discover to whose 
memory this tomb in the south aisle of the Choir was really erected. 

On Saturday the 8th of March 1892, one of the top or roof 
stones of the pyramidal tomb (falsely ascribed to Theobald) was 
lifted, and a lighted taper was inserted. To the surprise of those* 
who were looking in, there was seen a complete stone coffin with 
well-moulded lid. On Monday the 10th of March the contents of 
the coffin were fully examined.! 

The coffin, of Caen stone, tapers from a width of 30| inches at 
the head (or west end) to 22i inches at the foot (or east end). The 
lid, of Purbeck marble, is 7 inches thick. Two chamfers run com- 
pletely round this lid. The outer one is a simple flat chamfer, about 
2f inches wide. The inner or upper chamfer is a wide shallow 
hollow, which varies on the two sides and at the corners from Oi 
to 8 inches in width. These chamfers cause the central top surface 
of the lid to be only 9| inches wide at the head, and 6i inches wide 
at the foot. The total length of the coffin lid is 6 feet 9f inches. 

The depth of the exterior of the coffin is 16 inches, below the 
lid. The width of the coffin is rather greater at the top than at 
the bottom ; so that at the foot, its exterior width at the top is 
24 inches, and at the bottom 22 inches. 

When the lid was lifted, the body of an Archbishop in full 
pontificals was disclosed. His crosier was lying across the body 
from the right foot to the left shoulder. A chalice and paten had 
been placed beside him. His head rested upon a stone pillow, in 
which a hollow had been hewn to receive the head. The stone 
pillow extended across the full width of the coffin. 

Upon the head of the Archbishop was a plain mitre made of 
silk, without any embroidery or ornament. This silk was merely 
folded into shape ; the two infulae or pendants seem to have been 
attached to it with a couple of stitches. 

* Canon P. Holland, Canon C. F. Rontledge, and Dr. Sheppard. 

t There were then present : — Canon Francis Holland, Archdeacon B. F. 
Smith, Canon W. A. Scott Robertson, Dr. J. Brigstocke Sheppard, the Rev. John 
Morris, S.J., F.S.A., and the Rev. Pere Du Lac. 



284 TOMB OF ARCHBISHOP 

The woollen pallium lm<l decayed awaj ; but two gilt pins, each 
4t\ inches long, which had fastened the pallium to the chasuble, near 
the shoulders, still remain, and the Leaden weights which kept down 
the ends of the pallium were also found. They were flat pieces of 

lead about '2 inches by 11, winch had been covered with black silk. 
The heads of the pallium-'pins were shaped like daisies or mar- 
guerites, $ths of an inch in diameter. Each marguerite has 16 petals. 
Some prefer to call the flower a marigold. 

Around the primate's neck was the collar of his amice. It was 
lying loose, as the amice itself (like the alb and pallium) had 
decayed away. This collar is a wonderful example of embroidery 
in gold thread on silk. The width of it is only 3J? inches, and its 
length 22i inches. Yet within this small space are embroidered 
seven distinct figures, each within a roundel. A jewel (or mock 
turquoise) was originally inserted between each pair of roundels, 
but these are gone. 

(I.) — The central figure represents our Blessed Lord, seated, with Hisri^ht hand 
upraised in the attitude of Benediction. Above His right shoulder is 
a Greek Alpha, and above His left is the letter Omega. 

(II. and III.) — Eight and left of our Lord are the Evangelistic symbols of St. 
Matthew and St. John, with the name of each embroidered, not in a 
straight line, but with the letters placed wherever room could best be 
found ; as MAT.EVS and Iohannes.. 

(IV.) — On the spectator's right of St. John's symbol appears an oxdike Lion of 
St. Mark, with the name " marcvs." 

(V.) — On our left of St. Matthew appears the symbol of St. Luke with the 
word " lvcas." 

(VI.) — On the spectator's extreme left is the figure of the Archangel Michael, 
with his name, and on his right is one crescent moon. 

(VII.) — On the extreme right of the spectator is the figure of the Archangel 
Gabriel, with the name " Gabrielis," and two crescent moons, which may 
possibly symbolize his two messages of Annunciation — one to Elizabeth, 
and the other to the Blessed Virgin Mary. 

The lettering of all these names is in capitals of the twelfth 
century, closely resembling those which appear upon the wall- 
paintings in the Crypt Chapel of St. Gabriel in Canterbury 
Cathedral, as shewn in ArcliaBologia Cantiana, XIII., 66-7, 75, 78. 

The chasuble of the Archbishop is of that ample form which 
was used in the twelfth century. It is composed of silk, perhaps 
white originally, but now of the old-gold colour seen also in the 
mitre, in the ground-work of the amice-collar, and in the primate's 
sanctuary shoes. This very ample chasuble is bordered, at its edges, 
by a gold ribbon about 1 inch wide, formed of green silk and gold 
thread woven together. 



HUBERT WALTER (a.D. 1205). 285 

Up the centre of the front of the chasuble passes a broad braid 
or silken ribbon, woven with patterns which comprise the filfot, the 
swastika, and the tau, in various combinations. This vertical and 
central stripe has near its base two short flanking stripes, which 
seem to lean against it like buttresses. They produce the effect of 
a tripod at the base, and they at once reminded me of the similar 
ornament upon a chasuble of Archbishop Thomas Becket, w r hich is 
still preserved at the Cathedral of Sens. There are other additional 
stripes of ornament on that chasuble of Becket ; but this of Hubert 
Walter, which we examined on the 10th of March, appears to me 
closely to resemble that of Becket in amplitude and shape, as well 
as in this portion of its ornament. 

Parts of the stole, woven in silk with various combinations of 
the tau and the filfot patterns, still remain, and a piece of the Pri- 
mate's hair shirt was found near the waist. 

The hands having withered away to little more than mere bones, 
the Archbishop's signet ring of gold was lying loosely. It contains 
a Gnostic gem of the fourth century, as the Rev. S. S. Lewis (an 
expert) tells us, formed of a green stone called plasma, and adorned 
with the figui'e of a serpent standing erect, about whose head are 
rays of light. Parallel with the serpent's body is inscribed his 
name, in Greco-Coptic letters, "xnvphic." This ring weighs half 
an ounce avoirdupois. The inner diameter of the ring is f ths of an 
inch, and it exactly fits the forefinger of my own right hand. The 
gem is three-quarters of an inch long, and nine-sixteenths of an inch 
broad. Probably Hubert Walter had worn this signet when he was 
Bishop of Salisbury, and did not discard it when he became Primate. 
We are told by Mr. Waterton, in an article on Episcopal Rings, that 
after Hubert Walter had become Archbishop of Canterbury, Pope 
Innocent III. definitively settled, in a.d. 1194,* that thenceforward 
an episcopal ring should be of gold, solid, and set with a precious 
stone on which nothing was to be cut. Waterton quotes as his 
authority a work by Merati, edited by Gavanti (p. 1311). He 
states also that a curious episcopal ring, of the latter part of the 
twelfth century, was found near Oxford in 1S56 ; the bezel of which 
was set with a fine antique plasma, bearing the bust of a female. 
This episcopal ring seems closely to parallel that which we found in 
Archbishop Hubert Walter's tomb. The use of ancient Gnostic 
gems by prelates at that period may have caused Pope Innocent III. 
to issue his ordinance (in 1191) that henceforward episcopal rings 

* Arch ecological Journal, vol. xx., pp. 226-7. 



28C) TOMB OF AUC1IBISIIOP 

were to be plain, without device. The ordinance was probably 
enforced for a certain period after its issue, but ultimately no doubt 
it became a dead letter. 

The sanctuary shoes of Archbishop Huberl Walter are very re- 
markable. They are of silk, covered with a profusion of embroidery 
in gold thread. Their depth is such that they must have surrounded 
the ankles. The principal design is formed of large pear-shaped 
open curves. Two of these are interwoven at the toe. Between 
the toe and the instep are five of these pear-shaped curves, their 
broad ends being towards the toes, and the pointed end of each is 
finished with a jewel (a garnet) set in gold thread as in a ring. On 
both sides of the instep are two figures ; the upper pair being large 
heraldic lions passant ; the lower pair being bird-headed monsters, 
with tails that end in heads. Around the heel of each shoe we see 
several repetitions of a square figure, from each corner of which 
projects a fleur-de-lis, while a similar fleur-de-lis projects from the 
centre of each side of the square. This design, I fancy, has been 
copied from some coin. 

Upon the Primate's legs were buskins or leggings of silk, 
adorned with the filfot in various combinations. 

Near the feet was the " apparel " of the alb. That garment 
itself had entirely disappeared, having gone to dust. 

The crosier is in fragments, but it had been quite 5^ feet long. Its 
round stem is of cedar wood, about three-quarters of an inch (or 
more) in diameter. At the bottom was a long spiked ferule of metal, 
which was found close to the Primate's right foot. Near the top was 
a large silver gilt boss, in which were four antique red gems, one of 
which has dropped out. The late Eev. S. S. Lewis described the gems 
thus : — (a) Carnelian (pale) engraved with a horse passant ; (b) Sard 
(red) engraved rudely with 3 ears of wheat, held by a human hand ; 
(c) Jasper (red) engraved with a female figure (perhaps Persephone) 
seated on rocks, holding wheat ears in her right hand. Under her 
feet is a river god. The crook itself w r as small and plain, of silver 
gilt, and had become separated from its staff. The crosier was 
found lying across and resting beside the left shoulder of the 
Archbishop. 

The chalice is unique. It is more highly ornamented than any 
early coffin-chalice previously found. It weighs lOf ounces avoir- 
dupois, and is 5f inches high. The broad hemispherical bowl, 
4 inches and 5-16ths in diameter, and If inch deep, is wholly gilt 
inside, and has a decided lip curling outward. The exterior is 
adorned with engraved patterns wdiich are parcel gilt. The design 



HUBERT WALTER (a.D. 1205). 287 

shews 24 round arches interlaced. Twelve of these are short and 
spring from 12 small trefoil bosses; the other 12 are deeper and 
spring from 12 larger bosses of foliage on a lower level than the 
others. The base and knop are in one piece, hollow and open. 
"When a rule is inserted within the base and knop it penetrates 
3 inches and 5-16ths. 

The knop is li inch high. It is shaped into 12 convex flanges, 
above and below which there is a ring of large beads, 22 in number. 
Between each pair of flanges there is a minute incised ornament, 
resembling a series of small angles drawn parallel to each other. 

The swelling trumpet-like base is highly adorned, and parcel 
gilt. It beai*s 12 repousse flanges, flattened not convex. Each is 
about 2\ inches long, and at its upper part beneath the knot \ of 
an inch wide, while at the bottom the widest part is 15-16ths of an 
inch, beneath which comes the curved end. Engraving enriches 
each of these repousse flanges, and the engraving is gilt. Around 
the edge of the base, which is 4| inches or 4 inches and 7-16ths in 
diameter, there is a band of simple engraving parcel gilt. The pat- 
tern resembles a band of triangles. 

Inside the bowl there is, on one side, at the bottom, a discolora- 
tion of the surface. Whether this was produced by wine or by 
other action one cannot be sure. It is merely superficial. The 
gilding is perfect beneath the stain. On the exterior of one side of 
the bowl there are signs of decay produced by chemical action. 

The small plate-like paten has especial interest from its double 
inscription in twelfth-century capitals. This little paten weighs 
2f ounces avoirdupois. Its diameter is 5i inches. The centre is 
not flat but curved ; it is dished so as to have a depth of 7-16ths of 
an inch. The diameter of the dished centre is 3f inches. The 
width of the rim is \ ths of an inch. 

Upon the rim is one inscribed band, gilt, and upon the curved 
central part there is a second. These bands are each \ of an inch 
wide. That upon the dished centre surrounds a carefully engraved 
figure of the Holy Lamb. A cruciform nimbus encircles the head 
of the Lamb. The inscription around this central figure is, " Agnus 
Dei qui tollis peccata mundi, miserere nobis." The only con- 
tracted words are Dei, tollis, and nobis. For them the letters 
engraved are Di', Toll', and Nob'. 

The lettering is especially remarkable. It exactly resembles 
the twelfth-century lettering seen on the wall-paintings in the 
Crypt Chapel of St. Gabriel.* In this inner inscription we find one 
* Archteolugia Cantiana, XIII., see Plates opposite pp. 67, 75, 78. 



288 TOMBS OF LANGTON, PECKHAM, AM) W I NC II ELSE. 

square backed E (being tbc second k in 1 lie word MIBEBERE). 
Otherwise all the letters I'i upon this paten have round hacks. ( )f 
the other letters all except II are shaped like Roman capitals, and 
every N is reversed thus fi. 

The inscription around the rim is : — 

" Ara cruris, tumulique calix, lapidisque patena, 
Sindonis oficium {He) Candida l)issus (sic) liabet." 

Canon Francis Holland translates it thus : — 
The Altar, Chalice, Paten, Veil, 

O Lord of Quick and dead, 
These are the Cross, the Tomb, the Stone, 
And napkin round Thy Head. 

The Latin lines occur upon a small altar slab of the twelfth 
century at Cologne, in a church of St. Mary. 

Cardinal Stephen Langton, who died in 1228, was buried in 
the St. Michael's Chapel of Lanfranc's Cathedral, " deuaunt lauter 
Seint Michel."* When that chapel was rebuilt by Prior Chillen- 
den {circa 1400-10) the Cardinal's stone coffin was placed under the 
altar,f and part of it was built into the east wall. An arch was 
turned over the foot of the plain stone coffin, the lid whereof is 
carved with a cross, the head of which is still seen within the 
chapel, and resembles a Maltese cross. Dart gives a distorted 
view of it on p. 134 of his History of the Cathedral of Canterbury. 

John Peckham, ob. 1292, buried in the Martyrdom, has a very 
handsome tomb there, in the north wall at its western end. There 
is a wooden effigy of the Primate, and over the tomb is a beautiful 
canopy elaborately cusped. A poor engraving of it is given by 
Dart opposite p. 136 of his History of the Cathedral. 

Robert de Winchelse was buried (in 1313) near the south 
wall of the South-east Transept beside the Altar of St. Gregory. J 
There his tomb was seen by Leland in the reign of Henry VIII. 
The reputation of this Primate's sanctity was so great that, in 1319, 
the Lord Steward of England, Thomas, Earl of Lancaster and 
Leicester, strove to get him canonized ; and there was at that time, 
in front of Winchelse's tomb, a written description of the miracles 
wrought by God for this Archbishop. In I32f Archbishop 
Reynolds applied to the Pope for Winchelse's canonization, but in 
vain. It is supposed that on account of its reputation for miracles, 

* Harleian MS. 636, Polistorie del Eglise de Christ de Caunterbyre, folio 
204 b . 

f Parker MS. No. ccxcviii, 5, at Corpus Christi College, Cambridge ; a copy 
is in Lambeth Palace Library, MS. 585, p. 86. 

X Devers le suth deuaunt lauter seynt Gregorie le p'pe (Harleian MS. fi.36, 
Polistorie, fol. 231", second column). 



TOMBS OF REYNOLDS, MEPIIAM, AND STRATFORD. 289 

the tomb was removed at or before the Reformation. There is 
an effigy (of a date circa a.d. 1300-20) which has been inserted, 
with marks of violence and alteration, beneath a window in the 
south aisle of the Choir which may possibly be Winchelse's effigy. 
It has the mitre,* but neither pall, nor crosier, nor primate's staff — 
it lies east of and close to the tomb of Archbishop Reynolds. Dart 
engraved it on p. 131 of his History, calling it (erroneously) the 
tomb of Hubert Walter. The Canterbury monk, who wrote circa 
1532, says, " Robertus tic Wyncliiise sepultus est in Hcclesia Christi 
Cantuar. coram altari S. Gregorii in austral i parte chori in pariete" 
The last six words seem to describe the site we are considering, 
rather than that of St. Gregory's Altar in S.E. Transept. 

Walter Retnolds died in 1327, and an effigy without pall or 
staff, beneath a window in the south aisle of the Choir, is ascribed 
to him. It is engraved on p. 143 of Dart's History. 

Simon Mepham, who died in 1333, is commemorated by a hand- 
some tomb of black marble, without an effigy. This tomb stands 
beneath the arch of entrance to St. Anselm's Chapel (dedicated to 
St. Peter and St. Paul), near the eastern end of the south side of 
the south aisle of the Choir. It now forms the screen between 
St. Anselm's Chapel and the Choir aisle. The carvings, in low 
relief, upon the black marble of this tomb are worthy of attentive 
examination. Arched apertures through the width of the tomb 
were left open, according to a custom observed with respect to 
tombs of persons of saintly reputation. In the thirteenth and 
fourteenth centuries, many persons, who were troubled with bodily 
infirmities, desired to pass through such apertures afflicted portions 
of their bodies, expecting to derive curative benefit thereby. An 
engi*aving of the tomb will be found in Dart's History, opposite 
p. 141. When Archbishop Mepham was buried, the Bishop of 
Rochester (that well-known Kentish man, Haymo de Hethe) per- 
formed the chief part at his obsequies. 

John Stratford, who died on the 23rd of August 1348, 
was interred in a place of great honour, on the south side of the 
Presbytery, and south of the steps of St. Dunstau's Altar. His 
effigy is elaborately carved. It shews him wearing the mitre and 
the pallium (pinned upon the shoulders with long pins), and holding 
his pastoral staff. The arrangement and details of the cushions 
beneath his head should be compared with those seen beneath the 
heads of Archbishop Reynolds and the other prelate who lies east 

* Triors of Christ Church used a mitre after 1231; but no crosier before 
A.D. 1378. 

Vol,. XX. U 



2 ( .)0 TOMBS OF ARCHBPS. BRADWARDINE, SUDBURY, 

of Reynolds (probably Winchelse). Eacb Bide of the altar-tomb, 
beneath bis effigy, is ornamented with an arcading of fifteen small 
arches, beneath six of which small statuettes were originally placed. 
Over the whole stands an elaborate canopy of tabernacle work. 
(Sec an engraving in Dart's History, p. I 15.) 

Thomas Beadwaedine, who died at the Bishop of Roches- 
ter's Lambeth residence, December 1 st h 131!*, was interred beneath 
the great south window in St. Anselm's Chapel, which had been in- 
serted thirteen years before. There is no effigy of him, and this 
altar-like tomb has not much decoration. It is shewn in Dart's 
History, on p. 149. 

Simon Sudbury was regarded somewhat in the light of a martyr, 
because he was beheaded on Tower Hill, on the 14th of June 1381, 
by Wat Tyler's rebels. Consequently, when his body was brought 
to Canterbury (his head is still shewn at Sudbury), a position of 
highest honour was accorded to him, east of Archbishop Stratford's 
tomb, and south of the Altar of St. Dunstan. Thither came the 
Mayor and Corporation of Canterbury to pray for his soul, upon 
the anniversary of his death, every year, until the Reformation. 
Sudbury was a great benefactor both to the City and to the Cathe- 
dral. There is no effigy of him, but his altar-tomb is surmounted 
by an elaborate canopy of tabernacle work. Leland describes this 
monument as " a high tomb of copper and gilt." Dai't gives an 
illustration of it on p. 154 of his History. "When alterations, in 
the steps and floor, caused this tomb to be accidentally opened, in 
or about a.d. 1833, it was seen that the Archbishop's head was 
absent, and in its place was a ball of lead. The body was wrapped 
(apparently) in sere cloth. 

William Courtenay's tomb stands on the south side of the 
central portion of the Eetro-choir, commonly called the Trinity 
Chapel. It is exactly opposite the tomb of Hubert Walter, and 
it stands to the east of the Black Prince's tomb. The effigy of 
this Archbishop shews him wearing the mitre and the pallium, with 
the crosier on his left side. Its sides are ornamented with arcading, 
forming canopied niches with pinnacles. There is no canopy over 
the tomb. As Archbishop Courtenay's will named for his burial, 
either Exeter Cathedral or the churchyard of the Parish Church 
of Maidstone (which he had made Collegiate), and as he died at 
Maidstone, where a monumental brass to his memory w r as inserted 
in the floor of All Saints' Church, in front of the High Altar, it was 
by many believed that he was buried at Maidstone. The records of 
Christ Church, Canterbury, state, however, that Richard II., being 



COURTENAY, AND CHICHELE. 291 

at Canterbury in 1396, when Archbishop Courtenay was to be 
buried, directed that the Primate's body should be brought to his 
Cathedral Church, and that he was here buried. Thorn, the chroni- 
cler, distinctly states that he was entombed near the Shrine of 
St. Thomas. The Obituary of Christ Church as distinctly says that 
Courtenay was buried at the feet of the Black Prince. As Courte- 
nay had been a great benefactor to this Cathedral, in giving and 
procuring money to defray the cost of rebuilding the Nave and 
the Cloisters, it was agreed by the Prior and Convent in November 
1395, that a perpetual chantry for him and his parents should be 
maintained, to be served daily by two monks alternately (each 
serving for one week), who should be paid £2 per annum each 
for their services. Also it was arranged that upon every anni- 
versary of his death, a solemn service for him should be said with 
the same pomp and solemnity as was always observed upon the 
anniversary of Archbishop Eobert de Wynchelse. It was added 
that upon every such anniversary every monk of Christ Church 
who was a priest should say one mass for him, and every other monk 
should for him repeat fifty psalms. No doubt, by these arrange- 
ments they satisfied his desire that for his soul should be said 
15,000 masses, and 2000 matins. Dart's engraving of Courtenay's 
tomb is found on p. 15G of his History of the Cathedral. 

Hexrt Chichele, who died on the 12th of April 144-3, erected 
for himself the only painted tomb that now remains in Canterbury 
Cathedral. It stands on the north side of the Presbytery, nearly 
opposite the modern throne of the Archbishop, which is in the 
Choir. Chichele founded All Souls' College at Oxford ; he built 
the south-west tower of this Cathedral, which is known as the 
Oxford Steeple ; and he erected the Lollards' Tower in Lambeth 
Palace. "When he had been Primate for about 18 or 19 years he 
began to arrange for the erection of this tomb. On the 2 1st of 
April 1432, the Prior and Chapter of Christ Church gave permission 
that he might build his tomb on the north side of the Choir,* and 
they undertook that his monument should never be disturbed. 
He caused two effigies of himself to be placed, one above the 
other, upon this tomb. The upper effigy represents him in all the 
glory of primatial state, with mitre, pallium, Primate's staff, and 
every ensign of dignity that a Primate can wear. Beneath this 
Chichele caused to be placed a figure of himself as an emaciated 
corpse, denuded of all the ensigns of rank and power. Upon the 

" Inter locum reliquiarum et introitum chori de ve^tibulo ad summum 
altare." Sheppard's Liferre Cantuarienses, iii.. 159. 

l 2 



21)2 lOMliS or ARCIIIHSHOPS KHUP, I'.OTI IMiHCIlIER, 

large columns at the head and fool of the tomb are oichea con- 
taining small Btatuea of the Twelve Apostles, and also allegorical 
figures representing Time and Labour, Death and Rest. Upon 
the upper part of the sides of the altar-tomb are the arms of several 
Dioceses in England and Wales. Chichele's own anus, as Arch- 
bishop, are seen upon the canopy above the tomb. The authorities 
of All Souls' College have always evinced a lively interest in their 
founder and his loud). In 1451-2, on February 17th, the Prior 
of Christ Church, Canterbury, in response to a grant of £7 per 
annum from the College, engaged that at St. Stephen's Altar 
(which stood nearest to Chichele's tomb) there should daily be said 
one low mass for the soul of Archbishop Chichele, and at the High 
Altar a solemn mass of Bequiem at his Anniversary.* Between 
A.n. 1G30 and 1640 the tomb was repainted at the expense of the 
College, which, during this nineteenth century, has again repaired it. 
Dart's engraving of this tomb, on p. 159 of his History of the Cathe- 
dral, is remarkably good ; that given by Battely in his edition of 
Somner's Antiquities of Canterbury, part ii., between pp. 31 and 35, 
is also good ; far better than others in his book, and supplies some 
minute details not given in Dart's engraving. 

John Kemp, a native of Olantigh in Wye, who was Arch- 
bishop of York and a Cardinal Bishop before he became Archbishop 
of Canterbury, died on the 22nd March 1453-4, and was buried 
on the south side of the Presbytery. His tomb bears no effigy, 
and its sides are simply panelled ; each square panel contains a 
quatrefoil, cusped within, and having an ornament outside the 
indentation of each large cusp. Over it is a very elaborate double 
canopy ; a flat rectangular upper canopy surmounting the three tall 
tower-like pinnacles of the tabernacle work. These are clearly seen 
in Dart's engraving on p. 160 of his History. 

Thomas Bouhghchier (whose name is now often contracted 
to " Bowcher" and on his tomb is spelt Bourchier, was in his life- 
time spelt " Bourghchier") died on the 30th of March 1486. He 
was buried in a tomb built by himself during his lifetime, on the 
north side of the Presbytery, next to the Altar of St. Elphege. It 
is formed of Purbeck marble, in which are carved over and over 
again the Bourghchier Knot (a family badge), the arms of the See 
with the same knot placed across them, and the rose en soleil badge 
of King Edward IV., whom this Primate crowned, and whom he 
afterwards married to Elizabeth Woodvile. In 1472 (14 years 
before his death) this Primate obtained King Edward's licence to 
* Litem Caiituarienses, iii., 212. 213. 



MORTON, AND WAR HAM. 293 

give Parafield Manor, in Essex, to the Prior and Convent of Christ 
Church in order that its proceeds might defray the expenses of 
" Bowchyr's Chauntry." In 1473, on September 2, Prior Sellyng 
engaged that " Bourghchier's-mas " should be said daily at St. 
Stephen's Altar (in the North-east Transept) by two priest monks 
alternately (each officiating for one week), and he also engaged that 
on the Anniversary of Bourghchier's death, 8s. 4d. should be 
annually distributed in the Cathedral among 100 poor persons, Id. 
to each, in memory of this Primate.* This Archbishop died at 
Knole. His body was carried first to Maidstone Church, and next 
day to Favershain Abbey, whence, on the following day, it was 
carried in state to Canterbury, and buried in the tomb he had made 
ready. In 1492 King Henry VII. declared that Archbishop 
Bourghchier had no right to grant Pamfield Manor to the Priory 
here. The King, however, permitted the Priory to retain it, but 
upon condition that the masses and the distribution, which had 
been offered and made for the deceased Archbishop, should hence- 
forth be offered and made for the King (Henry VII.) , for his 
mother (the Lady Margaret), and for others of his family. 
Bourghchier's tomb is engraved by Dart on p. 163 of his History. 

Cardinal John Morton during his lifetime erected in the 
Crypt upon its south side, near the Chapel of our Lady in the 
undercroft, a handsome canopied monument, with effigy of himself. 
His cardinal's hat, his rebus of " Mort " (a bird) and a "tun," 
and the portcullis of Henry VII. are carved frequently upon his 
monument. In 1499 the Prior and Convent granted promise of 
frequent services in the Cathedral for his prosperity in life, and 
for his soul after death. f A huge monumental brass, commemo- 
rative of Cardinal Morton, was laid down in the floor of the Crypt 
in front of the Altar of " Our Lady," and it still remains there 
stripped of its brass ; but Mr. Duncombe states that when this 
stone was lifted the space beneath it was empty, so that pi*obably 
the Cardinal was buried beneath his Chantry tomb, south of the 
Lady Chapel. Dart's engraving of Cardinal Morton's tomb is 
found at p. 164 of his History. 

William AVariiam died on the 3rd of August 1532, but in 
March 1507 his Suffragan, Dr. John Thornton, Prior of Dover, 
titular Bishop of Cirene, dedicated a new altar of stone, in the Mar- 
tyrdom. In April, on Easter Day, the Archbishop's Chantry services 
were commenced thereat. During the same year "Warham's tomb 

* LitercB Cantuarienses, iii., 2(33 — 267. 

t Christ Church Cant, Register S, as analysed by Dr. Sheppard. 



294 TOMBS OF ARCHBISHOPS WA.KHA.lfl AND POLK. 

was completed, and in August the new stone altar was placed 
within its " Oratory." Tn September* this altar in its new position 
was a second time dedicated by the same Bishop Suffragan. The 
Archbishop was there buried in 1532, twenty-five years after his 
tomb had been erected. This tomb is said to have been repaired 
and rearranged by the Dean and Chapter in 1796-7 at a cost of 
£160. Archbishop Warham's tomb is engraved in Dart's History 
at p. 167 ; and we can therein see how differently it was arranged 
before a.d. 1796. 

Cardinal Reginald Pole's tomb remains in great simplicity 
in the Corona, at the extreme east end of the Cathedral, on the 
north side. The figure of St. Christopher, and beneath him two 
distinct subjects, in the lowest of which were two angels bearing 
shields with the Cardinal's arms, one shewing the arms of the See, 
the other the Pole coat of eight quarterings, were formerly painted 
upon the north wall, above his tomb. All these paintings have 
disappeared, but the engraving in Dart's History, p. 170, shews 
them. 

Since the interment of Cardinal Pole no Archbishop has been 
buried at Canterbury. 

* Somuer's MSS., C. xi, Register of the Penitentiaries as analysed by Dr. 
Sheppard. 



( 295 ) 



THE OLD CHURCH OE ST. MARTIN, AT 

DOVER. 

BY CANON SCOTT ROBERTSON. 

The history of " Old St. Martin's," or the church of St. 
Martin-le-Grand in (but now behind) the Market Square, at 
Dover, is somewhat remarkable. It was at first a Collegiate 
Church. Iu a.d. 691, Wihtred, King of Kent, removed the 
College of Canons from Dover Castle into the town, where 
he built for them a church dedicated to St. Martin. This 
church was then accounted "a royal chapel/' and the canons 
were increased in number, so that there were twenty-two of 
them. These canons of St. Martin were so largely endowed, 
that in the Domesday Survey their lands occupy a separate 
and considerable place, under the heading " Terra Canoni- 
corum S. Martini de DovreT Their church, built for them 
originally by King Wihtred, in 691, could not well survive the 
great fire which devastated Dover about a.d. 1066-67. So 
terrible were the effects of this fire, upon the town of Dover, 
that the Domesday Survey makes specific mention thereof. 
It records that on King William's " first arrival in England 
the town itself was burnt, and therefore its value could not 
be computed, how much it was worth when the Bishop of 
Baieux received it." 

If the Saxon church was partially or entirely destroyed 
by fire, a handsome Norman church must have been erected 
circa a.d. 1070. Canon Puckle has proved that the site upon 
which it was built had been occupied by Roman baths. He 
found the actual floor of the Roman building, beneath part 
of the east end, and north aisle, of the choir of Old St. 
Martin's Church, and he traced Roman masonry in an ai^ch 
of the north transept, see Archceoloyia Cantiana, XX., p. 121. 
Fragments of the choir and transepts remain still behind the 
houses on the west side of the market-place. The nave with 



2 ( .X> THE OLD CHURCH or ST. MARTIN, AT DOVER. 

its aisles was pulled down soon after ad. 1 .">:>(>. Its pews 
were given by King Henry VIII. to tbe parish of St. Mary, 
for use in St. Mary's Church. The Bite of the nave was used 
as a churchyard for burials, and within it was interred the 
body of Charles Churchill, the poet, in the year 1764. 

The history of this Norman church between the years 
1070 and L536 was not of the ordinary type. Its privileges 
as a royal chapel were lost in a.d. 1130, when King Henry I. 
granted it to Archbishop Corboil and his Priory of Christ 
Church, at Canterbury. Archbishop Corboil and his successor, 
Theobald, turned out the canons of St. Martin-le- Grand 
on account of irregularities, and considering that the posi- 
tion of that church within the town was to some extent 
conducive to irregularities, a new priory and church were 
erected outside the walls of Dover, and filled with Bene- 
dictine monks. The new priory was endowed, by those 
Archbishops, with all the property of the old canons of 
St. Martin's. It obtained the name of St. Martin Newark 
(that is, " of the new work"), while the ancient church in the 
market-place was thenceforward known as Old St. Martin's,* 
or St. Martin's-le-Grand. 

This old church, from a.d. 1139 to a.d. 1536, had a 
parochial character of a very peculiar kind. It was, like 
many others, exempt from the jurisdiction of the Archdeacon 
of Canterbury, and subject only to the Archbishop himself. 
Archdeacon Richard de Ferringes endeavoured to exercise 
jurisdiction over Old St. Martin's, but the Mayor and 
Commonalty of Dover energetically disputed his claim, so 
that in 1284 Archbishop Peckham issued a commission of 
inquiry, whereat the matter was settled. 

The incumbent of St. Martin's-le-Grand was called the 
archpriest (archvpresbyter), like the incumbent of the parish 

* It was styled " the Old Church of St. Martin " seven hundred years ago, 
in a charter granted to the Priory of St. Martin Newark, by Archbishop 
Richard, circa A.D. 1180. This charter confirms to the Priory " veteran 
quoque ecclesiarn Beati Martini, cum parochiis, et libertatibus, et omnibus aliis, 
sive in terra sive in mari ad ipsam juste pertinentiis ; ecclesiarn etiam Sanctse 
Maria? ; ecclesiarn Sancti Petri ; ecclesiarn Sancti Jacobi ; quae in Burgo Dovorra 
sitae sunt et fundatae," etc. (Dr. Sheppard's Litercc Cantuarienses, iii., 373). 



THE OLD CHURCH OF ST. MARTIN, AT DOVER. 297 

of Ulcombe in Kent ; but the extant Registers of the Arch- 
bishops do not contain the record of any appointment to 
this office. Evidently the church of the Newark Priory 
of St. Martin assumed all the parochial rights, dues, and 
duties of the Old Church of St. Martin. An Indulgence 
mentions "fabricam parochialis ecclesie Sci. Martini Novi 
Operis" {Reg. S. Martini, 52 '»). 

The special peculiarity of Old St. Martin's Church in 
Dover was, that in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, it 
combined beneath its one roof the churches of three parishes. 
They were those of St. Martin, St. Nicholas, and St. John 
the Baptist. This peculiar arrangement continued even in 
the time of Leland. He visited Dover before the death of 
Henry VIII., and apparently before a.d. 1536. He says : 
" The towne is devided into vi paroches, wherof iii be under 
one rofe at S 1 Martines yn the hart of the town." The 
other three parishes were those of St. Mary, St. James, and 
St. Peter, which are named in the Charter granted, circa 
a.d. 1180, by Archbishop Richard, quoted in a note above. 

A cathedral has in some cases contained the church of 
one parish beneath its roof. At Rochester Cathedral, the 
parish of St. Nicholas was permitted to use part of the 
cathedral's nave as a parish church. The case of St. Faith 
under St. Paul's, in London, is well known. 

St. Martin-le- Grand, at Dover, is almost unique in its 
peculiarity of having combined, within itself, three separate 
churches of three distinct parishes. In Devonshire, the 
parish of Tiverton was divided into four portions, each 
having a rector, while there was but one church ; at Pontes- 
bury, in Salop, there are three similar "portions," as there 
were also, until recent times, at Bampton, Oxon., and at 
Waddesdon, Bucks. The arrangement at Dover was far 
more convenient than in those parishes. At St. Martin's-le- 
Grand, each of the three incumbents had a separate high 
altar, and a distinct area to occupy. 

As time went on, all mention of the archpriest of St. 
Martin's disappeared from the Archiepiscopal Registers. 
Perhaps his office fell practically into abeyance after the 
Primacy of Archbishop Courtenay. Thus, from 1384 to 



2 ( .)S THE OLD CHURCH OF ST. MARTIN, AT DOVER. 

L536, it may be that, practically, only two incumbents 
occupied the large building. They were the incumbent of the 
parish of St. Nicholas, and the incumbent of St. John the 
Baptist's parish. Each of these incumbents was admitted and 
instituted by the Archbishop to his office, and to the cure of 
souls in his parish, but every entry of such admission and 
institution states distinctly that the altar of St. Nicholas, 
and the altar of St. John the Baptist, stood within the Old 
Church of St. Martin. The absence of all mention of the 
archpriest of St. Martin's for 150 years shews that the new 
Priory's Church absorbed the rights and duties of Old 
St. Martin's. His office comes into notice in a.u. 1511, 
in a statement that its " wages " are too small to induce 
any " honest preest " to accept it. The laity in Dover 
still desired to maintain the fabric of the old church. 
Two years later, in 1513, John Claryngbold, of St. Mary's 
parish, bequeathed 3s. 4d. to the reparation of the " Church 
of St. Martyn of Dovor " ; and John Clercke of St. James's 
parish bequeathed 6s. 8d. to the same old church. 

Architecturally the Old Church of St. Martin was noble. 
A plan of its ruined east end was given, by Dr. Plumptre, 
to the Kent Archaeological Society, and will be found in 
Archceologia Cantiana, IV., opposite p. 27. 

The structure, cruciform in plan, was undoubtedly grand 
in its design and its proportions. The choir was apsidal ; 
it had two choir-aisles, vaulted with tufa ; from its eastern 
end projected three apsidal chapels. It possessed a triforium, 
above which was the clerestory. Its three eastern apsidal 
chapels were carried up into the triforium, so that upon 
their site stood two tiers of chapels, six in all. It had tran- 
septs north and south of the great central tower, and the 
discoveries made, in 1892, by Mr. Edward W. Fry, prove that 
these transepts had each a chapel projecting from its east 
end. 

When Archbishop Warham held his visitation in 1511, 
it was found " that the church and steeple of S l Martin are 
unrepaired ; the which doeth great hurt to the Churche of 
Seynt Nicholas." Also, that the church of St. Martin " is 



THE OLD CHURCH OF ST. MARTIN, AT DOVER. 290 

not served with more masses a day but the passage masse." 
Also, that " the wages of th'archpreest of Seynt Martyns in 
Dover is so small that noo honest preest will tary there, and 
so Divine service is not dewly kept." 

At the same visitation, the churchwardens of St. Nicholas's 
parish reported " that the church of Seynt Martynes doeth 
the parisshe churche of Seynt Nicholas great hurt in fawte 
of reparation of the said church of Seynt Martynys." Also, 
they complain " that the parson paieth a pension to the 
Prior of Dover xjs. a yere, and the benefice is but v marks a 
yere " (equivalent to £3 6s. 4d.). 

The report made, in 1511, by the churchwardens of the third 
parish (St. John the Baptist) shews that they had abandoned 
all idea of attempting to have Divine service in their portion 
of the grand old edifice. The churchwardens of St. John 
say " that they have no preest to serve the church, but at 
the parisshe fynding ; & the parish is in such debility that 
it sufficeth not for a rector's sustenance." They add also 
" that the parsonage [of S l John's parish] is decayed bicause 
there is noo parson and by reason of that is nyghe lost." 

The reader will gather, even from these visitation pre- 
sentments, that there had been a rector of St. Nicholas's 
parish and a rector of St. John the Baptist's parish. The 
records of the institutions of these clergymen are worded in 
the peculiar manner which we should expect, when we know 
that the high altar of St. Nicholas's Church and the high 
altar of St. John's Church were both beneath the roof of St. 
Martin's Church. 

As an example we will translate from the register of 
Archbishop Tslip (folio 253a) the record of collation of one 
such rector : " On the 7 th of the Kalends of April a.d. 1350, 
at Mortlake, the most reverend Father, the Lord Simon, by 
the grace of God archbishop of Canterbury, conferred on 
Eichard, called ' of Woodstock,' a chaplain, the Rectory of 
the Altar of S 4 Nicholas in the Church of S* Martin at Dovor, 
now vacant, and to his collation of full right belonging by 
reason of the vacancy of the office of Prior of Dovor, and did 
canonically institute him rector of the said altar," etc. In 



300 THE OLD CHURCH OF ST. MARTIN, AT DOVER. 

the register of Archbishop Arundel, Simon Passemer was 
described as "curator* of the altar or iilturmjiinn of 
S< Nicholas in the Old Church of S 1 Martin at Dovor." He 
exchanged that position with John Elewe, who, for it, gave 
up the vicarage of St. John's in Thanet, August 26, 1400. 
In the year 1445 John Lascyngham was instituted by Arch- 
bishop Stafford " to the rectory, or portion, of the altar of 
S* Nicholas in S' Martin's, Dovor." His successor John 
Skales resigned in 1447 the incumbency of St. Nicholas, 
which was given to a University graduate Master John Hunt 
(Stafford's Register, fol. 94 b ). Mr. Skales then accepted the 
incumbency of St. John the Baptist's altar with its cure of 
souls, which he retained until 1469. The entry in Arch- 
bishop Stafford's Register (folio 92 b ) employs these words : — 
" . . . . Dominum Johannem Skales, capellanum, ad altare 
Sancti Johannis Baptiste curatum, in ecclesia veteri Sancti 
Martini, Dovorr. Cant, dioc, per liberam resignationem 
Domini Johannis Goldsmyth, ultinii curati ibidem, vacans 
.... Idemque admissus institutus fuit Rector sive curatus 
in eodem, cum suis juribus et pertinentibus universis .... 
Curam animarum," etc., etc. 

In the Registers of the Mediaeval Archbishops of Canter- 
bury, every admission of a rector of St. Nicholas, Dover, 
or of a rector of St. John Baptist, Dover, is similarly 
worded. Not one such entry omits to mention the con- 
nection of these rectors with the Old Church of St. Martin. 

About one-eighth of a mile south-east of Old St. Martin's 
Church, there remained in Bench Street, until the end of the 
last century, a mediaeval house with a tower, connected with 
which was one of those vaulted basements, so common in 
mediaeval houses, but by modern observers generally called a 
crypt. This in the last century was dubbed " St. Nicholas 
Church," and is so mentioned by Hasted in his History. 
That this building was not the church of St. Nicholas, the 

* Every entry of admission, to these peculiar parochial altars, contains 
phrases which connect the cure of souls with the incumbency. In Archbishop 
Bourgchier's Register (folio 96 b ) it is fully stated that when Thomas Smale was 
instituted to the Rectory of the Altar of St. Nicholas in the Old Church of St. 
Martin, " the cure of souls of the parishioners was committed to him." 



THE OLD CIIUHCH OF ST. MARTIN, AT DOVER. 301 

presentments of the churchwardens of St. Nicholas's Parish 
clearly prove. They allege, in 1511, that the default in re- 
paration of St. Martin's Church does the Parish Church of 
St. Nicholas great hurt. This would have been impossible 
unless the walls of the two churches were contiguous, or 
common to both. In like manner, Hasted alludes to a 
building, which had stood in Biggin Street, as the church of 
St. John. The authentic records of the Archbishops, and 
the ocular testimony of Leland, prove that up to circa 1520 
the churches of St. Nicholas and St. John were so contiguous 
to the ancient church of St. Martin-le- Grand as to justify 
the assertion that they were all three under one roof. 

As three apsidal chapels, at the east end of the choir of 
Old St. Martin's Church, were surmounted by other three 
upon a higher level (that of the triforium), those beneath 
might well be distinguished as " sub volta." One of them 
seems to have been so. Probably the central, or eastern- 
most, chapel of the three was a Lady Chapel, containing the 
altar of St. Mary-sub- volta. At all events, an " altar of St. 
Mary-snb-volta," in the Old Church of St. Martin, was 
dedicated by three bishops of Scotland. Pope Innocent III. 
spoke of it as very poorly endowed. Pope Honorius III., in 
a.d. 1226, granted an indulgence, for one-fourth part of their 
crimes, and half their venial sins, truly confessed, to all pil- 
grims visiting it on the anniversaries of its dedication (Regis- 
tmm Set. Martini, Dovor, fol. 56 b , in Lambeth MS. No. 241). 

A century and a half later, in 1371, this chapel greatly 
needed repair, and Cardinal Langham, who had been Arch- 
bishop of Canterbury, and Pope Gregory XI., granted in- 
dulgences of 100 days to every benefactor to the repair of 
this altar (Ibid., 55 a , 56 a ). This needy chapel was sustained 
throughout the following century. In the year 1513, John 
Byngham, of the parish of St. John the Baptist, in Dover, 
made his will and desired to be buried within the church of 
St. John the Baptist, which (as we have seen) was beneath 
the same roof as Old St. Martin's. He bequeathed to the 
" Light of S l Hillary, before our Lady undercrofte 6 tapers, 
every of them weying three quarters of a pounde of wax, to 
be renewed yerely " during five years. 



302 THE OLD CHURCH OF ST. MARTIN, AT DOVER. 

Wills of old inhabitants of Dover prove that within the 
precinct or area assigned to St. Nicholas's Parish Church there 
was an altar dedicated to St. John of Byrlynglon. In 1519 
Thomas a Barrowe expressed his wish to be buried in St. 
Nicholas's Church, on the right hand of the altar of St. John 
of Byrlyngton. Probably the saint in question was St. 
John of Bridlington who was popular at the close of the 
fourteenth century ; his translation took place on the 8th of 
May 1404. This saint is not often heard of in Kent. 

In the Priory Register and in the Registers of the Arch- 
bishops, at Lambeth, I have examined records of the incum- 
bencies of the following 

Rectors, Curators, or Portionaries of the Altar of St. 

Nicholas in the Old Church of St. Martin, Dover. 
1302 Stephen de Polton, rector (Priory Reg. 51 b ). 

Tho s Clement (Wynchelse's Reg. 51 a ). 

John de Sutton (Reynolds' Reg. 18'») . 

Peter Scott {Ibid., 23 b ). 

Richard of Woodstock (Islip's Reg. 253 a ). 

Nic. Godaventure (Ibid., 269 b ), resigned 
1376. 

Simon Passemer (exchanged in 1400). 

John Flewe, vicar of St. John's, Thanet 
(Arundel's Reg.). 

Henry Bishop (exchanged in 1416). 
1416 Aug. 1 Tho s Radford, vicar of Brynsete (Chichele's 

Reg. 76 a ), exchanged in 1420. 
1420 Jan. 11 John Dalby, vicar of Codeham (Chichele's 
Reg. 105). 

Richard Blake (resigned in 1445). 
1445 Aug. 18 John Lascyngham (Stafford's Reg. 84 1 '). 

John Skales (resigned in 1447). 
1447 June 19 Master John Hunt (Stafford's Reg. 94 b ). 

Richard Blake (again) resigned in 1459. 
1459 Aug. 14 William Fuller (Bourgchier's Reg. 74). 

Roger Hoose (resigned in 1467). 
1467 May 13 Thomas Smale (Bourgchier's Reg. 96 h ). 

John Kydde, died in 1480. 



1308 






1316 


Dec. 




1318 


Aug. 




1350 


Mar. 


. . 


1355 


June 




1376 


Oct. 




1400 


Aug. 


26 



THE OLD CHURCH OF ST. MARTIN, AT DOVER. 303 

1480 July 3 Ric. Multon (a Canon) by dispensation 
(Bourgchier's Reg. 125 b ). 
Robert Smyth died in 1516. 
1516 June 19 John Gynor* (Warham's Reg. 360"). 

Rectors, Curators, or Portionaries of St. John Baptist's 
Altar, in the Old Church of St. Martin, Dover. 

1346 Andrew, rector (Priory Reg. 51 n ). 

1349 Mar. . . Hen. Fraunkeleyn (Islip's Reg. 252 a ). 

Thomas Cokyl, exchanged in 1375. 
1375 Oct. . . Thomas Wit (Sudbury's Reg. 115 1 '). 
Thomas Harry (exchanged in 1419). 
1419 Oct. 14 Milo Faunt, vicar of St. Nicholas, Thanet 

(Chichele 102 a ), died in 1426. 
1426-7 Mar. 6 John Goldsmythf (Chichele 167 b ) resigned 

in 1447. 
1447 April 15 John Stales (Stafford's Reg. 92 1 ') resigned 

in 1468. 
1468-9 Jan. 2 Stephen Willes (Bourgehier's Reg. 99*). 

The parish of St. Nicholas possessed some land in Dover 
during the fourteenth century. It seems always to have been 
better endowed than the similarly situated benefice of St. 
John the Baptist in this Old Church of St. Martin. At the 
Archbishop's visitation, in 1511, the procurations due to 
his Grace were from the church of St. Nicholas 2s. 6d., 
and from the church of St. John Is. 8d. In like manner 
the pension payable to the priory of St. Martin of the New 
Work from the parish and " altarage " of St. John was only 
6s. 8d. per annum j while the parish and " altarage " of St. 
Nicholas had to pay lis. per annum to that priory. J 

It seems that, although the western portion of Old St. 
Martin's Church was pulled down in 1536, or soon after, its 
altars were not removed until 1546. At that time the Cor- 
poration began to let the site of the church and churchyard 

* Written " Joyner" in a contemporary deed. 

t Styled " rector of St. John Baptist Parish " in a contemporary deed. 

\ Both parishes and churches had fallen into such decay, before 1536, that 
when the J'alor Ecclesiasticus was compiled, it was therein distinctly stated 
that the pensions due to St. Martin's Priory were no longer exacted because the 
churches of St. Nicholas and St. John Baptist were so impoverished and decayed. 



304 THE <>U) OHURCB OF 8T. MARTIN', AT DOVER. 

to tenants upon Leases, reserving, however, "a Bufficienl ami 
lawful way to approach the burying ground from the market- 
place." This way of approach to the burial-ground was 
kept open as lately as the time of G-eorge IV. 

The Corporation sold for Lio 2s. 6d. the Bilver-gill pyx 
and bells of St. Martin's Church, in September 1548. Their 
total weight was 52. $ ozs. 

In July 1875, our Kent Archaeological Society visited the 
site of Old St. Martin's Church, and saw relics of the north 
aisle of the choir (in the yard of Mr. Gregory's house), the 
groined roof of the western bay of that aisle (in Mr. Hum- 
phrey's yard), and the north-east pier of the tower and 
chancel-arch, with the triforium passage through that pier. 

Early in 1892, in Market Street, upon clearing away the 
floor and foundations of an old cottage, which stood on the 
south side of the street, two graves were found hewn out of 
the chalk. One grave was that of a priest, with whom had 
been interred a coffin-chalice, and a paten, of pewter. The 
date of these may be early in the thirteenth century, as Mr. 
Franks and Mr. De Gray Birch think. 

Close to this grave, on its north side, was part of the 
north wall of the north chancel of Old St. Martin's Church. 
Its Norman masonry was uncovered when the cottage was 
removed. Further south, parallel with the two graves, was 
seen part of a Norman turret staircase. It stood south-east 
of the north transept of the Old Church, adjacent to the 
north wall of the choir-aisle. No doubt the graves and 
the stair-turret were at the west end of a small chapel or 
chancel, which projected eastward from the north transept. 
These features of the ancient church could not be seen in 
1846, when the Rev. Dr. F. C. Plumptre, master of Uni- 
versity College, Oxford, made a plan of the ruins, which 
will be found fully described in vol. iv. of Archceologia 
Cantiana, pp. 23-26. In fact, Mr. Plumptre wrote thus : 
" So far as could be ascertained, there were not any r traces 
of projecting chapels in the transepts." 



( 305 ) 



GENERAL INDEX. 



"A. coinitissa Aug.," G8 (see Eu). 

a Barrowe, Thomas, 302. 

Abbend', 66. 

Abberton, Essex, 260. 

Abel, Myghell, smith, 241. 

Abergavenny, Lord, 272. 

Abezim, Petrus de, 69. 

Abingdon, 277, 278. 

Abraham, Margaret, 42 ; Reginald, 42. 

Acketts, Elizabeth, 31 ; John, 31. 

Acknorth, Constance, 27 ; John, 27 ; 

William, 27. 
Ack worth, Elizabeth, 36 ; William, 36. 
Aeon, Thomas, plumber, 244. 
a Court, James, 239. 
Acourt alias Gardner, John, 42 ; 

Matthew, 42. 
Adams, Elizabeth, 5; Henry, 7 ; John, 

13 ; Margaret, 7, 13. 
Adcocke, Elizabeth, 34 ; John, 34. 
Addams, Joane, 31 ; Richard, 31. 
Addington, 4, 6, 9, 140 (2), 146, 189, 

190 (2), 212, 276 ; Rector of, 189, 

191. 
Addison, Edward, 27 ; Joan, 27. 
Adesham, Henry, 189. 
Adgore, Bridget, 10 ; Francis, 10 ; 

Thomas, 10; William, 10 (2). 
Adisham, 65 (5), 161. 
Adsall, see Hadsall. 
Ady, Mrs., see Cartwright, Julia. 
Adys, William, 5. 
Africa, 90, 99. 
Ager, Mr., 241. 
Akhangre, 169. 
Alard', Geruasius, 178 (3) ; Agnes, 

his wife, 178 (3). 
Alberry, Joan, 45 ; Richard, 45. 
Albrooke, Jane, 13 ; Richard, 13. 
Albur} r , Surrey, 150. 
Alby, Petrus, 70. 
Aldebarough, William, 263. 
" Aldermannescherch," 67. 
Aldharu St. Clere. Ightham, manor of, 

219. 

VOL. XX. 



Aldham, Thomas de, 171 (4) ; Kathe- 

rine, his wife, 171 (2). 
Aldington, 43 (2), 68. 
Alfred the Great, King of England, 

123. 
Alhallowes, Langbourn, 76. 
Alkham, xl, 169, 236, 245. 
Alkham church, xl ; visit of Archaeo- 
logical Society to, xl. 
All Saints, Hoo, 15, 18, 44. 
All Saints, Thames Street, 8. 
Allchin, John, 191. 
Allen, Edward, 23; Henry, 32; 

Robert, grocer, Mayor of Faversham, 

209 (2) ; Thomas, 35 ; William, 31, 

38, 45. 
Allen alias Jacob alias Spencer, 

Elizabeth, 32. 
Alleyn. Richard, 22. 
Allhallows, Lombard St., 82. 
Allington, 3 ; Castle, 18. 
Allison, Elizabeth, 7; Robert 7. 
Almayn, John, 108 ; Stephen the, see 

Hashenperg, Steven von. 
Aloesbridge, Hundred of, 240. 
Amazon river, 99. 
Amboyna, 91. 
America, 82, 90, 92, 93. 
Amherst, Earl, 274. 
Amos, Anna, 42 ; Manasses, 42. 
Amsterdam, 91. 

Amyes, Thomas, 9 ; and see Cripps. 
Andlove, William, 42. 
Andover, 248 (2), 249 (2). 
Andrew, — , rector of St. John the 

Baptist's altar, St. Martin's, Dover, 

303 ; John, 38. 
Andrew alias Lashe, Alice, 1 ; Thomas, 

1. 
Andrewes, Joan. 37 ; Susan, 32. 
Andrewes alias Delver, Elizabeth, 21. 
Andrews, Elizabeth, 15 ; John, 14 ; 

Mary, 14. 
Anglia Sacra, Wharton's, 28i. 
Anne of Denmark, Queen, 60. 



306 



GENERAL INDEX. 



Annedey, Nioholas, 37. 
Anscliiiiis ( v"icar of Wrotham), 69. 
Ami iquarii s. Society of, 272. 
Antiquities, Buck's, -">1 ; Grose's, 251 

(2), 253. 
Apeldrefelde, Henry de, 170 (2); 

John tic, 17<> (3) ; Johanna, his w ilc, 

170 (2); Thomas de, 170 ; William 

de, 170. 
Aplebye, Anne, 8 ; Thomas, 8. 
Appledore, 34, U), L61. 
Appleton, , 22 1. 
Aprice, Jeffery, L91. 
Apsley, George, 21. 
Apuldre, *ee Appledore. 
Aram, John (of London), 4. 
Archaeologia Cantiana, references to, 

xxxvii -xlii, xliv, xlv, 203,209,210, 

229, 269, 281, 284, 287, 295, 298, 

304. 
Archbold, Edward, M.A., 192 (3). 
Archeboud, Mart n, 162 (3). 
Archer, Anthony, 250. 
Archur, Lucy, 17; Thomas, 17. 
Arden, — , 225. 
Arderne, Thomas, Mayor of Favers- 

ham, 208 (2) ; Alice, his wife, 208. 
Ardingley, Sussex, 80. 
Argol, Captain, 93. 
Armados, Philip, 82. 
Armestronge, John, 45. 
Arnold, Mr. A. A., xliv, 54, 56, 74, 75 ; 

George M., F.S.A., 71 ; his Life of 

Robert Pocock, xxxvii ; on the 

Ruined Chapel of St. Katherine at 

Shorne, Kent, 195-202. 
Arlington, Agnes, 30. 
Arundel, Earl of, 84. 
Ash, 5, 37 (2), 40, 41, 48, 68 (2), 116 (2). 
Ash by Wrotham, 11, 28. 
Ashdowne, Joan (Johan), 7, 10 ; John, 

7, 10 (2) ; Matthew, 10, 38 ; Robert, 

38 ; and see Jesopp. 
Ashe, Ed., 270. 
Ashenden, Nicholas, 13. 
Ashert, 29. 
Ashford, 2, 9, 24, 32, 47, 70 (4), 80 (4), 

81, 112, 193, 241, 245. 
Ashford Church, 99 ; Liberty of, 240. 
Ashley, Dorothy, 21 ; Ferdinand, 21. 
Aslnnore, Elizabeth, see Warwick. 
Ashton, George, 36 ; and see Bish. 
Ashurst, 14, 20, 27, 33, 3G, 39. 
Asia, 90. 

Askelby, Thomas de, 177 (2). 
Asplan, Humphry, 9 ; Lidia, 9. 
Assheton, John, 189. 
Assholt Wood (Hundr. of Folkestone), 

239. 
Astley, Dame Catherine, 45 ; Dr., 



xxxvii, x.wix, xhi (2) ; ThomaSi 

86. 
Aston, Catherine, 20 : William, 7. 
A St n sate, Richard, 1 7 ; and tee Baylie. 
A Streete, se< Streete and Baker. 
Athie, Edward, K) 
Athol, Countess of, 283. 
Atkins, Elizabethi 3 1 ; Humphry, 

32 (2). 
Atkinson, Thomas, '.VI. 
Atnockc, see Couchman. 
Atnoke, Margaret, 32, 41; William, 

32. 
Atnooke, Margaret, 26; Richard, 26. 
Attwell, Anne, 38 ; John, 38. 
atte Baynore, William, lsi (2). 
atte Berne, Johanna, 163 (2), 167 (3) ; 

Stephen, 163 (1), 167 (2). 
atte Bregge, Walter, 162 (2), 163. 
atte Brok, John, 186. 
atte Castel, Isabella, 164 (4) ; John, 

164 (3). 
atte Coulcse, Juliana, 165 (3) ; 

Nicholas, 165 (2). 
atte Dene, William, 188. 
atte Gate, Thomas, 181 (3); Cecilia, 

his wife, 181 (2). 
atte Gayole, Alice, 167; Henry, 167 

(2) ; Robert, 167 (2). 

atte Holdene, Richard, 176 (4) ; 

Matilda, his wife, 176 (3). 
atte House, William, 171 (3) ; Celes- 

tria, bis wife, 171 (4). 
atte Med', Edmund, 184 (2) ; Gerarda, 

his wife, 184 (3). 
atte Melle, Alice, 163 (3) ; Nicholas, 

161; Richard, 161; Roger, 163 (4). 
atte Melne, Godefridus, 161 (4) ; Isa- 
bella, 161 (3) ; Ralph, 161 (4). 
atte Mersshe, John, 173 (2). 
atte Nelme, Alice, 169 (2), 170; John, 

169 (2). 
atte Newehouse, Thomas, 163 (2), 180 

(3). 
atte Noke, Adam, 165 (2). 
atte Ware, Anselmus, 171 ; Matilda, 

171 (3); William, 171 (2). 
atte Watere, John, 168 (2), 175 (2), 

176 (2). 
atte Welde, John, 1S5 (2). 
atte Wode, Alice, 183 (3); Johanna, 

185 (3) ; John, 184 (4) ; Juliana, 184 

(3) ; Martin, 184 (3) ; Paul, 185 (2) ; 
William, 183 (3). 

atte Woghelete, Simon, 170 (2). 

at Tonge, Seman, Mayor of Faversham, 

219. 
Atwode, James, 217. 
Atwood, Anthony, 12 ; and see Mor- 

lande. 



GENERAL INDEX. 



307 



Aucher, Agnes, 1G1 (2) ; Henry, 161, 

162 ; Isabella, 161 (2), 162 (2) ;• 

Nicholas, 161. 
Audele, Hugh de, 175. 
Audenard, Egidius de, 69. 
Audinton, 66. 

Audley, Elizabeth, 81 ; Henry, 81. 
Augmentations, Treasurer of, 208. 
Austen, Edward, 29; Elizabeth, 26, 

29 ; Francis, 24 ; Jane, 48 ; Jeffrey, 

26; Joan, 29; John, 29, 35 (2); 

Margaret, 13 ; Margery, 24 ; Peter, 

29 ; Thomas, 29. 
Austen alias Thomas, Elizabeth, 29. 
Austria, Archdukes of, 86 (2). 
Avcrell, Dorothy, 11; Thomas, 11. 
Awger, Henry, 8 ; Temperance, 8. 
Ayler, George, 45. 
Aylesford, 7, 17 (2), 32, 140, 143. 
Aylisford, see Aylesford. 
Ayloffe, John, Esq., 78; Isabel, his 

da., 78. 
Aynscombe, Mary, 14; William, 14. 
Aynsford, see Eynsford. 
Ayres, John, carpenter, 113. 

Babchilde, see Bapchild. 

Bachelor, Arthur, 12; Daniel, 11; 
William, 11. 

Bacon, Margaret, 29 ; Sir N., 57 ; 
Thomas, Salter, 241. 

Bagley, Elizabeth, 24 ; Nicholas, 24. 

Baily, John, 38 ; Thomas, 38. 

Baines, Alice, 1. 

Baiocis, Hen. de, 65 (2). 

Bakechilde, see Bapchild. 

Baker, Anne, 11, 45 ; Catharine, 77 ; 
Charles, B.A., 116 (4); Edward, 
38 ; Elizabeth, 35 ; George, 22 ; Sir 
Henry, 77 ; Herbert, 71, 73 ; Jane, 
36; John, 11, 22, 45; John Lewis, 
22; Rev. John, 269; Katharine, 
102 ; Lotty, 102 ; Margaret, 42 ; 
Margaret Lewis (Lodowick), 22 ; 
M r.,'" 224, 225 ; Richard, 3 (2), 42, 
47 ; Robert, M.A., 269 (2) ; Row- 
land, 34 ; Thomas, 22, 35 (2), 45 (2) ; 
William, 273; William, Mayor of 
Folkestone, 246, 248 ; and see Cub- 
berly. 

Baker alias A Streete, Mary, 18. 

Baker alias Burton, Grace, 42. 

Baker alias Heath, Joan, 3 ; Henry, 
3. 

Bakere, John le, 164 (3), 165; Saer, 
180 (4) ; Agatha, his wife, 180 (2). 

Baldwin, William, 36. 

Baldwyn, Barbara, 6; Bridget, 6: 
Elizabeth, 6; Henry, 34; Milon, 
6 ; Ralph, 6 ; Thomas, 6. 



Ball, Eleanor, 12; John, 12; Richard, 
98. 

Bampton, O.xon, 297. 

Bancroft, Richard, 21. 

Banes, Robert, Mayor of Faversham, 

209, 210. 
Banister, Dorothy, 23 ; John, 23 ; 

Thomas, 23. 
Banister alias Budgeon, Ann, 23. 
Bankyn, Edward, 25 ; Joan, 23, 25 ; 

John, 23. 
Bapchild, 20, 178, 181 (2), 212. 
Barber, Jasper, 40. 
Barbour, Alice, 167 (2) ; John le, 

172 (2) ; Roger, 167. 
Bard', Custaucia, 172 (2) ; Peter, 

172 (3). 
Bargrave, Angela, 112 ; Jane, 15 ; 

John, 15, 94 ; Robert, 15, 112. 
Barham, 208 ; Downs, 133. 
Barham, John, 23; William, 14; 

and see Hart. 
Baristow (Bairstow), Ann, 193, 215; 

Paul, 193; Rev. Paul, 193, 216 (2). 
Barker, Elizabeth, 17 ; Francis, 17 ; 

Jane, 8 ; William, 8. 
Barkett, Elizabeth, 34; John, 34. 
Barking, All Hallows, 276. 
Barlow, Arthur, 82. 
Barlv, Richard, 42. 
Banning, 20, 144. 
Barnacle, Anne, 38 ; Thomas, 38. 
Barnard, Rt. Hon. Elizabeth, Dow- 
ager Lady, 193 ; William, 38. 
Barne, Dame Anne, 20 ; Robert, 20. 
Barnes, Jane, 26; Phillip, 26; Robert, 

20 ; Thomas, 20. 
Barnesley, Dorothy, 16 ; Frances, 23 ; 

John, 16. 
Barnham, Sir Martin, 45. 
Barnston, Essex, 193. 
Baronagium (Seager's), 54, 55. 
Baroun, Richard, 176 (2). 
Barrey, Richard, Esq., 208. 
Barrow, Maurice, Esq., 78. 
Barrowe, Robert, 4 ; Susan, 4. 
Barry, John, 179. 
Barston, — , 226. 

Bartholomew, Joan, 14; Thomas, 14. 
Bartlett, William, 37. 
Bartlett alms Holmeden, Catherine, 37. 
Barton, — , 227. 
Barton Farm, 134. 
Barttou, " Master," 269. 
Barusse, James, 56. 
Basden, John, 9 ; Walter, 9. 
Basingstoke, 131, 248 (2), 249 (2). 
Bates, Abigail, 36; John, 36. 
Bath, Bp. of, see Fitzjoceline, Regi- 
nald ; Marquis of, 79. 

X 2 



;;<is 



(ill MORAL INDEX. 



Batherst, Elizabeth, 23; Riohard, 23. 
Bathurst, Elizabeth, 8; Robert, 8. 
Batt, Jane, 12; Riohard, 17, 38, 42. 
Battell, see Edwards. 
Baud, le, Johanna, 169 (3) ; John, 

L69 (2) ; William, L69 (2). 
Baydon, \\ ilts, 7s. 
Bayeux, Bishop of, 295. 
Bayford, 54 (3). 
Baylie, Anne, 23 ; John, 23. 
Baylie alias A Streate, Sara, 17. 
Bayls Wood, 238. 
Bayly, John, 11, L6, 38; Mary, 11 ; 

Richard, 11 ; Thomas, 38. 
Bayly alias BLodierne, I'riscilla, 16. 
Baynes, John, lit; Mary, 19. 
Beach alias Beare, Elizabeth, 3. 
Beache, Richard, 14; William, 3; 

and .see Downishe. 
Beadon, Richard, Bp. of Gloucester, 

116. 
Beale, Ambrose, 26 ; Catherine, 21, 26 ; 

John, 12; Margaret, 27; Richard, 27. 
Beamont, Robert, 8 ; Thomas, 8. 
Beard, Richard, 3G. 
Beare, *ee Beach. 
Beaufort, Admiral Sir Francis, K.C.B., 

81 ; Emily Ann, 81. 
Beaulowe, Henry, 163 (2) ; Johanna, 

163 (3). 
Beauxfeild alias Whitfeild, 113, 114. 
Beche, de la (or aite), Robert, 261 (2). 
Beckenham, 2, 5, 7 (2), 16, 19,24, 27, 

34, 35, 45. 
Beckingham, see Beckenham. 
Becknnm, see Beckenham. 
Bedford, John, Duke of, 219; Earl of, 

84. 
Bedinton, Petrus de, 67. 
Bedle (Bedell), Robt., 158 (2), 159, 

160 (2). 
Beecher, Audry, 20 ; Edmund, 16, 

42 ; Henry, 7, 20 ; Jane, 29 ; Jer- 

vase, 29 ; Jonn, 7, 16, 42 ; William, 89. 
Beeching, Mary, 18 ; Richard, 5 ; 

Thomas, 5, 18. 
Been, Letardus de, 175 (2) ; John, 

his son, 175 (2). 
Belcher, William, 42. 
Belcher alias Hanbury, Racbael, 42. 
Beliald, Clara, 41 ; John, 41 ; Thomas, 41. 
Belke, John, 25 ; William, 25. 
Bell, Elizabeth, 10; Thomas, 10; and 

see Bowden. 
Belomie, Thos., 157, 158. 
Bemonde, William, 190. 
Bence, Joan, 5 ; John, 5. 
Benenden, 5, 9, 21, 48, 68. 
Benere, Walter le, 170 (3) ; Johanna, 

his wife, 170 (3). 



Benet, Agnes, 13 ; Edward, 13 ; 

Nicholas, L3 ; Thomas, 13. 
Bennett, Edmund, 29; Elia, 12; 

Robert, I- ; Thomas, 29 ; Xp'ofer, 

87. 
Beowulf, Anglo- Saxon I'm ins of, 

Richard < looke, Esq., xlii. 
Bere, Edward, is. 
Bereblock, James, 15. 
Berechurch, Essex, si . 
Bereford', John de, 182 (2) ; Alioe, 

his wife, 182 (3). 
Berham, John de, 105. 
Berhekre, Richard, 186 (4). 
Berisford, Elizabeth, 22. 
BerkeF, Ernald de, 67 (2) ; Nidi's, 67. 
Berkeley, sir T , 77. 
Ben idsey, 262-266 ; Priory of St. 

Saviour's, 195; Monks of, 111"). 
Bermudas, 92 (4), 93, 95; Company, 

95, 102 ; Treasurer and Consuls of, 

102. 
Berners, John de, 175 (3) ; Lora, his 

wife, 175 (3). 
Berney, Elea or Eleanor, 5. 
Berre, John, 157. 
Berrv, John, 38 ; Robert, 11; Thomas, 

14; William. 14. 
Bertelot', Isabella, 181 (3) ; John, 181 ; 

John, his son, 181 (4). 
Besant, George, 45. 
Besbeech, Daniel, 42; John, 38; 

Richard, 38, 42. 
Besile, William, 184 (2). 
Best, Alan, 6 ; Daniane, 5 ; Francis, 6 ; 

George, 5 ; John, 17. 
Beswiok, Arthur, 21 ; Sir Thomas, 90 ; 

William, 21. 
Bettenham, Henry de, 177 (3) ; 

Dionisia, his wife, 177 (3) ; John de, 

178 (4) ; Lucia, 178 (4) ; Peter, 5 ; 

Samuel, 5. 
Betterton, Alexander, 42 ; Mary, 42. 
Betteshanger, 109, 111 (4), 112 (3), 

192 (2). 
Bettliscumbe, Robert le, 170 (2) ; 

Cristina, bis wife, 176 (3). 
Betts, Ellen, 17, 32; Francis, 17; 

Jane, 17 ; John, 7, 32 ; William, 17, 

32. 
Bety, Walter, 181 (4). 
Beverley. Elizabeth, 3 ; John, 3. 
Beverley, Provost of, see Fitz-Robert. 
Bewlv, Elizabeth, 30 (2) ; James, 

3(5 '(2). 
Bewsborough, Hundred of, 238. 
Bexlev, 2, 5,8, 9, 10, 11, 16, 17, 23, 

24(2), 28, 47. 
Bexlie, see Bexley. 
Bexlie, Gabriel, 3. 



GENERAL INDEX. 



309 



Bickerstaffe, Sir Charles, Bart,, 272 ; 

Prances, 272. 
Bickley, Mr., of MSS. Dept., Brit. 

Mus., 247. 
Bicknor, 66, 144. 
Bidborousch, 76, 77 (3), 78 (3), 97 (2), 

98, 100, 101, 102. 
Biddenden, 18, 20, 48, 58. 
Biddenden, John, 35 ; Thomas, 35. 
Biddenham, Bedford, 79 (2). 
Big, Mary, 20, 30. 
Bigge, John, 20; Smalhope, 8. 
Bikenor, see Bicknor. 
Billiard, Daniel, 32 ; and see Hart. 
Billingbere, Berks, 77 (2). 
Billinge, Joseph, 15. 
Billingsley, Edward, 23 ; Letitia, 112 ; 

Lettice, 112; Nicholas, 112, 113; 

Nicholas, M.A., 112 (3), 113. 
Billio, Elizabeth, 24; John, 24. 
Bilsington, 161. 
Bilsynton, see Bilsington 
Bineden, see Benenden. 
Binge, Henry, 32; Eobert, 32; 

Sarah, 9. 
Bingham, see "Wilkinson. 
Birch, Mr. de Gray, 304. 
Birchett, John, 38 ; Joseph, 38. 
Bircholt, Barony, 236 ; Franchise, 235 ; 

Hundred of, 240. 
Burling, 8, 9, 15, 21, 46 (2), 272. 
Birmingeham, John de, 65 (3). 
Bise, Hester, 21 ; Thomas, 21. 
Bish alias Ashton, Dorothy, 36. 
Bishop, Anna, 18; Henry, 302; Mar- 
garet, 15; Robert, 15 ; William, 18. 
Bishopp, John, 17, 31 ; Love, 31 ; 

Magdalen, 17- 
Bisshopp, John, 44. 
Bisshopp alias Jordan, Mary, 44. 
Bishopric of London, Custos of, see 

Bissopeston. 
Bishopsbourne, 66. 
Bissopesburn, see Bishopsbourne. 
Bissopeston, Henr. de, 66 (4). 
Bix, de, John, 166 ; Mabilla, 166. 
Bixle, 65. 

Black Prince, the, tomb of, in Canter- 
bury Cathedral, 281, 290, 291. 
Blackall, Thomas O., B.A., 274 (3). 
Black bourne, 238. 
Blackhealh, 134. 
Blackmanstone, 31. 
Blackwell, William, 1. 
Blakchorle, John, 265. 
Blake, Andrew, 38 ; Isaac, 38 ; Joan, 

35 ; John ; 38 ; Richard, 302 (2) ; 

William, ;-io. 
Blancke, Bernard, 8 ; Margaret, 8. 
Bland, Elizabeth, 45 ; Oliver, 4">. 



Blande, Christopher, 7; Mary, 11: 
Thomas, 7. 

Blatcher, Johau, 2<'>7 ; John, 22 ; 
Thomas, 22. 

Blatherwiek, Northampton, 78, 103. 

Blechenden, Ann, 29 ; Thomas, 29. 

Blechyngleye, 174. 

Blendon, Roger, 264. 

Blessyngton (Bilsington), 238. 

Biincoe, Mary, 19 ; Richard, 42 ; 
Stephen, 42. 

Blogg, Rev. E. Babington, xxxix. 

Bloome, Catherine, 9 ; George, 31 ; 
Sara, 31 ; Thomas, 9. 

Blount, Charles, Earl of Newport, 77 ; 
Sir Christopher, 83; John, 77; 
Sarah, 77, 82, 83 ; AVilliam, 77, 82, 
83, 99 ; "William, of Mauggareffield, 
77. 

Blower, see Darcy and Dixon. 

Bloxam, Principles of Gothic Ecclesi~ 
astical Architecture, 144. 

Blundell, Dorothy, 31. 

Bobbing, 4, 10, 47. 

Bobby nge next Middelton', 186. 

Bocland, Gaufr' de, 65. 

Bocton, see Boughton. 

Bocton Mallard, 29. 

Boddenden Wood, 238. 

Bodley, Mr., 145. 

Bodyam, Martha, 7 ; Richard, 7 (2) ; 
Stephen, 7 (2). 

Bogherst, John, 38 ; Parnell, 38. 

Bois, Mr., of Denton, 236. 

Bokeland', James de, 182 (2). 

Bokerly Dyke and. Wansdyke, Exca- 
vations in, bv Lieut-General Pitt- 
Rivers, F.R S., xlii. 

Bokton, see Boughton. 

Bolderyn, Anne, 21 ; Francis, 21. 

Boleserhe, John, 185 (2) ; Isabella, his 
wife, 185 (3). 

Boll, John, 238. 

Bolny, see Cotton. 

Bolun, John, 190. 

" Bona Esperanza," see Cape of Good 
Hope. 

Bonde, Richard, 190. 

Bouisvill, Reymundus de, 69. 

Bonner, Henrv, 34. 

" Bonnings Hothes," 237. 

Booker, Elizabeth, 15; Mary, 15. 

Booker alias Darling, Margaret, 15. 

Boote, John, 10 ; Thomas, 10. 

Booth, Wm., 218. 

Borden, 30, 46, 153, 175, 177 (5), 
186. 

Bordeneshalle, John de, 177 ( 1) ; 
Katherine, his wife, 177 (2) ; Philip 
de, 177 ; Idonia, his wife, 177 (2). 



310 



GENERAL INDEX. 



Borewaremershe, 1G3 (2); "next 

Romene," L80. 
Borkett, Thomas, 35. 

Bome, Edward, 12; Faint nut , 12; 
Henry, L2; James, 12(2); Robert, 
12; Thomas, 12 ; William, 12. 

Bosegate, Johnde, 180 (2). 

Bostocke, Elizabeth, 25 ; William, 25. 
Bosvile, Anna, .31 ; Sir Henry, 19, 27 ; 

Dame Isabella, 27, 38 ; Sir Leonard, 

25, 31 ; Dame Margaret, 81 ; 

Rachel, 19 ; Sir Ralph, 25 ; Thomas, 

27; Sir Thomas, Kt., 3f>, 38; Sir 

William, 81. 
Boswell, see Bosvile. 
Bosworth, Dorothy, 29, 32. 
Botcler, Alice, 79; Miss C, 118 

Catherine, 79; Margaret, 79 

Oliver, 79 ; Richard, 79; Thomas, 79 

Ursula, 79 (2) ; William, 79 ; Sir 

William (Lord Mayor), 79. 
Botelers of Teston, 79. 
Botiller, Peter le, 174 (2) ; Robert, 

174 (2) ; Margeria, his wife, 174, 

175. 
Bottin, Johanna, 45. 
Bottinge, John, 24 ; Thomas, 13. 
Boues, Thorn, de, 66 (2). 
Boughton, 2, 34, 45, 65, 66, 68. 
Boughton Aluph, 4, 8, 169. 
Boughton Aylofe, see Bougbtou 

Aluph. 
Boughton-under-Blean, 20, 26, 31,40, 

41, 42 (2), 170, 208. 
Boughton -Malherb, 167. 
Boughton Monchelsea, 4, 8, 182. 
Boughton, Anne, 8 ; Richard, 8. 
Boughton alias Finch, Elizabeth, 32. 
Boughtone Monchensy, see Boughton- 

Moncbelsea. 
Bouhton, see Boughton. 
Bounde, Roger, 184 (2) ; Beatrix, his 

wife, 184 (3) ; Susan, 26. 
Bourchier, Sr. Thomas, Knt., 54. 
Bourne, Dorothy, 13 ; Henry, 36 ; 

Johanna de, 103 (3) ; John, 32 (2) ; 

Mary, 32 ; Richard de, 163 ; 

Stephen, 13 ; Thomas, 45 ; Thomas 

de, 186 (3) ; Thomazine, 45. 
Bovvater, Humfry, 39 ; Thomas, 39. 
Bowden, Robert, 29. 
Bowden alias Bell, Mary, 29. 
Bowrcher, Dame Frances, 8. 
Bowrey, John, 13; Simon, 13. 
Bowsfell, Bartholomew, 191 (3) ; 

Henry, 191 (2) ; Thomas, 191. 
Bowsfielde, Thomas, 191. 
Boyce, Thomas, 37. 
Boyce alias Gaell, Anne, 37. 
Boycott, Elizabeth, 26; Richard, 26. 



Boyd, Miss, \liii ; Mr. Wm., 198. 
Boys, Edward, 8; Elizabeth, 5; George, 
5 ; John, Esq . 1 i I ; John, M \ . 

1 II (2). 1 12 (2) ; Mar-ant, 17 ; 

Richard, 17; Robert, 5; Thomas, 8, 

111; W.,93; Will., 110, 111. 
Boyse, Mary, 1 12. 
Box, Anne, 2 ; Elizabeth, 2 ; Godfrey, 

2 ; Sara, 2. 

Boxle, see Boxley. 

Boxley,6, 7,8, L8, 29, 36, 10, 168, 172. 
Boxley Parish, by Rev. J. Cave- 
Browne, xlii. 

Brabourne, " Bishop of Canterbury's 
wood " in, 238 ; Pound, 238. 

Brace, Ellen, 14; Richard, 14. 

Bradborne, 25, 31, 163, 168. 

Bradborne, John, 208 (2), 209; Mar- 
garet, his wife, 208 (2), 209 ; Nicho- 
las, 209. 

Bradegare, see Bredgar. 

Bradel, Waltorus de, 67. 

Bradewey, John de, 188. 

Bradford-on-Avon, 150. 

Bradley, Sarah, 34 ; Thomas, 34. 

Bradly, Mrs., 223, 224, 226, 227. 

Bradock, Elizabeth, 3 ; Thomas, 3. 

Bradshawe, Nicholas, 29 ; William, 29. 

Braggs, — , 90. 

Brampton, William de, 172 ; William, 
his son, 172 (3). 

Branche, William, 20. 

Brasnell, Margery, G ; Thomas, 6. 

Brasted, 2, 9, 13, 18, 22, 25, 28, 35. 

Bray, Mrs. Jane, widow, 114 ; Thomas, 
36 (2). 

Braysteede, see Brasted. 

Bread, Sussex, 30. 

Bredengstone Hill, 135. 

Bredgar, 25, 153, 173 (4). 

Bremanangyr, William, 106. 

Brenchley,^, 4, 10, 13, 18, 20, 30, 35, 
36, 190. 

Brenle, de, Cristina, 170 (5) ; Gilbert, 
170 (5). 

Brent, Algernon, Esq., xlii (2) ; Eliza- 
beth, 19 ; Thomas, 7 ; William, 19. 

Brenzet, 40. 

Brett, Edward, 45 ; Giles, 45 ; Mary, 
43 ; Thomas, 17 ; Thomas, LL.B., 
192. 

Bretun, Rand's le, 66. 

Brewer, Frances, 8, 13 ; John, 13 ; 
Richard, 39, 42 ; Robert, 6, 8, 158 ; 
Thomas, 6, 8, 42 (2) ; William, 23. 

Brewer alias Read, Mary, 41. 

Brice, see Cranevvell. 

Brickes, William, 34. 

Bridewell, 102. 

Bridge, Hundred of, 236. 



GENERAL INDEX. 



311 



Bridges, John, 45. 

Bridscll, John, 36. 

Briggeford', John do, 181 (3); Alice, 

his wife, L81 (3) j Thomas, 181 (2). 
Bright, John, 29. 
Bringest, Rich., 217. 
Brinton, Norfolk, 77. 
Brisenden, Joyce, 22 ; William, 22. 
Brissenden, Elizabeth, 45 ; Nicholas, 

45. 
Bristoe, Robert, 42. 
Britain, military occupation of, 135. 
British Museum, xliii ; Library, 88; 

Kentish Collection in, 232 ; Cole's 

MSS., 202; Harleian MSS., 228; 

Illustrations of Kent, Add. MSS., 

251. 
British Archaeological Association, 

xxxix. 
Brito or le Bretun, Ralph, 66 (4). 
Britt, Anne, 11 ; Joan, 18 ; John, 11 ; 

Thomas, 18. 
Brizes, see Bryzes. 
Broaker, Robert, 76. 
Brock, E. T. Loftus, Esq., F.S.A., 

xxxix (2), xl (3), xlii ; on Whitfield 

Church, xl. 
" Brock Hill," 238. 
Brockall, John, 34. 
Brocke, Edward, 16. 
Brograve, John, 24 ; Margaret, 24. 
Brokes, Robert, 190. 
Brokton', Adam de, 186 ; Matilda, his 

wife, 186 (3). 
Bromfelde, Richard de, 170 (4) ; 

Johanna, his wife, 170 (3). 
Bromfield alias Leedes, Anne, 22. 
Bromidge, Dorothy, 17 ; Thomas, 17. 
Bromley, xxxvii, 8, 10, 11 (2), 12, 16, 

23, 24, 25, 32 (2), 35, 78, 192; 

Green, 245. 
Bronston', Stephen de, 183 (2). 
Brook Place, manor of, 103 (2). 
Brooke, Agnes, 11 (2); Alice, 22; 

Ellen, 11; Francis, 45; James, 11 

(4) ; John, 11 (3) ; Mary, 11 (2) ; 

Robert, 3, 22, 46; Sarah, 45; 

Thamar, 46; Thomas, 11 (2) ; Wil- 
liam, 3. 
Brooke Place alias Sutton Place, 99. 
Brooke, 27. 

Brooker, Alexander, 14; and see Levet. 
Brooker alias French, Anne, 25. 
Brooker alias Wallis, Mary, 41. 
Brookland, 178. 
Brooks, John, 42; Richard, 36; 

Robert, 36 ; Thomas, 42. 
Broun, Robert, 170 (2). 
Brounker, Thomas, 76 ; Joan, his da., 

76. 



Brounyng, Bartholomew, 168 (2) ; 

John, 175 (2); Sabina, his wife, 

175 (3); Richard, 183 (4); Alice, 

his wife, 183 (2). 
Browell, William, 95. 
Brown or Browne, — , 225; Anna, 45; 

Anne, 45; Benedicte, see Spriver; 

Dr., 58 ; Edward, 11 ; Elizabeth, 1 1 ; 

Ellen, 35 ; G. T., 275 ; James, 2 ; 

John, 8, 11 (2), 16 (2) ; John, 

" vyttlar," 245 ; Marian, 16; Mary, 

see Clarke; Mr. Nicholas, 81; 

Robert, 38; Simon, 8, 11 (3); 

Thomas, 2, 35 ; William, 16. 
Browne alias Rundell, Elizabeth, 16. 
Brownrige, Thomas, 5 ; and see 

Ray ton. 
Broxbourne, 55. 
Brundisseh, Robert de, 214. 
Brunswick, the, 222. 
Bruton, Margaret, 11; William, 11. 
Bryan, Judith, 12, 24; Terrell, 12. 
Bryene, Sir William de, 262. 
Brymsted, Edward, 9 ; Izan, 9. 
Brynchesley, 185. 
Brynsete, 302. 

Bryzes, Elizabeth, 2 ; John, 2. 
Buck, Margaret, 45 ; Maximilian, 

B.A., 271 (5), 273; Peter, 45; 

Rebecca, 271 (3). 
Buck's Antiquities, picture of Sandgate 

castle, 251-254. 
Buckhurst, Lord, 83. 
Buckingham, Catherine, Dowager 

Duchess of, 193 ; George, Duke of, 

Warden of the Cinque Ports, 92, 94 ; 

Marquis of, 94. 
Buckland, 138, 245 ; Church, 138. 
Bucklaud, Berks, 25. 
Buckler, Mr. John Chessell, 119, 122. 
Buckley, Isabella, 27 ; Richard, M.A., 

269 ; Thomas, 27. 
Budgen, Thomas, 39. 
Budgen, see Banister. 
Bugler, Mr., xxxix (2) ; Mrs., xxxix. 
Bukley, Alexander, 190. 
Bukston', Andrew de, 186 (3). 
Bukyngham, Will, de, 106. 
Bulcher alias Grove, Anne, 10. 
Bulford, Patrick, 22. 
Bulkelie, Richard, 4; Catherine, 4. 
Bull, Christopher, 31 ; Grace, 42 ; 

Thomas, 42 ; Thomas, S.T.B., 191. 
Bullock, Thomas, 16 ; and see AValter. 
Bully Hill, 17 (2). 
Bullvncr', Alice, 174 (3) ; John, 174 

(2) ; William, 174. 
Bulman, Ann, 6, 23 ; John, 6. 23. 
Bunce, Mr., 269. 
BunnionaZi'a* Lee, Anne, 30. 



:;i-j 



GENERAL INDEX, 



Buntinge, Riohard, L56, 157 (1), 158, 

I.V.t (.'»), 160. 
Burbidge, Elizabeth, 11 ; Richard, 11; 

Thomas, 11. 
Burdett, Mary, 10. 
Burford, James, 10; Samuel, 10; 

William, bell-founder, 262. 

Btirges, Charles, 22, 81, 45; John, 

157, 159, Mary, 31, 15; Nathaniel, 

45; Susan, 22, 21; William, 31, 

45. 
Burges alias Phillipps, Ursula, 7. 
Burghley, Lord, 58. 
Burgis, Henry, 42 ; John, 42. 
Burgo, II. do, 6(5(3), 67. 
Burgundia, Hugo de, 70. 
Burham, 17, 20, 139, 153 ; Church, 154. 
Burial-places of the Archbishops of 

Canterbury, by Canon Scott Ro- 
bertson, 276. 
Buricche, Richard, 1G9 (2). 
Burke, Ellen, 81 ; Sir Thomas, 81. 
Burleton, Anne, 26. 
Burling, see Birling. 
Burly, Elizabeth, 42 ; Henry, 42. 
Burn', 67. 
Burns, Mr., 57. 
Burr, Anne, 22, 27; Elizabeth, 36; 

Robert, 22; Thomas, 27, 36; 

William, 22 (2). 
Burrell, Dorothy, 39 ; Robert, 39. 
Burridge, Catherine, 13 ; Robert, 13. 
Burrowes, William, 19. 
Burton, Erancis, 45 ; John, 29 ; Wini- 
fred, 29 ; and see Baker and Eve- 

leish. 
Burvill, James, B.A., 113 (3). 
Busbridge, Thomas, 12. 
Busbridge alias Petley, Elizabeth, 12. 
Busbridge alias Weldish, Elizabeth, 2. 
Busfield, Thomas, M.A., 191. 
Bushell, Dorothy, 36 ; William, 36. 
Buskin, Ralf, 45; William, 45. 
Busshe, Thomas, Clerk of the Ledger 

of Works at Sandgate, 228, 235, 247, 

248. 
Butcher, Anne, 7 ; Dionisia, 9 ; 

George, 16 ; Henry, 6 ; Mary, 6 ; 

Nicholas, 7. 
Butler, — , 94 ; Alice, 8 ; John, 8 ; 

Nathan, 36; Susan, 36 ; Ursula, 101, 

102. 
Buxton, Elizabeth, 43. 
Byng, see Gunsley. 
Bynge, George, 10 (2). 
Byngham, John, 301 ; Mr., 235. 
Byrchington, 21, 25, 39. 
" Byrd of Chipstead/' 61. 
Byrlinge, see Birling. 
Byrman, Sir Francis, 100. 



Cabot, Sebastian, 83. 
( laoott, Francis, 17. 
Cade's rebellion, 54, 219. 
( ladiz, Siege of, 79. 
( ladman, .1 udith, L5. 

Cadwell, Edward, 8; ^Thomas, 21; 
William, 8. 

< an, Stone, xli (5), 235, 250, 283. 

Cage, Christopher, 27 ; Sarah, 27. 

Cakcbread, Mary, 16; Thomas, 16. 

Calais, 56 (3), 229 ; Captain of, 229. 

Calcraft family, 71. 

Caleen, Mr. Andrew, 102. 

Calehill, 81 ; Hundred of, 240. 

Galleys, see Calais. 

Calli.V, Edward, 26 ; Elizabeth, 26; 
Hannah, 26 ; Joel, 26 ; John, 26 ; 
Mary, 26 ; Priscilla, 26 ; William, 26. 

Callis, Alice, 6 ; Thomas, 6. 

Calton, Elizabeth, 4. 

Calvert, Anne, 44. 

Cambridge, 265; All Saints, 273; 
Clare Hall, 111, 116, 117 ; Corpus 
Christi Coll., Ill, 192 ; Parker MS. 
at, 281 (2), 282, 288; Emmanuel 
Coll., 114, 115, 193; Jesus Coll., 
116, 272, 273 ; Queen's Coll., 98 (2), 
113, 192, 193 ; St. John's, 265 ; St. 
Mary's, 112; St. Peter's, 116; 
Trinity Coll., 194 (2), 271, 272. 

Camden Society's Publications, xlii. 

Camden, Marquess, 274 ; John Charles, 
Marquis, 275. 

Camilla, Thadisius de, 69 (3). 

Canterbury, xliv, 3, 4, 8, 13 (2), 20, 21, 
23, 29, 30, 37, 39 (4), 47 (2), 48, 56, 
58, 62 (3), 72 (2), 81, 128, 134 (2), 
161, 167 (3), 168, 169 (3), 174 (2), 
175 (2), 177, 179 (2), 181 (2), 183, 
184 (2), 189, 214, 235 (2), 241, 244, 
245 (5), 246, 248, 249, 272, 276- 
294. 

Canterbury, Archbishopric of, 65, 66, 
67, 104, 276-294. 

Canterbury, Archbishopric of, Custos, 
69. 

Canterbury, Archbishop of, 65 (4), 
66 (7), 68 (7), 71 (4), 72 (8), 104 (9), 
105 (2), 106 (12), 109 (3), 111 (3), 
112 (2), 113 (4), 114 (31, 115 (2), 
116 (5), 117 (2), 188 (3), 236, 263 
(3), 272, 276-294, 296, 298, 303. 

Canterbury, Archbishop of, Official of, 
65 (2), 66 (2), 68 (6). 

Canterbury, Archbishops of : — Abbot, 
George,*112 (2), 277 ; .Elfric, 278 ; 
Agelnoth, 279 ; Alfsin, see Elsin ; 
Anselm, 71, 72 (2), 279 ; Arundel, 
Thomas, 280 (2), 300; Athelard, 
278; Athelm, 278: Athelred, 278; 



GENERAL INDEX. 



313 



Augustine, 277; Baldwin, 71, 101 
(2), 277 ; Bancroft, Richard, 276; 
Beoket, Thomas, 275), 285 (2) ; 
Shrine of, 195, 279, 281, 291 ; Ben- 
son, Edward, 27(5 (2) ; Boniface, 
277 ; Bourghchier (Boucher), 
Thomas, 292-300 ; " Bowchyr's 
Chauntry,"203; The" Bourghchier 
Knot," 292 ; Bourghchier 's- mas, 
293; Bradwardine, Thomas, 290 ; 
Bregwin, 277, 278 ; Brithwald, 277 ; 
Ceolnoth, 278; Chichele, Henry, 
291 (3), 292 (3) ; Corhoil, William, 
279, 296 (2) ; Cornwallis, Hon. 
Frederick, 276 ; Courtenay, William, 
278, 290 (2), 291 (-4), 297 ; Cranmer, 
Thomas, 71, 72, 109, 204, 276; Cuth- 
bert, 277, 278 ; Dene, Henry, 280 ; 
D'Escures, see Turbine; Deusdedit, 
277 ; Eads}-, 279 ; Elsin or Alfsin, 
277 ; Ethelgar, 278 (2) ; Grant, see 
Wethershed ; Grindal, Edmund, 
276; Herring, Thomas, 276; Hono- 
rius, 277 ; Howley, William, 276 (2) ; 
Hutton, Matthew, 276 ; Islip, Simon, 

279 (2), 299 ; his tomb, 279 ; Jam- 
bert, 277 ; Justus, 277 ; Juxon, 
William, 276; Kemp, John, 292; 
Kilwardhy, Robert, 277 ; Lanfranc, 
187, 279 (2) ; Langham, Simon, 276, 
277, 301 ; Langton, Stephen, 65 (2), 
104, 105, 282 (3), 288 (2) ; Laud, 
William, 276 ; Lawrence, 277 ; 
Living, 278 ; Longley, 276 ; Melli- 
tus, 277 ; Mepham, Simon, 213 (2), 
214, 289 (2); Moore, John, 276; 
Morton, John, 293 (2) ; Nothelm, 
277 ; Odo, 278 ; Parker, Matthew, 
57, 276, 282 ; Peckham, John, 64, 
283, 288, 296; Plegmund, 278; 
Pole, Reginald, 294 (2) ; Pontigny, 
St. Edmund of, 277 ; Potter, John, 
276 ; Ralph, 72 (2) ; Reynolds, 
Walter, 282 (2), 288, 289 (3), 290; 
Richard, 24, 71, 72, 279, 296, 297 ; 
Robert [of Jumieges] , 277 ; St. 
Dunstan, 278; St. Elphege, 278 (2) ; 
Sancroft, William, 277 ; Seeker, 
Thomas, 115 (2), 276; Sheldon, Gil- 
bert, 276 ; Siric, 278 ; Stafford, John, 

280 (2), 300 (2) ; Stigand, 277; 
Stratford, John, 289 ; Sudbury, 
Simon, 290 (2) ; Sumner, John 
Bird, 276 (2) ; Sutton, Charles 
Manners, 276 ; Tait, Archibald, 276 
(2) ; Tatwin, 277 ; Tenison, Thomas, 
192, 276 ; Theobald, 279, 280, 281 
(3), 282, 283, 296; Theodore [of 
Tarsus], 277 ; Tillotson, John, 276 ; 
Turbine, de, or D'Escures, Ralph, 



270; Wake, William, I I .'», 276; 
Walter, Hubert, 65, 72 (3), 280 (4), 
281 (3), 282 (7), 283 (2), 285 (4), 
286, 289, 290; Warham, William, 
109, 204, 293 (2), 294 (2), 298; 
Wethershed or Grant, Richard, 277 ; 
Whitgift, John, 111, 204, 276; 
Wilfrid, 278 ; Winchelsea, Robert 
de, 109, 288 (3), 289, 290, 291 ; 
Wittlesey, William, 279, 280; 
Wlfhelni, 278. 

Canterbury, Archdeacons of, 65 (10), 
66 (7), 67 (14), 68 (10\ 69 (14), 
296. 

Canterbury, Archdeacons of :— Fer- 
ringes, Rich, de, 296 ; Mort Mari, 
H. de, 68 (6), 69 (14) ; Sandford, 
Henry de, 65 (10). 

Canterbury, Archdeacons of, Official 
of, 66 (3), 67 (11). 

Canterbury, Benefices in, 64; Castle 
of, 110. 

Canterbury Cathedral, 58, 112, 114, 
125, 276-294; Altars in, St. 
Benedict, 279 (2); St. Dunstan, 278, 
289; St. Elphege, 292; St. Gregory, 
278(2), 288; St. John the Evan- 
gelist, 278 (2) ; St. Martin, 278 (2), 
279; St. Mary, 279, 280; St. 
Stephen, 277, 278, 292, 203; The 
Trinity, in Ernulph and Conrad's 
Retro-choir, 278, 279 (2), 280, 282 
(3), 290. 

Canterbury Cathedral, Archives at, 
64. 

Canterbury Cathedral, Chapels in : — 
Crypt Chapel of St. Gabriel, 284, 
287 ; Dean's Chapel, 112 ; Lady 
Chapel, 279, 293 (2) ; Old Trinity 
Chapel, 279, 280; of St. Anselm, 
279, 289 (2), 290; St. John the 
Baptist, 277, 278 ; St. Michael, 282 
(3), 288 ; SS. Peter and Paul, 279, 
289 (2), 290. 

Canterbury Cathedral, Chapter House, 
279 ; Dean and Chapter of, xliii ; 
Library of, xliii ; " Oxford Steeple," 
291 ; tomb of St. Thomas in, 279. 

Canterbury, Christ Church, 19, 57, 
277, 278, 290, 291 (2) ; a monk of, 
281 (2) ; Precinct of, 38 (2), 45, 46 ; 
Prior and Convent of, 235, 238, 
289, 291 (2), 292, 293 (2) ; Priory 
of, 235, 296. 

Canterbury, Deanery of, 112. 

Canterbury, Diocese of, 2, 5 (2), 18, 
274. 

Canterbury, King's School, 111. 

Canterbury, Mayor and Corporation 
of, 290. 



3L1 



GENERAL INDEX. 



Canterbury, Metropolitan Bee of, 64, 

71, 276-294. 
Canterbury, Prerogative Courl of, 

110. 
Canterbury, Recorder of (Launoelol 

Lovelaoe), 61. 
Canterbury, St. Alphage, 43, 57 (2), 

61; St. Andrew, 15, 46, 48; St. 

Augustine, Abbey of, -77 (5) ; 

Al.iii.i of, 277; College of, 277; St. 

Gregor}', Precinct <>!', -15 ; St. Mar- 
garet, 37 ; St. Martin, 44, 48 ; St. 

Mary Magdalen, 26, 45, 62; St. 

Mary Northgate, 45; St. Paul, 47, 

63; St. Peter, 17. 
Canterbury, Antiquities of Soniner. 

Battely's edition, 280, 292. 
Canterbury, Architectural Jlistori/ of 

Christ Church, by Prof. Willis, '281. 
Canterbury, Burial-places of the Arch- 
bishops of by Canon Scott Robert- 

son, 276. 
Canterbury Cathedral, Architectural 

History of, by Prof. Willis. 277, 281, 

282. 
Canterbury, History of the Cathedral 

of Dart,* 279, 280 (2), 281, 288 (2), 

289 (3), 290 (3), 291, 292 (2), 293 

(2), 294 (2). 
Canute, King of England, 278. 
Cape of Good Hope, 89, 90. 
Capel-le-Ferne Church, visit of 

Archaeological Society to, xl, xli ; 

Figures of St. Johu and the Virgin 

in, xli. 
Capell, 39. 

Capeli, by Tunbridge, 15. 
Capell. Moses, M.A., 112 (3). 
Cardyn, Humphry, 6; John, 6. 
Care, Mary, 42 ; Thomas, 42. 
Carell, Francis, 57 ; Thomas, 57. 
Carey, Henry, Lord Huusdon, 268. 
Carlett, Maria, 17. 
Carlisle Castle, Repair of, 246. 
Carmarthen, Archdeacon of, 194. 
Carpenter, John, 25. 
Carpinter, Richard, LL.D., 190. 
Carrier, Emma, 16 ; Valentine, 16 ; 

William, 21. 
Carrington, Andrew, 29 ; Edward, 29. 
Carter, Henry, 36 ; Isaac, 46 ; John, 

5; Nicholas, M.A., 114 (2), 117; 

Elizabeth, his dau., 114 ; Robert, 

36 ; Thomas, 5, 15. 
Cartwright, Joseph, 39 ; Julia, 103 ; 

Mary, 39 ; William, 24. 
Cartewrighte, Thomas, 190. 
Carver, Michael, 235. 
Casingall, Stephen, 10 ; and see Dal- 

ton. 



Castelooke (Caalook), Abraham, 210; 
Alice, 210; Bennet, 210; Daniel, 
210; Elizabeth, 210; John, Sen., 
Mayor of Faversbam, 209, 210 (2) ; 
John, Jan., Mayor of Faversham, 
2li); William, 210. 

Castile, Constable of, 86 (2). 

Castle, John, 13 (2) ; Richard, 13. 

Castleden, Anne, lit ; Peter, 19. 

Castleton, Anne, 22; Thomas, 22. 

Caswell, Catherine, 14 ; John, 14, 24. 

Caswell alias Dingens, Mary, 24. 

( latchman, lane, 3 l ; John, 34. 

Cauel, Hamo, 185 (2). 

Caumbray, ELenr. de, 67. 

Caunterbi/re, Po/is/orie del Erjlise de 
Christ de (Harleian MS.), 281, 288 

(2). 
Cave-Browne, Rev. J., Boxley Parish, 

xlii. 
Cavell, Elizabeth, 7 ; John, 7. 
Cavendish, Lord, 94, 95. 
Cawsten, Anne, 29 ; John, 29 ; Mary, 

29 (2). 
Caxton, Jeremias de, 07. 
Cayser of Hollingbourne, Mary, 62. 
Cecil, Sir Robert, 58. 
Ceham, Bobert, 10(5. 
Cericeaus, John, 172 ; Richard, 172 

(3). 
Cerring, see Charing. 
Chace, Elizabeth, 27 ; Matthew, 27. 
Chadburne, Blanch, 29 ; William, 29. 
Chaford in Penshurst, 5. 
Chaldane, 169. 
Chalk, 45 (2), 61 (4), 170. 
Chalke, Johanna, 166 (2); Thomas, 

166 (3). 
Challenger, Sir Thos., 88. 
Chalneloke, 170. 
Chaloner, le, John, 174 (2) ; Juliana, 

his wife, 174 (3) ; Walter, 174. 
Chalons, Champagne, 80. 
Chamberlaine, Godfrey, 29, 32 ; Wil- 
liam, 36. 
Chambers, Edward, 24, 30 ; Margaret, 

24 ; Thomas, 13 (2), 20 ; William, 20. 
Chancery, Court of, 93. 
Chancey alias Greene, Elizabeth, 30. 
Channel, the, xli. 
Chaply, Thomas, 37. 
Chapman, Alexander, 26 ; Elizabeth, 

22 ; Henry, 11, 26, 31 ; Joan, 11 ; 

John, 22 ; Robert, 5, 6 ; Samuel, 24, 

26 ; William, 23. 
Chapman alias Lester, Anna, 39. 
Chappell, John, 87. 
Charing, xl, 2, 24, 66, 69, 70. 
Charles I., King of England, 1, 112, 

217, 276 ; Coronation of, 80. 



GENERAL INDEX. 



31 



Charles, Prince of Wales, Secretary to, 

see Sir Rich. Fanshawe. 
Charlett, Dr., 193. 

Charlton, 17,21, 26, 27. 
Charlton near Dover, 116. 
Charlton by Woolwich, 29. 

Charlton, Sir Dudley, Governor of 

Virginia, 93 (2). 
Chart, Hundred of, 237, 240 ; Great, 

5<>, 70, 192 ; Woods in Parish of, 

237; Little, 67, 09, 81 (3). 
Chartham, 6, 248; Court, beside Can- 
terbury, 236. 
Chatbourne, William, 209,210. 
Chatham, xlii, 6, 9 (2), 10 (2), 12, 13 

(3), 14. 15 (2), 16 (2), 18 (6), 19, 

20, 23,25, 27 (4), 28 (5), 34, 37 (2), 

38 (2), 46 (2). 
Chaumpeneys, Hugh, 164 (4), 165(3); 

Isabella, 164 (4), 165 ; James, 164 

(2), 165 (2); Nicholas, 164 (7), 

165 (3). 
Chaumpuent, Oto de, 69. 
Chaunceler, Joan, 190 ; Richard, 1S9, 

215. 
Chauntler, Elizabeth, 42 ; Walter, 42. 
"Cheape,"62 (2). 
Cheekes, Eliz., 102. 
Cheesruan, Thomas, 42 (4). 
Cheesman alias Senocke, Alice, 8. 
Chelreye, John de, 164 (2). 
Chelsea, 217, 218 ; College, 111. 
Chelsfeld, 14. 
Cheny, William de, 173 (3), 178 (4) ; 

Margeria, his wife, 173 (2), 178 (3). 
Chepsted', 180. 

Cheriden, John, 8 ; Rebecca, 8. 
Cheriton, 236, 238. 
Cherring, see Charing. 
Cherry, Sir Edward, 85 ; Sir Francis, 

85 (2), 88. 
Chertsey, Mr. Robert, 61. 
Cheseman, John, 157, 159 ; Richard, 

159. 
Cheston, Dorothy, 4 ; Thomas, 4. 
Chevening, xliv, 10, 11, 14, 15, 23, 26, 

69. 
Chewe, Edward, 10. 
Cheyne, John, 188; Robert de, 186 

(5). 
Chicche, John, 172; Katherine, his 

wife, 172. 
Chichester, Bishop of, 262 (2). 
Chiddingstoue, 6, 7 (3), 9. 10, 12 (2), 

17, 20, 28, 29 (2), 32, 41 (2), 43, 44, 

165, 268. 
Child, John, 26 ; Laurence, Bishop of 

St. Asaph, 262; Margaret, 32; Tho- 
mas, 26. 
Childen, Thorn, de, 68. 



Children, George, 98; Mary, 35; 
Thomas, 35 ; William, 22. 

Chilecumbe, Walterus de, 69, 

Chileham, Henry de, 167 (2); Johanna, 
167 (3). 

Chillam,28. 

Chillenden, Prior, 288. 

Chillyngden, 106. 

Chilton, 169. 

Chilt m, James, 63. 

Chbelhurst, 15, 23,41, 70. 

Cluslett, 192. 

Chitecrofr,, Roger, 175 (6) ; Thomas, 
175 (4); Walter, 175 (6); Mar- 
geria, his wife, 175 (5). 

Chitting, Helen, 5. 

Chowninge, Frances, 10 ; Reginald, 
10. 

Christian, Anne, 6 ; Capt. Edward, 
102 ; Mr. Ewan, 117 ; John, 6. 

Christ's Hospital, 102. 

Church, Faith, 45 ; Thomas, 108. 

Churchill, Charles, the poet, 296. 

Chyvening, see Chevening. 

Cimisinga (Kemsing), 258. 

Cinque Forts, Barons of the, by George 
Wilks, Esq., xliii. 

Cirene, Bishop of, 293. 

Clapham, Ralph, 36 ; William, 36. 

Clapshawe, John, 13. 

Claptus, William, 179 (2), 180 (2). 

Clarencieux (R. Cooke), 56. 

Clark, Mr. John, M.D., 100; Re- 
becca, 39 ; William, 39 ; and see 
Freer. 

Clarke, Anne, 26 ; Edith, 39 ; Edward, 
26 ; Humphry, 15 ; John, 22 (2), 24, 
39,158,160; Martin, 18; Robert, 
36 ; Thomas, 26 ; William, 58 (2) ; 
and see Smith and Welby. 

Clarke alias Browne, Mary, 16. 

Clai-yngbold, John, 298. 

Clavertigh in Elham, 236. 

Clay, see Denton. 

Clayborne, Sara, 3 (2) ; Thomas, 3 (2). 

Cleapoole, Elizabeth, 17 ; William, 17. 

Cleark, James, 192. 

Cleere, Margery, 34. 

Clegent, Peter,' 8; William, 8. 

Clemence, John, 11 ; William, 11. 

Clement, Thomas, 302. 

Clements, Christopher, 9 ; Elizabeth, 9. 

Clercke, John, 298. 

Clergy in Kent in the reign of Henry 
III., 69. 

Clerk, le, John, 176 ; Thomas, 176 (2) ; 
Anastasia, his wife, 176 (3). 

Gierke, John, 7 ; Margaret, 7, 59 (2) ; 
Ralph, 7; Sir Roland, Knt., 198, 
199,200; Thomas, 59; William, 7. 



310 



GENERAL INDEX. 



Clerkenwell, 77; St. James's, 77. 

Cleve I 'ourt, .">i . 

Clevetl Well (Trottesoliffe), 190. 

( 'leyworth, see Fugate. 

Cliffe, l. 8, 11. L6, 17, 22, 23 (2), 26, 

27, 82, 35, 39, 11. II, 17, is. 
Clilfc next Uou-litnii. 20. 

Clifford, Bio. de, 68. 

Clifton, Richard, 102. 

Clinte alias Parker, Joan, 17. 

Clunn, Rebecca, 18; Thomas, 18. 

Clynston, Sir John, 108. 

Clynton, de, Juliana, 162 (4), 173 (3) ; 

William, 162 (3), 172 (3). 
Clyterowe, John, 189, 215. 
Coates, Hanna, 45; William, 45. 
Cob, see Philpot. 
Cobb, Michael, Esq., 198, 199, 200; 

Thomas, 26, 31. 
Cobery, John, 31. 

Cobham, 20, 22, 30, 34, 37, 39, 195. 
Cobham, James de, 178 (2). 
Cockayne, Sir William, 96. 
Cocke, Arthur, 2 ; James, 39 ; John, 2. 
Cockes, Thomas, 110, 228, 230, 233, 

246 (2), 248; William, 109 (2). 
Cockle, Alice, 19 ; Thomas, 19. 
Cockman, Thomas, M.A., 193. 
Codd, Catherine, 21 ; John, 34 (2) ; 

Thomas, 42 ; William, 21 ; and see 

Marriott. 
Codeham, see Cudham. 
Coggan, Margaret, 36. 
Cogger, Ambrose, 34 ; Elizabeth, 34. 
Coke, Bridget, 60; Ciriar, 60 (2); 

Henry, 60 (2), 61 ; Jane, 60 ; Mar- 
garet, 60 (2), 63; Richard, 60; 

Robert, 60 ; Roger, 60. 
Coker alias Mayuard, Dorothy, 11. 
Colbecke, Philip, 7. 
Coldred,65 (3). 
Cole, Anna, 45 ; George, Esq., 103 ; 

Priscilla, 45 ; Stephen, 45. 
Colegate, Michael, 21. 
Coleman, Henry, 48. 
Colepeper, Sir Thomas, 80. 
Colethurst, Anne, 23 ; John, 23. 
Colham, 59, 60 (2). 
Colier, William, barber, 177 (2). 
Colkyn, Thomas, 172 (2) ; Alina, his 

wife, 172 (2), 173. 
Collard, Margaret, 21 ; Martha, 27 ; 

Thomas, 27. 
Collerd, Thomas, 23. 
Collet, Sara, 11 ; William, 11. 
Collett, Rev. A. M., xxxix, xlii. 
Colley, John, 248 (2), 249. 
Collier, Henry, 8; John, 5; Wil- 

liam, 8. 
Collin, Israel, 27 ; James, 27. 



Collins, George, 20; John, 16; 

Thomas, 20. 
< toluene, Eleanor, -•">• 
( lollison, Agnes, '.» ; I leorge, 9. 
Collymore, Mr, James, 58; John, 58 

(2) ; Mabel, his dau., 58. 
Colmagro, Town of, 84. 
Colman, Elizabeth, 31 ; Peter, 31. 
Cologne, Church of St. Mary, 288. 
Colongro, 88. 

Columbus, ( Ihristopher, 82. 
( iolumpna, J. de, <>7. 
Colyns. Richard, 175 (3); Johanna, his 

wife, 175 (2). 
(' be, John, 184, 185 (2) ; Isabella, 

his wife, 184, 185; William, 184, 

185(2). 
Comber, Matthew, 13. 
" Comebe Wood," 237. 
Coiney, Abigail, 12. 
Comport, Thomas, 4. 
Corny, Abigail, 19 ; Anthony, 19. 
Condon (? Cowden), 48. 
Congburst, 41 (2). 
Congragh, Sir John, 108. 
Constantino) de, 81, 85 ; Agent at, 85 ; 

Ambassador to, 81. 
Cooke, Edward, Apothecary, 102 ; 

Michaell, 108 ; R. (Clareucieux), 

56; Richard, Esq., Anglo-Saxon 

Poems of Beowulf, xlii. 
Cooke alias Grove, Catherine, 9. 
Coolinge, 37. 
Coomber, Christopher, 42 ; Joan, 

42. 
Cooper alias Pemberton, Alice, 27. 
Cooper, Alice, 29 ; Darce, 45 ; Eliza- 
beth, 22 ; Johu, 45, 192 ; Lidia, 34 

Mary, 45 ; Mrs., 118 ; Richard, 34 

Samuel, 26, 27, 29 ; Thomas, 22, 45 

William, 26. 
Cop, John, 238. 
Cope, — , "my Lord Chancellor's 

servant," 248. 
Coppinger, Anna, 31 ; John, 23. 
Coppyns Rout, 236. 
Cordwell alias Oliver, Mary, 26. 
Corey, Elizabeth, 17 ; John, 17. 
Cornell, Salamon de, 165 (2) ; Thomas, 

246 ; and see Pumfret. 
Cornewall's land, Blackbourn, 238. 
Cornhull', Petrus de, 65 ; Regiu. de, 

65 ; Will, de, 65, 66. 
Cornwall, Duchy of, 78 (2) ; Richard 

and Thomas Smythe, Receivers for, 

83. 
Corp', Thomas, 184 (3). 
Corsham, Wilts, 76, 78 (2). 
Coryngham, 169. 
Cose, Amery, 67. 



GENERAL INDEX. 



317 



Cosen, Henry, 16; Margaret, 6; 

William, 36 ; and see Lake. 
Cotes, Joan, 80 ; John, 30; Martha, 

30; Martin, 27, 42; Rebecca, 27, 

42; Richard, 30 (2) ; Sarah, 30. 
Collin-. Martha, 23. 
Cot tin-ham, 101. 

Cotton, Fasti Ecclesice HiherniccB, 2C>2. 
Cotton alias Bolny, Anne, 16. 
Cotty, Ann, 29. 
Couchman alias Atnocke, Johan, 39 ; 

Silvester, 39. 
Conle, see Widger. 
Coulston, James, 27 ; Mary, 27 (2) ; 

Thomas, 27. 
Coult, Alice, 42 ; John, 42. 
Conmbe, de Alice, 161 (2) ; John, 161 

(3). 
Country, Elizabeth, 45 ; Nicholas, 45. 
Conpore, Gilbert, 179 (2) ; Isabella, his 

wife, 179 (3). 
Conpere, le, Cecilia, 166 (3) ; Robert, 

166 (3) ; Thomas, 166 (2). 
Conpers, Thomas, 190. 
Court, Prerogative, of Canterbur}', 

100 ; of Chancery, 100. 
Conrtehosse, Hamo, 179 (3) ; Alianora, 

his wife, 179 (3). 
Courthopp, Thomas, 37 ; Walter, 37. 
Courtuej', Richard, 102. 
Courtopp, Richard, 26 ; Rose, 26. 
Coveney, Agnes, 42 ; Anne, 42 ; 

Henry, 42 ; Thomas, 42 ; William, 

42. 
Coven} r , John, 45. 
Coventry, Henry, 24 ; Roger, 24 ; 

Thomas, 37. 
Coventry and Lichfield, Bp. of, 66. 
Covert, Thomas, 80. 
Cow Pastures, 134. 
Cowchman, 'Xpoffor, 157, 158. 
Covvden, 8, 9, 10, 12, 13, 16, 24 (2), 

25, 27, 28, 31, 38, 44, 46, 48, 188, 

217 (2), 268. 
Cowdham, 12. 
Cowdray, William, 4. 
Cowdray alias Harbert, Margaret, 4. 
Cowell, Dr., 73. 
Cowper, Mr. J. M., 63. 
Cox, — , 200; John, 37; Mary, 32; 

Susanna, 37 ; William, 32. 
Coxden (Dorset), 55 (2). 
Cozens, Mary, 21 ; Robert, 21. 
Craiford, see Crayford. 
Crambrooke, Cranebrooke, see Cran- 

bi'ooke. 
Cranbrooke, 2, 4 (2), 6, 8, 10, 11, 12, 

22 (2), 36 (2), 37, 38, -48 (2), 66, 68, 

77 (2), 161. 
Cranebourne, John de, 188. 



Cranebroc, see Cranbrooke. 

( 'ranewell, Edward, 13. 

Cranewell alias Brice, .Martha, 13. 

Cranford, Lord, 91. 

Cranmer, Arohbp of Canterbury, 71, 
72, 109, 204, 276; Petition from 
New Romney to, 155 ; his answer to, 
155, 156. 

Craven, Earl of, 89 ; Sir William, 89. 

Crawford, Rev. William, M.A., D.D., 
194 (2), 216. 

Cray, Foot's, 17, 23, 25, 190. 

Crav, St. Mary, 7, 15, 16 (2), 26, 30, 
31, 35, 38, 164, 174. 

Cray, North, 5, 44, 214. 

Cray, St. Paul's, 7, 8, 70. 

Crayford, 2, 3 (3), 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 12, 21, 
22, 27 (2), 33, 35, 36, 43, 45. 

Crayford, Sir Robert, 16 ; and see 
Haggett. 

Crests, Anthony, 33. 

Crioil, Will, de, 67. 

Cripps, Thomas, 9 ; and see Greene. 

Cripps alias Amyes, Susan, 9. 

Crispe, Nicholas^ 23 ; AVilliam, 23. 

Cristean, James, 158 (2), 159. 

Crixsey, Essex, 79. 

Croft, Herbert, 16 ; Rogerus de. 68. 

Croftou, William, 190, 215 (2) ; Mar- 
gery, his wife, 190, 215, 216. 

Crompton, Sir Thomas, 92. 

Cromwell, Oliver, Lord Protector. 217 
(2), 218; Thomas, Lord Privy Seal, 
248, 249. 

Crongebury, 172. 

Cronk, William, 273 ; W., junr., 274. 

Cropredy Bridge, 58. 

Crosse, Andrew, 168 (2). 

Crover, Alice, 39 ; Francis, 39. 

Crowherst, Nicholas, 2 ; Susan, 2. 

Croyden, johan, 25 ; John, 25. 

Croydon, 276. 

Crud, Anthony, 13 ; John, 13. 

Crundall, Sir W. H., Mayor of Dover, 
xxxvii, xxxix (2). xlii ; Lady, xxxix. 

Crundell, 47. 

Crup, Elizabeth, 39 ; John, 39. 

Cruttall, Dina, 42; Edward, 42; 
George, 209, 210. 

Cryehyrche (Christ Church), see Can- 
terbury. 

Cryse, Rev. John, 155. 

Cubberly, William, 38. 

Cubberly alias Baker, Jane, 38. 

Cuckoe, Juliana, 39 ; and see Patten- 
den. 

Cudestede, Richard de, 183 (2). 

Cudham, 10, 22 (2), 37, 70, 164, 302. 

Cukkelestane (Cuxton), 213. 

Culliu, Edmund, 45; Elizabeth, 45. 



318 



GENERAL INDI.X. 



Culling, Elizabeth, 39 j William, 89. 

Cullynge, John, L10. 

Culverden, Elizabeth, 48 ; Robert, i::. 

Culverwell, Richard, 77,82; Judith, 
his wife, 77. 

Cambridge, Andrew, 8, 6; John, G; 
San, :;. 

Cumryg', 180. 

Cundicot, Hen. de, G7. 

Curokbie (Line.), 24. 

Curde, Elizabeth, 11 ; John, 11. 

Curgingall, Stephen, 25. 

Curling, Henry, 13 (2); John, 43; 
Mrs., 226. 

Curling alias Harding, Brigitt, 43. 

Curteis, Thomas M.A., 272 (2). 

Curties (Curtes), John, 157 (2), 159. 

Curtis, Edward, 13; Mary, 43; Na- 
thaniel, 13 ; Norton, 43 ; William, 
48. 

Cutler, Richard, 204 (3). 

Cutter, Francis, 14 ; Mary, 14 ; 
William, 14 (2). 

Cuxton, 21, 213. 

Dabridgcourt alias Eltonhead,Eleanor, 

23. 
Dacre, Lady Avis, 32 ; Lord (Henry), 

10 ; Mary, 32 ; Lord Richard, 10. 
Dakenham, Thomas de, 178, 179. 
Dalby, John, 302. 
Lale," Anne, 29; Christopher, 29; 

Thomas, 268 (2) ; Sir Thomas, 93. 
Dalton, Francis, S.T.B., 111 (2); James, 

23 ; and see Wilcox. 
Lalton alias Casingall, Joan, 10. 
Lamport, Sir William, 267. 
Lancy, Jane, 23. 
Dane, Mary, 8 ; Robert, 22. 
Dane alias Springett, Barbara, 22. 
Dane Court, 113. 
Danes, the, 84, 88 ; murder of St. 

Elphege by, 278. 
Danes, Thomas, 46. 
Danne, Alice, 43 ; James, 46 ; Martha, 

46 ; Thomas, 46. 
Danyell, Richard, 209, 210. 
Darbishire, Oliver, 159 (2). 
Darcv, Christopher, 11; Sir Edward, 

7, 11 ; Sir Robert, 7, 11. 
Darcy alias Blower, Dame Mary, 11. 
Darenth, 2, 9, 10, 23, 25, 39, 100, 149, 

153 (2). 
Darford, -see Dartford. 
Darke, see Slograve. 
Darknoll, Joan, 29. 
Darling, see Booker. 
D irrell, George, 81 ; James, 81 ; John, 

81 (2) ; Mr., 237 ; Olivia, 81 ; 

Philip, 81. 



Dart, 231 ; History of the Cathedral of 
Canterbury, 279,280(2), 281, 288 
(2), 289 (3),290 (8), 291, -"•'-' (2), 
293 (2), 294 (2). 

Dartford, 2 (3), 3. 6 (2), 7 (2), 11 (3), 
1 I., is (3), 19, :-':<, 24, 30, 31, 82, 84, 
36, 39, I"- (2), is. 77, Hi-', mi. L79, 
183 ; Early-Norman tower at, I 13; 
Parish Cburoh of, 54, L96. 

Dartnoll, Jasper, 24. 

Dauphin, the (1570), 230. 

Davids, see Da vies. 

Davie, Robt., 158 (2). 

Davies, Augustine, 26 ; Fulco, 26 ; 
Hugh, 26; John, 26 ; Robert, 32; 
Sara, 26; Thomazine, 19. 

Davies alias Davids, John, 19. 

Davington, 6, 166. 

Davis, A. Randall, Esq., xxxviii; Cover, 
15; George, 15. 

Davy (Davis ?), Alice, 78 ; John, 79 ; 
-Robert, 79 ; Mary, his wife, 79. 

Dawlinge, John, 32; Mary, 32; 
Richard, 22 ; Thomas, 32. 

Dawtry, Margaret, 39 : William, 39. 

Day, Alice, 12,18; John, 18; Mar- 
garet, 39 ; Robert, 39 ; Roger, 60 
(2) ; Thomas, 36 ; W'illiam, 12. 

Day alias Mun, Dorothy, 36. 

Deal, 9, 30, 33, 37, 38, 40, 42 (2), 114, 
224, 230 (2), 247; Castle, 32; 
Chapel, 114. 

Deane, 47. 

Deaue in Wingham, 28. 

Dearson, 49 (4), 50 (5), 51 (2), 52 (16), 
53 ; Roman Cemetery, 50, 52 (2) ; 
Farm, 49 ; Wood, 50. 

Death, Charles, 34 ; Thomas, 34. 

Debock, — , 227. 

Debtford, see Depti'ord. 

Debtlinge, 19. 

Dedham, Robert de, 182 (2) ; Emma, 
his wife, 182 (3). 

Deen, William de, seur., 170 ; William, 
his son, 170 (3). 

Deerhurst, 150 (2). 

Deeringe, John, 40. 

Deeson, Elenor, 34 ; William, 34. 

Delahav, Morgan, 19. 

Delaney, — , 100. 

De la Warr, Lord, Governor of Vir- 
ginia, 92 (2), 93. 

Delawne, Abraham, 27 ; Anne, 27. 

Delse Magna, 37. 

Delver, Alice, 21 (2) ; John, 21 ; 
Richard, 21 ; William, 21 (2) ; and 
see Andrewes. 

Demechurche, see Dymchurch. 

Den, John, 110. 

Denb\ , Sir John, 109. 



GENERAL INDEX. 



319 



Denham, Thomas, 46 (2). 
Denman, John, LL.I)., 2(57 (2). 
Denmark, Kin-- of, 87 (2). 
Denne, Alice, 26; Anne, 26; James, 

26 (2) ; John, 18, 26 ; Peter, 26 ; 
Thomas, 18. 

Dennis, Edward, 41. 

Dennison, Mr., 193. 

Densall Bushes, 236 ; " Minnis," 236. 

Denton, 40, 236. 

Denton, Anne, 46; Sir Anthony, 9; 
Arthur, 46 ; Dame Elizabeth, 9 ; 
Francis, 16 ; Sir Henry, cur., 191 ; 
Susan, 16. 

Denton alias Clay, Brigett, 46. 

Denwood, Fr', 3 ; Stephen. 3. 

Denvnton, John de, 187 (2). 

Deptford, 4 (2), 5 (2), 7 (2), 8 (2), 
9 (3), 10 (2), 11, 12 (2), 13 (4), 14 (4), 
15 (3), 16 (3), 17 (2), 18, 19 (3), 20, 
21, 22 (2), 23 (2), 24 (4), 25 (5), 2G, 

27 (5), 28 (2), 29 (2), 30, 32 (3), 33 
(4), 34 (3), 35, 36 (3), 37, 39 (2), 
40 (4), 41 (3), 44 (2), 47, 48 (2), 
91, 95, 96. 

Deptling, 146. 

Derby, John de, 173 (3) ; Cristina, his 

wife, 173 (2). 
Deringe, Sir Anthony, 7, 20 ; Sir Ed- 
ward, Bart., 43 (2) ; George, 5, 20 ; 

Richard, 5. 
Detling, the Croft, xxxviii. 
Detlvng' next Meidestan', 172. 
Devonishe, Radulphe, 156, 157 (2), 

158, 160. 
D'Ewes, Sir Simonds, 55 (2). 
Deysey, Alice, 190, 212. 
Dickens alias Robinson, Appolina, 30. 
Dicus, Humphry, 113 (7) ; Sarah, his 

wife, 113. 
Dier, Roger, 39. 
Digge, Koi^er, 213. 
Digges, John, elk., 261. 
Dit^gs, Sir Dudley, 19 ; Francis, 247 ; 

Mary, 19. 
Dike, Thomas, 36. 

Dingens, John, 24 (2) ; and see Caswell. 
Ditchingly, Sussex, 35. 
Ditton, 36, 140, 142, 146. 
Dittone, John de, 260 (2). 
Dixon, Edward, 37 ; Henr}', 36, 37 ; 

Humphrey, 11, 18; John, 18, 46, 

98; -Mary, 36, 37; Thomas, 14; 

William, 11 ; and see Omer. 
Dixon alias Blower, Mary, 11. 
Dobbles, Benedict, 162' (3) ; Joan, 

162 (4). 
Dod, Johanna, 174 (3); Mrs., 159; 

Robert, 174; Thomas, 159 (6), ICO 

(2), 174(4). 



Dodd, Roger, 269. 

Doddington, 173, 179. 

Domesday Book, 187, 211, 295 (2). 

Domine}', Edward, 43. 

Dominey alias Steere, Mary, 43. 

Dominican Convent of Moutargis in 
Picardy, 259. 

Donestaple, John de, 184, 185. 

Donne, Rev. C. E., M.A., author of 
Arden of Faversham, 208. 

Dorinon, John, 43 ; Paul, 43. 

Dorley alias Maydman, Dorothy, 39. 

Dorly, Thomas, 39. 

Dorman, Mary, 21 ; Millicent, 21. 

Dornell, William, 157, 159, 160. 

Dornford, dio. of Salisbury, 266 (2). 

Dorrell, Joyce, 10; Nicholas, 10. 

Dorrington, Fras., 76 ; Hawys, his 
wife, 76. 

Dorset, Lionel, Duke of, 271 (2), 272 
(4) ; Richard, Earl of, 270 (2), 271. 

Dorset, Receivership of, 84. 

Dossett, Richard, 39. 

Doune, see Down. 

Douorr', Henry de, 167 (4) ; Emma, 
his wife, 167 (2). 

Dour, River, 133 ; Waterfall of, 129 ; 
Valley, 138 (2). 

Dover, xxxix, xli, xlii, 15, 16, 17, 26, 
29, 30 (2), 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 (2), 
38, 39 (3), 40,41, 42 (2), 45 (2), 46, 
47 (3), 48, 112, 128, 138, 232, 236, 
238 (2), 241, 245, 248 (2) ; Basilica, 
132 ; Bench St., 130, 300 ; Biggin 
St., 301 ; Bishop of, xxxvii, 117 ; 
Butchery Gate, 130 ; Canon St., 120, 
130, 131; Carlton Club, 120; 
Castle, xxxvii, 69, 78, 132, 248 (4), 
259, 295; Church of, 68; Constable 
of, 68 ; Governor of, see Smythe, 
Robert; Hill, 128, 135; Visit of 
Archaeological Society to, xxxix ; 
Central Forum or Roman Market, 
132 ; Chapel Place, 130 ; College, 
President and Council of, xlii ; Col- 
legiate Church of Secular Canons of 
St. Martin, 121 ; Connaught Hall, 
xxxix; Cow Gate, 130; Deal Road, 
132; Dolphin Line, 129(2); En- 
graving of, in Roman times, 130 ; 
Fisherman's Gate, 130; Gate of 
Severus, or of the Merchauts' or 
Beggars' Bench, 130, 131; Ha- 
drian's Gate, 130, 131 ; Hospital 
S. Marie, 66 ; Imperial Hotel, 129 ; 
Lyon's History of, 234 ; Maison 
Dieu, or Town Hall, xxxvii, xxxix 
(2), xlii, 132 ; Market Square, 120 
(2), 121,295; Street, 304 ; Mayor 
of, xxxvii, xxxix, xli, 130, 296, 303 ; 



320 



(IKNKRAL INDEX. 



Meeting of Archaeological Society 

;it, x\\\ii-\li; Museum, Si, IL'H; 

Nortliorn or Biggin Gate, 183; Old 
Guildhall, L82; Pharos at, 128 et 
■-',/.; Portus Lemanis, xxxix, 12s. 
183; Prior of, 279, 293, 299 (2); 
Priory, xwix ; Roman, 128-136; 
Roman Baths, 120, 121, 205; Haven, 
129 ; Wall, 130 ; Romano-British 
Church in Castle, 121 ; Russell St., 
129 (2) ; St. Helen's Gate, L30, 131 ; 
St. James's, 69, 296,297,298; St. 
James's Street, 129; St. John the 
Baptist, 297-301 ; St, Martin's, 297 ; 
House, xlii; Postern, 130; St. Mar- 
tin's le Grand, or Old St. Martin's, 
121, 131, 295-304; Altar of St. 
Mary Sub-volta in, 301 (2) ; Canons 
of, 295, 296 (2) ; Excavations on site 
of, xxxix ; St. Martin Newark, 296 ; 
Priory of, 296, 297 (2), 303 (2); 
St. Mary's, 296 (2), 297, 298 ; Visit 
of Archaeological Society to, xxxix ; 
Churchyard^ 130 ; St. Mary in the 
Castle, 132; St. Mary the Virgin, 
119-128; St. Nicholas, 297-303; 
Altar of St. John of Byrlyngton in, 
302 (3) ; St. Peter's, 67 (2), 296, 297 ; 
Snare Gate, 129, 130 ; Snargate St., 
129; Starabrook, 130; Town Wall 
Street, 129, 130; Walls of, 296; 
Woolcomber St., 129 ; Wyck, 239. 

Dowble, John, 24, 46 ; William, 24, 
46. 

Dowd, Ruined Chapel of, 144. 

Dowker, G., 49. 

Down, 14 (2), 28,72,164. 

Downe, David, 18 ; Helen, 24 ; John, 
18 ; Richard, 24 ; Robert, 24 (2). 

Downes, Francis, 4 ; Robert, 33. 

Downishe alias Beache, Susan, 14. 

Downs, the, 247 (3), 248, 249. 

Draper, Catherine, 9; Henry, 9; 
Susanna, 43 ; Thomas, 43. 

Draper alias Walker, Joan, 2. 

Drax, William de, 177. 

Drew, John, 26, 238 (2) ; Margery, 
26 ; William, 238. 

Drewry alias Drowly, Robert, 20; 
William, 20. 

Drincker, John, 158. 

Drink water, Edward, 41 ; Francis, 41 ; 
and see Russell. 

Dromant, Andrew, 21 ; Anne, 21. 

Dromore, Ireland, Viscounts Strang- 
ford of, 76, 79, 80. 

Drought, John. 31 ; William, 31. 

Drowly, see Drewry. 

Dryland, John, 17. 

Dryver, Samuel, 6 ; Thomas, 6. 



Duhle, Richard, 171 (3). 

Dii Cange, Glossary of, :ii7. 

Ducke, David, si. 89; Joane, 31 
Margaret, I; Mary, 22, 31, :i<t 
Richard, 1 1 ; Robert, 4 ; Sara, 11 
William, 30, 31 (2). 

Duckett, William. 83, 35. 

Duffield, John, 32 ; -Magdalene, 32. 

Dii Lao, Rev. Pere, 288. 

Dulwicb Gallery, 56, 57. 

Duna, Dune, la, 71 (2), 72 (4), 73 (2). 

Duncan, Poland L., F.S.A., Editor of 

Kentish Administrations, 1604 — 

1649, 1. 
Duncke, John, 29 ; Thomas, 29. 
Duncombe, Mr., 293. 
Dungesell', William de, 170 (2), 171 ; 

Leticia, his wife, 170 (2). 
Dunham, Hugh de, 173 (3), 178 (4), 

179 (2). 
Dunkerk, 84. 
Dunscombe, Joseph, 29 ; Margaret, 

29 ; Susan, 5 ; Thomas, 5, 29 (.2). 
Dunstall, 43. 
Dunwich, Suffolk, 236. 
Duppa, John, 16 ; Robert, 20. 
Duraunt, Richard, 260. 
Durham, Bishop of, 123. 
Durham, Mary, 37. 
Durobrivian ware, 53. 
Durrant, see Darenth. 
Dustentone, William de, 167 (2). 
Dutch, the, 84, 90 (2), 91 (2) ; Settle- 
ments, 90. 
Dvina Soccana, river, 88. 
Dyer, Anne, 14 ; John, 39 ; Richard, 

14; Robert, 39; Sara, 18; Walter, 18. 
Dyke, Mr., 101. 
Dymchurch, 163. 
Dyne, Thomas, 189. 
Dytton, Cambs., 20. 

Ealderomene (Old Romney), 178. 

Ealdyng, 169. 

Earith, see Erith. 

Easday, John, 37. 

East- Bridge Hospital, Mastership of, 

111. 
East-Church, 12, 33, 46, 68, 179. 
East India Company, 89-91 ; Charter 

of, 89; Dutch, 89,91 (2). 
East Indies, the, 91. 
East Stewart, 33. 

East, Thomas, 19 ; and see Perch. 
Eastbourne " in com. Cautij," 42. 
Eastbregge next Rumene, 163. 
Eastdowne, Walter, 190. 
Easterfield, Abraham, 43; John, 43 

(2) ; Mary, 43. 
Eastling, 69'. 



GENERAL INDEX. 



321 



Eastre, see Eastry. 
Eastry, 108, 110 (2), 116, 134. 
Eastwell, 27, 169. 

Eatenden alias Tumber, John, 7 (2). 
Eaton, Richard, 34 ; William, 34. 
Eatonbridge, Etonbridge, see Eden- 
bridge. 
Edenberie, — , 156 (2). 
Edenbridge, 6, 8, 12, 15, 16, 19, 20, 23, 

25, 28, 31, 32, 35, 37 (2), 46, 171 ; 

Annual Meeting of Archaeological 

Society at, xlii, xliii. 
Edenden, Francis, 14 ; Humphry, 14. 
Edesham, see Adisham. 
Edgeworth, Jane. 2 ; Margaret, 2. 
Edlin, John, 24; Sarah, 24. 
Edmeds, Henry, 2(5 ; John, 26. 
Edmonds, Anne, 43 ; John, 43 (2). 
Edmundus (" persona eccl. de Offe- 

ham "), 70. 
Edolph, Margaret, 37 ; Mary, 15 ; 

Simon, 37. 
Edridge, Joan, 39. 
Edward', Idonia, 184 (2) ; John, 184 

(4) ; William, 184. 
Edward I., 259, 260. 
Edward II., King of England, 105, 260. 
Edward III., King of England, 105 

(2), 106, 214. 
Edward IV., King of England, 292 (2). 
Edward VI., 201. 
Edwards, Francis, 26, 46 ; Gwenne, 8 ; 

Henry, 8 ; Joan, 26 ; Johan, 46 ; 

John, 46 ; Marv, 7; Robert, 96; Tho- 
mas, 67, 246 ; Walter, 8 ; William, 6. 
Edwards alias Battell, Elizabeth, 2 ; 

Margaret, 2. 
Egerton, 38, 40, 48. 
Egerton, — , 57 ; Lord, 83. 
Egeryndenn', John de, 171 (2). 
Egglesfield, Francis, 31 ; Maria, 31 ; 

Thomas, 31. 
Eghteham, see Ightham. 
Eglesfeild, Christopher, 5 ; Elizabeth, 

5 ; Martha, 35 ; Thomas, 35. 
Eitham, see Ightham. 
Eketon, Stephen de, 66 (2). 
Eld, John, Esq., 80. 
Eldredge, Margaret, 27. 
Eldyng, 176 (3), 182. 
Eleys, see Elys. 
Elgar, Thomas, 247. 
Elham, 68 (2), 173, 236 (3), 238. 
Elham, John de, 175 (2) ; Thorn, de, 

Ortic. Archiep. Cant., 65 (5). 
Elizabeth, Queen of England, 83 (5), 

84, 85, 88, 110, 162, 191, 198, 199 

(4), 200, 201, 268 (2), 270, 276; 

Customer to, 76 ; Visit to Sandgate 

Castle, 253-256. 
TOL. XX. 



Ellfrythe, John, 209, 210. 

Elliott, Mr. G. E., xxxix. 

Ellis, Christopher, 113; Sir Edward, 
43 ; Elizabeth, 31 ; Elizeus, 43 (2) ; 
Henry, 43; Jane, 113 ; John, 31; 
Mary', 46, 113; Mrs., 60 (2); Ro- 
bert, 15 ; Samuel, 15 ; Thomas, 46 
(2). 

Elmele, 170. 

Elmerston, 167. 

Elmes, John, 25 ; Robert, 25. 

Elmestede, Thomas de, 179 (3). 

Elmstede, 35. 

Elphie, Anne, 36 ; George, 36. 

Elsingspittle, London, 190. 

Elson, John, 158. 

Elsyng', John de, 181. 

Elsyngg', William de, 177 (2). 

Eltam, see Eitham. 

Eitham, 8 (2), 9 (2), 14, 15 (2), 17 (4), 
23, 24, 41, 44, 45, 184. 

Elton, John, M.A., 193. 

Eltonhead, John, 23 ; Nicholas, 15, 24; 
William, 15, 24 (2) ; and see Da- 
bridgcourt. 

Elt mheade, Ann, 21. 

Eitonhed, Ralph, 21. 

Elvin, Mr., on " The three Castles that 
keep the Downs," 247 ; Records of 
Walmer, 253. 

Elweryk, Richard de, 182 (3). 

Elwood, Lidia, 46 ; Thomas, 46. 

Ely, Bishop of, see iforke, James. 

Ely, Robert de, 177 (3) ; Alice, his 
wife, 177 (2). 

Elys, Alice, 166, 167 (2) ; John, 163 
(2), 166, 167 (3) ; William, 105. 

Enbrook, the, Sand^afe, 251, 253. 

England, 86, 88, 95, 262, 281 ; Chan- 
cellor of (Hen. de Wengham), 68; 
Kingdom of, 86. 

England and Wales, Jewell's Apology 
placed in all churches of, 270. 

England, Annals of, Matthew of West- 
minster, 260. 

Engleski, Bonacursus, son of, 67. 

English, the, 90, 91, 93. 

Englissh, William, 264 (2). 

Ensham, 55. 

Ensyng', John de, 165 (2), 166 (2), 
168; Nicholas de, 165, 166 (7). 

Ensyngg, John de, 179. 

Eppse^Will., 157, 158. 

Equimo'. 84. 

Erasmus, Paraphrase of , 270 (2). 

Eriffe, 26, 45. 

Erith, 2, 12, 16, 19, 20,21 (2), 22, 26, 
29 (3), 31, 32, 33 (2), 37, 44, 46. 

Escomb, Durham, 150. 

Eseling, see Eastling. 



322 



GENERAL INDEX. 



Eshe, Esse, see Ashe. 

Esscwoll, lliTi-h's do, 07. 

Essex, L01, 217, 218. 

Essex House, 83. 

Essex, Karl of (1560), 82 (4), 83(11); 

Adam de, 65(2); Henry, 39; Judith, 

39 
Esshe, L76, L84. 
Esshe oexl Wyngeham, L69. 

Ksshetosl'ord', 10l\ 
Estchyrch, see East-Church. 
Estgrenewyohe, see Greenwich, East. 
EsthalL.de, John, 104 (4); Matilda, 

164 (3). 
Est hallo, 183. 
Esthaw, Henry, 261 (2). 
Esture, 76. 
Etchingham, 4. 
Etherton, Richard, 23. 
En, Alix, Countess of, 68. 
Eufemme, Thomas, 182 ; Alice, his 

wife, 182 (2). 
Evans, Griffin, 27 ; William, 27. 
Eveleigh, William, 42. 
Eveleigh alias Burton, Elizabeth, 42. 
Everenden, Elizabeth, 18; Josia, 2 ; 

Josias, 2 ; Mary, 18. 
Everest, Bennette, 7 ; John, 24 (2) ; 

Robert, 7. 
Everest alias Kinge, Joan, 24 (2). 
Evernden, William, 46. 
Evernden alias Ramkin, Elizabeth, 

46. 
Eversfield, Robert, 39. 
Everyng, John de, 188. 
Evesham, 259 (2). 
Evorunden, Catherine, 23. 
Exchequer, Barons of, 199 (3). 
Exeter, Cathedral, 290 ; Chancellor of 

(Hen. de Wenghani), 68; Diocese 

of, 261 ; Prebend at, 193. 
Eylding, 38. 
Eyneford, 67 (4). 

Eynsford, 5, 16, 25, 27, 34, 36, 38. 
Eyre, Robert, Esq., 208. 
Ey thorn, 111. 

Fageham, de, John, 162 ; Margeria, 

162 (2). 
Fagg, Robert, Esq., 208 ; Thomas, 245. 
Faierbrother, Joan, 9 ; Thomas, 9. 
Fairebrother, Anne, 16 ; Thomas, 16. 
Fairechilde, Joan, 33. 
Fairefeild, 22 (2). 
Fairfax, Lord, 217. 
Falke, in Seal, 266. 
Falkener, Edward, 25; John, 25. 
Fan, Nicholas, 156. 
Fane, Thomas, 22. 
Fanshaw, Joan, Lady, 101, 102 ; 



Richard, 102; Thomas, L01 (8) ; 
William, 101. 
Fanshawe, Alice, 79; Sir Henry, 79; 
Elizabeth, bis wife, 79; Joan, 79; 
Katherine, 79 j Mary, 79; sir 
Riohard, 79 ; Sir Simon, 79 ; Thomas, 

79 (2) ; Sir Thomas, P.aron and 
Viscounl Fanshawe of Dromore, 79 ; 

William, 79. 

Farleigh, East, 5, 27, 31 (2), 140, 
153, 161, 162. 

Farleigh, W r est, 22, 42, 140, 141, 142, 
169, 19 1. 

Farnaby, Sir Charles, Bart., 78 ; Sarah, 
his da., 78. 

Farnborough, 17, 20 (2), 44, 164. 

Farnefold, Dame Dorothy, 16; Sir 
Thomas, 16. 

Farnham, 80, 248. 

Farningham, 15, 17, 34 (2). 

Farrington, Thomas, Treasurer of East 
India Company, 90. 

Fasti Ecclesia Hibernicce, Cotton, 
262. 

Fathers, Alice, 3 ; Anna, 34 ; John, 
34; Simon, 3 ; William, 3, 6. 

Fauconberge, Eustace de, 66. 

Faucunberg, Philip de, Archd. of 
Huntingdon, 66. 

Faunce, Bonham, 27. 

Faunce alias Jenkyn, Mary, 27. 

Faunt, Milo, 303. 

Faussett, Bryan, xliii. 

Faversham, 1, 3, 6, 7, 25, 27, 28, 29, 
31, 32, 37, 38, 41, 47 (2), 48, 54, 65, 
165, 166, 169 (4), 174, 181, 183, 192, 
203-210 ; Abbev, 293 ; Abbey 
Green, 208 ; Abbey St., 208 ; Church 
mead, 208 ; Common Council held 
at, 209, 210; Gold Treasures from, 
xliii; Grammar School, 112, 203; 
Mayors, 203-210, 219-221, 222, 227 ; 
Parish Register, 112 ; Partridge 
Lane, 209 ; St. Saviour's, Abbot of, 
210; the Sextry, 209; the Thome 
House, 209 ; Wardmote, Book of 
Corporation, 203 ; Wardmotes held 
at, 203, 204, 206, 209, 219 (2). 

Faversham, History of, Jacob, 203 ; 
Parish Clerks and Sexton of, A.D. 
1506—1593, by F. F. Giraud. Town 
Clerk, 203-210 ; Regulations for the 
Toion Porters, 1448 (ibid), 219-221. 

Fawkham, 183. 

Feeld, Richard, 3 ; Silvesta, 3. 

Feider, George, 18 ; Susanna, 18. 

Feilder, Alice, 16; Henry, 16. 

Felton, Nicholas, 269. 

Fennell, — , 225, 226 ; Joan, 20 ; John, 
20. 



GENERAL INDEX. 



323 



Ferour, John lo, 180 (2) ; Petronilla, 
bis wife, 180 (3). 

Ferrers, Selina, Dowager Countess, 
115. 

Ferrier, Sam., 224. 

Fetherby, Anne, 19 ; Henry, 19. 

Few, Charles Edward, M.A., 274 (3), 
275 (2). 

Feyrefeld', Edmund de, 176 (3) ; Fe- 
licia, his wife, 176 (2). 

Feysaunt, Thomas, 161. 

" Ffeccham," dio. of Winchester, 189. 

Field, Angel, 43. 

Fielder, Francis, 39; Mark, 39; 
Thomas, 39. 

Figg, Mary, 43 ; Richard, 43. 

Figgett, Henry, 45. 

Filmer, Jane, 27 ; Reginald, 27. 

Firmer alias Mosse, Mary, 10. 

Finch, Hon. Francis, 34; Sir John, 
Kt., 34 (2) ; Prior, 280 ; Richard, 
11 ; William, 32 ; and see Boughton. 

Finche, Will., 160. 

Findall, Anne, 29 ; Geoff ry, 31 ; 
Thomas, 29, 31. 

Findall alias Luckine, Ann, 31. 

Fines, Kent, 4-7 Fdw. III., 161-186. 

Fineux, John, 76 ; Elizabeth, his da., 
76. 

Firminger, David, 3. 

Fishcocke, Anne, 10. 

Fishcocke alias Acretey, Jane, 10. 

Fisher, Anne, 22 ; Benneit, 37 ; Car- 
dinal, 196 ; Joan, 4 ; John, Bp. of 
Rochester, 265 ; Thomas, 4, 37. 

Fishere, Richard, 102. 

Fitch, William, 31. 

Fitchett, Elizabeth, 1G ; William, 16. 

Fitz, John, 59. 

Fitzjoceline, Reginald, Bp. of Bath, 
276. 

Fitzrichards, Joan, 2 ; Thomas, 2. 

Fitz-Robert, Simon, Archdeacon of 
Wells, Provost of Beverley, 65. 

Fitz Thomas, John le, 174. 

Flambard, Simon, 169 (3). 

Flamstead, Anne, 37 ; Edward, 37. 

Flashby, Alexander, 34. 

Flekkene, John de, 179 (3) ; Kathe- 
rine, his wife, 179 (4). 

Fleminge, Richard, 43 ; Susan, 43. 

Flent, Edward, 15 ; Robert, 15. 

Flesher, John, 36. 

Fletcher, Anthony, 21 ; Giles, 21 ; 
Henry, 22 ; Nathaniel, C ; Phebe, 
6 ; Rose, 4 ; Thomas, 4. 

Flete next Sandwich, 167. 

Flethe, John de, 166, 167. 

Flewe, John, 300, 302. 

Flinder, John, 43. 



Flinder alias Knight, .Mary, 43. 
Flittenden, 45. 

Flood or Fludd, Thomas, 58 (2). 

Fludd, Bridget. 16 ; Henry, 12. 

Flyn, Catherine (of Greenwich), 3. 

Fogge, Mr., 113 ; Richard, 113. 

Foleswych', John de, 183 (3) ; Mar- 
geria, his wife, 183 (2) ; Michael de, 
183. 

Folkestan', see Folkestone. 

Folkestone, xli, 2, 4, 139, 169, 192, 
232 (2), 234, 241 (2), 247 (2), 248, 
250 (2), 251, 252 ; Hundred of , 236 
(2), 239, 240 ; Kiln at, 236 ; Or- 
grove, in Manor of, 236 ; St. Eans- 
with's Chapel, 236, 242, 243. 

Forbes, Francis Augustine, 275 (2). 

Ford in Wrotham, 58. 

Ford, Ruth, 20. 

Fordell, John, 18. 

Fordwich, 220. 

Foreman, Mr., 118. 

Forman, Thomas (of Eastwood), 3. 

Foster and Andrews, Messrs., of Hull, 
275. 

Foster, Hopestill, 20 ; John. 20 ; Mar- 
garet, 15 ; Mary, 20, 39 ; Patience, 
20 ; Richard, 20, 39 ; Thomas, 33 ; 
and see Nightingale. 

Fotherby, Dr., 112. 

Founders' Hall, 89. 

Fountayne, Anne, 10 ; Hugh, 10. 

Founteyne, Katharine, 54 (2), 63 ; 
William. 54. 

Fouwvs, William, 179 ; Lucia, his 
wife, 179 (2), 180. 

Fowbery, Christian, 29 ; John, 29. 

Fowle, — , glazier, 225. 

Fowler, William, 30. 

Foxe, John, Acts and Monuments, 56. 

Frampton, Rev. Thos. Shipdem, M.A., 
F.S.A., 64, 214, 217; Fifty-eight 
Rectors of Trottesclife, 187-194; 
Forty-five Vicars of Tilmanstoue, 
104-118; List of Incumbents of St. 
Peter's Seal (Held with St. Mary's, 
Kemsing, until 1874), 258-275. 

Framyngham, Dio. of Norwich, 263. 

France, 86 ; Ambassador to, see Tuke, 
Sir Bryan ; King of (1570), 230 ; 
War of Edward I. with, 260. 

Franche, Dorothy, 13; Edmund, 13. 

Francis, John, 48. 

Francklyn, Mary, 37 ; Thomas, 37. 

Franklin, Mary, 6; Richard, 6. 

Franklyn, Richard, 78 ; Mary, his da., 
78. 

Franks, Mr., 304. 

Fratres Hospitalis S. Marie, Dovor', 
C6. 

y2 



324 



(iKNERAL INDEX. 



Fraunoeys, ConstRnoe, 178 (5) ; Mar- 

geria, her sister, 173; Matilda, L86 

f2) ; Robert, L86 (2) ; Roger, L78 

(2) ; Simon, L86 (8). 
Frauncheleynes, Will, do, 69. 
Fray, Selwyn, 18. 
Freeman, Richard, 39. 
Freer, Leonard, 22. 
Freer alias Clark, Joan, 22. 
Freezer, Alice, 17; Ingram, 17. 
Fremelyn, Robert, 260, 
French Company, the, 96. 
French King, the, 85. 
French, Henry, 25 ; A. D. Weld, Esq., 

Index Armorial, xlii ; and see Wil- 

eox, Brooker. 
Frenche, Agnes, 11 ; Magdalen, 20; 

Richard, 20; Robert, 11. 
Frond, Richard, 178 (2); Alice, his 

wife, 178. 
Freningham, Rad. de, 69 (2). 
Frensbury, see Frindsbury. 
Frensshe, William le, 167 (2). 
Frentlistede, Johanna de, 168 (2) ; 

John de, 168 (4). 
Frenyngham, 164. 
Frere, John, 180 (2). 
Fressingfield, 277. 
Freynshe, John, 177 (2) ; Sara, his 

wife, 177 (3) ; William, 177 (2). 
Friday, Thomas (of St. Margaret's, 

Rochester), 4. 
Frig, John, 176 (2) ; Johanna, his 

wife, 176 (3). 
Friland', William, 176 (2). 
Frindsbury, 3, 10, 11, 13, 17, 18, 22, 

27, 31, 33, 39, 180, 194 ; Church of, 

153. 
Frittenden, 44. 
Fry, Mr. Alderman, xxxix (2), xlii ; 

Anne, 33 ; Edward W., Esq., xlii, 

298 ; Richard, 33. 
Fryenson, Mary, 43. 
Fryer, Dr., 266. 
Frythynden, 177 (2). 
Fugate alias Cley worth, Agnes, 9 ; 

John, 9. 
Fuller, Meriell, 14 ; William, 302. 
Funeral Monuments, Weever, 261. 
Fumes, Thomas, 191. 
Fygge, Tho., 108. 
Fykeys, Robert, 180 (2) ; Alice, his 

wile, 180 (3). 
Fynchecok, Robert, 188. 
Fynes, Sir James, Lord of Saye and 

'Sele, 264. 
Fvnmore, Mr. R. J., of Sandgate, 232, 

257. 
Fynningley, Francis, 25; Mary, 

25. 



G., " Magiater," Rector of Elham, 68. 

Gaddi, Taddio, Florentine artist, 118. 
Gaell, John, 87 ; and see Boyoe. 
Gage, sir John, Knt., 219; Eleanor, 

his wife, 219. 
Gale, Francis, 26; Leonard, 26. 
Galeys, William, nil (3). 
Galfr 1 , Rob. alius, 65: Bog. Alius, 67. 
Galion, Robert, L57 (2), L59 (2). 
< iamage, Henry, 31. 
Gamage alias Rigden, Catherine, 31. 
Gardiner, Brian, 34; Richard, 11; 

William, 34. 
Gardner, Alice, 43 (2) ; Christopher, 

43 ; Edward, 33 ; Thomas, 33, 43 ; 

and see Acourt. 
Gardner- Waterman, Rev. Waterman, 

xli, xlii, xliii, 145. 
Gargrane, Christopher, 6; Michael, 6. 
Garland, Alexander, 24, 25 ; Ann, 

23; Augustus, 25; Edward, 23; 

Joan, 24, 25 ; John, 25 ; Timothy, 

25 ; William, 25. 
Garland alias Tapsfield, Joan, 25. 
Garrard, Dame Jane, 44 ; Richard, 

159 (2). 
Garrett, Anne, 45 ; Elizabeth, 11 ; 

Henry, 11 ; John, 39 ; Thomas, 39. 
Garwynton, Alice de, 161 ; Hamon de, 

161. 
Gasson, Susan, 43 ; William, 43. 
Gate, Catherine, 6 ; Stephen, 6. 
Gateman, Elizabeth, 54. 
Gates, Thomas, 14 (2); Sir Thomas, 

92 (3). 
Gatford, George, 6 ; Rose, 6. 
Gauelkynde, Custom of, 56. 
Gaunt, George, 17 ; Nicholas, 17. 
Gavanti, 285. 
Gavelkind, Heirs in, 103. 
Gaylor, Thomas, 6 ; William, 6. 
Gaythorne, John, 96. 
Geale, Dionis, 26 ; Jane, 26. 
Geffray, Rich., 158. 
Gellibraud, Edward, 3. 
Gemetica (Jumieges), 277. 
Gennyns or Jenyns, Gilbert, 269 (2). 
George I., King of England, 192, 234. 
George II., King of England, 272, 273. 
George III., King of England, 116. 
George IV., King of England, 304. 
George, Richard, 33. 
Ger, Edith, 5. 
Gerneys, Isabella, 162 (2) ; William, 

162. 
Gervase of Canterbur} 7 , 151 ; on the 

Tombs in Canterbury Cathedral, 

277 (2), 278 (4), 279. 
Gibbes, Francis, 25 ; William, 25. 
Gibbon, Arthur, 46; Leonard, 46; 



GENERAL INDEX. 



325 



Robert, 46; Susan, 46; "William, 
46. 

Gibbons, Margaret, 46 ; Richard, 46 ; 
and see Trott. 

Gihhs' Collection, xliii. 

Giffard, Adam, 66. 

Gifford, Thomas, M.D., 38. 

Gilbert, John, 188. 

Gilbertus fil. Alex', 68. 

Gilbourne, Martha, 27 ; Thomas, 27 
(2). 

Giles, Daniel, 27, 43 ; German, 16. 

Giles alias Goddyn, Elizabeth. 16. 

Giles alias Haselden, Mary, 43. 

Gilham, John, 46 ; William, 46. 

Gilingham, Simon de, 176 ; James, his 
son, 176 (2). 

Gill, Mr., Beadle of Sandwich, 224. 

Gillet, Alice, 4 ; Emanuel, 4 ; Wil- 
liam, 4. 

Gillingham, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7 (2), 8, 9 (2), 
10, 11 (3), 12 (3), 13, 14, 16, 17, 18 
(2), 21, 22, 25, 30 (2), 31 (2), 33, 34 
(2), 36, 37, 38, 39, 40 (4), 42, 43 (2), 
153, 176. 

Gillingham, Joh's de, 66 (2) ; Thorn, 
de, 66 (2). 

Ginnes, Baldewin de, 65. 

Giraud, F. F., Town Clerk of Favers- 
ham, On Parish Clerks and Sexton 
of Faversham, A.D. 1506-1593, 203- 
210 ; Faversham, Regulations for 
the Town Porters, 219-221. 

Girdler, Richard, 18. 

Gladewyne, Hamo, 166 (2) ; Johanna, 
166 (3) ; Robert, 166. 

Gla lvvyn, Mary, 43 ; Thomas, 43. 

Glasgow College, 116. 

Glasier, Robert, 33. 

Glen Magna, Dio. of Lincoln, 103. 

Gleydell, Judith, 18 ; Reginald, 18. 

Gloucester, Bishops of, see Johnson, 
James ; Beadon, Richard. 

Gloucestershire, Masons brought from, 
to Sandgate, 235. 

Glover, Charles. 39; John, 22, 39; 
Mar}', 22 ; and see Stevens. 

Godalming, 151 (3). 

Godiventure, Nic, 302. 

Goddard, William, 29 (2). 

" Godden," Seal, 265. 

Godden, James, 17 ; Susan, 17. 

Goddens, John, 190. 

Goddin, Jane, 40. 

Goddvn, Bertylmewe, 238 ; and see 
Giles. 

Godfrey, Catherine, 43; Edward, 6; 
Elizabeth, 11; Oliver, 6; Susan, 
15 ; William, 11, 15 ; and see Shork. 

Godlok, Alice, 165 (3) ; Peter, 165 (2). 



Godmersham, 40, 42, 67, 173. 
Godstone near Reigate, 153. 
Godwin, Nicholas, 27 ; Susan, 27. 
Godwot, Alice, 175 (3) ; Ralph, 175 

(2) ; Thomas, 175 (2). 
Godwyn, Bishop, 281 (2). 
Godwynston', 173. 
Goffe, Joan, 33 ; John, 33. 
Goger, Isaac, 2. 
Goldhurst, 3, 6, 9, 10 (2), 22, 23 (2), 

31 (2), 33, 44. 
Goldinge, Anne, 31 ; John, 31. 
Goldock, Alice, 39; William, 39. 
Goldock alias King, Agnes, 25 ; Jane, 

22 (2); Mary, 22 (2). 
Goldsmyth, John, 300, 303. 
Goldwell, William, 18. 
Golson, Patrick, 41. 
Goodall, John, 46. 
Gooday, Christopher, 14. 
Gooden, Thomas, 40. 
Goodenough, Lieut.-General, C.B., 

xlii (2). 
Goodfrey, Mary, 31 ; Thomas, 31. 
Goodgroome, Thomas, 30; William, 30. 
Goodinge, Stephen, 13. 
Goodnestone, 54; next Windham, 46. 
Goodson, Margaret, 13 ; Mr., 50, 51 ; 

Mrs., 51 ; Thomas, 13. 
Goodwin or Godwyn, Mary, 193. 
Goodwyn, Alice, 19 ; Elizabeth, 19 ; 

James, 19; John, 19; "Master," 

269 ; Robert, 19. 
Gore Court, Otham, 58. 
Gorram, John, 157, 158, 159. 
Gorsage, Rev. John, 58. 
Gorsich, John, 264 (2). 
Gorton, William, 48. 
Goseburne, Thomas