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X 



SAN FRANCISCO 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 1223 04552 1433 

REFERENCE BOOK 

Nol to be taken from the Library 



i 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

San Francisco Public Library 



http://www.archive.org/details/bayregionbusines15sanf 



INDEX 

MY KEGIOIT BUSINESS 
Vol. 15 1958 

AGRICULTUBE 

Aiiiinistration' s ^arai Policy Talk Scheduled No. 4. . . . 2-lU 

Farm Waste Burning No Factor in Smog Control No. 5« • • • 2-28 

Conmittee Formed to Insure Keeping Jr. Grand National No. 6.__... 3-1^ 

'Keep Green' Canipaign Timed for Holidays Wo', 11.... 5-23 

Roger Jessup, Southern Dair^/man, Named State 'Livestock 

Man of Year' "by Chamher (w/cut) No. 21.... 10- 10 

Cut: Bovine Briefing Session — Alan K. Bro\^e, Carl 

Garrison, Carol Eamsey No. 21.... 10- 10 

Cut: "Ambassador Extraordinary" — Alan K. Browne, 

Louis Rozzoni No. 21 10-10 

MacPhee Farny-City Week Luncheon Speaker No. Zh. . . .11-21 

Agriculture's Vital Importance to State Subject of Brochure. .No. 25.... 12 -5 

ALA-SKA 

Box: Alaskan Statehood Backed "by Chamher No. 2. . . . 1-1? 

ANNUAL REPORT 

Annual Report No. 3 1-31 

AVKLTION 

Additional Nonstop Air Carrier Service Urged "by Cham"ber No. k.... 2-14 

Cut: Alan K. Browne & Others at American Airlines- Western 

Airlines Ticket Office in Merchandise Mart No. 6.... "^-1^* 

CAB Petitioned "by Cham"ber to Intervene in Pacific Southwest 

Local Service Case No. lU.... 7- 4 

Western Air Lines Asks Temporary Texas Service No. 18.... 8-29 

Miller in Appearance on Nonstop Hearing No. I9. . . . 9-12 

Cuts: United Air Lines No. 25.... 12- 5 

Cut: Japan Airlines Relocating American Region Hdq« Here.... No. 26.... 12- 19 

AWARDS 

Cham'ber Award of Progress Given Phillips & Van Orden Print 

Firm (w/cut) No. 10.... 5-9 

Cut: 100 th Anniversary Award to Aetna Insurance Company No. 11.... 5-23 

Sutherland Named California's Top 1957 Industrialist (v/cut).No. I3.... 6-20 

Cut: Cham"ber Honors A"bercrom"bie & Fitch No. Ih. ... 7- U 

BALLOT 

Repair Proe-ram for Aquarium is Backed No. 8. . . . ^11 

Unanimous Cham"ber Backing Given to Port Bond Issue No. 8.... ^11 

Directors Unanimously Back Ear"bor Development Bond No. 10.... 5- 9 

Local Businessmen, Cham"ber Urge Passage of Proposition "D"...No. 11.... 5-23 
Cham"ber Urges 'Yes' Vote on Five I'unicipal Ballot 

Propositions No. 11.... 5-23 

Charn"ber Directors Unanimously Oppose Proposition 17 No. I5.... 7-18 

Proposition 2 Gets Backing of Cham"ber No. 15. • • . 7-18 

Cut: Proposition No. 4 No. I5.... 7-18 

Page 1 



5^ Vsandsco Fublit Utrm. 

65 fe« 



INDEX 



MY REGION 3USIIIESS 
Vol. 15 1958 

MLLOT (contd) 

Cut: Proposition No. k No. l6. 

Chamber Unanimous in Backing "Right to Work" Measure on 

State Ballot No. I9. 

Tax Exemption on Non-Prof it Private Schools Given Okeh No. I9. 

Chamber Approves Six Propositions on City November Ballot.. No. 21. 

Prop. No. k — Modernization a "Must" For S. F. Port No. 21. 

'Yes' Vote on Six Vital City Bond Issues is Urged *** 

Three State Propositions Draw Chamber Approval No. 22. 

Chamber's Voting; Recommendations No. 22. 

Support Given to 10 Charter Amendments No. 22. 

Approval of Six State Amendments Given by Chamber No. 22. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

New Chamber Officers and Directors Begin 1958 Term 

(w/cuts and biographies) No, 1. 

President' s Messaf^e No. 1. 

Chamber Director Rene A. May Dies (w/cut) No. 6. 

Cut: Jack H. How Heads '59 Chamber Officpr Slate No. 26. 

'Continued Healthy Business Climate Needed to Keep S. P. 

in Limelight of the World' \ No. 26. 

ALAN K. BROWNE 

Outlook for Business "Most Encouraging" No. 2. 

Browne Chosen Investment Banker of Year (w/cut) No. 14. 

BUILDING & CONSTRUCTION 

Cut: 'Face Lifting' Given Q,ueen of the West No. 2., 

More Than $145 Million for Construction and Modernization 

Evidences San Francisco's Growth No. 2. 

San Francisco Builds: Bank of America Service Center No. 14., 

New Hancock Home Office Here Gets Christmas Lighting 

(w/cut) No. 26. . 

BUSINESS ACTIVITY 

Record Set For San Francisco Business Activity During 

First 11 Months of '57 No. 1. . 

S. F. Business Activity for I957 Attains Best Annual 

Level Ever No. '^. . 

Survey of Business in San Francisco for the Year 1957 No. 3.. 

San Francisco Business Activity Shows Boom in Construction 

For January '58 No . 5 . . 

San Francisco Business Activity Index for First Two 

Months Spcond Best in Decade No. 7. 

S. F. Business Activity for March was 7.6 Per Cent Above 

February , jjo^ ^ 

San Francisco Business Activity Sets April Record, Neai^ 

Record For 4 Months IJo, 12. . 

Page 2 



..8-1 

. . 9-12 
.. 9-12 
..10-10 
,.10-10 

, . 10-24 
.10-24 
.10-24 
.10-24 



. 1- 3 
. 1- 3 
. 3-14 
.12-19 

,12-19 



1-17 
7- 4 



. 1-17 

. 1-17 
. 7- i^ 

,12-19 



1- 3 

1-31 
1-^1 

2-28 
^-28 
4-25 
6- 6 



INDEX 

MY REPtION business 
Vol. 15 1958 

3USIimSS ACTIVITY (contd ) 

San Francisco Business Activity Hits Second Highest 

May Level on Record No. Ik, . . . 7- k 

San Francisco Business Activity Index of 15^.1 Best June 

Level in History No. 16.... 8- 1 

San Francisco Business Activity Index of I58.8 Best July 

Level in Its History No. 18.... 8-29 

General Trend of San Francisco Business Activity Almost 

Equals August of '57 No. 20.... 9-26 

San Francisco Business Activity Might Eclipse or Equal 

Last Year's Record High No. 23.... 11- 7 

S. F. Business Activity Sets Record For First 10 Months 

And For Octoher No. 25.... 12- 5 

CALENDAR— CHAMBER EVENTS 

Calendar — Chamber Events No. 1. , . . 1-3 

" " " No. 2.... 1-17 

" " " No. 3.... 1-31 

" " " No. k 2-lU 

" " " No. 5 2-28 

" H n jjq^ 6.... 3-14 

" " " No. 7.... 3-28 

" " " No. 8 ^11 

" " " No. 9.... ^-25 

" n II jjq^ iQ 5_ g 

" " " No. 11.... 5-23 

" " " No. 12.... 6- 6 

" " " No. 13 6-20 

" II ti ^jj^ lU.... 7- U 

" " " No. 15.... 7-18 

" " " No. 16.... 8- 1 

" " " No. 17.... 8-15 

" " " No. 18 8-29 

" " " No. 19 9-12 

" " " No. 20 9-26 

" " " No. 21 10-10 

" " " No. 22 10-24 

" " " No. 23.... 11- 7 

" " " No. 24 11-21 

" " " No. 25 12- 5 

" " " No. 26. ...12-19 

CHA^^BER DIRECTORIES 

Box: Wholesaler Directory Ready No. 4 2-14 

First Complete Merchant Wholesalers Directory Issued 

(w/coupon) No. 5.. .. 2-28 

Cut: Wholesaler Directory, Alan K. Browne & Selwyn Eddy. ...No. 5.... 2-28 

Coupon: Domestic Trade Directories No. 6.... "^-Ik 

« » " " No. 7..., 3-28 

Large Manufacturers' Directory Issued No. 9.... 4-25 

Page 3 



INDEX 

MY BE&IOH BUSINESS 
Vol. 15 1958 



CIVIC DETELOPI^HT 

Opperaann Praises Chamber for Eole in Planning and 

Eedevelop3ient of City No. 7. . . . ■;'-28 

Eei^ional Probleni Study No. 9. . . . k-2^ 

CONTEBEITCES & CONVENTIONS 

Halting of Employee Benefit Fund Aliuse Subject of Chamber- 
Sponsored Conference No. 1. . . . 1- 3 

National Conference on Employee Benefit Fund Legislation 

To Be Held Here Monday (w/cut of Sen. Gordon Allott) No. 2.... I-17 

Pension Panelists Gather For Conference (w/cuts) No. 2.... I-I7 

Small Business Confab Backed by the Chamber No. 9.... i^25 

Defense Resources Conference Set (w/cut of Hugh Gallagher) .. ..No. I6. . . . 8 -1 

National Defense Resources Conference Committees Named No. 17.... 8-15 

National Defense Resources Conference Faculty Members Are 

Announced (v/cuts) No. 18.... 8-29 

National Defense Conference Under V/ay Next Week No. I9.... 9-12 

Cut: William M. McNabb & Lt. Cdr. D. S. Holyoake No. I9 9-12 

National Defense Conference Draws Praise of Leaders No. 20.... 9-26 

Inflation, "Economic Enemy No. 1," Target of Regional 

Conference (w/cut of Dean Jacoby) No. 21. . . .10-10 

Northern California Chambers Cooperate in 'Small Business' 

Day No. 21 10-10 

More Than 4,000 Businessmen Expected to Attend Small 

Business 'Opportunity Day' No. 22.... 10- 24 

Small Business "Opportunity Day" Here Judged Most Successful 

One Held in the Country (w/cut) No. 23.... 11- 7 

Taxation Conference to be Sponsored by CPAs and the Chamber. . .No. 24.... 11-21 
Income Tax Conference, Sponsored by C.P.A.s and Chamber, 

Slated Thursday No. 25.... 12 -5 

Cut: Taxmen to Return No. 26. . . . 12-19 

DOMESTIC TRADE 

Communities Look to S. F. For Leadership No. 6.... 3-14 

Mayor Declares April as Home Improvement Month No. 8.... 4-11 

Ticoulat Appointed "Coastal Days" General Chairman No. 14.... 7- 4 

"Coastal Days" Event Honors Business and Community Leaders. .. .No. 16.... 8- 1 

'Coastal Days' Points Up Need for Regional Cooperation No. I7.... 8-I5 

Remodeled Homes to be on Display in Chamber 'Better Living' 

Program No. 20. . . . o-26 

65 Modesto Visitors by Plane, Boat, Bus No. 20.... 9-26 

G. L. FOX 

G. L. Fox on Jury Naming Outstanding Industrialist ( w/cut) ... .No. 7.... 3-28 

GIANTS 

Horace C. Stoneham, Owner of Giants, Commends Chamber 

(w/cut) No. 2 1-17 

Cut: New Home of the Giants No. 5. • • . 2-28 

S.F. Giants Stadium to be Most Modern in the United States. .. .No. 5.... 2-28 

Page 4 



INDEX 

BAY BEGIOH EUSIHBSS 
Vol. 15 1958 



&KEAT GOLDEN FLBBT 

Log of ChamlDer's Great Golden Fleet No. 3.... I-31 

Cut: Ad.li. Willia-Ti Halsey & Dan E. London ; llo. 3.--. 1-31 

International Press Group to "be Hosted "by 'Great Golden 

Fleet' of the ChanilDer Ho. 9.... ^4-25 

Great Golden Fleet Press Day Judged a 'Treniendous Success' 

(w/cut) Ho. 10.... 5-9 

Box: 'Great Golden Fleet' Escorts S. P. Ferry on Her 

Final Trip Ho. 16 8- 1 

Captains of Great Golden Fleet Sworn in as San Francisco's 

'Sea-Going Sheriffs' (w/cut) No. I?.... &-15 

HITTING THE HIGH SPOTS 

Hitting the High Spots No. 1. . . . 1-3 

II II II 'I No. k..., 2-lU 

II " " " No. 5 2-28 

II » I' 'I No. 6 3-14 

II II " " No. 7.... 3-28 

II •• " " No. 8.... 4-11 

II II II II No. 9 4-25 

II II II II No. 10.... 5-9 

II 'I " " No. 11.... 5-23 

II II " " No. 12.... 6-6 

II i» " " No. 13.... 6-20 

II I' II " No. Ik 7- k 

" " " " No. 15.... 7-18 

II ' No. 16.... 8- 1 

II » " " No. 17 8-15 

n " " " No. 18.... 8-29 

II I' II " No. 19 9-12 

II « " " No. 20 ... . 9-26 

'• " " " No. 21 10-10 

II II I' " No. 22.... 10- 10 

II " I' " No. 23.... 10-24 

II " " " No. 24 11-21 

« " " " No. 25 12-5 

« " " " No. 26. . . . 12-19 

INDUSTRIAL 

Unique Chaniher Survey Points up Vast Manufacturing 

Potential of Bay Area No. 5. . . . 2-28 

Doerr Heads Industrial Advisory Coramittee No. 6.... 3-1^ 

Plans Formulated to Make Intensive Study of San Francisco 

Region' s Business Cliniate No. 6. . . . :'-l4 

'Wait and See' View Affects Expansions No. 12 6- 6 

Housing Code Passed "by Supervisors After Adoption by 

Chamber Directors No. 13.... 6-20 

'Task Force' Na-Tied for Business Climate Inventory Project No. 1^.... 6-20 

End of Industrial 'Slow-Down' Seen (w/cut of L. K. Holland) . .No. 14.... 7- 4 

Page 5 



i I D E X 

BAY REGION BUSIKESS 
Vol. 15 1958 

INDUSTRIAL (contd ) 

Industrial Expansion For 5 Months of '58 Shows Upward Trend. . .No. 15.... 7-18 

Hunters Point Reclamation Plans Nearin^ Reality No. 15. . . . 7-18 

Area "E" Tentative Plan Unveiling Set at S. 7. City Hall No. l6 8- 1 

Product Potential Survey in Demand No. I7. . . . &-I5 

Halo Sales to Move Industrial Quarters No. 18.... 8-29 

Industrial Expansion Growing in Bay Region No. 18. . . . 8-29 

Industrial Expansion Takes a Big Rise (7 Months) No. 20.... 9-26 

Littlefield, Former Chamber President, Elected to American 

Mining Congress Board of Governors No. 21.... 10- 10 

Over $4 Million in Industrial Expansion No. 23.... 11- 7 

$327,965,979 Committed in Industrial Expansion for 

Northern California No. 24. . . .11-21 

Air Pollution Group Formed "by Chamber No. 25. . . . 12- 5 

Lewis Holland Goes East for Industrial Conference (w/cut) No. 25.... 12- 5 

More Than $360 Million Committed in Industrial Expansion 

For Northern California No. 26....12-19 

LEGISLATION 

Reciprocal Trade Act Supported "by Chamber No. 6.... 3-14 

Tightening of Federal Budget Purse-Strings Urged by Chamber. ..No. 6.... 3-14 

Directors Back Cordiner Plan, Presidio Status Quo No. 7.... 3-28 

Canal Toll Bill Backed No. 9. . . . 4-25 

Federal Transioortation, Aviation Agency Bills Given Backing 

By Chamber Officials No. 14.... 7-4 

Wilderness Bill Opposed by Chamber No. 24. . . .11-21 

LUNCHEONS 

Sir David Eccles to Discuss Future of Britain at Luncheon 

(w/cut) No. 1. . . . 1- 3 

Asia Topic o"^ NBC News Correspondent (w/cut of Jim Robinson) . .No. 1.... 1- 3 
High-Calibre Federal Personnel Result of Civil Service Act, 

Says Chamber President No. 2. . . . I-I7 

Mellon Speaker at 75th Anniversary of Civil Service Act No. 1.... 1- 3 

"Holland in a V7orld of Turmoil" Subject of SFAUTA Address No. 4 2-14 

Sir Donald Anderson Addresses SFAWTA No. 7. . . . 3-28 

Inadequate Insurance Eatfs to be Discussed No. 8.... 4—11 

Gardiner Symonds 'Invest in America' Week Speaker (w/cut) No. 9.... 4-25 

Deputy Secretary of Defense Speaker at Armed Forces Lunch 

(w/cut) No. 10 5- 9 

Fr. John Connolly, S.J. Featured Speaker at USF Civic 

Luncheon (w/cut of Thos. F. Stack) No. I9.,.. 9-12 

Navy Day Luncheon Scheduled on Monday No. 22. . . . 10-24 

MASS TRANSIT 

Peirce is Appointed General Manager of Bay Transit District. . .No. 13.... 6-20 

Page 6 



I 5 D 1 X 

MY REGION BUSINESS 
Vol. 15 1958 



MEI.fflERSHIP 

New Members in Recent Months (w/cuts) No. U 2-1^ 

H II II H " "' No. 5 2-28 

II II ti II " •• No. 6.... 3-14 

M II II "I II n No. 7.... 3-28 

H II II II « •• No. 8.... U-11 

n II II II " " No. 11.... 5-23 

II II II II « " No. 13.... 6-20 

New Members of the ChamlDer (w/cuts) No. lU. . . . 7- ^ 

II II II II II " No. 15.... 7-18 

n II II II " " No. 16.... 8- 1 

II II II II II » No. 17.... 8-15 

II II II II " " No. 18.... 8-29 

n II II II I" •' No. 20.... 9-26 

11 II II II II " No. 22. . . . 10-2^ 

H II II II II " No. 25 12- 5 

Memhership Development Program Slated No. 26. . . . 12-19 

MISCELIANEOUS 

Commercial Nev.'s Widens Horizons, Given New Look (w/cuts 

of Newton Wise & William 7. Marriott) No. 2. . . . 1-17 

13 Federal Projects Invited "by GSA Financing Bids No. 2.... 1-17 

Box: Chamber of Commerce Week Set No. 3.... 1-?1 

Drawing Power of S. F. Region Sho\m hy Cinerama Success No. 4.... 2-14 

Cut: New Cinerama, "Search for Paradise," West Coast 

Premiere March 11 No. U 2-14 

Evelyn La Place Heads S. F. Council of District Merchants 

(w/cuts) No. 4. ... 2-14 

Cut: Chinatown Fetes 'Year of Dog' No. 4. . . . 2-14 

S. F. Bay Boasts 4 World's Top Bridges (w/cut of Bay Bridge. No. 8.... 4-11 
Cut: "My Enchanted City" record with Alan K. Browne, 

G. L. Fox, Chris Jenkins, Ted Hayes No. 11.... 5-23 

Cut: Alan K. Browne at Groimdhreaking of Allstate 

Insurance Center No. 11.... 5-23 

'My Enchanted City' Record Commended (w/cut & coupon) No. 12.... 6- 6 

Workers' Horsepower Shows Share Upswing (w/cut) No. 12.... 6- 6 

'Youth Wants to Work' Summer Program Slated No. 12.... 6- 6 

Cut: "My Enchanted City" Promotion at Chamher Exhibit at 

World Trade Week Ohservance No. 12. ... 6- 6 

S. F. Has 7 Billion Dollar Firms No. 12.... 6- 6 

Old Firm Relocates Here — ^Ahhot A. Hanks, Inc. (w/cuts) No. 13.... 6-20 

Box: San Francisco Quotes No. 13.... 6-20 

Box: " " " No. 14.... 7-4 

Box: 'Temporary' 40- Year Enrployee Retiring — Edna 

Thomason No. 14 7- 4 

Better Buy Now No. 14 7-4 

Cut: Edna Thomason, G. L. Fox No. 15.... 7-18 

Box: San Francisco Quotes No. I5. . . . 7-18 

Box: " " " No. 16.... 8- 1 



Page 7 



i 5 D E X 

MY REGION BUSINESS 
Vol. 15 1958 



MISCELIANEOUS (CONTD ) 

'Pacific Festival Days' Proclaimed "by Mayor in Honor of 

States and Nations of Ocean Area No. I7. . . . 8-I5 

Cut: Honoring Pacific — Mayor Christopher, Supervisor Henry 

Eolph, Rohert B. Murray, Cita Trinidad No. 1?.... 8-I5 

Coupon: San Francisco — My Enchanted City Record Order No. I7. . . . 8-15 

Cut: "Amhassadors Extraordinary" Cards Presented to Actors 

in "Line-Up" No. 18 8-29 

Producer, Actors of "The Lineup" Honored tiy Chamher No. 18.... 8-29 

Governors Speak at 'Pacific Festival' No. 18.... 8-29 

Cut: Chester R. MacPhee, Jack Lauck, Jim Warnock at Press 

Cluh No. 18. . . . 8-29 

Pacific Festival Calendar No. I9..., 9-12 

Cut: Mr. Fox and Miss Chinatown — USA No. I9.... 9-12 

"Pacific Festival Days," Honoring States and Nations of 

Pacific Area, Begins Today No. I9. . . . 9-12 

Cut: Festival Plans Discussed: Eohert Murray, Mayor 

Christopher, Dan S. London No. I9.... 9-12 

Cut: Overland Mail Commemorative Stamp No. 20.... 9-26 

Mail Centennial Celehration Plans Hearing Completion No. 20.... 9-26 

30 Large Corporations No. 20.... 9-26 

Mayor' s Plan for Annual Pacific Union Meeting in San 

Francisco Given Impetus from Festival No. 20. . . . 9-26 

Cut: Pacific Festival — Starlets See Film No. 20.... 9-26 

Box: San Francisco Quotes No. 20. . . . 9-26 

Program for Overland Mail Centennial No. 21. . . .10-10 

Cinerama Premiere Dinner Sponsored hy Press Cluh, Chamber No. 22....10-2U 

Cut: Cinerama South Seas Adventure No. 22.... 10-2'+ 

Fisherman's Wharf Fiesta Scheduled for First Time w/cuts No. 23.... 11- 7 

Hellenic Queen Press Cluh Cineraria Guest No. 23 11- 7 

Citywide Celehration Honors 'Muni Week' (w/cut) No. 23. ...11- 7 

San Francisco's First Annual Fisherman's Fiesta Acclaimed 

As "Highly Successful" No. 24 11-21 

Cut: Queen Diva and Supervisor Ziirooli No. 24. . . .11-21 

Box: Oddie Praised for Work as Chairman of Fisherman's 

Fiesta (w/cut) No. 24 11-21 

Speegle to Author Book on Chamher No. 24. , . . 11-21 

Cut: "Miss Cinerama South Seas" — Roy Buell, Margaret 

Cohan, Dan London No. 24. . . . 11-21 

National Conference of Christians and Jews to Hold 25th 

Anniversary No. 25. • . .12- 5 

San Francisco Quotes No. 25.... 12- 5 

San Francisco Facts No. 25-... 12- 5 

Marine Exchange Officers Named for Coming Year No. 26. . . .12-19 

Coupon: "San Francisco — My Enchanted City" Record Order No. 26.... 12- 19 

Record ' 59 Peak is Predicted for Tourism No. 26 12-19 

San Francisco Fact Fillers No. 26 12-19 



Page 8 



INDEX 

mY HEGIOU BUSINESS 
Vol. 15 1958 

REDEVELOPMENT 

Tentative Plan for Redevelopment of Area B-1, Ein"barcadero- 

Lower Market, Approved "by Chamter No. I7. . . . &-I5 

Produce ?irTns Back •G-olden Grate\<ay' No. I9. . . . 9-12 

RESEARCH 

San Francisco's Buying Income Per Capita Ranks Highest 

Among Large Cities in the United States No. 18. . . , 8-29 

RETAIL MERCHANTS ASSOCIATION 

Retail Merchants President Envisions Good Tear Ahead No. 2.... I-I7 

Cut: 1958 Retail Merchants Association Officers No. 2.... I-I7 

Fall Fashion Show is Slated July 24-25th No. 12.... 6- 6 

Retail Merchants Ass'n. , Tax Section Commended for Sales 

Tax Victory No. lU..., 7- k 

Cut: 'White Collar' (Jirle Parade No. I5.... 7-I8 

San Francisco Fashion Industries Hold Spectacular Union 

Square Apparel Show No . 1 5 ... . 7-18 

SALUTE TO SAN FRAITCISCO INDUSTRY 

California, Can Center of the Cosmos No. 2.... I-I7 

San Francisco, Headquarters for Western Advertising No. k.... 2-14 

Library of Western Industry A Notable S. F. 'First' No. 23.... 11- 7 

SAN FRANCISCANA 

The Argonaut — San Francisco Tradition No. 7. . . . 3-28 

Cut: The Argonaut, 1958 No. 7 3-28 

Chamher Begins Its 109th Historic Year (w/cuts of Sam 

Brannan, Birthplace of Chamber) No. 10.... 5- 9 

San Francisco Boys Chorus (w/cuts) No. I3. . . . 6r-20 

Santa Fe Film No. 15. . . . 7-18 

"Holiday for Kids" (Gray Line Tour) No. I6. . . . 8- 1 

World Within a City No. I7 8-I5 

City's Ballet Gains International Fame (w/cuts) No. 25. ...12- 5 

SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBERGRAPH 

No. 17— Bay Region Industrial Expansion No. 6. . . . 3-14 

No. 18 — Foreign Trade is a Billion Dollar Bay Area Business. . .No. 11.... 5-23 

No. 19— Housing—Vital in Regional Growth No. 24. . . .11-21 

No. 20 — S. F. Employment No. 26 12-19 

SAN FRAI^CISCO PROGRESSOGRAM 

No. 35 — Bay Model, Clue to Future No. 3.... I-3I 

No. 36 — Building Boom No. 5 2-28 

No. 37 — Bethlehem Building Giant Tankers No. 8. . . . 4-11 

No. 38 — Downtown Parking Gets a Break No. I9. . . . 9-12 

Page 9 



I. N D E X 
MY REGION BUSIMESS 



Vol. 15 



1958 



SPECIAL PROJECTS 

Record llimter of Businessmen Expected to Take Part in Eighth 

Annual Education-Business Day (w/cut) No. 8. . . . i<— 11 

8th Annual Education-Business Day Breaks Previous Attendance 

Record No. ^.. . , U-25 

Cut: Education-Business Day No. 10.... 5-9 

Many Firms Participated in San Francisco's 8th Annual 

Education-Business Day No. 12. ... 6-6 

Nearly 3,800 Teachers Sign Up for B-E Day No. I9.... 9-12 

Early Business-Education Sign-up Date Slated; Nearly 3.700 

Teachers Expected to Participate No. 21.... 10- 10 

Cut: Readyin;?; for Business-Education Day — Dr. J. Dierke, 

Handle Shields, Alan K. Brovme, Dr. Edward Goldman No. 21 10-10 

3,600 Teachers to he Hosted "by Firms During 8th Annual 

»B-E Day' No. 22. . . .10-24 

Cut: 8th Annual Business Education Day No. 22. . . . lO-Zh 

STREET. HIGHWAY & BRIDGE 

National Parkway Study Funds Urged No . 7 . . . . 3-28 

Extension of Highways and Freeways Vital to City's Growth 

(w/cut) No. 11. . . . 5-23 

Highway Budget for S. F. Recommended hy C of C No. 18.... 8-29 

Chamber Approves Crosstovm Freeway Plan ' In Principle' No. 22. . . .10-2^ 

Highway & Bridge Section Luncheon Set No. 24.... 11-21 

TAXES 

San Francisco Tax Calendar—First Half of 1958 No. 2 1-17 

Revision of City Charter Urged hy Chaaher in Compliance 

With Bradley- Bums Legislation No. 4. . . . 2-14 

Tightening of State Expenditures Urged No. 5. . . . 2-28 

•Ahility to Pay Should Determine Emergency Fees' No. 11.... 5-23 

S. F. Tax Calenda]>— Second Half, 1958 No. 13.... 6-20 

TRAFFIC SAFETY & CONTROL 

Citywide Safety Check Sponsored hy Chamher No. 8 4-11 

Citywide Voluntary Vehicle Safety-Check Program, Chamher- 

Sponsored, Next Week No. 11 5-23 

More Than 4,000 Vehicles Checked in Safety Campaign No. 12.... 6- 6 

Chamher Commended for Award-Winning Safety-Check Effort No. I6. . . . 8- 1 

'State Award of Excellence' Plaque Given to Chamher for 

Vehicle Safetj-^Check Work No. 24 11-21 

Cut: Safety Award No. 24 11-21 

WORLD TRADE 

Rohert Taylor Named SFA^iTTA President No. 2 I-I7 

Box: Symbol of Sister City - Osaka No. 4 2-14 

Itinerary for SFAWTA's Second Annual Business Tour of 

Eastern Asia All Set No. 4 2-14 

Page 10 



INDEX 

BAY BEGION SUSIMESS 
Vol. 15 1958 

WORLD TRAHE (COKTD ) 

Far East Trade Through S. F. Port Should Get Lift From 

Business Development Tour No. 6. . . . 3-lU 

New Features Planned For Celebration of 22nd Annual World 

Trade Week ITo. 

Trade Mission Lootds A "Resounding Success" .No. 

Cut: Planning East Bay Representation on 1958 Asia 

Business DeTelopmcnt Mission No. 

Cut: Far East Business Tour Members Leaving Airport No. 

Cut: Gift Sent to S.F.'s 'Sister-City' Osaka No. 

More Than 153 Foreign Officials Headquartered Here No. 

S. F. Australia Trade Potential "Untapped" No. 

Tripp Speaks at World Trade Lunch No. 

Port Authority Head Cyril Magnin World Trade Week Speaker. .. .No. 

Australian 'Business Opportunity Tour' Slated No, 

Chamher, SFAWTA to Aid S.F. International Fair No. 

Cut: Increase Your Pacific Business — Glenn S. Dumke, 

Dr. Willian P. Golden, Jr., Rohert Taylor No. 

Cut: Osaka Doll Presented to Sister City S. F No. 

Box: Brochure on "Billion Dollar Industry" Issued No. 

World Trade Brochure No. 

Businessmen Asked to Visit Tokyo Trade Fair No. 



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.. 3-1^ 


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.. 3-28 


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. . 3-28 


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.. 4-11 


9.. 


.. 4-25 


9.. 


.. U-25 


9.. 


.. 4-25 


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..5-9 


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..5-9 


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.. 9-26 


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. . 10-10 


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Page 11 



I 




FRANCISCO CHAMBER 



BUSINESS 



JANUARY 3. 1958 



New Chamber Officers and Directors Begin 1958 Term 




President 

ALAN K. BROWNE 

Vice-President, Bank of America N.T. & 
S.A. Born, Alameda, 1909. Attended 
University of California. Joined Bank of 
America (Bank of Italy 
^gffi N.T. & S.A.), 1929. 

Mtm \ Elected Vice Pres., B. 

jPv of A., 1952. Manager, 

Municipal Bond Dept., 
py,^ WCi' 1956. Served with 

A.U.S., 1942-46; re- 
'^' leased as Major, AGC. 

Member, S. F. Bay 
Area Rapid Transit 
Commission, S. F. Park- 
ing & Transit Council; 
Municipal Div. Council, Investment Bankers 
Association of America. 



Second Vice President 

JACK H. HOW 

President, Western Machinery Co. and 
Western-Knapp Engineering Co. since 
1953; General Mgr., Edward R. Bacon Co. 
since 1944. Born in Salt 
Lake City, 1909. Grad- 
uated, Stanford Univ., 
1930. Member Rotary 
Club of S. F., Engineers 
Club of S. F., Ameri- 
can Inst, of Mining & 
Metallurgical Engi- 
neers (A.I.M.M.E.); 
Dir., American Mining 
Congress (A.M.C.); 
Chairman, Board of 
Governors, Manufacturing Division, 1958 
American Mining Congr.; Director of Pa- 
cific National Bank. 



Treasurer 

EMMETT G. SOLOMON 

Vice-President and Director, Provident 
Securities Co., Crocker Estate Co. Born in 
Omaha and educated at University of Wis- 
consin. With First Nat'! 
Bank, Omaha, and for- 
mer President, Ameri- 
can Factors, Ltd., Hon- 
olulu. Joined present 
company, 1953. Direc- 
tor and Ch., Ex. Com., 
Gladding, McBean & 
Co., and director and 
member, Ex. Com., 
Crocker-Anglo Bank, 
Matson Nav. Co. Di- 
rector, Atholl McBean Foundation, Mills 
Mem. Hospital and Stanford Res. Institute. 





'P^e<UcCe*tt'<i THc^^^^ 

The presidency of the San Francisco 
Chamber of Commerce is a stewardship 
charged ivith the responsibility of carry- 
ing forward a continuing program which, 
during its 107-year history, has made the 
Chamber the one organization represent- 
ing all facets of the business and profes- 
sional community devoted to the welfare 
and progress of San Francisco. Many of 
the projects initiated during 193S will 
not see completion for many years; con- 
versely, we will owe many of our suc- 
cesses during the year to the groutidwork 
established by Chamber officers, directors 
and committeemen who have served the 

( Continued on page six ) 

Third Vice President 

O. R. DOERR 

Vice-President in Charge of Sales, Pa- 
cific Gas & Electric Company. Born in St. 
Louis, Mo. Educated at St. Louis Univer- 
sity and U. S. Naval 
Academy. With Great 
Western Power Co., 
1921; joined P.G. & E., 
1930; general sales 
manager, 1939; vice- 
president, 1948. Past 
President, Pac. Coast 
Gas Assn., S. F. Sales 
Managers' Assn., and 
Electric Club of San 
Francisco. Several 
years taught salesmanship and manage- 
ment, University of California Extension 
Service. 



Assistant Treasurer 

ROBERT H. BARR 

Vice President, Di Salvo Trucking Co. 
Born 1927 in San Francisco. Attended West 
Portal Grammar School, Aptos Junior High 
and Abraham Lincoln 
High School and the 
University of California 
Extension School. Em- 
ployed by Yellow Cab 
Co. in 1945, he served 
as purchasing agent, 
claims investigator and 
general manager of the 
Daly City Yellow Cab 
Co. In 1957 he became 
Vice President of Di 
Salvo Trucking Co., a Yellow Cab Co. sub- 
sidiary. Elected San Francisco Junior Cham- 
ber of Commerce Executive Vice President 
in 1956 and President in 1957. 






First V ice President 

DAN E. LONDON 

Managing Director, St. Francis Hotel and 
V-P, Western Hotels. Born, Seattle. AHend- 
ed Univ. of Washington. Hotel manage- 
ment in Northwest until 
1935 when he moved 
to San Francisco as 
manager of the Sir 
Francis Drake Hotel 
and became manager, 
St. Francis Hotel, 1938. 
Director, S. F. Conven- 
tion and Visitors Bu- 
reau and G.G. Bridge 
and Highway District. 
Past President, Califor- 
nia State Hotel Assn. Commodore, Great 
Golden Fleet. Life member. National Rifle 
Assn. 



Fourth Vice President 

G. L. FOX 

General Manager, San Francisco Cham- 
ber of Commerce. Born in Stockton, 
1899. Attended University of California 
with major studies in 
industrial engineering 
and management. 
Spent 3 years as work- 
ing newspaperman and 
managing editor. Was 
industrial and traffic 
director of Parr-Rich- 
mond Terminal Corp. 
and Parr Terminal Co. 
for 6 years before join- 
i n g San Francisco 
Chamber in 1943. Prior 
to affiliation with Parr, was manager, indus. 
dept., Stockton Chamber, for 13 years, and 
had broad experience in manufacturing, 
mining and other fields. 



Secretary 

MARIE A. HOGAN 

A native of Grass Valley, Calif., she has 
been with the Chamber for most of her 
business career. Joined staff in 1924 afi-er 
having served several 
years as legal secre- 
tary. Became Assistant 
Secretary in 1928; 
elected Secretary in 
1929. Corporate duties 
include serving as Sec- 
retary to the Board, 
custodian of Chamber 
records and assign- 
ments directed by 
General Klanager. 





Friday, January 3, 1958 



JAMES H. BARRY II 

President, The James H. Barry Co. Born in San 
Francisco, 1914. Graduated, Univ. of Calif., 
1935. Entered James H. 
Barry Co. as salesman. 
Served as Lt. Comndr., 
U. S. Navy W.W. II. 
Vice-President of his 
company. 1945, and ex- 
ecutive vice-president, 
1948. Became president 
in March, 1955. Region- 
al director. Printing In- 
dustry of America: Vice 
Pres., Employing Print- 
ers Association of San 
Francisco: Board of 
Governors, Bay Area Council. Me 
Advertising Club, Navy League, 
wealth Club. 




iber, S. F. 
Common- 



BENJAMIN F. BIAGGINI, JR. 

Vice Pres., Exec. Dept., Southern Pacific Co. 
Born, New Orleans, 1916. Educated at St. 
Mary's Univ. of Texas; 
St. Thomas University 
Houston; University of 
Houston: Harvard Bus. 
School. Entered railroad 
service, 1936, Texas & 
New Orleans Railroad. 
Entered S.P.'s executive 
office at Houston in 
1953 as Exec. Asst. 
Joined S. F. office of 
So. Pacific as vice pres. 
in August, 1956. Mem- 
ber, American Railway 
Engineering Assn. One of youngest ra 
executives in U. S. 





ROBERT W. CAHILL 

President, Cahill Construction Co. Born in 
Oalcland. Stanford University, Class of 1937. 
Vice President of West- 
ern Manganese Co. 
1940-42. See Bees, U. S. 
Navy, 3 yrs. Has held 
present position since 
end of World War II. f i 

Director, Californians, ■ ^ 

Inc., St. Elizabeth's Hos- 
pital, Former Director, 
United Crusade, Red 
Cross. Telegraph Hill 
Neighborhood Associa- 
tion. 



£. ir. CAREY 

E. W. (Stace) Carey, Vice President — Adminis- 
tration of Fibreboard Paper Products Corpora- 
tion. Born in Melbourne, 
Australia, September 4, 
1902. Graduated from 
Northwestern University 
School of Commerce in 
1925: spent the next 
four years with Arthur 
Andersen and Com- 
pany, public account- 
ants in Chicago and 
Milwaukee. In 1929 
joined United States 
Gypsum Company; dur- 
ing his 22 years with 
that organization served as controller, general 
dealer sales manager, and finally vice presi- 
dent-personnel. Appointed to his present office 
for Fibreboard in April, 1957. 





ir. ir. DAVISON 

Vice-President, Standard Oil Company. Born, 
Peabody, Kan., 1897. Graduated, Univ. of 
California, 192 1 , and 
joined Standard im- 
mediately as junior en- 
gineer. Served in vari- 
ous capacities until 
named general manager 
of the El Segundo Re- 
finery in 1944 and elect- 
ed vice-president, 1948. 
Member, Board of Gov- 
ernors, Federated Em- 
ployers of S. F., mem- 
ber, Stock Exchange 
Club, American Petro- 
leum Institute, N.A.M., and Junior Achieve- 
ment of San Francisco, Inc. 



ARTHUR J. DOLAN. JR. 

Vice Pres. & Sales Mgr., BIyth & Co., Inc. 
Born in S. F., 1908. Graduated, Lowell Hiah 
School; attended Co- 
lumbia Univ. U.S. Army 
1940-46, retiring as Lt. 
Colonel. Has served as 
Pres., S. F. Jr. Chamber 
of Commerce: member. 
Employees Council. Bay 
Area Rapid Tra nsit 
Commission; Dir., St 
Francis Homes Assn., Jr. 
Achievement; Chair- 
man, Invest-in-America 
Week. Founded Big 
Brother movement in Jr. 
Chamber, Volunteers for Better Govt. Chaii 
man, Republican Fin. Comm., S. F. 




IVAN BRANSON 

Founder & President, Morning Glory Sandwich 
Co. Born in Mariposa, 1901. Attended high 
school in Stockton, later 
learned telegraphy and 
worked for commercial 
firms and Associated 
Press, S. F. Began pres- 
ent business with 5-cent 
sandwich delivery serv- 
ice, 1931. Firm now em- 
ploys 45. Has served as 
Pres., Commcl. Telegra- 
phers Union; Pres., S. F. 
Gem & Mineral Society; 
and State Pres., Nat'l 
Exchange Club. During 
U.N. organization in S. F. he was named by 
Exchange Club to be consultant to U. S. State 
Dept. 




RANSOM M. COOK 

Senior Vice-President, American Trust Co. 
Born, Portland, Ore., and attended Oregon 
State College. Army 
service. World War I. 
Thirty-five years with 
American Trust and 
presently senior com- 
mercial loan officer and 
supervisor of Foreign 
Banking Dept. Vice 
President, California 
Bankers Assn., member. 
Board of Trustees and 
finance committee, Cali- 
fornia Physicians Serv- 
ice, President, The 
Japan Society of S. F.; Bd. of Trustees, S. F. 
Museum of Art. Dir., American Trust Co. and 
Cutter Laboratories, Besler Corporation, Re- 
serve Oil and Gas Company. 




SELWYN EDDY 

Vice President, West Coast, Shell Oil Com- 
pany. Born, Bay City, Mich., 1903. Attended 
Yale University. Began | 
with Shell in San Fran- 
cisco, 1925, as service 
station attendant. Sales | 
manager. Southern Cali- 
fornia, 1932; division 
manager, 1935. Lieut. 
Comndr., U. S. Navy, 
W.W. II. Named N. Y. 
marketing division man- 
ager for Shell, 1945, and 
appointed general sales 
mgr., 1954. Member, 
San Francisco Stock Ex- 
change Club, and the Pacific Union Club. 




ROBERT M. BROWN 

Partner, McCutchen, Thomas, Matthew, Grif- 
fiths & Greene. Born, Mobile, Alabama, 1911. 
Graduated Stanford 
Univ., 1931, Student 
Body President. Rhodes 
Scholar at Oxford Univ., 
England, Bachelor of 
Civil Law, 1934. Joined 
present firm after col- 
lege, becoming partner, 
1946. Served as Lt. 
Comndr., U. S. Navy. 
World War II. Member 
American Bar Associa- 
tion. 




EARLE C. DAHLEM 

Executive Vice President and General Manag- 
er of Wm. L. Hughson Co., Inc. Born in 
Summerfleld, III., 1895. | 
Enlisted in the Air Serv- 
ice in 1917. Became as- 
sociated with his pres- I 
ent company in 1920. In 
1938 became manager 
and acquired a one-half { 
interest in his firm. He 
belongs to the Polk-Van 
Ness Optimist Club, 
and became the Optim- 
ists' International Vice- 
President in 1945-46. 
He is a member of the Royal Arch Masons, 
S. F. No. 1; San Francisco Commandery No. 1 
Knights Templar, the Islam Temple and Royal 
Order of Jesters, S. F. Court No. 4. 




FRANK P. GOMEZ 

Industrial Realtor. Actively engaged in indus- 
trial real estate for 20 years. Member and 
Director, S. F. Real Es- 
tate Board. Member, 
Society of Industrial 
Realtors; Founder and 
President, Northern 
California Chapter, 
S.I.R. Member & Offi- 
cer, S. F. Bay Area 
Council. Member, S. F. 
Commercial Club. Born 
In Mazatlan. Educated 
In San Francisco schools. 
Has a wide background 
and deep experience in 
industrial development. 




Friday, January 3, 1958 




CHARLES THOMAS GRAY 

President, American Forest Products Corp. 

Born at Oaksdale, Wash., February 10, 1907. 

A.B., University of Calif. | 

at Los Angeles, 1929. 

Began career in 1929 as ! 

an office clerk, Yosennite 

Lumber Co., Merced 

Falls. General manager, 

Stockton Box Co., 1940- 

47, vice president in 

1947, president In 1948. 
Vice president, Ameri- 
can Forest Products 
Corp., 1948-53, director | 

1948, executive vi 
president 1954-55, pres- 1 
Ident In 1956. President, director, Oregon 
Creek Lumber Co., 1945-52 Member State 
Chamber of Commerce, National Wooden Box 
Association (president Pacific Division 1950- 
51); Western Pine Association, treasurer, 1950. 
Belongs to Delta Sigma Phi, Alpha Kappa PsI. 
Masons, and the Olympic Club. 



GEORGE F. HANSEN 

vice President, Mahson Navigation Comj 
Born in San Francisco, 1906. Entire bus 
career with Matson 
Navigation Company, 
having joined the com- 
pany in 1926. Served In 
sales management posi- 
tions in Chicago, Lon- 
don and New York, re- 
turning to San Francisco 
In 1945 as Passenger 
Traffic Manager. Be- 
came Vice President — 
Passenger Traffic In 
1949. Director, San 
Francisco Convention & 
Visitors Bureau and Downtown Assoclati^ 



WILLIS M. HOLTUM 

Mgr., Western Div., City Mortgage Dept., 
Equitable Life Assurance Society of U. S. Born 
in San Jose, 1900; at- 
tended San Jose schools 
and Univ. of Calif. Pa- 
cific Title Ins. Co., 1926. 
Served with Aetna Life 
Ins. Co., Coldwell Bank- 
er & Co. and Federal 
Home Loan Bank Board. 
Joined Equitable I I yrs. 
ago. Past Pres., Mort- 
gage Bankers Assn., No. 
Calif. Chap.; Past Pres., 
American Inst, of Real 
Estate Appraisers, No. 
Calif. Chapter. Presently Dlr., City of Paris, 
Sterling Furn. Co., Goodwill Industries. Mem- 
ber Commonwealth Club and Commercial 
Club. 






ROGER D. LAPHAM, JR. 

Resident Vice President and Director, Alex- 
ander & Co. of Calif. Born N.Y.C., 1918. Grad- 
uate Harvard, 1940, 
University of California 
Law School, 1941. Lieut. 
Comndr., U. S. Navy, 
W.W. II. War Shipping 
Administration, 1945- 
46; vice-president, Grls- 
wold & Co., Inc., 1946- 
1952. VIce-Pres., Henley 
& Scott, Inc., 1952-56. 
Member, Republican 
County Central and 
State Centra' Commit- 
tees. President, S. F. 
Planning Commission. 



JOHN R. LITTLE 

Vice Pres. & Gen. Mgr., Foote, C 
ing. Born In Passaic, N. J. Blali 
Wesleyan Univ. Joined 
present organization 
16 yrs. ago. Formerly 
Public Relations Dlr., 
All-Year Club of So. 
Calif.; owner of sales 
promotion co.; staff of 
Business Training Corp., 
N.Y.; freelance business 
writer; staff of Town & 
Country Mag., N. Y. 
Active In Boy Scouts, 
Presbyterian Church, 
Top Management Advi- 
sory Comm., L. A.; Pres., 
Down Town Association 
logical Seminary. 




EpI-Hab, U.S.A.; Dir., 
Trustee S. F. Theo- 



RENE A. MAY 

President, Geti Bros. & Co. Born, Mexico, 
1894. Educated In Mexico and the Lycee Car- 
not, Paris, France, 
business In Mexico until j 
1916 when came to San 
Francisco and joined 
Geti Bros., rising to the 
rank of President in 
1923. He Is a Past Presi- 
dent of the World Trade I 
Association; member of I 
the Commonwealth 
Club, Stock Exchange 
Club. He is VIce-Pre 
dent of the Northern | 
California Servi 
League, past president of the Jewish Commit- 
tee for Personal Service, and President of 
Alliance Francaise. 




HARRY C. MUNSON 

Vice-President and General Manager, Western 
Pacific Railroad Company. Born, Oslo, Nor- 
way, 1901. Graduated, 
University of Iowa, 
1923. Served with The 
Milwaukee Road for 
many years, rising to the 
post of assistant general 
manager at Chicago. 
1946-48. Joined the 




Western Pa< 

as Asst. Vice-Preslden 

— Operations, at Sar 

Francisco, and became 

Vice-Pres., Gen. Mgr. i 

Dlr. In 1949. Membei 

Newcomen Society. Commonwealth Club. 



1948 



tm 




STERLING R. NEWMAN 

Western Sales Mgr., United Air Lines. Born, 
Ontario, Ore. AHended University of Califor- 
nia. Joined U. S. Army 
Air Corps In 1931 and 
came to United Air 
Lines In 1933 as traffic 
representative at San 
Francisco and was pro- 
moted to present posi- 
tion In 1944. Member 
of Rotary Club of San 
Francisco and San Fran- 
cisco Sales Executives 
Association; San Fran- 
cisco Convention and 
Visitors Bureau; Ameri- 
can Society of Travel Agents; Pacific Area 
Travel Association: Skal Club and the Olympic 
Club. 



JACK T. PICKETT 

Editor, California Farmer. Born Kansas Cityi 
Missouri, June 21, 1915. Graduate of the 
University of California 
College of Agriculture. 
Served as a Third Mate 
in the Merchant Marine 
during World War II. 
Member of the Board of 
Governors and Execu- 
tive Committee of the 
Commonwealth Club of 
San Francisco. He also 
is President of the Cali- 
fornia Water, Transit 
and Defense Project; 
Chairman of the Agri- 
cultural Hospitality Comittee of the City and 
County of San Francisco; Director of Western 
Waterways; Director of the Wiley Gravity 
Plan Association, Inc. 




ir. F. KAPLAN 

Secretary -Treasurer, The Emporium -Capwell 
Co. Born at El Paso, Tex., 1900. Graduated 
Golden Gate College 
of Law, 1924. Joined 
Emporium, 1920, ap- 
pointed controller, 
1930; secretary-treasur- 
er. 1953. President, Re- 
tail Merchants Assn.; 
Board of Directors, 
Goodwill Industries; 
Board of Directors, Ap- 
parel City; Board of Di- 
rectors and Secretary- 
Treasurer, Retail Credit 

Assn., and asst. sec- — ^^^^ — —^ 
trees.. Retail Dry Goods Association. Member 
Financial Officers Association. 




WALTER J. MAYTHAM 

Vice-President, Westinghouse Electric Corpo- 
ration. Born, Atlanta, Ga., and educated at 
Iowa State College. 
Joined Westinghouse In 
Pittsburgh. Pa., 1926. 
Regional Manager, Pa- 
cific Coast, 1949; vice- 
president, 1954. Holds 
Westinghouse Order of 
Merit for outstanding 
performance. Director, 
Pac. Coast Electrical 
Assn., and Dlr., North- 
ern California Electrical 
Bureau. Member, Board 
of Governors. S. F. Bay 
Area Council; member, A.I.E.E., Sto 
change Club, Newcomen Society. 




QVENTIN REYNOLDS 

Division Manager, Division Bay Zone, Safeway 
Stores, Inc. Born in San Rafael, May 16, 1906 
Graduated from St. 
Mary's College In 1927. 
Began his career as a 
part-time clerk in 1923 
with Skagg's Stores, a 
predecessor company of 
Safeway. He was named 
to the San Francisco 
Division staff In 1944. A 
year later he became 
retail operations man- 
ager for the Division 
and manager of the Di- 
vision's Bay Zone in 
1950. He was appointed division manager In 
February, 1956. He is a member of the S. F. 
Rotary Club, the Olympic Club and Diablo 
Country Club. 




.^^ \ 



Friday, January 3, 1958 



Hitting the High Spots 



With JIM WARNOCK 

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA Entension Chorus. 
in cooperation with the Chamber, provided San 
Francisco's only mobile Christmas caroling from a 
Powell Street Cable car on December 23, directed 
by Miss Maidi Bacon and sent off the turntable at 
Powell and Market by Mayor George Christopher 
and President E. D. Maloney, later enjoyed wassail- 
ing at the Starlight Roof of the Sir Francis Drake 
Hotel as guests of the Chamber and the hotel. . . . 
MISS EDNA THOMASON, a member of the Cham 
ber's Accounting Department since 1917, was pre- 
sented a silver bowl by G. L. Fox. General Manag- 
er, honoring her forty years of service, at the staff 
Christmas party, Fairmont Hotel, December 20. . . . 
FIFTY ORPHANS from the non-profit, interdenomi- 
national Monticello "Home of Faith" for children 
in Napa County were guests of the Chamber on 
December 12 to visit Fleishhacker Zoo, ride the 
cable cars, visit Fisherman's Wharf and tour the 
Bay aboard the HARBOR QUEEN, courtesy of 
Harbor Tours, Inc. Employees of Aerojet General 
Corporation, Nimbus, Sacramento, generously pro- 
vided bus transportation for the tots. . . . 
THE HEAVY LOAD of Christmas mail and parcel 
post was handled promptly by the San Francisco 
Post Office, according to a survey of firms made by 
Charles C. Miller, Manager, Transportation Depart- 
ment, at the request of Postmaster General Arthur 
E. Summerfield. . . . 

INTERSTATE COMMERCE COMMISSION has 
granted permanent operating authority to Pan- 
Atlantic Steamship Corp. to transport passengers 
and freight in the common carrier intercoastal trade 
between Los Angeles, Long Beach, San Francisco, 
Oakland, Alameda, Richmond. Stockton. Portland, 
Seattl«, and Vancouver. . . . 

CALIFORNIA PUBLIC UTILITIES Commission hear- 
ings to determine whether the public interest re- 
quires that "radial highway common carriers" pub- 
lish and file freight rates and charges with the PUC 
are scheduled to continue January 8 and 9 at San 

Francisco and January 16 and 17 at Los Angeles 

PRODUCTION MANAGEMENT ENGINEERING 
Associates, Russ Building, announce the appoint- 
ment of Dr. Stephen A. Patkay as Executive Vice 
President, Robert D. Bullock and Millard B. Hahn 
as Vice Presidents. . . . 

FIFTY TALENTED HIGH SCHOOL science and 
mathematics teachers will spend a summer of study 
at Stanford University through an $82,700 fellow- 
ship grant of the Shell Companies Foundation. . . . 




WILLIAM C. GILMORE, test board man with 
Pacific Telephone & Telegraph Co. (left) was pre- 
sented a certificate last week by E. D. Maloney, 
1957 President of the Chamber (right) marking his 
appointment as Pacific Coast Commissioner of the 
National Pop Warner Conference. In the back- 
ground (left) is G. L. Fox. General Manager of 
the Chamber, and Alan K. Browne, 1958 President 
of the Chamber. The presentation was made at d 
Directors meeting at the Commercial Club. 



JAMES M. RICHTER, Chief Pilot for U. S. Steel's 
Columbia-Geneva Division, has been awarded a 
pilot safety award by the National Business Air- 
craft Association for a record of more than 900,000 
air miles without accident. . . . 
UNITED AIR LINES has become the world's first 
air carrier to be completely radar equipped. When 
the 186th plane rolled out of the company's big 
maintenance base at San Francisco International 
Airport after installation of RCA weather mapping 
gear, it marked the completion, at a cost of $5 
million, of the largest airborne radar equipment 
program in commercial aviation history, W. P. 
Hoare, Manager of the base, announced. . . . 
NATIONAL MACHINE ACCOUNTANTS Associa 
tion announces the appointment of Joseph L. New- 
miller as Manager of the I960 National Conference 
to be held In San Francisco. . . . 
RICHARD R. PETTIT has been elected Executive 
Vice President of the Transocean Corporation of 
California, parent company of Transocean Air 
Lines and 10 other aviation firms around the world, 
Orvls M, Nelson, President and Board Chairman, 
announces. . . . 

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES an- 
nounces the appointment of Alvln L. Harmon as 
Manager of the Western Region Applied Science 
Department, with headquarters in San Fran- 
cisco. . . . 

FOLLOW YOUR FLIGHT is the title of a booklet 
of charted air routes just published by Western 
Air Lines with full-color relief maps, certified route 
patterns, mileage indicators, and a unique time- 
and-dlstance computing index for passengers of the 
8,794 mile WAL system. . . . 

PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP operators have pro- 
tested a reported eastern railroad plan placing a 
$2 per ton penalty on ocean cargoes, predicting 
It could "destroy certain export markets: amount 
to tariff barriers on the Import of some commodi- 
ties- dry up certain domestic water movements; 
and even destroy some small businesses." The 
protest came In the form of a letter from the 
Pacific American Steamship Association to the 
Western Traffic Association of Chicago. . . . 
PAUL L. DAVIES, Chairman and Chief Executive 
Officer of Food Machinery and Chemical Corpora- 
tion, has been elected to the Board of Directors 
of Southern Pacific, D. J. Russell, President, an- 
nounces. . . . 

FIBREBOARD PAPER PRODUCTS Corporation an- 
nounces the appointments of Ben A. Wilson as 
Director of Purchases and Paul E. Fischer as Man- 
ager of Manufacturing-Building Materials Di- 
vision. . . . 

STANDARD OIL COMPANY of California, West- 
ern Operations, Inc., announces the contract for 
fabrication of the State's first offshore oil driiilng 
platform. National Steel and Shipbuilding, San 
Diego, will complete the platform In May of 1958 
for use at the Standard-Humble lease at Summer- 
land near Santa Barbara at a total cost of more 
than $2 million. . . . 

SURVEY TABULATING SERVICE, Inc., specializing 
In planning, tabulation, processing, and presenta- 
tion of survey and research data, has been estab- 
lished by Field Research Co. at 145 Montgomery 
with Edna F. Kelly as Manager. . . . 
JAMES W. NAGLE has been named Sale Super- 
visor for New York Life Insurance Company Central 
Pacific Division, Paul O. Klein, Field Vice President, 
announces. . . . 

A COMPREHENSIVE REPORT of prevailing salaries 
in private employment in San Francisco and In 
public employment throughout the State has been 
submitted to the Civil Service Commission by the 
U. S. Bureau of Labor Statistics as the first step 
In setting salaries of 9,429 City and County 
employees for the fiscal year beginning next 
July. . . . 

VINCENT K. KINN has been appointed Assistant 
Industrial Relations Manager for the Theo. Hamm 
Brewing Co. In San Francisco, Herbert A. Goodwin, 
Vice President and General Manager of Hamm's 
Western operfltlons announces. . . . 



Asia Topic of NBC 
News Correspondent 

"Asia Today and Tomorrow" will be the 
subject of Jim Robinson. NBC News Corre- 
spondent in Tokyo, when he addresses a lunch- 
eon meeting of the San 
Francisco Area World 
Trade Association, 
Chamber affiliate, next 
Tuesday. January 7. in 
the San Francisco Room 
(if the Fairmont Hotel. 

Robinson speaks and 
reads Chinese fluently. 
One of the few Asiatic 
scholars among We.stern 
Jim Robinson correspondents, he stud- 

ed and taught at Tsinghua and Yenching Uni- 
versities in Peiping before the Red Chinese 
took over. He's married to a member of the 
famous Soong Family — Barbara Soong. 




SHERWOOD A. NICHOLS, Vice President and 
Director of Transocean Air Lines, has been ap- 
pointed General Manager of Iranian Airways, one 
of the leading carriers of the Middle East, Reza 
Afshar, Chairman of the Board of Iranian, and Orvls 
M. Nelson, Chairman of the Board and President 
of Transocean, announced. . . . 

J. A. FOLGER & COMPANY, pioneer San Fran- 
cisco coffee packers since 1850, recently dedicated 
a new southern California processing plant to serve 
consumers in that area, President J. A. Folger 
announced. . . . 

C. P. MALONEY, President of Guaranty Savings 
and Loan Association, has announced the appoint- 
ment of C. R. Aronson as Manager of the firm's 
new office at Stockton and Geary Streets. . . . 
USS BAUER, recently commissioned at San Fran- 
cisco Naval Shipyard and one of the Navy's newest, 
was the first destroyer escort built in the San 
Francisco area by a private shipbuilder since 
World War II, having been launched at the Bethle- 
hem Pacific Steel shipyard in June. . . . 
SANTA FE RAILWAY announces four San Fran 
Cisco appointments: Edward S. Gaides and Ray- 
mond T. Snook to Assistant General Freight Agents; 

. Lawrence C. Johnson, Jr., and Nick R. Piscitello as 
City Freight Agents. . . . 

H. W. SHAW, Administrator of Kaiser Steel Cor- 
poration's record control program, has been 
elected First Vice President of the American 
Records Management Association. . . . 
BERNARD L. GLADIEUX has been admitted to the 
partnership of Booz. Allen & Hamilton, Manage- 
ment Consultants. ... 

STEEL CONSUMPTION IN 1958 will be close to 
the record amount actually used in the manufacture 
of steel products this year despite an expected 
decline of at least five per cent in steel production 
in the new year, B. E. Estes, Director of Staff Ad- 
ministration for United States Steel, told a recent 
meeting of the Northern California Chapter of the 
American Marketing Association. . . . 
PACIFIC SOUTHWEST AIRLINES becomes Ameri- 
ca's first local service airline to step Into the jet 
age with the purchase of three prop-jet Lockheed 
Electra luxury transports for service between San 
Diego. Los Angeles and San Francisco, President 
Kenneth Frledkln announces. . . . 
STANFORD RESEARCH INSTITUTE plans expan- 
sion of present research facilities into a $500,000 
metallurgical laboratory, largest west of the Missis- 
sippi equipped to undertake all phases of metal- 
lurgy research. Dr. Donald L. Benedict, Director of 
the Physical Sciences Division announces. . . . 
STANDARD OIL COMPANY OF CALIFORNIA has 
announced a new traffic safety education program 
designed to reach a broad segment of the Far 
West public In support of President Eisenhower's 
Committee for Traffic Safety. . . 



Friday, January 3, 1958 



Record Set For San Francisco Business 
Activity During First 11 Months of '57 

SAN FRANCISCO TREND— Business activity during the first eleven months of 1957 estab- 
lished a new record and surpassed the similar period last year by 2.6 per cent according to the 
Research Department of the Chamber. Most of the major phases of the economy shared in the 
gain. The exceptions were few and the losses minor. 

Residential construction authorized, a soft area in the local and regional economy during 
the year, through September, made some 



progress in October and November when com- 
pared to last year. Freight car movements fell 
behind in contrast to sharp increases in water- 
borne tonnage and air freight traffic during 
the first eleven months. Retail department 
store sales index trailed slightly below last 
year. However, total retail taxable sales in 
San Francisco may show some gain for the 
entire year. 

November business activity in San Francis- 
co with an index of 152.4 showed some im- 
provement over October at 151.1 but failed by 
2.8 per cent to reach the November level of 
last year because of mixed trends. 

November year-to-year improvements in- 
cluded gains in postal receipts of 2.4 per cent, 
electrical energy sales 3.4 per cent, airport 
traffic an estimated 5 to 10 per cent. Bay 
Bridge vehicle crossings 4.8 per cent and 
Golden Gate Bridge 5.1 per cent and residen- 
tial dwelling units authorized 47.8 per cent. 

The number of commercial failures in No- 
vember in San Francisco was down to 6 com- 
pared to 12 in October and 16 last November, 
and the November liabilities were less than 
one-third of the amount a year ago. Among 
the activities below last November were total 
construction authorized, ofl 57.9 per cent; real 
estate deeds recorded, 17.1 per cent; retail 
department store sales, 3.3 per cent; bank 
debits, 3.4 per cent; freight car movements. 
18.5 per cent; total port revenue tonnage 7.3 

Sir David Eccles To 
Discuss Future of 
Britain at Luncheon 

The Right Honorable Sir David Fccles. 
President of the Board of Trade of the United 
Kingdom and a member of the British Cabinet, 
will speak on "Britain's 
F'uture," today, nonn. in 
the Nob Hill Room of 
the Fairmont Hotel at 
hincheon honoring the 
new and reorganized 
British-American Cham- 
ber of Commerce and 
Trade Center. 

The luncheon is co- 
sponsored by the San 
Francisco Area World 
Trade Association, a 
Chamber affiliate, the 
World Affairs Council of 
Northern California and 
the British-American 
Chamber and Trade Center. 

Sir David has been a member of the British 
Cabinet since October, 1954. and has served as 
head of the Board of Trade since January of 
last year. 




Sir David Eccle 



per cent; and industrial and commercial water 
sales 2.1 per cent. 

BAY REGION TREND — The combined 
l)ank debits for the first eleven months for tlie 
seven cities reported in the Bay Region (San 
Francisco. Oakland. Berkeley. San Jose. Santa 
Rosa. Sacramento and Stockton) amounted to 
$69,665,415,000, an increase of $4,316,788,000 
or 6.6 per cent over the similar period last 
year. The November debits of $6,222,268,000 
showed little change from a year ago. 

Total construction authorized in the 9-coun- 
ty Bay Area in November totaled $41,463,000 
compared to $54,893,000 in October and $51.- 
720.000 in November last year. Residential 
construction authorizations accounted for $26.- 
.329.000 in November compared to $28,595,000 




in October and .S24.494.000 in .Novemiier last 
year. Dwelling units provided for in .Novem- 
ber totaled 2814 ( Santa Clara county alone 
accounted for 1059 of these I compared to 
2738 in October and 2033 in November last 
year. 

November department store .sales in the San 
Francisco-Oakland metropolitan area (6 coun- 
ties ) were 2 per cent below last year and in 
northern California they were down .3 |i.r 



BUSINESS ACTIVITY THROUGH NOVEMBER, 1957 



BRANCH OF ACTIVITY 
•GENERAL BUSINESS ACTIVITY INDEX 



CONSTRUCTION PERMITS Toinl Nirnibtr 

Value t 

Residential, New „ _ Value $ 

Dwelling Units „ J^umber 

Single-family nnin. New JVnmber 

Non-residential, New _ Value $ 

Additions, Alterations and Repairs Value $ 

Nine County dwelling units aulhoriled Number 



NOVEMBER 


Tc from 


11 MOS. 


•~, fro 


I9-.T 


I956 


I9S7 


1956 


152.1 


- 2.8 


13 1.8 


2.6 


870 


-20.3 


10.717 


8.4 


.1.0M.59I 


— ST.9 


64.021.824 


3.5 


1.162.253 


2.4 


14.915.766 


—^.7 


10,- 


47.8 


1J7I 


5.9 


411 


15.9 


673 


—15.2 


481.485 


— «9.3 


27.162.771 


- 2.4 


1.420.853 


- 12.8 


22.869.139 


26.8 


2.814 


38.4 


28.79! 


—5.0 



REAL ESTATE— Deeds Recorded 

•RETAIL DEPARTMENT STORE SALES.. 



..Number 



rific Coast Stock Exchange.. 



COMMERCIAL FAILURES 

INDUSTRY TREND— « County Total Employmrat... 

Mfg. A^e^age Weekly Earnings 

Manufacturing _.-......_ 

Construction, contract - 

real estate. „ _.. 



.. (eaminft) 
nploymeni) 



Retail trade 

Wholesale trade 
Service _~ 



Agriculture ......»..._.. 

Govt.— Federal, state, city... 
Other _ 



novemenl... 






TRANSPORTATION-Freig 

S. F. Airport— Planes In a 
Passengers Off and On .. 

Air Mail Loaded and Unloaded 

Air Express Loaded and Unloaded 

Air Freight Loaded and Unloaded -..........._„......_„_......... 

Rail Express Shipments „ ...„„_„..„„....„....««__._, 

•Truck Movements— S. F. Area 

Out-of-State passenger car entries into N, C _ 

PORT OF SAN FRANCISCO— Revanua Tons 

Coastwise _ _ _ Rr 

Inland Waterway _ „ „ Re 

Intercoastal _ „ Re 

Foreign _ _ Re 

CARGO VESSELS (Son Francisco Bayl 

Arrivals 

Millions of Registered Tons 



..Number 
Tolal 



3.81 1. 166 
2,973.96? 
3.491.710 
49.870.249 



I.0a6.600(p) 
9S.66(a> 
2l2.600(pl 
67.800lp) 
69.000(pl 
178.800(p) 
80.4001 pi 
246J0Olpl 
12l.600(pl 
17..500(p) 
89.600) p) 
3.aOO(pl 

11.970 



70.638 
1.54.1 
51.892 

485.603 
9.033 
.34.183 



45.012.058 
28.411.816 
32.180.309 
599.473345 



I.088.l9«(p) It 

220.327(pl I.I 

70.573(pl 8.3 

68.655(pl 2.6 

l74J7J(pl 0.9 

79.5541 pi 2.7 

239.672(pl 4 

12l.93«(pl 3.1 

|9.400lpl -10.5 

9|.309(pl 0.5 

;.718lpl 5.0 



(el 



UTILITIES-Ind. ft Comm. Cai Sales 

«Elec. Energy Sales. K.W Hrs 

Water Consumption— Connn. S Ind 

NEW DEVELOPMENTS 

Visitor and Newcomer Inquiries 

Bay Bridge Vehicle Crossings 

Golden Gale Bridge Vehicle Crossui(i_ 



..Cu. (I. 
..Indu 
. Cu. II. 



374 
1.822.603 

l.l.'.8JO3.30O 

152 

159.863.500 

882 



(e» 
(c) 
(.) 
579.7611 
I5«J 



5.736.819 

124.531 

573.544 

2.000 .Mio 

3.037A58 



1 1 .265.3 1 4.700 
147 

I.782.747.SOO 



I5.S03 
31J63.055 
I4.6S8.V.4 



10.9 
49.3 
10 



•S. F. 



CONSUMER PRICE INDEX 

Base 1194749 Monthly A. en 



ne = 1001 la) October latest. Ibl September lale>l 
ourres not shoMn due to space limitation, but available upon request 
RESEARCH DEPARTMENT. SAN FRANCISCO t HAMBFR OF COMMFRCE 



Quarterly average. Ipl V' 



Friday, January 3, 1958 




G. J. TICOULAT 

Senior Vice President and 
Crown Zellerbach Corp. 
Crui, Calif. Began work- 
ing for companies pre- 
ceding it in 1917. Dur- 
ing Korean Emergency 
served with National 
Production Authorit', 
and Defense Production 
Administration for 15 
months; Is now a men 
ber of National Defense 
Executive Reser 
Member Advisory Boardg 
College of Business Ad- 
ministration, Universityl 
of Santa Clara; member and Director, Rotary 
Club of San Francisco. 

Mellon Speaker At 
75tli Anniversary Of 
Civil Service Act 

"Know Your Government" is the theme of a 
talk to be given by Thomas J. Mellon, former 
President of the Chamber. January 16. noon, 
at the Peacock Court of the Mark Hopkins 
Hotel during a civic luncheon observing the 
75th anniversary of the Civil Service Act. 

Sponsors include all San Francisco Bay 
Area Federal departments, agencies and or- 
ganizations with the cooperation of the Cham- 
ber. 

"The Civil Service Act. signalling the end of 
the 'spoils system.' originated in response to 
public demand for reform following the assas- 
sination of President Garfield." G. L. Fox. 
General Manager of the Chamber, pointed 
out. "The Act became the foundation of a 
merit system under which more than two mil- 
lion Federal workers are employed today. 



Halting of Employee Benefit Fund Abuse 
Subject of Cbamber-Sponsored Conference 

\^ ith Congressional and State investigation- pointing up abuses in the use of employee 
welfare and pension funds, corrective legislation which will affect most employees and em- 
ployers will be studied fully at a day-long conference January 20 at the Sheraton-Palace Hotel 
under the cosponsorship of the Chamber, the U. S. Chamber, Federated Employers of San 

Francisco and tlie Western Pension Confer- 



(^4a*H^ ^ic*icC(Vi 



January 3— WTA LUNCHEON— Nob Hill Room, 
Fairmont Hotel, 12 noon. 

Speaker: Sir David Eccles, President of the 
Board of Trade of the United Kingdom. 
Subject: "Britain's Future." 
January 4— CANCCOCE BOARD OF DIRECTORS 
MEETING— 1st Floor Conference Room, Chamber, 
10:00 a.m. 

January 7— WTA LUNCHEON MEETING — San 
Francisco Room, Fairmont Hotel, 12 noon. 

Speaker: James Robinson, International Rep- 
resentative of NBC. 
January 15 — RETAIL MERCHANTS ASSOCIA- 
TION BOARD MEETING— Press Club, 555 Post 
Street. 8:00 a.-r-, 

January 16— DIAMOND ANNIVERSARY LUNCH- 
EON— Peacock Court, Mark Hopkins Hotel, 12 
noon. 

Commemorating 75th Anniversary of the slgn- 
Ina of the Civil Service Act. 
January 1 7— INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT COM- 
MIHEE TOUR— Tracy, Catlfornla Industrial Area. 



(Continued from page one) 

business and civic communities with de- 
votion in the past. 

We must not let impatience make us 
lose sight of the continuing nature of the 
Chamber's program: similarly, we must 
remember that Chamber membership is 
more than paying one's dues, receiving a 
membership card and being mailed as- 
sorted publications and notices. It is a 
two-way street. The long-term service 
the Chamber renders to its members, to 
firms, to whole industries and to the en- 
tire cotnmunity and the region depends 
as well on long-term financial atid moral 
support of its objectives. 

Faced with rising operating costs, the 
Chamber has continued to produce out- 
standing materials atid render full service, 
but the membership as a whole must real- 
ize fully its problems in today's economy 
atid the need for continued and increased 
financial support to meet the expanded 
needs of today's business community. 

For example, additional technical re- 
search is needed to support the posi- 
tions and goals of the Chamber on its 
tnany fronts. The Chamber should in- 
creasingly take the lead in regional con- 
ferences involving all Chambers in the 
San Francisco Bay Region to solve many 
mutual problems. 

The Fair Share Program, a continuing 
project with fuller support to meet these 
and many other objectives as its goal, has 
made good progress despite occasional 
adjustments brought about by changing 
activity in particular lines of business. It 
will be expanded and carried forward 
during 19^8. 

Briefly summarized, these major goals 
should be worked for during the year: a 
continued drive to assure San Francisco's 
position as administrative center of the 
San Francisco Bay Region and headquar- 
ters city of the West through constantly 
improved transportation links with the 
rest of the United States and the world, 
through improved existing transit and 



Senator John McClellan. head of the Senate 
Rackets Investigation Committee, recently 
stated that "legislation is urgently needed to 
prevent the economic power in employee bene- 
fit funds from falling into the hands of gang- 
sterism." These funds are currently valued at 
over $30 billion. 

Congressional investigators question the use 
of employee health, welfare and pension funds 
"that have accumulated to the amount of stag- 
gering millions of dollars." Various State leg- 
islatures, including California's already have 
passed laws regulating employee benefit jiro- 
grams. 

Reservations for the conference's morning, 
luncheon and afternoon sessions can be made 
by calling or writing the S. F. Chamber. SS.'? 
Pine Street. EXbrook 2-4511. Ext. 58. 



long-term development of Bay Area Rap- 
id Transit, and through redevelopment to 
provide the best facilities and services 
available in the West; continued promo- 
tion of trade with other points in north- 
ern California, the West and the Pacific 
Basin cotnmunity through the exchange 
of trade trips and visitors; and the con- 
tinued drive toward the specialized goals 
which will guarantee the city's position 
as a headquarters not only for finance, 
insurance, transportation, world trade, 
wholesaling and retailing, but for agri- 
culture, mining and many related fields 
as well. 

A favorable business climate to encour- 
age capital and maiMgement to establish 
new or expand existing operations 'in all 
of these fields is vital to the future of the 
city. A primary factor in this climate is 
resisting additional restrictions on busi- 
ness in such forms as inhibiting building 
requirements or legislation which will 
destroy San Francisco's competitive posi- 
tion with relation to surrounding com- 
munities. 

I urge the full participation of the 
membership in these vital activities, the 
full 14 se of Chamber services and mate- 
rials, and full communication between 
the members and Chamber committee- 
men and staff members to accomplish 
these goals. — Alan K. Browne 



2>AY REGION BUSINESS 



SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



AI..\N K. BROWNE. President 

C. L. FOX, General Mtnaser 

M. A. HOCAN. Secrelorr 

JAMES D. WARNOCK. ExecoliTe Editor 

JOSEPH I. HAUGHEY. Editor 



Publiihed CTCTT other week by the Sa 
of Coramerte at 333 Pine St.. San 
ConntT o( Sao Francisco. California. 
2-4511. (Non-member >nbicni>tion, t: 



I Francisco Chamber 
Francisco, Zone 4. 
Teleohone EXbrool 
.00 a year.) Entered 



I Second Oaii matter Aoril 26. 1944. at the Post Office at 

in Francisco, California, nnder the act of March 3. 1879. 

Circulation: 7.S00 thii issue 



Y 



SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER 




BUSINESS 



VOLUME 15 • NUMBER 2 • JANUARY 17, 1958 



'Face Lifting ' Given 
Queen of the West 




National Conference on Employee Benefit 
Fund Legislation to Be Held Here Monday 



Attesting to San Francisco's growth as the nation's western capital and strategic financial, communication, 
distribution and managerial center, a total of more than $145 million has been authorized In the city's cen- 
tral business district since 1955. 

More Than |145 Million for Constrnction and 
Modernization Evidences San Francisco's Growth 

More than $145 million for the construction or modernization of office huild- 
ings, stores, parking; garagies and miscellaneous large projects has I)een authorized 
or announced in the central husiness district of San Francisco since Januarv 1. 19Ii5>. 
according to a survey of the Research Department of the Chaniher. 



Included in the construction total are eight 
recently announced major projects totaling 
$101,950,000. They are the hotel-office build- 
ing at Geary and Franklin ($11,000,000) : 
the Bank of America office building at 11th 
and Van Ness ($5-6.000.000) ; the American 
President Lines building at California and 
Kearny ($8-10,000.000); the John Hancock 
building at California and Battery ($,5-7,000.- 
000) ; die Ben Swig building at Front and 
Pine ($10,000,000) ; the Giraldi Hotel at 
Powell and Jefferson ($10,000,000) : the Fed- 
eral office building at Civic Center ($15,000.- 
000); and the .Sutter and Stockton Garage 
($.5,450,000). 

Not included are several other large proj- 
ects such as the Bethlehem Pacific Coast Steel 
building at California and Davis, the value 
of which has not been announced. 

New construction and alteration of other 
office and financial buildings authorized since 
the beginning of 1955 has amounted to $29,- 



597.000. New and altered stores have account- 
ed for $3,740,000. 

Miscellaneous large projects have totaled 
$7.4.30.700 and parking garages S2.332.000. 

In addition. Emharcadero Freeway prcijects 
east of I'ifth Street during the past five years 
totaled $25,770,000, the report showed. 

"The dynamic expansion program in the 
building pattern of San Francisco's central 
business district is in direct relation to the 
tremendous strides San Francisco has made 
and is making as the nation's U estern capital 
and strategic financial, communication and 
distribution center of the West," declared 
G. L. Fo.x. General Manager. 

"The dramatic growth of thirty large cor- 
porations with their national headquarters in 
San Francisco which reported combined as- 
sets of $32.6 billion in 1956, or an increase 
(d more than $10 billion since 19,50. is an 
indication of the continued and future devel- 
opment of the city as a managerial center." 




SEN. GORDON ALLOTT 
State oj Colorado 



Senator Gordon Allott of Colorado, a legal 
authority on labor and public welfare affairs, 
will be the principal speaker at the National 
Conference on Employee Benefit Plan Legisla- 
tion Monday at the Sheraton-Palace Hotel. 

The subject of Senator Allott's address will 
be "Government in Labor-Management Rela- 
tions." The day-long 
conference is co- 
sponsored by the 
Chamber, the U. S. 
Chamber of Com- 
merce, Federated 
Employers of San 
Francisco and the 
Western Pension 
Conference. 

Lieutenant Gov- 
ernor of Colorado 
from 1951 through 
1955. Allott was elected to the U. S. Senate 
for a six-year term beginning in January. 
1955, serving as a member of the committees 
(m Labor and Public Welfare and the District 
of Columbia in the 84th Congress and as a 
member of the committee on Interior and 
Insular Affairs and the committee on Labor 
and Public Welfare in the 85th Congress. 

In the morning session, Paul J. Cotter, 
Special Counsel, Subcommittee on Welfare 
and Pension Plan Investigation, will speak on 
"Why Legislation?" He will be followed by 
Joseph L. Seligman, Jr.. local attorney and 
Immediate Past President. ^Xestern Pension 
Conference; Julius S. Wikler. First Deputy 
Superintendent of Insurance (d New ^ork: 
and F. Britton Mc('onnell. Insurance Com- 
missioner of California, who will all discuss 
existing state legislation. 

Senator Allott will speak on "Government 
in Labor-Management Relations" during the 
luncheon session. 

In the afternoon, the subject "What Legis- 
lation?" will be treated by Lawrence M. 
Cathles. Jr., Vice-President. Group Division. 
(Turn to piige two) 



Alaskan Statehood 
Backed hv Chandler 

.\ resolution favoring statehood for 
Alaska has been passed unanimously 
by llie Hoard of Direrlors of the 
Cliuniber. 

".Alaska will remain un undoelop*-)! 
area as long us il retains its roloniul 
status," oomnii-nleil llurr> K. Sniilli. 
cliuirnian of the Alaskan Affairs Sec- 
lion of llie (llnunber's Donie^lir Trailr 
Deparlnient, 

Smith poinleH out that (■(■t>n4inii<- 
ilevclopmeni and lli<- nio\rnienl of 
in<luslr> nnil scIIIits mIII be acreUTaleil 
if anil when stalehotMl i« :irbi<-\e<l. 



Friday, January 17, 1958 



Pension Panelists Gather for Conference 




J. L. Sellgman, Jr. Paul J. Cotter Julius S. Wilder F. B. McConnell Robert D. Gray 




Louis B. Lundborg L. M. Cathles, Jr. Esmond B. Gardner Arthur J. Goldberg Robert A. Hornby 



These nationally-known authorities on labor and pulilic welfare affairs will 
participate in the National Conference on Employee Benefit Plan Legislation 
Monday at the Sheraton-Palace. Left to right (top) are Joseph L. Seligman, Jr.. 
Attorney and Immediate Past President, Western Pension Conference; Paul J. 
Cotter. Special Counsel, Subcommittee on Welfare and Pension Plan Investigation ; 
Julius S. Wikler. First Deputy Superintendent of Insurance, State of New York; 
F. Britton McConnell. Insurance Commissioner, State of California; and Robert 
D. Gray, Director. Industrial Relations Section, California Institute of Technology. 

Bottom (left to right) are: Louis B. Lundborg, Director, Chamber of Com- 
merer of the United States; Lawrence M. Cathles, Jr.. Vice President, Group 
Division, Aetna Life Insurance Co.; Esmond B. Gardner, Vice President, Chase 
Manhattan Bank; Arthur J. Goldberg, General Counsel, Industrial Union Depart- 
ment, AFL-CIO; and Robert A. Hornby, President, Pacific Lighting Corp. 



High-Calibre Federal Personnel Result Of 
(]ivil Service Act, Says Chamber President 

"Constant building of high-calibre Federal personnel is the result of merit sys- 
tems which play an indispensiljle role in representative government," Alan K. 
Browne, President of the Chamber, told meniliers of the San Francisco Bay Area 
Federal departments, agencies and organizations during a civic luncheon observing 
the 75th anniversary of the Civil Service Act yesterday at the Mark Hopkins Hotel. 

"The Civil Service Act has served well the 
orderly growth of sound government and ad- 
ministration by attracting high quality per- 
sonnel," he continued. 

"We are delighted to salute you as people 
who have provided wonderful leadership in 
many fields in the communities around the 
Bay where you reside. 

".San Francisco — headquarters city of the 
West — is a particularly suitable locale for 
this occasion," he continued, "for here are 
centered not only 177 Federal agencies, but 
the many services and facilities to serve them 
in the vital work they do. The Federal govern- 
ment is tlie largest employer in the city with 
a normal complement of about .37,000 civilians 
and about 20,000 military personnel, making 
a total of about 57,000 with a combined an- 
nual payroll in excess of $200 million." 

Principal speaker was Thomas J. Mellon. 
San Francisco Police Commissioner and 
former President of the Chamber, who spoke 
(in the theme, "Know Your Government." 



Robert Taylor Named 
SFAWTA President 

Robert Taylor, Assistant Vice President, 
Foreign Department. American Trust Co.. has 
been elected 1958 President of the San Fran- 
cisco Area World Trade Association of the 
Chamber. 

Vice Presidents of the As.sociation are Rich- 
ard Nelson. Secretary-Treasurer, James S. 
Baker Co.; E. P. McCall, Export Department. 
Tidewater Oil Co.; W. B. Gribble. Export 
Manager, W. P. Fuller: and Peler B. Mackey. 
Atkins, Kroll & Co.. Treasurer. 

The Executive Committee is comprised of 
Norman D'Evelyn. D'Evelyn- Guggenheim: 
George C. Fortune, Balfour, Guthrie & (]o. : 
B. A. Malone. RCA Communications, Daniel 
Polak. Polak, Winters & Co.; and Jay T. 
Reed. Otis McAllister Export Corp. 




ALAN K. BROWNE 
Chamber President 



National Conference 
On Employee Benefit 
Legislation Scheduled 

(Gontinuecl from page one) 

Aetna Life Insurance Co., representing the 
insurance industry; Esmond B. Gardner. Vin- 
President, Chase Manhattan Bank, speaking 
for the corporate trustee: Arthur J. Goldberg. 
General Counsel. Industrial Union Depart- 
ment. AFL-CIO. representing organized labor; 
and Robert A. Hornby, President, Pacific 
Lighting Corp., spokesman for management. 
Chairmen are Alan K. Browne, president 
of the San Francisco Chamber of Commerce 
(morning session) ; Louis B. Lundborg, Di- 
rector, Chamber of Commerce of the United 
States (luncheon session) ; and Robert D. 
Gray, director. In- 
dustrial Relations 
Section, California 
Institute of Tech- 
nology (afternoon 
session). 

"Congressional 
and state investiga- 
tions have high- 
lighted abuses in 
the use of employee 
health, welfare and 
pension funds," 
G. L. Fox, General 
Managei of the 
Chamber, commented. "Senator John McClel- 
lan, head of the Senate Rackets investigation, 
recently stated that legislation is urgently 
needed to prevent the economic power in em- 
ployee benefit funds from falling into the 
hands of the 'gangster element.' 

"These funds are currently valued at more 
than 30 billions of dollars. Various state legis- 
latures, including California's, already have 
passed pertinent laws. Now Federal legisla- 
tion is in the offing. The Conference on Em- 
ployee Benefit Plan Legislation will provide 
timely and much-needed information on this 
vital subject. It will enable employers, and 
others concerned with collective bargaining 
and managing of these funds, to have an 
informed and effective voice in the shaping 
of new legislation on the problem." 

Reservations for the conference's morning, 
luncheon and afternoon sessions can be made 
by calling the Chamber. EXbrook 2-4511. ExI. 



Outlook for Business 
"Most Encouraging" 

Business" outlook for this year "is very en- 
couraging." according to Alan K. Browne. 
President of the Chamber. 

Factors indicating this, according to 
Browne, are: 

• Easing of Credit. 

• Increased savings. 

• Increased defense spending. 
".Savings." noted Browne, "were motivated 

by higher interest rates which have attracted 
funds which would otherwise have gone into 
other forms of investment, largely because of 
the Federal government's cautious policy of 
restrictive money." 



Friday, January 17, 1958 



SAN FRANCISCO TAX CALENDAR— FIRST HALF OF 1958 

Compiled by the Research Department, S. F. Chamber of Commerce 



















CITY-STATE SECTION 


Final 
Date 


Interested 
Parties 


Act Required 


Responsible 
Agency 


Final 
Date 


Interested 
Parties 


Act Required 


Responsible 


Each mont 
this da 








5 


City property 


File affidavit for exemption before 5 p.m 


City and 










owners 


last Monday in May. Welfare agencies mus 


County 




Common 


File report and pay tax on distilled spirit 


State Bd. of 






file by April 1. 


Assessor 




carriers 


sales for second preceding month. 


Equalization 


5 


City property 


Unsecured personal property due — delinquen 


City and 




Distributors 
motor-vehicle 


File and pay tax for the second precedinc 
month. 


State Bd. of 
Equalization 




owners 


August 31. 


County Tax 
Collector 




fuel 






15 


Corporations 


File return and pay all or first Installment 


State 


15 


Common 


File report of alcoholic beverages importec 
during preceding month. 


State Bd. of 
Equalization 






of taxes if on calendar year basis, otherwise 
2 months and 15 days after close of fisca 
year. 


Franchise 
Tax Board 


l£ 


Distilled spirits 
mfrs., mfrs. 
agents, and 
wholesalers, 
rectifiers and 
brandy mfrs. 


File report and pay tax for preceding month 


State Bd. of 
Equalization 


Apr! 

See also 

"Each 

Month this 

Day' 








15 


Beer and wine 
mfrs. and 
importers 


File report and pay taxes for preceding 
month. 


State Bd. of 
Equalization 


1 


Owners of 
state-assessed 


File statement of property owned or used 
and money and solvent credits owned noon 


State Bd. of 
Equalization 






property 


first Monday of March, 


15 


Producers 
and brokers 


File report and pay tax for preceding month 
on transactions in petroleum products. 


State Bd. of 
Equalization 


1 


Welfare 
agencies 


Last day to file affidavit and claim for 
welfare exemptions. 


aty and 

County 

Assessor 


25 


Motor vehicle 
transportation 
operators 


File and return on or before 25th and pay 
taxes for preceding month. 


State Bd. of 
Equalization 


1-30 


Employers 


State Unemployment and Disability Insurance 
Tax — pay first quarter returns— delinquent 
May 1. 


State Dept. of 
Employment 


25 


Users of 
Diesel fuel in 


File report and pay tax for preceding month 


State Bd. of 
Equalization 


1-30 


Retailers and 


File return and pay retail sales and use 


City and 
County Tax 








purchasers of 


taxes for quarter ending March 31. 












tangible per- 




Collector 












sonal property 






Last day 
of month 


Retailers and 


File sales tex and pay tax on or before last 


State Bd. of 




subject to tax 






purchasers of 
tangible per- 


day of month after close of taxable quarter 
If required to pay on monthly basis, do so 


Equalization 


10 


Property 


Second installment real property taxes: de- 
linquent at 5 p.m 


S. F. City 




sonal property 
subject to tax 


by last day of month following. 








and County 
Tax Collector 










15 


Off-sale gen- 


File report for quarter ended March 31 and 


State Bd. of 


January 










eral licensees 


pay required additional license fee. 


Equalization 


See also 








15 








"Each 








Donors 


File return showing gifts during preceding 


State 


Month this 
Day" 












calendar year. 


Controller 








15 


Individuals 


File return and pay first installment of tax 


State 


1-31 


Employers 


State Unemployment and Disability Insur- 
ance Tax fourth quarter 1957 due. Delinquent 


State Dept. of 
Employment 






for 1957 if on calendar year basis. 


Franchise 
Tax Board 






after January 31, 1958. 




30 


Private car 


File report covering operations of private 


State Bd. of 


1-31 


Retailers and 


File quarterly statement and pay Retail Pur- 


City Tax 




owners 


cars during preceding calendar year. 


Equalization 




purchasers of 


chase and Use Tax. 


Collector 




(railway car) 








tangible per- 






May 










sonal property 






See also 










subject to tax 






"Each 
Month this 








1 


Motor vehicle 


License renewal fee for calendar year pay- 


State Dept. 


Day" 










owners 


able: delinquent February 5. 


of Motor 
Vehicles 










15 


Off-sales gen- 


File report for quarter ending December 31 


State Bd. of 


28 


Churches, 
colleges, 
veterans. 


Last day for filing affidavit for exemptions. 


S. F. CiN 




eral licensees 


and pay required additional license fee. 


Equalization 




(Fourth Monday in May by 5 p.m.) 


and County 
Assessor 












orphanages. 






February 










exhibitors 






See also 








28 








"Each 








Personal 


-ast day to file unsecured property state- 


S. F. City 


Month this 










property 


ment. 


and County 


Day" 










owners 




Assessor 


1 


City property 


Second installment on Real Property Tax due 


City Tax 
Collector 


June 
See also 










owners 


and balance of Personal Property taxes on 


"Each 












secured roll due. Delinquent April 10 at 
5pm 




Month this 
Day" 








4 


Motor vehicle 


Last day to pay registration and license fees; 


State Dept. 










owners 


delinquent February 5. 


of Motor 
















Vehicles 


15 


ndividuals 


'ay third installment State personal income 


State 


15 


Employer 


File Forms 591 and 592 and pav amount 
withheld on non-residents, also f^orms 596 


State 




tax if fiscal year ended June 30. I9S7. 


Franchise 






Franchise 




Tax Board 




Persons whose 


and 599. 

Second installment of Personal Income Tax 


Tax Board 
State 






15 








fiscal year 


due. 


Franchise 


OFFICES OF TAX AGENCIES 






ended June 30 




Tax Board 


Assessor, City and Counln of San Francisco, Cilj Hall, Kl 3.)»10 




March 
See alto 

"Each 








lai Colledor. City and County of San Francisco, City Hall. HE 1 2121 
California Stale Board of Equalization, State Building. UN 1.8700 




Month this 
Day" 








Stale Franchise Tax Board. 540 Van Ness Avenue. UN 1 7234 
State Motor Vehicle Department, 160 South Van Ness Aienue. UN 3 0300 




5 


City property 
jwners on 


.ast day for owners of property on leased 
and to file lor separate tax bill. 


City and 
County 


Oistrict Director of Internal Revenue. 100 McAllister Street. UN 3-4<00 






eased land 




Assessor 


// J>M dJir /all. c.ii . M.fiJji »r Irgal *<./.,/j> . l^r rrmri, i, ^ue ihr /ollomimt J.v 




5 


City property 
owners 


•lie statement of all real and personal prop- 
erty owned at noon for assessment. 


City and 
County 


















Assessor 


' 


(See 


reverse side for Federal Section) 







Friday, January 17, 1958 



SAN FRANCISCO TAX CALENDAR— FIRST HALF OF 1958 



Each month 
this day 



Quarterly 
Last Day 
of Month 



"Each 

Month this 

Day" 



Employers 



•Individuals 
.not sublect 
to withhold- 
ng tax) 



Employer 



Employer 



Employer 



FEDERAL SECTION 



Act Required 



Payment ti 
ployers whi 
previous m 
quarter du 



returns covering ste 
3ns for preceding n 
stamps for stamp taxes. 



I authorized depository by em- 
) withheld more than $100 during 
>nth Payment for last month each 
! last day of the month. 



and bonds trans 
1. accounting foi 



Ind 



ast da 



duals whose fiscal year «i 
f any month except December— tile declara 
Ion of income tax and pay first installmen' 
f estimated tax on 15th of 4th month fol 
swing; the first amendment and second pay 



'ing; the 



payn 



Responsible 
Agency 



onth 
"cond amendment and third 
15th of 9th month foil 
final amendment and payment the 15th of 
the 13th month following; with final, return 
due the 15th of the 4th month following the 
close of the fiscal year. 

Corporations whose fiscal year ends on last 
dav of any month other than December— In- 
come tax returns are due by 15th of the Jrd 
month following the end of the fiscal year 
and at least one-half taxes then payable^ 
Balance of tax is payable on the 15th day o( 
6th month following close of fiscal year. 

le returns by 15th day of 4th month after 

ose of fiscal year; trust taxes in full accom- 

any returns but estates may make first qu,-- 

terly payment on filing date with instal 



District 
Director of 
Int. Rev. 



due 
3th 



onth 



nts 
15th' of fourth, seventh, tenth and 
I year. 



nth aftei 



■ each calenda 
ding quarter o 



On last day 

quarter, file return for p 

n No. 720 and pay tax oue lui oijii..==. 
dues, and miscellaneous taxes, including 
tellers Excise Tax. If liable amounts in 
month except last month of each, quartei 
ceed $100, deposit such amounts in a Fed 
Reserve Bank or any authorized local I 
by last day of following month. 



egin Old Age In 
_nd contributions o 
up to $4200. 



3X withholding 
alary payments 



Last day to make final payment of 1957 est 
mated tax by individuals previously making 
declarations and to amend estimated ta 



Last day to file quarterly return and rnake 
payment of taxes withheld during preceding 
quarter. 



Last day to furnish employees a 
ipt (W-2) of amount withheld 



Last day to file last quarterly return of 
amounts withheld at source (Form 941) with 
triplicate copies of W-2s issued during th- 
year. 



Employers of 4 
940 for 1957. 



persons file fo 



District 
Director of 
Int. Rev. 



District 
Director of 
Int. Rev. 



District 
Director of 
Int. Rev. 



District 
Director of 
Int. Rev. 



District 
Director of 
Int. Rev. 



District 
Director of 
Int. Rev. 



February 

See also 

"Each 

Month this 

Day" 



March 

See also 

"Each 

Month this 

Day" 

I 



April 

See also 

"Each 

Month thi 

Day' 



Foreign 
personal 
• Iding 
companies 

Corporatior 



Individuals 
iubject to 
withholding 



Indivldua 
(other) 



May 

See also 

"Each 

Month this 

Day" 



See al 
"Each 
Month this 
Day' 

IS 



Last day to file declaration and pay entire 
estimated tax for 1957 unless personal income 
tax paid in full on January 15, 1958. 

File return on payments of dividends in ex- 
of $10 and other corporate payment; 



of $600 



Last day to file information returns of div 
dends, salaries and other payments not su 
to withholding tax. (Forms 1099 ai 
1096.) 



File annual information returns by sha 
holders and by officers and directors. 



tax returns and pay 50% 



Last day to file personal incor 
calendar year 1957 (Form 1040. 
e final payment. 



1040-A) and 



Declaration and make payment of one q 
ter estimated income tax for calendar ' 
957. 

File gift tax annual return and make payment 
of tax due if gift of more than $3000 
le in 1957 to one individual. 

return for year ended December 



Reporting for calenda 
ment due. 



ir — quarterly pay 



Last day to file first 1958 quarterly return and 
payment of income and social security taxes 



Responsible 
Agency _ 



District 
Director of 
Int. Rev. 

Commissioner 

of Int. Rev. 

Processing 

Division 

C. C. Station 

Kansas City 2, 

Missouri 



of Int. Rev. 

Processing 

Division 

C. C. Station 

Kansas City 2, 



District 
Director of 
Int. Rev. 



District 
Director of 
Int. Rev. 



District 
Director of 
Int. Rev. 

District 
Director of 
Int. Rev. 

District 
Director of 
Int. Rev. 

District 
Director of 
Int. Rev. 

District 
Director of 
Int. Rev. 



Corporations, 
estates and 
trusts 

Individuals 
reporting 
first time 

Non-Resident 
business and 
individual 



District 
Director 
Int. Rev. 



Make payment of second quarterly install 
:nt for 1958. 



Quarterly payments due on 1957 income 
taxes for corporations, estates and trusts re 
porting for calendar year. 

Those required to file declarations for the 
first time at this date pay only one-third I95r 

mated tax due- 
Last day to file return of citizens abroad ir 
business whose principal Income is fron 
foreign countries or U. S. possessions. 



Friday, January 17, 1958 



Commercial News 
Widens Horizons, 
Given New Look 




William F. Marriott 



In pace with the Bay yVrea's expanding 
economic activity, tlie San Francisco Daily 
Commercial News this month became an area- 
wide newspaper with increased circulation, 
five times its former advertising support, a 
broadening of news 
coverage to include 
ail fields of business 
and industry, and a 
refreshing new tab- 
loid format. 

First major 
changes in its 82- 
year history, the 
pioneer business 
newspaper's new 
look was "engi- 
neered to the times" 
by a new publisher. 
William H. Mar- 
riott, founder and 
former publisher of 
Family Weekly Magazine. 

"San Francisco and the Bay Area," said 
Marriott, "are the business mecca of the 
West — the centers of finance, banking, in- 
surance, shipping, manufacturing and a 
multitude of other important industries. 

"Leaders in these vital fields should right- 
fully expect a firm voice through a daily 
business newspaper that concentrates on 
matters of interest to them all, with its sights 
on the betterment of the community; a paper 
that is comprehensive in its coverage, dynamic 
in its approach, and firm in its convictions." 
New features include a guest editorial page 
for opinions of local business leaders, an 
Advertising and Marketing column, reports 
from Washington by Robert S. Allen, a 
Commerce and Finance Roundup, and an 
Insurance and Real 
Estate page. 

The Maritime 
Guide, Shippers 
Guide. Ship Mani- 
fests, Businessmen 
in the News, and 
other such estab- 
lished features, re- 
main. 

Newton E. Wise, 
Jr. continues as 
Editor, with Mary 
T. Fortney as Asso- 
ciate Editor; Kath- 
erine Schneider, 

Su J 1 17J-* Newton Wise 

chedule Lditor; 

Peter Dadiani. Manifest Editor and Karl A. 

Dietrich, Advertising Manager. Walter J. 

Brown has been retained to aid in promotion 

and public relations. 

Fifty news correspondents have been named 
in commercial, industrial and agricultural 
centers from Bakersfield to Eureka. 

The newspaper currently is on 65 news- 
stands throughout San Francisco and the 
East Bay. 

The new Advertising and Marketing column 
reports personnel advances, new accounts and 
other news in these fields, accepting articles, 
comments and photographs from advertisers, 
agencies and afiiliated businesses. 





1958 RETAIL MERCHANT ASSOCIATION officers of the Chamber affiliate are (left to right): President. 
Walter J. Kaplan, Secretary-Treasurer, Emporium-Capwell Co.; First Vice President. Paul Elder, Jr., 
owner, Paul Elder Book Stores: Second Vice President, George E. Chaquet, Treasurer, Sherman Clay 
& Co.; and Managing Director. Harold V. Starr. Manager of the Chamber's Civic Development De- 
partment. 



Retail Merchants 
President Envisions 
Good Year Ahead 

.San Francisco retailers can look forward 
to good business conditions in 19.S8. according 
to Walter J. Kaplan. Chamber Director who 
was re-elected President of the Retail Mer- 
chants Association of the Chamber this week. 

"Among the many physical improvements 
in the central business district this year will 
be the opening of the Fifth and Mission ga- 
rage, with additional parking space for 1000 
cars," he stated. "The one-way street pattern 
should ease the flow of traffic in and out of 
the city and make shopping easier for all." 

Kaplan, who heads a Chamber affiliate 
dedicated to the prosperity of San Francisco's 
retailers and representing all sections of the 
city and types of business, points to such 
improvements as the widening of Geary 
Boulevard, new hotels on Van Ness Avenue 
and Fisherman's Wharf as good business in- 
fluence in those districts. 

He finds other good signs in the accelerated 
building along lower Market Street and the 
early completion of tlie civic center convention 
facility. 

Local business and civic leaders applauded 
Daily Commercial News' "new look." Cham- 
ber President Alan K. Browne said : 

"Banking, finance and business in general 
throughout the Bay Area should benefit from 
Daily Commercial News' revitalization pro- 
gram." 

Chamber General Manager G. L. Fox: 

"It is good news to the business community. 
Its enlarged base of coverage and ser\ice 
is consistent with the upward trend in all 
economic activities centering in San Fran- 
cisco." 

Mayor George Christopher: 

"San Francisco can always use new initia- 
tive and energy, and we heartily welcome 
Mr. Marriott. His expansion program . . . 
should prove very worlhwhile to our business 
conununity. We conunend liis enterprise." 

Publisher Marriott served with .\nierican 
Weekly and published the \^'estchesler (New 
York) News. 



Horace C. Stoneham, 
Owner of Giants, 
Commends Chamber 

Thr Chamber's campaign to promote the 
sale of San Francisco Giant tickets through 
chambers of commerce, corporations and the 
press in northern California's 48 counties this 
week brought a letter of appreciation from 
Horace C. Stoneham, oicner of the Giants, In 
Alan K. Browne, President of the Chamber 

"Please permit nie at this time to ex- 
press my most sincere ihunks f«jr the 
many ronlributions the San Francisco 
Chamber of Commerce ha.« already 
marie toward the San Francisco Gianis' 
program liere in the Bay Area. I was 
parlifularly impressed, and of rouror 
greatly pleased, by the special edition 
of the BAY BEGION BISINESS that 
your organiza- 
tion devoted to 
the Giants. It 
was a splendid 
edition, and 
our box oftire 
correspond- 
ence reflects 
the wide atten- 
tion it has re- 
ceived. 

"It follows 
that we are 
\ery grateful 
for this r<Hip- 
enilion. I (ind 
that there is a 
widespread in- 
terest in the 
(• i a n I - . a n il 
rerogniAe thai 

your Cliamher has done so murh to 
stimulate it. K\eryliod> hero has lM-<<n 
very kind, and it is clear to all of us 
thai in San Franri<.ro we are among 
frieniU. I am '•iiri' thai we ran and will 
meril that kind of <upp<>rl in llie «ear« 
ahead. 

Horace C. Sioiitham." 

More than UHllI reprints of thr article and 
mail order ticket request forms now hare 
been distributed by the Publicity Department. 




Horace C. Stonehan 



Friday, January 17, 1958 



13 Federal Projects 
Invited by GSA 
Fiiiaiicing Bids For 

Banks, insurance companies, trust adminis- 
trators, pension, university and union funds 
and others are invited by the General Serv- 
ices Administration to submit financing bids 
for 13 Federal projects now on the market in 
the GSA lease-purchase program, according 
to H. K. Cottrill. Regit)nal Director. Success- 
ful financing bids have been obtained for five 
projects, he said, and bids will be solicited 
later for the remainder of the 98 projects 
which have received Congressional approval. 

Procedures with reference to the proposed 
,145.300.000 Federal office and court build- 
ing in San Francisco will be contingent upon 
experience gained in these 13 projects. Tlie 
site for the local building is being acquired 
and it is understood that a contract for its 
architectural design will be awarded shortly. 

Potential and prospective investors may ob- 
tain from the Chamber's Research Depart- 
ment information kits containing sample bid- 
ding documents. Additional information may 
be obtained from Cottrill's office at YUkon 
6-3500. Ext. 762. 



January 1 7— INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT 
COMMITTEE TOUR — Tracy, California, 
Industrial Area. 

January 17— CANCOCCE MEETING — 

Fairmont Hotel, 12 noon. 

January 20 — CONFERENCE ON EM- 
PLOYEE BENEFIT PLAN LEGISLATION— 

Sheraton-Palace Hotel. 

Agenda: 9:30 a.m., Morning Session: 

"Why Legislation." 

12:15 p.m.. Luncheon Session: Senator 

Gordon Allott, Colorado: "Government 

In Labor Management Relations." 

2:00 p.m., Afternoon Session: "What 

Legislation." 

January 22 — MARKETING AND SMES 
PROMOTION COMMITTEE MEETING— 

Commercial Club, 465 California Street, 
12:00 noon. 

January 29— WTA LUNCHEON-MEETING 

— Panelii's Restaurant, 453 Pine Street, 
12:00 noon. 

Speaker: Mr. Don Delone, San Francisco 

Port Authority. 



SALUTE TO SF INDUSTRY 




^^^^^^^^l^vA^ 



California, Can Center of the Cosmos 

California — with its canning industry producing an annual billion dollar 
output and an annual pack of about 217 million cases — faces its second 
century of activity holding a pre-eminent position as the largest canned-food 
producing state in the nation. 

More than 100 different kinds of canned foods are processed. The annual 
food pack amounts to nearly one-third of the total canning production of the 
United States. Nearly every can of olives, peaches, apricots, figs and fruit 
cocktail opened by the American housewife is grown and canned in this state. 
About half of the total U. S. fruit, fish, sweet cherry, pear, asparagus and 
spinach pack originates here as does two-thirds of all its tomatoes and tomato 
products. 

California's 110,000 farmers and agricultural workers involved in fruit 
and vegetable production receive about $150 million annually from crops 
destined for the state's 375 canners and freezers. In a typical peak-season, 
some 100,000 cannery workers receive about $175 million in payrolls. 

Canning and its associated activities comprise the biggest peacetime 
source of jobs in the State. ■ 

The West Coast's first cannery was established in 1858 by Francis Cutting 
at Sacramento and Battery Streets — now the site of F. E. Booth & Co., canners 
of fruit, vegetables, tuna and sardines. F. E. Booth, incidentally, was the 
originator of the still familiar oval can container for sardines. The first sardines 
ever canned were done by him in Monterey. 

A half century after the production of the world's first tin can in England, 
early settlers brought canned pemmican and meats with them on their west- 
ward journey; it was one of these cans that made a round trip and carried the 
first shipment of California gold to Boston in 1849. 

Cutting was the first one responsible for packing California-grown prod- 
ucts. The first such to be packed and shipped were peaches from the Santa 
Clara Valley. 

Asparagus was first introduced in 1892 by Robert Hickmott in an old 
barn on Bouldin Island. Olives were first packed commercially in 1902, more 
than a century after the first olive trees were planted by Fra Junipero Serra 
near San Diego. Today both products are almost exclusively California- 
packed. 

Fish canning began in 1864 on the Sacramento River. About 2,000 cases 
of salmon were packed in handmade cans aboard a large scow by three 
men from Maine, Andrews S. Hapgood and the Hume brothers, George 
and William. 

Today California's annual total food pack of more than five billion cans 
is five times the production of the USSR and Its satellites. 



BAT REGION BUSINESS 



SAN rRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



.\LAN K. BROWNE. Presidenl 

C. L. FOX. General Manager 

M. A. HOCAN. SecreUrr 

JAMES D. WARNOCK. Executive Editor 

JOSEPH I. HAUCHEY. Editor 

Published ererr other week by the Sin Franciiro Chamber 
of Commerce at 333 Pine St.. San Francisco. Zone 4. 
Conntr of San Franciico. California. Telenhone EXbrooli 
2-4511. (Non-member lubacription. $3.00 a year.) Entered 
aa Second Clasi matter Aoril 26. 1944. at the Poit Office at 

California, under the act of March 3. 1879. 

Cireidation: 7,500 this issue 



U. S. POSTAGE 

2c PAID 

San Frcmcisco, Calif. 
Permit No. 1880 




1957 -flnnual (?kamtet JQ^epott — 



AY REGION ml BUSINESS 



SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE xfe^'^^ 



VOLUME 15 • NUMBER 3 • JANUARY 31. I-'SS 



Friday, January 31,1 958 



ACTIVITIES OF DEPARTMENTS FOR 1957 

Recorded on these pages are condensed highlights of your Chamber's accomplishments during the past 
year. Far from all-inclusive^ they should be gauged as a simplification of the truly wide complex range of 
activities engaged in on behalf of you, your business and your community. 

^^^nCCUlUtfl^— Chairman: Ray B. Wiser, Acting Chairman: 
Cart L. Garrison, Agricultural Committee; Chairmen: Henry Schacht, 
Livestock Man Award Section: William L. Losh. "Keep Green" Sec- 
tion: Randell Larson and H. J. Brunnier, Redevelopment Coordinating 
Section. Manager. Randle P. Shields. 

Reflecting San Francisco's acute interest in strengthening urban- 
rural relations and the advancement of agriculture in general, this 
department and its various committees — 
• Fostered Area E 



^<Mt€4tiC fXadC —Chairmen: Selwyn Eddy, Domestic 
Trade Committee; Harry R. Smith, Alaskan Affairs Section; IF. H. 
Mixter, Business Center Development Section; Harry W. Guppy, Gov- 
ernment Purchasing Liaison Section; Ransom W. Cook, Hawaiian 
.Affairs Section: Emmet Fitzpatrick. Inter-City Section; Palmer Field, 
Marketing and Sales Promotion .Section ; Irving Culver, Personal 
Property Tax Section; Roy P. Cole, Small Business Committee ; Dan 
E. London, Great Golden Fleet Committee. Manager: Sidney H. Keil. 



Redevelopment by suc- 
cessfully recommending 
a $37,500 city appropri- 
ation for appraising the 
section: supported city 
application for federal 
funds: opposed a pro- 
posal to reduce the 28- 
block area to eight 
blocks: and supported 
legislation — not yet en- 
acted — for the city to 
acquire land for a new 
produce terminal. 

• Campaigned for a 
solution of the State wa- 
ter problem after con- 
ducting a major study of 
it in cooperation with 
the Technical Projects 
Section of the Chamber. 

• Assisted in present- 
ing agricultural hospi- 
tality baskets to officials 
of convening groups, in- 
cluding some 900 may- 
ors of United States ci- 
ties during the American 
Municipal Association 
convention. 

• Conducted Forest 
Fire Prevention Cam- 
paign. 

• Commemorated 
Farm-City Week. 

• Successfully pro- 
moted premium prices 
for meat animals exhib- 
ited at the Grand Na- 
tional and Grand Na- 
tional Junior Livestock 
Expositions; selected 
John Baumgartner, Jr., 
of San Martin as Cali- 
fornia Livestock Man of 
the Year. 

• Executed programs 
of encouragement to 
farm youth throughout 
California. 

• Aided in promoting 
Stale's cotton and poul- 
try and egg industries. 

• Staged 11 meetings 
of the Agricultural Com- 
mittee at which 491 farm 
and business leaders of 
this area sought solu- 
tions of mutual prob- 
lems. 



..^^^^^^ 




1957 Officers and Directors 

PRESIDENT: E. D. Maloney. Vice President. Pacific Telephone & Telegraph Co. 
FIRST VICE PRESIDENT: Alan K. Browne, Vice President, Bank of America 

N.T. & S.A. 
SECOND VICE PRESIDENT: James B. DuPrau. Vice President and Assistant 

to the President, Columbia-Geneva Division. U. S. Steel Corp. 
THIRD VICE PRESIDENT: Jack How. President. Western Machinery Co. and 

Western-Knapp Engineering Co. 
FOURTH VICE PRESIDENT: G. L. Fox. General Manager. San Francisco 

Chamber of Commerce. 
TREASURER: George J. Greenwood. Vice President. The Bank of California. 

N.T. & S.A. 
ASSISTANT TREASURER: A. H. (Harry) Brawner. Jr.. Assistant Secretary 

and Manager. Export Sales Division. W. P. Fuller & Co. 
SECRETARY: Marie A. Hogan. 

DIRECTORS 



James H. Barry. II 

The James H. Barry Co. 
Benjamin F. Biaggini. Jr. 

Southern Pacific Co. 
Robert M. Brown. 

McCutcheon. Thomas. Matthews, 

Griffiths & Greene 
Ivan Branson, 

Morning Glory Sandwich Co. 
Robert W. Cahill. 

Cahill Construction Co. 
Roy P. Cole. Cole & DeGraf 
Ransom M. Cook, American Trust Co. 
W. W. Davison. Standard Oil Co. 
Charles de Bretteville, 

Spreckels Sugar Co. 
0. R. Doerr, Pacific Gas & Electric Co. 
Arthur J. Dolan. Jr.. Blyth & Co. 
SelwTn Eddy. West Coast Shell Oil Co. 
Frank P. Gomez. Industrial Realtor 



George F. Hansen, 

Matson Navigation Co. 
Willis M. Hokum. City Mortgage 

Dept., Equitable Life Assurance 

Society of U. S. 
W. F. Kaplan, 

The Emporium-Capwell Co. 
Roger D. Lapham. Jr.. Alexander & Co. 
John R. Little. Foote. Cone & Belding 
Dan E. London. St. Francis Hotel 
Rene A. May. Getz Bros. & Co. 
Walter J. Maytham, 

Westinghouse Electric Corp. 
Harry C. Munson. 

Western Pacific Railroad Co. 
Sterling R. Newman, United Air Lines 
Emmett G. Solomon. 

Provident Securities Co. 
Ray B. Wiser. \^'alkeng Mining Co. 



In its continuing goal 
of developing San Fran- 
ci.sco as the market cen- 
ter of the West, this 
department and its com- 
mittees engaged in the 
following activities dur- 
ing 1957— 

• Produced and dis- 
tributed throughout the 
western region 15,000 
San Francisco trade pro- 
motion pamphlets and 
trade show schedules. 

• Sponsored Jackson 
Square Day. 

• Presented "Award 
of Progress" certificates 
to six local firms 
recognition of significant 
expansion programs or 
completion of new head- 
quarters buildings. 

• Published monthly 
Business Tips Bulletin, 
including products and 
services of local firms 
available for distribution 
in domestic market. 

• Conducted trade 
promotion and goodwill 
trips to Napa and the 
Sonoma Valley; 13 cities 
and towns in the Sacra- 
mento Valley; the Klam- 
atli Falls-Medford-Ash- 
land. Oregon region; 
and the Eureka-Arcata 
area. 

• Sponsored "Valley 
Days" in September, 
hosting 187 business- 
men-civic leaders and 
wives. 

• Sponsored activities 
of "Great Golden Fleet." 

• Published com- 
pletely revised Regional 
and San Francisco City 
and County manufactur- 
ing directories; complet- 
ed research on first ma- 
jor directory on mer- 
chant wholesalers' and 
branch sales offices. 

• Fostered small 
business development. 



Friday, January 31,1 958 



^tutu^tnCcU—ChaiTmen and Vice Chairmen: O. R. Doerr, 
Industrial Advisory Committee; Frank P. Gomez and John S. Bolles. 
Industrial Development Committee; James H. Barry, II, and Gustav 
Schwarz, Manufacturers Committee; L. N. Vest and Roy M. Meikle- 
John, Chemical Industries Section; Jack H. How, and L. T. Rett, 
Mining Committee; George F. Hansen, Shipbuilding Committee; Wal- 
ter J. Maytham, and William B". Moore, Technical Projects Commit- 
tee; and Henry J. Degenkolb. Building Code Section. Manager, Lewis 
M. Holland; Assistant Manager, Harold T. Wood. 

Constantly striving for the advancement of San Francisco and the 
Bay Region as the best location for many types of industrial activities, 
this department and its committees — 

• Conducted 840 personal interviews, attended 110 meetings, held 
4.350 telephone conversations and executed 1.315 pieces of correspond- 
ence relating directly to all phases of industrial development of the 
area. 

• Provided plant location and factory information to more than 80 
inquirers about San Francisco and the Bay Region. 

• Assisted in formulating amendments to Hunters Point Reclama- 
tion District Act regarding street patterns and provision of funds for 
preliminary planning and engineering. 

• Established Chamber policy for lowering Bayview Park to pro- 
vide fill for Hunters Point Reclamation District. 

• Supported preliminary plan for modified project in South of 
Market Redevelopment "Area D." 

• Held second annual Industrial Development Conference in con- 
junction with Chamber's "Valley Days" program. 

• Published and distributed directory of member Consulting Engi- 
neers and Architects. 

• Formulated Chamber policy on Statewide Water Resource Devel- 
opment in cooperation with Agricultural Committee. 

• Continued to coordinate with technical groups studying building 
code problems. 

• Spearheaded community action on newly-proposed San Francisco 
Housing Code. 

• Established Chamber position on legislation regarding Mining 
Industry. 

• Completed Product Potential Survey, mailed to 7,500 firms. 

• Initiated program to foster development of furniture-manufactur- 
ing industry in Bay Region. 

• Instigated Chamber Board opposition to State monopoly in print- 
ing of elementary school textbooks. 

• Saluted Oronite Chemical Co. and California Spray-Chemical Co. 
for contributions to industrial development of Bay Area. 

• Endorsed Air Pollution Control program submitted by Benjamin 
Linsky. Pollution Control Officer. 

• Supported action for larger drydock at Hunters Point to accom- 
modate Forrestal Class vessels. 

• Instigated Chamber Board endorsement of program to expedite 
California State Lands Commission offshore oil production without 
royalty rates increase. 

• Instigated Chamber Board endorsement of proposed legislation 
to eliminate property tax from vessels being constructed in California 
shipyards. 



(^<M'C^C<A^'04i*tteHt — Civic Development Committee 
Chairman and Vice Chairman: Alan K. Browne and Arthur J. Dolan, 
Jr. Section Chairmen: Raymond D. Smith, Capital Improvement and 
Land Use; John J. Conlon, Fire Safety; Browne, A/a.w Transit; H. 
Irving Rhine, Parking; Leonard S. Mosias, Street, Highway and 
Bridge; Torres Weir, Traijic Safety & Control. Manager: Harold V. 
Starr. 

Seeking always to enhance the civic position of San Francisco, this 
department of the Chamber — 

• Encouraged urban redevelopment in Diamond Heights, the West- 
ern Addition and Produce Market Area. 

• Aided in the selection of a site and the acquisition of properly 
for tiie new Federal Office Buildi-ng. 

• (;ooi)erated witli u view to the acquisition of property to facilitate 
the building of a new stadium for the San Francisco Giants. 

• .\ided in forming a citizen's committee to prepare fi>r small boat 
harbor bond issue (.lune, 1958 election). 

• Approved and backed Ferry Building Park plans. 

• .\pproved "Golden Gateway" (.\rea E) Redevelopment Plan. 

• Approved "williin limits" the .San Francisco Maritime llislorical 



^^UvtcC /^MMtft^ — Chairmen and Vice Chairmen: Harry J 
Williams, Business-Education Day Committee; Stuart D. .Menist, and 
W. Kent Dyson, Armed Forces Section; S. R. Newman and 0. Kenneth 
Pryor, Aviation Section; Vincent Cullinan, Legislative and National 
Affairs Section; and F. B. Magruder, Tax Section. Manager: Randle 
P. Shields. 

In its field of law and governmental regulation and administration — 
constantly studied from the standpoint of the public interest and Wfl- 
fare — this department — 

• Sought solution of "double taxation" problem facing San Fran- 
cisco because of lack of reciprocal agreement with other cities and 
counties in collection of sales and use taxes by urging San Francisco's 
conformity with Bradley-Burns Sales and Use Tax Law. 

• Urged adoption of Hoover recommendations for economy and 
efficiency in federal government. 

• Successfully opposed bills which would have levied new or addi- 
tional state taxes. 

• Recommended elimination of personal property tax on ships 
under construction in California shipyards. 

• Sought adoption of Chamber policy on major issues affecting 
businessmen, including opposition to federal aid to education and 
opposition to bills restricting the effect of "good faith meeting of com- 
petition" as a complete defense against the charge of price discrimina- 
tion. 

•• Sought adoption and saw successful passage of such bills con- 
fronting the 1957 Ntate Legislature as: authority to establish a Bay 
Area Rapid Transit District: transfer of state-owned streets to the 
city to provide street patterns suitable tr) the industrial development in 
the Hunteis Point Reclamation District: regulation of debt counselors 
through limitation of fees charged for adjustment of debts of financial- 
ly overburdened individuals: and appropriation of an additional $2.9 
million to develop Squaw Valley as site of 1960 \^inler Olympics. 
bringing total outlay to S7.9 million for 200-acre Sierra development. 

• Successfully opposed state bills on beer and cigarette tax. 

• Provided bill referral service to Chamber committees and stafi 
studying state legislation, and research service to Chamber members 
regarding status of bills. 

• Studied and recommended Chamber policy on 10 local proposi- 
tions on November 5. 1957 ballot; published Chamber "Voting Rec- 
ommendations." Supported proposed $22,150,000 bond issue for Court 
Building and City Hall remodeling. 

• Campaigned to keep San Francisco abreast of the jet age by pro- 
moting San Francisco International .\irport: fostered Bay Area heli- 
copter service. Tackled Hight-safety and jet-sound problems. Cospon- 
sored "Air Youth Day." Sponsored nati<m's first course in aviation 
with accrediting of public school teachers. 

• Evinced llie iiusiness community's interest in national defense and 
problems of military perscmnel. Staged Armed Forces Day Luncheon. 

• Contributed to better understanding of .\merican enterprise sys- 
tem by staging 7th annual Education-Business Day and 7th Business- 
Education Day. Published "\X elcome Teacher" pamphlet for distribu- 
tion to some 3800 teachers. Cosponsored "Know Your .\merica V^eek." 

• Rendered numerous miscellaneous services, including arrangin-; 
tour and hospitality for 60 children from Mnnlicello. 



Museum project (Project X). preceding the same position taken by 
the Board of Supervisors. 

• Urged rapid completion of Civic Center Plaza Exhibit Hall (ex- 
pected March 1. 19581. with work on garage to begin that date. 

• Urged continued rehabilitaliim work at Laguna Honda Home and 
San Francisco Hospital. 

• Successfully opposed Zoning Ordinance Section 22-C 3. limiting 
floor area/site ratio of buildings. 

• Continued without let-up efforts to secure a second fireboat to 
cover six miles of San Francisco waterfront. 

• Requested more efficient equipment for Fire Deparlnienl. 

• Supported legislation (SB 850) setting up new Bay .\rea Rapid 
Transit District. 

• Saw campaigns realized making shuttle bus a permanent part of 
the Municipal Railway system, restoring California Street cablecar 
service and consididaling cable lines. 

• Distriluiled 75.000 driving lips leaflets. 

• Submitted comprehensive recommendations on freeway develop- 
ment in San Francisco for inclusion in 19.58-.S9 state liigliway budget. 

• Saw completion of Ellis-O'Farrell Garage and the de\eliipment 
of Suller-Slocklon Ciarage and Fifth and Mission Street- garage. 



Friday, January 31, 1958 



^UoZcCCtCf— Chairman: John R. Little, Publicity Committee. 
Manager: James D. W'arnock. Assistant Manager: Joseph I. Haughey. 
Fulfilling its functions of publicizing the City and County of San 
Francisco and its economic and cultural development for the ultimate 
benefit of local business, this department — 

• Prepared 407 news releases describing local business and in- 
dustrial development and Chamber activities. 

• Provided 1.773 photographs (captioned) of San Francisco for 
nearly 450 newspapers, magazines, organizations or individuals on a 
worldwide basis. 




• Loaned kodachronie negatives and slides to scores of persons and 
organizations. 

• Prepared and edited fortnightly publication. Bay Region Business. 

• Provided thousands of reprints to publicize various local organi- 
zations from "Progressograms" and "Salutes to Industry" — including 
9.000 re Hunter's Point Naval Shipyard, 5.000 or more re San Fran- 
cisco Giants. 3.000 on the San Francisco maiden voyage of the Mat- 
sonia. and 2.000 for WESCON's electronics convention. 

• Handled press, radio and television relations for approximately 
40 special events, including 17 luncheons sponsored or cosponsored by 
various departments of the Chamber: involved in public relations for 
World Trade Week; Western Airlines cablecar tour; Osaka-San 
Francisco affiliation: Jackson Square Day. Business-Education and 
Education-Business Days: International Industrial Development Con- 
ference: Grand and Junior Grand National Livestock Expositions, etc. 

• Prepared and supplied innumerable special articles on San 
Francisco as requested by newspapers and magazines throughout the 
world. 

• Conducted a speakers' information bureau which aided about 160 
organizations throughout the Bay Area. 

• Furnished slides to television stations, locally and throughout the 
country, depicting local scenes. 

• Produced and distributed innumerable releases and forest fire 
announcements to northern California's press, radio and television 
stations in cooperation with the "Keep Green" Committee of the 
Chamber. 

• Expanded, edited and brought up to date loan photo file. 

• Designed many brochures, booklets and leaflets and arranged for 
their production to further publicize Chamber activities on civic, inter- 
county, interstate and national levels. 



Financial operations of the San Francisco Chamber of 
Commerce for 1957 summarize as follows: 

INCOME 

Dues $310,015.18 

Subscriptions, fees, miscellaneous 26,666.98 



Total 



$336,682.16 



EXPENSES 

Total $391,392.65 

Less reimbursements by City 

and County of San Francisco 

for Publicity and Advertising 45,000.00 



Net Expenses 346,392.65 



Balance from Reserves $ 9,710.49 



f^C^^'^^lCn' — Working to recognize and report significant eco- 
nomic trends and to provide a major centralized facility for basic 
information on San Francisco and other Western Market Areas, this 
department, under Ralph B. Koeber, Manager, has — 

• Answered 80,874 counter, telephone and written requests relating 
to all phases of the local and regional economy from business people. 
visitors, newcomers, school students, educational institutions and gov- 
ernment agencies. 

• Provided business reference library and directory service, includ- 
ing current records of more than 1000 organizations in the area, 188 
latest telephone directories and 277 city directories. 

• Compiled organization directories covering agricultural, business, 
civic and improvement, foreign relations, governmental, industrial, 
military, professional, social and religious, 

• Compiled and published 36-page booklet, San Francisco and the 
Bay Area — an Economic Survey and Yearly Revieiv. 

• Made 12 monthly surveys of business conditions in the .San Fran- 
cisco Bay Region and developed reports for membership and the press. 

• Made special studies in such fields as population, dwelling units 
in Bay Region, tax calendar, sound industrial relations, employment 
trends, growth of large corporations headquartered in San Francisco, 
construction authorized in central business district, and passenger 
movements through the San Francisco Gateways. 

• Developed and supervised publication of Chamber map folder of 
San Francisco and Bay Region. 

• Maintained cooperative office of the U. S. Department of Com- 
merce. 

• Developed new census retail trade area map for San Francisco. 
Carried out key functions related to San Francisco census tracts and 
their usage. 

• Compiled and edited new editions of Facts for Newcomers and a 
new folder for school students. 

• Compiled Calendar of Events of Public Interest in San Francisco 
and published three editions and a supplement. 

• Developed special literature for distribution to prospective visitors 
and newcomers, including lists of hotels, motels, eating places, news- 
papers, real estate dealers, guide to employment opportunities, guide 
to housing, etc. 

• Compiled and published directory of Federal Agencies in San 
Francisco. Bay Area and Northern California. Also developed report 
on economic importance of Federal Government establishments in San 
Francisco. 

• Cooperated throughout the year with U. S. State Department by 
supplying factual information and reports for international visitors. 

• Prepared articles on San Francisco's progress and financial status 
and development for Encyclopedia Britannica (1958 year book). Also 
prepared foreword for the San Francisco City Directory, published by 
R. L. Polk & Co. 

"^et^Ut '^He^tC^^UttA ^i4/^CCCttia«t — President: 
W alter J. Kaplan. Managing Director: Harold I. Starr. Constantly 
striving to promote and protect San Francisco's retail industry, this 
segment of the Chamber — 

• Sent out 48 bulletins, including special mailing pieces on school 
closing and opening dates, legal holidays, admonitions on cashing 
checks and information for restaurants on safe food handling courses. 

• Campaigned for a city charter amendment which would place 
San Francisco under the Bradley-Burns Act. 

• Kept retailers informed on progress of Fair Labor Standards Act. 
Urged opposition to including retail and service personnel under this 
law. 

• Supported Union Square Fashion Show. 

• Kept retailers informed in general on significance of Fair Employ- 
ment Practices ordinance passed by the Board of Supervisors. 

• Issued Retail Merchants Association classified list. District Mer- 
ciiants .\ssociation roster and annual and monthly calendars of events, 

• Kept abreast of legislation on local, state and national levels 
affecting retailers. 

• Circulated folders on fringe parking experiment. 

• Supported efforts to alleviate traffic congestion. 

• Studied reports of Automotive Safety Foundation on legal respon- 
sibilities and improvement involved in street and traffic management 
in San Francisco. 



Friday, January 31, 1958 



fXOM^^Ont^COH ^Chairman and V ice-Chairman: Robert M. 

Brown and H. M. Daschbach, Transportation Committee. Manager, 
Charles C. Miller. Assistant Manager, James Cooper. 

Assuring San Francisco of adequate rail, water, highway and air 
transportation at just and reasonable rates and fares, this depart- 
ment — 

• Filed 22-page brief with Civil Aeronautics Board on Dallas-to- 
West Service Case. Attended dedication of Dallas' Love Field Ter- 
minal. 

• Conducted survey of leading San Francisco Bay Area industries 
on current San Francisco-New York nonstop service; met with Civil 
Aeronautics Board officials in Washington. D. C. re severance and 
expedited hearing of S.F.-N.Y. nonstop case. Also conferred with 
International Airport and City Public Utilities Commission officials 
and Deputy City Attorney. 

• Held Transportation Committee meeting on Pan-American re- 
quest for support of its position to make Seattle a traffic stop enroute 
to Japan and Manila. Later participated in S.F. Public Utilities Com- 
mission meeting in which City PUC reversed its stand and supported 
the position that Seattle should be made a passenger and mail traffic 
stop for Pan-American. 

• Special subcommittee appointed to recommend action on railroad 
tariff proposal to apply 10 cents per 100 pounds charge on export, 
import, coastal and intercoastal water destined traffic. 

• Successful in obtaining favorable decision by Interstate Com- 
merce Commission granting permanent operating rights in intercoastal 
.service between Pacific Coast and Atlantic Coast poits for Pan-Atlantic 
Steamship Corp. 

• Met with interested parties concerning petitions l<> re-open Key 
System transit case and application to substitute motor coach service 
for rail service and for increases and adjustments in rates and fares. 

• Successful with others in promoting agreement between the 
United States and Mexico for equal air service by American flag air 
lines from western points to Mexico. 

• Campaigned successfully for adjustment in San Francisco's dray- 
age tariff, eliminating disparity in classification ratings in East Bay 
Tariff No. 1-A. 

• Mailed special information bulletins to Transportalinii Committee 
membership. 

• Reviewed transportation legislation of 85th Congress (first ses- 
sion I and appropriations for transportation and communications; bills 
enacted; and major issues confronting second session of 85th Congress. 

• Succeeded in securing favorable decision for direct air route 
service between San Francisco and European points, a culmination of 
two years' work by the department. 

• Gained approval of Chamber Board of reconmiendation that 
feeder air line service be supported. 

• Rendered 5.183 direct services to Chamber members and others; 
answered 236 travel requests from all parts of the country: attended 
211 meetings re transportation matters. 

• In dual action with city officials, succeeded in having British 
Overseas Airways Corporation make San Francisco its West Coast 
terminal. 

• Made personal contacts with New York executives of Air France. 
Belgian World Airlines (Sabena), B.O.A.C, Scandinavian Airlines 
System and Swissair to maintain interest in San Francisco as an inter- 
national terminal. 

• Conferred with San Francisco representatives of foreign airlines 
— Chilean Airlines, Aerolineas Peruanas, Air-India International. Air 
France, Swissair, Sabena, Brazil International Airlines and Lufthansa. 

• Prepared 17 freight rate studies, rail and motor, totaling more 
than 2.000 rates, for Domestic Trade and Industrial Departments. 

^ • Battled to maintain San Francisco's rate differential with other 
California points to Pacific Northwest points during four hearings on 
motor freight rate adjustments held by the Pacific Inland Tariff 
Bureau. 

• Succeeded, with others, in publication of six transcontinental 
export and imiiort rate adjustments and supported nine proposals to 
induce import-export traffic to move via West Coast ports. 

• Reviewed air, motor, rail and water lines' rate dockets and new 
tariff matters. 

• Revised and distributed several hundred transportation service 
directories. 



TH-cwj^^fidAc^ 




— Chairmen: Harry C. 
Munson, Membership Committee; J. D. Gies- 
ler. Second Century Club. Manager: Alan J. 
Uren. Maintaining community acceptance and 
support of Chamber activities for the purpose 
of continually enhancing the organization's 
scope of service, this department — 

• Inducted 242 new members into the or- 
ganization. 

• Maintained constant liaison with mem- 
bership through the activities of the .Second 
Century Club. 

• Welcomed new members by means of 
special luncheon meetings. 

• Continued the "Fair Share Support 
Plan" aimed at strengthening the Chamber 
financially in order to broaden its program of 
action in promoting San Francisco and the 
Bay Region. 



TC^cnlc^ 7ra^e 



George E. Talmage. Jr.. President, San 
Francisco Area World Trade .Association; Harry L. Evans, Appeals 
Committee, World Trade Department ; C. H. Kroll, Arbitration Com- 
mittee; Olaf C. Hansen, School of World Business and Technical 
Advisory; Richard Nelson, World Trade Week Committee Chairman. 
Manager: James P. Wilson. Assistant Manager: Richard J. Abbott. 
Promoting expansion of two-way commerce for the Port of San 
Francisco and enhancing the city's reputation abroad as a vital center 
of international trade, this department and its affiliate, the San Fran- 
cisco .Area World Trade Association — 

• Published Interntilional Bulletin (monthly I. circulation about 
1200. 

• Saw exports and imports through the Golden Gate soar to a 
value of more than $1 billion for the first lime in the history of the 
.San Francisco area. 

• Rendered more than 35,000 direct commercial services to mem- 
l)ers. international traders and firms overseas. 

• Continued to encourage business through Foreign Trade Zone No. 
3. Persisted in attempts to relocate zone in adequate quarters. 

• Furnished hundreds of businessmen and chambers of commerce 
here and abroad witli detailed information regarding commercial, in- 
dustrial, world trade, air and marine port facilities of San Francisco 
area. 

• Continued efforts to bring more official and private world trade 
associations into the San Francisco orbit. 

• Cooperated with National Foreign Trade Council Committee for 
a National Trade Policy, National Council of .American Importers and 
other jirivate and public agencies to improve international facilities for 
world trade development. 

• Urged removal of "Buy American" Act from Slate statute books. 

• Continued negotiations for housing of World Trade Department 
in World Trade Center. 

• Cooperated in presenting display of .San Francisco area world 
trade facilities at National Foreign Trade Convention in New '^ork. 

• Prepared and distributed printed materials and photographs 
about San Francisco to overseas and American publications and official 
and private trade promotional organizations. 

• Provided letters of introduction and made special arrangement.* 
for convenience of local businessmen traveling abroad. 

• Prepared special pamphlet and directory kits for international 
trade fairs involving the United States. 

• Prepared new edition of Directory of Exporters and Importers 
with English. Japanese and Spanish titles. 

• Sponsored World Trade >X eek locally. 

• Sponsored the International Trade and Travel Exhibition at the 
W orld Trade Center during World Trade Week. 

• Arranged orientation meetings for 20 teams and more than 1.000 
key overseas businessmen, journalists and professional leaders visit- 
ing San Francisc<i during the year. 



Friday, January 31, 1958 



January 3 1 — TRANSPORTATION COM- 
MITTEE— R;c- 200 C-a-Der 2-4 cm. 

February 3— AGRICULTURAL COMMIT- 
TEE — San Francijco Room,, Fairm,or,t Hotel, 
1 2 noon. 

Febnjary 5— BUSINESS CENTER DEVEL- 
OPMENT COMMITTEE — Ccmmerda! 



3.4°': 



■freight 



S. F. Bi{si)icss Activity For 1957 
Attdi)js Best Annual Level Ever 

TREND: San Francisco business activity during the year 1957 attained the best 
annual leve ever, and topped the preceding year by 2.6%. The San Francisco Chamber 
of Commerce, December business index rose nearly 20 per cent above November, to a 

new all time record of 182.9 and helped to li^ the arrua' averaqe ■'o 154.4. (1945-49 
= lOO indeic.) 

TKe business treBd in San Francisco during 1957 
mamtained a >esd over 1956 ot 4% at +Ke end of 
©ect> ot t^e fiT^ ttiree qi/Srt«rs btrf, unable to 
escape t+>e ct;mu ative eT?ect ot ++» restricted 
credit policy in the Nation, it began sagging in 
October and No««mber then rebounded in De- 
camber fellowing reversa' ot some of t4>e restric- 
fions at the regions' and national level. 

fMAMCC: San Fra- ; ~'" '- trees', trans- 

ections rose ^0 a ^e« = '.'jaswred by 

banl debts to de-nand ;- - -ransactrons 

amounted to $«9.422,45i..DX, i' ,r.crsase ot $2.- 
067 16*,000 or *A% over 1956. The seven cities 
IK the San Francisco bay region transactions ac- 
counted tor 33.47°, ot the Twelfth Federal Re- 
serve District total and e"---.-*-^ +r? $76,221,579,- 
000, an increase over tte r i- ot $4,767.- 

220,000 or 6.7%. The ;-ry in San 

Francisco is a vita tar-: eopment ot 

t4>e city ^fc-rrr some 675 t rtrt^ in rrns ireid employing 
nearly 22,200 persons with annual insured payrol' 
o^ about $100 000 000. 

The San Fra-cisco division ot tt>e ?acitic Coast 
Stort ^r*r-r= scared in tt>e growing activity 
wt : " r-iange among the leaders ot the 

ns- ^ tirs* year i.nder consolidation, 

tt.e ^ r;?r-ed 35.262,939 stiares traded 

WTTn a maner vaue ot $651,249,566. 

Commercia' taiijres in San Francisco sliranl 
IB.S"; ^ '3? - '957 as against 170 in 1956. 

COWSTtOCTIOII: The tota' construction autti- 
oris-2 - S=- --i-:iscD in 1957 has been enceeded 
only in one oH>er yea'. Permi-rs •^■otaied 11.496 and 
omc>uirt«d tn $69 255 576 »" increase ot 8.1% in 
pe— " ^' rr 1956. New non 

Te; ; -d -o $27,074,861 

or - " I *e*"a"ior'S and re- 

pa >= i-.i.--£c :. - ar 36.9% ot the 

tota' and new re -ed to $16,017,601 

or 23.5% ot "Se -. _ __ _ _ i_thc»ri2ed and pro- 
vided tor 1372 oweiirng unr«. ot which 733 units 
were single -iamily type- 547 units were mufti- 
ta-r'''v -voe a--d 92 were Two ta-iTly type. 

KBAL ESTATt: 1957 rea' estate transactions 
were beow -he preceding year. Deeds recorded 
totaled 16 99B and we-e down 5.7%. MorSgages 
*nd deeds rt trus^ to-aed I4.BI4 and amounted to 
$172 2 '•'^5: a decease ot 11.4% in number and 
«0.l=^, - i-:.- 

TtAOB: "-t 1957 sates a+ retaTI in San Fran- 
cisco toppeo S2. 000 000.000 but were 1.6% below 
1956 Tk» ^A^rM. P^^c^v,^ g>^f .^^~4^ c.- Cran. 



Air mail 36.300.502 pounds i 
61,964,654 pounds up 12.0%. 

Port ot San Francisco revenue tonnage amounted 
to 6.250.781, an increase ot 12.2%: torelgn ton- 
nage accounted tor more than halt the total and 
increased 12.0%- inland waterway tratFic increased 
15.6% and amounted to 2.351,582 tons, inter- 
coastal tonnage increased 7.8% but coastwise 
dropped 15.7%. 

During 1957. 4 673 cargo vessels arrived in ttie 
San Francisco Bay compared to 4,613 in 1956. 
Freight car movements in San Francisco in 1957 
totaled 153,307 compared to 167,599 in the pre- 
ceding year. Truck movements In the San Francisco 
area were practically the same as a year ago. 

1957 Bay Bridge vehicle crossings totaled 34,297.- 
434 tor a new high, surpassing last year by 2.1% 
and &o'den Sate Bridge crossings totaled 15.- 
961,260 tor a new record which was 3.7% over a 
year age. 

BMHOYMEMT: Employment in San Francisco 
and the six county metropolitan area in 1957 main- 
tained the highest level on record witti a monthly 
average ot 1.089,693 persons or 1.2% above the 
previous high last year. Eight ot t+»e ten industry 
groups reported showed year to year increases: the 
service Industry group led with an average ot 240.- 
150 employed, an increase ot 3.9%: manufactur- 
ing ranked second, averaging 219,450 employed. 



^^^^^^ - — In order to build up the cotn- 
nii-n e nf the Port of San Francisco, the Cham- 
ber wa* active during 1957 in bringing about 
an improved status as grain terminals for 
San Francisco and Oakland. ha\ing tliem clas- 
sified as No. 2 terminals rather than No. 4. 
This required the Chamber to establish a 
supervising weighmasler service. George R. P. 
Schikore was engaged for this pur|xise under 
the supervision of the Chamber's Transporta- 
tion Department. This development has been 
jiartly responsible for the movement of in- 
rrasing volumes of grain into export through 
Oakland and San Francisco. 

In .\u2ust of last year, the community sus- 
tained a loss in the death of James J. Sulli- 
van, who had been Chief Inspector in the 
Chamber's Grain Department since 1902. \X ith 
his passing, the work of the supervising weigh- 
master is being consolidated with that of the 
Grain Department, which will be moved from 
quarters it has occupied in the Merchants Ex- 
change Building for some years to the offices 
of the Grain Exchange in the same building. 

up 0.6%: retail trade, third, averaged 175.667. _r 
0.6°4i transportation, communications and utlllt'e: 
tourth. averaged 121,808. up 2.8%: govemme^- 
fifth, averaged 92,100. up 0.6%; wholesale tre: 
sirtti. averaged 79,675. up 3.0%; contract c: 
struction. seventh, averaged 70,150, off 8.8%; t,- 
nance, msurance and real estate ranted eighth, av- 
eraged 6S.625 up 2.4%; and agriculture, ninth. 
averaged 19.325. off 1.8% 

UTIUTIBS: The number ot consumers in the 
utility field In San Francisco Increased in 1957: the 
net gain in gas consumers, amounted to 1 177, elec- 
tric consumers to II 27 and water consumers to 879, 
and the sales of electrical energy, eiceptlng street 
lighting and street raihway power. In San Francisco 
was up 3.5°5, Industria' ard cor^merclal water sales 
0.4". and residentla -a-e' c:rs^r-,c-Ion 1.3"-. 

POPULATION AMD CONSUMER PRICES: 

San Francisco's population on January I, 1958 was 
estimated by the Chamber of Commerce at about 
814,000. Consumer prices In San Francisco rz 
steadily during 1957. The December Index tor - 
Items at 124.8 represented an Increase of 2 t 
over last December. Based on yearly averages. '■ 
Items were up 4.1%; food, 3.2%: apparel, 1.7' 
housing, 3.5%; rents, 2.9%: transportation. 6.1 
medical, 4.6%; and personal care, 2.9%. In I-: 
average weekly earnings in the manufacturing 
dustry of production workers in the metropoUta' 
area were up 4.4% to $95.65. ■ 



ifctr.c- ii £.; ,--t --.i iir 

The 1957 wt,c.leiae-sa> 
e$t<T-,Bted a'' $5.3 bl'ic- 
Pftcrfic Coast Merchar- 

flTS^ I I m,:,-,^. .,{ IOC- 



lire 

tc.:. 



TKAMSPOtTATlOH: 



San Franc'sco were 

»- last year. 

= es tor t+ie 



'*ry A'ig- general 

;ry ooods 6% ano 

--'-■= 3%- hard- 

- . pment 4% 



,;• --i-.cisco Inter- 

netic-; *.-;•:- --i- r r -i' -_-. .,ed at a new 

fiigt .e.e. P-sr.e -rs=.c rc-aieo i 25,798 up 057.: 
Passengers cm and of to*9led 3.494,B03 up 1 55%; 



(^^a*H^r a^ ^^ommerce 7i/ee& Set 

Governor Goodwin J. Knight has proclaimed February 2-8 Chamber 
of Commerce Week in California and urged all citizens to be mindful of the 
contributions which these organizations have made to the economy. 

The first chamber of commerce in the West was established in San 
Francisco in 1850. This number has grown until today there are 621 Chambers 
providing leadership and constructive community development programs 
for California's fast growing cities. 

Knight said, "The immediate past has been stimulating and the imme- 
diate future is challenging. The volunteer leaders and those employed by 
our Chambers of Commerce in professional capacities will meet this chal- 
lenge with sound and constructive development programs for our communities. 

"The tremendous expansion of population in California in recent years 
has created many problems and It is substantially to the credit of such volun- 
tary associations of citizens that the assimilation of these additional millions 
of people has been carried out in an orderly manner." 



Friday, January 31, 1958 



Survey of Business in San Francisco for the Year 1957 



BRANCH Of ACTIVITY 
•GENERAL BUSINESS ACTIVITY (I) 

Sa- f-ardica Cnarrc*- of Co»"rnerce 

CONSTRUCTION PERMITS (2) 

Total . 

Residential. New 

Dwelling units „ .. 

Single-familv units, re« 

Two-family units, new 

Multi-family unit!, new 
Non-Residential, new . 

Addns., alterations and repairs 

Nine County — dwelling units auttio'i:ed 

REAL ESTATE (3) 

Deeds recorded . . „ 

Mortgages and dee<ls of trust. . 

•RETAIL DEPARTMENT STORE SALES (4) 

San Francisco (urtadiusted) 



Number 

Value 

Nurroer 
Number 
Number 
_Number 

_ Number 



Value 
Number 

Value 
Ni»mber 



Number 

.Number 

Amount 



12 mOS IK7 



779 


749 


*-S 


il^t 


3*}4 


; 1 


42*3 752 


4 20*228 


1.4 


M2eS7* 


** 0*6 473 


34 






91.7 


Ml 


92* 


—10 




SW.SiS 


nj 


liiXTja 


*5«4*Z2 


—35 


lOi 


«» 


110.4 


1 372 


'2m 


9.9 




31 


93.5 


723 


825 


— '1-2 




4 


50.5 


92 


7i 


2i.i 




13 


1*9.2 


5*7 


3*7 


57.* 


iC 


10 


OJ) 


52 


>Si 


0.0 


838 920 


20i3i»7 


-58.4 


27 074BH 


29K7aK 


-9J 




703 


—04 


i}«3 


9557 


9.7 


2 323K7 


I.Sfl.44« 


4*i> 


25 193 rl4 


9*22 9(0 


2f.4 




I.SS7 


165 


3i (B9 


32 2B 


-3-7 


1.075 


1359 


-20.9 


*99« 


I>.0l7 


— 5J 


1 013 


1 063 


—*J 


14(14 


1*72* 


— 11.4 


I0S4«7S9 


12945 25« 


-115 


I72 2I4 4SO 


I9i«0»777 


— i«.l 



Bank debits (4) 

Bank clearings (5) , 

Postal receipts (6) 

P. C. Stock Eich. (7) shar, 

Commercial failures (8) 

Liabilities . --^ 

Assets „ 



INDUSTRY TREND-* CoMty 6iiplB>re»rt {«)- 

weekly earningi 



Mfg.- 

Mlg. _ 

Construction, contract 

Finance, insurance, real esla«e_ 

Retail trade 

Wholesale trade 



Trans., comm., 
Agriculture 



Market Value I 



(Ooilartt 

Employmenfl 
Employmentj 



.(Employment) 
-(Employment) 



TRANSPORTATION 

Freight car movements (10). . 

S. F. Airoort traffic (11) 
■ and out . 



Passengers off and 0*1 -. 

Air mail loaded, unloaded 

Air express loaded, unloaded.. 

Ai' freight loaded, unloaded— 

Express shipments (12) rail. . .. _ 

uck movements — S. F. area (l)_ 



(Employment) 
Employmerrf) 
Employment) 
EmploymeiTt) 
Employment) 

Employment) 



-Number 
-Number 



Out-of-state passengc- cars entering Northern Califofnia (2I)_ 

Entering Passenge'S _„ 



Lbs. 

. Lbs- 
Lbs. 

Numbe- 

Indei 

-Number 
-Number 



PORT OF SAN FRANCISCO (13) 

Total . 

Coastwise 

Intercoastal - _ 

Inland Waterway 



For, 



-gn 



-Revenue to^s 
-Revenue tons 
-Revenue tons 
-Revenue to«s 
_ Revenue tor^s 



CARGO VESSELS (S. F. lay) (14) 



Registered tonnage . 



Ind.. comm. gas sales fIS) . 
•Elec. energy sales. KW hrs. (15) 
Water consumption, res. (I*) 
Comrr.ercia d'd industrial 

NEW DEVELOPMENTS 

Visitor & Newcomer Inquiries (l)„ 
Bay Bridge Veh. Crossings (17) 
Golden Gate Bridge Crossings 

Ftum AND VEGETAILES (19) 

LIVESTOCK SLAUGHTER (19) 

Cattle . 



S. F. CONSUMBI PRICE INDSC (20) 



Carlots 
Total 



Transportation 

Medical 

Personal Care 

Other Goods and Services 

All Items - — 



nda 
'-d«« 

-d«» 
•da 



4 410,398 


4 131 403 


ki 


49 422 45* 


47 365 292 


44 


3 070 0*9 


2.950 4** 


4.1 


34 87 7*4 


33 794 915 


3J 


3354799 


3.*J7.aiO 


— 7J 


31 7««2St 


32*i4«2 


JM 


3082*30 






35 2*2<39 






51 775 721 






*5' 249 S4« 






5 


12 


-58-3 


■sc 


iTD 


— MJ 


197 793 


252 743 


—21.7 


* *.- :-~ 


4 4«ap 


I4J 


107472 


72 400 


48.4 




2i«9»i 


-395 


1,099 400c 


1.108 900 


-09 




■ anTsa 


IJ 


'6 = 


93 -*!(*) 


2-7 


*5a6iO) 


»iJ*(e) 


4.4 


Z7= iCC z 


217*00 


—3-7 


2l9«0(p) 


2l«.flD 


04 


ic's^j z 


7*300 


— I4i» 


70 150 p) 
a.*25^p( 


»9S 


— u 


tiiyCO'D 


68 000 


OJ 


«7 0S 


2.4 


190,300(p| 


159 600 


0.4 


>75.**7p) 


l7*JDi 


OJ 


SO.JOKp) 


78 800 


IJ 


Tt.PSp) 


77 JO 


3jR 


245 2XrB! 


23*500 


3J 


2«.iS0 pi 


231 «0 


3-9 


■TiXO'z' 


120 600 


-JH 


■7i.iai p( 


IIRJI7 


2J 


z KC 


186CO 


—9.1 


19J2S<p) 


itVS 


— ij 


•'- <C z 


99«00 


0-0 


92100(0) 


91575 


SA 


;• XC : 


3900 


0.D 


2 70(0) 


2*17 


4J 



28*372 

4 418 28* 
960 871 

5 949 434 

95*23 
153.7 
5*171 

145 t*4 


237.75* 
4 120 597 

989 68* 
4 422.7C3 

1:202* 
149 I 

5«*« 
153 259 


20 -4 
72 

— I4JJ 

—7.1 

—14.* 

3.1 

—0.1 
— 5J 


3 464 803 
34 30C5C: 

22*9 93 


3I'»9« 
ic ■«: T72 

- ~ -JS 
-Si 

a 4 

»3«30> 

2«9 5e9 


55 

34 

— I4J 

'2.B 
— 33 ' 
-02 
—64 
— 5J 


513942 
5393 

2**75 
197.183 
284.71 1 


500 242 
|4<47 
2S992 
214.814 
241 9*9 


2.7 
— *2.7 
—8.0 

-aj 

17 J 


iia^ 


S5*9*«3 

154 «i 

414 304 

2as3ja 

2«67SO 


irj 

— »4J 
7J 
154 

ira 


393 

1 942 327 


379 
l^.»C 


3J 
5J 


4*73 

22 406 868 


4*i3 

21.717 210 




3.2 


1.473.568.900 

1*1 

m. 739.500 

155.944 000 


1.419.2** 700 

15* 

115 112000 

54 88*000 


3J 

3J 

—2.9 

0.7 


1573* 

1.40' 

1.93* -M' XT. 


«3 


-3.1 
35 
ij 
•J 


428 
2 934 379 
1.292*9* 


*59 
2 789 0*1 
1 22*8*7 


5J 

5.4 


<t 131 
34 297 4J4 

i5 9r 2tC 


17238 
33S81 '57 
<5«3a5e 


-*-4 

2< 
3-7 



25 000(4 
50OO(a 
40 000(a 
TSOOOta 



1195 
lOtJ 
127.4 
1415 
152.4 

141.0 

122J 
I2J.7 

I2«J 



I^4a00(a) —1*7 



25.000(4) 


OjO 


>ooao(a) 


-SOlO 


TX 


-l*.7 
— 19.4 


IWJ 


2J 


Nkt 


1.2 


IM.I 


2J 


I37J 


3.1 


I4RJ 


25 


136.9 


3J 


117.9 


14 


119.9 


12 


1214 


24 



2*1 aao(b) 
9]aao(e) 
t<paoo<bi 

278 0aMbl 



i.4tMa(b) 

2«*.88Mb) 



1*4 am b^ -«9j 



121. •lei 



•Indei Bate (1947-49 =: 100); {«] Nov«mb«*' (b 



--mnf S«n ff#^ 



P«rmit ft»*-**« «# Stt* FvMtcii 



Friday, January 3 1 , 1958 



(^%c<it (^MeU*t ^Icct 




"ADMIRABLE", SAYS ADMIRAL— Famed admiral 
William (Bull) Halsey looks on with interest as 
Dan E. London, Commodore of the Great Golden 
Fleet shows him the sights of the Bay during a re- 
cent cruise aboard the "Adventuress," flagship of 
the colorful Chamber organization. 

FLAGSHIP: ■'ADVENTURESS" 
Dan E. London, Commodore 

Feb. 17— Welcomed the SS "LEILANI" (Ha- 
waiian Steamship Co.) — 12 boats. 

Mar. II — Cruise, American Institute of Sup- 
ply Association — 7 boats. 

Apr. 5 — Escorted Stockton Inland Fleet into 
S. F.— 7 boats. 

Apr. 8 — Cruise, Council of the Organization 
of American States — 12 boats. 

Apr. 20 — Honor Escort, annual Bullship Race 
— 6 boats. 

Apr. 23— Hosted 16 officers of Industrial 
War College— FLAGSHIP. 

Apr. 25— Second Century Club, Chamber— 
FLAGSHIP. 

May 3— Cruise to City of Napa (Inter-City 
Section Members) — 5 boats. 

May 9— A.A.U. Olympic Handball Team— 
FLAGSHIP. 

May 27— Saluted Golden Gate Bridge 20th 
Anniversary — 9 boats. 

June 9 — Escorted Dairy Industry's Interna- 
tional Milking Contest in San Francisco Bay — 
5 boats. 

June I I — Executives of U. S. Steel Corpora- 
tion— FLAGSHIP. 

June 13 — Saluted navy's First Fleet — 8 boats. 

June 22— Welcomed SS "MATSONIA" (Mat- 
son Navigation Co.) — 12 boats. 

July II — Greeted 'Las Plumas' — 3 boats. 

July 28 — Australian Trade Mission Greeting 
— 3 boats. 

Oct. 7 — Association of Stock Exchange Firms 
Cruise — 9 boats. 

Oct. 13— Life-Time Cruise— 12 boats. 

Oct. 21— NATO-Chaplains Cruise — 6 boats. 

Nov. I I — Fashion Editors Cruise — 3 boats. 



BAT "REGION BU5IN"£5S 



SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



AI.AN K. nROWNE. Prr^iilrnl 

C. L. FOX, General Manater 

M. A. HOCAN, SccriUrr 

JAMES D. WARNOCK. Eieculive Editor 

JOSEPH I. HAUCHEY. Editor 

Publiihed ererr other »rrk \>j the San Franriiro Chamber 

of Commrrre at )33 Pine St.. San Franciico. Zone 4. 

CoimtT of San Franciico. California. Trleohone EXbrook 

2-4511. (Non-member lubicriplion. 13.00 a year.) Entered 

ai Second Qaii matter Aoril 26, 1944. at the Poil Office at 

San Franciico. California, under the act of March 3. 1879. 

Circti/ofion: 7.500 thit Untm 



BAY MODEL, CLUE TO FUTURE .... Progressogram No. 33 

The San Francisco Bay Model at Sausalifo — long deemed a necessity 
by the Chamber to test various barrier and land reclamation plans and 
determine the causes of shoalinq — is the largest hydraulic working model 
of any harbor in the v/orld. 

One of the few engineering devices built to foretell the future, this 
"crystal ball" has been described as "one of the most imaginative and far- 
seeing projects ever authorized by Congress." 

San Francisco Bay, discovered by Portola in 1769, is one of the 
great natural phenomena of the maritime world. Comprising 456 square 
miles the bay — an inset to an area which encompasses some 4000 square miles 
— provides the only passage to the sea for drainage of the Central Valley 
through the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers. It er;tends 50 miles inland, 
has a maximum width of up to 12 miles and is capable of floating every ship 
in the world at the same time. 

Despite more than 100 years of accumulated knowledge of currents, 
tides, salinity and silt-movement, it is still a mystery as to what created and 
has kept the huge crescent bar menacing the approaches to the Golden 
Gate — a giant, semi-circular shoal with a six-mile radlu:. and lying 300 feet 
beneath the ocean surface. Also, the slow drift of sediment in the ship 
channels remains unmeasured and unconfined. Too, salt intruding from the 
sea is becoming a dangerous enemy to the land, reaching the fertile delta 
region at the confluence of the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers. 

As a preliminary to the construction of the Bay Model, the U.S. Geo- 
logical Survey has made a determination of the Inflow of sediment into the 
Bay and delta systems, the U.S. Department of Agriculture has studied 
evaporation and transpiration; the University of California Institute of 
Engineering Research has investigated the use of radioisotopes to chart 
sedimentary movement in the Bay. 

The Federal Government, through the U.S. Army Engineer District 
hopper dredges, now spends some $2 million annually in dredging an average 
of eight million cubic yards a year, exclusive of money spent by State, local 
governments and private concerns. 

The Bay Model will provide definite data on the feasibility of two 
proposed barrier plans. One is that of Cornelius Biemond, director of water 
supply for Amsterdam, who suggests a small barrier across the Sacramento 
River in the delta area with aqueducts to transport fresh water wherever 
needed. The other is the Reber Plan which envisions giant earth barriers across 
the north and south portions of the Bay to create vast fresh water lakes 
within the Bay. 

The Model itself, which cost about $400,000 to construct, is comprised 
of 168 concrete slabs fitted to accord with the contours of the Bay. The 
scale of the model is 1:10, 14.4 minutes on the model equals 24 hours in the 
Bay. The Model envelooes the e-tirc northern and southern arms of the Bay, 
including the rivers and creeks which flow Into it, and it is limited in the 
East at (the Carqulnez Straits) as far as the junction o fthe Sacramento and 
San Joaquin rivers and in the West 17 miles Into the Pacific Ocean. 

The Model simulates the tides, salinity content of the ocean and Bay 
waters, current velocities and shoaling. 

The future of millions of people and the investment of billions of dollars 
hinges on the results of the tests conducted on the Model. It is truly "The 
world's largest crystal ball." 



*>S regular feotur 



ik fhe Chamber lor Reprints: EXbrook 2-4511, Ex*. 13 or M. Research Dept. 



^ 



Y REGION !^i BUSINESS 



SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE X^^^oeo^!^ 



VOLUMP IS • NUMBER * • FFB»UARY 14 1958 



Chinatown Fetes 
'Year of The Dog ' 



Itinerary for SFAWTA's Second Annual 
Business Tour of Eastern Asia All Set 




READY FOR SAN FRANCISCO'S CHINESE NEW YEAR— The 4656th year of the Chinese Lunar calen- 
dar, the Year of the Dog. will be welcomed February 21-23 by Sie Tze, the nnagniflcent lion imported 
from Hong Kong for the annual event sponsored by the Chinese Chamber of Commerce. Here, the 
Keeper of the Lions, Gee Sheu Wai (or John Gee), blesses the beast with water sprinkled from a Chinese 
citrus leaf as tiny Donna Wong looks on. Ceremonies took place in Kong Chow Temple, oldest in Ameri- 
ca. Sze Tze will ward off evil spirits and show the way to happiness and prosperity as he dances in the 
February 22 parade which will also feature a new block-long Golden Dragon. In cooperation with the 
Chinese Chamber of Commerce, the Chamber's Publicity Department sent out 200 mats of this scene to 
newspapers throughout the State. 

Revision of City Charter Urged by Chamber 
In CoiiipHaiiee With Bradley-Burns Legislation 



(lliaiiilxr l)ir<'<-loi> liavc vot<'(! iiiiuiii- 
iiioiislv to rcafririn a policv favoriii-i rcvi- 
!-ii>ii of tile ("ily and (louiily Charter l«) 
(■iial)l<' <'c>iii|iliaiicc witli tlio IJratUoy- 
Hiiriis I iiiforiii Sale," and I se Tax. 
ic-ullinj; in an ailililioiud aiiiuuil icvi'iiuc In 
llif City and Cniinly of ap|.iii\inuil<-ly $;{.0()().- 
000. 

Ilif DirfCtiirs" acliiili fiplluwcil llic ircnili- 
iiMiidutinns <if the Special Comniitlee on I'lir- 
clui^e and Use and Sales Tuxes, of wliicii 
WalliT F. Kaplan is Chairman. 

Tlir Hoard al-o voteil to "take Mich steps as 
neiev^ary to ha\e an appropriate charier 
ainendnient placed on the hallo) for the June 
election." and to work for voter support i>f 
the measure. 

"The efTects of the Hiadley-Huriis .\et in 
oilier counties and (he terms of the San F'ran- 
cisco Purchase and Use Tax Ordinance have 
led to many complications lendill); lo alTect 
San Krancisi'o hu-iness ailversely," Kaplan 
slated. "Ih'cuiise it has lieen necessary lo ex- 
empt certain purchases in Sun Francisco for 
ii~e in olher counties, and for other reasons, il 



is estimated thai .San F'rancisco has lost over 
S3.000.000 a year in purchase and use taxes. 

".\llliout;li various proposals have been 
made regarding methods of bringing San 
Francisco under the Bradley-Burns .\ct, it is 
agreed by the best authorities that the proper 
procedure is to amend the Charter by a vote 
of tile electors. For this purpose, two ballot 
propositions have been proposed." 

The first proposition would make action b\ 
the Board of .Supervisors mandatory. Tin- 
other would make action by the .Super\isor~ 
permissive. 

Kaplan elated that his conimitlee favors the 
"mandatory" amendment, but woiilil expect 
the Chamber to support thi- "permissive" 
amendmeni in the event the Supervisors do 
not place the b>rmer on the ballot. 

The proposed Charier amendments were 
drafted by Thomas J. Blunchurd. Deputy (!ily 
.Vtlorney. and have been siibmilled to tin- 
Bouiil of .Supervisors. Kuplun pointed out. and 
the subject hu- been pending before the Fi- 
nance Committee of tile Board of Supervisor* 
Criirn l<> puKe Imo) 



The itinerary fur the second annual Busi- 
ness Tour of Eastern Asia, sponsored by the 
San Francisco Area World Trade .\«soeiation. 
has been announced by Robert Taylor. Presi- 
dent. 

The lour is scheduled to leave .San Fran- 
cisco via Pan .-Vmerican World .\irway- f^lip- 
per .\pril 7 and return May 2 via Japan Air 
Lines. I'rice bir first class accommodations 
for the 18,000-mile. 26-day trip ha- been s«-t 
at $2,.S07. Tourist cla>s lrans|Hirtation is 
$2.1.38. 

.\ highlight of the lour will be a visit to the 
Japan International Trade Fair at Osaka. San 
Francisco's sister city in the "Town AfTilia- 
tion" program. 

General chairman of the .San Francisco- 
Osaka "town affiliation" committee is Phillips 
S. Davies, Vice President of N. W. Axe & Co., 
a New York investment-counseling firm with 
offices in San Francisco. The rest of the execu- 
tive c<mimittee is comprised of Henry North, 
Vice President of Metropolitan Insurance 
Company: Che-ler K. McPhee. l.S. Co|bct..r 
of Ciistcmis in .San Franci-co: Judge Harry 
Neubarth, presiding judge of the Superior 
Court: Benjamin Swig, owner of the Fairmont 
Hotel: Cyril Magnin. President of the .San 
Francisco Port .•Vuthority; Jo»eph .S. Thomp- 
son. President of the Federal I'acific Electric 
Company: Carlton Skinner, assistant to the 
President of .American President Lines; 
James P, Wilson, Manager of the ^'orld 
Trade Department of the Chanil>er: and 
Charles von I.oewenfeldl. President. Charles 
von l.oewenfeldt. Inc. 

Richard J, Abbott. As-islant Manager of 
the W orld Trade Department of the Chamlter. 
will be in charge of tour arrangements. 

Interested parlies are asked to contact the 
World Trade Department of the ChanilH-r, 
KXbrook 2-4511. Ext, 4<>. 

''Holland in a World 
Of Turnioir' Subject 
Of SFAWTA Address 

"Holland in a World of Turmoil" will be 
the -ubjecl of Dr. J. H. van Roijcn. .Xmbassa- 
dor of The Netlurlands to the I nit«-d Stale*, 
when he addre-.se- a lunche«>n in his honor 
-ponsoreil by the ('hamber \\edne»«lay, Feb- 
ruary I'A in the Venetian R<H<m of the Fair- 
mont Hotel, 

Alan K, Browne. President of the (Miandier. 
will preside. 

Reservations for the luncheon may Im- made 
by calling the ChandM-r. E\brm>k 2-1511. 



Friday, February 14, 1958 



Evelyn La Place Heads S .F. Council o f District M erchants 





EVELYN LA PLACE 
President 



IRWIN PHILLIPS 
Vice President 



RAY STELLING 
Vice President 



FRASER S. REAY 
Sergeant-at-Arms 



HAROLD V. STARR 
Executive Secretary 



Officials of the San Fraiuisc. Council of District Merchants Associations for 1938 were 
installed by W iiliam T. Sweipert. Superior Court Judge, during a recent ceremony at Roherts- 
at-the-Beach. 

Pledfied lo act on hehalf of all San Franci-.-o neighborhood shopping districts regarding 
traffic, transportation, legislation, citv welfare, undesirable businesses, special events, and inter- 
district information and assistance, the DMA has had close affinity with the Chamber on these 
matters. 

Officials installed included: 

Evelyn La Place. Taraval-Parkside Merchants Association. President: Irwin Phillips. 
Noriega Merchants Association, and Ray Stelling. Haight-Ashbury Merchants and Improve- 
ment Association. Vice Presidents: Judson G. 
Osburn. Marina Merchants Association. Secre- 
tary: Sam I.ightslone. Mission Merchants As- 
sociation. Treasurer; Fraser S. Reay. Portola 
Merchants Association. Sergeant-at-arms : 
Shirley Fischer, Greater Geary Boulevard 
Merchants and Property Owners Association. 
Corresponding Secretary: and Harold V. 
Siarr. managing director of the Chamber's 
Retail .Merchants Association. Executive Sec- 
retary. 

Under outgoing president Michael .]. 
(.Mikel Susko of the Portola DMA. tiie cun- 
cil: . 

• Saw the appointment of members on the 
Parking Authority and the Bond Screening 
Committee; 

• Initiated and took action to keep the 
Stale Miilor Vehicle Registration office on 

\,,lieu.' - 



• Made available to all member merchants 
an income replacement insurance program; 

• Organized and held a city-wide "Neigh- 
borhood Merchants Week": 

• Received representation before the U. S. 
Senate Small Business Sidi-Committee. 

Monthly meetings of the DMA are sched- 
uled every third Monday of the month in the 
Chamber Board of Directors Room. 





NEW CINERAMA. "Search for Paradise. " will have 
Ih West Coast premiere at the Orpheum Theatre 
March II. Here Harry Squire, director of photogra- 
phy. Jack Priestley, cameraman, and Otto Lang, 
director, stand on a trail high above the Indus 
River, one of the locales of the Lowell Thomas 
adventure. 



Drawing Power of 
S.F. Region Shown 
By Cinerama Success 

Audiences tolaling nearly .i.OOO.OOO have 
seen "This Is Cinerama." "Cinerama Holi- 
day." and "Seven Wonders of the World" 
since the first Cinerama opened at the Or- 
pheum Theatre Christmas Day. 19.S.3. About 
half of these audiences, or 1..S00.000. have 
been residents of northern Clalifornia and 
other parts of the West, demonstrating the 
unique regional drawing power to .'^an Fran- 
cisco of these attractions. 

The Chamber will co-sponsor, with the Press 
and Union League Club, a pre-premiere din- 
ner to be held at the PUI.C prior to the first 
W est Coast showing of "Search for Paradise," 
llie fourth Cinerama film. March 11. Dinner 
lickets, at $3.00. may be obtained from the 
( :lianiber. Ext. .SB. 

All proceeds from the premiere will go to 
the PULC scholarship fund for journalism 
students. 

Theatre tickets, at $2.00 and $3.00 are 
available at the St. Francis Hotel box office. 
DO 2-.3,S00. and the PULC. PR S-7800. 

The new production takes audiences into 
the remote and unexplored regions of the lofty 
Karakoram and Himalayan Mountains, into 
Pakistan. India. Kashmir. Ceylon. Nepal and 
litlle-known regions of the "roof of the world" 
area of Central Asia. 



SAM LIGHTSTONE 
Treasurer 



JUDSON G. OSBURN 

Secretary 



Revision of Charter 
Urged to Comply Witli 
Bradley-Burn? Act 

(Continued from page one) 

(or some time. 

.\s soon as the Supervisors have acte<i l.i 
place an amendment on the ballot, it is i" 
posed that the Chamber's special conimiti' ■ 
be expanded to enlist all possible cooiwration 
to bring about adoption of the measure. Kap- 
lan continued. Members of the special com- 
mittee are Kaplan, a Chamber Director. Presi- 
dent of Retail Merchants Association and 
Secretary-Treasurer. The Elmporium-Capwell 
Co.; .\lan H. Johnston. Controller. C. & H. 
Sugar Refining Corp.: Karl M. Stull. Presi- 
dent and Managing Director. Retail Dry 
Goods Association: Roy P. Cole, former 
Chamber Director. Cole & DeGraf: W. Need- 
ham Lambert. Standard Oil Company: and 
F. B. Magruder. Southirn Pacific Companv 



\l holesaler Direvtory Ready 

The Direrlor> of Merchant W half- 
salrrs' and liranrh So/en Offices. City 
niitl Coiiiily i>l Snn Fronrinco— -conlain- 

inK diilii on 2,t»00 Wrnf soon will bo 

aviiiluble at S,! per ropy for non- 
<:iianiber-mrniber an«l $2.50 per ropv 
for Ohanibor nienihors. 

The director? is obtainable throuRh 
the Donieslir Trade Department of the 
riiamber, 3.^3 I'inr Street. 



Friday, February 14, 1958 



Hitting the High Spots 



NEW MEMBERS 



RECENT MONTHS 




with JIM WARNOCK 

SAN FRANCISCO ranks among the eight best-gov- 
erned of twenty-three U.S. cities with estimated 
populations over 500,000, according to a recent 
article in FORTUNE Magazine. The eight outstand- 
ing: Cincinnati, Milwaukee, Philadelphia San Fran- 
cisco. New York, Pittsburgh, Baltimore, and Detroit. 
Ratings were based on such objective indexes as 
bond ratings, traffic accident rates, arrests for 
known crimes, etc, San Francisco was particularly 
high in fire protection, public health, recreation, 
noise abatement, and was included in a small group 
which has the most professional planning depart- 
ments. . . . 

THE McGUIRE COMPANY, internationally recog- 
nized San Francisco furniture manufacturing firm, 
has outgrown its cradle and moved its factory from 
Hotaling Place and Jackson Square, once a stable 
and no stranger to the horses of Wells Fargo ex- 
press teams, hansom cabs and the loaded drays of 
the Gold Rush days, to 952 BaHery Street. Dunbar 
Furniture, Bengt and Ellen Rlckberg, importers, and 
the McGuire Company will share quarters designed 
by Mario L. Galdano. San Francisco architect. . . . 
MAJOR ERNIE SMITH, the first man to pilot a 
single-engine aircraft from California to Hawaii, on 
July 14, 1927, was recently 
honored at a dinner at the 
Pancake Palace, San Fran- ^^^^—^--^^ 
Cisco International Airport, ^|^F^ \ 

In recognition of his career 
of more than 30 years in 
aviation. Smith retired as ^^ 

sales account executive for ^^1^^ ^^\.' 
Trans World Airlines on 
January 10. Mayor George 
Christopher presented a 
plaque honoring "The Trail 
Blazer of the Pacific" spon- MAJOR ERNIE 

sored by the Air Force SMITH 

Association, the Air Trans- 
port Association, the Aviation Writers Association, 
the Interstate Company and TWA. Another first for 
Smith was piloting the then 48-hour transcontinental 
plane service Inaugurated by TAT-Maddux Line, 
TWA's predecessor company, In 1929. 

A NEW CONCEPT in "electronically-controlled" 
warehousing and distribution was recently demon- 
stratd by officials of Factory Motor Parts, Inc., 
wholesale distributors of Chrysler automotive prod- 
ucts. Key to the system is a 305 RAMAC, radically 
new computer and accounting machine developed 
and manufactured by International Business Ma- 
chines Corporation. . . . 

BERNARR M. WILSON, President of Wilson-Rich 
Paper Co., has sold his stock in the company to 
Kenneth G. Rich and resigned as President. James 
S. Worden has been appointed Secretary-Treas- 
urer. . . . 

WESTERN ENVELOPE CORPORATION has moved 
to a new plant at 144 Spcnr Street, San Fran- 
cisco. . . . 



Admiiiislial ion's Farm 
Policy Talk Schrduh'd 

.Irvs,. W. Tap|i. 1%1 I'r.^i.l.nt and l'),W 
.'\^ririilliiral (lnnitnilti'i- Cliairniaii nf llic 
Chaiiilicr. will sprak nn "'Tlii' Administration's 
Farm I'olity" wlicii llir .A^riciiiliiral Commit- 
tee mcfis .Miiiiclay noon in liii- Nob Hill 
Room of till' Kaimiont llolil. 

Tapp, Cliairman of the Board of Dirrrtnrs, 
Bank of America N. T. & S. A., with head- 
quarters in Los Angeles, is an advisor to 
President Eisenhower on farm problems. 




J. J. Grun 



R. L. Burpee 



Leon G'egolre Lucrexia Kempe 



G. H. Lang* 

New members recently added to llie ChuiiiliiT (left to rifjlil I are Ceoffrey H. l.ai>tL>-. 
.Managing Director, yolkstiagen oj America. Inc.; John J. (irunewald. I)i%i«ion Manager. 
Direct .Sales. Union Oil Co. oj California: R. 1.. Burpee. Regional Manager. Detroit Die«el 
Engine Division. General Motors Corp.; Leon (iregoire. President. C.onsolidaled Hourr 
Shiftments, Inc.; and Lucre/.ia Kemper. Vice I'resjdent. Allien Frank-Gurnlher Laii . Inc.. 
Advirti~in" and I'lililir Rr!;ilion'-. 



THE BAY AREA'S top-ranlting high school science 
student will receive a $500 college scholarship as a 
highlight of National Engineers' Week. February 
16-22. The Bay Area Engineers' Week Committee, 
sponsors of the scholarship awards, will also select 
two runners-up to receive $300 awards. . . . 
CALIFORNIA'S PART OF THE BURDEN In finan- 
cing the nation's $73.9 billion budget is over ten 
per cent, or $7,770.500 000, according to the Cali- 
fornia Slate Chamber of Commerce. . . . 
ACCELERATION OF DEFENSE PROCUREMENT 
early in 1958 was predicted by Don G. Mitchell, 
Chairman of the Board and President of Sylvania 
Electric Products, when he addressed the San Fran- 
cisco Council of the West Coast Electronic Menu 
facturers Association at the Peninsula Golf ar^n 
Country Club in San Mateo. . . . 
R. V. DALEY, Dow Chemical International. Ltd., has 
been elected President of the Export Managers' As- 
sociation of San Francisco for 1958, succeeding 
Jack W. Cavanaugh, Export Manager for the West- 
ern United States, Stauffer Chemical Co. Other 
officials: L. Yribarren, Crown-Zellerbach Corp 
W. 8. Doolittle, Hewlett Packard Co.: and C. H 
Bates, General Paint Corp. . . . 
IN AN EFFORT TO AUGMENT SAN FRANCIS 
CO'S POSITION as a center for tea Imports fr 
India, establishment of a tea and spices e^charc' 
here is being considered, according to Robert T«, 
lor. President of the San Francisco Area Wcr . 
Trade Association of the Chamber. K. B. LALL. 
joint secretary of the Ministry of Commerce and 
Industry of India met with association officials last 
week to study the move. The meeting followed a 
luncheon meeting of the Directors of the Chamber 
at which officials from India and the Consul Gen- 
eral of India in Sen Francisco, Rajkumar Raghunath 
Sinha, were guests. 



SYMBOL OF SISTER CITY -Did you know 
Osaka, •City of Water. " is a focal point of 
one of the world's great na- 
tural harbors? Situated on 
%^ the eastern shore of the 

^9^ famed Soto Inland Sea at the 

X V^ mouth of the Yodo River 

-^^ ^^^ Osaka — San Francisco's "Sis 
^^^ ier City " — Is a strategic her- 

CT z' , t'O' 'of "'a western provinces 

Pl^ of Japan, for China. Korea 

I ^ ^^. and worldwide points. Learn 
» ^^ more about the trading area 

vital to the future of the 
great Pacific Basin commu- 
nity by joining the second annual Business 
Development Tour of the San Francisco Area 
World Trade Association departing April 7 
for Japan, Hong Kong and the Philippines 
Call or write the World Trade Department 
of the Chamber, 333 Pme Street San F-»p 
Cisco 4. EXbrock 2-4511. 



GEORGE R. P. SCHIKORE. recent,, appo.m.d 
Supervising Weighmaste' of the Grain Department 
of the Chamber, has been promoted to the position 
of Supervisor. Formerly located in Room 826 of 
the Merchants' Exchange Building, 465 Cai (omie 
Street. Schlkore will aid grain traders with various 
tests as well as inspect certain grains in his n«w 
office in Rorr-i 237 cf -h., ..^r. ^ b.iidln:! 



RECENTLY ELECTED Pres- 
ident of the San Fran- 
cisco Junior Chamber of 
Commerce. Victor B. L«»it, 
27 year old attorney and 
partner of Long S Levit. is 
one of the youngest men 
to hold the top position In 
the 31 year JC history. 
Other officers are William 
A. Carroll. G. Robert Mc- 
Gettigan, William J. Welsh, 
and Paul D. Barker. Beard 
members are Robert H. 
Barr. George N. Hale. Jr.. 
Edward L Israel Jr.. Ethan 
Allen Ives. Edmund A. 
Jung, Robert W. Merrill, 
Dean N. Meyer. R. C. 
Musselwhlte. Jr.. Philip B. 
Thresher, Derter C. Tight, 
and Donald B. Utirlch. Mar- 
tin B. Pray continues as 
Executive Manager. 




MARTIN B. PRAY 



LA TORRE RESTAURANT. 37S Bush Str^t an- 
nounces that i*i d nino '.---* *s ^.^''^b'?" ccy 
evening and al day 
groups of 30 to 150 • 
accommodations for b. . ...i . ., , . _ 

receptions. . . 

SIDNEY H. KEIL Va'-aac ' •••? t?:-? • '^ s^c 

Department ct •► 

Cal.fornia Aisc 

Managers convc ■ __ ______ ... 

takinq part !n a panai discuuion of cnaniy twnd 
drivat. . . . 

I95B OFFICERS OF MULTIPLE LISTING SEKVICE 
o* San Francisco a'e P'ei dt-^' F'o"i . r- » .<j'<". 
Vice President A J. Phiillpi. Seco'a', C -.r-a C. 
Young, and Treasurer Rob«rt S. f»:rma- 'ectors 
ar« Saul Barde. Henry Baum Thao E Ct'i,ttopKar- 
son. E Michael Dittler r^ - "■ ^ , C ejrfa E. 

McGcvern, and A'bert ■ 

BILL ROOOY, vetarsr -- c>'S<on na«s 

reporter, bagan a marine nv»s >r<c^ on KROW. 
Oakland, this weak, first ihoo o' its kind to on9i- 
nata n the Bay Araa. heard Monday thitouqh Friday 
morninqs at IOK)S dlract'v from Piaf 3. Sian Fran- 
cisco. . . . 



Friday, February 14, 1958 



Additional Nonstop 
Air Carrier Service 



Urged by Chamber 

Aware of the immense importance of the jet 
age to San Franrisco. the Board of Directors 
of the Chamber has nrged additional nonstop 
air carrier service between tliis city and the 
East Coast. 

Acting on the recommendation of its Trans- 
portation Committee, the Board swiftly filed a 
petition "for leave to intervene in Civil Aero- 
nautics Board Docket No. 9214 in support of 
additional nonstop carrier service between San 
Francisco and New York without expressing 
carrier preference. 

"This move is in keeping with the Cham- 
ber's farsighted policy of readying San Fran- 
cisco for the coming jet age," Alan K. Browne. 
l're-i(li*nt of the Chamber, commented. 



Februarv 1 7— TRANSPORTATION MEETING — 

Room 200, Chamber, I0;30 a.m. Agenda: Discus 
slon of Airline Increases and Rates. 

February I 7— AGRICU LTU RAL COMMITTEE 
LUNCHEON MEETING— Nob Hill Room. Fairmont 
Hote', 12 noon. Agenda: Jesse W. Tapp, Chairman, 
Board of Directors, Bank of America, to speak on: 
"The Administration's Farm Policy." 

February 17— MARKETING AND SALES PROMO- 
TION COMMITTEE MEETING— Commercial Cfub, 
4fe5 California Street, 12:00 noon. 

February 18— FIRE SAFETY SECTION MEETING— 

Room 200, Chamber, I I :00 a.m. Agenda: Discussion 
on handling anc storage of flammable liquids. 

February 19— BUSINESS CENTER DEVELOPMENT 
COMMITTEE MEETING— Commercial Club, 465 
California Street, 12:00 noon. 

February 19— CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT AND 
LAND USE SECTION MEETING— Room 200, 

Chamber, 10:30 a.m. Agenda: Discussion of pro- 
posed zoning ordinance. 

February 19— RETAIL MERCHANTS ASSOCIA- 
TION BOARD MEETING— Press Club, 555 Post 
Street, 8:00 a.m. 

February 19— V^TA LUNCHEON-MEETING— Ve- 
netian Room, Fairmont Hotel. 12:00 noon. Agenda: 
Dr. J. H. van Roijen, Ambassador of The Nether- 
lands to the United States to speak on: "h-lolland In 
A V/orld of Turmoil." 

February 26— MINING COMMIHEE MEETING — 
Commercial Club, 465 California Street, 12 noon. 
February 26— CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT AND 
LAND USE SECTION MEETING— Room 200 
Chamber, 10:30 a.m. Agenda: Discussion of bond 
issues. 



SALUTE TO SF INDUSTRY 




^^^=t=u 



San Francisco, Headquarters for Western Advertising 

San Francisco's role as the western headquarters city for organized adver- 
tising was pointed up this week by Mayor George Christopher and other civic 
leaders during Advertising Week. 

The City by the Golden Gate is the headquarters for such nationally-known 
organizations as the Advertising Association of the West, Advertising Federa- 
tion of America, American Association of Advertising Agencies, Association 
of Natonal Advertisers, the National Television Bureau and other national 
agencies. 

An estimated 360 advertising agencies, firms, outdoor and miscellaneous 
advertising groups employ more than 3,500 persons in various capacities in 
the creation, production and sale of advertising in San Francisco. Because the 
field involves many intangibles — touching as it does, on innumerable fields — 
the impact on the local economy is difficult to gauge. However, more than 
$1 15 million is placed annually in advertising in San Francisco alone. 

National Advertising Week itself was born in San Francisco in 1950 when 
Herbert Kirschner was president of the Advertising Association of the West, 
headquartered at 425 Bush Street. Today the AAW is comprised of 40 mem- 
ber ad clubs, 350 company business members and four affiliated organizations. 
The AAWs move to San Francisco from Los Angeles in 1942 signalled a 
significant upswing of advertising in this locale. 

The AAW's "Advancement of Business" program, sets the standard for 
the industry. The Association works for better advertising and better advertis- 
ing practices, a deepening of public interest in advertising campaigns and a 
fuller understanding of business and its relationship to the field. 

Overall, there are more than 3,000 advertising agencies in the United 
States — including 125 in San Francisco alone — responsible for some $4 billion 
or about 33 per cent of total advertising expenditures. 

San Francisco also boasts the oldest western advertising publication, 
WESTERN ADVERTISING. 

The 1957 advertising volume is estimated at $10,432,000,000, an increase 
of about $530 million or 5.3 per cent over 1956. National and and local 
advertising totals were both up: National, $6.3 billion, up 6.4; local, $4.1 
billion, up 3.7 per cent. 

"Advertising is one of the mainsprings in the process that has brought the 
good things in life in such great abundance to the people of America in 
general and San Francisco Bay Area citizens in particular," commented 
Charles W. (Chick) Collier, Executive Vice President of the AAW. 

One of the oldest ad groups in the United States is the San Francisco 
Advertising Club, organized nearly 55 years ago. Other key groups in the 
Bay Area include the Bay Area Independent Broadcasters, the S. F. Junior 
Ad Club, the Milline Club of San Francisco, Advertising Club of Oakland, 
San Francisco Art Directors, Society of Designers & Illustrators, San Francisco 
Better Business Bureau, California Newspaper Publishers Association, State 
Radio-TV Broadcasters Association, Copy Club, Direct Mail Advertising 
Association, Golden Gate College School of Advertising, S. F. Women's 
Advertising Production Club and Sales Executives of San Francisco. 



*" A regular f&afur 



sk the Chamber for Reprints; EXbrook 2-4511, Ext. 13 or T4, Research Dept. 



3AY XEGION BUSINESS 



SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



AI.AN K. BROWNE, President 

C. L. FOX, Ceneral Manager 

M. A. HOCAN. SecreUrr 

JAMES D. WARNOCK. ExeculWe Editor 

JOSEPH I. HAUCBEY. Editor 

Publlihed everr other week by the San Franriiro Chamber 

of Commerce at 333 Pine St.. San Franciico. Zone 4. 

County o( San Franciico. California. Teleohone EXbrook 

2-4511. (Non-member lubicription. tS.OO a year.) Entered 

ai Second Clan matter Anril 26. 1944. at the Post Office at 

San Francitco. Caliiomia. under the act of March 3. 1879. 

Cireutation: 7,500 thia Ugue 




FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



BUSINESS 



VOLUME 15 • NUMBER 5 • FEBRUARY 26 1958 




CROWN 2ELLERBACH 

Mark<!l & Halltry 



STANDARD OIL 

Mnrkel & Pine 



AMERICAN TRUST 

Sat-ramvnto, l.fid^tttorff 



BUILDING BOOM 

]ress-o-gram No. 36 



JOHN HANCOCK 

Calif. * nailery 



SKYWARD GROWTH— Nearly $230 million of new construction announced since 1954 in 
■p. k I ~i Z. ^^" Francisco's central business district will change the city's skyline radically. Completed, 

rrOQr6SS-0-QrQI7l no. Jo being buHt or projected are (above, left to right): Crown Zellerbach's $10 million, 20-:torY 

building (Hertika & Knowles and SItidmore, Owens & Merrill, architects; Haas & Haynie. 
contractors); Standard Oil Co. of Calif., $5.5 million, 8-story (Hertzka & Knowles; John Cahill Construction Co.); Moore's $1 million, 3-story, first 
major retail store in many years (Hertika & Knowles; Barrett Construction Co.) ; John Hancock Insurance, $5-7 million, 15-story (Skidmore, Owens 4 
Merrill; Cahill); and American Trust, $4.5 million, 12-story (Meyer & Evers; Cahill) . 



FIRST WESTERN BANK 

11)5 Monreoniery 



CALIF. UNION INS. 

244 Pine 



BETHLEHEM PACIFIC 

/Mm * Cnhl. 



GERALDI HOTEL-RESTAURANT 

Hslierm„n\ If /mr/ 





mm 

I i Mill!! 





TYPICAL OF MANY MODERNIZATION projects is the First Western 
Bank (above, left), $2 million, 15-story (Loubet & Flynn, architects; 
Cahill, contractor). New projects are the Nino Geraldi hotel-restaurant, 
$10 million; California Union Insurance, $1 million, 5-story (Hertika & 
Knowles; Haas & Haynie); Swig Building, $10 million, 25-story (William 
Lescaze; Haas & Haynie) and Bethlehem Pacific Steel, 16-story (Welton 
Becket & Associates 



LARGEST HEAD OFFICE building ;n many years is Fireman's Fund 
Group (below, left), $3,375,000 (Edward B. Page, architect; MacDon- 
ald. Young & Nelson, contractor); 'Jack Tar West' office-hotel, $11 
million, 9-story (Hertika & Knowles); 'University Club Hotel', $20 mil- 
lion, 23-story; (Alta En- 
gineering Associates); 
and America Fore, 7- 
story (Hertzka & Knowles; 
Cahill). 



'UNIVERSITY CLUB' HOTEL 

Pouell * <.^l/l^ 




A regular feature ... oik the Chamber for Reprints; CXbroot 2-(5U, fif. 13 or M, »eiearch Dept. 



Friday, February 28, 1958 




NEW HOME OF THE GIANTS— The sketch above shows fhe new 45,000 seat home for the San Fran- 
cisco Giants and Its parking area with a capacity tor 9,000 automobiles. The $11 million structure, ex- 
pected to be completed in time for the 1959 baseball season, was designed by Architect John S. Bolles, 
a member of the Chamber's Industrial Development Committee. 

Unique Chamber Survey Points Up Vast 
Manufacturing Potential of Bay Area 



More than S76 million in manufactur 
state by firms in the 13-county San Franc 
potential" survey of the area, just publi 
Chamber. 

Lacks in the area's industrial economy in 
the fields of cotton textiles, specific types of 
steel (including stainless and high carbon), 
cellophane and various chemical products 
point up a great potential for new manufactur- 
ing, according to the survey, which was begun 
late in 1956 by the Manufacturers Committee 
of the Chamber. 

"The survey, first of its type done in the 
United States, sets a pattern for the first in- 
telligent appraisal of the Bay Region indus- 
trial complex." James H. Barry. II, Chairman 
of the Manufacturers Committee stated. 

Harold Furst. Assistant Vice President at 
Bank of America's Market-New Montgomery 
office and former regional economist for the 
bank, analyzed the report during a meeting of 
the committee at the Fairmont Hotel. Also 
attending the meeting were members of the 
Chamber's Industrial Advisory Committee of 
which O. R. Doerr is Chairman. 

Barry acknowledged the work of the Prod 
uct Potential Committee, of which George A 
Vosper is Chairman, in completing the report 

"Particularly vital to successful completion 
of the project has been the help given by In 
ternational Business Machines Corporation 
Western Region. Crown Zellerbach Paper 
Company, and Pacific Gas and Electric Com 
pany," he stated. 



ed products is purchased outside of the 
isco Bay Region, according to a "product 
shed by the Industrial Department of the 



First Complete Merchant 
Wholesalers Directory Issued 

The first complete directory of San Francis- 
co merchant wholesalers and branch offices 
ever published has just been issued by tlu 
Chamber. 

Compiled by the Domestic Trade Depart- 
ment, the 84-page directory lists 2600 firms 
and employs the Standard Industrial Classifi- 
cation developed by the Federal government. 

Priced at S2.50 to Chamber members, the 
publication sells to the public for S5.00. Mem- 
bers can order by using the coupon below. 

Domestic Trade Dept., , 

San Francisco Chamber of Commerce, i 
333 Pine St., San Francisco 4 ' 

Please send the directories checked. 
Check enclosed. 

i I San Francisco Merchant 
' Wholesalers and Branch 

_ Sales Offices $2.50 

I Manufacturers in 

San Francisco . $2.00 

name 

firm 

address 



S.F. Giants Stadium 
To Be Most Modem 
In The United States 

The new home of the San Francisco Giants 
— to be built on the easterly slope of Bay 
View Hill near the San Francisco-San Mateo 
County line — will be the most modern, com- 
fortable and accessible stadium in the United 
States. 

Charles L. Harney, general contractor and 
a chief financial backer, has scheduled con- 
struction completion for tlie middle of Febru- 
ary next year. In the event the Giants are con- 
tenders for the National League pennant July 
1 of this year, a "crash program" providing 
for the installation of 30.000 seats by the first 
weeks of September is on the agenda. 

Cost is estimated at Sll million of which $4 
million will be supplied by the city through a 
bond issue passed in 1954. The balance will be 
financed by Harney: Blythe & Co.. a San Fran- 
cisco investment firm: and other investors. Re- 
payment will be made to the city from stadium 
revenue over a 35-year period. 

Home plate will be to the north and center- 
field 420 feet to the south. Left and right foul 
lines will be 325 feet long. 

The stadium will be three-decked with all 
seats having a clear view of the diamond. Total 
seating capacity will be about 45.000. During 
the football season an additional 5,000 bleach- 
er seats will be placed in right field. 

Parking areas will include space for buses 
with a combined capacity of 12,000 passengers 
and lots accommodating about 9.000 cars. 




NEW DIRECTORY of San Francisco wholesalers 
was presented to Alan K. Browne, President of the 
Chamber, by Selwyn Eddy, Chairman of the Do- 
mestic Trade Committee. "The directory is a long- 
needed basic tool for doing business in San Fran- 
cisco," Eddy said. 



Friday, February 28, 1958 



Hitting the High Spots 




fourth Cinerama filn 
ner can be obtained 



With JIM WARNOCK 

CARL F. WENTE, Chairman of the Executive Com- 
mittee, Bank of America N.T. & S.A., has been 
appointed Chairman of the 1958 Northern Califor- 
nia Invest-ln-America Week Committee. Chairman 
of the Executive Committee is E. W. Littlefield, 
Executive Vice President, Utah Construction Co. 
and past President of the Chamber; Treasurer is 
Alger J. Jacobs, Vice President, Crocker-Anglo Na- 
tional Bank; Coordinator is Ivy Lee, Jr. A highlight 
of the week, to be observed April 27 through May 
3, will be an April 28 luncheon to be co-sponsored 
by the Chamber. . . . 

"MISS PARADISE," who will be official hostess at 
the Cinerama pre- 
premlere dinner joint- 
ly sponsored by the 
Chamber and the 
Press and Union 
League Club at the 
club on March I I , Is 
Celeste Adams, TWA 
hostess chosen by 
Alan K. Browne, Presi- 
dent of the Chamber, 
and Roy N. Buell, 
Chairman of the Com- 
mittee, from among 
six airline hostesses 
who fly to the coun- 
tries where "Search 
For Paradise," the 
ade. Tickets for the din- 
from the Chamber, Ext. 58. 
Tickets for the premiere can be obtained from the 
PULC and the St. Francis Hotel box office. . . . 
GROWING IMPORTANCE of exports of agricul- 
tural surpluses through the Golden Sate was 
stressed this week at meetings with Washington 
officials of the Commodity Stabilization Service, 
according to Robert Taylor, President of the San 
Francisco Area World Trade Association. . . . 
THE SAN FRANCISCO-OAKLAND area's new 
television station. KTVU, Channel 2, Jack London 
Square, Oakland, will make its debut next Monday, 
after an intensive promotional campaign which be- 
gan this week, according to Ward D. Ingrim, Gen- 
eral Sales Manager. By proclamation of the mayors 
of San Francisco and Oakland, next week is "Chan 
nel 2 Week". . , . 



Farm Waste 
Burning No Factor 
In Smog Control 

Smog control laws permitting burning of 
agricultural waste and bruslilands should not 
now be changed, Alan K. Browne, President 
of the Chamber, advised following a recom- 
mendation of the Board of Directors of the 
Chamber and its Agricultural Committee. 

"Such regulations should remain unmodi- 
fied until the matter has been thoroughly 
studied by competent agricultural authorities," 
he continued. "A public report should be sub- 
mitted as a premise for sound modification of 
existing laws. 

"At the present we are unaware of evidence 
— if any — to which burning of farm waste has 
contributed to smog damage. The benefits ac- 
cruing to agriculture from the judicious use of 
fire to get rid of waste and stubble far out- 
weigh any contribution to smog as such." 




NEW MEMBERS IN RECENT MONTHS 

John Wilde Angus McSweeney Walter Landor Dr. H. L. Coderre Gil Coleman 

New members recently added to the Chamber roster include (left to right, above I 
John Wilde, General Manager, Atlantic and Pacific Trading Co.; Angus McSweeney, 
A.I. A., Angus McSweeney, architect; Waller Landor. head of Walter Landor & Associ- 
ates,, Industrial Designers; Dr. Harry L. Coderre. Partner. Rohrer, Hibler & Replogle, 
psychologists; and Gil Coleman, Gil Coleman Associates. 

Below (left to right) are: Gordon F. Cantelon, Branch Manager. The Greatlf'est 
Life Assurance Company; John W. Fearn, John IF. Fearn Associates; Wilbur E. Allen. 
Secretary-Treasurer, Des-Mark Inc.; Earl W. Blighton, President, DesMark Inc.; and 
George L. Hall, Vice-President, Des-Mark Inc. 




Earl W. Blighton George L Hall 



ROBERT G. HILL, Advertising Manager for Colum- 
bia-Geneva Division of United States Steel, has 
been named "Industrial Advertising's Man of the 
Year" for 1957, the first West Coast adman to be 
selected for the award In the 21 years of competi- 
tion. He was chosen for the honor by INDUSTRIAL 

MARKETING, Chicago 

COAST MARINE & TRANSPORTATION Directory 
for 1958 may be ordered from Pacific Shipper, DO 

2-8664 

SAN FRANCISCO JUNIOR CHAMBER OF COM- 
MERCE reports tremendous interest and response 
to Its sponsorship, along with the Foreign Policy 
Association, of "Great Decisions — 1958" in coop- 
eration with the SAN FRANCISCO CHRON- 
ICLE.... 

WENDELL R. SPACKMAN, architect and partner 
in the firm of Corlett & Spackman, has been elect- 
ed Chairman of the Building Industry Conference 
Board. He succeeds K. E. Parker, contractor. The 
new Vice Chairman Is Dudley Deane, consulting 
engineer. William E. Hague will continue as hon- 
orary Secretary. . . . 

SAN FRANCISCO must maintain a constant pro- 
gram of vigilance and promotion to urge assign- 
ment of shipbuilding and repair work to Bay Region 
shipyards by the Federal government, Paul A. BIs- 
singer, President of the San Francisco Police Com- 
mission and past President of the Chamber, told 
Chamber Directors at their meeting last week at 
San Francisco Naval Shipyard. "Particularly needed 
Is an intensified program to urge building of a 
super-carrier drydock at San Francisco Naval Ship- 
yard." he said. Directors toured the facility and 
heard Captain Floyd B. Schultz, Shipyard Com- 
mander, and Arthur G. Forster, President of the 
Employee's Association, give details of the opera- 
tion. , . . 

CONSUMER PURCHASING POWER in the United 
States will enjoy a healthy and steady growth to 
about $516 billion In 1975, compared to $277 
billion three years ago, according to Stanford 
Research Institute's newly-published "Income Trends 
In the United States through 1975." In California 
it will rise from $27 billion (1955) to $64 bllHon 
in 1975. ... 



DEDICATION OF THE OLD STATE CAPITOL at 

Benicia as a California historical monument will 
take place during a two-day celebration March 14 
and 15, during which the State will formally accept 
the building it has been restoring for seven years 
and the California Senate and Assembly will meet 
in the restored State house. . . . 
PORT OF SAN FRANCISCO'S cargo business rang 
up a six-year record In 1957. with 6,251,060 revenue 
tons moving over the port's state-operated piers, 
a 12.2 per cent gain over 1956. . . . 
STANFORD RESEARCH INSTITUTE will hold Its 
fourth Western Area Development Conference on 
May 26-27 in Vancouver, British Columbia, accord- 
ing to Charles L. Hamman, Assistant Director of ttie 
Economics Research Division. Theme: "New Prod- 
ucts and New Industries Through Research." . . . 
WEST COAST GENERAL MANAGEMENT CON- 
FERENCE of the American Management Associa- 
tion recently held at the Fairmont ranged from 
"General Outlook for Business" to "How to Keep 
In Phase with Changing Business Conditions" in the 
subjects it covered. . . . 

SAN FRANCISCO CHAPTER of National Office 
Management Association recently released to !♦: 
members a comprehensive regional salary survey on 
San Francisco office salaries. . . . 
PAN AMERICAN AIRWAYS Clippers carried a 
record volume of passengers and cargo on the 
company's trans-Pacific. Polar Alaskan routes during 
1957, according to Robert B. Murray, Jr., Executive 
Vice President of the Pacific-Alaska Division. Pas- 
sengers increased I I per cent ever 1956. . . . 
NEARLY 200 WINDOWS IN SAN FRANCISCO 
and Oakland in fourteen of the largest downtown 
stores are devoted to new spring fashions created 
by San Francisco designer^, according to Carl Liv- 
ingston, Jr.. merchandising executive of Livingston 
Bros, and Chairman of the Manufacturer-Retailer 
Liaison Committee of San Francisco Fashion Indus- 
trios 

IN ORDER TO SIMPLIFY Its Internal organliation, 
Jorgenson & Co. has merged with Its wholly-owned 
subsidiary, Knight-Counlhan Co.. the merged com. 
panles to operate under the name of Jorgenson & 
Co ... 



Friday, February 28. 1958 



San Francisco Business Activity Shows 
Boom in Construction for January '58 



San Francisco",* •.'•■ncral linsines? tr 
the ncord level of January a year aiio 1 
cordinf: to the Research department of th 
The ChamherV husincss activity inde 
were evident among major activities. 

Total construction authorized in San Fran- 
cisco rose 20 per cent above a year ago. New 
residential was up 142 per cent and additions, 
alterations and repairs 50 per cent. 

Dwelling unit starts in the nine-county Bay 
Area — Alameda. Contra Costa, Marin, San 
Francisco. San Mateo, Solano. Napa, Santa 
Clara and Sonoma — topped January of last 
year by 24.4 per cent with a total of 2.630 
dwellings compared to 2.119 a year ago. 

Employment in the six-county San Fran- 
cisco-Oakland Metropolitan Area — .\lameda. 



end in January dipped 2.6 per cent helow 
t was six |)er cent ahove January, 19.S6, ae- 
e Cliamher. 
L for January was l.'>4.7. Mixed trends 

Contra Costa. Marin. San Francisco. San 
.Mateo and Solano— amounted to 1,062.900 
|)ersons. off one per cent or 10.800. 

llnemployment accounted for 5.9 per cent 
of the labor force in the Metropolitan Area 
compared to 9.3 per cent in 19.50. 



Tightening of State 
Expenditures Urged 

Limitation of the State's General Fund ex- 
penditures for 1958-19.59 to the existing tax 
yield and a minimum use of surpluses — not 
including the S130 million earmarked for 
water purposes — has been recommended by 
the Chamber's Board of Directors. 

The Directors also urged the Legislature to 
effect "all possible savings and deny requests 
for new expenditure programs." 

The action resulted from the recommenda- 
tions of the Tax Section of the Chamber, head- 
ed by F. B. Magruder. chairman. 



March 4-5— INTER-CITY SECTION TRADE CULTI- 
VATION TRIP— 10 members to visit 9 communities 
between San Jose and San Luis Obispo. 
March 5— STREET HIGHWAY AND BRIDGE SEC- 
TION— Room 200. Chamber. 10:30 a.m. Agenda: 
SItyline Partway Presentation. 

March 5 — WTA LUNCHEON — San Francisco 
Room. Fairmont Hotel. 12:00 noon. Agenda: Mr. 
Russell Baiter, partner. Baker. McKenzie and High- 
tower, guest speaker. 

March 10— ARMED FORCES SECTION MEETING 
—Marines Memorial. 12:00 noon. 
March 1 1— AGRICULTURAL COMMITTEE MEET- 
ING— Fairmont Hotel, 12:00 non. 
March II— CINERAMA PRE-PREMIERE DINNER— 
Co-sponsored by the Chamber and Press and Unlor 
League Club, PULC 6:00 p.m. 
March 12— POLICY COMMIHEE MEETING — 
Pane:irs, 12:00 nocn. 

March II— MARKETING AND SALES PROMO- 
TION COMMinEE MEETING — Chamber. Room 
200, I 1:00 a.m. Agenda: Presentation of "Fun-Tours 
For Youth" idea to members of the hotel-motel 
industries. 




Business Actiyity Through January, 1958 



BRANCH OP ACTIVITY 

•GENERAL BUSINESS ACTIVITY INDEX 
CONSTRUCTION PERMITS 

Ne 



Dwelling Units 

Single-familv units. New, 

Non-residential. New 

Additions, Alterations and Repairs 
Nine County dwelling units authorized 

REAL ESTATE— Deeds Recorded 

•RETAIL DEPARTMENT STORE SALES 

FINANCE— Bank Debits 

Postal Recelots 

Pacific Coast Stock Exchange. 



COMMERCIAL FAILURES 

INDUSTRY TREND— 6 County Total 
Mfg. Average Weekly Earnings 

Manufacturing 

Construction, contract 
Finance, insurance, real estate 

Retail trade 

Wholesale trade 

Service 

Trans., comm.. & utilities 

Agriculture 

Govt.— Federal, state, clt, 
Other 



Total Number 

Value 

Value 

Number 

Number 

Value 

Value 

Number 




Number 




inde» 




. $000 

$ 

Shares traded 

Market value J 




Number 




(earnings) 

(emplovment) 





TRANSPORTATION— Freight car movement 

5. F. Airport— Planes In and Out 

Passengers Off and On 

Air Mail Loaded and Unloaded... 
Air Express Loaded and Unloaded 
Air Freight Loaded and Unloaded . 
Rail Express Shioments 

•Truck Movements— S. F. Area 

Out-of-State passenger car entries into N. 

PORT OF SAN FRANCISCO— Revenue Tons 

Coastwise 
tntercoastal 
Inland V/aterwa* 
Foreign 

CARGO VESSELS (San Francisco Bay) 

Arrivals .. 

Millions of Registered Tons 

UTILITIES— Ind. & Comm. Gas Sales 

•Elec. Energy Sales. K.W. Hours 

Water Consumption— Comm. & Ind. 

NEW DEVELOPMENTS 

Visitor and Newcomer Inguiries 

Bay Bridge Vehicle Crossings 

Golden Gate Bridge Vehicle Crossings 

FRUITS S VEGETABLE RECEIPTS 

LIVESTOCK SLAUGHTER ilnsp. Dlsts.) 

•S. F. CONSUMER PRICE INDEX— All Items 



...Lbs. 

..Lbs. 

. Lbs. 

Number 



Cu. Ft. 

Index 

Cu. Ft. 



•Inde 



Base (1947-49 Monthly Average = 100); (a) December I 
due to space limitations, but available upon request. 

RESEARCH DEPARTMENT. SAN FRANCISCO C 



ailable; (p) prelir 
HAMBER OF COMMERCE 



JANUARY 


% f-^~ 


1958 


1957 


154.7 


—2.6 


829 


—9.3 


4.081 392 


19.6 


1.999.009 


141,6 


180 


130.7 


56 


12.0 


2.076.512 


—29.1 


2,005,871 


50.7 


2,630 


24.4 


1,395 


— 14.6 


102 


—5.6 


4,190.108 


—3.4 


2.634.340 


6.8 


2,628,621 


—2.0 


49.726,689 


-16.9 


12 


—36.8 


1,062,900(0) 


—1.0 


96.10(a) 


0.8 


206,600(p) 


— 4 4 


63.500(D) 


—11.9 


68.600(p) 


1.2 


I73 800(p) 


0.3 


79.900(p) 


1.8 


243.500(p) 


3.2 


Il7.600(p) 


—1.7 


I5.700(p) 


-7 5 


9IOOO(p) 


0.0 


2.900(p) 


0.0 


11.062 


—18.2 


II Oil 


0.4 


267.286 


9.6 


3.045.284 


7.5 


729.436 


— 17.5 


5.590,444 


—2.3 


64,366 


— 15.6 


154.0 


1.0 


43.959 


6.2 


504.775 


-16.5 


4,543 


—55.8 


177 III 


— 18.9 


32,559 


—9.4 


290,562 


— 14.5 


366 


-0.8 


1,747,779 


-3.4 


1. 1^16, 101 ,600 


1.8 


167 


5.0 


153,060,000 


—4.5 


1,638 


16.6 


2,750 444 


1.7 


1.229.136 


6.8 


1.552(a) 


10.2 


95.000(a) 


-18.1 


124.8(a) 


2.6 


Basic data sou 


rces nc 



BAT "REGION BUSINESS 



SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



ALAN K. BROWNE. Prriidrnt 

C. L. FOX, Crncril Minatcr 

M. A. HOCAN. SecTflirr 

JAMFS D. WARNOCE. ExrcnliTt Editor 

JOSEPH I. HAUCBEY. Editor 

Pnbliihed cverr other wrelc by the San Franriieo Chamber 

of Commeree at 33] Pine St.. San Franri<ro. Zone «. 

CoontT of San Franriieo. California. Teleohone EXbrook 

2-4511. (Non-member •iibieriotion. fJ.OO a rear.) Entered 

ai Serond Clan matter Aoril 26. 1944. at the Poll OIGre at 

San Franeiieo, California, under the act of March I. 1S79. 

CinxiaOm: 7,AM thU (ania 




SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



BUSINESS 



VOLUME 15 • NUMBER 6 • MARCH 14. 1958 



New Airlines 
Office Opens 



New Features Planned for Celebration 
Of 22nd Annual World Trade Week 





BUBBLY WELCOME— Alan K. Browne (second from left) helps toast the new American Airlines-Western 
Airlines ticket office In the Western Merchandise Mart. Left to right are: Richard W. Grannis, President, 
Pot and Kettle Club (Housewares and Hardware); Browne; J. Jackson, President, Toy, Juvenile and Wheel 
Goods Association; A. Cameron Ball (Retired), General Manager, Western Merchandise Mart; and West- 
ern Airlines Stewardess Bethe Baldwin. 

Plans Formulated to Make Intensive Study 
Of San Franeisco Region's Business Climate 

Director.* of the Chaiiiher have approved plans for a systeniatie review an<l 
appraisal of the plus and minus factors of the area's husiness climate in an acceler- 
ated effort to attract new emjdoyers to the San Francisco Bay Rejjion, accordinfi 
to Alan K. Browiie, President. 

PointinfT out that San Francisco is the first city of over 500,000 to undertake a 
business climate survey on a formal basis, ■ 



Browne said tbe project will follow recom- 
mendations of the Industrial Advisory Com- 
mittee, 0. R. Doerr. Chairman, and will re- 
quire about two years to complete. 

'"Prosperity here adds up to how success- 
fully the region attracts and holds employers," 
Doerr stated. "Business climate is the total 



result of all the social, economic and political 
conditions which affect the cost of operatinj; 
a business in the area — tax rates, community 
services, availability and skill of workers, 
attitudes of people and groups toward in- 
dustry. 

(Turn to i>ii)je tlirre) 



World Trade Week, proclaimed by Presi- 
dent Eisenhower, will be celebrated in San 
Francisco May 18-24, according to Robert 
Taylor, President of the .San Francisco Area 
World Trade Association of the Chamber. 

Chairman is Edward P. 
McCall. export sales man- 
ager. Tidewater Oil Com- 
pany. B. A. .Malone. RCA 
Communications. Inc.. is 
Deputy (General Chairman 
of the annual salute to 
world trade through the 
(iolden Gate, to be spon- 
sored by the Chamber and 
the .Association for the 
22nd year. ej^^^j p ^^^Call 

.New features of tliis year's observance 
include an international aviation breakfast 
pointing up the growing importance of air 
freight in world trade, a special salute to the 
merchant marine and to land trans|>ortation 
and international communications, and a re- 
ception by foreign flag carriers. 

Also on the agenda are an international 
trade and travel exhibiticm. civic ceremonies 
in Golden Gate Park and at the historic Ferry 
Building marking .San Francisco's vital role 
in world commerce, the annual world trade 
luncheon honoring the consular corps and 
official economic representatives of other na- 
tions and an international banquet and ball. 

Committee chairmen and deputy chairmen: 



• I Tridr .n<l In 



DrpTIn 



llbilwn: Tri>drll B 

IL K. Krlil. Manacr. « orid Tradr C.DIn: Sprakt-r.' 
ram: Donald Toni»'< . Marih « Mrl rnna* €i>.<r.w I 
Inr. : World Tradr l.unrhron : K. ). H%kro. Paribc I ar 
l.inri. Iisr.: Ul<|>la« : Robert Mr4:abr. Japan Air l.mn . 
mahonal Banqurl and Ball: V. B. t;nbblr. V. IV KnJI«v 
>.: Finanrr: IVIrr R. Market, \lkin.. Kr»ll 1 i:. ; I lai- 
Cronir Trilofl. Oaklaud < orld Tr^dr Club: Cn^iu- 
: Jamri P. m il.on. Manairt. Rirbard J tbbMI. «..|.|. 
Mana<rr. World Tradr nrpann,rnl ol thr Ckaabn 



DOERR HEADS INDUSTRIAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE 



O. R. Doerr. Vice President in cluirt;c of .Sal. >, P 
trie Co., has been ap|»>inled (^liairinaii of the In 
Committee of the Chamber by Alan K. Browne Pi 
also a Chamber director. 

Others named to the Committee include: 
E. M. Barker. Vice President, Calaveras 
Cement Co. (Vice Chairman, Mining Commit- 
tee) ; James H. Barry. 11, President. The James 
11. Barry Co. (Chairman, Manufacturers Com- 
millee): John S. Bidles. architect (Vice Chair- 
man, Industrial Development Committee); T. K. 
Cleveland, Vice President. Research and Devel- 
opment, Philadelphia Quartz ('o. of Calif. (Vice 
Chairman, (Ihemical Industries Section) ; George 
M. C:ook, Assistant to the President, Oronite 




Chemical Co. ((Chairman, (^hemirul liulusirjo .SvlionK 

Henry J. Degenkolb. John J. Gould and H. J. Degenkolb. Consult- 
ing Engineers (Chairman. Building Cmle S-ction ) : Frank P. Gomez, 
Industrial Realtor (Chairman. Industrial Development Committc-r i ; 
l.iorge v. Hansen. Vice Presiilenl. Passenger Traffic. Matson Navi- 
iMtion l(!hairman. .Shipbuilding & .Ship Repair Commilte.-' ; l>aurrncr 
r. Kelt. General Manager, The Mountain Cop|ier ('•■inpany, Ltd. 
I Cl>airnian. Mining ("ommiltee) : \X alter J. Maytham. Nice President. 
W eslinghouse Electric (.'orporation (('hairman. Technical Projects 
Committee I : William W. .Moore, Dames and Mixire (Vice Chairman, 
Technical Projects ('onimillee i : (>ustav Schwarx, President. Connor 
Spring Manufacturing Co. (Vice Chairman. Manufacturers Commil- 
lee I ; and 1.. M. Ibdland. Industrial Maiugrr, Chamber of Commerce 
I .S'crelarv I . 



Friday, March 14, 1958 



Far East Trade Through S. F. Port Should 
Get Lift from Business Development Tour 

Trade between Japan and the United States through the Port of San Fran- 
cisco should '"increase greatly" as a result of the 2nd Annual Business Develoj)- 
ment Tour of Eastern Asia April 7-May 2, according to Robert Taylor. President of 
the San Francisco Area World Trade Association of the Chamber and Assistant 
Vice President of the Foreign Department of the American Trust Co. 

"Japan is our biggest buyer." Taylor said. __ 

".^bout 25 per cent of the total exports from 
the San Francisco Bay Area go to that coun- 
tr\'. Exports to Japan in 1956 were valued at 
$105,644,494, imports from Japan at S40.- 
516.712. 

"The chief single product shipped to Japan 
was California cotton. Value of raw cotton 
sent in 1957 was SI 1.690.421. 

"The bulk of this cotton is shipped to 
Osaka, 'sister city" of San Francisco in the 
Town Affiliation program cosponsored locally 
by the City and County of San Francisco, the 
Chamber, the SFAWTA. Japanese Chamber 
of Commerce. Japan Society (S. F. Chapter), 
Japanese .\merican Citizens League and the 
Japan Trade Center, among others. 

"Osaka. 'The Manchester of the Far East,' 
is the chief exporter of cotton textiles in the 
world and one of the principal importers of 
San Francisco Area products." Taylor con- 
tinued. "Thus it is of paramount importance 
that our 'sister city' relationship be strength- 
ened. The business development mission is a 
great step in that direction. 

"Recognizing the vast commercial interests 
involved between Japan and the United States, 
we feel this business tour in which all busi- 
ness people in the San Francisco area are wel- 
come is bound to result in even greater bene- 
fits to the Port of San Francisco in particular 
and California in general." 




Communities Look to 
S.F. For Leadership 

Communities in northern California are 
looking to San Francisco for leadership in 
solving civic and intercounty problems, ac- 
cording to Ivan Branson. Chamber Director 
and member of the Inter-City Section of the 
Chamber. 

Branson and members of the Chamber 
section took a two-day. 700-mile tour of the 
coast between San Francisco and San Luis 
Obispo last week. 

Community leaders of the various cities will 
visit San Francisco as guests of the Chamber 
August 14-15 during the annual Coastal Days 
event, sponsored by the Chamber. 



Chamber Director 
Rene A. May Dies 

Rene A. May, President of Getz Bros. 
& Co., prominent West Coast import- 
export firm. Director of the Chamber, 
and past President of the San Francisco 
Area World Trade Association, who suc- 
cumbed last week, was a leader in the 
San Francisco 
world business 
community for 
more than forty 
years. 

Born in IVogales, 
Mexico in 1894, he 
was educated in 
Mexico and at the 
Lycee Carnot, 
Paris. A business- 
man in Mexico un- 
til 1916, he came 
here to join Getz 

Bros, and rose to RENE A. MAY 

the rank of presi- (1894-1958) 

dent in iVZo. 

A member of the Commonwealth 
Club and Stock Exchange Club, he was 
also Vice President of the Northern 
California Service League, the Jewish 
Committee for Personal Service, the 
Alliance Francaise, and the Council for 
Civic Cnity. 

Reciprocal Trade Act 
Supported by Chamber 

Directors of the Chamber have unanimously 
reaffirmed a long-standing policy of support- 
ing the Reciprocal Trade Agreements .\ct. 
now up for renewal by Congress. 

Alan K. Browne, president of the Chamber, 
pointed out in announcing the action that the 
plan embodied in the act originated in the 
World Trade Department of the Chamber in 
1932 (two years before enactment) under the 
leadership of the late Dr. Henry F. Grady, 
who served as Chamber trade advisor, director 
and President. 

"United States support of the General 
Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) 
also should be continued,"' Browne stated. 



Co7n7nittee Formed 
To Insure Keeping 
Jr. Grand National 

To avert possible loss of the annual Grand 
National Junior Livestock Exposition — sched- 
uled March 29-April 2 in the Cow Palace — 
the Chamber has formed a Special Sales De- 
velopment Committee to guarantee premium 
prices of meat animals, according to Alan K. 
Browne, President of the Chamber. 

The Committee— headed by Carl L. Garri- 
son. Vice Chairman of the Chamber's Agri- 
cultural Committee and Manager of the Porter 
Estate Co. — will campaign among hotels, 
restaurants, airlines, retail firms and various 
companies and individuals to induce the pur- 
chase of hogs, lambs and steers at the Junior 
Show fat stock sales or to provide price- 
support funds. 

"In the past years the Junior Grand Nation- 
al annually has drawn more than 1.000 boys 
and girls from all over the West to exhibit 
as many as 2.500 animals." Garrison said. 
"These youthful exhibitors must sell their 
animals for prices above the going market to 
cover the costs of personal care given each 
animal, transportation and their stay in San 
Francisco. 

Committeemen appointed: 

W. H. .Adams, Howard G. Bergdoll, Clay 
Bernard, Ivan Branson, Joseph L. Brother- 
ton, Warren Burke, W. F. Campbell, Hunt 
Conrad, George M. Cook, G. Elmo Coon, J. 
Edgar Dick, W. Kent Dyson. E. F. Forbes, 
F. T. Garesche, J. A. Gruner, Lloyd Graybiel, 
George J. Greenwood, Walter Guild, Roger 
W. Gunder, W. J. Hanley, Eugene F. Hoff- 
man. W. D. Howell, W. R. Humphrey, Max 
King, C. H. Kinsley. 

John Lawler, Gilbert H. Kneiss. E. L. 
LeVesconte, John M. Lloyd, William J. Losh, 
Raymond Marks, George R. Monkhouse, 
Winthrop Miller, W. F. McGowan, William 
M. McNabb, Jefferj W. Meyer, Jesse D. Mid- 
dleton, Walter F. Murphy, Gary Nachmann, 
George Olsen, David N. Plant, L. Porter. H. 
Taylor Peery, George B. Pottorff, Charles 
Regal, Ed Rieder, Walter Rodman. 

Gordon Roth, Bruce Sanborn, Henry 
Schacht, Ray B. Schwartz, Edward C. Se- 
queira, Alyson E. Smith, Frank H. Smith, 
George D. Smith, Allace G. Steele, O. Grover 
Steele, E. W. Stephens, Benjamin Swig, L. 
N. Thompson, G. J. Ticoulat, Karl C. Weber, 
Wavne F. Weeks, P. S. Williams and W. P. 
Wing. 



Tightening of Federal Budget Purse-Strings Urged by the Chamber 



California Congressmen have been urged by 
the Chamber to support enactment of HR 8002 
to place Federal budgeting on an annual 
accrual expenditure basis, according to G. L. 
Fox. General Manager. 

"The measure would replace current obso- 
lete methods of budgeting, under which Con- 
gress makes lump sum appropriations over a 
period of years, with a program which would 
eliminate carrj-overs of unspent appropria- 
tions from year-to-year and lead to sizable 
saving," Fox stated. 

The measure, endorsed unanimously by 
Directors of the Chamber, has been recom- 



mended by the Hoover Commission, passed by 
the Senate without a single dissenting vote 
and approved by the House Government 
Operations and House Rules Committees. 

The action followed the recommendations of 
the Tax Section. F. B. Magruder, Chairman. 

'•Under HR 8002 the government would pay 
in a given year only for the goods and services 
received in that year, allowing Congress to 
check programs annually. This is the basis on 
which any well-run business or household has 
to be conducted," Magruder stated. "Legisla- 
tive control of the purse strings is a basic 
keystone of any free, self-governing nation." 



In related action. Chamber Directors also 
reiterated their endorsement of the Hoover 
Commission recommendations for economy and 
efficiency; urged that a moratorium be estab- 
lished on new or increased spending proposals 
consistent with national security; sought a 
return to the States and local government of 
the manifold activities and responsibilities 
which can be performed efficiently on a local 
level ; called for extension of current efforts to 
eliminate or curtail government enterprises in 
competition with private enterprise; and de- 
manded the adoption of a realistic long-range 
program for reduction of the public debt. 



Friday, March 14, 1958 



Hitting the High Spots 



with JIM WARNOCK 

OFFICIAL WELCOME CEREMONIES for the San 

Francisco Giants, consisting of a motorcade, a civic 
luncheon in the Garden Court of the Sheraton- 
Palace Hotel, and city-wide observance on April 14, 
the day before the opening game, with the Cham- 
ber, Building Owners & Managers Assn., Central San 
Francisco Assn., Chinese Chamber, Down Town 
Assn., Golden Gate Restaurant Assn., Hotel Em- 
ployers Assn., North Central Assn., Retail Dry Goods 
Assn., Retail Merchants Assn., S. F. Clearing House, 
S. F. Council of District Merchants Assn.. S. F. Hotel 
Assn., S. F. Real Estate Board and S. F. Division, 
Pacific Coast Stock Exchange participating, under 
the sponsorship of the civic Committee to Welcome 
the San Francisco Giants are set. Supervisor Francis 
McCarty is General Chairman. Tickets for the 
luncheon can be obtained by calling Eri. 58 at 
the Chamber. 

GEORGE F. HANSEN, Vice President, Matson Nav- 
igation Co., has been 
appointed chairman of 
the Shipbuilding and 
Ship Repair Commit- 
tee of the Chamber, 
devoted to the promo- 
tion of new contracts 
for yards in the Bay 
Region and related 
proiects. Members of 
the committee Include 
Paul A. BIssinger, Rus- 
sell D. Burwell, Phil A. 
Coxon, M. A. Cremer, 







I ■ Ci u L- Lj L George F. Hansen 

Louis bts-Hokm, Hugh 

Gallagher, Donald C. Faber, Chalmers G. Graham, 

Mario GrossettI, Tom C. Ingersoll, J. Rufus Klawans, 

T. Douglas MacMullen, Fred Mahr, Robert E. 

Mayer, Joseph A. Moore, Jr., T. A. Nllsen, L. C. 

Norgaard, Richard I. Palmer, John N. Pharr and 

William B. Warren. 



THIRD ANNUAL INDUSTRIAL MATERIALS Han- 
dling and Packaging Conference will be held Friday 
and Saturday. April 4 and 5 on the Berkeley campus 
of the University of California, according to E. Gor- 
ton Covington, Publicity Chairman. Last year's event 
at Stanford attracted more than 300 Bay Region 
Industrialists and an attendance of more than 400 is 
expected this year. Dr. Lillian Gilbreth, internation- 
ally-known consultant on Industrial engineering, will 
make the keynote address. Advance registrations 
can be made with Robert O. Swendsen, East Bay 
Municipal Utility District, 2127 Adeline Street, Oak- 
land 

AMPEX CORPORATION Is now shipping an aver- 
age of one $45,000 Ampex VR-IOOO videotape re- 
corder a day to television stations throughout the 
country. Delivery of color conversion accessories- — 
a single electronics rack which attaches to the de- 
vice to convert it for color recording and playback 
— will begin in June. . . . 

CHAMBER PRESIDENT ALAN K. BROWNE was 

introductory speaker on the March 6 TeleManage 
segment of the world's first closed circuit telecast 
on the subject at the Paramount Theatre, San Fran- 
cisco, sponsored by the San Francisco Sales Execu- 
tives Association. . . . 

BAGHDAD BY THE BAY, an article by Herb Caen 
illustrated by George Brooke, Don Wolter, and 
Ernest Braun, appears in the February issue of 
MAINLINER, magazine for United Air Lines guests. 
which also devotes the cover to a beautiful dusk 
shot of the Bay Bridge by Matt Southard of the 
SAN FRANCISCO EXAMINER. . . . 




Edgar N. Ston 



Paul M. Browne 



ng Dundas 



Byron Reynolds 

New members recently added to the Cliamber roster include (left to right) Edgar N. 
Stone, Owner. Altnian-Lesters Incorporated; John M. McRae. Station Manager. Radio 
Station KOBY ; Paul M. Browne. Owner. /-"««/ Brottne Associates, Travel Bureau; Irving 
Dundas. president, Dundas Associates; Byron Reynolds, Vice President and San Fran- 
chcti Manager, Charles Bowes Advertising, Inc. 



DAN E. LONDON, Commodore of the Great Gold- 
en Fleet and First Vice President of the Chamber 
has been appointed by Mayor George Christopher 
as his personal representative to Benicia for tomor- 
row's dedication of the Old State Capital as a major 
historical monument. The flagship ADVENTURESS, 
//ill lead 18 power boats of the fleet into San Pablo 
Bay and the Carqulnez Straits to tie up at the 
Benicia Arsenal docks at noon. Other members of 
the delegation include Alan K. Browne, President of 
the Chamber, Joseph Moore, Jr., President of 
Moore Drydock Co.: Rear Admiral R. E. Wood, 
Commandant of the 12th U. S. Coast Guard Dis- 
trict; and Christopher Eberts, Consul General for 
Canada in San Francisco. Among the Chamber 
skippers making the trip will be Vice Commodore 
Charles A. Langlais, President of Charles A. Lang- 
lais Co.; Rear Commodore James W. Elliott, Presi- 
dent of Taylor & Taylor; Harry Barusch, Secretary- 
Treasurer of Commercial Art & Engraving; Douglas 
Dorn, President of Dorn Properties, Inc.; Les Vogel, 
Jr., President of Les Vogel Chevrolet Co.; W. E. 
Welsgerber, Vice President of the Louis Roesch Co.; 
Leavitt Olds, President of Royal Blueprint Co.; and 
William J. Gray. . . . 

TWO OF NORTHERN CALIFORNIA'S major agen- 
cies for the blind. Enchanted Hills National Founda- 
tion and the San Francisco Association and Center 
for the Blind, have consolidated Into a single non- 
profit corporation to be known as the San Francisco 
Lighthouse for the Blind, with headquarters at 745 
Buchanan Street. Albert C. Meyer, Vice President, 
Bank of America N.T. &S.A., was elected President 
of the new agency. . . . 

BUYER AHENDANCE at the recent Winter Mar- 
ket Week at the Western Merchandise Mart was 
at an all-time high, with 18,715 registrations, an 
increase of 2,442 over last year's event. More than 
a thousand were new buyers coming to the Mart 
for the first time. The San Francisco event is now 
second only to the Chicago market (19,400), draw- 
ing more buyers than Los Angeles |7,90l). New 
York ( I 1.442), and Dallas (7.027). The tone of the 
market was one of confidence In the Immediate 
future, according to Henry A. Adams. General 
Manager. . . . 

SHIPS THAT ARE EXEMPT FROM TAXATION 

when m use should also be exempted from taxation 
while under construction, according to a resolution 
of the State Chamber Board of Directors. Ship- 
yards In many other states are free from such taxa- 
tion are thus at a competitive advantage with 
those in California, according to Lloyd Dinkol- 
splel. Chairman of the Chamber's Statewide Tax 
Committee. . . . 

SAN FRANCISCO'S EIGHTH ANNUAL Education 
Business Day, highly successful event during which 
businessmen visit the city's schools, will bs held on 
Wednesday. April 23. Business-Education Day will 
take place on Friday. October 24. . . . 



Plan Business (Jiniate 
Stndyof S.F. Area 

(Continued from page one) 

"For the first time these elements will be 
systematically appraised, the results forming 
a vital and srienlifically-liased 1<mjI for the 
work of the San Francisco Chamber of Com- 
merce and other organixations which have 
worked constantly for the economic progress 
of the region. 

"The study is motivated by increasing com- 
petition between states and communities to 
attract desirable new businesses; the careful 
weighing of business climate factors by po- 
tential employers before selecting sites for 
new operations; and a need for accurate 
information regarding the growth prosi)ects 
of a new industry once it is established." 

Doerr said businessmen themselves will be 
asked to fill out appraisal forms prepared by 
the Chamber's Industrial Department. These 
will then be evaluated to determine the most 
important short and long range objectives to 
improve the area's business climate. .\ time- 
table for realizing these objectives will be 
integrated into tlie Chamber's program for 
industrial development, actively pursued for 
many years. 

The committee then will consult with em- 
ployers and business groups to encourage 
multi-employer, community-wide action to im- 
prove the business climate, he said, this action 
to be based on the systematically as.sembled 
data. 



GOI\G FAST! 

Domestic Triide Drpl., 

Sun Francisco (lliunilx-r of ('uninicrrr, 

Xili I'ine St.. San Franrisro l 

Please send llie dirertories rhi-rked. 
(Iheck enclosed. 

San Francisco Merchani 
Wholesalers and Uranrh 
:>ales <>tiirei> »2.30 

□ Manufarlurers in 

Sun Frunrisro $2.00 

(Non iiu-inbcr prices $!>.00 .•urh) 



firm 
address 



Friday, March 14, 1958 



Civic Development 
Program of Chamber 
To Be Outlined 

Paul Oppermaiin. rctirinj; Director of city 
planninf;. will lie lioiioretl at a luncheon meet- 
ing announcing the 1958 program of the 
Civic Development Committee of the Cham- 
ber next Friday, according to Alan K. 
Browne. President of the Chamber and Chair- 
man of the Committee. 

Oppermann's address. "Today's Challenge 
to Central Cities." will keynote the meeting 
which will he attended by Directors of the 
Chamber, members of the committee's six .sec- 
tions, and city, state and federal officials in 
the Nob Hill Room of the Fairmont Hotel. 

.'Vrthiir J. Dolan, Jr. is Vice Chairman of 
tile committee. 

The Sections of the committee and their 
Chairmen are: Capital Improvement and 
Land Use. Raymond D. Smith, Chairman. 
Robert Lilienthal. Vice Chairman; Fire 
Safety. John J. Conlon. Chairman. Robert Lee 
St. Clair. Vice Chairman; Mass Transit. Alan 
K. Browne. Chairman. Arthur Jenkins. Vice 
Chairman; 

Parking, H. Irving Rhine. Chairman, Jack 
A. Simpson. Vice Chairman : Street. Highway 
and Bridge. Leonard S. Mosias. Chairman; 
Traffic Safety & Control. Torres Weir. Chair- 
man. 

Reservations for the luncheon can be made 
by calling the Chamber, EXbrook 2-4511, Ext. 



March 15— GREAT GOLDEN FLEET PARTICIPA- 
TION IN BENICIA CENTENNIAL— Benicia, Cali- 
fornia. 
March 18— 2nd CENTURY LUNCHEON MEETING 

—Iron Duke Restaurant, 132 Bush, I2;I5 p.m. 
March 19— RMA BOARD MEETING— Press Club, 
5B5 Post, 8:00 a.m. 

March 19 — WORLD TRADE ASSOCIATION 
LUNCHEON MEETING — Hunt Room, Fairmont 
Hotel, 12 noon. Honoring Australian delegation. 
March 21— CIVIC DEVELOPMENT COMMIHEE 
LUNCHEON— Nob Hill Room, Fairmont Hotel, 12 

March 24— AVIATION SECTION MEETING— Inter- 
national Room, San Francisco International Airport, 
12 noon. 

March 26 — WTA LUNCHEON MEETING — San 
Francisco Room, Fairmont Hotel, 12 noon. Speaker; 
Harold C. McClellan: "United States Trade Rela- 
tions With Japan." 

March 28 — MANUFACTURING COMMIHEE- 
Hunt Room, Fairmont Hotel, I2;I5 p.m. 



(2h(imbatatajak A/o. 17 



Expansion 



Bay Region Industria 

274,741.226 



SONOMA 

I.3W. 000 



YOLO 

II.VIP.OOO 



, SOLANO 

1,106,000 



SACRAMENTO 

\ l9,bJ8.926 



SAN FRANCISCO I 

ZQ-toz.eoo 



^ \ SAN JOAOUIN 

CONTRA COSTA 17.889 057 

■v^ tV 021 025 



ALAMEDA 

98.065012 



SAN I — 
MATEO \ SANTA CLARA 



SANTA^ 
CRUZ 

79'f.OOO 



—Courtesy Pocific Cm 6 Elec: 

New records in the nunnber o-f corrmni+menf's by industry for new nnanu- 
facturing plants and expansions were set in San Francisco and the Bay Region 
during 1957, accounting for 738 projects, according to the Industrial Depart- 
ment of the Chamber. 

In San Francisco, 139 projects totaled $20,402,500, compared to the 
previous high of 103 projects totaling $18,127,242 in 1956. 

New jobs created in San Francisco totaled 622 compared to the all-time 
record of 865 for 1956. 

In the Bay Region's 13 counties — Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, San 
Francisco, San Mateo, Solano, Napa, Santa Clara, Sonoma, Sacramento, San 
Joaquin, Santa Cruz and Yolo — commitments totaling $274,741,226 repre- 
sented a record of 738 projects compared to an all-time high of $407,424,257 
and 681 projects in 1956. 

A total of $300,129,076 was committed in northern California as a whole 
involving 865 projects or 288 new plants and 577 expansions. 

"The remarkable development of our area by industry is a testimonial to 
the serious and careful planning for industrial development by the Chamber 
and progressive-minded Bay Region communities," said O. R. Doerr, chairman 
of the Industrial Advisory Committee. 

A regular fealiirc. Jtt ihc Ch,inihcr Inr rcprnitt. Rcicjr.h Dcparlment. F.xl. I i 



B/VT REGION BUSI> 



SAN fRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



Al.AN K. BROWNE. Presidtnl 

G. L. FOX. General Manager 

M. A. HOCAN. Secrelarr 

JAMES D. WARNOCK, Execniive Editor 

JOSEPH I. HAUCHEY. Editor 

Pnbliihed every olhrr week by the San Franciico Chamber 

o{ Comraeree al 333 Pine St.. San Francitco. Zone 4. 

ConnlT of San Francisco. California. Telenhone EXbrook 

2-4S11. (Non-member lubicriDlion. $5.00 a year.) Entered 

aa Second Cla.. matter Aoril 26. 1944. at the Po.t Office at 

San Franciico. California, under the act of March i. 1879. 

Circulation: 7,500 this tsMU« 



■ION liil BUSINESS 



SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



VOLUME 15 • NUMBER 7 • MARCH 28 1958 



Oppermann Praises Chamber for Role 
In Planning and Redevelopment of City 

'"Without the Chaiiiltcr it would not have Ijeen j)ossil)le to accoiiiplisli tin- 
work of recent years on [)lannin^ of the city and on its renewal," Paul ()i){)eniiann. 
former Director of Planning of the City an<l County of San Francisco, told the 
Board of Directors and niend)ers of the Civic Development Committee of the 
Chamher last week at a luncheon at the Fairmont Hotel. 

Gl" -M-, I" -j»j , "The new and modern San Francisco I-- 

. L. I" OX on J Ury iNaming already taking form." he continued. "For th.- 

cooperation of the Chamher. its Civic Develop- 




Outstanding Industrialist 

G. L. Fox. General Manager of the Cham- 
ber, has been appointed to a 1958 Awards 
Jury of the California Museum of Science and 
Industry to select California's Industrialist of 
the Year. A California Scientist of the Year 
also will be named by ;i 
State Museum Awards . 
Jury. 

Other northern Califor- 
nians on the Industrialist 
Awards Jury are Adrien 
J. Falk, senior industrial- 
ist, San Francisco; Stan- 
ley McCaffrey. Vice Presi- 
dent. University of Cali- 
fornia. Berkeley; and 
James Mussatti. General 
Manager, State Chamber, 
San Francisco. G. L. Fo« 

Northern Californians 
on the Scientist Awards Jury are Dr. Wendell 
M. Stanley, Professor of Biochemistry and Di- 
rector of the Virus Laboratory. University of 
California; and Dr. Frederick E. Terman. 
Provost of the University and Dean of Engi- 
neering, Stanford University. 

Nominations may be submitted by mail or 
in person by April 15 to the California Mu- 
seum of Science and Industry, Exposition 
Park, Los Angeles. Brochures concerning the 
awards and forms for nominations are avail- 
able at the San Francisco Chamber. 

Military Matters 

Directors Back Cordiner 

Directors of the San Francisco Chamber of 
Commerce have urged California and other 
United States Senators to support legislation 
now under consideration to implement fea- 
tures of the Cordiner Plan as a solution to 
costly turnover of trained military personnel, 
according to Alan K. Browne, president. 

The action followed the recommendations 
of the Armed Forces Section, of which Briga- 
dier General Stuart D. Menist, USAR. is 
chairman. 

"The principle of pay for proficiency is 
sound and should be instituted by Congres- 
sional action." General MenisI slated. "Pres- 
ent practice places a bonus on li-iigth of serv- 
ice rather than on ability and value of con- 
tribution. It has been estimated that the Cordi- 
ner Plan would save as much us $5 billion 
iivi-r a period of years and strengthen na- 



ment Committee, its Industrial Development 
Committee . . . may I publicly express my 
thanks and the gratitude of the Department 
of City Planning as well. 

"No other part of the country can surpass 
or even equal us in architects — prize-winners, 
pioneers and pace-setters all. Excellent new 
buildings have been completed. More startling 
and even more important changes are in pros- 
pect as the old. run-down wholesale produce 
market is redeveloped on lines laid down for 
the Golden Gateway. . . . The most exciting 
civic design in the country is the proposed 
Ferry Park." 

Opperman offered a six-point program to 
aid in solving the Bay Region's inter-communi- 
ty problems: 

• Creation of local community councils with 
city- wide and neighborhood outlooks; 

• formation of a business advisory committee 
on civic development; 

• organization of a "flying wedge" financing 
business group with "minute men" recruited 
to get high priority jobs done swiftly and 
raise private funds. 

• appointment of a city development coordi- 
nator or a "top level management deputy" of 
the mayor; 

• adequate staffing of the Department of City 
Planning, and; 

• formation of a charter commission to make 
badly needed changes in municipal govern- 
ment. 



Plan, Presidio Status Quo 

tional defense by ending turnover." 

In related action the Directors followed the 
recommendation of the section to reaffirm 
their opposition to proposals for abandonment 
by the Army of the Presidio to make way for 
private land development. 

"Historically, the Chamber has deferred to 
the Department of the Army as to the best 
and highest use of the Presidio and has ad- 
viK-ated the improvement of facilities there 
rather than their abandonment." General 
Menist said. "Army operations entail tre- 
mendous amounts of purchasing fnrni local 
sources. Thi- section believes that if top mili- 
tary authorities contend, as they do. that the 
Presidio of .San Francisco is essential to na- 
tional defense, their judgment should not be 
questioned." 




PLANNING EAST BAY representation on the 1958 
Asia Business Development Mission are (left to 
right) Robert Taylor, President, S. F. Area World 
Trade Association; Jack Grounds. President, Oak- 
land World Trade Club; and Mortimer Smith, Presi- 
dent, Oakland Chamber of Commerce. 



Trade Mission Looms 
A "Resounding Success" 

The 2nd .\nnual Business Development 
Tour of Eastern Asia scheduled April 7-May 
2 should "achieve a resounding success." Rob- 
ert Taylor. President of the San Francisco 
Area World Trade Association of the Cham- 
ber, has predicted. 

"Chambers of commerce, trading and com- 
mercial organizations. L'. S. Government rep- 
resentatives and officials of other governments 
have contributed greatly to the itinerar>- and 
in arranging a select economic-political study 
of Eastern Asia, thus insuring the necessary 
groundwork for success in this undertaking. 

■"The development of San Francisco and its 
surrounding communities as an expanding 
market for goods. ser\ices and investments 
from neighboring Pacific naliims will be en- 
hanced considerably by diis tour." he con- 
cluded. 

John G. Ziel, President. Ziel & Co., San 
Francisco, who participated in the last mis- 
sion, commented. "This trip is a 'must.' Far 
greater value is to be derived from such a 
group tour than would lie possible by an in- 
dividual's trip." 

Highspot of the tour will be attendance at 
the Japan International Trade Fair, scheduled 
this year in Osaka, which has entered into a 
business and cultural affiliation with San 
Francisco. 

Dwiglii K. Tripp, HI, President of the 
Northern California Thrift Company, will 
officially reprcM-nt the City and County of 
San Francisco and Mayor Ge«»rpe Christopher 

(Turn lo pu(r Iwo) 



Friday, March 28, 1958 



3^79 ^%Ci79CC^Ca70a 



THE ARGONAUT 

San Franrisvo Tradilinn 



THE ARGONAUT 



SAN l=RAMlMl'. SlNllAS. MAKlH »5. i877 



n. KIO &«R.uitvn). 



■i M*K bat n4r <MHm bu^ 



nii-Vl^iliRll'A. 



PRICE TEN CENTS 
]M.,.T._.j,.„™«.w*.^^.-b._b^j TIIK AWjOS.UT. 

r^ T.^^t^> WtlA «%.M** to tta IMl, l«nJ wSmT^.H, ii'rftJL IihTm - ■• f- l^"l , II 

'-' . .,,^uht, *>4h ,^«W ••»« In^W^— ••««*««»*k«.*4iN*M,KM««( LA« 

t- • .w^.i>. ■ •.... I--*! <..—.^.*.1 ,-pwh.|.^ d> ,M »wt fcjJ «i«w* nyw* M< It** ■^ d 

IN 1877 a "society journal", devoted to the satirical . . . 

When Frank Pixley and Fred M. Somers brought out the first issue of the 
ARGONAUT on March 25, 1877, San Francisco was a trading and industrial 
city of some 230,000 population. Fresh from the 1873 recession, the city 
was still showing effects of Gold Rush Days. 

Pixley and Somers dedicated the new venture to the task of bringing 
culture and enlightenment to the most rapidly growing metropolis of the 
West, a goal which they eminently achieved; during its first 28 years, THE 
ARGONAUT built tremendous prestige by introducing the monumental 
figures of Gertrude Ather+on, Bret Harte, Jack London, Joaquin Miller and 
many other writers to a waiting world. 

The publishers had announced their intention to produce "a political, 
satirical and society journal which would be useful and amusing, instructive 
and entertaining." They claimed the right to discuss all public questions and 
hoped that the new journal would "sometimes offend its readers by the pub- 
lication of unpalatable truths." The publishers had taken on the job of look- 
ing impartially at every aspect of the current scene. "Our views will be our 
own and their utterance will be in the interest of no political party." 

In 1877 the editorial offices were at 522 California Street. For many 
years the paper sold for lOc a copy, or $3.00 a year by subscription. By 
1906 main offices had moved to 426 Sutter Street and the subscription price 
had gone up to $4.85. On April 18 of that year, the fire and earthquake 
completely destroyed presses and offices of the publication, but undaunted, 
the publishers moved to San Jose and in emergency quarters made the pub- 
lication date of April 21 — on schedule despite the necessity of writing a 
complete new issue in three days. 

Between 1906 and 1929 both San Francisco and THE ARGONAUT had 
a great period of growth. The great depression, which sent many a pub- 
lication to destruction, was weathered by the journal, which by this time had 
become both a magazine and a San Francisco tradition. 

On September 20, 1930, William Wallace Chapin became president of 
the Argonaut Publishing Company and general master of its fortunes. Dedi- 
cating itself to reportage of western society and business, THE ARGONAUT 
survived not only the depression but also World War II and its aftermath, 
always maintaining its policy of first quality writing and appearance and 
its ability to reflect the best of the San Francisco scene. 

In 1957, its eightieth year, Harry H. Nasburg of Denver bought out the 
Chapin interest and began the injection of a new spirit into the old maga- 
zine. Helped by George Baker, Assistant Editor, Nasburg began a moderni- 
zation process which still goes on to bring THE ARGONAUT into tune with 
modern San Francisco and the Bay Area. 

Now TIME size, the magazine has a new look and a new feel. It is still 
a mirror of the top levels of San Francisco society and finance, but it has a 
new staff of writers and photo-journalists dedicated to breathing a new ele- 
ment of modern life into another of San Francisco's century-old traditions. 

May the bright new face of the West's oldest weekly publication con- 
tinue to reflect the best of San Francisco and the Bay Area for another hun- 
dred years to come. 

.-1 f. .NV.'jr l,a:urc. ail ihc Chjmhcr l.,r r^/,nfili. Rcujr. /) r>if>arlrrunt, F.xl. /l 




IN 1958 ... a new spirit in an old magazine. 



Success Predicted For 
Asia Trade Mission 

(Continued from page one) 

during the tour. He will convey San Francis- 
co's greetings to the Mayor of Osaka, San 
Francisco's city sister. 

Others making tour reservations thus far 
include: 

Jark T. Buckley, Freight Sales Coordina- 
tor, American President Lines; Gean W. Can- 
non, local attorney and President of the 
Barristers Club of San Francisco and a Di- 
rector of the San Francisco Bar Association; 
James Cummins, President, Asiatic Tran> 
Pacific, Inc., and President of the Market 
Street Van & Storage Company; Evelyn 
Grant, representing John S. Bolles, indus- 
trial architect; Helen M. Guilleniin, private 
investment specialist, a reporter on the INapa 
Register and special representative of the 
Napa Chamber of (Commerce; Edward M. 
Nagel. Vice President, Oroweat Baking Com- 
pany; Phillips S. Davies, Vice President, E. 
W. Axe & Co. and General Chairman of the 
San Francisco-Osaka Town Affiliation com- 
mittee. 

Kichard J. Al)b<)tt. Assistant Manager of the 
World Trade Department of the Chambex. 
will conduct the tour. 

The grouj) will leave San Francisco via Pan 
American W orid Airways Clipper April 7 and 
return May 2 via Japan Air Lines. 

Sir Donald Anderson 
Addresses SFAWTA 

"Shipping and the Pacific" is the subject of 
an address to be made by Sir Donald Forsyth 
Anderson. Deputy Chairman and Managing 
Director of the Peninsular and Oriental Steam 
Navigation f^ompany of London. Thursday 
noon. April 10. in the Peacock Room of the 
Motel Mark Hopkins. 

The lunchecm. which welcomes the P. & 0. 
luxury liner Himalaya, is cosponsored by the 
San Francisco Area World Trade Association, 
the Chamber, the British American Chamber 
(if (Commerce and Trade Center. Marine Ex- 
change. .American Society of Travel Agents 
and the Pacific Area Travel Association. 



Friday. March 28, 1958 



Hitting the High Spots 



with jrM WARNOCK 

LURHANSA GERMAN AIRLINES officials, includ- 
ing Hans M. Bongers, President, and Wolfgang A. 
Kittel. General Manager. United States. Canada 
and Caribbean Area, were the guests of Alan K. 
Browne. Chamber President, at a reception oi the 
Pacific Un:on Club during their recent visit to San 
Francisco. . . . 

RALPH S. DOW has been appointed to the West- 
ern Regional executive staff of International Business 
Machines Corporation to coordinate sales and tech- 
nical planning for state and local government appli- 
cations of equipment in the 12 western states. 
Hawaii and Alaska. . . . 

PRIVATELY-OWNED AND OPERATED U. S.-flag 
merchant vessels (1000 gross tons and over only) 
provided employment for more than 64.200 seamen, 
including reserves, as of January I. according to the 
American Merchant Marine Institute. . . . 
TOOLS OF THE TRADE— modern business machines 
and methods — and how they can combat costs. In- 
crease efficiency and improve client relations — was 
the subject at the March 26 meeting of the San 
Francisco Bay Area Publicity Club at the Press and 
Union League Club. John W. Fearn, retiring Presi- 
dent, and direct mall specialists Marie Rodman and 
Larry Allen formed the panel. . . . 
DOUGLAS E. NEWTON, former Sales Manager of 
a Denver firm, has been appointed Product Man- 
ager with Western Machinery In San Francisco. 
where he will specialize In applications involving 
flotation, classification, conditioning and other proc- 
essing. . . . 

"PROFESSOR RAMAC," a four-ton electronic IBM 
"genius" with almost total historical recall and the 
ability to speak 10 languages, recently left San 
Francisco International Airport bound for Belgium 
where "he" will be a featured performer In the U. S. 
Pavilion at the Brussels World's Fair. The specially 
modified $224,000 Ramac computer was developed 
and manufactured by the San Jose IBM plant. . . . 
JOSEPH W. RABB, General Manager for the North- 
ern California Division of Ducommun Metals and 
Supply Co., has been elected President of the 
American Steel Warehouse Association, Northern 
California Chapter. . . . 

D. C. DUNCAN, President of the West Coast Elec- 
tronic Manufacturers Assn.. recently told Congress- 
men from California. Oregon and Washington that 
electronics now ranks as the fourth largest manufac- 
turing activity In the West, topped only by trans- 
portation, food processing and lumber. He said 664 
■estern companies last year produced $1,775,000.- 
000 worth of electronic equipment, or nearly 24 per 
cent of the nation's total output. . . . 

National Parkway 
Study Funds Urged 

Directors of the San Franci.sco Chamber of 
Ciinimerce have urged San Francisco super- 
visors to join witli San Mateo anil Santa Cruz 
counties in appropriatinji funds for studies 
of (levelopnienl of Skyline Boulevard as a 
national parkway, according to Alan K. 
Browne. President. 

The action followed the recommendations of 
the .Street. Highway & Bridge section, of which 
Leonard S. .Vfosias is Chairman. Ue Letiw. 
Calher & Co., has estimated that a preliminary 
planning type survey would cost between 
$l.>.nnn and $20,000.' he staled. This would 
include determination of route locations, right 
of way lines, location of rest areas, a prelimi- 
nary traffic study, and a general estimate of 
reconstruction and right of way costs. 




Irving C. Irelan 



George W. Uri 



Robert ParleH 



le H, Heredla Andrew F. Scatena 



New members recently added to the Chamber roster include the alwive ( left to 
right): Irving C. Irelan and George ^X'. L'ri. Partners. Irrlan & Iri: Robert Parletl, 
Civil Engineer; Emile H. Heredia. President. Philijipinr Amrriran Travrl Agency, Inc.; 

and .Andrew F. .Scalena. Resi^lered Hepre-ientalive. 11 Hhtim & Co.. Inr. 



J. EARL COKE, VICE PRESIDENT. Bank of America 
N.T. & S.A.. heads a sponsors' committee working 
for premium prices at the March 29-Aprll 2 Grand 
National Junior Livestock Exposition In cooperation 
with a special sales committee of the Chamber. . . . 
CHAMBER DIRECTORS adjourned last week's 
board meeting in memory of Rene A. May. late 
Director and President of Getz Bros. & Co.. past 
President of the San Francisco Area World Trade 
Association and for forty years a leader In the San 
Francisco world business community. . . . 
ALAN K. BROWNE, PRESIDENT of the Chamber, 
addressed the Redwood City Klwanls Club on 
March 19, the Menio Park Chamber of Commerce 
on March 24, the Women's Athletic Club of San 
Francisco on March 26, and the Oakland Rotary 
Club on March 27. . . . 

HAROLD CHADWICK McCLELLAN. President of 
the Old Colony Paint and Chemical Co. of Los 
Angeles and former Assistant Secretary of Com- 
merce for international affairs, addressed the San 
Francisco Area World Trade Association on Wednes- 
day at a luncheon In the San Francisco Room of the 
Fairmont Hotel on trade relations with Japan. . . . 
RICHFIELD OIL CORPORATION was awarded a 
special citation by Alan K. Browne. Chamber Presi- 
dent, honoring "Success Story" for outstanding 
merit in the field of public service during the pro- 
gram's final telecast on March 13. . . . 
•KNOW YOUR ELECTED REPRESENTATIVES," 
folder containing the names, addresses, and tele- 
phone numbers of City and County. State and 
national elected officials, has just been issued by 
the Chamber's Public Affairs Department. , . . 
DANIEL J. McGANNEY, JR., Resident Manager of 
Lionel D. Edle & Co.. Inc., and James P. Wilson. 
Manager of the Chamber's World Trade Depart- 
ment, appeared March 9 on the KPIX program 
"What's Your Opinion?" sponsored by the Junior 
Chamber of Commerce. Under discussion was 
'What U. S. Economic Policy for Survival?" . . . 
DR. SARVEPALLI RADHAKRISHNAN, Vice Pres 
dent of the Republic of India will be guest speaker 
at a special luncheon to be given in his honor b> 
the World Affairs Council of Northern California on 
Monday in the Peacock Court of the Hotel Marl 

Hopkins 

FIRST CONFERENCE ON USE OF FILMS by Bus 
ness and Industry will take place at the University 
of California Extension Center. San Francisco. Mav 
27 through May 29. the agenda including produc- 
tion techniques, cost, community and employee re- 
lations, film use and distribution. . . . 
BE YOUR OWN BUSINESS FORECASTER >as th.. 
♦ opic of C W. Lelhy. Editor of ELECTRICAL WEST 
McGraw Hill, before a recent meeting of San Fra- 
clsco Chapter of the National Office Managemer* 
Association at the Fraternity Club. . . . 
GENERAL PAIK SUN YUP, Chief c 
of Korea Army, recently arrived in \\ - 
lour of U S. Army Instal atlons n. 
San Francisco. . . 



THIRD ANNUAL CONFERENCE ON ESTATE 
PLANNING sponsored by the Estate Council of the 
East Bay wl i take p'ace en April 18 and 25 at the 
Claremont Hotel, Berkeiey. - . . 
SAN FRANCISCO'S EIGHTH ANNUAL Education- 
Business Day. highly successful event during which 
businessmen visit the city's schools, will be held 
Thursday. April 24 instead of the originally an- 
nounced April 23. according to Randy Shields, 
Manager of the Public Affairs Department. . . . Invi- 
tations have gone out to Chamber members. 
FORTY LEADERS OF TRAVEL and tourist activity 
In the Far East — from Tckyo. Hong Kong. Bangkok, 
Ceylon, the Philippines. Vietnam and New Guinea — 
recently completed a four-day California visit after 
arriving in San Francisco on the eastbound inaugural 
flight of the new DC-7C fleet of Japan Air Lines. . . . 
A THREE-POINT PROGRAM aimed at providing 
power for pumps of the projected San Luis water 
diversion project in central California at less cost 
than the Federal Government could do tfie same 
job. recently was presented to the Senate Irrigation 
and Reclamation Subcommittee by Pacific Gas and 
Electric Company Executive Vice President Robert 
H. Gerdes. . . . 

"TIME TO BE BOLD ' will be the subject of Dewey 
J. Dorsett, General Manager. Association of Casual- 
ty and Surety Companies of New York, when he 
addresses the annual Insurance Day luncheon on 
April 18 at the Commercial Club, co-sponsored by 
the Board of Fire Unc'erwriters of tfie Pacific, the 
Commercial Club and ttie Chamber. Reservations 
can be made by calling ttie Chamber. EXbrool 

2-4511. Ext. 58 

THIRD ANNUAL BLACK AND WHITE SYM- 
PHONY BALL Is scheduled Aprl 25 at the Sheraton- 
Pa'ace. St. Francis. Fairmont and Mart Hopkins 
Hotels to raise additional funds for the current 
operating expenses of the San Francisco Symphony 
Association wtiich maintains, manages and presents 
the orchestra. . . . 



GOiyC FAST! 

I>oiiie>lir Tru.le I>epl.. 

*>iin Krunri«ro (IIkiiiiImt iif ( loniliK-rrr. 

'.i'A'.i I'iiu- St.. .Niin Kranri>r» 4 

I'leUM- »end iho dirrrlorics rhrrkrd. 
Cheek enrUxed. 

San KranriM-xi ^Irrrhant 
\l li<d.-.aler. iind Itranrh 
.Sale. Ollire. «2.30 

D ^laiitifarliirrr^ in 

San Krunri.ro $2.00 

( \..n ,„. m.Im r prices »S.OO c«rh ) 



<irni 
•rfdr.-.. 



Friday, March 28, 1958 



San Francisco Business Activity Index for 
First Two Months Second Best in Decade 

TREND — General business activity in San Francisco during the first two 
months of 1958 exceeded the level of any corresponding period in the past ten 
vears except 1957, according to the Research Department of the Chamber. 

Here is the actual pattern based on the business activity index average for 

the first two months of each year: 1949 — 



SAN FRANCISCO 
BUSINESS ACTIVITY 

UNADJUSTED INDEX 1947 1949=100 



97.3: 1950—97.7: 1951—115.1; 1952—119.1; 
1953—120.6: 19.54—122.1; 1955—125.3: 1956 
—140.8; 1957—151.3; 1958—146.6. 

The Research Department survey of busi- 
ness for the first two months reveals mixed 
trends. Some areas of tlie local and regional 
economy experienced notable improvements. 
Others were not quite up to previous records. 
A few were off considerably. 

The February index of business activity 
reached 138.6 compared to 143.7 last year and 
135.7 in 1956. 

In San Francisco, during the first two 
months compared to a year ago, total con- 
struction authorized increased 9.9 per cent. 
New residential rose 87.1 per cent and ad- 
ditions, alterations and repairs 13.9 per cent. 
Electrical energy sales were up 3.8 per cent. 

Rail freight, express shipments and port 



March 28 — MANUFACTURING COMMITTEE 
MEETING— Fairmont Hotel, 12:15 p.m. 
March 31— BUSINESS EDUCATION COMMITTEE 
MEETING— Room 200, Chamber. 11:00 a.m. 
March 31— WORLD TRADE WEEK COMMITTEE— 
Room 200, Chamber, 12:30 p.m. 
April I— AGRICULTURAL COMMITTEE LUNCH- 
EON MEETING — San Francisco Room. Fairmont 
Hotel, 12 noon. 

April I— TRAFFIC SAFETY AND CONTROL SEC- 
TION, VOLUNTARY COMMITTEE — Room 200, 
Chamber. 10:30 a.m. 

April I —CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT AND LAND 
USE SECTION— Room 200, Chamber. 3:00 p.m. 
April 2— STREET, HIGHWAY AND BRIDGE SEC- 
TION MEETING— Room 200, Chamber, 10:30 a.m. 
April 2— LEGISLATIVE AND NATIONAL AFFAIRS 
SECTION— Room 200. Chamber. 3:00 p.m. 
April 3 — SFAWTA LUNCHEON — Peacock Court. 
Mark Hopkins Hotel. 12:00 noon. Speaker: Hon. 
Tom B. Coughran. Assistant Secretary of the Treas- 
ury: "Today's Challenge in Trade and Aid." 
April 3 — BUSINESS CENTER DEVELOPMENT 
COMMITTEE— Jackson Square, 10:00 a.m. 
April 7 — CHEMICAL INDUSTRIES SECTION 
MEETING — Hunt Room, Fairmont Hotel. 12:00 
noon. 

April 8— JAPAN WORLD TRADE COMMISSION 
—Room 200, Chamber, 6:00 p.m. 
April 9— WTA LUNCHEON— San Francisco Room. 
Fairmont Hotel, 12 noon. Speaker: E. E. Schnell- 
backer. Office of Trade Promotion, U. S. Depart- 
ment of Commerce. 



tonnage were off considerably during the first 
two months but truck movements in the San 
Francisco area were nearly equal to a year 
ago. Vegetable receipts in the six-county 
Metropolitan Area increased 13.1 per cent, but 
livestock slaughtered dropped 18.9 per cent. 




J I I L 



Business Activity Through February, 1958 



BRANCH OF ACTIVITY 



♦GENERAL BUSINESS ACTIVITY INDEX. 
CONSTRUCTION PERMITS 



Residential, Ne 



Dwelling Units 
Single-family 



No 



lits, Ne 



Ne 



..Number 
..Numbe 



-Value 



Additior 

REAL ESTATE— Deeds Recorded. Number 

•RETAIL DEPARTMENT STORE SALES _ _ _... Index 

Debits _. .$000 

Receipts $ 

Pacific Coast Stock Exchange Shares traded 

Market value $ 

COMMERCIAL FAILURES Number 

INDUSTRY TREND— 6 County Total Employment... 

Mfg. Average Weekly Earnings _ _ 

Manufacturing 



..(earnings) 
nployment) 



state, city.- 



Trans.. comn 

Agriculture 

Govt. — Fede 

Other 

TRANSPORTATION— Freight car movement. _ Number 

S. F. Airport— Planes In and Out _ Number 

Passengers Off and On Number 

Air Mail Loaded and Unloaded Lbs. 

Air Express Loaded and Unloaded Lbs. 

Air Freight Loaded and Unloaded _ _ Lbs. 

Rail Express Shipments Number 

•Truck Movements— S. F. Area _ Index 

Out-of-State passenger car entries into No. Calif... Number 

PORT OF SAN FRANCISCO— Revenue Tons_...._ L Total 

Coastv^ise „ _. Revenue tons 



Interco 



stal 



Inland Water. 



CARGO VESSELS (San Francisco Bay) 

Arrivals _ Number 

Millions of Registered Tons 

UTILITIES— Ind. & Comm. Gas Sales Cu. Ft. 

•Elec. Energy Sales, K.W. Hours Index 

Water Consumption— Comm. & Ind Cu. Ft. 

NEW DEVELOPMENTS 

Visitor and Newcomer Inguiries _ Number 

Bay Bridge Vehicle Crossings _ Number 

Golden Gate Bridge Vehicle Crossings _.... _ Number 

FRUITS & VEGETABLE RECEIPTS _.._ Carlots 

LIVESTOCK SLAUGHTER (Insp. Dists.) _ Number 

•S. F. CONSUMER PRICE INDEX— All Items _ 



FEBRUARY 


% from 


2 MOS. 


7o fron 


1958 


1957 


1958 


1957 


138.6 


-3.5 


147.2 


—2.7 


728 


— 11.3 


1.557 


—4.4 


3.318.386 


—^A 


9,399.778 


9.9 


1.329,840 


39.7 


3,328,849 


87.1 


142 


56.0 


322 


90.5 


54 


1.9 


no 


6.8 


557,740 


—34.4 


2,634.252 


—29.9 


1,430,806 


— 15.2 


3,436,677 


13.9 


1.400 


—3.0 


2,795 


—9.2 


96(p) 


—11 


99(p 


—6.6 


3,693,503 


-2.1 


7,883,611 


—2.9 


2.264.709 


—9.5 


4 899 049 


— 1.4 


2.102.795 


— 17.2 


4,731,416 




45,117.125 


—4.1 


94,843.814 


— 11.2 


4 


—71.4 


16 


—51.5 


l,052.IOO(p) 


— 1.8 


l,056,900(p 


—1.4 


95.91(a) 


0.9 






2O3.50O(p) 


—5.5 


209,400(p 


—2.9 


6l.000(p) 


— 13.4 


65,700(p 


—6.5 


68.l00(p) 


—0.3 


68,200(p 


0.2 


I69.700(p) 


— I.I 


I70,600(p 


-1.0 


79.60O(p) 


0.8 


79,300(p 


0.6 


244.000(p) 


3.1 


24O,300(p 


1.7 


Il7.400(p) 


—2.8 


ll9,IOO(p 


—0.9 


I5.200(p 


—1.3 


I5.450(p 


— 1.9 


9l,IOO(p) 


-0.2 


9l,200(p 


-0.1 


2.500(p) 


0.0 


2,50O(p 


-/.4 


9,786 


— 18.9 


20,842 


— 18.6 


9 771 


—2,3 


20,782 


-0.9 


240 365 


6.6 


507,651 


8.2 


2,881,023 


8.4 


5,926,307 


7.9 


558,976 


—26.2 


1,288,412 


—21.5 


5.935.651 


6.0 


1 1 ,526,095 


1.8 


61.364 


-15.1 


125,730 


—15.2 


137.0 


-0.3 


145.5 


-0.7 


40,770 


—3.2 


84,729 


1.5 


395,878 


-21.6 


900,653 


—18.8 


2,843 


—74.0 


7,386 


—65.2 


158,503 


—22.7 


335,614 


—20.7 


16,811 


-63.4 


49,370 


-39.7 


217.721 


— 10.5 


508,293 


-12.8 


331 


-6.2 


697 


-3.5 


1,612.483 


—2.4 


3,360,262 


-2.9 


1,606,834.900 


-3.9 


3,322,936,500 


—1.0 


158 


1.3 


163 




154.873,000 


—3.0 


307,933,000 


—3.7 


1.564 


15.8 


3,206 


16.3 


2,582.892 


4.1 


5,333,336 


2.9 


1,114,716 


3.9 


2,343,852 


5.5 


2.977 


10.7 


6,280 


13.1 


105.000(a) 


— 19.8 






124.8(c) 


2.6 







•Index Ba 
not shown 



du 



(1947-49 Monthly Average = 100); (a) January: (c) Dec. 1957 latest; (p) preliminary. Basic data soun 
to space limitation, but available upon reguest. 

RESEARCH DEPARTMENT. SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



ALAN K. BROWNE, President 

C. L. FOX, General Manager 

M. A. HOCAN, Secrelarr 

JAMES D. WARNOCK, Execalive Edilor 

JOSEPH I. HAUCHEY. Edilor 



Publiihed every other 


week bv the San Francisco Chamber 


of Commerce at 333 


Pine St.. San Francisco. Zone 4. 


CouniT of San Franri 


CO. California. Teleohone EXbrook 


2-4511. (Non.member 


siihscrintion. SS.OO a year.) Entered 


ai Serond Claai maltr 


Anril 26. 1944. at the Post Office at 


San Franciaco, Celifor 


nia. under the act of March 3. 1879. 


Circufo 


ion: 7.S00 thi» iMue 



i 



BAY REGION 

SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 




BUSINESS 



VOLUME 15 • NUMBER 7 • APRIL II. 1958 



WONDER OF THE 
MODERN WORLD 




MODERN MARVEL — The San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge, "seven-times-seven 
more wonderful than the Seven Ancient Wonders of the World." 



S.F. Bay Boasts 4 World's Top Bridges 

San Francisco Bay— with its 450 square miles of landlocked 
harbor — still possesses four of the world's greatest bridges de- 
spite the construction last year of the mighty Mackinac Bridge 
over the straits dividing Lake Michigan and Lake Huron. 

Four of the bay bridges — San Francisco-Oakland, Golden 
Gate, Richmond-San Rafael and Carquinez Straits — rate among 
the ten most notable structures in the world. Other bay bridges 
include the San Mateo-Hayward, Dumbarton, Southern Pacific 
Suisun Bay crossing, Benicia-SF Railroad, Antioch and the new 
parallel Carquinez Straits. Projected bridges include the San 
Francisco-Tiburon, the Army Street Southern Crossing and the 
Martinez-Benicia. 

The Golden Gate Bridge still has the world's longest single 
suspension span. The main distance, center-to-center of piers, is 
4,200 feet. The Mackinac is second, 3,800 feet, and the George 
Washington Hudson River Bridge third, 3,500 feet. 

The most prominent features of the Golden Gate Bridge are 
its two massive steel towers carrying the cables supporting a 
suspended structure 6,450 feet in length. 

The towers are each 746 feet above mean high water or 191 
feet taller than the 555-foot Washington Monument. Measured 
from the base of the San Francisco pier, the towers are 846 feet 
high and weigh 88,800,000 pounds— the highest and largest 
bridge towers in the world. 

The San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge, constructed in two 
sections and bisected by Verba Buena (Goat) Island, is still the 
longest steel bridge in the world. Part cable, part suspension, 
part truss, part tunnel and part cantilever, the bridge and its 
approaches total 43,500 feet or 8I/4 miles. 

The bridge proper, including the crossing at Verba Buena 
Island, is 23.000 feet long; without the island crossing 22 750 
feet. 

The foundations of the bridge extend to the greatest depth 
below water of any bridge ever constructed by man. It was nec- 
essary to sink one pier 242 feet below water, another about 200 
feet. The deepest pier is beneath the easterly end of the canti- 
lever span. 

The transbay bridge also boasts another distinction. It has 
(Turn to pape two) 



Mayor Declares April as 
Home Improvement Month 

April is "H<ime Improvement Month." by 
proclamation of Mayor George Christopher 
is cooperation with the Domestic Trade De- 
partment of the Chamber and the Home Im- 
provement Council of the Greater Bay Area. 

The Mayor called for active citizen partici- 
pation in the benefits to be derived "by keep- 
ing our homes, apartments and commercial 
establishments in the best possible state of 
appearance, comfort and service." 

The recently chartered Council, an organi- 
zation of responsible remodeling contractors, 
sub-contractors, material suppliers, lending 
institutions and services related to the indus- 
try, has joined efforts with those of the Better 
Business Bureau, the Chamber and govern- 
ment law enforcement agencies in an all-out 
war on fly-by-night and "suede shoe" opera- 
tors who have repeatedly attempted to swindle 
San Francisco home owners. 

Chairman of the Council is Kenneth L. 
Topping. Jr. 



Record Number of Businessmen Expected to Take 
Part in Eighth Annual Education-Business Dav 



A record number of Chamber metnbers is 
expected to participate in the eighth annual 
Education-Business Day. April 21. according 
to Gene K. Walker. (Chairman of the Business- 
Education ("ommittee of the Chamber. 

As many as 900 businessmen are expected 
to spend the day. from 
9 a.m. to 1 p.m.. at San 
Francisco's elementary, 
secimdary and special 
public and parochial 
schools. Walker said. 
Nearly 800 Chamber 
members from some 200 
firms visited 79 schoids 
last year 

"In view of the role of 
education in this day of Gene K. Walker 

satellites, the importance of this observance 




clearly apparent." Walker said. "This highly 
successful event — which the Chamber has 
helped to pioneer — has become nationally rec- 
ognized, setting a pattern for hundreds of 
communities thr(uighout the country in bring- 
ing together two vital groups of any city — 
businessmen and educators. 

"Chamber officials and their teacher-hosts 
anticipate thai this will be the most successful 
EB Day in our history." 

Walker urged Chamber mendiers to mail 
in their E-B Day signup sheets promptly to 
assure participation. 

The event, sponsored by the Clhamber and 
the Board of Education, aims at the mutual 
understanding of the problems, goals and 
lechniipies in education, commerce and in- 
dustry. 

(Turn to pmr two) 



Friday, April II, 1958 




SAN FRANCISCO WORID TRADE 
\ TOU R ■ 19S8 

SAN FRANCISCO AMBASSADORS OF TRADE AND GOOD WILL are these members of the second 
annual business development tour of the Far East sponsored by the San Francisco Area World Trade 
Association of the Chamber. Left to right (front) are Mr. and Mrs. John E. Cahill (President. Cahill 
Bros., Inc.); Dwight K. Tripp, III, President, Northern California Thrift Co.; Helen M. Guillemin. private 
investment specialist representing the Napa Chamber of Commerce; Mrs. James Cummins, whose husband 
is president and General Manager of Asiatic Trans Pacific, Inc.; and Edward M. Nagel, Vice President, 
Oroweat Baking Co. Standing are Jack T. Buckley, Freight Sales Coordinator, American President Lines; 
Gean W. Cannon, attorney and president of the Barristers Club of San Francisco; and Richard J. 
Abbott, Tour Manager and Assistant Manager of the World Trade Department of the Chamber. The 
group left San Francisco International Airport via Pan American World Airways on Monday and was 
joined in Honolulu by Evelyn Grout, Secretary-Treasurer, John S. Bolles, Industrial Architect. In Manila 
they will be joined by Rufino Ancheta, Secretary-Manager, Philippine Chamber of Commerce of America, 
Inc., San Francisco. They will return May 2 via Japan Air Lines. 

Eighth Annual Education-Busmess Day Set 



(Continued from page one) 

Committeemen include: 

Arnold E. Archibald, Chairman, Board of Direclors. S.F. 
Federal Savines & Loan Assn.; James A. Bacigalupi, Jr.. As- 
siitant Vice President. Crocker- Anplo National Bank: Alex- 
ander Black, Manager of Sales, American Can Company. 
Pacific Division; O. N. Booth, St. Francis Memorial Hospital; 
F. S. Bowen. Personnel Manager. California & Hawaiian 
Sugar Refining Corp., Ltd.; Joseph A. Braun. Controller. 
McCormick & Company; Ross Buell. Vice President, Wells 
Fargo Bank; Roy N. Buell, Division Manager, Pacific Tele- 
phone & Telegraph Co.; Paul W. Cane, Traveling Representa- 
tive, The Atchison. Topeka S Santa Fe Railway Company; 
George S. Cobb. Manager. Coca-Cola BotUing Co.: E. T. 
Collins. DisUicl Sales Manager, Pacific Telephone & Telegraph 
Co.: WUIiam Cullenward, Director. KCBS Press Info & Pub- 
lic Service. 

Edmund H. Driggs, The Curtis Publishing Co.; Re> . John 
T. Foudy, Superintendent of Schools, Department of Educa- 
tion, Archdiocese of San Francisco: Charles B. Hanby. 
Manager Field Services. No. Calif., California Trucking As. 
sociations. Inc.; Donald I. Rawken. Assistant Cashier. Bank 
of California N. A.; R. E. Hayes, Publications Representative. 
Bethlehem Pacific Coast Steel Corp.; WUIiam D. Hecht, Con- 
.nllanl. School and College Service. United Air Lines; Robert 
W. Jackson. Manager, Western Region, General Electric Co. 
Ronald E. Kaehler. President. S. F. Division, Pacific Coast 
Stock Exchange; Caroline S. Kuhns, Training Director. The 
Emporium: PhUip G. Lasky, Execulive-in-Charge, Westing- 
house Broadcasting. KPIX ; Bert W. Levit. Long and Levit: 
John Love, Coordinator, Plant Tours. Pan American World 
Airways System: William J. Marsico. Assistant Vice President. 



Eureka Federal Savings & Loan Assn. of S.F.; Charles Mayer, 
Publisher, San Francisco Examiner; M. E. McClendon, Assist- 
ant Treasurer, California Packing Corp.; Allison J. McNay, 
Standard Oil Co. of California: Nelson K. Milliken, Zone 
Sales Manager. American Airlines Inc.; H. R. Morris, Com- 
mercial Staff Supervisor. Pacific Telephone S Telegraph Co.; 
J. G. Molheral, Vice President, Batten, Barton, Durstine & 
Osbom. Inc.; Henr> E. North. Vice President, Metropolitan 
Life Insurance Company. 

A. C. Olshen, Vice President and Chief Actuary. West 
Coast Life Insurance Co.; John W. Pellil. Assistant to the 
President. Yellow Cab Company; Lawrence Priddy. Jr., Public 
Relations Representative, Tidewater Oil Company; Lawence 
D. Pritchard, Vice President, Public Relations, Bank of 
America N.T. 4 S.A.; Charles Regal. Assistant Director of 
Public Relations, Malson Navigation Company: John A. 
Remick. Manager. Industrial Products Department, California 
& Hawaiian Sugar Refining Corp. Ltd.; J. G. Shea. General 
Public Relations Manager. Southern Pacific Company; Dr. 
Harold Spears. Superintendent of Public Schools; Hal R. 
Strass. Public Relations Department. American Trust Com- 
pany; Robert W. Taylor, News Bureau Editor, Public Rela- 
tions Department. Crown Zellerbach Corporation. 

Gene K. Walker. Gene K. Walker Company; Frederic B. 
Whitman. President, The Western Pacific RR Co.: C. H. 
Whilworth, Administrative Assistant. Federal Reserve Bank 
of San Francisco; Eugene E. Whilworth. Pacific Gas & Elec. 
trie Co.: Harry J Williams, District Director, Public Rela- 
lions, Columbia-Geneva Steel Division; Roger H. Wood. New 
York Life Insurance Company; and Csrl Zachrisson. Vice 
President. N. W. Aver and Son Inc. 

Secretary of the Business-EducJition Committee of the 



Cha 



Handle P. Shields 



Unanimous Chamber 
Backing Given to 
Port Bond Issue 

Directors of the Chamber unanimously have 
endorsed the San Francisco Port Bond Law to 
provide $50 million in bonds for the improve- 
^ / ment of the port, according to G. L. Fox. 
' General Manager. 

The bond issue, which goes to the voters 
in November, also has the unanimous approval 
of the San Francisco Area World Trade Asso- 
ciation. Chamber affiliate, according to Robert 
Taylor, President. 

A special Chamber committee will be ap- 
pointed to work with the San Francisco Port 
Authority for ratification of the law by the 
voters of California. 

The action followed the recommendations 
of the Capital Improvement and Land Lisa 
section of which Raymond D. Smith is Chair- 
man. 

'"Historically, the Port of San Francisco has 
been intimately identified with the growth and 
development of the entire State and has pro- 
vided facilities and services essential to the 
well-being of the entire nation," Fox said. 

"The port is unusual in that it has always 
paid its way and has never found it necessary 
to resort to tax funds or for any other financial 
subsidy for its operations, improvements or 
maintenance." Fox pointed out. "The bond is- 
sue itself would be self-liquidating. It would 
be guaranteed by the State and paid for from 
port revenues," he added. 

"According to the plans of the Port Author- 
ity, bonds will only be issued when needed to 
accommodate ocean traffic which may be most 
advantageously served through the Port of San 
Francisco." 

Citywide Safety Check 
Sponsored by Chamber 

A voluntary community vehicle safety-check 
program will be held in this city May 26-28 
under the sponsorship of the Chamber, accord- 
ing to Alan K. Browne. President. 

"Periodic safety checks are needed for all 
vehicles to help prevent accidents." F. Torres 
Weir. Chairman of the Chamber's Traffic Safe- 
ty and Control Section, said. 



Bridges Over the San Francisco Bay Still Marvels of Engineering World 



( Continued from page one ) 

the largest vehicular tunnel in the world. Cut- 
ting through Verba Buena Island, it is the 
connecting link between the structures over 
the west and east channels. The bore is 76 
feet wide. 58 feet high and 540 feet long. 

The Richmond-San Rafael Bridge has the 
distinction of being the longest continuous 
steel bridge in the world. It has a total length 
of 29,045 feet, or 51/2 miles; its main structure 
is 2L343 feet long. The bridge is comprised of 
36 girdle spans, 289 truss spans and two canti- 
lever spans. 

The mighty Mackinac is the longest sus- 
pension-type bridge (but not the largest single 
span) in the world and the second longest 
continuous steel bridge. It is 26,444 feet or 



five miles and 44 feet long, including ap- 
proaches. It has a main structure 17,918 feet, 
a suspended distance totaling 8.614 feet (an- 
chorage to anchorage I and a main suspension 
span 3.800 feet. 

The Mackinac — the most expensive bridge 
ever built, costing $99,800.000— is said to be 
the world's most stable suspension bridge, 
aerodynamically, ever built. It has stiffening 
trusses 38 feet deep or 1/lOOth of the span 
length, the same ratio for the proposed Severn 
River Bridge in England and 68 per cent 
greater than the Golden Gate Bridge ratio. 

Other notable Bay Area bridges include 
the Suisun crossing which has a lift span 328 
feet long weighing 1.580 tons, reputed to be 
the largest and heaviest of its kind in the 



world; the old Carquinez Bridge with a main 
structure 4.482 feet long: and the Dumbarton. 
6^/2 miles long, built back in 1927. Founda- 
tions of the Carquinez. also constructed in 
1927. were pioneer prototypes of the Golden 
Gate and Bay Bridges. 

The San Francisco-Oakland, boasting two 
spans of 21.300 feet each and arching over 
12,000 feet of navigable water, is still the mar- 
vel of the modern engineering world whose 
wonders are seven-times-seven more impressive 
than the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. 
This bridge also has the largest main bridge 
structure in the world, 22.750 feet long to 
21,343 for the Richmond-San Rafael, 21,286 
feet for the Chesapeake Bay Bridge in An- 
napolis, Md., and 17,918 for the Mackinac. 



Friday, April II. 1958 



Hitting the High Spots 




Gardiner Symonds 



With JIM WARNOCK 

GARDINER SYMONDS, President and Director of 
the Tennessee Gas Transmission Company, with 
headquarters in Houston, will be the speaker at the 
INVEST IN AMERICA WEEK luncheon at noon 
Monday, April 28 in the 
Garden Court of the Shera- 
ton-Palace Hotel. His sub- 
ject: "Today's Philosophy 
of Investment." Sponsors: 
Northern California Invest 
in America Committee in 
cooperation with the Cham- 
ber, Investment Bankers As- 
sociation (California 
Group), Security Analysts 
of San Francisco, Pacific 
Coast Stock Exchange, San 
Francisco Real Estate 
Board, and San Francisco 
Life Underwriters Associa- 
tion. Presiding: Alan K. 
Browne, Chairman of the Day: Carl F. Wente. Res- 
ervations: EXbrook 2-4SI I, Ext. 58. 

BANNERS WELCOMING THE SAN FRANCISCO 
GIANTS are available for sale or rental at the 
Stuart Co., PLaza 6-3300. The three-foot by three- 
foot banner costs $4, the three-by-nine $10. The 
Giants will be given a civic reception, a civic 
luncheon at the Sheraton-Palace Hotel and a pa- 
rade April 14, the day before the opening of the 
baseball season against the Los Angeles Dodgers 
at Seals Stadium. . . . 

e. L. FOX, CHAMBER GENERAL MANAGER, ad- 
dressed a luncheon meeting of the San Francisco 
Real Estate Board on Tuesday at Simpson's on cur- 
rent economic trends and the outlook for the San 
Francisco Bay Region. On Sunday he will take part 
in a panel discussion on the job outlook on the 
KPIX program "What's Your Opinion?" 

LEWIS M. HOLLAND, MANAGER of the Cham- 
ber's Industrial Department, left yesterday for Den- 
ver. New York and Chicago to discuss possible new 
plants in the Bay Region with twenty-five manufac- 
turmg firms which during the past year have ex- 
pressed interest in locating here. While in the East, 
he will take part in the program of the 33rd annual 
conference of the American Industrial Development 
Council in Atlanta, April 13-16. As current mem- 
bership chairman he pointed out that the organiza- 
tion has received 220 applications from new mem- 
bers during the past year, an all-time record. 
THE FIRST ANNUAL PRESS DAY of the Chamber's 
Golden Fleet is scheduled Sunday, April 20, from 
two to four p.m. with a radio and television cruise 
of the bay on the agenda. Members of the local 
press will bo guests of skippers of the fleet. . 
BECAUSE OF ITS "BUILT-IN RESISTANCE to re- 
cession," the Bay Region has been able to with- 
stand many of the effects of the national business 
slowdown, Alan K. Browne, President of the Cham- 
ber, told northern California automobile dealers 
at the Fairmont Hotel last week. Cornerstone of 
the region's "built-in resistance to recession" is its 
"diversity and flexibility of business activities," he 
said. The meeting, a business improvement lunch- 
eon, was sponsored by the Chamber and the San 
Francisco Automobile Dealers Association. 
FIRST LARGE-SCALE ELECTRONIC COMPUTER 
to be Installed in a naval shipyard will be used to 
coordinate and speed construction of the new Polaris 
nissile-launching submarine at Mare Island Naval 
Shipyard, Valleio, largest submarine shipbuilding 
and repair center on the West Coast. . . . 

THOMAS B. IRVIN. Agent of the Santa Fe Railway 
Jt Richmond, has been appointed Assistant Agent 
St San Francisco in charge of a newly-established 
:entral accounting bureau. . . . 




F. J. Murray, Jr. Raymond F. Douglas John V. Breisky Lloyd Gartner John C. Speh 

New members recently added to the Chamber roster (left to right I are: F. J. Murray. 
Jr., Western Manager, Nichols Engineering & Research Corp.; Raymond F. Douglas. 
Managing Owner, Bankers Travel Service; John V. Breisky. Manager, San Francisco 
Branch Office, Connecticut General Life Insurance Company; Lloyd Gartner. A. I. A.. 
Lloyd Gartner, Architect; and John C. Speh. Vice President and General Manager of 
the San Francisco Branch Store. Abercrombie & Fitch Co. 



AUTOMATING THE MODERN BUSINESS was the 

theme of a recent conference sponsored by the San 
Francisco Chapter of the National Machine Ac- 
countants Association and the Graduate School of 
Business, Stanford, at the Mark Hopkins Hotel. . . . 

SAN FRANCISCO BRANCH OFFICE of Connecti- 
cut General Life Insurance Company has won the 
"Outstanding Agency Award" for superior all- 
round performance in 1957, highest given by the 
company to its field offices. . . . 

RECREATION CENTER FOR THE HANDICAPPEDr 
INC., Fleishhacker Pool BIdg., offers colored slide 
and film presentations of its activities to interested 
organizations. OVerland 1-6534. . . . 

CHAMPION PAPER AND FIBRE CO., Hamilton, 
Ohio, together with undetermined partners, plans 
to form Shasta Pulp and Paper Company, a sub- 
sidiary company, to erect a pulp and paper plant 
costing $30 million near Fairfield, Solano County, 
if a study shows economic and other factors to be 
favorable. . . . 

HEAVY INCREASES IN TARIFFS on imported tuna 
have been protested by the San Francisco Area 
World Trade Association and the Japanese Cham- 
ber of Commerce of Northern California to the 
California Legislature. . . . 

CLAUDE (JOE) GILLETT has joined Dalmo Victor 
as full-time Manager of Contract Manufacturing 
Sales to further the company's policy of Including 
production in its permanent growth plans. . . . 

KORET OF CALIFORNIA recently Introduced an 
extensive "Color Fusion" line for Fall 1958 at three 
regional sales meetings. A new departure in color 
coordination, the entire line centers on six colors, 
so that more than 140 separates and dresses can be 
mix-matched. . . . 

PACIFIC INTERMOUNTAIN EXPRESS recently 
opened the doors of its new building at 14th and 
Clay Streets in Oakland after transferring its gen- 
eral offices from 299 Adeline Street to the down- 
town center. . . . 

WELLS FARGO BANK, oldest in the West, re- 
cently opened its new office in the Fairway Park 
Shopping Center, Hayward. Rae Waite is Man- 
ager. . . . 

HOWARD EATON has been appointed Executive 
Director for "September is Canned Foods Month." 
a nation-wide promotion by the multi-billion-dollar 
canned foods industry, according to M. A. Cleven- 
ger. Management Committee Chairman represent- 
ing the Industry. . . . 

THE INTERNATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION, 

San Francisco, is a break-through in the bewilder- 
ing complexity of organizations facing scientists 
from overseas when visiting the United States." 
according to the NEW ZEALAND SCIENCE 
REVIEW 



STANDARD OIL COMPANY OF CALIFORNIA'S 

net earnings for 1957 totaled $288,230,391, or 
$4.65 a share, compared to $267,890,801, or $4.24 
a share in 1956. . . . 

KSFR, the San Francisco Bay Region's twelfth FM 
station, recently began operations at 94.9 mega- 
cycles and features "good taste and variety" daily 
from 8 a.m. to 12:00 midnight. . . . 

PERSONAL FINANCE, an evening course in the 
management of money. Is offered Wednesdays at 
7 p.m. by the University of California Business 
Administration Extension at the Center, 55 Laguna 

Street. . . . 

JOHN PINCETICH, Matson Lines' Public Relations 
Director in Hawaii, has succeeded Bernard Clayton, 
Jr., as Public Relations Director In San Francisco. 
Clayton has been elected Executive Vice President 
of P. K. Macker & Co., Public Relations, San Fran- 
cisco, . . . 

UNITED AIR LINES' air freight volume out of SaR 
Francisco International Airport in February was up 
an impressive 22.5 per cent over the same month 
a year ago, according to District Sales Manager 
H. E. Morley. . . . 

SECOND GRAND NATIONAL WORLD'S CHAM- 
PION Jumper Sweepstakes, with $17,000 in prizes. 
will highlight the 1958 Grand National Horse Show 
at the Cow Palace Oct. 31 -Nov. 9. according to 
Fred Parr Cox. horse show chairman. . . . 

WESTERN GIFT & HOUSEWARES ASSN. has ex- 
panded to include gift buyers and sellers, coordi- 
nating activities on the 2nd and 4th floors of the 
Western Merchandise Mart, including a monthly 
luncheon, to be under the direction of Don Weg- 
ener of Wagener & Swanson. . . . 

W. C. MAINWARINS, President of Western De- 
velopment and Power, will be General Chairman 
of the Fourth Western Area Development Confer- 
ence to be held in Vancouver May 27-29 under the 
sponsorship of Stanford Research Institute to ex- 
plore the theme "New Products and New Industries 
Through Research." . . . 

TWENTY EXTRA-HEAVY DEPRESSED-CENTER 

railroad flat-cars, each capable of carrying loads of 
125 tons, are being built on Southern Pacific's 
freight-car assembly line at Houston. Texas, the 
largest order ever placed by any American railroad 

for such equipment. . . . 

SHIP DEPARTURES from the Port of San Francisco 
during March averaged 36 vessels a week, to total 
IS4 by month's end, according to Port Traffic Man- 
ager Jeff H. Myers. . . . 

KRON-TV has been awarded an Honorable M«n- 
t.on in the WBC 1957 Radio-Television Historical 
Award Competition for "Sir Francis Drake in Cali- 
fornia." part of the SCIENCE IN ACTION series. 
according to Tom Mullahey. Director of Public 
Affairs 



Friday, April II, 1958 



Repair Program for 
Aquarium Is Backed 

Proposition "A" on San Francisco's June 
ballot, which would provide Sl.575.000 to re- 
pair the 35-year-old Steinhart Aquarium in 
Golden Gate Park, has been given the unani- 
mous support of the Board of Directors of the 
Chamber, according to G. L. Fox. General 
Manager. 

The action followed recommendations of 
the Civic Development Committee, with Alan 
K. Browne. President of the Chamber. Chair- 
man, and the Capital Improvement and Land 
Use Section. Raymond D. Smith. Chairman. 

A major project in the repair program 
would be a S237.000 plastic pipeline more 
than 31/2 miles long to replace the present 
badly-corroded ocean pipeline. 

Inadequate Insurance 
Rates to Be Discussed 

J. Dewey Dorsett. General Manager of the 
Association of Casualty and Surety Compa- 
nies. New York, will talk on inadequate in- 
surance rates and their effect on companies, 
agents and the insuring public next Friday, 
noon, at a luncheon at the San Francisco Com- 
mercial Club, sponsored by the Chamber. 
Board of Fire Underwriters of the Pacific and 
Commercial Club. The title of his address is 
"Time to be Bold!" 

The luncheon is in observance of the sev- 
enth annual San Francisco Insurance Day and 
the 52nd anniversary of the San Francisco 
conflagration. 



April I I — CANCCOCE LUNCHEON — Fairmcr- 
Ho*el— 12:30 P.M. 

April 12 — CACOM BOARD OF DIRECTORS 
MEETING— Directors Room, Room 200, Chamber, 
10:00 a.m. 

April 16— RETAIL MERCHANTS ASSOCIATION 
BOARD MEETING— Press Club, 555 Post Street, 
8:00 a.m., Brea^f^st Meeting. 

April 18— 2ND CENTURY CLUB — Cruise of bay 
aboard Commodore Dan E. London's ADVENTUR- 
ESS, 4 p.m. 

April 18— INSURANCE DAY LUNCHEON— Com 
mercial Club, 465 California Street. 12:00 noon. 
Speaker; J. Dewey Dorsett, General Manager, As- 
sociation of Casualty and Surety Companies, New 
York: "Time to Be Bold!" 

April 20— GOLDEN FLEET FIRST ANNUAL PRESS 
DAY— 2-4 p.m. 

April 22— AGRICULTURAL MEETING— Ci;ft No- 
te Redv/ood Room, 12:00 noon. 
April 24— BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING— 
Comm^-rial C ub 465 Caiiforria Street, 12:15 p.r-,. 
April 24— BUSINESS EDUCATION DAY — 9 an-,. 
to I p.m. 



PROGRESSOGRAM NO. 37 



Bethlehem Building Giant Tankers 




TWIN TANKERS— each will be 661 feet long, 90 feet wide, 45 feet deep 



San Francisco's downtown building boom has a counterpart in the shipping 
industry. 

Shown above on the building ways at Bethlehem Pacific's San Francisco 
shipyard are two 32,650-ton tankers, largest vessels ever constructed in a pri- 
vate yard on the Pacific Coast and the first to be built on the Coast with 
private capital since 1929. 

Each is 661 feet long, 90 feet wide and 45 feet deep; each has 30 compart- 
ments with a total barrel capacity of 280,466. Pumping equipment will enable 
the unloading of oil completely in only 12 hours. The main propulsion machinery 
will consist of 15,000 shaft horsepower geared steam turbines driving a single 
propeller. 

The vessel at the left, with 65-to-70 per cent of its hull erected, is being built 
for Albatross Tanker Corp. She is scheduled to be launched early this June 
with delivery set for late October. 

The tanker at the right is being built for Nautilus Petroleum Carriers Corp. 
She is scheduled to be launched in August of this year and delivered in late 
November. 

About two weeks after the tankers are launched, keels for two more will be 
laid on the same ways. 

•4 regular feature . . . osk the Chamber for KeprlnU: EXbrook 2-4S!I. Ext. 13 or 14, Research Dept. 



REGION 'SrUSTH'ESS 



SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER Of COMMERCE 



ALAN K. BUOWNE, Pre»id«nl 

C. L. FOX, General Mameer 

M. A. HOCAN. Sfcrtlarr 

JAMES D. WARNOCK, Executive Editor 

JOSEPH I. HAUGHEY. Editor 



Published every oilier week by the 
of Commerce at 333 Pine St.. ! 



1 Franci 
Franci 



Cha 



ConntT of San Francisco. California. Teleohone EXbrook 
2.4S1I. (Non-member lubicriotion. $3.00 a rear.) Entered 
•■ Second Qasi matter Aoril 26. 1944. at the Post DGBee at 
San Francisco. California, under the act of March 3. 1879. 
Circu/iULon: 7,500 thit uaue 



BAY REGION 

SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 




SINESS 



VOLUME 15 • NUMBER 9 • APRIL 25. 1958 



Gift Sent to S.F.'s 
'Sister-City' Osaka 



8th Annual Education-Business Day 
Breaks Previous Attendance Records 




SAN FRANCISCO'S GIFT TO OSAKA, selected by the Art Commission and presented by Dwight 
Tripp, III, mission leader and official city representative on the current second annual business develop- 
ment tour of the Far East of the San Francisco Area World Trade Association of the Chamber, is "Cali- 
fornia Landscape" by Emmy Lou Packard. Left to right are Phillips Davies. Chairman of the San Fran- 
cisco-Osaka affiliation program, Tripp, George Pottorff of Pan American World Airways which flew gift 
and members of tour to Japan, and Mayor George Christopher. After warm receptions in Tokyo, Osa- 
ka, Manila, and Hong Kong, the mission will return to San Francisco on May 2 via Japan Air Lines. 



More than 900 businessmen — largest num- 
ber in the history of the event — visited San 
Francisco schools yesterday during the eightli 
annual Education-Business Day, according to 
Gene K. Walker. Chairman of the Business- 
Education Committee of the Chamber. 

Thirly-nine elementary schools, fifteen jun- 
ior high schools, nine high schools, eight spe- 
cial schools and department.s. City College of 
San Francisco, San Francisco College for 
Women and two parochial high schools hosted 
San Francisco's businessmen. 

The highly successful community event was 
pioneered by the Chamber. San Francisco is 
the first major U. S. city to annually sponsor 
the event, which brings together two highly 
important elements of the city — businessmen 
and educators. 

"International developments in the past 
year have shown us how vital to America's 
future are teachers, students and the educa- 
tional i)rocess," Alan K. Browne, President of 
tile Ciiamber. pointed out. 

"For eight years the Chamber and San 
Francisco schools have brought together busi- 
ness and civic leaders and educators. This 
year the event took on new importance." 

Education-Business Day is a highlight of 
National Public Schools Week. 

On Business-Education Day, held during 
the Fall of each year, teachers are the guest-s 
of business firms in a reciprocal event spon- 
sored by the Chamber. 



Gardiner Symonds 'Invest in America' Week Speaker 



Gardiner Symonds, President and a Director of the Tennessee Gas Transuii.s- 
sion Company with headquarters in Houston, will address the Invest in America 
Week luncheon in the Garden Court of the Sheraton-Palace Hotel Monday noon, 
according to Alan K. Browne, President of the Chamber. 



Symonds has been chief executive official of 
Tennessee since it was 
formed in 1943. The 
company owns and op- 
erates the longest and 
one of the nation's larg- 
est natural gas transmis- 
sion systems, its lines 
stretching some 2200 
miles from So\ith Texas 
to the northeastern 
states. The firm, which 
has assets of more than 
one billion dollars, also 
has an integrated oil 
(Company operation, witli production, refining 
and marketing, produces liipiid natural gas 
hydrocarbons, and manufactures petrochemi- 
cals. 

Symonds received his B..\. in geology from 
Stanford University and his M.B..\. with dis- 




Gardlner Syn 



CAPITAL IS THE JACK OF ALL TRADES 



P^ 


D D D 
D □ D 


% 






$; M 



AMERICA WEEK 



tinction from the Harvard t'.raduate .'^chool of 
Business .\dminislration. 

He is a director of many outstanding com- 
panies, including Southern I'acific and Food 



Machinery and Chemical Corp. 

The luncheon is sponsored by the Northern 
('alifornia Invest in .\merica Committee, of 
which Carl F. Wente, Chairman of the Execu- 
tive Committee. Bank of .\merica N.T. & S.A.. 
is General Chairman. Cooperating are the 
Chamber. Investment Bankers Association 
(California Group). Security .Analysts of San 
Francisco, Pacific Coast Stock Exchange. San 
Francisco Real Estate Board, and San Fran- 
cisco Life Underwriters Assn. 

Co-chairmen of the luncheon are Charles 
Harkins. \ ice President. Blyth & Co., and 
Dennis H. McCarthy, Vice President, The 
First Boston Corporation. 

Reservations can be made bv calling the 
Chamber, EXbrook 2-1511, 

Regional Problem Study 

Creation of a Regional Problem Section as 
a unit of the Civic Development Committee of 
the Chamber has been announced by .\lan K. 
Browne, President, also chairman of tlie com- 
mittee. 



Friday. April 25. 1958 



S. F. Business Activity For March 
Was 7.6 Per Cent Above February 

Business activity in San Francisco during March — one of the wettest months 
in local history — rose 7.6 per cent above February, according to the Chamber's Re- 
search Department. 

First quarter activity topped all previous similar periods except the record 
first quarter of last year which was 2.6 per cent higher. 



The index of business activity in March 
amounted to 149.1 compared to 138.6 in 
February and 151.0 in March of last year; the 
three-month average amounted to 147.5 com- 
pared to 151.5 a year ago. 

Construction authorized in San Francisco 
surged ahead with a March total of 113.888,- 
137 or 79 per cent above last year and a 
cumulative total of S23.287,915 or 47 per cent 
above last year. 

March permits included three large proj- 
ects, $7,858,826 for the Jack Tar West hotel 
and office building at Van Ness Avenue and 
Geary Street; $778,000 for the eight-story 
office building addition to the California State 
Automobile Association headquarters on Van 
Ness Avenue; and $1,250,000 for the second 
unit of the 5th and Mission Streets parking 
garage. 

New residential permits authorized in San 
Francisco were 2%, times those of last March, 
providing for 204 dwelling units. Sixty-eight 
were in single-family types, 14 in two-family 
and 122 in multi-family structures. 

New housing authorized in March in the 
nine-county Bay Area was 34 per cent above 
a year ago. There were 3,023 dwelling units 
provided for compared to 1.635 in February 
and 2.271 in March last year. The first quarter 
total of 7,288, was 11 per cent ahead of a year 
ago. 

March financial transactions in the Bay Re- 
gion — measured by bank debits reported by 
seven cities — San Francisco, Oakland, Berk- 
eley, San Jose. Santa Rosa. Sacramento and 
Stockton — gained 1.1 per cent with a total of 
$6,187,698,000. The three-month cumulative 
of $18,916,479,000 was off only 0.1 per cent 
from last year. 

San Francisco's first quarter bank debits 
amounted to $11,837,649,000. down 3.1 per 
cent from last year's high. Bank clearings in 
San Francisco slipped only 0.3 per cent below 
last year's first quarter, amounting to $8,354.- 
366,000. The number of commercial failures 
in San Francisco during the first three months 
was down to 26 compared to 47 in the same 
period last year. The market value of the 
shares traded on the Pacific Coast Stock Ex- 
change in March increased 3.3 per cent, but 
the number of transactions dropped 14.1 per 
cent. 

Retail department store sales in San Fran- 
cisco held up exceptionally well. During 
March sales were up 4 per cent in San Fran- 
cisco compared to the similar period a year 
ago, 3 per cent in the six-county Metropolitan 
Area and 1 per cent in the 12th District and 
off 1 per cent in the Los Angeles Metropolitan 
Area. Comparisons for the cumulative period 
(January-Marcli) showed San Francisco off 2 
per cent, the Metropolitan Area off 2 per cent, 
and Los Angeles 3 per cent. 

Merchant wholesalers sales on the Pacific 
Coast slipped 6 per cent against 10 per cent 



in the nation during February and the first 
two months. End-of-month inventories, at cost, 
in February were down 6 per cent on the 
Pacific Coast compared to 5 per cent in Janu- 
ary. Sales for the first two months of 1958 
compared to the similar period last year were 
up 4 per cent in wholesale general line gro- 
ceries, 5 per cent in dry goods, 1 per cent 
in drugs. 8 per cent in tobacco and 1 per cent 
in fresh fruits and vegetables, but were off 
5 per cent in furniture and house furnishings, 
18 per cent in lumber and construction and 
11 per cent in industrial machinery. Hard- 
ware tied last year. 

Employment in the six-county metropolitan 
area rose slightly in March to 1,056,500, com- 




J F M A M J J 



S O N 



pared to the February low of 1,053,100 — but 
was 1.6 per cent below March of last year 
despite the fact that no losses were registered 
in five out of ten industrial groups. Industrial 
groups in March exceeding a year ago were: 
service, with 245.700, up 3.1 per cent; trans- 
portation, communications and utilities, 117,- 
100, up 3.2 per cent; government (federal, 
state, local) 91,700, up 0.5 per cent; agricul- 
ture 15.900. up 1.5 per cent; and wholesale 
trade, 79,400, up 1.5 per cent. 



Business AcHyit-y 

BRANCH OF ACTIVITY 
•GENERAL BUSINESS ACTIVITY INDEX. _. 


Throu 


gh March, 

MARCH 7o from 
1958 1957 

149.1 —1.3 

861 —5.4 

13,888,137 79.1 

10 076,991 753.3 

204 124.2 

68 -^.2 

2,701,498 —17.5 

1,109,648 — *0.3 

3.023 33.7 

1,523 0.5 

108 3.8 

3,954,038 —3.6 
2,396,402 —10.0 
2,347.464 —14.1 
49.020,315 3.3 
2,808,215 —0.2 

10 —28.6 

l,056,500(p) —1.6 

95.55(a) 0.6 

203,000(p) —6.2 

62,l00(p) —8.9 

6e,300(p) -0.3 

I70,900(p) —0.6 

79,400(p 0.0 

245,700(p) 3.1 

Il7,100(p) 3.2 

I5,900(p) 1.5 

9l,700(p) 0.5 

2,400(p) -4.0 

12,083 -14.3 

9,771 —2.3 

240, 365(a) 6.6 

2, 881, 023(a) 8.4 

558.976(a) —26.2 

5,935,65l(a) 6.0 

68,302 —14.1 

156.9 1.4 

49,222 -5.6 

458,672 —5.5 
6,106 —53.7 
33,597 49.7 
161,507 —16.6 
257.460 0.7 

403 1 .2 
1,955,095 2.8 

1,511,954,000 0.9 4 
158 2.6 
155.349,000 2.2 

1,918 13.2 
2.952,580 4.1 
1.296,004 4.9 

3,249 15.5 

84,000(a) —15.2 

124.8(c) 2.6 

ths average: (c) Decembe 
able upon request. 


1958 

3 MOS. 
1958 

147.5 

2,418 

23,287,915 

13,405,840 

526 

178 

5,335,750 

4,546.325 

7,288 

4,318 

102 

1 1 ,837,649 
7,295,451 
7,078,880 
143,864,129 
8,354,366 

26 

l,O57,20O(p) 
95.73(b) 
203.967(p) 
61.633(p) 
68,300(p) 
I71,833(p) 
79.733(p) 
244,533(p) 
I17,467(p) 
15700(p) 
91,567(p) 
2,567(p) 

32,925 

20,842 

507,65 Kb) 

5,926,307(b) 

I,288,.ii2(b) 

II, 526, 095(b) 

194 032 

149.3 

133,951 

1.359.325 

13,492 

82,969 

497,121 

765,753 

1,100 
5,315,357 

,834,890,500 

161 

463,282,000 

5.120 
8,285,916 
3,639,856 

9,529 

I89,000{b) 


% from 
1957 

—2.6 


CONSTRUCTION PERMITS. .... _ _ 


..Total Number 

Value 

Value 


—8.6 


Residential, New 


47.4 
352.9 


Dwelling Units _ _ 


Number 


102.3 


Single-familv iinih; New 
Non-residential, New _..._ 


Number 

Vslue 


2.3 
—24.2 


Additions, Alterations and Repairs .. 

Nine county dwelling units authorized- 

REAL ESTATE— Deeds Recorded _ . . 


Value 

Number 

Nnmher 


-21.8 
10.9 

—6.0 


•RETAIL DEPARTMENT STORE SALES _ 

FINANCE— Bank Debits __ 


Index 

_ $000 


-2.9 
—3.1 


Postal Receipts _ 


$ 


—4.5 


Pacific Coast Stock Exchange _ 


..Shares traded 
Market values 
_■_. $000 


— II.O 
-6.8 
-0.3 


COMMERCIAL FAILURES _ _ 


Number 


—44.7 


INDUSTRY TREND— 6 County Total Employment.. . .. 




— 1.5 


Mfg. Average Weekly Earnings _ 

Manufacturing 


(earnings) 

_(employment) 

Number 

_ Number 


1.7 
—5.6 


Construction, contract .. ; 


-12.2 
0.1 




-0.1 


Whnlpsnip trnrlp 


1.0 


!;ervlre 


3.2 


Trans., comm., & utilities _ 

Agriculture _ . . . 


-2.5 
-0.2 


Govt.— Federal, state, city _ _. 

Other 


0.4 
—2.5 


TRANSPORTATION— Freight car movement. 

S. F. Airport— Planes In and Out 

Passengers Off and On _ __ _ _. 


-6.0 

— 18.6 

8.2 


Air Mail Loaded and Unloaded _ 


Lbs. 

...Lbs. 


—21.5 


Air Freight Loaded and Unloaded _ 


Lbs. 

._ Number 


—13.2 


•Truck Movements— S. F. Area 




0.0 


Out-of-State passenger car entries into No. Calif.. 
PORT OF SAN FRANCISCO— Revenue Tons 


Number 

Total 


— 1.3 
—14.8 


Coastwise _ _ . _. 




—60.8 


Intercoastal ..„_ _ 




-20.5 






— 19.4 






—8.7 


CARGO VESSELS (San Francisco Bay) 

Arrivals 


Number 


— 1.9 






-0.9 


UTILITIES-lnd. & Comm. Gas Sales.— __ _ 
*Elec. Energy Sales K.W. Hours _ 


Cu. Ft. 

Index 


0.4 
3.2 




Cu. Ft. 


— 1.9 


NEW DEVELOPMENTS 

Visitor and Newcomer Inguiries ... 


Number 


15.0 




Number 


3.3 




Number 


5.2 


FRUITS & VEGETABLE RECEIPTS. 


Carlots 


13.9 


LIVESTOCK SLAUGHTER (Insp. Dists.) 


_ Number 


— 17.8 


•S. F. CONSUMER PRICE INDEX— All Items _ 






•Index Base (1947-49 Monthly Average = 100): (a) Feb 
liminary. Basic data sources not shown due to space lim 


ruary; (b) 2 mon 
tatlon, but aval 


Index latest: ( 


P) pre- 



RESEARCH DEPARTMENT. SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



Friday. April 25, 1958 



Hitting the High Spots 



with JIM WARNOCK 

WESTERN EMPIRE DIRECT ADVERTISING COM- 
PANY has appointed James Lovick & Co., Inc., San 
Francisco, as its advertising agency. . , . 

MID-AMERICA BROADCASTERS, INC. will con- 
struct new $100,000 studios and general offices for 
KOBY at 340 Mason, according to David M. Segal, 
President. . . . 

CAPITAL COMPANY, subsidiary of Transamerica 
Corporation, has moved Its head office to the 
Equitable Life Building, 120 Montgomery Street. 

"THE STORY OF CREATIVE CAPITAL", color and 
sound film produced by the Chamber of Com- 
merce of the United States, will be shown on 
KQED May 5. . . . 

WESTERN MERCHANDISE MART announces Its 
schedule of shows: Annual Western Toy, Juvenile 
& Wheel Goods Market, May 18-23; Western 
Summer Market, July 21-25; West Coast House- 
wares Show, August 3-5 and October 5-7. . . . 

INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITIES for banks, insur- 
ance companies, trust administrators, pension, uni- 
versity and union funds are offered in financing 
14 more lease-purchase projects of the General 
Service Administration Public Buildings Service, 
Washington 25, D.C. . . . 

ANTIOCH CONTAINER PLANT of FIbreboard 
Paper Products Corporation has received an award 
coveted throughout the California pulp and paper 
Industry — the State of California Governor's Safe- 
ty Trophy. . . . 

O. R. DOERR, Vice President of the Chamber and 
Vice President in Charge of Sales, Pacific Gas & 
Electric Company, will represent the Chamber 
and the City and County 
of San Francisco at the 
British Columbia centen- 
nial celebration in Victoria 
on Saturday, a highlight of 
which will be the arrival of 
a naval vessel representing 
the S. S. Commodore which 
arrived In Victoria from 
San Francisco on April 25, 
1858 with 450 miners as 
passengers, first of thous- 
ands. ... O. R. Doerr 

JACK D. GIESLER, Bank Specialist, General Fire- 
proofing Co., has been elected President of the 
Second Century Club of the Chamber. The or- 
ganization, dedicated to promoting the member- 
ship growth of the Chamber, takes its name from 
the second century of service to the community 
of the Chamber, founded in 1850. . . . 
LEWIS M. HOLLAND, Manager of the Industrial 
Department of the Chamber, has been elected 
National Vice President of the American Indus- 
trial Development Council at its convention just 
concluded in Atlanta. Holland will also call on 
twenty-five manufacturing firms In Denver, Chi- 
cago and New York which have expressed in- 
terest In locating new plants In the IS-county 
San Francisco Bay Region. . . . 
GORDON-HYMES & STAFF. INC., has been ap- 
pointed exclusive advertising representative for 
the DAV News, official newspaper of the Depart- 
ment of California, Disabled American Veterans. 

JOHN J. CONLON, Assistant Vice President, 
Wells Fargo Bank, has been appointed Chairman 
of the Fire Safety Section, Civic Development 
Committee of the Chamber, and Robert Lee St. 
Clair, Otis & Browne, Vice Chairman. Henry J. 
Degenkolb, consulting engineer, is again Chairman 
of the Building Code Section, Technical Projects 
Committee. . . . 




THE CHAMBER TOASTED THE BREWING IN- 
DUSTRY of California at a Cllft Hotel luncheon 
this week highlighting the California Beer Festival. 
Alan K. Browne, President of the Chamber, pre- 
sented a plaque saluting the industry's contribution 
to the economy of San Francisco and California. 
Brewing contributes directly to the livelihood of 
70,000 Californlans, pays $44 million in payrolls, 
$61 million in taxes. . . . 

AN UPTURN IN SUMMER INDUSTRIAL ACTIVITY 
has been predicted by Marcus J. Aurelius, Ad- 
ministrative Vice President of United States Steel 
Corp. . . . 

IVER C. LARSON, Executive Vice President of the 
National Safety Council, San Francisco Chapter, 
has been named Chairman of the Public Relations 
Committee of the Voluntary Community Vehicle 
Safety-Check Program to be held May 26-28, ir 
elusive, in San Francisco. John Sketchley, Supei 
visor. Safety Service, State Compensation Insui 
ance Fund, is Vice Chairman. Others on the corr 
mittee include: Henry E. Bennett, Post Safety D 
rector. The Presidio; Earl F. Campbell, Managing 
Director, California Traffic Safety Foundation 
Theodore S. Connolly, Public Relations Represen 
tatlve. National Automobile Club; Joseph Galvin 
Head of the Department of Driver Education 
S. F. Unified School District; and Joseph I 
Haughey, Assistant Manager, Publicity Department 
of the Chamber. . . . 

TWELFTH ANNUAL 91st INFANTRY DIVISION 
Spring Competition for San Francisco Public School 
R.O.T.C. will be held at 7:30 p.m., Friday, May 
2, In the Civic Auditorium. . . . 
STANFORD RESEARCH INSTITUTE has announced 
publication of "Canadian Resources, Part I," a 
volume of selected statistics relating to the natural 
resources and industrial development of Alberta, 
British Columbia, Manitoba and Saskatchewan. . . . 
MATSON HOTELS' new $500,000 Meeting House 
convention hall at the Princess Kalulani Hotel will 
be opened May I. . . . 

KTVU, San Francisco-Oakland television, treats its 
viewers to "good news flashes" as they develop, 
ranging from San Francisco Giants' victories to Im- 
portant Bay Area and national economic develop- 
ments. . . 

SAN FRANCISCO STATE COLLEGE will host edu- 
cators from all over the world at the inauguration 
of Dr. Glenn S. Dumke as sixth president of the 
school. . . . 

SANTA FE RAILWAY has established the fastest 
freight service in history between Chicago, Kansas 
City and California. . . . 

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES plant in 
San Jose, designed by John S. Bolles, has been 
named one of the top ten plants of the year by 
the editors of FACTORY. . . . 
RICHARD LYMAN ABBOH will be the new presi- 
dent of Sherman, Clay & Company starting August 
I. Clay Sherman will serve as chairman of the board 
of directors and chairman of the finance com- 
mittee. . . . 

JACK R. WALN, formerly director of publicity 
and public relations at John O'Rourke Advertising, 
Inc., has established his own firm under the name 
of Jack Wain & Company, specializing in services 
for industry, finance and professional groups, 25 
O'Farrell, YUkon 2-8955. . . . 

MATSON NAVIGATION COMPANY has estab- 
lished Its first sales promotion office in the South- 
west in Dallas, Tex. . . . 

CENTRAL COAST COUNCIL of the California 
State Chamber of Commerce recently approved 
$50 million of San Francisco Harbor Improvement 
Bonds and $10 million for Small Craft Harbor 
Development. . . . 

BROOKS CAMERAS, SAN FRANCISCO has re- 
ceived an award in the Brand Names Foundation's 
Tenth Annual Brand Name Rotaller-of-the-Year 
Competition for presenting manufacturers' adver- 
tised brands to the public during. 1957. . . . 



^i^ 


9^ ' 'i i 


m 






* 



100 YEARS OF SERVICE to San Francisco by the 
Aetna Life Insurance Company was honored at 
the April 18 Insurance Day luncheon commemo- 
rating the fifty-second anniversary of the fire and 
earthquake. Left to right are J. Dewey Dorsett, 
General Manager of the Association of Casualty 
and Surety Companies, New York, principal speak- 
er, Alan K. Browne, President of the Chamber, and 
C. M. Marshall, Vice President and Manager. Aetna 
Insurance Group. 



MacDONALD. YOUNG & NELSON, INC., general 

contractors, have started a major remodeling job 
at the San Francisco Commercial Club. The project, 
which will cost more than $160,000 will involve all 
four of the floors which the famed club occupies 
In the Merchants Exchange Building. . . . 

ALASKA FREIGHT LINES, through their California 
agents, William Dimond & Co., recently inaugu- 
rated a new and unique regular van-barge freight 
service from San Francisco direct to Anchorag-- 
Alaska. . . . 

DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE RESERVE AWARD, 

highest recognition given to civilian agencies which 
coopeiate with Armed Forces Reserve activities, 
has been presented to International Business Ma- 
chines Corporation. . . . 

LEGISLATIVE APPROVAL OF A $60 MILLION 

self-liquidating bond fund for state harbor develop- 
ment has been hailed by legislators and maritime 
officials as a "pay as you go" answer to the 
State's need for new facilities to serve waterborne 
traffic from outboard motorboats to ocean liners. 
The measure will appear on the State ballot next 
November 4 for approval by the voters. . . . 

SAN FRANCISCO REGIONAL OFFICE of the 

Post Office Department invites applications for the 
positions of Real Estate Officer and Real Estate 
Technician, YUkon 6-311 I, E.t. 756. . . . 

YOU AUTO BUY NOW Campaign ot the Motor 
Car Dealers Assn. of San Francisco is a huge 
success In stimulating the whole economy of the 
San Francisco Bay Region, according to Earl C. 
Dahlem. member of the executive committee and 
Chamber Director, and has 
spread to many other fields 
of rotailing on the Penin- 
sula and throughout north- 
ern California. The Cham- 
ber recently co-sponsored a 
business improvement 
luncheon with the Associa- 
tion, which employs 7000. 
One Out of sii businesses 
is connected with the in- 
dustry. One out of seven 
people in the U. S. de- 
pends on the industry for 
Earle C. Dahlem his livelihood. Dahlem said. 




Friday, April 25, 1958 



More Than 153 
Foreign Officials 
Headquartered Here 

The official corps of consular, trade, infor- 
mation and tourist representatives of other 
countries in San Francisco now totals more 
than 153, according to the list of "Official 
Representatives of Other Nations in the San 
Francisco Area," published this week by the 
World Trade Department of the Chamber. 

More representatives of other nations now 
make their headquarters in San Francisco 
than in any U. S. city other than Washington 
and New York. A total of 56 countries are 
represented by consuls general and consuls; 
28 offices maintain trade commissioners, com- 
mercial attaches and consuls, and commercial 
vice consuls; 24 countries have official infor- 
mation and travel representatives; and seven 
countries are represented by semi-official 
chambers of commerce and trade centers. 

All consuls general, commercial attaches, 
trade commissioners and commercial consuls 
and vice consuls resident in the Bay Area are 
honorary members of the San Francisco A^ea 
World Trade Association. 

Canal Toll Bill Backed 

Legislation now before Congress which 
would allow merchant marine training ships 
toll-free passage through the Panama Canal 
has been given the unanimous support of the 
Chamber, according to Alan K. Browne, Pres- 
ident. 

The action followed the recommendation of 
the Legislative and National Affairs Section 
of the Chamber. Vincent Cullinan, Chairman. 



April 25— LEGISLATIVE & NATIONAL AFFAIRS 

SECTION— Directors Room, Room 200, Chamber. 
I 1:00 a.m. 

April 28— GREAT GOLDEN FLEET BAY CRUISE 
FOR INTERNATIONAL PRESS INSTITUTE 
April 28— INVEST IN AMERICA LUNCHEON— 
Garden Court of ttie Sheraton Palace Hotel— 12 
noon — Speaker: Gardiner Symonds. President and 
Director. Tennessee Gas & Transmission Co. 
April 29— LEGISLATIVE & NATIONAL AFFAIRS 
SECTION— Directors Room, Room 200, Chamber, 
3:00 p.m. 

April 30— STREET, HIGHWAY & BRIDGE SEC- 
TION— Directors Room, Room 200, Chamber, 10:30 
a.m. Agenda: Senate Constitutional Amendment. 
May 2— INTER CITY SECTION & GREAT GOLDEN 
FLEET CRUISE TO STOCKTON. 



Large Manufacturers' 
Directory Issued 






International Press Group To Be Hosted 
By 'Great Golden Fleet' of The Chamber 

Eighty-five members of the International Press Institute, now touring the country, will be 
cruise guests of the Great Golden Fleet of the Chamber Monday. 

The group of journalists, representing 
Turkey. Swtizerland. the United Kingdom, 
Sweden. Pakistan. Norway. Netherlands, Jap- 
an, Germany. France. Finland. Denmark. Cey- 
lon and Austria, will arirve Sunday. 1:45 p.m.. 
at International Airport and will stay at the 
St. Francis Hotel. 

Monday's two-hour cruise of the Bay will 
begin at 10:30 a.m. 

The IPI, the equivalent of the American 
Society of Newspaper Editors with a member- 
ship of 870, largely from Europe and Asia, 
held its 1958 meeting April 15 in Washington. 
D. C. 

Another important junket is scheduled Fri- 
day. May 2. by the Great Golden Fleet, the 
biennial Goodwill Cruise to Stockton under- 
taken by the Inter-City Section of the Cham- 
ber. 

Total cost for this cruise, including lunch, 
refreshments, dinner and return transporta- 
tion is $10.50. without return transportation. 
$7.50. according to Sidney H. Keil. Manager 
of the Domestic Trade Department. All Cham- 
ber members are invited to join the cruise. 

The Inter -City Section also visited the 
Peninsula cities of Redwood City. Palo Alto. 
Santa Cruz, Sunnyvale. Mountain View and 
San Jose last Wednesday with Dave Plant, 
Chairman of one group and Emmett Fitzpat- 
rick, of another. 



A revised directory of large manufacturers 
in the San Francisco Bay Region listing firms 
with more than 75 employees has just been 
issued by the Domestic Trade Department of 
the Chamber. 

More than 700 companies in the 13-county 
Bay Region are listed along with headquarters 
locations and information on company opera- 
tions. 

San Francisco County with 210 manufactur- 
ers tops the list. Alameda with 186 is next. 
Santa Clara with 80 is third. 

Copies at $1.00 each to Chamber members 
and $2.00 to others are available at the Cham- 
ber. 



Small Business Confab 
Backed by The Chamber 

Full support of the Small Business Oppor- 
tunity Conference, scheduled by the Federal 
Government's Small Business Administration 
October 30 in the San Francisco Civic Audito- 
rium, has been unanimously pledged by the 
Board of Directors of the Chamber. 

Action followed the recommendation of the 
Small Business Committee of the Chamber. 
Roy P. Cole, Chairman. 

Seminars for local manufacturers and 
wholesalers on market opportunities that exist 
in selling to prime contractors and to branch- 
es of the Federal government and seminars on 
methods of selling and distribution are 
planned. 

The Chamber Small Business Committee 
expects an attendance of from 2.000 to 3.000 
business and military participants. 



Other directories recently issued by the 
Chamber include the San Francisco Merchant 
Wholesalers and Branch Sales Offices Direc- 
tory ($2.50 to members, 15.00 to others), 
Manufacturers in San Francisco ( $2.00 to 
members, $5.00 to others). Consulting Engi- 
neers and Architects ($1.00). Product Poten- 
tial Survey (free), and the San Francisco Im- 
porters and Exporters Directory (free to mem- 
bers, $1.50 to others). 



S. F. Australia Trade 
Potential "Untapped" 

"There is a wealth of untapped trade be- 
tween San Francisco and New South Wales, 
the richest state in Australia," James J. 
Cahill, Premier and Colonial Treasurer of 
New South Wales, told members of the San 
Francisco Area World Trade Association of 
the Chamber during a luncheon meeting today 
in the San Francisco Room of the Fairmont 
Hotel. 

"At present Australian trade markets sup- 
ply us with mineral ores, wool and animal 
products and buy lumber, machinery and 
vehicles from us." 

Cahill heads the New South Wales Trade 
Development Mission to North America. 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



ALAN K. BROWNE, President 

C. L. FOX. Central Manager 

M. A. HOCAN. Secretary 

JAMES D. WARNOCK, Executive Editor 

JOSEPH I. HAUGHEY. Editor 

Publiihed every otlier week by the San Franci.co Cliamher 

oj Commerce al 33J Pine St.. San Francijco. Zone 4. 

CoimtT of San Francisco. California. Teleohone EXbrook 

2,4511. (Non-member tiibicriolion. $3.00 a year.) Entered 

•• Second Clan mailer Aoril 26. 1944. at the Poll Office al 

San Franeiaco, California, under the act of March 3. 1879. 

Circulation: 7,500 thit i»Mum 



FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



VOLUME 15 • NUMBER 10 • MAY 9. 1958 



SoH^piaact^cuta 



The San Francisco Chamber of Commerce 
— oldest chamber in the West — observes its 
anniversary today — 108 years of service to the 
San Francisco and Bay Region business and 
civic communities. 

"Instituted before California obtained state- 
hood, the Chamber has been intimately con- 
nected with the expansion and development 
of commerce, industry and business in San 
Francisco almost since the beginning of the 
city's history," Alan K. Browne, President of 
the Chamber said. 

"As the senior commercial body of the 
Pacific Coast, the Chamber has been and 
must always be instantly aware and respon- 
sive to the significance of problems and op- 
portunities regarding the city and the region 
as they arise." 

According to an early chronicler of San 
Francisco history, "The year of grace 1850 
saw the birth of the Chamber which may be 
said to have been incarnated first by the cry- 
ing necessity of the hour." 

The first recorded interest in the formation 
of the Chamber came in a notice in the San 
Francisco ALTA CALIFORNIA of August, 
'49, announcing a meeting at the old school- 
house on the Plaza. 

San Francisco at that time was "a town of 
social turmoil where thousands of dollars 
nightly changed hands on the turn of a dice, 
where riot stalked broadcast through the 
streets and each member of the community 
was a law unto himself and the gun his final 
argument and verdict," the chronicler re- 
ported. 

The Chamber, bent on bringing law into 
the business life of the city, became, in its 
own words, "a committee of arbitration and 
appeals." It was so successful in its role of 
referee that a Chamber official was able to 
say later "no record of any appeal ever was 
made from the decision of the body." 

At a meeting in the Merchant's Exchange 
Building May 9. 18.S0, following the earlier 
organizational meeting in the city's first school- 
house, William Hooper was elected the first 
Chamber president. Among the first commit- 
teemen appointed was the colorful Sam Bran- 
nan, publisher of the city's first newspaper, 
THE STAR, and leader of the first Gold Rush 
to Sutter's millrace on the American River. 

Other original officials included Gabriel B. 
Post, later a State Senator; Talbot H. Green, 
a candidate for mayor in 1851; and J. W, 
Osborne, credited with being the first fruit 
grower in Napa Valley. 

The day the Chamber was officially or- 
ganized, coincidenlally, also was the day the 
city's civil government was formed, accord- 
ing to Colville's Directory, published in 1856. 

Early Chamber campaigns included the 
arbitration of commercial disputes, a vigorous 
and successful program to install lighthouse 
service at such places as Point Lobos, Point 



CHAMBER BEGINS ITS I09TH HISTORIC YEAR 

lis Birth ^Incarnated by C.ryinf; \pr*»««ily of The Hour 




BIRTHPLACE OF THE CHAMBER was fhe city's ^rst school house erected on the Plaia 
(later renanned Portsmouth Square) in 1847, Meetings here in August of 1849 to curb 
lawless and chaotic business conditions led to the formation of the Chamber. 



Ano Nuevo. Pigeon Point, Point Arena and 
Cape Blanco, the building of harbor fortifi- 
cations, the promotion of transcontinental 
railroad service (Chamber officials attended 
the Golden Spike celebration I and support of 
a simplified bankruptcy act. Greatest cam- 
paign in the early days was a battle against 
the 1852 "Bulkhead Bill" which would have 
denied the public the right to its own water- 
front. 

"The bulkhead gentlemen tried all sorts of 
things which the Chamber failed completely 
to grasp the meaning of, and then intimida- 
tion," a reporter reflected, "and TH.\T was 
a fatal mistake. 

"The men who had established law and 
order out of the chaos of 1849 were scarcely 



SAM BRANNAN, Publisher of THE STAR. 
San Francisco's first newspaper whose pub- 
licity gave impetus to the Gold Rush, was 
a member of one of the 
first committees ever 
formed by the Chamber 
when it was organized 
May 9, 1850. He also 
was one of the first pres- 
idents of the Society of 
California Pioneers. 

Brannan's name is list- 
ed in the San Francisco 
ALTA CALIFORNIA of 
May 7, 1850 on the 
"standing committee for 
May." 




the sort of men to be moved by these methods 
... so the people got their waterfront and 
all rights pertaining thereto preserved for 
them forever after through the determination 
and justice of the Chamber of Commerce." 

In the following years, the Chamber took 
a bold stand on each issue it faced in shaping 
the financial fate of the growing community. 
It brought about enactment of laws establish- 
ing pilot regulations for the i«irt, agitated 
for local fortifications, urged annexation of 
the Hawaiian Islands and played a vital role 
in the development of the railroads, shipping, 
and lighthouse, postal and revenue services. 

Prior to the turn of the century, the Cham- 
ber agitated for cable communications between 
the Pacific Coast, the islands of the Pacific, 
the Australian colonies. New Zealand and the 
Orient, improvement of the form of govern- 
ment in Alaska, fostering of the beet-sugar 
industry in the I'nited States, extension of 
the San Francisco seawall, establishment of a 
naval training service in the Bay, improved 
transportation, and navigation and a thousand- 
and-one interests involved in community bet- 
terment. 

.■\fter 1900. the Chamber's next 25 years of 
activity invnlvi-d ci\ic leadership in recover- 
ing from tlie I'XXi tire and earth(|uake. im- 
provement of the waterfront. dee|>eninp and 
widening of the Oakland Harlxtr channel, 
construction of tor|M-<lo lioats on the Pacific 
Coast, improved trans|)ortation via the Isth- 
mian Canal; improvements of the Sacramento 
iind San Joaipiin rivi-rs. improvement of bar- 
(Turn lo paicr ihrrv) 



Friday. May 9, 1958 



Directors Unanimously Back Harbor Development Bond 



Support of the Port of San Francisco Har- 
bor Development Bond Law on the November 
ballot has ben reaffirmed unanimously by tlie 
Board of Directors of the Chamber, accord- 
ing to G. L. Fox. general manager. 

Fox also urged that a letter writing cam- 
paign by all San Francisco businessmen be 
undertaken. 

•'Every business and industry throughout 
tlie State has a stake in the continued develop- 
ment of the Port of San Francisco, keystone 
to any well-rounded port development pro- 
gram in California." Fox stated. 

"The fact that the State-operated port hap- 
pens to be located at San Francisco does not 
negate the benefit to the entire state of tliis 
facility." he continued. 

"The bond issue needs particular emphasis 
in Oakland. Stockton. Los Angeles and San 
Diego." Fox pointed out. "These cities oper- 
ate their own port facilities and specialize in 
different commodities than the Port of San 
Francisco. The operations of these ports and 
that of San Francisco are mutually beneficial 
to the State as a whole and every segment of 
business and industry, rather than being mere- 



Port Authority Head 
Cpil Magnin World 
Trade Week Speaker 

Golden Gate World Trade Week — pro- 
claimed by President Eisenhower — will be 
held Sunday. May 18 through Sunday. May 25. 
according to Robert Taylor, President of the 
San Francisco Area World Trade Association 
of the Chamber. 

A highlight w ill be an address by Cyril Mag- 
nin. President of the San Francisco Port Au- 
thority, at the annual World Trade luncheon 
in the Peacock Court of the Mark Hopkins on 
May 21. His subject will be "Prosperin- 
through World Trade"'— theme of the week. 

Events being planned include the annual 
International Trade Exhibition: civic cere- 
monies in Golden Gate Park noting San Fran- 
cisco's role in world commerce; a salute to 
the merchant marine and to land transporta- 
tion and international communications in 
world trade: an international aviation lunch- 
eon spotlighting the growing importance of 
air freight in world trade: the annual World 
Trade Luncheon honoring consular and of- 
ficial economic representatives of other na- 
tions; and an international ball. 

Sponsors include the Chamber, the 
SFAWTA of the Chamber, San Francisco 
Junior Chamber of Commerce, Junior World 
Trade .Association. San Francisco Traffic Club 
and the San Franci.sco Air Cargo Association. 
Cooperating organizations are the World 
Trade Center, the Export Manager's Associa- 
tion, the Marine Exchange, the Northern Cali- 
fornia Ports and Terminals Bureau, the Port 
of San Francisco and the City and County of 
San Francisco. 

General Chairman of World Trade Week is 
Edward P. .McCall, Export Sales Manager. 
Tidewater Oil Company. Deputy General 
Chairman is B. A. Malone. Branch Manager, 
RCA Communications. 

(Turn lo page three) 



ly competitive. 

"This is not a question of one port cap- 
turing all of the import or export trade of 
the State, it is the question of the progress of 
the entire State — amply proven by the favor- 
able vote given the bond issue by the State 
Legislature prior to its being placed on the 
November ballot for ratification by the voters." 

Fox urged businessmen to write to col- 
leagues, associates and firm members with 
which they do business, particularly in Oak- 
land. Stockton. Los Angeles and San Diego. 

The Chamber reaffirmed its support of the 
full bond issue. .\.B. 116. an act providing for 



the issuance and sale of general obligation 
State bonds up to the amount of S60 million 
for construction and development of harbors. 
The act is dependent upon approval of 
Constitutional Amendment A.C.A. 11, author- 
izing issuance of bonds and validating the 
Harbor Development Bond Law of 1958. Of 
this total. §50 million would be allocated to 
the San Francisco Port Authority for im- 
provement of State-owned San Francisco Har- 
bor facilities for ocean-going vessels. The 
balance would be used for the development 
of self-liquidating small boat harbors through- 
out the state. 




HOSTED BY GOLDEN FLEET — Aboard the ADVENTURESS, flagship of the fleet, were Jack Laucic, Presi- 
dent of the Press and Union League Club and President of the Inter-Planetary Society of Freeloaders, 
Commodore Dan London, Gordon Roth of KCBS, President of the San Francisco Chapter of the Society, 
and Harry Nasburg Publisher of the SAN FRANCISCO ARGONAUT. 



Great Golden Fleet 
Press Day Judged a 
'Tremendous Success' 

The First Annual Press Day on the Bay of 
the Chamber's Great Golden Fleet was a tre- 
mendous success, with 44 members of the 
city's press-radio-television corps and their 
ladies enjoved a three hour cruise aboard 
Commodore Dan London's ADVENTURESS. 
Captain Douglas Dorn's CONTESSA. Cap- 
tain Bill Grav's GR.WLING, and Captain 
Jerry Hooper's LANG SYNE. 

Guests of the Captains at the April 20 event 
were Messrs. and Mesdames Richard Denior- 
est. THIS WORLD. CHRONICLE: Harry 
Nasburg. ARGONAUT; Newton Wise. 
DAILY COMMERCIAL NEWS; Gordon 
Roth. KCBS; Jack Lauck, P.U.L.C; Alan 
Torv. CITY-COUNTY RECORD; John Bert- 
rand. CALL-BULLETIN; 

William H. Marriott. DAILY COMMER- 
CIAL NEWS: Bill McPhillips. KSFO; Jack 
Schmaele. CHRONICLE; Charles Stabler. 
WALL STREET JOURNAL; Paige Abbott. 
INTERNATIONAL NEWS PHOTOS; Jack 
Foisie. CHRONICLE; William Flynn. NEWS- 
WEEK; 

Dick Nolan, EXAMINER; Robert Rose. 
KFRC: Donald K. White. EXAMINER; Bud 
Spencer, NEWS; Frank Collier. REUTERS; 
William Leiser. CHRONICLE; Bill Nichols, 
CALL-BULLETIN; Jim Crumpacker, KYA; 
Hal Burger. Jerry Gordon. Dick Moore. Bruce 
Polich. Har\'ev Sachs, and Paul O'Blunda, 
all of KGO RADIO & TV; and James D. 
Warnock, Chamber Publicity. 



Deputy Secretary of 
Defense Speaker at 
Armed Forces Lmtch 

Deputy Secretary of Defense Donald A. 
Quarles will be the principal speaker at San 
Francisco's Annual Armed Forces Day Lunch- 
eon at the Commercial Club Friday noon May 
16. 

Former Secretary of the Air Force. Quarles 
served as Assistant Sec- 
retary of Defense (Re- 
search and Develop- 
ment), first chairman of 
the reorganized Air 
Navigation Development 
Board, and member of 
the National Advisory 
Committee for Aeronau- 
tics before his present 
position. Prior to his en- 
try into government serv- 
ice he was Vice Presi- 
dent of Bell Telephone 
Laboratories, Vice Presi- 
dent of Western Electric 
and President of Sandia Corporation, subsidi- 
ary which operates the Sandia Laboratory in 
New Mexico for the Atomic Energy Commis- 




Donald A. Quarles 



Friday, May 9, 1958 



Hitting the High Spots Chamber Celebrates 108th Anniversary 




Jack T. Piclcett 



I With JIM WARNOCK 

IFORTY-THREE chamber members made the 
'good will cruise to Stockton in four boats of the 
iGreat Golden Fleet on Friday. May 2, sponsored 
by the Inter-City Section, enjoying the scenic delta 
cruise and an enthusiastic reception by officers and 
members of the Stockton Chamber and city offi- 
cials. Commodore Dan London, First Vice President 
of the Chamber, and Director Ivan Branson spoke 
on behalf of San Francisco. . . . 
AGRICULTURAL COM- 
.MIHEE of the Chamber 
will honor Brigadier Gen- 
eral William F. Cassidy, Di- 
vision Engineer, U.S. Army 
.Engineers Division, South 
'Pacific, at a luncheon at 
iSabella's Restaurant near 
Sausalito next Wednesday 
and tour the San Francisco 
'Bay model, according to 
Jack T. Pickett, Chairman. 
General Cassidy will leave 
shortly to assume new 
duties with the Eighth 
Army, Korea. . . . 

AMERICA'S BUSINESS RECESSION has now 
reached its climactic stage and industrial produc- 
tion will shortly level out and then turn up, declares 
the latest issue of FORTUNE magazine in its author- 
itative monthly Business Roundup forecast. . . . 
KQED'S FOURTH ANNUAL TV AUCTION is 
swinging into high gear, a large corps of volunteers 
making plans to solicit merchandise and services 
from leading distributors, manufacturers and retail- 
ers for the event. Scheduled for the first week in 
June, the auction will be telecast nightly from Tues- 
day, June 3 through Saturday, June 7. San Fran- 
cisco businessmen have joined a community-wide 
organization to contact donors under the leadership 
of Mrs. Carl Livingston, Jr., Chairman. The tradi- 
tional TV "spectacular" contributes to the support 
of the Bay Area's non-commercial, community sta- 
tion on Channel 9. . . . 

COLUMBUS SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIA- 
TION will open tomorrow with entrances at 419 
Columbus and 1424 Stockton, according to Angelo 
J. Scampini, President. The new institution is a 
guarantee capital stock association and will com- 
mence operation with paid-in capital and surplus 

of $500,000 

"MR. WEBSTER TAKES STOCK," a 28-minute 
16mm film on the fundamentals of investing, is 
pvailable from Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & 

Smith 

AMERICAN SHIPPERS, INC. has extended a new 
service, "Parcel Air System," to San Francisco, can 
deliver up to 40 pounds door to door to any city 
3r township in the United States in a maximum time 
>f three days. . . . 

;entral and northern California cham- 

jer of Commerce Executives will be guests of Mat- 
Son Navigation Co. for luncheon aboard the SS 

LURLINE on Monday 

E. F. TRIZ, Manager of Market Development for 
FMC International, a Division of Food Machinery 
Snd Chemical Corp., is a member of four-man U.S. 
Trade Mission which will tour Poland and visit the 
Poznan International Trade Fair under the auspices 
of the U. S. Department of Commerce. . . . 
SENIOR CITIZENS' WEEK gets under way Monday 
ihen the Senior Citizens Hobby Show opens in the 
Emporium Auditorium under the sponsorship of the 
Recreation and Park Commission. . . . 
H. E. WASTE, Executive Vice President of Bechtel 
Corporation and newly installed President of the 
American Ordnance Association's San Francisco 
'ost, announces that the annual dinner meeting of 
he Association will be held May 2." .it the Fairmont 
Hotel 



(Continued from page 1 ) 

racks and grounds at the Presidio, constant 
endeavors to secure better schools and other 
public buildings in San Francisco, and build- 
ing of more wharves, warehouses and trans- 
port docks along the waterfront. 

The Chamber also played a key role in the 
realization of the Panama Canal and bring- 
ing the Panama-Pacific International Exposi- 
tion to San Francisco, implemented the estab- 
lishment of the Bayshore Highway from San 
Francisco to San Jose, and urged the con- 
struction of the Duboce Tunnel to the Sun- 
set District. 

In more recent times, the Chamber vigor- 
ously fought for the building of the Golden 
Gate and San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridges, 
the International Airport and supported plans 
to build Alemany, Junipero Serra and Sun- 
set Boulevards and the Beach Esplanade. It 
also contributed leadership to key conimilfees 
which brought about the winning of three vital 
air bases for the Bay Area — Alameda, Hamil- 
ton Field and Sunnyvale, aided in the develop- 
ment of the Western Merchandise Mart, sup- 
ported Fort Miley as the site for the Veterans' 
Hospital, brought about the establishment of 
the Cow Palace, and initiated the setting up 
of the Golden Gate International Exposition 
and the building of Treasure Island as its 
site. 

Chamber issues of the moment include: 

• creation of an adequate water develop- 
ment fund from the state's oil resources rev- 
enues; 

• redevelopment of San Francisco's whole- 
sale produce market "Area E" and South-o'- 
Market "Area D" and the relocation of a 
new wholesale produce market in a suitable 
area; 

• building of a new Civil Courts Building 
and remodeling of the City Hall for adminis- 
trative purposes; 

• statehood for Alaska; 

• passage of the Harbor Development Bond 
Law of 1958: 

• development of International .\irport to 
accommodate the coming jet age; 

• revision of the City Charter to permit 
compliance with the state's uniform sales and 
use tax (enabling the city to receive an ad- 
ditional $3,500,000 in sales tax revenue an- 
nually). 

These are only highligiits of the Chamber's 



efforts on behalf of San Francisco. Its day-to- 
day operations, also of far-reaching impor- 
tance — include hundreds of .services to its 
members, the press, and to San Francisco 
business and civic organizations through re- 
ferral, inquiry and research. 

For example, directories and other pub- 
lications are constantly being compiled, re- 
vised and published for circulation through- 
out the region, the West and the world. Last 
year the Publicity department produced 407 
news releases and placed nearly 2,000 pho- 
tographs of .San Francisco and hundreds of 
special articles in publications throughout the 
world. 

During 1957 the Research Department 
answered 80.874 telephone and written in- 
quiries relating to all pha.ses of the local and 
regional economy from business people, visi- 
tors, newcomers, school students, educational 
institutions and governmental agencies. 

The Industrial Department conducted 840 
personal interviews, was represented at 110 
meetings, participated in 4.3.50 telephone con- 
versations, produced 1.315 pieces of corre- 
spondence relating directly to all phases of 
industrial development of the area and pro- 
vided plant location and factors- information 
about -San Francisco and the Bay Region to 
more than 80 inquiring major firms. 

The Chamber, the one organization repre- 
senting all the facets of the business and pro- 
fessional community, carries on its broad 
program through 13 departments and .50 com- 
mittees, subcommittees and sections. Its or- 
ganizational structure, acclaimed one of the 
most streamlined and effective of any chamber 
of commerce in the country, has been the 
model for many chambers of its size. 

.Accounting. Administrative. Grain, Mem- 
bership. Publicity and Research are the "serv- 
ice departments" which deal with the broad 
aspects of the Chamber. Highly specialized is 
the work of the "project departments" — .Agri- 
cultural. Civic Development. Domestic Trade. 
Industrial. Public .Affairs. Retail Merchants, 
Transportation and World Trade. Each de- 
partment has a full complement of commit- 
tees, subcommittees and sections to augment 
its work. The Chamber staff of .54. headed by 
G. L. Fox. General Manager since 1948. im- 
plements the work of 800 members who serve 
on ctmimittees and sections and the Chamber 
membership of nearly 4.500. 



Maffiiiii World Trade Week Talk Set 



(Continued from page two) 

Committee Chairmen and Deputy Chair- 
men: 

Iiilrrnolioniil Tmdr Exiiibilion : Wrndrll II. Drrri . Korrim 
Drparlinriil. Cruilirr-Ando NaKonal Bank; KratiL E. prlii 
Mananrr. W,>rld rradr Crnlrr. 

Speaker, program: Donald Toriiirv. Mar>h « Mrl.rniian- 
Co<|iro%r S Co.. Iiir. 

World Trade Luncheon: A. J. Hvken. Faririr Far Fail 
Line. hir. 

Diiplay: Thoniai C. Norman. Japan Air Line.. 

Education: John J. Jacob., Stale. Marinr-l.thniian Af enc) . 

International Ilanqiiel and Ball: W. II. Cribble. %' P 
Fuller t Co. 

Finance: Peter B. Market. Atkin.. Ktoll i Co. 

Liai.on: Ceoriie Telloft. (lakland « orld Trade Club. 

Publicity: Thonia. S. Page. Bank ..I America N.T. S S.A. 

Publicit. Coordination: Jame. D. Wamock. Publiritt 
Maiiaiter of the Chamber. 

Aviation: Koaer Kolda. Air Fkpre.. Intemational chair- 
man; Thon... Norman. Japan Airline.; and Frank Ol.on. 
Vnitcd Airline. 
Ccneril Coordinator!: Janir. V. « il.un. manairr; \l orld 



Trade Department; Kirhard J. Abbott. a.<i.tant manafer. 

Program anil activities committeemen in- 
clude: 

world trade di.pla... reception and parade: m illiam M. 
Sloan. I>| Sal.o Truck Co.; «. R. Do.le. Tidoater Od C». ; 
Reiinald « . Dunkle.. m e.tem Pariiic K.R. Co.; Hoard «. 
Haaac National Can Corp.; Jo.eph F. Loii«. Southern Pariic 
Railroad i:o. ; Ha.mond Truman. Garrett Frei(ht Linei. 

World Trade Luncheon. Ma. ;i : A. J. Rvken. Pacibc Fu 
Ka.l line.. Inr ; Robert Bennit. C.eneral Steam.hip Corp., 
Ltd.. and R. «dli.. American Pre.Hlent Line.. 

International Ball. Ma. :i : Beniamin Creenoufh. Tb* 
Rank of lalilornia. N. A. 

CiMc l>remonie.. Ma. :'. Daniel F. Barrrlo. Jr.. Vdit 
Far^o Rank. 

Maritime Da.. Mai II iPropeller CJub pr«(r<m): Ken- 
nrth Ni«. Pacific Far Fj.l Line inc. 

Charles («alK>, President of .\ir Express 
Internalional. will speak at the .Aviation Day 
Luncheon. Friilav. Mav 23. 



Friday. May 9, 1958 




Chamber Award of Progress Given 
Phillips & Van Orden Print Firm 



EDUCATION-BUSINESS DAY. sponsored by Ihe 
Chamber, San Francisco Unlfed School Disfrici and 
parochial schools on April 24, saw 3000 teachers 
and 70,000 students receiving nearly 1000 business- 
men as guests tor the day. At Riordan High School 
James A. Bacigalupi (left), Croclcer-Anglo National 
Bank, and Bruce Cochran (right), International Busi- 
ness Machines, observed an induction coil demon- 
stration by Felix Alfaro, senior student, and Brother 
Elmer Duslcy, S.M. 



Tripp Speaks At 
World Trade Lunch 

DwiglU K. Tripp. III. leader of tlie World 
Business Development Tour of Eastern Asia 
just completed under the sponsorship of the 
San Francisco Area World Trade Association 
of the Chamber, was the principal speaker at 
the world business and town affiliation meet- 
ing Thursday noon at tlie Yamato Sukiyaki 
House. 



(^^awd&t daCettcUin, 



May l2^CANCCOCE LUNCHEON— Aboard S.S. 

Lurllne. Guest of Matson Navigation Company. 12 
noon. 10:45 a.m. tour of the liner. 

May 13— JAPAN WORLD TRADE COMMIHEE 

MEETING— Directors Room, Room 200, Chamber, 
6:00 to 7:00 p.m. 

May 14— AGRICULTURAL BAY MODEL, Sausalito 

10:30 a.m., and LUNCHEON at Sabella's in Marin! 

May 16 — ARMED FORCES DAY LUNCHEON— 

Commercial Club, 465 California Street, 12:15 p.m. 
Speaker; The Honorable Donald A. Queries, Deputy 
Secretary of Defense. 

May 21— CIVIC DEVELOPMENT COMMIHEE 
MEETING— Mills Tower Building, Room 360, film 
showing, 10:30 a.m. 

May 21— RETAIL MERCHANTS ASSOCIATION— 

Merchants Board of Directors Meeting — Press & 
Union League Club, 555 Post Street, Room 800. 



BAY REGION BU5IN£S5 



SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



ALAN K. BROWNE, President 

C. U FOX, General Manager 

M. A. HOGAN. Secretarr 

JAMES D. WARNOCK, Eiecntive Editor 

JOSEPH I. HAUCBEY. Editor 

Pabliehed ©retT other week by the San Francisco Chamber 
of Commerce at 333 Pine St., San Francitco. Zone 4. 
CotmtT o( San Francisco. Califortiia. Teleohone EXbrook 
2-4S11, (Non-member snbscriDtion, $S.OO a rear.) Entered 
as Second Qass matter Aoril 26. 1944, at the Post OBSce at 
San Francisco, California, nnder the act of March 3. 1>;9. 
C{Tcvlationi 7.500 tkit fjaue 



Phillips & Van Orden Co.. San Francisco 
printing firm which last year purchased the 
city's largest industrial building at Fourth and 
Berry Streets from Southern Pacific Company 
and remodeled it at a total cost of $2,750,000. 
has received the Award of Progress of the San 
Francisco Chamber of Commerce, according 
to G. L. Fox. General Manager. 

The award, reserved for those firms and 
organizations which have made significant 
major investments in San Francisco's future 
through enhancing their area of the city and 
creating new employment, was presented to 
J. A. Forbush. Vice President and General 
Manager, by W. H. Mixter. Chairman of the 
Chamber's Business Center Development Com- 
mittee which selects the recipients. 

The company is affiliated with the J. W. 
Clement Company in Buffalo and Pacific 
Press. Inc. in Los Angeles, with John D. Tay- 
lor as President. In announcing the purchase 
earlier Taylor said that San Francisco is the 
heart of the nation's greatest growth area. 

"We are aware of the current vogue, notably 
within our own industry, to move out to the 
suburbs. But we are thoroughly convinced that 
our greatest opportunity for growth lies right 
here within the 46 square miles of San Fran- 
cisco. The city offers everything we want: good 
transportation facilities, a large and growing 
market, a reservoir of skilled labor and a fine 
place to work. 

"Moreover, San Francisco has helped us 
grow to our present size ; we can see no reason 
for taking our business elsewhere." 

The firm occupies about half of the 518.000 
square feet of the building, the Directory De- 
partment of Pacific Telephone and Telegraph 
occuping 110.000. Primarily telephone direc- 
tory printers. Phillips & Van Orden prints vol- 
umes for 44 cities ranging from Bakersfield 
north to Spokane and Tacoma. With more 
than 500 employees working three shifts, the 
firm also prints Motorland, National Mo- 
torist, California Teachers Journal and 
newspapers, trade journals, circulars, book- 
lets, folders and brochures. 

The company has already installed the only 
four-color rotary offset press in northern Cali- 
fornia, according to Forbush, and a "whole 
host of other equipment is arriving daily." 

The building is not only the largest indus- 
trial facility in San Francisco but one of the 
largest in the West. It is also the city's long- 
est: if its 800 feet of length were stood on end, 




PROGRESS HONORED— J. A. Forbush, Vice Presi- 
dent and General Manager, Phillips & Van Orden 
Company (seated), receives the Chamber's highly I 
coveted award from W. H. Mixter, Chairman of the '\ 
Business Center Development Committee, while ' 
G. L Fox, General Manager of the Chamber, looks 



it would be 67 stories high, he said. 

Other recipients of the award during the 
past two years have been S & W Fine Fond~. 
Petrini Plaza. Western Machinery Company. 
San Francisco Flower Market, Jackson Square 
Association, California Color Corporation. 
Fireman's Fund, Moore's, and Pacific Metal~ 
Company. 

"We are particularly happy to present the 
award to an outstanding representative of the. 
printing industry," Fox stated, "since printing' 
is the second largest manufacturing industry 
in San Francisco, adding about $85,000,000 in 
value of product annually. I 

"Directors of the Chamber last year went onj 
record against the printing of textbooks by the 
State printing plant, in the belief that such 
governmental operations are holding back the 
full development of private industry in the 
field not only in San Francisco but throughout 
the entire West." 



The first Pony Express rider arrived in San 
Francisco from St. Joseph, Missouri on April 
14, 1860. 



SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 




BUSINESS 



VOLUME 15 • NUMBER II • MAY 23. 1958 



Extension of Highways and Freeways Vital to City's Growth 



Francisco by extension of these freeways will 
prevent future bottlenecks." the statement 
continued. 

"Tlie Chamber, which annually presents its 
recommendations to the State Highway Com- 
mission regarding the construction and ad- 
vance planning of Highways in .San Francisco, 
believes Freeways are a major element in the 



physical reorganization of the city and a key 
factor in solving problems of mounting traffic 
volume, downtown congestion and hazardous 
driving conditions. 

"In laying the groundwork for future trans- 
portation needs, we are setting the pattern for 
tomorrow's way of life and assuming a real 
measure of responsibility as citizens." 



''Extension of the Southern and Embarca- 
dero Freeways is an urgent necessity if San 
Francisco is to keep pace with the develop- 
ment of the State Highway System." according 
to a policy statement by the Directors of the 
Chamber. 

The resolution, unanimously adopted by Di- 
rectors of the Chamber in order to strengthen 
its policy on highway and 
freeway construction, 
was based upon recom- 
mendations of the Civic 
Development committee. 
.Alan K. Browne, chair- 
man, and the Street. 
Highway and Bridge sec- 
tion. Leonard S. Mosias. 
chairman. 

"Inclusion of addition- 
al routes into the State 
Highway System, along 
the easterly edge of San PROFILE OF THE CITY — Viewed from the south, San Francisco's skyline is enhanced by the Peninsula approach. 




Chamber Urges 'Yes' Vote on Five Municipal Ballot Propositions 



The Chamber urges a "yes" vote on five im- 
portant propositions on the June 3. Municipal 
Ballot: 

Proposition A, submitted by the Board 
of Education of the San Francisco Unified 
School District, would raise the tax limit from 
$2 to $2.50. .\n increase in school enrollment 
for the coming year is expected to be an im- 
portant factor affecting the school tax rate. 
Enrollment may rise from 83.670 to 90.105 in 
1958-59. This would mean an increased cost of 
$1,372,500 for 2141/3 new teachers, additional 
supplies and increased transportation of pu- 
pils from crowded areas, .\lthough the present 
legal tax limit for the school district is $2. it 
has been, in practice, a limit of |L80. While 
the state law specifies use of only 90 per cent 
of the as.sessment roll. San Francisco has tra- 
ditionally used 100 per cent of the roll in c<mi- 
puting taxes. Therefore the controller has held 
that the tax limit must be adjusted by ten per 
cent, with a resulting tax limit of $1.80. 

Proposition B provides a bond issue for 
rehabilitaticm of the world-famous .Steiniiart 
.Aquarium in Golden Gate Park. P!und)ing. 
wiring, roof and tanks are badly in need of 
repair. In addition to the building renovation, 
the facility needs a new salt water pipeline 
from the Fleishhacker Pool to the a(|uarium 
csting S235.0OO. 

Proposition C woulii auliiorlz.-. through 
ciiarter amendment, the establishment of a 
narcotics fund not to exceed $25,000 per year 
to be used by the chief of police in enforce- 
ment of narcotic laws. The Board of .Super- 
visors would make the appropriation in the 
annual budget and the police chief would 
make expenditures from the sum which, in his 
judgment, would b<- for the best interests of 



Chamber Recommendations — 

Proposition VOTE 

A — School tax increase YES 

B^Aquarium rehabilitation YES 

C — Narcotics fund increase YES 

D — Retention ot use tax YES 

E — Police department 

reorganization YES 

F — Fire department salary 

changes No Recommendation 

the City and County in enforcing the law. The 
work of the narcotic squad was intensified 
recently and personnel added. .\t that time the 
chief requested more money for confidential 
investigative work and was informed that he 
was limited to the $25,000 specified for the 
contingency fund. That is the reason for the 
presently proposed charter amendment. If it 
is approved, the chief will have two confiden- 
tial funds to draw upon for the work of the 
department. 

Proposition D wouhl empower the HoanI 
of .Supervisors to enact an ordinance allowing 
the City and County to retain sales tax rev- 
enues on items sold here for delivery or use in 
other counties. The contemplated arrangenuni 
is to have the State of California ccdlect tin 
one per cent local sales tax along with tli. 
three per cent state sales tax and reimbur^i- 
the City and County for its one per cent share. 
It is estimated that liie proposition, if passed, 
would result in S3.500.000 in added re\enue~ 
annually for the City and County of San Fran- 
cisco. None of this money would be paid by 
San Francisco residents on their local purchas- 
es. The $3,500,000 is equal to a 26.3 cent re- 
duction in the tax rate each year. 



Proposition E proposes through a char- 
ter amendment reorganization of top positions 
in the Police Department, and retitling of 
other positions. It would provide a basis for 
higher salaries for a number of positions af- 
fected. New titles will be created for the posi- 
tions of assistant chief (now deputy chief I 
and deputy chiefs for the traffic, detective, 
patrol and administraliim departments. Revi- 
sions sought are based upon studies by the 
Police Commission, the Chief of Police and 
a police administration consultant retained on 
contract last year. 

Proposition F invidves no recommenda- 
tion bv the (!liaml>er. It would amend the city 
charter to provide similar salary-changing 
procedures as in Propositiim E. Salaries to be 
paid to the chief and deputy chief would be 
contingent upon the recommendation of the 
Fire Commission and adoption by the super- 
visors. No departmental reorganization is in- 
volved. 




"MY ENCHANTED CITY ■—Alan K. Browne, presi- 
dent of the Chamber, receives the new record from 
Chris Jenkins (left) and Ted G. Hayes of Seal Rec- 
ords. At eitreme left is G. L Fo«, general manager 
of the Chamber. 



Friday. May 23, 1958 



FOREIGN 
TRADE 



ffkambat^tapli Mo. 18 
IS A BILLION DOLLAR BAY AREA BUSINESS 



Mi»ions of Do//ors 
90 100 110 




DESIGNERS 



World trade — saluted during Golden Gate World Trade Week, May 18 through 25 — has reached the 
stature of a billion dollar industry in the San Francisco Bay Area. In 1957, $1,065,546,073 in trade 
passed through the Golden Gate— $601,441,529 in exports and $465,204,544 in imports. 
A regular feature . . . osit the Chamber lor Reprints: EXbrook 2-4511, Ext. 49 or 88, World Trade Oept. 



Local Businessmen, 
Chamber Urge Passage 
Of Proposition "D" 

Passage of Proposition D, the June 3 ballot 
measure designed to bring $31/2 million in an- 
nual revenue to tlie City and County of San 
Franci.sco, was urged this week by a committee 
of local business and civic leaders headed by 
Harold L. Zellerbach. 

The measure, a charter amendment, would 
authorize the Board of Supervisors to bring 
San Francisco under the Bradley-Burns Uni- 
form Sales and Use Tax Act. When out-of- 
town shoppers buy in San Francisco stores, 
they would pay a sales tax to San Francisco 
instead of a use tax now going to the counties 
where their goods are delivered. 

Walter F. Kaplan, secretary-treasurer of 
The Emporium-Capwell Co. and vice-chairman 
of the Committee for Proposition D. said: 

"Passage of Proposition D will put San 
Francisco on the same footing with all of its 
neighboring counties which ab-eady comply 
with the State act. In so doing, our city will 
gain approximately three and a half million 
dollars annually. 

"Proposition D will not levy any new taxes 
of any kind or adopt any new sales or pur- 
chase tax law. It will not add a cent to the 
tax now being paid by the citizens of San 
Francisco on their purchases." 

The $3,500,000 to be gained by passage of 
the measure is equivalent to 26.3c reduction in 
the city's tax rate, it was pointed out. 

Other members of the Committee for Propo- 
sition D are: 

George 3. Greenwood, treasurer; Alan K. Browne, Albert E. 
Schlesinger. Karl M. Stull, Clarence Krieger. Arthur E. Wil- 
kens. Alan H. Johnston. W. Needham Lambert. F. B. Magrnder 
and Roy P. Cole. 

Organizations sponsoring the measure are: 

The Chamber. Retail Merchants Association. Down Town 
Association, Motor Car Dealers Association. Municipal Confer- 
ence, Retail Dr> Goods Association, Council of District Mer- 
chants Associations, and Building Owners and Managers Asso- 

"Plug the $31/2 million tax leak!" is the 
committee's slogan for the measure. 

Firms are urged to call the Chamber, EX- 
brook 2-4511. Ext. 74, for supplies of a special 
folder covering Proposition D and to circular- 
ize all employees who are S.F. voters. 



May 23— INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT COMMIT- 
TEE MEETING — Commercial Club. 465 California 
Street, 12:15 p.m. 

May 23— WORLD TRADE JAPANESE CONFER- 
ENCE— Directors Room, Room 200, Chamber, 10:30 

May 25 — AVIATION SECTION MEETING— Com- 
mercial Club, 465 California Street, 12:00 noon. 
May 25— U. S. NAVAL SHIPYARD ORIENTATION 
— Tour for Bay Region Chamber Presidents and 
Managers co-sponsored by San Francisco Naval 
Shipyard Employees Association and San Francisco 
Chamber. 

May 29— CHEMICAL INDUSTRY SECTION MEET- 
ING— Garden Room, Fairmont Hotel, 12:15 p.m. 
May 29 — COMMIHEE ON TRADE RELATIONS 
WITH AFRICA — SFAWTA, Small Conference 
Room, 2:00 p.m. 

June 2— CUSTOMS AND TARIFFS COMMIHEE 
MEETING — SFAWTA, Small Conference Room, 
Chamber, 2:00 p.m. 

June 5— OPEN HOUSE IN JACKSON SQUARE— 
For all Chamber members and wives, sponsored by 
Business Center Development Committee, 11:00 
a.m. to 3:00 p.m. 

June 5— INTERNATIONAL FINANCE COMMIT- 
TEE MEETING— SFAWTA, Small Conference Room, 
Chamber, 2:00 p.m. 



Friday. May 23. 1958 



Hitting the High Spots 



NEW MEMBERS IN RECENT MONTHS 



with JIM WARNOCK 

THOMAS F. STACK, local attorney, has been elect- 
ed President of the University of San Francisco 
Alumni Association. . . . John F. O'Dea. also a San 
Francisco attorney, Harry M. Bardt, and Leo J. 
Murphy were elected vice presidents. John E. Cur- 
ley was chosen Secretary-Treasurer. . . . 
HARRY R. SMITH, Vice President, Bank of Amer- 
ica N.T. & S.A., has been named chairman of the 
Alaskan Affairs Section, Domestic Trade Depart- 
ment. . . . 

ANDREW C. McLaughlin, jr., President of An- 
drew C. McLaughlin Co., has been appointed 
Chairman of the Marketing and Sales Promotion 
Committee, Domestic Trade Department of the San 
Francisco Chamber of Commerce. . . . 
FOUR INSTRUCTORS of the Russian Division of 
the Army Language School at Monterey are avail- 
able for temporary assignments in translation and 
interpretation of Russian, Chinese. Ukrainian. Ger- 
man and Czech until October or November, at 
which time they will return to regular duty, accord- 
ing to Lt. Col. Fred A. Hicks, Commandant. Em- 
ployment briefs may be examined in the Research 
Department of the Chamber. . . . 
DANIEL WENTZ, Information Director of Ames 
Aeronautical Laboratories in Sunnyvale, will discuss 
research in the fields of missiles and space flight at 
the luncheon meeting of the Aviation Section Mon- 
day noon at the Commercial Club. . . . 
CAPTAINS OF THE GREAT GOLDEN FLEET will 
be deputized as "sea-going sheriffs" by Matthew 
C. Carberry, Sheriff of San Francisco, Monday noon 
in the May Fair Suite of the St. Francis Hotel. . . . 
TWO NEW UNITS OF RESIDENCE halls at the 
University of California will be equipped with elec- 
tronically directed automatic elevators. The West- 
inghouse Electric Corporation has been awarded 
the contract to supply eight automatic passenger 
elevators and two freight elevators with the "selec- 
tive-collective" elevators carrying 17 students each 
at 200 feet per minute. . . . Residence halls archi- 
tect Is Warnecke & Warnecke of San Francisco. 
The Dinwiddle Construction Company, also of San 
Francisco, is general contractor. 
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES Cor- 
poration has appointed S. G. Tremblckl Manager 
of the newly-established Sales Administration De- 
partment for the Western Region. . . . 
THE REVISED Directory of Large Manufacturers in 
the San Francisco Bay Region, recently Issued by 
the Domestic Trade Department of the Chamber, is 
still available, $1 each to Chamber members and 
$2 to non-members. . . . Other directories Issued 
recently and still available Include the San Fran- 
cisco Wholesalers and Branch Sales Offices Direc- 
tory ($2.50 and $5); Manufacturers In San Fran- 
cisco ($2 and $5); Consulting Engineers and Archi- 
tects ($1) and San Francisco Importers and Export- 
ers Directory (free to members, $1.50 to non-mem- 
bers) .... 

HERBERT ROGERS, JR.. President of Rogers Engi- 
neering Co., Inc., of San Francisco, has left for a 
supervisory tour of Thailand. . . . 
HARRY J. STEWART, President of West Coast Life 
of San Francisco, presided over the recent regional 
meeting of the American Life Convention at the 
Fairmont Hotel. . . . 

RICHFIELD OIL CORPORATION'S central divi- 
sion headquarters recently moved from 333 Mont- 
gomery to larger quarters at 417 Montgomery. . . . 
REVOLUTIONARY AMPEX magnetic tape recorder 
developments will make low priced, high quality, 
four-track 3% inch per second stereophonic tapes 
commercially available by midsummer, according 
to Phillip L. Gundy, Vice President of Ampex Cor- 
poration of Redwood City. . . . 
W. J. BUSH has announced the appointment of 
J. C. Gallagher as President of West Coast Ter- 
minals Co. of California. Bush, the former President, 
becomes Chairman. . . . 




C. M. Romanowitz 



R. N. Peters 



W. J. Wright George Turner Don Brundage 

New members recently added to the Chamber roller (left to right) are: Charles M. 
Romanowitz. Division Sales Manager. EUicott Machine Corporation; Richard .\. Peters. 
Division Sales Manager. Reynolds Metal Company; William J. Wrijiht. Land Surveyor. 
58 Sutter Street; George Turner, Executive Director. Pacific Area Travel Association; 
and Don Brundage. Brundage Associates, Industrial Engineers. 

In the lower panel (left to right I are: Erank A. Birdsall. Vice President and Man- 
ager, Gotham-Vladimir Advertising, Inc.; G. Kendrick Matthews. Owner and Manager. 
Maneely-Matthews, Funeral Directors; Horace C. Stoneham. President. .San Francisco 
Giants Baseball Club; Kenneth H. Smitten. Realtor and President. San Francisco Real 
Estate Board; and Peter F. Lynch. President. A. Sulka & Company. 




Frank A. Birdsall G. K. Matthews H. C. Stoneham K. H. Smitten Peter F. Lynch 




BOUND PROCEEDINGS of the National Confer- 
ence on Employee Benefit Plan Legislation, spon- 
sored by the Chamber, Chamber of Commerce of 
the United States, Federated Employers of San 
Francisco and the Western Pension Conference at 
the Sheraton-Palace Hotel and held January 20 at 
the Sheraton-Palace Hotel, are now available at the 
Public Affairs Department of the Chamber. Cost 
of the transcripts Is $2.50. ... 

WALT BROWN, Walter J. Brown Public Relations, 
has been elected President of the San Francisco 
Bay Area Publicity Club, 
organization of some 100 
men and women professional 
publicists who deal heavily 
in press-radio-television re- 
lations throughout the area. 
First and second vice pres- 
idents are Grant Robb ns. 
Grant Robblns & Associ- 
ates, and James D. War- 
nock. Aim of the group, 
which stresses workshop ses- 
sions with media repres3n- 
tatlves, is to 'maintain and improve standards cf 
publicity practice and increase the worth of pub- 
licity to all mass communication media." Brown suc- 
ceeds Jack Fearn. John W. Fearn Associates. . . . 
NEW GUIDE MAP to Napa Valley Winery Tour 
may be obtained by writing Napa Valley Vintners. 
St. Helena or calling at the Chamber Research 
Department. . . . 

TRANSOCEAN AIR LINES has inaugurated service 
on a U.S. Navy domestic cargo contract involving 
more than 2,000.000 miles of flying on a $2,500,000 
contract. . . . 

TWELVE MEMBERS OF THE INTER-CITY SEC- 
TION visited seven communities on the Peninsula 
Including Los Gatos and Santa Cruz on April 23, 
meeting with city and chamber officials to extend 
personal Invitations fo Coastal Days, scheduled for 
Thursday and Friday, August 13 and 14, according 
to Emmett Fitzpatrick, Chairman. . . . 
BROADWAY MANOR. Van Ness and Broadway. 
features conference rooms seating twenty-five and 
fifty people, complete with catering service. . . . 



UNITED PARCEL SERVICE has expanded its de- 
livery of parcels and small packages for wholesalers 
and manufacturers, according to J. M. Sivesind. 
Manager of the Store Service Division. San Fran- 
cisco office, and a member of the Transportation 
Committee of the Chamber. The service schedule 
now extends out of Santa Rosa north to Eureka and 
Arcadia, out of Sacramento to points on Highway 
50 as far as PlacervlHe. south of Tracy on Highway 
33 through Patterson, Newman. Los Banos and Fire- 
baugh. and out of Fairfield and Rio Vista on the 
Sacramento River. "Extension of this service is in 
keeping with San Francisco's reputation as one of 
the foremost distribution centers on the Pacific 
Coast with unexcelled services, quick deliveries and 
low distribution costs." according to Sivesind. . . . 
DR. D. W. ELAM has been elected a Vice President 
of Hiller Helicopters following Hiller's acquisition 
of the Adhesive Engineering Company, which is 
headed by Dr. Elam. . . . 



Walter J. Br 



'Keep Green" Campaign 
Timed for Holidays 

With thousands of area residents about lo 
start their Memorial Day wiek-ond treks to 
forest regions, the Chamber's Keep Green 
Committee has asked member oompanie* to 
help "remind our citizens of their responsibil- 
ities toward the preser\alion of these natural 
resources." 

Chairman \(illiam J. I.osh suggests that 
firms cooperate in tlie statewide forest fire 
prevention campaign through: 

• "Stuflers" in pay envelopes, bills, etc. 

• Reminder articles in house organs. 

• Placards, etc. on bulletin boards. 

• Forest fire prevention "drop ins" in dis- 
play advertising. 

Forest fire prevention n.aterial can be ob- 
tained through the Chamber. EXbnmk 2-4511, 
Extensiim 8.S. 



Friday, May 23. 1958 



'Ability to Pay 
Should Determine 
Emergency Fees' 

Charges covering tiie cost of San Francisco's 
emergency hospital services should be borne 
by the patient, provided he is able to pay. 
according to Directors of the Chamber. 

The recommendation followed a study made 
by the Tax Section of the Public Affairs De- 
partment of the Chamber. F. B. Magruder. 
chairman, including a discussion with Dr. 
Ellis D. Sox. Director of Public flealth. 

■'Cost of such services to city exceeds S700.- 
000 annually and amounts to about 5 cents on 
the tax rate." Magruder pointed out. "'and San 
Francisco is one of the few large cities in the 
country which does not charge those able to 
pay for such services. 

"In >iew of the fact tliat more and more 
persons are covered by industrial or medical 
insurance or are otherwise able to pay for this 
service, the Chamber feels the City and Coun- 
ty of San Francisco would be fully justified 
in taking this step. The emergency hospitals 
now treat many industrial and accident cases 
and persons who have prepaid medical insur- 
ance: these cases can and definitely should 
pay for any emergency hospital service ren- 
dered." 



1-p 




100 YEARS OF SERVICE to San Francisco by the 
Aetna Insurance Company were honored at the 
April 18 Insurance Day luncheon commemorating 
the fifty-second anniversary of the fire and earth- 
quake. Left to right are J. Dewey Dorsett, General 
Manager of the Association of Casualty and Surety 
Companies, New Yorit, principal speaker, Alan K. 
Browne. President of the Chamber, and C. M. Mar- 
shall, Vice President and Manager, Aetna Insurance 
Group. 



/ 



/\i,l/ii'Ai:: 

SAN FRANCISCO INSURANCE CENTfl^. 
COMPLETION DATE SE.PJ. 1.195'^'^ 

Stani 




GROUNDBREAKING— Fran McCar+y, President of the Board of Supervisors, was at the controls during 
recent groundbreaking tor Allstate Insurance Center on 19th Avenue between Rivera and Quintara Streets. 
Others, left to right, are R. A. Durtee, Jr., Allstate Resident Manager; Joe Francoeur. Group Manager, 
Sears Roebuck and Co.; Carl Gellert, President, Standard Building Company; and Alan K. Browne, Presi- 
dent of the Chamber. 

City wide Voluntary Vehicle Safety-Check 
Program, Chamber-sponsored, Next Week 

Plans for a voluntary coniniiinity vehicle community safety-check program, 
sponsored hy the Chamher and to be held May 26th, 27th and 28th, are complete, 
according to F. Torres Weir. Chairman of the Chamber's Traffic Safety & Control 
section. "'San Francisco is the first major city in the country to hold such a pro- 
gram." he said. 



"Nearly 48 million — or two out of every 
three registered vehicles — are using U. S. 
streets and highways without official checks 
to determine their safety. 

"More than 2V2 million vehicles were safety- 
rhicke I last year and 19.5 per cent — or ONE 
out of every FIVE — needed service attention. 

"Total casualties. 2.563.700. were the high- 
est in history. Speed and carelessness in check- 
ing cars account for four out of every five 
casualties."' 

\ chicle safety check lanes will be set up at 
the Marina Green ( in cooperation with Pre- 
sidio officials I. the Panhandle in Golden Gate 
Park, the Lake Merced end of Sunset Boule- 
vard and at Garfield Square. Harrison between 
25th and 26th Streets. 

The safety check is sponsored by the Traffic 



Safety and Control section of the Civic Devel- 
opment Committee of the Chamber in coopera- 
tion with the California Traffic Foundation, the 
San Francisco Chapter of the National Safety 
Council, the Pacific Telephone & Telegraph 
Co.. the Traffic Division of the San Francisco 
Police Department, the California Automobile 
Association, the California Safety Foundation, 
the San Francisco Unified School District, and 
the San Francisco Junior Chamber of Com- 
merce. 

Chairmen and vice chairmen of committees 
involved: 

Warren Brown, chairman, and Arl Sinilli and Amos Crov.1. 
imillee: John H. Brooke, 



lee; and H. A. Dunke 



and Pele Calk-jihe 



BAT REGION BUSINESS 



SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



ALAN K. BROWNE. President 

f;. L. FOX. General Manaeer 

M. A. HOCAN. Secretary 

JAMES D. WAHNOCK. Eleculi>e Editor 

JOSEPH I. HAUCHEY. Editor 

Published etery other week by the S«n Francisco Chamber 

o( Commerce at 333 Pine St.. San Francisco. Zone 4. 

County of San Francisco. California. Teleohone EXbrook 

2-«3n. (Non-member inbscriotion. t3.00 a year.) Entered 

a> Second Class matter Aoril 26. 1944. at the Post Office at 

San Francisco, Califomia. tinder the act of March 3. 1879. 

Circulation: 7,500 this issue 




FRANCISCO CHAMBER 



USINESS 



VOLUME 15 • NUMBER 12 • JUNE 6, 1958 



More Than 4,000 
Vehicles Checked 
In Safety Campaign 

More than 4.000 vehicles were checked in 
the recent citywide voluntary vehicle safety- 
check program sponsored hy the Chamber, 
according to F. Torres Weir. Chairman of the 
Traffic & Safety Control section. 

"We were highly pleased with the number 
of participants and the results," Weir contin- 
ued. "The total of cars checked exceeded our 
most optimistic expectations. Considering the 
fact that this was the first time such a pro- 
gram ever has been tried in a major city in 
the United States, we consider it was highly 
successful in its results." 

A total of 4.436 vehicles, including 3,679 
cars and 3.5.5 trucks, participated. 1,614 cars 
were rejected and a surprising number of 40^ 
returned to pass a recheck. Of the 355 trucks, 
including 314 mail trucks, 70 were declared 
unsafe. 

"Defective mechanism accounted for four 
out of five casualties last year," Weir pointed 
out. "We feel certain that the driving public 
has been made more conscious of this aspect 
of safe-driving as a result of our safety check 
program." 

Cooperating with the Chamber in the pro- 
gram were the California Traffic Safety Foun- 
dation. San Francisco Chapter of the National 
Safety Council, the San Francisco Police De- 
partment, the California Automobile Associa- 
tion. San Francisco Parochial and Public 
Schools, National Automobile Club, Private 
Truck Owners Bureau of California, and the 
Junior Chamber. 









PROMOTION of the new recording has included 
a special Chamber-sponsored exhibit at the World 
Trade Center International Exhibition as part of 
the World Trade Week. Shown are Ted S. Hayes, 
President, and Chris Jenkins, Vice President, Seal 
Records, and Robert Taylor, President of the San 
Francisco Area World Trade Association of the 
Chamber. 



S.F. HAS 7 BILLION DOLLAR FIRMS 

Backing up ifs title of "Headquarters City of the West," San Francisco now has 
seven of the nation's 90 corporations with assets exceeding a billion dollars. 

Heading the list is the Bank of America N.T. & S.A., largest bank in the world 
and fourth largest corporation in the country with nnore than 600 branches. 

According to the Chamber Research Department, 30 national enterprises with 
combined assets of $32.6 billion have headquarters here. Banks, railroad, steamship, 
utility, petroleum, insurance and manufacturing companies located here comprise a 
significant cross-section of the nation's economy. 

The seven San Francisco "Billion Dollar Club" members at the end of 1957 
compared to a year before, according to a recent survey by United Press inter- 
national, are: 



Bank of American N.T. & S.A. 
Pacific Telephone & Telegraph Co. 
Standard Oil Co. of California 
Southern Pacific Company 
Pacific Gas & Electric Company 
American Trust Company 
Crocker-Anglo National Bank 



Dec. 31, 1957 
$10,639,150,000 
2,397,380,000 
2,246,296,000 
2,177,191,000 
2,146,271,000 
1,682,866,000 
1,527,374,000 



Dec. 31, 1956 
$ 9,991,842,000 
2,088,068,000 
2,041,373,000 
2,136,537,000 
1,978,561,000 
1,620,354,000 
1,510,138,000 



'My Enchanted City' Record Commended 



Directors of the Chamber officially have 
commended and congratulated composers Ste- 
phen and Libby McNeil, conductor David 
Rose and Seal Records for "San Francisco — 
My Enchanted City," new long-playing rec- 
ord just issued. 

The special resolution commending the rec- 
ord followed the recommendation of the 
Chamber's Publicity Committee, of which John 
R. Little is chairman. 

"The quality of this production is outstand- 
ing in capturing the unique charms of San 
Francisco," the resolution stated. "Its poten- 
tial is great as a means of promoting the city 
on a national scale through regular sales 
channels, through sales to visitors and con- 
ventioneers, and through per.sonal and corpo- 
rate gift programs. It is an ideal souvenir of 
San Francisco." 

The statement also directed the Chamber to 
"promote the sale and gift of the record in 
every possible way through its various com- 
mit lees and departments." 

"This is the most successful effort to date to 
portray San Francisco in music and song," 
Little stated. "In the opinion of the Publicity 
(Committee, it is on a par with "Manhattan 
Towers" by Gordon Jenkins, which has sold 
nearly three million copies nationally, has 
been re-recorded several times, and been pro- 
duced as a television spectacular on a national 
network reaching many millions of viewers." 

The record is based on the sounds of San 
Francisco — cable cars, fog horns, the bells of 
ocean liners and of Mission Dolores, and the 
international accents of its different districts 
— set to music by Stephen McNeil and lyrics 
by his wife. Libby. It is sung by a large cast 
including Ray Coman. Jr., and played by 
Rose's orchestra. 




SAN FRANCISCO 



,^%~: AKuiaSr ^ UVIO lOSE 



HERE AT LAST is an excellent and lasting souvenir 
gift from San Francisco for your clients throughout 
the world. Retailing at $5.95. it is available in 
boxes of 20 at a saving of $1.05 a record through 
a special program of the Chamber for the benefit 
of the Second Century Club. Order today for 
Christmas, end-of-year and annual report gift pro- 
grams and benefit membership activities of your 
Chamber. 



Publicity Department 

San Francisco Chamber of Commerce 

333 Pine Street, San Francisco 4 

1 Please send k>oies of 20 records of 

"San Francisco — My Enchanted City," 

$99.00 a box. Including sales tax and 

shipping. Check enclosed. 
i I would like to arrange an audition of 

the recording by our company staff. 



Friday. June 6, 1958 



San Francisco Business Activity Sets 
April Record, Near-Record for 4 Months 

Business acthdty in San Francisco reached its highest peak in history for the 
month of April, and the first four months of this year surpassed all previous simi- 
lar periods except last year's record high, according to the Research Department 
of the Chamber. 

Tlie business activity index in April reached 155.5 compared to 149.1 in March 
and 154.4 last April. The four months average 



amounted to 149.5 compared to 152.2 last 
year and 146.3 in 1956. 

April business activity pulled ahead of 
March, leading by 4.3 per cent, and edged 
last April by 0.7 per cent. 

Financial Transactions Up 

April financial transactions, amounting to 
$4.2 billion in San Francisco, were S117 mil- 
lion above a year ago. The Bay Region total 
of $6.5 billion was up $265 million and ac- 
counted for a 2.4 per cent larger share of the 
12th Federal Reserve District total than last 
year. The four months cumulative amounted 
to $25.4 billion, an increase of 1.0 per cent 
over a year ago. 

$28.3 Million in Construction 

Construction authorized during the first four 
months in San Francisco amounted to $28.3 
million. New residential accounted for 814.8 
million, new non-residential $6.2 million and 
additional alterations and repairs |7.3 million. 
Multi-family dwelling units acounted for over 
half of the total units authorized. 

Commercial failures in San Francisco were 
33 per cent lower in April and 42 per cent 
lower during the four months of this year 
than the similar period last year. 

Duelling Units Up 9.9% 

Dwelling units authorized in the nine-county 
area (Alameda. Contra Costa, Marin. San 
Francisco, San Mateo, Solano, Napa, Santa 
Clara and Sonoma) during the four months 
were 9,9 per cent ahead of last year, April 
accounted for 3,333 units at a cost of $32,261,- 
000. Santa Clara County alone was responsible 
for 1,311 or more than one-third of the nine- 
county total, 

'Wait and See' View 
Affects Expansions 

First quarter figures for new plants and ex- 
pansions in northern California "reflect con- 
fidence in the industrial future of the West 
Coast." according to Lewis M. Holland. Man- 
ager of the Industrial Department of the 
Chamber. 

Although there is a slackening of activity — - 
reflected in the figures for the first quarter of 
the year compared to the previous year — it 
can be attributed to the current 'wait-and see' 
attitude of business in general." 



NEW PLANTS AND EXPANSIONS 




I9r.8 




First Quarter 
San Francisco 

5 New PlanU t 139.000 

22 Expansions _ 1,463,800 


31 Jobs 
87 Jobs 


27 Projects _ $ 1,602,800 


118 Jobs 



Bay Region 

4S New Plants „ _ $ 5,872,000 

UO Expansions _ 33.241.400 

185 Projects ..'. $39,113,400 

Korthem California 

58 New Plants S 6.858.000 

173 Expansions _ _ _ 39.048.800 

231 Projects $45,906,200 



In the transportation field, San Francisco 
Airport traffic attained a new April peak and 
a new high for the first four-month period. 
April passengers averaged 9,336 per day or a 
total of 280,077, and represented an increase 
of 7.2 per cent over last year; air freight rose 
1.2 per cent. 

Bridge Crossings Increase 

Bay Bridge vehicle crossings were up 4.2 
per cent for the four months cumulative pe- 
riod and the Golden Gate Bridge crossings 
were up 4.3 per cent 

April employment in the six-county metro- 
politan area reached 1,057,200 compared to 
1,056.700 in March. 

The State Department of Employment re- 




ported 75,700 persons unemployed or 6.7 per 
cent of the labor force compared to 3.7 per 
cent a year ago and a high of 9.3 per cent in 
April, 1949. 

Consumer Price Index Rises 

San Francisco consumer price index in 
March at 126.7 (1947-49=100) was 3.6 per 
cent above March last year. Food prices were 
up 5.8 per cent; rent 3.1 per cent; transporta- 
tion 3.1 per cent; medical 4.8 per cent; and 
personal care 3.9 per cent. 



Business Activity Through April, 1958 



BRANCH OF ACTIVITY 




APRIL 
1958 


% from 
1957 


4 MOS. 
I9S8 


% fro 
1957 


GENERAL BUSINESS ACTIVITY INDEX 




155.5 

939 

4,975,695 

1,372,400 

131 

63 

827,650 

2,775,645 

3,333 


0.7 

— I.I 

-57.3 

-3.9 

23.6 

— 10.0 

—90.3 

57.1 

8.0 


149.5 

3,357 

28.263,610 

14,778,240 

657 

241 

6,163,400 

7,321,970 

10,621 




r.ONSTRUr.TinN PFRMITS Tot^ll 


Number 

Value 

. Value 




Rp?;Hpntinl Npw 


2.9 
236 8 


DwcMint] Unit? 

."^tnglp-family unit-; Npw 

Non-residential, New .... _. . _. ._. . 


Mumber 
Number 
...Value 
.. Value 


79.5 

—1.2 

—60.2 

2.4 


Nine county dwelling units authorized 


^Jurnber 


9.9 


REAL ESTATE-Deerfs Recorded _. 


dumber 


1,422 


—3.9 


5,740 


—5.5 


RETAIL DEPARTMENT STORE SALES _ _ 


....Index 


115 


-^.9 


105 


-2.7 


FINANCE— Bant Dehits 


._. $000 


4,252,770 
2,724,514 
2,238.546 
52,515,217 


2.8 

7.5 

-33.6 

— 14.1 


16,090,419 

10,019,965 

9,533,997 

196,379,346 


— 1.6 


Pn>;t«l Rpreipts 

Pacific Coast Stock Exchange „. .Shares 

Market 


. .$ 

traded 

value $ 


— 1.5 
— 15.8 
—8.8 


COMMERCIAL FAILURES ..._ _. ... 


^lumber 


10 


-33.3 


36 


— )l.9 


INDUSTRY TREND— 6 County Total Employment _ 


rrnings] 
=yment) 


l,067,200{p) 
(n) 

202,700(p) 
6l,700fp) 
68,200{p 

I7l,000(p; 
79,400(p) 

246,300{p) 

Il6,700(p) 
I7,200(p) 
9l,500(p) 
2,400(p) 


—2.1 

^"s 

-12.2 

-0.6 

—1.2 

0.0 

3.0 

—3.6 

-5.0 

0.4 

^.0 


l,057,200(p) 
(n) 

203,775(p 
6l,700(p 
68,275(p 

I7l,600(p 
79.700(p) 

244,900(p' 

Il7,325(p) 
I6,I25(p: 
9l,475(p) 
2,525(p) 


— 1.6 


Mfg. Average Weekly Earnings (e 

Mriniifartirring (»>mpl 

Construction, contract __ 

Finance, insurance, real estate 


-5^8 

-12.2 

0.0 

—0.5 


Whnle^slp trnrlp 
.<;ervlre 


0.8 
3.1 


Trnn'; rnmm » utilities 


—2.7 


Agririiltiire 


-1.2 


Govt. — Federal, state, city _ 

Oth»r 


0.3 
—2.9 


TRANSPORTATION— Freight car movement. .. 

S. F. Airport— Planes In and Out 

Prt«f.ngf.r<L Off nrri On 

Air Mail Loaded and Unloaded __ 


Number 
Number 
Number 
_....Lbs. 
Lbs. 


11,514 

9,922 

280,077 

3,307,302 

584,333 

6 049,036 

63,099 

159.1 

(n) 


— 19.6 
-6.7 

7.2 
7.6 

— 13.9 

1.2 

10.2 

—0.1 


43,439 

40,895 

1,062,466 

12,428,936 

2,794,263 

23,876,791 

257,131 

151.8 

(n) 


—19.7 

—3.8 

7.7 

6.8 

-12.8 


Air Froight \ nnrl^ri and llnlr.arl#.d 


..Lbs. 


1.3 


Rail Express Shipments ... .... 

•Tr.irl Mnv^mpnt,- <; F Aroa 


Number 
....Index 
slumber 


—9.9 
0.0 


Out-of-State passenger car entries into No. Calif — 





PORT OF SAN FRANCISCO— Revenue Tons 

Coastwise Rfive 


.._Total 
lue tons 


447,848 
9,413 
38,380 
155,256 
245,799 


—29.3 
—27.3 
-27.3 
-35.9 
-24.6 


1,807,173 
22,905 
121,349 
652,377 

1,011,552 


—18.9 
—51.6 


Intcrrnrntal " 


—32.8 


Inland Waterway _. " 

Foreign , ., " 


—24.1 
—13.2 


CARGO VESSELS (San Francisco Bay) 

Arrivals _._ _ _ 


Number 


392 
1,818,438 


—6.9 
—8.9 


1,492 
7,133,795 


—3.3 

—3.1 


UTILITIES-lnd. & Comm. Gas Sales _. 

•Elec. Energy Sales, K.W. Hours _ _ _..._ 


.Cu. Ft. 
...Index 


1,487,876,200 

151 

155,534,000 

1,817 
2,958,254 
1,221,688 


6.5 

4.1 

—0.2 

4.0 
6.7 


6,322,766,700 

159 

618,816,000 

6,937 
11,244,170 
4,861,544 


I.I 
3.9 


Water Consumption— Comm. & Ind _ _ 


.Cu. Ft. 


— 1.5 


NEW DEVELOPMENTS 

Visitor and Newcomer Inquiries _ _.. ._ 

Bay Bridge Vehicle Crossings _ 

Golden Gate Bridge Vehicle Crossings 


Number 
Number 
Number 


11.9 
4.2 
4.3 


FRUITS & VEGETABLE RECEIPTS 


Carlots 


3,394 


0.2 


12,923 


10.0 


LIVESTOCK SLAUGHTER (Insp. Dists.) _... 


Number 


89.000(a) 


— 11.9 


278,000(b) 


— 16.1 


•S. F. CONSUMER PRICE INDEX— All Items 


._ 


126.7(a) 


3.6 







• Index Base (1947-49 Monthly Average = 100); (a) March la 
iminary. Basic data sources not shown due to space limitatic 


est: (b) 
n. but a 


3 months; (m) 
vallable upon r 


not aval 
equest. 


able for survey; 


P) pre 



RESEARCH DEPARTMENT, SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



Friday, June 6, 1958 



Hitting the High Spots 



with JIM WARNOCK 

CHAMBER PRESIDENT Alan K. Browne was an 
auctioneer in the KQED television auction which 
runs through this weekend. Among the items auc- 
tioned to support the West's outstanding television 
station were a photo mural donated by the Cham- 
ber's Publicity Department and five recordings of 
"San Francisco — My Enchanted City" autographed 
by conductor David Rose and donated by Seal Rec 
ords and Sonic Distributors. . . . 

HENRY H. KEITH, former account executive at 
McCann-Erickson International, New York, has 
been appointed Assistant Manager of the World 
Trade Department of the Chamber. Keith replaces 
Richard J. Abbott, former Assistant Secretary of 
the Trans-Pacific Freight Conference, who has left 
the Chamber to seek other employment 
THE SECOND ANNUAL JACKSON SQUARE 
DAY, sponsored by the Chamber, was held yester- 
day wtih 60 showrooms opening their doors to 
several thousand visitors. The Square now boasts 27 
buildings, 60 showrooms and approximately 255,000 
square feet of showroom space in an area bounded 
by Pacific, Washington, Montgomery and Sansome 
Streets, In the past year ten new firms have been 
added to the membership roster of the Jackson 
Square Association and have brought more new 
fabrics, wallpapers, floor coverings, furniture and 
decorative accessories to the famed area. 
"BRITANNIA DAY," May 8, was proclaimed by 
Acting Mayor Harold S. Dobbs to honor BOAC's 
recently inaugurated Bristol Britannia Jet-Prop 
service, fastest air link to Europe by 35 minutes 
yet offered Northern California residents. World's 
largest and fastest commercial airliner, the Britan- 
nia made its trans-Atlantic debut on December 19 
on BOAC's New York-London route and already 
holds two speed records on this run. The giant 
transport is completely vibrationless and is the 
intermediate step beteween piston driven aircraft 
and pure jet. . . , 



"San Francisco is the most pub- 
licized city in the world. In only 
two days here I can see why.'' 

— David Lewin, Editor of 
Lord Beaverbrook's 
London Daily Express 

Thanks lo Jack Rosenbaum, SAN FRANCISCO NEWS 



AHESTING TO THE GROWING importance of 
soccer in the local sports scene, the Manchester, 
England, soccer team played to a large audience 
at Kezar Stadium Wednesday night, Matthew J. 
Boxer, General Chairman of the California Football 
Association and San Francisco Football League and 
a member of the Board of Directors of the Retail 
Merchants' Association, reports 
PEOPLE TO PEOPLE is the title of the excellent 
new public service discussion program of the World 
Affairs Council of Northern California seen on 
KRON-TV at 1:30 p.m. every Sunday 
APPRAISAL REQUESTS for proposed Gl homes 
went up 195 per cent to a total of 24,800 during 
April, compared with 8,406 received in March, 
according to Sumner G. Whittier, Administrator of 
Veterans Affairs. . . . 

AIDING YOUTH WANTS TO WORK, proiect 
sponsored by the Chamber and many civic organ- 
izations, the San Francisco Examiner will run a four- 
line ad free for four days for any firm or individual 
wishing to employ student summer help, office or 
domestic. Contact Miss Eddy, SU 1-2424 Ext 
791 




"This should help clear up 
your congestion" 

CARTOON is from the excellent new publication 
of the San Francisco Bay Area Rapid Transit Dis- 
trict. Entitled "Rapid Transit," it has been mailed 
to all members of Chamber committees. If you 
would like to be placed on the mailing list, contact 
B. R. Stokes, Editor and Director of Information 

870 Market, YD 2-9838 

EUGENE I. HARRINGTON has been elected 
Chairman of the Board of Honig-Cooper & Miner, 
West Coast advertising agency with offices at 1275 
Columbus Avenue, according to Louis Honig, Pres- 
ident. Honig also said the agency name will be 
expanded to Honig-Cooper, Harrington & Miner 
effective July I. . . . 

KRON-TV's "SCIENCE IN ACTION" has won sec- 
ond place honorable mention in the Ohio State 
Awards for 1958 in the category of "cultural, 
drama, art, science and literature" programs — the 
only award made to any local California television 
station north of Los Angeles. . . . 
PARCEL AIR, a new method of shipping by air 
providing two to three-day delivery service from 
the Bay Area to any city in the country at rates 
comparable to surface transportation, was an- 
nounced recently with the opening of offices f. ■ 
American Shippers, Inc., at San Francisco Inte- 
national Airport. . . . 

AMERICAN AIRLINES will inaugurate new "Super 
speed" airfreight flights at San Francisco Inter 
national Airport June 9, providing a major improve 
ment in volume, schedules, and flight connection: 
for air cargo shippers of the Bay Area, accordin.:. 
to G. E. Coon, District Sales Manager. . 
TRANS WORLD AIRLINES made a strong appea 
to the Civil Aeronautics Board last week for the 
removal of what it termed "the oldest surviving 
restrictions in the industry," preventing TWA from 
offering unrestricted service between Los Angelo 
San Francisco and Oakland as is done by Unite : 
and Western. . . . 

FORMATION OF A NEW PUBLICATIONS DIVI- 
5'ON, offering complete printing and production 
facilities for house organs and magazines of other 
firms, has been announced by Pacific Shipper. Inc., 
of San Francisco. John W. Fearn Associates has 
been appointed public relations and magazine con 
sultant to the new division. 

BRITISH MERCHANDISE CENTER, new firm with 
offices in the World Trade Center, represents 30 
British manufacturers covering a wide range of 
articles, including bone china, pottery, brushes, 
fancy goods, and knitwear. . . . 
SOUTHERN PACIFIC has won the National Safety 
Council's Public Safety Award for the fourth con- 
secutive year for its "outstanding program directed 
to employees and the general public." . 



PACIFIC GAS & ELECTRIC has installed a giant 
electronic computer capable of turning out 100.000 
customer bills a day. Norman R. Sutherland. Presi- 
dent and General Manager, announces. The 18-ton 
IBM 705, largest of its type west of the Mississippi. 
will eventually prepare nearly 2 million bills per 
month and handle all related records. . . 
E. WAYNE RUSSON of Salt Lake City has joined 
the public relations staff of United States Steel 
Corporation as Field Representative in the Western 
District with headquarters in San Francisco. . . 
SANTA FE RAILROAD is sponsoring $15,050 in 
scholarship awards to 4-H Club and Future Farmers 
of America members in nine states this year. . . . 
LINTON L EMERSON. JR., C. P. A. announces 
the merger of his practice with Bailey & Kokjer 
and continuation under the firm name of Bailey. 
Kokjer & Emerson. . . . 

RALPH J. WRENN of San Francisco, President of 
Stecher-Traung Lithograph Corporation, has been 
elected Vice President and Director of the Label 
Manufacturers National Association, also serves 
on the Executive Committee of the Lithographers 
National Association. . . . 

WALTER A. DIEHM, lecturer in business manage- 
ment, Stanford University Graduate School of 
Business, has been named Assistant Dean of the 
school. . . , 

DONALD K. ROSS has been appointed an Assist- 
ant Vice President of New York Life and placed 
in charge of the company's San Francisco invest- 
ment office. . . 

CHARLES V. AHERN has been named Vice Presi- 
dent and General Manager of Pacific Fruit Ex- 
press. . . . 

A. L WHITE has been named District Sales Mana- 
ger of Continental Airlines in the Bay Area. 
MARTIN BLATT. sports representative for United 
Air Lines' district sales office at Oakland, has been 
appointed Transportation Director forthe VIII Olym- 
pic Winter Games at Squaw Valley In I960 by 
Prentiss C. Hale, President of the Games Organiz- 
ing Committee. . . . 

PROPOSITION NO. 4 ON THE NOVEMBER 
STATE BALLOT, a $60-milllon self-liquidating Har- 
bor Bond Issue which includes $50 million for devel- 
opment of Port of San Francisco facilities and $10 
million for small craft harbor development, has 
been endorsed by Directors of the California State 
Chamber of Commerce and described as "essential 
to the operation of the port and financially feas- 
ible." ... 




CHANCELLOR ON CRUISE— Julius Raab (second 
from left), Chancellor of Austria, was the guest of 
Dan E. London (left). Commodore of the Great 
Golden Heet. aboard his flagship. THE ADVEN- 
TURESS, during a recent tour of the Bay. To ttie 
right is Dr. Wllfried Plati.r, Austrian Ambassador 
to the United States. Seated next to him is Alan K. 
Browne. President of ttie Chamber. Also on the 
cruise was Karl C. Weber, Austrian Consul to San 
Francisco. 



Friday, June 6, 1958 



Fall Fashion Show Is 
Slated July 24-25th 

The fourth annual Union Square Fashion 
Show, a civic event proclaimed by Mayor 
Christopher and staged and promoted by vari- 
ous civic organizations including the Chamber 
and the Retail Merchants Association, will be 
held July 24-25. according to Walter F. Kap- 
lan. President of the RMA. 



June 6-7-8 — NORTHERN CALIFORNIA INDUS- 
TRIAL MANAGERS CONFERENCE — Stateline, 
Nevada. 

June 9— "COASTAL DAYS" INVITATION COM- 
MITTEE, INTER-CITY SECTION—Directors Room, 
Room 200. Chamber, 11:00 a.m. 

June 10— JAPAN COMMITTEE— Directors Room, 
Room 200. Chamber, 6:00-7:00 p.m. 
June 10— TRANSPORTATION COMMITTEE— Di- 
rectors Room, Room 200, Chamber. 10:30-12:00 
p.m. 

June 10— AGRICULTURE COMMIHEE — Cirque 
Room Fairmont Hotel, 12:00 p.m. 
June io— SECOND CENTURY CLUB LUNCHEON 
MEETING— Iron Duke Restaurant, 132 Bush Street, 
12:15 p.m. 

June 13— CANCCOCE LUNCHEON MEETING— 
Garden Room, Fairmont Hotel, 12:30 p.m. 
June 16 — TAX SECTION MEETING — Directors 
Room, Room 200, Chamber, 3:00 p.m. 
June 17— JAPANESE CHAMBER— Directors Room, 
Room 200, Chamber, 6:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. 
June 18 — STREET, HIGHWAY AND BRIDGE 
SECTION MEETING — Mills Tower Building, 220 
Bush Street, Room 360, 10:00 a.m. till 12:00 p.m. 



HORSEPOWER PER PRODUCTION WORKER 
IN MANUFACTURING 



S\ 



WORKERS' HORSEPOWER SHOWS SHARP UPSWING 

Capital investment of millions of dollars by industry has increased the horsepower 
of factory equipment in manufacturing enormously over the years, according to the 
National Association of Manufacturers. 

The additional "muscle pow- 
er" made available for workers 
permits greater productivity 
and has been the primary con- 
tributor to our rising standard 
of living. 

Four of the 21 manufactur- 
ing groups — primary metals, 
chemicals, transportation 
equipment, petroleum and coal 
— account for a little more 
than half of the total power 
used in industry. 

The gain of horsepower 
available per production work- 
er since 1919 has been particu- 
larly sharp. 




^^^^ 



^ 



879 1889 1899 1909 1919 1929 193» 

1 Horsepower of Power Equipment, Bulletin MC-207 
U.5 Department of Commerte 

Prepored by NAM Ifom Gov'l 



'\outh Wants to Work' Summer Program Slated 



A "Youth Wants to Work" program to help 
high school and college students obtain vaca- 
tion jobs is being sponsored by the Chamber 
along with various other community organiza- 
tions. 

Participating organizations include the San 
Francisco public and parochial schools, San 
Francisco Youth Association, California De- 
partment of Employment. Down Town Asso- 
ciation, Junior Chamber of Commerce, The 



Guardsmen, San Francisco Youth Council and 
San Francisco Bay Area Publicity Club. 

Businessmen are asked to call the S. F. 
Youth Association, student division. PRospect 
6-3850. Work permits for all minors under the 
age of 18 can be secured by students from the 
Board of Education. Bureau of Attendance, 
room 16, 13.S Van Ness Avenue, UNderhill 
3-4580. 



Many Firms Participated in San Francisco's 8th Annual Education-Business Day 



More than 900 businessmen — largest num- 
ber in the history of the event — visited San 
Francisco schools during the eighth annual 
Education-Business Day held recently. 

Firms which sent representatives were: 

A-l Nurses Registry. Abbell Electric Corporation, Academy 



Co 



For, 
Brake Shoe 



• ompany, 

American Can Company. American Forest Products Corpora- 
lion. American President Lines, American Smelting & Re- 
fining Co., American Trust Company. 

Argonaut Insurance Company, Argonaut Savings & Loan 
Assn.. George C. Aronslamm, Ashley. Keyser and Runge, Auto 
Procurement Service. Automation & Speedwriling Institute, 
N. W. Ayer & Son. Baldxin, Lima, Hamilton Corp., Bank of 
America N.T. * S.A„ Bank of California, J. Barth and Com- 
pany. Batten, Barton, Durstine & Osbom, Inc. 

Bausch and Lomb Optical Co., Bechlel Corporation. Beth- 
lehem Pacific Coast Steel Corporation. Belter Business Bureau 
of San Francisco, Ltd.. T. J. Belles Company. Blake. Moffitt 
and Towne. Bonestell Paper Company. H. J. Brunnier, Cali- 
fornia Casually Indemnity Exchange, California & Hawaiian 
Sugar Refining Corp., Ltd., California Loan i Finance Asso- 
ciation. California Packing Corporation, California Savings & 
Loan Co., California Stale Automobile Assn., California The- 
atres Assn., Cal-Weslem Life Insurance Co., The Call-Bulletin. 

Camphell-Ewald Co., Cinerama Theatres of Calif., Inc., 
Citizens' Federal Savings & Loan Assn., City Transfer and 
Storage, The Coca-Cola Bottling Co. of CaliL, Cold«ell. 
Banker and Co., Colonial Savings & Loan Assn., Commercial 
Union-Ocean Group, Continental Service Company, Coronet 
Motel, Crocker-Anglo National Bank, Crown Zellerbach Cor- 
poralion. Leo A. Daly and Assoc, Dames & Moore, Dean Wit- 



ter and Co., John Deere Plow Company, Dictation Systems 
Company, Dohrmann Hotel Supply Co.. Earl and Wright Inc., 
Edwards Lumber and Mfg. Co., Employers' Group, The Em- 
porium, Equitable Life Assurance Co., Eureka Federal Savings 
& Loan Assn., Facit, Inc.. Fairman and Johnson Realtors, 
Howard H. Fassett Co.. Federal Reserve Bank of San Fran- 

Fibreboard Paper Products Corp., Fireman's Fund Insurance 
Company, First Western Bank and Trust Co., Foole, Cone and 
Belding, Foster and Kleiser Co., Fox Theatre, General Elec- 
tric, General Insurance Co., General Mills, General Motors 
Corp., General Petroleum Corp., Gladding. McBean and Co., 
Golden Slate Co., Ltd., William P. Goss, Great American 
Croup, Green Glen Dairy, Guild, Baseom and Bonfigli, Inc. 

J. H. Helsers and Co., Edward Hill Jr. & Associates, Hills 
Brothers Coffee, Inc.. The Home Insurance Co.. Home Mutual 
Savings & Loan Assn., Household Finance Corp., Hurt-Trudell- 
Capell, Arch.. IBM Corporation. Industrial Indemnity Com- 
pany, Irwin Memorial Blood Bank of S. F., KCBS, Donald 
Beach Kirby, Arch.. KPIX-TV, Kraft Foods, KRON-TV, Le- 
gallel Tanning Co., Leslie Salt Co., Libby McNeill and Libby, 
Liberty Mutual Insurance Co., H. Liebes and Co., Lillleman 
Stores, Link-Belt Company, Loomis Armored Car Service Inc., 
Luckenbach Steamship Co.. Lumbermen's Mutual Casualty Co.. 
Irving Lundborg and Co., Lybrand, Ross Bros. & Montgomery. 

Macy's. I. Magnin and Co.. Manning's Inc.. Marchant Cal- 
culators, Inc., Marsh & McLennan-Cosgrove and Co., Matson 
Navigation Co., Maurice Hotel, McCormick and Co., Inc., 
(Schilling Div.l, McKinsey and Co., Inc., Metropolitan Life 
Insurance Co., Milton Meyer and Co., Milo Harding Co. 

Monroe Calculating Machine Co., Inc., Morris Plan Co. of 
Calif.. R. H. Moullon and Co., Multiple Listing Service of 
S. F.. Municipal Railway. Mutual of New York. R. N. Nason 
and Co.. National Lead Co., O'Keefe and Merrill Co.. Outdoor 
Advertising Inc., Overseas Merchandise Inspection Co.. Ltd.. 
Owens Illinois, Pacific Airlines. Pacific Coast Stock Exchange. 



Pacific Finance Loans. Pacific Fire Rating Bureau. Pacific 
Gas St Electric Co., Pacific Inlermounlain Express, Pacific Tele- 
phone & Telegraph Co., Pacific Vegetable Oil Corp.. Pan Amer- 
ican World Airways. Paris Fashions. Inc.. Parkmerced - Metro- 
polilan Life Insurance Co.. Pepsi Cola-Belfast Beverages Inc., 
Pioneer Investors Savings and Loan. 

Planters Nut & Chocolate Co., Pope and Talbot, Precision 
Electrotype Co., Walter Radell Co.. Railway Express Agency, 
Ransohoffs, Inc.. RCA Communications, Inc., Regal Pale Brew- 
ing Co.. Remington Rand. Richfield Oil Corp.. Romaine. 
Skellon, Roos Brothers, Inc., Roval-Globe 



St. Fri 



Me 



Examiner, S.F. Fed 

Naval Shipyard. Sai 

John Sardis and As 

and Co.. Shell Ch< 

Towel Service & Supply Co 

SoundScriber-Califomia Inc.. Souths 



I Hospiul. St. Luke's Hospital. Salvation 
Chamber of Commerce. San Francisco 
al Savings & Loan Assn.. San Francisco 
Francisco News. Santa Fe Railway Co.. 
.. Schwabacher and Co., Sears Roebuck 
Corporation. Shell Oil Co.. Shop 
»ns Co.. W. & J. Sloane. 



■ific Co. 



Oil C 



Southwestern Publishing Co.. Spreckels Russell Dairy Co.. 
Ltd., Standard Oil Company of California. Stewart Eubanks 
Meyerson and Co.. Levi Strauss and Co., Tidewater Oil Com- 
pany, Touche Niven Bailey and Smart. 

Union Central Life Ins. Co 
United Air Lines, United Paci 
Steel Corp., Van Waters and Rogers Inc 
Co., Les Vogel Chevrolet Co., Gene K. 
Walker Engraving Corp., John Carl Wa 

Fargo Bank, West Coast Life Insurance Co., Western Electric 
Co., Western Employers Senice, Western Greyhound Lines, 
Western Machinery Co., The Western Pacific Railroad Co.. The 
Western Union Telegraph Co., Westinghonse Electric Corp., 
Wheel Industries Inc., The White House, F. W. Woolworth, 
Yellow Cab Co., Zellerbach Paper Co. 



»f California. 
Co., United Slates 
Victor Equipment 
Calker Associates, 
ecke, AIA, Wells 



a'N'ESS 



SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



ALAN K. BROWNE, President 

C, L. FOX, General Manager 

M. A. HOCAN. Secrelarr 

JAMES D. WARNOCK. Executive Editor 

JOSEPH I. HAUGHEY. Editor 

Pobliihed every other week by the San Francisco Chamber 
of Commerce at 333 Pine St.. San Francisco, Zone 4. 
ConntT of San Francisco. California, Teleohone EXbrook 
2-4511. (Non-member inbicripUon. to.OO m year.) Entered 
•• Second Qaii matter Aoril 26. 1944. at the Poit Office at 
San Franciico, California, under the act of March 3. 1879, 
Cireuiation: 7,500 thU U$u€ 




FRANCISCO CHAMBER 



USINESS 



VOLUME 15 • NUMBER 13 • JUNE 20. 1958 



S^^ ^n^OHCc^ccuta 



SAN FRANCISCO 
BOYS CHORUS 




COSMOPOLITAN CHORUS— Including all races and creeds, the San Francisco Boys' Chorus, now 
celebrating its lOth anniversary, is an integral part of San Francisco's cultural life. Here are some 
of the boys singing under the direction of Madi Bacon, 

Unique among San Francisco's musical organizations is the San Francisco 
Boys' Chorus, now celebrating its 1 0th anniversary. 

Kurt Herbert Adler and the late Gaetano Merola founded the chorus to 
fill children's parts in local opera productions. They asked Miss Madi Bacon, 
then head of the music extension division of the University of California, to 
recruit and train a group of boys between eight and 14 years of age. More 
than 550 boys have been members of the chorus since its inception. About 75 
are current members. 

Since its organization the chorus "has taken off on a jetpropelled career 
of its own," in the words of Alfred Frankenstein, music critic of the SAN 
FRANCISCO CHRONICLE. 

Despite its success in appearances with the San Francisco and Cosmopoli- 
tan Opera companies and in many concerts under the direction of distin- 
guished conductors, San Francisco Boys' Chorus needs outside support to 
supplement its income from concerts and tuitions. Tuitions are kept low in order 
not to deprive the chorus of any fine voices and some scholarships are given 
by the group. 

"The San Francisco Boys' Chorus, a nonprofit musical and educational 
foundation is worthy of financial and promotional support by all those inter- 
ested in furthering the city's reputation as an outstanding American cultural 
center," Frankenstein said. 

Through their many appearances the boys have gained valuable training 
in stage deportment and in working with top-rate professional artists as well 
as learning great music. Being a part of the boys' chorus is also an experience 
in group living. The chorus includes boys from all creeds, races and walks of 
life. The boys elect their own officials. The more experienced members help 
conduct and teach the others. At their Feather River summer camp the boys 
are given classes in music theory, instrumental practice and rehearsals plus 
all the usual camp activities and sports. 

Under the direction of Miss Bacon, the group has developed a large 
repertoire, including religious music, art and folk songs and dramatic works. 
"Tom Sawyer," a folk-opera, was written for them specifically by Jonathan 
Elkus. Another work written for the chorus was "The Hypnotist," by Mell 
Carey, young Bay Area composer. 

The RCA Victor recording of "Borus Goudonoff" with Leopold Stokowski 
conducting includes the boys' chorus singing in Russian. They also had a promi- 
nent part in the production "Joan of Arc at The Stake" by Honegger and 
produced by the Opera Company in 1955, and roles in such operas as "Car- 
men," "La Boheme," "Tosca," "Parsifal" and "Rosenkavalier." 

A regular feature, ask the Chamber for reprints, 333 Pine Street, EXbrook 2-451 I 



Sutherland Named 
California's Top 
1957 Industrialist 

Norman R. Sutherland. San Francisco-born 
President of the Pacific Gas & Electric Co.. 
was named California Industrialist of the Year 
1957 at the First Annual Science and Industry- 
Awards banquet held recently at the Beverly 
Hilton Hotel under the 
sponsorship of the Cali- 
fornia Museum of Science '' 
and Industry. 

Sutherland won the 
award "for over-all busi- 
ness leadership" and for 
"spearheading construc- 
tion of the Vallecitos 
Atomic Power Plant at 
Pleasanton. the first pri- 
vately financed atomic 
power plant in the United 
States." He received a gold medallion. 

Two Californians shared the Scientist of the 
Year Award: Dr. Heinz L. Fraenkel-Conrat. 
virus laboratory research chemist at the Tni- 
versity of California. Berkeley, and Dr. \^il- 
liam A. Fowler, profes.sor of physics at the 
California Institute of Technology. They 
shared a $5,000 award. 

More than 1.000 persons, including G. L. 
Fox. General Manager of the Chamber and a 
member of the awards jury, attended the ban- 
quet. 

Dr. Fraenkel-Conrat was cited for experi- 
ments with virus nucleic acid "whicii have 
brouglit man closer to an understanding, in 
terms of chemical structure, of the mechan- 
isms of virus infection and of hereditv." 




N. R. Sutherland 




VERSATILITY— Th,^ San Fr,,nc;sco Boys' Chorus has 
a large repertoire which includes the performing of 
Jonathan Elkus' folk opera "Tom Sawyer." Left to 
right are "Tom Sawyer," "Huckleberry Finn" and 
"Joe." 



SAN FRANCISCO TAX CALENDAR— SECOND HALF, 1958 

CITY— STATE— FEDERAL 

Compiled by the Research Department, San Francisco Chamber of Commerce 



CITY-STATE SECTION 



CITY-STATE SECTION (Cont'd) 



Final 
Date 



Each month 
this day 



Interested 
Parties 



July 

See 

"Each 

Month this 

Day' 



Distributors 
motor-vehicle 

fuel 



agents, and 
wholesalers, 
rectifiers and 
brandy mfrs. 

Beer and wine 
mfrs. and 
importers 



Motor vehicle 
transportation 
operators 

Users of 
Diesel fuel in 
motor vehicles 

Retailers and 
purchasers of 
tangible per- 
sonal property 
subject to tax 



Off-sale gen- 



31 

August 

See 

■■Each 

Month thi 

Day 



■■Each 

Month this 

Day' 



October 

See 

"Each 

Month thi 

Day 

IS 



tangible per- 
sonal property 
subject to tax 

Retailers and 
purchasers of 
tangible per- 
sonal property 
subject to tax 

Employers 



Property 



Corporatic 



Responsible 
Agency 



ile report and pay tax on distilled spirits 
ales for second preceding month. 

File and pay tax for the second preceding 



File report of alcoholic beverages Imported 
during preceding month. 



File report and pay tax for preceding r 



eport and pay taxes for preceding 



report and pay tax for preceding month 
on transactions In petroleum products. 



return on or before 25th and pay tax 
for preceding month. 



File report and pay tax for preceding 



File return and pay tax on or before last day 

lonth after close of taxable quarter. If 
quired to pay on monthly basis, do so by last 
day of month following. 



File report for fiscal year ended t/30 and pay 
required additional license fee. 



File sales tax return and pay tax for quarter 
ended t/30/5e. (See last day each month.) 



File purchase and use tax return and pay tax 
for quarter ended 6/30/58. 



File return and pay second quarter State Un 
employment and Disability Insurance Tax. 



Pay second installment of tax if on calenda 
year basis. 



Last day to pay taxes on unsecured personal 
property roll. 



File return and pay at least half of corp 
tion franchise tax if year ended 6/30/58. 



Pay second installment of corporation fran 
chise tax if on calendar year basis. 



File and pay first installment of individual 
income tax if fiscal year ended 6/30/58. 



Retailers and 
purchasers of 
tangible per- 
sonal property 
subject to tax 

Retailers and 
purchasers of 
tangible per- 
sonal property 
subject to tax 

Employers 



State Bd. of 
Equalization 



State I 

Equall 



State Bd. of 
Equalization 



State Bd. of 
Equalization 



State Bd. of 
Equalization 



State Bd. of 
Equalization 



State Bd. of 
Equalization 



State Bd. of 
Equalization 



File purchase and use tax return and pay tax 
for quarter ended 9/30/58. 



File return and pay third quarter State Ur 



State Bd. of 
Equalization 



S. F. City 
and County 
TaxCollecto 



State Dept. of 
Employment 



S. F. City 
and County 
Tax Collector 



State Bd. of 
Equalization 



S. F. City 
and County 
Tax Collectoi 



State Dept. of 



Final 
Date 



November 

See 

"Each 

Month this 

"Day 

15 



December 
See 

"Each 

Month this 

Day^' 



Interested 
Parties 



Producers and 
brokers, motor 
vehicle fuel 



Responsible 
Agency 



Pay first installment real property taxes and 
one-half or all personal property taxes on 
Secured roll. 

Pay third installment of personal income tax. 



Pay fee and apply for license for ensuing year 



Last day for renewal of licensi 



S. F. City 
and County 
Tax Collector 

State 
Franchise 
Tax Board 

State Bd. of 
Equalization 



Department 
of Alcoholic 
Beverage 
Control 



FEDERAL SECTION 



Each month 
this day 



Quarterly 
Last Day 
of Month 



July 31 

and 

Oct. 31 



Retailers, 
mfrs., 
amusemer 
cabarets 



f income tax withheld, plus 41/2% of wages 
ubject to social security equal or exceed 
$100, pay to authorized depository. Payment 
for last month each quarter due last day of 
the following month with filing of return. 

returns covering stocks and bonds trans- 
actions for preceding month, accounting for 
stamps for stamp taxes. 

Individuals whose fiscal year ends on last day 
of any month except December— file declara- 
tion of income tax and pay first installment of 
estimated tax on 15th of 4th month following; 
the first amendment and second payment are 
due on 15th of the 6th month following; the 
second amendment and third payment on the 
15th of 9th month following; final amendment 
and payment the 15th of the 13th month fol- 
lowing; with final return due the 15th of the 
4th month following close of the fiscal year. 

Corporations whose fiscal year ends on last 
day of any month other than December— In- 
come tax returns are due by 15th of the 3rd 
month following the end of the fiscal year 
and at least one-half taxes then payable. 
Balance of tax is payable on the 15th day 
of 6th month following close of fiscal year 

File returns by 15th day of 4th month aftei 
close of fiscal year; trust taxes in full accom 
pany returns but estates may make first quar 
terly payment on filing date with installment: 
due on 15th of fourth, seventh, tenth and 13th 
month after close of fiscal year. 

On last day of month after each calenda: 
quarter, file return for preceding quarter or 
Form No. 720 and pay tax due for admissions 
dues, and miscellaneous taxes, including Re 
tailers Excise Tax. If liable amounts in am 
month except last month of each quarte 
exceed $100, deposit such amounts in a Fed 
eral Reserve Bank or any authorized local 
bank by last day of following month. 

Last day to file quarterly return and make 
payment of taxes of preceding calendar quar 
ter for Federal Income and Social Security 
Pay quarterly installment on Federal Unem- 
ployment Insurance tax. 



ated 



File declaration and pay first installn 
corporation's 1958 estimated tax. 



ta; 



Responsible 
Agency 



District 
Director of 
Internal 
Revenue 

District 
Director of 
Internal 



District 
Directo 
Interna 



District 
Director of 
Internal 



District 
Director of 
Internal 
Revenue 



District 
Director 
Internal 



District 

Director of 

Internal 

Revenue 

District 

Director of 

Internal 

Revenue 

District 

Director of 

Internal 

Revenue 



OFFICES OF TAX AGENCIES 

Assessor, City and County of San Francisco, City Hail, Kl 2-1910 

Tax Collector, City and County of San Francisco, City Hall, HE 1-2121 

California State Board of Equalization, Stale Building, UN 1 8700 

State Franchise Tax Board, 540 Van Ness Avenue, UN 1-7234 

Stale l^otor Vehicle Department, 160 South Van Ness Avenue, UN 3-0300 

District Director of Internal Revenue, 100 McAllister Street, UN 3 4900 



Friday, June 20, 1958 



Hitting the High Spots 



With JIM WARNOCK 

GREAT GOLDEN FLEET of the Chamber, led by 
Commodore Dan E. London's flagship the ADVEN- 
TURESS, will greet the U. S. First Fleet when It sails 
into the bay July 3. Skippers interested In joining 
the Great Golden Fleet in escorting the naval 
vessels into the bay from a rendezvous near the 
Golden Gate are asked to contact Sidney Keil. 
Fleet Secretary, at the Chamber, EXbrook 2-4511. 

Ext. 63. for details 

WESTERN AIR LINES, grounded for 108 days by a 
pilots' union strike, again is providing daily air 
service to travelers and shippers throughout its 
9,153-mile route system extending from Minne- 
apolis-St. Paul to San Diego and from Seattle to 
Mexico City. Return of WAL flights on June 10 
climaxed the most intensive and carefully-planned 
"back-to-work" program in airline Industry annals. 
O. R. Doerr. Third Vice President of the Chamber, 
participated in brief re-opening ceremonies. . . . 
COPIES OF EXHIBITS showing the need for addi- 
tional nonstop airline carrier service between San 
Francisco and New York, prepared by the Chamber 
Transportation department for use at the July 8 
Civil Aeronautics Board hearing here, have been 
sent to all Interested parties by Charles C. Miller. 
Transportation Department Manager. . . . 
AMPHON SUNANANTA, Inspecting Commission- 
er, Ministry of Communications, Government of 
Thailand, recently visited Transcon Lines' San Fran- 
cisco and Oakland facilities as the third phase in a 
study sponsored by the International Cooperation 
Administration. . . . 




SAN FRANCISCO 

MilEililMBITEDCBTY 

.'Xtm amUugSf ^ DAVm HOSE m.^iL-aiuSi i^.^ 



HERE AT LAST is an excellent and lasting souvenir 
gift from San Francisco for your clients throughout 
the world. Retailing at $5.95, It Is available in 
boxes of 20 at a saving of $1.05 a record through 
a special program of the Chamber for the benefit 
of the Second Century Club. Order today for 
Christmas, end-of-year and annual report gift pro- 
grams and benefit membership activities of your 
Chamber. 



Publicity Department 

San Francisco Chamber of Commerce 

333 Pine Street, San Francisco 4 

D Please send boxes of 20 records of 

"San Francisco — My Enchanted City," 

$99.00 a box. Including sales \iix and 

shipping. Check enclosed. 
□ I would like to arrange an audition of 

the recording by our company staff. 



NEW MEMBERS IN RECENT MONTHS 




Paul F. O'Ga 



New members recently added to the Chamber roster include the above (left to 
right): Paul F. O'Gara. Partner, O'Gara and O'Gara, Attorneys: William H. Gacke. 
Vice President, Gould, Gleiss & Benn, Inc.; Thomas F. Stack. Thomas F. Slack Law 
Offices; Robert Vanderbilt, Director. Robert Vanderbilt Agency and S.F. Casting Offices; 
and Karl Romaine, President, Romaine-Skelton, Inc. Photographers. 




NEW JETLINER— Here Is the first of 138 swept- 
wlng DC-8 Jetliners built by Douglas Aircraft and 
expected to be put In use next year at International 
Airport by American Airlines, Inc., Japan Air Lines 
Co., Ltd., Pan American World Airways, Inc., 
Qantas Empire Airways, Ltd.. and Trans World Air- 
lines, Inc. This 600-mph aircraft Is destined for serv- 
ice on 17 of the world's leading airlines. Capable of 
carrying from 118 to 175 passengers, the DC-8 
measures 139 feet 9 Inches from wingtip to wingtip 
and 150 feet six Inches in length. The slanting tall 
towers more than 42 feet off the ground. Douglas 
has poured some $250 million of private capital into 
the Jetliner. 



3RD ANNUAL BLACK AND WHITE SYMPHONY 
BALL realized $23,000 for the San Francisco Sym- 
phony and was an outstanding success, according 
to Kenneth Monteagle, President of the Associa- 
tion, who expressed appreciation of the Chamber's 
assistance. . . . 

80 PROMINENT SCIENTISTS took part in a two- 
day conference on communication of scientific in- 
formation at the San Jose Research Laboratory o' 
International Business Machines Corp., in conjunc- 
tion with the recent dedication and opening of the 
new facility. . . . 

DOBSON, INC., announces the acquisition of Asso 
clated-AD Products, distributors of advertising spe- 
cialties and selling aids. The firm will continue to 
work independently as a division of Dobson, under 
the management of Homer R. Jackson, Vice Presi 
dent, with headquarters at 532-36 Jessie St. . . . 
EIGHTEEN SAN FRANCISCO SOCIETIES will pa, 
ticlpate in the San Francisco Rower Show to be 
held August 21 and 22 in the rotunda of Cit> 

Hall 

LT. GEN. JAMES M. GAVIN, recently retired Chief 
of Army Research and Development, delivered the 
principal address at the First Science and Industry 
Awards banquet at the Beverly Hilton Hotel. Los 
Angeles. The event paid tribute to California's 
Scientist of the Year and Industrialist of the Year, 
both announced that night. . . . 
HOTEL BROADMOOR, Sutter and Gough. now 
specializes in permanent guests, offering attractive- 
ly furnished two and three-room suites with fuM 
hotel service. . . . 

WILLIAM P. KELLEY is new West Coast editorial 
representative of Doubleday & Company. Inc. 
located at 449 Phelan Building, succeeding Miss 
Mary Lou Mueller, now a June bride. . . 



$975,000 CONTRACT FOR CONSTRUCTION c- 

a jet engine overhaul buiiding at San Franciscc 
International Airport has been awarded by United 
Air Lines to Haas and Haynie. General Contrac- 
tors. The line has increased its service between San 
Francisco International Airport and Reno by three 
additional round-trip flights dally, effective June 
I. . . . 

PACIFIC GAS AND ELECTRIC COMPANY has 

won the 1957 Edison Electric Institute Residential 
Sales Award In competition with all other electric 
and combination utility companies serving moro 
than 300.000 customers. . . . 

A BUSINESS UPSWING n the late fall and a 
boom in the early '60s was predicted by Adrlen J. 
Falk, retired president of S & W Fine Foods and 
past President of the Chamber, speaking before 250 
business leaders at the California Business Admin- 
istration Alumni conference at Berkeley. . . . 
BILL RODDY, San Francisco TV film producer, has 
a new program, "Boat Show," every Friday at 6:45 
p.m. on KNBC, sponsored by Scott-Atwater Califor- 
nia Co. . . . 

CALIFORNIA FARMS. RANCHES and recreational 
acreages are meeting with an unprecedented de- 
mand, according to Robert M. Chamberlain, Presi- 
dent of United Farm Agency, nationwide rural real 
estate brokerage organization. Inquiries for Cali- 
fornia farm land have Increased 50 per cent com. 
pared to the first quarter of last year. . . 
FINK AND SCHINDLER. specializing In fixture* 
and custom made furniture for stores, banks and 
offices, is observing Its seventy. fifth anniversary and 
is the oldest firm of Its kind in the West. . . . 

NEW HOTELS. OFFICE CONSTRUCTION HERE— 
A total of $551/2 million will be expended for hotels 
and office construction by Hilton Hotels Corpora- 
tion. Work on a 20-slory. lODO-room. $23 million 
structure at Mason and O'Farrell will begin within 
six months. Hilton also plans a $30 million office 
building at Ellis and Taylor. A $2l,/2 million Inn 




(above) will be built 01 a 10 ac 

from the International Airport ma.n Terminal Du id- 
ing. The Cahill Construction Company already has 
begun filling and leveling for the construction of the 
inn. The circular one-story building (right) will in- 
clude a restaurant, coffee shop, cocktail lounge, 
kitchen, three private dining rooms and registration 
and administrative offices. The two buildings (left), 
each two stories high, will have 300 bedrooms, a 
landscaped patio and two swimming pools. 



Friday, June 20, 1958 




OLD FIRM RELOCATES HERE— Abbot A. Hanks, 
Inc.. oldest laboratory of its kind In the United 
States — established 92 years ago by Henry G. 
Hanks, first California State minerologist — is moving 
from 624 Sacramento Street to Sansome and Filbert 
Streets. Total investment, including land costs, for 
the new laboratory is $300,000. Breaking ground for 
the new site are (left to right): Elvin C. Stendell, 
contractor; Theodore P. Dresser, Jr., Vice President 
and Chief Engineer of the corporation; Herbert D. 
Imrle, President: and John Lyon Reid, architect of 
John Lyon Reid & Partners. 




NEW LABORATORY— This is the architect's drav 
ing of Abbot A. Hanks. Inc , new laboratory. 



June 23 — AVIATION LUNCHEON MEETING — 

Commercial Club, 12 noon. 

June 23— "COASTAL DAYS" INVITATION COM- 
MITTEE MEETING — Directors Room, Room 200. 

Chamber. I I a.m. 

June 24— TRANSPORTATION COMMIHEE MEET- 
ING— Directors Room, Room 200, Chamber, 10:30 
tl: 12:00 p.m. 

June 25— "COASTAL DAYS" COMMITTEE MEET- 
ING— Commercial Club. 12 noon. 

June 27— BRAZILIAN STUDY GROUP— 1 5t Floor 

Conference Room, 10:00 till 12:00 p.m. 

July 3— "GREAT GOLDEN FLEET"— Great Golden 
Fleet to welcome the First Navy Fleet, I I :00 a.m. 



BAT 


IIEGION BI 

PUSLISHCD BY THt 


JSIN 


"£S.5 






AI.AN K. DRO\FNE. President 

C. L. FOX, General Maniger 

M. A. HOGAN. Setreurr 

JAMES D. WAR.NOCK. Executive Ediio 

JOSEPH I. HAL'CHEY. Editor 


, 


Pablithed every other week b.v the San 
of Commerce al 333 Pine St.. San 
Conntr of San Francisco. California. 
5-4511. (Non-member tubicription. $S 
ai Second Clait matter April 26. 1944. 
San Franeiieo, California, under the a 


Franciico Chamber 
Franri<co. Zone 4. 
Tclcohone EXfarook 
00 a year.) Entered 
at the Poit Office al 
et of March 3. 1879. 




CircuJution: 7.S00 thu 


"'"• 


\ 



Housing Code Passed by Supervisors 
After Adoption by Chaml^er Directors 

Directors of the Chamber approved and urged adoption of the new San 
Francisco Housing Code prior to its first passage hy the Board of Super^asors, 
according to Alan K. Browne. President. Final passage is considered certain at 
Monday's meeting. 

The directors also authorized letters of recommendation to the Supervisors" 
Public Health and Welfare Committee, the Department of Public Works, and the 

Coordinator of Urban Renewal. 

Also commended were the local elements of 
the Structural Engineers Association of North- 
ern California, .\nierican Society of Civil En- 
gineers. American Institute of Electrical Engi- 
neers. Consulting Engineers Association of 
California. .American Society of Mechanical 
Engineers. American Institute of Architects. 
Building Industries Conference Board. Real 
Estate Board. Buildins Owners & Managers 
and -Apartment House Owners. 

The action followed recommendations of the 
Technical Projects Committee, of which Wal- 
ter J. Maythani is chairman, and the Building 
Code Section, of wjiich Henry .1. Degenkolh is 
chairman. 

Under recent amendment'^ lo the Federal 
Housing Act. communities wishing to qualify 
for Federal aid in their urban renewal and 
redevelopment programs must have a "work- 
able plan" certified by the Housing and Home 
Finance Agency, according to Browne. The 
new San Francisco Housing code is part of 
such a plan, he stated. 



'Task Force' Named 
For Business Climate 
Inventory Project 

A "Task Force" intent on conducting a 
business climate inventory of San Francisco 
has been appointed by 0. R. Doerr. Chairman 
of the Industrial .Advisory Committee of the 
San Francisco Chamber i>f Commerce. 

"The chief purpose of the business climate 
inventory is to analyse environmental elements 
affecting the cost of doing busines.« in a com- 
munity." Doerr. also Vice President in charge 
of sales, the Pacific Gas & Electric Co.. said. 

Chairman of the "Task Force" is Gustav 
Schwarz. Vice Chairman of the Manufacturers 
Committee of the Chamber and President of 
Connor Spring Manufacturing Co. 

Others named to the "Task Force" include: 



G 


orge 


M. 


Coo 


t. Chairman o 


Ihr 


Chcmi 


al 1 


ndi 


sirirs 


secll 


on 


of Ih 


<;h 


amber and -Ass 


<Ianl 


o the 


Pre. 


de 


nl ol 


Oroi 


ite 


Chcm 


iral 


Co.; Frank P. 


Gome 


I. Cha 


rmar 


n 


the 


Indu 


stria 


1 Oe> 


elop 


nent Commillee 


and 1 


jcal In 


hisir 


al 


Real- 


tor; 


«il 


iam W. M 


aore. Vice Chair 


nan o 


the T 


chni 


ral 


Proj. 


eels 


Con 


nmitte 


e. a 


so of Dames a 


nd Mo 


ore; C 


. C. 


<I 


arT> ) 


'Walker. 


Comn 


nerci 


.1 Vice Presiden 


t of General 


Flee 


rir 


Co.: 


Pan 


th 


er. Jr 


. of 


Paul Elder Co. 


nd Fi 


St Vice 


Pre 


ide 


nl ol 


the 


Ket 


il M 


ercha 


nls Association 


1 Char 


nbcr a 


filial 


^1 


and 


And 


cw 


.McLa 


u^hl 


n of McLaushI 


m Co 


, Cha 


rman 


o 


the 



Markeline S Sales Promotion Committee of the Chamber. 

The Task Force held its first meeting yester- 
day noon, in the Cypress Room of the Sir 
Francis Drake. H. F. Williams. Program Di- 
rector of the Employers Labor Relations Com- 
mittee. Inc.. of New York, who has a.ssisted 
many communities in organizing business 
climate surveys, attended. 



■'.'f clean, plegant, cosmopolitan 
city possessed of a special quality 
all its oivn: Parisian chic uithoul 
Parisian snobbery: .\»'ir York so- 
phistication without its furious 
bustle: the tradition of London 
ivithout its coldness. San Francisco 
is a wonderfully friendly city ichich 
icill gladly yield you your fondest 
dreams unless you're a clod and a 
boor." 

— Plavbov Magazine. June. 1958. 



Peirce is Appointed 
General Manager of 
Bay Transit District 

John M. Peirce. State Director of Finance, 
has been appointed General Manager of the 
five-county San Francisco Rapid Transit Dis- 
trict. Peirce. 56. will take 
over the S.32..500 per year 
position July 14. 

Peirce's appointment 
was recommended unani- 
mou'^ly by a special selec- 
tion committee lieaded by 
Director J. Frank Barrett 
after considering 2.3 candi- 
dates from all sections of 
the nation. 

"Peirce will bring to 
this job thorough educa- 
tion and long practical ex- 
perience in finance, taxa- 
tion, transportation economics, governmental 
processes and the administration of large >cr\i- 
operations." Barrett said. 




FRANCISCO CHAMBER 



VOLUME 15 • NUMBER 14 • JULY 4, 1958 



End of Industrial 'Slow-Down' Seen 

Forty-eight Industrial Expansion projects in San Francisco total- 
ing 12,316,800 and creating 347 new jobs have been announced 
through April of this year, according to a survey recently completed 
by the Industrial Department of the Chamber. 

Eight were new manufacturing plants totaling 1172,500, and 
forty were expansions totaling $2,144,300, according to Lewis M. 
Holland, Manager. 

Twenty-one of the projects totaling $714,000 and creating 229 
jobs were announced during April, he said. 

"While 1958 started slowly, reflecting the general attitude of 
business, progress for the first four months is only 15 per cent oflE 
from 1957. If April's accelerated activity continues, 1958 should 
reflect the trend in Industrial Development which was forecast 
before the 'slow-down' developed last year." 




Lewis M. Holland 



Federal Transportation, Aviation Agency 
Bills Given Backing by Chamber Officials 

Directors of the Chamber have endorsed two bills pending before the U. S. 
Senate and House of Representatives. 

Following the recommendation of the Transportation Committee, they have 
voted to support Senate Bill 3778 — the Smathers Bill — and its companion bill 
H.R. 12832. These acts would broaden and according to A. D. Carleton, Vice Chairman 




enlarge existing federal jurisdiction over 
intrastate rates and services, permit carriers 
to appeal to the ICC on matters concerning 
the discontinuance or change of intra-state rail 
service which is proven to be unprofitable and 
a burden on interstate commerce, provide for 
more flexibility in competitive rate making, 
establish a temporary program of guaranteed 
loans for railroads, amend the agricultural 
exemption clause of the ICC Act, and prohibit 
the hauling of property by private carriage in 
interstate commerce unless the commodity 
transported is used in the primary business of 
the transporter. 

The Smathers Bill, sometimes designated as 
the Transportation Act of 1958, is one of the 
most important bills before the 85th Congress, 

For BEST BUYS in 

Ihnces-Radio-T.V. 



of the Transportation Committee. 

Following the recommendation of the Avia- 
tion Section, the Directors endorsed in prin- 
ciple legislation to create a Federal Aviation 
Agency — S 3880. Senator Monroney — to con- 
trol commercial, private and military aviation 
in the interests of air safety. The independent 
agency would be directly responsible to the 
President and Congress, would be headed by a 
single civilian administrator with aviation ex- 
perience, and would regulate airspace over 
the United States and operate a uniform sys- 
tem of air-traffic control. Early passage is 
expected to end the numerous "near misses" 
recently occurring. 



Ticoulat Appointed 
"Coastal Days" 
General Chairman 

G. J. Ticoulat. Chamber Director and Senior 
Vice President of Crown Zellerbach Corpora- 
tion, has been named General Chairman of 
"Coastal Days — 1958" during wiiich 200 busi- 
ness, civic and agricultural leaders of coastal 
counties from Eureka to 
San Luis Obispo will be 
guests of the Chamber 
and San Francisco firms 
on .\ugust 14 and 15. 

The event, which al- 
ternates on a three-year 
basis with "Sacramento 
Valley Days" and "San 
Joaquin Valley Days." 
will host the central and 
northern California lead- 
ers and their wives at a 
two day round of busine: 

On Thursday, August 14, they will be guests 
at a welcome breakfast in tlie Mural Room of 
the St. Francis Hotel at which President Alan 
K. Browne will preside; 
a choice of industrial 
tours of San Francisco 
Naval Shipyard. United 
Air Lines Maintenance 
Base or Phillips & Van 
Orden Printing Co.; a 
luncheon followed by a 
game between the San 
Francisco Giants and the 
St. Louis Cardinals; and 
a cocktail party for 
guests and wives in the 
Italian Room of the St. Francis Hotel. 

On Friday, .August 15, they will have a 
choice of a northern California industrial de- 
( Continued on page three) 



G. J. Ticoulat 
and social events. 




van Branson 



Appli 



BETTER BUY 



NOW 



A CURRENT CAMPAIGN to help dealers Increase 
sales and improve economic conditions, continuing 
at least through September, has the backing of 
the Northern California Electrical Bureau, Gas Ap- 
pliance Society and the Pacific Gas & Electric 
Company. More than 2300 dealers have received 
announcement brochures, window banners, bumper 
strips, handout slips, "tent" cards and lapel but- 
tons. P.G. & E. advertising media for the next 
three months will stress the theme. 



Browne Chosen Investment Banker of Year 

Alan K. Browne, President of tlie Chamber ^^^BTT^Tl ~\ I | 

and Vice President of Bank of America, has ~ 

been chosen Investment Banker of the Year 
by tile San Francisco Bond Club. 

Browne was presented the Arnold Grunigen, 
Jr.. perpetual trophy during a meeting of the 
Bond Club at the Hotel St. Francis. The late 
Arnold Grunigen, Jr.. of J. Barth & Co., was 
one of tlie club's founders. 

The award was made by Wendell W. Witter. 
Partner of Dean Witter & Co. Browne was 
cited for his "professional service"' as manager 
of the bank's municipal bond department. He 
also was praised for his civic contributions as 
President of the Chamber and as a member of 
the advisory board on financing of the San 
Francisco Bay Area Rapid Transit District, 
president and director of San Francisco Stadi- 
um, member of the executive committee of the 
San Francisco Bay Area Council and trustee 
of Franklin Hospital. 




INVESTMENT BANKER OF THE YEAR, Alan K. 
Browne receives the San Francisco Bond Club 
Arnold Grunigen, Jr. perpetual trophy from Wen- 
deli W. Witter (left), Partner, Dean Witter & Co. 
At right is Harvey J. Franklin of Merrill Lynch, 
Pierce, Fenner & Smith, who is also President of 
the San Francisco Bond Club. 

Tile Bond Club installed new officials. Presi- 
dent is Harvey J. Franklin, Municipal Bond 
Manager. Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & 
Smith. 



Friday. July 4. 1958 



San Francisco Business Activity Hits 
Second Highest May Level on Record 

General business activity in San Francisco for May, reflecting: the usual sea- 
sonal trend, was below the April peak but attained the second highest May level on 
record, according; to the Research Department of the Chamber. The business activ- 
ity index amounted to 146.2 



In contrast to the general trend, several 
phases of the economy showed sharp improve- 
ments during May and the first five months 
compared to a year ago. They included total 
construction authorized with new residential 
taking the lead, industrial and commercial gas 
and water sales and electrical energy sales, 
airport traffic, apparel store sales, bridge ve- 
hicle crossings and market value of shares 
traded on the stock exchange. Fewer commer- 
cial failures were recorded. 

Construction value in San Francisco at the 
end of the first five months totaled $34 million. 
New residential accounted for one half or $17 
million and was up 174^0 : new non-residential 
accounted for $7.6 million and additions, al- 
terations and repairs $9.3 million. 

Bank debits totaled $20 billion, off three per 
cent from the similar five-month period of last 
year. 

Airport Traffic Grows 

Airport passenger traffic reached 1.356.516, 
an increase of seven per cent. Port of San 
Francisco revenue tonnage slipped 17.9 per 
cent. Freight car movements were off 18.4 per 
cent but truck movements were up 0.3 per 
cent. Vehicle crossings over the Bay Bridge 
gained 2.5 per cent and the Golden Gate 
Bridge 5.5 per cent. 

Industrial gas sales increased 1.3 per cent 
and electrical energy sales 6.6 per cent. 

In the Bay Region, bank debits for May 
amounted to $6.4 billion, an increase of $147 
million over a year ago. The five months total 
of $31.8 billion was up $135 million and ac- 
counted for 33.73 per cent of the 12th Federal 
Reserve District total. Santa Rosa, Sacramento 
and Modesto chalked up the best gains for five 
months over last year. 

Employment Increases 

Construction value authorized in the San 
Francisco Bay Area's nine counties (Alameda, 
Contra Costa, Marin, San Francisco, San Ma- 
teo. Solano. Napa. Santa Clara and Sonoma) 
totaled $284 million during the five months. 
New dwelling units authorized accounted for 
$143 million and provided for 14,090 units, an 
increase of 11.5 per cent over last year. 

May employment in the six-county Metro- 
politan Area (Alameda. Contra Costa, Marin, 



^Temporary 40-Year 
Employee Retiring 

Miss Erfna G. Thomason, Supervisor 
of the Accounting Unit who joined the 
Chamber "on a temporary basis" 40 
years ago, retired June SO under the 
organization's Pension Plan. 

"Miss Thomason has been very ef- 
ficient and deeply loyal in performance 
of her duties," G. L. Fox, General Man- 
ager, commented. "Her warmth and 
cordiality, given unstintingly every day 
of her long service, have endeared her 
to every member of the staff." 

A tea in honor of Miss Thomason 
was held Monday at the Commercial 
f;lub. 



San Francisco. San Mateo and Solano) 
reached 1.058.500. a gain of 9,000 over April 
— one of the largest April-to-May increases on 
record. Employment was down 1.5 per cent 
compared to May last year and 1.6 per cent 
off compared to the similar five-month period 
last year. Three of the largest industrial 
groups — retail trade, service and government, 
which accounted for nearly half the total em- 
ployed persons — reported gains in May over 
last year. The unemployed total of 64,700 per- 
sons was equal to 5.7 per cent of the May 
labor force. 

Store Sales Gain 

Six-county Metropolitan Area May retail 
department store sales were three per cent 
ahead of a year ago. Apparel store sales were 
up eight per cent. Department store sales for 
the first five months were identical but up one 
per cent in the apparel group. San Francisco, 
San Jose and Vallejo led the field in May. 




JFMAMJJASONO 

Pacific Coast merchant wholesalers' sales 
during the first four months slipped six per 
cent compared to nine per cent in the nation. 
Inventories at the end of April were off four 
per cent on the Pacific Coast compared to 
three per cent in the nation. 

All wholesale lines on the Pacific Coast 
except grocery, fruit, vegetable, drug and to- 
bacco reported lower sales during the first 
four months compared to the similar period 
last year. 

May ship arrivals rose sharply over last 
year with a 5.8 increase in number and 8.8 
per cent in registered tonnage. 



Business Actiyity Through May, 1958 



BRANCH OF ACTIVITY 

•GENERAL BUSINESS ACTIVITY INDEX .._.. 

CONSTRUCTION PERMITS 



Residential, New 

Dwelling Units 

Single-family units, New... 



No 
Additii 



;iden 



and Repairs- 



Nine county dwelling units authorized — 

REAL ESTATE— Deeds Recorded 

•RETAIL DEPARTMENT STORE SALES 

FINANCE— Bank Debits 

Postal Receipts _ 

Pacific Coast Stock Exchange.. 



..Number 
Index 



COMMERCIAL FAILURES _ 

INDUSTRY TREND— 6 County Total Employment- 

Mfg. Average Weekly Earnings 

Manufacturing 

Construction, contract 



(earnings) 

.(employment) 



a I estate... 



Agricu 
Govt.- 

Other 



-Fede 



& utilities. 
I,""state,' 



ity.. 



TRANSPORTATION— Freight car movement 

S. F. Airport— Planes In and Out 

Passengers Off and On 

Loaded and Unio ' ' 



Air Express Loaded and Unloaded.. 
Air Freight Loaded and Unloaded.. 

lil Express Shipments — 

uck Movements— S. F.' Area — 



..Lbs. 
..Lbs. 
..Lbs. 



PORT OF SAN FRANCISCO— Revenue Tons... 
Coastwise _ 

Intercoastal 



nd Waterway 

Foreign _.. 



CARGO VESSELS (San Francisco Bay) 



Millions of Registered Tons 

UTILITIES— Ind. & Comm. Gas Sales... 



Energy Sales, K.W. Ho 
Water Consumption— Comm. 



NEW DEVELOPMENTS 

Visitor and Newcome 
Bay Bridge Vehicle C 
Golden Gate Bridge Veh 



Inquil 
ngs... 



Cu. Ft. 



_Numbe 



1123 
5,696,780 
2,266.730 



1,469,742 

1,960,308 

3,469 



3,887,225 
2,430,865 
2,534,533 
65,624,491 

II 

l,067.500(p) 

96.03(a) 

203,600(p) 

66.800(p) 

68,000(p) 

I7l,600(p) 

79,200(p) 

247,IOO(p) 

Il6.500{p) 

I9,l00{p 

93,200(p) 

2,400{p) 

I 1 ,753 

10,171 

294,050 

3 281,650 

588,818 

6,524,946 

61,923 

164.3 

500,603 
8,845 
23,034 
184,439 
284.285 



423 
2.076,343 

1,261,398.500 

145.0 

161,321,000 

1,878 



4,480 
33,960,390 
17,044,970 



7,633,142 

9,282,278 

14.090 

7,178 

107 

19,977,644 
12,450,830 
12 068,530 
262,003,837 



-54.7 

—2.4 

11.5 



-3.0 

—4.3 
—21.0 



—0.7 

2.5 

—0.4 



136.2 
—17.6 
1097.3 



47 -J4.5 
l,059,560(p) —1.6 

203,700(p) —5.9 

62,740(p — 10.9 

68,240(p —0.2 

I7l,640{p) —0.6 

79,620(p) 0.6 

245,320(p) 3.1 

Il7,l20(p) —2.9 

I6.720(p —2.6 

92,080(p) I.I 

2,500(p) —3.8 



Crossings 

FRUITS & VEGETABLE RECEIPTS 

LIVESTOCK SLAUGHTER (Insp. Dists.) 

•S. F. CONSUMER PRICE INDEX— All Items... 



..Number 
..Carlots 



—3.9 



0.3 



55,192 

SI, 066 

1,356,516 

15,710,586 

3,383,081 

30,401,737 

319,054 

154.3 

2,307,776 
31,750 
144,383 
836,816 

1,295,837 



7,584,165,200 

155.9 

780,137.000 

8,815 
13.968,840 
6,336,522 



—18.4 
-^.3 



0.3 

—17.9 
—43.0 
—25.5 
—22.7 
—12.3 



Nun 



-17.9 



16,652 
44l,000(c 



Index Base (1947-49 Monthly Average=IOO); (a) 
ary. Basic data sources not shown due to space lir 

RESEARCH DEPARTMENT, SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



3,729 
IIO,000(b)- 

126.7(b) 3.6 

latest; (b) March quarterly index; (c) 3 month; (p) prelii 
, but available upon request. 



Friday. July 4, 1958 



Hitting the High Spots 



with JIM WARNOCK 

FAMILY DAYS, sponsored by a Citizens Commif- 
■fee appointed by Mayor George Christopher in 
conjunction with the San Francisco Chapter, Na- 
tional Safety Council, and designed to urge peo- 
ple to remain in the City and off the highways, is 
being held this weekend. Many events are sched- 
uled, including First Fleet Open hlouse. the Giants- 
Cards baseball series at Seals Stadium, many band 
concerts, tours of Crissy Army Field and the nike 
site at Battery Caulfield, Coast Guard Open House. 
Family Fishing Parties at Lake Merced, Folk 
Dancing, Quarter Midget Auto Racing at the 
Kezar Stadium Parking Lot, and Little League Horse 
Show at Bercut Field, Golden Gate Park, Polo in 
the Old Stadium and Open House at the Josephine 
D. Randall Junior Museum, 16th Street and Roose- 
velt Way. . . . 

PRESS AND UNION LEAGUE CLUB, 555 Post, 
after a remodeling program has six rooms with 
capacities of from 17 to 90 available for meetings 
with or without meals or cocktails. The main dining 
room is also available on Saturdays and Sundays 
for dinners, dances, receptions and large meet- 
ings, with a maximum capacity of 500. Minimum 
meal charges In all rooms are breakfast, $1.50: 
lunch, $2.75; and dinner, $3.00, all plus tax. For 
reservations call Walter Ramage, Manager, PR 
5-7800. . . . 

WM. A. BURNS COMPANY, pioneer northern 
California physical inventory service, has moved 
into new and larger quarters at I 141 Market 
Street. . . . 

SAN FRANCISCO BUSINESSMEN are reminded 
that "Youth Wants to Work" and can arrange fcr 
student summer help by calling the State Depart- 
ment of Employment. Student Division, PR 6-3850. 
The SAN FRANCISCO EXAMINER will also run 
a four-line ad free for four days for any firm 
or individual wishing to employ student help, of- 
fice or domestic. Contact Miss Eddy, SU 1-2424, 
Ext. 791. .. . 

GREAT GOLDEN FLEET OF THE CHAMBER 
spearheaded the welcome of the U. S. First Fleet 
by yachts and small craft when it sailed into San 
Francisco Bay yesterday for a civic welcome and 
three-day liberty. . . , 

"COASTAL DAYS" SET 

( Continued from page 1 ) 

velopment conference at the St. Francis or a 
"New Construction" tour of San Francisco in- 
clufling Jackson Square and the San Francisco 
Flower Terminal. These events will be fol- 
lowed by a luncheon courtesy of American 
President Lines. Ltd.. Matson Navigation 
Company. Pacific Far East Line. Inc.. and 
States Steamship Company, followed by a 
cruise of San Francisco Bay as guests of the 
captains of the Cliamlier's Great Golden Fleet. 

Coinniittee rhairnirn are: Invitations, Hor- 
aee Welcome, Vice President, Crocker-Anglo 
National Bank; Finance, John P. Walsh, Di- 
rector of Sales, Class and Building Protlucts, 
W. P. Fuller & Co.; Transportation, J. B. 
Haggerty, District Passenger and Public Re- 
lations Representative, Southern Pacific ('om- 
pany, and Most. Ivan Branson, Chamber Di- 
rector and President, Morning Glory ('atcr- 
ing Company. Program Chairman is Enimelt 
Fit7.palrick, Assistant General Public Rela- 
tions Manager of Southern Pacific Company 
and Chairman of the Inler-City Section which 
coordinates this annual event. 

San Francisco firms are asked to call 
Finance Chairman Walsh or Sidney Keil. 
Manager, Domestic Trade Department of the 
Chamber, to arrange sponsorship of one or 
more guests at $25 each. 



NEW MEMBERS OF THE CHAMBER 




R. A. Montgomery Ted G. Hays 



Fred H. Stalling Leonard Formosa 



New members added to the Chamber include the al)ove (left to right): Robert A. 
Montgomery. General Manager. Montybex Engineering Co.: Ted G. Hays, Partner, Sonic 
Distributors; Fred H. Stelling. Managing Owner, Head Gasket Company; Leonard For- 
mosa, Industrial Manager and District Manager. Stockton Port District; and C. P. Herr. 
President. Oroweat Baking Company oj San Francisco. 




A. C. Eichhoh 



ALVIN C. EICHHOLZ, U. S. Commercial Attache 
at Ottawa, Canada, and former Manager of the 
World Trade Department of the Chamber, will ex- 
amine current and long-range trends in U.S. -Cana- 
dian trade relations In a talk to members of the 
San Francisco Area World 
Trade Association at a 
luncheon meeting in the 
San Francisco Room of the 
Fairmont Hotel, Wednes- 
day, July 9. 

According to the U. S. 
Ambassador to Canada 
Livingston T. Merchant, the 
unfavorable balance of 
trade for Canada Is a 
source of resentment 
against the U. S., particu- 
larly when the U. S. pro- 
poses restrictions on im- 
ports of goods and com- 
modities which Canada 
produces, such as oil, lead, zinc, and copper. On 
June 17 Canada stated it would do everything in 
its power to reduce purchases in the U.S., as a 
result of our recent restrictions on oil imports. 

Americans have some $8 billion directly invested 
in Canada. Canadians are generally not allowed to 
participate in U. S. wholly-owned subsidiaries in 
their country. 

UNITED AIR LINES, first U. S. domestic carrier 
to order commercial jet aircraft, is committed to 
the purchase of 51 jet airliners — 40 DC-8's and 
eleven Boeing 720's — at a total expenditure of 
$275 million, all to receive their major overhauls 
at UAL's San Francisco Maintenance Base. These 
facts were inadvertently omitted from an item In 
the last issue of BAY REGION BUSINESS. . . . 

SAN FRANCISCO'S NEWEST DOWNTOWN 
MOTEL Is Beck's Motor Lodge at 15th & Market 
Streets, second and largest of the firm, with 46 
rooms of modern styling for the tourist and busi- 
nessman. Bill Beck, a native San Franciscan, fore- 
sees many more motels to keep pace with the 
mounting national interest in the city as a tourist 
and business center. . . . 

"DESPITE RESTRICTIONS on oil Imports, recent 
tourist problems, and an unsettled political situa- 
tion. Venezuela will continue to be the United 
States' best market in Latin America as well as our 
best friend In that area," Richard G. Lurie, Editor 
of American Exporter, told the San Francisco Area 
World Trade Association of the Chamber recently 
during a luncheon In the Cirque Ro^m o' 'he 
Fairmont Hotel. . . . 

NINE HOLIDAY MAGAZINE RESTAURANT 
AWARDS have gone to Amolio's, The Blue Fox, 
Ernie's, The Garden Court of the Sheraton-Palace, 
India House, Jack's, Kan's, Trader Vic's, Yamato 
Sukiyaki House, largest number to any city other 
than New York, which received 15. New Orleans 
received 5. . . . 




GIFT FROM THE GOLDEN GATE— "San Fran- 
cisco — My Enchanted City, " recently released by 
Seal Records, and endorsed by the Chamber, is 
now presented to all distinguished visitors along 
with keys to the city. Mayor George Christopher, 
center, accepts the first group of gift records from 
Ted G. Hays, Vice President. Seal Records (left), 
and Alan K. Browne, President of the Chamber. 

BEHER BUSINESS RELATIONS THROUGH PLANT 
TOURS, just off the press, is now aval ab'e from 
the Business Relations Department. Chamber of 
Commerce of the U. S.. 1615 H Street. N.W.. 
Washington 6. D. C. at $4.00. Descriptive folders 
and order forms may be obtained from the San 
Francisco Chamber's Research Dept. . . . 
SAN FRANCISCO'S PRESS, radio and television 
corps, along with other special guests, has been 
invited to sail to Oakland aboard the Chamber's 
Great Golden Fleet on July 1 1 to join in ceremonies 
opening the new Jack London Square headquarters 
of KTVU. San Francisco-Oakland Television. The 
fleet arrival will be given live coverage by the new 
station. . . . 

CALIFORNIA FRYER FESTIVAL in Modesto re 
cently served broiled chicken to 12,000 to salute 
California's first rank in dollar income from pro- 
duction of eggs and poultry. Stanislaus County 
contributes neirly $16 million of the State's $195 
million poultry and egg industry. . . . 
E. W. LinLEFIELO, 1956 President of the Chamber 
and Executive Vice President, Utah Construction 
has been elected a Director of Ca' f-'-Is PacHna 
Corporation. . . . 



"Thoro arc just three cities in 
the Vnited States that are 'story 
cities,' .^«>n• i orA". of ctmrse. 
yew Orleans ami. I>e.st of the lot. 
San Frnnci.-ici}." 

— Frank Norris. quoted in 
MOTORI.AND 



Friday. July 4, 1958 



Retail Merchants Ass'n., 
Tax Section Connnended 
For Sales Tax Victory 

Alan K. Browne. President, has commended 
the Retail Merchants Association and the Tax 
Section of the Chamber for action in obtaining 
passage of Proposition D. Uniform .Sales Tax. 
on the June 3 ballot and in expediting it> 
enactment. 

"Walter F. Kaplan. RMA President and 
Chamber Director, and F. B. Magruder, Chair- 
man of the Tax Section, led arduous and vigor- 
ous campaigns to make passage and enact- 
ment of this proposition possible." Browne 
said. 



July 7— BUSINESS CLIMATE TASK FORCE MEET- 

ItslG— Small Conference Room. 1st Floor, Chann- 
ber, 3:00 p.m. 

July 9— WORLD TRADE ASSOCIATION LUNCH- 
EON MEETING — San Francisco Room. Fairmont 
Hotel. 12 noon. Speaker: Alvin C. Eichholz, Com- 
mercial Attache, American Embassy, Ottawa Can- 
ada: "Canadian-United States Trade Relations." 
July II— OPENING OF T.V. STUDIOS AT KTVU— 
Jack London Square. 2:00 p.m. Great Golden Fleet 
to participate. 




Construction is underway on the $13 million 
Service Center for the Bank of America at Market, 
South Van Ness and llth Street. 

Scale model shows the llth Street drive-up 
banking and interior parking exits and the Market 
Street exposure. 

The building will have the largest usable floor 
space of any office building in San Francisco 
when completed late next year. 

The eight-story, 619,430-square foot structure 
will house departments serving Metropolitan Bay 
Area branches and the entire Bank of America 
organization. Five additional stories can be added 
later. 



BAT REGION BUSINESS 




INVESTMENT HONORED — Otis L. Guernsey, President, Abercrombie & Fitch (second from left) and 
John C. Speh, Vice President and San Francisco General Manager (second from right), received the 
Chamber's Award of Progress from W. H. Mixter, Chairman of the Business Center Development Com- 
mittee. At left is G. L. Fox, General Manager of the Chamber. 

Chamber Honors Abercrombie & Fitch 



Abercrombie & Fitch Company, "the great- 
est sporting goods stores in the world," has 
been presented the Award of Progress of the 
San Francisco Chamber of Commerce for cre- 
ating new quarters and employment through 
remodeling 220 Post Street. 

The award, reserved for those firms and 
organizations which have made significant 
major investments in San Francisco's future 
through enhancing their area of the City and 
creating new employment, was presented to 
Otis L. Guernsey, President, and John C. 
Speh. Vice President and General Manager of 
the San Francisco store, by W. H. Mixter, 
Chairman of the Chamber's Business Center 
Development Committee which selects the 



recipients. 

The company, one of the oldest of its type 
in the country, had net sales in 1957 of 144 
million, and had the 33,000 square foot San 
Francisco store designed to its specifications 
by the St. Francis Investment Co., from which 
it leases the property. It employs a staff of 90. 

The firm, extremely pleased by the friendly 
reception of business colleagues and the buy- 
ing public, is developing California sources 
for many of its lines. 

Attending the brief award ceremonies were 
Selwyn Eddy, Chamber Director and Chair- 
man of the Domestic Trade Committee, G. L. 
Fox, General Manager, and Sidney H. Keil, 
Manager of the Domestic Trade Department. 



CAB Petitioned by Chamber To Intervene 
In Pacific Southwest Local Service Case 

The Chamber has filed a petition with the Civil Aeronautics Board to intervene 
in the Pacific Southwest local service case and wlU assist in "developing the rec- 
ord to see that San Francisco receives maximum air service consistent with sound 
economics, without expressing carrier preference." 

Following other action by the Board of 



Directors, based on recommendations of the 
Transportation Department, an airmail letter 
was sent to the CAB supporting TWA's re- 
quest for an expedited hearing and decision 
on its petition to permit turn-around service 
by removal of TWA's route restriction be- 
tween San Francisco and Los Angeles. 

The Pacific Southwest case is a CAB inves- 
tigation of the air service pattern between 



San Francisco and Sacramento on the north, 
San Diego on the south, and Reno, Las Vegas 
on the east and all intermediate points. 

The turn-around case is the result of a 
petition filed by Trans World Airlines request- 
ing the removal of restrictions on air service 
between San Francisco and Los Angeles and a 
motion for expedited hearing and decision on 
this petition. 



SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



ALAN K. BROWNE. President 

G. L. FOX, General Manager 

M. A. HOGAN. Secrelarr 

JAMES D. WARNOCK. Eiecntive Editor 

JOSEPH I. HAUCHEY. Editor 

Pabliahed every other week by the San Francisco Chamber 
o{ Commerce at 333 Pine St.. Sao Francisco. Zone 4. 
Cocmty a{ San Franeiico. California. Teleohone EXbroolc 
2-4511. (Non.member iDbBcription. $3.00 a rear.) Entered 



Circulation: 7,S$0 thia 



FRANCISCO CHAMBER 



VOLUME 15 • NUMBER 15 • JULY 18. 1958 



'WHITE COLLAR' 
GIRLS PARADE 



San Francisco Fashion Industries Hold 
Spectacular Lnion Square Apparel Show 




SHAPE OF '58— White Collar Girls, selected by the city's fashion editors to model for the San Francisco 
Fashion Industries and local stores In the Union Square Fashion Show July 24 and 26 are (above, left to 
right, back row); Maureen Cunningham, Southern Pacific Co., who will model for Joseph Magnin Co. Inc.; 
Nancy Walker, California Packing Corp., The White House; Shirley Payton, Pacific Gas & Electric Com- 
pany, Hales Department Stores; Marsha Zedlar, Metropolitan Life Insurance Co., Roos-Atkins; Jan Stock- 
well, Pacific Intermountain Express, Kahns; Jackie Hilton, American Trust Co., City of Paris. Left to right, 
front row, are; Verna HInkle, Standard OH Co., H. Liebes Co.; Lee Kurti, Western Pacific Railroad Co., 
H. C. Capwell Co.; Marlon Tydell, Wells Fargo Bank, Livingston's; Helen Winters, Bank of America, The 
Emporium; Kathleen Florness. San Francisco Chamber of Commerce, I. Magnin & Co.; Marcla Herrlin, 
Pacific Telephone Company, Macy's. 



Spectacular outdoor fa.-^liion shows of ap- 
parel designed and manufactured in .San Fran- 
cisco will he presented in Union Square for 
the fourth successive year. July 24-2.5. accord- 
ing to William A. Mingst of John Andrew Co., 
President of San Francisco Fashion Industries. 

The fashion showings highlight a week's 
City-s|)onsored trihute. in cooperation with the 
Chamher. to locally-made fashions in Bay 
.Area stores. Mayor George Christopher has 
proclaimed "San Francisco Designers" Fall 
Fashion" week. July 24-30. 

The program is managed by the mayor's 
civic committee with Supervisor Harold Dobbs 
as chairman and Carl Livingston. Jr.. Living- 
ston's merchandise executive, as co-chairman. 

The city's famed cool July weather — with a 
temperature average of .58.9 — makes possible 
.America's earliest and biggest outdoor fall 
fashion preview. It is only in San Francisco 
that it is possible to show fall clothes, display 
them in stores and have them worn at this 
time. 

About 30 professional models will appear 
a](mg with 12 typical fashion-smart "white 
collar girls" on a 345-foot runway which will 
reach from Powell to Stockton .Streets. The 
theme is "Shape of '58." 

Nerice Fugate. Director of the House of 
Charm, will identify each costume by program 
number, designer's and store names. Each 
model will carry a number card keyed with 
the program, commentary, store, window dis- 
play and ads. 

A press section will he reserved on the plat- 
form dailv. 



Chamber Directors Unanimously Oppose Proposition 17 



Because the State's governmental expenses 
have already exceeded its income and for 
many other reasons. Directors of the Chamber 
have voted unanimously to oppose Proposition 
17 on the November ballot. 

The Chamber action followed the recom- 
mendation of its Tax Section, of which F. B. 
Magruder is Chairman. 

"The Proixisitlon would cut the State's sales 
tax from three per cent to two per cent, great- 
ly increase personal income taxes in some 
brackets and prohibit the legislature from in- 
creasing the sales tax rate or making changes 
in income tax rates," Magruder pointed out. 

Principal sources of revenue for the govern- 
ment of the State of California are closely re- 
lated to the business cycle, according to Alan 
K. Browne, President of the (Chamber. 

"During the last fiscal year the State oper- 
ated at a deficit. With constantly increasing 
costs of government, this is no time to tamper 
with tlie sales and use and income tax laws." 
Browne continued. "Such reserve funds as are 



"San Francisco is exciting, 
ivarm, glamorous and impul- 
sive, [minted on its canvas of 
contrasting cool grays." 

— Samuel Dickson, fpiolcd in 
SAN FRANCISCO IS YOUR HOME 



available to the .State are limited. .Adoption of 
this proposition would result in tremendous 
deficiencies in State revenues," Browne de- 
clared. 

"Increasing deficits in the Stale's financial 
operations would seriously impair the State's 
ability to provide financing for schools, public 
buildings and other urgent needs as the 
State's general obligation bonds are paiti out 
of the State's general fund. 

'it is obvious the increasi^ in ."^lale personal 
income taxes would fall far shor4 bv at least 



$.34 million — of meeting the loss in revenue 
resulting from the proposed one per cent de- 
crease in sales tax. 

"The excessive tax rates on higher incomes 
as proposed would force headquarter offices 
and corporate executives out of the State — 
a particularly dangerous possibility for a 
headquarter city like San Francisco. 

"Further, the State would find it necessary 
to curtail many vital programs, including State 
aid to the needy, operation of universities. 
State colleges, mental institutions and prisons, 
or it might be forced to raise revenues by 
eliminating the exemption of food products in 
the present sales tax law or possibly adopting 
a State ad valorem real proi>erty tax. increas- 
ing the taxes of every home owner in Califor- 
nia." 

The California Taxpayers .Association has 
taken a staml against a tax reduction measure 
for the first time in its history by opposing 
the proposition. Browne said. .Among many 
other groups in opposition is the California 
State Chamber of Commerce. 



Friday, July 18, 1958 



S^Ut ^*l€UtCi4CCUl^ 




SANTA FE FILM 
A NATIONAL 'HIT' 

Santa Fe Railway's mo+ion picture, "San Francisco" — seen by more than 
10,105,000 persons throughout the nation last year — is rapidly gaining the distinc- 
tion of being the finest documentary or travel film ever made about a city. 

Dispensed throughout the country by Santa Fe's key bureaus — Chicago, Ama- 

rillo, Galveston, Topeka, Oklahoma City, Los 
Angeles, and San Francisco — the f im recent- 
ly was the recipient of the George Washing- 
ton Honor Medal Award of the Freedom 
Foundation. It was selected by the Founda- 
tion as "an outstanding achievement in help- 
ing bring about a better understanding of 
the American Way of Life during 1957." 

The film was recently shown at the Ven- 
ice Film Festival and will be shown at the 
Edinburgh Film Festival, August 18-25. It also 
won the Christ Award in the travel category 
at the recent Columbus, O., Film Festival. 
It has been shown a total of 1,100 times 
to 105,000 persons and on 30 television sta- 
tions to an estimated 10 million viewers. 

After the film was introduced locally in 
May 1957, the San Francisco office alone had a total of 194 showings to 350,846 
persons (including 189 showings to 10,845 viewers and five television runs to 340,000 
others) up until the end of the year, many of them arranged by the Chamber. 

"San Francisco," a 16-mm motion picture in color and sound, was produced for 
Santa Fe Railway by Ernest Klelnberg. It tells the story of San Francisco as seen 
through the eyes of a captain of a tugboat, one of a fleet which Santa Fe operates 
in San Francisco Bay. 

As the captain steers his freight load through the Bay, he recalls the fascinating 
past of the city, touching on the Gold Rush, Sutter's Mill, and Virginia City. 

The scenes shift around the city's hills and harbor and San Francisco's world- 
famous fog is woven into the film. The picture also includes the story of the many 
nationalities blended into a city known around the 
world for its charm, sophistication and tolerance. 
It has scenes of Chinatown (the largest Oriental 
settlement outside of Asia with a population of 
30,000) and colorful North Beach (focal point for 
54,759 Italians), among other nationalities. San 
Francisco's waterfront and night life also are part 
of this exciting film. 

The film is available on a free loan basis 
to schools, libraries, community groups, business 
organizations, and for television public service 
showings. 

Used throughout the land at various conven- 
tions, its power in luring people to San Francisco 

and in stimulating widespread interest In the City by the Golden Gate is incalculable. 
Showings of the film can be arranged by writing Santa Fe Film Bureau, I 14 
Sansome Street, San Francisco 4, or calling the Publicity Department, San Francisco 
Chamber. 

A regular feanire, ask the Chamber for reprints, 333 Pine Street, EXbrook 2-45 1 1 




200 to Gather for 
Annual Coastal Days 

More than 200 businesnien and civic and 
agricultural leaders from Eureka to San Luis 
Obispo will be guests of the Chamber and San 
Francisco firms during "Coastal Days" August 
14-1.5, according to John P. Walsh, Finance 
Chairman. 

Walsh urges all member firms who wish to 
sponsor a guest or guests to fill in $25 sponsor- 
ship checks and mail them to the Chamber. 

"This event is conducted by the Chamber 
Inter-City Section to win new friends and new 
business for San Francisco." he said. 



Proposition 2 Gets 
Bacldng of Chamber 

Proposition No. 2 on the November ballot 
— providing for a $220 million State school 
bond issue, has been unanimously approved 
by the Chamber Board of Directors. The ac- 
tiim resulted from a study by the Tax Section 
of the Chamber. F. B. Magruder. Chairman. 

"The Tax .Section is impressed by the criti- 
cal need for funds which would be made avail- 
able through passage of this proposition." 
Magruder said. "Public school enrollment in 
elementary and high schools will increase by 
more than twothirds — 3.019,000 in 1958 to 
.5,125.000 in 1970." 




CHEF D'OEUVRE — The Commercial Club pastry 
chef came up with a masterpiece in creating this 
huge cake in honor of Miss Edna G. Thomason, 
former Supervisor of the Chamber Accounting Unit, 
who retired recently after joining the organization 
"on a temporary basis" 40 years ago, G. L Fox, 
Chamber General Manager, is to the left. In the 
background is Harold V. Starr, Manager of the 
Chamber Civic Development Department. 

Industrial Expansion 
For 5 Months of '58 
Shows Upward Trend 

A total of $143,098,990. involving 393 proj- 
ects in new manufacturing plants and expan- 
sions, was scheduled in northern California 
for the first five months of this year, according 
to the Industrial Department of the Chamber. 

Though the total committed was $11,843,650 
less than the similar period last year, "the 
accelerated increase in the number of projects 
or business volume indicates continued faith 
in the growth of the area and the West Coast 
industrial-wise." according to Lewis M. Hol- 
land, Manager of the Chamber Industrial 
Department. 

May, 1958 



SAN FRANCISCO 

3 New Plants $ 75,000 
13 Expansions 39&.0OO 


10 Jobs 
40 Jobs 


16 Proiccts 471.000 


50 Jobs 


BAY REGION 

39 New Plants S 1,151,500 
M Expansions 35.228,690 




123 Proiects $ 36,380.190 




NORTHERN CALIFORNIA 

50 New Plants $ 1,974.500 
107 Expansions 36,325,790 




157 Proiccts S 38.300,290 




CUMULATIVE TOTALS FOR THE FIRST FIVE MONTHS 


SAN FRANCISCO 

II New Plants S 247.500 
53 Expansions 2.540.300 


73 Jobs 
324 Jobs 


64 Proiects S 2,787,800 


397 Jobs 


BAY REGION 
104 New Plants S 7.699.500 
307 Expansions 125,336.590 




411 Proiects $133,036,090 




NORTHERN CALIFORNIA 

135 New Plants % 10,088.500 
376 Expansions 133.010.490 




cii o.»:.^< «i4?n9R99n 





Friday. July 18, 1958 



Hitting the High Spots 



With JIM WARNOCK 

ALASKA'S STATEHOOD ADVOCATES, E. L. BaD- 
lett and Ernest Gruening, were sent congratulatory 
wires for their successful drives for statehood by 
Alan K. Browne. President of the Chamber, and 
G. L. Fox, General Manager. . , . 

KTVU, SAN FRANCISCO-OAKLAND TELEVISION, 

opened Its excellent new headquarters at # I Jack 
London Square. Oalcland, on July I I during cere- 
monies spearheaded by the Great Golden Fleet of 
the Chamber and attended by 600 area press, radio 
and television representatives and civic leaders. . . . 

HONORING THE MEMORY OF DR. HENRY 
FRANCIS GRADY, San Francisco world trade lead- 
er, educator and diplomat, an outstanding book on 
world trade will be presented each year to the 
School of Business Administration of the University 
of California by the San Francisco Area World 
Trade Association. . . . 

RAPKEN & COMPANY, LTD., 150 Chestnut Street, 
for many years engaged in the manufacture and 
packaging of foods, has enlarged its facilities and 
now offers a complete packaging service covering 
food and non-food lines. . . . 

STECHER-TRAUNG LITHOGRAPH CORP. has es 

tablished a new department devoted exclusively to 
the production of catalogs and catalog inserts, 
according to Leo P. Blank, Vice President of the 
national lithograph firm whose western headquar 
ters are in San Francisco. . . . 

SAN FRANCISCO AREA WORLD TRADE ASSO- 
CIATION has set up a new group insurance pro- 
gram designed specifically for international business 
firms and their personnel. . . 

GUSTAV SCHWARZ, Pres 
ident of Connor Spring 
Manufacturing Co., has 
been appointed Chairman 
of the Business Climate Task 
Force of the Chamber's 
Industrial Department. He 
is also Vice Chairman of 
the Manufacturers Commit- 
tee. The Task Force will con- 
duct a business climate sur- 
vey of San Francisco. . . . 




Gustav Schwan 

CHARLES C. MILLER, Manager of the Chamber 
Transportation Department, attended a conference 
of the Pacific Inland Tariff Bureau in Portland yes- 
terday during which the adiustment and establish- 
ment of motor rates between California, Oregon 
and Washington were discussed. . . 

B. R. JOHNSON was recently named President and 
General Manager of Pacific Motor Trucking Co., 
Southern Pacific's highway subsidiary. Johnson, who 
started as a truck driver in 1935, rose to the posi- 
tion of Vice President and General Manager of 
PMT prior to his recent promotion. 

H.R. 12695 SIGNED INTO PUBLIC LAW 85-475 

by President Eisenhower on June 30 climaxed the 
Chamber's work seeking removal of the 3 per cent 
wartime transportation tax on freight. All California 
long haul shippers and receivers will benefit from 
the law. which becomes effective August I. . . . 

WELTON BECKET AND ASSOCIATES, architects 
and engineers, have been awarded a contract for 
$10 million worth of Improvements at San Francisco 
International Airport, to include a passenger ter- 
minal building, concourses, a cargo terminal build- 
ing and parking structure, bringing to $165 million 
the work by the firm in the Bay Area. Dudley Deane 
and Associates will be the mechanical and electri- 
cal engineers, John A. Blume and Associates the 
structural engineers, and Wilsey and Ham the civil 
engineers for the project. . . . 



NEW MEMBERS OF THE CHAMBER 




Friti Oehlmann A. S. Lockwood E. J. Cathcart Wil 

New members added to the Chamber roster include 



D. Blake 



Roy H. Olberg 
(above, left to right): Fritz 
Cehimann. District Sales Manager. Lufthansa-German Airlines; Alfred S. Lockwood. 
MLinaaer. Foreign Freight Division. Watson Bros. Transportation Co., Inc.; E. J. Calh- 
<art. Manager. Continental National Group; William D. Blake. President. William D. 
liluke Agency. Inc.; and Roy H. Olberg. Manager. .San Franci-^co agency. Pacific Mutual 
Insurance Cumpany. 



LOUIS FRANDSEN, Southern Pacific land commis- 
sioner since 1949, advanced to President of the 
Southern Pacific Land Company and Manager of 
the railroad's land department, according to Presi- 
dent D. J. Russell. . . . 

JAMES A. MINENNA OF MINS TRAVEL CENTER 

has been presented a commendation by the San 
Francisco Area World Trade Association for serving 
the traveling public for fifteen years and for open. 
ing new offices at 133 O'Farrell Street. , . . 

HERB CAEN'S GUIDE TO SAN FRANCISCO, now 

out in a revised edition which includes his com- 
ments on the Giants and the "San Francisco artistic 
renaissance," has been called "as valuable to the 
San Francisco businessman who wants to take a 
>'isiting fireman to dinner, as to the visiting fireman 
himself." . . , 

THE FACE OF CHINATOWN is the title of a 
photographic essay to be produced by Hal Rith, 
magazine photographer, and Charles L. Leong, writ- 
er and long-time resident of Chinatown, which will 
aim to capture "the real substance and record of 
the daily life of the Chinese, a pattern blending 
the best of a 4,600 year-old civilization with the 
free democratic spirit of America." . . 

MAYOR CHRISTOPHER proclaimed May 8 "Bri- 
tannia Day," honoring BOAC's recently inaugurated 
Britannia Jet-Prop service, fastest air link to Europe 
by 35 minutes yet offered northern California resi- 
dents. . . . 

THERE IS TOO MUCH BUSINESS available to 
consider recession or retrenchment at this time, 
according to Fred Parr Cox, President of Parr In- 
dustrial Corporation of San Francisco. "People 
should stop looking for security and capitalize on 
opportunity," he says. , . . 

HARRY GUPPY, Chairman of the Chamber's Gov 
ernment Purchasing Liaison Section, urges all whole- 
salers and manufacturers to remove from their 
mailing lists Parks Air Force Base, which has been 
undergoing a gradual deactivation for the past 
twenty-four months. . . . 

NOSTALGIA, San Francisco ballad composed by 
James C. Knollin, Knollln Advertising Agency, has 
been published and Is available at sheet music 
counters. Along with "Suvllla Waltz," it was re- 
corded and distributed as a gift to clients and 
friends of the agency. . 

SIGNALLING THE RENASCENCE of International 
Settlement — a section which had fallen into dis- 
repair and disuse as a nightclub area — International 
Floor Coverings opened its new showroom Wednes- 
day at 592 Pacific Avenue with a champagne cock- 
tail party. The firm, which exhibits wholesale prod- 
ucts for leading floorcoverlng manufacturers, includ- 
ing rich handwoven rugs made in Morocco, is part 
of the continuing redevelopment of the Jackson 
Square area. ... '^ 



ALVIN T. GUTHERT7. former public relations spe- 
cialist with the Army Corps of Engineers, has 
opened his own public relations agency at 335 
Hayes Street. . . . 

MARK R. SULLIVAN. President of Pacific Tele- 
phone and Telegraph Co. since 1947. has been 
elected President of the California State Chamber 
of Commerce. . . . 

KPIX has developed a new series of station break 
announcements based on colorful San Francisco 
facts and produced in cooperation with the Public- 
ity Department of the Chamber. . . . 

CREATION OF A FEDERAL AVIATION AGENCY 

to control both civilian and military air traffic is 
necessary if collisions are to be averted in the 
future, Grover J. Fulkerson, Area Supervisor of the 
Civil Aeronautics Administration told the Aviation 
Section of the Chamber at a recent luncheon at 
the Commercial Club highlighting the 20th birth- 
day of the governmental agency. "Two-rule air 
traffic control is outmoded in this day and age." 
he said. "It would make sense If airplane drivers 
followed one set of rules just as automobile drivers 
do." . . . 

RANSOM M. COOK. Chamber Director and 
Senior Vice President. American Trust Co., was re- 
cently elected President of the California Bankers 
Association. . . . 




MORE THAN 200 government and industry leaders 
participated in a recent civic luncheon at the Fair- 
mont Hotel marking the lOOth anniversary of the 
State's canning industry during which a sculpture of 
Francis P. Cutting, founder of the State's canning 
industry (created by Lia di Leo), was unveiled. 
Lieut. Gov. Harold J. Powers (left) congratulates 
Robert C. Stolk, Vice President of American Can 
Company. From left to right are Alan K. Browne. 
President of the Chamber; W. E. Beach. Southern 
California Food Processors Association: and J. M. 
Mardeslch, President, California Fish Canners Asso- 
ciation. 



Friday. July 18, 1958 



Hunters Point 
Reclamation Plans 
Nearing Reality 

Signing of an engineering contract for tlie 
Hunters Point Reclamation District is a mile- 
stone toward realization of the goal to add an 
additional 500 acres of industrial land to San 
Francisco, according to E. Elmore Hutchison. 
President of the Board of Trustees. 

The SI 7.200 contract for the services of 
Dames and Moore. San Francisco engineering 
firm, will develop preliminary plans and speci- 
fications for fillin'j;. surface drainage, and pro- 
tection of the filled area. The contract was 
made possible by part of a $3.5.000 appropria- 
tion by the Board of Supervisors, a loan to be 
repaid from assessments on the land within 
the district. 

Plans for creation of the district have been 
developing since 1953. when the Industrial 
Development Committee of the Chamber, rec- 
ognizing a pressing need for additional Indus- 
trial land in San Francisco, created a Rec- 
lamation Subcommittee to investigate its feas- 
ibility. 

Under the Chairmanship of John Gould. 
Consulting Engineer, and with the enthusiastic 
backing of George Christopher, then President 
of the Board of Supervisors, and Matthew 
Carberry. then Chairman of the Supervisors' 
Commercial and Industrial Development Com- 
mittee, the Chamber subcommittee made pre- 
liminary feasibility studies and instigated leg- 
islation — the Hunters Point Reclamation .^ct 
of 19.55 — which was passed by the State Legis- 
lature to create the district. 



July 21 — FOREIGN TRADE ZONE LUNCHEON 
COMMITTEE MEETING — San Francisco Commer- 
cial Club. 12:15 p.m. 

July 22— LEGISLATIVE & NATIONAL AFFAIRS— 
Room 200, Chamber, 3:00 p.m. 
July 23— JAPANESE CHAMBER COMMITTEE 
MEETING— Room 200. Chamber, 5:00-7:00 p.m. 
July 24— AUGUST BOARD COMMIHEE MEET- 
ING— Room 200, Chamber, 5:15 p.m. 
July 24— NATIONAL DEFENSE RESOURCES 
CONFERENCE COMMIHEE MEETINGS — SELEC- 
TION AND ARRANGEMENTS— Room 200, Cham- 
ber, 10:30-12:00 p.m. 

July 24— JAPAN TRADE COMMIHEE MEETING 

— Snnall Conference Room, 1st Floor, Chamber, 2:15 
p.m. 

July 24 — COMMITTEE ON TRADE RELATIONS 
WITH JAPAN — MEETING — Small Conference 
Room, Ist Floor, Chamber, 2:15 p.m. 
July 24-25— WHITE COLLAR GIRL FALL FASH- 
ION SHOW— Union Square, 12:00 p.m. 



BAT REGION BUSIN"£.S.S 



SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



ALAN K. BROWNE. President 

C. L. FOX, C«Danl Huuger 

M. A. HOCAN, Sfcreurr 

JAMES D. WARNOCK, ExeniUve Editor 

JOSEPH I. HAUCHEY. Editor 

Pnbliahed eTery other week by the San Francisco Chamber 



of Commerce at 3S3 Pine St.. Sa 









Conntj of San Francisco. California. Teleohone EXbrook 
2-4J11. (Non-member subseription. tS.OO a year.) Entered 
as Second Qass matter AnrU 26. 1944. at the Post Office al 
San Francisco, California, imder the act of March 3. 1879. 
CirevXittion: 7,500 thii Utum 




PROPOSITION NO. 4 ON THE NOVEMBER STATE BALLOT, a $60-million self-liquidating Harbor 
Bond Issue, will include $50 million for development of Port of San Francisco facilities and $10 mil- 
lion for small craft harbor development throughout California. 






BAY REGION 

SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 




BUSINESS 



Sa*t 'P^OHci^caHa 



"HOLIDAY FOR KIDS" 

A bus line in the role of "baby-sit+er." 

That's the Gray Lines, inc., with its "Holiday For Kids," a regularly sched- 
uled tour of San Francisco originated and sponsored by the Marketing & Sales 
Promotion committee of the Chamber. 

"The purpose of the tour," according to Andrew C. McLaughlin, of 
Andrew C. McLaughlin Co., and Committee Chairman, "is to enable children 
to enjoy visiting the city and to free their parents for lunching, shopping or 
taking in a show. 

"Under this program, parents can relax while the children enjoy an 
exciting itinerary under the supervision of college students. 

"It's a unique service for children in a city that has become famous for its 
appeal for adults," McLaughlin continued. "It's also the first regularly 
scheduled tour of its type anywhere in the country. We're delighted the 
enterprise of the Gray Line has made the Chamber's idea a reality. 

"If you subtract $1 for lunch from the total cost of $4.65, which includes a 
box lunch in the price, the cost of caring for each child for the 53^-hour tour 
amounts to about 60 cents an hour," McLaughlin calculated. "And that's real 
bargain basement babysitting." 

The tours also include pickup 
and delivery service from the 
visiting parents' hotel or motel. 
The minimum age is eight. How- 
ever, younger children may at- 
tend if accompanied by an 
adult. 

"Kids Tour No. I, "scheduled 
Mondays, Wednesdays and Fri- 
days, includes a tour of China- 
town, Telegraph Hill, Fisher- 
man's Wharf, a Bay Cruise, a 
visit to the Maritime Museum, 
Golden Gate Park, Steinhart 
Aquarium, Golden Gate Bridge 
and Twin Peaks. 

"Kids Tour No. 2," sched- 
uled Tuesdays and Thursdays, 
includes Fisherman's Wharf, the 
Balclutha, the Presidio, Fleishhacker Zoo, Lake Merced and Stonestown. 

For fuK /nformaffon call or wrife to T/ie Gray Lines, Inc., 44 Fourfh %iretf, lUkon 6-4000. 




Defense Resources Conference Set 



The National Defense Resources Conference 
will be held September 15-26, tentatively, at 
Nourse Auditorium, according to Hugh Gal- 
lagher, executive of Matson Navigation Com- 
pany who was recently 

named General Chair- 
man of the session. 

The Conference, co- 
sponsored by the Indus- 
trial College of the 
Armed Forces and the 
Chamber, will be at- 
tended by key civilians 
and top naval and milita- 
ry men from all branches 
of the service. It will 
cover all phases of the 
national economy — as 
diversified as niateiial 
resources, building, contracting, transportation 
and publishing — and inform those in attend- 
ance about material matters as they may be 




Hugh Gallagher 



affected by a national emergency. Gallagher 
said. 

"Our next war, if it comes, will not allow 
for 'inventory taking' to see what we have, 
what we can produce, or what we can contrib- 
ute to the defense of our nation." Gallagher 
said, "It will break suddenly. 

"Good common sense directs thaf we should 
be as well informed and prepared as is human- 
ly possible. Wi' caiuiot blame our responsible 
government leaders if we fail to assist them in 
their efforts to do for us what we know they 
should do." 

Handle P. .Shields. Manager of the Public 
Affairs Department of the Chamber, will be 
civilian coordinator of the conference. Military 
and naval coordinator will be Lt. Com. D. S. 
Holyoake, USNH. 

Reservations may be made and other infor- 
mation obtained by calling Shields at the 
Chamber. 




VOLUME 15 • NUMBER 16 • AUGUST I, 1958 

"Coastal Days" Event 
Honors Business and 
(Community Leaders 

.More than 200 business, civic and agricul- 
tural leaders from Eureka to San Luis Obispo 
will be guests of the Chamber and San Fran- 
cisco firms during "Coastal Days — 19.58" Au- 
gust 14 and 15. according to G. J. Ticoulat. 
Chamber Director and General Chairman of 
the event. 

The event — which alternates on a three-year 
basis with "Sacramento Valley Days" and "San 
Joaquin Valley 
Days" — hosts 
northern Cali- 
fornia leaders 
and their wives 
on a two-day 
round of busi- 
ness and social 
events. Sched- 
uled for the 
first day are: a 

welcome breakfast in the Mural Room of the 
.St. Francis Hotel at which Alan K. Browne, 
President of the Chamber, will speak: a choice 
of industrial tours of San Francisco Naval 
.Shipyard. United .\ir Lines Maintenance Base 
or Phillips & Van Orden Printing Co.; a lunch- 
eon followed by a baseball game between the 
.San Francisco Giants and St. Louis Cardinals; 
and a cocktail party for guests and wives in 
the Italian Room of the St. Francis Hotel. 

On the second day the group has a choice of 
the Northern California Industrial Develop- 
ment Conference at the St. Francis or a "New- 
Construction" tour which includes Jackson 
Square and the San Francisco Flower Termi 
nal. These events will be followed by a lunch 
I'on through the courtesy of American Presi 
dent Lines. Ltd.. Matson Navigation Company. 
Pacific Far East Line. Inc.. and State Steam 
<hip Company. Following tlie luncheon will be 
a cruise of tlie Bay of .San Francisco, hosted 
by captains of the Great lioldeii Fleet of the 
Chamber. 

Area "E" Tentative 
Plan Unveilint; Set 
At S.F. City Hall 

Hearings on the Tentative Plan for rede- 
velopment of the wholesale produce area — 
.\rea "E" — will be held Tuesday, .\ugust 12 
at 2 p.m. by the Re<levelopment .■\gency in the 
chambers of the Board of Super%isors in Citv 
Hall. 

After careful study of the Tentative Plan, 
the Redevelopment C4Mirdinating Committee of 
the (Chamber has recommendi-d that the Board 
of Directors go <m record in sup|M>rt of it. ac- 
i-ording to Randell Larson. Chairman. 

The obieclives of the .\rea "E" Preliminary 
Plan of the project, one of tlie Iwldcsl ever 
conceived in lliis city, has had long and con- 
tinuous backing of the Chamber. 



Friday, August I, 1958 



San Francisco Business Activity Index 
Of 1541 Best June Level In History 

Business activity in San Francisco rose to its liest June level in history but 
the encouraging trend was clouded by disturbing inflationary factors, according to 
the Chamber Research Department. . ^ u 

A show of strength in financial, construction, utihty and transportation faelds 

in June counterbalanced early spring setbacks 



resulting in a 2.9 gain over June of last year 
and lifting the first half-year's activity to with- 
in 1.4 per cent of the similar period last year. 
The June business activity index was 154.1 
compared to 149.7 in June last year; the first 
half-year index average was 149.7 compared 
to 151.9 a year ago. 

Living Costs Skyrocket 
Ballooning consumer prices of goods and 
services during the past year in the San Fran- 
cisco area — with the all items index hitting 
128 this June — boosted living costs 4.2 per cent 
above June last year, compared to a rise of 
2.9 in the United States. Average weekly earn- 
ings in the manufacturing industry during the 
first five months this year rose only 1.7 per 
cent. 

In San Francisco itself, food prices soared 
5.3 per cent, rent 3.7 per cent, transportation 
5.3 per cent and medical care 9.9 per cent. 
Record Financial Transactiom 
June financial transactions in San Francisco, 
measured by bank debits, rose to a record $4.2 
billion— almost S200 million or 4.6 per cent 
above June a year ago. The six-month total of 
$24.2 billion, however, slipped 1.4 per cent 
from last year. 

Pacific Coast Stock Exchange transactions 
topped last June with the number of shares 
traded, up 31.7 per cent and the market value 
26.1 per cent. However, the six-month cumula- 
tive shares traded fell 14.1 per cent and the 
market value 0.2 per cent. 

Commercial fadures in San Francisco were 
down to eight compared to 11 in June last 
year ; the six-month cumulative total of 55 was 
far below the 85 last year. June liabilities were 
lower by 23.1 per cent and the six-month total 
by 62.1 per cent. 

Construction Booming 
Total construction authorized in San Fran- 
cisco amounted to a booming $10,758,030 this 
June, 55.3 per cent of it new non-residential. 
Large projects authorized included 14,750,- 
000 for a second unit of the 14-story John 
Hancock Mutual Life Insurance office building 
at California and Battery Streets; $820,000 for 
a 100-dwelling unit housing project by the San 
Francisco Housing Authority; $.323,400 for 
alteration of a building at 30 Onondaga; 
$200,000 for a Safeway store at Chestnut and 
Taylor Streets; and a grading permit of $140,- 
000 for the first unit of the Bank of America 
Budding at Market and 11th Streets. 

Authorized first half-year building totaled 
$44,718,420 or 20.5 per cent above a year 
ago. Of this new residential accounted for 
$19,931,685 and provided for 1,107 dwelling 
units, new non-residential $13,575,667; and 
additions, alterations and repairs $11,211,068. 
Construction authorized in the nine Bay 
County area — Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, 
Napa, San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara, 
Solano and Sonoma — amounted to $69,602,000 
in June— an increase of $12 million and a gain 



of 49 per cent over June of last year. The six- 
month total of $3.54,226.000 was 13.5 per cent 
above last year. 

Labor market employment in the six-county 
area (Alameda. Contra Costa, Marin, San 
Francisco. San Mateo and Solano) reached 
1.076.900 in June, the highest level of the 
year and 9.800 above the preceding month but 
15,400 below June last year. 

The first six-month total employment was off 
1.5 per cent with manufacturing and construc- 
tion contract groups down 6.0 and 9.7 per cent 
respectively. 

Transportation Groivs 
In the transportation field in June freight 
car movements, ship arrivals, airport traffic, 
bridge traffic and truck movements pushed 
ahead of last June. 




J FMAMJJASOND 

First half-year San Francisco airport traffic 
and bridge traffic attained new peaks. Pros- 
pective visitors and newcomers written in- 
quiries to the Chamber were up 46.8 per cent 
in June and 18.1 per cent for the first six 
months. 

Store Sales Keep Level 

June retail department store sales in San 
Francisco equaled last year and apparel stores 
sales were up three per cent. In California 
sales were off three per cent and eight per cent 
respectively and two and seven per cent in the 
12th Federal Reserve District. 



Business Actiyity Through June, 1958 



BRANCH OF ACTIVITY 



•GENERAL BUSINESS ACTIVITY INDEX.. 
CONSTRUCTION PERMITS 



Residential, New 
Dwelling Units 



New... 



Single-famiiy units, 

Non. residential. New _ _ 

Additions, Alterations and Repairs 

Nine county dwelling units authorized 

REAL ESTATE— Deeds Recorded 

M o rtg a g es — 

•RETAIL DEPARTMENT STORE SALES 

ebits 



.....Value 

......Value 

..Number 



■ipts 



Pacific Coast Stock Exchange- 

Bank Clearings ....- 

COMMERCIAL FAILURES 



..$000 
mber 



INDUSTRY TREND—* County Total Employment_ 
Mfg. Average Weekly Earnings 

Construction, contract 



-(employment) 



insurance, real estate... 

Retail trade 

Wholesale trade 

Service 

Trans., comm., & utilities 

Agriculture 
Govt. — Fede 
Other __ 

TRANSPORTATION— Freight car mo' 

S. F. Airport— Planes In and Out- 
Passengers Off and On 

Loaded and Unloaded. 



)1, state, city... 



Air Express Loaded and Unloaded 
Air Freight Loaded and Unloaded. 

Rail Express Shipments — 

•Truck Movements— S. F. Area 

Out-of- State passenger car entries into N 

Out-of-State passenger entrie 



-Number 
-Number 
.Number 

Lbs. 

Lbs. 

_ Lbs. 

-Number 



..Inde 



Calif Nun 

No. Calif .....Nun 



PORT OF SAN FRANCISCO— Revenue Tons — 
Coastwise - 

Inter. 



and Waterway 
Foreign 



CARSO VESSELS (San Francisco Bay) 

Millions of Registered Tons 

UTILITIES— Ind. 8. Comm. Gas Sales 

•Elec. Energy Sales, K.W. Hours 

Water Consumption— Comm. & Ind 

NEW DEVELOPMENTS 

Visitor and Newcomer Inguiries— — 

Bay Bridge Vehicle Crossings 

Golden Gate Bridge Vehicle Crossings 



,.Cu. Ft. 

Index 

...Cu. Ft. 



LIVESTOCK SLAUGHTER (Insp. Dists.) 

•S. F. CONSUMER PRICE INDEX— All Items — 



5,942,525 

1,928.790 

3.960 



116 

4,214.790 
2,349,643 
3,499,571 
66.781,962 
3,009,778 



l,O76,90O(p) 
97.47(ai 
206,700(p) 
70,000(p) 
68,400(p 
173,00O(p) 
79,700(pl 
245,8001 p) 
1 17,3001 p) 
20,600(p) 
93,000(p) 
2,400(p) 

12,044 

10,581 

339,862 

3,023,691 

518,155 

6,572,440 

60,760 

166.9 

69, 023(a) 

168,787(al 

484,828 
8,917 
41,869 
170,122 
263,920 



406 

1,964,194 

,123,240,700 

146 

164,829,000 

2.077 
3 127,124 
1,534,788 

I09,000(a) 

128.0 



—1.3 
136.6 

90.8 
119.8 

30.2 
321.8 

18.6 

48.9 

2.4 
35.7 

—0.9 



149.7 

5,465 

44,718,420 

19,931,685 

1,107 

413 

13,575,667 

11,211,068 

18,053 



109 

24,192,434 
14,800,473 
15,551,530 
328.785.799 
16,952.036 

55 



—5.0 
20.5 

157.7 
71.6 



l,062,383(p) —1.5 



89.0 
—14.8 
6,704.6 



204,l65(p) 
63,950(p) 
68,300(p) 

17l,935(p) 
79,635(p 

245,335(pi 

117.150(p) 
I7,365(p 
92 I65(pi 
2,485(c) 

67,236 

61,647 

1,696,378 

18,734,277 

3,901,236 

36,974,177 

379,814 

156.4 

252, 176(b) 

609,304(b) 

2,787,604 

40,667 

180,252 

1 ,006,938 

1,559,747 



—9.7 
—0.1 
—0.5 



— 18.0 
—20.3 
—10.9 



•Index Ba 



erage=100); (a) May; (b) 5 months; (c) March-June quarterly 
«n due to space limitation, but available upon request. 

RESEARCH DEPARTMENT, SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMEJJCE 



!,707,405,900 

154 

944,966,000 

10,892 
17,095,964 
7,871,310 

487,000(b) 

127.3(c) 

age; (p) 



prelif 



Friday, August I, 1958 



Hitting the High Spots 



With JIM WARNOCK 

SENATE APPROVAL of a three-year extension of 
the reciprocal trade agreements progrann without 
most of the crippling amendments recommended 
by the Senate Finance Committee has been hailed 
as a "very heartening" development by Alan K. 
Browne, President of the Chamber. The 23-year- 
old trade agreements program was born in the 
Chamber in the early '30s when the late Dr. Henry 
F. Grady was in charge of the Chamber's foreign 
trade programs. . . . 

PRESIDENTIAL APPROVAL of a bill to construct an 
$80 million super liner for American President Lines 
for service between California and the Orient was 
recently given, the 43,000-ton liner to be home- 
bet+hed at the Port of San Francisco's Pier 50, 
headquarters for all APL ships. . . . 
SAN FRANCISCO PANORAMA by Madison Devlin 
is the latest book published on the City by the 
Golden Gate, telling its story in pictures with a 
minimum of text. Devlin, a native San Franciscan, 
spent ten months taking over 2000 pictures from 
which he has selected almost 200 to show places of 
the city. Published by Fearon Publishers at $1.75, 
the book Is available at all book stores. . . . 
WORK BEGAN RECENTLY to double the size of 
the United Air Lines ticket office in the Sheraton- 
Palace through a $30,000 remodeling program. 
General contractor is Elvin Stendell. . . . 
PROSPERITY LIES AHEAD FOR ALASKA and 
statehood will bring a population of 30 million 
within 50 years, W. P. Fuller Brawner, President of 
V/. p. Fuller & Co., recently told the Anchorage 
Chamber of Commerce. . . . 

JOHN F. FIXA, POSTMASTER OF SAN FRAN- 
CISCO, will be honored at a testimonial banquet 
marking his tenth anniversary In office in the Gold 
Room of the Fairmont Hotel tomorrow night. . . . 
RESULTS IN FOREIGN TRADE for the first half of 
1958 indicate that United States merchandise ex- 
ports run about 15 per cent below 1957, at a level 
of $16.4 billion, according to a mid-year review by 
the National Foreign Trade Council. 
CALIFORNIANS OPENED MORE THAN 3.346 
000,000 tin cans last year— 246 for each person in 
the State— containing a whole host of products 
ranging from tomato paste to talcum powder, the 
Can Manufacturers Institute reports. , . . 




ALASKAN VISITOR— Members of the Chamber's 
Alaskan Affairs Section, led by Harry R. Smith, 
Chairman (left), greeted Miss Alaska (Elinor 
Moses), when she stepped off a Western Airlines 
plane recently at International Airport enroute to 
Long Beach and the Miss Universe contest. State- 
hood for Alaska has had a long history of backing 
by the Chamber section. 



NEW MEMBERS OF THE CHAMBER 




2^1 



d M. Sheldon Charles B. Rhodes A. J. Bale, Jr. Grady Galloway 

.\ew members joining tile Cliamber include liie above (left to right I : Hanns Kolmar. 
President Kolmar Assuciales Fublicily Agency ; David M. Sheldon. Owner. Holt-l Broad- 
moor ; Charles B. Rhodes. Owner Stanford Pro/jerlies Company; A. J. Bale. Jr.. Bale & 
Company, Consulting Engineers: and Grady Galloway. San Francisco Manager, tt'olcott 
& Associates, Inc., Public Relations Counsel. 



'Great Golden Fleet' 
Escorts S.P. Ferry 
On Her Final Trip 

The Southern Pacific ferrv SAN 
LEANDRO, last of the Bay of San 
Francisco's storied ferryboats, was es- 
corted on her final trip from the Ferry 
Building to Oakland Wednesday by the 
Great Golden Fleet of the Chamber. 

The flotilla was led by the ADVEN- 
TURESS, flagship of the Great Golden 
Fleet, with Commodore Dan E. London 
at the helm. 

Aboard the SAN LEANDRO were the 
mayors of cities on both sides of the 
bay, Arthur Fieldler and his "Pops" 
Orchestra, contingents from press, ra- 
dio and television (including repre- 
sentatives from LIFE magazine) and 
Emmett Fitzpatriek. Chairman of the 
Inter-City section of the Chamber. 



JAPAN INDUSTRY FLOATING FAIR, bound for 
South America aboard the OSK Atlas Maru, will 
make Its only North American call in San Francisco 
April 17-19, 1959, according to arrangements just 
completed between Japanese leaders and port 
officials. . . . 

IMPROVED EARNINGS FOR UNITED AIR LINES 
during the first half of the year have been reported 
by W. A. Patterson, President. Net earnings were 
$4,001,143, compared to $1,403,558 as of June. 
1957. . .. 

CAPTAIN HUGH MACKAY, USN, has assumed 
luties as Supervising Inspector of Naval Material, 
Western District, with headquarters at Treasure 
Island, relieving Captain Eugene T. Aldrldge who 
retired last month. . . . 

ARMY TRANSPORTATION TERMINAL COM- 
MAND at Fort Mason chalked up a total of 181.- 
730 passengers involving the expenditure of $1,693,- 
758 and 378,327 net tonnage in export cargo during 
the year ending March 31. Dollar expenditures in 
the San Francisco Area In support of the Terminal 
Command totaled $26,259,496. including a civilian 
payroll at Fort Mason of $7,155,200. . . 
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA'S TENTH ANNUAL 
SUMMER Management Conference, to be held 
September 2-5 at Asilomar, Pacific Grove, will be 
devoted to an examination of basic values in our 
Industrial society. . . . 

RUE W. SIMS, well-known in management, printing 
and civic circles, has joined the staff of Century 
Business Forms. Inc., of San Francisco as plant man- 
ager, according to Edward R. Nunes, President 
WYMAN ADVERTISING OF SAN FRANCISCO 
was recently named agency for Koret of California, 
Inc., it was announced by Mervin N. Brown, adver- 



tising Manager for the leading women's sportswear 

firm 

PODESTA & BALDOCCHI. "America's Most Fa- 
mous Florists." has named Fuller & Smith & Ross, 
Inc.. to direct advertising for the pioneer firm's s / 
San Francisco shops. . . . 

BRIGADIER GENERAL ROBERT G. MACDON- 
NELL, has been named South Pacific Division En- 
gineer of the Army's Corps of Engineers, succeeding 
Brigadier General William F. Cassldy. He will direct 
the spending of approximately $240 million for this 
year's construction program in California. Arizona. 
Nevada, Utah and portions of five bordering states. 
ADOPTION OF PROPOSITION 17. a ruinous and 
reckless tax scheme, would create serious financial 
and economic problems in California, James Mus- 
sattl, California State Chamber of Commerce Gen- 
eral Manager, told a hearing of the McBride Joint 
Legislative Committee on Taxation. . . . 
THE NATIONAL ECONOMY WILL PICK UP THIS 
FALL and the general trend will boost our gross 
national product from the present $424 million to 
about $600 million by 1965, H. M. Blinn, Vice Presi- 
dent, Pacific Metal Division, Continental Can Com- 
pany, San Francisco, predicts. 




UNIQUE BANK CHECK - Earle H. LeMasters 
(left). President of the Pacific National Bank of San 
Francisco. 333 Montgomery Street, and Mayor 
George Christopher of San Francisco display the 
bank's newly issued check which features a picture 
of the city's financial center, skyline and Bay Bridge. 
The check is printed on a new-type "safety paper" 
which readily reveals any attempt at alterations. 



Friday, August I, 1958 



S<x*t 'P'uutci'ica ZccatcA- 

"Ao cily invites the heart as 
San Franrisco does. Arrival in 
San Franiisro is an exfyerienre 
in living." 

— William Saroyan. 



Chamber Commended 
For Award-Winning 
Safety-Check Effort 

San Francisco has wi>n a "State award of 
excellence" for "outstanding effort" in last 
May's National Vehicle Safety-Check for Com- 
munities. 

More than 2.000 cities and counties partici- 
pated in the program, sponsored nationally by 
the Inter-Industry Highway Safety Committee, 
Washington. D.C.. and LOOK MAGAZINE. 

The local vehicle safety-check was spear- 
headed by the Traffic Safety & Control section 
of the Chamber. 

San Francisco, participating for the first 
time, was second only to Seattle in earning one 
of the two top "State Awards of Excellence" 
given to major cities in the United States. 

The National Board of Judges commended 
the Chamber "for an outstanding job of co- 
ordinating a large number of civic, educa- 
tional, military, industrial, business, automo- 
tive, insurance, youth and public officials into 
a working unit for safety education and acci- 
dent prevention." 

More than 35,000 vehicles were safety- 
checked in San Francisco during the three-day 
period preceding the Memorial Day weekend, 
according to F. Torres Weir. General Chair- 
man, of tlie program and Chairman of the 
Traffic Safety & Control Section of the Cham- 
ber. 



(^dOfH^ 0€UcHdcifl 



August I— BUILDING CODE SECTION COMMIT- 
TEE MEETING— San Francisco Commercial Club, 
465 California Street, 12 noon. 

August 6 — PARKING SECTION COMMITTEE 
MEETING— Room 200, Chamber, 10:30-12:00 noon. 
August 6 — WORLD TRADE ASSOCIATION 
LUNCHEON — San Francisco Room, Falrmount 
Hotel, 12 noon. Speaker: Frank E. Triz, Manager, 
Market Development Machinery Export Department. 
Food Machinery Chemical International Corporation. 
August 8— CANCCOCE LUNCHEON MEETING— 
Garden Room, Fairmont Hotel, 12:30 p.m. 
August 13 — STREET, HIGHWAY & BRIDGE SEC- 
TION MEETING— Room 200, Chamber, 10:30-12:00 

August 13— PACIFIC COAST YACHTING ASSO- 
CIATION CRUISE— 1 :30-3:30 p.m. 
August 14-15— "COASTAL DAYS— 1958" 



;gion busint.55 



SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



ALAN K. BROWNE. Prtsident 

C. L. FOX, General Huager 

M. A. HOCAN. Secretary 

JAMES D. WARNOCK. Execnlive Editor 

JOSEPH I. HAUCHEY. Editor 

Pnbliihed eTery other week bjr the San Francisco Chamber 

of Commerce at 333 Pine St., San Francisco, Zone 4. 

ConntT o{ San Francisco. California. Telenhone EXbrook 

2-4511. (Non-member subscription, tS.OO a rear.) Entered 

as Second Class metier Anril 26, 1944. at the Post Office u 

San Frmncisco, California, onder the act of March 3. 1879. 

Ciradation; 7,500 this Usue 




PROPOSITION NO. 4 ON THE NOVEMBER STATE BALLOT, a $60-million self-liquidating Harbor 
Bond Issue, will Include $50 million for development of Port of San Francisco facilities and $10 mil- 
lion for small craft harbor development throughout California. 



SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE V^ 




BAY REGION Mil BUSINESS 



VOLUME 15 • NUMBER 17 • AUGUST 15, 1958 



'Coastal Days' Points Up Need For Regional Cooperation 



"Coastal Days" — which today ended a two-day sojourn to 
San Francisco by more than 200 leaders from northern Cah- 
fornia's 16 coastal counties — was hailed as "an exc<'i.tionally 
useful mode of intercommunity undcrstandinjj" hy G. j. 
Ticoulat, General Chairman of the event. 

Ticoulat, also a Chamber director and Senior Vice President 
of Crown Zellerhach Cori>oration, added: "Northern Califor- 
nia is one of the most diversified— therefore one of the most 
complicated— economic re-ions in the West. To simphfy and 
streamline its operations, cooperation on an intercounty level 
between all of its 48 counties is necessary for the prosperity 



of all. Even a team of horses knows enough to pull together 
to lighten its load. Our northern CaUfornia counties should 
emulate this kind of horse sense. 

'■rhe Chamber has been concerned with regional problems 
almost since its birth 108 years ago. 

"Full communication and understanding and complete co- 
operation and intelligent liaison in policy and planning are of 
the essence if San Francisco and its neighboring cities and 
communities are to prosper. 

. "'T"*.,'*^<^«P 'n step together is to keep in tempo with the 
times." 



Festivity 

for 

Fellowship 



'Pacific Festival Days' Proclaimed by Mayor 
In Honor of States and Nations of Ocean Area 




HONORING PACIFIC-Mayor George Christopher (right) has proclaimed a Pacific Festival for San 
Francisco from September 12-21 to honor countries represented in this area and the city's role as the 
RoheTt'^B M r V S"P«7'"r Henry R Rolph (left) is Honorary Chairman of 7he event and 

wt Cifa tZ'l A^l^r pt- •' " ^'""*"'' Oh.\rrr... of the citizens' committee to organize the event. 
Miss tita Triniadad of the Philippine government tourist bureau, aHired in Filipino costume, holds globe. 



Tentative Plan for Redevelopment of Area E-1, 
Embarcadero-Lower Market, Approved by Chamber 

Unanimous support of Project E-1, the tentative plan for redevelopment of the 
Embarcadero-Lower Market Street area, has been given hv the Chamber's Board 
of Directors. 

The tentative plan, a development of the original area "E" plan which would 
create a "Golden (;ateway"' for San Francisco, will he fullv considered during a 
September 3 liearin;!; of the Kedcvfjopiiient 



Agency in the Board of Supervisors' chanibers 
at the City Hall. 

The action of the Directors resulted from 
a recommendation of the Redevelopment Co- 
ordinating Committee of the Chamber with 
Randell Larson as Chairman. 

"Through its support of the tentative plan 
as such, the Cliand)er continues its role as 
prime mover in the project." Larson pointed 
out. "The Chaml)er was the first to recommend 
that the existing wholesale produce market 



area be redeveloped to its highest and best 
use. when the .Vgriculturai committee made a 
study in 19,S3. 

"All-out Chami)er support will he especiallv 
important at this stage if delays that would 
preclude a federal grant of $,i.93,3.T00 for the 
project are to he avoided." Larson adde<l. 

"This plan poir\ts the way to dramatic new 
horizons for San Francisco and to the 
strengthening and growth of the city's posi- 
tion as the heaihiuarlers-city of the Viest." 



"Pacific Festival Days" — honoring lands of 
the Pacific Ocean area to which San Francisco 
has been America's traditional gateway — have 
been proclaimed by Mayor George Christo- 
pher. 

The festival will be observed here Septem- 
ber 12 through 21. with the Chamber and iLs 
affiliate, the San Francisco Area World Trade 
Association, acting as cooperating agencies. 

The proclamation followed passage by the 
Board of Supervisors of a resolution intro- 
duced by Supervisor Henry Rcdph. Honorary 
Chairman of the event. 

Robert B. Murray. Jr., Executive Vice Presi- 
dent of Pan American \^'orld .\irways' Pacific 
Alaska Division, was named Executive Chair- 
man of a citizens' committee to plan and carry 
out the affair. 

"This festival will give us all a chance to 
reinforce and bring out our city's traditional 
role as the Gateway to the Pacific." Murrav 
said. 

"San Francisco has filled this position since 
the days of the sailing ships. Since the air age. 
San Francisco has enhanced its position. With 
the jet age upon us. the place the Cit>' oc- 
cupies in trade, commerce and tourism is even 
more vital. 

Leaders in commerce and business will be 
asked to join with historic and cultural or- 
ganizations to plan celebrations noting San 
Francisco's position in relationship with the 
Pacific area states and nations. 

The states and nations of the "Pacific Neigh- 
horhootl" include the following: 

Alaska. Australia. British Columbia. Burma, 
California. t:amliodia. Canada, Chile. China, 
Colombia. Costa Rica. Ecuador. El Salvador. 
France. Guatemala. Hawaii. Honduras. Hong 
Kong. Indonesia. Japan. Korea, Macao. Ma- 
laya. Mexico. Netherlands. New Zealand. 
Nicaragua, Oregon. Panama. Peru. Philip- 
pines. Portugal. Soviet Union. Tahiti. Thai- 
land. Vietnam. Washington. 



Friday, August 15, 1958 



National Defense 
Resources Conference 
Committees Named 

Cliairmt-n and committee members have 
been named for the National Defense Re- 
sources Conference, to be held September 
15-26 at Nourse Auditorium under the auspices 
of the Chamber, according to Hugh Gallagher. 
General Chairman of the session and executive 
of Matson iNavigation Company. The confer- 
ence is presented by the Industrial College of 
the Armed Forces. 

Honorary Chairman is Mayor George Chris- 
topher. Co-chairmen of the Arrangements Com- 
mittee are Robert Lee St. Clair and F. T. 
Garesche. William M. McNabb and Charles L. 
\^heeler are Chairman and Vice Chairman of 
the Selection Committee, respectively. 

.\rrangements committeemen : 

Tom Barbour. Rov N. Biirfl. Empsl Draper Ho»arJ. G. 
L Fov. George W. Johns. BriB. Gen. Sluarl D. Menisl. 
ISAR. VADM B. J. Rodpers. I SN (Rel.l. Elmer J. To~le. 
and Edxard I.. Turtinflon. 

Selection committeemen: 

C. D. Allen, Cipl. C. H. Becker. ISN. Eupene D. Bennell. 
B F Biagpini. Paul A. Bissinper. TCilliam C. Blake. Ll. Col. 
Oliver D. Burden. I SAP. John Parr Cox. Dr. Glenn S. 
Dumke. Georpe Enpland. Louis Els-Hokin. J. Els-Hokin. Lee 
Ellelson. Daniel V. Flanagan. John J. Flynn. Jaek Coldberp- 
er, Chalmers Graham. Gardiner Johnson, Winston J. Jones. 
Waller F. Kaplan, Edpar A. Kaiser. Harry A. Lee. Victor B. 
Levil. William H. Marriott. Joseph Martin. Jr.. V. P. Mc- 
Murdo. Dr. Robert C. Miller. Mrs. Austin Morris. Joseph 
Nobriea. Henrv E. North. Mr-. Robert Olsea. Georpe Phelps. 
VAdSi John R. Redman. LSN iRet.l. RADM Gill C. Rich- 
ardson, ISN IRet.l. John N. Rosecrans. Miss E< elyn Srhmilz. 
Col. John M. Stark. ISA. RADM R. E. Wood. I SCG ; 
Charles Schneider, Russell G. Smith. Dr. Harold Spears. 
Benjamin H. Swip and Sluart R. Ward. 




SAN FRANCISCO 

.?-^<.: i^.AcS(fy DAVID lOSl ^••^AuK'tla^ii /m-t, 



HERE AT LAST is an excellent and lasting souvenir 
gift from San Francisco for your clients throughout 
the world. Retailing at $5.95, it is available in boxes 
of 20 at a saving of $1.05 a record through a spe- 
cial program of the Chamber for the benefit of the 
Second Century Club. Order today for Christmas, 
end-of-year and annual report gift programs and 
benefit membership activities of your Chamber. 

Publicity Department 

San Francisco Chamber of Commerce 

333 Pine Street, San Francisco 4 

□ Please send boxes of 20 records of 
"San Francisco — My Enchanted City," 
$99.00 a box, including sales tax and 
shipping. Check enclosed. 

□ I would like to arrange an audition of the 
recording by our company staff. 




ScM 'P%€UtcUcCLKCi WORLD WITHIN A CITY 

San Francisco is on the fip of a beautiful peninsula and on fhe edge of a 
mighfy continenf. Ifs hills jut between a magnificent bay and the world's largest 
ocean. They rise steeply, joined together in a struggle to reach the sky, the sun 
and the stars. 

The metropolis by the Golden Gate 
and blue Pacific has the vision that goes 
with the heights. Its universality is as lim- 
itless as the heavens it aspires to attain. 
San Francisco is as tolerant as it is 
beautiful; it is democratic and inter- 
nationally-minded. A city with a world- 
view. It has no room in Its varied ethnic 
and national roots for the domination of 
minorities. It Is Intolerant of intolerance, 
whether racial or religious. 

With a population of 814,000, rep- 
resenting a great diversification in its 
racial and national origins and Influence, 
a walk around San Francisco's neighbor- 
hoods is like a trip around the world. 

Ethnically there are 716,846 Cauca- 
sians, 52,000 Negroes and 45,154 Orientals In San Francisco. 

Leading national groups — including native and foreign-born — are the 
Italians, 54,759; Germans, 37,848; Irish (Eire), 36,683; Chinese, 32,000; English 
and Welsh, 19,575; Russians, 17,137; Mexicans, 14,026; Swedish, 11,398; and 
French, 9,947. (National group figures are based on an estimated increase for 
Caucasians of 3.3 per cent over the 1950 U. S. Census level.) 

In the heart of downtown San Francisco is one of the world's most amazing 
communities — Chinatown. A city-within-a-clty, Chinatown Is the largest Orien- 
tal settlement outside of Asia, containing about 30,000 Americans either 
Chinese-born or of Chinese descent. 

Chinatown — a transplanted segment of Old Canton — grudgingly yields 
to the ways of the West while continuing to venerate a native civilization as 
ancient as the pyramids. 

The American brig EAGLE brought San Francisco's first Chinese immi- 
grants in the spring of 1848, two men and a woman. Clipper ships in the China 
trade brought in 25,000 coolies and peasants from Kwangtung Province during 
the following decade. Eager to escape the famine which followed the disastrous 
Tal Ping rebellion, and lured by prospects of sudden wealth, they arrived to do 
the menial work of the Gold Rush. 

San Francisco Is still called "Old Gold Mountain" by the Chinese — reflect- 
ing the opportunity it offered an older generation and the fulfillment it repre- 
sents for modern Chinese. 

Next to Chinatown — where Columbus Avenue slants Into Grant Avenue — 
Is the Italian section, "Little Italy," the world of Neapolitans and Tuscans, 
Romans, Sicilians and Venetians and assorted paisani "from the toe to the knee 
of the Italian boot." Although the first Italians arrived as early as the I830's, 
they began to overwhelm the other nationalities numerically toward the end 
of the nineteenth century. By the thousands they came, laborers, artisans, 
mechanics, farmers and shopkeepers. The majority settled in the North Beach- 
Telegraph Hill section because It reminded them of their native land, and 
because It was near the Bay, where many of them could earn a living by 
fishing. It was here that Amadeo GlanninI founded the Bank of Italy, later to 
become the Bank of America N.T. & S.A. — largest bank in the world and fourth 
largest corporation in the country, listing more than 600 branches. 

With the discovery of gold in a mill- 
race on the American River near the 
foothills of the mighty Sierra Nevada, 
a variety of races and nationalities 
poured into San Francisco in 1849. Out 
of the many peoples lured by the Gold 
Rush — most of them swashbuckling and 
individualistic — the character of the city 
was formed. 

In I 945 the United Nations was born 
and its charter written in San Francisco; 
in 1951 the Japanese Peace Treaty was 
signed in the City by the Golden Gate. 
San Francisco had transcended from 
earthbound parochialism to the stratosphere of internationalism. 

(A REGILAR FEATLRE OF BA\ REt.lO\ BISISESS. ASK VOl R CHAMBER FOR REPRINTSl 




Friday, August 15, 1958 



Flitting tlie Hijrli Spots 



With JIM WARNOCK 

SENATOR WILLIAM F. KNOWLAND, Congress- 
men Clair Engle and Patrick Hillings, Governor 
Goodwin J. Knight, Attorney General Edmund G. 
Brown, and Judge Stanley Mosk, all top candidates 
for major California political offices in the Novem- 
ber elections, will speak at the keynote luncheon of 
the California State Junior Chamber of Commerce 
tomorrow at the Bellevue Hotel. . . . 

1957 TOTAL PERSONAL INCOME in the State of 
California reached $34,517,000,000, according to a 
recent preliminary compilation by the California 
State Chamber of Commerce Research Department 
based on State Department of Finance figures. Total 
personal Incomes were $32,501,000,000 in 1956 and 
$16,637,000,000 in 1947. . . . 




"HOLIDAY FOR KIDS," a regularly scheduled 
Gray Lines, Inc., tour of San Francisco originated 
by the Chamber's Marketing & Sales Promotion 
Committee, had its inaugural run recently. On 
hand were (left to right): Rodger I. Mendes, Man- 
ager of Marketing Research, Pacific Gas & Electric; 
Tim Hovey, juvenile movie star; and Randolph 
Ward, Traffic Manager of Gray Lines. 

FIFTEEN TONS OF GRAMMAR SCHOOL BOOKS 

were recently shipped from the Port of San Fran- 
cisco to school children in Pakistan through the 
combined efforts of Menio Park schools and civic 
groups, Isbrandtsen Steamship Co., and the U. S. 
Marine Corps. . . . 

SAN FRANCISCO will be represented at the 
August 24 California State Fair Stew-A-Cue, in 
which press, radio and television from throughout 
the West are served representative foods and bev- 
erages from California cities, by 50 pounds of 
frozen crab meat donated by ten Fisherman's Wharf 
firms and taken up the Sacramento River by Cap- 
tain William Weisgerber aboard his yacht JULIE 
ANN, a member of the Chamber's Great Golden 
Fleet. . . . 

SANTA FE RAILWAY'S new Travel Center was re- 
cently opened at 44 Fourth St., Harris W. Beck, 
Western General Passenger Agent, announces. . . . 



SIX PROPOSED BOND ISSUES totaling $38,560,000 
have been approved by the supervisors as to "pub- 
lic interest and necessity. " They are: $22,150,000 for 
construction of a civil courts building and rehabili- 
tation of the city hall; $7,225,000 for rehabilitation 
of the civic auditorium; $3,600,000 for rebuilding 
of the Palace of Fine Arts; $2,785,000 for a Ferry 
Building Park; $1,500,000 for a new maintenance 
yard for the Department of Electricity; and $1,300.- 
000 for expansion of the maintenance yard of the 
Public Works Department. The bond issues are 
slated for the November ballot along with local 
charter amendments and 18 state propositions, in- 
cluding four bond issues totaling $780,000,000. . . . 

BAY AREA INDUSTRIAL FIRMS received $62,281, 
150 in new defense business awarded by Army Ord- 
nance during the first six months of 1958. Col. John 
M. Stark, commanding officer of the San Francisco 
Ordnance District, reports. . . . 

UNITED BAY AREA CRUSADE starts a five-county 
campaign on September 22 to seek a goa' of 
$1 1,750,000. . . . 

100 CONTROLLERS OF DEPARTMENT STORES 

and specialty shops — the men and women who man- 
age the finances in retailing throughout the West- 
ern States — met at the Fairmont Hotel this week. . . . 

PENCIL. PAD & PROFIT, three marketing presenta 
tions, are being made available without charge to 
trade associations and business groups by the 
Northern California Chapter of the American Mar- 
keting Association, according to Howard Hetzler of 
the Calaveras Cement Co. . . . 

NEW NONSTOP DC-6A CARGOLINER service 

from San Francisco to Chicago was started recently 
by United Air Lines, providing a weekly eastbound 
cargo lift of 450,000 pounds. , . . 

MANAGEMENT PRACTICES AND INDUSTRIAL 
POTENTIAL in the Soviet Union will be one of the 
highlights of the University of California's tenth 
annual summer management conference at Asilomar 
beginning September 2. . . . 

PORT OF SAN FRANCISCO vessel sailings in Au 
gust will total 203, Port Traffic Manager Jeff H. 
Myers reports. . . . 

SAN FRANCISCO LAW SCHOOL plans a full 
course for beginning students In Oakland again this 
year, as well as the regular four year curriculum in 
San Francisco, classes scheduled between 6:20 and 
9:10 p.m., offering an opportunity to earn an LL.B. 
while employed. . . . 

"PUBLIC RELATIONS — ATTITUDES AND PLATI- 
TUDES" was the topic of John W. Fearn before the 
recent meeting of the Mail Advertising Service 
Association at the Ivy House. . . . 
AN OFF-CAMPUS PROGRAM in engineering 
leading to a Master of Science degree will be in- 
augurated in the Santa Clara-San Mateo area this 
fall by the Graduate Division and the Department 
of Engineering of the University of California in 
cooperation with University Extension. . . . 



NEW MEMBERS OF THE CHAMBER 




Phillips S. Davies Robert Batchelor G. Harold MeUnder C. Ru , Herschel J. Brown 

New member;- of llu' (iliuiiilier iiieliule the ul)o\e (led In li^tlilt ; I'liillips S. Davies, 
Vice Presi<lenl. E. H . .txc &■ Co.. Inc.: Koherl Hutehelor. A.I.A.. arcliilecl: G. Harold 
Meiaiuler, Vice President jiikI Secretary. I'laiiLlin Saiifigs iinil Loan AssorintUm : C. Riis- 
sell Joiiiisoii. I'resiiient. liiion l.iimlirr C.omimny ; and ilerscliel .1. Brown. .Assistant Gen- 
eral Manaijer. Mi-sile .'system^ Division. I.oihhiid Mnriiit (.oriioralion. .*<Mnnvvale. 




BALL PARK BOND MONEt— Aian ^. Browne, 
President of San Francisco Stadium, Inc., President 
of the Chamber and Vice President. Bank of 
America N.T. & S.A., receives checks for $7 million 
in bond money for construction of tfie S. F. Gianfs' 
future home. Bank of America will hold Hie checks 
in trusteeship. Top check is for $5 million from 
bonds authorized by San Francisco voters in 1954. 
Bottom checks are $1 million each from Insurance 
companies which bought additional revenue bonds 
from the non-profit San Francisco Stadium, Inc. 
NEW DOWNTOWN CENTER cf San Francisco 
State College will present a full schedule of evenlna 
classes beginning September 12 at 540 Powe 
Street, liberal arts courses being offered in additlo" 
to those in business and world business. . . . 

Product Potential 
Survey in DeinaiKl 

More than .i.OOO <opie- of \\u- Product Po- 
tential Survey rejiort have heen distributed to 
inquirers, according to Lewis .M. Holland. 
Manager of the Industrial Department. 

Out of that total. .J.4(K) were sent to indi- 
vidual manufacturers and l.OOO to other inter- 
ested parties. 

The survey, "first of its kind along this 
line." was undertaken in 195ft by the Cham- 
ber's Manufacturers Committee. 

Classifying of each item in the report was 
done on a volunteer basis and took a total of 
180 man-hours to sunimari/.e. Cost of repro- 
ducing and printing 6.000 copies exewdeil 
- 1 ..'lOO. 

.More than S7(>..T million wurth of manufac- 
tured products are purcha-ed outside of (Cali- 
fornia by firms in the l.'{ counties of the San 
Francisco Bay .\rea. the survey found, .\mong 
manufactured products purchastni outside arc 
cotton textiles, certain types of steel tstainle^- 
and high carlmn). cellophane and sundry 
chemical products. 

"If the textile industry were as large in 
relation to the State's overall economy as il is 
to the nation as a whole, there would be S.'i.OOO 
new California jobs creatt-d." G. L. Fox. 
Chamber General Manager. |M>inled out. 



Friday, August 15, 1958 




SEA-GOING DEPUTY SHERIFFS — Thirteen captains of the Great Golden Fleet of the Chamber recently were appointed deputies of the Sheriff's office of the 
City and County of San Francisco in a ceremony aboard Commodore Dan E. London's flagship ADVENTURESS. Left to right (front row) are: Vernon S. Dall- 
man, Charles A. Langlais, Sidney Keil (Manager, Domestic Trade Department), Sheriff Matt C. Carberry, London, Mayor George Christopher, Douglas Dorn, 
Francis Cross and Jerry Hooper. Back row: Jim Bodrero, William J. Gray, James V^. Elliott, Gerald Mincher, Leavitt Olds, Stephen A. Zellerbach, Edward 
Wise, Jr., and W. E. Weisgerber. "Swearing in" ceremonies took place off Angel Island's shores. 

Captains of Great Golden Fleet Sworn In 
As San Francisco's 'Sea-Going Sheriffs' 

The Sheriff's Office of the City and County of San Francisco has gained a new 
marine division with the swearing in of thirteen captains of the Great Golden 
Fleet of the San Francisco Chamher of Commerce as deputies by Sheriff Matt C. 
Carberry. 

Brief ceremonies honoring the captains and 
authorizing them to aid in law enforcement in 
San Francisco Bay took place aboard the 
ADVENTURESS. Commodore Dan London's 
yacht, flagship of the fleet of motor launches, 
as it was anchored off Angel Island, a tip of 
which forms the northeastern limit of San 
Franci.«co County. 

Mayor George Christopher was aboard for 
the ceremony after luncheon on the ADVEN- 
TURESS and the JOLLY ROGER of Captain 
Leavitt Old.s. 

Captains of the Golden Fleet, sea-going am- 
bassadors of good will of the Chamber, are 
thus fully deputized for law enforcement with- 
in the City and County's limits of San Fran- 
cisco Bay as volunteers to assist law enforce- 
ment agencies when needed. 

Formed in 19.51. the unique fleet has acted 
as official judges in yachting regattas and 
other maritime events, in addition to hosting 
hundreds of distinguished visitors to San 
Francisco on cruises of the bay. greeting new 
liners on their maiden voyages, and welcoming 
visiting naval units. 

The marine divisi<m will supplement tlie 
sheriff's air squadron, of which Vincent Raney 
is adjutant, and the mounted posse, of which 
Jack Mailliard i> captain. 



August 18 — NATIONAL DEFENSE RESOURCES 
CONFERENCE COMMITTEE MEETING — Room 

200, Chamber, 10:30 a.m. 

August 21 — NATIONAL DEFENSE RESOURCES 
CONFERENCE COMMIHEE MEETING— 1st Floor 
Conference Room Cnamber, 2:00 o.m. 
August 22 — REGIONAL PROBLEMS SECTION 
MEETING — CIVIC DEVELOPMENT — Room 200, 
C-amber, 10:30 a.-. 

August 22— WORKSHOP FOR CHAMBER SEC- 
RETARIES OF NORTHERN CALIFORNIA— Mark 
Hopkins Hotel 9:00 a,m. 

August 25 — "SMALL BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY 
DAY" COMMITTEE MEETING— Rcom 200, Cham- 
ber, I 1:00 a.m. 

August 26— COMMITTEE ON TRADE RELATIONS 
WITH AUSTRALIA— 1st Poor Conference Room, 
Chamber, 2:00 -4:00 p.m. 

August 28 — NATIONAL DEFENSE RESOURCES 
CONFERENCE — 1st Boor Conference Room, 
Chamber, 2:00 p.m. 

August 28 — FREEWAY RECOMMENDATION 
PRESENTATION TO CALIFORNIA HIGHWAYS 
COMMISSION— I 120 N" Street, Sacramentc 
I I :00 a.m., LUNCHEON— Sutter Club, 12:00 noon. 



Halo Sales to Move 
Industrial Quarters 

Halo Sales, chief distributor of birthday and 
holiday candles in the United States — induced 
to locate in San Francisco by the Chamber last 
year — will move into new and larger quarters 
at 444 Townsend Street early next month, ac- 
cording to Lewis M. Holland. Manager of the 
Chamber Industrial Department 




RISING ALOFT is the flag of the Sheriff s Office 
of the City and County of San Francisco, marking 
the swearing in of 13 captains of the Great Golden 
Fleet as deputies in a ceremony off Angel Island, 
northeasterly corner of the county limit. 



BAY REGION BUSINE55 



SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



AI^AN K. BROWNE. Pre.jdenl 

C. L. FOX, General Manager 

M. A. HOCAN. Seerelarr 

JAMES D. WARNOCK. Execntive Edilor 

JOSEPH I. HAUCHEY. Edilor 

Pnbliihed eretr other weeli bj the San Franciieo Chamber 

of Commerce at 333 Pine Si., San Franciieo. Zone 4. 

Coontr of San Francisco. California. Teleobone EXbrook 

2-4511. (Non-member ■obacriplion. S5.00 a 7ear.) Entered 

ai Second aaii mailer Anril 26. 1944. at the Pott Office at 

San Franciieo, CalUomia, tinder the act of March 3. 1879. 

Circulation; 7,500 thit i*tu« 



SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 




BUSINESS 



VOLUME 15 • NUMBER 18 • AUGUST 29. 1958 




"AMBASSADORS EXTRAORDINARY"— Alan K. Browne (leff), President of the Chamber, presents copies 
of the record "San Francisco — My Enchanted City" to two leading actors and the producer of "The Line- 
up" while G. L. Fox, (second from right). General Manager, looks on. The trio, chosen as "Ambassadors 
Extraordinary" of San Francisco, includes (left to right) actors Tom Tully and Warner Anderson and (far 
right) producer Jaime del Valle. 

San Francisco's Buying Income Per Capita Ranks 
Highest Among Large Cities in the United States 



The effective buyinjl income per c 
was highest amon}j the large cities in 
Economic Survey recently released by 

The figure compares to $2,113 in the State 
as a whole and $1,734 in the nation. Total 
effective hiiying income in San Francisco last 
year amounted to $2,143,231,000. 

San Fraiicisfo also letl all major U. S. filies 
ill population gain per scjuare mile of land 
area between 19IO-l")r>8. On January 1, 19,S8, 
San Francisco had 811,1)00 residents -38.643 
more than in Ifl.'iO and 179,464 more than in 
1940. 

On the average, about 311.000 additional 
persons enter the city daily, creating a market 
of more than a million persons. 

The Federal Reserve Bank of San Fran- 
cisco, headfiuarlers of the Twelfth Federal Re- 
serve District, had the second largest volume 
of business of all districts In the system last 
year. The member banks in the district re- 
ported 10,142 officers and 61,164 employees 
and accounted for 14.7 per cent of the total 
assets. 22. .5 jier cent of the time deposits- - 
highest of all dislricis I.'i.y7 per cent of taxes 
on net income and 14.3 per cent of net profits 
of all member banks in the Federal Reserve 
System. 

San Francisco hanks, which include the 
world's largest and six of the nation's M) 
largest commercial hanks, reported total de- 
posits of $n.6 billion at the end of 19S7, an 
increase of S8."> 1,110(1.000 over a vear earlier 
and $.S.3 billion above 19.''>0, 
Insurance center of the West, the city had 
about 654 insurance carriers, agenis and bro- 
kers and 23.491 persons cngagi'd in tliat field 

in IW?. with an annual payroll of al t Sl()3.- 

000.000. 



apita in San Francisco last year of .$2.6.33 
the United States, according to the 19.S8 
the Research Department of the Chaniher. 

Insured wages in the manufacturing indus- 
tries in San Francisco during 1%7 amounted 
to about $386,000,000, or about $123,000,000 
above the 1950 level. 

In world trade, commodities valued at 
S.i61,2.S.'5,589 were exported through the San 
Francisco Customs District last vear compared 
to $262,.531, .S71 in 1948. Imports totaled $436,- 
.'541,665 last vear compared to $224,465,242 in 
1948, 

Total of exports and imports through the 
customs district was $997,797,254 last year or 
(Turn to page four) 



Producer, Actors of 
'The Lineup" Honored 
By The Chamber 

Honoring "The Lineup" for authentically 
t' Ming the story of the city's police department 
iiid for televising .San Francisco scenes into 
iriillions of homes throughout the world, the 
liroducer and two principal actors of the show 
liave been named "Ambassadors Extraordi- 
nary" by the Chamber. 

Producer Jaime del Valle and actors War- 
ner Anderson and Tom Tully were presented 
linnorary cards along with copies of the record- 
ing "San Francisco — My Enchanted City" on 
location at Steinhart Aquarium by Alan K. 
Browne, President of the Chamber, 

"We're very proud of the program," Browne 
told del Valle. "It's a tremendous asset for this 
city. San Francisco gains much of its pros- 
perity from visitors and conventions, "The 
Lineup' has photographed the city with great 
authenticity and devotion." 

Western Air Lines Asks 
Temporary Texas Service 

\^ estern Air Lines has sought permission 
from the Federal Aviation Agency to tempo- 
rarily operate Texas to California air service 
pending the final decision of the Civil .\ero- 
nautics Board on the Dallas-to-the-West Case. 

The City and County of San Francisco and 
the Chamber consistently have urged "immedi- 
ate authorization" of new temporary passenger 
service between the West Coast, Dallas and 
F"ort Worth. 

Fifteen airlines, including \^'AL. and some 
16 civic bodies and governmental agencies 
have expended nearly a half-million dollars in 
processing the 31-nionth old Dallas-Vl'est 
Coast Case, 



Governors Speak at 'Pacific Festival' 



{governors of Hawaii and .\laska — repre- 
senting the Pacific Area's newest and "next" 
states— will be the principal speakers during 
the Pacific Festival, September 12-21. Mayor 
George Christopher has announced, 

(Hivernor William Quinn of Hawaii and 
(ioNernor Mike Stcpani>vich siiaie the rostrum 
at the Pacific Covcrnors Day Luncheon in the 
(iaiden Court of the Sheraton-Palace Hotel 
.September 19, Governors of British Columbia, 
Washington. Oregon, California, an<l Baja 
California have been invited to sit at the head 
table. 

"New Look in the Pacific" will he the liieme 
of the luncheon, sponsored by the Common- 
wealth (!lub in cooperation witli the (Chamber. 



the San Francisco World Trade .\ssiociation 
and the Down Town Association, 

.\ny of the organizations may be contacted 
for tickets and reservations are being accepted 
on a first-come, first-serve basis. Nearly 1,000 
business and community leaders are expected 
to attend. 

Supervisor Henry R. Rolph is Honorary 
Chairman of the nine-day festival which will 
honor 38 slates and neighbors comprising the 
"Pacific Neighborhimd" and fKiint up this 
city's traditional role as "Gateway to The 
Pacific." 

The event has the backing of a citizens com- 
mittee of 60 ;>an Francisco executives, headed 
by General Chairman RoIktI B, Murray, Jr. 



Friday, August 29, 1958 



San Francisco Business Activity Index 
of 158.8 Best July Level in Its History 

Business activity in San Francisco attained a new liif;h for July and the first 
seven month's cumulative activity was only 0.6 i>er cent helow last years alltime 
record for the similar j)eriod. according to the Chamber Research Department. 

The July l)iisiness activity index of 158.8 

topped last July Ijy 4.4 per cent and was 3.0 
per cent above June of this year. The average 
for the first seven months amounted to 151.0 
compared to 151.9 last year. 

Bank Debits Up 6.8% 

.\ considerable rise in financial transactions 
carried July banic debits to $4,483,800,000 in 
San Francisco. $284 million or 6.8 per cent 
above last year. 



In the real estate field, mortgages and deeds 
of trust totaled $22.6 million or 44.0 per cent 
above a year ago. The market value of shares 
traded on the Pacific Coast Stork Exchange 
was up ISA per cent. Retail department store 
sales in San Francisco were down two per cent 
in July, .\pparel store sales slipped one per 
cent from a year ago. 

July construction authorized in San Fran- 
cisco included 1.079 permits valued at $5,062.- 
419. New residential accounted for $1,829,613 
and provided for 171 dwelling units. 

New non-residential accounted for $906,825 
and additions, alterations and repairs for 
$2,325,981. The larger permits included a 
foundation for the new Hall of Justice at 7th 
and Bryant Streets. $899,000: alterations to 
the Academy of Science. Golden Gate Park. 
$450,000: hospital alterations. 100 Masonic 
Avenue. $203,000: P.G.&E. substation altera- 
tions at 8th and Mission Streets. $190,000: 
and a new 3-story. 19 unit apartment dwelling 
at 4745 Geary Boulevard. $146,775. 

Airport Traffic Record 

In the transportation field. San Francisco 
International Airport traffic established a new 
July passenger record with 11.314 planes in 
and out and 3.32.211 passengers off and on. 
Airmail handled was up 11.2 per cent. July 
freight car movements and revenue port ton- 
nage were down 5.5 per cent from last year 
but ship arrivals in San Francisco Bay were 
up 14.2 per cent. Truck movements in the San 
Francisco area in July were 3.2 per cent above 
a year ago. July bridge vehicle crossings hit 
new all-time highs: the Bay Bridge totaled 
.3,1.36,558 and the Golden Gate Bridge 1,625,- 
625. 

In the utility field in San Francisco in July, 
electrical energy sales were up 4.3 per cent, 
industrial and commercial gas sales one per 
cent, industrial and commercial water con- 
sumption 0.8 per cent and residential 8.5 per 
cent. 

Construction Booms 

July bank debits for the seven cities re- 
ported in the Bay Region amounted to $6.8 
billi(m or $432 million above last July, an 
increase of 6.2 per cent. The seven-month 
cumulative of $45.0 billion topped the same 
period last year by 1.6 per cent compared to 
1.4 per cent in the 12th Federal Reserve Dis- 
trict. 

Building construction authorized in the 
nine-county Bay Area — Alameda, Contra Cos- 
ta, Marin. San Francisco. San Mateo. Solano. 
Napa. Santa Clara and Sonoma — amounted to 
$65,689,000 in July compared to $61,138,000 



a year ago. New residential accounted for 
$41,840,000 of the total and provided for 
3.800 dwelling units compared to $28,959,000 
and 2.695 units in July of last year. 

Large-scale tract housing projects gave 
strong impetus in the residential field. The 
average permit value per dwelling unit in July 
was $10,824 compared to $10,745 a year ago. 
The seven-month total dwelling units author- 
ized in the nine-county area amounted to 21- 
853. an increase of 22.5 per cent. 

Employment in the six-county metropolitan 
area — Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, San 
Francisco. San Mateo and Solano — in July 
reached 1.082.500 compared to 1.095,600 a 
year ago and 1.077,800 in June, Industry 
groups lagging behind the most in a July-to- 
july comparison were manufacturing, 4.7 per 
cent: construction. 3.7 per cent: transporta- 




tion, communications and utilities. 5.3 per 
cent; and agriculture. 1.8 per cent. The fi- 
nance and trade groups were close to last 
year's levels. Service and government groups 
were ahead of a year ago. 

July unemployment totaled 61,900 or 5.4 
per cent of the labor force. In scarce supply 
were scientific and technical personnel with 
nuclear experience, medical technicians, x-ray 
technicians, nurses and well qualified secre- 
taries and stenographers. Welders, shipfitters 
and shipwrights also were in demand. 



Business Actiyit-y Through July, 1958 



BRANCH OF ACTIVITY 

•GENERAL BUSINESS ACTIVITY INDEX- 
CONSTRUCTION PERMITS 



Residential, New 
Dwelling Units 
Single-familv ur 



1,079 
5,062,419 
1,829,613 



New.. 
"and 



Additions, Alteratic 

Nine county dwelling units authorized.. 

REAL ESTATE^Deeds Recorded 



—42.7 
20.3 
30.5 
18.2 
—72.5 
^t2.l 
41.4 



•RETAIL DEPARTMENT STORE SALES 



..Number 
Index 



FINANCE— Bank Debits _ $000 

Postal Receipts _ $ 

Pacific Coast Stock Exchange.- _ Shares traded 

Market value $ 

COMMERCIAL FAILURES _ _ Number 

^(ear 



INDUSTRY TREND— 6 County Total Employment... 

Mfg. Average Weekly Earnings 

Manufacturing - „ 

Construction, contract 

Finance, insurance, real estate „ 

Retail trade ._... 



lings) 
-(employment) 



state, city... 



Wholesale trade 

Service __ 

Trans., comm.. & 

Agriculture 

Govt. — Federal. 
Other 

TRANSPORTATION— Freight car movement-. 

S. F. Airport— Planes In and Out 

Passengers Off and On_.... _ _ 

Air Mail Loaded and Unloaded 

Air Express Loaded and Unloaded- 



Lbs. 

Lbs. 

iight Loaded and Unloaded Lbs. 

Rail Express Shipments Number 

•Truck Movements— S. F. Area _ Index 

Out-of-State passenger car entries into No. Calif Number 



PORT OF SAN FRANCISCO- 
Coastwise 

Intercoastal 



•Rev 



Tons-, 



Inland Waterway . 



4,483,880 
2 567,880 
3,438,428 
76,324.768 

II 

l.082.50O(p) 
99.22(a) 
2IO,700(p) 
70,800(p) 
69,ICO(p) 
I73,700(p) 
79.?00(p) 
242,800(p) 
Il7,l00(p) 
2l.300(p) 
94.500(p) 
2.600(p) 

12,105 
11,314 
332,211 
3.195,365 
561,239 
6,930,617 
65,BB0(d) 

172.3 
126.973 

444,938 
5.230 
32,125 
176,188 
231,395 



6.544 
49.780,839 
21,761,298 



28,676,314 

17,368,353 

18.989,958 

405,110,567 



—0.6 

—3.1 
8,3 

135.2 
64.7 
11.8 



—0.2 
—2,1 
— 11.6 



1.065. 386(p) 

'205.230(p) 
64.770(p) 
68.385(p) 
I72,l55(p) 
79.7l5(p) 
245.070(p) 
Il7,l00(p) 
I7.930(p) 
92,600(p) 
2.50O(p) 

79 341 

72.961 

2,028 589 

21,929,642 

4 462.475 

43 904,794 

445, 694(d) 

158.7 



—5.5 
—47.6 
^3.9 



3.232.542 

45.897 

212,377 

I. 183. 126 

1,791,142 



— 14,3 
—62.2 
—22.0 



CARGO VESSELS (San Francisco Bay) 

Arrivals _ _ 

Millions of Registered Tons 

UTILITIES— Ind. & Comm. Gas Sales 

•Elec. Energy Sales, K.W. Hours 

Water Consumption— Comm. & Ind 

NEW DEVELOPMENTS 

Visitor and Newcomer Inquiries 

Bay Bridge Vehicle Crossings 

Golden Gate Bridge Vehicle Crossings _.. 

FRUITS S VEGETABLE RECEIPTS 

LIVESTOCK SLAUGHTER (Insp. Dists.) 

•S. F. CONSUMER PRICE INDEX— All Items.. 



,„Cu. Ft. 

Index 

..Cu. Ft. 



•Indeic Base (1947-49 Monthly Ave 
last year 21 days In July; (n) Ne 
tlon, but available upon request. 



:I00); (a) June: (b) Ma 
time high; (p) Prellmini 



425 
2,037,07! 

I 094.600,100 

144 

170,419,500 

1,959 
3,l36,558(n) 
l.625,625(n) 

4,936 

99,0OO(a) 

128.0(a) 

, ave.; (c) 6 m 



9,802,006,000 

153 

1,115,385,500 

12,851 
20 232,522 

9,496,935 

26,19! 

586,000(c) 

127.3(b) 

■e.; (d) Strike cond 
wn due to space lir 



10.5 
-11.3 



RESEARCH DEPARTMENT. SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



Friday, August 29, 1958 



Hitting the High Spots 



vho are complete 
'ith varying amounts of 



With JIM WARNOCK 

A Professional and Business Men's Painting Group 
is being organized under the sponsorship of the San 
Francisco Art Asociation in cooperation with the 
Chamber, 

John R. Little. Vice Presi- 
dent & General Manager, 
San Francisco, Foote, Cone 
^nd Beldlng, Director of the 
Chamber and Chairman of 
its Publicity Committee, will 
be advisor to the group. 
^^^^^^ The group will meet at 

^^^^^y^^ the California School of 

^H ^^''^fcl ^'"« ^^^' 800 Chestnut St., 
^^^^ W ^^H San Francisco on Tuesday 
^^^^^ t^k ^^^M evenings beginning Sep- 
^^^^^^ ^™ tember 16 from 7 to 10 
John R. Little P-m, Ralph Putzker, well- 

Inown West Coast artist, 
will act as instructor and critic. Fee: $28 for IS 
weeks. 

Organized specifically for men interested in 
painting as an enrichment of leisure time and as a 
way to greater understanding and appreciation of 
the work of historical and contemporary painters, 
the program will Interest 
beginners and amateurs 
training and experience. 

All Instruction and criticism will be on a com- 
pletely individual basis. Techniques of various types 
of painting will be presented so that the individual 
can explore any style he chooses, or can develop his 
chosen style further. Work will be from the model: 
still-life and imagination according to the needs 
and interests of each person. 

For further information write S.F.A.A., 800 Chest- 
nut St., S. F. or telephone ORdway 3-2640. 

"CALIFORNIA LANDS— OWNERSHIP, USE AND 
MANAGEMENT," final report and valuable refer- 
ence work, :s available from The American Forestry 
Association, 919 Seventeenth Street. N.W,. Wash- 
ington 6, D. C. at $4.50. . . . 

PAUL E. HOOVER, President, Crocker-Anglo Na- 
tional Bank, announces the appointments of William 
M, Brady and Scott Runyan as Assistant Vice Presi- 
dents and Paul D. Kardman as Assistant Cashier.... 

KENNETH C. CHRISTENSEN, Treasurer of Pacific 
Gas and Electric Company, has been elected Vice 
President and Treasurer, President Norman R. 
Sutherland announces. . . , 

GRAHAM KISLINGBURY PUBLIC RELATIONS 

and Advertising Agency will handle the 1958 Grand 
National Livestock Exposition, Horse Show, and 
Rodeo at the Cow Palace, October 3 1 -November 
9. , . . 

AIR TRAFFIC CONTROL DIVISION of the Civil 
Aeronautics Administration &f San Francisco Inter- 
national Airport is being expanded, work to be 
completed this fall. . . . 

CITY AND CHAMBER OFFICIALS from communl- 
ties around the bay were on hand to welcome the 
USS RANGER, world's largest warship, when she 
docked recently at Alameda Naval Air Station, in- 
cluding Chamber General Manager G. L. Fox, from 
San Francisco. Arrival of crew of 3500 and their 
dependents is equivalent to a new city of 10,000 on 
San Francisco Bay in payroll and buying income.... 

CALAVERAS CEMENT COMPANY reported net 
earnings for first six months of $584,598 as com- 
pared to $533,473 for the comparable period a 
year ago, William Wallace Mein, Jr., President, an- 
nounces. . . . 

70 MILLION PASSENGER MILES of military air- 
lift were offered immediately by U. S. scheduled 
airlines in response to an Air Force canvass during 
the Lebanon crisis, according to the Air Transport 
Association of America. . . . 




Robert Royston Don L. Gelsert Donald P. Smith Mary K. Murphy George S. Livermon 

Robert Royston. Land.scape Architect. Kuyston, Hanamolo & Miiyfs; Don L. Geisert. 
District Sales Manager. Pacific Iron & Steel Corporation : Donald Powers Smith. .^.I..\.. 
.Architect: Miss Mary K. Murphy. Executive Secretary. Independent Colleges of North- 
ern Calijornia; and George S. Livermore. Owner. George Livermore & Assoriates, 

Designers. 



GEORGE KILLION, RANDOLPH SEVIER and John 

C. McHose of Los Angeles head of a State Com- 
mittee for Harbor Development and Small Boat 
Activities planning an Intensive statewide campaign 
on behalf of Proposition 4 on the November ballot, 
the campaign to be handled by Whitaker and Bax- 
ter. The chairmen called the proposition "a sound 
way for California to provide vitally necessary har- 
bor facilities without costing the taxpayers a 
cent." . . . 

EMMETT S. CLIFFORD, Assistant Controller of Mat- 
son Navigation Company, has been elected First 
Vice President of the Federal Government Account- 
ants Association — first man In private Industry to 
hold a national office In the 10-year-old organi- 
zation. . . . 

S.F. BAY AREA PUBLICITY CLUB met key execu- 
tives of KTVU, San Francisco-Oakland Television 
Station, and heard Don Arlett, Promotion Manager, 
discuss "Is Television Really Important to Publi- 
cists?" They toured the station facilities after a 
dinner at the Sea Wolf, Jack London Square. . . . 

LEGALSOUND CORPORATION, 49 N. First Street, 
San Jose, a new member of the Chamber, offers a 
complete convention reporting service, specializing 
In delivery of proceedings, printed and bound, 
within a week of adjournment as well as complete 
sound recording service. . . . 

SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA RAPID TRANSIT 

District Directors have created the position of chief 
engineer on the district's staff and established a 
salary range of from $20,00 to $30,000, General 
Manager John M. Peirce announces. Applicants 
should write him at 628 Flood Building. San Francis- 
co 2. .. . 

TWO ENORMOUS JAPANESE LANTERNS and a 

collection of paintings by school children, official 
gifts from Osaka to her sister city of San Francisco 
were recently delivered to Mayor George Christo- 
pher. Superintendent of Schools Harold Spears by 
Captain J. D. Cox of the PRESIDENT WILSON. 
Consul General Aklra NIshlyama represented the 
Japanese City. The lanterns will first be displayed 
in public In the City Hall rotunda during the Pacific 
Festival on Pacific Sister City Day. September 12, 
marking beginning of the event honoring states and 
nations of the Pacific. . . . 

ERIC LIVINGSTON. President of Crane Pest Con- 
trol, recently returned from Vienna, where, as Vice 
Chairman of the American Delegation to the Inter- 
national Congress for Pest Control, he authored the 
motion to incorporate this unique group within the 
scope of the United Nations. The most important 
action of the meeting, his resolution was unanimous- 
ly adopted by the 350 delegates from 26 nations 
including the USSR. According to Livingston, this 
move to form an International Union of Pest Con- 
trol within the health section of the United Nations 
will prove tremendously important to health and 
sanitation throughout the world. . . .' 



FIRST COMMERCIAL ELECTRONIC ADDRESSING 

system In the United States has been ns+a'led at 
the Electronic Mailing House in San Francisco, a 
subsidiary of Blum's Direct Advertising Agency. 
oldest and largest mailing house on the West 
Coast. . . . 

"SCIENCE CAPSULE." new television film series 
starring Dr. Tom Groody, is now l>eing presented on 
KTVU sponsored by Bay View Federal Savings & 
Loan Association. The five-minute program is sched- 
uled three times weekly — Monday. Wednesday and 
Friday — at 4:25 p.m. . . . 

"COMPLETE COOPERATION and a fuller under- 
standing of Intercounty policy-making and planning 
are necessary If northern California's explosive 
economy Is to realize its full potential," G. J. Tl- 
coulat. Senior Vice President of Crown Zellerbach 
and General Chairman of the Chamber-sponsored 
"Coastal Days" told more than 180 civic and busi- 
ness leaders from 16 coastal counties at a recent- 
luncheon at San Francisco Naval Shipyard. . . . 

SAN FRANCISCO INTERNATIONAL Film Festive 
October 29 through November I I — the only offi- 
cially recognized festival In the Western Hemi- 
sphere — has attracted entrants from at least 20 
countries of the film-producing world, according to 
the San Francisco Art Commission, which sponsors 
the event. . . . 

RAY ANDREW HUBBARD has been appointed 

Program Director of KPIX, the Westlnghouse Broad- 
casting Company television outlet in San Francisc : 
He succeeds William Dempsey, recently resigned. . . 
THE FACE-LIFTIN© OF LOWER MARKET STREET 

took another step with the opening of Pacific Na- 
tional Life Assurance Company's handsome new 
300-car parking structure adjoining the Matson 
Building. ... 

RAYMOND E. BYLER has been appointed Manager 
of Research and Development by the Western Ma- 
chinery Company, according to Sheldon P. Wimp- 
fen, General Manager, Planning, Research & Devel- 
opment. Former business manager for the Western 
Division of Arthur D. Little. Inc.. Byler will pt«y a 
key role in Western Machinery- s greatly expanded 
research and development work in chemical and 
metallurgica' equipr^ient and proCMses. . . . 
CONTINUED OVER-SUPPLY of tanker tonnage 
throughout the world has forced freight rates fc 
petroleum and petroleum products to their lows • 
level in the last 10 years, according to the America - 
Merchant Marine Institute. . . . 
MATSON LINES will open a new uptown passenge- 
sales office in the heart of Union Square in Decern 
ber at Geary and Powell. Architect Gardner A 
Dailey is designing the new facilities. . . . 
"WHERE" AND "HOW" to do practically any 
thing in the Pacific Area — from riding e'»phenK ',r 
Cambodia to panning for gold in *' ' 
found In the second annual Pacific ^- 
ust published by the Pacific Area ^ 
tion. $2.00. 153 Kearny Street. YUkon 6 4o4<: 



Friday. August 29, 1958 




NEW CHIEF ADMINISTRATION OFFICER— Ches- 
ter R. McPhee (left), recently appointed Chief 
Administrative Officer by Mayor George Christo- 
pher, received congratulations at a Press Club 
"Gang Dinner." recently from Jack Laucic (center), 
PULC President, and Jim Warnoclc. Chamber Pub- 
licity Manager. 

PACIFIC FESTIVAL 

(Continued from page one) 

73 per cent above 1950 level and 4.7 times tlie 
1940 total. Over 2.50 air and marine lines 
maintain offices or agencies in San Francisco. 

Total population of the thirteen-county Bay 
Region was estimated at 4.240.300 persons as 
of January 1 of this year. The Bay Region 
population in 1960 is conservatively estimated 
at 4.509.000. 

Growth of the Bay Region is continuing at 
an accelerated pace in every phase of busi- 
ness, industry, and finance under the impact 
of an average of 10.472 new residents each 
month since 1950. 



^dofft^et ^aCcttdofi 



August 29— GREAT GOLDEN FLEET VISIT TO 
PETALUMA CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION. 
September 3— NATIONAL DEFENSE RESOURCES 
CONFERENCE COMMIHEE MEETING — Room 
200. Chamber, I 1:15-12:00 p.m. 
September 3— SMALL BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY 
DAY PLANNING COMMIHEE MEETING— Federal 
Reserve Bank Auditorium, 10:00 a.m. 
September 4— EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE MEETING 
ON NATIONAL DEFENSE RESOURCES CONFER- 
ENCE— ut Floor Conference Room. Chamber 
2:00 p.m. 

September 1 1— NATIONAL DEFENSE RESOURCES 
CONFERENCE COMMITTEE MEETING— 1st Floor 
Conference Room. Chamber. 2:00 p.m. 
September 12-13— Vv'ESTERN AMERICAN DEVEL- 
OPMENT COUNCIL — SFAWTA — Room 200. 
Chamber. 9:00 a.m. 



BAY IlEGIDN BUSINIi^^ 



SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER Of COMMERCE 



National Defense Resources Conference 
Faculty Members Are Announced 

Faculty mcnil)ers of the Industrial Collr<;c of the Armed Forces who will lec- 
ture at the National Defense Resources Conference. Septendier l.'i-26, at Nourse 
Auditorium under the auspices of the Chandler in cooperation with all hranches 
of the anned forces, have been announced by Huph Gallagher, General Chairman. 

Heading the faculty list is Col. George F. 
Connor. USA, former Chief of the Investiga- 
tions Division. Office of Inspector General, 
Washingt.m. D. C. 

Other lecturers include: 

C(d. David W. Alexander. USAF, outer 
space expert: Capt. Charles H. Mead. USN, 
formerly with the Intelligence Division Head- 
([uarters, U. S. European Command, Paris; 
Capt. Irwin Moore, who served with the staff 
of the Inspector General of Supply Corps. 
Navy Department. Washington. D. C; Col. 
Wilfred J. Smith. Ex-chairman of the Division 
of Social Sciences. USAF Academy and Lec- 
turer on Geo-politics; and Lieut. Col. Richard 
P. de Camera, former Chief. Communications 
Division. 7th Army Signal Section, and Lec- 
turer in Geo-Econoniics. 

"At no time in our history has it been more 
important for the American public and Ameri- 
can business to gauge its resources, so basic 
to defense." Gallagher said. 




Industrial Expansion 
Growing in Bay Region 

Indicating a brisk trend in industrial de- 
velopment, manufacturing firms in the San 
Francisco Bay Region committed 1200.911,0.50 
during the first six months of this year in 
new plants and expansion.s — S40.205..560 more 
than in the first half of last year — according 
to the Chamber Industrial Department. 

The figure for the Bay Region's 13 coun- 
ties — Alameda, Contra Costa. Marin. Napa, 
Sacramento. San Francisco. San Joaquin. San 
Mateo. Santa Clara. Solano, and Yolo — in- 
volved 508 projects compared to 408 for the 
same period last year. 

Last year's 12-month cumulative total of 
$274,741,226 and 738 projects "is certain to 
be eclipsed." Lewis M. Holland, manager of 
the Chamber Industrial Department, pre- 
dicted. 

In San Francisco, firms committed $3,283.- 
800 for the first half of the year. 

Ciiinulalivc lolals for the first six months: 
San FrnncUto 

1.1 New Plants S :i22..inO 88 Jobs 

69 E.vpansions 2,961.300 372 Jobs 



82 Projects 
/I«v Region 
128 New Pla 
380 Expansi. 



S 3.283,800 
S 12,360..i00 



PREPARE FOR CONFERENCE— Brig. Gen. Ken- 
neth F. Zitzman. USA, (left) Deputy Commandant, 
industrial College of the Armed Forces, Washing- 
ton, D. C, greets Hugh Gallagher, (right). Special 
Representative of Matson Navigation Co. and 
General Chairman of the National Defense Re- 
sources Conference to be held here September 
15-26. G. L. Fox, General Manager of the Chamber, 
looks on. 

Highway Budget for S.F. 
Recommended by C. of C. 

San Francisco Chamber of Commerce bud- 
get recommendations to the California State 
Highway Commission for the 1959-60 fiscal 
year, include nearly S30 million for construc- 
tion and right-of-way allocations in the city, 
according to Leonard S. Mosias. chairman of 
the .Street. Highway & Bridge section. 

The figure of .$29,737,000 includes $20,162.- 
000 for continued construction of the Southern 
Freeway, routes 225 and 2. from the end of the 
presently budgeted project at Trumbull Street 
to the end of the presently adopted route at 
Orizaba Avenue. Another 16.100,000 is being 
sought for the addition of two lanes for the 
Golden Gate Bridge approach from Richard- 
son Avenue. Route 2. to inter-change with 
Route 56 (north of Golden Gate Park I. 

Another $3,275,000 is being requested to 
construct Clay-Washington ramps. Route 224. 

A final allocation of $200,000 is being 
sought to landscape the James Lick Memorial 
(Bayshorel Freeway. Route 68. for 5.2 miles 
from the South City Limits to the Bay Bridge, 
and to landscape one mile of the Central Free- 
way. Ritute 2. from the Division .Street "Y" 
to Turk .Street. 



ALAN K. BROWNE, President 

C. L. FOX. General Manager 

M. A. HOCAN. Secretary 

JAMES D. WARNOCK. Executive Editor 

JOSEPH I. HAUGHEY. Editor 

Published every other week by the San Francigco Chamber 

of Cor^merce at 333 Pine St., San Francisco. Zone 4. 

CountT of Saa Francisco. California. Teleohone EXbrook 

2-4S1I. (Non. member sabscription, $5.00 a rear.) Entered 

•I Second Class matter April 26. 1944. at the Post Office at 

San Francisco, California, under the act of March 3. 1879. 

Circulation: T.SOO thi$ ittue 




FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



BUSINESS 



VOLUME 15 • NUMBER 19 • SEPTEMBER 12 (956 



'Fellowship 
in Freedom' 



'Tacific Festival Days, 

And Nations of Pacific Area, Begins Today 



Honoring States 



PACIFIC FESIiVAL 







14 15 



tacifW 
lesiivt 




Saliilinf; 37 states and nations of the Pacific 
Basin, the 10-day Pacific Festival, sponsored 
by a Citizens Committee of more than 70 dis- 
tinguished citizens and 13 civic orcianizations. 
including tlie Chamber, begins today. 

0[)ening ceremonies included Mayor George 
Christopher's official acceptance of lamps 
from Osaka. Japan, marking that city's "sis- 
tership" with -San Francisco, and the visit of 
a Japanese naval squadron led by .\dmiral 
^ osliida. The naval unit will hold open hou.se 
for the public t<miorrow. Pier 18. from 9:.30 
to 11:.30 a.m. 

"This festival underscores our appreciation 
of the growing b<mds of friendship between 
the nations and slates of the Pacific." Robert 
I?. Murray. Jr.. Kxecutive Vice President of 
Pan .\merican World .\irways and General 
(Hiairman of the event stated. "The strength 
iif America's friendship with the Pacific na- 
tions is unsurpassed in any other part of 
the world. 

"This cultural and economic interchange 
points up San Francisco's significant role as 
the gateway to a vastly potential area. 

"The festival signifies our growing aware- 
ness of the area's key role in shaping the 
future of the world. 

"There has been a magnificent response be- 
tween the town affiliation program of West 
(^oast cities and cities in Japan, excellent re- 
ception of our trade missions in Japan and 
the Philippines and a growing cooperation in 
many parts of the Pacific from .Alaska on 
the north to New Zealand and .\ustralia on 
the southwest." 

(Turn to page Iwu) 



PACIFIC FESTIVAL BRIEFING is given June Gong, Miss Chinatown— U. S. A., by G. L Fox, general 
manager of the Chamber, one of 13 cooperating organizations in the September 12-21 area-wide event. 
The Festival honors 37 states and nations of the Pacific, many of which she will visit as Mayor Chris- 
topher's emissary during a tour of Asian nations beginning September 29. 

National Defense Conference Under Way Next Week 



What would total mobilization mean to the 
average Bay Area business or industry? 

Answers to this and many other vital (jues- 
tions will be attempted by sonu- of the na- 
tion's lop experts during the National Re- 
sources Conference which begins Monday at 
Nourse Auditorium and ends Friday, Sep- 
tember 26. 

Presented by the Industrial College of the 
.\rmed Forces under the auspices of the Cham- 
ber and all branches of the service, the col- 
lege graduate-level symposium is expected to 
attract more than 200 business and industrial 
executives and armed forces reserve officers. 

Six faculty members of the Industrial Col- 
lege — rated equal to the famed War College 
— will lecture on outer space, geopolitics, 
emergency management of tlie naliunul econo- 
my and other phases of America's position in 
this atomic age. 

The lecturers include Col. George F. Con- 



ner, U.S. Army, chief of the faculty team; 
Col. David W. Alexander, U.S. Air Force; 
Capt. Charles H. Mead, U.S. Navy: Capt. 
Irwin S. Moore. U.S. Navy: Col. Wilfred J. 
.Smith. U.S. .\ir Force: and l.ieut. Col. Ricli- 
ard P. de Camara. U.S. .\rmy. 

"This is an unusual opportunity for all seg- 
metils of business and labor to obtain vital in- 
formation about our defense resources and 
the effect on the economy of mobilization." 
Hugh Gallagher. (General Chairman of the 
event, stated. 

William M. McNabb. Chairman of the Con- 
ference Selection Conmiittee, commented: 

"In this jet-missile-atomic age, the .\meri- 
can businessman's understanding of his coun- 
try's military program is a major element of 
national defense." 

Reservations may be made by contacting 
Randle P. Shields. Conference Coordinator, 
at the Chamber. 




SELECTING CONFERENCE AHENDEES William 
M. McNabb (left). Chairman of the Selection 
Committee, National Defense Resources Confer- 
ence, and Lt. Cdr. D. S. Holyoale, Course Ad- 
ministrator, look over the list of applicants for the 
conference, open to Bey Area business leaders. 



Friday, September 12, 1958 




FESTIVAL PLANS DISCUSSED— Mayor George Christopher of San Francisco (center), honorary chair- 
naan of the Pacific Festival, talks over plans for the event with Robert B. Murray, Jr. (left), general chair- 
man, and Dan E. London, a member of the Citizens committee and first vice president of the San Fran- 
cisco Chamber of Commerce. 



1 PACIFIC FESTIVAL 

( Continued from page one ) 

Climaxing the Festival are two major events 
next Friday. Governors William Quinn of 
Havifaii and Mike Stepovich of Alaska vfill 
address an expected 1.000 persons at the 
Sheraton-Palace at noon and the Grand Ball 
will be held that night, 10:30 p.m., in the 
City Hall Rotunda. 

"American Day" will be celebrated Sunday 
with ceremonies and entertainment scheduled, 

2 p.m., in the music concourse of Golden Gate 
Park and spectacular Japanese fireworks 
slated. 9 p.m., at the Marina. Governor Good- 
win J. Knight, Mayor Christopher and Ad- 
miral Yoshida are expected to attend the color- 
ful park ceremonies which will feature bands 
of the Japanese squadron, our armed forces 
plus the Municipal Band and the appearance 
of opera stars and a number of marching units. 

Distinguished visitors will board the Har- 
bor Queen and other vessels to view the Ma- 
rina fireworks. 

Japan Day and Pacific Products Day will 
be observed Monday; Pacific, Pan-American 
and Italy Days, Tuesday; U. S. Constitution, 
Pacific Youth and Chinese Days, Wednesday; 
Philippines and Pacific Friendship Days, 
Thursday. Hawaii Day Friday and Latin 
America Day a week from tomorrow. 

University of California's marching band, 
fresh from its triumph at Brussels Fair, is 
scheduled to perform Wednesday noon at 
Union Square. 

Another highlight of next weekend's activity 
will be a Latin America Ball Saturday, Sep- 
tember 20, at the Sheraton-Palace Hotel. 

Winding up the gala event will be "Tour 
Your Airport Day" with visits to International 
Airport scheduled September 21 under the 
sponsorship of the San Francisco Junior 
Chamber of Commerce. 



Miller In Appearance 
On Nonstop Hearing 

Charles C. Miller, manager of the Transpor- 
tation department of the Chamber, was in 
Washington Monday, appearing before the 
Civil Aeronautics Board in connection with ad- 
ditional non-stop service between here and 
New York City, according to G. L. Fox. gen- 
eral manager. 

CAB Examiner Walter W. Bryan resumed 
the hearings, known as the San Francisco- 
New York Non-Stop Case (Docket 9214, 
et al). 

Harold Messersmith, operations manager at 
San Francisco International Airport, was the 
lead-off witness. His testimony was supported 
by Miller, in line with the Chamber's pro- 
gram of aggressive backing for the City's ef- 
forts to increase service between San Fran- 
cisco and other points. 



Chamber Unanimous in 
Backing "Right to Work" 
Measure on State Ballot 

Directors of the Chamber have voted unani- 
mously to support Proposition 18 — the "right 
til work" measure — on the November State 
ballot, according to Alan K. Browne, Presi- 
dent. 

The State constitutional amendment pro- 
vides that persons shall not be denied the 
right to work because of membership or non- 
membership in any labor organization. 

Action followed the recommendation of the 
Legislative & National Affairs section of the 
Chamber, of which Vincent Cullinan is chair- 
man. 

"The Section believes it is tlie fundamental 
right of any worker to gain employment with- 
out being forced to join a union and that the 
principle of voluntary unionism provides a 
safeguard against abuses which result from 
monopoly control of employment," Cullinan 
said. 

The measure prohibits future agreements 
between employers and labor organizations 
which would require membership in the lat- 
ter organizations. It prohibits employers from 
requiring employees to join or not to join a 
labor organization as a condition of employ- 
ment or as a condition of continuation of em- 
ployment. 

It also prohibits persons, firms, associations, 
corporations or labor organizations from 
causing or attempting to cause an employer 
to violate any provisions of the amendment." 

Nearly 3,800 Teachers 
Sign Up for B-E Day 

Nearly 3.800 teachers — 200 more than last 
year — will be hosted at the 9th annual Busi- 
ness-Education Day Friday, October 24, ac- 
cording to Gene K. Walker, Chairman of the 
Chamber B-E Committee. 

"The list of host firms should be expanded 
accordingly," Walker said. "It is urgent that 
companies and organizations make early con- 
tact in order to participate in this worthwhile 
event." 



PACIFIC FESTIVAL CALENDAR 



September 12— PACIFIC "SISTER CITY" DAY— 

All-stores Fashion Show of the Pacific, Union 
Square, noon; Japanese naval squadron reception, 
Mayor's Office, 3:30 p.m.; presentation of gift 
lamps from Osaka, Japan, and speech by Mayor 
George Christopher, City Hall Rotunda, 4:00 p.m.; 
'Gang Dinner' honoring visiting Japanese Press, 
Press & Union League Club, 7 p.m. 
September 13— PACIFIC MARITIME DAY— Japa- 
nese naval squadron ships open to public. Pier 18 
from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m., program Maritime Mu- 
seum, Aquatic Park; Mexican Ball, Scottish Rite 
Auditorium, 10:30 p.m. 

September 14 — AMERICAN DAY— Ceremonies and 
entertainment, music concourse. Golden Gate Park, 
2:00 p.m.; Japanese fireworks, Marina green, 9:00 
p.m. 

September 15— JAPAN DAY, PACIFIC PROD- 
UCTS DAY— Fashion show, Union Square, noon; 
press luncheon. International airport, noon; Macy's 
Fashion Show. 7:00 p.m. 

September 16— PACIFIC PAN-AMERICAN DAY, 
ITALY DAY — Ceremonies honoring Mexican Inde- 



pendence Day and Latin America. Union Square, 
noon and 5 to 7 p.m. 

September 17— U. S. CONSTITUTION DAY, PA- 
CIFIC YOUTH DAY, CHINA DAY— University of 
California marching band, Chinatown bands and 
marching units, and folk dancing groups, Union 
Square, noon. Pacific 'Book and Author' luncheon, 
Mark Hopkins Hotel, noon. 

September I 8— PH I LI PPI NES DAY, PACIFIC 
FRIENDSHIP DAY— Music program. Union Square, 
noon; "Holiday Bazaar" fashion show. Hotel Can- 
terbury, 4-7 p.m. 

September 19— HAWAII DAY, GOVERNOR'S DAY 
— Governor's Day luncheon. Commonwealth Club, 
noon; Hawaian music. Union Square, noon; launch- 
ing of super tanker, Bethlehem Pacific Shipyards, 
4:00 p.m.; Gang Dinner, honoring visiting Gov- 
ernors, Press &Union League Club, 7:00 p.m.; n,^ 
Grand Ball. City Hall Rotunda. 10:30 p.m. ^ 

September 20— "LATIN AMERICA DAY"— Tours 
of International Airport; Latin-American Ball. Shera- 
ton-Palace, 10:30 p.m. 

September 21— TOUR YOUR AIRPORT DAY— 
Tours of International Airport. 



Friday, September 12, 1958 



Hitting the High Spots 




Jack Giesler 



With JIM WARNOCK 

JACK GIESLER of General Fireprooflng Co. of San 
Francisco !s President of the Second Century Club 
of the Chamber, a group 
of outside salesnnen and 
others from Chamber mem- 
ber organizations, devoted 
to a voluntary program of 
building Chamber member- 
ship. The club, which takes 
its name from the second 
century of operation of the 
Chamber, plans an aggres- 
sive fall campaign on be- 
half of the corporate gift 
program for the recording 
"San Francisco — My En- 
chanted City." If your com- 
pany would like to learn more about the record as a 
gift for your clients, please call Giesler at VA 
I 6-5303. 

I PORT OF SAN FRANCISCO officials are advising 
1 hundreds of trucking companies in California and 
the west to schedule their calls at San Francisco 
piers through the port's truck coordinating service 
[ to avert delays when the western trucking tie-up 
I ends. While most truck-borne freight is moved to 
and from the waterfront by contract carriers not 
affected by the tieup, port officials say they ex- 
pect to see some congestion after the strike ends, 
until backlogs of cargo have been delivered and 
picked up. . . . 

IN COOPERATION with the Home Improvement 
Council, the Chamber Is sponsoring an open house 
of 15 dwellings on the Sundays of September 21 
and 28 from I to 4 p.m. Purpose of the "Better 
I Your Living" program is to encourage home owners 
to modernize their houses and to stimulate building 
sales and create new jobs, a long and continuing 
goal of the Chamber, according to Sidney H. Keil, 
Manager of the Domestic Trade department. 

INSTITUTE OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS SEMI- 
NAR on organizations and institutions begins Sep- 
tember 17 at the University of California San 
Francisco Extension Center and is designed for 
personnel and industrial relations specialists and 
other qualified persons Interested in developing a 
broader understanding of the interrelationship of 
organizational structure and human relations in 
large-scale business and governmental organiza- 
tions. . . . 

ROBERT FOUKE, prominent local corporate, estate 
and tax attorney, spoke on "America's Economic 
System," under the auspices of the Chamber, be- 
fore the recent Congress of the National Federa- 
tion of Catholic College Students at the Sheraton- 
Palace Hotel . . . 

MEN WHO MANAGE, new interview series fea- 
turing eight top executives of leading Bay Area 
• corporations had its debut on KQED this week, with 
an interview of Frederic B. Whitman, President of 
Western Pacific Railroad Co., will be seen for 
seven Mondays at 9:30 p.m. . . . 

"PROPOSITION NO. 17 THREATENS to foist upon 
the people of California one of the most damaging 
and Irresponsible frauds ever perpetrated in politi- 
cal history," Senator Hugh Burns of Fresno and 
Assemblyman Caspar Weinberger of San Francisco, 
co-chairmen of a two-party public committee dedi- 
cated to the defeat of the November ballot 
measure have stated. . . .* 

CHARLES M. HEATH has been appointed Director 
of Labor Relations for Kaiser Steel Corporation, 
according to G. E. Balsley, Manager of Industrial 
Relations at the company's home office in Oak- 
land, . . . 



STATEWIDE INDUSTRIAL COMMIHEE of the 

California State Chamber of Commerce has an- 
nounced a position of strong support for Proposi- 
tion 18 on the November ballot. "Passage of 
Proposition 18, which prohibits compulsory union- 
ism, is vital to the interests of employees, the 
public, and the State's future economy. The ex- 
istence of voluntary unionism, which will enable 
free union members to demand fair treatment bv 
union bosses or pull of the union, will assure ' 
the future the type of responsible unionism necv 
sary to encourage the industrial payrolls we musT 
have in California for our rapidly expanding pop- 
ulation. . . . 

MORE THAN 2,000 MARITIME LEADERS are 

pected to attend three-day sessions of the Prop- 
er Club's 32nd Annual Convention and Mercha 
Marine Conference here October 15-17, accord ' 
to Randolph J. Sevier, Matson Navigation Cc^: 
pany President and general chairman of the con- 
vention, first national maritime meeting to be held 
on the Pacific Coast in a decade. . . . 

LOUIS A. ROZZONI, President of the California 
Farm Bureau Federation and a delegate of the 
American Farm Bureau Federation to the Interna- 
tional Federation of Agricultural Producers meeting 
in Brussels next month, will be the honored guest at 
the Chamber Agricultural Committee luncheon 
Tuesday In the Cirque Room of the Fairmont 
Hotel, according to Jack T. Pickett, Chairman. . . . 

DESIGN FOR PROGRESS, 32-page illustrated book- 
let showing the approach of Western Knapp En- 
gineering Co. to the design and construction of 
modern industrial installations is available from 
Dept. G-2 of the company at 650 Fifth Street, San 
Francisco. . . . 

EVENING COURSES IN ALL PHASES of business 
administration and economics have opened at Uni- 
versity of California Extension Centers in San 
Francisco, Oakland and Berkeley. . . . 

PHILIP G. LASKY, Executive Director of West 
Coast operations for the Westlnghouse Broadcast- 
ing Company, went to Sacramento Saturday, Au- 
gust 30 to receive two awards from the State Fair 
on behalf of KPIX-TV. The station won the Silver 
Award for "The Road Back" series dealing with the 
status of the United States in relationship to its 
competition with the USSR and a special merit 
award for its "Open Heart Surgery" telecast. . . . 





TOUR ARRANGED — The Honorable Melvijl. 
Marshall (left), Australian Consul, shows Richard 
P. Conlon of Conlon Associates (international busi- 
ness counselors) a map of Australia, where Conlon 
will visit with business men from all over the United 
States on the newly organized "Business Oppor- 
tunities Tour to Australia," now being arranged by 
RaynKond Douglas Travel Service, "San Francisco. 



CRAB FROM SAN FRANCISCO— Shown receiving 
a case of crab from William Weisgerber, Captain 
of the Julie Ann of the Great Golden Fleet of the 
Chamber, is Pat Jordan, Fair model. The 50 lbs. of 
crab were San Francisco's contribution to the giant 
press preview on August 24 and was made possible 
by Joe Tarantino, ten Fisherman's Wharf firms end 
the Chamber. 

TED L RAUSCH of Ted L. Rausch Co., has suc- 
ceeded Ben Greenough of Bank of California as 
President of the Junior World Trade Association. 
Other officers include: Harvey Davis of Bank of 
California, new Vice-President; Leslie B. Taylor of 
Fred Olsen Line, Secretary: and Alan L Wendroff 
of James S. Baker Co., Inc., Treasurer. . . . 
"TIME-STRYKE" BELLS, tonally as fine as the best 
bronze-cast bells, have been installed in the ofRces 
of Franklin Savings & Loan Association, 8th and 
Market streets. The tones — produced by a tiny 
hammer striking a small rod of bell-metal — can bo 
heard as far away as the Ferry Building when am- 
plified. . . . 

CLASSES FOR BUSINESS and Professional Men's 

Painting Group, organized under the sponsorship 
of the San Francisco Art Association in coopera- 
tion with the Chamber, will begin Tuesday at the 
California School of Fine Arts, 800 Chestnut street. 
and continue through January 13. The fee is $28 for 
15 weekly meetings from 7 to 10 p.m. . . . 

Tax Exemption On 
Non-profit Private 
Schools Given Okeh 

Proposition No. 16 on tlie State ballot, 
whicii would end tax exemption on property 
of non-profit private schools below the college 
level, has been opposed by tJie Board of Di- 
ri'ctors of tlie Chamber, according to Alan K. 
Mrowne, Chamber president. 

"Non-profit schools contribute greatly to 
the welfare of the State by educating more 
than 340.000 students who would otherwise 
have to be accommodated in already overly- 
crowded schools." Browne said. 

'it is obvious that wiiat might be lost in 
tax revenue by the present exemption is very 
little compared to what it would cost the tax- 
payers if tiie children concerned had to be 
educated in public schools." Browne com- 
mented. 

"The total tax exemption now is less than 
$2 million annually, according to some tax 
experts. The additional cost to the Slate would 
be an estimated $118 million annually if the 
State had to educate those students." 

Opposition to the proposition resulted after 
unanimous recommendation of the Legislative 
and National Affairs Section of the Chamb<'r, 
V incent CuUinan, Chairman. 



Friday, September 12. 1958 



Fr. John Connolly, S.J. 
Featnred Speaker at 
USF Civie Lnnelieon 

A civic luncheon observing the beginning 
of the 104th year of tlie University of San 
Francisco will be held Tiiiirsday noon at thi- 
San Francisco Commercial Club. 

Featured speaker will 
be the Reverend Father 
John F. X. Connolly. S.J.. 
President of the univer- 
sity. His subject will be 
. ^m, f ""Hiiiher Education and 
. ^ >^ j' the Future." 

The luncheon is cos])on- 
sored by the Chamber, the 
USF Alumni Association 
and the S.F. Commercial 
Club. 
Thos. F. Stack. President of the USF Alum- 
ni Association and local attorney, is Chair- 
man of The Day. Presiding will be Alan K. 
Browne. President of the Chamber. 

Reservations can be made at the Chamber. 
EXbrook 2-4.511. Extension .58. 




^(ZfH^e^ 0alcKcCaft 



nlier 12-21— PACIFIC FESTIVAL. 

iihrr 15-26— N.ATIONAL DEFENSE BESOLRCES CON- 



12— Great Colde 



Scpleml.er lf> SHIP BlILDl.NC AND SHIP REPAIR COM- 
MITTEE— Meetini!, Concert Room. Sheratou-Palace Hotel. 
12:00 p m. 



September 16— AGRICL LTIRAL COMMITTEE MEETING 
Ll'NCHEON— Cirque Room, Fairmont Hotel. 12:00 noon. 

September 16— SAN FRANCISCO MUNICIPAL CONFER- 
ENCE Room 200. Chamber. .1 :00-.) :00 p.m. 

September 17 WORLD BUSINESS LUNCHEON San Fran- 
riseo Riiom. Fairmont Hotel. 12:00 noon. Speaker: Mr. Rile> 
Doe. Vice President. Safeway Stores, Inc.. "International 



September 18 NATIONAL DEFENSE RESOURCES CON- 
FERENCE— 1st Floor Conference Room, Chamber. 2:00 p.m. 

September 18 UNIVERSITY OF SAN FRANCISCO LUNCH- 
EON San Francisco Commercial Club. 465 California Street. 
12:00 noon. Speaker: Rev. Father John F. X. Connolly. S.J., 
"Higher Education and the Future." 

September 21— BETTER- VOUR-LIVINC-OPEN-HOUSE — At 
15 different private residences throughout citv Phone DO. 
2-2536 or EX. 2-45II for addresses. 

September 26 REGIONAL PROBLEMS SECTION COMMIT- 
TEE MEETING — (CIVIC DEVELOPMENT) — Room 200. 
Chamber. 10:30-12:00 noon. 

September 26— MODESTO BUSINESSMEN'S VISIT TO SAN 
FRANCISCO — HOSTS: INTER-CITV SECTION Com- 

mencing 12 noon. 



Progressogram No. 38 

DOWNTOWN PARKING GETS A BREAK 




Completion of the Fifth and Mission streets garage has given downtown 
shoppers the equivalent of four additional miles of curb parking. 

With the facility now accommodating 1,083 cars, an abundance of 
short-term parking area is provided for customers, clients and patrons of 
retail establishments, business houses and professional offices. 

Construction cost for the four-level facility — 634 feet long and 150 feet 
wide — was approximately $1,500,000 or $3.75 per square foot. The total 
development cost about $2,135,000 — borne entirely by the City of San 
Francisco Downtown Parking Corp., a private, non-profit corporation. Land 
acquisition costs, $1,600,000, were paid for by the City and County of San 
Francisco out of $5 million parking bond funds authorized in 1947. 

Operated by S. E. Onorato, Inc., the facility would accommodate an ad- 
ditional 500 cars by the addition of two stories. 

"This magnificent garage is the result of splendid cooperation between 
city government and free enterprise," commented Alan K. Browne, President 
of the Chamber, at the recent opening ceremonies. Construction financing was 
accomplished under provisions of the State Streets and Highways Code 
Section 32809 (parking law of 1949) which permits the City and County, 
acting as a parking authority, to accept financial assistance from "any source 
in aid of a parking facility under stipulated conditions." 

Financing was provided by the S.F. Downtown Parking Corp. under 
agreement with Continental Assurance Co. and Continental Casualty Co. 
of Chicago with arrangements made by William J. Moran of Alhambra and 
Oakland, Calif., and William Blair & Co. of Chicago. Kell & Connolly, local 
attorneys, acted as Corporation Counsel. 



Produce Firms Back 'Golden Gateway' 



"Swift and favorable action" on the $200 
million ''Golden Gateway" project has been 
predicted by Joseph L. Alioto. President of the 
Redevelopment Agency, following a "go- 
ahead" signal from wholesale produce area 
firms during a recent meeting of the agency. 



The project long has been championed by 
the Chamber which is also intent on relocating 
the firms on a site acceptable to all concerned. 

Chamber indorsement of the multi-million 
dollar .scheme was reaffirmed by H. .1. Brun- 
nier. representing the Redevelopment Coor- 
dinating Committee of the Chamber. 



.SGION BUSINESS 



SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



ALAN K. BROWNE. Pretidenl 

C. L. FOX, C«iierml Manager 

M. A. HOCAN. Secretary 

JAMES D. WARNOCE. ExecDtive Editor 

JOSEPH I. HAUGHEY. Editor 

Poblished eTary ether week by the San Franeiico Chamber 
of Co.-nraerc* at 533 Pine St.. San Francitco. Zone 4. 
ConntT of San Francifco. California. Telenhone EXbrook 
2-4511. (Non-member inbicriptioB. IS.OO a year.) Entered 
aa Second Qasi matter April 26. 1944. at the Port Office at 
San Francuco, California, under the act of March 3. 1879. 
Cireidaticn: 7,500 thi» Usum 




FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



BUSINESS 



VOLUME 15 • MUMBER 20 • SEPTEMBER 26 1958 




OVERLAND MAIL COMMEMORATIVE STAMP, an estimated 400,000 of which will be sold on first 
day of issue, October 10, according to Postmaster John F. Fixa. observes the centennial of the famous 
route which ran from Tipton, Mo,, to San Francisco, first connecting California with the rest of the Union 
through regular service. Designed by W. H. BucHey, a member of the Citizens Stamp Advisory Com- 
mittee, with art work by C. R. Chickering, Bureau of Engraving and Printing, the stamp has excited great 
interest in international philatelic circles. 

Mayor's Plan for Annual Pacific Union Meeting 
In San Francisco Given Impetus from Festival 



"Thr f'arifir is a heritage of our pio- 
neer past, and a fundamental increment 
in our growing economy, our scenic 
beauty and our promising future." 

— GovKRNOR Goodwin J. Knk.hi 

Willi congratulatory nies.sage.s .•still pouring 
in over the recent Pacific Festival, local civic 
leaders today were considering Mayor Christo- 
pher's concept of a Pacific Union patterned 
after the highly successful Pan .\merican 
Union. 

Christopher's suggestion, made at the Gov- 
ernors' Luncheon Sept. 19 during the Festival 
and hacked enthusiastically hy Governors 
Mike .Stepovich of Alaska and William Quinn 
of Hawaii, envisions an annual meeting in 



'"''The extreme geninlily of San 
Frnnri.sco^s economic, intellectu- 
al and political climate makes it 
the most varied and challenfiinfi 
city in the United States.'''' 
—JAMES A. MICIIENER. aulhor of 

"Tales <>f the .Soulh I'uoifir" and 

"Voices of Asia," (luring the rereni 

Pacific Fesli%al. 




/ 

STARLETS SEE FILM — During Pacific Festival 
Week, six starlets were guests at a performance of 
"South Pacific" in Todd-AO at the Alexandria 
Theatre. Above are Muffett Webb, who played a 
Navy nurse in the film, Mitsuyo Hosaka of Japan 
and Susan Roces from the Philippines. 



San Francisco of states and nations of ihc 
Pacific Basin. 

Hands across the Pacific were never more 
(irmly clasped in friendship than now if the 
messages of congratulations, continuing (o he 
received, are any criteria. 

Modesto Farcdan. (Commissioner of Tourism. 
Ivcpublic of the Philippines, cabled: 

"The Pacific Festival is a concept that, 
translated into cooperative action and carried 
out throughout the entire Pacific IJasln. will 
in due time make all of us truly one Pacific 
community, a goal the early attainment of 
which should hi' our conunon aim." 

.Vmong many others sending messages 
were : 

Thr Honorabia N«uvrn l>hu Hai. I'rrirri of Saiiian; I Tal 
Chrr. I>rrildant, Chiiii-.r Manularliicrr. I nioii. Hon> kona : 
IVlrr Vliila, Sarrrlan. Ki|i Vitilur, lliirraii. Sii<a. Ki|i Thr 
lluiiorahlp Oik Kii« <;<ian. Mator ..I Sinaaporr : 

I'nirn C. Honiara. Srrrrlar> uf Ciiinnirrrr anil liiilii.li, 
Manila; J. Nr«nian. |-rr..,lr„l. \r. /ralanil Tra.rl I. Ilnli- 
.layi Aoorialian. « rliiiiaton. N. /.; Hi. h'xrrllrnr. Surab- 
honiiir Tiiral. I.anl Mat or o( llanaLok : Thr Hunoralilr H K 
Jrn,un. I.oni Mator ••( Stiliirt ; Duiiala, tilaaiir. Chaiiman. 
Crnrral Chanilirr ot Cuinmrrrr. Hnni kona ; 

Srilrhlr.i ^ ii.ni. Cixrmi.r ol Tok.o: Hi. F<rrllrn,. Sir 
KohrtI lllarL. Cu.riiior of H»ni Kqiii ; and Ml. F.trrllrnr. 
■■alrirk llonalil MardonalH. <:M<;. .\rlini l^oirrnur Km 
l.lan.1.. Suva. 



Mail Centennial 
Celebration Plans 
Nearing Completion 

Plan.s are nearing completion for a Market 
.Street parade, civic ceremony and luncheon 
honoring the Overland Mail Centennial and 
i-sue of a special commemorative stamp on 
October 10, according to /Man K. Browne, 
(.haniber President and chairman of the Over- 
land Mail Ceremonies Committee. 

Cooperating are the Chamber. California 
Historical .Society. .Society of California Pio- 
1 ■■'•r-i and Post Office Department. 

Dramatic focal point of the observance will 
lie the arrival in .San Franci-co of the Over- 
land Mail Caravan which left Tipton. Mis- 
souri, original eastern terminus of the route 
which first connected California with the re>t 
of the country through re-iu!ar overland mail 
service, on September 16. 

The caravan, including a Butterfield stage- 
coach that once made the 2800-niile run 
through cross timbers, mountains, desert, over 
trace and narrow trail, fonling creeks and 
rivers, through a frontier land made danger- 
ous by outlaws, brigands, and wild Indian 
tribes, will arrive in .San Francisco on the 
morning of October 10. It will retrace, as 
nearly as possible the original route, entering 
California at Yuma, proceeding to Los .\n- 
geles and thence to .San Francisco through the 
.San Joaquin Valle\. 

.\fter presentation of an album of the com- 
memorative stamp to Mayor Christopher and 
others at 11 a.m., ceremonies at the .Society of 
California Pioneers. 456 McAllister, will open 
a civic luncheon there to be addressed by F. 
George Siedle. .\ssistant Po-lma^ler General. 

Remodeled Homes to Re 
On Display iti Chamber 
^Retter Living' Program 

Fifteen private remodeled homes, scatlereti 
in \arious parts of the city, will In- >liown to 
the public Sunday as a highlight of the "Bel- 
ter ^our Living" program of the Chanil>er in 
cooperation with local radio stations. 

-Vddresses of the homes can be obtained \>\ 
calling lliese radio slatifms Sunday from 1 to l 
p.m.: 

KVA DOuglas 2-2.S36 or K.IBS ORdwax 
.<- 1 1 Mi. 

Australian 'Rusiness 
Opportunity Tour Slated 

.Support of a "Business Op|iorlunity Tour to 
Australia," October 4-2.S. has lieen assured li\ 
the Chamber and its affiliate, the Sun Fran 
cisco Area World Trade .\ss<M-ialion, accord 
ing to Robert Taylor. SF.\Vi T.\ president. 

The tour will depart from .San Francis«-o via 
Oantas" round-the-world airline Octolwr 4 and 
will return October 2.^ after slops in Honolulu 
and Fiji. 



Friday, September 26, 1958 



General Trend of San Francisco Business 
Activity Almost Equals August of '57 

Tlie i;eneral trend of business activity in San Francisco in August turned down 
slightly from the July peak hut corresponded closely to the August level last year, 
according to the Research Department. Trends for August and first 8 months in 
relation to similar periods last year were decidedly mixed, with about as many 
factors showing gains as there were showing losses. 
The Chamber's business activity index 



amounted to 154.0 in August compared to 
154.6 a year ago. The average for the first 
eight months v/as 151.4, compared to 152.2 
last year. 

Construction authorized in the nine Bay 
Area counties — Alameda, Contra Costa. Ma- 
rin. Napa, San Francisco. Santa Clara. San 
Mateo, Solano and Sonoma — amounted to 
$490,537,000 for the first eight months. This 
topped last year by $66,344,000. The August 
figure amounted to $70,622,000— almost $20 
million above a year ago. 

New dwelling units authorized in the area 
in August accounted for $44,907,000, provid- 
ing for 4,295 units — bringing the eight months 
total to 26,148 compared to 20,415 a year ago. 

Construction authorized in August for San 
Francisco included permits valued at $6,219,- 
468, an increase of 26.8 per cent in value over 
a year ago. Larger projects included $406,648 
for the state's alteration of the Bay Bridge 
Terminal Ramp, Mission and Second Streets, 
and $100,000 in reconstruction for the Western 
Merchandise Mart. 

Total construction authorized during the 
eight months totaled $56,000,307, or 10 per 
cent above last year. 

New residential amounted to $24,198,236, 
providing for 1,505 dwelling units of which 
576 were single-family type, 837 multi-dwell- 
ing type and 92 two-family type. New non- 
residential totaled $16,431,776 and additions, 
alterations and repairs $15,370,295. 

In the financial field, bank debits in San 
Francisco amounted to $4,043,141,000 for 
August, three per cent below a year ago. 
Debits for the Bay Region were down 1.8 per 
cent. Transactions in the 12th District fell 
slightly below last August. Debits for the 
eight months were off one per cent in San 
Francisco but were up one per cent in the 
Bay Region and the District. 

The number of shares traded in August on 
the Pacific Coast Stock Exchange was 62.5 
per cent above a year ago and the market 
value up 23 per cent. The eight months market 
value was up 5.1 per cent. 

San Francisco postal receipts, reflecting the 
recent rise in rates, climbed 33 per cent above 
August of last year to $3,030,804. 

During August, mortgages and deeds of 
trust against San Francisco real estate num- 
bered 1,.350 and amounted to $15,956,2.56. 

Commercial failures were fewer, with 74 in 
the eight month period and eight in August, 
compared to 104 and 10 last year. 

Ship arrivals in San Francisco Bay totaled 
,399 during August compared to 389 a year 
ago. The eight-month total amounted to .3,145 
compared to 3,106 last year. Port of San Fran- 
cisco revenue tonnage handled in August was 
13.5 per cent below a year ago. The eight- 
month cumulative was off 21.2 per cent — 
foreign tonnage, which accounts for more than 
half the total, however, was off only 9.2 per 
cent. 



Vehicle crossings over the Bay Bridge estab- 
lished a new monthly high of 3,255,446 or 5.9 
per cent above a year ago. The Golden Gate 
Bridge also hit a new record with 1,696,121 
crossings or a gain of 6.2 per cent. 

Total number of passenger cars entering 
northern California's gateways during August 
amounted to 131,132, topping last year by 5.3 
per cent. 

San Francisco freight car movements, re- 
flecting the trucking strike, topped August a 
year ago by 7.9 per cent although the eight 
months total was off 11.5 per cent. Truck 
movements in the San Francisco Area were 
up 1.9 per cent in August and 1.7 per cent for 
the eight months. 




Employment in the six-county metropolitan 
areas — Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, San 
Francisco, San Mateo and Solano — totaled 
1.096.600 in August, slightly below 1,106,100 
a year ago. The average for the first eight 
months of 1.068,9.50 was 1.4 per cent below 
the similar period last year. 

Unemployment dropped to 58.700 or 5.1 per 
cent of the labor force in August compared to 
3.1 per cent last year. 



Business Activit-y Through August, 1958 



BRANCH OF ACTIVITY 



•GENERAL BUSINESS ACTIVITY INDEX... 
CONSTRUCTION PERMITS _ 



Ne 



..Value 
umber 



Dwelling Units 

Sinale-famllv units Now 

Multi-family units, New Number 

Nonresidential, New _ Value 

Additions. Alterations and Reoairs Value 

Nine county dwelling units authorized Number 

REAL ESTATE— Deeds Recorded Number 

•RETAIL DEPARTMENT STORE SALES _ _ Index 

FINANCE— Bank Debits _ $000 

- $ 

Shares traded 

t^j.ket value $ 

COMMERCIAL FAILURES _ Number 

INDUSTRY TREND— 6 County Total Employment 

Mfg. Average Weekly Earnings (earnings) 

Manufacturing (employment) 



AUGUST 
1958 

154.0 



1.949 284 

1.833.246 

4,295 



Agrii 
Gov) 

Othe 



, comm., 
ulture .... 
— Federa 



& utilities., 
"state," ci't 



TRANSPORTATION— Freight car moven 
S. F. Airport— Planes In and Out,. 

Passengers Off and On 

Air Mail Loaded and Unloaded. . 

Air Express Loaded and Unloaded 

Air Freight Loaded and Unloaded.. 
Rail Express Shipn 



ck Mo 



Ms— 5 F. ^r 



Out-of-State passenge 
PORT OF SAN FRANCISCO- 



intnes 



nto No. 
e Tons.. 



Calif Numbe 



CARGO VESSELS (San Francisco Bay) 
Arrivals 
Millions of Registered Tons 



UTILITIES— Ind. & Comm. Gas 5a 
•Elec. Energy Sales. K.W. Hours 
V/ater Consumption— Comm. 8. I 



..Cu. Ft, 

Index 

..Cu. Ft. 



NEW DEVELOPMENTS 

Visitor and Newcomer Inquiries Numbe 

Bay Bridge Vehicle Crossings Numbe 

Golden Gale Bridge Vehicle Crossings Numbe 

FRUITS & VEGETABLE RECEIPTS.... Carlot 

LIVESTOCK SLAUGHTER (Insp. Dists.) Numbe 

CONSUMER PRICE INDEX-AII Items 



I.096,600(p) 
101.40 

22l,30C(p) 
7l,500(p) 
69,IOO(o) 

I74,700(p) 
80,200fp) 

242, 100(d) 

Il7,700fp) 
22,700fp) 
94 6O0(p) 
2,700{p) 

13,511 

Il,3l4(c) 

332.211(c) 

3, 195, 365(c) 

561, 239(c) 

6.930, 617(c) 

65.f80(c) 

173.2 
131,132 

460.823 
7.205 
25,607 
1 59 972 
268,039 



,152.657,100 

150.0 

167,703.500 



1,459 
3.255,446 
1.696,121 

4,675 
99,0O0(a) 



73.3 
54.5 
71.4 
77.4 
-25.0 
66.3 



33.3 
62.5 
23.0 

20.0 
-0.9 



—03 
—0.3 
— I 
-0.9 



7 464 
56,000,307 
24.198,236 

1.505 



16,431.776 

15,370,295 

26,148 



32,719,455 
20 399 157 
22,828,929 
467.358.236 



144.0 

—27.4 

— 12.7 

28.1 



—2.6 
—0.6 



l,068.950(p) 



207,060(p) —5.5 

65.575(p) —8.0 

68 4''0(p) —0.2 

l77,500fD) —0.4 

79 8IO'p) 0.3 

244,5IO(p) 2.8 

Il72i0'p) —3.7 

18 525(0) —2.1 

92P60(d) 1.3 

2,525(p) -4.7 

92,853 —11.5 

72,961 (d) —2.9 

2, 028, 589(d) 5.1 

21, 929, 642(d) 8.5 

4, 462, 475(d) 4.8 

43, 904, 794(d) —5.8 

445.694(d) 43.1 

160.5 1.7 



3.693,365 

53,102 

237,934 

1,343,098 

2,059,181 



10.955,257,100 

153 

1,283.089.000 



14.310 
23.879,775 
11,193,056 



—21.6 
-^2.6 
—24.7 
— 17.6 
—9.2 



•RETAIL FOOD 



Inde 



128.0(a) 
124.1(c) 



•Inde 



(1947-49 Monthly Average= 100) ; 
sources not shown due to space 



a) June 



—0.3 
(d) 7 



30,866 
586,000(b) ■ 
127.3(b) 



10.7 
-11.3 



RESEARCH DEPARTMENT, SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



Friday, September 26, 1958 



Hitting the High Spots 



With JIM WARNOCK 

JOHN GARTH, San Francisco painter, recentl* 
received the gold medal of honor of the American 
Artists' Professional League, nation's largest organi- 
zation of working artists, with headquarters in New 
York, at the thirtieth annual banquet at the Waldorf 
Astoria. The citation noted that for over three 
decades Garth has performed outstanding service 
to his fellow American artists and the beauty-loving 
American public by his intelligent and fearless 
championship of art's highest ideals. It was the first 
award of the medal to a Pacific Coast artist. Garth 
recently created the new Benjamin Franklin murals 
for the Franklin Savings and Loan Association of 
San Francisco, has done many others in the Bay 
Region, including works for the University of Cali- 
fornia, Fairmont Hotel, General Electric Company, 
Railway Express Agency, and Sir Francis Drake 
Hotel. . . . 

BOLLES GALLERY, unique establishment at 729 
Sansome in Jackson Square, will open October 2, 
with Dr. Grace L. McCann Morley, former Director 
of the San Francisco Museum of Art and one of 
America's outstanding experts on modern painting, 
sculpture and the graphic arts, as consultant. Ac- 
cording to the founder, John S. Bolles, well-known 
San Francisco industrial architect and Vice Chair- 
man of the Chamber's Industrial Development 
Committee, "This gallery, in the heart of the busi- 
ness and design center of San Francisco, will offer 
business executives and corporations opportunities 
to see, understand, enjoy and purchase works of 
art of outstanding regional, national and interna- 
tional painters and sculptors and to encourage their 
use in architecture." D. Faralla is Administrative 
Director. . . . 

MAYOR GEORGE CHRISTOPHER, Senator 
Thomas H. Kuchel and Congressman John F. Shelley 
were among the public officials and leaders of 
business, labor and industry who attended the re- 
Cent civic luncheon, sponsored by the Chamber, 
the Commercial Club and USF Alumni Association, 
cemmemorating the beginning of the school's 
104th year of educating the youth of the city. 
Senator Kuchel and Congressman Shelley presented 
a flag which flew over the Capitol in 'Washington 
last year to Rev. John F. X. Connolly. President of 
the University. . . . 

WILLIAM A. McDonnell. President of the 
Chamber of Commerce of the United States, will 
be guest speaker at the annual banquet of the 
Associated Traffic Club of America on September 
30 at the Sheraton-Palace. . , 
MORE THAN 1500 MEN AND WOMEN from the 
U. S., Canada and Mexico are attending the 3Sth 
annual convention of the Associated Traffic Clubs 
of An-ierica in San Francisco, September 28 - Oc- 
tober I. , . . 




NEW MEMBERS OF THE CHAMBER 




Harold A. Wright Cornelius C. Sampson D. A. Estrada 



Larry Sparks 



I M. Perry 



New members recently added to the Chamber include (left to right): Harold A 
Wright. Consulting Electrical Engineer. 251 Kearny Street: Cornelius C. .Samp-on 
Cornelius Sampson & Associates: D. A. Estrada. Owner-Manager. Estrada Pacific Im- 
port; Larry .Sparks. President. Madewell of California: and William M. P.-rrv. irHliam 
Perry Company, Food Brokers. 



THEME SHIP OF PACIFIC FESTIVAL was the 
GRACIE S., famous San Francisco pilot boat which 
greeted Pacific ships for 50 years. Sterling Hayden 
(right), owner of the vessel is shown with Kenneth 
A. Albertson, District Sales Manager of Flying 
Tigers, Inc., which made participation of the 
GRACIE possible by flying new sails from Glouces- 
ter, Mass., in time for event. 




AD AWARD— Governor Goodwin Knight is shown 
awarding the State Fair Advertising Sliver Medal 
to Carl Heinti, Jr., of Heinti & Co., Inc., San 
Francisco, who accepted It on behalf of advertising 
campaign winner Regal Pale Brewing Co. 

COME-SEE TOURS, a highly successful information 
project of the United Bay Area Crusade, give busi- 
ness executives an opportunity to tour several 
agencies, morning or afternoon, Monday through 
Friday, with guided groups of 1 5 to 20, transporta- 
tion provided. To book a tour for members of your 
company, call Marion Cotton, YU 2-6940. 
PENSION AND DEFERRED PROFIT SHARING 
PLANS, new course opened by Business Administra- 
tion Extension of the University of California at the 
San Francisco and Oakland branches this week, will 
continue for 12 weeks. . . . 

GOURMETS, CHEFS AND HOUSEWIVES will have 
a field day at the International Food Fiesta at 
Civic Auditorium on Friday, October 10, according 
to Karl Weber, President of the Culinary Arts 
Foundation and President of the Whitcomb Hotel. 
The Chamber is one of many sponsors. 
"SCIENCE IN ACTION," popular KRON-TV edu- 
cational program conducted by Dr. Earl S. Herald, 
has received an award from the 1958 American 
Exhibition of Educational Radio and Television 
Programs, sponsored by Ohio State University, for 
"illustrating clearly the virtues, in education, of 
taking infinite pains and sparing no energies to 
teach an exciting lesson." . . . 

65 Modesto J isitors 
By Plane, Boat, Bus 

-More than 6.5 businessmen and .Modesto 
Chamber of Commerce members arrived in 
San Francisco this morning by plane, boat and 
bus for a one-day visit. 

The "Modesto Day Welcome" is sponsored 
by the Inler-Cily .S,.<-li(m and Domestic Trade 
(:omniillee. Irving Vi . Danielson. Project 
Chairman. 



GENERAL ELECTRIC CO. departments in Call 
forma have gone on record in favor of voluntar, 
unionism and Proposition 18, according to C. C 
Walker. Regional Vice President of the company 
which has an annual payroll of $46 million in 30 
California cities and has committed $25 million 
for new and expanded facilities during the past 
three years. . . . 

ERNEST HEMINGWAY'S Nobel Prize and Pulitzer 
Prize winning "The Old Man and the Sea." with 
Spencer Tracy playing the lead role in the film, 
will open at the Coronet Theater October 23 fol- 
lowing the 96-week run of "Around The World In 80 
Days," according to Hanns Kolmar of Kolmar As- 
-lates, publicist for the film. . 

HUMAN FACTORS IN SUPERVISION AND 
LEADERSHIP, short course presented by the Insti- 
tute of Industrial Relations, University of California. 
runs from 4:30 to 9:00 on eight successive Thursdays 
beginning October 2. . . . 

TRANS WORLD AIRLINES has reported that Au- 
gust was the biggest single month in its history, 
setting new records on 48,000 miles of system 
routes for revenue passenger miles flown and gross 
revenue. . . . 

GROWING IMPORTANCE of the San Francisco 
Bay Region as a rodeo center has been emphasized 
by the announcement that Nye Wilson, Secretary- 
Manager of the Cow Palace has been appointed a 
member of a nationwide Rodeo Industry Interim 
Committee which functions in an advisory capacity 
for professional rodeos. . . . 

"THE STENCIL ON THE CRATE, design of ship- 
ping cases, treatment of offices, truck, railroad car, 
letterhead and calling card — the design of those 
and countless other objects offer a company the 
opportunity to say the right thing about itself, its 
products and services," Walter Landor, internation- 
ally recognized Industrial designer recently told the 
San Francisco Advertising Club. 



•S (\ ¥R IM.ISCO MY h:\. 
(.11 I V7'f.7) CITY" Thr orifrinal 
music Has icrittrn h\ Stcphrn aiul 
Lihliy l/r.\«i7 ami it nas finssrii 
by Sfal Records. IT r ncivr llnnif-ht 
u-i' tcoulit ho out scUiiiji records, 
hut this thinp is really hrautifiil. 
If voH /<»(•<• San FrartrisciK v<iji will 
get a Ittiup in your thntat. es/te- 
daily if you are auay from h<tme. 
I>aiid Rose ilirects the music, and 
the entire thine is terrific in our 
hum hie estimation." 

— CM IKOKM\ KVRMF.R 



Friday, September 26, 1958 



National Defense 
Conference Draws 
Praise of Leaders 

More than 400 "students" — including 200 
civilians and 200 armed forces members — 
today received certificates for completing a 
10-day curriculum of the National Defense 
Resources Conference, given by the Industrial 
College of the Armed Forces at Nourse Audi- 
torium. 

Faculty members on the Industrial College. 
Col. George F. Conner of the U. S. Army. Col. 
David .Alexander of the U. S. Air Force. Capt. 
Charles H. Mead of the U. S. Navy. Capt. Ir- 
win S. Moore of the U. S. Navy, Col. Wilfred 
,1. Smith of the U. S. Air Force and Lt. Col. 
Richard P. de Camara of the U. S. Army, all 
e.xpressed gratification over the response and 
interest of those attending, according to HuL'h 
Gallagher, General Chairman, and LCdr D. .S. 
Holyoake, USNR. Course .\dniinistrator. 

"The importance of being thus informed 
cannot be overemphasized."' Chester R. Mac- 
Phee. Chief Administrative Officer of the City 
and County, said. "Our city and citizens were 
fortunate to have such an opportunity to gain 
valuable knowledge relating to defense activ- 
ity ])lanning." 

.\lan K. Browne, President of the Chamber, 
added: 

■"One of the hallmarks of our successful free 
enterprise system has been its ability to be 
flexible and to adapt to changing times, emer- 
gencies, even crises. Such sound adaptation 
could not. however, be achieved without the 
type of sound knowledge provided by this 
conference." 

Industrial Expansion 
Takes A Big Rise 

A total of S27 1.739.2.50— involving 707 proj- 
ects — was committed by northern California 
in industrial expansion for the first seven 
months of this year, according to the Indus- 
trial Department of the .San Francisco Cham- 
ber of Commerce. 

IXDLSTRIAl, rXPANSION KEPORT 
Cumulative totals {or the firt >e>en mnnll.s : 



San Francisco 
15 New Plants 
80 Expansions 

95 Projects 
Bay Region 

\3<) New Plants 
421 Expansions 


S 352,500 
3.560.800 

S 3,913.300 

S 14.875.500 
225,255,:50 


98 Job 
434 Job 

532 Job 


MO Projects 
\orthfrn California 
181 .New Plant. 
526 Expansions 


5240,131.250 

S 33.286,300 
238,452,750 




TOT Projects 


5271,739,250 





BA" 


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SAN 


FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE J 






A I. AN 


K. BROWNE. President 








C. L. 


FOX. General M 


ana!!er 








M. 


\. HOCAN. Secretary 






JAMES D. 


WAR.NOCK. Exe 


rutive Editu 


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JOSEPH I. HAUGHEY 


Editor 




Publish 
of Com 
County 
2-4511. 
rla„ po 


ed 

of 

(N 


every other week by the Sa 
rre at 333 Pine St.. San 
San Francisco. California, 
on. member subscription. 5' 
nr paid at San Francisco, 


n Francisco 
Francisco, 
Telephone 

.00 a year. 

Calil. 


Chamber 
Zone 4. 
EXbrook 
Second- 






Circ 


ulalion: 7.S00 this 


Usue 





30 Large Corporations 

Eight S. F. Firms In Billion Dollar Class 

Thirty large corporations — eight of thenn billion-dollar businesses — with national 
headquarters in San Francisco reported combined assets of $34.2 billion last year, 
according to the Chamber Research Department. 

Representing a broad cross-section of the national economy — including finance, 
insurance, utilities, railroads, shipping, manufacturing and trade — the corporations 
have shown an increase of $12 billion since 1950. 

A few of the corporations are among the largest in the nation. One of the banxs 
and the gas and electric company are foremost in the country. 

ASSETS— (In Millions) 



Bank of America NT&SA 
Federal Reserve Bank of S. F. 
Pacific Telephone & Telegraph 

Co 

Standard Oil Company of Calif. 
Southern Pacific Company 
Pacific Gas & Electric Company 
American Trust Company 
Crocker-Anglo National Bank 
First Western Bank & Trust Co 
Pacific Lighting Corporation 
Wells Fargo Bank 
Bank of California, N.A., The 
Crown Zellerbach Corporatior 
Fireman's Fund Insurance Con 

P3"y 
California Packing Corporation 
(N. A.— Non-available) 



1957 


1950 


$10,157 


$6,580 


5,974 


4,874 


2,397 


1,1 16 


2,246 


1,233 


2,177 


1,854 


2,146 


1,236 


1,683 


1,081 


1,527 


1,119 


975 


318 


746 


399 


638 


497 


584 


380 


537 


181 


458 


252 


T 272 


159 



HIbernia Bank, The 
Firstamerica Corporation 
Western Pacific Railroad Com- 
pany 
American President Lines, Ltd. 
Stauffer Chemical Company 
Flbreboard Paper Products Corp. 
Matson Navigation Company 
Pacific National Bank of S. F. 
Honolulu Oil Corporation 

Emporium Capwell Co., The 

Transamerlca Corporation 

West Coast Life Insurance Co. 
Morris Plan Co. of California, 

The 
Kern County Land Company 
Pacific Far East Lines, Inc. 
(N.A.— Non-available) 



1957 
210 
169 

162 
139 
138 
125 
12! 
105 
89 
85 
82 
81 



1950 
170 



138 
68 

n.a 

110 
85 
39 
47 
38 

157 
49 

22 

43 



^^€Utd€fi (^aicKeOvt <»/ ^(muh^ S<^*tt^ 



September 26— LIVESTOCK MAN OF THE YEAR 

AWARD — LUNCHEON — Commercial Club, 465 
California Stree*, 12 noon. 

September 26— MODESTO BUSINESSMEN'S VISIT 
—75 Visiting Men, HOST; Inter-City Section, 
September 28 — BEHER-YOUR - LIVING-OPEN - 
HOUSE — At 15 different orlvate residences 
throughout city— Phone DO 2-2536 or EX 2-4511 
for addresses. 

September 30 — SAN FRANCISCO MUNICIPAL 
CONFERENCE— Rocr^ 200, Chamber, 3 p.m. 
September 30 — INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT 
COMMITTEE — San Mateo County Development 
Association. 

September 26 — SFAWTA — Meeting at Interna- 
tional Airport — International Air Cargo Commit- 
tee — 2 p.m. 

October I— INDUSTRIAL TOUR OF GLENN 
COUNTY. 

October I —SFAWTA — LUNCHEON MEETING 
ON BOARD THE HARBOR QUEEN TO VIEW 
PORT FACILITIES. 

October 3 — GRAND NATIONAL LIVESTOCK 
SALES DEVELOPMENT COMMIHEE MEETING— 
Room 200, Cnam:ber, I 1:00 a.m. 
October 3— MEETING OF INTERNATIONAL EX- 
HIBITIONS COMMITTEE — (SFAVvTA) — Sma 1 
Csrferencs Room I jt F^oor Chamber, 2 p.m. 
October 4 — AUSTRALIAN BUSINESS DEVELOP- 
MENT TOUR DEPARTS— 'SFAWTA). 



October 6 — MANUFACTURERS COMMITTEE 
LUNCHEON — Commercal Club, 465 Calitornia 
Street, 12 noon. 

October 7 — KNOW YOUR AMERICA WEEK 
COMMITTEE MEETING— Ro-m 200. Chamber. 3 

October 8— MARIN COUNTY INDUSTRIAL TOUR 

—AH day. (INDUSTRIAL.) 

October 8— NETHERLANDS U.S. TRADE LUNCH- 
EON — Venetian Room. Fairmont Hote^, 12 noon. 
Speaker: Ambassador of the Netherlands 
lands-U. S. Trade Relations." 
October 10— REGIONAL PROBLEMS 
COMMIHEE MEETING— Room 200 
10:30-12:00 p.m. 

October 10— BUTTERFIELD OVERLAND MAIL 
CENTENNIAL— Parade, 10:30 a.m.. City Hall Cere 
monies, 11:00 a.m. Civic Luncheon, I2t00 p.m.. 
Hioneer Society, 456 McAllister Street. 
October 10—1959 WORLD TRADE WEEK COM. 
MITTEE MEETING— Room 200. Chamber. 2 p -. 



■'Netho 



SECTION 

CHambfr, 



.San Franrisro's Cow Palace, largest iniloot 
arena in the West, is valued at more than S-i" 
million and ran seat more than 17,000. 



The daily mean maximum trmprrnliirr 
San Frnnrisrn i<; 62.6 degrees. 



BAY 



ION 



SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 




BUSINESS 



VOLUME 15 • NUMBER 21 • OCTOBER 10, I95E 




"LIVESTOCK MAN OF YEAR" — Here's Roger 
Jessup of Glendale, milk producer and distributor 
and former Los Angeles County Supervisor, who has 
been named California's "Livestock Man of the 
Year" for 1958 by the Chamber. 

Chamber, SFAWTA to Aid 
S. F. International Fair 

The Chamber will assist in the presentation 
of tlie International Fair of San Francisco, to 
be held in the Cow Palace June 4-14, 1959, 
according to G. L. Fox, general manager. 

Also assisting will be the San Francisco 
Area World Trade Association, Chamber affili- 
ate, according to Robert Taylor, President. 

Fair sponsorship and management are vest- 
ed in a non-profit corporation under the direc- 
tion of prominent San Francisco business and 
civic leaders. Mayor George Christopher is 
honorary chairman. 



Roger Jessup, Southern Dairyman, Named 
State 'Livestock Man of Year' l)y Chamber 

Rofier Jessup of Glendale, one of the state's outslandin;; milk producers and 
distributors and a Supervisor in Los Angeles County for nearly 24 years, has been 
named California's Livestock Man of the Year for' 1958 by tlie Chamber. 

Alan K. Browne, President of the Chamber, and Vice-President of Bank of 
America N.T. & S.A., will present a silver tray to Jessup bestowinfr the honor Sat- 
urday night, November 1, at the 1958 Grand 
National Exliibition at the Cow Palace. 

Jessup began his own dairy farm and milk 
distribution while attending school in Salt 
Lake City, milked and managed a small dairy 
herd and drove his own milk wagon. After 
serving in the United States Army in France 
during World War I. he rented a small dairy 
farm near Glendale in 1919. His present dairy 
farm and milk distribution plant was estab- 
lished in 1925. 

A keen student of pedigrees and pro- 
duction, he has won many awards for 
lop milk production and for top ani- 
mals. In 1954 he had the highest pro- 
ducing four-year-old registered Holstein 
in the country. 

About 2,000 cows are producing milk at his 
dairy farms in Glendale, Torrance and Pacoi- 
ma. Jessup has one of the two certified milk 
plants west of El Paso, Texas. 

Jessup and his son. Dr. Vince Jessup, have 
developed one of the largest artificial insemi- 
nation operations in the land, serving South- 
ern California, Hawaii and other states, the 
latter through a special freezing process. 

Jessup also pioneered a "Cash and Carry" 
dairy in southern California, affording milk at 
reduced rates to thousands of persons. 

In 1937 he entered the range cattle business 
by leasing the Three C Ranch near Ely, Nev. 
He now has a cow and calf ranch in Modoc 
County, a steer and heifer ranch near Morgan 
Hill, a combination ranch for dairy replace- 
ments and beef cattle at Arroyo Grande and 
a 2.750-acre irrigated pasture ranch near Liv- 




BOVINE BRIEFING SESSION— Carol Ramsey uses 
a chart to point out to sales promotion committee- 
men qualities needed to produce premium beef. 
Looking on (left to right) are Karl C. Weber, 
Chairman of the 1958 Grand National Livestock 
Sales Committee, I -a District; Carl L. Garrison, 
Chairman of the Chamber's Livestock Sales Devel- 
opment Committee; and Alan K. Browne, President 
of the Chamber. The committees have been formed 
to insure premium prices for exhibitors at the Grand 
National, October 31 to November 9, at the San 
Francisco Cow Palace. 

ingston. He also has a registered Holstein 
herd, operated by his sons Webster and Vin- 
cent, at Tipton, Tulare County. 

Jessup also was one of the first — if 
not the first — southern California dair>'- 
( Continued on page two) 



Chamber Approves Six Propositions on City November Ballot 



Directors of the Chamber thus far hav 
voted to support six propositions on the city 
November ballot "in the interests of San 
Francisco's progress," according to Alan K. 
Browne, President of the Chamber. 

The Directors have backed projiositions B, 
C, D, E, F, and L while opposing Proposition 
A. 

The rundown : 

Proposition B, a $3,600,000 bond issue for 
restoration of the Palace of Fine Arts was 
approved following the joint recommendation 
of the Tax Section, of which F. B. Magruder 
is Chairman, and the Capital Improvement & 
Land Use Section, of whirli Raymond D. 
Smith is Chairman. "In the opinion of section 
members, it would be unfortunate if San 
Francisco were to lose the Palace of Fine Arts 
as a world-renowned example of great archi- 



tecture, Browne commented. 

Proposition C, a proposed $2,785,000 bond 
issue for the Ferry Building Park, providing 
for the acquisition, construction and com- 
pletion of a four-acre park and relocation of 
the municipal trolley bus terminal, won the 
support of the Directors. 

Following tlie recommendations of the 
Chamber Civic Development Committee, of 
which Browne is Chairman, and the Capital 
Improvement and Land Use Section and the 
Tax Section, the Directors also approved tlie 
$7,225,000 Civic Auditorium Bond Issue for 
modernization of the building. Proposition D. 

Another important proposition supported 
by the Directors was Proposition E. providing 
for a $1.,500.000 bond issue for a new main- 
tenance yard for the Department of Electricity 
to be constructed at Jerrolih .\venue and 



Quint Street. 

Approval of the Directors also was voted 
for Proposition F, a $1..300.000 bond issue for 
expansion and modernization of the Depart- 
ment of Public Works Maintenance Yard. 
2323 Army Street. 

The last proposition approved, L. would 
empower the Public Utilities Commission to 
negotiate and execute leases with airlines at 
tlie San Francisco International Airport The 
vote confirmed an action by the Chamber 
Executive Committee, according to G. L. Fox. 

Chamber Directors opposed Proposition .\, 
proposing a $22,150,000 bond issue for a Civic 
Center courthouse and for remodeling City 
Hall as a city office building. 

"A new city and county office building and 
conversion of City Hall to a courthouse seem 
a more logical solution to the admitted need." 



Friday, October 10, 1958 




READYING FOR Business-Education Day at a re- 
cent Chamber B-E Committee meeting were (left 
to right) Dr. James Dierke, Acting Superintendent 
of Public Schools, Randle P. Shields, Manager of 
the Chamber Public Affairs Department, Alan K. 



Browne, President of the Chamber, and Dr. Edward 
Goldman, Assistant Superintendent, Adult and Vo- 
cational Education. A record 3,700 teachers are 
expected to be hosted by San Francisco firms dur- 
ing B-E Day, annual Chamber calendar high spot. 



Early Business-Education Sign-up Date Slated; 

Nearly 3,700 Teachers Expected to Participate 

Deadline for signing-up of host firms for Business-Education Day is Tuesday, 
October 14, according to Gene K. Walker, of Gene K. Walker Company, Chairman 
of the Chamber Business-Education Committee. The early sign-up for B-E Day, 
scheduled Friday, October 24, results from a San Francisco Unified School District 
decision to process B-E Day teacher assigmnents by IBM for the first time. Walker 
said. 

The program calls for 
host firms by 10 a.m., 



guest arrivals at 
with adjournment 
around 3 p.m., following conferences, a lunch- 
eon and tour of business premises. 

"B-E Day is being repeated at the request 
of more than 96 per cent of the companies 
which participated last year," Alan K. 
Browne, President of the Chamber, pointed 
out. 

"These companies realize that where mis- 
understanding of American business exists, 
free enterprise suffers. They see B-E Day as 
an invaluable opportunity to correct misunder- 
standing and to strengthen necessary team 
•work between businessmen and educators. 

"Teacher guests — estimated :it 3701) -their 




Northern California 
Chambers Cooperate in 
'Small Business' Day 

Chambers of commerce in northern Califoi^ 
nia, including the San Francisco Chamber, 
are marshalling forces to present the Small 
Business "Opportunity Day" in the Civic 
Auditorium Thursday. October 30. 

A minimum of 50 staffed exhibits, with all 
Federal agencies cooperating, will be pre- 
sented with visits by small businessmen en- 
couraged between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. 

The American Marketing Association, 
northern California chapter, is scheduled to 
present two 20-minute illustrated marketing 
talks entitled "Pad, Pencil and Profits" — 
12:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. in the auditorium. 

Emphasis will be on the ways and means 
of doing business profitably with the Federal 
Government, according to Roy P. Cole, Cole 
& DeGraf, chairman of the Chamber's Small 
Business Committee. 



'citizens of tomorrow' and the companies in- 
volved will profit by participation." 

Companies wishing to take part are urged 
to return their completed sign-up cards 
promptly, or to call EXbrook 2-4511, Exten- 
sion 85. 

Roger Jessup Chosen 
'Livestock Man of Year' 

( Continued from page one ) 

man to green chop alfalfa, a practice 
which has spread to dairy and beef op- 
erations in other areas throughout the 
country. 

Jessup is the current President of the Cali- 
fornia Association for the National Cowboy 
Hall of Fame and past President of tlie Super- 
visors' Association of California. 

Jessup also has earned respect of 

labor for the manner in which he has 

conducted his farming, dairying and 

beef cattle operations. 

He also is recognized as one of the largest 
beef cattle producers on the Pacific Coast. 




OSAKA DOLL, exhibiting the official flag of the 
City of Osaka, was presented to the City at recent 
Pacific Festival ceremonies in conjunction with the 
arrival of a training squadron of the Japanese 
Navy. The doll was received by Mayor Christopher 
from Vice Admiral Hidemi Yoshida in behalf of 
the San Francisco-Osaka Sister City Affiliation. 

Program for Overland 
Mail Centennial — 

Here's today's program for the Butterfield 
Overland Mail Centennial: 

scorl Caravan from City and 



Counly line lo 2nd Street; 

10:30 a.m. — Caravan Parade forms on Second Street; 

11 a.m. — Parade departs for City HaU, proceeding up Ma 
ket to McAllister and left on Polk; 

11:25 a.m.— Caravan welcome on City Hall steps; 

11:30 a.m.— First Day-of-Issue Ceremonies in Rotunda; 

12:30 p.m.— Civic luncheon, Society o£ California Pioneer 
456 McAllister; 

3 p.m. — Caravan departs for the Presidio. 



Littlefield, Former Chamber President, Elected 

To American Mining Congress Board of Governors 



"AMBASSADOR EXTRAORDINARY" — Alan K. 
Browne (left). President of the Chamber, presents 
B certificate designating Louis A. Rozioni, President 
of the California Farm Bureau Federation, as Am- 
bassador Extraordinary of the Chamber. The honor, 
reserved for those who have enhanced San Fran- 
cisco's prestige throughout the world, preceded 
Rozzoni's departure for the Brussels International 
Fair as a delegate of the American Farm Bureau 
Federation to the International Federation of Agri- 
cultural Producers which meets this month in Brus- 
sels. Rozzoni was named California "Livestock Man 
of the Year" by the Chamber in 1952. 



E. W. Littlefield, Executive Vice President 
of Utah Construction Co. and 1956 President 
of the Chamber, was elected to the Board of 
Governors, "Western Division of the American 
Mining Congress during the recent show and 
convention in San Francisco. 

Members of the national Board of Directors 
are Jack H. How, President of Western Ma- 
chinery and Vice President of the Chamber, 
and S. H. Williston, Vice President, Cordero 
Mining Co., and member of the Chamber's 
Mining Committee. 

Playing key roles in the convention, largest 
and most successful in the history of the or- 



ganization, were many Chamber members and 
members of the Mining Committee: 

John D. Bradley is Chairman. Western Division: Worthen 
Bradley and S. H. Williston are members. Jack H. How, 
Chairman, Manufacturers Division; W. W. Mein, Jr.. Chair- 
man. Welcoming Committee; Laurance Kett. Mining Commit- 
tee Chairman, member. Program Committee. 

Other members on the General Committee: Bert C. Austin, 
Cordon I. Gould, Harry N. How. Herbert D. Irarie, Olaf P. 
Jenkins, Donald H. McLaughlin, J. A. Mecia, J. B. Newsom, 
S. H. Williston and Edward Wisser. 

Serving on the Welcoming Committee were E. M. Barker, 
Vice Chairman, Mining Committee, Granville S. Borden, 
James P. Bradley, Phil R. Bradley, Jr., past Chairman of 
the Mining Committee, Worthen Bradley, John P. Davis, 
E. W. Littlefield, Fred Lohse, William J. Losh, W. Spencer 
Reid, Ralph Utl, and Ernest Vogt. 

John L. Merrill, Publicity Chairman; Lewis M. Holland, 
Publicity Vice Chairman. 

The Chamber members presided at many of 
the sessions and took part in others. 



Friday, October 10. 1958 



Hitting the High Spots 



with JIM WARNOCK 

BAY AREA AIR POLLUTION CONTROL DISTRICT 
OFFICIALS Benjamin Linsky, John E. Yocom and 
Elmer Robinson were heard by the Industrial Devel- 
opment Committee and the Technical Proiects Com- 
mittee of the Chamber last week in an information 
session at the new district offices, 1480 Mission 
Street, following a tour of the new facility. Principal 
subject discussed was proposed regulation No. 2 
which will set standards for the control of air 
pollutants from industrial plants. A sub-committee 
is being formed to study the proposals. . . . 

CHARLES C. MILLER, Manager of the Chamber 
Transportation Department, has been attending 
hearings this week at the California Public Utilities 
Commission on proposed statewide rate increases 
for trucking firms to compensate for wage increases 
resulting from the recent truck strike. . . . 

OVERLAND MAIL Caravan members are guests of 
Karl C. Weber, owner of the Whitcomb Hotel, 
during their stay for the Centennial. . . . 

GEORGE RHODES, Aviation Editor of the CALL- 
BULLETIN and a member of the Aviation Commit- 
tee, is now northern California correspondent for 
all U. S. aviation publications, including AVIATION 
DAILY, AMERICAN AVIATION, MISSILES AND 
ROCKETS, and ARMED FORCES MANAGEMENT. 
WILLIAM C. FITCH, Director, Special Staff on 
Aging, Department of Health, Education and Wel- 
fare, Washington, D. C, will speak at a Bay Area 
meeting on problems of our aging population next 
Friday, 10 a.m., at Nourse Auditorium under the 
sponsorship of the California Association for Health 
and Welfare Division of Adult Education, S. F. 
Unified School District, and the United Community 
Fund of San Francisco Gerontological Society. 
RICHARD M. ODDIE, Assistant Vice President, 
Bank of America N.T. & S.A„ has been appointed 
Chairman of the Chamber Marketing and Sales 
Promotion Committee, according to Alan K. Browne, 
Chamber President. Oddie, a recognized authority 
on business development problems, succeeds the 
late Andrew C. McLaughlin, Jr., formerly of Andrew 
C. McLaughlin Co. "San Francisco and the Cham- 
ber have lost one of the city's most loyal citizens 
with the demise of Mr. McLaughlin," Browne said. 
LIGHTHOUSE ACHIEVEMENT DAY luncheon at 
the Fairmont Hotel on October 16 will feature a 
keynote address by Mayor George Christopher, 
highlighting a dramatic story of courage and ac- 
complishments by the blind of northern California, 
under sponsorship of The Lighthouse for the Blind, 
and will springboard the agency's 1958 Thanksgiving 
Seal campaign, reservations HEmlock 1-2743. 
THE "BEHER YOUR LIVING" Open House Show- 
ings, held In San Francisco September 21 and 28, 
were "highly successful," Sidney Kell, Manager of 
the Chamber Domestic Trade Department, has re- 
ported. Radio Station KYA reported several hun- 
dred telephone calls each day. Private dwellings 
Involved were visited by large numbers of Interested 
home-owners. . . . 

AUTUMN FESTIVAL TOUR to the Orient, under 
the auspices of the San Francisco Chinese Cham- 
ber of Commerce, left September 30 via Pan 
American World Airways for Honolulu, Tokyo, Tai- 
pei, Formosa and Hong Kong. June Gong, Miss 
Chinatown — USA, will present greetings from the 
Chinese Chamber to the heads of State in the vari- 
ous countries she visits and will be Mayor George 
Christopher's goodwill emissary to the Far East. 
Among others making the tour will be James H. 
Loo, prominent Chinatown business leader and Vice 
President of the Chinese Chamber. . . . 
PROPOSITION 17 on the November ballot is a 
"neatly packaged, pleasant tasting, deadly poison 
— sugar-coated cyanide," according to S. J. Arnold, 
General Manager of the California Taxpayers' As- 
sociation . . . 





"INCREASE YOUR PACIFIC BUSINESS" is the theme of an international trade seminar to be held 
Tuesdays and Thursdays, October 14-30, at the new Downtown Center, 540 Powell Street, under the spon- 
sorship of the San Francisco State College School of World Business and the San Francisco Area World 
Trade Association, Chamber affiliate. Discussing plans (left to right) are Dr. Glenn S. Dumke, President 
of State, Dr. William P. Golden, Jr., Administrator of the Center; and Robert Taylor, SFAWTA President. 



LEONARD J. SNYDER, former San Francisco over- 
night editor in charge of all International Hevn 
Service, Pacific Coast and Far Eastern operations, 
heads the local office of a unique new service 
organization known as World Wide Information 
Services, an outgrowth of the INS special service 
division, including information (by text, photo 
and newsfllm), specialized research, executive level 
Interviews, opinion studies and polls, feature stories 
for trade magazines and house organs, advertising 
data, and convention news coverage. San Francisco 
office Is at 275 Post Street, YUkon 2-3974. . . . 
FIRST ANNUAL MEMBERSHIP DIRECTORY of 
fhe San Francisco Medical Society, Including pic- 
'.■■es, backgrounds, specialties and addresses of 
"embers can be obtained by writing or calling the 
society at 250 Masonic Avenue, San Francisco 18, 
WEst 1-7200. $5.00 a copy 

ENDORSEMENT OF PROPOSITION 4. self-liqui- 
dating State Harbor Development Act, by the San 
Diego and Los Angeles Chambers of Commerce 
has been hailed by Cyril Magnln, President of the 
State Port Authority, and H. G. Stevens, Chief of 
the State Division of Small Craft Harbors. "Out- 
standing support given in port areas from San 
Diego to Crescent City indicates recognition by re- 
sponsible officials of the importance of the harbor 
development program to the future of California." 
ARTHUR W. TOWNE, President of Blake, Moffitt 
& Towne, has announced the appointment of E. 
Dixon Helse to the key position of San Francisco 
Regional Division Manager, effective October 15. 
MAJOR EXPANSION OF PACIFIC NATIONAL 
LIFE Assurance Company, group and individual life 
insurance affiliate of Matson Navigation Company, 
has been announced by H. B. Perrin, Pacific Na- 
tional President. . . . 

WESTINGHOUSE TELEVISION STATION KPIX has 

presented KQED. San Francisco's excellent educa- 
tional channel, $4,000 to help it acquire equipment 
to increase its power. Gift was made through the 
Bay Area Educational Television Association. . . . 
"THE CIVIL JET AGE— A LOOK AT TOMOR- 
ROW," prepared by the Air Transport Association 
of America representing the nation's scheduled air- 
lines. 2 1 -page booklet with full information about 
the forthcoming jet era, can be obtained from the 
Chamber's Research Department. . . . 
SIX ADMIRALS OF VARIOUS RANKS are on the 
list of speakers for the 32nd Propeller Club Convc 
fion and Merchant Marine Conference opening ■" 
San Francisco October 15, according to Randolf 
J. Sevier, General Chairman. . . . 
DUN & BRAOSTREET, Inc. has announced the add 
tion of 23 offices to its credit network, a private 
wire communications system which Is the first in the 
country to carry credit Information, making a total 
of 42 in the system leased from Western Union. 
The company plans to extend the network coast to 
coast by early 1959. . . . 



GOODWILL "AMBASSADORESS" — Judy Wilson, 
Miss San Francisco, plays the role of conductor 
aboard the Western Air Line's cable car before tak- 
ing off on a flight to Mexico City Sept. 13 to cele- 
brate Mexican Independence Day during the recent 
Pacific Festival. 



SELECTION of most of the films to be shown In 
the San Francisco International Film Festival, Octo- 
ber 29-November 1 1 at the Metro Theatre, have 
been made by the S. F. Art Commission Committee, 
according to Irving M. Levin, Executive Director of 
the event. Films from India. Poland, Hungary, Great 
Britain, Japan and the United States thus far have 
been picked. . . . 

INTERNATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION an- 
nounces three new governors from the Bay Area: 
J. F. Sullivan, Jr., Crocker-Anglo National Bank; 
Edwin Randle, Romano-Randle Properties, Sunny- 
vale; and Merrltt K. Ruddock, Southwest Develop- 
ment Corporation. . . . 

SAN FRANCISCO NAVAL SHIPYARD has re- 
ceived the green light on construction of a guided 
missile frigate and conversion of the cruiser CHI- 
CAGO to a guided missile cruiser. . . . 

COW PALACE had record-breaking attendance 
of 1,134,454 at twenty events, spending an esti- 
mated $8,000,000 during first six months of the year, 
according to J. W. Mallllard, III, President of the 
I -A District Agricultural Association and past 
President of the Chamber. . . . 

JOHN W. FEARN ASSOCIATES will direct public 
relations for first International imported car show, 
November 19-23, In Brooks Hall, according to J. P. 
Cahn. managing director of the show. 

ANNUAL COORDINATED SURVEY OF WAGES 

and salaries in the San Francisco Bay Area is again 
being conducted jointly this year by U.S. Depart- 
ment of Labor, City and County of San Francisco, 
Bay Area Salary Survey Committee, Department of 
the Navy, National Advisory Committee for Aero- 
nautics and United States Mint . . . 



Friday. October 10, 1958 




Dean Jacoby 



Inflation, ''Economic 
Enemy No. 1," Target 
Of Regional Conference 

How has inflation become the nation's "eco- 
nomic enemy No. 1" and what steps should be 
taken immediately to combat it? Answers 
bearing on the spiraling of prices will be given 
at the first Pacific Coast Regional Conference 
to Curb Inflation. October 23. at the Fairmont 
Hotel. 

Six West Coast authorities on economic and 
monetary matters will be speakers at the ses- 
sion, to be sponsored by the National Citi- 
zens Committee to Curb Inflation with the 
San Francisco, Los An- 
geles, Portland and Seat- 
tle Chambers of Com- 
merce as co-operating 
organizations. 

San Francisco Cham- 
ber President Alan K. 
Browne will chair the 
luncheon session in the 
Venetian Room, featur- 
ing an address by Dr. 
Neal Jacoby. Dean of the 
Graduate School of Busi- 
ness Administration. Uni- 
versity of California at 
Los Angeles. Dean Jacoby's subject wiU be 
"Inflation — Stagnation — or Real Prosperity?" 

Morning and afternoon conference sessions, 
free of charge. wiU feature Dr. Edward Shaw. 
Economist. Stanford University: "Inflation: 
Causes and Cures." Donald Yates, former 
President. Seattle Chamber of Commerce: 
"Wliat Inflation is Doing to the Average Busi- 
nessman — and T^liat He is Doing About it." 

Father Richard E. Mulcahy S. J.. Dean. 
College of Business Administration, University 
of San Francisco: "Government — Controller 
of Inflation." Louis A. Rozzoni. President. 
California Farm Bureau Federation: "\^ hat 
Inflation is Doing to Agriculture." E. J. Swan. 
First Vice President. Federal Reserve Bank of 
San Francisco: "Inflation, the Federal Re- 
serve, and You." 

"We are very fortunate to be hosting so 
many outstanding authorities on inflation at a 
single event," Browne said. 

"I hope many Chamber members will attend 
the luncheon session featuring Dr. Jacoby — 
one of tlie nation's foremost authorities in this 
field — as well as the morning and afternoon 
sessions featuring speakers equally well quali- 
fied." 

Reservations may be made through Walter 
J. Brown, 2,56 Sutter Street. GArfield 1-273.5. 



S>AY IIEGION BUSINESS 



Proposition I\o. 4 — 

Modernization a "Must" For S. F. Port 

A sweeping moderniza+ion program for the Port of San Francisco is imperative 
if this city is to maintain its pre-eminent position as the major port of the Pacific 
basin, Alan K. Browne, President of the Chamber, said today. 

Proposition No. 4, the vital $60 million self-liquidating harbor and small craft 
development bond issue on the State ballot, calls for major new facilities to keep this 
famed deepwater harbor in step with the needs of the city's accelerating ocean 
trade, a billion-dollar industry. 

Far-reaching changes are underway in the size and character of merchant fleets 
serving the State. U. S. and foreign lines have billions of dollars of passenger and 
cargo ships coming — bigger, faster vessels with larger pay-load capacities, new 
cargo-handling, streamlined operating schedules and new requirements in pier 
services. 

Construction of new pier facilities, designed to meet these fast-changing 
techniques in handling and transporting ocean cargo, is the greatest need of San 
Francisco's state-owned port. 

Without these new facilities, the port, now in a dilapidated condition, would no 
longer be able to provide efficient service to the state's booming ocean trade, 
Browne warned. The priority need is to replace older piers, now averaging 45 years 
of age and becoming outmoded rapidly. 

Typical pier projects needed for the Port of San Francisco: 

• General Cargo Terminal — large, fireproof, quay-type on the site of existing Piers 
16, IB and 20, now considered outmoded. Estimated cost: $10 million. 

• Ocean passenger facility planned for Mission Rock Terminal, the largest overwater 
pier on the Pacific Coast. San Francisco, the nation's No. 2 port in ocean passenger 
traffic, has no specially designed passenger facility at present. Estimated cost: 
$3,500,000. 

• General cargo terminal with integrated ship-rail-truck access on the site of Piers 
25 and 27. Estimated cost: $9,500,000. 

• Lift-on, lift-off facilities serving van-carrying vessels now planned by U. S. steam- 
ship operators for coastwise, intercoastal and offshore trades. Estimated cost: 
$1,500,000. 

• Pier No. 9 expansion, lengthening this 800-foot pier to 1,000 feet to provide 
additional berthing and cargo-handling space. Estimated cost: $600,000. 

• General cargo terminal, another in the planned series of modern, integrated piers, 
scheduled to replace older piers 42, 44 and 46. Estimated cost: $6,500,000. 

• Port maintalnence shops, needed for more efficient upkeep of both new and 
existing facilities (previous shops were burned out in the Ferry Building fire of 1955). 
Estimated cost: $300,000. 

• Cargo-passenger terminal, tentatively planned for a site immediately south of the 
Ferry Building. This fireproof, concrete-piled pier would berth several freight 
and or pasenger vessels, allowing a concentration of steamship and terminal 
operations now spread over several aging piers at the Port. Estimated cost: $15 
million. 



(^Aaw6€ft ^a^€*tdaft <^ S<Mtutf Sf^cttU 



October 10— REGIONAL PROBLEMS SECTION— 

Rcom 200, Chamber, 10:30-12:00 p.m. 
October ID— BUTTERFIELD OVERLAND MAIL 
CENTENNIAL — Parade, 11:00 a.m., City Hall 
Ceremonies. 11:30 a.m., Civic Luncheon, 12:30 
p m.. Pioneer Society, 456 McAllister Street. 
October 15 — RETAIL MERCHANTS ASSOCIA- 
TION BOARD— Press Club, 555 Post Street, 8:00 

October 17— BUSINESS EDUCATION DAY ORI- 
ENTATION — Federal Reserve Bank, Sansome and 



Sacramento Streets, I 1:00 a.m. 

October 17— SECOND CENTURY CLUB— C-uise 

on San Francisco Bay aboard ADVENTURESS, 4:00- 

6:00 p.m. 

October 21— "SMALL BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY 

DAY" MEETING— Rcom 200, Chamber, 11:00 a.m. 

October 21 — AGRICULTURAL COMMITTEE 

LUNCHEON MEETING— Cirque Room, Fairmont 

October 24 — BUSINESS EDUCATION DAY— 

Teachers to tour Chamber, 10:00 a.m. 



SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



ALAN K. BRO^FNE, Presidenl 

C. L. F0.\, General Manager 

M. A. HOGAN, Seerelary 

JAMES D. 'WAR-NOCK. EiecnliTe Editor 

JOSEPH I. H.\LGHEY, Editor 

Published everr other week by the San Francisco CI 
Francisco, 



I. Telepho 
13.00 a 
CaUf. 

Circulation : 7,500 Ihis issue 



EXbrook 
•.) Second- 




FRANCISCO CHAMBER 



BUSINESS 



VOLUME 15 • NUMBER 22 • OCTOBER 24. 1958 



'Yes' Vote on Six Vital City Bond Issues Is Urged 

*** *** *•* 

Three State Propositions Draw Chamber Approval 



Implementing a conviction that San Francisco must continue to 
improve facilities to assure its growth as a headquarters city, the 
Chamber urges a "Yes" vote on all city bond issues except "A" on the 
November 4 municipal ballot. 

PROPOSITION A, a $22,150,000 bond 
issue to remodel City Hall for offices ( S7.770.- 
550), and build a courts building in Marshall 
Square (S14.379.450). is opposed because of 
the suitability of City Hall as a courthouse, 
but lack of suitability as an office building. 
If the project were carried out, an annex 
office building would in time be required at 
an additional cost of $7,900,000. There is 
great need for court and office facilities, but 
a better solution than that proposed would be 
conversion of City Hall to a courthouse and 
building of new office facilities at what could 
prove to be less eventual cost to San Francisco 
taxpayers. 

PROPOSITION B is a $3,600,000 bond 
issue for restoration of the Palace of Fine Arts 
to match a $2,000,000 allocation from the 
State Park and Beach Fund, the latter to be 
lost to the city unless matching funds are pro- 
vided. Rehabilitation would add needed con- 
vention and cultural facilities to the city and 
preserve one of San Francisco's most cher- 
ished landmarks. The measure would make 
the site a State Park to be leased by the City, 
would add only 2.2c to the tax rate, and faces 
no organized opposition. 

PROPOSITION C is a 12,785,000 bond 
issue for construction of the four-acre Ferry 
Building Park. It provides for acquisition, 
construction and completion of the project 
and is considered a vital first step in redevel- 
opment of the Golden Gateway Area E-1 ad- 
joining and related improvement of lower 
Market Street. 

PROPOSITION D is a 17,225.000 bond 
issue to modernize Civic Auditorium, create 
60 additional meeting rooms for large con- 
ventions and local cultural needs, and increase 
the income potential of the facility to the City 
from $1.50.000 in present annual rentals to 
$400,000. Present convention business 
amounts to $29,000,000 but could be increased 
with improv<'d facilities at the auditorium, 
which was built in 1914 and needs modi-rniza- 
tion. 

PROPOSITION E provides for a 
$1..500.000 bond issue to construct a new 
maintenance yard for the Department of Klec- 
tricity, including a two-story building for 
shops, administrative and warehouse space to 
replace the present inade(|uate yard built in 
1914, resulting in an annual estimated saving 

to the department of $9,000 through increased 

efficiency. 

.„, o I o ■. (Voting rKommanddtion 

( I urn lo iHiRe Z, rol. ,i ) Chambar Raiaarch Daparim 



The Chamber urges 
the November 4 ballot 
tion 1. 



a "yes" vote on three vital .State bond issues on 
— Propositions 2. 3. and 4. Opposed is Proposi- 



Chamber's Voting 
Recommendations 

NOVEMBER 4, 1958 
MUNICIPAL MEASURES 

PROPOSITION VOTE 

A $22,150,000 Court House, City Hall Bond 



NO 

$3,600,000 Palace of Fine Arts Bond Issue YES 
$2,785,000 Ferry Building Park Bond Issue YES 
$7,225,000 Civic Auditorium Bond Issue. .. YES 
$1,500,000 Electricity Maintenance Yard 

Bond Issue . YES 

$1,300,000 Public Works Maintenance 

Yard Bond Issue YES 

Director of Arboretum Qualifications YES 

Expert Witness Compensation YES 

Transfer of Traffic Engineering Duties to 

Public Works YES 

Adjustments in Retirement Allowances NO 

Platform Employees Legal 

Holiday Pay . No Recommendation 

Leasing of Airport, Other Land by PUC YES 

Lease Term Extension YES 

Social Security Coverage Extension YES 

Police Pension Liberalization NO 

Fire Pension Liberalization NO 



STATE MEASURES 

Veterans Bond Issue ($300,000,000). NO 

School Bond Issue ($220,000,000) YES 

State Construction Bond Issue 

($200,000,000) YES 

Harbor Development Bond Issue 

($60,000,000) YES 

Method of establishing compensation of 

State Legislators YES 

State Indebtedness NO 

Succession to the Office of Governor YES 

Voting for Presidential Electors NO 

Legislative Sessions NO 

Eminent Domain (School Districts and 

Airports NO 

County Bonds for Street and 

Road Purposes NO 

Holding Notary Public OfFlce by 

Legislators YES 

Making State Superintendent of Public 

Instruction appointive YES 

Changing compensation of County and 

City Officers YES 

Repeal of prohibition against boxing and 
wrestling on Memorial Day and Sunday. .. NO 

Tax Exemption of Non-Public Schools NO 

State Sales, Use and Income Tax Rate NO 

Right to Work YES 



PROPOSITION 1, opposed, would pro- 
vide a $.300 million bond issue for the exten- 
sion of the veterans home and farm loan pro- 
gram at a time when this would hinder the 
ability of the State to extend proper amounts 
of credit, at reasonable rates, to imperative 
public needs such as .State institutions and the 
solution of .State water problems. California 
having an outstanding bonded debt exceeding 
•SI. 400.000.000. 

PROPOSITION 2 provides for a $220 
million State school bond issue to meet a criti- 
cal need for funds to meet increased public 
school enrollment in elementary and high 
schools from 3.019.000 in 19.58 to 5.125.000 in 
1970 in counties requiring State aid for cla.<s- 
rooms because of limitations of assessed valu- 
ations. 

PROPOSITION 3 provides for a $200 
million bond issue to help carry out a five-year 
State building construction program to meet 
the increasing demands faced by State Col- 
leges. University of California, mental hospi- 
tals and correctional institutions. 

PROPOSITION 4, a $60 million self- 
liquidating harbor and small craft develop- 
ment bond issue, would provide for building 
boating facilities throughout the State and 
vitally needed improvements at the Port of 
San Francisco, only State-owned port, .\n act 
providing for the bonds was unanimously ap- 
proved by the Legislature and signed by tlie 
Governor but requires ratification by Califor- 
nia voters. 

Support Givt'ii to 10 
Charter Anu'iidmeuts 

Six of ten charter amendment^' — Proposi- 
tions G. H. I. L. M. and \— on the November 
4 municipal ballot are siipi>4)rled by the .San 
Francisco Chamber of Commerce. 

PROPOSITION G would establish re- 
(|uir.ni.iil- for the position of director of the 
Strybing .Vrboretum and Botanical Gardens 
in Golden I'.ate I'ark and stipulate that "only 
a iierson pos.sessing educational and adminis- 
trative ipialificalions and neces,sary experi- 
ence" be appointed to the civil service exempt 
post by the General Manager of the Park and 
Recreation Department, subject to the ap- 
proval (.f the Kecrealion and Park Commi- 
sion. Actual cost would be $16,000 for salar\ 
and related costs. 

(Turn lo pufci- 2. rol. 2 ) 



Friday, October 24, 1958 



Approval of Six 
State Amendments 
Given by Chamber 



The Chamber urges a "yes" vote on six 
constitutional amendments on the November 
4 ballot— Propositions 5. 7. 12. 13. 14, and 18. 

PROPOSITION 5 would fix the sal- 
aries of State legislators by statute and limit 
them to the average of the salaries of super- 
visors in the State's five most populous coun- 
ties. 

PROPOSITION 7 would empower the 
Legislature to name a successor to the Gover- 
nor and relocate the state capital and county 
seats if necessary because of wartime catas- 
trophe. 

PROPOSITION 12 would permit mem- 
bers of the Legislature to hold the office of 
Notary Public. 

PROPOSITION 13 would make the 
office of Superintendent of Public Instruction 
appointive instead of elective. 

PROPOSITION 14 would remove the 
prohibition against increa.sing compensation 
of any county, township or municipal official 
after election or during a term of office. 

PROPOSITION 18 would provide that 
persons shall not be denied the right to work 
because of membership or non-membership 
in any labor organization, providing greater 
democracy in labor union elections and mak- 
ing union officers more responsible to mem- 
bers. 

Opposed are eight measures — Propositions 
6. 8. 9. 10. 11. 1.5. 16 and 17. 

PROPOSITION 6 would require that 
proposed laws regarding bond issues on the 
State ballot be published in at least one news- 
paper in each of at least .50 counties for eight 
weeks preceding voting. 

PROPOSITION 8 would allow persons 
who have resided in the -State for 54 days to 
vote for presidential electors. 

PROPOSITION 9 would provide con- 
tinuous legislative sessions of 120 days and 
eliminate the split in the odd-numbered year 
general sessions. 

PROPOSITION 10 would permit State 
or local governments to gain immediate pos- 
session of property to be used for public air- 
ports or schools without a court trial. 

PROPOSITION 11 would enable cities 
and counties to sell br)nds in the amount of 
25 per cent of future gas tax returns for a 
maximum of 10 years at a maximum of six per 
cent interest for street and road development. 
PROPOSITION 15 would repeal the 
prohibition against boxing and wrestling on 
Memorial Day and Sundays. 

PROPOSITION 16 would end tax ex- 
emption on the property of non-profit private 
schools below the college level, tax exemption 
now amounting to less than $2 million an- 
nually, but cost of educating the same chil- 
dren being equivalent to saving to the .State 
of S118 million annually. 

PROPOSITION 17 would reduce the 
State sales tax from 3 per cent to 2 per cent, 
greatly increase personal income tax in some 
brackets, prohibit Legislature from increasing 
sales tax or making changes in income tax 
rates, and create an annual State deficit esti- 
mated at $.50 million which would have to be 
met with increased taxes in other forms. 



More Than 4,000 Businessmen Expected to 
Attend Small Business 'Opportunity Day' 

An estimated 4.000 independent businessmen are expected to attend Small 
Business "Opi>ortunity Day" — sponsored by the Cbamber, other northern Cabfor- 
nia chami)ers and the Small Business Administration — Thursday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., 
in the Civic Auditorium, accordinj; to Rov P. Cole of Cole & DeGraf, Chairman of 
the Chamber Small Business Committee. 



The conference, designed to acquaint inde- 
l)endent businessmen with governmental con- 
tracting possibilities, will include exhibits of 
more than 50 interrelated agencies, including 
the armed services. 

Procurement officers from Sixth Army head- 
quarters at the Presidio and Army Technical 
Services will be present to supply independ- 
ent businessmen with information on Army 
bidding regulations and procedures needed to 
qualify for governmental contracts. 

Alan K. Browne. President of the Chamber, 
will make the opening address at 10 a.m.. fol- 
lowed by the official welcome of George 
Christopher. Mayor of San Francisco, and ad- 
dreses by Wendell B. Barnes. Administrator 
of the Small Business Administration. Wash- 
ington, D. C. and Senator \^'iliam F. Know- 
land. 

The American Marketing Association will 
present two 20-minute illustrated talks on 
■'Pad. Pencil and Profits" at 12:.30 p.m. and 
4 p.m. 



Chamber Approves 
Crosstown Freeway 
Plan 'In Principle' 

Directors of the Chamber have approved in 
principle construction of the Crosstown Free- 
way to connect the Southern Freeway and the 
proposed Western Freeway, according to Alan 
K. Browne. President. 

The freeway, to be built by the city as a 
necessary future segment of the freeway sys- 
tem, largely state-built, will be 2.9 miles long, 
routed through Glen Park Canyon along 
Woodside Avenue through Laguna Honda Ra- 
vine. An 1.100-foot tunnel under Portola Drive 
would preserve the existing character of the 
area. 

Directors also recommended that the De- 
partment of Public Works review alternate 
routes and that, if the presently proposed route 
and structure are adopted, a viaduct portion 
be eliminated or appreciably modified to re- 
duce its length. 



Support Given to 10 
Charter Amendments 

(Conlinuefl from page one) 

PROPOSITION H would provide com- 
pensation for retired members of the Police 
and Fire Departments as expert witnesses be- 
fore courts, legislative or administrative bod- 
ies, in cases involving the City and County, 
giving them same rights as other retired em- 
ployees. 

PROPOSITION I would transfer traffic 
engineering duties from the Police Depart- 
ment to the Department of Public Works, part 
of a long term program to centralize traffic 
management. 

PROPOSITION L would clarify Sec- 
tion 93 of the charter to empower the Public 
Utilities Commission to negotiate and execute 
leases with airlines at San Francisco Inter- 
national Airport and with others on lands 
controlled by the Water Department, eliminat- 
ing referral of such leases to the Board of 
Supervisors for approval or change. 

PROPOSITION M would enable tlie 
Public Utilities Commission to make longer 
leases than the 20 and 40-year maximums now 
specified in Section 93, to provide a greater 
return on idle land belonging to the City, 
only with the approval of the Board of Super- 
visors. 

PROPOSITION N would provide social 
security coverage for the San Francisco Uni- 
fied School District and City and County em- 
ployees, excepting policemen and firemen, in- 
creasing benefits to employees and resulting 
in substantial savings to taxpayers. It would 
also aid in recruiting city employees by allow- 
ing persons with social security coverage else- 
where to enter city service without loss of 
benefits. 



'Yes' Vote Urged on 
Six City Bond Issues 

(Continued from page one) 

PROPOSITION F is a Sl.300.000 bond 
issue for expanding the Department of Public 
Works maintenance yard and modernizing its 
facilities. Better organization of the crowded 
yard, to which three division have been added 
since construction in 1951. would result in an 
estimated $70,500 in annual savings. 

Propositions J. 0. and P. all dealing with 
pension liberalization for city employees, 
policemen and firemen, are opposed by the 
Chamber. 

PROPOSITION J would provide ad- 
justments in retirement allowances of city 
employees based upon future changes in sal- 
aries and would apply to all future retire- 
ments. Taxpayers would bear the full cost, 
no contributions being made by employees on 
the basis of future adjustments. 

PROPOSITION O would allow police- 
men to retire after 25 years of service with 
full benefits, regardless of age, provide death 
benefits for non-service related causes, and 
increase death benefits after retirement, cost- 
ing the taxpayers an approximate annual 
$1,192,719. 

PROPOSITION P would liberalize fire- 
men's pensions to provide survivors' benefits 
for deaths before retirement not related to 
duty and would increase payments to 73 pen- 
sioners. Cost for the first year would be an 
estimated $128,782. 

Directors of the Chamber did not make a 
voting recommendation regarding Proposition 
K. which would provide legal holiday pay for 
platform employees of the Municipal Railway. 



Friday, October 24, 1958 



Hitting the High Spots 



with JIM WARNOCK 

JACK H. HOW, President of Western Machinery 
Company, Vice President of the Chamber and a 
leading member of Its Mining Committee, warns 
that passage of Proposition 17 "would destroy Cali- 
fornia's business climate" to the point where his 
company and many other companies vital to the 
economy would be forced to move out of the state. 
Western Machinery, which recently remodeled its 
headquarters building at 650 Fifth Street, employs 
thousands In its statev/ide operations. . . . 

AMERICAN FOREST PRODUCTS Corporation 
has deferred action on a plant expansion program 
involving several million dollars and employment of 
many additional persons pending the outcome of 
Proposition 17, according to C. T. Gray, President 
of the company and a Director of the Chamber. 
"Its passage would increase the deficits of our 
state, bar the development of sound fiscal measures 
by the Legislature and present the destructive alter- 
native of a state property tax and sales fax on 
foods." . . . 




GENERAL FIREPROOFING COMPANY, nationally 
known manufacturer and distributor of metal busi- 
ness furniture and many allied products, has moved 
to its new San Francisco branch sales office at 
150! Vermont Street. A new display floor — 4,000 
of the total 12,000 square feet — shows the com- 
pany's new line of office furnishings for the execu- 
tive. Having maintained a branch here for forty 
years, the firm has expanded with the city. The 
main manufacturing plant is in Youngstown, Ohio, 
and a California plant has recently been com- 
pleted at San Luis Obispo. 

CHARLES C. MILLER, Manager. Transportation 
Department of the Chamber has been elected 
Secretary-Treasurer of the San Francisco Region 
Chapter, Association of Interstate Commerce Com- 
mission Practitioners. 

PLANS FOR OBSERVING THE 4th ANNUAL Na 

tlonal Farm-City Week In California Novembe 
21-27 have been formulated by the Statewide Farm 
City Week Committee In San Francisco In connec 
tlon with the California State Chamber of Com 
merce and Kiwanls International. . . . 

TWENTY-THREE NORTHERN CALIFORNIANS 

v^ill receive educational awards from a fund pro- 
vided by Santa Fe Railway to further vocational 
agricultural education and Future Farmer of Amer- 
ica work. . . . 

UNITED AIR LINES has begun construction of a 
$475,000 building to house iet engine test cells at 
the company's maintenance base adjoining San 
Francisco International Airport, acco'ding to J. A. 
Herlihy, Senior Vice President — Engineering and 
Maintenance. It will be built by Western-Knopp 
Engineering Company, a division of Western 
Machinery Company. . . . 

JAMES M. RICHTER, Chief Pilot for U. S. Steel's 
Columbia-Geneva Division, has been awarded a 
1,000,000-mile pilot safety award by the National 
Business Aircraft Association. . . . 

SAN FRANCISCO FASHION INDUSTRIES an 

nounces new officers: Andre Dubbs, President; 
Ernest Benesch, Eddie Friedman and Martin Lleber- 
man. Vice Presidents; and Howard Abrams, Secre- 
tary. . . . 



NEW MEMBERS OF THE CHAMBER 



fhii€' l«^% 




Dwight E. Argo Lawrence Sanford 




Ivy Lee. J 



W. Coy Filmer 

New members recently added to the Chaniher (above, left to right I include: Uwight 
K. Ar{>;(i. Regional Sales Manager (11 Western states}. .4. B. Chance Company; Lawrence 
Sanford. Owner. SanjonI & Co.; Ivy Lee. Jr.. Owner. Iiy Lei- Jr. & Associates; Glenn W. 
Smith. Smith & Garthonie. Consultinji Kngineers: and W. Coy Filmer. President. Filmer 
Publishing Company. 



JOHN W. DAVIS of Honig-Cooper, Harrington & 
Miner, has been elected Chairman of the Northern 
California Council of the American Association of 
Advertising Agencies for 1958-59. Other officers 
elected: Phipps Rasmussen of McCann-Erickson In- 
corporated, Vice Chairman; Alan Conner of Gar- 
field Advertising, Inc., Secretary-Treasurer; Mrs. 
Lucrezia Kemper of Albert Frank Guenther Law 
Inc., and Marshall WIegel of Lennen & Newell, Inc., 
Governors. Continuing as Governors through 1959 
are Jerome J. Cowen of Cunningham & Walsh, Inc., 
and T. Milburn Johnston of Campbell-Ewald Com- 
pany. . . . 

THE SUCCESSFUL sale of exhibited fat livestock 
ai the Grand National Livestock Exposition Novem- 
ber 7 at the Cow Palace is the aim of a special 
Livestock Sales Committee of the Chamber, now 
working with many hotels, restaurants, airlines, 
steamship companies, business firms and individu- 
als who will be bidding In the event. Carl L. Garri- 
son heads a committee of 21 businessmen support- 
ing the event. Karl C. Weber is chairman of a Com- 
munity Livestock Sales Committee of 37 promoting 
the event throughout the Bay Area. . . . 
MATTHEW BOXER, a member of the Retail Mer- 
chants Association Board of Directors and owner of 
Boxer's Furniture Appliance & TV Co., was master 
of ceremonies at the dedication of Balboa Soccer 
Field's new bleachers last Sunday. Boxer, former 
President of the San Francisco Soccer Football 
League, often has been called "Mr. Soccer of San 
Francisco. " . . . 

ALAN K. BROWNE, President of the Chamber, 
presided at the luncheon session of the Pacific 
Coast Regional Conference to Curb Inflation at the 
Fairmont Hotel on Thursday. Speaker was Dr. Neil 
H. Jacoby, Dean of the Graduate School of Busi- 
ness Administration, University of California ai Los 
Angeles. Ivan Branson, Chamber Director, presided 
at the morning session. The one-day conference to 
combat "the nation's number one economic enemy 
— inflation" was presented by the National Citizens 
Committee to Curb Inflation in cooperation with 
the San Francisco, Los Angeles. Portland and 
Seattle Chambers of Commerce. . . . 



CHAMBER DIRECTORS held their regular meeting 
of October 9 a\ Fireman's Fund new head office 
building in San Francisco as guests of James F. 
Crafts. President, and Stuart D. Menitt, Resident 
Vice President, Pacific Department. Left to right are 
Crafts, Alan K. Browne. President of the Chamber, 
and Menist, who is Chairman of the Chamber's 
Armed Forces Section. 




ly's Nike 



FIRST HAWK missile system installation in the San 
Francisco area is planned in the near future, it was 
announced jointly by Lieutenant General Charles 

D. Palmer, Com- 

manding General. 
Sixth U. S. Army, 
and Major General 

E. J. McGaw, Com- 
manding General, 
6th Region, Army 
Air Defense Com- 
mand. Reconnais- 
sance for selection 
of sites will begin 
shortly. Federal, 
State or County 
land to be used 
whenever possible. 
The Hawk is a 
surface-to-air system 
considered a key 
defender of Ameri- 
can cities. Designed 
to provide low alti- 
tude defense, it will 
complement the de- 
fense against high 

altitude air attack provided by the Ar 
system. 

THE GRACIE S, now rechristened THE WANDER- 
ER by owner Sterling Hayden. has been presented 
a copy of a famous ship's bell by Stuart Greenberg 
for its participation in the Pacific Festival as theme 
ship. The bell is a replica of that of the STAR- 
LIGHT, famous sloop which William C. Lynde 
grandfather of EXAMINER columnist Anita Da. 
Hubbard, operated in the '90's between San Frar 
Cisco and California City in Marin County. . . . 
DEAN WITTER, senior partner of Dean Witter & 
Co.. has been elected to the Board of Directors of 
the pioneer western paint and glass firm of W. P 
Fuller & Co., A. H. Brawner. Chairman of the Boaro 
announces. . . . 

A GOODWILL TOUR of Reno has been scheduled 
November 1 3- 1 5 by the Inter-City Section of the 
Chamber, according to Ivan Branson. Chamber Di- 

.•ctor and Trip Chairman. Included for $32.50 Is 
•■aln transportation, two nights in Holiday Hotel 

.Reno's newest hotel), souvenirs, sandwiches and 
^eer on the train and drinks at the hotel. . . . 
ART BLUM AGENCY has been retained by Lotus 
Cake Co. of San Francisco, creators and manufac- 
turer of the famed Chinese Fortune Cookies." to 
inaugurate a nationwide public relations campaign 
Introducing a line of gift baskets and stressing the' 
messages in the cockles are a novel and effective 
way of reaching clients and the public. . . . 
GOLDEN GATE GOURMET, edited by Roxana D 
Robertson with a foreword by Herb Caen, is a fine 
collection of favorite recipes of Bay Area hostesses, 
consulates, chefs and bachelors, $3.50 at all book 
stores. . . . 



Friday. October 24. 1 958 




^ Mr. WALKER 



Dr.SPEARS 



EIGHTH ANNUAL BUSINESS EDUCATION DAY 

in San Francisco was fully briefed for representa- 
tives of 200 companies taking part as hosts at a 
panel discussion last week. Left to right are Gene 
K. Walker, Business Education Chairman, George 
Cobb, President, Coca Cola Bottling Co., and Dr. 
Harold Spears, Superintendent of Public Schools. 

Navy Day Luncheon 
Scheduled on Monday 

Rear Admiral William E. Centner. Jr.. USN. 
Director. Aviation Plans Division. Office of the 
Chief of Naval Operations, will be the princi- 
pal speaker at Monday's Navy Day luncheon 
at the Commercial Club. 

"The Future of the Aircraft Carrier in the 
Missile Age" will be his subject. 

The luncheon is jointly sponsored by tlie 
Chamber, the Navy League of the United 
States (San Francisco Council), and the Com- 
mercial Club. 



October 24— BUSINESS EDUCATION DAY— Morn- 
ing and afternoon sessions. 

October 24 — INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT 
LUNCHEON — Commercial Club, 465 California 
Street, noon. 

October 30 — SMALL BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY 
CONFERENCE— Civic Auditorium, open from 9 to 
5 p.m. to the public. 

October 31— CHEMICAL INDUSTRIES — Interna- 
tional Kitchens — Field Trip to Nlles — 10:30-5:00 
p.m. 

November 3 — AVIATION SECTION LUNCHEON 
— Tour of jet facilities, San Francisco International 
Airport, noon. 

November 6— KNOW YOUR AMERICA WEEK— 
Room 200, Chamber, 3:00 p.m. 
November-6— ARMED FORCES SECTION LUNCH- 
EON — Commercial Club, 465 California Street, 
noon. 

November 7 — TRANSPORTATION — Room 200, 
Chambei, 10:30 a.m. Guest Speaker: Gerald Col- 
lins, Manager, Transportation Department, Chamber 
of Commerce of the United States: "Transportation 
Legislation." 



BAY IISGION B"^5I^ 


'ESS 


PUBllSHtD M THE 




SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 


ALAN K. BROWNE, Preiidenl 




C. L. FOX, General Manager 




M. A. HOCAN, Secrelary 




JAMES D. WARNOCK, Executive Edit 


)r 


JOSEPH 1. HAUCHEV, Editor 




Published every other week by the San Francisco 
of Commerce at 333 Pine St., San Francisco 
County of San Francisco. California. Telephone 
2-«U. (Non-member subscription, $.i.00 a year, 
class postage paid at San Francisco, Calif. 


Chamber 
Zone 4. 
EXbrook 
1 Second- 


Circvlationz 7,500 this issue 





3,600 Teachers to Be 
Hosted by Finns During 
8th Annual 'B-E Day' 

-Schtxils out today for more than .3.600 San 
Francisco teachers who will spend the day as 
gue-its of 200 business firms during the city's 
eighth annual Business-Education Day spon- 
sored hy the Chamber. 

The teachers will tour plants and offices, 
hear executives and lunch with firms to broad- 
en their knowledge of private enterprise in 
action, and learn training requirements of 
many segments of business and industry. 

For many teachers the event will mark eight 
years of participation during which they have 
increasingly broadened their concepts of the 
San Francisco economy, having visited a dif- 
ferent firm or organization each year. 

The Chamber was the first in the country to 
inaugurate the program in a major city, ac- 
cording to Gene K. Walker, Business Educa- 
tion Chairman, and its success has inspired 
many other towns and cities to follow suit. 

Enthusiasm is shared by Dr. Harold Spears. 
Superintendent of Schools, San Francisco 
teachers and the hosting firms, 96,8 per cent 
of which indicated in a poll that they wanted 
to continue the annual event. 

Nineteen teachers and School Department 
representatives from all over the city will be 
guests of the Chamber for tours and sessions 
with G, L. Fox. General Manager, and depart- 
ment managers, lunch at the Sheraton-Palace, 
and refreshments at the .San Francisco Com- 
mercial Club. 

Chamber guests and their schools or offices 
are Grace L. Bond. Paul Revere; Irving G. 
Breyer, Central Office: Elizabeth Bunting. San 
Miguel: Audrey Cervesi, Lakeshore: Phoebe 
Cole, Aptos Jr. High; Louis G. Conlan, Cen- 
tral Office; Robert Wayne Daw, Pelton Jr, 
High; Armond Demartini, Marina Jr. High; 
Mary J. Devine. Ulloa: Beverly Doran. Aptos 
Jr. High; 

Alice E. Duffy. Central Office; Barbara Fol- 
som, Luther Burbank Jr. High; Dr. Edward 
Goldman. Central Office: Harold Graubart, 
West Portal; Bernice Pelkey, Parkside; Rob- 
ert A. Polier. Sir Francis Drake; Marian 
Schmidt, Francisco Jr. High; Armenag Ter- 
zian. Central Office; and Helen F. Youngclaus, 
James Lick Jr, High, 

Randle P. Shields, Manager of the Public 
Affairs Department, is Chamber coordinator 
for the event; Robert W, Daw is coordinator 
for the San Francisco Unified School District, 




CINERAMA SOUTH SEAS ADVENTURE features 
actresses Marlene Lizilo and Diane Beardmore. 
Center Is Carl Dudley, producer, and in background 
is the Aloha Tower of hlonolulu, one of the locales 
of the production. 

Cinerama Premiere 
Dinner Sponsored by 
Press Chib, Chamber 

In cooperation with the San Francisco Press 
& Union League Club, the Chamber will co- 
sponsor a dinner on November 25 before the 
premiere of the new fifth Cinerama produc- 
tion, "Cinerama South Seas Adventure," at 
the Orpheum Theatre, 

After dinner at the Press Club, 555 Post 
.Street, guests will proceed directly to the 
theatre for the premiere of the new produc- 
tion, which explores the South Seas in the 
wake of Captain Cook. 

Tickets for the dinner, at .$3.50. are avail- 
able at the Chamber or the Club. Theatre 
tickets at $2.00 and $.3.00 are available at the 
.St. Francis Hotel box office or the Club. 



Brochure on "Billion 
Dollar Industry" Issued 

A brochure stressing the significance 
of world trade — California's multi- 
billion dollar industry — has been pub- 
lished by the World Trade Department 
of the Chamber. 

About 2,500 copies will be distrib- 
uted to governments overseas, cham- 
bers of commerce and newspaper pub- 
lications at home and abroad and 
Trade Association members. 




SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



BUSINESS 



VOLUME 15 • NUMBER 23 • NOVEMBER 7, 1958 



Fisherman's Wharf Fiesta Scheduled For First Time 



Plans for San Francisco's first annual Fisherman's Fiesta November 14-16 honoring 
world-famous Fisherman's Wharf and the opening of the crab season are nearing com- 
pletion, according to Richard M. Oddie. chairman of the Marketing and Sales Promotion 
Committee of the Chamber and executive chairman of the event. 

The public of northern California is cordially invited to join in the festivities to 
include the blessing of the crab Heet and departure of the boats on Friday. November 14. 
their return with the first crab on Saturday. November 1.5. and entertainment and street 
dancing on Saturday and Sunday. 

The wharf and the boats will be colorfully decorated with pennants and banners for 
the event, according to Oddie. Posters and displays throughout the city will also observe 
the fiesta. 

Guests of honor will be the crab fishermen of San Francisco and the Crab Boat 
Owners Association. 

Sponsors include the City and County of San Francisco, Down Town Association of 
San Francisco, Fisherman's Wharf Association, Northern California Sea Food Institute, 
the Chamber and the San Francisco Port Authority. Cooperating organizations are 
Californians. Inc.. and the San Francisco Convention and Visitors Bureau. 

Sidney H. Keil. manager of the Domestic Trade department of the Chamber, will be 

coordinator of the ob- 
servance. Publicity 
will be handled by 
the Publicity depart- 
ment of the Chamber. 
The Down Town 
Association will coor- 
dinate entertainment 
and display, accord- 
ing to Tom Gray, 
manager. 

'"San Francisco has 
long been justly 
proud of world fa- 
mous Fisherman's 
Wharf as a colorful 
bit of the Old World 
transplanted to the 





TOURISTS, STROLLING along narrow sidewalks at Fishermar<'s Wharf, 
examine the gleaming display of freshly caughl sea food spread out on 
brick tables, and watch fresh crabs and lobsters being cooked in huge, 
steaming wooden vats. 



Small Business *'Opport unity Day" Here Judged 
Most Successful One Held in the Country 

The Small Business "Opportunity Day"' held recently in the Ci\'ic Auditorium 
under the joint sponsorship of the Chamher and Small Business Administration, 
was adjudged "the most successful one held in the country to date." Iiv \\ endell 
B. Barnes, administrator of the Small Business .\dmini.<tration. ^ ashinjilon. D. C 

Attendance, estimated by some from 6.000 — 

its resurgent economy moving ahead toward 
new records." Barnes told hundreds of inde- 
pendent business proprietors at the confer- 
ence. 

"President Eisenhower's Council of Eco- 
nomic Advisors just the other day estimated 
the gross national product of the nation at an 
annual rate of S440 billion — indicating a new 
record by year's end," Barnes disclosed. 

"It ap|)ears obvious," he continued, "That 
there is going to be ample opportunity for 
small business in the years ahead. But, he 
warned, "opportunity has to be seized and put 
to work — and that calls for planning and in- 
genuity." 

During its existence, Barnes pointed out. the 
SBA "has reserved more than three billion 
dollars in more than 4.S.000 proposed contracts 
for award to small business. 



to 7,000. far exceeded expectations, according 
to Roy P. Cole of Cole & DeGraf. Chairman 
111 tile Chamber Small Business Committee. 

"The conference, bringing together all pro- 
iiiii-ment divisions of the armed forces and 
prime contractors under one roof, proved to 
be a great opportunity for the independent 
businessman to i)econie conversant with the 
articles needed by the (government in its vast 
buying program." Cole said. 

All branches of the government, both mili- 
tary and civilian, participated. .\t least 70 
governmental agencies and 20 first-tier con- 
tractors of the government exhibited 

Speakers included Alan K.. Bmwne. Presi- 
dent of the Chamber, Mayor tieorge Cliris- 
li>|)her and Senator William V. Knowland. 

"This nation — now poised on the threshold 
of an immeasurably challenging future- finds 



MONTEREY-TYPE boats, which had their origin on the 
Nile in ancient times and were used for centuries by Italian 
fishermen in the Mediterranean, add color to the Wharf, 
Every year the fleet is blessed at ceremonies honoring 
Santa Maria Del Lume (St. Mary of the Light), patroness 
of the fishermen. 



heart of America's most cosmopolitan citys,"' 
Oddie said. 

"The Chamber has been contemplating such 
an event for several years. Vie are hopeful 
that the fiesta will become an annual event 
saluting a colorful and important part of the 
city's culture and economy." 

There are about 1200 full-time employees 
on the Wharf, making it one of the city's 
major employment groups. Personal property 
taxes paid to the City and County of San 
Francisco by the dozens of restaurants, fishing 
companies, boat repair shops and related 
businesses average about $25,000 a year. Total 
rentals from all sources paid to the State 
through the Port .\uthority are about $23,000 
a month. 

Estimated total expenditures for private 
property improvements on the VS'harf during 
the past five years has amounted to about 
$1,350,000, creating hundreds of additional 
jobs in the building trades. 




NO 'SMALL SUCCESS— The recent Small Business 
"Opportunity Day" was judged one of the most 
successful such sessions held to date in ttie country. 
Pictured at the conference above (left to right) 
are Alan K. Browne, President of the Chamber; 
Wendell B. Barnes. Administrator. Small Business 
Administration, Washington, D. C.: and Roy P, 
Cole, Chairman of the conference. 



Friday, November 7, 1958 



San Francisco Business Activity Might 
Eclipse or Equal Last Year's Record High 

Experiencing its best September in history, San Francisco business rolled ahead 
today \vith a good possibility of eclipsing or equaling last year's all-time record, 
according to the Chamber Research Department. 

The Chamber l)usiness activity index of 158.6 for September topped August by 
3.0 per cent and September last year by 1.8 per cent. The nine months index aver- 
_ aged 152.2, reducing 




Bethlehem Steel 
buildi 



at 



the gap between the 
same period last year 
to 0.3 per cent com- 
pared to 1.4 per cent 
for the six months peri- 
od and 2.6 per cent at 
the end of the first 
quarter. 

Construction author- 
ized in San Francisco 
during September 
soared to $10,887,842 
or $4 million above a 
year ago. This included 
a permit for the 
$6,905,000. 13 story 
Bethlehem Pacific 
Coast Steel Corp. head- 
Sacramento and Front 



quarter 
Streets. 

In the nine-county San Francisco Bay Area 
— Alameda. Contra Costa, Marin, Napa, San 
Francisco. San Mateo. Santa Clara. Solano 
and Sonoma — construction authorized in Sep- 
tember amounted to $76,977,000 compared to 
$61,132,000 a year ago. The cumulative total 
for the first nine months amounted to $567.- 
514.000— an increase of $82,189,000 or 16.9 
per cent above the same period last year. New 
residential dwellings authorized in September 
accounted for $43,389,000 and provided for 
4.116 units compared to only 2,841 units a 
year ago. The nine months total aggregated 
30.624, an increase of 30 per cent over last 
year. 

September financial transaction in San 
Francisco — based on bank debits — amounted 
to 14.346.932.000 or $300 million above 
August and $136 million above September last 
year. The nine months cumulative of 137.1 
billion was only 0.1 per cent below the similar 
fieriod last year. Postal receipts in September 
ascended 6.5 per cent and the cumulative was 
up 2.5 per cent. 

Pacific Coast Stock Exchange transactions 
more than doubled last September's total; the 
market value was up 196 per cent putting the 
cumulative total ahead of last year by 4.5 per 
cent and 17.8 per cent, respectively. 

Increased activity was reported in the entire 
transportation field in San Francisco for Sep- 
tember. Freight car movements were up 20.3 
per cent; plane traffic. 3.6 per cent; truck 
traffic. 9.6 per cent; express -shipments, 22 per 
cent; Port of San Francisco revenue tonnage, 
13.3 per cent; and cargo vessels arrivals in 
San Francisco Bay, 3.2 per cent. The nine 
months cumulative airport traffic, truck traffic 
and ship arrivals were also above last year. 
Freight car movements and revenue port ton- 
nage, however, were off. 

Bridge vehicle crossings were at new highs 
for September with Bay Bridge up six per cent 
to 3.077.456 and Golden Gate Bridge up 6.2 
per cent to 1,474,962. Visitor and newcomer in- 
quiries in September soared 20.7 per cent 



above a year ago and the nine months cumula- 
tive was up 12.3 per cent. Out-of-state passen- 
ger cars entering northern California gateways 
in September totaled 89.901 — a gain of 2.1 per 
cent — and carried 214.876 passengers. 

September employment in the six-county 
Metropolitan area reached the year's high 
of 1.102,000. only 0.9 per cent below last 
year. The nine months average of 1,072,725 
was 1.4 per cent below the similar period last 
year. 

Several industrial groups were employing 
more persons in September this year than in 
the same month a year ago. These included 
construction, up 4.3 per cent; finance, 0.6 per 
cent; service, 2.3 per cent; and government. 
3.2 per cent. Retail and wholesale trade 




JFMAMJJASOND 

groups were practically the same as last year. 
Manufacturing was down 5.1 per cent and 
transportation, communications and utilities, 
6.5 per cent. 

The consumer price index for San Francisco 
of 128.4 in September was up 0.3 per cent 
from June and four per cent above September 
of last year. 

Year-to-year rises were: food prices. 3.8 per 
cent; apparel, 0.6 per cent; housing. 3.4 per 
cent; transportation. 6.6 per cent; medical, 
9.8 per cent: and other. 0.2 per cent. 



Business Act-iyity Through September, 1958 



BRANCH OF ACTIVITY 



•GENERAL BUSINESS ACTIVITY INDEX 

CONSTRUCTION PERMITS ..._ _ Total Number 



Residential. New 

Dwelling Units , 

Single-tamilv units. New 

Non-residential, New 

Additions, Alterations and 
Nine county dw 

REAL ESTATE— Deeds Recorded Number 

•RETAIL DEPARTMENT STORE SALES. -... Index 

FINANCE— BanIc Debits _ $000 

Postal Receipts — - $ 

Pacific Coast Stock Exchange Shares traded 

Market value $ 



158.6 

l,M5 



19.4 
58.5 
43.1 
42.1 
14.8 
221.8 
—39.7 
44.9 



COMMERCIAL FAILURES 



..Number 



INDUSTRY TREND— 4 County Total Employment 

Mfg. Average Weekly Earnings _ (earnings) $ 

Manufacturing (employment) 

Construction, contract " 

Finance, insurance, real estate " 

Retail trade 



Wholesale trade . 






Service ._ - - 


Trans., comm., & utilities 

Agriculture 












Other _ _ 


_ 


_ 



TRANSPORTATION— Freight car movement.. 

S. F. Airport— Planes In and Out 

Passengers Off and On _ 

Air Mail Loaded and Unloaded 

Air Express Loaded and Unloaded- 



;ight Loaded and Unloaded.. 

Rail Express Shipments 

' uck Movements— S. F. Area.. 



-Lbs. 
-Lbs. 
-Lbs. 



Out-of-State passenger car entries into No. Calif.. 

PORT OF SAN FRANCISCO— Revenue Tons 

Coastwise _ _ 

Intercoastal 

Inland Waterway - „, 

Foreign _ 



CARGO VESSELS (San Francisco Bay) 

Arrivals 

Millions of Registered Tons _ 



UTILITIES— Ind. & Comm. Gas Sales..... 

•Elec. Energy Sales, K.W. Hours 

Water Consumption— Comm. & Ind 



NEW DEVELOPMENTS 

Visitor and Newcom. 
Bay Bridge Vehicle C 
Golden Gate Bridge Vehici 



.....Cu. Ft. 

Index 

Cu. Ft. 



Inquiries 

ssings 

Crossings- 



Numbe 

..-Numbe 



FRUITS & VEGETABLE RECEIPTS... Carlots 

LIVESTOCK SLAUGHTER (Insp. Dists.; 
•S. F. CONSUMER PRICE INDEX— All Items.- 



4,346,932 
2,809,051 
4 226,840 
76,669,301 

12 

I,l02,000(p) 
101.42 

22l,500(p) 
72,600(p) 
69,20O(p) 

176,200(p) 
80,IOO(p) 

248.200(p) 

Il5,800(p) 
2l,500(p) 
94.300(p 
2,600(p) 

14 379 

11.051 

320,795 

3,226,753 

697,291 

9,043,694 

81,847 

170.3 

89,901 

506,803 
7,100 
34,057 
183,002 
282,644 



390 
1,899.599 

1,082,283,500 

148 

170.136,500 

1,121 
3,077,456 
1 ,474,962 

4,377 

97.000(a) 

128.4 



8,609 

66,888,149 

26.129.310 

1,667 

638 

23,357,776 

17 401,063 

30,264 



37,066,387 
23,208,208 
27,072,191 
554,027,597 



—0.3 

— 1.7 
15.9 
118.4 
63-3 
16.4 
— 12.0 



17.8 
-2S.2 



l,072,725(p) —1-4 



208.650(p) 
66,445 p) 
68.5IO(p) 

172,910(p) 
79,855(p) 

244,945 p 

I17,035(p) 
I8,855(p) 
92.990(p) 
2.535(p) 



—6.5 
-0.1 
—0.4 



108,231 

75,441 

2,708,709 

28.367,518 

5,929.620 

61,581,417 

611,493 

161.6 



4,200,168 

60,202 

272.041 

1,526.100 

2.341.825 



12,037,540.600 

152 

1,459,225,500 



15,431 
26.957,231 
12,668.018 



— 11.6 
—42.0 
—23.2 

— 15.0 
—6.3 



•Index Base ( 1947-49 Monthly Average= 100); (a) August latest available; (b) B m 
(p) preliminary. Basic data sources not shown due to space limitation, but available upon req 

RESEARCH DEPARTMENT, SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



35,243 17.6 

791, 000(b) —15.2 

127.7(c) 4.0 

(c) March-June-Sept. Av. 



Friday, November 7, 1958 



Hitting the High Spots 



with JIM WARNOCK 

WHAT TO DO WHEN A REVENUE AGENT 
CALLS? and other pertinent tax questions will be 
answered by a panel of experts at the second annual 
Small Business Income Tax Forum to be held at the 
Oakland Auditorium Theater, 8 to 10:30 p.m. 
Thursday. November 13. Sponsored by the Oakland 
Chamber of Commerce and the East Bay Chapter 
of the California Society of Certified Public Ac- 
countants, the forum will follow the format of the 
highly successful affair of last year, according to 
Kenneth L. Thompson, Chairman of the Revenue 
and Taxation Committee, who Is program chairman. 
WOLCOTT & ASSOCIATES, INC., nationwide pub- 
lic relations counsel, has moved its offices from 47 
Kearny Street to larger quarters at 209 Post Street 
In the furtherance of its expansion program in the 
Bay Area, President Robert B. Wolcott, Jr., has 
announced. Grady Galloway is Manager of the 
firm's San Francisco facility. . . . 

PRESTON H. MULCAHY has been named General 
Manager of WEMCO, Herbert J. Mayer, Execu- 
tive Vice President of Western Machinery Company, 
has announced. WEMCO, a division of Western 
Machinery Company, manufactures and sells a wide 
variety of Industrial equipment. . . . 
PORT OF SAN FRANCISCO cargo volume rang up 
a 1958 record in September with 506.803 tons of 
ocean shipments moving across the piers in the bus- 
iest month since last December, Port Director Carl 
M. Smith reports. . . . 

ANNOUNCEMENTS OF THE COVETED AWARDS 
of Excellence and speaker Robert Fawcett shared 
the spotlight at the Awards luncheon of the Tenth 
Annual Directors Exhibition of Advertising Art 
sponsored by the Art Directors and Artists Clubs of 
San Francisco yesterday at the Canterbury Hotel. 
Don Bonfigli, Chairman of the Exhibition, announced 
winners in 25 classifications. In addition, the Wil- 
liam Randolph Hearst Memorial Award for the most 
outstanding newspaper ad and the Foster and 
Kleiser Medal for the best outdoor poster design 
was announced. . . . 

EXECUTIVES WHO DIRECT JOB-TRAINING will 
learn how to better their own Job performance when 
the second annual Training Institute meets on the 
University of San Francisco campus November 17 
through 19. Sponsored by the Northern California 
Chapter of the American Society of Training Direc- 
tors and the University, the group is meeting for 
the second year at USF, according to Ralph E. 
Boynton, Bank of America Training Director and 
President of the Chapter. . . . 




BENJAMIN F. FAIRLESS, President of the Ameri- 
can Iron and Steel Institute, spoke this morning at 
a regional technical meeting of the institute at the 
Mark Hopkins Hotel. Another major speech was 
presented by James B. Black, Chairman of the 
Board of Pacific Gas and Electric Company and a 
director of the United States Steel Corporation. 
Final speaker at the morning session was Professor 
Earl R. Parker of the University of California. The 
meeting was moderated by H. H. Fuller, President, 
Bethlehem Pacific Coast Steel Corporation. L. B. 
Worthington, President, Columbia - Geneva Steel 
Division, United States Steel Corporation, will pre- 
side at the afternoon session. This will Include pa- 
pers by H. C. Swett. Bethlehem Pacific Coast Steel 
Corporation: John D. Saussaman, Kaiser Steel Cor- 
poration; R. M. von Storch, Columbia-Geneva Steel 
Division of United States Steel Corporation, and 
Charles G. Campbell, The Colorado Fuel and Iron 
Corporation. . . . 

ONE OF THE NATION'S OUTSTANDING commer- 
cial airline pilots whose aviation career spans the 
era from World War I "iennies" to modern jets, 
retired from United Air Lines on November I. He 
Is Captain W. D. Williams, pioneer air mail pilot 
and northern California flight manager for United. 
More than 250 associates from UAL and other 
lines honored him at a retirement dinner on Octo- 
ber 30 

BUNKER HILL COMPANY OF SAN FRANCISCO 

has announced plans to construct a $10 million fer- 
tilizer plant in the Northwest scheduled to go Into 
production by July, I960. John D. Bradley. Presi- 
dent, said the production of fertilizer was an Impor- 
tant and logical part of the company's planned di- 
versification program. . . . 

A GOODWILL TOUR OF RENO has been sched- 
uled Thursday, Friday and Saturday. November 13- 
15, by the Inter-Clty Section of the Chamber, ac- 
cording to Ivan Branson, Chamber Director and 
Trip Chairman. Included for $32.50 is train trans- 
portation, two nights In the Holiday Hotel (Reno's 
newest hotel), souvenirs and refreshments. Mayor 
Len Harris and Reno Chamber of Commerce offi- 
cials will fete the San Francisco group at a luncheon 
Friday noon. November 14. to be followed by a 
discussion of trade relations and a tour of Reno's 
industry and commerce. . . . 

THE FIRST PUBLIC INFORMATION Institute on 
"The Mental Aspects of Dental Health." sponsored 
by the Education and Informational Fund for Com- 
munity Welfare of the San Francisco Dental Society, 
will be held Saturday. November 15. at Galileo 
High School. It will be the first time that members 
of the psychiatric profession will be cooperating 
with members of the dental profession as resource 
consultants. "Preventive dentistry" and the impor- 
tance of the oral cavity in relation to the whole per- 
son will be stressed. . . . 

SHIPBUILDING PROGRAM for over $130 million, 

involving nine new Mariner ships to be built stort- 
ing in 1959 was included In a 20-year contract re- 
cently signed between Pacific Far East Line, Inc.. 
and the Federal Maritime Board, and announced 
by T. E. Cuffe, President and Chairman of the 
Board. The contract provides that PFE will maintain 
Its trans-Pacific service between California ports 
and the Far East including Japan. Hong Kong. Man- 
churia. Formosa, Korea. Okinawa, the Philippines. 
Vietnam. Cambodia, Thailand, and with ports of 
China and the USSR in the event trade should be 
opened with those countries. . . . 



Citywide Celebration 
Honors 'Muni Week' 




MUNICIPAL RAILWAY GENERAL MANAGER 
Charles D. Miller congratulates Edward Mullane. 
veteran employee, on his selection to represent the 
railway as "Mr. Muni." In his new role Mullane has 
spent the past several weeks calling San Francisco's 
attention to its transit system. 

"Ride the Muni I" 

The cheery invitation has been thuroughly 
extended to practirally all of San Francisco 
the past several weeks as part of a citywide 
promotion in honor of tlie Municipal Railway. 

Mayor Christopher had officially designated 
the period as "Muni Vi eek" and the Railway 
had selected Edward Mullane. veteran o[iera- 
tor. to represent the more than 1800 of his 
fellow platform employees in a numlier of 
special events to focus public attention on the 
vital service being performed by the Muni. 

The transit system carries more than 16.- 
000.000 pas.sengers each month in a city that 
has the second highest per capita riding habit 
in the I'nited Stales. 

Each weekday the modern transit vehicles 
of the "Muni" travel 90.000 miles, or a daily 
distance equal to more than thrice around the 
world. 



THE CHEMICAL INDUSTRIES section of the Cham- 
ber recently visited P. G. & E.'s Vallecltos Atomic 
Laboratory — the nation's first ail-privately financed 
nuclear power plant — at Plessanton. The group 
lunched at the International Kitchen in Niles. . . . 

A SEARCH IS ON for San Francisco's outstanding 
young man of the year, whose notable contribution 
to his community will win the San Francisco Junior 
Chamber of Commence Distinguished Service 
Award. . . . 

SEMINAR ON PROFIT SHARING PROBLEMS 

sponsored by the Northern California Chapter of 
the Council of Profit Sharing Industries Is he^d in the 
Standard Oil Building one day each month from r^ 
to 6 p.m. For information call Mrs. M. G. Herma" 
YU 6-6568 



THE NAVY HAS INVITED bids to lease 344 acres WHAT INTERESTS THE WOMAN READER? »«< 



ROGER JESSUPand eight California Livestock Men 
of the Year chosen by the Chamber in the past are 
honored In this exhibit of portraits by Hartjook 
Studios observing the Grand National in the Ameri- 
can Airlines office in the St. Francis Hotel. 



at the Naval Air Station, Moffett Field, for use as 
agricultural land. The land, divided into nine sepa- 
rate parcels, will be leased on an annual basis, be- 
ginning December I, 1958, renewable annually for 
an additional four years. Bidders are requested to 
make two bid proposals: agricultural bids on seven 
plots and maintenance bids on two. T . . 



the subject of a panel discussion of a San Frj-. sec 
Bay Area Publicity Club dinner meeting In t^c P'oi< 
Box of the Press Club lest week. Panel me-^-bers 
were James P. Est«s. Women's Editor, CHRONI- 
CLE: Grace Oddie. Society Editor. CALL BULLE- 
TIN; Eve Jolly, Prudence Penny. " EXAMINER; and 
Dorothy Walker, Women's Editor. NEWS. . . . 



Friday, November?. 1958 



Over $4 Million in 
Industrial Expansion 

A total of 14,118,300 was committed in in- 
dustrial expansion for 107 projects by manu- 
facturing firms in San Francisco for the first 
eight months of this year, according to the 
Industrial Department of the San Francisco 
Chamber of Commerce. 

Cumulalive lolals lor llir firsl eishi nionlhs : 

20 New Plains S 413.500 123 Jobs 



107 Projecls 


$ 4.118,300 


Bay Region 
180 New Plants 
513 Expansions 


$ 16,625,400 
249,935,090 


693 Projects 


$266,560,490 


Northern California 
232 New Plants 
630 Expansions 


t 35,353,900 
263,570.090 


862 Projects 


$298,923,990 


S«n Froncisfo 
5 New Plants 
7 Expansions 


AUGUST. 1958 

S 61.000 
144.000 


12 Projecls 


S 205.000 


Bay Region 
41 Ne» Plants 
92 Expansions 


t 1.749.900 
24.679,340 


133 Projects 


$ 26,429.240 


Northern California 
51 New Plants 
104 Expansions 


$ 2,067.400 
25,117.340 



World Trade Brochure 

"More World Trade For Better Living in 
San Francisco Area" is the title of a brochure 
which has been published by the World Trade 
Department of the Chamber. 

The folder will be distributed to more than 
2,500 schools, libraries, foreign relations' 
groups and San Francisco Area World Trade 
Association members throughout Alameda, 
Contra Costa. Marin, Napa, San Francisco, 
San Mateo, Santa Clara, Solano and Sonoma 
counties. 



November 7 — TRANSPORTATION — Room 200, 
Chamber, 10:30 a.m. Guest speaker: Gerald Col- 
lins, Manager. Transportation Department, Chamber 
of Commerce of the United States: "Transportation 

November 1 1— SECOND CENTURY CLUB LUNCH- 
EON— Iron Duke Restaurant. 132 Bush Street, noon. 
November I I— TRAFFIC, SAFETY AND CONTROL 
—Driver Education Center, 552 McAllister Street, 
10:30-12:00 p.m. 

November 13 — HUMAN RIGHTS — Room 200, 
Chamber, 3:45 p.m. 

November 14-1 6— FISHERMAN'S FIESTA— 
November 19— RETAIL MERCHANTS ASSOCIA- 
TION BOARD— Press and Union League Club, 555 
Post Street, 8 a.m. 

November 21— REGIONAL PROBLEMS— Room 200, 
Chamber, 10:30 a.m. 

November 13-14 — INTER-CITY— Reno Goodwill 
trip, open to all Chamber Members. 
November 14— CANCCOCE LUNCHEON— Hunt 
Room, Fairmont Hotel, 12:30 p.m. 



BAY IISGION business: 



SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



ALAN K. BROWNE, President 

C. L. FOX. General Manager 

M. A. HOGAN, Secretary 

JAMES D. WARNOCK, Executive Editor 

JOSEPH I. HAUCHEY, Editor 

Published every other week by the San FranciBco Chamber 
of Commerce at 333 Pine St., San Franciico, Zone 4. 
County of San Francisco, California. Telephone EXbrook 
2-4511. (Non-member lubseripUon. t5.00 a year.) Second- 
class postage paid at San Francisco, Calif, 

Ciradation: 7,500 this s'ltue 



SALUTE TO SF INDUSTRY 




Library of Western Industry A Notable S.F. 'First' 

A new San Francisco publishing progrann of note is the Library of Western 
Industry, a book series which shows pronaise of evolving a significant composite 
"salute" to the energy and enterprise of America's industrial West. 

Embodying a new concept in organizational histories, the Library of West- 
ern Industry will devote each of its uniformly-styled volumes to an individual 
industrial organization whose progress is identifiable with the growth of the 
West. 

Already written and due for early publication are: "Line Haul" (the story 
of Pacific Intermountain Express) by Samuel W. Taylor, and the story of Cali- 
fornia fine wines, primarily identified with Paul Masson Vineyards (as yet 
untitled), by Alice Means Reeve and Lloyd Eric Reeve. Subsequent volumes in 
prospect, will honor other great names in the Pacific states. 

In addition to the continuing public relations value of component volumes 
— far exceeding any publicity or pamphlet program — it is the Library's aim 
that stories emphasize the inspirational overtones of subjects' acorn-to-oak 
growth — to captivate the imaginations and spur the ambitions of American 
youth. The series can do much to inspire career-minded youth, attract better 
brains and technicians to the western states, impress trade-minded organiza- 
tions at home and abroad with the acumen and vigor of industry in this area. 
Distribution to libraries, high schools and colleges is planned. 

Conceived and directed by Nathan A. Hurwitz, who has spent many years 
in book publishing, the Library of Western Industry is a division of Filmer 
Publishing Co. (W. Coy Filmer, President), 330 Jackson Street, San Francisco. 

Not only is the library a notable "first" emanating from San Francisco, 
it is also a first of its kind in the country. Unlike individually-published "com- 
pany histories" (which vie for attention with some 12,000 other books published 
in the U.S.A. each year) this series vouchsafes that the dramatic stories of 
Western enterprise shall stand side-by-side in a cumulative commemoration of 
Western accomplishment. 

All books in the Library will be of standard size (about 320 pages, replete 
with illustrative matter), attractively bound as members of a uniform set. All 
volumes will be encased in attractive multi-colored jackets. And all volumes will 
be embellished with lithographed front and back endsheets bearing a stylized 
montage reflecting western industry, especially designed for the Library of 
Western Industry by San Francisco artist Jim Forman. 



Hellenic Queen Press Club Cinerama Guest 



Frederika, Queen of the Hellenes, Princess 
Sophia, and members of their party, now tour- 
ing the United States, will be among the 
guests of honor at the Press Club dinner pre- 
ceding the northern California premiere of 
■"Cinerama South Seas Adventure" November 
25. 

The event, co-sponsored by the Chamber 
and the Club for the benefit of the PULC 



scholarship program, will be a black tie event. 
Also honored will be Christian A. Axelos, 
Consul General of Greece in San Francisco. 

A limited number of tickets for the dinner 
at $3.50 are available at the Chamber. Ext. 58. 
Theatre tickets at $2.00 and $3.00 are avail- 
able at the St. Francis Hotel box office or the 
Press Club. 







SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER 



BUSINESS 



VOLUME 15 • NUMBER 24 • NOVEMBER 21 1958 




PERT DIVA MERCURIC, 17-year old Mercy High 
School senior and daughter of a San Francisco 
fisherman, reigned as queen of the fiesta. Super- 
visor Alfonso J. ZIrpoli was Chairman of the Citizens 
Committee for the event. 

Japanese-U.S. Trade 
Subject of Discussion 

Heitaro Inagaki. President of the Japan 
Foreign Trade Council, spoke on '"Trade With 
Japan" at a luncheon honoring a 10-man 
Japanese trade mission yesterday noon in the 
Nob Hill Room of the Fairmcmt Hotel under 
the sponsorship of the San Francisco .\rea 
World Trade Association of the Chamber. 

"Japan depended upon the United States 
for 30 per cent of her total exports last year. 
Next to Canada, Japan is the largest importer 
of American products. Last year 40 per cent 
of her total imports came from the United 
States. 

"Remedying this serious imbalance of trade 
between the United States and Japan is one 
of the basic reasons for the Japan Trade Mis- 
.sion's visit," he said. 

The mission visited this country under the 
joint auspices of Foreign Minister .\iichiro 
Fujiyama and .Minister of International Trade 
and Industry Tatsunosnke Takasaki. 



San Francisco's First Annual Fisherman's 
Fiesta Acclaimed as "Highly Successful" 

San Francisco's first annual Fisherman's Fiesta ol)8er\int: the openinfi of the 
crab season ami honorinfr the colorful and sifrnificant conlrii)Uli<)ns of Fisherman's 
Wharf to the citv was hifihly succes-sful, acoordin;; to Richanj M. ()<hJie. Kxecutive 
Chairman of the Fiesta and Chairman of the Marketinfi and Sahs Promotion Com- 
mittee of the Chamljcr. 

"Public interest in the wharf and appre- 
ciation of its valorous fishermen and fine 
restaurants have never been higher." Oddie 
said. "The excellent coverage by the city's 
daily newspapers and other segments of press, 
radio and television made possible the great 
impact of the fiesta." 

All four dailies saluted the fiesta with 
special editorials pointing out how appropri- 
ate an annual event it was for the city, and 
most radio and television stations provided 
news coverage and public .service spot an- 
nouncements. 

NBC's MONITOR carried news of the 
fiesta into millions of homes throughout the 
country. 

"Members of the Fisherman's Wharf As- 
sociation and others on the wharf are to be 
commended for the close cooperation which 
made the event possible and for the promo- 
tion of San Francisco it accomplished through- 
out the country. 

"A special medal should be presented to 
Guy Cherney who steadfastly devoted him- 
self to the entertainment program in spite of 
some of the coldest winds ever to hit the 
area." 

Mayor George Christopher was Honorary 
Chairman : Supervisor Alfonso J. Zirpoli was 
Chairman of the Citizens Committee. 

Co-chairmen of the Fiesta were Cyril Mag- 
nin and Sil Oliva. Chairman of the Host Com- 
mittee for the Wharf was Reno Barsocchini. 

Members of the Citizens Committee were 
Frank Alioto, Alan K. Browne. Paul Can- 
nizzaro. Wendell B. Campbell. S. A. Cisler. 
Vice Adm. Maurice E. Curts, James Day, Rob- 
ert DiGiorgio. Lee Ettelson. Edwin P. Frank- 
lin, George Fuerst, W. Parmer Fuller, III. 
Nino Giraldi, Walter A. Haas. Phil J. Lasky. 
Harry A. Lee. Alan Lefilt. E. Vi . Littlefield, 
Carl Livinjision. Dan E. London. ]. W. .Mail- 
Hard. HI, E. D. .Maloney. William H. Mar- 
riott. Charles Mayer. 



Oddie Praised For 
Work as Chairman of 
Fisherman s Fiesta 

**San Francisco is fortunate inHt-ed 
to have many citizens inter^^lr^l in and 
devoted to the colorful institutions and 
qualities which 
make it unique 
among American 
cities," G. L. Fox. 
General Manager 
of the (Chamber, 
said yesterday. 

"A fine example 
is Richard M. Od- 
die, Chairman of 
the Marketing and 
Sales Promotion 
Committee of the 
Chamber, who 
served as Executive 
Chairman of the 
Fisherman's Fiesta, devoting many 
hours to the details which made it a 
success and working »nioolhl> with 
Sidney Keil, James ^ arnock and the 
many other individuals and organiza- 
tions whose cooperation made the event 
possible for the first time. 

"The congralulation> of the Cham- 
ber go to him for a job well done." 

Oddie is .\ssistant Nice President, 
Business Developmenl Deparlinenl of 
Bank of America N.T. X S. A. 




Richard M. Oddie 



MacPhee Farm-City Week Luncheon Speaker 



Chester R. MacPhee. Chief .\dministrative 
Officer and Chairman of the Regional Serv- 
ices Committee of the ('ity and County of .San 
Francisco, will be the principal speaker at 
the National Farm-City Week luncheon Tues- 
day noon. November 2.S, in the Venetian 
Room of the Fairmont Hotel, according to 
Jack T. Pickett. Ghairnian of the Chamber 
Aiiricultural Committee. 

Miss Carole Keppler. (California's Maid of 
(jitlon. will be an honored guest. 

rile luncheon is sponsored by the Agricul- 



tural Committee. Domestic Trade Committees. 
Industrial (j)mmittees. Transportation Com- 
mittee. Retail Merchant's .Vssociation and the 
.San Francisco .\rea World Trade Association 
of the Chamber. 

Tickets are obtainable either at the door. 
$.3.25 each, or at the Chamber, EXbrook 
2-4,SlL 

"In view of the especially powerful impact 
of agriculture on all segments of San Fran- 
cisco's economy, it is fitting that our Chamber 
committees concerned take cogni/anci- <d this 
obsiTvance." Pickett said. 



E. J. McCIanahan, Maj. Gen. Edward J. 
McGaw. Vincent P. McMurdo. Thomas J. 
Mellon. John H. Mitchell. William Pabst. 
Lieut. Gen. Charles D. Palmer. Norw<M)d J. 
Patterson. Louis Petri, William H. Quayle. 
Rear Adm. G. L. Russell. Albert E. Stliie>- 
inger. Charles Schneider. Harold S«f. David 
M. -Segal, Liimel Shatz. William D. Shaw. 
I.ou Simon. Dominirk (". Strazzullo. Benjamin 
II. Swig. Joseph C Tarantino. (!liarles de- 
Young Thieriot. Morion J. Wagner. R. W. 
Wassenberg and Maurice Webster. 

Sponsors, in addition to the Chamber, weri 
the City and County of San Francisco. Down 
Town .\ssociation. Fisherman's Wharf .Vsso- 
rialion. Northern California .Seafood Institute 
and the San Franci-co I'orl Authority. Co- 
operating were Californian> Inc. and the San 
Francisco Convention and Visitors Bureau. 

Co-ordination of the fiesta under Oddie'- 
rhairmansliip was iiandled by .Sidney H. Keil 
Manager of lh<- Cband>er's Domestic Trait> 
Department. Publicity was bandied by Janu- 
D. Warnock. Manager of the Publicity De- 
partment. Entertainment was arranged by 
(Turn lo page two) 



Friday. November 21,1 958 



Taxation Conference 
To Be Sponsored by 
CPA's and The Chamber 

An income tax conference covering many 
phases of taxation important to big business 
and small business alike is scheduled Thurs- 
day, December 11. 10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.. in the 
Terrace Room of the Fairmont Hotel under 
the co-sponsorship of the San Francisco Chap- 
ter of the California Society of Certified Public 
Accountants and the Chamber, according to 
G. L. Fox. General Manager. 

Panelists on the program include James E. 
Lane. Jr.. Henry T. Maschal. Louis H. Pen- 
ney, and John S. Perkins. Lorin A. Torrey. 
Mary E. Lanigar. Thomas S. Wood, James E. 
Hammond. Paul A. Kelson and Charles -\. 
Whitehead. 

Arrangements are being conducted by the 
Tax Section of the Chamber. F. B. Magruder. 
Chairman. 

Joseph M. Cullen, District Director, Inter- 
nal Revenue Service, and Ernest C. Wright. 
Regional Commissioner, Internal Revenue 
Service, will be luncheon speakers, noon, in 
the Gold Room of the Fairmont Hotel. 

Alan K. Brovme, President of the Chamber 
vv'ill open the morning session and preside at 
the luncheon. 

Introductory remarks are scheduled by Le- 
roy E. Schadlich, Chairman of the C.P.-A. 
Society's Committee on Taxation, and Herman 
H. Hoss, Vice Chairman of the Tax Section 
of the Chamber. 

Registrations at $6.00, including the lunch- 
eon session, are being bandied by the Cham- 
ber's Public Affairs Department, EX 2-4511. 
Extension 86. 

Fisherman's Fiesta 

( Continued from page one ) 

Tom Gray of the Down Town Association and 
Guy Cherney. 

About 8.000.000 pounds of the famous 
Dungeness crab are taken in record years, the 
best colonies being found off the coast of 
northern California between Monterey and 
Eureka and centering off the Golden Gate. 
The season opened November 15 and closes 
May 31, fishermen being allowed to take in 
their traps only male crabs measuring more 
than 7 inches in breadth. 

All types of fish and shell fish sold through 
the wharf amount to about $25,000,000 in an 
average year, according to the Institute. 



November 21— AVIATION & REGIONAL PROB- 
LEMS — Proposed Golden Gate Authority. Roorri 
200. Chamber, 10:30 a.m. 

November 21— NATIONAL DEFENSE RESOURCES 
CONFERENCE LUNCHEON — Invitational Vista 
Room, Whitccmb Hotel, 11:45 a.m. 
November 24— AIR POLLUTION SUBCOMMITTEE 
^Lewls M. Holland, Manager, Industrial Depart- 
ment, 1st Floor Conference Room. Chamber, 11:00 
a.m. 

November 24— GREAT GOLDEN FLEET— Council 
for Social Studies Cruise, San Francisco Yacht Har- 
bor. 3:00-5:00 p.m. 

November 25— MAID OF COHON & FARM CITY 
V/EEK LUNCHEON — Venetian Room Fairmont 
Hotel. 12 noon. 

December I— MANUFACTURERS — Commercial 
CLb, 465 California Street. 12 noon. 



Chambergraph No. 19 

HOUSING --VITAL IN REGIONAL GROWTH 

SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 
DWELUN6 UNITS UP 33 PERCENT IN 8 YEARS 

KILL TOP J. 500. 000 MARK DOTING 1959 




Approximate - First Quarter 
1950 coapletions not known; 
deaolitions not reported; 
soae area reports ineoaplele. 



3SS.262 NEW DWU.ING UNITS AimWRIZED IN EICKT YEARS 1950-1%7 
BRING UNIT TOTAL TO ABOUT 1.434.602 

All sections of the San Francisco Bay Region have experienced excep- 
tional growth since early in 1950 when the U. S. Census reported 1,079,340 
dwelling units in the I 3-county Region. Adequate housing for the new popula- 
tion is basic. 

Between January I, 1950 and January I, 1958. 355,262 new dwelling 
units were authorized for construction in the Bay Region. By the end of 1958 
the number will exceed 400,000 — enough for 1,200,000 persons at the 1950 
occupancy ratio. 

About one out of each four dwelling units In the Bay Region has been 
added during the 8-year period. Several counties far exceeded the I to 4 
ratio: in Santa Clara the relationship was I to 2.2. in San Mateo I to 2.5, in 
Sacramento I to 2.7 and in Contra Costa I to 3.1. 

San Francisco's housing growth per square mile for the eight-year period 
of 364.3 new dwelling units was over 3 times that of any other county and 
I I times the Region's average of 32.7 per square mile but ranked sixth in 
total new units authorized during these eight years. 



Wilderness Bill Opposed by Chamber 



A Senate bill which would establish a na- 
tional wilderness preservation system limiting 
the right of miners and prospectors in discov- 
ering and developing mineral and other nat- 
ural resources, has been opposed by the board 
of directors of the Chamber. 

Opposition to Senate Bill 4028. followed a 



recommendation of the Chamber .Mining com- 
mittee of which Laurance Kett is chairman. 

"Throughout the past the Western mining 
industry has been faced with the gradual en- 
croachment in highly mineralized areas of 
Federal land acquisitions, now totaling more 
than 400 million acres of land," Kett said. 



Friday, November 2 1. 1958 



Hitting the High Spots 



with JIM WARNOCK 

SAN FRANCISCO WAS REPRESENTED at the 

annual National Foreign Trade Convention in the 
Waldorf-Astoria by an information and hospitality 
center arranged through the cooperation of the 
San Francisco Port Authority, the Marine Exchange 
and the Chamber. Local foreign traders were rep- 
resented by Robert Taylor, President of the San 
Francisco Area World Trad© Association of the 
Chamber, and James F. Wilson. Manager of the 
World Trade Department. Two Port Authority staff 
officials, Don E. DeLone and Charles T. Soares, rep- 
resented the city's maritime industries. . , . 

SURPRISE BIRTHDAY 
GIFT from the Lone 
Star State for Alan K. 
Browne, President of 
■'"e Chamber, was a 
■ e-gal Ion Stetson 
•lown from Dallas in 3 
hours and 21 minutes 
aboard an American 
Airlines iet Boeing 
707. The hat was a 
gift of J. Erilt Jonsson. 
President of the Dallas 
Chamber of Com- 
merce, who had earli- 
er received a basket 
of California fruit and 
wine and a copy of 
trie recording "San 
i-iancisco — My En- 
chanted City" when American made a jet training 
flight to the Texas city. 

RON H. BAILEY, former District Manager m the 
Western Division of the Chamber of Commerce of 
the United States, has been named Manager of 
the Western Division with headquarters at 93C 
Santa Cruz Avenue, Menio Park, succeeding Lisle 
L. Berkshire. The announcement was made by /".rch 
N. Booth, Executive Vice President. . . . 
MAYOR LEN HARRIS of Reno, Bill Morgan, Presi- 
dent of the Reno Chamber of Commerce, and Bill 
Brussard, General Manager of the Reno C of C, 
hosted about 35 members of the Inter-City Section 
last weekend, according to Ivan Branson, Trip 
Chairman. The San Francisco contingent was also 
hosted by Harold's Club, Holiday Hotel, Riverside 
Hotel, Mapes Hotel and the Nugget in Sparks. 
Nev. Ernie Louie, owner of Lotus Cakes, presented 
four baskets of his product to Reno officials and 
four records of "San Francisco, My Enchanted 
City" were given as gifts to Reno officials. About 
60 Reno civic leaders hosted the Inter-City group 
at a luncheon last Friday at the Holiday Hotel. . . . 
THREE VALUABLE CHAMBER DIRECTORIES are 
now being offered for $5.00 to all those interested. 
They are "Large Manufacturers in the Bay Region," 
"San Francisco Manufacturers," and "Wholesalers 
and Branch Offices in San Francisco." To receive 
them, mall a check payable to the Chamber to 
Sidney Kell, Manager, Domestic Trade Depart- 
ment. . . . 





EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY officially dedicated 
the new headquarters of Its Pacific northern sales 
division at 3250 Van Ness Avenue (above) Novem- 
ber 10 with Alan K. Browne. President of the 
Chamber, and G. L. Fox, General Manager, attend- 
ing. Kodak has been a member of the San Fran- 
cisco business community for more than half a 
century. Architects for the building were Kitchen & 
Hunt and the contractor was Louis C. Dunn, Inc.. 
all of San Francisco. 



NORTHERN CALIFORNIA'S first International Im- 
ported Car Show opened Wednesday in Brooks 
Hall, Civic Center, and continues through Sunday, 
open II a.m. to 10 p.m. Forty famous Imported 
cars are displayed and the show also includes film 
showing, fashion shows, a concours d'elegance, a 
French sidewalk cafe, an English pub and displays 
of related products. Kjell H. Qvale, President of 
the sponsoring San Francisco Imported Car Dealers 
Association, points out that California ranks first 
In sales nationally, buying more than twice as many 
as New York State. 

MEMBERS OF THE CHAMBER Industrial Develop- 
ment Committee, headed by Frank P. Gomez, In- 
dustrial realtor and Chairman, and Lewis M. Hol- 
land. Manager of the Chamber Industrial Depart- 
ment, met with members of the Urban Land Insti- 
tute last week for a panel study of a proposed 
Crocker Industrial park. Attending the briefing 
session were Chamber members David D. Bohannon. 
President of the Urban Land Institute: Daniel T. 
Daggett, Southern Pacific Company: E. Elmore 
Hutchison, consulting engineer for the Crocker 
estate; Robin Hood, Coldwell, Banker & Company: 
and Fred J. Mahr, Pacific Gas & Electric Company. 
Chairman of the Briefing Session was W. F. Morton, 
Vice President and General Manager, Crocker- 
Huffman Land and Water Company. The ULI re- 
port will be available early next year. . . . 

LIVESTOCK SALES DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE 

of the Chamber had an increase of 40 donors and 
buyers of livestock at the Grand National Exposi- 
tion this year over last year, according to officers 
of the No. I -A District Agricultural Association. 
Out of the 181 persons or firms that purchased at 
the sale, more than 100 were those who participated 
at the urging of the Chamber Committee, Carl L. 
Garrison, Chairman. . . . 

CALIFORNIA MAID OF COHON for 1958 is 

Carole Keppler of UCLA, a 

resident of Los Angeles, who 

was presented to the I Ith 

Cotton Cotillion in Fresno 

recently. She will tour the 

state and be guest of honor 

at a Chamber luncheon at 

the Fairmont Hotel on No- ^ 

vember 25 observing Nation- W 1 

al Farm-City Week. She will ^ * 

represent California in the 

national contest in Memphis, 

Tenn. in January. 

THE CHAMBER'S AVIATION SECTION 

Newman, Chairman, previewed new je* * i 
being rushed to completion at International Air- 
port Monday, November 3. The Section inspected 
some of the hangars and other buildings being 
readied by such companies as American Airlines. 
Pan American World Airways, Inc., Trans World 
Airlines and United Air Lines and heard plans of 
BOAC, QANTAS, Japan Air Lines and others. 
Arrangements were made by Program Chairman 
George Rhodes. Barrett Transportation Company 
made a 45-passenger bus available for the occasion 
and a luncheon was held at the International Inn. . . . 

ALBERT F. ERNECKE. Commercial Counselor of 
the German Embassy, Washington. D. C. today 
was scheduled to talk on the European common 
market at a noon luncheon at the Commercial Club 
under the sponsorship of the San Francisco Area 
World Trade Association, Chamber affiliate. . . . 

CALIFORNIA PROFILE, an illustrated review of the 
state's economy published by Bank of America. Is 
being distributed now to business and Industrial 
executives and economists throughout the country. 
Making dramatic use of charts, maps and multi-col- 
ored photographs, the profile shows vividly the 
strength and growth of California's diversified pro- 
ductive activities. The 32-page brochure is the 
latest of several studies of economic trends pub- 
lished by the bank In recent years to inform the 
business world of the state's continuing develop- 
ment. . . 





ROY ROGERS AND DALE EVANS were met at 
San Francisco International Airport by J. W. 
Mailllard. Ill, President of the Cow Palace and 
Past President of the Chamber, when they arrived 
to telecast their November 9 Chevy Show using the 
rodeo cowboys and Canadian Mountles appearing 
in the Grand National. He presented them with a 
copy of "San Francisco — My Enchanted City." The 
show reached an estimated national audience of 55 
million, having one of the highest ratings in TV. The 
Grand National established a new attendance rec- 
ord of 173,687 — 15 per cent higher than 1957. More 
than $93,000 in prizes went to exhibitors of prize 
stock. 

COMMERCIAL INDUSTRIAL MANUFACTURERS 

have been invited to lease two Army Ordnance 
stand-by plants at Pittsburg and Riverbank, Colo- 
nel John S. Harnett, San Francisco District Army 
Engineer has announced. . . . 

EXTENSION of local air services from the San 
Francisco-Oakland, San Jose, Stockton and Sacra- 
mento segment to Reno, has been tentatively voted 
by the Civil Aeronautics Board, according to 
Charles C. Miller, Manager. Transportation Depart- 
ment of the Chamber. West Coast Airlines and 
Pacific Airlines would be expanded in an area en- 
closed by the Canadian border, the Pacific Coast 
and an arc through San Francisco, Reno. Salt Lake 
City, Boise and Spokane. 

CAPITAL BUSINESS SERVICE has opened an elec- 
tronic bookkeeping and tax service office for the 
small businessman at 2323 Polk Street. Source 
Information is recorded on a "sensimatic" tape 
through which a combination of Burroughs. Reming- 
•on Rand and IBM electronic data-processing 
equipment prints a complete profit and loss state- 
ment, a payroll summary, and a journal-ledger and 
balance sheet with these forms returned monthly 
to the businessman. . . . 

FINAL PLANS for the construction of a new 12- 
story, $12 million block-long headquarters building 
for American Trust Company, to front on California 
Street, have been an- , 
nounced by Harris C 
Kiric, the bank's presi 
dent. The steel and 
concrete structure wil 
be a single, fully in 
tegrated building a 
though it is beino 
constructed in tw, 
separate units. The 
first unit, now unde' 
construction at Sacra 
monto and Leidesdor** - 
Streets, Is scheduled 
for completion 1 r 
about five months. !• 
will serve as the bank ^ 
temporary head office 
while the second unit 
is being built. The sec- 
ond unit is expected to be finished early in 1961. 
The completed headquarters, which will include a 
new two-story building on Montgomery Street, will 
have a total floor area of about 400,000 square fee- 




AMERICAN TRUST 
Unit No. I 



Friday, November 2 1 . 1958 




SAFETY AWARD— Alan K. Browne, (center) Presi- 
dent of the Chamber, receives a plaque commemo- 
rating San Francisco's "state award of excellence" 
for "its outstanding effort" in last May's National 
Vehicle Safety Check. Making the presentation was 
Walter C. Lunsford, Regional Representative, Inter- 
Industry Highway Safety Committee, Washington, 
D.C. (left). On the right is F. Torres Weir, Chair- 
man of the Traffic Safety & Control Section of the 
Chamber Civic Development Committee. 

$327,965,979 Committed 
In Industrial Expansion 
For Northern California 

A total of $327,965,979 was committed in 
northern California industrial expansion dur- 
ing the first nine months of this year, accord- 
ing to the Industrial Department of the San 
Francisco Chamber of Commerce. 

787 projects in the 13-county San Fran- 
cisco Bay Region — Alameda. Contra Costa, 
Marin, San Francisco. San Mateo, Solano, 
Napa. Santa Clara, Sonoma. Sacramento. San 
Joaquin. Santa Cruz and Yolo counties — 
amounted to $283,607,584. San Francisco's 
share in the industrial expansion was $4.- 
352,400. 



Cumulative totals 
San Francisco 
2:-, New Plants 
100 Expansions 

12.1 Projects 
Bay Region 

214 New Plants 
573 Expansions 


STKIAL 
{or the 

SEP! 


EXPANSION REPORT 
6rst nine months : 

$ 487,600 
3,864,800 

S 4,332,400 

S 17,889,300 
265,718,284 


135 Jobs 
494 Jobs 

629 Jobs 


787 Projects 
\orthern Caliform 
27.-; .New Plants 
705 Expansions 


S283,607,584 

S 36,814,800 
291.151,179 




980 Projects 

San Francisco 

5 New Plants 
13 Expansions 


S327,96S,979 
EMBER, 19.58 

$ 74,100 
160.000 


10 Jobs 
28 Jobs 


18 Projects 
Bay Region 

31 New Plants 
60 Expansions 

y4 Projects 
Vorlfcern Catilorni 
43 New Plants 
75 Expansion. 


S 234.100 

$ 1.263.900 
15,783,194 

S 17,047,094 

S 1,460,900 
27.581.089 


38 Jobs 


118 Projeclt 


S 29,041,989 






'State Award of Excellence' Plaque Given 
To Chamber for Vehicle Safety-Check Work 

A '"State Award of Excellence" plaqu? for co-ordinating San Francisco's "out- 
standino; effort" in last May's National Vehicle Safety-Check for Communities has 
hvcn presented to the Chamber, aecordinfi to C L. Fox. General Manager. 

San Francisco, participating for the first time, was second only to Seattle in 
earning one of the two top "State Awards of Excellence" with more than 2,000 
cities and counties competing. 

Walter C. T,unsford. Regional Representa- 
tive of the Inter-Industry Highway Safety 
Committee. Washington. D.C. made the for- 
mal presentation of the plaque to Alan K. 
Browne. President of the Chamber, and F. 
Torres Weir, chairman of the Traffic .Safety 
& Control section of the Civic Development 
Committee. 

More than 35.000 vehicles were safely- 
checked in San Francisco during the week 
preceding the hazardous Memorial Day week- 
end. 

The National Board of Judges commended 
the Chamber "for an outstanding job in pub- 
licizing and co-ordinating a large number of 
civic, educational, military, industrial, busi- 
ness, automotive, insurance, youth and public 
officials into a working unit for safety-educa- 
tion and accident prevention." The program 
was credited with averting 12 traffic deaths 
during the first six months of this year com- 
pared to the same period last year. 

The local vehicle safety-check was spear- 
headed by the Traffic .Safety & Control Section 
of the Chamber in cooperation with the Cali- 
fornia Traffic Safety Foundation, the San 
Francisco Chapter of the National Safety 
Council. San Francisco Police Department. 
California Automobile Association. San Fran- 
cisco public and parochial schools. National 
Automobile Club. San Francisco Junior Cham- 
ber of Commerce and local business firms. 

"A major factor in the success of San 
Francisco's drive was the excellent publicity 
provided by the Chamber plus the fine co- 
operation of press, radio and television iii 
bringing home the importance of the program 
to the public," the Board of Judges reported. 



Highway & Bridge 
Section liUncheon Set 

Members of the State Highway Commission 
and state and city representatives will be 
guests of the Chamber's Street. Highway & 
Bridge Section at an informal luncheon today 
at Holiday Lodge in San Francisco. 

Oscar Fisher. Vice Chairman of the Section, 
will preside at the event which annually hosts 
city and state highway officials. Dan E. Lon- 
don, First Vice President of the Chamber, 
will repre.sent the Board of Directors. 



"MISS CINERAMA SOUTH SEAS" chosen by Roy 
Buell (left), PULC committeeman, and Dan E. 
London, First Vice President of the Chamber, is 
Margaret Cohan, QANTAS stewardess. She will be 
official hostess for the northern California premiere 
of the film at the Orpheum Theatre and the dinner 
preceding the showing co-sponsored by the Cham- 
ber and the Press Club November 25. Premiere 
tickets are available at the PULC, St. Francis Hotel 
ticket office and the Orpheum. 

Speegle to Author 
Book on Chamber 

The dramatic story of the San Francisco 
Chamber of Commerce — a saga of over 108 
years of problems and accomplishments inti- 
mately affecting the economic and civic life of 
the San Francisco Bay Region — is to be pub- 
lished as one of the books in the Library of 
Western Industry, it was announced recently 
by G. L. Fox. General Manager of the Cham- 
ber. 

Following the unanimous recommendation 
of its Publicity Committee, headed by John R. 
Little, the Chamber's Board of Directors ac- 
cepted an invitation by the Library of Western 
Industry to include the Chamber's story as 
one of the component volumes in the series 
which is dedicated to honoring the great names 
identified with the deveIoprr(ent of America's 
industrial West. 

Paul Speegle. featured columnist for the 
San Francisco CALL-BULLETIN, has been 
commissioned by the Library to write this im- 
portant book, tentatively scheduled for publi- 
cation in the early Fall of 1959. 

Alan K. Browne. President of the Chamber, 
expressed "extreme enthusiasm about the 
project" which, in his opinion, "will fill a 
long-felt need." 



BAY IISGION mJSTN'ESS 



SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



ALAN K. BROWNE, President 
C. L. FOX, General Manager 
M. A. HOGAN, Secretary 
JAMES D. WARNOCK, Executive Edito 
JOSEPH I. HAUGHEY. Editor 
ry other week by the San F 



Published 

of Comm 

County of San Fran 

2-4511. (Non-member subtci 

clas< postage paid at San Fi 



St.. 
Califo 



lia. Telepho 
$5.00 a ye; 
o. Calif. 



Circulation: 7,500 this i 



e EXbroolc 



Y 



SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER 




BUSINESS 



VOLUME 15 • NUMBER 25 • DECEMBER 5, 1958 




PETER TCHAIKOVSKY'S "Nutcracker Suite," a traditional Christmas "must" with the San Francisco 
ballet, will be performed for the 13th straight year this December at the V/ar Memorial Opera House. 

CITTS BALLET GAINS INTERNATIONAL FAME 

S-an Francisco's ballet, oldest in America, has become internationally celebrated. 

Directed by Lew Christensen — considered America's most creative choreogra- 
pher — the group has won world-wide fame for its artistry and imaginative repertoire. 

Christensen, who has written more than 60 ballets — including "Jinx," "Con 
Amore," and "The Dryad," to name a few of his most popular works — is credited with 
giving the company a repertory second to none in the country. Other choreographers 
whose works are extensively used are George Balanchine, credited with having more 
Impact on the terpsichorean art in modern times than anyone else In the field, and 
William Dollar, also nationally known. 

The eurhythmy of the company is scored to the works of such composers as 
Bach, Mendelssohn, Mozart, Schubert, Rossini, Tschaikow- 
sky, Vivaldi, Stravinsky and Benjamin Britten. The English 
composer Sir Arthur Bliss recently created music for a new 
ballet, "The Lady of Shallot," commissioned by the Uni- 
versity of California. 

Founded in 1933, the ballet company began to make 
a name for Itself in the first years of existence under Adolph 
Bolm, its first choreographer. Bolm was succeeded by Serge 
Oukrainsky in 1936 who appointed William Christensen as 
"premier danseur." 

Christensen made the ballet a full-scale organization. 
He added the evening-long ballet by presenting such works 
as "Coppeiia," "Swan Lake," and "The Nutcracker" in their 
entirety. 

"The Nutcracker" was so popular it was added as an 
annual Christmas event. This year it will be presented Sun- 
day, December 21, and Monday, December 22, at 2 p.m., 
and Wednesday, December 24 at II a.m. in the War 
Memorial Opera House; and at Stanford, December 24 at 
2:45 p.m. "Beauty and The Beast" is scheduled Friday, De- 
cember 19, at 8:30 p.m., and Saturday, December 20, at 
2 p.m. at the Opera House. 

In January 1957, the ballet company took a 10-week, 
35,000-mile tour of I I Asian nations which rocketed it to 
the forefront of the international dance world. The ballet 
performed before the King of Thailand, Madame Chiang 
Kai-shek, the Governor General of Hong Kong, the Prime 
Minister of Burma, the late President of the Philippines (Ramon Magsaysay) and the 
King of Cambodia. Commented the Singapore Tiger Standard: "They looked like an 
exotic flock of graceful, long-legged egrets." 

Earlier this year the company toured 14 Latin American countries. In January the 
ballet will take off on a four-month I I -nation tour of the Middle East. 

The ballet features from 55 to 100 dancers for each local performance (aug- 
mented by personnel from the San Francisco Ballet School), and about 45 musicians 
from the San Francisco Symphony under the direction of Earl Murray, Associate Con- 
ductor of the orchestra. 




DANCERS Sukl Schorer, 
Gerrie Bucher. Eugenia Van 
Horn and Tlilie Abbe pose 
in front of a monument 
marking the equator in 
Quito. Ecuador. 



Agriculture's Vital 
luiportauce to State 
Subject of Brochure 

■'Agriculture's Vital Importance in Califor- 
nia's Economy" is the title of a brochure is- 
sued by the Chamber in co-operation with 
licgional .Service Committee of the City and 
(bounty of San Francisco. 

The brochure, conlainins! an address by 
Roger Jessup, California's "Livestock Man of 
the Year," has been mailed to more than 
2.000 chambers of commerce, farm organiza- 
tions, newspapers and publications thtough- 
out Northern California. 

Copies also were distributed at the Farm- 
City luncheon last week in the Venetian Room 
of the Fairmont Hotel which featured a talk 
by Chester R. MacPhee. Chief Administra- 
tive Officer and Chairman of the Regional 
Services Committee. 

Miss Carole Keppler, California's Maid of 
Cotton, and UCLA co-ed. was honored at the 
luncheon. 

Facts gleaned from the booklet: 

• California, which has 139.000 farms or 
ranches, is the leading agricultural state in 
the nation; 

• It also is the leading state in slaughter- 
ing of cattle with its 131 slaughtering estab- 
lishments; a total of 2^2 million head of 
cattle and 764.000 head of calves were slaugh- 
tered last year. 

• This state also tops all other states in 
dairy producing: its products for a single 
year have a retail value of $600 million: 

• California also has the largest fruit pack- 
ing shed in the world (in Placer County I 
and the largest winery in the world I in Ma- 
ilera County I ; 

• Fanners in this state have an income 
2'/2 times greater than the national average; 

• University of California at Davis is the 
leading agricultural college in the nation. 

Leivis HoUdiui (^oos East 
For Industrial Coufereme 

Lewis M. Holland. 
Manager of the Indus- 
trial Department of the 
("hand)er. is m Chicago 
to attend a nu'i-ting d 
the American Industri.il 
Development ("ounci I 
Hoard of Dinvturs to 
morrow. 

Today Holland al>.. 
will interview represent- 
atives of industrial tirm- 
intere~ted in establish- 
ing plants in the Ka> 
Xrea. He return- Sunilu\. 




Lewis M. Holland 



Friday, December 5, 1958 



S.F. Business Activity Sets Record 
For First 10 Months and for October 



Many factors combined to make Oct 
month of the year and the best Octobe 
Department of the Chanil)er. Nearly 
topped last October's levels by frood marg 
activity to a new all time record for this p 

Tilt' Chaniher business activity index for 
Oct(ii)cr of 16S.1 surpassed last October by 7.2 
per cent. The 10-month average of 153.3 edged 
the same period last year by 0.5 per cent. 

Sharing in the October year-to-year gains in 
San Francisco were: the construction permits 
value authorized, up 24.7 per cent : real estate 
deeds recorded. 8.0 per cent: retail depart- 
ment store sales. 7.6 per cent; bank debits. 
8.5 per cent; number of shares traded on the 
Pacific Coast Stock Exchange. 68.8 per cent 
and their market value, 212.6 per cent ; freight 
car movements. 11.5 per cent; San Francisco 
Airport plane traffic. 4.2 per cent; passenger 
traffic. 6.2 per cent; air mad poundage, 18 per 
cent; and air freight. 12.2 per cent. Truck 
movements were up 7.3 per cent; Port of San 
Francisco revenue tonnage, 2.0 per cent; Bay 
Bridge vehicle traffic, 8.2 per cent; and Gold- 
en Gate Bridge vehicle traffic, 8.6 per cent. 
Commercial failures were fewer by 8.3 per 
cent. 

Major fields sharing in gains for the first 
10 months compared to the similar period last 
year were: construction permit value. 16.3 per 
cent; bank debits, 0.7 per cent; stock ex- 
change transaction shares, 10.7 per cent; and 
market value. 29 per cent. 

Commercial failures were down to 97 com- 
pared to 127 last year. Airport passenger traf- 
fic increased 3.6 per cent; air mail. 10.9 per 
cent; and air freight, 1.4 per cent. 

Truck movements rose 3.1 per cent; ship 
arrivals, 0.9 per cent; electrical energy sales, 
3.3 per cent; industrial and commercial water, 
0.6 per cent; vehicle crossings over the Bay 
Bridge, 6 per cent; and Golden Gate Bridge. 
5 per cent. 

Financial transactions in the Bay Region 
amounted to $6,795,254,000 in October or 
$517,930,000 above a year ago (an increase of 
8.2 per cent). The 10-nionth cumulative trans- 
actions of $64,793,387,000 topped the same 
period last year by $1,350,240,000, or 2.1 per 
cent, and accounted for 33.51 per cent of the 
12th Federal Reserve District transactions 
compared to 33.62 per cent last year. 

The nine-county Bay Area — Alameda. Con- 
tra Costa, Marin, San Francisco, San Mateo, 
Solano, Napa, Santa Clara and Sonoma — 10- 
months' total construction value amounted to 
1632,900,000 or $92,481,000 above last year 
(a rise of 17 per cent). The number of dwell- 
ing units authorized in tliis area totaled 34,299 
compared to 25.978 in the 10-month period 
last year. Of the total, 4,035 were authorized 
in October, 47.4 per cent more than last 
October. 

October employment in the six-county San 
Francisco-Oakland Metropolitan Area — Ala- 
meda, Contra Costa, Marin. San Francisco. 
San Mateo and Solano— totaled 1.099.900 per- 
sons, only 700 below the September peak and 
4,800 below October of last year. 

Five industry groups reported employment 
above last year in October: contract construc- 



obcr business in San Francisco the best 
on record, according; to the Research 
very major field of activity in October 
ins and also carried the 1958 ten months* 
eriod. 

tion was up 5.2 per cent; finance, insurance 
and real estate. 0.7 per cent; retail trade, 0.2 
per cent; service, 1.8 per cent; and govern- 
ment, 3.8 per cent. Three groups fell below a 
year ago: manufacturing. 4.7 per cent; trans- 
portation, communication and utilities. 4.2 per 
cent; and agriculture. 2.9 per cent. 

October unemployment, in terms of the total 
labor force, amounted to 4.2 per cent com- 
pared to 4.7 per cent in September and 3.0 
per cent in October last year. 

Wholesale sales of Pacific Coast merchant 
wholesalers in September (latest available) 
were five per cent above a year ago. The nine 
months' sales were off two per cent. In the 
nation, sales gained five per cent over a year 
ago but were down nine per cent for the year 




through September. 

.Septemlier sales on the Pacific Coast were 
up in 12 out of 15 groups. Automotive equip- 
ment was up 11 per cent; electrical apparatus, 
14 per cent; furniture and home furnishings, 
8 per cent; hardware, 14 per cent; plumbing 
and heating equipment, one per cent; and 
lumber and construction materials, 18 per 
cent. 

Dry goods sales were off one per cent; in- 
dustrial and machinery, 10 per cent; fresh 
fruit and vegetables remained the same. 



Business Activity Through October, 1958 



BRANCH OF ACTIVITY 



•GENERAL BUSINESS ACTIVITY INDEX.. 



CONSTRUCTION PERMITS _.._ Total Nu 



Residential, New _ _ 

Dwelling Units 

Single-family units. New , 

Non-residential, New 

Additions, Alterations and Repairs 

Nine county dwelling units authorized- 

REAL ESTATE— Deeds Recorded 



Value 
..Value 



..Number 
..Number 



•RETAIL DEPARTMENT STORE SALES _.._ _ Index 

FINANCE— Bank Debits _.. $000 

Postal Receipts -_ -.. - - —.$ 

Pacific Coast Stock Exchange Shares traded 

Market value $ 

COMMERCIAL FAILURES _ Number 

INDUSTRY TREND— 4 County Total Employment _ 

Mfg. Average Weekly Earnings _.._ - - (earnings) $ 

Manufacturing (employment) 

Construction, contract 

Finance, insurance, real estate 

Retail trade " 

Wholesale trade " 

Service 



Agriculture 

Govt. — Federal, 
Other _ 



& utilities... 



465,670 

1,846,662 

4,035 



4,436,459 8.5 

3,222,278 15.6 

4.685,593 68.8 

89,674,021 212.6 

II —8.3 

l,099,900(p) —0.4 

101.42(a) 3.5 

2l4,400(p) —4.7 

72.300(p) 5.2 

69,IOO(p) 0.4 

I76,700(p) 0.2 

80.300(p) —0.2 

249,900(p) 1.8 

ll7,50O(p) —^.7 

23,300(p) —2.9 

93,500(p) 3.8 

2,900(p) 0.0 



TRANSPORTATION— Freight car movement 

S. F. Airport— Planes In and Out 

Passengers Off and On 

Air Mail Loaded and Unloaded 

Air Express Loaded and Unloaded 

Air Freight Loaded and Unloaded 

Rail Express Shipments 

Area.. 



..Number 
..Number 

Lbs. 

....Lbs. 

Lbs. 

...Number 
..Index 



Out-of-State passenger car entries into No. Calif Number 

PORT OF SAN FRANCISCO— Revenue Tons_, 
Coastwise — 

Intercoastal 



..Revenue tons 



Inland Waterway 
Foreign 



14,508 

11,390 

321,178 

3,692,596 

700,109 

8 921,086 

76,491 

184.3 

(n) 

507,794 
6.941 
29.035 
179,363 
292,455 



11.5 



CARGO VESSELS (San Francisco Bay) 

Arrivals 

Millions of Registered Tons 



UTILITIES— Ind. & Comm. Gas Sales... 

•Elec. Energy Sales, K.W. Hours 

Water Consumption— Comm. & Ind.. 



..Cu. Ft. 



I 028,693,500 

148.9 

173,477 500 



NEW DEVELOPMENTS 

Visitor and Newcomer Inguiries 

Bay Bridge Vehicle Crossings 

Golden Gate Bridge Vehicle Crossings 

FRUITS & VEGETABLE RECEIPTS... 

LtVESTOCK SLAUGHTER (Insp. Dists.) 

•S. F. CONSUMER PRICE INDEX— All Items. 

(1947-49 Monthly Average=IOO) 



..Number 
.Number 
..Number 

...Carlots 

-Number 



15.8 
— 1.0 



3) Sept. latest; (b) 9 



4,175 
I03,000(a) 
128.4(a) 4.0 
,.; (c) Mar.-June-Sept. 



9,738 
70.908,699 
27,837,528 



23,823,446 

19,247,725 

34,299 



41,502,846 
26,430,486 
31,757,784 
643,701,618 



l,075,430(p) 

~266?675(p) 
67,0301 p) 
68,550(p) 
I73.300(p) 
79,920(p) 
245,3601 p) 
Il7,l00(p) 
I9,300(p) 
93,000(p) 
2,580(p) 

1 22 739 

106,831 

3,029,887 

32.060,114 

6,629,729 

70,502,503 

687,984 

163.9 

(n) 

4,707,962 

67,143 

301 ,076 

1,705,463 

2,634,280 



1.066, 234. lOO 

151.7 

,632.703,000 



16,289 
30,135,291 
14,084,175 

39,418 
894.000(b) ■ 
127.7(c) 
,v.: (n) not av 



0.5 

— 1.2 
16.3 

102.4 
54.8 
12.8 

— 1 1.0 

— 10.3 
32.0 

—2.5 



(p) preliminary. 



but 



able 



upon regu 
RESEARCH DEPARTMENT, SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



Friday, December 5, 1958 



Hitting the High Spots 



with JIM WARNOCK 

NEW CHRISTMAS TREE GIFT CERTIFICATE plan 
for business and manufacturing firms is being offered 
this year by the Guardsmen as a feature of their 
annual drive. Firms may purchase certificates for 
their employees in any amount to be exchanged for 
trees at the lot at Bush and Divisadero. For informa- 
tion call sutler I -6785. . . . 

SWEET EXECUTIVE, original musical comedy by 
Richard Arnold of Consultants, Inc. and Ray Hack- 
ett, will be presented December II, 12 and 13 at 
the Alcazar Theatre by the Junior League of San 
Francisco to augment the League's Community 
Trust Fund. More than 100 San Francisco firms are 
listed as "angels " of the production and many area 
businessmen are members of the cast. Tickets may 
be reserved at Sherman Clay at $6. $4 and $2. 
Those attending any of the performances may make 
reservations to attend a gala party for the cast at 
the Sheraton-Palace Hotel after the final perform- 
ance on December I 3. . . . 

ROBERT L. KING, Executive Director, VIII Wlntei 
Olympics Organizing Committee, San Francisco, 
will speak on the I960 Olympic Games today be- 
fore the Travel and Recreation Section of the Call 
fornia State Chamber of Commerce in the Nob 
Hill Room of the Fairmont Hotel. . . . 
NIKKO, $250,000 suklyaki restaurant, recently 
opened at Van Ness and Pine and has been herald- 
ed as one of the most beautiful restaurants to open 
in San Francisco in many years. Luncheon prices 
start at $1.00 and dinner from $2.00. . . . 
NATIONAL OFFICERS of Stecher-Traung Lithe 
graph Corporation convened at the Mark Hopkini 
Hotel on Monday for their annual week-long execu- 
tive session to be followed tomorrow by a directors' 
meeting. Representing the firm's San Francisco divi- 
sion are R. J. Wrenn, President: Leo A. Blank. Vice 
President, Sales: and Frank Sheedy, Vice President, 
Production. . . . 

CLIFF ENGLE, top-rated Don Lee newscaster and 
commentator, has been appointed KFRC News DI 
rector effective January 5. it was announced by 
KFRC General Manager, Wendell B. Campbell. . . . 
SECRETARY OF STATE John Foster Dulles deliv- 
ered a major policy address yesterday at the Fair 
mont Hotel before the thirty-first annual meeting 
of the California State Chamber of Commerce. . . . 
SAN FRANCISCO'S NEWEST AND VIEWIEST 
banquet and convention facility, the Whitcomb 
Hotel's Vista Room overlooking City Hall and 
Civic Center, was recently opened by Karl C 
Weber, President and General Manager of the 
hotel. With approximately 7000 square feet of 
space, the room will provide dining area for 500 
and meeting facilities for nearly 1000 people, it is 
available for dances, receptions, banquets, parties 
and all types of meetings. Completely enclosed by 
glas?, it runs the entire length of the hotel's top 
floor fronting on Market Street. . . . 
TENTH ANNIVERSARY of the signing of the Unl 
versal Declaration of Human Rights, guaranteeing 
freedom, justice and equality to all people every 
where regardless of race, religion or national origin 
will be observed December 10 in Nourse Auditorium 
under the sponsorship of the Bay Area Human Rela- 
tions Clearing House with 35 civic, religious, labor 
and other groups acting as co-sponsors. Key speaker 
will be Mike Wallace, nationally-known television 
personality. . . . 

HAMILTON FIELD will hold an open house Sunday 
from I p.m. to 5 p.m. celebrating the 1 0th anni- 
versary of the Continental Air Command (ConAC) 
and saluting the 349th Troop Carrier Wing, the only 
flying reserve unit of the Air Force in northern 
California. The "Ready Reserve" or "Weekend 
Warriors" will participate in a "fly-over." F-SO's, 
F-84's, C-46's and C-ll9's ("Flying Boxcars") wiP 
be flown, according to Doug Cronin, Project Officer 
of the Reserves. . . 



NEW MEMBERS OF THE CHAMBER 




Don W. MeColly G. R. Concannon Francis E. Kelley Samuel S. Mete Jack R. Wain 

New members recently added to the Chamber roster include the above (left to 
right I : Don W. McColly, President and Oeneral Manager. If'ine Institute; George R. 
Concannon. Community and Industrial I'ropfrtirs : Francis K. Kelley. Vice President. 
International Fund-Raising Institute; .Samuel S. .Mete. Vice President. Shojijiers' Phone 
Service; and Jack K. Wain. Jack Wain & Comf>any. Public Kelati<ms. 



*'. . . 'Sun Fruncisco is not 
herself only. She is not only the 
most interesting city in the 
Union, and the hugest smelting- 
pot of races and the precious 
metals. She keeps, besides, the 
doors of the Pacific. . . . " 

— Robert Louis Stevenson 



CHARLES A. ANDERSON, former Assistant Man- 
ager In The Chamber Industrial Department, has 
been appointed Executive Director of Monterey 
County Industrial Development, Inc., according to 
Jack Ogilvie, President of the organization. . . . 

A TOUR OF freeways now under construction in 
San Francisco followed a luncheon of the Chamber 
Street. Highway & Bridge Section recently at Holi- 
day Lodge, Oscar H. Fisher, Jr., Vice Chairman. 
Guests included T. Fred Bagshaw, recently appoint 
ed Director, Department of Public Works, and 
Chairman of the California Highway Commission: 
Chester R. MacPhee, Chief Administrative Officer 
City and County of San Francisco; Dan E. London, 
First Vice President of the Chamber; B. W. Booker. 
Assistant State Highway Engineer, District IV; and 
Norman C. Raab, Chief of Division, Division of S. F. 
Bay Toll Crossings, and other notables. . . . 

1958 KNOW YOUR AMERICA WEEK, devoted to 
an interpretation and study of the basic principles 
of American democracy as contrasted to commu- 
nist and other totalitarian Ideologies and sponsored 
nationally by the All-American Conference to Com- 
bat Communism, was recently observed in San 
Francisco, which last year won the award for the 
finest community celebration of the 4,500 held in 
American cities and towns. John H. Milhollen was 
chairman. . . . 

MORTON J. WAGNER, Executive Vice President 
of Bartell Family Radio, has assumed general man- 
agement of KYA. The announcement was made b\ 
Gerald A. Bartell, President of the nationwide 
broadcasting corporation. Wagner will retain super- 
vision of radio stations WAKE in Atlanta, WILD in 
Boston and WYDE In Birmingham, in addition to 
managing KYA. He is a veteran of sixteen years in 
broadcasting and has been a Bartell Family Radio 
executive since 1952. . . . 

WESTERN INDUSTRIAL EMPIRE, new monthly 
magazine published by the long-established CALI- 
FORNIA INDUSTRIAL PURCHASING GUIDE of 
Los Angeles, is devoted to subject mat+er of Inter- 
est to executives in some thirty major industries now 
vigorously growing throughout the-West. . . 



FIRST ARTIFICIALLY REFRIGERATED speed ska- 
Ing rink tc be used in Olympic competition, po^ 
ered by Westinghouse equipment built in Sunny- 
vale, is being readied for the I960 games at Squaw 
Valley. Electrical and mechanical engineers for the 
California Olympic Commission are Vandament & 
Darmsted of San Francisco. The architects are Cor- 
lett & Spackman. A.I.A., and Kitchen & Hur- 
A.I.A 

STANDARD OIL COMPANY of California has an 
nounced plans to award in 1959 more than $175,000 
In unrestricted grants to 34 private colleges in the 
United States. The grants supplement the broad 
program of scholarships, fellowships, scientific 
grants and special services already included in !• 
general program of aid to education. . . . 

SUTRO & CO.. pioneer investment brokers, has 
appointed Honig-Cooper, Harrington & Miner as 
its advertising agency effective January I. . . . 

JAPAN FOOD CORPORATION recently came 
Into being with a capitalization of $1 million as a 
merger of Modern Food Products Company. Pacific 
Mutual Sales. Inc., and others. With headquarters 
here, branch offices will continue to be maintained 
In Los Angeles, Chicago and New York. . . . 

CONSTRUCTION IS NEARING COMPLETION on 

the new main West Coast sales office of the Morton 
Salt Co. In Burlingame. Architects are Weltoo 
Becket & Associates of San Francisco in assocla 
tion with Marvin G. Probst of Chicago. Contractc- 
are Swinerton & Walberg o' San Francisco. . . . 

Air Pollution Group 
Formed by Chamber 

An Air Pollution Control Subcommittee, 
composed of five key men. has been formed 
by the Chamber, according to Lewis .M. Hol- 
land. Manager of the Industrial Department. 

"The purpose of the Subcommittee is to in- 
sure proper and effective contnds while pro- 
tecting industry against the possibility of un- 
reasonable regulations." Holland said. 

Members include John O. Ciprico. Design- 
Engineer. Manufacturing Department. Stand- 
ard Dil Co. of California, and a memlier of 
the ("handier Technical Projects Committee: 
George .\. Davidson, a Director and Vice Pres- 
ident of Standard Oil; K. P. Jagels. General 
-Manager of Standard Realty & Development 
Co. ( subsidiary of Vi estern Pacific t and a 
mendier of the Chamlwr Industrial Develop- 
ment ("onimittee: Herbert R. Lutz. Resident 
Manager. The .\uslin Company: and B. J 
Osborne, .\ssistanl to the Nice President. K.i 
ser Steel Corporation, and a memlier of ihi 
(Chamber Manufacturers (^immittee. 



Friday, Decembers, 1958 






WHEN UNITED AIR LINES recently dedicated a 
new jet hangar at San Francisco Iniernat'onal Air- 
port, part of a $4,000,000 Jet maintenance center 
projected by the tine, it also displayed one ot 40 
long-range DC-8 iet liners (above) ordered at a 
cost of $175,000,000. The plane will go into regular 
service next summer, carrying I I 6 to 151 passengers 
coast-to-coast in 4.5 hours. American Airlines also 
recently displayed the first of 30 Boeing 707 jet 
liners (below) at the airport and has begun a series 




of training and cargo flights throughout the coun- 
try. The plane is scheduled to enter non-stop cross- 
country service between New York and California 
before the end of the year. Six 707's are in trans- 
Atlantic service for Pan American World Airways, 
which expects to start trans-Pacific service using the 
DC-8 late in 1959. 




PART OF FACILITY EXPANSION in the area of 
the airport is a $3 million "fly in" hotel, to be built 
by Hyatt House Hotels on a ten-acre site just north 
of the Broadway-Burllngame overpass of the Bay- 
shore Freeway. Construction of the ultra-modern. 
300-room hotel is expected to be completed in 
April. 



San Francisco's Fleishhacker Pool is the 
longest in the world and contains 6,000,000 
gallons of warm salt nater. 

Calijornia's 48 northern counties have 62 
per cent of the State's farm product sales, 70 
per cent of the farms, 74 per cent of orchard 
land, and 57 per cent of the livestock and 
livestock products sales. 



BAY 3<EGION BUSINESS 



SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



Income Tax Conference, Sponsored by 
C.P.A.'s and Chamber, Slated Thursday 

"How Your Tax Return is Processed I)y the Intrnial Revenue" will be dis- 
cussed Thursday. 12:15 p.m.. in the Gold Room, Fairmont Hotel, at the 1958 In- 
come Tax Conference luncheon, sponsored by the Chamber and the San Francisco 
Chapter of The California Society of Certified Public Accountants. 

Discussinjr the subject will l)e Ernest C. Wripht. Re^onal Commissioner. 
L'nited States Internal Revenue Servire. and 



Josep)i M. Cullen. District Director of the 
IRS. 

Spealvers at the morning session, in the 
Terrace Room of the Fairmont. 10 a.m. to 
noon, will include John S. Perkins of Peat. 
Marwick. Mitchell & Co.. who will discu.ss 
"Travel. Entertainment, and Other Business 
Expenses"; Henry T. Maschal. Harris. Kerr. 
Forster & Co.. "The Effect of Tax Laws on 
Business Expansion": James E. Lane. Jr.. 
Arthur Andersen & Co.. "Recent Experiences 
With Administration of the 19.54 Internal 
Revenue Code": and a panel of tax experts, 
including Mary E. Lanigar of Arthur Young 
& Company. Lorin A. Torrey of Ernst & 
Ernst and Thomas S. Wood of Barlow. Davis 
& Wood, who will discuss "19.58 Changes in 
the Federal Tax Law." 

In the afternoon session. 2 to 3:30 p.m. 
in the Terrace Room. Louis H. Penney of L. 
H. Penney & Co. will discuss "Death and 
Taxes." A paneL consisting of James E. Ham- 
mond of Skinner & Hammond. Paul A. Kel- 
-on of Price Waterhouse & Co. and Charles 
X. Whitehead of Haskins & Sells, will discuss 
"Increasing the Compensation for Executive 
Personnel." 

Program Moderator will be Leroy E. Schad- 
lich of Touche. Niven. Bailey & Smart. 

The conference is a project of the Cham- 
ber's Tax Section. F. B. Magruder. chairman. 



Businessmen Asked to 
Visit Tokyo Trade Fair 

A letter from Seichiro Yasui. Governor of 
Tokyo Metropolis, inviting local businessmen 
to attend the International Trade Fair this 
coming May. has been received by G. L. Fox. 
General Manager. 

A visit to the Fair is planned as a highlight 
of the San Francisco Area World Trade Asso- 
ciation Business Development Tour of Asia 
.\pril 19 to May 15. according to Roltert Tay- 
lor. SFA\^TA President. 



'Sational Conference of 
Christians and Jeivs to 
Hold 25th Anniversary 

Plans are under way to celebrate the 25th 
year of existence of the San Francisco re- 
gional office of the National Conference of 
Christians and Jews. February 15-22. 

San Franciscans ser\'ing as national officers 
include: 

James F. Twnhy. National Co-Chairman; Cvril Magnin. 
Chairman o( the National Extension Program; Andrew J. 
Lynch. Joseph P. Williams and Benjamin H. S»ig. Re- 
gional Co-chairmen; Karl Bennett Justus. National Viee- 
Presidenl: Dr. Watt A. Long, Director of Education: Ed- 
ward J. Harris. Direelor of Public Relations; and Frederick 
J. Kosler. Honorary Chairman. 

San Franciscans on the Executive and Ad- 
visory Committee are: 

Ivan Anixler. Paul A. Bissinger, Governor-Elect Edmund 
G. I Pat I Brown. Jesse C. Colman, Don Faiackerley. Mortimer 
Fleishhacker. W. Parmer Fuller. III. Randolph A. Hearst. 
George KUlion. Daniel E. Koshland. Thomas J. Mellon. 
T. S. Petersen, Judge Daniel R. Shoemaker. Richard L. 
Sloss. J. Joseph Sullivan, J. F. Sulliian. Jr.. Karl C. Weber, 
J, D. Zellerbach. Rev. Asa Davis. Judge Lenore Underwood, 
Jacob Shemano, Stuart Creenberg. Mrs. Maurice Goldman, 
I.lovd W. Dinkelspiel. Judge Walter Carpeneti. Dr. Lloyd 
Luckman. Nil Schmulowilz, Joseph Blumenfield, J. Eugene 
McAleer. Rabbi Bernard Ducoff. Mrs. Marion L. Mayers, 
James Slralton. Mrs. A. S. Musante. Lucy Amerson. Albert 
Colegrove, William Dempsev, Don Mozley. Robert Naify. 
James Srhwabarher. Eugene Block. Mayor George Chris- 
topher and Gerild A. Awes. 

Requests for data on the conference wiU be 
fulfilled at the National Conference of Chris- 
tions and Jews. 703 Market .Street. Suite 815. 
EXbrook 2-7742. 



(?^aw^ dcUendcifi 



-Ter 



December 9— AGRICULTURAL LUNCHEON- 

race Room. Fairmont Hotel, 12:00 p.m. 
December 9— FISHERMAN'S FIESTA— Dilvlaggio's 
Restaurant, 3:00 p.m. 

December 10— SPACE CONFERENCE— Room 200 
Chamber, I 1:00 a.m 

December 1 1 — INCOIvIE TAX CONFERENCE — 
Terrace R-om, Fa^^rr.or- Hc-el, 10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. 
December II— JOINT BREAKFAST MEETING, 
1958-1959 BOARD OF DIRECTORS — Garden 
Room, Fairmont Hclel, 8:00 a.m. 
December 12— AVIATION SECTION— Commercial 
Club 465 Calltornia Street, 12:00 p.m. 
December 12 — INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT — 
Room 200, Chamber 10:30 a.rr,, 
December 12— CANCCOCE LUNCHEON— Vene 
tlan Room, Fairmont H-tei 11:30 a.m. 
December 12 — NORTHERN CALIFORNIA IN- 
DUSTRIAL MANAGERS' CONFERENCE— Meeting 
a' Chamber, 333 Pine Street, 4:30 p.m. 



ALAN K. BROWNE, President 

G. L. FOX. General Manager 

M A. HOC AN, Secretary 

JAMES D. WARNOCK, Executive Edito 

JOSEPH I. HAUCHEV, Editor 



Published every oth 
of Commerce at 333 Pine St., 
County of San Francisco. Cslifi 
2-4S11. (N'on. member nibscriptit 
class pottage paid at San Franc 



k by the San Francis 

le St., San Francis. 

Telepho 



Circulation: 7,S00 titii 



SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE V<W7\%^> 




REGION iMt BUSINESS 



VOLUME IS • NUMBER 26 • DECEMBER 19, 1958 



JACK H. HOW HEADS '59 CHAMBER OFFICER SLATE 




NEW OFFICERS OF THE CHAMBER FOR 1959 elected December II are. left to right: Willis M. Holtum, Vice President, Equitable Life Assurance Society of 
the U. S., Treasurer; Dan E. London, Managing Director, St. Francis Hotel, Firsl' Vice President; O. R. Doerr, Vice President in Charge of Sales, Pacific Gas & 
Electric Company, Second Vice President; Jack H. How, President, Western Machinery Company, President of the Chamber; Miss Marie A. Hogan. Secretary 
of the Chamber; B. F. Biaggini, Jr., Vice President, Southern Pacific Company, Tiird Vice President; G. L. Fox, Fourth Vice President and General Manager of 
the Chamber; Victor B. Levit, Attorney, Long and Levit, Assistant Treasurer. A membership development program is their first goal. 



'Continued Healthy Business Climate Needed 
To Keep S. F. in Limelight of the World' 



"'We want San Francisco to remain 
world," Jack H. How, President of the C 
last week at the Fairmont Hotel. "The C 
make certain that we have an endurinf; h 
President of Western Machinery Co. and 
"Thfjre are more than 20.000 business enter- 
prises, large and small, in San Francisco, yet 
only 10 to 11 per cent of them belong to or 
in any way support activities of the Chamber. 
"Thus wc have a double task — Irving 
to do a job for the roiiiinunity with a 
tiny force and very limited funds — and 
Iryinis to jar our friends and neighbors 
out of their coniiihiceney to gel iheni t<i 
join with and support our programs. 
We will do our best to insure an endur- 
ing, healthy and attrurtive business rli- 
niate for this eomniunily." 
How, a native of .Salt Lake City and a grad- 
uate of Lowell High School and Stanford Uni- 
versity, will succeed Alan K. Browne. Vice 
President of the Bank of America. 

Other new officers elected for 1%9 include: 
Dan K. London. Managing Director of tiic 
St. Francis Hot<-l. First Vice President: (). R. 
Doerr, Vice President in Charge of .Sales. 
Pacific Gas & Klectrie Co., Second Vice Presi- 
dent, succeeding How; B. F. Biaggini, Jr.. 
Vice President, Executive Department. South- 
ern Pacific Co., Third Vice President; and 
G. L. Fox, Chamber General Manager and 
Fourth Vice President. 

Willis M. Holtum, Vice President of the 
Equitable Life Assurance Society of the V. S., 
was elected Treasurer, and Victor B. Levit of 
Long & Levit, attorneys, .Assistant Treasurer. 



in the liinelijiltt as the hest city in the 
hamher for 1959, said after his election 
linmher's task in realizing this end is to 
oalthy and attractive husines climate."" the 
Western Knapp Engineering ("o. said. 




TAXMEN TO RETURN — Alan K. Browne (left), 
President of the Chamber, Louis H. Penney of L. H. 
Penney & Co., Clarence R. Giles, President of the 
California Society of Certified Public Accountants, 
and Thomas J. Ennis, President of the San Francisco 
Chapter of the California CPA Society, huddle to 
discuss the practicality of making the recent Income 
Tax Conference, held at the Fairmont, an annual 
event. "Success of the all-day conference has in- 
sured that it will be an annual event," Browne said. 



Record \59 Peak is 
Predicted for Tourism 

Tourists and visitors, who spend about $50 
million in .San Francisco annually, should at- 
tain a record peak in 19.S9. G. L. Fox. General 
Manager of the Chamber, said this week. 

Fox based his prediction on the establish- 
ment of major league baseball, completion of 
Brooks Hall and the projected expansion <d 
other convention facilities — including new 
hotels, motels and dining establishments — and 
the continued improvement of facilities and 
services of air and other modes of transporia 
tion as well as the attraction of San Francisc" 
entertainment. 

"The great and growing interest in San 
Francisco as a tourist attraction i^ underlined 
by the fact that the Chamber Research Depart- 
ment received and answered more than 16.000 
\ isitor and newcomer imjuiries during the first 
10 months of the year- -an increase of 11.4 per 
cent over last year's comparable period."' Fi>\ 
continued. "Similarly, the Publicity Depart- 
ment sent 2.126 captioned photographs of San 
Francisco for the first 10 months this year — an 
increase of 6.'i per rent over la-t year."" 



Membership Development Prooram Slated 



.Support of an intensified niend)ership <level- 
opment program -with an increase of l.liOO in 
the number of pledged memberships the goal 

has been givi-n the unanimous hacking of 
the Board id Directors of the Chamber, ac- 
cording to C L. Fox. lieneral Manager. 

Action followed a special report submitted 
by the Executive and Finance Committees. 



"The (!hunilM-r. ihroiiKli .'^0 stundinK 
roniinitlee- and I .'{ di-parltnenl>, rwn- 
durtn a roinprehen-,i\e program to >!>• 
>ure the rontinueil progre-- and pr«»»- 
peril> of the roniniunil* ." the report 
pointeil out. "Our orguni/alion has 
gained »«>rlil-»«ide rerognilion «> one of 
the mo«t uriite btMli<-> of it> kind in the 
(Turn to page four) 



iHnry (El^rtHtmaH atti a Ma^^ij Nnit f par! 



Friday, December 19. 1958 



More Than $360 Million 
Committed in Industrial 
Expansion for No. Calif. 

A total <.f $360,023,029 was committed in 
nortliern California industrial expansion dur- 
ing the first ten months of this year, according 
to the Industrial Department of the Chamber. 
The figure included 1.074 project,s or 771 
expansions valued at $312,765,229 and 303 
new plants valued at S47.2.57.800. 

Included in the total was $32,057,050 for 
the month of October alone with 94 projects 
announced or 66 expansions at $21,614,050. 
and 28 new plants. $10,443,000. 

Largest amounts invested in e.xpan- 
sion for the first ten months were in the 
petroleum industry. Without taking into 
account the tremendous expansion of 
Tidewater Oil Company during the last 
three years, this industry still ran up- 
wards of 848 million for this year. 
Standard Oil's Richmond Refinery ex- 
pansion in June made up the bulk of 
this amount. 

The food industry was second only to petro- 
leum products in financial outlays for tlie 
year. Prominent in its development in northern 
California was formation of a new farmers' 
cooperative, California Canners & Growers, a 
new firm which bought out Filice & Perelli 
and Richmond-Chase Company in a trans- 
action amounting to $19 million. 

In third place was paper and paper 
products with Fihreboard Paper Prod- 
ucts Corp. expanding at Antiooh and 
Emeryville. 

October figures included a third project for 
the Frito Company. Frito. after buying out the 
Crispie Potato Chip Company in Stockton, 
expanded in Richmond and Watsonville. 

Contra Costa figures continued to reflect the 
sizable pickup on Tidewater Oil Company's 
investment in its Avon refinery with the com- 
pletion of a three-year program. 

Santa Clara County continued its 
steady advance in the electronics field 
with major expansions for both Fair- 
child Semiconductor Corp. and Sylvania 
Electric Products. 

The largest single new project for October 
announced in northern California was Valley 
Nitrogen Producers. Inc., a farmers' coopera- 
tive organization producing chemical fertilizer 
with headquarters in Fresno. 

CLML'I.ATIVE TOTALS FOR THE FIRST TEN MONTHS 
San Fmnciuro 



31 New Planl, 
117 ExpatiftiotiK 


184 J 
572 J 

756 J 


obs 
obs 

obfi 


8 .167,600 
4.421,600 


148 ProjecU 


$ 4.989,200 


Bay Region 

237 N.w Plinl. 
630 Expaniion. 






$ 18.847.30fl 
280,996.334 


867 Projecis 


$299,843,634 


Northern California 
30J New Pl.nti 
771 Expansion* 






1 47.257.800 
312,765,229 


1074 Prajrcti 






$360,023,029 


San Francisco 


OCTOBER, 19 


38 




li Nf» Planl> 
17 Expaniioni 


49 J 
78 1 


ob« 
obk 


$ 80.000 
556.800 


23 Projccli 


127 Jobs 


$ 636,800 


Boy Rrfion 

23 New Plant. 
S7 Expansionn 






t 958,000 
15,278,050 


80 Project* 


8 16,236.050 


yorthem California 
28 .-Vew Planta 
66 Expaneioni 






S 10.443.000 
21,614.050 


94 Projects 


8 32.057,050 



Chamber graph Ao. 20 

SAN FRANCISCO EMPLOYMENT INCREASES 

SAN FRANCISCO INDUSTRY AND COMMERCE: 

• RAISED TOTAL EMPLOYMENTT048I, 100 in 1957 

. PAID IN EXCESS OF 2.2 BILLION DOLLARS IN SALARIES AND WAGES 

. ADDED 33,000 PERSONS TO PAY ROLLS IN SEVEN YEARS 

. RETAINED ALMOST CONSTANT EMPLOYMENT RATIOS AMONG 
MAJOR INDUSTRY GROUPS 

Number 

Elnployed 

Persons 

_ 500,000 

Af.7 Rm 47&.400 481.100 



_ 400,000 



300,000 



_ 200,000 



_ 100,000 



448,200 


,,,-"'" 


28% 


TRADE 










II20%~ 


SERVICE 














' 


MANUFACTURING 


lii 13%] I 


TRANSPORTATION 
COM. & UTILITIES 


9% 


Finance, Ins. 
& Real Estate 


^^ 


Construction, 
Government*, Minint 
and Agriculture 



26% 



-20% — 





20%. 



10% 



2b% 



-21%— 



m 



iil!il4%ii 



10% 




1950 



1956 



1957 



San Francisco employment records reveal substanfial growth in the 
economy during the 1950-57 period, rising from 448,200 employed persons 
in 1 950 to 467,800 by 1955 and to 476,400 in 1956 and 481,100 in 1957. 

The relation of the major industry groups, however, changed little during 
this 7-year period, retaining almost constant employment ratios. 

Private business accounted for about 87 per cent of the total employment 
and government for 13 per cent in 1957. The Federal government was the 
largest single employer in San Francisco with over 32,000 employees, the 
City employed about 20,000 and the State nearly 10,000. Nearly 500 busi- 
nesses employ 100 or more persons. 

In 1957, 21,362 businesses in San Francisco reported insured employ- 
ment and payrolls. The average business employed 16 persons but nearly 75 
per cent of all businesses employed less than eight persons. 

*Some are classified in 1950-57 chart above under specific industry groups, 
other than government. 

I A regular feature of the Chamber: reprints available at the Reseorcli Deportment. EX 2-451 1) 



Friday, December 19, 1958 



Hitting the High Spots 



With JIM WARNOCK 




PERSON-TO-PERSON OUTDOOR SALES PITCH 
was recently made by Foster & Kleiser, Division of 
W. R. Grace & Co.. when Walter Jacobs, President 
of Herti Rent-A-Car Corp. of Chicago, was visiting 
in San Francisco. Considering a large painted "bul- 
letin" near the exit ramp of the San Francisco-Oak- 
land Bay Bridge, he asked the company to light it 
up for his inspection. By the time he returned that 
evening from a tour of Hertz Peninsula and East Bay 
offices they had added this message. Mr. Jacobs is 
still undecided about the bulletin but he is prepar- 
ing to spend $350,000 or more to expand Hertz San 
Francisco headquarters at 433 Mason, and feels 
that California holds the greatest potential for 
growth of business in the world. 

BRITISH OVERSEAS AIRWAYS CORPORATION 

will boast its first round-the-world service on April 
4 when it extends its present London-to-San Fran- 
cisco route across the Pacific to Tokyo and Hong 
Konq subject to U. S. and Japanese approval. The 
new trans-Pacific extension, to be operated with jet 
prop Britannia airliners, will link at Hong Kong and 
Tokyo with existing BOAC eastward flights from 
London to these points, . . . 

SABENA BELGIAN AIRLINES opened new talks in 
Washington this week to extend its service to San 
Francisco. The Chamber will continue its support of 
the application with the CAB. San Francisco is the 
natural terminus for Sabena, according to Charles 
C. Miller. Manager of the Transportation Depart 
ment. . . . 

UNITED AIR LINES will commence throuqh-plano, 
one-stop service between San Francisco and Pitts- 
burgh on January II, H. E. Morley, District Sales 
Manager, announced. United will offer first class 
DC-7 service and the first DC-7 Custom Coach 
service in history to the Pennsylvania city, . . . 

WESTERN AIR LINES' CABLE CAR. "Old No. 44, 
the Clay Bernard, chalked up Its I2,000th mile as a 
rolling ambassador from San Francisco during the 
recent Hollywood Santa Claus parade. Launched on 
"the longest cable car ride in history" a year ago 
with the endorsement of the Chamber, the car has 
toured seven western states and British Columbia 
attracted large crowds and accomplished greal 
good will for San Francisco. . . . 

FLORENCE GARDNER, Executive Director of the 
San Francisco Advertising Club, was surprised with 
many gifts and congratulations honoring her fortieth 
anniversary with the club last week. She arrived by 
bus In 1915 to visit the Panama Pacific Exposition 
and never got back to Brooklyn. . . . 



CARRYING OUT CHALLENGES made by the 

Chamber to the Miami Beach Chamber of Com- 
merce and the Jamaica Tourist Board, Trans World 
Airlines this week flew Miss Sally Dorr, TWA hostess 
to Miami on Its first direct flight linking that 
city and San Francisco. After partial exposure to 
the gentle, healthful sun of San Francisco, Miss 
Dorr's complexion will be exposed to the more 
rugged Miami Beach variety and dermatologists 
will determine which portion Is in the best condition, 
the challenge having contended that San Francisco 
women have the most beautiful complexions in the 
world. The contest will be repeated in Jamaica. On 
behalf of the San Francisco Chamber, Jeroboams 
of Paul Masson champagne will be presented to the 
directors of the Miami Beach Chamber and Jamaica 
Tourist Board as consolation prizes. Twenty-four 
Florida city officials and members of the press ar 
rive here today on the return leg of the flight. . 

PLANS FOR THE DOWNTOWN AIRLINES TERMI- 
NAL dedication at 10 a.m., Monday, January 5, are 
nearinq completion under a committee composed 
of A. F. Dibble, United Air Lines, Chairman; George 
A. Monson, Western Air Lines: Axel Mlkkelsen, Pan 
American World Airways; F. R. Moran, Trans World 
Airlines; G. E. Coon, American Airlines; and J. 
Frank Barrett, Larry Barrett, Larry Barrett, Jr.. 
Robert F. Barrett, and R. H. Barrett, all of Barrett 
Terminals, Inc. Co-chairmen of publicity for the 
event are Tom Barbour, American Airlines; Jim 
Crawford, United Air Lines; Clay Bernard, Western 
Air Lines and Bernard Clayton, representing interna- 
tional carriers. The terminal at Taylor and O'Farrell 
Streets Is the first of its kind west of New York. . . . 

CHINESE NEW YEAR FESTIVAL honoring the "Year 
of the Boar," the 4,657th year of the lunar calendar, 
will take place February 13-15, under the sponsor- 
ship of the Chinese Chamber of Commerce with the 
Chamber cooperating. A nation-wide Chinese 
beauty contest will seek "Miss Chinatown, U. S. A." 




SAN FRANCISCO 

lifEKHAIITEDCBTY 



HERE AT LAST Is an excellent and lasting souvenir 
gift from San Francisco for your clients throughout 
the world. Retailing at $5.95, it is available in boxes 
of 20 at a saving of $1.05 a record through a spa- 
clal program of the Chamber for the benefit of fh« 
Second Century Club. Order today for Chrlstmai, 
•nd-of-year and annual report gift programs and 
benefit membership activities of your Chamber. 

Publicity Department 

San Francisco Chamber of Commerce 

333 Pine Street. San Francisco 4 

Q Please send boxes of 20 records of 

"San Francisco — My Enchanted City," 
$99.00 a box, including sales tax and 
shipping. Check enclosed. 

Q I would like to arrange an audition of the 
recording by our company staff. 




FIRM. 
ADDRESS 



COMMENDED — Cyril Magnin (right). President 
of the San Francisco Port Authority, accepts a scroll 
commending him for his vigorous campaign In the 
successful passage of Proposition No. 4 on the State 
ballot, the $60 million self-liquidating harbor and 
small craft development bond Issue calling for major 
new facilities to keep San Francisco's famed deep- 
water harbor In step with the ctiy's accelerating 
ocean trade, a billion-dollar industry. Making the 
presentation on behalf of the San Francisco Area 
World Trade Association of the Chamber Is Robert 
Taylor, its President. In the background Is James P. 
Wilson, Manager of the World Trade Department. 

NEW GENERATING UNIT at Pacific Gas and 
Electric Company's Hunters Point Power Plant, Evans 
and Jennings Streets, dedicated this week, raises 
the station's electrical capacity to 427,000 kilowatts, 
fourth largest in the PG&E system. President N. R. 
Sutherland said that the $21 million unit increases 
the company's 72-plant capacity to five and one- 
quarter million kilowatts, three times its capacity at 
the end of World War II. 21 powers stations having 
been built or enlarged since then. . . . 

DR. HAROLD SPEARS, San Francisco Suporlntenc 
ent of Schools, has been elected President of tt-» 
United Nations International Advisory Committee 
on School Curriculum which met recently in Paris. 
He has been official U. S. representative on tKe 
committee, a subsidiary of the United Natio' 
Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organiiatic 
since its formation. . . . 

CONLON ASSOCIATES. LTD. has been selected by 
the Malayan Advertisers Association, Singapore, to 
establish professional market research facilities for 
Singapore and the Federation of Malaya, according 
•-) Richard P. Conlon. President. . . . 

WAYS TO DEAL WITH problems of inflation w, 
be discussed at the Aircade meeting of the Cham 
ber of Commerce of the United States here Febr. 
ary 20 with the cooperation of the Chamber. . . 
J. H. GUMZ, Manager of Commercial and In- 
dustrial Sales. PG&E, now retiring after more then 
35 years of service, was presented a gift by the 
Chemical Industries Section of the Chamber during 
a luncheon this week at the French Club. George 
Monkhouse. transferred to higher duties in New 
York as Vice President of Shell Oil Company's 
Chemical Division, also was honored. . . . 

HALO SALES CORPORATION of San Francisco 
has established a new branch, Spardent Labora- 
tories, directed "to the development of quality in 
mechanical, electrical, chemical and pharmaceutical 
products through intensified research, better pack 
aging and improved merchandising" accordinq t 
Robert Reilly, general manager of the division. . . 

FIRST CHRISTMAS CONCERT IN STEREO, two 

hour broadcast of the season's music, will be pre- 
sented Christmas afternoon by First Savings and 
Loan Association of San Francisco over stationi 
KROW and KJBS. No special equipment is re- 
quired, two standard AM radios placed 8 feet apa" 
each being tuned to one of the stations. . . 



Friday, December 19, 1958 



Chamber Officials 
Back Membership 
Development Drive 

(Continued from page one) 

country anH is the largest community 
development association in the San 
Francisco Bay Region. There is hardly 
any element of the community that has 
not benefited from projects sponsored 
by the Chamber. 

"During recent years a growing workluaii 
without proportionate increases in expenses 
has been carried by the Chamber. Today. San 
Francisco is confronted by unprecedented 
problems as well as opportunities for con- 
tinued growth and prosperity. The Chamber 
has arrived at a point where a substantial in- 
crease in its income from dues is imperative. 
This may best be and must be accomplished 
by a long-range, intensified membership de- 
velopment program. Its success will require 
the support of the entire community. 

".•\t present the Chamber is supported 
by 4. .370 members. It needs at least 
1.300 more memberships at $72 a year 
each to operate effectively. 
"Financial problems by which the Chamber 
is currently confronted are no different from 
those of most other organizations and busi- 
neses. It is faced by increasing costs of opera- 
tions because of prices of things which it buys 
and the imperative need for early salary re- 
visions. 

"Also, in the organization's operations, there 
have been a number of deficiencies. To an 
optimum degree, consistent with San Fran- 
cisco's wealth and position in the world, these 
should be overcome through increased income 
to: 

• meet higher and rising unit costs: 

• restore about three persons to the 
staff to permit more effective opera- 
tions; 

• replace and improve equipment; 

• rehabilitate and improve certain of 
the Chamber's quarters to make them 
more consistent with what is expected 
of a prosperous community's major civ- 
ic organization; and 

• produce certain motion pictures 
and literature needed to comply with 
requests to facilitate negotiations con- 
cerning San Francisco as a business 
headquarters and factory location and 
to attract receptive, potential visitors." 
The intensified membership development 

program will be started early in 1959, Fox 
stated. To succeed, it will require the active 
support and cooperation of the Chamber's 
officers, Directors. -Staff, Committees and Mem- 
bers. 




JAPAN AIR LINES has moved its American region 
headquarters from New York to San Francisco. 
At a party celebrating the relocation, held re- 
cently at the Sheraton-Palace Hotel, are (left to 
right), Jitsuro Kobayashi. new Acting General 
Manager of JAL for the U.S., his wife, and G. L. 
Fox, General Manager of the Chamber. 



December 23— MINING COMMITTEE — 

Merchants Exchange Club, 465 California 
Street, I 2 noon. 

December 30 — INDUSTRIAL DEVELOP- 
MENT CLUB LUNCHEON — Commercial 
Club, 12:15 p.m. Speaker: M. I. Gershen- 
son. Chief, California State Division of La- 
bor Statistics & Research, San Francisco. 
Subject: "Labor Factors In Industrial Devel- 
opment." 



San Francisco is the insurance center of the 
West, with 674 carriers, agents and brokers 
employing about 21,800 persons and paying 
an annual payroll of about $95 million. 



San Francisco ivas the first city in the 
nation to build a civic opera house and to 
vote municipal support of its symphony. 



New Hancock Home 
Office Here Gets 
Christmas Lighting 

Boston and San Francisco celebrated the 
advent of Yuletide jointly when the John Han- 
cork Western Home Office Building at Cali- 
fornia and Battery .Streets — now about half 
completed — was illuminated this week by 
Byron K. Elliott. President of tiie company, 
and Alan K. Browne. President of the Chani- 



i.el 



)ld Boston custom of 




Introducing thf 
Christmas lighting 
locally. Ray Des- 
ton. Western Vice 
President of John 
Hancock, placed a 
phone call to Elli- 
ott at the Statler- 
Hilton Hotel in 
Boston, scene of 
the company's an- 
nual Christma- 
party. Elliott 
pushed a button 
which lit up the 
California .Street 
side of the display. 
Browne then 
switched on the 
Battery Street 
lights of the new 
W estern Home Of- 
fice building. 

.\lso present were Robert Jordan from the 
Boston home office: John Cahill. Jr.. of Cahill 
Bros. Construction Company: Charles Bas- 
sett and .\llen Robinson of .Skidmore. Owings 
& Merrill: and Robert Purcell and Chuck Cor- 
bett of Norris. Beggs & .Simpson. 

.Seven floors of the 15-story. $5-7 million 
building have been completed. Dedication is 
expected in October or November of next year. 




John Hancock BIdg. 



Marine Exchange Officers Named for Coming Year 



Officials of the Marine Exchange, Inc.. for 
1959 — all from Chamber member organiza- 
tions — have been announced by V. P. Mc- 
Murdo. current President of the 109-year-old 
organization and Pacific Coast Manager of the 
Luckenbach Steamship Co.. also a Chamber 
member organization. 

Newly-elected President is D. N. Lillevand. 
Vice President of Grace Lines, Inc. Selected 
to serve with him for the coming year were: 

Thomas B. Crowlev o( the Crowley Launch and Tuphoal 
Co.. Fir.l Vice President; Henr> R. Rolph of Graham. James 
S Rolph. Second Vice President; John B. \» af ner of Pacific 
Far Easl Lines. Inc.. Third Vice President; and John D. 
Kno\ of ^ e>erhaeiiser Steamship Company. Treasurer. 



Robert H. Langner, local trade and port 
promotion specialist, was appointed Secretary- 
Manager. Langner. formerly with the World 
Trade Departments of the New- York and San 
Francisco Chambers and Port Promotion Man- 
ager of the latter, recently was Branch Plan- 
ning Division .Manager of \^'ells Fargo Bank. 
He also is an active member of the San Fran- 
cisco Area World Trade .\ssociation of the 
Chamber and co-author of a report, "Promo- 
tion and Improvement of the Port of San 
Francisco," a summary of a year-long study 
bv the Chamber. 



BAY REGION BUSINESS 



SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



ALAN K. BRO^FNE. President 

<:. L. FOX. General Manager 

M. A. HOGA.N. Secretary 

JAMES D. WARNOCK, Executive Editor 

JOSEPH t. HALCHEY. Editor 

ed everr other week bv the San Francisco Chamber 
imerre at 333 Pine St.. San Francisco. Zone 4. 
of San Francisco. California. Telephone EXbrook 
(Non. member <ubscription. S3.00 a year.) Second- 



Cireutation : 7.^00 thit 



I