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Full text of "Black's Picturesque Guide to The Isle of Wight"

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Ronton, Brighton, & §fmth Coast flailiDas- 

THE DIRECT MID-SUSSEX LINE. 

The Shortest and Quickest Main Line Eoute to or from 

the City and West End of London and the Isle of Wight. 

BOATS from RYDE and also from COWES, connecting with 
Fast Trains Direct to London Bridge and Victoria. (The City and 
West End Stations.) 

The New station at Portsmouth Harbour is now open. 

Passengers can walk from Train to Boat, and vice versa, under a 
covered platform. 

The BEST ROUTE also, via Victoria, to the Northern and 

Midland Districts. 

SPECIAL FACILITIES for the Comfort and Convenience of 

Families. 

The Only Route to and from PORTSMOUTH and the City 

and West End of London without change of carriage. 

THROUGH TICKETS issued and LUGGAGE Registered 

including all charges. 

LONDON STATIONS. 

London Bridge, Victoria, Kensington, Liverpool Street, West 

Brompton, Chelsea, Clapham Junction, New Cross, Deptford, Rother- 
hithe, Wapping, Whitechapel, Old Kent Road, Peckham, Denmark 
Hill, Tiilse HiU, Brixton, Streatham, &c. 

Victoria Station connects with the London and North "Western, 

Great Western, Great Northern, Midland, North London, Chatham 
and Dover, Metropolitan, and District Railways. 

London Bridge connects with the Charing Cross, Cannon 
Street, and South Eastern Railway. 

Liverpool Street connects with the Great Eastern, North 
London, and Metropolitan Railways. 

Booking & Enquibt Offices. — ^Ryde : the Pier ; Messrs. Curtis & Son's, 
Esplanade ; Messrs. Pickford and Cc's, the Quay, and Union Street. Ventnor : 
Messrs. Pickford and Co.'s, High Street ; Messrs. Curtis and Son's, Spring Hill, 
and Baldwin's Coach Office, 11 High Street The Isle of Wight Railway 
Stations. Newport : Railway Station ; the Company's Office, High Street 
(adjoining the Bugle Hotel). Cowes : the Company's Office on the Pier ; and 
of the Company's District Agent, 5 Ordnance Row, Portsmouth, and Claren- 
don Road, Southsea, where every information can be obtained. 

Cir Ask for through Tickets by " South Coast Railway." 

J. P. KNIGHT, Gen. Manager. 

London Bbidob Station. 



BLACK'S 

PICTURESQUE GUIDE 

THE ISLE OF WIGHT 

8BVBNTH EDITION 



EDINBTTEGH 

ADAH AND CHAKLES BLACK 

1876 



Bh. IC>^^o. "^X 



t^ 



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CONTENTS 



Oonenl DMOriptlon of tha Island 
Synopsis of Bontes uid Itineraries 
HoMls 
Antiquities. 



▼ 



/ 



Alum Bay 

Blackgang 

Bonchnrcli 

Brading 

Brixton 

Calbonme 

Carislnrook 

Cowes (West) 

rreshwater 

GodsUU 

Niton 

Newport 

Byde 

Sandown 

Shanklin 

Yentnor 

Yarmonth 



88 
45 
59 
64 
48 
25 
69 
16 
86 
22 
61 
10 
1 
63 
61 
56 
88 






OONTBNTS. 



Excursions from Byde. 

Ryde— Binstead— (jnarr Abbey— -Wootton Bridge— Newport 
Ryde to St. Helen's— ABhey Down, etc. 

Excursions from Newport 

Newport to West Cowes 

Newport to Osborne and East Cowes 

Newport to OodshiU 

Newport to Calbonme 

Newport to Kingston 

Newport to Shorwell 

Newport, via Yarmouth, to FrMhwater 

Shalfleet to Calbonme 

Yarmonth to Freshwater Gate 







PAOB 


Twrt 


• * 


1-14 


• 


• a 


66 


•t 

• 


« 


15-19 




• 1 


19-21 


• 


• i 


82-24 

25-27 

27 




• 4 


28-30 




. 


80-41 




• < 


82 




• i 


84 



Excursions from Freshwater. 

Freshwater to Alum Bay and Cliff End 

Freshwater Gate to Yarmonth (By Coast Bonte) 
Freshwater Gate to Yentnor 
Chale to Newport .... 
Niton to Newchurch 



87 

40 

41-68 

46 

62 



Excursions firom Yentnor. 

Ventnor to Gk)dshill ..... 

Yentnor to Newchurch ..... 
Yentnor to Byde, by Bonchurch— Lucoombe— Shanklin— Sandown— 

Brading ...... 

ShankUn to Newchurch ..... 

Voyage round the Island 

A Day at Carishrook ..... 

List of the Lords, Wardens, Governors, and Captains of the Isle 

ofWight ...... 



66 

58 

58-66 
62 
67 
69 

81 



T 



THE ISLE OF WIGHT. 



The Isle of Wight (the Vecta or Vectifl of the Romans) is 
separated from Hampshire by a beautiful channel, called the 
Solent Sea, the breadth of which varies &om one to six miles.* 
In this channel^ though it contains no harbour of importance, 
there are many places of perfect security, where ships may ride 
at anchor. Ilie best of these is Spithead, the great rendezvous 
of the British fleet in time of war. The form of the island is an 
irregular ellipsis, measuring 23 miles from east to west, and 13 
miles from north to south. Its circumference is about 60 miles, 
and its superficial contents 93,341 acres, of which a great portion 
is highly productive. It is said to have been formerly covered 
with woods, but to have been in a great measure denuded of these 
owing to its vicinity to Portsmouth^ and the great demand of 
that naval arsenal for timber. 

The face of the country may be described as rather undulat- 
ing than hilly, though there is a range of hills, or rather downs, 
running from east to west through the island, with a few points 
of considerable elevation. There is a great variety of rural 
scenery, adorned with a great diversity of foliage ; and though 
there are few or no woods, yet, as the fields are enclosed within 
hedge-rows, among which fine trees, and especially stately elms, 
grow most luxuriantly, these, added to the beauty of the verdant 
fields, and glimpses of the sea, present to the eye a succession of 
most pleasing prospects. The two sides of the island possess each 
a peculiar character. The northern side is marked by everything 
that is rich, lovely, and picturesque ; the southern, or the part 
called the JBack of the Island^ abounds in bold rocks, precipitous 
projections, ravines, deep chasms, and other features of the impos- 
ing, and a few even of the sublime. In some parts, these oppo- 
site characters are mingled. On the south side of the island 

* There is every reason to believe that the Isle of Wight formed at 
one time a portion of the mainland of Britain ; and, even so late as the 
period when the Greeks traded with Cornwall for tin, the channel is said 
to have been passable by men and carts at low-water. 



VI INTRODUCTOET. 

there is a tract of land, known as the Undercliffy abont seven 
miles in length, and from a half to a quarter of a mile in 
breadth. This singular district consists of a series of terraces, 
formed by fragments of rocks, chalk, and sandstone, wHch have 
been detached from the clifTfl and hills above, and deposited 
upon a substratum of white marL The whole of this Undercliff 
is completely sheltered from the north, north-west, and west 
winds, by the range of lofty downs or hills of chalk or sand- 
stone, which rise boldly from the upper termination of these 
terraces, on elevations varying from four to six and seven 
hundred feet in height. The two extremities of the range are 
indeed higher, as St Boniface Down is 780 feet above the level 
of the sea, and St. Catherine's Hill on the west nearly 835 
feet. The protection afforded by this mountain barrier is greatly 
increased, by the very singnW and striking abruptness with 
which it terminates on its southern aspect. This, in many 
places, consists of the bare perpendicular rock of sandstone ; in 
others of chalk, assuming its characteristic rounded form, covered 
with a fine turf and underwood. 

The river Medina, which, rises at the foot of St. Catherine's 
Down, and falls into the Solent Channel, at Cowes, divides the 
island into two hundreds of nearly equal extent, called respectively 
East and West Medina, the former comprehending 14, the latter, 
16 parishes. 

The population of the Isle of Wight, at the last census of 
1871, was 66,219, being an increase of nearly 11,000 during 
the preceding ten years. Previously to the passing of the 
Reform Bill of 1832, the boroughs of Newport, Newton, and 
Yarmouth, returned each two members to Parliament, but Newton 
and Yarmouth were then disfranchised, and one member returned 
for the Isle, and two for the borough of Newport. By the late 
Reform Bill, Newport was deprived of one of its members. 

The Isle of Wight was first invaded by the Romans, a.d., 43, 
in the reign of the Emperor Claudius, and they retained posses- 
sion of it till 530, when it was reduced by Cedric the Saxon. It 
suffered severely during the wars of the Saxon heptarchy, and 
was also frequently plundered and devastated by the Danes. It 
was on various occasions invaded by the French, but in almost 
every attack they were beaten and driven back to their ships by 
the islanders, who had made systematic preparations for their de- 
fence. After the naval superiority of Britain was established, the 



ISLE OF WIGHT. Vll 

island was further secured from tlie calamities of foreign invasion, 
and during the civil war between Charles I. and his Parliament, 
the inhabitants enjoyed comparative freedom from the prevailing 
commotions. 

The Lordship of the Isle of Wight was conferred by William 
the Conqueror on William Fitz-Osbome, who is known in English 
history under the title of the Earl of Hereford, and for more than 
two centuries the island continued to be governed by its 
independent lords. But in 1293, Edward L purchased the 
regalities for the sum of ^4000 from Isabella de Fortibus, Lady 
of Wight, and since that time, the island has been governed by 
wardens, appointed by the Crown. The office has now become 
honorary, and, as is understood, unaccompanied by any salary. 

In the year 1644, the weak and unfortunate Henry YL con- 
ferred the title of King of Wight on Henry Beauchamp, Duke of 
Warwick, and crowned him with his own hands ; but the empty 
title expired with the nobleman who first bore it 

The Isle of Wight derives additional interest from the fact 
of its having become a stated place of residence by Her present 
Majesty, who, in 1844, conjointiy with the late Prince Albert, 
purchased the mansion of Osborne, in which she resides, with its 
park, and the adjoining estate of Baxton. Osborne House is 
situated in the immediate neighbourhood of East Cowes, and near 
tiie north coast of the island. The principal towns and villages 
in the island are Ryde, West Cowes, Yarmouth, and Freshwater, 
on the north coast ; Newport and Qodshill in the interior of the 
island ; Yentnor on the south ; Shank! in and Sandown on the 
south-east. 

Affboaches to the Island. 

The following are the usual routes of approach to the Me of 
Wight :— 

1. By Mid-Sussex line (London, Brighton, k South Coast) from 
London Bridge, Yictoria, or Kensington Stations ; vid Ports- 
mouth and SotUhsea for Ryde ; or by steam-packet for West 
Cowes. 

2. By London and South- Western Railway, vid SoiUhampion for 
West Cowes ; vid Portsmouth for Ryde ; and vid Lyndnffton 
for Yarmouth. 



Viii THE ISLB OF WIGHT. 

The following itineraries are given for tlie convenience of 
those who intend spending a few days on the Island : — 



FOUB DAYS' rriNERARY.— FROM RYDB, 
The Railway is now open to Yentnor. 



FiBST DAT. —To Brading, 4 m. ; Sandown, 2 m. ; Shanklin, 2 J m. ; 
Tjuccombe, 1^ m. ; Bonchnrch, 1) m. ; Yentnor, 1 m. 

Bboond Day. — ^To Steephill, 1 m. ; St Lawrence, 1 m. ; Sandrock, 
2 m. ; Blackgang, 1^ m. ; Chale, ) m. ; Shorwell, 4} m. ; Brixton, 2 m. 

Thibd Day. — To Mottistone, 2 m. ; Brook, 1 m. ; Freshwater Gate, 
4 m. ; Needles Lighthouse, 3} m. ; Alum Bay, 1 m. ; Freshwater, 2 m. ; 
Yarmouth, 8} m. ; Shalfleet, 4 m. ; Carisbrook, 5} m. ; Newport, 1 m. 

FouETH DAT.— To West Cowes, 6 m. ; Whippingham, 2 m. ; Stapler's 
Heath, 8 m. ; Arreton, 2^ m. ; Ashey Down, 2 m. ; Whitefield Wood, 
and Sea Yiew, 5 m. ; Ryde, 2 m. 



THREE DAYS' ITINERARY.— FROM RYDB. 

FiBST Dat. — ^To Binstead, l^ m. ; Quarr Abbey, H m. ; Wootton 
Church, 1} m. ; Whippingham, 24 m. ; East Cowes, and by floating- 
bridge, to West Cowes, 2 m. ; Newport, 5 m. 

Secokd Dat. — ^To Carisbrook, 1 m. ; Calboume, 4} m. ; Freshwater, 
34 m. ; Alum Bay, 2 m. ; The Needles, 1 m. ; Freshwater Gate, 84 m. ; 
Brook, 4 m. ; Mottistone, 1 m. ; Brixton, 2 m. 

TmBD Dat. — ^To Blackgang, 7 m. ; St Lawrence, 8) m. ; Steephill, 
1 m. ; Yentnor, 1 m. ; Bonchurch, 1 m. ; Shanklin, 8 m. ; Sandown^ 
2) m. ; Brading, 2 m. ; Ryde, 4 m. 

Coaches ran between Yentnor and Blackgang. 



INTBODUGTOBT. 



FOUR DAYS^ ITINBRABY.— FROM WEST COWES. 

FnssT Day. — To Gumet Bay, 2 m. ; Thomess 2} m. ; Newtoira, 8 m. ; 
Shalfleet, 1 m. ; Yarmouth, 4 m. ; Freshwater, 2 m. ; Alum Bay, 2 m. ; 
Freshwater Gate, 8 m. 

Sboohd Day. — ^To Galbonme, 6 m. ; Carisbrook, 4 iil ; Newport, 

1 m. ; Gatcombe, 8 m. ; ShorweU, dm.; Brixton, 2 m. 

Thibd Bat. — ^To Blackgang, 7 m. ; Niton, 1 m. ; Sandrock, 1 m. ; 
St Lawrence, 2} m. ; Steephill, 1 m. ; Ventnor, 1 m. ; Bonchnrch, 1 m. 

FoxJBTH Day. — To Shanklin, 8 m. ; Sandown, 2J m. ; Brading, 2 m. ; 
Byde, 4 m. ; Wootton Bridge, 8} m. ; Whippingbam, 8 m. ; East Cowes, 

2 m. ; and cross by floating-bridge to West Cowes, 



THREE DAYS* ITINERABY.— FROM WEST COWES. 

First Day. — ^To Whippingbam, 2 m. ; Wootton Bridge, 8 m. ; Ryde, 
84 m. ; Brading, 4 m. ; Sandown^ 2 m. ; Shanklin, 2} nL ; Bonchnrch, 
8 m. ; Ventnor, 1 m. 

Seookd Day. — To St. Lawrence, 2 m. ; Sandrock, 2J m. ; Blackgang, 
H m. ; Brixton, 6 m. ; Mottistone^ 2 m. ; Brook, 1 m. ; Freshwater 
Gate, 4 m. 

Third Day. — ^Alnm Bay, 8 m. ; Freshwater, 2 m. ; Yarmouth, 2 m. ; 
Shalfleet, 4 m ; Newtown, 1 m. ; Carisbrook, 5 m. ; Newport, 1 m. ; 
West Cowes, 5 m. 



THB ISLE OF WIGHT. 



FLIES. 

The Tumal chaiges aro— (including Diivers' Fees)— l^or a one horse carriage, 
Is. 8d. per mile ; 8s. per hour ; £1 per day. For two horses. Is. 8d. per mile ; 58. 
per hour ; £1, 10s. per day. 

HOTELS, INNS, sic. 

Alum Bay— Royal Alum Bay, The Needles, HoUU, 

Arreton— Hare and Hounds, Inn. 

Blackgang — The Chine, Hotel. 

Bonchurch — Ribband's Family Hotel. 

Brading— Bugle, Wheatsheaf, and New, Iwna, 

Brixton— New Inn; Five Bells, Inn. 

Galboume— The Sun, Jiwu 

Cowes, West— The Marine, The Gloster, Vine, Fountain, etc., Hotels. 

Freshwater — Red Lion, In/n. 

Freshwater Gate— Plumbley's and Albion, Hotde. 

Godshill— The Griffin, Inn. 

Niton— Royal Sandrock, Hotel; Victoria, Baths. 

Newport— Bugle, Warburton's, Hotels; Star, Wheatsheaf, Imns. 

Ryde— Pier, Royal Kent, Telfs, Royal York, Sivier's, Belgrave, Eagle, 

Esplanade, Hotels; Star, Inn. 
Sandown— Sandown, Star and Garter, and Railway, Hotels, 
Sea View — Crown, In/n. 

Shanklin— Daish's, HoUier's, Marine, and Falcon, Hotels, 
Yentnor- Royal, Marine, Esplanade, Terminus, Commercial, Hotels; Crab 

and Lobster, Globe, Inns, 
Wootton Bridge— Sloop, Inn. 
Yaimouth— The George, Hotel; Bugle, Inn. 

POINTS OF VIEW. 
Afton Down; Ashey Down; Bembridge Down; St Catherine's Down; Si. 
George's Down ; Needles Down ; Shanklin Down (from Cook's Castie) ; and gene- 
rally, the principal hills of the island. 

ANTIQUITIES. 
BooLESiAsnoAL:— Arreton, Bonchurch, Brading, Calboume, Carisbrook, Fresh- 
water, Godshill, St. Lawrence, Mottistone, Shorwell, Shalfleet, Wootton, and Taver 
land, Chwrches. Ruins of Qnourr Abbey and Woolverton Chapel 

Carisbrook CastU. 

Btman Villa at Carisbrook. 

Ancient BriHsh SetOments at Rowborongh, GalUbnry, and Newbams. 

Celtic Tumuli on Chessel and Shalcomb Downs. 

The I/mg Stone, or Cromleeh, at Mottistone. 

Mano^ Houses at Arreton, Chale, Sheat, Mottistone, and Taverland. 

JTajwioM at Northoourt and Swainstone. 

TIME-TABLES. 

For further particulars relative to Railways, Coaches, and Steam-packets, cod- 
suit Wayland's Penny Time-Tdbles, issued every month by Mr Wayland, Union 
Street, Ryde. 



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BTDE. 

Hotda: Fi«r, Eent^TelTs, Sivier'B, Grown, York, Belgrave, Eagle, EsplanadA. 
Iwn$: Star. Vine* GasOe. H(m»-agents: Messrs. Wallis, Bcott, Biddett, Marvin, 
Knight, Hancock, Cooper, and James. Baths : Victoria Pier, Kemp's, and Hinter's. 
Banks: Hampshire and National Froyincial Banking Companies. 

Bailway to Vkhtnob, vid Brading, Sandown, Shanklin, and WroxaU. Coaches 
and OmnibuaM to Nbvtpokt and Cabisbboos. 

[Byde to Binstead, 1^ m. ; Quarr Abbey, 1^ m. ; Wootton Bridge, 1 m. ,* New- 
port, 3^ m.] 

So large a majority of visitors to the Isle of Wight enter it 
at its most agreeable approach, the town of Kyde, that it is from 
thence, as the most popular and convenient starting-point, we 
shall commence our explorations. 

Its appearance, as seen from the Solent,* is eminently 
attractive. The hill-side on which it clusters presents an amphi- 
theatre of pleasant villas, set round with trim gardens and belts 
of vigorous trees ; out of which springs the slender spire of 
Trinity Church, on the left, and the less graceful one of St. 
Thomas' Church on the right. Leading up from the pier 
stretches the broad but somewhat precipitous Union Street, 
the principal thoroughfare of the town. To the right rises the 
handsome elevation of Brigstocke Terrace, and almost beneath 
it, the neat mansion of the Victoria Yacht Club shews its long 
line of windows and miniature battery. Away to the west rolls 
the undulating shore, well wooded in many parts, and broken 
into by sequestered creeks and abrupt coves, — the view terminat- 
ing agreeably with the Italian campaniles of Osborne. To the 
east we survey in succession the Esplanade, the Elizabethan 
turrets of Applet Towers — ^perched on a commanding ascent, 
the bold headline of Sea View, and the wooded banks which 
contribute to the security of St. Helen's Roads. 

The approach to Ryde is one of its principal " lions," — pre- 

* The channel here is abont 4 miles wide. Bede derives the word SolerU tram 
Holyeo (quasi Solvent), "to loosen," in reference to the supposed separation of the 
island trom the mainland by the action of natural cause's. 

B 



2 RTDE. 

senting itself in the form and fiashion of q;d, admirable Pier, whose 
extreme length is 2250 feet, and itsi)readth from 12 to 20 feet. 
It was commenced by a joint-stock eompaiiy in 1813, and opened 
the following year, its length then being 1740 feet In 1824 
300 feet were added, and in 1833 it received a further addition. 
The pier-head and pavilion date from 1842. In 1856, and sub- 
sequently, farther extensions took place ; and recently a tramway 
has been laid down alongside for the conveyance of passengers, 
and of heavy goods to and from the shipping. A New Pier, 
" The Victoria," was commenced by the Steam Ferry Company, 
but never completed, and is now used for bathing. 

Previous to the construction of Ryde Pier, embarkation or 
disembarkation was of the most inconvenient character, and the 
desagremms to which travellers were subjected have been humor- 
ously sketched by Fielding and Marryatt The former stopped 
here for a few days on Ids voyage to Lisbon in 1753. On 
leaving the vessel he was put into a hoy, and on leaving the hoy 
was put into a small boat, which rowed as near as possible to the 
shore, and then committed him to the tender mercies of two 
sailors, upon whose shoulders he was borne to the dry land. At 
a later period, a horse and cart became agreeable substitutes for 
the shoulders of porters and sailors. 

Fielding was not slow, however, despite of these difficulties, 
to appreciate the charming situation of this now fashionable 
watering-place. It is true that it could only boast of one butcher, 
whose stock of meat was limited ; and that it could not supply 
" a single leaf of tea — ^for as to what Mrs. Humphrey's (his limd- 
lady) and the shopman called by that name, it was not of Chinese 
growth, but a tobacco of the mundungus species ; " but its situation 
he considered '^ most delightful, and in the most pleasant spot in 
the whole island." " This pleasant village," he adds, " is situated 
on a gentle ascent from the water, whence it affords that charm- 
ing prospect I have sdready described. Its soil is a gravel, which, 
associated with its declivity, preserves it always so dry that 
immediately after the most violent rain a fine lady may walk 
without wetting her silken shoes. The fertility of the place is 
apparent from its extraordinary verdure ; and it is so shaded 
with large and flourishing elms that its narrow lanes are a natural 
grove or walk, which in the regularity of its plantation rises 
with the power of art, and in its wanton exuberance greatly 
exceeds it" 



BYDB — PUBLIC BUILDrNGb. 3 

The Esplanade, formed in 1856-7, stretches along the sea- 
wall, and is 1200 feet in lei^gth by from 50 to 80 and 100 feet 
in width. The gea-waU, which is made of concrete faced with 
stone, is 9 feet thick at the base, and 19|^ feet high, of which 5 
feet are under the surface of the shore. 

The Public BuiLDmas of the town are few and unimportant. 
The most pretentious is the Town Hall and Mabkbt House in 
Lind Street, erected in 1829-31, from the designs of an architect 
named Sanderson, and at an expense of £5000. The centre 
exhibits an Ionic portico, supported by a Doric colonnade. The 
market in the IdPfc wing is little used. The right wing is de- 
voted to various offices, and the purposes of the Eyde Literary 
Institute. The Town Hall proper consists of two apartments 
which, by the removal of a partition, may be thrown into one 
60 feet long by 26 feet wide. 

"Westward of the pier stands the Club House of the Royal 
Victoria Yacht Club — a neat building with a small batt^;ry, 
whose first stone was laid by the Prince Consort in 1846. It 
was, in 1864, enlarged and much improved by the addition of a 
new Italian facade with ornamental pillars, etc. The Club itself 
was established May 24, 1845, and enrols about seventy-five 
yachts, with an aggregate tonnage of 8000 tons. Entrance-fee, 
£b, 5s. ; yearly subscription, j£5, 5s. The regatta is held about 
the second week in August, and is followed, a week or two later, 
by a town regatta. 

In Union Street the visitor wiU observe a covered prome- 
nade, bordered by shops, and terminating in a semi-circular vesti- 
bule, which bears the loyal appellation of the Rotal Victoria 
Arcade. It was built in 1835, from the designs of Westmacott, 
at the cost of £10,000. 

Of the Theatre (bmlt in 1816), at the top of Union Street, 
it is only necessary to say that its stage was the scene of the last 
appearance of poor Mrs. Jordan, on her way to France in 1816, 
in search of retirement and repose. 

The Infirmary is a commodious edifice, well adapted for its 
purposes, situated in Upper Ryde, on the road to Ashey. Through 
the exertions of a benevolent physician, the late Dr. Dodd, it 
was raised by voluntary subscriptionB, in 1845. Accommodation 
is provided for fifty patients. The annual income averages 
.€1500. 

The Ecclesiastical Buildinos fare easily examined. St. 



4 BYDB. 

• 

Thomas's Church, in St. Thomas Street, a paltry specimen of 
Gothic, was erected in 1827 by George Player, Esq. The found- 
ation stone of a new parish church was kid by HJRJBE. Princess 
Christian of Schleswig-Holstein in August 1869, in Queen's Road. 
The architect is G. G. Scott, Esq., and the style Decorated Gothic 

St. JABiEs' Church, in Lind Street, erected as a proprietary 
chapel in 1829 by Alderman Hughes, is even uglier than its 
neighbour, St. Thomas*. 

Holy Trinity Church, on the south-eastern crest of the lull, 
was erected in 1845, from the designs of Mr. Thomas Hellyer, a 
local architect The style is Early English, and the interior is 
elegant. Tower and spire rise to a height of 146 feet. 

The Church of St. Michael and all the Angels, at Swan- 
more, is a heavy monastic-looking building, erected in 1862. 
The services conducted here are highly ritualistic 

The HoMAN Catholic Chapel (St. Mary's ; architect, Mr. 
Hansom ; built in 1845, at the sole cost of the Dowager Countess 
of Clare) is worth examination. The architecture is elaborately 
rich in ornament 

The Independent Chapel, in George Street, is a handsome 
edifice ' in the Grecian style, and lighted entirely from the roof. 
It was erected in 1855 at a cost of £3000. The new Baptist 
Chapel, in the same street, is a neat and chaste structure in the 
Early English style. 

The Cemetery, consecrated in 1842 and enlarged in 1862, 
contains several handsome monuments, including one to the 
veteran Indian General Sir J. L. Caldwell, G.C.B. The Water- 
works, at Ashey, having been found insufficient, additional 
works have lately been constructed at Knighton. The Isle of 
Wight Philosophical and Scientific Society occupy the old 
National Schools in Melville Street, where they have a Museum 
of Natural History and Antiquities. 

It is interesting to notice the rapid growth of Ryde. In the 
reign of Richard IL it was burnt by the French as one of those 
places where " watch and ward " were kept in those troublous 
times for the defence of the island, and up to the commencement 
of the present century, it was nothing but a collection of fisher- 
men's huts on the shore, and a few straggling cottages on the 
crest of the hill. It was then divided into L6wer and Upper Ryde, 
and separated by a leafy screen of trees. It received a charter 
of incorporation in 1868« and has now a population of 12,576. 



« BTDE TO NBWPOBH. 

Our route from Eybe to Newport (the capital of the islai 
traverses a very agreeable, if not a very romantic country. " 1 
charms arise," says an Edinburgh reviewer, " from the sight oi 
verdure and fertility spread over an undulating and well-wooded 
surface, many points commanding fine views of the sea, and par- 
ticularly of the strait which separates the island from the coast of 
England." We advise the tourist to turn aside, however, from 
the main road, and cross the fields as far as Wootton Bridge. 

Quitting Ryde, therefore, by the Spencer Road (observe, on 
the right, Westfield, the seat of Sir Augustus Cliiford ; and 
Rtde House), we turn off to the north-west by a footpath 
up hiU and down hill, through pleasant meadows and green 
hedgerows, and, crossing the tiny brook which separates the 
parish of Newchurch from that of Binstead, climb the ascent 
which is crowned by Binstead Church (ij mile). The 
quarries in this vicinity produce a species of limestone composed 
of comminuted shells held together by sparry calcareous cement, 
which yields a stone sufficiently firm for building purposes. This 
stone was largely employed by Bishops Walkelyn and "William 
of Wykeham, in the erection of Winchester Cathedral. Fresh- 
water shells abound here, and teeth and bones of mammalia, seed- 
vessels and stems of aquatic plants often repay the geologist's 
well-directed inquiries. 

The Church, dedicated to the Holy Cross, was rebuilt in 
1842, from Mr. T. Hellyer^s designs, and is a commendable 
specimen of Early English. The entrance-gateway exhibits a 
Norman door, and a curious sculpture, vulgarly known as " the 
Idol/' of a grotesque demii-figure seated on a ram's head, preserved 
from the old Norman Church. 

In the rear of the church, surrounded by beautiful grassy 
slopes, stands the villa of General Lord Downes, G.CJB. ; and, in 
a delightful breadth of blooming garden, on the left, is the pic- 
turesque rectory-house. 

The parish of BINSTEAD contained, in 1871, 748 inhabi- 
tants ; 147 inhabited houses ; and 1207 acres. The rectory is in 
the gift of the Bishop of Winchester. 

Passing the church we enter, by a gate on the right hand, a 
long stretch of low oak-copses, commanding at several points the 
goodliest views imaginable of the gleaming Solent and the blue 
line of the Hampshire coast beyond. In the hollow to which 



rSOK BTDB TO NKWFOBT. 

we now descend (2} miles) lie the scantj xemains of the onoe 
fSamooB 

QuARR Abbey, anciently Quarraiia, from the qtiames in its 
neighbourhood. Out of its ruins have been constructed a de- 
formed farm-house and its appendant buildings, and a laigp 
bam, whose walls are ancient, and which was, it is said, the 
monastic refectory. Remark a small building (to the east) with 
a Perpendicular door, and three arches in tolerable preservation ; 
remains of a fine Decorated doorway, a moulded segmental 
arch, and '' a nookshaft of excellent workmanship," may also be 
examined. Quarr Abbey was founded in 1132 by Baldwin de 
Bedvers, afterwards Lord of the Island and Earl of Devon. He 
planted here a small colony of monks &om the Benedictine abbey 
of Savigni in Normandy, which, in 1148, was attached to the 
Cistercian order. Quarr thus became the second CHstercian house 
established in England. It was dedicated by its founder to the 
Yiigin Mary, and amply endowed with lands--an example which 
his successors imitated, so that, ia due time, the Abbot of Quarr 
became one of the leading magnates of the island. By license from 
Edward IIL, the abbey, which was often exposed to the attacks 
of French sea-rovers, was fortified with a stone wall endosing an 
area of 40 acres. The sea-gate and considerable portions of the 
wall may still be traced. 

Many distinguished personages were buried at Quarr : — ^the 
founder, and his wife Adeliza ; William de Vernon, lord of the 
island, who bequeathed £300 for the erection of a stately monu- 
ment ; and the Lady Cicely, second daughter of Edward IV., 
whose Hfe, in its changes and contrasts, might well attract the 
attention of the romancist 

At the suppression of religious houses, the yearly revenue of 
Quarr w£te ;£181 : 16 : 2. In 1404 it was computed at £96, 
13s. 4d. The abbey was purchased, and rudely demolished, by 
a Mr. John Mills of Southampton, whose son's widow, Mrs. 
Dowsabell Mills, became the mistress of Sir Edward Horsey, 
captain of the i<«land. Sir Thomas Fleming, Lord Chief-Justice 
temp. James L, purchased the manor of her representatives, and 
in the Fleming feunily it still remains. 

Among the numerous traditions attached to Quarr, the follow- 
ing is specially absurd : — " At a short distance south of the ruins 
of the abbey is a wood, formerly thickly timbered, but now only 
consisting of a few decayed oaks and brushwood ; it is called 



r 



■V \ 



V 

V 



V 



V. 

N 



woonoN CHtmoH. 7 

Eleanoi^s Grove, from a tradition that Eleanor of Gnienne, queen 
of Heniy IL, was imprisoned at Quarr, and frequented this 
secluded spot, where, after death, it is related she was interred in 
a golden coffin, which is supposed still to be protected from 
sac^egious cupidity by magical spells.'' 

Continuing our ramble, we soon arrive at FiSHBOURin!!, a small 
collection of small huts at the mouth of Eishboume Cree^, or, as 
it is more commonly called, Wootton Biveb. At high wate»— 
for the river is tidal as far as Wootton Bridge — ^the scene &om this 
point is by no means devoid of beauty. The sloping banks are 
Mnged with oak-copses, whose pendent branches are pleasantly re- 
flected in the lucent waves shimmering beneath ; which, above the 
causeway, broaden into an ample and tranquil lake. 

The high road from Byde to Newport crosses the creek 
at Wootton Bridge {Inn: The Sloop). A new bridge has 
recently been constructed here, and tiie approaches, which 
were awkward, have, been very much improved. Gross- 
ing the bridge we ascend a steep hill, upon whose decUvity 
clusters the little village of Wootton, while behind us stands 
the ivy-shrouded front of Kite Hill. On our left, a high 
tower rising above the richly-wooded uplands, belongs to Fern 
Hill, a "' seat'' of some pretensions, built (1791-1796) by the 
Right Hon. Thomas Orde, afterwards Lord Bolton, during his 
governorship of the island. Ascending the hill, we arrive at 
the picturesque Old Bectort (F. White Popham, Esq.), where 
are preserved some interesting relics of gentle '^ Izaak Walton," 
to whose family the late rector belonged. 

1^* At this point two roads branch off from our main route ; 
that to the right leads, across green meadows, to Wootton 
Church, and thence, through Barton, to East Cowes. The left 
road conducts us to Arreton. 

1^* Wootton Chu'roh, a long narrow edifice, consisting of a 
nave and chancel, was built by one of the De Insulas, or L'Isles, a 
famous old island family, long time lords of Wootton. It is dedi- 
cated to St. Edmund. Its points of interest are— a Norman door- 
way, with chevron mouldings, on the south ; an Early English arch, 
which formerly opened into the chantry of St. Edmund ^e King ; 
and the Early Decorated windows on the east and west. Observe 
the pulpit, tenvp, James I., and the memorial to Sir William Lidty 
d. 1665. Sir William, by the way, was the royalist brother of 
the regicide, SiT«/bAn lAde^ one of Cromwell's peers, and a sturdy 



« BRANCH BOUTE — WOOTTON TO ARBBTON. 

Puritan, slain at Lausanne, after the Restoration, by two Irish 
bravoes. His widow, Dame Alice Lisle, was condemned by Judge 
Jeflfreys (aj). 1685), for having mercifully sheltered two fugi- 
tives from the fatal field of Sedgemoor. '* She was put to death 
on a scaffold in the miarket-place of Winchester, and underwent 
her fate with serene courage." — (Macaulai/), 

WOOTTON (U, Wood-town) contams 1076 acres. Popu- 
lation in 1871, 82. The rectory, valued at £240, is in the gift 
of F. White Popham, Esq. 

We now turn aside for a while from our Newport route, to 
examine the road to Arreton (3 miles). 

Branch Route — ^Wootton to Arreton. 

On our right lie the green depths of Quarr Copse, afford- 
ing some pleasant effects of light and shadow ; on our left 
extend the grounds of FemhilL Passing these ''pleasant places," 
we turn aside to the left, and adopt a road which is agreeably 
picturesque, winding through deep banks clothed with verdure, 
with trailing ivy, and ferns, and grasses, and wild flowers. Cross- 
ing the Downs — ^those watch-towers of nature, from whence her 
disciples may survey all the wonders of vale, meadow, grove, and 
garden — ^we plunge abruptly into the sweet valley of ARRETON 
(population, 1880. Inn: Hare and Hounds), one of the fairest 
spots in the ** Fair Island." Its Church stands upon a slight 
ascent which rises gently from the road — a fine old building, mainly 
, Early English in style, but retaining many traces of the earlier 
Norman foundation in the tower-arch, and the windows of the 
west gable. The tower itself is Perpendicular, and strengthened 
by heavy buttresses ; the double chancel. Early English, and a 
satis&ctory specimen. Observe the aumbry, on the west side of 
the altar ; and the remarkable brass, in tiie south chancel, date 
1430, exhibiting the effigy of an aimed knight, and an early 
EngUflh epitaph: — 

Here is y buried voder this grane 
Harry Hawles his sonl God saae 
Longe tyme steward of ye yle of Wyght 
Have mercy on hym Qod ful of myght. 

A brass plate against a pillar in the south aisle commemorates, 
In uncouth rhymes, the good deeds of one William Serle, d. 1595. 



EAST 8TANDEN. 9 

There are several memorials to members of the Holmes family 
— especially that by Westmacott to Richard Fleniitig Wordey — 
and the churchyard is unusually full of noticeable inscriptions. 
One of the most interesting of these is to the memory of Elieor- 
heth WalJhridge, the "Dairyman's Daughter," whose simple stoiy 
was told so effectively by the Bev. Legh Richmond.* 

Just beyond the Church stands the ancient Manor House, 
temf» James L^ now occupied as a farm. The interior contains 
some excellent carving. From this point the tourist may ascend 
the chalk-hills, whose ridge exhibits several barrows of Anglo- 
Saxon date, and turning to the left, as if to cross St. Geobge's 
Down, descend to the manor-house of EAST STANDEN, notice- 
able from its historical associations. The present building is of 
Georgian date, but occupies the site of the ancient residence of 
the Lady Cicely, second daughter of Edward lY., and a woman 
of singular beauty and merit She stooped from her high estate, 
soon after sher sister Elizabeth's marriage to Henry YH., to ally 
herself with John, Lord Wells, a gallant soldier about twice her 
own age. Left a widow in 1498, she chose for her second hus- 
band a man of still lower degree, one Thomas Kyme, of the 
Kymes of Lincolnshire, with whom she retired (pirca 1504) to the 
Isle of Wight, and by whom she is said to have had two children, 
Richard and Margerie. In the tranquillity of East Standen she 
spent three quiet years. Her death took place on the 24th of 
August 1507, in the 38th year of her age. She was buried at 
Quarr Abbey, and commemorated by a stately monument. 

South-east of Arreton is Hasdey, where, during his captaincy 
of the island, resided the bold and unscrupulous Sir Edward 
Horsey. He died here, of the plague, in 1582. 

[i£V From Arreton a gHoiions walk along the crest of the chalk ridge— Arreton, 
Measly, Ashey, and Brading Downs— may be extended to the village of Braoino, 
on the Byde and Ventnor road. Or the tourist may stroll across St George's Down 
to Shide, and thence, to Cabisbiiook or Newfobt. A ramble of scarcely In- 
ferior Interest may be made by way of Horringford, across the Yar or Main river, 
and passing the " Daibtmam's Dauohtbb's " Cottaob, to Sandown, and its beauti- 
fol Bay; or the traveller may proceed from Arreton, via Merston, to Godshill, and 
tbeuce, through Whitwell, to St Lawrence and the Underdifll 

In this neighbourhood the botanist may search for the Verhaacum inigrwBi^ A%- 
thtmis arventii, and Daphne laureola. The high banks which shelter its "green and 
Italy lanes " are luxuriantly prodigal of clematis, woodbine, and polypody.'' 

* The epitaph Is from the pen of the late Mrs. W. C. Bousfield, well known a« a 
poeteM among her own friends. 



N. 



10 i NSWFOBI. 



MAIN ROUTE RESUMED— WOOTTON to NEWPORT. 

The cottDtry between Wootton and Newport is of a pleasing 
cliaracter, but scarcely calls for detailed description, llie road 
crosses Wootton Heath ; traverses the head of the small creek 
known as Eong's Quay, from an old bnt erroneous tradition that 
its wooded shores afforded shelter to King John after his escape 
from the potent barons who had compelled his signature to Magna 
Charta ; passes, on the right, the red brick buildings of the late 
Prince Consort's Farm, and after descending into the valley of the 
Medina, leaves behind it the respectable old mansion of Fairles, 
and the recently constructed Newport Cemetery. Then it 
crosses the Medina at Coppin's Bridge, and connects itself with 
High Street, the main thoroughfare of Newport 

NEWPORT. 

E(Adi : The Bugle, Warbnrton*8 Family Hotel Iwm : The Star, Green Dragon, 
Wheatsheaf, etc. Banks: London and County, National Provincial, and Hamp< 
shire Banking Company. Population 7956. 

iSV Rail to West Cowes. Omnibuses several times during the day betvreen 
Newport and Ryde, and Newport and Ventnor. Omnibuses to Freshwater eveiy 
Monday, Wednesday, and Saturday afternoon ; and to Yarmouth, Monday, Wednes- 
day, and Saturday. 

A Boat leaves Newport Quay for West Cowes every tide. 

Market-Day : Saturday. Cattle market every alternate Wednesday.] 

Newport receives its name from its modem relation to the 
ancient capital of the island, which, by most antiquaries, is placed 
at Carisbrook. There is good reason, however, to believe that it 
is of Boman foundation, and numerous relics of the imperial colo- 
nists have been discovered here. The plan of the town as it if, 
was laid out by Richard de Redvers, Earl of Devon and lord of 
the island, early in the reign of Henry the First, " apportionments 
being let off for building at one shilling 'a place ''' — (Venablea), 
From Richard de Redvers, third of the name, the rising town 
received its first charter ; and the privileges then granted were 
confirmed and enlarged by the famous Lady of the Island, Isabella 
de Fortibus. Fifteen charters, in amplification of these original 
provisions, were successively granted by our Sovereigns, from 
Richard II. to Charles IL 



NEWPORT. 1 ] 

The fiist charier of incorporation was granted by James X., 
who substituted for " the Bailiff of Newport " a mayor, twenty- 
four burgesses, and a recorder. This arrangement was modified 
after the Restoration, and a mayor, eleven aldermen, and an equal 
number of burgesses, appointed. By the Municipal Corporation 
Act (William IV.) the corporation was again re-constituted, and 
now consists of a mayor, six aldermen, and eighteen town-coun- 
cillors — the latter of whom are elected by the inhabitants. 

In August 1377 the prosperity of the town was seriously 
checked by a French invasion. The ravages of the marauders 
were so destructive that for two years " no tenant was resident in 
the town," and a couple of centuries passed before it rose to any 
degree of wealth or importance. In 1582 its inhabitants were 
almost decimated by the plague. '' The road to Carisbrook (the 
mother-church) was blocked up by the dead-carts, and so crowded 
was the cemetery, that licence was accorded to the inhabitants to 
form a graveyard round their own church." But from this period 
the unfortunate town appears to have struggled into prosperity. 
A Town Hall and a Gaol were bmlt, and an ordinary established, 
at which Sir John Oglander — ^an island-worthy, whose MSS. are 
full of curious details — ^had known ^' twelve knights and as many 
gentlemen to attend.** Camden speaks of it as being, in his time, 
" a tonne well-seated and much frequented, populous with inhabi- 
tants, having an entrance into the isle from the haven, and a 
passage for vessels of small burden unto the key.** 

Newport became, in 1648, the stage whereon was played out 
one of the most remarkable scenes in the terrible drama of the 
Civil War. It had previously been disturbed from its propriety 
by a silly attempt of Captain Burley, a royalist gentleman of 
Yarmouth, to provoke a re-action on behalf of Charles L The 
outbreak was quickly put down by a detachment of soldiers from 
Carisbrook, and Captain Burley was seized, tried at Winchester 
for high treason, and executed on the 2d of February. The 
attachment of the majority of the inhabitants to the cause of the 
Parliament was not, however, to be questioned ; and Newport was 
accordingly selected as the most convenient place for the negotia- 
tions commenced between the king and his opponents in September 
1648. These negotiations took place in the Grammar School, 
the king occupying the house of a private citizen, his attendants 
being accommodated at the George Inn on the south side of High 
Street (now destroyed), and the Commissioners staying at the 
Bull (now the Bugle) Inn. 



/J2/ NEWPORT. V/^^^^^VA ^V^^'^ 

Newport has been represei)ited in Parliament by several 
hiatoiic worthies : Lord Falkland in 1640 — ^Admiral Sir Robert 
Holmes in 1678-89 — ^Lord Cutts, one of Marlborough's soldiers, 
1698 — ^Lord Palmerston in 1807 — ^and the Bight Honourable 
George Canning in 1826. Here were bom the learned anti- 
quarian divine, Thcmvas JamUy in 1571 ; his nephew, an erudite 
controversialist, Richard James; and Sir Thomas Fleming ^ who 
rose from a low estate to the dignity of Lord Chief-Justice of 
England, temp, James L 

The first point of interest to which the tourist, in Newport, 
should direct his steps, is the new Church, dedicated to St 
Thomas, and erected, 1854-7, at a cost of £12,000, and from 
the designs of Mr. DaukSST The old church dated from 1175, 
when it was erected by Bichard de Kedvers, and dedicated to the 
recently canonized Archbishop of Canterbury, Thomas k Becket. 
The memorials it contained are preserved in the new building — 
an Early Decorated structure, of great beauty of proportion and 
unusual richness of detail The tower at the west end is lofty 
and imposing. The nave *is clerestoried, and there are gabled 
aisles and a chancel, north and south chapels, and north and 
south porches. The west doorway is elaborately ornamented, 
and the interior exhibits much admirable and thoughtful decora- 
tion. The Pulpit (from the old church) dates from 1633. Its 
carvings were the work of one Thomas Caper, whose device — a 
goat, in allusion to his name — ^may be seen on its back. Justice . 
and Mercy figure on the sounding-board, which is lettered with a \U '■[ 
sentence from the Psalms : — " Cry aloud, and spare not : lift up ^ ,. .'-r 
thy voice like a trumpet." On the sides are sculptured a curious p. ' - 
personification of the Three Graces, the Four Cardinal Virtues, ^J-. ^- ,.• • 
and the Seven Liberal Sciences — grammar, dialectics, rhetoric, / 
music, arithmetic, geometry, astrology. Bemark the monument 
to Sir Edward H<yrsey, formerly captain of the island (1565-82), 
presenting his effigy, dad in armour, beneath a rich painted and 
gilded canopy, and an epitaph which ascribes to him many more 
virtues than, we fear, he possessed. The memorial (by Maro- 
chetti) erected by the queen to Charles the First's ill-£a.ted 
daughter, the Princess Elizabeth, is chastely beautifoL It repre- 
sents her as, according to tradition, she was discovered by her 
attendants, reclining in death upon her couch, her hands folded 
in prayer, and her face resting on the pages of an open Bible, a 
gift from her royal father. Her body was buried la the chancel 



yf / 



/ . / 



NEWPORT — GHUBOHES. 13 

of Old Newport Church on the 20th of September 1650, but its 
lesting-place was totally forgotten until, in 1793, some labourers 
engaged in digging a grave for the Honourable Septimus West, 
discovered the royal maiden's coffin. The place of interment was 
then indicated by a stone bearing a suitable inscription. 

The window of painted glass, on the south side of the chancel, 
is dedicated to the memory of officers and soldiers slain in the 
Crimean war, who had formerly been stationed at Parkhurst A 
medallion likeness, in white marble, of Prince Albert has been 
placed in the north aisle by the inhabitants of Newport. During 
a violent storm in the spring of 1866, the vane and a portion of 
the spire on which it stood, were blown down on a Sunday 
forenoon, and fell through the roof of the church ; but, fortunately, 
the clergyman had, in consequence of the storm, dismissed the 
congregation without the usual sermon, and scarcely had he done 
so when the accident occurred. The top of the spire which was 
so carried oflf, has only recently been restored. 

The Church of St. John, at Node Hill, on the road to Shide, 
13 a neat but commodious structure in the Early English style. It 
was erected in 1837 at the cost of about £4500. At Barton 
vniage, on the east side of the town, is St. Paul's Church, a 
neat edifice in the Norman style, erected in 1844 at the cost of 
about i£2000. 

The Independents have a handsome chapel in St. James* Street, 
erected, in 1848, on the site of a chapel first erected in 1699, 
and rebuilt in 1777. It is in the Early English style, and cost, 
together with its school, nearly £4000. There is another In- 
dependent Chapel at Node Hill, a Baptist Chapel in Castle- 
hold, a Roman Catholic Chapel in Pyle Street (where the ex- 
Emperor and Empress of the French attended mass, when on a 
visit to Osborne, in August 1857), several Methodist, and other 
places of worship. 

The Grammar School, founded in 1612 by Lord Chief- 
Justice Fleming, is a noticeable Jacobean mansion, much im- 
proved by the present head-master. The school-room remains in 
nearly the same condition as when it was occupied by Charles L 
during the negotiations which resulted in the abortive treaty of 
Newport. It was here the unfortunate monarch was seized by 
Major Rolph and his myrmidons, November 30, 1648, and from 
hence he was hurried to Hurst Castle. 

The Town Hall, from the designs of Nash, a semi-classica? 



14 NEWPORT. 

Btnicture. with Ionic portico and colonnade, was built in 1816. 
The lower portion is used as a market-house. The coundl- 
chamber is 30 feet long and 28 wide ; the magistrates* room, 
70 feet long by 30 feet wide. 

The Isle of Wight Literary Institution is a handsome 
stone building at the comer of High Street and St. James' Square, 
erected in 1 8 1 at the cost of about £3000. It has an extensive 
library, and a well supplied news room. The annual subscription 
is j£2 : 2s. The Isle of Wioht Museum, at the comer of St 
James' Street and Crocker Street, contains a large and interesting 
collection of antiquities, fossils, etc., connected with the island ; 
but, unfortunately, the arrangement and manner in which they 
are kept leave much room for improvement In Lugley Street is 
The Blue School, established in 1761 for educating and 
clothing poor girls. In St Thomas' Square, opposite the princi- 
pal entrance to the church, is the Com Exchange, which has 
recently been covered in and glazed. 

Snudl vessels come up the river with the tide as far as 
Newport, and the number of warehouses in the neighbourhood 
of its small quay show that in this way a considerable trade is 
carried on. It is also the centre of a considerable trade with the 
surrounding country. 

To the east of the town, on the road to Ryde, is the Lace 
Factory, which formerly employed about 200 hands in the manu- 
facture of Isle of Wight lace ; but this branch jof business having 
ceased to be remunerative, the establishment has lately been 
closed. 

About 2 miles below the town, on the west bank of the river, 
are the extensive cement works of Messrs. Francis Brothers and 
Co. of Nine Elms, London, who employ here about 100 hands in 
the manufacture of Portland and Medina cements. There are 
several nurseries about the town. 

The position of Newport, in a gentle valley, watered by the 
Lugley and the Medina, and sheltered by a cincture of noble 
downs, whose grassy slopes are constantly dappled with shiftinji 
shadows, cannot but commend itself to tibe tourist's attention 

** Set in the midst of our meridian Isle, 
By wandering heaths and pensive woods embraced. 
With dewy meads, and downs of open snule. 
And winding waters, naturally graced. 
The rural capital is meetly placed. 



PARKHURST FOREST. 15 

ITewport, so long as to the blue-eyed deep 

Thy river by its gleamy wings is traced. 

Be it thine thy portion unimpaired to keep ?" — Edmund Fed, 

The neighbourhood abounds in pleasant rambles, and the 
Branch Boutes we are about to indicate will conduct the travellei 
into a wonderful series of agreeable landscapes. 



NEWPORT TO PARKHURST FOREST. 

We leave Newport by St. James* Street, cross the shining 
waters of the Lugley, and passing the site of the ancient priory 
of Holy Cross, commence our ascent of Honey or Hunny Hill. 
The House of Industry, established by Act of Parliament in 
1770 for 'Hhe maintenance and employment of the poor of the 
Isle of Wight, by a general consolidation of the poor-rates ** — ^the 
prototype, in fact, of the new poor law system — ^is now conspi- 
cuous on our right. We next arrive at the Albany Barracks, 
named after the Duke of York and Albany, Commander-in-chief, 
and erected in 1798 — a congeries of red brick buildings which, 
however useful, are by no means ornamental The parade- 
ground is of great extent, and the barracks themselves are capable 
of accommodating between 2000 or 3000 soldiers. 

Just beyond stands the Parkhurst Prison, which was estab- 
lished in 1 838 as a " General Penitentiary for Juvenile Offenders ;" 
but owing to the establishment of reformatories in various parts, it 
came to be less required for its original purpose, and the juveniles 
have been removed. At present the building is used as a general 
prison for convicts ; but it has for some time been in contempla- 
tion to break up the establishment altogether. 

Away to the westward spreads the leafy demesne of Park- 
hurst Forest — a " cantle " of the old royal Park of Watching- 
well, the first royal chase established in England^ — still retain- 
ing the appellation of '' Forest,** though its primeval grandeui 
has entirely disappeared, and it now mainly consists of large 
j)lantations of stunted oaks and young firs. It offers^ neverthe- 
less, many pleasant walks ; many rambles tinder green leaves, 

* It is mentioned in Domesday Book as the King's Park, and ex- 
tended from the Medina to Newtown river, east to west^ and from the 
Aolent to tlie Chalk Downs, north to south. 



16 WEST OOWES. 

and through blossomy glades ; and the toTirisfs imagination will^ 
perhaps, people it again with "the antlered herd," as in the days 
when James L and Prince Charles hunted in the forest, and 
"killed a bocke" — (Aug. 2, 1609. Vide Parish Registers of 
Carisbrook). 

COWES AND NEWPORT RAILWAY. 

This convenient line of railway now connects the towns 
of Cowes and Newport. About midway is NORTHWOOD (popu- 
lation in 1871, 7374, including West Cowes), whose Church, 
dedicated to St. John the Baptist, remained a chapelry to Caris- 
brook until the reign of Henry VIIL Its general characteristics 
are Transition-Norman, and the south door is Norman, with a zig- 
zag moulding. It has recently been partially rebuilt and a new 
tower and spire added. 

WEST COWES. 

[Population, 6077. Hotels : The Marine, The Gloster, on fhe Parade (late the 
Boyal Yacht Squadron House), Vine, Fountain, Glohe, Oeozge, and Dolphin.] 

Leland speaks somewhat bombastically of the two forts 
established by Henry YIIL in 1539, on the eastern and western 
headlands of the Medina estuary : — 

"The two great Cows that in loud thunder roar, 
This on the eastern, that the western shore, 
Where Newport enters stately Wight.*' 

From the erection of this small castle, whose materials were 
obtained out of the ruins of the famous Abbey of Beaulieu^ dates 
the history of WEST COWES, though its growth was slow, and 
even in Charles the First's time it contained but half a dozen 
houses. The advantages afforded by its commodious harbour 
became, however^ gradually appreciated, and Sir John Oglander 
tells us that, in 1 620, he had seen 300 ships there at anchor. 
In 1811^ the port possessed 141 vessels or 4230 tons ; in 1857, 
168 vessels, or 8000 tons ; and in 1866^ 215 vessels, or 11,100 
tons. The receipt of customs rose from £2348 in 1846y to 
£3634 in 1865. 

The world-fSamous SHZP-BuiLDma Yards of the Messrs 



WEST OOWSS. 17 

fl 

White were origiBated in 1815. The Medina Dock was built 
in 1845 ; it is 330 feet long by 62 feet wide. The vessels 
launched by this enterprising firm are celebrated for their sea- 
going qualities. 

As a watering-place the popularity of West Cowes dates from 
the estabHshment of the Royal Yacht Club in 1812, and the 
foundation of a dub House in 1816. But its facilities for sea- 
bathing were appreciated at an earlier period. A rhymester, 
named Henry Jones, in a poem dedicated to the glorification of 
the Isle of Wight, and published in 1760, eiclahns — 

** No more to foreign baths shall Britain roam, 
Bnt plnnge at Cowes, and find rich health at home." 

The EoYAL Yacht Club includes about 150 members, and 
registers 99 yachts, which employ upwards of 1400 seamen, and 
presents a total of 10,000 tons. Each member has a warrant 
from the Admiralty to carry the St. George's ensign, and the 
yachts are admitted into foreign ports free of port-dues. The 
yachting season lasts from May to November. The Regatta 
takes place annually on the 21st of August, and two following 
days, and usually under the immediate patronage of Royalty. 
Entrance-fee, £l5 ; annual subscription, .£8. 

The Castle was purchased by the Club in 1856, and has 
been refitted and repaired at a considerable expense. For a long 
period it had simply served as a pleasant residence for a sinecure 
Governor. During the Commonwealth and Protectorate it was 
chiefly made use of as a state prison, and here Sir William Dave- 
nant, during his incarceration, wrote a portion of his epic of 
" Gondibert." A small garrison occupied it during the Revolu- 
tionary War. 

The Royal Landings at Cowes have been numerous. Henry 
Vin. disembarked here in 1538, and proceeded to Appuldur- 
combe, on a visit to his favourite Richard Worsley, captain of the 
island. On August 2, 1 609, it was visited by James I. and 
Prince Charles, on their way to enjoy the pleasures of the chase 
in Parkhurst Forest ; and on the 27 th August 1618, by Prince 
Charles alone, who afterwards patronized with his presence a 
military display. Charles L landed here, September 22, 1647, 
as a prisoner, on Ms way to Carisbrook ; and his cMdren, the 
Princess Elizabeth and the young Duke of Gloucester, on Tues- 

c 



1 8 WEST OOWES. 

day^ August 13| 1650. The Duke ot York, afterwards Jame? 
ILy was here in 1673. 

Morland, the artist^ resided at West Cowes for some months, 
in 1799. Sir Charles Fellowes, the Lycian traveller, was ako 
one of its more distinguished residents until his recent and 
much-lamented death. He erected the row of handsome houses 
known as The Terrace on the Marine Parade, and was un- 
ceasingly active in promoting the prosperity of the town. 

Beyond the Castle, and extending along the shore of the 
Solent is The Green, which has been recently laid out and pre- 
sented to the inhabitants by G. B. Stephenson, Esq., and forms an 
agreeable promenade. 

The Old Church of West Cowes (a chapelry of Northwood 
and a perpetual curacy in the gift of the Vicar of Carisbrook) 
was built in 1653, and consecrated, after the restoration of the 
Anglican Church, in 1662, by Morley, bishop of Winchester. In 
1811, it was enlarged and deformed, at the cost of George Ward, 
Esq. of Northwood Park, from the designs of Nash, by whom the 
hideous tower was added as a mausoleum for the Ward family 
The new church, the foundation-stone of which was laid 2d May 
1867, was opened on 28th May 1868. The Chapel of the Holt 
Trinitt, on the West Cliff, was founded in 1832 by Mrs. Goodwin. 
Its architect was a Mr. Bramble, of whose genius this structure 
affords no striking evidence. The National Schools were 
erected in 1821, on ground presented by the late Mr. Ward. 
The Dissenters possess various places of worship — thQ Independents, 
in Union Boad, the Wesleyans, in Birmingham Boad, and there 
is a Boman Catholic Chapel (dating from 1796) in Carvel Lane. 

Above the town, on the crest of the hill, stands the commo- 
dious Italian mansion, of stone, of Northwood Park, the seat of < 
W. G. Ward, Esq., the lord of the manor. 

[A pleasant walk along the JIabimx Paiudx leads to a honse, quaintly named 
EoTPT, now oonyerted into a large boaiding-schooL From this point may be 
enjoyed a smpxisingly heantifol proapect of the Hampshire coast, Eaglehnrst and 
Calshot Castle, and the mast-thronged Solent. The ramble may be oontinned to 
GVRMBT Bat, where Charles IL landed in 1671 on his way to Yannouth. The 
tin-trade is supposed by some authorities to have been carried on between a port 
which formerly existed here and Leap on the opposite shore. On the uplands above 
stands Woodyale (Admiral Ffarington). The low difb in the vicinity of Tbobhxss 
Bat consist of Bembridge limestone, and a few fossils may occasionally be obtained. 
The tourist may here ascend ftom the shore by Whippence Farm into fho hifl^ 
road, and return to West Oowes tiuougfa Lower Gockleton. 

The return to Newport may be varied by descending to the xiver bankatWEBBOv 



06B0BN1B. 19 

Pabm, crossing the Medixut to the Follt Ixtn (notable for its oyster IwnqoeU;, 
aseending into the East Cowes road, and so into Newport vid Fairlie.] 



NEWPORT TO OSBORNE and EAST COWES. 

The pTincipal points of interest in this short but agreeable 
route (6 miles) are quickly enumerated. Faiblib is an old and 
unpretending mansion^ formerly occupied by a branch of the 
ancient Oglmder family^ and pleasantly situated on. the uplands, 
above the winding river. The neat cottages erected by Her 
Majesty and the late Prince Consort on their estates, and the late 
Prince Consort's farm-buildings, are seen on our right From 
various points we command veiy good views of the river and 
valley of the Medina. 

A road on the left descends the hill-side to WHIPPINQHAM 
(population, 3730 — ie,y Wipinga's ham or settlement) — ^a parish 
which includes in its area of 4638 acres East Cowes and a con- 
siderable portion of the Osborne estate. The Church was re- 
built in 1860 by Mr. A. J. Humbert, under the direction of the 
late Prince Consort, who took a special interest in the work. It 
is a cruciform structure, Transition-Norman in style, with an 
aisled chancel, and large central tower surmounted by a spire. 
The interior is neat and chaste, and in the chancel is a white 
marble monument, by Theed, to the late Prince, erected by Her 
Majesty. Two angels are represented holding an immortelle, and 
crowning a medallion bust of the Prince. The monument records 
tnat it " is placed in the Church, erected under his direction, by 
his broken-hearted widow, Queen Victoria. 1864." In the 
interior is also a plain memorial to Dr. Arnold's father. 

A pretty rural lane now runs parallel for about three-quar- 
ters of a mile with the East Cowes road, and eventually joins it 
near one of the principal entrances of 



OSBORNE, 

This royal manor was anciently called Austerboume or 
Oysterboume, and derives its name, it is said, from the 
"oyster-beds of the Medina." From the Bowermans, an old 
idand-funily not yet extinct, the estate passed into the 



20 OSBORNE AND EAST OOWBS. 

hands of one Eustace Mann, who, during the troubles of the 
Civil War, buried a mass of gold and silver coins in a coppice 
still known as Money Coppice, and having forgotten to mark 
the spot, was never afterwards able to recover his treasure. A 
Mr. Blachford married his grand-daughter, and transmitted the 
estate to his heirs. From Lady Isabella Blachford it was purchased 
by Her Majesty in 1840, and it has since been enlarged by the 
addition of Barton and other demesnes until it includes an area 
of upwards of 5000 acres, — bounded, north by the Solent, south 
by the Ryde and Newport road, east by the inlet of King's Quay, 
and west by the Medina. The stone mansion, built by Mr. Blach- 
ford, was pulled down when the Queen became its possessor, and 
the present noble house erected, in the Italian style, under the 
direction of Mr. T.Cubitt. The campanile is 90 feet high, the 
flag-towef 112. The royal apartments are adorned by a large 
and choice collection of statuary and paintings, and look out upon 
terraced gardens, and a breadth of lawny slope which stretches to 
the very margin of the Solent. The surrounding grounds are of 
considerable beauty, and the farm is benefited by the introduc- 
tion of every modem improvement. The best view of Osborne 
is obtained from the water. Neither the house nor grounds are 
opened to the public. 

The manor of Barton, or Bfrton, lies to the east. An Ora- 
tory was founded here in 1272 by John de Insula and Peter de 
Winton, respectively the rectors of Shalfleet and Godshill, for the 
reception of an arch-priest, six chaplains, and a clerk, of the 
Augustinian order. Its lands were granted in the fifteenth cen- 
tury to Winchester College ; from whose authorities they were 
purchased by Her Majesty. The head steward of the royal 
estates resides in Barton Court House, recently rebuilt, but 
still retaining its characteristic Tudor front. 

The road skirts the Osborne estate for a considerable distance. 
Near the principal entrance, and adjoining the road which descends 
through East Cowes Park (an unfortunate building speculation) 
to East Cowes, stands the pretentious gateway of East Cowes 
Castle (Dowager Viscountess Gort), a tawdry specimen of 
Georgian Gothic, erected by Nash, the Regent Street architect, 
for his own residence. The grounds are admirably arranged. A 
noble conservatory, 250 feet long, is a splendid adjunct. The 
picture gallery and library are richly fitted up.] 

Lower down the hill, on the right, is Slatwoods (the lesi- 



BAST COWES. 21 

dence of B. Peacock Esq), which the tourist will regard with 
more than ordinary interest as the birthplace of the great and 
good Dr. Arnold (June 13, 1795). His father was collector of 
customs at East Cowes, and died here in 1801. The great 
historian and educational reformer never forgot the scene of his 
earlier days, and from the large willow-tree — still remaining in 
the grounds — ^transplanted slips successively to Laleham, Rugby, 
and Fox How. — {Carion, SiarU^'8 Life and Letters of Arnold), 

A private road, passing Spring Hill (W. 6. Shedden, Esq.), 
ascends to Nobbis Castle (Robert Bell, Esq.), a noble castellated 
mansion, built for Lord Henry Seymour by Sir J. WyattviUe. 
Its ivy-shrouded front is bold and picturesque ; and the glorious 
prospects which it commands of Southampton Water, and the 
spires and masts beyond — of the deep shadowy masses of the 
New Forest — ^and the greenly-wooded coast of the island even to 
St Helen's, are eminently striking in their constantly varying 
e£fects of light and shade. 

George IV. was received here by Lord Henry Seymour in 
1819, and it was a favourite residence of Her Majesty, while 
Princess Victoria. The Duchess of Kent occupied it in the 
summer of 1869. 

Retracing our steps, we plunge suddenly into the squalid 
streets of EAST CJOWES (population, 1954. EoUl : The East 
Medina), where it will be unnecessary to detain the tourist for 
any lengthened period. Of East Cowes Castle, which Henry 
VIIL constructed upon the ruins of a cell attached to the abbey 
of Beaulieu, and known as East Shahblord, there are no remains ; 
but its position is still known as Old Castle Point. (Shamblord, 
in the reign of Edward HI., was oue of the three principal ports 
of the Island.) Mr. Hamilton White has a shipbuilding estab- 
lishment below the Queen's private landing-place, called Falcon 
Yabd. a floating bridge connects East and West Cowes. 

The Chubch of East Cowes, dedicated to St. James, has 
recently been taken down and a new edifice erected in its place, 
from plans prepared by Mr. Hellyer of Ryde, and approved of 
by her Migesty. 

The tourist may return to Newport by boat if the tide per- 
mits ; or keep along the river-bank to the Folly Inn, cross to 
Werror Farm, ascend the slope to Northwood Church, and thence, 
by way of Parkhurst, ^' regaia the capital of the island.** 



22 



NEWPORT TO GODSHILL. 

We are inclined to consider the road from Newport to Gods- 
hill as one of the most picturesque in this part of the Wight 
On emerging from the town — Cleaving behind us, on our right, 
the churdi of St. John's — ^we quickly descend to Shide Bridge, 
on the Medina — a spot of some importance in the earlier history 
of the island — cross the Medina, and traverse the romantic valley 
that here breaks through the great barren of the central range of 
chalk hills. We follow the course of the river with but little 
variation until Blackwater is reached. Here the valley opens 
upon a smiling expanse of grassy plains, and the undulating 
downs roll far away to the east, like the crest of some enormous 
wave. At the base of Pan Down may be noted the plain brick 
building of STAin)EN House. To the right extend the leafy 
groves of Gatcombe, clustering in a pleasant valley, and watered 
by the winding river. Observe Gatcombe House (Mrs. Estcourt), 
and the square gray tower of Gatcombe Church, rising conspi- 
cuously and gracefully above their environment of ancient trees. 
In due time we reach Pidford House, about 3 miles from New- 
port, where a road diverges to Gatcombe, and another road, or 
lane, a short distance beyond, to Sheat Farm, and thence south- 
ward to Chillerton. Booklet, and its little schoolhouse, is our 
next point. Here we have a dioice of routes. The road to the 
left skirts the sloping sides of Bookley Down, and passes some 
sequestered farmsteads on its way to Godshill, affording some 
noble vistas of the southern downs, and the distant hill (of ferru- 
ginous sand) upon which Godshill Chxtrch raises its ancient 
tower, like a venerable landmark of the past. On our way we 
may endeavour to collect the fantastic navel-wort {cotyledon vm- 
hilicas), Tanacetum, and Datura stramonium. The other road at 
the Chequers Inn divides again, — one branch, by a circuitous 
route, reaching Godshill ; the lane to the right crossing Bleak 
Down, and proceeding by way of Lashmere Pond — ^an excellent 
locality for the botanist — ^to NrroN. 

Let us suppose that we have arrived at GODSHILL (popula- 
tion, 1215. Inn: The Grifi&n). This, the ''most romancy" (as 
old Aubrey would say) of the island-villages, abounds in bloom 
and leafiness, out of whose balmy depths rises the rugged church- 



OODSHILL. 23 

erested hill^ its abrnpt sides stadded with iiregular cottages^ and 
broken into flowery rifts and chasms. The Church, dedicated 
to All Saints^ is worth a visit, as well on account of its architec- 
tural merits and interesting memorials, as of its admirable and 
striking position. A panorama, only to be described by a poet, 
greets the spectator's eye from this insulated point. ^'To the 
north the gaze embraces the whole of the vale of Newchurch, 
with the undulating ridge of the chalk downs beyond, ending 
towards the valley of the Medina in the abrupt slope of St. Qeorge's 
Down. The white clifb of Culver are just descried over some 
rising ground to the right ; to the left we have the ridge separat- 
ing the valleys of the Yar and Medina, and the bold line of chalk 
downs which here take a due southerly direction. To the south 
the view is more varied. The northern front of the southern 
chalk range, with its bold projecting spurs, and sinuous valleys 
lies before us. Appuldurcombe, or Week Down, with its shattered 
obelisk, bold wall of cliff (the northern face of the firestone stratum, 
which gives its picturesque character to the Undercliff ), and rich 
hanging woods, rising immediately in front over the scattered 
houses and leafy knolls of the village ; to the west is the huge 
mass of St Catherine's, marked by the twin pharoses, and the 
slender Alexandrian pillar ; to tiie east rises the more pic- 
turesque outline of Shanklin Down, with its belt of timber half 
concealing its cliffs, on the summit of which stands the modem 
ruin of Cook's Castle" — {Venc^les). 

All Saints' Chubch is a cruciform structure, with a western 
Perpendicular tower, so like to those of Carisbrook and Chale, 
that it was probably erected by the same architect The two 
transepts are supplemented by small chapels. On the gable of 
the south transeptal chapel stands a singiilar Saints' or Sanctx 
Bell* turret The pordi contains two tablets blazoned with in- 
scriptions — one in Latin, the other a versified translation — ^in 
honour of Richard Oardy who liberally endowed the village 
school, t 

** The needy raised, 
And by the latest memory will be praised.*' 

* This bell was rang when the host was lifted up at the verse '' Holy, 
Holy, Lord God of Sabaoth." 

f Gkxlshill once possessed an excellent grammar school, the ohief is 
the island, founded in 1595 by Richard Andrews. 



24 GODSHILIi. 

Many remarkable memorials demand our attentdon in the in- 
terior^ which is spacious, lofty, and imposing. The best, perhaps, 
is the rich altar-tomb, temp, Henry VIIL, with fretted canopy, of 
Sir John Leigh and his wife Mary, The recimibent alabaster 
figures are well executed. Observe, also, the kneeling figures of 
Sir Jamet Worsley and his wife Anne ; the memorial to James 
Worsley, captain of the island, d. 1595, and his two sons, — 

•* Sorte perempti 
Prepropera, infesti pulveris igne jacent/' 

slain in boyhood by an accidental explosion of gunpowder in the 
gate-house at Appuldurcombe. The huge sarcophagus, with its 
busts and figures, erected by Sir Robert Worsley for himself and 
his brother Henry, and the pretentious monument to Sir Richard 
WoreUy, the last male of his famous line, erected by the late Earl 
of Yarborough, who married Sir Bichard's niece, may both be 
examined to be — condemned. 

Godshill was one of the six churches with which William 
Fitz-Osbert, after the Norman Conquest, endowed his favourite 
abbey of Lire, in Normandy. Charles L presented it to Queen's 
CoUege, Oxford. It was much injured by Ughtning in January 
1778. A tradition (of no uncommon character) attempts to ac- 
count for the peculiar name of the village. Its builders first pro- 
posed to erect it at the foot of the hill, but every morning found 
the preceding day's work undone, and their materiak carried to 
the summit. After a few days* perseverance they wisely resolved 
to struggle no longer against the invisible workmen, and built 
the church on the site indicated by the spirits, where it still stands 
— to all the country side around a stately beacon of the Christian 
faith. 

Dr. Henry Cole, a true " Vicar of Bray," who changed from 
Protestantism to Roman CatioUcism, and back again, according 
as Mary or Elizabeth sat upon the throne, and who ^' damn'd 
himself to everlasting fame" by consenting to preach the sermon 
when Cranmer was burnt, was bom at Godshill. 

[A day or two may be agreeably spent in examining this delightftil locality. 
The road to VENTNOR passes SAin>FOBD (where the AinXhemis Arvensis occnrs), 
Wrozall, and crossing the Downs, suddenly descends to the platean of the XTnder- 
diir. The walk to WHITWELL and ST. LAWRENCE may also be commended ; 
and an excursion should not fail to be made to Sbanklin, by way of Sandford^ 
French Mill, Whitely Bank, and Hungerberry Gopse.1 



CALBOURNE. 25 



NEWPORT TO CALBOUENE, 5j Milefc 

From Newport we strike forwaxd at once for Carisbrook 
(see post), but neglectiiig for the nonce its triple attractions — ^ita 
churcli^ its castle, and Boman villa — ^we turn aside, on the right, 
for Alvington or Bowcombb Down (Beau-combe, the fine valley), 
and dimb its abrupt acclivity. In the hollow beneath us, 
towards the north, lies the manor-house of Alvington, backed, so to 
speak, by the young oak-coppices and dark-green fir-dumps of Park- 
hurst Forest At Park Cross, 2^ miles, a road, right, branches 
off to Thomess, and thence by Tinker's Lane and Lower Cockle- 
ton into [West Cowes ; another, left, crosses the chalk billa to 
Bowcombe Farm. Continuing our route we reach (at 4 miles 
from Newport) the grounds and mansion of Swainston (Lady 
Simeon), included in the manor of Swainston, a manor an- 
ciently attached by King Egbert (a.d. 826) to the see of Win- 
chester, and retained by the bishops until John de Pontissera 
yielded it up to Edward L upon " mild compulsion." The manor 
was afterwards in the hands of the Montacutes, earls of Salisbury, 
the king-making Earl of Warwick, Clarence brother of Edward 
IV. and his victim, and the countess of Salisbury, beheaded in 
her gray hairs by Henry VJJLl. The countess's grand-daughter 
received the forfeited estates from the generosity of Queen Mary, 
and bestowed them and her hand upon Sir Thomas Barrington, 
from whom they have descended by marriage to their present 
proprietor. The house, a square stone mansion, about half a 
century old, contains some Early English fragments (ecclesiastical 
in character) of the ancient episcopal residence. The demesne is 
richly wooded, and to the north lies Watchingwbll, a portion 
of the old royal chase of Parkhurst Forest Southward runs a 
picturesque lane to Bowridge (where, in the neighbouring copses, 
may be found the beautiful Calamintha gyhatica, and on the 
downs several varieties of orchides), and across the Mils to Galli- 
BURY and BowBOROUGH, the sites of some andent Cdtic pit- 
villages. 

At a mile and a half from Swainston we gain the interesting 
village of CALBOURNE (population, 728. Iim: The Sun), 
partly situated round a pleasant green, adorned by its church and 



26 CALBOURNE. 

parsonage^ and watered by the stream — ^the Caxtl-bourne — from 
which it takes its name. All about this most charming village 
lie quarries, large and smaU, of freshwater limestone, where excel, 
lent specimens of the fossils peculiar to these strata may readily 
be obtained, and the botanist should be on the look out for 
the OrchiB ttstulata, Inula helemumy Verbena officinalis, Neottia 
ntdiis^viSf and Bupleurum rotimdtjlorivm, of which some fine 
plants are often procurable. 

The Church, dedicated to All Saints, was much altered and 
enlarged in 1836 by the late Sir Richard Simeon, to whom we 
owe the north pordi and the north transept (the Simeon mau- 
soleum), in the Early Decorated style. The Early English chan- 
cel and south aisle are both ancient Remark the east window, 
two separate lancet lights, surmounted by a foliated circle. In a 
slab inserted in the pavement of the south aisle is a good brass 
efSgy of an armed knight, temp, Edward III., supposed to com- 
memorate one of the Montacutes, lords of Swainston. A brass 
plate affixed to the north wall of the chancel is inscribed to the 
memory of the puritan minister of Calboume, the " reverend, 
religious, and learned -preacher, Daniel Evance,** with an anagram 
ou his name, " I can deal even.'' 

** Who is sufficient for this thinge, 
Wisely to harpe on every stringe, 
Bi^tly divide the word of troth 
To babes and men, to age and youth. 
One of a thousand where he *s found, 
So learned, pious, and profound — 
Earth has but few — there is in Heaven 
One who answers, * I can deal even.' " 

The rectory of Calboume, valued at £464 is in the gift of 
the Bishop of Winchester. Dr. Hopton Sydenham, a kinsman of 
Sydenham the Roundhead soldier, and Sydenham the physician, 
enjoyed the living &om 1638 to 1648. 

A short distance below the church, its grounds skirted by 
Lynch Lane (Leading to Calboume Bottom, and across the downs 
to Brixton), stands Westoveb, a modem house of no great 
pretensions, founded by the Holmes family, and recently occupied 
by their representative by marriage, the present Earl of Heytes- 
buiy (the Hon. W. Ashe A'Court, who assumed the name of 
Holmes on his marriage with the daughter and heiress of Sir 



GATOOMBX. 27 

Leonard Wordey Holmes). The late Loid HeTtesbuiy was 
governor of the Isle of Wight from 1851 to 1857, when he was 
succeeded by the Bight Honourable Lord Viscount Eversley, the 
present governor. 

[From Calboorne the tourist may prolong hia ezcnrsion by way of Newbridge 
(across the Newton riyerX Stoneover, Wellow, and Thorley, to Yabmooth, 6 miles; 
or he may torn aside at Newbridge, and proeeed through the river-watered meadow 
to Shai^fldet/S miles. Through Lynch Lane and Calboixme Bottom to Buxnur, 
3| miles, will be found a deUghtftd walk. From Calboorne to Freshwater Gate, 
6 miles, is an excursion of great interest and surprising beauty.] 



NEWPORT TO KINGSTON, vtd GATCOMBE. 

Six miles of woodland, meadow, and rugged heath ; six miles 
of agreeable, if not particularly strildng scenery, will be enjoyed 
by the traveller from Newport to Kingston, especially if he be 
not one of those who go " from Dan to Beersheba " to find, in 
their ignorance, that '' all is barren.*' As we leave Newport and 
its canopy of smoke— out of which, in simple beauty, rises the 
tall tower of the new church — ^in our rear, the gray walls and con- 
spicuous keep of Carisbrook Castle rise prominently on their 
insulated hill, and soon we penetrate the orchards of Whitcombe, 
clothing the green slopes with an admirable luxuriance of leaf 
and blossom. Just bdore we enter the park of Gatcombe, we 
pass, on our left, a lane, leading into the Blackwater road, which 
bears the appellation of Sandt Lanb. A romantic road, on the 
right, leads to the sequestered village of Gatcombb (population, 
260)— the QATB, or mouth, of the oohbb, or valley. 

Gatcombb Chuboh, dedicated to St Olave, raises its Perpen- 
dicular pinnacled tower above a mass of foliage, and in a deJl of 
tranquil loveliness. A new chancel was added in 1865. It 
contains a remarkable wooden effigy of an armed knight, ap- 
parently of the time of Edward L, and conmiemorating, perhaps, 
one of the Esturs^ anciently lords of the manor. The tradition 
among the villagers has long represented it as a figure of St. 
Bhadegnnd. 

The rectory of Gatcombe is enjoyed by the principal of St 
Edmund Hall, Oxford, having been purchased by the imiversity 
in 1821. 

Gatoombb House (Mrs. Estcourt) is a large stone mansion, 
built about 1750. ^The high knoUs of timber that back and 



28 NEWPORT TO SHORWELL. 

flank the building, and a lange of coppice that covers the steep 
precipice of a lofty hill on the south side^ sufiBiCiently mark out 
its beautiful situation" — i^yndhximC). 

Besuming our ramble^ we keep within the shelter of the 
hollow as fear as the old Jacobean manor-house of Sheat^ and then 
commence the ascent of the ravine which, at Chillerton, breaks 
through the chalk-hills. Turning aside, at length, from the lofty 
crest of Chillerton Down, the road which we foUow strikes into 
the open fields (lower greensand), passes Billinqham House, 
formerly a seat of one of the branches of the Worsley family, and 
reaches, in an exposed and somewhat desolate situation, the little 
church of Kinqston (population, 66), a low Early English build- 
ing, containing some good stained glass windows, and a brass, 
with effigies, to Sir Bdckard Mewysy d. 1535, and his four sons. 

In the neighbourhood will be found the plants characteristic of 
the lower greensand districts : — ^bristle bent {Agrostis aetacea), the 
Knapweed, Ox-eye, SileTie anglica, Filago minimay and Taruibcetvm, 



NEWPORT TO SHORWELL. 

From Newport to Shorwell is 5 miles. The tourist leaves 
Newport by the High Street, and that continuation of it which is 
known as Castle Hold, ^ once a sort of Alsatia, the privileged 
resort of the bad characters of the neighbourhood, in which a 
conventicle was forcibly dispersed in 1683" — (Venables) ; tra- 
verses the tree-bordered Mall, a favourite promenade with the 
beaux and belles of Newport ; crosses the crystal rivulet of 
Carisbrooe ; ascends the hiU whose flank is covered with the 
pleasant village, and, turning off to the left, winds past the 
Vicarage into the Fair Valley — ^the leafy hollow of Bowcombe. 
(For a full account of the antiquities of Carisbrooe, see 
'^ A Day at Carisbrook," jmt) The scenery here increases in 
attraction. The gray old castle, lonely and magnificent, crowns 
the hill on our left, and soon the road creeps in and about the 
sloping sides of overhanging downs, occasionally . passing an 
ancient farmstead, a pretty rose-trellised cottage, or a clump of 
ancient trees. (At Bowborough Farm, on the- right, a steep lane 
diverges to the Ancient British Settlement, a pit-villagt well 
worth examination, lying in the hollow between Gallibury and 
Bowborough Downs.) Li due time we come to the summit of 



SHORWELL. 29 

the chalk-range, and descend into the valley of Shorwell, the 
road for some distance skirting the grounds of Northooubt (Sir 
EL P. Gordon), a stately Jacobean mansion, commenced by Sir 
John Leigh. The terraced gardens are of great beauty, and 
command some admirable views of the adjacent country, and the 
gleaming waters of the distant Channel In a woody hoUow is a 
mausoleum containing a stately sarcophagus of white marble in 
memory of Miss C. Bull, erected by her sister, a former proprietrix. 
In the grounds rises a crystal spring, which gives name to the 
neighbouring village. 

SHOBWELL (population, 612) rejoices in a position of 
more than ordinary beauty, and a church of more than ordinary 
interest The latter building, dedicated to St. Peter, was well 
restored by the late vicar, the Eev. E. Eobinson, and a visit to it 
should on no account be omitted by the tourist It consists of a 
nave and chancel, with little constructional difference, north and 
south aisles — separated from the body of the church by low rude 
arcades — and tower and spire at the west end. A curious fresco, 
illustrative of the life and adventures of St Christopher, orna- 
ments the waU over the north door. It is in tolerable preserva- 
tion. The stone pulpit, paneUed and canopied, with its iron 
hour-glass frame, temp, James L, will attract the visitor's atten- 
tion. The font is of the same period. A brass commemorates 
a former vicar of Shorwell, Richard Bethell, d. 1518 ; and to the 
Leighs of Northcourt there are numerous interesting memorials. 
Kemark, especially, the singular brass plate erected by Barnabas 
Leigh in honour of his two deceased wives, Mrs, Elisdbeth Bamjh 
Held, d. 1615, and Mrs, Oartrude Fercevall, d. 1619, with a com- 
plimentary allusion to his third spouse, then living. One wife 
is foUowed by a train of children ; the other stands solitary and 
childless. Equally worthy of notice is the memorial to Sir John 
Leigh, of Northcourt, d. 1629, and his great grandchild Barnabas, 
who died seven days after him. The inscription is in singular 
taste, or want of taste : — 

'* Inmate in grave he took his grandchild heire, 
Whose Boul did haste to make to him repaire, 
And BO to heaven along, as little page, 
With him did poast to wait upon his age." 

Observe, too, the memorials tc Lady Elizabeth Leighy d 



30 NKWPOET, VIA YABMOUTH, TO PBBSHWATER GATJ5. 

1619 — ^'^Sixteene a maid, and fiffcie yeares a wife ;" and Joh-n, 
Leigh, d 1688. 

The chalice and paten are of curious workmauahip. The 
latter was purchased abroad by the late vicar^ and though un« 
ouited to its sacred office, displays consideiable artistic excellence. 
Twelve medallions of the Caesars encircle a representation of Eve's 
temptation of Adam, which is also surrounded by an emblematic 
border, allegorizing " Musique, Grammatique, Aremitique, Astro- 
nomic, Minerve, and Betorique." The chalice is dated 1569. 

From ShorweU the tourist may proceed to BKIXTON, 2 
miles, or through Kingston to Chalb, .5 miles, and BLACKGANG 
CHINE, ^ nule. Oeranium Ittcidttm and Cainpanula trachelium 
occur ia tiie lanes near ShorwelL 



NEWPORT, via YARMOUTH, to FRESHWATER GATE. 

[Shalfleet, 6 m. ; Thorley, 4 m. ; Yarmouth, 1 m. ; Freshwater Village, 2 m. 
Freshwater Gate 1^ m.] 

Throughout all the isle 

There was no covert, no retired cave 

Unhaunted by the mnrmnroas noise of waves. 

Eeats. 

The Yarmouth Road diverges from the West Cowes Boad 
near the ALBANY BARRACKS, and traversing the growing 
plantations of Parkhurst Forest, passes the ancient farm of 
YiTTLEFiELD, 2^ miles, and at Watghinowell, 3^ miles, plunges 
into a pleasant breadth of green oak-coppices. For this road we 
are indebted, it is said, to brave old Sir Robert Holmes — ^Diyden's 

Holmes, — 

" Holmes, the Achates of the general*s fight, 
Who first bewitched oar eyes with Guinea gold," — 

but its present excellent condition dates from a more recent 
period. Some agreeable landscapes, enlivened by the many 
branches of the Newtown river, greet our eyes as we press for- 
ward to Shalfleet, but, until we arrive at that not too lively 
village there is really nothing to bid us pause. At Shalfleet 
(population, 1196) we may stop awhile to examine its Norman 
Chubgh, for that it was originally built by Norman architects, its 
low, vast tower, with its plain Btring-course, is a sufficient proo£ 



NEWTOWN. 31 

llie north doorway is also Norman, and the tympanum is filled 
up with a cnrions scnlptore of a priest resting his hands on twx) 
heraldic grifiEins, though some antiquaries will have it that the 
allegory so rudely carved represents David contending mth the 
Lion and the Bear, The remainder of the building is Early 
Second Pointed, or Early Decorated, and its most interesting 
features are the windows in the south aisle, the chancel-arch, and 
the arcades which separate the nave from the aisles. Bemark 
the rudely sculptured shields, dated 1630, in the south aisle, 
and the monumental slab which lies on the chancel-floor ; the 
latter, measuring 5 feet 10 inches, is adorned with shield and 
spear, and evidently dates from the early part of the twelfth 
century. 

The vicarage of Shalfleet, valued at ^£210, is in the gift of 
the Lord Chancellor. 

From Shalfleet a very delightful lane leads to NEWTOWN 
(Inn : the Newtown Anns), a scattering of cottages along the 
shores of a navigable creek. It is worth visiting on account of 
its peculiar scenery, but retains nothing of its former importance. 
Up to 1832 it was a parliamentary borough, returning two 
members, and was as '' close" a borough as Grampound or Hasle- 
mere. John Churchill, afterwards Duke of Marlborough (1678- 
81), Admiral Sir Thomas Hopson (1705), and George Canning 
(1793, 1806, 1807), were among its representatives. Certain 
lanes are still known as Gold Street, Quay Street, and High Street, 
and are supposed to indicate its former extent 

The first charter of Franchevillb (as it was originally called), 
was granted by Aymer, bishop of Winchester ; a market was 
allowed it by Edward XL It was destroyed by the Danes in 
1011, but recovered from the blow. In 1377 it was again 
devastated, this time by the French, but did not recover. Though 
out of the ashes of the unhappy Francheville sprang the borough 
of Newtown. 

The Church, dedicated to the Holy Spirit, is a chapeby to 
Calboume. It was erected from the designs of Mr. Liveaay, in 
the Early English style, and incorporated a few fragments of the 
ancient building. In the Town Hall, built in 1699, and now 
used as a school-house^ is preserved a silver mace of liie time of 
EdwaidlV. 

Some tolerable trout-fishing may be ei\}oyed in a branch of 



32 NEWPORT^ VIA TABMOUTH^ TO FUB&flWATiflEt GATE. 

the NeTvtowD river, and the botanist will find on its banks several 
notable aquatic plants. The salterns below the Chnich shonld 
be examined. ¥iom sea-water, collected in laige shallow pans, 
the salt is procured by a series of evaporating processes. 



Branch Route — Shalfleet to Calbourne. 

For the sake of the lover of the picturesque we indicate this 
pleasant ramble. It is equally agreeable whether he adopts the 
shortest road, and makes his way into Shalfleet by Elm Copse 
and Stoney Cross, or traverses the meadows by the bank of the 
Newtown river, turning into the Calbourne road at Newbridge ; 
or, finally, selects a most circuitous but interesting path, and 
passes Warlands — so named from the ancient proprietor, Walleran 
Trenchard ; Ningwood (Rev. T. Cottle), a picturesque old manor- 
house ; and Dodpits, a large quarry abounding in the freshwater 
limestone fossils. 



MAIN ROUTE RESUMED— SHALFLEET to YARMOUTH. 

A mile or so past Shalfleet, and close to the little rural bridge 
which carries the Yarmouth road across Ringwood Creek, a lane 
turns aside, on the left, to Ningwood Farm. The tourist then 
turns his face to the west, passes Wellow — said to be the site of 
the "Waltham" referred to in the Saxon Chronicle, anno 1001, 
as destroyed by the Danes — ^and following, with tolerable exact- 
ness, the course of a branch of the River Yar, arrives,at 10 miles 
from Newport, at THORLEY (population, 154), situated in a ripe 
agricultural district, but scarcely noticeable for other considera- 
tions. Its bam-like Church, dedicated to St. Swithin, has 
neither spire, nor tower, nor gables, nor interesting memorials — 
has nothing in its exterior or interior to attract the eye but a 
curious bell-turret over the south porch. 

We pass the church, cross the Thorley rivulet, and quickly 
ascend to the bank of the Solent, along which the road now 
runs, at ft slight elevation, and in fall exposure — as experience 
has taught us — ^to a vast variety of winds, but commanding some 
peculiarly striking views of Lymington river. Hurst Castle, the 
New Forest, and the general line of the Hampshixtt coast. The moat 



TARMOUTE. 33 

and drawbridge whicli formerly protected the entrance to Yar- 
mouth no longer exist, and the stranger goes on his way rejoicing 
and unchallenged. 

YARMOUTH (population, 720. Inns: The George, the Bugle 
— ^the former the ancient mansion of Sir Robert Holmes, where he 
entertained Charles H. in 1671 ; the latter containing an excellent 
collection of local birds made by the landlord, Mr. Butler, a good 
shot, and a skilful taxidermist) will be found a convenient jmnt 
iT ajppui by the tourist who meditates a thorough e;icploration oi 
the extreme west of the island. It is an old decayed town, with 
an old-world look about it, though it possesses no antiquities 
wherewith we may ''point a moral, or adorn a ttjle ;" but the 
recent establishment of a steamboat and railway communication 
with London, via I^ymington, and the erection of a bridge across 
the mouth of the Yar, may perhaps galvanize it into life. Its 
position is very attractive : Alum Bay, the Needles, and Fresh- 
water Gate, being within a day's easy ramble ; and to the invalid 
its clear fresh air must be of unusual benefit. It is less exposed 
than Ryde to keen eastern winds, and than Yentnor to a glaring 
burning sim. 

''Once upon a time" — ^that is, in the thirteenth century, 
when it was incorporated by Baldwin de Redvers, Earl of Devon 
— ^it was a place of some importance, and much frequented as a 
port of communication with the mainland. John Lackland 
visited it In 1206, and again in 1209, on each occasion residing 
here for a few days. A heavy blow was dealt to the prosperity 
of the rising town in 1277, when it was burnt to the ground by 
the marauding French, and a still heavier stroke* was its second 
occupation by the same foe in 1524. A few years later (1639) 
a round port, or castle, wa^ erected for its protection by Henry 
YHL Up to 1832, and from the 27th of Elizabeth, it returned 
two members to parliament, its representativefl being always 
selected by the Holmes fEunily. The number of electors whose 
" most sweet voices" were thus expressed in parliament seldom 
exceeded nine. 

The trade in the town consists in the importation of cattle — 
about 12,000 head annually— Ksoals, and slate, and iron. A litUe 

com is exported. 

^ The Castle commands tlie entrance to the Yav, and is nothing 
but a semicircular battery, armed with four guns. But it is, w« 

D 



S4 YARMOUTH. 

believe^ in pursuance of the recommendations of the recent 
defence commission, to be considerably enlarged and strengthened. 
It occupies the site of the church destroyed by the French in 
1624. 

The present Church was erected 1611-1614, by private 
subscriptions, and the results of a brief issued for that purpose. 
It consists of a nave, north and south aisles, chancel, north and 
south chapels, and square tower. To the architectural student it 
will scarcely be an object of admiration. In the south chapel 
stands a remarkably fine statue of white marble (by Kysbrach ?), 
beneath an arched canopy, which solid Ionic colunms of porphyry 
support, of Sir Bobert Holmes, governor of the island, 1667-1692, 
and one of the stoutest seamen of the time. A ponderous epitaph 
in Latin records the principal events of his career ; his birth at 
Mallow, county of Cork — ^his gallant deeds as a soldier under 
Prince Rupert and Charles I. — his successes against the Dutch 
on the coast of Guinea — ^his capture of the Dutch colony of 
Nova Belgia, now so famous as New York — his foray in the 
roads of Vlie, where he burnt the villages on the coast, two 
ships of war, and 140 merchantmen — ^his attack upon the Dutch 
Smyrna fleet of merchantmen — ^and, finally, his long governorship 
of the island. He was knighted by Charles 11. in 1666. 

The body of the statue — ^an exquisite work of art — ^as well 
as the sculptor engaged upon it, were captured, it is said, by 
Holmes on board a French ship. It was intended to be com- 
pleted with a head of Louis XIV., but Holmes "compelled 
the sculptor to :reo6Lve him as a sitter/' instead of le Grand 
Monarque. The rough old seaman conferred many benefits upoi^ 
Yarmouth ; ancT the embankment of its marshes was carried out 
under his direction. 

The Town Hall, rebuilt in 1764, is one of the plainest of 
plain buildings. The National Schools, erected in 1855-6, are 
a pleasing specimen of modcom Elizabethan. 



Branch Route prom Yarmouth to Freshwater Gate. 

(East of the Yar.) 

This brief but pleasant ramble will conduct the pedestrian 
through the little hamlet of THORLEY (see ant^)y and then, in a 
south-west direction, to Wilmingham. Skirting the great hui;e 



FRESHWATER GATE. 35 

barrier of the central downs, and penetrating the wooded valley 
of the Yar, we soon arrive at the Calbourne road, and turning to 
the right pass Apton Farm, and, afterwards, Afton House (B. 
Cotton, Esq.), a well-looking mansion, situated on the hill-side 
which slopes to the Yar. (Ap, Avon — the generic British word 
for " water/*) A quarter of a mile more, and we find ourselves 
in the tiny hamlet of Easton, from whence a green lane on the 
right leads to Farringford, the residence of Alfred Tennyson. 
Turning to the left we, however, now plunge through the 
narrow " gate " or opening in the chalk-range, formed by the 
little Yar, and arrive at FRESHWATER GATE, in face of the 
foaming channel, which here, as Tennyson says, 



** Tumbles a breaker on chalk and sand." 

A few yards inland, and separated from the sea only by a 
narrow bank of shingle and pebbles — a strip of beach, which, in 
stormy weather the ocean does not always respect as a barrier — 
is the source of the Yar. The river is tidal from Yarmouth to 
Freshwater Mill, a distance of about two miles. 

At Freshwater Gate there are two good Hotels — Plumhle^s, 
and the Albion. The neighbourhood is famous for its romantic 
beauty and savage grandeur, while to the geologist it affords an 
inexhaustible store of speculation and study. 

MAIN ROUTE RESUMED— YARMOUTH to FRESHWATER 

GATE. (West of the Yar.) 

Instead of adopting the circuitous route through Wilmingham, 
Thorley, and Afton, which we have just described, and to which 
equestrians and " carriage folk " were formerly confined, we may 
now cross the estuary of the Yar by the new bridge, and proceed 
through the delectable village of Freshwater to Freshwater Gate. 
On the shore, facing the Lymington river, and commanding the 
finest views imaginable of Hurst Castle, the Solent, and the 
Hampshire coast, is situated Norton, a collection of cottages and 
decent villas. Here are Norton Lodge (the seat of Sir Andrew S. 
Hammond), The Marina' (Rear- Admiral Crozier), Hill Lodge, 
(Capt. T. W. Pixley). 

Climbing the hill which overlooks the shimmering waters of 
the Yar — at high water the scene is calmly beautiful — we pass 
through More Green, and descend into 



36 FRESHWATER GATE. 

FRESHWATER, 

(Population, 2688. Inn : The Red Lion), 2 miles, a village veiy 
agreeably situated, and offering, from some points of yiew, pio* 
turesque " bits " which the sketcher wiU do well not to neglect 
At its Rectory was bom, July 18, 1635, the ingenious and 
erudite Dr. Robert Hooke, one of the earliest members of the Royal 
Society, and the great improver of the pendulum. Dr. Wood, the 
mathematician, was rector of Freshwater ; died 1839. 

The Church, dedicated to All Saints, is a Transition-Norman 
building, with a singular arched tower of unusual construction. 
The nave is divided from the aisles by two pointed arches, and 
the chancel is supported by north and south chapels of a later 
date. Remark the rood-screen, and the pulpit {temp, James L) ; 
the ancient Transition-Norman recess in the south wall ; and the 
characteristic epitaph which commemorates « the most virtuous 
Mrs. Aivne Toppe, in her widowhood, by a memorable Providence, 
preserved out of the flames of the Irish rebellion," d. 1648. 

The rectory is in the patronage of the Master and Fellows of 
St. John's College, Cambridge, to whom it was granted by Lord- 
Keeper WUliams in 1623. 

In our route to Freshwater Gate we may include Farring- 
FORD House, already referred to as the residence of the author 
of the " IdyUs of the King." In a lyric addressed to the Rev. 
F. Maurice he speaks of it pleasantly : — 

" Where, far from noise and smoke of town, 
I watch the twilight falling brown 

All roand a careless-ordered garden, 
Close to the ridge of a noble down." 

In the bay, formed by the action of the sea upon the huge 
clifls of chalk which here defend the Wight, rises the Arohed 
Rock, one of two isolated masses of chalk separated from the 
cliff by natural causes. Long ago, in tiie dim obscurity of a 
Past which ended, perhaps, before human annals had a begin- 
ning, the ceaseless ocean swept away the softer portion of the 
rock, and feishioned, in all its inimitable beauty, this mighty 
natural curiosity — ^this Triumphal Arch of the Waters, througla 
which, ever and anon, they roll in grand procession, as if to the 
sounds of martial music A similar mass, at no great distance 
from it, is called the Staq Rock. 

This part of the coast was often sketched by the artist Moxt* 



THE NEEDLES POINT. 37 

land^ who made here some of his studies of fishermen^ and was 
accustomed to frequent a small cabaret, '^ affording every accom- 
modation," says Hassell, "a traveller could wish for" — called 
The Cabin (aj). 1799). 



ALUM BAY, THE NEEDLES, and CLIFF END. 

No excursion in the Isle of Wight is, probably, more popular 
with tourists than that which we are now about to indicate. We 
regret that our limits will not permit us to dwell upon its attrac- 
tive features with the minuteness which they deserve, and our 
familiarity with them would suggest. Days which we mark 
especially with a white chalk, and whose impressions are never 
to be forgotten, have been devoted by us to their thorough exa- 
mination ; and the pedestrian who surveys them with " leisurely 
love" will have no reason to consider his time mis-spent 

Passing the new Fort, planted on a plateau scooped out of 
the lofty cliffs, we traverse tJie ridge of the High Downs, rising 
to the height of 716 feet above the sea, the ridge gradually 
narrowing as it approaches the Needles Point, where it breaks off 
abruptly in a bold bluff, overhsmging the seething waters. ** The 
view from hence," says Mr. Thome, " is glorious, and the bahny 
breezes come over the wide waters with that delightful freshness 
which is never felt but in wandering along the lofty hills that 
rise at once from the ocean. The 'dreadful trade' of gathering 
samphire is still practised here. Samphire grows abundantly 
on these cliffs, and is in common use as a pickle among the 
poorer classes. But the main inducement to practise the perilous 
eraft is the profit arising from the sale of the eggs and feathers of 
the various sea-birds which build in surprising numbers on the 
ledges and in the crevices of the cliffs. In order to get at these 
eggs, the men fasten a rope to an iron bar which they have driven 
firmly into the ground, and then placing themselves on a rude 
seat, formed of two pieces of wood placed across, they lower them- 
selves, by means of a second rope, down the face of the cliff. 
The practice is almost as dangerous as it appears to be ; many a 
bold man has lost his life in pursuing it." 

A new LiGHTHonsB was erected (1859) on the outermost 
Needle rock, the old one having often been rendered useless by 
the thick mists which, at certain seasons, enveloped it. 



38 THE NEEDLES — ALUM BAT AND CLIFF END. 

The Needles. The celebrated Needles are five " isolated 
masses of the extreme west point of the middle range of Downs, 
which have been produced by the decomposition and wearing 
away of the rock in the direction of the joints or fissures with 
which the strata are traversed. The angular or wedge-shaped 
form of these rocks has resulted from the highly-inclined north- 
ward dip of the beds of which they are composed." The appella- 
tion NeedUs has been traced by some to the German nieder feU^ 
or " nether cliff ;" but, more probably, was suggested by the 
numerous pinnacles starting up from each rugged mass, or by the 
lofty conical rock, 120 feet high, known as " Lot's Wife," which 
f^U into the sea, in 1764, with a clash and a roar audible at 
Portsmouth harbour. The channel between the Needles and the 
Dorsetshire coast is called The Race. " There is something im- 
posing," wrote Mr. Rush, the American ambassador, in 1817, 
" in entering England by this access." " I afterwards," he con- 
tinued, " entered at Dover in a packet from Calais — my eye fixed 
upon the sentinels as they slowly paced the heights. But those 
cliffs, bold as they are, and immortalized by Shakespere, did not 
equal the passage through the Needles." 

Retracing our steps for a short distance, we may descend the 
northern slope of the Down by a rugged footpath to the Waeren, 
a broad rugged tract of heath between the Down and EEeadon 
Hill. Behind us may be noted the Needles Bay Hotel. F^^mu 
the Warren we descend, through a narrow rift or chine, to the 
shore, after passing the Eoyal Hotel ; then, tiuning to the 
left, find ourselves in Alum Bat. The effect produced by its 
wonderfully coloured cliffs contrastbig with the glittering masses 
of the snowy Needles, is very curious and delightfuL The strata 
are vertically arranged, and their tints are so bright and so 
varied that they have not the appearance of anything natural : — 
" Deep purplish-red, dusky blue, bright ochreous-yellow, grey 
approaching nearly to white, and absolute black, succeed each 
other, as sharply defined as the stripes in silk ; and after rain tne 
sun, which from about noon till his setting in summer illumi- 
nates them more and more, gives a brilliancy to some of these 
nearly as resplendent as the high lights on real silk" — {EngU' 
field), 

Septaria (cement-stones), occur here on the shore, and fosaila 
are also numerous. The alvm which gives name to the bay is 
no longer gathered for commercial purposes^ but considerable 



HEADON HILL. 39 

quantities of the white sands found at the foot of Headon Hill 
are exported for use in glass factories^ and the coloured sands, as 
every visitor to the island knows, are arranged in fantastic forms 
as pictures or ornaments for sale to curious strangers. 

A small spring issuing from the chalk cliff is known as 
Mother Large's Well ; the same old lady^s Eitghen is a cavern 
at a slight distance further, which a constant percolation of water 
renders, we fear, unpleasantly damp. 

Headon Hill, 397 feet (with its new fort), must certainly 
he ascended hy every tourist in search of the picturesque. Gol- 
well and Totland bays, the Tall'ey of the Yar, the wooded lanes 
and green meadows between Yarmouth and Newtown, Hurst 
Castle, Lymington, the distant shadows of the New Forest, are 
included in the magnificent prospect which it overlooks. The 
geologist will notice here the junction of the chalk with the 
freshwater deposits and the London clay. The eocene strata, from 
the uppermost bed in Headon Hill to the chalk, are 1660 feet in 
thickness. 

From Headon Hill the tourist may push along the cliff to 
Colwell Chine. (At Colwell, a few yards inland, is a small Inn, 
fhe NeUon Arms) Colwell Bay is bounded, south, by Warden 
Point, terminating in the dangerous reef known as Warden 
Ledge. The view from here is very fine. Among the fossils 
which occur are, — ^the Cytheria incrassata, Neritina concava, and 
several kinds of Cerithia. Near Bramble Chine are some banks 
of oysters of considerable thickness. 

The north extremity of Colwell Bay is called Cliff's End, 
and protected by the Albert Fort, a battery mounting 40 guns, 
whidi is, we believe, to be enlarged and strengthened. On the 
site of Caret's Sconce, a blockhouse erected in the reign of 
Elizabeth by Sir George Carey, stands Victoria Fort, with 50 
guns, which is also to receive additional defensive works. Be- 
tween the Sconce and Cliff's End formerly stood Worslet's 
Tower, erected by Bichard Worsley, captain of the island, about 
1544. From hence to Hurst Castle, three quarters of a mile, 
runs the submarine electric telegraph cable. 

The return to Freshwater Gate may be made by way of 
Norton, More Green, and Freshwater, or from Cliff's End, through 
Colwell, Pound Green^ Middleton, Farringford and Easton. 



40 OOABT BOUTB — ^FBBSHWATEB GATE TO TABMOUTB. 

COAST BOUTE from FRESHWATER GATE to YARMOUTH, 

BY Sailing Boat. 

We shall now point out the principal points of interest to be 
observed by the voyager along the western coast of the Wight, 
from Freshwater Gkite to Yarmouth. 

Rounding the point protected by the new Fort, we imme- 
diately enter Watcombb Bat, whose wall of cliff is burrowed by 
four cavernous recesses, and its feurther extremity denoted by a 
pyramidal mass of rock, rudely but fentastically shapen. The 
cliffs, beneath whose dark shadow we glide along, gradually rise 
to a height of 617 feet, — ^this eastern portion being known as the 
Nodes, the western portion (as far as Sun Comer) as the Main 
Bench. There are numerous cavities in the face of the cliff, 
from one of which percolates a sweet, cold spring of fresh water. 
The larger and mere important recesses, which we pass in the 
following order, are fantastically named : — 

(i. Neptune's Cavies, one of which is 200 feet deep ; the other 90 feet. 

2. Bar Cave, 90 feet deep. 

8. Frenchman's Hole, 90 feet deep. 

4. Lord Holmes' Parlour, where that noble goremor of the island was wont to 
entertain his friends. His Kitchen and CELLABiare close at hand. 

6. Boo's Hall, said to be 600 feet in height 

6. Preston's Boweb. 

The Wedge Bock, a triangular mass, 12 feet by 8, wedged in between the cliff and 
an isolated pyramidical rock, some 60 feet high ; and the Old Pepper Bock, wiB 
serve to indicate to the tourist the commencement of the Main Bench.] 

Bounding the bold abrupt headland of Sun Corneb, we sail 
into Scbatchbll's Bat, where the clifis are about 400 feet in 
height, and the sea has hollowed out a stupendous Abched 
Cavebn, which the voyager should assuredly land and explore. 
" Its edges are worn to an astonishing thinness by the action of 
wind and rain ; a segment, as it were, of a dome, from beneath 
which he looks out on the ocean, with all its solenm breadth and 
sparkling points rolling away^ till it seems piled up against the 
sky" — {Sterling), 

The Needles Cave is a recess, about 280 feet in depth* 

Of the Needles we have already spoken, and of Alum Bay, 

whose glowing walls now dazzle the admiring eye. Rounding 

Hathebwood Points (beneath Headon Hill) we lose sight of thfe 

chalk, and come upon the darker cliffo of the eocene formation. 



FRE8HWATEB BAT. 41 

We now enter Totlands Bat ; pass Warden Point ; shoot into 
CJoLWELL Bay ; observe the " grinning brazen mouths " of the 
guns of Albert and Victoria Forts, which, with those of Hurst 
Castle^ completely command the entrance of the Solent ; and, in 
due time, glide into the sheltered harbour afforded by the estuary 
of the Yar, and land at Yarmouth. 



FRESHWATER GATE to VENTNOR. 

LBrook» 4 m. ; MottiBtone, 1 m. ; Brixton, 2 in. ; Chale, 6^ m. ; Blackgang, } m. ; 
Sandrock Hotel, 1^ m. ; St Lawrence, 2 m. ; Steephill, 1 m. ; Ventnor, 1 m.] 

[A military road has recently been formed at considerable expense between 
Freshwater and Chale, and which is to be continued to Sandown, thus connecting 
the two principal military positions on the island. It runs for the most part at no 
great distance from the coast, and the traveller may occasionally avail himself of 
it with advantage. Unfortunately it sometimes interferes with the natural beauty 
of thescenei'J 

" The prospects from Alton Down have always been famous ; the 
view over Freshwater is especially striking. Freshwater Bay 
stretches round in a splendid curve, the chalk cliffs rising per- 
pendicularly to a height of some 500 or 600 feet above the sea. 
Beyond is the broad belt of ocean^ along which ships of all sizes 
are constantly passing to and fro. In the extreme distance lies 
• 5 the coast of Dorset, which is visible from Poole Harbour to 
.'^ ,\'^ ^Portland Bill, while the foreground obtains boldness and strength 
."N from the shattered and detached masses of rock that lift their 
r heads far above the waters at Freshwater Qate. Nor, though less 
grand, is that inland view less pleasing where the Yar wends its 
* silver-winding way' along the rich valley to which it gives its 
J name, enlarging rapidly from a scarcely traceable rivulet till, in 
x: a mile or two, it has become a goodly estuary" — {Thome), 
:; To obtain the prospect thus admirably described the tourist 
will not complain of the steep ascent to Afton Down, whose lofty 
crest is marked by numerous graves (barrows or tumuli) of the 
;- -early British settlers in the Wight. The summit of this noble 
^ hill is 600 feet above the sea. On. the edge of the cliff a simple 
stone commemorates the accidental de^th of^ a^ la^^who fell over 
the brink, August 28, 1846. 'MY^^^^^ C 1 • ^^ 
\ Passing (in a hollow on the right) Comptoli Farm, whence a 

bye-path turns off to Oompton Grange, we traverse SHALOOMfiE 
Down, and descend into the vaUey which, at Brook Chine^ opens 




^ 



v^ 



4"^ 






$»^ 



> ^ 



42 FBOIC FBESHWATEB GATE TO VENTNOR. 

out npon the sea. A road (to the left) leads to Ches^el Farm, 
and crosses Chessel Down to Calboume. Several Saxon tumuli 
have been ezeavated upon Chessel Down, which would seem to 
have been a favourite cemetery, or burial-place, with the Pictisb 
colonists of the island. 

Descending the ravine between Shaleombe and Mottistone 
Downs we pass the Church of BROOK (population, 157), rebuilt, 
in 1864, in the style of the thirteenth century, the old church 
having been destroyed by fire in 1863. It is dedicated to St. 
Mary. Brook House (C» Seely, Esq., where he entertained 
Gkuibaldi in 1863), is a plain stone mansion, rebuilt by one of 
the Bowerman family about 1780, on the site of the old manor- 
house, where Dame Joanna Bowermsui, in 1499, entertained 
King Heniy VIL 

[We next pass through the scattered little Tillage to ezamiBe the Chine— produced 
like the other island-chines (eiman, Saxon, a cleft or catting) by the action of a sub- 
terranean spring on the softer slarata of the cliff A walk, westward, along the 
beach conducts the tourist to Brook Point, geologically celebrated for its exten- 
Hive f 088IL Forest. These petrified tomches, boughs, and trunks of trees evidently 
originated " in a raft composed ot a prostrate pine forest, transported ftom a dis- 
tance by the river which flowed through the country whence the Wealden dei>osits 
were derived, and became sulHnerged in the sand and mud of the delta, bur>'ing 
Mdth it the bones of reptiles, mussel-shells, and other extraneous bodies it had 
gathered in its course. . . . Hony of the stems are concealed and protected by 
the fiici, corallines, aad zoophytes which here thrive luxuriantly, and occupy the 
place of the lichens and other parasitical plants, wiUi which the now petrified trees 
were doubtlessly invested when flourishing in their native forests, and affording 
shelter to the Iguanodon and other gigantie reptfles*'— {AfanteZO.] 

We regain the high road at Hulvbbston, lying fur beneath 
the lofty crest of Mottistone Down, 610 feet above the sea. 
MOTTISTONE (population, 160) itself is soon gained, and the 
tourist will not fail to admire the attractive scene presented by 
its ancient Chubch, its Jacobean Manob-House (built, in 1567, 
by one of the Cheke family), and its little cluster of gray cottages. 
Tlie Chubch, dedicated to Saints Peter and Paul, is mainly Early 
English in character, and consists of a nave, chancel, north and 
south aisles, and low spire. From this point a steep narrow lane 
leads up the hillside to the Long Stone or Mote Stone (m6t, 
Saxon, a public assembly T) which gives name, at is said, to tl^e 
neighbouring village. The Long Stone is a rudely shaped block 
of ferruginous sandstone, 13 feet high, 6^ feet wide, and 20 feet 
in circuit ; and near it lies a similar pile, 9i feet long and 4 feet 
wide — the remains, perhaps, of an ancient cromlech or sepulchral 



BRIXTON — GHALE. 43 



• 



ciiamber, though there are not wanting authorities who declare 
them to be simply Boundabt Marks. 

The road to BRIXTON (population, 695. Inns : The Five 
Bells, the New Inn), 2 miles, is not particularly striking, but the 
village itself is very lovely and picturesque ; " a cheerful little 
village, on the sunny side of the Isle of Wight, sheltered from 
cold winds by overhanging hills, with a goodly church, and a 
near prospect of the sea." It is associated with pleasant recol- 
lections of good and great Bishop Kenn, who was rector here from 
1667 to 1669; and of William Wilberforce, who spent at the 
rectory, then occupied by his son, the present Bishop of Oxford, 
the summer of 1832 — ^** climbing with delight to the top of the 
chalk downs, or of an intermediate terrace, or walking long upon 
the unfrequented shore." 

About 1 mile on the Shorwell road is Ltmerston, at the foot 
of Lymerston Down, where one of the De Lymerstons founded, 
in the twelfth century, an oratory for three Augustinian priests. 
On the same road lie West Court, an ivy-shrouded manor-house 
formerly belonging to the Lisles, and Woolverton {jL «., Wulpher's 
town), an ancient mansion which is probably worth examination. 

Brixton Church, dedicated to St. Mary, was thoroughly 
restored, at the expense of the late rector (Rev. E. Macall), in 
1852. Its chancel is Early English, the side chapel Perpendi- 
cidar. The stained glass window in the tower was the gift of 
the Bishop of Oxford. Remark the piscina in the south aisle, 
the rood staircase, and the recess and bracket for a statuette, on 
the west side of one of the aisle columns. 

The traveller intent upon reaching CHALE from Brixton 
may either adopt the high road through Shorwell and Kings- 
ion {ante, Route 2), or follow the cliff path, a longer but more 
picturesque and varied route, by Grange, Barnes, and Atherfield. 
We shall presume that he selects the latter. In that case he 
will first direct his steps, seaward, to Grange Chine, sometimes 
called Jackman's, a rough, gaping, gorse-grown cleft in the 
Wealden cliffs, which is not without a certain savage grandeur 
of its own. Or he may commence his journey at Chilton 
Chine, about & mile to the west, and nearly opposite the dange- 
rous mass of sandstone called the Bull-faced Rock. Continuing 
our eastward route along the shore, if the tide pennitc^ ; other- 



44 vKOM FR£SH\7ATEB GATE TO YENTNOU. 

wise along the cliff — ^we pass the sandstone reef of Shipledoe, 
and next arrive at Barnes, where recent landslips have exposed 
to the curiosity of archsaologists highly interesting traces of a 
Romano-British pottery. Barnes Chine will attract the tourist's 
attention. At Dutchman's Hole, a cavern into which (it is said) 
a Dutch vessel was once sea-driven, gold coins are occasionally 
discovered at certain turns of the tide. The low red cliffe of the 
Wealden formation continue as far as Cowleaze Chine, when 
we come upon the lower greensand. Both Cowleaze and Shep- 
herd Chines were formed by one little rivulet which rises near 
Kingston, and formerly fell into the sea at Cowleaze ; but its 
course having been diverted by an eel-loving shepherd, and its 
waters augmented by heavy rains, it wrought a new channel 
through the yielding strata, and created the ravine through which 
it now leaps and foams. These chines, as well as Whale, Ladder, 
and Walpen, are, to our thinking, far more picturesque and 
romantic than that " lion " of the island, and hackneyed show- 
place, Blackqang. 

Atherpield Point, a superstructure of clay on a foundation 
of rock, is a good locality for the fossil-hunter. It throws out 
far into the sea a ledge of " blue slaty clay," which forms the 
dangerous Atherfield Race. (Atherfield, from Aderfeldt^ the 
veined, or streaked field?) The clifiGs here are about 150 feet 
in height 

Our next point of interest is Whale Chine, 180 feet Tvide at 
the mouth ; and just beyond it is Ladder Chine, an excavation 
in the black clay cliffs which dips deep into the land, and throws 
out, as it were, numerous ramifications. '^ The most striking 
peculiarity of its character is the copious exudation of chalybeate 
springs from its sides, which are stained with ochreous tints to a 
very great extent, and their dusky red on the black clay ground 
gives the appearance of a vast extinguished furnace to the deep 
\LoM.o^^-^Englefield), All these chines originate in the action of 
small streams of waters upon the more pliable strata of the 
Wealden and greensand formations. 

The cliffs gradually increase in height as we advance, and 
Walpen Chine assumes, therefore, a character of wild sublimity. 
Its sides are broken up into a variety of picturesque formations. 
Walpen Cliff is 190 feet above the Bea. Inlanu lies Walpen 
Farm. 

Having thus skirted the dangerous shores of Chale Ba\, we 



'■^'Z . "^\ '-^.{. 'n/;, ^. - ' .^ V-i- 






BLACKGANG CHINE. ^^ 

airive, after a seven miles' walk, at Blackgang Chine, the great 
^show-place" and natural wonder of the island, upon which, 
however, those who have traced with us the route from Grange 
Chine will hardly hestow an unmeasured admiration. Yet it is 
not without its characteristics of wild romance and savage gran- 
deur. Its dull ochreous sides are unrelieved hy tree or shrub, 
and constantly echo and re-echo with the roar of the ocean-waters, 
which, in winter storms, often roll irresistibly into their gloomy 
recesses. The neighbouring coast has been the scene of many 
lamentable wrecks, especially of the Clarendon West Indiaman, 
October 11, 1836, when only three lives were saved out of a 
crew of seventeen officers and seamen, and eleven passengers. 
Most of the bodies were recovered and buried in Chale church- 
yard. 

Dr. Mantell's description of Blackgang may here be intro- 
duced : — ^** The cascade falls," he says " in a perpendicular column 
from a ledge of 70 feet high, down the midst of a deep chasm 
formed in dark ferrugmoua clays and sands, and sumoimted by 
broken cliffs 400 feet high, and towering above all is the majestic 
escarpment of St. Catherine's Hill, rising to an altitude of between 
800 and 900 feet The bands of greenish-gray sand and sand- 
stone which alternate with ferruginous days in this division of 
the greensand system, appear very prominent, owing to the wear- 
ing away of the soft and friable intermediate beds. As the face 
of the sandstone, after long exposure to the atmosphere, separates 
into square blocks, the appearance of the projecting bands of 
stone, which are from 10 to 15 feet thick, is very singular, and 
is not unaptly compared by Sir Henry Englefield to courses of 
masonry, built up at different heights to sustain the mouldering 
cliflfe. The thin layer of ironstone grit which is very constantly 
found in this division of the greensand, constituting as it were a 
line of demarcation between the upper arenaceous deposits and 
the lower more argillaceous group, intercepts the water that per- 
colates through the upper porous strata, and projecting in a 
ledge, forms the bed of the stream that falls in a cascade over 
the face of the cliff.'' At the Museum is the skeleton of a large 
whale which had been washed ashore here some years ago. 

Near the Chine stands an excellent Hotel, and some good 
lodging-houses may be found in the vicinity. Half a mile inland 
lies CHALE (population, 584); its Church, dedicated to St 
^drew, standing in an open waste, wind-beaten and weather- 



46 THOM FRESHWATER GATE TO VENTNOB. 

worn, and raising a square gray tower, of the Perpendicular order, 
much resembling that of Carisbrook, among the grass-grown 
graves of many a shipwrecked mariner. It was founded in 1 1 1 4 
by Hugh de Yemun, and contains a simple piscina and a good 
monument to Major-General Sir Hervry Worsley, d. 1846. 

Beyond the church, on the right of the Newport road, the 
tourist will not fail to notice Oft ale Farm, some interesting bits 
of antiquity being wrought up in the more modem bmlding. A 
fine barn, 100 feet by 30, resembles the refectory of an ancient 
abbey. Chale Parsonage is a picturesque house in a pleasur- 
able locality. 



Branch Route — Chale to Newport. 

A road of an agreeable character leads through Chale Street, 
and by way of Stroud Green, to Kingston Down. Crossing 
this greensand ridge it winds through a barren district into the 
Shorwell valley, ascends the hill (Northcourt, on the left) and 
proceeds, " under the shadow of melancholy boughs," to Row- 
borough Farm, where a lane (on the left) diverges to the locale 
of the ancient British villages of Rowborough and Gallibury. 
Traversing the valley of Bowcomb, we speedily come in sight of 
Carisbrook's gray keep, and turn into the Newport road, enter- 
ing the town by the Mall and Castle Hold. The distance m 
about 10^ miles. 

Another route may be suggested : At Stroud Green t!ie 
tourist should turn to the right, passing North Ground Farm, 
and a walk of about two miles will bring him to Lashmere 
Pond, at the foot of Bleak Down. 

[The Pond is a favourite spot with persevering botanists, and the Down also 
affords many interesting specimens. MyriophyUvm altemiflorvm and Hdosciadum 
i/Mmdatum occur in the pond, and its haaka are fringed with WahleTibergia hedera- 
eea, Nardus stricta, Scripus seiactus, etc. About the hill-slope, and towards the sum- 
mity aid found Hypericum humifuaumf Viola eanina, Juncus sguarrosuSf Mociuhia 
erecta, and Sagina avJmlata.] 

Traversing the Down (which conmiands some good views of 
Appuldurcombe, the valley of the eastern Yar, Godshill, and 
beacon-crowned St. Catherine's) we reach the Chequers Inn, 
cross Kennerlt Heath, pass through Booklet, where we join 
the Godshill road, and by way of Pidford, Blackwater, and 



ST. CATHERINlfs HILL. 47 

ShidE) proceed to Newport, which we enter at Node Hill- 
distance^ 9 miles. 



MAIN ROUTE RESUMED— BLACKGANG to VENTNOR. 

From Blackgang to Niton there are two routes : one crosses 
tJie southern slope of St. Catherine's Hill, in the direction of 
west to east, the other winds round the steep escarpment of th« 
UnderdifiP, passes the Sandrock Hotel, and then turning to the 
north-east, plunges abruptly into Niton. Tte latter is, of course, 
to be adopted by carnages, and, after a visit to St. Catherine's, will 
be chosen by ourselves. Pedestrians may avail themselves of 
either, or even select the diff-path, which is practicable as far as 
PucKASTER Cove, and opens up some splendid views of ocean and 
many picturesque bits of coast scenery. 

i^^ St. Catherine's Hill, 335 feet above the sea-level, is 
easily accessible from Blackgang or Niton, and no tourist should 
neglect to avail himself of the magnificent prospects of the Island 
which, in clear weather, its lofty crest commands. He will see 
that '' the neighbouring coast forms part of a great bay, indented 
by smaller ones. The shore is dosed in with red sand-difife, 
rather low, broken, and jagged ; but away to the west the red 
sand changes into chalk, and the clifEs become very steep, and 
rise to a great height, standing out against the sky when the 
sun shines on them, until they almost dazzle the eye ; and at 
otiier times covering themselves, as it were, with a blueish veil 
of mist, and looking out proudly from behind it. . . . Below the 
ridge the ground is very flat for a long way. From the edge of 
the cliff it is level for miles, cut up into corn-fields and pastures, 
with a few trees dotting the hedge-rows. We can see as far as 
Newport, and beyond it ; away, indeed, to where the river, which 
has its source close to us, and is there only a tiny brook, becomes 
quite a broad stream, and deep enough to float vessels" — {Miss 
JSewelFe Ursula), The coast of Hampshire is also visible across 
the thin bright line of the Solent, and in the opposite direction 
" the high lands about Cherbourg are said to be occasionally seen" 
— (Thome), 

Towards the close of the thirteenth century a Hermitage 
would seem to have been established on this lofty desolate height 
by some pious devotee. At all events, in the Winchester register 



48 FROM FRESHWATER GATE TO YSirrNOK. 

an entiy notifies that, a.d. 1312, a certain Walter Langstrell 
(heart-weary of the world, we fancy) was admitted to it. In 
1323 a chantry was built by Walter de Godyton, who dedicated 
it to the patron saint of hills and mountains, St. Catherine, and 
provided an endowment for a solitary priest, who was to sing 
masses for the souls of the founder and founder^s ancestors, and 
maintain by night a signal-lamp for the guidance of mariners 
along this dangerous coast. Priest, and masses, and signal were 
swept away by Henry VIIL, but the belfry tower, 35^ feet high, 
was preserved on account of its value as a landmark, and has 
frequently been repaired. Some excavations made in 1767 re- 
vealed the foundations of the chiEipel and of the priest's ceU. 

In 1785 the Trinity Board commenced the erection of a 
lighthouse here, but were forced to discontinue their labours ; 
the mists which so frequently dose over the hill rendering it of 
no use in tempestuous weather. " Only the stone scattered upon 
the green turf, and a portion of the lower walls remain ; and a 
gooseberry-bush, which grew in the little garden belonging to the 
lighthouse, is the sole mark that any care had ever be^n taken 
to make such a place habitable*' — {Mi98 Sewell), 

^^ St. Catherine's is the western extremity of the south range 
of chalk-downs which is separated by a considerable district of 
greensand from the central chain of hills. This system of chalk- 
downs varies in breadth from half a mile to 3 miles, and extends 
6 miles in a direction E.NJS. and W.S.W., from St. Catherine's 
Hill to Dunnose, its eastern termination, which is 771 feet high. 
The intermediate parts of this range maintain an elevation of 
from 650 to 800 feet, with the exception of a deep valley on the 
east of St. Catherine's, through which the road to Niton passes, 
and another at Steep Hill, called the Shute, or Shoot, above 
Ventnor, traversed by the road to Appuldurcombe and Newport" 
— (Mantell), 

[Following the path along the ridge of the Down in a northerly direction, the 
ridge gradually narrowing into a species of promontory which juts out boldly into 
the level chamjudgn, we come to the At.etatcdbiah Pillak ; a column -plaxied on 
the brink of the escarpment, and about 580 feet above the sea, by Michael Hoy, a 
Russian merchant, in commemoration of the visit to England, in 1814, of Alexander 
of Russia, and of " many years' happy residence in his dominions." A gentleman, 
Lieut W. H. Dawes, recently afllixed a tablet to the southern side of the capital 
" in memoriam " of the British officers and soldiers slain in the Crimean War. Thus 
the same pillar now perpetuates the memory of England's friendship with Alexander, 
tnd her hostility to Nicholas 1 

A path through a thick mass of idgorous plantations, which are separated fh>in 



ST. CATHERINE'S POINT — LIGHTHOUSE. |9 

the Down by a light mm fence, leada to the pictaretfqae seat ol Tbv IIebmitaqs 
(T. Hawkins, Esq.), celebrated in Miss Sewell's " Ursula" as Bene (see vol 1. pp. 
12-31). 1 

We now retrace our steps to the seaward face of St. Cathe- 
rine's, but before we commence our descent, must pause to survey 
the wonderful scene unrolled beneath. " Oni reaching the edge, 
there is a sight which makes a stranger start. Far below lies, 
not the sea, but a broad tract of land, tossed up and down in 
little hills and valleys. It is scattered all over with huge rocks, 
which look as though giants had thrown them about in their 
play, and it slopes down in a steep descent towards the top of a 
second range of clifOs. This range cannot, of course, be discovered 
immediately underneath the upper cliffs, but it can be traced 
towards the west for many miles, forming the outline of Chale 
Bay. It must have been a fierce time on earth when the land 
sank away from the upper diflfe, and the great rocks were hurled 
down, and the streams, which have now worked their way through 
the lower cliffe and formed deep chasms, first began to flow " — 
(Miss Sewell), 

1^^ Bejfore commencing his route to Niton, the tourist will 
wish, perhaps, to descend to St. Catherine's Point, and visit the 
Lighthouse, erected there in 1838-40. From water-mark to 
the top of its lightning conductor is 204 feet ; from the ground, 
121 feet The diameter of the interior is 14 feet, and 152 steps 
lead up to the lantern-room. The lighting apparatus embraces 
250 mirrors, which reflect a steady glowing flame, visible at a 
distance of 25 miles. From hence the ramble along the shore 
may be extended westward to the savage desolation of Kocken 
End ; or, eastward, to the Royal Victoria Hotel, and the seques- 
tered loveliness of Puckaster Cove, where Charles II. was com- 
pelled, by stress of weather, to land, July 1, 1675. Some 
antiquaries trace its peculiar name to the Latin " Portus Castren- 
sis," and represent it as the favoured harbour of the galleys 
which bore to continental shores the tin extracted from the 
Cornish mines, and stored in the Isle of Wight as in a centra] 
dep6t. (See Adarru^s " History , Toj^ogra'phy ^ and Antiquities oj 
the Isle of WightP) 

Let us now commence our journey. We are entering the 
beautiful region of the Undercliff, and at every step shall find 
something to interest and surprise us. It is, however, a region 
80 well known, has supplied our artists with so many subjects 

E 



50 FROM FRESHWATER GATE TO VENTNOR. 

and received sucli frequent eulogium from distinguished pens» 
that it hardly requires description. It extends, broadly speaking, 
from Blackgang to Dunnose, a distance of some 7 miles. " Con- 
sisting of a platform varying from half a mile to a quarter of a 
mile in width, bounded on the south by the undulating bays and 
promontories of the Channel, and on the north by a perpendicular 
wall of gray rocks, which form the buttress to a range of downs 
of almost mountainous elevation, it is easy to perceive that it 
unites two of the principal constituents of a beautiful landscape. 
But when, besides its guardian hiUs and ever-varying ocean, we 
remember the richness of its vegetation, the clearness of its air. 
and the wild seclusion of its innumerable dells, the glowing ex- 
pressions of enthusiastic tourists would seem not much, if at all, 
beyond the truth" — (Rev, James White), Lord Jeffrey speaks of 
it in language equally appreciative. " The cliffs," he writes, " are 
in some places enormously high — ^from 600 to 700 feet. The 
beautiful places are either where they sink deep into bays and 
valleys, opening Kke a theatre to the sun and the sea, or where 
there has been a terrace of low land formed at their feet, which 
stretches imder the shelter of that enormous wall, like a rich 
garden plot aU roughened over with masses of rock fallen in 
distant ages, and overshadowed with thickets of myrtle, and roses, 
and geraniums, which all grow wild in great luxuriance and pro- 
fusion." With one more testimony to the singular beauty of the 
Undercliff, our quotations must conclude : — " The ground is 
tossed about in every direction, and huge rocks lie scattered upon 
it. But thorns, and chestnuts, and ash trees have sprung up 
amongst them upon the greensward ; ivy has climbed up the 
ledges of the jagged cliffs ; primroses cluster upon the banks ; 
cowslips glitter on the turf ; and masses of hyacinths may be seen 
in glades, half hidden by the foliage of the thick trees, and 
through which the jutting masses of gray rock peep out upon the 
open sea, sparkling with silver and blue some hundreds of feet 
beneath them^ A lovely scene it is ! There is a verse spoken 
of a very different country, which often comes to my mind when 
I think of it : — ^ It is a land which the Lord thy God careth for 
The eyes of the Lord thy God are always upon it, from the be- 
ginning of the year even unto the end of the year.* Sometimes 
it has even seemed to me that heaven itself can scarcely be more 
beautiful" — (Miss SewelJ). 

The question which the tourist will naturally put, How vxu 



MOUNT CLEEVES NITON. 61 

the Underclif formed F is easily answered. Its strata are arranged 
in the following order : — clialk marl^ chalk, green sandstone, blue 
marl, and red ferruginous sand. The blue marl is quickly acted 
upon by landsprinK and subsides into a soft yielding' mud, 
locally called " blue slipper," which oozes out, and consequently 
deprives the upper strata of their support This inner action of 
the landsprings has, at the same time, been assisted by the 
operations of the sea, which have beaten out the ferruginous sand, 
and thus, the chalk and sandstone having been violently dis- 
rupted, the UnderclifF has originated in the new formations. This 
great change must have occurred at a very distant period, and 
before the conmiencement of historic record ; but several land- 
slips in the present century have plainly exhibited the secret 
agencies at work in this peculiar district. A fearful fall occurred 
in February 1799, when a farm near Niton, called Pitlands, 
and about 100 acres of land, were rent to pieces at one sudden 
catastrophe. At East End, in 1810, 30 acres were uptom in a 
similar manner, and 50 acres in 1818 ; but there is no reason 
to apprehend any further disturbance of a serious character. 

Our road runs in the shadow of " the eternal cliffs" for a con- 
siderable distance. But fii*st we reach the pleasant villakin of 
Mount Cleeves, and then our admiration is excited by the Royal 
Sandrock Hotel, which looks as little like an hotel as may well 
be imagined, and stands in the most picturesque grounds that 
ever an hotel was located in. It is at some distance from, and 
at some height (258 feet) above the sea, near the aluminous 
chalybeate spring, no. longer in use, which Mr. Waterworth, a 
clever Newport surgeon, discovered in 1807. 

We now turn our faces to the north-east, and passing on our 
left the terraced gardens of West Cliff (Captain Kerr), soon find 
ourselves in NITON (population, 700. Inn: White Lion. There 
is also a neat wayside inn at Buddlb, between Mount Cleeves 
and the Victoria Hotel), commonly called Crab Niton, in honour 
of the crustaceous ground on the neighbouring shore, and to dis- 
tinguish it from K-nighton, a ruined manor-house near New- 
church. This tranquil, neat, and pretty village — ^it emphatically 
deserves the three adjectives we have selected — is situated at the 
head of a valley which breaks through the great southern range 
of chalk hills, and opens out upon the sea at Wreeth Bat. The 
Church, dedicated to St. John^ stands at the base of St. Cathe- 



62 BRANCH ROUTE — NITON TO NEWCHURCH. 

rine*8 Down, near the meeting point of two roads — one ascending 
the eastern slope of the down to its beacon-crowned summit, the 
other skirting the southern face, and joining the Chale road at 
Blackgang. The building is Early Decorated, and has recently- 
been restored. Bemark its piscina, and Flaxman's medallion 
monument (with bas-reliefs by Biou) to the late Mr. Arnold of 
Jiirables. 

Niton was one of the six churches with which William Fitz- 
Osbert endowed his abbey of Lire in Normandy. Charles L, at 
the instance of Queen Henrietta, conferred it upon Queen's Col- 
lege, Oxford. 

Branch Route — Niton to Newchurch. 

Niton will be found a convenient resting-place by the tourist 
who desires to explore the southern district of the island, and a 
score of agreeable rambles might easUy be pointed out for his 
advantage. But as we have already sketched the country through 
which those rambles would mainly be extended, we shall now 
confine ourselves to a brief indication of the road from Niton to 
Newchurch, whence the tourist, if he so pleases, may continue 
his explorations as far as RYDE or NEWPORT. 

A lane from Niton leads in a north-easterly direction across 
the fields (where rises the tiny stream of the Eastern Yar) to 
WHITWELL (population, 570), whose Church, with its low 
square tower and two separate chapels,— one, built by De Estur 
of Gatcombe, dedicated to St Rhadegund, and devoted to the 
ministrations on certain occasions of the rector of Gatcombe, the 
other dedicated to the Virgin, and devoted to the uses of the Whit- 
well parishioners — ^will interest the inquiring visitor. Both chapels 
present in the main Early English characteristics, and have recently 
been restored. The pulpit and reading-desk date from James I. 



Whitwell Shuts {shuie, a localism), formerly a steep 
and somewhat dangerous road, has within the last two or three 
years been much improved, and though still steep is now a 
practicable carriage way. It descends the sloping undulating 
down to ST. LAWRENCE (see post), and opens up some fine and 
unexpected views at various points. 

Following the main road through Whitwell we reach in du« 



NBWCHURCH. 53 

time South Ford Mill, and turning aside from the Yar, speed 
on to Lower Stenburt. A little beyond this farmstead there 
is a turning to the right which we adopt as far as Shebpwash, 
where we turn to the left, and keep due north to QODSHILL 
(see Route 2). Then we set our faces eastward as far as Sand- 
ford, where we again turn to the left (i®" the road to the right 
leads by way of Appuldurcombe and Wroxall to VENTNOR), 
and cross a countryside which is occasionally picturesque, and 
always open and breezy, into NEWCHURCH, the parish, which, 
up to 1&66, included Ryde and Ventnor, with a tolerably 
large village straggling along the high road to Ryde. The 
Church, dedicated to All Saints, a plain and exceedingly taste- 
less structure, with an Early English chancel, and Early Deco- 
rated arches separating the nave from the aisles, stands on the 
very brink of an abrupt red sand bluff, and thence acquires a 
prominency and an importance its architectural character would 
not insure it. The main road here descends a steep declivity 
through lofty and well-wooded banks, crosses the Yar at Lang 
Bridge, winds through the vale of Knighton — ^where some gray 
fragments mark the site of a once celebrated manorial mansion — 
and climbing Ashey Down (distiDguished by its searmark, a 
triangular stone pillar erected in 1735), runs across meadow and 
cornfield, over rivulet and through leafy coppice, to Ryde. 



MAIN ROUTE RESUMED— NITON to VENTNOR. 

From Niton let us now direct our steps to the Sandrock 
Hotel, and there resume our rambles in the Undercliff As we 
move forward we pass, on our right, the charming grounds and 
picturesque cottage of Puckaster (F.L. Popham, Esq.) ; and 
the richly-blossomed terraces of The Orchard (Sir Henry P, 
Gordon) ; and, on the left, Beauchamp, always abounding in 
flowers — ^in the wildling daughters of Earth, and those rare 
exotics which are bom of Art and Nature. Cripple Path, a 
romantic footway, here leads to the top of the cliff, whence a 
splendid prospect is obtained. In 1831 a young female, in 
attempting to recover a basket which she had dropped, fell over 
the cUffs in this neighbourhood, and was so little injured that 
she was able to walk on to Niton. A man carrying two water- 
cans, by night, stepped over the cliff, and though badly injured 



54 mOH FRESHWATER GATE TO VEKTKOB. 

shortly afterwards recovered. Soon we arrive at Mirables 
(J. Coape, Esq.), and a mile or so fuitlier, on our light, lies Old 
Park (Sir J. Cheape), sequestered in the bosom of rich leafy 
groves. We now pass through the little picturesque hamlet of 
Wrongs ; and at Woolverton, the ivy-dirouded ruins of its 
Early English Chapel will attract the tourist's attention. We 
now turn to the left, and ascend by a somewhat difficult road 
to ST. LAWRENCE, famous for its miniature sanctuary.. The 
late Earl of Yarborough enlarged the chancel by 10 feet, and 
added a new porch and bell-turret. The dimensions now are, 
30 feet length, 6 feet height (to the eaves), and 12 feet breadth. 
We now pass St. Lawrence Villa (Lord Monson), built by Sir 
Richard Worsley, the historian of the island, who made here an 
imsuccessful attempt to plant a vineyard. St. Lawrence's 
Well, a spring of the freshest and purest crystal, was enshrined 
in a little Gothic archway by the late Lord Yarborough ; but 
since the formation of the new road, it has been enclosed, and is 
no longer accessible. Passing Pelham Woods, and the lodge 
and grounds of the Hon. Mrs. Pelham's cottage, we reach Steep- 
hill Castle ( — Hamborough, Esq.), the finest " seat " in the 
island as far as regards its adjuncts of grove and garden, and the 
wonderful attractiveness of its situation. Its battlements, and 
parapets, and embrasures, and towers, have a picturesque appear- 
ance, especially when seen at a distance, reposing as it were, in 
the depth of a luxuriant wood. The building was erected from 
Sanderson's designs in 1835, on the site of a small villa built by 
the Right Hon. Hans Stanley (afterwards Lord Bolton), when 
governor of the island. 

About three-quarters of a mile from Ventnor, is the site of the 
National Consumptive Hospital, comprising over six acres. It was 
projected by Dr. Arthur Hill Hassall, and is constructed on the cot- 
tage principle. It is intended to consist of sixteen houses, each 
with accommodation for at least six patients. The first block of 
building was occupied in November 1869 ; and a second block, 
— ^the foundation stone of which was laid by H.R.H. the Princess 
Louise, on behalf of the Queen — was opened in March 1871. A 
third block of building has since been opened ; and there is now 
accommodation for 40 patients. It is partly supported by volun- 
tary contributions, and partly seK-supporting. 






\ 
VENTNOR. 65^ 

VENTNOR. 

Hotels: Tlie Royal, Marine, Esplanade, Tenninus, CommerciaL Inns : Crab and 
Lobster, Globe, Freemasons, Prince of Wales. House-agents : Messrs. Spary and 
Son, Wicker and Son, W. Y. Brown, T. A. Raynes. Bank ; Hampshire. Banking 
Ck>mpany. Population (1871), 4841. \ 

eS" Railway to Sbanklin, Sandown, Brading, and Ryde. Coaches to Godshill and 
Newport ; and, during the summer months, to Niton, Blackgang, and Freshwater.] 

" Ventnor,*' says Mr. Thome, " lias been most affected by the 
popiilarity of the Undercliff. Forty years ago it contained about 
half a dozen humble cottages, and until the publication of Sir 
James Clark's work,* its few inhabitants were nearly all fishermen. 
It was one of the most picturesque spots along the coast. The 
platform was broken into several uneven terraces. The huge hills 
towered up aloft. Down to the broad smooth beach the ground 
ran in smooth slopes, mingled with abrupt banks of rock, along 
which a brawling rivulet careered gaily towards the sea, and the 
few fishermen's huts gave a piquant rustic liveliness to all besides. 
The climate seemed most favourable, and the neighbourhood 
most agreeable, to the invalid. In the open gardens of the 
cottages, myrtles and other tender plants flourished abundantly, 
and without need of protection even in winter ; snow hardly ever 
lies on the ground ; sunny and sheltered walks abound, and the 
beach is excellent for bathing. Ventnor at once caught the. 
attention of the crowd of visitors ; and it was one of the first 
places to provide them suitable accommodation. In the tiny 
fishing-hamlet soon sprang up hotels, and boarding-houses, and 
shops, and a church, and Ventnor became the capital of the 
Undercliff. Invalids came here for a winter retreat, as well as 
a summer visit. Speculation was stimulated. And now, as 
Fuller has it, * the plague of building ' lighted on it, and it spread 
until every possible spot was planted with some staring building, 
or row of buildings. The variety of odd forms is remarkable. 
We have hotels, churches, shops, cottages, and villas, in every 
conceivable style and every outrageous shape. Strawberry Hill 
GJothic, Seaside Swiss, and Carpenter's Palazzo, each has its repre- 
sentatives ; and, as Spenser says— 

* each one 
Of sundry shape, yet all ill-favoured.* " 

The Church, dedicated to St. Catherine, was built in 1836-7, 
at the expense of the late J. Hambrough, Esq. of Steephill Castle. 

• " On the Influence of Climate in the Prevention and Cure of Disease." 



\ 



7' 

/ 



/ 



VENTNOE TO QODSHILL. 



W the designs of Mr. Ebbels. Holy Trinity Church, de- 

/ ^ by Mr. Giles, was erected in 1862, at the eastern part of the 

town. It is a very handsome building surmounted by a lofty spire. 
The National Schools, in Albert Street, are graceful and well 
proportioned. The Independent Chapel was erected in 1854. 

The Esplanade was constructed in 1848, and ajffords an 
agreeable promenade. There are some good houses in the singu- 
larly shaped hollow known as the Cove. The " Ventnor 
Diamonds " (bits of transparent quartz), agates, and specimens of 
chalcedony, and choamites, are found on the beach below. 

At the undercliff of Ventor is situated the Royal National 
Hospital for Consumption, consisting of a series of separate 
blocks and a Chapel. The site is nearly twenty acres in extent, 
and admirably adapted for the object The Hospital being for 
the relief of patients from all parts, and of all denominations, is 
worthy of general support. 

At Hillside, Ventnor, resided (and died) John Sterling, im- 
mortalised by the biographies of Carlyle and Archdeacon Hare. 
He was buried in Bonchurch old churchyard. Among the 
celebrities of Ventnor and Bonchurch are the late Rev. James 
White, the dramatist and historian ; Edmund Peel, the poet of 
" the Fair Island ; " the Rev. E. Venables, who has ably illustrated 
. the topography of the Wight ; the late Dr. Martin, author of an 
interesting book on " the Undercliff ; " Sir Lawrence Peel, the 
Indian Chief-Justice, and brother of the late Sir Robert ; and Miss 
SeweU, to whom the reading world is indebted for "Amy 
Herbert," « Ivors," and " Ursula." 

[Excursions to APPULDURCOMBE and GODSHILL by way of Sloven's Bush 
and Wroxall ; to BYDE, viA Luooombf Bhankuk, Sandowk, and B&aoino ; 
to NEWPORT, vi(2 IGoDdHiLL, RooKLBT, Blaokwatbr, and Shidb ; along the cliff 
to ST. LAWRENCE ; across the Downs to WHITWELL ; through the Landslip, 
and along the shore, to LUCCOMBE and SHANKLIN ; "over the hills " to COOK'S 
CASTLE, and the rare rich scenery of APSE. From Ventnor to Godshill, and 
fh)m Ventnor to Nbwohuroh, are, however, Branch Routes which we cannot omit 
to particularise.] 

Ventnor to Godshill. 

A steep, heart-breaking road climbs up the hill to Sloven's 
Bush Turnpike, but the view from the summit — gorgeous in its 
contrast of colours, magnificent in its extent and variety — ^will 
amply repay the traveller for the labour of the ascent. The road 
then dips down into a picturesque hollow, which in spring is re« 
iolent of fragrance, and bright with many-coloured blossoms, and 



APPULDUBOOMBE^-GODSHILL. 67 

runs between the slopes of Rew Down and St Boniface Down (780 
feet) to Wroxall Cross. We then mount the hill to Cleveland 
Wood, and once more descending, plunge into Appulduroombb 
Street, opposite the pleasant grounds of Appuldurcombe. 

APPULDURCOMBE — opttWre-comJe, the apple-tree hollow — 
was recently taken by a Limited Liability Company for a hotel ; 
which, however, did not succeed. It is now leased to the Rev. 
Mr. Pound for an academy. The manor was bestowed by Isabella 
de Fortibus, Lady of the Island, upon the Benedictine Abbey of 
Montesbourg (in Coutances — ^founded by Richard de Redvers, 
1090), which established here a cell of a prior and two monks, 
removed by Edward III. to Salisbury. At the dissolution of 
religious houses these lands fell to the share of the Captain of 
the Island, Sir James Worsley, whose son, Richard, in the 
noble mansion which he erected here, entertained his burly 
sovereign Henry VIIL, and that sovereign's ill-fated minister, 
the able and unprincipled Thomas Cromwell (a.d. 1639). The 
present house was commenced by Sir Robert Worsley in 
1710, and finished by Sir Richard, half a century later. Sir 
Richard enshrined here a magnificent collection of antiques, 
statuary, and pictures, which has been removed by his represen- 
tative, the present Earl of Farborough, to his seat in Lincolnshire. 
The House is bmlt of Portland stone, and consists of a centre 
with two projecting wings, in the Corinthian style, imposing but 
sombre. The Park was laid out by " Capability Brown." The 
ground rises nobly in the rear of the mansion, and exhibits a fine 
mass of deep dense woods. On the crest of the hill stands the 
WoRSLET Obelisk, of Cornish granite, dedicated by Sir Richard 
Worsley, in 1774, to his ancestor Sir Robert. It suflfered from 
lightning in 1831, and is now some few feet short of its original 
dimensions, 70 feet. 

From Appuldurcombe we make our way by Redhill Lane 
— a delightful spot on a summer afternoon — ^to Sandpord, a 
picturesque gathering of quaint cottages ; and, turning to the left, 
strike quickly into GODSHILL (see Route 2). The return to 
Ventnor may be made by Sandford and French Mill (so called 
from the French monks at Appuldurcombe — Rev, E, Venables) to 
Whetely Bank ; and thence, by Cook's Castle — a mimic ruin 
which overlooks an extensive prospect — across Shanklin and 
Boniface Downs into Ventnor. 



58 PROM VENTNOR TO RTDIL 



Ventnor to Newchurch. 



This route follows the high road to Ryde as far as Shanklin, 
where the tourist must turn to the left, and by way of Apse 
Castle and Apse Heath, penetrate to Princelet Shute, and 
thence, through Winford, into NEWCHURCH, 8 miles. Apse 
Castle is a locality of high interest, which has been graphically 
described by the late Dr. Bromfield, in the Phytohgisty as "a 
thick wooded eminence, about one mile west-north-west of 
Shanklin, commanding a fiiie view, and flanked on one side by a 
deep ravine, along whose bottom winds a clear bat shallow brook, 
overhimg by precipitous banks covered with trees and shrubs, 
the natural growth of the place. A more delightful scene can 
hardly be imagined than is offered by this fresh and verdant 
spot, when, on some radiant morning in April or May, we tread 
the soUtary mazes of Apse Castle, a blooming wildemew of prim- 
roses, wood-anemones, hyacinths, violets, and a htmdred other 
lovely and fragrant things, overtopped by the taller and purple- 
stained wood-spurge, early purple orduB, and the pointed hoods 
of the spotted leaved wake-robin ; the daisy besprinkled track 
leading us upward, skirted by mossy fern-clad banks on one 
hand, and by shelving thicket on the other, profusely over- 
shadowed by ivy-arched oak and ash, the graceful birch, and 
varnished holly." 



For NEWCHURCH, see p. 5 3. From Newchurch, acrosa 
Ashey Down, to Ryde, is about 6 miles. 



VENTNOB to SHANKLIN and BYDE. 

[Bonchurch) 1 m. ; Lnccombe, 1 m. ; Shanklin, 1} m. ; Sando^vn, 2^ m. ; Brading, 
S m. ; Byde, 4 m. (also rail from Ventnor to Byde). 

" The quiet homes 
And hallow'd birth-spots of the English race, 
Scattered at will beneath the crag's rude face, 
While springs gush round, and near the ocean foams, 
What finds he like to these afar who roams?" 

John Sterling. 

There are three roads leading from Ventnor into Bonchurch, of 
which the Madeira is the most attractive, affording a noble idea 



BONCHURCEL 59 

of the grand beauty of St. Boniface Down, 780 feet, and some 
picturesque glimpses of enchanting scenery. 

The tourist, if his step is firm and his head not easily dizzied, 
may climb the steep ascent of St. Boniface to the Wishing 
Well. According to an old tradition, if you reach that crystal 
spring without, like Orpheus, once casting a backward glance, the 
wish to which you give utterance while drinking of its waters 
will receive a speedy fulfilment Ships, as they sailed along this 
part of the coast, were wont to lower their topsails in honour of 
St Boniface. At the foot of the down a square plot of glebe-land 
(attached to the rectory of Bonchurch) is known as The Bishop's 
AcBE. It is said that, ^^ once upon a time," a certaui bishop, when 
tiding across the Downs in a dense fog, suddenly found himseK 
and his horse on the brink of this tremendous decUvity, and 
flinging his reins on the horse's neck, resigned himself to hk fate, 
vowing, that if he reached the bottom in safety he would give an 
acre of ground to the church of blessed St Boniface. The saint, 
we presume, was bribed by the vow, for the bishop did not break 
his neck, and the acre still belongs to the priests of Bonchurch. 

BONCHUKCH (population, 564. Eotel: Ribband's) abounds 
in the most delightful scenery and most enchanting walks. It is 
a combination of wood and water, of rock and deU, of lawny 
slopes and blossoming gardens, of Italian skies and sunny seas, 
with, over all, the majestic shadow of lofty downs, upon which 
the dullest eye cannot gaze unsatisfied. Its climate enjoys so 
much genial warmth that the myrtle and the fuchsia, the verbeaoa 
and the clianthus, grow in. the open air, stalwart and vigorous, 
and demand from the gardener but little attention. In all sorts 
of odd nooks, either reposing against the mighty wall of the Under- 
cliff, or hiding away in leafy hollows, are perched its picturesque 
cottages and handsome viUas. At East Dene (J. Snowdon 
Henry, Esq.) ; at the Maples (Dr. Leeson) ; at Woodlynch (Sir 
Lawrence Peel) ; at Under Mount (Sir J. Pringle) ; at Mount- 
field ( — Morrison, Esq.) ; and at Upper Mount (Mrs. Huish), 
art has been summoned to assist and develop nature. 

The PiTLPiT Book, a projecting mass of sandstone surmounted 
by a rural cross, is a conspicuous object in any comprehensive 
survey of Bonchurch. 

ITie new Church, designed by Ferrey, merits attention from 
its correct imitation of the Nonnan style and the beauty of the 



60 FROM VBNTNOR TO RYDB.' 

garth in whidi it stands. It was built in 1847-8, and con- 
sists of a nave, cliancel, and north transept. The Font is in- 
scribed to the memory of the Bey. William Adams, the author of 
several beautiful Sac^red Allegories, who died at-Bonchurch in 
1848. The stained glass in the east window is by Wailes. 

Turning to the left we descend to the Old Church, a pic- 
turesque, leaf-shrouded Norman building, founded about 1070. 
Bemark the chancel-arch and the south doorway. Some traces 
of a rude fresco were discovered on the north wall in 1849. In 
the quiet churchyard, within hearing of the restless sea, and in 
the shadow of many an ancient elm, lie the Bev. William Adams, 
his tomb distinguished by a cross of iron, in allusion to his 
pathetic volume " The Shadow of the Cross ;" and John Sterling, 
the great but imperfect genius, commemorated by Carlyle and 
Archdeacon Hare.* 

The sweet sequestered cove below the church is known as 
Monk's Bay, and is said to have been the favourite landing-place 
of the monks of lire, when they came to preach their faith at 
Bonchurch. It was here (according to Sir J. Oglander and Mr. 
Venables) that, in 1545, a detachment of soldiers was landed 
from D'Annebauf s fleet, while similar efforts were made at Sea 
View, and near Bembridge. The Frenchmen, at each point, were 
compelled to retire with heavy ^oss. (See Mr. Frovdis graphic 
narrative in the 4th voL (pp. 4231-7) of his " History of Eng- 
land.") 

•Ascending the steep Shutb at the extreme end of Bonchurch, 
we turn into the wUd romantic scenery of " the Landslip," and 
make our way through its masses of gray rock and its murmur- 
ous copses to LnccoMBE Chine, from whence we may continue 
our walk to Shanklin along the diff, or descending the chine, 
speed merrily along the firm and sandy beach. Luccombe Farm 
lies about half a mile inland, at the foot of Shanklin Down (771 
feet). The Chine is a deep fissure in the ferruginous sandstone 
caused by the constant action of a small rivulet ; one side is utterly 
bare and nude, the other is clothed with masses of hanging foliage. 
From the shore its aspect is very fine. 

The glorious view of the white cliffs of the Culvers, of the 

* Admiral Sir Thomas Hopson, the hero of Vigo Bay in 1702, was 
bom at BoDchurch, of parents " of low degree." He ran away to sea 
from the tailor at Niton to whom he had been apprenticed. 



SHANKLIN. 61 

rolling crests of the verdurons Downs, of the sweet copses of 
Shanklin, and the lovely bay of Sandown, which, as the traveller 
passes along the cliff &om Lnccombe, bursts at once upon his 
enraptured gaze, is a thing not to be easily forgotten. 

SHANKLIN. 

{Hotels : Daish's, HoUier's, and The Marine). " The vil- 
lage," writes Lord Jeffrey, " is very small and scattery, all mixed 
up with trees, and lying among sweet airy faUs and swells of 
grounds which finally rise up behind the breezy downs 800 feet 
high, and sink down in front to the edge of the varying cliffs 
which overhang a pretty beach of fine sand, and are approach- 
able by a very striking wooded ravine which they call the Chine.** 
Of course the Chine is the great " lion ** of Shanklin * The cliff, 
where the stream which forms the Chine enters the sea, is about 1 00 
feet high, and about 150 wide at the top, but at the bottom little 
wider than the channel of the stream. The sides are very steep, and 
in most places are clothed with rich underwood. After proceeding 
about 100 yards in a direct line from the shore, the chasm makes 
a sudden bend to the left and grows much narrower. Its sides are 
nearly perpendicular, and but little covered with shrubbery. It 
terminates in an extremely narrow fissure, down which the rill 
which has formed the Chine falls about 30 feet. " The sides of the 
gloomy hollow in which it falls are of the blackish indurated clay, 
of which the greater part of the soil hereabouts is composed, 
and the damp of the water has covered most of it with shining 
green lichens and mosses of various shades" — {Sir H, Englefield), 
Beyond the Chine the cliffs, extending westward, consist of an 
alternating series of clays and sands. The upper part is greenish- 
white sand, resting on a bed of dark-blue clay ; the lower of 
ferruginous sands, with concretionary layers of green sand full of 
fossil terebratulas. 

Shanklin Church, dedicated to St. John the Baptist, stands 
on a slight ascent bordered by trees, and dates from the reign of 
Edward ILL It retains, however, little of its ancient character^ 
and has been much disfigured by ill-devised additions. 

* Keats, the poet, was at Shanklin in 1819, and wrote there his fine 
poem of ** Lamia.*' Lord Jeffrey was a visitor in 1846, — the year before 
bis death. 



62 FROM VEKTNOR TO RTDE. 



Shanklin to Newchurch. 

The first point on our road is the old farm-stead of Lan- 
GUARD, from whence we proceed to Merrtqarden, and 
turning to the left, cross the hill to Cheverton. The road 
then skirts the fir-fringed Apse Heath, and rune forward to 
Arreton, but for ourselves we shall take, at Apse Heath, 
the right-hand turning, and push through the pleasant open 
glades of the ancient forest of Bordwood, a forest now, in^name 
only, though it once abounded with red and fallow deer, and 
often rang with the shrill echoes of the huntsman's horn. A small 
mound, on the right, is called Queen Bower, and was the spot, 
it is said, where Isabella de Fortibus, the good and great Lady of 
the Island, was wont to station herself, and watch the chase in the 
surrounding woodlands. The view from this point is extensive 
and beautifuL 

A steep picturesque lane, on the left, leads up Skinner^s Hill 
to Newchurch (see p. 53). 

[Many delightful Ezoubsxons may be made from Shanklin,— specially so, to the 
groves of America, to the old manor-house of Apss, to Luooombk Chine, across 
ghanklin and St Boniface Downs to Yentnob, to Cook's Castle and Appuldub- 
ooMBB ; or, by way of Whetely Bank and Sandford, to Godshuju] 



MAIN ROUTE RESUMED— SHANKLIN to BRADING. 

As pleasant a summer day's walk as pedestrian could desire 
is afforded by the 4 miles between Shanklin and Brading. De- 
lightful glimpses of the blue waters nestling in Sandown Bay, of 
the glittering headland of the Culver and the green crest of Bem- 
bridge Down, of the rich interchange of meadow, cornfield, and 
woodland which lies between the two great ranges of chalk- 
hills, are constantly afforded, and sometimes through the fanciful 
fi»mework of over-arching foliage — ^like a landscape set in a ring 
of gleaming emerald. At the Stag Inn diverges the Arreton road, 
passing Cheverton, the Cottage of the " Dairyman's Daugh- 
ter," and Horringford ; and just beyond a bye-lane turns aside 
to cross Blackpan Common, and ascend by way of Alverston 
»nd Knighton to Ashet Down. Continuing in the main road, 
however, we pass through Laej: (note its Jacobean farm-house), 



BANDOWN. 63 

itscend an abrupt accllTity of the sandstone, and enter 

SANDOWN, 

(Population, 1030. Hotels: Sandown Hotel, Star and Garter, 
and King's Head. Hotae Agents : Messrs. Mear and Higgs), with 
the Barracks on our left hand. The principal street winds down 
the hill to the low shore of Sandown Bat, and then strikes 
inland. 

Sandown Church, an excellent Early English building, 
erected in 1845 from the designs of a Mr. Woodman, and at a 
cost of jB2600, raises its tall spire on the left of the road, and 
at a short distance from it Close at hand are the admirable 
Schools, recently erected through the energetic exertions of some 
of the principal inhabitants. 

Wilkes, the demagogue, was a resident at Sandown from 
1788 to 1797, the year of his death. His " villakin" occupied 
the site of Royal Heath Cottage. 

The old Fort (of Sandown), lately removed, was built by Lord 
Conway, governor of the island, in 1632, — the old quadrangular 
block-house, erected by Henry VHI., having been destroyed by 
the encroachments of the sea. A new fort, on a much larger and 
more approved scale, has recently been erected further to the 
N. E. It is built of brickwork and turf, and faced with granite. 

1^* The Culver Cliffs, Bembridgb Down, and Yaver- 
LAND, may weU be visited from Sandown, and the tourist should 
certainly make this detour if his time will permit. The path 
turns off beyond the Fort, and climbs the acclivity of Bembridge 
Down, 355 feet in height. On the summit stood the obelisk 
erected in 1849 to the memory of the late Earl of Yarborough, 
but this has been removed further east, to make way for the 
vast fort which now crowns the Down. The prospect unrolled 
around is full of changes of colour and form, and comprehends 
the greater portion of the East of the Wight, with St Helen's 
roads and Spithead to the north-west, the peninsula of Bembridge 
to the north-east, and Sandown Bay, with the sweep of cliffs to 
Shanklin and Dunnose Point, southward. From the Down we 
may descend to the Culver Cliff (from culfre, a pigeon), and by 
a somewhat diflSicult path to the fossiliferous locality of WmTE- 
cliff Bat, — a locality of intense interest to the geological student 
The circuit of the peninsula may then be made to Bembridge, a 



64 PROM VENTNOR TO RYDE. 

charmingly situated little village, on the eastern bank of Brading 
Haven, with a neat new church, a ferry across to St. Helen's, a 
variety of pleasant prospects, and a peculiarly healthy air. 

The village of YAVERLAND lies on the southern slope of 
Bembridge Down. It contains an ancient Norman Church (with 
line chancel-arch and south doorway) standing upon an elm- 
girdled mound, with an antique Jacobean Manor-Housb (a.d. 
1620) in its rear. The latter is a building of much interest, 
and contains some curious carvings. 

A steep lane descends through a bold cutting in the sandstone 
to Yarbridgb {Inn: The Angler's Arms), where the river broadens 
into a picturesque pool, and joins the Brading road. 

From Yar Bridge, a favourite resort of anglers, we reach 
BRADING {Inns: The Bugle, Wheatsheaf, and New Inn), 
which was once represented in Parliament, and still boasts of two 
bailiffs, two justices, two constables, and a hayward, though it 
has neither trade nor manufactures to support its dignity. Descend- 
ing the hilly street, the tourist will notice, in a small open area 
on the left, the Bull-Ring, to which were bound the unfortunate 
beasts tortured for the amusement of our enlightened forefathers. 
The Town Hall, a small structure of wood supported upon brick 
arches, stands at the comer of the lane leading up to the Church, 
nearly opposite the shed which encloses one of the Brass Guns 
made, in 1549, at the expense of the different parishes of the island 
to enable them to repulse the marauding French. In the market- 
place (under the Town Hall) stands an antiquated pair of stocks. 

The Church, of high interest, is dedicated to St. Mary, and 
is mainly Transition-Norman in character, with a few fragments 
of an earlier building. The tower, a stately pile, is Early English. 
In the interior is a fine incised slab of Flemish work, adorned 
with figures of the Virgin, the child Jesus, and the Twelve 
Apostles, and an eflSgy, in full armour, of Sir John Ck&rovdny 
d. 1441 constable of Portchester Castle. In the Oglander 
Chapel (at the east end of the south aisle), there may be seen 
effigies of members of that family, one a knight in armour, and 
the other a loyal cavalier, whose Diary in MS. contains some 
curious pictures of the condition of the island during the Civil 
Wars. The interior of the Church was restored in 1864, at the 
expense of Sir Henry Oglander. 



ST. HELEN'S. 65 

In the cbtircliyaTd some epitaplis of unusual merit will he 
foand : especially Mrs. Steele's lines " Forgive, blest shade, the 
tributary tear/' set to music by Dr. Calcott ; and the Rev. Legh 
Richmond's tribute to " Jane, the Young Cottager." Legh Rich- 
mond w&s curate of Brading and Yaverland from 1797 to 1805. 

Below Brading the Eastern Yar or "Main River" (as it is 
sometimes called) flows into the ample tidal lake known as 
Brading Haven. From the high ground about Brading this 
expanse of waters (about 800 acres) presents, at favourable times 
of the tide, a beautiful spectacle. Attempts have been unsuccess- 
fully made to reclaim some portion of the level which, at high 
water, the sea so completely covers, and Sir Hugh Middleton, the 
" New River " knight, brought, on one occasion, his engineering 
skill to bear upon the enterprise. The mouth of the Haven 
is closed in by the shelving sides of Bembridge Point, south 
east, and St. Helen's Spit, north-west. Oyster-beds have re- 
cently been formed here, and a company has been established 
for carrying on the trade. 

From the Ryde road, as we emerge from Brading, glimpses 
are enjoyed of the oak-groves of Nunwell, the seat, since the 
Conquest, of the old Norman family of Oglander. The house is 
picturesquely situated at the foot of Brading Down. 



A mile beyond, and a road diverges (on the right) to 
ST. HELEN'S (population, 3412),the only island-village grouped, 
in good old English fashion, around a pleasant green. The 
Church, which formerly stood on the sea-shore, near the Spit, 
was destroyed by the encroaching waves ; but its tower, preserved 
and repaired at the cost of government, still serves as an important 
landmark. A new Church was erected in 1719, on the road 
to Sea View ; a plain, insignificant building in a lonely and 
retired situation. 

The main road now passes through Whitefield Wood (a 
pleasant lane, on the right, descends through Barnslby to SEA 
VIEW and SPRING VALE), and across an agreeable open 
country, to ST. JOHN'S, a suburb of Ryde, with a good Early 
English Church, erected in 1843, after the designs of Mr. 
Thomas Hellyer. St. John's, a seat belonging to the heir of 
Sir John Simeon, was built by General Lord Amherst ; its 
attractive grounds were laid out by Repton, the landscape ^ 



66 FROM VEHTTNOS TO RTDB. 

gardener. Descending St John's Hill— observe, on the left^ 
St. John's Park, a new settlement of trim smart villas — ^we cross 
the DuvER, or Dover, formerly a waste tract, where the bodies 
of the iU-fated victims lost in the Boi/al George were interred, 
but now traversed by rows of excellent houses. Along the 
Esplanade — observe the iron pier projected by the Ryde and 
Stoke*8 Bay Steam Ferry Company — ^we proceed to the Pier, 
from whence, satisfied with our explorations of the island, we may 
speed to " fresh scenes and pastures new.** 

Before taking leave of this part of the island we most indicate an ezcnision 
trom Ryde to ST. HELEN'S. Keeping along the sea-wall we pass Appley Woods 
and Applet (J. Hyde, Esq.), formerly the abode of a wealthy smuggler, one David 
Biyce— above whose trees rises the picturesque structure of Applet Towers (O. 
Young, Esq.). Next, the narrow path skirts the grounds of St. Clare (Col. V. 
Harcourt), a castellated mansion of some pretensions, and widens into a passable 
load at the sea-side lodging-house hamlet of Spring Vale. Crossing the salterns, 
we turn into SEA VIEW, where an Early English church, small but excellently 
appointed, has recently been erected from Mr. T. Hellyer's designs. At Sea View 
the French, in 1549, made an unsuccessful attempt to invade the island. 

We may cross the sands of Pbiort Bat, so named from a Cluniac house, founded 
about 1150, whose site is partly occupied by a modem mansion, erected by Chief- 
Justice Orose, and reach the ruined beacon-tower of old St. Helen's Church. 
Traversing the Spit we ascend to ST. HELEN'S, and turning to the right, return to 
Ryde by way of NBrrLESTONs Obbsn, Westbrook (P. Mahon, Esq.), and St. 
John's. 

Another excursion may be made to Ashet Down, and the Ryde Waterworks, 
proceeding thither by way of Play Street, Haylands, and Upton House, and 
returning through Bloodstone Copse, Qreen Lane, and Smallbrook. Ashet Fabm 
marks the site of a cell of nuns, attached to the nunnery of Wheiwell, in Hampshixe. 
From Ashey Down is obtained one of the finest if not the very finest view in the 
island. 

At Haven Street, 8 miles firom Ryde, a graceftd little Chx7rch, designed by 
Mr. T. Hellyer, will attract attentioiLj 



▼OTAGE ROUND THE ISLAND. 69 

VOYAGE EOUND THE ISLAND. 

roT the COAST ROUTE from YARMOUTH to FRESHWATER, see page 40. 



Steamers leave Ryde thrice a week during the summer- 
season, and accomplish the Voyage round the Island in about 
six hours, but thoroughly to appreciate the beauties of the coast 
the tourist must charter a sailing-boat, and devote two days to 
the excursion, sleeping (the first night) at Yarmoulli. 

Starting from Ryde, westward, we pass Westfield, the seat 
of Vice Admiral Sir Augustus Clifford, distinguishable by its 
tower ; the pretty semi-Elizabethan villa of Bucklands (Mrs. 
Alleyne Yard) ; and the white-looking, tree-surrounded pile of 
Ryde House. The woods of Binstead and the oak coppices 
of monastic Quarr now fringe the sloping shore, and soon 
we find ourselves at the mouth of Wootton River, the 
rolling waters glinting through the trees with pleasant flashes of 
silver light, and the tower of Fern Hill shewing conspicuously 
in the distance. The next inlet is called King*8 Quay, from a 
baseless tradition that the neighbouring woods were once the 
hiding-place of King John, and immediately after passing its oak- 
bordered banks we come in sight of Victorians marine palace — of 
the towers, terraces, gardens and lawns of Osborne. Norris Castle 
(R. Bell, Esq.) next presents to our view its ivy-shrouded battle- 
ments. Now we shoot across the noble estuary of the Medina, 
alive with sails and masts of every nation. West Cowes clustering 
on its western bank ; we pass the romantically situated villa so 
quaintly named Egypt, and glide along the well-wooded shores 
of Gurnard Bay, where the tin was landed from Leap, on the 
Hampshire coast. Soon we pass Thorness Bay, the salterns of 
Elmsworth, the mouth of the Newtown river, the fossOiferous 
locality of Hempstead Hill, abounding in the plants, seeds, 
shells and univalves of the fluvio-eocene deposits. The shore is 
low and uninteresting until we come in sight of Yarmouth, and 
the bold slope, covered with villas and groves, of Nortok. 
Remark, now, the bristling ramparts of the Victoria and Albert 
Forts (Sconce and Cliff End), commanding, in conjunction with 
the opposite stronghold (Hurst Castle, so singularly situated at 
the extremity of yonder narrow promontory), the entrance of the 
Solent. Let us glide quickly across Colwell Bay, and around 



68 FOIBIB or ISTMBMat, 

Wabdes Ledge ; sboot acroaB Oolweix and Alum Bats ; pass 
the fanioiu rocks of the Needles ; enter Sgraichell's Bat ; and 
sail in the shadow of the lofty cliffs of Madt Bench and the 
Nodes, to Watookbe Bat and Fbsshwateb Gate. These are 
places we have already visited (see pp. 36-41). Now we enter 
Compton Bay (below Afton Down), and commence an exploration 
of the southern coast Let ns note down the points of interest 
we shall sacceasively pass ' — 

(In COMFTON BAT : 

CoMFioir Chdi K. Observe the Junction of the chalk and greeDsand foxmaUaoB. 

COMPTOV Obamob Chikx. 

Bbook Pout, and Ledge, with its ramaikaUe petrified Forest (p. 42.) 

Bbook OHm ; above which is the YiOage of Bbook (see p. 42.) 

Blackwood Ponrr. 
In BBIXTON BAT : 

Buu. Faced Bock. 

Cbjuiox Chihk. 

OKAV<sCHnnB. 

Ship's Lkdok. 

BABms CHnrE. 

CowuBAZB CHiinB. Between these two Chines maj be noted the JmstloB- 
point of the Wealden and Oieensand formations. 
Bhxphkbd'b Chihb. (p. 44.) 

ATHEBnELD PoDTT, and dsngeroDs ledge of xoeka. 
ItiCHALEBAT: 

Whale Chisx. 

LaddebChihc. 

Walfsm Chute. 

Blaokoako Chute, (p. 46.) 

BockxnEmd. 
ST. CATHERINE'S POINT and Ughthonse. Note the eommeneement of tL» 

lofty wall and pictnreaqne terraces of the Underdifll (pp. 47-66i) 
WREETH BAT. On the shore, the Botal Victobla. Hotel^ 
PUCKASTER cove :— where Charles II. was diiven ashore, (p. 49.) 
BINNBL BAT. 

BINNEL POINT. Remark the grounds north of Old Pabk. 
WOODT BAT and Point. Above, is the site of the new town of Woolverton. 
ORCHARD BAT. Note the marine villa of the Earl of Tarborongh. The cliffs 

b«yond are called the Webtebh Lutes. 
8TEEPHILL COVR 
HILL BAT. The Ventnor Esplanade will now be noticed : the qnalnt villas of 

Ventnor ; and the lofty crest of St Boniface Down. Horse-shoe Bay (ao 

named ft-om its shape) ; Bonchorch old church, and Monk's Bay will next 

attract the attention, and the tennination of the Undercliff is reached at 
DUNNOSE : a formidable headland, rising to an elevation of 771 feet] 

The Coast from Dunnosb to Rtdb is well worthy of exami, 
nation. Lofty cliffs of a dark brown colour, occasionally relieved 



A DAY AT CABISBROOK. 69 

Dy patches of ochre, stretch northward until they dip down to 
the level sands of Sandown. These cliffs are rent at Luccombb 
and Shanklin by bold deep Chines, the former cntting inland 
with a semicircular sweep; the latter, clothed in verdure, is 
broken up into several romantic curvatures. Sandown Bay 
stretches &om Dunnose, south-east, to the Culvers, north-east, the 
town being seated on the level nearly in its centre. After passing 
Sandown, the cliff's gradually rise into the noble promontory of 
the Culver, its face of glittenng chalk curiously streaked with 
bands of flint. Now we sweep into Whiteclifp Bat, and 
rounding Bembridge Ledge and the Foreland, glide past the 
village of Bembridge ; shoot across Brading Haven ; and sail 
into the well-known roadstead of St. Helen's. Here a small 
wooded curve in the shore is named from an ancient Cluniac 
foundation, Priory Bay. We are now in sight" of Sea View 
and Nettlestone Point. The shore from this point is duU, level, 
and iminteresting. Eemark the little hamlet of Spring Yale, 
facing the broad firm sands, and offering ^' great facilities for 
bathing;" the castellated pile of St. Clare (CoL Harcourt), the 
woods of Appley (J. Hyde, Esq.), the Ryde Esplanade, the iron 
pier and quay of the Ryde and Stokes Bay Steam Ferry Com- 
pany ; and finally, the long wooden arm of Ryde Pier, so well 
known to yachtsmen and promenaders, the boast and glory of 
the most fashionable watering-place in England. 



EXCURSION— A DAY AT CARISBROOK 

[OABIBBROOE is 1 m. trom Newport, 8 m. firom Ryde, and 6 m. from Cowes. 
Coaches daily trom Ryde to Newport and Carisbrook ; railway from Cowes to New 
port, and omnibus to Carisbrook. The excursionist who leaves London early, may 
easily Include Cowes, Newport, and Carisbrook, or Ryde, Newport, and Carisbrook 
in his day's tour, by availing himself of these conveyances, though, of course, he 
will only be able to ei^oy a cursory glance at the principal points of interest 

Inns at Cakisbeumk : The Bugle, the Carisbrook Castle, etc.] 



We leave Newport by the High Street, pass through 
Castle Hold, and traverse the pleasant promenade of the Mall, 
which brings us to the foot of Carisbrook hilL Here we may 
turn off to the left, and wind up a narrow lane to the Castle, or 
ascending the hill, through Carisbrook village, pay our first visit 
to the Church ; taking next the Roman Villa ; and lastly, the 
Castle. 



70 A DAT AT GAEIBBBOOK. 

CARISBROOK CmiRCH, 

dedicated to St Mary, was originally attached to the pnoiy of 
Carisbrook, founded here by William Fitz-Osbert (to whom 
William the Conqueror granted the Isle of Wight) as a cell to his 
Abbey of Lire, or Lyra, in Normandy. The Priory, which stood 
north of the church, and of which a few grey stones are the only 
remains — these stones having been made use of in the neighbour- 
ing farm — ^was leased, at the dissolution of the religious houses, 
to Sir James Worsley, and passed to Queen Elizabeth's famous 
minister. Sir Francis Walsingham, on his marriage with Sir James' 
son's widow (the reader must excuse this complication of possessive 
cases). Walsingham thriftily converted the monastic buildings to 
profitable uses, and to avoid the expense of repairing the chancel 
of the priory-church, which, by lease, he was enforced to keep 
in due order, he persuaded the people of Carisbrook that the 
church was too large for them, and, with their consent, pulled 
down the chancel ! 

The Church is still a very stately building, with a remark- 
ably fine Perpendicular tower, of the same date as the towers of 
Gatcombe, Qiale, and GodshilL The south aisle is separated 
from the nave, by a Transition-Norman arcade. An ancient slab, 
broken into two pieces, commemorates one of the monks, vicars 
of Carisbrook. Very noticeable is the sculpture dedicated to 
Lady Dorothy Wadham, Queen Jane Seymour's sister — ^the small 
figures in the back-groimd being supposed to represent the 
deformed and lame whom her charitv benefited. A curious 
rhyming inscription (in too many quatrains to be quoted here) 
records the merits of WiUiam Keeling ^ d. 1619, one of our early 
adventurers in the Eastern seas, and perpetuates the affection of 
his wife, who, we fancy, was its author. The allegory which 
surmounts the inscription is extremely quaint. 

The vicarage of Carisbrook — one of the best livings in the 
island — ^was granted by Charles I. to Queen's College, Oxon, at 
the instigation of Henrietta Maria (a.d. 1626). 

Near the parsonage lie the ruins of 

The ROMAN VILLA, 

discovered during the works necessary for the construction of 
some stabling, early in 1859, and preserved for the public through 



GARXSBROOK CASTLE. 7l 

the exertions of C. Seeley, Esq. of Brook, R P. Wilkins, Esq. of 
Newport, the Rev. K Kell, and Mr. W. Spickemell of Carishrook. 
The villa, it would seem, included an area of 120 feet hy 55, 
and contains several apartments — ^the largest 40 feet by 22 — a 
semicircular bath, hypocaust, etc. A mosaic pavement, some 
coins, and other relics, have't been carefully preserved. ' The 
Queen and the late Prince Consort visited this memorial of the 
past, and expressed their desire it should be thrown open to 
public examination. 



CARISBROOK CASTLE. 

A chiefless castle, breathing stem farewells 

From gray and ivied walls where Ruin greenly dwells. 

Byron. 

The different historical periods through which the castie has 
passed might easily be inferred from a mer^ cursory examination 
of its ruins. Th^ Keep is^ mainly Saxon, but retains some preoise 
indications of having been founded upon a previous Roman 
fortress, while there aire not wanting traces of even those wild 
but gallant British tribes^ whb so stoutly resisted the l^ons, and 
so often brought disgrace upon thev standards of the Caesars. The 
fine gateway through which we entered, with its stout machi- 
colated towers, recalls the days of the Roses, when Edward 
Woodville lorded it over' the Isle of Wight The ground-plan 
of the castle, with its pentagonal arrangement, represents the 
additions to it^ fortifications made in the reign of Elizabeth 
under the direction of an Italian engineer named Genobellau 
The ruined chapel reminds us of its founder, Lord Lymington, who 
was governor of the castie in the days of Qeorge II. A dilapidated 
window, with a few rusty bars, brings back the storm and 
shadow of the Civil Wars, being pointed out as that through 
which Charles I., a king, but a prisoner, vainly attempted to 
escape.* Thus, almost every era of English history has some 
association with the ruined stronghold. 

Every ancient ruin is, as it were, a picture in many panels 

* The actual window, however, was an aperture further to the east, 
but now blocked up, though still recognisable in the exterior of the 
wall nearly adjoining the only buttress on this side of the castle. 



72 A DAT AT CABISBBOOK. 

Looking in this light at Carisbrook Castle, we will endeavour, 
though with an unskilful brush, to depict its most interesting 
" pictorial effects." 

The tin ti-ade, which first brought England into connection 
with the rest of the civilized world, appears to have had its dep6t 
in the Isle of Wight, and the route by which it is supposed th^ 
caravans conveyed their stores across the island must have passed 
within a bow-shot of the present position of Carisbrook Castle. 
It is probable, therefore, that a site so commanding was early 
recognized, in a military point of view, by the Britons, and there 
is reason to believe that a Celtic (or British) encampment was 
formed upon it 

When the Romans occupied the island their military skill 
soon seized upon the strategical advantages of the British camp, 
and they erected a fortress upon its site. In like manner, the 
Saxons rehabilitated — ^if we may use the expression — ^the Roman 
stronghold, and undoubtedly formed the nucleus of the later 
feudal castJe. 

After the Battle of Hastings, William distributed with lavish 
liberality the riches of the conquered land among his followers. 
The Isle of Wight fell to the share of one of the most powerful, 
a knight ready both in council and action, William, son of 
Osbert, .or Fitz-Osbert. This sagacious Norman repaired and 
enlarged the Saxon fortress, adding what is called the basecourt 
to the Saxon keep, and constructing stro^g stout walls, which 
included a space of an acre and a hal£ In the castle he had 
erected, he often held high revels, and, imitating the example of 
his royal master, he divided the surrounding country among his 
faithful vassals, who afterwards held their estates of ^' the Honour 
and Castle of Carisbrook." 

William Fitz-Osbert died, as became so bold a warrior, on 
the red battle-field, and his honours passed to his son ; but 
Count Roger, as he was called, was neither so prudent nor so 
able as his father, and rebelling against King William, was cast 
into prison and deprived of ids possessions. Thus the Castle of 
Carisbiook fell into the hands of the king. 

Eong WOliam only paid one visit to his island-fortress, and 
that was in an hour of peril, which vividly brought out the manly 
qualities of his kingly mind. His half-brother, Odo, bishop of 
Bayeux, half warrior, half priest, who had received from King 
WUliam the earldom of Kent, and fiit estates and manifold honours^ 



CABISBBOOK OASTLB. 7h 

duiing the Conqueroi's absence in Normandy (1081), collected a 
large and powerful following in the Me of Wight, and prepared 
to quit England for Italy. The king, apprised of the ambitions 
Odo's design, suddenly returned, and summoned to Carisbrook 
Castle his knights, and men-at-arms, and other vassals. 

They met in the Boyal Hall, by the shifting light of a hundred 
torches, which wavered and flickered merrily enough upon the 
glittering armour of the knightly throng. William, with moody 
brow and angry eye, sat in stem silence upon the dais ; and when 
the murmur of voices was hushed, he recounted, one by one, the 
offences which Odo had done against him. " He has despoiled 
the church — ^he has wronged the state — ^has sought to seduce 
from their standard my soldiers who were designed to protect 
England. Tell me now,'' he cried, ^' how shall I act towards such 
a brother?" 

Odo was a prelate and a noble — ^wealthy, powerful, and not 
over-slow in his punishment of an enemy. What marvel, then, 
that out of all that knightly gathering not one dared raise his 
voice against him ? 

" Seize him 1" shouted the Conqueror, as if resolved to con- 
strue their silence into an acknowledgment of his brother^s offences ; 
" seize him, and let him be closely guarded I" 

But not a knight laid his finger upon the prince of the church. 
All stood mute and aghast at the king's wrath. With instant 
decision, he sprang from his seat, strode through his astonished 
followers, and grasped his brother's robes. 

Whereupon Odo exclaimed, '^ I am a priest, and a servant of 
the Lord 1 None but the Pope has the right to judge me." 

But the monarch, prepared for the crafty excuse, replied, — 
'^ I do not punish thee as a priest ; but as my own vassal, and a 
noble, whom I myself have made." 

And Odo was surrounded by his sovereign's guards, and in 
due time despatched across the seas, and imprisoned in a Norman 
fortress.* 

Let the years roU by, and bear with them the names and 
deeds of many a famous knight and stout soldier, who in due 
succession governed the Me of Wight, and maintained a splendid 
state in Carisbrook Castle. What legends, what quaint stories, 
what seemingly extravagant romances, its ivied stones, had they 
but tongues, could tell ! Fair dames and gallant knights ; the 

* Ordericus Yitalis, Hist. Eccles., booJc iy. 



74 A DAY AT CABISBBOOE. 

brawl, the fight, the wassail ; love, jealousy, sorrow, ambition, 
hate, revenge — all have mingled their weird influences to shed 
a poetry and a mystery upon the ruined ramparts of Carisbrook. 
Like the sea, it holds a thousand treasures which it will never 
unbosom. 

In 1377, the Castle was surrounded with the din of battle. 
A large body of French rovers landed on the east shore of the 
island ; forced their way through its valleys and over its bills ; 
swept through Newport, and encamped beneath the walls of Caris- 
brook. Finding it too strong to be carried without regular mili- 
tary approaches, and being unprovided for a regular siege, they 
attempted to capture it by a coup-dle^main, but fell into an ambus- 
cade planned by Sir Hugh Tyrrel, the governor, and were cut 
to pieces — not a fugitive escaping to tell the French maidens of 
the beautiful island-glades. So great was the slaughter, that the 
islanders (according to a very doubtful tradition) called the fight 
thus easily won the battle of the Noddies, or simpletons, and the 
spot where the chief rush of the mSl^ took place is still called 
the Noddiei^ or Node HUL 

The Castle received a distinguished prisoner in 1397, — ^the 
Earl of Warwick, who had joined " the Fitzalan Conspiracy" 
against Eichard IE., and was saved from the scaflbld by the earnest 
solicitations of the Earl of Salisbury. " Earl of Warwick," said 
his judges, when announcing the king's clemency, '^ this sentence 
is very lenient, for you have merited to die as much as your com- 
peers ; but the exceUent services rendered by you in times past 
to King Edward of blessed memory, as well on this as on the 
other side of the sea, have saved your life, and it is ordered that 
you banish yourself to the Isle of Wight, taking with you where- 
withal to maintain your state as long as you live, and never 
quitting the island." 

Himiphrey the " good" Duke of Gloucester, — ^Richard Duke 
of York who perished at Agincourt, — Edmund Duke of Somerset, 
— ^Anthony, the valiant and accomplished Lord Scales, the very 
mirror of knighthood, and chiefest ornament of the fourth Ed- 
ward's court, — Sir Edward WoodviUe, a gaUant and courteous 
gentleman, who kept up a brave splendour at Carisbrook — and 
Richard Worsley, a favourite councillor of Henry the Eighth's, were 
among the captains of Carisbrook Castle and lords of the Isle of 
Wight 

In Elizabeth's reign, during the panic caused by the fitting 



CARISBROOK CASTLB. 75 

out of the Spanish Armada, the Castle was repaired, strengthened, 
and enlarged under the directions of a fEunous Italian engineer, 
Genobella. It was once visited by James L and twice by Prince 
Charles, who '^ hunted in the parke, and kUled a bucke," and 
otherwise amused their idle hours during; their brief excur- 
sions. 

At the outset of the great Civil War it was garrisoned by a 
smaU detachment of BoyaUst troops under a chivalrous cavalier^ 
Colonel Brett. The wife of the governor of the island, the Coun- 
tess of Portland, and her five children, were intrusted to their 
loyal care, and all hoped, in the stout castle, to secure a pleasant 
asylum. But the inhabitants of Newport were fiercely Parlia- 
mentarian, and assisted by 400 naval auxiliaries, resolved upon 
seizing the Castle, and holding it for the Parliament. The be- 
siegers were numerous, well provided with artillery, and easily 
supplied with stores. The garrison consisted but of a few invalided 
soldiers, and had but three days' provisions. " There seemed no 
alternative," says a recent writer, " but an unconditional surrender. 
In these critical circumstances, their only resource — but it was 
sufficient — ^was the hero-heart that beat in the bosom of the 
Countess. As she leapt upon the ramparts, with a lighted match 
iu her hand, admiration insensibly stirred the minds of those who 
gazed upon her. Englishmen reverenced a true Englishwoman. 
She spoke— clearly, firmly, without a faltering accent — 'Grant 
to us honourable terms ; grant to these brave men safety of life 
and limb, and permission to go where they will — or, with my 
own hand, I will fire the first cannon, and will defend these 
walls until they bury us in their ruins !' The besiegers acceded 
to her demands," and the Countess retired from the Castle in 
much honour. 

Thirty years had elapsed since Prince Charles hunted the 
buck in Parkhurst Forest, and rested awhile within the towers of 
Carisbrook Castle, free, beloved, happy in the prospect of a glo- 
rious crown and a noble people's affection, rich in personal graces 
and intellectual refinements, — ^when a king, crowned, sceptred, 
but powerless, he passed again under the massive archway to t^e 
solitude and sorrow of a prison ! At first he was treated with all 
the respect due to his exalted dignity. He rode out whenever he 
pleased, and again hunted the deer in Parkhurst, though Colonel 
Hammond rode at his side. The parliament allowed him a 
yearly revenue of £6000, and he lived in the state apartments of 



76 A DAT AT GARISBBOOK. 

the castle — long shewn as King CharUi Roonu — Burrounded with 
the ceremonials of royalty. 

But he was gradually stripped of these. His chaplains and 
faithful attendants were removed, and others forced upon him, of 
whom he only knew that they were chosen by his enemies. He 
no longer rode abroad, no longer hunted in the forest, but was 
constrained to view the bright valleys and sparkling plains through 
the bars of his prison window. A decrepit old man was almost 
his sole companion. — '^ He is sent every morning to light my 
fire," said 'King Charles to Philip Warwick, " and is the best 
companion I have had for many months." Thus " cribb'd, 
cabin'd, and confined," the unhappy monarch became careless of 
his attire, in which once he had so fine a taste ; allowed his beard 
to grow ; was wan and haggard, — *^ a gray discrowned king."* 

How the imprisoned king passed his days has been duly 
recorded by his faithful attendants. He rose early. He took 
moderate exercise, walking round the ramparts, or pacing to and 
fro the narrow bowling-green, into which Colonel Hammond had 
converted " the place of arms." Of food he ate sparingly, and 
his drink at dinner was sack, diluted with two parts water. He 
chiefly employed his leisure hours in reading, writing, and medi- 
tating, or L conversation on things huma^ and divine with those 
who waited about his person. The principal books he read were 
Bishop Andrews* Sermons, Hooker's Ecclesiastical Polity, Her- 
bert's Poems, Fairfax's version of Tasso's « Gierusalemme Liber- 
ata," and Spenser's " Faery Queen." In one of these books he 
penned a Latin distich, which vividly illustrates his peculiar cast 
of thought : — 

" Rebas in adversis facile est contemnere vitam ; 
Fortiter ille facit qui miser esse potest." 

Ungliahed. 

In evil times, life we may well disdain : 
He doeth bravely who can suffer pain. 

Two attempts were made by the Boyalists to secure the 
monarch's freedom, but both were ineffectual He carried on a 
correspondence with his chief adherents in cipher ; but the cipher 
was detected, and the letters were intercepted by the parliamen- 

• " My gray discrowned head," — the king's own expression in his 
'* Maje$ty in Misery" 



GARISBBOOK CASTLE. 77 

tarian leaders, who consequently were enabled to frustrate the 
plans contrived for his escape. 

The first attempt was made on the night of the 20th of March 
1648. Four or five gentlemen — ^Firebrace, Worsley, Newland, 
and Osbom — were on the watch to assist the king, whose purpose 
it was to force himself through his pnson window, cross the court 
of the castle, and reach the counterscarp. A horse, ready saddled 
and bridled, was there waiting for him, in charge of a trusty 
cavalier. A ride across the island, protected by the heavy night- 
shadows, and at the sea-shore was a boat, well-manned, to bear 
him to liberty and a throne ! The scheme was well-devised, but 
failed through the narrowness of the window, which prevented 
the unhappy monarch from forcing his person through it. 

The second attempt was made on Sunday night, May 28th, 
when the king removed the bars which had impeded him on the 
former occasion, and might have escaped, but that the whole 
details of the project were known to Colonel Hammond, the 
governor of Carisbrook, and double guards were placed at conve- 
nient positions, to fire upon any person leaving the castle. 

The king's captivity came to an end on November 29 th. He 
was roused at the dead of night by a detachment of Roundhead 
soldiers, and hurried through the darkness towards Worsley*8 
Tower, which stands upon the north-western shore of the island. 
Then he embarked with his few attendants, and crossed the strait 
to Hurst Castle. 

A brief entry in the register of Carisbrook Church records 
the king's removal : — " The last day of November he went from 
Newport to Hurst Castell to prison, carried away by to (}wo) 
troops of horse." Another pithy passage sums up the ill-fated 
monarch*s history: — "In the year of our Lord God, 1649, 
January the 30th day, was Kinge Charles beheaded at Whitehall 
Gate," — ^last sad scene of " that deplorable tragedy," as Clarendon 
calls it, " so much to the dishonour of the nation, and the reli- 
gion professed by it, though imdeservedly." 

The next prisoners in this famous castle were recommended 
to the humanity of their getolers by their innocent youth as much 
as by their royal blood. The Princess Elizabeth and the Duke of 
Gloucester, the daughter and son of ** the Martyr King," were 
removed here on the 16th of August 1660. 

The Princess Elizabeth was " a lady of excellent parts, great 
observation, and an early understanding," fair, delicate — deformed 



'^' '7P A / A DAT AT iilLBISBROOK. / 

and bbwed -down by aii unconquerable malady. Jler brother nks / 
been described by the great Clarendon as " a prince of extraor- ^ 
, dinary bopes^ botJi from the comeliness and gracefulness of his 
person, and the vivacity and vigour of his wit and imderstand- 
ing.** While residing at Carilsbrook he was addressed as 
'' Master Harry,*' and a yearly allowance of J^IOOO was granted 
both to him and the princess for the maintenance of a decent 
splendour. 

But within a week after their arrival, the princess '' being at 
bowls, a sport she much delighted in, there fell a sudden shower, 
and being of a sickly constitution it caused her to take cold, and 
the next day she complained of headach and feverish distemper, 
which by fits increased upon her ; and on the first three or four 
days she had the advice of Dr. Bignall, a worthy and able physi- 
cian of Newport, and then care was taken by Dr. Treheme, in 
London, to send a physician and remedies of election [an astro- 
logical nostrum] to her. But notwithstanding the care of that 
honest and faithful gentleman, Anthony Mildmay, Esq., and all 
the art of her physicians, her disease grew upon her ; and after 
many rare ejaculatory expressions, abundantly demonstrating her 
unpaitdleled piety, to the eternal honour of her own memory, 
and the astonishment of those who waited on her, she took leave 
of the world on Sunday the 8th September 1650.'** It is said 
she was found lying upon her couch, as if sleeping, her face rest- 
ing upon an open Bible, her royal father's gift. She was buried 
in Newport church September 20, 1660. 

The young Duke of Gloucester remained a prisoner in the 
castle until 1662, when, by permission of Cromwell, he was 
released and departed into Holland. 

We will now, having concluded our brief historical reswm^ 
enter the castle by Queen Elizabeth's Gate (it bears a label, 
EJL 1598), cross the grassy moat, and pass under the fine machi- 
colated Gateway, erected by Anthony Woodville, afterwards 
Lord Scales, about 1464. A portcullis defends it, and on each 
side it is strengthened by a round tower. The stout wooden 
gates are veiy ancient. Ibitering the Gbeat CtOURT we observe, 
on our left, the Elizabethan building occupied by Charles L 
after his first attempt to escape. Here too is the chamber in 
whifih it is ^aid th^ tjie Princess Elizabeth jbreathed her last 

' .. . ' , u^-J- . ,f -* . ' 

• "Fuller's Worthies, 'voL it ; ' '■ -^^ 






CABISBROOK CASTLE. 79 

The main buildings (before us) were formerly the .GtOVEBNOb's 
Residence. Recent repairs, imder the direction of Mr. Hardwiok 
the architect, have brought to light some ancient features of high 
interest. The great staircase appears to have been converted out 
of an Early English Chapel, built by William de Vernon, 1 184- 
1217, and the Great Hall (aula regia) of Baldwin de Redvers, 
1135-1156, was found to have been divided into two storeys. 
The apartments occupied by Charles before his first attempted 
flight have been carefully renovated, and a good stone fireplace, 
and a hagioscope communicating with the chapel, wiU attract 
attention in the royal " Presence-Chamber." The " King's Bed- 
room" was on the upper storey. 

The Chapel of St. Nicholas, now a most shameful ruin, 
was bmlt by Lord Lymington, governor of the island, in 1738, 
on the site of an ancient fane, wl^ch was supposed to be Saxon 

in its origin. cO. '/^^ ^ « «^t v* ^*' :^ s. ' < ^<.- / T . 

The Keep, occupymg the site of the old Celtic stronghold of 
the rude fortress erected by the Saxon Wihtgar, and the stout 
tower of Wniiam Fitz-Osbert, is still massive and imposing. Its 
summit overlooks a wide reach of landscape. The mound 
whereon it stands is scaled by 72 broken steps. " In a ruined 
chamber to the left is the Well, nearly choked with rubbish, 
but still deep enough to need protection, as a very ugly fcdl may 
easily be met with by the unwary" — (Venahles), It fisdled 
during the siege of the castle by King Stephen's forces in 1160, 
and Baldwin de Redvers was consequently forced to surrender. 
That a similar catastrophe might not again occur. Count Baldwin 
sunk, ui another part of the castle-area, the famous Well, bo 
great an object of attraction to wondering visitors, from whose 
depths (145 feet) the water is drawn up by means of an indus- 
trious donkey and a large wooden wheeL The donkeys thus 
distinguished have been remarkable for their longevity : one 
died in 1798, aged 32. A successor " paid the debt of nature" 
in 1861, after 21 years' toil. The present labourer commenced 
his honourable service in 1861. The Well-House, dating from 
the fifteenth century, has been well restored by Mr. Hardwick. 

The visitor should conclude his examination of the castle by 
a stroll round its outworks, and a visit to the Tmr-YARD (formerly 
the place of arms, and appropriated by Colonel Hammond to 
King Charleses use as a bowling green), and the Mountjot 
Tower, which strengthens the south-east angle of the ramparts. 



no A DAT AT GABISBBOOE. 

The return to Newport should be made by the Node Hill 
road, passmg the New Cemetery, and traversing the green slopes 
of Monntjoy — a summer ramble which the pedestrian will not 
fail to enjoy. 

Behind the Cemetery, and on the way to Gatcombe, is the 
Homan Catholic Nunnery, erected in 1866 by the Dowager 
Countess of Clare, at a cost of £11,000. 

[The word Caritbrook Is derived by some authorities from the Saxon fintresii . 
erected by Wihtgar-4. «.» Wihtgcmulbwrgh ; by others, from the compound eoer, a 
fort, and hrookf indicating its position upon the Medina river. The parish includes 
an area of 7630 acres. Its population, in 1861, was 7080, including 918 soldiers at 
Parkhurst. The vicarage is in the patronage of the Provost and Fellows of 
Queen's College, Ozfoxd, and has supremacy over the rectory of Northwood. J 



THE LORDS, WARDENS, GOVERNOES, AND CAPTAINS 

OF THE ISLE OP WIGHT. 



Bbitish Pebiod. 

BoacAir Pkbiod— The island subdaed by Vespasian. 

Saxon Pxbiod— The island conquered by Cerdio and Cynric, two Jntish chlefls, in 
680. Cerdic's nephew, Wihtgar, is said to have founded Wihtgarabyrig, ox 
Carisbrook. CeadwaUa subdues the island, and converts it to Christianity, a.d. 
688. Numerous incursions by the Danes, a.d. 897, 998, 1001, 1006, 1009, and 
1013. Canute was here in 1022 ; Earl Godwin and his sons, 1050 and 1052. 

Thb Nobman Period— Duke William bestows the Island on his kinsman and 
councillor, William Ilitz-Osbert 

LORDS OP THB ISLAND. 

1066-70. William Fitz-Osbert 

1070-86. Roger de BreteuiL William L visits the island, and makes prisoner hiB 

half-brother. Bishop Odo, in the ** Aula Regia" at Carisbrook (a.d. 1085). 
1101-7. Richard de Redvers L | 1163-1184. Richard de Redvers IIL 



1107-1155. Baldwin de Redven I. 
1156-61. Richard de Redvers II. 
1161-1162. Baldwin de Redvers n. 



1184-1216. William de Vernon. 
1216-1245. Baldwin de Redvers IT. 
1245-1283. Amicia de Qare. 



128S-1293. Isabella de Fortibus. Sovereignty of the island restored to the crown by 
engagement between her and Edward L 

WARDENS OF THE ISLAND. 



1298-1295. John Fits-Thomas. 



1807-1310. Nicholas de Lisle. 



1310-132L Sir John de Lisle. 
1321-1325. Sir Henry Tyes. 



1295-1802. Richard de Affeton. 

1802-1807. Sir John de Lisle. 

1825- . John de la Hure and John IMe. 

1936- . John de Langford. 

1888-1840. Sir Theobald RusselL Invasion of the French, a.d. 1840. They4anded 

at St Helen's, and were repulsed by Sir Theobald, who was slain in the action. 
1377- . Sir Hugh TyrrilL Another invasion : the French penetrated as fiur as 

Newport, where they fell into an ambuscade, and were cut to pieces. 

LORDS OF THE ISLAND. 

1886-97. William de Montacute, Earl of Salisbury. 

1897-1415. Edward, Earl of Rutland, and Duke of York (fifth son of Edward III). 

The Earl of Warwick, accused of treason, is banished to the Isle of Wight, a.i>. 

1897. Invasion by the French in 1404. 
1415-1480. Duchess of York. Descents by the French in 1418 and 1419. 



82 LOBDS, WABDBNS^ ETO.^ OF THE ISLB OF WIGHT. 

1489-1447. Humphrey, Duke of Oloncester. Coronation of the yonthftil Heniy 

Beanchamp, Dnke of Warwick, as " Eing of the Isle of Wight^" ▲.». 1448. 
1449-14U). Richard, Dnke of York (father of Edward lY). 
14&8-1456. Edmnnd, Dnke of Somerset 
1466-1464. Henry, Dnke of Somerset 
1467-1488. Anthony, Lord Scales (afterwards Earl Birers). 

OAFTAmS OF THE ISLAIO). 

1488-1484. Sir Winiam Berkeley. 

1484-1485. Sir John Sayile. 

1486-1488. Sir Edward WoodviUe. Fonr hundred of the leading men of the island 
and their retainers foUow him to assist the Dnke of Brittany in his war against 
the French king. At the Battle of St Austin they all perish, only one hoy 
surviving to tell the tale. 

1495- . Sir Beglnald Bray. The Princess Ciody, and h«r husband John Kime. 
retire to the Isle of Wight, 1504-1507. 
•1511. Sir Nicholas Wadham. 

1511-1538. Sir James Worsley. 

1538-1565. Sir Bichard Worsley. Entertains Henry VIIL and his minister Cromwell 
at Appulduroomhe, a.d. 1540. Invasion by the French in 1549,. who land 
detachments at Sea View, near Bembridge, and at Bonchurch. (?) About 
1539-40, forts are built at Sandown, East and West Cowes, Tazmouth, and 
Worsley's Tower. 

1565-1582. Sir Edward Horsey. 

1682-1608. Sir Oeoige Carey, afterwards Lord Hunsdon. 

CAPTAINS AND GOVEBNOBS OF THE ISLAND. 

1608-1625. Henry, Earl of Southampton. Eing James and Prince Charles vliit the 

island in 1607 and 1609 ; Prince Charles, in 1618. 
1625-163L Edward, Lord Conway. i 1634-1642. Jerome, Earl of Portland. 

1681-1634. Bichard, Earl of Portland. | 1642-1647. Eaxl of Pembroke. 
1647-1649. Colonel Bobert Hammond. Imprisonment of Charles I. at Caiisbrook, 

November 28, 1647, to November 29, 1648. 
1649-1660. Colonel Sydenham. Imprisonment of Princess Elisabeth and the young 

Duke of Gloucester at Carisbrook. The Princess dies Sept. 8, 1650. 
1660-1667. Thomas, Lord Culpeper. 
1667-1692. Admiral Sir Bobert Holmes. Charles IL visits the island in 1671 and 

1676. James, Duke of York, in 1673. 



1698-1706. John, Lord Cutts. 
1706-1710. Charles, Duke of Bolton. 
1710-1715. Lieutenant-General Webb. 
1715-1726. William, Earl Cadogan. 



1726-1733. Charles, Duke at Bolton. 
1783-1734. John, Duke of Montague. 
1784-1742. Lord Viscount Lymington. 
1742-1745. Charles, Duke of BoUan. 



1745-1762. Lord Lymington, afterwards Earl of Portsmouth. 



1770-1780. Bight Hon. Hans Stanley. 
1780-1782. Sir Bichard Worslqr. 
1782-1791. Duke of Bolton. 



1768-1764. Thomas, Lord Hohnes. 

1764-1766. Bight Hon. Hans Stanley. 

1766-1770. Duke of Bolton. 

1791-1807. Bight Hon. Thomas Orde Powlett, afterwards Lord Bolton. 

1807-1841. EarlofMalmesbury. 

1841-1857. EarlofHeytesbnry. 

1867- . Viscount Bversley. 



INDEX 



AvTOi DowVy 41 ; Hoose^ 86. 

Albany BainclDi, 15. 

Alezandrian Pillar, St. Cafherinet Hm, 

4& 
AlltSahits' ChtDoh, Galboume, S6; 

Freshwater, 86 ; Qodshlll, 28. 
Alum Bay, 88. 
Alvington, 25. 
Appley, 60 ; Towen, (M, 
Appuldorcombe, 67* 
Apse Castle, 68. 

Arched Cayern2Sciatche]l*B Bay, 4a 
Arched Rock, The, 86. 
Arnold, Dr., Birthplace of, SI. 
Arreton. 8. 
Ashey Down, 68, 66. 
Atherfleld Point, 44, 68 ; Raee, 44. 

Bab Cavb, 40. 

Barnes, 44 ; Chine, 44, 68. 

Barton Court HouBe, 20. 

Beauchamp, 68. 

Bembridge, 68. 

Billinffham House, 28. 

Binnel Bay, 68 ; Point, 68. 

Binstead, 5. 

Bishop's Acre. 69. 

BlacJ^ng Chine, 46. 

Blackwood Point, 68. 

Bonchurch, 60. 

Bordwood, 62. 

Bowcombe Down, 26. 

Brading; 64 ; Hayen, 66. 

Bramble Chine, 89. 

British Yillagee, Andent^ 26, 28, 46. 

Brixton, 48 ; Bay, 48, 66. 

Brook, 42; Chine242, 68 ; Honae, 42. 

Bull-faced Bock, The 48, 68. 

Calboubhx, 26. 
Carisbrook, 69; Castle, 71.*, 
Caul-bourne Stream, 26. 
Chale, 46 ; Bay, 44, 68. 
Chessel Down, 42. 
Chillerton Down, 2a 



Chilton Chine, 48, 0& 

Clifb' Bnd, 80. 

OolweU Bay, 89, 41, 67. 

Compton Bay, 68 ; Chine, 68 ; Orange 

41 ; Orange Chine, 68. 
Cook's Casue, 57. 
Cowes, West, 16. 
Cowes, Bast, 21. 
Cowleaxe Chine, 44, 68. 
Cripple Path, 53. 
Cufver CliflDs, 68. 

DAUtncAK's Dauortbb, 9 ; Cottage, t. 
Dodpits Quarry, 82. 
Dunnose, 48;^. 
Dutchman's Hole, 44. 

Ea8t'Cowxs, 21 ; Castle, 20 ; Park, 2Ql 
East Dene, 69 
Easton, 85. 
East Standen, 9. 

Faiblib Houss, 19. 
Ftoringford House, 86, 86. 
Fern Hill, 8. 
Fishboume. 7. 
Frenchman's Hole, 40. 
French Mill, 67. 
Freshwater, 86 ; Gate, 86. 

Gaiububt, 26. 

Gkitcombe, 22, 27 ; Church, 27 ; Honaa^ 

27. 
GodshilL 22 ; Church, 28. 
Grange Chine, 48. 
Gurnard Bay, 18, 67. 

Haselby, 0. 

Hatherwood Points, 40. 

Headon HilL 89. 

Hempstead Hill, 67. 

Hermitage, The, 49. 

High Downs, 87. 

Hm Lodge, 85. 

Holy Cross Church, Binstead, 6. 

Holy Spirit, Church of, Newton, 81. 



84 



INDEX. 



Holy Trinity Church, Byde, 4. 
Honey HiU, 16. 
Hulverstone, 42. 
Honny Hill, 15. 

Jackhav'b Chins, 43. 

King's Quay, 10, 07. 

Kingston, 28. 
Knighton, &8. 

Ladder Chinx, 44. 

Lake, 62. 

Langnaid Farm, 62. 

Lashmere Pond, 46. 

Longstone, The, 42. 

Lord Holmes' Parlour, 40; Cellar and 

SLitchen, 40. 
Luccomhe Chine, 60. 
Lymerston, 43. 

Main Bsnch, The, 40. 

Maples, 59. 

Marina, 35. 

Medina River, 19. 

Menygarden, 62. 

Mill Bay, 6& 

Mirahles, 53. 

Monks Bay, 60. 

More Oreen, 35. 

Mother Large's Kitchen, 89 ; Well, 39. 

Mottistone, 42 ; Down, 42. 

Mount Cleeves, 51. 

Mountfleld, 59.^ 

Needles, The, 38. 
Needles Cave, 40. 
Neptune's Cave, 40. 
Nettlestone Oreen, 66. 
Newchurch, 53. 
Newport, 10 ; Church, 18. 
Newtown, 31. 
Ningwood, 32. 
Niton, 51. 
Nodes, The, 40. 
Norris Castle, 21. 
Northcourt, 29. 
Northwood, 16 ; Park, 1& 
Norton Lodge, 35. 
Nunwell, 65. 

Old Pabk, 53. 
Old Pepper Bock, 40. 
Orchard, The, 53. 
Orchard Bay, 68. 
Osborne Palace, 19. 

Park Cboss, 25. 

Parkhurst Forest, 16 ; Prison, 16. 

Pelham Woods, 54. 

Pidford House, 21 

Preston's Bow^, 40. 

Priory Bay, 6€. 

Puckaster, 53 ; Cove, 49, 68. 

Pulpit Bock, 69. 



QuARB Abbey, 6. 
Quarr Copse, 8. 
Queen Bower, 62. 

Bew Down, 57. 

Bocken End, 49. 

Boc's Hall Cave, 40. 

Boman Villa, Carisbrook, 70l 

Bookley, 22. 

Bowborough, 25 ; Farm, 2^ 46. 

Bowridge, 25. 

Boyal Sandrock Hotel, 51. 

Boyal Victoria Yacht Club, 8. 

Boyal Yacht Club, 17. 

Byde, 1 ; House, 6. 

St. Andrew's Chttroh, Chale, 46. 

St Boniface Down, 57, 59. 

St. Catherine's Church, Ventnor, 55. 

St. Catherine's HiU, 47 ; Point, 49, 68. 

St Clare, 66. 

St Edmund's Church, Wootton, 7. 

St Helen's, 65. 

St James' Church, East Cowes, 21 
Byde, 4. 

St John's, 65. 

St John's Park, 66. 

St John the Baptist, Church of, North< 
wood, 16. 

St Lawrence. 52, 54. 

St Lawrence s well, 64. 

St. Mary's Church, Brading, 64; Brix- 
ton, 43 ; Carisbrook, 70. 

St Marys B. C. Chapel, Byde, 4. 

St. Olave's Church, Gatcombe, 27. 

St Peter's Church, Shorwell, 29. 

St Peter and St Paul, Church of. Mot* 
tistone, 42. 

St Swithin's Church, Thorley, 32. 

St Thomas' Church, Newport, 18. 

Sandf Old, 67. 

Sandowu, 63. 

Scratchell's Bay, 40. 

Sea View, 66. 

Shalcombe Down, 41. 

ShalHeet, 80. 

Shanklin, 61 ; Down, 60. 

Sheat Manor House, 88. 

Shepherd Chine, 44, 68. 

Shipl^dge Beef, 44, 68. 

Shorwell, 29. 

Shitwoods, 20. 

Spring Hill, 81. 

Spring Vale, 66. 

Stag Bock. 86. 

Standen House, 81 

Steephffl Castle, 64; Gove. ML 

Stroud Oreen, 40. 

Sun Comer, 40. 

Bwainstone, 86. 

Tennyson, Alfred, BestdenfieoC 35, 86. 
Thorley, 82. 
Thomess Bay, 18, 67. 
Totland's Bay, 4L 



INDEX. 



85 



CJin>iBOLnrr Riaiov, 49. 
Under Mount, 59. 
Upper Monnt, 59. 

VSHTNOB, 55. 

Victoria Fort, 39. 

Walpen Chins, 44 ; Cliff, 44 
Warden Ledge, 89 ; Point, 89. 
Warlands, 82. 
Warren, The, 88. 
Watchingwell, 25. 
Watcombe Bay, 40. 
Wedge Rock, 40. 
Wellow, 82. 
Werror Farm, 18. 
Westbrook, 66. 
West Cowes, 16 ; (lOuiioh, 1& 
West Court, 48. 
Westfleld, 5, 67. 
WestoTer, fit. 



Whale Chine, 44. 
Whetely Bank, 57. 
Whippingham, 19. 
WhitediffBay, 68. 
Whitwell, 62. 
Wihningham. 84. 
Wishing Well, 59. 
Woodlynch, 59. 
Woodvale, 18. 
Woody Bay, 68 ; Point, 6& 
Woolverton« 48, 54. 
Wootton Bridge, 7 ; Biyer, 7, 67. 
Worsley's Obelisk, 57. 
Worsley's Tower, Rite of, 89. 
Wreeth Bay, 51, 68. 
Wrongs, 54. 

Yabbobouoh, Earl of. Obelisk to, $k 
Tarmoath, 88 ; CasUe, 88. 
Tar Biver, 85. 
TsrotlaiMl, M. 




GLASGOW AND THE HIGHLANDS. 

(Bot/al Route via Orinan and Caledonian Canals,) 
THE ROYAL MAIL STEAMERS-- 



lONA, 

MOUNTAINEER, 
CLANSMAN, 
ISLAY, 



GONDOLIER, STAPFA, 
GLENGARRY, LINNET, 
CYGNET, PLOVERj 

INVERARAY CASTLE, 



CHEYALIER, 

PIONEER, 

CLYDESDALE, 

GLENCOE, 
LOCHAWE, AND QUEEN OF THE LAKE, 
Sail dnring the season for Port Ellen, Port^Askaig, Islay, Oban, Fort- 
William, Inverness, Staffa, lona, Glencoe, Loch Awe, Tobermory, Portree, 
Gairloch, Ullapool, Lochinver, and Stomoway ; affording Tourists an 
opportunity of Visiting the Magnificent Scenery of .Loch Awe, Glencoe, 
the Coolin Hills, Loch Coruisk, Loch Maree, and the famed Islands of 
Staffa and Ion:a. 

%* These vessels afford in their passage a view of the beautilUl scenery of the Clyde, 
with all its Watering-Flaces— the Island and Eyles of Bute— Island of Arran— Moun- 
tains of Cowal, Knapdale, and Eintyre— Lochfyne— Grlnan— with the Islands of Jura, 
Scarba, Mull, and many others of the Western Sea— The Whirlpool of Coiry vreckan— 
the Mountains of Lorn, of Morven, of Appin, of Kingairloch, and Ben Nevis — Inrer- 
lochy — ^The Lands of Lochiel, the scene of the wanderings of Prince Charles, and near 
to where the clans raised his Standard in the '45— Lochaber — the Caledonian Canal'— 
Loch Iiochy—Loch Oteh — ^Loch Ness, with the Glens and Mountains on either side, and 
the celebrated FALLS OF FOTEBS. Books descriptire of the route may be had on 
board the Steamers. 

Time -Bill, with Map, sent post free on application to the Proprietors, Datid 
HUT0HB9ON and Co., 110 Hope Street, Glasgow. 



Olabqow, 1877. 



LI, ABERDEEN-IMPERIAL HOTEL 

" n § ^"oS (NEAREST FiaaT-CLASS EOTBL TO RAILWAY STATION) 







if: 



e?l, Pll^iSI p 



§1 1- 5tjrsn-§ c 

■"" Blffiligs 



P 



' t tg|E SS So 

a 4 g'n^ S£'5»^ CaaeftdB with Rookery, ^hoae delicious Foimtiuiii 

a g ESc2 ^^S'" play oq a proftision of LuTuriant I'erna, 

g = Ss I' ^^P beautiflea and refroHheB tlie HalL 

f else ^ Spaoiooa Billiard Boom for Beaideuta in tli« Hotel, 

° il.& /n»*WiamoBn,JiMaI(;™i(o. wiUimilirJiiJi., e™l<oad 

puTifiu tkcair. 



ABERDEEN. 

THE PALACE HOTEL, 

UNIOM STREET AND BRIDGE STREET, ABERDEEN. 

rriHIS Hotel, which has been recently erected &nd,fumiBhed 
with all modern improvements, ia one of the finest in 
the City. 

It is situated in the principal street, with convenient 
accesa to the Etdlway Station and chief Business localities. 

Public and Private Drawing-Eooms are furnished with 

special reference to the comfort of Lady and Gentlemen, Visitors. 

Handsome Commercial Boom, Stock Eooms, Billiard Boom ) 

Bed-Boom Accommodation for upwards of one hundred ; Hot, 

Cold, and Shower Baths. 

A. M. MACKIE, 
Late of Ike " Northern Hotel," Lessee. 



V 



4 ABBRFELDT ABERFOYLE ABERGELE. 

ABERFELDY. 
BBEABALBANE ARMS HOTEL, 

(One miwMs walk from the Railway Staiion) 

Containing Fiist-class accommodation, is beautifully situated on the 
river Tay, in the County of Perth, close to the splendid Falls of Moness 
(Birks of Aberfeldy), Taymouth Castle, and the xmrivalled scenery of Glen 
Lyon. 

Parties leaving Edinburgh and Glasgow in the morning, and arriving in 
Aberfeldy by the first train, can enjoy a five hours' drive through the finest 
scenery in the Highlands (including Pass of Glen Lyon, Taymouth Castle 
and grounds from the *' Fort "), and return south by the last train. 

Orders for Horses and Conveyances pit/nctually attended to. 
The Hotel 'Bus awaits the airival of all the ^Araliui. 

ABERFOTLE. 

BAILIE NICOL JARVIE HOTEL. 

Tourists and Visitors will Jlnd first-class accommodation at the above. 

By writing the day before, parties can secure Boats for fishing on 
Loch Ard or Loch Chon, and Conyeyances to meet them at Bttcklyvie 
Station, on the Forth and Clyde Bailway. 

JAMES BLAIR, Proprietor. 

ABERGELE, NORTH WALES. 

THE CAMBRIAN HOTEL, 

PENSARN, Abergelb* 



R. HUMPHREYS, Proprietor. 

Close to the Station, and within two minutes' walk of the Beach, for Boarding or 
Private Apartments, Posting, etc. Wines and Spirits of the best quality. 

A spacious Billiard Boom has lately been added to the Hotel, with a flist-class new 
BiUiaxd Table, by th? eminent makers Borroughes^and Watts. 



AMBLESIDE BALLAOHULISH. 5 

AMBLESIDE, WINDERMEKR 

THE SALUTATION HOTEL. 

This fine old house, which has been established upwards of two centuries, has 
recently been considerably 'enlarged, re-modelled, and re-furnished. It con- 
tains Suites of Booms for Families, also Dining, Drawing, Billiard, Smoking, 
and Bath (Hot, Cold, and Shower) Booms. The views are unrivalled, and the 
famed Stock Ghyll Force is in the grounds of the " Salutation." • 

Post Horses, and Close and Open Carriages in great variety. District 
Coaches daily. Table d'hdte ; Breakfast at 9 a.m.. Dinner at 7 P.M. 

Postal Telegraph Station. ^ 

MICHAEL TAYLOB, Proprietor. 



BALLACHULISH HOTEL 

AND COACHING ESTABLISHMENT, 

AT THE ENTRANCE TO GLENCOE, 

ABGYLESHIBE. 



JOHN CUEEIE, of the Tontine Hotel, Greenock, takes this 
opportunity of returning his sincere thanks to the Nobility, 
Gwitry, and Public in general for the la^e amount of patronage 
he has so long enjoyed while at the Tontine, and begs to inti- 
mate that he has taken a Lease of the Eallachulish Hotel,: Glencoe, 
which for its magnificent scenery is not surpassed in any ot^^ 
part of the Highlands. 

J. C. trusts £rom his long experience in conducting such 
establishments to merit a share of general support. 



\ 



|B BANJlVIB BEIiPAST. 

BANAVIE. 

BANAVIE HOTEL. 

npHE extensive additions and alterations on this Hotel are now com- 
, pleted, &ad it will be found one of the most attractive places for pleaBure- 
seekers in the Highlands. Several excursions can be made either by driving 
or on foot, — such as to the Falls of Glen Nevis, 12 milies ; Glenfinnan, 15 
miles; Glen Spean, 9 miles 4 the Parallel Roads of Glen Ro}^ 17 miles ; 
Loch Ark^-ig, 12 miles ; the foot of Glencoe, Ballachulish, 16 miles ; old 
Inverlochy Castle, 2 miles ; Tor Castle, where tradition says Banquo lived, 
2 miles. Guides and ponies are kept to ascend Ben Nevis : the Hotel is 
ixnmedlately in front, and the nearest placebo start from. 

Salpaon and traut-fishing can also be had by parties staying at the 
Hotel on lake and river, the Lochy being the best salmon water in Scot- 
land. Special terms made with parties staying by the week or month. 

'Route : — London to Glasgow, and thence by steamer "lona," or by 
rail to Kingussie and coach here. 

JOHN MCGREGOR, Proprietor. 

BELFAST. 



THE IMPERIAL HOTEL. 

FIEST CLASS. BEST SITUATION. 

Omniiuses meet all Trains and Steamers. ' 

♦ yir. J, JUEY, Proprietor. 

BELFAST. 
ltQBINSON'8 COMMERCIAL TEMPERANCE HOTEL, 

' 82 DONEGALL STREET. 

ESTABLISHED 1851. 

A FIRST-CLASS Family and Commercial Hotel. Conducted on 
afcrictly Abetinence Principles. Comfort, Quiet, and moderate 

Charges. 

Private Sitting^ Rooms and Sbow Rooms, 



B EDDG KL BKT BI DEFORD. 

BEDDGELERT. 



THE ROYAL & GOAT 

HOTEL. 

THIS Eatnhlishraciit is btsutiFulIy sitimteil in the miAnt of some of the flneat 
acenety In Walea, and ia within a mile snd a half of the Ahei^lmlyn 
Pass. It 19 in tlie banda of B new Propriator, Mr. RiceabD HnHPRBET, l*te 
of the Pftdaro Villa Hotel, Lliuiberis ; haa nniiergone a most <!om[Jete repair ; 
ia newly and handsomely refurnished ; and the intention la that a reputaOon 
for attention, comfort, and moderate chaises shall be pennanenlly eiUTied. 
Cnauhes wilt run during tiia season between Portmadoc, the Hot^l, and 
Llanberia. - 

It bw an excellent Coffee Room. Billiard Room. Smoke Boom, to. 
Siabioe on the Lakea Girynant, Dinas, and Cuder. 

BIDEFOED, DEVOHSHIBB. 
TANTON'S 

FIBST.0LA98 FAMILY AND COMMERCIAL HOTEL, AND POSTINQ HOUSE' 
Tura Hotel ia pleasantly s[tiia.tFd, facing the river Tciridge, noted for i(a Salmon, Trout, 



ita neigbbourbood. 



Diteat notice. 8l(>tii 


tg Riuk Disjoin ing the Hotel. 




BILLIARDS. 


S.D.—TlH Hail-Coee 


h oUrts from this HoEcl daily a 


parcels, e 


to., for CLovelly, Hirtlund, and 



8 BLAIR ATHOLE. 

BLAIR ATHOLE. 



ATHOLE AEMS HOTBL. 

Adjoining the Railway Station, No Omnibus necessary, 

npHE recently completed additions ren'der this Hotel one of the largest and 
■*• best- appointed in the Highlands. 

Very elegantly furnished Deawinq-Room for Ladies, and considerably 
enlarged Sitting-room, Bedroom, Smoking, and Bath-room accommodation. 

Table d'H6te daily during the season in the magnificent Dining Saloon. 

Board by the week at a reduced rate except during August. 

Blair Athole is much the nearest and most central point from which to visit 
Killiecrankie, the Queen's View, Loch Tummel, Rannoch, Glen Tilt, Braemar ; 
the Falls of Bruar, Garry, Tummel, and Fender ; the grounds of Blair Castle, 
&c. ; and it is the most convenient resting-place for breaking the long railway 
journey to and from the North of Scotland. 

The Posting Department is thoroughly well equipped. 

Experienced Guides- and Ponies for Glen TUt^ Braemar, and Mountain 
excursions. 

D. & P. T. MACDONALD, Proprietors. 

1877. 

BLAIE-ATHOLE. 

BRIDGE OF TILT HOTEL. 

Within Five Minutes^ Walk from the Railway Station, 
ALEXANDER STEWART, Proprietor. ' 

rriHIS HOTEL, under new Management, is beautifully situated 
-*- opposite the entrance of famous Glen Tilt, Blair Cabtlk 
Grounds, and within walking, distance of the Falls of Fender, 
The Salmon Leap, and other objects of interest. 

Visitors and Tourists honouring this Hotel will find every atten- 
tion paid to their comfort and convenience, combined with Moderate 
Charges. 

POSTING IN ALL ITS DEPARTMENTS. 

The Prives include Glen Tilt, the Pass of Kiljiecrankie, Queen's 
View, Loch Tummel, Falls of Tummel, Falls of Bruar, &c &c. 

Letters and Telegrams for Apartments or Conveyances punctually 

attended to. 

An Omnibus to and^ from the Station free of Charge. 

Parties boarded by the week at a reduced rate except during August. 



BLAIBOOWBIB; ^BRAEUAB bridge of ALLAN. 9 

BLAIRGOWRIE. 

QUEEN'S <^i8&^ H O T E L. 



^m^ikki^.]^ 



Established ^^"''^^■■^i*"**"*^ Haifa Ckniury. 
mHE aboy long-established and ftrst-class Hotel has recently been mnch enlarged 
-■- and iinproved, so that Families, Tourists, and Commercial Gentlemen will find in 
it erery comfort and attention. Blairgowrie is on the shortest and most direct route to 
Braemar and Balmoral, the drive to which is very gitind, passing Craighall (Col. Clerk- 
Rattray), one of the most picturesquely-situated mansions in Scotland. Post Horses 
and Carriages of every description, with careful Drivers. 

Charges strictly Moderate. 
Coaches to Braemar early in July. Passengers booked at the Hotel. 
An Omnibrts waits aU Trains. D. M'DONALD, Proprietor. 

Orders by Post or Telegram for Rooms, Carriages, or Coach seats, carefully attended to. 



BLAIEGOWRIE. 



ROYAL .^m^ HOTEL. 

FAHILIBS, Tourists, and Commercial Gentlemen will find every endeavour being 
made to render this Hotel equal to itslong-known reputation. 

Salmon Fishing on the Tay by the Day or Longer. 

Al Stvd of Horses and Vehicles. 

Coach to Braemar early in July. 
Seats secured by post or telegram. 'Bus meets all trains. 

JOHN ANDERSON, Proprietor. 
BRAEMAR. 

THE INVEBGAVLD ARMS HOTEL. 

The Finest Hotel SUvMtion in Scotland* 

MR. M'GREGOR begs to announce that the extensive additions to this Hotel are 
completed, comprising Magnificent Dining Saloon, Ladies' Drawing Room, Bil- 
liard Hall, Smoking Room, and over Thirty Bedrooms, all fUmished in the most modem 
style. Beautiful Croquet and Pleasure Grounds. Posting in all its branches. Guides 
and Ponies to the different hills. Coaches during the season to Blairgowrie, Dunkeld, 
and Ballater. Letters and Telegrams punctually attended to. 

.?r..B.— Besides the excellent Salmon and Ttout Pishing belonging to the Establish- 
ment, the Proprietor has concluded arrangements in terms of which Visitors staying at 
the Hotel will be allowed to Ash on. the Invercauld private Water, reckoned the best 
in Scotland for Salmon. 

BRroGE OF ALLAN. 

THE 

BOTAL .^^i^ HOTEL. 



THIS well-known First-Class Hotel has extensive and superior accommodation for 
Tourists and Families, with a large Drawing Room and Dining Room for Ladies 
and Gentlemen, and beautifully laid out Pleasure Grounds. Charges strictly moderate. 
It is situated in the centre of this famous Spa, and is within easy access to Callander, 
the Trossachs, Loch Lomond, and most of the finest scenery in Scotland. Posting 
establishment complete. A 'Bos belonging to the Hotel awaits all the Trains. 

ROBERT PHILP, Proprietor. 



THE FIFE AEMS HOTEL 

BRAEMAR, BY BALMORAL. 

A^E. M'NAB begs respectfully to infomi the Nobility, 
-"■*- Gentry, and Tourists, that the extensive additions to the 
Hotel are now completed. The Hotel, aa now constructed, 
comprises over 100 Bedrooms, a Dining Saloon {one of the 
largest and most elegant in Scotland), elegant Private Sitting- 
Boom^, Ladies' Drawing-Eoom, Billiiird-Koom, and Bath- 
Booms. 

Charges strictly moderate. Letters or Telegrams will 
receive the most careful attention. Posting in all its "varied 
departments. Coaches during the Season to Ballater and 
Blairgowrie Stations. 

Parties Boarded by the Week or Kooth. 

Note. — Gentlemen slaying] at Ike Hold can have excellent Salmon 

OT" Trout Fishing free of all charge. 



BRIDGE OF ALLAN — -BRIGHTON. 11 

THE 

BRIDGE OF ALLAN 

HTDBOPATHIG ESTABLISHHENT, 

OCHIL PARK, STmLINGSHIRE, 
Medical Adviser — Dr. Hunter, 

rjOMBINES Salubrity of Climate, Dry Soil, and Exquisite 
Scenery. Tlie House is well appointed, and provide a 
good Table with cheerful society. 

Terms, including all charges, £2 : 12 : 6 per week. 

Applications regarding accommodation, &c., to be addressed 
to Mr. M*Kay, House Superintendent. 

BEIDGE OF ALLAN. 

QUEEN'S HOTEL. 

rpHIS First-class Hotel affords excellent accommodation for 
-*• Families, Tourists, and Visitors. 

THE HOTEL OMNIBUS AWAITS ALL TRAINS. 

A. ANDEESON, Propriei<yr. 

BEIGHTON GBAND AQXTABITIM. 

THE largest and most complete Marine and Fresh Water Aquarium in the world. 
The Collection of Fishes and other aquatic Animals in this magnificent Establish- 
ment is unequalled for variety and the number and size of the specimens eidiibited. 

Sea Uons, monster Porpoises, Royal Sturgeons, baby Sturgeons, Telescope Fish, Sea 
Horses, Herring, Mackerel, Sterlet, Mud Fish (Gambia), Electric Eels (Amazon), Family 
of Alligators (Mississippi), Seii Birds (Northern Divers), and thousands of other rare 
Specimens. 

The Aqaaxinm Band at intervals daily, and every evening at 7. SO. Vocal and Instru* 
mental Concerts, Wednesday and Saturday afternoons at 8. 

Admission : — Daily, Is. ; Evening 8d. Sohools Half-Prioe. 
Periodical Tickets.— One Month, 7s. 6d. ; Three Months, 10s. 6d. 

G. BEEVES SMITH, Gmeral Manager. 



1 2 BRIGHTON BRISTOL CALLANDER CARLISLE.. 

BBIGHTON. 

BOTAL CBESCENT HOTEL, 

•^ MARINE PARADE, 

Facing the Sea, contains comfortable and spacious Suites of Apart- 
ments for Families, handsome CoflFee-Room, Ladies* Drawing-Room^ 
good Bed-Rooms, Smoking-Room, &c. &c. Boarding arrangements 
made. Tariff on application. HENRY HILUAR, ProprieUrr. 

BEISTOL. 

ROYAL HOTEL, CO LLEGE GREEN. 

FIRST-CLASS, Central, and pleasantly situated. Very spacious Coffee, 
Dining, Heading, Smoking, and Billiard Rooms. Prirate Apartments 
en suite. One Hundred and Twenty Bed-Rooms. Steam Lift and Laundry. 
Hot and Cold Baths. Telegraph Office and Post Office in the Hotel Fixed 
Charges. All Omnibuses pass the door. Night Porter kept. 

F. SW ANSON, Manager, 
CALLLANDER. 

nPHIS well-known and favourite Hotel has just been refurnished throughout, 
•*" and is now open for visitors, who will meet with every comfort. Salmon 
Fishing in the Teith, also Boats and Men for Loch Vennachar and Loch Lub- 
naig. Posting in all its branches as heretofore. Letters and Telegrams 
addressed to the Manager will receive prompt attention. 

JAMES M*LEOD, Manager, 

CARLISLE. 

THE COUNTY HOTEL, 

WHICH affords every accommodation for Families and Gentle- 
men, is Fireproof, and connected with the Platform of the 
Central Railway Station by a covered way. Porters in attendance 
on arrival of Trains. 

A Z«adies' Coffee-Boom. 



BUXTON. 



13 



BDXTON, DERBTSHIBE. 










T 




rnniS First-Class hotel for FAMILIES and 
GENTLEMEN forms the South Wing of the Crescent. 
It is only One Minute from Eailway Stations, and 
is connected by Covered Colonnade with the JSbt and 
Naturai Baths, Drinking Wells, and the New Pavilion 
and Gardens, where a splendid Band performs Four 
Hours daily. — 

THE ASSEMBLY ROOM 

in this Hotel, which has long been celebrated for its elegant 
proportions, has recently been re-decorated in the first style, 

and is now converted into the 

DINING-ROOM OF THE HOTEL. 



l^ubUc Binittg ^ IBrabitng "^ntmsi. 



SUITES OF APARTMENTS FOR PRIVATE FAMILIES. 



TABLE D'HOTE AT 6 P.M. 



nSST-CIASS STABLnra aito loce-ttp coace-eotjses. 

JOHN SMILTEE, Proprietor. 



14 BUXTON. 

OLD HALL HOTEL, BUXTON, DERBYSHIRE. 

BRIAN BATES, Proprietor. 
Also ofGfosvenoT Boarding House ^ No. 6 atid 7 Broad Walk, Buxton, 

Terms sent on Application. " "~ 

FIBST-CLASS CABBIAGES, HOBSES, STABLING, & COACE-HQUSES. 

SEASON PRICES. 

Private Sitting Rooms (including lights), 42s,, 49s., 56s. per week. Bed Rooms, 148., 
MTs. 6d., 21s., 25s. per week. Double Bedded Booms, 25s. and 'iSs. per week. Servants' 
Beds from 7s. to 10s. 6d. per week. Board in Private, 7s. 6d. per day and upwards. 
Board in Public, 7s. 6d. per day. Hot Meat to Breakfast or Tea (Ham or Eggs excepted 
at Breakfast only), 6d. extra. Breakfasts in Bed Rooms, 6d. extra. Children's Board 
in Private (under 10 years of age), ft-om 3s. to 4s. per day ; if in Public, full price. Serv- 
ant's Board (including malt liquors), 4s. per day. Firesin Sitting Rooms, Is. 3d. per day. 
Fines in Bed Rooms, lOd. per dJay. Wax Lights, from is. 6d. to 2s. per pair. Charge for 
attendance, including Waiters and every Female Servant througliout the Establishjnenty 
Is. .6d. each person per day. Hip or Sponge Baths, 4d. each. 
' Visitors leaving early wiU oblige the Proprietor by ordering their Bills the night prerHous. 

^,, , , mm —«■■■>»»■ »■ ■ I ■ I > ■ . 1 I ■ ■ .1, ■ ■ » ■ . ■■■■■■ ■ ■ M l ■ ■ I 11 I I w I ■ M^ 

6B0SVENQR QQARD AND LODGING-HOUSE, 

a & 7 BROAD WALK, BUXTON 

(in close proximity to the Baths and Wells). 

BRIAN BATES, Proprietor. 
Also of the Old JIaU Hotel, and Brooklyn Board and Utdgitig House, Buxton, Derbyshire.} 

SUPERIOR SITTIKG-ROOMS, 
The Grbi|ven6r Bearding House having a full new of 1;he Pavilion and Gardens. 

TERMS. 

F^or Board and Lodgings, including attendance, at 7s. and 8s. per day— in Public. 

Ditto, in Private, 9s. per day and upwards. Servant's Bed and Board, 4s. per day. 

Boots extra— Gentlemen, 2a. per week ; Ladies, Is. 6d. per week. 

WINTIER TERMS (froH November Ist to April 30th). 

Bed Room and Board in Public, 6s. per day. Ditto in Private, 78. per day. 

SMOKING ROOM FOR GENTLEMEN, FOR VISITORS ONLY. 

Carriages may he ordered at the Bar of the Old Hall Hold. 

No. 1 & 2 BfiOOKLYN PLACE, SPRING GARDENS, 

BUXTON', DERBYSHIRE. 

BOARD AND LODGING HOUSlEv 

f. - , . « 

TO suit all parties, Mr. Bates has opened an excellent Board and Lodging House, as 
above, at most Moderate Charges, viz.— £2 : 2s. and £2:5:6 per week, or 7s. per 
day for less than a week. Boots extra— Gentlemen, Is. 9d. per week ; Ladies, Is. 3d. 
per week. 

Carriages may he ordered at Mr. Bates' Stables, near to the above. 

BRIAN BATES, Pbopriktob. 



tVON CHATSWOJ 



CARNARVON, NORTH WALES. 

ROYAL HOTEL 

(LATE UXBKIDGE AEMSl, 
FIRST-CLASS FAMILY Sc COMMERCIAL ESTABLISHMENT 

BeautitnUj sLtuatBd on the Banks of the Mensi atraito' snd in close proamitj to the 
Ksilwaj SUtion. 

EDWARD HUMPHREYS. 

An Omuilras will regularly attend the arrival of eaohXriin at tlio Rsilway Station, 
train, via Beddgelert, Vale'of Gwjnant, andthf Pass of Llunberis, snivingat the hotel 

CHATSWOBTH HOTEL, EDENSOB, 

DERBYSHTEE. 

TM> Hotel U bMDttfnlly Bitnsted in Chstswortli Park, and within ten minutes' walk 
or th« prlncBlT residence of the Diike of Devonrtilte. 

The hotel is- the kri;eat In the neighbourhood, and Ita proximity ie the BdwbIo}' 
=._..._ ._ .,...., „.^M i..j^.jj_ affords every facility toTonriats deaii-one of visiting 

( nrini'i™) trains at Rowsley Station. 

ill appointed Bed-Rooms. 

HENBT HAERISO!T, PBOPBieTOTi : 
— ■ — J'S HOTEL, Br 
Posdrl orfdres 
Dny TIcksta for fOie Chniawnrth Fishery^ 

CHELTENHAM. 

BELLE VUE HOTEL. 

FOR FAMILIES AND GENTLEMEN. 

This Hotel is delightfolly situated in the healthiest part of the town; 

TERMS MOD ERA TE. 

G. EOLPH, Proprietor. 



16 CHEPSTOW — COLWYN BAY. 

CHEPSTOW. 



BEAUFORT ARMS HOTEL 

An Old-Established First-class Family Hotel, within two minutes* walk of the Rail- 
way Station, Castle, and River Wye. 

Ladies' Coffee-Room 60 feet by 30. Gentlemen's Coffee and Billiard Rooms. 
Omnihnses and Carriages meet all trains. 

The BEAITFOBT ABMS HOTHIi, Tintem Abbey, conduoted by 

tlie same Proprietor. "W. GARBBTT. 

CHEPSTOW. 

GEORGE FAMILY HOTEL. 

Ladies' Coffee and Sitting Booms ; Large Garden and Meadows 
back of the Hotel. 

Post Homes and Carriages. 

Excellent Billiard Room. 
Good Stables and Coach Horses. 

JOHN PRICHARD, Proprietor. 



COLWYN BAY, NORTH WALES. 

POLLYGROGHON HOTEL, 

(Late the Eesidence of Lady Erskine). 

nPHIS First-class Family Hotel is most beautifully situated 
in its own finely-wooded park in Colwyn Bay, com- 
manding splendid land and sea views, and miles of delightful 
walks in the adjacent woods. It is within a few minutes' 
walk of the Beach and ten minutes' of Colwyn Bay Station^ 
and a short drive of Conway and Llandudno. 

Sea-Bathing, Billiards, Posting. 

J. PORTEE, Proprietor. 



CLIFTON CONJSTON CONNBMARA. 17 

CLIFTON-DOWN HOTEL, 

CLIFTON. 
Facing the Sicspeiision Bridge. 

THE popularity of this Hotel has compelled the.proprietors to extend the accommo- 
dation by the addition of several Bedrooms, Ladies' Drawing Rooms, a Suite of 
Apartments for Wedding Breakfasts, Ball Suppers, &c. &c. Visitors will find all the 
cAmforts of home, with llxed and tnoderate charges. The situation of the Hotel is 
unrivalled, being on the Downs, and within ten minutes' walk of the new Clilton-Down 
Rail^ray Station. 

2^. -B.— From this Hotel the following-Trips are easy, returning to the Hotel the same 
day : - Chepstow Castle, the Wynd Cliff, Tintem Abbey, Wells Cathedral, Glastonbury 
Tor, Bath, Weston-super-Mare, Clevedon, Portishead, Carditf, Newport, and Channel 
Docks. • D. QITTINS, Manager. 

Clifton Hotel Company (Limited). 

CONISTON LAKE, LANCASHIEK 

SLY'S 
WATERHEAD HOTEL. 

'T^HIS First-Class Establishment is perhaps the most delightfully 
• situated of any Hotel in the Lake District ; it is surrounded with 
"beautiful pleasure-grounds and select walks, and embraces most interesting 
Lake and Mountain Views.. ' 

laADIES' AMD ai:NTi:.E]M[E:»r*S COFFES-ROOM. 

BILLLA.RDS. PRIVATE BOATS. CROQUET GROUND. 
A Steam G-ondola runs daily on the liake durins^ the Season. 

Open and Close Carriages, Post Horses, Guides. 
COACHES DAILY TO AMBLESIDE DURING THE SEASON. 

Postal -Telegraph Station at Coniston. 

An Oninibus meets all Trains. 

Postal Address— ComBToy, Ambleside. JOSEPH SLY, Proprietcr, 

CONNEMARA. 

GLENDALOUGH FISHERY HOTEL. 

TMULLARKEY begs leave to announce that the above establish- 
• ment is in connection with his Hotel at Clifden. It is admir- 
ably situated for the Angler, commanding as it does the key or centre of 
the splendid and extensive Fishery of Ballinahinch ; and for the Tourist 
and Family Parties visiting the Irish Highlands affording the most beauti- 
ful Scenery in the West of Ireland, with all the comforts of Home. The 
Proprietor trusts that, with every attention to the comforts of his Visitors, 
he will merit their future support and patronage. Timely application is 
requited. — Address T. MulIakkey, Hotel, Clifden ; or. Fishery Hotel, 
Glendalough, vi& Galway. 

B 



18 CONWAY CORK CRIEFF. 

CONWAY. 

THE CASTLE HOTEL. 

17IIRST- CLASS. Beautifully situated in the Vale of 
Conway, and very central for Tourists in North 
Wales. 

ldthjiprillH77. ' * ' 

CORK 

STEPHENS' COMMERCIAL HOTEL 

(Opposite the General Post Office, Oork), 

"POSSESSES first-class accommodation for Tourists, Commer- 
cial Gentlemen, and Families. 

It is very centrally situated, being opposite the General 
Post Office — close to the Bank, Theatre, &c. &c. 

Charges ea^emely Moderate, 
WILLIAM D. STEPHENS, Proprietor, 

From the West of England. 

. EiTBACT from a " Tour through Ireland," published in the 

North BriUm, 186^:— 
" When we arrived in Cork we took up our quarters at Stephens* Ck)m- 
mercial Hotel, where we oBtained excellent accommodation. 

•* What this Hotel lacks in external show is amply compensated by 
nnremitting attention on the part of the Proprietors and their attendants to 
the comfort of their Guests." 

. ■ — '■■''■■'--■» 

CRIEFF. 
THE DRTIMmCOND ARMS HOTEL. 

Tlie only First-Cluss Hotel in Crieff. Families boarded by 
Week or Month. Large Posting Establishment. 

Prompt Attention given to all Comm^jnications. 
The Hotel Omnibus meets every Train, 

D. MACKENZIE, Proprietor. 



CORK. 19 




IMFUBIAL ^1^^ HOTEL, 



CORK. 

P. CURRY, Proprietor. 

■ ■ ■* 

rpHIS long-establislied and well-known Hotel is conducted on the most 
•*■ approved and modern system. It possesses every requisite to promote 
the Comfort and Convenience of Tourists. The Hotel contains 

OVER ONE HUNDRED BEDROOMS, 

Three Coffee Rooms, Commercial Room, a Drawing Room for Ladies and 
Families, Suites of Private Apartments, Smoking and Billiard Rooms, 
Bath Rooms, &c. 

TABLE D'HOTE DAILY AT HALF-PAST BVH O'OLOCK. 

The Hotel adjoins the General Post Office ; as also the Commercial 
Building, where Merchants meet on " Change," and the earliest Telegraphic 
News is received, to the Reading Room of which Visitors to the Hotel have 
free access.' It has been patronised within the last few years by their 
Royal Highnesses the Prince of Wales, Prince Alfred, Prince Napoleon, 
the Due D'Orleans, the Comte de Paris, and the Coimt de Flandres, the 
successive Lords Lieutenant of Ireland — Clarendon, Eglinton, Carlisle, 
and Abercom — as well as by the Nobility, and most of the leading 
Gentry visiting Cork. 

The Charges will be found most Moderate. 

The Imperial Omnibuses attend the arrival and departure of 

each Train, 



Xztraot from Sir CX7SACK RONET'S "Month in Ireland:" 

" Judge Haliburton (Sam Slick) says, * There are two things to be recom- 
mended to the notice of visitors to Ireland :-^If yon are an admirer of 
beautiful scenery, go to the Cove of Cork ; if yon want a good hotel, go to the 
ImperiaL' The Hotel in question is situated in. Pembroke Street, having an 
entrance also. in the South Mall, through the Commercial Buildings, the 
splehdid News Eodm of which is open to visitors to the Hotel. For conveni- 
ence and cohort there is not a hotel superior to it in the Em|»re.*' 



20 DALUALLV DORKING DOVER. 

LOCHAWE. 

DALMALLY HOTEL 

GLENORCHY. 

(At the Termini of th& Callcmder <ind Oban Railway,) 

npHIS Hotel is beautifully situated on the main road between 
-*- Oban, Inveraifay, Tarbet, and Killin, and commands unrivalled 
views of mountain scenery, which are unsurpassed for grandeur by 
any irt Scotland. Excellent Salmon and Trout Fishing pn lioch 
Awe and River Orchy free of charge to parties staying at the Hot^L 
The Tarbet, Inveraray, Oban, and Tyndrum Goachea arrive and 
depart daily from this Hotel, where seats iu:e securejl and every 
information given. 

I ^.5.-j— Passengers hy the above Coaches havef the-libertyof break- 
ing the ^journey at Dalmally, visiting the variona objects of interest 
in the neighbourhood, and proceeding any following d'dy. 

D. FRASEE* PlROPMSTOB. 

', ■ . ,:!/ ' ' ' '■ DORKING. 

WHITE HOESB HOTEL, 

TjlOR FAMILIES and TOUBtSTS. Enlarged and re-decorated. Fixvt-claM ac- 
"^ couimod'ation. Saddle Horses. Carriages of every description lior Picnics to 
iiealh Hill, Bozhill, ftc. Excellent StabUng. FREDERICK COO^E, Proprietor. 

Omnibus on arrival of Trains at both Stations. 

N.B. —Dorking Coach Office. F.lt-Hastbr by Appointment to Brighton and South- 
Eastem BiiUiriy Companies. 

DOVER ' ■ 

A DJOINING the Harbour Station of the London, Chatham^ 
""■ and Dover Railway. 

One of the best^appointed Houses on ihe Coast for Families 
and Tourists. . Good attention and reasonable Charges. . 

THOS. WICKENS FEY, 
Proprittoi?, 



IK)VER DOVE DALE— DUBLIN. 3^1- 

DIVER'S DOVER CASTLE HOTEL, 

' lEstablished upwards of Half a Century. 

rpHIS Hotel, having been considerably enlarged and redecorated, offers every advan- 
tage to Families a^dthe Pabiic traveUi&g to and ttovi the Continent^ is situated 
on the Quay — close to both Railway Stations, and njearly ac|joining the Admiralty Pier 
whence the Mail Boats depart. Good vIeW of Sea, Harbour, Castle, and Cliffs. New 
iMge and lofty Coffee Boom, Ladies' jDirawlng Boom, and Private Booms. Charges^ 
moderate. Arrangements made for Boarding per week on application. French and. 
German spoken. Night Porter. 

PEVERIL HOTEL, 

D O V E D A L E, ^ 

^ NEAR ASHBOURNE, DERBYSHIRE. 

THIS Hotel is most, delightfully situated near the entrance to the Dale, witk pn-^ata 
QurdeaanH Civqttet Ground. The Proprietor, G. H!ircM^ldrTS,^fn thanking fail 
numerous Friends and the Public in general for their past favours, assures them th|lt 
he wiO detbtO'hiS' best' energies to merit their continued support. - 

Zaunoheons always Ready, and Dinners on tiie fihoriest Notitoe^ 

Parties boarded by the Day, Week, or Month at Moderate Charges. 
:« A, Choice Selection OF Wines, Liqueurs, &c. 
Convegances to and from the Station. • Tariff on AppliAsation. 

DUBLIN. 

JURY'S HOTEL, COLLEGE GREEN. , 

• • Estahliehed 40 Ye^r^^ r r -^ 

. . . i .' Greatly finlarered'And Xmproveif. ; . ^ ^ 

Situated in the centre of the City, close tp the , Bank of Ireland, 
Trinity College, the Castle, Theatres, &c. 

TABLE D/HOTE- AT THRfIB AND HALF-PAST SIX. 

Charges Moderate, 

two NIGHT PORTERS IN ATTfeNdANCE. i' 

HSHUT J. JUET, Proprietor. , 
DUBLIN. 

SHEIiBOUBNE HOTEL; 

QITUATED in most central and fashionable ptrt of Dublin. 
'^^ ' Contains Bjiagnificent Public Booms, Elevator, Telegraph 
Office, .&c^ &c. First-Class. Charges Moderate. . ... : r 

JTTRY ^ CPTTOjr, J^qprietorsJ. 



22 DUBUN ^DUNBLANE DUNOON. 

- ' DUBLIN. 

THE "ABBEy HOTEL, 

Commercial and Family Hotel (Scotch Hoiise)| 

102 & 103 MIDDLE ABBEY STREET (off SACKVILLE STREET), 
^ Mks. ARTHUR, Proprietress, 

COMBINES the Gpmfort of a Home with Moderate Charges. Is centrally situated, 
being within two minutes' walk of the General Post Office, and near the Bwilc. 
College, Steamboats, and Bailway Stations. 

Show Booms for Commerolal Gentlemen. 

-- I .I... I ■ III . *• ! 

DUNBLANE. . . 

STIRLING ARMS HOTEL 

VISITOES and TOURISTS visiting the Far-famed 
Cathedral will find every Comfort combined with 
Moderate Oharges in the above Hotel. 

H. MARSHALL, Propriet(yr. 
DUNOON. . , 

ARGYLL HOTEL. 

■ ■ r . ' 

undur new management. 

AIElXAIfDER GTJNN, Lessee, 

T>E0ll to call the attention of the Nobility^ Tourists, and Travelling Public to the 
■t^ sijperior accomtnodation he is now able to give. The Hotel is greatly enlarged, 
lembdened, and refurnished in elegant style, with all modem improvements. 

Suites of Apartments ; magnificent Coffee Room and Ladies' Drawing Room ; Private 
Parlours ; Smoking and Billiard Saloon ; Fresh and Salt Water Baths ; and upwards 
of Fifty Large and Well- Aired Bed-Booms, looking over the Firth of Clyde. Altogether, 
i;his Hotel will be found one of the most complete in Scotland. 

The "Argyll" is the only first-class Hotel in Dunoon, and is situated witbin one 
minute's \^alk of the Pier. ^ 

Table D'Hote Psdly." DiTrner? a U Oartd,' 

Posting in all its Branches. | A^ Orders .punctually attended to. 

' Post and Telegram Office in connection with the Hotel. 

Dunoon is the favourite Watering-place on the Clyde, and the meirt central station ' 
for the following Excursions :— Ardrishaig (by Steamer Iona\ Lochlomond, Lochlong, 
Lochgoil, Oareloch, Ayr. Rothesay, Arran, all returning the same day. Purtiea going 
by Steamer lilma would do well to be in Dunoon the previous evening. 



DUNOON DUNKBLD EDINBURGH. 23 

M^COLL'S HOTEL, 

ADJOINING THE CASTLE HILL, 

WEST BAY, DUNOON. 

MR. M*COLL, late Lessee of the Argyll Hotel, Dunoon, begs to intimate 
to his numerous friends that he has purchased Lismore Lodge, (late 
residence of H. E. C. Ewing, Esq., Lord-Lieutenant of Dumbartonshire) 
and has opened it as a First-Class Family and Commercial Hotel. The 
house is beautifully situated, and commands a magnificent view of the 
Firth of Clyde. Every attention having been paid to the fitting up of the 
house, it will be found to possess all the comforts of a home. 

Tourists will find this a very convenient resting-place, as all. the Steamers 
for the favourite routes touch here at convenient hours. 

This is the only Hotel in Dunoon with Ladies' Drawing Room and 
Private Plea8ure_^Grounds. 

II<^, Cold, and Spray Baths. 

Private entrance to West Bay Shore for Sea Bathing. 

Spacious and Aiiy Bed Rooms, Private Sitting and magnificent Drawing 
Booms. Splendid Dining Room. Croquet Lawn. 

Table I>*Hote Dally. Charsres Moderate. 

" DUNKELD. ^ '■' 

FISHER'S^^i^ ROYAL 

HOTEL. 

(Under the Patronage of the Ro^l Family.) 

THISHQTEL, one of the largest in the Highlands of Scotland, and well known as a 
flrst-claaa establishment, is most conveniently situated for visiting the Duke of 
Athole's Pleasure Grounds, the ancient Cathedral, the Hermitage, Rumbling Bridge,- 
and the numerous Lakes in the immediate neighbourhood ; and also for making Excur- 
sions to the Pass of RilliecTankie, Falls of the Tummel and Bruar, Blair Castle, Aber- 
feldy, and Taymouth Castle. Families Boarded at moderate terms during the early 
part of the Season. Coach to Braemar and Balmoral ; seats secured only at the Hot^ 
CkurrioLges of every description. OmniJmses to meet each Train. 

^^— ^ ■■ — -■■ — ■ ■■ ■ ■- ■■■■ aiMayM. — ^iii ■ ■■■■■II -I m ■■ - II,.. .1, 

THE ROYAL ALEXANDRA HOTEL 

11, 12, & 13 SHANDWICK PLACE, EDINBURGH. 

West End of Princes Street, and in the irwnediate neighbourhood of the Caledonian and 

Haymarket Stations. 

THIS First-class Family Hotel was opened on the 1st of June 1874 by 
MISS BROWN, formerly of the Windsor Hotel, Moray Place, and the 
Clarendon Hotel, Princes Street. The Royal 'Alexandra Hotel has 
been entirely rebuilt, and fitted up with every modem improventent re- 
quired for the convenience and comfort of visitors, and Miss Brown hopes 
to merit a continuance of the favours she has already received. Coffee-room 
and public drawing-room. 



BUI K BUBS a. 



THE RUTLAND HOTEL, 

NEWLY C0N3TEUCTEI>, DECORATED, *»D FURNISHED - 



AdlDlDlng tlie'Caleilontan Railmi! SUtion, Writ End of Princes Btnet. lad within 3 
minutes- walk gf the HajmsrlKt Statica, \'orth British lUilway, 

SOIKBITItoa. 

(ifpHB 



MUSSELBURGH (kbai Epiijbproh). 

SCITSSELBITH&H ABIIS HOTEL. 

CONVENIEHTLV sLCnated in tbe ctotn of the Town, and In the intinedliit« rlcinlty 
or the L[nki. ConnnerciaL Gentlemen, Vlaitora, Ooir«rs visitiog MUBselburgh, hiA 
And the Hotel rt^lele with every uiodero eonveDleles, caiDbiaed with UodeniM-, 

"*"■ BILLIARD HOOM. _ ; 

iSluAJiny aUaclud wUti accimimiiilation fin- Rtu» Mating^ 

POSTIMQ IN ALL ITS BrANCBBS, 

THOMAS LAIDLAW, PHOFBiirroE. ' 



BDlKBUBflH. 



Ojiposilc the Scott ilonlimcnt and Gardens. 

THE aOYAL HOTEL, 

(ittac®rEgor, late GIBB'S) 

S3 PRINCES STREET, EDINBURGH. 



wiiterScutt's Monument tjalisbui 
The Royal Inntltution. The Royi 
AntlquarlBn HuBeum. From towei 
ttk Lomond, Coistorphine, and I 
neighbourlnK counties. The Boji 
BUtlona, and occupies the finest posmuu m uiu tnj. 
- Ctamrgaa Moderate. 

An Elevator. Nmht Porters.. 

CAUTION.— Fintorj inttnding a F<a ■u.p nt the Royal miwf bt ra^ 



THE BALMORAL HOTEL, 

PRINCES STREET, EDINBURGH. 



K THEIM, Manager. J. GRIEVE, PTO^rielor. 



BDINBDRGH. 



EDINBURGH. 

PHILP'S GOGKBURN HOTEL, 

ImtntdiaUly adjoining the Terminus of the Qreat 2forthem TVaint. 

THIS eottimodioQe and well-appointed Hotel ie besotifullj aitusted, oieri 
looking Princes Street Goraene, &nd commanding Bome of the finest 
TJAWBin the city. 

A. Urge and elegantly-lumiabed Saloon — admitted to be the finest in 
Sootlsad — Bet apartforLadieitiQeDtlemen, or Families, wiahing to avoid the 
expenss of SittiDg-RoDina. 

The fiewB from, the immenas vindowB of this Saloon are, withoat ex- 
ception, the finest in Edinburgh. 

Private Suites of Apartments, Bath-Eooms, Coffee and Smoking Boomt, 
and every accommodation for Gentlemen. 

PIANOS IM ALL THE CARLOUIIS AND SALOONS. 

Charga, XTiclvding Attendance, ttrictly Moderate, 

P.K— Mr. Cook (of London) mat*a this Hotel Mb be»dqiiirterB nhcn la Bcotlsnd, 

Cook'i Hotel Coupotu accepted at tht Cocklmm. 

On Pable FBUiSiU. M»b Bpsicbt DsnrBoa. 

nrt-OauTvTkMBttlhiinaoiHuctimnWUltUEaU. 



WATERLOO HOTEL, 

WATERLOO PLACE, EDINBURGH. 

mHIS elerant scd Couimodiaug BoiMing, the 9nEst In gcDtlKDd speciilly bnDt for m 
-■- Firat-ClABs Hotel, "Lth every modem convenience Md ippiiinea, )iis now puaed 
Into the hands of Mr. Andkbbon o! the Csti Royal Hotel, and the whole Establishment 
hu been nswly decoratsd snd fumislied In a style unsurpassed, 

'The IfATERUio' te nearly opposite tbe Oenenl Poet Offlfe, and Jn the iratnediatfl 
vicinity et the ,Oene[al Railway TeiminuB, Reglstei House, Banlis, and otlier Public 



THE CAFE ROYAL HOTEL & DINING-ROOMS 

(The largest Lining-Rooms in Scotiand) 
will— »loog Willi 'Thi WiTBBLoo'— be condmUd, as hitherto, under the penoBBl 

Dining Establishment piinciple, at Se., conaisting of Boupe, Fisbes, Bntrees, Joints, 

BREAKFASTS, LUNCHEONS, DINNERS, SUPPERS, A LA CARTE. 
This HnMl alao afforda erery acoonunodatloo to Vislton, and luia r«aentl7 been 

SPACIOUS COFPEE-BOOM. LADIES' COPPEE-BOOK. 

Large Wdl-VetUUated- Bed-Booms. 

hot, cold, & shower baths & lavatories. 

Bed and Attbndancb, 3b. 

W. ANDERSON, Proprietor. 



EDINBURGH. 29 



THE OLD 



WAVERLEY 

TEMPERANCE HOTEL, 
43 PRINCES STREET, EDINBURGH. 



«• t 



BOBEBT CBANSTON, in returning thanks to his numerous Friends and the 
Public, b^s to inform them that the above Hotel has been re-constructed, fitted, 
and furnished with all the most modern improvements which the present times can 
supply, and that, notwithstanding the great rise in the value of property in Princes 
3tne«^ and the high prices c^ labour and material in the erection of his New Hotel, the 
chaises for Bed-Rooms remain the same as they were 33 years ago. Hoping for a 
continuance of their kind patronage, R. C. will make it his constant endeavour to 
attend, to the comfort, convenience, an^ interest of his Friends. 

TO STBANGEBS unacquainted with Edinburgh, R. C. begs to intimate that 
the situation of the Old Waverley is within one minute from the Great Central Railway 
Station, and commands the Grandest Views in the City ; while the street itself is said 
to be the finest in the world. Immediately opposite the Hotel, and forming the south 
sidff of Princes Street, is the Garden Terrace, a public promenade, upon which stabd 
the unequalled "Scott" and other noble monuments, while the gardens below form the 
valley betwixt the Old and New Towns. To the west, the grand old Castle, towering 
over the city ; to the south, the romantic Old Town, with St. Giles' Cathedral and 
other prominent staruetures ; and to the east, Arthur's Seat, Holyrood P^ace, and 
Calton Hill, the view from the latter of which is said to surpass even that of the Bay 
of Naples. 

Uniform Charges are made at the following Hotels, belonging to the same Pro< 
prietor :— 

^blNBTTRQU . OLD WAVERLEY, 43 PRINCES STREET. 

BDUTBITBaH NEW WAVERLEY, 18 WATERLOO PLACE. 

aiiABGCW . . 185 BUCHANAN STREET. 

IfONPON . . 87 KING STREET, CHEAPSIDE. 



Breakfast or Tea 1b. 3d., Is. 6d., Is. Od. 

Public Dixmer 2s. 

Bed-Boom Is. 6d. 

Private Parlours 8s. 

Service Is. 



Recommended by BradshaVs Tourists' Guide as '*the cheapest and best Tempor- 
anoe Hotel they had ever seen," and by J. B. Gough as "the only Homb he had found 
sine* leaTing his own in America." 



30 EDINBURGH. 

- EDmBURGH. 
ROBERT MIDDLEMASS, Proprietor of the 
EDINBURGH HOTEL, PRINCES STRE 

has the honour of announcing that he has 
entered on a Lease of 





U 





SAINT ANDREW SQUARE, 

■ 

which has for many years been distinguished by the Patronage of the 
Moyal Families of Great Britain and Europe, 

It is situated in the principal Square, from which picturesque views 
are obtained, within a short distance of all the Railway Stations ; and 
while it commands perfect quietude, is in the vicinity of the various Public 
Buildings and Places of Interest for which the City is so justly famed. 

The moderate Tariff, which has given such universal satisfaction to visit- 
ors at the Edinburgh Hotel,' has been adopted at the Douglas. 

THE 

PALACE HOTEL 

109 AND 110 PRINCES STREET, 

EDINBURGH. 
THIS FIRST-CLASS FAMILY HOTEL 

Occupies the Best Posmion in Princes Street, immediately 
opposite Edinburgh Castle, and commands Beautiful Views over 
the Gardens, with the Calton Hill and Arthur's Seat in the 
distance. Extensive Alterations have just been completed, not 
only adding to the 'accommodation, but supplying increased Resi- 
i>ENTrAL Comforts ; and although the House was built only five 
years ago, the Furnishings and Decorations have been entirely 
overhauled and largely renewed. 

A detailed Tariff will be forwarded on application, and prompt 
attention given to all communications. 

J. FERGUSON, Jlfanitt/er. 



EDINBURGH. 31 

THE WINDSOR HOTEL, 

(Late DejayVs) 

99, 100, 101, PEINCES STEEET, EDINBXP-EGH. 

nPHIS First-class Family Hotel, having recently been considerably 
improved, is situated in the most pleasant and central part of 
the Metropolis, opposite the Castle, and overlooking West Princes 
Street Gardens. Private suites of Apartments, handsome Coffee 
Eoom, Ladies* and Gentlemen's Drawing Rooms, Smoking Room, 
and Bath Rooms. 

The Culinary Department is under the personal superintendeiioe 
of the Proprietor, whose thorough practical experience as Glief de 
CttUine of the Balmoral Hotel is well known, and will be a 
sufficient guarantee for efficiency. 

Continental Languages Spoken, Charges Strictly Moderate, 

French and German Newspapers kept. 

A. M. THIEM, Fro2)rietor. 

THE CLARENDON HOTEL, 

104 and 105 PEINCES STEEET, EDINBUEGH, 

Directly opposite the Castle, and overlooking West Princes Street 

Gardens, 

rjlHIS First-Class Hotel, after having been entirely built, and 
Furnished in the most elegant manner, was opened May 
1876 for the reception of Visitors. 

The view from the large oriel windows of Public and 
Private Sitting Eooms is unsurpassed, the Bed Kooms large 
and airy,v and fitted up with every regard to comfort. 

Charges StricUy Moderate. 

JAMES M'GEEGOR, 

Fropietor, 



l32 BBINBURGH. 

THE LONDON HOTEL, 

ST. ANDREW SQUARE, EDINBURGH. 

Established v^wards of Fifty Years, 



THIS COMMODIOUS and COMFORTABLE HOTEL, 
entirely RE -MODELLED and RE -FURNISHED 
throughout, has been opened by 

HSNBT ITyHITl!, late Clubxnaster to the UlTIVEBSXT? CIiIJB, 

Princes Street, Bdinburgh. 

From its Central Situation and the spacious character of its Accommo- 
dation, the London will be found, as hitherto, an Extbembly Contenebnt 
Hotel ; while from Mr. White's experience as Clubmaster and otherwise, 
he can confidently ensure to the Public an Exceptionally Superior Cuisvtu, 

Tbe BUiIiIABD and SMOKING BOOMS have been fitted up in the most 

comfortable manner. 

EDINBURGH. 
CALEDONIAN HOTEL, 

115, 116, &117 PRINCES STREET, and 1 CASTLE STREET. 

Xstabliflhed 40 Tears. 

(Exactly opposite the Castle.) 
R. B. Moore. Late J. Burnett. 



ALMA HOTEL, 

112, 113, and lU PRINCES STREET, EDINBURGH, 

(Opposite the Castle.) 

/COMBINING all the comforts of a Home with the convenience of a 
^ Hotel Ladies* Coffee-room and Drawing-room. Table d*Hdte. 

Charges strictly moderate. 

A. ADDISON, Proprietor. 



BOINBUBOH. S3 

EDINBURGH. 

THE ROXBURGHE HOTEL. 

THIS Hotel is situated in Charlotte Square, one of the finest parts of the 
City. • The garden in front of the Hotel was specially approved of by 
Her Majesty the Queen for the site of the National Albert Monument. The 
Coffee-room is quiet and comfortable, and well adapted for Ladies or Gentle- 
men. The Private Sitting-rooms are laid out with Bed-rooms and Dressing- 
room en suite. In connection with the above is 

KERR'S PRIVATE HOTEL. 

VEI TC H'S 

FIRST-CLASS 

PRIVATE HOTEL, 

120 AND 122 GEORGE STREET, EDINBURGH. 



Charges strictly , Moderate. Established over 30 Tears, 

GUNN'S (LATE MOORES) PRIVATE FAMILY HOTEL 

{Estdblisfted over Twenty Tears). 

2 FORRES STREET & 1 ST. COLME STREET, 

WEST EKD OF QUEEN STREET, EDINBURGH. 

rpHIS Pirat-Class family Hbtel occupies one of the best And quietest positions in Edin- 
-*• burgh, and only three minutes' walk from the Caledonian Railway Station, Princes St. 

Bed-Rooms and Attendance from 2s. 6d. Sitting-Rooms from 8s. per day. Plain 
Breakfasts and Teas fVom Is. Full Dinners from 2s. 6d. 



JOHN GUNN, Proprietor, 

TO WHOM ALL COMMtJKICATIONS SHOULD BE ADDRESSED. 

DARLING'S REGENT HOTEL 

20 WATERLOO PLACE, EDINBURGH. 
Nearly opposite the General Post- Office, 
Situated in the Principal Street of the City, in the immediate vici- 
nity of the Calton Hill and Public Buildings. Large comfortable 
Coffee-Room for parties with Ladies, free of charge. Also Private 
Parlours. 

This is admitted to be one of the best Temperance Hotels in Scotland 

Charges strictly Moderate. 



34 EDINBURGH EXBTEB — FORBES. 

THE 

ROYAL BRITISH HOTEL, 

22 PRINCES STREET, EDINBUR&H. 

Public Drawing-Room. Suites of Apartments for Families and Gentlemen. 

Table d*HUe in the Grand Saloon, 
Public and Private Billiard-Rooms. 

J. GRIEVE, Proprietok. 




4rj« 



TJ1 V TJ1 Fn T1 TO 

ROYAL CLARENCE HOTEL 

CATHEDKAL YARD. 

This Old-Established and Fashionable Tlotel has just undergone entire 
renovation, and is fitted with every convenience for the comfort of Ladies 
and Gentlemen, ffot and Cold Baths. Ladies* Coffee-Eoom, 

W. BIRKETT, Proprietor. 

EXETER 

POPLE'S NEW LONDON HOTEL, 

FOE FAMILIES AND GENTLEMEN. 

This Hotel contains all the appointments found in First-Class Estab- 
lishments, adjoining Northernbay Park, and within three minutes' walk 
of the CathedraL Visitors will find the comfort and attention of home 
with fixed moderate charges. A Ladies' Coffee Room. Night Porter. 
Omnibuses to every Train, Posting in all its branches. 

■' ■ — ■■■-■■ — ■■ M .l Ml I pi I ^^M^^M^^l^^^^^^— I . I ■ I P - ■ ■ ■ I ^— ^^l^ ■ , ^ 

FOEEES. 
WILEIE'S (Late Edgar's) 

FAHILT AND GOHHERGIAL HOTEL, 

HIGH STREET, FOEEES. 
Cha^^ Hoderate. 



PORRES POBT-WILLIAM GLASGOW. 



35 



CAMPBELL'S 

ROYAL STATION HOTEL 



FORRES, Adjoining the Railway Platform. 

(Patronised hy the Royal Family and Leading Members of the 

Nobility and Aristocracy of Europe.) 

APABTMENTB EN BIXITB. SPACIOUS BILLIARD AND SMOKING 

ROOM JUST ADDED. 

Boots in attendance at all Trains, 

JAMES CAMPBELL, Proprietor, and Lessee. 
FOKT-WILLIAM. 

CALEDOiriAir HOTEL. 

KODBRICK M 'DONALD, of long experience as Hotel-keeper in Scotland and 
England, begs most respectfully to intimate that he has become Lessee of the 
above first-class Hotel, which contains excellent abcoromodation for Families, Tourists, 
and Travellers, combined with reasonable cluu:ges. Three minutes' walk from the Fier, 
where the daily 5-30 a.m. steamer to Glasgow calls half-a-nrile fk'om the foot of the far- 
famed Ben-Nevis. Guides, Ponies, &c., kept for ascending the mountain. 

An Omnibus ftom the Hotel to and from the Inverness steamers on the Caledonian 
Canal at Bannavie twice a-day. 

The Royal Mail Coach to and from Eingosaie daily, on the route to Glenoott and 
Lochloniond. Charges stricfly Moderate. 



GLASGOW. 

ROTiL HAHOVER HOTEL, 

HANOVER STREET, GEORGE SQUARE, GLASGOW. 

MERTON R. COTES, Proprietor, 

'< The Editor of 'BRADSHAW highly recommends this Hotel for its Superior 
Arrangements, Excellent Mana^ment, and Domestic Comforts."— -Sept. 7, 1871. 

** First-Class Hotel for Famibes and Gentlemen, replete with the comforts of 
"Bomt."— Murray's Guide to Scotland, 1871. 

" Quiet Family Hotel, combining excellence in every department."— BZodb't 
Guide to Scotland, 1871. 



GLASGOW. 

BALMOBAL HOTEL 

Opposite Caledonian Railway Station, Buchanan St, 

SUITES OF ROOMS. 



8. d. 8. d. 
Drawing Room, with Bed and 
Dressing Rooms en suite 8 
Sebvick. 
Each person 1 



OtolO 



6 



8. d. s. 

Breakfasts 1 6 to 2 

Dinners from 2 

BED ROOMS. 

Bed Rooms for One Person ... 2 
Do. for Two Persons ... 8 



6 
6 






THIS HOTEL is, in Style and Comfort, equal to any in Glasgow, while 
the Charges are Moderate in the extreme. 

*--'«'*-' GoffBO Room. 

D. J. BROWN, Proprietor, 



liadies' 



GAIELOCH HOTEL, 

Sea-Bathing.] ROSS-SHIRE. [Sea-Bathing. 

{In eotiTierfwin vnth Loch Mane Sotetj 
rpHlS UrgS and eplendid Estibliahmenb. Milt Id 1ST2 and 1873, offers, tlironah Its 
■■- nuuiBlflcent litMlion und supertot aeconimoditloii, all the comforts of the beet flret- 
cluB Hotels. It contains bsndsonie Dioing Boom, Ladies' Dnwiaa; Room, Private 

id Landscapes of etngiilir beauty. It 




Over SeventT E 

POSTING. 

idSkye Riilnsy Company ^ and Heeecs. David Botcheson&Co.'aiwin aleamen 

It, CoaeJi Sum, dt AparlTnaUa, cartfuOv 
JAUEa HOBirSB'T, 



GLASGOW. 37 

GLASGOW. 

MACLEAN'S HOTEL, 

ST. VINCENT STREET, GLASGOW. 

MR. MACLEAN be^s to announce that he will REMOVE his Business 
early in July to his Magnificent NEW PREMISES, situated on the 
Plateau immediately above the old House, and adjoining Blythswood 
Square (the most central and salubrious situation in Glasgow). 

The New Hotel is built from the foundation in the grandest i^tyle, and 
contains every comfort and convenience suggested by modern ingenuity. 

Elevator to convey Visitors to each Floor. 

The Finest Ladies' Drawing-Room in the Kingdom* 

Reaping, Smoking, and Billiabd Rooms. 

Handsome Coffee-Room and Magnificent Dining Saloon, 
Apartments en suite for Families, and over 120 Bedrooms. 

Baths of every description. 
Visitors may rely upon every attention being given to ensure their comfort. 

Moderate Charges, 

GLASGOW, 

THE BLYTHSWOOD HOTEL 

FOOT or HOPE STREET, IN ARGYLE STREET. 

CONSISTING of Fifty Apartments— viz. Coffee Room, Commercial 
Room, Smoking and Billiard Rooms, Reading and Writing Room, 
Six Parlours, and Forty Bedrooms. Every accommodation for Commercial 
Gentlemen and Families. Two minutes' walk from St. Enoch Station. 

JNO. LEARY (late Clubmaster, New Club), Proprietor. 

ATHOLE ARMS HOTEL 

{Opposite the Entrance of the North British Railway Station), 

DUNDAS STREET, GLASGOW. 

rpHE Proprietor begs respectfully to announce that, having found the " ATHOLE 
•*- ARMS " much too small for his increasing business, he has made extensive Altera- 
tions and Additions. The Hotel has been thoroughly Re-decorated and Re-fumished, 
consisting of a spacious COFFEE ROOM for Ladies and Gentlemen ; COMMERCIAL 
BOOM ; BILLIARD ROOM ; SMOKING ROOM ; several Elegantly Furnished PRI- 
VATE PARLOURS. Upwards of Thirty Extra BED ROOMS have been added. Hot, 
Cold, Shower, and Spray Baths. Bed Room, including attendance, from 2s. 6d. to 
38. 6d. The Wines and Spirits are of the Best Quality, having been specially selected. 
NIGHT PORTER. JAMES M'KENZ1:B, Proprietor, 

P.S.— Kew EntraxLoes, Kob. 18 and HI Dimdas Street. 



38 GLASGOW^ 

MANN'S 

EAINBOW HOTEL, 

6 BEIDGE STEEET, GLASGOW. 

^HIS Hotel has undei^one extensive Alterations and Improve- 
ments, and is now, in point of Comfort, all that could be 
desired. Its immediate proximity to the various Railway Termini, 
the arrival and departure Wharves of the American, Highland, and 
Coasting Steamers, renders it unquestionably convenient alike for 
Commercial Gentlemen, Families, and Tourists. 

Numerous Suites of Private Hooms. 

Large and Elegant Commercial Room. 

Superbly Furnished Coffee Room for Ladies and Oentlemen, 

SMOKING ROOM. BILLIARD ROOM. BATH ROOMS. 

Wines of Choicest Brands carefully selected. 
Man Sprkht DeiUsch, On Parle Fran^aise* 

CHARLES MANN, Proprietor. 

»*, lO^A BERTH DIRECTLY OPPOSITE. 

NORTH BRITISH IMPERIAL HOTEL 

(AT THE NORTH BRITISH TERMINUS), 

GEOEGE SQUARE, GLASGOW. 

FIRST-CLASS FAMILY AND COMMERCIAL, 

PETER MACDONALD, Proprietor. 

REGENT HOTEL, 

221 SAUCHIEHALL STREET, GLASGOW. 

{Under New Management.) 

First-Glass for Families and Visitors. 

Bed and Attendance, 3s. and 8s. 6d. Parlours from 5s. per day. 

Spaeious Coffee-Rooin, capable of dining over 130 persons. 

AN ELEGANT DRAWING-ROOM. 

JOHN KENNEDY, Proprietor 

(Many years in the Queen's and George Hotels, Glasgow, 
and late of Rothesay). 



GLASGOW. 39 

WASHINGTON TEMPERANCE HOTEL, 

172 TO 184 SAUCHIEHALL STKEET, GLASGOW. 

A First-Class Family and Commercial Hotel, within Three Minutes* 
•^^ drive of the Bailways. 

Breakfast and Tea, Is. 6d. and 2s. Bed and Attendance, 2s. dd. 

CITY COMMERCIAL DINING ROOMS, 

64 & 60 UNIOK STREET, AND 35 MITCHELL STREET, GLASGOW. 

ONE of the most Extensive and Comfortable Dining Establishments in 
Scotland, capable of accommodating upwards of 2000 Visitors daily. 
Breakfasts, Dinners, and Teas, served with comfort, economy, and despatch. 

Bill of Fare, EXTRA MODERATE. 

LADIES* PRIVATE DINING ROOM. GENTLEMEN'S LAVATORY 

No GroiuUies to Waiters. 

MATTHEW WADDELL, Proprietor. 

THE BEDFORD HOTEL 

(COMMERCIAL AND FAMILY) 

8T. BEORGE'S PLACE (CORNER OF BUCHANAN STREET), 

GLASGOW. 

THIS Commodious and Comfortable Hotel, entirely Remodelled and 
Befumished anew, has been opened by JOHN GUNN. 

BeadUi^ and Drawiitg Roinn in eonnectUm wiOi, Cojfee-Eoom. Stock Sooms. 

GLASGOW. 

HIS LORDSHIP'S LARDER AND HOTEL, 
IQ ST. ENOCH SQUABE, GLASGOW. 

BaBAKPASTS, Luncheons, Dinners, Teas ; Otstbk, Fish, and Tripii 
Suppers. Good Kooms for Dinner and Supper Parties. 

Excellent Bedrooms. Coffee-Room. Good Lavatory, and Smoking-Room. 

Charges Moderate. 
Opposite St Enoch Station Booking Office. 

E. SALMON, Proprietor. 



40 OLENGABRIFF. 

HEALTH EESOET, 

GLENGARRIFF, 

TS strongly recommended by Eminent Physicians for its equable, mild, but 
not relaxing climate. The excursions by land and water are numerous, 
—amongst others, the celebrated drive to the LAKES OF KILLARNEY, 
thus described by Lord John Manners : — 

"The twenty miles from Kenmare to Glengarriff form the grander 
road, barring the Alpine passes, that I know.'* 

The celebrated Thackeray writes : — " fPTiat sends picturesque tourists 
to the BMne and Sa^xon Switzerland f Within five miles of the pretty Inn 
of Glengarriff, there is a country of the magnificeivce of which no pen can 
give an idea. The journey from Glengarriff to Kenmare is one of astonish- 
ing beauty ; and I have seen Killarney since, and am sure that Glengarriff 
loses nothing by comparison with this most famous of lakes." 

From Happy Thought Notes, — Punch. ** Glengarriff.-z^cclea 
Hotel. Charmingly situated. Facing the bay, and on the road. Old- 
fashioned, covered with creepers and roses, and bed-rooms commanding 
the bay. Eccles Hotel, Glengarriff, is worth far more than a passing visit. 
I am delighted with it. It is, as far as attendance and cuisine and general 
comfort, the best Hotel I've been in. The coffee-room seems to have been 
fitted up to the very latest fashion of taste ; the climate is so mild, that 
even at nine o'clock on an early spring evening you can sit out in front of 
tihe hotel, and enjoy your coffee and cigar. And here also I will introduce 
a useful piece of advice for the tourist who may be passing the same route 
as myself. Only hire your car from Killarney to Glengarriff. You can 
get another ai your own convenience, and just as good at Glengarriff, to take 
you on.** 

Murray's Hanbdook por Ireland describee this Hostelry as one 
of the best of the South of Ireland Hotels. Over Ten Thousand Pounds 

have recently been expended on 

THE ECCLES HOTEL 

and its extensive pleasure grounds, through which are five miles of beauti- 
ful walks. 

The Hotel is replete with indoor comforts, library, picture gallery, &c 
The telegraph office and pier adjoin the Hotel Sea bathing, boating, 
fishing, shooting, &c. Reduced tariff during the winter months. Terms 
and Testimonials from Eminent Physicians can be obtained from the 
Manager. 



GLOUCESTER GOLSPIE GBANTOWN GREENOCK. 4 1 

GLOUCESTER 

THE BELL, 

OLD-ESTABLISHED, First-class Family and Commercial Hotel. 
Appointments, Cuisine, and Wines perfect, combined with the cer- 
tainty of Comfort and Attention, Omnibuses to and from every Train. 
Extensive Stabling, Post Horses, and Carriages. Night Porter in attendance. 
Tariff on application to 

THOMAS ALLEN, Manager, etc. 

GOLSPIE. 

ROYAL SUTHERLAND ARMS HOTEL 

BEAUTIFULLY situated within a mile of Dunrobin Castle, the Grounds 
of which are open to the Public. Free Trout Fishing on Loch Brora 
for parties staying at the Hotel. Five minutes' walk froni sea-ghore. 
Horses and Carriages on Hire. An Omnibus meets Trains. Charges 
moderate. JAMES MITCHELL, Proprietor, 

^ GRANTOWN. "~^ 

GRANTOWN, ON THE HIGHLAND RAILWAY. 

THE GRANT ARMS HOTEL, 

Patronised by Her Majesty the Queen. 

rPHIS well-known Hotel has lately been lebuilt and greatly enlarged. Commercial 
-*• Room, Coffee Room, Private Parlours, en suite. Grantown is acknowledged to be 
one of the very healthiest places in Scotland. The summer climate being peculiarly 
ftalnbrious, with delightftdly bracing air, which is invariably experienced by visitors in 
One Day's time. Cairngorm and the surrounding Mountains, Huntly's Cave, and 
Castle Grant, are specially interesting, besides the famed scenery of Rothiemurchus and 
Banks of the Spey, which afford beautiful drives. Good Trout Fishing can be had in 
the neighbourhood, and Salmon occasionally. The Hotel '13us attends the Trains. 
Posting. Carriages of every description for Hiring. Parties Posted on to Balmoral, 
Braemar, and Ballater. A. FRASER, Proprietor. 

GREENOCK. 

TONTINE HOTEL." 



"DEING the Largest and Principal Hotel in Greenock, 
■^ Travellers and Tourists will find all the Comforts of a 
Home at the Tontine. 

JOHN CURRIE, Proprietor. 



42 GBASMKRE. 



GBASMERE. 



PRINCE OF WALES'- 

LAKE HOTEL 

ERECTED EXPRESSLY FOR A HOTEL^ ON THE MARGIN OF 

THE LAKE, 

And contains Public Dining and Drawing Eooms. Private 
Sitting Eoonisr Large and Airy Bed-rooms. Billiard and 
Smoking Booms. Cannot be equalled for varied and 
beautiful views, or as a central station for making daily 
Excursions to all the principal Lakes and Mountains, 
which may be seen upon looking at the Maps in any of the 
Lake Guide Books. The Prince of Wales and Suite during 
their tour in the Lake District made this Hotel their head- 
quarters, and made their daily excursions from it. 

Posting in all its branches. Mountain Ponies and 
Guides. Boats. 

V 

COACHES AND OMNIBUSES TO ALL THE RAILWAYS 

AND LAKE STEAMERS. 

EDWAED BEOWN, Proprietor, 
'N,B.~Postal Address— GuAsm.^^, WESTMOEELAND. 



aUEBNSGT. HARLECH. 43 

GUERNSEY. 




OLD GOVERNMENT HOUSE. 

GARDNER'S PRIVATE HOTEL. 

THIS establishment, being elevated above the town, commands a sea and panoramic 
view of all the Channel Islands. Visitors should be particular in mentioning the 
** Old Government House." Table d'H6te. Terms on application. 

J. GARDNER, Proprietor. 

THE ISLAND OF GUERNSEY. 
GARDNER'S 



ROYAL .^^^ HOTEL, 

FAMILY d: COMMERCIAL HOUSE, ESPLANADE, GUERNSEY. ' 

THIS Hotel is situated in the most commanding part of the Island, facing the 
spacious harbours and the approaches thereto, also having a full fnmt view of the 
adjacent islands of Bark, Herm, Jersey, and Alderney. Visitora should be especially 
careful on landing to ask for the " Royal." Table d'Udte. 

GUERNSEY, CHANNEL ISLANDS. 

VICTOEIA HOTEL, 

FAMILY AND COMMERCIAL. 

ri^HIS Hotel commands the finest sea view in the Island. The established 
JL reputation of this Hotel is the best guarantee that every attention is 
paid to the comfort of its Patrons. Hot and Cold Baths always ready. 

A Moderate Fixed Tabiff including Attendance. 

TMe d'Hdte cU Six o'clock. 

A Porter in attendance on the arrival of Steamers. 

HARLECH, NORTH WALES. 

CASTLE HOTEL. 

THE above Hotel, which has-been newly built and elegantly furnished with all the 
latest improvements conducive to comfort and health, is now ready fcH* the recej)- 
tion of Visitors. It is situate opposite the Old Castle, and in the most picturesque 
part of North Wales, in close proximity to Dolgelley, Barmouth, Festiniog, Snowdon, 
IJanberis, Carnarvon, and other favourite resorts. 

Harlech possesses an excellent beach for bathing, within a short distance of the 
Hotel, where bathing-machines are provided. 

Billiard Table by one of the best Makers. 
Post Horses aud Cars. First-class Stabling. 

W. J. LOVEGBOVB, Proprietor. 



4 4 HARROGATE HELENSBURGH HUNSTANTON ILFRAOOMBB. 

HARROGATE WELLS. 

BARBER'S OEOflGE HOTEL. 

■y ISITORS to Han-ogate will find many advantages in making their temporary residence 
' at this Hotel, it being situated within three minutes' walk of the Sulphur and 
Cheltenham Springs, seven miuutes' walk from the Railway Station, and in the imme- 
diate vicinity of the Public Baths, Concert Rooms, etc. The sheltered situation of the 
Hotel makes it admirably adapted for Visitors in Spring and Autumn. Terms per day :— 
Board and Lodgings, in Public Room,. 6s. 6d. each; Ditto ditto, in Private Rooms, 
7s. 6d. each ; Private Sittlng-Rooms, Ss. to 5s. each ; Attendance, Is. each. Beds 
charged extra if for less than three nights. Horse's Hay, 148. per week. Boots and 
Ostler extra. Billiard Room. Excellent Stabling for Hunters and Carriage Horses. 
JV.A-^No fees given to conductor to recommend this Hotel. 

HELENSBURGH. 

n^HE Finest Watering-Place in the West of Scotland. Trains and Boats to Ijoch 
i- Lomond and Trossachs, and Steamer every moraing to Dunoon at '8. 45, in time to 
meet the " lona" for the Highlands by that most celebrated Route— Ardrishaig, Crinan, 
and Oban, to StafTa and lona. The alterations and improvements at the Qtrs£N*S 
. HOTSIi are now completed, and the Suites of Apartments for Families cannot be sur- 
passed. The view of the Clyde and Lake is most magnificent. Tourists conveniently 
4rrfinged, A magnificent Coffee-Room. Smoking and Billiard Room. 

AU Charges strictly Moderate. 

Omnibukea arid Carriages to all Steamers and Trains. 

A. WILLIAMSON, Proprietor. 

THE SANDBIITGHAM HOTEL, 

HUNSTANTON. 
T^HIS Hotel is now open, and is replete with every Com- 
fort for the Convenience and Accommodation of Visitors, 
Spacious Coffee-Eoom, Ladies' Drawing-Eoom, Billiard and 
Smoking Eooms. Extensive Sea Views., Hot and Cold Baths. 

The Hotel is ttrithin an ?iour's Drive of tjie Residence of H.R,H, the 
Prince of Wales. A. J, MUIR, Manager^ 

ILFRACOMBE. 

ROYAL CLARENCE 

FAHILT AND COMMERCIAL HOTEL. 

"DEPLETE with every Home comfort. Spacious Ladies* Coffee- 
■*-•' Koom. Moderate Charges. R. LAKE, Proprietor, 

First-Class Billiard-Room. Good Post Horses. 

Omnilms meets every Train. 
^N.B. — General Coach Office and Delivery Agent. 



INNELLAN — INVBRABAT. 45 

INNELLAN. 

ROYAL HOTEL. 

JOHN CLARE has much pleasure in thanking his friends and the public for past 
favours ; having added largely to the former Hotel, -which Aow makes it one of the 
Largest and most Complete Hotels on the Firth of Clyde, and it wiU be his constant 
endeavour, by strict personal superintendence, to make it one of the most Comfortable 
Hotels for Families and Tourists. Boarding terms by day or week upon application. 
The Hotel is unequalled for situation, being placed on an elevation near the Pier, and 
commands one of the most magnificent views on the Firth of Clyde and the sur- 
rounding scenery ; beihg enclosed by about three acres of ground, makes it quite 
private. 

Parties intending to proceed by the " lona " to Ardrishaig and the North would do 
well to arrive at the " BoyaL** the previous evening, not requiring to leave till 10 a.m. 
next morning. 

During Summer, Steamers arrive and depart nearly every hour for all the different 
places on the coast, and there is convenient access from Glasgow by Caledonian and 
Wemyss Bay and Greenock and Ayrshire Railways daily, from Bridge Street and St. 
Enoch Stations, Glasgow. 

HOT AND COLD BATHS. | PRIVATE SEA BATHING. 

Carriages and Horses kept for Hire. Drives beautiful. 



ROYAL HOTEL RESTAUIRANT 

(Head of the Pier). 
LUNCHEONS AND REFI^ESHMENTS ON THE SHORTEST NOTICE. 

INVERARAY. 

ARGYLL ARMS HOTEL 



INVERARAY, at the head of Lochfyne, is one of the most 
desirable, as well as the most romantic and beautiful 
retreats for Tourists and Visitors. His Grace the DUKE op 
ARGYLL kindly allows Parties staying at the Hotel the privi- 
lege of Walking or Driving through the Castle Grounds at all 
times. 

Gentlemen staying at the ARGYLL ARMS HOTEL can 
have excellent SALMON and TROUT FISHING on the 
Rivers Aray and Douglas, Free of Charge. 

Fonies kept for ascending Duniquoich Hill, 

D. MACPHERSON, Proprietor. 



MACDONALO*S STATION HOTEL, 

INVERJTESS. 

PatronisM by their Royal Higknemes the Pri'nee and Princess nf WaUt 
and other Members of the Royal Family, atid by moit qf the 
Nobility of Europe. 
"pAETTES travelling from South to Notth, anil vice versa, ■will 
-* find this very large and handsome Hotel adjoining the 
Station, wberoby they can arrive at, or depart from, the Hotel 
under cover. The house was specially built for a Hotel, is 
elegantly furnished with all modern improvements, and containB 
numerous suites of Private Eooms, including 

U0IE8' AND GEKTLEMEN'S COFFEE-ROOM, 

SMOKINO-ROOMS. BILLIARD-ROOMS, BATS-ROOMS, ice. 

Over 100 beds can be made up. 

Parties leaing this Hotel in the morning can go over the 

grand scenery along the Skye Railway, or visit either Loch- 

maree, Gairloch, Dunrobin, and Guihpie, and return same day. 

Table d'H6te at 5^^*^ d 7.30. 

French, Gbkuah, AncJ^oo^N spoken. 

An Omnilmt attends the Steamert. Posting. 



INVERNESS. 



THE EOYAL HOTEL. 

Opposite the entrance to the Railway Statwn. 

J. S. Christie begs to BoUcit the attention of the travelling Public 
to the Royal Hotel, which has been greatly improved and enlarged, 
and now comprehends, besides extensive First-class Bed-Room 
accommodation, a SPACIOUS and LOFTY LADIES' and GENTLE- 
MEN'S DINING SALOON, with handsome DRAWING-ROOM eti 
suite, and several elegant and handsomely furnished SUITES of 
PRIVATE ROOMS ; also SMOKING-ROOM, HOT, COLD and 
SHOWER BATH ROOMS, ete. 

Though immediately opposite and within a few yards of the 
Railway Station entrance, the Hotel is entirely removed from the 
bustle, noise, and other disturbing influences which usually affect 
the comfurt of Hotels situated in close proximity to the Railway. 

Table d'Hote at 5.30 aiid 7.30. 

The Porters of the Hotel await the arrival of all trains, and an 
Omnibus attends the Caledonian Canal Sleamen. Posting. 



y" 



48 INVERNESS ISLE OP WIGHT. 

INVERNESS. 

CALEDOITIAN HOTEL 

(Two minutes' walk from the Eailway Station). 

THIS well-known first-class Family Hotel, patronised by the 
Royal Family and most of the Nobility of Europe, has 
recently undergone extensive additions and improvements. A 
large and elegant Dining-Saloon and Ladies' Drawing-Eoom, 
also a spacious Billiard and Smoking Eoom. 

In point of situation this Hotel is the only one in Inverness 
that commands a wide and extensive view of the Ness and the 
great glen of " Caledonia." 

Table d'Hotb Daily, and Dinners 1 la Carte. 
An Omnibus attends all the Canal Steamers. 

JOHN MENZIES, 

Proprietar, 

WHEN YOU AEE 

IN 

THE HIGHLANDS 

VISIT 

ISLE OF WIGHT— SHANKLIN. * 

MADEIRA HOTEL, 

{On the Mam Road from the Station to the Sea.) 

REPLETE with every Convenience. Cleanliness and Comfort ensared. 
Ladies' and Gentlemen's Coffee Rooms, Ladies' Drawing-room, 
Private Sitting Rooms^ Billiards, Crdquet Lawn. 

Terms Strictly Moderate. 

M. SHARP, Managieresa, 



ISLE OF WIGHT JERSEY. 49 



ISLE OF WIGHT. 



TEE MAEIM HOTEL, 

PARADE, WEST COWES. 



JAMES DROVER, PROPRIETOR. 



PLEASANTLY SITUATED, FACING THE SEA. 

The comfort of Visitors stituMedin every way. 
173.— Board at low Bates during the Winter Konths. 

ISLE OF WIGHT— SHANKLIN. 

HINTON'S ROYAL SPA HOTEL. 

{On the Esplanade^ directl/y.faci'ng- (he Sea,) 

Aspect sonth south-east. Well sheltered by surrounding cliffs. Tariff 
on application. Table-d'Hote at Seven o'clock. 

Dratoing-room and Billiards for Families staying in the Hotel only. 

Pension — 10s. 6d. per Day. 

J E R S E Y. 

BRITISH HOTEL, 

FOR FAMILIES AND GENTLEMEN. 

rpHIS Hotel enjoys an established reputation of more than fifty 
X years, and affords Visitors every accommodation at moderate 
charges. 

D 



50 JBRSEY ^KSNMOBB. 

JERSET.-STOPFORD HOTEL. 

rriHIS first-class Hotel, situated in the best part of St. Heliers, has for up- 
•*- wards of thirty years been success^ly conducted under the name of 

BREE'S BOARDING HOUSE. 

It has recently been altered, enlarged, and improyed, and is now the 
largest and best appointed Hotel in St. Hellers. 

The Dining Room can accommodate one hundred persons, and is lofty 
and well ventilated. 

The Ladies' Drawing Boom is new and unequalled by any in the 
Channel Islands. 

The Cuisine is perfect, and the Wines excellent 

T9j)le d'Hote every day at Six p.m. 

PRIVATE SITTING ROOMS, IF REQUIRED. 
. ' Carriages of every description at a moment's notice. 

Pablio and Private Dinners served in the best possible style. 
CHARGES MODERATE. 
For Tariff, etc.^ apply t(x E. BREE, PBOmiEToa. 

KENMORE. 
. . : . PEETHSHIEE HIGHLANDS. 

BEEADALBANE HOTEL. 

THIS comfortable Hotel is picturesquely situated at the east end of Loch Tay, 
quite close to Taymouth Castle, tke princely seat of the Earl of Breadalbane. 
From its central position, it forms an admirable point from vhich to make excur- 
sions to the historic and romantic scenes with which the district abounds, while its 
quiet and retired situation eminently suits it for the invalid and lover of nature. 

A large and commodious Billiard-'room has been added to the Hotel. 

Visitors staying at the Hotel ure allowed the privilege of fishing for Trout 
and Salmon in the river Lyon free — and in Loch Tuiy for a specified chaTge. 

Coaches run daily during the summer months to and from Aberfeldy and 
Eill^o, and the Hotel 'Bus awaits the arriyal of th^ prificip^l trains at 
Aberfeldy. There is a daily po&t to and from Aberfeldy and Eotlin. 

Letters and Telegrams for Apavtments, Conveyance^ &c., punctually 
attended to. 

A^.B. — During the first four weeks of Salmon Pishing '(1875) Gentlemen 
at this^otel landed 244 Salmon, or an average o£ 10 salmon per day. 

W. MUNBO, Proprietor. 



KESWICK KILKEE. 5 1 

KESWICK. 
DERWENTWATER LAKE. 

THE BOEEOWDALE HOTEL, 

{Late ABMSTRONGTS) 

Patronised hy H,R.H. the Prince of Wales^ Prince Arthur, and the 

Nobility of Great Britain. 

rilHE above large ertablishment is the only Hotel situated immediately 
i at the head of Derwrentwater, at the entrance of the picturesque Vale 
of Borrowdale, and commands the grandest views of the Lakes, Mountains, 
ftnd Valleys of this, the most romantic, part of the Lake District. Parties 
visiting this Hotel may safely rely upon the best attendance and all the 
comforts of Home. 

An Omnibus meets all Trains at the Keswick Station. 
Posting in all its Branches, Mountain Ponies, experienced Guides, 
Boatmen, &c., and good Boating on the Lake. 

Fishing Free to those staying in the Motel. 

HOT, COLD, AND SHOWER BATHS. 

Parties Boarded by Day, "Week, or Month, on the most reasonable terms. 
^ E. B. GOODFELLOW, Proprietor, 

THE ENGLISH LAKES— SKIDDAW. 

FAMILY & COMMERCIAL TEMPERANCE HOTEL, 

EESWIGE. 

. (In the Centre of Oie Town, near the Banks, Post-Office, dsc, ) 

In connection with the above Hotel are to be haa POST HORSES, MOUNTAIN" 
PONIES, and GUIDES, on the shortest notice, to any part of the Lake District. 

Good and extensive Stabling, and Lock-up Co a ch-Houscl Also, enlarge Hall, 
suitable for Pie-Nic Parties, School Trips, or Excursion Parties. 

N.B.—A Coach leaves the above Hotel every morning during the Season, at 10 
o'clock, fbr Buttermere, through Borrowdale, returning by way of Newlands, and 
arriving at Keswick at 6 p.m. J. GILLESPIE, ProprieUyr. 

KILKEE. 
ULURNET TO CONNEMARii; IRE LOWER SHANNON, AND KILKEL 

MOOBE'S HOTEL, KILKEE.— Tourists purposing to visit the delightful Scenery of 
the Western Coast are respectfully informed that this Establishment has been 
fitted up in a style that will ensure them every comfort and accommodation. Every 
exertion is used by the Proprietor to secure from each individual a confirmation of the 
character his house bears. Tourists will find this to be the most convenient as well as 
most interesting route from Killamey to Connemara, as, together with the grand and 
varied Coast Scenery in the immediate vicinity, the road leads by the stupendous Cliffs 
of Moher, and the interesting Coast Drive by Black Head and Galway Bay. All from 
Killamey to Galway two days' journey. 

* * Omnibuses attend the Steamer at •Kilrush, and Public Cars convey from here 
to Beflyvanghan, and Steamer to Galway. 



52 KILLABNET. 

RAILWAY HOTEL, 

LAKES OF KILLARNEY, 

ADJOINS Lord Kenmare's Demesne, is within a few minntes' drive of 
Ross Castle, and within easy distance of Muckross Abbey and Grounds, 
the Gap of Dunloe, and the other points of interest. It is the largest and 
most commodious in the Lake District, and possesses every comfort for the 
convenience of Tourists and Families. 

The Porters of the Hotel await the arrival of eaoh train 
for the removal of lugrerage, eto. 

Boats, Carriages, Ponies, etc., with steady attendants, always ready 
for engagement. 

The Manager personally undertakes the formation of Excursion 
Parties, with a view to their comfort and economy. 

Table d'H6te at Half-past Six o'clock. 
The charges arejixed and moderate. All attendance charged in the BiUL 
Further i>artioulars will be furnished on application to 

G. J.. CAPSEY, Manager, 

{Late Manager f Westminster Palace Hotels London.) 

KILLARNEY LAKES. 



By Her Most Gracious Maje8tyi*a Sp,ecial Permission, 

THE ROYAL VICTORIA HOTEL, 

Patronised hy H.RH. THE PRINCE OF WALES ; by HJiS. 

PRINCE ARTHUR, on his recent visit to Ireland ; and 

by the Royal Families of France and Belgiunij^ &c. 

rPHIS Hotel ia situated on tb,e Lower L^ke, close to the 

water's edge, within ten minutea* driye of the Railway 

Station, and a short distance from the far-famed G^p of Dunloe. 

TABLE D'HOTE DUEING THE SEASON. 

There is a Postal Telegraph Office in the Hotel. 
Hotel open throughout the year. Boarding terms from 1st Nov. to Ist May. 

• JOHN O'LEARY, Proprietor. 



KILLARNEY ^LEAMINGTON — LIMERICK. 53 

KILLARNEY LAKES. . 

THE MUCKROSS HOTEL. 

JOHN ROSS, Proprietor, 

IN the centre of the best scenery, as a glance at Map of Lake District will 
show, near the foot of Mangerton, Muckross Abbey, Tore Waterfall, 
close to the Lower and Middle Lakes, near the entrance to the far-famed 
Demesne of Muckross, to which free access is accorded. Charges extremely 
moderate. Good Salmon and Trout fishing. 

Table d'Hote at 6.30 p.m. 

Hotel Omnibus and Porters attend all Trains. 

See that the 'Bits you enter hears Proprietor's Name, 

LEAMINGTON. 
IIIANOB HOUSE HOTEL, 

FOR I'amilie^ and Gentlemen, beautifully situated in its own Grounds. 
Within 3 minutes* walk of North -Western and Great Western Stations. 
Charges very moderate. Elegant Coffee Room for Ladies. Private Booins en Suite. 
Spacious Billiard Room, Croquet Lawns, Archeiy Grounds, Pleasure 
Boats, etc. Special attention has been given to selections of the Wines, 
etc., quality and purity of which are guaranteed. Terms on Application. 

There ia excellent Spring Water on the Premises. 
WILLIAM WALSH, Manager, 

LEAMINGTON. 

THE REGENT HOTEL. 

A FIRST-CLASS FAMILY AND HUNTING ESTABLISHMENT; \ 

FLYS AND OMNIBUS 

MEET ALL THE G. W. AND L. AND N. W. TRAINS. 

POSTING, &c. 

L. BISHOP, Propriety, 

LIMEEICK. 

CRUISE'S ROYAL HOTEL, 

J. J. CLEARY, Proprietor. 

THIS long-established and well-known FIRST-CLASS HOTEL is now conducted under 
the sole superintendence of the Proprietor, and possesses everything requisite to pro- 
mote the comfort and convenience of the Nobility, Gentry, and Tourists, and aflfords 
particular facilities to Commercial Gentlemen, having first-rate Show-Rooms, together 
with Moderate Charges. 

Omnibuses attend all Trains, Steamers, etc. etc. etc. ; also a 'Bus attends the Night 
Mails for the convenience of Gentlemen coming by the late Trains. 

iV.B.— This is the PRINCIPAL HOTEL IN THE CITY, and is capable of accom- 
modating over 150 persons, together with a splendid Suite of Drawing-Rooms. 

HOT, COLDi AND SHOWER BATHS. 
Caution.— This is the only Hotel in the City called The Royal Hoteu 



COMPTON HOTEL, 

CHUBCH STREET, LIVERPOOL. 

ONE of the most elegant, commodious, and economical Hotels in England, 
for a descriiJtion of wiiicli the Proprietor begs to refer to a graphic 
aceoimt of his establishment which appeafed in the Liverpool Mercury, 
from which he has freely quoted the following pasaagea ; — 

Having psased the liondEonisly curved niahogui; doors, the Tisltor l)nds Iilmaelf in 
a eapaotons vesttbule. 16 feet wide, supported by Bienna MfttWe Columaa, nil the walla 
being patiitfld jn correspoudlng colours. 

The BILLIARD BOOM, attuated on the graond floor, ia romished «lth fleveu 
liandBome new tables, md »o sealed that tie speetalor can witness anj one or all ot 

■ae BB^TADKANT or LUXCHEON ROOM, in the rnmishing and decoration ot 
whicli no elpenae hsa been spared, ia iupport«l by handsome iharble colnnina, and 
tastefully panelled and ponded in warm nnd ub^rtiil tints. 

TheCOPPEE BOOH, which is 40 fE^et aquBre,ls beButiruUyruinlBlied In mabogany, 
and is suited to the most fastidiotis taste. 

The LADIES' DRAWING ROOM. 30 feet by 20 feet, is, lierhaps, the moat beauti- 
Maroon-eoloi'ired'mreoht Velvet^ rn ore ing i in e 

The COMMERCIAL BOOM, 90 feet by 30 feet, has all the necessary arrangements 
for Commercial Oentlemeo to eirry on tlietr correspnndanae or to meet their cuatuniers, 

prepared and fitted tor tlie purpose. ' * '" "™" 



I an adjoining aittlng Room, as a SUITE 0¥ A 
. . jceupied and eompMelj shut nlT frum each otht^r. 
le SANITARY ABRANamiENTS have received the fullest at 



-Idoaiiyoc 

The FUR^fITtiH£"^IiBK;'HiKraflHWARm and PLATE, have all been m 



!oinpleta and aatUhstoTr kind. 
rRrflTirBH,UNBIf,BlBTHaN,.,>cu::, «m r.^ 
Ihia HoU at a sott ol mati! thonsand pounds. 



In abort, in the Elttlui tini Deooratloiu 
tosecnre the Comfort of the Onesta, end to Invest the Hotel with tUe character of 
■"■omt.— Mvojwol Dnffjr Mercurg, DetaOtr SSlh, 1BT4. 

WM. BUSSEZiIi, Proprietor. 



LINCOLN r-LlNDUDNO LLANGOLLEN LOCH AWE. 55 

LINCOLN, 

SABACEN'S HEAD HOTEL. 

Tills, the Oldest, Largest, and Principal Family and Commercial Hotel 
and Posting House in the City, is the most Central, and replete with 
every Comfort, at Moderate Charges. Foreigners can obtain here every 
information respecting this far-famed Agricultural County. 

Hearses, Mourning Coaches, Waggonette9> Broughams, &c., with flrBt<-cIass' Horses. 
Hunters for Sale. Carriage Manufactory. Ladies' Coffee Room. 

N.B.—A New Wing has been built to this Hotel ; also several New Boxes for 
Horses. Omnibuses, painted Yellow, meet every Train. 

L. T. THORNTON, Proprietor, 

LLANDUDNO. 

THE IMPERIAL FAMILY HOTEL. 

THIS beautiful Hotel stands in one of the most desirable spots in Llandudno, 
commanding a view of the entire Bay, th« G-reat and the Little Orme, the 
Irish Channel, and the Snowdonian Range. The Hotel, which is elegantly 
furnished, is the favourite resort of the leading Families of the Kingdom, and 
all modern improvements have been adopted in the arrangements. An Omni- 
bus awaits the arrival of all trains. Excellent Stabling, eta ' 

TaHff on application, JOHN CHANTREY, Pro?eietor. 



LLANGOLLEN. 

EDWARDS' HAND HOTEL, 

THE "HAND/' 

Unequalled for the Beauty of its SUuaiion wi the Banks of the Dee, 

Several Bed-Rooms and Sitting-Rooms have been added to the House to 
suit the requirements of Families visiting this delightful Neighbourhood, 

HOT, COLD, AND SHOWER BATHS. BILLIARDS. 

Omnibuses firom this Hotel meet all Trains at UangoUexi Station* 

LOCH AWE, ARGYLESHIRE, PORT SONACHAN HOTEL. 

rpHOMAS CAMERON begs to intimate that the above Hotel, of which he has taken 
-*- a lease, is Now Open, after having been rebuilt on a new site commanding a mag- 
nificent view of the Lake. It contains Public Rooms, Private Parlours, and upwards 
of twenty Bedrooms, which have all been newly furnished in a superior manner through- 
out. The Trout Fishing in Loch Awe is free, and is not surpassed in Scotland. Anglers 
will find first-class boats, with experienced boatmen, always in attendance.' The Hotel, 
which is the principal one on the banks of the Lake, is situated 13 miles from Inveraray, 
Dalmally 10, Tyndnim 22, Oban 20. Steamer passes and re-passes daily during Summer. 
Passengers by the Steamer can break their journey at Port^onachan, and resume 
it again with the same ticket. 

A Coach runs between Dalmally Station and Port SonocMn during the Season, 
Horses and Conveyances kept for Hire. 

DAILY POST VIA INVERARAY. 



t 

66 LOCHBABNHBAD — LOCHLOHONO. 

LOCH EAEN HEAD. 

LOCH EARN HEAD HOTEL, 

BALQUHIDDER, PERTHSHIRE 

12 miles by rail from. Callander. 
{Under Royal Patronage. Twice visited hy the Qtieen,) 

rpiIIS Hotel has excellent accommodation for Families and Tourists, 
"^ with every comfort and quiet, lies high and dry, and charmingly 
sheltered at the foot of the Wild Glen Ogle (the Kyber Pass). It com- 
mands fine views of the surrounding Hills and Loch, the old Castle of 
Glenample, the scenery of the Legend of Montrose, in the neighbourhood 
,4)f Ben Voirlich, Rob Roy's Grave, Loch Voil, Loch Doine, and Loch Lub- 
naig, with many fine drives and walks. Posting and Carriages for Hire. 
Boats for Fishing and Rowing free. A 'Bus to and from the Hotel for the 
Trains during Summer. 

Coaches to and front Crieff dally In Summer. 
] R. DAYTON. 

LOCHLOMOND. 

TASBET HOTEL, 

(OPPOSITE BEN-LOMOND) 

A. H. IK'FHEBSON, Proprietor, 

TS the finest and most commodious Hotel on the Lake, and commands 
•^ the best View of Ben- Lomond. 

Coaches direct for the far-famed Glencroe, Inverary, and Oban, will 
commence running early in June. 

Tourists en route for Trossachs and Callander can leave per 10.15 
A.M. Steamer, next morning, in connection with the Steamer down Loch 
Katrine. 

Small Boats on .the Lake, and Guides to Ben-Lomond, to be had at the 
Hotel. 

May 1877. 



LOOH LOMOND. 57 

Under Kew Manag^ement. 

HEAD OF LOCH LOMOND. 

ARDLUI HOTEL. 

One Minute's Walk from the Pier. 
ff'HIS is the only landing-place on the Lake for the Coaches to Glencoe, Ballachullsb, 
-I- Fort- William, &c., in connection with the Railway at Crianlarich to Killin, 
Callander, Ac, Also a starting-point for the Dalmally and Oban Coaclies, all of which 
start daily from the Hotel durmg the season, where seats can be secured and all inform- 
ation supplied. Parties intending to proceed by either of the above routes would do 
well to be at Ardlui Hotel the previous evening, so as to secure seats. Parties staying 
at this Hotel can visit the Trossachs and return same day. Parties arranged with by 
the Week or Month. Four arrivals and departures of Steamboats to and from Ardlui daily 
doling the season. Good Fishing on the Falloch and Loch Lomond, free. Boats, 
and Posting in aU its Branches. Comfortable and airy Bed-Rooms, with Moderate 
Charges. D SINCLAIR, Proprietor. 

LOCHLOMOND. ^ 

BALLOGH HOTEL, FOOT OF LOCHLOMOND. 

THE above first-class Hotel is beautifully situated at the foot of the " Queen of Scottish 
Lakes," and at an easy distance from the Railway Station. Visitors will have every 
comfort, combined with moderate charges. Parties purposing to proceed by first 
Steamer up Lochlomond would do well to arrive at the Hotel the previous evening. 

Visitors staying at this Hotel have the privilege of going through the Grounds and 
Flower Gardens of Sir James Colquhoun, Bart., and Mr, Campbell of Tillychewan, and 
have permission to visit " Mount Misery," which commands 17 miles of the most beauti- 
ful portion of Lochlomond — 23 islands being comprised in the view. Excellent Trout 
and Salmon Fishing. Posting in all its branches. Boats for the*Lake. 
GEORGE M'DOUGALL, ProprieioT. 

LOCHLOMOND. 

INVERSNAID HOTEL is situated in the most central and picturesque 
parts of the banks of Lochlomond, and is the landing-place for tourists 
and others visiting the delightful scenery of Loch Katrine, the Trossachs, 
dachan of Aberfoyle, &c. Coaches and other conveyances are always in 
readiness for parties crossing to the Stronachlachar Hotel, for the Steamer 
plying on Loch Katrine from Coalbams Pier to the Trossachs. 

R. BLAIR, Proprietor, 

liOGH lOMONO, lUSS HOTEL. 

KOBBBT M'NAB. 
Posting. Pleasure Boats. Fishing Free. 

INCHTAVANACH and the STRONE BRAE command the 
most extensive, magnificent, and picturesque prospects of 
this, the far-famed 

"QUEEN OP SCOTTISH LAKES." 



58 LOX^^HLOMOND — ^LOCH MAREE — LOCH TAY. 

LOCHLOMOND. 

ROWARDENNAN HOTEL, 

Foot of Ben Lomond. 

T) JARRATT begs to return his sincere thanks to Tourists and others vho have so 
■^* kindly patronised him for the last nine years. Visitors will find this Hotel clean 
and comfortable, with every attention. Rowardennan is the best and shortest road to 
Ben Lomond, and the only place where Guides and Ponies cab be had, by which parties 
can ride witli ease and safety to the top, the distance being only four miles to the very 
summit 

The Loch Lomond Steamers call at Rowardennan Wharf Biz times a day on their 
route up and down the Loch. — May 1877. 

LOCH MAEEE HOTEL, 

ROSS-SHIRE, 

(In connection with Mr, Hornshy's Gairloch Hotel,) 

'pHE accommodation and comforts of this fine Hotel, which 
occupies the most beautiful site on Loch Maree — opposite the 
Islands, with Sliugach, 4000 feet, on the further shore — renders it 
a charming summer resort for Sportsmen, Tourists, and Families. 
Visitors have the privilege of Fishing on the Loch, which abounds in 
sea-trout and salmon, besides the native fish, which run to a large size. 

In the Posting Department are Horses and Carriages of superior de- 
scription. There are frequent excursions to Gairloch and tlie scenery of 
Glen Torridon ; and the mail coaches plying between Gairloch Hotel and 
Achnasheen (Dingwall and Skye Hallway) pass the Hotel twice daily in 
summer. 

Tahle-d'Hote at 5 p.m. Bally, or shortly after arrival of Coach. 
Orders for Conveyances, Coach SeMs, or ApartmerUSf carefully aMended to. 

1st June 187?! JAMES & ROBERT HORNSBY. 

LOCH TAY— PERTHSHIRE. 

BEN LAWERS HOTEL. 

THIS Hotel has been largely added to and refurnished, offers first-class 
accommodation to Tourists and Visitors. The Mountain, which is 
easy of ascent, is unequalled for the forest Alpine plants. Parties wishing 
to ascend with ponies should give notice the day previous. Salmon and 
Trout Fishing in the Loch. Trout fishing free. Coaches in connection 
with this Hotel to and from Killin, Kenmore, and Aberfeldy daily. 
Telegrams or letters for Boats, Coach-seats, Apartments, and Private Ck)n- 
veyances, strictly attended to. 

JAMES ANDERSON, Proprietor. 



^ LONDON. 59 

LONDON. 

UPPER NORWOOD. 

NEAR THE CRYSTAL PALACE. 

THE QUEEN'S HOTEL. 

npHIS Tinique establishment stands unrivalled for the exquisite 
picturesqueness and beauty of its situation ; its command- 
ing and central position ; and the commodiousness and complete- 
ness of its general arrangements. Delicate persons, to whom a 
light bracing air, charming scenery, close vicinity to the Crystal 
Palace and its amusements, and quiet seclusion, would be an 
invaluable boon, will find, in this establishment, their wishes 
fully realised* It is built on a dry gravelly soil, and stands at 
an elevation of 390 feet above the level of the sea, and is sur- 
rounded by several acres of its own pleasure-grounds and 
pastures. 

There are Wings detached from the main building for the 
accommodation of Families and their suites. Wedding Breakfast 
parties, &c. The establishment also has its own Dairy, Home- 
made Bread, Kitchen Garden, &c. The Stabling Department 
is large and complete, and is provided with an ample number of 
lock-up Coach-houses. 

SPECIAL NOTICE OF WINTER ARRANGEMENTS AND TERMS 

AT THE ABOVE HOTEL 

The Patrons of this establishment are rcspectfiilly informed that 
Tourists, Families, and others are received on most reasonable terms for the 
"Winter months — which season has many enjoyments for Visitors at the 
Queen's Hotel, owing to its elevated, dry, and salubrions situation, and 
its convenient vicinity to the Crystal Palace and the Winter Garden, 
whilst it corano^nds by Rail easy access to the West End, the City, &c. 
Application for terms and other information to be addressed to the Manager. 



60 LONDON LTNTON (alsO f. -63). 

THE 

HOLBOEN EESTAURANT, 

218 HIGH HOLBORN. 

OME OF THE SI8HTS AND ONE. OF THE OQMFORTS OF LONDON. 

Attractions of the Chief Parisian Establishments, with the quiet and 

order essential to English Customs. 

DINNERS AND LUNCHEONS FROM DAILY BILL OF FARE. 

A TABLE D'HOTE, AT SEPARATE TABLES, EVERY EVENING, 

In the Grand Salo!^, the Prinoe's Salon, and the Duke's Salon, 
From 6 to 8.30, 3s. 6d., inoluding 

TWO SOUPS, TWO KINDS OF FISH, TWO ENTREES, JOINTS, SWEETS, 
CHEESE (IN VARIETY), SALAD, &c., WITH ICES AND DIISSERT. 

This favourite Dinner is accompanied by a Selection of high-class 

Instrumental Music., 

THE DEVONSHIRE HOUSE HOTEL, 

12 BISHOPGATE STREET WITHOUT, E.a 

HENRY G. CHALKLEY, PropHetcrr. 

THIS New First-class TEMPERANCE and FAMILY HOTEL, now open to the Public, 
the best of the kind in the Metropolis, is fitted with every modern improvement, 
and offers gi'eat advantages to Visitors for its excellent position, being in one of the 
best parts of the City, and two minutes' walk from the North London, London and 
North- Western, Great Eastern, and Metropolitan Railway Stations in Liverpool Street ; 
and five minutes' walk from the Midland and Great Northern Railway Stations in Moor- 
gate Street and Bank. Splendid Public Rooms, and a spacious Room for holding Public 
Meetings. The private Sitting Rooms, with lofty Bedrooms en, suite, are replete with 
every home comfort. Moderate Charges and first-class attention. Reduced charges 
during the Winter, dnd liberal arrangements made with Visitors staying a lengthened 
period. A Night Porter for late Trains. Address E. CESARI, Manager, 

LYNTON, NORTH DEVON. 

THE VALLEY OF ROCKS HOTEL 

THIS favourite and beautifully situated Hotel, which has lately had extensive alter- 
ations, additions, and improvements, combines with moderate chaige all necessary 
means for the accommodation and comfort of Families and Tourists. The splendid 
Table d'Hdte and Coffee-Room, Reading-Rooms, Ladies' Drawing-Room, and several 
private Sitting Rooms, range in a long front overlooking the sea, and looking into the 
extensive private grounds of the Hotel Here the visitor commands uninterrupted 
views of the Bristol Channel, the Tors, and the Valleys of the East and West Lynns, 
and the Coast of. South Wales, &c. The Hotel is also most conveniently situated as a 
centre for visiting all the places of interest in the district. 

Post Horses and Cabbiaqes. 

JOHN CROOK, Proprietor. 



MALVERN. 

THE IMPERIAL HOTEL, 

. RAILWAY STATION, GREAT MALTERN. 

THIS Hotel oontaioB upwarda of one hundred BedroomB, Drawing- 
Booms, Bed and DreBsing Rootob and Closets en suite, & Ladies' 
CofTee-Room, a Gentlemen'? CofFee-Room, Table d'Hotc, Reading and 
Billiard Rooms, etc. etc. 

Of Great Malvern — (he salubrity of tbe air and the purity of the 
water, its invigorating effects in summer and winter, and the beauties of 
tbe place — it is superfluous to speak. As a winter residence, also, the 
dryness and high temperature of Malvern are shown by conclusive and 
trustworthy testimonr, and are confirmed by comparative tables of 
winters in other localities. 

The new Stables belonging to the Company are now open, and oom- 
prise first-clasE accommodation for Horses and Carriages. Carriages, 
Baddle-horBes, and Flies may be had at the Hotel. 

A covered way conducts the visitor from the railway station to the 
Hotel. 

Porters attend every train, to convey passengers' lu^age to the Hotel. 

To meet the wishes of nuinerous visitors to the Hotel, the Proprietors 
have decided to take Ladies and Gentlemen as Boardeis dunng the 
seaaon, on the terms stated in the tariff, which will be forwarded upon 
applicaUon. 



WASCHESTER — (SIAREE, LOCH, Se6 p. t 



MANCHESTER. 

KNOWSLEY HOTEL, 

CHEETHAM HILL ROAD, 

Only a few minuted lealk from Victoria Railvjay Station, 

Will be found by Travellers who appreciate Good and Lofty 
Eooma, and etyoy the Quietude and Comfort which the noisy 
part of the City cannot offer, a very acceptable hoiisa. 

Omnibuses to all ports of the City pass ttie door 
every few minutes, 

J. R BRENMEHL, Pboprietor. 



LTNTON — MELROSE. 63 

LYNTON, NOETH DEVON. 

THE BOTAL CASTLE FAULT HOTEL. 

Patronised by H,R,H. the Prince 'of Wales and other Mcmhers of 

the Royal Family, 

'pHE above Hotel is beautifully situated in its own grounds, comprising 
-*- over twelve acres, laid out for the recreation of visitors, and commands 
the finest views of the Bristol Channel, the South Wales Coast, Valleys of 
the East and West Lynns, &c. &c. 

P In connection with this Hotel, and in the same extensive grounds, is a 
Private Hotel and 'Boarding House, also replete with every comfort and 
convenience for families visiting this romantic neighbourhood. The Hotel 
is within easy distance of all places of interest in the vicinity, and has 
been recently enlarged to meet the progressive increase of patronage. 

Kew and Zleflrant Coffee Rooms. Post Horses and Carriages of every description. 
Oooiches in the Season to Barnstaple and Ilfracorribe, 

THOMAS BAKER, Proprietor, 

MELROSE. 

THE ABBEY HOTEL, ABBEY GATE. 

THIS is the only Hotel which is built on the Abbey Grounds, at the 
entrance to the far-famed ruins of Melrose Abbey. An extensive 
addition having been built to the Establishment, consisting of Private 
Sitting Rooms, Bedrooms, etc. etc., it is now the largest Hotel in Melrose, 
and only two minutes* walk from the Railway Station. 

First-class Horses and Carriages to Abbotsford and Dryburgh Abbey. 
An Omnibus attends all trains to convey Visitors' Luggage to and from 

the Hotel. GEORGE HAMILTON, Proprietor. 




MELROSE, CLEAVER'S KING'S ARMS HOTEL. 

Carriages of every description for Hire. An Omnibus attends every Tiuin 

Free of Charge. 

One-Horse Carriage to Abbotsford and back, 6s. Qd. Do. to Dryburgh and back, 7s. Hd. 
DinneiSy Luncheons, &c., promptly provided on the Arrival of th^ Tr^s. 



64 MELROSE! MOFFAT — HUMBLES — NORWICH. 

MELROSE, 

GEORGE AND ABBOTSFORD HOTEL 

is now Enlarged and Improved, with Ladies' Drawing-Room, Smoking- 
Rooms, Billiard-Rooms, and all the latest improvements of a First-class 
Hotel, while the Charges are not more than minor Hotels. Being only 
two minutes' walk from the Station, the same from the Abbey, it is there- 
fore convenient for Strangers visiting Melrose. 

March 30, 1877. 

MOFFAT SPA. 

AXTKAXTDALE AEMS HOTEL. 

ROBERT NORRIS, Proprietor. 

Tourists and Visitors to this famous watering-place will find at the Annandale Arms 
Hotel first-class accommodation, combined with Moderate Charges. Commercial Gen- 
tlemen will find every attention to their convenience and interests. Omnibuses meet 
the Trains at Beattock Station. A Summer Excursion Omnibus runs along the 
route — passing "Craigiebum Wood," Bodesbeck, Grey Mare's Tail, to 8t.vMary*s Loch, 
each Tuesday and Saturday. Omnibuses ply to the Well every morning. Carriages of 
all kinds. Job and Post Horses on Hire. A first-class Billiard Room on the Premises. 

MUMBLES, SOUTH WALES. 

SHIP AND CASTLE HOTEL. 

TpAMILIES and Tourists visiting the Mumbles will find at 
-■- the above Hotel comfortable Accommodation combined 
with Moderate Charges. 

Miss PHILLIPS, Propietress, 

NORWICH. 

LIVINGSTONE'' (FIRST-CLASS TEMPERANCD HOTEL 

The Most Noble the Marquis Townshend, after stajing at the "Livingstone" Hotel, 
gave the following Testimonial :—" Dec. 22d, 1875.— I beg to recommend the 'liiving- 
stone ' Hotel as an establishment extremely well conducted. The accommodation is 
excellent, and the Charges very reasonable. In every respect the Hotel is aU liiat can 
be desired. TOWNSHEND." 

Opinions of the Press.—" In all respects a first-class Temperance Hotel." — WorJbBk 
Chronicle. '* One of the most commodious, clean, and comfoitable Hotels in the Eastern 
Counties." — Norwich Free Press. 

Good Staples and Stock Rooms. 

EDWARD. BURGESS, ProprMior. 



MARINE HOTEL, 

NAIRN, ; /\ ' "; 

" The Brlgiiton of the TTortti* ' ^ a L '^ j 

Under the same MandgemeTd as Station Hotel, Inverness. 

A FIRST-CLASS hotel for Familiea and ToarWta, aad Boarding 

-^*- EatftMiahment. TUehouaewssapecialljbuiltfoi'aHfttel.andhaannder- 

ggne it thorough and estensive repair, and is newly and elerantly fumiajitji 

in. the most modem style, and contains nmneroiiasuites of -PriTiiie Rooms; 

jnclading Ladies' aail Gentlemen's Dining Saloon with Dntning-SbatD; also 

Smolung Room, ^llifinl Koom, U<i. .Over Se.vratj Seds e^xt be wade up; . 

The Climate of Nairn is well known to be lie best jn. Scotland, and-js 

becoming yearly more and more a favourite resort of the, Upper Classes 

and TourJBts from all parts of the Kingdom. It is also in high 'tepnte with 

the leading Physicians b( the Country, who invariably recomMiend tSieir 

patients in incrMsJDg fiiimbers to «ecurathe benefits of ti|e dry! «Qd bnHnji 

air of the district. . r ■ . , 

Bup«ri(ip Hot- and Oold Salt Wate» Bafha in the.Hpt?^ < 

AN OMNIBUS AWAITS THE ARRIVAL OF ALL TRAIr^ . , . , . , 
Postittg ia all ill branehe^ will, it dane in first-chisi s^yU, at^ will be^ 
carefully aliened te. 



66 KOBTH BERWICK. 

NORTH BERWICK 

ROYAL HOTEL. 

THE MOST FASHIONABLE AND FINEST MARINE SITUATION 

IN SCOTLAND. 

THIS extensive and commodious erection, recently built 
for a First-Class Family Hotel, replete with all modem 
appliances, is one of the most complete Provincial Hotels in 
the Kingdom. 

Families, &o., Boarded per Day or Week on Moderate Terms. 

AiMrtmenta '* En Suite.*' 

Cfuisine under the superintendence of a Fvrst'Olass man OooJc, 

The Golfing Links are adjacent to the Hotel, and the 
Bass Bock, Tantallon Castle, &c. &c., are at short Distances. 
The Walks and Drives are varied and interesting. 

CHAS. JOHNSTON, Proprietor. 

MARINE HOTEL, 

NORTH BERWICK. 

{OiM Hour by Rail from Edinburgh) 

THIS NEW FIRST-CLAS6 FAMILY HOTEL, 
Acknowledged to be one of the most Comfortable Residengbs in 
Scotlandjis open all the Year round. It stands within its own Grounds, 
dose to the Favourite Golfing Links, and commands Magnificent 
Views of the varied scenery of the Firth of Forth, including the 
Bass Rock, the May, and other islands. 

The attractions of this Fashionable Marine Resort have been 
increased since Last Season by the great extension and improvement 
of the Golfing links. 

Numerous Suites of Apartments and Single Bed-Eooms at 
moderate chaises. Spacious Public Rooms. Hot, Cold, Spray, 
Douche, Fresh and Salt Water Baths ; also Medicated Baths on the 
premises. Good Stabling and Omnibus to meet the Trains. 
Tariff on avplioatton to J. BSSPHtUS, Manager. 



CAMPBELL'S 

CALEDONIAN HOTEL 

OBAN. 

{UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT.) 

mHTS LAEGE AND COMMODIOUS FIEST-CLASS 
HOTEL has just undergone extensive Additions and 
Iniprovements. It haa been furnished anew in a most 
handsome and elegant style, rendering it the finest and most 
comforUhle Hotel in TOWN" and WEST HIGHLANDS. 
BILLIARD ROOM. 

ALEXANDEE CAMPBELL; 

Fropriet«r cmd Managtr. 



68 OBAN. 

OBAN. 

6BEAT WESTERN HOTEL 

BEAUTIFULLY SITUATED. 

TjimST-CLASS. This well-known Hotel has been 
recently enlarged and improved. It is now 
replete with every comfort and convenience. ' ^ 

J. CAMPBELL, 

ProprietTess. 



O B A iS[. 



THE ALEXANDRA 

PlfiST-CLASS HOTEL, 

ON THE ESPLANADE. 



T G. MACARTHUE having now finished the large additions 
* to his Hotel, begs to inform his Patrons and the Public 
generally that the Alexandra is now one of the most complete 
Hotels in Scotland ; and that it will ever be his constant 
endeavour, by. personal superintendence, to make it one of the 
most comfortable. 



N {see also page 70)— nazroRD, 



OBAN— CBAIG^-AfiD HOTEL— R- maclaubin, Propritior. 

'I'OURIBTB snd Strangers vialtine the West HleUuidi wlH And that, irhether u k- 
■>■ gude Situiition, Conirort, or ADCommadatiDn, comblued with Uadcntte Charges, 
thts elcgint Hotel, built Bipreesly for anmmer Visitora, csnnot >« surpassed, wblle ib 






OXFORD. 

In the Best and most Central part of Ae City. 

RANDOLPH HOTEL 

{Opponte Martyri' Memorial, and lun-oandtd btf the Principal ColUgu) 

OXFORD. 
FIRST-CLASS ACCOMMODATION. ' 

CHARGES MODERATE. 

HANDSOME COFFEE-ROOM FOR LADIES. 

BILLIARD-ROOMS, BATHS, &c &c. 
GOOD STABLING, LOOSE BOXES, ic. 

UiBS I'ANSON, Managtnit. 



OBAN PBNZANOB. 



THE GRAND HOTEL, 

OBAH. 

fTHISN 



in*gnlBt;ei 



Fir 
w 


8t-0las9 Hotel haa been e 
l«riag-FlBCs oiforda, an 

venienoe ; and from tlie 


reeted apan the grsndeBt site which this bmona 

■nished, and wiQ bs toond replete with everj 
Proprietor's extensive eiperlence in Englud, 
hsMe-CuMne io the Western Clnb. Glasgow, 

C, H. FOX. JVoprittor. 



PENZANCE-SEA-SIDE. 
QUEEN'S HOTEL. 



THIS magnlflcent Hotel lias I'eoently been greatly enlai]^ cutiroty re-ansnged, u 
bandBom^ tamlBhed, having a frontage of ovec 170 feet, all the rooms of whii 
rrverlaok the sea. It Is the only Hotel that commands a Tail Had aninlsiTaptsd Tlew 
ttonnt's Bay. Penzance stands nnriralled tor the Tariety and qnlet beauty of its scenei 
whilst the milduesa of Its climate is admirably adapted to invalids. ApHrtments 
nilto. Ladiu' Coffee-Room. Kliiard-Rooai, I Hot and Cohl BaUia. An Omnibns niei 
every tmlo. Posting in all Its brsoohee. Yactla, Ac. 

HENBY BLACEWBLL, F 



pm2AN0E» — PEJITH. 71 

PENZANCE, 

Seaside Family Hotel and Superior Lodgmg-Honse. 
MOUNTS BAY HOUSE,^ 

. ON THE ESPLANADE. 

NO expense or labour has been spared by the Proprietor. The house is 
furnished in the most modem style, is well supplied with Hot and Cold 
Baths, and replete with every accommodation suitable for Tourists to "West 
Cornwall. All the Drawing-Rooms command an tminterrupted and unsuT' 
passed View of St. Michael's Mount, and the whole of the magnificent bay. 
InvaUds wiU find in MOUNT'S BAY HOUSE the comforts of a home, 
while the beauty and salubrity of the situation, and its nearness to the 
charming walks on the Sea-shore, render it a healthy and delightful resi- 
dence. 

m 

Suites of Apartments for Families of Distinction, 

POST HORSES AND GARRIAGES, YACHTS AND PLEASURE 

BOATS, ON SHORTEST NOTICE, 

CHAB6ES MODERATE. 

Mks. EDWARD LAVIN, Proprietress. 



PERTH. 

TEE EOTAL GEORGE HOTEL 




BY SPECIAL ,^ Viap*2?«S^l*S!rr ,.-. APPOINTMENT. 



TtTK. KENNEDY begs to intimate that the Boyal George Hotel 
■^'■*- having been recently greatly enlarged and improved, Families, 
Tourists, Commercial Gentlemen, and Visitors, will find the Hotel 
replete with every Comfort. 

The Queen's Room, Commercial Room, Private Parlours, and 
Bed-Rooms, will be found of the most approved modem style, and 
the Ladies' and Gentlemen's Saloon is both elegant and complete. 

The situation is the best in town, and Omnibtises run to suit all trains. 

Charges sfrictly Moderate, and Attendance charged in the Bill. 

K.B.— A Magttifioeni Billiard Saloon, the beat In Scotland in 
oonneotlon \vitli a Hotal, has Just been added. 



713.' PERDB^-TKlPOSf— BOTSKSAY. 

PERTH. 

HENKY'S QUEEN'S HOTEL 

Opposite tbe Oeneral Railway Station, 



THAT IS THE HOUSE TO GO TO. 



• PERTH. 

. POPLE'S ROYAL BRITISH HOTEL 

(Opposite the General Station). 

Patronised 6y their Itoyal Highnesses Vie Prince and Princess of JVales^ 
Prinze and Princess- Christian^ Prince Arthur ^ and other Members of 
;, .the. Itoyal Family, and the leading Nobility of the Kingdom. 

rpHIS Family Hotel has long stood pre'eminent ; and the Proprietor 
-■- would remark that the same care and unremitting attention, which 
are universally acknowledged hy all who have patronised him, it will be 
his constant study to continue. 

EIPON, FOUNTAINS ABBEY. 

UNICOEN HOTEL AND POSTING HOUSE, 

Patronised BY H.R.H. PRINCE of WALES. 

^C\^ of the Oldest Established Hotels in the North of England, and 
v/pthe prinoipal in liipon. To meet requirements it has been lately 
miicli enlarged and improved. 

Orders by Post punctually attended to, 
R!. E. CiOIiEli^SQN, Wine and Spirit Merchant. Proprietor. 

' ftOTHESAY^ c^aAj^o WEST BAY. 

QUEEN^S ^^^Mir HOTEL. 

, . , EsxABtisHED Twenty Years. 

Pirn Minutes' Walk from the. Quay on the Esplanade. 
Tlf M. M. "WHlTTB begs to%nnounce that fhe extensive alterations and additions to 
^^ this Old-Established and First-class Hotel are complete, comprising a magnifi- 
i>ent Bining-Saloon (one of the finest in Scotland), Ladies' Drawing-Room, elegant 
'Siitting-Rooms, Smoking-Room, Bath-Roonis, and over Forty Bed-Rooms— all furnished 
in the .inost.uiodern style. Beautiful Gardeus and Pleasure-G rounds. 
Letters and Telegrams punctually attended to. 
i,-^ ;■..;;• PAETIJSa. BOARDED BY THE WEEK OH MONTH. • 

2»r. U.—Headq^uarters of ^e Royal Northern Taqht Club are in connection with 
• '''•'»■'■'-■ theHotel; • - •-' * 



PITLOCHRIE. 

FIRST-CLASS FAMILY HOTEL 
POSTING ESTABLISHMENT. 



■pARTIES -wisliing to see the mugnificent Scenery in this part ol ths 
-'- Scottish HighUnda will find this Hotel (to which large additions havs 
been made) most convenient, for in One Drive they can visit the 
f alia of Tummsl, the Queen's View of Loch Tumtnel ; 
The Far-Famed Fa^ of ELUieorankie ; 
Glen TUt ; The Falls of Bruar, &o. 
Pitlochtie is on the direct route to Balmoral Csstle, by Spittal of Glen- 
shee and Braemar ; and to Taymouth Castle and Kinloch-Hannoch, by 
Tummel- Bridge. 

Salman and Trout Fishing on the Rivers Tummel and Garry, and on the 
Locha iu the neighbourhood. 

Job and Post Horses and Carriages of every kind, 
By ate Day, Week, or Month. 



PLTMOUTH. 



I The Boyal Hotel, FlymontlL 



3 

s 
J. 






1^ 



I 



S. PEABSE, PROPROrroB. 



DUKE OF CORNWALL HOTEL, 

{Opposite the liaihmy Station). 
POSTAL TELEGRAPH OFFICE, 

PLYMOUTH, DEVON. ■ 



FIRST-CLASS FAMILY HOTEL, 



A HANDSOME GENEEAL OOEFEE EOOM. 

LADIES' DRAWING EOOM. 

SMOKING AND BEADING EOOMS. 

LAEGE BILLIARD EOOM (Tm TMa). 

SUITES OF APAETMENTS. 

HOT AND COLD BATHS. 



TABLE VHOTE DAILY. 



Address to the Uauager. 



76 [Eipon — Rothesay J see p. 72] RUMBLiNa bridge — Salisbury. 

RUMBLING BRIDGE HOTEL 
NEW ROUTE IN SCOTLAND. 

RUMBLING BRIDGE AND FALLS OP DEVON BY DOLLAR. 

1 Hour by rail from Stirling. 
Fifteen minutes by rail from Kinross, Locbleven. 

Fine Scenery and First-class Hotel Accommodation. 

D. M*ARA, JProprietor. 



SALISBUEY. 




WHITE HAET HOTEL, 

A N Old-established and well-known First-class Family 
Hotel, within half-a-xninnte's walk of the Close 
and Cathedral, and a pleasant drive to Stonebenge. 

A large and well-appointed Ladies' Cofifee-Eoom is pro- 
vided. A spacious Coffee-Koom for Gentlemen, and a first- 
class Billiard and Smoking Eoom. Hot and Cold Baths. 

Posting-master to Her Majesty. Carriages and Horses 
of every description. H. T. BOWES, Manager. 

SALISBUEY. 

THSEE SWANS^FiHILT HOTEL. 

A LADIES' COFFEE-ROOM. 

A Commodious Gentlemen's Coffee-Room. 

There is no Commercial Room in this Hotel, neither is it a Limited 

Liability Company. 

HENRY FIGES, Ptapridor. 



SALTBCRN-BT-THE-SHA— SKTB. 77 

SALTBUEN-BY-THE-SEA.— YORKSHIEE. 






THIS Palatial Establishment has been recently enlarged and embel- 
lished, and now contains upwards of 150 Rooms, embracing splendid 
CoJBfee-Rooms, large Drawing and Music Rooms, Bed-Rooms, Rooms en 
tuite^ Smoke and Billiard Rooms, etc. Extensive Livery Stabling and 
Goach-Houses, with Rooms for Livery Servants. Carriages and Horses of 
every description. Tosting in all its branches. Excellent Cuisine. 
Wines and Spirits most carefully selected. Specialities in Old Vintage 
Ports, Clarets, etc. 

** THE ZETLAND faces the Sea, and commands magnificent Ocean and 
Inland Views, and is, for comfort, etc., acknowledged to be par excellence 

THE HOTEL OF THE NORTH." 

All Visitors to this Hotel have free access into the beautiful Pleasure- 
Grounds of the Improvement Company. A Platform connects the Railway 
Station with the Hotel, and Porters are in attendance on the arrival of 
every train. Direct Telegraph communication from the Hotel. 

, Private and Public Dinners^ LuncTieons, etc., on the shortest notice. 

Wedding Breakfasts, Carriages, etc., provided. 

Miss BOULDING, Manageress. 

S K Y E. 

SLIGACHAN HOTEL 

THIS House, which has been greatly added to, is nine and 
■^ a half miles from Portree, fifteen from Broadford, and is 
beautifully situated at the very foot of the Cuchullin Hills. 
Ponies and Guides for Coruisk, the Spar Cave, Heart-o-Corry. 
&C. &c. Good Rahing. Posting. 
J. A. BUTTEES, Lessee. 

poete.ee, skye. 
ROSS'S ROYAL HOTEL. 

THIS well-known Hotel is situated on an elevated plateau 

■*■ near the Steamboat ^Tiarf, and commands an extensive 

view of the beautiful Bay and Cuchullin Hills, and within easy 

access to the famous Quiraing and Coruisk. 

Coaches leave the Hotel daily (Sundays excepted) for Uig (near 
Quiraing) and Sligachan (near Coruisk), returning same evening.^j . 

Posting in aU its Branches. 



78 SLiaO — STAFFORD BTIBI.INQ. 

SLIGO. 

IMPERIAL HOTEL. 

THIS long-established tad well-known Hotel is conducted on the most 
approved system. The Proprietress begs to solicit the Patronage of 
Families and Commercial Gentlemen, and trusts, by strict attention and 
moderate charges, to merit their Patronage. A Coffee-room for Ladies. 
Posting in all its branches. The " Imperial " Omnibus awaits the arrival 
and departure of each Train. 

STAFFORD. 

NORTH-WESTERN HOTEL 

(ADJOINING THE RAILWAY STATION). .* 

I 

A FIRST-CLASS HOTEL for the Nobility and Gentry, which la fitted np with aU 
the Requirements of a Modem Establishment, combined with Strictly Moderate 
Charges, and is under the personal superintendence of 

SARAH WOOD, Frqjmetress. 
HORSES and CARRIAQES in Connection with the Hotel at the Shortest Notice. 

STIELING. 

GOLDEN LION HOTEL. 

STUART, LATB CAMPBELL. 



fTlHIS Oldest Established and First-Class Hotel .is conveniently situated 
■*- near the Bailway Station and Castle. It has been newly renovated 
and improved, and affords comfortable accommodation to Tourists and 
Families visiting the Beautiful and Historical Scenery in the vicinity. 

Conveyances await the arrival of all Trains and Steamers. 

Post Horses and Carriages of every description, • - 

ROBERT STUART, Proprietor, 
iiay 1877. 

See Sliear0r*8 aoideTto Stirling and Lakes, Is. free by Pott 



STIBUNG — TEINBT — TOBQUAT — TBOSSAOHS. 79 

STIELING. 

ROYAL HOTEL. 

THIS Old-established First-Class Hotel is conveniently situated, beinc 
within three minutes* walk of the Railway Station, and is patronised 
by their Royal Highnesses the Prince and Princess of Wales, and other 
members of the Royal Family. 

4^ Please address Letters in fuU to 

A. CAMPBELL, Eoyal Hotel, Stirling. 
TENBY. 

ROYAL GATE HOUSE HOTEL. 

COMMANDINO A DELIGHTFUL VIEW OF THE BA Y, 

(FAMILIES AND GENTLEMEN.) 

JOSEPH GREGORY, Peopeibtob. 
TORQUAY. 

EOYAL HOTEL. 

First-class Family Hotel overlooking the Sea. Very 
comfortable. 

W. G. KING, Proprietor and Manager, 

™' * ' '■■■ ■»i.l-IBll.l.i ■■ l.ll , .,.,. I.. ■-■■■■ . _.__.__..__^ ^ 

TROSSACHS. 

STKONACLACHEE HOTEL, 

HEAD OF LOCH KATRINE. 

DONALD FERGUSON begs to return hia sincere thanks to Tourists and others for 
their liberal support for the last tweuty-flve years (since the above Hotel was 
opened). It is beautifully situated at the Head of ioch Katrine, and the only Hotel 
that commands a view of the Lake. 

It is the best Fishing Station, and Boats with experienced Boatmen are always in 
readiness. ' 

During the season Coaches run to and from Inversnaid, in connection with the 
Steamers on Loch Katrine and Loch Lomond. 

Carnages and other Conveyances Tceptfiyr Eire. ' 

■ SntONACLACmCB, 1877. _ 



TROflSAOHS TTN DRUM TUTDERHIOtB. 



THE TBOSSAGHS HOrTEL, 

LOCH KATRINE. 
A, BLAIR, Peoprietok. 

TYNDR^M, PERTHSHIEK 

ROYAL HOTEL. 

. JAMES ANDERSON, Proprietor, 

OS to intlmsta hiving tsken ■ Lease of this Hote], whi«li aajolna tlia SUUo 



^ „ , witli bosla, alio 

>l8WnB on Eiver Flltan. CoaoSes to and from Dalmslly, InTeraiiy, Oban, FOTt-William, 
Ballsohullsh, and Qlencoa AtWj, SuDdiT excepted. All Oiden b; Post It TelBgTvn 
carefully gttepded to. CAaiyea very Modtratt} 

WINDERMERE 

THE ROTAL HOTEL, BOWNESS, 

IS THE OLDEST AT WINDERMERE LAKE. 
Thli'Batibliahment Is Bituata near tba Lake, and on the Road tbence to the Railway 

Station. A aeparato Ladies' Coltee-Baoni, Btlliards, Posting, Jic, 

OmnibnsM from the Hotel meet all the Trains, and Private Carriages if required. 

DMrtct Coaci Oglte. 

Westmoreland amofaed haina and bacon always on sale at reasonable prices. 

Mra. SqOTT, FrspriUren. 



WlNDBBMinB — YORK. 81 

WINDEEMEEE. 

GLOUOSDALE'S GROWN HOTEL 

{Patronised by Royalty y American Prmdents, and the RothschUds.) 

THE pre-eminence of the Ckown is indicated by the fact that the 
Hotel has been made a Foetal Telegraph Station by Goyemment 
Authority. 

As Head-quarters for Families and Tourists desirous of yisiting the 
other Lakes and Mountain Scenery of this Picturesque District, the Ckown, 
both by reason of its central situation and conyenient access, is acknow- 
ledged to be unequalled. 

It faces the Lake and Steam Yacht Piers. 

The District Coaches run from the Crown for Ambleside, Grasmere, 
Keswick ; also for Ullswater and Coniston during the Season. 

NINETY BEDS. 

Table d' Hole Daily ixt 6,S0 T.U, 

Omnibuses attend the arriyal of Trains at Windermere Station, and 
Steamers at the Pier. 

YOEK. 

HASKEE'S TOSK: HOTEL, 

ST. HELENAS SQUARE. 

THIS long-established and First-Class Family Hotel is in the 
best Situation in the City, being nearest to the Minster, the 
Kuins of St; Mary's Abbey, &c., ani within Three Minutes* walk of 
the Railway Station. 

P. MATTHEWS, Proprietor. 

: 0. ABBOTT (late Scawin), 

RAILWAY AND FAMILY HOTEL, 

{FiHt Clmt) 

YORK. 

ESTABLISHED many years. Befornisfaed and thorottglily Renovated. Adjoinine 
the Station Qates. The Largest Hotel in York. Private Booms. Ladies' and 
Gentlemen's Coffee-Rooms. Every accommodation for Night Travellers. Portexs 
attend the Station Night and Day. A .good Commercial connection attached to this 
HouM. Excellent Stabling. Billiard Saloon. Zf.A— "Ask for Abbott's PorUrs." 



fe2 RAtLWAtS. 

DUdland Hallway. 

■NEW ROUTE BETWEEN ENGLAND ANi> SCOTLAND 

THE Settle and Carlisle RailwaitIs now open for Passenger Traffic, and an entirely 
New Seo'viee of Express and Fast Txliins has been estal^lished between tbe Midland 
System and Scotland. 

A MomingExpress Train runs between London and Edinburgh and Glasgow, in each 
direction, with Pullman Drawing-Room Cars attached, and a Night Express Train rons 
in each direction between the same places, with Pullman Sleeping Cars attached. 
IWrst^lass Passengers may avail themselves of the comfort and convenience of these- 
Inxnrious Cars on pajrment of a small ohargd in addition ti> thd JE&ailway Fare, paiticu< 
lars of which may be ascertained at the Stations. 

f6T theconvenience of Passengers to and from the West of England and Scotland, 
a New Service of Express Passenger Trains has been established to and from Bristol, 
Bath, Gloucester, and Birmingham, in connection with the Through Service between 
London and Edinburgh and Glasgow. 

' The Up And Down Day Express Trains stop hatf-an-hour at Normainton, In all oases, 
to enable Passengers to dine. A spacious and comfortable Dining Boom, is provided at 
that Station fol* their accommodation. 

Through Guards, in charge of the Luggaae of Passengers, travel between London 
and Edinburgh and Glasgow by the Day and Night Express Trains in both directions. 

Passengers by this Route by the Express Trains between London and Edinburgh an^ 
Glasgow are conveyed in Through Carriages of the most improved description, fitted up 
■*rith the WesthighouseContinuons Break and all the most approved modem appliances. 

Ordinary Return Tickets between Stations in England andl Stations in Scotland~are 
available for the Return Journey on any day within One Calendar Month of the date of 
issue. 



i" 



BELFAST, 



BY THE NEW AIJfD SHORT SEA BQUTE via BARROW. 

rpHE capacious ^ewDocka of Barrow, situated within the ancient Harbour of Peel, 
Jt ■ u'ndei* sheltet of Wrtlney Island, being now open for traffic," the Swift and Powerful 
¥iis<b-pla«i8 Paddle ftteamiShips^" Ajttmjsi," "^oe," '^Talbqt," and •* SaBLBUBKE," will 
sail between Barrow and Belfast (weather permitting) in connection with through Trains 
ob' the Midland and Fumess' Railways ; 'and thix>ugh ^Tickets to Belfast, in connection 
with the Boat, will be issued from London, Northampton, Leicester, Nottii^ham, 
Bristol, Binningham, Derby^ Sheffield, ^eeds, Bradford, and principal Stations on the 
Midland BttUway— Betum Ticketa being 'available for One Calendar Month. 

Passengers to and from London, and other Stations south of Leicester, may break 
the journey at Fumess Abbey,. LcedSy Dprby, TrenJ;, or Leifcester : ^d Passengers to 
or from Stations west df'Derby, at Furftesa Abbey, Leed^'or Derojr, taking care that 
from any jof itipsp places thqy proceed by Midland Trtitns^ . . ; p , 

i - * 8 21 Ttatj-RifeTs' rrcKBTs. » • ?-::*.-• 

During the summer months 1st and 3d CXass.Tourist Tickets, available for two Calen- 
dar Months, will be' issued from Londoi\j(6t.( ^aneras) and principal Stations on the 
Midland Railway to Edinburgh, Glasgow, GreenocW, Melrose, Dumfries, Ayr, Stirling, 
Perth, Dundee, Aberdeen, .Inverness, and other places of interest in Scotland.- 

>. Saloon, Family, and Invalid carrit^es can be obtained for the use of parties travel* 
ling to and from Scotland by tiia Midland Route, by giving a few days', notice to ibe 
Station Maatw at any-of the principal Stations, or to the Superintenaent of the Line, 
Derby.. . - / ; ,.•;.. :. 



ftAU^WAYS. $3 




OLISH LAKES. 



During the Summer months Ist and Sd Class Tourist Tickets, available for Two 
Calendar Months, are Issued from Principal Stations on the Midland Railway to Win* 
DKRMXBJC, AMBT.BfiiPB, Gbangb, JE*UAznBS8 Abpey, Pekbiis, Esswick, Tboutbxck, and 

MORECAMBK. 

Bveiy Saturday, from May 19th to October 8th, Cheap Excursion Tickets to More- 
cambe will be issued from Leicester, Nottingham, Derby, Sheffield, Masboro', 
Bamsley, Normanton, Leeds, Bradford, Eeighley, and principal jbitem^edlate pp^ts, 
available to return up to the Tuesday evening after date of issue. 

For Faies and ftirther particulios, see Tourist Programmes and Special Hand-bills. 

MATLOCK AND BUXTON. 

First and Third Class Tourist Tickets are issued during the Summer Months from 
principal Stations on the Midland Railway, and Lines in connection, to Matlock and' 
BtfxtoB— Tickets being available tot Two Calendar Months. 

Passengers holding Tickets to Buxton are allowed to b^eak the joomey at principal, 
places of interest on the Line between Matlock and Buxton. 

RETURN TICKETS at Low Fares will be Issued to Maixock and Buxton, by any 
of the Through Trains, on Saturdays, from May Idth to October 8th, available for 
Betum by any Train uptathe TV&SDAT EVENING after daU o/istw. 

First and Third Class available (in most cases) for Two Months, are issuod dotiogi 
the Summer Months from Principal Stations on the Midland Railway, to 

Scarlwro', Whitby, Filey, Bridlington, Harrogate, Ilkley, and>ther Stations to the 
YorkBhire district. 

Tarmouthi Lowestoft, CleethorpeSj, and other Stations on the East€oast. 

Brighton, Hastings, Portsmouth, The Isle of Wight, Bournemouth, and othet 
Stations in the South of England. ' 

Penamoe, Plymouth, Torquay, Exeter, Weston-super-mare, IlAcacombe, and othet 
Stations in the West of England. 

Newport, Monmouth, Cardiff, Swansea, Tenby, and other Stations in South Wales*. 

Aberystwith, Llandudno, Rhyl, Bangor, and other Stations in North Wales. 

Lytham, Southport, Blackpool, and other Stations on the Lauoashire Coast ; an4 tq 
Bath, Malvern, Leamington, Brecon, etc. ; as well as to Edinburgh, Glasgow, Stirling. 
Perth, Dundee, Dumfjries, Aberdeen, Inverness, and other Principal Stations in Scot- 
landi • .i\^\^ 

• . For ftirther particulars, see Tourist Programmes and Hand-bills. 



FLEASUEE PASTIES. 

JVoTO 1«< MAY to Z\at OCTOBER 1877, 

CHEAP RETURN TICKETS 

Will be issued to parties of not less than SIX First Class, or TEN Third Clasii 

Passengers, desjxous of taking Pleasure Excursions to t>lace8 on or adjacent to this 

Railway. 

^ For particulars apply to the Station-masters on the Line, or to the Superintendent 

of the Line at Derby. 

DsBBYV^1877. JAMES ALLPORT, GvMifiA Manager. 



64 



tUtM'ktB. 



LONOON ft NORTH-WESTERN ANO CALEDONIAN RAILWAYS. 



f « 



WEST COAST BOTAL MAIIi BOUTE 

BETWEEN 

ENGLAND AND SCOTLAND. 

l8t, fid, and 8d CLASS TOURIST TICKETS, AVAILABLE 

FOR TWO MONTHS, 

are (daring the Season conunencing 14th May), issued from the Principal 
Stations in England to the chief places of interest in Scotland, and idso 
from the same places in Scotland to English Stations. 

Passengers by the Through Trains between London (Euston Station) and 
Scotland are conveyed in 

THROUGH CARRIAGES 

of the most improved description, and constructed specially for the accom- 
modation of this Traffic. 

Saloons, Family Carriages, Reserved Compartment^ and all other con- 
veniences necessary to ensure comfort on the journey can be arranged upon 
application to Mr. G. P. Nbelb, Superintendent of the L. and N.-W. Line, 
Euston Station, London ; Mr. H. Ward, General Superintendent, Cale- 
donian Railway, Glasgow; or to any of the Station-masters at the Stations 
on the West Coast Route. 

The Passenger Fares, and Horse, Carriage, and Dog Rates between 
London and Scotland have been revised and reduced. 

TABLE OF EXPRESS TRAINS BETWEEN LONDON AND SCOTLAND. 

DOWN JOURNEY. 



Stations. 


Week Datb. 


BUKOATIL 


" » » 


mora. 


mo n. 


m^m. 


morn. 


niffht 


night 


Dight 


tait. 


London (Boston) . dep. 


6.15 


7.15 


10.0 


10.10 


8.50 


9.0 


8.50 


9.0 


Edinburgh (Princes St; Stn.) art. 


4.40 


5.50 


7.50 


9.45 


6.45 


9.0 


•6.45 


.9.0 


01asgoi/(BtichaiianSt. Sta.) „ 


4.58 


e.o 


810 


10.0 


6.55 


9,16 


6.55 


9.15 


Qreenoc^E . . . „ 


6.40 


7.10 


9.5 


11.8 


n.50 


♦11.20 


7.50 


11.20 


Stirling . . . . „ 


• ■ 


6.48 


• • 


10.27' 


7.53 


*9.55 


7.68 


9.55 


Perth . . . . „ 


• • 


9.30 


• • 


11.86 


9.0 


11.6 


9.0 


11.5 


Aberdeen . . . . „ 


• • 


• • 




3.20 


12.40 


*4.5 


12.40 


4.6 


Isvernesg. . . . „ 


1 


• • 


• • 


8.59 


2.45 


*6.34 


2.46 


6.25 



No oonfMdioH /Jxmh London io Plaoe$ marked thus (*) on Saturday Ni§hH. \ 



BAi;L.WA7fl. 



«e 







UP JOURNEY. 








• 




*^ ^ . • r .- 


. i " . - ...» - r •» /""s 


STATIONS. 

• 


• 


Week Days. 


* 
Sundays. 






irft. 


mom. 


mom. 


mom. 


aft. 


aft. 


mom. 


night. 


Internxss . . . dep. 


7.35 


« ■ 


• • 


10.18 


■ « 


12.40 


10.18 


• • 


Aberdeen 


>» 


• • 

mom. 


• • 


9.15 


K.23 


'.. 


4.10 


12.23 


• • 


Perth . 




8.30 


• • 


1.55 


4.4 


• ■ 


7.30 


4.4 


• • 


Stirling . . , . 




9.30 


• ■ 


3.24 


5.3 


• • 


8.86 


5.3 


• • 


Greenook ... 




9.0 


• • 


3.0 


4.40 


• • 


• • 


• • 


• • 


Glasgow (Bnohanan St. Btn.) 




10.0 


10.10 


4.15 


6.0 


9.10 


• • 


6.0 


9.10 


Edinburgh (PrincesiSt. Stn.) 




10.0 


10.40 


4.25 


6.10 


^.2& 


• • 


6.10 


9.25 


London (Euston) . 


an-. 


8.10 


9.50 


5.30 


4.5 


*8.0 


*9.0 


4.5 


t8.15 


■ 




night. 


night. 


mom. 


mora. 


mom. 


morn. 


mom. 


mom. 


* From Scotland daily, except 


Sands 


ty. 




f From Scotland on Sunday. 



• On and after the 1st June the 10*0 A.M. Fast Express from Euston 
Station, London, will he run to Perth and Dundee. 

THE LIMITED MAIL TRAINS 

travel hy this route, and are in connection with th^ Mail Coaches to the 
Outlying Districts of the Highlands. These Trains have recently heen 
accelerated between London and Edinburgh and Glasgow ; and addit^'al 
accommodation and increased facilities are now afforded to passengers 
■travelling by them. ^ 

DAY SALOONS, 

with Lavatory accommodation attached, are now run between Lpndon and 
Edinburgh and Glasgow, lea-wing Euston Station by 10 '0 A.M. DoWn Ex- 
press, and returning from Edinburgh and Glasgow by 10*0 a.m. Tip 
Express on "Week Days. No extra charge is made for Passengers travelliiig 
in these Saloons, and Compartments are specially reserved for Ladies and 
Family Parties. 

SLEEPING SALOONS 

between London and Perth and Glasgow, and Carriages with Sle^pik^g 
Compartments, are also run between London and Edinburgh by the 
Night-Trains. " The extra charge for berths in the Saloons or Sleeping 
Carriages is 5s. in addition to the ordinary 1st class fare. 

Conductors, iu charge of the Luggage, &c. , travel by the Through Trains. 

Dog Boxes specially provided. 

Game Consignments conveyed by the Limited Mail. 

Family Luggage. — ^With a view of giving greater facility for the con- 
veyance of heavy Luggage by Passenffer Trains, arrangements haVe been 
made in all the large towns for carting to the Station, at low rates, the 
Luggage of Families proceeding to Scotland, and also for forwarding such 
Luggage by Passenger Trains in advance. 

The charge for conveyance by Passenjger Train is at the rate of 6d; pe* 
Truck per Mile, for any weight up to 60 cwts., with a minimum of 7s. 6(i,, 
and exclusive of a reasonable charge for collection and delivery. 

i/ay 1877. JSY ORDER. 



€6 RAILWAYS; 

CALEDONIAN RAILWAY, 




BOYAL UAIL BOXJTEj 

BETWKKN 

ENGLAND AND SCOTLAND. 

DIRECT .TRAINS run to and from London (Euston), Bibhingham, 
LiVKKPooL, Manchester, Leeds, Bradford, &c., and GiiAsaow, EIdik- 
BiJROH, Greenock, Paisley, Dumfries, Peebles, Stirlikg, Pbkth, 
Dundee, Aberdsbn, Inyerness, and the North. 

CfT* Sleeping and Day Saloons are run bettpeen England and Seotland, .At 

Tourists may break their journey at various Stations on the Route. 

To Oreenock, Paisley, Wemyss Bay, the Firth- of Olyde and 

the West Highlands of Scotland. 

The Company's Trains run Daily from Edinburgh, Glasgow, Carlisle, 
&c., to Greenock, Wemyss Bay, &c., in connection with the Steamers 
**Iona," ** Lord of the Isles," and other steamers, to Dunoon, Innellan, 
Rothesay, Kyles of Bute, Tarbert, Inveraray, Oban, lona, Staffa, Ballachn- 
lish, Glencoe, Fort-William, Caledonian Canal, Falls o# Foyers, Inverness, 
Isle of Skye, and Loch-^ong, Loch-Goil, .Kilmun, Blairmore, Airran, &c. 

To Stirling, Callander, Dalmally, Perth, Dundee, Aberdeen, 
Inverness, ftc, and the North Highlands. 

Trains run from Carlisle, Edinburgh, Glasgow, &c., to the North, in con- 
nection with Coaches from Callander for TroSsachs, Loch-Katrine, and 
Loch-Lomond ; from Crieff and Locheamhead for Circular Tour via St. 
Fillans and Loch-Earn ; from Killin and Aberfeldy for Circular Tour via 
Loch-Tay and Taymouth Castle ; also for Tours via Dunkeld, Pitlochry, Pass 
of Killiecrankie, Blair- Athole, Inverness, Aberdeen, Isle of Skye, &c. ; from 
Tyndrum for Glenorohy, Blackmount Deer Forest, Glencoe, and Fort- 
William ; and from Dalmally for Loch-Awe, Inveraray, Taynuilt, Oban, 
lona, Stafla, &c. 

Billot TraSns between Edinburgh and Olasgow. 
A full service of Trains is run by the Direct Route between Edinbu^h 
and Glasgow at the most convenient hours of the day. 

For particulars, see the Company's Time Tables and Programme of Tours. 

CAUEDOmiK RAtLWAY COMPANY'S OFFICES, JAMES SMITHELLS, 

Glasgow, ISTT. General Manager, 



.BAILWATS. 87 

GREAT WESTERN RAILWAY. 



► -» 



TOURIST ARRANGEMENTS 1877. 

1st, 2d, and 3d Class Tourist Tickets, available for two calendar Months, 
and renewable (with exceptions) on payment of a certain percentage up to 
December 31st, will be issued fix>m May 14th to Ootober Slst inclusive, at 
the principal stations on this Railway, to the Watering and other places of at- 
traction in the West and South of England, North and South Wales ; also to 
Malvern, the Channel Islands, Isle of Man, Scotland, and Ireland* . Passengers 
holding Istor 2ddass Tourist Tickets to the principal stations in the West of 
England can trav^ by the 11.45 a.ni. jQzpress tftdn from Paddington, which 
reaches Exeter mfcmr hours and a quarter , and Plymouth in six hours g/nd a 
quarter. 

For particulars of the viaiious Circular Tours, Fares, Andother infonnatioii» 
see the Company's Tourist Programmes, which can be obtained at the Stations 
and Booking-offices. 

PICNIC AND PLEASURE PARTIES. 

During the Summer months (May 1st to October 31st inclusive), 1st, 2d, 
and 3d Class Return Tickets, available for one day only, will be issued (with 
certain exceptions and limitations) at .reduced fares, at all. the principal 
Stations, to parties of not less than six 1st class or ten 2d or 3d class passengers. 

To obtain these Tickets application must be made to one of the peraons 
named below not less than three days before, giving full particulars of ^he pro- 
posed excuraion. 

Cheap Return Tickets will be issued by certain trains daily from "May 
Ist to October Slst inclusive, from Paddington, Moorgate Street, and all Stations 
on the Metjropolitan Railway, to Edgware Road inclusive, Mansion House and 
all 'Stations on the District Railway to Gloucester Road inclusive, Kensington 
(Addison Road), and other London Stations, to the undermentioned stations ai; 
the ftires shown : — 

CooapAM, ..V ,p^.^^ 



Windsor, 2s. 6d. V ipj^jj^ 



BoueneEnd, , ^j 

Great Marlow, C q. r^ 
Henlby-on-Thames, ' »- • "tt« 



EXCURSION TRAINS 

at low fares will run at intervals during the season, to and from London, 
Liverpool, Manchester, Birmingham, Bristol, Worcester, Weymouth, the West 
of England, North and South Wales, the South of Ireland, and all parts of the 
Great Westeni a^stenu. C 

Jull information, as to Trains, Fares, Routes, etc, will be duly announced, 
and may be obtained on application to the Company's Superintendents : — 
Mr. H. Hi^hes and Mr. A, Higgins, Paddington ; Mr. H. Stevens, Reading ; 
Mr. T..Grahain orHr. T. W. Walton, Bristol j Mr. B. C. Conipton, Plymouth ; 
Mr. O. C. Grover, Hereford ; Mr. J. Kelley, Chester ; Mr. .N. J. Burlinson^ 
Birmingham. ; Mr. H. Y. Adye, Worcester ; Mr. T.- L Allen, Newport (Mon.) ; 
Mr* R Besant, Swansea ; and Mr. P. Donaldson, Pontypobl Road (Mon.) 

. . J. GRIERSOK, 

Pacidingisisn, Terminus, Qeneral Managtr, 



88 • RAILWATS. 



KOKTH BKITISH EAILWAT. 



THE WAYEBLEY BOUTE between EHaLAlTD and SCOTUUn). 

The Waverley is tiie most interesting and attractive, and is the only Route wfaicU 
enables the Toniist to visit Melrose (for Melrose Abbey and Abbotslord) and 

St Boswells (for Dryburgh Abbey). 

PULLMAN DRAWING-ROOM AND SLEEPING CARS 

Are run daily by E3q)ress Trains between 

EDINBURGH and LONDON 

(Waverley Station) . {St. Pancras Station) 

C^* For details of Direct Express Train Service by the New Midland 
Route and the Waverley Route, see the North British and Midland Com- 
panies' Time-tables. 

BT THE EAST COAST fiOUTE 

BETWEEN 

GLASGOW, EDINBURGH, AND LONDON, 

(Queen's Street Station) (Waverley Station) (Kino's Cross Station) 

SLEEPIN& OARBIAOES RUN DAILY. 

CV* For details of Direct Express Train Service by the East Coast 
Route, see the North British and East Coast Companies' Time-tables. 

EDINBURGH, OREENOGK, and IRELAND. 

THROUGH TRAINS run every Week-day between EDINBURGH (Waveblkv and 
Haymarket Stations) and GREENOCK (Albert Harbour), carrying Passengers to 
and from Prince's Pier, Greenock, without change of Carriage, and thus placing them 
alongside the Clyde Steamers without walking through the streets. "^ 

TH£ BELFAST BOYAli MAIIi STBAMEBS bind and embark 
passengers at Prince's Pier daily, in connection with Train to and, from Edinburgh 
(Waverley and Hc^market Stations). ^ 

THE SHORTEST ROUTE to STIRLINa, AUOA> be. 

The North British Company's own Carriages run ftom Glasgow (Queen Street) to 

Stirling, Alloa, &c., and vice versa. 

THE HELEHSBURGH ROUTE to and from the WEST COAST. 

Return Tickets, available for going or returning on any day, are issued from Glas- 
gow (Queen Street) and Edinburgh (Waverley and Haymarket Stations), to KU- 
oreggan. Kirn, Dunoon, G-arelochhead^ Arroohar, and other Wateriug- 
Places on the Coast, at Cheap fkres, which include the Pier Dues at Helensburgh. 
N.B.-^hQ above Service from and to Helensburgh Pier is given by the favourite 
Steamers "Dandle Dinmont," " Garelooh,*' and ** Chanoellor/' 



/ 



RAIIiWATfi. 89 

NOETH BRITISH RAIIWAT, 



JHYEBVESS, CAIiEDOVIAH GAKAL, ISLE OF SETE, WEST 
HIOHLANDS, and FISTH OF CLYDE. 

In connection with the celebrated Steamship " lONA " (in Summer and Auiv/mn), 

MoMTHLT Tickets for Circular Tonrs embracing the above-mentioned pUoes are iigued 
at GiiAsaow (Queen Street), Edinbuboh (Wayerley and Haymarket Stations), 
^ and the other principal Stations on North British Bailway. 

To the TB0SSACH8, LOCH EATBIHE, and LOCH LOMOiBn). 

Bx7SV>Day Tickets are issued at Glasgow (Queen Street), Edinburgh (Wayerley 
and Hayroarket Stations), Perth, Dundee, Stirling, Falkirk, ^nd other Stations on 
the North British Railway, for a Circular Tour via Callander, Troscwiehs, Loch Katrine, 
Looh Lomond, and back vid Dumbarton or Forth and Clyde Railway. 




For particulars of Tonrs, Fares, and general arrangements, see the Company's Time- 
Tables and Tourist Programme, which may be obtamed from any of the Station Agents 
of the Company, or firom Mr. Jamkb M'Laren, General Superintendent, Head Office, 
Edinburgh. 

J. Walkeb, GenercUManager. 
EDiNBUHan, 1877. 



LONDON & SOUTH-WESTERN RAILWAY, 

WATERLOO STATION, LONDON. 

The Shortest and Quickest Eoute to the South-West and West 
of England, EXETER, BARNSTAPLE, BIDEFORD (« West- 
ward Ho !'0 ILFRACOMBE, NORTH and SOUTH DEVON, 
TAVISTOCK, LAUNCESTON, PLYMOUTH, WEYMOUTH, 
BOURNEMOUTH, SOUTHAMPTON, PORTSMOUTH, 
STOKES BAY, and ISLE OP WIGHT. 

Fast Expresses and Frequent Trains, 

Through Tickets in connection with the London and North- 
western, Great Northern, and Midland Railways. 

Regular Mail Steam-Ships, vid, Southampton, to and from the 
CHANNEL ISLANDS, JERSEY and GUERNSEY. Also 
Fast Steam-Ships for Havre, Rouen, and Paris, St. Malo, 
Cherbourg, Granville, and Honfleur. 



BAILWATS. 

MIOUND GliEAT WESTERN BAt LWAY 01 IRELAND. 
CHEAP CIBCTTLAB, TOITRS. 

TOURIST RETURN TICKETS 

Are issued f^m BroailBtone Station, DubUn, during the Season, available for One 
Month, enabling the holders to visit the magnificent and picturesque Mountain and 
Lake District of 

CON N EM A R A, 

The bold Cliflfe and curious Caves of the 

COASTS OF ACHiLL AND CLARE, 

* * . ■ 

The celebrated Chalybeate Spaa of 

LISDOONVABNA, 

And the Romantic Scenery of the 

LAKES OF KILLARNEY. 



Oh the Route are many remarkable Antiquties and places of HiSTOaic 
Interest ; and the most frequented resorts of the 

ANGLER hm SPORTSMAfI 

IN THE 

WEST OP IRELAND, 

INCLUDING THE 

tfojjEtrlTe, Glendalonghi Ballynahinch, and Oalway fisheries.; and tiie 
Erris> Ballycroy, AchiU, Leenajie» and Kecess Shooting Cfronnds; ia 
the vicinity of which are 

GOOD HOTELS, 

Some of which have been recently opened, whilfit others have been considerably enlaiiged 

RETURN THROUGH TICKETS to Connemara, available for Two Months, are 
issued in all the principal Towns in England and Scotland, by the Expreas and Hail 
Trains of the London and North-Westem Railway, via Holyhead, and of th6 Midland 
and other Railways running in connection with the Steam Packets which ply between 
the ports of Liverpool, Bristol, Barrow, SlUoth, and Ol^^gow ;. and Dnblin or Belfast 
—(See Tourist Programanes of the respective Railway arid Steam, Pa<Jcet Companies for 
Faresjand Gonditions). 

W ASK FOR A CONMEMARA TOURIST TICKET. . ' 

Tourists holding Through Tickets for Killamey and other parts of Ireland, may 
obtain, on arrival in Dublin, Supplemental Coupons, at Reduced Fares, for the Conne- 
mara Tour, on amplication at Broadstone Station. 

An Illustrated Prospectus of all the Circular Tours in connection wiih the Midland 
Great Western system, containing Skeleton Routes for Tours of a we^ ot fortnight, 
a "Descbiptivb Guide" to the places named, and " Akglkr's Compank>n," witli 
coloured maps of the Fishing districts, may be obtained, with every further information 
required, on application at the MiNAQXR'a Office, BkoADStoNX Teji^xkus, Ddblik, 
price ed, - 

BROAD8TOKB, DuBLiN, Moy 1877. J, E. WARD, Manager, 



91 



Ste MontMy Tim«-Tailea and Oompcmy'a HandhilU, 

SCOTLAND AND IRELAND. 

BOYAL MAIL LINE.— DAILY SERVICE. 

GLASGOW AND BELFAST, 

DUBIiIN, IiONDONDBRBY, &c. 

POYAL MAIL STEAM SHIPS RACOON, CAMEL, LLAMA, BUFFALO, and 
^ PBITQUIN, sail as under :— " * 



From SCOTLAITD to EBBLAND. 



From Glasgow, Broomielaw . 
From Glasgow, St. Enoch's Station 
From Paisley .... 
From Greenock, Prince's Pier 
Arrive at BBUTAfiT 
From Belfast for Dublin 
Prom Belfast for Londonderry 
Ytom Belfast fdr Portrttsh . 



by Steamer 
by Train 
by Train 

by Steamer 
. about 
by Train 
by Train 
by Train 



Daily 
(Sunday sexcepted). 



, * 6 P.M. 
8 P.M. 

7.14 P.M. 
8.45 P.M. 

6 A.M. 

t 7 a.m. 

t 6.10 A.M. 
t 0.10 A.M. 



♦ On Saturdays the Steamer Sails from Glasgow at 8 p.m. 

Passengers from Fdinburoh are conveyed to Greenock without change of carriage^ 
by North British Train, leaving Edinburgh at 3.30 p.m., for First Service, and 6.40 p.m. 
for Second Sei^vice; and Passengers from Aberdeen, Dundee, Perth, Stirling, &c., 
will find in the Time Tables of the Railway Companies Trains at suitable hours. 

t Passengers can proceed from Belfast by later Trains during the day, if they choose. 



From IRELAND to SCOTLAND. 


Daily 
(Sundays excepted). 


From Dublin by Train 

From Londonderry by Train 

From Portrush by Train 

From BEIiFAST by Steamer 

Arrive at Greenock, Prince's Pier . . about 
From Greenock, Prince's Pier . . by Train 

Arrive at Paisley by Train 

Arrive at Glasgow by Train 

Arrive at Glasgow, about . ; . by Steamer 


2.0 P.M. 

2.46 P.M. 

" 3.35 P.M. 

8 p.m. 

4.80 A.M. 

4.45 A.M. 

5.15 A.M. 

6.30 A. M, 

7 a.m. 



- Passengers for Edinburgh are conveyed direct from Greenock without change of 
carriage by North British Rail (Sundays excepted). No Train from Greenock to 
Glasgow on Sundays. 

F A B E S. 
Between Glasgow, Paisley, or Greenock and BELFAST~lst Class and Cabin, 
Single Journey, 12r. tfd. ; Return; 208. 8d Class and Steerage, Single Journey, 4s. 
Between Glasgow, Paisley, or Greenock, and Dublin — 1st Class and Cabin, Single 
Journey, 25s.; Return,, 40s. 3d Class and Steerage, Single Journey, lis. Between 
Glasgow, Paisley, or Greenock, and Londonderry or Portrush (Giant's Causeway 
Station)— Ist Class and Cabin, Single Journey, 22s. 6d. ; Return, 85s. 3d Class and 
Steen^e, Single Journey, 9s. lid. 

* Return Tickets are available for One Calendar Month. 

These Fares are exclusive of conveyance of Passengers or Luggage between the 
Terminus and Steamers. Passengers are requested to take chai'ge of their own Luggage." 

Passengers must procure Tickets before going on board the Steamers. 

Berths by all the vessels secured at the Offices of A. G. S. M'Cullooh, 26 Donegal 
Quay, Belfast ; and 

G. & J. BXJIINS, 267 Argyle Street^ Glasgow. 



92 ST1AMK18. 

FLEETWOOD TO BELFAST 

AND THE ' 

NOETH OP ,,^^ lEELAND. 

EYEBT EVENING v^HbBm (SUNDAYS EXCEFTED)l 

In oonnection with the Iiancashire and Torkshire* and 
Iiondon and North- Western Bailways^ 

HE NORTH LANCASHIRE STEAM NAVIGATION COMPANY'S 

Royal Mail Steam SMps, 



T 



Thomas Ditgdale, 
Princess of Wales, 



Duke of Connatjght (New Steamer), 
Earl of Ulster (Building), 

LEAVE FLEETWOqD FOR BELFAST, 

Every Evening (Sundays excepted), at or after 7-40 p.m., after arrival 
of trains from London, Birmingham, Hull, Newcastle, Bradford, Leeds, 
Liverpool, Manchester, Preston, and all parts of the Kingdom ; returning 

FROM BELFAST TO FLEETWOOD . 

Every Evening (Sundays excepted), at 7-45 p.m., arriving in Fleetwood 
in time for early morning trains to the aljove places. 

FARES. — Saloon, 12s. 6d. ; Steerage, 5s. ; Rbtxtrn Tickets (avail- 
able for one mo^th), Saloon, 21s. ; Steerage, 8s. 6d. Through Tickets 
(single and return) are also issued from all the principal Stations of the 
London and North -Western, Lancashire and Yorkshire, North-Eastern, 
Great Western, Great Northern and Manchester, Sheffield and Lincoln- 
shire Railway Companies, to Belfast, and vice versa. Return Tickets are 
available for one month. 

SPECIAL TOURISTS'. TICKETS 

Are issued during the Summer Season, via the Fleetwood Route, whereby 
Tourists may visit all places of interest in the North of Weland and Dublin. 
For particulars, see the Lancashire and Yorkshire and London and North- 
western Companies' Books of Tourists' Arrangements. 

At Fleetwood the railway trains run alongside the steamers, and 
passengers* luggage is carried from the train at the quay on board freic 
OF charge. 

Fleetwood is unrivalled as a steam packet station for the North of 
Ireland, and the unexampled regularity with which the Belfast Line of 
Steamers have made the passage between the two ports for more than 
thirty yeaj's, is probably without a parallel in steamboat service, and has 
made this Route the most popular, as it is certainly the most Expeditious 
and Desirable, for Passengers, Goods, and Merchandise, between the great 
centres of commerce in England, and the North and North- West of Ireland. 

For further information, see Bradshaw's Guide, page 304, or apply-at 
any of the stations of the Railway Companies before named ; T. C. Haines, 
20 Donegall Quay, Belfast ; or to THOS. H. CARR, FLEETWOOD. 



TO TouaxsTa 
STEAM TO CAITHNESS 

AND THE 

ISLANDS OF ORKNEY and SHETLAND 

From aranton Harbom (EIUNBUEQH), and ABERDEEN, by the 
Steamshipe " St. Magnus," " St Nicholas," " St. Clair," and " Qneen," 
dniing summer. To Wick every Monday and Friday, to Thurso 
evety Monday, to Kirkwall and Lerwick esery Tuesday and Friday. 
Faxes very low, and PasBenger accommodatioK first olasa. Apply 
to James M. Datt, Aberdeen Steam Wharf, 257 Wapping, London ; 
John^Mather & Son, 147 Queen Street, Qtasgow ; Georqb Mathik- 
SON, Agent, 16 Waterloo Place, Edinbu^h. ; or to Johh Milni, 
Man^r, Aberdeen. 

N.B. — The very fast and commodious new Steamahip " Eabl or 
ZBTI.AND," built and specially adapted for the Trade, is now on the 
pasB^e, and will ply regularly tnice a-week between Lerwick and 
the North Isles of Shetland. 

The "Earl of Zetlaud" has First-Class Passenger Accommodation 
and will give unequalled facilities for Tourists visiting the different 
Islands with every comfort. 

CHARLES MERRYLEES, .^ent, Lerwick. 

NEW ROUTE. ^ 

GLASGOW AJfD THE HIGHLANDS. 

THE Steamer '' Dunnra Cattle " sails fcom Glasgow for Colonsa^, Ions, 
BoueMan (Mnll), Tyrae, and Coll, Struan, Catboat, Dnnvegan, St^ and 
Uig (Bkye), Taibeii and fiodel (Harris), Locbmadd;, EaUin, Carnan and Loch- 
boisdole (Hist), and Bana. 

.*, The Touriat who deairea (within the limits of a week, and at a reason- 
fble expense) a panoramic view of the general scenery of the Hebrides, with 
all its varied heaaty, gnblinuty, and grandeur, has no better opportunitj 
afforded him than by the above ninte. 

I'urtker imfortnation amd Time^lh may he had by applying to 

lUJtTIN OIIME, 20 Robertson Street, OUsgow. 



"ALLAN" LINE OF MAIL STEAMERS 

E-anning in Connectimi mth the 

Qramd Trnu^i BftlUmorB and Ohio, and othsi &adlwa7«, 

ud lorwardiug Fassengen on euv terms to sU Btationa in CuiaOa and the Westtin 

ud BoDtheni Slates, 
Siil ttom LivEBFooL to Qdibic Gt«i7 tUitiiBdaf, calling at Londoodeir]' to cmluik 
Uaila and Paaaengera. 

From LivEHPooi. to BiLTiMOne Km Hallfta every aUcrnite Tupaday, Qtbia Parea 
to Qnebec, Hallfai, or BalUmore, £12, £1», oi £1% according to position of Btata 

FVom Qlasoow to IJCBEEO every Tneadsy. Cabin Fa», £12 :12a.' 

OCEAN RBTUKW TICKETS iaaued at £22; £25, or £30, available for Twelve 
Months, from any of the American or Canadian Ports from whieh the Company'B 
Steaoteia eait, 

«»■ PasMngeri taking "BeiUBN TiCHETe " hy thla line of Steanisrs can go out by 
way of Quebec, and i etum lij way of Baltimore, or ties ueian. 

For ftirther partimlai* apply in Montreal to Hngh and Andrew Allan ; in Ijnebec 
to Allans, Bas, and Cooipany ; in LaltinoiB to A, Schumaeher and Company ; In 
Hallfai to &. Cimaid and Company: la London lo Uontgomeiie and Oreenhome, IT 
OTacedintcb BCreet; inQlugow to Jameaand Alexander Allan. TO droat Clyde Street; 



ABERDEEN 
LONDON 



THE ABERDEEN STEAM NAVIGATION 
COMPANY'S STEAMSHIPS 

uv-Bia&. ciTT OF lassoa. n ctft w aseedeeh.s 

w9t-bBdeepat^ed(wBatfaer, etc, perDritUng)fro!B ABERDEEN, andfromA 
ateaa yilimf, Wapianc, IX>NUON, every Wedneaday and IMtiuday. 
' FAnEB^includJng filewards' Tees—FrirxUe Cabma accommodating [our pas 
E6. rriimlt CaJtim, It ocoupiefl by fewer than four paasengera, £5, 

Single T(c)tfU— Fint Cabin, 30i. ; Becoml -Cabin, 15b. ; Children under (onrtaen 
yeata, 16a. and 10s, Ilttam r{i:l:eU— available for three months— 45a. and £te. ; 

Fasaengeia will please obaerve that from the bednnlug of June unljl the and of 
September one of the London Steamboat Companira eteamera ' 
Temple Pier, Thame " 



conv'eying^paaaengera and their luggage alongaide the AbCrdeea fitearaerB (kspe of 
chuge. Porters in tbs Company's aervico will Maltt wltli the luggage. 

-^ • i™applytoJiiiEflM.Divir,Agsnt,257Wapping; aodlOSftiieeu 

London ; or to Obakles Sbei>hisd, Hauager, Waterloo Quay. 



particnlarfl 



STBAMBBS — JUSGELLANBODS. 



LEITH AND LONDON 

IH£ LONDON ft EDINBUBGH SmPFINO COMPANY'S 

SFLENDIS FABT-aA.ItiIKG SCBBff-aTBAUeBIFS 

MARMIOH, lONA, MALVINA, OR MORNA, 

Sail from Vhttokia Dock, L^Th, every JFidmiiay and BUrarday after- 
nooD ; and from Hbbmitaqz SiriM: Whaef, LohdON, eyeiy W*d7iei- 
day and Saturday morning. 

For Rates of Freight and Fares, apply to Thomas Aitkett, 
8 Bock Place, Leith.' 

GLASS SHADES. 



ORNAMENTAL TILE WINDOW BOXES. 
ax.Ass ixowxa vasxs, 



TABL E GLASS O F ALL KIMDS. 

FHOTOQUAFEIC GLASS MATEBIALS AKl) 
APPARATUS. 



trum m paiiited slass, for memorial, ecclesiastio, 

DOMESTIC, «|IIIDO«S. 

OEOBSG EOtTGIHTON AND SON, , 
8B Higli flolboni, Lottdon. . . 



96 



INBURANGS MISOBLXiANEOnS. 



INSUEANCE AGAINST ACCIDENTS. 



ACCIDENT INSURANCE ASSOCIiATION OF SCOTLAND 

(LIMITED). 
HEAD OFFICE— 28 QUEEN STREET, EDINBURGH. 

ACCIDENTS OF ALL KINDS. 

£Z a year insures J^IOOO at Death and £6 a week during 
Disablement. 30s. a year insures £1000 at Death. 

RAILWAY ACCIDENTS. 

15s. a year insures XlOOO at Death, and £6 a week during 

Disablement 

OSO. TOPD CBnCNS, BCaiuig^r. 



TOURISTS' MAPS. 

(SELECTED FROM JOHNSTON'S "ROYAL ATLAS.") 
MffiMted on Canvas, and bound in a Poeket-Case^ 



America HJ.S.) 

America (South) . 

Australia 

.Austria ' . • . 

iBelgium and the Netherlands 

Canada . . . ' 

China and Japan .. 

England . . : . 

India .... 

Ireland . ... 

Italy 

Mdditeiraneau Shore» . 

Palestine 

Prussia- . .• •. • 

Steotljuui .... 

Spain and Poi'tngal 

Sweden and Norway 

Switzerland 



2 Sheets, with Index of 5675 Names 



2 
1 
2 

1 

2 

1 
2 
2 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 



It 

>» 
»> 
$> 



it 
f» 
»» 
*) 
>t 
»» 
»» 
>> 
»> 



I* 
>» 
»> 
f* 
»» 
»» 
ft 
»> 



>» 
it 



5400 
1980 
6300 
5300 
3070 
2420 
11,700 
7500 
5JJ70 
6170 
2170 
8100 
2550 
9000 
4100 
1630 
4907 



it 
>» 
»» 
»» 

>» 

it 
i» 
a 
i* 
it 
tt 
it 
it 
it 
»> 



ConipleU CataJfigua of Maps, cte., ofi xtpplication. 

W. & A. K. JOHNSTON, 

ST. ANDREW SQUARE, EDINBURGH ; and 
18 PATERNOSTER ROW, LONDON, E.C. 



.*. 
8 
8 
4 
8 
4 
8 
4 
8 
8 
4 
8 
4 
4 
4 

7 

4 

4 
4 



d 



6 

6 

6 




6 
6 
6 

6 
6 
6 



MISOSLLANEOUS. 97 

TO TOURISTS IN IRELAND. 

BABTIiETT'S (W, H.) THE SCENEBY AND ANTIQUITIES 
OF IRELAND. — Illustrated in 119 engravings on steel, from original 
drawings, made expressly for the Work, with historical and descriptive 
text by J. Sterling Coyne, N. P. Willis, and others. Published at 42s., 
selling for 21s., Post free 23s. 

'WICKIiO^y AND KHiLABNEY. Views in Water Colour from 
Original Drawings by T. L. Rowbotham, with descriptive notes ty Rev. 
W. J. Loftie. B.A., F.S.A., bound in ornamental cloth, gilt edge*. Pub- 
lished at 7b. 6d. ; selling for 5s. ; Post free. 5s. 6d. 

MOOKE'S IBISH MELODIES, with symphonies and accompaniments, 
by Sir John Stevenson, edited by J. B. Glover, bound in ornamental cloth, 
gilt edges. Published at 12s. 6d. ; selling for 6s. ; Post free, 7s. 6d. 

HAIiIi'S (MJ78. S. C.) SKETCHES OF IBISH CHABACTEB, 
with numerous illustrations on steel and wood, by Daniel Maclise, Su^ 
John Gilbert, W. Harvey, and G. Cruikshank. 8vo, cloth extra, gilt. 
Published at 78. 6d. ; selling for 6s. 3d. ; Post free, 7«. 

"The Irish sketches of this lady resemble Miss Mitford's beautiful 
English skelkihes in *Our Village,' but they are far more vigorous and 
picturesque and bright.'* — Blackwood* s Mccgazine. 

HAVEBTY (M.) HISTOBY OP IBELAND, Ancient and Modem, 
derived from the native annals, from the most recent researches of 
eminent Irish Scholars and Antiquaries, and from State papers. Published 
at 12s. 6d. ; selling for 6s. 6d. ; Post free, 7s. 6d. 

GEMS OF HUSH SCENEBY, being photographs 3| x 44 in., by Payne 
Jennings, of Wicklow, Killamey, RuiDed Abbeys, Castles, Round Towers, 
Rivers, Glens, and Valleys. Scraps, 6d., or mounted on Card, 9d. each ; 
7s. 6d. per dozen ; Post free, 8s. 
Stereosoopio Views of Dublin, 'Wioklow, Killamey, Cork, &c., 
Os. per dozen ; Post free, 6s. 6d. 

COLOURED VIEWS OF IRISH SCENERY. 

DITBIjIN — contains views of St. Patrick's Cathedral, Christ Church, Chapel 

Royal, Bank, Trinity College, Post Office, Phoenix Park, &c. &c. Is. ; 

Post free, Js. Id. 
KIIjIjABNEY — 12 views, of the Lakes, &c.. Is. ; post free. Is. Id. 
COBK — contains 10 views of the city, Queenstown and River Lee, Blarney 

Castle, &c.. Is. ; post free. Is. Id. 
O-IANT'S CATTSE'WAY and the neighbourhood, contain 11 views of the 

Causeway, Dunluce Castle, Carrick-arRede, Portnish, Antrim Castle, &c.. 

Is. ; post free. Is. Id. 
OABVED PAPEB KNIVES, with Micro- Photographic views of Dublin, 

Is each 

CARSON BROTHERS, 

TOURIST MAP AND GUIDE-BOOK DEPOT, -^ 

7 GRAFTON STREET, DUBLIN. 

Agenis for Bradshaw^s British mid Continmtai Guide. 
AH Orders must l^e accompftisiod t^ a Cash RemiUaaoe. 



MIB0BU.AHB0U8. 



TO TOURISTS IN GLASGOW. 



Toniuti and .Strangers ii) Glasgow will find a large variety ol 
Stereoscopic and Albom 

VIEWS OF SCOTTISH SCENERY, 

GUIDE-BOOKS AND MAPS, 

JAMES REID»S, 

BOOKSELLER AND STATIONER, 
144 ABOYI.E STBEETT, aZiASOOW. 

AGEST FOR BRADSHAWS RAILWAY GVIDBS. 
(e* Fonrtb Shop West of Buchanan Street. 



BROWN'S 
8PEI!TMilE, tlELD GLASS, BAROMETER, PHOKMIRAPH, 
. AND BEHERAL OPTICAL OEPOT, 

76 ST, VINCENT STBBET, 
GLASGOW. 



ItlSOIUiAITEOnS. 



9.9 



PHOTOGRAPHS OF SCOTTISH SCENERY 



/ BY 



J. VALENTINE, 



Photographeb by 
Special Appointment 




To Her Majesty 
The Queen. 



DUNDEE, 



JSmbracing a very large aeries of the principal places of interest in the 
Lowlands and Highlands, in Imperial (8 x 10), Cabinet, Garb, and 
Stsrbosgopio Sizes. 

In reference to a series of these Views the late Earl of Dalhousie pre- 
sented to the Queen, he. wrote as follows : — 

** Sir — I think it due to you, as an artist, to inform you that I had the 
honouir of presenting the set of your Photographs to the Queen, and that Her 
Majesty was pleased to express her approval of them as works of art. 

"Yours truly, 

" Dalhousde. 
** To Mr. James Valentine, Dundee." 



Selections geographically arranged, made up in Morocco and 
Clan Tartan Wood Bindings, suitaljle for Presentation, from £1 : Is. to 
£10 : lOs. each. 

Also, Illustrations of the various Tourists' districts, in Cabinet and 
Card Size. Panoramic Books in Neat Blue Cloth Bindings. 

GcUalogites on appliccUion. 

These Views may be had of all respectable Booksellers and Printsellers ; 
also of Agents in the districts which the Views illustrate. 



r*i 




JOSEPH GILLOTT'S 

STEEL PENS. 

Sold by aU dea^s Throughout tht World, 



1^00 MISOELLANKOUft. 

WHEN YOU ARE IN INVEBNESS YOU SHOULD SEE 

THE 



GREAT JEWELLERY ^^ ESTABLISHMENT 




p. G- WILSON, 

44 High Street. 

VISITORS are freely admitted to inspect the Shop and Manufactory, although they 
may not wish to purchase anything. The interior is about one hundred and 
twenty feet long, the m>nt part of which is fitted up in the style of an Exhibition 
Room or Museum, thereby allowing the Visitor to walk round and see conveniently 
everything contained in the Shelves and Cases. The "Press "has described "the whole 
as forming one of the finest places of business in the Jewellery and Watchmaking Trade 
in the kingdom.** 

JEWELLERY, 

PLATE, 

WATCHES, 

CLOCKS, 

BRONZES, 

OPTICAL GOODS, &c. ftc. 

Of that superior quality which has won the fame of P. G. WILSON, the COURT GOLD- 
SMITH and JEWELLER at INVERNESS, and extended his Business Connection all 
over the world ; and he would call attention to the fact, that while his productions and 
Articles for Sale are of the best quality, his unices are not higher than those of minor 
establishments, his object being to secure a laige amount of patronage, and at the same 
time'the approval of his Customers. 

*^* Orders by Post receive most earefiU attention. 



SM8TH. SONS 



3 V^IW^ 

AND 



LAUGHIANO 



GENEEAL WAEEHOUSEMEN, 
HOUSEHOLD FURNISHERS, 

AND 

COMPLETE OUTFITTERS, 

80 UNION STEEET, 

GLASGOW. 



UI8CELLA.NE0US. 101 

PHOTOGRAPHS OF SCOHISH SCENERY. 



6. W. WILSON I CO., ABERDEEN, 

FhotograpIia*s to Her Majesty in Scotland, 

"pUBLISH the largest selection of Photographs of 
Scottish Scenery, comprising Views on the principal 
Tourist Eoutes, in Imperial Cabinet, and 4x3 scraps. Also 
Albums in various bindings filled with Views of the various 
districts separately, and others of a larger size illustrating a 
General Tour in Scotland. Prices from 12s. to £10 : 10s. 

Sold by all respectable Booksellers and Printsdlers, and by 
Agents in every district which the Views illmtrat&, 

Catalo^^ues on Application. 

AMERICAN CENTENNIAL PRIZE MEDAL 

(TENTH INTERNATIONAL MEDAL AWARDED). 

Fry's Cocoa 

In i-lb. and i-lb. Packets, Is. 4d. per lb. 

THE CARACAS COCOA, specially recommended by the 
Mamrfacturers, owes its delicious flavour to the celebrated 
Cocoa of Caracas, combined with other choice descriptions. 
Purchasers should ask specially for " Pry's Caracas Cocoa,*' 
to distinguish it from other varieties. 

** Caracas Cocoa has ever been considered the best of all that is produced upon 
the American soil" R. T. C. Middleton, Consul-General, Caracas.— /(nirwal of Allied 
Science. 

** A packet can easily be obtained, ^.nd its delicate flavour and fine aroma ensur« its 
adoption as a beverage for breakfast or supper." — Standa/rd. 

J. S. FRY AND SONS, BRISTOL AND LONDON. 



UIB0ELLANEOTJ3. 

FBIZE MEDALS, 

LONDON, § PARIS,; 

1862., aSlRb 1867. 



"Mr. MaishaU'B producttonB are not einimssed in fnterest and beinty by tlose of 



FISHING TACKLE. 

Gentlemen viaiting Ediabni^li will find a first-claaa ABsortineiit of 

Salmon and Tront Bods, Reels, Lines, Flies, &c., 

Sai1«d for the Scottish Lakes and Rivers, at 

PHIK'S FISHING-TACKLE WAEEHOTTSi; 

80b Frinoes Street, First Door np Stair*, 

All of Beat Material and Workmnnship, and at Moderate Prices. 
Obitrre— SOPBINCES BTEEET. neit the Life Asaoeiatlon new linlldiiig. 

MACABA'S SCOTCH FHOTOGKAPHS, 

witli Historical Description. 

No. 1. The ITewliaveii Fishwife. No. 2. The Scotch WacOilng. 

C. de v. Siie— Plain 6d. ; CotonrBd, la. 
Caliinet „ ,. Is. „ 2b. 

.y.B.— Macam's Series ot Scotch Photos are giiarante»d to be boma fiie 
Portraits, and mnst bear hia signature to be genuine. 

D. MACARA, Stationei^, 

8 COCKBURN STREET, WAVERLEY BRIDGE, 

EDIISBURGH. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 103 

EOTAL IRISH POPLINS. 



" They have never been surpassed for beauty and_elegance." — Court Journal. 

*' They outlast every other material." — Graphic. 

** No dress so attractive at any promenade, or so becoming to young or old." 

O'REILLY, DUNNE, & CO., 

POPLIN MANUFACTURERS TO THE ROYAL FAMILY. 
(neakly a century established.) 

Besides all the New Shades (Plain and Brocaded) of the Season, an exquisite assort' 
nient of Whites, Silvers, Pearls, &c., for Bridal Dresses. 

Ladies who find it so difih^ult to obtain aood BI«ACE: Silks (a favourite Press with 
every Lady) will do well to try O'Reilly, Dunne, & Co.'s BLACK stliK ISISH 
POPliIKS. which, with infinitely more lustre, so far surpass Silks ^in wear as to 
render them' the most durable as weU as beautiful of all fabrics— preserving sthbir 

LUSTRE TO THE LASTl 

ir.B.-LUSTBOUS BLACK POPLIKS AS SUPPLIED TO HES HAJESTY. 

Patterns post free. Parcels carriage paid. 



ROYAL POPLIN FACTORY, 

30 COLLEGE GREEN, DUBLIN. 

TURKEY, INDIAN, & PERSIAN 

CARPETS. 

MANUFACTURED FOR AND IMPORTED BY 

WATSON, BONTOR, & COMPANY, 

OARFZiT MAin7FAGT17RERS TO 

HER UAJESTY THE QUEEN 

AND 

H.R.H. THE FEINCE OF WALES: 

And makers of Superior HAND-LOOM CARPETS, in patterns of their own 
ezdnsiye designs, and suitable for every style of decoration*. 

Fine BENGAL MATTING, six yards wide. Rooms covered in One Piece. 



Nos. 35 & 36 OLD BOND STREET, LONDON, W. 



MlSCBLLANEOUtJ. 

Clan Tartan Warehouse. 



NEILSON, SHAW AND MAGGREGOR, ; 

44 BUCHANAN STREET, GLASGOW 
SILK MERCERS, LINEN AND WOOLLEN DRAPERS, > 

SHAWL IMPORTEHS, AND GENERAL WAREHOUSEMEN. 

DEPARTMENTS— 
BrltiBh and Poreien Silks. Clun and Fanoy Tartona. 

Prenoh and Paisley Shawla. Scotoli and En^Ush Tweadg. 

Beal Shetland Shawlti. Beal Aberdeen^^inceyi. 

loaiary, Printa. Grenadines. 

. Knitting; Tar 

. Muslins. Trinunings. Lacas. Bod-Tioka. 

CobuTffs. Oambrios. Small 'Wares. Furs. Blankets. 

A Laroe Saloon for MANTLES, MILLIRBET, LADIES' OUTFIT, rra 

HABBTAQE TROUSSEAUX or -mi Best Matebt>ls and Wokkhahship. 

UPHOLSTERY DEPARTMENT. 

CARPETS, OIL CLOTHS, WINDOW CORNICES, and CURTAIN FABBICB. 

SCOTCH SHEETINGS, TABLE LINEN, ctc. 

; A FULL STOCK OF SUMMER COSTUMES ' ■ 

READY-MADE, OE MADE TO ORDER AT A FEW HOURS' NOTICE, 
For Coast and Tisvelllng Saiaon. 

FAMILY MOURNINGS. 

Tlu Bbbt Materiiu tupplied in all the Dt^iarlraeiia. 

A Competent Peraon sent lo Rf sldenoee in Town or Countrj to take in«traolioii» wlun 

TAtLORlNG DEPARTMENT. 

For OENTLEMEN'B stid BOYS' EUITa, 

A LLTg* Vailetf of Bcolch, EngllEh, and Ovrman Tweeds, Heather Ulxtutee, etc., 

alwara in Stack. 

SHOOTINS COATS, ULSTER COATS, HIGHLAND CAPES, eic.. 



COSTUMES, BODDICES. and to MINJISTKB8' OrOVfNa and CASSOCKS' 



SCBLLAXEOUa. 



CBAITDELIEBS, CASBELASHA AND GAS FITTINas, 

IN SROHZB AND ORUOLU : 
CBrefully f«mtnieMd on a principle to svold the Escape and Odour or i.xf. 



MZDAL AWABDED. 
BBPORT OP THE JURORS :-" Mfasfng^r and Sons, for great prosr^.-, .n.! •!. 

IBON BAXLINQS FOB STAXBCASBS, BAI.CONIES, &c.; 



106 ICISCBliLANBOUa. 

Dr. J. GOLLIS BEOWNE'S 

OHL OROD YNE. 

THE ORIG INAL AND ONLY GENUINE. 

CHLORODYNE is the best remedy known for Coughs, Con- 
sumption, Bronchitis, Asthma. 

CHLORODYNE effectually checks and arrests those too often 

fatal diseases known as Diphtheria, Fever, 
Croup, Ague. 

CHLORODYNE acts like a charm in Diarrhcea, and is the 

only specific in Cholera and Dysentery. 

CHLORODYNE effectually cuts short all attacks of Epilepsy, 

Hysteria, Palpitation, and Spasms. 

CHLORODYNE is the only palliative in Neuralgia, Eheuma- 

TisM, Gout, Cancer, Toothache, Menin- 
gitis, &c. 

The Right Hon. EARL RUSSELL has graciously favoured J. T. DAVENPORT with 

the following : — 
'"Earl Russell communicated to the College of Physicians that he receiyed a 
despatch from Her Ma^iesty's Consul at Manilla, to the effect that Cholera has been 
raging fearfully, and that the only remedy of any service was CHLORODYNE."— See 

Laiicet, December Ist, 1864. 

From W. Vesalius Pettigrew, M.D. 
I have no hesitation in stating that I never met with any medicine so efficacious as 
an Anti-spasmodic and Sedative. I have used it in Consumption, Asthma, Diarrhoea, 
and other diseases, and am perfectly satisfied with the results. 

From, Dr. B. J. BouUon (6 Co., Homcastle. 
We have made pretty extensive use of Chlorodyne in our practice lately, and look 
upon it as an excellent Sedative and Anti-spasmodic. It seems to aUay pain and 
Irritation in whatever organ and from whatever cause. It induces a feeling of comfort 
and quietude not obtainable by any other remedy, and it seems to possess this great 
advantage over all other Sedatives, that it leaves no unpleasant after-eSects. 



CAUTION.— The extraordinary medical reports on the efficacy of Chlorodyne render 
it of vital importance that the public should obtain the genuine, which bears the words 
"Dr. J. Collls Browne's Chlorodyne." 

Vice-chancellor Wood stated that Dr. J. COLLIS BROWNE was undoubtedly the 
Inventor of CHLORODYNE ; that the whole story of the defendant Freeman was 
deliberately untrue. 

Lord Chancellor Selbome and Lord Justice James stated that the defendant had 
made a deliberate misrepresentation of the decision of Vice-Chancellor Wood. 

Chemists throughout the land confirm this decision that Dr. J^</.3R0WNE was 
the Inventor of CHLORODYNE. 

Sold in Bottles at Is. l^cU, 2s. 9d., and 4s. 6d., by all Cliemista. 

Sols Manuvacturgb : 
J. T. DAVENPORT, 83 Great Russkll Street, BLOdcaBUBT, London. 



inSOBLLANEOUB. 107 



fflOUBNING FOR LADIES 



liyTESSRSl JAY, anxious to remove the impression 
which they find has gained undue circulation, 
• that none but the richest materials in Costumes, Mantles, 
and Millinery, are sold at their Establishment, deem it 
a duty to themselves and the Public to assure all families 
who have not yet dealt at Jay's Mourning Warehouse, 
that good wearing materials are cut from the piece, and 
at more than an equivalent for the price, which is from 
Is. per yard upwards, and Crape from Is. 9d. per yard. 

Messrs. Jay have always at command experienced 
Dressmakers and Milliners, who act as travellers, so that 
in the event of immediate Mourning being required, or 
any other sudden emergency for dress, one can be de- 
spatched to any part of the kingdom on receipt of a letter 
or telegram, without any expense whatever to the pur- 
chaser. All articles are marked in plain figures, and 
charges are the same as if the goods were bought for 
ready money at the Warehouse. 

JAY'S, 
TIE LOHDOI 6EHERAL I0URHIH6 WAREIOm. 

REGENT STREET, LONDON, W. 



MISCELLANEOUa 



DOLLOND, 

MANUFACTURING OPTICIAN, 

1 LUDGATE HILL, LONDON. 



TOURISTS' OPERA-GLASSES 

FIELD-SIASSES 21s 

42s. „ . . , 

On receipt of 
Carriage Free. P. 0. Order. 



DOLLOND'S {5?SS,S£'SIEi!S« £7:15:0 



DOLLOND'S r™"S'5,;jSS™} from 23. 

nni I nUn'C tPKOOMRTERS, for registering) ni — 

UULLUnU \ THE DISTANCE WALKED | iAXS. 

UULLUNU O 1F0CKF.T ANEROEDBAROMETERSF £3 * OS. 



THE STUDENT'S 

PRICE-LISTS FREE. ESTABLISHED 7750. 



HISCELLAHEOUS. 109 

WATERPEOOFS FOE TOUEISTS 
IIPOBUIT TO TISITOIIS TO THE HIGHIUDS. 

EDMISTON &SON 

(From 5 Charing Gross) 

WATERPROOFEltS, SOLE MAKERS OF THE 

^^i'tW'ifB, POCKET 
-SIPHONIA 

(WEIGHT 12 OZ.), 

■^ The only WA TERPEOOF COA T 

gmtmnteed NOT io hecoim STICKY, 

and tkm-cm^hly reUabk. 

PRICE, FROM 42s. 

Iiegg;ing8, firom Ifis. 6d,; Stont 

Siphoniaa, ftotn 4S«. 

DOUBLE TEXTURE SCOTCH TWEED 

WATERPROOF COATS 

witli India Eubbar between two layers of 

cloth — uo sluDy BUiface, 

LADIES' SIPHOBIA CLOAKS, with Hoods and Sleeves. 

LiDiEB' WATERPROOF TRAmijjMa Twbed CLOAKS. 
TTavelUng Rwjs mtd Watei-proof Rug and Cloak Cov&ts u-ilh sirapx, 
AIR PILLO'WS AND CUSHIONS, 
effectually prevent JOLTING iii Coach ami Railway Travelling. 
Patent Portable POOKBT BATES tcom 31s. : FlshmE Stccklngs, 
Brognea, and "Wadine TrouBeis : Portmanteaua, Trunks, and 
TraTellins Bft«8 ; COBE BEDS and WATBEPEOOP TELE- 
SQOPE COVEB8 for Deer Stalking. 

Detailed Price Listsfree on apph'mtion or l^ poel. 



EDMISTON & SON, 

14 COCKSPUB STREET, 

PALL MALL, LONDON, S.W. (opposite the IL^ymabket) 



LADIES 
TRAVELLING, 

Visiting the Sea-side, or otherwise exposed to 
the Bcorcbing raye of the Sun and heated p^clee 
of Dust, will fiud 

ROWLAND'S 
KALYDOR 

A most refreshing and cooling preparation 
for the complexion, dispelling the cloud of 

languor and relaxation, and allaying all heat 

and irritability. Freckles, Tan Spots, Pimples, Flufihea, and 
Discoloration fly before its application, and give place to delicate 
smoothness and the glow of beauty and of bloom. In cases of Sim-" 
bum, or Stings of Insects, its Tirtues have been long acknowledged, 
Price 4s. 6d. and 8s. 6d. per botile. 

The heat of the summer also frequently communicates a dryness 
to the hair, and a tendency to fall off, which may be completely 
obviated by the u 



ROWLANDS' MACASSAR OIL 

tful, fragrant, and transparent preparation, an 
r, beyond all precedent.— Price 38. 6d., 7a., 
our amall, and 21s. per bottle. 

ROWLAND'SODONTO 



A delightful, fragrant, and transparent preparation, and, as aa 
invigorator, beyond all precedent.— Price Ss. 6d., 7a., 10s. 6d. 
equal to four amall, and 21s. per bottle. 



OR PEAEL DENTIFRICE, 
Bestows on the Teeth a Pearl-like Whiteness, frees them from 
Tartar, and imparts to the Oums a healthy firmness, and to llie 
Breath a delicate fragrance.— Price 2s. 9d. per Box. 

Sold hy aM Chemists, PerfimieTs, and Hairdressers. 

»,* Ask for "EOWLAND'S ARTICLES," and buy none 

but Bowland's, 



MISCELLANEOUS. Ill 






» V,« 



ALEXANDEE PEEGTT&ON, 

1 MELBOURNE PLACE. 

THE BEST PRESENT FROM EDINBURGH. 

PEEGUSON'S "EDINBUEGH EOCK," 

MANUFACTURED ONLY BY 

Alex, ferguson, 

Cottfectioner to ^.M^ tfje ©ueen, attti to fg.E.S. t?je ©ufte of ©tinfjutgft^ 

I I ■ ■ ■■■■^» ■ I m^^^^-^ ■■■■■■ ■■■» ■■■■ ■ II ■■ ■^■^^^» ■■ I I I ■ ■ III ■ , I ■■ ■»^^^^— ^B^^^—i ^— — ^— 

Z^ mdlleur Souvenir ou cadeau d" Edimbourg. 
FERGUSON'S "EDINBURGH ROCK," 

fabriqui seulement par 

ALEX. FERGUSON, 

Confiseur de Sa Majesty la reitie et son Altesse Roy ale le due 

d'Edimbourg, 

SDa$ (efle ®efc^enf ti«n SbinBucg^ 

(au8 feinflcm 3«tf«), 
etnjtg unb aUein er^eugt t?on 

©onbitot %^xtt SBajcftact ber ^onigtn unb @r ^ongl: ^jol^eit bSc 

.^crjogS tjon (Sbinburg. 



V OTTIMO DOKO O REGALO D*EDIMBURGO. 

FERGUSON^S ^^ EDINBURGH ROOK/' 

FABEICATO SOLAMENTB pA 

ALEX. FERGUSON, 

Confettoriere di Sua Ma;est^ la Regina^e di Sua Altezza il Duca d'Edimburgo. 



WISCELLiNGOUS. 



ALIENS PORTMANTEAUS 



37 WEST STRAND, LONDON. 



S PATENT QUADRUPLE 



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ALLEN'S NEW TEN OUtNEA ALLEN'S 

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JUleu's Barr&ck'Furnitnre Cxtalo^e for bffloers. Stte^g. 

POST FREK - 

PVJZE HEDAL AWARDED 

. ran GENERAL- EXCELUESlS:. ■ 
(DISCOUNT FOR CASH 10 PER CENTJ 






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