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Full text of "Boston Symphony Orchestra concert programs, Season 116, 1996-1997, Subscription, Volume 02"

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Seiji Ozawa, Music Director 

Bernard Haitink, Principal Guest Conductor 

One Hundred and Sixteenth Season, 1996-97 



Trustees of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Inc. 



R. Willis Leith, Jr., Chairman 
Peter A. Brooke, Vice-Chairman 
Mrs. Edith L. Dabney, Vice-Chairman 
Harvey Chet Krentzman, Vice-Chairman 



Nicholas T. Zervas, President 

William J. Poorvu, Vice-Chairman and Treasurer 

Ray Stata, Vice-Chairman 



Harlan E. Anderson 
Dr. Amar G. Bose 
James F. Cleary 
John F. Cogan, Jr. 
Julian Cohen 
William F. Connell, 
ex-qfficio 

Life Trustees 

Vernon R. Alden 
David B. Arnold, Jr. 
J. P. Barger 
Leo. L. Beranek 
Abram T. Collier 



William M. Crozier, Jr. 
Nader F. Darehshori 
Deborah B. Davis 
Nina L. Doggett 
Avram J. Goldberg 
Thelma E. Goldberg 



Nelson J. Darling, Jr. 
Archie C. Epps 
Mrs. Harris Fahnestock 
Mrs. John H. Fitzpatrick 
Dean W. Freed 



Julian T. Houston 

Edna S. Kalman 

George Krupp 

Mrs. August R. Meyer 

Richard P. Morse 

Mrs. Robert B. Newman 



Robert P. O'Block, 

ex-ojficio 
Peter C. Read 
Margaret Williams- 

DeCelles, ex-officio 



Mrs. John L. Grandin 
Mrs. George I. Kaplan 
George H. Kidder 
Thomas D. Perry, Jr. 
Irving W Rabb 



Mrs. George Lee Sargent 
Richard A. Smith 
Sidney Stoneman 
John Hoyt Stookey 
John L. Thorndike 



Other Officers of the Corporation 

Thomas D. May and John Ex Rodgers, Assistant Treasurers 



Daniel R. Gustin, Clerk 



Board of Overseers of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Inc. 

Robert P. O'Block, Chairman 

Molly Beals Millman, Secretary Phyllis Dohanian, Treasurer 



Mrs. Herbert B. Abelow 
Helaine B. Allen 
Joel B. Alvord 
Amanda Barbour Amis 
Marjorie Arons-Barron 
Caroline Dwight Bain 
Sandra Bakalar 
Gabriella Beranek 
Lynda Schubert Bodman 
William L. Boyan 
Jan Brett 
Robin A. Brown 
Mrs. Marshall Nichols 

Carter 
Earle M. Chiles 
William H. Congleton 
William F. Connell 
John M. Connors, Jr. 
Martha H.W 

Crowninshield 
Diddy Cullinane 
Joan P. Curhan 
Tamara P. Davis 
Betsy P. Demirjian 
JoAnne Walton 

Dickinson 
Harry Ellis Dickson 
Mitchell L. Dong 
Hugh Downs 



Francis A. Doyle 
Goetz B. Eaton 
Harriett Eckstein 
William R. Elfers 
George M. Elvin 
Edward Eskandarian 
J. Richard Fennell 
Nancy J. Fitzpatrick 
Eugene M. Freedman 
Dr. Arthur Gelb 
Mrs. Kenneth J. 

Germeshausen 
Charles K. Gifford 
Jordan Golding 
Mark R. Goldweitz 
Deborah England Gray 
Michael Halperson 
John P. Hamill 
Ellen T. Harris 
Daphne P. Hatsopoulos 
Deborah M. Hauser 
Bayard Henry 
Marilyn Brachman 

Hoffman 
Ronald A. Homer 
Phyllis S. Hubbard 
F. Donald Hudson 
Lola Jaffe 
Mrs. Robert M. Jaffe 



Dr. Hisashi Kaneko 
Martin S. Kaplan 
Susan Beth Kaplan 
Mrs. S. Charles Kasdon 
Frances Demoulas 

Kettenbach 
Robert D. King 
Mrs. Gordon F. Kingsley 
David I. Kosowsky 
Arthur R. Kravitz 
Mrs. William D. 

Larkin, Jr. 
Thomas H. Lee 
Stephen R. Levy 
Edward Linde 
Frederick H. Lovejoy, Jr. 
Diane H. Lupean 
Mrs. Charles P. Lyman 
Barbara Jane Macon 
Joseph C. McNay 
William F. Meagher, Jr. 
Nathan R. Miller 
Robert J. Murray 
Paul C. O'Brien 
Norio Ohga 
Louis F. Orsatti 
Stephen Davies Paine 
Gloria Moody Press 



Millard H. Pryor, Jr. 
Robert E. Remis 
William D. Roddy, Jr. 
John Ex Rodgers 
Keizo Saji 
Roger A. Saunders 
Carol Scheifele-Holmes 
Hannah H. Schneider 
Cynthia D. Scullin 
Elizabeth T Selkowitz 
Roger T. Servison 
L. Scott Singleton 
Mrs. Micho F. Spring 
Thomas G. Sternberg 
Jacquelynne M. 

Stepanian 
Bill Van Faasen 
Paul M. Verrochi 
Stephen R. Weiner 
Robert A. Wells 
Mrs. Joan D. Wheeler 
Reginald H. White 
Mrs. Florence T. 

Whitney 
Margaret Williams- 

DeCelles 
Robin Wilson 
Kathryn A. Wong 






Overseers Emeriti 

Mrs. Weston Adams 
Bruce A. Beal 
William M. Bulger 
Mary Louise Cabot 
Mrs. Levin H. 

Campbell 
Johns H. Congdon 
Phyllis Curtin 
Katherine Fanning 
Peter H.B. 

Frelinghuysen 
Mrs. Thomas J. 

Galligan, Jr. 
Mrs. James Garivaltis 
Mrs. Haskell R. Gordon 



Susan D. Hall 
Mrs. Richard D. Hill 
Susan M. Hilles 
Glen H. Hiner 
H. Eugene Jones 
Mrs. Louis I. Kane 
Leonard Kaplan 
Richard L. Kaye 
Robert K. Kraft 
Benjamin H. Lacy 
Mrs. James F. 

Lawrence 
Mrs. Hart D. Leavitt 
Laurence Lesser 
Mrs. Harry L. Marks 



C. Charles Marran 
Hanae Mori 
Mrs. Stephen V.C. 

Morris 
Patricia Morse 
David S. Nelson 
Mrs. Hiroshi H. 

Nishino 
Vincent M. O'Reilly 
Andrall S. Pearson 
John A. Perkins 
David R. Pokross 
Daphne Brooks Prout 
Mrs. Peter van S. Rice 
Mrs. Jerome Rosenfeld 



Mrs. William C. 

Rousseau 
Angelica L. Russell 
Francis P. Sears, Jr. 
Mrs. Carl Shapiro 
Mrs. Donald B. 

Sinclair 
Ralph Z. Sorenson 
Mrs. Arthur I. Strang 
Luise Vosgerchian 
Mrs. Thomas H.P. 

Whitney 
Mrs. Donald R. Wilson 
Mrs. John J. Wilson 



Business Leadership Association 

Board of Directors 

Harvey Chet Krentzman, Chairman Emeritus 
James F. Cleary, Chairman 



Nader F. Darehshori 
Francis A. Doyle 
John P. Hamill 
William F. Meagher 



Robert J. Murray 
Robert P. O'Block 
Patrick J. Purcell 
William D. Roddy 



William F. Connell, President 
William L. Boyan, Vice-President 



Cynthia Scullin 
Malcolm L. Sherman 
Ray Stata 



Stephen J. Sweeney 
William C. Van Faasen 
Patricia Wolpert 



Emeritus Leo L. Beranek 



Ex-Officio R. Willis Leith, Jr. • Nicholas T. Zervas 



Officers of the Boston Symphony Association of Volunteers 

Margaret Williams-DeCelles, President Charlie Jack, Treasurer 

Goetz Eaton, Executive Vice-President Doreen Reis, Secretary 

Diane Austin, Symphony Shop Marilyn Pond, Public Relations Dorothy Stern, Resources 



Noni Cooper, Adult Education 
Ginger Elvin, Tanglewood 

Association 
Nancy Ferguson, Hall Services 
Phyllis Hubbard, Nominating 



Dee Schoenly, Development 
William C. Sexton, 

Tanglewood Association 
Barbara Steiner, Youth Activities 



Development 
Erling Thorgalsen, Membership 
Eva Zervos, Fundraising 
Wendy Ziner, Fundraising 



The Gericke Years: 
1884-1889 and 1898-1906 




The archival exhibit currently on display in the Huntington Ave- 
nue corridor of the Cohen Wing explores the Boston Symphony 
Orchestra during Wilhelm Gericke's two terms as conductor. 
Generally acknowledged as the BSO's first "professional" con- 
ductor, Gericke is credited with having transformed the BSO 
from a group of musicians into an orchestra. Among the many 
innovations that occurred during Gericke's conductorship were 
the inauguration in 1885 of the "Promenade Concerts," which 
were the predecessor of the Boston Pops; the commencement of 
tours to other United States cities in 1886, the initiation of a 
series of Young People's Concerts in 1887, and the move from 
the old Boston Music Hall to Symphony Hall in 1900. 



Programs copyright ©1997 Boston Symphony Orchestra, Inc. 

Cover design by Jaycole Advertising, Inc./ Cover and BSO photos by Steve J. Sherman 



«\* 



■ 



Administration 

Kenneth Haas, Managing Director 

Daniel R. Gustin, Assistant Managing Director and Manager of Tanglewood 

Anthony Fogg, Artistic Administrator 

Thomas D. May, Director of Finance and Business Affairs 

Nancy Perkins, Director of Development 

Caroline Smedvig, Director of Public Relations and Marketing 

Ray F. Wellbaum, Orchestra Manager 

ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF/ ARTISTIC 

Dennis Alves, Artistic Coordinator, Boston Pops • Faith Hunter, Executive Assistant to the Managing 
Director • Karen Leopardi, Artist Assistant/Secretary to the Music Director • Vincenzo Natale, Chauffeur/ 



Valet • James O'Connor, Administrative Assistant, Artistic Administration 
Assistant to the Tanglewood Manager 



Brian Van Sickle, Executive 



ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF/PRODUCTION 

Christopher W. Ruigomez, Operations Manager 

Scott Schillin, Assistant Manager, Boston Pops and Youth Activities 

Felicia A. Burrey, Chorus Manager • Nancy Cohen, Auditions Coordinator/Administrative Assistant, 
Orchestra Personnel • Jana Euler Gimenez, Administrative Assistant, Management Office • Diane A. 
Read, Production Coordinator 



BOX OFFICE 

Russell M. Hodsdon, Manager of Box Office 

Mary J. Broussard, Clerk • Cary Eyges, Clerk • Lawrence Fraher, Clerk 
Assistant Manager of Box Office • Arthur Ryan, Clerk 






Kathleen Kennedy, 



BUSINESS OFFICE 

Sarah J. Harrington, Budget Manager 

Craig R. Kaplan, Controller 

Roberta Kennedy, Manager, Symphony Shop 

Christopher Fox, Budget Analyst • Michelle Green, Executive Assistant to the Director of Finance 
and Business Affairs • Ian Kane, Senior Financial Analyst • Scott Langill, General Accountant • John 
O'Callaghan, Payroll Accountant • Yaneris Pena-Briggs, Cash Accountant • Sharon Sherman, 
Accounts Payable Supervisor • Victoria L. Tan, Staff Accountant 

DEVELOPMENT 

Daniel P. Breen, Director of Administration for Development 

Madelyne Cuddeback, Director of Corporate Programs 

Julie H. Diaz, Campaign Director 

John C. Marksbury, Director of Foundation and Government Support 

Joyce M. Serwitz, Associate Director of Development 

Diane Abe, Campaign Coordinator • Maureen Barry, Administrative Assistant to the Associate Director 
of Development • Courtney A. Barth, Assistant Director, Corporate Projects • Anne Cademenos, Associate 
Director of Corporate Programs • Sally Dale, Manager of Donor Relations • Rebecca Ehrhardt, Development 
Officer • Sarah Fitzgerald, Data Coordinator • Ginny Gaeta, Executive Assistant to the Director of Develop- 
ment • Joyce Hatch, Director of Boston Symphony Annual Fund • Deborah Hersey, Coordinator of Infor- 
mation Systems • Shelley Kooris, Manager of Development Research • Matthew Lane, Administrative 
Assistant, Campaign Communications • Sabrina Learman, Administrative Assistant/Office Manager • 
Katherine A. Lempert, Assistant Director, Tanglewood Development • Kathleen Maddox, Assistant Direc- 
tor, Corporate Sponsorships • Robert Massey, Data Production Assistant • Cynthia McCabe, Admini- 
strative Assistant, Foundation and Government Support • Rachel 0. Nadjarian, Donor Relations Assistant * 
Gerrit Petersen, Assistant Director of Foundation and Government Support • Julie A. Phaneuf, Coordin- 
ator of Central Processing • Alicia Salmoni, Reseacher/Track Manager • George Saulnier, Data Entry 
Clerk • Bethany Tammaro, Administrative Secretary, Corporate Programs • Valerie Vignaux, Administrative 
Assistant, Annual Fund • Tracy Wilson, Director of Tanglewood Development 






EDUCATIONAL ACTIVITIES/ARCHIVES 

Richard Ortner, Administrator of the Tanglewood Music Center 

Myran Parker-Brass, Coordinator of Youth Activities 

Bridget P. Carr, Archivist— Position endowed by Caroline Dwight Bain 
Assistant, Tanglewood Music Center 



Barbara Logue, Administrative 



FUNCTIONS OFFICE 

Cheryl Silvia Lopes, Function Manager 

Lesley Ann Cefalo, Assistant Function Manager 
Manager/Tanglewood Function Coordinator 



Elizabeth Francey-Amis, Assistant to the Function 



HUMAN RESOURCES 

Marion Gardner-Saxe, Director of Human Resources 

Anna Asphar, Benefits Manager • Yuko Uchino, Administrative Assistant, Human Resources 

INFORMATION SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT 

Robert Bell, Manager of Information Systems 

James Major, Coordinator of Information Systems • Michael Pijoan, Assistant Manager of Information 
Systems 

PUBLIC RELATIONS 

Bernadette M. Horgan, Director of Media Relations 

Susanna Bonta, Media Relations Coordinator • Caleb Cochran, Media Relations Assistant/Assistant to 
the Director of Public Relations and Marketing • Leah Oko, Administrative Assistant 

PUBLICATIONS 

Steven Ledbetter, Musicologist & Program Annotator 
Marc Mandel, Publications Manager 

Eleanor Hayes McGourty, Boston Pops Publications Coordinator/Marketing Copywriter 

SALES, SUBSCRIPTION, AND MARKETING 

Nancy A. Kay, Director of Sales & Marketing Manager 

Helen N.H. Brady, Group Sales Manager • Richard Chiarella, Graphic Designer • Susanna Concha, 
Marketing Coordinator • B. Victoria Johnson, Subscription Representative • Michael Miller, Symphony- 
Charge Manager • Michelene Miller, Group Sales Assistant • Kim Noltemy, Associate Marketing Manager • 
Carol Mason Pasarelli, Subscription Manager • Brian Robinson, Senior Subscription Representative 

SYMPHONY HALL OPERATIONS 

Robert L. Gleason, Facilities Manager 
James E. Whitaker, House Manager 

H.R. Costa, Technical Supervisor • Michael Finlan, Switchboard Supervisor • Wilmoth A. Griffiths, 
Supervisor of Facilities Support Services • Catherine Lawlor, Administrative Assistant • John MacMinn, 
Supervisor of Building Maintenance • William D. McDonnell, Chief Steward • Cleveland Morrison, 
Stage Manager • Shawn Wilder, Mailroom Clerk 

House Crew Charles F. Cassell, Jr. • Francis Castillo • Thomas Davenport • John Demick, 
Stage Coordinator • Michael Frazier • Hank Green • Juan Jimenez • William P. Morrill • Mark 
C. Rawson 

Security Christopher Bartlett • William Beckett • David Parker, Security Supervisor 

Cleaning Crew Desmond Boland • Clifford Collins • Angelo Flores • Rudolph Lewis • Robert 
MacGilvray • Lindel Milton, Lead Cleaner 

TANGLEWOOD OPERATIONS 
James J. Mooney, Facilities Manager 

VOLUNTEER OFFICE 

Leslie Wu Foley, Director of Volunteer Services 

Jennifer Flynn, Senior Project Coordinator • Pauline McCance, Senior Administrative Assistant 



BSO 



The Norman V. and Ellen B. Ballou 
Memorial Concert 
Friday, January 24, 1997 

This week's Friday-afternoon concert has 
been endowed by a generous grant from a 
trust established by Norman V. Ballou and 
his wife Ellen B. Ballou. The grant will en- 
dow one Friday-afternoon concert each win- 
ter season for many years to come. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ballou lived in Providence, 
Rhode Island, for a major part of their lives, 
attending BSO concerts there and in Boston. 
Both were born in Providence and graduated 
from college in 1927, Norman from Wesleyan 
and Ellen from Wellesley. He did graduate 
work at Oxford, she at Northwestern. When 
they married in the early 1930s they lived in 
Norton, Massachusetts, where Ellen, deeply 
involved in the theater, taught drama at 
Wheaton College, while Norman worked in 
, his family's business in Providence. 

During World War II Norman was a naval 
officer, serving as an aide to Admiral King, 
among other assignments. Meanwhile, Ellen 
held a responsible position with the Office 
of Strategic Services. Afterward, while Nor- 
man commuted to Boston as an officer of the 
United Shoe Company, Ellen taught in the 
English Department. Later she wrote a high- 
ly respected history of Houghton Mifflin Com- 
pany, the distinguished Boston publisher. 

Late in the 1960s the Ballous retired to 
Dublin, New Hampshire, where they had a 
summer home for many years. They were 
avid golfers at the Dublin Lake Club; after 
Norman's death, Ellen donated a cup in his 
honor for a major golf tournament. A public- 
spirited citizen who was intensely interested 
in the theater and other cultural affairs, Ellen 
died in 1995. 

Boston Symphony Chamber Players 

at Jordan Hall 

Sunday, February 9, 1997, at 3 p.m. 

The Boston Symphony Chamber Players, 
with pianist Gilbert Kalish, will perform the 
second concert of their 1996-97 season of 
three Sunday-afternoon concerts at Jordan 
Hall at the New England Conservatory on 
Sunday, February 9, 1997 at 3 p.m.. The 



program will include Beethoven's Clarinet 
Trio in B-flat, Opus 11, for clarinet, cello, 
and piano; Leon Kirchner's Piano Trio No. 2, 
and Shostakovich's Quintet in G minor for 
piano and strings, Opus 57. Tickets at $25, 
$28, and $14.50 are available through Sym- 
phony Charge at (617) 266-1200, at the Sym- 
phony Hall box office, or, on the day of the 
concert, at the Jordan Hall box office. The 
Chamber Players' closing concert this season 
will take place on Sunday, March 16, and 
will include Haydn's Trio in E-flat for piano, 
violin, and cello, Hob. XV:29, Irving Fine's 
Partita for Winds, and Schumann's Quintet 
in E-flat for piano and strings, Opus 44. 

The BSO Goes On-line 

Boston Symphony and Boston Pops fans 
with access to the Internet can now visit 
the orchestra's new official home page 
(http://www.bso.org), which provides up-to- 
the-minute information about all the orches- 
tra's activities. In addition to program listings 
and ticket prices, the web site has biogra- 
phies of BSO musicians and guest artists, 
current press releases, historical facts and 
figures, helpful telephone numbers, and in- 
formation on auditions and job openings. A 
highlight of the site, and a first for cultural 
organizations represented on the Internet, is 
a virtual-reality tour of the orchestra's home, 
Symphony Hall. Since the BSO web site will 
be updated on a regular basis, to include 
1997 Boston Pops and Tanglewood informa- 
tion as well as any program changes, we 
invite you to check in frequently. 

New "Supper Talks" Series 
To Begin in January 

Beginning later this month, the BSO is 
pleased to introduce a new series of "Sup- 
per Talks" that focus specifically on the 
evening's BSO program. These pre-concert 
talks will be given primarily by BSO Musi- 
cologist and Program Annotator Steven 
Ledbetter and BSO Publications Manager 
Marc Mandel, who for many years have 
given the very popular talks preceding BSO 
Open Rehearsals and selected Friday-after- 
noon concerts. Beginning with a buffet-style 
supper, "Supper Talks" offer insights into 
the evening's Boston Symphony program, 
including taped musical examples to en- 



- 

1 







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and exercise room plus an apartment. 

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Harbor on more than eight acres featuring a 
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One acre parcel also available. $190,000 
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GREAT ESTATES 



hance your appreciation of the music under 
discussion. Upcoming "Supper Talks" will 
focus on music of Berlioz (Tuesday, January 
28), Mozart and Bruckner (Thursday, Janu- 
ary 30), American composers Gould, Cop- 
land, Schuman, and Gershwin (Tuesday, 
February 11), and Haydn and Shostakovich 
(Saturday, February 15). Doors open at 
5:30 p.m. for a la carte cocktails and con- 
versation. Supper is served at 6:15 p.m. in 
Higginson Hall in the Cohen Wing. These 
events are offered on an individual basis, 
even to those who are not attending the BSO 
concert. Tickets, priced at $24 per person, 
are available at the Symphony Hall Box 
Office or through SymphonyCharge at (617) 
266-1200. There is a $2.50 handling fee for 
each ticket ordered by telephone. 

BSO Members in Concert 

Founded by BSO cellist Jonathan Miller, the 
Boston Artists Ensemble plays music of J.S. 
Bach, Geminiani, and Telemann on a pro- 
gram with Elliott Carter's Sonata for flute, 
oboe, cello, and harpsichord on Friday, Jan- 
uary 31, at 8 p.m. at the Peabody Essex 
Museum in Salem, and on Sunday, February 
2, at 2:30 p.m. at Trinity Church in Newton 
Centre. In addition to Mr. Miller, the per- 
formers include Elizabeth Ostling, flute, Peg- 
gie Pearson, oboe, and Mark Kroll, harpsi- 
chord. Tickets are $20 ($17 students and 
seniors). For more information call (617) 
964-6553. 

Harry Ellis Dickson and the Boston 
Classical Orchestra perform Handel's Water 
Music, Haydn's C major cello concerto with 
Israeli cellist Inbal Magiddo, and Bach's 
Brandenburg Concerto No. 4 on Friday, Feb- 
ruary 7, at 8 p.m. and Sunday, February 9, 
at 3 p.m. at Faneuil Hall at Quincy Market. 
Single tickets are $18, $25, and $31 ($2 
discount for seniors, $5 discount for stu- 
dents). For tickets call (617) 423-3883. 

The Hawthorne String Quartet — BSO 
members Ronan Lefkowitz, Si-Jing Huang, 
Mark Ludwig, and Sato Knudsen — joins 
conductor Ronald Knudsen and the New 
Philharmonia Orchestra for Schulhoff's Con- 
certo for String Quartet and Chamber Or- 
chestra as part of a program also including 



Brahms's Tragic Overture and Shostakovich's 
Symphony No. 5 on Saturday evening, Feb- 
ruary 8, at 8 p.m. and on Sunday afternoon, 
February 9, at 3 p.m. at Ellsworth Auditori- 
um at Pine Manor College in Chestnut Hill. 
Tickets are $22 and $17 (students $12 and 
$10). For tickets or more information, call 
(617) 527-9717. 

Supper Concerts at Symphony Hall 

Enhance your evening at Symphony with a 
BSO Supper Concert, a chamber music per- 
formance by members of the Boston Sym- 
phony Orchestra in the Cabot-Cahners Room 
at 6 p.m., followed by a buffet supper served 
in Higginson Hall. Doors open at 5:30 p.m. 
for a la carte cocktails and conversation. 
The repertoire for Supper Concerts consists 
of chamber music by composers whose sym- 
phonic works are featured in that evening's 
BSO concert. Upcoming Supper Concerts 
will feature music of Grieg and Mozart (Sat- 
urday, February 1, and Tuesday, February 4) 
and music of Copland, Gershwin, and Schu- 
man (Thursday, February 6, and Saturday, 
February 8). These events are offered on an 
individual basis, even to those who are not 
attending the BSO concert. Tickets are priced 
at $24 per person. Advance reservations 
must be made by mail. For reservations the 
week of the Supper Concert, please call 
SymphonyCharge at (617) 266-1200. All 
reservations must be made at least 48 hours 
in advance. There is a $2.50 handling fee 
for each ticket ordered by telephone. For 
further information call (617) 638-9390. 

Ticket Resale 

If, as a Boston Symphony subscriber, you 
find yourself unable to use your subscrip- 
tion ticket, please make that ticket available 
for resale by calling (617) 266-1492 during 
business hours. You may also leave your 
ticket information on the Resale Line at 
(617) 638-9426 at any time. In this way you 
help bring needed revenue to the orchestra 
and at the same time make your seat avail- 
able to someone who might otherwise be 
unable to attend the concert. A mailed re- 
ceipt will acknowledge your tax-deductible 
contribution. 



^v 




SEUI OZAWA 

Seiji Ozawa is now in his twenty-fourth season as music 
director of the Boston Symphony Orchestra. Mr. Ozawa 
became the BSO's thirteenth music director in 1973, 
after a year as music adviser; his tenure with the Bos- 
ton Symphony is the longest of any music director 
currently active with an American orchestra. In his 
nearly twenty-five years as music director, Mr. Ozawa 
has maintained the orchestra's distinguished reputa- 
tion both at home and abroad, with concerts at Sym- 
phony Hall and Tanglewood, on tours to Europe, Japan, 
Hong Kong, China, and South America, and across 
the United States, including regular concerts in New 
York. Mr. Ozawa has upheld the BSO's commitment to 
new music through the commissioning of new works, 
including a series of centennial commissions marking 
the orchestra's hundredth birthday in 1981, a series of works celebrating the fiftieth 
anniversary in 1990 of the Tanglewood Music Center, the orchestra's summer training 
program for young musicians, and a current series of commissions represented this sea- 
son by new works from Leon Kirchner and Bernard Rands. In addition, he has recorded 
more than 130 works with the orchestra, representing more than fifty different composers, 
on ten labels. 

Mr. Ozawa has led the orchestra in European tours on seven occasions since 1976, 
including the orchestra's first tour devoted exclusively to appearances at the major Euro- 
pean music festivals, in 1979; concerts in the fall of 1981 as part of the BSO's centenni- 
al tour of Europe and Japan; and further tours in 1984, 1988, and 1991. The most recent 
European tour under Mr. Ozawa's direction took place in December 1993, with concerts 
in London, Paris, Madrid, Vienna, Milan, Munich, and Prague. Mr. Ozawa and the or- 
chestra have appeared in Japan on five occasions since 1978, most recently in December 
1994, as part of a tour that also included concerts in Hong Kong. Mr. Ozawa led the 
orchestra in its first tour to South America in October 1992. Major tours of North Amer- 
ica have included a March 1981 tour celebrating the orchestra's centennial, a tour in 
March 1983 to the midwestern United States, an eight-city tour spanning the continent 
in the spring of 1991, and an eight-city, nine-concert tour in February 1996. 

In addition to his work with the Boston Symphony, Mr. Ozawa appears regularly with 
the Berlin Philharmonic, the New Japan Philharmonic, the London Symphony, the Or- 
chestre National de France, the Philharmonia of London, and the Vienna Philharmonic. 
He made his Metropolitan Opera debut in December 1992, appears regularly at La Scala 
and the Vienna Staatsoper, and has also conducted opera at the Paris Opera, Salzburg, 
and Covent Garden. In September 1992 he founded the Saito Kinen Festival in Matsu- 
moto, Japan, in memory of his teacher Hideo Saito, a central figure in the cultivation of 
Western music and musical technique in Japan, and a co-founder of the Toho School of 
Music in Tokyo. In addition to his many Boston Symphony recordings, Mr. Ozawa has 
recorded with the Berlin Philharmonic, the Chicago Symphony, the London Philharmon- 
ic, the Orchestre National, the Orchestre de Paris, the Philharmonia of London, the Saito 
Kinen Orchestra, the San Francisco Symphony, the Toronto Symphony, and the Vienna 
Philharmonic, among others. 

Born in 1935 in Shenyang, China, Seiji Ozawa studied music from an early age and 
later graduated with first prizes in composition and conducting from Tokyo's Toho School 
of Music, where he was a student of Hideo Saito. In 1959 he won first prize at the Inter- 
national Competition of Orchestra Conductors held in Besancon, France. Charles Munch, 
then music director of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, subsequently invited him to at- 
tend the Tanglewood Music Center, where he won the Koussevitzky Prize for outstand- 
ing student conductor in 1960. While a student of Herbert von Karajan in West Berlin, 
Mr. Ozawa came to the attention of Leonard Bernstein, who appointed him assistant con- 
ductor of the New York Philharmonic for the 1961-62 season. He made his first profes- 



8 



sional concert appearance in North America in January 1962, with the San Francisco 
Symphony. He was music director of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra's Ravinia Festi- 
val for five summers beginning in 1964, music director of the Toronto Symphony from 
1965 to 1969, and music director of the San Francisco Symphony from 1970 to 1976, fol- 
lowed by a year as that orchestra's music adviser. He conducted the Boston Symphony 
Orchestra for the first time in 1964, at Tanglewood, and made his first Symphony Hall 
appearance with the orchestra in January 1968. In 1970 he became an artistic director 
of Tanglewood. 

Mr. Ozawa recently became the first recipient of Japan's Inouye Sho ("Inouye Award"). 
Created to recognize lifetime achievement in the arts, the award is named after this cen- 
tury's preeminent Japanese novelist, Yasushi Inouye. In September 1994 Mr. Ozawa 
received his second Emmy award, for Individual Achievement in Cultural Programming, 
for "Dvorak in Prague: A Celebration," with the Boston Symphony Orchestra. He won 
his first Emmy for the Boston Symphony Orchestra's PBS television series "Evening at 
Symphony." Mr. Ozawa holds honorary doctor of music degrees from the University of 
Massachusetts, the New England Conservatory of Music, and Wheaton College in Nor- 
ton, Massachusetts. 

Mr. Ozawa's compact discs with the Boston Symphony Orchestra include, on Philips, 
the complete cycle of Mahler symphonies, Mahler's Kindertotenlieder with Jessye Nor- 
man, Bartok's Concerto for Orchestra and The Miraculous Mandarin, Richard Strauss's 
Elektra with Hildegard Behrens in the title role, and Schoenberg's Gurrelieder with Jes- 
sye Norman, James McCracken, and Tatiana Troyanos. EMI has recently issued "The 
American Album" with Itzhak Perlman, including music for violin and orchestra by 
Bernstein, Barber, and Foss, and which recently won a Grammy Award for Best Instru- 
mental Performance by a soloist with orchestra. Recordings on Deutsche Grammophon 
include Mendelssohn's complete incidental music to A Midsummer Nights Dream, with 
Kathleen Battle and Frederica von Stade; violin concertos of Bartok and Moret with Anne- 
Sophie Mutter; Shostakovich and Schumann concertos with violinist Gidon Kremer; 
Poulenc's Gloria and Stabat mater with Kathleen Battle; and Liszt's two piano concertos 
and Totentanz with Krystian Zimerman. Other recordings include Rachmaninoff's Third 
Piano Concerto with Evgeny Kissin, Tchaikovsky's Pique Dame, with Mirella Freni, 
Maureen Forrester, Vladimir Atlantov, Sergei Leiferkus, and Dmitri Hvorostovsky, and 
Berlioz's Requiem, with tenor Vinson Cole and the Tanglewood Festival Chorus, on RCA 
Victor Red Seal; "The Dvorak Concert from Prague," with Rudolf Firkusny, Yo-Yo Ma, 
Itzhak Perlman, and Frederica von Stade, on Sony Classical (audio and video); music 
for piano left-hand and orchestra by Ravel, Prokofiev, and Britten with Leon Fleisher, 
Strauss's Don Quixote with Yo-Yo Ma, and, on one disc, Britten's Young Persons Guide to 
the Orchestra, Prokofiev's Peter and the Wolf, and Saint-Saens' Carnival of the Animals, 
also on Sony Classical; and Beethoven's five piano concertos and Choral Fantasy with 
Rudolf Serkin, on Telarc. 




mm 




First Violins 

Malcolm Lowe 

Concertmaster 
Charles Munch chair, 
fully funded in perpetuity 

Tamara Smirnova 
Associate Concertmaster 
Helen Horner Mclntyre chair, 
endowed in perpetuity in 1976 



BOSTON 

ORCHESTRA 

1996-97 

Seiji Ozawa 

Music Director 

Music Directorship endowed by 

John Moors Cabot 

Bernard Haitink 

Principal Guest Conductor 




Assistant Concertmaster 

Robert L. Beal, and 

Enid L. and Bruce A. Beal chair, 

endowed in perpetuity in 1980 
°Laura Park 

Assistant Concertmaster 

Edward and Bertha C. Rose chair 
Bo Youp Hwang 

John and Dorothy Wilson chair, 

fully funded in perpetuity 
Lucia Lin 

Forrest Foster Collier chair 
Leo Panasevich 

Carolyn and George Rowland chair 
Gottfried Wilfinger 

Dorothy Q. and David B. Arnold, Jr., 

chair, fully funded in perpetuity 
Alfred Schneider 

Muriel C. Kasdon 

and Marjorie C. Paley chair 
Raymond Sird 

Ruth and Carl Shapiro chair, 

fully funded in perpetuity 
Ikuko Mizuno 

David and Ingrid Kosowsky chair 
Amnon Levy 

Theodore W. and Evelyn Berenson 

Family chair 

* Harvey Seigel 

Stephanie Morris Manyott and 
Franklin J. Marryott chair 

* Nancy Bracken 
*Aza Raykhtsaum 

* Bonnie Bewick 

* James Cooke 

* Victor Romanul 

Bessie Pappas chair 

* Catherine French 

Second Violins 

Marylou Speaker Churchill 

Principal 

Fahnestock chair 
Vyacheslav Uritsky 

Assistant Principal 

Charlotte and Irving W. Rabb chair, 

endowed in perpetuity in 1977 
Ronald Knudsen 

Edgar and Shirley Grossman chair 
Joseph McGauley 

Shirley and J. Richard Fennell chair 
Ronan Lefkowitz 

David H. and Edith C. Howie chair, 

fully funded in perpetuity 
*Jerome Rosen 

* Sheila Fiekowsky 
*Jennie Shames 

* Participating in a system of rotated 
seating 
%On sabbatical leave 
°On leave 
§ Substitute player 



* Valeria Vilker Kuchment 
*Tatiana Dimitriades 
*Si-Jing Huang 

* Nicole Monahan 

* Kelly Barr 
*Wendy Putnam 

Violas 

Steven Ansell 

Principal 

Charles S. Dana chair, 

endowed in perpetuity in 1970 
Hui Liu 

Assistant Principal 

Anne Stoneman chair, 

fully funded in perpetuity 
Ronald Wilkison 

D)is and Harlan Anderson chair 

Robert Barnes 

Burton Fine 

Joseph Pietropaolo 

Michael Zaretsky 

Marc Jeanneret 

*Mark Ludwig 

Helene R. Cahners-Kaplan and 
Carol R. Goldberg chair 

* Rachel Fagerburg 

* Edward Gazouleas 
*Kazuko Matsusaka 

Cellos 

Jules Eskin 

Principal 

Philip R. Allen chair, 

endowed in perpetuity in 1 969 
Martha Babcock 

Assistant Principal 

Vernon and Marion Alden chair, 

endowed in perpetuity in 1977 
Sato Knudsen 

Esther S. and Joseph M. Shapiro chair 
Joel Moerschel 

Sandra and David Bakalar chair 
Luis Leguia 

Robert Bradford Newman chair, 

fully funded in perpetuity 
Carol Procter 

Lillian and Nathan R. Miller chair 

* Ronald Feldman 

Richard C. and Ellen E. Paine chair, 
fully funded in perpetuity 

* Jerome Patterson 

Charles and JoAnne Dickinson chair 

* Jonathan Miller 

Rosemary and Donald Hudson chair 
*Owen Young 

John F. Cogan, Jr., and 
Mary Cornille chair, 
fully funded in perpetuity 

* Andrew Pearce 

Gordon and Mary Ford Kingsley 
Family chair 

Basses 

Edwin Barker 

Principal 

Harold D. Hodgkinson chair, 

endowed in perpetuity in 1974 
Lawrence Wolfe 

Assistant Principal 

Maria Nistazos Stata chair, 

fully funded in perpetuity 



10 



Joseph Hearne 

Leith Family chair, 
fully funded in perpetuity 
John Salkowski 
Joseph and Jan Brett Hearne chair 

* Robert Olson 

* James Orleans 
*Todd Seeber 
*John Stovall 

* Dennis Roy 

Flutes 

Elizabeth Ostling 

Acting Principal 
Walter Piston chair, 
endowed in perpetuity in 1970 
Fenwick Smith 
Myra and Robert Kraft chair, 
endowed in perpetuity in 1981 



Assistant Principal 
Marian Gray Lewis chair, 
fully funded in perpetuity 

Piccolo 

Geralyn Coticone 

Evelyn and C. Charles Marran 
chair, endowed in perpetuity in 1979 

Oboes 

Alfred Genovese 
Principal 

Mildred B. Remis chair, 
endowed in perpetuity in 1975 

Mark McEwen 

Keisuke Wakao 

Assistant Principal 

Elaine and Jerome Rosenfeld chair 

English Horn 

Robert Sheena 
Beranek chair, 
fully funded in perpetuity 

Clarinets 

William R. Hudgins 
Principal 

Ann S.M. Banks chair, 
endowed in perpetuity in 1977 

Scott Andrews 

Thomas Martin 

Associate Principal & E-flat clarinet 
Stanton W. and Elisabeth K. Davis 
chair, fully funded in perpetuity 



Bass Clarinet 

Craig Nordstrom 

Farla and Harvey Chet 

Krentzman chair, 

fully funded in perpetuity 

Bassoons 

Richard Svoboda 

Principal 

Edward A. Taft chair, 

endowed in perpetuity in 1974 
Roland Small 

Richard Ranti 

Associate Principal 

Contrabassoon 

Gregg Henegar 
Helen Rand Thayer chair 

Horns 

Charles Kavalovski 

Principal 

Helen Sagojf Slosberg chair, 

endowed in perpetuity in 1974 
Richard Sebring 

Associate Principal 

Margaret Andersen Congleton 

chair, fully funded in perpetuity 
Daniel Katzen 

Elizabeth B. Storer chair 
Jay Wadenpfuhl 
Richard Mackey 
Jonathan Menkis 

Trumpets 

Charles Schlueter 

Principal 

Roger Louis Voisin chair, 

endowed in perpetuity in 1977 
Peter Chapman 

Ford H. Cooper chair 
Timothy Morrison 

Associate Principal 

Nina L. and Eugene B. 

Doggett chair 
Thomas Rolfs 

Trombones 

^Ronald Barron 

Principal 

J. P. and Mary B. Barger chair, 

fully funded in perpetuity 



Norman Bolter 
§ Darren Acosta 

Bass Trombone 

Douglas Yeo 

Tuba 

Chester Schmitz 
Margaret and William C. 
Rousseau chair, 

fully funded in perpetuity 

Timpani 

Everett Firth 

Sylvia Shippen Wells chair, 
endowed in perpetuity in 1974 

Percussion 

Thomas Gauger 
Peter and Anne Brooke chair, 
fully funded in perpetuity 

Frank Epstein 
Peter Andrew Lurie chair 

J. William Hudgins 

Timothy Genis 

Assistant Timpanist 

Harps 

$ Ann Hobson Pilot 
Principal 

Willona Henderson Sinclair chair 
Sarah Schuster Ericsson 

Librarians 

Marshall Burlingame 

Principal 

Lia and William Poorvu chair 
William Shisler 
Sandra Pearson 

Assistant Conductor 

Richard Westerfield 
Anna E. Finnerty chair 

Personnel Managers 

Lynn Larsen 
Bruce M. Creditor 

Stage Manager 

Position endowed by 
Angelica L. Russell 
Peter Riley Pfitzinger 




BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

Seiji Ozawa, Music Director 

Bernard Haitink, Principal Guest Conductor 

One Hundred and Sixteenth Season, 1996-97 



Thursday, January 23, at 8 
Friday, January 24, at 1:30 
THE NORMAN V. AND ELLEN B. BALLOU MEMORIAL CONCERT 

Saturday, January 25, at 8 
Tuesday, January 28, at 8 




SEIJI OZAWA conducting 



ALL-BERLIOZ PROGRAM 



Waverley, Grand overture, Opus 1 

La Mort d'Orphee, Monologue and Bacchanale 
for tenor soloist, women's chorus, 
and orchestra (American premiere) 
(performing edition by David Gilbert) 

Introduction et Monologue 

Bacchanale 

Tableau musical 

JOHN ALER, tenor 

WOMEN OF THE TANGLEWOOD FESTIVAL 
CHORUS, JOHN OLIVER, conductor 

Text and translation begin on page 26. 



INTERMISSION 



The evening concerts will end about 9:55 and the afternoon concert about 3:25. 

RCA, Deutsche Grammophon, Philips, Telarc, Sony Classical/CBS Masterworks, Angel/EMI, 
London /Decca, Erato, Hyperion, and New World records 

Baldwin piano 

Please be sure the electronic signal on your watch or pager is switched off 
during the concert. 

The program books for the Friday series are given in loving memory of Mrs. Hugh 
Bancroft by her daughters Mrs. A. Werk Cook and the later Mrs. William C. Cox. 

Boston Symphony Orchestra concerts are funded in part by a grant from the 
Massachusetts Cultural Council, a state agency. 



12 



Te Deum, for tenor soloist and three choruses, 
with orchestra and organ 

Te Deum laudamus 

Tibi omnes angeli 

Praeludium 

Dignare, Domini 

Christe, Rex gloriae 

Te ergo quaesumus 

Judex crederis esse venturus 

JOHN ALER 

TANGLEWOOD FESTIVAL CHORUS, 

JOHN OLIVER, conductor 
PALS (PERFORMING ARTISTS AT LINCOLN SCHOOL), 

JOHANNA HILL SIMPSON, artistic director 
JAMES DAVID CHRISTIE, organ 

Text and translation begin on page 36. 



- " " jy\ JSK A^ 4 %-** ~~^-',JV'^ - .*£- 










IR>fia» 



*.^2j 



if * . 






a 



Berlioz conducting a choral concert; from a drawing 
by Gustav Dor4 in "La Journal pour Rire," 1850 



13 






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14 



Hector Berlioz 

Waverley, Grand overture, Opus 1 




Louis-Hector Berlioz was born at La Cote-St. Andre, 
here, France, on December 11, 1803, and died in Paris 
on March 8, 1869. His Waverley Overture was com- 
posed in 1827 and was ultimately published as Opus 1, 
though it was the second Berlioz work to receive that 
designation, since he had already assigned the number 
to his "Eight Scenes from Goethe's 'Faust'," a composi- 
tion that he withdrew, granting numerical primacy to 
Waverley. Berlioz himself conducted the first perform- 
ance on May 26, 1828, in Paris. The first American 
performance took place in Boston in a concert given by 
the Germania Musical Society under the direction of 
Carl Bergmann on December 13, 1851. The only previ- 
ous Boston Symphony performances of the Waverley 
Overture were given by Colin Davis, in Boston and New York in January 1975, and by 
Seiji Ozawa, first in September and October 1983, then more recently in November and 
December 1994, including tour performances in Hong Kong and Toyko. The overture is 
scored for two flutes (second doubling piccolo), two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons 
(with optional doubling to four), four horns, valve trumpet in D and two trumpets, three 
trombones and tuba, timpani, and strings. 

It was characteristically bold of the twenty-five-year-old Berlioz to give a concert en- 
tirely of his own music at a time when he was still regarded as a student by his teachers 
at the conservatory (though, as events would show soon enough, he had already sur- 
passed them in originality and daring). The concert was conceived largely as a means 
of attracting the attention of the young Irish actress Harriet Smithson, who had just 
made a sensation in Paris playing the role of Ophelia in Kemble's production of Hamlet, 
which opened in Paris on September 11, 1827. Berlioz was bowled over by Shakespeare 
in this production, but he was also personally bowled over by the Ophelia. Perhaps a 
performance of his music would attract her attention? Yet an orchestral concert entirely 
devoted to the works of a conservatory student was unheard of! Not least of Berlioz's 
problems was getting around old Cherubini, the director of the institution, a crabbed 
and embittered man, utterly devoted to artistic conservatism and to maintaining "rules" 
regardless of whether they had any point. (The director's first encounter with young 
Berlioz a few years earlier had occurred when Cherubini had called him virtually a 
criminal for entering the conservatory by the ladies' entrance — though the rule that 
made it so had only just been promulgated by Cherubini and not made known to the 
public at large!) Berlioz used all his skill and some political connections to go around 
the director and obtain permission for the use of the conservatory's concert hall. It was 
important for Berlioz that news of his concert come to the ears of Harriet Smithson, so 
he was careful to arrange for announcements in the press, emphasizing the unusual 
nature of the occasion. But if she was at all aware of Berlioz, she certainly did not 
come to his concert. (Some years later his constant pursuit finally succeeded; they 
married — and were soon utterly miserable with one another.) 

But in every respect except the personal one of Harriet Smithson, the concert was 
a complete success. The players were enthusiastic from the first rehearsal. The critics 
were generous — even those who later became violently opposed to Berlioz's music. One 
of these, F.J. Fetis, who was soon to attack the Symphonie fantastique , wrote: "M. Berlioz 
has genius. His style is energetic and sinewy. His inspirations are often graceful. But 
still more often he spends himself in combinations of an original and passionate cast, 
which border on the wild and bizarre and are only saved by the fact that they come 




15 



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off." Two of the works on the program were the Waverley Overture and the overture to 
his opera Les Francs-juges . The critics generally preferred the former. Today the view 
is reversed. Waverley is a fine achievement for a young composer, but the Francs-juges 
overture reveals more of what we now recognize as the true Berlioz. 

Walter Scott's historical novels of Scotland (and later of England and still more exot- 
ic places) excited enormous enthusiasm all over Europe from the anonymous publica- 
tion of the first in the series, Waverley, in 1814. Eventually Scott's novels were read all 
over Europe and America and became the sources for any number of romantic operas, 
including Lucia di Lammermoor and versions of Ivanhoe by Marschner, Nicolai, and 
Arthur Sullivan. Berlioz no doubt had read Waverley, but his overture reveals little spe- 
cific musical detail to tie it to this particular book. On his original manuscript Berlioz 
copied out a text made up of sentences from the novel, but he finally replaced it with 
this much simpler epigraph, drawn from the fifth chapter, which now stands at the 
head of the score: 

Dreams of love and Lady's charms 
Give place to honour and to arms. 

The first line of this couplet is no doubt meant to refer to the slow introduction, which, 
after an inchoate idea in the lower strings, turns into a calm lyric melody in the cellos; 
at its continuation the woodwinds hint at imitations. The Allegro vivace is vigorous and 
spirited. It may remind us more of the spirit of Italian opera than of historical adven- 
ture in Scotland, but it remains a remarkable accomplishment among a young compos- 
er's early outings. 

— Steven Ledbetter 



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Hector Berlioz 

La Mort d'Orphee— Monologue et Bacchanale for tenor, 
women's chorus, and orchestra 




Berlioz wrote La Mort d'Orphee (The Death of OrpheusJ 
in 1827; its composition and early history are discussed 
below. The present performances are the first in America. 
La Mort d'Orphee is scored for two flutes (doubling pic- 
colos), two oboes, two clarinets, four bassoons, two trum- 
pets, two cornets (which would have been straight, valve- 
less instruments in 1827), two horns, three trombones, 
and strings, along with harp, timpani, and three pairs 
of cymbals. A four-part women's chorus sings the part of 
the Bacchantes, and Orpheus is sung by a tenor. 

Berlioz wrote La Mort d'Orphee in 1827 for his sec- 
ond attempt at the Prix de Rome, a prestigious and 
lucrative award offered annually between 1803 and 
1969 to young French composers by the Academie des 
Beaux Arts, one of the five auspicious Academies that make up the Institut de France. 
The Academicians who judged these aspiring composers were often a generation (or 
two) behind the times; in periods of artistic and cultural change, during the advent of 
Romanticism at the beginning of the nineteenth century and modernism at the end, 
they did their best to preserve music from dangerous new influences. Berlioz partici- 
pated in the competition five times before gaining the prize. In 1826 his preliminary 
exercise was deemed too incorrect by the Music Section of the Academy, all of whom 
were also professors at the Conservatoire, to get him into the final round. In 1828 he 
produced Herminie, a work conservative enough to get him a second prize and notable 
today for the appearance of the theme that became the idee fixe of the Symphonie fan- 
tastique. For the 1829 competition Berlioz composed Cleopdtre, a work the judges 
found incomprehensible, but which is now considered the best and is the most com- 
monly performed of the works Berlioz produced before he burst into music history in 
1830 with his Symphonie. Finally, in need of money, wanting to marry and get on 
with his career, Berlioz took the advice of the sympathetic Daniel-Frangois Auber 
and composed a work for the 1830 competition which seemed to him incredibly 
banal. The judges remarked on how much progress he had made and awarded him 



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a first prize. Berlioz conducted the award-winning cantata, La Mort de Sardanapale 
(The Death of Sardanapalus), three times before destroying all but the final pages of 
the score. The music he had forced himself to write to gain the prize had become an 
embarrassment to him. 

The Academicians selected "The death of Orpheus" as the subject for the 1827 
competition. Wandering in misery and alone after the loss of Eurydice, Orpheus is torn 
to shreds by the jealous priestesses of Bacchus whose love he can never return. The 
text was by Henri-Montan Berton, a member of the Music Section and one of Berlioz's 
lifelong detractors. The subject brought to Berlioz's mind the music of Gluck, a com- 
poser dear to his heart, whose music he had studied in the Conservatoire library and 
whose operas he had worshipped at the Academy of Music. The judges desired music 
from the contestants that upheld their eighteenth-century ideals — music that main- 
tained a decorous distance from emotion, followed a strict and decrepit recitative-and- 
aria form, and, most important, was easy to reduce at the piano (since this was the only 
reading the contestants' works received before the jury). What Berlioz gave them was 



Title page of the 
surviving score of 
Berlioz s "La Mort 
dVrphe-e." To the 
copyists title and 
description Berlioz 
has added in the 















Ofliu- 






anru^TuiiXIW . . 



upper-right hand corner a quotation from Thomas Moore s "Irish Melodies." At the 
bottom Berlioz has written: "Work declared unperformable by the Music Section of 
the Institute and performed at the Royal School of Music the 22nd of July, 1828." 
No performances of Berlioz s music took place on that date, however. 



2] 



Week 13 



music that delved into the psychology of the situation, was truly orchestral in nature, 
and which stretched the worn-out forms and harmonic and melodic conventions of the 
previous generation. Knowing himself to be a bad boy of music, Berlioz took up the 
mantle of a new Orpheus and unconsciously, or perhaps intentionally, set himself up to 
be torn apart for not following the rules and emulating the music written by the peruques 
who were his judges. He would make them jealous of his talent, his youthful enthusi- 
asm, and his future. In the heat of composition, locked in the Institute for thirty days 
with three other contestants, he composed a work that graphically illustrates the rather 
overwrought text. He dispensed with half of what was assigned, decided a chorus of 
Bacchantes was needed, and wrote new words for them to sing. Furthermore, for the 
first time in history, he added cornets to the orchestral brass and specified three pairs 
of cymbals among the percussion. 

The jury, however, got to hear only part of Berlioz's "abomination." The accompanist 
hired to play the contestants' cantatas during the adjudication was unable to reduce 
Berlioz's orchestrally conceived work and gave up in despair during the Bacchanale. 
The Music Section decided the work was unperformable and asked Berlioz to withdraw 
it. He agreed to do so. The incident gave him ammunition for a series of journalistic 
attacks on the Academy and the Prix de Rome competition, and proved to him he had 
written a truly innovative orchestral work. 

Berlioz's "Monologue and Bacchanale" opens with an instrumental introduction which 
sets the classical pastorale scene. We hear a rippling brook and the singing of birds. 
Orpheus soon appears, represented by a long theme played by the flutes, horns, and 
violas. Berlioz's inspiration here is Gluck's opera Orphee et Eurydice and the Act II 
aria Orpheus sings after he has conquered the spirits of Hades and he views the Elys- 
ian Fields. Orpheus' first words in Berlioz's cantata, however, protest the priestesses of 
Bacchus' unflinching jealous hatred, accompanied by a short motive in the strings as- 
sociated throughout the cantata with the Bacchantes. 

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Music is the only delight left to Orpheus after the loss of his beloved Eurydice. He 
sings an aria in praise of his lyre which incorporates the theme from the introduction. 
Muted brass (possibly another orchestral innovation in the cantata) depict the drunken 
calls of the approaching Bacchantes. They arrive on the scene and in a furious unre- 



First page of the "Tableau musical." Berlioz has added this note 
at the bottom of the page: 

"For the understanding of the performers it is necessary for me 
to explain my thinking. I have represented and tried to render in 
this musical tableau several different and contrasting effects. 

"After the death of Orpheus the Bacchantes have retreated from 
the scene of the catastrophe; already one cannot distinguish the 
sound of their steps. The wind moans sorrowfully and occasionally 
causes the strings of Orpheus' half-broken harp to vibrate. In the dis- 
tance a herdsman of the Thracian mountains who has remembered 
Orpheus' first song seeks to reproduce it on his flute. The wind dies 
little by little, the sounds that it carries die away, the harp makes 
only a few incoherent vibrations. Calm. . . silence. . . solitude. " 



22 



lenting orgs' of violence deal Orpheus blow after blow. Orpheus" cries to Apollo are of 
no avail, while the Bacchantes invoke Bacchus to intensify their revenge. In their furi- 
ous jealousy they rip him apart. "Pick to pieces the shreds of his quivering body so 
that thev redden the waters of the rushing torrent." With a final invocation i"Eurydiee! 
Eurvdice!"') Orpheus drops his harp from his hand and succumbs to the brutal attack. 
The Bacchantes are victorious and scatter his remains far and wide. As they retreat 
from the scene, now drunk on both blood and wine, a calm slowly descends upon the 
landscape. Silence... A breeze touches the strings of Orpheus* abandoned harp. A dis- 
tant shepherd, innocent of the knowledge of the tragedy that has befallen the world, 
hesitantlv picks out Orpheus' hymn on his pipe. But Orpheus has at last passed through 
the gates of Hades and is once again united with his beloved Eurydiee in the Elysian 
Fields. 

Berlioz wanted to prove to the stodgy Conservatoire professors that his work was 
indeed performable — by an orchestra — and rehearsed it for a concert of his music- 
planned for May 1828. The cantata made a great impression on the instrumentalists, 
and Berlioz himself was particularly moved by the closing Tableau musical, i Berlioz 




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reused this section twice more in later works: for the section called La Harpe eoli- 
enne— Souvenirs in Lelio, and in his Traite d Instrumentation et d' Orchestration as an 
illustration of the flexibility and beauty of the clarinet timbre.) Unfortunately the tenor 
who was to sing the solo fell ill the day of the performance and La Mort d'Orphee was 
never heard in public. Berlioz says in his memoirs that he destroyed the score. In reali- 
ty, however, he gave a copy of the manuscript made by a rather clumsy copyist to his 
friend Humbert Ferrand. The music to the cantata was considered lost until this score 
surfaced in 1923. It is only recently, however, that La Mort d'Orphee has been performed 
and recorded. 

While La Mort d'Orphee is not without its technical flaws (Berlioz had only been 
studying composition for three years), it is the first work in which he consistently dis- 
plays his mature style. He had made great strides since composing the Messe solennelle 
in 1825. It is remarkable that Berlioz could produce such a work before being exposed 
to some of the major influences of his life and of nineteenth-century Romanticism. In 
the year following the 1827 competition Berlioz first read Goethe's Faust, saw Shake- 
speare's plays (in which his wife-to-be played the role of Ophelia), and heard Beetho- 
ven's music for the first time. Thus, La Mort d'Orphee is an original creation of French 
romanticism, the seed from which these important events would nurture Berlioz's fully 
mature works. 

— David Gilbert 

Text and translation begin on the next page. 

David Gilbert is music librarian at Wellesley College and editor of Berlioz's Prix de 
Rome works for the New Berlioz Edition being published by Barenreiter. Program note 
copyright © David Gilbert; all rights reserved. 




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HECTOR BERLIOZ, "La Mort d'Orphee" 

Text by Henri-Montan Berton 
Text in italic by Berlioz 



Introduction et Monologue 

Pretresses de Bacchus, votre haine 

inflexible 
d'un epoux malheureux calomnia les 

pleurs; 
Mais l'amant d'Euridice, en ce sejour 

paisible, 
Saura braver vos jalouses fureurs. 

seul bien qui me reste! 6 ma celeste 

lyre! 
Retentis dans ces bois, viens embellir 

mes vers, 
Ranime mes accents, seconde mon delire; 
Que tes brillants accords etonnent 

l'univers. 

Quel bruit affreux se fait entendre? 

D'une secrette horreur je ne puis me 

defendre . . . 

ciel!. . . en croirai-je mes yeux? 

Ce sont elles! les bacchantes! 

Des cymbales bruyantes 
De leurs cris menagants, de leurs chants 

furieux, 
Retentissent deja les echos de ces 

lieux. . . ! 



Introduction and Monologue 

Priestesses of Bacchus, your unyielding 

hate 
For an unfortunate husband, slandered 

my tears. 
But the lover of Eurydice in this peaceful 

place 
Will know how to brave your jealous rags. 

0, the only good left to me! O, my 

heavenly lyre! 
Resound through these woods, come 

embellish my verses, 
Revive my strains, renew my delight; 
May your brilliant harmony astonish the 

universe. 

What frightful sound is heard?... 
From a hidden power I cannot defend 

myself 
heaven! . . . Can I believe my eyes? 
It is they! . . . The Bacchantes! . . . 
With the noisy clash 
Of their threatening cries, of their raging 

songs, 
The echos of these groves already 

resound! 




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Bacchanale 


Bacchanale 


Dieu puissant, fils de Latone 

Toi qui fus mon mattre, entends-moi; 

Apollon, du haut de ton trone, 

Lance tes feux, je n'ai d'espoir qu'en toi. 


powerful god, son of Latone, 
You who were my master, hear me; 
Apollo, from the height of your throne, 
Hurl your fire, I have no hope but in you. 


Bacchus! Evoe! vengeons-nous de 

V outrage 
Dont Vorgueilleux Orphee a paye notre 

amour, 
quil tombe sous nos coups et que nos cris 


Bacchus, avenge us of the insult 

with which the proud Orpheus has 

returned our love; 
that he drop beneath our blows, that our 


de rage 
le poursuivent encore au tenebreux sejour. 


cries of rage 
follow him through the sombre place. 


Barbares arretez; pardonner a mes pleurs; 
Qu'ai-je fait? qu'ai-je dit? ces pleurs sont 

tout mon crime. 
Epargnez en ce jour la tremblante victime 
que le sort livre a vos fureurs! 
Mais rien ne peut toucher leurs inflexi- 
bles coeurs. 


Stop, barbarians! pardon my tears, 
What have I done, what have I said? 
Tears are my whole crime. 
Spare this day the trembling victim 
That fate surrenders to your fury! 
But nothing can touch their unyielding 
hearts. 


De son corps palpitant dechirons les lam- 
beaux 

du torrent mugissant quils rougissent les 
eaux. 


Pick to pieces the shreds of his quivering 
body 

so that they redden the waters of the rush- 
ing torrent. 


C'est un hymne a ta gloire! 

Frappons, ilfuit en vain, 

Deja sa Lyre s'echappe de sa main. 

Meurs! 


It is a hymn to your glory, 
Strike, he flees in vain, 
Already his lyre escapes his hand. 
Die! 


Apollon! Tu m'as abandonne, 

Grand Dieu, 
aux horreurs d'un affreux supplice, 


Apollo! You have abandoned me, 

great god, 
To the horrors of a frightful torture, 


Euridice, attends-moi...je vais mourir. .. 

adieu... 
Je meurs. . . je te rejoins. . . Euridice. . . 

Euridice... 


Eurydice, hear me. . . I am dying. . . 

Adieu 
I die. . . I join you again. . . Eurydice. . . 

Eurydice 


Victoire! 


Victory! 


27 


Week 13 








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Hector Berlioz 

Te Deum, for tenor soloist and three choruses, 
with orchestra and organ 




Berlioz composed his Te Deum (using some materials 
and ideas from earlier sketches) from October 1848 
into the beginning of 1849, with revisions in 1852 and 
1855. Berlioz himself conducted the first performance 
on April 30, 1855, in the church of St.-Eustache, Paris. 
The first American performance took place in Chicago 
on December 1, 1877, with the Apollo Musical Club 
directed by W.L. Tomlins. Boston first heard the score in 
a performance by the Handel and Haydn Society under 
the direction of Carl Zerrahn on January 29, 1888. 
Three years later, on May 5, 1891, the Te Deum formed 
part of the opening concert at Carnegie Hall under the 
direction of Walter Damrosch; one member of the audi- 
ence was the composer Tchaikovsky, who noted in his 
diary that he found the piece "somewhat boring; only toward the end did I begin to find 
great enjoyment in it." The Boston Symphony Orchestra first performed the work on 
August 7, 1954, at Tanglewood, with tenor David Poleri, the Festival Chorus, and organ- 
ist W.J. Frank; Charles Munch conducted. Colin Davis was next to lead BSO perform- 
ances, on August 13, 1972, at Tanglewood, and then in February 1973 at Symphony 
Hall, with tenor Kenneth Riegel, the Tanglewood Festival Chorus, John Oliver, conduc- 
tor, and organist Berj Zamkochian. The Tanglewood performance also included the 
Albany All Saints Cathedral Choir of Men and Boys, and Girls from the Indian Hill 
School; the children's chorus at Symphony Hall was the St. Pauls School Boy Choir, 
Theodore Marier, director. Gennady Rozhdestvensky led the only BSO performances since 
then, in April 1990, marking the twentieth anniversary of the Tanglewood Festival 
Chorus, John Oliver, conductor; also participating were tenor David Gordon, organist 
James David Christie, and the Boston Boy Choir, John Dunn, director. The score calls 
for two mixed choirs (each divided into three sections: women's voices ["soprani"], tenor, 
and bass) and a third chorus of children's voices, tenor solo, organ, and an orchestra 
consisting of four flutes, four oboes, four clarinets, four bassoons, four horns, two trum- 
pets, two cornets a pistons, six trombones, two tubas, timpani, and strings. 

As a French child growing up in the early years of the nineteenth century, Berlioz 
had plenty of opportunity to observe and enjoy the massive public spectacles organized, 
as a rule, by the government, whether republic, empire, or restored monarchy. Roughly 
equivalent to the ancient Roman circus in its aim of entertaining and tranquilizing the 
populace, the spectacles often had a grandiose musical element that never failed to ap- 
peal to Berlioz. It remained an aspect of his art — though only one aspect — all his life. 
Until quite recently, when recordings have made it easy for us to hear most of Berlioz's 
music, the casual remark that his work was all grandiose and overblown, conceived for 
a "cast of thousands" and designed to overwhelm the listener with sheer volume rather 
than artistic merit, passed easily enough as a general description of his work. All that 
has changed; we now recognize that there was a Berlioz of extraordinary delicacy and 
refinement, too, and we know that he was a composer of unmatched rhythmic variety 
and power as well as one of the great melodists of the century. 

Still, there is a grain of truth in the old image, too. Certain works were clearly de- 
signed from the start to be impressive; one of these, without doubt, is the Te Deum. We 
don't know exactly why Berlioz chose to set the liturgical Te Deum text. It was probably 
not in response to some deep personal need. Rather the opposite: at the time he benl 
himself to concentrated work on the piece, Berlioz had just lost his father, and a setting 



29 



Week 13 




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deductible. For information, please call (617) 63>8~9251. 



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of the praise-filled Te Deum text would not be a likely response to a personal loss. His 
father's sudden decline in health happened so quickly that Berlioz had been unable to 
see him before his death on July 28, 1848. The two had always maintained a somewhat 
prickly relationship, as the elderly doctor had never been entirely reconciled to his 
son's decision to give up medicine for music, and he had never heard a note of any of 
Berlioz's major works. 

Then, for some reason, starting in October, Berlioz began to work intensively on a 
grandiose Te Deum without a commission and without any known pending event of 
public celebration that could serve as a possible reason to perform a work of this scope. 
He had not composed any large work in two full years, since the completion of The 
Damnation of Faust in October 1846, and the intervening time had been filled with 
ill health and personal difficulties. 

Still, compose it he did. Perhaps the events of the revolutionary year of 1848 aroused 
near-dormant recollections of an earlier heroic period; maybe the arrival of a new Napo- 
leon — though one as different from his namesake as could be imagined — played some 
part in his mood. Critics have long suggested that some of the ideas in the work resur- 
faced from sketches for vast public scores conceived long before but never finished, 



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31 



though they usually hedged this suggestion with the idea that it was only the grandiose 
conception of a monumental music, and not particular thematic ideas, that Berlioz 
polled oat of his zif hi : ry for the new work. For ex ample, in the early 1830s he consid- 

rr-f-z n\ ■ _ 2 :-;.;rss3_ zrzim: rr.~i.f-i -<■: i ■ f , :i" ::. —-:-.-■: "7:.f Lis: I:v ;: 

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m . ^ n- ii-fizzif-i ::: 2. r~ f :: :-;-ir»:tsin£ z- ~" : iizy r ::.:_:::: . r.:z : ;: :i:= r.er:. 
r.f z.zm.f 1 2 ~ :--.: fz^::: i^i. ir.f £r=: Zf-siiiez 25 2 zzrf ~f_ :: ir.f irzve s:.z ifr= 
«ir_: zii :i_fi in Iizl.v. :_-.r ; 7 : :: 25 ~Triumrr.=_ finry in:; Jim? : nif - - 1= " 

Tjh~ k~~ z :: if.f 112 :r 1:: f= = ::i_ rfinzir.f-z 1 - 1 : •: ::' :n = mir.z 21.2 -i=y live 



Etas, we now know that there is at least one precise ear- 

f~:_ifs: zrz^ 111 :=:n ::i. 1 '•'-:;■;■; Tinrr. 

2 irfn =11 111.1 : ::i;i :=:~:i_ ::i m: _: 2 yfzr Ir.f' :r>: 
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given it to a frier, z. and :: tumed op a few yezr- 21 

1. ^: : 1. _ - 1 -:i n 21 -- 112 ::_.-: mi; 1211 11: — 
ances - the Boston Symphony in the fall of 1994 — 

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THURS., DEC. 5, AT 10:30AM 
SEIJI OZAWA, conductor 
ARCADI VOLODOS, piano 
Music of RACHMANINOFF and 
TCHAIKOVSKY 

WED., JAN. 22, AT 7:30PM 
SEIJI OZAWA, conductor 
JOHN ALER, tenor 
TANGLEWOOD FESTIVAL CHORUS, 

JOHN OLIVER, conductor 
ALL-BERLIOZ PROGRAM 

THURS., FEB. 6, AT 10:30AM 
ANDRE PREVIN, conductor and pianist 
WILLIAM R. HUDGINS, clarinet 
Music of GOULD, COPLAND, 
SCHUMAN, and GERSHWIN 

WED., FEB. 12, AT 7:30PM 
ANDRE PREVIN, conductor 
Music of HAYDN and SHOSTAKOVICH 



SINGLE TICKET PRICE: $12.50 (General Admission) 

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THURS., APRIL 3, AT 10:30AM 
SEIJI OZAWA, conductor 
MSTISLAV ROSTROPOVICH, cello 
STEVE ANSELL, viola 
Music of THOMAS, RANDS, 
and STRAUSS 

WED., APRIL 23, AT 7:30PM 
BERNARD HAITINK, conductor 
YURI BASHMET, viola 
Music of HAYDN, GUBAIDUUNA, 
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THURS., MAY 1 , AT 10:30AM 
BERNARD HAITINK, conductor 
Music of STRAVINSKY and 
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mark his major masterpieces, lacking as yet only the technique to bring them off fully. 
He himself clearly realized this fact, because he metaphorically "burned" his manu- 
script — but not before drawing on it again and again for familiar passages that we now 
know as part of the Symphonie fantastique, the Requiem, the Roman Carnival Over- 
ture, and the Te Deuml In the early Mass, Berlioz composed a tenor solo to the closing 
section of the Proper for the Mass, the Agnus Dei. This solo reappears, only slightly 
changed, in the Te Deum, but to an entirely different text, twenty-four years later — 
complete with the chantlike echoes for women's voices. So carefully, yet subtly, did he 
adapt the music to the new text that no one ever suspected this movement to contain 
the oldest music in the entire score until the recovery of the lost early Mass setting. 

Once having finished the score, Berlioz began looking for a suitable performance 
opportunity. Clearly, given the forces required, it could only be given in connection 
with some major event. For several years he offered the Te Deum at every suitable 
opportunity — including gala performances at the Crystal Palace Exhibition (which 
might be called the first modern industrial trade show and world's fair) in London in 
1851 and at the coronation of Emperor Louis-Napoleon in 1852, only to be disappoint- 
ed on both occasions. What finally led to the only complete performance during the 
composer's lifetime was the dedication of a new organ in the church of St.-Eustache in 



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Paris. Berlioz had given the organ a prominent (though not large) solo part in his Te 
Deum, and it seemed to be a good choice to celebrate the event, in conjunction with 
solo performances on the organ. The children's chorus required for the Te Deum could 
be made available from an orphanage of which the Empress was patron, and the whole 
affair could be made particularly festive if it were timed to coincide with the French 
response to the Crystal Palace Exhibition, the "Universal Exposition of Works of Art 
and Products of Agriculture and Industry." Unfortunately the exposition was postponed 
by Imperial decree one day before the dress rehearsal. 

By that time Berlioz had already assembled his orchestra, his two adult choruses, a 
group of six hundred orphans to sing the children's chorus, and his soloist, so that the 
performance simply could not be postponed. Aside from the loss of glamour associated 
with the possible presence of several heads of state, the principal effect on the Te Deum 
of the festival's delay was to force the omission of an elaborate march "for the presenta- 
tion of the banners" of Catholic exhibitors. The march remains part of the score but it 
is omitted in most performances, including the present ones. 

The performance was musically solid, and the church was jammed with the perform- 
ers themselves and a large, enthusiastic audience. Berlioz was convinced that he had 
composed a masterpiece to put alongside the Requiem, and he said as much in a letter 
to Liszt a few weeks later. Not the least of the pleasant aspects of that spring was the 
opportunity Berlioz had to make the acquaintance of Giuseppe Verdi, who was in Paris 
for the production of his own contribution to the exposition, his grand opera Les Vepres 
siciliennes. The two composers enjoyed one another's company and continued to express 
their mutual admiration and respect afterwards. 

Compared to the Requiem, the Te Deum has never had anything like the same degree 
of popular success, though it is cast in much the same mold, with carefully planned 
"spatial" effects among the participants to generate a monumental sound. As Berlioz 
composed it, the score consisted of six choral movements plus two for instruments, a 
"Prelude" after the second movement and the processional march of the banners at the 
end. Berlioz omitted the Prelude entirely at the premiere and did not even publish it 
with the vocal score, though it appears in the full score and will be performed here. 
He conducted the march of the banners during the dress rehearsal on April 28, but 
omitted it from the actual performance two days later, since there was no procession 
for it to accompany. 

Like the Requiem, the Te Deum is a monumental score, with great blocks of sound 
deployed in self-contained segments, mixing, the austere with the splendid, and a struc- 
ture that alternates the celebration of God's grandeur with the expression of man's in- 
significance. Textures change with dramatic suddenness, as do orchestral color and 
dynamics. Delicate intimacy of expression coexists with monumental grandeur. The 
opening chords for the orchestra, alternating with chords for solo organ, establish the 
sonorous space of the score. The alternation of moods occurs within the larger move- 
ments (such as the opening one), but more subdued movements ("Dignare" and "Te 
ergo quaesumus" with its tenor solo) provide striking contrast, while the last movement 
of all, "Judex crederis," recaptures much of the dramatic power of the "Lacrymosa" in 
the Requiem. Berlioz regarded this, with justification, as the finest part of the score and 
one of the finest achievements of his life. 



— S.L. 



Text for the Te Deum begins on the next page. 



35 



Week 13 



BERLIOZ, "Te Deum' 



Te Deum laudamus (Hymn) 

Te Deum laudamus; te Dominum 

confitemur, 
Te aeternum Patrem: omnis terra 

veneratur. 



We praise Thee, o God, we 

ackowledge Thee to be the Lord. 
All the earth doth worship Thee, 
the Father everlasting. 



Tibi omnes angeli (Hymn) 

Tibi omnes angeli: tibi coeli et 

potestates; 
Tibi cherubim et seraphim incessabili 

voce proclamant: 
Sanctus, Sanctus, Sanctus: Deus 

Sabaoth! 
Pleni sunt coeli et terra majestatis 

gloriae tuae. 
Te gloriosus chorus apostolorum, 

Te prophetarum laudabilis numerus, 

Te martyrum candidatus laudat exercitus. 
Te per orbem terrarum sancta confitetur 
Ecclesia 



To Thee all angels cry aloud: the heavens 

and all the powers therein; 
To Thee cherubim and seraphim 

continually do cry: 
Holy, Holy, Holy: Lord God of 

Sabaoth; 
Heaven and earth are full of the majesty 

of thy glory. 
The glorious company of the apostles 

praise Thee. 
The goodly fellowship of the prophets 

praise Thee. 
The noble army of martyrs praise Thee. 
The holy Church throughout all the 

world doth acknowledge Thee, 




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Patrem immensae majestatis; 
Venerandum tuum verum et unicum 

Filium, 
Sanctum quoque Paraclitum Spiritum. 



The Father of an infinite majesty; 
Thine honorable, true, and only Son; 

Also the Holy Ghost, the Comforter. 



Praeludium 



Dignare, Domine (Prayer) 

Dignare, Domine, die iste, sine peccato 

nos custodire. 
Aeterna fac cum Sanctis tuis in gloria 

in numerari. 
Miserere nostri! miserere nostri! 



Christe, Rex gloriae (Hymn) 

Tu, Christe, Rex gloriae: 
Patris sempiternus Filius. 

Tu, devicto mortis aculeo, 

aperuisti credentibus regna coelorum. 



Tu, ad liberandum suscepturus 

hominem, 
non horruisti Virginis uterum. 
Tu ad dexteram Dei sedes, in gloria 

Patris. 



Vouchsafe, o Lord, to keep us this day 

without sin. 
Make us to be numbered with Thy saints 

glory everlasting. 
O Lord, have mercy upon us, have mercy 

upon us. 



Thou art the King of glory, o Christ: 
Thou art the everlasting Son of the 

Father. 
When Thou hadst overcome the 

sharpness of death, 
Thou didst open the kingdom of heaven 

to all believers. 

When Thou tookest upon Thee to 

deliver man, 
Thou didst not abhor the Virgin's womb, 
Thou sittest at the right hand of God, 

in the glory of the Father. 



Te ergo quaesumus (Prayer) 

Te ergo, quaesumus, famulis tuis We therefore pray Thee, help Thy 

subveni, servants, 

quos pretioso sanguine redemisti. whom Thou hast redeemed with Thy 

precious blood. 

Fiat super nos misericordia tua, Domine, Lord, let Thy mercy lighten upon us, 

quemadmodum speravimus in te. as our trust is in Thee. 



Judex crederis (Hymn and Prayer) 
Judex crederis esse venturus. 

In te, Domine, speravi; non confundar 

in aeternum. 
Salvum fac populum tuum et benedic 

hereditati tuae, Domine. 
Per singulos dies benedicimus, 

laudamus te et laudamus nomen tuum. 



We believe that Thou shalt come to be 

our judge, 
O Lord, in Thee have I trusted; let me 

never be confounded. 
O Lord, save Thy people, and bless 

thine heritage. 
Day by day we magnify Thee, and we 

worship Thy name, ever world without 

end. 










37 



Week 13 









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More . . . 



Though unlucky enough in his own lifetime, Berlioz has been supremely fortunate in 
recent decades to attract biographers of the highest merit. Hugh Macdonald, general 
editor of the new Berlioz critical edition, has written a superbly balanced, enthusiastic 
compact introduction to the life and works of the composer in the Master Musicians 
series (Dent). The more recent biography by D. Kern Holoman, also entitled simply 
Berlioz (Harvard), somewhat larger in scope than Macdonald's book, is equally highly 
recommended. It may be the best place to find out almost anything you care to know 
about the composer. Though Jacques Barzun's magisterial two-volume study, Berlioz 
and the Romantic Century (Columbia), first published more than a generation ago, 
remains important, Holoman's book is not only more compact but also gives a better 
sense of Berlioz's life as he lived it. (Barzun had to spend a lot of space fighting rear- 
guard actions against critics who did not consider Berlioz a significant composer, and 
this inevitably interrupted the argument.) In addition, Holoman beautifully integrates 
the work with the life, showing how Berlioz's music grew out of a distinctive French tra- 
dition as well as out of his own fertile imagination. He traces the ways in which the 







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composer uses early sketches for pieces composed much later, and he takes advantage 
of forty or more years of detailed Berlioz scholarship and seems to encompass it all in 
a single gracefully written volume. His book will surely be the standard one-volume 
Berlioz study for this generation. Barzun is particularly rich in its discussion of the 
cultural context; he also prepared a one-volume abridgment, Berlioz and his Century, 
which has been reprinted in a new edition (University of Chicago paperback). Word 
has it that David Cairns's new Berlioz book — not yet published in this country — is also 
first-rate. For a well-informed brief introduction, the excellent Berlioz article in The 
New Grove is the place to start; it is by Hugh Macdonald, who, as noted above, is the 
general editor of the new edition of Berlioz's works. The article has been reprinted in 
The New Grove Early Romantic Masters 2 (Norton paperback), along with those on 
Weber and Mendelssohn. The helpful BBC Music Guides series includes a short vol- 
ume on Berlioz Orchestral Works, also by Macdonald (BBC). An excellent purely musi- 
cal discussion of Berlioz's work is Brian Primmer's The Berlioz Style (Oxford). A much 
more technical book (it grew out of a doctoral dissertation) is D. Kern Holoman's The 
Creative Process in the Autograph Musical Documents of Hector Berlioz, c. 1818-1840 
(UMI Research Press), which traces the composition of many of the composer's early 
masterpieces in some detail. 

The most direct and personal way to begin finding out about Berlioz is from his own 
memoirs, a masterpiece of autobiography. Despite the difficulties of his career and his 
increasing bitterness, Berlioz's sense of humor allowed him to achieve a remarkable 
balance in telling the story of his life. He is also the finest writer among the great com- 
posers, so the book is memorable from the purely literary point of view as well. The 
translation to read is the one by David Cairns, published as The Memoirs of Hector Ber- 
lioz, which can be found in libraries (the Norton edition, once available in paperback, 
is now out of print). An older translation by Ernest Newman is still available (Dover) 
but lacks the detailed corrections of Berlioz's misstatements and exaggerations. None- 
theless the Memoirs capture the composer's pride, wit, passion, and sardonic humor 
with special flair. 

Waverley is included on Sir Colin Davis's first-rate disc of Berlioz overtures with the 
London Symphony (Philips, including also he Corsaire, Roman Carnival, Les Francs- 
juges, and King Lear). La Mort d'Orphee is available in two different recordings: with 
Jean Fournet conducting the Dutch Radio Choir and Radio Symphony Orchestra with 
tenor Gerard Garino (Denon, on a disc also including three other Berlioz cantatas, the 
Scene Hero'ique—La Revolution grecque, Le Cinq Mai— Chant sur la mort de VEmpereur 
Napoleon, and LTmperiale); and, preferably, with Jean-Claude Casadesus conducting 
the Choeur Regional Nord/Pas de Calais and the Orchestre National de Lille with tenor 
Daniel Galvez Vallejo (Harmonia Mundi, on a disc also including Berlioz's Prix de Rome 
cantatas Herminie, La Mort de Cleopdtre, and a fragment — all that survives — of the one 
that finally won him the prize, La Mort de Sardanapale. The Te Deum can be had in a 
recording, by turns lyrical and grandiose, from Sir Colin Davis with the London Sym- 
phony Orchestra and Chorus with Franco Tagliavini as the tenor soloist (Philips). 

— Steven Ledbetter 






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John Aler 

The acclaimed American lyric tenor John Aler has performed with 
most of Europe's major opera companies and houses, as well as 
with New York City Opera and the companies of St. Louis, Santa 
Fe, Washington, D.C., and Baltimore in the United States. As solo- 
ist he performs frequently with the major American and European 
orchestras, with such conductors as Barenboim, Dutoit, Masur, 
Mehta, Norrington, Ozawa, Rattle, Salonen, Slatkin, and Zinman. 
Highlights of last summer included a recording for Decca of Adam's 
Le Toreador with Richard Bonynge and the Welsh Opera Orchestra, 
a return to the Minnesota Sommerfest as Ottavio in Don Giovanni 
under David Zinman, and a return to Australia singing the Berlioz Requiem with John Nel- 
son and the Sydney Symphony as part of the Fourth World Symposium on Choral Music. In 
addition to the present Boston Symphony concerts, highlights of his 1996-97 season include 
performances as David in Wagner's Die Meistersinger with James Conlon and the Gurzenich 
Orchestra of Cologne, Elgar's Dream of Gerontius with Richard Hickox and the Bournemouth 
Symphony, Orff's Carmina burana with Jukka-Pekka Saraste and the Toronto Symphony, 
music of Schubert with Daniel Barenboim and the Chicago Symphony, Judas Maccabaeus 
with the University of Maryland Handel Festival, Tokyo performances of Honegger's Jeanne 
d'Arc au bucher with Charles Dutoit and the NHK Symphony, and Beethoven's Ninth Sym- 
phony with Kurt Masur and the Gewandhaus Orchestra of Leipzig in that city's New Year 
Concerts. In addition he sings recitals in Philadelphia and at Alice Tully Hall and performs 
with the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center. Mr. Aler has made more than fifty re- 
cordings. Recent releases include a solo collection on Delos entitled "Songs We Forgot to 
Remember," the Glyndebourne Opera recording of The Merry Widow on EMI, Berlioz songs 
for Deutsche Grammophon, and Stravinsky's Pulcinella and Renard with Hugh Wolff and 
the Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra for Teldec. Recently he was heard on the soundtrack of 
the film "Little Women" singing a duet with Barbara Hendricks from the EMI recording of 



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Bizet's The Pearl Fishers. Mr. Aler is also featured on two 1994 Grammy-winning record- 
ings on Deutsche Grammophon: as Jupiter in Handel's Semele with John Nelson and the 
English Chamber Orchestra on Deutsche Grammophon, and on the Pierre Boulez/Chicago 
Symphony disc of Bartok's The Wooden Prince and Cantata pro/ana. In 1985 he was award- 
ed a Grammy for Best Classical Vocal Soloist, for his Telarc recording of the Berlioz Requiem 
with Robert Shaw and the Atlanta Symphony. A native of Baltimore, John Aler attended 
Catholic University in Washington, D.C., before going on to pursue his musical education 
at Juilliard. An alumnus of the Tanglewood Music Center, he has appeared frequently with 
the Boston Symphony Orchestra since his BSO debut in 1974, most recently in Carmina 
burana at Tanglewood with Seiji Ozawa in 1995, and for subscription performances of Liszt's 
A Faust Symphony with Sir Simon Rattle in January 1994. 




Tanglewood Festival Chorus 
John Oliver, Conductor 

Organized in the spring of 1970, when founding conductor John 
Oliver became director of vocal and choral activities at the Tangle- 
wood Music Center, the Tanglewood Festival Chorus marked its 
twenty-fifth anniversary in April 1995 and celebrated the anniver- 
sary that summer. In December 1994, in its first performances over- 
seas, the chorus joined Seiji Ozawa and the Boston Symphony Orches- 
tra for tour performances in Hong Kong and Japan of Berlioz's Requiem, 
Romeo et Juliette, the "Royal Hunt and Storm" from Les Troyens, and, 
in its Asian premiere, the Messe solennelle. Co-sponsored by the 
Tanglewood Music Center and Boston University, and originally 
formed for performances at the Boston Symphony Orchestra's summer home, the chorus was 
soon playing a major role in the BSO's Symphony Hall season as well. Now the official 
chorus of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, the Tanglewood Festival Chorus is made up of 
members who donate their services, performing in Boston, New York, and at Tanglewood, 
working with Music Director Seiji Ozawa, the Boston Pops, Principal Guest Conductor 
Bernard Haitink, and such prominent guests as Marek Janowski, Roger Norrington, and 
Simon Rattle. The chorus has also collaborated with Seiji Ozawa and the Boston Symphony 
Orchestra on numerous recordings, beginning with Berlioz's The Damnation of Faust for 
Deutsche Grammophon, a 1975 Grammy nominee for Best Choral Performance. Recordings 
with Seiji Ozawa and the Boston Symphony Orchestra on compact disc also include Tchai- 
kovsky's Pique Dame and Berlioz's Requiem, on RCA Victor Red Seal; Strauss's Elektra, 
Mahler's Second, Third, and Eighth symphonies, Bartok's The Miraculous Mandarin, and 
Schoenberg's Gurrelieder, on Philips; Poulenc's Gloria and Stabat mater with Kathleen 
Battle, and Mendelssohn's complete incidental music to A Midsummer Nights Dream, on 
Deutsche Grammophon; and Debussy's La Damoiselle elue with Frederica von Stade, on 
Sony Classical/CBS Masterworks. Also for Philips, the chorus has recorded Ravel's Daphnis 
et Chloe and Brahms's Alto Rhapsody with the Boston Symphony Orchestra under Bernard 
Haitink's direction. They may also be heard on two Christmas albums with John Williams 
and the Boston Pops Orchestra: "Joy to the World," on Sony Classical, and "We Wish You 
a Merry Christmas," on Philips. 

In addition to his work with the Tanglewood Festival Chorus, John Oliver was for many 
years conductor of the MIT Chamber Chorus and MIT Concert Choir, and a senior lecturer 
in music at MIT. Mr. Oliver founded the John Oliver Chorale in 1977; his recent recording 
with that ensemble for Koch International includes three pieces written specifically for the 
Chorale — Bright Sheng's Two Folksongs from Chinhai, Martin Amlin's Times Caravan, and 
William Thomas McKinley's Four Text Settings — as well as four works of Elliott Carter. A 
second recording for Koch is planned, to include Carter's remaining choral works, and music 
by other American composers. Mr. Oliver's recent appearances as a guest conductor have 
included performances of Mozart's Requiem with the New Japan Philharmonic, and Mendels- 
sohn's Elijah and Vaughan Williams's A Sea Symphony with the Berkshire Choral Institute. 
Mr. Oliver made his Boston Symphony Orchestra conducting debut at Tanglewood in 1985. 



44 





Tanglewood Festival Chorus 




John Oliver, Conductor 






Sopranos 


Gale Livingston 


Pate Steele 


Michelle Nicole Abadia 


April Merriam 


Kirk Sullivan 


Carol Amaya 


Margaret O'Connell 


Joseph P. Tucker 


Annette Anfinrud 


Fumiko Ohara 


L. Daniel Vincent 


Michele M. Bergonzi 


Susan Quinn Pierce 


Thomas Westfall 


Joanne Colella Boag 


Marian Rambelle 


Benjamin Antes Youngman 


Sarah S. Brannen 


Rachel Shetler 




Patricia Cox 


Linda Kay Smith 


Basses 


Sarah Dorfman Daniello 


Ada Park Snider 


Neal Addicott 


Carol E. Didget 


Julie Steinhilber 


Stephen Bloom 


Christine P. Duquette 


Amy K. Toner 


Bryan M. Cadel 


Ann M. Dwelley 


Cindy Vredeveld 


James W. Courtemanche 


Camelia M. Garrido 


Christina Lillian Wallace 


Edward E. Dahl 


Martha R. Golub 


Cynthia Rodgers Zimmerman 


Marc J. DeMille 


Nancy Kurtz 




Mark Gianino 
Oshin B. Gregorian 


Marlene Luciano-Kerr 


Tenors 


Jane Circle Morfill 


Paul Allen 


Jay Gregory 


Kimberly A. Powell 


Bill Backus 


Mark L. Haberman 


Livia Racz 


John C. Barr 


Jeramie D. Hammond 


Charlotte C. Russell 


James Barnswell 


Michael G. Healy 


Melanie W. Salisbury 


Richard A. Bissell 


John Knowles 


Lynda Schiller 


Dominador F. Coloyan 


Bruce Kozuma 


Suzanne Schwing 


Andrew 0. Crain 


Steven Ledbetter 


S. Lynn Shane 


Richard Damaso 


David K. Lones 


Joan P. Sherman 


James DeSelms 


Greg Mancusi-Ungaro 


Mary Beth Stevens 


Reginald Didham 


Michael Olbash 


Patricia J. Stewart 


Tom Dinger 


John Olson 


Sarah J. Telford 


J. Stephen Groff 


Stephen H. Owades 




John W. Hickman 


Simon A. Rakov 


Mezzo-sopranos 


Stanley Hudson 


Vladimir Roudenko 


Maisy Bennett 


Trent Hutchinson 


Karl Josef Schoellkopf 


Betty B. Blume 


James R. Kauffman 


David W. Secour 


Sharon Brown 


Ronald Lloyd 


Frank R. Sherman 


Ethel Crawford 


Henry Lussier 


Peter S. Strickland 


Abbe Irene Dalton 


John Vincent Maclnnis 


J. Michael Trogolo 


Diane Droste 


Ronald J. Martin 


Brad Turner 


Paula Folkman 


David Hale Mooney 


Thomas C. Wang 


Dorrie Freedman 


David Norris 


Terry L. Ward 


Irene Gilbride 


David Raish 


Brian Watson 


Donna Hewitt-Didham 


Brian R. Robinson 


Peter J. Wender 


Evelyn Eshleman Kern 


Paul Rolanti 


Warren P. Ziegler 


Annie Lee 






Felicia A. Burrey, Chorus Manager 




Frank Corliss, Rehearsal Pianist 




Sarah J. Telford, Language Coach 






Boston Symphony Oi 


fchestra concertmaster Mai 


•olin Lowe performs on 




a Stradivarius violin loaned to the orchestra by Lisa, 


Nicole, and Wanda Reindorf 




in memory of their brother, Mark Reindorf. 






45 





& 




PALS (Performing Artists at Lincoln School) 
Johanna Hill Simpson, Artistic Director 

PALS (Performing Artists at Lincoln School) is a singing-based 
music and theater program founded in 1989 by its conductor and 
artistic director, Johanna Hill Simpson. The goal was to provide the 
children at one public school with the training necessary to achieve 
excellence in the performing arts. Now in its seventh season, PALS 
choruses have performed with the Harvard-Radcliffe Chorus, Chorus 
Pro Musica, Nashoba Valley Chorale, and the Melrose Polymnia 
Society, and in such well-known venues as Boston's Symphony Hall, 
Harvard's Sanders Theatre, and the Gardner Museum. PALS were 
invited by audition to sing at the American Choral Directors Assoc- 
iation (ACDA) Eastern Division Conference in Philadelphia and participated in the Festival 
of Treble Choruses at Radcliffe College. Last April they made their debut with Seiji Ozawa, 
the Boston Symphony Orchestra, and the Tanglewood Festival Chorus performing Elliot 
Goldenthal's Fire Water Paper: A Vietnam Oratorio. From its first season with fifteen mem- 
bers, PALS has grown into a major after-school program at the W. H. Lincoln School in Brook- 
line, Massachusetts. Privately funded, with rehearsal and performance space provided by 
school principal Barbara Shea, PALS consists of four ensembles and more than 100 children 
who receive instruction in choral singing, drama, and dance. The seven- through thirteen- 
year-old students of this culturally rich, economically diverse public school community are 
invited each September to audition for placement in beginning, preparatory, or advanced 
choral ensembles. PALS is tuition-based, with an extensive scholarship assistance program. 

Johanna Hill Simpson founded the PALS Children's Chorus in 1989. Ms. Simpson re- 
ceived her B.A. in music from Dartmouth College and her master's in choral conducting 
from the New England Conservatory of Music, where she studied with Lorna Cooke DeVaron 
and served as assistant conductor of the New England Conservatory Chorus. In addition to 
directing the PALS program in Brookline, she also conducts the Nashoba Valley Chorale, 
a sixty-voice independent mixed chorus. She was guest conductor of the Radcliffe Choral 
Society in 1990 and of the Harvard-Radcliffe Chorus in 1992. She has recently been ap- 
pointed Massachusetts ACDA Repertoire and Standards Chairperson for Children's Choruses. 



PALS (Performing Artists at Lincoln School) 



Isaiah Andrews 
Thomas Arm 
Luisa Badaracco 
Zachary Botham 
Alice Cardim 
Christine Clark 
Alexander Dynan 
Sophia Fisher 
Megan Gamerman 
Emilia Gianfortoni 
Sarah Green- Golan 
Daniel Gomery 
Monica Gomery 
Anna Gridneva 
Jessica Griebenow 
Elyse Hendrickson 
Kiah Hufane 
Dana Jensen 
Keri Jensen 
Julia Kuhns 



Wren Leader 
Mary Leshchiner 
Ethan Lipsitz 
Bailey Lojek 
Patricia Malley 
Aaron Martel 
Charlotte Martin 
Jason Murray 
Heather Olins 
Sam Orleans 
Willie Osterweil 
Dax Peters 
Leona Pierre 
Markus Potyranski 
Tobias Potyranski 
Leah Rappaport 
Will Rappaport 
Jamie Reilly 
David Resnick 
Jennifer Resnick 



Coby Rhoades 
Deborah Schwartz 
Daniel Seltzer 
Evan Shannon 
Jonathan Simpson 
Peter Simpson 
Christopher Skinner 
Mariya Spivak 
Lindsay Stoll 
Fay Strongin 
Joanna Sullivan 
Hannah Swaim 
Jordan Swaim 
Samuel Urmy 
Zoe Vrabel 
Alison White 
Lauren White 
Fan Yang 
Diana Zeng 



Johanna Hill Simpson, Conductor 
Nancy Walker, Admininstrative Director 



46 




James David Christie 

Internationally acclaimed as one of the finest organists of his gener- 
ation, James David Christie has performed throughout North Amer- 
ica, Europe, and Japan, in solo concerts and with major symphony 
and period-instrument orchestras. He has premiered works by Anton 
Heiller, Daniel Pinkham, Ellen Taaffe Zwilich, Jean Langlais, George 
Crumb, and P.D.Q. Bach (for the hundredth anniversary of the Bos- 
ton Pops Orchestra with conductor John Williams). He is currently 
Distinguished Artist-in-Residence at the College of the Holy Cross 
in Worcester, Massachusetts, and serves on the faculties of Welles- 
ley College and the Boston Conservatory. He has served as organist 
for the Boston Symphony Orchestra since 1978 and is also the artistic director of the Inter- 
national Artists Series at Worcester's Mechanics Hall. In August 1979 he became the first 
American to win First Prize at the International Organ Competition in Bruges, Belgium; he 
was also the first person in that competition's history to win the First Prize of the Jury as 
well as the Prize of the Audience. Mr. Christie has served on juries for the American 
Guild of Organists, the Bodky Early Music Competition, international organ competitions 
in Bruges, Worcester, Leipzig, and Lille, and numerous conservatories in France, Belgium, 
and Canada. He received his degrees from the Oberlin Conservatory and the New England 
Conservatory. He was awarded the Artist's Diploma from the New England Conservatory 
in 1977 and an honorary doctor of music degree from the New England School of Law in 
1980 for his outstanding contributions to the musical life of Boston. His teachers included 
Marie-Claire Alain, Bernard Lagace, and Harald Vogel. In 1994 the New England Conser- 
vatory honored him with its Outstanding Alumni Award. Mr. Christie has traveled exten- 
sively throughout Europe studying historic instruments and doing musicological research. 
He has performed for major music festivals in this country, Europe, and Japan; his solo 
performances have been broadcast throughout the United States and Europe; he has per- 
formed for the International Congress of Organists and for several national conventions of 
the American Guild of Organists; and he is founder and director of Ensemble Abendmusik, 
a period-instrument group devoted to music of the seventeenth century. Mr. Christie has 
recorded for Philips, Nonesuch, Decca, Koch International, MusicMasters, BMG, Bridge, 
GM Records, Northeastern, Denon, and Naxos. His most recent recording on Naxos, organ 
music of Sweelinck on the Fisk Renaissance organ at Wellesley College, was awarded the 
Preis der Deutschen Schallplatten Kritik. Recently he recorded Daniel Pinkham's Sonata 
III with the London Symphony and Paul Hindemith's Concerto for Orchestra and Orchestra 
with members of the Boston Symphony for Koch International; gave concerts at the London 
Proms and in Italy with the Bach Ensemble under Joshua Rifkin; toured Belgium, France, 
and Switzerland with the Orchestra of St. Luke's and La Chapelle Royale, Philippe Herre- 
weghe conducting; and performed as guest artist with the Vienna Philharmonic in its 1996 
Carnegie Hall Festival. Daniel Pinkham dedicated his Organ Concerto II to Mr. Christie; 
the world premiere took place with the Rheinland Philharmonic in Koblenz, Germany, as 
part of a month-long festival featuring American organ music. With Seiji Ozawa and the 
Boston Symphony, Mr. Christie has recently performed Saint-Saens' Organ Symphony and 
recorded Faure's Requiem for BMG. 



47 



/BOSTON^ 




{ SYMPHONY| DCA i- C 1 • 

Iorchestra/ BhU Corporate Sponsorships 

^^ SE III OZAWA JL 






^sffisf 




The Boston Symphony wishes to acknowledge this distinguished group 


of corporations for their outstanding and exemplary support 


of the Orchestra during the 1996 fiscal year. 


FIDELITY INVESTMENTS 


FILENE'S 


MASSACHUSETTS OFFICE 


Tanglewood on Parade 


OF TRAVEL AND TOURISM 




"Evening at Pops" Public Television 


NORTHWEST AIRLINES 


Broadcasts 


Gospel Night at Pops 


NEC CORPORATION 




BSO North American Tour 


ITT SHERATON 




CORPORATION 


FIDELITY INVESTMENTS 


BOSTON SHERATON 


Boston Pops Esplanade Orchestra 


HOTEL AND TOWERS 


Summer Tour 


Boston Pops New Year's Eve Concert 


FLEET BANK 




WCVB-TV, HEARST 


BANKBOSTON 


BROADCASTING 


CORPORATION 


WCRB 102.5 FM 


BLUE CROSS AND BLUE 


Salute to Symphony 


SHIELD OF MASSACHUSETTS 


BANK OF BOSTON 


COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER 


Holiday Pops Series 


COMPANY 




FOUR SEASONS HOTEL 


JOHN HANCOCK FUNDS 




Opening Night at Symphony 


INGALLS, QUINN & JOHNSON 


Opening Night at Pops 


JOHN HANCOCK 




FINANCIAL SERVICES 


LEXUS 


NYNEX 


Exclusive Automobile of: 


MANULIFE FINANCIAL 


Opening Night at Symphony and 




Opening Night at Pops 


NORTEL 




PAINEWEBBER 


TDK ELECTRONICS 




CORPORATION 


RAYTHEON COMPANY 


Tanglewood Tickets for Children 


Single Concert Sponsors 


For information on the BSO Corporate Sponsorship Program, contact 


Madelyne Cuddeback, Director of Corporate Sponsorships, 


at (617) 


638-9254. 



48 



Boston 
Symphony Orchestra 



C/3 



Simply the Best 



From one proud house to another. 




The Studley Press 



Fine printing since 1938. 

Full service, digital front end, multi color presses, full bindery capabilities. 

CatalogsC^Fine Art ReproductionsC^Annual ReportsC/^NewslettersC/^Magazines 

InvitationsC^BrochuresC/sBooks&oPromotional Materials 

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is reflected from the ceiling, walls and floor. To hear the results of our 
research, listen to any Bose product. In the meantime, welcome to our lab. 

"Bose breaks the mold. ... Who said American companies cant innovate?" 

- Rich Warren, Chicago Tribune 



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Better sound through research® 



Business Leadership Association 

($10,000 and above) 

The support provided by members of the Business Leadership Association is 
instrumental in enabling the Orchestra to pursue its mission of performance, 
training and community outreach. The BSO gratefully acknowledges the following 
organizations for their generous leadership support. 

(The following includes annual, capital, and sponsorship support during the BSO's 
fiscal year beginning September 1, 1995 through August 31, 1996). 



Fidelity Investments 
Edward C. Johnson 3d 



Beethoven Society 

($500,000 and above) 

NEC Corporation 
Hisashi Kaneko 



Massachusetts Office of Travel and Tourism 
Mary Jane McKenna 



BankBoston Corporation 
William M. Crozier, Jr 

John Hancock Funds 
Edward J. Boudreau, Jr. 

LEXUS 

James E. Press 

Massachusetts Cultural Council 
A state agency 



Gold Baton 

($100,000 - $499,999) 

NYNEX 
Donald Reed 

WCBB 102.5 FM 

Cynthia Scullin 



WCVB-TV, Hearst Broadcasting 
Paul La Camera 



Silver Baton 

($75,000 - $99,999) 



Fleet Bank of Massachusetts, N.A. 
Leo Breitman 



Conductor's Circle 

($25,000 - $49,999) 






Blue Cross and Blue Shield of 

Massachusetts 
William C. Van Faasen 

Community Newspaper Company 
William R. Elfers 

ITT Sheraton Corporation 
John Kapioltas 

Manulife Financial 
Dominic DAlessandro 

Northwest Airlines 
7erry M. Leo 



NORTEL 

Robert 0. Nelson 

Paine Webber, Inc. 

Bruce Cameron, Richard F. Connolly, 

Charles T. Harris, Joseph F. Patton, Jr. 

Raytheon Company 
Dennis J. Picard 

Sheraton Boston Hotel & Towers 
Denise Coll 

TDK 

Ken Kihara 



49 



Principal 

($15,000 - 



Andersen Consulting LLP 
William D. Green 

BBN Corporation 
George H. Conrades 

Boston Edison Company 
Thomas J. May 

Boston Herald 
Patrick J. Purcell 

Connell Limited Partnership 
William F. Connell 

Coopers & Ly brand LLP 
Francis A. Doyle 

Ernst & Young LLP 
James S. DiStasio 



Player 

$24,999) 

Filene's 

Joseph M. Melvin 

The Gillette Company 
Alfred M. Zeien 

Harcourt General Charitable Foundation 
Richard A. Smith 

John Hancock Financial Services 
William L. Boyan 

Liberty Mutual Group 
Gary L. Countryman 

Royal Appliance Mfg. Co. 
Michael J. Merriman 

Von Hoffman Press, Inc. 
Frank A. Bowman 



Essex Investment 
Joseph McNay 



[anagement Co., Inc. 



Honor Roll 

($10,000 - $14,999) 



Analog Devices, Inc. 
Ray Stata 

Arley Corporation 
David I. Riemer 

Arnold Communications, Inc. 
Ed Eskandarian 

Arthur Andersen LLP 
George Massaro 

Arthur D. Little 
Charles LaMantia 

Bingham, Dana & Gould 
Jay S. Zimmerman 
William A. Bachman 

The Boston Company 
Christopher Condron 

Converse Inc. 
Glenn Rupp 

Deloitte & Touche 
Michael Joyce 

Eastern Enterprises/Boston Gas Company 
J. Atwood Ives 
Chester R. Messer 

EMC Corporation 
Richard Egan 

Hewitt Associates 

Christopher S. Palmer 



Houghton Mifflin Company 
Nader F. Darehshori 

IBM Corporation 

Patricia S. Wolpert 

KPMG Peat Marwick 
Donald B. Holmes 

Loomis Sayles & Company, L.P. 
Mark W Holland 

Lucent Technologies 
Michael Decelle 

McKinsey & Company 
David Fubini 

Millipore Corporation 
C. William Zadel 

The New England 
Robert A. Shafto 

Sodexho Management Services 

& Creative Gourmets 
Michel Landel 

State Street Bank and Trust Company 
Marshall N. Carter 

The Stop & Shop Foundation 
Avram J. Goldberg 

Thermo Electron Corporation 
Dr. George N. Hatsopoulos 

Watts Industries 
Timothy Home 



50 



Gifts in Kind 



The Boston Symphony Orchestra extends a special thanks to the following donors for their 
generous contributions of goods and services between September 1, 1995, and August 31, 
1996: 



American Airlines 
Bernie Willett 

Crane & Co. Paper Makers 
Lansing E. Crane 

Four Seasons Hotel 
Robin A. Brown 



Ingalls Quinn & Johnson 
Richard C. Garrison 

Sheraton Boston Hotel and Towers 
Denise Coll 



BUSINESS LEADERSHIP ASSOCIATION 

(Industry Listing) 

The Boston Symphony Orchestra is pleased to acknowledge the following business 
leaders for their generous contributions of Si, 500 or more during the BSO's fiscal 
year ending August 31, 1996. 

Companies contributing $10,000 or more are indicated in bold capital letters; con- 
tributions of $5,000-$9,999 are indicated in capital letters, an asterisk denotes gifts 
of $2,500-$4,999, and italicized names indicate donors of services or products. 

For information about becoming a Business Leadership Association member, con- 
tact Anne Cademenos, Associate Director of Corporate Programs, at (617) 638-9298. 



Accounting 



ARTHUR ANDERSEN LLP 

George E. Massaro 

COOPERS & 
LYBRAND LLP 

Francis A. Doyle 

DELOITTE & 
TOUCHE LLP 

Michael Joyce 

*DiPesa & Company, CPAs 
Dolly DiPesa 

Ercolini & Company 
Robert Ercolini, CPA 
Michael Tucci, CPA 

ERNST & YOUNG LLP 

James S. DiStasio 

Harte Carucci & Driscoll, 
PC. 
Neal Harte 

KPMG PEAT MARWICK 

Donald B. Homes 

PRICE WATERHOUSE 
LLP 

Paul Sullivan 



Advertising/ 
Public Relations 



ARNOLD COMMUNICA- 
TIONS, INC. 

Ed Eskandarian 

Bronner Slosberg Humphrey 
Michael Bronner 

CAHOOTS 

Carol Lasky 

Clarke & Company, Inc. 
Peter A. Morrissey 

Conventures, Inc. 
Dusty S. Rhodes 

Design Wise 
Freelow Crummett 

HILL, HOLLIDAY, 
CONNORS, 
COSMOPULOS, INC. 

John M. Connors, Jr. 

Houston, Herstek FAVAT 
Douglas W. Houston 

Ingalls, Quinn & Johnson 
Richard C. Garrison 

Irma S. Mann, Strategic 
Marketing, Inc. 
Irma S. Mann 

MASSmedia 
Charles N. Shapiro 



*Rasky & Co. 
Larry Rasky 

Alarm Systems 



American Alarm & 
Communications, Inc. 
Richard L. Sampson 

First Security Services 
Corporation 
Robert F Johnson 

Architects/ Interior Design 

Tellalian Associates 
Architects & Planners 
Donald J. Tellalian, AIA 

Automotive 

IRA LEXUS 

Ira Rosenberg 

LEXUS OF NORWOOD 

Herbert Chambers 

LEXUS OF WATERTOWN 

Murray Patkin 

Aviation 

Flight Time International 
Jane McBride 

Banking 

BANKROSTON 
CORPORATION 

William M. Crozier, Jr. 



51 



David L. Babson & Co, Inc. 

Investment Counsel 




Best wishes to the Boston Symphony Orchestra and 
the Boston Pops for an exciting 1996-1997 Season 

George W. Browning/Stephen B. O'Brien 
One Memorial Drive, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142 
Telephone: 617-225-3800 Facsimile: 617-494-1511 



Do you know the Four Seasons Hotel 
in Boston is the only AAA Five Diamond 
hotel in New England? 



"No, but ii you hum a rew bars..." 



Four Seasons Hotel 

A Four Seasons • Recent Hotel 

200 Boylston Street, Boston, MA • (6l7) 338-4400 

AAA Five Diamond Award WWV 



52 



Cambridge Trust Company 
James F. Dwinell III 

CITIZENS BANK 
Robert M. Mahoney 

FLEET BANK OF 
MASSACHUSETTS, N.A. 

John P. Hamill 

PNC Bank, New England 
Joan L. Gulley 

STATE STREET BANK 
AND TRUST COMPANY 

Marshall N. Carter 

USTRUST 

Neal F. Finnegan 

Wainwright Bank & Trust 
Company 
John M. Plukas 

Building/Contracting 

*Harvey Industries, Inc. 
Frederick Bigony 

Lee Kennedy Co., Inc. 
Lee M. Kennedy 

*The MacDowell Company 
Roy MacDowell 

*NSC Corporation 
Frank Fradello 

New England Insulation Co. 
Theodore H. Brodie 

*Perini Corporation 
David B. Perini 

Consulting: 
Management /Financial 

Anchor Capital Advisors, Inc. 
William P. Rice 

ANDERSEN 
CONSULTING LLP 

William D. Green 

ANDERSEN 
CONSULTING LLP 

Michael J. Young 

ARTHUR D. 
LITTLE, INC. 

Charles LaMantia 

BAIN & COMPANY INC. 

Orit Gadiesh 

BBF Corporation 
Boruch B. Frusztajer 

THE BOSTON 
CONSULTING GROUP 
INC. 

Jonathan L. Isaacs 

The Cullinane Group, Inc. 
John J. Cullinane 

Dock Square Consultants 
Richard J. Lettieri 



*Heidrick & Struggles 
Robert E. Hallagan 

Lee Hecht Harrison, Inc. 
Frank Mainero 

HEWITT ASSOCIATES 

Christopher S. Palmer 

Lochridge & Company, Inc. 
Richard K. Lochridge 

*Lyons Company 
J. Peter Lyons 

MCKINSEY & 
COMPANY, INC. 
David G. Fubini 

Mercer Management 
Consulting 
James W. Down 

NORTH AMERICAN 
MORTGAGE COMPANY 

John F. Farrell, Jr. 

*The O'Brien Group, Inc. 
Paul C. O'Brien 

Pendergast & Company 
Edward H. Pendergast 

Right Associates Consulting 
Warren Radtke 

Sawyer Miller Consulting 
Micho F. Spring 

*Towers Perrin 

V. Benjamin Haas 

*Watson Wyatt Worldwide 
Daniel B. Holmes 

WILLIAM M. MERCER, 
INCORPORATED 
Peter A. Bleyler 

Consulting: Opportunity 
Development 

New Directions, Inc. 
David D. Corbett 

Consumer Goods/ 
Food Service 

*A11 Seasons Services, Inc. 
Donald G. Friedl 

Coca-Cola Bottling Company 
of New England 
Terrance M. Marks 

*Franklin Sports, Inc. 
Larry J. Franklin 

*Johnson, O'Hare Co., Inc. 
Harry "Chip" O'Hare, Jr. 

Merkert Enterprises, Inc. 
Gerald R. Leonard 

O'Donnell-Usen Fisheries 
Corporation 
Arnold S. Wolf 



SODEXHO MANAGE- 
MENT SERVICES & 
CREATIVE GOURMETS 

Michel Landel 

Staton Hills Winery 
Peter Ansdell 

Welch's 
Everett N. Baldwin 

*Whitehall Company, Ltd. 
Marvin A. Gordon 

Distribution 

Standard Tube Sales 
Corporation 

Dorothy C. Granneman 

Francis J. Walsh, Jr. 

Education 

BENTLEY COLLEGE 
Joseph M. Cronin 

Electrica I / Electronics 

*Boston Acoustics, Inc. 
Francis L. Reed 

R&D ELECTRICAL 
COMPANY, INC. 
Richard D. Pedone 

Energy/Utilities 

BOSTON EDISON 
COMPANY 

Thomas J. May 

EASTERN 
ENTERPRISES/ 
BOSTON GAS COMPANY 

J. Atwood Ives 
Chester R. Messer 

*New England Electric 
System 
Joan T Bok 

Entertainment/Media 

*Don Law Company 
Don Law 

WCVB-TV, Hearst 
Publications 
Paul La Camera 

WHDH-TV Channel 7 
Mike Carson 

*Yawkey Foundation 
John Harrington 

Environmental 

Jason M. Cortell & Associates 
Jason M. Cortell 

Financial 
Services/Investments 









ADAMS, HARKNESS& 
HILL, INC. 
Joseph W. Hammer 



53 



■u 






Beats and Measures. 



Fitcorp provides the Fitcorp Wellness Benefit, an innovative 

mix of fitness and health promotion programs, to hundreds 

of Boston's leading corporations since 1979. Programs of 

award-winning performance and measureable results. 

To learn more about the Fitcorp Wellness Benefit, 

call Mariska Lutz, Corporate Sales Manager, 

at (617) 375-5600, xl07. 

RtCQTp 

Corporate Offices, Prudential Center, Suite 200, Boston, MA 02199 



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si 



JAiAIM 



A- • *• '•"'•»■•- 'Jie-r \ — >• -:. - 1 -' ■ *.,. — ■ ■*'&&. "■■'■-'V.99: 



*£ 



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?'-4 



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'ingate has spirit. The kind of spirit that keeps 
people connected to their community. With it, we have become 
so much more thaft full-service skilled nursing facilities and a 
certified home health agency. Over the years, we have become a 
place where home town roots are as important as compassionate care. 

We invite you to learn more about Wingate's facilities and 
Wingate at Home's services by calling: 617-928-3300. 



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WINGATE AT HOME - ANDOVER & CHESTNUT HILL 



54 



ADVENT INTERNATIONAL 
CORPORATION 
Peter A. Brooke 

ALLMERICA FINANCIAL 
John F. O'Brien 

ALLMERICA FINANCIAL 
INSTITUTIONAL SERVICES 

Larry C. Renfro 

THE BERKSHIRE GROUP 
Laurence Gerber 

^Berkshire Partners 
Russell Epker 

BOSTON CAPITAL 
PARTNERS, INC. 

Christopher W. Collins 

Herbert F. Collins 

Richard J. DeAgazio 

John P. Manning 

THE BOSTON COMPANY 

Christopher M. Condron 
W. Keith Smith 

*BTM Capital Corporation 
E.F McCulloch, Jr. 

Carson Limited Partnership 
Herbert Carver 

THE CIT GROUP/CAPITAL 
EQUIPMENT FINANCING 
G. Todd Derr 

Cowen & Company 
Richard A. Altschuler 

CS FIRST BOSTON 
William Cadigan 
Patricia F. Lenehan 

ESSEX INVESTMENT 
MANAGEMENT CO., INC. 
Joseph C. McNay 

*Farrell, Healer & 
Company Inc. 
Richard A. Farrell 

FIDELITY INVESTMENTS 

Edward C. Johnson 3d 

JOHN HANCOCK 
FINANCIAL SERVICES 

William L. Boyan 

JOHN HANCOCK FUNDS 

Edward J. Boudreau, Jr. 

KAUFMAN & COMPANY 
Sumner Kaufman 

KESSLER FINANCIAL 
SERVICES, L.P. 
Howard J. Kessler 

LIBERTY FINANCIAL 
COMPANIES, INC. 
Kenneth R. Leibler 

LOOMIS-SAYLES & 
COMPANY, L.P. 

Mark W Holland 



LPL FINANCIAL 
SERVICES 
Todd A. Robinson 

PAINEWEBBER, INC. 

Bruce Cameron 
Richard F. Connolly 
Charles T Harris 
Joseph F Patton, Jr. 

THE PIONEER GROUP, INC. 
John F Cogan, Jr. 

* Putnam Investments 

*State Street Development 
Management Corp. 
John R. Gallagher III 

United Asset Management 
Corporation 

*United Gulf 
Management, Inc. 

W.P. STEWART & CO., INC. 
William P. Stewart 

*Woodstock Corporation 
Mrs. Edith L. Dabney 

Food Service Equipment 

*Boston Showcase Company 
Jason E. Starr 

High Technology 

ANALOG DEVICES, INC. 

Ray Stata 

*ATI Orion Research 
Chane Graziano 

BBN CORPORATION 

George H. Conrades 

*Bull HN Information 
Systems Inc. 
Donald P. Zereski 

COGNEX CORPORATION 
Dr. Robert J. Shillman 

COMPUTERVISION 
CORPORATION 
Kathleen Cote 

CORNING COSTAR 
CORPORATION 
R. Pierce Baker 

EDS 
Barry Raynor 

EG&G, INC. 
John M. Kucharski 

EMC CORPORATION 

Richard J. Egan 

*Helix Technology 
Corporation 
Robert J. Lepofsky 

IBM CORPORATION 

Patricia S. Wolpert 



INSO CORPORATION 
Steven R. Vana-Paxhia 
Instron Corporation 
Harold Hindman 

INTERNATIONAL DATA 
GROUP 
Patrick J. McGovern 

IONICS INCORPORATED 
Arthur L. Goldstein 

*LAU Technologies 
Joanna T Lau 

MICROCOM INC. 

Roland D. Pampel 

MILLIPORE 
CORPORATION 

C. William Zadel 

NEC CORPORATION 

Hisashi Kaneko 

PRINTED CIRCUIT CORP 

Peter Sarmanian 

RAYTHEON COMPANY 

Dennis J. Picard 

*The Registry, Inc. 
G. Drew Conway 

SIGNAL TECHNOLOGY 
CORPORATION 
Dale L. Peterson 

SOFTKEY 

INTERNATIONAL INC. 
Michael J. Perik 

STRATUS COMPUTER, INC. 
William E. Foster 

* SystemSoft Corporation 
Robert Angelo 

TDK ELECTRONICS 
CORPORATION 

Ken Kihara 

Teradyne, Inc. 
Alexander V D'Arbeloff 

THERMO ELECTRON 
CORPORATION 

Dr. George N. Hatsopoulos 

WATERS CORPORATION 
Douglas A. Berthiaume 



Hotels/ Restaurants 

BOSTON MARRIOTT 
COPLEY PLACE 
William Munck 

FOUR SEASONS HOTEL 

Robin A. Brown 

ITT SHERATON 

CORPORATION 

John Kapioltas 

THE RITZ-CARLTON, 
BOSTON 



55 



n 



SHERATON BOSTON 
HOTEL & TOWERS 

Denise Coll 

*Sonesta International Hotels 
Corporation 
Paul Sonnabend 

THE WESTIN HOTEL, 
COPLEY PLACE 

David King 



Insurance 

AON RISK SERVICES, INC. 
William J. Tvenstrup 

*The Bostonian Group 
John Casey 

Bradley Insurance 
Agency, Inc. 
John J. Bradley 

CADDELL & BYERS 
INSURANCE AGENCY, INC. 
Paul D. Bertrand 

*Carlin Insurance 
Michael D. Holmes 

The Chickering Group 
Frederick H. Chicos 

* Chubb Group of Insurance 
Companies 

John H. Gillespie 

COMMONWEALTH LAND 
AND TITLE INSURANCE CO. 
Terry Cook 

* Johnson & Higgins of 
Massachusetts, Inc. 
William S. Jennings 

* Lexington Insurance 
Company 

Kevin H. Kelley 

LIBERTY MUTUAL 
GROUP 

Gary L. Countryman 

MANULIFE FINANCIAL 

Dominic D'Alessandro 

THE NEW ENGLAND 
Robert A. Shafto 

*North American 
Security Life 
William J. Atherton 

THE PIONEER GROUP, INC. 

John F. Cogan, Jr. 

SAFETY INSURANCE 
COMPANY 
Richard B. Simches 

SEDGWICK OF 
NEW ENGLAND, INC. 
P. Joseph McCarthy 



Sun Life Assurance Company 
of Canada 
David D. Horn 

Swerling Milton Winnick 
Public Insurance Adjusters, 
Inc. 

Marvin Milton 

Bruce Swerling 

Paul Winnick 

Trust Insurance Company 
Craig M. Bradley 

Legal 

BINGHAM, DANA 
& GOULD 

Jay S. Zimmerman 
William A. Bachman 

*Choate, Hall & Stewart 
Charles L. Glerum 

Dickerman Law Offices 
Lola Dickerman 

Dionne, Bookhout & Gass 
Richard D. Gass 

FISH & RICHARDSON PC. 
Ronald Myrick 

GADSBY & HANNAH LLP 
Paul E. Clifford 

GOLDSTEIN & 
MANELLO, PC. 
Richard J. Snyder 

GOODWIN, PROCTER 
&HOAR 
Robert B. Fraser 

*Hale & Don- 
John Hamilton 

*Lynch, Brewer, Hoffman 
& Sands 
Owen B. Lynch, Esq. 

MINTZ, LEVIN, COHN, 
FERRIS, GLOVSKY & 
POPEO, PC. 
Jeffrey M. Wiesen, Esq. 

Nissenbaum Law Offices 
Gerald L. Nissenbaum 

Nutter, McClennen & Fish 
Robert Fishman 

PALMER & DODGE, LLP 
Michael R. Brown 

Robins, Kaplan, Miller 
& Ciresi 
Alan R. Miller, Esq. 

* Ropes & Gray 
Truman S. Casner 

Sarrouf, Tarricone & 
Flemming 
Camille F Sarrouf 

Sherin and Lodgen 



*Weingarten, Schurgin, 
Gagnebin & Hayes 
Stanley M. Schurgin 

Manufacturer's 
Representatives/ 
Wholesale Distribution 

*Alles Corporation 
Stephen S. Berman 

Asquith Corporation 
Laurence L. Asquith 

*Brush Fibers, Inc. 
Ian P. Moss 

*Clinique Laboratories U.S.A. 
Daniel J. Brestle 

J.A. WEBSTER, INC. 
John A. Webster. 

JOFRAN, INC. 
Robert D. Roy 

Lantis Corporation 
Scott Sennett 

United Liquors, Ltd. 
A. Raymond Tye 

Viva Sun 
Gary Podhaizer 

Manufacturing 

Alden Products Company 
Elizabeth Alden 

ARLEY CORPORATION 

David I. Riemer 

Autoroll Machine Corporation 
William M. Karlyn 

*The Biltrite Corporation 
Stanley J. Bernstein 

*C.R. Bard, Inc. 
Richard J. Thomas 

* Cabot Corporation 

CHELSEA 
INDUSTRIES, INC. 
Ronald G. Casty 

CONNELL LIMITED 
PARTNERSHIP 

William F Connell 

CONVERSE INC. 

Glenn Rupp 

*Cri-Tech, Inc. 
Richard Mastromatteo 

D.K. Webster Family 
Foundation 
Dean K. Webster 

Design Mark Industries 
Paul S. Morris 

Diacom Corporation 
Donald W. Comstock 



56 



Ekco Group, Inc. 
Robert Stein 

GENERAL LATEX 
AND CHEMICAL 
CORPORATION 
Robert W. MacPherson 

THE GILLETTE 
COMPANY 

Alfred M. Zeien 

HIGH VOLTAGE 
ENGINEERING 
CORPORATION 
Paul H. Snyder 

HMK ENTERPRISES, 
INC. 
Steven E. Karol 

*J.D.P. Company 
Jon D. Papps 

*Jones & Vining, Inc. 
Michel Ohayon 

New Balance Athletic Shoe 
James S. Davis 

NEW ENGLAND BUSINESS 
SERVICE, INC. 
Robert J. Murray 

OAK INDUSTRIES, INC. 

William S. Antle III 

OSRAM SYLVANIA INC 

Dean T Langford 

The Pfaltzgraff Company 
Annette Seifert 

PHILIP MORRIS 
COMPANIES, INC. 

Matthew Paluszek 

*Piab USA, Inc. 

Charles J. Weilbrenner 

*The Rockport Company, Inc. 
Anthony J. Tiberii 

ROYAL APPLIANCE 
MFG. CO. 

Michael J. Merriman 

*Springs Industries, Inc. 
Dan Gaynor 

THE STRIDE RITE 
CORPORATION 
Robert C. Siegel 

SUMMIT PACKAGING 
SYSTEMS INC. 
Gordon Gilroy 

The Syratech Corporation 
Leonard Florence 

TY-WOOD/CENTURY 
MANUFACTURING CO., 
INC. 
Joseph W. Tiberio 



WATTS INDUSTRIES, 
INC. 

Timothy P. Home 

Wire Belt Company of 
America 

F. Wade Greer 

Philanthropic 

First Winthrop Corporation 
Richard J. McCready 

The Fuller Foundation 

*The Kouyoumjian Fund 
The Kouyoumjian Family 

Printing/Publishing 

*Addison Wesley Longman, 
Inc. 
J. Larry Jones 

*Banta Corporation 
Donald Belcher 

BOSTON HERALD 

Patrick J. Purcell 

CAHNERS PUBLISHING 
COMPANY 

Bruce Barnet 

COMMUNITY 
NEWSPAPER 
COMPANY 

William R. Elfers 

DANIELS PRINTING 
COMPANY 

Grover B. Daniels 

George H. Dean Co. 

G. Earle Michaud 

HARCOURT GENERAL 

CHARITABLE 

FOUNDATION 

Richard A. Smith 

HOUGHTON MIFFLIN 
COMPANY 

Nader F Darehshori 

Invisuals 
Dennis Ozer 

Reynolds- DeWalt Printing 
Peter DeWalt 

The Studley Press, Inc. 
Chuck Gillett 

VON HOFFMANN 
PRESS, INC. 

Frank A. Bowman 

Real Estate/Development 

*The Abbey Group 
Robert Epstein 
David Epstein 
John Svenson 



57 



BEACON PROPERTIES 
CORPORATION 

Alan M. Leventhal 

*Cornerstone Properties, Inc. 
John S. Moody 

CUMMINGS PROPERTIES 
James L. McKeown 

DEWOLFE NEW ENGLAND 
Richard B. De Wolfe 

EQUITABLE REAL ESTATE 
Tony Harwood 

*The Flatley Company 
Thomas J. Flatley 

Heafitz Development 
Company 
Lewis Heafitz 

*John M. Corcoran & Co. 
John M. Corcoran 

* Meredith & Grew 
Thomas J. Hynes, Jr. 

Retail 

COUNTRY CURTAINS 
Mr. & Mrs. John & Jane 
Fitzpatrick 

The E.B. Horn Company 
Harry Finn 

FILENE'S 

Joseph M. Melvin 

Gordon Brothers 
Michael Frieze 

Hermes 
Jean-Louis Dumas-Hermes 

J. Baker, Inc. 
Allan L. Weinstein 

*Lechmere, Inc. 

Frederick E. Meiser 

Marshalls 
Jerome R. Rossi 

NEIMAN MARCUS 
William D. Roddy 

*Saks Fifth Avenue 

Alison Streider Mayher 

THE STOP & SHOP 
FOUNDATION 

Avram J. Goldberg 

THE STOP & SHOP 

SUPERMARKET 

COMPANY 

Robert G. Tobin 

Talbots 
Arnold B. Zetcher 

THE TJX COMPANIES, INC. 
Bernard Cammarata 

*Town & Country Corporation 
C. William Carey 



WELCH & FORBES 

Creative investment management 
and fiduciary services since 1838. 



Kenneth S. Safe, Jr. 
John K. Spring 
John Lowell 
Thomas N. Dabney 
V. William Efthim 
Guido R. Perera, Jr. 




Richard Olney III 
Arthur C. Hodges 
Richard F. Young 
M. Lynn Brennan 
John H. Emmons, Jr. 
Charles T. Haydock 
Oliver A. Spalding 



Old City Hall, 45 School Street, Boston, MA 02108 617/523-1635 




Boston Symphony Orchestra... 

Day, Berry & Howard... 

Hard work before the performance pays off. 



Innovation. Quality. Teamwork. 



DAY, BERRY & HOWARD 

Counsellors At Law 
Boston, Hartford and Stamford 



58 



Science /Medical 



AMERICAN MEDICAL 
RESPONSE, INC. 
Paul M. Verrochi 

Baldpate Hospital 
Lucille M. Batal 

BLUE CROSS AND 
BLUE SHIELD OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

William C. Van Faasen 

BOSTON SCIENTIFIC 
CORPORATION 

CRA Managed Care 
Lois Silverman 

CHARLES RIVER 
LABORATORIES 

James C. Foster 

Citizens Medical Corporation 
John J. Doran 

CORNING CLINICAL 
LABORATORIES 
Robert Meehan 

Datacube 
Stanley Karandanis 

FISHER SCIENTIFIC 
INTERNATIONAL INC. 

Paul M. Montrone 

GENETICS 
INSTITUTE, INC. 
Dr. Patrick Gage 



MERCK-MEDCO 
MANAGED CARE 
Per Lofberg 

* Medical Information 
Technology, Inc. 

Morton E. Ruderman 

Services 

Benn Theodore, Inc. 
Benn Theodore 

Betsy Bassett Photography 
Betsy Bassett 

*Blake and Blake 
Genealogists 
Richard A. Blake, Jr. 

CFI Design Group, Inc. 
David A. Granoff 

TAD RESOURCES 
INTERNATIONAL INC. 

James S. Davis 

Team 
Marion Rossman 

Technical Aid Corporation 
Salvatore Balsamo 

Telecommunications 

AT&T NETWORK SYSTEMS 
Michael Decelle 

* Boston Technology, Inc. 

Dr. John C.W Taylor 



CELLULAR ONE 

Kathy Dowling 

GTE GOVERNMENT 
SYSTEMS 
John R. Messier 

LUCENT TECHNOLOGIES 

Michael Decelle 

MCI TELECOMMUNICA- 
TIONS CORPORATION 

Susan Beckmann 
Joe McKeown 

NORTEL 

Robert 0. Nelson 

NYNEX 

Donald Reed 

*NYNEX Information 
Resources Co. 
Matthew J. Stover 



Travel /Transportation 

DAVEL CHAUFFEURED 
TRANSPORTATION 
NETWORK 
Scott A. Solombrino 

Lily Transportation Corp. 
John A. Simourian 

NORTHWEST AIRLINES 

Terry M. Leo 






Please join us as a member of me BSO's 
Business Leadership Association! 

For a minimum contribution of $1 ,800 to the BSO's Business Fund, your com- 
pany can enjoy membership in the BSO's Business Leadership Association, a 
dynamic and influential group of more than 350 New England businesses 
who have come together to support the Boston Symphony Orchestra. 

Membership privileges for your company include: a complimentary listing in 
the BSO and Pops program books throughout the season, priority ticket 
reservations for the sell-out Holiday Pops and Tanglewood concerts, personal 
ticket assistance through the Corporate Programs office, and use of the 
Beranek Room, a private patrons' lounge, reserved exclusively for members 
of the BSO's Business Leadership Association and Higginson Society. 

For more information about becoming a member of the BSO's Business Leadership 
Association, please contact Anne Cademenos in the Corporate Programs office at 
(617)638-9298. 



59 



VPmrvl 
won 



BHV 1 



i-ir 



NEXT PROGRAM. . . 

Thursday, January 30, at 8 
Friday, January 31, at 1:30 
Saturday, February 1, at 8 
Tuesday, February 4, at 8 

JEFFREY TATE conducting 



MOZART 



BRUCKNER 



Piano Concerto No. 9 in E-flat, K.271 

Allegro 

Andantino 

Presto — Menuetto: Cantabile — Presto 

ELISABETH LEONSKAJA 



INTERMISSION 



Symphony No. 2 in C minor 

Moderato 

Andante 

Massig schnell [Moderately fast] 

Finale. Mehr schnell [Faster] 



English conductor Jeffrey Tate introduces pianist Elisabeth Leonskaja to Boston 
Symphony audiences in the work most specialists feel is Mozart's earliest true 
masterpiece, the richly tuneful Piano Concerto No. 9 in E-flat, K.271. The pro- 
gram closes with Anton Bruckner's infrequently heard Second Symphony, the score 
with which the composer first made his symphonic name in Vienna, a powerful 
and glowing musical cathedral in sound, with an ardent symphonic prayer in the 
slow movement and a vigorously propulsive scherzo. 



Single tickets for all Boston Symphony Orchestra concerts throughout the season 
are available at the Symphony Hall box office, or by calling "SymphonyCharge" 
at (617) 266-1200, Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m. until 6 p.m., to 
charge tickets instantly on a major credit card, or to make a reservation and then 
send payment by check. Outside the 617 area code, call 1-800-274-8499. 
Please note that there is a $2.50 handling fee for each ticket ordered by phone. 



60 



COMING CONCERTS . . . 

Thursday 'D'— January 30, 8-10:10 
Friday 'B'— January 31, 1:30-3:40 
Saturday 'B'— February 1, 8-10:10 
Tuesday 'C— February 4, 8-10:10 

JEFFREY TATE conducting 
ELISABETH LEONSKAJA, piano 

MOZART Piano Concerto No. 

in E-flat, K.271 
BRUCKNER Symphony No. 2 






Fine imported 
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at fabulous prices 




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'W 


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OUTLET STORE 


Powerhouse Arcade 


West Lebanon 


New Hampshire 03784 


603.298.8656 


10 TO 9 MONDAY-SATURDAY 


12 TO 5 SUNDAY 



Thursday, February 6, at 10:30 a.m. 

Open Rehearsal 
Steven Ledbetter will discuss the program 

at 9:30 in Symphony Hall. 
Thursday 'A' — February 6, 8-10:10 
Friday 'B— February 7, 1:30-3:40 
Saturday 'A— February 8, 8-10:10 
Tuesday 'B'— February 11, 8-10:10 

ANDRE PREVIN, conductor and pianist 
WILLIAM R. HUDGINS, clarinet 



GOULD 
COPLAND 
SCHUMAN 
GERSHWIN 



Fall River Legend Suite 
Clarinet Concerto 
Symphony No. 3 
Rhapsody in Blue 



Wednesday, February 12, at 7:30 p..m. 

Open Rehearsal 
Marc Mandel will discuss the program 

at 6:30 in Symphony Hall. 
Thursday 'C — February 13, 8-10:10 
Friday 'A— February 14, 1:30-3:40 
Saturday 'B'— February 15, 8-10:10 

ANDRE PREVIN conducting 

HAYDN Symphony No. 96, 

Miracle 
SHOSTAKOVICH Symphony No. 8 

From Thursday, February 20, through Satur- 
day, March 1, Andre Previn and the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra will perform eight con- 
certs in the Canary Islands and Florida. 

Thursday 'A— March 6, 8-9:50 
Friday 'A— March 7, 1:30-3:20 
Saturday 'A— March 8, 8-9:50 

JAMES CONLON conducting 
MAXIM VENGEROV, violin 

RAVEL Gaspard de la Nuit 

(arr. Constant) 
PROKOFIEV Violin Concerto No. 2 

JANACEK Sinfonietta 

Programs and artists subject to change. 



61 



ttmlk 






zMmBk 



MAMM 




ARIA 



"Best Italian cuisine. 

In spite of its informal name, the 

upscale Mamma Maria offers the 

best Italian cuisine in Boston/' 

Frotnme/s Boston, 1996 

Highest overall rating for Italian 

restaurants. 

"Intimate and romantic... 

exceptional dishes/' 

Zagat Survey, 1996 

"Best Italian restaurant." 

Boston Magazine 

Reader's Poll, 1995 

"One of Boston's best restaurants, 

period." 
Bon Appetit, 1994 

3 NORTH SQUARE, BOSTON (617) 523-0077 
Valet Parking Private Dining Rooms 



The Shepherd King 

by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart 

January 17-26, 1997 

Emerson Majestic Theatre 

L'Elisir d'Amore 

by Gaetano Donizetti 

April 2-13, 1997 

Emerson Majestic Theatre 

For tickets call 542-OPRA 



BOSTON LYRIC OPERA 



Symphony Shopping 



The Symphony Shop is in the 
Cohen Wing at the West Entrance 
on Huntington Avenue. 

Hours: 

Tuesday through Friday, 11^4 

Saturday 12-6; and from one hour before 

each concert through intermission. 




BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 



62 



SYMPHONY HALL INFORMATION 

FOR SYMPHONY HALL CONCERT AND TICKET INFORMATION, call (617) 266-1492. 
For Boston Symphony concert program information, call "C-O-N-C-E-R-T" (266-2378). 

THE BOSTON SYMPHONY performs ten months a year, in Symphony Hall and at Tangle- 
wood. For information about any of the orchestra's activities, please call Symphony Hall, or 
write the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Symphony Hall, Boston, MA 02115. 

THE BSO'S NEW WEB SITE (http://www.bso.org) provides information on all of the orches- 
tra's activities at Symphony Hall and at Tanglewood, and is updated regularly. 

THE EUNICE S. AND JULIAN COHEN WING, adjacent to Symphony Hall on Huntington 
Avenue, may be entered by the Symphony Hall West Entrance on Huntington Avenue. 

IN THE EVENT OF A BUILDING EMERGENCY, patrons will be notified by an announce- 
ment from the stage. Should the building need to be evacuated, please exit via the nearest 
door, or according to instructions. 

FOR SYMPHONY HALL RENTAL INFORMATION, call (617) 638-9241, or write the 
Function Manager, Symphony Hall, Boston, MA 02115. 

THE BOX OFFICE is open from 10 a.m. until 6 p.m. Monday through Saturday; on concert 
evenings it remains open through intermission for BSO events or just past starting time for 
other events. In addition, the box office opens Sunday at 1 p.m. when there is a concert that 
afternoon or evening. Single tickets for all Boston Symphony subscription concerts are avail- 
able at the box office. For most outside events at Symphony Hall, tickets are available three 
weeks before the concert at the box office or through SymphonyCharge. 

TO PURCHASE BSO TICKETS: American Express, MasterCard, Visa, a personal check, and 
cash are accepted at the box office. To charge tickets instantly on a major credit card, or to 
make a reservation and then send payment by check, call "SymphonyCharge" at (617) 266- 
1200, Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m. until 6 p.m. Outside the 617 area code, phone 
1-800-274-8499. There is a handling fee of $2.50 for each ticket ordered by phone. 

GROUP SALES: Groups may take advantage of advance ticket sales. For BSO concerts at 
Symphony Hall, groups of twenty-five or more may reserve tickets by telephone and take 
advantage of ticket discounts and flexible payment options. To place an order, or for more 
information, call Group Sales at (617) 638-9345. 

FOR PATRONS WITH DISABILITIES, an access service center, accessible restrooms, and 
elevators are available inside the Cohen Wing entrance to Symphony Hall on Huntington 
Avenue. For more information, call VOICE (617) 266-1200 or TTD/TTY (617) 638-9289. 

LATECOMERS will be seated by the ushers during the first convenient pause in the pro- 
gram. Those who wish to leave before the end of the concert are asked to do so between pro- 
gram pieces in order not to disturb other patrons. 

IN CONSIDERATION OF OUR PATRONS AND ARTISTS, children four years old or young- 
er will not be admitted to Boston Symphony Orchestra concerts. 

TICKET RESALE: If for some reason you are unable to attend a Boston Symphony concert for 
which you hold a subscription ticket, you may make your ticket available for resale by calling 
(617) 266-1492 during business hours, or (617) 638-9426 at any time. This helps bring need- 
ed revenue to the orchestra and makes your seat available to someone who wants to attend the 
concert. A mailed receipt will acknowledge your tax-deductible contribution. 

RUSH SEATS: There are a limited number of Rush Seats available for Boston Symphony sub- 
scription concerts Tuesday and Thursday evenings, and Friday afternoons. The low price 
of these seats is assured through the Morse Rush Seat Fund. Rush Tickets are sold at $7.50 
each, one to a customer, on Fridays as of 9 a.m. and Tuesdays and Thursdays as of 5 p.m. 
Please note that there are no Rush Tickets available on Friday or Saturday evenings. 

PLEASE NOTE THAT SMOKING IS NOT PERMITTED ANYWHERE IN SYMPHONY 
HALL. 

CAMERA AND RECORDING EQUIPMENT may not be brought into Symphony Hall during 
concerts. 



63 



LOST AND FOUND is located at the security desk at the stage door to Symphony Hall on St. 
Stephen Street. 

FIRST AID FACILITIES for both men and women are available. On-call physicians attending 
concerts should leave their names and seat locations at the switchboard near the Massachu- 
setts Avenue entrance. 

PARKING: For evening concerts only, the Prudential Center Garage offers a discount to any 
BSO patron with a ticket stub for that evening's performance, courtesy of R.M. Bradley & Co. 
and The Prudential Realty Group. There are also two paid parking garages on Westland Ave- 
nue near Symphony Hall. Limited street parking is available. As a special benefit, guaranteed 
pre-paid parking near Symphony Hall is available to subscribers who attend evening concerts. 
For more information, call the Subscription Office at (617) 266-7575. In addition, the Uptown 
Garage at 10 Gainsborough Street next to the New England Conservatory offers discounted 
parking ($6 with ticket stub) for all BSO concerts, including Friday afternoons. 

ELEVATORS are located outside the Hatch and Cabot-Cahners rooms on the Massachusetts 
Avenue side of Symphony Hall, and in the Cohen Wing. 

LADIES' ROOMS are located on the orchestra level, audience-left, at the stage end of the 
hall, on both sides of the first balcony, and in the Cohen Wing. 

MEN'S ROOMS are located on the orchestra level, audience-right, outside the Hatch Room 
near the elevator, on the first-balcony level, audience-left, outside the Cabot-Cahners Room 
near the coatroom, and in the Cohen Wing. 

COATROOMS are located on the orchestra and first-balcony levels, audience-left, outside the 
Hatch and Cabot-Cahners rooms, and in the Cohen Wing. Please note that the BSO is not re- 
sponsible for personal apparel or other property of patrons. 

LOUNGES AND BAR SERVICE: There are two lounges in Symphony Hall. The Hatch Room 
on the orchestra level and the Cabot-Cahners Room on the first-balcony level serve drinks 
starting one hour before each performance. For the Friday-afternoon concerts, both rooms 
open at noon, with sandwiches available until concert time. 

BOSTON SYMPHONY BROADCASTS: Friday-afternoon concerts of the Boston Symphony 
Orchestra are broadcast live by WGBH-FM (Boston 89.7) and by WAMC-FM (Albany 90.3, 
serving the Tanglewood area). Saturday-evening concerts are broadcast live by WCRB-FM 
(Boston 102.5) 

BSO FRIENDS: The Friends are donors to the Boston Symphony Orchestra Annual Fund. 
Friends receive BSO, the orchestra's newsletter, as well as priority ticket information and 
other benefits depending on their level of giving. For information, please call the Develop- 
ment Office at Symphony Hall weekdays between 9 and 5, (617) 638-9251. If you are already 
a Friend and you have changed your address, please inform us by sending your new and old 
addresses to the Development Office, Symphony Hall, Boston, MA 02115. Including your 
patron number will assure a quick and accurate change of address in our files. 

BUSINESS FOR BSO: The BSO's Business Leadership Association program makes it possible 
for businesses to participate in the life of the Boston Symphony Orchestra through a variety of 
original and exciting programs, among them "Presidents at Pops," "A Company Christmas at 
Pops," and special-event underwriting. Benefits include corporate recognition in the BSO pro- 
gram book, access to the Beranek Room reception lounge, and priority ticket service. For fur- 
ther information, please call Anne Cademenos, Associate Director of Corporate Programs, at 
(617) 638-9298. 

THE SYMPHONY SHOP is located in the Cohen Wing at the West Entrance on Huntington 
Avenue and is open Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday from 11 a.m. until 4 p.m., Saturday 
from noon until 6 p.m., and from one hour before each concert through intermission. The 
Symphony Shop features exclusive BSO merchandise, including The Symphony Lap Robe, 
calendars, coffee mugs, posters, and an expanded line of BSO apparel and recordings. The 
Shop also carries children's books and musical-motif gift items. A selection of Symphony 
Shop merchandise is also available during concert hours outside the Cabot-Cahners Room. 
All proceeds benefit the Boston Symphony Orchestra. For further information and telephone 
orders, please call (617) 638-9383. 



64 



oof is in ©lie 
Performance 



Animal reports, product brochures, publications, 
catalogs & data sheets — a symphony of multi-color 
printing using our image editing and electronic page 
assembly capabilities to enhance the performance. 
Bravo! MacDonald & Evans Printers. 
One Rex Drive • Braintree, Massachusetts 02184 
Tel: (617) 848-9090 • Fax: (617) 843-5540 
Email: inacevanl@aol 



"Two words describe both the Boston 

Symphony Orchestra and Hoover Capital 

Management: sound and disciplined" 




"You come to Symphony Hall to hear wonderful sound produced by 
disciplined musicians. I invite you to come to Hoover Capital to get sound 
investment management practiced by disciplined investment professionals. 

"Our value-based approach benefits substantially our institutional and 

individual clients because, at Hoover Capital, we have only one standard 

for both performance and service - the highest." 

— Stevin R. Hoover — 

Chairman and CEO 

HOOVER CAPITAL MANAGEMENT 

50 Congress Street 

Boston, Massachusetts 02109 

617-227-3133 

Hoover Capital Management is a Registered Investment Advisor. Copies of Form ADV as filed with the 
Securities and Exchange Commission are available upon request. Past performance is no guarantee of future results. 



OZAWA-MUSIC DIRECTOR 



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To determine whether Fidelity may provide trust services in your state, please call Fidelity at 1 -800-854-2829. 

Investor Centers are branches of Fidelity Brokerage Services, Inc. Member NYSE, SIPC. 




Seiji Ozawa, Music Director 

Bernard Haitink, Principal Guest Conductor 

One Hundred and Sixteenth Season, 1996-97 



Trustees of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Inc. 



R. Willis Leith, Jr., Chairman 
Peter A. Brooke, Vice-Chairman 
Mrs. Edith L. Dabney, Vice-Chairman 
Harvey Chet Krentzman, Vice-Chairman 



Nicholas T. Zervas, President 

William J. Poorvu, Vice-Chairman and Treasurer 

Ray Stata, Vice-Chairman 



Harlan E. Anderson 
Dr. Amar G. Bose 
James F. Cleary 
John F. Cogan, Jr. 
Julian Cohen 
William F. Connell, 
ex-officio 

Life Trustees 

Vernon R. Alden 
David B. Arnold, Jr. 
J. P. Barger 
Leo. L. Beranek 
Abram T. Collier 



William M. Crozier, Jr. 
Nader F. Darehshori 
Deborah B. Davis 
Nina L. Doggett 
Avram J. Goldberg 
Thelma E. Goldberg 



Nelson J. Darling, Jr. 
Archie C. Epps 
Mrs. Harris Fahnestock 
Mrs. John H. Fitzpatrick 
Dean W Freed 



Julian T. Houston 

Edna S. Kalman 

George Krupp 

Mrs. August R. Meyer 

Richard P. Morse 

Mrs. Robert B. Newman 



Robert P. O'Block, 

ex-officio 
Peter C. Read 
Margaret Williams- 

DeCelles, ex-officio 



Mrs. John L. Grandin 
Mrs. George I. Kaplan 
George H. Kidder 
Thomas D. Perry, Jr. 
Irving W. Rabb 



Mrs. George Lee Sargent 
Richard A. Smith 
Sidney Stoneman 
John Hoyt Stookey 
John L. Thorndike 



Other Officers of the Corporation 

Thomas D. May and John Ex Rodgers, Assistant Treasurers 



Daniel R. Gustin, Clerk 



Board of Overseers of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Inc. 

Robert P. O'Block, Chairman 

Molly Beals Millman, Secretary Phyllis Dohanian, Treasurer 



Mrs. Herbert B. Abelow 
Helaine B. Allen 
Joel B. Alvord 
Amanda Barbour Amis 
Marjorie Arons-Barron 
Caroline Dwight Bain 
Sandra Bakalar 
Gabriella Beranek 
Lynda Schubert Bodman 
William L. Boyan 
Jan Brett 
Robin A. Brown 
Mrs. Marshall Nichols 

Carter 
Earle M. Chiles 
William H. Congleton 
William F. Connell 
John M. Connors, Jr. 
Martha H.W. 

Crowninshield 
Diddy Cullinane 
Joan P. Curhan 
Tamara P. Davis 
Betsy P. Demirjian 
JoAnne Walton 

Dickinson 
Harry Ellis Dickson 
Mitchell L. Dong 
Hugh Downs 



Francis A. Doyle 
Goetz B. Eaton 
Harriett Eckstein 
William R. Elfers 
George M. Elvin 
Edward Eskandarian 
J. Richard Fennell 
Nancy J. Fitzpatrick 
Eugene M. Freedman 
Dr. Arthur Gelb 
Mrs. Kenneth J. 

Germeshausen 
Charles K. Gifford 
Jordan Golding 
Mark R. Goldweitz 
Deborah England Gray 
Michael Halperson 
John P. Hamill 
Ellen T Harris 
Daphne P. Hatsopoulos 
Deborah M. Hauser 
Bayard Henry 
Marilyn Brachman 

Hoffman 
Ronald A. Homer 
Phyllis S. Hubbard 
F. Donald Hudson 
Lola Jaffe 
Mrs. Robert M. Jaffe 



Dr. Hisashi Kaneko 
Martin S. Kaplan 
Susan Beth Kaplan 
Mrs. S. Charles Kasdon 
Frances Demoulas 

Kettenbach 
Robert D. King 
Mrs. Gordon F. Kingsley 
David I. Kosowsky 
Arthur R. Kravitz 
Mrs. William D. 

Larkin, Jr. 
Thomas H. Lee 
Stephen R. Levy 
Edward Linde 
Frederick H. Lovejoy, Jr. 
Diane H. Lupean 
Mrs. Charles P. Lyman 
Barbara Jane Macon 
Joseph C. McNay 
William F. Meagher, 
Nathan R. Miller 
Robert J. Murray 
Paul C. O'Brien 
Norio Ohga 
Louis F. Orsatti 
Stephen Davies Paine 
Gloria Moody Press 



Jr. 



Millard H. Pryor, Jr. 
Robert E. Remis 
William D. Roddy, Jr. 
John Ex Rodgers 
Keizo Saji 
Roger A. Saunders 
Carol Scheifele-Holmes 
Hannah H. Schneider 
Cynthia D. Scullin 
Elizabeth T. Selkowitz 
Roger T. Servison 
L. Scott Singleton 
Mrs. Micho F. Spring 
Thomas G. Sternberg 
Jacquelynne M. 

Stepanian 
Bill Van Faasen 
Paul M. Verrochi 
Stephen R. Weiner 
Robert A. Wells 
Mrs. Joan D. Wheeler 
Reginald H. White 
Mrs. Florence T. 

Whitney 
Margaret Williams- 

DeCelles 
Robin Wilson 
Kathryn A. Wong 



Shi 

m 

EBotbI 



Overseers Emeriti 

Mrs. Weston Adams 
Bruce A. Beal 
William M. Bulger 
Mary Louise Cabot 
Mrs. Levin H. 

Campbell 
Johns H. Congdon 
Phyllis Curtin 
Katherine Fanning 
Peter H.B. 

Frelinghuysen 
Mrs. Thomas J. 

Galligan, Jr. 
Mrs. James Garivaltis 
Mrs. Haskell R. Gordon 



Susan D. Hall 
Mrs. Richard D. Hill 
Susan M. Hilles 
Glen H. Hiner 
H. Eugene Jones 
Mrs. Louis I. Kane 
Leonard Kaplan 
Richard L. Kaye 
Robert K. Kraft 
Benjamin H. Lacy 
Mrs. James F. 

Lawrence 
Mrs. Hart D. Leavitt 
Laurence Lesser 
Mrs. Harry L. Marks 



C. Charles Marran 
Hanae Mori 
Mrs. Stephen V.C. 

Morris 
Patricia Morse 
David S. Nelson 
Mrs. Hiroshi H. 

Nishino 
Vincent M. O'Reilly 
Andrall S. Pearson 
John A. Perkins 
David R. Pokross 
Daphne Brooks Prout 
Mrs. Peter van S. Rice 
Mrs. Jerome Rosenfeld 



Mrs. William C. 

Rousseau 
Angelica L. Russell 
Francis P. Sears, Jr. 
Mrs. Carl Shapiro 
Mrs. Donald B. 

Sinclair 
Ralph Z. Sorenson 
Mrs. Arthur I. Strang 
Luise Vosgerchian 
Mrs. Thomas H.P. 

Whitney 
Mrs. Donald R. Wilson 
Mrs. John J. Wilson 



Business Leadership Association 

Board of Directors 

Harvey Chet Krentzman, Chairman Emeritus 
James F. Cleary, Chairman 



Nader F. Darehshori 
Francis A. Doyle 
JohnP Hamill 
William F. Meagher 



Robert J. Murray 
Robert P. O'Block 
Patrick J. Purcell 
William D. Roddy 



William F. Connell, President 
William L. Boyan, Vice-President 



Cynthia Scullin 
Malcolm L. Sherman 
Ray Stata 



Stephen J. Sweeney 
William C. Van Faasen 
Patricia Wolpert 



Emeritus Leo L. Beranek 



Ex-Officio R. Willis Leith, Jr. • Nicholas T. Zervas 



Officers of the Boston Symphony Association of Volunteers 

Margaret Williams-DeCelles, President Charlie Jack, Treasurer 

Goetz Eaton, Executive Vice-President Doreen Reis, Secretary 



Diane Austin, Symphony Shop 
Noni Cooper, Adult Education 
Ginger Elvin, Tanglewood 

Association 
Nancy Ferguson, Hall Services 
Phyllis Hubbard, Nominating 



Marilyn Pond, Public Relations 
Dee Schoenly, Development 
William C. Sexton, 

Tanglewood Association 
Barbara Steiner, Youth Activities 



Dorothy Stern, Resources 

Development 
Erling Thorgalsen, Membership 
Eva Zervos, Fundraising 
Wendy Ziner, Fundraising 



The Gericke Years: 
1884-1889 and 1898-1906 




The archival exhibit currently on display in the Huntington Ave- 
nue corridor of the Cohen Wing explores the Boston Symphony 
Orchestra during Wilhelm Gericke's two terms as conductor. 
Generally acknowledged as the BSO's first "professional" con- 
ductor, Gericke is credited with having transformed the BSO 
from a group of musicians into an orchestra. Among the many 
innovations that occurred during Gericke's conductorship were 
the inauguration in 1885 of the "Promenade Concerts," which 
were the predecessor of the Boston Pops; the commencement of 
tours to other United States cities in 1886, the initiation of a 
series of Young People's Concerts in 1887, and the move from 
the old Boston Music Hall to Symphony Hall in 1900. 



Programs copyright ©1997 Boston Symphony Orchestra, Inc. 

Cover design by Jaycole Advertising, Inc. /Cover and BSO photos by Steve J. Sherman 



Administration 

Kenneth Haas, Managing Director 

Daniel R. Gustin, Assistant Managing Director and Manager of Tanglewood 

Anthony Fogg, Artistic Administrator 

Thomas D. May, Director of Finance and Business Affairs 

Nancy Perkins, Director of Development 

Caroline Smedvig, Director of Public Relations and Marketing 

Ray F. Wellbaum, Orchestra Manager 



ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF/ARTISTIC 

Dennis Alves, Artistic Coordinator, Boston Pops • Faith Hunter, Executive Assistant to the Managing 
Director • Karen Leopardi, Artist Assistant/Secretary to the Music Director • Vincenzo Natale, Chauffeur/ 



Valet • James O'Connor, Administrative Assistant, Artistic Administration 
Assistant to the Tanglewood Manager 



Brian Van Sickle, Executive 



ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF/ PRODUCTION 

Christopher W. Ruigomez, Operations Manager 

Scott Schillin, Assistant Manager, Boston Pops and Youth Activities 

Felicia A. Burrey, Chorus Manager • Nancy Cohen, Auditions Coordinator/Administrative Assistant, 
Orchestra Personnel • Jana Euler Gimenez, Administrative Assistant, Management Office • Diane A. 
Read, Production Coordinator 



BOX OFFICE 

Russell M. Hodsdon, Manager of Box Office 

Mary J. Broussard, Clerk • Cary Eyges, Clerk • Lawrence Fraher, Clerk 
Assistant Manager of Box Office • Arthur Ryan, Clerk 



Kathleen Kennedy, 



BUSINESS OFFICE 

Sarah J. Harrington, Budget Manager 

Craig R. Kaplan, Controller 

Roberta Kennedy, Manager, Symphony Shop 

Christopher Fox, Budget Analyst • Michelle Green, Executive Assistant to the Director of Finance 
and Business Affairs • Ian Kane, Senior Financial Analyst • Scott Langill, General Accountant • John 
O'Callaghan, Payroll Accountant • Yaneris Pena-Briggs, Cash Accountant • Sharon Sherman, 
Accounts Payable Supervisor • Victoria L. Tan, Staff Accountant 



DEVELOPMENT 

Daniel P. Breen, Director of Administration for Development 

Madelyne Cuddeback, Director of Corporate Programs 

Julie H. Diaz, Campaign Director 

John C. Marksbury, Director of Foundation and Government Support 

Joyce M. Serwitz, Associate Director of Development 

Diane Abe, Campaign Coordinator • Maureen Barry, Administrative Assistant to the Associate Director 
of Development • Courtney A. Barth, Assistant Director, Corporate Projects • Anne Cademenos, Associate 
Director of Corporate Programs • Sally Dale, Manager of Donor Relations • Rebecca Ehrhardt, Development 
Officer • Sarah Fitzgerald, Data Coordinator • Ginny Gaeta, Executive Assistant to the Director of Develop- 
ment • Joyce Hatch, Director of Boston Symphony Annual Fund • Deborah Hersey, Coordinator of Infor- 
mation Systems • Shelley Kooris, Manager of Development Research • Matthew Lane, Administrative 
Assistant, Campaign Communications • Sabrina Learman, Administrative Assistant/Office Manager • 
Katherine A. Lempert, Assistant Director, Tanglewood Development • Kathleen Maddox, Assistant Direc- 
tor, Corporate Sponsorships • Robert Massey, Data Production Assistant • Cynthia MeCabe, Admini- 
strative Assistant, Foundation and Government Support • Rachel O. Nadjarian, Donor Relations Assistant * 
Gerrit Petersen, Assistant Director of Foundation and Government Support • Julie A. Phaneuf, Coordin- 
ator of Central Processing • Alicia Salmoni, Reseacher/Track Manager • George Saulnier, Data Entry 
Clerk • Bethany Tammaro, Administrative Secretary, Corporate Programs • Valerie Vignaux, Administrative 
Assistant, Annual Fund • Tracy Wilson, Director of Tanglewood Development 



mm 






EDUCATIONAL ACTIVITIES/ARCHIVES 

Richard Ortner, Administrator of the Tanglewood Music Center 
Myran Parker-Brass, Coordinator of Youth Activities 

Bridget P. Carr, Archivist—Position endowed by Caroline Dwight Bain • Barbara Logue, Administrative 
Assistant, Tanglewood Music Center 

FUNCTIONS OFFICE 

Cheryl Silvia Lopes, Function Manager 

Lesley Ann Cefalo, Assistant Function Manager • Elizabeth Francey-Amis, Assistant to the Function 
Manager/Tanglewood Function Coordinator 

HUMAN RESOURCES 

Marion Gardner-Saxe, Director of Human Resources 

Anna Asphar, Benefits Manager • Yuko Uchino, Administrative Assistant, Human Resources 

INFORMATION SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT 

Robert Bell, Manager of Information Systems 

James Major, Coordinator of Information Systems • Michael Pijoan, Assistant Manager of Information 

Systems 

PUBLIC RELATIONS 

Bernadette M. Horgan, Director of Media Relations 

Susanna Bonta, Media Relations Coordinator • Caleb Cochran, Media Relations Assistant /Assistant to 

the Director of Public Relations and Marketing • Leah Oko, Administrative Assistant 

PUBLICATIONS 

Steven Ledbetter, Musicologist & Program Annotator 

Marc Mandel, Publications Manager 

Eleanor Hayes McGourty, Boston Pops Publications Coordinator/Marketing Copywriter 

SALES, SUBSCRIPTION, AND MARKETING 

Nancy A. Kay, Director of Sales & Marketing Manager 

Helen N.H. Brady, Group Sales Manager • Richard Chiarella, Graphic Designer • Susanna Concha, 
Marketing Coordinator • B. Victoria Johnson, Subscription Representative • Michael Miller, Symphony- 
Charge Manager • Michelene Miller, Group Sales Assistant • Kim Noltemy, Associate Marketing Manager • 
Carol Mason Pasarelli, Subscription Manager • Brian Robinson, Senior Subscription Representative 

SYMPHONY HALL OPERATIONS 

Robert L. Gleason, Facilities Manager 

James E. Whitaker, House Manager 

H.R. Costa, Technical Supervisor • Michael Finlan, Switchboard Supervisor • Wilmoth A. Griffiths, 

Supervisor of Facilities Support Services • Catherine Lawlor, Administrative Assistant • John MacMinn, 

Supervisor of Building Maintenance • William D. McDonnell, Chief Steward • Cleveland Morrison, 

Stage Manager • Shawn Wilder, Mailroom Clerk 

House Crew Charles F. Cassell, Jr. • Francis Castillo • Thomas Davenport • John Demick, 
Stage Coordinator • Michael Frazier • Hank Green • Juan Jimenez • William P. Morrill • Mark 
C. Rawson 
Security Christopher Bartlett • William Beckett • David Parker, Security Supervisor 

Cleaning Crew Desmond Boland • Clifford Collins • Angelo Flores • Rudolph Lewis • Robert 
MacGilvray • Lindel Milton, Lead Cleaner 

TANGLEWOOD OPERATIONS 

James J. Mooney, Facilities Manager 

VOLUNTEER OFFICE 

Leslie Wu Foley, Director of Volunteer Services 

Jennifer Flynn, Senior Project Coordinator • Pauline McCance, Senior Administrative Assistant 



BSO 



Boston Symphony Chamber Players 

at Jordan Hall 

Sunday, February 9, 1997, at 3 p.m. 

The Boston Symphony Chamber Players, 
with pianist Gilbert Kalish, will perform the 
second concert of their 1996-97 season of 
three Sunday-afternoon concerts at Jordan 
Hall at the New England Conservatory on 
Sunday, February 9, 1997 at 3 p.m. The 
program will include Beethoven's Clarinet 
Trio in B-flat, Opus 11, for clarinet, cello, 
and piano; Leon Kirchner's Piano Trio No. 2, 
and Shostakovich's Quintet in G minor for 
piano and strings, Opus 57. Tickets at $25, 
$28, and $14.50 are available through Sym- 
phonyCharge at (617) 266-1200, at the Sym- 
phony Hall box office, or, on the day of the 
concert, at the Jordan Hall box office. The 
Chamber Players' closing concert this season 
will take place on Sunday, March 16, and 
will include Haydn's Trio in E-flat for piano, 
violin, and cello, Hob. XV:29, Irving Fine's 
Partita for Winds, and Schumann's Quintet 
in E-flat for piano and strings, Opus 44. 

Symphony Hall Tours 

As we approach the centennial of Symphony 
Hall in the year 2000, interest in tours of 
this historic building is growing. The Boston 
Symphony Association of Volunteers is 
pleased to offer tours of Symphony Hall, 
conducted by experienced tour guides, for 
groups of adults or children. The tours take 
approximately one hour and can be arranged 
between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through 
Friday, depending on the orchestra's sched- 
ule. For further information, please call Paul- 
ine McCance in the Volunteer Office at (617) 
638-9263. 

New "Supper Talks" Series 

Beginning this month, the BSO is pleased 
to introduce a new series of "Supper Talks" 
that focus specifically on the evening's BSO 
program. These pre-concert talks will be 
given by BSO Musicologist and Program 
Annotator Steven Ledbetter and BSO Publi- 
cations Manager Marc Mandel, who for many 
years have given the very popular talks pre- 



ceding BSO Open Rehearsals and selected 
Friday-afternoon concerts. Beginning with 
a buffet-style supper, "Supper Talks" offer 
insights into the evening's Boston Symphony 
program, including taped musical examples 
to enhance your appreciation of the music 
under discussion. Upcoming "Supper Talks" 
will focus on music of Mozart and Bruckner 
(Thursday, January 30), American composers 
Morton Gould, Copland, William Schuman, 
and Gershwin (Tuesday, February 11), Haydn 
and Shostakovich (Saturday, February 15), 
and J. S. Bach, John Williams, and John 
Corigliano (Thursday, March 27, and Tues- 
day, April 1). Doors open at 5:30 p.m. for 
a la carte cocktails and conversation. Supper 
is served at 6:15 p.m. in Higginson Hall in 
the Cohen Wing. These events are offered 
on an individual basis, even to those who 
are not attending the BSO concert. Tickets, 
priced at $24 per person, are available at 
the Symphony Hall Box Office or through 
SymphonyCharge at (617) 266-1200. There 
is a $2.50 handling fee for each ticket or- 
dered by telephone. 

Andre Previn and the 
Boston Symphony Orchestra to 
Tour Canary Islands and Florida 
February 20-March 1 

From Thursday, February 20, through 
Saturday, March 1, following his two weeks 
of subscription concerts, Andre Previn will 
lead the Boston Symphony Orchestra on tour 
to the Canary Islands and Florida, perform- 
ing eight concerts in Las Palmas and Santa 
Cruz in the Canary Islands, and in West Palm 
Beach, Sarasota, and Clearwater, Florida. 
The concerts in Clearwater and Sarasota are 
sponsored in part by Publix Super Markets 
Charities. The tour repertory includes the 
two programs Mr. Previn and the orchestra 
perform at Symphony Hall this month, the 
first an ail-American program of music by 
Morton Gould, Aaron Copland (the Clarinet 
Concerto, featuring BSO principal clarinet 
William R. Hudgins), William Schuman (his 
Symphony No. 3, composed for Serge Kousse- 
vitzky and premiered by the BSO in October 
1941), and George Gershwin (Rhapsody in 
Blue, with Mr. Previn at the piano), the sec- 



4 



n 

VXCuUm 

mSSSsam 






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come for total financial solutions. This includes personal 
banking services, residential mortgages, business lending, 
and investment management. 

Shouldn't you 
choose Boston Private Bank? 

Please call Timothy L. Vaill, President, 
at (617) 556-1902, to learn more about us. 

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ond including Haydn's Symphony No. 96, 
The Miracle, and Shostakovich's powerful 
Symphony No. 8, one of the great works of 
the World War II years. 

BSO Members in Concert 

Founded by BSO cellist Jonathan Miller, the 
Boston Artists Ensemble plays music of J.S. 
Bach, Geminiani, and Telemann on a pro- 
gram with Elliott Carter's Sonata for flute, 
oboe, cello, and harpsichord on Friday, Jan- 
uary 31, at 8 p.m. at the Peabody Essex 
Museum in Salem, and on Sunday, February 
2, at 2:30 p.m. at Trinity Church in Newton 
Centre. In addition to Mr. Miller, the per- 
formers include Elizabeth Ostling, flute, Peg- 
gie Pearson, oboe, and Mark Kroll, harpsi- 
chord. Tickets are $20 ($17 students and 
seniors). For more information call (617) 
964-6553. 

Harry Ellis Dickson and the Boston 
Classical Orchestra perform Handel's Water 
Music, Haydn's C major cello concerto with 
Israeli cellist Inbal Magiddo, and Bach's 
Brandenburg Concerto No. 4 on Friday, Feb- 
ruary 7, at 8 p.m. and Sunday, February 9, 
at 3 p.m. at Faneuil Hall at Quincy Market. 
Single tickets are $18, $25, and $31 ($2 
discount for seniors, $5 discount for stu- 
dents). For tickets call (617) 423-3883. 
The Hawthorne String Quartet — BSO mem- 
bers Ronan Lefkowitz, Si-Jing Huang, Mark 
Ludwig, and Sato Knudsen — joins conduc- 
tor Ronald Knudsen and the New Philhar- 
monia Orchestra for Schulhoff's Concerto for 




MGH/Spaulding 

Home Health Agency 



Serving 40 Greater Boston 
communities around the clock. 

(617)726^)945 



String Quartet and Chamber Orchestra as 
part of a program also including Brahms's 
Tragic Overture and Shostakovich's Sym- 
phony No. 5 on Saturday evening, February 
8, at 8 p.m. and on Sunday afternoon, Feb- 
ruary 9, at 3 p.m. at Ellsworth Auditorium 
at Pine Manor College in Chestnut Hill. 
Tickets are $22 and $17 (students $12 and 
$10). For tickets or more information, call 
(617) 527-9717. 

Attention, Friday-afternoon 
Subscribers: Bus Service 
to Symphony Hall 

If you're tired of fighting traffic and search- 
ing for a parking space when you come to 
Friday-afternoon Boston Symphony con- 
certs, why not consider taking the bus from 
your community directly to Symphony Hall? 
Under the auspices of the Boston Symphony 
Association of Volunteers, the following 
communities sponsor round-trip bus service 
for the Friday-afternoon concerts for a nomi- 
nal fee: Andover, Cape Cod, Concord, Ded- 
ham/Dover, Marblehead/Swampscott, New- 
ton/Wellesley, North Shore, South Shore, and 
Weston in Massachusetts; Concord, North 
Hampton, and Peterborough in New Hamp- 
shire; and Rhode Island. Taking advantage 
of your area's bus service not only helps 
keep this convenient service operating, but 
also provides opportunities to spend time 
with your Symphony friends, meet new peo- 
ple, and conserve energy. In addition, many 
of the participating communities make a 
substantial contribution to the BSO from the 
proceeds. If you would like to start a service 
from your community, or would like further 
information about bus transportation to Fri- 
day-afternoon concerts, please call Pauline 
McCance in the Volunteer Office at (617) 
638-9263. 

In Case of Snow. . . 

To find out the status of a Boston Symphony 
concert and options available to you in case 
of a snow emergency, BSO subscribers and 
patrons may call a special Symphony Hall 
number. Patrons may dial (61 7) 638-9495 at 
any time for a recorded message regarding 
the current status of a concert. 



mm 







Chester Williams, Fox Hill Village resident and Dean Emeritus, New England Conservatory or Music. 

"Teaching music to my irienas here 
hringfs harmony to my lire. 7 

You couldn't rind a liner music teacher than Mr. Williams. Just 
ask the Fox Hill Village residents who take his class on music 
appreciation. To learn how Fox Hill Village can hring harmony 
to your life, call us at 617-329-4433. Fox Hill Village, New 
England's premiere retirement community. Developed by The 
Massachusetts General Hospital ana the Hillnaven Corporation. 




Fox Hill Village 

atWESTWOOD 

10 Longwood Drive, Westwood, MA 02090 (617) 329-4433 
(Exit 16B off Route 128) 



8 




SEIJI OZAWA 

Seiji Ozawa is now in his twenty-fourth season as music director 
of the Boston Symphony Orchestra. Mr. Ozawa became the 
BSO's thirteenth music director in 1973, after a year as music 
adviser; his tenure with the Boston Symphony is the longest of 
any music director currently active with an American orches- 
tra. In his nearly twenty-five years as music director, Mr. Ozawa 
has maintained the orchestra's distinguished reputation both at 
home and abroad, with concerts at Symphony Hall and Tangle- 
wood, on tours to Europe, Japan, Hong Kong, China, and South 
America, and across the United States, including regular con- 
certs in New York. Mr. Ozawa has upheld the BSO's commit- 
ment to new music through the commissioning of new works, including a series of cen- 
tennial commissions marking the orchestra's hundredth birthday in 1981, a series of 
works celebrating the fiftieth anniversary of the Tanglewood Music Center in 1990, and 
a current series represented this season by new works from Leon Kirchner and Bernard 
Rands. In addition, he has recorded more than 130 works with the orchestra, represent- 
ing more than fifty different composers, on ten labels. 

In addition to his work with the Boston Symphony, Mr. Ozawa appears regularly 
with the Berlin Philharmonic, the New Japan Philharmonic, the London Symphony, the 
Orchestre National de France, the Philharmonia of London, and the Vienna Philhar- 
monic. He made his Metropolitan Opera debut in December 1992, appears regularly at 
La Scala and the Vienna Staatsoper, and has also conducted opera at the Paris Opera, 
Salzburg, and Covent Garden. In September 1992 he founded the Saito Kinen Festival 
in Matsumoto, Japan, in memory of his teacher Hideo Saito, a central figure in the cul- 
tivation of Western music and musical technique in Japan, and a co-founder of the 
Toho School of Music in Tokyo. In addition to his many Boston Symphony recordings, 
Mr. Ozawa has recorded with the Berlin Philharmonic, the Chicago Symphony, the 
London Philharmonic, the Orchestre National, the Orchestre de Paris, the Philharmonia 
of London, the Saito Kinen Orchestra, the San Francisco Symphony, the Toronto Sym- 
phony, and the Vienna Philharmonic, among others. 

Born in 1935 in Shenyang, China, Seiji Ozawa studied music from an early age and 
later graduated with first prizes in composition and conducting from Tokyo's Toho School 
of Music. In 1959 he won first prize at the International Competition of Orchestra Con- 
ductors held in Besancon, France. Charles Munch, then music director of the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra, subsequently invited him to attend the Tanglewood Music Center, 
where he won the Koussevitzky Prize for outstanding student conductor in 1960. While 
a student of Herbert von Karajan in West Berlin, Mr. Ozawa came to the attention of 
Leonard Bernstein, who appointed him assistant conductor of the New York Philharmon- 
ic for the 1961-62 season. He made his first professional concert appearance in North 
America in January 1962, with the San Francisco Symphony. He was music director of 
the Chicago Symphony Orchestra's Ravinia Festival for five summers beginning in 1964, 
music director of the Toronto Symphony from 1965 to 1969, and music director of the 
San Francisco Symphony from 1970 to 1976, followed by a year as that orchestra's 
music adviser. He conducted the Boston Symphony Orchestra for the first time in 1964, 
at Tanglewood, and made his first Symphony Hall appearance with the orchestra in 
January 1968. In 1970 he became an artistic director of Tanglewood. 

Mr. Ozawa recently became the first recipient of Japan's Inouye Sho ("Inouye 
Award"). Created to recognize lifetime achievement in the arts, the award is named 
after this century's preeminent Japanese novelist, Yasushi Inouye. In September 1994 
Mr. Ozawa received his second Emmy award, for Individual Achievement in Cultural 
Programming, for "Dvorak in Prague: A Celebration," with the Boston Symphony Orches- 
tra. He won his first Emmy for the Boston Symphony Orchestra's PBS television series 
"Evening at Symphony." Mr. Ozawa holds honorary doctor of music degrees from the 
University of Massachusetts, the New England Conservatory of Music, and Wheaton 
College in Norton, Massachusetts. 






















First Violins 

Malcolm Lowe 

Concertmaster 
Charles Munch chair, 
fully funded in perpetuity 

Tamara Smirnova 

Associate Concertmaster 
Helen Horner Mclntyre chair, 
endowed in perpetuity in 1976 



BOSTON 

ORCHESTRA 

1996-97 

Seiji Ozawa 

Music Director 
Music Directorship endowed by- 
John Moors Cabot 

Bernard Haitink 

Principal Guest Conductor 




Assistant Concertmaster 

Robert L. Beal, and 

Enid L. and Bruce A. Beal chair, 

endowed in perpetuity in 1980 
° Laura Park 

Assistant Concertmaster 

Edward and Bertha C. Rose chair 
Bo Youp Hwang 

John and Dorothy Wilson chair, 

fully funded in perpetuity 
Lucia Lin 

Forrest Foster Collier chair 
Leo Panasevich 

Carolyn and George Rowland chair 
Gottfried Wilfinger 

Dorothy Q. and David B. Arnold, Jr., 

chair, fully funded in perpetuity 
Alfred Schneider 

Muriel C. Kasdon 

and Marjorie C. Paley chair 
Raymond Sird 

Ruth and Carl Shapiro chair, 

fully funded in perpetuity 
Ikuko Mizuno 

David and Ingrid Kosowsky chair 
Amnon Levy 

Theodore W. and Evelyn Berenson 

Family chair 

* Harvey Seigel 

Stephanie Morris Marryott and 
Franklin J. Marryott chair 

* Nancy Bracken 
*Aza Raykhtsaum 

* Bonnie Bewick 

* James Cooke 

* Victor Romanul 

Bessie Pappas chair 

* Catherine French 

Second Violins 

Marylou Speaker Churchill 

Principal 

Fahnestock chair 
Vyacheslav Uritsky 

Assistant Principal 

Charlotte and Irving W. Rabb chair, 

endowed in perpetuity in 1977 
Ronald Knudsen 

Edgar and Shirley Grossman chair 
Joseph McGauley 

Shirley and J. Richard Fennell chair 
Ronan Lefkowitz 

David H. and Edith C. Howie chair, 

fully funded in perpetuity 

* Jerome Rosen 

* Sheila Fiekowsky 

* Jennie Shames 

* Participating in a system of rotated 
seating 
iOn sabbatical leave 
°On leave 
§ Substitute player 



* Valeria Vilker Kuchment 
*Tatiana Dimitriades 
*Si-Jing Huang 

* Nicole Monahan 

* Kelly Barr 
*Wendy Putnam 

Violas 

Steven Ansell 

Principal 

Charles S. Dana chair, 

endowed in perpetuity in 1970 
Hui Liu 

Assistant Principal 

Anne Stoneman chair, 

fully funded in perpetuity 
Ronald Wilkison 

Lois and Harlan Anderson chair 

Robert Barnes 
Burton Fine 
Joseph Pietropaolo 
Michael Zaretsky 
Marc Jeanneret 
*Mark Ludwig 

Helene R. Cahners-Kaplan and 
Carol R. Goldberg chair 

* Rachel Fagerburg 

* Edward Gazouleas 
*Kazuko Matsusaka 

Cellos 

Jules Eskin 

Principal 

Philip R. Allen chair, 

endowed in perpetuity in 1969 
Martha Babcock 

Assistant Principal 

Vernon and Marion Alden chair, 

endowed in perpetuity in 1977 
Sato Knudsen 

Esther S. and Joseph M. Shapiro chair 
Joel Moerschel 

Sandra and David Bakalar chair 
Luis Leguia 

Robert Bradford Newman chair, 

fully funded in perpetuity 
Carol Procter 

Lillian and Nathan R. Miller chair 

* Ronald Feldman 

Richard C. and Ellen E. Paine chair, 
fully funded in perpetuity 

* Jerome Patterson 

Charles and JoAnne Dickinson chair 
* Jonathan Miller 

Rosemary and Donald Hudson chair 
*Owen Young 

John F. Cogan, Jr., and 

Mary Cornille chair, 

fully funded in perpetuity 

* Andrew Pearce 

Gordon and Mary Ford Kingsley 
Family chair 

Basses 

Edwin Barker 

Principal 

Harold D. Hodgkinson chair, 

endowed in perpetuity in 1974 
Lawrence Wolfe 

Assistant Principal 

Maria Nistazos Stata chair, 

fully funded in perpetuity 



10 



Joseph Hearne 

Leith Family chair, 

fully funded in perpetuity 
John Salkowski 

Joseph and Jan Brett Hearne chair 

* Robert Olson 

* James Orleans 
*Todd Seeber 
*John Stovall 

* Dennis Roy 

Flutes 

Elizabeth Ostling 

Acting Principal 

Walter Piston chair, 

endowed in perpetuity in 1970 
Fenwick Smith 

Myra and Robert Kraft chair, 

endowed in perpetuity in 1981 

Assistant Principal 
Marian Gray Lewis chair, 
fully funded in perpetuity 

Piccolo 

Geralyn Coticone 
Evelyn and C. Charles Marran 
chair, endowed in perpetuity in 1979 

Oboes 

Alfred Genovese 
Principal 

Mildred B. Remis chair, 
endowed in perpetuity in 1975 

Mark McEwen 

Keisuke Wakao 
Assistant Principal 
Elaine and Jerome Rosenfeld chair 

English Horn 

Robert Sheena 
Beranek chair, 
fully funded in perpetuity 

Clarinets 

William R. Hudgins 

Principal 

Ann S.M. Banks chair, 
endowed in perpetuity in 1977 
Scott Andrews 

Thomas Martin 
Associate Principal & E-flat clarinet 
Stanton W. and Elisabeth K. Davis 
chair, fully funded in perpetuity 



Bass Clarinet 

Craig Nordstrom 
Farla and Harvey Chet 
Krentzman chair, 
fully funded in perpetuity 

Bassoons 

Richard Svoboda 

Principal 

Edward A. Taft chair, 

endowed in perpetuity in 1974 
Roland Small 

Richard Ranti 

Associate Principal 

Contrabassoon 

Gregg Henegar 
Helen Rand Thayer chair 

Horns 

Charles Kavalovski 

Principal 

Helen Sagojf Slosberg chair, 

endowed in perpetuity in 1974 
Richard Sebring 

Associate Principal 

Margaret Andersen Congleton 

chair, fully funded in perpetuity 
Daniel Katzen 

Elizabeth B. Storer chair 
Jay Wadenpfuhl 
Richard Mackey 
Jonathan Menkis 

Trumpets 

Charles Schlueter 

Principal 

Roger Louis Voisin chair, 

endowed in perpetuity in 1977 
Peter Chapman 

Ford H. Cooper chair 
Timothy Morrison 

Associate Principal 

Nina L. and Eugene B. 

Doggett chair 
Thomas Rolfs 

Trombones 

tRonald Barron 

Principal 

J. P. and Mary B. Barger chair, 

fully funded in perpetuity 



Norman Bolter 
§ Darren Acosta 

Bass Trombone 

Douglas Yeo 

Tuba 

Chester Schmitz 
Margaret and William C. 
Rousseau chair, 
fully funded in perpetuity 

Timpani 

Everett Firth 

Sylvia Shippen Wells chair, 
endowed in perpetuity in 1974 

Percussion 

Thomas Gauger 

Peter and Anne Brooke chair, 
fully funded in perpetuity 
Frank Epstein 

Peter Andrew Lurie chair 
J. William Hudgins 

Timothy Genis 
Assistant Timpanist 

Harps 

$ Ann Hobson Pilot 
Principal 

Willona Henderson Sinclair chair 
Sarah Schuster Ericsson 

Librarians 

Marshall Burlingame 

Principal 

Lia and William Poorvu chair 
William Shisler 
Sandra Pearson 

Assistant Conductor 

Richard Westerfield 
Anna E. Finnerty chair 

Personnel Managers 

Lynn Larsen 
Bruce M. Creditor 

Stage Manager 

Position endowed by 
Angelica L. Russell 
Peter Riley Pfitzinger 




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BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

Seiji Ozawa, Music Director 

Bernard Haitink, Principal Guest Conductor 

One Hundred and Sixteenth Season, 1996-97 

Thursday, January 30, at 8 
Friday, January 31, at 1:30 
Saturday, February 1, at 8 
Tuesday, February 4, at 8 

JEFFREY TATE conducting 




MOZART 



Piano Concerto No. 9 in E-flat, K.271 

Allegro 

Andantino 

Presto — Menuetto: Cantabile — Presto 

ELISABETH LEONSKAJA 



INTERMISSION 



BRUCKNER 



Symphony No. 2 in C minor 

Moderato 

Andante 

Massig schnell [Moderately fast] 

Finale. Mehr schnell [Faster] 



The evening concerts will end about 10:10 and the afternoon concert about 3:40. 

RCA, Deutsche Grammophon, Philips, Telarc, Sony Classical/CBS Masterworks, Angel/EMI, 
London /Decca, Erato, Hyperion, and New World records 

Baldwin piano 

Elisabeth Leonskaja plays the Steinway piano. 

Please be sure the electronic signal on your watch or pager is switched off 
during the concert. 

The program books for the Friday series are given in loving memory of Mrs. Hugh 
Bancroft by her daughters Mrs. A. Werk Cook and the later Mrs. William C. Cox. 

Boston Symphony Orchestra concerts are funded in part by a grant from the 
Massachusetts Cultural Council, a state agency. 



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Wolfgang Amade Mozart 

Piano Concerto No. 9 in E-flat, K.271 




Joannes Chrisostomus Wolfgang Gottlieb Mozart, who 
began calling himself Wolfgango Amadeo about 1 770 
and Wolfgang Amade in 1 777, was born in Salzburg, 
Austria, on January 27, 1756, and died in Vienna on 
December 5, 1791. Mozart completed his E-flat piano 
concerto, K.271, in January 1 777 for a touring French 
pianist, Mile. Jeunehomme, whose name he is apt to 
spell 'jenome" or "jenomy" and which his father, Leo- 
pold Mozart, turned into "genommi." Presumably 
Mile. J. played the first performance, but we have no 
details about this. Mozart included his own cadenzas 
in the autograph score. In February 1 783, he sent his 
sister newly composed "Eingange, " or cadenza-like 
flourishes, to introduce solo passages. Emma Boynet 
was soloist for the first Boston Symphony performances of this work, conducted by Serge 
Koussevitzky in April 1943. Later soloists featured in Boston Symphony performances of 
this concerto included Leonard Bernstein with himself as conductor, Ania Dorfmann with 
Charles Munch, Rudolf Serkin with Erich Leinsdorf John Browning with William Stein- 
berg, Christoph Eschenbach with Seiji Ozawa, Alfred Brendel with Klaus Tennstedt, Andrds 
Schiff with Andre Previn, Emanuel Ax with Tennstedt, Maria Joao Pires with Ozawa (the 
most recent subscription performances, in March 1 994), and Emanuel Ax again, with 
Bernard Haitink (the most recent Tanglewood performance, in August 1996, to open that 
summer's final Boston Symphony concert). The orchestra consists of two oboes, two horns, 
and strings. 

On February 12, 1874, Miss Amy Fay, a young pianist then in her fifth year of liv- 
ing in Germany where she had gone, as they said in those days, to refine her taste and 
improve her technique, wrote to her family in St. Albans, Vermont: 

Deppe wants me to play a Mozart concerto for two pianos with Fraulein Steiniger, 
the first thing I play in public. Did you know that Mozart wrote twenty concertos 
for the piano, and that nine of them are masterpieces? Yet nobody plays them. Why? 
Because they are too hard, Deppe says, and Lebert, the head of the Stuttgardt con- 
servatory, told me the same thing at Weimar. I remember that the musical critic 
of the Atlantic Monthly remarked that "we should regard Mozart's passages and 
cadenzas as child's play, now-a-days." Child's play, indeed! That critic, whoever 
it is, "had better go to school again," as C. always says!* 

Actually, counting the concerto for two pianos that Miss Fay prepared with Fraulein 
Steiniger, and another for three pianos, Mozart wrote twenty-three piano concertos. (This 
does not take into account his adaptations of sonatas by other composers that he made 
for his tours between 1765 and 1767.) Most of us, moreover, would have a hard time 
reducing the number of "masterpieces" to just nine. The series, at any rate, begins with 
the still seldom heard, inventive, brilliant, if not perfectly equilibrated concerto in D, 
K.175, of December 1773, and concludes with one of the most familiar of the "master- 
pieces," the gently shadowed concerto in B-flat, K.595, completed three weeks before 
Mozart's thirty-fifth and last birthday. Mozart's most intense concentration on the genre 
occurred in the middle of the 1780s, the peak of his popularity as a composer and as 
an adult performer. The concerto that Elisabeth Leonskaja plays at these concerts holds 



*Amy Fay's Music Study in Germany, six years' letters to her family, first published in 1880 at the 
urging of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, with later English, German, and French editons sponsored 
by, respectively, Sir George Grove, Franz Liszt, and Vincent d'Indy, is one of the most vivid, infor- 
mative, and delightful of all books about music. It has been available as a Dover paperback reprint. 



15 



Week 14 






MB 



■ 



a special place in the sequence, for, after the dashing display of ingenuity of K.175 
and the charms of K.238 in B-flat and K.246 in C, it is an all but inconceivable leap 
forward in ambition and achievement alike. At twenty-one, Mozart is mature. 

It all leaves us most curious about Mile. Jeunehomme — "die jenomy" — whose play- 
ing, whose personality, or perhaps whose reputation so stimulated Mozart. But to no 
avail. She passes through Salzburg and through musical history for just a moment in 
January 1777, leaving her indiscriminately spelled name attached to the work in which 
Mozart, as it were, became Mozart, and she disappears again — to France, one imagines, 
to concerts and teaching, perhaps to marriage and retirement from public life. We know 
that Mozart himself played "her" concerto at a private concert in Munich on October 4, 
1777, and from his sending "Eingange" to Nannerl in February 1783 we know that it 
continued to engage his attention. 

The scoring is modest: only pairs of oboes and horns join the strings, something re- 
membered always with surprise because the impression is so firmly of a big concerto. 
(It is, in fact, Mozart's longest.) But Mozart uses these restricted resources remarkably: 
the horn gets to play a melody in unison with the piano, and more than once Mozart 
explores the uncommon sonority of the keyboard instrument joined only by the two 




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16 



oboes. The orchestra's opening flourish is a formal call to attention. The piano's response 
is a delicious impertinence. Normal concerto etiquette after all obliges the solo to wait 
until the end of an extended tutti. But the piano's penchant for playing at unexpected 
times once established, the whole issue of who plays when becomes the subject of con- 
tinuing, subtle jokes and surprises. 

It was often typical of Mozart to translate the gestures of opera into the context of 
the concerto. In the slow movement of his Sinfonia concertante for violin and viola, for 
example, Mozart engages the soloists in impassioned operatic duetting. Here, in the 
Andantino of this concerto, he presents a scene from some sombre tragedy. Strings are 
muted, violins proceed by close imitation, and the music that prepares the singer's 
entrance makes its cadence on the formal full close of an opera seria recitative. The 
aria is impassioned and complex, the C minor of its beginning soothed occasionally by 
a gentler music in E-flat major, but it is the gestures of recitative, now pathetic, now 
stern, that dominate the discourse. 

The finale begins in unbuttoned and purling virtuosity, and again we might infer that 
Mile. Jeunehomme was an especially elegant executant of trills. One of the virtuosic 
sweeps down the keyboard and up again leads to the opening of a door onto a world of 
whose existence we had not expected a reminder: we hear a minuet, music of a new 
character, a new meter, a new key. Mozart outdoes himself both in his melodic embel- 
lishments, so characteristic in their confluence of invention and control, pathos, and 
grace, and also in the wonderfully piquant scoring as each strain is repeated with or- 
chestral accompaniment (first violins and the lowest strings pizzicato, but the former 
with far more notes; the middle voices sustained, but their tone veiled by mutes). The 
minuet dissolves into another cadenza, whence the Presto emerges again to send the 
music to its runaway close. 

— Michael Steinberg 

Now Program Annotator and Lecturer of the San Francisco Symphony and the New York 
Philharmonic, Michael Steinberg was the Boston Symphony Orchestra's Director of Publica- 
tions from 1976 to 1979. Oxford University Press has recently published a compilation of his 
program notes (including many written for the Boston Symphony) entitled The Symphony— 
A Listeners Guide. 



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Anton Bruckner 

Symphony No. 2 in C minor 




Anton Bruckner was born in Ansfelden, near Linz, Upper 
Austria, on September 4, 1842, and died in Vienna on 
October 11, 1896. He composed the Second Symphony 
in 1871 and 1872, and the work was first performed on 
October 26, 1873, with Bruckner himself conducting 
the Vienna Philharmonic. He made revisions in 1876 
and 1877. The score published in 1892 had alterations 
far beyond Bruckner's own hand and is now regarded 
as inauthentic; the present performances will use the 
1877 version in the edition of Leopold Nowak. The Sec- 
ond is the only Bruckner symphony to lack a dedication 
(the circumstances that led to this fact are described 
below). The first Boston Symphony Orchestra perform- 
ances took place in late March and early April 1974 
under the direction of Carlo Maria Giulini. Seiji Ozawa led the only BSO performances 
since then in April 1987, in Symphony Hall, at Carnegie Hall, and at C. W. Post College 
in New York. The score calls for two each of flutes, oboes, clarinets, and bassoons, four 
horns, two trumpets, three trombones, timpani, and strings. 

The premieres of Bruckner's first two numbered symphonies present a startling study 
in contrasts. Symphony No. 1 in C minor was composed in Linz where the composer, 
then in his thirties and early forties, spent twelve years as the cathedral organist and 
where he also wrote his three mature Masses. The symphony was completed in 1866 
and shown in Munich to the leading conductor and Wagner disciple, Hans von Billow, 
who reacted with a mixture of astonished admiration and alarm. Bruckner could not 
pluck up the courage to show it to Wagner himself, but two years later he was rash 
enough to attempt a performance under his own direction. The event is thus described 
by his biographer, Erwin Doernberg: 

The first performance took place in Linz in sadly unfavorable conditions. An 
inadequate orchestra was assembled, consisting of the theater orchestra, members 
of two regimental bands stationed in the town, and dilettantes; there were twelve 
violins, three violas, three violoncelli, and three double basses. Quite apart from 
this, neither the musicians nor the provincial audience could be expected to grasp 
the complexity of the vast and original work. In fact there was but a scanty audi- 
ence, because on the day preceding the performance the bridge across the Danube 
had collapsed, and the people of Linz were much too thrilled by the disaster to be 
interested in a matinee concert. Bruckner's laconic comment was: "It cost me a lot 
of money to cover the deficit." 

The same year, 1868, Bruckner moved permanently to Vienna, where he had been 
trying to secure an economic foothold during most of his tenure at Linz. He became a 
lecturer at the Vienna Conservatory — a decisive step, for he was thereafter to spend 
most of his life teaching, and composing symphonies. His earlier renown as an organ 
virtuoso took him, however, to Paris in 1869 and London in 1871, where he reported 
excitedly, "Everywhere my name appears in letters bigger than myself!" These were 
Bruckner's first and last trips abroad. 

While in London he began composing his Symphony No. 2, again in C minor, and it 
was finished in Vienna the following year. It was submitted to the Vienna Philharmonic 
and rehearsed under Otto Dessoff, who proclaimed it to be nonsense. After some fruit- 
less discussion about possible cuts, the score was returned as "unplayable." It must 
have been a bitter joke to Bruckner that his Great Mass in F minor had been similarly 
refused a hearing in Vienna on the ground of being "unsingable." Once again he was 






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thrown back on his own resources, but this time, instead of using a scratch orchestra, 
he contrived to retain the Philharmonic itself. Doernberg describes the altered scene as 
follows: 

Bruckner, however, did not give in. With the help of a substantial subvention 
from Prince Johann Liechtenstein, he engaged the orchestra at his own expense. 
While beginning the first rehearsal he made the announcement, "Well, gentlemen, 
we can rehearse as long as we like. I have got someone to pay for it." Most of the 
musicians were uncooperative, obstinate, and sarcastic during the first rehearsals 
under Bruckner's direction, but among the friendly members of the orchestra was 
a young violinist whose immediate admiration for Bruckner was to be of decisive 
importance later — Artur Nikisch.* The performance took place on October 26, 
1873. Apart from conducting the symphony, Bruckner played Bach's Toccata and 
Fugue in D minor and a free organ improvisation. It was a tremendous success in 
the concert hall, and the symphony was reasonably well reviewed by the newspa- 
per critics. The orchestra had warmed up to the difficult work and performed the 
"unplayable" symphony with so much enthusiasm that the following day Bruckner 
wrote them an exuberant letter. 

One of the critics, Ludwig Speidel of the Fremdenblatt, had indeed written, "There 
is introduced in this symphony a composer whose very shoelaces his numerous ene- 
mies are not fit to tie." In his letter, Bruckner asked permission to dedicate his sym- 
phony to the Philharmonic, saying that "your acceptance would give me great joy." 
Originally, the biography relates, 

Bruckner had wished to dedicate the work to the Abbe Liszt, but the relation 
between the two composers never developed. Quite apart from the differences in 
their musical outlook, Liszt found Bruckner's personality positively annoying. On 
one occasion he told a friend that nothing made him more irritable than to hear 
himself addressed as "Your Grace, most reverend Herr Canonicus." The Philhar- 
monic Orchestra failed to reply to his offer of dedication, and later, in 1884, 
Bruckner reverted to his original idea of inscribing the work to Liszt. The latter's 
reply was cool and formal. Soon afterwards, Liszt lost the score when leaving 
Vienna in haste. It found its way back to Bruckner, who was offended; Liszt, it 
seems, never noticed the loss. 

As a result, No. 2 became the only Bruckner symphony bearing no dedication. 

The near-acceptance of the symphony on its first presentation did not, of course, end 
Bruckner's orchestra difficulties in Vienna. The long-delayed, self-conducted 1877 pre- 
miere of his monumental Third Symphony, previously dedicated to Wagner, was a dis- 
aster in its own right, and it was not until No. 4 was introduced by Hans Richter, in 
February 1881, that the musical capitals of Europe began to take Bruckner seriously. 
By that time the composer was fifty-six. 

The "alarming" First Symphony, from Bruckner's Linz period, had differed from his 
still earlier symphonic attempts by its boldness, even wildness, of expression. It was a 
true "storm and stress" work, which he later dubbed "the impudent urchin" ("das kecke 
BeserV). The other C minor work, No. 2, was almost its complement — more sober, more 
lyrical, more restrained in expression. Meanwhile two other symphonic endeavors of 
that time were suppressed altogether by the composer himself with the comment: "They 
are no good; I dare not write down a respectable theme." Attempting to write "more 
simply," as his friends urged him, he still could not bring himself to cut back on the 



*Nikisch was to become the third conductor of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, which he led dur- 
ing the years 1889-1893. Oddly enough, despite his enthusiasm for Bruckner's music, he did not 
see fit to conduct any of it during his time in Boston. Wilhelm Gericke had conducted the Seventh 
Symphony in 1887, but no other work of Bruckner's was heard in a BSO concert before 1899, dur- 
ing Gericke's second term as conductor. [ — S.L.] 



21 



Week 14 



rich proliferation of thematic material which was to be his personal trait in symphonic 
music. So he hit on the device of clarifying his expanded sonata constructions by sharp 
separation of their thematic groups. Thus he anticipated one increasingly important 
and significant feature of his mature style, so that the Second has much more of the 
characteristic look and sound of a Bruckner symphony than the First. 

In his original score for this work, he also used such an inordinate number of gener- 
al pauses, in order to mark off the sections, that a member of the Vienna Philharmonic 
itself dubbed it the "Rest Symphony." The expression, Erwin Doernberg writes, "soon 
found its way into the vocabulary of Bruckner's adversaries, even when the work had 
been revised and most of the pauses had disappeared from the score." His frequent, 
often very pregnant, use of the general pause thereafter has sometimes been likened to 
an organist pausing to change his registration, or to permit the echoes to die away in a 
large cathedral before resuming. To Bruckner himself it was perfectly natural, like tak- 
ing a deep breath, and in discussion he once exclaimed waggishly: "What's all the fuss 
about? Beethoven has a pause right at the beginning of his Fifth Symphony." 

After the premiere of Symphony No. 2, Bruckner was persuaded by his friend Johann 
Herbeck and others to make a few cuts and changes in the score. He conducted the 
second version on February 20, 1876, at his own expense. He then made some further 




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changes in 1877 and again in 1879. The work was not played by the Vienna Philhar- 
monic under Richter himself until November 1894. The critical edition of the score 
prepared by Robert Haas is based on Bruckner's full-length 1872 version, and that by 
Leopold Nowak on his 1877 version. The first edition of 1892 is considered completely 
inauthentic, since it contains the usual quota of alterations beyond any of Bruckner's 
own. The present performances are from the Nowak edition. 

I. Moderato, C minor, 4/4 time. Many of the basic characteristics of a typical Bruck- 
ner first movement are already discernible in this one. For the first time the music 
begins with a soft tremolo in the upper strings, which serves as an atmospheric back- 
ground to the opening theme. The theme itself begins, in this case, with a soulful dia- 
logue between cellos and horn. Already there are, as always, two well-defined groups 
of themes plus a closing group just as important as the first two. The second group (re- 
markably short in this movement) begins with a bucolic singing theme with a familiarly 
Upper Austrian folk-flavor, while the sturdier final group typically conceals a chorale- 
like strain. The very last idea, or codetta, which is introduced in the exposition (and 
again in the recapitulation), is a two-bar figure beginning with a melodic turn, which is 
delicately bandied about from the oboe to the other woodwinds. It shows a surprising 
resemblance to the music of the Christmas-party scene (No. 6) in Tchaikovsky's Nut- 
cracker, composed twenty years later. 

The first part of the development section has just that mysterious sense of depth and 
space, of fantasy and wonder, which is also a Bruckner trademark. And the beginning 
of the coda eerily evokes the corresponding point in Beethoven's Ninth Symphony. 




* 



Silhouette by Otto Bbhler of Bruckner at 
the organ 



23 



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■ 



Doernberg comments on this: "Bruckner was long haunted by the Beethoven coda. In 
the Symphony 'No. 0' [key of D minor] he adopted it literally (and here it did not link 
up with his own themes), while in the Third Symphony, which is again in the same key 
as Beethoven's Ninth, Bruckner restricted himself to using Beethoven's descending 
notes. Here, in the Second Symphony, the similarity is veiled to a considerable extent 
by the difference of key and the speedier tempo, though it was certainly not Bruckner's 
intent to conceal it." So smitten is Bruckner with this coda-opening that in the original 
1872 version he begins it twice — after thirty-two bars, that is, the music dies out and 
begins again. In the 1877 version, it begins only once. 

II. Andante, A-flat major, 4/4 time. In the Haas edition, this movement bears the 
title "Adagio" while the Nowak edition shows the title "Andante"; in both editions, 
however, the initial tempo indication is "Feierlich, etwas bewegf ("Solemn, somewhat 
agitated"). The form of the movement is a simple alternation of two subjects, with more 
elaborate embroidery and more dynamic intensity in each of three successive appear- 
ances of the first subject. The second subject is of a type peculiar to Bruckner, and 
especially familiar from the Fourth and Fifth symphonies. Here a harmonized chorale- 
like theme is plucked by the strings, while the horn plays a solo melody over it, coming 
in only at the second bar of each four-bar phrase. The first elaboration of this subject, 
following immediately on its initial statement, is omitted in the 1877 version. Just 
before the coda there is "a sudden hush, and a passage that anticipates amazingly the 
Adagio of Bruckner's Ninth Symphony" (Doernberg). The coda itself begins with a lit- 
eral quotation from his Great Mass in F minor. It is played by the strings, the first vio- 
lins raising to a higher octave the melody sung by the bass soloist to the words "Bene- 
dictus qui venit in nomine Domini." This segues into the opening bars of this movement's 
main theme. The haunting figure heard in the closing page is played by the horn in the 
1872 version, and by the clarinet in the 1877 version. 



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III. Scherzo, C minor, 3/4. This is headed "SchnelV ("Fast") in the earlier version, 
and "Mafiig schnelV ("Moderately fast") in the later one. Also the repeat signs in the 
main scherzo and the middle (Trio) section are omitted in the 1877 version, though of 
course the scherzo proper is still repeated verbatim following the Trio, after Bruckner's 
custom; a special coda, in this case, follows the complete return. The main section, 
writes Deryck Cooke, "is of the stamping peasant-dance type characteristic of Bruck- 
ner's first three symphonies (after which he conceived a completely new type for each 
work)." This one begins with a bold flourish, and is also noteworthy for its boisterous 
chromatic scales which almost anticipate Mahler. The first four notes are identical in 
rhythm and melody to the famous Prelude from Bach's Violin Partita in E major. The 
Trio section (same tempo, C major) begins with another soft violin tremolo like the first 
movement's, introducing a viola theme in the style of an Austrian Landler, with an 
Alpine yodel built into it. The special coda is apt to startle the semi-aficionado by 
starting off with a timpani barrage, on one note, in the same rhythm as that unforget- 
table one in the scherzo of Bruckner's Ninth. It just happens to be the rhythm of our 
main theme here, which has already been given the one-note treatment by the unison 
trumpets — not quite the same thing. 

IV. Finale, C minor, 2/2. Instead of a simple rondo for a finale, we have another big 
sonata form with rondo elements added. Here Bruckner incorporates, for the first time, 
the unifying cyclic principle featured in all his later symphonies. But there is no dra- 
matic piling-up of the earlier movements' themes in the coda, nor is there any rhetori- 
cal parading and dismissal of them one by one in an introduction. Instead there are the 
subtlest reminders of their basic elements, infused into the basic elements of this move- 
ment. The first running string figure, for example, neatly conceals the first four notes of 
the first movement, albeit without their distinctive rhythm that will come in the devel- 
opment section. The main fortissimo theme, toward which the running strings build up 
for thirty-two bars, begins with a triplet snap which is simply a more peremptory form 
of the flourish that launched the scherzo. Later this fast triplet acquires some small 
portion of the motor energy in the one that propels the finale of Schubert's great C major 
symphony. 

The key-relationship with the second subject — again a bucolic Austrian one — is a 
shocker. Our third group builds up to a triple-^/brte and breaks off sharply, and the sud- 
denly hushed codetta that follows brings another poignant quotation from the F minor 
Mass — this time taken from the final pages of the Kyrie eleison. A later repetition of 
this quote, shortly before the coda, is omitted in the 1877 version. The coda itself is 
again a double statement, but this time it is the first statement that is the longer of the 
two: sixty-six bars ending with a gradually slowing-down alternation of the symphony's 
first four melodic bars with the finale's bucolic theme. This first statement is deleted in 
toto in the later version of the score. The coda remains in the minor until just twenty- 
three bars from the end, when the triplet snap leads off the C major tutti with an exhil- 
arating sense of exact timing and finality. 

— Jack Diether 



•«.; 






The late Jack Diether was the author of many articles on the lives and works of Bruckner 
and Mahler. In 1969 he became the editor of Chord and Discord, the journal of the Bruckner 
Society of America. His program note on the Bruckner Second appeared in the BSO's program 
book when the orchestra first played this symphony in 1974. 



27 



Week 14 



Www 









^H 



More . . . 



The newest Mozart biography is something different: Maynard Solomon's Mozart: A Life 
(HarperCollins) follows his highly regarded Beethoven in taking an entirely fresh look 
at a thrice-familiar master, questioning received opinions, analyzing sources often over- 
looked, and, in particular, bringing a perceptive psychological analysis to bear on the 
vital question of Mozart and his father. Psychobiography often runs the risk of veering 
into sheer invention, but Solomon employs the form as well as it has ever been used, 
and no account of Mozart from now on will be able to avoid the issues it raises, though 
not everyone will want to follow him in laying many of the problems of Mozart's life so 
strongly at the door of his father Leopold. Stanley Sadie's fine Mozart article in The 
New Grove has been published separately (Norton paperback); Sadie is also the author 
of Mozart, a convenient brief life-and-works survey with nice pictures (Grossman paper- 
back). Alfred Einstein's classic Mozart: The Man, the Music is still worth knowing (Ox- 
ford paperback). In many respects the most informative biography of Mozart — though 
it covers only the last ten years of his life — is Volkmar Braunbehrens' Mozart in Vienna, 
1781-1791 , which convincingly lays to rest many myths about the composer while 
sketching far more effectively than previous writers the milieu in which he worked 
(Harper Perennial paperback). H.C. Robbins Landon has also covered the same ground 
in several volumes devoted to Mozart in Vienna, to his final year, and to Vienna itself 
during the time Mozart was there. The Mozart Compendium: A Guide to Mozart's Life 
and Music, edited by H.C. Robbins Landon (Schirmer Books) is a first-rate single-vol- 
ume reference work for the Mozart lover, filled with an extraordinary range of informa- 
tion, including things it might never have occurred to you to look up, but which you'll 
be delighted to know. A distinguished roster of specialists writes about the historical 
background of Mozart's life, the musical world in which Mozart lived, his social milieu 



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and personality, and his opinions on everything from religion and reading matter to sex 
and other composers. In addition, there are entries for all of Mozart's works with basic 
information regarding their composition, performance, publication, location of manu- 
scripts, and special features (such as nicknames or borrowed tunes). Finally, a discus- 
sion of the reception of Mozart's music, performance practices, myths and legends about 
Mozart, Mozart in literature, and an evaluation of the biographies, analytical studies, 
and editions of Mozart's music caps a remarkable book. The concept of the book proved 
so successful — detailed and scholarly for the specialist, wide-ranging, yet accessible 
for the general music-lover — that the same model has been followed for similar vol- 
umes devoted to Beethoven and Wagner. Cuthbert Girdlestone's Mozart and his Piano 
Concertos contains much information rather buried in decoratively elegant descriptions 
(Dover paperback). The Mozart Companion, edited by H.C. Robbins Landon and Donald 
Mitchell (Norton paperback), contains two major chapters on the concertos: Friedrich 
Blume discusses their sources, Robbins Landon their musical origin and development. 
Philip Radcliffe's Mozart Piano Concertos is a brief contribution to the useful BBC 
Music Guides series (University of Washington paperback). Any serious consideration 
of Mozart's music must include Charles Rosen's splendid study The Classical Style 
(Norton paperback). His discussion of K.271 is especially masterful. This week's con- 
ductor, Jeffrey Tate, has recorded the "Jeunehomme" concerto with Mitsuko Uchida 
and the English Chamber Orchestra (Philips, with the Concerto No. 8 in C, K.248). 
Other recordings of note include Robert Levin's on fortepiano with the Academy of 
Ancient Music under the direction of Christopher Hogwood (Oiseau-Lyre, coupled with 
the Concerto No. 12 in A, K.414), and Murray Perahia's delicate, imaginative reading 
as both soloist and conductor with the English Chamber Orchestra (CBS, with the Con- 
certo No. 21 in C, K.467). Among the many other recordings currently available, it is 
worth pointing out a live performance, dating from 1952, by Dame Myra Hess with the 
Perpignan Festival Orchestra under the direction of Pablo Casals (Melodram, with the 
Schumann Piano Concerto). 

Hans-Hubert Schonzeler's Bruckner is a brief, nicely illustrated life-and-works (Cal- 
der). The most penetrating musical discussion of the symphonies is to be found in The 
Essence of Bruckner (Chilton) by Robert Simpson, himself a composer, who brings a per- 
ceptive ear and a sympathetic pen to the task of explaining Bruckner's gigantic and 
sometimes confusing structures. Philip Barford's Bruckner Symphonies in the BBC Music 
Guides gives a helpful introduction to these works, briefer and less technical than Simp- 
son's (BBC paperback). Dika Newlin's Bruckner, Mahler, Schoenberg is an interesting, 
if quirky, study that links the three composers as part of the great Viennese musical tra- 
dition (Norton). The complex series of scores, versions, and editions of Bruckner's music, 
brought on largely by the well-intentioned but misguided efforts of his disciples to 
spread performances of his work, have caused headaches for everyone performing, study- 
ing, or writing about this music. Deryck Cooke brought some order out of this chaos in 
a series of articles originally published in the Musical Times; this has been convenient- 
ly reprinted in a posthumous collection of Cooke's essays, Vindications (Cambridge Uni- 
versity Press). Bernard Haitink's recording for Philips of Bruckner's Second (using the 
Haas version) with the Concertgebouw Orchestra has not been issued on compact disc. 
Herbert von Karajan's reading with the Berlin Philharmonic is paced with greater vari- 
ety; this uses the briefer Nowak version with some of the cuts opened a la Haas (Deutsche 
Grammophon). Two more recent recordings worth considering (both from 1991) are 
Georg Solti's with the Chicago Symphony (London) and Riccardo Chailly's with the 
Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra (London). The most recent recording has Christoph 
Eschenbach conducting the Haas edition with the Houston Symphony Orchestra (Koch 
International Classics) 

— S.L. 



J 












29 



Week 14 



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Jeffrey Tate 

Jeffrey Tate made his conducting debut in 1978 with Carmen at the 
Goteborg Opera. Principal conductor since 1985 of the English 
Chamber Orchestra, he is also principal guest conductor of the Or- 
chestre National de France. He was music director of the Rotter- 
dam Philharmonic from 1990 to 1993 and principal conductor of 
the Royal Opera, Covent Garden, from 1986 to 1993. Born in Salis- 
bury, England, in 1943, Jeffrey Tate studied medicine at the Uni- 
versity of Cambridge and qualified as a doctor at St. Thomas' Hos- 
pital in London. But music had always been a great interest, and in 
1970 he joined the music staff at Covent Garden, remaining there 
through 1977 and working with such conductors as Sir Georg Solti, Sir Colin Davis, Rudolf 
Kempe, Carlos Kleiber, and John Pritchard. He assisted Pierre Boulez in 1976 with the 
centennial production of Wagner's Ring at Bayreuth and also worked with Herbert von 
Karajan at Salzburg. Jeffrey Tate now conducts regularly in the world's leading opera hous- 
es and festivals, with a repertoire based on Mozart, Strauss, Wagner, and French opera. 
Orchestras he has conducted include the London Symphony, the Berlin Philharmonic, the 
Boston Symphony, the Cleveland Orchestra, the Toronto Symphony, the Montreal Symphony, 
the Los Angeles Philharmonic, the Orchestre de la Suisse Romande, and the Israel Phil- 
harmonic, among many others. At the Theatre du Chatelet in Paris, Jeffrey Tate has recent- 
ly led a new production of Wagner's Ring with the Orchestre National de France and a new 
production of Britten's Peter Grimes. He has also conducted new productions of Weill's Ma- 
hagonny at the Opera de la Bastille in Paris, Gluck's Orfeo ed Euridice at the Grand Theatre 
of Geneva, and Mozart's Cosifan tutte at the Aix-en-Provence Festival. In March 1996 he 
reopened the Opera Palais Gamier in Paris with a new production of Cosifan tutte. He led 
Wagner's Die Walkiire this past September at the Teatro Colon in Buenos Aires, and he is 
scheduled to lead a new production of Wagner's Parsifal in Bonn this spring. Forthcoming 
concerts include appearances with the Maggio Musicale in Florence, the Accademia Naz- 
ionale di Santa Cecilia in Rome, the Orchestra Sinfonica della RAI in Torino, the Israel 
Philharmonic, the Los Angeles Philharmonic, the Danish Radio Orchestra, the Stockholm 
Philharmonic, and the Dresden Philharmonic. His recent recordings have included Strauss's 
Arabella, Humperdinck's Hansel und Gretel, Offenbach's Les Contes d'Hoffmann, Berg's 
Lulu, Mozart piano concertos with Mitsuko Uchida, all of Mozart's symphonies with the 
English Chamber Orchestra, the major orchestral works of Elgar with the London Symphony 
Orchestra, and Mendelssohn's complete Midsummer Nights Dream music with the Rotter- 
dam Philharmonic. Other recordings include Bruckner's Symphony No. 9 with the Rotter- 
dam Philharmonic, Grieg's Peer Gynt with the Berlin Philharmonic, and the Ninth sympho- 
nies of Schubert and Beethoven with the Dresden Staatskapelle. Jeffrey Tate made his 
Boston Symphony debut in April 1986 and appeared with the orchestra most recently lead- 
ing subscription concerts in November 1995 and two Tanglewood concerts last summer. 



Boston Symphony Orchestra concertmaster Malcolm Lowe performs on 

a Stradivarius violin loaned to the orchestra by Lisa, Nicole, and Wanda Reindorf 

in memory of their brother, Mark Reindorf. 




31 



^■1 








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Elisabeth Leonskaja 

Making her Boston Symphony debut this week, Elisabeth Leonskaja 
was born in Tiflis in the USSR. She made her debut with orchestra 
at age eleven and gave her first piano recital two years later. From 
1964 until 1971 Ms. Leonskaja studied with Jacob Milstein at the 
Moscow Conservatory, winning prizes during this period at interna- 
tional competitions in Bucharest, Paris, and Brussels. Before she 
emigrated from the Soviet Union and chose Vienna as her perma- 
nent residence, she played numerous duo-concerts with Sviatoslav 
Richter, a collaboration that had a strong influence on her further 
artistic development. With recitals during the Salzburg Festival in 
the years 1979 and 1980, she laid the foundation for her career in the musical world of the 
West. Since then she has performed regularly as guest soloist with the leading orchestras 
of the world, among them the Vienna Symphony, the Munich Philharmonic, the Tonhalle 
Orchestra of Zurich, the Royal Philharmonic of London, the BBC Orchestra, the Paris Radio 
Orchestra, the Royal Concertgebouw of Amsterdam, the Bamberg Symphony, the Gewand- 
haus Orchestra of Leipzig, the Orchestre de Paris, and the Czech Philharmonic. An acclaimed 
debut with the Los Angeles Philharmonic at the Hollywood Bowl resulted in invitations to 
perform with the Cleveland Orchestra, the New York Philharmonic, and the symphony or- 
chestras of Cincinnati, St. Louis, and Houston. Ms. Leonskaja is also a frequent guest at 
many summer festivals, including the London Proms, Edinburgh, Lucerne, Salzburg, the 
Vienna Festival, and others. In addition she is a much-admired partner in the realm of 
chamber music, performing with such colleagues as Heinrich Schiff, the Alban Berg Quar- 
tet, and the Vienna Philharmonic Chamber Ensemble. In the summer of 1992 she again 
played recitals with Sviatoslav Richter. Numerous recordings — solo, chamber, and with 
orchestra — also reflect Ms. Leonskaja's abilities. Under an exclusive recording contract 
with Teldec she has recorded the two Brahms piano concertos — the First with Eliahu Inbal 
and the Philharmonia, the Second with Kurt Masur and the Gewandhaus Orchestra of Leip- 
zig — and an album of Brahms piano sonatas that won the Caecilia Prize. In the 1995-96 
season Ms. Leonskaja's North American concert engagements included appearances with 
the New York Philharmonic and Cincinnati Symphony and a performance with the Guar- 
neri Quartet as part of Lincoln Center's "Great Performers" series. In addition to this week's 
Boston Symphony concerts, her engagements for 1996 and 1997 include a recital with the 
Philadelphia Chamber Music Society. 




/V> 



OSTON LYRIC OPERA 



L'Elisir d y Amove 

Boston Lyric Opera presents 
Gaetano Donizetti's delightful 
comedy of love lost and found 
in a bottle of not so magical elixir. 

April 2-13, 1997 at the 
Emerson Majestic Theatre 



For tickets call 542-OPRA 



33 






1 I >•}'>' yv>V 



IHHi 

■■HL 




KEEP GREAT MUSIC ALIVE 



The Higginson Society 

The Boston Symphony Orchestra is grateful to the 
following individuals for their generous support during 
the 1995-96 season. These patrons have each donated 
$1,800 or more to the Boston Symphony Annual Fund. 

Annual Fund gifts are unrestricted and are applied 

directly to the Orchestra's operating budget. This roster 

acknowledges contributions received between 

September 1, 1995, and August 31, 1996. 

Annual Fund Contributors 




Patrons 
$10,000+ 



Mr. and Mrs. 
Mr. and Mrs. 
Mr. and Mrs. 
Mr. and Mrs. 
Mr. and Mrs. 
Mr. and Mrs. 

Crozier, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. 
Mr. and Mrs. 

Darling, Jr. 
William and 
Mr. and Mrs. 
Mr. and Mrs. 



David B. Arnold, Jr. 
J. P. Barger 
Peter A. Brooke 
Irving S. Brudnick 
Julian Cohen 
William M. 

Lewis S. Dabney 
Nelson J. 

Deborah Elfers 
John H. Fitzpatrick 
Richard M. Fraser 



Sponsors 
$5,000 - $9,999 



Mr. and Mrs. Harlan E. Anderson 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard Bartley 
Mr. and Mrs. Eugene H. Clapp II 
Mr. John F Cogan, Jr. and 

Ms. Mary L. Cornille 
Mr. and Mrs. Nader F 

Darehshori 
Tamara P. and Charles H. Davis II 
Deborah B. Davis 
Mr. and Mrs. J. Richard Fennell 
Mr. and Mrs. Dean W Freed 
Mr. and Mrs. Ulf B. Heide 



Fellows 

$2,500 - $4,999 



Mrs. Weston W Adams 

Joel B. Alvord 

Mr. and Mrs. James B. Ames 

Prof, and Mrs. Rae D. Anderson 

Donald P. Babson 

Mr. and Mrs. David Bakalar 

Mr. and Mrs. John E. Beard 

Nancy and Mark Belsky 



Mrs. Kenneth J. Germeshausen 

Mr. and Mrs. Francis W. Hatch 

Joseph Hearne and Jan Brett 

Bayard and Julie Henry 

Ms. Susan Morse Hilles 

Mr. and Mrs. George H. Kidder 

Mr. and Mrs. Allen Z. 

Kluchman (d) 
Mr. and Mrs. R. Willis Leith, Jr. 
Mrs. August R. Meyer 
Mr. and Mrs. Nathan R. Miller 
Mrs. Olney S. Morrill 



Mr. and Mrs. Joe M. Henson 
Ms. Marilyn Brachman Hoffman 
Mrs. Ellen 0. Jennings 
Mr. and Mrs. George Krupp 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles P. Lyman 
Mr. and Mrs. John F Magee 
Ms. Elizabeth E. Meyer 
Mr. and Mrs. John D. Montgomery 
Mr. and Mrs. William B. 

Moses, Jr. 
Mrs. Robert B. Newman 
Ms. Edith H. Overly 



Gabriella and Leo Beranek 
Lynda Schubert Bodman 
Mr. and Mrs. John M. Bradley 
Mr. and Mrs. J. Gary Burkhead 
Dr. and Mrs. Dexter L. Burley 
Mr. and Mrs. Stanford 

Calderwood 
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Carr 

34 



Mr. and Mrs. William J. Poorvu 
Mrs. George R. Rowland 
Ms. Ruth Russel Smith 
Mr. and Mrs. Ray Stata 
Mr. and Mrs. William F 

Thompson 
Mrs. Richard Wengren 
Henry and Joan T. Wheeler 
Mrs. Joan D. Wheeler 
Mr. and Mrs. E. S. Wood 
Dr. and Mrs. Nicholas T. Zervas 
Anonymous (3) 



Mrs. Andrew J. Palmer 

Mrs. Hollis Plimpton, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Francis P. Sears, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Carl Shapiro 

Ms. Eileen C. Shapiro 

Mrs. Anson P. Stokes 

Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Stoneman 

Mr. and Mrs. William O. Taylor 

Mrs. John J. Wilson 

Mrs. H. Melvin Young 

Anonymous (2) 



Mr. and Mrs. Marshall N. Carter 
Mrs. Florence C. Chesterton- 

Norris 
Charles Christenson 
Dean and Mrs. Robert C. Clark 
Dr. and Mrs. Stewart H. Clifford 
Ms. Mary Hart Cogan 
Mr. and Mrs. Abram T. Collier 



Mr. and Mrs. William H. 

Congleton 
Mr. and Mrs. John L. Cooper 
Mr. and Mrs. Bigelow Crocker, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Stanton W. Davis 
Dr. and Mrs. Charles C. 

Dickinson III 
Mr. and Mrs. Eugene B. Doggett 
Mr. and Mrs. Ed Eskandarian 
John Gamble 
Dr. and Mrs. Arthur Gelb 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert R. Glauber 
Prof, and Mrs. Ray A. Goldberg 
Mr. and Mrs. Macey J. Goldman 
Mr. and Mrs. John L. Grandin, Jr. 
Mrs. James H. Grew 
Mr. and Mrs. James B. 

Hangstefer 
Mrs. Robert G. Hargrove 
Dr. and Mrs. George Hatsopoulos 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert P. 

Henderson 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard D. Hill 
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Hyman 
Ms. Emily C. Hood 



Members 
$1,800- $2,499 

Mr. and Mrs. William F. 

Achtmeyer 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert W Adams 
Mr. and Mrs. Vernon R. Alden 
Mr. and Mrs. Alvin B. Allen 
Mr. and Mrs. William F. Allen, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Walter Amory 
Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth A. 

Anderson 
Mr. and Mrs. Stephen H. Anthony 
Mrs. Elsie J. Apthorp 
Marshall and Patricia Armstrong 
Mrs. Neil R. Ayer 
Mr. and Mrs. Martin Begien 
Mr. and Mrs. George W Berry 
Mr. and Mrs. Jordan Birger 
Peter M. Black 

Mr. and Mrs. William L. Boyan 
W Walter Boyd 
Mrs. James W Bradley 
Mrs. Alexander H. Bright 
Mr. and Mrs. Paul P. Brountas 
Mrs. Charles D. Brown 
Mr. and Mrs. William L. Brown 
Mr. and Mrs. Pierce B. Browne 
Catherine and Paul Buttenwieser 
Mr. and Mrs. Harold Caro 
Dr. Kevin J. Clancy 
Mr. and Mrs. James F. Cleary 
Kenneth W. Cohen 



Mr. and Mrs. Ronald J. Jackson 
Mr. and Mrs. Bela T. Kalman 
Mrs. George I. Kaplan 
Martin and Wendy Kaplan 
Ms. Susan B. Kaplan and 

Mr. Ami Trauber 
Rita J. and Stanley H. Kaplan 

Foundation and Family 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert D. King 
Mr. and Mrs. Gordon F. Kingsley 
Mr. and Mrs. David Knight 
Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Chet 

Krentzman 
Mr. and Mrs. John M. Kucharski 
Barbara Lee 

Mr. and Mrs. Stephen R. Levy 
Anne Lovett and Stephen 

Woodsum 
Mr. and Mrs. Harry L. Marks 
Mr. and Mrs. Wells Morss 
Mrs. Richard P. Nyquist 
Dr. and Mrs. Oglesby Paul 
May and Daniel Pierce 
Mrs. Paul Pigors 
Mrs. Daphne Brooks Prout 



Mrs. I. W Colbum 

Mr. and Mrs. Aaron H. Cole 

Mr. and Mrs. Marvin A. Collier 

Johns H. Congdon 

Mr. and Mrs. E. Raymond Corey 

Dr. and Mrs. Stephen H. Crandall 

Mr. and Mrs. Albert M. 

Creighton, Jr. 
Mrs. Harry King Cross 
Mr. and Mrs. Ronald C. Curhan 
Sarah H. Davis 
Mrs. F Stanton Deland, Jr. 
Phyllis Dohanian 
Mitchell Dong and 

Robin LaFoley Dong 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert W Doran 
Francis A. Doyle 
Dr. Richard W Dwight 
Mr. and Mrs. Goetz B. Eaton 
Mrs. Otto Eckstein 
Mrs. Priscilla Endicott 
Mrs. Harris Fahnestock 
K. H. Fairbend 
Ms. Katherine Fanning and 

Mr. Amos C. Mathews 
Mr. and Mrs. Steven S. Feinberg 
Nancy J. Fitzpatrick and 

Lincoln Russel 
Dr. and Mrs. Henry L. Foster 
Stefan M. Freudenberger 

35 



Mr. and Mrs. Peter C. Read 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. Remis 

Mr. and Mrs. Jerome Rosenfeld 

Mrs. Benjamin Rowland 

Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Rubin 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Saltonstall 

Mr. and Mrs. Thornton Stearns 

Mr. and Mrs. Ira Stepanian 

Miss Elizabeth B. Storer 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Swiniarski 

Mrs. Nathan B. Talbot 

Mrs. Charles H. Taylor 

Mrs. David D. Terwilliger 

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Thorne, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. John A. Tillinghast 

Stephen Tilton 

Jonathan B. Treat II 

William W Treat 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles H. Watts II 

Stephen and Dorothy Weber 

Miss Christine White 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas H. P. 

Whitney 
Mrs. Nancy P. Williams 



Mr. and Mrs. Thomas J. 

Galligan, Jr. 
Dr. and Mrs. Donald B. Giddon 
Ms. Pamela Ormsbee Giroux 
Arthur S. Goldberg 
Carol R. Goldberg and 

Avram J. Goldberg 
Mr. and Mrs. Jordan L. Golding 
Mr. Mark R. Goldweitz 
Ms. Linda Goodman 
Mrs. Haskell R. Gordon 
Mrs. Harry N. Gorin 
Martin Gottlieb 

Mr. and Mrs. Daniel S. Gregory 
David and Harriet Griesinger 
Mrs. Harold K. Gross 
Dr. and Mrs. Jerome H. Grossman 
Mr. and Mrs. Henry R. Guild, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Graham Gund 
Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Haas 
Ellen and John Harris 
Mr. and Mrs. Harry R. Hauser 
Mr. and Mrs. Noah T. Hemdon 
Mrs. Richard R. Higgins 
Mrs. Louise P. Hook 
Mrs. Harrison D. Horblit 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles B. Housen 
Mr. and Mrs. William W Howells 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles A. Hubbard 
Mr. and Mrs. F. Donald Hudson 






HHHI 



H 



Higginson Society Membership continued 



Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Hyman 

Mrs. Joanie V. Ingraham 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Jaffe 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul Jameson 

Mrs. S. Charles Kasdon 

Joan Bennett Kennedy 

Mr. and Mrs. Seth A. Klarman 

Ms. Virginia B. Kleinrock 

Mason J. 0. Klinck 

William and Elaine Kopans 

Dr. and Mrs. Arthur R. Kravitz 

Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin H. Lacy 

Mr. and Mrs. David L. Landay 

Mr. and Mrs. Roger Landay 

Dr. and Mrs. William J. Landes 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis E. Lataif 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert A. Lawrence 

Mr. and Mrs. Maurice Lazarus 

Mr. and Mrs. Hart D. Leavitt 

Mr. and Mrs. David S. Lee 

Mr. and Mrs. Irving Levy 

Emily S. Lewis 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward H. Linde 

Graham Atwell Long 

Diane H. Lupean 

Mrs. Victor A. Lutnicki 

Ms. Anna L. Lyon 

Barbara Jane Macon 

Mrs. Olivia A. Manice 

Dr. Theodore Marier 

Mr. and Mrs. Satoru Masamune 

Dr. and Mrs. John D. Matthews 

Dr. and Mrs. Jeremiah P. 

McDonald 
Mr. and Mrs. William F. 

Meagher, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. Millar 
Mr. and Mrs. Jeffrey Millman 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard P. Morse 
Mr. and Mrs. Michael S. Scott 

Morton 

(d) indicates deceased 



Dr. and Mrs. Gordon S. Myers 

Pete and Ginny Nicholas 

Mr. and Mrs. Andrew L. Nichols 

Mr. and Mrs. Rodger P. Nordblom 

Gerald O'Neil 

Mr. and Mrs. Vincent M. O'Reilly 

Mrs. Andrew Oliver 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis F. Orsatti 

Mr. and Mrs. Stephen D. Paine 

Gary M. Palter 

Joseph and Susan Paresky 

Dr. and Mrs. Eliot J. Pearlman 

Mrs. Thorn Pendleton 

Mr. and Mrs. John A. Perkins 

Nancy Perkins and John Arata 

Mr. and Mrs. David R. Pokross 

Dr. and Mrs. John T Potts 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Prouty 

Mr. and Mrs. Millard H. Pryor, Jr. 

Ms. Sally Quinn 

Mr. and Mrs. Irving W Rabb 

Mr. and Mrs. David 

Rockefeller, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. William C. 

Rousseau 
Dr. Jordan S. Ruboy 
Mrs. George Lee Sargent 
Carol Scheifele-Holmes and 

Ben Holmes 
Mr. and Mrs. Marvin G. Schorr 
Mrs. Paul A. Schmid, Sr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Maurice Segall 
Dr. Bernard and Mrs. Carol 

Selland 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles M. Shane 
Dr. Jerome H. Shapiro and 

Meredith Pearlstein Shapiro 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Shenton 
Mr. and Mrs. Malcolm L. 

Sherman 
Mrs. Jeanette S. Simon 



Mrs. Donald B. Sinclair 
Richard and Susan Smith 
Peggy Snow 

Mr. and Mrs. Jeffrey P. Somers 
Mrs. Irma Mann Stearns and 

Dr. Norman Stearns 
Mr. and Mrs. Herbert B. Stern 
Mr. and Mrs. Howard H. 

Stevenson 
Mr. and Mrs. Harris E. Stone 
Mr. and Mrs. Henry S. Stone 
Betty W and Richard D. Stone 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. Sullivan 
Mr. and Mrs. John F. Taplin 
Charlotte Valentine Taylor 
Mr. and Mrs. Theodore H. Teplow 
Mr. and Mrs. John L. Thorndike 
Mr. and Mrs. W Nicholas 

Thorndike 
Drs. Eugene J. and Hilde H. 

Tillman 
Mr. and Mrs. Carlos H. Tosi 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. 

Trippe, Jr. 
Mrs. Irving Usen 
Mr. and Mrs. John H. Valentine 
Mr. and Mrs. William C. 

Van Faasen 
Robert A. Vogt 
Mr. and Mrs. Roger L. Voisin 
Charles M. Werly 
Mrs. Florence T Whitney 
Mrs. Ralph B. Williams 
Mrs. Shepard F. Williams 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas B. Williams 
Mr. and Mrs. Donald B. Wilson 
Miss Elizabeth Woolley 
Drs. Richard J. and Judith 

Wurtman 
Anonymous (12) 



36 



The Boston Symphony Orchestra gratefully acknowledges those individuals 
whose gifts to a Boston Capital Gift Program made during the 1995-96 season 
equal or exceed $1,800. 



Drs. Norman and Phyllis Abramson 

Mrs. weston W. Adams 

Prof, and Mrs. Rae D. Anderson 

Mr. and Mrs. David B. Arnold, Jr. 

Richard L. Benson 

William I. Bernell 

Peter Alexander Berton 

Ms. Helen Ladd Brackett 

Ms. Sierra Bright 

Mr. and Mrs. Peter A. Brooke 

Mrs. Elizabeth F. Cilley 

Prof, and Mrs. Vincent Cioffari 

Mr. and Mrs. James F. Cleary 

Mr. John F. Cogan, Jr., and 

Ms. Mary L. Cornille 
Mr. and Mrs. William F Connell 
Mr. and Mrs. Ronald C. Curhan 
Mr. and Mrs. Stephan D. Cutler 
Mr. and Mrs. Nader F Darehshori 
Mr. and Mrs. Nelson J. Darling, Jr. 
Mrs. Stanton W Davis 
Mr. and Mrs. Holbrook R. Davis 
Mr. and Mrs. Louis A. DeLucia 
Mr. and Mrs. Channing Dichter 
Dr. and Mrs. Charles C. 

Dickinson III 
Mr. and Mrs. William Elfers 
Dr. and Mrs. J. Richard Fennell 
Mr. and Mrs. Henry N. Flynt, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Freed 



Mr. and Mrs. Dean Freed 
Dr. and Mrs. Arthur Gelb 
Mr. and Mrs. Melvin Y. 

Gershman 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard J. Gilbert 
Mr. and Mrs. John P. Hamill 
Mrs. Robert G. Hargrove 
Ellen and John Harris 
Mr. and Mrs. Francis W. Hatch 
Dr. and Mrs. George Hatsopoulos 
Ms. Susan Morse Hilles 
Mr. and Mrs. George F Hodder 
Ms. Emily C. Hood 
William M. Joel 
Mr. Leonard Kaplan and 

Mrs. Marcia Simon Kaplan 
Mr. and Mrs. Martin S. Kaplan 
Ms. Susan B. Kaplan and 

Mr. Ami A. Trauber 
Dr. and Mrs. Arthur R. Kravitz 
J. Kenneth Kruvant 
Steven Kruvant 

Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin H. Lacy 
Mr. and Mrs. William D. Larkin 
Ms. Barbara Lee 
Mrs. Jerome J. Lipson 
Mr. and Mrs. Edwin N. London 
Mr. and Mrs. Caleb Loring, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Edward Mandell 
Mr. and Mrs. Jeffrey Millman 



Mrs. Robert B. Newman 

Mrs. Albert L. Nickerson 

Mr. and Mrs. William J. Poorvu 

Mr. and Mrs. Irving W. Rabb 

Mr. and Mrs. Fred Robins 

Mr. and Mrs. John Ex Rodgers 

Mr. and Mrs. Jerome Rosenfeld 

Mrs. Angelica L. Russell 

Roger A. Saunders 

Mr. and Mrs. Alvin C. Shottenfeld 

Mr. and Mrs. Mark L. Selkowitz 

Mark Silver 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard A. Smith 

Mr. and Mrs. Ray Stata 

Mr. Thomas G. Sternberg 

Mr. and Mrs. Denis EG. 

Tottenham 
Mrs. Irene Boveri Trackman 
Ms. Nancy Watts 
Rabbi Pamela Wax 
Miss Christine White 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas H.P. 

Whitney 
Mrs. Margaret A. Williams- 

DeCelles and 

Mr. Joseph DeCelles 
Mr. and Mrs. Donald B. Wilson 
Mr. and Mrs. Giles C. Winder 
Estate of G. Crandon Wooley 
Mr. and Mrs. Eric K. Zeise 



The Boston Symphony Orchestra is also grateful to the following Corporations and 
Foundations for their gifts of $1,800 and above to one or more of the Boston 
Capital Gift Programs during the 1995-96 season. 



Frank M. Barnard Foundation 
Caddell and Byers Insurance 

Agency, Inc. 
Chubb Group of Insurance 

Companies 
Clark Charitable Trust 
Germeshausen Foundation 
Gordon Fund 



William and Mary Greve 

Foundation 
Henry Hornblower Fund, Inc. 
Edward MacCrone Charitable 

Trust 
MASSmedia 
NEC USA, Inc. 
NEC Corporation 



Overly Foundation 

Thomas A. Pappas Charitable 

Foundation 
Saltonstall Charitable 

Foundation 
Leo Wasserman Foundation 
Edwin S. Webster Foundation 



37 






rXferiSKu 



Friends of the Boston Symphony Orchestra 



The Charles Munch Society 
($1,000-$1,799) 

Mr. and Mrs. John Abele 

Mr. and Mrs. David C. Abrams 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles F. 

Adams, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Peter C. Aldrich 
Mr. and Mrs. David L. Anderson 
Mrs. Marjorie M. Arons-Barron 
Mrs. Nicholas J. Baker 
Stephen Y. Barrow 
Mr. and Mrs. Michael E. Barton 
Mrs. Robert B. M. Barton 
Mrs. Randolph P. Barton 
Mrs. Richard E. Bennink 
Mr. and Mrs. Philip W. Bianchi 
Mr. and Mrs. Henry K. 

Bramhall, Jr. 
John W. Brewer 
Robin A. Brown 
Mr. and Mrs. Allan T. Buros 
Mr. and Mrs. James W. Carter 
Richard L. Cartwright 
Mrs. Paul C. Child 
Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Ciffolillo 



Mrs. William Claflin III 
Mrs. George H. A. Clowes 
Mr. and Mrs. Harold L. Cohen 
Mr. and Mrs. Loring W. Coleman 
Thomas E. Connolly 
Mr. and Mrs. John M. 

Connors, Jr. 
Victor Constantiner 
Mr. and Mrs. John J. Cullinane 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Curtis 
S. William Dahar II 
Mr. and Mrs. Disque Deane 
Harry Ellis Dickson 
David Driscoll 
Mr. and Mrs. William R. 

Driver, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Ronald F. Duff 
Mrs. Peter Edwards 
Dr. and Mrs. Herbert S. Elins 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard S. Emmet 
Mrs. Henri A. Erkelens 
Mr. and Mrs. Leroy Fadem 
Mrs. Hortense F. Feldblum 



Mrs. Norma Fine 

Mr. and Mrs. George P. 

Gardner, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. John L. Gardner 
Mrs. Morton R. Godine 
Arthur S. Goldberg 
Gourmet Caterers, Inc. 
Mr. and Mrs. Clark H. Gowen 
Janet and Clifton Gustafson 
Mr. and Mrs. John P. Hamill 
Mrs. Paul F. Hannah 
Mrs. Petie Hilsinger 
Gordon Holmes 
Mr. and Mrs. Franklin K. Hoyt 
Mr. and Mrs. J. Atwood Ives 
Dean C. Johnson 
Mrs. Albert S. Kahn 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard L. Kaye 
Sen. Edward M. Kennedy 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert K. Kraft 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard A. Leahy 
Mrs. George C. Lee 
Mr. and Mrs. Henry Lee 




"Today we have a noble orchestra - the work of our hands - which brings joy 

and comfort to many people... with your hearty cooperation, the work will last. " 

— Henry Lee Higginson, founder and sustainer, Boston Symphony Orchestra, April 27, 1914 

Henry Lee Higginson founded the BSO in 1881 and sustained the Orchestra until 1918. 
Since that time, the BSO has relied upon support from numerous individuals to keep 
its "noble orchestra" fine-tuned. Each season, Higginson Society members provide 
more than half of all unrestricted annual support for the BSO. 

JOIN THE BSO'S HIGGINSON SOCIETY AND HELP KEEP GREAT MUSIC ALIVE! 

Daniel P. Breen, Director of Administration for Development, Symphony Hall, Boston, MA 021 15 • 617-638-9251 



38 



Friends of the Boston Symphony Orchestra continued 



Dr. Elia Lipton 

Mr. and Mrs. Caleb Loring, Jr. 

Miss Ann E. Macdonald 

Mr. and Mrs. John P. Madden 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald Malpass, Jr. 

James A. Manninen 

Estate of Mrs. Gertrude Herbert 

Marcy 
Paul F. McDevitt 
Mr. and Mrs. John J. Morgan 
Mr. and Mrs. David G. Mugar 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert J. Murray 
Mr. and Mrs. Horace S. Nichols 
Mr. and Mrs. Paul C. O'Brien 
Mr. and Mrs. Walter H. Palmer 
Mrs. Helen W. Parsons 
Carmen J. Patti 
Mr. and Mrs. Malcolm D. 

Perkins 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas L. Phillips 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard D. 

Phippen 



Anthony C. Piatt 
Dr. Frank F. Rand III 
Mrs. J. C. Rauscher 
Michael C. Ruettgers 
Leonard J. Samia 
Mr. and Mrs. Albert J. Sandler 
Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Schore 
Mr. and Mrs. William J. 

Schwann 
Drs. Janine and Robert S. 

Schwartz 
Mr. and Mrs. David W Scudder 
Ms. Cynthia D. Scullin 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. Scully 
Mrs. George C. Seybolt 
Marshall H. Sirvetz 
Mr. and Mrs. John M. Skenyon 
W. Thomas and Joan C. Smith 
Mr. and Mrs. Eliot Snider 
Mrs. Lamar Soutter 
Mr. and Mrs. John K. Spring, Sr. 
Dr. and Mrs. Walter St. Goar 



Mr. and Mrs. David C. 

Starkweather 
Mr. and Mrs. Maximilian 

Steinmann 
Mrs. Patricia Hansen Strang 
Mr. and Mrs. Alan J. Strassman 
Mr. and Mrs. Makoto Suzuki 
Mr. and Mrs. Alan J. Tichnor 
Mrs. Howard Ulfelder 
Ms. Kathy Darling Walker 
Ms. Joyce A. Warchol 
Mrs. Ruth B. Ward 
Lois A. and Peter F. Way 
Miss Genevieve C. Weeks 
Mrs. Edith G. Weyerhaeuser 
Stetson Whitcher 
Ms. Robin Wilson 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles 0. 

Wood III 
Mrs. Clotilde Zannetos 
Anonymous (6) 



^H 



Friends 

($750-$999) 



Mrs. Herbert Abrams 

Mr. and Mrs. Hamilton T Bailey 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas R. 

Bateman 
Mr. and Mrs. John C. Bloom 
The Branded-New England Co. 
Dr. and Mrs. Bradford Cannon 
Lewis C. Cohen 
Mrs. John J. Conway 
Mrs. Charles Devens 
Ms. Carolyn A. Dilts 
Paul Doguereau 



Mrs. Gladys A. Eggimann 

John S. Farrell, Jr. 

John F. Foran 

Dr. and Mrs. Paul E. Gray 

Mr. and Mrs. Malcolm C. Green 

Mr. and Mrs. Raymond E. 

Hender 
Edwin W Hiam 
Ms. Sarah Kantor 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert J. 

Kaufmann 
Mr. and Mrs. James P. Keeney 



Mr. and Mrs. George W Kuehn 
John A. Lechner IV 
Mr. and Mrs. William S. Malcom 
Mr. and Mrs. William M. Marcus 
Mr. and Mrs. William H. Park 
Dr. and Mrs. Fredrick J. Stare 
Mrs. Jeanne M.H. Talbourdet 
Mrs. Richard F. Tread way 
Ralph P. Vertuccio Jr. 
Mrs. Amos N. Wilder 
Mr. and Mrs. Leslie J. Wilson 
Anonymous (3) 



Friends 

($350-$749) 



Mrs. John Q. Adams 
Dr. and Mrs. Alex F Althausen 
Mr. and Mrs. Oliver F. Ames 
Mr. and Mrs. John E. Andrews II 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard F. 

Armknecht, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Bruce C. Avery 
Mr. and Mrs. Dalton J. Avery 
Dr. Lloyd Axelrod 
James C. Ayer 

Dr. and Mrs. George P. Baker, Jr. 
Mrs. Richard Bancroft 



Joseph S. Banks 

Mrs. Bishop Bargate 

Mr. and Mrs. Frederick E. 

Barstow 
Mr. and Mrs. Sherman C. Bedford 
Mr. and Mrs. G. D'Andelot Belin 
Mr. and Mrs. Gerald A. Berlin 
William I. Bernell 
Walter W Birge III 
Mr. and Mrs. George Blagden 
Eugene R. Boeglin, Jr. 
Sen. Walter J. Boverini 



Daniel P. Breen 

Alan H. Brock 

Mrs. Adrian J. Broggini 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael R. Brown 

Ms. Georgia Bruggeman 

Gregory Bulger 

Mrs. Mary Louise Cabot 

Mrs. James G. Campbell 

Richard Carpenter 

John J. Chase 

Mr. and Mrs. Daniel S. Cheever 

Dr. and Mrs. F. Sargent Cheever 



39 



Visiting Nurse Association of Boston 



Providing quality home health care for over 110 years. 
One-stop service for all your home health care needs. 



* Nursing 
:; "Home Health Aide 
Rehabilitation Therapies 




75 Arlington Street 

Boston, MA 02116 

(617) 426-6630 




A 19 Year Tradition 



* Geriatric 

*Home Health Care 

"Specializing in Live-in Services 



607 Boylston Street, Copley Square, Boston, MA 02116 

(617) 267-5858 

Skilled nursing and rehabilitation therapy available through an affiliation with the VNA of Boston 




UNnY • HARMONY • ARTISTRY 



The Boston Symphony Orchestra 

extends congratulations to the 

Boston Musicians' Association, 

Local 9-535, on the occasion 

of its 100th anniversary. 




40 



Friends of the Boston Symphony Orchestra continued 



Gregory T. Clark 

Lewis F. Clark 

Mr. and Mrs. Stephen R. Clark 

Mrs. George A. Cluett, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bertram M. Cohen 

Mr. and Mrs. Stephen E. Coit 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles C Colby III 

Mrs. Gilman W. Conant 

Ms. Nancy Concannon 

Mr. and Mrs. Woolsey S. Conover 

Leon Constantiner 

Mrs. Arthur F. Cook 

Mr. and Mrs. William A. Cook 

Lucy A. and James E. Coppola 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert W. Costello 

Mr. and Mrs. Julian Crocker 

Mr. and Mrs. David C. Crockett 

Paul M. Crowe 

Ms. Deborah G. Cuccia 

Mr. and Mrs. Scott Cunningham 

William D. Curtis 

Dr. and Mrs. Chester C. 

D'Autremont 
Mrs. Vincent D'Orazio 
Mr. and Mrs. Alexander T. 

Daignault 
Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence J. Daly 
Mrs. Ernest B. Dane, Jr. 
Miss Evelyn J. Desmarais 
Thomas A. DiPietro 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard P. Dober 
Mrs. Sarah C. Doering 
Mr. Erik A. Domolky 
Ms. Ann Donaldson 
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur C. Doran 
Mr. and Mrs. J. Keller Duncan 
Mr. and Mrs. George P. 

Edmonds, Jr. 
Dr. and Mrs. Richard H. Egdahl 
Mr. and Mrs. William Elfers 
Mrs. John F. Elliott 
Mrs. Alexander Ellis, Jr. 
Charles H. Ellis, Jr. 
Bradford M. Endicott 
Mr. and Mrs. Gerald S. Epstein 
Ms. Martha A. Erickson 
Dr. and Mrs. Manfred Ernesti 
Mr. and Mrs. Donald J. Evans 
Romeyn Everdell 
Miss Ellen Fahy 
Mrs. Jarvis Farley 
Mrs. Barbara B. Fearing 
Roger and Judith Feingold 
Dr. Harvey V. Fineberg 
Mr. and Mrs. Niles D. Flanders 
Mr. and Mrs. Gustav 

I leischmann III 
Ms. Marie H. Fox 



Ms. Suzanne Freedman 

Conrad F. Frey 

Mr. and Mrs. Alan A. Friedberg 

Barry L. Friedman 

Ms. Marilyn Fuller 

Ms. Mary-Hale Furman 

Mrs. Barbara K. Gamage 

Mr. and Mrs. Steve Ganak 

Miss Eleanor Garfield 

Mr. and Mrs. Spyros A. Gavris 

Mr. and Mrs. John R. Ghublikian 

Mrs. Chandler Gifford, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Nelson S. Gifford 

Mr. and Mrs. Howard F. Gillette 

Alan R. Goff 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold Gold 

Mrs. Susan D. Goodall 

Mrs. Sylvan A. Goodman 

Mrs. John W. Goodrich 

Ms. Linda Gorham 

Ms. Kathleen M. Gorski 

Mrs. Charles D. Gowing 

Kenneth Grandberg 

Mr. and Mrs. John B. Gray 

Judy Green and Daryl Durant 

Mr. and Mrs. George L. 

Greenfield 
John G. Guillemont 
Mr. and Mrs. Ralph L. Gustin, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. John C. Haas 
Dr. and Mrs. Edgar Haber 
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur T. Hadley 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert M. Hale 
Mrs. Henry M. Halvorson 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles M. 

Hamann 
D. Gibson Hammond and Susan 

C. Hammond 
Mrs. Molly Harrington 
Ralph Hayden 

Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Haynes 
Mrs. Harold L. Hazen 
Mrs. Donald C. Heath 
Ms. Diane M. Heberg 
Mr. and Mrs. G.L. Cabot 

Henderson 
Mr. and Mrs. Arnold S. Hiatt 
Stephen M. Hill 

Dr. and Mrs. Stephen Hilzenrath 
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph D. Hinkle 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert W Hinman 
Mrs. Anne C. Hodsdon 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard L. 

Holbrook, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. H. Brian Holland 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas J. Hollyday 
Charles Hood 
Andrew I loulalian 



Mrs. Charles Fox Hovey 
Mr. and Mrs. Guerard H. 

Howkins, Jr. 
Dr. Peggy J. Howrigan 
Mrs. Charles W Hubbard III 
Ms. Judith Huenneke 
Mr. and Mrs. James F. 

Hunnewell 
Arthur J. Hurley Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. R. Blake Ireland 
Drs. David and Mira Irons 
Miss Carol F. Ishimoto 
Michael Iwanowicz 
Miss Elizabeth B. Jackson 
Ms. Anna S. Jeffrey 
Mr. and Mrs. David B. Jenkins 
Mr. and Mrs. Leland H. Jenkins 
Mr. and Mrs. Pliny Jewell III 
Mrs. H. Alden Johnson, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Howland B. 

Jones, Jr. 
Dr. H. Royden Jones, Jr. 
Betty and Dana Jost 
Mr. and Mrs. John H. Kallis 
Mrs. Leonard S. Kandell 
Dr. and Mrs. Charles F. Kane 
Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Kaplan 
Mr. and Mrs. William M. 

Kargman 
Sumner and Carol Kaufman 
David A. Kendall 
Mrs. Prescott L. Kettell 
Dr. and Mrs. Samuel Kim 
John M. Kimpel 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas P. King 
Ms. Barbara M. Kirchheimer 
Mr. and Mrs. Henry E. Kloss 
Mr. and Mrs. David C. Knapp 
Mrs. Russell W Knight 
Richard H. Knoebel 
Professor Helmut Koester 
Mr. and Mrs. Loren Korte 
Andrew Kotsatos 
Jack Krauss 

Mr. and Mrs. Mark A. Krentzman 
Mr. and Mrs. Melvin Kutchin 
Mr. and Mrs. Albert R. Lamb III 
Dr. Barry M. Lamont 
Mr. and Mrs. Ray E. Larson 
Dr. and Mrs. William B. Latta 
Hon. and Mrs. John P. La Ware 
Mrs. Edmund F Leland III 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert J. Lepofsky 
Dr. and Mrs. Clinton IN. Levin 
Dr. and Mis. Frie Licliter 
Dr. and Mrs. Charles S. Upson 
Mrs. Mary Ann Harris Livens 

Stephen F. Loner 



41 



vrai 

I ■ ' 




OUR THIRTY-NINTH YEAR 



r We invite you to trade in 

your unwanted or worn jewelry 

towards designs from our collection or 

to consider our restoration services. 



JEWELERS 



® 



FRIDAY &c SATURDAY 10:00 - 5:00 
OR BY APPOINTMENT 



30 CHURCH STREET WELLESLEY 
6i7.237.273O 



WELCH & FORBES 

Creative investment management 
and fiduciary services since 1838. 



Richard Olney III 
Arthur C. Hodges 
Richard F. Young 
M. Lynn Brennan 
John H. Emmons, Jr. 
Charles T. Haydock 
Oliver A. Spalding 



Old City Hall, 45 School Street, Boston, MA 02108 617/523-1635 



Kenneth S. Safe, Jr. 


1? 




John K. Spring 


1 (♦in !*i j 




John Lowell 
Thomas N. Dabney 




t'.i»% ; 


V. William Efthim 


Guido R. Perera, Jr. 




^L'&^ 



42 



Friends of the Boston Symphony Orchestra continued 



Mr. and Mrs. Robert I. Lurie 

Henry Lyman 

Ms. Therese A. Maloney 

Mrs. Lucretia K. Manzelli 

The Sogg Foundation 

Mrs. Patricia G. Marsh 

Marvin S. Martin 

Dr. Hiroko Masamune 

Robert McAvoy 

Dr. Marie C. McCormick 

Dr. and Mrs. John S. McGovern 

Mrs. Raymond W. McKittrick 

Mrs. Patricia McLeod 

John and Michaela McSheffrey 

John Messier 

Miss Karen Metcalf 

Mr. and Mrs. Bernard F. Meyer 

Dr. and Mrs. Alan S. Michaels 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph S. 

Michelson 
Mr. and Mrs. Norio Miyamoto 
James J. Mooney 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert F Morse 
Robert M. Morse 
Mrs. Richard S. Morse 
David L. Morton 
Ms. Martha S. Mugar 
James E. Mulcahy 
Ms. Alma Nahigian 
Ms. Helen H. Naylor 
Mrs. Hiroshi H. Nishino 
Mr. and Mrs. George Noble 
Richard S. Nutt 

Mr. and Mrs. Fred O'Connor, Sr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Jason S. Orlov 
Mrs. George A. Ott 
Mr. and Mrs. David Otten 
Ms. Mary B. Parent 
Dr. and Mrs. Jack S. Parker 
Mr. and Mrs. John B. Pepper 
Mr. and Mrs. James H. 

Perkins, Jr. 
H. Angus and Genevieve T. 

Perry 
Dr. and Mrs. Robert A. 

Petersen 
Mr. and Mrs. Nicholas J. 

Philopoulos 
Mr. and Mrs. Ervin Pietz 
Mr. and Mrs. Alvar W. Polk, Jr. 
Mrs. H. Burton Powers 
Ms. Carolyn C. Preston 
Professor Michael C. J. Putnam 
Ms. Anne Marie T. Rakip 
Ms. Janet E. Reardon 
Sumner M. Redstone 
William M. Reid 



Arthur S. Reinherz 

John C. Rennie 

Mrs. Ellen B. Richstone 

Mrs. Karl Riemer 

Mrs. Philip Rittenberg 

Dr. Gordon and Jacqueline 

Robbins 
Dorothy B. and Owen W. 

Robbins 
Mr. and Mrs. Leif Robinson 
Mr. and Mrs. John Ex Rodgers 
Dr. and Mrs. Malcolm P. Rogers 
Mr. and Mrs. Donald Rosenfeld 
Mr. and Mrs. Herbert G. 

Roskind, Jr. 
Drs. A. Daniel and Delilah 

Rubenstein 
Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence G. 

Rubin 
Sherman Russ 
Ms. Holly P. Safford 
Mr. and Mrs. Paul Sanders 
Donald and Elizabeth 

Sandstrom, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. John V. C. Say lor 
Mr. and Mrs. Peter K. Schofield 
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur R. 

Schwartz 
Mr. and Mrs. George G. 

Schwenk 
Richard S. Scipione 
Ms. Carol P. Searle 
Mr. and Mrs. John Seavey 
Mrs. Freema Shapiro 
Leslie and Howard Shapiro 
Mr. and Mrs. Frederic A. Sharf 
Mrs. William F. Shelley 
Mr. and Mrs. Jack Shirman 
Dr. Alene Silver 
Mr. and Mrs. Wallace E. Sisson 
Howard D. Sitzer 
Mr. and Mrs. Edgar A. Smith 
Mrs. Gordon Smith 
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph P. Solomon 
Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Z. 

Sorenson 
Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Spalding 
Mr. and Mrs. Marvin Sparrow 
Peter A. Spiegelman 
Mrs. Marcia Sprague 
Dr. and Mrs. David G. Stahl 
Mrs. John C. Starr 
Drs. Roger and Marilyn Steinerl 
Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence W. 

Strattner, Jr. 
Ms. Geraldine P. Sweeney 
Yutaka Tagaya 



43 



Mrs. Holly A. Tartaglia 
Mr. and Mrs. James Taylor 
Mr. and Mrs. Philip C. 

Thibodeau 
Mr. and Mrs. Donald B. Tobin 
Emery P. Todd 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Todd 
Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Robert 

Toorock 
Mr. and Mrs. D. C. Tosteson 
Mr. and Mrs. C. Robert Tully 
Marc Ullman 
Allan van Gestel 
Mr. and Mrs. Jack H. Vernon 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert A. Vieira 
Mr. and Mrs. Salvatore J. 

Vinciguerra 
Peter S. Voss 
Ms. Donna Wainwright 
Mrs. Charles F. Walcott 
Patrick Walsh 
Steven C. Walske 
Dr. and Mrs. Stephen and 

Nancy Wanger 
Mr. and Mrs. Howland S. 

Warren 
Mr. and Mrs. Harvey A. 

Wartosky 
Dr. and Mrs. James E. Wasco 
Mr. and Mrs. Walter Watson II 
Ms. Janice Weber 
Mr. and Mrs. Sinclair 

Weeks, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. John P. Weitzel 
Mr. and Mrs. David L. Weltman 
Mrs. Jeanie Noyes Wheeler 
Miss Elisabeth E. White 
Mr. and Mrs. John W White 
Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence 

Whiteside 
Edward T. Whitney, Jr. 
Jeffery Deane Williams 
Ms. Dena G. Willmore 
Mr. and Mrs. Arnold Wolf 
Mr. and Mrs. Allan Wolfe 
Ms. Mary F. Wolfson 
Ms. Susannah W. Wood 
Mr. and Mrs. John M. 

Woolsey, Jr. 
Paul H. Young 
Ms. Ruth Young 
Mr. and Mrs. Arnold M. Zaek 
Ms. Suzanne M. Xaff 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Zildjian 
Anonymous (46) 












Dinner, Parking 

AndThe Shuttle, 

ForASong. 

Make dinner at Boodle's part of your 
night out at the Symphony. We're offering 
our customers special parking privileges 
in our private garage for just $5, and free 

"Symphony Express" shuttle service 
Tuesday and Thursday. Just show us your 
Symphony tickets, and we'll arrange for 
your $5 parking, take you to Symphony 
Hall after your meal, and return you to 
your car after the performance. With a 
deal like that, a night at the Symphony 
never •T^" s tN sounded better. 




RESTAURANT&BAR 



IN THE BACK BAY HILTON (617) BOODLES 



Fine 
Handcrafted Jewelry 



FINE ART /AMERICAN CRAFTS 




Chalcedoney Druzy, brooch/pendant 
22K with granulation & rose cut diamonds 

Dock Square, 24 North St., Boston, MA 

Mashpee Commons, Mashpee, MA 

Mall at Chestnut Hill, Chestnut Hill, MA 

48 Post Rd. East at Main St., Westport, CT 

1-800-539-0025 



Life is short. Play. 

Restored Steinways Available 
A Tradition of Excellence 
Since 1950 




Acme Piano Craftsmen 
Lee Doherty 

President 

(617) 623-0600 

10 Garfield Avenue, Somerville, MA 02145 




44 



DEDICATED GIFTS 

Contributions were made to the Boston Symphony Orchestra during the 1995-96 fiscal 
year in honor of the following individuals: 



Mrs. Evelyn Arac 
Mrs. Emma Cohn 
Mrs. Ham King Cross 
Kenneth R. Feinberg 
Ray Goldberg 
Eva Goodman 



Ina Gordon 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Hyman 

Bela Kalman 

Richard P. Morse 

Dr. Ellison C. Pierce, Jr. 

Suzanne Read 



Mortimer Roth 

Ruth Shapiro 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Solomon 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul Sonnabend 

Dr. Norma Zack 

Dr. Nicholas Zervas 



Contributions were made to the Boston Symphony Orchestra during the 1995-96 fiscal year 
in memory of the following individuals: 



Philip K. Allen 
Hannah G. Ayer 
Louise Bates 
Linda Berman 
Jack Chvat 
Kelly Cole 
Ida Curhan 
Katharine Cushman 
Stanton W. Davis 
Margaret E.C. Downs 
Kathryn Felton 
Ben Frelinghuysen 
Kathy Fullerton 
Conrad Gassner 
Joseph Glasser 



Frances Gluskin 
Bertram D. Halperson 
Robert Hargrove 
Dr. Ernest Hermann 
Dr. R. Harlow Hermanson 
Sarah J. Hill 
George F. Hodder 
Edith C. Howie 
Richard V. Hyatt 
John W. Johnson, Jr. 
Allen and Betsy Kluchman 
Jane Reardon Labys 
Richard Burton Lewis II 
May Madsen 
John E. O'Donnell 



Faith Pigors 
William H. Ryan 
Kenneth B. Schwartz 
Betty Seymour 
Dr. Sidney Silver 
Alice E. Sines 
Jason Spencer 
Stanley Swaebe 
Gerard S. Sweeney 
Joseph L. Tribble, Jr. 
Gladys Vanderweerdt 
Lois King Walton 
Heinz Weissenstein 
Alma D. Worley 






The Boston Symphony Orchestra is particularly grateful to those individuals who 
chose to remember the BSO through a bequest. The Walter Piston Society recog- 
nizes and honors those who let the Orchestra know that it is included in their 
testamentary plans. 



Norman V. and Ellen B. Ballou 

Allen G. Barry 

Alice E. Buff 

Lee and Phyllis Coffey 

Margaret C. Dumas 

Benjamin Fisher 

Grace Cornell Graff 

Marion A. Green 

Edith C. Howie 



Erick Kauders 
James Lawrence 
Barbara G. La Mont 
Augusta W Little 
Virginia C. Mabley 
Franklin J. and 

Stephanie M. Marryott 
Anita B. Preston 
Miriam B. Rogers 



Paul C. Rasmussen 
Wilhelmina C. Sandwen 
Anna W. Snow 
Edna Betts Talbot 
Charles B. Whiteside 
Shirley M. Whitcher 
William Winer 
Dixie Ward Wonders 
Jerome R. Zipkin 



45 



/BOSTON^ 




|SYMPHONY| oo^ ^ C i . 

Iorchestra/ KhU Corporate Sponsorships 






^S^S? 




The Boston Symphony wishes to acknowledge this distinguished group 


of corporations for their outs 


tanding and exemplary support 


of the Orchestra during the 1996 fiscal year. 


FIDELITY INVESTMENTS 


FILENE'S 


MASSACHUSETTS OFFICE 


Tanglewood on Parade 


OF TRAVEL AND TOURISM 




"Evening at Pops" Public Television 


NORTHWEST AIRLINES 


Broadcasts 


Gospel Night at Pops 


NEC CORPORATION 




BSO North American Tour 


ITT SHERATON 




CORPORATION 


FIDELITY INVESTMENTS 


BOSTON SHERATON 


Boston Pops Esplanade Orchestra 


HOTEL AND TOWERS 


Summer Tour 


Boston Pops New Year's Eve Concert 


FLEET BANK 




WCVB-TV, HEARST 


BANKBOSTON 


BROADCASTING 


CORPORATION 


WCRB 102.5 FM 


BLUE CROSS AND BLUE 


Salute to Symphony 


SHIELD OF MASSACHUSETTS 


BANK OF BOSTON 


COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER 


Holiday Pops Series 


COMPANY 




FOUR SEASONS HOTEL 


JOHN HANCOCK FUNDS 




Opening Night at Symphony 


INGALLS, QUINN & JOHNSON 


Opening Night at Pops 


JOHN HANCOCK 




FINANCIAL SERVICES 


LEXUS 


NYNEX 


Exclusive Automobile of: 
Opening Night at Symphony and 


MANULIFE FINANCIAL 


Opening Night at Pops 


NORTEL 




PAINEWEBBER 


TDK ELECTRONICS 




CORPORATION 


RAYTHEON COMPANY 


Tanglewood Tickets for Children 


Single Concert Sponsors 


For information on the BSO Corporate Sponsorship Program, contact 


Madelyne Cuddeback, Director of Corporate Sponsorships, 


at (617) 


638-9254. 



46 



Business Leadership Association 

($10,000 and above) 

The support provided by members of the Business Leadership Association is 
instrumental in enabling the Orchestra to pursue its mission of performance, 
training and community outreach. The BSO gratefully acknowledges the following 
organizations for their generous leadership support. 

(The following includes annual, capital, and sponsorship support during the BSO's 
fiscal year beginning September 1, 1995 through August 31, 1996). 



'a 



Beethoven Society 

($500,000 and above) 



Fidelity Investments 
Edward C. Johnson 3d 



NEC Corporation 
Hisashi Kaneko 



Massachusetts Office of Travel and Tourism 
Mary Jane McKenna 



BankBoston Corporation 
William M. Crozier, Jr 

John Hancock Funds 
Edward J. Boudreau, Jr. 

LEXUS 

James E. Press 

Massachusetts Cultural Council 
A state agency 



Gold Baton 

($100,000 - $499,999) 

NYNEX 
Donald Reed 

WCRB 102.5 FM 

Cynthia Scullin 



WCVB-TV, Hearst Broadcasting 
Paul La Camera 



Silver Baton 

($75,000 - $99,999) 



Fleet Bank of Massachusetts, N.A. 
Leo Breitman 



Conductor's Circle 

($25,000 - $49,999) 



Blue Cross and Blue Shield of 

Massachusetts 
William C. Van Faasen 

Community Newspaper Company 
William R. Elfers 

ITT Sheraton Corporation 
John Kapioltas 

Manulife Financial 
Dominic DAlessandro 

Northwest Airlines 
Terry M. Leo 



NORTEL 

Robert 0. Nelson 

Paine Webber, Inc. 

Bruce Cameron, Richard F. Connolly, 

Charles T. Harris, Joseph F. Patton. Jr. 

Raytheon Company 
Dennis J. Picard 

Sheraton Boston I Iotel & Towers 
Denise Coll 

TDK 

Ken Kihara 



47 



Principal Player 

($15,000 - $24,999) 



Andersen Consulting LLP 
William D. Green 

BBN Corporation 
George H. Conrades 

Boston Edison Company 
Thomas J. May 

Boston Herald 
Patrick J. Purcell 

Connell Limited Partnership 
William F. Connell 

Coopers & Ly brand LLP 
Francis A. Doyle 

Ernst & Young LLP 
James S. DiStasio 

Essex Investment Management Co., Inc. 
Joseph McNay 



Filene's 

Joseph M. Melvin 

The Gillette Company 
Alfred M. Zeien 

Harcourt General Charitable Foundation 
Richard A. Smith 

John Hancock Financial Services 
William L. Boyan 

Liberty Mutual Group 
Gary L. Countryman 

Royal Appliance Mfg. Co. 
Michael J. Merriman 

Von Hoffman Press, Inc. 
Frank A. Bowman 



Honor Roll 

($10,000 - $14,999) 



Analog Devices, Inc. 
Ray Stata 

Arley Corporation 
David I. Riemer 

Arnold Communications, Inc. 
Ed Eskandarian 

Arthur Andersen LLP 
George Massaro 

Arthur D. Little 
Charles LaMantia 

Bingham, Dana & Gould 
Jay S. Zimmerman 
William A. Bachman 

The Boston Company 
Christopher Condron 

Converse Inc. 
Glenn Rupp 

Deloitte & Touche 
Michael Joyce 

Eastern Enterprises/Boston Gas Company 
/. Atwood Ives 
Chester R. Messer 

EMC Corporation 
Richard Egan 

Hewitt Associates 
Christopher S. Palmer 



Houghton Mifflin Company 
Nader F. Darehshori 

IBM Corporation 
Patricia S. Wolpert 

KPMG Peat Marwick 
Donald B. Holmes 

Loomis Sayles & Company, L.P. 
Mark W Holland 

Lucent Technologies 
Michael Decelle 

McKinsey & Company 
David Fubini 

Millipore Corporation 
C. William Zadel 

The New England 
Robert A. Shafto 

Sodexho Management Services 

& Creative Gourmets 
Michel Landel 

State Street Bank and Trust Company 
Marshall N. Carter 

The Stop & Shop Foundation 
Avram J. Goldberg 

Thermo Electron Corporation 
Dr. George N. Hatsopoulos 

Watts Industries 
Timothy Home 



48 



Gifts in Kind 



The Boston Symphony Orchestra extends a special thanks to the following donors for their 
generous contributions of goods and services between September 1, 1995, and August 31, 
1996: 



American Airlines 
Bernie Willett 

Crane & Co. Paper Makers 
Lansing E. Crane 

Four Seasons Hotel 
Robin A. Brown 



Ingalls Quinn & Johnson 
Richard C. Garrison 

Sheraton Boston Hotel and Towers 
Denise Coll 



BUSINESS LEADERSHIP ASSOCIATION 

(Industry Listing) 

The Boston Symphony Orchestra is pleased to acknowledge the following business 
leaders for their generous contributions of $1,500 or more during the BSO's fiscal 
year ending August 31, 1996. 

Companies contributing $10,000 or more are indicated in bold capital letters; con- 
tributions of $5,000-$9,999 are indicated in capital letters, an asterisk denotes gifts 
of $2,500-$4,999, and italicized names indicate donors of services or products. 

For information about becoming a Business Leadership Association member, con- 
tact Anne Cademenos, Associate Director of Corporate Programs, at (617) 638-9298. 



Accounting 



ARTHUR ANDERSEN LLP 

George E. Massaro 

COOPERS & 
LYBRAND LLP 

Francis A. Doyle 

DELOITTE & 
TOUCHE LLP 

Michael Joyce 

*DiPesa & Company, CPAs 
Dolly DiPesa 

Ercolini & Company 
Robert Ercolini, CPA 
Michael Tucci, CPA 

ERNST & YOUNG LLP 

James S. DiStasio 

Harte Carucci & Driscoll, 
PC. 
Neal Harte 

KPMG PEAT MARWICK 

Donald B. Homes 

PRICE WATERHOUSE 
LLP 

Paul Sullivan 



Advertising/ 
Public Relations 



ARNOLD COMMUNICA- 
TIONS, INC. 

Ed Eskandarian 

Bronner Slosberg Humphrey 
Michael Bronner 

CAHOOTS 

Carol Lasky 

Clarke & Company, Inc. 
Peter A. Morrissey 

Conventures, Inc. 
Dusty S. Rhodes 

DesignWise 
Freelow Crummett 

HILL, HOLLIDAY, 
CONNORS, 
COSMOPULOS, INC. 

John M. Connors, Jr. 

I louston, Herstek FA VAT 

Douglas W. Houston 

Ingalls, Quinn & Johnson 
Richard C. Garrison 

Inn. i S. Mann, Strategic 
Marketing, Inc. 

lima S. Maim 

\1 VSSmedia 
Charles N. Shapiro 



*Rasky & Co. 
Larry Rasky 

Alarm Systems 



American Alarm & 
Communications, Inc. 
Richard L. Sampson 

First Security Services 
Corporation 
Robert F. Johnson 

Architects/ Interior Design 

Tellalian Associates 
Architects & Planners 
Donald J. Tellalian, AIA 

Automotive 
IRA LEXUS 

Ira Rosenberg 

LEXUS OF NORWOOD 

Herbert Chambers 

LEXUS OF WATERTOWN 

Murray Pal kin 

Aviation 



Flighl Time International 

Jane McBridc 

Banking 



BAINKBOSTON 
CORPORATION 

\\ illiam M. Crozier, Jr. 



49 



NORTHEAST INVESTMENT 
MANAGEMENT, INC. 

FORMERLY GUILD, MONRAD & OATES, INC. 



Investment Advisers and Trustees 



Fifty Congress Street 

Boston, Massachusetts 02109 

Telephone: (617) 523-1320 or (800) 523-1320 



Henry R. Guild, Jr. Ernest E. Monrad William A. Oates, Jr. Rotert B. Minturn, Jr. 
Bruce H. Monrad John K. Herbert, III Gordon C. Barrett Kimterly H. Latin Richard J. Semple 




V 



The residents of Newhury Court know firsthand how rewarding retirement can be. 
They re enjoying an active lifestyle in elegant surroundings in historic Concord. 

• On 35 acres overlooking the Sudhury River * Spacious 1, 2, or 2 Bedroom w/Den Designs 

• 24-Hour Security • Fitness Center • On-Site Healthcare 

• Fine Dining * Social Activities • Weekly Housekeeping 

• Maintenance-Free Lifestyle • Indoor Parking 

For more information, call: (508) 369-5155. 

100 NewWy Court, Concord, MA 01742 




Newbury Court 



New England Deaconess Association 



50 



Cambridge Trust Company 
James F. Dwinell III 

CITIZENS BANK 
Robert M. Mahoney 

FLEET BANK OF 
MASSACHUSETTS, N.A. 

John P. Hamill 

PNC Bank, New England 
Joan L. Gulley 

STATE STREET BANK 
AND TRUST COMPANY 

Marshall N. Carter 

USTRUST 

Neal F. Finnegan 

Wainwright Bank & Trust 
Company 
John M. Plukas 

Building/Contracting 

* Harvey Industries, Inc. 
Frederick Bigony 

Lee Kennedy Co., Inc. 
Lee M. Kennedy 

*The MacDowell Company 
Roy MacDowell 

*NSC Corporation 
Frank Fradello 

New England Insulation Co. 
Theodore H. Brodie 

*Perini Corporation 
David B. Perini 

Consulting: 
Management /Financial 

Anchor Capital Advisors, Inc. 
William P. Rice 

ANDERSEN 
CONSULTING LLP 

William D. Green 

ANDERSEN 
CONSULTING LLP 

Michael J. Young 

ARTHUR D. 
LITTLE, INC. 

Charles LaMantia 

BAIN & COMPANY, INC. 
Orit Gadiesh 

BBF Corporation 
Boruch B. Frusztajer 

THE BOSTON 
CONSULTING GROUP 
INC. 

Jonathan L. Isaacs 

The Cullinane Group, Inc. 
John J. Cullinane 

Dock Square Consultants 
Richard J. Lettieri 



*Heidrick & Struggles 
Robert E. Hallagan 

Lee Hecht Harrison, Inc. 
Frank Mainero 

HEWITT ASSOCIATES 

Christopher S. Palmer 

Lochridge & Company, Inc. 
Richard K. Lochridge 

*Lyons Company 
J. Peter Lyons 

MCKINSEY & 
COMPANY, INC. 
David G. Fubini 

Mercer Management 
Consulting 
James W. Down 

NORTH AMERICAN 
MORTGAGE COMPANY 

John F. Farrell, Jr. 

*The O'Brien Group, Inc. 
Paul C. O'Brien 

Pendergast & Company 
Edward H. Pendergast 

Right Associates Consulting 
Warren Radtke 

Sawyer Miller Consulting 
Micho F. Spring 

*Towers Perrin 

V. Benjamin Haas 

* Watson Wyatt Worldwide 
Daniel B. Holmes 

WILLIAM M. MERCER, 
INCORPORATED 
Peter A. Bleyler 

Consulting: Opportunity 
Development 

New Directions, Inc. 
David D. Corbett 

Consumer Goods/ 
Food Service 

*A11 Seasons Services, Inc. 
Donald G. Friedl 

Coca-Cola Bottling Company 
of New England 
Terrance M. Marks 

*Franklin Sports, Inc. 
Larry J. Franklin 

*Johnson, O'Hare Co., Inc. 
Harry "Chip" O'Hare, Jr. 

Merkert Enterprises, Inc. 
Gerald R. Leonard 

O'Donnell-Usen Fisheries 
Corporation 
AmoldS. Wolf 



SODEXHO MANAGE- 
MENT SERVICES & 
CREATIVE GOURMETS 

Michel Landel 

Staton Hills Winery 
Peter Ansdell 

Welch's 
Everett N. Baldwin 

*Whitehall Company, Ltd. 
Marvin A. Gordon 

Distribution 

Standard Tube Sales 
Corporation 

Dorothy C. Granneman 

Francis J. Walsh, Jr. 

Education 

BENTLEY COLLEGE 
Joseph M. Cronin 

Electrica I /Electronics 

*Boston Acoustics, Inc. 
Francis L. Reed 

R&D ELECTRICAL 
COMPANY, INC. 
Richard D. Pedone 

Energy/ Utilities 

BOSTON EDISON 
COMPANY 

Thomas J. May 

EASTERN 
ENTERPRISES/ 
BOSTON GAS COMPANY 

J. Atwood Ives 
Chester R. Messer 

*New England Electric 
System 
Joan T Bok 

Entertainment/Media 

*Don Law Company 
Don Law 

WCVB-TV, Hearst 
Publications 
Paul La Camera 

WHDH-TV Channel 7 
Mike Carson 

*Yawkey Foundation 
John Harrington 

Environmental 



'C§ 



Jason M. Cortell & Associates 
Jason M. Cortell 

Financial 
Services/Investments 



ADAMS, HARKNKSS & 
HILL, INC. 
Joseph W. Hammer 



51 






RHP 



BV 

DEi 



77?p 




POPS 



'97 Season 



America J s 
ORCHESTRA 

CATCH THE POPS THIS 

MAY, JUNE, AND JULY! 



KEITH LOCKHART 
conductor 




ADVENT INTERNATIONAL 
CORPORATION 
Peter A. Brooke 

ALLMERICA FINANCIAL 
John F. O'Brien 

ALLMERICA FINANCIAL 
INSTITUTIONAL SERVICES 
Larry C. Renfro 

THE BERKSHIRE GROUP 

Laurence Gerber 

* Berkshire Partners 
Russell Epker 

BOSTON CAPITAL 
PARTNERS, INC. 

Christopher W. Collins 

Herbert F Collins 

Richard J. DeAgazio 

John P. Manning 

THE BOSTON COMPANY 

Christopher M. Condron 
W. Keith Smith 

*BTM Capital Corporation 
E.F McCulloch, Jr. 

Carson Limited Partnership 
Herbert Carver 

THE CIT GROUP/CAPITAL 
EQUIPMENT FINANCING 
G. Todd Derr 

Cowen & Company 
Richard A. Altschuler 

CS FIRST BOSTON 
William Cadigan 
Patricia F Lenehan 

ESSEX INVESTMENT 
MANAGEMENT CO., INC. 

Joseph C. McNay 

*Farrell, Healer & 
Company Inc. 
Richard A. Farrell 

FIDELITY INVESTMENTS 

Edward C. Johnson 3d 

JOHN HANCOCK 
FINANCIAL SERVICES 

William L. Boyan 

JOHN HANCOCK FUNDS 

Edward J. Boudreau, Jr. 

KAUFMAN & COMPANY 

Sumner Kaufman 

KESSLER FINANCIAL 
SERVICES, L.P. 
Howard J. Kessler 

LIBERTY FINANCIAL 
COMPANIES, INC. 
Kenneth R. Leibler 

LOOMIS-SAYLES & 
COMPANY, L.P. 

Mark W Holland 



LPL FINANCIAL 
SERVICES 
Todd A. Robinson 

PAINEWEBBER, INC. 

Bruce Cameron 
Richard F. Connolly 
Charles T. Harris 
Joseph F Patton, Jr. 

THE PIONEER GROUP, INC. 
John F Cogan, Jr. 

*Putnam Investments 

*State Street Development 
Management Corp. 
John R. Gallagher III 

United Asset Management 
Corporation 

*United Gulf 
Management, Inc. 

WP STEWART & CO., INC. 
William P. Stewart 

*Woodstock Corporation 
Mrs. Edith L. Dabney 

Food Service Equipment 

* Boston Showcase Company 
Jason E. Starr 

High Technology 

ANALOG DEVICES, INC. 

Ray Stata 

*ATI Orion Research 
Chane Graziano 

BBN CORPORATION 

George H. Conrades 

*Bull HN Information 
Systems Inc. 
Donald P. Zereski 

COGNEX CORPORATION 
Dr. Robert J. Shillman 

COMPUTERVISION 
CORPORATION 
Kathleen Cote 

CORNING COSTAR 
CORPORATION 
R. Pierce Baker 

EDS 
Barry Raynor 

EG&G, INC. 
John M. Kucharski 

EMC CORPORATION 

Richard J. Egan 

*Helix Technology 
Corporation 
Robert J. Lepofsky 

IBM CORPORATION 

Patricia S. Wolpert 



INSO CORPORATION 

Steven R. Vana-Paxhia 
Instron Corporation 
Harold Hindman 

INTERNATIONAL DATA 
GROUP 
Patrick J. McGovern 

IONICS INCORPORATED 
Arthur L. Goldstein 

*LAU Technologies 
Joanna T Lau 

MICROCOM INC. 

Roland D. Pampel 

MILLIPORE 
CORPORATION 

C. William Zadel 

NEC CORPORATION 

Hisashi Kaneko 

PRINTED CIRCUIT CORP. 
Peter Sarmanian 

RAYTHEON COMPANY 

Dennis J. Picard 

*The Registry, Inc. 
G. Drew Conway 

SIGNAL TECHNOLOGY 
CORPORATION 
Dale L. Peterson 

SOFTKEY 

INTERNATIONAL INC. 
Michael J. Perik 

STRATUS COMPUTER, INC. 
William E. Foster 

*SystemSoft Corporation 
Robert Angelo 

TDK ELECTRONICS 
CORPORATION 

Ken Kihara 

Teradyne, Inc. 
Alexander V D'Arbeloff 

THERMO ELECTRON 
CORPORATION 

Dr. George N. Hatsopoulos 

WATERS CORPORATION 
Douglas A. Berthiaume 

Hotels/ Restaurants 

BOSTON MARRIOTT 
COPLEY PLACE 

William Munck 

FOUR SEASONS HOTEL 

Robin A. Brown 

ITT SHERATON 

CORPORATION 

John Kapioltas 

THE RITZ-CARLTON, 
BOSTON 






4 



53 



Sing & Swing 

Some folks swoon over La Traviata. Others sway to Sing, Sing, Sing. 
The Colonnade Hotel indulges both passions every weekend* with our 
acclaimed "Nights at the Opera" and "Dancing with the Winikers. 

Opera lovers dine on a lyrical four-course dinner in Cafe Promenade while 
top performers sing their favorite arias. In Zachary's Bar, swing fans put 

on their dancing shoes for a night of classic sounds from the Winiker 
Swing Orchestra. A stirring aria. A swinging standard. Whatever the 
tune, plan on a noteworthy evening at The Colonnade Hotel. 

For reservations or information call 617.425.3240. 





Dancing with the Winikers 

Fridays and Saturdays from 9 pm at Zachary's Bar. 



Nights at the Opera 

Saturdays from 8 pm at Cafe Promenade. 

Dinner and Music from $42 

•Oho 




olonna 




O S IMIlLl TON 



l\W, V 



120 Huntington Ave. Boston, MA 02116 
617.424.7000 or 1.800.962.3030 



Nights at The Opera offered October through April 




Making Any Occasion 
Extra Special 

617 623-8700 

A Family Business since 1924 

A&A Limousine Renting 
Worldwide Reservations 800 336-4646 

Major Credit Cards Accepted 
Look for us in the Nynex Yellow Pages 



Life care 
retirement living 

=1=1=1=1=1=1=1= Dnsi 

BROaOMVEN 

AT LEXINGTON 

Lexington, Massachusetts 02173 
(617) 863-9660 (800) 283-1114 



54 



SHERATON BOSTON 
HOTEL & TOWERS 

Denise Coll 

*Sonesta International Hotels 
Corporation 
Paul Sonnabend 

THE WESTIN HOTEL, 
COPLEY PLACE 

David King 



Insurance 

AON RISK SERVICES, INC. 
William J. Tvenstrup 

*The Bostonian Group 
John Casey 

Bradley Insurance 
Agency, Inc. 
John J. Bradley 

CADDELL & BYERS 
INSURANCE AGENCY, INC. 
Paul D. Bertrand 

*Carlin Insurance 
Michael D. Holmes 

The Chickering Group 
Frederick H. Chicos 

*Chubb Group of Insurance 
Companies 
John H. Gillespie 

COMMONWEALTH LAND 
AND TITLE INSURANCE CO. 
Terry Cook 

*Johnson & Higgins of 
Massachusetts, Inc. 
William S. Jennings 

*Lexington Insurance 
Company 
Kevin H. Kelley 

LIBERTY MUTUAL 
GROUP 

Gary L. Countryman 

MANULIFE FINANCIAL 

Dominic DAlessandro 

THE NEW ENGLAND 
Robert A. Shafto 

*North American 
Security Life 
William J. Atherton 

THE PIONEER GROUP, INC. 
John F. Cogan, Jr. 

SAFETY INSURANCE 
COMPANY 

Richard B. Simches 

SEDGWICK OF 
NEW ENGLAND, INC. 
P. Joseph McCarthy 



Sun Life Assurance Company 
of Canada 
David D. Horn 

Swerling Milton Winnick 
Public Insurance Adjusters, 
Inc. 

Marvin Milton 

Bruce Swerling 

Paul Winnick 

Trust Insurance Company 
Craig M. Bradley 

Legal 

BINGHAM, DANA 
& GOULD 

Jay S. Zimmerman 
William A. Bachman 

*Choate, Hall & Stewart 
Charles L. Glerum 

Dickerman Law Offices 
Lola Dickerman 

Dionne, Bookhout & Gass 
Richard D. Gass 

FISH & RICHARDSON PC. 
Ronald Myrick 

GADSBY & HANNAH LLP 
Paul E. Clifford 

GOLDSTEIN & 
MANELLO, PC. 
Richard J. Snyder 

GOODWIN, PROCTER 
&HOAR 
Robert B. Fraser 

*Hale & Dorr 
John Hamilton 

*Lynch, Brewer, Hoffman 
& Sands 
Owen B. Lynch, Esq. 

MINTZ, LEVIN, COHN, 
FERRIS, GLOVSKY & 
POPEO, PC. 
Jeffrey M. Wiesen, Esq. 

Nissenbaum Law Offices 
Gerald L. Nissenbaum 

Nutter, McClennen & Fish 
Robert Fishman 

PALMER & DODGE, LLP 
Michael R. Brown 

Robins, Kaplan, Miller 
& Ciresi 
Alan R. Miller, Esq. 

* Ropes & Gray 
Truman S. Casner 

Sarrouf, Tarricone & 
Flemming 
Camille F. Sarrouf 

Sherin and Lodgen 



*Weingarten, Schurgin, 
Gagnebin & Hayes 
Stanley M. Schurgin 

Manufacturer's 
Representatives/ 
Wholesale Distribution 



*Alles Corporation 
Stephen S. Berman 

Asquith Corporation 
Laurence L. Asquith 

*Brush Fibers, Inc. 
Ian P. Moss 

*Clinique Laboratories U.S.A. 
Daniel J. Brestle 

JA. WEBSTER, INC. 
John A. Webster. 

JOFRAN, INC. 
Robert D. Roy 

Lantis Corporation 
Scott Sennett 

United Liquors, Ltd. 
A. Raymond Tye 

Viva Sun 
Gary Podhaizer 

Manufacturing 

Alden Products Company 
Elizabeth Alden 

ARLEY CORPORATION 

David I. Riemer 

Autoroll Machine Corporation 
William M. Karlyn 

*The Biltrite Corporation 
Stanley J. Bernstein 

*C.R. Bard, Inc. 
Richard J. Thomas 

*Cabot Corporation 

CHELSEA 
INDUSTRIES, INC. 
Ronald G. Casty 

CONNELL LIMITED 
PARTNERSHIP 

William F. Connell 

CONVERSE INC. 

Glenn Rupp 

*Cri-Tech, Inc. 
Richard Mastromatteo 

D.K. Webster Family 
Foundation 
Dean K. Webster 

Design Mark Industries 
Paul S. Morris 

Diaeom Corporation 
Donald W. Comstock 






* 



55 



David L. Babson & Co. Inc. 

Investment Counsel 




Best wishes to the Boston Symphony Orchestra and 
the Boston Pops for an exciting 1996-1997 Season 

George W. Browning/Stephen B. O'Brien 
One Memorial Drive, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142 
Telephone: 617-225-3800 Facsimile: 617-494-1511 







Classics in the Morning 

with Ron Delia Chiesa, weekdays at 8am 

Classical Performances 

with Richard Knisely, weekdays at 12noon 

Boston Symphony Orchestra 

with Ron Delia Chiesa, 
Fridays at 1pm, October-April 

Morning pro musica 

with Robert J. Lurtsema, weekends at 7am 

Sound S Spirit 

with Ellen Kushner, Sundays at 12noon 

Schickele Mix 

with Peter Schickele, Sundays at 1pm 

Music Through the Night 

with Jeff Esworthy and Tom Crann, 
Monday-Thursday from 12-5am 




56 






Ekco Group, Inc. 
Robert Stein 

GENERAL LATEX 
AND CHEMICAL 
CORPORATION 
Robert W. MacPherson 

THE GILLETTE 
COMPANY 

Alfred M. Zeien 

HIGH VOLTAGE 
ENGINEERING 
CORPORATION 
Paul H. Snyder 

HMK ENTERPRISES, 
INC. 
Steven E. Karol 

*J.D.P Company 
Jon D. Papps 

* Jones & Vining, Inc. 
Michel Ohayon 

New Balance Athletic Shoe 
James S. Davis 

NEW ENGLAND BUSINESS 
SERVICE, INC. 

Robert J. Murray 

OAK INDUSTRIES, INC. 

William S. Antle III 

OSRAM SYLVANIA INC 

Dean T Langford 

The Pfaltzgraff Company 
Annette Seifert 

PHILIP MORRIS 
COMPANIES, INC. 
Matthew Paluszek 

*Piab USA, Inc. 

Charles J. Weilbrenner 

*The Rockport Company, Inc. 
Anthony J. Tiberii 

ROYAL APPLIANCE 
MFG. CO. 

Michael J. Merriman 

^Springs Industries, Inc. 
Dan Gaynor 

THE STRIDE RITE 
CORPORATION 
Robert C. Siegel 

SUMMIT PACKAGING 
SYSTEMS INC. 
Gordon Gilroy 

The Syratech Corjjoration 
Leonard Florence 

TY-WOOD/CENTURY 
MANUFACTURING CO., 
INC. 

Joseph W. Tiberio 



WATTS INDUSTRIES, 
INC. 

Timothy P. Home 

Wire Belt Company of 
America 

F. Wade Greer 

Philanthropic 

First Winthrop Corporation 
Richard J. McCready 

The Fuller Foundation 

*The Kouyoumjian Fund 
The Kouyoumjian Family 

Printing/Publishing 

* Addison Wesley Longman, 
Inc. 
J. Larry Jones 

*Banta Corporation 
Donald Belcher 

BOSTON HERALD 

Patrick J. Purcell 

CAHNERS PUBLISHING 
COMPANY 
Bruce Barnet 

COMMUNITY 
NEWSPAPER 
COMPANY 

William R. Elfers 

DANIELS PRINTING 
COMPANY 
Grover B. Daniels 

George H. Dean Co. 

G. Earle Michaud 

HARCOURT GENERAL 

CHARITABLE 

FOUNDATION 

Richard A. Smith 

HOUGHTON MIFFLIN 
COMPANY 

Nader F. Darehshori 

Invisuals 
Dennis Ozer 

Reynolds- De Walt Printing 
Peter DeWalt 

The Studley Press, Inc. 
Chuck Gillett 

VON HOFFMANN 
PRESS, INC. 

Frank A. Bowman 

Real Estate/Development 

*The Abbey Group 
Robert Epstein 
David Epstein 
John Svenson 



57 



BEACON PROPERTIES 
CORPORATION 
Alan M. Leventhal 

*Cornerstone Properties, Inc. 
John S. Moody 

CUMMINGS PROPERTIES 
James L. McKeown 

DEWOLFE NEW ENGLAND 
Richard B. DeWolfe 

EQUITABLE REAL ESTATE 
Tony Harwood 

*The Flatley Company 
Thomas J. Flatley 

Heafitz Development 
Company 
Lewis Heafitz 

*John M. Corcoran & Co. 
John M. Corcoran 

*Meredith & Grew 
Thomas J. Hynes, Jr. 

Retail 

COUNTRY CURTAINS 
Mr. & Mrs. John & Jane 
Fitzpatrick 

The E.B. Horn Company 
Harry Finn 

FILENE'S 

Joseph M. Melvin 

Gordon Brothers 
Michael Frieze 

Hermes 
Jean-Louis Dumas-Hermes 

J. Baker, Inc. 
Allan L. Weinstein 

*Lechmere, Inc. 

Frederick E. Meiser 

Marshalls 
Jerome R. Rossi 

NEIMAN MARCUS 
William D. Roddy 

*Saks Fifth Avenue 

Alison Streider Mayher 

THE STOP & SHOP 
FOUNDATION 

Avram J. Goldberg 

THE STOP & SHOP 

SUPERMARKET 

COMPANY 

Robert G. Tobin 

Talbots 
Arnold B. Zetcher 

THE TJX COMPANIES, INC. 
Bernard Cammarata 

* Town & Country Corporation 
C. William Carey 















^gpflf I ^ d Cedars Nursing 

■ Care Center 






Jewish Home 
for Aged 



In the design of facilities for senior adults, light - filled 
spaces are essential for the physiological and 
psychological well being of residents. 

Specializing in the design of Senior Living Facilities 
385 Elliot Street Newton, MA 02164 



Portland, 
Maine 



Tsomides 
Associates 

Architects 
Planners 
Interior Design 
www.tsomides.com 

(617)969-4774 




Age Weighted 
Plans 



Pioneer Can Help Small Business Owners 
Find The Right Route. 



We make it easy: a full menu of plans, a low-cost turnkey 401(h), 
dedicated retirement specialists, and customized proposals. 



800-622-0176 




Ask for your 
free Pocket 
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10G196^BSO-3762 



Investing for Value Since 1928 

Pioneer Funds Distributor, Inc., 60 State St., Boston, MA 02109 




58 



Science /Medical 



AMERICAN MEDICAL 
RESPONSE, INC. 

Paul M. Verrochi 

Baldpate Hospital 
Lucille M. Batal 

BLUE CROSS AND 
BLUE SHIELD OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

William C. Van Faasen 

BOSTON SCIENTIFIC 
CORPORATION 

CRA Managed Care 
Lois Silverman 

CHARLES RIVER 

LABORATORIES 

James C. Foster 

Citizens Medical Corporation 
John J. Doran 

CORNING CLINICAL 
LABORATORIES 
Robert Meehan 

Datacube 
Stanley Karandanis 

FISHER SCIENTIFIC 
INTERNATIONAL INC. 

Paul M. Montrone 

GENETICS 
INSTITUTE, INC. 
Dr. Patrick Gage 



MERCK-MEDCO 
MANAGED CARE 
Per Lofberg 

* Medical Information 
Technology, Inc. 

Morton E. Ruderman 

Services 

Benn Theodore, Inc. 
Benn Theodore 

Betsy Bassett Photography 
Betsy Bassett 

*Blake and Blake 
Genealogists 
Richard A. Blake, Jr. 

CFI Design Group, Inc. 
David A. Granoff 

TAD RESOURCES 
INTERNATIONAL INC. 

James S. Davis 

Team 
Marion Rossman 

Technical Aid Corporation 
Salvatore Balsamo 

Telecommunications 

AT&T NETWORK SYSTEMS 
Michael Decelle 

* Boston Technology, Inc. 

Dr. John C.W Taylor 



CELLULAR ONE 

Kathy Dowling 

GTE GOVERNMENT 
SYSTEMS 
John R. Messier 

LUCENT TECHNOLOGIES 

Michael Decelle 

MCI TELECOMMUNICA- 
TIONS CORPORATION 

Susan Beckmann 
Joe McKeown 

NORTEL 

Robert 0. Nelson 

NYNEX 

Donald Reed 

* NYNEX Information 
Resources Co. 
Matthew J. Stover 



Travel /Transportation 

DAVEL CHAUFFEURED 
TRANSPORTATION 
NETWORK 
Scott A. Solombrino 

Lily Transportation Corp. 
John A. Simourian 

NORTHWEST AIRLINES 

Terry M. Leo 



Please join us as a member of me BSO's 
Business Leadership Association! 

For a minimum contribution of $1 ,800 to the BSO's Business Fund, your com- 
pany can enjoy membership in the BSO's Business Leadership Association, a 
dynamic and influential group of more than 350 New England businesses 
who have come together to support the Boston Symphony Orchestra. 

Membership privileges for your company include: a complimentary listing in 
the BSO and Pops program books throughout the season, priority ticket 
reservations for the sell-out Holiday Pops and Tanglewood concerts, personal 
ticket assistance through the Corporate Programs office, and use of the 
Beranek Room, a private patrons' lounge, reserved exclusively for members 
of the BSO's Business Leadership Association and Higginson Society. 

For more information about becoming a member of the BSO's Business Leadership 
Association, please contact Anne Cademenos in the Corporate Programs office at 
(617)638-9298. 



59 



NEXT PROGRAM. . . 

Thursday, February 6, at 10:30 a.m. (Open Rehearsal; 

Pre-Rehearsal Talk at 9:30 in Symphony Hall) 
Thursday, February 6, at 8 
Friday, February 7, at 1:30 
Saturday, February 8, at 8 
Tuesday, February 11, at 8 

ANDRE PREVIN, conductor and pianist 



GOULD 



Fall River Legend Suite 

Prologue 

Waltzes 

Elegy 

Hymnal Variations 

Cotillion 

Epilogue 



COPLAND 



Clarinet Concerto 

Slowly and expressively — 
Cadenza — Rather fast 

WILLIAM R. HUDGINS 



INTERMISSION 



SCHUMAN 



Symphony No. 3 

Part I. Passacaglia and Fugue 
Part II. Chorale and Toccata 



GERSHWIN 



Rhapsody in Blue 
ANDRE PREVIN, piano 



Andre Previn returns to Symphony Hall with an all-American program for his 
first of two concerts this season. In tribute to the remarkable composer of both 
serious and "pops" works, Morton Gould, who died last year, Mr. Previn leads 
a suite of music from Gould's ballet about the Lizzie Borden story, Fall River 
Legend. Then BSO principal clarinet William R. Hudgins is featured in Copland's 
Clarinet Concerto, originally written for Benny Goodman. William Schuman's 
Third Symphony, composed during the heart of World War II, is one of the great 
American symphonies, original in plan, dynamic and powerful in detail. This 
Koussevitzky commission established Schuman as a major American symphonist. 
Finally Mr. Previn takes his place at the piano for a performance with the orches- 
tra of Gershwin's ever-popular Rhapsody in Blue. 



60 



COMING CONCERTS . . . 



Thursday, February 6, at 10:30 a.m. 

Open Rehearsal 
Steven Ledbetter will discuss the program 

at 9:30 in Symphony Hall. 
Thursday 'A'— February 6, 8-10:10 
Friday 'B'— February 7, 1:30-3:40 
Saturday 'A'— February 8, 8-10:10 
Tuesday 'B'— February 11, 8-10:10 

ANDRE PREVIN, conductor and pianist 
WILLIAM R. HUDGINS, clarinet 

GOULD Fall River Legend Suite 

COPLAND Clarinet Concerto 

SCHUMAN Symphony No. 3 

GERSHWIN Rhapsody in Blue 







DONALD JUDD 






SOL LEWITT 






BRICE MARDEN 






AGNES MARTIN 


n 




FRED SANDBACK 


> 

30 
D 




The Persistence of Vision, Part II 


> 

> 




1 February - 12 March 1997 


KRAKOW GALLERY 

10 NEWBURY STREET BOSTON MASSACHUSETTS 02116 



Wednesday, February 12, at 7:30 p..m. 

Open Rehearsal 
Marc Mandel will discuss the program 

at 6:30 in Symphony Hall. 
Thursday 'C— February 13, 8-10:10 
Friday 'A — February 14, 1:30-3:40 
Saturday 'B'— February 15, 8-10:10 

ANDRE PREVIN conducting 

HAYDN Symphony No. 96, 

Miracle 
SHOSTAKOVICH Symphony No. 8 

From Thursday, February 20, through Satur- 
day, March 1, Andre Previn and the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra will perform eight con- 
certs in the Canary Islands and Florida. 

Thursday 'A'— March 6, 8-9:50 
Friday 'A'— March 7, 1:30-3:20 
Saturday 'A— March 8, 8-9:50 

JAMES CONLON conducting 
MAXIM VENGEROV, violin 

RAVEL Gaspard de la Nuit 

(arr. Constant) 
PROKOFIEV Violin Concerto No. 2 

JANACEK Sinfonietta 

Thursday 'C— March 20, 8-10 
Friday 'A— March 21, 1:30-3:30 
Saturday 'A'— March 22, 8-10 
Tuesday 'C— March 25, 8-10 

HANS GRAF conducting 
LEIF OVE ANDSNES, piano 



STRAVINSKY 



MOZART 



MOZART 



STRAVINSKY 



Dumbarton Oaks 

Concerto 
Piano Concerto No. 20 

in D minor, K.466 
Adagio and Fugue 

in C minor, K.546 
Symphony in C 



Programs and artists subject to change. 



Single tickets for all Boston Symphony Orchestra concerts throughout the season 
are available at the Symphony Hall box office, or by calling "SymphonyCharge" 
at (617) 266-1200, Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m. until 6 p.m., to 
charge tickets instantly on a major credit card, or to make a reservation and then 
send payment by check. Outside the 617 area code, call 1-800-274-8499. 
Please note that there is a $2.50 handling fee for each ticket ordered by phone. 



61 









HI' 



*':/7 



Beats and Measures. 



Fitcorp provides the Fitcorp Wellness Benefit, an innovative 

mix of fitness and health promotion programs, to hundreds 

of Boston's leading corporations since 1979. Programs of 

award-winning performance and measureable results. 

To learn more about the Fitcorp Wellness Benefit, 

call Mariska Lutz, Corporate Sales Manager, 

at (617) 375-5600, xl07. 

Rteorp 

Corporate Offices, Prudential Center, Suite 200, Boston, MA 02199 






K^ 






¥3! 



—7 



WW 



u 



£n£xd f &ommimitw iShliHty 



:«r. 



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89 









ingate has spirit. The kind of spirit that keeps 

/** (^ people connected to their community* With it, we have become 
so much more than full-service skilled nursing facilities and a 
m ^ "^F certified home health agency. Over the years, Ave have become a 
place where hometown roots are as important as compassionate care. 

We invite you to learn more about Wingate's facilities and 
Wingate at Home's services by calling: 617-928-3300. 



^ 



WINGATE 

7 Wells Avenue- Newton, MA 02159 

ANDOVER • BRIGHTON • DUTCHESS (NY) 

NEEDHAM • READING • SUDBURY • WILBRAHAM 

WINGATE AT HOME - ANDOVER & CHESTNUT HILL 



62 



SYMPHONY HALL INFORMATION 

FOR SYMPHONY HALL CONCERT AND TICKET INFORMATION, call (617) 266-1492. 
For Boston Symphony concert program information, call "C-O-N-C-E-R-T" (266-2378). 

THE BOSTON SYMPHONY performs ten months a year, in Symphony Hall and at Tangle- 
wood. For information about any of the orchestra's activities, please call Symphony Hall, or 
write the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Symphony Hall, Boston, MA 02115. 

THE BSO'S NEW WEB SITE (http://www.bso.org) provides information on all of the orches- 
tra's activities at Symphony Hall and at Tanglewood, and is updated regularly. 

THE EUNICE S. AND JULIAN COHEN WING, adjacent to Symphony Hall on Huntington 
Avenue, may be entered by the Symphony Hall West Entrance on Huntington Avenue. 

IN THE EVENT OF A BUILDING EMERGENCY, patrons will be notified by an announce- 
ment from the stage. Should the building need to be evacuated, please exit via the nearest 
door, or according to instructions. 

FOR SYMPHONY HALL RENTAL INFORMATION, call (617) 638-9241, or write the 
Function Manager, Symphony Hall, Boston, MA 02115. 

THE BOX OFFICE is open from 10 a.m. until 6 p.m. Monday through Saturday; on concert 
evenings it remains open through intermission for BSO events or just past starting time for 
other events. In addition, the box office opens Sunday at 1 p.m. when there is a concert that 
afternoon or evening. Single tickets for all Boston Symphony subscription concerts are avail- 
able at the box office. For most outside events at Symphony Hall, tickets are available three 
weeks before the concert at the box office or through SymphonyCharge. 

TO PURCHASE BSO TICKETS: American Express, MasterCard, Visa, a personal check, and 
cash are accepted at the box office. To charge tickets instantly on a major credit card, or to 
make a reservation and then send payment by check, call "SymphonyCharge" at (617) 266- 
1200, Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m. until 6 p.m. Outside the 617 area code, phone 
1-800-274-8499. There is a handling fee of $2.50 for each ticket ordered by phone. 

GROUP SALES: Groups may take advantage of advance ticket sales. For BSO concerts at 
Symphony Hall, groups of twenty-five or more may reserve tickets by telephone and take 
advantage of ticket discounts and flexible payment options. To place an order, or for more 
information, call Group Sales at (617) 638-9345. 

FOR PATRONS WITH DISABILITIES, an access service center, accessible restrooms, and 
elevators are available inside the Cohen Wing entrance to Symphony Hall on Huntington 
Avenue. For more information, call VOICE (617) 266-1200 or TTD/TTY (617) 638-9289. 

LATECOMERS will be seated by the ushers during the first convenient pause in the pro- 
gram. Those who wish to leave before the end of the concert are asked to do so between pro- 
gram pieces in order not to disturb other patrons. 

IN CONSIDERATION OF OUR PATRONS AND ARTISTS, children four years old or young- 
er will not be admitted to Boston Symphony Orchestra concerts. 

TICKET RESALE: If for some reason you are unable to attend a Boston Symphony concert for 
which you hold a subscription ticket, you may make your ticket available for resale by calling 
(617) 266-1492 during business hours, or (617) 638-9426 at any time. This helps bring need- 
ed revenue to the orchestra and makes your seat available to someone who wants to attend the 
concert. A mailed receipt will acknowledge your tax-deductible contribution. 

RUSH SEATS: There are a limited number of Rush Seats available for Boston Symphony sub- 
scription concerts Tuesday and Thursday evenings, and Friday afternoons. The low price 
of these seats is assured through the Morse Rush Seat Fund. Rush Tickets are sold at $7.50 
each, one to a customer, on Fridays as of 9 a.m. and Tuesdays and Thursdays as of 5 p.m. 
Please note that there are no Rush Tickets available on Friday or Saturday evenings. 

PLEASE NOTE THAT SMOKING IS NOT PERMITTED ANYWHERE IN SYMPHONY 
HALL. 

CAMERA AND RECORDING EQUIPMENT may not be brought into Symphony Hall during 
concerts. 



Ml 



63 



m 

^^^M 



LOST AND FOUND is located at the security desk at the stage door to Symphony Hall on St. 
Stephen Street. 

FIRST AID FACILITIES for both men and women are available. On-call physicians attending 
concerts should leave their names and seat locations at the switchboard near the Massachu- 
setts Avenue entrance. 

PARKING: For evening concerts only, the Prudential Center Garage offers a discount to any 
BSO patron with a ticket stub for that evening's performance, courtesy of R.M. Bradley & Co. 
and The Prudential Realty Group. There are also two paid parking garages on Westland Ave- 
nue near Symphony Hall. Limited street parking is available. As a special benefit, guaranteed 
pre-paid parking near Symphony Hall is available to subscribers who attend evening concerts. 
For more information, call the Subscription Office at (617) 266-7575. In addition, the Uptown 
Garage at 10 Gainsborough Street next to the New England Conservatory offers discounted 
parking ($6 with ticket stub) for all BSO concerts, including Friday afternoons. 

ELEVATORS are located outside the Hatch and Cabot-Cahners rooms on the Massachusetts 
Avenue side of Symphony Hall, and in the Cohen Wing. 

LADIES' ROOMS are located on the orchestra level, audience-left, at the stage end of the 
hall, on both sides of the first balcony, and in the Cohen Wing. 

MEN'S ROOMS are located on the orchestra level, audience-right, outside the Hatch Room 
near the elevator, on the first-balcony level, audience-left, outside the Cabot-Cahners Room 
near the coatroom, and in the Cohen Wing. 

COATROOMS are located on the orchestra and first-balcony levels, audience-left, outside the 
Hatch and Cabot-Cahners rooms, and in the Cohen Wing. Please note that the BSO is not re- 
sponsible for personal apparel or other property of patrons. 

LOUNGES AND BAR SERVICE: There are two lounges in Symphony Hall. The Hatch Room 
on the orchestra level and the Cabot-Cahners Room on the first-balcony level serve drinks 
starting one hour before each performance. For the Friday-afternoon concerts, both rooms 
open at noon, with sandwiches available until concert time. 

BOSTON SYMPHONY BROADCASTS: Friday-afternoon concerts of the Boston Symphony 
Orchestra are broadcast live by WGBH-FM (Boston 89.7) and by WAMC-FM (Albany 90.3, 
serving the Tanglewood area). Saturday-evening concerts are broadcast live by WCRB-FM 
(Boston 102.5) 

BSO FRIENDS: The Friends are donors to the Boston Symphony Orchestra Annual Fund. 
Friends receive BSO, the orchestra's newsletter, as well as priority ticket information and 
other benefits depending on their level of giving. For information, please call the Develop- 
ment Office at Symphony Hall weekdays between 9 and 5, (617) 638-9251. If you are already 
a Friend and you have changed your address, please inform us by sending your new and old 
addresses to the Development Office, Symphony Hall, Boston, MA 02115. Including your 
patron number will assure a quick and accurate change of address in our files. 

BUSINESS FOR BSO: The BSO's Business Leadership Association program makes it possible 
for businesses to participate in the life of the Boston Symphony Orchestra through a variety of 
original and exciting programs, among them "Presidents at Pops," "A Company Christmas at 
Pops," and special-event underwriting. Benefits include corporate recognition in the BSO pro- 
gram book, access to the Beranek Room reception lounge, and priority ticket service. For fur- 
ther information, please call Anne Cademenos, Associate Director of Corporate Programs, at 
(617) 638-9298. 

THE SYMPHONY SHOP is located in the Cohen Wing at the West Entrance on Huntington 
Avenue and is open Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday from 11 a.m. until 4 p.m., Saturday 
from noon until 6 p.m., and from one hour before each concert through intermission. The 
Symphony Shop features exclusive BSO merchandise, including The Symphony Lap Robe, 
calendars, coffee mugs, posters, and an expanded line of BSO apparel and recordings. The 
Shop also carries children's books and musical-motif gift items. A selection of Symphony 
Shop merchandise is also available during concert hours outside the Cabot-Cahners Room. 
All proceeds benefit the Boston Symphony Orchestra. For further information and telephone 
orders, please call (617) 638-9383. 

64 



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BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

Seiji Ozawa, Music Director 

Bernard Haitink, Principal Guest Conductor 

One Hundred and Sixteenth Season, 1996-97 

SUPPER CONCERT V 




»A 






Saturday, February 1, at 6 
Tuesday, February 4, at 6 

ROBERT SHEENA, oboe 

MARK McEWEN, oboe and English horn 

SCOTT ANDREWS, clarinet and E-flat clarinet 

CRAIG NORDSTROM, clarinet 

RICHARD RANTI, bassoon 

GREGG HENEGAR, bassoon 

JONATHAN MENKIS, horn 

RICHARD MACKEY, horn 






GRIEG 



From the Lyric Pieces 

(arranged by Willard Elliot for wind octet) 

Wedding Day at Troldhaugen 

Shepherd Boy 

Notturno 

Recollections 



MOZART 



Serenade No. 11 in E-flat, K.375, for two oboes, 
two clarinets, two bassoons, and two horns 

Allegro maestoso 

Menuetto 

Adagio 

Menuetto 

Allegro 



Please exit to your left for supper following the concert. 



Week 14 






Edvard Grieg 

Selections from the Lyric Pieces, arranged for wind octet 



When Tchaikovsky commented "Grieg enchants the heart/' he was surely thinking of 
the Norwegian composer's Lyric Pieces, delightful and varied miniatures for solo 
piano composed almost throughout his lifetime and published in ten sets as Opus 12, 
38, 43, 47, 54, 57, 62, 65, 68, and 71. Grieg was himself a fine pianist, and he was mar- 
ried to a superb soprano. Thus it should not be a surprise that a large part of his out- 
put of works was either for his own instrument alone or for his instrument and his 
wife's voice. Outside of Norway, we think of him almost entirely as the composer of 
an attractive concerto and a suite from the incidental music to Ibsen's poetic-psycho- 
logical drama Peer Gynt. At home he is also revered as the creator of a Norwegian 
style, which grows out of the rich romantic tradition of small "character pieces" for 
piano and solo songs. From early in the century, with Beethoven and Schubert, and 
later on especially with Chopin and Schumann, the short lyrical piano work, evoking 
a single intense image in music of perhaps three to five minutes' duration, became a 
favorite genre, partly because it was the kind of thing that would sell to the thousands 
of fair-to-excellent pianists who made their music at home for the entertainment of 
themselves and their friends and family. 

Of course many thousands of character pieces were composed in the romantic era, 
most of them sweet, charming, even well-made, but distressingly bland. But Grieg had 
the gift of creating a particular sonority, a harmonic color related to Norwegian folk 
song and dance, mat gave his works a unique character. Though they were intended 
for performance on the piano, the melodic charm and harmonic grace of Grieg's 
miniatures can lend them well to imaginative transcription. The four selections to be 
performed here were arranged for wind octet by Willard Elliot, longtime principal 
bassoon of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, who made these versions for the 
Chicago Symphony Wind Octet. 

Among the most famous of all the Lyric Pieces is the sparkling dance in Bryllupsdag pa 
Troldhaugen ("Wedding Day at Troldhaugen"), Opus 65, No. 6, which suggests an 
event of great joy and celebration — no doubt at least partly a tribute to the composer's 
own serenely happy marriage. Gjdetergut ("Shepherd Boy"), Opus 54, No. 1, projects a 
poignant mood of solitude, its principal melody shaped by a scale pattern characteris- 
tic of Norwegian folk music. Many of the Lyric Pieces — not to mention most of the 
other character pieces by countless composers of the century — are in three-part form, 
ABA, with the opening material repeated at the end, but Notturno, Opus 54, No. 4, 
unfolds in its own way, continually unwinding and opening out in an atmosphere of 
sustained tranquility. Efterklang ("Recollections"), Opus 71, No. 7, the very last of the 
Lyric Pieces, is a wistful waltz, melancholy in its meandering through a series of keys 
before dying softly away. 



Wolfgang Amade Mozart 
Serenade in E-flat for winds, K.375 



Mozart's larger works for wind ensemble are part of a tradition known as "Har- 
moniemusik" ("harmony music"), no doubt because the winds frequently functioned 
in symphonic writing of his day as harmonic support to the thematic material most often 
found in the strings. The standard Hartnonie ensemble was based on two horns, with a 
pair of bassoons providing the bass, and one or more pairs of higher instruments — oboes, 
clarinets, or flutes — for the melodic line. This kind of ensemble was very effective for per- 
formances in the open air, where a good deal of music was heard at the time. 



When Mozart arrived in Vienna in 1781, Harmoniemusik was not an important part 
of the musical milieu. But upon hearing rumors that the Emperor had decided to cre- 
ate a "harmony" ensemble, Mozart wrote the E-flat serenade in the hope of gaining 
Imperial favor. Originally he wrote the work as a sextet, for clarinets, horns, and bas- 
soons, telling his father in a letter of November 3, 1781, that he had taken consider- 
able pains with the work in the hope of gaining position at the court. Unfortunately 
the emperor decided to make his ensemble an octet, adding two oboes to the original 
six instruments. Mozart quickly updated his piece by adding two oboes to the origi- 
nal complement, while at the same time composing an entirely new serenade in C 
minor, K.388, conceived from the start for this instrumentation. It was his bad luck 
that the emperor decided not to seek original compositions for his Harmonie ensemble 
but rather to order arrangements of tunes from the popular operas instead. As far as 
we know, none of Mozart's music of this type was heard by the emperor or added to 
his library 

In the first, third, and fifth movements, Mozart took special pains to work the 
newly-added oboes into the texture organically. If the clarinets first stated the dotted 
theme that opens the work, oboes take the lead in the fanfare figure that introduces 
the second theme, followed by brilliant rapid scales in the clarinets. The extended 
development passes the material through the whole ensemble and moves through 
one false ending before finally returning home for the recapitulation. The division of 
labor in the Adagio makes the oboes at least as important melodically as the clarinets, 
while the finale bustles with all the energy of a comic-opera ensemble, with every 
instrument doing its part in the free-for-all. The two Menuets and Trios, which come 
second and fourth, are scored more lightly. Here, whether for contrast of texture or 
just because he was in a hurry, Mozart simply superimposed the two new oboes onto 
the pre-existing sextet. Wind octets are less easily come by than, say, string quartets, 
so we hear this music far less frequently than we should, but Mozart's ear for instru- 
mental color and his ability to craft material ideally suited to each participant make 
this serenade, and its siblings, a joyous experience whenever we have a chance to 
hear it. 

— Notes by Steven Ledbetter 



Robert Sheena joined the Boston Symphony as its English horn player in May 1994. Mr. Sheena 
holds degrees from the University of California at Berkeley and Northwestern University 
School of Music, and he is an alumnus of the Tanglewood Music Center. From 1991 to 1994 
he was principal English horn and assistant principal oboe of the San Antonio Symphony. 
Prior to that he was principal English horn and assistant principal oboe from 1987 to 1991 
with the Hong Kong Philharmonic, and English horn and oboe player from 1984 to 1987 
with the Civic Orchestra of Chicago. In January 1993 he was the only American among four- 
teen players invited to audition for the Berlin Philharmonic's principal English horn position. 

Born in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada, and a graduate of the Curtis Institute of Music, 
Mark McEwen became the Boston Symphony's second oboe in September 1996, having pre- 
viously been acting principal oboe of Canada's National Arts Centre Orchestra in Ottawa, 
and principal oboe of the Horida Orchestra and the Music Festival of Taipei. Mr. McEwen 
played oboe and English horn with the Milwaukee Symphony during the 1993-94 season 
and has performed as soloist with the Elora Festival of Ontario and the Orchester Staatsbad 
Meinberg in Germany. An alumnus of the Tanglewood Music Center, he has also held fel- 
lowships at Aspen and with the Colorado Philharmonic. 

Scott Andrews joined the Boston Symphony in January 1996 as the BSO's second clarinet. 
Prior to that he was principal clarinet of the Gardner Chamber Orchestra; at Symphony 
Hall he was a substitute player during the 1994-95 BSO season and the 1995 Boston Pops 



season. A Tanglewood Music Center alumnus, Mr. Andrews has also been principal clarinet 
of the New England Chamber Orchestra and the Toho Gakuen Symphony Orchestra, sub- 
stitute principal clarinet of the New World Symphony, and second clarinet of the Cantata 
Singers and Ensemble. A graduate of the New England Conservatory of Music, he received 
a 1992 Kneisel Hall Chamber Music Fellowship. His teachers included Harold Wright, 
Sidney Forrest, and Edward Knakal. 

Born in Denver, Colorado, Craig Nordstrom became bass clarinetist of the Boston Sym- 
phony in 1979. Mr. Nordstrom is a graduate of Northwestern University; during his years 
there he was a member of the Chicago Civic Orchestra and the Colorado Philharmonic. 
Following graduation he was a member of the United States Marine Band in Washington, 
D.C., where he earned his master of music degree from the Catholic University of America. 
Before joining the BSO, Mr. Nordstrom was bass clarinetist in the Vancouver Symphony 
and the Cincinnati Symphony, and a participant in the Grand Teton Music Festival. He is 
currently on the faculty of the New England Conservatory of Music. 

Associate principal bassoonist Richard Ranti joined the Boston Symphony at the start of 
the 1989-90 season. Also principal bassoonist of the Boston Pops Orchestra, Mr. Ranti was 
born in Montreal and started bassoon at age ten, studying with Sidney Rosenberg and 
David Carroll. After graduating from Interlochen Arts Academy, he studied with Sol 
Schoenbach at the Curtis Institute. At nineteen he won the second bassoon position in the 
Philadelphia Orchestra, spending six years with that orchestra, the last as acting associate 
principal. A Tanglewood Music Center alumnus, Mr. Ranti has also participated in the 
Spoleto and Marlboro festivals. He won second prize in the 1982 Toulon International Bas- 
soon Competition and received two Canada Council grants. 

Gregg Henegar joined the Boston Symphony Orchestra as its contrabassonist in the fall of 
1992, having held the same position with the Houston Symphony from 1975. A devoted 
advocate of new works for his instrument, he has performed frequently as soloist in Donald 
Erb's Contrabassoon Concerto, commissioned by the Houston Symphony for Mr. Henegar 
in 1985 and later recorded with the London Philharmonic. Mr. Henegar studied bassoon 
with George Goslee at the Cleveland Institute of Music and with Sanford Berry at the Uni- 
versity of Illinois. A faculty member at the New England Conservatory, Boston University, 
and the Boston University Tanglewood Institute, he is the author of "Modern Exercises for 
the Contrabassoon." 

Originally from West Orange, New Jersey, Jonathan Menkis received his bachelor's degree 
from Ithaca College in 1981, then joined the Sacramento Symphony as its associate princi- 
pal horn. He became assistant principal horn with the New Orleans Philharmonic the fol- 
lowing season and was appointed to the BSO's horn section in 1984. Mr. Menkis has been a 
member of the Colorado Philharmonic Orchestra, the Colorado Music Festival Orchestra, 
and the American Wind Symphony Orchestra. An occasional soloist in the Boston area and 
a frequent performer of chamber music, he is on the faculty of the New England Conserva- 
tory of Music and was previously on the faculty of the Boston Conservatory. 

Born in Philadelphia, Richard Mackey joined the horn section of the Boston Symphony in 
January 1973. Mr. Mackey began his musical training at eleven with trumpet and switched 
to the horn two years later. A Tanglewood Music Center alumnus, he attended the New 
England Conservatory of Music, where he studied horn with former BSO principal William 
Valkenier and solfege with Gaston Duf resne, then also a BSO member. During his career 
Mr. Mackey was a member of the orchestras of Kansas City, San Antonio, Detroit, New 
Orleans, and Cleveland, leaving Cleveland in 1963 to become solo horn of the Japan Phil- 
harmonic, playing under Seiji Ozawa many times. Before joining the BSO he was a freelance 
musician in the Los Angeles studios and attended the Marlboro Music Festival in Vermont. 
His first and continuing musical love is Mozart; he collects scores, facsimiles, books, first 
and early editions, and just about anything relating to the composer. 



SEIJI OZAWAMUSIC DIRECTOR 



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1996-97 SEASON 



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Seiji Ozawa, Music Director 

Bernard Haitink, Principal Guest Conductor 

One Hundred and Sixteenth Season, 1996-97 



Trustees of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Inc. 



R. Willis Leith, Jr., Chairman 
Peter A. Brooke, Vice-Chairman 
Mrs. Edith L. Dabney, Vice-Chairman 
Harvey Chet Krentzman, Vice-Chairman 



Nicholas T. Zervas, President 

William J. Poorvu, Vice-Chairman and Treasurer 

Ray Stata, Vice-Chairman 



Harlan E. Anderson 
Dr. Amar G. Bose 
James F. Cleary 
John F. Cogan, Jr. 
Julian Cohen 
William F. Connell, 
ex-officio 

Life Trustees 

Vernon R. Alden 
David B. Arnold, Jr. 
J. P. Barger 
Leo. L. Beranek 
Abram T. Collier 



William M. Crozier, Jr. 
Nader F. Darehshori 
Deborah B. Davis 
Nina L. Doggett 
Avram J. Goldberg 
Thelma E. Goldberg 



Nelson J. Darling, Jr. 
Archie C. Epps 
Mrs. Harris Fahnestock 1 " 
Mrs. John H. Fitzpatrick 
Dean W Freed 



Julian T. Houston 

Edna S. Kalman 

George Krupp 

Mrs. August R. Meyer 

Richard P. Morse 

Mrs. Robert B. Newman 



Robert P. O'Block, 

ex-officio 
Peter C. Read 
Margaret Williams- 

DeCelles, ex-officio 






Mrs. John L. Grandin 
Mrs. George I. Kaplan 
George H. Kidder 
Thomas D. Perry, Jr. 
Irving W. Rabb 



Mrs. George Lee Sargent 
Richard A. Smith 
Sidney Stoneman 
John Hoyt Stookey 
John L. Thorndike 



Other Officers of the Corporation 

Thomas D. May and John Ex Rodgers, Assistant Treasurers 



Daniel R. Gustin, Clerk 



Board of Overseers of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Inc. 

Robert P. O'Block, Chairman 

Molly Beals Millman, Secretary Phyllis Dohanian, Treasurer 






Mrs. Herbert B. Abelow 
Helaine B. Allen 
Joel B. Alvord 
Amanda Barbour Amis 
Marjorie Arons-Barron 
Caroline Dwight Bain 
Sandra Bakalar 
Gabriella Beranek 
Lynda Schubert Bodman 
William L. Boyan 
Jan Brett 
Robin A. Brown 
Mrs. Marshall Nichols 

Carter 
Earle M. Chiles 
William H. Congleton 
William F. Connell 
John M. Connors, Jr. 
Martha H.W. 

Crowninshield 
Diddy Cullinane 
Joan P. Curhan 
Tamara P. Davis 
Betsy P. Demirjian 
JoAnne Walton 

Dickinson 
Ham Ellis Dickson 
Mitchell L. Dong 
Hugh Downs 



Francis A. Doyle 
Goetz B. Eaton 
Harriett Eckstein 
William R. Elfers 
George M. Elvin 
Edward Eskandarian 
J. Richard Fennell 
Nancy J. Fitzpatrick 
Eugene M. Freedman 
Dr. Arthur Gelb 
Mrs. Kenneth J. 

Germeshausen 
Charles K. Gifford 
Jordan Golding 
Mark R. Goldweitz 
Deborah England Gray 
Michael Halperson 
John P. Hamill 
Ellen T. Harris 
Daphne P. Hatsopoulos 
Deborah M. Hauser 
Bayard Henry 
Marilyn Brachman 

Hoffman 
Ronald A. Homer 
Phyllis S. Hubbard 
F. Donald Hudson 
Lola Jaffe 
Mrs. Robert M. Jaffe 



Dr. Hisashi Kaneko 
Martin S. Kaplan 
Susan Beth Kaplan 
Mrs. S. Charles Kasdon 
Frances Demoulas 

Kettenbach 
Robert D. King 
Mrs. Gordon F. Kingsley 
David I. Kosowsky 
Arthur R. Kravitz 
Mrs. William D. 

Larkin, Jr. 
Thomas H. Lee 
Stephen R. Levy 
Edward Linde 
Frederick H. Lovejoy, Jr. 
Diane H. Lupean 
Mrs. Charles P. Lyman 
Barbara Jane Macon 
Joseph C. McNay 
William F. Meagher, Jr. 
Nathan R. Miller 
Robert J. Murray 
Paul C. O'Brien 
Norio Ohga 
Louis F. Orsatti 
Stephen Davies Paine 
Gloria Moody Press 



Millard H. Pry or, Jr. 
Robert E. Remis 
William D. Roddy, Jr. 
John Ex Rodgers 
Keizo Saji 
Roger A. Saunders 
Carol Scheifele-Holmes 
Hannah H. Schneider 
Cynthia D. Scullin 
Elizabeth T. Selkowitz 
Roger T Servison 
L. Scott Singleton 
Mrs. Micho F. Spring 
Thomas G. Sternberg 
Jacquelynne M. 

Stepanian 
Bill Van Faasen 
Paul M. Verrochi 
Stephen R. Weiner 
Robert A. Wells 
Mrs. Joan D. Wheeler 
Reginald H. White 
Mrs. Florence T. 

Whitney 
Margaret Williams- 

DeCelles 
Robin Wilson 
Kathryn A. Wong 



+ Deceased 



Overseers Emeriti 

Mrs. Weston Adams 
Bruce A. Beal 
William M. Bulger 
Mary Louise Cabot 
Mrs. Levin H. 

Campbell 
Johns H. Congdon 
Phyllis Curtin 
Katherine Fanning 
Peter H.B. 

Frelinghuysen 
Mrs. Thomas J. 

Galligan, Jr. 
Mrs. James Garivaltis 
Mrs. Haskell R. Gordon 



Susan D. Hall 
Mrs. Richard D. Hill 
Susan M. Hilles 
Glen H. Hiner 
H. Eugene Jones 
Mrs. Louis I. Kane 
Leonard Kaplan 
Richard L. Kaye 
Robert K. Kraft 
Benjamin H. Lacy 
Mrs. James F. 

Lawrence 
Mrs. Hart D. Leavitt 
Laurence Lesser 
Mrs. Harry L. Marks 



C. Charles Marran 
Hanae Mori 
Mrs. Stephen V.C. 

Morris 
Patricia Morse 
David S. Nelson 
Mrs. Hiroshi H. 

Nishino 
Vincent M. O'Reilly 
Andrall S. Pearson 
John A. Perkins 
David R. Pokross 
Daphne Brooks Prout 
Mrs. Peter van S. Rice 
Mrs. Jerome Rosenfeld 



Mrs. William C. 

Rousseau 
Angelica L. Russell 
Francis P. Sears, Jr. 
Mrs. Carl Shapiro 
Mrs. Donald B. 

Sinclair 
Ralph Z. Sorenson 
Mrs. Arthur I. Strang 
Luise Vosgerchian 
Mrs. Thomas H.P. 

Whitney 
Mrs. Donald R. Wilson 
Mrs. John J. Wilson 



Business Leadership Association 

Board of Directors 

Harvey Chet Krentzman, Chairman Emeritus 
James F. Cleary, Chairman 



Nader F. Darehshori 
Francis A. Doyle 
John P. Hamill 
William F. Meagher 



Robert J. Murray 
Robert P. O'Block 
Patrick J. Purcell 
William D. Roddy 



William F. Connell, President 
William L. Boyan, Vice-President 



Cynthia Scullin 
Malcolm L. Sherman 
Ray Stata 



Stephen J. Sweeney 
William C. Van Faasen 
Patricia Wolpert 



Emeritus Leo L. Beranek 



Ex-Officio R. Willis Leith, Jr. • Nicholas T. Zervas 



Officers of the Boston Symphony Association of Volunteers 

Margaret W illiams-DeCelles, President Charlie Jack, Treasurer 

Goetz Eaton, Executive Vice-President Doreen Reis, Secretary 



Diane Austin. Symphony Shop 
Noni Cooper, Adult Education 
Ginger Elvin, Tanglewood 

Association 
Nancy Ferguson, Hall Services 
Phyllis Hubbard, Nominating 



Marilyn Pond. Public Relations 
Dee Schoenly, Development 
William C. Sexton, 

Tanglewood Association 
Barbara Steiner. Youth Activities 



Dorothy Stern, Resources 

Development 
Erling Thorgalsen, Membership 
Eva Zervos, Fundraising 
Wendy Ziner, Fundraising 



The Gericke Years: 
1884-1889 and 1898-1906 




The archival exhibit currently on display in the Huntington Ave- 
nue corridor of the Cohen W^ing explores the Boston Symphony 
Orchestra during W^ilhelm Gericke's two terms as conductor. 
Generally acknowledged as the BSO's first "professional" con- 
ductor, Gericke is credited with having transformed the BSO 
from a group of musicians into an orchestra. Among the many 
innovations that occurred during Gericke's conductorship were 
the inauguration in 1885 of the "Promenade Concerts," which 
were the predecessor of the Boston Pops; the commencement of 
tours to other United States cities in 1886, the initiation of a 
series of Young People's Concerts in 1887, and the move from 
the old Boston Music Hall to Symphony Hall in 1900. 



Programs copyright ©1997 Boston Symphony Orchestra, Inc. 

Cover design by Jaycole Advertising, Inc./ Cover and BSO photos by Steve J. Sherman 






Administration 

Kenneth Haas, Managing Director 

Daniel R. Gustin, Assistant Managing Director and Manager of Tanglewood 

Anthony Fogg, Artistic Administrator 

Thomas D. May, Director of Finance and Business Affairs 

Nancy Perkins, Director of Development 

Caroline Smedvig, Director of Public Relations and Marketing 

Ray F. Wellbaum, Orchestra Manager 



■ 



ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF/ARTISTIC 

Dennis Alves, Artistic Coordinator, Boston Pops • Faith Hunter, Executive Assistant to the Managing 
Director • Karen Leopardi, Artist Assistant/Secretary to the Music Director • Vincenzo Natale, Chauffeur/ 
Valet • James O'Connor, Administrative Assistant, Artistic Administration • Brian Van Sickle, Executive 
Assistant to the Tanglewood Manager 

ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF/PRODUCTION 

Christopher W. Ruigomez, Operations Manager 

Scott Schillin, Assistant Manager, Boston Pops and Youth Activities 

Felicia A. Burrey, Chorus Manager • Nancy Cohen, Auditions Coordinator/Administrative Assistant, 
Orchestra Personnel • Jana Euler Gimenez, Administrative Assistant, Management Office • Diane A. 
Read, Production Coordinator 

BOX OFFICE 

Russell M. Hodsdon, Manager of Box Office 

Mary J. Broussard, Clerk • Cary Eyges, Clerk • Lawrence Fraher, Clerk • Kathleen Kennedy, 
Assistant Manager of Box Office • Arthur Ryan, Clerk 

BUSINESS OFFICE 

Sarah J. Harrington, Budget Manager 

Craig R. Kaplan, Controller 

Roberta Kennedy, Manager, Symphony Shop 

Christopher Fox, Budget Analyst • Michelle Green, Executive Assistant to the Director of Finance 
and Business Affairs • Ian Kane, Senior Financial Analyst • Scott Langill, General Accountant • John 
O'Callaghan, Payroll Accountant • Yaneris Pena-Briggs, Cash Accountant • Sharon Sherman, 
Accounts Payable Supervisor • Victoria L. Tan, Staff Accountant 



DEVELOPMENT 

Daniel P. Breen, Director of Administration for Development 

Madelyne Cuddeback, Director of Corporate Programs 

Julie H. Diaz, Campaign Director 

John C. Marksbury, Director of Foundation and Government Support 

Joyce M. Serwitz, Associate Director of Development 

Diane Abe, Campaign Coordinator • Maureen Barry, Administrative Assistant to the Associate Director 
of Development • Courtney A. Barth, Assistant Director, Corporate Projects • Anne Cademenos, Associate 
Director of Corporate Programs • Sally Dale, Manager of Donor Relations • Rebecca Ehrhardt, Development 
Officer • Sarah Fitzgerald, Data Coordinator • Ginny Gaeta, Executive Assistant to the Director of Develop- 
ment • Erika-Marie Haeussler, Administrative Assistant, Tanglewood Development • Joyce Hatch, Director 
of Boston Symphony Annual Fund • Deborah Hersey, Coordinator of Information Systems • Shelley Kooris, 
Manager of Development Research • Matthew Lane, Administrative Assistant, Campaign Communications • 
Sabrina Learman, Administrative Assistant/Office Manager • Katherine A. Lempert, Assistant Director, 
Tanglewood Development • Kathleen Maddox, Assistant Director, Corporate Sponsorships • Robert Massey, 
Data Production Assistant • Cynthia McCabe, Administrative Assistant, Foundation and Government Support 
• Rachel 0. Nadjarian, Donor Relations Assistant • Genii Petersen, \ssistant Director of Foundation and 
Government Support • Julie A. Phaneuf, Coordinator of Central Processing • Alicia Salmoni, Reseacher/ 
Track Manager • George Saulnier, Data Entry Clerk • Bethany Tammaro, Administrative Secretary, Corpo- 
rate Programs • Valerie Vignaux, Administrative Assistant, Annual Fund • Tracy Wilson, Director <>/' Tangle- 
wood Development 



^r 



EDUCATIONAL ACTIVITIES/ARCHIVES 

Richard Ortner, Administrator of the Tanglewood Music Center 

Myran Parker-Brass, Coordinator of Youth Activities 

Bridget P. Carr, Archivist— Position endowed by Caroline Dwight Bain • Barbara Logue, Administrative 
Assistant, Tanglewood Music Center 



FUNCTIONS OFFICE 

Cheryl Silvia Lopes, Function Manager 

Lesley Ann Cefalo, Assistant Function Manager 
Manager/Tanglewood Function Coordinator 



Elizabeth Francey-Amis, Assistant to the Function 



HUMAN RESOURCES 

Marion Gardner-Saxe, Director of Human Resources 

Anna Asphar, Benefits Manager • Yuko Uchino, Administrative Assistant, Human Resources 

INFORMATION SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT 

Robert Bell, Manager of Information Systems 

James Major, Coordinator of Information Systems • Michael Pijoan, Assistant Manager of Information 

Systems 

PUBLIC RELATIONS 

Bernadette M. Horgan, Director of Media Relations 

Susanna Bonta, Media Relations Coordinator • Caleb Cochran, Media Relations Assistant /Assistant to 

the Director of Public Relations and Marketing • Leah Oko, Administrative Assistant 

PUBLICATIONS 

Steven Ledbetter, Musicologist & Program Annotator 
Marc Mandel, Publications Manager 

Eleanor Hayes McGourty, Boston Pops Publications Coordinator/Marketing Copywriter 

SALES, SUBSCRIPTION, AND MARKETING 

Nancy A. Kay, Director of Sales & Marketing Manager 

Helen N.H. Brady, Group Sales Manager • Richard Chiarella, Graphic Designer • Susanna Concha, 
Marketing Coordinator • B. Victoria Johnson, Subscription Representative • Michael Miller, Symphony- 
Charge Manager • Michelene Miller, Group Sales Assistant • Kim Noltemy, Associate Marketing Manager • 
Carol Ann Passarelli, Subscription Manager • Brian Robinson, Senior Subscription Representative 

SYMPHONY HALL OPERATIONS 

Robert L. Gleason, Facilities Manager 

James E. Whitaker, House Manager 

H.R. Costa, Technical Supervisor • Michael Finlan, Switchboard Supervisor • Wilmoth A. Griffiths, 

Supervisor of Facilities Support Services * Catherine Lawlor, Administrative Assistant • John MacMinn, 

Supervisor of Building Maintenance • William D. McDonnell, Chief Steward • Cleveland Morrison, 

Stage Manager • Shawn Wilder, Mailroom Clerk 

House Crew Charles F. Cassell, Jr. • Francis Castillo • Thomas Davenport • John Demick, 

Stage Coordinator • Michael Frazier • Hank Green • Juan Jimenez • William P. Morrill • Mark 

C. Rawson 

Security Christopher Bartlett • William Beckett • David Parker, Security Supervisor 

Cleaning Crew Desmond Boland • Clifford Collins • Angelo Flores • Rudolph Lewis • Robert 

MacGilvray • Lindel Milton, Lead Cleaner 

TANGLEWOOD OPERATIONS 
James J. Mooney, Facilities Manager 

VOLUNTEER OFFICE 

Leslie Wu Foley, Director of Volunteer Services 

Jennifer Flynn, Senior Project Coordinator • Pauline McCance, Senior Administrative Assistant 



4 



BSO 



Boston Symphony Chamber Players 

at Jordan Hall 

Sunday, February 9, 1997, at 3 p.m. 

The Boston Symphony Chamber Players, 
with pianist Gilbert Kalish, will perform the 
second concert of their 1996-97 season of 
three Sunday-afternoon concerts at Jordan 
Hall at the New England Conservatory on 
Sunday, February 9, 1997, at 3 p.m. The 
program will include Beethoven's Clarinet 
Trio in B-flat, Opus 11, for clarinet, cello, 
and piano; Leon Kirchner's Piano Trio No. 2, 
and Shostakovich's Quintet in G minor for 
piano and strings, Opus 57. Tickets at $25, 
$28, and $14.50 are available through Sym- 
phonyCharge at (617) 266-1200, at the Sym- 
phony Hall box office, or, on the day of the 
concert, at the Jordan Hall box office. The 
Chamber Players' closing concert this season 
will take place on Sunday, March 16, and 
will include Haydn's Trio in E-flat for piano, 
violin, and cello, Hob. XV:29, Irving Fine's 
Partita for Winds, and Schumann's Quintet 
in E-flat for piano and strings, Opus 44. 

New BSO Recording of 
Faure's "Requiem" due 
on RCA Victor Red Seal 

Due for release this month on RCA Victor 
Red Seal is Seiji Ozawa's recording with 
the Boston Symphony Orchestra of Faure's 
Requiem, taped in March/April 1994 at 
Symphony Hall with soprano Barbara Bon- 
ney, baritone Hakan Hagegard, and the 
Tanglewood Festival Chorus, John Oliver, 
conductor. Filling out the disc is a selection 
of Faure songs sung by Barbara Bonney and 
Hakan Hagegard with pianist Warren Jones. 
Among recent discs by Boston Symphony 
members, two feature BSO flutist Fenwick 
Smith — an album of Ned Rorem's "Chamber 
Music with Flute" on Etcetera, with perform- 
ers also including BSO principal harp Ann 
Hobson Pilot; and, on Archetype Records, 
an album of music by John Harbison entitled 
"The Boston Collection," featuring Mr. Smith 
in Harbison's Duo for Flute and Piano with 
pianist Randall Hodgkinson. In addition, 
BSO principal trombonist Ronald Barron is 
featured on two recent discs on the Boston 



Brass Series label: "All American Trom- 
bone," a collection of music by American 
composers, Leonard Bernstein among them; 
and "In the Family," including music of 
Harold Shapero, Shostakovich, Vaughan 
Williams, and others, with Edwin Barker, 
Thomas Gauger, Marianne Gedigian, Ann 
Hobson Pilot, and Douglas Yeo among the 
performers. 

Andre Previn and the 
Boston Symphony Orchestra to 
Tour Canary Islands and Florida 
February 20-March 1 

From Thursday, February 20, through Satur- 
day, March 1, following his two weeks of 
subscription concerts, Andre Previn will 
lead the Boston Symphony Orchestra on tour 
to the Canary Islands and Florida, perform- 
ing eight concerts in Las Palmas and Santa 
Cruz in the Canary Islands, and in West Palm 
Beach, Sarasota, and Clearwater, Florida. 
The concerts in Clearwater and Sarasota are 
sponsored in part by Publix Super Markets 
Charities. The tour repertory includes the 
two programs Mr. Previn and the orchestra 
perform at Symphony Hall this month, the 
first an all-American program of music by 
Morton Gould, Aaron Copland (the Clarinet 
Concerto, featuring BSO principal clarinet 
William R. Hudgins), William Schuman (his 
Symphony No. 3, composed for Serge Kousse- 
vitzky and premiered by the BSO in October 
1941), and George Gershwin {Rhapsody in 
Blue, with Mr. Previn at the piano), the sec- 
ond including Haydn's Symphony No. 96, 
The Miracle, and Shostakovich's powerful 
Symphony No. 8, one of the great works of 
the World War II years. 

Public Funding for the 
Boston Symphony Orchestra 

The BSO is the recipient this season of an 
operating grant from the Massachusetts Cul- 
tural Council, an award being used to help 
underwrite the cost of subscription-season 
concerts. The mission of the Council is to 
promote excellence, access, education, and 
diversity in the arts, humanities, and inter- 
pretive sciences in order to improve the 
quality of life for all Massachusetts residents 




■ 



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^ 



Sullivan Weinstein & McQuay... 
a new Boston law firm, 



■ 





salutes 




Boston Symphony Orchestra 



an old Boston tradition. 




SULLIVAN WEINSTEIN & MCQUAY 

A PRC ONAL CORPORATION 

COUNSELLORS AT LAW 

TWO PARK PLAZA BOSTON, MA 021 1 6 617-348-4300 



and contribute to the economic vitality of 
our communities. 

A state agency, the Massachusetts Cultural 
Council receives an annual appropriation 
from the Commonwealth, as well as support 
from the National Endowment for the Arts. 
The BSO has also received a grant from the 
NEA that helps make possible its yearly 
program of fifteen Youth Concerts. Govern- 
mental support also stimulates economic 
activity; in 1992, Massachusetts cultural 
organizations employed 20,000 people and 
generated $1.5 billion for the economy. In 
spite of all that it has accomplished, public 
funding for the arts has declined dramati- 
cally during the past ten years. The federal 
government currently spends only 32 cents 
per taxpayer on NEA, while Massachusetts 
spends $2.31 per head on MCC. 

The orchestra urges you to contact your 
state and federal representatives, or other 
congressional leaders, to express your ap- 
preciation for the music that public support 
helps make available to you as a member of 
Boston Symphony audiences. For more in- 
formation on public funding for the arts and 
how to contact your representatives, please 
call Gerrit Petersen, the BSO's Assistant 
Director of Foundation and Government 
Support, at (617) 638-9462. 

Attention, Friday-afternoon 
Subscribers: Bus Service 
to Symphony Hall 

If you're tired of fighting traffic and search- 
ing for a parking space when you come to 
Friday-afternoon Boston Symphony con- 
certs, why not consider taking the bus from 
your community directly to Symphony Hall? 
Under the auspices of the Boston Symphony 
Association of Volunteers, the following 
communities sponsor round-trip bus service 
for the Friday-afternoon concerts for a nomi- 
nal fee: Andover, Cape Cod, Concord, Ded- 
ham/ Dover, Marblehead/Swampscott, New- 
ton /Wellesley, North Shore, South Shore, and 
Weston in Massachusetts; Concord, North 
Hampton, and Peterborough in New Hamp- 
shire; and Rhode Island. Taking advantage 
of your area's bus service not only helps 
keep this convenient service operating, but 
also provides opportunities to spend lime 



with your Symphony friends, meet new peo- 
ple, and conserve energy. In addition, many 
of the participating communities make a 
substantial contribution to the BSO from the 
proceeds. If you would like to start a service 
from your community, or would like further 
information about bus transportation to Fri- 
day-afternoon concerts, please call Pauline 
McCance in the Volunteer Office at (617) 
638-9263. 

BSO Members in Concert 

Harry Ellis Dickson and the Boston Clas- 
sical Orchestra perform Handel's Water 
Music, Haydn's C major cello concerto with 
Israeli cellist Inbal Magiddo, and Bach's 
Brandenburg Concerto No. 4 on Friday, Feb- 
ruary 7, at 8 p.m. and Sunday, February 9, 
at 3 p.m. at Faneuil Hall at Quincy Market. 
Single tickets are $18, $25, and $31 ($2 
discount for seniors, $5 discount for stu- 
dents). For tickets call (617) 423-3883. 
The Hawthorne String Quartet — BSO 
members Ronan Lefkowitz, Si-Jing Huang, 
Mark Ludwig, and Sato Knudsen — joins 
conductor Ronald Knudsen and the New 
Philharmonia Orchestra for Schulhoff's Con- 
certo for String Quartet and Chamber Or- 
chestra as part of a program also including 
Brahms's Tragic Overture and Shostakovich's 
Symphony No. 5 on Saturday evening, Feb- 
ruary 8, at 8 p.m. and on Sunday afternoon, 
February 9, at 3 p.m. at Ellsworth Auditori- 
um at Pine Manor College in Chestnut Hill. 
Tickets are $22 and $17 (students $12 and 
$10). For tickets or more information, call 
(617) 527-9717. 

Symphony Hall Tours 

As we approach the centennial of Symphony 
Hall in the year 2000, interest in tours of 
this historic building is growing. The Boston 
Symphony Association of Volunteers is 
pleased to offer tours of Symphony Hall, 
conducted by experienced tour guides, for 
groups of adults or children. The tours take 
approximately one hour and can be arranged 
between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through 
Friday, depending on the orchestras sched- 
ule. For further information, please call Paul- 
ine McCance in the Volunteer Office at (617) 
638-9263. 






■ 
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^ 4 



A 



■■V 






A Board of Directors 
with recognized experience 
and specialized knowledge. 

An important part of a 
Fiduciary relationship. 



Nancy B. Beecher 
jane C. Bradley 
C. Richard Carlson 
Daniel S. Cheever, Jr. 
John W Cobb 
John K. Dineen 
Judith R Eissner 
Nicholas A. Grace 
Susan R. Gunderson 
Bayard Henry 
Robert N. Karelitz 
Edmund H. Kendrick 
John M. Meyer 
Stanley Miller 



FIDUCIARY 



H. Gilman Nichols 
Joseph R Pellegrino 
Kevin C. Phelan 
Daniel A. Phillips 
Jonathan R. Phillips 
Daniel Pierce 
Charles C J. Piatt 
Laura N. Rigsby 
James J. Roche 
Preston H. Saunders 
Douglas R. Smith-Peter sen 
John L. Thorndike 
John F. Winchester 
Robert G. Windsor 



TRUST 




INVESTMENT MANAGERS AND TRUSTEES FOR 
INDIVIDUALS AND FAMILIES SINCE 1885. 



175 Federal Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02110-2289 
Telephone (617) 482-5270 



8 



t %% 




SEIJI OZAWA 

Seiji Ozawa is now in his twenty-fourth season as music director 
of the Boston Symphony Orchestra. Mr. Ozawa became the 
BSO's thirteenth music director in 1973, after a year as music 
adviser; his tenure with the Boston Symphony is the longest of 
any music director currently active with an American orches- 
tra. In his nearly twenty-five years as music director, Mr. Ozawa 
has maintained the orchestra's distinguished reputation both at 
home and abroad, with concerts at Symphony Hall and Tangle- 
wood, on tours to Europe, Japan, Hong Kong, China, and South 
America, and across the United States, including regular con- 
certs in New York. Mr. Ozawa has upheld the BSO's commit- 
ment to new music through the commissioning of new works, including a series of cen- 
tennial commissions marking the orchestra's hundredth birthday in 1981, a series of 
works celebrating the fiftieth anniversary of the Tanglewood Music Center in 1990, and 
a current series represented this season by new works from Leon Kirchner and Bernard 
Rands. In addition, he has recorded more than 130 works with the orchestra, represent- 
ing more than fifty different composers, on ten labels. 

In addition to his work with the Boston Symphony, Mr. Ozawa appears regularly 
with the Berlin Philharmonic, the New Japan Philharmonic, the London Symphony, the 
Orchestre National de France, the Philharmonia of London, and the Vienna Philhar- 
monic. He made his Metropolitan Opera debut in December 1992, appears regularly at 
La Scala and the Vienna Staatsoper, and has also conducted opera at the Paris Opera, 
Salzburg, and Covent Garden. In September 1992 he founded the Saito Kinen Festival 
in Matsumoto, Japan, in memory of his teacher Hideo Saito, a central figure in the cul- 
tivation of Western music and musical technique in Japan, and a co-founder of the 
Toho School of Music in Tokyo. In addition to his many Boston Symphony recordings, 
Mr. Ozawa has recorded with the Berlin Philharmonic, the Chicago Symphony, the 
London Philharmonic, the Orchestre National, the Orchestre de Paris, the Philharmonia 
of London, the Saito Kinen Orchestra, the San Francisco Symphony, the Toronto Sym- 
phony, and the Vienna Philharmonic, among others. 

Born in 1935 in Shenyang, China, Seiji Ozawa studied music from an early age and 
later graduated with first prizes in composition and conducting from Tokyo's Toho School 
of Music. In 1959 he won first prize at the International Competition of Orchestra Con- 
ductors held in Besancon, France. Charles Munch, then music director of the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra, subsequently invited him to attend the Tanglewood Music Center, 
where he won the Koussevitzky Prize for outstanding student conductor in 1960. While 
a student of Herbert von Karajan in West Berlin, Mr. Ozawa came to the attention of 
Leonard Bernstein, who appointed him assistant conductor of the New York Philharmon- 
ic for the 1961-62 season. He made his first professional concert appearance in North 
America in January 1962, with the San Francisco Symphony. He was music director of 
the Chicago Symphony Orchestra's Ravinia Festival for five summers beginning in 1964, 
music director of the Toronto Symphony from 1965 to 1969, and music director of the 
San Francisco Symphony from 1970 to 1976, followed by a year as that orchestra's 
music adviser. He conducted the Boston Symphony Orchestra for the first time in 1964, 
at Tanglewood, and made his first Symphony Hall appearance with the orchestra in 
January 1968. In 1970 he became an artistic director of Tanglewood. 

Mr. Ozawa recently became the first recipient of Japan's Inouye Sho ("Inouye 
Award"). Created to recognize lifetime achievement in the arts, the award is named 
after this century's preeminent Japanese novelist, Yasushi Inouye. In September 1994 
Mr. Ozawa received his second Emmy award, for Individual Achievement in Cultural 
Programming, for "Dvorak in Prague: A Celebration," with the Boston Symphony Orches- 
tra. He won his first Emmy for the Boston Symphony Orchestra's PBS television series 
"Evening at Symphony." Mr. Ozawa holds honorary doctor of music degrees from the 
University of Massachusetts, the New England Conservatory of Music, and Wheaton 
College in Norton, Massachusetts. 



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BOSTON SYMPHONY 

ORCHESTRA 

1996-97 

Seiji Ozawa 

Music Director 

Music Directorship endowed by 

John Moors Cabot 

Bernard Haitink 

Principal Guest Conductor 




First Violins 

Malcolm Lowe 

Concertmaster 

Charles Munch chair, 
fully funded in perpetuity 

Tamara Smirnova 

Associate Concertmaster 
Helen Horner Mclntyre chair, 
endowed in perpetuity in 1976 



Assistant Concertmaster 

Robert L. Beal, and 

Enid L. and Bruce A. Beal chair, 

endowed in perpetuity in 1 980 
° Laura Park 

Assistant Concertmaster 

Edward and Bertha C Rose chair 
Bo Youp Hwang 

John and Dorothy Wilson chair, 

fully funded in perpetuity 
Lucia Lin 

Forrest Foster Collier chair 
Leo Panasevich 

Carolyn and George Rowland chair 
Gottfried Wilfinger 

Dorothy Q. and David B. Arnold, Jr., 

chair, fully funded in perpetuity 
Alfred Schneider 

Muriel C Kasdon 

and Marjorie C Paley chair 
Raymond Sird 

Ruth and Carl Shapiro chair, 

fully funded in perpetuity 
Ikuko Mizuno 

David and Ingrid Kosowsky chair 
Amnon Levy 

Theodore W. and Evelyn Berenson 

Family chair 

* Harvey Seigel 

Stephanie Morris Marryott and 
Franklin J. Marryott chair 

* Nancy Bracken 
*Aza Raykhtsaum 

* Bonnie Bewick 

* James Cooke 

* Victor Romanul 

Bessie Pappas chair 

* Catherine French 

Second Violins 

Marylou Speaker Churchill 

Principal 

Fahnestock chair 
Vyacheslav Uritsky 

Assistant Principal 

Charlotte and Irving W. Rabb chair, 

endowed in perpetuity in 1977 
Ronald Knudsen 

Edgar and Shirley Grossman chair 
Joseph McGauley 

Shirley and J. Richard Fennell chair 
Ronan Lefkowitz 

David H. and Edith C Howie chair, 

fully funded in perpetuity 

* Jerome Rosen 

* Sheila Fiekowsky 
*Jennie Shames 

* Participating in a system of rotated 
seating 
%On sabbatical leave 
° On leave 
§ Substitute player 

10 



* Valeria Vilker Kuchment 
*Tatiana Dimitriades 
*Si-Jing Huang 

* Nicole Monahan 

* Kelly Barr 

* Wendy Putnam 

Violas 

Steven Ansell 

Principal 

Charles S. Dana chair, 

endowed in perpetuity in 1970 
Hui Liu 

Assistant Principal 

Anne Stoneman chair, 

fully funded in perpetuity 
Ronald Wilkison 

Lois and Harlan Anderson chair 

Robert Barnes 
Burton Fine 
Joseph Pietropaolo 

Michael Zaretsky 

Marc Jeanneret 

*Mark Ludwig 

Helene R. Cahners-Kaplan and 
Carol R. Goldberg chair 

* Rachel Fagerburg 

* Edward Gazouleas 
*Kazuko Matsusaka 

Cellos 

Jules Eskin 

Principal 

Philip R. Allen chair, 

endowed in perpetuity in 1 969 
Martha Babcock 

Assistant Principal 

Vernon and Marion Alden chair, 

endowed in perpetuity in 1977 
Sato Knudsen 

Esther S. and Joseph M. Shapiro chair 
Joel Moerschel 

Sandra and David Bakalar chair 
Luis Legufa 

Robert Bradford Newman chair, 

fully funded in perpetuity 
Carol Procter 

Lillian and Nathan R. Miller chair 
*Ronald Feldman 

Richard C. and Ellen E. Paine chair, 

fully funded in perpetuity 

* Jerome Patterson 

Charles and JoAnne Dickinson chair 

* Jonathan Miller 

Rosemary and Donald Hudson chair 
*0wen Young 

John F. Cogan, Jr., and 
Mary Cornille chair, 
fully funded in perpetuity 

* Andrew Pearce 

Gordon and Mary Ford Kingsley 
Family chair 

Basses 

Edwin Barker 

Principal 

Harold D. Hodgkinson chair, 

endowed in perpetuity in 1974 
Lawrence Wolfe 

Assistant Principal 

Maria Nistazos Stata chair, 

fully funded in perpetuity 



Joseph Hearne 

Leith Family chair, 
fully funded in perpetuity 
John Salkowski 
Joseph and Jan Brett Hearne chair 

* Robert Olson 

* James Orleans 
*Todd Seeber 
*John Stovall 

* Dennis Roy 

Flutes 

Elizabeth Ostling 

Acting Principal 

Walter Piston chair, 

endowed in perpetuity in 1970 
Fenwick Smith 

Myra and Robert Kraft chair, 

endowed in perpetuity in 1 981 



Assistant Principal 
Marian Gray Lewis chair, 
fully funded in perpetuity 

Piccolo 

Geralyn Coticone 
Evelyn and C. Charles Marran 
chair, endowed in perpetuity in 1979 

Oboes 

Alfred Genovese 
Principal 

Mildred B. Remis chair, 
endowed in perpetuity in 1975 

Mark McEwen 

Keisuke Wakao 

Assistant Principal 

Elaine and Jerome Rosenfeld chair 

English Horn 

Robert Sheena 
Beranek chair, 
fully funded in perpetuity 

Clarinets 

William R. Hudgins 
Principal 

Ann S.M. Banks chair, 
endowed in perpetuity in 1977 

Scott Andrews 

Thomas Martin 
Associate Principal & E-flat clarinet 
Stanton W. and Elisabeth K. Davis 
chair, fully funded in perpetuity 



Bass Clarinet 

Craig Nordstrom 

Farla and Harvey Chet 

Krentzman chair, 

fully funded in perpetuity 

Bassoons 

Richard Svoboda 

Principal 

Edward A. Toft chair, 

endowed in perpetuity in 1974 
Roland Small 

Richard Ranti 

Associate Principal 

Contrabassoon 

Gregg Henegar 
Helen Rand Thayer chair 

Horns 

Charles Kavalovski 

Principal 

Helen Sagojf Slosberg chair, 

endowed in perpetuity in 1974 
Richard Sebring 

Associate Principal 

Margaret Andersen Congleton 

chair, fully funded in perpetuity 
Daniel Katzen 

Elizabeth B. Storer chair 
Jay Wadenpfuhl 
Richard Mackey 
Jonathan Menkis 

Trumpets 

Charles Schlueter 

Principal 

Roger Louis Voisin chair, 

endowed in perpetuity in 1977 
Peter Chapman 

Ford H. Cooper chair 
Timothy Morrison 

Associate Principal 

Nina L. and Eugene B. 

Doggett chair 
Thomas Rolfs 

Trombones 

^Ronald Barron 

Principal 

J. P. and Mary B. Barger chair, 

fully funded in perpetuity 



Norman Bolter 
§ Darren Acosta 

Bass Trombone 

Douglas Yeo 

Tuba 

Chester Schmitz 
Margaret and William C. 
Rousseau chair, 

fully funded in perpetuity 

Timpani 

Everett Firth 

Sylvia Shippen Wells chair, 
endowed in perpetuity in 1974 

Percussion 

Thomas Gauger 
Peter and Anne Brooke chair, 
fully funded in perpetuity 

Frank Epstein 
Peter Andrew Lurie chair 

J. William Hudgins 

Timothy Genis 

Assistant Timpanist 

Harps 

$ Ann Hobson Pilot 
Principal 

Willona Henderson Sinclair chair 
Sarah Schuster Ericsson 

Librarians 

Marshall Burlingame 

Principal 

Lia and William Poorvu chair 
William Shisler 
Sandra Pearson 

Assistant Conductor 

Richard Westerfield 
Anna E. Finnerty chair 

Personnel Managers 

Lynn Larsen 
Bruce M. Creditor 

Stage Manager 

Position endowed by 
Angelica L. Russell 
Peter Riley Pfitzinger 




11 






Four Si 



our oeasons 



Hotel Boston 
a 



Boston Symphony Orchestra, 

Making Music 

Together 




Four Seasons Hotel 

A Four Seasons • Rrgeivt Hotki 

200 Boylston Street, Boston, Massachusetts (617) 338-4400 
The only AAA Five Diamond note! in New England. 



12 



BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

Seiji Ozawa, Music Director 

Bernard Haitink, Principal Guest Conductor 

One Hundred and Sixteenth Season, 1996-97 

Thursday, February 6, at 8 
Friday, February 7, at 1:30 
Saturday, February 8, at 8 
Tuesday, February 11, at 8 

SPONSORED BY FOUR SEASONS HOTEL BOSTON 

ANDRE PREVIN, conductor and pianist 




Friends of Frances Fahnestock have dedicated this week's 
Friday-afternoon concert in her memory (see page 14). 



GOULD 



COPLAND 



Fall River Legend Suite 

Prologue 

Waltzes 

Elegy 

Hymnal Variations 

Cotillion 

Epilogue 

Clarinet Concerto 

Slowly and expressively - 
Cadenza — Rather fast 

WILLIAM R. HUDGINS 



INTERMISSION 



SCHUMAN 



GERSHWIN 



Symphony No. 3 

Part I. Passacaglia and Fugue 
Part II. Chorale and Toccata 

Rhapsody in Blue 
ANDR£ PREVIN, piano 



The evening concerts will end about 10:10 and the afternoon concert about 3:40. 

RCA, Deutsche Grammophon, Philips, Telarc, Sony Classical/CBS Maslerworks. Angel/EMI, 

London/Decca, Erato, Hyperion, and New World records 
Baldwin piano 
Andr6 Previn plays a Bosendorfer piano. 

The program books for the Friday series are given in loving memory of Mrs. Hugh 
Baneroft by her daughters Mrs. A. Werk Cook and the late Mrs. William C. fox. 

Boston Symphony Orchestra concerts are funded in part by a grant from the 
Massachusetts Cultural Council, a state ageney. 



13 



Week 15 




Frances Jeffery Fahnestock 

December 28, 1915- January 17, 1997 

The Boston Symphony Orchestra concert on Friday, 
February 7, 1997, is dedicated to the memory of 
Frances Jeffery Fahnestock, Life Trustee of the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra, BSO Trustee from 1970 to 1984, 
BSO Overseer from 1968 to 1970, BSAV member, and 
Vice-President of the Board of Trustees from 1979 to 
1984. Fran passed away on Friday, January 17, 1997. 
The friends of Frances Fahnestock dedicate this con- 
cert in her memory with gratitude for her many years 
of extraordinary and dedicated service to the BSO, 
which included the distinction of becoming the first 
female vice-president of any major orchestra. 

Frances Fahnestock was born in Chicago in 1915 
and traveled extensively on all five continents during 
her youth, particularly to European music festivals. 
Music, skiing, and love of adventure kept her travel- 
ing her whole life, often with her daughters, Joan and Deborah. An individual who loved 
to give parties and do things for other people, Fran exhibited joy and vivacity in all her 
endeavors. As she stated, "My idea is really to make the most of life while we're still on 
the planet — we're on it for such a short length of time." 

Mrs. Fahnestock studied piano under Bustini in Rome, where she sat in his box at 
the old Augusteo along with Respighi, Pizzetti, and Cui. She majored in music at Vassar 
and studied piano with Paul Hoffman in Chicago and Heinrich Gebhard in Boston. She 
was a member of the first Women's Committee of the Chicago Symphony and at the age 
of nineteen ran the first Chicago Opera Ball. In 1939 she married Harris Fahnestock of 
New York and Lenox and moved to the Boston area; he had already purchased her first 
BSO subscription, seats V-25 and V-26, during his courtship of her. He died in 1970. 
Mrs. Fahnestock was a member of the first BSO Council of Friends and planned many 
successful Symphony events, chairing the first BSO Ball and leading Friends of the 
BSO on four BSO European tours. The Fahnestock Chair, endowed in 1970 for the prin- 
cipal second violinist, was the first individually endowed orchestra position. In 1984 the 
Junior Council of the BSO endowed a seat in Symphony Hall in her honor. "She was our 
mentor and the force behind the Junior Council," says Vicki Danberg, who was co- 
chairman of the Council from 1982 to 1984. "Fran worked tirelessly, and thanks to her 
efforts and leadership we were able to accomplish a great deal." It was the first and 
only time the Junior Council of the BSO endowed a seat in someone's honor. Over the 
years Mrs. Fahnestock exhibited a deep concern for the members of the Boston Sym- 
phony Orchestra, many of whom remember her as a Trustee who cared about them not 
only as musicians but as people. 

Fran Fahnestock had a long, dedicated career in philanthropy. She served as a Trustee 
to numerous institutions, including the Wang Center, the Boston Opera Association, and 
the Visiting Nurse Association. She served as vice-president of Emerson Hospital in Con- 
cord and was also a corporation member of Massachusetts General Hospital. 

As a descendant of Peregrine White, the first baby born on the Mayflower, Frances 
Jeffery Fahnestock was a past president of the National Society of the Colonial Dames 
of America in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, and First Lady of Dumbarton in 
Washington, D.C. Her devotion to and philanthropic leadership in the Boston cultural 
and medical communities mark her as an extraordinary woman, one whose energy and 
love for life and others remain an inspiration to all of us who knew her. 



14 



Morton Gould 

Suite from the ballet Fall River Legend 




Morton Gould was born in New York City on December 
10, 1913, and died in Orlando, Florida, on February 
21, 1996. He composed his ballet Fall River Legend 
for Agnes DeMille in 1947; the first performance took 
place under the auspices of the Ballet Theater at the 
old Metropolitan Opera House, New York, on April 22, 
1948. That same year, Gould extracted a suite compris- 
ing slightly under half of the score. Pierre Monteux 
conducted the San Francisco Symphony in the first per- 
formance on January 6, 1949. These are the first per- 
formances by the Boston Symphony Orchestra. The score 
of the suite calls for two flutes (one doubling piccolo), 
two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons, four horns, two 
trumpets, three trombones, timpani, and strings. 

He was an American composer who wrote for the concert hall and the theater, in 
popular and serious styles. He composed Broadway shows. He was a media personality 
(on the radio). He was a superb pianist who enjoyed the trick of taking audience requests 
and working them up into a fugue or some other complex but satisfying piece. He was 
a gifted conductor and recording artist. There are those who maintain that the finest 
recording ever made of Gershwin's Rhapsody in Blue features him as both conductor 
and soloist. If asked to name the artist who had such wide-ranging talents, most people 
would likely pick Leonard Bernstein, and, indeed, there are surprising correspondences. 
Like the more famous and more flamboyant Bernstein, whose life his own enfolded 
chronologically, Morton Gould touched American musical life with vigor, energy, and 
imagination. He understood the full range of American music-making, and he made 
much of it his own. Like Bernstein, his more popular "light" works, such as the Latin- 
American Symphonette or American Salute or the Pavane from his American Sympho- 
nette No. 2 — all the product of his radio days in the 1940s — sometimes blinded audi- 
ences to the fact that he was a serious musician of substance, though his quality was 
recognized at the end of his long and fruitful life when he received the 1994 Pulitzer 
Prize for his Stringmusic. 

Gould's profile as a composer of "popular" music almost kept him from writing one 
of his most famous scores. When Agnes DeMille was looking for a collaborator for a 
ballet about America's favorite non-political murder, the Lizzie Borden case, she nearly 
rejected the proposal that she contact Gould because she only knew his popular radio 
work. 

It is entirely fitting that the earliest inkling the young Morton Gould gave of his mu- 
sical talents should be connected with a quintessentially American composition. On 
Armistice Day, November 11, 1918, the child — not quite five years old — heard a brass 
band playing Sousa's Stars and Stripes Forever! and astonished his parents by playing 
out the tune on the piano without a mistake. Music lessons were clearly called for. At 
eight he received a scholarship to the Institute of Musical Art (later renamed the Juil- 
liard School). At fifteen he saw his first composition, a piano suite, published, and the 
following year he performed a recital of his own music. The Depression changed what- 
ever plans he had to conquer the concert hall. He urgently needed to eat, and he took a 
job playing the piano for vaudeville acts, including his own stunt routines. He arranged 
music for others, becoming supremely skilled at orchestration and at turning fragile 
ideas into satisfying sounds. By the mid- 1930s he was composing, conducting, and 
arranging for the radio while also enjoying the opportunity to hear some of his works 
played by major orchestras in their concert series. He conducted the Boston Symphony 




15 



Week 15 



in December 1945 in a program consisting entirely of his own works, an event virtually 
unheard-of for an American composer at that time. 

It was no doubt his long experience in vaudeville and on the radio that confirmed 
Gould in his conviction that the composer's first duty was to communicate with his 
audience, whether the music in question was light or serious. And he did so as an un- 
abashed American, not apologizing for the popular traditions of our music, but joyfully 
and enthusiastically reshaping it into his own. As Schima Kaufman wrote in the Ameri- 
can Mercury, he created "an individual native musical language which is not a mixture 
of classical and jive but rather jazz-become-classical." And to his great surprise, many 
of the pieces he composed for a popular radio broadcast, with the idea that they would 
have no further life, began turning up on concert programs. 

To the very end of his long life, Gould found inspiration in America's music, from 
Sousa's marches and nineteenth-century minstrelsy to jazz and swing and Latin tunes 
and even (in one of his last works, The Jogger and the Dinosaur, composed in collabo- 
ration with two of his grandsons) rap. He was also a significant musical citizen, serving 
leadership roles with the American Symphony Orchestra League and nearly a decade 
as the president of ASCAP (the American Society of Composers, Authors, and Publish- 



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ers). Even at the age of eighty-two his death seemed untimely (he was actively at work 
on new pieces, including a piano concerto), but it came in the midst of a successful 
residency at the Disney Institute in Florida, quietly, during the night, after a successful 
concert of his music. And however sad the loss, the years immediately following the 
death of an important figure in our cultural life give an impetus to reconsidering the 
amazing range of his work. 

From the very beginning Fall River Legend has been regarded as one of the high 
points of Gould's output. In a 1990 conversation between Gould and the choreographer 
Agnes DeMille (taped and included on a recording of the full ballet score), DeMille 
explained that the conductor Max Goberman had recomended Gould as the composer 
and overcame her doubts: he could compose in any style, he could write tunes, and he 
could orchestrate beautifully. The two artists fleshed out the scenario over a long lunch 
at the Russian Tea Room. As DeMille recalled it, she was satisfied with about three- 
quarters of her scenario, but she was worried about the ending. How should they deal 
with the question of Lizzie Borden's guilt in the murder of her father and stepmother? 
The historical Lizzie was acquitted, though most authorities remain convinced that she 
was guilty. Gould suggested that, in the ballet, she should be hanged, arguing that this 
was justifiable poetic license and added that he could easily write "hanging music," 



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whereas it would be difficult to attempt "acquittal music and acquittal choreography." 
(In any case, neither the murders nor the hanging are explicitly represented on the 
stage in the choreography.) 

From the start the ballet was a great success; it has remained one of Gould's most 
frequently-performed theatrical works, and one of the most highly regarded of DeMille's 
creations. For the orchestral suite, which comprises somewhat under half the score, 
Gould chose to emphasize the set pieces, the ensemble dances, which suggest the time 
and place in which the story occurs. He eliminated most of the "psychological" and 
mimetic music associated with Lizzie's increasing unhappiness, her decision to murder, 
and her punishment, though enough of that music is retained to indicate the darker 
side of the score. 

The ballet and the suite open with a brief Prologue, a brutal, assertive statement 
of the music that will be associated with the gallows. (In the full ballet, the prologue 
music continues to unfold quietly under the voice of a speaker who reads the indict- 
ment against Lizzie Borden.) We then move back into the past. The adult Lizzie is 
present, an observer of her own history, but powerless to change the course of events. 
She sees first her childlike self — danced by a younger woman — happily living with 
her father and mother. This occurs to the music of Waltzes, which sets the tone of the 
period (the early 1890s) and the innocence of childhood (indicated in part by a brief 
quotation of "Chopsticks"). But Lizzie's mother collapses; she must be taken home. 
The next scene (Elegy) begins as a tender pas de deux of the two parents, later joined 
by young Lizzie and the invisible adult Lizzie, who observes the tenderness of the fam- 
ily group, then watches as her mother suffers a second attack and is carried into the 
house. The other dancers dress the adult Lizzie in black for mourning, and we realize 
that her mother has died. She has only her mother's shawl as a memory of her. Soon 
another woman from the town comes to console the grieving father. She takes the shawl 
from Lizzie, making it clear that she will soon marry the widower Borden. 




Morton Gould at work in a CBS radio studio 



19 



Week 15 




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The suite skips past the music of the next few scenes, in which it becomes clear that 
the father prefers the company of his new wife to that of his daughter, and Lizzie is left 
in an emotionless vacuum. (At this point the dancer representing the mature Lizzie takes 
over in the ballet and the younger dancer disappears from the scene.) The new couple 
lives a life that offers only suffocating boredom for Lizzie. The stepmother begins to 
hint that Lizzie is not quite right in the head. Lizzie meets the understanding Pastor, 
and for a time it seems as if they will form a supportive relationship, but the parents 
order Lizzie back into the house. She goes to a rear door and reenters with an ax. The 
music builds to a climactic sinister mood as the father and stepmother express fear at 
this sudden, apparently violent, apparition. Lizzie had merely intended to chop fire- 
wood (which she proceeds to do) but is carried away in laughter at her parents' obvious 
fear; we realize that a terrible idea has begun to germinate in her mind. She caresses 
the handle of the ax, as one would a child; it represents for her the opportunity to live 
and be free. The Pastor arrives to invite her to the church social. He is almost deterred 
by the whispers of the stepmother about Lizzie's mental condition, but once he is left 
alone with the younger woman again, he repeats the invitation and they head off to the 
church. 

Here the suite continues. The Church Social (omitted at these performances) is 
a large ensemble dance in which Gould captures the mood and spirit of a small New 
England town with intimations of folk tunes and hymnody, yet without ever using a bor- 
rowed melody. Lizzie is welcomed to join the throng of dancers. In the ensuing Hymnal 
Variations she dances with the pastor, a pas de deux that grows more and more intense, 
as if — in Agnes DeMille's conception — he were fighting for her soul as well as her heart. 
The entire congregation joins in the joyous Cotillion. 

But Lizzie's stepmother arrives; she again begins whispering about Lizzie's mental 
disturbances and persuades the Pastor to let her take Lizzie home. The next sections, 
which encompass the gory climax of the ballet, are not included in the suite. When she 
reaches home, Lizzie heads straight for the ax, covering it with her skirt, then suddenly 
revealing it, to the terror of her parents. Lizzie covers her face, contorted in anguish, as 
there is a sudden blackout. The "Death Dance" is a kind of dream sequence. The back- 
drop is changed to show the three rocking chairs in the Borden household standing in a 
pool of blood. Lizzie dances with the spirit of her dead mother, trying to hide the blood- 
stains on her petticoat. The mother forces her to reveal them, then slaps her hand and 
leaves her; Lizzie must face the consequences of her action alone. The next scene be- 
gins in utter silence. The townspeople have gathered outside, having heard strange 
noises. Lizzie appears from the back room and stares at them through the window; they 
stare back. She slowly opens the door and, her face making a soundless scream, rushes 
off. Instantly the orchestra explodes in the "Mob Scene" as the crowd rushes in and 
discovers (offstage) the bodies of Lizzie's father and stepmother. She is brought back 
and confronted with the ax and the bloodstained shawl. The house is slowly dismantled 
and converted into the gallows. 

The suite concludes with the Epilogue. The crowd slowly disappears, leaving Lizzie 
alone with the Pastor as the orchestra recalls the passages of her life leading up to this 
moment. Finally she is left all alone, confronting the gallows, and we hear once more 
the brutal orchestral cry with which the ballet opened. A dark final roll on the timpani 
brings Lizzie to face her own death as the ballet ends. 

— Steven Ledbetter 



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Aaron Copland 

Clarinet Concerto 

Aaron Copland was born in Brooklyn, New York, on 
November 14, 1900, and died in Peekskill, New York, 
on December 2, 1 990. He began his Clarinet Concerto 
in 1947 but composed most of the work during the 
summer of 1948. It was commissioned by Benny 
Goodman, who gave the first performance on November 
6, 1 950, in a radio broadcast with the NBC Symphony 
Orchestra, Fritz Reiner conducting. Copland himself 
conducted the first Boston Symphony performance, on 
July 24, 1970, at Tanglewood, with Gervase de Peyer as 
soloist. Harold Wright was soloist in all subsequent 
BSO performances: subscription performances under 
Joseph Silverstein in October/November 1975, three out- 
of-town performances that November under Seiji Ozawa, 
and a Tanglewood performance with Copland leading a program of his own music on 
July 5, 1980, to celebrate the fortieth anniversary of the Tanglewood Music Center (then 
called the Berkshire Music Center). In addition to the soloist, the score calls for a string 
orchestra including harp and piano. 

Early in his career Copland had adopted some of the rhythmic elements and charac- 
teristic sonorities of jazz in order to sound more "American." In such works as Music 
for the Theatre of 1925 he translated the "feel" of the popular stage of the day — vaude- 
ville and charming "book" musicals with great songs and brainless plots — into a tasty 
concert piece that challenged the symphony orchestras called upon to play it, because 
almost all of the musicians were Europeans of the old school with no feeling for the 
syncopations of American popular music. 

During the '30s, Copland found other ways of creating an American sound, mostly 
through the employment of folk songs and fragments in his popular ballets Billy the 
Kid, Rodeo, and Appalachian Spring. But he returned quite naturally to his jazzy licks 
when writing a piece for a great jazz musician, clarinetist Benny Goodman. After mak- 
ing his mark as a jazzman, Goodman began to take an interest in classical music as 
well, playing the Mozart concerto and other standard repertory works for his instrument. 
When he decided to commission a new piece, he wanted the best composer available. 
Various musical advisors were unanimous in suggesting Copland. 

Copland, an inveterate traveler, began the score in Rio de Janeiro late in 1947, but 
he finished it during his sixth season of teaching at Tanglewood during the summer of 
1948. Goodman found it a challenge, especially in the lively syncopated parts, which 
move in ways rather different from the jazz he was accustomed to. But his loving per- 
formance (and the superb recording he made) quickly established the concerto as a 
popular modern favorite. 

Structurally, the work is simplicity itself: two movements (slow, then fast) linked by 
a solo cadenza. The first movement is graceful and songful, cast in broad but gentle 
musical arches. The cadenza introduces some jazzy elements that are then fully ex- 
ploited in the faster second movement. 

— S.L. 



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Week 15 



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William Schuman 

Symphony No. 3 

William Howard Schuman was born in New York City 
on August 4, 1910, and died there on February 15, 
1 992. He composed the Third Symphony in late 1 940, 
completing it in Larchmont, New York, on January 11, 
1941. The symphony bears the dedication "For Serge 
Koussevitzky," and was given its first performance on 
October 1 7 that same year by the Boston Symphony 
Orchestra with Koussevitzky conducting. Later BSO 
performances were given by Richard Burgin, Pierre 
Monteux, Erich Leinsdorf Seiji Ozawa (the most recent 
subscription performances, in October 1980), and Den- 
nis Russell Davies (the most recent Tanglewood perform- 
ance, on August 4, 1990, the composer's eightieth 
birthday). The symphony is scored for two flutes (one 
doubling piccolo), two oboes and English horn, two clarinets, E-flat clarinet, and bass 
clarinet, two bassoons, four horns, four trumpets, four trombones, tuba, timpani, snare 
drum, cymbals, bass drum, xylophone, and strings. Also listed in the score as "Optional, 
but very desirable" are third flute (doubling second piccolo), third clarinet, third bas- 
soon, contrabassoon, an additional four horns, and piano. 

There is no surprise when an American boy shows a passionate interest in baseball. 
Nor was it unusual for a teenager in the 1920s to discover an interest in music and form 
a jazz band for which he would write and arrange popular-style tunes. We might expect 
that "Billy Schuman and his Alamo Society Orchestra" might, with luck and persever- 
ance and a repertory of original songs — including several written in collaboration with 
Frank Loesser — have developed into one of the successful dance bands of the day. But 
who would have imagined in early 1930 that this boy, almost twenty, would within a 
decade appear as one of America's most promising symphonic composers? Or that he 
would pursue a career of rare distinction as composer, educator, and administrator, be- 
coming (among other things) president of the Juilliard School and the first president of 
Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts? And that he would produce, in the course of 
his distinguished career, ten symphonies, numerous concertos, choral works, chamber 
music, and even an opera about baseball? 

The surprising transmutation occurred because William Schuman agreed reluctantly 
to go with his sister to a Carnegie Hall concert on April 4, 1930, at which Toscanini 
led the New York Philharmonic in music by Wagner, Kodaly, and his near-namesake 
Robert Schumann. The powerful effect of that experience — seeing the massed strings 
bowing uniformly, hearing the sonorous brasses, reveling in the infinitely varied sonori- 
ties — convinced the young man that he had to compose symphonic music. He was un- 
deterred by the fact that he had not yet even begun the most basic study of music theo- 
ry. With characteristic energy and determination he plowed right in, finding teachers 
who could teach what he wanted to know and listening to a great deal of music. 

He quickly became a master of contrapuntal techniques, of technical skills that are 
evident in all of his symphonic works. Perhaps it is not too fanciful to suggest that 
Schuman's early mastery of counterpoint may be in some way related to his experience 
in composing for a teenage band without a score; he had to keep an entire work in his 
head while teaching each member of the ensemble his own part. Such long-range think- 
ing was surely the foundation of his sense of musical architecture, which is so brilliant- 
ly displayed in the Third Symphony. 

The emergence of the young William Schuman in the late 1930s was largely due to 
the perceptiveness of Serge Koussevitzky. Prompted by a word from Aaron Copland, 



■ 












25 



Week 15 




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Koussevitzky programmed Schuman's Second Symphony. Though it was not a great suc- 
cess with the critics and audiences — one radio listener wrote, "Your symphony made 
me lose my faith in the power of aspirin tablets" — Koussevitzky retained faith in him. 
His next work, the American Festival Overture, was an instant success. Koussevitzky 
requested a new piece; this was Schuman's Third Symphony, the earliest of his ten 
symphonies that he later recognized (the first two were withdrawn and have not been 
performed since the 1930s). Its premiere brought the composer the highest praise and 
the first award in music ever given by the recently founded New York Critics Circle. 

One of the first things that is clear from a hearing of Schuman's music is that he is a 
true symphonist — not a composer who strings together unrelated melodies in a kind of 
potpourri, but rather one who builds from the smallest, most abstract musical bricks and 
mortar an edifice planned on a grand scale, never losing sight of the main goal even in 
the swirl of richly elaborate detail. Moreover he handles his instrument — the orches- 
tra — in a way that is characteristic and recognizable. He loves to write for the instru- 
ments in family groups, resulting in a rich impasto of pure woodwind sound, or brass, 
or strings. His basic approach is melodic. Indeed, it is common for his symphonies to 
begin with a soaring, chromatic arch of cantabile melody exposing the essential ideas 
from which the rest of the piece is to be built. 

The Third Symphony is in two large movements, each subdivided into two parts: 
Passacaglia and Fugue, Chorale and Toccata. The terms refer to time-honored Baroque 
forms, but there is nothing academic about the way Schuman employs them. He proba- 
bly chose these genres because they are traditionally contrapuntal, an approach he found 
congenial. The Passacaglia theme, exposed at once in the violas, is typically Schuman- 
esque, featuring large leaps with gaps filled in by smaller ones, not repeating itself any- 
where, and reaching a single climactic high note. The melodic intervals function as the 
building blocks for all the thematic ideas in the symphony: octave-leaps, successive 
fourths producing a seventh, upward-soaring sixths. The Passacaglia begins with a 




Serge Koussevitzky and William Schuman in 1944 



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canon, each part entering seven measures after the preceding voice and a half-step 
higher, so that the entries climb through half an octave, from E to B-flat, leading to a 
series of variations that culminate without break in the Fugue. Its theme, constructed 
of the same motivic material as the Passacaglia, is first presented in violas, cellos, and 
horns. Each fugal entry begins a half-step higher than the preceding one, so that we 
move by semitones from B-flat to E, thus completing the octave rise begun in the Pas- 
sacaglia. Since no voice drops out after entering, the result is a massive structure in 
seven real parts, a contrapuntal tour de force, most astonishing for the fact that Schu- 
man's scoring keeps all this activity clear when it could become hopelessly muddled. 
After an interlude for four trumpets, a more tranquil, lyrical version of the theme gen- 
erates a new, lighter fugal section, which builds to the movement's climax, with trum- 
pets and horns playing a harmonized version of the original fugue theme, freely aug- 
mented, against the more lyrical variant in the trombones and basses. 

The second movement, like the first, begins rather slowly and quietly before build- 
ing to a sonorous conclusion. The Chorale is an original melody constructed out of the 
same intervals as the Passacaglia and Fugue, though rather squarer in its phrasing, 
like a hymn tune. The full tune is first played by the trumpet, after which several vari- 
ations wind down to a soft conclusion that leads without pause in the Toccata, a hell- 
for-leather orchestral showpiece that begins with its own theme (still derived from the 
Passacaglia) but gradually brings together elements from other parts of the symphony. 

Practically all of Schuman's symphonies are conceived purely as abstract musical 
compositions, without programmatic elements. Still, it is impossible to hear the Third 
without being aware that the music is tremendously affirmative. It is also, in the best 
sense of the phrase, a symphony very much of its time. That time, 1940-41, was a peri- 
od of darkening portents for the whole world; Europe was at war, and many people 
wondered how long America could stay out of it. Perhaps subconsciously, William 
Schuman responded to the mood of the day with a "heroic symphony" — not a piece of 
jingoistic flag-waving, but a reminder that the qualities of decisive commitment and 
courage have been among the most attractive elements of the American character in 
times of danger. Yet he did not write a symphony limited to its time, but rather a sturdy 
expressive structure to which we can still respond with recognition of things often for- 
gotten. And in so doing, he composed a work that can rank with but a handful of others 
as contenders for the title of "the great American symphony." 

— S.L. 




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George Gershwin 

Rhapsody in Blue 

George Gershwin was born in Brooklyn, New York, on 
September 26, 1898, and died in Hollywood, California, 
on July 11, 1937. He composed Rhapsody in Blue early 
in 1924 and played the piano part at the first perform- 
ance, which took place on February 12, 1924, in Aeol- 
ian Hall, New York, with Paul Whiteman and his Band. 
Ferde Grofe scored the work for the Whiteman Band 
and also later produced the full orchestra version. These 
are the first subscription performances by the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra, though the orchestra has previ- 
ously performed the work at Tanglewood: twice with 
pianist Earl Wild and Arthur Fiedler conducting, in 
August 1959 as part of "Tanglewood on Parade" and 
later in August 1974; twice on July Fourth, with Andre 
Watts under Seiji Ozawas direction in 1976 and then with Michael Tilson Thomas as 
both soloist and conductor in the original jazz-band version; with Christopher O'Riley 
under the direction of John Williams as part of "Tanglewood on Parade" in August 1990; 
and most recently last summer, on July 26, 1996, with Seiji Ozawa conducting Marcus 
Roberts and a group of supporting jazz musicians in something rather different, Roberts's 
own adaptation of the score. In the version for full orchestra, besides the solo piano, the 
score calls for an orchestra of two clarinets in B-flat (first doubling oboe, second dou- 
bling bass clarinet), two alto saxophones in E-flat (first doubling soprano sax in B-flat, 
second doubling baritone sax in E-flat), tenor saxophone in B-flat (doubling clarinet in 
E-flat), two horns, two trumpets, two trombones, timpani, snare drum, bass drum, bells, 
gong, suspended cymbal, crash cymbals, eight violins, banjo, bass/tuba, celesta, and 
orchestral piano. 

A perpetual debate of the '20s revolved around the subject of jazz. Was it good 
music? (Some even asked if it was music at all.) Could it be employed in traditional 
classical forms and media? Did listening to jazz bring about the inevitable corruption 
of taste, the destruction of the home, and immorality of every kind? Most established 
composers, with their European training, had a simple answer: jazz was not good music; 
listening to it tended to destroy all that was wholesome and uplifting in western cul- 
ture. A few composers of traditional training were more open-minded, though. Charles 
Martin Loeffler, the Alsatian-American composer who had been assistant concertmas- 
ter of the BSO for twenty years before the turn of the century, haunted nightspots with 
his young friend George Gershwin whenever Gershwin was in Boston for the opening of 
a new show, and he even tried his hand at some jazz-tinged chamber music. Still earli- 
er the Frenchman Darius Milhaud had produced a scandalously successful ballet, La 
Creation du monde, employing musical elements picked up in Harlem in the early 
years of the decade. But probably the man most responsible for making jazz respect- 
able to white audiences was Paul Whiteman, who thus served much the same function 
that Elvis Presley later did with respect to rock 'n roll. Whiteman was not a real jazz- 
man himself, but he was a solid musician who wanted to use whatever was new in the 
world of popular music. Not the least of his contributions to our musical life was the 
encouragement of "symphonic jazz," which produced the first concert success by 
George Gershwin, Rhapsody in Blue. And that success in turn began to set Gershwin 
thinking of working in larger forms and produced, in addition to his string of hit shows 
and wonderful songs, such works as the Concerto in F, An American in Paris, and 
Porgy and Bess. 

Some time in the fall of 1923, Whiteman told Gershwin that he wanted to produce 
a concert that would celebrate the rapprochement between symphonic music and jazz, 



31 



Week 15 




© 1995 Simplex Time Recorder Co 



32 



and that he expected a contribution from Gershwin — who promptly forgot about the 
conversation, only to be suddenly reminded on January 3, 1924. George was playing 
pool with Buddy DeSylva (of the songwriting team DeSylva, Brown and Henderson) 
while Ira was reading the Herald Tribune when he suddenly came across an announce- 
ment of Whiteman's concert, "An Experiment in Modern Music," to be given in New 
York's Aeolian Hall on February 12. According to the paper, George would produce a 
"jazz concerto" for the event. Whiteman had been the conductor of the 1922 George 
White s Scandals for which Gershwin had written a one-act opera entitled Blue Monday, 
his first attempt to create a theatrical work with African-American characters, an idea 
later to be so richly developed in Porgy and Bess. Though Blue Monday was a flop with 
the audience (it was much too serious for a frivolous revue like the Scandals), it made 
a deep impression on Whiteman, who regarded Gershwin as the man of the hour. 

Whiteman's concert, so the announcement ran, would involve a committee of judges 
whose task it would be to pass on the question, "What is American music?" (Ironical- 
ly — but typically for the time — not one of the judges was American; they included 
Sergei Rachmaninoff, Jascha Heifetz, Efrem Zimbalist, and Alma Gluck.) Given the 
shortness of time, and Gershwin's limited experience in scoring his works, Whiteman 
offered the services of his arranger, Ferde Grofe, to orchestrate the new work as it was 
being composed. 

At the time, Gershwin was busily putting the finishing touches on a show called 
Sweet Little Devil, which was due to open in New York on January 21. The Rhapsody 
took shape in his mind as he was traveling to Boston for the show's out-of-town tryout. 

I had already done some work on the rhapsody. It was on the train, with its steely 
rhythms, its rattle-ty bang that is often so stimulating to a composer. . . I frequently 
hear music in the very heart of noise. And there I suddenly heard — and even saw 
on paper — the complete construction of the rhapsody, from beginning to end. No 
new themes came to me, but I worked on the thematic material already in mind 
and tried to conceive the composition as a whole. I heard it as a sort of musical 
kaleidoscope of America — of our vast melting pot, of our unduplicated national 
pep, of our blues, our metropolitan madness. By the time I reached Boston, I had 
a definite plot of the piece, as distinguished from its actual substance. 

Later, at a party in New York, Gershwin was improvising on the piano — as he invari- 
ably did at social gatherings — when, as he later said, "I heard myself playing a theme 
that must have been haunting me inside, seeking outlet. [It] oozed out of my fingers." 
Ira, who was becoming not only Gershwin's closest collaborator on lyrics, but also his 
best listener, encouraged him to use this theme as the lyrical climax of the work, a real 
contrast to the jazziness of the opening. Later on, though, when he was convinced that 
he had found what he wanted, Gershwin carefully notated all the details of the solo 
part. 

The famous opening clarinet glissando actually predated the rest of the composition. 
Whiteman's clarinetist Ross Gorman had developed the trick of playing a two-octave 
upward glissando, something that had been believed impossible before. Gershwin had 
already been captivated by this sound, which was familiar from the Jewish klezmer tra- 
dition. He had attempted to notate it in one of his sketchbooks, and early on he thought 
of it as the perfect opening for the work. 

Time was so short that Gershwin left a number of the solo piano spots blank, to be 
improvised in the performance (Whiteman's score simply said "wait for nod.") And 
Victor Herbert, who had a piece of his own on the concert (his last work to be performed 
publicly, since he died suddenly just three months later), was present at the rehearsals 
and made a suggestion that Gershwin accepted. Just before the appearance of the big 
tune, the romantic E major melody that is the heart of the Rhapsody, there was a tran- 
sition in which the piano simply repeated a rising passage in contrary motion. Herbert 



33 



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suggested that, instead of a sterile repetition, a climactic rise to a fermata would be a 
more effective way of introducing the new theme. Gershwin accepted the suggestion, 
and the passage was changed to the version we know today.* Though Whiteman had 
announced a "concerto," Gershwin decided that it would be better to follow the freer 
form of the rhapsody. The score plays with the ambivalence between major and minor, 
with choices of notes called "blue" from their use in the traditional singing style of the 
blues, which hover between major and minor and sometimes right in between. The prev- 
alence of "blue" notes and the rhapsodic ground plan of the work suggested to Ira the 
title that George gratefully accepted: Rhapsody in Blue — the first word redolent of the 
European tradition, the remainder instantly evocative of modern America. 

Whiteman's Aeolian Hall concert was billed as one of the major new musical events 
of the season, and the glittering audience included just about every musical dignitary 
in New York that week. But the event was much too long, and as it dragged on and on 
it began to appear that Whiteman's "Experiment in Modern Music" was a bust. Victor 
Herbert's Suite of Serenades, at the beginning of the second half, aroused the greatest 
interest to that point on the program, though it was not in any sense a jazz composition, 
but rather a series of clever "characteristic" pieces scored for jazz orchestra. Rhapsody 
in Blue came next-to-last on the program, when the audience was more than a little 
restive. Gershwin strode out to the piano and nodded to Whiteman; the performance 
began with Ross Gorman's clarinet "wail." The effect was electrifying. This was some- 
thing really new, and everyone recognized it at once. The audience response at the end 
was rapturous. Critical response in the press ranged from enthusiastic to highly nega- 
tive, but the work was performed repeatedly that spring, and by June 10 Gershwin and 
the Whiteman band had already committed the first version to disc (in slightly abridged 
form). The Rhapsody has remained the most frequently performed of comparable con- 
temporary scores, despite persistent nagging criticisms of its loose structure. The com- 
poser himself, when Irving Kolodin asked him a decade later whether he didn't think 
he could work it over and improve it, replied, "I don't know; people seemed to like it 
the way it was, so I left it that way." 

— S.L. 



*There is something particularly touching in this incident. Victor Herbert, the last great figure of 
an earlier generation of American popular music — his career had begun when he played for Liszt 
in the 1880s and spent a year in the Strauss orchestra in Vienna — was a man of great generosity 
who recognized and welcomed Gershwin's talent; he even offered him free lessons in orchestra- 
tion, which the younger man was not yet ready to accept. But by the time Gershwin was interested 
in pursuing that skill, Herbert had died. 



35 



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More . . . 

There is as yet no biographical or critical study of the work of Morton Gould, with the 
exception of an unpublished 1978 doctoral dissertation by Lee Evans, who wrote the 
article on Gould for The New Grove Dictionary of American Music. There are two com- 
plete recordings of the ballet Fall River Legend. The earlier grew out of stage perform- 
ances, with Milton Rosenstock, the conductor of the 1983 production by the Dance 
Theater of Harlem, leading the National Philharmonic; actor Brock Peters reads the 
indictment (Albany). This recording also contains a twenty-seven-minute conversation 
between Morton Gould and Agnes DeMille in which the two creators of the ballet remi- 
nisce about its composition and first production. The other complete recording was 
made by the late Andrew Schenk with the New Zealand Symphony (Koch International, 
with Randall Thompson's Symphony No. 1). The composer himself recorded the suite 
from the ballet with his own orchestra (RCA, with his Latin-American Symphonette , 
Interplay for piano and orchestra, and the Declaration Suite). 

Copland, working with scholar Vivian Perlis, produced an unusual autobiography in 
two volumes: Copland: 1900 through 1942 and Copland Since 1943 (St. Martin's). It is 
an oral history, based on many taped interviews. The result is a witty, friendly, person- 
able (though not deeply personal) story that gives a clear-eyed view of the public man 
and musician, amplified by reminiscences from many of his colleagues and friends. For 
musical discussion, Arthur Berger's short book Copland remains a classic; it does not 
deal with works written after the early 1950s, but it is exceptionally knowledgeable 
and appreciative. Quite technical issues are treated in a surprisingly accessible man- 
ner (would that all books about music said so much so easily!). Neil Butterworth's The 
Music of Copland is a more up-to-date discussion of the composer's entire output, though 
its musical insights are far less penetrating than Berger's. Pride of place among record - 







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ings of the Clarinet Concerto naturally goes to the one by Benny Goodman, who commis- 
sioned the piece and first played and recorded it. His performance, with the composer 
conducting the Columbia Symphony Orchestra, is available on a CBS compact disc, 
where it is joined by four other significant Goodman performances: Bartok's Contrasts, 
with Bartok and Joseph Szigeti; Bernstein's Prelude, Fugue, and Riffs, Morton Gould's 
Derivations, and Stravinsky's Ebony Concerto. Other recordings of note include those 
of Stanley Drucker with the New York Philharmonic conducted by Leonard Bernstein 
(Deutsche Grammophon, an all-Copland disc also including Connotations, Music for the 
Theatre, and El Salon Mexico); David Schifrin with the New York Chamber Symphony 
led by Gerard Schwarz (Angel, with Copland's Dance Panels, Music for the Theatre, and 
Quiet City); and Richard Stoltzman and the London Symphony Orchestra conducted by 
Lawrence Leighton Smith (RCA, with Bernstein's Prelude, Fugue, and Riffs, John Corig- 
liano's Clarinet Concerto, and Stravinsky's Ebony Concerto). 

It is high time for a full-length study of William Schuman and his music, but for the 
moment there are only a few brief essays, beginning with Bruce Saylor's article on the 
composer in The New Grove Dictionary of American Music and a short but informative 
booklet by composer Christopher Rouse entitled William Schuman Documentary, issued 
by Schuman's publishers, Theodore Presser Co. and G. Schirmer. It contains a brief 
biography current to the composer's seventieth birthday and a detailed catalogue of his 
works and recordings. This replaces the earlier short book brought out by G. Schirmer 
in 1954, which, however, remains the single most useful publication about Schuman. 
Its biographical portion, by Flora Rheta Schreiber, is somewhat fuller in detail (though, 
of course, ending in the 1950s); the fine musical discussion by Vincent Persichetti 
traces the principal elements of the composer's style and analyzes five works in some 
detail — the American Festival Overture, Symphony No. 3, Symphony for Strings, Under- 
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40 



the composer's early period. Nathan Broder's article "The Music of William Schuman" 
in The Musical Quarterly for 1945 also provides a clear introduction to his earlier mu- 
sic. The only available recording of the Third Symphony — fortunately a magnificent 
one — is by Leonard Bernstein with the New York Philharmonic (Deutsche Grammo- 
phon, coupled with Roy Harris's Third Symphony). 

There have been many popularized writings about George Gershwin, but the most 
substantial biography to date remains the one by Edward Jablonski, Gershwin: A Biog- 
raphy (Doubleday). The fullest discussion of the composer's work is Steven Gilbert's 
The Music of Gershwin (Yale), which is filled with insightful analyses, though its Schen- 
kerian graphs and technical terminology will be daunting to those untrained in the ap- 
proach. A very readable discussion of the lifelong collaboration between Gershwin and 
his brother Ira is Deena Rosenberg's Fascinating Rhythm: The Collaboration of George 
and Ira Gershwin (Dutton, available as a Plume paperback). Rhapsody in Blue is surely 
the most frequently-recorded American composition ever written. Gershwin himself 
made early recordings, both acoustically and on piano rolls. His 1927 recording with 
the Whiteman band — the original version of the piece — is available in a two-disc Pearl 
set containing much other historical material as well: An American in Paris, the Con- 
certo in F, excerpts from Porgy and Bess, and the three piano Preludes. The piano-roll 
version has also been recorded with a live modern ensemble, to give the impression of 
a "live" Gershwin performance in high-fidelity sound; the first conductor to do this was 
Michael Tilson Thomas with the Columbia Jazz Band (CBS, with other Gershwin selec- 
tions). One historical performance, unlikely on the face of it, but fascinating, is a 1942 
Toscanini broadcast with Earl Wild as the superb soloist and Benny Goodman playing 
the opening clarinet glissando (and, unfortunately, missing the top note); despite Good- 
man's "live" error, the rest of the performance is of considerable interest (Vintage Jazz 
Classics, with live Toscanini performances of An American in Paris and the Concerto in 
F with Oscar Levant, plus three jazz tracks featuring Benny Goodman). Wild was also 
the soloist in a highly-regarded recording by Arthur Fiedler and the Boston Pops (RCA, 
with other Gershwin scores including the Concerto in F and the Variations on "7 Got 
Rhythm"). Two modern recordings by pianist/conductors with a strong feel for the jazz 
elements of the score cannot be omitted: this week's guest conductor, Andre Previn, is 
both soloist and conductor with the Pittsburgh Symphony (Philips, with An American in 
Paris and the Concerto in F), and Leonard Bernstein fills both roles with the Columbia 
Symphony Orchestra (CBS, with An American in Paris and Grofe's Grand Canyon Suite). 

— S.L. 



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41 



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as author and television host. As guest conductor of the world's major 
and most recorded orchestras, Mr. Previn appears annually with the 
Vienna Philharmonic both in Vienna and at the Salzburg Festival, 
its summer home. In addition he regularly conducts the Boston Sym- 
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Symphony, and San Francisco Symphony, to name but a few. In 1993 
he became Conductor Laureate of the London Symphony Orchestra, of which he was prin- 
cipal conductor for ten years. During the past twenty-five years he has held chief artistic 
posts with the Los Angeles Philharmonic, Pittsburgh Symphony, Royal Philharmonic, Lon- 
don Symphony, and Houston Symphony, touring with several of them worldwide. In the 
1996-97 season, Mr. Previn appears in North America with the Boston Symphony (followed 
by a tour to Florida and the Canary Islands), New York Philharmonic, Pittsburgh Symphony 
(including a tour to the midwestern United States), Curtis Institute Orchestra, and, in a 
series of three Carnegie Hall concerts, the Orchestra of St. Luke's. In Europe, besides con- 








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44 



certs and recordings with the London Symphony and Vienna Philharmonic, he will conduct 
the Munich Philharmonic and NDR Symphony Orchestra of Hamburg and will appear in 
several orchestral and chamber concerts in Cologne. As pianist, Mr. Previn performs and 
records chamber music with a variety of colleagues. With each orchestra of which he has 
been music director he has begun chamber music programs with the orchestral musicians. 
Mr. Previn has recently returned to one of his first loves, jazz, performing and recording 
with jazz bass legend Ray Brown, guitarist Mundell Lowe, and drummer Grady Tate. The 
Andre Previn Jazz Trio has toured Japan, North America, and Europe. Mr. Previn moved 
from his native Berlin to California as a child. He studied composition with Joseph Achron 
and Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco and conducting with Pierre Monteux. Also at this time he 
began his musical and personal friendship with Joseph Szigeti, which imbued him with a 
lifelong interest in chamber music. As a teenager he began to concentrate his efforts on the 
symphonic world in conducting and composition. His compositions include a piano concer- 
to for Vladimir Ashkenazy, a cello sonata for Yo-Yo Ma, vocal works for Dame Janet Baker, 
Kathleen Battle, Barbara Bonney, and Sylvia McNair, a violin sonata for Young Uck Kim, 
a piano and woodwind trio for the St. Luke's Chamber Ensemble, and a music drama, Every 
Good Boy Deserves Favour, written in collaboration with playwright Tom Stoppard. On com- 
mission from San Francisco Opera, Mr. Previn is currently writing an opera based on Ten- 
nessee Williams' A Streetcar Named Desire, to a libretto by Philip Littell, to be premiered 
in San Francisco in September 1998. In 1991 Doubleday released Mr. Previn's memoir, 
"No Minor Chords— My Early Days in Hollywood," chronicling his years as composer, ar- 
ranger, and orchestrator at the MGM Studios. Now an exclusive Deutsche Grammophon 
recording artist, Mr. Previn has recorded extensively for more than thirty years. He has 
appeared regularly as a guest conductor with the Boston Symphony Orchestra since his 
Tanglewood debut in 1977. In January 1996 he was awarded a knighthood (KBE) by Her 
Majesty Queen Elizabeth II. 



■ 



William R. Hudgins 

BSO principal clarinetist William R. Hudgins joined the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra in the fall of 1992 as second clarinet, was act- 
ing assistant principal for the 1993-94 season, and was appointed 
principal clarinet in the summer of 1994. Before joining the Boston 
Symphony he was principal clarinet of the Charleston (SC) Symphony 
Orchestra from 1984 to 1992, and assistant principal and then prin- 
cipal clarinet of the Sinfonica Municipal de Caracas in Venezuela. 
The winner of a CD. Jackson Master Musician Award in 1979 while 
a Tanglewood Music Center Fellow, Mr. Hudgins was a member for 
six seasons of both the Spoleto Festival Orchestra in Charleston, 
South Carolina, and the Festival dei Due Mondi in Spoleto, Italy. Mr. Hudgins received his 
bachelor of music degree from the Boston University School for the Arts, studying mainly 
with the BSO's late principal clarinet Harold Wright, as well as with former BSO clarinetist 
Pasquale Cardillo. His teachers also included members of the Indianapolis and Cincinnati 
symphony orchestras and Jules Serpentini, formerly of the Philadelphia Orchestra. As prin- 
cipal clarinet of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, he is also a member of the Boston Sym- 
phony Chamber Players. 




Boston Symphony Orchestra concertmaster Malcolm Lowe performs on 

a Stradivarius violin loaned to the orchestra hy Lisa, Nicole, and Wanda Reindorf 

in memory of their hrother, Mark Reindorf. 



45 



TJiffi 
■ I ■ ™ 

Hi 

ifinK 



/BOSTON^ 




f SYMPHONY \ nCA r c , . 

loRCHESTKA/ BhU Corporate Sponsorships 

^^ SE1II OZAWA J* 






^^^ 




The Boston Symphony wishes to acknowledge this distinguished group 


of corporations for their outs 


tanding and exemplary support 


of the Orchestra during the 1996 fiscal year. 


FIDELITY INVESTMENTS 


FILENE'S 


MASSACHUSETTS OFFICE 


Tanglewood on Parade 


OF TRAVEL AND TOURISM 




"Evening at Pops" Public Television 


NORTHWEST AIRLINES 


Broadcasts 


Gospel Night at Pops 


NEC CORPORATION 




BSO North American Tour 


ITT SHERATON 




CORPORATION 


FIDELITY INVESTMENTS 


BOSTON SHERATON 


Boston Pops Esplanade Orchestra 


HOTEL AND TOWERS 


Summer Tour 


Boston Pops New Years Eve Concert 


FLEET BANK 




WCVB-TV, HEARST 


BANKBOSTON 


BROADCASTING 


CORPORATION 


WCRB 102.5 FM 


BLUE CROSS AND BLUE 


Salute to Symphony 


SHIELD OF MASSACHUSETTS 


BANK OF BOSTON 


COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER 


Holiday Pops Series 


COMPANY 




FOUR SEASONS HOTEL 


JOHN HANCOCK FUNDS 




Opening Night at Symphony 


INGALLS, QUINN & JOHNSON 


Opening Night at Pops 


JOHN HANCOCK 




FINANCIAL SERVICES 


LEXUS 


NYNEX 


Exclusive Automobile of: 
Opening Night at Symphony and 


MANULIFE FINANCIAL 


Opening Night at Pops 


NORTEL 




PAINEWEBBER 


TDK ELECTRONICS 




CORPORATION 


RAYTHEON COMPANY 


Tanglewood Tickets for Children 


Single Concert Sponsors 


For information on the BSO Corporate Sponsorship Program, contact 


Madelyne Cuddeback, Director of Corporate Sponsorships, 


at (617) 


638-9254. 



46 



Business Leadership Association 

($10,000 and above) 

The support provided by members of the Business Leadership Association is 
instrumental in enabling the Orchestra to pursue its mission of performance, 
training and community outreach. The BSO gratefully acknowledges the following 
organizations for their generous leadership support. 

(The following includes annual, capital, and sponsorship support during the BSO's 
fiscal year beginning September 1, 1995 through August 31, 1996). 



•Wfr«aL* I 



Fidelity Investments 
Edward C. Johnson 3d 



Beethoven Society 

($500,000 and above) 

NEC Corporation 
Hisashi Kaneko 



Massachusetts Office of Travel and Tourism 
Mary Jane McKenna 



BankBoston Corporation 
William M. Crozier, Jr 

John Hancock Funds 
Edward J. Boudreau, Jr. 

LEXUS 
James E. Press 

Massachusetts Cultural Council 
A state agency 



Gold Baton 

($100,000 - $499,999) 

NYNEX 
Donald Reed 

WCRB 102.5 FM 

Cynthia Scullin 



WCVB-TV, Hearst Broadcasting 
Paul La Camera 



Silver Baton 

($75,000 - $99,999) 



Fleet Bank of Massachusetts, N.A. 
Leo Breitman 



Conductor's Circle 

($25,000 - $49,999) 



Blue Cross and Blue Shield of 

Massachusetts 
William C. Van Faasen 

Community Newspaper Company 
William R. Elfers 

ITT Sheraton Corporation 
John Kapioltas 

Manulife Financial 
Dominic DAlessandro 

Northwest Airlines 
Terry M. Leo 



NORTEL 
Robert 0. Nelson 

Paine Webber, Inc. 

Bruce Cameron, Richard F. Connolly, 

Charles T. Harris, Joseph F. Patton, Jr. 

Raytheon Company 
Dennis J. Picard 

Sheraton Boston Hotel & Towers 
Denise Coll 

TDK 

Ken Kihara 



47 



■ 



Principal Player 

($15,000 -$24,999) 



Andersen Consulting LLP 
William D. Green 

BBN Corporation 
George H. Conrades 

Boston Edison Company 
Thomas J. May 

Boston Herald 
Patrick J. Purcell 

Connell Limited Partnership 
William F. Connell 

Coopers & Lybrand LLP 
Francis A. Doyle 

Ernst & Young LLP 

James S. DiStasio 

Essex Investment Management Co., Inc. 
Joseph McNay 



Filene's 

Joseph M. Melvin 

The Gillette Company 
Alfred M. Zeien 

Harcourt General Charitable Foundation 
Richard A. Smith 

John Hancock Financial Services 
William L. Boyan 

Liberty Mutual Group 
Gary L. Countryman 

Royal Appliance Mfg. Co. 
Michael J. Merriman 

Von Hoffman Press, Inc. 
Frank A. Bowman 



Honor Roll 

($10,000 -$14,999) 



Analog Devices, Inc. 
Ray Stata 

Arley Corporation 
David I. Riemer 

Arnold Communications, Inc. 
Ed Eskandarian 

Arthur Andersen LLP 

George Massaro 

Arthur D. Little 
Charles LaMantia 

Bingham, Dana & Gould 
Jay S. Zimmerman 
William A. Bachman 

The Boston Company 
Christopher Condron 

Converse Inc. 
Glenn Rupp 

Deloitte & Touche 
Michael Joyce 

Eastern Enterprises/Boston Gas Company 
/. Atwood Ives 
Chester R. Messer 

EMC Corporation 
Richard Egan 

Hewitt Associates 
Christopher S. Palmer 



Houghton Mifflin Company 
^ader F. Darehshori 

IBM Corporation 
Patricia S. Wolpert 

KPMG Peat Marwick 
Donald B. Holmes 

Loomis Sayles & Company, L.P. 
Mark W. Holland 

Lucent Technologies 
Michael Decelle 

McKinsey & Company 
David Fubini 

Millipore Corporation 
C. William Zadel 

The New England 
Robert A. Shafto 

Sodexho Management Services 

& Creative Gourmets 
Michel Landel 

State Street Bank and Trust Company 
Marshall N. Carter 

The Stop & Shop Foundation 
Avram J. Goldberg 

Thermo Electron Corporation 
Dr. George N. Hatsopoulos 

Watts Industries 
Timothy Home 



48 




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The gardeners grow almost everything rrom rerns to roses 

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Discover all there is to like. 
Call ror a rree brochure or a tour, today. 



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OWNED AND OPERATED BY CARLETON-WILLARD HOMES, INC., A NOT-FOR-PROFIT CORPORATION 







• » 




INVESTMENT TOOLS ARE IMPORTANT FOR 

REACHING A SECURE FINANCIAL FUTURE. 

ALMOST AS IMPORTANT AS KNOWING 

THE BEST WAY TO USE THEM. 

Whatever plans you're making for the future and for those you love, 
Fleet Investment Services can help make them a reality. We start with a full range of 

investment options, but don't stop there. Our Relationship Managers can 
help you focus on your particular financial goals and help you choose the best way 

to get there. With a tradition of service since 1791, and a consistent ranking 

as one of the country's leading investment managers in assets, we have more ways to 

help you do more with your money. To learn more, call Bill Flemer at (617) 346-2165. 



JMFJeet 



INVESTMENT MANAGEMENT 
TRUST AND ESTATE PLANNING SERVICES 



Gifts in Kind 

The Boston Symphony Orchestra extends a special thanks to the following donors for their 
generous contributions of goods and services between September 1, 1995, and August 31, 
1996: 



American Airlines 
Bernie Willett 

Betsy Bassett Photography 
Betsy Bassett 

CAHOOTS 

Carol Lasky 

DAV EL CHAUFFEURED 
TRANSPORTATION NETWORK 

Scott A. Solombrino 

Four Seasons Hotel 
Robin A. Brown 



Hermes 

Jean-Louis Dumas-Hermes 

Ingalls Quinn & Johnson 
Richard C. Garrison 

Sheraton Boston Hotel and Towers 
Denise Coll 

The Syratech Corporation 
Leonard Florence 



>"£ 






BUSINESS LEADERSHIP ASSOCIATION 

(Industry Listing) 

The Boston Symphony Orchestra is pleased to acknowledge the following business 
leaders for their generous contributions of $1,500 or more during the BSO's fiscal 
year ending August 31, 1996. 

Companies contributing $10,000 or more are indicated in bold capital letters; con- 
tributions of $5,000-$9,999 are indicated in capital letters, an asterisk denotes gifts 
of $2,500-$4,999, and italicized names indicate donors of services or products. 

For information about becoming a Business Leadership Association member, con- 
tact Anne Cademenos, Associate Director of Corporate Programs, at (617) 638-9298. 



Accounting 



ARTHUR ANDERSEN LLP 

George E. Massaro 

COOPERS & 
LYBRAND LLP 

Francis A. Doyle 

DELOITTE & 
TOUCHE LLP 

Michael Joyce 

*DiPesa & Company, CPAs 
Dolly DiPesa 

Ercolini & Company 
Robert Ercolini, CPA 
Michael Tucci, CPA 

ERNST & YOUNG LLP 

James S. DiStasio 

Harte Carucei & Driscoll, 
PC. 

Neal Harte 

KPMG PEAT MARWICK 
Donald B. Homes 

PRICE WATERHOl SI, 
LLP 
Paul Sullivan 



Advertising/ 
Public Relations 



ARNOLD COMMUNICA- 
TIONS, INC. 

Ed Eskandarian 

Bronner Slosberg Humphrey 
Michael Bronner 

CAHOOTS 
Carol Lasky 

Clarke & Company, Inc. 
Peter A. Morrissey 

Conventures, Inc. 
Dusty S. Rhodes 

DesignWise 
Freelow Crummett 

HILL, HOLLIDAY, 
CONNORS, 
COSMOPULOS, INC. 

John M. Connors, Jr. 

Houston, Herstek I \\ VI 
Douglas W. I [ouston 

Ingalls, Quinn & Johnson 
Richard (.. Garrison 



Irma S. Mann, Strategic 
Marketing, Inc. 
Irma S. Mann 

MASSmedia 
Charles N. Shapiro 

*Rasky & Co. 
Larry Rasky 

Alarm Systems 

American Alarm & 
Communications, Inc. 
Richard L. Sampson 

First Security Services 
Corporation 
Robert F. Johnson 

Architects/ Interior Design 



Tellalian Associates 

Architects iK Planners 
Donald J. Tellalian, \l \ 

Automotive 



IRA LEXUS 
Ira Rosenberg 

LEXUS OF NORWOOD 

I lerberl ( lhambers 



49 



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Pioneer Funds Distributor, Inc., 60 State St., Boston, MA 02109 

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50 



LEXUS OF WATERTOWN 

Murray Patkin 

Aviation 

Flight Time International 
Jane McBride 

Banking 

BANKBOSTON 
CORPORATION 

William M. Crozier, Jr. 

Cambridge Trust Company 
James F. Dwinell III 

CITIZENS BANK 

Robert M. Mahoney 

FLEET BANK OF 
MASSACHUSETTS, N.A. 

John P. Hamill 

PNC Bank, New England 
Joan L. Gulley 

STATE STREET BANK 
AND TRUST COMPANY 

Marshall N. Carter 

USTRUST 

Neal F. Finnegan 

Wainwright Bank & Trust 
Company 
John M. Plukas 

Building/Contracting 

*Harvey Industries, Inc. 
Frederick Bigony 

Lee Kennedy Co., Inc. 
Lee M. Kennedy 

*The MacDowell Company 
Roy MacDowell 

*NSC Corporation 
Frank Fradello 

New England Insulation Co. 
Theodore H. Brodie 

*Perini Corporation 
David B. Perini 



Consulting: 
Management /Financial 



Anchor Capital Advisors, Inc. 
William P. Rice 

ANDERSEN 
CONSULTING LLP 

William D. Green 

ANDERSEN 
CONSULTING LLP 

Michael J. Young 

ARTHUR D. 
LITTLE, INC. 

Charles LaMantia 



BAIN & COMPANY, INC. 

Orit Gadiesh 

BBF Corporation 
Boruch B. Frusztajer 

THE BOSTON 
CONSULTING GROUP 
INC. 

Jonathan L. Isaacs 

The Cullinane Group, Inc. 
John J. Cullinane 

Dock Square Consultants 
Richard J. Lettieri 

*Heidrick & Struggles 
Robert E. Hallagan 

Lee Hecht Harrison, Inc. 
Frank Mainero 

HEWITT ASSOCIATES 

Christopher S. Palmer 

Lochridge & Company, Inc. 
Richard K. Lochridge 

*Lyons Company 
J. Peter Lyons 

McKINSEY & 
COMPANY, INC. 
David G. Fubini 

Mercer Management 
Consulting 
James W. Down 

NORTH AMERICAN 
MORTGAGE COMPANY 

John F. Farrell, Jr. 

*The O'Brien Group, Inc. 
Paul C. O'Brien 

Pendergast & Company 
Edward H. Pendergast 

Right Associates Consulting 
Warren Radtke 

Sawyer Miller Consulting 
Micho F. Spring 

*Towers Perrin 

V. Benjamin Haas 

*Watson Wyatt Worldwide 
Daniel B. Holmes 

WILLIAM M. MERCER, 
INCORPORATED 
Peter A. Bleyler 

Consulting: Opportunity 
Development 



New Directions, Inc. 
David D. Corbet! 

Consumer Goods/ 
Food Service 



Coca-Cola Bottling Company 
of New England 
Terrance M. Marks 

*Franklin Sports, Inc. 
Larry J. Franklin 

*Johnson, O'Hare Co., Inc. 
Harry "Chip" O'Hare, Jr. 

Merkert Enterprises, Inc. 
Gerald R. Leonard 

O'Donnell-Usen Fisheries 
Corporation 
Arnold S. Wolf 

SODEXHO MANAGE- 
MENT SERVICES & 
CREATIVE GOURMETS 

Michel Landel 

Staton Hills Winery 
Peter Ansdell 

Welch's 
Everett N. Baldwin 

*Whitehall Company, Ltd. 
Marvin A. Gordon 

Distribution 

Standard Tube Sales 
Corporation 

Dorothy C. Granneman 

Francis J. Walsh, Jr. 

Education 

BENTLEY COLLEGE 
Joseph M. Cronin 

Electrical /Electronics 

*Boston Acoustics, Inc. 
Francis L. Reed 

R&D ELECTRICAL 
COMPANY, INC. 
Richard D. Pedone 

Energy/Utilities 

BOSTON EDISON 
COMPANY 

Thomas J. May 

EASTERN 
ENTERPRISES/ 
BOSTON GAS COMPANY 

J. Atwood Ives 
Chester R. Messer 

*New England Electric 
System 
Joan T. Bok 

Entertainment /Media 






*A11 Seasons Services. Inc 

Donald (/. Fried! 



*I)on Law Company 
Don Law 

WCVB-TV, I ha. si 
Publications 

Paul La Camera 



SJ 



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Boston Symphony Orchestra... 

Day, Berry & Howard... 

Hard work before the performance pays off. 



Innovation. Quality. Teamwork. 



DAY, BERRY & HOWARD 

Counsellors At Law 
Boston, Hartford and Stamford 



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**W people connected to their community. With it, we have become 

so much more tfaari full-service skilled nursing facilities and a 

certified home Ifialth agency. Over the years, we have become a 

place where hometown roots are as important as compassionate care. 

We invite you to learn more about Wingate's facilities and 
Wingate at Homers services by calling: 617-928-3300. 



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52 



WHDH-TV Channel 7 
Mike Carson 

*Yawkey Foundation 
John Harrington 

Environmental 

Jason M. Cortell & Associates 
Jason M. Cortell 

Financial 
Services/Investments 

ADAMS, HARKNESS & 
HILL, INC. 
Joseph W. Hammer 

ADVENT INTERNATIONAL 
CORPORATION 
Peter A. Brooke 

ALLMERICA FINANCIAL 
John F. O'Brien 

ALLMERICA FINANCIAL 
INSTITUTIONAL SERVICES 
Larry C. Renfro 

THE BERKSHIRE GROUP 
Laurence Gerber 

*Berkshire Partners 
Russell Epker 

BOSTON CAPITAL 
PARTNERS, INC. 

Christopher W. Collins 

Herbert F. Collins 

Richard J. DeAgazio 

John P. Manning 

THE BOSTON COMPANY 

Christopher M. Condron 
W. Keith Smith 

*BTM Capital Corporation 
E.F McCulloch, Jr. 

Carson Limited Partnership 
Herbert Carver 

THE CIT GROUP/CAPITAL 
EQUIPMENT FINANCING 
G. Todd Derr 

Cowen & Company 
Richard A. Altschuler 

CS FIRST BOSTON 
William Cadigan 
Patricia F. Lenehan 

ESSEX INVESTMENT 

MANAGEMENT CO., INC. 

Joseph C. McNay 

*Farrell, Healer & 
Company Inc. 
Richard A. Farrell 

FIDELITY INVESTMENTS 

Edward C. Johnson 3d 

JOHN HANCOCK 
FINANCIAL SERVICES 

William L. Boyan 



JOHN HANCOCK FUNDS 

Edward J. Boudreau, Jr. 

KAUFMAN & COMPANY 
Sumner Kaufman 

KESSLER FINANCIAL 
SERVICES, L.P. 
Howard J. Kessler 

LIBERTY FINANCIAL 
COMPANIES, INC. 
Kenneth R. Leibler 

LOOMIS-SAYLES & 
COMPANY, L.P. 

Mark W. Holland 

LPL FINANCIAL 
SERVICES 
Todd A. Robinson 

PAINEWEBBER, INC. 

Bruce Cameron 
Richard F. Connolly 
Charles T Harris 
Joseph F. Patton, Jr. 

THE PIONEER GROUP, INC. 
John F. Cogan, Jr. 

*Putnam Investments 

*State Street Development 
Management Corp. 
John R. Gallagher III 

United Asset Management 
Corporation 

*United Gulf 
Management, Inc. 

W.P STEWART & CO., INC. 
William P. Stewart 

*Woodstock Corporation 
Mrs. Edith L. Dabney 



Food Service Equipment 

*Boston Showcase Company 
Jason E. Starr 



High Technology 



ANALOG DEVICES, INC. 

Ray Stata 

*ATI Orion Research 
Chane Graziano 

BBN CORPORATION 

George H. Conrades 

*Bull HN Information 
Systems Inc. 
Donald P. Zereski 

COGNEX CORPORATION 
Dr. Robert J. Shillman 

COMPUTERVISION 
CORPORATION 
Kathleen Cote 



CORNING COSTAR 
CORPORATION 
R. Pierce Baker 

EDS 
Barry Raynor 

EG&G, INC. 
John M. Kucharski 

EMC CORPORATION 

Richard J. Egan 

* Helix Technology 
Corporation 
Robert J. Lepofsky 

IBM CORPORATION 

Patricia S. Wolpert 

INSO CORPORATION 
Steven R. Vana-Paxhia 
Instron Corporation 
Harold Hindman 

INTERNATIONAL DATA 
GROUP 
Patrick J. McGovern 

IONICS INCORPORATED 
Arthur L. Goldstein 

*LAU Technologies 
Joanna T Lau 

MICROCOM INC. 

Roland D. Pampel 

MILLIPORE 
CORPORATION 

C. William Zadel 

NEC CORPORATION 

Hisashi Kaneko 

PRINTED CIRCUIT CORP 

Peter Sarmanian 

RAYTHEON COMPANY 

Dennis J. Picard 

*The Registry, Inc. 
G. Drew Conway 

SIGNAL TECHNOLOGY 
CORPORATION 
Dale L. Peterson 

SOFTKEY 

INTERNATIONAL INC. 
Michael J. Perik 

STRATUS COMPUTER, INC. 
William E. Foster 

*SystemSoft Corporation 
Robert Angelo 

TDK ELECTRONICS 
CORPORATION 

Ken Kihara 

Teradyne, Inc. 
Alexander V. D'Arbeloff 

THERMO ELECTRON 
CORPORATION 

Dr. George N. Hatsopoulos 



53 



WELCH & FORBES 

Creative investment management 
and fiduciary services since 1838. 



Kenneth S. Safe, Jr. 
John K. Spring 
John Lowell 
Thomas N. Dabney 
V. William Efthim 
Guido R. Perera, Jr. 




Richard Olney III 
Arthur C. Hodges 
Richard F. Young 
M. Lynn Brennan 
John H. Emmons, Jr. 
Charles T. Haydock 
Oliver A. Spalding 



Old City Hall, 45 School Street, Boston, MA 02108 617/523-1635 



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call Mariska Lutz, Corporate Sales Manager, 

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Corporate Offices, Prudential Center, Suite 200, Boston, MA 02199 



54 



WATERS CORPORATION 
Douglas A. Berthiaume 

Hotels/Restaurants 

BOSTON MARRIOTT 
COPLEY PLACE 
William Munck 

FOUR SEASONS HOTEL 

Robin A. Brown 

ITT SHERATON 
CORPORATION 

John Kapioltas 

THE RITZ-CARLTON, 
BOSTON 

SHERATON BOSTON 
HOTEL & TOWERS 

Denise Coll 

*Sonesta International Hotels 
Corporation 
Paul Sonnabend 

THE WESTIN HOTEL, 
COPLEY PLACE 

David King 

Insurance 

AON RISK SERVICES, INC. 
William J. Tvenstrup 

*The Bostonian Group 
John Casey 

Bradley Insurance 
Agency, Inc. 
John J. Bradley 

CADDELL & BYERS 
INSURANCE AGENCY, INC. 
Paul D. Bertrand 

*Carlin Insurance 
Michael D. Holmes 

The Chickering Group 
Frederick H. Chicos 

*Chubb Group of Insurance 
Companies 
John H. Gillespie 

COMMONWEALTH LAND 
AND TITLE INSURANCE CO. 
Terry Cook 

*Johnson & Higgins of 
Massachusetts, Inc. 
William S. Jennings 

* Lexington Insurance 
( lompany 

Kr\in H. Kelley 

LIBERTY MUTUAL 
GROUP 

Gary L. Countryman 

MANULIFE FINANCIAL 

Dominic I)" Mc.s^andro 



THE NEW ENGLAND 
Robert A. Shafto 

* North American 
Security Life 

William J. Atherton 

THE PIONEER GROUP, INC. 
John F. Cogan, Jr. 

SAFETY INSURANCE 
COMPANY 
Richard B. Simches 

SEDGWICK OF 
NEW ENGLAND, INC. 
P. Joseph McCarthy 

Sun Life Assurance Company 
of Canada 
David D. Horn 

Swerling Milton Winnick 
Public Insurance Adjusters, 
Inc. 

Marvin Milton 

Bruce Swerling 

Paul Winnick 

Trust Insurance Company 
Craig M. Bradley 

Legal 

BINGHAM, DANA 
& GOULD 

Jay S. Zimmerman 
William A. Bachman 

*Choate, Hall & Stewart 
Charles L. Glerum 

Dickerman Law Offices 
Lola Dickerman 

Dionne, Bookhout & Gass 
Richard D. Gass 

FISH & RICHARDSON PC. 
Ronald Myrick 

GADSBY & HANNAH LLP 
Paul E. Clifford 

GOLDSTEIN & 
MANELLO, PC. 
Richard J. Snyder 

GOODWIN, PROCTER 
& HOAR 
Robert B. Fraser 

*Hale & Dorr 
John Hamilton 

* Lynch, Brewer, Hoffman 

& Sands 
Owen B. Lynch, Esq. 

MINTZ, LEVIN, COHN, 
FERRIS, GLOVSKY & 
POPEO, PC. 
Jeffrey M. Wiesen, Esq. 

Nisscnhaum Law Offices 

Gerald L. Nissenbaum 



55 



Nutter, McClennen & Fish 
Robert Fishman 

PALMER & DODGE, LLP 
Michael R. Brown 

Robins, Kaplan, Miller 
& Ciresi 
Alan R. Miller, Esq. 

* Ropes & Gray 
Truman S. Casner 

Sarrouf, Tarricone & 
Flemming 
Camille F Sarrouf 

Sherin and Lodgen 

*Weingarten, Schurgin, 
Gagnebin & Hayes 
Stanley M. Schurgin 

Manufacturer's 
Representatives/ 
Wholesale Distribution 

*Alles Corporation 
Stephen S. Berman 

Asquith Corporation 
Laurence L. Asquith 

*Brush Fibers, Inc. 
Ian P. Moss 

*Clinique Laboratories U.S.A. 
Daniel J. Brestle 

J.A. WEBSTER, INC. 
John A. Webster. 

JOFRAN, INC. 
Robert D. Roy 

Lantis Corporation 
Scott Sennett 

United Liquors, Ltd. 
A. Raymond Tye 

Viva Sun 
Gary Podhaizer 

Manufacturing 

Alden Products Company 
Elizabeth Alden 

ARLEY CORPORATION 

David I. Riemer 

Autoroll Machine Corporation 
William M. Karlyn 

*The Biltrite Corporation 
Stanley J. Bernstein 

*C.R. Bard, Inc :. 

Richard J. Thomas 

*Cabo1 Corporation 

CHELSEA 
INDUSTRIES, INC. 
Ronald G. ( lasty 



The 



BOSTON 
POPS 






'"- ■', ..,■" '■" 



'97 Season 



America's 
ORCHE STRA 

CATCH THE POPS THIS 

MAY, JUNE, AND JULY! 



KEITH LOCKHART, 
conductor ' 



Group Sales now available (617) 638-9345. 

For general concert information call (617) 266-2378. 



56 



CONNELL LIMITED 
PARTNERSHIP 

William F. Connell 

CONVERSE INC. 

Glenn Rupp 

*Cri-Tech, Inc. 
Richard Mastromatteo 

D.K. Webster Family 
Foundation 
Dean K. Webster 

Design Mark Industries 
Paul S. Morris 

Diacom Corporation 
Donald W Comstock 

Ekco Group, Inc. 
Robert Stein 

GENERAL LATEX 
AND CHEMICAL 
CORPORATION 
Robert W MacPherson 

THE GILLETTE 
COMPANY 

Alfred M. Zeien 

HIGH VOLTAGE 
ENGINEERING 
CORPORATION 
Paul H. Snyder 

HMK ENTERPRISES, 
INC. 
Steven E. Karol 

*J.D.P Company 
Jon D. Papps 

* Jones & Vining, Inc. 
Michel Ohayon 

New Balance Athletic Shoe 
James S. Davis 

NEW ENGLAND BUSINESS 
SERVICE, INC. 
Robert J. Murray 

OAK INDUSTRIES, INC. 
William S. Antle III 

OSRAM SYLVANIA INC 

Dean T Langford 

The Pfaltzgraff Company 
Annette Seifert 

PHILIP MORRIS 
COMPANIES, INC. 
Matthew Paluszek 

*Piab USA, Inc. 

Charles J. Weilbrenner 

*The Rockport Company, Inc. 
Anthony J. Tiberii 

ROYAL APPLIANCE 
MFG. CO. 

Michael J. Merriman 



*Springs Industries, Inc. 
Dan Gaynor 

THE STRIDE RITE 
CORPORATION 
Robert C. Siegel 

SUMMIT PACKAGING 
SYSTEMS INC. 
Gordon Gilroy 

The Syratech Corporation 
Leonard Florence 

TY-WOOD/CENTURY 
MANUFACTURING CO., 
INC. 
Joseph W. Tiberio 

WATTS INDUSTRIES, 
INC. 

Timothy P. Home 

Wire Belt Company of 
America 

F. Wade Greer 

Philanthropic 

First Winthrop Corporation 
Richard J. McCready 

The Fuller Foundation 

*The Kouyoumjian Fund 
The Kouyoumjian Family 

Printing/Publishing 

*Addison Wesley Longman, 
Inc. 
J. Larry Jones 

*Banta Corporation 
Donald Belcher 

BOSTON HERALD 

Patrick J. Purcell 

CAHNERS PUBLISHING 
COMPANY 
Bruce Barnet 

COMMUNITY 
NEWSPAPER 
COMPANY 

William R. Elfers 

DANIELS PRINTING 
COMPANY 
Grover B. Daniels 

George H. Dean Co. 

G. Earle Michaud 

HARCOURT GENERAL 

CHARITABLE 

FOUNDATION 

Richard A. Smith 

HOUGHTON MIFFLIN 
COMPANY 

Nader F. Darehshori 

Invisuals 
Dennis Ozer 



57 



Reynolds- DeWalt Printing 
Peter DeWalt 

The Studley Press, Inc. 
Chuck Gillett 

VON HOFFMANN 
PRESS, INC. 

Frank A. Bowman 

Real Estate/Development 

*The Abbey Group 
Robert Epstein 
David Epstein 
John Svenson 

BEACON PROPERTIES 
CORPORATION 
Alan M. Leventhal 

* Cornerstone Properties, Inc. 
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CUMMINGS PROPERTIES 
James L. McKeown 

DEWOLFE NEW ENGLAND 
Richard B. De Wolfe 

EQUITABLE REAL ESTATE 
Tony Harwood 

*The Flatley Company 
Thomas J. Flatley 

Heafitz Development 
Company 
Lewis Heafitz 

*John M. Corcoran & Co. 
John M. Corcoran 

* Meredith & Grew 
Thomas J. Hynes, Jr. 

Retail 

COUNTRY CURTAINS 
Mr. & Mrs. John & Jane 
Fitzpatrick 

Crane & Co. Papermakers 
Lansing E. Crane 

The E.B. Horn Company 
Harry Finn 

FILENE'S 

Joseph M. Melvin 

Gordon Brothers 
Michael Frieze 

Hermes 
Jean-Louis Dumas-Hermes 

J. Baker, Inc. 
Allan L. Weinstein 

*Lechmere, Inc. 

Frederick E. Meiser 

Marshalls 
Jerome R. Rossi 



Dinner, Parking 

AndThe Shuttle, 
ForASong. 

Make dinner at Boodle's part of your 
night out at the Symphony. We're offering 
our customers special parking privileges 
in our private garage for just $5, and free 

"Symphony Express" shuttle service 
Tuesday and Thursday. Just show us your 
Symphony tickets, and we'll arrange for 
your $5 parking, take you to Symphony 
Hall after your meal, and return you to 
your car after the performance. With a 
deal like that, a night at the Symphony 
never •*tt\ sounded better. 




RESTAURANT&BAR 



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58 



NEIMAN MARCUS 
William D. Roddy 

*Saks Fifth Avenue 

Alison Streider Mayher 

THE STOP & SHOP 
FOUNDATION 

Avram J. Goldberg 

THE STOP & SHOP 
SUPERMARKET 
COMPANY 
Robert G. Tobin 

Talbots 
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THE TJX COMPANIES, INC. 
Bernard Cammarata 

*Town & Country Corporation 
C. William Carey 

Science /Medical 

AMERICAN MEDICAL 
RESPONSE, INC. 
Paul M. Verrochi 

Baldpate Hospital 
Lucille M. Batal 

BLUE CROSS AND 
BLUE SHIELD OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

William C. Van Faasen 

BOSTON SCIENTIFIC 
CORPORATION 

CRA Managed Care 
Lois Silverman 

CHARLES RIVER 
LABORATORIES 

James C. Foster 



Citizens Medical Corporation 
John J. Doran 

CORNING CLINICAL 
LABORATORIES 
Robert Meehan 

Datacube 
Stanley Karandanis 

FISHER SCIENTIFIC 
INTERNATIONAL INC. 

Paul M. Montrone 

GENETICS 
INSTITUTE, INC. 
Dr. Patrick Gage 

MERCK-MEDCO 
MANAGED CARE 
Per Lofberg 

* Medical Information 
Technology, Inc. 
Morton E. Ruderman 

Services 

Benn Theodore, Inc. 
Benn Theodore 

Betsy Bassett Photography 
Betsy Bassett 

*Blake and Blake 
Genealogists 
Richard A. Blake, Jr. 

CFI Design Group, Inc. 
David A. Granoff 

TAD RESOURCES 
INTERNATIONAL INC. 

James S. Davis 

Team 
Marion Rossman 



Technical Aid Corporation 
Salvatore Balsamo 

Telecommunications 

AT&T NETWORK SYSTEMS 
Michael Decelle 

* Boston Technology, Inc. 
Dr. John C.W Taylor 

CELLULAR ONE 

Kathy Dowling 

GTE GOVERNMENT 
SYSTEMS 
John R. Messier 

LUCENT TECHNOLOGIES 

Michael Decelle 

MCI TELECOMMUNICA- 
TIONS CORPORATION 

Susan Beckmann 
Joe McKeown 

NORTEL 

Robert 0. Nelson 

NYNEX 

Donald Reed 

*NYNEX Information 
Resources Co. 
Matthew J. Stover 

Travel /Transportation 

DAV EL CHAUFFEURED 
TRANSPORTATION 
NETWORK 
Scott A. Solombrino 

Lily Transportation Corp. 
John A. Simourian 

NORTHWEST AIRLINES 

Terry M. Leo 



Please join us as a member of the BSO's 
Business Leadership Association! 

For a minimum contribution of $1 ,800 to the BSO's Business Fund, your company can 
enjoy membership in the BSO's Business Leadership Association, a dynamic and influ- 
ential group of more than 350 New England businesses who have come together to 
support the Boston Symphony Orchestra. 

Membership privileges for your company include: a complimentary listing in the BSO 
and Pops program books throughout the season, priority ticket reservations for the 
sell-out Holiday Pops and Tanglewood concerts, personal ticket assistance through the 
Corporate Programs office, and use of the Beranek Room, a private patrons' lounge, 
reserved exclusively for members of the BSO's Business Leadership Association and 
Higginson Society. 

For more information about becoming a member of the BSO's Business Leadership Association, 
please contact Anne Cademenos in the Corporate Programs office at (617) 638-9298. 



59 



NEXT PROGRAM. . . 

Wednesday, February 12, at 7:30 p.m. (Open Rehearsal: 

Pre-Rehearsal Talk at 6:30 in Symphony Hall) 
Thursday, February 13, at 8 
Friday, February 14, at 1:30 
Saturday, February 15, at 8 

ANDRE PREVIN conducting 



HAYDN 



Symphony No. 96 in D, The Miracle 

Adagio — Allegro 
Andante 

Menuetto: Allegretto 
Finale: Vivace assai 



INTERMISSION 



SHOSTAKOVICH 



Symphony No. 8 in C minor, Opus 65 

Adagio 
Allegretto 
Allegro non troppo 
Largo 
Allegretto 



For his second Boston Symphony program this season, Andre Previn offers two 
works from master symphonists of different centuries. Haydn's Symphony No. 96 
was one of the dozen symphonies composed for his lengthy visits to London in the 
1890s, visits that made him both famous and wealthy. Filled with the dramatic and 
witty surprises for which Haydn is known, The Miracle takes its nickname for an 
incident that supposedly took place (though it probably didn't!) at the premiere, 
when a heavy chandelier crashed down but missed those seated under it because 
the audience in that area had rushed forward for a better look at their favorite 
composer. Completed in 1943, and one of the great works of the World War II 
years, Shostakovich's powerful Symphony No. 8 reflects the darkness of its day, 
a time in which the Russian composer defied governmental censorship, communi- 
cating movingly through music what he could not say in words. 



Single tickets for all Boston Symphony Orchestra concerts throughout the season 
are available at the Symphony Hall box office, or by calling "SymphonyCharge" 
at (617) 266-1200, Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m. until 6 p.m., to 
charge tickets instantly on a major credit card, or to make a reservation and then 
send payment by check. Outside the 617 area code, call 1-800-274-8499. 
Please note that there is a $2.50 handling fee for each ticket ordered by phone. 



60 




MAMM 



"Best Italian cuisine. 

In spite of its informal name, the 

upscale Mamma Maria offers the 

best Italian cuisine in Boston/' 

Fromtner's Boston, 1996 

Highest overall rating for Italian 

restaurants. 

"Intimate and romantic... 

exceptional dishes." 

Zagat Survey, 1996 

"Best Italian restaurant." 

Boston Magazine 

Reader's Poll, 1995 

"One of Boston's best restaurants, 

period." 
Bon Appetit, 1994 

3 NORTH SQUARE, BOSTON (617) 523-0077 
Valet Parking Private Dining Rooms 




For rates and 
information on 
advertising in the 
Boston Symphony, 
Boston Pops, 
and 

Tanglewood program books 
please contact: 

STEVE GANAK AD REPS 
(617) 542-6913, in Boston. 



COMING CONCERTS . . . 

Wednesday, February 12, at 7:30 p..m. 

Open Rehearsal 
Marc Mandel will discuss the program 

at 6:30 in Symphony Hall. 
Thursday 'C — February 13, 8-10:10 
Friday 'A' — February 14, 1:30-3:40 
Saturday 'B' — February 15, 8-10:10 

ANDRE PREVIN conducting 

HAYDN Symphony No. 96, 

Miracle 
SHOSTAKOVICH Symphony No. 8 

From Thursday, February 20, through Satur- 
day, March 1, Andre Previn and the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra will perform eight con- 
certs in the Canary Islands and Florida. 

Thursday 'A— March 6, 8-9:50 
Friday 'A— March 7, 1:30-3:20 
Saturday 'A— March 8, 8-9:50 

JAMES CONLON conducting 
MAXIM VENGEROV, violin 



RAVEL 

PROKOFIEV 
JANACEK 



Gaspard de la Nuit 

(arr. Constant) 
Violin Concerto No. 2 
Sinfonietta 



Thursday 'C— March 20, 8-10 
Friday 'A— March 21, 1:30-3:30 
Saturday 'A — March 22, 8-10 
Tuesday 'C— March 25, 8-10 

HANS GRAF conducting 
LEIF OVE ANDSNES, piano 



STRAVINSKY 



MOZART 



MOZART 



STRAVINSKY 



Dumbarton Oaks 

Concerto 
Piano Concerto No. 20 

in D minor, K.466 
Adagio and Fugue 

in C minor, K.546 
Symphony in C 



Programs and artists subject to change. 



61 



A seat in Symphony Hall — 



a gift for all seasons. 




©JBLimited 



Your tax-deductible contribution of $10,000 will endow and 
name a seat in Symphony Hall, forever associating that certain 
someone with one of the world's great symphony orchestras. 

For further information about named and memorial gift 
opportunities at Symphony, please call or write: 

Joyce M. Serwitz 

Associate Director of Development 
Boston Symphony Orchestra 
Boston, Massachusetts 02115 
Telephone (617) 638-9273 



62 



SYMPHONY HALL INFORMATION 

FOR SYMPHONY HALL CONCERT AND TICKET INFORMATION, call (617) 266-1492. 
For Boston Symphony concert program information, call "C-O-N-C-E-R-T" (266-2378). 

THE BOSTON SYMPHONY performs ten months a year, in Symphony Hall and at Tangle- 
wood. For information about any of the orchestra's activities, please call Symphony Hall, or 
write the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Symphony Hall, Boston, MA 02115. 

THE BSO'S NEW WEB SITE (http://www.bso.org) provides information on all of the orches- 
tra's activities at Symphony Hall and at Tanglewood, and is updated regularly. 

THE EUNICE S. AND JULIAN COHEN WING, adjacent to Symphony Hall on Huntington 
Avenue, may be entered by the Symphony Hall West Entrance on Huntington Avenue. 

IN THE EVENT OF A BUILDING EMERGENCY, patrons will be notified by an announce- 
ment from the stage. Should the building need to be evacuated, please exit via the nearest 
door, or according to instructions. 

FOR SYMPHONY HALL RENTAL INFORMATION, call (617) 638-9241, or write the 
Function Manager, Symphony Hall, Boston, MA 02115. 

THE BOX OFFICE is open from 10 a.m. until 6 p.m. Monday through Saturday; on concert 
evenings it remains open through intermission for BSO events or just past starting time for 
other events. In addition, the box office opens Sunday at 1 p.m. when there is a concert that 
afternoon or evening. Single tickets for all Boston Symphony subscription concerts are avail- 
able at the box office. For most outside events at Symphony Hall, tickets are available three 
weeks before the concert at the box office or through Symphony Charge. 

TO PURCHASE BSO TICKETS: American Express, MasterCard, Visa, a personal check, and 
cash are accepted at the box office. To charge tickets instantly on a major credit card, or to 
make a reservation and then send payment by check, call "SymphonyCharge" at (617) 266- 
1200, Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m. until 6 p.m. Outside the 617 area code, phone 
1-800-274-8499. There is a handling fee of $2.50 for each ticket ordered by phone. 

GROUP SALES: Groups may take advantage of advance ticket sales. For BSO concerts at 
Symphony Hall, groups of twenty-five or more may reserve tickets by telephone and take 
advantage of ticket discounts and flexible payment options. To place an order, or for more 
information, call Group Sales at (617) 638-9345. 

FOR PATRONS WITH DISABILITIES, an access service center, accessible restrooms, and 
elevators are available inside the Cohen Wing entrance to Symphony Hall on Huntington 
Avenue. For more information, call VOICE (617) 266-1200 or TTD/TTY (617) 638-9289. 

LATECOMERS will be seated by the ushers during the first convenient pause in the pro- 
gram. Those who wish to leave before the end of the concert are asked to do so between pro- 
gram pieces in order not to disturb other patrons. 

IN CONSIDERATION OF OUR PATRONS AND ARTISTS, children four years old or young- 
er will not be admitted to Boston Symphony Orchestra concerts. 

TICKET RESALE: If for some reason you are unable to attend a Boston Symphony concert for 
which you hold a subscription ticket, you may make your ticket available for resale by calling 
(617) 266-1492 during business hours, or (617) 638-9426 at any time. This helps bring need- 
ed revenue to the orchestra and makes your seat available to someone who wants to attend the 
concert. A mailed receipt will acknowledge your tax-deductible contribution. 

RUSH SEATS: There are a limited number of Rush Seats available for Boston Symphony sub- 
scription concerts Tuesday and Thursday evenings, and Friday afternoons. The low price 
of these seats is assured through the Morse Rush Seat Fund. Rush Tickets are sold at $7.50 
each, one to a customer, on Fridays as of 9 a.m. and Tuesdays and Thursdays as of 5 p.m. 
Please note that there are no Rush Tickets available on Friday or Saturday evenings. 

PLEASE NOTE THAT SMOKING IS NOT PERMITTED ANYWHERE IN SYMPHONY 
HALL. 

CAMERA AND RECORDING EQUIPMENT may not be brought into Symphony Hall during 
concerts. 



63 




LOST AND FOUND is located at the security desk at the stage door to Symphony Hall on St. 
Stephen Street. 

FIRST AID FACILITIES for both men and women are available. On-call physicians attending 
concerts should leave their names and seat locations at the switchboard near the Massachu- 
setts Avenue entrance. 

PARKING: For evening concerts only, the Prudential Center Garage offers a discount to any 
BSO patron with a ticket stub for that evening's performance, courtesy of R.M. Bradley & Co. 
and The Prudential Realty Group. There are also two paid parking garages on Westland Ave- 
nue near Symphony Hall. Limited street parking is available. As a special benefit, guaranteed 
pre-paid parking near Symphony Hall is available to subscribers who attend evening concerts. 
For more information, call the Subscription Office at (617) 266-7575. In addition, the Uptown 
Garage at 10 Gainsborough Street next to the New England Conservatory offers discounted 
parking ($6 with ticket stub) for all BSO concerts, including Friday afternoons. 

ELEVATORS are located outside the Hatch and Cabot-Cahners rooms on the Massachusetts 
Avenue side of Symphony Hall, and in the Cohen Wing. 

LADIES' ROOMS are located on the orchestra level, audience-left, at the stage end of the 
hall, on both sides of the first balcony, and in the Cohen Wing. 

MEN'S ROOMS are located on the orchestra level, audience-right, outside the Hatch Room 
near the elevator, on the first-balcony level, audience-left, outside the Cabot-Cahners Room 
near the coatroom, and in the Cohen Wing. 

COATROOMS are located on the orchestra and first-balcony levels, audience-left, outside the 
Hatch and Cabot-Cahners rooms, and in the Cohen Wing. Please note that the BSO is not re- 
sponsible for personal apparel or other property of patrons. 

LOUNGES AND BAR SERVICE: There are two lounges in Symphony Hall. The Hatch Room 
on the orchestra level and the Cabot-Cahners Room on the first-balcony level serve drinks 
starting one hour before each performance. For the Friday-afternoon concerts, both rooms 
open at noon, with sandwiches available until concert time. 

BOSTON SYMPHONY BROADCASTS: Friday-afternoon concerts of the Boston Symphony 
Orchestra are broadcast live by WGBH-FM (Boston 89.7) and by WAMC-FM (Albany 90.3, 
serving the Tanglewood area). Saturday-evening concerts are broadcast live by WCRB-FM 
(Boston 102.5) 

BSO FRIENDS: The Friends are donors to the Boston Symphony Orchestra Annual Fund. 
Friends receive BSO, the orchestra's newsletter, as well as priority ticket information and 
other benefits depending on their level of giving. For information, please call the Develop- 
ment Office at Symphony Hall weekdays between 9 and 5, (617) 638-9251. If you are already 
a Friend and you have changed your address, please inform us by sending your new and old 
addresses to the Development Office, Symphony Hall, Boston, MA 02115. Including your 
patron number will assure a quick and accurate change of address in our files. 

BUSINESS FOR BSO: The BSO's Business Leadership Association program makes it possible 
for businesses to participate in the life of the Boston Symphony Orchestra through a variety of 
original and exciting programs, among them "Presidents at Pops," "A Company Christmas at 
Pops," and special-event underwriting. Benefits include corporate recognition in the BSO pro- 
gram book, access to the Beranek Room reception lounge, and priority ticket service. For fur- 
ther information, please call Anne Cademenos, Associate Director of Corporate Programs, at 
(617) 638-9298. 

THE SYMPHONY SHOP is located in the Cohen Wing at the West Entrance on Huntington 
Avenue and is open Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday from 11 a.m. until 4 p.m., Saturday 
from noon until 6 p.m., and from one hour before each concert through intermission. The 
Symphony Shop features exclusive BSO merchandise, including The Symphony Lap Robe, 
calendars, coffee mugs, posters, and an expanded line of BSO apparel and recordings. The 
Shop also carries children's books and musical-motif gift items. A selection of Symphony 
Shop merchandise is also available during concert hours outside the Cabot-Cahners Room. 
All proceeds benefit the Boston Symphony Orchestra. For further information and telephone 
orders, please call (617) 638-9383. 



64 



r • • 

root is in 



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catalogs & data sheets — a symphony of multi-color 
printing using our image editing and electronic page 
assembly capabilities to enhance the performance. 
Bravo! MacDonald & Evans Printers. 
One Rex Drive • Braintree, Massachusetts 02184 
Tel: (617) 848-9090 • Fax: (617) 843-5540 
Email: macevanl@aol 



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Management: sound and disciplined!' 




"You come to Symphony Hall to hear wonderful sound produced by 
disciplined musicians. I invite you to come to Hoover Capital to get sound 
investment management practiced by disciplined investment professionals. 

"Our value-based approach benefits substantially our institutional and 

individual clients because, at Hoover Capital, we have only one standard 

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Hoover Capital Management is a Registered Investment Advisor. Copies of Form ADV as filed with the 
Securities and Exchange Commission are available upon request. Past performance is no guarantee of future results. 



BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

Seiji Ozawa, Music Director 

Bernard Haitink, Principal Guest Conductor 

One Hundred and Sixteenth Season, 1996-97 

SUPPER CONCERT VI 




Thursday, February 6, at 6 
Saturday, February 8, at 6 

VALERIA VILKER KUCHMENT, violin 
AMNON LEVY, violin 
MICHAEL ZARETSKY, viola 
JOEL MOERSCHEL, cello 
STEPHEN DRURY, piano 



SCHUMAN 



String Quartet No. 2 

I. Sinfonia (Vigoroso) 
II. Passacaglia (Adagio) 
III. Fugue (Allegro moderato) 

Ms. VILKER KUCHMENT, Mr. LEVY, 
Messrs. ZARETSKY and MOERSCHEL 



COPLAND 



Vitebsk, for piano trio 

Messrs. LEVY, MOERSCHEL, and DRURY 



GERSHWIN 



Lullaby, for string quartet 

Mr. LEVY, Ms. VILKER KUCHMENT, 
Messrs. ZARETSKY and MOERSCHEL 



Baldwin piano 

Please exit to your left for supper following the concert. 



Week 15 



■Mi 



I 



William Schuman 
String Quartet No. 2 



The list of William Schuman's work in Bruce Savior's article about the composer 
for The New Grove Dictionary of American Music includes five string quartets and 
ten symphonies. These abstract musical genres are the heart of his output, his most 
fundamental response to the creative impulse. But Schuman was a late starter as a 
symphonist; though he studied the violin as a young man, his first compositions 
were in the style of the popular songs of the '20s and '30s, an area in which he was 
almost completely self-taught. When he discovered symphonic music — almost by 
accident — at nineteen, he determined that it was the musical world he wished to 
inhabit and began to take some private lessons in harmony and counterpoint. The 
premiere of Roy Harris's Symphony 1933 by Serge Koussevitzky and the BSO in 
January 1934 opened the path to the kind of music Schuman wished to write; 
indeed that was the year in which he finally gave up the composition of popular 
songs. It is often said that Schuman studied with Harris, but the lessons were never 
so formal as a course in composition. William Schuman told me in 1980 that they 
were essentially more-or-less regular conversations during the summer of 1936 
centered around music that he was then writing, with helpful observations and 
hints from the slightly older and more experienced composer. 

During these learning years from 1932 to 1937 Schuman created four orchestral 
works — two small pieces and his first two symphonies — and two string quartets; 
these early works were later withdrawn by the composer and can no longer be 
heard. All, that is, except the String Quartet No. 2, which can thus be regarded as the 
first work of his early maturity. Certainly there can be little question that Schuman's 
String Quartet No. 2 comes from the same wellsprings as the magnificent Symphony 
No. 3 of four years later. Simply on the surface one can see that the idiosyncratic use 
of Baroque genres (here Sinfonia, Passacaglia, and Fugue) turned to vigorous and 
vivid modern use anticipates a similar approach in the Third Symphony. More pro- 
found is the composer's interest in the long line, the careful preparation of climax 
and dramatic effect through the operation of contrapuntal techniques. 

From the beginning of the opening Sinfonia, there is a tautness to the four lines of the 
quartet, a feeling of energetic competition between one part and another, that was to 
remain characteristic of Schuman's music throughout his career. The muscular opening 
theme yields to a more songful solo utterance with a pizzicato accompaniment. 

The Passacaglia functions as the slow movement of the three and is also the longest 
and darkest. (A passacaglia is a special type of theme-and-variations in which the 
"theme" is usually a bass line repeated over and over again — this is called "osti- 
nato," the Italian word for "obstinate" — while newer melodies continually unfold on 
top of it.) It opens in a stark unison presentation of the ostinato theme, nine individ- 
ual pitches. Over the course of the numerous variations, the countermelodies are for 
the most part subdued and gently lilting. In the end, the music dies gently away. 

The final Fugue opens with three brusque, attention-getting chords, then a fidgety ner- 
vous passage that prepares the listener for the fugue proper. The brusque chords recur to 
close the introduction, and the fugal exposition begins, a fast-moving melody that does 
not sound as if designed for contrapuntal use, not obviously "fugal" — but so it proves to 
be. But this is no academic exercise. The intersecting lines build to dramatic moments 
where occasionally the brusque chords punctuate the flow and set it off in a new direc- 
tion. Here already Schuman has turned the formality of the fugue into a very personal 
musical medium such as he was later to use for the climax of his Third Symphony. 



Aaron Copland 

Vitebsk 

Copland's first work to employ a folk melody was inspired by hearing a Jewish folk 
tune in a performance of The Dybbuk, a well-known Yiddish drama by S. Ansky. 
He was fascinated by the tune and decided to use it as the basis of a composition. 
Upon learning that Ansky had first heard the tune in the Russian village of Vitebsk, 
he decided to use the geographical reference as his title. In the intervening years, 
Vitebsk has changed character, and Copland recalled in his autobiography Copland 
to 1942, "Years later when I traveled to the Soviet Union, the Russians were amazed 
that any composer would name a piece of music after the city of Vitebsk, a large 
industrial complex resembling Pittsburgh or Cleveland !" He completed the work 
at the MacDowell Colony in September 1928. It was first performed in New York's 
Town Hall on February 16, 1929, by pianist Walter Gieseking and two members of 
the Pro Arte Quartet. 

The work is in a single movement of rhapsodic character divided into three sections: 
slow-fast-slow. The opening harshly juxtaposes simultaneous major and minor triads 
in the piano. This combination seemed to Copland to imply a pitch somewhere in 
between the major third and the minor third: in other words, quarter-tones, which 
appear in the violin and cello, emphasizing the Hebraic atmosphere of the piece. They 
set the scene for the folk tune, played by the cello. The tempo changes to an Allegro 
vivace for a section that to the composer displays a "Chagall-like grotesquerie." The 
unrelenting scherzo is filled with offbeat rhythms and inklings of the folk tune's open- 
ing notes. At the return to the opening tempo, Grave, the theme reappears in violin 
and cello, with the piano again commenting in harsh major/minor chords. The coda 
resolves the tensions thus established in a solemn hush. 

George Gershwin 
Lullaby, for string quartet 

George Gershwin came out of Tin Pan Alley and made his first income in music as 
a "song plugger," tirelessly sitting at a piano in a publisher's music shop, demon- 
strating the latest hit songs to customers who might be persuaded to buy the sheet 
music themselves. Gradually he had an opportunity to demonstrate some of his 
own tunes and soon was contributing songs to reviews, then writing the scores of 
entire shows. But he also aspired to serious musical respectability. Even after 
becoming wealthy and successful, he continued to study music with the best teach- 
ers he could find, even undertaking extensive work in orchestration (with which 
few Broadway composers would trouble themselves, since there was never time 
for the composer to orchestrate a show anyway). In addition to his Broadway 
shows, Gershwin wanted to write for the concert hall and opera house, so he also 
undertook work in many of the standard "classical" genres. His Lullaby for string 
quartet, composed about 1919 or 1920, is one of the earliest examples of this aspira- 
tion, of his determination to learn part-writing and scoring for a standard classical 
ensemble. It is a far more delicate work than the bouncy show tunes he was writ- 
ing at the same time, but that probably reflects his own understanding of the 
dichotomy between popular and classical. In any case, he still imbues his Lullaby 
with a subtle touch of syncopation. 

— Notes by Steven Ledbetter 






Valeria Vilker Kuchment graduated from the Tchaikovsky Conservatory in Moscow; 
upon finishing her studies she became a faculty member at the Tchaikovsky Conserva- 
tory College. A prizewinner in a number of international violin and chamber music com- 
petitions, she has appeared as recitalist, soloist and in chamber music. In the Boston area 
she has been concertmaster of SinfoNova, the Harvard Chamber Orchestra, the Handel 
and Haydn Society, and the Boston Philharmonic. Ms. Vilker Kuchment joined the BSO 
at the beginning of the 1986-87 season. A faculty member at the New England Conser- 
vatory of Music, the Longy School of Music in Cambridge, the Tanglewood Music Cen- 
ter, and the Boston University Tanglewood Institute, she has recorded for Melodiya and 
Sine Qua Non. 

BSO first violinist Amnon Levy's musical career began in Tel Aviv, where he was born. 
After hearing him play, Jascha Heifetz urged Mr. Levy's teachers to send him to the 
United States for advanced studies; there he attended the Juilliard School of Music in 
New York and the Curtis Institute in Philadelphia, where he studied with Ivan Galamian. 
After graduating from Curtis he participated in the Marlboro Music Festival, where he 
performed chamber music with Rudolf Serkin. A BSO member since 1964, Mr. Levy has 
performed with orchestras and given solo recitals throughout the United States and in 
Mexico City. He has recently undertaken a conducting career as well, making his con- 
ducting debut at Jordan Hall in February 1988 with the Longwood Symphony Orchestra. 

Born in the Soviet Union, violist Michael Zaretsky studied originally as a violinist at the 
Central Music School in Moscow and at the Music College of the Moscow State Conserva- 
tory, where he then continued his education as a violist. In 1972 Mr. Zaretsky immigrated 
to Israel, where he became principal violist of the Jerusalem Broadcasting Symphony 
Orchestra and a soloist of Israeli Radio. In 1973 he auditioned for Leonard Bernstein, who 
helped him obtain an immigration visa to the United States and brought him to Tangle- 
wood. There, while a Fellow of the Tanglewood Music Center, he successfully auditioned 
for the BSO, which he joined that fall. An established soloist and chamber musician, Mr. 
Zaretsky teaches at the Boston University School of Music and the Longy School of Music. 

Born and raised in Oak Park, Illinois, Joel Moerschel received his early musical training 
from Chicago Symphony cellist Nicolai Zedeler and from Karl Fruh at the Chicago 
Musical College. Advanced studies with Ronald Leonard at the Eastman School of Music 
earned him a bachelor of music degree and a performer's certificate. A member of the 
Boston Symphony since 1970, Mr. Moerschel has also been an active member of Boston's 
musical community, exploring chamber music with groups such as the Wheaton Trio and 
Francesco String Quartet, and contemporary music with Boston Musica Viva and Collage 
New Music. 



Pianist Stephen Drury has appeared as soloist with orchestras from San Diego to 
Bucharest and in music festivals on both sides of the Atlantic. A prizewinner in several 
competitions, including the Concert Artists Guild, Affiliate Artists, and Carnegie 
Hall/Rockefeller competitions, his repertoire stretches from Bach, Mozart, and Liszt to 
the music of today. He has directed the world premiere of George Russell's Time Line 
for orchestra, chorus, jazz band, and soloists; premiered the solo part of John Cage's 
1 Ol with the BSO; and gave the first performance of John Zorn's Aporias with Dennis 
Russell Davies and the Cologne Radio Symphony. Mr. Drury has commissioned new 
works from John Cage, John Zorn, Terry Riley, Lee Hyla, and Chinary Ung. His record- 
ings include music by Elliott Carter, Frederic Rzewski, John Cage, and Colin McPhee. 



SEIJI OZAWAMUSIC DIRECTOR 



S1AIBISII1W 



1996-97 SEASON 



ORCHESTRA 






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Seiji Ozawa, Music Director 

Bernard Haitink, Principal Guest Conductor 

One Hundred and Sixteenth Season, 1996-97 



Trustees of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Inc. 

R. Willis Leith, Jr., Chairman Nicholas T. Zervas, President 

Peter A. Brooke, Vice-Chairman William J. Poorvu, Vice-Chairman and Treasurer 

Mrs. Edith L. Dabney, Vice-Chairman Ray Stata, Vice-Chairman 

Harvey Chet Krentzman, Vice-Chairman 



Harlan E. Anderson 
Dr. Amar G. Bose 
James F. Geary 
John F. Cogan, Jr. 
Julian Cohen 
William F. Connell, 
ex-qfficio 

Life Trustees 

Vernon R. Alden 
David B. Arnold, Jr. 
J. P. Barger 
Leo. L. Beranek 
Abram T. Collier 



William M. Crozier, Jr. 
Nader F. Darehshori 
Deborah B. Davis 
Nina L. Doggett 
Avram J. Goldberg 
Thelma E. Goldberg 



Nelson J. Darling, Jr. 
Archie C. Epps 
Mrs. Harris Fahnestock + 
Mrs. John H. Fitzpatrick 
Dean W Freed 



Julian T. Houston 

Edna S. Kalman 

George Krupp 

Mrs. August R. Meyer 

Richard P. Morse 

Mrs. Robert B. Newman 



Robert P. O'Block, 

ex-qfficio 
Peter C. Read 
Margaret Williams- 

DeCelles, ex-officio 



Mrs. John L. Grandin 
Mrs. George I. Kaplan 
George H. Kidder 
Thomas D. Perry, Jr. 
Irving W Rabb 



Mrs. George Lee Sargent 
Richard A. Smith 
Sidney Stoneman 
John Hoyt Stookey 
John L. Thorndike 



Other Officers of the Corporation 

Thomas D. May and John Ex Rodgers, Assistant Treasurers 



Daniel R. Gustin, Clerk 



Board of Overseers of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Inc. 

Robert P. O'Block, Chairman 

Molly Beals Millman, Secretary Phyllis Dohanian, Treasurer 



Mrs. Herbert B. Abelow 
Helaine B. Allen 
Joel B. Alvord 
Amanda Barbour Amis 
Marjorie Arons-Barron 
Caroline Dwight Bain 
Sandra Bakalar 
Gabriella Beranek 
Lynda Schubert Bodman 
William L. Boyan 
Jan Brett 
Robin A. Brown 
Mrs. Marshall Nichols 

Carter 
Earle M. Chiles 
William H. Congleton 
William F. Connell 
John M. Connors, Jr. 
Martha H.W. 

Crowninshield 
Diddy Cullinane 
Joan P. Curhan 
Tamara P. Davis 
Betsy P. Demirjian 
JoAnne Walton 

Dickinson 
Harry Ellis Dickson 
Mitchell L. Dong 
Hugh Downs 



Francis A. Doyle 
Goetz B. Eaton 
Harriett Eckstein 
William R. Elfers 
George M. Elvin 
Edward Eskandarian 
J. Richard Fennell 
Nancy J. Fitzpatrick 
Eugene M. Freedman 
Dr. Arthur Gelb 
Mrs. Kenneth J. 

Germeshausen 
Charles K. Gifford 
Jordan Golding 
Mark R. Goldweitz 
Deborah England Gray 
Michael Halperson 
John P. Hamill 
Ellen T. Harris 
Daphne P. Hatsopoulos 
Deborah M. Hauser 
Bayard Henry 
Marilyn Brachman 

Hoffman 
Ronald A. Homer 
Phyllis S. Hubbard 
F. Donald Hudson 
Lola Jaffe 
Mrs. Robert M. Jaffe 



Dr. Hisashi Kaneko 
Martin S. Kaplan 
Susan Beth Kaplan 
Mrs. S. Charles Kasdon 
Frances Demoulas 

Kettenbach 
Robert D. King 
Mrs. Gordon F. Kingsley 
David I. Kosowsky 
Arthur R. Kravitz 
Mrs. William D. 

Larkin, Jr. 
Thomas H. Lee 
Stephen R. Levy 
Edward Linde 
Frederick H. Lovejoy, Jr. 
Diane H. Lupean 
Mrs. Charles P. Lyman 
Barbara Jane Macon 
Joseph C. McNay 
William F. Meagher, Jr. 
Nathan R. Miller 
Robert J. Murray 
Paul C. O'Brien 
Norio Ohga 
Louis F. Orsatti 
Stephen Davies Paine 
Gloria Moody Press 



Millard H. Pry or, Jr. 
Robert E. Remis 
William D. Roddy, Jr. 
John Ex Rodgers 
Keizo Saji 
Roger A. Saunders 
Carol Scheifele-Holmes 
Hannah H. Schneider 
Cynthia D. Scullin 
Elizabeth T. Selkowitz 
Roger T Servison 
L. Scott Singleton 
Mrs. Micho F. Spring 
Thomas G. Sternberg 
Jacquelynne M. 

Stepanian 
Bill Van Faasen 
Paul M. Verrochi 
Stephen R. Weiner 
Robert A. Wells 
Mrs. Joan D. Wheeler 
Reginald H. White 
Mrs. Florence T. 

Whitney 
Margaret Williams- 

DeCelles 
Robin Wilson 
Kathryn A. Wong 



+ Deceased 



I 






Overseers Emeriti 

Mrs. Weston Adams 
Bruce A. Beal 
William M. Bulger 
Mary Louise Cabot 
Mrs. Levin H. 

Campbell 
Johns H. Congdon 
Phyllis Curtin 
Katherine Fanning 
Peter H.B. 

Frelinghuysen 
Mrs. Thomas J. 

Galligan, Jr. 
Mrs. James Garivaltis 
Mrs. Haskell R. Gordon 



Susan I). Hall 
Mrs. Richard D. Hill 
Susan M. Hilles 
Glen H. Hiner 
H. Eugene Jones 
Mrs. Louis I. Kane 
Leonard Kaplan 
Richard L. Kaye 
Robert K. Kraft 
Benjamin H. Lacy 
Mrs. James F. 

Lawrence 
Mrs. Hart D. Leavitt 
Laurence Lesser 
Mrs. Harry L. Marks 



C. Charles Marian 

Hanae Mori 

Mrs. Stephen V.C. 

Morris 
Patricia Morse 
David S. Nelson 
Mrs. Hiroshi H. 

Nishino 
Vincent M. O'Reilly 
Andrall S. Pearson 
John A. Perkins 
David R. Pokross 
Daphne Brooks Prout 
Mrs. Peter van S. Rice 
Mrs. Jerome Rosenfeld 



Mrs. William C. 

Rousseau 
Angelica L. Russell 
Francis P. Sears, Jr. 
Mrs. Carl Shapiro 
Mrs. Donald B. 

Sinclair 
Ralph Z. Sorenson 
Mrs. Arthur I. Strang 
Luise Vosgerchian 
Mrs. Thomas H.P 

Whitney 
Mrs. Donald R. Wilson 
Mrs. John J. Wilson 



Business Leadership Association 

Board of Directors 

Harvey Chet Krentzman, Chairman Emeritus 
James F. Cleary, Chairman 



Nader F. Darehshori 
Francis A. Doyle 
John P. Hamill 
William F. Meagher 



Robert J. Murray 
Robert P. O'Block 
Patrick J. Purcell 
William D. Roddy 



William F. Connell, President 
William L. Boyan, Vice-President 



Cynthia Scullin 
Malcolm L. Sherman 
Ray Stata 



Stephen J. Sweeney 
William C. Van Faasen 
Patricia Wolpert 



Emeritus Leo L. Beranek 



Ex-Officio R. Willis Leith, Jr. • Nicholas T. Zervas 



Officers of the Boston Symphony Association of Volunteers 

Margaret Williams-DeCelles, President Charlie Jack, Treasurer 

Goetz Eaton, Executive Vice-President Doreen Reis, Secretary 



Diane Austin, Symphony Shop 
Noni Cooper, Adult Education 
Ginger Elvin, Tanglewood 

Association 
Nancy Ferguson, Hall Services 
Phyllis Hubbard, Nominating 



Marilyn Pond, Public Relations 
Dee Schoenly, Development 
William C. Sexton, 

Tanglewood Association 
Barbara Steiner, Youth Activities 



Dorothy Stern, Resources 

Development 
Erling Thorgalsen, Membership 
Eva Zervos, Fundraising 
Wendy Ziner, Fundraising 



The Gericke Years: 
1884-1889 and 1898-1906 

The archival exhibit currently on display in the Huntington Ave- 
nue corridor of the Cohen Wing explores the Boston Symphony 
Orchestra during Wilhelm Gericke's two terms as conductor. 
Generally acknowledged as the BSO's first "professional" con- 
ductor, Gericke is credited with having transformed the BSO 
from a group of musicians into an orchestra. Among the many 
innovations that occurred during Gericke's conductorship were 
the inauguration in 1885 of the "Promenade Concerts," which 
were the predecessor of the Boston Pops; the commencement of 
tours to other United States cities in 1886, the initiation of a 
series of Young People's Concerts in 1887, and the move from 
the old Boston Music Hall to Symphony Hall in 1900. 




Programs copyright ©1997 Boston Symphony Orchestra, Inc. 

Cover design by Jaycole Advertising, Inc./ Cover and BSO photos by Steve J. Sherman 



Administration 

Kenneth Haas. Managing Director 

Daniel R. Gustin, Assistant Managing Director and Manager of Tanglewood 

Anthony Fogg, Artistic Administrator 

Thomas D. May, Director of Finance and Business Affairs 

Nancy Perkins, Director of Development 

Caroline Smedvig, Director of Public Relations and Marketing 

Ray F. Wellbaum, Orchestra Manager 

ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF/ARTISTIC 

Dennis Alves, Artistic Coordinator, Boston Pops • Faith Hunter, Executive Assistant to the Managing 
Director • Karen Leopardi, Artist Assistant/Secretary to the Music Director • Vincenzo Natale, Chauffeur/ 



Valet • James O'Connor, Administrative Assistant, Artistic Administration 
Assistant to the Tanglewood Manager 



Brian Van Sickle, Executive 



ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF/PRODUCTION 

Christopher W. Ruigomez, Operations Manager 

Scott Schillin, Assistant Manager, Boston Pops and Youth Activities 

Felicia A. Burrey, Chorus Manager • Nancy Cohen, Auditions Coordinator/Administrative Assistant, 
Orchestra Personnel • Jana Euler Gimenez, Administrative Assistant, Management Office • Diane A. 
Read, Production Coordinator 



BOX OFFICE 

Russell M. Hodsdon, Manager of Box Office 

Mary J. Broussard, Clerk • Cary Eyges, Clerk • Lawrence Fraher, Clerk 
Assistant Manager of Box Office • Arthur Ryan, Clerk 



Kathleen Kennedy, 



BUSINESS OFFICE 

Sarah J. Harrington, Budget Manager 

Craig R. Kaplan, Controller 

Roberta Kennedy, Manager, Symphony Shop 

Christopher Fox, Budget Analyst • Michelle Green, Executive Assistant to the Director of Finance 
and Business Affairs • Ian Kane, Senior Financial Analyst • Scott Langill, General Accountant • John 
O'Callaghan, Payroll Accountant • Yaneris Pena-Briggs, Cash Accountant • Sharon Sherman, 
Accounts Payable Supervisor • Victoria L. Tan, Staff Accountant 

DEVELOPMENT 

Daniel P. Breen, Director of Administration for Development 

Madelyne Cuddeback, Director of Corporate Programs 

Julie H. Diaz, Campaign Director 

John C. Marksbury, Director of Foundation and Government Support 

Joyce M. Serwitz, Associate Director of Development 

Diane Abe, Campaign Coordinator • Maureen Barry, Administrative Assistant to the Associate Director 
of Development • Courtney A. Barth, Assistant Director, Corporate Projects • Anne Cademenos. Associate 
Director of Corporate Programs • Sally Dale, Manager of Donor Relations • Rebecca Ehrhardt, Development 
Officer • Sarah Fitzgerald, Data Coordinator • Ginny Gaeta, Executive Assistant to the Director of Develop- 
ment. * Erika-Marie Haeussler, Administrative Assistant, Tanglewood Development • Joyce Hatch. Director 
of Boston Symphony Annual Fund • Deborah Hersey, Coordinator of Information Systems • Shelley Kooris, 
Manager of Development Research • Matthew Lane, Administrative Assistant, Campaign Communications • 
Sabrina Learman, Administrative Assistant/Office Manager • Katherine A. Lempert, Assistant Director. 
Tanglewood Development • Kathleen M addox, Assistant Director, Corporate Sponsorships • Robert Massey, 
Data Production Issistani • Cynthia McCabe, idministrative Assistant, Foundation and Government Support 
• Rachel O. Nadjarian. Donor Relations Assistant • Gerrit Petersen, Assistant Director of Foundation and 
Government Support • Julie A. Phaneul. Coordinator of Central Processing • Alicia Salmoni, Reseacher/ 
'Track Manager • George Saulnirr. Da/a Entry Clerk • Bethany 'I ainmaro. Administrative Assistant, Corpo- 
rate Programs • Valerie Vignaux, Administrative issistant, Annual Fund • Tracy Wilson. Director of Tangle- 
wood Development 



• 



EDUCATIONAL ACTIVITIES/ARCHIVES 

Richard Ortner, Administrator of the Tanglewood Music Center 
Myran Parker-Brass, Coordinator of Youth Activities 

Bridget P. Carr, Archivist-Position endowed by Caroline Dwight Bain 
Assistant, Tanglewood Music Center 



Barbara Logue, Administrative 



FUNCTIONS OFFICE 

Cheryl Silvia Lopes, Function Manager 

Lesley Ann Cefalo, Assistant Function Manager • Elizabeth Francey-Amis, Assistant to the Function 

Manager/Tanglewood Function Coordinator 

HUMAN RESOURCES 

Marion Gardner-Saxe, Director of Human Resources 

Anna Asphar, Benefits Manager • ^uko L'chino. Administrative Assistant, Human Resources 

INFORMATION SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT 

Robert Bell, Manager of Information Systems 

William Beckett, Information Systems Coordinator • James Major, Information Systems Special 
Projects Coordinator • Michael Pijoan. Assistant Manager of Information Systems 

PUBLIC RELATIONS 

Bernadette M. Horgan, Director of Media Relations 

Susanna Bonta, Media Relations Coordinator • Caleb Cochran, Media Relations Assistant /Assistant to 

the Director of Public Relations and Marketing • Leah Oko, Administrative Assistant 

PUBLICATIONS 

Steven Ledbetter, Musicologist & Program Annotator 

Marc Mandel, Publications Manager 

Eleanor Hayes McGourty, Boston Pops Publications Coordinator/Marketing Copywriter 

SALES, SUBSCRIPTION, AND MARKETING 
Nancy A. Kay, Director of Sales & Marketing Manager 

Helen N.H. Brady, Group Sales Manager • Richard Chiarella, Graphic Designer • Susanna Concha, 
Marketing Coordinator • B. Victoria Johnson. Subscription Representative • Michael Miller, Symphony- 
Charge Manager • Michelene Miller, Group Sales Assistant • Kim Noltemy, Associate Marketing Manager • 
Carol Ann Passarelli, Subscription Manager • Brian Robinson, Senior Subscription Representative 

SYMPHONY HALL OPERATIONS 

Robert L. Gleason, Facilities Manager 
James E. Whitaker, House Manager 

H.R. Costa, Technical Supervisor • Michael Finlan, Switchboard Supervisor • \vilmoth A. Griffiths. 
Supervisor of Facilities Support Services • Catherine Lawlor, Administrative Assistant • John MacMinn, 
Supervisor of Building Maintenance * William D. McDonnell, Chief Steward • Cleveland Morrison, 
Stage Manager • Shawn Wilder, Mailroom Clerk- 
House Crew Charles F. Cassell, Jr. • Francis Castillo • Thomas Davenport • John Demick, 
Stage Coordinator • Michael Frazier • Hank Green • Juan Jimenez • William P. Morrill • Mark 
C. Rawson 

Security Christopher Bartlett • David Parker, Security Supervisor 

Cleaning Crew Desmond Boland • Clifford Collins • Angelo Flores • Rudolph Lewis • Robert 
MacGilvray • Lindel Milton, Lead Cleaner 

TANGLEWOOD OPERATIONS 

James J. Mooney, Facilities Manager 

VOLUNTEER OFFICE 

Leslie Wu Foley, Director of Volunteer Services 

Jennifer Flynn, Senior Project Coordinator • Pauline McCance, Senior Administrative Assistant 



BSO 






Andre Previn and the 
Boston Symphony Orchestra to 
Tour Canary Islands and Florida 
February 20-March 1 

From Thursday, February 20, through Satur- 
day, March 1, following his two weeks of 
subscription concerts, Andre Previn will 
lead the Boston Symphony Orchestra on tour 
to the Canary Islands and Florida, perform- 
ing eight concerts in Las Palmas and Santa 
Cruz in the Canary Islands, and in West Palm 
Beach, Sarasota, and Clearwater, Florida. 
The concerts in Clearwater and Sarasota are 
sponsored in part by Publix Super Markets 
Charities. The tour repertory includes the 
two programs Mr. Previn and the orchestra 
perform at Symphony Hall this month, the 
first an all-American program of music by 
Morton Gould, Aaron Copland (the Clarinet 
Concerto, featuring BSO principal clarinet 
William R. Hudgins), William Schuman (his 
Symphony No. 3, composed for Serge Kousse- 
vitzky and premiered by the BSO in October 
1941), and George Gershwin {Rhapsody in 
Blue, with Mr. Previn at the piano), the sec- 
ond including Haydn's Symphony No. 96, 
The Miracle, and Shostakovich's powerful 
Symphony No. 8, one of the great works of 
the World War II years. 

New BSO Recording of 
Faure's "Requiem" due 
on RCA Victor Red Seal 

Due for release this month on RCA Victor 
Red Seal is Seiji Ozawa's recording with 
the Boston Symphony Orchestra of Faure's 
Requiem, taped in March/April 1994 at 
Symphony Hall with soprano Barbara Bon- 
ney, baritone Hakan Hagegard, and the 
Tanglewood Festival Chorus, John Oliver, 
conductor. Filling out the disc is a selection 
of Faur6 songs sung by Barbara Bonney and 
Hakan Hagegard with pianist Warren Jones. 
Among recent discs by Boston Symphony 
members, two feature BSO flutist Fenwick 
Smith — an album of Ned Rorem's "Chamber 
Music with Flute" on Etcetera, with perform- 
ers also including BSO principal harp Ann 
Hobson Pilot; and, on Archetype Records, 
an album of music by John Harbison entitled 



"The Boston Collection," featuring Mr. Smith 
in Harbison's Duo for Flute and Piano with 
pianist Randall Hodgkinson. In addition, 
BSO principal trombonist Ronald Barron is 
featured on two recent discs on the Boston 
Brass Series label: "All American Trom- 
bone," a collection of music by American 
composers; and "In the Family," including 
music of Harold Shapero, Shostakovich, 
Vaughan Williams, and others, with Edwin 
Barker, Thomas Gauger, Marianne Gedigian, 
Ann Hobson Pilot, and Douglas Yeo among 
the performers. 

These and other Boston Symphony record- 
ings — including also a brand-new Doyen 
release, "Proclamations," featuring BSO bass 
trombonist Douglas Yeo — are available in 
the Symphony Shop. 

Symphony Hall Tours 

As we approach the centennial of Symphony 
Hall in the year 2000, interest in tours of 
this historic building is growing. The Boston 
Symphony Association of Volunteers is 
pleased to offer tours of Symphony Hall, 
conducted by experienced tour guides, for 
groups of adults or children. The tours take 
approximately one hour and can be arranged 
between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through 
Friday, depending on the orchestra's sched- 
ule. For further information, please call Paul- 
ine McCance in the Volunteer Office at (617) 
638-9263. 

Public Funding for the 
Boston Symphony Orchestra 

The BSO is the recipient this season of an 
operating grant from the Massachusetts Cul- 
tural Council, an award being used to help 
underwrite the cost of subscription-season 
concerts. The mission of the Council is to 
promote excellence, access, education, and 
diversity in the arts, humanities, and inter- 
pretive sciences in order to improve the 
quality of life for all Massachusetts residents 
and contribute to the economic vitality of 
our communities. 

A state agency, the Massachusetts Cultural 
Council receives an annual appropriation 
from the Commonwealth, as well as support 
from the National Endowment for the Arts. 
The BSO has also received a grant from the 
INK A that helps make possible its \ early 



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program of fifteen Youth Concerts. Govern- 
mental support also stimulates economic 
activity; in 1992. Massachusetts cultural 
organizations employed 20.000 people and 
generated $1.5 billion for the economy. In 
spite of all that it has accomplished, public 
funding for the arts has declined dramati- 
cally during the past ten years. The federal 
government currently spends only 32 cents 
per taxpayer on NEA, while Massachusetts 
spends $2.31 per head on MCC. 

The orchestra urges you to contact your 
state and federal representatives, or other 
congressional leaders, to express your ap- 
preciation for the music that public support 
helps make available to you as a member of 
Boston Symphony audiences. For more in- 
formation on public funding for the arts and 
how to contact your representatives, please 
call Gerrit Petersen, the BSO's Assistant 
Director of Foundation and Government 
Support, at (617) 638-9462. 

Art in Support of Art 

Throughout the 1996-97 season, as Sym- 
phony Hall resounds with music, the Cabot- 
Cahners Room is filled with works of art, 
continuing the long-standing tradition of 
bringing visual pleasure to the concertgoing 
public and especially the art collectors 
among them. Sponsored by the Boston Sym- 
phony Association of Volunteers, the shows 
for the 1996-97 season continue with an 
exhibition of photographs by Bela Kalman. 
Born in Hungary, Mr. Kalman left that coun- 
try during the 1956 uprising and moved to 
the United States. During his years as a pro- 
fessional photographer Mr. Kalman has been 
honored by the International Artist Photog- 
raphers Association, has won seventeen 
medals, and has had nineteen one-man 
shows. His work is in the permanent collec- 
tions of eighteen museums. The author of 
several books, Mr. Kalman is currently work- 
ing on Flowers, a book featuring flower pho- 
tos from his archives, the earliest from 1939, 
and continuing through his latest electronic 
images from 1996. Houghton-Mifflin Pub- 
lishers is producing the book in the fall of 
1997. A selection of these (lower photographs 
is on display in the Cabot-Cahners Room, 
under the auspices of Boston's Robert Klein 

Gallery, through March 3. This exhibition 



will be followed by a display of works from 
the Francesca Anderson Gallery. For further 
information please contact Jen Flynn in the 
Volunteer Office at (617) 638-9391; she can 
put you in touch with our art advisers or ar- 
range your purchase. Remember, the orches- 
tra benefits from the sale of every art work. 

The BSO Goes On-line 

Boston Symphony and Boston Pops fans 
with access to the Internet can now visit 
the orchestra's new official home page 
(http://www.bso.org), which provides up-to- 
the-minute information about all the orches- 
tra's activities. In addition to program listings 
and ticket prices, the web site has biogra- 
phies of BSO musicians and guest artists, 
current press releases, historical facts and 
figures, helpful telephone numbers, and in- 
formation on auditions and job openings. A 
highlight of the site, and a first for cultural 
organizations represented on the Internet, is 
a virtual-reality tour of the orchestra's home, 
Symphony Hall. Since the BSO web site will 
be updated on a regular basis, to include 
1997 Boston Pops and Tanglewood informa- 
tion as well as any program changes, we 
invite you to check in frequently. 

Ticket Resale 

If, as a Boston Symphony subscriber, you 
find yourself unable to use your subscrip- 
tion ticket, please make that ticket available 
for resale by calling (617) 266-1492 during 
business hours. You may also leave your 
ticket information on the Resale Line at 
(617) 638-9426 at any time. In this way you 
help bring needed revenue to the orchestra 
and at the same time make your seat avail- 
able to someone who might otherwise be 
unable to attend the concert. A mailed re- 
ceipt will acknowledge your tax-deductible 
contribution. 

In Case of Snow. . . 

To find out the status of a Boston Symphony 
concert and options available to you in case 
of a snow emergency, BSO subscribers and 
patrons may call a special Symphony Hall 
number. Patrons may dial (617) 638-9495 at 
any time for a recorded message regarding 
the current status of a concert. 



I 



. 




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8 




SEUI OZAWA 

Seiji Ozawa is now in his twenty-fourth season as music director 
of the Boston Symphony Orchestra. Mr. Ozawa became the 
BSO's thirteenth music director in 1973, after a year as music 
adviser; his tenure with the Boston Symphony is the longest of 
any music director currently active with an American orches- 
tra. In his nearly twenty-five years as music director, Mr. Ozawa 
has maintained the orchestra's distinguished reputation both at 
home and abroad, with concerts at Symphony Hall and Tangle- 
wood, on tours to Europe, Japan, Hong Kong, China, and South 
America, and across the United States, including regular con- 
certs in New York. Mr. Ozawa has upheld the BSO's commit- 
ment to new music through the commissioning of new works, including a series of cen- 
tennial commissions marking the orchestra's hundredth birthday in 1981, a series of 
works celebrating the fiftieth anniversary of the Tanglewood Music Center in 1990, and 
a current series represented this season by new works from Leon Kirchner and Bernard 
Rands. In addition, he has recorded more than 130 works with the orchestra, represent- 
ing more than fifty different composers, on ten labels. 

In addition to his work with the Boston Symphony, Mr. Ozawa appears regularly 
with the Berlin Philharmonic, the New Japan Philharmonic, the London Symphony, the 
Orchestre National de France, the Philharmonia of London, and the Vienna Philhar- 
monic. He made his Metropolitan Opera debut in December 1992, appears regularly at 
La Scala and the Vienna Staatsoper, and has also conducted opera at the Paris Opera, 
Salzburg, and Covent Garden. In September 1992 he founded the Saito Kinen Festival 
in Matsumoto, Japan, in memory of his teacher Hideo Saito, a central figure in the cul- 
tivation of Western music and musical technique in Japan, and a co-founder of the 
Toho School of Music in Tokyo. In addition to his many Boston Symphony recordings, 
Mr. Ozawa has recorded with the Berlin Philharmonic, the Chicago Symphony, the 
London Philharmonic, the Orchestre National, the Orchestre de Paris, the Philharmonia 
of London, the Saito Kinen Orchestra, the San Francisco Symphony, the Toronto Sym- 
phony, and the Vienna Philharmonic, among others. 

Born in 1935 in Shenyang, China, Seiji Ozawa studied music from an early age and 
later graduated with first prizes in composition and conducting from Tokyo's Toho School 
of Music. In 1959 he won first prize at the International Competition of Orchestra Con- 
ductors held in Besangon, France. Charles Munch, then music director of the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra, subsequently invited him to attend the Tanglewood Music Center, 
where he won the Koussevitzky Prize for outstanding student conductor in 1960. While 
a student of Herbert von Karajan in West Berlin, Mr. Ozawa came to the attention of 
Leonard Bernstein, who appointed him assistant conductor of the New York Philharmon- 
ic for the 1961-62 season. He made his first professional concert appearance in North 
America in January 1962, with the San Francisco Symphony. He was music director of 
the Chicago Symphony Orchestra's Ravinia Festival for five summers beginning in 1964, 
music director of the Toronto Symphony from 1965 to 1969, and music director of the 
San Francisco Symphony from 1970 to 1976, followed by a year as that orchestra's 
music adviser. He conducted the Boston Symphony Orchestra for the first time in 1964, 
at Tanglewood, and made his first Symphony Hall appearance with the orchestra in 
January 1968. In 1970 he became an artistic director of Tanglewood. 

Mr. Ozawa recently became the first recipient of Japan's Inouye Sho ("Inouye 
Award"). Created to recognize lifetime achievement in the arts, the award is named 
after this century's preeminent Japanese novelist, Yasushi Inouye. In September 1994 
Mr. Ozawa received his second Emmy award, for Individual Achievement in Cultural 
Programming, for "Dvorak in Prague: A Celebration," with the Boston Symphony Orches- 
tra. He won his first Emmy for the Boston Symphony Orchestra's PBS television series 
"Evening at Symphony." Mr. Ozawa holds honorary doctor of music degrees from the 
University of Massachusetts, the New England Conservator) of Music, and Wheaton 
College in Norton, Massachusetts. 




■ 




First Violins 

Malcolm Lowe 

Concertmaster 

Charles Munch chair, 
fully funded in perpetuity 

Tamara Smirnova 
Associate Concertmaster 
Helen Horner Mclntyre chair, 
endowed in perpetuity in 1976 



BOSTON SYMPHONY 

ORCHESTRA 

1996-97 

Seiji Ozawa 

Music Director 

Music Directorship endowed by 

John Moors Cabot 

Bernard Haitink 

Principal Guest Conductor 




Assistant Concertmaster 

Robert L. Beal, and 

Enid L. and Bruce A. Beal chair, 

endowed in perpetuity in 1 980 
° Laura Park 

Assistant Concertmaster 

Edward and Bertha C. Rose chair 
Bo Youp Hwang 

John and Dorothy Wilson chair, 

fully funded in perpetuity 
Lucia Lin 

Forrest Foster Collier chair 
Leo Panasevich 

Carolyn and George Rowland chair 
Gottfried Wilfinger 

Dorothy Q. and David B. Arnold, Jr., 

chair, fully funded in perpetuity 
Alfred Schneider 

Muriel C. Kasdon 

and Marjorie C. Paley chair 
Raymond Sird 

Ruth and Carl Shapiro chair, 

fully funded in perpetuity 
Ikuko Mizuno 

David and Ingrid Kosowsky chair 
Amnon Levy 

Theodore W. and Evelyn Berenson 

Family chair 

* Harvey Seigel 

Stephanie Morris Marryott and 
Franklin J. Marryott chair 

* Nancy Bracken 
*Aza Raykhtsaum 

* Bonnie Bewick 

* James Cooke 

* Victor Romanul 

Bessie Pappas chair 

* Catherine French 

Second Violins 

Marylou Speaker Churchill 

Principal 

Fahnestock chair 
Vyacheslav Uritsky 

Assistant Principal 

Charlotte and Irving W. Rabb chair, 

endowed in perpetuity in 1977 
Ronald Knudsen 

Edgar and Shirley Grossman chair 
Joseph McGauley 

Shirley and J. Richard Fennell chair 
Ronan Lefkowitz 

David H. and Edith C. Howie chair, 

fully funded in perpetuity 

* Jerome Rosen 

* Sheila Fiekowsky 

* Jennie Shames 

* Participating in a system of rotated 
seating 
%0n sabbatical leave 
°On leave 
§ Substitute player 



* Valeria Vilker Kuchment 
*Tatiana Dimitriades 
*Si-Jing Huang 

* Nicole Monahan 

* Kelly Barr 
*Wendy Putnam 

Violas 

Steven Ansell 

Principal 

Charles S. Dana chair, 

endowed in perpetuity in 1970 
Hui Liu 

Assistant Principal 

Anne Stoneman chair, 

fully funded in perpetuity 
Ronald Wilkison 

lx>is and Harlan Anderson chair 

Robert Barnes 

Burton Fine 

Joseph Pietropaolo 

Michael Zaretsky 

Marc Jeanneret 

*Mark Ludwig 

Helene R. Cahners-Kaplan and 
Carol R. Goldberg chair 

* Rachel Fagerburg 

* Edward Gazouleas 
*Kazuko Matsusaka 

Cellos 

Jules Eskin 

Principal 

Philip R. Allen chair, 

endowed in perpetuity in 1969 
Martha Babcock 

Assistant Principal 

Vernon and Marion Alden chair, 

endowed in perpetuity in 1977 
Sato Knudsen 

Esther S. and Joseph M. Shapiro chair 
Joel Moerschel 

Sandra and David Bakalar chair 
Luis Leguia 

Robert Bradford Newman chair, 

fully funded in perpetuity 
Carol Procter 

Lillian and Nathan R. Miller chair 

* Ronald Feldman 

Richard C. and Ellen E. Paine chair, 
fully funded in perpetuity 

* Jerome Patterson 

Charles and JoAnne Dickinson chair 
*Jonathan Miller 

Rosemary and Donald Hudson chair 
*Owen Young 

John F. Cogan, Jr., and 

Mary L. Cornille chair, 

fully funded in perpetuity 

* Andrew Pearce 

Gordon and Mary Ford Kingsley 
Family chair 

Basses 

Edwin Barker 

Principal 

Harold D. Hodgkinson chair, 

endowed in perpetuity in 1974 
Lawrence Wolfe 

Assistant Principal 

Maria Nistazos Stata chair, 

fully funded in perpetuity 



10 



■ « 

■ 



I 



Joseph Hearne 

Leith Family chair, 
fully funded in perpetuity 
John Salkowski 
Joseph and Jan Brett Hearne chair 

* Robert Olson 

* James Orleans 
*Todd Seeber 
*John Stovall 

* Dennis Roy 

Flutes 

Elizabeth Ostling 

Acting Principal 

Walter Piston chair, 

endowed in perpetuity in 1970 
Fenwick Smith 

Myra and Robert Kraft chair, 

endowed in perpetuity in 1981 



Assistant Principal 
Marian Gray Lewis chair, 
fully funded in perpetuity 

Piccolo 

Geralyn Coticone 
Evelyn and C. Charles Marran 
chair, endowed in perpetuity in 1979 

Oboes 

Alfred Genovese 

Principal 

Mildred B. Remis chair, 
endowed in perpetuity in 1975 
Mark McEwen 

Keisuke Wakao 
Assistant Principal 
Elaine and Jerome Rosenfeld chair 

English Horn 

Robert Sheena 
Beranek chair, 
fully funded in perpetuity 

Clarinets 

William R. Hudgins 

Principal 

Ann S.M. Banks chair, 
endowed in perpetuity in 1977 
Scott Andrews 

Thomas Martin 
Associate Principal & E-flat clarinet 
Stanton W. and Elisabeth K. Davis 
chair, fully funded in perpetuity 



Bass Clarinet 

Craig Nordstrom 
Farla and Harvey Chet 
Krentzman chair, 
fully funded in perpetuity 

Bassoons 

Richard Svoboda 

Principal 

Edward A. Toft chair, 
endowed in perpetuity in 1974 
Roland Small 

Richard Ranti 

Associate Principal 

Contrabassoon 

Gregg Henegar 
Helen Rand Thayer chair 

Horns 

Charles Kavalovski 

Principal 

Helen Sagoff Slosberg chair, 

endowed in perpetuity in 1974 
Richard Sebring 

Associate Principal 

Margaret Andersen Congleton 

chair, fully funded in perpetuity 
Daniel Katzen 

Elizabeth B. Storer chair 
Jay Wadenpfuhl 
Richard Mackey 
Jonathan Menkis 

Trumpets 

Charles Schlueter 

Principal 

Roger Louis Voisin chair, 

endowed in perpetuity in 1977 
Peter Chapman 

Ford H. Cooper chair 
Timothy Morrison 

Associate Principal 

Nina L. and Eugene B. 

Doggett chair 
Thomas Rolfs 

Trombones 

tRonald Barron 

Principal 

J. P. and Mary B. Barger chair, 

fully funded in perpetuity 



Norman Bolter 
§Darren Acosta 

Bass Trombone 

Douglas Yeo 

Tuba 

Chester Schmitz 
Margaret and William C. 
Rousseau chair, 

fully funded in perpetuity 

Timpani 

Everett Firth 

Sylvia Shippen Wells chair, 
endowed in perpetuity in 1974 

Percussion 

Thomas Gauger 

Peter and Anne Brooke chair, 
fully funded in perpetuity 
Frank Epstein 

Peter Andrew Lurie chair 
J. William Hudgins 

Timothy Genis 

Assistant Timpanist 

Harps 

t Ann Hobson Pilot 
Principal 

Willona Henderson Sinclair chair 
Sarah Schuster Ericsson 

Librarians 

Marshall Burlingame 

Principal 

Lia and William Poorvu chair 
William Shisler 
Sandra Pearson 

Assistant Conductor 

Richard Westerfield 
Anna E. Finnerty chair 

Personnel Managers 

Lynn Larsen 
Bruce M. Creditor 

Stage Manager 

Position endowed by 
Angelica L. Russell 
Peter Riley Pfitzinger 






I 




11 



A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

Now in its 116th season, the Boston Symphony Orchestra gave its inaugural concert 
on October 22, 1881, and has continued to uphold the vision of its founder, the philan- 
thropist, Civil War veteran, and amateur musician Henry Lee Higginson, for more than 
a century. Under the leadership of Seiji Ozawa, its music director since 1973, the 
Boston Symphony Orchestra has performed throughout the United States, as well as in 
Europe, Japan, Hong Kong, South America, and China, and reaches audiences number- 
ing in the millions through its performances on radio, television, and recordings. It 
plays an active role in commissioning new works from today's most important com- 
posers; its summer season at Tanglewood is regarded as one of the world's most impor- 
tant music festivals; 

it helps develop the audience of the future through BSO Youth Concerts and through a 
variety of outreach programs involving the entire Boston community; and, during the 
Tanglewood season, it sponsors the Tanglewood Music Center, one of the world's most 
important training grounds for young composers, conductors, instrumentalists, and 
vocalists. The orchestra's virtuosity is reflected in the concert and recording activities of 
the Boston Symphony Chamber Players, the world's only permanent chamber ensemble 
made up of a major symphony orchestra's principal players. The activities of the Boston 
Pops Orchestra have established an international standard for the performance of lighter 
kinds of music. Overall, the mission of the Boston Symphony Orchestra is to foster and 
maintain an organization dedicated to the making of music consonant with the highest 
aspirations of musical art, creating performances and providing educational and training 
programs at the highest level of excellence. This is accomplished with the continued 
support of its audiences, governmental assistance on both the federal and local levels, 
and through the generosity of many foundations, businesses, and individuals. 

Henry Lee Higginson dreamed of founding a great and permanent orchestra in his 
home town of Boston for many years before that vision approached reality in the spring 
of 1881. The following October the first Boston Symphony Orchestra concert was given 
under the direction of conductor Georg Henschel, who would remain as music director 
until 1884. For nearly twenty years Boston Symphony concerts were held in the Old 
Boston Music Hall; Symphony Hall, one of the world's most highly regarded concert 
halls, was opened in 1900. Henschel was succeeded by a series of German-born and 
-trained conductors — Wilhelm Gericke, Arthur Nikisch, Emil Paur, and Max Fiedler — 
culminating in the appointment of the legendary Karl Muck, who served two tenures as 
music director, 1906-08 and 1912-18. Meanwhile, in July 1885, the musicians of the 
Boston Symphony had given their first "Promenade" concert, offering both music and 
refreshments, and fulfilling Major Higginson's wish to give "concerts of a lighter kind of 




12 



music." These concerts, soon to be given in the springtime and renamed first "Popular" 
and then "Pops," fast became a tradition. 

In 1915 the orchestra made its first transcontinental trip, playing thirteen concerts 
at the Panama-Pacific Exposition in San Francisco. Recording, begun with RCA in 1917, 
continued with increasing frequency, as did radio broadcasts. In 1918 Henri Rabaud 
was engaged as conductor; he was succeeded a year later by Pierre Monteux. These 
appointments marked the beginning of a French-oriented tradition which would be 
maintained, even during the Russian-born Serge Koussevitzky's time, with the employ- 
ment of many French-trained musicians. 

The Koussevitzky era began in 1924. His extraordinary musicianship and electric 
personality proved so enduring that he served an unprecedented term of twenty-five 
years. Regular radio broadcasts of Boston Symphony concerts began during Kousse- 
vitzky's years as music director. In 1936 Koussevitzky led the orchestra's first concerts 
in the Berkshires; a year later he and the players took up annual summer residence at 
Tanglewood. Koussevitzky passionately shared Major Higginson's dream of "a good hon- 
est school for musicians," and in 1940 that dream was realized with the founding of the 
Berkshire Music Center (now called the Tanglewood Music Center). 

In 1929 the free Esplanade concerts on the Charles River in Boston were inaugurat- 
ed by Arthur Fiedler, who had been a member of the orchestra since 1915 and who in 
1930 became the eighteenth conductor of the Boston Pops, a post he would hold for half 
a century, to be succeeded by John Williams in 1980. The Boston Pops Orchestra cele- 
brated its hundredth birthday in 1985 under Mr. Williams's baton. Keith Lockhart 
began his tenure as twentieth conductor of the Boston Pops in May 1995, succeeding 
Mr. Williams. 

Charles Munch followed Koussevitzky as music director of the Boston Symphony 
Orchestra in 1949. Munch continued Koussevitzky's practice of supporting contempo- 
rary composers and introduced much music from the French repertory to this country. 
During his tenure the orchestra toured abroad for the first time and its continuing series 
of Youth Concerts was initiated. Erich Leinsdorf began his seven-year term as music 
director in 1962. Leinsdorf presented numerous premieres, restored many forgotten and 
neglected works to the repertory, and, like his two predecessors, made many recordings 
for RCA; in addition, many concerts were televised under his direction. Leinsdorf was 
also an energetic director of the Tanglewood Music Center; under his leadership a full- 
tuition fellowship program was established. Also during these years, in 1964, the Boston 
Symphony Chamber Players were founded. William Steinberg succeeded Leinsdorf in 
1969. He conducted a number of American and world premieres, made recordings for 
Deutsche Grammophon and RCA, appeared regularly on television, led the 1971 Euro- 
pean tour, and directed concerts on the east coast, in the south, and in the mid-west. 

Now in his twenty-fourth season as the BSO's music director, Seiji Ozawa became the 
thirteenth conductor to hold that post in the fall of 1973, following a year as music ad- 
viser and having already been appointed an artistic director of the Tanglewood Festival 
in 1970. During his tenure as music director Mr. Ozawa has continued to solidify the or- 
chestra's reputation both at home and abroad. He has also reaffirmed the BSO's commit- 
ment to new music, through a series of centennial commissions marking the orchestra's 
100th birthday, a series of works celebrating the fiftieth anniversary of the Tanglewood 
Music Center in 1990, and a continuing series of commissions from composers includ- 
ing Henri Dutilleux, Lukas Foss, Alexander Goehr, John Harbison, Hans Werner Henze, 
Leon Kirchner, Bernard Rands, Sir Michael Tippett, and Yehudi Wyner. Under his direc- 
tion the orchestra has also expanded its recording activities, to include releases on the 
Philips, Telarc, Sony Classical/CBS Masterworks, EMI/Angel, Hyperion, New World, 
and Erato labels. In 1995 Seiji Ozawa and the Boston Symphony Orchestra welcomed 
Bernard Haitink in his new role as Principal Guest Conductor, in which capacity 
Mr. Haitink conducts and records with the orchestra, and also teaches at Tanglewood. 

Today the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Inc. presents more than 250 concerts annu- 
ally. It is an ensemble that has richly fulfilled Henry Lee Higginson's vision of a great 
and permanent orchestra in Boston. 



I 






13 



■ • . 




■ To all those who practiced 

tirelessly all those years. 

Without applause. Without praise. 

Driven by the music, the emotion 

struggling to get out. Never satisfied. 

Constantly pushing to be better. 

Dreaming. Always dreaming of 

the day they'll give the 

performance of their lives. 

■ As a company that is passionate 

about its performance, 

Nortel is proud to sponsor 

the Boston Symphony. 

It's part of our worldwide 

commitment to communications 

excellence in all its forms. 

■ For more information, 

call i-8oo-4 NORTEL. 

Or reach us on the Internet at 

http://www.nortel.com. ■ 



N&RTEL 

NORTHERN TELECOM 

Enterprise Networks • Wireless Networks 
Broadband Networks • Public Carrier Networks 



© 1996. Nortel is a registered trademark of Northern Telecom. 



BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

Seiji Ozawa, Music Director 

Bernard Haitink, Principal Guest Conductor 

One Hundred and Sixteenth Season, 1996-97 

Thursday, February 13, at 8 
SPONSORED BY NORTEL 

Friday, February 14, at 1:30 
Saturday, February 15, at 8 

ANDRE PREVIN conducting 




HAYDN 



Symphony No. 96 in D, The Miracle 

Adagio — Allegro 
Andante 

Menuetto: Allegretto 
Finale: Vivace assai 



INTERMISSION 



SHOSTAKOVICH 



Symphony No. 8 in C minor, Opus 65 

Adagio 
Allegretto 
Allegro non troppo 
Largo 
Allegretto 



The evening concerts will end about 10:10 and the afternoon concert about 3:40. 

RCA, Deutsche Grammophon, Philips, Telarc, Sony Classical/CBS Masterworks, Angel/EMI. 
London/Decca, Erato, Hyperion, and New World records 

Baldw in piano 

Please be sure the electronic signal on your wateli or pager is switched off 
during the concert. 

The program hooks for the Friday series are given in loving memory of Mrs. Hugh 
Bancroft by her daughters Mrs. A. Werk Cook and the late Mrs. William C Cox. 

Boston Symphony Orchestra concerts are funded in part by a grant from tin- 
Massachusetts Cultural Council, a state agency. 

L5 Week 16 



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TRADITION 
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Boston Symphony Orchestra 

**> gain the satisfaction of preserving a great 

Boston cultural resource 

... and avoid capital gains liability 

If you or someone you know may be interested in learning more about 
this successful program, please contact: 

Joyce M. Serwitz 

Director, Major Gifts Program 

Boston Symphony Orchestra 

Boston, MA 02115 

(617) 638-9273 




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Joseph Haydn 

Symphony No. 96 in D, The Miracle 




Franz Joseph Haydn was born in Rohrau, Lower Austria, 
during the night of March 31/ April 1, 1732, and died 
in Vienna on May 31, 1809. He wrote this symphony in 
London in 1791 and performed it at one of the concerts 
produced by Johann Peter Salomon during that year, 
possibly as early as the fourth concert in the series, given 
on April 1. (Concert programs and newspaper reviews 
of the time never identify a symphony by key, so unless 
some specific musical detail is mentioned, it is not al- 
ways possible to know which symphony was performed 
at which concert.) In any event, it was certainly per- 
formed by the twelfth concert, the end of the series, on 
June 3. This symphony did not remain much in the 
public favor during the romantic era; it was apparently 
never performed in the United States until the twentieth century, and it did not enter the 
repertory of the Boston Symphony Orchestra until Erich Leinsdorf conducted it here in 
November 1962 and then again in January 1968, when he also brought it to New York, 
later BSO performances being given by Seiji Ozawa (including the orchestras only Tangle- 
wood performance, on July 31, 1971, though the work was played there more recently by 
the Academy of St. Martin-in-the- Fields, Neville Marriner conducting, in July 1987) and 
Joseph Silverstein (October 1980 and January 1981, with a Providence performance also 
that month). The symphony is scored for flutes, oboes, bassoons, horns, and trumpets in 
pairs, timpani, and strings. 

The story of Haydn's dramatic meeting with the impresario Salomon (who walked 
into Haydn's home one morning in December 1790 and announced, "I am Salomon 
from London and I have come to fetch you") is too well-known to require elaboration, 
but it is worth noting that Haydn's two extended visits to London, the first beginning in 
January 1791 and the second ending in August 1795, finally made the Viennese real- 
ize that they had a truly great composer in their midst, a composer who could and did 
arouse unprecedented enthusiasm from the large musical public that London boasted 
at the time. (Of all European cities London had the most varied and active musical life, 
and the most perceptive audiences.) Haydn's major accomplishment for his London 
visits was the composition of his last twelve symphonies, capping off the extraordinary 
development that had seen the creation of more than a hundred works in the genre in 
less than four decades. 

Haydn took with him a handful of recently composed symphonies that had not yet 
been heard in England. He almost certainly made his debut in Salomon's concert series, 
the first of which was given on March 11, 1791, in the Hanover Square Rooms, with 
one of these older symphonies, mostly likely the Symphony No. 92 (based on the evi- 
dence of a description of the first rehearsal, which commented that the piece in question 
opened with three notes of the same pitch), but Symphony No. 96 could have been on 
the program, since Haydn had composed it some weeks earlier, almost immediately after 
arriving in England. Curiosity was high. Haydn was widely admired, but there was con- 
cern that anyone who wrote so much must sooner or later write himself out. Yet the first 
concert showed otherwise. Over and over again the reviews noted that Haydn's music 
was both "pleasing" and "scientific," these two terms being constantly recurring locutions 
to identify Haydn's unique accomplishment: the ability to write music that was at once 
immediately accessible and structurally significant with a fully refined technique. 

The nickname for the symphony, The Miracle, was known only in England. In Ger- 
man-speaking countries until fairly recently it has always been identified only by key 



17 



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18 



and number, though now the English nickname occasionally appears in German trans- 
lation as well. The nickname comes from an incident that seems to have occurred at 
one of Haydn's concerts, but the connection of Symphony No. 96 with the incident (if 
it happened at all) appears to be an error. Haydn's friend and early biographer Albert 
Dies recounts it this way: 

When Haydn appeared in the orchestra and seated himself at the Pianoforte,* 
to conduct a symphony personally, the curious audience in the parterre left their 
seats and pressed forward towards the orchestra, with a view to seeing Haydn bet- 
ter at close range. The seats in the middle of the parterre were therefore empty, 
and no sooner were they empty but a great chandelier plunged down, smashed, 
and threw the numerous company into great confusion. As soon as the first mo- 
ment of shock was over, and those who had pressed forward realized the danger 



*It was not yet standard practice for a conductor to stand in front of an orchestra with a baton (that 
was a development of the romantic era). Most commonly the composer, if he was present, sat at 
the keyboard, like a continuo player in the older Baroque practice, and led the performance from 
that position, regardless of the fact that no part was composed for the keyboard and the change in 
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which they had so luckily escaped, and could find words to express the same, 
many persons showed their state of mind by shouting loudly: "miracle, miracle!" 
Haydn himself was much moved, and thanked merciful Providence who had 
allowed it to happen that he [Haydn] could, to a certain extent, be the reason, 
or the machine, by which at least thirty persons' lives were saved. Only a few 
of the audience received minor bruises. 

This occurrence I have heard in various versions, almost always with the addi- 
tional fact that the symphony has in London been given the complimentary name 
"The Miracle." It may be that this is true, but when I asked Haydn about it, he 
said: "I know nothing of that." 

It's a great story, but there are skeptics. Neukomm, who annotated the Dies biography, 
commented, "I have never heard anything of this anecdote, either from Haydn, or later, 
in England." And, in any case, it seems that the anecdote got connected to the wrong 
piece of music; the chandelier incident, according to H.C. Robbins Landon, occurred 
at the first performance of the Drumroll Symphony, No. 103. 

The nickname The Miracle might justifiably be applied to Symphony No. 96 purely 
on the grounds of its musical riches, were it not for the fact that Haydn composed elev- 
en other symphonies for his London audience, each of which, in its own way, could be 
said to deserve the label. Still, for all its brilliant energy, the symphony did not survive 
changes of taste unscathed. Some of the most original touches — the use of trumpets 
and timpani in the slow movement, and one of the most strikingly unexpected harmon- 
ic changes in the same movement — were stupidly removed or edited out of existence 
by an anonymous nineteenth-century hand. Other mistakes apparently were the errors 
of the first copyists, who prepared the performance material from Haydn's manuscript; 
these mistakes were then carried over into other sets of parts prepared from the first 
copies. No doubt these copyists were unfamiliar with Haydn's hand and, more impor- 
tantly, his system of manuscript abbreviations. As a newcomer to the country, Haydn 
apparently did not find the best copyists at first (he wrote to Vienna in the fall of 1791 




The Hanover Square Rooms, where Haydn himself led the first 
performance of his Symphony No. 96 



21 



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of his difficulties with copyists), so that the first two symphonies he wrote in London — 
Nos. 96 and 95 — suffered especially. Not until very recently, until the appearance of 
H.C. Robbins Landon's critical edition, have we been able to hear The Miracle actually 
as Haydn wrote it. 

As with all but one of the London symphonies, Haydn chose to begin with a slow 
introduction, a procedure that lends weight and dignity to the opening while serving at 
the same time to quiet the enthusiastic audience with a loud first chord, thereby ensur- 
ing that everyone would hear the actual (quiet) beginning of the movement proper. The 
introduction also reveals a move that Haydn makes several times in the course of the 
symphony, a sudden change from the major to the minor mode, momentary here, though 
it has wider implications later. The main material of the Allegro is not so much melod- 
ic as rhythmic — more accompaniment than theme, though Haydn uses this purposely 
restricted material throughout the movement in a richly imaginative way. Particularly 
telling is the pick-up of three eighth-notes which accumulate potential energy, releas- 
ing it on the downbeat to propel the music forward. That particular motive becomes 
ubiquitous as the movement proceeds. Haydn's development takes us through the rela- 
tively dark key of C major, sequencing to land solidly on an F-sharp, followed by a sur- 
prising silence lasting almost three measures. Now, we are primed to expect a recapitu- 
lation after so dramatic a pause, and it would be possible (though a bit irregular) to 
return to the home key after that F-sharp. But Haydn has a delicious surprse: a false 
reprise in G, which may sound convincing enough at first until he brings us around to 
the real return, signaled with a quiet scale passage in the first violins, not the horns 
and trumpets of the purposely misleading joke. 

The Andante is a delicious, lighthearted play featuring woodwind obbligatos and the 
unusual presence of trumpets and timpani. It takes on a more serious tone with a turn 
to the minor and the more "academic" air of a fugato for the middle section. As the 



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24 



opening section returns and concludes, we have a delightful surprise: Haydn pauses on 
the chord that normally introduces the cadenza in a concerto, and suddenly two solo 
violins seize the moment. Followed by a flute and pairs of oboes, bassoons, and horns, 
they take off on a written-out ensemble cadenza, even closing with the traditional trills. 
Robbins Landon has suggested that this passage was Haydn's graceful bow to the musi- 
cal tastes of the London audiences, who still loved to attend "Antient Concerts" con- 
sisting of the concerti grossi of Corelli and Handel, and that Haydn here playfully hint- 
ed at the texture of those works without indulging in actual archaizing. 

The minuet is Austrian to the core, from the sturdy grandeur of the main section, 
which would not have been out of place in any Viennese palace, to the gracefully coun- 
trified Landler of the Trio, with the oboe singing over the simple "oom-pah-pah" of the 
strings. 

Haydn's characteristic fingerprints were noted by an Italian composer of Bavarian 
birth, Giovanni Simone Mayr, in a little booklet designed to introduce the works of 
Haydn to an Italian audience in 1809. His enthusiastic description of a Haydn finale is 
worth quoting, for it fits this one like a glove: 

The final Allegros or Rondos, in which Haydn employs all the means and all the 
forms offered him by measure, harmony and rhythm (in the management of which 
no one can equal him), generally consist of short phrases conjoined by means of 
diligent and artful elaboration to the highest degree of comic art, in which he is 
unmatched. In the middle and at the end these pieces are full of life, of spirit, of 
savor; they breathe a freedom, energy, and boldness that enchant and surprise 
even the most practiced ears. Here one finds every element of serious technique 
employed only to render the lightness of this delicious game of tones still more 
unexpected, and to fool us at every hand, until — tired of trying to guess what will 
come next or what we could imagine there — we submit entirely to the composer's 
discretion; and that comic power (vis comica), that gaiety so pure, so mischievous, 
full of spirit and honesty, combined with the most overflowing imagination and the 
most profound learning transport us into a sea of beautiful modulations, the sweet, 
inexpressible sensations of which neither intellect nor emotion can resist. 
[ — translation by S.L.] 

That was written in the year of Haydn's death, and though a lot of symphonies have 
come and gone since then (and a few have received enough of a welcome to stay), 
Mayr's words are still true. 

— Steven Ledbetter 







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Dmitri Shostakovich 

Symphony No. 8, Opus 65 

Dmitri Dmitrievich Shostakovich was born in St. Peters- 
burg on August 25, 1906, and died in Moscow on August 
9, 1975. He composed his Eighth Symphony in the sum- 
mer of 1943; its completion was announced by Radio 
Moscow on September 20. Soon afterward, Shostakovich 
played the symphony on the piano to a group of invited 
composers and conductors. Yevgeny Mravinsky, to whom 
the work is dedicated, conducted the State Symphony 
Orchestra in the first orchestral performance, before 
another invited audience of musicians, artists, critics, 
and journalists, at the Moscow Conservatory on Novem- 
ber 3, 1943. Artur Rodzinski led the New York Philhar- 
monic-Symphony in the American premiere on April 2, 
1944. Three weeks later, on April 21 and 22, Serge 
Koussevitzky introduced the Eighth to Boston Symphony audiences. Koussevitzky gave 
repeat performances a year later, in April 1 945, in which month he also conducted the 
Adagio alone, in memory of President Franklin D. Roosevelt, at concerts in Philadelphia 
and New York. The only Boston Symphony performances since then were led by Mstislav 
Rostropovich in February 1977 and by Bernard Haitink in November 1985. The score 
calls for two flutes and two piccolos (doubling third and fourth flutes), two oboes and 
English horn, E-flat clarinet, two clarinets and bass clarinet, two bassoons and contra- 
bassoon, four horns, three trumpets, three trombones and tuba, timpani, xylophone, side 
drum, cymbals, bass drum, tam-tam, and strings. 

Late in 1941, in immediate response to the German siege on Leningrad (which was 
to last 900 days), Shostakovich composed his Seventh Symphony (still known as the 
Leningrad), two movements of which were actually written in the besieged city. It was 
played in Russia and then all over the world as a symbol of resistance to Nazi aggres- 
sion. Although the composer's own later comments undercut any notion of the piece as 
a glorification of heroism, nonetheless the Seventh was hailed — especially in Russia — 
as an expression of Soviet opposition to Nazism, and as an apotheosis of the Russian 
spirit. 

It cannot be surprising, then, that the much darker Eighth Symphony, which fol- 
lowed the Seventh by two years, should long have been overshadowed by its more 
extrovert predecessor. The much more restrained mood of tragedy, without the relief of 
the notorious march episode in the first movement of the Seventh, seemed altogether 
too "negative" for many listeners — especially those in government posts. The official 
line frowned on works of art that were not triumphant and outgoing, because they gave 
rise to negative feelings that might be applied to the state. More sensitive listeners 
were overwhelmed. Ilya Ehrenburg wrote, after hearing the Eighth for the first time, 
"I came home from the performance astounded: I had heard the voice of an ancient 
chorus from Greek tragedy. Music has a great advantage: without mentioning anything, 
it can say everything." Only during the war was it possible to write music of Lamenta- 
tion or anger, because the functionaries who insisted on finding political significance 
in the music could assume that the complaints were directed at a foreign foe. 

Shostakovich is ((noted in Testimony, his problematic ""memoirs." ;is saving years 
later, "the Seventh and Eighth symphonies arc my requiem." He found little or no dif- 
ference between the two works in expressive intent. Hut it was the Eighth, rather than 
the Seventh, that was attacked for being one-sided and negative. 

When the Eighth was performed, it was openly declared coimler-rc\ olulionar\ and 
anti-Soviet. The) said. W hy did Shostakovich write an optimistic symphony at the 



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beginning of the war and a tragic one now? At the beginning of the war we were 
retreating and now we're attacking, destroying the Fascists. And Shostakovich is 
acting tragic, that means he's on the side of the Fascists. 

Again, many years later, Shostakovich told the editor of his memoirs, Solomon Volkov, 
that, although both the Seventh and Eighth symphonies had been composed rapidly 
during the war, he thought extensively about the mood and character of his music be- 
fore beginning the rather speedy task of writing it out. Thus, the moods inherent in the 
music had been germinating for a long time before 1943. 

Nowadays people like to recall the prewar period as an idyllic time, saying that 
everything was fine until Hitler bothered us. Hitler is a criminal, that's clear, but 
so is Stalin. I feel eternal pain for those who were killed by Hitler, but I feel no 
less pain for those killed on Stalin's orders. I suffer for everyone who was tortured, 
shot, or starved to death. There were millions of them in our country before the 
war with Hitler began. The war brought much new sorrow and much new destruc- 
tion, but I haven't forgotten the terrible prewar years. That is what all my sym- 
phonies, beginning with the Fourth, are about, including the Seventh and Eighth. 

Within five years of the composition of the Eighth, Shostakovich was attacked by the 
Soviet cultural bureaucracy led by Andrei Zhdanov. Most of his serious works — includ- 
ing even pieces that had been awarded the Stalin Prize — were attacked and quickly 
dropped from the repertory. The Eighth Symphony was singled out for special attack 
and dropped from the repertory in Russia for nearly a decade; it was finally "rehabili- 
tated" in 1957. In the interim the symphony was attacked with all the usual terms 
applied by Soviet bureaucrats: formalist, self-pitying, expressionist, subjective, ultra- 
individualist. Vladimir Zakharov, a composer of light music who became secretary of 
the presidium of the Composers Union, declared: "There are still discussions around 
the question whether the Eighth is good or bad. Such a discussion is nonsense. From 
the point of view of the people, the Eighth is not a musical work at all; it is a 'composi- 
tion' that has nothing whatsoever to do with art." Circumstances change, though, and 




A photo from the 1940s of Sergei Prokofiev, Dmitri Shostakovich, and 
Aram Khachaturian 



29 



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In todav. in the West, at least, Shostakovich has come to be recognized as one of the 
great humanist composers of the century, continually drawing attention to ethical 
dilemmas and the moral obtuseness of power. 

Structurally the Shostakovich Eighth is unusual, comprising five movements strik- 
ingly unbalanced in length and respective weight. The first movement is enormously 
long, though itself organized in a slow-fast-slow pattern. It is followed by two fast move- 
ments to which the word "scherzo" might be applied, were they not so utterly drained 
of humor or jesting. Then comes a slow passacaglia (one of Shostakovich's favorite gen- 
res) and finally a finale which, though it has its momentary outbursts, is surprisingly 
quiet and tranquil overall. Within this unusual pattern Shostakovich wrote some of his 
most deeply felt music, expressing rage, lamentation, desolation, sympathy, and dreams 
of peace. It makes more sense to us today, perhaps, because we have had more oppor- 
tunity to become acquainted with similarly atypical ground plans in the symphonies of 
Mahler, a prime influence on Shostakovich. 

The lengthy opening movement calls up at once the memory of the Fifth Symphony: 
the sharply-dotted rhythms in the strings, disposed in two unison lines, are an immedi- 
ate reminder of that work. A calmer theme in the first violins soon follows (a melody 
that will be savagely parodied in the development section), and then — after the winds 
have had a chance to comment — the second theme, again in the strings with a chordal 
accompaniment. This, too, is remarkably like the corresponding passage of the Fifth 
Symphony. But the themes become progressively more military in character, and by the 
arrival of the Allegro they are being satirized and bombarded and torn apart, only to 
move on to a mood of tranquility at the very end of the movement, where the gentle ar- 
rival at C major prefigures the close of the symphony. 

The second movement is a ferocious march-scherzo, powerful and energetic, but 
without glorifying power. The third movement suggests a powerful machine with its 
non-stop rhythm of marching quarters in an ostinato carried boldly to extremes. Another 
kind of ostinato fills the fourth movement Largo, where Shostakovich indulges in one 
of his favorite devices, the passacaglia. Following two great orchestral screams, the 
noble passacaglia melody begins fff and gradually diminishes through its ten measures 
to piano. It is repeated ten more times with sympathetic commentaries superimposed 
by horn, flute, and piccolo. At the end of the movement Shostakovich arranges a magi- 
cal move from the G-sharp of the Largo to C major, in which key promptly begins the 
final Allegretto. 

To some listeners this movement has come as an anticlimax. Certainly if Shostako- 
vich had appended a tub-thumping brassy march conclusion he would never have got- 
ten into the kind of political trouble that the Eighth brought him. But his aim is not to 
glorify, but to hope. Under the circumstances, hope is a tenuous thing. If Shostakovich 
depicts an awakening of life, it is with a full memory of the tragedy just past, even in 
the most spacious and delicate pages of the conclusion. 

— S.L. 






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More . . . 

Jens Peter Larsen's excellent Haydn article in The New Grove (with work-list and bib- 
liography by Georg Feder) has been reprinted separately (Norton paperback). Rosemary 
Hughes's Haydn in the Master Musicians series is a first-rate short introduction (Little- 
field paperback). The longest study (hardly an introduction!) is H.C. Robbins Landon's 
mammoth, five-volume Haydn: Chronology and Works (Indiana); it will be forever an 
indispensable reference work, though its sheer bulk and the author's tendency to include 
just about everything higgledy-piggledy make it rather hard to digest. No consideration 
of Haydn should omit Charles Rosen's brilliant study The Classical Style (Norton paper- 
back). Two recent books cut a significant swathe across a substantial part of Haydn's 
work, ranging far beyond the limited field implied in their titles. James Webster's 
Haydn's "Farewell" Symphony and the Idea of Classical Style devotes about one-third 
of its length to a detailed appreciation of the Farewell Symphony and the remainder of 
the book to its implications for cyclic organization throughout Haydn's work (Cambridge). 
Elaine R. Sisman's Haydn and the Classical Variation offers thorough treatment of one 
of Haydn's most fundamental procedures (Harvard). Antal Dorati's complete cycle of 



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recordings of the Haydn symphonies with the Philharmonia Hungarica, with extensive 
annotation by Robbins Landon, includes No. 96 in the eighth volume (London Stereo 
Treasury, four discs containing symphonies 96-104). Recordings of the Symphony No. 96 
exist for all tastes, from standard modern orchestra to "original instruments" ensemble. 
Andre Previn has recorded No. 96, along with symphonies 94 (Surprise) and 104 (Lon- 
don), with the Pittsburgh Symphony (EMI Classics). George Szell recorded No. 96, with 
nos. 92 and 94, with the Cleveland Orchestra (Sony Classical). For a modern orchestra 
under the direction of a specialist in historical performance, there is Nikolaus Harnon- 
court's reading with the Royal Concertgebouw (Teldec, with the Symphony No. 97). For 
dyed-in-the-wool early instruments, one may choose Sigismund Kuijken with La Petite 
Bande (German Harmonia Mundi, with symphonies 97 and 98). 

Boris Schwarz's Shostakovich article in The New Grove has been reprinted, along 
with the articles on Rimsky-Korsakov, Scriabin, Rachmaninoff, and Prokofiev, in The 
New Grove Russian Masters 2 (Norton paperback); the Shostakovich piece benefits es- 
pecially, in this reprint, from a revised work-list and a much-enlarged bibliography pre- 
pared by Laurel E. Fay. The smallest book about Shostakovich is one of the most infor- 
mative: Norman Kay's Shostakovich summarizes his musical style through the Twelfth 
String Quartet of 1968 (Oxford). Brief but sympathetic and informed discussion of all of 
Shostakovich's symphonic works is to be found in Hugh Ottaway's Shostakovich Sym- 
phonies in the BBC Music Guides series (University of Washington paperback). The 
best general study of music in Soviet Russia is Boris Schwarz's Music and Musical Life 
in Soviet Russia, 1917-1980 (University of Indiana Press; the older edition, with a cut- 
off date of 1970, is available as a Norton paperback). As with Prokofiev, but for differ- 
ent reasons, political strains have made it hard to find a solidly documented, reliable 
biographical study of the composer. Ian MacDonald's The New Shostakovich (Northeast- 
ern University Press) offers a thorough consideration of the composer's life and works, 
a rethinking that is all the more urgent because of the many questions raised about the 
authenticity of Testimony: The Memoirs of Dmitri Shostakovich, "as related to and edited 
by" Solomon Volkov (Harper & Row paperback). Recent political changes in the Soviet 
Union and the continued emigration of persons who knew the composer well now allow 
far more light to be cast on every phase of his career. Still more informative — indeed, 
the best available guide to the personality of an intensely private man — is Elizabeth 
Wilson's recent book, Shostakovich: A Life Remembered (Princeton), told largely in the 
words of the people who knew him best (some of which were quoted in the program note). 
We still await, however, the major up-to-date reevaluation of his work in the light of the 
rethinking of his biography. More and more in recent years, the Eighth Symphony has 
taken its place among Shostakovich's most powerful works, and it has seen a number 
of fine recordings. These include Andre Previn's with the London Symphony Orchestra 
(Deutsche Grammphon), Bernard Haitink's with the Concertgebouw Orchestra (London), 
Mstislav Rostropovich's with the National Symphony (Teldec), and Kurt Sanderling's 
with the Berlin Symphony Orchestra (Berlin Classics). Serge Koussevitzky's powerful 
1945 BSO recording of the symphony's opening Adaigo — all that was recorded — was 
issued for the very first time in 1989, as part of a BSO "Salute to Symphony" fundrais- 
ing CD that sold out quickly. More recently it has turned up, without authorization, on 
a Biddulph disc that also includes Koussevitzky/BSO recordings of Prokofiev's Romeo 
and Juliet Suite No. 2, Rachmaninoff's Isle of the Dead, the same composer's Vocalise, 
and two works by Koussevitzky himself: Chanson triste, and the Andante from Kousse- 
vitzky's Concerto for Double Bass with Koussevitzky as soloist. 

— S.L. 



35 



Week 16 



. ' 






The 



I 



BOSTON 
POPS 




? 97 Season 



America's 

- 

ORCHESTRA 

CATCH THE POPS THIS 

MAY, JUNE, AND JULY! 



KEITH LOCKHART 
conductor 




36 







Andre Previn 

One of America's best-known and most versatile musicians, Andre 
Previn is familiar around the world as a conductor, an award-win- 
ning composer of orchestral, chamber, stage, and film scores, a 
pianist in chamber music and jazz, a prolific recording artist, and 
as author and television host. As guest conductor of the world's major 
and most recorded orchestras, Mr. Previn appears annually with the 
Vienna Philharmonic both in Vienna and at the Salzburg Festival, 
its summer home. In addition he regularly conducts the Boston Sym- 
phony, New York Philharmonic, Philadelphia Orchestra, Pittsburgh 
Symphony, and San Francisco Symphony, to name but a few. In 1993 
he became Conductor Laureate of the London Symphony Orchestra, of which he was prin- 
cipal conductor for ten years. During the past twenty-five years he has held chief artistic 
posts with the Los Angeles Philharmonic, Pittsburgh Symphony, Royal Philharmonic, Lon- 
don Symphony, and Houston Symphony, touring with several of them worldwide. In the 
1996-97 season, Mr. Previn appears in North America with the Boston Symphony (followed 
by a tour to Florida and the Canary Islands), New York Philharmonic, Pittsburgh Symphony 
(including a tour to the midwestern United States), Curtis Institute Orchestra, and, in a 
series of three Carnegie Hall concerts, the Orchestra of St. Luke's. In Europe, besides con- 
certs and recordings with the London Symphony and Vienna Philharmonic, he will conduct 
the Munich Philharmonic and NDR Symphony Orchestra of Hamburg and will appear in 
several orchestral and chamber concerts in Cologne. As pianist, Mr. Previn performs and 
records chamber music with a variety of colleagues. With each orchestra of which he has 
been music director he has begun chamber music programs with the orchestral musicians. 
Mr. Previn has recently returned to one of his first loves, jazz, performing and recording 
with jazz bass legend Ray Brown, guitarist Mundell Lowe, and drummer Grady Tate. The 
Andre Previn Jazz Trio has toured Japan, North America, and Europe. Mr. Previn moved 
from his native Berlin to California as a child. He studied composition with Joseph Achron 
and Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco and conducting with Pierre Monteux. Also at this time he 
began his musical and personal friendship with Joseph Szigeti, which imbued him with a 
lifelong interest in chamber music. As a teenager he began to concentrate his efforts on the 
symphonic world in conducting and composition. His compositions include a piano concer- 
to for Vladimir Ashkenazy, a cello sonata for Yo-Yo Ma, vocal works for Dame Janet Baker, 
Kathleen Battle, Barbara Bonney, and Sylvia McNair, a violin sonata for Young Uck Kim, 
a piano and woodwind trio for the St. Luke's Chamber Ensemble, and a music drama, Every 
Good Boy Deserves Favour, written in collaboration with playwright Tom Stoppard. On com- 
mission from San Francisco Opera, Mr. Previn is currently writing an opera based on Ten- 
nessee Williams' A Streetcar Named Desire, to a libretto by Philip Littell, to be premiered 
in San Francisco in September 1998. In 1991 Doubleday released Mr. Previn's memoir, 
"No Minor Chords— My Early Days in Hollywood," chronicling his years as composer, ar- 
ranger, and orchestrator at the MGM Studios. Now an exclusive Deutsche Grammophon 
recording artist, Mr. Previn has recorded extensively for more than thirty years. He has 
appeared regularly as a guest conductor with the Boston Symphony Orchestra since his 
Tanglewood debut in 1977. In January 1996 he was awarded a knighthood (KBE) by Her 
Majesty Queen Elizabeth II. 



Boston Symphony Orchestra concertmaster Malcolm Lowe performs on 

a Stradivarius violin loaned to the orchestra hy Lisa, Nicole, and Wanda Reindorf 

in memory of their brother, Mark Reindorf. 



37 



^TBOSTON\ 




{SYMPHONY^ dca ^ c 

Iorchestra/ BhU Corporate Sponsorships 

^^ SEIJI OZAWA j& 






^S^Sf 




The Boston Symphony wishes to acknowledge this distinguished group 


of corporations for their outstanding and exemplary support 


of the Orchestra during the 1996 fiscal year. 


FIDELITY INVESTMENTS 


FILENE'S 


MASSACHUSETTS OFFICE 


Tanglewood on Parade 


OF TRAVEL AND TOURISM 




"Evening at Pops" Public Television 


NORTHWEST AIRLINES 


Broadcasts 


Gospel Night at Pops 


NEC CORPORATION 




BSO North American Tour 


ITT SHERATON 




CORPORATION 


FIDELITY INVESTMENTS 


BOSTON SHERATON 


Boston Pops Esplanade Orchestra 


HOTEL AND TOWERS 


Summer Tour 


Boston Pops New Years Eve Concert 


FLEET BANK 




WCVB-TV, HEARST 


BANKBOSTON 


BROADCASTING 


CORPORATION 


WCRB 102.5 FM 


BLUE CROSS AND BLUE 


Salute to Symphony 


SHIELD OF MASSACHUSETTS 


BANK OF BOSTON 


COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER 


Holiday Pops Series 


COMPANY 




FOUR SEASONS HOTEL 


JOHN HANCOCK FUNDS 




Opening Night at Symphony 


INGALLS, QUINN & JOHNSON 


Opening Night at Pops 


JOHN HANCOCK 




FINANCIAL SERVICES 


LEXUS 


NYNEX 


Exclusive Automobile of: 
Opening Night at Symphony and 


MANULIFE FINANCIAL 


Opening Night at Pops 


NORTEL 




PAINEWEBBER 


TDK ELECTRONICS 




CORPORATION 


RAYTHEON COMPANY 


Tanglewood Tickets for Children 


Single Concert Sponsors 


For information on the BSO Corp 


orate Sponsorship Program, contact 


Madelyne Cuddeback, Director of Corporate Sponsorships, 


at (617) 


638-9254. 



38 



Business Leadership Association 

($10,000 and above) 

The support provided by members of the Business Leadership Association is 
instrumental in enabling the Orchestra to pursue its mission of performance, 
training and community outreach. The BSO gratefully acknowledges the following 
organizations for their generous leadership support. 

(The following includes annual, capital, and sponsorship support during the BSO's 
fiscal year beginning September 1, 1995 through August 31, 1996). 



Fidelity Investments 
Edward C. Johnson 3d 



Beethoven Society 

($500,000 and above) 

NEC Corporation 
Hisashi Kaneko 



Massachusetts Office of Travel and Tourism 
Mary Jane McKenna 



BankBoston Corporation 

William M. Crozier, Jr 

John Hancock Funds 
Edward J. Boudreau, Jr. 

LEXUS 

James E. Press 

Massachusetts Cultural Council 
A state agency 



Gold Baton 

($100,000 - $499,999) 

NYNEX 
Donald Reed 

WCRB 102.5 FM 

Cynthia Scullin 



WCVB-TV, Hearst Broadcasting 
Paul La Camera 



Fleet Bank of 
Leo Breitman 



Silver Baton 

($75,000 - $99,999) 



[assachusetts, N.A. 



Conductor's Circle 

($25,000 - $49,999) 



Blue Cross and Blue Shield of 

Massachusetts 
William C. Van Faasen 

Community Newspaper Company 
William R. Elfers 

ITT Sheraton Corporation 
John Kapioltas 

Manulife Financial 
Dominic DAlessandro 

Northwest Airlines 
Terry M. Leo 



NORTEL 

Robert 0. Nelson 

Paine Webber, Inc. 

Bruce Cameron, Richard F. Connolly, 

Charles T. Harris, Joseph F. Patton, Jr. 

Raytheon Company 
Dennis J. Picard 

Sheraton Boston Hotel & Towers 
Denise Coll 

TDK 

Ken Kihara 



39 






Principal Player 

($15,000 - $24,999) 



Andersen Consulting LLP 
William D. Green 

BBN Corporation 
George H. Conrades 

Boston Edison Company 
Thomas J. May 

Boston Herald 
Patrick J. Purcell 

Connell Limited Partnership 
William F. Connell 

Coopers & Ly brand LLP 
Francis A. Doyle 

Ernst & Young LLP 
James S. DiStasio 

Essex Investment Management Co., Inc. 
Joseph McNay 



Filene's 

Joseph M. Melvin 

The Gillette Company 
Alfred M. Zeien 

Harcourt General Charitable Foundation 
Richard A. Smith 

John Hancock Financial Services 
William L. Boyan 

Liberty Mutual Group 
Gary L. Countryman 

Royal Appliance Mfg. Co. 
Michael J. Merriman 

Von Hoffman Press, Inc. 
Frank A. Bowman 



Honor Roll 

($10,000 - $14,999) 



Analog Devices, Inc. 
Ray Stata 

Arley Corporation 
David I. Riemer 

Arnold Communications, Inc. 
Ed Eskandarian 

Arthur Andersen LLP 
George Massaro 

Arthur D. Little 
Charles LaMantia 

Bingham, Dana & Gould 
Jay S. Zimmerman 
William A. Bachman 

The Boston Company 
Christopher Condron 

Converse Inc. 
Glenn Rupp 

Deloitte & Touche 
Michael Joyce 

Eastern Enterprises/Boston Gas Company 
J. Atwood Ives 
Chester R. Messer 

EMC Corporation 
Richard Egan 

Hewitt Associates 
Christopher S. Palmer 



Houghton Mifflin Company 
Nader F. Darehshori 

IBM Corporation 
Patricia S. Wolpert 

KPMG Peat Marwick 
Donald B. Holmes 

Loomis Sayles & Company, L.P. 
Mark W Holland 

Lucent Technologies 
Michael Decelle 

McKinsey & Company 
David Fubini 

Millipore Corporation 
C. William Zadel 

The New England 
Robert A. Shafto 

Sodexho Management Services 

& Creative Gourmets 
Michel Landel 

State Street Bank and Trust Company 
Marshall N. Carter 

The Stop & Shop Foundation 
Avram J. Goldberg 

Thermo Electron Corporation 
Dr. George N. Hatsopoulos 

Watts Industries 
Timothy Home 



40 




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I couldnt retire without my best rriencL 

Dog lovers appreciate Carleton- Willard Villages 

pro -pet policy. And its 65 wooded acres. Those wno dont nave 

pets like the ract that there's room ror everyone. 

Trie gardeners grow almost everything rrom rerns to roses 

rignt outside tneir rront door. Otner residents 

prerer painting, writing, or puttering in tne woodworking snop. 

Discover all tnere is to like. 
Call ror a tree Drocnure or a tour, today. 










CARLETON -WILLARD VILLAGE 

Fully Accredited by the Continuing Care Accreditation Commission. 
100 OLD BILLERICA ROAD, BEDFORD, /VIA 01 730 1 -800-429-8669 

OWNED AND OPERATED BY CARLETON-WILLARD HOMES, INC., A NOT-FOR-PROFIT CORPORATION 




■KHM 



Jni 



Oh 

O 

u 












y 
S 

Xt 

e 




INVESTMENT TOOLS ARE IMPORTANT FOR 

REACHING A SECURE FINANCIAL FUTURE. 

ALMOST AS IMPORTANT AS KNOWING 

THE BEST WAY TO USE THEM. 

Whatever plans you're making for the future and for those you love, 
Fleet Investment Services can help make them a reality. We start with a full range of 

investment options, hut don't stop there. Our Relationship Managers can 
help you focus on your particular financial goals and help you choose the best way 

to get there. With a tradition of service since 1791, and a consistent ranking 

as one of the country's leading investment managers in assets, we have more ways to 

help you do more with your money. To learn more, call Bill Flemer at (617) 346-2165. 



JHFieet 



INVESTMENT MANAGEMENT 
UST AND ESTATE PLANNING SERVICES 



Gifts in Kind 

The Boston Symphony Orchestra extends a special thanks to the following donors for their 
generous contributions of goods and services between September 1, 1995, and August 31, 
1996: 



American Airlines 
Bernie Willett 

Betsy Bassett Photography 
Betsy Bassett 

CAHOOTS 

Carol Lasky 

DAV EL CHAUFFEURED 
TRANSPORTATION NETWORK 

Scott A. Solombrino 

Four Seasons Hotel 
Robin A. Brown 



Hermes 

Jean-Louis Dumas-Hermes 

Ingalls Quinn & Johnson 
Richard C. Garrison 

Sheraton Boston Hotel and Towers 
Denise Coll 

The Syratech Corporation 
Leonard Florence 



BUSINESS LEADERSHIP ASSOCIATION 

(Industry Listing) 

The Boston Symphony Orchestra is pleased to acknowledge the following business 
leaders for their generous contributions of $1,500 or more during the BSO's fiscal 
year ending August 31, 1996. 

Companies contributing $10,000 or more are indicated in bold capital letters; con- 
tributions of $5,000-$9,999 are indicated in capital letters, an asterisk denotes gifts 
of $2,500-$4,999, and italicized names indicate donors of services or products. 

For information about becoming a Business Leadership Association member, con- 
tact Anne Cademenos, Associate Director of Corporate Programs, at (617) 638-9298. 



Accounting 



ARTHUR ANDERSEN LLP 

George E. Massaro 

COOPERS & 
LYRRAND LLP 

Francis A. Doyle 

DELOITTE & 
TOUCHE LLP 

Michael Joyce 

*DiPesa & Company, CPAs 
Dolly DiPesa 

Ercolini & Company 
Robert Ercolini, CPA 
Michael Tucci, CPA 

ERNST & YOUNG LLP 

James S. DiStasio 

Harte Carucci & Driscoll, 
PC. 
Neal Harte 

KPMG PEAT MARWICK 

Donald B. Homes 

PRICE WATERHOUSE 
LLP 

Paul Sullivan 



Advertising/ 
Public Relations 



ARNOLD COMMUNICA- 
TIONS, INC. 

Ed Eskandarian 

Bronner Slosberg Humphrey 
Michael Bronner 

CAHOOTS 
Carol Lasky 

Clarke & Company, Inc. 
Peter A. Morrissey 

Conventures, Inc. 
Dusty S. Rhodes 

DesignWise 
Freelow Crummett 

HILL, HOLLIDAY, 
CONNORS, 
COSMOPULOS, INC. 

John M. Connors, Jr. 

Houston, Herstek FAVAT 
Douglas W. Houston 

Ingalls, Quinn & Johnson 
Richard C. Garrison 



Irma S. Mann, Strategic 
Marketing, Inc. 
Irma S. Mann 

MASSmedia 
Charles N. Shapiro 

*Rasky & Co. 
Larry Rasky 

Alarm Systems 

American Alarm & 
Communications, Inc. 
Richard L. Sampson 

First Security Services 
Corporation 
Robert F. Johnson 

Architects/ Interior Design 

Tellalian Associates 
Architects & Planners 
Donald J. Tellalian, AIA 

Automotive 

IRA LEXUS 

Ira Rosenberg 

LEXUS OF NORWOOD 

Herbert Chambers 



41 



A 



Visiting Nurse Association of Boston 

Providing quality home health care for over 110 years. 
One-stop service for all your home health care needs. 



* Nursing 
*Home Health Aide 
Rehabilitation Therapies 




75 Arlington Street 

Boston, MA 02116 

(617) 426-6630 



7 

GOLDEN 
CARE 

A 19 Year Tradition 



* Geriatric 

*Home Health Care 

Specializing in Live-in Services 



607 Boylston Street, Copley Square, Boston, MA 02116 

(617) 267-5858 

Skilled nursing and rehabilitation therapy available through an affiliation with the VNA of Boston 




BOSTON LYRIC OPERA 



UElisir d y Amove 

Boston Lyric Opera presents 
Gaetano Donizetti's delightful 
comedy of love lost and found 
in a bottle of not so magical elixir. 

April 2-13, 1997 at the 
Emerson Majestic Theatre 



For tickets call 542-OPRA 



42 



LEXUS OF WATERTOWN 

Murray Patkin 

Aviation 

Flight Time International 
Jane McBride 

Banking 

BANKBOSTON 
CORPORATION 

William M. Crozier, Jr. 

Cambridge Trust Company 
James F. Dwinell III 

CITIZENS BANK 
Robert M. Mahoney 

FLEET BANK OF 
MASSACHUSETTS, N.A. 
John P. Hamill 

PNC Bank, New England 
Joan L. Gulley 

STATE STREET BANK 
AND TRUST COMPANY 

Marshall N. Carter 

USTRUST 

Neal F. Finnegan 

Wainwright Bank & Trust 
Company 
John M. Plukas 

Building/Contracting 

*Harvey Industries, Inc. 
Frederick Bigony 

Lee Kennedy Co., Inc. 
Lee M. Kennedy 

*The MacDowell Company 
Roy MacDowell 

*NSC Corporation 
Frank Fradello 

New England Insulation Co. 
Theodore H. Brodie 

*Perini Corporation 
David B. Perini 

Consulting: 
Management /Financial 

Anchor Capital Advisors, Inc. 
William P. Rice 

ANDERSEN 
CONSULTING LLP 

William D. Green 

ANDERSEN 
CONSULTING LLP 

Michael J. Young 

ARTHUR D. 
LITTLE, INC. 

Charles LaMantia 



BAIN & COMPANY, INC. 

Orit Gadiesh 

BBF Corporation 
Boruch B. Frusztajer 

THE BOSTON 
CONSULTING GROUP 
INC. 

Jonathan L. Isaacs 

The Cullinane Group, Inc. 
John J. Cullinane 

Dock Square Consultants 
Richard J. Lettieri 

*Heidrick & Struggles 
Robert E. Hallagan 

Lee Hecht Harrison, Inc. 
Frank Mainero 

HEWITT ASSOCIATES 

Christopher S. Palmer 

Lochridge & Company, Inc. 
Richard K. Lochridge 

*Lyons Company 
J. Peter Lyons 

McKINSEY & 
COMPANY, INC. 
David G. Fubini 

Mercer Management 
Consulting 
James W Down 

NORTH AMERICAN 
MORTGAGE COMPANY 

John F. Farrell, Jr. 

*The O'Brien Group, Inc. 
Paul C. O'Brien 

Pendergast & Company 
Edward H. Pendergast 

Right Associates Consulting 
Warren Radtke 

Sawyer Miller Consulting 
Micho F. Spring 

*Towers Perrin 

V. Benjamin Haas 

* Watson Wyatt Worldwide 
Daniel B. Holmes 

WILLIAM M. MERCER, 
INCORPORATED 
Peter A. Bleyler 

Consulting: Opportunity 
Development 

New Directions, Inc. 
David D. Corbett 

Consumer Goods/ 
Food Service 

*A11 Seasons Services, Inc. 
Donald G. Fried! 



Coca-Cola Bottling Company 
of New England 
Terrance M. Marks 

*Franklin Sports, Inc. 
Larry J. Franklin 

* Johnson, O'Hare Co., Inc. 
Harry "Chip" O'Hare, Jr. 

Merkert Enterprises, Inc. 
Gerald R. Leonard 

O'Donnell-Usen Fisheries 
Corporation 
Arnold S. Wolf 

SODEXHO MANAGE- 
MENT SERVICES & 
CREATIVE GOURMETS 

Michel Landel 

Staton Hills Winery 
Peter Ansdell 

Welch's 
Everett N. Baldwin 

*Whitehall Company, Ltd. 
Marvin A. Gordon 

Distribution 

Standard Tube Sales 
Corporation 

Dorothy C. Granneman 

Francis J. Walsh, Jr. 

Education 

BENTLEY COLLEGE 
Joseph M. Cronin 

Electrica I /Electronics 

*Boston Acoustics, Inc. 
Francis L. Reed 

R & D ELECTRICAL 
COMPANY, INC. 
Richard D. Pedone 

Energy/Utilities 

BOSTON EDISON 
COMPANY 

Thomas J. May 

EASTERN 
ENTERPRISES/ 
BOSTON GAS COMPANY 

J. Atwood Ives 
Chester R. Messer 

*New England Electric 
System 
Joan T. Bok 

Entertainment /Media 



*Don Law Company 
Don Law 

WCVB-TV, Hearst 
Publications 
Paul La Camera 



43 



KtvV 

m 






The Latest Recording by Seiji Ozawa and 

the Boston Symphony Orchestra — 

Now Available at the Symphony Shop 

This RCA Victor release features Seiji 
Ozawa leading the BSO in the 
serenely beautiful requiem by 
Gabriel Faure, with soprano 
Barbara Bonney, baritone 
Haken HagegArd, and the 
Tanglewood Festival Chorus, 
John Oliver, conductor. 

The Symphony Shop is in the Cohen Wing 
at the West Entrance to Symphony Hall. 




Beats and Measures. 



Fitcorp provides the Fitcorp Wellness Benefit, an innovative 

mix of fitness and health promotion programs, to hundreds 

of Boston's leading corporations since 1979. Programs of 

award-winning performance and measureable results. 

To learn more about the Fitcorp Wellness Benefit, 

call Mariska Lutz, Corporate Sales Manager, 

at (617) 375-5600, xl07. 

Rtcorp 

Corporate Offices, Prudential Center, Suite 200, Boston, MA 02199 



44 



WHDH-TV Channel 7 
Mike Carson 

*Yawkey Foundation 
John Harrington 

Environmental 

Jason M. Cortell & Associates 
Jason M. Cortell 

Financial 
Services/Investments 

ADAMS, HARKNESS & 
HILL, INC. 
Joseph W. Hammer 

ADVENT INTERNATIONAL 
CORPORATION 
Peter A. Brooke 

ALLMERICA FINANCIAL 
John F O'Brien 

ALLMERICA FINANCIAL 
INSTITUTIONAL SERVICES 
Larry C. Renfro 

THE BERKSHIRE GROUP 
Laurence Gerber 

*Berkshire Partners 
Russell Epker 

BOSTON CAPITAL 
PARTNERS, INC. 

Christopher W. Collins 

Herbert F Collins 

Richard J. DeAgazio 

John P. Manning 

THE BOSTON COMPANY 

Christopher M. Condron 
W. Keith Smith 

*BTM Capital Corporation 
E.F McCulloch, Jr. 

Carson Limited Partnership 
Herbert Carver 

THE CIT GROUP/CAPITAL 
EQUIPMENT FINANCING 
G. Todd DeiT 

Cowen & Company 
Richard A. Altschuler 

CS FIRST BOSTON 

William Cadigan 
Patricia F Lenehan 

ESSEX INVESTMENT 
MANAGEMENT CO., INC. 

Joseph C. McNay 

*Farrell, Healer & 
Company Inc. 
Richard A. Farrell 

FIDELITY INVESTMENTS 

Edward C. Johnson 3d 

JOHN HANCOCK 
FINANCIAL SERVICES 

William L. Boyan 



JOHN HANCOCK FUNDS 

Edward J. Boudreau, Jr. 

KAUFMAN & COMPANY 
Sumner Kaufman 

KESSLER FINANCIAL 
SERVICES, L.P. 
Howard J. Kessler 

LIBERTY FINANCIAL 
COMPANIES, INC. 
Kenneth R. Leibler 

LOOMIS-SAYLES & 
COMPANY, L.P. 

Mark W Holland 

LPL FINANCIAL 
SERVICES 
Todd A. Robinson 

PAINEWEBBER, INC. 

Bruce Cameron 
Richard F Connolly 
Charles T Harris 
Joseph F Patton, Jr. 

THE PIONEER GROUP, INC. 
John F Cogan, Jr. 

*Putnam Investments 

*State Street Development 
Management Corp. 
John R. Gallagher III 

United Asset Management 
Corporation 

*United Gulf 
Management, Inc. 

W.P STEWART & CO., INC. 
William P. Stewart 

*Woodstock Corporation 
Mrs. Edith L. Dabney 



Food Service Equipment 

*Boston Showcase Company 
Jason E. Starr 



High Technology 

ANALOG DEVICES, INC. 

Ray Stata 

*ATI Orion Research 
Chane Graziano 

BBN CORPORATION 

George H. Conrades 

*Bull HN Information 
Systems Inc. 
Donald P. Zen-ski 

COGNEX CORPORATION 
Dr. Robert J. Shillman 

COMPUTERVISION 
CORPORATION 

Kathleen Cole 



CORNING COSTAR 
CORPORATION 
R. Pierce Baker 

EDS 

Barry Raynor 

EG&G, INC. 
John M. Kucharski 

EMC CORPORATION 

Richard J. Egan 

* Helix Technology 
Corporation 
Robert J. Lepofsky 

IBM CORPORATION 

Patricia S. Wolpert 

INSO CORPORATION 
Steven R. Vana-Paxhia 
Instron Corporation 
Harold Hindman 

INTERNATIONAL DATA 
GROUP 
Patrick J. McGovern 

IONICS INCORPORATED 
Arthur L. Goldstein 

*LAU Technologies 
Joanna T Lau 

MICROCOM INC. 

Roland D. Pampel 

MILLIPORE 
CORPORATION 

C. William Zadel 

NEC CORPORATION 

Hisashi Kaneko 

PRINTED CIRCUIT CORP. 
Peter Sarmanian 

RAYTHEON COMPANY 

Dennis J. Picard 

*The Registry, Inc. 
G. Drew Conway 

SIGNAL TECHNOLOGY 
CORPORATION 
Dale L. Peterson 

SOFTKEY 

INTERNATIONAL INC. 
Michael J. Perik 

STRATUS COMPUTER, INC. 
William E. Foster 

*SystemSoft Corporation 
Robert Angelo 

TDK ELECTRONICS 
CORPORATION 

Ken Kihara 

Teradyne, Inc. 
Alexander V. D'Arbeloff 

THERMO ELECTRON 
CORPORATION 

Dr. George N. rlatsopoulos 






45 






Sing & Swing 

Some folks swoon over La Traviata. Others sway to Sing, Sing, Sing. 
The Colonnade Hotel indulges both passions every weekend* with our 
acclaimed "Nights at the Opera" and "Dancing with the Winikers. 

Opera lovers dine on a lyrical four-course dinner in Cafe Promenade while 
top performers sing their favorite arias. In Zachary's Bar, swing fans put 

on their dancing shoes for a night of classic sounds from the Winiker 
Swing Orchestra. A stirring aria. A swinging standard. Whatever the 
tune, plan on a noteworthy evening at The Colonnade Hotel. 

For reservations or information call 617.425.3240. 




Dancing with the Winikers 

Fridays and Saturdays from 9 pm at Zachary's Bar. 

Nights at the Opera 

Saturdays from 8 pm at Cafe Promenade. 
Dinner and Music from $42 




Nights at The Opera offered October through April 




olonna< 




120 Huntington Ave. Boston, MA 02116 
617.424.7000 or 1.800.962.3030 







UNITY • HARMONY • ARTISTRY 



The Boston Symphony Orchestra 

extends congratulations to the 

Boston Musicians' Association, 

Local 9-535, on the occasion 

of its 100th anniversary. 




46 



WATERS CORPORATION 
Douglas A. Berthiaume 

Hotels/Restaurants 

BOSTON MARRIOTT 
COPLEY PLACE 
William Munck 

FOUR SEASONS HOTEL 

Robin A. Brown 

ITT SHERATON 

CORPORATION 

John Kapioltas 

THE RITZ-CARLTON, 
BOSTON 

SHERATON BOSTON 
HOTEL & TOWERS 

Denise Coll 

*Sonesta International Hotels 
Corporation 
Paul Sonnabend 

THE WESTIN HOTEL, 
COPLEY PLACE 

David King 

Insurance 

AON RISK SERVICES, INC. 
William J. Tvenstrup 

*The Bostonian Group 
John Casey 

Bradley Insurance 
Agency, Inc. 
John J. Bradley 

CADDELL & BYERS 
INSURANCE AGENCY, INC. 
Paul D. Bertrand 

*Carlin Insurance 
Michael D. Holmes 

The Chickering Group 
Frederick H. Chicos 

*Chubb Group of Insurance 
Companies 
John H. Gillespie 

COMMONWEALTH LAND 
AND TITLE INSURANCE CO. 
Terry Cook 

*Johnson & Higgins of 
Massachusetts, Inc. 
William S. Jennings 

^Lexington Insurance 
Company 
Kevin H. Kelley 

LIBERTY MUTUAL 
GROUP 

Gary L. Countryman 

MANULIFE FINANCIAL 

Dominic D'Alessandro 



THE NEW ENGLAND 
Robert A. Shafto 

* North American 
Security Life 
William J. Atherton 

THE PIONEER GROUP, INC. 
John E Cogan, Jr. 

SAFETY INSURANCE 
COMPANY 

Richard B. Simches 

SEDGWICK OF 
NEW ENGLAND, INC. 
P. Joseph McCarthy 

Sun Life Assurance Company 
of Canada 
David D. Horn 

Swerling Milton Winnick 
Public Insurance Adjusters, 
Inc. 

Marvin Milton 

Bruce Swerling 

Paul Winnick 

Trust Insurance Company 
Craig M. Bradley 

Legal 

BINGHAM, DANA 
& GOULD 

Jay S. Zimmerman 
William A. Bachman 

*Choate, Hall & Stewart 
Charles L. Glerum 

Dickerman Law Offices 
Lola Dickerman 

Dionne, Bookhout & Gass 
Richard D. Gass 

FISH & RICHARDSON PC. 
Ronald Myrick 

GADSBY & HANNAH LLP 
Paul E. Clifford 

GOLDSTEIN & 
MANELLO, PC. 

Richard J. Snyder 

GOODWIN, PROCTER 
&HOAR 
Robert B. Fraser 

*Hale & Dorr 
John Hamilton 

*Lynch, Brewer, Hoffman 
& Sands 
Owen B. Lynch, Esq. 

MINTZ, LEVIN, COHN, 
FERRIS, GLOVSKY & 
POPEO, PC. 
Jeffrey M. Wiesen, Esq. 

Nissenbaum Law Offices 
Gerald L. Nissenbaum 



Nutter, McClennen & Fish 
Robert Fishman 

PALMER & DODGE, LLP 
Michael R. Brown 

Robins, Kaplan, Miller 
& Ciresi 
Alan R. Miller, Esq. 

* Ropes & Gray 
Truman S. Casner 

Sarrouf, Tarricone & 
Flemming 
Camille F Sarrouf 

Sherin and Lodgen 

*Weingarten, Schurgin, 
Gagnebin & Hayes 
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Manufacturer's 
Representatives/ 
Wholesale Distribution 

*Alles Corporation 
Stephen S. Berman 

Asquith Corporation 
Laurence L. Asquith 

*Brush Fibers, Inc. 
Ian P. Moss 

*Clinique Laboratories U.S.A. 
Daniel J. Brestle 

J.A. WEBSTER, INC. 
John A. Webster. 

JOFRAN, INC. 
Robert D. Roy 

Lantis Corporation 
Scott Sennett 

United Liquors, Ltd. 
A. Raymond Tye 

Viva Sun 
Gary Podhaizer 

Manufacturing 

Alden Products Company 
Elizabeth Alden 

ARLEY CORPORATION 

David I. Riemer 

Autoroll Machine Corporation 
William M. Karlyn 

*The Biltrite Corporation 
Stanley J. Bernstein 

*C.R. Bard, Inc. 
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INDUSTRIES, INC. 

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47 




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please contact Joyce M. Serwitz, Associate Director of 

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Help endow our orchestra's future! 



48 



CONNELL LIMITED 
PARTNERSHIP 

William F. Connell 

CONVERSE INC. 

Glenn Rupp 

*Cri-Tech, Inc. 
Richard Mastromatteo 

D.K. Webster Family 
Foundation 
Dean K. Webster 

Design Mark Industries 
Paul S. Morris 

Diacom Corporation 
Donald W. Comstock 

Ekco Group, Inc. 
Robert Stein 

GENERAL LATEX 
AND CHEMICAL 
CORPORATION 
Robert W MacPherson 

THE GILLETTE 
COMPANY 

Alfred M. Zeien 

HIGH VOLTAGE 
ENGINEERING 
CORPORATION 
Paul H. Snyder 

HMK ENTERPRISES, 
INC. 

Steven E. Karol 

*J.D.P. Company 
Jon D. Papps 

* Jones & Vining, Inc. - 
Michel Ohayon 

New Balance Athletic Shoe 
James S. Davis 

NEW ENGLAND BUSINESS 
SERVICE, INC. 
Robert J. Murray 

OAK INDUSTRIES, INC. 
William S. Antle III 

OSRAM SYLVANIA INC 
Dean T. Langford 

The Pfaltzgraff Company 
Annette Seifert 

PHILIP MORRIS 
COMPANIES, INC. 

Matthew Paluszek 

*Piab USA, Inc. 

Charles J. Weilbrenner 

*The Rockport Company, Inc. 
Anthony J. Tiberii 

ROYAL APPLIANCE 
MFG. CO. 

Michael J. Merriman 



*Springs Industries, Inc. 
Dan Gaynor 

THE STRIDE RITE 
CORPORATION 

Robert C. Siegel 

SUMMIT PACKAGING 
SYSTEMS INC. 

Gordon Gilroy 

The Syratech Corporation 
Leonard Florence 

TY-WOOD/CENTURY 
MANUFACTURING CO., 
INC. 
Joseph W Tiberio 

WATTS INDUSTRIES, 
INC. 

Timothy P. Home 

Wire Belt Company of 
America 
F Wade Greer 

Philanthropic 

The Fuller Foundation 

*The Kouyoumjian Fund 
The Kouyoumjian Family 

Printing/Publishing 

* Addison Wesley Longman, 
Inc. 
J. Larry Jones 

*Banta Corporation 
Donald Belcher 

BOSTON HERALD 

Patrick J. Purcell 

CAHNERS PUBLISHING 
COMPANY 
Bruce Barnet 

COMMUNITY 
NEWSPAPER 
COMPANY 

William R. Elfers 

DANIELS PRINTING 
COMPANY 
Grover B. Daniels 

George H. Dean Co. 
G. Earle Michaud 

HARCOURT GENERAL 

CHARITABLE 

FOUNDATION 

Richard A. Smith 

HOUGHTON MIFFLIN 
COMPANY 

Nader F Darehshori 

Invisuals 
Dennis Ozer 

Reynolds- De Walt Printing 
Peter DeWalt 



The Studley Press, Inc. 
Chuck Gillett 

VON HOFFMANN 
PRESS, INC. 

Frank A. Bowman 

Real Estate/Development 

*The Abbey Group 
Robert Epstein 
David Epstein 
John Svenson 

BEACON PROPERTIES 
CORPORATION 
Alan M. Leventhal 

*Cornerstone Properties, Inc. 
John S. Moody 

CUMMINGS PROPERTIES 
James L. McKeown 

DEWOLFE NEW ENGLAND 
Richard B. De Wolfe 

EQUITABLE REAL ESTATE 

Tony Harwood 

First Winthrop Corporation 
Richard J. McCready 

*The Flatley Company 
Thomas J. Flatley 

Heafitz Development 
Company 
Lewis Heafitz 

*John M. Corcoran & Co. 
John M. Corcoran 

*Meredith & Grew 
Thomas J. Hynes, Jr. 

Retail 

COUNTRY CURTAINS 
Mr. & Mrs. John & Jane 
Fitzpatrick 

Crane & Co. Papermakers 
Lansing E. Crane 

The E.B. Horn Company 
Harry Finn 

FILENE'S 

Joseph M. Melvin 

Gordon Brothers 
Michael Frieze 

Hermes 
Jean-Louis Dumas-Hermes 

J. Baker, Inc. 
Allan L. Weinstein 

*Lechmere, Inc. 

Frederick E. Meiser 

Marshalls 
Jerome R. Rossi 






49 




Newbury Court Retirement Community 
New England Deaconess Association 
Concord, Massachusetts 



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Every design decision we make enhances the quality 
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50 



NEIMAN MARCUS 
William D. Roddy 

*Saks Fifth Avenue 

Alison Streider Mayher 

THE STOP & SHOP 
FOUNDATION 

Avram J. Goldberg 

THE STOP & SHOP 

SUPERMARKET 

COMPANY 

Robert G. Tobin 

Talbots 
Arnold B. Zetcher 

THE TJX COMPANIES, INC. 
Bernard Cammarata 

*Town & Country Corporation 
C. William Carey 

Science /Medical 

AMERICAN MEDICAL 
RESPONSE, INC. 
Paul M. Verrochi 

Baldpate Hospital 
Lucille M. Batal 

BLUE CROSS AND 
BLUE SHIELD OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

William C. Van Faasen 

BOSTON SCIENTIFIC 
CORPORATION 

CRA Managed Care 
Lois Silverman 

CHARLES RIVER 

LABORATORIES 

James C. Foster 



Citizens Medical Corporation 
John J. Doran 

CORNING CLINICAL 
LABORATORIES 
Robert Meehan 

Datacube 
Stanley Karandanis 

FISHER SCIENTIFIC 
INTERNATIONAL INC. 

Paul M. Montrone 

GENETICS 
INSTITUTE, INC. 
Dr. Patrick Gage 

MERCK-MEDCO 
MANAGED CARE 
Per Lofberg 

* Medical Information 
Technology, Inc. 
Morton E. Ruderman 

Services 

Benn Theodore, Inc. 
Benn Theodore 

Betsy Bassett Photography 
Betsy Bassett 

*Blake and Blake 
Genealogists 
Richard A. Blake, Jr. 

CFI Design Group, Inc. 
David A. Granoff 

TAD RESOURCES 
INTERNATIONAL INC. 

James S. Davis 

Team 
Marion Rossman 



Technical Aid Corporation 
Salvatore Balsamo 

Telecommunications 

AT&T NETWORK SYSTEMS 
Michael Decelle 

* Boston Technology, Inc. 
Dr. John C.W Taylor 

CELLULAR ONE 

Kathy Dowling 

GTE GOVERNMENT 
SYSTEMS 
John R. Messier 

LUCENT TECHNOLOGIES 

Michael Decelle 

MCI TELECOMMUNICA- 
TIONS CORPORATION 

Susan Beckmann 
Joe McKeown 

NORTEL 

Robert O. Nelson 

NYNEX 

Donald Reed 

*NYNEX Information 
Resources Co. 
Matthew J. Stover 

Travel /Transportation 

DAVEL CHAUEEEURED 
TRANSPORTATION 
NETWORK 
Scott A. Solombrino 

Lily Transportation Corp. 
John A. Simourian 

NORTHWEST AIRLINES 

Terry M. Leo 



Please join us as a member of the BSO's 
Business Leadership Association! 

For a minimum contribution of $1 ,800 to the BSO's Business Fund, your company can 
enjoy membership in the BSO's Business Leadership Association, a dynamic and influ- 
ential group of more than 350 New England businesses who have come together to 
support the Boston Symphony Orchestra. 

Membership privileges for your company include: a complimentary listing in the BSO 
and Pops program books throughout the season, priority ticket reservations for the 
sell-out Holiday Pops and Tanglewood concerts, personal ticket assistance through the 
Corporate Programs office, and use of the Beranek Room, a private patrons' lounge, 
reserved exclusively for members of the BSO's Business Leadership Association and 
Higginson Society. 

For more information about becoming a member of the BSO's Business Leadership Association, 
please contact Anne Cademenos in the Corporate Programs office at (617) 638-9298. 



51 



» 



■ 



■ 



1 ,/• W 



. 



NEXT PROGRAM. . . 

Thursday, March 6, at 8 
Friday, March 7, at 1:30 
Saturday, March 8, at 8 

JAMES CONLON conducting 



RAVEL 

(arr. CONSTANT) 



Gaspard de la Nuit 

Ondine 
Le Gibet 
Scarbo 



PROKOFIEV 



Violin Concerto No. 2 in G minor, Opus 63 

Allegro moderato 
Andante assai 
Allegro ben marcato 

MAXIM VENGEROV 



INTERMISSION 



janaCek 



Sinfonietta 

Allegretto — Allegro — Maestoso 

Andante — Allegretto 

Moderato 

Allegretto 

Andante con moto 



Returning guest conductor James Conlon opens this BSO program with an un- 
usual orchestral transcription of a Ravel piano work, Gaspard de la Nuit. Ravel 
often created orchestral versions of his piano pieces, but Gaspard, one of his 
finest piano works, he left as is. The version to be heard here was created by com- 
poser Marius Constant. Violinist Maxim Vengerov makes a return Symphony Hall 
appearance with one of the most melodious of all violin concertos, Prokofiev's 
Second. The program concludes with one of the last masterpieces of Leos Jana- 
cek, his Sinfonietta. Though the title suggests a small work, this requires twelve 
trumpets, and the rest of the orchestra also gets a chance to shine before the end. 



Single tickets for all Boston Symphony Orchestra concerts throughout the season 
are available at the Symphony Hall box office, or by calling "SymphonyCharge" 
at (617) 266-1200, Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m. until 6 p.m., to 
charge tickets instantly on a major credit card, or to make a reservation and then 
send payment by check. Outside the 617 area code, call 1-800-274-8499. 
Please note that there is a $2.50 handling fee for each ticket ordered by phone. 



52 



COMING CONCERTS . 



From Thursday, February 20, through Satur- 
day, March 1, Andre Previn and the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra will perform eight con- 
certs in the Canary Islands and Florida. 

Thursday 'A'— March 6, 8-9:50 
Friday 'A— March 7, 1:30-3:20 
Saturday 'A— March 8, 8-9:50 

JAMES CONLON conducting 
MAXIM VENGEROV, violin 



RAVEL 

prokofiev 
janACek 



Gaspard de la Nuit 

(arr. Constant) 
Violin Concerto No. 2 
Sinfonietta 



Dinner, Parking 

AndThe Shuttle, 
ForASong. 

Make dinner at Boodle's part of your 
night out at the Symphony. We're offering 
our customers special parking privileges 
in our private garage for just $5, and free 

"Symphony Express" shuttle service 
Tuesday and Thursday. Just show us your 
Symphony tickets, and we'll arrange for 
your $5 parking, take you to Symphony 
Hall after your meal, and return you to 
your car after the performance. With a 
deal like that, a night at the Symphony 
never •y^'VN sounded better. 




RESTAURANT&BAR 



IN THE BACK BAY HILTON (617) BOODLES 



Thursday 'C— March 20, 8-10 
Friday 'A— March 21, 1:30-3:30 
Saturday 'A — March 22, 8-10 
Tuesday 'C— March 25, 8-10 

HANS GRAF conducting 
LEIF OVE ANDSNES, piano 



STRAVINSKY 



MOZART 



MOZART 



STRAVINSKY 



Dumbarton Oaks 

Concerto 
Piano Concerto No. 20 

in D minor, K.466 
Adagio and Fugue 

in C minor, K.546 
Symphony in C 



Thursday 'B'— March 27, 8-9:50 
Friday Evening — March 28, 8-9:50 
Saturday 'B'— March 29, 8-9:50 
Tuesday 'C— April 1, 8-9:50 

JOHN WILLIAMS conducting 
JAMES GALWAY, flute 
RICHARD SVOBODA, bassoon 

Flute Concerto in G 
Five Sacred Trees, for 

bassoon and orchestra 
Pied Piper Fantasy, for 

flute and orchestra 



QUANTZ 
WILLIAMS 

CORIGLIANO 



Thursday, April 3, at 10:30 a.m. 

Open Rehearsal 
Steven Ledbetter will discuss the program 

at 6:30 in Symphony Hall. 
Thursday 'A— April 3, 8:10 
Friday 'B'— April 4, 1:30-3:30 
Saturday 'A— April 5, 5-8:10 

SEIJI OZAWA conducting 
MSTISLAV ROSTROPOVICH, cello 
STEVEN ANSELL, viola 

Celebrating Mstislav Rostropovich's 
70th Birthday 

THOMAS Chanson, for cello 

and orchestra 
(world premiere) 

RANDS Cello Concerto No. 1 

(world premiere; 
BSO commission) 

STRAUSS Don Quixote 

Programs and artists subject to change. 



53 



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54 



SYMPHONY HALL INFORMATION 

FOR SYMPHONY HALL CONCERT AND TICKET INFORMATION, call (617) 266-1492. 
For Boston Symphony concert program information, call "C-O-N-C-E-R-T" (266-2378). 

THE BOSTON SYMPHONY performs ten months a year, in Symphony Hall and at Tangle- 
wood. For information about any of the orchestra's activities, please call Symphony Hall, or 
write the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Symphony Hall, Boston, MA 02115. 

THE BSO'S NEW WEB SITE (http://www.bso.org) provides information on all of the orches- 
tra's activities at Symphony Hall and at Tanglewood, and is updated regularly. 

THE EUNICE S. AND JULIAN COHEN WING, adjacent to Symphony Hall on Huntington 
Avenue, may be entered by the Symphony Hall West Entrance on Huntington Avenue. 

IN THE EVENT OF A BUILDING EMERGENCY, patrons will be notified by an announce- 
ment from the stage. Should the building need to be evacuated, please exit via the nearest 
door, or according to instructions. 

FOR SYMPHONY HALL RENTAL INFORMATION, call (617) 638-9241, or write the 
Function Manager, Symphony Hall, Boston, MA 02115. 

THE BOX OFFICE is open from 10 a.m. until 6 p.m. Monday through Saturday; on concert 
evenings it remains open through intermission for BSO events or just past starting time for 
other events. In addition, the box office opens Sunday at 1 p.m. when there is a concert that 
afternoon or evening. Single tickets for all Boston Symphony subscription concerts are avail- 
able at the box office. For most outside events at Symphony Hall, tickets are available three 
weeks before the concert at the box office or through SymphonyCharge. 

TO PURCHASE BSO TICKETS: American Express, MasterCard, Visa, a personal check, and 
cash are accepted at the box office. To charge tickets instantly on a major credit card, or to 
make a reservation and then send payment by check, call "SymphonyCharge" at (617) 266- 
1200, Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m. until 6 p.m. Outside the 617 area code, phone 
1-800-274-8499. There is a handling fee of $2.50 for each ticket ordered by phone. 

GROUP SALES: Groups may take advantage of advance ticket sales. For BSO concerts at 
Symphony Hall, groups of twenty-five or more may reserve tickets by telephone and take 
advantage of ticket discounts and flexible payment options. To place an order, or for more 
information, call Group Sales at (617) 638-9345. 

FOR PATRONS WITH DISABILITIES, an access service center, accessible restrooms, and 
elevators are available inside the Cohen Wing entrance to Symphony Hall on Huntington 
Avenue. For more information, call VOICE (617) 266-1200 or TTD/TTY (617) 638-9289. 

LATECOMERS will be seated by the ushers during the first convenient pause in the pro- 
gram. Those who wish to leave before the end of the concert are asked to do so between pro- 
gram pieces in order not to disturb other patrons. 

IN CONSIDERATION OF OUR PATRONS AND ARTISTS, children four years old or young- 
er will not be admitted to Boston Symphony Orchestra concerts. 

TICKET RESALE: If for some reason you are unable to attend a Boston Symphony concert for 
which you hold a subscription ticket, you may make your ticket available for resale by calling 
(617) 266-1492 during business hours, or (617) 638-9426 at any time. This helps bring need- 
ed revenue to the orchestra and makes your seat available to someone who wants to attend the 
concert. A mailed receipt will acknowledge your tax-deductible contribution. 

RUSH SEATS: There are a limited number of Rush Seats available for Boston Symphony sub- 
scription concerts Tuesday and Thursday evenings, and Friday afternoons. The low price 
of these seats is assured through the Morse Rush Seat Fund. Rush Tickets are sold at $7.50 
each, one to a customer, on Fridays as of 9 a.m. and Tuesdays and Thursdays as of 5 p.m. 
Please note that there are no Rush Tickets available on Friday or Saturday evenings. 

PLEASE NOTE THAT SMOKING IS NOT PERMITTED ANYWHERE IN SYMPHONY 
HALL. 

CAMERA AND RECORDING EQUIPMENT may not be brought into Symphony Hall during 
concerts. 



55 



LOST AND FOUND is located at the security desk at the stage door to Symphony Hall on St. 
Stephen Street. 

FIRST AID FACILITIES for both men and women are available. On-call physicians attending 
concerts should leave their names and seat locations at the switchboard near the Massachu- 
setts Avenue entrance. 

PARKING: For evening concerts only, the Prudential Center Garage offers a discount to any 
BSO patron with a ticket stub for that evening's performance, courtesy of R.M. Bradley & Co. 
and The Prudential Realty Group. There are also two paid parking garages on Westland Ave- 
nue near Symphony Hall. Limited street parking is available. As a special benefit, guaranteed 
pre-paid parking near Symphony Hall is available to subscribers who attend evening concerts. 
For more information, call the Subscription Office at (617) 266-7575. In addition, the Uptown 
Garage at 10 Gainsborough Street next to the New England Conservatory offers discounted 
parking ($6 with ticket stub) for all BSO concerts, including Friday afternoons. 

ELEVATORS are located outside the Hatch and Cabot-Cahners rooms on the Massachusetts 
Avenue side of Symphony Hall, and in the Cohen Wing. 

LADIES' ROOMS are located on the orchestra level, audience-left, at the stage end of the 
hall, on both sides of the first balcony, and in the Cohen Wing. 

MEN'S ROOMS are located on the orchestra level, audience-right, outside the Hatch Room 
near the elevator, on the first-balcony level, audience-left, outside the Cabot-Cahners Room 
near the coatroom, and in the Cohen Wing. 

COATROOMS are located on the orchestra and first-balcony levels, audience-left, outside the 
Hatch and Cabot-Cahners rooms, and in the Cohen Wing. Please note that the BSO is not re- 
sponsible for personal apparel or other property of patrons. 

LOUNGES AND BAR SERVICE: There are two lounges in Symphony Hall. The Hatch Room 
on the orchestra level and the Cabot-Cahners Room on the first-balcony level serve drinks 
starting one hour before each performance. For the Friday-afternoon concerts, both rooms 
open at noon, with sandwiches available until concert time. 

BOSTON SYMPHONY BROADCASTS: Friday-afternoon concerts of the Boston Symphony 
Orchestra are broadcast live by WGBH-FM (Boston 89.7) and by WAMC-FM (Albany 90.3, 
serving the Tanglewood area). Saturday-evening concerts are broadcast live by WCRB-FM 
(Boston 102.5) 

BSO FRIENDS: The Friends are donors to the Boston Symphony Orchestra Annual Fund. 
Friends receive BSO, the orchestra's newsletter, as well as priority ticket information and 
other benefits depending on their level of giving. For information, please call the Develop- 
ment Office at Symphony Hall weekdays between 9 and 5, (617) 638-9251. If you are already 
a Friend and you have changed your address, please inform us by sending your new and old 
addresses to the Development Office, Symphony Hall, Boston, MA 02115. Including your 
patron number will assure a quick and accurate change of address in our files. 

BUSINESS FOR BSO: The BSO's Business Leadership Association program makes it possible 
for businesses to participate in the life of the Boston Symphony Orchestra through a variety of 
original and exciting programs, among them "Presidents at Pops," "A Company Christmas at 
Pops," and special-event underwriting. Benefits include corporate recognition in the BSO pro- 
gram book, access to the Beranek Room reception lounge, and priority ticket service. For fur- 
ther information, please call Anne Cademenos, Associate Director of Corporate Programs, at 
(617) 638-9298. 

THE SYMPHONY SHOP is located in the Cohen Wing at the West Entrance on Huntington 
Avenue and is open Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday from 11 a.m. until 4 p.m., Saturday 
from noon until 6 p.m., and from one hour before each concert through intermission. The 
Symphony Shop features exclusive BSO merchandise, including The Symphony Lap Robe, 
calendars, coffee mugs, posters, and an expanded line of BSO apparel and recordings. The 
Shop also carries children's books and musical-motif gift items. A selection of Symphony 
Shop merchandise is also available during concert hours outside the Cabot-Cahners Room. 
All proceeds benefit the Boston Symphony Orchestra. For further information and telephone 
orders, please call (617) 638-9383. 



56 



r • • 

root is in 



i 



rmance 



Annual reports, product brochures, publications, 
catalogs & data sheets — a symphony of multi-color 
printing using our image editing and electronic page 
assembly capabilities to enhance the performance. 
Bravo! MacDonald & Evans Printers. 
One Rex Drive • Braintree, Massachusetts 02184 
Tel: (617) 848-9090 • Fax: (617) 843-5540 
Email: macevanl@aol 



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Symphony Orchestra and Hoover Capital 

Management: sound and disciplined^ 




"You come to Symphony Hall to hear wonderful sound produced by 
disciplined musicians. I invite you to come to Hoover Capital to get sound 
investment management practiced by disciplined investment professionals. 

"Our value-based approach benefits substantially our institutional and 

individual clients because, at Hoover Capital, we have only one- standard 

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— Stevin R. Hoover — 

Chairman and CEO 

HOOVER CAPITAL MANAGEMENT 

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Boston, Massachusetts 02109 

617-227-3133 

Hoover Capital Management is a Registered Investment Advisor. Copies of Form ADV as filed with the 
Securities and Exchange Commission are available upon request. Past performance is no guarantee of future results. 



The security of a trust, 
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To determine whether Fidelity may provide trust services in your state, please call Fidelity at 1-800-854-2829. 

Investor Centers are branches of Fidelity Brokerage Services, Inc. Member NYSE, SIPC. 




Seiji Ozawa, Music Director 

Bernard Haitink, Principal Guest Conductor 

One Hundred and Sixteenth Season, 1996-97 



Trustees of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Inc. 



R. Willis Leith, Jr., Chairman 
Peter A. Brooke, Vice-Chairman 
Mrs. Edith L. Dabney, Vice-Chairman 
Harvey Chet Krentzman, Vice-Chairman 



Nicholas T. Zervas, President 

William J. Poorvu, Vice-Chairman and Treasurer 

Ray Stata, Vice-Chairman 



Harlan E. Anderson 
Dr. Amar G. Bose 
James F. Cleary 
John F. Cogan, Jr. 
Julian Cohen 
William F. Connell, 
ex-officio 

Life Trustees 

Vernon R. Alden 
David B. Arnold, Jr. 
J. P. Barger 
Leo. L. Beranek 
Abram T. Collier 



William M. Crozier, Jr. 
Nader F. Darehshori 
Deborah B. Davis 
Nina L. Doggett 
Avram J. Goldberg 
Thelma E. Goldberg 



Nelson J. Darling, Jr. 
Archie C. Epps 
Mrs. Harris Fahnestock 1 " 
Mrs. John H. Fitzpatrick 
Dean W. Freed 



Julian T. Houston 

Edna S. Kalman 

George Krupp 

Mrs. August R. Meyer 

Richard P. Morse 

Mrs. Robert B. Newman 



Robert P. O'Block, 

ex-officio 
Peter C. Read 
Margaret Williams- 

DeCelles, ex-officio 



Mrs. John L. Grandin 
Mrs. George I. Kaplan 
George H. Kidder 
Thomas D. Perry, Jr. 
Irving W Rabb 



Mrs. George Lee Sargent 
Richard A. Smith 
Sidney Stoneman 
John Hoyt Stookey 
John L. Thorndike 



Other Officers of the Corporation 

Thomas D. May and John Ex Rodgers, Assistant Treasurers 



Daniel R. Gustin, Clerk 



Board of Overseers of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Inc. 

Robert P. O'Block, Chairman 

Molly Beals Millman, Secretary Phyllis Dohanian, Treasurer 



Mrs. Herbert B. Abelow 
Helaine B. Allen 
Joel B. Alvord 
Amanda Barbour Amis 
Marjorie Arons-Barron 
Caroline Dwight Bain 
Sandra Bakalar 
Gabriella Beranek 
Lynda Schubert Bodman 
William L. Boyan 
Jan Brett 
Robin A. Brown 
Mrs. Marshall Nichols 

Carter 
Earle M. Chiles 
William H. Congleton 
William F. Connell 
John M. Connors, Jr. 
Martha H.W. 

Crowninshield 
Diddy Cullinane 
Joan P. Curhan 
Tamara P. Davis 
Betsy P. Demirjian 
JoAnne Walton 

Dickinson 
Harry Ellis Dickson 
Mitchell L. Dong 
Hugh Downs 



Francis A. Doyle 
Goetz B. Eaton 
Harriett Eckstein 
William R. Elfers 
George M. Elvin 
Edward Eskandarian 
J. Richard Fennell 
Nancy J. Fitzpatrick 
Eugene M. Freedman 
Dr. Arthur Gelb 
Mrs. Kenneth J. 

Germeshausen 
Charles K. Gifford 
Jordan Golding 
Mark R. Goldweitz 
Deborah England Gray 
Michael Halperson 
John P. Hamill 
Ellen T. Harris 
Daphne P. Hatsopoulos 
Deborah M. Hauser 
Bayard Henry 
Marilyn Brachman 

Hoffman 
Ronald A. Homer 
Phyllis S. Hubbard 
F. Donald Hudson 
Lola Jaffe 
Mrs. Robert M. Jaffe 



Dr. Hisashi Kaneko 
Martin S. Kaplan 
Susan Beth Kaplan 
Mrs. S. Charles Kasdon 
Frances Demoulas 

Kettenbach 
Robert D. King 
Mrs. Gordon F. Kingsley 
David I. Kosowsky 
Arthur R. Kravitz 
Mrs. William D. 

Larkin, Jr. 
Thomas H. Lee 
Stephen R. Levy 
Edward Linde 
Frederick H. Lovejoy, Jr. 
Diane H. Lupean 
Mrs. Charles P. Lyman 
Barbara Jane Macon 
Joseph C. McNay 
William F. Meagher, Jr. 
Nathan R. Miller 
Robert J. Murray 
Paul C. O'Brien 
Norio Ohga 
Louis F. Orsatti 
Stephen Davies Paine 
Gloria Moody Press 



Millard H. Pryor, Jr. 
Robert E. Remis 
William D. Roddy, Jr. 
John Ex Rodgers 
Keizo Saji 
Roger A. Saunders 
Carol Scheifele-Holmes 
Hannah H. Schneider 
Cynthia D. Scullin 
Elizabeth T Selkowitz 
Roger T Servison 
L. Scott Singleton 
Mrs. Micho F. Spring 
Thomas G. Sternberg 
Jacquelynne M. 

Stepanian 
Bill Van Faasen 
Paul M. Verrochi 
Stephen R. Weiner 
Robert A. Wells 
Mrs. Joan D. Wheeler 
Reginald H. White 
Mrs. Florence T. 

Whitney 
Margaret Williams- 

DeCelles 
Robin Wilson 
Kathryn A. Wong 



+ Deceased 






Overseers Emeriti 

Mrs. Weston Adams 
Bruce A. Beal 
William M. Bulger 
Man Louise Cabot 
Mrs. Levin H. 

Campbell 
Johns H. Congdon 
Phyllis Curtin 
Katherine Fanning 
Peter H.B. 

Frelinghuysen 
Mrs. Thomas J. 

Galligan. Jr. 
Mrs. James Garivaltis 
Mrs. Haskell R. Gordon 



Susan D. Hall 
Mrs. Richard D. Hill 
Susan M. Hilles 
Glen H. Hiner 
H. Eugene Jones 
Mrs. Louis I. Kane 
Leonard Kaplan 
Richard L. Kave 
Robert K. Kraft 
Benjamin H. Lacy 
Mrs. James F. 

Lawrence 
Mrs. Hart D. Leavitt 
Laurence Lesser 
Mrs. Harry L. Marks 



Business Leadership Association 

Board of Directors 

Harvey Chet Krentzman. Chairman Emeritus 
James F. Clean - . Chairman 



Nader F. Darehshori 
Francis A. Doyle 
John P. Hamill 
W illiam F. Meagher 



Robert J. Murray 
Robert P. O'Block 
Patrick J. Purcell 
William D. Roddv 



C. Charles Marran 
Hanae Mori 
Mrs. Stephen V.C. 

Morris 
Patricia Morse 
David S. Nelson 
Mrs. Hiroshi H. 

Nishino 
Vincent M. O'Reilly 
Andrall S. Pearson 
John A. Perkins 
David R. Pokross 
Daphne Brooks Prout 
Mrs. Peter van S. Rice 
Mrs. Jerome Rosenfeld 



Mrs. William C. 

Rousseau 
Angelica L. Russell 
Francis P. Sears, Jr. 
Mrs. Carl Shapiro 
Mrs. Donald B. 

Sinclair 
Ralph Z. Sorenson 
Mrs. Arthur I. Strang 
Luise Vosgerchian 
Mrs. Thomas H.P. 

Whitney 
Mrs. Donald R. Wilson 
Mrs. John J. Wilson 



\X illiam F. Connell. President 
W illiam L. Boyan. Vice-President 

Cynthia Scullin Stephen J. Sweeney 

Malcolm L. Sherman W illiam C. Van Faasen 
Ray Stata Patricia \\olpert 



Emeritus Leo L. Beranek 



Ex-Officw R. WiUis Leith, Jr. • Nicholas T. Zervas 



Officers of the Boston Symphony Association of Volunteers 

Margaret W illiams-DeCelles. President Charlie Jack. Treasurer 

Goetz Eaton. Executive 1 ice-President Doreen Reis, Secretary 



Diane Austin. Symphony Shop 

Noni Cooper. Adult Education 
Ginger Elvin. Tanglewood 

Association 
Nancy Ferguson. Hall Services 
Phyllis Hubbard, dominating 



Marilyn Pond. Public Relations Dorothy Stern, Resources 

Dee Schoenly, Development Development 

W illiam C. Sexton, Erling Thorgalsen. Membership 

Tangleuood Association Eva Zervos, Fundraising 

Barbara Steiner. Youth Activities Wendy Ziner. Fundraising 



The Gericke Years: 
1884-1889 and 1898-1906 

The archival exhibit currently on display in the Huntington Ave- 
nue corridor of the Cohen \^ ing explores the Boston Symphony 
Orchestra during \5 ilhelm Gericke's two terms as conductor. 
Generally acknowledged as the BSOs first "professional" con- 
ductor. Gericke is credited with having transformed the BSO 
from a group of musicians into an orchestra. Among the many 
innovations that occurred during Gericke's conductorship were 
the inauguration in 1885 of the "Promenade Concerts," which 
were the predecessor of the Boston Pops; the commencement of 
tours to other United States cities in 1886. the initiation of a 
series of Young People's Concerts in 1887. and the move from 
the old Boston Music Hall to Symphony Hall in 1900. 




Programs copyright ©199. Boston Symphony Orchestra. Inc. 

Cover design by Jaycole Advertising, Inc. /Cover and BSO photos by Steve J. Sherman 



Administration 

Kenneth Haas, Managing Director 

Daniel R. Gustin, Assistant Managing Director and Manager of Tanglewood 

Anthony Fogg, Artistic Administrator 

Thomas D. May, Director of Finance and Business Affairs 

Nancy Perkins, Director of Development 

Caroline Smedvig, Director of Public Relations and Marketing 

Ray F. Wellbaum, Orchestra Manager 

ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF/ARTISTIC 

Dennis Alves, Artistic Coordinator, Boston Pops • Faith Hunter, Executive Assistant to the Managing 
Director • Karen Leopardi, Artist Assistant/Secretary to the Music Director • Vincenzo Natale, Chauffeur/ 
Valet • James O'Connor, Administrative Assistant, Artistic Administration • Brian Van Sickle, Executive 
Assistant to the Tanglewood Manager 

ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF/ PRODUCTION 

Christopher W. Ruigomez, Operations Manager 

Scott Schillin, Assistant Manager, Boston Pops and Youth Activities 

Felicia A. Burrey, Chorus Manager • Nancy Cohen, Auditions Coordinator/Administrative Assistant, 
Orchestra Personnel • Jana Euler Gimenez, Administrative Assistant, Management Office • Diane A. 
Read, Production Coordinator 



BOX OFFICE 

Russell M. Hodsdon, Manager of Box Office 

Mary J. Broussard, Clerk • Cary Eyges, Clerk • Lawrence Fraher, Clerk 
Assistant Manager of Box Office • Arthur Ryan, Clerk 



Kathleen Kennedy, 



BUSINESS OFFICE 

Sarah J. Harrington, Budget Manager 

Craig R. Kaplan, Controller 

Roberta Kennedy, Manager, Symphony Shop 

Christopher Fox, Budget Analyst • Michelle Green, Executive Assistant to the Director of Finance 
and Business Affairs • Ian Kane, Senior Financial Analyst • Scott Langill, General Accountant • John 
O'Callaghan, Payroll Accountant • Yaneris Pena-Briggs, Cash Accountant • Sharon Sherman, 
Accounts Payable Supervisor • Victoria L. Tan, Staff Accountant 

DEVELOPMENT 

Daniel P. Breen, Director of Administration for Development 
Madelyne Cuddeback, Director of Corporate Programs 
Julie H. Diaz, Campaign Director 

John C. Marksbury, Director of Foundation and Government Support 
Joyce M. Serwitz, Associate Director of Development 

Diane Abe, Campaign Coordinator • Maureen Barry, Administrative Assistant to the Associate Director 
of Development • Courtney A. Barth, Assistant Director, Corporate Projects • Anne Cademenos, Associate 
Director of Corporate Programs • Sally Dale, Manager of Donor Relations • Katrina DeBonville, Adminis- 
trative Assistant to the Major Gifts Officer • Rebecca Ehrhardt, Major Gifts Officer • Sarah Fitzgerald, Data 
Coordinator • Ginny Gaeta, Executive Assistant to the Director of Development • Erika-Marie Haeussler, 
Administrative Assistant, Tanglewood Development • Joyce Hatch, Director of Boston Symphony Annual Fund • 
Deborah Hersey, Coordinator of Information Systems • Shelley Kooris, Manager of Development Research • 
Matthew Lane, Administrative Assistant, Campaign Communications • Sabrina Learman, Administrative 
Assistant/Office Manager * Katherine A. Lempert, Assistant Director, Tanglewood Development • Robert 
Massey, Data Production Assistant • Cynthia MeCabe, Administrative Assistant, Foundation and Government 
Support • Rachel O. Nadjarian, Donor Relations Assistant, • Gerrit Petersen, Assistant Director of Foun- 
dation and Government Support • Julie A. Phaneuf, Assistant Director, Boston Symphony Annual Fund • 
Alicia Salmoni, Reseacher/Track Manager • George Saulnier, Data Entry Clerk • Bethany Tamilian), 
Administrative Assistant. Corporate Programs • Valerie VignaiJX, Administrative Assistant, \nnual Fund • 
Tracy Wilson, Director of Tanglewood Development 



EDUCATIONAL AGTIVITIES/ARCHIVKS 

Richard Ortner, Administrator of the Tanglewood Music Center 
Myran Parker-Brass, Coordinator of Youth Activities 

Bridget P. Carr, Archivist— Position endowed by Caroline Dwight Bain 
Assistant, Tanglewood Music Center 



Barbara Logue, Administrative 



FUNCTIONS OFFICE 

Cheryl Silvia Lopes, Function Manager 

Lesley Ann Cefalo, Assistant Function Manager • Elizabeth Francey-Amis, Assistant to the Function 
Manager/Tanglewood Function Coordinator 

HUMAN RESOURCES 

Marion Gardner-Saxe, Director of Human Resources 

Anna Asphar, Benefits Manager • Yuko Uchino, Administrative Assistant, Human Resources 

INFORMATION SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT 
Robert Bell, Manager of Information Systems 

William Beckett, Information Systems Coordinator • James Major, Information Systems Special 
Projects Coordinator • Michael Pijoan, Assistant Manager of Information Systems 

PUBLIC RELATIONS 

Bernadette M. Horgan, Director of Media Relations 

Susanna Bonta, Media Relations Coordinator • Caleb Cochran, Media Relations Assistant/Assistant to 

the Director of Public Relations and Marketing • Leah Oko, Administrative Assistant 

PUBLICATIONS 

Steven Ledbetter, Musicologist & Program Annotator 
Marc Mandel, Publications Manager 

Eleanor Hayes McGourty, Boston Pops Publications Coordinator/Marketing Copywriter 

SALES, SUBSCRIPTION, AND MARKETING 
Nancy A. Kay, Director of Sales & Marketing Manager 

Helen N.H. Brady, Group Sales Manager • Richard Chiarella, Graphic Designer • Susanna Concha, 
Marketing Coordinator • B. Victoria Johnson, Subscription Representative • Michael Miller, Symphony- 
Charge Manager • Michelene Miller, Group Sales Assistant • Kim Noltemy, Associate Marketing Manager • 
Carol Ann Passarelli, Subscription Manager • Brian Robinson, Senior Subscription Representative 

SYMPHONY HALL OPERATIONS 

Robert L. Gleason, Facilities Manager 
James E. Whitaker, House Manager 

H.R. Costa, Technical Supervisor • Michael Finlan, Switchboard Supervisor • Wilmoth A. Griffiths, 
Supervisor of Facilities Support Services • Catherine Lawlor, Administrative Assistant • John MacMinn, 
Supervisor of Building Maintenance • William D. McDonnell, Chief Steward • Cleveland Morrison, 
Stage Manager • Shawn Wilder, Mailroom Clerk 

House Crew Charles F. Cassell, Jr. • Francis Castillo • Thomas Davenport • John Demick, 
Stage Coordinator • Michael Frazier • Hank Green • Juan Jimenez • William P. Morrill • Mark 
C. Rawson 
Security Christopher Bartlett • David Parker, Security Supervisor 

Cleaning Crew Desmond Boland • Clifford Collins • Angelo Flores • Rudolph Lewis • Robert 
MacGilvray • Lindel Milton, Lead Cleaner 

TANGLEWOOD OPERATIONS 
James J. Mooney, Facilities Manager 

VOLUNTEER OFFICE 

Leslie Wu Foley, Director of Volunteer Services 

Jennifer Flynn, Senior Project Coordinator * Pauline McCance, Senior Administrative Assistant 



BSO 



"Salute to Symphony" 1997 

Friday, March 21-Sunday, March 23 

"Salute to Symphony," the BSO's annual 
community outreach event and fundraiser, 
takes on a new look in 1997, giving greater 
emphasis to the music, the musicians, and 
the BSO's role in the community. The fes- 
tivities begin with the annual telecast on 
WCVB-TV Channel 5, to air Friday, March 
21, from 7:30 to 9 p.m. Hosted by WCVB 
news anchors Natalie Jacobson and Chet 
Curtis, the program includes orchestral 
selections led by Seiji Ozawa, John Williams, 
and Keith Lockhart, "up close and person- 
al" segments about some of the people who 
make up the BSO, an update on Mariana 
Green, a student in Project STEP (String 
Training and Educational Program for stu- 
dents of color), a visit with Keith Lockhart 
and Lucia Lin at their Boston home, and a 
review of some BSO and Boston Pops high- 
lights of the past year. Frank Avruch and 
Dixie Whatley will also be on hand for this 
special televised concert, to be simulcast on 
WCRB 102.5 FM. 

"Salute to Symphony" would not be pos- 
sible without the generous support of Fideli- 
ty Investments, the new corporate sponsor of 
"Salute"; of WCVB-TV Channel 5, produc- 
ers of the "Salute" telecast for 21 years; and 
of WCRB 102.5 FM, radio broadcasters of 
"Salute" for 27 years. "We are very excited 
about the new direction 'Salute to Symphony' 
is taking because it focuses on what we do 
best — bringing the BSO's music to as many 
people as possible throughout New England, 
across the country, and around the world," 
said Daniel R. Gustin, BSO Assistant Man- 
aging Director. "In the spirit of change, we 
are delighted to welcome Fidelity Invest- 
ments, generous supporters of the Boston 
Pops through their sponsorship of 'Evening 
at Pops' and the 1997 Boston Pops National 
Summer Tour, to the 'Salute' team. We also 
offer special thanks to the more than 200 
volunteers from the greater Boston commu- 
nity whose outstanding effort embodies the 
spirit of the weekend." 

Throughout the weekend WCRB 102.5 
FM will celebrate the BSO with "Salute" 



broadcasts encouraging listeners to "Get to 
Know the BSO." This year's radio program- 
ming will continue the tradition of broad- 
casting the most popular BSO and Boston 
Pops recordings, both current and historical, 
as well as rarely heard tapes from the BSO 
archives, and interviews with BSO musi- 
cians, including informal conversations 
with Seiji Ozawa, Keith Lockhart, and John 
Williams. 

The annual Symphony Hall Open House, 
sponsored by Fidelity Investments, is one 
of the orchestra's most popular events. On 
Saturday, March 22, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m, 
Symphony Hall will open its doors for a day 
of free musical activities for everyone, in- 
cluding solo and chamber music perform- 
ances by BSO musicians, tours of Symphony 
Hall, instrument demonstrations, perform- 
ances on the Symphony Hall organ, a live 
broadcast by WCRB 102.5 FM, and infor- 
mal talks with musicians. 

Community support of the BSO is vital to 
maintaining and furthering our goals in Sym- 
phony Hall, in area schools, and throughout 
the region. To make a pledge to "Salute to 
Symphony" call 1-800-325-9400; a pledge 
of any amount is appreciated! 

New BSO Recording of 

Faure's "Requiem" 

on RCA Victor Red Seal 

Seiji Ozawa's recording with the Boston Sym- 
phony Orchestra of Fame's Requiem, taped 
in March/April 1994 at Symphony Hall with 
soprano Barbara Bonney, baritone Hakan 
Hagegard, and the Tanglewood Festival 
Chorus, John Oliver, conductor, has been 
released on RCA Victor Red Seal. Filling 
out the disc is a selection of Faure songs 
sung by Barbara Bonney and Hakan Hage- 
gard with pianist Warren Jones. 

Among recent discs by Boston Symphony 
members, two feature BSO flutist Fenwick 
Smith — an album of Ned Rorem's "Chamber 
Music with Flute" on Etcetera, with perform- 
ers also including BSO principal harp \mi 
Hobson Pilot; and, on Archetype Records, 
an album of music by John Harbison entitled 
"The Boston Collection," featuring Mr. Smith 
in Harbison's Duo for Flute and Piano with 
pianist Randall Hodgkinson. In addition. 






■ 




Because most of our New England facilities are within an hour ^ 

from Boston's nuyor medical centers, our residents can - ^k 

receive the medical care they need from regional hospitals t jfc AgE 
and return to a Life Care managed facility in their Caff* J 13® 

hometown area, Life Care facilities provide long-term v-Qv^Hterc 
health care, Alzheimer's care, subacute services and Mj* RCib 

rehabilitative therapies-all in a warm, homelike environment. Amenca 



Life Care Center 
of Merrimack Valley 
N. Billerica, MA 
(508)667-2166 

Evergreen House 
Health Center 
East Providence, Rl 
(401) 438-3250 

Life Care Center 
of Attleboro 
Attleboro, MA 
(508)222-4182 



Life Care Center 
of North Shore 
Lynn, MA 
(617)592-9667 

Life Care Center 
of Wilbraham 
Wilbraham, MA 
(413)596-3111 

Littleton House 
Nursing Home 
Littleton, MA 
(508)486-3512 



Life Care Center 
of Auburn 
Auburn, MA 
(508) 832-4800 

Life Care Center 
of Raynham 
Raynham, MA 
(508)821-5700 

Life Care Center 
of Plymouth 
Plymouth, MA 
(508) 747-9800 



The Oaks 

New Bedford, MA 

(508) 998-7807 

Life Care Center of 
the South Shore 
Scituate, MA 
(617)545-1370 

Suburban Manor 
Rehabilitation 
Nursing Center 
Acton, MA 
(508)263-9101 



Life Care Center 
of West Bridgewater 
West Bridgewater, MA 
(508) 580-4400 

Cherry Hill Manor 
Johnston, Rl 
(401)231-3102 

Life Care Center of 
Stoneham (opening 
summer 1 997) 



6 



BSO principal trombonist Ronald Barron is 
featured on two recent discs on the Boston 
Brass Series label: "All American Trom- 
bone," a collection of music by American 
composers; and "In the Family," including 
music of Harold Shapero, Shostakovich, 
Vaughan Williams, and others, with Edwin 
Barker, Thomas Gauger, Marianne Gedigian, 
Ann Hobson Pilot, and Douglas Yeo among 
the performers. 

These and other Boston Symphony record- 
ings — including also a brand-new Doyen 
release, "Proclamations," featuring BSO bass 
trombonist Douglas Yeo — are available in 
the Symphony Shop. 

BSO Members in Concert 

BSO flutist Fenwick Smith is soloist with 
Max Hobart and the Civic Symphony Or- 
chestra for the New England premiere of 
John Harbison's Flute Concerto on Sunday, 
March 9, at 3 p.m. at Jordan Hall at the New 
England Conservatory of Music. Also on the 
program: Mozart's Magic Flute Overture, 
Piston's Suite from The Incredible Flutist, 
and Berlioz's Symphonie fantastique . Single 
tickets at $20 and $15 are available at the 
Jordan Hall box office. 

BSO associate concertmaster Tamara 
Smirnova is featured in the Brahms Violin 
Concerto with Harry Ellis Dickson and the 
Boston Classical Orchestra on Friday, March 
14, at 8 p.m. and Sunday, March 16, at 3 p.m. 
Also on the program are Rossini's overture 
to The Italian Woman in Algiers and Schu- 
bert's Symphony No. 2. Single tickets are 
$18, $25, and $31 ($2 discount for seniors, 
$5 discount for students). For tickets call 
(617) 423-3883. 

Founded by BSO cellist Jonathan Miller, 
the Boston Artists Ensemble plays Aren- 
sky's Quartet in A minor for violin, viola, 
and two cellos, Opus 35, Ravel's Sonata for 
violin and cello, and Glazunov's Quintet in 
A minor for two violins, viola, and two cel- 
los, Opus 39, on Friday, March 21, at 8 p.m. 
at the Peabody Essex Museum in Salem, 
and on Sunday, March 23, at 2:30 p.m. at 
Trinity Church in Newton Centre. In addi- 
tion to Mr. Miller, the performers include 
violinists Arturo Delmoni and Sharan Lev- 
enthal, BSO violist Kazuko Matsusaka, and 



BSO cellist Martha Babcock. Tickets are 
$20 ($17 students and seniors). For more 
information call (617) 964-6553. 

BSO principal trumpet Charles Schlueter 
is joined by the Quintet Brassil, made up of 
Paraiba Federal University music faculty, 
for "An Evening of Brazilian Music" on 
Sunday, March 30, at 8 p.m. at Jordan Hall 
at the New England Conservatory. The pro- 
gram includes Lindenberg Cardoso's Xan- 
xando, Oskar Bohme's Sextet in E-flat minor, 
Jose Ursicino da Silva (Duda)'s Concertino, 
Suite Monette, Eugene Bozza's Sonatine, 
and Flavio Fernandes de Lima's Quinteto 
Nordeste. Admission is free. 

BSO bass trombonist Douglas Yeo pre- 
sents music for bass trombone and serpent 
(the eighteenth- and nineteenth-century 
predecessor to today's valved bass brass in- 
struments) on Monday, March 31, at 8 p.m. 
at Jordan Hall at the New England Conser- 
vatory. BSO trombonist Norman Bolter con- 
ducts two of his own works for bass trom- 
bone and orchestra — Dances of Greeting 
and Of Mountains — as part of this program, 
which also includes Albinoni's Trio Sonata 
for three trombones, Cliff Bevan's That Pesky 
Serpent, Simon Proctor's Concerto for Ser- 
pent, David Fetterby's Split Personality for 
solo bass trombone, and music with the New 
England Brass Band. Admission is free. 

The BSO Goes On-line 

Boston Symphony and Boston Pops fans 
with access to the Internet can now visit 
the orchestra's new official home page 
(http://www.bso.org), which provides up-to- 
the-minute information about all the orches- 
tra's activities. In addition to program listings 
and ticket prices, the web site has biogra- 
phies of BSO musicians and guest artists, 
current press releases, historical facts and 
figures, helpful telephone numbers, and in- 
formation on auditions and job openings. A 
highlight of the site, and a first for cultural 
organizations represented on the Internet, is 
a virtual-reality tour of the orchestra's home, 
Symphony Hall. Since the BSO web site will 
be updated on a regular basis, to include 
1997 Boston Pops and Tanglewood informa- 
tion as well as any program changes, we 
invite you to check in frequently. 



Generational planning 
and family wealth: 

An important part of a 
Fiduciary relationship. 

If you have accumulated substantial assets that will 
pass to heirs in this and future generations, you should 
give careful consideration to how and when these funds 
can best be transferred using generational planning, 
trusts and other tax-advantaged plans and techniques. 

Founded in 1885 as a family office, Fiduciary has 
extensive experience working with several generations 
of a family. In fact, we currently manage and have cus- 
tody of over $5 billion in assets belonging to families 
and individuals. Our private ownership and century-old 
commitment to the trust and asset management busi- 
ness ensure a continuity of service unmatched by other 
institutions. 

If you have $500,000 or more to invest and would 
like to learn more about Fiduciary including investment 
performance, please write or call Donald P Lee at 
(617) 574-3425 for a brochure outlining our services and 
ideals. 



FIDUCIARY 




TRUST 



INVESTMENT MANAGERS AND TRUSTEES FOR 
INDIVIDUALS AND FAMILIES SINCE 1885. 



175 Federal Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02110-2289 
Telephone (617) 482-5270 



8 




SEUI OZAWA 

Seiji Ozawa is now in his twenty-fourth season as music director 
of the Boston Symphony Orchestra. Mr. Ozawa became the 
BSO's thirteenth music director in 1973, after a year as music 
adviser; his tenure with the Boston Symphony is the longest of 
any music director currently active with an American orches- 
tra. In his nearly twenty-five years as music director, Mr. Ozawa 
has maintained the orchestra's distinguished reputation both at 
home and abroad, with concerts at Symphony Hall and Tangle- 
wood, on tours to Europe, Japan, Hong Kong, China, and South 
America, and across the United States, including regular con- 
certs in New York. Mr. Ozawa has upheld the BSO's commit- 
ment to new music through the commissioning of new works, including a series of cen- 
tennial commissions marking the orchestra's hundredth birthday in 1981, a series of 
works celebrating the fiftieth anniversary of the Tanglewood Music Center in 1990, and 
a current series represented this season by new works from Leon Kirchner and Bernard 
Rands. In addition, he has recorded more than 130 works with the orchestra, represent- 
ing more than fifty different composers, on ten labels. 

In addition to his work with the Boston Symphony, Mr. Ozawa appears regularly 
with the Berlin Philharmonic, the New Japan Philharmonic, the London Symphony, the 
Orchestre National de France, the Philharmonia of London, and the Vienna Philhar- 
monic. He made his Metropolitan Opera debut in December 1992, appears regularly at 
La Scala and the Vienna Staatsoper, and has also conducted opera at the Paris Opera, 
Salzburg, and Covent Garden. In September 1992 he founded the Saito Kinen Festival 
in Matsumoto, Japan, in memory of his teacher Hideo Saito, a central figure in the cul- 
tivation of Western music and musical technique in Japan, and a co-founder of the 
Toho School of Music in Tokyo. In addition to his many Boston Symphony recordings, 
Mr. Ozawa has recorded with the Berlin Philharmonic, the Chicago Symphony, the 
London Philharmonic, the Orchestre National, the Orchestre de Paris, the Philharmonia 
of London, the Saito Kinen Orchestra, the San Francisco Symphony, the Toronto Sym- 
phony, and the Vienna Philharmonic, among others. 

Born in 1935 in Shenyang, China, Seiji Ozawa studied music from an early age and 
later graduated with first prizes in composition and conducting from Tokyo's Toho School 
of Music. In 1959 he won first prize at the International Competition of Orchestra Con- 
ductors held in Besangon, France. Charles Munch, then music director of the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra, subsequently invited him to attend the Tanglewood Music Center, 
where he won the Koussevitzky Prize for outstanding student conductor in 1960. While 
a student of Herbert von Karajan in West Berlin, Mr. Ozawa came to the attention of 
Leonard Bernstein, who appointed him assistant conductor of the New York Philharmon- 
ic for the 1961-62 season. He made his first professional concert appearance in North 
America in January 1962, with the San Francisco Symphony. He was music director of 
the Chicago Symphony Orchestra's Ravinia Festival for five summers beginning in 1964, 
music director of the Toronto Symphony from 1965 to 1969, and music director of the 
San Francisco Symphony from 1970 to 1976, followed by a year as that orchestra's 
music adviser. He conducted the Boston Symphony Orchestra for the first time in 1964, 
at Tanglewood, and made his first Symphony Hall appearance with the orchestra in 
January 1968. In 1970 he became an artistic director of Tanglewood. 

Mr. Ozawa recently became the first recipient of Japan's Inouye Sho ("Inouye 
Award"). Created to recognize lifetime achievement in the arts, the award is named 
after this century's preeminent Japanese novelist, Yasushi Inouye. In September 1994 
Mr. Ozawa received his second Emmy award, for Individual Achievement in Cultural 
Programming, for "Dvorak in Prague: A Celebration," with the Boston Symphony Orches- 
tra. He won his first Emmy for the Boston Symphony Orchestra's PBS television series 
"Evening at Symphony." Mr. Ozawa holds honorary doctor of music degrees from the 
University of Massachusetts, the New England Conservatory of Music, and Wheaton 
College in Norton, Massachusetts. 




First Violins 

Malcolm Lowe 

Concertmaster 
Charles Munch chair, 
fully funded in perpetuity 

Tamara Smirnova 

Associate Concertmaster 
Helen Horner Mclntyre chair, 
endowed in perpetuity in 1976 



BOSTON SYMPHONY 

ORCHESTRA 

1996-97 

Seiji Ozawa 

Music Director 

Music Directorship endowed by 

John Moors Cabot 

Bernard Haitink 

Principal Guest Conductor 




Assistant Concertmaster 

Robert L. Beal, and 

Enid L. and Bruce A. Beal chair, 

endowed in perpetuity in 1 980 
Laura Park 

Assistant Concertmaster 

Edward and Bertha C. Rose chair 
Bo Youp Hwang 

John and Dorothy Wilson chair, 

fully funded in perpetuity 
Lucia Lin 

Forrest Foster Collier chair 
Leo Panasevich 

Carolyn and George Rowland chair 
Gottfried Wilfinger 

Dorothy Q. and David B. Arnold, Jr., 

chair, fully funded in perpetuity 
Alfred Schneider 

Muriel C. Kasdon 

and Marjorie C. Paley chair 
Raymond Sird 

Ruth and Carl Shapiro chair, 

fully funded in perpetuity 
Ikuko Mizuno 

David and Ingrid Kosowsky chair 
Amnon Levy 

Theodore W. and Evelyn Berenson 

Family chair 

* Harvey Seigel 

Stephanie Morris Marryott and 
Franklin J. Marryott chair 

* Nancy Bracken 
*Aza Raykhtsaum 

* Bonnie Bewick 

* James Cooke 

* Victor Romanul 

Bessie Pappas chair 

* Catherine French 

Second Violins 

Marylou Speaker Churchill 

Principal 

Fahnestock chair 
Vyacheslav Uritsky 

Assistant Principal 

Charlotte and Irving W. Rabb chair, 

endowed in perpetuity in 1977 
Ronald Knudsen 

Edgar and Shirley Grossman chair 
Joseph McGauley 

Shirley and J. Richard Fennell chair 
Ronan Lefkowitz 

David H. and Edith C. Howie chair, 

fully funded in perpetuity 
*Jerome Rosen 

* Sheila Fiekowsky 
*Jennie Shames 

* Participating in a system of rotated 
seating 
%On sabbatical leave 
°On leave 
§ Substitute player 



* Valeria Vilker Kuchment 
*Tatiana Dimitriades 
*Si-Jing Huang 

* Nicole Monahan 

* Kelly Barr 
*Wendy Putnam 

Violas 

Steven Ansell 

Principal 

Charles S. Dana chair, 

endowed in perpetuity in 1970 
Hui Liu 

Assistant Principal 

Anne Stoneman chair, 

fully funded in perpetuity 
Ronald Wilkison 

Lois and Harlan Anderson chair 

Robert Barnes 
Burton Fine 
Joseph Pietropaolo 
Michael Zaretsky 
Marc Jeanneret 
*Mark Ludwig 

Helene R. Cahners-Kaplan and 
Carol R. Goldberg chair 

* Rachel Fagerburg 

* Edward Gazouleas 
*Kazuko Matsusaka 

Cellos 

Jules Eskin 

Principal 

Philip R. Allen chair, 

endowed in perpetuity in 1 969 
Martha Babcock 

Assistant Principal 

Vernon and Marion Alden chair, 

endowed in perpetuity in 1977 
Sato Knudsen 

Esther S. and Joseph M. Shapiro chair 
Joel Moerschel 

Sandra and David Bakalar chair 
Luis Leguia 

Robert Bradford Newman chair, 

fully funded in perpetuity 
Carol Procter 

Lillian and Nathan R. Miller chair 

* Ronald Feldman 

Richard C. and Ellen E. Paine chair, 
fully funded in perpetuity 

* Jerome Patterson 

Charles and JoAnne Dickinson chair 

* Jonathan Miller 

Rosemary and Donald Hudson chair 
*Owen Young 

John F. Cogan, Jr., and 
Mary L. Cornille chair, 
fully funded in perpetuity 

* Andrew Pearce 

Gordon and Mary Ford Kingsley 
Family chair 

Basses 

Edwin Barker 
Principal 

Harold D. Hodgkinson chair, 
endowed in perpetuity in 1974 
Lawrence Wolfe 
Assistant Principal 
Maria Nistazos Stata chair, 
fully funded in perpetuity 



10 



Joseph Hearne 
Leith Family chair, 
fully funded in perpetuity 
John Salkowski 
Joseph and Jan Brett Hearne chair 
* Robert Olson 
*James Orleans 
*Todd Seeber 
*John Stovall 
*Dennis Roy 

Flutes 

Elizabeth Ostling 

Acting Principal 

Walter Piston chair, 

endowed in perpetuity in 1970 
Fenwick Smith 

Myra and Robert Kraft chair, 

endowed in perpetuity in 1 981 



Assistant Principal 
Marian Gray Lewis chair, 
fully funded in perpetuity 

Piccolo 

Geralyn Coticone 
Evelyn and C. Charles Marran 
chair, endowed in perpetuity in 1979 

Oboes 

Alfred Genovese 
Principal 

Mildred B. Remis chair, 
endowed in perpetuity in 1975 

Mark McEwen 

Keisuke Wakao 
Assistant Principal 
Elaine and Jerome Rosenfeld chair 

English Horn 

Robert Sheena 
Beranek chair, 
fully funded in perpetuity 

Clarinets 

William R. Hudgins 
Principal 

Ann S.M. Banks chair, 
endowed in perpetuity in 1977 

Scott Andrews 

Thomas Martin 
Associate Principal & E-flat clarinet 
Stanton W. and Elisabeth K. Davis 
chair, fully funded in perpetuity 



Bass Clarinet 

Craig Nordstrom 
Farla and Harvey Chet 
Krentzman chair, 
fully funded in perpetuity 

Bassoons 

Richard Svoboda 

Principal 

Edward A. Taft chair, 

endowed in perpetuity in 1974 
Roland Small 

Richard Ranti 
Associate Principal 

Contrabassoon 

Gregg Henegar 
Helen Rand Thayer chair 

Horns 

Charles Kavalovski 

Principal 

Helen Sagqff Slosberg chair, 

endowed in perpetuity in 1974 
Richard Sebring 

Associate Principal 

Margaret Andersen Congleton 

chair, fully funded in perpetuity 
Daniel Katzen 

Elizabeth B. Storer chair 
Jay Wadenpfuhl 
Richard Mackey 
Jonathan Menkis 

Trumpets 

Charles Schlueter 

Principal 

Roger Louis Voisin chair, 

endowed in perpetuity in 1977 
Peter Chapman 

Ford H. Cooper chair 
Timothy Morrison 

Associate Principal 

Nina L. and Eugene B. 

Doggett chair 
Thomas Rolfs 

Trombones 

^Ronald Barron 

Principal 

J. P. and Mary B. Barger chair, 

fully funded in perpetuity 



Norman Bolter 
§Darren Acosta 

Bass Trombone 

Douglas Yeo 

Tuba 

Chester Schmitz 
Margaret and William C. 
Rousseau chair, 

fully funded in perpetuity 

Timpani 

Everett Firth 
Sylvia Shippen Wells chair, 
endowed in perpetuity in 1974 

Percussion 

Thomas Gauger 

Peter and Anne Brooke chair, 
fully funded in perpetuity 
Frank Epstein 

Peter Andrew Lurie chair 
J. William Hudgins 

Timothy Genis 
Assistant Timpanist 

Harps 

X Ann Hobson Pilot 
Principal 

Willona Henderson Sinclair chair 
Sarah Schuster Ericsson 

Librarians 

Marshall Burlingame 

Principal 

Lia and William Poorvu chair 
William Shisler 
Sandra Pearson 

Assistant Conductor 

Richard Westerfield 
Anna E. Finnerty chair 

Personnel Managers 

Lynn Larsen 
Bruce M. Creditor 

Stage Manager 

Position endowed by 
Angelica L. Russell 
Peter Riley Pfitzinger 




11 



A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

Now in its 116th season, the Boston Symphony Orchestra gave its inaugural concert 
on October 22, 1881, and has continued to uphold the vision of its founder, the philan- 
thropist, Civil War veteran, and amateur musician Henry Lee Higginson, for more than 
a century. Under the leadership of Seiji Ozawa, its music director since 1973, the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra has performed throughout the United States, as well as in Europe, 
Japan, Hong Kong, South America, and China, and reaches audiences numbering in the 
millions through its performances on radio, television, and recordings. It plays an active 
role in commissioning new works from today's most important composers; its summer 
season at Tanglewood is regarded as one of the world's most important music festivals; 
it helps develop the audience of the future through BSO Youth Concerts and through a 
variety of outreach programs involving the entire Boston community; and, during the 
Tanglewood season, it sponsors the Tanglewood Music Center, one of the world's most 
important training grounds for young composers, conductors, instrumentalists, and vocal- 
ists. The orchestra's virtuosity is reflected in the concert and recording activities of the 
Boston Symphony Chamber Players, the world's only permanent chamber ensemble 
made up of a major symphony orchestra's principal players. The activities of the Boston 
Pops Orchestra have established an international standard for the performance of lighter 
kinds of music. Overall, the mission of the Boston Symphony Orchestra is to foster and 
maintain an organization dedicated to the making of music consonant with the highest 
aspirations of musical art, creating performances and providing educational and training 
programs at the highest level of excellence. This is accomplished with the continued 
support of its audiences, governmental assistance on both the federal and local levels, 
and through the generosity of many foundations, businesses, and individuals. 

Henry Lee Higginson dreamed of founding a great and permanent orchestra in his 
home town of Boston for many years before that vision approached reality in the spring 
of 1881. The following October the first Boston Symphony Orchestra concert was given 
under the direction of conductor Georg Henschel, who would remain as music director 
until 1884. For nearly twenty years Boston Symphony concerts were held in the Old 
Boston Music Hall; Symphony Hall, one of the world's most highly regarded concert 
halls, was opened in 1900. Henschel was succeeded by a series of German-born and 
-trained conductors — Wilhelm Gericke, Arthur Nikisch, Emil Paur, and Max Fiedler — 
culminating in the appointment of the legendary Karl Muck, who served two tenures as 
music director, 1906-08 and 1912-18. Meanwhile, in July 1885, the musicians of the 
Boston Symphony had given their first "Promenade" concert, offering both music and 
refreshments, and fulfilling Major Higginson's wish to give "concerts of a lighter kind of 



p.. y "^^, 






T* 




The first photograph, actually a collage, of the Boston Symphony Orchestra under Georg Henschel, 
taken 1882 



12 



music." These concerts, soon to be given in the springtime and renamed first "Popular" 
and then "Pops," fast became a tradition. 

In 1915 the orchestra made its first transcontinental trip, playing thirteen concerts 
at the Panama-Pacific Exposition in San Francisco. Recording, begun with RCA in 1917, 
continued with increasing frequency, as did radio broadcasts. In 1918 Henri Rabaud 
was engaged as conductor; he was succeeded a year later by Pierre Monteux. These 
appointments marked the beginning of a French-oriented tradition which would be 
maintained, even during the Russian-born Serge Koussevitzky's time, with the employ- 
ment of many French-trained musicians. 

The Koussevitzky era began in 1924. His extraordinary musicianship and electric 
personality proved so enduring that he served an unprecedented term of twenty-five 
years. Regular radio broadcasts of Boston Symphony concerts began during Kousse- 
vitzky's years as music director. In 1936 Koussevitzky led the orchestra's first concerts 
in the Berkshires; a year later he and the players took up annual summer residence at 
Tanglewood. Koussevitzky passionately shared Major Higginson's dream of "a good hon- 
est school for musicians," and in 1940 that dream was realized with the founding of the 
Berkshire Music Center (now called the Tanglewood Music Center). 

In 1929 the free Esplanade concerts on the Charles River in Boston were inaugurat- 
ed by Arthur Fiedler, who had been a member of the orchestra since 1915 and who in 
1930 became the eighteenth conductor of the Boston Pops, a post he would hold for half 
a century, to be succeeded by John Williams in 1980. The Boston Pops Orchestra cele- 
brated its hundredth birthday in 1985 under Mr. Williams's baton. Keith Lockhart 
began his tenure as twentieth conductor of the Boston Pops in May 1995, succeeding 
Mr. Williams. 

Charles Munch followed Koussevitzky as music director of the Boston Symphony 
Orchestra in 1949. Munch continued Koussevitzky's practice of supporting contempo- 
rary composers and introduced much music from the French repertory to this country. 
During his tenure the orchestra toured abroad for the first time and its continuing series 
of Youth Concerts was initiated. Erich Leinsdorf began his seven-year term as music 
director in 1962. Leinsdorf presented numerous premieres, restored many forgotten and 
neglected works to the repertory, and, like his two predecessors, made many recordings 
for RCA; in addition, many concerts were televised under his direction. Leinsdorf was 
also an energetic director of the Tanglewood Music Center; under his leadership a full- 
tuition fellowship program was established. Also during these years, in 1964, the Boston 
Symphony Chamber Players were founded. William Steinberg succeeded Leinsdorf in 
1969. He conducted a number of American and world premieres, made recordings for 
Deutsche Grammophon and RCA, appeared regularly on television, led the 1971 Euro- 
pean tour, and directed concerts on the east coast, in the south, and in the mid-west. 

Now in his twenty-fourth season as the BSO's music director, Seiji Ozawa became the 
thirteenth conductor to hold that post in the fall of 1973, following a year as music ad- 
viser and having already been appointed an artistic director of the Tanglewood Festival 
in 1970. During his tenure as music director Mr. Ozawa has continued to solidify the or- 
chestra's reputation both at home and abroad. He has also reaffirmed the BSO's commit- 
ment to new music, through a series of centennial commissions marking the orchestra's 
100th birthday, a series of works celebrating the fiftieth anniversary of the Tanglewood 
Music Center in 1990, and a continuing series of commissions from composers includ- 
ing Henri Dutilleux, Lukas Foss, Alexander Goehr, John Harbison, Hans Werner Henze, 
Leon Kirchner, Bernard Rands, Sir Michael Tippett, and Yehudi Wyner. Under his direc- 
tion the orchestra has also expanded its recording activities, to include releases on the 
Philips, Telarc, Sony Classical/CBS Masterworks, EMI/Angel, Hyperion, New World, 
and Erato labels. In 1995 Seiji Ozawa and the Boston Symphony Orchestra welcomed 
Bernard Haitink in his new role as Principal Guest Conductor, in which capacity 
Mr. Haitink conducts and records with the orchestra, and also teaches at Tanglewood. 

Today the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Inc. presents more than 250 concerts annu- 
ally. It is an ensemble that has richly fulfilled Henry Lee Higginson's vision of a great 
and permanent orchestra in Boston. 



13 






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14 



BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

Seiji Ozawa, Music Director 

Bernard Haitink, Principal Guest Conductor 

One Hundred and Sixteenth Season, 1996-97 

Thursday, March 6, at 8 
SPONSORED BY INGALLS, QUINN & JOHNSON 

Friday, March 7, at 1:30 
Saturday, March 8, at 8 




JAMES CONLON conducting 

Please note that violinist Maxim Vengerov is suffering from a shoulder injury 
and is unable to perform Prokofiev's Violin Concerto No. 2 this week as origi- 
nally scheduled. We are fortunate that pianist Helene Grimaud is available to 
appear here at short notice, making her Boston Symphony debut with Ravel's 
Piano Concerto in G. The program is otherwise unchanged. 



RAVEL 



Gaspard de la Nuit 
(orchestrated by Marius Constant) 

Ondine 
Le Gibet 
Scarbo 



RAVEL 



Piano Concerto in G 

Allegramente 
Adagio assai 
Presto 

HELENE GRIMAUD 



INTERMISSION 



JANACEK 



Sinfonietta 

Allegretto — Allegro — Maestoso 

Andante — Allegretto 

Moderato 

Allegretto 

Andante con moto 



H£lene Grimaud plays the Steinway piano. 



Week 17 




Helene Grimaud 

Since her 1988 debut with the Orchestre de Paris under Daniel 
Barenboim, the French pianist Helene Grimaud has appeared with 
major orchestras and conductors in Europe, North America, and 
the Far East. Her most recent engagements have included a highly 
successful tour of Spain with Jeffrey Tate and the English Chamber 
Orchestra in May 1996. During the summer of 1996 she performed 
with Claudio Abbado at the Lucerne and Pesaro festivals and 
returned to the Mostly Mozart Festival in New York and on tour in 
Tokyo. Ms. Grimaud recently signed an exclusive recording con- 
tract with Erato. Her first release on that label, with David Zinman and the Deutsches 
Sinfonie-Orchester Berlin, pairs the Schumann Piano Concerto with Richard Strauss's 
Burleske for piano and orchestra. A disc of Brahms's shorter piano works, Opp. 116-119, 
was released recently to critical acclaim. Upcoming projects include a disc of late 
Beethoven sonatas. Previously Ms. Grimaud recorded for Denon, releasing a Rach- 
maninoff recital that won the Grand Prix du Disque in 1988, three other recital albums 
of works by Chopin, Liszt, Schumann, and Brahms, and a disc pairing Ravel's Piano 
Concerto in G and Rachmaninoff's Piano Concerto No. 2, with the Royal Philharmonic 
Orchestra under Jesus Lopez-Cobos. Born in Aix-en-Provence, Ms. Grimaud began 
music studies at the Conservatoire there, studying later with Pierre Barbizet in Marseille. 
At thirteen she was accepted by a unanimous vote into the Conservatoire National 
Superieur de Musique in Paris. In 1985 she was awarded first prize in Jacques Rouvier's 
class and was invited to participate in master classes given by Gyorgy Sandor and Leon 
Fleisher. Ms. Grimaud makes her Boston Symphony debut with these concerts. 



Maurice Ravel 

Piano Concerto in G 



At about the same time that Paul Wittgenstein, a concert pianist who had lost a hand 
during World War I, asked Ravel if he would write a concerto for him, the French com- 
poser's longtime interpreter Marguerite Long asked for a concerto for herself. Thus, 
though he had written no piano music for a dozen years, he found himself in 1930 writ- 
ing two concertos more or less simultaneously. The Concerto for the Left Hand, written 
for Wittgenstein, turned out to be one of his most serious compositions; but the G major 
concerto, dedicated to and first performed by Madame Long, falls into the delightful 
category of high-quality diversion. Ravel's favorite term of praise was divertissement de 
luxe, and he succeeded in producing just such a piece with this concerto. 

The motoric high jinks of the first movement are set off by the cracking of a whip, 
though they occasionally yield to lyric contemplation. The second movement is a total 
contrast, hushed and calm, with a tune widely regarded as one of the best melodies 
Ravel ever wrote. But the effort cost him dearly — he found it necessary to write the 
Adagio assai one or two measures at a time — and it may have been here that he first 
realized that his powers of composition were failing. (They broke down completely in 
1932, when the shock of an automobile collision brought on a nervous breakdown, and 
he found himself thereafter incapable of sustained work.) The final Presto brings back 
the rushing motor rhythms of the opening. It and the second movement now and then 
bear witness that Ravel had traveled in America and had become acquainted with jazz 
and recent popular music. He also met George Gershwin and told him that he thought 
highly of his Rhapsody in Blue; perhaps it is a reminiscence of that score that can be heard 
in some of the "blue" passages here and there. 



-Steven Ledbetter 



BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

Seiji Ozawa, Music Director 

Bernard Haitink, Principal Guest Conductor 

One Hundred and Sixteenth Season, 1996-97 

Thursday, March 6, at 8 
SPONSORED BY INGALLS, QUINN & JOHNSON 

Friday, March 7, at 1:30 
Saturday, March 8, at 8 

JAMES CONLON conducting 




RAVEL 



Gaspard de la nuit (orchestrated 
by Marius Constant) 

Ondine 
Le Gibet 
Scarbo 



PROKOFIEV 



Violin Concerto No. 2 in G minor, Opus 63 

Allegro moderato 
Andante assai 
Allegro ben marcato 

MAXIM VENGEROV 



INTERMISSION 



JANACEK 



Sinfonietta 

Allegretto — Allegro — Maestoso 

Andante — Allegretto 

Moderato 

Allegretto 

Andante con moto 



The evening concerts will end about 9:45 and the afternoon concert about 3:15. 

RCA, Deutsche Grammophon, Philips, Telarc, Sony Classical/CBS Masterworks, Angel/EMI, 
London /Decca, Erato, Hyperion, and New World records 

Baldwin piano 

Please be sure the electronic signal on your watch or pager is switched off 
during the concert. 

The program books for the Friday series are given in loving memory of Mrs. Hugh 
Bancroft by her daughters Mrs. A. Werk Cook and the late Mrs. William C. Cox. 

Boston Symphony Orchestra concerts are funded in part by a grant from the 
Massachusetts Cultural Council, a state agency. 

15 Week 17 




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Maurice Ravel 

Gaspard de la nuit (orchestrated by Marius Constant) 



-~^S 




Joseph Maurice Ravel was born in Ciboure, Basses Pyre- 
nees, France, on March 7, 1875, and died in Paris on 
December 28, 1937. He composed Gaspard de la nuit 
I for solo piano in 1908, and Ricardo Vines played the 
first performance on January 9, 1909. Marius Constant 
was born in Bucharest, Romania, on February 7, 1925; 
he lives in Paris. Constant began this orchestration of 
Ravels piano work in St.-Malo in June 1988 and com- 
pleted it in Paris that October. The first American per- 
formance was given by the Utah Symphony Orchestra 
under the direction of Laurent Petitgerard on October 
27, 1995. These are the first performances by the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra. The score calls for a large orches- 
tra of three flutes (second doubling alto flute, third dou- 
bling piccolo), three oboes (third doubling English horn), three clarinets (third doubling 
E-flat clarinet) and bass clarinet, three bassoons (third doubling contrabassoon), four 
horns, three trumpets (third doubling bugle and flugelhorn), three trombones, one tuba, 
two harps, celesta, timpani, a large percussion group (xylophone, glockenspiel, tubular 
bells, crotales, snare drum, bass drum, two crash cymbals, two suspended cymbals, two 
tam-tams [low and very low], triangle, slapstick, wood block, castanets, wind machine, 
and geophone [aflat drum with two heads, filled with pellets], and strings (which, when 
subdivided into two sections, are divided by front and back stands rather than between 
the two players on each stand). 

Where angels fear to tread: that must be our first reaction to the prospect of one of 
Ravel's piano works orchestrated by someone other than Ravel, one of the supreme 
geniuses when it came to turning piano music into large orchestral works — particularly 
since Gaspard de la nuit is the only substantial piano piece of his own that he himself 
did not turn into orchestral guise. Indeed, the last movement of Gaspard has been regard- 
ed as the ne plus ultra of pianistic virtuosity in Ravel's output and perhaps, therefore, 
the least amenable to translation into orchestral form. But Marius Constant chose to 
challenge himself on RaVel's own ground and produced a supremely virtuosic orches- 
tral treatment of a supremely virtuosic keyboard score. 

Gaspard de la nuit is the title of a collection of poems in prose by Aloysius Bertrand 
(1807-1841), written about 1830 and published posthumously in 1842. The texts are 
fevered, imagistic, weird, conjuring up such quintessential romantic subjects as castles 
towering over dark lakes, distant chimes, dark nocturnal visions. During his student 
days, Ravel was fascinated by these poems when introduced to them by his friend Ricar- 
do Vines. He reread them continually and eventually selected three for musical treat- 
ment. When Durand published the three pieces under the title of Bertrand's collection, 
Ravel had all three poems included with the music, emphasizing how closely the piano 
music interprets the imagery. He composed the work between May and September 1908. 
The first performer was none other than the friend who had turned him on to the texts 
originally. Vines's performance, in January 1909, aroused wide acclaim for his extraor- 
dinary virtuosity — Ravel had intended to make the work more difficult than Balakirev's 
Islamey, widely regarded as the most challenging piano solo ever written — and most of 
the critics had at least a comfortable respect for the score, though it did not win early 
adherents easily. The pianist Beveridge Webster (who later made a distinguished record- 
ing of Gaspard) told Ravel biographer Arbie Orenstein that when he heard Robert Cas- 
adesus play it in the 1920s, the reaction was still the one so frequently given to new 
and still challenging works: "How can one be sure that he is playing all the right notes?" 



17 



Week 17 



Get to Know the BSO! 



Celebrate the great 
traditions of the Boston 
Symphony and 
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Salute to Symphony, 
March 21-23. 




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WATCH WCVB-TV Channel 5 on 

Friday, March 21 , from 7:30 
to 9 p.m. for a special "Salute" 
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magnificent Symphony Hall 
during the Open House on 
Saturday, March 22, from 
1 1 a.m. to 4 p.m. for a day 
of musical activities free to al 



LISTEN to WCRB 102.5 FM all 
weekend long for special 
"Salute" broadcasts. 






"Salute to Symphony" 1 997 is sponsored by 



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FOR INFORMATION CALL (617) 638-9390 




18 



The opening movement, Ondine, refers to the beautiful water sprite (in English, an 
undine) who lures unwary males with the promise that if they marry her, they will be- 
come "king of the lake." The scene is a castle balcony by a blue lake. Ravel opens with 
the opalescent shimmer of water represented by a tremolo on a major triad with an add- 
ed minor sixth. The melody heard soon after is the song of the undine in "a sad, tender 
voice"; this becomes the principal thematic material of the movement. The undine urges 
her love several times, the music finally building to a surging climax. This dies away 
to a single unharmonized melodic line that closely echoes the close of the poem: "And 
when I told her that I was in love with a mortal woman, she was sulky and vexed; she 
wept a few tears, burst out laughing, and vanished in showers that formed white trick- 
les down my blue windowpanes." The undine's sulky tears take up only four measures 
of that single-line melody. Then, with a final brilliant spray of notes, she laughs and 
disappears. 

Bertrand's epigraph for Le Gibet (The Gibbet) was drawn from Goethe's Faust: "What 
do I see moving around that gibbet?" The very choice of this German text for a poem 
by a French poet of about 1830 demonstrates the essentially romantic nature of Ber- 
trand's work. (The young Berlioz discovered Faust at about the same time, with a power- 
ful effect on his own work.) Bertrand's reaction is a spooky poem that attempts to iden- 
tify the sound heard on a dark night around the gallows: Is it the wind? The sigh of the 
hanged? A cricket, or a fly, or a spider? No, it is the distant tolling of a bell near the 
walls of a city just out of sight, while "the carcass of a hanged man" still dangles from 
the cross-beam. Ravel's score, marked "very slow" and "without speeding up or slow- 
ing down until the end" is built entirely on the sound of a regularly reiterated B-flat 
tolling, evoking this macabre landscape marked eternally, it seems, by the sound of the 
funeral bell (bells, as much as water, had been regular elements in earlier Ravel works, 
both songs and solo piano pieces). Bertrand seems to anticipate the uncanny mood that 
we most often associate with Edgar Allen Poe, and Ravel certainly captures that spirit 
in this brief, intense, hushed movement. 

Scarbo is a wily dwarf, and a mysterious one, who appears in a bedchamber after 
dark, mocking and making strange noises, but disappearing as suddenly as he came. 
Ravel makes of this poem a somewhat free-form work which builds gradually in inten- 
sity to a dramatic climax only moments before the end — as the music vanishes almost 
as quickly as the goblin. 

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20 



Sergei Prokofiev 

Violin Concerto No. 2 in G minor, Opus 63 




Sergei Sergeyevich Prokofiev was born at Sontzovka, near 
Ekaterinoslav in the Ukraine, on April 23, 1891, and died in 
Moscow on March 5, 1953. He composed his Second Violin 
Concerto in 1935 as a response to a commission from a group 
of French musicians for a concert piece for their friend, the 
violinist Robert Soetens. The concerto received its first per- 
formance on December 1 that year in Madrid, with Soetens 
as soloist and Enrique Fernandez Arbos conducting. Serge 
Koussevitzky and the Boston Symphony Orchestra gave the 
first American performance on December 17, 1937, with 
Jascha Heifetz as soloist. Later Boston Symphony perform- 
ances featured Heifetz again (with Richard Bur gin and 
Koussevitzky), Zino Francescatti, Isaac Stern, and Joseph 
Silverstein (all with Charles Munch), Masuko Ushioda and 
Itzhak Perlman (both with Erich Leinsdorf), Peter Zazofsky (Seiji Ozawa), Frank Peter 
Zimmermann (Yuri Temirkanov), Tamara Smirnova (the most recent subscription per- 
formances, in November 1989, with Carl St. Clair), Joshua Bell (at Tanglewood with 
Charles Dutoit, who had already conducted a Tanglewood performance with Cho-Liang 
Lin and the Montreal Symphony), and Midori (the most recent Tanglewood performance, 
on July 17, 1994, with Mariss Jansons). In addition to the solo violin, the concerto is 
scored for two each of flutes, oboes, clarinets, and bassoons, two horns, two trumpets, 
bass drum, snare drum, triangle, cymbals, castanets, and strings. 

After fifteen years of living in the West, Prokofiev returned to Russia in 1933 and 
remained there, except for brief tours, the remaining two decades of his life. His Rus- 
sian tour in 1927 had been a singular success; such works as the Third Piano Concerto, 
the Classical Symphony, and the suite from his opera Love for Three Oranges had at- 
tracted widespread applause. Later tours in 1929 and 1932 showed him, however, that 
his more demanding music would not have the same enthusiastic response, and when 
he finally decided to return for good, he faced a difficult period of readjustment. At 
first he seemed to agree that it was necessary consciously to simplify his musical style 
for the new and wider audiences he was facing: "In the Soviet Union music is addressed 
to millions of people who formerly had little or no contact with music. It is the new 
mass audience that the modern Soviet composer must strive to reach." In conformity 
with this view, he sought to produce works of highly melodic character with clear for- 
mal structures. Within a few years, though, he insisted that audiences wanted great 
music, not simplification. 

Whatever view he held, his works were not always accepted at once by the public or 
by the musicians who acted as political functionaries for the arts and dominated criti- 
cal discussion of new music. He suffered from his desire to write music in his home- 
land (being essentially a non-political person, his return to Russia was primarily moti- 
vated by nostalgia), finding many of his late works, the operas especially, vilified and 
attacked as "formalist," the Soviet buzzword for music that is neither immediately ac- 
cessible to a broad general audience nor directed to clearly propagandists ends. Only 
after Stalin's death and his own (the two events occurred within hours of each other) 
did much of his later music attain a position of honor in the prophet's homeland; within 
a decade of his death, the derided operas were hailed as classics. 

Still, with all of the difficulties, Prokofiev had a substantial share of success, loo. 
Many of the works that have achieved the most widespread popularity come from his 
period of adaptation to Soviet canons of taste: Lieutenant Kije, the hallo! Romeo and 
Juliet, the charming orchestral children's tale Peter <m<l the Wolf the brilliant score to 



21 



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Eisenstein's film Alexander Nevsky (later adapted by the composer into a concert can- 
tata), and the work presently under discussion, the Second Violin Concerto. And though 
we deplore the intrusion of political pressure into artistic creation, it is not clear that 
Prokofiev's music would have been dramatically different between 1933 and 1953 if 
there had been no Union of Composers looking over his shoulder. Soviet critics insist 
that his music took on lyrical qualities as a result of his "Sovietization" upon his return 
to Russia, but these qualities were certainly adumbrated — and even sometimes prevail- 
ing — in his earlier music, including the Classical Symphony and the First Violin Con- 
certo, as well as some of the piano concertos. Western critics, on the contrary, tend to 
charge that Prokofiev's music completely lost its satirical wit and bite, its occasional 
grotesquerie, once he bowed to Soviet domination. This view is equally one-sided, since 
parodistic and witty elements still appear in many of the scores, and reports from his 
Russian colleagues in those years indicate that the composer often stood up to the crit- 
ics quite boldly, at least until the Zhdanov denunciation of 1948, when he was no long- 
er in good health and lacked the strength for the struggle. All in all, it is perhaps more 
sensible to refer to Prokofiev's style as one that mellowed with the years, though reveal- 
ing itself throughout his life as fundamentally consistent. 

Prokofiev worked on the Second Violin Concerto at about the same time as he was 
writing Romeo and Juliet. The concerto was commissioned while he was on a visit to 



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24 



Paris. There a group of French musicians, friends of the violinist Robert Soetens, request- 
ed a concert work for their friend with the stipulation that he was to have exclusive 
rights of performance for one year after the premiere. He began composing while still 
in Paris. Prokofiev recalled in his memoirs: "As in the case of the preceding concertos, 
I began by searching for an original title for the piece, such as 'concert sonata for violin 
and orchestra,' but finally returned to the simplest solution: Concerto No. 2. Neverthe- 
less I wanted it to be altogether different from No. 1 both as to music and style." Dur- 
ing the summer of 1935 Prokofiev worked at a rest home in Polenovo, in central Russia, 
where he found that the quiet of his secluded house was conducive to work, and he 
made rapid progress on both the concerto and the ballet. Part of the concerto was also 
composed on tour, and it was completed in Baku, capital of Azerbaijan, in August. 

During the winter of 1935-36, Prokofiev made a concert tour with Soetens, playing 
one of his own violin sonatas as well as works of Beethoven and Debussy. It was during 
this tour that the concerto received its first performance; it was successful from the very 
first and was popularized in this country by Jascha Heifetz, who played it frequently 
following his performance in Boston, the American premiere. 

From the outset, which is for the unaccompanied solo violin, Prokofiev emphasizes 
the cantabile qualities of the instrument. The structure of the opening movement, a 
straightforward sonata form, is purposely kept clear, with articulations to set off the 
various sections and to mark, for example, the beginning of the second theme (in the 
classically expected key of B-flat), a lyric descending line over murmuring strings in 
contrast to the ascending (but equally lyrical) line of the first theme. The long-breathed 
melody of the Andante assai, which here and there plays off the slight rhythmic jolt of 
4/4 time against the accompanimental 12/8, has long been recognized as one of Proko- 
fiev's most gorgeous melodic effusions. The last movement, lively and dance-like (with 
castanets occasionally lending it a Spanish flavor), is still rather more lyrical than vir- 
tuosic, though the various sections of its rondo shape have plenty of vigor. 

— S.L. 




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Leos Janacek 

Sinfonietta 

Leos Janacek was born in Hochwald (Hukvaldy) in 
Northern Moravia on July 3, 1854, and died on August 
12, 1928, in Moravskd Ostrava. He composed the Sin- 
fonietta in 1925 and 1926, and the first performance 
was given on June 26, 1 926, at Prague with Vaclav 
Talich conducting the Czech Philharmonic Orchestra. 
The New York Symphony Society gave the American 
premiere under the direction of Otto Klemperer on March 
4, 1927. Erich Leinsdorf led the first Boston Symphony 
performances in October 1 968, later BSO performances 
being given by Seiji Ozawa, Yuri Simonov (the most 
recent subscription performances, in November 1989), 
and Marek Janowski (the most recent Tanglewood per- 
formance, on July 21, 1995). The Sinfonietta is scored 
for four flutes and piccolo, two oboes and English horn, three clarinets and bass clarinet, 
two bassoons, four horns, nine trumpets in C and three in F, two bass trumpets, four trom- 
bones, two tenor tubas, bass tuba, timpani, cymbals, harp, and strings. 

So often do we hear about musical prodigies like Mozart, Schubert, and Mendelssohn 
that we tend to forget the other end of the scale, the composer whose mastery develops 
very slowly, but steadily, leading to a series of masterpieces written at an advanced age. 
There are two classic instances of composers whose real artistic achievement began 
after the age of fifty, the eighteenth-century French composer Rameau and the twenti- 
eth-century Moravian composer Janacek. 

Janacek had composed prolifically from the mid- 1870s in just about every possible 
medium — piano and chamber music, orchestral work, opera, choral pieces, and folk 
music arrangements. Only with the premiere in January 1904 of his opera Jeji pastor- 
kyna ("Her Stepdaughter," known outside of Czechoslovakia as Jenufa) did he produce 
a piece that was widely recognized as a masterwork; it was the first in a string of eight 
powerful works for the musical theater composed in the next twenty-four years. World- 
wide recognition came even later: it took Jenufa twenty years to get to the Metropolitan 
Opera, and by then Janacek had completed all his works except those that came in a 
final vigorous bouquet of fresh invention: his last opera, From the House of the Dead 
(1927-28), the powerful Glagolitic Mass, a remarkable series of instrumental works 
including the wind sextet Mlddi ("Youth") and the two string quartets (subtitled "The 
Kreutzer Sonata" and "Intimate Letters ," respectively), a Concertino for piano, two vio- 
lins, viola, clarinet, horn and bassoon, and his last completed orchestral work, the 
Sinfonietta. 

Like his great Russian predecessor Mussorgsky (whose work surely inspired him), 
Janacek took inspiration from the rhythm of his native language. Just as Mussorgsky 
turned Russian inflections into musical rhythms and melodic turns, so Janacek did it 
with Moravian. Characteristically his music grows from little snatches of melody linked, 
repeated, and inventively varied. 

The birth of the Sinfonietta can be traced to a sunny day in 1925 when Janacek and 
his close friend Kamila Stosslova, who profoundly influenced many works in the last 
decade of his life, sat together in a park and listened to a military band concert. The 
various players in the ensemble stood up for their solos and then sat down again. Janacek 
was evidently much taken with the performance and constantly mentioned it in letters 
to Kamila. When the editors of a Czech journal commissioned a new work for perform- 
ance at the 1926 Sokol Festival of Gymnastics, JanaCek was ready to write his own fan- 
fares. When he was finishing the work, in March 1926, he described it to a correspon- 



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Are you looking for a change of pace before your next Boston Symphony concert? 
Would you like to enhance your knowledge of great composers and their music? What 
if a delightful meal were also included? We have just the ticket — a BSO "Supper 
Talk" or "Supper Concert.'' "Supper Talks" combine a buffet supper with an 
informative talk. "Supper Concerts" offer a chamber music performance by members 
of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, with supper served buffet-style afterwards. 



SUPPER CONCERT DATES 

Saturday, April 19; Tuesday, April 22 

Music of MOZART and SCHUMANN 

Sheila Fiekowsky and Nancy Bracken, violins:, Robert Barnes, 

viola:, Ronald Feldman, cello:, Judith Gordon, piano 

Thursday, April 24; Tuesday, April 29 
Music of GUBAIDULINA and BEETHOVEN 
Fenwick Smith, flute; Sarah Schuster Ericsson, harp; 
Catherine French, violin:, Rachel Fagerburg, viola 

Thursday, May 1; Saturday, May 3 
Music of STRAVINSKY and TCHAIKOVSKY 
Aza Raykhtsaum and Harvey Seigel, violins; 
Burton Fine, viola: Martha Babcock, cello 



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Thursday, March 27; Tuesday, April 1 
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Thursday, April 17; Friday, April 18 
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All programs subject to change. 

For further information call 
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dent as a "pretty little Symfonietta [sic] with fanfares." The term suggests an instru- 
mental miniature: who would expect that a work with a diminutive title like "Sinfoni- 
etta" would call for an enormous orchestra including no fewer than twelve trumpets? 

The fanfare inspiration no doubt suggested the emphasis on the brass at the begin- 
ning and end; Janacek dedicated the piece to the Czechoslovak Armed Forces, origi- 
nally with the title "Military Sinfonietta," declaring that the music expresses "the con- 
temporary free man, his spiritual beauty and joy, his strength, his courage, and his 
determination to fight for victory." 

The Sinfonietta is laid out in five movements of diverse scoring, but as the first of 
these is essentially an "intrada" — a kind of marching-on entry piece, with the players 
standing up, according to the composer's direction — the work boils down to a small (in 
the sense of brief!) symphony in four movements. Originally Janacek gave each move- 
ment a title, but he later chose to use only the traditional Italian tempo markings to 
identify them. The titles seem in some cases to have little to do with the musical char- 
acter, but Janacek explained in an article that he had a specific connotation in mind: 
the various "scenes" refer to places in his native city, Brno, as it was in the 1920s. With 
the 1918 union of Bohemia, Moravia, Silesia, and Slovakia into a new country, called 
Czechoslovakia, free of the centuries-long control of the Hapsburg empire, Brno was 
suddenly transformed from an inhospitable outpost of the Austro-Hungarian Empire 
to a free Czech city. 

And then I saw the town undergo a miraculous change. I lost my dislike of the 
gloomy Town Hall, my hatred of the hill [the notorious Spilberk fortress, with its 
dungeons for political prisoners] from whose depth so much pain was screaming, 
my distaste for the street and its throng. As if by a miracle, liberty was conjured 
up, glowing over the town — the rebirth of October 28, 1918. I saw myself in it. 
I belonged to it. And the blare of the victorious trumpets, the holy peace of the 
Queen's Monastery, the shadows of night, the breath of the green hill, and the 
vision of the growing greatness of the town, of my Brno, were all giving birth to 
my Sinfonietta. 

The formal organization comes from the piling up of repetitive blocks, which lends a 
powerful solidity to the score. (In the discussion that follows, the original title of each 
movement is indicated in parentheses, since it gives a hint, at least, of the composer's 
intentions.) The opening Allegretto ("Fanfares") is a massive brass movement, built up 
of ostinato figures overlapping at different tempos. The Andante ("The Castle") grows 
from a highly rhythmic dance-like tune of almost burlesque character with a rich chain 
of motivic variants. The slow third movement ("The Queen's Monastery") is the most 
purely lyrical of the movements in the piece. The fourth movement ("The Street") with 
its numerous repetitions of a single fragment first heard in the trumpet and the changes 
rung on it — including some musical joking — is the "scherzo" of the Sinfonietta. The 
last movement ("The Town Hall") begins rather wistfully, but passes through crisis to a 
joyous festivity in which twelve trumpets in unison proclaim again the fanfares of the 
opening movement. Janacek's expression of faith in the future of his newly-free nation 
is at the same time one of the most remarkable orchestral scores of any day. 

— S.L. 



29 



Week 17 















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More . . . 

The best Ravel book available has not yet been published in this country; it is Roger 
Nichols" contribution to the Master Musicians series, replacing the older but still useful 
volume by Norman Demuth. Nichols is both insightful and enthusiastic in his treatment 
of Ravel's music. He has also assembled a readable and informative collection of recol- 
lections from people who knew Ravel personally in Ravel Remembered (Norton); these 
recollections of musicians and non-musicians alike bring the composer's personality 
vividly to life. Arbie Orenstein's Ravel: Man and Musician (Columbia) is a thorough 
study but very dry, all too clearly revealing its origin in a doctoral dissertation. A sensi- 
tive discussion of Ravel can be found in Romanticism and the Twentieth Century, the 
final volume of the four-volume study Man and his Music by Wilfred Mellers (Schocken). 
An excellent brief discussion of Ravel's orchestral music can be found in the BBC Music 
Guide that Laurence Davies devotes to that subject (University of Washington paper- 
back). Davies has also written a fine book called The Gallic Muse with essays on Faure, 
Duparc, Debussy, Satie, Ravel, and Poulenc (Barnes). Ravel's own performance of the 
second movement ("Le Gibet") of Gaspard de la nuit is included on a Laserlight CD 
entitled "Ravel Plays Ravel," containing a number of Ravel's performances (as both 




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32 



pianist and conductor) of his own music. Pascal Roge performs the complete work, along 
with Jeux d'eau, the Mother Goose Suite (in its two-piano version), the Pavane for a 
Dead Princess, and Le Tombeau de Couperin in a budget-priced double-disc set from 
London. Ivo Pogorelich's performance of Gaspard is richly colored (Deutsche Grammo- 
phon, with Prokofiev's Sonata No. 6). Christopher O'Riley (Albany) and Vlado Perle- 
mutter (Nimbus) both include Gaspard in their all-Ravel programs. The Marius Constant 
orchestration has not been recorded. 

For a long time Prokofiev suffered from a lack of balanced critical evaluation both 
in Russia and in the West; Soviet historians tended to attack those works written while 
the composer was in the "decadent" West as "formalistic" and unmusical, while Euro- 
pean and American critics tend to criticize the works of Prokofiev's later years, after he 
had returned to Russia, as responses to the pressure of "official" standards of musical 
style. By far the most balanced general study to date is the newest, Sergei Prokofiev: A 
Biography, by Harlow Robinson (Viking), rich in biographical detail, more cursory but 
still useful in musical discussion. A fundamental and very reasonable book is Music 
and Musical Life in Soviet Russia, 1917-1970 by Boris Schwarz (Norton paperback), 
which is filled with a broad range of fascinating material, though, of course, Prokofiev 
is only one of many players. An updated edition carries the story forward to 1980 (Uni- 
versity of Indiana). Of the older Prokofiev literature, the standard Soviet biography by 
Israel Nestyev, Prokofiev (Standard), has much information but strong biases against 
the composer's pre-Soviet period. On the other hand, Victor Seroff's Sergei Prokofiev: 
A Soviet Tragedy is little more than a hatchet job from the opposite point of view and is 
by no means scrupulously accurate. Prokofiev's earliest years, through his conservatory 
days, are richly illuminated in his memoir, Prokofiev by Prokofiev (Doubleday). Jascha 
Heifetz was closely associated with the Second Violin Concerto, especially when accom- 
panied by the Boston Symphony Orchestra. Recordings that he made with two Boston 
Symphony conductors are in the current catalogue. The earlier of the two, from 1937, 
with Serge Koussevitzky conducting the BSO, is part of a Heifetz retrospective that also 
includes music by Brahms, Faure, Saint-Saens, and Sarasate (RCA Gold Seal, two discs). 
Heifetz's later recording with the BSO, under Charles Munch, is on a compact disc with 
the Glazunov and Sibelius concertos (RCA). Itzhak Perlman recorded the Second Con- 
certo with the Boston Symphony under Erich Leinsdorf (RCA, with the two Prokofiev 
violin sonatas, in which Perlman is joined by Vladimir Ashkenazy). A number of record- 
ings couple Prokofiev's two violin concertos on the same disc, including versions by Gil 
Shaham with Andre Previn conducting the London Symphony Orchestra (Deutsche Gram- 
mophon, with a bonus in the form of the Sonata for unaccompanied violin) and by Shlomo 
Mintz with the Chicago Symphony under Claudio Abbado (Deutsche Grammophon). 

The fullest account of Janacek's life and work in English is to be found in Leosjand- 
cek by Jaroslav Vogel in the revised edition by Karel Janovicky (Norton). John Tyrrell's 
article on Janacek in The New Grove is a fine introduction; this is also available in 
paperback as part of The New Grove Modern Masters I (Norton). Simon Rattle pairs 
Janacek's Sinfonietta with his other great late-period score, the Slavonic (or Glagolitic) 
Mass, with the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra (EMI), a pairing of works 
favored also by Charles Dutoit with the Montreal Symphony (London). Charles Macker- 
ras chooses to link the Sinfonietta with the tone poem Taras Bulba in his Vienna Phil- 
harmonic recording (London), as do Vaclav Neumann with the Czech Philharmonic 
(Supraphon, also including the Violin Concerto and the incidental music to Schluck 
und Jau) and Jose Serebrier with the Czech State Philharmonic Orchestra of Brno (Ref- 
erence Recordings, also including the Lachian Dances). 

— S.L. 



■t* 



33 



W«M-k 17 



James Conlon 

James Conlon has conducted in virtual]) ever) musical capital in 
the I nited Mates. Europe and Japan. In August 1996 he became 
principal conductor of the Pari> Opera. Since 1989 he has also 
been both general music director of the City of Cologne and chief 
conductor of the Cologne Opera, the firsl person in forty-five 
to assume artistic responsibility for both the symphonic and operat- 
ic activity in that city. Since 1979 he has been mu>ic director of 
the Cincinnati May Festival, the oldest choral mu-ic festival in 
the United States. In 1996-97. his first season as principal conduc- 
tor of the Paris Opera, he leads new productions of Rigoletto and 
Lohengrin at the Bastille and a new Robert \^ ilson production of Pelleas et Melisande at 
the Palais Gamier: he also directs the annual concert series of the Paris Opera Orchestra 
at both the Bastille and Palais Gamier. As music advisor last season he returned to the 
Paris Opera after a decade for a new Jonathan Miller production of La boheme and led 
Mahler's Resurrection Symphony with the Paris Opera Orchestra and Chorus. In Cologne 
this season he leads stagings of \erdi"s Fal staff and Otello. a concert version of Die Meister- 
singer to open the tenth-anniversary season of Cologne's Philharmonic and concert perform- 
ances of Parsifal and Zemlinsky's Eine florentinische Tragodie: he also continues a four- 





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34 



year Mahler symphony survey and a three-year Beethoven cycle. This season Mr. Conlon 
makes guest appearances in the United States with the Boston Symphony and the Pittsburgh 
Symphony: he also conducts the final round and prizewinning concerts of the Tenth Van 
Cliburn International Piano Competition. Since his debut at the Metropolitan Opera in 
1976, Mr. Conlon has conducted more than 200 performances with that company, leading 
a wide range of works from the Italian, German, French, Russian, and Czech repertoires. 
Most recently he celebrated his twenty-year association with the Met conducting two twen- 
tieth-century masterworks, Shostakovich's Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk and Benjamin Britten's 
Peter Grimes. Operatic engagements have also taken him to London's Royal Opera, the 
Paris Opera, the Maggio Musicale Fiorentino, Chicago Lyric Opera, and La Scala in Milan. 
Since his New York Philharmonic debut in 1974, Mr. Conlon has appeared with major 
orchestras throughout the United States and Canada. In Europe he has appeared with the 
Berlin Philharmonic, the London Philharmonic, the London Symphony, the Orchestre de 
Paris, the Orchestre National de France, the Staatskapelle Dresden, the Santa Cecilia Or- 
chestra, the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra, and the Kirov Opera of St. Peters- 
burg. From 1983 to 1991 he was music director of the Rotterdam Philharmonic. Mr. Conlon 
recently led the Orchestre de Paris in the sound track to a film version of Madama Butter- 
fly directed by Frederic Mitterand; the audio release on Sony Classical has been gathering 
international awards and acclaim. Mr. Conlon's extensive discography for Erato includes 
music of Berlioz, Dvorak, Liszt, Martinu, Mozart, Poulenc, and Stravinsky, as well as the 



fV; 




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35 




at inspired your love 
of classical music? 




I'd llltt lu i)uppo\ 

JJO U XJJiHUUL JJlLUi 

Enclosed is ray check for $_ 

payable to the Boston Symphony Annual 

Fund. (Friend* benefits begin at $50.) 

Please send your contribution, to Daniel P. Breen, Director 
of the Boston Symphony Annual Fund, Symphony Mall, 
Bo j ton, MA 02115. A portion of your gift may be tax- 
deductible. For information, please call (61 7) 638-9251. 



Was it a toy, or even a recording 
that first inspired you? For some 
of us it was the Symphony itself. 
Now you can help inspire new 
listeners with a gift to the BSO's 
Annual Fund. Through your 
support, the BSO will continue 
to be accessible to the entire com- 
munity thanks to our discounted 
rush ticket program, and students 
will experience live performance 
for the first time at our Youth 
Concerts. Help the BSO keep its 
strong tradition of world-class 
performances and 
educational and 
training programs 
alive. Send your 
gift today. 




if.i V — — 1/Tm 




please clip and mail 



PHONE (Indicate home or business) 



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sound track for a 1987 film of La boheme. He has also appeared many times on television: 
in Germany with the Gurzenich Orchestra/Cologne Philharmonic, in France with the Paris 
Opera, in two Metropolitan Opera telecasts — leading Tosca in 1978 and Semiramide in 
1991 — and in an appearance with the National Symphony during that orchestra's annual 
July 4 Capitol Steps concerts. Bom in New York City in 1950. James Conlon made his pro- 
fessional debut in 1971 at the Spoleto Festival with Boris Godunoi . Both a graduate and 
former faculty member of the Juilliard School, he made his New Vjrk debut conducting La 
boheme at Juilliard in February 1972. while still a student. In June 1996. for his services 
to French music, he was named an Officier de l'Ordre des Arts et des Lettres by the French 
government. Mr. Conlon made his Boston Symphony debut in January 1981. He appeared 
with the orchestra most recently leading subscription concerts in January 1996 and two 
concerts last Julv at Tanglewood. 




Maxim ^Vengerov 

The twenty-tw o-year-old Siberian violinist Maxim \engerov recently 
received two 1996 Grammy nominations — for "Classical Album of 
the Year" and for "Best Instrumental Soloist with Orchestra" — for 
his recording of Shostakovich and Prokofiev concertos. In just five 
years. Mr. Aengerov has moved from the verge of a promising career 
to the status of a performer compared frequently to the great violin- 
ists of the past. Bom in August 1974 in Novosibirsk, the capital of 
Western Siberia, he began playing violin at four-and-a-half, gave 
his first recital at five playing works by Paganini. Tchaikovsky, and 
Schubert, and played his first concerto at six. Four years later he 
was selected by the Soviet government to represent his country in the Junior \^ ieniawski 
Competition in Poland, where, under the tutelage of Galina Turtschaninova. he took first 
place. He continued studying with her for three years in Moscow, later returning home to 
study with the distinguished pedagogue Zakhar Bron. He played recitals regularly in Mos- 
cow and Leningrad and soon made solo debuts with the Royal Concertgebouw under "run 
Temirkanov. the BBC Philharmonic, and with \alery Gergiev at the Litchfield Festival in 
the L nited Kingdom and with the L SSR State Symphony Orchestra on an extensive tour of 
Italy. In 1990 he took top honors at the Carl Flesch International \ iolin Competition, win- 
ning not only first prize but also special prizes in interpretation and the prize of the audi- 
ence. Following that victory the fifteen-year-old Aengerov embarked upon a full-time pro- 
fessional career that soon made his reputation around the globe. He has by now performed 
with virtually every major orchestra and conductor in the world. He has already recorded 
with the Berlin Philharmonic, the New \ork Philharmonic, the London Symphony, and the 
Chicago Symphony. Additionally, he and pianist Itmar Golan regularly play recitals in the 
world's most prestigious venues, debut highlights having brought them to London's \^ ig- 
more Hall. Tokyo's Suntory Hall. ."Salzburg's Mozarteum. and Amsterdam's Concertgebouw. 
Mr. \engerov has made several recordings for Melodiya and released a debut album on the 
Biddulph label. He now records exclusively for Teldec Classics International, which has 
released his recordings of sonatas by Beethoven and Brahms: Paganini's \ iolin Concerto 
No. 1 w ith Zubin Mehta and the Israel Philharmonic: sonatas of Mozart. Beethoven, and 
Mendelssohn: a disc of virtuoso violin pieces: and the Bruch and Mendelssohn concertos 
in award-winning performances with Kurt Masur and the Gewandhaus Orchestra of Leip- 
zig. In 1994 Mr. \engerov won Gramophone magazine's "Young Arti>t of the 'lear" award: 
his release of the Prokofiev and Shostakovich First Concertos was the magazine's "Record 
of the ^ear." His latest recording, of the Tchaikovsky and Glazunov concertos with Claudio 
Abbado and the Berlin Philharmonic, was released in the fall of 1995. When not perform- 
ing on tour. Mr. \engero\ resides in \msterdam. He plays a 1723 Cremona violin 1>\ Stradi- 
vari, ex Kjesewetter, on extended loan from Clement Arri-on through the Stradivari Society, 
Inc.. of Chicago. Mr. Vengerov made hi- Bo-ton Symphony debut in April 199"). playing 
Mozart'- I) major violin concerto. K.218. under Seiji Ozawa's direction. Hi- most recent 
appearance with the orchestra followed at Tanglewood that July, as soloisl in Mozart's Sinfonia 
concerteuUe, K.364, with conductor Jukka-Pekka Saraste and violisl Yuri Bashmet 



37 




BSO Corporate Sponsorships 



The Boston Symphony wishes to acknowledge this distinguished group 

of corporations for their outstanding and exemplary support 

of the Orchestra during the 1996 fiscal year. 



FIDELITY INVESTMENTS 

MASSACHUSETTS OFFICE 
OF TRAVEL AND TOURISM 

"Evening at Pops" Public Television 
Broadcasts 

NEC CORPORATION 

BSO North American Tour 

FIDELITY INVESTMENTS 

Boston Pops Esplanade Orchestra 
Summer Tour 

FLEET BANK 

WCVB-TV, HEARST 

BROADCASTING 

WCRB 102.5 FM 

Salute to Symphony 

BANK OF BOSTON 

Holiday Pops Series 

JOHN HANCOCK FUNDS 

Opening Night at Symphony 
Opening Night at Pops 

LEXUS 

Exclusive Automobile of: 

Opening .Sight at S)mphony and 

Opening Night at Pops 

TDK ELECTRONICS 
CORPORATION 

Tanglewood Tickets for Children 



FILENE'S 

Tanglewood on Parade 

NORTHWEST AIRLINES 

Gospel A ight at Pops 

ITT SHERATON 
CORPORATION 

BOSTON SHERATON 
HOTEL AND TOWERS 

Boston Pops New Year's Eve Concert 

BANKBOSTON 
CORPORATION 

BLUE CROSS AND BLUE 
SHIELD OF MASSACHUSETTS 

COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER 
COMPANY 

FOUR SEASONS HOTEL 

INGALLS, QUINN & JOHNSON 

JOHN HANCOCK 
FINANCIAL SERVICES 

NYNEX 

MANULIFE FINANCIAL 

NORTEL 

PAINEWEBBER 

RAYTHEON COMPANY 

Single Concert Sponsors 






For information on the BSO Corporate Sponsorship Program, contact 

Madelyne Cuddeback. Director of Corporate Sponsorships, 

at (617) 638-9254. 



38 



Business Leadership Association 

($10,000 and above) 

The support provided by members of the Business Leadership Association is 
instrumental in enabling the Orchestra to pursue its mission of performance, 
training and community outreach. The BSO gratefully acknowledges the following 
organizations for their generous leadership support. 

(The following includes annual, capital, and sponsorship support during the BSO's 
fiscal year beginning September 1, 1995 through August 31, 1996). 



Fidelity Investments 
Edward C. Johnson 3d 



Beethoven Society 

($500,000 and above) 

NEC Corporation 
Hisashi Kaneko 



Massachusetts Office of Travel and Tourism 
Mary Jane McKenna 



BankBoston Corporation 
William M. Crozier, Jr 

John Hancock Funds 
Edward J. Boudreau, Jr. 

LEXUS 

James E. Press 

Massachusetts Cultural Council 
A state agency 



Gold Baton 

($100,000 - $499,999) 

NYNEX 
Donald Reed 

WCRB 102.5 FM 

Cynthia Scullin 



WCVB-TV, Hearst Broadcasting 
Paul La Camera 



Silver Baton 

($75,000 - $99,999) 



Fleet Bank of Massachusetts, N.A. 
Leo Breitman 



Conductor's Circle 

($25,000 - $49,999) 



Blue Cross and Blue Shield of 

Massachusetts 
William C. Van Faasen 

Community Newspaper Company 
William R. Elfers 

ITT Sheraton Corporation 
John Kapioltas 

Manulife Financial 
Dominic DAlessandro 

Northwest Airlines 
Terry M. Leo 



NORTEL 

Robert 0. Nelson 

Paine Webber, Inc. 

Bruce Cameron, Richard F. Connolly, 

Charles T. Harris, Joseph F. Patton, Jr. 

Raytheon Company 
Dennis J. Picard 

Sheraton Boston Hotel & Towers 
Denise Coll 

TDK 

Ken Kihara 



39 



Principal 

($15,000 



Andersen Consulting LLP 
William D. Green 

BBN Corporation 
George H. Conrades 

Boston Edison Company 
Thomas J. May 

Boston Herald 
Patrick J. Purcell 

Connell Limited Partnership 
William F. Connell 

Coopers & Lybrand LLP 
Francis A. Doyle 

Ernst & Young LLP 
James S. DiStasio 

Essex Investment Management Co., Inc. 
Joseph McNay 



Player 

$24,999) 

Filene's 

Joseph M. Melvin 

The Gillette Company 
Alfred M. Zeien 

Harcourt General Charitable Foundation 
Richard A. Smith 

John Hancock Financial Services 
William L. Boyan 

Liberty Mutual Group 
Gary L. Countryman 

Royal Appliance Mfg. Co. 
Michael J. Merriman 

Von Hoffman Press, Inc. 
Frank A. Bowman 



Honor Roll 

($10,000 - $14,999) 



Analog Devices, Inc. 
Ray Stata 

Arley Corporation 
David I. Riemer 

Arnold Communications, Inc. 
Ed Eskandarian 

Arthur Andersen LLP 
George Massaro 

Arthur D. Little 
Charles LaMantia 

Bingham, Dana & Gould 
Jay S. Zimmerman 
William A. Bachman 

The Boston Company 
Christopher Condron 

Converse Inc. 
Glenn Rupp 

Deloitte & Touche 
Michael Joyce 

Eastern Enterprises/Boston Gas Company 
J. Atwood Ives 
Chester R. Messer 

EMC Corporation 
Richard Egan 

Hewitt Associates 
Christopher S. Palmer 



Houghton Mifflin Company 
Nader F. Darehshori 

IBM Corporation 

Patricia S. Wolpert 

KPMG Peat Marwick 
Donald B. Holmes 

Loomis Sayles & Company, L.P. 
Mark W. Holland 

Lucent Technologies 
Michael Decelle 

McKinsey & Company 
David Fubini 

Millipore Corporation 
C. William Zadel 

The New England 
Robert A. Shafto 

Sodexho Management Services 

& Creative Gourmets 
Michel Landel 

State Street Bank and Trust Company 
Marshall N. Carter 

The Stop & Shop Foundation 
Av ram J. Goldberg 

Thermo Electron Corporation 
Dr. George N. Hatsopoulos 

Watts Industries 
Timothy Home 



40 



I 




INVESTMENT TOOLS ARE IMPORTANT FOR 

REACHING A SECURE FINANCIAL FUTURE. 

ALMOST AS IMPORTANT AS KNOWING 

THE BEST WAY TO USE THEM. 

Whatever plans you're making for the future and for those you love, 
Fleet Investment Services can help make them a reality. We start with a full range of 

investment options, hut don't stop there. Our Relationship Managers can 
help you focus on your particular financial goals and help you choose the best way 

to get there. With a tradition of service since 1791, and a consistent ranking 

as one of the country's leading investment managers in assets, we have more ways to 

help you do more with your money To learn more, call Bill Flemer at (617) 346-2165. 



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INVESTMENT MANAGEMENT 
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Jordan Hall at the New England Conservatory 

with GILBERT KALISH, pianist 

SUNDAY, MARCH 16, AT 3PM 

HAYDN Piano Trio in E-flat, Hob.XV:29 
FINE Partita for Wind Quintet 
SCHUMANN Quintet in E-flat for 
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SINGLE TICKET PRICES: $25, $18, $14.50 

Tickets may be purchased through SymphonyCharge at (6 1 7) 266- 1 200, 

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Gifts in Kind 

The Boston Symphony Orchestra extends a special thanks to the following donors for their 
generous contributions of goods and services between September 1, 1995, and August 31, 
1996: 



American Airlines 
Bernie Willett 

Betsy Bassett Photography 
Betsy Bassett 

CAHOOTS 

Carol Lasky 

DAV EL CHAUFFEURED 
TRANSPORTATION NETWORK 

Scott A. Solombrino 

Four Seasons Hotel 
Robin A. Brown 



Hermes 

Jean-Louis Dumas-Hermes 

Ingalls Quinn & Johnson 
Richard C. Garrison 

Sheraton Boston Hotel and Towers 
Denise Coll 

The Syratech Corporation 
Leonard Florence 



BUSINESS LEADERSHIP ASSOCIATION 

(Industry Listing) 

The Boston Symphony Orchestra is pleased to acknowledge the following business 
leaders for their generous contributions of $1,500 or more during the BSO's fiscal 
year ending August 31, 1996. 

Companies contributing $10,000 or more are indicated in bold capital letters; con- 
tributions of $5,000-$9,999 are indicated in capital letters, an asterisk denotes gifts 
of $2,500-$4,999, and italicized names indicate donors of services or products. 

For information about becoming a Business Leadership Association member, con- 
tact Anne Cademenos, Associate Director of Corporate Programs, at (617) 638-9298. 



Accounting 



ARTHUR ANDERSEN LLP 

George E. Massaro 

COOPERS & 
LYBRAND LLP 

Francis A. Doyle 

DELOITTE & 
TOUCHE LLP 

Michael Joyce 

*DiPesa & Company, CPAs 
Dolly DiPesa 

Ercolini & Company 
Robert Ercolini, CPA 
Michael Tucci, CPA 

ERNST & YOUNG LLP 

James S. DiStasio 

Harte Carucci & Driscoll, 
P.C. 
Neal Harte 

KPMG PEAT MARWICK 

Donald B. Homes 

PRICE WATER HOUSE 
LLP 

Brian L. Cornell 



Advertising/ 
Public Relations 



ARNOLD COMMUNICA- 
TIONS, INC. 

Ed Eskandarian 

Bronner Slosberg Humphrey 
Michael Bronner 

CAHOOTS 

Carol Lasky 

Clarke & Company, Inc. 
Peter A. Morrissey 

Conventures, Inc. 
Dusty S. Rhodes 

DesignWise 
Freelow Crummett 

HILL, HOLLIDAY, 
CONNORS, 
COSMOPULOS, INC. 

John M. Connors, Jr. 

Houston, Herstek FAVAT 
Douglas W. Houston 

Ingalls, Quinn & Johnson 
Richard C. Garrison 



Irma S. Mann, Strategic 
Marketing, Inc. 
Irma S. Mann 

MASSmedia 
Charles N. Shapiro 

*Rasky & Co. 
Larry Rasky 

Alarm Systems 

American Alarm & 
Communications, Inc. 
Richard L. Sampson 

First Security Services 
Corporation 
Rohert F. Johnson 

Architects/ Interior Design 

Tellalian Associates 
Architects & Planners 
Donald J. Tellalian, AIA 

Automotive 



IRA LEXUS 
Ira Rosenberg 

LEXUS OF NORWOOD 

Herhert Chamhers 



41 



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Kenneth S. Safe, Jr. 
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Thomas N. Dabney 
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Arthur C. Hodges 
Richard F. Young 
M. Lynn Brennan 
John H. Emmons, Jr. 
Charles T Haydock 
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42 



\ 



LEXUS OF WATERTOWN 

Murray Patkin 

Aviation 

Flight Time International 
Jane McBride 

Banking 

BANKBOSTON 
CORPORATION 

William M. Crozier, Jr. 

Cambridge Trust Company 
James F Dwinell III 

CITIZENS BANK 
Robert M. Mahoney 

FLEET BANK OF 
MASSACHUSETTS, N.A. 
John P. Hamill 

PNC Bank, New England 
Joan L. Gulley 

STATE STREET BANK 
AND TRUST COMPANY 

Marshall N. Carter 

USTRUST 

Neal F. Finnegan 

Wainwright Bank & Trust 
Company 
John M. Plukas 

Building/Contracting 

*Harvey Industries, Inc. 
Frederick Bigony 

Lee Kennedy Co., Inc. 
Lee M. Kennedy 

*The MacDowell Company 
Roy MacDowell 

*NSC Corporation 
Frank Fradello 

New England Insulation Co. 
Theodore H. Brodie 

*Perini Corporation 
David B. Perini 

Consulting: 
Management /Financial 

Anchor Capital Advisors, Inc. 
William P. Rice 

ANDERSEN 
CONSULTING LLP 

William D. Green 

ANDERSEN 
CONSULTING LLP 

Michael J. Young 

ARTHUR D. 
LITTLE, INC. 

Charles LaMantia 



BAIN & COMPANY, INC. 
Orit Gadiesh 

BBF Corporation 
Boruch B. Frusztajer 

THE BOSTON 
CONSULTING GROUP 
INC. 

Jonathan L. Isaacs 

The Cullinane Group, Inc. 
John J. Cullinane 

Dock Square Consultants 
Richard J. Lettieri 

*Heidrick & Struggles 
Robert E. Hallagan 

Lee Hecht Harrison, Inc. 
Frank Mainero 

HEWITT ASSOCIATES 

Christopher S. Palmer 

Lochridge & Company, Inc. 
Richard K. Lochridge 

* Lyons Company 

J. Peter Lyons 

McKINSEY & 
COMPANY, INC. 
David G. Fubini 

Mercer Management 
Consulting 
James W Down 

NORTH AMERICAN 
MORTGAGE COMPANY 

John F. Farrell, Jr. 

*The O'Brien Group, Inc. 
Paul C. O'Brien 

Pendergast & Company 
Edward H. Pendergast 

Right Associates Consulting 
Warren Radtke 

Sawyer Miller Consulting 
Micho F. Spring 

* Towers Perrin 

V. Benjamin Haas 

*Watson Wyatt Worldwide 
Daniel B. Holmes 

WILLIAM M. MERCER, 
INCORPORATED 

Peter A. Bleyler 

Consulting: Opportunity 
Development 

New Directions, Inc. 
David D. Corbett 

Consumer Goods/ 
Food Service 

*A11 Seasons Services, Inc. 
Donald G. Friedl 



Coca-Cola Bottling Company 
of New England 
Terrance M. Marks 

*Franklin Sports, Inc. 
Larry J. Franklin 

* Johnson, O'Hare Co., Inc. 
Harry "Chip" O'Hare, Jr. 

Merkert Enterprises, Inc. 
Gerald R. Leonard 

O'Donnell-Usen Fisheries 
Corporation 
Arnold S. Wolf 

SODEXHO MANAGE- 
MENT SERVICES & 
CREATIVE GOURMETS 

Michel Landel 

Staton Hills Winery 
Peter Ansdell 

Welch's 
Everett N. Baldwin 

*Whitehall Company, Ltd. 
Marvin A. Gordon 

Distribution 

Standard Tube Sales 
Corporation 

Dorothy C. Granneman 

Francis J. Walsh, Jr. 

Education 

BENTLEY COLLEGE 
Joseph M. Gronin 

Electrical /Electronics 

*Boston Acoustics, Inc. 
Francis L. Reed 

R&D ELECTRICAL 
COMPANY, INC. 
Richard D. Pedone 

Energy/Utilities 

BOSTON EDISON 
COMPANY 

Thomas J. May 

EASTERN 
ENTERPRISES/ 
BOSTON GAS COMPANY 

J. Atwood Ives 
Chester R. Messer 

*New England Electric 
System 
Joan T Bok 

Entertainment/Media 

*Don Law Company 
Don Law 

WCVB-TV, Hearst 
Publications 
Paul La Camera 



43 



Visiting Nurse Association of Boston 

Providing quality home health care for over 110 years. 
One-stop service for all your home health care needs. 



* Nursing 
*Home Health Aide 
Rehabilitation Therapies 




75 Arlington Street 

Boston, MA 02116 

(617) 426-6630 



7 

GOLDEN 
CARE 

A 19 Year Tradition 



* Geriatric 

*Home Health Care 

Specializing in Live-in Services 



607 Boylston Street, Copley Square, Boston, MA 02116 

(617) 267-5858 

Skilled nursing and rehabilitation therapy available through an affiliation with the VNA of Boston 



For rates and 
information on 
advertising in the 
Boston Symphony, 
Boston Pops, 
and 

Tanglewood program books 
please contact: 

STEVE GANAK AD REPS 
51 CHURCH STREET 
BOSTON, MASS. 02116 




(617) 542-6913 



44 



- 1 



WHDH-TV Channel 7 
Mike Carson 

*Yawkey Foundation 
John Harrington 

Environmental 

Jason M. Cortell & Associates 
Jason M. Cortell 

Financial 

Services / 1 n vestments 

ADAMS, HARKNESS & 
HILL, INC. 

Joseph W. Hammer 

ADVENT INTERNATIONAL 
CORPORATION 
Peter A. Brooke 

ALLMERICA FINANCIAL 
John F. O'Brien 

ALLMERICA FINANCIAL 
INSTITUTIONAL SERVICES 
Larry C. Renfro 

THE BERKSHIRE GROUP 
Laurence Gerber 

* Berkshire Partners 
Russell Epker 

BOSTON CAPITAL 
PARTNERS, INC. 

Christopher W. Collins 

Herbert F. Collins 

Richard J. DeAgazio 

John P. Manning 

THE BOSTON COMPANY 

Christopher M. Condron 
W. Keith Smith 

*BTM Capital Corporation 
E.F. McCulloch, Jr. 

Carson Limited Partnership 
Herbert Carver 

THE CIT GROUP/CAPITAL 
EQUIPMENT FINANCING 
G. Todd Derr 

Cowen & Company 
Richard A. Altschuler 

CREDIT SUISSE 
FIRST BOSTON 
Marc A.White, Jr. 

ESSEX INVESTMENT 
MANAGEMENT CO., INC. 

Joseph C. Me Nay 

*Farrell, Healer & 
Company Inc. 
Richard A. Farrell 

FIDELITY INVESTMENTS 

Edward C. Johnson 3d 

JOHN HANCOCK 
FINANCIAL SERVICES 

William L. Boyan 



JOHN HANCOCK FUNDS 

Edward J. Boudreau, Jr. 

KAUFMAN & COMPANY 
Sumner Kaufman 

KESSLER FINANCIAL 
SERVICES, L.P 
Howard J. Kessler 

LIBERTY FINANCIAL 
COMPANIES, INC. 
Kenneth R. Leibler 

LOOMIS-SAYLES & 
COMPANY, L.P. 

Mark W. Holland 

LPL FINANCIAL 
SERVICES 
Todd A. Robinson 

PAINEWEBBER, INC. 

Bruce Cameron 
Richard F. Connolly 
Charles T. Harris 
Joseph F. Patton, Jr. 

THE PIONEER GROUP, INC. 
John F. Cogan, Jr. 

* Putnam Investments 

*State Street Development 
Management Corp. 
John R. Gallagher III 

United Asset Management 
Corporation 

*United Gulf 
Management, Inc. 

WP. STEWART & CO., INC. 
William P. Stewart 

*Woodstock Corporation 
Mrs. Edith L. Dabney 

Food Service Equipment 

*Boston Showcase Company 
Jason E. Starr 



High Technology 

ANALOG DEVICES, INC. 

Ray Stata 

*ATI Orion Research 
Chane Graziano 

BBN CORPORATION 

George H. Conrades 

*Bull HN Information 
Systems Inc. 
Donald P. Zereski 

COGNEX CORPORATION 
Dr. Robert J. Shillman 

COMPUTERVISION 
CORPORATION 

Kathleen Cote 



CORNING COSTAR 
CORPORATION 
R. Pierce Baker 

EDS 
Barry Raynor 

EG&G, INC. 
John M. Kucharski 

EMC CORPORATION 

Richard J. Egan 

* Helix Technology 
Corporation 
Robert J. Lepofsky 

IBM CORPORATION 

Patricia S. Wolpert 

INSO CORPORATION 
Steven R. Vana-Paxhia 
Instron Corporation 
Harold Hindman 

INTERNATIONAL DATA 
GROUP 
Patrick J. McGovern 

IONICS INCORPORATED 
Arthur L. Goldstein 

*LAU Technologies 
Joanna T. Lau 

MICROCOM INC. 

Lewis Bergins 

MILLIPORE 
CORPORATION 

C. William Zadel 

NEC CORPORATION 

Hisashi Kaneko 

PRINTED CIRCUIT CORP. 
Peter Sarmanian 

RAYTHEON COMPANY 

Dennis J. Picard 

*The Registry, Inc. 
G. Drew Conway 

SIGNAL TECHNOLOGY 
CORPORATION 
Dale L. Peterson 

SOFTKEY 

INTERNATIONAL INC. 
Michael J. Perik 

STRATUS COMPUTER, INC. 

William E. Foster 

*SystemSoft Corporation 
Robert Angelo 

TDK ELECTRONICS 
CORPORATION 

Ken Kihara 

Teradyne, Inc. 
Alexander V. D'Arbeloff 

THERMO ELECTRON 
CORPORATION 

Dr. George N. Hatsopoulos 



45 



Sing & Swing 

Some folks swoon over La Traviata. Others sway to Sing, Sing, Sing. 
The Colonnade Hotel indulges both passions every weekend* with our 
acclaimed "Nights at the Opera" and "Dancing with the Winikers." 

Opera lovers dine on a lyrical four-course dinner in Cafe Promenade while 
top performers sing their favorite arias. In Zachary's Bar, swing fans put 

on their dancing shoes for a night of classic sounds from the Winiker 
Swing Orchestra. A stirring aria. A swinging standard. Whatever the 
tune, plan on a noteworthy evening at The Colonnade Hotel. 

For reservations or information call 617.425.3240. 





Dancing with the Winikers 

Fridays and Saturdays from 9 pm at Zachary's Bar. 

Nights at the Opera 

Saturdays from 8 pm at Cafe Promenade. 
Dinner and Music from $42 




olonm 




O S Mlllim TON 



120 Huntington Ave. Boston, MA 02116 
617.424.7000 or 1.800.962.3030 



Nights at The Opera offered October through April 




UNITY • HARMONY • ARTISTRY 



The Boston Symphony Orchestra 

extends congratulations to the 

Boston Musicians' Association, 

Local 9-535, on the occasion 

of its 100th anniversary. 




46 



m 



■ 



WATERS CORPORATION 
Douglas A. Berthiaume 

Hotels/Restaurants 

BOSTON MARRIOTT 
COPLEY PLACE 

William Munck 

FOUR SEASONS HOTEL 

Robin A. Brown 

ITT SHERATON 

CORPORATION 

John Kapioltas 

THE RITZ-CARLTON, 
BOSTON 

SHERATON BOSTON 
HOTEL & TOWERS 

Denise Coll 

*Sonesta International Hotels 
Corporation 
Paul Sonnabend 

THE WESTIN HOTEL, 
COPLEY PLACE 

David King 

Insurance 

AON RISK SERVICES, INC. 
William J. Tvenstrup 

*The Bostonian Group 
John Casey 

Bradley Insurance 
Agency, Inc. 
John J. Bradley 

CADDELL & BYERS 
INSURANCE AGENCY, INC. 

Paul D. Bertrand 

*Carlin Insurance 
Michael D. Holmes 

The Chickering Group 
Frederick H. Chicos 

*Chubb Group of Insurance 
Companies 
John H. Gillespie 

COMMONWEALTH LAND 
AND TITLE INSURANCE CO. 
Terry Cook 

*Johnson & Higgins of 
Massachusetts, Inc. 
William S. Jennings 

*Lexington Insurance 
Company 
Kevin H. Kelley 

LIBERTY MUTUAL 
GROUP 

Gary L. Countryman 

MANULIFE FINANCIAL 

Dominic D'Alessandro 



THE NEW ENGLAND 
Robert A. Shafto 

*North American 
Security Life 
William J. Atherton 

THE PIONEER GROUP, INC. 
John F. Cogan, Jr. 

SAFETY INSURANCE 
COMPANY 

Richard B. Simches 

SEDGWICK OF 
NEW ENGLAND, INC. 
P. Joseph McCarthy 

Sun Life Assurance Company 
of Canada 
David D. Horn 

Swerling Milton Winnick 
Public Insurance Adjusters, 
Inc. 

Marvin Milton 

Bruce Swerling 

Paul Winnick 

Trust Insurance Company 
Craig M. Bradley 

Legal 

BINGHAM, DANA 
& GOULD 

Jay S. Zimmerman 
William A. Bachman 

*Choate, Hall & Stewart 
Charles L. Glerum 

Dickerman Law Offices 
Lola Dickerman 

Dionne, Bookhout & Gass 
Richard D. Gass 

FISH & RICHARDSON PC. 
Ronald Myrick 

GADSBY & HANNAH LLP 
Paul E. Clifford 

GOLDSTEIN & 
MANELLO, PC. 

Richard J. Snyder 

GOODWIN, PROCTER 
&HOAR 
Robert B. Fraser 

*Hale & Don- 
John Hamilton 

*Lyneh, Brewer, Hoffman 
& Sands 
Owen B. Lynch, Esq. 

MINTZ, LEVIN, COHN, 
FERRIS, GLOVSKY & 
POPEO, PC. 

Jeffrey M. Wiesen, Esq. 

Nissenbaum Law Offices 
Gerald L. Nissenbaum 



47 



Nutter, McClennen & Fish 
Robert Fishman 

PALMER & DODGE, LLP 
Michael R. Brown 

Robins, Kaplan, Miller 
& Ciresi 
Alan R. Miller, Esq. 

* Ropes & Gray 
Truman S. Casner 

Sarrouf, Tarricone & 
Flemming 
Camille F. Sarrouf 

Sherin and Lodgen 

*Weingarten, Schurgin, 
Gagnebin & Hayes 
Stanley M. Schurgin 

Manufacturer's 
Representatives/ 
Wholesale Distribution 

*Alles Corporation 
Stephen S. Berman 

Asquith Corporation 
Laurence L. Asquith 

*Brush Fibers, Inc. 
Ian P. Moss 

*Clinique Laboratories U.S.A. 
Daniel J. Brestle 

J.A. WEBSTER, INC. 
John A. Webster. 

JOFRAN, INC. 
Robert D. Roy 

Lantis Corporation 
Scott Sennett 

United Liquors, Ltd. 
A. Raymond Tye 

Viva Sun 
Gary Podhaizer 

Manufacturing 

Alden Products Company 
Elizabeth Alden 

ARLEY CORPORATION 

David I. Riemer 

Autoroll Machine Corporation 
William M. Karlyn 

*The Biltrite Corporation 
Stanley J. Bernstein 

*C.R. Bard, Inc. 
Richard J. Thomas 

*Cabot Corporation 

CHELSEA 
INDUSTRIES, INC. 
Honald G. Casty 






■ 












MP 



Simplex. 



P >-%>v 



Performing Daily 



At Boston's 



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MX.i^ rUSmI I^HHBMmII 


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Simplex is proud to provide Boston's Symphony Hall with fire detection and security 
systems. As a company with decades of experience in life safety solutions — 
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prepared to do whatever it takes to protect this ^JSlITlDlGX 
Boston landmark. To learn what Simplex can do for you, call 1-800-221-7336. 



FIRE DETECTION • SECURITY • COMMUNICATIONS • TIME MANAGEMENT 



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48 



CONNELL LIMITED 
PARTNERSHIP 

William F. Connell 

CONVERSE INC. 

Glenn Rupp 

*Cri-Tech, Inc. 
Richard Mastromatteo 

D.K. Webster Family 
Foundation 
Dean K. Webster 

Design Mark Industries 
Paul S. Morris 

Diacom Corporation 
Donald W Comstock 

Ekco Group, Inc. 
Robert Stein 

GENERAL LATEX 
AND CHEMICAL 
CORPORATION 
Robert W MacPherson 

THE GnXETTE 
COMPANY 

Alfred M. Zeien 

HIGH VOLTAGE 
ENGINEERING 
CORPORATION 
Paul H. Snyder 

HMK ENTERPRISES, 
INC. 
Steven E. Karol 

*J.D.P Company 
Jon D. Papps 

* Jones & Vining, Inc. 
Michel Ohayon 

New Balance Athletic Shoe 
James S. Davis 

NEW ENGLAND BUSINESS 
SERVICE, INC. 
Robert J. Murray 

OAK INDUSTRIES, INC. 
William S. Antle III 

OSRAM SYLVANIA INC 

Dean T Langford 

The Pfaltzgraff Company 
Annette Seifert 

PHILIP MORRIS 
COMPANIES, INC. 
Matthew Paluszek 

*Piab USA, Inc. 

Charles J. Weilbrenner 

*The Rockport Company, Inc. 
Anthony J. Tiberii 

ROYAL APPLIANCE 
MFG. CO. 

Michael J. Merriman 



*Springs Industries, Inc. 
Dan Gaynor 

THE STRIDE RITE 
CORPORATION 

Robert C. Siegel 

SUMMIT PACKAGING 
SYSTEMS INC. 
Gordon Gilroy 

The Syratech Corporation 
Leonard Florence 

TY-WOOD/CENTURY 
MANUFACTURING CO., 
INC. 
Joseph W Tiberio 

WATTS INDUSTRIES, 
INC. 

Timothy P. Home 

Wire Belt Company of 
America 
F Wade Greer 

Philanthropic 

The Fuller Foundation 

*The Kouyoumjian Fund 
The Kouyoumjian Family 

Printing/Publishing 

* Addison Wesley Longman, 
Inc. 
J. Larry Jones 

*Banta Corporation 
Donald Belcher 

ROSTON HERALD 

Patrick J. Purcell 

CAHNERS PUBLISHING 
COMPANY 

Bruce Barnet 

COMMUNITY 
NEWSPAPER 
COMPANY 

William R. Elfers 

DANIELS PRINTING 
COMPANY 

Grover B. Daniels 

George H. Dean Co. 
G. Earle Michaud 

HARCOURT GENERAL 

CHARITARLE 

FOUNDATION 

Richard A. Smith 

HOUGHTON MIFFLIN 
COMPANY 

Nader F Darehshori 

Invisuals 
Dennis Ozer 

Reynolds- De Walt Printing 
Peter DeWalt 



The Studley Press, Inc. 
Chuck Gillett 

VON HOFFMANN 
PRESS, INC. 

Frank A. Bowman 

Real Estate/Development 

*The Abbey Group 
Robert Epstein 
David Epstein 
John Svenson 

BEACON PROPERTIES 
CORPORATION 
Alan M. Leventhal 

* Cornerstone Properties, Inc. 
John S. Moody 

CUMMINGS PROPERTIES 
James L. McKeown 

DEWOLFE NEW ENGLAND 
Richard B. De Wolfe 

EQUITABLE REAL ESTATE 
Tony Harwood 

First Winthrop Corporation 
Richard J. McCready 

*The Flatley Company 
Thomas J. Flatley 

Heafitz Development 
Company 
Lewis Heafitz 

*John M. Corcoran & Co. 
John M. Corcoran 

*Meredith & Grew 
Thomas J. Hynes, Jr. 

Retail 

COUNTRY CURTAINS 
Mr. & Mrs. John & Jane 
Fitzpatrick 

Crane & Co. Papermakers 
Lansing E. Crane 

The E.B. Horn Company 
Harry Finn 

FILENE'S 

Joseph M. Melvin 

Gordon Brothers 
Michael Frieze 

Hermes 
Jean-Louis Dumas- Hermes 

J. Baker, Inc. 
Allan L. Weinstein 

*Lechmere, Inc. 

Frederick F. Meiser 

Marshalls 
Jerome l{. Rossi 



■ 



49 




Ivan & Florence Hoyt 

A distinctive Retirement Community in historic Concord. 

• 35 acres overlooking trie Sudbury River • Spacious 1, 2, or 2 Bedroom w/Den Designs 

• 24-Hour Security • Fitness Center • On-Site Healthcare w ^ r fa 

• Fine Dining • Social Activities • Weekly Housekeeping 

• Maintenance-Free Liiestvle • Indoor Parking 



V 



For more iniormation, call: (508) 369-5155. 
100 NewWy Court, Concord, MA 01742 



Newbury Court 



New England Deaconess Association 
Equal Opportunity Housing 



Beats and Measures. 



Fitcorp provides the Fitcorp Wellness Benefit, an innovative 

mix of fitness and health promotion programs, to hundreds 

of Boston's leading corporations since 1979. Programs of 

award-winning performance and measureable results. 

To learn more about the Fitcorp Wellness Benefit, 

call Mariska Lutz, Corporate Sales Manager, 

at (617) 375-5600, xl07. 

RtCQTp 

Corporate Offices, Prudential Center, Suite 200, Boston, MA 02199 



50 



NEIMAN MARCUS 


Citizens Medical Corporation 


Technical Aid Corporation 


William D. Roddy 


John J. Doran 


Salvatore Balsamo 


*Saks Fifth Avenue 


Datacube 


Telecommunications 


Alison Streider Mayher 


Stanley Karandanis 




THE STOP & SHOP 


FISHER SCIENTIFIC 


AT&T NETWORK SYSTEMS 
Michael Decelle 


FOUNDATION 


INTERNATIONAL INC. 


Avram J. Goldberg 


Paul M. Montrone 


* Boston Technology, Inc. 


THE STOP & SHOP 


GENETICS 


Dr. John C.W Taylor 


SUPERMARKET 


INSTITUTE, INC. 


CELLULAR ONE 


COMPANY 


Dr. Patrick Gage 


Kathy Dowling 


Robert G. Tobin 


MERCK-MEDCO 


GTE GOVERNMENT 


Talbots 


MANAGED CARE 


SYSTEMS 


Arnold B. Zetcher 


Per Lofberg 


John R. Messier 


THE TJX COMPANIES, INC. 


* Medical Information 


LUCENT TECHNOLOGIES 


Bernard Cammarata 


Technology, Inc. 


Michael Decelle 


*Town & Country Corporation 


Morton E. Ruderman 


MCI TELECOMMUNICA- 


C. William Carey 


QUEST DIAGNOSTICS INC. 


TIONS CORPORATION 




Robert Meehan 


Susan Beckmann 




Robert J. Gorman 


Joe McKeown 


Science /Medical 




NORTEL 


AMERICAN MEDICAL 


Services 


Robert 0. Nelson 


RESPONSE, INC. 






Paul M. Verrochi 


Benn Theodore, Inc. 


NYNEX 




Benn Theodore 


Donald Reed 


Baldpate Hospital 
Lucille M. Batal 


Betsy Bassett Photography 
Betsy Bassett 


*NYNEX Information 
Resources Co. 


BLUE CROSS AND 


Matthew J. Stover 



BLUE SHIELD OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

William C. Van Faasen 

BOSTON SCIENTIFIC 
CORPORATION 

CRA Managed Care 
Lois Silverman 

CHARLES RIVER 

LABORATORIES 

James C. Foster 



*Blake and Blake 
Genealogists 
Richard A. Blake, Jr. 

CFI Design Group, Inc. 
David A. Granoff 

TAD RESOURCES 
INTERNATIONAL INC. 

James S. Davis 

Team 
Marion Rossman 



Travel /Transportation 

DAVEL CHAUFFEURED 
TRANSPORTATION 
NETWORK 
Scott A. Solombrino 

Lily Transportation Corp. 
John A. Simourian 

NORTHWEST AIRLINES 

Terry M. Leo 



Please join us as a member of the BSO's 
Business Leadership Association! 

For a minimum contribution of $1 ,800 to the BSO's Business Fund, your company can 
enjoy membership in the BSO's Business Leadership Association, a dynamic and influ- 
ential group of more than 350 New England businesses who have come together to 
support the Boston Symphony Orchestra. 

Membership privileges for your company include: a complimentary listing in the BSO 
and Pops program books throughout the season, priority ticket reservations for the 
sell-out Holiday Pops and Tanglewood concerts, personal ticket assistance through the 
Corporate Programs office, and use of the Beranek Room, a private patrons' lounge, 
reserved exclusively for members of the BSO's Business Leadership Association and 
Higginson Society. 

For more information about becoming a member of the BSO's Business Leadership Association, 
please contact Anne Cademenos in the Corporate Programs office at (617) 638-9298. 



51 



■ 



*4 




NEXT PROGRAM. . . 

Thursday, March 20, at 8 
Friday, March 21, at 1:30 
Saturday, March 22, at 8 
Tuesday, March 25, at 8 

HANS GRAF conducting 



STRAVINSKY 



MOZART 



Concerto in E-flat for chamber orchestra, 
Dumbarton Oaks 

Tempo giusto 
Allegretto 
Con moto 

Piano Concerto No. 20 in D minor, K.466 

Allegro 

Romanza 

Rondo: Allegro assai 

LEIF OVE ANDSNES 



INTERMISSION 



MOZART 
STRAVINSKY 



Adagio and Fugue in C minor, K.546 

Symphony in C 

Moderato alia breve 

Larghetto concertante 

Allegretto 

Largo — Tempo giusto, alia breve 



Pairing neo-Classical works of Stravinsky with classical works of Mozart, this 
program brings the return of Austrian guest conductor Hans Graf and the sub- 
scription series debut of the young Norwegian pianist Leif Ove Andsnes. Stravin- 
sky's Dumbarton Oaks Concerto is a charming modern equivalent of the Baroque 
concerto grosso, similar to Bach's Brandenburg Concertos; the Symphony in C is 
Stravinsky's brilliantly playful take on Beethoven's Fifth and other classical sym- 
phonies. Mozart's Adagio and Fugue in C minor is his own tribute to the past, in 
this case the mastery of J.S. Bach. The D minor piano concerto is among the most 
romantic of all Mozart's works, the only one among that great outpouring of his 
concertos that was played regularly through the nineteenth century to our own 
time. 



52 



■*•** 






COMING CONCERTS . . . 

Thursday 'C— March 20, 8-10 
Friday 'A'— March 21, 1:30-3:30 
Saturday 'A' — March 22, 8-10 
Tuesday 'C— March 25, 8-10 

HANS GRAF conducting 
LEIF OVE ANDSNES, piano 

STRAVINSKY 



MOZART 



MOZART 



STRAVINSKY 



Dumbarton Oaks 

Concerto 
Piano Concerto No. 20 

in D minor, K.466 
Adagio and Fugue 

in C minor, K.546 
Symphony in C 




MGH/Spaulding 

Home Health Agency 



Serving 40 Greater Boston 
communities around the clock. 

(617)726-6945 



Thursday 'B'— March 27, 8-9:50 
Friday Evening— March 28, 8-9:50 
Saturday 'B'— March 29, 8-9:50 
Tuesday 'C— April 1, 8-9:50 

JOHN WILLIAMS conducting 
JAMES GALWAY, flute 
RICHARD SVOBODA, bassoon 



QUANTZ 
WILLIAMS 

CORIGLIANO 



Flute Concerto in G 
Five Sacred Trees, for 

bassoon and orchestra 
Pied Piper Fantasy, for 

flute and orchestra 



Thursday, April 3, at 10:30 a.m. 

Open Rehearsal 
Steven Ledbetter will discuss the program 

at 6:30 in Symphony Hall. 
Thursday 'A'— April 3, 8-10 
Friday 'B'— April 4, 1:30-3:30 
Saturday 'A' — April 5, 8-10 

SEIJI OZAWA conducting 
MSTISLAV ROSTROPOVICH, cello 
STEVEN ANSELL, viola 

Celebrating Mstislav Rostropovich's 
70th Birthday 



THOMAS 



RANDS 



STRAUSS 



Chanson, for cello 

and orchestra 

(world premiere) 
Cello Concerto No. 1 

(world premiere; 

BSO commission) 
Don Quixote 



Programs and artists subject to change. 



Single tickets for all Boston Symphony Orchestra concerts throughout the season 
are available at the Symphony Hall box office, or by calling "SymphonyCharge" 
at (617) 266-1200, Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m. until 6 p.m., to 
charge tickets instantly on a major credit card, or to make a reservation and then 
send payment by check. Outside the 617 area code, (tall 1-800-274-8499. 
Please note that there is a $2.50 handling fee for each ticket ordered by phone. 



53 



* 



■ 



■ 



■<s 






"S< 



The Latest Recording by Seiji Ozawa and 

the Boston Symphony Orchestra — 

Now Available at the Symphony Shop 




This RCA Victor release features Seiji 
Ozawa leading the BSO in the 
serenely beautiful requiem by 
Gabriel Faure, with soprano 
Barbara Bonney, baritone 
Haken Hagegard, and the 
Tanglewood Festival Chorus, 
John Oliver, conductor. 

The Symphony Shop is in the Cohen Wing 
at the West Entrance to Symphony Hall. 




Boston Symphony Orchestra... 

Day, Berry & Howard... 

Hard work before the performance pays off. 



Innovation. Quality. Teamwork. 



DAY, BERRY & HOWARD 

Counsellors At Law 
Boston, Hartford and Stamford 



54 



SYMPHONY HALL INFORMATION 

FOR SYMPHONY HALL CONCERT AND TICKET INFORMATION, call (617) 266-1492. 
For Boston Symphony concert program information, call "C-O-N-C-E-R-T" (266-2378). 

THE BOSTON SYMPHONY performs ten months a year, in Symphony Hall and at Tangle- 
wood. For information about any of the orchestra's activities, please call Symphony Hall, or 
write the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Symphony Hall, Boston, MA 02115. 

THE BSO'S NEW WEB SITE (http://www.bso.org) provides information on all of the orches- 
tra's activities at Symphony Hall and at Tanglewood, and is updated regularly. 

THE EUNICE S. AND JULIAN COHEN WING, adjacent to Symphony Hall on Huntington 
Avenue, may be entered by the Symphony Hall West Entrance on Huntington Avenue. 

IN THE EVENT OF A BUILDING EMERGENCY, patrons will be notified by an announce- 
ment from the stage. Should the building need to be evacuated, please exit via the nearest 
door, or according to instructions. 

FOR SYMPHONY HALL RENTAL INFORMATION, call (617) 638-9241, or write the 
Function Manager, Symphony Hall, Boston, MA 02115. 

THE BOX OFFICE is open from 10 a.m. until 6 p.m. Monday through Saturday; on concert 
evenings it remains open through intermission for BSO events or just past starting time for 
other events. In addition, the box office opens Sunday at 1 p.m. when there is a concert that 
afternoon or evening. Single tickets for all Boston Symphony subscription concerts are avail- 
able at the box office. For most outside events at Symphony Hall, tickets are available three 
weeks before the concert at the box office or through SymphonyCharge. 

TO PURCHASE BSO TICKETS: American Express, MasterCard, Visa, a personal check, and 
cash are accepted at the box office. To charge tickets instantly on a major credit card, or to 
make a reservation and then send payment by check, call "SymphonyCharge" at (617) 266- 
1200, Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m. until 6 p.m. Outside the 617 area code, phone 
1-800-274-8499. There is a handling fee of $2.50 for each ticket ordered by phone. 

GROUP SALES: Groups may take advantage of advance ticket sales. For BSO concerts at 
Symphony Hall, groups of twenty-five or more may reserve tickets by telephone and take 
advantage of ticket discounts and flexible payment options. To place an order, or for more 
information, call Group Sales at (617) 638-9345. 

FOR PATRONS WITH DISABILITIES, an access service center, accessible restrooms, and 
elevators are available inside the Cohen Wing entrance to Symphony Hall on Huntington 
Avenue. For more information, call VOICE (617) 266-1200 or TTD/TTY (617) 638-9289. 

LATECOMERS will be seated by the ushers during the first convenient pause in the pro- 
gram. Those who wish to leave before the end of the concert are asked to do so between pro- 
gram pieces in order not to disturb other patrons. 

IN CONSIDERATION OF OUR PATRONS AND ARTISTS, children four years old or young- 
er will not be admitted to Boston Symphony Orchestra concerts. 

TICKET RESALE: If for some reason you are unable to attend a Boston Symphony concert for 
which you hold a subscription ticket, you may make your ticket available for resale by calling 
(617) 266-1492 during business hours, or (617) 638-9426 at any time. This helps bring need- 
ed revenue to the orchestra and makes your seat available to someone who wants to attend the 
concert. A mailed receipt will acknowledge your tax-deductible contribution. 

RUSH SEATS: There are a limited number of Rush Seats available for Boston Symphony sub- 
scription concerts Tuesday and Thursday evenings, and Friday afternoons. The low price 
of these seats is assured through the Morse Rush Seat Fund. Rush Tickets are sold at $7.50 
each, one to a customer, on Fridays as of 9 a.m. and Tuesdays and Thursdays as of 5 p.m. 
Please note that there are no Rush Tickets available on Friday or Saturday evenings. 

PLEASE NOTE THAT SMOKING IS NOT PERMUTED ANYWHERE IN SYMPHONY 
HALL. 

CAMERA AND RECORDING EQUIPMENT may not be brought into Symphony Hall during 
concerts. 



55 



LOST AND FOUND is located at the security desk at the stage door to Symphony Hall on St. 
Stephen Street. 

FIRST AID FACILITIES for both men and women are available. On-call physicians attending 
concerts should leave their names and seat locations at the switchboard near the Massachu- 
setts Avenue entrance. 

PARKING: For evening concerts only, the Prudential Center Garage offers a discount to any 
BSO patron with a ticket stub for that evening's performance, courtesy of R.M. Bradley & Co. 
and The Prudential Realty Group. There are also two paid parking garages on Westland Ave- 
nue near Symphony Hall. Limited street parking is available. As a special benefit, guaranteed 
pre-paid parking near Symphony Hall is available to subscribers who attend evening concerts. 
For more information, call the Subscription Office at (617) 266-7575. In addition, the Uptown 
Garage at 10 Gainsborough Street next to the New England Conservatory offers discounted 
parking ($6 with ticket stub) for all BSO concerts, including Friday afternoons. 

ELEVATORS are located outside the Hatch and Cabot-Cahners rooms on the Massachusetts 
Avenue side of Symphony Hall, and in the Cohen Wing. 

LADIES' ROOMS are located on the orchestra level, audience-left, at the stage end of the 
hall, on both sides of the first balcony, and in the Cohen Wing. 

MEN'S ROOMS are located on the orchestra level, audience-right, outside the Hatch Room 
near the elevator, on the first-balcony level, audience-left, outside the Cabot-Cahners Room 
near the coatroom, and in the Cohen Wing. 

COATR.OOMS are located on the orchestra and first-balcony levels, audience-left, outside the 
Hatch and Cabot-Cahners rooms, and in the Cohen Wing. Please note that the BSO is not re- 
sponsible for personal apparel or other property of patrons. 

LOUNGES AND BAR SERVICE: There are two lounges in Symphony Hall. The Hatch Room 
on the orchestra level and the Cabot-Cahners Room on the first-balcony level serve drinks 
starting one hour before each performance. For the Friday-afternoon concerts, both rooms 
open at noon, with sandwiches available until concert time. 

BOSTON SYMPHONY BROADCASTS: Friday-afternoon concerts of the Boston Symphony 
Orchestra are broadcast live by WGBH-FM (Boston 89.7) and by WAMC-FM (Albany 90.3, 
serving the Tanglewood area). Saturday-evening concerts are broadcast live by WCRB-FM 
(Boston 102.5) 

BSO FRIENDS: The Friends are donors to the Boston Symphony Orchestra Annual Fund. 
Friends receive BSO, the orchestra's newsletter, as well as priority ticket information and 
other benefits depending on their level of giving. For information, please call the Develop- 
ment Office at Symphony Hall weekdays between 9 and 5, (617) 638-9251. If you are already 
a Friend and you have changed your address, please inform us by sending your new and old 
addresses to the Development Office, Symphony Hall, Boston, MA 02115. Including your 
patron number will assure a quick and accurate change of address in our files. 

BUSINESS FOR BSO: The BSO's Business Leadership Association program makes it possible 
for businesses to participate in the life of the Boston Symphony Orchestra through a variety of 
original and exciting programs, among them "Presidents at Pops," "A Company Christmas at 
Pops," and special-event underwriting. Benefits include corporate recognition in the BSO pro- 
gram book, access to the Beranek Room reception lounge, and priority ticket service. For fur- 
ther information, please call Anne Cademenos, Associate Director of Corporate Programs, at 
(617) 638-9298. 

THE SYMPHONY SHOP is located in the Cohen Wing at the West Entrance on Huntington 
Avenue and is open Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday from 11 a.m. until 4 p.m., Saturday 
from noon until 6 p.m., and from one hour before each concert through intermission. The 
Symphony Shop features exclusive BSO merchandise, including The Symphony Lap Robe, 
calendars, coffee mugs, posters, and an expanded line of BSO apparel and recordings. The 
Shop also carries children's books and musical-motif gift items. A selection of Symphony 
Shop merchandise is also available during concert hours outside the Cabot-Cahners Room. 
All proceeds benefit the Boston Symphony Orchestra. For further information and telephone 
orders, please call (617) 638-9383. 

56 



mm 



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I 

■ 



"Two words describe both the Boston 

Symphony Orchestra and Hoover Capital 

Management: sound and disciplined." 




"You come to Symphony Hall to hear wonderful sound produced by 
disciplined musicians. I invite you to come to Hoover Capital to get sound 
investment management practiced by disciplined investment professionals. 

"Our value-based approach benefits substantially our institutional and 

individual clients because, at Hoover Capital, we have only one standard 

for both performance and service - the highest." 

— Stevin R. Hoover — 

Chairman and CEO 

HOOVER CAPITAL MANAGEMENT 

50 Congress Street 

Boston, Massachusetts 02109 

617-227-3133 

Hoover Capital Management is a Registered Investment Advisor. Copies of Form ADV as filed with the 
Securities and Exchange Commission are available upon request. Past performance is no guarantee of future results. 



SEIJI OZAWA- MUSIC DIRECTOR 



»-^uLUlSm*L. 



1996-97 SEASON 



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The security of a trust, 
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Seiji Ozawa, Music Director 

Bernard Haitink, Principal Guest Conductor 

One Hundred and Sixteenth Season, 1996-97 



Trustees of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Inc. 



R. Willis Leith, Jr., Chairman 
Peter A. Brooke, Vice-Chairman 
Mrs. Edith L. Dabney, Vice-Chairman 
Harvey Chet Krentzman, Vice-Chairman 



Nicholas T. Zervas, President 

William J. Poorvu, Vice-Chairman and Treasurer 

Ray Stata, Vice-Chairman 



Harlan E. Anderson 
Dr. Amar G. Bose 
James F. Cleary 
John F. Cogan, Jr. 
Julian Cohen 
William F. Connell, 
ex-officio 

Life Trustees 

Vernon R. Alden 
David B. Arnold, Jr. 
J. P. Barger 
Leo. L. Beranek 
Abram T. Collier 



William M. Crozier, Jr. 
Nader F. Darehshori 
Deborah B. Davis 
Nina L. Doggett 
Avram J. Goldberg 
Thelma E. Goldberg 



Nelson J. Darling, Jr. 
Archie C. Epps 
Mrs. Harris Fahnestock + 
Mrs. John H. Fitzpatrick 
Dean W Freed 



Julian T. Houston 

Edna S. Kalman 

George Krupp 

Mrs. August R. Meyer 

Richard P. Morse 

Mrs. Robert B. Newman 



Robert P. O'Block, 

ex-officio 
Peter C. Read 
Margaret Williams- 

DeCelles, ex-officio 



Mrs. John L. Grandin 
Mrs. George I. Kaplan 
George H. Kidder 
Thomas D. Perry, Jr. 
Irving W. Rabb 



Mrs. George Lee Sargent 
Richard A. Smith 
Sidney Stoneman 
John Hoyt Stookey 
John L. Thorndike 



Other Officers of the Corporation 

Thomas D. May and John Ex Rodgers, Assistant Treasurers 



Daniel R. Gustin, Clerk 



Board of Overseers of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Inc. 

Robert P. O'Block, Chairman 

Molly Beals Millman, Secretary Phyllis Dohanian, Treasurer 



Mrs. Herbert B. Abelow 
Helaine B. Allen 
Joel B. Alvord 
Amanda Barbour Amis 
Marjorie Arons-Barron 
Caroline Dwight Bain 
Sandra Bakalar 
Gabriella Beranek 
Lynda Schubert Bodman 
William L. Boyan 
Jan Brett 
Robin A. Brown 
Mrs. Marshall Nichols 

Carter 
Earle M. Chiles 
William H. Congleton 
William F. Connell 
John M. Connors, Jr. 
Martha H.W. 

Crowninshield 
Diddy Cullinane 
Joan P. Curhan 
Tamara P. Davis 
Betsy P. Demirjian 
JoAnne Walton 

Dickinson 
Harry Ellis Dickson 
Mitchell L. Dong 
Hugh Downs 



Francis A. Doyle 
Goetz B. Eaton 
Harriett Eckstein 
William R. Elfers 
George M. Elvin 
Edward Eskandarian 
J. Richard Fennell 
Nancy J. Fitzpatrick 
Eugene M. Freedman 
Dr. Arthur Gelb 
Mrs. Kenneth J. 

Germeshausen 
Charles K. Gifford 
Jordan Golding 
Mark R. Goldweitz 
Deborah England Gray 
Michael Halperson 
John P. Hamill 
Ellen T. Harris 
Daphne P. Hatsopoulos 
Deborah M. Hauser 
Bayard Henry 
Marilyn Brachman 

Hoffman 
Ronald A. Homer 
Phyllis S. Hubbard 
F. Donald Hudson 
Lola Jaffe 
Mrs. Robert M. Jaffe 



Dr. Hisashi Kaneko 
Martin S. Kaplan 
Susan Beth Kaplan 
Mrs. S. Charles Kasdon 
Frances Demoulas 

Kettenbach 
Robert D. King 
Mrs. Gordon F. Kingsley 
David I. Kosowsky 
Arthur R. Kravitz 
Mrs. William D. 

Larkin, Jr. 
Thomas H. Lee 
Stephen R. Levy 
Edward Linde 
Frederick H. Lovejoy, Jr. 
Diane H. Lupean 
Mrs. Charles P. Lyman 
Barbara Jane Macon 
Joseph C. McNay 
William F Meagher, Jr. 
Nathan R. Miller 
Robert J. Murray 
Paul C. O'Brien 
Norio Ohga 
Louis F. Orsatti 
Stephen Davies Paine 
Gloria Moody Press 



Millard H. Pryor, Jr. 
Robert E. Remis 
William D. Roddy, Jr. 
John Ex Rodgers 
Keizo Saji 
Roger A. Saunders 
Carol Scheifele-Holmes 
Hannah H. Schneider 
Cynthia D. Scullin 
Elizabeth T. Selkowitz 
Roger T. Servison 
L. Scott Singleton 
Mrs. Micho F. Spring 
Thomas G. Sternberg 
Jacquelynne M. 

Stepanian 
Bill Van Faasen 
Paul M. Verrochi 
Stephen R. Weiner 
Robert A. Wells 
Mrs. Joan D. Wheeler 
Reginald H. White 
Mrs. Florence T. 

Whitney 
Margaret Williams- 

DeCelles 
Robin Wilson 
Kathryn A. Wong 



+ Deceased 



Overseers Emeriti 

Mrs. Weston Adams 
Bruce A. Beal 
William M. Bulger 
Mary Louise Cabot 
Mrs. Levin H. 

Campbell 
Johns H. Congdon 
Phyllis Curtin 
Katherine Fanning 
Peter H.B. 

Frelinghuysen 
Mrs. Thomas J. 

Galligan, Jr. 
Mrs. James Garivaltis 
Mrs. Haskell R. Gordon 



Susan D. Hall 
Mrs. Richard D. Hill 
Susan M. Hilles 
Glen H. Hiner 
H. Eugene Jones 
Mrs. Louis I. Kane 
Leonard Kaplan 
Richard L. Kaye 
Robert K. Kraft 
Benjamin H. Lacy 
Mrs. James F. 

Lawrence 
Mrs. Hart D. Leavitt 
Laurence Lesser 
Mrs. Harry L. Marks 



C. Charles Marran 
Hanae Mori 
Mrs. Stephen V.C. 

Morris 
Patricia Morse 
David S. Nelson 
Mrs. Hiroshi H. 

Nishino 
Vincent M. O'Reilly 
Andrall S. Pearson 
John A. Perkins 
David R. Pokross 
Daphne Brooks Prout 
Mrs. Peter van S. Rice 
Mrs. Jerome Rosenfeld 



Mrs. William C. 

Rousseau 
Angelica L. Russell 
Francis P. Sears, Jr. 
Mrs. Carl Shapiro 
Mrs. Donald B. 

Sinclair 
Ralph Z. Sorenson 
Mrs. Arthur I. Strang 
Luise Vosgerchian 
Mrs. Thomas H.P. 

Whitney 
Mrs. Donald R. Wilson 
Mrs. John J. Wilson 



Business Leadership Association 

Board of Directors 

Harvey Chet Krentzman, Chairman Emeritus 
James F. Cleary, Chairman 



Nader F. Darehshori 
Francis A. Doyle 
John P. Hamill 
William F. Meagher 



Robert J. Murray 
Robert P. O'Block 
Patrick J. Purcell 
William D. Roddy 



William F. Connell, President 
William L. Boyan, Vice-President 



Cynthia Scullin 
Malcolm L. Sherman 
Ray Stata 



Stephen J. Sweeney 
William C. Van Faasen 
Patricia Wolpert 



Emeritus Leo L. Beranek 



Ex-Officio R. Willis Leith, Jr. • Nicholas T. Zervas 



Officers of the Boston Symphony Association of Volunteers 

Margaret Williams-DeCelles, President Charlie Jack, Treasurer 

Goetz Eaton, Executive Vice-President Doreen Reis, Secretary- 



Diane Austin, Symphony Shop 
Noni Cooper, Adult Education 
Ginger Elvin, Tanglewood 

Association 
Nancy Ferguson, Hall Services 
Phyllis Hubbard, Nominating 



Marilyn Pond, Public Relations 
Dee Schoenly, Development 
William C. Sexton, 

Tanglewood Association 
Barbara Steiner, Youth Activities 



Dorothy Stern, Resources 

Development 
Erling Thorgalsen, Membership 
Eva Zervos, Fundraising 
Wendy Ziner, Fundraising 



The Gericke Years: 
1884-1889 and 1898-1906 




The archival exhibit currently on display in the Huntington Ave- 
nue corridor of the Cohen Wing explores the Boston Symphony 
Orchestra during Wilhelm Gericke's two terms as conductor. 
Generally acknowledged as the BSO's first "professional" con- 
ductor, Gericke is credited with having transformed the BSO 
from a group of musicians into an orchestra. Among the many 
innovations that occurred during Gericke's conductorship were 
the inauguration in 1885 of the "Promenade Concerts," which 
were the predecessor of the Boston Pops; the commencement of 
tours to other United States cities in 1886, the initiation of a 
series of Young People's Concerts in 1887, and the move from 
the old Boston Music Hall to Symphony Hall in 1900. 



Programs copyright ©1997 Boston Symphony Orchestra, Inc. 

Cover design by Jaycole Advertising, Inc./ Cover and BSO photos by Steve J. Sherman 



Administration 

Kenneth Haas, Managing Director 

Daniel R. Gustin, Assistant Managing Director and Manager of Tanglewood 

Anthony Fogg, Artistic Administrator 

Thomas D. May, Director of Finance and Business Affairs 

Nancy Perkins, Director of Development 

Caroline Smedvig, Director of Public Relations and Marketing 

Ray F. Wellbaum, Orchestra Manager 

ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF/ARTISTIC 

Dennis Alves, Artistic Coordinator, Boston Pops • Faith Hunter, Executive Assistant to the Managing 
Director • Karen Leopardi, Artist Assistant/Secretary to the Music Director • Vincenzo Natale, Chauffeur/ 
Valet • James O'Connor, Assistant to the Artistic Administrator • Brian Van Sickle, Executive Assistant to 
the Tanglewood Manager 

ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF/ PRODUCTION 

Christopher W. Ruigomez, Operations Manager 

Scott Schillin, Assistant Manager, Boston Pops and Youth Activities 

Felicia A. Burrey, Chorus Manager • Nancy Cohen, Auditions Coordinator/Administrative Assistant, 
Orchestra Personnel • Jana Euler Gimenez, Administrative Assistant, Management Office • Diane A. 
Read, Production Coordinator 



BOX OFFICE 

Russell M. Hodsdon, Manager of Box Office 

Mary J. Broussard, Clerk • Cary Eyges, Clerk • Lawrence Fraher, Clerk 
Assistant Manager of Box Office • Arthur Ryan, Clerk 



Kathleen Kennedy, 



BUSINESS OFFICE 

Sarah J. Harrington, Budget Manager 

Craig R. Kaplan, Controller 

Roberta Kennedy, Manager, Symphony Shop 

Christopher Fox, Budget Analyst • Michelle Green, Executive Assistant to the Director of Finance 
and Business Affairs • Ian Kane, Senior Financial Analyst • Scott Langill, General Accountant • John 
O'Callaghan, Payroll Accountant • Yaneris Pena-Briggs, Cash Accountant • Sharon Sherman, 
Accounts Payable Supervisor • Victoria L. Tan, Staff Accountant 

DEVELOPMENT 

Daniel P. Breen, Director of Administration for Development 
Madelyne Cuddeback, Director of Corporate Programs 
Julie H. Diaz, Campaign Director 

John C. Marksbury, Director of Foundation and Government Support 
Joyce M. Serwitz, Associate Director of Development 

Diane Abe, Campaign Coordinator • Maureen Barry, Administrative Assistant to the Associate Director 
of Development • Courtney A. Barth, Assistant Director, Corporate Projects • Sally Dale, Manager of Donor 
Relations • Katrina DeBonville, Administrative Assistant to the Major Gifts Officer • Rebecca Ehrhardt, 
Major Gifts Officer • Sarah Fitzgerald, Data Coordinator • Ginny Gaeta, Executive Assistant to the Director 
of Development • Erika-Marie Haeussler, Administrative Assistant, Tanglewood Development • Joyce Hatch, 
Director of Boston Symphony Annual Fund • Deborah Hersey, Coordinator of Information Systems • Shelley 
Kooris, Manager of Development Research • Matthew Lane, Administrative Assistant, Campaign Communi- 
cations • Sabrina Learman, Administrative Assistant/Office Manager • Katherine A. Lempert, Assistant 
Director, Tanglewood Development • Robert Massey, Data Production Assistant • Cynthia McCabe, Admini- 
strative Assistant, Foundation and Government Support • Rachel 0. Nadjarian, Donor Relations Assistant * 
Gerrit Petersen, Assistant Director of Foundation and Government Support • Julie A. Phaneuf, Assistant 
Director, Boston Symphony Annual Fund • Alicia Salmoni, Reseacher/ Track Manager • George Saulnier, 
Data Entry Clerk • Bethany Tammaro, Administrative Assistant, Corporate Programs • Alleather Toure, 
leadership Gifts Officer • Valerie Vignaux, Administrative Assistant, Annual Fund • Tracy Wilson, Director 
of Tanglewood Development 



. 



EDUCATIONAL ACTIVITIES/ARCHIVES 

Richard Ortner, Administrator of the Tanglewood Music Center 

Myran Parker-Brass, Coordinator of Youth Activities 

Bridget P. Carr, Archivist— Position endowed by Caroline Dwight Bain • Barbara Logue, Administrative 
Assistant, Tanglewood Music Center 



Elizabeth Francey-Amis, Assistant to the Function 



FUNCTIONS OFFICE 

Cheryl Silvia Lopes, Function Manager 

Lesley Ann Cefalo, Assistant Function Manager 
Manager/Tanglewood Function Coordinator 

HUMAN RESOURCES 

Marion Gardner-Saxe, Director of Human Resources 
Anna Asphar, Benefits Manager 

INFORMATION SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT 
Robert Bell, Manager of Information Systems 

William Beckett, Information Systems Coordinator • James Major, Information Systems Special 
Projects Coordinator • Michael Pijoan, Assistant Manager of Information Systems 

PUBLIC RELATIONS 

Bernadette M. Horgan, Director of Media Relations 

Susanna Bonta, Media Relations Coordinator • Caleb Cochran, Media Relations Assistant /Assistant to 

the Director of Public Relations and Marketing * Leah Oko, Administrative Assistant 

PUBLICATIONS 

Steven Ledbetter, Musicologist & Program Annotator 

Marc Mandel, Publications Manager 

Eleanor Hayes McGourty, Boston Pops Publications Coordinator/Marketing Copywriter 

SALES, SUBSCRIPTION, AND MARKETING 
Nancy A. Kay, Director of Sales & Marketing Manager 

Helen N.H. Brady, Group Sales Manager • Richard Chiarella, Graphic Designer • Susanna Concha, 
Marketing Coordinator • B. Victoria Johnson, Subscription Representative • Michael Miller, Symphony- 
Charge Manager • Michelene Miller, Group Sales Assistant • Kim Noltemy, Associate Marketing Manager • 
Carol Ann Passarelli, Subscription Manager • Brian Robinson, Senior Subscription Representative 

SYMPHONY HALL OPERATIONS 

Robert L. Gleason, Facilities Manager 
James E. Whitaker, House Manager 

H.R. Costa, Technical Supervisor • Michael Finlan, Switchboard Supervisor • Wilmoth A. Griffiths, 
Supervisor of Facilities Support Services • Catherine Lawlor, Administrative Assistant • John MacMinn, 
Supervisor of Building Maintenance • William D. McDonnell, Chief Steward • Cleveland Morrison, 
Stage Manager • Shawn Wilder, Mailroom Clerk 

House Crew Charles F. Cassell, Jr. • Francis Castillo • Thomas Davenport • John Demick, 
Stage Coordinator • Michael Frazier • Hank Green • Juan Jimenez • William P. Morrill • Mark 
C. Rawson 

Security Christopher Bartlett • Sean Glennon • David Parker, Security Supervisor 

Cleaning Crew Desmond Boland • Clifford Collins • Angelo Flores • Rudolph Lewis • Robert 
MacGilvray • Lindel Milton, Lead Cleaner 

TANGLEWOOD OPERATIONS 

James J. Mooney, Facilities Manager 

VOLUNTEER OFFICE 

Leslie Wu Foley, Director of Volunteer Services 

Jennifer Flynn, Senior Project Coordinator • Pauline McCance, Senior Administrative Assistant 



BSO 



A Tribute to The Calvert Trust 



The appearances of Leif Ove Andsnes on 
March 20, 21, 22, and 25 have been fund- 
ed in part by The Calvert Trust Endowment 
Fund. The Calvert Trust was established in 
1965 by the late Mrs. Ruth Crary Young and 
named in honor of her father, Calvert Crary. 
Mrs. Young was a faithful Friday-afternoon 
subscriber and dedicated Friend of the Bos- 
ton Symphony Orchestra during her lifetime. 
The Fund was created in 1989 to support 
the appearance of a guest artist each season. 

"Salute to Symphony" 1997 

This Weekend, 

Friday, March 21 -Sunday, March 23 

"Salute to Symphony," the BSO's annual 
community outreach event and fundraiser, 
takes on a new look in 1997, giving greater 
emphasis to the music, the musicians, and 
the BSO's role in the community. The fes- 
tivities begin with the annual telecast on 
WCVB-TV Channel 5, to air Friday, March 
21, from 7:30 to 9 p.m. Hosted by WCVB 
news anchors Natalie Jacobson and Chet 
Curtis, the program includes orchestral 
selections led by Seiji Ozawa, John Williams, 
and Keith Lockhart, "up close and person- 
al" segments about some of the people who 
make up the BSO, an update on Mariana 
Green, a student in Project STEP (String 
Training and Educational Program for stu- 
dents of color), a visit with Keith Lockhart 
and Lucia Lin at their Boston home, and a 
review of some BSO and Boston Pops high- 
lights of the past year. Frank Avruch and 
Dixie Whatley will also be on hand for this 
special televised concert, to be simulcast on 
WCRB 102.5 FM. 

"Salute to Symphony" would not be pos- 
sible without the generous support of Fideli- 
ty Investments, the new corporate sponsor of 
"Salute"; of WCVB-TV Channel 5, produc- 
ers of the "Salute" telecast for 21 years; and 
of WCRB 102.5 FM, radio broadcasters of 
"Salute" for 27 years. "We are very excited 
about the new direction 'Salute to Symphony' 
is taking because it focuses on what we do 
best — bringing the BSO's music to as many 
people as possible throughout New England, 



across the country, and around the world," 
said Daniel R. Gustin, BSO Assistant Man- 
aging Director. "In the spirit of change, we 
are delighted to welcome Fidelity Invest- 
ments, generous supporters of the Boston 
Pops through their sponsorship of 'Evening 
at Pops' and the 1997 Boston Pops National 
Summer Tour, to the 'Salute' team. We also 
offer special thanks to the more than 200 
volunteers from the greater Boston commu- 
nity whose outstanding effort embodies the 
spirit of the weekend." 

Throughout the weekend WCRB 102.5 
FM will celebrate the BSO with "Salute" 
broadcasts encouraging listeners to "Get to 
Know the BSO." This year's radio program- 
ming will continue the tradition of broad- 
casting the most popular BSO and Boston 
Pops recordings, both current and historical, 
as well as rarely heard tapes from the BSO 
archives, and interviews with BSO musi- 
cians, including informal conversations 
with Seiji Ozawa, Keith Lockhart, and John 
Williams. 

The annual Symphony Hall Open House, 
sponsored by Fidelity Investments, is one 
of the orchestra's most popular events. On 
Saturday, March 22, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m, 
Symphony Hall will open its doors for a day 
of free musical activities for everyone, in- 
cluding solo and chamber music perform- 
ances by BSO musicians, tours of Symphony 
Hall, instrument demonstrations, perform- 
ances on the Symphony Hall organ, a live 
broadcast by WCRB 102.5 FM, and infor- 
mal talks with musicians. 

Community support of the BSO is vital to 
maintaining and furthering our goals in Sym- 
phony Hall, in area schools, and throughout 
the region. To make a pledge to "Salute to 
Symphony" call 1-800-325-9400; a pledge 
of any amount is appreciated! 

Taking the BSO Into the Next Century 

The next four years mark a critical period 
for the long-term future of the Boston Sym- 
phony Orchestra. The BSO is not immune 
to the cultural and financial challenges fac- 
ing arts organizations today. Consequently, 
the orchestra has launched the BSO/2000 
Campaign to maintain its artistic standards 
and to fulfill its mission of performance, out- 
reach, and training, the scope of which is 



■ 



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unrivaled the world over. This $130 million 
fundraising effort is the largest of any sym- 
phonic organization. Continuing through the 
year 2000, the campaign will permit the or- 
chestra to sustain its seven enterprises: the 
Boston Symphony Orchestra, the Boston Pops, 
the Tanglewood summer season, the Tangle- 
wood Music Center, the Boston Symphony 
Chamber Players, the Tanglewood Festival 
Chorus, and the facilities of Symphony Hall 
and Tanglewood. 

Serving as financial guardians of the BSO, 
individuals, corporation, foundations, gov- 
ernment agencies, and estates have already 
contributed more than $50 million toward 
this goal. If you would like to learn more 
about the orchestra's mission, its seven en- 
terprises, and the BSO/2000 Campaign, 
please call the Development Office at (617) 
638-0250, or write to Julie Diaz, Campaign 
Director, Symphony Hall, Boston, MA 02115. 

Crescendo Event to 
Feature John Williams 

Crescendo, the volunteer network of young, 
diverse professionals affiliated with the Bos- 
ton Symphony Orchestra, is pleased to fea- 
ture John Williams as the special guest at 
its event on Friday, March 28. The evening 
includes the concert at 8 p.m. followed by a 
dessert reception in the Cabot-Cahners Room 
with Mr. Williams. Making his BSO subscrip- 
tion series debut that week, Mr. Williams 
leads his own The Five Sacred Trees, for bas- 
soon and orchestra, with BSO principal 
Richard Svoboda, as well as Quantz's Flute 
Concerto in G and Corigliano's Pied Piper 
Fantasy, both with flutist James Galway. 
Tickets for this event, priced at $40 per per- 
son, include admission to both the concert 
and the reception. 

Crescendo seeks to introduce a new audi- 
ence, ages 25 to 45 predominantly, to the 
orchestra in a relaxed, social atmosphere. 
Each Crescendo event includes a BSO or 
Boston Pops concert and a reception featur- 
ing a guest speaker from the BSO family. To 
order tickets to the March 28 event, or for 
more information about Crescendo, please 
call the Volunteer Office at (617) 638-9390. 

BSO Members in Concert 

BSO principal trumpet Charles Schlueter is 
joined by the Quintet Brassil, made up of 



Paraiba Federal University music faculty, 
for "An Evening of Brazilian Music" on 
Sunday, March 30, at 8 p.m. at Jordan Hall 
at the New England Conservatory. The pro- 
gram includes Lindenberg Cardoso's Xan- 
xando, Oskar Bohme's Sextet in E-flat minor, 
Jose Ursicino da Silva (Duda)'s Concertino, 
Suite Monette, Eugene Bozza's Sonatine, 
and Flavio Fernandes de Lima's Quinteto 
Nordeste. Admission is free. 

BSO bass trombonist Douglas Yeo pre- 
sents music for bass trombone and serpent 
(the eighteenth- and nineteenth-century 
predecessor to today's valved bass brass in- 
struments) on Monday, March 31, at 8 p.m. 
at Jordan Hall at the New England Conser- 
vatory. BSO trombonist Norman Bolter con- 
ducts two of his own works for bass trom- 
bone and orchestra — Dances of Greeting 
and Of Mountains — as part of this program, 
which also includes Albinoni's Trio Sonata 
for three trombones, Cliff Bevan's That Pesky 
Serpent, Simon Proctor's Concerto for Ser- 
pent, David Fetterby's Split Personality for 
solo bass trombone, and music with the New 
England Brass Band. Admission is free. 

Mstislav Rostropovich to Give 
Special Master Class for 
Project STEP 

Project STEP (String Training and Education- 
al Program for students of color) is pleased 
to present a master class with Mstislav Ros- 
tropovich and young artists from Project 
STEP on Friday, April 4, from 4 to 5:30 p.m. 
in the Cabot-Cahners Room of Symphony 
Hall. The esteemed cellist, celebrating his 
seventieth birthday, will be performing in 
three concerts that week with Seiji Ozawa 
and the Boston Symphony Orchestra. Proj- 
ect STEP, now in its fifteenth year, is spon- 
sored by the Boston Symphony Orchestra, 
Boston University School for the Arts, the 
Greater Boston Youth Symphony Orchestras, 
and New England Conservatory. General ad- 
mission to the master class is $50 for adults 
and $10 for high school and college students, 
with patron tickets available at $100, bene- 
factor tickets at $250, and underwriter tickets 
at $500. Following the master class there 
will be a dessert reception in Higginson 
Hall. Proceeds will benefit Project STEP. 
For tickets or further information please 
call (617)267-5777. 



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■ i 



H 
I 




SEIJI OZAWA 

Seiji Ozawa is now in his twenty-fourth season as music director 
of the Boston Symphony Orchestra. Mr. Ozawa became the 
BSO's thirteenth music director in 1973, after a year as music 
adviser; his tenure with the Boston Symphony is the longest of 
any music director currently active with an American orches- 
tra. In his nearly twenty-five years as music director, Mr. Ozawa 
has maintained the orchestra's distinguished reputation both at 
home and abroad, with concerts at Symphony Hall and Tangle- 
wood, on tours to Europe, Japan, Hong Kong, China, and South 
America, and across the United States, including regular con- 
certs in New York. Mr. Ozawa has upheld the BSO's commit- 
ment to new music through the commissioning of new works, including a series of cen- 
tennial commissions marking the orchestra's hundredth birthday in 1981, a series of 
works celebrating the fiftieth anniversary of the Tanglewood Music Center in 1990, and 
a current series represented this season by new works from Leon Kirchner and Bernard 
Rands. In addition, he has recorded more than 130 works with the orchestra, represent- 
ing more than fifty different composers, on ten labels. 

In addition to his work with the Boston Symphony, Mr. Ozawa appears regularly 
with the Berlin Philharmonic, the New Japan Philharmonic, the London Symphony, the 
Orchestre National de France, the Philharmonia of London, and the Vienna Philhar- 
monic. He made his Metropolitan Opera debut in December 1992, appears regularly at 
La Scala and the Vienna Staatsoper, and has also conducted opera at the Paris Opera, 
Salzburg, and Covent Garden. In September 1992 he founded the Saito Kinen Festival 
in Matsumoto, Japan, in memory of his teacher Hideo Saito, a central figure in the cul- 
tivation of Western music and musical technique in Japan, and a co-founder of the 
Toho School of Music in Tokyo. In addition to his many Boston Symphony recordings, 
Mr. Ozawa has recorded with the Berlin Philharmonic, the Chicago Symphony, the 
London Philharmonic, the Orchestre National, the Orchestre de Paris, the Philharmonia 
of London, the Saito Kinen Orchestra, the San Francisco Symphony, the Toronto Sym- 
phony, and the Vienna Philharmonic, among others. 

Born in 1935 in Shenyang, China, Seiji Ozawa studied music from an early age and 
later graduated with first prizes in composition and conducting from Tokyo's Toho School 
of Music. In 1959 he won first prize at the International Competition of Orchestra Con- 
ductors held in Besancon, France. Charles Munch, then music director of the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra, subsequently invited him to attend the Tanglewood Music Center, 
where he won the Koussevitzky Prize for outstanding student conductor in 1960. While 
a student of Herbert von Karajan in West Berlin, Mr. Ozawa came to the attention of 
Leonard Bernstein, who appointed him assistant conductor of the New York Philharmon- 
ic for the 1961-62 season. He made his first professional concert appearance in North 
America in January 1962, with the San Francisco Symphony. He was music director of 
the Chicago Symphony Orchestra's Ravinia Festival for five summers beginning in 1964, 
music director of the Toronto Symphony from 1965 to 1969, and music director of the 
San Francisco Symphony from 1970 to 1976, followed by a year as that orchestra's 
music adviser. He conducted the Boston Symphony Orchestra for the first time in 1964, 
at Tanglewood, and made his first Symphony Hall appearance with the orchestra in 
January 1968. In 1970 he became an artistic director of Tanglewood. 

Mr. Ozawa recently became the first recipient of Japan's Inouye Sho ("Inouye 
Award"). Created to recognize lifetime achievement in the arts, the award is named 
after this century's preeminent Japanese novelist, Yasushi Inouye. In September 1994 
Mr. Ozawa received his second Emmy award, for Individual Achievement in Cultural 
Programming, for "Dvorak in Prague: A Celebration," with the Boston Symphony Orches- 
tra. He won his first Emmy for the Boston Symphony Orchestra's PBS television series 
"Evening at Symphony." Mr. Ozawa holds honorary doctor of music degrees from the 
University of Massachusetts, the New England Conservatory of Music, and Wheaton 
College in Norton, Massachusetts. 



I 



■ 



H 




First Violins 

Malcolm Lowe 

Concerlmaster 
Charles Munch chair, 
fully funded in perpetuity 

Tamara Smirnova 
Associate Concertmaster 
Helen Horner Mclntyre chair, 
endowed in perpetuity in 1976 



BOSTON SYMPHONY 

ORCHESTRA 

1996-97 

Seiji Ozawa 

Music Director 

Music Directorship endowed by 

John Moors Cabot 

Bernard Haitink 

Principal Guest Conductor 




Assistant Concertmaster 

Robert L. Beal, and 

Enid L. and Bruce A. Beal chair, 

endowed in perpetuity in 1 980 
° Laura Park 

Assistant Concertmaster 

Edward and Bertha C. Rose chair 
Bo Youp Hwang 

John and Dorothy Wilson chair, 

fully funded in perpetuity 
Lucia Lin 

Forrest Foster Collier chair 
Leo Panasevich 

Carolyn and George Rowland chair 
Gottfried Wilfinger 

Dorothy Q. and David B. Arnold, Jr., 

chair, fully funded in perpetuity 
Alfred Schneider 

Muriel C. Kasdon 

and Marjorie C. Paley chair 
Raymond Sird 

Ruth and Carl Shapiro chair, 

fully funded in perpetuity 
Ikuko Mizuno 

David and Ingrid Kosowsky chair 
Amnon Levy 

Theodore W. and Evelyn Berenson 

Family chair 

* Harvey Seigel 

Stephanie Morris Marryott and 
Franklin J. Marryott chair 

* Nancy Bracken 
*Aza Raykhtsaum 

* Bonnie Bewick 

* James Cooke 

* Victor Romanul 

Bessie Pappas chair 

* Catherine French 

Second Violins 

Marylou Speaker Churchill 

Principal 

Fahnestock chair 
Vyacheslav Uritsky 

Assistant Principal 

Charlotte and Irving W. Rabb chair, 

endowed in perpetuity in 1977 
Ronald Knudsen 

Edgar and Shirley Grossman chair 
Joseph McGauley 

Shirley and J. Richard Fennell chair 
Ronan Lefkowitz 

David H. and Edith C. Howie chair, 

fully funded in perpetuity 

* Jerome Rosen 

* Sheila Fiekowsky 

* Jennie Shames 

* Participating in a system of rotated 
seating 
$On sabbatical leave 
° On leave 
§ Substitute player 



* Valeria Vilker Kuchment 
*Tatiana Dimitriades 
*Si-Jing Huang 

* Nicole Monahan 

* Kelly Barr 
*Wendy Putnam 

Violas 

Steven Ansell 

Principal 

Charles S. Dana chair, 

endowed in perpetuity in 1970 
Hui Liu 

Assistant Principal 

Anne Stoneman chair, 

fully funded in perpetuity 
Ronald Wilkison 

Lois and Harlan Anderson chair 

Robert Barnes 
Burton Fine 
Joseph Pietropaolo 
Michael Zaretsky 
Marc Jeanneret 
*Mark Ludwig 

Helene R. Cahners-Kaplan and 
Carol R. Goldberg chair 

* Rachel Fagerburg 

* Edward Gazouleas 
*Kazuko Matsusaka 

Cellos 

Jules Eskin 

Principal 

Philip R. Allen chair, 

endowed in perpetuity in 1969 
Martha Babcock 

Assistant Principal 

Vernon and Marion Alden chair, 

endowed in perpetuity in 1977 
Sato Knudsen 

Esther S. and Joseph M. Shapiro chair 
Joel Moerschel 

Sandra and David Bakalar chair 
Luis Leguia 

Robert Bradford Newman chair, 

fully funded in perpetuity 
Carol Procter 

Lillian and Nathan R. Miller chair 

* Ronald Feldman 

Richard C. and Ellen E. Paine chair, 
fully funded in perpetuity 

* Jerome Patterson 

Charles and JoAnne Dickinson chair 

* Jonathan Miller 

Rosemary and Donald Hudson chair 
*Owen Young 

John F. Cogan, Jr., and 
Mary L. Cornille chair, 
fully funded in perpetuity 

* Andrew Pearce 

Gordon and Mary Ford Kingsley 
Family chair 

Basses 

Edwin Barker 

Principal 

Harold D. Hodgkinson chair, 
endowed in perpetuity in 1974 
Lawrence Wolfe 
Assistant Principal 
Maria Nistazos Stata chair, 
fully funded in perpetuity 



10 



Joseph Hearne 

Leith Family chair, 
fully funded in perpetuity 
John Salkowski 
Joseph and Jan Brett Hearne chair 
* Robert Olson 
*James Orleans 
*Todd Seeber 
*John Stovall 
*Dennis Roy 

Flutes 

Elizabeth Ostling 

Acting Principal 

Walter Piston chair, 

endowed in perpetuity in 1970 
Fenwick Smith 

Myra and Robert Kraft chair, 

endowed in perpetuity in 1981 



Assistant Principal 
Marian Gray Lewis chair, 
fully funded in perpetuity 

Piccolo 

Geralyn Coticone 
Evelyn and C. Charles Marran 
chair, endowed in perpetuity in 1979 

Oboes 

Alfred Genovese 
Principal 

Mildred B. Remis chair, 
endowed in perpetuity in 1975 

Mark McEwen 

Keisuke Wakao 
Assistant Principal 
Elaine and Jerome Rosenfeld chair 

English Horn 

Robert Sheena 
Beranek chair, 
fully funded in perpetuity 

Clarinets 

William R. Hudgins 
Principal 

Ann S.M. Banks chair, 
endowed in perpetuity in 1977 

Scott Andrews 

Thomas Martin 
Associate Principal & E-flat clarinet 
Stanton W. and Elisabeth K. Davis 
chair, fully funded in perpetuity 



Bass Clarinet 

Craig Nordstrom 

Farla and Harvey Chet 

Krentzman chair, 
fully funded in perpetuity 

Bassoons 

Richard Svoboda 

Principal 

Edward A. Taft chair, 

endowed in perpetuity in 1974 
Roland Small 

Richard Ranti 

Associate Principal 

Contrabassoon 

Gregg Henegar 
Helen Rand Thayer chair 

Horns 

Charles Kavalovski 

Principal 

Helen Sagojf Slosberg chair, 

endowed in perpetuity in 1974 
Richard Sebring 

Associate Principal 

Margaret Andersen Congleton 

chair, fully funded in perpetuity 
Daniel Katzen 

Elizabeth B. Storer chair 
Jay Wadenpfuhl 
Richard Mackey 
Jonathan Menkis 

Trumpets 

Charles Schlueter 

Principal 

Roger Louis Voisin chair, 

endowed in perpetuity in 1977 
Peter Chapman 

Ford H. Cooper chair 
Timothy Morrison 

Associate Principal 

Nina L. and Eugene B. 

Doggett chair 
Thomas Rolfs 

Trombones 

tRonald Barron 
Principal 

J. P. and Mary B. Barger chair, 
fully funded in perpetuity 



Norman Bolter 
§Darren Acosta 

Bass Trombone 

Douglas Yeo 

Tuba 

Chester Schmitz 
Margaret and William C. 
Rousseau chair, 
fully funded in perpetuity 

Timpani 

Everett Firth 

Sylvia Shippen Wells chair, 
endowed in perpetuity in 1974 

Percussion 

Thomas Gauger 

Peter and Anne Brooke chair, 
fully funded in perpetuity 
Frank Epstein 

Peter Andrew Lurie chair 
J. William Hudgins 

Timothy Genis 

Assistant Timpanist 

Harps 

$ Ann Hobson Pilot 
Principal 

Willona Henderson Sinclair chair 
Sarah Schuster Ericsson 

Librarians 

Marshall Burlingame 
Principal 

Lia and William Poorvu chair 
William Shisler 
Sandra Pearson 

Assistant Conductor 

Richard Westerfield 
Anna E. Finnerty chair 

Personnel Managers 

Lynn Larsen 
Bruce M. Creditor 

Stage Manager 

Position endowed by 
Angelica L. Russell 
Peter Riley Pfitzinger 







ii 



. 



Get to Know the BSO! 



Celebrate the great 
traditions of the Boston 
Symphony and 
Boston Pops during 
Salute to Symphony, 
March 21-23. 




rr 



WATCH WCVB-TV Channel 5 on 

Friday, March 21 , from 7:30 
to 9 p.m. for a special "Salute' 
concert (simulcast by WCRB 
102.5 FM), hosted by Natalie 
Jacobson and Chet Curtis. 



VISIT 



magnificent Symphony Hall 
during the Open House on 
Saturday, March 22, from 
1 1 a.m. to 4 p.m. for a day 
of musical activities free to al 



LISTEN to WCRB 1 02.5 FM all 
weekend long for special 
"Salute" broadcasts. 






"Salute to Symphony" 1 997 is sponsored by 



Fidelity 
Investments* 



FOR INFORMATION CALL (617) 638-9390 




12 



'«* 



BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

Seiji Ozawa, Music Director 

Bernard Haitink, Principal Guest Conductor 

One Hundred and Sixteenth Season, 1996-97 

Thursday, March 20, at 8 
Friday, March 21, at 1:30 
Saturday, March 22, at 8 
Tuesday, March 25, at 8 



HANS GRAF 



STRAVINSKY 




MOZART 



conducting 

Concerto in E-flat for chamber orchestra, 
Dumbarton Oaks, 8. v. 38 

Tempo giusto 
Allegretto 
Con moto 

Piano Concerto No. 20 in D minor, K.466 

Allegro 

Romanza 

Rondo: Allegro assai 

LEIF OVE ANDSNES 



The appearance of Leif Ove Andsnes is funded in part 
by income from The Calvert Trust Fund. 



INTERMISSION 



MOZART 
STRAVINSKY 



Adagio and Fugue in C minor, K.546 

Symphony in C 

Moderato alia breve 

Larghetto concertante 

Allegretto 

Largo — Tempo giusto, alia breve 



The evening concerts will end about 10 and the afternoon concert about 3:30. 

RCA, Deutsche Grammophon, Philips, Telarc, Sony Classical/CBS Masterworks, Angel/EMI, 
London /Decca, Erato, Hyperion, and New World records 

Baldwin piano 

Leif Ove Andsnes plays the Steinway piano. 

The program books for the Friday series are given in loving memory of Mrs. Hugh 
Bancroft by her daughters Mrs. A. Werk Cook and the late Mrs. William C. Cox. 

Boston Symphony Orchestra concerts are funded in part by a grant from the 
Massachusetts Cultural Council, a state agency. 



13 



Week 18 




Finally Found! 

Uncommon Resources for Enriching Your Life 



The Arts 



Chamber Music Flute and classical 
guitar. Also, Celtic, Jewish, Spanish 
music. Concerts on TV and abroad. 
The Anthony Duo (617) 782-3133 



Expressive Arts Therapy Combining 
clinical and creative practices and 
trainings for individuals or groups. 
Lore Peters MA, LMHC (617) 641-1102 



Chamber Music Varied classical and Portrait Artist Oils and pastels 

jazz ensembles. Our tape helps you of adults and children. Extensive 

select the best music for your event. exhibition and teaching history. 

Elysia Chamber Players (800) 334-5212 Diana Shank MFA (617) 277-4108 

Work and Family 



Accountant Nonprofit auditing. 
Income taxes and financial planning 
for alternative couples. Lillian 
Gonzalez CPA, MST (617) 461-0098 



Eastern European Travel Experts 

Business incentive programs. Custom 
contacts. Exclusive cultural tours. 
Quo Vadis (617) 421-9494 



Accountant Small business start-up Elder Care Management Assessing, 

services. Individual and corporate planning, staffing, and monitoring in 

tax preparation. Non-profit auditing, the home, assisted living, or nursing 

Linda McCarthy CPA (508) 620-8805 home Creative Alliances (617) 731-1414 

Adoption Attorney Helped over Financial Aid Consultant Working 

500 children join families, including with parents of high school age 

my own. Fifteen years experience. children to maximize college awards. 

Herbert D. Friedman, Esq. (617)261-6000 Student Aid Advisors (617) 969-9020 

Couples Health Program Learn Geriatric Care Manager Planning 

proven-effective skills to break old gentle and dignified quality care for 

habits, resolve conflicts. 5 workshops, the elderly and their busy families. 

Janice Levine PhD (617) 863-5600 Suzanne ModigKani LICSW (617) 566-0926 



Check Writing and Health Claim 

management for elders. Home visits, 
tailored to personal needs. Bonded. 
Prime Life Assistance (617) 327-3300 



Psychologist Specialty in postpartum 
anxiety anddepressioa Women's issues 
across the lifespan. Dr. Ruth Lull PhD 
Acton and Burlington (617) 272-8505 



If you would like your uncommon resource to be considered for our pages, 

call Finally Found! (617)864-4357. 



14 



I 




Igor Stravinsky 

Concerto in E-flat for chamber orchestra, Dumbarton Oaks, 8.V.38 

Igor Stravinsky was born at Oranienbaum, Russia, on 
June 1 7, 1882, and died in New York on April 6, 1971. 
He composed his Concerto in E-flat on a commission from 
Mrs. Robert Woods Bliss, beginning work at the Chateau 
de Montoux, near Annemasse, France, in the spring of 1937, 
and completing it in Paris on March 29, 1938. Nadia Bou- 
langer conducted the first performance on May 8, 1938, at 
the Bliss family estate — "Dumbarton Oaks" — in Washington, 
D.C., in celebration of the thirtieth wedding anniversary of 
Mr. and Mrs. Bliss. The Boston Symphony has performed 
this work on just one previous occasion, in subscription con- 
certs under Colin Davis in October 1973. The score calls for 
one flute, one E-flat clarinet, one bassoon, two horns, three 
violins, three violas, two cellos, and two double basses. 

Although the official title of this work is "Concerto in E-flat," it is casually, and much 
more commonly, referred to by the distinctive title "Dumbarton Oaks," for the Wash- 
ington, D.C., estate where the work was performed. (Today Dumbarton Oaks is owned 
by Harvard University and is the university's Center for Byzantine Studies.) The title, 
as it appears on the score, was the result of negotiations between Stravinsky and his 
publisher Willy Strecker shortly after the premiere of the piece. After completing the 
music, Stravinsky corresponded with Strecker about the form that the dedication should 
take in the printed score, suggesting that he could write it in either French or English 
and that it could be reproduced in facsimile. Strecker replied, "If I know Americans, 
the French dedication is preferable." But Mrs. Bliss had other ideas. She would be hap- 
py to dispense with any dedication, but she wanted the work to be called "Dumbarton 
Oaks Concerto" after her property. And it had been suggested to Stravinsky by his col- 
laborator and friend Samuel Dushkin (the violinist for whom he had written several 
concert works including the Violin Concerto in D) that he might "tranquilly go on com- 
posing Dumbarton Oaks Concertos as Bach did his Brandenburg Concertos," since 
Mrs. Bliss intended to continue giving concerts at her estate, and she might become a 
long-term patron to the composer. But Strecker had a serious objection: 

Frankly, I do not like the title "Dumbarton Oaks Concerto." Bach did not call his 
concertos "Brandenburg Concertos": this title was attached to them gradually over 
the years. No one outside of America will understand the designation or be able 
to pronounce it, and stupid remarks may even by made about the name, since it 
resembles duck or frog sounds in French and German pronunciation. 

So Strecker suggested a compromise: give the work a formal title, "Concerto in E-flat," 
and add as a notation the place and date of the first performance: "Dumbarton Oaks, 
8.v.38" (that is, 8 May 1938). 

This added notation is a hint to the character of the piece, which is really a celebra- 
tory divertissement composed as a gift for a wedding anniversary. And Stravinsky's ref- 
erence to Bach's Brandenburg Concertos in his letter to Strecker was entirely appropri- 
ate, because the Dumbarton Oaks Concerto was, at least in its opening movement, ex- 
plicitly inspired by the Bach compositions, especially the Third. 

Here, as in so many places in Stravinsky's output, the past seems alive in the mind 
of the composer, not because he is imitating an older piece or style — anyone can do 
that — but because he has absorbed its essence and is recreating it in his own terms. 
Throughout his career Stravinsky assimilated the most diverse influences — from rag- 
time to twelve-tone serialism — without ever losing his own evident personality. And in 
the 1930s, particularly, and through the following decade, virtually all of Stravinsky's 

15 Week 18 



The 








BOSTON 
POPS 




'97 Season 



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music sprang from an encounter with or a reaction to some "foreign" influence. Stra- 
vinsky's heart and soul were Russian, and the essential core of his music came from 
a basis in Russian culture that was deep and rich (as Richard Taruskin has recently 
shown in a brilliant new large-scale study). But revolution and world war drove Stra- 
vinsky from his homeland; he was "deracinated," forced to live and work in a culture 
not his own. By the end of the 1930s, he had begun to acclimate himself to being a 
Frenchman when the same thing happened all over again, and he became, perforce, 
an American. So his works of those years, large and small, can be understood in part 
as reconnoiterings of the territory to see what is there and what he can do with it. And 
that territory ranged from classical ballet to the circus march, and from the Baroque 
concerto to the Beethovenian symphonic tradition. (As different as they may seem at 
first, the Dumbarton Oaks Concerto has links with the Symphony in C, Stravinsky's 
first "American" score, the next piece that he was to compose.) 

In any case, the character of Dumbarton Oaks was not difficult for him to choose, 
because the occasion for which it was composed was purely celebratory. The work is a 
modern equivalent to the kinds of brilliant entertainment music that a court composer 
would have been called upon to write two centuries earlier to celebrate thirty years of 
marriage of his duke or prince — only now the aristocrats were plutocrats. Three move- 
ments in the standard fast-slow-fast pattern were a foregone conclusion. Stravinsky's 
first theme is similar to the opening of Bach's Brandenburg Concerto No. 3, and his 
scoring likewise calls for three violins and three violas, yet another adumbration of 
Bach. All fifteen instruments are treated as soloists. The sonority is clear and bell-like, 
with occasional "added-note" dissonances, especially from the horn, to piquant effect. 
The first movement is predominantly polyphonic in texture, with characteristic brief 
motives intertwining and turning into a kind of fugue. The bustling rhythms, inspired 
by Baroque "beat-marking" patterns, become entirely Stravinskyan in their flexible 
irregularity. The slow movement is built of little wisps of tune or even simply of sound, 
growing to a shimmering texture with subdivided strings. The processional character of 
the finale does not prevent it from turning briefly into a fugato as well, though it no 
longer has much "Bachian" feel to it. The concerto is brief. Its three movements take, 
in all, only a dozen minutes, yet within that span Stravinsky packs rich polyphonic tex- 
tures and exhilarating wit. 

— Steven Ledbetter 




BOSTON LYRIC OPERA 



L'Elisir d'Amore 

Boston Lyric Opera presents 
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Wolfgang Ainade Mozart 

Piano Concerto No. 20 in D minor, K.466 




Joannes Chrisostomus Wolfgang Gottlieb Mozart, who 
began calling himself Wolfgango Amadeo about 1 770 
and Wolfgang Amade in 1 777, was born in Salzburg, 
Austria, on January 27, 1 756, and died in Vienna on 
December 5, 1791. He completed the D minor piano 
concerto on February 10, 1785, and was soloist in the 
first performance the very next day. Carl Bergmann 
led the first Americna performance on March 16, 1861, 
with the New York Philharmonic Society and soloist 
Richard Hoffman. The Boston Symphony Orchestra 
first performed this concerto in February 1886 with 
Mrs. H.H.A. Beach as soloist and Wilhelm Gericke con- 
ducting. Subsequent Boston Symphony performances 
have featured Vladimir de Pachmann (with Arthur 
Nikisch), Ossip Gabrilowitsch (Karl Muck and Ernst Schmidt); Myra Hess and Alfredo 
Casella (both with Pierre Monteux); Renee Longy Miquelle, Hortense Monath, and Mar- 
tha Baird (all with Serge Koussevitzky); Clara Haskil, Monique Haas, and Seymour 
Lipkin (Charles Munch); Rudolf Serkin (Erich Leinsdorf); Claude Frank (Jorge Mester); 
Lili Kraus, Murray Perahia, Cecile Licad, Andrds Schiff, and Maria Joao Pires (all with 
Seiji Ozawa, Licad s, in October 1983, being the most recent subscription performances); 
Veronica Jochum (Eugen Jochum), Alfred Brendel (Otmar Suitner), Emanuel Ax (Roger 
Norrington), Ivan Moravec (Mariss Jansons), Alicia de Larrocha (Charles Dutoit), and 
Mitsuko Uchida (the most recent Tanglewood performance, with Seiji Ozawa on July 9, 
1995). The orchestra consists of flute, two oboes, two bassoons, two horns, two trumpets, 
timpani, and strings. 

On February 14, 1785, Leopold Mozart sent his daughter Marianne, called Nannerl 
by the family, news of her famous younger brother in Vienna: "[I heard] a new and ex- 
cellent piano concerto by Wolfgang, where the copyist was still at work when we arrived, 
and your brother didn't even have time to play through the rondo because he had to 
supervise the copying operation." It was not a unique experience for Mozart: in April 
of the previous year, for example, he had given, to tumultuous applause, the premiere 
of his exceedingly difficult violin sonata in B-flat, K.454, with a violinist whom he had 
not met for a rehearsal, who had barely received her part in time for the concert, and 
with himself playing from sheets that were blank except for a few stenographic reminders. 

Testimony, all that, not just of Mozart's facility and confidence but as well to his pop- 
ularity in the years just after his move from Salzburg to Vienna in 1781. That populari- 
ty reached its crest in 1784-85. On March 3, 1784, he wrote to his father that he had 
had twenty-two concerts in thirty-eight days, adding, "I don't think that in this way I 
can possibly get out of practice." From this popularity grows the astonishing run of piano 
concertos that Mozart wrote in those years: eleven of them between February 1784 (K.449 
in E-flat) and March 1786 (K.488 in A and K.491 in C minor). What happened later 
tells an equally vivid story of the dip in Mozart's fortunes. In the remaining not quite 
six years of his life he wrote just three more piano concertos, the second of them for a 
journey to Frankfurt, the last for an appearance as supporting artist in a Vienna con- 
cert by someone else. 

K.466 is one of only two Mozart concertos in a minor key, and of the two it is the 
stormier. It does not surprise that the young Beethoven made a powerful impression as 
an interpreter of this piece when he moved to Vienna soon after Mozart's death, and he 
wrote for it a pair of superbly intelligent and powerfully expressive cadenzas that are 
still heard more often than any others. And during the nineteenth century, at a time 



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when Mozart was widely perceived as a gifted forerunner of Beethoven, the D minor 
concerto was the only one of his piano concertos to hold its place in the repertoire. 

It shows its temper instantly in an opening that is without theme, all atmosphere and 
gesture: violins and violas throb in agitated syncopations, most of their energy concen- 
trated on the rhythm, while the pitches at first change little, and low strings anticipate 
the beats with upward scurries of quick notes. A general crescendo of activity — the 
bass notes occur twice in each measure rather than just once, the violin melody becomes 
more active (that is, more like a melody), all the lines push toward higher registers — 
and the full orchestra enters with flashes of lightning to illumine the scene. Most of 
what follows in the next few minutes is informed more by pathos than by rage, the most 
affecting moment of all being reserved for the first entrance — with an almost new mel- 
ody over an already familiar accompaniment — -of the solo piano. And now the witty and 
serious play of conversation, of exchange of materials can begin, and the opportunity 
for the pianist to ravish with the plangency of simulated song or to dazzle with mettle- 
some traversal of brilliant passages. 

All these storms eventually recede in a pianissimo fascinatingly seasoned with the 
distant thud of drums and the low tones, so curiously hollow, of trumpets. The second 
movement, after this, is by intention mild. Mozart gives no tempo indication; neither 
does his designation "Romance" denote specific form as much as suggest a certain at- 
mosphere of gently serene songfulness. An interlude brings back the minor mode of the 
first movement and something of its storms, but this music is far more regular and to 
that degree less agitating. And in all its formality, Mozart's slow application of brakes 
as he approaches the return of his Romance melody is one of his most masterful strokes 
of rhythmic invention. The piano launches the finale, a feast of irregularities, ambigui- 
ties, surprises, and subtle allusions to the first movement. Its most enchanting feature 
is perhaps the woodwind tune that is first heard harmonically a bit off-center in F major; 
then in a delicious variant whose attempt to be serious about being in D minor is sub- 
verted by the coquettish intrusion of F-sharps and B-naturals from the world of D major; 
and again after the cadenza, now firmly in major and on the home keynote of D, deter- 
mined to lead the ebullient rush to the final double bar. 

— Michael Steinberg 

Now Program Annotator and Lecturer of the San Francisco Symphony and the New York 
Philharmonic, Michael Steinberg was the Boston Symphony Orchestra's Director of Publica- 
tions from 1976 to 1979. Oxford University Press has recently published a compilation of his 
program notes (including many written for the Boston Symphony) entitled The Symphony— 
A Listener's Guide. 



I IV A 



21 



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Wolfgang \:r. w Mozart 
Adagio and Fugue in C minor. K 

:.:.*■ . ' " " 

--.--.- : ,- — — __ , .- ..— -_• -;-._._. :ry _ .-- _ . ... •-- 

--;—. ■■ ;■- :~- :.:.:.-: \ :.:r- . :.;---■• — - .""-.- ~~ - - 
circumstances of the first performance are not knc 
--::.^' \: ~.:^~: -.;•-- _>--•- -...»■--; z< : •-:_-:- >■:-.:-■:. 
a tradition long established in Vtennc 

C —.:-.■:- A :..:*:■; :.-.: . r :.*:..- :- A :'>*—>■-.* ^ J . :.v 
:t- — . :-.:-- >-; _ _ : : - -_ ,\ ;;..-.-.-: ::z.-r . L -■ :.-..-.• 
V:.-;- ;- -:.'.. :<:: :.>:.:•-..> .>■■-. ~- _ _- r _ :~: J --"J. 

:.:...::->: :.->- ~.;y: --;--; »:..:-v-:r::.:" :- — ..:.-.:•:.-■ :~ 

.4/>rf/ 1962). Jorge Mester. and Stanislaw Skrouacz 

. -'/ — 

Ff-' :::.::':^:?:.i-'r?.: :ri:i; i_ ~ :::;-::_:- ~:~ _-- .1:: ;:-: .:~: r_.-~ :' :::.f:?ijM :- 
ir: : : : :: -_: / .--: "• : u:.~ ~f .:•?:-::- i : : -" -r ~_v./_ z "_ :;.: ' :■.- _ . \_ / i.r -i~ ' .~:z:. ::■">. 
from it what he needed, and passed on to the next piece or style. The miracle of Moza: 
though- is that all of the - :>m all ower Europe woe n that one 

extraordinary musical mind into a ang. - style: Mozartean. Mozar mature 

composer in his mid-twenties when he encountered the possibilities of counterpoint in 




:.~- —-_:■?: : :: /..- z 



pi. which h- ntered on a - 

These musical influences grabbed Mozart's attei 
and 1 784 he eomp- k without fim s 

with embeddec ns. The C minor fugue, 

achievement in th> 

which form - atalogue numb- 

to the piece. rewn: : _ - . and added an e 

a Baroque prelude. The piece has been published 
nination of the manuscript she s bat ] 

tra. since he caller, loncelir — in the plura 

line for the double bass, which would not. of < 
performance. 

.lowing the slow prelude, with its sharp I rhythms, the fugue begins :ha 

theme similar in profile to : gues in and the ' g of J.S. 

Bach. Mozart makes of tour deforce ot s :sal tev 

— S 



znd he learned of the dram a 

."._ ■ . :._"r "- '':::>- - - - 

red with an enthusiastic mu? - 

eluding: Messiah, to fill out the har- 
by the contm. -red 

n the mc lets - 1 in manu- 

_ 

ition fars 

genera _ as Moral - 

12 - later he retu 

xluetion in the style of 
as a work for - _ ]uartet. bu 

- 
\ — and near the end wrot irate 



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Igor Stravinsky 

Symphony in C 

Stravinsky began work on the Symphony in C in the 
autumn of 1938 in Paris, where he composed the first 
movement. He began the second movement at Sancell- 
moz in late March 1939, completing it in August. The 
third movement took form during the autumn and win- 
ter of 1 939-40, which the composer spent in Cambridge, 
Massachusetts. He composed the fourth movement in 
Beverly Hills, California, during the summer of 1940, 
completing the score on August 19. The title page bears 
the following dedication: "This symphony, composed to 
the Glory of God, is dedicated to the Chicago Symphony 
Orchestra on the occasion of the Fiftieth Anniversary of 
its existence." Stravinsky himself conducted the Chicago 
Symphony in the first performance, which took place on 
November 7, 1940. He also led the first Boston Symphony Orchestra performances — -first 
in Cambridge on January 16, 1941, and then in Symphony Hall on the two succeeding 
days — and repeated the work here again in January 1 944. The only other Boston Sym- 
phony performances were given by Erich Leinsdorf (including subscription performances 
in April 1969, the BSOs only Tanglewood performance on August 1 that same year, and 
the most recent subscription performances in January 1989) and Michael Tilson Thomas 
(in Boston and Brooklyn in October 1971). The score calls for two flutes and piccolo, two 
oboes, two clarinets in B-flat and A, two bassoons, four horns, two trumpets, three trom- 
bones and tuba, timpani, and strings. 

Stravinsky wrote a traditional symphony early in his career, when he was still study- 
ing with Rimsky-Korsakov, to whom the work was dedicated; it was the first work to 
which he gave an opus number. But then his music pursued a very different path from 
that of the concert hall. The phenomenal success of his three early ballets (The Fire- 
bird, Petrushka, and The Rite of Spring) led him to the theater rather than the concert 
hall for the bulk of his early works. The very word "symphony" came to mean some- 
thing distinctive in his work; his Symphonies of Wind Instruments was entirely sui 
generis, evoking the etymological meaning of the word "symphony" ("a playing togeth- 
er") without suggesting either a particular form or a particular genre. And the Sym- 
phony of Psalms, composed for the Boston Symphony Orchestra's fiftieth anniversary, 
is, despite its title, not a traditional symphony in any sense; it is likely, indeed, that 
Stravinsky chose the title he did simply because he had been commissioned to write 
a "symphonic" work. 

During the 1920s and '30s Stravinsky continued to compose more works for the the- 
ater than the concert hall, though his oeuvre also included the Octet for wind instru- 
ments, the Concerto for Piano and Winds, the Capriccio for piano and orchestra, the 
Violin Concerto in D, and the Dumbarton Oaks Concerto for chamber orchestra. These 
pieces, nestled between operas and ballets, revealed Stravinsky's increasing interest in 
the music of the eighteenth century, of Baroque and Classical composers from Lully to 
Haydn, whose music and culture he loved. Already while composing the ballet Pulcin- 
ella (1919-20) he had indulged in his fondness for the music of that era, reworking the 
typical harmonic and rhythmic gestures with economy and wit. 

The discovery of the eighteenth century as a compositional resource opened a period 
of nearly thirty fruitful years of working in a vein usually described as "neo-classical." 
During this time Stravinsky came to terms with traditional operatic gestures (in Oedipus 
Rex and even more in The Rakes Progress) and with the notion of the symphony, a 
genre he had avoided after completing his Opus 1. He finally recreated the symphonic 



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genre on his own terms with the Symphony in C and the Symphony in Three Movements. 

The impetus to write the symphony came from Mrs. Robert Woods Bliss, who offered 
Stravinsky a commission for a symphony to celebrate the fiftieth anniversary of the 
founding of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra. Stravinsky had already composed the 
Concerto in E-flat {Dumbarton Oaks) for the thirtieth wedding anniversary of Mr. and 
Mrs. Bliss, and he cheerfully accepted the commission. The period of composition proved 
to be one of the saddest times in Stravinsky's life. He began the new work in the fall 
of 1938, but while he was on a concert tour in Italy he learned that his older daughter 
Lyudmila had suddenly died of the "family disease," tuberculosis, in the sanatorium 
where his wife and younger daughter were also being treated. Only intense work on the 
new score allowed him in some measure to sublimate his grief. Three months later his 
wife Catherine died as well, and not long after that his mother. Stravinsky himself had 
been diagnosed as tubercular on a New York visit; he now decided to undergo treat- 
ment, spending five months at the sanatorium of Sancellmoz, where he composed the 
second movement of the symphony. 

The deaths of three close members of his family seemed to cut one of Stravinsky's 
ties to Europe, and the impending threat of war, combined with an invitation from Har- 
vard University to deliver the Charles Eliot Norton lectures at Harvard in the 1939-40 
academic year, persuaded him to think about permanent resettlement in America. He 
landed in New York at the end of September and went straight to Cambridge. There he 
composed the third movement of the symphony, delivered his lectures (which had, in 
fact, been largely ghost-written by the French writer and critic Alexis Roland-Manuel 
on the basis of conversations with Stravinsky, and which were later published under 
the title Poetics of Music), and took part in Walter Piston's composition classes. During 
the winter he traveled across the country for concert appearances, reunited with Vera 



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28 






■ 



de Bosset, his soulmate and lover since the 1920s, whom he was now free to many (the 
ceremony took place in Boston in March 1939), and determined to settle in southern 
California, where the air was dry and still salubrious. By the beginning of the summer 
of 1940, Stravinsky had purchased a house in Los Angeles and settled in to finish the 
first composition of his American years, the finale of the Symphony in C. This he fin- 
ished by mid-August, in time for the scheduled performance in Chicago. 

Though its composition straddles two continents (and though Stravinsky himself 
claimed to detect a marked variation in style between the first two and the last two 
movements), the Symphony in C is a remarkably cohesive work that casts the trenchant 
and jocular Stravinskyan eye on the traditional gestures of the classical symphony. The 
composer rather sarcastically ridiculed a critic who claimed to find Tchaikovsky's Fifth 
Symphony as the model for his work on the strength of having visited the composer at 
home and seen the Tchaikovsky score on Stravinsky's piano. What about all the Haydn 
and Mozart scores he had? Stravinsky wondered. 

Certainly many features of the work correspond to the pattern of the classical sym- 
phony: the arrangement into four movements, the character of each of the movements, 
the size of the orchestra and its general treatment, and the basic tonal relationships of 



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the four movements, centered respectively on C, F, G, and C. But Stravinsky's use of 
harmony is entirely his own. He consistently avoids the basic triadic harmonies that 
normally shape our perception of key. He rarely puts the root of the chord in the bass, 
where it gives the most solid effect (even the final chord of the Symphony is thus some- 
how tentative), and often leaves the root out entirely, requiring us to infer the key from 
the remaining notes of the chord. This we do easily enough from years of experience 
with the musical tradition of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, but it also allows 
Stravinsky the opportunity to play some tricks on us, cleverly frustrating our expecta- 
tions and leading us in different directions. Like a clever magician who convinces us 
that we have seen something that is not there, Stravinsky firmly asserts just enough 
clues to the key of C to suggest that he is writing "normal" tonal music when, in fact, 
he builds the structure in his own characteristic way. 

Stravinsky's score offers sly homage to the great tradition. Few listeners will fail to 
think of Beethoven's Fifth in the basic rhythmic figure of the first movement, and char- 
acteristic scales and dotted rhythms are part and parcel of the old symphonic language, 
here reasserted with witty energy. The symphony opens with a measure of eighth-notes 
reiterating the note B, which usher in the tiny motto that lies at the heart of the work. 



A second phrase of this introductory passage, beginning in the lower strings, contains 
another extended upbeat of repeated B's, in the characteristic eighth-note rhythm most 
familiar from Beethoven's Fifth Symphony, again building to a statement of the motto. 



^ 



£§ 



After a brief dialogue between winds and strings on this eighth-note pattern, the motto 
appears as a more drawn-out melody in the violins and cellos 




f 1 g i p 



J 



against running scales in the other parts. The scales and further versions of the motto 
build in energy to the statement of the principal theme in the flute, an airy melody into 
which the motto is repeatedly embedded. 



I 



H 



f f nrj f tf .r t i f% #r 



These few examples show some of the ways in which the three-note motto appears again 
and again throughout the movement (and in the finale as well). 

The first movement is based on the sonata-allegro form, though the harmonic tensions 
that play so vital a role in the symphonies of Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven are not 
part of Stravinsky's vision. His form grows in phrases carefully balanced against one 
another, with elements organized into a mathematical ratio of roughly 5:7 (some sections 
being roughly twenty-five measures in Length, others thirty-four). The coda at the end 
of the movement balances the introduction at the beginning, the recapitulation balances 
the exposition, and right at the (-enter of the arch is a "false reprise," a typical Haydn 



31 



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Are you looking for a change of pace before your next Boston Symphony concert? 
Would you like to enhance your knowledge of great composers and their music? What 
if a delightful meal were also included? We have just the ticket — a BSO "Supper 
Talk" or "Supper Concert." "Supper Talks" combine a buffet supper with an 
informative talk. "Supper Concerts" offer a chamber music performance by members 
of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, with supper served buffet-style afterwards. 



SUPPER CONCERT DATES 

Saturday, April 19; Tuesday, April 22 

Music of MOZART and SCHUMANN 

Sheila Fiekowsky and Nancy Bracken, violins; Robert Barnes, 

viola-, Ronald Feldman, cello; Judith Gordon, piano 

Thursday, April 24; Tuesday, April 29 
Music of GUBAIDULINA and BEETHOVEN 
Fenwick Smith, flute; Sarah Schuster Ericsson, harp; 
Catherine French, violin; Rachel Fagerburg, viola 

Thursday, May 1; Saturday, May 3 
Music of STRAVINSKY and TCHAIKOVSKY 
Aza Raykhtsaum and Harvey Seigel, violins; 
Burton Fine, viola; Martha Babcock, cello 



SUPPER TALK DATES 

Thursday March 27; Tuesday, April 1 
Music of QUANTZ, WILLIAMS, 
and CORIGLIANO 

Thursday, April 17; Friday, April 18 
Music of SCHUMANN and BRAHMS 

AH programs subject to change. 

For further information call 
the Supper Concerts information 
line at (617) 638-9328. 



TICKETS FOR ALL SUPPERS ARE PRICED AT $24 PER PERSON. 
FOR TICKETS CALL SYMPHONYCHARGE AT (617) 266-1200, OR VISIT THE 
SYMPHONY HALL BOX OFFICE, MONDAY THROUGH SATURDAY, 10AM-6PM. 





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trick. And as for the question of key, Stravinsky himself explained to a Boston inter- 
viewer (while he was still composing the work): 

My new Symphony is going to be classical in spirit, more concise in its form than 

Beethoven Instead of all the chords gravitating toward one final tonic chord, all 

notes gravitate toward a single note. Thus this Symphony will be neither a Sym- 
phony in C major nor a Symphony in C minor but simply a Symphony in C. 

The second and third movements are linked by an attacca, setting them off from the 
outer sections. The slow movement begins with a sonority characteristic of much Baroque 
music — solo oboe with strings. But the oboe and the first violin have an unusual dia- 
logue, each of them playing what is at heart the same melody, but with different deco- 
rations or sudden shifts of octave to highlight one instrument or the other. The ear can 
never quite decide which is the leading instrument and which the accompaniment; 
their relationship changes constantly. A faster middle section is followed by an abbre- 
viated restatement of the opening, dying away in a brief duet of oboe and bassoon. 

The last oboe figure is immediately repeated, nearly three octaves lower, in the cel- 
los and basses, to begin the third movement. The first two movements were surprising- 
ly un-Stravinskyan in one respect: the meter remained the same virtually throughout 
each movement. But in the third movement, a Stravinskyan scherzo, the composer com- 
pensates for his earlier forbearance. The meter changes frequently, and the rush of 
events carries us headlong. A particularly delicious moment comes in a passage for 
solo bassoon, accompanied by trombones, staccato. The jaunty, leaping bassoon part 
came to Stravinsky, he reported, "with the neon glitter of the Californian boulevards 
from a speeding automobile." 

The last movement opens with a dark introduction, with a newly invented orchestral 
color of low bassoons, horns, and trombones. This offers oblique suggestions of the 
opening motto. These become more explicit once the main portion of the movement 
gets underway, and before the onrushing development has run its course the motto 
returns, full and clear. The very close of the symphony is another of those impressive, 
hieratic apotheoses, like the one that ended the Symphony of Psalms — a ritual march 
sustaining the complex of tonic and dominant chords to bring the two halves of the work 
together. 

— S.L. 



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Stravinsky is without any doubt the best-documented composer of the twentieth century. 
Eric Walter White has produced a catalogue of Stravinsky's output with analyses of every 
work, prefaced by a short biography, in Stravinsky: The Composer and his Works (Univer- 
sity of California). The most convenient brief survey of his life and works is White's Stra- 
vinsky article in The New Grove (with a work-list by Jeremy Noble); this has been re- 
printed in The New Grove Modern Masters: Bartok, Hindemith, Stravinsky (Norton paper- 
back). The most important new Stravinsky publication in decades is Richard Taruskin's 
extraordinary two-volume study Stravinsky and the Russian Traditions: A Biography of 
the Works through Mavra (University of California). Though it runs nearly 1700 pages, 
it takes Stravinsky only to the early 1920s — roughly the first fifteen years of his career 
— and yet it probes deeply into areas that were previously completely unknown or mis- 
understood. Taruskin places the man and the early "Russian" work in the context of the 
Russian culture in which he grew up and against which he often fought. It will take years 
to absorb all the new insights that this book offers. Probably the best one-volume study 
of Stravinsky's music is Stephen Walsh's The Music of Stravinsky (Oxford paperback). 
The short volume by Francis Routh in the Master Musicians series is informative (Little- 



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35 






field paperback), though it suffers from the standardized format of the series, which deals 
with the works by genre in individual chapters — less useful in this case, since Stravin- 
sky's development often involved work on several different types of music in close prox- 
imity. The large-scale (and large-format) volume Stravinsky in Pictures and Documents 
(Simon and Schuster) by Vera Stravinsky and Robert Craft is indispensable, incomplete, 
undigested, fascinating — a cornucopia of material, confusingly organized, but with a 
wealth of detail about some subjects while skimming over others. Primary source mate- 
rial can also be found in the three volumes of Stravinsky letters, edited by Robert Craft 
(Knopf). They tell more about Stravinsky the businessman than Stravinsky the artist, 
but they are filled with fascinating things nonetheless. Craft has edited two further vol- 
umes that are essentially coffee table books, full of photographs and reminiscence, but 
by no means devoid of interest, particularly for the many reproductions of Stravinsky 
manuscripts (sometimes, in the case of short works, a complete facsimile). Igor and 
Vera Stravinsky is the more personal of the volumes, illustrating his social surroundings 
and tracing the loving fifty-year relationship of the composer with the woman who be- 
came his second wife. A Stravinsky Scrapbook, 1940-1971 deals with the professional 
aspects of the composer's American years. Boris Asaf'yev's A Book About Stravinsky, 
written in Russian (under the pseudonym Igor Glebov) and published in Leningrad in 



Dinner, Parking 

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"Symphony Express" shuttle service 
Tuesday and Thursday. Just show us your 
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1929, much later translated into English by Richard F. French and published in this 
country (UMI Research Press), is a valuable view of his early work from the vantage 
point of mid-career. Though the book obviously cannot deal with any of Stravinsky's 
later works, it is full of enlightening analytical commentary on all of the works up to 
the instrumental compositions of the mid-1920s, to which is appended a short added 
chapter dealing with Stravinsky's return to the theater in Oedipus Rex, Apollo, and The 
Fairy s Kiss. Since Stravinsky's style had a very distinct and recognizable personality 
throughout his life, despite the frequent surface changes evident in his music, the rich- 
ness of observation in this book explains a good deal about the composer and his work 
even beyond its cutoff date. Recent issues in our view of Stravinsky are treated in Con- 
fronting Stravinsky, edited by Jann Pasler (University of California), the papers read 
at a centennial conference. There are two essential discussions of the Symphony in C. 
Edward T. Cone's "The Uses of Convention: Stravinsky and His Models," in Stravinsky: 
A New Appraisal of His Work, edited by Paul Henry Lang (Norton paperback), first point- 
ed out the significance of the 5:7 ratios in the structure of the opening movement. A 
further elaboration of that point, extended to the entire symphony, appears in an article 
by B.M. Williams, "Time and the Structure of Stravinsky's Symphony in C," in The 
Musical Quarterly for July 1973, a valuable but technically detailed article that really 
requires the reader to follow its argument with a score and a recording at hand. 

Charles Dutoit has recorded the Dumbarton Oaks Concerto with the Montreal Sinfoni- 
etta (London, with Apollo, the Concerto in D for strings, and Danses concertantes). Chris- 
topher Hogwood's recording with the St. Paul Chamber Orchestra also includes Pulcin- 
ella, another eighteenth-century-flavored score, and is filled out with some of the origi- 
nal works Stravinsky borrowed for use in the latter (London). Robert Craft's recording 
with the Orchestra of St. Luke's (in the fourth volume of a series of new recordings of 
many Stravinsky works) contains many other scores of his American period, including 
the ballet Agon, delightful small pieces like the Circus Polka, Scherzo a la Russe and 
Eight Instrumental Miniatures, and the more serious Scenes de Ballet and Canonic Vari- 
ations on Vom Himmel hoch (MusicMasters). 

The Symphony in C has enjoyed a number of fine recordings. The composer's own 
performance with the CBC Symphony will always have a historical significance, even 
though other conductors may get more out of the music (CBS). A longtime favorite of 
mine, by Charles Dutoit with the Orchestre de la Suisse Romande and coupled with the 
Symphony in Three Movements, has disappeared from the catalogue (London). Michael 
Tilson Thomas leads the London Symphony Orchestra in performances of both sympho- 
nies plus the Symphony of Psalms (Sony Classical). Vladimir Ashkenazy conducts the 
Berlin Radio Symphony in the two symphonies and the Symphonies of Wind Instruments 
(London). 

The newest Mozart biography is something different: Maynard Solomon's Mozart: A 
Life (Harper Collins) follows his highly regarded Beethoven in taking an entirely fresh 
look at a thrice-familiar master, questioning received opinions, analyzing sources often 
overlooked, and, in particular, bringing a perceptive psychological analysis to bear on 
the vital question of Mozart and his father. Psychobiography often runs the risk of veer- 
ing into sheer invention, but Solomon employs the form as well as it has ever been used, 
and no account of Mozart from now on will be able to avoid the issues it raises, though 
not everyone will want to follow him in laying many of the problems of Mozart's life so 
strongly at the door of his father Leopold. Stanley Sadie's fine Mozart article in The New 
Grove has been published separately (Norton paperback); Sadie is also the author of 
Mozart, a convenient brief life-and-works survey with nice pictures (Grossman paper- 
back). Alfred Einstein's classic Mozart: The Man, the Music is still worth knowing (Ox- 
ford paperback). In many respects the most informative biography of Mozarl — though 
it covers only the last ten years of his life — is Volkmar Braunbehrens' Mozart in Vienna, 
1781-1791 , which convincingly lays to rest many myths about the composer while 



* » 



37 



Week 18 




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Saturday 12-6; and from one hour before 

each concert through intermission. 




BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 



38 






sketching far more effectively than previous writers the milieu in which he worked (Har- 
per Perennial paperback). H.C. Robbins Landon has also covered the same ground in 
several volumes devoted to Mozart in Vienna, to his final year, and to Vienna itself dur- 
ing the time Mozart was there. The Mozart Compendium: A Guide to Mozart s Life and 
Music, edited by H.C. Robbins Landon (Schirmer Books), is a first-rate single-volume 
reference work for the Mozart lover, filled with an extraordinary range of information, 
including things it might never have occurred to you to look up, but which you'll be 
delighted to know. A distinguished roster of specialists writes about the historical back- 
ground of Mozart's life, the musical world in which Mozart lived, his social milieu and 
personality, and his opinions on everything from religion and reading matter to sex and 
other composers. In addition, there are entries for all of Mozart's works with basic infor- 
mation regarding their composition, performance, publication, location of manuscripts, 
and special features (such as nicknames or borrowed tunes). Finally, a discussion of 
the reception of Mozart's music, performance practices, myths and legends about Mozart, 
Mozart in literature, and an evaluation of the biographies, analytical studies, and edi- 
tions of Mozart's music caps a remarkable book. The concept of the book proved so 
successful — detailed and scholarly for the specialist, wide-ranging, yet accessible for 
the general music-lover — that the same model has been followed for similar volumes 
devoted to Beethoven and Wagner. Any serious consideration of Mozart's music must 
include Charles Rosen's splendid study The Classical Style, with its insightful treatment 
of the piano concertos (Norton paperback). Cuthbert Girdlestone's Mozart and his Piano 
Concertos contains much information rather buried in decoratively elegant descriptions 
(Dover paperback). The Mozart Companion, edited by H.C. Robbins Landon and Don- 
ald Mitchell (Norton paperback), contains two major chapters on the concertos: Fried- 
rich Blume discusses their sources, Robbins Landon their musical origin and develop- 
ment. Philip Radcliffe's Mozart Piano Concertos is a brief contribution to the useful 
BBC Music Guides series (University of Washington paperback). 

Recommended recordings of Mozart's Piano Concerto No. 20 include Alfred Brendel's 
with Neville Marriner and the Academy of St. Martin in the Fields (Philips, with the 
Concerto No. 24 in C minor); Murray Perahia's as both soloist and conductor with the 
English Chamber Orchestra (CBS, with the Concerto No. 27 in B-flat); and Artur Schna- 
bel's with George Szell and the New York Philharmonic (Music & Arts, recorded live in 
1944; with the Concerto No. 17 in G). If you go for historical instruments and approach- 
es, Steven Lubin as soloist and conductor with the Mozartean Players (Arabesque, with 
the Concerto No. 23 in A) or Malcolm Bilson with the English Baroque Soloists conduct- 
ed by John Eliot Gardiner (Deutsche Grammophon, with the Concerto No. 21 in C) are 
good choices. 

The Adagio and Fugue in C minor, K.546, can be found in both orchestral and cham- 
ber performances. The most readily accessible of the former is that by Neville Marriner 
with the Academy of St. Martin in the Fields (Philips, with Eine kleine Nachtmusik, the 
Toy Symphony once attributed to Haydn, and the Pachelbel Canon). The most readily 
accessible of the chamber version is a recording by Gidon Kremer, Karen Phillips, Kim 
Kashkashian, and Yo-Yo Ma (CBS, with Schubert's String Quartet No. 15 in G). 

— S.L. 












39 



Week 18 



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Hans Graf 

Born in Austria, Hans Graf is music director of the Calgary Phil- 
harmonic Orchestra. Mr. Graf studied conducting in Austria and 
Russia and attended the master classes of Franco Ferrara, Sergiu 
Celibidache, and Arvid Jansons. In 1979 he won first prize at the 
Karl Bohm Competition. Mr. Graf is known internationally for his 
work as music director of the Mozarteum Orchestra of Salzburg from 
1984 to 1994, music director of Salzburg's Landestheater, and music 
director of the Orchestra National de Euskadi in San Sebastian, 
Spain. He has appeared as guest conductor with the major orches- 
tras of Boston, Dallas, Detroit, Milwaukee, and Pittsburgh, the Vienna 
Philharmonic, the Vienna Symphony, the Gewandhaus Orchestra of Leipzig, the Orchestre 
National de France, the NHK Symphony of Tokyo, the Leningrad Philharmonic, and the 
Israel Philharmonic. He has also appeared at major international festivals, including Aspen, 
Lincoln Center's Mostly Mozart Festival, Aix-en-Provence, Bregenz, the Maggio Musicale 
Fiorentino, and the Savonlinna Festival in Finland. In addition he has conducted numer- 
ous opera productions, including Wagner's Der Ring des Nibelungen, Strauss's Ariadne auf 
Naxos, Elektra, and Der Rosenkavalier, Janacek's Jenufa, Berg's Wozzeck, Beethoven's 
Fidelio, Verdi's Otello, and all the major Mozart operas, as well as Leonard Bernstein's Mass. 
Since first conducting the Vienna State Opera in 1981, Mr. Graf has appeared at other major 
houses including Berlin, Munich, and Paris. His recordings on EMI, Erato, JVC, and Capric- 
cio include the complete symphonies of Mozart, Zemlinsky's opera Es war einmal, and var- 
ious concertos, arias, and other works. Mr. Graf made his Boston Symphony debut with an 
all-Mozart program in March 1995. 




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42 




Leif Ove Andsnes 

Pianist Leif Ove Andsnes was born in Karmoy, Norway, in 1970. He 
made his North American orchestral debut in 1990 with the Cleve- 
land Orchestra under Neeme Jarvi's direction at the Blossom Festi- 
val, subsequently appearing with the Chicago Symphony, the Los 
Angeles Philharmonic, the San Francisco, Detroit, St. Louis, Toronto, 
Montreal, and Baltimore symphony orchestras, and the Cleveland 
Orchestra at Severance Hall. Having made his Boston Symphony 
debut at Tanglewood and a return appearance at Ravinia last sum- 
mer, Mr. Andsnes makes debut appearances in 1996-97 with the 
New York Philharmonic and the Philadelphia Orchestra. Recital 
appearances bring him to New York, Washington, D.C., Chicago, Los Angeles, San Francis- 
co. Toronto, and Quebec. One of Europe's most highly regarded young pianists, Mr. Andsnes 
appears regularly with the leading orchestras and in recital in such major centers as Lon- 
don, Paris, Berlin, Vienna, Amsterdam, and Prague. In 1992 he made his debut with the 
Berlin Philharmonic and his first appearance at the Proms in London with the BBC Phil- 
harmonic. He returned to the Proms in 1995 with the Philharmonia, in a performance broad- 
cast live by BBC Television; in the 1996 Proms he performed Rachmaninoff's Piano Con- 
certo No. 3. In November 1996 he undertook a major tour of Japan and the Far East with 
Mariss Jansons and the Oslo Philharmonic. Earlier tours had taken him to Australia with 
the ABC Orchestras in the summer of 1994, and to Austria and Germany with the Danish 
Radio Symphony Orchestra in November 1995. In February 1996 he made his concerto 
debut in Paris with the Orchestre National de France. Also a great chamber music enthusi- 
ast, he is artistic director of the Risor Chamber Music Festival. Mr. Andsnes records for 
Virgin Classics; his releases include the Grieg and Liszt piano concertos, Rachmaninoff's 
Piano Concerto No. 3, solo works by Janacek, the three Chopin sonatas, solo music of Grieg, 
the Brahms and Schumann works for viola and piano with Lars Anders Tomter, a solo Niel- 
sen recording, and a chamber music disc with violinist Christian Tetzlaff. Future releases 
include solo piano music of Schumann and Szymanowski's Sinfonia concertante with Simon 
Rattle and the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra. Leif Ove Andsnes began playing 
piano at ten and in 1986 entered the Bergen Music Conservatory, where he studied with 
Jiri Hlinka. His numerous awards include the Hindemith Prize (Frankfurt 1987), the Levin 
Prize (Bergen 1988), the Norwegian Music Critics Prize (Oslo 1988), and the Grieg Prize 
(Bergen 1990). His recording of Janacek piano works was awarded the Deutsche Schallplatt- 
enkritik prize, and in November 1992 he received the Dorothy B. Chandler Performing Arts 
Award in Los Angeles. Mr. Andsnes makes his BSO subscription series debut this week. 



I 

■ 

H 






Boston Symphony Orchestra concertmaster Malcolm Low*' performs on 

a Stradivarius violin loaned to the orchestra hy Lisa, Nicole, and Wanda licindorf 

in memory of their brother, Mark Rcindorf. 



43 




at inspired your love 
of classical music? 




I'd lilta w Juppu. 



Uu 



\J (J xifuiiiiiL If nil 



Enclosed is my check for $ 



payable to the Boston Symphony Annual 
Fund. (FriendS benefit* begin at $50.) 

Please send your contribution to Daniel P. Breen, Director 
of the Boston Symphony Annual Fund, Symphony Hall 
Boston, MA 02115. A portion of your gift may be tax- 
deductible. For information, please call (617) 638-9251. 



Was it a toy, or even a recording 
that first inspired you? For some 
of us it was the Symphony itself. 
Now you can help inspire new 
listeners with a gift to the BSO's 
Annual Fund. Through your 
support, the BSO will continue 
to be accessible to the entire com- 
munity thanks to our discounted 
rush ticket program, and students 
will experience live performance 
for the first time at our Youth 
Concerts. Help the BSO keep its 
strong tradition of world-class 
performances and , ^ m 

educational and .^^¥s^ 

training programs SftfTTfphOTTy 
alive. Send your /\nTTUcU ; 

gift today. AFUT1< 



^y - 



please clip and mail 



PHONE (Indicate home or business) 



ADDRESS 



CITY 



STATE 



IV 

- 






I 

f ■ 







KEEP GREAT MUSIC ALIVE 



The Higginson Society 

The Boston Symphony Orchestra is grateful to the 
following individuals for their generous support during 
the 1995-96 season. These patrons have each donated 
$1,800 or more to the Boston Symphony Annual Fund. 

Annual Fund gifts are unrestricted and are applied 

directly to the Orchestra's operating budget. This roster 

acknowledges contributions received between 

September 1, 1995, and August 31, 1996. 

Annual Fund Contributors 




Patrons 
$10,000+ 



Mr. and Mrs. 
Mr. and Mrs. 
Mr. and Mrs. 
Mr. and Mrs. 
Mr. and Mrs. 
Mr. and Mrs. 

Crozier, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. 
Mr. and Mrs. 

Darling, Jr. 
William and 
Mr. and Mrs. 
Mr. and Mrs. 



David B. Arnold, Jr. 
J. P. Barger 
Peter A. Brooke 
Irving S. Brudnick 
Julian Cohen 
William M. 

Lewis S. Dabney 
Nelson J. 

Deborah Elfers 
John H. Fitzpatrick 
Richard M. Fraser 



Sponsors 
$5,000 - $9,999 



Mr. and Mrs. Harlan E. Anderson 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard Bartley 
Mr. and Mrs. Eugene H. Clapp II 
Mr. John F. Cogan, Jr. and 

Ms. Mary L. Cornille 
Mr. and Mrs. Nader F. 

Darehshori 
Tamara P. and Charles H. Davis II 
Deborah B. Davis 
Mr. and Mrs. J. Richard Fennell 
Mr. and Mrs. Dean W. Freed 
Mr. and Mrs. Ulf B. Heide 



Fellows 

$2,500 - $4,999 



Mrs. Weston W. Adams 

Joel B. Alvord 

Mr. and Mrs. James B. Auks 

Prof, and Mrs. Rae I). Anderson 

Donald P. Babsori 

Mr. and Mrs. David Bakalar 

Mr. and Mrs. John F. Beard 

Nancy and Mark Belsk) 



Mrs. Kenneth J. Germeshausen 

Mr. and Mrs. Francis W. Hatch 

Joseph Hearne and Jan Brett 

Bayard and Julie Henry 

Ms. Susan Morse Hilles 

Mr. and Mrs. George H. Kidder 

Mr. and Mrs. Allen Z. 

Kluchman (d) 
Mr. and Mrs. R. Willis Leith, Jr. 
Mrs. August R. Meyer 
Mr. and Mrs. Nathan R. Miller 
Mrs. Olney S. Morrill 



Mr. and Mrs. Joe M. Henson 
Ms. Marilyn Brachman Hoffman 
Mrs. Ellen O. Jennings 
Mr. and Mrs. George Krupp 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles P. Lyman 
Mr. and Mrs. John F Magee 
Ms. Elizabeth E. Meyer 
Mr. and Mrs. John D. Montgomery 
Mr. and Mrs. William B. 

Moses, Jr. 
Mrs. Robert B. Newman 
Ms. Edith H. Overly 



Gabriella and Leo Beranek 
Lynda Schubert Bodman 
Mr. and Mrs. John M. Bradley 
Mr. and Mrs. J. Gary Burkhead 
Dr. and Mrs. Dexter L. Burley 
Mr. and Mrs. Stanford 

Calderwood 
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Can- 



Mr. and Mrs. William J. Poorvu 
Mrs. George R. Rowland 
Ms. Ruth Russel Smith 
Mr. and Mrs. Ray Stata 
Mr. and Mrs. William F. 

Thompson 
Mrs. Richard Wengren 
Henry and Joan T. Wheeler 
Mrs. Joan D. Wheeler 
Mr. and Mrs. E. S. Wood 
Dr. and Mrs. Nicholas T. Zervas 
Anonymous (3) 



Mrs. Andrew J. Palmer 

Mrs. Hollis Plimpton, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Francis P. Sears, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Carl Shapiro 

Ms. Eileen C. Shapiro 

Mrs. Anson P. Stokes 

Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Stoneman 

Mr. and Mrs. William 0. Taylor 

Mrs. John J. Wilson 

Mrs. H. Melvin Young 

Anonymous (2) 



1 



Mr. and Mrs. Marshall N. Carter 
Mrs. Florence C. Chesterton- 

Nonis 

Charles Christenson 

Dean and Mrs. Robert C. Clark 
Dr. and Mrs. Stewart II. Clifford 
Ms. Mary Hart Cogan 
Mr. and Mrs. Abram T. Collier 



45 



WELCH & FORBES 

Creative investment management 
and fiduciary services since 1838. 



Kenneth S. Safe, Jr. 
John K. Spring 
John Lowell 
Thomas N. Dabney 
V. William Efthim 
Guido R. Perera, Jr. 




Richard Olney III 
Arthur C. Hodges 
Richard F. Young 
M. Lynn Brennan 
John H. Emmons, Jr. 
Charles T. Haydock 
Oliver A. Spalding 



Old City Hall, 45 School Street, Boston, MA 02108 617/5234635 



More Choices 





Classics in the Morning 

with Ron Delia Chiesa, weekdays at 8am 

Classical Performances 

with Richard Knisely, weekdays at 12noon 

Boston Symphony Orchestra 

with Ron Delia Chiesa, 
Fridays at 1pm, October-April 

Morning pro musica 

with Robert J. Lurtsema, weekends at 7am 

Sound 8 Spirit 

with Ellen Kushner, Sundays at 12noon 

Schickele Mix 

with Peter Schickele, Sundays at 1pm 

Music Through the Night 

with Jeff Esworthy and Tom Crann, 
Monday-Thursday from 12-5am 







46 






Mr. and Mrs. William H. 

Congleton 
Mr. and Mrs. John L. Cooper 
Mr. and Mrs. Bigelow Crocker, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Stanton W. Davis 
Dr. and Mrs. Charles C. 

Dickinson III 
Mr. and Mrs. Eugene B. Doggett 
Mr. and Mrs. Ed Eskandarian 
John Gamble 
Dr. and Mrs. Arthur Gelb 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert R. Glauber 
Prof, and Mrs. Ray A. Goldberg 
Mr. and Mrs. Macey J. Goldman 
Mr. and Mrs. John L. Grandin, Jr. 
Mrs. James H. Grew 
Mr. and Mrs. James B. 

Hangstefer 
Mrs. Robert G. Hargrove 
Dr. and Mrs. George Hatsopoulos 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert P. 

Henderson 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard D. Hill 
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Hyman 
Ms. Emily C. Hood 



Members 
$1,800- $2,499 

Mr. and Mrs. William F. 

Achtmeyer 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert W. Adams 
Mr. and Mrs. Vernon R. Alden 
Mr. and Mrs. Alvin B. Allen 
Mr. and Mrs. William F. Allen, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Walter Amory 
Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth A. 

Anderson 
Mr. and Mrs. Stephen H. Anthony 
Mrs. Elsie J. Apthorp 
Marshall and Patricia Armstrong 
Mrs. Neil R. Ayer 
Mr. and Mrs. Martin Begien 
Mr. and Mrs. George W Berry 
Mr. and Mrs. Jordan Birger 
Peter M. Black 

Mr. and Mrs. William L. Boyan 
W Walter Boyd 
Mrs. James W Bradley 
Mrs. Alexander H. Bright 
Mr. and Mrs. Paul P. Brountas 
Mrs. Charles D. Brown 
Mr. and Mrs. William L. Brown 
Mr. and Mrs. Pierce B. Browne 
Catherine and Paul Buttenwieser 
Mr. and Mrs. Harold Caro 
Dr. Kevin J. Clancy 
Mr. and Mrs. James F. Geary 
Kenneth W. Cohen 



Mr. and Mrs. Ronald J. Jackson 
Mr. and Mrs. Bela T. Kalman 
Mrs. George I. Kaplan 
Martin and Wendy Kaplan 
Ms. Susan B. Kaplan and 

Mr. Ami Trauber 
Rita J. and Stanley H. Kaplan 

Foundation and Family 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert D. King 
Mr. and Mrs. Gordon F. Kingsley 
Mr. and Mrs. David Knight 
Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Chet 

Krentzman 
Mr. and Mrs. John M. Kucharski 
Barbara Lee 

Mr. and Mrs. Stephen R. Levy 
Anne Lovett and Stephen 

Woodsum 
Mr. and Mrs. Harry L. Marks 
Mr. and Mrs. Wells Morss 
Mrs. Richard P. Nyquist 
Dr. and Mrs. Oglesby Paul 
May and Daniel Pierce 
Mrs. Paul Pigors 
Mrs. Daphne Brooks Prout 



Mrs. I. W Colburn 

Mr. and Mrs. Aaron H. Cole 

Mr. and Mrs. Marvin A. Collier 

Johns H. Congdon 

Mr. and Mrs. E. Raymond Corey 

Dr. and Mrs. Stephen H. Crandall 

Mr. and Mrs. Albert M. 

Creighton, Jr. 
Mrs. Harry King Cross 
Mr. and Mrs. Ronald C. Curhan 
Sarah H. Davis 
Mrs. F. Stanton Deland, Jr. 
Phyllis Dohanian 
Mitchell Dong and 

Robin LaFoley Dong 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert W. Doran 
Francis A. Doyle 
Dr. Richard W Dwight 
Mr. and Mrs. Goetz B. Eaton 
Mrs. Otto Eckstein 
Mrs. Priscilla Endicott 
Mrs. Harris Fahnestock 
K. H. Fairbend 
Ms. (Catherine Fanning and 

Mr. Amos C. Mathews 
Mr. and Mrs. Steven S. Feinberg 
Nancy J. Fitzpatrick and 

Lincoln Kussel 
Dr. and Mis. Henry I.. Foster 
Stefan M. Freudenberger 



Mr. and Mrs. Peter C. Read 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. Remis 

Mr. and Mrs. Jerome Rosenfeld 

Mrs. Benjamin Rowland 

Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Rubin 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Saltonstall 

Mr. and Mrs. Thornton Stearns 

Mr. and Mrs. Ira Stepanian 

Miss Elizabeth B. Storer 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Swiniarski 

Mrs. Nathan B. Talbot 

Mrs. Charles H. Taylor 

Mrs. David D. Terwilliger 

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Thorne, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. John A. Tillinghast 

Stephen Tilton 

Jonathan B. Treat II 

William W Treat 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles H. Watts II 

Stephen and Dorothy Weber 

Miss Christine White 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas H. P. 

Whitney 
Mrs. Nancy P. Williams 



Mr. and Mrs. Thomas J. 

Galligan, Jr. 
Dr. and Mrs. Donald B. Giddon 
Ms. Pamela Ormsbee Giroux 
Arthur S. Goldberg 
Carol R. Goldberg and 

Avram J. Goldberg 
Mr. and Mrs. Jordan L. Golding 
Mr. Mark R. Goldweitz 
Ms. Linda Goodman 
Mrs. Haskell R. Gordon 
Mrs. Harry N. Gorin 
Martin Gottlieb 

Mr. and Mrs. Daniel S. Gregory 
David and Harriet Griesinger 
Mrs. Harold K. Gross 
Dr. and Mrs. Jerome H. Grossman 
Mr. and Mrs. Henry R. Guild, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Graham Gund 
Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Haas 
Ellen and John Harris 
Mr. and Mrs. Harry R. Hauser 
Mr. and Mrs. Noah T. Herndon 
Mrs. Richard H. Higjuns 
Mrs. Louise P. Hook 
Mrs. Harrison I). Ilorblil 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles B. Housen 
Mr. and Mrs. William \\ I lowells 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles A. Hubbard 
Mr. and Mrs. F. Donald Hudson 






■ 



47 



Higginson Society Membership continued 



Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Hyman 

Mrs. Joanie V. Ingraham 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Jaffe 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul Jameson 

Mrs. S. Charles Kasdon 

Joan Bennett Kennedy 

Mr. and Mrs. Seth A. Klarman 

Ms. Virginia B. Kleinrock 

Mason J. 0. Klinck 

William and Elaine Kopans 

Dr. and Mrs. Arthur R. Kravitz 

Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin H. Lacy 

Mr. and Mrs. David L. Landay 

Mr. and Mrs. Roger Landay 

Dr. and Mrs. William J. Landes 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis E. Lataif 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert A. Lawrence 

Mr. and Mrs. Maurice Lazarus 

Mr. and Mrs. Hart D. Leavitt 

Mr. and Mrs. David S. Lee 

Mr. and Mrs. Irving Levy 

Emily S. Lewis 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward H. Linde 

Graham Atwell Long 

Diane H. Lupean 

Mrs. Victor A. Lutnicki 

Ms. Anna L. Lyon 

Barbara Jane Macon 

Mrs. Olivia A. Manice 

Dr. Theodore Marier 

Mr. and Mrs. Satoru Masamune 

Dr. and Mrs. John D. Matthews 

Dr. and Mrs. Jeremiah P. 

McDonald 
Mr. and Mrs. William F. 

Meagher, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. Millar 
Mr. and Mrs. Jeffrey Millman 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard P. Morse 
Mr. and Mrs. Michael S. Scott 

Morton 



Dr. and Mrs. Gordon S. Myers 

Pete and Ginny Nicholas 

Mr. and Mrs. Andrew L. Nichols 

Mr. and Mrs. Rodger P. Nordblom 

Gerald O'Neil 

Mr. and Mrs. Vincent M. O'Reilly 

Mrs. Andrew Oliver 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis F. Orsatti 

Mr. and Mrs. Stephen D. Paine 

Gary M. Palter 

Joseph and Susan Paresky 

Dr. and Mrs. Eliot J. Pearlman 

Mrs. Thorn Pendleton 

Mr. and Mrs. John A. Perkins 

Nancy Perkins and John Arata 

Mr. and Mrs. David R. Pokross 

Dr. and Mrs. John T Potts 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Prouty 

Mr. and Mrs. Millard H. Pryor, Jr. 

Ms. Sally Quinn 

Mr. and Mrs. Irving W. Rabb 

Mr. and Mrs. David 

Rockefeller, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. William C. 

Rousseau 
Dr. Jordan S. Ruboy 
Mrs. George Lee Sargent 
Carol Scheifele-Holmes and 

Ben Holmes 
Mr. and Mrs. Marvin G. Schorr 
Mrs. Paul A. Schmid, Sr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Maurice Segall 
Dr. Bernard and Mrs. Carol 

Selland 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles M. Shane 
Dr. Jerome H. Shapiro and 

Meredith Pearlstein Shapiro 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Shenton 
Mr. and Mrs. Malcolm L. 

Sherman 
Mrs. Jeanette S. Simon 



Mrs. Donald B. Sinclair 
Richard and Susan Smith 
Peggy Snow 

Mr. and Mrs. Jeffrey P. Somers 
Mrs. Irma Mann Stearns and 

Dr. Norman Stearns 
Mr. and Mrs. Herbert B. Stern 
Mr. and Mrs. Howard H. 

Stevenson 
Mr. and Mrs. Harris E. Stone 
Mr. and Mrs. Henry S. Stone 
Betty W and Richard D. Stone 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. Sullivan 
Mr. and Mrs. John F. Taplin 
Charlotte Valentine Taylor 
Mr. and Mrs. Theodore H. Teplow 
Mr. and Mrs. John L. Thorndike 
Mr. and Mrs. W. Nicholas 

Thorndike 
Drs. Eugene J. and Hilde H. 

Tillman 
Mr. and Mrs. Carlos H. Tosi 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. 

Trippe, Jr. 
Mrs. Irving Usen 
Mr. and Mrs. John H. Valentine 
Mr. and Mrs. William C. 

Van Faasen 
Robert A. Vogt 
Mr. and Mrs. Roger L. Voisin 
Charles M. Werly 
Mrs. Florence T Whitney 
Mrs. Ralph B. Williams 
Mrs. Shepard F. Williams 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas B. Williams 
Mr. and Mrs. Donald B. Wilson 
Miss Elizabeth Woolley 
Drs. Richard J. and Judith 

Wurtman 
Anonymous (12) 



(d) indicates deceased 



48 







INVESTMENT TOOLS ARE IMPORTANT FOR 

REACHING A SECURE FINANCIAL FUTURE. 

ALMOST AS IMPORTANT AS KNOWING 

THE BEST WAY TO USE THEM. 

Whatever plans you're making for the future and for those you love, 
Fleet Investment Services can help make them a reality. We start with a full range of 

investment options, but don't stop there. Our Relationship Managers can 
help you focus on your particular financial goals and help you choose the best way 

to get there. With a tradition of service since 1791, and a consistent ranking 

as one of the country's leading investment managers in assets, we have more ways to 

help you do more with your money. To learn more, call Bill Flemer at (617) 346-2165. 



JHFleet 



INVESTMENT MANAGEMENT 
TRUST AND ESTATE PLANNING SERVICES 



Boston Symphony 
Chamber Players 

Sunday, March 16, at 3pm 



Mij 


^ 1 

s 


1 


nl /■ \ ' '% 

in hi ii Ss 

III' 


jfJiEIIu?3! 


Jgjjpj 





TICKETS 



ARE ON 



SALE NOW! 



Jordan Hall at the New England Conservatory 
with GILBERT KALISH, pianist 

SUNDAY, MARCH 16, AT 3PM 

HAYDN Piano Trio in E-flat, Hob.XV:29 
FINE Partita for Wind Quintet 
SCHUMANN Quintet in E-flat for 
piano and strings, Op. 44 

ALL PROGRAMS AND ARTISTS SUBIECT TO CHANCE- 



SINGLE TICKET PRICES. $25, $18, $14.50 
Tickets may be purchased through SymphonyCharge at (6 1 7) 266- 1 200, 

or visit the Symphony Hall Box Office, Mon.-Sat., 10am-6pm. On the day of the concert, 

tickets are available only at the Jordan Hall Box Office, (6 1 7) 536-24 1 2. 






S9 ^^^^^B *J»t 






Viewer 









Carleton WUlard Villagfe • 
I cotudnt retire without my test rriend, 

Dog lovers appreciate Carleton-Willard Villages 

pro-pet policy. And its 65 wooded, acres. Those who don't have 

pets like the ract that there's room ior everyone. 

The gardeners grow almost everything rrom rerns to roses 

right outside their rront door. Other residents 

prerer painting, writing, or puttering in the woodworking shop. 

Discover all there is to like. 
Call ror a rree hrochure or a tour, today. 




CARLETON-WILLARD VILLAGE 

Fully Accredited by the Continuing Care Accreditation Commission. 
100 OLD BILLERICA ROAD, BEDFORD, MA 01 730 1-800-429-8669 

OWNED AND OPERATED BY CARLETON-WILLARD HOMES, INC., A NOT-FOR-PROFIT CORPORATION 




The Boston Symphony Orchestra gratefully acknowledges those individuals 
whose contributions to a Boston capital gift program made during the 1995- 
96 season equal or exceed $1,800. 



Mrs. Weston Adams 

Mr. and Mrs. Vernon R. Alden 

Professor and Mrs. Rae D. 

Anderson 
Mr. and Mrs. David B. Arnold, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Sherwood E. Bain 
Mrs. Allen G. Bam' 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas P. Beal 
William I. Bernell 
Ms. Sierra Bright 
Mr. and Mrs. Peter A. Brooke 
Mrs. Elizabeth F. Cilley 
Professor and Mrs. Vincent Cioffari 
Mr. and Mrs. James F. Cleary 
Mrs. George H. A. Clowes 
Mr. John F. Cogan, Jr. and 
Ms. Mary L. Cornille 
Mr. and Mrs. Abram T. Collier 
Mr. and Mrs. Donald Conaway, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Stephen D. Cutler 
Mr. and Mrs. Lewis S. Dabney 
Mr. and Mrs. Nelson J. Darling, Jr. 
Deborah B. Davis 
Mr. and Mrs. Holbrook R. Davis 
Mr. and Mrs. Louis A. DeLucia 
Dr. and Mrs. Charles C. 

Dickinson III 
Mr. and Mrs. Eugene B. Doggett 



Mr. and Mrs. Goetz B. Eaton 

Mrs. Otto Eckstein 

Mr. and Mrs. George Howard 

Edmonds 
Mr. and Mrs. William Elfers 
Dr. and Mrs. J. Richard Fennell 
Anna E. Finnerty 
Mrs. Benjamin Fisher 
Mrs. Arline M. Fitch 
Mr. and Mrs. Dean W Freed 
Dr. and Mrs. Arthur Gelb 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard J. Gilbert 
Mr. and Mrs. John L. Grandin, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. John P. Hamill 
Mrs. Robert G. Hargrove 
Mr. and Mrs. Francis W Hatch 
Mr. and Mrs. Bayard Henry 
Mrs. Ruth L. Hertz 
Ms. Susan Morse Hilles 
Mrs. George F. Hodder 
Mr. and Mrs. Bela T. Kalman 
Mr. and Mrs. George H. Kidder 
Mr. and Mrs. Gordon F. Kingsley 
Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin H. Lacy 
Dr. Elia Lipton 

Mr. and Mrs. Caleb Loring, Jr. 
Dr. and Mrs. Frederick H. 

Lovejoy, Jr. 



Mr. and Mrs. C. Charles Marran 

Mr. and Mrs. Nathan R. Miller 

Ms. Dolly Montague 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard P. Morse 

Mrs. Robert B. Newman 

Mr. and Mrs. John A. Perkins 

Mr. and Mrs. William J. Poorvu 

Mr. and Mrs. Peter C. Read 

Mr. and Mrs. Jerome Rosenfeld 

Mrs. Angelica Lloyd Russell 

Mrs. George Lee Sargent 

Roger A. Saunders 

Ms. Carol Schiefele-Holmes and 

Mr. Ben Holmes 
Mr. and Mrs. Carl Shapiro 
Mrs. Hinda L. Shuman 
Mr. and Mrs. Ray Stata 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas G. 

Sternberg 
Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Stoneman 
Mr. and Mrs. John L. Thorndike 
Nancy Watts 

Mr. and Mrs. Stephen R. Weiner 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas H. P. 

Whitney 
Mr. and Mrs. Donald B. Wilson 
Mrs. John J. Wilson 



The Boston Symphony Orchestra is also grateful to the following Corporations and 
Foundations for their contributions of $1,800 and above to one or more of the 
Boston capital gift programs during the 1995-96 season. 



Frank M. Barnard 

Foundation, Inc. 
Theodore and Evelyn Berenson 

Charitable Foundation 
Clark Charitable Trust 
Connell Limited Partnership 
Dynatech Corporation 
Eastern Enterprises 
Germeshausen Foundation 



The Gillette Company 
Gordon Fund 

Henry Hornblower Fund, Inc. 
Edward MacCrone Charitable 

Trust 
MASSmedia 
Overly Foundation 
Thomas A. Pappas Charitable 

Foundation 



Esther V. and Sidney R. Rabb 

Foundations 
Saltonstall Charitable Foundation 
Richard and Susan Smith Family 

Foundation 
Edwin S. Webster Foundation 



49 



^BOSTON\ 




{SYMPHONY^ OCi^ i^ C 1 • 

Iorchestra/ BSU Corporate Sponsorships 






^M$£S* 




The Boston Symphony wishes to acknowledge this distinguished group 


of corporations for their outstanding and exemplary support 


of the Orchestra during the 1996 fiscal year. 


FIDELITY INVESTMENTS 


FILENE'S 


MASSACHUSETTS OFFICE 


Tanglewood on Parade 


OF TRAVEL AND TOURISM 




"Evening at Pops" Public Television 


NORTHWEST AIRLINES 


Broadcasts 


Gospel Night at Pops 


NEC CORPORATION 




BSO North American Tour 


ITT SHERATON 




CORPORATION 


FIDELITY INVESTMENTS 


BOSTON SHERATON 


Boston Pops Esplanade Orchestra 


HOTEL AND TOWERS 


Summer Tour 


Boston Pops New Year's Eve Concert 


FLEET BANK 




WCVB-TV, HEARST 


BANKBOSTON 


BROADCASTING 


CORPORATION 


WCRB 102.5 FM 


BLUE CROSS AND BLUE 


Salute to Symphony 


SHIELD OF MASSACHUSETTS 


BANK OF BOSTON 


COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER 


Holiday Pops Series 


COMPANY 




FOUR SEASONS HOTEL 


JOHN HANCOCK FUNDS 




Opening Night at Symphony 


INGALLS, QUINN & JOHNSON 


Opening Night at Pops 


JOHN HANCOCK 




FINANCIAL SERVICES 


LEXUS 


NYNEX 


Exclusive Automobile of: 
Opening Night at Symphony and 


MANULIFE FINANCIAL 


Opening Night at Pops 


NORTEL 




PAINEWEBBER 


TDK ELECTRONICS 




CORPORATION 


RAYTHEON COMPANY 


Tanglewood Tickets for Children 


Single Concert Sponsors 


For information on the BSO Corporate Sponsorship Program, contact 


Madelyne Cuddeback, Director of Corporate Sponsorships, 


at (617) 


638-9254. 



50 



vy v 

■' *. I 



■ 



Business Leadership Association 

($10,000 and above) 

The support provided by members of the Business Leadership Association is 
instrumental in enabling the Orchestra to pursue its mission of performance, 
training and community outreach. The BSO gratefully acknowledges the following 
organizations for their generous leadership support. 

(The following includes annual, capital, and sponsorship support during the BSO's 
fiscal year beginning September 1, 1995 through August 31, 1996). 



Fidelity Investments 
Edward C. Johnson 3d 



Beethoven Society 

($500,000 and above) 

NEC Corporation 
Hisashi Kaneko 



Massachusetts Office of Travel and Tourism 
Mary Jane McKenna 



BankBoston Corporation 
William M. Crozier, Jr 

John Hancock Funds 
Edward J. Boudreau, Jr. 

LEXUS 

James E. Press 

Massachusetts Cultural Council 
A state agency 



Gold Baton 

($100,000 - $499,999) 

NYNEX 
Donald Reed 

WCRB 102.5 FM 

Cynthia Scullin 



WCVB-TV, Hearst Broadcasting 
Paul La Camera 



Silver Baton 

($75,000 - $99,999) 



Fleet Bank of Massachusetts, N.A. 
Leo Breitman 



Conductor's Circle 

($25,000 - $49,999) 



Blue Cross and Blue Shield of 

Massachusetts 
William C. Van Faasen 

Community Newspaper Company 
William R. Elfers 



NORTEL 

Robert 0. Nelson 

Paine Webber, Inc. 

Bruce Cameron, Richard F. Connolly, 

Charles T. Harris, Joseph F. Patton, Jr. 



■K 



»3 






.« 






LIT Sheraton Corporation 
John Kapioltas 

Manulife Financial 
Dominic DAlessandro 

Northwest Airlines 
Terry M. Leo 




Raytheon Company 
Dennis J. Picard 

Sheraton Boston Hotel & Towers 
Demise Coll 

TDK 

Ken Kihara 


51 









Principal Player 

($15,000 - $24,999) 



Andersen Consulting LLP 
William D. Green 

BBN Corporation 
George H. Conrades 

Boston Edison Company 
Thomas J. May 

Boston Herald 
Patrick J. Purcell 

Connell Limited Partnership 
William F. Connell 

Coopers & Lybrand LLP 
Francis A. Doyle 

Ernst & Young LLP 

James S. DiStasio 

Essex Investment Management Co. 
Joseph McNay 



Filene's 

Joseph M. Melvin 

The Gillette Company 
Alfred M. Zeien 

Harcourt General Charitable Foundation 
Richard A. Smith 

John Hancock Financial Services 
William L. Boyan 

Liberty Mutual Group 
Gary L. Countryman 

Royal Appliance Mfg. Co. 
Michael J. Merriman 

Von Hoffman Press, Inc. 
Frank A. Bowman 



Inc. 



Honor Roll 

($10,000 - $14,999) 



Analog Devices, Inc. 
Ray Stata 

Arley Corporation 
David I. Riemer 

Arnold Communications, Inc. 
Ed Eskandarian 

Arthur Andersen LLP 
George Massaro 

Arthur D. Little 

Charles LaMantia 

Bingham, Dana & Gould 
Jay S. Zimmerman 
William A. Bachman 

The Boston Company 
Christopher Condron 

Converse Inc. 
Glenn Rupp 

Deloitte & Touche 
Michael Joyce 

Eastern Enterprises/Boston Gas Company 
J. Atwood Ives 
Chester R. Messer 

EMC Corporation 
Richard Egan 

Hewitt Associates 
Christopher S. Palmer 



Houghton Mifflin Company 
Nader F. Darehshori 

IBM Corporation 
Patricia S. Wolpert 

KPMG Peat Marwick 
Donald B. Holmes 

Loomis Sayles & Company, L.P. 
Mark W Holland 

Lucent Technologies 
Michael Decelle 

McKinsey & Company 
David Fubini 

Millipore Corporation 
C. William Zadel 

The New England 
Robert A. Shafto 

Sodexho Management Services 

& Creative Gourmets 
Michel Landel 

State Street Bank and Trust Company 
Marshall N. Carter 

The Stop & Shop Foundation 
Avram J. Goldberg 

Thermo Electron Corporation 
Dr. George N. Hatsopoulos 

Watts Industries 
Timothy Home 



52 



Gifts in Kind 

The Boston Symphony Orchestra extends a special thanks to the following donors for their 
generous contributions of goods and services between September 1, 1995, and August 31, 
1996: 



American Airlines 
Bernie Willett 

Betsy Bassett Photography 
Betsy Bassett 

CAHOOTS 

Carol Lasky 

DAV EL CHAUFFEURED 
TRANSPORTATION NETWORK 

Scott A. Solombrino 

Four Seasons Hotel 
Robin A. Brown 



Hermes 

Jean-Louis Dumas-Hermes 

Ingalls Quinn & Johnson 
Richard C. Garrison 

The Ritz Carlton, Boston 
Henry Boubee 

Sheraton Boston Hotel and Towers 
Denise Coll 

The Syratech Corporation 
Leonard Florence 



BUSINESS LEADERSHIP ASSOCIATION 

(Industry Listing) 

The Boston Symphony Orchestra is pleased to acknowledge the following business 
leaders for their generous contributions of $1,500 or more during the BSO's fiscal 
year ending August 31, 1996. 

Companies contributing $10,000 or more are indicated in bold capital letters; con- 
tributions of $5,000-$9,999 are indicated in capital letters, an asterisk denotes gifts 
of $2,500-$4,999, and italicized names indicate donors of services or products. 

For information about becoming a Business Leadership Association member, con- 
tact Anne Cademenos, Associate Director of Corporate Programs, at (617) 638-9298. 



Accounting 



ARTHUR ANDERSEN LLP 

George E. Massaro 

COOPERS & 
LYBRAND LLP 

Francis A. Doyle 

DELOITTE & 
TOUCHE LLP 

Michael Joyce 

*DiPesa & Company, CPAs 
Dolly DiPesa 

Ercolini & Company 
Robert Ercolini, CPA 
Michael Tucci, CPA 

ERNST & YOUNG LLP 

James S. DiStasio 

Harte Carucci & Driseoll, 
PC. 
Neal Harte 

KPMG PEAT MARWICK 

Donald B. Homes 

PRICE WATERHOUSE 
LLP 

Brian L. Cornell 



Advertising/ 
Public Relations 



ARNOLD COMMUNICA- 
TIONS, INC. 

Ed Eskandarian 

Bronner Slosberg Humphrey 
Michael Bronner 

CAHOOTS 
Carol Lasky 

Clarke & Company, Inc. 
Peter A. Morrissey 

Conventures, Inc. 
Dusty S. Rhodes 

DesignWi.se 
Freelow Crummett 

HILL, HOLLIDAY, 
CONNORS, 
COSMOPULOS, INC. 

John M. Connors, Jr. 

Houston, Herstek FAVAT 
Douglas W. Houston 

Ingalls. Quinn &: Johnson 
Richard C. Garrison 



Irma S. Mann, Strategic 
Marketing, Inc. 
Irma S. Mann 

MASSmedia 
Charles N. Shapiro 

*Rasky & Co. 
Larry Rasky 

Alarm Systems 

American Alarm & 
Communications, Inc. 
Richard L. Sampson 

First Security Services 
Corporation 
Robert F. Johnson 

Architects/ Interior Design 

Tellalian Associates 
Architects & Planners 
Donald J. Tellalian, AIA 

Automotive 



IRA LEXUS 
Ira Rosenberg 

LEXUS OF NORWOOD 

I lerhert Chambers 



■ ■ 



^m 



■ 



■ ■ 



m 



53 






LEXUS OF WATERTOWN 

Murray Patkin 

Aviation 

Flight Time International 
Jane McBride 

Banking 

BANKBOSTON 
CORPORATION 

William M. Crozier, Jr. 

Cambridge Trust Company 
James F. Dwinell III 

CITIZENS BANK 
Robert M. Mahoney 

FLEET BANK OF 
MASSACHUSETTS, N.A. 

John P. Hamill 

PNC Bank, New England 
Joan L. Gulley 

STATE STREET BANK 
AND TRUST COMPANY 

Marshall N. Carter 

USTRUST 

Neal F. Finnegan 

Wainwright Bank & Trust 
Company 
John M. Plukas 

Building/Contracting 

*Harvey Industries, Inc. 
Frederick Bigony 

Lee Kennedy Co., Inc. 
Lee M. Kennedy 

*The MacDowell Company 
Roy MacDowell 

*NSC Corporation 
Frank Fradello 

New England Insulation Co. 
Theodore H. Brodie 

*Perini Corporation 
David B. Perini 

Consulting: 
Management /Financial 

Anchor Capital Advisors, Inc. 
William P. Rice 

ANDERSEN 
CONSULTING LLP 

William D. Green 

ANDERSEN 
CONSULTING LLP 

Michael J. Young 

ARTHUR D. 
LITTLE, INC. 

Charles LaMantia 



BAIN & COMPANY, INC. 

Orit Gadiesh 

BBF Corporation 
Boruch B. Frusztajer 

THE BOSTON 
CONSULTING GROUP 
INC. 

Jonathan L. Isaacs 

The Cullinane Group, Inc. 
John J. Cullinane 

Dock Square Consultants 
Richard J. Lettieri 

*Heidrick & Struggles 
Robert E. Hallagan 

Lee Hecht Harrison, Inc. 
Frank Mainero 

HEWITT ASSOCIATES 

Christopher S. Palmer 

Lochridge & Company, Inc. 
Richard K. Lochridge 

* Lyons Company 
J. Peter Lyons 

McKINSEY & 
COMPANY, INC. 
David G. Fubini 

Mercer Management 
Consulting 
James W Down 

NORTH AMERICAN 
MORTGAGE COMPANY 

John F. Farrell, Jr. 

*The O'Brien Group, Inc. 
Paul C. O'Brien 

Pendergast & Company 
Edward H. Pendergast 

Right Associates Consulting 
Warren Radtke 

Sawyer Miller Consulting 
Micho F. Spring 

*Towers Perrin 

V. Benjamin Haas 

*Watson Wyatt Worldwide 
Daniel B. Holmes 

WILLIAM M. MERCER, 
INCORPORATED 
Peter A. Bleyler 

Consulting: Opportunity 
Development 

New Directions, Inc. 
David D. Corbett 

Consumer Goods/ 
Food Service 

*A11 Seasons Services, Inc. 
Donald G. Friedl 



Coca-Cola Bottling Company 
of New England 
Terrance M. Marks 

*Franklin Sports, Inc. 
Larry J. Franklin 

*Johnson, O'Hare Co., Inc. 
Harry "Chip" O'Hare, Jr. 

Merkert Enterprises, Inc. 
Gerald R. Leonard 

O'Donnell-Usen Fisheries 
Corporation 
Arnold S. Wolf 

SODEXHO MANAGE- 
MENT SERVICES & 
CREATIVE GOURMETS 

Michel Landel 

Staton Hills Winery 
Peter Ansdell 

Welch's 
Everett N. Baldwin 

*Whitehall Company, Ltd. 
Marvin A. Gordon 

Distribution 

Standard Tube Sales 
Corporation 

Dorothy C. Granneman 

Francis J. Walsh, Jr. 

Education 

BENTLEY COLLEGE 
Joseph M. Cronin 

Electrical /Electronics 

*Boston Acoustics, Inc. 
Francis L. Reed 

R&D ELECTRICAL 
COMPANY, INC. 
Richard D. Pedone 

Energy/Utilities 

BOSTON EDISON 
COMPANY 

Thomas J. May 

EASTERN 
ENTERPRISES/ 
BOSTON GAS COMPANY 

J. Atwood Ives 
Chester R. Messer 

*New England Electric 
System 
Joan T. Bok 

Entertainment/Media 

*Don Law Company- 
Don Law 

WCVB-TV, Hearst 

Publications 
Paul La Camera 



54 



WHDH-TV Channel 7 
Mike Carson 

*Yawkey Foundation 
John Harrington 

Environmental 

Jason M. Cortell & Associates 
Jason M. Cortell 

Financial 

Services /Investments 

ADAMS, HARKNESS & 
HILL, INC. 
Joseph W Hammer 

ADVENT INTERNATIONAL 
CORPORATION 
Peter A. Brooke 

ALLMERICA FINANCIAL 
John F. O'Brien 

ALLMERICA FINANCIAL 
INSTITUTIONAL SERVICES 
Larry C. Renfro 

THE BERKSHIRE GROUP 

Laurence Gerber 

^Berkshire Partners 
Russell Epker 

BOSTON CAPITAL 
PARTNERS, INC. 

Christopher W. Collins 

Herbert F. Collins 

Richard J. DeAgazio 

John P. Manning 

THE BOSTON COMPANY 

Christopher M. Condron 
W. Keith Smith 

*BTM Capital Corporation 
E.F McCulloch, Jr. 

Carson Limited Partnership 
Herbert Carver 

THE CIT GROUP/CAPITAL 
EQUIPMENT FINANCING 
G. Todd Derr 

Cowen & Company 
Richard A. Altschuler 

CREDIT SUISSE 
FIRST BOSTON 
Marc \.\\ Kite, Jr. 

ESSEX INVESTMENT 
MANAGEMENT CO., INC. 

Joseph C. McNay 

*Farrell, Healer & 
Company Inc. 
Richard \. FarreU 

FIDELITY INVESTMENTS 

Edward C. Johnson 3d 

JOHN HANCOCK 
FINANCIAL SERVICES 
William L. Boyan 



JOHN HANCOCK FUNDS 

Edward J. Boudreau, Jr. 

KAUFMAN & COMPANY 

Sumner Kaufman 

KESSLER FINANCIAL 
SERVICES, L.P. 
Howard J. Kessler 

LIBERTY FINANCIAL 
COMPANIES, INC. 
Kenneth R. Leibler 

LOOMIS-SAYLES & 
COMPANY, L.P. 

Mark W. Holland 

LPL FINANCIAL 
SERVICES 
Todd A. Robinson 

PAINEWEBBER, INC. 

Bruce Cameron 
Richard F. Connolly 
Charles T. Harris 
Joseph F. Patton, Jr. 

THE PIONEER GROUP, INC. 
John F. Cogan, Jr. 

* Putnam Investments 

*State Street Development 
Management Corp. 
John R. Gallagher III 

United Asset Management 
Corporation 

*United Gulf 
Management, Inc. 

W.P. STEWART & CO., INC. 
William P. Stewart 

*Woodstock Corporation 
Mrs. Edith L. Dabney 



Food Service Equipment 

*Boston Showcase Company 
Jason E. Stan- 



High Technology 



ANALOG DEVICES, INC. 

Ray Stata 

*ATI Orion Research 
Chane Graziano 

BBN CORPORATION 

George H. Conrades 

*Bull HN Information 
S3 stems Inc. 
Donald P. Zereski 

COGNEX CORPORATION 
Dr. Robert J. Shillman 

COMPUTERVISION 
CORPORATION 
Kathleen Cote 



CORNING COSTAR 
CORPORATION 
R. Pierce Baker 

EDS 
Barry Raynor 

EG&G, IMC. 
John M. Kucharski 

EMC CORPORATION 

Richard J. Egan 

* Helix Technology 
Corporation 
Robert J. Lepofsky 

IBM CORPORATION 

Patricia S. Wolpert 

INSO CORPORATION 
Steven R. Vana-Paxhia 
Instron Corporation 
Harold Hindman 

INTERNATIONAL DATA 
GROUP 
Patrick J. McGovern 

IONICS INCORPORATED 
Arthur L. Goldstein 

*LAU Technologies 
Joanna T. Lau 

MICROCOM INC. 

Lewis Bergins 

MILLIPORE 
CORPORATION 

C. William Zadel 

NEC CORPORATION 

Hisashi Kaneko 

PRINTED CIRCUIT CORP. 
Peter Sarmanian 

RAYTHEON COMPANY 

Dennis J. Picard 

*The Registry, Inc. 
G. Drew Conway 

SIGNAL TECHNOLOGY 
CORPORATION 
Dale L. Peterson 

SOFTKEY 

INTERNATIONAL INC. 
Michael J. Perik 

STRATUS COMPUTER. INC. 
William E. Foster 

*SystemSofl ( Corporation 
Robert Angelo 

TDK ELECTRONICS 
CORPORATION 

Ken Kihara 

Terad) ne, Inc. 
Alexander V. D'Arbeloff 

THERMO ELECTRON 
CORPORATION 

Dr. George N. Hatsopoulos 



55 



WATERS CORPORATION 
Douglas A. Berthiaume 

Hotels/Restaurants 

BOSTON MARRIOTT 
COPLEY PLACE 
William Munck 

FOUR SEASONS HOTEL 

Robin A. Brown 

ITT SHERATON 

CORPORATION 

John Kapioltas 

SHERATON BOSTON 
HOTEL & TOWERS 

Denise Coll 

*Sonesta International Hotels 
Corporation 
Paul Sonnabend 

THE WESTIN HOTEL, 
COPLEY PLACE 

David King 

Insurance 

AON RISK SERVICES, INC. 

William J. Tvenstrup 

*The Bostonian Group 
John Casey 

Bradley Insurance 
Agency, Inc. 
John J. Bradley 

CADDELL & BYERS 
INSURANCE AGENCY, INC. 
Paul D. Bertrand 

*Carlin Insurance 
Michael D. Holmes 

The Chickering Group 
Frederick H. Chicos 

*Chubb Group of Insurance 
Companies 
John H. Gillespie 

COMMONWEALTH LAND 
AND TITLE INSURANCE CO. 
Terry Cook 

* Johnson & Higgins of 
Massachusetts, Inc. 
William S. Jennings 

*Lexington Insurance 
Company 
Kevin H. Kelley 

LIBERTY MUTUAL 
GROUP 

Gary L. Countryman 

MANULIFE FINANCIAL 

Dominic D'Alessandro 

THE NEW ENGLAND 
Robert A. Shafto 



* North American 
Security Life 
William J. Atherton 

THE PIONEER GROUP, INC. 

John F. Cogan, Jr. 

SAFETY INSURANCE 
COMPANY 
Richard B. Simches 

SEDGWICK OF 
NEW ENGLAND, INC. 
P. Joseph McCarthy 

Sun Life Assurance Company 
of Canada 
David D. Horn 

Swerling Milton Winnick 
Public Insurance Adjusters, 
Inc. 

Marvin Milton 

Bruce Swerling 

Paul Winnick 

Trust Insurance Company 
Craig M. Bradley 

Legal 

BINGHAM, DANA 
& GOULD 

Jay S. Zimmerman 
William A. Bachman 

*Choate, Hall & Stewart 
Charles L. Glerum 

Dickerman Law Offices 
Lola Dickerman 

Dionne, Bookhout & Gass 
Richard D. Gass 

FISH & RICHARDSON PC. 
Ronald Myrick 

GADSBY & HANNAH LLP 
Paul E. Clifford 

GOLDSTEIN & 
MANELLO, PC. 
Richard J. Snyder 

GOODWIN, PROCTER 
&HOAR 
Robert B. Fraser 

*Hale & Don- 
John Hamilton 

*Lynch, Brewer, Hoffman 
& Sands 
Owen B. Lynch, Esq. 

MINTZ, LEVIN, COHN, 
FERRIS, GLOVSKY & 
POPEO, PC. 
Jeffrey M. Wiesen, Esq. 

Nissenbaum Law Offices 
Gerald L. Nissenbaum 

Nutter, McClennen & Fish 
Robert Fishman 



56 



PALMER & DODGE, LLP 
Michael R. Brown 

Robins, Kaplan, Miller 
& Circsi 
Alan R. Miller, Esq. 

*Ropes & Gray 
Truman S. Casner 

Sarrouf, Tarricone & 
Flemming 
Camille F. Sarrouf 

Sherin and Lodgen 

*Weingarten, Schurgin, 
Gagnebin & Hayes 
Stanley M. Schurgin 

Manufacturer's 
Representatives/ 
Wholesale Distribution 

*Alles Corporation 
Stephen S. Berman 

Asquith Corporation 
Laurence L. Asquith 

*Brush Fibers, Inc. 
Ian P. Moss 

*Clinique Laboratories U.S.A. 
Daniel J. Brestle 

J.A. WEBSTER, INC. 
John A. Webster. 

JOFRAN, INC. 
Robert D. Roy 

Lantis Corporation 
Scott Sennett 

United Liquors, Ltd. 
A. Raymond Tye 

Viva Sun 
Gary Podhaizer 

Manufacturing 

Alden Products Company 
Elizabeth Alden 

ARLEY CORPORATION 

David I. Riemer 

Autoroll Machine Corporation 
William M. Karlyn 

*The Biltrite Corporation 
Stanley J. Bernstein 

*C.R. Bard, Inc. 
Richard J. Thomas 

* Cabot Corporation 

CHELSEA 
INDUSTRIES, INC. 
Ronald G. Casty 

CONNELL LIMITED 
PARTNERSHIP 

William F. Connell 






i ■ 

■ 



CONVERSE INC. 

Glenn Rupp 

*Cri-Tech, Inc. 
Richard Mastromatteo 

D.K. Webster Family 
Foundation 
Dean K. Webster 

Design Mark Industries 
Paul S. Morris 

Diacom Corporation 
Donald W Comstock 

Ekco Group, Inc. 
Robert Stein 

GENERAL LATEX 
AND CHEMICAL 
CORPORATION 
Robert W. MacPherson 

THE GILLETTE 
COMPANY 

Alfred M. Zeien 

HIGH VOLTAGE 
ENGINEERING 
CORPORATION 
Paul H. Snyder 

HMK ENTERPRISES, 
INC. 
Steven E. Karol 

*J.D.P. Company 
Jon D. Papps 

* Jones & Vining, Inc. 
Michel Ohayon 

New Balance Athletic Shoe 
James S. Davis 

NEW ENGLAND BUSINESS 
SERVICE, INC. 
Robert J. Murray 

OAK INDUSTRIES, INC. 
William S. Antle III 

OSRAM SYLVANIA INC 
Dean T Langford 

The Pfaltzgraff Company 
Annette Seifert 

PHILIP MORRIS 
COMPANIES, INC. 

Matthew Paluszek 

*Piab USA, Inc. 

Charles J. Weilbrenner 

*The Rockport Company, Inc. 
Anthony J. Tiberii 

ROYAL APPLIANCE 
MFG. CO. 

Michael J. Merriman 

*Springs Industries, Inc. 
Dan Gaynor 

THE STRIDE HI IK 



CORPORATION 
Robert C. Siegel 

SUMMIT PACKAGING 
SYSTEMS INC. 
Gordon Gilroy 

The Syratech Corporation 
Leonard Florence 

TY-WOOD/CENTURY 
MANUFACTURING CO., 
INC. 
Joseph W. Tiberio 

WATTS INDUSTRIES, 
INC. 

Timothy P. Home 

Wire Belt Company of 
America 

F. Wade Greer 

Philanthropic 

The Fuller Foundation 

*The Kouyoumjian Fund 
The Kouyoumjian Family 

Printing/Publishing 

* Addison Wesley Longman, 
Inc. 
J. Larry Jones 

*Banta Corporation 
Donald Belcher 

ROSTON HERALD 

Patrick J. Purcell 

CAHNERS PUBLISHING 
COMPANY 

Bruce Barnet 

COMMUNITY 
NEWSPAPER 
COMPANY 

William R. Elfers 

DANIELS PRINTING 
COMPANY 
Grover B. Daniels 

George H. Dean Co. 

G. Earle Michaud 

HARCOURT GENERAL 

CHARITARLE 

FOUNDATION 

Richard A. Smith 

HOUGHTON MIFFLIN 
COMPANY 

Nader F. Darehshori 

Invisuals 
Dennis Ozer 

Reynolds-De Walt Printing 
Peter DeWall 

The Studley Press. Inc. 
Chuck Gilletl 



VON HOFFMANN 
PRESS, INC. 

Frank A. Bowman 

Real Estate/Development 

*The Abbey Group 
Robert Epstein 
David Epstein 
John Svenson 

BEACON PROPERTIES 
CORPORATION 
Alan M. Leventhal 

*Cornerstone Properties, Inc. 
John S. Moody 

CUMMINGS PROPERTIES 
James L. McKeown 

DEWOLFE NEW ENGLAND 
Richard B. DeWolfe 

EQUITABLE REAL ESTATE 
Tony Harwood 

First Winthrop Corporation 
Richard J. McCready 

*The Flatley Company 
Thomas J. Flatley 

Heafitz Development 
Company 
Lewis Heafitz 

*John M. Corcoran & Co. 
John M. Corcoran 

*Meredith & Grew 
Thomas J. Hynes, Jr. 

Retail 

COUNTRY CURTAINS 
Mr. & Mrs. John & Jane 
Fitzpatrick 

Crane & Co. Papermakers 
Lansing E. Crane 

The E.B. Horn Company 
Harry Finn 

FILENE'S 

Joseph M. Melvin 

Gordon Brothers 
Michael Frieze 

Hermits 
Jean-Louis Dumas-Hermes 

J. Baker, Inc. 
Allan L. Weinstein 

*Lechmere, Inc. 

Frederick E. Meiser 

Marshalls 
Jerome H. Rossi 

NFIMAN MARCUS 
William I). Roddy 



■ 
■ 






57 



David L. Batson & Co, Inc 

Investment Counsel 




Best wishes to the Boston Symphony Orchestra and 
the Boston Pops for an exciting 1996-1997 Season 



George W. Browning/Stephen B. O'Brien 
One Memorial Drive, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142 
Telephone: 617-225-3800 Facsimile: 617-494-1511 




RiverMead Retirement Community, Peterborough, New Hampshire 

In our pre-planning, programming and design stages 
we not only address environmental and esthetic 
considerations, we also address the particular needs 
of the senior adults who will be residing in the 
communities we design. 

Specializing in the design of Senior Living Facilities 



385 Elliot Street 



Newton, MA 02164 



Tsomides 
Associates 

Architects 
Planners 
Interior Design 
www.tsomides.com 

(617) 969-4774 



58 



*Saks Fifth Avenue 

Alison Streider Mayher 

THE STOP & SHOP 
FOUNDATION 

Avram J. Goldberg 

THE STOP & SHOP 

SUPERMARKET 

COMPANY 

Robert G. Tobin 

Talbots 
Arnold B. Zetcher 

THE TJX COMPANIES, INC. 
Bernard Cammarata 

*Town & Country Corporation 
C. William Carey 

Science /Medical 

AMERICAN MEDICAL 
RESPONSE, INC. 
Paul M. Verrochi 

Baldpate Hospital 
Lucille M. Batal 

BLUE CROSS AND 
BLUE SHIELD OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

William C. Van Faasen 

BOSTON SCIENTIFIC 
CORPORATION 

CRA Managed Care 
Lois Silverman 

CHARLES RIVER 

LABORATORIES 

James C. Foster 

Citizens Medical Corporation 
John J. Doran 



Datacube 
Stanley Karandanis 

FISHER SCIENTIFIC 
INTERNATIONAL INC. 

Paul M. Montrone 

GENETICS 
INSTITUTE, INC. 
Dr. Patrick Gage 

MERCK-MEDCO 
MANAGED CARE 
Per Lofberg 

*Medical Information 
Technology, Inc. 
Morton E. Ruderman 

QUEST DIAGNOSTICS INC. 
Robert Meehan 
Robert J. Gorman 

Services 

Benn Theodore, Inc. 
Benn Theodore 

Betsy Bassett Photography 
Betsy Bassett 

*Blake and Blake 
Genealogists 
Richard A. Blake, Jr. 

CFI Design Group, Inc. 
David A. Granoff 

TAD RESOURCES 
INTERNATIONAL INC. 

James S. Davis 

Team 
Marion Rossman 

Technical Aid Corporation 
Salvatore Balsamo 



Telecommunications 

AT&T NETWORK SYSTEMS 
Michael Decelle 

* Boston Technology, Inc. 
Dr. John C.W Taylor 

CELLULAR ONE 

Kathy Dowling 

GTE GOVERNMENT 
SYSTEMS 
John R. Messier 

LUCENT TECHNOLOGIES 

Michael Decelle 

MCI TELECOMMUNICA- 
TIONS CORPORATION 

Susan Beckmann 
Joe McKeown 

NORTEL 

Robert 0. Nelson 

NYNEX 
Donald Reed 

*NYNEX Information 
Resources Co. 
Matthew J. Stover 

Travel /Transportation 

DAVEL CHAUFFEURED 
TRANSPORTATION 
NETWORK 
Scott A. Solombrino 

Lily Transportation Corp. 
John A. Simourian 

NORTHWEST AIRLINES 

Terry M. Leo 



Please join us as a member of the BSO's 
Business Leadership Association! 

For a minimum contribution of $1 ,800 to the BSO's Business Fund, your company can 
enjoy membership in the BSO's Business Leadership Association, a dynamic and influ- 
ential group of more than 350 New England businesses who have come together to 
support the Boston Symphony Orchestra. 

Membership privileges for your company include: a complimentary listing in the BSO 
and Pops program books throughout the season, priority ticket reservations for the 
sell-out Holiday Pops and Tanglewood concerts, personal ticket assistance through the 
Corporate Programs office, and use of the Beranek Room, a private patrons' lounge, 
reserved exclusively for members of the BSO's Business Leadership Association and 
Higginson Society. 

For more information about becoming a member of the BSO's Business Leadership Association, 
please contact the Corporate Programs office at (617) 638-9270. 



59 



NEXT PROGRAM. . . 

Thursday, March 27, at 8 
Friday, March 28, at 8 
Saturday, March 29, at 8 
Tuesday, April 1, at 8 

JOHN WILLIAMS conducting 



QUANTZ 



Flute Concerto in G 

Allegro 
Adagio. Mesto 
Presto 

JAMES GALWAY 



WILLIAMS 



The Five Sacred Trees, Concerto for Bassoon 
and Orchestra 

I. E6 Mugna 
II. Tortan 

III. Tree of Ross (Eo Rossa) 

IV. Craeb Uisnig 
V. Dathi 

RICHARD SVOBODA 



INTERMISSION 



CORIGLIANO Pied Piper Fantasy, for flute and orchestra 

I. Sunrise and The Piper's Song 
II. The Rats 

III. Battle With the Rats 

IV. War Cadenza 

V The Piper's Victory 
VI. The Burghers' Chorale 
VII. The Children's March 

JAMES GALWAY 



Boston Pops Laureate Conductor John Williams makes his BSO subscription series 
debut leading a program of three concertos for woodwinds, two of them featuring 
the internationally popular flutist James Galway. The other features BSO princi- 
pal bassoonist Richard Svoboda, who performs one of Mr. Williams's own recent 
scores, The Five Sacred Trees. Mr. Galway opens the program with music by the 
German Baroque composer/flutist Johann Joachim Quantz and concludes the 
concert with the charmingly conceived Pied Piper Fantasy of John Corigliano, in- 
spired by the old fairy tale of the magical flute player and the town of Hamelin. 



60 



COMING CONCERTS . . . 



Thursday 'B'— March 27, 8-9:50 
Friday Evening — March 28, 8-9:50 
Saturday 4 B'— March 29, 8-9:50 
Tuesday 'C— April 1, 8-9:50 

JOHN WILLIAMS conducting 
JAMES GALWAY, flute 
RICHARD SVOBODA, bassoon 



QUANTZ 
WILLIAMS 



CORIGLIANO 



Flute Concerto in G 
The Five Sacred Trees, 

Concerto for bassoon 

and orchestra 
Pied Piper Fantasy, for 

flute and orchestra 




For rates and 
information on 
advertising in the 
Boston Symphony, 
Boston Pops, 
and 

Tanglewood program books 
please contact: 

STEVE GANAK AD REPS 
(617)542-6913, in Boston. 



Thursday, April 3, at 10:30 a.m. 

Open Rehearsal 
Steven Ledbetter will discuss the program 

at 9:30 in Symphony Hall. 
Thursday 'A— April 3, 8-10 
Friday 'B'— April 4, 1:30-3:30 
Saturday 'A— April 5, 8-10 

SEIJI OZAWA conducting 
MSTISLAV ROSTROPOVICH, cello 
STEVEN ANSELL, viola 

Celebrating Mstislav Rostropovich's 
70th Birthday 

THOMAS 



RANDS 



STRAUSS 



Chanson, for cello 

and orchestra 

(world premiere) 
Cello Concerto No. 1 

(world premiere; 

BSO commission) 
Don Quixote 



Tuesday 'B'— April 8, 8-9:50 

SEIJI OZAWA conducting 
SYLVIA McNAIR, soprano 

BRITTEN Les Illuminations, for 

voice and string 
orchestra 

TCHAIKOVSKY Manfred Symphony 

Thursday 'C— April 17, 8-10 
Friday Evening — April 18, 8-10 
Saturday 'A— April 19, 8-10 
Tuesday 'B'— April 22, 8-10 

BERNARD HAITINK conducting 
EMANUEL AX, piano 

SCHUMANN Symphony No. 2 



BRAHMS 



Piano Concerto No. 2 



Programs and artists subject to change. 



Single tickets for all Boston Symphony Orchestra concerts throughout the season 
are available at the Symphony Hall box office, or by calling "SymphonyCharge" 
at (617) 266-1200, Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m. until 6 p.m., to 
charge tickets instantly on a major credit card, or to make a reservation and then 
send payment by check. Outside the 617 area code, call L -800-274-8499. 
Please note that there is a $2.50 handling fee for each ticket ordered by phone. 



61 



Fine imported 
Italian linens 
at fabulous prices 




Fine 
Handcrafted Jewelry 



FINE ART /AMERICAN CRAFTS 



ANICHINI 

OUTLET STORE 

Powerhouse Arcade 

West Lebanon 

New Hampshire 03784 

603.298.8656 

10 TO 9 MONDAY-SATURDAY 
12 TO 5 SUNDAY 




Dock Square, 24 North St., Boston, MA 

Mashpee Commons, Mashpee, MA 

Mall at Chestnut Hill, Chestnut Hill, MA 

48 Post Rd. East at Main St., Westport, CT 

1-800-539-0025 







UNITY • HARMONY • ARTISTRY 



The Boston Symphony Orchestra 

extends congratulations to the 

Boston Musicians' Association, 

Local 9-535, on the occasion 

of its 100th anniversary. 




62 



SYMPHONY HALL INFORMATION 

FOR SYMPHONY HALL CONCERT AND TICKET INFORMATION, call (617) 266-1492. 
For Boston Symphony concert program information, call "C-O-N-C-E-R-T" (266-2378). 

THE BOSTON SYMPHONY performs ten months a year, in Symphony Hall and at Tangle- 
wood. For information about any of the orchestra's activities, please call Symphony Hall, or 
write the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Symphony Hall, Boston, MA 02115. 

THE BSO'S NEW WEB SITE (http://www.bso.org) provides information on all of the orches- 
tra's activities at Symphony Hall and at Tanglewood, and is updated regularly. 

THE EUNICE S. AND JULIAN COHEN WING, adjacent to Symphony Hall on Huntington 
Avenue, may be entered by the Symphony Hall West Entrance on Huntington Avenue. 

IN THE EVENT OF A BUILDING EMERGENCY, patrons will be notified by an announce- 
ment from the stage. Should the building need to be evacuated, please exit via the nearest 
door, or according to instructions. 

FOR SYMPHONY HALL RENTAL INFORMATION, call (617) 638-9241, or write the 
Function Manager, Symphony Hall, Boston, MA 02115. 

THE BOX OFFICE is open from 10 a.m. until 6 p.m. Monday through Saturday; on concert 
evenings it remains open through intermission for BSO events or just past starting time for 
other events. In addition, the box office opens Sunday at 1 p.m. when there is a concert that 
afternoon or evening. Single tickets for all Boston Symphony subscription concerts are avail- 
able at the box office. For most outside events at Symphony Hall, tickets are available three 
weeks before the concert at the box office or through SymphonyCharge. 

TO PURCHASE BSO TICKETS: American Express, MasterCard, Visa, a personal check, and 
cash are accepted at the box office. To charge tickets instantly on a major credit card, or to 
make a reservation and then send payment by check, call "SymphonyCharge" at (617) 266- 
1200, Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m. until 6 p.m. Outside the 617 area code, phone 
1-800-274-8499. There is a handling fee of $2.50 for each ticket ordered by phone. 

GROUP SALES: Groups may take advantage of advance ticket sales. For BSO concerts at 
Symphony Hall, groups of twenty-five or more may reserve tickets by telephone and take 
advantage of ticket discounts and flexible payment options. To place an order, or for more 
information, call Group Sales at (617) 638-9345. 

FOR PATRONS WITH DISABILITIES, an access service center, accessible restrooms, and 
elevators are available inside the Cohen Wing entrance to Symphony Hall on Huntington 
Avenue. For more information, call VOICE (617) 266-1200 or TTD/TTY (617) 638-9289. 

LATECOMERS will be seated by the ushers during the first convenient pause in the pro- 
gram. Those who wish to leave before the end of the concert are asked to do so between pro- 
gram pieces in order not to disturb other patrons. 

IN CONSIDERATION OF OUR PATRONS AND ARTISTS, children four years old or young- 
er will not be admitted to Boston Symphony Orchestra concerts. 

TICKET RESALE: If for some reason you are unable to attend a Boston Symphony concert for 
which you hold a subscription ticket, you may make your ticket available for resale by calling 
(617) 266-1492 during business hours, or (617) 638-9426 at any time. This helps bring need- 
ed revenue to the orchestra and makes your seat available to someone who wants to attend the 
concert. A mailed receipt will acknowledge your tax-deductible contribution. 

RUSH SEATS: There are a limited number of Rush Seats available for Boston Symphony sub- 
scription concerts Tuesday and Thursday evenings, and Friday afternoons. The low price 
of these seats is assured through the Morse Rush Seat Fund. Rush Tickets are sold at $7.50 
each, one to a customer, on Fridays as of 9 a.m. and Tuesdays and Thursdays as of 5 p.m. 
Please note that there are no Rush Tickets available on Friday or Saturday evenings. 

PLEASE NOTE THAT SMOKING IS NOT PERMITTED ANYWHERE IN SYMPHONY 
HALL. 

CAMERA AND RECORDING EQUIPMENT may not be brought into Symphony Hall during 
concerts. 



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03 



LOST AND FOUND is located at the security desk at the stage door to Symphony Hall on St. 
Stephen Street. 

FIRST AID FACILITIES for both men and women are available. On-call physicians attending 
concerts should leave their names and seat locations at the switchboard near the Massachu- 
setts Avenue entrance. 

PARKING: For evening concerts only, the Prudential Center Garage offers a discount to any 
BSO patron with a ticket stub for that evening's performance, courtesy of R.M. Bradley & Co. 
and The Prudential Realty Group. There are also two paid parking garages on Westland Ave- 
nue near Symphony Hall. Limited street parking is available. As a special benefit, guaranteed 
pre-paid parking near Symphony Hall is available to subscribers who attend evening concerts. 
For more information, call the Subscription Office at (617) 266-7575. In addition, the Uptown 
Garage at 10 Gainsborough Street next to the New England Conservatory offers discounted 
parking ($6 with ticket stub) for all BSO concerts, including Friday afternoons. 

ELEVATORS are located outside the Hatch and Cabot-Cahners rooms on the Massachusetts 
Avenue side of Symphony Hall, and in the Cohen Wing. 

LADIES' ROOMS are located on the orchestra level, audience-left, at the stage end of the 
hall, on both sides of the first balcony, and in the Cohen Wing. 

MEN'S ROOMS are located on the orchestra level, audience-right, outside the Hatch Room 
near the elevator, on the first-balcony level, audience-left, outside the Cabot-Cahners Room 
near the coatroom, and in the Cohen Wing. 

COATROOMS are located on the orchestra and first-balcony levels, audience-left, outside the 
Hatch and Cabot-Cahners rooms, and in the Cohen Wing. Please note that the BSO is not re- 
sponsible for personal apparel or other property of patrons. 

LOUNGES AND BAR SERVICE: There are two lounges in Symphony Hall. The Hatch Room 

on the orchestra level and the Cabot-Cahners Room on the first-balcony level serve drinks 
starting one hour before each performance. For the Friday-afternoon concerts, both rooms 
open at noon, with sandwiches available until concert time. 

BOSTON SYMPHONY BROADCASTS: Friday-afternoon concerts of the Boston Symphony 
Orchestra are broadcast live by WGBH-FM (Boston 89.7) and by WAMC-FM (Albany 90.3, 
serving the Tanglewood area). Saturday-evening concerts are broadcast live by WCRB-FM 
(Boston 102.5) 

BSO FRIENDS: The Friends are donors to the Boston Symphony Orchestra Annual Fund. 
Friends receive BSO, the orchestra's newsletter, as well as priority ticket information and 
other benefits depending on their level of giving. For information, please call the Develop- 
ment Office at Symphony Hall weekdays between 9 and 5, (617) 638-9251. If you are already 
a Friend and you have changed your address, please inform us by sending your new and old 
addresses to the Development Office, Symphony Hall, Boston, MA 02115. Including your 
patron number will assure a quick and accurate change of address in our files. 

BUSINESS FOR BSO: The BSO's Business Leadership Association program makes it possible 
for businesses to participate in the life of the Boston Symphony Orchestra through a variety of 
original and exciting programs, among them "Presidents at Pops," "A Company Christmas at 
Pops," and special-event underwriting. Benefits include corporate recognition in the BSO pro- 
gram book, access to the Beranek Room reception lounge, and priority ticket service. For fur- 
ther information, please call Anne Cademenos, Associate Director of Corporate Programs, at 
(617) 638-9298. 

THE SYMPHONY SHOP is located in the Cohen Wing at the West Entrance on Huntington 
Avenue and is open Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday from 11 a.m. until 4 p.m., Saturday 
from noon until 6 p.m., and from one hour before each concert through intermission. The 
Symphony Shop features exclusive BSO merchandise, including The Symphony Lap Robe, 
calendars, coffee mugs, posters, and an expanded line of BSO apparel and recordings. The 
Shop also carries children's books and musical-motif gift items. A selection of Symphony 
Shop merchandise is also available during concert hours outside the Cabot-Cahners Room. 
All proceeds benefit the Boston Symphony Orchestra. For further information and telephone 
orders, please call (617) 638-9383. 



64 









GWMm 



The Proof is in the Performance 

Annual reports, product brochures, publications, 
catalogs & data sheets — a symphony of multi-color 
printing ii-iiii: our image editing and electronic page 
assembly capabilities lo enhance die performance. 
Bravo! MarDonald t\ Evans Printers. 
One Hex Drive • llrainlree. >l A 02 1 HI 
Tel: (617) 848-9090 • Fax:(617)843-3540 
I mail: macexnn I @aol 





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"Two words describe both the Boston 

Symphony Orchestra and Hoover Capital 

Management: sound and disciplined^ 




"You come to Symphony Hall to hear wonderful sound produced by 
disciplined musicians. I invite you to come to Hoover Capital to get sound 
investment management practiced by disciplined investment professionals. 

"Our value-based approach benefits substantially our institutional and 

individual clients because, at Hoover Capital, we have only one standard 

for both performance and service - the highest." 

— Stevin R. Hoover — 

Chairman and CEO 

HOOVER CAPITAL MANAGEMENT 

50 Congress Street 

Boston, Massachusetts 02109 

617-227-3133 

Hoover Capital Management is a Registered Investment Advisor. Copies of Form ADV as filed with the 
Securities and Exchange Commission are available upon request. Past performance is no guarantee of future results. 






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SEIJI OZAWAMUSIC DIRECTOR 



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1996-97 SEASON 



ORCHESTRA 












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The security of a trust, 
Fidelity service and expertise. 

A CIojjIc Composition 




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Seiji Ozawa, Music Director 

Bernard Haitink, Principal Guest Conductor 

One Hundred and Sixteenth Season, 1996-97 



Trustees of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Inc. 



R. Willis Leith, Jr., Chairman 
Peter A. Brooke, Vice- Chairman 
Mrs. Edith L. Dabney, Vice-Chairman 
Harvey Chet Krentzman, Vice-Chairman 



Nicholas T. Zervas, President 

William J. Poorvu, Vice-Chairman and Treasurer 

Ray Stata, Vice-Chairman 



Harlan E. Anderson 
Dr. Amar G. Bose 
James F. Cleary 
John F. Cogan, Jr. 
Julian Cohen 
William F. Connell, 
ex-qfficio 

Life Trustees 

Vernon R. Alden 
David B. Arnold, Jr. 
J. P. Barger 
Leo. L. Beranek 
Abram T. Collier 



William M. Crozier, Jr. 
Nader F. Darehshori 
Deborah B. Davis 
Nina L. Doggett 
Avram J. Goldberg 
Thelma E. Goldberg 



Nelson J. Darling, Jr. 
Archie C. Epps 
Mrs. Harris Fahnestock + 
Mrs. John H. Fitzpatrick 
Dean W Freed 



Julian T. Houston 

Edna S. Kalman 

George Krupp 

Mrs. August R. Meyer 

Richard P. Morse 

Mrs. Robert B. Newman 



Robert P. O'Block, 

ex-qfficio 
Peter C. Read 
Margaret Williams- 

DeCelles, ex-officio 



Mrs. John L. Grandin 
Mrs. George I. Kaplan 
George H. Kidder 
Thomas D. Perry, Jr. 
Irving W Rabb 



Mrs. George Lee Sargent 
Richard A. Smith 
Sidney Stoneman 
John Hoyt Stookey 
John L. Thorndike 



Other Officers of the Corporation 

Thomas D. May and John Ex Rodgers, Assistant Treasurers 



Daniel R. Gustin, Clerk 



Board of Overseers of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Inc. 

Robert P. O'Block, Chairman 

Molly Beals Millman, Secretary Phyllis Dohanian, Treasurer 



Mrs. Herbert B. Abelow 
Helaine B. Allen 
Joel B. Alvord 
Amanda Barbour Amis 
Marjorie Arons-Barron 
Caroline Dwight Bain 
Sandra Bakalar 
Gabriella Beranek 
Lynda Schubert Bodman 
William L. Boyan 
Jan Brett 
Robin A. Brown 
Mrs. Marshall Nichols 

Carter 
Earle M. Chiles 
William H. Congleton 
William F. Connell 
John M. Connors, Jr. 
Martha H.W. 

Crowninshield 
Diddy Cull inane 
Joan P. Curhan 
Tamara P. Davis 
Betsy P. Demirjian 
JoAnne Walton 

Dickinson 
Harry Ellis Dickson 
Mitchell L. Dong 
Hugh Downs 



Francis A. Doyle 
Goetz B. Eaton 
Harriett Eckstein 
William R. Elfers 
George M. Elvin 
Edward Eskandarian 
J. Richard Fennell 
Nancy J. Fitzpatrick 
Eugene M. Freedman 
Dr. Arthur Gelb 
Mrs. Kenneth J. 

Germeshausen 
Charles K. Gifford 
Jordan Golding 
Mark R. Goldweitz 
Deborah England Gray 
Michael Halperson 
John P. Hamill 
Ellen T. Harris 
Daphne P. Hatsopoulos 
Deborah M. Hauser 
Bayard Henry 
Marilyn Brachman 

Hoffman 
Ronald A. Homer 
Phyllis S. Hubbard 
F. Donald Hudson 
Lolajaffe 
Mrs. Robert M. Jaffe 



I 



Dr. Hisashi Kaneko 
Martin S. Kaplan 
Susan Beth Kaplan 
Mrs. S. Charles Kasdon 
Frances Demoulas 

Kettenbach 
Robert D. King 
Mrs. Gordon F. Kingsley 
David I. Kosowsky 
Arthur R. Kravitz 
Mrs. William D. 

Larkin, Jr. 
Thomas H. Lee 
Stephen R. Levy 
Edward Linde 
Frederick H. Lovejoy, Jr. 
Diane H. Lupean 
Mrs. Charles P. Lyman 
Barbara Jane Macon 
Joseph C. McNay 
William F. Meagher. Jr. 
Nathan R. Miller 
Robert J. Murray 
Paul C. O'Brien 
Norio Ohga 
Louis F. Orsalli 
Stephen I )a\ ies Paine 
Gloria Moody Press 



Millard H. Pryor, Jr. 
Robert E. Remis 
William D. Roddy, Jr. 
John Ex Rodgers 
Keizo Saji 
Roger A. Saunders 
Carol Scheifele-Holmes 
Hannah H. Schneider 
Cynthia D. Scullin 
Elizabeth T. Selkowitz 
Roger T. Servison 
L. Scott Singleton 
Mrs. Micho F. Spring 
Thomas G. Sternberg 
Jacquelynne M. 

Stepanian 
Bill Van Faasen 
Paul M. Verrochi 
Stephen R. Weiner 
Robert A. Wells 
Mrs. Joan D. Wheeler 
Reginald H. White 
Mrs. Florence T. 

Whitnej 
Margaret Williams- 

DeCelles 
Robin Wilson 
Kathryn A. Wong 

t Deceased 



Overseers Emeriti 

Mrs. Weston Adams 
Bruce A. Beal 
William M. Bulger 
Mary Louise Cabot 
Mrs. Levin H. 

Campbell 
Johns H. Congdon 
Phyllis Curtin 
Katherine Fanning 
Peter H.B. 

Frelinghuysen 
Mrs. Thomas J. 

Galligan, Jr. 
Mrs. James Garivaltis 
Mrs. Haskell R. Gordon 



Susan D. Hall 
Mrs. Richard D. Hill 
Susan M. Hilles 
Glen H. Hiner 
H. Eugene Jones 
Mrs. Louis I. Kane 
Leonard Kaplan 
Richard L. Kaye 
Robert K. Kraft 
Benjamin H. Lacy 
Mrs. James F. 

Lawrence 
Mrs. Hart D. Leavitt 
Laurence Lesser 
Mrs. Harry L. Marks 



C. Charles Marran 
Hanae Mori 
Mrs. Stephen V.C. 

Morris 
Patricia Morse 
David S. Nelson 
Mrs. Hiroshi H. 

Nishino 
Vincent M. O'Reilly 
Andrall S. Pearson 
John A. Perkins 
David R. Pokross 
Daphne Brooks Prout 
Mrs. Peter van S. Rice 
Mrs. Jerome Rosenfeld 



Mrs. William C. 

Rousseau 
Angelica L. Russell 
Francis P. Sears, Jr. 
Mrs. Carl Shapiro 
Mrs. Donald B. 

Sinclair 
Ralph Z. Sorenson 
Mrs. Arthur I. Strang 
Luise Vosgerchian 
Mrs. Thomas H.R 

Whitney 
Mrs. Donald R. Wilson 
Mrs. John J. Wilson 



Business Leadership Association 

Board of Directors 

Harvey Chet Krentzman, Chairman Emeritus 
James F. Cleary, Chairman 



Nader F. Darehshori 
Francis A. Doyle 
John P. Hamill 
William F. Meagher 



Robert J. Murray 
Robert P. O'Block 
Patrick J. Purcell 
William D. Roddy 



William F. Connell, President 
William L. Boyan, Vice-President 



Cynthia Scullin 
Malcolm L. Sherman 
Ray Stata 



Stephen J. Sweeney 
William C. Van Faasen 
Patricia Wolpert 



Emeritus Leo L. Beranek 



Ex-Officio R. Willis Leith, Jr. • Nicholas T Zervas 



Officers of the Boston Symphony Association of Volunteers 

Margaret Williams-DeCelles, President Charlie Jack, Treasurer 

Goetz Eaton, Executive Vice-President Doreen Reis, Secretary 

Diane Austin, Symphony Shop Marilyn Pond, Public Relations Dorothy Stern, Resources 



Noni Cooper, Adult Education 
Ginger Elvin, Tanglewood 

Association 
Nancy Ferguson, Hall Services 
Phyllis Hubbard, Nominating 



Dee Schoenly, Development 
William C. Sexton, 

Tanglewood Association 
Barbara Steiner, Youth Activities 



Development 
Erling Thorgalsen, Membership 
Eva Zervos, Fundraising 
Wendy Ziner, Fundraising 



The Gericke Years: 
1884-1889 and 1898-1906 




The archival exhibit currently on display in the Huntington Ave- 
nue corridor of the Cohen Wing explores the Boston Symphony 
Orchestra during Wilhelm Gericke's two terms as conductor. 
Generally acknowledged as the BSO's first "professional" con- 
ductor, Gericke is credited with having transformed the BSO 
from a group of musicians into an orchestra. Among the many 
innovations that occurred during Gericke's conductorship were 
the inauguration in 1885 of the "Promenade Concerts," which 
were the predecessor of the Boston Pops; the commencement of 
tours to other United States cities in 1886, the initiation of a 
series of Young People's Concerts in 1887, and the move from 
the old Boston Music Hall to Symphony Hall in 1900. 



Programs copyright ©1997 Boston Symphony Orchestra, Inc. 

Cover design by Jaycole Advertising, Inc. /Cover and BSO photos by Steve J. Sherman 



r^'i 



I ■ 



Aduiiiiistration 

Kenneth Haas. Managing Director 

Daniel R. Gustin, Assistant Managing Director and Manager of Tanglewood 

Anthony Fogg. Artistic Administrator 

Thomas D. May, Director of Finance and Business Affairs 

Nancy Perkins, Director of Development 

Caroline Smedvig, Director of Public Relations and Marketing 

Rav F. Wellbaum, Orchestra Manager 

ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF/ARTISTIC 

Dennis Alves, Artistic Coordinator, Boston Pops • Faith Hunter, Executive Assistant to the Managing 
Director • Karen Leopardi, Artist Assistant/Secretary to the Music Director • Vincenzo Natale, Chauffeur/ 
Valet • James O'Connor, Assistant to the Artistic Administrator • Brian Van Sickle, Executive Assistant to 
the Tanglewood Manager 

ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF/PRODUCTION 

Christopher W. Ruigomez, Operations Manager 

Scott Schillin, Assistant Manager, Boston Pops and Youth Activities 

Felicia A. Burrey, Chorus Manager • Nancy Cohen, Auditions Coordinator/Administrative Assistant, 

Orchestra Personnel • Jana Euler Gimenez, Administrative Assistant, Management Office • Diane A. 

Read, Production Coordinator 

BOX OFFICE 

Russell M. Hodsdon, Manager of Box Office 

Mary J. Broussard, Clerk • Cary Eyges, Clerk • Lawrence Fraher, Clerk • Kathleen Kennedy, 

Assistant Manager of Box Office • Arthur Ryan, Clerk 

BUSINESS OFFICE 

Sarah J. Harrington, Budget Manager 

Craig R. Kaplan, Controller 

Roberta Kennedy, Manager, Symphony Shop 

Christopher Fox, Budget Analyst • Michelle Green, Executive Assistant to the Director of Finance 
and Business Affairs • Ian Kane, Senior Financial Analyst • Scott Langill, General Accountant • John 
O'Callaghan, Payroll Accountant • Yaneris Pena-Briggs, Cash Accountant • Sharon Sherman, 
Accounts Payable Supervisor • Victoria L. Tan, Staff Accountant 

DEVELOPMENT 

Daniel P. Breen, Director of Administration for Development 

Madelyne Cuddeback, Director of Corporate Programs 

Julie H. Diaz, Campaign Director 

John C. Marksbury, Director of Foundation and Government Support 

Joyce M. Serwitz, Associate Director of Development 

Diane Abe, Campaign Coordinator • Maureen Barry, Administrative Assistant to the Associate Director 
of Development • Courtney A. Barth, Assistant Director, Corporate Projects • Sally Dale, Manager of Donor 
Relations • Katrina DeBonville, Administrative Assistant to the Major Gifts Officer • Rebecca Ehrhardt, 
Major Gifts Officer • Sarah Fitzgerald, Data Coordinator • Ginny Gaeta, Executive Assistant to the Director 
of Development • Erika-Marie Haeussler, Administrative Assistant, Tanglewood Development * Joyce Hatch, 
Director of Boston Symphony Annual Fund • Deborah Hersey, Coordinator of Information Systems • Shelley 
Kooris, Manager of Development Research • Matthew Lane, Administrative Assistant, Campaign Communi- 
cations • Sabrina Learman, Administrative Assistant/Office Manager • Katherine A. Lempert, Issistant 
Director, Tanglewood Development • Robert Masse\. Data Production Assistant • Cynthia MeCabe. Admini- 
strative issistant, Foundation and Government Support • Rachel 0. Nadjaiian, Donor Relations issistant • 
Genii Petersen, issistant Director of Foundation and Government Support • Julie A. Phaneuf, Assistant 
Director. Boston S\inp/m>i\ innuol Fund • Alicia Salmoni, Reseacher/Jrack Manager • George Saulnier, 
Data Entry Clerk • Bethanj Tammaro, idministrative issistant, Corporate Programs • Alleather Ton re. 
Leadership Gifts Officer • Valerie Vignaux, Administrative issistant, Annual Fund • Tracj Wilson. Director 

of Tanglewood Development 



'» 



EDUCATIONAL ACTIVITIES/ ARCH IVES 

Richard Ortner, Administrator of the Tanglewood Music Center 

My ran Parker-Brass, Coordinator of Youth Activities 

Bridget P. Carr, Archivist— Position endowed by Caroline Dwight Bain 

Assistant, Tanglewood Music Center 



Barbara Logue, Administrative 



FUNCTIONS OFFICE 

Cheryl Silvia Lopes, Function Manager 

Lesley Ann Cefalo, Assistant Function Manager • Elizabeth Francey-Amis, Assistant to the Function 

Manager/Tanglewood Function Coordinator 

HUMAN RESOURCES 

Marion Gardner-Saxe, Director of Human Resources 
Anna Asphar, Benefits Manager 

INFORMATION SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT 
Robert Bell, Manager of Information Systems 

William Beckett, Information Systems Coordinator • James Major, Information Systems Special 
Projects Coordinator * Michael Pijoan, Assistant Manager of Information Systems 

PUBLIC RELATIONS 

Bernadette M. Horgan, Director of Media Relations 

Susanna Bonta, Media Relations Coordinator • Caleb Cochran, Media Relations Assistant/Assistant to 
the Director of Public Relations and Marketing 

PUBLICATIONS 

Steven Ledbetter, Musicologist & Program Annotator 

Marc Mandel, Publications Manager 

Eleanor Hayes McGourty, Boston Pops Publications Coordinator/Marketing Copywriter 

SALES, SUBSCRIPTION, AND MARKETING 

Nancy A. Kay, Director of Sales & Marketing Manager 

Helen N.H. Brady, Group Sales Manager • Richard Chiarella, Graphic Designer • Susanna Concha, 
Marketing Coordinator • B. Victoria Johnson, Subscription Representative • Michael Miller, Symphony- 
Charge Manager • Michelene Miller, Group Sales Assistant • Kim Noltemy, Associate Marketing Manager • 
Carol Ann Passarelli, Subscription Manager • Brian Robinson, Senior Subscription Representative 

SYMPHONY HALL OPERATIONS 
Robert L. Gleason, Facilities Manager 
James E. Whitaker, House Manager 

H.R. Costa, Technical Supervisor • Michael Finlan, Switchboard Supervisor * Wilmoth A. Griffiths, 
Supervisor of Facilities Support Services • Catherine Lawlor, Administrative Assistant • John MacMinn, 
Supervisor of Building Maintenance • William D. McDonnell, Chief Steward • Cleveland Morrison, 
Stage Manager • Shawn Wilder, Mailroom Clerk 

House Crew Charles F. Cassell, Jr. • Francis Castillo • Thomas Davenport • John Demick, 
Stage Coordinator • Michael Frazier • Hank Green • Juan Jimenez • William P. Morrill • Mark 
C. Rawson 

Security Christopher Bartlett • Sean Glennon • David Parker, Security Supervisor 

Cleaning Crew Desmond Boland • Clifford Collins • Angelo Flores • Rudolph Lewis • Robert 
MacGilvray • Lindel Milton, Lead Cleaner 

TANGLEWOOD OPERATIONS 

James J. Mooney, Facilities Manager 

VOLUNTEER OFFICE 

Leslie Wu Foley, Director of Volunteer Services 

Jennifer Flynn, Senior Project Coordinator • Pauline McCance, Senior Administrative Assistant 






BSO 



The BSO's Great Benefactors 

Showing their love of music through gifts to 
endowment and the annual fund, 16,000 
donors today help to sustain the BSO's $50 
million annual budget. Thirty-three of these 
contributors — composed of individuals, cor- 
porations, foundations, government agen- 
cies, and estates — have each reached the 
$1 million mark in their cumulative giving. 
The Boston Symphony has chosen to present 
this week's Tuesday-evening concert in their 
honor, recognizing them as Great Benefac- 
tors. Many of the BSO's Great Benefactors 
began their history of giving at modest levels. 
To learn more about the variety of ways you 
can give to the orchestra, please call the 
Development Office at (617) 638-9250, or 
write to Julie Diaz, Campaign Director, Sym- 
phony Hall, Boston, MA 02115. 

Symphony Hall Tours 

As we approach the centennial of Symphony 
Hall in the year 2000, interest in tours of 
this historic building is growing. The Boston 
Symphony Association of Volunteers is 
pleased to offer tours of Symphony Hall, 
conducted by experienced tour guides, for 
groups of adults or children. The tours take 
approximately one hour and can be arranged 
between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through 
Friday, depending on the orchestra's sched- 
ule. For further information, please call Paul- 
ine McCance in the Volunteer Office at (617) 
638-9263. 

Taking the BSO Into the Next Century 

The next four years mark a critical period 
for the long-term future of the Boston Sym- 
phony Orchestra. The BSO is not immune 
to the cultural and financial challenges fac- 
ing arts organizations today. Consequently, 
the orchestra has launched the BSO/2000 
Campaign to maintain its artistic standards 
and to fulfill its mission of performance, out- 
reach, and training, the scope of which is 
unrivaled the world over. This $130 million 
fundraising effort is the largest of any sym- 
phonic organization. Continuing through the 
year 2000, the campaign will permit the or- 



chestra to sustain its seven enteiprises: the 
Boston Symphony Orchestra, the Boston Pops, 
the Tanglewood summer season, the Tangle- 
wood Music Center, the Boston Symphony 
Chamber Players, the Tanglewood Festival 
Chorus, and the facilities of Symphony Hall 
and Tanglewood. 

Serving as financial guardians of the BSO, 
individuals, corporation, foundations, gov- 
ernment agencies, and estates have already 
contributed more than $50 million toward 
this goal. If you would like to learn more 
about the orchestra's mission, its seven en- 
terprises, and the BSO/2000 Campaign, 
please call the Development Office at (617) 
638-0250, or write to Julie Diaz, Campaign 
Director, Symphony Hall, Boston, MA 02115. 

Mstislav Rostropovich to Give 
Special Master Class for 
Project STEP 

Project STEP (String Training and Education- 
al Program for students of color) is pleased 
to present a master class with Mstislav Ros- 
tropovich and young artists from Project 
STEP on Friday, April 4, from 4 to 5:30 p.m. 
in the Cabot-Cahners Room of Symphony 
Hall. The esteemed cellist, celebrating his 
seventieth birthday, will be performing in 
three concerts that week with Seiji Ozawa 
and the Boston Symphony Orchestra. Proj- 
ect STEP, now in its fifteenth year, is spon- 
sored by the Boston Symphony Orchestra, 
Boston University School for the Arts, the 
Greater Boston Youth Symphony Orchestras, 
and New England Conservatory. General ad- 
mission to the master class is $50 for adults 
and $10 for high school and college students, 
with patron tickets available at $100, bene- 
factor tickets at $250, and underwriter tickets 
at $500. Following the master class there 
will be a dessert reception in Higginson 
Hall. Proceeds will benefit Project STEP. 
For tickets or further information please 
call (617) 267-5777. 

New "Supper Talks" Series 

This past January the Boston Symphony 
introduced a new series of "Supper Talks" 

at which BSO Musicologist and Program 
Annotator Steven Ledbetler and BSO Publi- 
cations Manager Mare Mandel locus specili- 




Moving beyond 
mutual funds. 

An important part of a 
Fiduciary relationship. 

If you have $500,000 or more invested in mutual funds, 
you may have outgrown the type and kind of services that 
they are best able to provide. Taking the important step 
beyond funds to your own personal asset management 
portfolio and financial plan can be rewarding in several 
important ways. 

At Fiduciary, successful financial management involves 
the use of many financial disciplines that address a client's 
total financial situation combined with close personal 
service. 

• Portfolios at Fiduciary are constructed, allocated and 
managed individually by your own personal investment 
manager. 

• Personal risk preferences, screens and tax considera- 
tions are integrated into each client portfolio. 

• All of our investment, estate, retirement and planning 
services are provided under our fee which can be 
significantly less than mutual fund fees. 

Fiduciary, founded in 1885 as a family office, supervises 
over $5 billion of assets exclusively for individuals and fami- 
lies. If you would like to learn more about Fiduciary and its 
personal services, please call or write Charles R. Eddy, Jr. 
at (617) 574-3403. 



FIDUCIARY 




TRUST 



INVESTMENT MANAGERS AND TRUSTEES FOR 
INDIVIDUALS AND FAMILIES SINCE 1885. 

175 Federal Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02110-2289 
Telephone (617) 482-5270 



cally on the evenings BSO program. Begin- 
ning with a buffet-style supper, these "Sup- 
per Talks" offer insights into the evening's 
Boston Symphony program, including taped 
musical examples to enhance your apprecia- 
tion of the music under discussion. For the 
final "Supper Talks" of the season, Marc 
Mandel will discuss music of Schumann and 
Brahms on Thursday, April 17, and Friday, 
April 18. Doors open at 5:30 p.m. for a la 
carte cocktails and conversation. Supper is 
served at 6:15 p.m. in Higginson Hall in the 
Cohen Wing. These events are offered on an 
individual basis, even to those who are not 
attending the BSO concert. Tickets, priced 
at $24 per person, are available at the Sym- 
phony Hall Box Office or through Symphony- 
Charge at (617) 266-1200. There is a $2.50 
handling fee for each ticket ordered by tele- 
phone. For further information call the Sup- 
per Concerts information line at (617) 638- 
9328. 

The BSO Goes On-line 

Boston Symphony and Boston Pops fans 
with access to the Internet can now visit 
the orchestra's new official home page 
(http://www.bso.org), which provides up-to- 
the-minute information about all the orches- 
tra's activities. In addition to program listings 
and ticket prices, the web site has biogra- 
phies of BSO musicians and guest artists, 
current press releases, historical facts and 
figures, helpful telephone numbers, and in- 
formation on auditions and job openings. A 
highlight of the site, and a first for cultural 
organizations represented on the Internet, is 
a virtual-reality tour of the orchestra's home, 
Symphony Hall. Since the BSO web site will 
be updated on a regular basis, to include 
1997 Boston Pops and Tanglewood informa- 
tion as well as any program changes, we 
invite you to check in frequently. 

Public Funding for the 
Boston Symphony Orchestra 

The BSO is the recipient this season of an 
operating grant from the Massachusetts Cul- 
tural Council, an award being used to help 
underwrite the cost of subscription-season 



concerts. The mission of the Council is to 
promote excellence, access, education, and 
diversity in the arts, humanities, and inter- 
pretive sciences in order to improve the 
quality of life for all Massachusetts residents 
and contribute to the economic vitality of 
our communities. 

A state agency, the Massachusetts Cultural 
Council receives an annual appropriation 
from the Commonwealth, as well as support 
from the National Endowment for the Arts. 
The BSO has also received a grant from the 
NEA that helps make possible its yearly 
program of fifteen Youth Concerts. Govern- 
mental support also stimulates economic 
activity; in 1992, Massachusetts cultural 
organizations employed 20,000 people and 
generated $1.5 billion for the economy. In 
spite of all that it has accomplished, public 
funding for the arts has declined dramati- 
cally during the past ten years. The federal 
government currently spends only 32 cents 
per taxpayer on NEA, while Massachusetts 
spends $2.31 per head on MCC. 

The orchestra urges you to contact your 
state and federal representatives, or other 
congressional leaders, to express your ap- 
preciation for the music that public support 
helps make available to you as a member of 
Boston Symphony audiences. For more in- 
formation on public funding for the arts and 
how to contact your representatives, please 
call Gerrit Petersen, the BSO's Assistant 
Director of Foundation and Government 
Support, at (617) 638-9462. 

Ticket Resale 

If, as a Boston Symphony subscriber, you 
find yourself unable to use your subscrip- 
tion ticket, please make that ticket available 
for resale by calling (617) 266-1492 during 
business hours. You may also leave your 
ticket information on the Resale Line at 
(617) 638-9426 at any time. In this way you 
help bring needed revenue to the orchestra 
and at the same time make your seat avail- 
able to someone who might otherwise be 
unable to attend the concert. A mailed re- 
ceipt will acknowledge your tax-deductible 
contribution. 














1 995 Simplex Time Recorder Co 



8 




SEIJI OZAWA 

Seiji Ozawa is now in his twenty-fourth season as music director 
of the Boston Symphony Orchestra. Mr. Ozawa became the 
BSO's thirteenth music director in 1973, after a year as music 
adviser; his tenure with the Boston Symphony is the longest of 
any music director currently active with an American orches- 
tra. In his nearly twenty-five years as music director, Mr. Ozawa 
has maintained the orchestra's distinguished reputation both at 
home and abroad, with concerts at Symphony Hall and Tangle- 
wood, on tours to Europe, Japan, Hong Kong, China, and South 
America, and across the United States, including regular con- 
certs in New York. Mr. Ozawa has upheld the BSO's commit- 
ment to new music through the commissioning of new works, including a series of cen- 
tennial commissions marking the orchestra's hundredth birthday in 1981, a series of 
works celebrating the fiftieth anniversary of the Tanglewood Music Center in 1990, and 
a current series represented this season by new works from Leon Kirchner and Bernard 
Rands. In addition, he has recorded more than 130 works with the orchestra, represent- 
ing more than fifty different composers, on ten labels. 

In addition to his work with the Boston Symphony, Mr. Ozawa appears regularly 
with the Berlin Philharmonic, the New Japan Philharmonic, the London Symphony, the 
Orchestre National de France, the Philharmonia of London, and the Vienna Philhar- 
monic. He made his Metropolitan Opera debut in December 1992, appears regularly at 
La Scala and the Vienna Staatsoper, and has also conducted opera at the Paris Opera, 
Salzburg, and Covent Garden. In September 1992 he founded the Saito Kinen Festival 
in Matsumoto, Japan, in memory of his teacher Hideo Saito, a central figure in the cul- 
tivation of Western music and musical technique in Japan, and a co-founder of the 
Toho School of Music in Tokyo. In addition to his many Boston Symphony recordings, 
Mr. Ozawa has recorded with the Berlin Philharmonic, the Chicago Symphony, the 
London Philharmonic, the Orchestre National, the Orchestre de Paris, the Philharmonia 
of London, the Saito Kinen Orchestra, the San Francisco Symphony, the Toronto Sym- 
phony, and the Vienna Philharmonic, among others. 

Born in 1935 in Shenyang, China, Seiji Ozawa studied music from an early age and 
later graduated with first prizes in composition and conducting from Tokyo's Toho School 
of Music. In 1959 he won first prize at the International Competition of Orchestra Con- 
ductors held in Besancon, France. Charles Munch, then music director of the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra, subsequently invited him to attend the Tanglewood Music Center, 
where he won the Koussevitzky Prize for outstanding student conductor in 1960. While 
a student of Herbert von Karajan in West Berlin, Mr. Ozawa came to the attention of 
Leonard Bernstein, who appointed him assistant conductor of the New York Philharmon- 
ic for the 1961-62 season. He made his first professional concert appearance in North 
America in January 1962, with the San Francisco Symphony. He was music director of 
the Chicago Symphony Orchestra's Ravinia Festival for five summers beginning in 1964, 
music director of the Toronto Symphony from 1965 to 1969, and music director of the 
San Francisco Symphony from 1970 to 1976, followed by a year as that orchestra's 
music adviser. He conducted the Boston Symphony Orchestra for the first time in 1964, 
at Tanglewood, and made his first Symphony Hall appearance with the orchestra in 
January 1968. In 1970 he became an artistic director of Tanglewood. 

Mr. Ozawa recently became the first recipient of Japan's Inouye Sho ("Inouye 
Award"). Created to recognize lifetime achievement in the arts, the award is named 
after this century's preeminent Japanese novelist, Yasushi Inouye. In September 1994 
Mr. Ozawa received his second Emmy award, for Individual Achievement in Cultural 
Programming, for "Dvorak in Prague: A Celebration," with the Boston Symphony Orches- 
tra. He won his first Emmy for the Boston Symphony Orchestra's PBS television scries 
"Evening at Symphony." Mr. Ozawa holds honorary doctor of music degrees from the 
University of Massachusetts, the New England Conservatory of Music, and Wheaton 
College in Norton, Massachusetts 








First Violins 

Malcolm Lowe 

Concertmaster 
Charles Munch chair, 
fully funded in perpetuity 

Tamara Smirnova 

Associate Concertmaster 
Helen Horner Mclntyre chair, 
endowed in perpetuity in 1976 



BOSTON SYMPHONY 

ORCHESTRA 

1996-97 

Seiji Ozawa 

Music Director 

Music Directorship endowed by 

John Moors Cabot 

Bernard Haitink 

Principal Guest Conductor 




Assistant Concertmaster 

Robert L. Beal, and 

Enid L. and Bruce A. Beal chair, 

endowed in perpetuity in 1 980 
Laura Park 

Assistant Concertmaster 

Edward and Bertha C. Rose chair 
Bo Youp Hwang 

John and Dorothy Wilson chair, 

fully funded in perpetuity 
Lucia Lin 

Forrest Foster Collier chair 
Leo Panasevich 

Carolyn and George Rowland chair 
Gottfried Wilfinger 

Dorothy Q. and David B. Arnold, Jr., 

chair, fully funded in perpetuity 
Alfred Schneider 

Muriel C. Kasdon 

and Marjorie C. Paley chair 
Raymond Sird 

Ruth and Carl Shapiro chair, 

fully funded in perpetuity 
Ikuko Mizuno 

David and Ingrid Kosowsky chair 
Amnon Levy 

Theodore W. and Evelyn Berenson 

Family chair 

* Harvey Seigel 

Stephanie Morris Marryott and 
Franklin J. Marryott chair 

* Nancy Bracken 
*Aza Raykhtsaum 

* Bonnie Bewick 

* James Cooke 

* Victor Romanul 

Bessie Pappas chair 

* Catherine French 

Second Violins 

Marylou Speaker Churchill 

Principal 

Fahnestock chair 
Vyacheslav Uritsky 

Assistant Principal 

Charlotte and Irving W. Rabb chair, 

endowed in perpetuity in 1977 
Ronald Knudsen 

Edgar and Shirley Grossman chair 
Joseph McGauley 

Shirley and J. Richard Fennell chair 
Ronan Lefkowitz 

David H. and Edith C. Howie chair, 

fully fiinded in perpetuity 
*Jerome Rosen 

* Sheila Fiekowsky 

* Jennie Shames 

* Participating in a system of rotated 
seating 
$On sabbatical leave 
°On leave 
§ Substitute player 



* Valeria Vilker Kuchment 
*Tatiana Dimitriades 
*Si-Jing Huang 

* Nicole Monahan 

* Kelly Barr 
*Wendy Putnam 

Violas 

Steven Ansell 

Principal 

Charles S. Dana chair, 

endowed in perpetuity in 1970 
Hui Liu 

Assistant Principal 

Anne Stoneman chair, 

fully funded in perpetuity 
Ronald Wilkison 

Lois and Harlan Anderson chair 

Robert Barnes 

Burton Fine 

Joseph Pietropaolo 

Michael Zaretsky 

Marc Jeanneret 

*Mark Ludwig 

Helene R. Cahners-Kaplan and 
Carol R. Goldberg chair 

* Rachel Fagerburg 

* Edward Gazouleas 
*Kazuko Matsusaka 

Cellos 

Jules Eskin 

Principal 

Philip R. Allen chair, 

endowed in perpetuity in 1969 
Martha Babcock 

Assistant Principal 

Vernon and Marion Alden chair, 

endowed in perpetuity in 1977 
Sato Knudsen 

Esther S. and Joseph M. Shapiro chair 
Joel Moerschel 

Sandra and David Bakalar chair 
Luis Leguia 

Robert Bradford Newman chair, 

fully funded in perpetuity 
Carol Procter 

Lillian and Nathan R. Miller chair 

* Ronald Feldman 

Richard C. and Ellen E. Paine chair, 
fully funded in perpetuity 

* Jerome Patterson 

Charles and JoAnne Dickinson chair 

* Jonathan Miller 

Rosemary and Donald Hudson chair 
*Owen Young 

John F. Cogan, Jr., and 
Mary L. Cornille chair, 
fully funded in perpetuity 

* Andrew Pearce 

Gordon and Mary Ford Kingsley 
Family chair 

Basses 

Edwin Barker 

Principal 

Harold D. Hodgkinson chair, 

endowed in perpetuity in 1974 
Lawrence Wolfe 

Assistant Principal 

Maria Nistazos Stata chair, 

fully funded in perpetuity 



10 



Joseph Hearne 

Leith Family chair. 

fully funded in perpetuity 
John Salkowski 

Joseph and Jan Brett Hearne chair 

* Robert Olson 

* James Orleans 
*Todd Seeber 
*John Stovall 
*Dennis Roy 

Flutes 

Elizabeth Ostling 

Acting Principal 

Walter Piston chair, 

endowed in perpetuity in 1970 
Fenwick Smith 

Myra and Robert Kraft chair, 

endowed in perpetuity in 1 981 



Assistant Principal 
Marian Gray Lewis chair, 
fully funded in perpetuity 

Piccolo 

Geralyn Coticone 
Evelyn and C. Charles Marran 
chair, endowed in perpetuity in 1979 

Oboes 

Alfred Genovese 

Principal 

Mildred B. Remis chair, 
endowed in perpetuity in 1975 
Mark McEwen 

Keisuke Wakao 
Assistant Principal 
Elaine and Jerome Rosenfeld chair 

English Horn 

Robert Sheena 
Beranek chair, 
fully funded in perpetuity 

Clarinets 

William R. Hudgins 

Principal 

Ann S.M. Banks chair, 
endowed in perpetuity in 1977 
Scott Andrews 

Thomas Martin 
Associate Principal & E-flat clarinet 
Stanton W. and Elisabeth K. Davis 
chair, fully funded in perpetuity 



Bass Clarinet 

Craig Nordstrom 
Farla and Harvey Chet 
Krentzman chair, 
fully funded in perpetuity 

Bassoons 

Richard Svoboda 

Principal 

Edward A. Taft chair, 

endowed in perpetuity in 1974 
Roland Small 

Richard Ranti 

Associate Principal 

Contrabassoon 

Gregg Henegar 
Helen Rand Thayer chair 

Horns 

Charles Kavalovski 

Principal 

Helen Sagojf Slosberg chair, 

endowed in perpetuity in 1974 
Richard Sebring 

Associate Principal 

Margaret Andersen Congleton 

chair, fully funded in perpetuity 
Daniel Katzen 

Elizabeth B. Storer chair 
Jay Wadenpfuhl 
Richard Mackey 
Jonathan Menkis 

Trumpets 

Charles Schlueter 

Principal 

Roger Louis Voisin chair, 

endowed in perpetuity in 1977 
Peter Chapman 

Ford H. Cooper chair 
Timothy Morrison 

Associate Principal 

Nina L. and Eugene B. 

Doggett chair 
Thomas Rolfs 

Trombones 

tRonald Barron 
Principal 

J. P. and Mary B. Barger chair, 
fully funded in perpetuity 



Norman Bolter 
§Darren Acosta 

Bass Trombone 

Douglas Yeo 

Tuba 

Chester Schmitz 
Margaret and William C. 
Rousseau chair, 

fully funded in perpetuity 

Timpani 

Everett Firth 

Sylvia Shippen Wells chair, 
endowed in perpetuity in 1974 

Percussion 

Thomas Gauger 

Peter and Anne Brooke chair, 
fully funded in perpetuity 
Frank Epstein 

Peter Andrew Lurie chair 
J. William Hudgins 

Timothy Genis 
Assistant Timpanist 

Harps 

X Ann Hobson Pilot 
Principal 

Willona Henderson Sinclair chair 
Sarah Schuster Ericsson 

Librarians 

Marshall Burlingame 

Principal 

Lia and William Poorvu chair 
William Shisler 
Sandra Pearson 

Assistant Conductor 

Richard Westerfield 
Anna E. Finnerty chair 

Personnel Managers 

Lynn Larsen 
Bruce M. Creditor 

Stage Manager 

Position endowed by 
Angelica L. Russell 
Peter Riley Pfitzinger 




11 



A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

Now in its 116th season, the Boston Symphony Orchestra gave its inaugural concert 
on October 22, 1881, and has continued to uphold the vision of its founder, the philan- 
thropist, Civil War veteran, and amateur musician Henry Lee Higginson, for more than 
a century. Under the leadership of Seiji Ozawa, its music director since 1973, the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra has performed throughout the United States, as well as in Europe, 
Japan, Hong Kong, South America, and China, and reaches audiences numbering in the 
millions through its performances on radio, television, and recordings. It plays an active 
role in commissioning new works from today's most important composers; its summer 
season at Tanglewood is regarded as one of the world's most important music festivals; 
it helps develop the audience of the future through BSO Youth Concerts and through a 
variety of outreach programs involving the entire Boston community; and, during the 
Tanglewood season, it sponsors the Tanglewood Music Center, one of the world's most 
important training grounds for young composers, conductors, instrumentalists, and 
vocalists. The orchestra's virtuosity is reflected in the concert and recording activities of 
the Boston Symphony Chamber Players, the world's only permanent chamber ensemble 
made up of a major symphony orchestra's principal players. The activities of the Boston 
Pops Orchestra have established an international standard for the performance of lighter 
kinds of music. Overall, the mission of the Boston Symphony Orchestra is to foster and 
maintain an organization dedicated to the making of music consonant with the highest 
aspirations of musical art, creating performances and providing educational and training 
programs at the highest level of excellence. This is accomplished with the continued 
support of its audiences, governmental assistance on both the federal and local levels, 
and through the generosity of many foundations, businesses, and individuals. 

Henry Lee Higginson dreamed of founding a great and permanent orchestra in his 
home town of Boston for many years before that vision approached reality in the spring 
of 1881. The following October the first Boston Symphony Orchestra concert was given 
under the direction of conductor Georg Henschel, who would remain as music director 
until 1884. For nearly twenty years Boston Symphony concerts were held in the Old 
Boston Music Hall; Symphony Hall, one of the world's most highly regarded concert 
halls, was opened in 1900. Henschel was succeeded by a series of German-born and 
-trained conductors — Wilhelm Gericke, Arthur Nikisch, Emil Paur, and Max Fiedler — 
culminating in the appointment of the legendary Karl Muck, who served two tenures as 
music director, 1906-08 and 1912-18. Meanwhile, in July 1885, the musicians of the 
Boston Symphony had given their first "Promenade" concert, offering both music and 
refreshments, and fulfilling Major Higginson's wish to give "concerts of a lighter kind of 




The first photograph, actually a collage, of the Boston Symphony Orchestra under Georg Henschel, 
taken 1882 



12 






music." These concerts, soon to be given in the springtime and renamed first "Popular" 
and then "Pops," fast became a tradition. 

In 1915 the orchestra made its first transcontinental trip, playing thirteen concerts 
at the Panama-Pacific Exposition in San Francisco. Recording, begun with RCA in 1917, 
continued with increasing frequency, as did radio broadcasts. In 1918 Henri Rabaud 
was engaged as conductor; he was succeeded a year later by Pierre Monteux. These 
appointments marked the beginning of a French-oriented tradition which would be 
maintained, even during the Russian-born Serge Koussevitzky's time, with the employ- 
ment of many French-trained musicians. 

The Koussevitzky era began in 1924. His extraordinary musicianship and electric 
personalitv proved so enduring that he served an unprecedented term of twenty-five 
years. Regular radio broadcasts of Boston Symphony concerts began during Kousse- 
vitzky's years as music director. In 1936 Koussevitzky led the orchestra's first concerts 
in the Berkshires; a year later he and the players took up annual summer residence at 
Tanglewood. Koussevitzky passionately shared Major Higginson's dream of "a good hon- 
est school for musicians," and in 1940 that dream was realized with the founding of the 
Berkshire Music Center (now called the Tanglewood Music Center). 

In 1929 the free Esplanade concerts on the Charles River in Boston were inaugurat- 
ed by Arthur Fiedler, who had been a member of the orchestra since 1915 and who in 
1930 became the eighteenth conductor of the Boston Pops, a post he would hold for half 
a century, to be succeeded by John Williams in 1980. The Boston Pops Orchestra cele- 
brated its hundredth birthday in 1985 under Mr. Williams's baton. Keith Lockhart 
began his tenure as twentieth conductor of the Boston Pops in May 1995, succeeding 
Mr. Williams. 

Charles Munch followed Koussevitzky as music director of the Boston Symphony 
Orchestra in 1949. Munch continued Koussevitzky's practice of supporting contempo- 
rary composers and introduced much music from the French repertory to this country. 
During his tenure the orchestra toured abroad for the first time and its continuing series 
of Youth Concerts was initiated. Erich Leinsdorf began his seven-year term as music 
director in 1962. Leinsdorf presented numerous premieres, restored many forgotten and 
neglected works to the repertory, and, like his two predecessors, made many recordings 
for RCA; in addition, many concerts were televised under his direction. Leinsdorf was 
also an energetic director of the Tanglewood Music Center; under his leadership a full- 
tuition fellowship program was established. Also during these years, in 1964, the Boston 
Symphony Chamber Players were founded. William Steinberg succeeded Leinsdorf in 
1969. He conducted a number of American and world premieres, made recordings for 
Deutsche Grammophon and RCA, appeared regularly on television, led the 1971 Euro- 
pean tour, and directed concerts on the east coast, in the south, and in the mid-west. 

Now in his twenty-fourth season as the BSO's music director, Seiji Ozawa became the 
thirteenth conductor to hold that post in the fall of 1973, following a year as music ad- 
viser and having already been appointed an artistic director of the Tanglewood Festival 
in 1970. During his tenure as music director Mr. Ozawa has continued to solidify the or- 
chestra's reputation both at home and abroad. He has also reaffirmed the BSO's commit- 
ment to new music, through a series of centennial commissions marking the orchestra's 
100th birthday, a series of works celebrating the fiftieth anniversary of the Tanglewood 
Music Center in 1990, and a continuing series of commissions from composers includ- 
ing Henri Dutilleux, Lukas Foss, Alexander Goehr, John Harbison, Hans Werner Henzc. 
Leon Kirchner, Bernard Rands, Sir Michael Tippett, and Yehudi Wyner. Under his direc- 
tion the orchestra has also expanded ils recording activities, to include releases on the 
Philips. Telarc, Son) Classical/CBS Masterworks, EMI/Angel, Hyperion. New World, 
and Erato labels. In 1995 Seiji Ozawa and the Boston Symphony Orchestra welcomed 
Bernard tiaitink in his new role as Principal Guesl Conductor, in which capacity 
Mr. Haitink conducts and records with the orchestra, and also teaches ai Tanglewood. 

Today the Boston Symphony Orchestra. Inc. presents more than 250 conceits annu- 
ally. It is an ensemble that has richly fnllilled Henry I -ee Higginson's vision ol a great 
and permanent orchestra in Boston. 

















1 






■ 




















■ mr 









L3 



BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

Seiji Ozawa, Music Director 

Bernard Haitink, Principal Guest Conductor 

One Hundred and Sixteenth Season, 1996-97 

Thursday, March 27, at 8 
Friday, March 28, at 8 
Saturday, March 29, at 8 
Tuesday, April 1, at 8 

JOHN WILLIAMS conducting 




&^^> 



QUANTZ 



Flute Concerto in G 

Allegro 
Adagio. Mesto 
Presto 

JAMES GALWAY 



WILLIAMS 



The Five Sacred Trees, Concerto for Bassoon 
and Orchestra 

I. E6 Mugna 
II. Tortan 

III. Tree of Ross (Eo Rossa) 

IV. Craeb Uisnig 
V. Dathi 

RICHARD SVOBODA 



INTERMISSION 



The Tuesday-evening concert is presented in honor of the 
Great Benefactors of the Boston Symphony Orchestra (see page 16). 



These concerts will end about 9:50. 

RCA, Deutsche Grammophon, Philips, Telarc, Sony Classical/CBS Masterworks, Angel/EMI, 
London /Decca, Erato, Hyperion, and New World records 

Baldwin piano 

Please be sure the electronic signal on your watch or pager is switched off 
during the concert. 

Boston Symphony Orchestra concerts are funded in part by a grant from the 
Massachusetts Cultural Council, a state agency. 



14 



Week 19 



tv 



■ 



CORIGLIANO Pied Piper Fantasy, for flute and orchestra 

I. Sunrise and the Piper's Song 
II. The Rats 

III. Battle With the Rats 

IV. War Cadenza 

V. The Piper's Victory 
VI. The Burgher's Chorale 
VII. The Children's March 

JAMES GALWAY 



with assisting flutists 
DENNIS WRIGHT, COLLEEN CANNATA, and AMANDA DUDLEY of Boston 
Latin Academy; VENESSA SUM of Dorchester High School; AMELIA LUKAS, 

SARAH PAYSNICK, and KELLEY RUSSELL of the Greater Boston Youth 

Symphony Orchestras; TAMMY GHATTAS, SUSAN NORRIS, and JULIE WANG 

of Wellesley High School; KATHRYN HAKIM, SEONG-EUN KIM, and 

LINDSAY O'CONNELL of the New England Conservatory Youth Philharmonic 

Orchestra; HEIKO TODT of Burncoat Senior High School, Worcester; 

CHERYL BURRELL and JENNIFER-LEE VAN DYKE of Peabody High School; 

and STEPHANIE FRAMPTON of Newton South High School 



■ 

■ 









*' 



Introduction to the Program 

This week's concert features three concertos for wind instruments. One of these, 
some two-and-a-half-centuries old, is set forth in the standard three-movement 
pattern that was established by Italian composers in the Baroque era some three 
hundred years ago. But the other two, creations of the last decade, take a differ- 
ent tack — and it is one that has a fascinating resonance in that both concertos 
can be called, in some sense, programmatic. John Williams and John Corigliano, 
in composing their concertos for woodwind instruments, consciously decided not 
to contribute one more work to the three-movement pattern (fast-slow-fast) fol- 
lowed by so many hundreds of concertos over the centuries — not that there is 
anything wrong with that pattern, even now, if the composer has a way of justify- 
ing the choice! Instead, they have both found inspiration in literary works and 
ideas that are also symbolic statements about the environment in which we live, 
celebrations of the natural world that existed long before our intrusive arrival. 
One of these works — John Williams's The hive Sacred Decs — is poetic and con- 
templative in character; the other — John Corigliano's Pied Piper Fantasy — is 
dramatic and exuberant. Taken together with the QuantZ concerto, these recent 
scores demonstrate anew the flexibility, the range, and the variety of even the 
most venerable of musical types. 

— S.L. 



L5 






Great Benefactors of the Boston Symphony Orchestra 

In building his great new orchestra for America, Henry Lee Higginson 
knew that ticket revenues could never fully cover costs. He shouldered 
the orchestra's $20,000-$50,000 annual deficit personally. From 1881 to 
1918 his donations exceeded $1 million. Today, the Boston Symphony 
Orchestra gratefully acknowledges the thirty-three individuals, corpora- 
tions, foundations, government agencies, and estates that have each sur- 
passed the $1 million mark with their cumulative giving. 

Anonymous (2) 

Mr. and Mrs. David. B. Arnold, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. P. Barger 

Gabriella and Leo Beranek 

Mr. and Mrs. Peter A. Brooke 

The Chiles Foundation 

Mr. and Mrs. Julian Cohen 

Mr. and Mrs. William H. Congleton 

John F. Cogan, Jr., and Ms. Mary L. Cornille 

Mr. and Mrs. Lewis S. Dabney 

Mr. and Mrs. Nelson J. Darling, Jr. 

Mrs. Stanton W. Davis 

Dr. and Mrs. J. Richard Fennell 

Fidelity Investments 

Mr. and Mrs. John H. Fitzpatrick 

The Germeshausen Foundation 

The Estate of Marie Gillet 

The Gillette Company 

Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Chet Krentzman 

The Kresge Foundation 

Mr. and Mrs. R. Willis Leith, Jr. 

The Estate of Augusta W Little 

Massachusetts Office of Travel and Tourism 

Mr. and Mrs. Nathan R. Miller 

National Endowment for the Arts 

NEC Corporation 

Norio Ohga 

Mr. and Mrs. William J. Poorvu 

Dr. and Mrs. Raymond H. Schneider 

Mr. and Mrs. Carl Shapiro 

Mr. and Mrs. Ray Stata 

Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Stoneman 



16 



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Johaiui Joachim Quantz 

Concerto in G for fllute, strings, and basso continuo, QV 5:174 

J oh ann Joachim Quantz was born in Oberscheden, near 
Hannoversch-Munden, Germany, on January 30, 1697, 
and died in Potsdam, just outside Berlin, on July 12, 
1 773. He composed this G major concerto, which is 
identified as number 5:1 74 in the complete catalogue 
of Quantz s works, about 1745 for Frederick the Great, 
King of Prussia, who may have played the first perform- 
ance himself, or else listened to a performance by Quantz 
given at Fredericks palace of Sans Souci ("Carefree") 
in Potsdam. These are the first performances by the 
Boston Symphony Orchestra. In addition to the solo 
flute, the score calls for string ensemble with continuo. 
Fredericks own ensemble was chamber-music sized, 
with one instrument for each of the string parts, plus 
harpsichord and an optional bassoon to double the bass line. But Quantz also gave per- 
formances of these concertos in larger halls where more strings would have performed 
each part, as here. The continuo harpsichordist at these performances is Mark Kroll. 

There have been many monarchs over the centuries with strong musical inclinations, 
including a fair number reported to have been fine performers on various instruments. 
But very few heads of state have gained much renown as composers. With the possible 
exception of England's Henry VIII (who left a few part-songs, some of them quite charm- 
ing) and Queen Victoria's consort Prince Albert (not, to be sure, a head of state himself), 
whose collected works are mostly parlor songs and piano pieces of a Mendelssohnian 
stamp, it is hard to think of any king or prince who wrote much in the way of substan- 
tial musical works, except for Frederick the Great of Prussia. This monarch — officially 
Frederick II, who lived from 1712 to 1786 and reigned for nearly a half-century, from 
May 30, 1740 — was not only one of Europe's most important military leaders and polit- 
ical rulers, but also a superb writer of political philosophy (writing in French, a lan- 
guage he had perfected in a distinguished correspondence with Voltaire), and a remark- 
ably gifted musician, as flutist, composer, and opera librettist. 

Frederick's father, the "barracks king" Wilhelm I, was displeased at his young son's 
predilection for intellectual pursuits and tried to supervise his early years in such a 
way that he would have no time for anything but such "masculine" pursuits as warfare 
and hunting. But his mother and older sister provided the "forbidden" books and gave 
him the opportunity of playing flute duets with a servant. Already at the age of seven 
he had the opportunity of studying thoroughbass (the Baroque practice of practical har- 
mony at the keyboard), and at sixteen he heard in Dresden a performance of Hasse's 
opera Cleofide, by which he was overwhelmed. That visit proved to have even greater 
significance, because he also heard the playing of a flutist named Quantz, who soon 
started traveling to Berlin to give lessons to the young prince. 

Frederick's father absolutely prohibited his further participation in such amusements, 
and, at the age of eighteen, he attempted to escape to England. The attempt was a fail- 
ure, and, as partial punishment, Frederick was forced to observe the beheading of one 
of the courtiers who had assisted him in his plans. Now he reluctantly agreed to marry 
the bride chosen for him, and to pursue his military activities. He did this with such 
diligence that even his father gained confidence in his abilities, but he also continued 
to maintain a musical establishment and study with Quantz. When he ascended the 
throne in 1740, he was finally able to exercise the musical interests that he had SO long 
developed almost in secret, while at the same lime undertaking a number of successful 
military ventures. He established the Berlin opera, broughl Quant/ to court as a perma- 



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Week 19 




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nent fixture in 1741, and employed C.P.E. Bach, the eldest son of the Cantor of Leipzig, 
who, in turn, engineered the famous visit by J.S. Bach to the court at Potsdam in 1747, 
which led to the composition of Bach's Musical Offering. Frederick wrote, or took part 
(as collaborator or consultant) in the writing of virtually all of the opera librettos com- 
posed by Graun, the head of the opera. The principal musical entertainment in Berlin, 
or at the king's pleasure palace of Sans Souci in Potsdam, was the performance of sona- 
tas and concertos featuring the flute, with the solo parts performed either by Frederick 
or by Quantz. And the king himself actually composed some flute concertos, though he 
essentially created the melody line and bass, leaving the inner parts to be filled out by 
a musical assistant — not because he was incapable of doing so, but because the demands 
of state usually deprived him of the essential free time. 

This remarkable patron provided a happy and stable environment for his flute and 
composition teacher, Johann Joachim Quantz, whose last thirty-two years were spent 
at a peak of fame in full-time service with Frederick. Like most musicians of his day, 
Quantz was a capable player on a number of instruments — violin, oboe, and trumpet — 
but he showed particular skill and expressive genius on the flute. He extended his ex- 
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instrumental styles of each of the principal centers of music in Europe. Once Frederick 
became king. Quantz enjoyed a favored position; relieved of the necessity of participat- 
ing in the opera orchestra, he was charged with organizing the chamber music soirees 
and composing music for the flute, receiving extra payments, over his already generous 
salary, for each new composition. In addition he was a lively writer who left an informa- 
tive autobiography and, especially, a treatise on playing the flute, which is really an 
encyclopedic presentation of virtually all aspects of musical performance in the middle 
of the eighteenth century. This book, Versuch einer Anweisung die Flote traversiere zu 
spielen (a title more simply translated as On Playing the Flute), remains one of the basic 
sources of our information about musical performance in the milieu of J.S. Bach, offer- 
ing information of benefit to all musicians, not just flutists. 

Needless to say, most of Quantz's works employ the flute in some capacity. These in- 
clude 204 sonatas for flute and basso continuo, some three dozen works for unaccom- 
panied flute, forty-five trio sonatas, and nearly 300 concertos for flute, strings, and 
basso continuo — and that is only a partial listing! There is virtually no way of being 
certain when any given concerto was composed or premiered. The G major concerto to 
be heard here was probably composed about 1745 and was certainly heard then, but 
after Frederick's death it fell into disuse. Quantz's own score is lost, but several sets of 
orchestral parts survive; as indicated by markings on the pages themselves, one was 
intended for use at the Charlottenburg Palace in Berlin, a second for the City Palace in 
Potsdam, and a third for Sans Souci — suggesting that Frederick must have been espe- 
cially fond of this piece to have had the music copied out several times over and kept 
at each of his residences. The third copy was given by Quantz to his friend Pisendel, 
the foremost German violinist of his day, whom Quantz had known since arriving at 
Dresden as a young man. It was Pisendel's parts that turned up in Dresden more than 
a century after his death, making possible an 1877 performance and the 1884 publica- 
tion of the concerto. Given the fact that virtually none of Quantz's music was published 
in the nineteenth century, it was almost certainly this concerto that was heard in New 
York's Chickering Hall on February 14, 1889, probably the first of Quantz's pieces to 
be performed in the United States. 

Quantz's concertos fall midway between the high Baroque concertos of Vivaldi and 
the Classical concerto of the next generation after him. Structurally they retain the fast- 
slow-fast arrangement of the three traditional movements of the Baroque concerto. They 
also retain the Baroque ritornello form — in which the essential material is exposed in 
its entirety at the outset by the orchestra before the soloist enters with a version of that 
material that leads off into foreign keys. For the rest of the piece, the ritornello appears 
several times, in various keys, sometimes complete, sometimes truncated, as a firm 
point of solidity linked by the virtuosic line of the solo instrument. But Quantz's melo- 
dies are far more straightforward, and his harmonies generally simpler, than those of 
Bach and his predecessors. These elements are signs of the changing musical language 
and the general simplification that was to be at the heart of the Classical style. The slow 
movement is in the key of G minor in a songful pensive mood, while the final Presto 
races along with high spirits and brilliant virtuosity. 

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John Williams 

The Five Sacred Trees, Concerto for Bassoon and Orchestra 

John Williams was born in New York on February 8, 
1 932, and lives in Los Angeles. He composed The Five 
Sacred Trees on a commission from the New York Phil- 
harmonic Orchestra for its principal bassoonist, Judith 
LeClair, on the occasion of the orchestras 150th anni- 
versary (December 7, 1992). Judith LeClair was soloist 
in the first performance on April 12, 1995, with Kurt 
Masur conducting the New York Philharmonic. These 
are the first performances by the Boston Symphony Or- 
chestra. In addition to the solo bassoon, the score calls 
for three flutes (third doubling piccolo), two oboes and 
English horn, two clarinets and bass clarinet, two bas- 
soons and contrabassoon, four horns in F, three trum- 
pets in C, three trombones, bass trombone, tuba, harp, 
piano, celesta, timpani, percussion battery, and strings. The percussion battery includes 
glockenspiel, vibraphone, marimba, triangle, suspended cymbal, sizzle cymbal, Irish 
Bodhrdn drum (optional), Hawaiian pulli sticks, tubular bells (optional), small wood 
blocks, thin Japanese sticks, medium gong, ratchet, and maracas (medium-large). The 
duration of the piece is 20-22 minutes. 

John Williams began learning piano at the age of eight in New York, continuing in 
Los Angeles, where his family moved when he was sixteen. Work in the service bands 
of the U.S. Air Force gave him the opportunity to begin orchestrating and conducting. 
In 1954 he returned to New York and studied piano for a year with Rosina Lhevinne at 
Juilliard. During this time his principal musical activities were as a jazz pianist. But as 
soon as he returned to Los Angeles, where he enrolled at UCLA and took private com- 
position lessons with Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco, among others, he was in demand as a 
pianist at the Hollywood studios, and from there it was a short hop to begin orchestrat- 
ing for the films and then composing for them. It is, of course, in the area of film in 
which he has achieved his greatest renown over the last quarter-century. But he has 
always continued to compose concert works, drawing upon his wide familiarity with the 
capabilities of orchestral instruments and on a vivid orchestral imagination. A large 
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(composed for the Boston Pops and Chester Schnritz), and cello (composed for Yo-Yo 
Ma and premiered by the Boston Symphony Orchestra under Mr. Williams's direction 
at the 1994 opening of Seiji Ozawa Hall at Tanglewood). 

When the New York Philharmonic commissioned him to write a bassoon concerto as 
one of a series of new works commemorating that orchestra's 150th anniversary (and, 
incidentally, to showcase its principal players), he conceived of an unusual approach to 
the concerto, inspired by Celtic tree lore, and perhaps also by the fact that the Italian 
word for bassoon, "''fagotto,' 1 '' means "a bundle of sticks" — hence, parts of a tree. Each 
of the five diverse movements evokes a traditional ancient prayer made before the cut- 
ting of a different kind of tree, as the composer explains in his own program note, re- 
printed here. 

— S.L. 

As we become increasingly aware of the damage done by the destruction of our 
forests, it is illuminating to discover that our ancestors, many thousands of years 
ago, prayed to the spirits before felling a tree. One prayer was appropriate for a 
maple, another for the elm, the ash, and so on. 

The English poet, Robert Graves, writes of these prayers, which I have been 
unable to find but which, nonetheless, have moved me to compose this music 
about trees featuring the bassoon, itself a tree. 

This is all the result of a request for a concerto by the great bassoonist Judith 
LeClair, whose unparalleled artistry is a mystery and a wonder in itself. 

I. 

E6 Mugna, the great oak, whose roots extend to Connla's Well in the "other- 
world," stands guard over what is the source of the River Shannon and the font 
of all wisdom. The well is probably the source of all music, too. The inspiration 
for this movement is the Irish Uilleann pipe, a distant ancestor of the bassoon, 
whose music evokes the spirit of Mugna and the sacred well. 

II. 

Tortan is a tree that has been associated with witches and as a result, the 
fiddle appears, sawing away, as it is conjoined with the music of the bassoon. 
The Irish Bodhran drum assists. 

III. 
The Tree of Ross (or Eo Rossa) is a yew, and although the yew is often re- 
ferred to as a symbol of death and destruction, the Tree of Ross is the subject of 
much rhapsodizing in literature. It is referred to as "a mother's good," "diadem 
of angels," and "faggot of the sages." Hence the lyrical character of this movement, 
wherein the bassoon incants and is accompanied by the harp! 

IV. 

Craeb JJisnig is an ash and has been described by Robert Graves as a source 
of strife. Thus, a ghostly battle, where all that is heard as the phantoms struggle, 
is the snapping of twigs on the forest floor. 

V. 

Dathi, which purportedly exercised authority over the Poets, and was the last 
tree to fall, is the subject for the close of the piece. The bassoon soliloquizes as it 
ponders the secrets of the Trees. 

— John Williams 






25 



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4* 



John Corigliano 

Pied Piper Fantasy, for flute and orchestra 




John Corigliano was born in New York City on February 
16, 1938, and lives there. He composed his Pied Piper 
Fantasy after James Galway asked him, in 1978, for a 
flute concerto to be premiered at the opening night of 
the 1980 season of the Hollywood Bowl. The resulting 
work, inspired by Robert Brownings poetic retelling of 
the Pied Piper of Hamelin and Coriglianos own exten- 
sion of the legend, was not completed until 1981. James 
Galway was soloist in the first performance on February 
I 4, 1982, with the Los Angeles Philharmonic under the 
^^k ^^^^ •' h direction of Myung-Whun Chung. These are the first 

m M Ni^H I performances by the Boston Symphony Orchestra. In 

M m I ^L ■ fl addition to the solo flute (the soloist must also play pic- 

mi ftk. .flk \ mwmm. Vfl I colo and tin whistle), the score calls for two flutes (third 
flute optional, second doubling piccolo), three oboes, three clarinets (third doubling E-flat 
clarinet and bass clarinet), three bassoons (third doubling contrabassoon), four horns, 
three trumpets, three trombones, tuba, timpani, percussion (four players, with two alu- 
minum rods, vibraphone, glockenspiel, crotales, xylophone, snare drum, tenor drum, bass 
drum, temple blocks, five tom-toms, ratchet, chimes, medium and large crash cymbals, 
three sizes of suspended cymbals, three sizes of triangles, whip, two large tam-tams, sand- 
paper, and crude high bell), harp, piano, celesta, and strings, plus a group of audience 
participants (the "children's group") consisting of at least three flutes and two percussion. 

John Corigliano has long established himself as one of the most prominent of con- 
temporary American composers, having won major awards for his Symphony No. 1, 
a searing and moving response to the AIDS crisis (written for the Chicago Symphony 
while he was composer-in-residence there, and performed by the Boston Symphony in 
March 1993), and having accomplished that rarest of achievements, a successful new 
opera for the Met, The Ghosts of Versailles, which was wildly cheered on its opening 
night, broadcast, recorded for video release, and revived in a subsequent season. He 
has also occasionally composed film scores, garnering an Academy Award nomination 
for Altered States in 1981 and a British award for "outstanding achievement in film 
music" for Revolution. But most of his music has been for the recital stage and the 
concert hall. 

Born into a musical environment — his father (also John Corigliano) was assistant 
concertmaster of the New York Philharmonic when the composer was born, and in 1943 
became that orchestra's first American-born concertmaster — John Corigliano studied 
with Otto Luening at Columbia University and later worked with Vittorio Giannini and 
Paul Creston. As this list of teachers might indicate, Corigliano was never part of the 
ultra-radical New York school of the period, and his music always revealed a somewhat 
conservative tendency that was mocked by the avant-gardists of the time, though it has 
become the leading tendency of new music in the last decade or so. His first work to 
achieve considerable notice was a violin sonata that won a prize at the Spoleto Festival 
in 1964. He composed a series of concertos in the late 1960s and through the 1970s, 
including concertos for piano (1968), oboe (1975), and clarinet (1977), before writing 
the Pied Piper Fantasy. In particular, the Clarinet Concerto, commissioned by the New 
York Philharmonic for its principal clarinetist Stanley Drucker, became a watershed in 
his career; it was received with great enthusiasm, recorded at once, and widely performed. 

It was very likely the success of the Clarinet Concerto that suggested Corigliano as a 
composer to James Galway when he wanted to commission a new work. The composer 
recalls in the booklet notes to the recording of Pied Piper Fantasy that his first reaction 



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was, "Oh no, not another wind concerto!" He postponed committing himself, hoping to 
come up with an approach that could produce something original. The fact that the new 
work was intended for the outdoor facilities of the Hollywood Bowl, and that the orches- 
tra and soloist were both virtuosic participants, "suggested a large-scale buoyant vehi- 
cle, but that wasn't enough for me, yet." He began to consider the soloist's special skills, 
one of which is also playing the tin whistle, a primitive form of recorder. This suggest- 
ed old legends of flute playing, which in turn suggested the story of the Pied Piper of 
Hamelin. 

The biggest problem was that the legend per se had no elements of virtuosity in 
it; the Piper played his song to charm the rats and lead them to destruction and 
piped a march to lead the children away from Hamelin, but there were no actual 
confrontations or tensions that could lead me to write virtuosically for the soloist. 
So I had to modify the story a bit, and I included battle scenes between the Piper 
and the rats and other elements that could set the soloist's fingers racing. 

The development of the story also suggested that the work should be more than sim- 
ply a concert piece in which the performers sit sedately on the stage and play the 
music from beginning to end. In particular, the passage in which the Piper leads the 
children of Hamelin away from the town, leaving the villagers grieving at the loss, 
implied an actual departure from the hall — and not only of the soloist, but of a group 
of children, too, who, in Corigliano's conception, would also play flutes and drums. In 
many later performances of the work, the dramatic element of the score was further 
developed locally, through lighting effects or simple elements of costuming. Corigliano 
has approved of such developments "as long as the musical integrity of the work is pre- 
served." 

— S.L. 



The following discussion of the movements in the Pied Piper Fantasy were written by 
John Corigliano as notes to the recording of the piece. 

I. Sunrise and The Piper's Song. Sunrise is represented by an orchestral tutti 
beginning with pointillistic night-sounds. A single note emerges, initiated by an oboe 
and culminating in trumpets. It is surrounded by flurrying bursts of energy that grow 
wilder and wilder. A huge crescendo suddenly breaks off and is succeeded by a soft, 
warm string chord signifying the risen sun. Low brass chords introduce the Piper-soloist, 
who begins in an improvisational manner and then plays The Piper's Song. Eventually 
the day ends as the night-sounds return. 

II. The Rats. The rats come out at night. This section is totally orchestral, with the 
rodents represented by two "rat motives." At the climax the low brass ominously sound 
the night-music chords against the high squeaks of strings and winds. 

III. Battle With the Rats. The Piper enters the fray. Clusters of rodents dart about 
the lower register; he rushes down the scale after them, but they disappear, only to re- 
surface immediately in another spot at a higher pitch. The Piper races to that area, but 
again most of the rats vanish. He tries to scatter the stragglers with sudden sforzandos, 
but more and more appear until a sort of totentanz ["dance of death"] ensues, with Piper 
(flute) and rats (orchestra) locked in angular embrace as the soloist imitates and chal- 
lenges the rodents with their own musical motives. 

IV. War Cadenza. The battle culminates with a gigantic orchestral glissando — and 
then silence. The soloist explores this sudden quiet, testing the air. He charges up the 
scale, anticipating flurrying rat-sounds at the top but finding only silence'. He savagely 
attacks a note, expecting the hidden rats to scatter — but once again, silence. He slowly 

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begins to relax and to become more and more lyrical (although sudden short flute out- 
bursts indicate he is still being cautious). But the extended silence finally convinces 
him. He becomes confident, then joyous, then exultant, singing the same improvisation 
from the beginning of the work — but with a purer and richer sound. 

Just, however, as the Piper is about to relax completely and begin his song again, a 
soft scraping sound rises from the orchestra. He realizes there are many more rats than 
he could ever have imagined — millions. They run berserk. Their glissando-motive snarls 
through the brass, as winds and strings portray their wild scampering. He is overwhelmed. 

V. The Piper's Victory. In despair the Piper improvises a lament. It continues over 
the scurrying and unconsciously incorporates a fragment of The Piper's Song. The rac- 
ing sounds below cease as the rats become aware of the hypnotizing melody but resume 
as the lament continues with other material. This happens twice, but by the second 
time the Piper begins to realize that his special song has a strange effect on the rats. 

So he begins to play the entire Pipers Song, and as he does, the rats freeze and be- 
gin a hypnotic slow dance. The song grows in intensity as the swaying rat-sounds di- 
minish. 

VI. The Burghers' Chorale. The last strains of The Pipers Song are interrupted 
by a distant-sounding, pompous chorale, accompanied by a banging bass drum. This 
is The Burghers' Chorale, the march of the townspeople: smug-sounding, self-satisfied, 
self-important. 

As the burghers approach the Piper, he begins to play. His music is bright and cheer- 
ful, for he obviously wishes to make friends with the new arrivals but is constantly in- 
terrupted by the blaring brass. This non-conversation continues, with the Piper's flexi- 
ble and warm music persistently cut off by the rigidly metronomic chorale. Gradually 
the Piper becomes more and more irritated with the proceedings, and finally he takes 



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SUPPER CONCERT DATES 

Saturday, April 19; Tuesday, April 22 

Music of MOZART and SCHUMANN 

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Thursday, April 24; Tuesday, April 29 
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Thursday March 27; Tuesday, April 1 
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to mocking the bass drum figure with a high, shrill fluttertongued note. 

VII. The Children's March. The Piper has had enough. He puts his flute aside 
and pulls a tiny tin whistle out of his pocket and plays The Children's March. In con- 
trast to the chorale, the march is bright, cheerful, and lively. It grows in volume and 
spirit despite occasional interruptions from the burghers' brass group. 

After the march's first peak, the Piper begins to trill. Suddenly a group of young flut- 
ists positioned in the audience answers his call. The Piper calls again, and another 
group responds, and yet another. The flutists join with young drummers similarly posi- 
tioned in the audience, all moving toward the stage; more children appear, answering 
the Piper, and all gather on stage where he proceeds to lead them in The Children s 
March. 

As a final bid for attention the burghers try an outburst of their chorale, but it is eas- 
ily swamped by the piping children who, led by the Piper, begin to march off the stage, 
back into the audience, and eventually out of the hall. They play a counterpoint to an 
orchestral restatement of The Pipers Song; this begins in the low range of the cellos and 
grows as it progresses through the strings and winds to a final utterance by the orches- 
tra's solo flute, echoing the town's sense of loss. The lonely sounds return in the orches- 
tra, as the jaunty distant marching melody fades away. 

— John Corigliano 



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at inspired your love 
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Enclosed is my check for 

payable to the Boston Symphony Annual 

Fund. (Friend**' benefit*? begin at $50.) 

Please yendyour contribution to Daniel P. Breen, Director 
of the Boston Symphony Annual Pund, Symphony Mall, 
Boston, MA 02115. A portion of your gift may be tax- 
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Was it a toy, or even a recording 
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More . . . 



The compact account of Johann Joachim Quantz's life that is found in The New Grove 
Dictionary of Music and Musicians can be supplemented with Edward R. Reilly's use- 
ful introduction to Reilly's translation of Quantz's famous treatise, On Playing the Flute 
(Schirmer paperback), which is itself of interest to anyone who performs music of the 
high Baroque era. James Galway has recorded four Quantz flute concertos, including 
the Concerto in G, with the Wiirttemberg Chamber Orchestra under the direction of 
Jorg Faerber (RCA Victor Red Seal). 

The most extensive treatment of John Williams's work to date is found in a special 
issue (March 1991) of The Cue Sheet, the journal of the Society for the Preservation of 
Film Music. As one might expect, this offers a lot of information about his work for film 
and television, but little about the concert music. John Williams has recorded The Five 
Sacred Trees with the London Symphony Orchestra and the soloist for whom it was writ- 
ten, Judith LeClair (Sony Classical, with Takemitsu's Tree Line, Hovhaness's Symphony 
No. 2, Mysterious Mountain, and Tobias Picker's Old and Lost Rivers). Leonard Slatkin 
and the London Symphony Orchestra have recorded Williams's Flute Concerto with solo- 
ist Peter Lloyd and the Violin Concerto with soloist Mark Peskanov (Varese Sarabande). 

The most recent and detailed information about John Corigliano can be found in the 
issues of Opera News that immediately preceded the premiere of his opera The Ghosts 
of Versailles in the fall of 1991; these can be supplemented by the older article about 
him in The New Grove Dictionary of American Music. The Pied Piper Fantasy, coupled 
with Voyage for flute and string orchestra, has been recorded by James Galway with the 
Eastman Philharmonia conducted by David Effron (RCA Red Seal). 



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John Williams 

Making his BSO subscription series debut this week, John Williams 
was named nineteenth Conductor of the Boston Pops Orchestra In 
January 1980. He became Boston Pops Laureate Conductor follow- 
ing his retirement in December 1993 and is also Artist-in-Residence 
at Tanglewood. Born in New York, Mr. Williams attended UCLA, 
studied composition privately with Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco, and 
attended the Juilliard School, where he studied piano with Madame 
Rosina Lhevinne. He worked as a jazz pianist before beginning his 
career in the film studios, where he worked with such composers as 
Bernard Herrmann, Alfred Newman, and Franz Waxman. He went 
on to write music for many television programs in the 1960s, winning two Emmy awards for 
his work. John Williams has composed the music and served as music director for more than 
seventy-five films, including Nixon, Sabrina, Schindlers List, Jurassic Park, Home Alone 2, 
Far and Away, JFK, Hook, Home Alone, Presumed Innocent, Born on the Fourth of July, the 
three Indiana Jones films, The Accidental Tourist, Empire of the Sun, The Witches of East- 
wick, E.T. (the Extra-Terrestrial), Superman, Close Encounters of the Third Kind, the Star 
Wars trilogy, Jaws, and Goodbye, Mr. Chips. His most recent score was for the film Rose- 
wood. He has received thirty-four Academy Award nominations, most recently for his score 
for the film Sleepers; he has been awarded five Oscars, one British Academy Award, and six- 





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Chester Williams, Fox Hill Village resident and Dean Emeritus, New England Conservatory or Music. 

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teen Grammys, as well as several gold and platinum records. His score for the film Schind- 
lers List earned him both an Oscar and a Grammy. In addition to his film music, Mr. Williams 
has written many concert pieces, including two symphonies, a bassoon concerto ( The Five 
Sacred Trees) premiered by the New York Philharmonic in 1995, a cello concerto premiered 
by Yo-Yo Ma and the Boston Symphony Orchestra in 1994 as part of the concert that opened 
Seiji Ozawa Hall that summer, concertos for flute and violin recorded by the London Sym- 
phony Orchestra, and concertos for clarinet and tuba. His most recent work is a trumpet 
concerto commissioned by the Cleveland Orchestra. In addition, Mr. Williams composed 
the NBC News theme The Mission, Liberty Fanfare (composed for the rededication of the 
Statue of Liberty), We're Lookin Good! (composed for the Special Olympics in celebration 
of the 1987 International Summer Games), and themes for the 1984, 1988, and 1996 Sum- 
mer Olympic games. The theme of last summer's Olympics may be heard on Mr. Williams's 
latest compact disc release with the Boston Pops Orchestra, "Summon the Heroes," on Sony 
Classical. Many of Mr. Williams's film scores have been released as recordings; the sound- 
track album to Star Wars has sold more than four million copies, more than any non-pop 
album in recording history. He has led a highly acclaimed series of albums with the Boston 
Pops Orchestra on the Philips label and for Sony Classical. Among their recent recordings, 
all on Sony Classical, are a tribute to Frank Sinatra entitled "Night and Day"; an album 
featuring music by John Williams and Aaron Copland entitled "Music for Stage and Screen"; 
"It Don't Mean a Thing If It Ain't Got That Swing," with vocalist Nancy Wilson; and "Wil- 
liams on Williams: The Classic Spielberg Scores." Mr. Williams has led the Boston Pops Or- 
chestra and the Boston Pops Esplanade Orchestra on several tours. He has led the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra at Tanglewood on numerous occasions, including his first complete 
BSO concert there in August 1993. As guest conductor Mr. Williams has appeared with the 
London Symphony, the Cleveland Orchestra, the Philadelphia Orchestra, the Chicago Sym- 
phony, the Pittsburgh Symphony, the Dallas Symphony, the San Francisco Symphony, and 
the Los Angeles Philharmonic. 



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40 







James Galway 

Flutist James Galway is internationally regarded as both a match- 
less interpreter of the classical repertoire and a consummate enter- 
tainer whose charismatic appeal crosses all musical boundaries. 
Through his extensive tours, numerous best-selling RCA Victor Red 
Seal and RCA Victor recordings and videos, and frequent television 
appearances, he has reached vast audiences worldwide, creating en- 
thusiastic new fans for classical music. His varied repertoire ranges 
from Bach, Vivaldi, and Mozart to contemporary music, jazz, and 
Irish folk melodies. He is also continually broadening the flute liter- 
ature through his commissions of works by contemporary compos- 
ers. Mr. Galway has circled the globe many times, keeping his artistry fresh with a mixture 
of recitals, concerto appearances, chamber music, and master classes. Highlights of this 
season include solo performances with the Boston, National, Dallas, Cincinnati, and Toledo 
symphony orchestras and a sixteen-city United States recital tour with pianist Phillip Moll 
in the spring. Overseas engagements include concerts in Korea and Taiwan, orchestral ap- 
pearances throughout the United Kingdom, Ireland, Denmark, Switzerland, and Germany, 
and trio performances with Mr. Moll and gambist Sarah Cunningham in Italy, Spain, Ger- 
many, and Switzerland. An exclusive RCA Victor Red Seal artist, Mr. Galway has won 
numerous awards for his recordings, including a Grand Prix du Disque and "Record of the 
Year" awards from both Cash Box and Billboard magazines, a platinum record, and several 
gold records. His most recent recordings on RCA Victor Red Seal include "The French 
Recital" with pianist Christopher O'Riley, a disc of Bach sonatas with Phillip Moll and 
Sarah Cunningham, and concertos for flute and clarinet by the eighteenth-century compos- 
er Franz Danzi with clarinetist Sabine Meyer and the Wurttemberg Chamber Orchestra. 
Recent crossover releases include "The Celtic Minstrel," "The Lark in the Clear Air," "The 
Seasons," featuring works by a wide variety of composers along with traditional Irish and 




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