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Full text of "Boston Symphony Orchestra concert programs, Season 110, 1990-1991, Subscription"

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Opening Night 1990 Gala Committee 

Honorary Chairmen 

Julian and Eunice Cohen 

Co-Ch airmen 

Sarah W. Armstrong Barbara Goldsmith Taub 



Martha S. Boyd 

Margaret A. Congleton 

Pamela K. Duncan 

Goetz B. Eaton 

Deborah A. Korb 

Pembroke H. Kyle 



Prudence A. Law 

Debra R. Levin 

Beverly J. Pieper 

Patricia L. Tambone 

Margaret Williams-DeCelles 



Hosts and Hostesses 



Deborah Armstrong 

Phyllis and Herman Beal 

Amy Botto 

Linda Billows 

Emily Belliveau 

Yvonne Bednarz 

Martha and James Boyd 

Pamela Duncan 

Gretchen Elmendorf 

Nancy Ferguson 

Diane and Tom Griffiths 

Mildred and Leon Jacobs 

Prudy Law 

Cynthia Lovell 



Robert Mann 

Claudia Marcaccio 

Ann Macdonald 

Paula Meridan 

Diane Pergola 

Marilyn Pond 

Suzanne Read 

Barbara Schwartz 

Virginia Soule 

Sue Sternberg 

Julianne Whelan 

Flornie Whitney 

Eva Zervos 



The Opening Night Gala Committee gratefully acknowledges 
the following donors for their generous support: 



The Boston Company 

Carol's Cloths 

Currier & Chives 

Champion International Corporation 

Hub Mail Advertising, Inc. 
Massachusetts Envelope Company 
Newton Corner Press Incorporated 



One Main Street Florists 

Pastene Companies Ltd. 

Prudential Property Company, Inc. 

Steinberg Miller Design 

Larry Volk Photographic 

Webster Printing Company, Inc. 

Work Force 



With special thanks to the Volunteer Office 
and the staff of the Boston Symphony Orchestra. 



Benefactors 



Angela P. Abelow 

Mr. and Mrs. William F. Achtmeyer 

Mrs. Weston W. Adams 

Mr. and Mrs. Ralf Adolfsson 

Mr. and Mrs. Harlan E. Anderson 

Prof. & Mrs. Rae D. Anderson 

Carol and Anthony Antico 

Paul A. Argenti 

Sarah Webb Armstrong 

Mr. and Mrs. David B. Arnold, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert H. Arnold 

Lois and Sherman Baker 

Mr. and Mrs. J. P. Barger 

Lucille M. Batal/Baldpate Hospital 

Mr. and Mrs. Rhett Bently 

Dr. and Mrs. Leo L. Beranek 

Boston Acoustics, Inc. 

The Boston Company 

William N. Bullard 

The Hon. Suzanne M. Bump 

and Paul F. McDevitt 
Mr. and Mrs. Austin Cable 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas D. Cabot 
M. Christian Casadesus 
Mme. Gisele Casadesus 
Dr. and Mrs. Robert B. Clarke 
James F. and Barbara Cleary 
Mr. John F. Cogan, Jr. and 

Ms. Mary L. Cornille 
Julian and Eunice Cohen 
Rosalie and Bertram Cohen 
Abram T. Collier 

Mr. and Mrs. William H. Congleton 
Mrs. A. Werk Cook 
Mr. and Mrs. Henry E. Cooper III 



Prof, and Mrs. Stephen H. Crandall 

Mr. and Mrs. Lewis S. Dabney 

Nader F. Darehshori 

Mr. and Mrs. Nelson J. Darling, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael H. Davis 

Donald C. Dervis 

Dr. and Mrs. Charles C. Dickinson III 

Mr. and Mrs. Eugene B. Doggett 

Phyllis Dohanian 

Dr. Richard W. Dwight 

Dynatech Corporation 

Mr. and Mrs. Goetz B. Eaton 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry David Epstein 

Mrs. Harris Fahnestock 

Mildred and Murray Finard 

Anna E. Finnerty 

The Hon. and Mrs. John H. 

Fitzpatrick 
Dr. Jan Fossel and Dr. Eric Fossel 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard Fraser 
Robert M. Gargill 
Mr. and Mrs. James S. Garrett 
Don and Paula Gaston 
Carol and Avram Goldberg 
Professor and Mrs. Ray A. Goldberg 
Mr. and Mrs. Jordan L. Golding 
Mr. and Mrs. Haskell R. Gordon 
Mr. and Mrs. Nathan Greenberg 
Mr. and Mrs. Howard R. Grimes 
Sarah L. Hackett 

Mr. and Mrs. R. Douglas Hall III 
Mrs. Robert T. Hamlin 
John Hancock Financial Services 
Mr. and Mrs. Francis W. Hatch 
Daniel P. Hays 



Boston Bank of Commerce 

Ms. Charmienne Hughes 

Mr. and Mrs. F.H. Hyler 

Edwin and Lola Jaffe 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard I. Johnson 

Mr. and Mrs. Bela T. Kalman 

Mr. and Mrs. David M. Kaplan 

Mr. and Mrs. George I. Kaplan 

Susan B. Kaplan and Ami A. Trauber 

Edward B. Kellogg 

Mr. and Mrs. George H. Kidder 

Paul L. King 

William N. Koch 

Farla & Harvey Chet Krentzman 

Lee Lamont/ICM Artists LTD 

Mrs. James F. Lawrence 

Mr. and Mrs. R. Willis Leith 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert J. Lepofsky 

Albert and Celia Levine 

Robin and Anita Lincoln 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles P. Lyman 

Evelyn and C. Charles Marran 

Mr. and Mrs. August R. Meyer 

Mr. and Mrs. Adolf F. Monosson 

Mr. and Mrs. Wells Morss 

Neiman Marcus InCircle 

Mr. and Mrs. Melvin B. Nessel 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Nelson 

Mrs. Robert B. Newman 

Robert P. O'Block 

Joseph M. O'Reilly 

Mr. and Mrs. David S. Pettit 

Dr. and Mrs. Daniel Piatt 

Mrs. Norbert Platzer 

Mr. and Mrs. William J. Poorvu 



Mr. and Mrs. Irving W Rabb 

Peter & Suzanne Read 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. Remis 

Mr. and Mrs. Eugene J. Ribakoff 

Mr. and Mrs. H. Wayman Rogers, Jr. 

Mrs. George R. Rowland 

Elaine and Jerome Rosenfeld 

Mr. and Mrs. Roberto Rosillo 

Melvin and Eleanor Ross 

Louis Rudolph 

Mr. and Mrs. Albert J. Sandler 

Ann Sargent 

Mrs. George Lee Sargent 

Roger and Nina Saunders 

Dr. Raymond and Hannah H. 

Schneider 
Sharon R. Simons 
Mrs. Donald Bellamy Sinclair 
ChoKyun Rha and Anthony J. 

Sinskey 
Mr. and Mrs. Howard J. Stagg III 
Mr. and Mrs. Gordon Stark 
Miriam and Sidney Stoneman 
Ray and Maria Stata 
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur I. Strang 
Robert and Anne Sullivan 
Barbara Goldsmith Taub and Peter 

Taub 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. White 
Mr. and Mrs. George Wilhelm 
Margaret Williams-DeCelles 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Windsor 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard W Young 
Mr. and Mrs. Erwin N. Ziner 




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Champion Welcomes You 
to Opening Night! 

Champion is one of America's leading manufacturers of paper for business 
communications, commercial printing, publications, and newspapers. 




©1990CIC 



Champion 

Champion International Corporation 

20 William Street 

Wellesley, Massachusetts 02181 



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Seiji Ozawa, Music Director 
Grant Llewellyn and Robert Spano, 

Assistant Conductors 
One Hundred and Tenth Season, 1990-91 



Trustees of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Inc. 

Nelson J. Darling, Jr., Chairman Emeritus 

J. P. Barger, Chairman George H. Kidder, President 

Mrs. Lewis S. Dabney, Vice-Chairman Archie C. Epps, Vice-Chairman 

Mrs. John H. Fitzpatrick, Vice-Chairman William J. Poorvu, Vice-Chairman and Treasurer 



David B. Arnold, Jr. 
Peter A. Brooke 
James F. Cleary 
John F. Cogan, Jr. 
Julian Cohen 
William M. Crozier, Jr. 
Mrs. Michael H. Davis 
Mrs. Eugene B. Doggett 

Trustees Emeriti 

Vernon R. Alden 
Philip K. Allen 
Allen G. Barry 
Leo L. Beranek 
Mrs. John M. Bradley 
Abram T. Collier 



Avram J. Goldberg 
Mrs. R. Douglas Hall III 
Francis W. Hatch 
Julian T. Houston 
Mrs. Bela T. Kalman 
Mrs. George I. Kaplan 
Harvey Chet Krentzman 
R. Willis Leith, Jr. 



Mrs. Harris Fahnestock 
Mrs. John L. Grandin 
E. Morton Jennings, Jr. 
Edward M. Kennedy 
Albert L. Nickerson 
Thomas D. Perry, Jr. 

Other Officers of the Corporation 

John Ex Rodgers, Assistant Treasurer Michael G. 

Daniel R. Gustin, Clerk 



Mrs. August R. Meyer 
Mrs. Robert B. Newman 
Peter C. Read 
Richard A. Smith 
Ray Stata 

William F. Thompson 
Nicholas T. Zervas 



Irving W. Rabb 
Mrs. George R. Rowland 
Mrs. George Lee Sargent 
Sidney Stoneman 
John Hoyt Stookey 
John L. Thorndike 



McDonough, Assistant Treasurer 



Administration 

Kenneth Haas, Managing Director 

Daniel R. Gustin, Assistant Managing Director and Manager of Tanglewood 

Michael G. McDonough, Director of Finance and Business Affairs 

Evans Mirageas, Artistic Administrator 

Anne H. Parsons, Orchestra Manager 

Caroline Smedvig, Director of Public Relations and Marketing 

Josiah Stevenson, Director of Development 

Robert Bell, Manager of 

Information Systems 
Peter N. Cerundolo, Director of 

Corporate Development 
Madelyne Cuddeback, Director of 

Corporate Sponsorships 
Patricia Forbes Halligan, Personnel 

Administrator 
Sarah J. Harrington, Budget Manager 
Margaret Hillyard-Lazenby, 

Director of Volunteers 
Russell M. Hodsdon, Manager of Box Office 
Bernadette M. Horgan, Public Relations 

Coordinator 
Craig R. Kaplan, Controller 
Nancy A. Kay, Director of Sales & 

Marketing Manager 
John M. Keenum, Director of 

Tanglewood Music Center Development 



Patricia Krol, Coordinator of Youth Activities 
Steven Ledbetter, Musicologist & 

Program Annotator 
Michelle R. Leonard, Media and Production 

Manager, Boston Symphony Orchestra 
Marc Mandel, Publications Coordinator 
John C. Marksbury, Director of 

Foundation and Government Support 
Julie-Anne Miner, Manager of Fund 

Reporting 
Richard Ortner, Administrator of 

Tanglewood Music Center 
Scott Schillin, Assistant Manager, 

Pops and Youth Activities 
Joyce M. Serwitz, Director of Major Gifts/ 

Assistant Director of Development 
Cheryl L. Silvia, Function Manager 
Susan E. Tomlin, Director of Annual Giving 






Board of Overseers of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Inc. 

John F. Cogan, Jr., Chairman 

Mrs. Ray A. Goldberg, Vice -Chairman 

Mrs. R. Douglas Hall III, Secretary 



Mrs. Herbert B. Abelow 

Harlan Anderson 

Mrs. David Bakalar 

Bruce A. Beal 

Mrs. Leo L. Beranek 

Lynda Schubert Bodman 

Donald C. Bowersock, Jr. 

William M. Bulger 

Mrs. Levin H. Campbell 

Earle M. Chiles 

Mrs. C. Thomas Clagett, Jr. 

James F. Cleary 

William H. Congleton 

William F. Connell 

Walter J. Connolly, Jr. 

S. James Coppersmith 

Albert C. Cornelio 

Phyllis Curtin 

Alex V. d'Arbeloff 

Phyllis Dohanian 

Hugh Downs 

Goetz B. Eaton 

Edward Eskandarian 

Katherine Fanning 

Peter M. Flanigan 

Dean Freed 

Eugene M. Freedman 

Peter H.B. Frelinghuysen 

Mrs. James Garivaltis 

Mark R. Goldweitz 



Haskell R. Gordon 

Steven Grossman 

John P. Hamill 

Daphne P. Hatsopoulos 

Joe M. Henson 

Mrs. Marilyn Brachman Hoffman 

Ronald A. Homer 

Julian T. Houston 

Lola Jaffe 

Anna Faith Jones 

H. Eugene Jones 

Susan B. Kaplan 

Mrs. S. Charles Kasdon 

Richard L. Kaye 

Robert D. King 

Mrs. Gordon F. Kingsley 

Allen Z. Kluchman 

Koji Kobayashi 

Mrs. Carl Koch 

David I. Kosowsky 

Robert K. Kraft 

George Krupp 

Mrs. Hart D. Leavitt 

Laurence Lesser 

Stephen R. Levy 

Frederick H. Lovejoy, Jr. 

Mrs. Charles P. Lyman 

Mrs. Harry L. Marks 

C. Charles Marran 

Nathan R. Miller 



Mrs. Thomas S. Morse 

Richard P. Morse 

E. James Morton 

David G. Mugar 

David S. Nelson 

Mrs. Hiroshi H. Nishino 

Robert P. O'Block 

Paul C. O'Brien 

Vincent M. O'Reilly 

Walter H. Palmer 

Andrall E. Pearson 

John A. Perkins 

Daphne Brooks Prout 

Millard H. Pryor, Jr. 

Keizo Saji 

Roger A. Saunders 

Mrs. Raymond H. Schneider 

Mark L. Seiko witz 

Malcolm L. Sherman 

Mrs. Donald B. Sinclair 

W. Davies Sohier, Jr. 

Ralph Z. Sorenson 

Ira Stepanian 

Mrs. Arthur I. Strang 

Mark Tishler, Jr. 

Roger D. Wellington 

Robert A. Wells 

Mrs. Thomas H.P. Whitney 

Margaret Williams-DeCelles 

Mrs. John J. Wilson 



Overseers Emeriti 

Mrs. Weston W. Adams 
Mrs. Frank G. Allen 
Mrs. Richard Bennink 
Mary Louise Cabot 
Johns H. Congdon 
Mrs. Thomas J. Galligan 
Mrs. Richard D. Hill 
Susan M. Hilles 



Mrs. Louis I. Kane 
Leonard Kaplan 
Benjamin H. Lacy 
Mrs. James F. Lawrence 
Hanae Mori 

Mrs. Stephen V.C. Morris 
Stephen Paine, Sr. 
David R. Pokross 



Mrs. Peter van S. Rice 
Mrs. Jerome Rosenfeld 
Mrs. William C. Rousseau 
Francis P. Sears, Jr. 
Mrs. Edward S. Stimpson 
Mrs. Richard H. Thompson 
Luise Vosgerchian 
Mrs. Donald B. Wilson 



Symphony Hall Operations 

Robert L. Gleason, Facilities Manager 
James E. Whitaker, House Manager 

Cleveland Morrison, Stage Manager 

Franklin Smith, Supervisor of House Crew 

Wilmoth A. Griffiths, Assistant Supervisor of House Crew 

William D. McDonnell, Chief Steward 

H.R. Costa, Lighting 



Officers of the Boston Symphony Association of Volunteers 

Susan D. Hall, President 

Thelma E. Goldberg, Executive Vice-President 

Joan Erhard, Secretary 

Patricia A. Maddox, Treasurer 

Betty Sweitzer, Nominating Chairman 



Vice-Presidents 

Helen Doyle, Hall Services 
Goetz B. Eaton, Fundraising 
Charles W. Jack, Adult Education 
Pat Jensen, Membership 
Maureen Hickey, Tanglewood 

Chairmen of Regions 

Krista Kamborian Baldini 
Judy Clark 
Joan Erhard 
Bettina Harrison 



Marilyn Larkin, Tanglewood 

Patricia A. Newton, Regions 

Carol Scheifele-Holmes, Public Relatioyis 

F. Preston Wilson, Development 

Pat Woolley, Youth Activities 



Helen Lahage 
Paula Murphy 
Pamela S. Nugent 



Beverly J. Pieper 
Patricia L. Tambone 
Arline Ziner 



Business and Professional Leadership Association 
Board of Directors 



Harvey Chet Krentzman, Chairman 



James F. Cleary, BPLA President 



Members 

J. P. Barger 
Leo L. Beranek 
William F. Connell 
Nelson J. Darling, Jr. 



Thelma E. Goldberg 
Joe M. Henson 
George H. Kidder 
Vincent M. O'Reilly 



Malcolm L. Sherman 
Ray Stata 
Stephen J. Sweeney 
Roger D. Wellington 



Special thanks to the National Endowment for the Arts and the Massachusetts 
Cultural Council for their continued support of the Boston Symphony Orchestra. 



Celebrating the 90th Anniversary of Symphony Hall 




On display in the first-floor Huntington Avenue corridor of the Cohen Wing is an archival 
exhibit celebrating the 90th anniversary' of Symphony Hall. In addition to newspaper accounts 
of the building's opening in 1900, the exhibit includes period photographs and a tribute to 
acoustician Wallace Clement Sabine. 

Articles on various aspects of Symphony Hall will be featured in the BSO program book 
throughout the season. 




rSHflfl 



Seiji Ozawa 




Now in his eighteenth year as music 
director of the Boston Symphony Orches- 
tra, Seiji Ozawa was named the BSO's 
thirteenth music director in 1973, follow- 
ing a year as music adviser. His many 
tours with the orchestra in Europe, Japan, 
and throughout the United States have 
included the orchestra's first tour devoted 
exclusively to appearances at the major 
European music festivals, in 1979; four 
visits to Japan; and, to celebrate the 
orchestra's centennial in 1981, a fourteen- 
city American tour and an international 
tour to Japan, France, Germany, Austria, 
and England. In March 1979 Mr. Ozawa 
and the Boston Symphony Orchestra made 
an historic visit to China for a significant 
musical exchange entailing coaching, 
study, and discussion sessions with Chi- 
nese musicians, as well as concert perform- 
ances, becoming the first American per- 
forming ensemble to visit China since the 
establishment of diplomatic relations. In 
December 1988 he and the orchestra gave 
eleven concerts during a two-week tour to 
England, the Netherlands, France, Ger- 
many, Austria, and Belgium. In December 
1989 Mr. Ozawa and the orchestra trav- 
eled to Japan for the fourth time, on a 
tour that also included the orchestra's first 
concerts in Hong Kong. 

Mr. Ozawa' s recent recordings for Phil- 
ips with the Boston Symphony Orchestra 



include Richard Strauss's Elektra, recorded 
during concert performances at Symphony 
Hall in Boston with Hildegard Behrens in 
the title role; and Mahler's First, Second 
{Resurrection), and Fourth symphonies, 
part of a continuing Mahler cycle on Phil- 
ips that also includes the Symphony No. 8 
{Symphony of a Thousand). Mahler's 
Seventh and Ninth symphonies, and his 
Kinderiotenlieder, with Jessye Norman, 
have been recorded for future release. Mr. 
Ozawa's recent recordings with the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra for Deutsche Gram- 
mophon include Poulenc's Gloria and Sta- 
bat mater with soprano Kathleen Battle 
and the Tanglewood Festival Chorus, the 
two Liszt piano concertos and Totentanz 
with Krystian Zimerman, an album of 
music by Gabriel Faure, and "Gaite parisi- 
enne," an album of music by Offenbach, 
Gounod, Chabrier, and Thomas. Other 
Deutsche Grammophon releases include 
Prokofiev's complete Romeo and Juliet, 
Berlioz's Romeo et Juliette and Damnation 
of Faust, and, with Itzhak Perlman, an 
award-winning album of the Berg and 
Stravinsky violin concertos. Also available 
are Schoenberg's Ourrelieder, on Philips; 
the complete Beethoven piano concertos 
with Rudolf Serkin, on Telarc; the Dvorak 
Cello Concerto with Mstislav Rostropovich 
and Tchaikovsky's Pathetique Symphony, 
on Erato; Strauss's Don Quixote and the 
Schoenberg/Monn Cello Concerto with 
Yo-Yo Ma, the Mendelssohn Violin Con- 
certo with Isaac Stern, and Berlioz's Les 
Nuits d'ete with Frederica von Stade, on 
CBS Masterworks; and Stravinsky's Fire- 
bird, on EMI/Angel. 

Mr. Ozawa pursues an active interna- 
tional career, appearing regularly with the 
Berlin Philharmonic, the Orchestre de 
Paris, the French National Orchestra, the 
Vienna Philharmonic, the Philharmonia of 
London, and the New Japan Philharmonic. 
Recent appearances conducting opera have 
included La Scala, Salzburg, the Vienna 
Staatsoper, and the Paris Opera; he has 
also conducted at Covent Garden. In 1983, 
at the Paris Opera, he conducted the world 



premiere of Olivier Messiaen's St. Francis 
of Assist. In addition to his many Boston 
Symphony Orchestra recordings, he has 
recorded with the Berlin Philharmonic, the 
London Philharmonic, the Philharmonia of 
London, the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, 
the Orchestre National, the Orchestre de 
Paris, the San Francisco Symphony, and 
the Toronto Symphony Orchestra, among 
others. His opera recordings include 
Bizet"s Carmen with Jessye Norman and 
the Orchestre National, on Philips, and 
Les C antes d 'Hoffmann with Placido Dom- 
ingo and Edita Gruberova. on Deutsche 
Grammophon. 

Born in 1935 in Shenyang, China, to 
Japanese parents, Serji Ozawa studied 
Western mnsic as a child and later gradu- 
ated with first prizes in composition and 
conducting from Tokyo's Toho School of 
Mnsic. where he was a student of Hideo 
Saito. In 1959 he won first prize at the 
International Competition of Orchestra 
Conductors held in Besancon. France, and 
was invited to Tanglewood by Charles 
Munch, then music director of the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra and a judge at the 
competition. In 1960 he won the Tangle- 
wood Music Center's highest honor, the 
Koussevitzky Prize for outstanding student 
conductor. 



While a student of Herbert von Karajan 
in West Berlin. Mr. Ozawa came to the 
attention of Leonard Bernstein. He accom- 
panied Mr. Bernstein on the New York 
Philharmonic's 1961 tour of Japan and 
was made an assistant conductor of that 
orchestra for the 1961-62 season. In Janu- 
ary 1962 he made his first professional 
concert appearance in North America, with 
the San Francisco Symphony. Mr. Ozawa 
was music director of the Chicago Sym- 
phony Orchestra "s Ravinia Festival for five 
summers beginning in 1964, music director 
of the Toronto Symphony Orchestra from 
1965 to 1969. and music director of the 
San Francisco Symphony from 1970 to 
1976. followed by a year as that orches- 
tra's music advisor. He conducted the 
Boston Symphony Orchestra for the first 
time at Tanglewood, in 1964. and made 
his first Symphony Hall appearance with 
the orchestra in 1968. In 1970 he was 
named an artistic director of the Tangle- 
wood Festival. 

Mr. Ozawa holds honorary doctor of 
music degrees from the University of 
Massachusetts, the New England Conser- 
vatory of Music, and Wheaton College in 
Norton, Massachusetts. He has won an 
Emmy for the Boston Symphony Orches- 
tra's "Evening at Symphony' PBS televi- 
sion series. 







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Leo Panasevich 

Carolyn and George Rowland chair 

Sheldon Rotenberg 

Muriel C. Kasdon and 


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^BOSTON^ 
I SYMPHONY J 




^ORCHESTRA/ 

\sEIJI OZAWa/ 


Marjorie C. Paley chair 

Alfred Schneider 


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Raymond Sird 
Ikuko Mizuno 




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Amnon Levy 




Music Directorship endowed by 
John Moors Cabot 

BOSTON SYMPHONY 

ORCHESTRA 

1990-91 

First Violins 

Malcolm Lowe 

Concertmaster 
Charles Munch chair 

Tamara Smirnova-Sajfar 

Associate Concertmaster 
Helen Horner Mclntyre chair 

Max Hobart 

Assistant Concertmaster 

Robert L. Beal, and 

Enid L. and Bruce A. Beal chair 

Lucia Lin 

Assistant Concertmaster 

Edward and Bertha C. Rose chair 

Bo Youp Hwang 

John and Dorothy Wilson chair, 
fully funded in perpetuity 

Max Winder 

Forrest Foster Collier chair 

Fredy Ostrovsky 

Dorothy Q. and David B. Arnold, Jr. 
chair, fully funded in perpetuity 

Gottfried Wilfinger 



Participating in a system of rotated 
seating within each string section 
%0n sabbatical leave 



Second Violins 

Marylou Speaker Churchill 

Fahnestock chair 

Vyacheslav Uritsky 

Charlotte and Irving W. Rabb chair 

Ronald Knudsen 

Edgar and Shirley Grossman chair 

Joseph McGauley 
Leonard Moss 

* Harvey Seigel 

* Jerome Rosen 

* Sheila Fiekowsky 
Ronan Lefkowitz 

* Nancy Bracken 
*Jennie Shames 
*Aza Raykhtsaum 
*Valeria Vilker Kuchment 
*Bonnie Bewick 
*Tatiana Dimitriades 
*James Cooke 
*Si-Jing Huang 

Violas 

Burton Fine 

Charles S. Dana chair 

Patricia McCarty 

Anne Stoneman chair, 
fully funded in perpetuity 

^Ronald Wilkison 

Lois and Harlan Anderson chair 

Robert Barnes 





Jerome Lipson 
Joseph Pietropaolo 
Michael Zaretsky 
Marc Jeanneret 
*Mark Ludwig 

* Rachel Fagerburg 

* Edward Gazouleas 

Cellos 

Jules Eskin 

Philip R. Allen chair 

Martha Babcock 

Vernon and Marion Alden chair 

Sato Knudsen 

Esther 8. and Joseph M. Shapiro chair 

Joel Moerschel 

Sandra and David Bakalar chair 

* Robert Ripley 
Luis Leguia 

Robert Bradford Newman chair 

$Carol Procter 

Lillian and Nathan R. Miller chair 

* Ronald Feldman 

Charles and JoAnne Dickinson chair 

*Jerome Patterson 
* Jonathan Miller 

Basses 

Edwin Barker 

Harold D. Hodgkinson chair 

Lawrence Wolfe 

Maria Nistazos Stata chair, 
.fully funded in perpetuity 

Joseph Hearne 
Bela Wurtzler 
John Salkowski 

* Robert Olson 

* James Orleans 
*Todd Seeber 
*John Stovall 

Flutes 



Walter Piston chair 

Leone Buyse 

Acting Principal Flute 
Marian Gray Lewis chair 

Fenwick Smith 

Myra and Robert Kraft chair 

Piccolo 

Geralyn Coticone 

Evelyn and C. Charles Marran chair 



Oboes 

Alfred Genovese 

Mildred B. Remis chair 

Wayne Rapier 
Keisuke Wakao 

English Horn 

Laurence Thorstenberg 

Beranek chair, 

fully funded in perpetuity 

Clarinets 

Harold Wright 

Ann S.M. Banks chair 

Thomas Martin 

Bass Clarinet 

Craig Nordstrom 

Farla and Harvey Chet 
Krentzman chair 

Bassoons 

Richard Svoboda 

Edward A. Taft chair 

Roland Smail 
Richard Ranti 

Contrabassoon 

Richard Plaster 

Helen Rand Thayer chair 

Horns 

Charles Kavalovski 

Helen Sagojf Slosberg chair 

Richard Sebring 

Margaret Andersen Congleton chair 

Daniel Katzen 
Jay Wadenpfuhl 
Richard Mackey 
Jonathan Menkis 

Trumpets 

Charles Schlueter 

Roger Louis Voisin chair 

Peter Chapman 

Ford H. Cooper chair 

Timothy Morrison 
Steven Emery 



Trombones 

Ronald Barron 

J. P. and Mary B. Barger chair, 
fully funded in perpetuity 

Norman Bolter 

Bass Trombone 

Douglas Yeo 

Tuba 

Chester Schmitz 

Margaret and William C. 
Rousseau chair 

Timpani 

Everett Firth 

Sylvia Shippen Wells chair 

Percussion 

Arthur Press 

Assistant Timpanist 
Peter Andrew Lurie chair 

Thomas Gauger 

Peter and Anne Brooke chair 

Frank Epstein 

Harp 

Ann Hobson Pilot 

Willona Henderson Sinclair chair 

Sara Schuster Ericsson 



Personnel Managers 

Lynn Larsen 
Harry Shapiro 

Librarians 

Marshall Burlingame 
William Shisler 
James Harper 

Stage Manager 

Position endowed by 
Angelica Lloyd Clagett 

Alfred Robison 



We 



E INAUGURATE this evening the Boston Symphony 
Orchestra's 110th season, Mr. Ozawa's eighteenth year as our Music 
Director, and the 90th anniversary of Symphony Hall's becoming the 
orchestra's permanent home. This Opening Night, apart from the 
felicitous marking of the start of a new subscription season, will be 
the occasion for our dedication of the renovated Cohen Wing. 

At a moment in the life of our nation and Commonwealth when 
concerns for regional and national economic vitality lay a burden 
upon many, we have cause to find reassurance in the success of our 
recently concluded Tanglewood season and confirmation that at such 
a time the music of the Boston Symphony Orchestra can be respon- 
sive to the deeper needs and condition of our audiences. Record num- 
bers attended Tanglewood performances this summer, many of them 
of memorable content. We are deeply grateful to those here this 
evening, and the larger legion of music lovers, who made our past 
subscription season and this summer's Tanglewood Festival so 
successful. 

The new Cohen Wing will for years to come give pleasure to Sym- 
phony Hall patrons in the expanded and enhanced facilities for their 
benefit on the totally renovated first floor. For administrative staff 




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long forced to make do in cluttered and restricted office space, offer- 
ing an intimacy of proximity but no privacy, the new offices, meeting 
rooms, and work stations on the second floor promise a new lease on 
working life. We celebrate tonight what the generosity of the Sym- 
phony's family, inspired by the extraordinary thoughtfulness of Julian 
and Eunice Cohen, has made possible. 

The corporate sponsor for Opening Night for the first time is The 
Boston Company, a Boston banking institution of venerable tradition 
and quality. We welcome this new association and we thank its man- 
agement for what their corporate generosity makes possible this 
evening. 

We also wish to point out to this evening's audience improvements 
only just now being completed to peripheral space along the westerly 
corridors at the first and second balcony levels. These include the 
newly created Beranek Room, new spaces for the volunteers, reno- 
vated Press and Program offices, and a new ladies' restroom on the 
first-balcony level. 

Once again, the devoted and tireless members of the Boston Sym- 
phony Association of Volunteers, led by Barbara Goldsmith Taub 
and Sarah W. Armstrong, contributed the endless hours of meticu- 
lous planning for this Opening Night. It is a highly important event 
in the year-long calendar of BSAV projects. The standard of care the 
volunteers bring to assure the unbroken success of these projects rises 
from one year to the next. The efforts of our volunteers are the proxi- 
mate reason for much of the base of community spirit which the Bos- 
ton Symphony Orchestra enjoys. 

Our deeply grateful thanks go out to Mr. Ozawa and each mem- 
ber of our orchestra for the consummate talent and commitment they 
bring to the concerts we are privileged to enjoy. This city is richly 
blessed by their presence and performances. 

To our audiences, and particularly the one here this evening, we 
renew our appreciation for what your support as subscribers, as con- 
tributors to our fund appeals, and as advocates for the best of the 
musical art means to the security of this orchestra's future. Welcome 
to this happy celebration. 




nf • /cl/w^t-v 



George H. Kidder 
President, Board of Trustees 
Boston Symphony Orchestra 




J. P. Barger 

Chairman, Board of Trustees 

Boston Symphony Orchestra 



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Symphony Hall at 90 

A Timeless Gift to Bostonians 

by Robert Campbell 

Symphony Hall as a piece of architecture is so Bostonian it's almost a caricature. It 
begins by repeating the sacred, iconic brick and limestone of Harvard Yard and Bea- 
con Hill. Then it goes on to display, rather ostentatiously perhaps, a typical Boston 
refusal to be ostentatious. It comes to us in a plain brown wrapper of dark brick, a 
brown wrapping that conceals rather than advertises the sensuous, rhythmic delights 
of the music that is performed — as if secretly — deep inside. That dowdy wrapping 
reminds us of the Victorian matrons of Boston who kept their new dresses from Paris 
in the closet for a year so they wouldn't look too fashionable. Symphony Hall doesn't 
wish to look fashionable and it certainly doesn't want to look expensive. Its 
buttoned-up architecture tells us that it is a building that will be Good for Us, a 
venue for Culture, something to be taken quite seriously. 

The architect was one of the most famous in American history, Charles Follen McKim, 
a Pennsylvanian who came to town to work as a draftsman for an even greater archi- 
tect, Henry Hobson Richardson. McKim went off on his own in 1879 at age thirty- two 
to found a firm called McKim, Mead & White, the most successful of its era. McKim 
became virtually house architect for Harvard, designing such varied landmarks there 
as the stadium and the New York Harvard Club. In Copley Square, across from 
H.H. Richardson's famed Trinity Church, McKim outdid his mentor by designing the 
Boston Public Library, still today, perhaps, the city's greatest public building. And in 
1900, his Symphony Hall opened — to something less than universal acclaim. 

Critic William Apthorp of the Boston Transcript wrote, notoriously, "Expert con- 
demnations of the hall differ, as far as we have been able to discover, only in degrees 
of violence." We must shudder at the impact so firm a judgment must have had on 
that newspaper's all-too-loyal subscribers, as we recall the lines of the young T.S. Eliot: 

The readers of the Boston Evening Transcript 
Sway in the wind like a field of ripe corn. 

As so often happens, the judgment of posterity differed from that early judgment. 
Acoustician and BSO Trustee Leo Beranek attributes the mistake to the fact that 
orchestras in the Hall's first years were simply too small — and therefore too faint — 
for so large a space. In any case, for many decades now, as everyone knows, Sym- 
phony Hall has been all but universally regarded as one of the three or four best halls 
in the world, acoustically speaking, for symphonic music. 

Architects soon learn that experiment is risky in their field. McKim' s first proposal 
was an experiment: a circular hall, the shape of a Greek theater. It would have been 
an acoustical disaster, a truth that, luckily, was pointed out to the architect by Wal- 
lace Sabine, a young Harvard professor who was in the process, at that very moment, 
of founding the science of acoustics. Sabine recommended that the new hall should 
simply be a copy of some old one that worked — sound advice indeed. McKim's final 
proposal for the interior of Symphony Hall, therefore, was a very close imitation of 
the old Music Hall (now renovated as the Orpheum), in which the orchestra had pre- 
viously played. 

Much as everyone loves Symphony Hall's interior (despite its narrow and squeaky 
seats), few have been equally thrilled by the building's exterior. Typical is the com- 
ment of the current (1984) edition of the Blue Guide to Boston and Cambridge: "This 
is generally considered to be one of McKim's least-successful designs, principally 
because of the top-heavy facade and the overly massive Ionic portico that supports it." 



McKim must have disliked the exterior himself, judging by the scant notice he gave 
it in his firm's many publications. The problem was that the donor, Henry Lee Hig- 
ginson, omitted most of McKim's proposed decorative program for the exterior — carv- 
ings, inscriptions, and architectural doodads of all kinds — in order to save money. 

But perhaps we needn't really regret that loss. The plainness of Symphony Hall's 
exterior, which has often been compared to an industrial warehouse or a train station, 
actually strengthens the compelling architectural concept of the building as a whole. 
It is a box inside a box. The outer box is a carton, but the inner box is a gift. The 
outer box is the brick shell. The inner box is the orchestra hall. Between them, like so 
much styrofoam insulation, is an air space that contains corridors and offices. The air 
space insures that no noise from the street will penetrate to damage the orchestra hall. 

Opening a present that has just arrived in the mail is a delight. A comparable plea- 
sure is the experience of penetrating the outer carton of Symphony Hall to discover 
the gift within — the lovely ornamented interior, with its delicate play of grays, its 
statues, its hint of giltwork, and, at concert time, its sculptural glitter of instruments 
on stage. 

Over the decades, inevitably, a few things went wrong with Symphony Hall. 
McKim's main entrance was a bold row of doors on the Huntington Avenue facade. 
But in the 1940s, Huntington was widened for an underpass, and Symphony Hall's 
main entrance was moved around the corner to Massachusetts Avenue, employing 
what had originally been conceived as a secondary carriage drop-off. The generous 
lobby on Huntington became today's Hatch Room, and the tiny lobby on Massachu- 





Symphony Hall during the 1939-40 season, before the Huntington Avenue underpass 
was constructed 







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setts served, very inadequately, to replace it. Coherence and orientation suffered. 
Entering on Huntington, the visitor walked into the Hall on axis with the stage, eas- 
ily comprehending the building's symmetrical order as a reflection of the symmetry of 
the visitor's own body. Entering on Massachusetts, by contrast, one sidles awkwardly 
toward the seats, moving at right angles to the Hall's axis. The architectural order is 
far harder to grasp. 

Other problems were those of crowding. Many new functions jammed the original 
office spaces, never very generous to begin with. Mechanical and electrical systems 
aged. Oddball elements of decor clashed with the architecture. As a result of all this, 
a major program of restoration and improvement began a few years ago. A thought- 
fully staged master plan of improvements was created by the BSO, with the help of 
the firm of James Stewart Polshek and Partners of New York. 

This fall occurs the opening of the largest and brightest piece to date of that reno- 
vation: the Cohen Wing, completely gutted and rebuilt, with new patron spaces on the 
ground floor and office spaces above. Banquet and meeting rooms and a new Sym- 
phony Shop are among the badly needed facilities provided by the new wing. In the 
Hall itself, a new Higginson Room, renamed the Beranek Room, is opening. Archi- 
tects for this stage of the improvements were Crissman & Solomon Associates, and 
the contractor was the Walsh Brothers. Future improvements, as funds become avail- 
able, will include a backstage building for the musicians, and eventually a new lobby 
and entrance. 

Symphony Hall has served its purpose nobly, economically, and often just a little 
bit shabbily for ninety years. Never a good place in which to show off a fancy gown, it 
is a very good place in which to listen to music. As much as any other building it 
embodies the essence of Boston. 

Robert Campbell, an architect in Cambridge, is architectural adviser to the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra and architecture critic of the Boston Globe. 




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The Boston 
Symphony 
Orchestra 

& 

The Boston 

Company. 

Together In 
Concert 



The Boston Company is sponsoring The Boston Symphony Orchestra's 
110th Opening Night. Since its first concert on October 22, 1881, this legendary 
orchestra has played a major role in American musical life. Five generations of 
loyal supporters have helped make that possible. The Boston Company, a 
tradition itself since 1872, is honored to share in that support. 



THE BOSTON COMPANY 

Boston Safe Deposit and Trust Company 




A subsidiary of Shearson Lehman Brothers Inc. An American Express company 

© 1990 The Boston Company, Inc. 



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BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

Seiji Ozawa, Music Director 

Grant Llewellyn and Robert Spano, 

Assistant Conductors 
One Hundred and Tenth Season, 1990-91 

OPENING NIGHT 1990 

SPONSORED BY THE BOSTON COMPANY 

Thursday, September 27, at 8:30 p.m. 
SEIJI OZAWA conducting 




TCHAIKOVSKY 



Violin Concerto in D, Opus 35 
Allegro moderato — Moderate assai 
Canzonetta: Andante 
Finale: Allegro vivacissimo 

MIDORI 



MAHLER 



INTERMISSION 

Symphony No. 5 
Parti 



Funeral March: At a measured pace 
Stormy, with utmost vehemence 

Part II 

Scherzo: Energetic, not too fast 

Part III 

Adagietto: Very slow 

Rondo-Finale: Allegro giocoso. Vigorous 



This performance of Mahler's Fifth Symphony is being recorded by Philips 
for future release as part of the orchestra's continuing Mahler cycle on that 
label. Your cooperation in keeping noise in the Hall at a minimum is sincerely 
appreciated. 



Opening Night 1990 is a project of the Boston Symphony Association of Volunteers. 



RCA, Deutsche Grammophon, Philips, Telarc, Sony Classical/CBS Masterworks, EMI/Angel, 
New World, Erato, and Hyperion records 

Baldwin piano 



1 ' 1 




Design that celebrates 
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season of the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra. 




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1 1 ^y^SiSSsTw^r^R^ 







Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky 

Violin Concerto in D, Opus 35 




Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky was horn at Votkinsk, 
district of Vyatka, on May 7, 1840, and died in St. 
Petersburg on November 6, 1893. He began work on 
the Violin Concerto at Clarens, Switzerland, in 
March 1878, completing it on April 11, but on the 
advice of his brother Modest and his student Yosif 
Kotek he took a few more days to replace the origi- 
nal Andante with the present Canzonetta. (The 
Andante survives as the "Meditation" that opens the 
set of pieces for violin and piano called "Souvenir 
d'un lieu cher," Opus 42). Leopold Auer, to whom 
the concerto was first dedicated, pronounced it 
"impossible to play, " and the first performance was 
given by Adolf Brodsky at a Vienna Philharmonic 
concert conducted by Hans Richter on December 4, 
1881. The first complete performance in the United States was given on January 18, 
1889, by Maud Powell, with Walter Damrosch conducting the New York Symphony. It 
entered the repertory of the Boston Symphony Orchestra in December 1893, when 
Timothee Adamowski played the second and third movements only, Emil Paur conduct- 
ing. The orchesra's first complete performances took place in January 1900, with soloist 
Alexander Petschnikoff and conductor Wilhelm Gericke. Shlomo Mintz was soloist for 
the most recent subscription performances in February 1988 under Kurt Masur's direc- 
tion. Itzhak Perlman gave the most recent Tanglewood performance in July 1989 under 
Yoel Levi's direction. In addition to the solo violin, the concerto calls for flutes, oboes, 
clarinets, and bassoons in pairs, four horns, two trumpets, timpani, and strings. 

In his rich and perceptive biography of Tchaikovsky, now nearing completion with a 
fourth volume, David Brown devotes the entire second volume to a narrow span of 
four years in the composer's life, as indicated by the volume's subtitle: "The Crisis 
Years, 1874-1878." The crisis was a real one and it had complicated elements, both 
professional and personal. Its centerpiece was the composer's catastrophic marriage, a 
step taken in the hope of stopping supposition about his homosexuality. He and his 
bride had scarcely started off on their honeymoon before the composer recognized the 
folly of his action. In torment, he ran away to Switzerland to try to forget. It was 
there that he composed the Violin Concerto. 

The marriage was by no means Tchaikovsky's only crisis during those years. At the 
beginning of the period in question, he had composed a piano concerto for his close 
friend Nikolai Rubinstein, only to have the pianist declare the work worthless and 
unplayable. Utterly dismayed, Tchaikovsky finally managed to arrange a perform- 
ance — in far-away Boston — so that if it was a flop, he would not have to be present 
to hear it himself. Ironically that concerto rather quickly became one of the most pop- 
ular of all piano concertos. Soon after, Tchaikovsky composed the ballet Swan Lake, 
arguably the finest ballet score of the entire nineteenth century, though it was a fail- 
ure in its first production, and the composer went to his grave without ever knowing 
that the world would regard his work as a masterpiece. 

There were some assorted triumphs, though. The Fourth Symphony— deeply etched 
with his Slavic fatalism — was not only a success, but marked one of the first major 
works that he composed with the extraordinary patronage of Nadezhda von Meek, 
who sent him a regular stipend for a dozen years on the strict understanding that 
they were never to meet. The grateful composer declared that in the future his every 
note would be composed with an implicit dedication to her. 



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But in the aftermath of his marriage there was only flight — frantic determination 
to get away. His wife Antonina was staying at Kamenka with the composer's sister 
and her husband. Letters passed back and forth between all the members of the fam- 
ily, with Antonina sometimes making wild charges (such as the one that Tchaikov- 
sky's valet had bewitched him into hating her), sometimes expressing hope for a rec- 
onciliation, despite Tchaikovsky's repeated insistence that such a thing could never be. 
He spent some months in Italy, where several of his brothers joined him, and he 
gradually grew calmer in the contemplation of Italian art and the Italian countryside. 
But financial necessity forced him to find a cheaper place to stay, and on March 9, 
1887, he arrived in Clarens, Switzerland. He quickly telegraphed his student, friend, 
and possible lover, the violinist Anton Kotek, who was then in Berlin, to inform him 
of the change of address. On the thirteenth he began a piano sonata, his first act of 
composition since the wedding. The next day Kotek arrived in Clarens. Within a few 
days, Tchaikovsky abandoned the piano sonata, which was not going well. Within a 
day or two, he and Kotek played through Lalo's Symphonie espagnole, which, in spite 
of its title, is a violin concerto. His interest in this piece (he noted that it had "a lot 
of freshness, lightness, of piquant rhythms, of beautiful and excellently harmonized 
melodies") may well have turned his own mind in the direction of a violin concerto. 
He liked the way that Lalo 

does not strive after profundity, but carefully avoids routine, seeks out new 
forms, and thinks more about musical beauty than about observing established 
traditions, as do the Germans. 

Perhaps this experience persuaded him to give up the sonata entirely and turn to a 
concerto, particularly since he had a violinist at hand to give him technical advice 
about the solo part. On March 17 he began the new piece and discovered to his 
delight that— unlike the piano sonata — it went easily. In just eleven days he sketched 
the entire concerto. The composer's brother Modest and Kotek expressed reservations 
about the slow movement, though they were enthusiastic about the two outer move- 
ments. Upon consideration, Tchaikovsky agreed with them, and on April 5 he replaced 
the original slow movement with a new piece. The enthusiasm of all three men was so 



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great that Tchaikovsky finished the orchestration, too, in short order. By April 11 the 
concerto was complete. 

Now, however, he was in for another professional crisis — a repetition of his experi- 
ence with the First Piano Concerto. He dedicated the new work to Leopold Auer, hop- 
ing naturally that he would play the first performance, which was, in fact, advertised 
for March 22, 1879. The work had already been published, and Auer regretted (so he 
wrote thirty years later) that he had not been consulted before the work had been 
fixed in print. Auer is supposed to have declared the work to be "unplayable," though 
he later defended himself by explaining that he meant only that, as written, some of 
the virtuoso passages would not sound as they should. 

In any case, Tchaikovsky was deeply wounded. Kotek himself declined to play the 
work in Russia. Two years later Tchaikovsky learned from his publisher that Adolf 
Brodsky had learned the piece and was planning to play it in Vienna. That perform- 
ance, which took place at the end of 1881, called forth one of the most notorious 
reviews by Vienna's conservative music critic Eduard Hanslick. Tchaikovsky never got 
over it; to the end of his life he could quote it by heart. 

The Russian composer Tchaikovsky is surely no ordinary talent, but rather, an 
inflated one, obsessed with posturing as a genius, lacking discrimination and 
taste. . . . The same can be said for his new, long, and ambitious Violin Concerto. 
For a while it proceeds soberly, musically, and not mindlessly, but soon vulgarity 
gains the upper hand and dominates until the end of the first movement. The 
violin is no longer played; it is tugged about, torn, beaten black and blue. . . . 
The Adagio is well on the way to reconciling us and winning us over, but it soon 
breaks off to make way for a finale that transports us to the brutal and wretched 
jollity of a Russian church festival. We see a host of savage, vulgar faces, we 
hear crude curses, and smell the booze. In the course of a discussion of obscene 
illustrations, Friedrich Vischer once maintained that there were pictures which 
one could see stink. Tchaikovsky's Violin Concerto for the first time confronts us 
with the hideous idea that there may be compositions whose stink one can hear. 

Hanslick, sitting in Vienna, found Russia, and everything Russian, as represented 
in Tchaikovsky's music, to be uncivilized. How ironic that, among his contemporaries, 
Tchaikovsky was regarded as the westernized Russian, the one who had spurned the 
truly nationalistic approach of "The Five." 

In any case, we have trouble today locating the "stink" in this music. For nearly a 
century it has simply been one of the four or five most popular violin concertos in the 
literature, which is answer enough to Hanslick. 

The first movement starts with a simple, graceful melody in the violins — a melody 
that will not return. (This is a trick that Tchaikovsky famously employed in the First 
Piano Concerto, too.) Here we might even anticipate a quasi-classical piece like the 
Rococo Variations. But soon the orchestral part grows more portentous, preparing for 
the soloist's entrance. The melodic flow of the exposition is not only a joy to contem- 
plate for sheer melodic invention but also a marvel of continuing development, as tiny 
figures from one melody crop up, subtly varied, in the next. The Andante is an 
extended song (its heading "Canzonetta" is significant). During the months away from 
Russia, Tchaikovsky had written endlessly in his letters of his nostalgia, of his long- 
ing to be home again. He poured all of the yearning into the melancholy of this 
ardent movement. The finale is vigorous, even pictorial, with hints of peasant bag- 
pipes and dances, vivid in its color and rhythm, but not in its smell! Even at its most 
virtuosic, the solo part is designed to color and highlight the melodic unfolding of the 
movement. Surely it is this openhearted singing quality that wins all hearts. 

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Gustav Mahler 

Symphony No. 5 




Gustav Mahler was born in Kalischt (Kaliste) near 
the Moravian border of Bohemia on July 7, 1860, 
and died in Vienna on May 18, 1911. He began 
writing his Fifth Symphony in 1901 and completed 
it the following year. He himself conducted the pre- 
miere in Cologne on October 18, 1904. The first 
American performance was given by the Cincinnati 
Symphony Orchestra under the direction of Frank 
van der Stucken on March 25, 1905. The first Bos- 
ton Symphony Orchestra performance took place on 
February 2, 1906, Wilhelm Gericke conducting. The 
BSO has also performed the Fifth under the direc- 
tion of Karl Muck, Serge Koussevitzky, Richard 
Burgin, Erich Leinsdorf, Michael Tilson Thomas, 
Joseph Silverstein, and Seiji Ozawa. Seiji Ozawa 
conducted the orchestra's most recent subscription performances in November 1986 and 
most recent Tanglewood performance in August 1987. The orchestra has played the 
Adagietto alone on two occasions: on a tour performance in Baltimore under Gericke in 
February 1906, and under Leonard Bernstein at Tanglewood in July 1974, in memory 
of Serge Koussevitzky. The score calls for four flutes, two piccolos, three oboes and 
English horn, three clarinets, D clarinet, and bass clarinet, three bassoons and contra- 
bassoon, six horns, four trumpets, three trombones and tuba, timpani, snare drum, bass 
drum, cymbals, triangle, tam-tam, slapstick, glockenspiel, harp, and strings. 

Mahler finished his "first period" with his Fourth Symphony right at the end of the 
nineteenth century. The music he wrote at the beginning of the new century pointed 
in a new direction. The first four symphonies are all inspired by or based on songs, 
especially the songs drawn from the collection of folk poetry known as Des Knaben 
Wunderhom {The Youth's Magic Horn). By the turn of the century, Mahler had 
stopped drawing upon that source for good, though with perhaps one last glimpse in 
the Fifth Symphony. His next songs were settings of the poet Riickert, including his 
finest cycle, Kindertotenlieder, three songs of which were completed before he began 
work on the symphony. The songs make themselves felt here and there in the Fifth 
by way of brief reminiscences, but the symphony as a whole — like its two successors — 
is a purely orchestral work with no vocal parts and no hint of musical shapes dictated 
by song. 

The group of three instrumental symphonies — Nos. 5, 6, and 7 — belongs together 
in another respect. Mahler's orchestration is notably different from that of the earlier 
works. The parts are now often more independent of one another, yielding a highly 
contrapuntal texture, and his tendency toward using small subsections of the large 
orchestra — as if the whole orchestra consisted of an immensely varied series of cham- 
ber ensembles — is intensified. At first the novelty of this approach gave Mahler con- 
siderable trouble. At a reading rehearsal in Vienna before the Cologne premiere of the 
Fifth, he was horrified to discover that he had seriously over-orchestrated large sec- 
tions of the score. He took a red pencil to his manuscript and crossed out many 
parts. Still unsatisfied after the official premiere, Mahler continued touching up the 
scoring of the Fifth Symphony almost until the day he died. 

The distinction between works written before and after the turn of the century is 
not cut-and-dried, to be sure. The Fourth Symphony already shows a growing interest 
in independent instrumental writing, and the scoring of the Kindertotenlieder and 
other Riickert songs grows quite naturally out of it. It leads as naturally into the 










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AMERICA'S PARTNERSHIP FOR THE ARTS 
IS THREATENED 

The National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency that 
has provided essential support for the nation's orchestras, art 
museums, and theater, dance, and opera companies with thou- 
sands of grants over the past twenty-five years, is facing grave 
threats on the floor of the U.S. Congress. Opponents have 
accused the NEA of funding art with obscene content and have 
proposed restructuring or abolishing the agency altogether. 

Here in Massachusetts, the Massachusetts Cultural Commis- 
sion's budget has been sharply reduced, rendering the agency 
far less effective in supporting artistic activities throughout the 
state. 

Together with other arts organizations throughout the Com- 
monwealth, the Boston Symphony Orchestra believes that: 

• The arts in this country and their extended services to a 
large public have been supported by a vital partnership of 
private donors, corporate underwriters, foundations, and 
local, state, and federal government. 

• Obscenity is the antithesis of art. It is without artistic 
merit, and not protected by the First Amendment. The 
NEA does not support or condone obscenity. 

• NEA and MCC cuts threaten the ability of our state's arts 
organizations to continue to provide a wide range of out- 
reach and education programs as well as free and reduced- 
price services to the public. 

As the fall season begins, members of Congress are returning 
to Washington, where they will address the future of the NEA. 
Please make your views known. Call the number below, and tell 
Congress that you support the Arts Endowment. 

CALL 1 -900-226- ARTS 



For just $4.50 (charged to your phone bill) the 

American Arts Alliance will send mailgrams, in your name, 

to your Senators and Representative telling them that you 

support the National Endowment for the Arts and that you want 

Congress to reauthorize the Endowment without restructuring. 



instrumental style of the Fifth. The novelty is more a matter of degree than of kind. 
Still, the Fifth marks a perceptible turning point in Mahler's output, a determination 
to avoid programmatic elements (at least those of the kind inherent in the setting of a 
text or proclaimed to the public in a printed program note) and let the music speak 
for itself. 

The contrapuntal character of the Fifth was perhaps anticipated in some conversa- 
tions Mahler had with his friend Natalie Bauer-Lechner while he was recuperating in 
March 1901 from surgery for an intestinal hemorrhage that very nearly killed him. 
He talked to Natalie about the late Beethoven string quartets, describing them as 
"far more polyphonic than his symphonies." He was obsessed with the idea of dif- 
ferent themes that would combine and "develop freely, side by side, each with its own 
impetus and purpose, so that people will always be able to distinguish them one from 
another." And he plunged into hours of study of the Bachgesellschaft edition of Bach's 
works. 

His illness, he decided that spring, had been caused in large part by the strains of 
conducting the rebellious Vienna Philharmonic, with many of whose members he had 
deep-rooted differences of opinion on matters of musical interpretation, and by the 
need to withstand the endless attacks of an anti-Semitic press. On returning from a 
holiday on the Istrian peninsula, he submitted his resignation to the committee of the 
Philharmonic, retaining the music directorship of the opera, which brought him quite 
enough headaches. 

But as summer approached, Mahler was able to look forward to a summer vacation 
dedicated largely to composing in a newly built retreat all his own, a large house 
rather like a chalet, at Maiernigg, a resort town in Carinthia on Lake Worth. He had 
selected the site before the season of 1899-1900 and followed the construction of the 
house whenever he was not actually working on the Fourth Symphony in the summer 
of 1900. By 1901 it was ready for occupancy. Villa Mahler was situated between the 




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forest and the water, arranged so that all the rooms had panoramic lake views. He 
worked several hours a day in a "Hauschen" ("little house") not far away but com- 
pletely isolated, since he demanded total silence while composing. 

He brought Bach with him and spent hours studying in particular one of the eight- 
part motets. "The way the eight voices are led along in a polyphony which he alone 
masters is unbelievable!" In addition to Bach, he studied some songs of Schumann, 
whom he regarded as second only to Schubert in that genre, and he arranged evening 
musicales in the house. At first he didn't worry about composition. By July he started 
composing a few songs — the last of the Wunderhorn group (Tamboursg'sell) and the. 
first of his Riickert songs. He determined to give himself two weeks of complete rest, 
and ironically, just at that point, he found himself immersed in a large project that 
was to become the Fifth Symphony. 

There were others in the household — his sister Justine; the violinist Arnold Rose, 
with whom Justine was having an affair and whom she later married; and Natalie 
Bauer-Lechner, a musician friend who kept an informative journal of her encounters 
with Mahler and who clearly suffered pangs of unrequited love (she disappeared from 
his life within days of his engagement to Alma Schindler). To them he said nothing 
about the new work. But as he spent more and more hours in the Hauschen, no one 
doubted that he was involved in something extensive. In fact, he w r as composing two 
movements of the symphony (one of them the scherzo, which gave him an enormous 
amount of trouble), and turning now and then to further songs, including the finest of 
all, Ich bin der Welt abhanden gekommen. All too soon the summer was over, and the 
symphony had to remain unfinished as he took up his operatic duties in Vienna. 

Mahler was not able to return to work on the symphony until the following sum- 
mer, but in the meantime a casual encounter at a dinner on November 7 changed his 
life. Seated opposite him at the table was a young woman of spectacular beauty and 
considerable self-assurance. Her name was Alma Schindler, and she had been study- 



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ing composition with Alexander Zemlinsky. After dinner Alma and Mahler got into a 
heated argument about a ballet score that Zemlinsky had submitted to Mahler for 
possible production. Mahler had never replied to the submission, and she taxed him 
with rudeness. Before the evening was over Mahler was clearly enchanted with the 
girl's beauty, but also by her wit and her fiery disposition. He made her promise to 
bring samples of her own work to the Opera. In less than two weeks it was clear to 
all concerned that something serious was in the wind. By November 27 Mahler was 
already talking of marriage and almost against her will Alma was realizing that "He's 
the only man who can give meaning to my life, for he far surpasses all the men I've 
ever met." Yet she was still confused, having recently been convinced that she was in 
love with Zemlinsky. But by December 9, when Mahler left for ten days in Berlin to 
conduct his Second and Fourth symphonies, she had made up her mind. 

Before Christmas they officially celebrated their engagement. When they married 
on March 9, Alma was already pregnant. It was only the least of the complications in 
their life together. In some respects two people can hardly have been less well suited 
to each other, whether by age, temperament, character, or interests. Mahler was pas- 
sionately in love with her, but was overbearing in his demands that she entirely devote 
her attention to him, even to the point of giving up her study of composition. Alma 
was capricious, flirtatious, and conceited, though she was also very intelligent and 
witty, musical, capable of great generosity and petty meanness. Yet virtually every- 
thing Mahler wrote for the rest of his life was composed for her, beginning with the 
conclusion of the Fifth Symphony. And whatever difficulties they may have experi- 
enced in their life together, there is little question that she inspired him to vast com- 
positional achievements — seven enormous symphonies (counting Das Lied von der 
Erde and the unfinished Tenth) in less than a decade, during the first five years of 





Alma Schindler-Mahler 



which he was also in charge of the Vienna Opera and later of the New York 
Philharmonic. 

It is possible that Mahler wrote the famous Adagietto movement of the Fifth dur- 
ing the period before his marriage. At any rate, the conductor Willem Mengelberg 
wrote this note in his score: 

NB: This Adagietto was Gustav Mahler's declaration of love to Alma! Instead 
of a letter he confided it in this manuscript without a word of explanation. 
She understood it and replied: He should come!!! (I have this from both of 
them!) W.M. 

Though Alma's diary fails to mention such a musical missive, it is possible that the 
movement served in fact as a love letter (Mahler wrote her plenty of other letters, too, 
especially when he was away in Berlin). Since she was a musician and composition 
student herself, she could be expected to be able to read the music and sense its emo- 
tional import, especially since it has the sparest scoring of any symphonic movement 
Mahler ever wrote: strings and harp. 

After their wedding, Mahler and Alma took their honeymoon in Russia, where he 
conducted some performances in St. Petersburg. Then, after a short time in their 
Vienna apartment, they went to Krefeld, where Mahler conducted the first complete 
performance of his Third Symphony on June 9. This performance was a great suc- 
cess, the beginning of Mahler's fame outside of Vienna. Elated, he and Alma went to 
Maiernigg for the summer, where they enjoyed swims and long walks. He worked on 
completing the Fifth in the seclusion of his Hauschen, while she remained in the 
house preparing a fair copy of the finished pages of score. The work was completed in 
short score by autumn. Mahler wrote out the detailed orchestration during the winter 
by rising before breakfast and working on it until it was time to go to the opera 
house. 

One unusual aspect of the Fifth — the complete absence of a text or descriptive 
explanation from the composer — seems to have been motivated by the unhappy reac- 
tion of the audience at the premiere of the Fourth Symphony in November 1901, 




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when Mahler conducted it in Munich, to almost universal ridicule and misunderstand- 
ing. The success he had achieved with the Second so recently was completely undone. 
He attributed the critics' lack of perception to their inability to follow an abstract 
musical argument. It was all the fault of Berlioz and Liszt, he said, who began writ- 
ing program music (though theirs had genius, he admitted, unlike the music of some 
later composers) so that the "plot" of the score had become a necessary crutch to 
listening. 

One result of this experience was Mahler's determination to avoid giving any expla- 
nation of the "meaning" or "program" of his next symphony. Even when supportive 
musicians asked him for some guidance, he remained silent. He expressed himself 
with far greater vigor on the subject at a dinner in Munich following a performance of 
the Second Symphony. When someone mentioned program books, Mahler is reported 
to have leaped upon the table and exclaimed: 

Down with program books, which spread false ideas! The audience should be left 
to its own thoughts over the work that is performed; it should not be forced to 
read during the performance; it should not be prejudiced in any manner. If a 
composer by his music forces on his hearers the sensations which streamed 
through his mind, then he reaches his goal. The speech of tones has then 
approached the language of words, but it is far more capable of expression and 
declaration. 

He is then reported to have raised his glass, emptied it, and cried "Pereat den Pro- 
grammenl" ("Let the programs perish!"). (When the Boston Symphony performed the 
Fifth for the first time in 1906, Philip Hale wrote in his program book essay, "Let us 
respect the wishes of Mr. Mahler.") 

Following such an outburst, the annotator proceeds with trepidation. Still, Mahler's 
pique was aimed at first-time listeners whose reaction might be prejudiced one way or 
another by an explanation. Eventually listeners may desire some consideration of the 
music, especially because Mahler's music is no less expressive for all his eschewing of 
programs, and in some respects it is a good deal more complicated. 

The symphony is laid out in five movements, though Mahler grouped the first two 
and the last two together, so that there are, in all, three "parts" tracing a progression 
from tragedy to an exuberant display of contrapuntal mastery and harmonic progres- 
sion from the opening C-sharp minor to D major. The keys of the intervening move- 
ments (A minor, D, and F) also outline a chord on D, which would therefore seem to 
be a more reasonable designation for the key of the symphony, with the opening 
C-sharp conceived as a leading tone. Nonetheless the Fifth is customarily described as 
being in the key of C-sharp minor. 

The opening movement has the character of a funeral march, rather martial in 
character, given the opening trumpet fanfare (derived from the first movement of the 
Fourth Symphony*) and the drumlike tattoo of the strings and winds in the introduc- 
tory passage. The main march theme is darkly sombre, a melody related to the 
recently composed song Der Tamboursg'sell (a last echo of Des Kfiaben Wunderhorn) . 
The Trio is a wild, almost hysterical outcry in B-flat minor gradually returning to the 
tempo and the rhythmic tattoo of the opening. The basic march returns and closes 



*Much has been written about the numerous internal references between one work and another 
in Mahler's output, and the Fifth Symphony is very much a case in point. It is worth recalling 
that Mahler was frequently conducting one work while finishing the scoring of another and 
planning the composition of yet a third. It would be very surprising, under the circumstances, if 
the musical world of one such piece did not make itself felt in his imagination when he was 
working out the details of a new piece. A composer who either did not conduct at all or could 
rely on others to introduce his music and give most of the performances would be more easily 
able to put a finished work entirely behind him. 



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with a recollection of the first song from Kindertotenlieder, which Mahler was almost 
certainly composing while he worked on this movement as well The second Trio, in 
A minor, is more subdued and given largely to the strings. Last echoes of the trumpet 
fanfare bring the movement to an end. 

The second movement, marked "Stormy, with utmost vehemence," has a number of 
links to the first. It takes the frenetic outbursts of the first movement as its basic 
character and contrasts them with a sorrowful march melody in the cellos and clari- 
nets. They take turns three times (each varied and somewhat briefer than the one 
before). A premature shout of triumph is cut off, and the main material returns. The 
shout of triumph comes back briefly as a chorale in D (the key that will ultimately 
prevail), but for now, the movement ends in hushed mystery. 

According to Natalie Bauer-Lechner, Mahler had an idea for the character of the 
scherzo, though he chose not to reveal it to the public. Following the dark and emo- 
tional character of Part I, the second part was to represent "a human being in the 
full light of day, in the prime of his life." The scherzo is on an unusually large scale, 
but it moves with great energy and speed, much of it as a lilting and whirling waltz 
with a featured solo horn. There are sardonic twists here and there, boisterous pas- 
sages, even brutal ones, and some that have the lilt and verve of The Merry Widow. 

The last part begins with the famous Adagietto, once almost the only movement of 
Mahler's music that was heard with any frequency. When Mahler wrote it, he was 
recalling the musical worlds created for the second song of Kindertotenlieder and Ich 
bin der Welt abhanden gekommen, though he is not using either song to shape this 
exquisitely restrained movement. The melody grows in sweeping arches to a climactic 
peak that is not hammered with fortissimos but as if with bated breath. 

Mahler builds his finale as a grand rondo in which, after an opening horn call, a 
bassoon quotes a phrase from one of Mahler's Wunderhorn songs, Lob des hohen Ver- 
standes, which describes a singing contest the outcome of which is controlled by a 
donkey. Good natured satire of academic pedantry is the point of the song, and 
Mahler here undertakes his own cheerful demonstration of counterpoint, the academic 
subject par excellence in music theory, treated in a wonderfully exuberant and free- 
wheeling way. He is concerned to build up a symphonic structure, alluding to the 
theme of the Adagietto with music of very different spirit. The climax of the sym- 
phony brings back the chorale theme from the second movement, the one earlier pas- 
sage in all that tragic realm that hinted at the extroversion of D major, now finally 
achieved and celebrated with tremendous zest. 



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S.L. 




Sony Classical' are trademarks of Sony Corporation © 1990 Sony Classical GmbH 



cP 



-^ Bartok: Violin Concertos 
cp u Nos. 1 & 2 

^j?^ Berlin Philharmonic/Zubin Mehta 



SK 45941 




MPHGk 





Midori 

At age nineteen, acclaimed violinist Midori has appeared with 
major orchestras and conductors throughout the world. Sum- 
mer festival appearances have included Tanglewood, Saratoga, 
Great Woods, the Hollywood Bowl, Ravinia, the Mann Music 
Center, Blossom, and Mostly Mozart. Her 1989-90 season 
included tour performances in East Asia with Zubin Mehta and 
the New York Philharmonic, recitals throughout Japan, her 
Carnegie Hall orchestral debut, recitals throughout the United 
States and Europe, and numerous orchestral engagements. 
This summer she returned to Japan for recitals and appear- 
ances with the London Symphony Orchestra as part of the inaugural Sapporo Festi- 
val. In the United States she performed at the Hollywood Bowl, Tanglewood, 
Saratoga Springs, and the Garden State Arts Center. Besides the BSO's Opening 
Night concert and her first BSO subscription appearances, in January, in both Bos- 
ton and New York, the 1990-91 season brings her Carnegie Hall recital debut and 
appearances with the symphony orchestras of Dallas, Detroit, Pittsburgh, San Fran- 
cisco, and St. Louis. In Japan, besides regular recitals and her 1989 performances 
with the New York Philharmonic, she has appeared with the St. Louis Symphony and 
the NHK Symphony and participated in the Concert for Peace conducted by Leonard 
Bernstein in Hiroshima. Midori is an exclusive Sony Classical (formerly CBS Master- 
works) recording artist. Her debut recording for that label was the Dvorak Violin 
Concerto with Zubin Mehta and the New York Philharmonic; this was followed by the 
Paganini Caprices for solo violin and Bartok's two violin concertos with the Berlin 
Philharmonic under Mr. Mehta. Earlier recordings, for Philips, have included music of 
Vivaldi, Bach, Paganini, and Tchaikovsky. In 1989 Midori was among the first recipi- 
ents of the Los Angeles Music Center's Dorothy B. Chandler Performing Arts 
Awards; in 1988 she became the youngest person ever named Best Artist of the Year 
by the Japanese government. She has appeared many times on television, including 
the 1988 Kennedy Center Honors and the gala Tanglewood concert celebrating 
Leonard Bernstein's seventieth birthday. Born in Osaka, Japan, in 1971, Midori 
began studying the violin with her mother, Setsu Goto. In 1982 she came to New 
York, where she studied with Dorothy DeLay, Jens Ellermann, and Yang-Ho Kim. In 
1982, when she was eleven, Zubin Mehta invited her to be a surprise soloist on the 
New York Philharmonic's New Year's Eve concert. Midori lives in New York City and 
attends the Professional Children's School. She made her Boston Symphony debut at 
Tanglewood in 1986 and has since appeared there each summer. 



m 






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ance. For the Friday-afternoon concerts, both 
rooms open at 12:15, with sandwiches available 
until concert time. 



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110th Season 

19 9 0-91 




Boston Symphony Orchestra 

Seiji Ozawa, Music Director 

90th Anniversary of Symphony Hall 



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Grant Llewellyn and Robert Spano, 

Assistant Conductors 
One Hundred and Tenth Season, 1990-91 



Trustees of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Inc. 

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J. P. Barger, Chairman 

Mrs. Lewis S. Dabney, Vice-Chairman 

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Programs copyright ©1990 Boston Symphony Orchestra, Inc. 



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Board of Overseers of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Inc. 

John F. Cogan, Jr., Chairman 

Mrs. Ray A. Goldberg, Vice-Chairman 

Mrs. R. Douglas Hall III, Secretary 



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Roger A. Saunders 

Mrs. Raymond H. Schneider 

Mark L. Selkowitz 

Malcolm L. Sherman 

Mrs. Donald B. Sinclair 

W. Davies Sohier, Jr. 

Ralph Z. Sorenson 

Ira Stepanian 

Mrs. Arthur I. Strang 

Mark Tishler, Jr. 

Roger D. Wellington 

Robert A. Wells 

Mrs. Thomas H.P. Whitney 

Margaret Williams-DeCelles 

Mrs. John J. Wilson 



Overseers Emeriti 

Mrs. Weston W. Adams 
Mrs. Frank G. Allen 
Mrs. Richard Bennink 
Mary Louise Cabot 
Johns H. Congdon 
Mrs. Thomas J. Galligan 
Mrs. Richard D. Hill 
Susan M. Hilles 



Mrs. Louis I. Kane 
Leonard Kaplan 
Benjamin H. Lacy 
Mrs. James F. Lawrence 
Hanae Mori 

Mrs. Stephen V.C. Morris 
Stephen Paine, Sr. 
David R. Pokross 



Mrs. Peter van S. Rice 
Mrs. Jerome Rosenfeld 
Mrs. William C. Rousseau 
Francis P. Sears, Jr. 
Mrs. Edward S. Stimpson 
Mrs. Richard H. Thompson 
Luise Vosgerchian 
Mrs. Donald B. Wilson 



Symphony Hall Operations 

Robert L. Gleason, Facilities Manager 
James E. Whitaker, House Manager 

Cleveland Morrison, Stage Manager 

Franklin Smith, Supervisor of House Crew 

Wilmoth A. Griffiths, Assistant Supervisor of House Crew 

William D. McDonnell, Chief Steward 

II. R. Costa, Lighting 




Officers of the Boston Symphony Association of Volunteers 

Susan D. Hall, President 

Thelma E. Goldberg, Executive Vice-President 

Joan Erhard, Secretary 

Patricia A. Maddox, Treasurer 

Betty Sweitzer, Nominating Chairman 



Vice-Presidents 

Helen Doyle, Hall Services 
Goetz B. Eaton, Fundraising 
Charles W. Jack, Adult Education 
Pat Jensen, Membership 
Maureen Hickey, Tanglewood 

Chairmen of Regions 

Krista Kamborian Baldini 
Judy Clark 
Joan Erhard 
Bettina Harrison 



Marilyn Larkin, Tanglewood 

Patricia A. Newton, Regions 

Carol Scheifele-Holmes, Public Relations 

F. Preston Wilson, Development 

Pat Woolley, Youth Activities 



Helen Lahage 
Paula Murphy 
Pamela S. Nugent 



Beverly J. Pieper 
Patricia L. Tambone 
Arline Ziner 



Business and Professional Leadership Association 
Board of Directors 



Harvey Chet Krentzman, Chairman 



James F. Cleary, BPLA President 



Members 

J. P. Barger 
Leo L. Beranek 
William F. Connell 
Nelson J. Darling, Jr. 



Thelma E. Goldberg 
Joe M. Henson 
George H. Kidder 
Vincent M. O'Reilly 



Malcolm L. Sherman 
Ray Stata 
Stephen J. Sweeney 
Roger D. Wellington 



Special thanks to the National Endowment for the Arts and the Massachusetts 
Cultural Council for their continued support of the Boston Symphony Orchestra. 



Celebrating the 90th Anniversary of Symphony Hall 




On display in the first-floor Huntington Avenue corridor of the Cohen Wing is an archival 
exhibit celebrating the 90th anniversary of Symphony Hall. In addition to newspaper accounts 
of the building's opening in 1900, the exhibit includes period photographs and a tribute to 
acoustician Wallace Clement Sabine. 

Articles on various aspects of Symphony Hall will be featured in the BSO program book 
throughout the season. The cover photograph shows the cartouche directly above the 
Symphony Hall stage. Whereas numerous European halls traditionally highlighted various 
composers' names, Beethoven became the only composer whose name was inscribed on any of 
the plaques that trim the stage and balconies of Symphony Hall. The others were left empty 
since, at the time the Hall was opened, it was felt that only Beethoven's popularity would 
remain unchanged. 




AMERICA'S PARTNERSHIP FOR THE ARTS 
IS THREATENED 

The National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency that 
has provided essential support for the nation's orchestras, art 
museums, and theater, dance, and opera companies with thou- 
sands of grants over the past twenty-five years, is facing grave 
threats on the floor of the U.S. Congress. Opponents have 
accused the NEA of funding art with obscene content and have 
proposed restructuring or abolishing the agency altogether. 

Here in Massachusetts, the Massachusetts Cultural Commis- 
sion's budget has been sharply reduced, rendering the agency 
far less effective in supporting artistic activities throughout the 
state. 

Together with other arts organizations throughout the Com- 
monwealth, the Boston Symphony Orchestra believes that: 

• The arts in this country and their extended services to a 
large public have been supported by a vital partnership of 
private donors, corporate underwriters, foundations, and 
local, state, and federal government. 

• Obscenity is the antithesis of art. It is without artistic 
merit, and not protected by the First Amendment. The 
NEA does not support or condone obscenity. 

• NEA and MCC cuts threaten the ability of our state's arts 
organizations to continue to provide a wide range of out- 
reach and education programs as well as free and reduced- 
price services to the public. 

As the fall season begins, members of Congress are returning 
to Washington, where they will address the future of the NEA. 
Please make your views known. Call the number below, and tell 
Congress that you support the Arts Endowment. 

CALL 1 -900-226- ARTS 



For just $4.50 (charged to your phone bill) the 

American Arts Alliance will send mailgrams, in your name, 

to your Senators and Representative telling them that you 

support the National Endowment for the Arts and that you want 

Congress to reauthorize the Endowment without restructuring. 



BSO 



The Fanny Peabody Mason 

Memorial Concert 

Friday, September 28, 1990 

The first Friday-afternoon concert of the Bos- 
ton Symphony Orchestra's subscription season 
is dedicated to the memory of Miss Fanny 
Peabody Mason, who was a Friday- afternoon 
subscriber and an active patron of music both 
in the United States and abroad until her 
death in 1948. Many music lovers recall the 
outstanding concerts Miss Mason presented in 
the music room of her townhouse on Common- 
wealth Avenue and at her summer residence in 
Walpole, New Hampshire. The endowment to 
honor Miss Mason perpetually was created in 
1985 by the Peabody-Mason Music Founda- 
tion, established by Miss Mason, and which 
presented young and well-established artists in 
concert in Boston and Cambridge for more 
than 35 years. The president of the founda- 
tion, Paul Doguereau, initiated the gift to the 
BSO as a way to recognize Miss Mason's love 
of music, and to foster the highest aspirations 
of the art. Besides the concert sponsorship, the 
gift created the Mason Lounge for musicians 
and staff and the Mason Green Room. 



The Refurbished Cohen Wing Opens 

The Boston Symphony Orchestra is pleased to 
celebrate the 90th anniversary of Symphony 
Hall with the completion of a $7.2 million ren- 
ovation program. Carried out by architects 
Crissman & Solomon of Watertown, Massachu- 
setts, the work has resulted in a skillful and 
beautiful union of the historic McKim, Mead & 
White structure and the adjacent Cohen Wing, 
named in honor of Julian and Eunice Cohen, 
whose generosity made possible the purchase 
of the building ten years ago. Without interfer- 
ing with the auditorium or its famed acoustics, 
the improvements provide spacious new facili- 
ties for public functions, a new home for the 
Symphony Shop, additional restrooms and 
wheelchair-accessible facilities, an additional 
coatroom, and offices for administrative staff. 
The two buildings are linked by a stairway and 
elevator at all levels. The renovation was 
financed entirely by private donations. Our 
thanks go to the Symphony Hall Renovation 
Campaign co-chairmen Frank Hatch and Bill 



Leith and to the countless donors and volun- 
teers whose generosity and leadership has 
made the BSO's home shine with new luster. 

In addition to patron amenities, the first 
floor of the Cohen Wing provides a handsome 
new home for the BSO's Casadesus Collection 
of Ancient Instruments, which was given to the 
orchestra in 1926 by Henri Casadesus, founder 
of the French Society of Ancient Instruments. 
During the renovation of the Cohen Wing the 
collection was taken to the Museum of Fine 
Arts for restoration. 

Symphony Spotlight 

This is one in a series of biographical sketches 
that focus on some of the generous individuals 
who have endowed chairs in the Boston Sym- 
phony Orchestra. Their backgrounds are varied, 
but each felt a special commitment to the Bos- 
ton Symphony Orchestra. 

Margaret and William C. Rousseau Chair 

William C. Rousseau received his M.S. from 
M.I.T. in 1936 and went to work for E.B. 
Badger & Sons. His first assignment, to 
Abdan, Iran, led to a productive and fulfilling 
career. He is currently a senior visiting lec- 
turer emeritus with the chemical engineering 
department at M.I.T. Margaret Rousseau says 
that having been taken at the age of four to 
hear Galli-Curci ignited in her an appreciation 
for fine music and live performances. After 
receiving two degrees at Rice University, she, 
too, attended M.I.T., where she became the 
first woman at M.I.T. to receive a doctor of 
science degree in chemical engineering. "I 
found myself paired with William on a number 
of projects," she recalls, "and two years later 
the pairing became official for life." The Rous- 
seaus attended Symphony concerts for some 
time, but it was volunteer work for the orches- 
tra that brought them to a new awareness of 
the BSO's joys and needs. With the centennial 
drive, they found themselves ready to make the 
important gift of an endowed chair. Their gift 
endowed the tuba position, currently held by 
Chester Schmitz. 

The Symphony Shop Celebrates the New 
BSO Season in a New Location 

Now in an attractive street-level storefront 
location at Symphony Hall's West Entrance on 
Huntington Avenue, the new, expanded Sym- 
phony Shop opened its doors for the 1990 
Opening Night at Pops concert. The Shop con- 



H^^^HJI 



References furnished 
on request 



Armenta Adams 
American Ballet Theater 
Michael Barrett 
John Bayless 
Leonard Bernstein 
William Bolcom 
Jorge Bolet 

Boston Pops Orchestra 
Boston Sympjbony 

Chamber Players 
Boston Symphony 

Orchestra 
Boston University School 

of Music 
BrooW^n Philharmonic 
Dave Bpibeck 
Aaron Cropland 
John Gdrigliano 
Phyllis Curtin 
Rian de Waal 
Michael Feins tein 
Lukas Foss 
Philip Glass 
Karl Haas 
John F. Kennedy Center 

for Performing Arts 



David Korevaar 
Garah Landes 
Micha el Jbjinkester 
Eryanje Eaussade 
Marion McPartland 
jplnn %uman 
Seiji O^wa 
Luciano Pavar otti 
Alexander Peskanov 
Andre Previn 
Steve Reich 
Santiago Rodriguez 
George Shearing 
Bright Sheng 
Leonard Shure 
Abbey Simon 
Stephen Sondheim 
Herbert Stessin 
Tanglewood Music 

Center 
Nelita True 
Craig Urquhart 
Earl Wild 
John Williams 
Yehudi Wyner 
and 200 others 



BALDWIN 

OF 

BOSTON 

98 Boylston, Boston, MA 02116, (617) 482-2525 




tinues to offer exclusive Boston Symphony and 
Boston Pops merchandise as well as recordings 
and other items with a musical motif. Business 
was brisk throughout the Pops season, and the 
BSAV anticipates a successful fall. One special 
piece of new merchandise is itself worth a visit 
to the Shop — an exquisite Swiss music box 
that is the only one of its kind available in the 
United States. Crafted by the Reuge Music 
Company, the music box is made of rosewood 
with a Chinese lacquer finish. The box plays 
Viennese waltzes every hour on the hour, and 
the interior of the box lights up to reveal three 
elegant dancers, costumed in handmade 
dresses of silk, feathers, and pearls. Notewor- 
thy for its musical precision as well, the music 
box features two combs that provide 142 notes. 
If you are not able to visit the Shop on the 
hour, you can activate the music at any time 
with a quarter. Other new merchandise 
includes the 1991 BSO datebook and address 
book, both leatherbound, a Quill pen, clothing 
in such fashion colors as teal, magenta, water- 
melon, and jade, and the return, by popular 
demand, of the black t-shirt and sweatshirt 
with gold foil colophon. The Symphony Shop is 
open Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday from 11 
a.m. to 3 p.m., Saturday from 1 p.m. to 6 
p.m., and from one hour before every Sym- 
phony Hall concert through intermission. 



Suppers at Symphony Hall 

The Boston Symphony Association of Volun- 
teers is pleased to continue its sponsorship of 
the BSO's evening series of pre-concert events. 
"Supper Talks" combine a buffet supper at 
6:30 p.m. in the Cohen Wing's Higginson Hall 
with an informative talk by a BSO player or 
other distinguished member of the music com- 
munity. "Supper Concerts" offer a chamber 
music performance given by members of the 
Boston Symphony Orchestra in the Cabot- 
Cahners Room at 6 p.m., followed by a buffet 
supper served in Higginson Hall. Doors open 
for all Suppers at 5:30 p.m. for a la carte 
cocktails and conversation. These events are 
offered on an individual basis, even to those 
who are not attending that evening's BSO con- 
cert. Speakers for upcoming Supper Talks 
include the BSO's part-time archivist Janet 
Hayashi (Thursday, October 25), BSO Artistic 
Administrator Evans Mirageas (Tuesday, Octo- 
ber 30), and Darcy Kuronen, Curatorial Assis- 



tant, Collection of Musical Instruments, 
Museum of Fine Arts (Thursday, November 
1). Upcoming Supper Concerts will feature 
music of Brahms and Takemitsu (October 4 
and 9), music of Schubert (October 11 and 
16), and music of Beethoven and Haydn 
(November 3). The suppers are priced at $22 
per person for an individual event, $61 for any 
three, or $118 for any six. Advance reserva- 
tions must be made by mail. For reservations 
the week of the supper, please call (617) 
638-9390. All reservations must be made at 
least 48 hours prior to the supper. For further 
information, please call (617) 266-1492, 
ext. 516. 

BSO Members in Concert 

BSO associate concertmaster Tamara 
Smirnova-Sajfar will perform the Tchaikovsky 
Violin Concerto with the Wellesley Symphony 
Orchestra on Sunday, October 28, at 3 p.m. at 
Massachusetts Bay Community College, 50 
Oakland Street in Wellesley Hills, near the 
junction of Rtes. 16 and 9. Robert Prins con- 
ducts a program also including Dvorak's 
Carnival Overture and Mozart's Symphony 
No. 41, Jupiter. Tickets are priced from $6 to 
$8. Call (617) 444-0091 or 431-1314 for fur- 
ther information. 

The John Oliver Chorale opens its 1990-91 
subscription season with Swiss composer 
Frank Martin's Requiem and the United States 
premiere of Martin's Pilate on Saturday, 
November 3, at 8 p.m. at St. Paul's Church in 
Cambridge, at Bow and Arrow streets. The 
soloists are soprano Dominique Labelle, mezzo- 
soprano Gloria Raymond, tenor Paul Kirby, 
baritone Paul Rowe, and bass Donald Wilkin- 
son. Single tickets are $20, $14, and $5; sea- 
son subscriptions are also available. For fur- 
ther information, call (617) 325-0886. 

Ronald Knudsen leads the Newton Sym- 
phony Orchestra in the opening concert of its 
25th Anniversary Season on Sunday, Novem- 
ber 4, at 8 p.m. at Aquinas Junior College, 
15 Walnut Park in Newton. Sanford Sylvan is 
soloist in the world premiere of Charles Fus- 
sell's Wilde, a Symphony for Baritone and 
Orchestra, commissioned by the Newton Sym- 
phony Orchestra, on a program also including 
the Mussorgsky/Ravel Pictures at an Exhibi- 
tion. Single tickets are $14 and $12; season 
subscriptions are also available. Call 
(617) 965-2555 for further information. 





Now in his eighteenth year as music 
director of the Boston Symphony Orches- 
tra, Seiji Ozawa was named the BSO's 
thirteenth music director in 1973, follow- 
ing a year as music adviser. His many 
tours with the orchestra in Europe, Japan, 
and throughout the United States have 
included the orchestra's first tour devoted 
exclusively to appearances at the major 
European music festivals, in 1979; four 
visits to Japan; and, to celebrate the 
orchestra's centennial in 1981, a fourteen- 
city American tour and an international 
tour to Japan, France, Germany, Austria, 
and England. In March 1979 Mr. Ozawa 
and the Boston Symphony Orchestra made 
an historic visit to China for a significant 
musical exchange entailing coaching, 
study, and discussion sessions with Chi- 
nese musicians, as well as concert perform- 
ances, becoming the first American per- 
forming ensemble to visit China since the 
establishment of diplomatic relations. In 
December 1988 he and the orchestra gave 
eleven concerts during a two-week tour to 
England, the Netherlands, France, Ger- 
many, Austria, and Belgium. In December 
1989 Mr. Ozawa and the orchestra trav- 
eled to Japan for the fourth time, on a 
tour that also included the orchestra's first 
concerts in Hong Kong. 

Mr. Ozawa's recent recordings for Phil- 
ips with the Boston Symphony Orchestra 



include Richard Strauss's Elektra, recorded 
during concert performances at Symphony 
Hall in Boston with Hildegard Behrens in 
the title role; and Mahler's First, Second 
{Resurrection), and Fourth symphonies, 
part of a continuing Mahler cycle on Phil- 
ips that also includes the Symphony No. 8 
{Symphony of a Thousand). Mahler's 
Fifth, Seventh, and Ninth symphonies, and 
his Kindertotenlieder, with Jessye Norman, 
have been recorded for future release. Mr. 
Ozawa's recent recordings with the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra for Deutsche Gram- 
mophon include Poulenc's Gloria and Sta- 
bat mater with soprano Kathleen Battle 
and the Tanglewood Festival Chorus, the 
two Liszt piano concertos and Totentanz 
with Krystian Zimerman, an album of 
music by Gabriel Faure, and "Gaite parisi- 
enne," an album of music by Offenbach, 
Gounod, Chabrier, and Thomas. Other 
Deutsche Grammophon releases include 
Prokofiev's complete Romeo and Juliet, 
Berlioz's Romeo et Juliette and Damnation 
of Faust, and, with Itzhak Perlman, an 
award-winning album of the Berg and 
Stravinsky violin concertos. Also available 
are Schoenberg's Gurrelieder, on Philips; 
the complete Beethoven piano concertos 
with Rudolf Serkin, on Telarc; the Dvorak 
Cello Concerto with Mstislav Rostropovich 
and Tchaikovsky's Pathetique Symphony, 
on Erato; Strauss's Don Quixote and the 
Schoenberg/Monn Cello Concerto with 
Yo-Yo Ma, the Mendelssohn Violin Con- 
certo with Isaac Stern, and Berlioz's Les 
Nuits d'ete with Frederica von Stade, on 
CBS Masterworks; and Stravinsky's Fire- 
bird, on EMI/Angel. 

Mr. Ozawa pursues an active interna- 
tional career, appearing regularly with the 
Berlin Philharmonic, the Orchestre de 
Paris, the French National Orchestra, the 
Vienna Philharmonic, the Philharmonia of 
London, and the New Japan Philharmonic. 
Recent appearances conducting opera have 
included La Scala, Salzburg, the Vienna 
Staatsoper, and the Paris Opera; he has 
also conducted at Covent Garden. In 1983, 
at the Paris Opera, he conducted the world 




premiere of Olivier Messiaen's St. Francis 
ofAssisi. In addition to his many Boston 
Symphony Orchestra recordings, he has 
recorded with the Berlin Philharmonic, the 
London Philharmonic, the Philharmonia of 
London, the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, 
the Orchestre National, the Orchestre de 
Paris, the San Francisco Symphony, and 
the Toronto Symphony Orchestra, among 
others. His opera recordings include 
Bizet's Carmen with Jessye Norman and 
the Orchestre National, on Philips, and 
Les Contes d' Hoffmann with Placido Dom- 
ingo and Edita Gruberova, on Deutsche 
Grammophon. 

Born in 1935 in Shenyang, China, to 
Japanese parents, Seiji Ozawa studied 
Western music as a child and later gradu- 
ated with first prizes in composition and 
conducting from Tokyo's Toho School of 
Music, where he was a student of Hideo 
Saito. In 1959 he won first prize at the 
International Competition of Orchestra 
Conductors held in Besangon, France, and 
was invited to Tanglewood by Charles 
Munch, then music director of the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra and a judge at the 
competition. In 1960 he won the Tangle- 
wood Music Center's highest honor, the 
Koussevitzky Prize for outstanding student 
conductor. 



While a student of Herbert von Karajan 
in West Berlin, Mr. Ozawa came to the 
attention of Leonard Bernstein. He accom- 
panied Mr. Bernstein on the New York 
Philharmonic's 1961 tour of Japan and 
was made an assistant conductor of that 
orchestra for the 1961-62 season. In Janu- 
ary 1962 he made his first professional 
concert appearance in North America, with 
the San Francisco Symphony. Mr. Ozawa 
was music director of the Chicago Sym- 
phony Orchestra's Ravinia Festival for five 
summers beginning in 1964, music director 
of the Toronto Symphony Orchestra from 
1965 to 1969, and music director of the 
San Francisco Symphony from 1970 to 
1976, followed by a year as that orches- 
tra's music advisor. He conducted the 
Boston Symphony Orchestra for the first 
time at Tanglewood, in 1964, and made 
his first Symphony Hall appearance with 
the orchestra in 1968. In 1970 he was 
named an artistic director of the Tangle- 
wood Festival. 

Mr. Ozawa holds honorary doctor of 
music degrees from the University of 
Massachusetts, the New England Conser- 
vatory of Music, and Wheaton College in 
Norton, Massachusetts. He has won an 
Emmy for the Boston Symphony Orches- 
tra's "Evening at Symphony" PBS televi- 
sion series. 



e 








HIHMil 





Music Directorship endowed by 
John Moors Cabot 

BOSTON SYMPHONY 

ORCHESTRA 

1990-91 

First Violins 

Malcolm Lowe 

Concertmaster 
Charles Munch chair 

Tamara Smirnova-Sajfar 

Associate Concertmaster 
Helen Horner Mclntyre chair 

Max Hobart 

Assistant Concertmaster 

Robert L. Beat, and 

Enid L. and Bruce A. Beat chair 

Lucia Lin 

Assistant Concertmaster 

Edward and Bertha C. Rose chair 

Bo Youp Hwang 

John and Dorothy Wilson chair, 
fully funded in perpetuity 

Max Winder 

Forrest Foster Collier chair 

Fredy Ostrovsky 

Dorothy Q. and David B. Arnold, Jr., 
chair, fully funded in perpetuity 

Gottfried Wilfmger 



*Participating in a system of rotated 
seating within each string section 
%On sabbatical leave 



Leo Panasevich 

Carolyn and George Rowland chair 

Sheldon Rotenberg 

Muriel C Kasdon and 
Marjorie C. Paley chair 

Alfred Schneider 
Raymond Sird 
Ikuko Mizuno 
Amnon Levy 

Second Violins 

Marylou Speaker Churchill 

Fahnestock chair 

Vyacheslav Uritsky 

Charlotte and Irving W. Rabb chair 

Ronald Knudsen 

Edgar and Shirley Grossman chair 

Joseph McGauley 
Leonard Moss 

* Harvey Seigel 
*Jerome Rosen 

* Sheila Fiekowsky 
Ronan Lefkowitz 

* Nancy Bracken 

* Jennie Shames 
*Aza Raykhtsaum 
*Valeria Vilker Kuchment 
*Bonnie Bewick 
*Tatiana Dimitriades 
*James Cooke 
*Si-Jing Huang 

Violas 

Burton Fine 

Charles S. Dana chair 

Patricia McCarty 

Anne Stoneman chair, 
fully funded in perpetuity 

^Ronald Wilkison 

Lois and Harlan Anderson chair 

Robert Barnes 




10 





Jerome Lipson 
Joseph Pietropaolo 
Michael Zaretsky 
Marc Jeanneret 
*Mark Ludwig 

* Rachel Fagerburg 
*Edward Gazouleas 

Cellos 

Jules Eskin 

Philip R. Allen chair 

Martha Babcock 

Vernon and Marion Alden chair 

Sato Knudsen 

Esther S. and Joseph M. Shapiro chair 

Joel Moerschel 

Sandra and David Bakalar chair 

* Robert Ripley 
Luis Leguia 

Robert Bradford Newman chair 

tCarol Procter 

Lillian and Nathan R. Miller chair 

*Ronald Feldman 

Charles and JoAnne Dickinson chair 

*Jerome Patterson 

* Jonathan Miller 

Basses 

Edwin Barker 

Harold D. Hodgkinson chair 

Lawrence Wolfe 

Maria Nistazos Stata chair, 
fully funded in perpetuity 

Joseph Hearne 
Bela Wurtzler 
John Salkowski 

* Robert Olson 
*James Orleans 
*Todd Seeber 
*John Stovall 

Flutes 



• Walter Piston chair 

Leone Buyse 

Acting Principal Flute 
Marian Gray Lewis chair 

Fenwick Smith 

Myra and Robert Kraft chair 

Piccolo 

Geralyn Coticone 

Evelyn and C. Charles Marran chair 



Oboes 

Alfred Genovese 

Mildred B. Remis chair 

Wayne Rapier 
Keisuke Wakao 

English Horn 

Laurence Thorstenberg 

Beranek chair, 

fully funded in perpetuity 

Clarinets 

Harold Wright 

Ann S.M. Banks chair 

Thomas Martin 

Bass Clarinet 

Craig Nordstrom 

Farla and Harvey Chet 
Krentzman chair 

Bassoons 

Richard Svoboda 

Edward A. Taft chair 

Roland Small 
Richard Ranti 

Contrabassoon 

Richard Plaster 

Helen Rand Thayer chair 

Horns 

Charles Kavalovski 

Helen Sagojf Slosberg chair 

Richard Sebring 

Margaret Andersen Congleton chair 

Daniel Katzen 
Jay Wadenpfuhl 
Richard Mackey 
Jonathan Menkis 

Trumpets 

Charles Schlueter 

Roger Louis Voisin chair 

Peter Chapman 

Ford H. Cooper chair 

Timothy Morrison 
Steven Emery 



Trombones 

Ronald Barron 

J. P. and Mary B. Barger chair, 
fully funded in perpetuity 

Norman Bolter 

Bass Trombone 

Douglas Yeo 

Tuba 

Chester Schmitz 

Margaret and William C. 
Rousseau chair 

Timpani 

Everett Firth 

Sylvia Shippen Wells chair 

Percussion 

Arthur Press 

Assistant Timpanist 
Peter Andrew Lurie chair 

Thomas Gauger 

Peter and Anne Brooke chair 

Frank Epstein 

Harp 

Ann Hobson Pilot 

Willona Henderson Sinclair chair 

Sara Schuster Ericsson 



Personnel Managers 

Lynn Larsen 
Harry Shapiro 

Librarians 

Marshall Burlingame 
William Shisler 
James Harper 

Stage Manager 

Position endowed by 
Angelica Lloyd Clagett 

Alfred Robison 



11 




Congratulations to the 
Boston Symphony Orchestra 
on yet another wonderful 
season of magical music. 

Jordan marsh 

A TRADITION SINCE 1851 



12 



A Brief History of the Boston Symphony Orchestra 



Now in its 110th season, the Boston Sym- 
phony Orchestra gave its inaugural concert 
on October 22, 1881, and has continued to 
uphold the vision of its founder, the philan- 
thropist, Civil War veteran, and amateur 
musician Henry Lee Higginson, for more 
than a century. Under the leadership of Seiji 
Ozawa, its music director since 1973, the 
Boston Symphony Orchestra has performed 
throughout the United States, as well as in 
Europe, Japan, and China, and it reaches 
audiences numbering in the millions through 
its performances on radio, television, and 
recordings. It plays an active role in com- 
missioning new works from today's most 
important composers; its summer season at 
Tanglewood is regarded as one of the most 
important music festivals in the world; it 
helps to develop the audience of the future 
through the Boston Symphony Youth Con- 
certs and through a variety of outreach pro- 
grams involving the entire Boston commu- 
nity; and, during the Tanglewood season, it 
sponsors one of the world's most important 
training grounds for young composers, con- 
ductors, instrumentalists, and vocalists, the 
Tanglewood Music Center, which celebrated 
its fiftieth anniversary this past summer. 
The orchestra's virtuosity is reflected in 
the concert and recording activities of the 
Boston Symphony Chamber Players — the 
world's only permanent chamber ensemble 
made up of a major symphony orchestra's 



principal players — and the activities of the 
Boston Pops Orchestra have established an 
international standard for the performance 
of lighter kinds of music. Overall, the mis- 
sion of the Boston Symphony Orchestra is 
to foster and maintain an organization dedi- 
cated to the making of music consonant 
with the highest aspirations of musical art, 
creating performances and providing educa- 
tional and training programs at the highest 
level of excellence. This is accomplished with 
the continued support of its audiences, 
governmental assistance on both the federal 
and local levels, and through the generosity 
of many foundations, businesses, and 
individuals. 

Henry Lee Higginson dreamed of found- 
ing a great and permanent orchestra in his 
home town of Boston for many years before 
that vision approached reality in the spring 
of 1881. The following October, the first 
Boston Symphony Orchestra concert was 
given under the direction of conductor Georg 
Henschel, who would remain as music direc- 
tor until 1884. For nearly twenty years Bos- 
ton Symphony concerts were held in the Old 
Boston Music Hall; Symphony Hall, the 
orchestra's present home, and one of the 
world's most highly regarded concert halls, 
was opened in 1900. Henschel was suc- 
ceeded by a series of German-born and 
-trained conductors— Wilhelm Gericke, 
Arthur Nikisch, Emil Paur, and Max 




The first photograph, actually a collage, of the Boston Symphony Orchestra under Georg Henschel, 
taken 1882 



13 




U SH ' ■ Ml 



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14 




Fiedler — culminating in the appointment of 
the legendary Karl Muck, who served two 
tenures as music director, 1906-08 and 
1912-18. Meanwhile, in July 1885, the 
musicians of the Boston Symphony had 
given their first "Promenade" concert, offer- 
ing both music and refreshments, and ful- 
filling Major Higginson's wish to give "con- 
certs of a lighter kind of music." These 
concerts, soon to be given in the springtime 
and renamed first "Popular" and then 
"Pops," fast became a tradition. 

In 1915 the orchestra made its first 
transcontinental trip, playing thirteen con- 
certs at the Panama-Pacific Exposition in 
San Francisco. Recording, begun with RCA 
in 1917, continued with increasing fre- 
quency, as did radio broadcasts. In 1918 
Henri Rabaud was engaged as conductor; he 
was succeeded a year later by Pierre Mon- 
teux. These appointments marked the begin- 
ning of a French-oriented tradition that 
would be maintained, even during the 
Russian-born Serge Koussevitzky's time, 
with the employment of many French- 
trained musicians. 

The Koussevitzky era began in 1924. His 
extraordinary musicianship and electric per- 
sonality proved so enduring that he served 
an unprecedented term of twenty-five years. 
Regular radio broadcasts of Boston Sym- 
phony Orchestra concerts began during 
Koussevitzky's years as music director. In 
1936 Koussevitzky led the orchestra's first 
concerts in the Berkshires; a year later he 
and the players took up annual summer res- 
idence at Tanglewood. Koussevitzky passion- 
ately shared Major Higginson's dream of "a 
good honest school for musicians," and in 
1940 that dream was realized with the 
founding of the Berkshire Music Center 
(now called the Tanglewood Music Center). 

In 1929 the free Esplanade concerts on 
the Charles River in Boston were inaugu- 
rated by Arthur Fiedler, who had been a 
member of the orchestra since 1915 and 
who in 1930 became the eighteenth conduc- 
tor of the Boston Pops, a post he would 
hold for half a century, to be succeeded by 
John Williams in 1980. The Boston Pops 
Orchestra celebrated its hundredth birthday 
in 1985 under Mr. Williams's baton. 



Charles Munch followed Koussevitzky as 
music director in 1949. Munch continued 
Koussevitzky's practice of supporting con- 
temporary composers and introduced much 
music from the French repertory to this 
country. During his tenure the orchestra 
toured abroad for the first time and its con- 
tinuing series of Youth Concerts was initi- 
ated. Erich Leinsdorf began his seven-year 
term as music director in 1962. Mr. Leins- 
dorf presented numerous premieres, restored 
many forgotten and neglected works to the 
repertory, and, like his two predecessors, 
made many recordings for RCA; in addition, 
many concerts were televised under his 
direction. Leinsdorf was also an energetic 
director of the Tanglewood Music Center, 
and under his leadership a full-tuition fel- 
lowship program was established. Also dur- 
ing these years, in 1964, the Boston Sym- 
phony Chamber Players were founded. 

William Steinberg succeeded Leinsdorf in 
1969. He conducted a number of American 
and world premieres, made recordings for 
Deutsche Grammophon and RCA, appeared 
regularly on television, led the 1971 Euro- 
pean tour, and directed concerts on the east 
coast, in the south, and in the mid-west. 

Seiji Ozawa, an artistic director of the 
Tanglewood Festival since 1970, became the 
orchestra's thirteenth music director in the 
fall of 1973, following a year as music 
adviser. Xow in his eighteenth year as music 
director, Mr. Ozawa has continued to solid- 
ify the orchestra's reputation at home and 
abroad, and he has reaffirmed the orches- 
tra's commitment to new music through a 
series of centennial commissions marking 
the orchestra's 100th birthday, a series of 
works celebrating the fiftieth anniversary of 
Tanglewood Music Center, and recent works 
commissioned from such prominent compos- 
ers as John Cage, Hans Werner Henze, 
Peter Lieberson, and Bernard Rands. Lender 
his direction the orchestra has also expanded 
its recording activities to include releases on 
the Philips, Telarc, CBS, EMI/Angel, Hype- 
rion, New World, and Erato labels. 

Today, the Boston Symphony Orchestra. 
Inc., presents more than 250 concerts annu- 
ally. It is an ensemble that has richly ful- 
filled Higginson's vision of a great and per- 
manent orchestra in Boston. 



15 



Symphony Hall at 90 

A Timeless Gift to Bostonians 

by Robert Campbell 

Symphony Hall as a piece of architecture is so Bostonian it's almost a caricature. It 
begins by repeating the sacred, iconic brick and limestone of Harvard Yard and Bea- 
con Hill. Then it goes on to display, rather ostentatiously perhaps, a typical Boston 
refusal to be ostentatious. It comes to us in a plain brown wrapper of dark brick, a 
brown wrapping that conceals rather than advertises the sensuous, rhythmic delights 
of the music that is performed — as if secretly— deep inside. That dowdy wrapping 
reminds us of the Victorian matrons of Boston who kept their new dresses from Paris 
in the closet for a year so they wouldn't look too fashionable. Symphony Hall doesn't 
wish to look fashionable and it certainly doesn't want to look expensive. Its 
buttoned-up architecture tells us that it is a building that will be Good for Us, a 
venue for Culture, something to be taken quite seriously. 

The architect was one of the most famous in American history, Charles Follen McKim, 
a Pennsylvanian who came to town to work as a draftsman for an even greater archi- 
tect, Henry Hobson Richardson. McKim went off on his own in 1879 at age thirty-two 
to found a firm called McKim, Mead & White, the most successful of its era. McKim 
became virtually house architect for Harvard, designing such varied landmarks there 
as the stadium and the New York Harvard Club. In Copley Square, across from 
H.H. Richardson's famed Trinity Church, McKim outdid his mentor by designing the 
Boston Public Library, still today, perhaps, the city's greatest public building. And in 
1900, his Symphony Hall opened — to something less than universal acclaim. 

Critic William Apthorp of the Boston Transcript wrote, notoriously, "Expert con- 
demnations of the hall differ, as far as we have been able to discover, only in degrees 



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16 




of violence." We must shudder at the impact so firm a judgment must have had on 
that newspaper's all-too-loyal subscribers, as we recall the lines of the young T.S. Eliot: 

The readers of the Boston Evening Transcript 
Sway in the wind like a field of ripe corn. 

As so often happens, the judgment of posterity differed from that early judgment. 
Acoustician and BSO Trustee Leo Beranek attributes the mistake to the fact that 
orchestras in the Hall's first years were simply too small — and therefore too faint — 
for so large a space. In any case, for many decades now, as everyone knows, Sym- 
phony Hall has been all but universally regarded as one of the three or four best halls 
in the world, acoustically speaking, for symphonic music. 

Architects soon learn that experiment is risky in their field. McKim's first proposal 
was an experiment: a circular hall, the shape of a Greek theater. It would have been 
an acoustical disaster, a truth that, luckily, was pointed out to the architect by Wal- 
lace Sabine, a young Harvard professor who was in the process, at that very moment, 
of founding the science of acoustics. Sabine recommended that the new hall should 
simply be a copy of some old one that worked — sound advice indeed. McKim's final 
proposal for the interior of Symphony Hall, therefore, was a very close imitation of 
the old Music Hall (now renovated as the Orpheum), in which the orchestra had pre- 
viously played. 

Much as everyone loves Symphony Hall's interior (despite its narrow and squeaky 
seats), few have been equally thrilled by the building's exterior. Typical is the com- 
ment of the current (1984) edition of the Blue Guide to Boston and Cambridge: "This 
is generally considered to be one of McKim's least-successful designs, principally 
because of the top-heavy facade and the overly massive Ionic portico that supports it." 





Symphony Hall during the 1939-40 season, before the Huntington Avenue underpass 
was constructed 



17 



■-.■'.■■■'-•• 



mmmmmmm 




McKim must have disliked the exterior himself, judging by the scant notice he gave 
it in his firm's many publications. The problem was that the donor, Henry Lee Hig- 
ginson, omitted most of McKhn's proposed decorative program for the exterior — carv- 
ings, inscriptions, and architectural doodads of all kinds — in order to save money. 

But perhaps we needn't really regret that loss. The plainness of Symphony Hall's 
exterior, which has often been compared to an industrial warehouse or a train station, 
actually strengthens the compelling architectural concept of the building as a whole. 
It is a box inside a box. The outer box is a carton, but the inner box is a gift. The 
outer box is the brick shell. The inner box is the orchestra hall. Between them, like so 
much styrofoam insulation, is an air space that contains corridors and offices. The air 
space insures that no noise from the street will penetrate to damage the orchestra hall. 

Opening a present that has just arrived in the mail is a delight. A comparable plea- 
sure is the experience of penetrating the outer carton of Symphony Hall to discover 
the gift within — the lovely ornamented interior, with its delicate play of grays, its 
statues, its hint of giltwork, and, at concert time, its sculptural glitter of instruments 
on stage. 

Over the decades, inevitably, a few things went wrong with Symphony Hall. 
McKim's main entrance was a bold row of doors on the Huntington Avenue facade. 
But in the 1940s, Huntington was widened for an underpass, and Symphony Hall's 
main entrance was moved around the corner to Massachusetts Avenue, employing 
what had originally been conceived as a secondary carriage drop-off. The generous 
lobby on Huntington became today's Hatch Room, and the tiny lobby on Massachu- 
setts served, very inadequately, to replace it. Coherence and orientation suffered. 
Entering on Huntington, the visitor walked into the Hall on axis with the stage, eas- 
ily comprehending the building's symmetrical order as a reflection of the symmetry of 




18 




the visitor's own body. Entering on Massachusetts, by contrast, one sidles awkwardly 
toward the seats, moving at right angles to the Hall's axis. The architectural order is 
far harder to grasp. 

Other problems were those of crowding. Many new functions jammed the original 
office spaces, never very generous to begin with. Mechanical and electrical systems 
aged. Oddball elements of decor clashed with the architecture. As a result of all this, 
a major program of restoration and improvement began a few years ago. A thought- 
fully staged master plan of improvements was created by the BSO, with the help of 
the firm of James Stewart Polshek and Partners of New York. 

This fall occurs the opening of the largest and brightest piece to date of that reno- 
vation: the Cohen Wing, completely gutted and rebuilt, with new patron spaces on the 
ground floor and office spaces above. Banquet and meeting rooms and a new Sym- 
phony Shop are among the badly needed facilities provided by the new wing. In the 
Hall itself, a new Higginson Room, renamed the Beranek Room, is opening. Archi- 
tects for this stage of the improvements were Crissman & Solomon Associates, and 
the contractor was the Walsh Brothers. Future improvements, as funds become avail- 
able, will include a backstage building for the musicians, and eventually a new lobby 
and entrance. 

Symphony Hall has served its purpose nobly, economically, and often just a little 
bit shabbily for ninety years. Never a good place in which to show off a fancy gown, it 
is a very good place in which to listen to music. As much as any other building it 
embodies the essence of Boston. 

Robert Campbell, an architect in Cambridge, is architectural adviser to the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra and architecture critic of the Boston Globe. 




19 



GwESrfǤ2E 




SEIJI OZAWA 

and the Boston Symphony Orchestra 
on Deutsche Grammophon 




© 1990 DG / PolyGram Records 



20 






n at 



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BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

Seiji Ozawa, Music Director 

Grant Llewellyn and Robert Spano, 

Assistant Conductors 
One Hundred and Tenth Season, 1990-91 

Friday, September 28, at 2 

THE FANNY PEABODY MASON MEMORIAL CONCERT 

Friday, October 12, at 8 

SEIJI OZAWA conducting 




BACH/SAITO 



J.S. Bach's Chaconne in D minor, from BWV 1004, 
orchestrated by Hideo Saito 



INTERMISSION 



MAHLER 



Symphony No. 5 

Parti 

Funeral March: At a measured pace 

Stormy, with utmost vehemence 

Part II 

Scherzo: Energetic, not too fast 

Part III 

Adagietto: Very slow 

Rondo-Finale: Allegro giocoso. Vigorous 



These performances of Mahler's Fifth Symphony are being recorded by Philips 
for future release as part of the orchestra's continuing Mahler cycle on that 
label. Your cooperation in keeping noise in the Hall at a minimum is sincerely 
appreciated. 



The afternoon concert will end about 4:05 and the evening concert about 10:05. 

RCA, Deutsche Grammophon, Philips, Telarc, Sony Classical/CBS Masterworks, EMI/Angel, 
New World, Erato, and Hyperion records 

Baldwin piano 

Please be sure the electronic signal on your watch or pager is switched off 

during the concert. 

The program books for the Friday- afternoon series are given in loving memory of Mrs. Hugh 

Bancroft by her daughters Mrs. A. Werk Cook and the late Mrs. William C. Cox. 



21 



Week 1 



HBHBBBI 



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BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTEA 

Seiji Ozawa, Music Director 

Grant Llewellyn and Robert Spano, 

Assistant Conductors 
One Hundred and Tenth Season, 1990-91 

Saturday, October 13, at 8 
SEIJI OZAWA conducting 




&^±- 



PROKOFIEV 



Piano Concerto No. 3 in C, Opus 26 

Andante —Allegro 

Theme (Andantino) and Variations 

Allegro ma non troppo 

MARTHA ARGERICH 



MAHLER 



INTERMISSION 

Symphony No. 5 
Parti 



Funeral March: At a measured pace 
Stormy, with utmost vehemence 

Part II 

Scherzo: Energetic, not too fast 

Part III 

Adagietto: Very slow 

Rondo-Finale: Allegro giocoso. Vigorous 



This performance of Mahler's Fifth Symphony is being recorded by Philips 
for future release as part of the orchestra's continuing Mahler cycle on that 
label. Your cooperation in keeping noise in the Hall at a minimum is sincerely 
appreciated. 



Program notes for tonight's concert begin on page 29. 
Tonight's concert will end about 10:15. 

RCA, Deutsche Grammophon, Philips, Telarc, Sony Classical/CBS Masterworks, EMI/Angel, 

New World, Erato, and Hyperion records 
Baldwin piano 
Martha Argerich plays the Steinway piano. 

Please be sure the electronic signal on your watch or pager is switched off during the 
concert. 



23 



Week 1 



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Johann Sebastian Bach 

Chaconne in D minor from the Partita for unaccompanied violin, BWV 1004, 
orchestrated by Hideo Saito 




Johann Sebastian Bach was born in Eisenach, Sax- 
ony, on March 21, 1685, and died in Leipzig on 
July 28, 1 750. The D minor Chaconne closes his 
Partita for unaccompanied violin, BWV 1004, prob- 
ably composed during Bach's Cothen years, 1717 to 
1 723. Hideo Saito was born in Tokyo on May 23, 
1902, and died there on September 18, 1974. His 
orchestration of Bach's work calls for two flutes and 
piccolo, two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons, four 
horns, two trumpets, three trombones and tuba, tim- 
pani, and strings. 

When J.S. Bach died in 1750, he was regarded 
by most musicians as a talented organist and an 
old-fashioned composer. His own sons had pro- 
gressed far beyond the music of the old man, and 
tastes had begun to change drastically. Who cared for complicated fugal or canonic 
structures from Papa Sebastian when one of the sons, Carl Philipp Emmanuel, might 
astonish the listener with striking and even bizarre gestures, while another son, 
Johann Christian, might seduce the ear with sweet Italianate melody? The keyboard 
works of the older Bach were the province of antiquarians, not active musicians, and 
no one knew the cantatas or the Passions, which moldered in storage at the 
Thomaskirche in Leipzig. 

But increasingly since 1850, when the complete works began to be published by the 
Bach-Gesellsehaft, Bach's work has become central to western music. Since the com- 
pletion of the Bach edition (and now work on a New Bach Edition following modern 
standards of scholarship), Bach's works have been readily available to anyone who 
cares to study or perform them. Since 1850, an amazing number of composers have 
turned to Bach for study, intellectual stimulation, musical delight. 

Of Bach's large output, one small work has repeatedly attracted the attention of 
composers and performers for its combination of sheer technical bravura and depth of 
musical expression: the last movement of Bach's second partita for unaccompanied 
violin, BWV 1004, a chaconne, is the most famous single work ever written for that 
instrument, a challenge to the composer as well as to the performer. Part of the chal- 
lenge comes from the fact that the violin is essentially a melody instrument, while a 
chaconne is, by definition, a contrapuntal form, requiring several melodic lines at once 
to project its shape. Popular in the Baroque era, the chaconne is a kind of variation 
form involving a "ground bass" — a melody that keeps restating itself over and over, 
usually in the lower register — while other musical ideas are projected against it as 
countermelodies of increasing expressive and textural complexity. 

Bach's D minor Chaconne has been admired by countless musicians. Perhaps the 
most heartfelt praise of the work comes from the pen of Johannes Brahms, who in 
1877 transcribed it for the piano, for left hand only. When he sent this off to his dear 
friend Clara Schumann, he added the following letter: 

I don't suppose I have ever sent you anything as delightful as what I am sending 
you today, provided your fingers can survive the pleasure! The Chaconne is in my 
opinion one of the most wonderful and incomprehensible pieces of music. Using 
the technique adapted to a small instrument, the man wrote a whole world of the 
deepest thoughts and most powerful feelings. If I could picture myself writing, or 
even conceiving, such a piece, I am certain that the extreme excitement and emo- 
tional tension would have driven me mad. If one has no supremely great violinist 



25 



Week 1 



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at hand, the most exquisite of joys is probably simply to let the Chaconne ring in 
one's mind. But the piece certainly inspires one to occupy oneself with it some- 
how. One does not always want to hear the music actually played, and in any 
case [Joseph] Joachim is not always there, so one tries it otherwise. 

Brahms found it necessary to try to recreate Bach's implied challenge by accepting a 
conscious limitation— writing for the left hand only— as Bach had done in writing for 
unaccompanied violin. But other musicians, equally seized by the power of Bach's 
astonishing work, have sought instead to do justice to its grandeur on the fullest 
scale. 

Hideo Saito was one of the leading musical figures in contemporary Japan. The son 
of a scholar of English literature, he began musical studies at the age of twelve and 
then took up the cello at sixteen. In 1923 he went to Leipzig to study, and upon his 
return to Japan in 1927 he became principal cellist of the New Symphony Orchestra 
(now the NHK Symphony Orchestra). Further studies in Germany with Emanuel 
Feuermann developed his interest in education, and work with Josef Rosenstock 
turned his attention to conducting, to which he devoted himself from 1942 to 1948, 
while also performing in chamber music concerts. 

In 1948, convinced that the standard of music-making in Japan needed to be 
raised, Saito began a "Music Class for Children," which became the foundation for 
the present Toho Gakuen School of Music in Tokyo; a high school was inaugurated in 
1952, a two-year college in 1955, and a four-year college in 1961. Until his death, 
Saito devoted himself to music education, with an emphasis on stringed instruments, 
conducting, and orchestral ensemble. He was instrumental in making European classi- 
cal music popular in Japan, and he took the Toho Gakuen Orchestra on tours to the 
United States in 1964 and to Europe and the Soviet Union in 1970. In all likelihood, 
he prepared his transcription of the Bach Chaconne for this student orchestra, so 
dear to his heart. Unlike Brahms, who chose to restrict his technique as Bach had 
done, Saito chose rather to enlarge the canvas in order to accommodate that "whole 
world of the deepest thoughts and most powerful feelings." 

— Steven Ledbetter 




Hideo Saito 



27 



Week 1 



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Sergei Prokofiev 

Piano Concerto No. 3 in C, Opus 26 




Sergei Sergeyevich Prokofiev was born at Sontzovka, 
Government of Ekaterinoslav, Ukraine, on April 23, 
1891, and died at Nikolina Gora near Moscow on 
March 5, 1953. He began planning a third piano 
concerto as early as 1911, but completed it only in 
1921. Prokofiev himself played the solo part in the 
premiere, which was given on October 16 that year 
by the Chicago Symphony Orchestra conducted by 
Frederick Stock. The composer was also soloist at 
the first Boston Symphony Orchestra performance, 
on January 29, 1926; Serge Koussevitzky conducted. 
Other pianists to undertake the concerto on BSO 
concerts have included Alexander Borovsky with 
Koussevitzky, William Kapell and Gary Grajfman 
with Richard Burgin, Alexander Urinsky with 
Charles Munch and Burgin, Jorge Bolet and John Browning with Erich Leinsdorf, 
Grajfman with Michael Tilson Thomas, Maurizio Pollini with Seiji Ozawa and 
Thomas, Byron Janis and Martha Argerich with Ozawa, Jeffrey Siegel with William 
Steinberg, Browning with Aldo Ceccato, Israela Margalit with Lorin Maazel and 
Joseph Silverstein, and John hill with Yuri Temirkanov. The most recent Symphony 
Hall performances, in April 1985, featured Alexander Toradze with Seiji Ozawa; the 
most recent BSO performance at Tanglewood, in August 1990, featured pianist Yefim 
Bronfman with Charles Dutoit conducting. Besides the solo piano, the score calls for two 
flutes and piccolo, two each of oboes, clarinets, and bassoons, four horns, two trumpets, 
three trombones, timpani, bass drum, castanets, tambourine, cymbals, and strings. 

As the only child in a cultural and affluent household, Prokofiev's early development 
was directed first by his doting pianist mother, who gave him his first lessons on the 
instrument, and then— when his talent proved to be unmistakable — by the young com- 
poser Reinhold Gliere, who was hired to come as a private music tutor to Sontzovka. 
By the time Prokofiev entered the St. Petersburg Conservatory in 1904 he had 
already completed a remarkable number of youthful works, mostly for the piano, but 
also a violin sonata and an opera. During his first four years in St. Petersburg he 
pursued the course in composition. It was a difficult time: 1905 brought the first rum- 
blings of the coming revolution, disturbing the tranquility of academic life (Rimsky- 
Korsakov was fired for anti-government activities, and other leading teachers resigned 
in protest). But Prokofiev himself was responsible for most of his own difficulties. 
Rather arrogant by nature, he was also younger than the other students and found it 
difficult to make friends with them. Most of his teachers were conservative peda- 
gogues whose tutelage Prokofiev found dull; eventually he found himself in open 
clashes with his harmony teacher Liadov. Within a few years, the headstrong young 
colt had appeared in a recital of his own music that marked him as an enfant terrible, 
an image he assiduously cultivated for some time. 

His experience in a composition program had so disillusioned him to the prospects 
of teaching that he decided to pursue a career as a performer. Thus, though he had 
maintained at best a love-hate relationship with the St. Petersburg Conservatory 
— somewhat skewed to the latter — he decided to stay on for the study of piano and 
conducting. Here, too, his willful self-assurance made difficulties, but his piano 
teacher, Anna Esipova, proved as strong-willed as he. Prokofiev disdained to play the 
music of the Classical era without adding his own "improvements," and he found the 
discipline of technical drills a waste of time. Only when Esipova threatened him with 



29 



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expulsion did he see the light. His four years of study proved essential to his career 
as a soloist. He already played brilliant pieces brilliantly, but Esipova nourished a 
strain of lyricism that was to become as important to his composition as it was to his 
playing. 

Needless to say, he did not give up composing during this time. Before completing 
the piano program, Prokofiev had already finished his first two piano concertos (obvi- 
ously designed as showpieces for himself) and had even boldly chosen to play the 
First Concerto as his piece for the final keyboard competition, although it was 
expected that the participants would choose a work from the established repertory. 

The years following Prokofiev's graduation in 1914 were marked by war and revolu- 
tion in the world at large and in Russia in particular. Yet in spite of this, Prokofiev 
began to achieve renown, composing some of his best-known works (including the 
Classical Symphony and the First Violin Concerto). Eventually, though, the unsettled 
condition of musical life and almost everything else persuaded him to go abroad, at 
least for a time. He set out with high hopes for New York, going the long way, 
through Vladivostock, Tokyo, and San Francisco. While on this long journey he began 
sketching a new opera, The Love for Three Oranges, as well as two movements of a 
string quartet. Though the opera was eventually to become his most successful stage 
work, its first production was fraught with difficulties. After signing a contract for a 
1919 production in Chicago, Prokofiev finished the score in time for rehearsals. The 
sudden death of the intended conductor postponed the premiere for one year, then a 
second. Increasingly disillusioned with the United States, Prokofiev left for Paris in 
the spring of 1920. 

Paris was a good place for a Russian composer of advanced tendencies. Diaghilev's 
brilliant Ballets Russes was open to the newest ideas, especially from Russian com- 
posers, and Serge Koussevitzky had founded his own concert series emphasizing new 
works. After the exciting premiere of his ballet The Tale of the Buffoon by the Ballets 
Russes (Paris loved it, London hated it), Prokofiev adjourned to the coast of Brittany 
for a summer of composition. There he achieved his long-held plan to write a Third 
Piano Concerto. Much of the material was already in hand, since he had been think- 
ing about such a work since completing the Second Concerto in 1914, and some of the 
musical ideas go back even before that. He was still committed to the premiere of his 
opera in Chicago that fall, so he took the opportunity of introducing the new piano 
concerto there during the same trip. The Love for Three Oranges was premiered (in 
French, rather than the Russian in which it had been composed) at the Auditorium 
Theater in Chicago on December 30, 1921; the concerto, though composed later, pre- 
ceded the opera into the world by two months. Here, too, Prokofiev received diverse 
reactions: Chicago loved both works, New York hated them. Following this experience, 
Prokofiev returned to Paris, where he lived until his permanent return to the Soviet 
Union in 1938. Only concert tours brought him back to the United States during that 
period. By now, though, his two major "American" pieces are well established as 
favorites among Prokofiev's output. 

The Third Piano Concerto, in fact, is the most frequently performed of Prokofiev's 
five contributions to that genre. Though it is not a whit less demanding technically 
than the first two concertos, it opens up a new and appealing vein of lyricism that 
Prokofiev was to mine successfully in the years to come. At the same time his biting, 
acerbic humor is never absent for long, especially in the writing for woodwinds and 
sometimes for percussion. 

Prokofiev customarily wrote melodic ideas in a notebook as they occurred to him, 
sometimes gathering them for years before assembling them into a finished work, 
sometimes taking material from a work already completed and recasting it in a new 
guise. Both of these procedures occurred in the creation of the Third Piano Concerto. 
Some of the material dates back to 1911. But the first identifiable ideas to find their 



31 



Week 1 



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way into the score came when he created a theme to be used as the basis of a set of 
variations in 1913 (this now opens the second movement), though he did not work 
further on it at that time. In 1916-17 he created the main ideas for the first move- 
ment and wrote two variations on the 1913 theme. The string quartet that he began 
and then abandoned while en route to the United States was, according to the com- 
poser, a "white" quartet, because it was in a diatonic style playable on the white keys 
of the piano. (Such a description obviously comes from a pianist, since the idea of 
"white keys" would mean nothing to a string player!) Two of the themes from that 
work found their way into the new concerto. Thus, when Prokofiev began working 
specifically on the Third Concerto in 1921, he already had virtually the entire the- 
matic material of the work at hand. 

The concerto opens with a yearning lyrical theme in the clarinet, immediately ech- 
oed in flute and violins; its simplicity makes it memorable, and it will mark several 
stages of the form later on. 



i 1 




Almost at once a bustling of sixteenth-note runs in the strings ushers in the soloist, 
whose nervous theme grows out of the first three notes of the opening lyrical theme (a 
major second down and a perfect fifth up) turned backwards (a perfect fifth down and 
a major second up), then sweeps farther afield harmonically in its headstrong energy. 



f,trr&tfi\&&&tfS£jmPm 



An austere march of pounding chords leads to a faster passage of whirling triplets to 
conclude the exposition. The basic material is developed and recapitulated in a free 
sonata form. 

The main theme of the second movement is one of those patented Prokofiev tunes, 
dry and sardonic. But it doesn't stay that way long. The first variation is a Chopin 
nocturne with a twist; each ensuing variation has its own special color and character, 
by turns brilliant, meditative, and vigorously energetic. A climactic restatement of the 
theme with further pianistic display dies away mysteriously into nothing. 

The finale begins with a crisp theme in bassoons and pizzicato lower strings in 
A minor; the piano argues with thundering chords, clouding the harmony. Despite 
various contrasting materials, some lyrical, some sarcastic, the opening figure pro- 
vides the main basis for the musical discussion, ending in a brilliant pounding coda. 

— Steven Ledbetter 



33 



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Gustav Mahler 

Symphony No. 5 




Gustav Mahler was born in Kalischt (Kaliste) near 
the Moravian border of Bohemia on July 7, 1860, 
and died in Vienna on May 18, 1911. He began 
writing his Fifth Symphony in 1901 and completed 
it the following year. He himself conducted the pre- 
miere in Cologne on October 18, 1904. The first 
American performance was given by the Cincinnati 
Symphony Orchestra under the direction of Frank 
van der Stucken on March 25, 1905. The first Bos- 
ton Symphony Orchestra performance took place on 
February 2, 1906, Wilhelm Gericke conducting. The 
BSO has also performed the Fifth under the direc- 
tion of Karl Muck, Serge Koussevitzky, Richard 
Burgin, Erich Leinsdorf Michael Tilson Thomas, 
Joseph Silverstein, and Seiji Ozawa. Seiji Ozawa 
conducted the orchestra's most recent subscription performances in November 1986 and 
most recent Tanglewood performance in August 1987. The orchestra has played the 
Adagietto alone on two occasions: on a tour performance in Baltimore under Gericke in 
February 1906, and under Leonard Bernstein at Tanglewood in July 1974, in memory 
of Serge Koussevitzky. The score calls for four flutes, two piccolos, three oboes and 
English horn, three clarinets, D clarinet, and bass clarinet, three bassoons and contra- 
bassoon, six horns, four trumpets, three trombones and tuba, timpani, snare drum, bass 
drum, cymbals, triangle, tam-tam, slapstick, glockenspiel, harp, and strings. 

Mahler finished his "first period" with his Fourth Symphony right at the end of the 
nineteenth century. The music he wrote at the beginning of the new century pointed 
in a new direction. The first four symphonies are all inspired by or based on songs, 
especially the songs drawn from the collection of folk poetry known as Des Knaben 
Wunderhorn (The Youth's Magic Horn). By the turn of the century, Mahler had 
stopped drawing upon that source for good, though with perhaps one last glimpse in 
the Fifth Symphony. His next songs were settings of the poet Ruckert, including his 
finest cycle, Kindertotenlieder, three songs of which were completed before he began 
work on the symphony. The songs make themselves felt here and there in the Fifth 
by way of brief reminiscences, but the symphony as a whole — like its two successors — 
is a purely orchestral work with no vocal parts and no hint of musical shapes dictated 
by song. 

The group of three instrumental symphonies — Nos. 5, 6, and 7 — belongs together 
in another respect. Mahler's orchestration is notably different from that of the earlier 
works. The parts are now often more independent of one another, yielding a highly 
contrapuntal texture, and his tendency toward using small subsections of the large 
orchestra — as if the whole orchestra consisted of an immensely varied series of cham- 
ber ensembles — is intensified. At first the novelty of this approach gave Mahler con- 
siderable trouble. At a reading rehearsal in Vienna before the Cologne premiere of the 
Fifth, he was horrified to discover that he had seriously over- orchestrated large sec- 
tions of the score. He took a red pencil to his manuscript and crossed out many 
parts. Still unsatisfied after the official premiere, Mahler continued touching up the 
scoring of the Fifth Symphony almost until the day he died. 

The distinction between works written before and after the turn of the century is 
not cut-and-dried, to be sure. The Fourth Symphony already shows a growing interest 
in independent instrumental writing, and the scoring of the Kindertotenlieder and 
other Ruckert songs grows quite naturally out of it. It leads as naturally into the 



35 



Week 1 




Without You, 
This Is The Whole Picture. 



This year, there is an $ 1 1 million difference 
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we must spend to make our music. 

Your gift to the Boston Symphony Annual 
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It will help us continue to fund outreach, 



educational and youth programs, and to attract 
the world's finest musicians and guest artists. 

Make your generous gift to the Annual 
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Symphony Annual Fund. 



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Please send your contribution to: Susan E. Tomlin, Director of Annual Giving, 

Boston Symphony Orchestra, Symphony Hall, Boston, MA 02115. 

A portion of your gift may not be tax-deductible. For information call (617) 638-9251. 




KEEP GREAT MUSIC ALIVE 



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36 




instrumental style of the Fifth. The novelty is more a matter of degree than of kind. 
Still, the Fifth marks a perceptible turning point in Mahler's output, a determination 
to avoid programmatic elements (at least those of the kind inherent in the setting of a 
text or proclaimed to the public in a printed program note) and let the music speak 
for itself. 

The contrapuntal character of the Fifth was perhaps anticipated in some conversa- 
tions Mahler had with his friend Natalie Bauer-Lechner while he was recuperating in 
March 1901 from surgery for an intestinal hemorrhage that very nearly killed him. 
He talked to Natalie about the late Beethoven string quartets, describing them as 
"far more polyphonic than his symphonies." He was obsessed with the idea of dif- 
ferent themes that would combine and "develop freely, side by side, each with its own 
impetus and purpose, so that people will always be able to distinguish them one from 
another." And he plunged into hours of study of the Bachgesellschafi edition of Bach's 
works. 

His illness, he decided that spring, had been caused in large part by the strains of 
conducting the rebellious Vienna Philharmonic, with many of whose members he had 
deep-rooted differences of opinion on matters of musical interpretation, and by the 
need to withstand the endless attacks of an anti-Semitic press. On returning from a 
holiday on the Istrian peninsula, he submitted his resignation to the committee of the 
Philharmonic, retaining the music directorship of the opera, which brought him quite 
enough headaches. 

But as summer approached, Mahler was able to look forward to a summer vacation 
dedicated largely to composing in a newly built retreat all his own, a large house 
rather like a chalet, at Maiernigg, a resort town in Carinthia on Lake Worth. He had 
selected the site before the season of 1899-1900 and followed the construction of the 
house whenever he was not actually working on the Fourth Symphony in the summer 
of 1900. By 1901 it was ready for occupancy. Villa Mahler was situated between the 
forest and the water, arranged so that all the rooms had panoramic lake views. He 




The Villa Mahler at Maiernigg, where Mahler spent his summer holidays working on the 
Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, Seventh, and Eighth symphonies from 1900 to 1907 



37 



Week 1 







worked several hours a day in a "Hauschen" ("little house") not far away but com- 
pletely isolated, since he demanded total silence while composing. 

He brought Bach with him and spent hours studying in particular one of the eight- 
part motets. "The way the eight voices are led along in a polyphony which he alone 
masters is unbelievable!" In addition to Bach, he studied some songs of Schumann, 
whom he regarded as second only to Schubert in that genre, and he arranged evening 
musicales in the house. At first he didn't worry about composition. By July he started 
composing a few songs — the last of the Wunderhom group (Tamboursg'sell) and the 
first of his Ruckert songs. He determined to give himself two weeks of complete rest, 
and ironically, just at that point, he found himself immersed in a large project that 
was to become the Fifth Symphony. 

There were others in the household — his sister Justine; the violinist Arnold Rose, 
with whom Justine was having an affair and whom she later married; and Natalie 
Bauer-Lechner, a musician friend who kept an informative journal of her encounters 
with Mahler and who clearly suffered pangs of unrequited love (she disappeared from 
his life within days of his engagement to Alma Schindler). To them he said nothing 
about the new work. But as he spent more and more hours in the Hauschen, no one 
doubted that he was involved in something extensive. In fact, he was composing two 
movements of the symphony (one of them the scherzo, which gave him an enormous 
amount of trouble), and turning now and then to further songs, including the finest of 
all, Ich bin der Welt abhanden gekommen. All too soon the summer was over, and the 
symphony had to remain unfinished as he took up his operatic duties in Vienna. 

Mahler was not able to return to work on the symphony until the following sum- 
mer, but in the meantime a casual encounter at a dinner on November 7 changed his 
life. Seated opposite him at the table was a young woman of spectacular beauty and 
considerable self-assurance. Her name was Alma Schindler, and she had been study- 




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ing composition with Alexander Zemlinsky. After dinner Alma and Mahler got into a 
heated argument about a ballet score that Zemlinsky had submitted to Mahler for 
possible production. Mahler had never replied to the submission, and she taxed him 
with rudeness. Before the evening was over Mahler was clearly enchanted with the 
girl's beauty, but also by her wit and her fiery disposition. He made her promise to 
bring samples of her own work to the Opera. In less than two weeks it was clear to 
all concerned that something serious was in the wind. By November 27 Mahler was 
already talking of marriage and almost against her will Alma was realizing that "He's 
the only man who can give meaning to my life, for he far surpasses all the men I've 
ever met." Yet she was still confused, having recently been convinced that she was in 
love with Zemlinsky. But by December 9, when Mahler left for ten days in Berlin to 
conduct his Second and Fourth symphonies, she had made up her mind. 

Before Christmas they officially celebrated their engagement. When they married 
on March 9, Alma was already pregnant. It was only the least of the complications in 
their life together. In some respects two people can hardly have been less well suited 
to each other, whether by age, temperament, character, or interests. Mahler was pas- 
sionately in love with her, but was overbearing in his demands that she entirely devote 
her attention to him, even to the point of giving up her study of composition. Alma 
was capricious, flirtatious, and conceited, though she was also very intelligent and 
witty, musical, capable of great generosity and petty meanness. Yet virtually every- 
thing Mahler wrote for the rest of his life was composed for her, beginning with the 
conclusion of the Fifth Symphony. And whatever difficulties they may have experi- 
enced in their life together, there is little question that she inspired him to vast com- 
positional achievements — seven enormous symphonies (counting Das Lied von der 
Erde and the unfinished Tenth) in less than a decade, during the first five years of 




Alma Schindler- Mahler 



39 



Week 1 







which he was also in charge of the Vienna Opera and later of the New York 
Philharmonic. 

It is possible that Mahler wrote the famous Adagietto movement of the Fifth dur- 
ing the period before his marriage. At any rate, the conductor Willem Mengelberg 
wrote this note in his score: 

NB: 77m Adagietto was Gustav Mahler's declaration of love to Alma! Instead 
of a letter he confided it in this manuscript without a word of explanation. 
She understood it and replied: He should come!!! (I have this from both of 
them!) W.M. 

Though Alma's diary fails to mention such a musical missive, it is possible that the 
movement served in fact as a love letter (Mahler wrote her plenty of other letters, too, 
especially when he was away in Berlin). Since she was a musician and composition 
student herself, she could be expected to be able to read the music and sense its emo- 
tional import, especially since it has the sparest scoring of any symphonic movement 
Mahler ever wrote: strings and harp. 

After their wedding, Mahler and Alma took their honeymoon in Russia, where he 
conducted some performances in St. Petersburg. Then, after a short time in their 
Vienna apartment, they went to Krefeld, where Mahler conducted the first complete 
performance of his Third Symphony on June 9. This performance was a great suc- 
cess, the beginning of Mahler's fame outside of Vienna. Elated, he and Alma went to 
Maiernigg for the summer, where they enjoyed swims and long walks. He worked on 
completing the Fifth in the seclusion of his Hauschen, while she remained in the 
house preparing a fair copy of the finished pages of score. The work was completed in 
short score by autumn. Mahler wrote out the detailed orchestration during the winter 
by rising before breakfast and working on it until it was time to go to the opera 
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One unusual aspect of the Fifth — the complete absence of a text or descriptive 
explanation from the composer — seems to have been motivated by the unhappy reac- 
tion of the audience at the premiere of the Fourth Symphony in November 1901, 
when Mahler conducted it in Munich, to almost universal ridicule and misunderstand- 
ing. The success he had achieved with the Second so recently was completely undone. 
He attributed the critics' lack of perception to their inability to follow an abstract 
musical argument. It was all the fault of Berlioz and Liszt, he said, who began writ- 
ing program music (though theirs had genius, he admitted, unlike the music of some 
later composers) so that the "plot" of the score had become a necessary crutch to 
listening. 

One result of this experience was Mahler's determination to avoid giving any expla- 
nation of the "meaning" or "program" of his next symphony. Even when supportive 
musicians asked him for some guidance, he remained silent. He expressed himself 
with far greater vigor on the subject at a dinner in Munich following a performance of 
the Second Symphony. When someone mentioned program books, Mahler is reported 
to have leaped upon the table and exclaimed: 

Down with program books, which spread false ideas! The audience should be left 
to its own thoughts over the work that is performed; it should not be forced to 
read during the performance; it should not be prejudiced in any manner. If a 
composer by his music forces on his hearers the sensations which streamed 
through his mind, then he reaches his goal. The speech of tones has then 
approached the language of words, but it is far more capable of expression and 
declaration. 

He is then reported to have raised his glass, emptied it, and cried "Pereat den Pro- 
grammed." ("Let the programs perish!"). (When the Boston Symphony performed the 
Fifth for the first time in 1906, Philip Hale wrote in his program book essay, "Let us 
respect the wishes of Mr. Mahler.") 

Following such an outburst, the annotator proceeds with trepidation. Still, Mahler's 
pique was aimed at first-time listeners whose reaction might be prejudiced one way or 
another by an explanation. Eventually listeners may desire some consideration of the 
music, especially because Mahler's music is no less expressive for all his eschewing of 
programs, and in some respects it is a good deal more complicated. 

The symphony is laid out in five movements, though Mahler grouped the first two 
and the last two together, so that there are, in all, three "parts" tracing a progression 
from tragedy to an exuberant display of contrapuntal mastery and harmonic progres- 
sion from the opening C-sharp minor to D major. The keys of the intervening move- 
ments (A minor, D, and F) also outline a chord on D, which would therefore seem to 
be a more reasonable designation for the key of the symphony, with the opening 
C-sharp conceived as a leading tone. Nonetheless the Fifth is customarily described as 
being in the key of C-sharp minor. 

The opening movement has the character of a funeral march, rather martial in 
character, given the opening trumpet fanfare (derived from the first movement of the 
Fourth Symphony*) and the drumlike tattoo of the strings and winds in the introduc- 
tory passage. The main march theme is darkly sombre, a melody related to the 



*Much has been written about the numerous internal references between one work and another 
in Mahler's output, and the Fifth Symphony is very much a case in point. It is worth recalling 
that Mahler was frequently conducting one work while finishing the scoring of another and 
planning the composition of yet a third. It would be very surprising, under the circumstances, if 
the musical world of one such piece did not make itself felt in his imagination when he was 
working out the details of a new piece. A composer who either did not conduct at all or could 
rely on others to introduce his music and give most of the performances would be more easily 
able to put a finished work entirely behind him. 



41 



Week 1 








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recently composed song Der Tamboursg'sell (a last echo of Des Knaben Wunderhom). 
The Trio is a wild, almost hysterical outcry in B-flat minor gradually returning to the 
tempo and the rhythmic tattoo of the opening. The basic march returns and closes 
with a recollection of the first song from Kindertotenlieder, which Mahler was almost 
certainly composing while he worked on this movement as well The second Trio, in 
A minor, is more subdued and given largely to the strings. Last echoes of the trumpet 
fanfare bring the movement to an end. 

The second movement, marked "Stormy, with utmost vehemence," has a number of 
links to the first. It takes the frenetic outbursts of the first movement as its basic 
character and contrasts them with a sorrowful march melody in the cellos and clari- 
nets. They take turns three times (each varied and somewhat briefer than the one 
before). A premature shout of triumph is cut off, and the main material returns. The 
shout of triumph comes back briefly as a chorale in D (the key that will ultimately 
prevail), but for now, the movement ends in hushed mystery. 

According to Natalie Bauer-Lechner, Mahler had an idea for the character of the 
scherzo, though he chose not to reveal it to the public. Following the dark and emo- 
tional character of Part I, the second part was to represent "a human being in the 
full light of day, in the prime of his life." The scherzo is on an unusually large scale, 
but it moves with great energy and speed, much of it as a lilting and whirling waltz 
with a featured solo horn. There are sardonic twists here and there, boisterous pas- 
sages, even brutal ones, and some that have the lilt and verve of The Merry Widow. 

The last part begins with the famous Adagietto, once almost the only movement of 
Mahler's music that was heard with any frequency. When Mahler wrote it, he was 
recalling the musical worlds created for the second song of Kindertotenlieder and Ich 
bin der Welt abhanden gekommen, though he is not using either song to shape this 
exquisitely restrained movement. The melody grows in sweeping arches to a climactic 
peak that is not hammered with fortissimos but as if with bated breath. 

Mahler builds his finale as a grand rondo in which, after an opening horn call, a 
bassoon quotes a phrase from one of Mahler's Wunderhom songs, Lob des hohen Ver- 
standes, which describes a singing contest the outcome of which is controlled by a 
donkey. Good natured satire of academic pedantry is the point of the song, and 
Mahler here undertakes his own cheerful demonstration of counterpoint, the academic 
subject par excellence in music theory, treated in a wonderfully exuberant and free- 
wheeling way. He is concerned to build up a symphonic structure, alluding to the 
theme of the Adagietto with music of very different spirit. The climax of the sym- 
phony brings back the chorale theme from the second movement, the one earlier pas- 
sage in all that tragic realm that hinted at the extroversion of D major, now finally 
achieved and celebrated with tremendous zest. 

-S.L. 



43 



Week 1 



More . . . 

The revolution (no tamer word will suffice) in our knowledge of Bach's creative activ- 
ity due to the researches of Alfred Diirr and Georg von Dadelsen (and a host of other 
scholars after them) has left any study of Bach more than thirty years old hopelessly 
out of date, including, unfortunately, the standard Schmieder catalogue of Bach's 
works, from which we get our BWV numbers. The superb New Grove article on Bach 
by Walter Emery and Christoph Wolff has been reissued as a single volume (Norton 
paperback). The other most easily available general treatment that takes into account 
most of the new research is Karl Geiringer's Johann Sebastian Bach: Culmination of 
an Era (Oxford), though even that has been overtaken by some recent discoveries. 
The basic documents are conveniently available in English translation in The Bach 
Reader, edited by Arthur Mendel and Hans T. David (Norton paperback). There are a 
number of recordings of Busoni's piano transcription of the Bach Chaconne, but none 
for orchestra. Seiji Ozawa and the Boston Symphony will record Hideo Saito's orches- 
tration for Philips as part of an album of orchestral transcriptions of a number of 
Bach works. For the original version, there are many complete sets of the three sona- 
tas and three partitas for unaccompanied violin by such advocates as Jascha Heifetz 
(RCA, two compact discs), Nathan Milstein (DG, two discs), Shlomo Mintz (DG, 
three discs), and Itzhak Perlman (Angel, two discs). Sergiu Luca's set is worth look- 
ing out for as a bargain on three LPs or cassettes (Nonesuch). And for a distin- 
guished performance on historical instruments, there is Jaap Schroder (Smithsonian 
Collection, two discs). 

Prokofiev has long suffered from a lack of balanced critical evaluation both in Rus- 
sia and in the West; Soviet historians tend to attack those works written while the 
composer was in the "decadent" West as "formalistic" and unmusical, while European 
and American critics tend to criticize the works of Prokofiev's later years, after he 
had returned to Russia, as responses to the pressure of "official" standards of musical 
style. By far the most balanced general study to date is the newest, Sergei Prokofiev: 
A Biography, by Harlow Robinson (Viking), rich in biographical detail, more cursory 
but still useful in musical discussion. A fundamental and very reasonable book is 
Music and Musical Life in Soviet Russia, 1917-1970 by Boris Schwarz (Norton paper- 
back), which is filled with a broad range of fascinating material, though, of course, 
Prokofiev is only one of many players. An updated edition carries the story forward to 
1980 (University of Indiana). Of the older Prokofiev literature, the standard Soviet 



WHERE TO ACQUIRE 

GOOD TASTE WHEN YOU'RE 

NOT AT THE SYMPHONY. 



Next time, before you go to the symphony, have dinner at Newbury's 
Steak House. You'll find char-broiled steaks, fresh seafood and chicken, 
a great salad bar, and ever greater prices. Plus discounted parking. All 
less than a ten minute walk away. |^ Tn^ivTT^T T-n^7i/^ 

MEWBURY'S 

_STEAK HOUSE— 



94 Massachusetts Ave. (corner of Newbury St.) 
536-0184 • Serving noon to midnight 



44 



rate 



biography by Israel Nestyev, Prokofiev (Standard), has much information but strong 
biases against the composer's pre-Soviet period. On the other hand, Victor SerofFs 
Sergei Prokofiev: A Soviet Tragedy is little more than a hatchet job from the opposite 
point of view and is by no means scrupulously accurate. Prokofiev's earliest years, 
through his conservatory days, are richly illuminated in his memoir, Prokofiev by 
Prokofiev (Doubleday). Among the available recordings of the Prokofiev Third Piano 
Concerto, you might like to try Vladimir Ashkenazy's reading with Andre Previn and 
the London Symphony (Angel, coupled with the Bartok Concerto for Orchestra), Gary 
Graffman's with George Szell and the Cleveland Orchestra (CBS, coupled with 
Prokofiev's First Concerto and Piano Sonata No. 3), Martha Argerich's with Claudio 
Abbado and the Berlin Philharmonic (DG, coupled with the Ravel Concerto in G), or 
Jon Kimura Parker's with Andre Previn and the London Philharmonic (Telarc, cou- 
pled with Tchaikovsky's Piano Concerto No. 1). 

The best place to start reading about Gustav Mahler is Paul Banks's superbly 
insightful article in The New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians; it has been 
reissued in paperback, along with the Grove articles on Janacek, Richard Strauss, and 
Sibelius, in The New Grove Turn of the Century Masters. Next, a little larger, is the 
splendid short study by Michael Kennedy in the Master Musicians series (Littlefield 
paperback). Going by increasing size, we come to Kurt Blaukopf s biography, a read- 
able journalistic account (London), and Egon Gartenberg's, which is especially good 
on the Viennese milieu if somewhat trivial on the music (Schirmer paperback). Henry- 
Louis de La Grange's Mahler (Doubleday) is an extremely detailed biographical study. 
Only one volume has been published in English yet, although the second and third 
volumes are out in the original French. It will be the standard biographical study for 
many years. Donald Mitchell's perceptive and detailed study of the music now runs to 
three volumes with a fourth volume yet to come; the series consists of Gustav Mahler: 
The Early Years, Gustav Mahler: The Wunderhorn Years, and Gustav Mahler: Songs 
and Symphonies of Death (California, the second volume available in paperback). The 
extremely detailed study is informed by a strong musical intelligence. Alma Mahler's 
autobiography And the Bridge Is Love (Harcourt Brace Jovanovich) and her Gustav 
Mahler: Memories and Letters (University of Washington paperback) offer essential 
source material, but they must be treated with caution and considerable skepticism. 
The most recent edition of the latter book provides important corrections by Donald 
Mitchell and Knud Martner. Martner has edited Gustav Mahler: Selected Letters (Far- 
rar, Straus and Giroux), which contains all of the letters published earlier in Alma 
Mahler's less than reliable collection plus a good many more, though it is still a far 
cry from the complete edition of Mahler letters we need. Seiji Ozawa and the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra are recording Mahler's Fifth Symphony "live" during these per- 
formances, as part of their continuing Mahler cycle for Philips. Currently available 
recordings include Herbert von Karajan's refined and intense reading with the Berlin 
Philharmonic (DG, coupled with Kindertotenlieder as sung by Christa Ludwig) and 
Klaus Tennstedt's with the London Philharmonic Orchestra (Angel, coupled with the 
Adagio from Symphony No. 10). Both of the foregoing fill two compact discs. Georg 
Solti's dramatic reading with the Chicago Symphony has the advantage of fitting 
entirely on a single compact disc (London). Giuseppe Sinopoli's performance with the 
Philharmonia Orchestra emphasizes the contrast between the tragedy of the opening 
part and the lighter quality of the end (Deutsche Grammophon). 

-S.L. 



45 



Week 1 




" The profit from selling my business shows I'm good at making 
money. But more important is keeping it.... Part of managing money 
well is knowing when to call professionals. 

I had to consider taxes, investments, and the future security of 
my family. I called my Private Banker at BayBank. 

That's how I heard about Trust Services. I was introduced to my 
own Trust Officer, who helped me determine long-term investment 
goals and gave me more objective advice than I've ever had before. 

With one Officer assigned specifically to my account, I always 
know where I stand. My Trust Officer knows how I feel about 
diversification, risk versus security, and income needs. 





BayBank 



m 



Private banking 



For an introduction to Private Banking Trust Services, call Pamela Henrikson, Senior Vice President, 
at (617) 556-6528, or Stephen Root, Senior Vice President, at (413) 731-4736. 

Member FDIC 



46 




Martha Argerich 

One of the world's most renowned artists, pianist Martha Argerich 
is a familiar presence in the concert halls of Europe, the Soviet 
Union, the Near East, and the Far East, In North America, she 
has performed as guest soloist with such orchestras as the Boston 
Symphony, Chicago Symphony, Los Angeles Philharmonic, Mont- 
real Symphony, National Symphony, New York Philharmonic, Phil- 
adelphia Orchestra, and Toronto Symphony. She has also per- 
formed as guest soloist with the major orchestras of the United 
States and Canada. Ms. Argerich's discography includes more than 
a dozen Deutsche Grammophon recordings, encompassing works by 
Bach, Bartok, Beethoven, Brahms, Chopin, Falla, Franck, Schubert, Schumann, and 
Tchaikovsky. She has recorded Chopin and Schumann duos for piano and cello with Mstis- 
lav Rostropovich, and Beethoven and Schumann sonatas with Gidon Kremer. Among her 
most recent recordings are a Schumann collection featuring Kreisleriana and Kinderscenen, 
Bach cello sonatas with Mischa Maisky, the Ravel Piano Concerto in G with Claudio 
Abbado and the London Symphony, and the second installment in a projected complete 
cycle of Beethoven violin sonatas with Gidon Kremer. Ms. Argerich plans to record 
Beethoven's piano trios with Messrs. Kremer and Maisky in the near future. Born in 1941, 
Martha Argerich gave her first professional performance at the age of eight, in Buenos 
Aires, her native city. She later moved to Europe, to continue her studies with Friedrich 
Gulda, Nikita Magaloff, Madame Dinu Lipatti, and Arturo Benedetti Michelangeli, among 
others. At sixteen, in the space of three weeks, she won both the Geneva International 
Competition and the Ferruccio Busoni International Competition in Bolzano, Italy. In 
1965, upon returning from a self-imposed retreat, she became the first artist from the 
western hemisphere to win first prize at the Chopin Competition in Warsaw. This success 
led to her United States debut, in 1966, on Lincoln Center's "Great Performers" series. 
Ms. Argerich has performed with the Boston Symphony Orchestra on two previous occa- 
sions, both times under the direction of Seiji Ozawa: as soloist in Prokofiev's Third Piano 
Concerto in October 1979, and in Schumann's Piano Concerto in December 1981. 



Boston 1 s distinctive 

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BOSTON 



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We invite you to step inside any one of our 55 

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47 



BUSINESS 




Business and Professional 
Leadership Association 



The Boston Symphony Orchestra wishes to acknowledge this distinguished group of 
corporations and professional organizations for their outstanding and exemplary 
support of the orchestra's needs during the past or current fiscal year. 



CORPORATE SPONSORSHIPS 

$25,000 and above 

Digital Equipment Corporation 

Boston Pops Orchestra Public Television Broadcasts 

NEC 

Boston Symphony Orchestra North American Tour 1991 

Boston Symphony Orchestra European Tour 1991 

NYNEX Corporation 
WCVB-TV, Channel 5 Boston and WCRB 102.5 FM 

Salute to Symphony 1990 

The Boston Company 

Opening Night At Symphony 1990 

BayBanks, Inc. 

Opening Night at Pops 1990 

Lexus 

A Division of Toyota Motor Sales U.S.A., Inc. 

Tanglewood Opening Night 1990 

TDK Electronics Corporation 

Tanglewood Tickets for Children 1990 

Bank of Boston 
Country Curtains and The Red Lion Inn 

BSO Single Concert Sponsors 1990 



For information on these and other corporate funding opportunities, contact 
Madelyne Cuddeback, BSO Director of Corporate Sponsorships, Symphony Hall, 
Boston, MA 02115, (617) 638-9254. 



48 



1990-91 Business Honor Roll ($10,000 and Above) 



Advanced Management Associates 
Harvey Chet Krentzman 

Analog Devices, Inc. 
Ray Stata 

AT&T Network Systems 
John F. McKinnon 

Bank of Boston 
Ira Stepanian 

Barter Connections 
Kenneth C. Barron 

BayBanks, Inc. 
William M. Crozier, Jr. 

Bingham, Dana & Gould 
Joseph Hunt 

Bolt Beranek & Newman 
Stephen R. Levy 

The Boston Company 
Christopher M. Condron 

Boston Edison Company 
Stephen J. Sweeney 

The Boston Globe 
William 0. Taylor 

Boston Herald 
Patrick J. Purcell 

Bull HN Information Systems, Inc. 
Roland D. Pampel 

Cahners Publishing Company 
Ron Segel 

Connell Limited Partnership 
William F. Connell 

Coopers & Lybrand 
William K. O'Brien 

Country Curtains 
Jane P. Fitzpatrick 

Delia Femina, McNamee, Inc. 
Michael H. Reingold 

Deloitte & Touche 
James T. McBride 

Digital Equipment Corporation 
Kenneth G. Olsen 

Dynatech Corporation 
J. P. Barger 

Eastern Enterprises 
Ronald S. Ziemba 

EG&G, Inc. 
John M. Kucharski 

The First Boston Corporation 
Malcolm MacColl 

General Cinema Corporation 
Richard A. Smith 



The Gillette Company 
Colman M. Mockler, Jr. 

Graf aeon, Inc. 
H. Wayman Rogers, Jr. 

GTE Products Corporation 
Dean T. Langford 

Hill, Holliday, Connors, Cosmopulos, Inc. 
Jack Connors, Jr. 

The Henley Group 
Paul M. Montrone 

Houghton Mifflin Company 
Nader F. Darehshori 

IBM Corporation 
Paul J. Palmer 

John Hancock Mutual Life Insurance Company 
E. James Morton 

Lexus 

A Division of Toyota Motor Sales, U.S.A., Inc. 
J. Davis Illingworth 

Liberty Mutual Insurance Group 
Gary L. Countryman 

Loomis-Sayles & Company, Inc. 
Charles J. Finlayson 

McKinsey & Company 
Robert P. O'Block 

Morse Shoe, Inc. 
Manuel Rosenberg 

NEC Corporation 
Tadahiro Sekimoto 

NEC Deutschland GmbH 
Masao Takahashi 

Nestle-Hills Brothers Coffee Company 
Ned Dean 

The New England 
Edward E. Phillips 

New England Telephone Company 
Paul C. O'Brien 

Northern Telecom, Inc. 
Brian Davis 

Nynex Corporation 
William C. Ferguson 

Paine Webber, Inc. 
James F. Cleary 

KPMG Peat Marwick 
Robert D. Happ 

Polaroid Corporation 
I.M. Booth 

Prudential-Bache Capital Funding 
David F. Remington 



49 



HHH 



'$***•*■ 




1990-91 Business Honor Roll (continued) 



Raytheon Company 
Thomas L. Phillips 

The Red Lion Inn 
John H. Fitzpatrick 

Shawmut Bank, N.A. 
John P. Hamill 

The Stop & Shop Companies, Inc. 
Lewis Schaeneman 



TDK Electronics Corporation 
Takashi Tsujii 

USTrust 
James V. Sidell 

WCRB-102.5 FM 
Richard L. Kaye 

WCVB-TV, Channel 5 Boston 
S. James Coppersmith 



Dinner at 6. 

Symphony at 8. 

Parking at $ 5. 

Make dinner at Boodle's part of 
your night out at the Symphony. 
When you do, you'll not only enjoy 
an award winning dining experi- 
ence from Boston's authentic grill, 
you'll also get special parking 
privileges at the Back Bay Hilton's 
private garage. 

Just show us your tickets at dinner 
on the night of the performance 
and park your car for just $5. And 
with a deal like that, a night at the 
Symphony never sounded better. 




BOODLE'S 



OF • BOSTON 

An Authentic Grill 

Lunch and dinner daily. In Boston's Back Bay Hilton. 
Phone (617) BOODLES. 



St. r Botptpfi Restaurant 




r\ Charming 19th Century Brick 
Townhouse serving fine continental 
cuisine in contempory informal elegance. 
Offering lunch and dinner with a variety 
of fresh seafood specials daily. Located 
minutes away from Huntington Theatre 
and Symphony Hall. 

99 St. Botolph Street 266-3030 
behind the Colonnade Hotel 

Daily 11:30 -Midnight 



"Nationally Outstanding" 

-Esquire Magazine 




Serving Dinner Nightly 



In The Charles Hotel 
One Bennett at Eliot Street 
Cambridge, MA 02138 
Reservations (617) 864-1200 



50 



Business and Professional Leadership Association 

The Boston Symphony Orchestra gratefully acknowledges these Business Leaders for their 
generous and valuable support totaling $1,250 and above during the past fiscal year. Names 
which are both capitalized and underscored in this listing make up the Business Honor Roll 
denoting support of $10,000 and above. Capitalization denotes support of $5,000-$9,999, and 
an asterisk indicates support of $2,500-$4,999. 



Accountants 

ARTHUR ANDERSEN & CO. 
William F. Meagher 

Charles E. DiPesa & Company 
William F. DiPesa 

COOPERS & LYBRAND 



William K. O'Brien 
DELOITTE & TOUCHE 



James T. McBride 
ERNST & YOUNG 



Thomas M. Lankford 
KMPG PEAT MARWICK 



Robert D. Happ 

Theodore S. Samet & Company 
Theodore S. Samet 



Advertising/Public Relations 

Arnold Advertising 
Edward Eskandarian 

DELLA FEMINA, MCNAMEE, 
INC. 
Michael H. Reingold 

Elysee Public Relations 
Tanya Keller Dowd 

HILL, HOLLIDAY, CONNORS, 



COSMOPULOS, INC. 



Jack Connors, Jr. 

Ingalls, Quinn & Johnson 
Bink Garrison 



Aerospace 

"Northrop Corporation 
Kent Kresa 



Architects 

Cambridge Seven Associates 
Charles Redman 

LEA Group 
Eugene R. Eisenberg 



Automotive 

J.N. Phillips Glass 
Company, Inc. 
Alan L. Rosenfeld 

Lexus 

A Division of Toyota Motor 
Sales U.S.A., Inc. 
J. Davis Illingworth 



Banking 

BANK OF BOSTON 
Ira Stepanian 

*Bank of New England 
Corporation 
Lawrence K. Fish 

*Baybanks, Inc. 
William M. Crozier, Jr. 

THE BOSTON COMPANY 
Christopher M. Condron, Jr. 

Cambridge Trust Company 
Lewis H. Clark 

CITICORP/CITIBANK 
Walter E. Mercer 

First National Bank of Chicago 
Robert E. Gallery 

*Rockland Trust Company 
John F. Spence, Jr. 

SHAWMUT BANK, N.A. 
John P. Hamill 

* State Street Bank & 
Trust Company 
William S. Edgerly 

USTRUST 

James V. Sidell 

Wainwright Bank & Trust Company 
John M. Plukas 



Building/Contracting 

*Harvey Industries, Inc. 
Frederick Bigony 

J.F. White Contracting Company 
Philip Bonanno 

Lee Kennedy Co., Inc. 
Lee M. Kennedy 

*Moliterno Stone Sales, Inc. 
Kenneth A. Castellucci 

* National Lumber Company 
Louis L. Kaitz 

PERINI CORPORATION 
David B. Perini 



Consumer Goods/Distributors 

BARTER CONNECTIONS 
Kenneth C. Barron 

FAIRWINDS GOURMET COFFEE 
COMPANY 

Michael J. Sullivan 

51 



Lindenmeyr Munroe 

NESTLE-HILLS BROTHERS 
COFFEE COMPANY 
Ned Dean 

Welch's 
Everett N. Baldwin 



Education 

BENTLEY COLLEGE 

Gregory Adamian 

Electrical/HVAC 

"p.h. mechanical Corporation 
Paul A. Hayes 

'R & D Electrical Company, Inc. 
Richard D. Pedone 



Electronics 

Alden Electronics, Inc. 
Joseph Girouard 

* Analytical Systems 
Engineering Corporation 
Michael B. Rukin 

PARLEX CORPORATION 

Herbert W. Pollack 



Energy 

CABOT CORPORATION 

Samuel W. Bodman 

Engineering 

Goldberg-Zoino & Associates, Inc. 
Donald T. Goldberg 

The Thompson & Lichtner 
Company, Inc. 
John D. Stelling 

Entertainment/Media 

GENERAL CINEMA CORPORATION 
Richard A. Smith 

National Amusements, Inc. 
Sumner M. Redstone 



Finance/Venture Capital 

"31 Corporation 
Ivan N. Momtchiloff 




GUILD, MONRAD & OATES, INC. 

Family Investment Advisers 



50 Congress Street 

Boston, Massachusetts 02109 

Telephone: (617) 523-1320 



For Those Who Want 

Specialized Individual Attention and Care 

in the Management of Investments 

and Tax and Estate Planning 



Henry R. Guild, Jr. Ernest E. Monrad William A. Oates, Jr. Robert B. Minturn, Jr. 



Find out 

WHAT 

YOU'RE 

MISSING. 



The Admission Office 
The Williston 
Northampton School 

Box 30 

1 9 Payson Avenue 

Easthampton, 

Massachusetts, 01027 

Fax: 413/527-9494 



If you're not at The Williston 
Northampton School, you're missing 
a wealth of academic and 
extracurricular opportunities. 

You're missing out on high school 
classes of 15 students. You're missing 
teachers who live with you and take 
part in your life. 



Call us. 

Find out what you're 
missing. 



413/527-1520 



The Williston Northampton School. 



More than 30 percent ot our students receive academic scholarships or need-based financial aid. We are an independent school and welcome 
young men and women of any race, religion, or national origin. 



li 



52 



Carson Limited Partnership 
Herbert Carver 

THE FIRST BOSTON 



CORPORATION 



Malcolm MacColl 

GE CAPITAL CORPORATE 
FINANCE GROUP 
Richard A. Goglia 

KRUPP COMPANIES 

George Krupp 



Food Service/Industry 

Au Bon Pain 
Louis I. Kane 

Boston Showcase Company 
Jason E. Starr 

Cordel Associates, Inc. 
James B. Hangstefer 

Johnson O'Hare Co., Inc. 
Harry O'Hare 



Footwear 

Converse, Inc. 
Gilbert Ford 

J. Baker, Inc. 

Sherman N. Baker 

Jones & Vining, Inc. 
Sven A. Vaule, Jr. 

MORSE SHOE, INC. 



Manuel Rosenberg 

Reebok International Ltd. 
Paul Fireman 

The Rockport Corporation 
Anthony Tiberii 

THE STRIDE RITE 
CORPORATION 
Arnold S. Hiatt 



Furnishings/Housewares 

ARLEY MERCHANDISE 
CORPORATION 
David I. Riemer 

BBF Corporation 
Boruch B. Frusztajer 

COUNTRY CURTAINS 



Jane P. Fitzpatrick 

Jofran Sales, Inc. 
Robert D. Roy 

Graphic Design 

CLARK/LINSKY DESIGN 
Robert H. Linsky 

INDEPENDENT DESIGN 
Patrick White 



High Technology/Electronics 

Alden Products Company 
Betsy Alden 

ANALOG DEVICES, INC. 

Ray Stata 

*Aritech Corp. 
James A. Synk 

Automatic Data Processing 
Arthur S. Kranseler 

BOLT BERANEK AND 
NEWMAN, INC. 
Stephen R. Levy 

BULL HN INFORMATION 
SYSTEMS, INC. 
Roland D. Pampel 

* Cerberus Technologies, Inc. 

George J. Grabowski 

Costar Corporation 
Otto Morningstar 

CSC PARTNERS, INC. 
Paul J. Crowley 

DIGITAL EQUIPMENT 
CORPORATION 
Kenneth G. Olsen 

DYNATECH CORPORATION 
J. P. Barger 

EG&G, INC. 
John M. Kucharski 

EMC CORPORATION 
Richard J. Egan 

Helix Technology Corporation 
Robert J. Lepofsky 

THE HENLEY GROUP 
Paul M. Montrone 

HEWLETT PACKARD COMPANY 
Ben L. Holmes 

IBM CORPORATION 
Paul J. Palmer 

*Intermetrics Inc. 
Joseph A. Saponaro 

IONICS, INC. 
Arthur L. Goldstein 

* Lotus Development Corporation 

Jim P. Manzi 

*M/A-Com, Inc. 
Robert H. Glaudel 

MILLIPORE CORPORATION 
John A Gilmartin 

*The MITRE Corporation 
Charles A. Zraket 

NEC CORPORATION 

Tadahiro SeMmoto 

NEC DEUTSCHLAND GmbH 
Masao Takahasi 

*Orion Research, Inc. 
Alexander Jenkins III 

53 



POLAROID CORPORATION 
I.M. Booth 

PRIME COMPUTER, INC. 

John Shields 

* Printed Circuit Corporation 
Peter Sarmanian 

RAYTHEON COMPANY 
Thomas L. Phillips 

SofTech, Inc. 
Justus Lowe, Jr. 

*TASC 
Arthur Gelb 

TDK ELECTRONICS 
CORPORATION 
Takashi Tsujii 

THERMO ELECTRON 
CORPORATION 

George N. Hatsopoulos 

XRE Corporation 
John K. Grady 



Hotels/Restaurants 

57 Park Plaza Hotel 
Nicholas L. Vinios 

*Back Bay Hilton 
Carol Summerfield 

*Boston Marriott Copley Place 
Jurgen Giesbert 

THE RED LION INN 
John H. Fitzpatrick 

* Sheraton Boston Hotel & Towers 
Steve Foster 

*Sonesta International 
Hotels Corporation 
Paul Sonnabend 

*The Westin Hotel, Copley Place 
David King 



Industrial Distributors 

*Alles Corporation 
Stephen S. Berman 

Brush Fibers, Inc. 
Ian P. Moss 

* Eastern Refractories Company 
David S. Feinzig 

Millard Metal Service Center 
Donald Millard, Jr. 



Insurance 

♦American Title Insurance Company 
Terry E. Cook 

*Arkwright 
Enzo Rebula 

Caddell & Byers 
John Dolan 



THE BSO 
ANNOUNCES AN 




netting 

HOLIDAY" 



PROGRAM 




DECEMBER 19, 1990 

Give your company an early Christmas present by treating your 

management, employees, customers, vendors, and friends to a 

special evening at Pops in a unique holiday program. This 

program, available to only 1 16 businesses and professional 

organizations at $3,500 per company, includes 16 seats, 

pre-concert hors d'oeuvres and a traditional Pops gourmet dinner. 

Please join the New England business community for this 

celebrated holiday tradition! 

For information on "A Company Christmas at Pops": 

James F. Cleary, Managing Director, PaineWebber, Inc. (439-8000) 

Chet Krentzman, President, Advanced Management Associates (332-3141) 

William F. Meagher, Managing Partner, Arthur Andersen & Co. (330-4300) 

William D. Roddy, Vice President and General Manager, Neiman Marcus (536-3600) 

Michael H. Reingold, President, Delia Femina, McNamee WCRS, Inc. (737-6450) 

Peter N. Cerundolo, BSO Corporate Development Office (638-9252) 



54 




E. James Morton 

*Johnson & Higgins of 
Massachusetts, Inc. 
Robert A. Cameron 

*Keystone Provident Life 
Insurance Company 
Robert G. Sharp 

Lexington Insurance Company 
Kevin H. Kelley 

LIBERTY MUTUAL INSURANCE 



CAMERON & COLBY CO, INC. 
Lawrence S. Doyle 

*Charles H. Watkins & Company 
Paul D. Bertrand 

Chubb Group of Insurance Cos. 
John Gillespie 

FRANK B. HALL & CO. OF 
MASSACHUSETTS, INC. 
William F. Newell 

International Insurance Group 
John Perkins 

JOHN HANCOCK MUTUAL 
LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY 



GROUP 



Gary L. Countryman 
THE NEW ENGLAND 



Edward E. Phillips 

SAFETY INSURANCE COMPANY 
Richard B. Simches 

*Sedgwick James of 
New England, Inc. 
P. Joseph McCarthy 

Sullivan Risk Management Group 
John H. Sullivan 

Sun Life Assurance Company 
of Canada 
Paul Vaskas 



Investments 

Baring International Investment, Ltd. 
John F. McNamara 

Bear Stearns & Company, Inc. 
Keith H. Kretschmer 

Essex Investment Management 
Company, Inc. 
A. Davis Noble, Jr. 

Goldman, Sachs & Company 
Peter D. Kiernan 

KAUFMAN & COMPANY 
Sumner Kaufman 

LOOMIS-SAYLES & COMPANY, 



INC. 



Charles J. Finlayson 
PAINEWEBBER, INC. 



James F. Cleary 



PAINEWEBBER CAPITAL 
MARKETS 

Joseph F. Patton 

SALOMON INC. 
John V. Carberry 

*Spaulding Investment Company 
C.H. Spaulding 

* State Street Development 
Management Corp. 
John R. Gallagher III 

TUCKER ANTHONY, INC. 
John Goldsmith 

Whitman & Evans, Art Investments 
Eric F. Mourlot 

*Woodstock Corporation 
Nelson J. Darling, Jr. 



Legal 

BINGHAM, DANA & GOULD 
Joseph Hunt 

*Choate, Hall & Stewart 
Robert Gargill 

Dickerman Law Offices 
Lola Dickerman 

*Fish & Richardson 
Robert E. Hillman 

* Gaston & Snow 

Richard J. Santagati 

GOLDSTEIN & MANELLO 
Richard J. Snyder 

GOODWIN, PROCTER AND HOAR 
Robert B. Fraser 

*Hemenway & Barnes 
John J. Madden 

Hubbard & Ferris 
Charles A. Hubbard 

* Joyce & Joyce 

Thomas J. Joyce 

*Lyneh, Brewer, Hoffman & Sands 
Owen B. Lynch 

MINTZ, LEVIN, COHN, FERRIS, 
GLOVSKY & POPEO, P.C. 
Francis X. Meaney 

Nissenbaum Law Offices 
Gerald L. Nissenbaum 

* Nutter, McClennen & Fish 

John K. P. Stone III 

PALMER & DODGE 
Robert E. Sullivan 

*Raekemann, Sawyer & Brewster 
A. Fortier 

Sarrouf, Tarricone & Flemming 
Camille F. Sarrouf 

Weiss, Angoff, Coltin, Koski & 
Wolf, P.C. 
Dudley A. Weiss 

55 



Management/Financ ial/C onsulting 

ADVANCED MANAGEMENT 

ASSOCIATES 
Harvey Chet Krentzman 

*Bain & Company, Inc. 
William W. Bain 

THE BOSTON CONSULTING 
GROUP 
Jonathan L. Isaacs 

* Corporate Decisions 

David J. Morrison 

*Haynes Management, Inc. 
G. Arnold Haynes 

Index Group 
David G. Robinson 

Irma Mann Strategic Marketing 
Irma Mann Stearns 

Jason M. Cortell 
& Associates, Inc. 
Jason M. Cortell 

Lochridge & Company, Inc. 
Richard K. Lochridge 

MCK3NSEY & COMPANY 
Robert P. O'Block 

PRUDE NTIAL-BACHE 
CAPITAL FUNDING 
David F. Remington 

*Rath & Strong 
Dan Ciampa 

* Towers Perrin 

J. Russell Southworth 

*William M. Mercer, Inc. 
Chester D. Clark 

*The Wyatt Company 
Paul R. Daoust 

Yankelovich Clancy Shulman 
Kevin Clancy 



Manufacturer's Representatives 

*Ben Mac Enterprises 
Larry Benhardt 
Thomas McAuliffe 

*Paul R. Cahn Associates, Inc. 
Paul R. Cahn 

Manufacturing/Industry 

*AGFA Corporation 
Ken Draeger 

*AMCEL Corporation 
Lloyd Gordon 

*Avedis Zildjian Company 
Armand Zildjian 

The Biltrite Corporation 
Stanley J. Bernstein 

Boston Acoustics, Inc. 
Frank Reed 



M 



^^^■i 



*C.R. Bard, Inc. 

Robert H. McCaffrey 

* Century Manufacturing Company 
Joseph Tiberio 

*Chelsea Industries, Inc. 
Ronald G. Casty 
CONNELL LIMITED PARTNERSHIP 
William F. Connell 

Dennison Manufacturing Company 
Nelson G. Gifford 



Media 

THE BOSTON GLOBE 

William 0. Taylor 

BOSTON HERALD 
Patrick J. Purcell 

PEOPLE MAGAZINE 
Peter Krieger 

WCRB- 102.5 FM 



ERVING PAPER MILLS 
Charles B. Housen 

*FLEXcon Company, Inc. 
Mark R. Ungerer 

* Georgia-Pacific Corp. 

Maurice W. Kring 

THE GILLETTE COMPANY 
Colman M. Mockler, Jr. 

GTE PRODUCTS CORPORATION 
Dean T. Langford 

HARVARD FOLDING BOX 
COMPANY, INC. 
Melvin A. Ross 

H.K. Webster Company, Inc. 
Dean K. Webster 

*HMK Group Companies, Ltd. 
Joan L. Karol 

Hudson Lock, Inc. 
Norman Stavisky 

* Industrial Filter and Equipment 
Corporation 

Donald R. Patnode 

Kendall Company 
J. Dale Sherratt 

LEACH & GARNER COMPANY 
Philip F. Leach 

Leggett & Piatt, Inc. 
Alexander M. Levine 

NEW ENGLAND BUSINESS 
SERVICE, INC. 
Richard H. Rhoads 

* Parks Corporation 

Lee Davidson 

* Pierce Aluminum 

Robert W. Pierce 

*Statler Tissue Company 
Leonard Sugerman 

Superior Brands, Inc. 
Richard J. Phelps 

♦Tech Pak, Inc. 
J. William Flynn 

Textron, Inc. 
B.F. Dolan 

Wire Belt Company of America 
F. Wade Greer 



Richard L. Kaye 

WCVB-TV, CHANNEL 5 BOSTON 
S. James Coppersmith 

Personnel 

TAD TECHNICAL SERVICES 
CORPORATION 
David J. McGrath, Jr. 



Printing 

*Bowne of Boston, Inc. 
Donald J. Cannava 

Customforms, Inc. 
David A. Granoff 

DANIELS PRINTING COMPANY 
Lee S. Daniels 

*Espo Litho Co., Inc. 
David M. Fromer 

George H. Dean Company 
Earl Michaud 

GRAFACON, INC. 



Hilon Development Corporation 
Joan Eliachar 

*John M. Corcoran & Company 
John M. Corcoran 

Keller Co., Inc. 
Joseph P. Keller 

*Leggat McCall Properties, Inc. 
Dennis F. Callahan 

Northland Investment Corporation 
Robert A. Danziger 

Tetlow Realty Associates 
Richard J. Gilbert 

*Trammell Crow Company 
Arthur DeMartino 

Urban Investment & Development 
Rudy K. Umscheid 

*Windsor Building Associates 
Mona F. Freedman 



H. Wayman Rogers, Jr. 



Publishing 

Addison-Wesley Publishing Company, 
Inc. 
Warren R. Stone 

CAHNERS PUBLISfflNG COMPANY 

Ron Segel 

HOUGHTON MIFFLIN COMPANY 
Nader F. Darehshori 

Little, Brown & Company 
Kevin L. Dolan 



Real Estate/Development 

*Boston Capital Partners 
Christopher W. Collins 
Herbert F. Collins 
Richard J. DeAgazio 
John P. Manning 

* Combined Properties, Inc. 
Stanton L. Black 

*The Flatley Company 
Thomas J. Flatley 

Heafitz Development Company 
Lewis Heafitz 



Retail 

*Channel Home Centers, Inc. 
Malcolm L. Sherman 

FILENE'S 
David P. Mullen 

*Jordan Marsh Company 
Richard F. Van Pelt 

Karten's Jewelers 
Joel Karten 

*Neiman Marcus 
William D. Roddy 

Out of Town News, Inc. 
Sheldon Cohen 

*Saks Fifth Avenue 
Alison Strieder Mayher 

THE STOP & SHOP COMPANIES, 
INC. 

Lewis Schaeneman 

TJX COMPANIES 
Ben Cammarata 



Science/Medical 

Baldpate Hospital, Inc. 
Lucille M. Batal 

Blake & Blake Genealogists 
Richard A. Blake, Jr. 

CHARLES RD7ER 
LABORATORIES, INC. 
Henry L. Foster 

"CompuChem Corporation 
Gerard Kees Verkerk 

J.A. WEBSTER, INC. 
John A. Webster 

'Portsmouth Regional Hospital 
William J. Schuler 



56 



*■*#('' 



Services 

*Don Law Productions 
Don Law 

: Giltspur Exhibits/Boston 
Thomas E. Knott 

Shaughnessy & Ahern Co. 
John J. Shaughnessy 

Wild Acre Inns, Inc. 
Bernard S. Yudowitz 



Software/Information Services 

"International Data Group 
Patrick J. McGovern 

* Phoenix Technologies Foundation 
Neil Colvin 



Travel/Transportation 


NEW ENGLAND TELEPHONE 


* Crimson Travel Service/ 


COMPANY 


Thomas Cook 


Paul C. O'Brien 


David Paresky 


NORTHERN TELECOM, INC. 


* Heritage Travel, Inc. 


Brian Davis 


Donald R. Sohn 


NYNEX CORPORATION 




William C. Ferguson 


Telecommunications 




AT&T 


Utilities 


Robert Babbitt 


BOSTON EDISON COMPANY 


*AT&T 


Stephen J. Sweeney 


Glenn Swift 


EASTERN ENTERPRISES 


AT&T NETWORK SYSTEMS 


Ronald S. Ziemba 


John F. McKinnon 


New England Electric System 


CELLULAR ONE 


Joan T. Bok 


Charles Hoffman 





you are cordially invited to sample our 
Symphony Menu 



at 



The Cafe (Promenade 




7 or Reservations Call, 61 7-424-7000 

Reduced partying rates when dining at c The Colonnade for 

Symphony Matrons. 



WjzP 



The Colonnade Hotel is located at 120 Huntington Avenue, Boston 



57 



*BasedonR. L. Polk & Co. owner retention study of 'MY 1984-1986. 




1991 405 models from $15,300 to $21,700. tCall 1.-800-447-2882. tMSRP. Excludes tax, title, options, registration and destination charges. 



After more than a century of building fine automobiles. Peugeot creates cars 
so well-conceived that some of the best qualities of the car may not be apparent 
at a glance. 

But those willing to take the time to look more closely will find themselves 
richly rewarded. They'll discover a distinctive European automobile whose rare 
combination of intelligent engineering, legendary driving comfort and enduring 
style has won the acclaim of automotive enthusiasts the world over. 

All of which only begins to explain why people who own Peugeots keep them 
longer than most import cars on the road* 

Evidently, once you've looked beyond the obvious, it is difficult to see anything less. 



.«(%»./? 



Boston 

Symphony 

Annual 

Fund 

KEEP GREAT MUSIC ALIVE 



The Higginson Society 

The Boston Symphony Orchestra is grateful to 
the following contributors for their generous sup- 
port during the 1989-90 season. These patrons 
have each donated $1,500 or more to either the 
Boston Symphony Annual Fund or one or more 
of the Capital Gift programs. Gifts to the 
Annual Fund are unrestricted and are applied 
directly to the Orchestra's operating budget. 
Capital Gifts are restricted and may be added to 
the Orchestra's endowment or designated for the 
physical enhancement of the BSO faculties. This 
list acknowledges contributions received between 
September 1, 1989 and August 31, 1990. 



Annual Fund Contributors 




Patrons 



Mr. and Mrs. J. P. Barger 
Mr. and Mrs. John Barnard, Jr. 
Earle M. Chiles 
Mr. and Mrs. Lewis S. Dabney 
Mr. and Mrs. Nelson J. Darling, Jr. 
Dr. and Mrs Charles C. Dickinson 
Mrs. Harris Fahnestock 
The Honorable and Mrs. John H. 
Fitzpatrick 



Sponsors 



Mr. and Mrs. Harlan E. Anderson 
Mr. and Mrs. John M. Bradley 
Roger and Florence Chesterton-Norris 
Mr. and Mrs. Eugene H. Clapp II 
Mr. and Mrs. John F. Cogan, Jr. 
Haskell and Ina Gordon 
Mr. and Mrs. James H. Grew 



Fellows 



Mr. and Mrs. Robert W. Adams 

Mrs. Weston W. Adams 

Mr. and Mrs. Vernon R. Alden 

Mr. and Mrs. David B. Arnold, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth C. Barron 

Mrs. Richard E. Bennink 

James K. Beranek 

W. Walter Boyd 

Mrs. Helene R. Cahners-Kaplan 

Dr. and Mrs. Stewart H. Clifford 

Mr. and Mrs. William H. Congleton 

Mr. and Mrs. John L. Cooper 

Mrs. Pierre De Beaumont 

Mrs. Charles Freedom Eaton, Jr. 



Mr. and Mrs. Richard M. Fraser 
Mrs. Kenneth J. Germeshausen 
Mrs. Henry M. Greenleaf 
Mr. and Mrs. Francis W. Hatch 
Ms. Susan Morse Hilles 
Mr. and Mrs. George H. Kidder 
Dr. and Mrs. Edwin H. Land 
Mr. and Mrs. R. Willis Leith, Jr. 



Mrs. Henry S. Hall, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Bayard Henry 
Ms. Susan B. Kaplan 

and Mr. Ami Trauber 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert D. King 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles P. Lyman 
Mr. and Mrs. William B. Moses, Jr. 



Mr. and Mrs. William Elfers 

Mr. and Mrs. Dean W. Freed 

Mrs. Robert G. Fuller 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas J. Galligan, Jr. 

John Gamble 

Mrs. Morton R. Godine 

Mr. and Mrs. John L. Grandin, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard D. Hill 

Mr. and Mrs. Amos B. Hostetter, Jr. 

Mrs. Louise Shonk Kelly 

Mr. and Mrs. Carl Koch 

Mr. and Mrs. John M. Kucharski 

Mr. and Mrs. Stephen R. Levy 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. Millar 

59 



Mrs. Ellis Little 

Robert W. MacPherson 

Mrs. August R. Meyer 

Mrs. Robert B. Newman 

Mrs. James H. Perkins 

Mrs. George R. Rowland 

William F. and Juliana W. Thompson 

Anonymous (1) 



Mr. and Mrs. Thomas A. Rosse 
Mrs. Donald B. Sinclair 
Dr. and Mrs. W. Davies Sohier 
Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Stoneman 
Charles M. Werly 
Anonymous (6) 



Robert M. Morse 

Mr. and Mrs. E. James Morton 

David B. Perini 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. Remis 

Mr. and Mrs. Francis P. Sears, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Malcolm L. Sherman 

Dr. and Mrs. Fredrick J. Stare 

Miss Elizabeth B. Storer 

Mrs. Patricia Hansen Strang 

Stephen Tilton 

Mrs. Roland von Weber 

Dr. and Mrs. Nicholas T. Zervas 

Mr. and Mrs. Erwin N. Ziner 

Anonymous (3) 



Members 






Mr. and Mrs. William F. Achtmeyer 

Mrs. Frank G. Allen 

Mrs. Charles Almy 

Mr. and Mrs. James B. Ames 

Mr. and Mrs. David L. Anderson 

Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth A. Anderson 

Professor and Mrs. Rae D. Anderson 

Mrs. Julius H. Appleton 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry Axelrod 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald P. Babson 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard B. Bailey 

Mr. and Mrs. Vincent Bajakian 

Mr. and Mrs. David Bakalar 

Dr. and Mrs. William H. Baker 

Mrs. Norman V. Ballou 

Mr. and Mrs. Clifford B. Barrus, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Allen G. Barry 

Thomas R. Bateman 

Mr. and Mrs. John E. Beard 

Mr. and Mrs. George W. Berry 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael B. Bever 

Mr. and Mrs. Jordan Birger 

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel W. Bodman III 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael J. Bohnen 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald C. Bowersock, Jr. 

Mrs. Alexander H. Bright 

Mr. and Mrs. Peter A. Brooke 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard A. Brown 

Mr. and Mrs. William L. Brown 

Mr. and Mrs. Allan T. Buros 

Dr. and Mrs. Paul A. Buttenweiser 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas D. Cabot 

Mr. and Mrs. Stanford Calderwood 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold Caro 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Carr 

Charles Christenson 

James Russell Clarke, Jr. 

Mrs. Nicholas B. Clinch 

Ms. Mary Hart Cogan 

Mr. and Mrs. Stephen E. Coit 

Mr. and Mrs. IW. Colburn 

Mr. and Mrs. Aaron H. Cole 

Mr. and Mrs. Abram T. Collier 

Mr. and Mrs. Marvin A. Collier 

Charles A. Coolidge, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry E. Cooper III 

Mrs. John Crocker 

Mr. and Mrs. William M. Crozier, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ronald C. Curhan 

Mr. and Mrs. Eric Cutler 

Mrs. Dimitri d'Arbeloff 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles H. Davis II 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael H. Davis 

Mr. and Mrs. Stanton W. Davis 

Miss Amy Davol 

Mr. and Mrs. Allen F. Dickerman 



Mr. and Mrs. John H. Dickison 

Mr. and Mrs. Eugene B. Doggett 

Ms. Phyllis Dohanian 

Mr. and Mrs. William R. Driver, Jr. 

Dr. Richard W. Dwight 

Mr. and Mrs. Goetz B. Eaton 

Mrs. Otto Eckstein 

Mrs. Alexander Ellis, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard S. Emmet 

Mr. and Mrs. Bradford M. Endicott 

Mrs. Priscilla Endicott 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward Eskandarian 

Mrs. Sewall H. Fessenden 

John and Barbara Fibiger 

Miss Anna E. Finnerty 

Mr. and Mrs. Maynard Ford 

Dr. and Mrs. Henry L. Foster 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. V. French 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Gable 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas P. Gerrity 

Dr. and Mrs. Donald B. Giddon 

Arthur S. Goldberg 

Carol R. and Avram J. Goldberg 

Professor and Mrs. Ray A. Goldberg 

Mr. and Mrs. Jordan L. Golding 

Mr. and Mrs. Mark R. Goldweitz 

Mrs. Sylvan A. Goodman 

Mrs. Harry N. Gorin 

Mrs. Stephen W. Grant 

Mr. and Mrs. E. Brainard Graves 

Mr. and Mrs. Daniel S. Gregory 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry R. Guild, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Graham Gund 

Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth G. Haas 

Mr. and Mrs. R. Douglas Hall III 

Mrs. N. Penrose Hallowell, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. James B. Hangstefer 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul F. Hannah 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry R. Hauser 

Daniel P. Hays 

Noah T. Herndon 

Mrs. Waldo H. Holcombe 

Mrs. Harrison D. Horblit 

Mr. and Mrs. Daniel A. Hosage 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles A. Hubbard 

Mrs. Charmienne Hughes 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter Hunnewell 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Hyman 

Dr. and Mrs. Robert A. Indeglia 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert F. Jasse 

E. Morton Jennings 

Mrs. Dewitt John 

Theodore Jones 

Mrs. Albert S. Kahn 

Mr. and Mrs. Bela T. Kalman 

Dr. and Mrs. S. Charles Kasdon 



Mr. and Mrs. Gordon F. Kingsley 

Mr. and Mrs. William Kopans 

Ms. Cynthia Kosowsky 

Dr. and Mrs. Arthur R. Kravitz 

Edward J. Kutlowski 

Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin H. Lacy 

Mr. and Mrs. David L. Landay 

Mr. and Mrs. Allen Latham, Jr. 

Mrs. James F. Lawrence 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert A. Lawrence 

Dr. and Mrs. Brian W. A Leeming 

Mr. and Mrs. Irving Levy 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward Linde 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph P. Lombard 

Mr. and Mrs. John F. Magee 

Mr. and Mrs. Gael Mahony 

Mr. and Mrs. Satoru Masamune 

Mr. and Mrs. Amos C. Mathews 

Dr. Clinton F. Miller and 

Ms. Adele Wick 
Mrs. Dudley L. Millikin 
Mr. and Mrs. Adolf F. Monosson 
Mrs. Olney S. Morrill 
Mr. and Mrs. Wells Morss 
David G. Mugar 

Mr. and Mrs. Gerard F. Murphy 
Miss Alice B. Newell 
Mr. and Mrs. Albert L. Nickerson 
Mr. and Mrs. Rodger P. Nordblom 
Mrs. Richard P. Nyquist 
Miss Mary-Catherine O'Neill 
Mrs. Andrew Oliver 
Miss Grace Marshall Otis 
Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Davies Paine 
Mr. and Mrs. Walter H. Palmer 
Gary M. Palter 
Miss Harriet F. Parker 
Mrs. Brackett Parsons 
Dr. and Mrs. Oglesby Paul 
Mr. and Mrs. George W. Pearce 
Mr. and Mrs. Andrall E. Pearson 
Mr. and Mrs. Edward E. Phillips 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas L. Phillips 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard D. Phippen 
Mr. and Mrs. John R. Pingree 
Mrs. Hollis Plimpton, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. David R. Pokross 
Mr. and Mrs. William J. Poorvu 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard Preston 
Mr. and Mrs. Irving W. Rabb 
Mr. and Mrs. Peter C. Read 
Mr. and Mrs. David F. Remington 
Mr. and Mrs. Eugene J. Ribakoff 
Mr. and Mrs. David G. Robinson 
Mr. and Mrs. John Ex Rodgers 
Mr. and Mrs. Jerome Rosenfeld 



60 



%mu 



Dr. Jordan S. Ruboy 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Saltonstall 

Mr. and Mrs. Albert J. Sandler 

Mrs. George Lee Sargent 

Mr. and Mrs. John G. Sehmid 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul A. Sehmid 

Mr. and Mrs. George G. Schwenk 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael S. Scott Morton 

Alan H. Scovell 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles N. Shane 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert A. Sinclair 

Mr. and Mrs. Jeffrey P. Somers 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles H. Spaulding 

Mrs. Irma Mann Stearns and 

Dr. Norman Stearns 
Mr. and Mrs. Thornton Stearns 
Mr. and Mrs. Ira Stepanian 
Mr. and Mrs. Herbert B. Stern 
Mrs. Edward S. Stimpson 
Mr. and Mrs. Harris E. Stone 



Mr. and Mrs. Henry S. Stone 
Mr. and Mrs. James W. Storey 
Dr. and Mrs. Nathan B. Talbot 
Mr. and Mrs. John F. Taplin 
Mrs. Charles H. Taylor 
Mr. and Mrs. William O. Taylor 
Mr. and Mrs. Theodore H. Teplow 
Mrs. David Terwilliger 
Dr. and Mrs. Richard H. Thompson 
Mr. and Mrs. John L. Thorndike 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard K. Thorndike 
Mr. and Mrs. W. Nicholas Thorndike 
Mr. and Mrs. Alan J. Tichnor 
Mr. and Mrs. John Tillinghast 
Dr. and Mrs. Eugene J. Tillman 
Mrs. Richard F. Treadway 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. Trippe 
Mrs. George C. Underwood 
Mr. and Mrs. John H. Valentine 
Mr. and Mrs. Roger Voisin 



Mrs. Evelyn R. Wagstaff-Callahan 

Mrs. H. Saint John Webb 

Mr. and Mrs. Stephen R. Weber 

Mrs. Barrett Wendell, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Wengren 

Miss Barbara West 

Mrs. Joan D. Wheeler 

Stetson Whitcher 

Dr. and Mrs. Harold J. White 

Robert W. White 

Mrs. Florence T. Whitney 

Richard T. Whitney 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas H. P. Whitney 

Mrs. Margaret A. Williams-DeCelles 

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph B. Williams 

Mrs. Shepard F. Williams 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas B. Williams 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald B. Wilson 

Miss Elizabeth Woolley 

Anonymous (15) 



Mr. and Mrs. Vernon R. Alden 

Mrs. and Mrs. Philip M. Allen 

Professor and Mrs. Rae D. Anderson 

Mr. and Mrs. Stephen H. Anthony 

Mr. and Mrs. Marshall Armstrong 

Mr. and Mrs. David B. Arnold, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Sherwood E. Bain 

Mr. and Mrs. J. P. Barger 

Dr. and Mrs. Leo L. Beranek 

Caroline Thayer Bland 

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel W. Bodman III 

Mrs. Ralph Bradley (d) 

Mrs. Alexander H. Bright 

Mr. and Mrs. Peter A. Brooke 

Ms. Phyllis Brooks 

Mrs. Helene R. Cahners-Kaplan 

Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Gene Casty 

Mr. and Mrs. C. Thomas Clagett, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. James F. Geary 

Mrs. George H. A. Clowes 

Mr. and Mrs. John F. Cogan, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Julian Cohen 

Mr. and Mrs. Abram T. Collier 

Mr. and Mrs. William H. Congleton 

Mr. and Mrs. William F. Connell 

Mrs. A. Werk Cook 

Mr. and Mrs. Lewis S. Dabney 

Mr. and Mrs. Nelson J. Darling, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael H. Davis 

Mrs. John E. Dawson 

Mr. and Mrs. Eugene B. Doggett 

Mrs. Charles Freedom Eaton, Jr. 



Capital Gifts Contributors 

Mr. and Mrs. Goetz B. Eaton 
The Honorable and 

Mrs. John H. Fitzpatrick 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard M. Fraser 
Mrs. Kenneth J. Germeshausen 
Carol R. and Avram J. Goldberg 
Mr. and Mrs. John L. Grandin, Jr. 
Barbara and Steven Grossman 
Catherine Louise Hagney (d) 
Mrs. Henry M. Halvorson 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. Hargrove 
Mr. and Mrs. Francis W. Hatch 
Mr. and Mrs. George Hatsopoulos 
Mr. and Mrs. George F. Hodder 
Mr. and Mrs. Bela T. Kalman 
Mr. and Mrs. Stanley H. Kaplan 
Mr. and Mrs. George H. Kidder 
Mr. and Mrs. Carl Koch 
Dr. and Mrs. David I. Kosowsky 
Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Chet Krentzman 
Mr. and Mrs. George F. Krim 
Mr. and Mrs. R. Willis Leith, Jr. 
Dr. and Mrs. Clinton N. Levin 
Mr. and Mrs. Caleb Loring, Jr. 
Mrs. Frederick H. Lovejoy, Sr. 
Dr. and Mrs. Frederick H. Lovejoy, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles P. Lyman 
Mr. and Mrs. Harry L. Marks 
Mrs. August R. Meyer 
Mr. and Mrs. Nathan R. Miller 
Mr. and Mrs. Paul M. Montrone 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard P. Morse 



Mr. and Mrs. William B. Moses, Jr. 

Mrs. Robert B. Newman 

Mr. and Mrs. Albert L. Nickerson 

Dr. Peter L. Page 

Mr. and Mrs. John A. Perkins 

Miss Pauline Perry 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas D. Perry, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Pierce 

Mr. and Mrs. William J. Poorvu 

Mr. and Mrs. Irving W. Rabb 

Mr. and Mrs. Peter C. Read 

Mr. and Mrs. David Riemer 

Mr. and Mrs. Jerome Rosenfeld 

Mr. and Mrs. William C. Rousseau 

Mrs. George R. Rowland 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael B. Salke 

Mrs. George Lee Sargent 

Mr. and Mrs. Francis P. Sears, Jr. 

Dr. and Mrs. W. Davies Sohier 

Dr. Sylvia Spiller 

Mr. and Mrs. Ray Stata 

Mr. and Mrs. Thornton Stearns 

Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Stoneman 

Miss Elizabeth B. Storer 

William F. and Juliana W. Thompson 

Mr. and Mrs. John L. Thorndike 

Lewis H. Weinstein 

Miss Christine White 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas H. P. Whitney 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald B. Wilson 

Mrs. John J. Wilson 

Anonymous (8) 



61 



MB ■ ■ • . 1H ' • ' ■ ■ ■ 



OFFICERS 




H. GILMAN NICHOLS 
President 

JOHN L. THORNDIKE 
JOHN W. COBB 
DANIEL A. PHILLIPS 
JOHN M. MEYER 
ROBERT N. KARELITZ 
JONATHAN R. PHILLIPS 
JOHN F. WINCHESTER 
DOUGLAS R. SMITH-PETERSEN 
EDWARD P. THOMPSON 
RICHARD W. STOKES 
GEORGE BLAGDEN 
LAURA N. RIGSBY 
SUSAN R. GUNDERSON 
CHARLES R. EDDY, JR. 
FREDERIC C.R. STEWARD 
WILLIAM J. O'KEEFE 
GEORGE L. GRAY 


CHARLES C.J. PLATT 
ANTHONY B. BOVA 
FRANK WOODARD III 
JAMES J. ROCHE 
ARTHUR C. PICKETT 
JONATHAN B. LORING 
DENISE CRONIN 
ALTON L. CIRIELLO, JR. 
STEVEN H. BRAVEMAN 
J. BRIAN POTTS 
MARY JANE SMITH 
NANCY B. SMITH 
ELLEN COPE-FLANAGAN 
DONALD P. LEE 
JOHN R. LAYTON 
SARAH A. PHILLIPS 
ROSALYN M. SOVIE 
MAUREEN W. BURKE 


© 




FIDUCIARY 

BOSTON TRUSTEES 

Fiduciary Trust Company 

175 Federal Street 

Boston, Massachusetts 02110 

Telephone (617) 482-5270 



62 



*'•#'" 



■ 



The Boston Symphony Orchestra gratefully acknowledges the generous support 
of the following foundations. Their grants have made possible a variety of 
programs and projects. 



Acushnet Foundation 

The Lassor and Fanny Agoos 

Charity Fund 
The Anthony Advocate Foundation 
J.M.R. Barker Foundation 
Frank M. Barnard Foundation, Inc. 
The Theodore H. Barth Foundation 
Adelaide Breed Bayrd Foundation 
Charles S. Bird Foundation 
The Boston Foundation 
The Boston Globe Foundation 
The Britten-Pears Foundation 
Cabot Family Charitable Trust 
Calvert Trust 

The Cambridge Foundation 
Roberta M. Childs Foundation 
Chiles Foundation 
Clark Charitable Trust 
Clipper Ship Foundation 
The Clowes Fund, Inc. 
Compton Foundation, Inc. 
Jessie B. Cox Charitable Trust 
Melvin S. Cutler Charitable 

Trust 
Nancy Sayles Day Foundation 
Deluxe Check Printers Foundation 
The Demoulas Foundation 
Dennis Family Foundation 
Aaron Diamond Foundation 
The Eastman Charitable 

Foundation 
Eaton Foundation 
Fidelity Foundation 
Orville W. Forte Charitable 

Foundation 
Joseph C. and Esther Foster 

Foundation 
The Frelinghuysen Foundation 
G.P. and Rose Gardner Charitable 

Trust 



Gerondelis Foundation 

Ann and Gordon Getty Foundation 

The Gordon Fund 

The Nehemias Gorin Foundation 

The Robert Z. Greene Foundation 

Greenwalt Charitable Trust 

The William and Mary Greve 

Foundation, Inc. 
Grosberg Family Charity Fund 
Florence Gould Foundation 
Luke B. Hancock Foundation 
The HCA Foundation 
William Randolph Hearst 

Foundation 
High Meadows Foundation 
Aldus C. Higgins Foundation 
Henry Hornblower Fund, Inc. 
The Hunt Foundation 
Rita and Stanley H. Kaplan 

Foundation 
Koussevitzky Music Foundation 
Raymond E. Lee Foundation 
June Rockwell Levy Foundation 
The Lovett Foundation 
Lowell Institute 

James A. Macdonald Foundation 
Helen and Leo Mayer Charitable 

Trust 
William Inglis Morse Trust 
Mu Phi Epsilon Memorial 

Foundation 
Max and Sophie Mydans 

Foundation 
Nakamichi Foundation 
Edward John Noble Foundation 
Olivetti Foundation, Inc. 
The Palriwala Foundation of America 
The Bessie Pappas Charitable 

Foundation 



The Theodore Edson Parker 

Foundation 
Amelia Peabody Foundation 
Amelia Peabody Charitable Fund 
The Harold Whitworth Pierce 

Charitable Trust 
Property Capital Trust 
Olive Higgins Prouty Foundation 
AC. Ratshesky Foundation 
The Frederick W. Richmond 

Foundation, Inc. 
Billy Rose Foundation, Inc. 
Richard Saltonstall Charitable 

Foundation 
Sasco Foundation 
The William E. and Bertha 

Schrafft Charitable Trust 
Albert Shapiro Fund 
Miriam Shaw Fund 
George and Beatrice Sherman Family 

Charitable Trust 
Mary Jean and Frank P. Smeal 

Foundation 
The Seth Sprague Educational 

and Charitable Foundation 
The Stearns Charitable Trust 
Nathaniel and Elizabeth P. Stevens 

Foundation 
The Stone Charitable Foundation, 

Inc. 
Gertrude W. and Edward M. Swartz 

Charitable Trust 
Tisch Foundation 
Charles Irwin Travelli Fund 
Frederick E. Weber Charities 
Edwin S. Webster Foundation 
Carl A. Weyerhaeuser Trust 
Anonymous (1) 



63 



Next Program . . . 

Thursday, October 4, at 8 
Friday, October 5, at 2 
Saturday, October 6, at 8 
Tuesday, October 9, at 8 

SEUI OZAWA conducting 



••■"-'■ 



RAVEL 



BRITTEN 



Piano Concerto in D for the left hand 
(October 4 and 9 only) 

Diversions, for piano (left hand) and 
orchestra, Opus 21 
(October 5 and 6 only) 

LEON FLEISHER 



TAKEMITSU 



Orion and Pleiades, for cello and orchestra 
Orion. Lento, quasi una fantasia 
and. Intermezzo 
Pleiades. Allegretto ben moderato 

TSUYOSHI TSUTSUMI 



INTERMISSION 



BRAHMS 



Symphony No. 1 in C minor, Opus 68 

Un poco sostenuto— Allegro 
Andante sostenuto 
Un poco allegretto e grazioso 
Adagio — Piu Andante— Allegro non troppo 
ma con brio — Piu Allegro 



Single tickets for all Boston Symphony Orchestra concerts throughout the season 
are available at the Symphony Hall box office, or by calling "Symphony-Charge" at 
(617) 266-1200, Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m. until 6 p.m., to charge 
tickets instantly on a major credit card, or to make a reservation and then send 
payment by check. Please note that there is a $1.75 handling fee for each ticket 
ordered by phone. 



64 









Coming Concerts . . . 



Wednesday, October 3, at 7:30 

Open Rehearsal 
Marc Mandel will discuss the program 

at 6:30 in Symphony Hall. 
Thursday 'C- October 4, 8-10:05 
Tuesday 'B'- October 9, 8-10:05 

SEIJI OZAWA conducting 
LEON FLEISHER, piano 
TSUYOSHI TSUTSUMI, cello 



RAVEL 

TAKEMITSU 

BRAHMS 



Piano Concerto for the left 

hand 
Orion and Pleiades for cello 

and orchestra 
Symphony No. 1 



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Friday 'B'- October 5, 2-4:10 
Saturday 'A -October 6, 8-10:10 
SEIJI OZAWA conducting 
LEON FLEISHER, piano 
TSUYOSHI TSUTSUMI, cello 



BRITTEN 



TAKEMITSU 



BRAHMS 



Diversions for piano left- 
hand and orchestra 

Orion and Pleiades for cello 
and orchestra 

Symphony No. 1 



Thursday, October 11, at 10:30 a.m. 

Open Rehearsal 
Steven Ledbetter will discuss the program 

at 9:30 in Symphony Hall. 
Thursday A' -October 11, 8-10 
Tuesday 'C- October 16, 8-10 

SEIJI OZAWA conducting 
MARTHA ARGERICH, piano 

PROKOFIEV Piano Concerto No. 3 

SCHUBERT Symphony in C, The Great 

Friday Evening— October 12, 8-10:05 

SEIJI OZAWA conducting 

BACH/SAITO Chaconne in D minor 

MAHLER Symphony No. 5 

Saturday 'B'- October 13, 8-10:15 

SEIJI OZAWA conducting 
MARTHA ARGERICH, piano 

PROKOFIEV Piano Concerto No. 3 

MAHLER Symphony No. 5 

Thursday A' -October 25, 8-9:45 
Friday A' -October 26, 2-3:45 
Saturday 'B'- October 27, 8-9:45 
Tuesday 'C- October 30, 8-9:45 
WITOLD LUTOSIAWSKI conducting 
RONAN LEFKOWITZ, violin 
EMANUEL AX, piano (October 25, 26, 27) 
ANTHONY DI BONAVENTURA, piano 
(October 30 only) 

ALL- Livre pour Orchestre 

LUTOSIAWSKI Chain II, for violin and 
PROGRAM orchestra 

Piano Concerto 

Programs and artists subject to change. 



65 



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66 



Symphony Hall Information . . . 



FOR SYMPHONY HALL CONCERT AND 
TICKET INFORMATION, call (617) 266- 
1492. For Boston Symphony concert program 
information, caU "C-O-N-C-E-R-T" (266-2378). 

THE BOSTON SYMPHONY performs ten 
months a year, in Symphony Hall and at Tan- 
glewood. For information about any of the 
orchestra's activities, please call Symphony 
Hall, or write the Boston Symphony Orches- 
tra, Symphony Hall, Boston, MA 02115. 

THE NEWLY REFURBISHED EUNICE S. 
AND JULIAN COHEN WING, adjacent to 
Symphony Hall on Huntingdon Avenue, may be 
entered by the Symphony Hall West Entrance 
on Huntington Avenue. 

FOR SYMPHONY HALL RENTAL INFOR- 
MATION, call (617) 638-9240, or write the 
Function Manager, Symphony Hall, Boston, 
MA 02115. 

THE BOX OFFICE is open from 10 a.m. 
until 6 p.m. Monday through Saturday; on con- 
cert evenings it remains open through intermis- 
sion for BSO events or just past starting-time 
for other events. In addition, the box office 
opens Sunday at 1 p.m. when there is a con- 
cert that afternoon or evening. Single tickets 
for all Boston Symphony subscription concerts 
are available at the box office. For outside 
events at Symphony Hall, tickets are available 
three weeks before the concert. No phone 
orders will be accepted for these events. 

TO PURCHASE BSO TICKETS: American 
Express, MasterCard, Visa, a personal check, 
and cash are accepted at the box office. To 
charge tickets instantly on a major credit card, 
or to make a reservation and then send pay- 
ment by check, call "Symphony-Charge" at 
(617) 266-1200, Monday through Saturday 
from 10 a.m. until 6 p.m. There is a handling 
fee of $1.75 for each ticket ordered by phone. 

GROUP SALES: Groups may take advantage of 
advance ticket sales. For BSO concerts at Sym- 
phony Hall, groups of twenty-five or more may 
reserve tickets by telephone and take advantage 
of ticket discounts and flexible payment options. 
To place an order, or for more information, call 
Group Sales at (617) 638-9345. 

IN CONSIDERATION of our patrons and 
artists, children under four will not be admit- 
ted to Boston Symphony Orchestra concerts. 



THE SYMPHONY SHOP is located in the 
Cohen Wing at the West Entrance on Hunting- 
ton Avenue and is open Tuesday, Thursday, and 
Friday from 11 a.m. until 3 p.m., Saturday from 
1 p.m. until 6 p.m., and from one hour before 
each concert through intermission. The shop car- 
ries BSO and musical-motif merchandise and 
gift items such as calendars, clothing, appoint- 
ment books, drinking glasses, holiday ornaments, 
children's books, and BSO and Pops recordings. 
A selection of Symphony Shop merchandise is 
also available during BSO concert hours outside 
the Cabot-Cahners Room in the Massachusetts 
Avenue corridor. All proceeds benefit the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra. For merchandise informa- 
tion, please call (617) 267-2692. 

TICKET RESALE: If for some reason you 
are unable to attend a Boston Symphony con- 
cert for which you hold a ticket, you may make 
your ticket available for resale by calling the 
switchboard. This helps bring needed revenue 
to the orchestra and makes your seat available 
to someone who wants to attend the concert. A 
mailed receipt will acknowledge your tax-deduct- 
ible contribution. 

RUSH SEATS: There are a limited number of 
Rush Seats available for the Friday-afternoon, 
Tuesday-evening, and Saturday-evening Boston 
Symphony concerts (subscription concerts only). 
The low price of these seats is assured through 
the Morse Rush Seat Fund. The tickets for Rush 
Seats are sold at $6 each, one to a customer, on 
Fridays as of 9 a.m. and Saturdays and Tues- 
days as of 5 p.m. 

PARKING: The Prudential Center Garage 
offers a discount to any BSO patron with a 
ticket stub for that evening's performance. 
There are also two paid parking garages on 
Westland Avenue near Symphony Hall. 
Limited street parking is available. As a spe- 
cial benefit, guaranteed pre-paid parking near 
Symphony Hall is available to subscribers who 
attend evening concerts on Tuesday, Thursday, 
Friday, or Saturday. For more information, 
call the Subscription Office at (617) 266-7575. 

LATECOMERS will be seated by the ushers 
during the first convenient pause in the pro- 
gram. Those who wish to leave before the end 
of the concert, are asked to do so between pro- 
gram pieces in order not to disturb other 
patrons. 



67 



SMOKING IS NOT PERMITTED in any 
part of the Symphony Hall auditorium or in 
the surrounding corridors. It is permitted only 
in the Cabot-Cahners and Hatch rooms, and in 
the main lobby on Massachusetts Avenue. 

CAMERA AND RECORDING EQUIPMENT 

may not be brought into Symphony Hall dur- 
ing concerts. 

FIRST AID FACILITIES for both men and 
women are available. On-call physicians attend- 
ing concerts should leave their names and seat 
locations at the switchboard near the Massa- 
chusetts Avenue entrance. 

WHEELCHAIR ACCESS to Symphony Hall 
is available via the Cohen Wing, at the West 
Entrance. Wheelchair-accessible restrooms are 
located in the main corridor of the West 
Entrance, and in the first-balcony passageway 
between Symphony Hall and the Cohen Wing. 

ELEVATORS are located outside the Hatch 
and Cabot-Cahners rooms on the Massachu- 
setts Avenue side of Symphony Hall, and in 
the Cohen Wing. 

LADIES' ROOMS are located on the orches- 
tra level, audience-left, at the stage end of the 
hall, on both sides of the first balcony, and in 
the Cohen Wing. 

MEN'S ROOMS are located on the orchestra 
level, audience-right, outside the Hatch Room 
near the elevator, on the first-balcony level, 
audience-left, outside the Cabot-Cahners Room 
near the coatroom, and in the Cohen Wing. 

COATROOMS are located on the orchestra 
and first-balcony levels, audience-left, outside 
the Hatch and Cabot-Cahners rooms, and in 
the Cohen Wing. The BSO is not responsible 
for personal apparel or other property of 
patrons. 

LOUNGES AND BAR SERVICE: There are 
two lounges in Symphony Hall. The Hatch 
Room on the orchestra level and the Cabot- 
Cahners Room on the first-balcony level serve 



drinks starting one hour before each perform- 
ance. For the Friday-afternoon concerts, both 
rooms open at 12:15, with sandwiches available 
until concert time. 

BOSTON SYMPHONY BROADCASTS: Con- 
certs of the Boston Symphony Orchestra are 
heard by delayed broadcast in many parts of 
the United States and Canada, as well as 
internationally, through the Boston Symphony 
Transcription Trust. In addition, Friday- 
afternoon concerts are broadcast live by 
WGBH-FM (Boston 89.7); Saturday-evening 
concerts are broadcast live by both WGBH-FM 
and WCRB-FM (Boston 102.5). Live broad- 
casts may also be heard on several other public 
radio stations throughout New England and 
New York. 

BSO FRIENDS: The Friends are annual 
donors to the Boston Symphony Orchestra. 
Friends receive BSO, the orchestra's newslet- 
ter, as well as priority ticket information and 
other benefits depending on their level of giv- 
ing. For information, please call the Develop- 
ment Office at Symphony Hall weekdays 
between 9 and 5, (617) 638-9251. If you are 
already a Friend and you have changed your 
address, please send your new address with 
your newsletter label to the Development Office, 
Symphony Hall, Boston, MA 02115. Including 
the mailing label will assure a quick and accu- 
rate change of address in our files. 

BUSINESS FOR BSO: The BSO's Business 
& Professional Leadership program makes it 
possible for businesses to participate in the life 
of the Boston Symphony Orchestra through a 
variety of original and exciting programs, 
among them "Presidents at Pops," "A Com- 
pany Christmas at Pops," and special-event 
underwriting. Benefits include corporate recog- 
nition in the BSO program book, access to the 
Higginson Room reception lounge, and priority 
ticket service. For further information, please 
call the BSO Corporate Development Office at 
(617) 638-9250. 



68 




When Marjory and Robert take to the 
dance floor at Fox Hill Village, people say 
they move just like Fred Astaire and 
Ginger Rogers. Such grace and style. 
Such flawless execution. 

The same can be said of Fox Hill Village 
Set amid 83 gracefully wooded acres, 
Fox Hill Village offers a style of retire 
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With an ever-changing schedule of 
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best years are yet to come. 

Yet Fox Hill Village is surprisingly 
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and a unique cooperative plan which 
lets you retain the many investment 
and tax benefits of home ownership. 

Come see for yourself. Call (617) 
329-4433 today while preferred 
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Sponsored in part by The Massachusetts General Hospital Health Services Corp. 



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Pastene Olive Oil helps turn meals into masterpieces. 

So support the arts and stock up with Pastene. 

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110th Season 

19 9 0-91 




Boston Symphony Orches 

Selji Ozawa, Music Director 



90th Anniversary of Symphony Hall 



Only the few 
Will Ow an aijdemars 





Classic Straps: Automatic Perpetual Calendar: 

with date and second-hand in 18K gold. Day, date, month and moon phase in 18K gold. 



v/nly the few will seek the exclusivity that comes with owning 
an Audemars Piguet. Only the few will recognize jn 

more than a century of technical in- /il 

novation; today, that innovation is /Ill/I ATTI Q 1*0 flllTHA'i" 
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tion of our perpetual calendars, and more recently, our dramatic 
new watch with dual time zones. Only the few will appreciate The CEO 
Collection which includes a unique selection of the finest Swiss watches 
man can create. Audemars Piguet makes only a limited number of watches 
each year. But then, that's something only the few will understand. 



SHREVECRUMP &WW 

JEWELERS SINCE 1800 

330BOYLSTON ST., BOSTON, MASS. 02116 (617)267-9100 « 1-800-225-7088 
THE MALL AT CHESTNUT HILL • SOUTH SHORE PLAZA 






iVSfl 



%m 




Seiji Ozawa, Music Director 
Grant Llewellyn and Robert Spano, 

Assistant Conductors 
One Hundred and Tenth Season, 1990-91 



Trustees of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Inc. 



Nelson J. Darling, Jr., Chairman Emeritus 

J. P. Barger, Chairman 

Mrs. Lewis S. Dabney, Vice-Chairman 

Mrs. John H. Fitzpatrick, Vice-Chairman 



George H. Kidder, President 

Archie C. Epps, Vice-Chairman 

William J. Poorvu, Vice-Chairman and Treasurer 



David B. Arnold, Jr. 
Peter A. Brooke 
James F. Cleary 
John F. Cogan, Jr. 
Julian Cohen 
William M. Crozier, Jr. 
Mrs. Michael H. Davis 
Mrs. Eugene B. Doggett 

Trustees Emeriti 

Vernon R. Alden 
Philip K. Allen 
Allen G. Barry 
Leo L. Beranek 
Mrs. John M. Bradley 
Abram T. Collier 

Other Officers of the C 

John Ex Rodgers, Assistant 
Daniel R. Gustin, Clerk 



Avram J. Goldberg 
Mrs. R. Douglas Hall III 
Francis W. Hatch 
Julian T. Houston 
Mrs. Bela T. Kalman 
Mrs. George I. Kaplan 
Harvey Chet Krentzman 
R. Willis Leith, Jr. 



Mrs. Harris Fahnestock 
Mrs. John L. Grandin 
E. Morton Jennings, Jr. 
Edward M. Kennedy 
Albert L. Nickerson 
Thomas D. Perry, Jr. 

orporation 

Treasurer Michael G. 



Mrs. August R. Meyer 
Mrs. Robert B. Newman 
Peter C. Read 
Richard A. Smith 
Ray Stata 

William F. Thompson 
Nicholas T. Zervas 



Irving W. Rabb 
Mrs. George R. Rowland 
Mrs. George Lee Sargent 
Sidney Stoneman 
John Hoyt Stookey 
John L. Thorndike 



McDonough, Assistant Treasurer 



Administration 

Kenneth Haas, Managing Director 

Daniel R. Gustin, Assistant Managing Director and Manager of Tanglmvood 

Michael G. McDonough, Director of Finance and Business Affairs 

Evans Mirageas, Artistic Administrator 

Anne H. Parsons, Orchestra Manager 

Caroline Smedvig, Director of Public Relations and Marketing 

Josiah Stevenson, Director of Development 



Robert Bell, Manager of 

Information Systems 
Peter N. Cerundolo, Director of 

Corporate Development 
Madelyne Cuddeback, Director of 

Corporate Sponsorships 
Patricia Forbes Halligan, Personnel 

Administrator 
Sarah J. Harrington, Budget Manager 
Margaret Hillyard-Lazenby, 

Director of Volunteers 
Russell M. Hodsdon, Manager of Box Office 
Bernadette M. Horgan, Public Relations 

Coordinator 
Craig R. Kaplan, Controller 
Nancy A. Kay, Director of Sales & 

Marketing Manager 
John M. Keenum, Director of 

Tanglewood Music Center Development 



Patricia Krol, Coordinator of Youth Activities 
Steven Ledbetter, Musicologist & 

Program Annotator 
Michelle R. Leonard, Media and Production 

Manager, Boston Symphony Orchestra 
Marc Mandel, Publications Coordinator 
John C. Marksbury, Director of 

Foundation and Government Support 
Julie-Anne Miner, Manager of Fund 

Reporting 
Richard Ortner, Administrator of 

Tanglewood Music Center 
Scott Schillin, Assistant Manager, 

Pops and Youth Activities 
Joyce M. Serwitz, Director of Major Gifts/ 

Assistant Director of Development 
Cheryl L. Silvia, Function Manager 
Susan E. Tomlin, Director of Annual Giving 



Programs copyright ©1990 Boston Symphony Orchestra, Inc. 
erjising, Inc./Cover photo by Ira Wyman 



,."■•'."".;■"'■■"■'■■ 



Board of Overseers of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Inc. 

John F. Cogan, Jr., Chairman 

Mrs. Ray A. Goldberg, Vice-Chairman 

Mrs. R. Douglas Hall III, Secretary 



Mrs. Herbert B. Abelow 

Harlan Anderson 

Mrs. David Bakalar 

Bruce A. Beal 

Mrs. Leo L. Beranek 

Lynda Schubert Bodman 

Donald C. Bowersock, Jr. 

William M. Bulger 

Mrs. Levin H. Campbell 

Earle M. Chiles 

Mrs. C. Thomas Clagett, Jr. 

James F. Cleary 

William H. Congleton 

William F. Connell 

Walter J. Connolly, Jr. 

S. James Coppersmith 

Albert C. Cornelio 

Phyllis Curtin 

Alex V. d Arbeloff 

Phyllis Dohanian 

Hugh Downs 

Goetz B. Eaton 

Edward Eskandarian 

Katherine Fanning 

Peter M. Flanigan 

Dean Freed 

Eugene M. Freedman 

Peter H.B. Frelinghuysen 

Mrs. James Garivaltis 

Mark R. Goldweitz 



Haskell R. Gordon 

Steven Grossman 

John P. Hamill 

Daphne P. Hatsopoulos 

Joe M. Henson 

Mrs. Marilyn Brachman Hoffman 

Ronald A. Homer 

Julian T. Houston 

Lola Jaffe 

Anna Faith Jones 

H. Eugene Jones 

Susan B. Kaplan 

Mrs. S. Charles Kasdon 

Richard L. Kaye 

Robert D. King 

Mrs. Gordon F. Kingsley 

Allen Z. Kluchman 

Koji Kobayashi 

Mrs. Carl Koch 

David I. Kosowsky 

Robert K. Kraft 

George Krupp 

Mrs. Hart D. Leavitt 

Laurence Lesser 

Stephen R. Levy 

Frederick H. Lovejoy, Jr. 

Mrs. Charles P. Lyman 

Mrs. Harry L. Marks 

C. Charles Marran 

Nathan R. Miller 



Mrs. Thomas S. Morse 

Richard P. Morse 

E. James Morton 

David G. Mugar 

David S. Nelson 

Mrs. Hiroshi H. Nishino 

Robert P. O'Block 

Paul C. O'Brien 

Vincent M. O'Reilly 

Walter H. Palmer 

Andrall E. Pearson 

John A. Perkins 

Daphne Brooks Prout 

Millard H. Pryor, Jr. 

Keizo Saji 

Roger A. Saunders 

Mrs. Raymond H. Schneider 

Mark L. Selkowitz 

Malcolm L. Sherman 

Mrs. Donald B. Sinclair 

W. Davies Sohier, Jr. 

Ralph Z. Sorenson 

Ira Stepanian 

Mrs. Arthur I. Strang 

Mark Tishler, Jr. 

Roger D. Wellington 

Robert A. Wells 

Mrs. Thomas H.P. Whitney 

Margaret Williams-DeCelles 

Mrs. John J. Wilson 



Overseers Emeriti 

Mrs. Weston W. Adams 
Mrs. Frank G. Allen 
Mrs. Richard Bennink 
Mary Louise Cabot 
Johns H. Congdon 
Mrs. Thomas J. Galligan 
Mrs. Richard D. Hill 
Susan M. Hilles 



Mrs. Louis I. Kane 
Leonard Kaplan 
Benjamin H. Lacy 
Mrs. James F. Lawrence 
Hanae Mori 

Mrs. Stephen V.C. Morris 
Stephen Paine, Sr. 
David R. Pokross 



Mrs. Peter van S. Rice 
Mrs. Jerome Rosenfeld 
Mrs. William C. Rousseau 
Francis P. Sears, Jr. 
Mrs. Edward S. Stimpson 
Mrs. Richard H. Thompson 
Luise Vosgerchian 
Mrs. Donald B. Wilson 



Symphony Hall Operations 

Robert L. Gleason, Facilities Manager 
James E. Whitaker, House Manager 

Cleveland Morrison, Stage Manager 

Franklin Smith, Supervisor of House Crew 

Wilmoth A. Griffiths, Assistant Supervisor of House Crew 

William D. McDonnell, Chief Steward 

H.R. Costa, Lighting 



:.■-■■■■■■■■ 




Officers of the Boston Symphony Association of Volunteers 

Susan D. Hall, President 

Thelma E. Goldberg, Executive Vice-President 

Joan Erhard, Secretary 

Patricia A. Maddox, Treasurer 

Betty Sweitzer, Nominating Chairman 



Vice-Presidents 

Helen Doyle, Hall Services 
Goetz B. Eaton, Fundraising 
Charles W. Jack, Adult Education 
Pat Jensen, Membership 
Maureen Hickey, Tanglewood 

Chairmen of Regions 

Krista Kamborian Baldini 
Judy Clark 
Joan Erhard 
Bettina Harrison 



Marilyn Larkin, Tanglewood 

Patricia A. Newton, Regions 

Carol Scheifele-Holmes, Public Relations 

F. Preston Wilson, Development 

Pat Woolley, Youth Activities 



Helen Lahage 
Paula Murphy 
Pamela S. Nugent 



Beverly J. Pieper 
Patricia L. Tambone 
Arline Ziner 



Business and Professional Leadership Association 
Board of Directors 



Harvey Chet Krentzman, Chairman 



James F. Cleary, BPLA President 



Members 

J. P. Barger 
Leo L. Beranek 
William F. Connell 
Nelson J. Darling, Jr. 



Thelma E. Goldberg 
Joe M. Henson 
George H. Kidder 
Vincent M. O'Reilly 



Malcolm L. Sherman 
Ray Stata 
Stephen J. Sweeney 
Roger D. Wellington 



Special thanks to the National Endowment for the Arts and the Massachusetts 
Cultural Council for their continued support of the Boston Symphony Orchestra. 



Celebrating the 90th Anniversary of Symphony Hall 




On display in the first-floor Huntington Avenue corridor of the Cohen Wing is an archival 
exhibit celebrating the 90th anniversary of Symphony Hall. In addition to newspaper accounts 
of the building's opening in 1900, the exhibit includes period photographs and a tribute to 
acoustician Wallace Clement Sabine. 

Articles on various aspects of Symphony Hall will be featured in the BSO program book 
throughout the season. The cover photograph shows the cartouche directly above the 
Symphony Hall stage. Whereas numerous European halls traditionally highlighted various 
composers' names, Beethoven became the only composer whose name was inscribed on any of 
the plaques that trim the stage and balconies of Symphony Hall. The others were left empty 
since, at the time the Hall was opened, it was felt that only Beethoven's popularity would 
remain unchanged. 



References furnished 
on request 



Armenta Adams 
American Ballet Theater 
Michael Barrett 
John Bayless 
Leonard Bernstein 
William Bolcom 
Jorge Bolet 

Boston Pops Orchestra 
Boston Symphony 

Chamber Players 
Boston Symphony 

Orchestra 
Boston University School 

of Music 
Brooklyn Philharmonic 
Dave Bruheck 
Aaron Copland 
John Corigliano 
Phyllis Cur tin 
Rian de Waal 
Michael Feinstein 
Lukas Foss 
Philip Glass 
Karl Haas 
John F. Kennedy Center 

for Performing Arts 



David Korevaar 
Garah Landes 
Micha el Lpikester 
Elyane Laussade 
Marion McPartland 
John Nauman 
Seiji Ozawa 
Luciano Pavarotti 
Alexander Peskanov 
Andre Previn 
Steve Reich 
Santiago Rodriguez 
George Shearing 
Bright Sheng 
Leonard Shure 
Ahhey Simon 
Stephen Sondheim 
Herbert Stessin 
Tanglewood Music 

Center 
Nelita True 
Craig Urquhart 
Earl Wild 
John Williams 
Yehudi Wyner 
and 200 others 



BALDWIN 

OF 

BOSTON 

98 Boylston, Boston, MA 02116, (617) 482-2525 




BSO 



The Refurbished Cohen Wing Opens 

The Boston Symphony Orchestra is pleased to 
celebrate the 90th anniversary of Symphony 
Hall with the completion of a $7.2 million ren- 
ovation program. Carried out by architects 
Crissman & Solomon of Watertown, Massachu- 
setts, the work has resulted in a skillful and 
beautiful union of the historic McKim, Mead & 
White structure and the adjacent Cohen Wing, 
named in honor of Julian and Eunice Cohen, 
whose generosity made possible the purchase 
of the building ten years ago. Without interfer- 
ing with the auditorium or its famed acoustics, 
the improvements provide spacious new facili- 
ties for public functions, a new home for the 
Symphony Shop, additional restrooms and 
wheelchair-accessible facilities, an additional 
coatroom, and offices for administrative staff. 
The two buildings are linked by a stairway and 
elevator at all levels. The renovation was 
financed entirely by private donations. Our 
thanks go to the Symphony Hall Renovation 
Campaign co-chairmen Frank Hatch and Bill 
Leith and to the countless donors and volun- 
teers whose generosity and leadership has 
made the BSO's home shine with new luster. 

In addition to patron amenities, the first 
floor of the Cohen Wing provides a handsome 
new home for the BSO's Casadesus Collection 
of Ancient Instruments, which was given to the 
orchestra in 1926 by Henri Casadesus, foundei 
of the French Society of Ancient Instruments. 
During the renovation of the Cohen Wing the 
collection was taken to the Museum of Fine 
Arts for restoration. 

Symphony Spotlight 

This is one in a series of biographical sketches 
that focus on some of the generous individuals 
who have endowed chairs in the Boston Sym- 
phony Orchestra. Their backgrounds are varied, 
but each felt a special commitment to the Bos- 
ton Symphony Orchestra. 

Margaret and William C. Rousseau Chair 

William C. Rousseau received his M.S. from 
M.I.T. in 1936 and went to work for E.B. 
Badger & Sons. His first assignment, to 
Abdan, Iran, led to a productive and fulfilling 
career. He is currently a semor visiting lec- 



turer emeritus with the chemical engineering 
department at M.I.T. Margaret Rousseau says 
that having been taken at the age of four to 
hear Galli-Curci ignited in her an appreciation 
for fine music and live performances. After 
receiving two degrees at Rice University, she, 
too, attended M.I.T., where she became the 
first woman at M.I.T. to receive a doctor of 
science degree in chemical engineering. "I 
found myself paired with William on a number 
of projects," she recaUs, "and two years later 
the pairing became official for life." The Rous- 
seaus attended Symphony concerts for some 
time, but it was volunteer work for the orches- 
tra that brought them to a new awareness of 
the BSO's joys and needs. With the centennial 
drive, they found themselves ready to make the 
important gift of an endowed chair. Their gift 
endowed the tuba position, currently held by 
Chester Schmitz. 

Art Exhibits in the Cabot-Cahners Room 

For the seventeenth year, a variety of Boston 
area galleries, museums, schools, and non- 
profit artists' organizations are exhibiting their 
work in the Cabot-Cahners Room on the first- 
balcony level of Symphony Hall. On display 
through October 19 are works from the Copley 
Society, the country' s oldest nonprofit art asso- 
ciation. This exhibit will be followed by works 
from the Carnegie Hall Photo Exhibition 
(October 22-November 19) and works from the 
Dyansen Gallery (November 19-December 14). 
These exhibits are sponsored by the Boston 
Symphony Association of Volunteers, and a 
portion of each sale benefits the orchestra. 
Please contact the Volunteer Office at 
(617) 638-9390, for further information. 

The Symphony Shop Celebrates the New 
BSO Season in a New Location 

Now in an attractive street-level storefront 
location at Symphony Hall's West Entrance on 
Huntington Avenue, the new, expanded Sym- 
phony Shop opened its doors for the 1990 
Opening Night at Pops concert. The Shop con- 
tinues to offer exclusive Boston Symphony and 
Boston Pops merchandise as well as recordings 
and other items with a musical motif. Business 
was brisk throughout the Pops season, and the 
BSAV anticipates a successful fall. One special 
piece of new merchandise is itself worth a visit 
to the Shop — an exquisite Swiss music box 




©1990 Peugeot Motors of America, Inc. 



*Based on R. L. Polk & Co. owner retention study of 'MY 1984- 1986. 




G E T 



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at a glance. 

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richly rewarded. They'll discover a distinctive European automobile whose rare 
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that is the only one of its kind available in the 
United States. Crafted by the Reuge Music 
Company, the music box is made of rosewood 
with a Chinese lacquer finish. The box plays 
Viennese waltzes every hour on the hour, and 
the interior of the box lights up to reveal three 
elegant dancers, costumed in handmade 
dresses of silk, feathers, and pearls. Notewor- 
thy for its musical precision as well, the music 
box features two combs that provide 142 notes. 
If you are not able to visit the Shop on the 
hour, you can activate the music at any time 
with a quarter. Other new merchandise 
includes the 1991 BSO datebook and address 
book, both leatherbound, a Quill pen, clothing 
in such fashion colors as teal, magenta, water- 
melon, and jade, and the return, by popular 
demand, of the black t-shirt and sweatshirt 
with gold foil colophon. The Symphony Shop is 
open Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday from 11 
a.m. to 3 p.m., Saturday from 1 p.m. to 6 
p.m., and from one hour before every Sym- 
phony Hall concert through intermission. 

Suppers at Symphony Hall 

The Boston Symphony Association of Volun- 
teers is pleased to continue its sponsorship of 
the BSO's evening series of pre-concert events. 
"Supper Talks" combine a buffet supper at 
6:30 p.m. in the Cohen Wing's Higginson Hall 
with an informative talk by a BSO player or 
other distinguished member of the music com- 
munity. "Supper Concerts" offer a chamber 
music performance given by members of the 
Boston Symphony Orchestra in the Cabot- 
Cahners Room at 6 p.m., followed by a buffet 
supper served in Higginson Hall. Doors open 
for all Suppers at 5:30 p.m. for a la carte 
cocktails and conversation. These events are 
offered on an individual basis, even to those 
who are not attending that evening's BSO con- 
cert. Speakers for upcoming Supper Talks 
include the BSO's part-time archivist Janet 
Hayashi (Thursday, October 25), BSO Artistic 
Administrator Evans Mirageas (Tuesday, Octo- 
ber 30), and Darcy Kuronen, Curatorial Assis- 
tant, Collection of Musical Instruments, 
Museum of Fine Arts (Thursday, November 
1). Upcoming Supper Concerts will feature 
music of Brahms and Takemitsu (October 4 



and 9), music of Schubert (October 11 and 
16), and music of Beethoven and Haydn 
(November 3). The suppers are priced at $22 
per person for an individual event, $61 for any 
three, or $118 for any six. Advance reserva- 
tions must be made by mail. For reservations 
the week of the supper, please call (617) 
638-9390. All reservations must be made at 
least 48 hours prior to the supper. For further 
information, please call (617) 266-1492, 
ext. 516. 

BSO Members in Concert 

BSO associate concertmaster Tamara 
Smirnova-Sajfar will perform the Tchaikovsky 
Violin Concerto with the Wellesley Symphony 
Orchestra on Sunday, October 28, at 3 p.m. at 
Massachusetts Bay Community College, 50 
Oakland Street in Wellesley Hills, near the 
junction of Rtes. 16 and 9. Robert Prins con- 
ducts a program also including Dvorak's 
Carnival Overture and Mozart's Symphony 
No. 41, Jupiter. Tickets are priced from $6 to 
$8. Call (617) 444-0091 or 431-1314 for fur- 
ther information. 

The John Oliver Chorale opens its 1990-91 
subscription season with Swiss composer 
Frank Martin's Requiem and the United States 
premiere of Martin's Pilate on Saturday, 
November 3, at 8 p.m. at St. Paul's Church in 
Cambridge, at Bow and Arrow streets. The 
soloists are soprano Dominique Labelle, mezzo- 
soprano Gloria Raymond, tenor Paul Kirby, 
baritone Paul Rowe, and bass Donald Wilkin- 
son. Single tickets are $20, $14, and $5; sea- 
son subscriptions are also available. For fur- 
ther information, call (617) 325-0886. 

Ronald Knudsen leads the Newton Sym- 
phony Orchestra in the opening concert of its 
25th Anniversary Season on Sunday, Novem- 
ber 4, at 8 p.m. at Aquinas Junior College, 
15 Walnut Park in Newton. Sanford Sylvan is 
soloist in the world premiere of Charles Fus- 
sell's Wilde, a Symphony for Baritone and 
Orchestra, commissioned by the Newton Sym- 
phony Orchestra, on a program also including 
the Mussorgsky/Ravel Pictures at an Exhibi- 
tion. Single tickets are $14 and $12; season 
subscriptions are also available. Call 
(617) 965-2555 for further information. 



Seiji Ozawa 





Now in his eighteenth year as music 
director of the Boston Symphony Orches- 
tra, Seiji Ozawa was named the BSO's 
thirteenth music director in 1973, follow- 
ing a year as music adviser. His many 
tours with the orchestra in Europe, Japan, 
and throughout the United States have 
included the orchestra's first tour devoted 
exclusively to appearances at the major 
European music festivals, in 1979; four 
visits to Japan; and, to celebrate the 
orchestra's centennial in 1981, a fourteen- 
city American tour and an international 
tour to Japan, France, Germany, Austria, 
and England. In March 1979 Mr. Ozawa 
and the Boston Symphony Orchestra made 
an historic visit to China for a significant 
musical exchange entailing coaching, 
study, and discussion sessions with Chi- 
nese musicians, as well as concert perform- 
ances, becoming the first American per- 
forming ensemble to visit China since the 
establishment of diplomatic relations. In 
December 1988 he and the orchestra gave 
eleven concerts during a two-week tour to 
England, the Netherlands, France, Ger- 
many, Austria, and Belgium. In December 
1989 Mr. Ozawa and the orchestra trav- 
eled to Japan for the fourth time, on a 
tour that also included the orchestra's first 
concerts in Hong Kong. 

Mr. Ozawa's recent recordings for Phil- 
ips with the Boston Symphony Orchestra 



include Richard Strauss's Elektra, recorded 
during concert performances at Symphony 
Hall in Boston with Hildegard Behrens in 
the title role; and Mahler's First, Second 
(Resurrection), and Fourth symphonies, 
part of a continuing Mahler cycle on Phil- 
ips that also includes the Symphony No. 8 
(Symphony of a Thousand). Mahler's 
Fifth, Seventh, and Ninth symphonies, and 
his Kindertotenlieder, with Jessye Norman, 
have been recorded for future release. Mr. 
Ozawa's recent recordings with the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra for Deutsche Gram- 
mophon include Poulenc's Gloria and Sta- 
bat mater with soprano Kathleen Battle 
and the Tanglewood Festival Chorus, the 
two Liszt piano concertos and Totentanz 
with Krystian Zimerman, an album of 
music by Gabriel Faure, and "Gaite parisi- 
enne," an album of music by Offenbach, 
Gounod, Chabrier, and Thomas. Other 
Deutsche Grammophon releases include 
Prokofiev's complete Romeo and Juliet, 
Berlioz's Romeo et Juliette and Damnation 
of Faust, and, with Itzhak Perlman, an 
award-winning album of the Berg and 
Stravinsky violin concertos. Also available 
are Schoenberg's Gurrelieder, on Philips; 
the complete Beethoven piano concertos 
with Rudolf Serkin, on Telarc; the Dvorak 
Cello Concerto with Mstislav Rostropovich 
and Tchaikovsky's Pathetique Symphony, 
on Erato; Strauss's Don Quixote and the 
Schoenberg/Monn Cello Concerto with 
Yo-Yo Ma, the Mendelssohn Violin Con- 
certo with Isaac Stern, and Berlioz's Les 
Nuits d'ete with Frederica von Stade, on 
CBS Masterworks; and Stravinsky's Fire- 
bird, on EMI/Angel. 

Mr. Ozawa pursues an active interna- 
tional career, appearing regularly with the 
Berlin Philharmonic, the Orchestre de 
Paris, the French National Orchestra, the 
Vienna Philharmonic, the Philharmonia of 
London, and the New Japan Philharmonic. 
Recent appearances conducting opera have 
included La Scala, Salzburg, the Vienna 
Staatsoper, and the Paris Opera; he has 
also conducted at Covent Garden. In 1983, 
at the Paris Opera, he conducted the world 



premiere of Olivier Messiaen's St. Francis 
ofAssisi. In addition to his many Boston 
Symphony Orchestra recordings, he has 
recorded with the Berlin Philharmonic, the 
London Philharmonic, the Philharmonia of 
London, the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, 
the Orchestre National, the Orchestre de 
Paris, the San Francisco Symphony, and 
the Toronto Symphony Orchestra, among 
others. His opera recordings include 
Bizet's Carmen with Jessye Norman and 
the Orchestre National, on Philips, and 
Les Contes d 'Hoffmann with Placido Dom- 
ingo and Edita Gruberova, on Deutsche 
Grammophon. 

Born in 1935 in Shenyang, China, to 
Japanese parents, Seiji Ozawa studied 
Western music as a child and later gradu- 
ated with first prizes in composition and 
conducting from Tokyo's Toho School of 
Music, where he was a student of Hideo 
Saito. In 1959 he won first prize at the 
International Competition of Orchestra 
Conductors held in Besancon, France, and 
was invited to Tanglewood by Charles 
Munch, then music director of the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra and a judge at the 
competition. In 1960 he won the Tangle- 
wood Music Center's highest honor, the 
Koussevitzky Prize for outstanding student 
conductor. 



While a student of Herbert von Karajan 
in West Berlin, Mr. Ozawa came to the 
attention of Leonard Bernstein. He accom- 
panied Mr. Bernstein on the New York 
Philharmonic's 1961 tour of Japan and 
was made an assistant conductor of that 
orchestra for the 1961-62 season. In Janu- 
ary 1962 he made his first professional 
concert appearance in North America, with 
the San Francisco Symphony. Mr. Ozawa 
was music director of the Chicago Sym- 
phony Orchestra's Ravinia Festival for five 
summers beginning in 1964, music director 
of the Toronto Symphony Orchestra from 
1965 to 1969, and music director of the 
San Francisco Symphony from 1970 to 
1976, followed by a year as that orches- 
tra's music advisor. He conducted the 
Boston Symphony Orchestra for the first 
time at Tanglewood, in 1964, and made 
his first Symphony Hall appearance with 
the orchestra in 1968. In 1970 he was 
named an artistic director of the Tangle- 
wood Festival. 

Mr. Ozawa holds honorary doctor of 
music degrees from the University of 
Massachusetts, the New England Conser- 
vatory of Music, and Wheaton College in 
Norton, Massachusetts. He has won an 
Emmy for the Boston Symphony Orches- 
tra's "Evening at Symphony" PBS televi- 
sion series. 






Music Directorship endowed by 
John Moors Cabot 

BOSTON SYMPHONY 

ORCHESTRA 

1990-91 

First Violins 

Malcolm Lowe 

Concertmaster 
Charles Munch chair 

Tamara Smirnova-Sajfar 

Associate Concertmaster 
Helen Horner Mclntyre chair 

Max Hobart 

Assistant Concertmaster 

Robert L. Beal, and 

Enid L. and Bruce A. Beal chair 

Lucia Lin 

Assistant Concertmaster 

Edward and Bertha C Rose chair 

Bo Youp Hwang 

John and Dorothy Wilson chair, 
fully funded in perpetuity 

Max Winder 

Forrest Foster Collier chair 

Fredy Ostrovsky 

Dorothy Q. and David B. Arnold, Jr., 
chair, fully funded in perpetuity 

Gottfried Wilfinger 



* Participating in a system of rotated 
seating within each string section 
%0n sabbatical leave 



Leo Panasevich 

Carolyn and George Rowland chair 

Sheldon Rotenberg 

Muriel C. Kasdon and 
Marjorie C. Paley chair 

Alfred Schneider 
Raymond Sird 
Ikuko Mizuno 
Amnon Levy 

Second Violins 

Marylou Speaker Churchill 

Fahnestock chair 

Vyacheslav Uritsky 

Charlotte and Irving W. Rabb chair 

Ronald Knudsen 

Edgar and Shirley Grossman chair 

Joseph McGauley 
Leonard Moss 

* Harvey Seigel 
*Jerome Rosen 

* Sheila Fiekowsky 
Ronan Lefkowitz 

* Nancy Bracken 
*Jennie Shames 
*Aza Raykhtsaum 
*Valeria Vilker Kuchment 
*Bonnie Bewick 
*Tatiana Dimitriades 
*James Cooke 
*Si-Jing Huang 

Violas 

Burton Fine 

Charles S. Dana chair 

Patricia McCarty 

Anne Stoneman chair, 
fully funded in perpetuity 

tRonald Wilkison 

Lois and Harlan Anderson chair 

Robert Barnes 




10 



I ^H 




Jerome Lipson 
Joseph Pietropaolo 
Michael Zaretsky 
Mare Jeanneret 
*Mark Ludwig 

* Rachel Fagerburg 

* Edward Gazouleas 

Cellos 

Jules Eskin 

Philip R. Allen chair 

Martha Babcock 

Vernon and Marion Alden chair 

Sato Knudsen 

Esther S. and Joseph M. Shapiro chair 

Joel Moerschel 

Sandra and David Bakalar chair 

* Robert Ripley 
Luis Leguia 

Robert Bradford Newman chair 

$Carol Procter 

Lillian and Nathan R. Miller chair 

* Ronald Feldman 

Charles and JoAnne Dickinson chair 

* Jerome Patterson 

* Jonathan Miller 

Basses 

Edwin Barker 

Harold D. Hodgkinson chair 

Lawrence Wolfe 

Maria Nistazos Stata chair, 
fully funded in perpetuity 

Joseph Hearne 
Bela Wurtzler 
John Salkowski 

* Robert Olson 
*James Orleans 
*Todd Seeber 
*John Stovall 

Flutes 



Walter Piston chair 

Leone Buyse 

Acting Principal Flute 
Marian Gray Lewis chair 

Fenwick Smith 

Myra and Robert Kraft chair 

Piccolo 

Geralyn Coticone 

Evelyn and C. Charles Marran chair 



Oboes 

Alfred Genovese 

Mildred B. Remis chair 

Wayne Rapier 
Keisuke Wakao 

English Horn 

Laurence Thorstenberg 

Beranek chair, 

fully funded in perpetuity 

Clarinets 

Harold Wright 

Ann S.M. Banks chair 

Thomas Martin 

Bass Clarinet 

Craig Nordstrom 

Farla and Harvey Chet 
Krentzman chair 

Bassoons 

Richard Svoboda 

Edward A. Taft chair 

Roland Small 
Richard Ranti 

Contrabassoon 

Richard Plaster 

Helen Rand Thayer chair 

Horns 

Charles Kavalovski 

Helen Sagojf Slosberg chair 

Richard Sebring 

Margaret Andersen Congleton chair 

Daniel Katzen 
Jay Wadenpfuhl 
Richard Mackey 
Jonathan Menkis 

Trumpets 

Charles Schlueter 

Roger Louis Voisin chair 

Peter Chapman 

Ford H. Cooper chair 

Timothy Morrison 
Steven Emery 



Trombones 

Ronald Barron 

J. P. and Mary B. Barger chair, 
fully funded in perpetuity 

Norman Bolter 

Bass Trombone 

Douglas Yeo 

Tuba 

Chester Schmitz 

Margaret and William C. 
Rousseau chair 

Timpani 

Everett Firth 

Sylvia Shippen Wells chair 

Percussion 

Arthur Press 

Assistant Timpanist 
Peter Andrew Lurie chair 

Thomas Gauger 

Peter and Anne Brooke chair 

Frank Epstein 

Harp 

Ann Hobson Pilot 

Willona Henderson Sinclair chair 

Sara Schuster Ericsson 



Personnel Managers 

Lynn Larsen 
Harry Shapiro 

Librarians 

Marshall Burlingame 
William Shisler 
James Harper 

Stage Manager 

Position endowed by 
Angelica Lloyd Clagett 

Alfred Robison 



11 





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the same kind of devotion to our work that Duke Ellington did to his. 

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For more information or to see samples of our work, give 
us a call. You'll find we're playing your song. 

The proof is in the performance. 

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Phone: (617) 848-9090 • Fax: (617) 843-5540 

12 




1 



, 



A Brief History of the Boston Symphony Orchestra 



Now in its 110th season, the Boston Sym- 
phony Orchestra gave its inaugural concert 
on October 22, 1881, and has continued to 
uphold the vision of its founder, the philan- 
thropist, Civil War veteran, and amateur 
musician Henry Lee Higginson, for more 
than a century. Under the leadership of Seiji 
Ozawa, its music director since 1973, the 
Boston Symphony Orchestra has performed 
throughout the United States, as well as in 
Europe, Japan, and China, and it reaches 
audiences numbering in the millions through 
its performances on radio, television, and 
recordings. It plays an active role in com- 
missioning new works from today's most 
important composers; its summer season at 
Tanglewood is regarded as one of the most 
important music festivals in the world; it 
helps to develop the audience of the future 
through the Boston Symphony Youth Con- 
certs and through a variety of outreach pro- 
grams involving the entire Boston commu- 
nity; and, during the Tanglewood season, it 
sponsors one of the world's most important 
training grounds for young composers, con- 
ductors, instrumentalists, and vocalists, the 
Tanglewood Music Center, which celebrated 
its fiftieth anniversary this past summer. 
The orchestra's virtuosity is reflected in 
the concert and recording activities of the 
Boston Symphony Chamber Players — the 
world's only permanent chamber ensemble 
made up of a major symphony orchestra's 



principal players — and the activities of the 
Boston Pops Orchestra have established an 
international standard for the performance 
of lighter kinds of music. Overall, the mis- 
sion of the Boston Symphony Orchestra is 
to foster and maintain an organization dedi- 
cated to the making of music consonant 
with the highest aspirations of musical art, 
creating performances and providing educa- 
tional and training programs at the highest 
level of excellence. This is accomplished with 
the continued support of its audiences, 
governmental assistance on both the federal 
and local levels, and through the generosity 
of many foundations, businesses, and 
individuals. 

Henry Lee Higginson dreamed of found- 
ing a great and permanent orchestra in his 
home town of Boston for many years before 
that vision approached reality in the spring 
of 1881. The following October, the first 
Boston Symphony Orchestra concert was 
given under the direction of conductor Georg 
Henschel, who would remain as music direc- 
tor until 1884. For nearly twenty years Bos- 
ton Symphony concerts were held in the Old 
Boston Music Hall; Symphony Hall, the 
orchestra's present home, and one of the 
world's most highly regarded concert halls, 
was opened in 1900. Henschel was suc- 
ceeded by a series of German-born and 
-trained conductors — Wilhelm Gericke, 
Arthur Nikisch, Emil Paur, and Max 




The first photograph, actually a collage, of the Boston Symphony .Orchestra under Georg Henschel, 
taken 1882 



13 



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Fiedler — culminating in the appointment of 
the legendary Karl Muck, who served two 
tenures as music director, 1906-08 and 
1912-18. Meanwhile, in July 1885, the 
musicians of the Boston Symphony had 
given their first "Promenade" concert, offer- 
ing both music and refreshments, and ful- 
filling Major Higginson's wish to give "con- 
certs of a lighter kind of music." These 
concerts, soon to be given in the springtime 
and renamed first "Popular" and then 
"Pops," fast became a tradition. 

In 1915 the orchestra made its first 
transcontinental trip, playing thirteen con- 
certs at the Panama-Pacific Exposition in 
San Francisco. Recording, begun with RCA 
in 1917, continued with increasing fre- 
quency, as did radio broadcasts. In 1918 
Henri Rabaud was engaged as conductor; he 
was succeeded a year later by Pierre Mon- 
teux. These appointments marked the begin- 
ning of a French-oriented tradition that 
would be maintained, even during the 
Russian-born Serge Koussevitzky' s time, 
with the employment of many French- 
trained musicians. 

The Koussevitzky era began in 1924. His 
extraordinary musicianship and electric per- 
sonality proved so enduring that he served 
an unprecedented term of twenty-five years. 
Regular radio broadcasts of Boston Sym- 
phony Orchestra concerts began during 
Koussevitzky' s years as music director. In 
1936 Koussevitzky led the orchestra's first 
concerts in the Berkshires; a year later he 
and the players took up annual summer res- 
idence at Tanglewood. Koussevitzky passion- 
ately shared Major Higginson's dream of "a 
good honest school for musicians," and in 
1940 that dream was realized with the 
founding of the Berkshire Music Center 
(now called the Tanglewood Music Center). 

In 1929 the free Esplanade concerts on 
the Charles River in Boston were inaugu- 
rated by Arthur Fiedler, who had been a 
member of the orchestra since 1915 and 
who in 1930 became the eighteenth conduc- 
tor of the Boston Pops, a post he would 
hold for half a century, to be succeeded by 
John Williams in 1980. The Boston Pops 
Orchestra celebrated its hundredth birthday 
in 1985 under Mr. Williams's baton. 



Charles Munch followed Koussevitzky as 
music director in 1949. Munch continued 
Koussevitzky' s practice of supporting con- 
temporary composers and introduced much 
music from the French repertory to this 
country. During his tenure the orchestra 
toured abroad for the first time and its con- 
tinuing series of Youth Concerts was initi- 
ated. Erich Leinsdorf began his seven-year 
term as music director in 1962. Mr. Leins- 
dorf presented numerous premieres, restored 
many forgotten and neglected works to the 
repertory, and, like his two predecessors, 
made many recordings for RCA; in addition, 
many concerts were televised under his 
direction. Leinsdorf was also an energetic 
director of the Tanglewood Music Center, 
and under his leadership a full-tuition fel- 
lowship program was established. Also dur- 
ing these years, in 1964, the Boston Sym- 
phony Chamber Players were founded. 

William Steinberg succeeded Leinsdorf in 
1969. He conducted a number of American 
and world premieres, made recordings for 
Deutsche Grammophon and RCA, appeared 
regularly on television, led the 1971 Euro- 
pean tour, and directed concerts on the east 
coast, in the south, and in the mid-west. 

Seiji Ozawa, an artistic director of the 
Tanglewood Festival since 1970, became the 
orchestra's thirteenth music director in the 
fall of 1973, following a year as music 
adviser. Now in his eighteenth year as music 
director, Mr. Ozawa has continued to solid- 
ify the orchestra's reputation at home and 
abroad, and he has reaffirmed the orches- 
tra's commitment to new music through a 
series of centennial commissions marking 
the orchestra's 100th birthday, a series of 
works celebrating the fiftieth anniversary of 
Tanglewood Music Center, and recent works 
commissioned from such prominent compos- 
ers as John Cage, Hans Werner Henze, 
Peter Lieberson, and Bernard Rands. Under 
his direction the orchestra has also expanded 
its recording activities to include releases on 
the Philips, Telarc, CBS, EMI/Angel, Hype- 
rion, New World, and Erato labels. 

Today, the Boston Symphony Orchestra, 
Inc., presents more than 250 concerts annu- 
ally. It is an ensemble that has richly ful- 
filled Higginson's vision of a great and per- 
manent orchestra in Boston. 



15 



■^■I^B^^^H 



Symphony Hall at 90 

A Timeless Gift to Bostonians 

by Robert Campbell 

Symphony Hall as a piece of architecture is so Bostonian it's almost a caricature. It 
begins by repeating the sacred, iconic brick and limestone of Harvard Yard and Bea- 
con Hill. Then it goes on to display, rather ostentatiously perhaps, a typical Boston 
refusal to be ostentatious. It comes to us in a plain brown wrapper of dark brick, a 
brown wrapping that conceals rather than advertises the sensuous, rhythmic delights 
of the music that is performed — as if secretly— deep inside. That dowdy wrapping 
reminds us of the Victorian matrons of Boston who kept their new dresses from Paris 
in the closet for a year so they wouldn't look too fashionable. Symphony Hall doesn't 
wish to look fashionable and it certainly doesn't want to look expensive. Its 
buttoned-up architecture tells us that it is a building that will be Good for Us, a 
venue for Culture, something to be taken quite seriously. 

The architect was one of the most famous in American history, Charles Follen McKim, 
a Pennsylvanian who came to town to work as a draftsman for an even greater archi- 
tect, Henry Hobson Richardson. McKim went off on his own in 1879 at age thirty- two 
to found a firm called McKim, Mead & White, the most successful of its era. McKim 
became virtually house architect for Harvard, designing such varied landmarks there 
as the stadium and the New York Harvard Club. In Copley Square, across from 
H.H. Richardson's famed Trinity Church, McKim outdid his mentor by designing the 
Boston Public Library, still today, perhaps, the city's greatest public building. And in 
1900, his Symphony Hall opened — to something less than universal acclaim. 

Critic William Apthorp of the Boston Transcript wrote, notoriously, "Expert con- 
demnations of the hall differ, as far as we have been able to discover, only in degrees 




Gracious. Glorious. 

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of violence." We must shudder at the impact so firm a judgment must have had on 
that newspaper's all-too-loyal subscribers, as we recall the lines of the young T.S. Eliot: 

The readers of the Boston Evening Transcript 
Sway in the wind like a field of ripe corn. 

As so often happens, the judgment of posterity differed from that early judgment. 
Acoustician and BSO Trustee Leo Beranek attributes the mistake to the fact that 
orchestras in the Hall's first years were simply too small — and therefore too faint — 
for so large a space. In any case, for many decades now, as everyone knows, Sym- 
phony Hall has been all but universally regarded as one of the three or four best halls 
in the world, acoustically speaking, for symphonic music. 

Architects soon learn that experiment is risky in their field. McKim's first proposal 
was an experiment: a circular hall, the shape of a Greek theater. It would have been 
an acoustical disaster, a truth that, luckily, was pointed out to the architect by Wal- 
lace Sabine, a young Harvard professor who was in the process, at that very moment, 
of founding the science of acoustics. Sabine recommended that the new hall should 
simply be a copy of some old one that worked — sound advice indeed. McKim's final 
proposal for the interior of Symphony Hall, therefore, was a very close imitation of 
the old Music Hall (now renovated as the Orpheum), in which the orchestra had pre- 
viously played. 

Much as everyone loves Symphony Hall's interior (despite its narrow and squeaky 
seats), few have been equally thrilled by the building's exterior. Typical is the com- 
ment of the current (1984) edition of the Blue Guide to Boston and Cambridge: "This 
is generally considered to be one of McKim's least-successful designs, principally 
because of the top-heavy facade and the overly massive Ionic portico that supports it." 





Symphony Hall during the 1939-40 season, before the Huntington Avenue underpass 
was constructed 



17 



McKim must have disliked the exterior himself, judging by the scant notice he gave 
it in his firm's many publications. The problem was that the donor, Henry Lee Hig- 
ginson, omitted most of McKim's proposed decorative program for the exterior — carv- 
ings, inscriptions, and architectural doodads of all kinds — in order to save money. 

But perhaps we needn't really regret that loss. The plainness of Symphony Hall's 
exterior, which has often been compared to an industrial warehouse or a train station, 
actually strengthens the compelling architectural concept of the building as a whole. 
It is a box inside a box. The outer box is a carton, but the inner box is a gift. The 
outer box is the brick shell. The inner box is the orchestra hall. Between them, like so 
much styrofoam insulation, is an air space that contains corridors and offices. The air 
space insures that no noise from the street will penetrate to damage the orchestra hall. 

Opening a present that has just arrived in the mail is a delight. A comparable plea- 
sure is the experience of penetrating the outer carton of Symphony Hall to discover 
the gift within — the lovely ornamented interior, with its delicate play of grays, its 
statues, its hint of giltwork, and, at concert time, its sculptural glitter of instruments 
on stage. 

Over the decades, inevitably, a few things went wrong with Symphony Hall. 
McKim's main entrance was a bold row of doors on the Huntington Avenue facade. 
But in the 1940s, Huntington was widened for an underpass, and Symphony Hall's 
main entrance was moved around the corner to Massachusetts Avenue, employing 
what had originally been conceived as a secondary carriage drop-off. The generous 
lobby on Huntington became today's Hatch Room, and the tiny lobby on Massachu- 
setts served, very inadequately, to replace it. Coherence and orientation suffered. 
Entering on Huntington, the visitor walked into the Hall on axis with the stage, eas- 
ily comprehending the building's symmetrical order as a reflection of the symmetry of 




18 



the visitor's own body. Entering on Massachusetts, by contrast, one sidles awkwardly 
toward the seats, moving at right angles to the Hall's axis. The architectural order is 
far harder to grasp. 

Other problems were those of crowding. Many new functions jammed the original 
office spaces, never very generous to begin with. Mechanical and electrical systems 
aged. Oddball elements of decor clashed with the architecture. As a result of all this, 
a major program of restoration and improvement began a few years ago. A thought- 
fully staged master plan of improvements was created by the BSO, with the help of 
the firm of James Stewart Polshek and Partners of New York. 

This fall occurs the opening of the largest and brightest piece to date of that reno- 
vation: the Cohen Wing, completely gutted and rebuilt, with new patron spaces on the 
ground floor and office spaces above. Banquet and meeting rooms and a new Sym- 
phony Shop are among the badly needed facilities provided by the new wing. In the 
Hall itself, a new Higginson Room, renamed the Beranek Room, is opening. Archi- 
tects for this stage of the improvements were Crissman & Solomon Associates, and 
the contractor was the Walsh Brothers. Future improvements, as funds become avail- 
able, will include a backstage building for the musicians, and eventually a new lobby 
and entrance. 

Symphony Hall has served its purpose nobly, economically, and often just a little 
bit shabbily for ninety years. Never a good place in which to show off a fancy gown, it 
is a very good place in which to listen to music. As much as any other building it 
embodies the essence of Boston. 

Robert Campbell, an architect in Cambridge, is architectural adviser to the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra and architecture critic of the Boston Globe. 



1 







19 



mm ' : ■-.■■■■■■-■ ■■- " ■■ 




Congratulations to the 
Boston Symphony Orohestra 
on yet another wonderful 
season of magical music. 

Man marsh 

A TRADITION SINCE 1851 



20 



BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

Seiji Ozawa, Music Director 

Grant Llewellyn and Robert Spano, 

Assistant Conductors 
One Hundred and Tenth Season, 1990-91 

Thursday, October 4, at 8 
Tuesday, October 9, at 8 

SEIJI OZAWA conducting 




RAVEL 



Piano Concerto in D for the left hand 
(in one movement) 

LEON FLEISHER 



TAKEMITSU 



Orion and Pleiades for cello and orchestra 

Orion. Lento, quasi una fantasia 

and. Intermezzo 

Pleiades. Allegretto ben moderato 

TSUYOSHI TSUTSUMI 



INTERMISSION 



BRAHMS 



Symphony No. 1 in C minor, Opus 68 

Un poco sostenuto— Allegro 
Andante sostenuto 
Un poco allegretto e grazioso 
Adagio — Piu Andante— Allegro non troppo 
ma eon brio — Piu Allegro 



These concerts will end about 10:05. 

RCA, Deutsche Grammophon, Philips, Telarc, Sony Classical/CBS Masterworks, 

EMI/Angel, New World, Erato, and Hyperion records 
Baldwin piano 
Leon Fleisher plays the Steinway piano. 

Please be sure the electronic signal on your watch or pager is switched off 
during the concert. 



21 



Week 2 



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BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

Seiji Ozawa, Music Director 

Grant Llewellyn and Robert Spano, 
Assistant Conductors 

One Hundred and Tenth Season, 1990-91 

Friday, October 5, at 2 
Saturday, October 6, at 8 

SEIJI OZAWA conducting 




BRITTEN 



&=*-& 



TAKEMITSU 



Diversions, for piano (left hand) and 
orchestra, Opus 21: 

Theme: Maestoso 

Var. I: Recitative (L'istesso tempo) 

Var. II: Romance (Allegretto mosso) 

Var. Ill: March (Allegro con brio) 

Var. IV: Arabesque (Allegretto) 

Var. V: Chant (Andante solennemente) 

Var. VI: Nocturne (Andante piacevole) 

Var. VII: Badinerie (Grave) 

Var. VIII: Burlesque (Molto moderato) 

Var. EKa: Toccata I (Allegro) 

Var. IXb: Toccata II (L'istesso tempo) 

Cadenza 

Var. X: Adagio 

Finale: Tarantella (Presto con fuoco) 

LEON FLEISHER 

Orion and Pleiades for cello and orchestra 

Orion. Lento, quasi una fantasia 

and. Intermezzo 

Pleiades. Allegretto ben moderato 

TSUYOSHI TSUTSUMI 



INTERMISSION 



BRAHMS Symphony No. 1 in C minor, Opus 68 

Un poco so stenuto— Allegro 
Andante sostenuto 
Un poco allegretto e grazioso 
Adagio — Piu Andante— Allegro non troppo 
ma con brio — Piu Allegro 

Friday's concert will end about 4:10 and Saturday's about 10:10. 

RCA, Deutsche Grammophon, Philips, Telarc, Sony Classical/CBS Masterworks, 

EMI/Angel, New World, Erato, and Hyperion records 
Baldwin piano 
Leon Fleisher plays the Steinway piano. 

The program books for the Friday series are given in loving memory of Mrs. Hugh Bancroft 
by her daughters Mrs. A. Werk Cook and the late Mrs. William C. Cox. 



23 



Week 2 




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Maurice Ravel 

Piano Concerto in D for the left hand 




Joseph Maurice Ravel was born in Ciboure near 
Saint-Jean-de-Luz, Basses-Pyrenees, in the Basque 
region of France just a short distance from the 
Spanish border, on March 7, 1875, and died in 
Paris on December 28, 1937. He composed the Con- 
certo in D for the left hand, along with his other 
piano concerto, the G major, in the years 1929-31. 
The left-hand concerto was completed in August 
1930. Paul Wittgenstein, the pianist for whom the 
work was composed, played the first performance on 
January 17, 1933, in Paris. Wittgenstein was also 
the pianist for the first American performance, 
given by Serge Koussevitzky and the Boston Sym- 
phony Orchestra on November 9, 1934. Later BSO 
performances featured pianist Jacques Fevrier with 
Koussevitzky; Seymour Lipkin with Charles Munch; Robert Casadesus with Pierre Mon- 
teux; Monique Haas with Munch; Vlado Perlemuter with Munch; John Browning with 
Joseph Silverstein; and Leon Fleisher with Seiji Ozawa. Leon Fleisher was soloist 
under Seiji Ozawa' s direction for the most recent subscription performances, in October 
1986, as well as for the most recent Tanglewood performance, in July 1988. The orches- 
tra includes two flutes and piccolo, two oboes and English horn, E-flat clarinet, two 
clarinets, and bass clarinet, two bassoons and contrabassoon, four horns, three trumpets, 
three trombones, tuba, timpani, triangle, side drum, cymbals, bass drum, wood block, 
tam-tam, harp, and strings. 

About 1930, Ravel found himself simultaneously with two commissions for piano 
concertos, one from his long-time interpreter Marguerite Long, and the other from 
Paul Wittgenstein, a concert pianist who had lost his right arm in World War I. 
Ravel worked on both commissions at the same time, but the results were quite dif- 
ferent. The G major concerto composed for Ravel's own use, but eventually given to 
Marguerite Long when Ravel realized he was too ill to perform it himself, falls into 
the category of brilliant entertainment music. The concerto for the left hand, perhaps 
inevitably, is altogether more serious. It is, in fact, one of the most serious of all the 
works of that urbane master. 

Paul Wittgenstein was a remarkable member of a remarkable Viennese family. He 
was the brother of the philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein, who also possessed consider- 
able musical talent. Paul had barely begun his concert career when he was called into 
the Austrian reserves in 1914. Only a few months later he was wounded, and his 
right arm had to be amputated. After being captured by the Russians (when the army 
hospital in which he was located was overrun), Wittgenstein was exchanged as an 
invalid and returned to Vienna, where he resumed his concert career in the season of 
1916-17. He quickly made a name for himself as a pianist with only one arm, and he 
induced many leading composers to write substantial works for him in all the genres — 
chamber and orchestral — that made use of a piano. Among the musicians who 
responded to his requests were Richard Strauss, Franz Schmidt, Erich Wolfgang 
Korngold, Britten, Prokofiev, Hindemith, and, most notably, Ravel. 

There are few sources of music for the left hand alone to which Ravel might have 
gone to study the problems involved; he is known to have consulted Saint- Saens' six 
studies for the left hand, and Leopold Godowsky's transcriptions for left hand alone 
of the Chopin etudes. He might also have seen Brahms's mighty transcription of the 
Bach D minor Chaconne for unaccompanied violin and Scriabin's Prelude and Noc- 



25 



Week 2 



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EiVJOYA 
SPLENDID SEASON 
OF CHAMBER WORKS 

Join the principal players of the Boston Symphony 
Orchestra and experience chamber music at its best 
with one of the world's finest ensembles. 

BOSTON SYMPHONY CHAMBER PLAYERS 
THREE SUNDAY AFTERNOONS AT 3:00PM 

JORDAN HALL 

AT NEW ENGLAND CONSERVATORY 

$42.00, $32.00, $24.00 
GILBERT KALISH, pianist 

November 11. 1990 

PISTON Divertimento for strings and winds 
HARBISON 'Words from Paterson' 

with SANFORD SYLVAN, baritone 
BEETHOVEN Septet in E-flat for strings and 

winds, Op. 20 

February 3. 1991 

HAYDN Trio in E for piano, violin, and cello, 

Hob. XV:28 
BRAHMS Trio in E-flat for horn, violin, 

and piano, Op. 40 
KELLAWAY 'Esque,' for trombone and double bass 
SHOSTAKOVICH Quintet in G minor for piano and 

strings, Op. 57 

March 10. 1991 

WYNER New work for brass and percussion 

(world premiere) 
PISTON Quintet for piano and strings 
SCHUBERT String Quintet in C, D.956 

SUBSCRIBE NOW TO THE 1990-91 SEASON! 



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Call the Subscription Office at (617) 266-7575, 
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26 







i^^^tk^m^m 



turne. But for the most part Ravel was on his own, especially as he wanted the piano 
part to be as full and active as if it were intended for a pianist who had both hands. 
The result, needless to say, is a work that is technically difficult, though perfectly 
gauged for the shape of the left hand (which can have, for example, a rather large 
stretch between the thumb and index finger in the higher pitch levels and the upper 
ends of the chords, an arrangement that would be reversed if the piece were conceived 
for right hand). 

Ravel once discussed his two piano concertos with M.D. Calvocoressi. Of the left- 
hand concerto, he commented: 

In a work of this sort, it is essential to avoid the impression of insufficient weight 
in the sound-texture, as compared to a solo part for two hands. So I have used a 
style which is much more in keeping [than that of the lighter G major work] with 
the consciously imposing style of the traditional concerto. 

The concerto is in one long movement divided into Lento and Allegro sections. 
Beginning low and dark in strings and contrabassoon, a long orchestral section avoids 
the first appearance of the soloist until a climax brings the piano in with a cadenza 
designed to show right off the bat that limiting the conception to a single hand does 
not prevent extraordinary virtuosity. Ravel describes this as being "like an improvisa- 
tion." It is followed by what Ravel called a "jazz section," exploiting ideas he had 
picked up during his visit to America. "Only gradually," he noted, "is one aware that 
the jazz episode is actually built up from the themes of the first section." The level of 
virtuosity required by the soloist increases — if that is possible — to the end. Ravel 
rightly considered this, his last completed large-scale work, a supreme piece of illu- 
sion. Who can tell, just from listening, the nature of the self-imposed restriction 
under which he completed his commission? 

— Steven Ledbetter 




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Benjamin Britten 

Diversions, for piano (left hand) and orchestra, Opus 21 

Benjamin Britten was born in Lowestoft, Suffolk, 
on November 22, 1913, and died in Aldeburgh on 
December 4, 1976. He composed Diversions in 
Maine during the summer of 1940 on a commission 
from Paul Wittgenstein, who gave the first perform- 
ance on January 16, 1942, in Philadelphia with 
Eugene Ormandy conducting the Philadelphia 
Orchestra. The only previous Boston Symphony 
Orchestra performance took place at Tanglewood on 
July 6, 1986, with Leon Fleisher as soloist and 
Seiji Ozawa conducting. In addition to the solo 
piano, the score calls for two flutes (second doubling 
piccolo), two oboes (second doubling English horn), 
two clarinets, two bassoons and contrabassoon, alto 
saxophone, four horns, two trumpets, three trom- 
bones and tuba, timpani, percussion battery, harp, and strings. 

When the concert pianist Paul Wittgenstein lost his right arm in World War I, he 
made the best of the situation by commissioning a series of compositions for the left 
hand alone from composers like Ravel, Hindemith, Prokofiev, and Richard Strauss. 
When Britten received a commission from Wittgenstein, he was far younger and less 
well established than the other masters, but he had already begun to make quite a 
name for himself as an unusually gifted young English composer who could write for 
almost any combination of voices and instruments, and who was remarkably prolific. 
He had made a sensation at the 1937 Salzburg Festival with his Variations on a 
Theme of Frank Bridge for string orchestra, composed for the Boyd Neel Orchestra in 
the space of ten days when the organizers of the festival insisted that the concert 
include a world premiere or the booking would be cancelled. But his career did not 
seem to be developing in England, where reviews patronizingly referred to his work as 
"clever." In the spring of 1939 he decided to follow his friends W.H. Auden and 
Christopher Isherwood in emigrating to America. In this move he was joined by his 
friend, collaborator, and lifelong companion Peter Pears. 

Britten's American years were important for a number of developments, personal 
and professional. He wrote several pieces here, including the Violin Concerto, the Sin- 
fonia da Requiem, Diversions, and a folk opera called Paul Bunyan with a libretto by 
Auden. He made an important friend in Serge Koussevitzky, who, after a BSO per- 
formance of the Sinfonia da Requiem, asked him why a composer with such an obvi- 
ous dramatic flair did not compose an opera. Britten explained that he had no way of 
supporting himself during the extended period of composition that an opera would 
require; Koussevitzky replied soon after with cold cash — a commission from the Kous- 
sevitzky Foundation. The eventual result was Peter Grimes, which was given its Amer- 
ican premiere at Tanglewood in 1946, under the direction of Leonard Bernstein. Per- 
haps the most important development of Britten's American years, though, was the 
realization that he really belonged in England, especially on the east coast that he 
had known as a boy. Soon after his talk with Koussevitzky, Britten and Pears sailed 
for home. 

With the possible exception of the Sinfonia da Requiem, the works of Britten's 
American years have not been heard much in performance. Paul Bunyan was 
regarded as a flop at its first performance in 1941, but a recent' revival, publication, 
and a recording have revealed qualities that were not recognized by many people at 
the time. Diversions, too, has not been much performed or recorded. And while it may 



29 



Week 2 




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■Bms 




not rank among Britten's weightiest masterpieces (the very title suggests that the 
composer considered it to be rather a lighter work — but where's the harm in that!), it 
is a characteristic and attractive piece that reveals many of the same strengths as the 
Bridge Variations. Indeed, the variation form may have been chosen to demonstrate 
those strengths. Britten had the gift of writing music of character, music that sug- 
gested a style or a person. It is the gift of the born operatic composer (which is, no 
doubt, why Koussevitzky encouraged him so). The Bridge Variations had demon- 
strated this talent brilliantly, presenting the theme in a great variety of manners. 
Similarly, Diversions offers many clever and subtle guises as the theme is presented in 
ten variations (an eleventh was dropped by the composer when he revised the score in 
1951) and a finale. 

Britten commented, in a foreword to his score, that he had been attracted 

by the problems involved in writing a work for this particular medium, especially 
as I was well acquainted with and extremely enthusiastic about Mr. Wittgen- 
stein's skill in overcoming what seem to be insuperable difficulties. In no place in 
the work did I attempt to imitate a two-handed piano technique, but concentrated 
on exploiting and emphasizing the single line approach. 

The score is filled with delightful Brittenisms, some that we can see (with the benefit 
of hindsight) as leading to important masterworks at a later date. The theme, for 
example, is based on a rising series of fifths (heard first in the orchestra over a pedal 
C in the basses); this conjures up an unmistakable hint of the main theme from The 
Turn of the Screw of 1954, and, as in that masterful little opera, it offers the com- 
poser a remarkable flexibility of treatment. The headings that the composer provided 
for each of the variations provide a sufficiently clear indication of the musical charac- 
ter from section to section. 

— Steven Ledbetter 



For rates and 
information on 
advertising in the 
Boston Symphony, 
Boston Pops, 
and 

Tanglewood program books 
please contact: 

STEVE GANAK AD REPS 
51 CHURCH STREET 
BOSTON, MASS. 02116 



BOSTON 
SYMPHONY 
ORCHESTRA/ 

SEIJI OZAWA 

Music Dine tor j 

(617)-542-6913 



31 




We can take you to 

encore performances everywhere. 




Whether it's 
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Toru Takemitsu 

Orion and Pleiades for cello and orchestra 




Toru Takemitsu was born in Tokyo, Japan, on 
October 8, 1930, and lives there. He composed Orion 
and Pleiades on a commission from the Suntory 
Music Foundation for cellist Tsuyoshi Tsutsumi, 
who gave the first performance in May 1984 in 
Paris, with the Tokyo Philharmonic Orchestra con- 
ducted by Tadaaki Otaka. These are the first perfor- 
mances by the Boston Symphony Orchestra. The 
score calls for two flutes (second doubling alto flute) 
and piccolo, two oboes (second doubling English 
horn) and oboe d'amore, three clarinets (second dou- 
bling E-flat clarinet, third doubling bass clarinet), 
three bassoons (third doubling contrabassoon), four 
horns, three trumpets (with straight, cup, and har- 
mon mutes), three trombones (with straight and cut 
mutes) and tuba, four percussionists (playing glockenspiel, vibraphone, marimba, tubu- 
lar bells, three tam-tams, and antique cymbals), celesta, two harps, and a body of 
strings consisting of fourteen first violins, twelve second violins, ten violas, eight cellos, 
and six double basses. 

Toru Takemitsu is one of Japan's best-known composers today, both at home and 
in the West. His career came about as an unlikely result of an accident that occurred 
when he was sixteen. While mountain climbing, he dropped his camera into a water- 
fall. In trying to retrieve it, he caught pneumonia, and was forced to spend a long 
period convalescing at home. There he listened to music on the radio for hours on end 
and — though he had never studied music up to that time — decided to be a composer. 
He bought scores and taught himself to play the piano. Though he became the private 
pupil of Kosuji Kiyose at the age of eighteen, he is largely self-taught as a composer. 
Within three years he had organized Tokyo's Experimental Workshop, a society for 
the performance of avant-garde music, and in 1966 he created, with Seiji Ozawa and 
Toshi Ichiyanagi, the group Orchestral Space. 

Takemitsu' s earlier music made fleeting obeisance to the expressionism of the sec- 
ond Viennese school or to the melodic and harmonic gestures of French music in this 
century from Debussy to Messiaen. But for the most part his music is entirely sui 
generis. He does not concern himself with traditional theory or musical structures. 
His rhythms are irregular and very flexible. His harmonies are not functional. For the 
most part, he has been interested in timbre and texture, in the most varied and deli- 
cate colors of sound — and, as a corollary, with silence. Much of his music finds inspi- 
ration in poetry, especially the work of his favorite writer, Mahota Ooka, who is a 
contemporary of the composer's. 

His earliest large work, Requiem for string orchestra (1957), was heard in 1959 by 
Igor Stravinsky, who declared it to be a masterpiece. After giving lectures with John 
Cage at the East-West Center in Hawaii in 1964, Takemitsu staged a series of 
"events" in Tokyo in collaboration with Cage and others. At the same time, he 
became interested anew in such traditional Japanese instruments as the biwa and the 
shakuhachi. He used the biwa in his 1962 film score Seppuku and later employed both 
instruments in a sort of double concerto called November Steps, composed in 1967 for 
the 125th anniversary of the New York Philharmonic. Other film scores have come 
from his pen, including music for the well-known 1964 film Woman of the Dunes. In 
these, and in a large output of pieces for orchestra and for various instrumental com- 



33 



Week 2 



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binations, Takemitsu has demonstrated an ability to fuse oriental musical gestures 
with those from the West in a language that is personal and idiomatic. 

Owing to Seiji Ozawa's long acquaintance with Takemitsu and his collaboration 
with the composer in performances going back more than two decades, the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra has enjoyed a continuing relationship with the composer over 
the years and has given American premieres of many of his compositions. Boston 
Symphony performances of his works have included the Requiem for string orchestra 
at Tanglewood in 1967; November Steps No. 1 in November 1969; Cassiopeia for per- 
cussionist and orchestra at Tanglewood in 1971, repeated in Boston that November 
with The Dorian Horizon for strings; Quatrain (with the chamber ensemble Tashi) in 
March 1977 and at Tanglewood that July; A Flock Descends into the Pentagonal Gar- 
den in November and December 1978; To the Edge of Dream for guitar and 

orchestra in November 1977; and the piano concerto Riverrun at Tanglewood in July 
1985. Takemitsu was an artist-in-residence at Tanglewood in 1986; several of his 
smaller works were performed during that year's Festival of Contemporary Music, 
including the American premiere of Dream/Window. Later this month, as part of Car- 
negie Hall's centennial celebration in New York, Seiji Ozawa and the Boston Sym- 
phony Orchestra will give the world premiere of Takemitsu's From me flows what you 
call Time with the percussion ensemble Nexus. 

Orion and Pleiades is one of a group of works — all for solo instrument and orches- 
tra—that Takemitsu calls his "Constellation" series, in that they are named after 
astronomical groupings. The first of these was Asterism of 1967; this was followed by 
Cassiopeia (1971) and Gemaux (i.e. "Gemini," begun 1971, in progress). 

Orion was a mighty hunter of great beauty and gigantic strength; according to one 
myth (as recounted by Homer in Book V of the Odyssey) he was slain by the arrows 
of Artemis, goddess of the hunt. As a constellation, Orion is one of the most easily 
recognizable in the winter sky for the hunter's belt of three stars, which seem to fall 
in a straight line. In the same vicinity of the sky, though actually in the constellation 
of Taurus, there appears the star cluster known as the Pleiades, after the seven 
daughters of Atlas and Pleione. One myth — one of the few such tales clearly of astro- 
nomical origin — tells of Orion amorously pursuing the sisters and their mother until 
Zeus translated all of them to the sky, where they circle around one another eternally. 

The composer has provided the following commentary on his work: 

The music consists of two parts, "Orion" and "Pleiades," and a short interlude in 
between: 

1. Orion Lento, quasi una fantasia 

2. and Intermezzo 

3. Pleiades Allegretto 

"Orion" represents a process whereby a melisma melody of solo cello is being 
formed ultimately into definite lines symbolizing Orion's belt, and naturally, the 
number "3" is dominant here. 

"and" is a little interlude woven up by correspondence between a cadenza part 
and a pastoral orchestra. 

In "Pleiades," just as this constellation always is an embodiment of congregation, 
the movement is diversified as against the lines of "Orion," and is more colorful. 

-S.L. 



35 



Week 2 




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36 




Johannes Brahms 

Symphony No. 1 in C minor, Opus 68 



it\- 







Johannes Brahms was born in Hamburg, Germany, 
on May 7, 1833, and died in Vienna on April 3, 
1897. He completed his First Symphony in 1876, 
though some of the sketches date back to the 1850s. 
Otto Dessoff conducted the first performance on 
November 4, 1876, at Karlsruhe; Leopold Damrosch 
introduced the symphony to America on December 
15, 1877, in New York's Steinway Hall. Boston 
heard it for the first time when Carl Zerrahn con- 
ducted it at a Harvard Musical Association concert 
in the Music Hall on January 3, 1878, and the 
Boston Symphony played it during its first season 
on December 9 and 10, 1881, Georg Henschel con- 
ducting. It has also been played at BSO concerts 
under Wilhelm Gericke, Arthur Nikisch, Emit Paur, 
Karl Muck, Max Fiedler, Pierre Monteux, Serge Koussevitzky, Richard Burgin, Sir 
Adrian Boult, Charles Munch, Guido Cantelli, Carl Schuricht, Eugene Ormandy, Erich 
Leinsdorf William Steinberg, Rafael Kubelik, Bruno Maderna, Joseph Silverstein, Seiji 
Ozawa, Sir Georg Solti, Eugene Ormandy, and Leonard Bernstein, who gave the most 
recent Tanglewood performance in July 1985. Christoph von Dohndnyi and Pascal Ver- 
rot led the most recent Boston Symphony subscription performances in February 1989, 
although Giuseppe Sinopoli led performances with the Philharmonia Orchestra on BSO 
subscription concerts in January 1990. The symphony is scored for two flutes, two 
oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons and contrabassoon, four horns, two trumpets, three 
trombones, timpani, and strings. 

When Brahms finished his First Symphony in September 1876, he was forty- two 
years old. (Beethoven was thirty, Schumann thirty-one, Mahler twenty-eight at the 
completion of their respective first symphonies; Mozart was eight or nine, but that's 
another story altogether.) As late as 1873, the composer's publisher Simrock feared 
that a Brahms symphony would never happen ("Aren't you doing anything any more? 
Am I not to have a symphony from you in '73 either?" he wrote the composer on 
February 22), and Eduard Hanslick, in his review of the first Vienna performance, 
noted that "seldom, if ever, has the entire musical world awaited a composer's first 
symphony with such tense anticipation." 

Brahms already had several works for orchestra behind him: the Opus 11 and 
Opus 16 serenades, the D minor piano concerto (which emerged from an earlier 
attempt at a symphony), and that masterwork of orchestral know-how and control, 
the Variations on a Theme by Haydn, a piece too little performed today. But a sym- 
phony was something different and had to await the sorting out of Brahms's compli- 
cated emotional relationship with Robert and Clara Schumann, and, more important, 
of his strong feelings about following in Beethoven's footsteps. 

Beethoven's influence is certainly to be felt in Brahms's First Symphony: in its 
C minor-to-major progress, in the last-movement theme resembling the earlier com- 
poser's Ode to Joy (a relationship Brahms himself acknowledged as something that 
"any ass could see")*, and, perhaps most strikingly, in the rhythmic thrust and tight, 
motivically-based construction of the work — in some ways quite different from the 



*Perhaps less obvious is the relationship between the theme itself and the violin phrase of the 
last movement's opening measures. 



37 



Week 2 



TBI 



melodically expansive Brahms we know from the later symphonies. But, at the same 
time, there is really no mistaking the one composer for the other: Beethoven's rhyth- 
mic drive is very much his own, whereas Brahms' s more typical expansiveness is 
still present throughout this symphony, and his musical language is unequivocally 
nineteenth-century-Romantic in manner. 

Following its premiere at Karlsruhe on November 4, 1876, and its subsequent 
appearance in other European centers, the symphony elicited conflicting reactions. 
Brahms himself had already characterized the work as "long and not exactly amia- 
ble." Clara Schumann found the ending "musically, a bit flat . . . merely a brilliant 
afterthought stemming from external rather than internal emotion." Hermann Levi, 
court conductor at Munich and later to lead the 1882 Bayreuth premiere of Wagner's 
Parsifal, found the two middle movements out of place in such a sweeping work, but 
the last movement he decreed "probably the greatest thing [Brahms] has yet created 
in the instrumental field." The composer's close friend Theodor Billroth described the 
last movement as "overwhelming," but found the material of the first movement 
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One senses in these responses an inability to reconcile apparently conflicting ele- 
ments within the work, and the two inner movements do indeed suggest a world quite 
different from the outer ones. At the same time, these reactions also point to the 
seeming dichotomy between, as Hanslick put it, "the astonishing contrapuntal art" on 
the one hand and the "immediate communicative effect" on the other. But the two go 
hand in hand: the full effect of the symphony is dependent upon the compositional 
craft that binds the work together in its progress from the C minor struggle of the 
first movement through the mediating regions of the Andante and the Allegretto to 
the C major triumph of the finale. 

The first Allegro's two principal motives — the three eighth-notes followed by a 
longer value, representing an abstraction of the opening timpani strokes, and the hesi- 
tant, three-note chromatic ascent, across the bar, heard at the start in the 
violins — are already suggested in the sostenuto introduction, which seems to begin in 
mid-struggle. The movement is prevailingly sombre in character, with a tension and 
drive again suggestive of Beethoven. The second idea's horn and wind colorations pro- 
vide only passing relief: their dolce and espressivo colorings will be spelled out at 
greater length in the symphony's second movement. 

The second and third movements provide space for lyricism, for a release from the 
tension of the first. The calmly expansive oboe theme of the E major Andante is 
threatened by the G-sharp minor of the movement's middle section (whose sixteenth- 
note figurations anticipate the main idea of the third movement), but tranquility 
prevails when the tune returns in combined oboe, horn, and solo violin. The A-flat 
Allegretto is typical of Brahms in a grazioso mood — compare the Second Symphony's 
third movement — and continues the respite from the main battle. And just as the 
middle movements of the symphony are at an emotional remove from the outer ones, 
so too are they musically distant, having passed from the opening C minor to third- 
related keys: E major for the second movement and A-flat major for the third. 

At the same time, the third movement serves as preparation for the finale: its end- 
ing seems unresolved, completed only when the C minor of the fourth movement, 
again a third away from the movement that precedes it, takes hold. As in the first 
movement, the sweep of the finale depends upon a continuity between the main 
Allegro and its introduction. This C minor introduction gives way to an airy C major 
horn call (originally conceived as a birthday greeting to Clara Schumann in 1868) 
which becomes a crucial binding element in the course of the movement. A chorale in 
the trombones, which have been silent until this movement, brings a canonic buildup 
of the horn motto and then the Allegro with its two main ideas: the broad C major 
tune (intimated in the first violin phrase of the movement's introduction, as men- 
tioned above) suggestive of Beethoven's Ninth, and a powerful chain of falling inter- 
vals, which crystallize along the way into a chain of falling thirds, Brahms 's musical 
hallmark. The movement drives to a climax for full orchestra on the trombone chorale 
heard earlier and ends with a final affirmation of C major — Brahms has won his 
struggle. 

-Marc Mandel 



39 



Week 2 



■HH 



ftk- 



More . . . 

The best Ravel book available has not yet been published in this country; it is Roger 
Nichols' new contribution to the Master Musicians series, replacing the older (but still 
useful) volume by Norman Demuth. Nichols is both insightful and enthusiastic in his 
treatment of Ravel's music. Arbie Orenstein's Ravel: Man and Musician (Columbia) is 
a thorough study but very dry, all too clearly revealing its origin in a doctoral disser- 
tation. A sensitive discussion of Ravel can be found in Romanticism and the Twentieth 
Century, the final volume of the four-volume study Man and His Music by Wilfred 
Mellers (Schocken). An excellent brief discussion of Ravel's orchestral music is to be 
found in the BBC Music Guide that Laurence Davies devotes to that subject (Univer- 
sity of Washington paperback); Davies has also written a fine book called The Gallic 
Muse with essays on Faure, Duparc, Debussy, Satie, Ravel, and Poulenc (Barnes). 
Leon Fleisher will record the Concerto for the Left Hand with Seiji Ozawa and the 
Boston Symphony for Sony Classical in conjunction with these performances. Fleish- 
er' s performance with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra under the direction of 
Sergiu Comissiona is currently available (Vanguard, coupled with La Valse and Saint- 
Saens's Symphony No. 3). Other performances worth considering are those by Pascal 
Roge with the Montreal Symphony Orchestra under Charles Dutoit (London), Alicia 
de Larrocha with the London Philharmonic under Lawrence Foster (London), Aldo 
Ciccolini with the Orchestre de Paris under Jean Martinon (Angel), and Louis Lortie 
with the London Symphony Orchestra under Rafael Fruhbeck de Burgos (Chandos); 
all of these discs also include the Concerto in G and an occasional smaller work. Of 
considerable historical interest is the performance by the work's dedicatee, Paul Witt- 
genstein, with Bruno Walter conducting the Concertgebouw Orchestra in a live con- 
cert recorded in 1937 (AS Disc, coupled with Debussy's La Mer and Prelude to the 
Afternoon of a Faun). 

Michael Kennedy has written a splendid short volume, Britten, for the Master 
Musicians series, but it has so far been published only in England (Dent); it is prob- 
ably due to appear here as a Littlefield paperback. The biggest and fullest book about 
Britten's music is a recent volume by Peter Evans, The Music of Benjamin Britten 
(University of Minnesota), which provides extended analyses of the major scores and 
some discussion of just about everything. For an informed and enthusiastic discussion 
of the composer up to the early 1950s, the symposium volume edited by Donald 
Mitchell and Hans Keller, Benjamin Britten: A Commentary on his Work by a Group 
of Specialists, is first-rate; unfortunately, it is now out of print and hard to locate. An 
evocative photographic study has been prepared by Donald Mitchell and John Evans: 
Benjamin Britten: Pictures from a Life, 1913-1976 (Scribners). The newest symposium 
is The Britten Companion, edited by Christopher Palmer, which is full of interesting 
essays covering most of Britten's work as well as his character (Cambridge, available 
in paperback). Leon Fleisher will record Britten's Diversions with Seiji Ozawa and 
the Boston Symphony Orchestra for Sony Classical in conjunction with these con- 
certs. The only currently available recording also features Leon Fleisher, with the 
Baltimore Symphony Orchestra under the direction of Sergiu Comissiona (Desto, cou- 
pled with Ezra Laderman's Concerto for Orchestra). 

Books written about Toru Takemitsu are almost all in Japanese. The early 
Requiem for string orchestra has been recorded by the Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra 
under the direction of Kazuhiro Koizumi (CBC Enterprises, coupled with music by 
Debussy, Louie, Mendelssohn, and Respighi). Other works currently available on 
recording are for solo piano or small chamber combinations, but several orchestral 
works have been recorded by Seiji Ozawa; though the records are not in print, it may 
be possible to locate the occasional copy. These include Dream/Window (issued pri- 
vately on a compact disk by the Kyoto Shinkin Bank), Arc, for piano and orchestra, 



40 



with pianist Yuji Takahashi and the Yomiuri Nippon Symphony Orchestra (Varese- 
Sarabande, coupled with music by Ichiyanagi, Ligeti, and Xenakis), and Quatrain and 
A Flock Descends into the Pentagonal Garden, with Tashi and the Boston Symphony 
Orchestra (DG). Also currently out of print is In an Autumn Garden, performed by 
the Tokyo Gakuso Orchestra (Varese-Sarabande). 

-S.L. 

Florence May, an Englishwoman who knew Brahms and studied piano with him, 
produced a comprehensive two-volume biography of the composer now available in an 
expensive reprint of the original 1905 edition (Scholarly). Karl Geiringer's Brahms: 
His Life and Work is a smaller but no less important biography (Oxford). Also useful 
are Peter Latham's Brahms in the Master Musicians series (Littlefield paperback), 
John Horton's Brahms Orchestral Music in the series of BBC Music Guides (Univer- 
sity of Washington paperback), and Julius Harrison's chapter on Brahms in The 
Symphony: Vol. I, Haydn to Dvorak, edited by Robert Simpson (Penguin paperback). 
Donald Francis Tovey's program note on the Brahms First is included in his Essays 
in Musical Analysis (Oxford paperback). Of special interest are Arnold Schoenberg's 
essay "Brahms the Progressive" in Style and Idea (St. Martin's), and an interview 
with "Carlo Maria Giulini on Brahms" in Bernard Jacobson's Conductors on Conduct- 
ing (from Columbia Publishing Company, but Unfortunately out of print). Recom- 
mended recordings of the Brahms First include — in alphabetical order by conductor 
— Leonard Bernstein's with the Vienna Philharmonic (DG), Christoph von 
Dohnanyi's with the Cleveland Orchestra (Teldec), Herbert von Karajan's with the 
Berlin Philharmonic (DG), Georg Solti's with the Chicago Symphony (DG), and 
Giinter Wand's with the Cologne Radio Symphony (RCA). Aside from his numerous 
"live" performances showing up on CD, Wilhelm Furtwangler's powerful studio- 
recorded statement with the Berlin Philharmonic is worth watching for (DG, monau- 
ral). Also of importance is Guido Cantelli's beautiful and moving performance with 
the Philharmonia Orchestra, likely to be reissued on CD by EMI. Toscanini-watchers, 
meanwhile, have a wealth of options, among them his studio recording with the NBC 
Symphony (RCA, monaural, in a mid-priced four-disc box that includes all four sym- 
phonies, the Tragic and Academic Festival Overtures, the Haydn Variations, the Dou- 
ble Concerto, the Liebeslieder Waltzes, the Gesang der Parzen, and four Hungarian 
Dances), an intensely powerful, "live" 1940 account with the NBC (Melodram, with 
the first movement of the Serenade No. 1), a strongly nuanced account from his very 
first NBC Symphony concert on Christmas eve of 1937 (Myto, with Vivaldi's Con- 
certo Grosso in D, Op. 3, No. 11, and Mozart's Symphony No. 40 from that same 
concert), and the 1952 Philharmonia performance from his last concerts in London 
(Hunt Productions, in a three-disc box including all four symphonies, the Tragic 
Overture, and the Haydn Variations; note that the sound of this set is somewhat less 
good than the other "live" performances mentioned here). 

-M.M. 



41 



Week 2 



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Leon Fleisher 

Equally renowned as pianist and conductor, Leon Fleisher is a 
native of San Francisco, where he gave his first public recital at 
six. On hearing him three years later, Artur Schnabel broke a long- 
standing rule against teaching children, becoming Fleisher's mentor 
and close friend for ten years. In 1944, at sixteen, Mr. Fleisher 
made his debut with the New York Philharmonic, as soloist in the 
Brahms D minor concerto under the direction of Pierre Monteux. 
He went on to become the first American ever to win any major 
European music competition, when he won the Queen Elisabeth of 
**" JaP* Belgium International Competition. He received a Ford Foundation 
grant in 1959 and for the next six years appeared in recital and with leading orchestras 
worldwide. Then, midway through the 1964-65 season, as he prepared for a State Depart- 
ment tour of Western Europe with George Szell and the Cleveland Orchestra, with whom 
he made many distinguished concerto recordings, an ailment later diagnosed as "carpal 
tunnel syndrome" crippled his right hand. He eventually readjusted to a new career, mas- 
tering the keyboard literature for left hand and forging a reputation as a conductor. In 
1967 he founded the Theater Chamber Players of the Kennedy Center; in 1970 he became 
conductor and music director of the Annapolis Symphony. He made his New York conduct- 
ing debut at the Mostly Mozart Festival in 1970, became associate conductor of the Balti- 
more Symphony in 1973, and has since appeared as guest conductor with the Boston Sym- 
phony, the Chicago Symphony, the San Francisco Symphony, the Cleveland Orchestra, and 
the Montreal Symphony, among others. He first conducted opera in Baltimore during the 
1988-89 season and made his Washington Opera debut in the fall of 1989 with Mozart's 
Cosi fan tutte. He conducted a tour of the New Japan Philharmonic in the spring of 1989 
and led the Stuttgart Symphony on a tour of the United States in February 1990. Holder 
since 1959 of the Andrew W. Mellon Chair at the Peabody Conservatory of Music, Mr. 
Fleisher is also famous as a teacher, giving master classes at such venues as the Salzburg 
Mozarteum, the Paris Conservatory, Chicago's Ravinia Festival, and New York's Metropol- 
itan Museum of Art. Since 1986 he has been artistic director of the Tanglewood Music 
Center. Mr. Fleisher made his BSO debuts as piano soloist and conductor in January 1954 
and July 1971, respectively; he appeared most recently as soloist in September and Octo- 
ber 1988 and as conductor that November. He will record Ravel's Piano Concerto for the 
left hand and Britten's Diversions with Seiji Ozawa and the BSO for Sony Classical in 
conjunction with these concerts. 



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GOOD TASTE WHEN YOU'RE 

NOT AT THE SYMPHONY. 



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Tsuyoshi Tsutsumi 

f% Born in Tokyo, cellist Tsuyoshi Tsutsumi won the International 
Casals Competition in Budapest in 1963. He first appeared in New 
York the following year; his subsequent engagements as recitalist, 
chamber musician, soloist with orchestra, and recording artist have 
won him acclaim throughout the world. Mr. Tsutsumi's early train- 
ing with famed Japanese teacher Hideo Saito, founder of the Toho 
Conservatory, led to his debut at twelve with the Tokyo Philhar- 
monic. He soon won several major prizes, including Japan's most 
prestigious, that of the Mainichi Music Competition. He made his 
first international tour as a soloist at eighteen, with the NHK 
Symphony Orchestra. Following his Tokyo recital debut, a Fulbright Foundation grant 
brought him to the United States to study with Janos Starker, whom he later assisted on 
the faculty of Indiana University. He has since appeared as soloist throughout the world. 
Mr. Tsutsumi has recorded the Dvorak Cello Concerto with the Czech Philharmonic for 
Sony Classical, has appeared with Seiji Ozawa and the Toho Gakuen Orchestra at the 
United Nations in a concert telecast worldwide, and has given frequent festival appear- 
ances with Canada's important orchestras. His world premieres of Japanese and Canadian 
works have included the Miyoshi Cello Concerto with the Tokyo Yomiuri Orchestra and 
Takemitsu's Orion and Pleiades with the Tokyo Philharmonic. Mr. Tsutsumi has toured 
North America and Japan as a founding member of Quartet Canada, and he has appeared 
in joint recital with such artists as Gervase de Peyer, Ronald Turini, Adele Marcus, and 
James Campbell. He has been a visiting professor at the University of Western Ontario, 
served as guest professor at Toho, and has taught at the University of Illinois. In the fall 
of 1988 he joined the permanent faculty of Indiana University. Recently, Mr. Tsutsumi 
has recorded Haydn cello concertos with the English Chamber Orchestra for Sony Classi- 
cal, performed at the Bratislava Festival, toured wtih the Gewandhaus Orchestra of 
Leipzig and the Austrian Broadcasting Symphony, and appeared with the Accademia di 
Santa Cecilia under Giuseppe Sinopoli. He was a featured soloist in the opening concert of 
Tokyo's new Suntory Hall and has played chamber concerts there with such artists as 
Isaac Stern and Yo-Yo Ma. He has also toured Europe with the Philharmonic Soloists of 
Japan (Saito Memorial Orchestra). Making his BSO debut with these concerts, Mr. Tsut- 
sumi has received the prestigious Suntory Award for his contribution to music in Japan. 
He also performed for His Majesty, the late Emperor Hirohito of Japan, a rare honor. 




45 



BUSINESS 




Business and Professional 
Leadership Association 



The Boston Symphony Orchestra wishes to acknowledge this distinguished group of 
corporations and professional organizations for their outstanding and exemplary 
support of the orchestra's needs during the past or current fiscal year. 



CORPORATE SPONSORSHIPS 

$25,000 and above 

Digital Equipment Corporation 

Boston Pops Orchestra Public Television Broadcasts 

NEC 

Boston Symphony Orchestra North American Tour 1991 

Boston Symphony Orchestra European Tour 1991 

NYNEX Corporation 
WCVB-TV, Channel 5 Boston and WCRB 102.5 FM 

Salute to Symphony 1990 

The Boston Company 

Opening Night At Symphony 1990 

Bay Banks, Inc. 

Opening Night at Pops 1990 

Lexus 
A Division of Toyota Motor Sales U.S.A., Inc. 

Tanglewood Opening Night 1990 

TDK Electronics Corporation 

Tanglewood Tickets for Children 1990 

Bank of Boston 
Country Curtains and The Red Lion Inn 

BSO Single Concert Sponsors 1990 



For information on these and other corporate funding opportunities, contact 
Madelyne Cuddeback, BSO Director of Corporate Sponsorships, Symphony Hall, 
Boston, MA 02115, (617) 638-9254. 



46 





1990-91 Business Honor Roll ($10,000 and Above) 



Advanced Management Associates 
Harvey Chet Krentzman 

Analog Devices, Inc. 
Ray Stata 

AT&T Network Systems 
John F. McKinnon 

Bank of Boston 
Ira Stepanian 

Barter Connections 
Kenneth C. Barron 

BayBanks, Inc. 
William M. Crozier, Jr. 

Bingham, Dana & Gould 
Joseph Hunt 

Bolt Beranek & Newman 
Stephen R. Levy 

The Boston Company 
Christopher M. Condron 

Boston Edison Company 
Stephen J. Sweeney 

The Boston Globe 
William O. Taylor 

Boston Herald 
Patrick J. Purcell 

Bull HN Information Systems, Inc. 
Roland D. Pampel 

Cahners Publishing Company 
Ron Segel 

Connell Limited Partnership 
William F. Connell 

Coopers & Lybrand 
William K. O'Brien 

Country Curtains 
Jane P. Fitzpatrick 

Delia Femina, McNamee, Inc. 
Michael H. Reingold 

Deloitte & Touche 
James T. McBride 

Digital Equipment Corporation 
Kenneth G. Olsen 

Dynatech Corporation 
J. P. Barger 

Eastern Enterprises 
Ronald S. Ziemba 

EG&G, Inc. 
John M. Kucharski 

The First Boston Corporation 
Malcolm MacColl 

General Cinema Corporation 
Richard A. Smith 



The Gillette Company 
Colman M. Mockler, Jr. 

Graf aeon, Inc. 
H. Wayman Rogers, Jr. 

GTE Products Corporation 
Dean T. Langford 

Hill, Holliday, Connors, Cosmopulos, Inc. 
Jack Connors, Jr. 

The Henley Group 
Paul M. Montrone 

Houghton Mifflin Company 
Nader F. Darehshori 

IBM Corporation 
Paul J. Palmer 

John Hancock Mutual Life Insurance Company 
E. James Morton 

Lexus 

A Division of Toyota Motor Sales, U.S.A., Inc. 
J. Davis Illingworth 

Liberty Mutual Insurance Group 
Gary L. Countryman 

Loomis-Sayles & Company, Inc. 
Charles J. Finlayson 

McKinsey & Company 
Robert P. 0' Block 

Morse Shoe, Inc. 
Manuel Rosenberg 

NEC Corporation 
Tadahiro Sekimoto 

NEC Deutschland GmbH 
Masao Takahashi 

Nestle-Hills Brothers Coffee Company 
Ned Dean 

The New England 
Edward E. Phillips 

New England Telephone Company 
Paul C. O'Brien 

Northern Telecom, Inc. 
Brian Davis 

Nynex Corporation 
William C. Ferguson 

PaineWebber, Inc. 
James F. Cleary 

KPMG Peat Marwick 
Robert D. Happ 

Polaroid Corporation 
I.M. Booth 

Prudential-Bache Capital Funding 
David F. Remington 



47 



1990-91 Business Honor Roll (continued) 



Raytheon Company 
Thomas L. Phillips 

The Red Lion Inn 
John H. Fitzpatrick 

Shawmut Bank, N.A. 
John P. Hamill 

The Stop & Shop Companies, Inc. 
Lewis Schaeneman 



TDK Electronics Corporation 
Takashi Tsujii 

USTrust 
James V. Sidell 

WCRB-102.5 FM 
Richard L. Kaye 

WCVB-TV, Channel 5 Boston 
S. James Coppersmith 



Dinner at 6. 

Symphony at 8. 

Parking at $ 5. 

Make dinner at Boodle's part of 
your night out at the Symphony. 
When you do, you'll not only enjoy 
an award winning dining experi- 
ence from Boston's authentic grill, 
you'll also get special parking 
privileges at the Back Bay Hilton's 
private garage. 

Just show us your tickets at dinner 
on the night of the performance 
and park your car for just $5. And 
with a deal like that, a night at the 
Symphony never sounded better. 




BOOM'S 



OF • BOSTON 

An Authentic Grill 

Lunch and dinner daily. In Boston's Back Bay Hilton. 
Phone (617) BOODLES. 



St. (BowfpH %tsiaxirant 




J\ Charming 19th Century Brick 
Townhouse serving fine continental 
cuisine in contempory informal elegance. 
Offering lunch and dinner with a variety 
of fresh seafood specials daily. Located 
minutes away from Huntington Theatre 
and Symphony Hall. 

99 St. Botolph Street 266-3030 
behind the Colonnade Hotel 

Daily 11:30 -Midnight 



"Nationally Outstanding" 

-Esquire Magazine 




48 




BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONAL LEADERSHIP ASSOCIATION 

The Boston Symphony Orchestra gratefully acknowledges these Business Leaders for their 
generous and valuable support totaling $1,250 and above during the past fiscal year. Names 
which are both capitalized and underscored in this listing make up the Business Honor Roll 
denoting support of $10,000 and above. Capitalization denotes support of $5,000-$9,999, and 
an asterisk indicates support of $2,500-$4,999. 



Accountants 

ARTHUR ANDERSEN & CO. 
William F. Meagher 

* Charles E. DiPesa & Company 
William F. DiPesa 

COOPERS & LYBRAND 
William K. O'Brien 

DELOITTE & TOUCHE 
James T. McBride 

ERNST & YOUNG 
Thomas M. Lankford 

KMPG PEAT MARWICK 
Robert D. Happ 

*Theodore S. Samet & Company 
Theodore S. Samet 

Advertising/Public Relations 

*Arnold Advertising 
Edward Eskandarian 

DELLA FEMINA, MCNAMEE, 
INC. 

Michael H. Reingold 

Elysee Public Relations 
Tanya Keller Dowd 

HILL, HOLLIDAY, CONNORS, 
COSMOPULOS, INC. 
Jack Connors, Jr. 

*Ingalls, Quinn & Johnson 
Bink Garrison 



Aerospace 

'Northrop Corporation 
Kent Kresa 



Architects 

'Cambridge Seven Associates 
Charles Redman 

'LEA Group 
Eugene R. Eisenberg 



Automotive 

J.N. Phillips Glass 
Company, Inc. 
Alan L. Rosenfeld 

Lexus 

A Division of Toyota Motor 
Sales U.S.A., Inc. 
J. Davis Illingworth 



Banking 

BANK OF BOSTON 

Ira Stepanian 

*Bank of New England 
Corporation 
Lawrence K. Fish 

*Baybanks, Inc. 

William M. Crozier, Jr. 

THE BOSTON COMPANY 

Christopher M. Condron, Jr. 

Cambridge Trust Company 
Lewis H. Clark 

CITICORP/CITIBANK 
Walter E. Mercer 

First National Bank of Chicago 
Robert E. Gallery 

* Rockland Trust Company 

John F. Spence, Jr. 

SHAWMUT BANK, N.A. 
John P. Hamill 

* State Street Bank & 
Trust Company 

William S. Edgerly 

USTRUST 
James V. Sidell 

Wainwright Bank & Trust Company 
John M. Plukas 



Building/Contracting 

*Harvey Industries, Inc. 
Frederick Bigony 

J.F. White Contracting Company 
Philip Bonanno 

Lee Kennedy Co., Inc. 
Lee M. Kennedy 

*Moliterno Stone Sales, Inc. 
Kenneth A. Castellucci 

* National Lumber Company 
Louis L. Kaitz 

PERINI CORPORATION 
David B. Perini 



Consumer Goods/Distributors 

BARTER CONNECTIONS 
Kenneth C. Barron 

FAIRWINDS GOURMET COFFEE 
COMPANY 
Michael J. Sullivan 



Lindenmeyr Munroe 

NESTLE-HILLS BROTHERS 
COFFEE COMPANY 
Ned Dean 

O'Donnell-Usen Fisheries 
Arnold S. Wolf 

Welch's 
Everett N. Baldwin 



Education 

BENTLEY COLLEGE 
Gregory Adamian 

Electrical/HVAC 

*p.h. mechanical Corporation 
Paul A. Hayes 

*R & D Electrical Company, Inc. 
Richard D. Pedone 

Electronics 

Alden Electronics, Inc. 
Joseph Girouard 

*Analytical Systems 
Engineering Corporation 
Michael B. Rukin 

PARLEX CORPORATION 
Herbert W. Pollack 

Energy 

CABOT CORPORATION 
Samuel W. Bodman 

Engineering 

Goldberg-Zoino & Associates, Inc. 
Donald T. Goldberg 

The Thompson & Lichtner 
Company, Inc. 
John D. Stelling 

Entertainment/Media 

GENERAL CINEMA CORPORATION 
Richard A. Smith 

National Amusements, Inc. 
Sumner M. Redstone 

Finance /Venture Capital 

*3i Corporation 
Ivan N. Momtchiloff 



49 



'■■■•" i '■ " ■ ■ 



Carson Limited Partnership 
Herbert Carver 

THE FIRST BOSTON 
CORPORATION 

Malcolm MacColl 

GE CAPITAL CORPORATE 
FINANCE GROUP 
Richard A. Goglia 

KRUPP COMPANIES 
George Krupp 



Food Service/Industry 

Au Bon Pain 
Louis I. Kane 

"Boston Showcase Company 
Jason E. Starr 

Cordel Associates, Inc. 
James B. Hangstefer 

Johnson O'Hare Co., Inc. 
Harry O'Hare 



Footwear 

Converse, Inc. 
Gilbert Ford 

J. Baker, Inc. 
Sherman N. Baker 

"Jones & Vining, Inc. 
Sven A. Vaule, Jr. 

MORSE SHOE, INC. 

Manuel Rosenberg 

"Reebok International Ltd. 
Paul Fireman 

"The Rockport Corporation 
Anthony Tiberii 

THE STRIDE RITE 
CORPORATION 
Arnold S. Hiatt 



Furnishings/Housewares 

ARLEY MERCHANDISE 
CORPORATION 
David I. Riemer 

BBF Corporation 
Boruch B. Frusztajer 

COUNTRY CURTAINS 
Jane P. Fitzpatrick 

'Jofran Sales, Inc. 
Robert D. Roy 

Graphic Design 

CLARK/LINSKY DESIGN 
Robert H. Linsky 

INDEPENDENT DESIGN 
Patrick White 



High Technology/Electronics 

Alden Products Company 
Betsy Alden 

ANALOG DEVICES, INC. 

Ray Stata 

*Aritech Corp. 
James A. Synk 

Automatic Data Processing 
Arthur S. Kranseler 

BOLT BERANEK AND 
NEWMAN, INC. 



Stephen R. Levy 

BULL HN INFORMATION 
SYSTEMS, INC. 



Roland D. Pampel 

*Cerberus Technologies, Inc. 
George J. Grabowski 

Costar Corporation 
Otto Morningstar 

CSC PARTNERS, INC. 
Paul J. Crowley 

DIGITAL EQUIPMENT 
CORPORATION 
Kenneth G. 01 sen 

DYNATECH CORPORATION 
J. P. Barger 

EG&G, INC. 
John M. Kucharski 

EMC CORPORATION 
Richard J. Egan 

Helix Technology Corporation 
Robert J. Lepofsky 

THE HENLEY GROUP 
Paul M. Montrone 

HEWLETT PACKARD COMPANY 
Ben L. Holmes 

IBM CORPORATION 
Paul J. Palmer 

*Intermetrics Inc. 
Joseph A. Saponaro 

IONICS, INC. 
Arthur L. Goldstein 

*Lotus Development Corporation 
Jim P. Manzi 

*M/A-Com, Inc. 
Robert H. Glaudel 

MILLIPORE CORPORATION 
John A. Gilmartin 

♦The MITRE Corporation 
Charles A. Zraket 

NEC CORPORATION 
Tadahiro Sekimoto 

NEC DEUTSCHLAND GmbH 
Masao Takahasi 

*Orion Research, Inc. 
Alexander Jenkins III 

50 



POLAROID CORPORATION 
I.M. Booth 

PRIME COMPUTER, INC. 

John Shields 

♦Printed Circuit Corporation 
Peter Sarmanian 

RAYTHEON COMPANY 
Thomas L. Phillips 

SofTech, Inc. 
Justus Lowe, Jr. 

*TASC 
Arthur Gelb 

TDK ELECTRONICS 
CORPORATION 
Takashi Tsujii 

THERMO ELECTRON 
CORPORATION 

George N. Hatsopoulos 

XRE Corporation 
John K. Grady 



Hotels/Restaurants 

57 Park Plaza Hotel 
Nicholas L. Vinios 

*Back Bay Hilton 
Carol Summerfield 

*Boston Marriott Copley Place 
Jurgen Giesbert 

THE RED LION INN 
John H. Fitzpatrick 

*Sheraton Boston Hotel & Towers 
Steve Foster 

*Sonesta International 
Hotels Corporation 
Paul Sonnabend 

*The Westin Hotel, Copley Place 
David King 

Industrial Distributors 

*Alles Corporation 
Stephen S. Berman 

Brush Fibers, Inc. 
Ian P. Moss 

* Eastern Refractories Company 
David S. Feinzig 

Millard Metal Service Center 
Donald Millard, Jr. 



Insurance 

*American Title Insurance Company 
Terry E. Cook 

*Arkwright 
Enzo Rebula 

Caddell & Byers 
John Dolan 




eHHBr 




CAMERON & COLBY CO., INC. 
Lawrence S. Doyle 

*Charles H. Watkins & Company 
Paul D. Bertrand 

Chubb Group of Insurance Cos. 
John Gillespie 

FRANK B. HALL & CO. OF 
MASSACHUSETTS, INC. 
William F. Newell 

* International Insurance Group 

John Perkins 

JOHN HANCOCK MUTUAL 
LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY 
E. James Morton 

*Johnson & Higgins of 
Massachusetts, Inc. 
Robert A. Cameron 

*Keystone Provident Life 
Insurance Company 
Robert G. Sharp 

Lexington Insurance Company 
Kevin H. Kelley 

LIBERTY MUTUAL INSURANCE 
GROUP 
Gary L. Countryman 

THE NEW ENGLAND 

Edward E. Phillips 

SAFETY INSURANCE COMPANY 
Richard B. Simches 

* Sedgwick James of 
New England, Inc. 

P. Joseph McCarthy 

Sullivan Risk Management Group 
John H. Sullivan 

*Sun Life Assurance Company 
of Canada 
Paul Vaskas 



Investments 

*Baring International Investment, Ltd. 
John F. McNamara 

*Bear Stearns & Company, Inc. 
Keith H. Kretschmer 

*Essex Investment Management 
Company, Inc. 
A. Davis Noble, Jr. 

* Goldman, Sachs & Company 
Peter D. Kiernan 

KAUFMAN & COMPANY 
Sumner Kaufman 

LOOMIS-SAYLES & COMPANY, 
INC. 
Charles J. Finlayson 

PAINEWEBBER, INC. 



James F. Cleary 



PAINEWEBBER CAPITAL 
MARKETS 
Joseph F. Patton 

SALOMON INC. 
John V. Carberry 

*Spaulding Investment Company 
C.H. Spaulding 

* State Street Development 
Management Corp. 
John R. Gallagher III 

TUCKER ANTHONY, INC. 
John Goldsmith 

Whitman & Evans, Art Investments 
Eric F. Mourlot 

*Woodstock Corporation 
Nelson J. Darling, Jr. 



Legal 

BINGHAM, DANA & GOULD 
Joseph Hunt 

*Choate, Hall & Stewart 
Robert Gargill 

Dickerman Law Offices 
Lola Dickerman 

*Fish & Richardson 
Robert E. Hillman 

* Gaston & Snow 

Richard J. Santagati 

GOLDSTEIN & MANELLO 
Richard J. Snyder 

GOODWIN, PROCTER AND HOAR 
Robert B. Fraser 

*Hemenway & Barnes 
John J. Madden 

Hubbard & Ferris 
Charles A. Hubbard 

*Joyce & Joyce 
Thomas J. Joyce 

*Lynch, Brewer, Hoffman & Sands 
Owen B. Lynch 

MINTZ, LEVIN, COHN, FERRIS, 
GLOVSKY & POPEO, P.C. 
Francis X. Meaney 

Nissenbaum Law Offices 
Gerald L. Nissenbaum 

* Nutter, McClennen & Fish 

John K. P. Stone III 

PALMER & DODGE 
Robert E. Sullivan 

*Rackemann, Sawyer & Brewster 
Stephen Carr Anderson 

Sarrouf, Tarricone & Flemming 
Camille F. Sarrouf 

Weiss, Angoff, Coltin, Koski & 
Wolf, P.C. 
Dudley A. Weiss 



Management/Finaneial/Consulting 

ADVANCED MANAGEMENT 
ASSOCIATES 
Harvey Chet Krentzman 

*Bain & Company, Inc. 
William W. Bain 

THE BOSTON CONSULTING 
GROUP 
Jonathan L. Isaacs 

*Corporate Decisions 
David J. Morrison 

*Haynes Management, Inc. 
G. Arnold Haynes 

Index Group 
David G. Robinson 

Irma Mann Strategic Marketing 
Irma Mann Stearns 

Jason M. Cortell 
& Associates, Inc. 
Jason M. Cortell 

Lochridge & Company, Inc. 

Richard K. Lochridge 
MCKINSEY & COMPANY 

Robert P. O'Block 

The Pioneer Group, Inc. 
William H. Keogh 

PRUDE NTIAL-BACHE 
CAPITAL FUNDING 
David F. Remington 

*Rath & Strong 
Dan Ciampa 

* Towers Perrin 

J. Russell South worth 

* William M. Mercer, Inc. 

Chester D. Clark 

*The Wyatt Company 
Paul R. Daoust 

Yankelovich Clancy Shulman 
Kevin Clancy 

Manufacturer's Representatives 

*Ben Mac Enterprises 
Larry Benhardt 
Thomas McAuliffe 

*Paul R. Cahn Associates, Inc. 
Paul R. Cahn 

Manufacturing/Industry 

*AGFA Corporation 
Ken Draeger 

*AMCEL Corporation 
Lloyd Gordon 

*Avedis Zildjian Company 
Armand Zildjian 

The Biltrite Corporation 
Stanley J. Bernstein 

Boston Acoustics, Inc. 
Frank Reed 



51 



C.R. Bard, Inc. 
Robert H. McCaffrey 

Century Manufacturing Company 
Joseph Tiberio 

Chelsea Industries, Inc. 
Ronald G. Casty 

CONNELL LIMITED PARTNERSHIP 

William F. Connell 

Dennison Manufacturing Company 
Nelson G. Gifford 

ERVING PAPER MILLS 
Charles B. Housen 

PLEXcon Company, Inc. 
Mark R. Ungerer 

Georgia-Pacific Corp. 
Maurice W. Kring 

THE GILLETTE COMPANY 
Colman M. Mockler, Jr. 

GTE PRODUCTS CORPORATION 
Dean T. Langford 

HARVARD FOLDING BOX 
COMPANY, INC. 
Melvin A. Ross 

H.K. Webster Company, Inc. 
Dean K. Webster 

HMK Group Companies, Ltd. 
Joan L. Karol 

'Hudson Lock, Inc. 
Norman Stavisky 

Industrial Filter and Equipment 

Corporation 

i Donald R. Patnode 

Kendall Company 
i J. Dale Sherratt 

LEACH & GARNER COMPANY 
Philip F. Leach 

Leggett & Piatt, Inc. 
Alexander M. Levine 

NEW ENGLAND BUSINESS 
SERVICE, INC. 
Richard H. Rhoads 

Parks Corporation 
Lee Davidson 

Pierce Aluminum 
Robert W. Pierce 

Statler Tissue Company 
Leonard Sugerman 

Superior Brands, Inc. 
Richard J. Phelps 

Tech Pak, Inc. 
J. William Flynn 

Textron, Inc. 
B.F. Dolan 

Wire Belt Company of America 
F. Wade Greer 



Media 

THE BOSTON GLOBE 
William 0. Taylor 

BOSTON HERALD 
Patrick J. Purcell 

PEOPLE MAGAZINE 
Peter Krieger 

WCRB- 102.5 FM 
Richard L. Kaye 

WCVB-TV, CHANNEL 5 BOSTON 



S. James Coppersmith 



Personnel 

TAD TECHNICAL SERVICES 
CORPORATION 
David J. McGrath, Jr. 



Printing 

*Bowne of Boston, Inc. 
Donald J. Cannava 

Customforms, Inc. 
David A. Granoff 

DANIELS PRINTING COMPANY 

Lee S. Daniels 

*Espo Litho Co., Inc. 
David M. Fromer 

George H. Dean Company 
Earl Michaud 

GRAFACON, INC. 
H. Wayman Rogers, Jr. 

Publishing 

Addison-Wesley Publishing Company, 
Inc. 
Warren R. Stone 

CAHNERS PUBLISHING COMPANY 
Ron Segel 

HOUGHTON MIFFLIN COMPANY 
Nader F. Darehshori 

Little, Brown & Company 
Kevin L. Dolan 



Real Estate/Development 

* Boston Capital Partners 
Christopher W. Collins 
Herbert F. Collins 
Richard J. DeAgazio 
John P. Manning 

* Combined Properties, Inc. 
Stanton L. Black 

*The Flatley Company 
Thomas J. Flatley 

Heafitz Development Company 
Lewis Heafitz 



Hilon Development Corporation 
Joan Eliachar 

*John M. Corcoran & Company 
John M. Corcoran 

Keller Co., Inc. 
Joseph P. Keller 

*Leggat McCall Properties, Inc. 
Dennis F. Callahan 

Northland Investment Corporation 
Robert A. Danziger 

Tetlow Realty Associates 
Richard J. Gilbert 

*Trammell Crow Company 
Arthur DeMartino 

Urban Investment & Development 
Rudy K. Umscheid 

*Windsor Building Associates 
Mona F. Freedman 



Retail 

* Channel Home Centers, Inc. 
Malcolm L. Sherman 

FILENE'S 
David P. Mullen 

*Jordan Marsh Company 
Richard F. Van Pelt 

Karten's Jewelers 
Joel Karten 

*Neiman Marcus 
William D. Roddy 

Out of Town News, Inc. 
Sheldon Cohen 

*Saks Fifth Avenue 
Alison Strieder Mayher 

THE STOP & SHOP COMPANIES, 
INC. 



Lewis Schaeneman 

TJX COMPANIES 
Ben Cammarata 



Science/Medical 

Baldpate Hospital, Inc. 
Lucille M. Batal 

Blake & Blake Genealogists 
Richard A. Blake, Jr. 

CHARLES RP7ER 
LABORATORIES, INC. 
Henry L. Foster 

"CompuChem Corporation 
Gerard Kees Verkerk 

J.A. WEBSTER, INC. 
John A. Webster 

"Portsmouth Regional Hospital 
William J. Schuler 



52 







Services 

*Don Law Productions 
Don Law 

*Giltspur Exhibits/Boston 
Thomas E. Knott 

Shaughnessy & Ahern Co. 
John J. Shaughnessy 

Wild Acre Inns, Inc. 
Bernard S. Yudowitz 



Software/Information Services 

* International Data Group 
Patrick J. McGovern 

*Phoenix Technologies Foundation 
Neil Colvin 



Travel/Transportation 


NEW ENGLAND TELEPHONE 


* Crimson Travel Service/ 
Thomas Cook 


COMPANY 
Paul C. O'Brien 


David Pareskv 


NORTHERN TELECOM, INC. 


*Heritage Travel, Inc. 


Brian Davis 


Donald R. Sohn 


NYNEX CORPORATION 




William C. Ferguson 


Telecommunications 




AT&T 


Utilities 


Robert Babbitt 


BOSTON EDISON COMPANY 


*AT&T 


Stephen J. Sweeney 


Glenn Swift 


EASTERN ENTERPRISES 


AT&T NETWORK SYSTEMS 


Ronald S. Ziemba 


John F. McKinnon 


New England Electric System 


CELLULAR ONE 


Joan T. Bok 


Charles Hoffman 





you art cordially invited to sample our 

Symphony iMenu 

at 

*The Cafe (Promenade 




7 or Reservations Call, 61/ r -424 -7000 

Reduced partying rates when dining at c Tht Colonnade for 

Symphony (Patrons. 

The Colonnade "Hotel is located, at 120 Huntington Avenue, 'Boston 



53 



Dear Patron of the Orchestra: 

For many years the Boston Sym- 
phony Orchestra has been known 
as the "aristocrat of American 
orchestras." There is indeed a 
distinctive "BSO sound" that has 
earned worldwide acclaim and has 
attracted the greatest musicians to 
audition for membership in the 
orchestra. 

An important ingredient in the 
creation of this unique sound is 
having the finest musical instruments 
on the BSO's stage. However, the cost of many of these instruments 
(especially in the string sections) has become staggeringly high, and it is 
incumbent upon the Symphony to take steps to assure that musicians in 
key positions who do not themselves own great instruments have access 
to them for use in the orchestra. 




Two recent initiatives have been taken to address this concern: First, in 
1988, the Boston Safe Deposit and Trust Company stepped forward 
with a creative loan program that is making it possible for players to 
borrow at one and a half percent below prime to purchase instruments. 
Second, last fall, the incentive of a Kresge Foundation challenge grant 
helped launch our effort to raise a fund of $1 million for the Orchestra 
to draw upon from time to time to purchase instruments for use by the 
players. The BSO in this case would retain ownership. 

Donations of both outright gifts and instruments are being sought to 
establish the BSO's Instrument Acquisition Fund. Fine pianos, 
period instruments, special bows, heirloom violins, etc. all make 
ideal gifts. Opportunities for naming instruments and for other 
forms of donor recognition may be available according to the wishes 
of the donor. 

If you are interested in this program please contact me or Joyce Serwitz 
in the orchestra's Development Office at (617) 638-9273. Your support 
will help make a difference that will be music to our ears! 



George H. Kidder 
President 



The Higginson Society 



# ■•-< 



Boston 

Symphony 

Annual 

Fund 

KEEP GREAT MUSIC ALIVE 



The Boston Symphony Orchestra is grateful to 
the following contributors for their generous sup- 
port during the 1989-90 season. These patrons 
have each donated $1,500 or more to either the 
Boston Symphony Annual Fund or one or more 
of the Capital Gift programs. Gifts to the 
Annual Fund are unrestricted and are applied 
directly to the Orchestra's operating budget. 
Capital Gifts are restricted and may be added to 
the Orchestra's endowment or designated for the 
physical enhancement of the BSO facilities. This 
list acknowledges contributions received between 
September 1, 1989 and August 31, 1990. 




Annual Fund Contributors 



Patrons 



Mr. and Mrs. J. P. Barger 
Mr. and Mrs. John Barnard, Jr. 
Earle M. Chiles 

Mr. and Mrs. Lewis S. Dabney 
Mr. and Mrs. Nelson J. Darling, Jr. 
Dr. and Mrs Charles C. Dickinson 
Mrs. Harris Fahnestoek 
The Honorable and Mrs. John H. 
Fitzpatrick 



Sponsors 



Mr. and Mrs. Harlan E. Anderson 
Mr. and Mrs. John M. Bradley 
Roger and Florence Chesterton-Norris 
Mr. and Mrs. Eugene H. Clapp II 
Mr. and Mrs. John F. Cogan, Jr. 
Haskell and Ina Gordon 
Mr. and Mrs. James H. Grew 



Mr. and Mrs. Richard M. Fraser 

Mrs. Kenneth J. Germeshausen 

Mrs. Henry M. Greenleaf 

Mr. and Mrs. Francis W. Hatch 

Ms. Susan Morse Hilles 

Mr. and Mrs. George H. Kidder 

Dr. and Mrs. Edwin H. Land 

Mr. and Mrs. R. Willis Leith, Jr. 



Mrs. Henry S. Hall, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Bayard Henry 
Ms. Susan B. Kaplan 

and Mr. Ami Trauber 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert D. King 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles P. Lyman 
Mr. and Mrs. William B. Moses, Jr. 



Mrs. Ellis Little 

Robert W. MacPherson 

Mrs. August R.' Meyer 

Mrs. Robert B. Newman 

Mrs. James H. Perkins 

Mrs. George R. Rowland 

William F. and Juliana W. Thompson 

Anonymous (1) 



Mr. and Mrs. Thomas A. Rosse 
Mrs. Donald B. Sinclair 
Dr. and Mrs. W. Davies Sohier 
Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Stoneman 
Charles M. Werly 
Anonymous (6) 



Fellows 



Mr. and Mrs. Robert W. Adams 

Mrs. Weston W. Adams 

Mr. and Mrs. Vernon R. Alden 

Mr. and Mrs. David B. Arnold, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth C. Barron 

Mrs. Richard E. Bennink 

James K. Beranek 

W. Walter Boyd 

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Mr. and Mrs. John L. Cooper 

Mrs. Pierre De Beaumont 

Mrs. Charles Freedom Eaton, Jr. 



Mr. and Mrs. William Elfers 

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Mrs. Robert G. Fuller 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas J. Galligan, Jr. 

John Gamble 

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Mr. and Mrs. Richard D. Hill 

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Mrs. Louise Shonk Kelly 

Mr. and Mrs. Carl Koch 

Mr. and Mrs. John M. Kucharski 

Mr. and Mrs. Stephen R. Levy 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. Millar 

55 



Robert M. Morse 

Mr. and Mrs. E. James Morton 

David B. Perini 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. Remis 

Mr. and Mrs. Francis P. Sears, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Malcolm L. Sherman 

Dr. and Mrs. Fredrick J. Stare 

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Mr. and Mrs. Erwin N. Ziner 

Anonymous (3) 



Members 






Mr. and Mrs. William F. Achtmeyer 

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Professor and Mrs. Rae D. Anderson 

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Miss Amy Davol 

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Ms. Phyllis Dohanian 

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Dr. Richard W. Dwight 

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Arthur S. Goldberg 

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Professor and Mrs. Ray A. Goldberg 

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E. Morton Jennings 

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Theodore Jones 

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Ms. Adele Wick 
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Mr. and Mrs. Gerard F. Murphy 
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Gary M. Palter 
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Mr. and Mrs. Eugene J. Ribakoff 
Mr. and Mrs. David G. Robinson 
Mr. and Mrs. John Ex Rodgers 
Mr. and Mrs. Jerome Rosenfeld 



56 



Dr. Jordan S. Ruboy 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Saltonstall 

Mr. and Mrs. Albert J. Sandler 

Mrs. George Lee Sargent 

Mr. and Mrs. John G. Schmid 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul A. Schmid 

Mr. and Mrs. George G. Schwenk 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael S. Scott Morton 

Alan H. Scovell 

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Mr. and Mrs. Robert A. Sinclair 

Mr. and Mrs. Jeffrey P. Somers 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles H. Spaulding 

Mrs. Irma Mann Stearns and 

Dr. Norman Stearns 
Mr. and Mrs. Thornton Stearns 
Mr. and Mrs. Ira Stepanian 
Mr. and Mrs. Herbert B. Stern 
Mrs. Edward S. Stimpson 
Mr. and Mrs. Harris E. Stone 



Mr. and Mrs. Henry S. Stone 
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Mr. and Mrs. Roger Voisin 



Mrs. Evelyn R. Wagstaff-Callahan 

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Stetson Whitcher 

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Robert W. White 

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Mr. and Mrs. Thomas H. P. Whitney 

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Mr. and Mrs. Thomas B. Williams 

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Miss Elizabeth Woolley 

Anonymous (15) 



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Professor and Mrs. Rae D. Anderson 

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Mr. and Mrs. Sherwood E. Bain 

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Caroline Thayer Bland 

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Mrs. Ralph Bradley (d) 

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Ms. Phyllis Brooks 

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Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Gene Casty 

Mr. and Mrs. C. Thomas Clagett, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. James F. Cleary 

Mrs. George H. A. Clowes 

Mr. and Mrs. John F. Cogan, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Julian Cohen 

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Mr. and Mrs. William H. Congleton 

Mr. and Mrs. William F. Connell 

Mrs. A. Werk Cook 

Mr. and Mrs. Lewis S. Dabney 

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Mr. and Mrs. Michael H. Davis 

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Mrs. Charles Freedom Eaton, Jr. 



Capital Gifts Contributors 

Mr. and Mrs. Goetz B. Eaton 
The Honorable and 

Mrs. John H. Fitzpatrick 
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Mrs. Kenneth J. Germeshausen 
Carol R. and Avram J. Goldberg 
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Barbara and Steven Grossman 
Catherine Louise Hagney (d) 
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Mr. and -Mrs. Stanley H. Kaplan 
Mr. and Mrs. George H. Kidder 
Mr. and Mrs. Carl Koch 
Dr. and jMrs. David I. Kosowsky 
Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Chet Krentzman 
Mr. and Mrs. George F. Krim 
Mr. and Mrs. R. Willis Leith, Jr. 
Dr. and Mrs. Clinton N. Levin 
Mr. and Mrs. Caleb Loring, Jr. 
Mrs. Frederick H. Lovejoy, Sr. 
Dr. and Mrs. Frederick H. Lovejoy, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles P. Lyman 
Mr. and Mrs. Harry L. Marks 
Mrs. August R. Meyer 
Mr. and Mrs. Nathan R. Miller 
Mr. and Mrs. Paul M. Montrone 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard P. Morse 



Mr. and Mrs. William B. Moses, Jr. 

Mrs. Robert B. Newman 

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Dr. Peter L. Page 

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Miss Pauline Perry 

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Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Pierce 

Mr. and Mrs. William J. Poorvu 

Mr. and Mrs. Irving W. Rabb 

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Dr. and Mrs. W. Davies Sohier 

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Miss Elizabeth B. Storer 

William F. and Juliana W. Thompson 

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Lewis H. Weinstein 

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Mr. and Mrs. Thomas H. P. Whitney 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald B. Wilson 

Mrs. John J. Wilson 

Anonymous (8) 



57 



T^/iot 6etter uxu^ to start t/i& c/qu? 

<SBircl&ofi(p&, mu&io> as comfurta/d& conytwnions, 

as reasoned 'assessment oftA& dcuf&neioS', 

assens& oftA& u>ea/Aerfea{tern&, andtAen — 



moromusio. 




^{mericass most /istened ' tch programs of 
c/assical, traditional and ' ctmtemfiorar^ musio, 
Jk(ornin^bro~musica/u>itn^ 

iss^resented ' eoert^ dae/sjronv sevens ti/l noons 
onsStiTtion&ofth^lSdMic^^^ 

and ' is; Aeard ins tA& ySostons areas 









Jktorfus^ftro-mussicwi&macde'^^ 
jjrastf&</rom/ &a/6vt& and ' ($cuf&8anA&, and by fflcwe/odi/. 

58 



^H^HII^^M^^BBIM^^H^HBH^^^^^HI 






Friends of the Boston Symphony Orchestra 




Friends 






$750 - $1,499 






Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Abeles 


Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Fisher 


Mr. and Mrs. Robert P. Pitts 


Miss Barbara Adams 


Stefan M. Freudenberger 


Mr. and Mrs. Albert Pratt 


Mr. and Mrs. Charles F. Adams 


Dr. and Mrs. Orrie M. Friedman 


Nathaniel Pulsifer 


Ms. Joan K. Alden 


Robert P. Giddings 


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Mr. and Mrs. Philip K. Allen 


Mr. and Mrs. Nelson Gore 


Ms. Patricia B. Rice 


Mr. and Mrs. Walter Amory 


Mrs. Charles D. Gowing 


Mr. and Mrs. David Rockefeller, Jr. 


Mr. and Mrs. John E. Andrews II 


Mr. and Mrs. Harold K. Gross 


Alford Paul Rudnick 


Mrs. Elsie J. Apthorp 


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Mrs. Louis Rudolph 


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Robert L. Harris 


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Mr. and Mrs. Milan A. Heath, Jr. 


Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. Scully 


Mrs. Richard Baer 


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Mr. and Mrs. Edwin W. Hiam 


George C. Seybolt 


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Mrs. Petie Hilsinger 


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Gordon Holmes 


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George A. Chamberlain III 


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Richard 0. Lodewick 


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Mr. and Mrs. Paul C. Child 


Graham Atwell Long 


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Mr. & Mrs. Josiah Stevenson TV 


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Toshitsugu Takeuchi 


Victor Constantiner 


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G. Robert Tod 


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Mrs. Franklin Dexter 


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Sang-Seek Park 


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Dr. and Mrs. Jack S. Parker 


Ms. Katharine Winthrop 


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Anonymous (11) 


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Mrs. Paul Pigors 




and Dr. Mary E. Wilson 






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$350 - $749 






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Mrs. Putnam Cilley 


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and Ms. Peggy Reiser 


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Mare H. Cramer 


Miss Anahid Barmakian 


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Mrs. Ernest B. Dane, Jr. 


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Mrs. Adrian J. Broggini 


Mrs. Brenton H. Dickson III 


Ms. Norma Jean Bassett 


Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd Millard Bunting III 

59 


Tom DiPietro 



&k 



.*'■'■■ 



Ms. Victoria J. Dodd 

Paul Doguereau 

Mrs. Malcolm Donald 

Elbert Drazy 

Mr. and Mrs. F. C. Dumaine 

John Dwinell 

Ms. Majorie C. Dyer 

Jerome Eaton 

Mrs. Phillip Eiseman 

Mr. and Mrs. William V. Ellis 

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Mr. and Mrs. Murray W. Finard 

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Miss Elaine Foster 

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Ms. Suzanne Freedman 

Edward B. Galligan 

Mrs. Charles Mack Ganson 

Miss Eleanor Garfield 

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Mr. and Mrs. A. Edward Giberti 

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Martin Gottlieb 

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George L. Greenfield 

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Mr. and Mrs. Joseph D. Hinkle 

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Miss Isabel B. Hooker 

Mrs. Joseph Howe 

Mrs. David H. Howie 

Roger H. Howland 

Dr. Richard F. Hoyt, Jr. 

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Martin L. Jack 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Jackson, Jr. 

Miss Elizabeth B. Jackson 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry B. Jackson 

Mrs. Paul M. Jacobs 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul Jameson 

Dr. and Mrs. Charles F. Kane 

Ms. Sarah Kantor 



Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Kaplan 

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Mr. and Mrs. Allen Kluchman 

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Mr. and Mrs. James N. Krebs 

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Mr. and Mrs. W. Loeber Landau 

Mr. and Mrs. Roger Landay 

Mr. and Mrs. Gene Landy 

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Mrs. Paul B. Le Baron 

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Leonard Lynch, Jr. 

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Dr. Judith Marquis 

and Mr. Keith F. Nelson 
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Mrs. Roy R. Merchant, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert W. Meserve 
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Takashi Nakajima 
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and Ms. Nancy Goodwin 
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Dr. Michael C.J. Putnam 
Richard Quinn 



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Anonymous (24) 



60 









Friends 

$250 - $349 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard M. Adams 
Edward Addison 
Mr. and Mrs. Jack Adelson 
Mrs. Nelson Aldrich 
Mrs. Theodore Ames 
Mr. and Mrs. John A. Anderson, Jr. 
Steven B. Andrus 
Ms. Jill A. Angel 
Richard D. Angel 
Mr. and Mrs. David Auerbach 
Lloyd Axelrod, MD and Eleanor C. Axelrod 
James C. Ayer 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard P. Baccari 
Dr. and Mrs. George P. Baker, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Spencer H. Baker 
Yonathan Bard 

Mr. and Mrs. Brewster Barnard 
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Barnes 
Dr. and Mrs. Joseph R. Barrie 
Ms. Margaret E. Bass 
Mr. and Mrs. Nathaniel B. Bates 
Mr. and Mrs. Edward H. Bauerband, Jr. 
Dr. and Mrs. Martin D. Becker 
Mr. and Mrs. F. Gregg Bemis 
Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Berman 
Mrs. David W. Bernstein 
Mrs. V. Stoddard Bigelow 
Mrs. Charles S. Bird III 
Maxwell V. Blum 
Mrs. Anne C. Booth 
Mr. and Mrs. I. Macallister Booth 
Jeffrey and Margie Borenstein 
Morris B. Boms te in 
Gustavo Bottan 
Mr. and Mrs. Bruce A. Bouton 
Senator Walter J. Boverini 
Raymond A. Bowman 
James C. Boyd 
Lee C. Bradley HI 
Mr. and Mrs. Daniel M. Braude 
Mrs. Edward P. Breau 
John H. Brooks, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. E. Burton Brown 
Mr. and Mrs. Jacob B. Brown, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Vance Brown 
Mr. and Mrs. Donald Bruck 
Reverend Thomas W. Buckley 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard B. Bunn 
Betty 0. and Richard S. Burdick 
Frank Burge 

Mr. and Mrs. Rodman Bun- 
Mr. and Mrs. Walter M. Cabot 
Dr. Charlotte C. Campbell 
Richard P. Campbell 
Mr. and Mrs. David A. Cane 
Leon M. Cangiano, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. James Carangelo 
David Carder III 
Mr. and Mrs. David H. Carls 
Ray F. Carmichael 
Dorothy and Herbert Carver 
Mr. and Mrs. Edward F. Carye 
John Caswell 
Mrs. Ephron Catlin 



Miss Stephanie Chamberlain 

Mr. and Mrs. Hugh M. Chapin 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. Chatfield 

Dr. F. Sargent Cheever 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard N. Cheever 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Y. Chittick, Jr. 

Mrs. Miles Nelson Clair 

Roger E. Clapp 

Mr. and Mrs. Ernest C. Clark, Jr. 

Mrs. Ronald C. Clark 

Dr. and Mrs. Robert B. Clarke 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles C. Colby HI 

Mrs. Donald W. Comstock 

Johns H. Congdon 

Thomas E. Connolly 

Woolsey S. Conover 

Mr. and Mrs. John Cook 

Mr. and Mrs. James Cooke 

Mr. and Mrs. Sheldon Cooperman 

Lucy A. and James E. Coppola 

Mr. and Mrs. Allan M. Cormaek 

Robert E. Corriveau 

Mr. and Mrs. Jason M. Cortell 

Mrs. Robert W. Costello 

Dr. and Mrs. J. Holland Cotter 

Mr. and Mrs. David Baer Cotton 

Mr. and Mrs. John C. Coughlin, Jr. 

Paul M. Crowe 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Cushman 

Arnold R. Cutler 

Jan E. Dabrowski, Esq. 

Mr. and Mrs. John D. Dalton 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Danziger 

Mrs. Elizabeth K. Darlington 

Mrs. Freeman I. Davison, Jr. 

James De Jesu and Marion De Jesu 

Dr. and Mrs. Roman W. DeSanctis 

Dr. and Mrs. Norman H. Diamond 

Mrs. Dominic P. Dimaggio 

Miss Catherine-Mary Donovan 

Dr. and Mrs. Barry C. Dorn 

Mr. and Mrs. Melbourne S. Dorr 

Thomas B. Draper 

Mr. and Mrs. John P. Driscoll, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael Dziekan 

Reverend and Mrs. William S. Eaton 

Mrs. Gladys A. Eggiman 

Dr. and Mrs. John P. Eliopoulos 

Charles H. Ellis, Jr. 

Mrs. William P. Ellison 

Mrs. Gardner G. Emmons 

Mr. and Mrs. Gerald S. Epstein 

Mr. and Mrs. Steven S. Feinberg 

Judith and Roger Feingold 

Martin P. Feldman 

William W. Fenniman 

Paul W. Finnegan 

Mr. and Mrs. Niles D. Flanders 

Dr. and Mrs. Brent P. Fletcher 

F. Murray Forbes, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Sumner J. Foster 

Dr. and Mrs. John A. Fox 

Mrs. Marie H. Fox 

Walter S. Fox, Jr. 



Mrs. Edward L. Francis 

Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Richard Frank 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry Freedman 

Mr. and Mrs. Marc Friedlander 

Barry L. Friedman 

Mrs. John Furman 

Mr. and Mrs. Steve Ganak 

Richard D. Gass 

Ara and Pamela Gechijian 

Rabbi and Mrs. Everett E. Gendler 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul B. Gilbert 

Mr. and Mrs. John Gilmartin 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Glasser 

Alan Goldberg 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles M. Goldman 

Mr. and Mrs. Macey J. Goldman 

Mrs. Barbara J. Goldsmith 

Mr. and Mrs. Arnold Goldstein 

Frederick Goldstein 

Mrs. John D. Gordan, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. William H. Gorham 

Kevin J. Gorny 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas E. Gottwald 

Dr. Robert A. Gough, Jr. 

Dr. Ekkehard Grampp 

Ms. Margaret M. Grant 

Mr. and Mrs. Raymond C. Green 

Mr. and Mrs. Nathan Greenberg 

John H. Griffin 

Mr. and Mrs. James G. Groninger 

Ms. Mona Gross 

Mrs. Helen Grossman 

Mr. and Mrs. John Grover 

Mr. and Mrs. Arnold Gurin 

Mrs. Lyman P. Gutterson 

Edward Guzovsky 

Mr. and Mrs. John C. Hass 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur T. Hadley 

Mrs. Frederick W. Haffenreffer 

Mr. and Mrs. George A. Hall 

Mrs. Ariel Halpern 

Mr. and Mrs. Harley L. Hansen 

Donald Harding 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. Hargrove 

Frank L. Harrington 

Mrs. Arthur W. Harris 

Mr. and Mrs. Steven Harth 

Arthur L. Hatcher, Jr. 

Mrs. Richard C. Hayes 

William Hardy Hayes 

Mr. and Mrs. G. Arnold Haynes 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard H. Heaton 

Frank Hegarty 

Mrs. Patricia L. Heilner 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert P. Henderson 

Gardner Hendrie 

Mr. and Mrs. Jerome S. Hertz 

Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence A. Hicks 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert W. Hinman 

Ms. Roberta Hirsh 

Mrs. Karl J. Hirshman 

John W. F. Hobbs, Jr. 

Ms. Linda M. Holbrook 

Mr. and Mrs. H. Brian Holland 



61 



Mr. and Mrs. Paul M. Holland 

Mr. and Mrs. James Hollis III 

Ms. Charlotte Hollister 

Miss Majorie B. Holman 

Ross G. Honig 

Alfred Hoose 

Ms. Gertrude D. Houghton 

Dr. and Mrs. Terry Howard 

Mr. and Mrs. Christopher W. Hurd 

Constantine Hutchins, Jr. 

Dr. and Mrs. Roger L. Hybels 

Mark Hyman, Jr. 

Joseph Incandela 

Mr. and Mrs. R. Blake Ireland 

Mr. and Mrs. Jonathan Issaes 

Mr. and Mrs. David 0. Ives 

Dr. and Mrs. Neil D. Jackson 

Richard F. Jarrell 

Mrs. H. Alden Johnson, Jr. 

Mrs. Kathleen Minadeo Johnson 

Walter J. Johnson 

Paul and Barbara Jaskow 

Ms. Jacqueline M. Jung 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward M. Kaplan 

William W. Karatz 

Mrs. Charles Kassel 

Mr. and Mrs. Stanley W. Katz 

Dean Kauffman 

Sumner Kaufman 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert J. Kaufmann 

William E. Kelly 

Dr. Samuel H. Kim 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard W. Kimball 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas E. King 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry E. Moss 

Ms. Marilyn Bone Kloss 

Mr. and Mrs. David C. Knapp 

Mr. and Mrs. David Knight 

Mr. and Mrs. Eliot Knowles 

Dr. Ruth B. Kundsin 

Mr. and Mrs. Melvin Kutchin 

Ms. Celia A. Lacey-Anzuoni 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward H. Ladd 

James R. Lajoie 

Ms. Miehele Landes 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard E. Lang 

Mrs. William L. Langer 

Mr. and Mrs. Eugene D. Lattimier 

Mrs. Edward W. Lawrence 

Burke and Barbara Leahey 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard A. Leahy 

Mrs. Marie J. Leonhardt 

Richard Leventhal 

Dr. and Mrs. Elia Lipton 

Mrs. Laurence M. Lombard 

Mrs. Robert P. Loring 

Ms. Cynthia Gail Lovell 

Mrs. George H. Lyman, Jr. 

Mrs. Richard W. Lyman 

Dr. George D. Lynch 

John F. Macauley 

Mr. and Mrs. David D. Mackintosh 

Mr. and Mrs. David Macneill 

Dr. and Mrs. Hywel Madoc-Jones 

David Malkin 

Mr. and Mrs. John F. Malloy 

Ms. Therese A. Maloney 

Miss Ellen J. Mandigo 



Hugo J. Marchi 

Dr. Pamela Marron 

Mr. and Mrs. Franklin J. Marryott 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul D. May 

Ms. Joanne M. McCarthy 

Mr. and Mrs. Kevin J. McCarthy 

Mrs. Maurice McCarthy 

John P. McGonagle 

Mr. and Mrs. Raymond W. McKittrick 

Mr. and Mrs. James Messing 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry H. Meyer, Jr. 

Dr. and Mrs. Alan S. Michaels 

Ms. Judith Ann Miller 

Dr. and Mrs. Michael B. Millis 

James A. Mitchell 

John M. Morss 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward Motley 

R.E. Moulton, Jr. 

Ms. Martha S. Mugar 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward R. Murphy 

John J. Murphy 

Ms. Janet H. Murrow 

Mrs. Ellen Dana Nagler 

Koichi Naruse 

Dr. and Mrs. Paul P. Nesbeda 

Mr. and Mrs. Horace S. Nichols 

Joseph J. Nicholson 

Kevin T. Nolan 

Mr. and Mrs. Geoffrey Nunes 

Richard O'Neil 

Mr. and Mrs. Jason S. Orlov 

Miss Esther E. Osgood 

Mr. and Mrs. Hyman Ossoff 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael Ossoff 

Seiichiro Ota 

Richard B. Packard 

Mrs. Milton S. Page 

Dr. and Mrs. Simon Parisier 

Mr. and Mrs. William Park 

Franklin E. Parker 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Harry Parker 

Mr. and Mrs. Peter Pattison 

Dr. and Mrs. Anthony S. Patton 

Edward L. Pattullo 

Mr. and Mrs. Francis W. Peabody 

C.L. Pecchenino 

Mr. and Mrs. John Peirce 

Mr. and Mrs. John B. Pepper 

Mr. and Mrs. Guido R. Perera, Jr. 

Mr. Edward Perry and Ms. Cynthia Wood 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward Lee Perry 

Mr. and Mrs. Marvin D. Perry 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard G. Peters 

Ms. Nancy Peterson 

Raul and Viive Pettai 

Ms. Margaret D. Philbrick 

Mr. and Mrs. William E. Phillips 

Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin S. Phinney 

Mr. and Mrs. Laurence A. Pierce 

Mr. and Mrs. Alvar W. Polk, Jr. 

Edward E. Pomfret 

Dr. Phillip J. Porter 

Mrs. John H. Privitera 

Dr. and Mrs. James M. Rabb 

Mr. and Mrs. Norman S. Rabb 

Ms. Nancy Winship Rathborne 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert V. Reece 

John R. and Laura Eby Regier 



Mr. and Mrs. Peter Remis 

Miss Jeanette W. Renshaw 

Dr. and Mrs. George B. Reservitz 

Mary Bartlett Reynolds 

Mr. and Mrs. Bernard A. Riemer 

Mrs. Karl Reimer 

Ms. Judith Rist 

Ms. Marcia A. Rizzotto 

Mr. and Mrs. Owen W. Robbins 

Mr. and Mrs. Hugo D. Rockett 

Mr. and Mrs. Allan Romanow 

Stephen R. and Barbara Roop 

Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Rosen 

Dr. and Mrs. Kenneth M. Rosenfeld 

Ms. Fran V. Ross 

William C. Rothert 

Dr. and Mrs. A. Daniel Rubenstein 

David T. Rubin 

Mrs. Howard Rubin 

Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence G. Rubin 

Mr. and Mrs. Milton B. Rubin 

Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Sandberg 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald Sandstrom 

Stephen Santis 

John H. Saxe 

Ms. Carol Scheifele-Holmes 

Mr. and Mrs. Pieter Schiller 

Robert W. Schlundt 

Henry L. P. Schmelzer 

Ms. Carole M. Schnizer 

Peter Schofield 

Dr. and Mrs. Leslie R. Schroeder 

Mr. and Mrs. Kent Schubert 

Mr. and Mrs. John C. Scully 

Mr. and Mrs. Douglas H. Sears 

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Sepinuck 

Mrs. Freema Shapiro 

Dr. and Mrs. Jerome H. Shapiro 

Mr. and Mrs. William H. Shepard 

Mr. and Mrs. Jack Shirman 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward C. Shotwell 

Mr. and Mrs. Joel P. Shriberg 

Ms. Jane Sibley 

Phyllis and Kenneth Sisson 

Mr. and Mrs. Wallace Sisson 

Dr. and Mrs. Edward L. Sleeper 

Mr. and Mrs. David Slye 

Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin F. Smith 

Mr. and Mrs. W. Thomas Smith 

Mrs. Hrisafie M. Sophocles 

Dr. and Mrs. Arthur S. Spangler, Jr. 

Mrs. Josiah A. Spaulding 

Mrs. Hester D. Sperduto 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. Stampler 

James F. Steen 

Norman Stein 

Alan Steinert 

Dr. and Mrs. Goodwill M. Stewart 

Mrs. Phillip C. Stolar 

Mr. and Mrs. James F. Stone 

Edward T. Sullivan 

Joseph A. Sullivan, Jr. 

Richard A. Swartz 

Hideotoshi Tanaka 

Mrs. Charles L. Taylor 

Marc Teller 

Robert Tello 

Mr. and Mrs. John Larkin Thompson 



62 




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Mr. and Mrs. Mark Tishler 

Richard P. Tlapa 

Donald and Frances Trott 

Ms. Judith R. Tucker 

C. Robert Tully 

Dr. Robert 0. Valerio 

Allan Van Gestel 

David L. VanDerMeid 

Reverend George D. Vartzelis 

Mr. and Mrs. Gordon F. Vawter 

Professor and Mrs. Evon Z. Vogt 

Robert A. Vogt 

Mr. and Mrs. Augustus F. Wagner, Jr. 

Mrs. Charles F. Walcott 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas S. Walker 



Ms. Joyce A. Warchol 

Mrs. John Ware, Jr. 

Mrs. John C. B. Washburn 

Ms. Catherine Weary Steets 

Ms. Leslie H. Weisman 

Mrs. Phillip S. Weld 

Mr. and Mrs. Roger U. Wellington 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold Wernick 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard S. West 

Mr. and Mrs. Mark C. Wheeler 

Clark and Nancy Whitcomb 

Mrs. Constance V. R. White 

John White 

Mr. and Mrs. Carl J. Wiedemann 



Mrs. Morrill Wiggin 

Edward G. Williams 

Mr. and Mrs. Alexander M. Wilson 

Mr. and Mrs. David J. WinstanJey 

Mrs. Charlotte Wolf 

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel J. Wolstadter 

Mr. and Mrs. Rawson Lyman Wood 

Mr. and Mrs. John Woodman 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Woods 

Mrs. Whitney Wright 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. Zeller 

Mrs. Vincent C. Ziegler 

Mr. and Mrs. Barry Zimman 

Anonymous (22) 



Contributions were made to the Boston Symphony Orchestra during the 
1990 fiscal year in honor of the following individuals: 



Dr. Leo L. Beranek 

Alexander Brown 

Virginia W. Cabot 

Mrs. Helene R. Cahners-Kaplan 

Madeline Carey 

Julian Cohen 

Nelson J. Darling, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Fagan 



Charles T. Francis 

Robert Frank 

Mr. and Mrs. Haskell Gordon 

Julian Greenfield 

Mr. and Mrs. Hootstein 

George E. Judd 

George Kaplan 

Richard L. Kaye 



Mrs. Robert H. P. Kennard 
Dr. and Mrs. Arthur Kravitz 
Mildred Lee 
Edward Levanthal 
Chris and Linda Sprague 
Margaret Whitney 
Mrs. Ethel Smith 



Contributions were made to the Boston Symphony Orchestra during the 1990 
fiscal year in memory of the following individuals: 



Maximi Bourni Anastos, M.D. 

Hannah G. Ayer 

Sam Barish 

Richard Burgin 

Charles F. Cassell 

Richard Connor 

Anne Dareshori 

Hope S. Dean 

Eleanor K. Dickinson 

Haim Eliachar 

Lois Whitney Forbes 

Edward L. Francis 

Robert Frank 

Jean Riddle-Gerry 



Paul S. Gottlieb 
Dorothy Green 
Gladys Gwritzman 
Mrs. Winifred Idell 
Leroy S. Kenfield 
Louis E. Kopito 
Paulie Kripke 
Clement R. Lawson 
Mary Leibovici 
Lucille Leland 
Muriel G. S. Lewis 
Mrs. Robert C. Madden 
Paul Mellen 



Vincent K. Overlook 
Wendy Patrick 
Harold Putnam, Jr. 
Marshall J. Ross 
Mrs. Emily Z. Shuffer 
Gertrude Spiller 
Chester St. Clair 
Stanley Swaebe 
Miss Madeline Trent 
Edward A. Weeks 
Mrs. Lyon Weyborn 
Roger D. Whittemore 
Mrs. Nathaniel Whittier 



63 






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The Williston 
Northampton School 

Box 30 

1 9 Payson Avenue 

Easthampton, 

Massachusetts, 01027 

Fax: 413/527-9494 



If you're not at The Williston 
Northampton School, you're missing 
a wealth of academic and 
extracurricular opportunities. 

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More than 30 percent of our students receive academic scholarships or need-based financial aid. We are an independent school and welcome 
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Members of the Appraisers Association of America 

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Hours: Monday-Saturday 10am-5pm 
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64 



The Boston Symphony Orchestra gratefully acknowledges 


the generous support 


of the following foundations. 


Their grants have made possible a variety of 


programs and projects. 






Aeushnet Foundation 


Gerondelis Foundation 


The Theodore Edson Parker 


The Lassor and Fanny Agoos 


Ann and Gordon Getty Foundation 


Foundation 


Charity Fund 


The Gordon Fund 


Amelia Peabody Foundation 


The Anthony Advocate Foundation 


The Nehemias Gorin Foundation 


Amelia Peabody Charitable Fund 


J.M.R. Barker Foundation 


The Robert Z. Greene Foundation 


The Harold Whitworth Pierce 


Frank M. Barnard Foundation, Inc. 


Greenwalt Charitable Trust 


Charitable Trust 


The Theodore H. Barth Foundation 


The William and Mary Greve 


Property Capital Trust 


Adelaide Breed Bayrd Foundation 


Foundation, Inc. 


Olive Higgins Prouty Foundation 


Charles S. Bird Foundation 


Grosberg Family Charity Fund 


A.C. Ratshesky Foundation 


The Boston Foundation 


Florence Gould Foundation 


The Frederick W. Richmond 


The Boston Globe Foundation 


Luke B. Hancock Foundation 


Foundation, Inc. 


The Britten-Pears Foundation 


The HCA Foundation 


Billy Rose Foundation, Inc. 


Cabot Family Charitable Trust 


William Randolph Hearst 


Richard Saltonstall Charitable 


Calvert Trust 


Foundation 


Foundation 


The Cambridge Foundation 


High Meadows Foundation 


Sasco Foundation 


Roberta M. Childs Foundation 


Aldus C. Higgins Foundation 


The William E. and Bertha 


Chiles Foundation 


Henry Hornblower Fund, Inc. 


Schrafft Charitable Trust 


Clark Charitable Trust 


The Hunt Foundation 


Albert Shapiro Fund 


Clipper Ship Foundation 


Rita and Stanley H. Kaplan 


Miriam Shaw Fund 


The Clowes Fund, Inc. 


Foundation 


George and Beatrice Sherman Family 


Compton Foundation, Inc. 


Koussevitzky Music Foundation 


Charitable Trust 


Jessie B. Cox Charitable Trust 


Raymond E. Lee Foundation 


Mary Jean and Frank P. Smeal 


Melvin S. Cutler Charitable 


June Rockwell Levy Foundation 


Foundation 


Trust 


The Lovett Foundation 


The Seth Sprague Educational 


Nancy Sayles Day Foundation 


Lowell Institute 


and Charitable Foundation 


Deluxe Check Printers Foundation 


James A. Macdonald Foundation 


The Stearns Charitable Trust 


The Demoulas Foundation 


Helen and Leo Mayer Charitable 


Nathaniel and Elizabeth P. Stevens 


Dennis Family Foundation 


Trust 


Foundation 


Aaron Diamond Foundation 


William Inglis Morse Trust 


The Stone Charitable Foundation, 


The Eastman Charitable 


Mu Phi Epsilon Memorial 


Inc. 


Foundation 


Foundation 


Gertrude W. and Edward M. Swartz 


Eaton Foundation 


Max and Sophie Mydans 


Charitable Trust 


Fidelity Foundation 


Foundation 


Tisch Foundation 


Orville W. Forte Charitable 


Nakamichi Foundation 


Charles Irwin Travelli Fund 


Foundation 


Edward John Noble Foundation 


Frederick E. Weber Charities 


Joseph C. and Esther Foster 


Olivetti Foundation, Inc. 


Edwin S. Webster Foundation 


Foundation 


The Palriwala Foundation of America 


Carl A. Weyerhaeuser Trust 


The Frelinghuysen Foundation 


The Bessie Pappas Charitable 


Anonymous (1) 


G.P. and Rose Gardner Charitable 


Foundation 




Trust 







65 



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Family Investment Advisers 



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Telephone: (617) 523-1320 



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66 



The Boston Symphony Orchestra gratefully acknowledges the following donors whose very 
generous support made possible the successful completion of the $7.2 million Symphony Hall 
Renovation Program. 



INDIVIDUALS 

Mr. and Mrs. Vernon R. Alden 
Mr. and Mrs. Stephen H. Anthony 
Mr. and Mrs. David B. Arnold, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Axelrod 
Mr. and Mrs. Hazen Aver 
Mr. and Mrs. J. P. Barger 
Mrs. Gabriella Beranek 
Mr. and Mrs. Samuel W. Bodman 
Mr. and Mrs. John M. Bradley 
Mrs. Alexander H. Bright 
Mr. and Mrs. Peter A. Brooke 
Mr. and Mrs. C. Thomas Clagett 
Mr. and Mrs. James F. Cleary 
Mr. and Mrs. Julian Cohen 
Mr. and Mrs. Abram T. Collier 
Mr. and Mrs. William H. Congleton 
Mr. and Mrs. William F. Connell 
Mrs. A. Werk Cook 
Mr. and Mrs. Lewis S. Dabney 
Mr. and Mrs. Nelson J. Darling, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Michael H. Davis 
Mr. and Mrs. Eugene B. Doggett 
Ms. Phyllis Dohanian 
Mr. and Mrs. Goetz B. Eaton 
Mr. and Mrs. Archie C. Epps 
Mr. and Mrs. Edward Eskandarian 
Mrs. Harris Fahnestock 
Mr. and Mrs. John H. Fitzpatrick 
Allyn B. and Lois W. Forbes 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard Fraser 
Mr. and Mrs. Dean Freed 
Carol R. and Avram J. Goldberg 
Professor & Mrs. Ray A. Goldberg 
Mr. and Mrs. Jordan L. Golding 
Mr. and Mrs. Haskell R. Gordon 
Mr. and Mrs. John L. Grandin 
Mr. and Mrs. R. Douglas Hall, III 
Mr. and Mrs. Francis W. Hatch 
Ms. Susan Morse Hilles 
Mr. Frederick Johnson 
Mr. and Mrs. Bela T. Kalman 
Dr. and Mrs. S. Charles Kasdon 
Senator Edward M. Kennedy 
Mr. and Mrs. George H. Kidder 
Mr. and Mrs. Gordon F. Kingsley 



Mr. and Mrs. Carl Koch 

Mr. and Mrs. David I. Kosowsky 

Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Chet 

Krentzman 
Mr. and Mrs. R. Willis Leith 
Mr. and Mrs. Caleb Loring 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles P. Lyman 
Mr. and Mrs. George Macomber 
Mr. and Mrs. William D. Manice 
Mr. and Mrs. C. Charles Marran 
Mrs. August R. Meyer 
Mr. and Mrs. Nathan R. Miller 
Mr. and Mrs. Paul M. Montrone 
New Hampshire Bus Group 
Mrs. Robert B. Newman 
Mr. and Mrs. Albert L. Nickerson 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert P. O'Block 
Mr. and Mrs. David R. Pokross 
Mr. and Mrs. William J. Poorvu 
Mr. and Mrs. Irving W. Rabb 
Sidney & Esther Rabb Charitable 

Foundation 
Sidney R. Rabb Charitable Trust 

Helene R. Cahners-Kaplan— Trustee 

Carol R. Goldberg— Trustee 
Mr. and Mrs. Peter C. Read 
Mr. and Mrs. Jerome Rosenfeld 
Mr. and Mrs. Daniel E. Rothenberg 
Mr. and Mrs. William C. Rousseau 
Mrs. George Rowland 
Mrs. George Lee Sargent 
Mr. and Mrs. Roger A. Saunders 
Mr. and Mrs. Francis P. Sears, Jr. 
Mr. Robert Segel 
Mrs. Donald B. Sinclair 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard A. Smith 
Dr. and Mrs. W. Davies Sohier 
Mr. and Mrs. Ray Stata 
Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Stoneman 
Miss Elizabeth Storer 
Mr. and Mrs. William F. Thompson 
Mr. and Mrs. John L. Thorndike 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas H.P. Whitney 
Roger D. Whittemore, Jr. 

Memorial Fund 



Mrs. Margaret A. Williams-DeCelles 
Mr. and Mrs. Donald B. Wilson 
Mrs. John J. Wilson 
Mr. Fumihiko Yonezawa 
Mr. and Mrs. Erwin N. Ziner 



CORPORATIONS 

Arthur Andersen & Company 

Bank of Boston 

Bank of New England Corporation 

BayBanks, Inc. 

Coopers & Lybrand 

Deluxe Check Printers 

Dynatech Corporation 

Ernst and Young 

The Gillette Company 

John Hancock Mutual Life Insurance 

Company 

The Henley Group 

Liberty Mutual Insurance Company 

Polaroid Corporation 

Price Waterhouse 

Raytheon Company 

Shawmut Bank, N.A. 

State Street Bank and Trust Company 

Charles H. Watkins & Co., Inc. 



FOUNDATIONS 

Chiles Foundation 

Clowes Foundation 

The George B. Henderson Foundation 

Rita & Stanley H. Kaplan Foundation 

Kresge Foundation 

Levy Foundation 

Amelia Peabody Charitable Fund 

Amelia Peabody Foundation 

Schrafft Foundation 

Seth Sprague Foundation 

Stevens Foundation 

Edwin S. Webster Foundation 

Weyerhauser Trust 

Yawkey Foundation II 



67 



The Boston Symphony Orchestra gratefully acknowledges those who have established Named 
Endowment Funds. These Funds support the Endowed Orchestra Chair program, the Tan- 
glewood Music Center Fellowship program, the Youth Activities program and the Musical 
Programming and Instrument Acquisition Funds. Named Fund's also provide unrestricted 
endowment for general support of annual operations. Named Endowment Funds can be cre- 
ated with a minimum contribution of $10,000. Additional contributions and market value 
appreciation enhance the Funds' value. 



Matinee Abravanel Scholarship Fund 
George W. and 

Florence N. Adams Fund 
Vernon P. and 

Marion P. Alden Chair Fund 
Philip R. and 

Anne Allen Chair Fund 
Anderson Family Fund 
Dorothy Q. and 

David B. Arnold, Jr. Chair Fund 
Mr. and Mrs. David B. Arnold, Jr. 

Fellowship Fund 
Ethan Ayer Fund 
Mrs. Paul T. Babson 

Fellowship Fund 
Sandra and David Bakalar 

Chair Fund 
Jane W. Bancroft Fellowship Fund 
Jane W. Bancroft Fund 
Anne S. M. Banks Chair Fund 
Kathleen H. Banks Fellowship Fund 
Talcott M. Banks Memorial Fund 
Mary and J. P. Barger Chair Fund 
BayBanks Fellowship Fund 
Robert L. Beal, and Enid 

and Bruce A. Beal Chair Fund 
Leo L. Beranek Chair Fund 
Leo L. Beranek Fellowship Fund 
Berkshire Chair Fund 
Leonard Bernstein Fellowship Fund 
Caroline Thayer Bland Fund 
Boston Symphony Orchestra Musical 

Instrument Acquisition Fund 
Edward and Lois Bowles 

Master Teacher Fund 
John and Jane Bradley 

Family Fund 
Eleanor Cabot Bradley Fund 
Frederic and Juliette Brandi 

Fellowship Fund 
Peter A Brooke Family Chair Fund 
Brookline Youth Concerts Awards 

Committee Fellowship Fund 
Rosamond Sturgis Brooks 

Memorial Fellowship Fund 
Richard Burgin Chair Fund 
William S. Busiek 

Broadcast Booth Fund 
John Moors Cabot Chair Fund 



Virginia Wellington Cabot 

Concert Fund 
Henry B. Cabot Memorial Fund 
Helene R. and 

Norman L. Cahners Chair Fund 
Helene R. and Norman L. Cahners 

Fellowship Fund 
Marion Callanan Memorial 

Fellowship Fund 
Calvert Trust Guest Soloist Fund 
Richard B. Carter Fund 
Stanley Chappie Fellowship Fund 
Alfred E. Chase Fellowship Fund 
Angelica Lloyd Clagett Chair Fund 
Angelica Lloyd Clagett 

Youth Concerts Fund 
Clowes Fellowship Fund 
George H. A. Clowes, Jr. Fund 
John F. Cogan, Jr. Fund 
Julian and Eunice S. Cohen Fund 
Nat Cole Memorial Fellowship Fund 
Abram T. Collier Chair Fund 
Andre Come Fellowship Fund 
Commissioning New Works Fund 
Caroline G. Congdon 

Memorial Fellowship Fund 
Margaret Andersen Congleton 

Chair Fund 
Arthur P. Contas Fund 

for the Commissioning of 

New Works 
Eugene Cook Scholarship Fund 
Charles A. Coolidge, Jr. Fund 
Ford H. Cooper Chair Fund 
Dorothy and Montgomery Crane 

Fellowship Fund 
William E. Crofut 

Family Scholarship Fund 
Charles E. Culpeper 

Foundation Fellowship Fund 
Charles E. Culpeper 

Tanglewood Music Center 

Faculty Chairman Fund 
Anna W. Cutler Fund 
Eleanor Naylor Dana 

Visiting Artists Fund 
Darling Family Fellowship Fund 
DARTS Fund 
Deborah B. and Michael H. Davis Fund 

68 



Omar Del Carlo 

Tanglewood Fellowship Fund 
Charles and JoAnne Dickinson Chair Fund 
Harry Ellis Dickson Fund 

for Youth Concerts 
Nina L. and Eugene B. Doggett Fund 
Carlotta M. Dreyfus Fellowship Fund 
Charles F. and Elizabeth Y. Eaton Fund 
Otto Eckstein Family Fellowship Fund 
Ethel Barber Eno Fellowship Fund 
Esplanade Concerts Funds 
Arthur Fiedler Boston Pops Fund 
Arthur Fiedler Financial Ad Fund 
Fitzpatrick Fund 
Allyn B. Forbes Memorial Fund 
Dr. Marshall N. Fulton 

Memorial Fellowship Fund 
Judy Gardiner Fellowship Fund 
Juliet Esselborn Geier Fellowship Fund 
Gerald Gelbloom Memorial 

Fellowship Fund 
Dr. and Mrs. Kenneth J. Germeshausen 

Youth Concerts Fund 
Ann and Gordon Getty Fund 
Armando A. Ghitalla Fellowship Fund 
Marie L. Audet and Fernand Gillet 

Concert Fund 
Fernand Gillet Memorial 

Fellowship Fund 
Marie Gillet Memorial Fellowship Fund 
Haskell and Ina Gordon Fellowship Fund 
Gordon/Rousmaniere/Roberts Fund 
Florence Gould Foundation 

Fellowship Fund 
Grainger Foundation Fund 
John and Susanne Grandin 

Fellowship Fund 
Edgar and Shirley Grossman 

Chair Fund 
Abigail and Robert T. Hamlin Fund 
Luke B. Hancock Foundation 

Fellowship Fund 
Margaret L. and Robert G. Hargrove Fund 
Hatsopoulos Family Fund 
William Randolph Hearst Fellowship Fund 
Heifetz Scholarship Fund 
Henry L. Higginson FundGeorge F. and 

Elsie Barnard Hodder Fund 
Harold D. Hodgkinson Chair Fund 







Mickey L. Hooten Memorial Fond 


Marian Douglas Martin 


Rotenberg/Carlyle Foundation 


Mark M. Horblitt Trust Fund 


Master Teacher Fund, 


Library Fund 


Henry Hornblower Fund 


endowed by Marilyn B. Hoffman 


Margaret and William C. Rousseau 


F. Donald Hudson Fund 


Fannie Peabody Mason Fund 


Chair Fund 


Emma L. Hutchins Memorial Fund 


Robert G. McClellan & IBM 


Carolyn and George R. Rowland Chair Fund 


CD. Jackson Fellowship Fund 


Matching Grants Fellowship Fund 


Carolyn and George R. Rowland 


Grace B. Jackson Prize Fund 


Andrew Mellon Foundation 


FeDowship Fund in Honor of 


Paul Jacobs Memorial 


Trust Fund 


Eleanor Panasevich 


Commissions Fund 


Merrill Lynch Fellowship Fund 


Helena Rubinstein Fund 


Lola and Edwin Jaffe 


Charles E. Merrill 


Lawrence J. and 


Fellowship Fund 


Tanglewood Music Center Fund 


Anne Cable Rubenstein Fund 


Leah Jansizian Memorial 


Lillian and Nathan R. Miller 


Sara H. Sabbagh and 


Scholarship Fund 


Chair Fund 


Hasib J. Sabbagh Chair Fund 


Japanese Fellowship Fund 


Charles L. Moore Fund 


Mary B. Saltonstall Fund 


Adele Wentworth Jones Trust Fund 


Stephen and Persis Morris 


Morris A Schapiro Fellowship Fund 


Kalman Fund 


Fellowship Fund 


Hannah and Raymond Schneider 


Susan B. Kaplan and 


Richard P. and Claire Morse Fund 


FeDowship Fund 


Ami Trauber Fellowship Fund 


for Youth Concerts 


Esther and Joseph Shapiro Chair Fund 


Miriam Ann Kenner Memorial 


Ruth S. Morse Fellowship Fund 


Malcolm and Barbara Sherman Fund 


Scholarship Fund 


Morse Rush Tickets Fund 


Asher J. Shuffer Fellowship Fund 


Amey P. Ketchum Memorial Fund 


Charles Munch Memorial Chair Fund 


W. H. Sinclair Chair Fund 


Mr. and Mrs. Allen Kluchman 


Newman Family Chair Fund 


Helen Slosberg Chair Fund 


Fellowship Fund 


Albert L. and Elizabeth Nickerson 


Richard ASmith Family Fund 


Dr. John H. Knowles Memorial 


Fellowship Fund 


Mary H. Smith Scholarship Fund 


Fellowship Fund 


Northern California Audition Fund 


Albert Spaulding Fellowship Fund 


Jean Koch Fund 


Northern California Fellowship Fund 


Jason Starr Fellowship Fund 


Koussevitzky Tanglewood Music 


Opera Training Program Fund 


Starr Foundation Fellowship Fund 


Center Scholarship Fund 


Seiji Ozawa Fellowship Fund 


Ray and Maria Stata Chair Fund 


Robert and Myra Kraft Chair Fund 


Richard Paine Family Fund 


Tanglewood Programmers and Ushers 


Louis Krasner Fund 


Theodore Edson Parker 


Scholarship Fund 


Harvey C. and Farla Krentzman 


Fellowship Fund 


Anne Stoneman Chair Fund 


Chair Fund 


Joanne and Andrall Pearson 


Miriam and Sidney Stoneman 


William Kroll Memorial 


Scholarship Fund 


Fellowship Fund 


Fellowship Fund 


Marion G. Perkins Fund 


Roberta Strang Fund 


Bernice and Lizbeth Krupp 


Frank R. and 


Surdna Foundation Fellowship Fund 


Fellowship Fund 


Margaret J. Peters Fund 


Surdna Foundation Master Teacher 


Philip and Bernice Krupp 


Harold W. Pierce Charitable Fund 


Chair Fund 


Fellowship Fund 


Walter Piston Chair Fund 


Taft Memorial Chair Fund 


Felicia and Harry Kutten 


David R. and Muriel K. Pokross 


Tanglewood Music Center 


Commissioning Fund for 


Fellowship Fund 


Composition Program Fund 


Youth Concerts 


William and Lia Poorvu 


Tappan Dixey Brooks 


La Croix Family Fund 


Fellowship Fund 


Memorial Fellowship 


Paul Jacobs Memorial 


William and Lia Poorvu Fund 


William F. and Juliana W. Thompson 


Fellowship Fund 


Beatrice Sterling Procter 


Fellowship Fund 


Leith Family Fund 


Master Teacher Chair Fund 


R. Amory Thorndike 


I. Norman Levin Trust Fund 


Daphne Brooks Prout 


FeDowship Fund 


Dorothy Lewis Fellowship Fund 


Fellowship Fund 


Augustus ThorncDke FeDowship Fund 


Lovejoy Family Fund 


Claire and Millard Pryor 


Tisch Foundation Scholarship Fund 


Dr. and Mrs. Frederick H. 


Scholarship Fund 


Edyth and Irving Usen Fund 


Lovejoy, Jr. Fund 


Charlotte F. and Irving W. Rabb 


Roger L. Voisin Chair Fund 


Lucy Lowell Fellowship Fund 


Chair Fund 


Sherman Walt Memorial Fund 


Edward E. MacCrone 


Readers Digest Fellowship Fund 


Leo Washerman FeDowship Fund 


Youth Trust Fund 


Mildred B. Remis Chair Fund 


Mrs. Edwin S. Webster Fund 


Nancy Lurie Marks 


Harry and Mildred Remis 


Katherin Lane Weems Fund 


Foundation Chair Fund 


Fellowship Fund 


Roger D. and Diana G. WeDington Fund 


Evelyn and C. Charles Marran 


Vladimir Resnikoff Fund 


Sylvia Shippen WeDs Chair Fund 


Chair Fund 


Peggy Rockefeller Fellowship Fund 


Alonzo A and Georgia B. West Fund 




Bertha and Edward Rose Chair Fund 
69 


John and Dorothy WDson Chair Fund 



Next Program . . . 

Tuesday, October 11, at 8 
Tuesday, October 16, at 8 

SEIJI OZAWA conducting 



PROKOFIEV 



Piano Concerto No. 3 in C, Opus 26 

Andante-Allegro 

Theme (Andantino) and Variations 

Allegro ma non troppo 

MARTHA ARGERICH 



INTERMISSION 



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Andante-Allegro ma non troppo 
Andante con moto 
Scherzo: Allegro vivace 
Allegro vivace 



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70 







Next Program . . . 



Friday, October 12, at 8 
Saturday, October 13, at 8 

SEUI OZAWA conducting 



BACH/SAITO 



J.S. Bach's Chaconne in D minor, from BWV 1004, 
orchestrated by Hideo Saito 
(October 12 only) 



PROKOFIEV 



Piano Concerto No. 3 in C, Opus 26 
( October 13 only ) 

Andante-Allegro 

Theme (Andantino) and Variations 

Allegro ma non troppo 

MARTHA ARGERICH 



MAHLER 



INTERMISSION 

Symphony No. 5 
Parti 



Funeral March: At a measured pace 
Stormy, with utmost vehemence 

Part II 

Scherzo: Energetic, not too fast 

Part III 

Adagietto: Very slow 

Rondo-Finale: Allegro goicoso, Vigorous 



Single tickets for all Boston Symphony Orchestra concerts throughout the season 
are available at the Symphony Hall box office, or by calling "Symphony-Charge" at 
(617) 266-1200, Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m. until 6 p.m., to charge 
tickets instantly on a major credit card, or to make a reservation and then send 
payment by check. Please note that there is a $1.75 handling fee for each ticket 
ordered by phone. 



71 



THE BSO 
ANNOUNCES AN 




HOLIDAY" 
PROGRAM 




DECEMBER 19, 1990 

Give your company an early Christmas present by treating your 

management, employees, customers, vendors, and friends to a 

special evening at Pops in a unique holiday program. This 

program, available to only 116 businesses and professional 

organizations at $3,500 per company, includes 16 seats, 

pre-concert hors d'oeuvres and a traditional Pops gourmet dinner. 

Please join the New England business community for this 

celebrated holiday tradition! 

For information on "A Company Christmas at Pops": 

James F. Cleary, Managing Director, PaineWebber, Inc. (439-8000) 

Chet Krentzman, President, Advanced Management Associates (332-3141) 

William F. Meagher, Managing Partner, Arthur Andersen & Co. (330-4300) 

William D. Roddy, Vice President and General Manager, Neiman Marcus (536-3600) 

Michael H. Reingold, President, Delia Femina, McNamee WCRS, Inc. (737-6450) 

Peter N. Cerundolo, BSO Corporate Development Office (638-9252) 

72 




Boston^ s distinctive 

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accessories. 



Coming Concerts 



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508-779-6241 617-236-1700 



Thursday, October 11, at 10:30 a.m. 

Open Rehearsal 
Steven Ledbetter will discuss the program 

at 9:30 in Symphony Hall. 
Thursday 'A' -October 11, 8-10 
Tuesday 'C- October 16, 8-10 

SEIJI OZAWA conducting 
MARTHA ARGERICH, piano 

PROKOFIEV Piano Concerto No. 3 

SCHUBERT Symphony in C, The Great 

Friday Evening— October 12, 8-10:05 

SEIJI OZAWA conducting 

BACH/SAITO Chaconne in D minor 

MAHLER Symphony No. 5 

Saturday 'B'- October 13, 8-10:15 
SEIJI OZAWA conducting 
MARTHA ARGERICH, piano 

PROKOFIEV Piano Concerto No. 3 

MAHLER Symphony No. 5 

Thursday 'A' -October 25, 8-9:45 
Friday 'A' -October 26, 2-3:45 
Saturday 'B'- October 27, 8-9:45 
Tuesday 'C- October 30, 8-9:45 
WITOLD LUTOSLAWSKI conducting 
RONAN LEFKOWITZ, violin 
ANTHONY DI BONAVENTURA, piano 

ALL- Livre pour Orchestre 

LUTOSLAWSKI Chain II, for violin and 
PROGRAM orchestra 

Piano Concerto 

Thursday, November 1, at 10:30 a.m. 

Open Rehearsal 
Evans Mirageas will discuss the program 

at 9:30 in Symphony Hall. 
Thursday 'D'- November 1, 8-10 
Friday 'B'- November 2, 2-4 
Saturday 'A' -November 3, 8-10 
Tuesday 'B'- November 6, 8-10 

KURT SANDERLING conducting 
ALICIA DE LARROCHA, piano 



HAYDN 



MOZART 



BEETHOVEN 



Overture to La fedeltd 

premiata 
Piano Concerto No. 25 

in C, K503 
Symphony No. 6, Pastoral 



Programs and artists subject to change. 



73 





74 



Symphony Hall Information . . . 



FOR SYMPHONY HALL CONCERT AND 
TICKET INFORMATION, call (617) 266- 
1492. For Boston Symphony concert program 
information, call "C-O-N-C-E-RrT" (266-2378). 

THE BOSTON SYMPHONY performs ten 
months a year, in Symphony Hall and at Tan- 
glewood. For information about any of the 
orchestra's activities, please call Symphony 
Hall, or write the Boston Symphony Orches- 
tra, Symphony Hall, Boston, MA 02115. 

THE NEWLY REFURBISHED EUNICE S. 
AND JULIAN COHEN WING, adjacent to 
Symphony Hall on Huntington Avenue, may be 
entered by the Symphony Hall West Entrance 
on Huntington Avenue. 

FOR SYMPHONY HALL RENTAL INFOR- 
MATION, call (617) 638-9240, or write the 
Function Manager, Symphony Hall, Boston, 
MA 02115. 

THE BOX OFFICE is open from 10 a.m. 
until 6 p.m. Monday through Saturday; on con- 
cert evenings it remains open through intermis- 
sion for BSO events or just past starting-time 
for other events. In addition, the box office 
opens Sunday at 1 p.m. when there is a con- 
cert that afternoon or evening. Single tickets 
for all Boston Symphony subscription concerts 
are available at the box office. For outside 
events at Symphony Hall, tickets are available 
three weeks before the concert. No phone 
orders will be accepted for these events. 

TO PURCHASE BSO TICKETS: American 
Express, MasterCard, Visa, a personal check, 
and cash are accepted at the box office. To 
charge tickets instantly on a major credit card, 
or to make a reservation and then send pay- 
ment by check, call "Symphony-Charge" at 
(617) 266-1200, Monday through Saturday 
from 10 a.m. until 6 p.m. There is a handling 
fee of $1.75 for each ticket ordered by phone. 

GROUP SALES: Groups may take advantage of 
advance ticket sales. For BSO concerts at Sym- 
phony Hall, groups of twenty-five or more may 
reserve tickets by telephone and take advantage 
of ticket discounts and flexible payment options. 
To place an order, or for more information, call 
Group Sales at (617) 638-9345. 

IN CONSIDERATION of our patrons and 
artists, children under four will not be admit- 
ted to Boston Symphony Orchestra concerts. 



THE SYMPHONY SHOP is located in the 
Cohen Wing at the West Entrance on Hunting- 
ton Avenue and is open Tuesday, Thursday, and 
Friday from 11 a.m. until 3 p.m., Saturday from 
1 p.m. until 6 p.m., and from one hour before 
each concert through intermission. The shop car- 
ries BSO and musical-motif merchandise and 
gift items such as calendars, clothing, appoint- 
ment books, drinking glasses, holiday ornaments, 
children's books, and BSO and Pops recordings. 
A selection of Symphony Shop merchandise is 
also available during BSO concert hours outside 
the Cabot-Cahners Room in the Massachusetts 
Avenue corridor. All proceeds benefit the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra. For merchandise informa- 
tion, please caU (617) 267-2692. 

TICKET RESALE: If for some reason you 
are unable to attend a Boston Symphony con- 
cert for which you hold a ticket, you may make 
your ticket available for resale by calling the 
switchboard. This helps bring needed revenue 
to the orchestra and makes your seat available 
to someone who wants to attend the concert. A 
mailed receipt will acknowledge your tax-deduct- 
ible contribution. 

RUSH SEATS: There are a limited number of 
Rush Seats available for the Friday-afternoon, 
Tuesday-evening, and Saturday-evening Boston 
Symphony concerts (subscription concerts only). 
The low price of these seats is assured through 
the Morse Rush Seat Fund. The tickets for Rush 
Seats are sold at $6 each, one to a customer, on 
Fridays as of 9 a.m. and Saturdays and Tues- 
days as of 5 p.m. 

PARKING: The Prudential Center Garage 
offers a discount to any BSO patron with a 
ticket stub for that evening's performance. 
There are also two paid parking garages on 
Westland Avenue near Symphony Hall. 
Limited street parking is available. As a spe- 
cial benefit, guaranteed pre-paid parking near 
Symphony Hall is available to subscribers who 
attend evening concerts on Tuesday, Thursday, 
Friday, or Saturday. For more information, 
call the Subscription Office at (617) 266-7575. 

LATECOMERS will be seated by the ushers 
during the first convenient pause in the pro- 
gram. Those who wish to leave before the end 
of the concert are asked to do so between pro- 
gram pieces in order not to disturb other 
patrons. 



75 



SMOKING IS NOT PERMITTED in any 
part of the Symphony Hall auditorium or in 
the surrounding corridors. It is permitted only 
in the Cabot-Cahners and Hatch rooms, and in 
the main lobby on Massachusetts Avenue. 

CAMERA AND RECORDING EQUIPMENT 
may not be brought into Symphony Hall dur- 
ing concerts. 

FIRST AID FACILITIES for both men and 
women are available. On-call physicians attend- 
ing concerts should leave their names and seat 
locations at the switchboard near the Massa- 
chusetts Avenue entrance. 

WHEELCHAIR ACCESS to Symphony Hall 
is available via the Cohen Wing, at the West 
Entrance. Wheelchair-accessible restrooms are 
located in the main corridor of the West 
Entrance, and in the first-balcony passageway 
between Symphony Hall and the Cohen Wing. 

ELEVATORS are located outside the Hatch 
and Cabot-Cahners rooms on the Massachu- 
setts Avenue side of Symphony Hall, and in 
the Cohen Wing. 

LADIES' ROOMS are located on the orches- 
tra level, audience-left, at the stage end of the 
hall, on both sides of the first balcony, and in 
the Cohen Wing. 

MEN'S ROOMS are located on the orchestra 
level, audience-right, outside the Hatch Room 
near the elevator, on the first-balcony level, 
audience-left, outside the Cabot-Cahners Room 
near the coatroom, and in the Cohen Wing. 

COATROOMS are located on the orchestra 
and first-balcony levels, audience-left, outside 
the Hatch and Cabot-Cahners rooms, and in 
the Cohen Wing. The BSO is not responsible 
for personal apparel or other property of 
patrons. 

LOUNGES AND BAR SERVICE: There are 
two lounges in Symphony Hall. The Hatch 
Room on the orchestra level and the Cabot- 
Cahners Room on the first-balcony level serve 



drinks starting one hour before each perform- 
ance. For the Friday-afternoon concerts, both 
rooms open at 12:15, with sandwiches available 
until concert time. 

BOSTON SYMPHONY BROADCASTS: Con- 
certs of the Boston Symphony Orchestra are 
heard by delayed broadcast in many parts of 
the United States and Canada, as well as 
internationally, through the Boston Symphony 
Transcription Trust. In addition, Friday- 
afternoon concerts are broadcast live by 
WGBH-FM (Boston 89.7); Saturday-evening 
concerts are broadcast live by both WGBH-FM 
and WCRB-FM (Boston 102.5). Live broad- 
casts may also be heard on several other public 
radio stations throughout New England and 
New York. 

BSO FRIENDS: The Friends are annual 
donors to the Boston Symphony Orchestra. 
Friends receive BSO, the orchestra's newslet- 
ter, as well as priority ticket information and 
other benefits depending on their level of giv- 
ing. For information, please call the Develop- 
ment Office at Symphony Hall weekdays 
between 9 and 5, (617) 638-9251. If you are 
already a Friend and you have changed your 
address, please send your new address with 
your newsletter label to the Development Office, 
Symphony Hall, Boston, MA 02115. Including 
the mailing label will assure a quick and accu- 
rate change of address in our files. 

BUSINESS FOR BSO: The BSO's Business 
& Professional Leadership program makes it 
possible for businesses to participate in the life 
of the Boston Symphony Orchestra through a 
variety of original and exciting programs, 
among them "Presidents at Pops," "A Com- 
pany Christmas at Pops," and special-event 
underwriting. Benefits include corporate recog- 
nition in the BSO program book, access to the 
Higginson Room reception lounge, and priority 
ticket service. For further information, please 
call the BSO Corporate Development Office at 
(617) 638-9250. 



76 




When Marjory and Robert take to the 
dance floor at Fox Hill Village, people say 
they move just like Fred Astaire and 
Ginger Rogers. Such grace and style. 
Such flawless execution. 

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Set amid 83 gracefully wooded acres, 
Fox Hill Village offers a style of retire 
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BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 



Seiji Ozawa, Music Director 
Grant Llewellyn and Robert Spano, 
Assistant Conductors 
One Hundred and Tenth Season, 1990-91 




SUPPER CONCERT I 

Thursday, October 4, at 6 
Tuesday, October 9, at 6 

NANCY BRACKEN, violin 
BONNIE BEWICK, violin 
PATRICIA McCARTY, viola 
JOEL MOERSCHEL, cello 
DEBORAH DeWOLF EMERY, piano 



BRAHMS 



Quintet in F minor for piano and strings, 
Opus 34 

Allegro non troppo 
Andante, un poco adagio 
Scherzo: Allegro; Trio 

Finale: Poco sostenuto— Allegro non troppo- 
Presto, non troppo 



Baldwin piano 

Please exit to your left for supper following the concert. 

The performers appreciate your not smoking during the concert. 



Week 2 



,V*v" 



Johannes Brahms 

Quintet in F minor for piano and strings, Opus 34 



i 

i i 



Brahms's Quintet in F minor went through a tortuous pre-history before ending up as 
a cornerstone of the chamber music repertory. In 1862 Brahms composed the work as 
a string quintet (with two cellos, like the great C major quintet of Schubert). On 
August 29 he sent the first three movements to Clara Schumann, who replied on 
September 3. 

I do not know how to start telling you quietly the great delight your quintet has 
given me. I have played it over many times and I am full of it. It grows on me. 
What a world of strength there is in the first movement, and what an Adagio! It is 
one long melody from start to finish. I am constantly playing it over and over 
again and never wish to stop. I like the scherzo also, but I am inclined to think the 
Trio a bit too short. When will the last movement be ready? 

When the complete work arrived, Clara was full of enthusiasm: "The work is a 
masterpiece." The views of violinist Joseph Joachim were slightly tempered. He 
admitted that the piece was "certainly of the greatest importance and.. .strong in 
character," but it was also very difficult, and "I am afraid that without vigorous 
playing it will not sound clear." By April 1863 Joachim had rehearsed it several times, 
and he felt more strongly that Brahms would wish to make changes before allowing 
publication. He did, in fact, adjust some of the passages that Joachim objected to. 
But even so, when he heard a private performance in Vienna, he was not satisfied. 
And when Joachim himself played the quintet for Brahms in Hanover, the composer 
was convinced that he had demanded too much of the strings and still knew too little 
of their capabilities. 

Brahms withdrew the string quintet entirely and turned it into a sonata for two 
pianos, which he completed by February 1864 and performed with Karl Tausig in 
April. The work was still not a success. Clara Schumann insisted that it called for the 
resources of an orchestra and begged Brahms to rework the material yet again. This 
time he took the advice of Hermann Levi and turned it into a quintet for piano and 
strings, thus combining elements of both earlier versions. He sent the final score to 
Levi in November 1865, and received a rapturous response from the enthusiastic 
musician: 

The quintet is beautiful beyond words. Anyone who did not know it in its earlier 
forms... would never believe that it was not originally thought out and designed 
for the present combination of instruments.... You have turned a monotonous 
work for two pianos into a thing of great beauty, a piano duo accessible only to a 
few connoisseurs into a tonic for every dilettante who has some music in him, a 
masterpiece of chamber music, the like of which we have not seen since 1828 [the 
year Schubert died]. 

Even so, Brahms continued polishing his quintet further before sending it off to his 
publisher in July 1865. He also chose to publish the intermediate two-piano version 
of the score as well, but he utterly destroyed the original version for strings alone. He 
was not to return to the string quintet for nearly twenty years~and when he did, it 
was to a different ensemble with two violas instead of two cellos. 

The first movement grows from three tiny musical ideas presented right at the 
outset and varied with wonderful imagination into a tightly cohesive structure that 



constantly harps at the minor mode, only briefly relenting at the end of the exposition 
and in a parallel passage of the recapitulation. An extended passage for the four 
strings alone (almost the only one in the movement) seems to foretell a brighter and 
gentler conclusion, but it is rudely cut off by a violent reversion to the minor-key 
storms of the opening idea. The slow movement is lushly harmonized and sweet, the 
strongest possible contrast to the first movement. It is direct and singing throughout, 
with the opening section of its ABAform rescored at its return. 

The scherzo starts out with a tense pizzicato pulse in the cello, and it looks as if 
we are in for a mysterious and ghostly time. The syncopated 6/8 figure soon turns 
into a 2/4 march (still hushed) and suddenly bursts into a broader 6/8 version of the 
march. Brahms particularly enjoys the contrast of meters, and he works out his 
material in an unpredictable way, including a crisp, hushed fugal passage and 
untraditional keys. The scherzo proper ends with urgently reiterated statements of a 
D-flat sinking to C; this falling semitone is one of the most important motives of the 
whole piece, but its appearance here—particularly on D-flat and C— is very likely an 
intentional reference to the conclusion of Schubert's great C major quintet. 
Remember that Brahms originally wrote this passage for the same five instruments 
that Schubert used, so the sonority would reinforce the reminiscence. The Trio is, as 
usual, in marked contrast to the tension of the scherzo, a grand, noble tune stated 
twice (with different scoring) before beginning to work its way back for the repeat of 
the scherzo. 

The finale opens with a dark, chromatic introduction yearning upwards and 
threatening some massive explosion. When the Allegro finally arrives, it turns out to 
be a quirky cello tune, followed by a syncopated second subject. The elements draw 
together in an extended coda in a faster tempo (but not too fast-Brahms is careful to 
modify his "Presto" with "non troppo," and his own performances are reported to 
have been quite deliberate). Misleading final-sounding chords bring on the second 
subject, now in much more dramatic guise and extended at some length, before the 
vigorous syncopation of the scherzo returns to bring the quintet to a passionate close. 

-Steven Ledbetter 



Violinist Nancy Bracken studied with Ivan Galamian at the Curtis Institute of Music 
and later with Donald Weilerstein of the Cleveland Quartet at the Eastman School of 
Music. Originally from St. Louis, she was a member of the Cleveland Orchestra for two 
years before joining the Boston Symphony Orchestra in 1979. Ms. Bracken has 
appeared as soloist with the St. Louis Symphony, the St. Louis Philharmonic, and the 
Boston Pops Esplanade Orchestra. In 1975 she won first prize in the college string 
competition of the Music Teachers National Association. Ms. Bracken has participated 
in summer music festivals in Aspen and the Grand Tetons and was concertmaster and a 
frequent violin soloist with the Colorado Philharmonic for two summers. Since joining 
the Boston Symphony Orchestra, she has played numerous solo recitals and chamber 
music concerts, including appearances at the Gardner Museum, Harvard University, 
the Clark Art Institute, and the Berkshire Museum. 



Born in Honolulu, Hawaii, in 1963, violinist Bonnie Bewick joined the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra in January 1987. Ms. Bewick now performs frequently in the 
Boston area in recitals and in chamber music concerts, and she was concertmaster of the 
New England Philharmonic, with which has appeared as soloist. Founder of the First 
Presbyterian Artists Series in Quincy, she teaches privately and has taught at the New 
England Conservatory Extension Division. Ms. Bewick studied at the University of 



Michigan in Ann Arbor, and at the Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia, where she 
received her bachelor's degree in music. Her teachers included Aaron Rosand and 
David Cerone while she was at Curtis, Ruggiero Ricci and Paul Makanowitzky in 
Michigan, and Elizabeth Holborn in California. Ms. Bewick has made solo appearances 
with a number of west coast orchestras; her orchestral experience has included positions 
with the Colorado Philharmonic, the Lansing Symphony Orchestra, and the Peninsula 
Symphony Orchestra. She has also been a member of the Grand Teton Music Festival 
Orchestra and the orchestra of the Spoleto Festival of Two Worlds. 

A prizewinner in the Geneva International Competition at the age of eighteen, violist 
Patricia McCarty has performed throughout the United States and in Europe. She has 
been soloist with the Houston Symphony, the Boston Pops Orchestra, and the Orchestre 
de la Suisse Romande, among many other orchestras, and her recital appearances have 
included Boston, Detroit, Geneva, and a highly acclaimed 1986 London debut at 
Wigmore Hall. Her recording of works by Rebecca Clarke for Northeastern Records 
was named a "1987 Critics' Choice" by Gramophone magazine. As a chamber musician, 
Ms. McCarty has performed at the Marlboro and Tanglewood festivals, she has toured 
with Music From Marlboro, the Lenox Quartet, and the Boston Symphony Chamber 
Players, and she has recorded for Nonesuch and Northeastern. Selected in 1988 to 
present concert residencies under the auspices of New York-based Affiliate Artists, Inc., 
Ms. McCarty has also received a Solo Recitalist Grant from the National Endowment for 
the Arts, to perform a series of recitals throughout the United States during the 1989-90 
and 1990-91 seasons. In February 1991 she will give the world premiere of a work by 
Keith Jarrett with the Fairfield (Connecticut) Chamber Orchestra. Ms. McCarty joined 
the Boston Symphony Orchestra as assistant principal viola in 1979. 

Born and raised in Oak Park, Illinois, Joel Moerschel received his early musical 
training from Chicago Symphony cellist Nicolai Zedeler and from Karl Fruh, professor 
of music at the Chicago Musical College. Advanced studies with Ronald Leonard at 
the Eastman School of Music earned him a bachelorof music degree and a performer's 
certificate. Mr. Moerschel has been a soloist with community orchestras in the Boston, 
Chicago, and Rochester, New York, areas and received extensive training in orchestral 
music as a tutti player and principal cellist in professional and student orchestras before 
joining the Boston Symphony Orchestra in 1970. An active member of Boston's musical 
community, Mr. Moerschel is devoted to exploring chamber music with groups such as 
the Wheaton Trio and Francesco String Quartet, and contemporary music with the 
Boston Musica Viva and Collage New Music. He also performs the standard cello and 
piano literature with his wife Rita. Mr. Moerschel is an instructor of cello at Wheaton 
College in Norton, Massachusetts. 

Originally from Iowa, pianist Deborah DeWolf Emery holds her bachelor of music 
degree from Oberlin and studied in master classes with Andre Watts at Tanglewood in 
1973; she has been active as a freelance musician since graduating from college. Since 
moving to Boston with her husband, trumpet player Steven Emery, who joined the 
Boston Symphony at the start of the 1988 Tanglewood season, she has performed 
chamber music regularly with members of the Boston Symphony Orchestra and other 
Boston-area musicians, and performed as an extra player with the Boston Symphony 
and Boston Pops orchestras. Previously, Ms. Emery performed as orchestra pianist with 
the Kansas City Philharmonic and Columbus (Ohio) Symphony and worked with Lyric 
Opera of Kansas City and Opera Columbus. 







110th Season 

19 9 0-91 




Boston Symphony Orchestra 



Seiji Ozawa, Music Director 



90th Anniversary of Symphony Hall 




Unly the few will seek the exclusivity that comes with owning 
an Audemars Piguet. Only the few will recognize *|» 

more than a century of technical in- f\Y 

novation; today, that innovation is 
reflected in our ultra-thin mech- 
anical movements, the sophistica- 
tion of our perpetual calendars, and more recently, our dramatic 
new watch with dual time zones. Only the few will appreciate The CEO 
Collection which includes a unique selection of the finest Swiss watches 
man can create. Audemars Piguet makes only a limited number of watches 
each year. But then, that's something only the few will understand. 



Memais Piguet 



SHREVE.CRUMP &LOW 



JEWELERS SINCE 1800 



330 BOYLSTON ST., BOSTON, MASS. 02116 (617) 267-9100 • 1-800-225-7088 
THE MALL AT CHESTNUT HILL • SOUTH SHORE PLAZA 




Seiji Ozawa, Music Director 
Grant Llewellyn and Robert Spano, 

Assistant Conductors 
One Hundred and Tenth Season, 1990-91 



&=^ 



Trustees of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Inc. 

Nelson J. Darling, Jr., Chairman Emeritus 



J. P. Barger, Chairman 

Mrs. Lewis S. Dabney, Vice-Chairman 

Mrs. John H. Fitzpatrick, Vice-Chairman 



George H. Kidder, President 

Archie C. Epps, Vice-Chairman 

William J. Poorvu, Vice-Chairman and Treasurer 



David B. Arnold, Jr. 
Peter A. Brooke 
James F. Cleary 
John F. Cogan, Jr. 
Julian Cohen 
William M. Crozier, Jr. 
Mrs. Michael H. Davis 
Mrs. Eugene B. Doggett 

Trustees Emeriti 

Vernon R. Alden 
Philip K. Allen 
Allen G. Barry 
Leo L. Beranek 
Mrs. John M. Bradley 
Abram T. Collier 



Avram J. Goldberg 
Mrs. R. Douglas Hall III 
Francis W. Hatch 
Julian T. Houston 
Mrs. Bela T. Kalman 
Mrs. George I. Kaplan 
Harvey Chet Krentzman 
R. Willis Leith, Jr. 



Mrs. Harris Fahnestock 
Mrs. John L. Grandin 
E. Morton Jennings, Jr. 
Edward M. Kennedy 
Albert L. Nickerson 
Thomas D. Perry, Jr. 

Other Officers of the Corporation 

John Ex Rodgers, Assistant Treasurer Michael G. 

Daniel R. Gustin, Clerk 



Mrs. August R. Meyer 
Mrs. Robert B. Newman 
Peter C. Read 
Richard A. Smith 
Ray Stata 

William F. Thompson 
Nicholas T. Zervas 



Irving W. Rabb 
Mrs. George R. Rowland 
Mrs. George Lee Sargent 
Sidney Stoneman 
John Hoyt Stookey 
John L. Thorndike 



McDonough, Assistant Treasurer 



Administration 

Kenneth Haas, Managing Director 

Daniel R. Gustin, Assistant Managing Director and Manager of Tanglewood 

Michael G. McDonough, Director of Finance and Business Affairs 

Evans Mirageas, Artistic Administrator 

Anne H. Parsons, Orchestra Manager 

Caroline Smedvig, Director of Public Relations and Marketing 

Josiah Stevenson, Director of Development 

Robert Bell, Manager of 

Information Systems 
Peter N. Cerundolo, Director of 

Corporate Development 
Madelyne Cuddeback, Director of 

Corporate Sponsorships 
Patricia Forbes Halligan, Personnel 

Administrator 
Sarah J. Harrington, Budget Manager 
Margaret Hillyard-Lazenby, 

Director of Volunteers 
Russell M. Hodsdon, Manager of Box Office 
Bernadette M. Horgan, Public Relations 

Coordinator 
Craig R. Kaplan, Controller 
Nancy A. Kay, Director of Sales & 

Marketing Manager 
John M. Keenum, Director of 

Tanglewood Music Center Development 



Patricia Krol, Coordinator of Youth Activities 
Steven Ledbetter, Musicologist & 

Program Annotator 
Michelle R. Leonard, Media and Production 

Manager, Boston Symphony Orchestra 
Marc Mandel, Publications Coordinator 
John C. Marksbury, Director of 

Foundation and Government Support 
Julie-Anne Miner, Manager of Fund 

Reporting 
Richard Ortner, Administrator of 

Tanglewood Music Center 
Scott Schillin, Assistant Manager, 

Pops and Youth Activities 
Joyce M. Serwitz, Director of Major Gifts/ 

Assistant Director of Development 
Cheryl L. Silvia, Function Manager 
Susan E. Tomlin, Director of Annual Giving 



Programs copyright ©1990 Boston Symphony Orchestra, Inc. 
ivertisina. Inc./Cover photo by Ira Wyman 



Board of Overseers of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Inc. 

John F. Cogan, Jr., Chairman 

Mrs. Ray A. Goldberg, Vice-Chairman 

Mrs. R. Douglas Hall III, Secretary 



Mrs. Herbert B. Abelow 

Harlan Anderson 

Mrs. David Bakalar 

Bruce A. Beal 

Mrs. Leo L. Beranek 

Lynda Schubert Bodman 

Donald C. Bowersock, Jr. 

William M. Bulger 

Mrs. Levin H. Campbell 

Earle M. Chiles 

Mrs. C. Thomas Clagett, Jr. 

James F. Cleary 

William H. Congleton 

William F. Connell 

Walter J. Connolly, Jr. 

S. James Coppersmith 

Albert C. Cornelio 

Phyllis Curtin 

Alex V. d'Arbeloff 

Phyllis Dohanian 

Hugh Downs 

Goetz B. Eaton 

Edward Eskandarian 

Katherine Fanning 

Peter M. Flanigan 

Dean Freed 

Eugene M. Freedman 

Peter H.B. Frelinghuysen 

Mrs. James Garivaltis 

Mark R. Goldweitz 



Haskell R. Gordon 

Steven Grossman 

John P. Hamill 

Daphne P. Hatsopoulos 

Joe M. Henson 

Mrs. Marilyn Brachman Hoffman 

Ronald A. Homer 

Julian T. Houston 

Lola Jaffe 

Anna Faith Jones 

H. Eugene Jones 

Susan B. Kaplan 

Mrs. S. Charles Kasdon 

Richard L. Kaye 

Robert D. King 

Mrs. Gordon F. Kingsley 

Allen Z. Kluchman 

Koji Kobayashi 

Mrs. Carl Koch 

David I. Kosowsky 

Robert K. Kraft 

George Krupp 

Mrs. Hart D. Leavitt 

Laurence Lesser 

Stephen R. Levy 

Frederick H. Lovejoy, Jr. 

Mrs. Charles P. Lyman 

Mrs. Harry L. Marks 

C. Charles Marran 

Nathan R. Miller 



Mrs. Thomas S. Morse 

Richard P. Morse 

E. James Morton 

David G. Mugar 

David S. Nelson 

Mrs. Hiroshi H. Nishino 

Robert P. O'Block 

Paul C. O'Brien 

Vincent M. O'Reilly 

Walter H. Palmer 

Andrall E. Pearson 

John A. Perkins 

Daphne Brooks Prout 

Millard H. Pryor, Jr. 

Keizo Saji 

Roger A. Saunders 

Mrs. Raymond H. Schneider 

Mark L. Selkowitz 

Malcolm L. Sherman 

Mrs. Donald B. Sinclair 

W. Davies Sohier, Jr. 

Ralph Z. Sorenson 

Ira Stepanian 

Mrs. Arthur I. Strang 

Mark Tishler, Jr. 

Roger D. Wellington 

Robert A. Wells 

Mrs. Thomas H.P. Whitney 

Margaret Williams-DeCelles 

Mrs. John J. Wilson 



Overseers Emeriti 

Mrs. Weston W. Adams 
Mrs. Frank G. Allen 
Mrs. Richard Bennink 
Mary Louise Cabot 
Johns H. Congdon 
Mrs. Thomas J. Galligan 
Mrs. Richard D. Hill 
Susan M. Hilles 



Mrs. Louis I. Kane 
Leonard Kaplan 
Benjamin H. Lacy 
Mrs. James F. Lawrence 
Hanae Mori 

Mrs. Stephen V.C. Morris 
Stephen Paine, Sr. 
David R. Pokross 



Mrs. Peter van S. Rice 
Mrs. Jerome Rosenfeld 
Mrs. William C. Rousseau 
Francis P. Sears, Jr. 
Mrs. Edward S. Stimpson 
Mrs. Richard H. Thompson 
Luise Vosgerchian 
Mrs. Donald B. Wilson 






Symphony Hall Operations 

Robert L. Gleason, Facilities Manager 
James E. Whitaker, House Manager 

Cleveland Morrison, Stage Manager 

Franklin Smith, Supervisor of House Crew 

Wilmoth A. Griffiths, Assistant Supervisor of House Crew 

William D. McDonnell, Chief Steward 

H.R. Costa, Lighting 



"• ' 




Officers of the Boston Symphony Association of Volunteers 

Susan D. Hall, President 

Thelma E. Goldberg, Executive Vice-President 

Joan Erhard, Secretary 

Patricia A. Maddox, Treasurer 

Betty Sweitzer, Nominating Chairman 



Vice-Presidents 

Helen Doyle, Hall Services 
Goetz B. Eaton, Fundraising 
Charles W. Jack, Adult Education 
Pat Jensen, Membership 
Maureen Hickey, Tanglewood 

Chairmen of Regions 

Krista Kamborian Baldini 
Judy Clark 
Joan Erhard 
Bettina Harrison 



Marilyn Larkin, Tanglewood 

Patricia A. Newton, Regions 

Carol Scheifele-Holmes, Public Relations 

F. Preston Wilson, Development 

Pat Woolley, Youth Activities 



Helen Lahage 
Paula Murphy 
Pamela S. Nugent 



Beverly J. Pieper 
Patricia L. Tambone 
Arline Ziner 



Business and Professional Leadership Association 
Board of Directors 



Harvey Chet Krentzman, Chairman 



James F. Cleary, BPLA President 



Members 

J.P. Barger 
Leo L. Beranek 
William F. Connell 
Nelson J. Darling, Jr. 



Thelma E. Goldberg 
Joe M. Henson 
George H. Kidder 
Vincent M. O'Reilly 



Malcolm L. Sherman 
Ray Stata 
Stephen J. Sweeney 
Roger D. Wellington 



Special thanks to the National Endowment for the Arts and the Massachusetts 
Cultural Council for their continued support of the Boston Symphony Orchestra. 



Celebrating the 90th Anniversary of Symphony Hall 




On display in the first-floor Huntington Avenue corridor of the Cohen Wing is an archival 
exhibit celebrating the 90th anniversary of Symphony Hall. In addition to newspaper accounts 
of the building's opening in 1900, the exhibit includes period photographs and a tribute to 
acoustician Wallace Clement Sabine. 

Articles on various aspects of Symphony Hall will be featured in the BSO program book 
throughout the season. The cover photograph shows the cartouche directly above the 
Symphony Hall stage. Whereas numerous European halls traditionally highlighted various 
composers' names, Beethoven became the only composer whose name was inscribed on any of 
the plaques that trim the stage and balconies of Symphony Hall. The others were left empty 
since, at the time the Hall was opened, it was felt that only Beethoven's popularity would 
remain unchanged. 



OFFICERS 

H. GILMAN NICHOLS 
President 

JOHN L. THORNDIKE 
JOHN W. COBB 
DANIEL A. PHILLIPS 
JOHN M. MEYER 
ROBERT N. KARELITZ 
JONATHAN R. PHILLIPS 
JOHN F. WINCHESTER 
DOUGLAS R. SMITH-PETERSEN 
EDWARD P. THOMPSON 
RICHARD W. STOKES 
GEORGE BLAGDEN 
LAURA N. RIGSBY 
SUSAN R. GUNDERSON 
CHARLES R. EDDY, JR. 
FREDERIC C.R. STEWARD 
WILLIAM J. O'KEEFE 
GEORGE L. GRAY 



CHARLES C.J. PLATT 
ANTHONY B. BOVA 
FRANK WOODARD III 
JAMES J. ROCHE 
ARTHUR C. PICKETT 
JONATHAN B. LORING 
DENISE CRONIN 
ALTON L. CIRIELLO, JR. 
STEVEN H. BRAVEMAN 
J. BRIAN POTTS 
MARY JANE SMITH 
NANCY B. SMITH 
ELLEN COPE-FLANAGAN 
DONALD P. LEE 
JOHN R. LAYTON 
SARAH A. PHILLIPS 
ROSALYN M. SO VIE 
MAUREEN W. BURKE 




FIDUCIARY 

BOSTON TRUSTEES 

Fiduciary Trust Company 

175 Federal Street 

Boston, Massachusetts 02110 

Telephone (617) 482-5270 



BSO 



The Refurbished Cohen Wing Opens 

The Boston Symphony Orchestra is pleased to 
celebrate the 90th anniversary of Symphony 
Hall with the completion of a $7.2 million ren- 
ovation program. Carried out by architects 
Crissman & Solomon of Watertown, Massachu- 
setts, the work has resulted in a skillful and 
beautiful union of the historic McKim, Mead & 
White structure and the adjacent Cohen Wing, 
named in honor of Julian and Eunice Cohen, 
whose generosity made possible the purchase 
of the building ten years ago. Without interfer- 
ing with the auditorium or its famed acoustics, 
the improvements provide spacious new facili- 
ties for public functions, a new home for the 
Symphony Shop, additional restrooms and 
wheelchair-accessible facilities, an additional 
coatroom, and offices for administrative staff. 
The two buildings are linked by a stairway and 
elevator at all levels. The renovation was 
financed entirely by private donations. Our 
thanks go to the Symphony Hall Renovation 
Campaign co-chairmen Frank Hatch and Bill 
Leith and to the countless donors and volun- 
teers whose generosity and leadership has 
made the BSO's home shine with new luster. 

In addition to patron amenities, the first 
floor of the Cohen Wing provides a handsome 
new home for the BSO's Casadesus Collection 
of Ancient Instruments, which was given to the 
orchestra in 1926 by Henri Casadesus, founder 
of the French Society of Ancient Instruments. 
During the renovation of the Cohen Wing the 
collection was taken to the Museum of Fine 
Arts for restoration. 

Symphony Spotlight 

Tnis is one in a series of biographical sketches 
that focus on some of the generous individuals 
who have endowed chairs in the Boston Sum- 
plumy Orchestra. Their backgrounds are varied, 
but each felt a special commitment to the Bos- 
ton Symphony Orchestra. 

Sylvia Shippen Wells Chair 

Sylvia Shippen Wells was born in Boston, the 
daughter of the late Reverend and Mrs. 
Eugene R. Shippen. She attended Wheelock 
College and in 1928 married John M. Wells. 
They moved to Southbridge, Massachusetts, 



where she became active in community affairs, 
but she always maintained her great interest in 
and devotion to the Boston Symphony Orches- 
tra. Mr. Wells founded and from 1940 until 
1960 successfully ran his own company, 
Harvey- Wells Electronics. He has also been 
extremely involved in amateur radio and avia- 
tion; in 1939 he was named chairman of the 
Massachusetts Aeronautics Commission by 
Governor Leverett Saltonstall. He is an active 
member of many organizations, such as the 
Friends of the BSO and Tanglewood. "My rea- 
son for endowing the principal timpani chair in 
honor of Sylvia, who died in 1973," said Mr. 
Wells, "was that I wanted to keep her memory 
alive for me and for others, since she was such 
a staunch supporter of the BSO all her life." 

Boston Symphony Chamber Players at 
Jordan Hall, Sunday, November 11, at 3 p.m. 

The Boston Symphony Chamber Players, with 
pianist Gilbert Kalish, open their 1990-91 sub- 
scription season at Jordan Hall on Sunday, 
November 11, at 3 p.m. Baritone Sanford 
Sylvan is featured in John Harbison's Words 
from Paterson, on a program also including 
Piston's Divertimento for strings and winds 
and Beethoven's Septet in E-flat for strings 
and winds, Opus 20. Single tickets are $16, 
$12, and $9, available on the day of the con- 
cert at the Jordan Hall box office, or in 
advance at the Symphony Hall box office or by 
calling SymphonyCharge at (617) 266-1200. 

Subscriptions at $42, $32, and $24 for the 
Chamber Players' three-concert series are still 
available; for complete subscription information, 
see page 30 of this program book. 

The Symphony Shop Celebrates the New 
BSO Season in a New Location 

Now in an attractive street-level storefront 
location at Symphony Hall's West Entrance on 
Huntington Avenue, the new, expanded Sym- 
phony Shop opened its doors for the 1990 
Opening Night at Pops concert. The Shop con- 
tinues to offer exclusive Boston Symphony and 
Boston Pops merchandise as well as recordings 
and other items with a musical motif. Business 
was brisk throughout the Pops season, and the 
BSAV anticipates a successful fall. One special 
piece of new merchandise is itself worth a visit 
to the Shop — an exquisite Swiss music box 
that is the only one of its kind available in the 
United States. Crafted by the Reuge Music 



References furnished 
on request 



Armenta Adams 
American Ballet Theater 
Michael Barrett 
John Bayless 
Leonard Bernstein 
William Bolcom 
Jorge Bolet 

Boston Pops Orchestra 
Boston Symphony 

Chamber Players 
Boston Symphony 

Orchestra 
Boston University School 

of Music 
Brooklyn Philharmonic 
Dave Brubeck 
Aaron Copland 
John Corigliano 
Phyllis Cur tin 
Rian de Waal 
Michael Feinstein 
Lukas Foss 
Philip Glass 
Karl Haas 
John F. Kennedy Center 

for Performing Arts 



■ Wm 



David Korevaar 
Garah Landes 
Micha el Lankes t er 
Elyane Laussade 
Marion McPartland 
Sjtthn Nauman 
Seiji Ozkwa 
Luciano Pavarotti 
Alexander Peskanov 
Andre Previn 
Steve Reich 
Santiago Rodriguez 
George Shearing 
Bright Sheng 
Leonard Shure 
Abbey Simon 
Stephen Sondheim 
Herbert Stessin 
Tanglewood Music 

Center 
Nelita True 
Craig Urquhart 
Earl Wild 
John Williams 
Yehudi Wyner 
and 200 others 



BALDWIN 

OF 

BOSTON 

98 Boylston, Boston, MA 02116, (617) 482-2525 




Company, the music box is made of rosewood 
with a Chinese lacquer finish. The box plays 
Viennese waltzes every hour on the hour, and 
the interior of the box lights up to reveal three 
elegant dancers, costumed in handmade 
dresses of silk, feathers, and pearls. Notewor- 
thy for its musical precision as well, the music 
box features two combs that provide 142 notes. 
If you are not able to visit the Shop on the 
hour, you can activate the music at any time 
with a quarter. Other new merchandise 
includes the 1991 BSO datebook and address 
book, both leatherbound, a Quill pen, clothing 
in such fashion colors as teal, magenta, water- 
melon, and jade, and the return, by popular 
demand, of the black t-shirt and sweatshirt 
with gold foil colophon. The Symphony Shop is 
open Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday from 11 
a.m. to 3 p.m., Saturday from 1 p.m. to 6 
p.m., and from one hour before every Sym- 
phony Hall concert through intermission. 

BSO Guests on WGBH-FM-89.7 

In the coming weeks, Morning pro Musica with 
Robert J. Lurtsema will feature live perform- 
ances and interviews with BSO members and 
guest conductors: principal trumpet Charles 
Schlueter will perform with pianist Deborah 
DeWolf Emery on Friday, October 26; com- 
poser Witold LutosMwski, who will lead the 
orchestra in a program of his own works, 
appears on Tuesday, October 30; Mark Kroll, 
frequent harpsichordist with the orchestra, will 
perform on Thursday, November 1; guest con- 
ductor Kurt Sanderling, who will lead music of 
Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven, appears on 
Monday, November 5; and guest conductor 
Marek Janowski, who will lead music of 
Schumann and Bruckner, appears on Monday, 
November 26. All performances and interviews 
begin at 11 a.m. 

BSO Members in Concert 

BSO associate concertmaster Tamara 
Smirnova-Sajfar will perform the Tchaikovsky 
Violin Concerto with the Wellesley Symphony 
Orchestra on Sunday, October 28, at 3 p.m. at 
Massachusetts Bay Community College, 50 
Oakland Street in Wellesley Hills, near the 
junction of Rtes. 16 and 9. Robert Prins con- 
ducts a program also including Dvorak's 
Carnival Overture and Mozart's Symphony 
No. 41, Jupiter. Tickets are priced from $6 to 
$8. Call (617) 444-0091 or 431-1314 for fur- 
ther information. 

BSO violist Michael Zaretsky performs 



Schnittke's Viola Concerto with the Boston 
University Symphony Orchestra at BU's Tsai 
Performance Center, 685 Commonwealth Ave- 
nue in Boston, on Friday, November 2, at 
8 p.m. Also on the program are Busoni's 
Berceuse elegiaque and Elgar's Symphony No. 2; 
David Hoose conducts. General admission is 
$5 ($3 seniors and students). 

The John Oliver Chorale opens its 1990-91 
subscription season with Swiss composer 
Frank Martin's Requiem and the United States 
premiere of Martin's Pilate on Saturday, 
November 3, at 8 p.m. at St. Paul's Church in 
Cambridge, at Bow and Arrow streets. The 
soloists are soprano Dominique Labelle, mezzo- 
soprano Gloria Raymond, tenor Paul Kirby, 
baritone Paul Rowe, and bass Donald Wilkin- 
son. Single tickets are $20, $14, and $5; sea- 
son subscriptions are also available. For fur- 
ther information, call (617) 325-0886. 

Ronald Knudsen leads the Newton Sym- 
phony Orchestra in the opening concert of its 
25th Anniversary Season on Sunday, Novem- 
ber 4, at 8 p.m. at Aquinas Junior College, 
15 Walnut Park in Newton. Sanford Sylvan is 
soloist in the world premiere of Charles Fus- 
sell's Wilde, a Symphony for Baritone and 
Orchestra, commissioned by the Newton Sym- 
phony Orchestra, on a program also including 
the Mussorgsky/Ravel Pictures at an Exhibi- 
tion. Single tickets are $14 and $12; season 
subscriptions are also available. Call 
(617) 965-2555 for further information. 



CAREY* 



LIMOUSINE 

•CHAUFFEUR DRIVEN SEDANS, 

VANS AND LIMOUSINES 

FOR ALL OCCASIONS 
• EXECUTIVE SERVICE 
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Seiji Ozawa 




Now in his eighteenth year as music 
director of the Boston Symphony Orches- 
tra, Seiji Ozawa was named the BSO's 
thirteenth music director in 1973, follow- 
ing a year as music adviser. His many 
tours with the orchestra in Europe, Japan, 
and throughout the United States have 
included the orchestra's first tour devoted 
exclusively to appearances at the major 
European music festivals, in 1979; four 
visits to Japan; and, to celebrate the 
orchestra's centennial in 1981, a fourteen- 
city American tour and an international 
tour to Japan, France, Germany, Austria, 
and England. In March 1979 Mr. Ozawa 
and the Boston Symphony Orchestra made 
an historic visit to China for a significant 
musical exchange entailing coaching, 
study, and discussion sessions with Chi- 
nese musicians, as well as concert perform- 
ances, becoming the first American per- 
forming ensemble to visit China since the 
establishment of diplomatic relations. In 
December 1988 he and the orchestra gave 
eleven concerts during a two-week tour to 
England, the Netherlands, France, Ger- 
many, Austria, and Belgium. In December 
1989 Mr. Ozawa and the orchestra trav- 
eled to Japan for the fourth time, on a 
tour that also included the orchestra's first 
concerts in Hong Kong. 

Mr. Ozawa' s recent recordings for Phil- 
ips with the Boston Symphony Orchestra 



include Richard Strauss's Elektra, recorded 
during concert performances at Symphony 
Hall in Boston with Hildegard Behrens in 
the title role; and Mahler's First, Second 
(Resurrection), and Fourth symphonies, 
part of a continuing Mahler cycle on Phil- 
ips that also includes the Symphony No. 8 
(Symphony of a Thousand). Mahler's 
Fifth, Seventh, and Ninth symphonies, and 
his Kindertotenlieder, with Jessye Norman, 
have been recorded for future release. Mr. 
Ozawa' s recent recordings with the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra for Deutsche Gram- 
mophon include Poulenc's Gloria and Sta- 
bat mater with soprano Kathleen Battle 
and the Tanglewood Festival Chorus, the 
two Liszt piano concertos and Totentanz 
with Krystian Zimerman, an album of 
music by Gabriel Faure, and "Gaite parisi- 
enne," an album of music by Offenbach, 
Gounod, Chabrier, and Thomas. Other 
Deutsche Grammophon releases include 
Prokofiev's complete Romeo and Juliet, 
Berlioz's Romeo et Juliette and Damnation 
of Faust, and, with Itzhak Perlman, an 
award-winning album of the Berg and 
Stravinsky violin concertos* Also available 
are Schoenberg's Gurrelieder, on Philips; 
the complete Beethoven piano concertos 
with Rudolf Serkin, on Telarc; the Dvof ak 
Cello Concerto with Mstislav Rostropovich 
and Tchaikovsky's Pathetique Symphony, 
on Erato; Strauss's Don Quiocote and the 
Schoenberg/Monn Cello Concerto with 
Yo-Yo Ma, the Mendelssohn Violin Con- 
certo with Isaac Stern, and Berlioz's Les 
Nuits d'ete with Frederica von Stade, on 
CBS Masterworks; and Stravinsky's Fire- 
bird, on EMI/Angel. 

Mr. Ozawa pursues an active interna- 
tional career, appearing regularly with the 
Berlin Philharmonic, the Orchestre de 
Paris, the French National Orchestra, the 
Vienna Philharmonic, the Philharmonia of 
London, and the New Japan Philharmonic. 
Recent appearances conducting opera have 
included La Scala, Salzburg, the Vienna 
Staatsoper, and the Paris Opera; he has 
also conducted at Covent Garden. In 1983, 
at the Paris Opera, he conducted the world 



■ 



wHMBp 

■HHnsB 



premiere of Olivier Messiaen's $t Francis 
ofAssisi. In addition to his many Boston 
Symphony Orchestra recordings, he has 
recorded with the Berlin Philharmonic, the 
London Philharmonic, the Philharmonia of 
London, the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, 
the Orchestre National, the Orchestre de 
Paris, the San Francisco Symphony, and 
the Toronto Symphony Orchestra, among 
others. His opera recordings include 
Bizet's Carmen with Jessye Norman and 
the Orchestre National, on Philips, and 
Les Contes d 'Hoffmann with Placido Dom- 
ingo and Edita Gruberova, on Deutsche 
Grammophon. 

Born in 1935 in Shenyang, China, to 
Japanese parents, Seiji Ozawa studied 
Western music as a child and later gradu- 
ated with first prizes in composition and 
conducting from Tokyo's Toho School of 
Music, where he was a student of Hideo 
Saito. In 1959 he won first prize at the 
International Competition of Orchestra 
Conductors held in Besancon, France, and 
was invited to Tanglewood by Charles 
Munch, then music director of the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra and a judge at the 
competition. In 1960 he won the Tangle- 
wood Music Center's highest honor, the 
Koussevitzky Prize for outstanding student 
conductor. 



While a student of Herbert von Karajan 
in West Berlin, Mr. Ozawa came to the 
attention of Leonard Bernstein. He accom- 
panied Mr. Bernstein on the New York 
Philharmonic's 1961 tour of Japan and 
was made an assistant conductor of that 
orchestra for the 1961-62 season. In Janu- 
ary 1962 he made his first professional 
concert appearance in North America, with 
the San Francisco Symphony. Mr. Ozawa 
was music director of the Chicago Sym- 
phony Orchestra's Ravinia Festival for five 
summers beginning in 1964, music director 
of the Toronto Symphony Orchestra from 
1965 to 1969, and music director of the 
San Francisco Symphony from 1970 to 
1976, followed by a year as that orches- 
tra's music advisor. He conducted the 
Boston Symphony Orchestra for the first 
time at Tanglewood, in 1964, and made 
his first Symphony Hall appearance with 
the orchestra in 1968. In 1970 he was 
named an artistic director of the Tangle- 
wood Festival. 

Mr. Ozawa holds honorary doctor of 
music degrees from the University of 
Massachusetts, the New England Conser- 
vatory of Music, and Wheaton College in 
Norton, Massachusetts. He has won an 
Emmy for the Boston Symphony Orches- 
tra's "Evening at Symphony" PBS televi- 
sion series. 




m 



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^^ 



Music Directorship endowed by 
John Moors Cabot 

BOSTON SYMPHONY 

ORCHESTRA 

1990-91 

First Violins 

Malcolm Lowe 

Concertmaster 
Charles Munch chair 

Tamara Smirnova-Sajfar 

Associate Concertmaster 
Helen Horner Mclntyre chair 

Max Hobart 

Assistant Concertmaster 

Robert, L. Beal, and 

Enid L. and Bruce A. Beal chair 

Lucia Lin 

Assistant Concertmaster 

Edward and Bertha C Rose chair 

Bo Youp Hwang 

John and Dorothy Wilson chair, 
fully funded in perpetuity 

Max Winder 

Forrest Foster Collier chair 

Fredy Ostrovsky 

Dorothy Q. and David B. Arnold, Jr., 
chair, fully funded in perpetuity 

Gottfried Wilfinger 



* Participating in a system of rotated 
seating within each string section 
%0n sabbatical leave 



Leo Panasevich 

Carolyn and George Rowland chair 

Sheldon Rotenberg 

Muriel C. Kasdon and 
Marjorie C Paley chair 

Alfred Schneider 
Raymond Sird 
Ikuko Mizuno 
Amnon Levy 

Second Violins 

Marylou Speaker Churchill 

Fahnestock chair 

Vyacheslav Uritsky 

Charlotte and Irving W. Rabb chair 

Ronald Knudsen 

Edgar and Shirley Grossman chair 

Joseph McGauley 
Leonard Moss 

* Harvey Seigel 
*Jerome Rosen 

* Sheila Fiekowsky 
Ronan Lefkowitz 

* Nancy Bracken 
*Jennie Shames 
*Aza Raykhtsaum 
*Valeria Vilker Kuchment 
*Bonnie Bewick 
*Tatiana Dimitriades 
*James Cooke 
*Si-Jing Huang 

Violas 

Burton Fine 

Charles 8. Dana chair 

Patricia McCarty 

Anne Stoneman chair, 
fully funded in perpetuity 

^Ronald Wilkison 

Lois and Harlan Anderson chair 

Robert Barnes 





Jerome Lipson 

Joseph Pietropaolo 

Michael Zaretsky 

Marc Jeanneret 
*Mark Ludwig 
*Rachel Fagerburg 
*Edward Gazouleas 

Cellos 

Jules Eskin 

Philip R. Allen chair 

Martha Babcock 

Vernon and Marion Alden chair 

Sato Knudsen 

Esther S. and Joseph M. Shapiro chair 

Joel Moerschel 

Sandra and David Bakalar chair 

*Robert Ripley 
Luis Leguia 

Robert Bradford Newman chair 

$Carol Procter 

Lillian and Nathan R. Miller chair 

* Ronald Feldman 

Charles and JoAnne Dickinson chair 

* Jerome Patterson 

* Jonathan Miller 

Basses 

Edwin Barker 

Harold D. Hodgkinson chair 

Lawrence Wolfe 

Maria Nistazos Stata chair, 
fully funded in perpetuity 

Joseph Hearne 
Bela Wurtzler 
John Salkowski 

* Robert Olson 

* James Orleans 
*Todd Seeber 
*John Stovall 

Flutes 



Walter Piston chair 

Leene Buyse 

Acting Principal Flute 
Marian Gray Lewis chair 

Fenwick Smith 

Myra and Robert Kraft chair 

Piccolo 

Geralyn Coticone 

Evelyn and C. Charles Marran chair 



Oboes 

Alfred Genovese 

Mildred B. Remis chair 

Wayne Rapier 
Keisuke Wakao 

English Horn 

Laurence Thorstenberg 

Beranek chair, 

fully funded in perpetuity 

Clarinets 

Harold Wright 

Ann S.M. Banks chair 

Thomas Martin 

Bass Clarinet 

Craig Nordstrom 

Farla and Harvey Chet 
Krentzman chair 

Bassoons 

Richard Svoboda 

Edward A. Taft chair 

Roland Small 
Richard Ranti 

Contrabassoon 

Richard Plaster 

Helen Rand Thayer chair 

Horns 

Charles Kavalovski 

Helen Sagoff Slosberg chair 

Richard Sebring 

Margaret Andersen Congleton chair 

Daniel Katzen 
Jay Wadenpfuhl 
Richard Mackey 
Jonathan Menkis 

Trumpets 

Charles Schlueter 

Roger Louis Voisin chair 

Peter Chapman 

Ford H. Cooper chair 

Timothy Morrison 
Steven Emery 



Trombones 

Ronald Barron 

J. P. and Mary B. Barger chair, 
fully funded in perpetuity 

Norman Bolter 

Bass Trombone 

Douglas Yeo 

Tuba 

Chester Schmitz 

Margaret and William C. 
Rousseau chair 

Timpani 

Everett Firth 

Sylvia Shippen Wells chair 

Percussion 

Arthur Press 

Assistant Timpanist 
Peter Andrew Lurie chair 

Thomas Gauger 

Peter and Anne Brooke chair 

Frank Epstein 

Harp 

Ann Hobson Pilot 

Willona Henderson Sinclair chair 

Sara Schuster Ericsson 



Personnel Managers 

Lynn Larsen 
Harry Shapiro 

Librarians 

Marshall Burlingame 
William Shisler 
James Harper 

Stage Manager 

Position endowed by 
Angelica Lloyd Clagett 

Alfred Robison 



11 




Without You, 
This Is The Whole Picture 



This year, there is an $ 1 1 million difference 
between what the BSO will earn — and what 
we must spend to make our music. 

Your gift to the Boston Symphony Annual 
Fund will help us make up that difference. 

It will help us continue to fund outreach, 



educational and youth programs, and to attract 
the world's finest musicians and guest artists. 

Make your generous gift to the Annual 
Fund — and become a Friend of the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra today. Because without 
you, the picture begins to fade. 



r 



~i 



Yes, I want to keep great music alive. 

I'd like to become a Friend of the BSO for the 1990-91 season. (Friends' benefits 

begin at $50.) Enclosed is my check for $ payable to the Boston 

Symphony Annual Fund. 



Name 



Tel. 



Address. 
City 



.State 



.Zip 



L 



Please send your contribution to: Susan E. Tomlin, Director of Annual Giving, 

Boston Symphony Orchestra, Symphony Hall, Boston, MA 02115. 

A portion of your gift may not be tax-deductible. For information call (617) 638-9251. 




KEEP GREAT MUSIC ALIVE 



"J 



12 



A Brief History of the Boston Symphony Orchestra 



Now in its 110th season, the Boston Sym- 
phony Orchestra gave its inaugural concert 
on October 22, 1881, and has continued to 
uphold the vision of its founder, the philan- 
thropist, Civil War veteran, and amateur 
musician Henry Lee Higginson, for more 
than a century. Under the leadership of Seiji 
Ozawa, its music director since 1973, the 
Boston Symphony Orchestra has performed 
throughout the United States, as well as in 
Europe, Japan, and China, and it reaches 
audiences numbering in the millions through 
its performances on radio, television, and 
recordings. It plays an active role in com- 
missioning new works from today's most 
important composers; its summer season at 
Tanglewood is regarded as one of the most 
important music festivals in the world; it 
helps to develop the audience of the future 
through the Boston Symphony Youth Con- 
certs and through a variety of outreach pro- 
grams involving the entire Boston commu- 
nity; and, during the Tanglewood season, it 
sponsors one of the world's most important 
training grounds for young composers, con- 
ductors, instrumentalists, and vocalists, the 
Tanglewood Music Center, which celebrated 
its fiftieth anniversary this past summer. 
The orchestra's virtuosity is reflected in 
the concert and recording activities of the 
Boston Symphony Chamber Players — the 
world's only permanent chamber ensemble 
made up of a major symphony orchestra's 



principal players — and the activities of the 
Boston Pops Orchestra have established an 
international standard for the performance 
of lighter kinds of music. Overall, the mis- 
sion of the Boston Symphony Orchestra is 
to foster and maintain an organization dedi- 
cated to the making of music consonant 
with the highest aspirations of musical art, 
creating performances and providing educa- 
tional and training programs at the highest 
level of excellence. This is accomplished with 
the continued support of its audiences, 
governmental assistance on both the federal 
and local levels, and through the generosity 
of many foundations, businesses, and 
individuals. 

Henry Lee Higginson dreamed of found- 
ing a great and permanent orchestra in his 
home town of Boston for many years before 
that vision approached reality in the spring 
of 1881. The following October, the first 
Boston Symphony Orchestra concert was 
given under the direction of conductor Georg 
Henschel, who would remain as music direc- 
tor until 1884. For nearly twenty years Bos- 
ton Symphony concerts were held in the Old 
Boston Music Hall; Symphony Hall, the 
orchestra's present home, and one of the 
world's most highly regarded concert halls, 
was opened in 1900. Henschel was suc- 
ceeded by a series of German-born and 
-trained conductors— Wilhelm Gericke, 
Arthur Nikisch, Emil Paur, and Max 




The first photograph, actually a collage, of the Boston Symphony Orchestra under Georg Henschel, 
taken 1882 



13 




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Fiedler — culminating in the appointment of 
the legendary Karl Muck, who served two 
tenures as music director, 1906-08 and 
1912-18. Meanwhile, in July 1885, the 
musicians of the Boston Symphony had 
given their first "Promenade" concert, offer- 
ing both music and refreshments, and ful- 
filling Major Higginson's wish to give "con- 
certs of a lighter kind of music." These 
concerts, soon to be given in the springtime 
and renamed first "Popular" and then 
"Pops," fast became a tradition. 

In 1915 the orchestra made its first 
transcontinental trip, playing thirteen con- 
certs at the Panama-Pacific Exposition in 
San Francisco. Recording, begun with RCA 
in 1917, continued with increasing fre- 
quency, as did radio broadcasts. In 1918 
Henri Rabaud was engaged as conductor; he 
was succeeded a year later by Pierre Mon- 
teux. These appointments marked the begin- 
ning of a French-oriented tradition that 
would be maintained, even during the 
Russian-born Serge Koussevitzky's time, 
with the employment of many French- 
trained musicians. 

The Koussevitzky era began in 1924. His 
extraordinary musicianship and electric per- 
sonality proved so enduring that he served 
an unprecedented term of twenty-five years. 
Regular radio broadcasts of Boston Sym- 
phony Orchestra concerts began during 
Koussevitzky's years as music director. In 
1936 Koussevitzky led the orchestra's first 
concerts in the Berkshires; a year later he 
and the players took up annual summer res- 
idence at Tanglewood. Koussevitzky passion- 
ately shared Major Higginson's dream of "a 
good honest school for musicians," and in 
1940 that dream was realized with the 
founding of the Berkshire Music Center 
(now called the Tanglewood Music Center). 

In 1929 the free Esplanade concerts on 
the Charles River in Boston were inaugu- 
rated by Arthur Fiedler, who had been a 
member of the orchestra since 1915 and 
who in 1930 became the eighteenth conduc- 
tor of the Boston Pops, a post he would 
hold for half a century, to be succeeded by 
John Williams in 1980. The Boston Pops 
Orchestra celebrated its hundredth birthday 
in 1985 under Mr. Williams's baton. 



Charles Munch followed Koussevitzky as 
music director in 1949. Munch continued 
Koussevitzky's practice of supporting con- 
temporary composers and introduced much 
music from the French repertory to this 
country. During his tenure the orchestra 
toured abroad for the first time and its con- 
tinuing series of Youth Concerts was initi- 
ated. Erich Leinsdorf began his seven-year 
term as music director in 1962. Mr. Leins- 
dorf presented numerous premieres, restored 
many forgotten and neglected works to the 
repertory, and, like his two predecessors, 
made many recordings for RCA; in addition, 
many concerts were televised under his 
direction. Leinsdorf was also an energetic 
director of the Tanglewood Music Center, 
and under his leadership a full-tuition fel- 
lowship program was established. Also dur- 
ing these years, in 1964, the Boston Sym- 
phony Chamber Players were founded. 

William Steinberg succeeded Leinsdorf in 
1969. He conducted a number of American 
and world premieres, made recordings for 
Deutsche Grammophon and RCA, appeared 
regularly on television, led the 1971 Euro- 
pean tour, and directed concerts on the east 
coast, in the south, and in the mid-west. 

Seiji Ozawa, an artistic director of the 
Tanglewood Festival since 1970, became the 
orchestra's thirteenth music director in the 
fall of 1973, following a year as music 
adviser. Now in his eighteenth year as music 
director, Mr. Ozawa has continued to solid- 
ify the orchestra's reputation at home and 
abroad, and he has reaffirmed the orches- 
tra's commitment to new music through a 
series of centennial commissions marking 
the orchestra's 100th birthday, a series of 
works celebrating the fiftieth anniversary of 
Tanglewood Music Center, and recent works 
commissioned from such prominent compos- 
ers as John Cage, Hans Werner Henze, 
Peter Lieberson, and Bernard Rands. Under 
his direction the orchestra has also expanded 
its recording activities to include releases on 
the Philips, Telarc, CBS, EMI/Angel, Hype- 
rion, New World, and Erato labels. 

Today, the Boston Symphony Orchestra, 
Inc., presents more than 250 concerts annu- 
ally. It is an ensemble that has richly ful- 
filled Higginson's vision of a great and per- 
manent orchestra in Boston. 



15 




Deutsche Grammophon 
salutes 

MARTHA 
ARGERICH 




and from Ms. Argerich's DG CD catalogue: 

Chopin Piano Concerto No. 1 (Abbado) 

Schumann Kinderszenen; Kreisleriana 

Tchaikovsky Nutcracker (for two pianos, with Nicolas Economou) 



© 1990 DG/PolyGram Records 



16 




■ '•.■■••■ 




BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

Seiji Ozawa, Music Director 

Grant Llewellyn and Robert Spano, 
Assistant Conductors 

One Hundred and Tenth Season, 1990-91 

Thursday, October 11, at 8 
Tuesday, October 16, at 8 

SEIJI OZAWA conducting 




g^^r- 



PROKOFIEV 



Piano Concerto No. 3 in C, Opus 26 

Andante —Allegro 

Theme (Andantino) and Variations 

Allegro ma non troppo 

MARTHA ARGERICH 



INTERMISSION 



SCHUBERT 



Symphony in C, D.944, The Great 

Andante— Allegro ma non troppo 
Andante con moto 
Scherzo: Allegro vivace 
Allegro vivace 



These concerts will end at about 10. 

RCA, Deutsche Grammophon, Philips, Telarc, Sony Classical/CBS Masterworks, EMI/Angel, 

New World, Erato, and Hyperion records 
Baldwin piano 
Martha Argerich plays the Steinway piano. 

Please be sure the electronic signal on your watch or pager is switched off 
during the concert. 



17 



Week 3 







Its Not 

The Instrument, 

It's How 

You Play It. 








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kind of devotion to our work that Louis Armstrong did to his. 

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turn even the most ordinary printing job into a work of art. 

We'd like the chance to prove what we can do for you. 
For more information or to see samples of our work, give 
us a call. You'll find we're playing your song. 

The proof is in the performance. 

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Phone: (617) 848-9090 • Fax: (617) 843-5540 




18 



IWjfCJw 




Sergei Prokofiev 

Piano Concerto No. 3 in C, Opus 26 




Sergei Sergeyevich Prokofiev was born at Sontzovka, 
Government of Ekaterinoslav, Ukraine, on April 23, 
1891, and died at Nikolina Gora near Moscow on 
March 5, 1953. He began planning a third piano 
concerto as early as 1911, but completed it only in 
1921. Prokofiev himself played the solo part in the 
premiere, which was given on October 16 that year 
by the Chicago Symphony Orchestra conducted by 
Frederick Stock. The composer was also soloist at 
the first Boston Symphony Orchestra performance, 
on January 29, 1926; Serge Koussevitzky conducted. 
Other pianists to undertake the concerto on BSO 
concerts have included Alexander Borovsky with 
Koussevitzky, William Kapell and Gary Graffman 
with Richard Burgin, Alexander Urinsky with 
Charles Munch and Burgin, Jorge Bolet and John Browning with Erich Leinsdorf 
Graffman with Michael Tilson Thomas, Maurizio Pollini with Seiji Ozawa and 
Thomas, Byron Janis and Martha Argerich with Ozawa, Jeffrey Siegel with William 
Steinberg, Browning with Aldo Ceccato, Israela Margalit with Lorin Maazel and 
Joseph Silverstein, and John Lill with Yuri Temirkanov. The most recent Symphony 
Hall performances, in April 1985, featured Alexander Toradze with Seiji Ozawa; the 
most recent BSO performance at Tanglewood, in August 1990, featured pianist Yefim 
Bronfman with Charles Dutoit conducting. Besides the solo piano, the score calls for two 
flutes and piccolo, two each of oboes, clarinets, and bassoons, four horns, two trumpets, 
three trombones, timpani, bass drum, castanets, tambourine, cymbals, and strings. 

As the only child in a cultural and affluent household, Prokofiev's early development 
was directed first by his doting pianist mother, who gave him his first lessons on the 
instrument, and then— when his talent proved to be unmistakable— by the young com- 
poser Reinhold Gliere, who was hired to come as a private music tutor to Sontzovka. 
By the time Prokofiev entered the St. Petersburg Conservatory in 1904 he had 
already completed a remarkable number of youthful works, mostly for the piano, but 
also a violin sonata and an opera. During his first four years in St. Petersburg he 
pursued the course in composition. It was a difficult time: 1905 brought the first rum- 
blings of the coming revolution, disturbing the tranquility of academic life (Rimsky- 
Korsakov was fired for anti-government activities, and other leading teachers resigned 
in protest). But Prokofiev himself was responsible for most of his own difficulties. 
Rather arrogant by nature, he was also younger than the other students and found it 
difficult to make friends with them. Most of his teachers were conservative peda- 
gogues whose tutelage Prokofiev found dull; eventually he found himself in open 
clashes with his harmony teacher Liadov. Within a few years, the headstrong young 
colt had appeared in a recital of his own music that marked him as an enfant terrible, 
an image he assiduously cultivated for some time. 

His experience in a composition program had so disillusioned him to the prospects 
of teaching that he decided to pursue a career as a performer. Thus, though he had 
maintained at best a love-hate relationship with the St. Petersburg Conservatory 
— somewhat skewed to the latter — he decided to stay on for the study of piano and 
conducting. Here, too, his willful self-assurance made difficulties, but his piano 
teacher, Anna Esipova, proved as strong-willed as he. Prokofiev disdained to play the 
music of the Classical era without adding his own "improvements," and he found the 
discipline of technical drills a waste of time. Only when Esipova threatened him with 



19 



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expulsion did he see the light. His four years of study proved essential to his career 
as a soloist. He already played brilliant pieces brilliantly, but Esipova nourished a 
strain of lyricism that was to become as important to his composition as it was to his 
playing. 

Needless to say, he did not give up composing during this time. Before completing 
the piano program, Prokofiev had already finished his first two piano concertos (obvi- 
ously designed as showpieces for himself) and had even boldly chosen to play the 
First Concerto as his piece for the final keyboard competition, although it was 
expected that the participants would choose a work from the established repertory. 

The years following Prokofiev's graduation in 1914 were marked by war and revolu- 
tion in the world at large and in Russia in particular. Yet in spite of this, Prokofiev 
began to achieve renown, composing some of his best-known works (including the 
Classical Symphony and the First Violin Concerto). Eventually, though, the unsettled 
condition of musical life and almost everything else persuaded him to go abroad, at 
least for a time. He set out with high hopes for New York, going the long way, 
through Vladivostock, Tokyo, and San Francisco. While on this long journey he began 
sketching a new opera, The Love for Three Oranges, as well as two movements of a 
string quartet. Though the opera was eventually to become his most successful stage 
work, its first production was fraught with difficulties. After signing a contract for a 
1919 production in Chicago, Prokofiev finished the score in time for rehearsals. The 
sudden death of the intended conductor postponed the premiere for one year, then a 
second. Increasingly disillusioned with the United States, Prokofiev left for Paris in 
the spring of 1920. 

Paris was a good place for a Russian composer of advanced tendencies. Diaghilev's 
brilliant Ballets Russes was open to the newest ideas, especially from Russian com- 
posers, and Serge Koussevitzky had founded his own concert series emphasizing new 
works. After the exciting premiere of his ballet The Tale of the Buffoon by the Ballets 
Russes (Paris loved it, London hated it), Prokofiev adjourned to the coast of Brittany 
for a summer of composition. There he achieved his long-held plan to write a Third 
Piano Concerto. Much of the material was already in hand, since he had been think- 
ing about such a work since completing the Second Concerto in 1914, and some of the 
musical ideas go back even before that. He was still committed to the premiere of his 
opera in Chicago that fall, so he took the opportunity of introducing the new piano 
concerto there during the same trip. The Love for Three Oranges was premiered (in 
French, rather than the Russian in which it had been composed) at the Auditorium 
Theater in Chicago on December 30, 1921; the concerto, though composed later, pre- 
ceded the opera into the world by two months. Here, too, Prokofiev received diverse 
reactions: Chicago loved both works, New York hated them. Following this experience, 
Prokofiev returned to Paris, where he lived until his permanent return to the Soviet 
Union in 1938. Only concert tours brought him back to the United States during that 
period. By now, though, his two major "American" pieces are well established as 
favorites among Prokofiev's output. 

The Third Piano Concerto, in fact, is the most frequently performed of Prokofiev's 
five contributions to that genre. Though it is not a whit less demanding technically 
than the first two concertos, it opens up a new and appealing vein of lyricism that 
Prokofiev was to mine successfully in the years to come. At the same time his biting, 
acerbic humor is never absent for long, especially in the writing for woodwinds and 
sometimes for percussion. 

Prokofiev customarily wrote melodic ideas in a notebook as they occurred to him, 
sometimes gathering them for years before assembling them into a finished work, 
sometimes taking material from a work already completed and recasting it in a new 
guise. Both of these procedures occurred in the creation of the Third Piano Concerto. 
Some of the material dates back to 1911. But the first identifiable ideas to find their 



21 



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way into the score came when he created a theme to be used as the basis of a set of 
variations in 1913 (this now opens the second movement), though he did not work 
further on it at that time. In 1916-17 he created the main ideas for the first move- 
ment and wrote two variations on the 1913 theme. The string quartet that he began 
and then abandoned while en route to the United States was, according to the com- 
poser, a "white" quartet, because it was in a diatonic style playable on the white keys 
of the piano. (Such a description obviously comes from a pianist, since the idea of 
"white keys" would mean nothing to a string player!) Two of the themes from that 
work found their way into the new concerto. Thus, when Prokofiev began working 
specifically on the Third Concerto in 1921, he already had virtually the entire the- 
matic material of the work at hand. 

The concerto opens with a yearning lyrical theme in the clarinet, immediately ech- 
oed in flute and violins; its simplicity makes it memorable, and it will mark several 
stages of the form later on. 




V dot 



Almost at once a bustling of sixteenth-note runs in the strings ushers in the soloist, 
whose nervous theme grows out of the first three notes of the opening lyrical theme (a 
major second down and a perfect fifth up) turned backwards (a perfect fifth down and 
a major second up), then sweeps farther afield harmonically in its headstrong energy. 




An austere march of pounding chords leads to a faster passage of whirling triplets to 
conclude the exposition. The basic material is developed and recapitulated in a free 
sonata form. 

The main theme of the second movement is one of those patented Prokofiev tunes, 
dry and sardonic. But it doesn't stay that way long. The first variation is a Chopin 
nocturne with a twist; each ensuing variation has its own special color and character, 
by turns brilliant, meditative, and vigorously energetic. A climactic restatement of the 
theme with, further pianistic display dies away mysteriously into nothing. 

The finale begins with a crisp theme in bassoons and pizzicato lower strings in 
A minor; the piano argues with thundering chords, clouding the harmony. Despite 
various contrasting materials, some lyrical, some sarcastic, the opening figure pro- 
vides the main basis for the musical discussion, ending in a brilliant pounding coda. 

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Franz Schubert 

Symphony in C, D.944, The Great 




Franz Peter Schubert was born in Liechtental, a 
suburb of Vienna, on January 31, 1797, and died 
in Vienna on November 19, 1828. He began this 
symphony in the summer of 1825 and completed it 
by, at latest, October 1826. At some point between 
the summer of 1827 and November 1828, the work 
received at least one reading at a rehearsal of the 
orchestra of the Vienna Society of the Friends of 
Music (Gesellschaft der Musikfreunde). The first 
fully authenticated performance, heavily cut, took 
place on March 21, 1839, Felix Mendelssohn- 
Bartholdy conducting the orchestra of the Leipzig 
Gewandhaus. Theodor Eisfeld introduced the sym- 
phony to America with the Philharmonic Society of 
New York on January 11, 1851. It came to Boston 
on October 6, 1852, a certain Mr. F. Suck conducting an orchestra with four first vio- 
linists, two extra cellos replacing the bassoons, and with a second oboist engaged 
expressly for the occasion! More professional performances followed, the Germania 
Orchestra playing the work on January 8, 1853, and again in 1854, and the Philhar- 
monic Society coming along in 1857, these concerts being under the direction of Carl 
Zerrahn. Georg Henschel brought the work into the Boston Symphony's repertory on 
January 13 and 14, 1882, the twelfth subscription week of the orchestra's first season, 
and the orchestra has since played it under Wilhelm Gericke, Arthur Nikisch, Emil 
Paur, Karl Muck, Max Fiedler, Pierre Monteux, Serge Koussevitzky, Adrian Boult, 
George Szell, Leonard Bernstein, Charles Munch, Erich Leinsdorf, Josef Krips, William 
Steinberg, Max Rudolf, Peter Maag, Klaus Tennstedt, Colin Davis, and Kurt Masur. 
Erich Leinsdorf led the most recent Tanglewood performance in July 1982 and Jesus 
Lopez-Cobos the most recent subscription performances in February 1989. The score 
calls for flutes, oboes, clarinets, bassoons, horns, and trumpets, all in pairs; also three 
trombones, timpani, and strings. 

When he was a young man, Schubert found writing symphonies almost as easy as 
breathing. He had absorbed from birth the musical language of Mozart and Haydn, 



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and he was able to use it to say things that were fresh and characteristic of him alone 
from a very early age. He had finished his First Symphony before the end of 1813 — 
when he was sixteen years old. Within eighteen months he had completed two more. 
The Fourth and Fifth were composed in the spring and fall of 1816, respectively, and 
the Sixth in the winter of 1817-18. In short, six symphonies composed in the space of 
five years. Schubert was to live another ten years after finishing the Sixth, but he 
only composed one more complete symphony. Yet it was not for want of trying! He 
made extensive sketches for other symphonies, and he completed the first two move- 
ments of the Unfinished Symphony in B minor, one of his most magical scores. In 
that whole decade, though, only the Great C major symphony was fully com- 
pleted — and even it remained generally unknown for more than a decade after the 
composer's early death. 

Something happened about 1818 to undermine the confidence he had shown 
hitherto. For the next five years his output contains dozens of works begun and not 
finished, many of them sketched out on a grand scale.* Part of the change, no doubt, 
came from Schubert's emotional maturing (he was, after all, just twenty-one years old 
in 1818) and from a desire to express deeper and more intense feelings in his music. 



*One of these, a planned symphony in E, is so extensively drafted that it has been completed by 
other hands on more than one occasion. Mendelssohn, Sullivan, and Brahms all considered the 
possibility of completing it. John Francis Barnett, an English composer, actually did so in 
1863, as did Felix Weingartner, the Austrian conductor and composer, in 1934. In 1977, Brian 
Newbould made a far more satisfactory edition (and followed it up with completions of numer- 
ous other Schubert symphonic sketches and a "Tenth Symphony"). Newbould's versions are 
very much worth hearing (they have been recorded), though the listener must keep in mind that 
they are hypothetical final versions of works that Schubert chose — for whatever reason — not to 
finish. 



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Part of it surely resulted from the overwhelming example of Beethoven, who had 
redefined the character of the symphony during Schubert's lifetime. After Beethoven 
the symphony had to be grand, even heaven-storming. It was not music for entertain- 
ment, even of the supremely witty and accomplished kind that Haydn had perfected. 
Schubert evidently felt the need to reconsider his entire approach to the symphony; 
many of his attempts evidently did not meet his new standards, or raised musical 
problems that he was unable to resolve, so they remained simply sketches or incom- 
plete torsos. 

Going by the numbering in the chronological catalogue of Schubert's works first 
put together by Otto Erich Deutsch, the Great C major symphony (so called to distin- 
guish it from Symphony No. 6 in the same key) was one of the prolific composer's 
final compositions.* Indeed, the manuscript actually bears the date "March 1828" 
written in Schubert's hand, suggesting to earlier investigators that he composed the 
symphony just eight months before his death. 

But there is a mystery here. It is well documented that Schubert composed a sym- 
phony in the summer of 1825, during a vacation trip to Gmunden and Gastein with 
his friend Johann Michael Vogl, and that he submitted a work described as "this, my 
symphony" to the Vienna Philharmonic Society in October 1826, though it was never 



''The question of proper number for the Great C major symphony is a vexing one. By the time 
the Schubert symphonies first came to be published, it was known that he had composed six 
early symphonies; about those we have no problem. The Great C major was originally published 
as "No. 7." When it came to light, the Unfinished Symphony was then identified as "No. 8." 
But the realization that the Unfinished was composed several years before the Symphony in C 
led some publishers to rechristen the latter work "No. 9," which was chronologically correct, 
but left a gap at 7. A few commentators filled in the gap with the unfinished Symphony in E 
that had been completed by other hands, but this seems unwise, since Schubert himself never 
considered it to be a finished work. In 1978 the revised edition of the Deutsch Schubert cata- 
logue took the bull by the horns and renumbered the Unfinished as "No. 7" and the C major as 
"No. 8." Still more recently, the publication and recording of the Newbould completions of 
Schubert sketches have led some performers to call the C major symphony "No. 10" (though 
there is also a series of late sketches that Newbould completed with that number!). Thus it is 
possible to find scores, records, or concert programs in which this symphony is billed as No. 7, 
8, 9, or 10. That way madness lies. For the sake of our own sanity, and perhaps yours, we now 
use only the key, Deutsch catalogue number, and relevant nickname for Schubert symphonies 
after the Sixth. 



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publicly performed. The 1828 date written on the manuscript of the Great C major 
symphony convinced that devoted Schubertian George Grove that it could not possibly 
be the work offered for performance in 1826. Thus scholars, partly indulging in wish- 
ful thinking, have looked for the "missing" Gastein symphony for more than a cen- 
tury. Only recently has a reconsideration of the evidence brought quite convincing 
arguments that the Great C major symphony is, in fact, the work that Schubert com- 
posed in Gastein. It was never "lost." Only careless or willful misreading of the evi- 
dence could have generated the hypothesis postulating a missing work. 

Happily, there is now new physical evidence to add to the demonstration. The 
paper on which Schubert wrote most of the symphony is of a distinctive type that he 
also used for five dated compositions — all of them written in the summer of 1825. 
Moreover, Schubert's idol, Beethoven, used the same paper for his Opus 132 string 
quartet, which he was writing at the same time. The lengthy manuscript of Schubert's 
symphony does contain, here and there, four other types of paper, but they occur in 
revisions made later than the original drafting of the score. The first movement in 
particular shows signs of later reworking, to be discussed below. This probably took 
place months or even years after the original work of composition. It seems most 
likely, then, that Schubert added the date "March 1828" to the autograph when he 
undertook the final revision of a work that had long since been completed and may 
even have had a private reading at the Philharmonic Society. 

After Schubert's death in 1828, the symphony was "lost" in the sense that it 
remained in manuscript and unperformed. Not until New Year's Day 1829 was it 
seen by a musician who truly valued its significance: Robert Schumann. He immedi- 
ately arranged for a performance (conducted by Mendelssohn) in Leipzig, the first 
hearing of this enormous score. At a time when Schubert was still scarcely known 
outside of Vienna, Schumann hailed him at length as the greatest successor to 



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Beethoven (though he only outlived that master by a year). The C major symphony 
offered, to Schumann's mind, all possible virtues from variety and colorful effects to 
clear form and craftsmanship: 

For here, beside masterful technique of musical composition, there is life in every 
fiber, color in the finest gradations, significance everywhere, sharply cut detail. 
And finally, over the whole there is poured out that romanticism we know to be 
characteristic of Franz Schubert. And these heavenly lengths, like a great novel 
in four volumes by one such as Jean Paul . . . 

Despite Schumann's well-known praise of the symphony's "heavenly length" the work 
was heavily cut on this occasion. The first performance was a success, but almost 
everywhere else orchestras reacted as the Philharmonic Society had when Schubert 
first offered the piece: it was "too long and difficult." Schumann himself recognized 
that listeners might be at first bewildered by "the brilliance and novelty of inspiration, 
by the length and breadth of the form, by the enchanting fluctuation of feeling," but 
he insisted that gradually, over time with repeated hearings, the connections would 
become clear. Indeed, audiences eventually came to know the symphony in spite of its 
length and to recognize the truth of Schumann's ecstatic reaction: "It transports us 
into a world where we cannot recall ever having been before." 

The first movement begins with a melody, Andante, in the horns that might be the 
typical "slow introduction" — except that Schubert welds it to the body of the move- 
ment, making it the cornerstone of the entire symphony. The first three notes 
(C-D-E) cover the interval of a major third, which is heard, either rising or falling, in 
many passages throughout the score. The transition from the "splendid romantic 
introduction" aroused Schumann's explicit enthusiasm. The dotted figure from the 
opening phrase becomes more insistent; it builds to a climax that resolves quietly to 
C major, where the woodwinds take up the horn melody against a new triplet figure in 
the strings. The introduction gathers momentum, then the same basic figures — dotted 
notes and triplets — spill over the Allegro ma non troppo: 



[strings, trunpets] 



feppPPPppP^ 



JJJJJ J. JJJ J U 



- ■ ./ 

Schubert had composed the entire first movement using an even simpler motive: 



J- JU- J 1 J- jU- ^ 



/ 

After completing the full score, he decided to rework the theme, which meant rewrit- 
ing all the hundreds of times it occurs in the first movement; this he did by scratching 
out the original note with a penknife at each appearance, then writing in the correc- 
tion. It is astonishing what a lift that tiny change gives the flow of the section, avoid- 
ing what might become a drearily monotonous repetition. (Possibly this was the major 
revision of March 1828 that justified, in the composer's mind, appending that date to 
the manuscript as a sign of completion.) A new, crisp march theme appears in the 
oboes and bassoons over whispering strings in the rather surprising key of E minor. 
But soon it moves again to the more expected secondary key of G major, where the 
theme is repeated, with a charming chromatic addition. But the exposition is far from 
over; the marchlike figure expands harmonically, almost as if we were already in the 
middle of the development, only to settle firmly again on the dominant, where 
Schubert marks a double bar for the conductor daring enough to repeat this extraor- 
dinarily lengthy exposition (few have accepted the challenge). Schubert's development 



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reworks fragments of the ideas already heard in new combinations that grow increas- 
ingly darker, more hushed, and more mysterious until the first dotted theme returns, 
now piano, in the original key. All of the material heard in the exposition is reworked 
at length, becoming finally an extended coda moving at a still faster tempo, so that 
when Schubert offers the masterstroke of bringing back the opening horn call, it is 
transmuted from a gentle, slightly bucolic melody to a grand rush of high energy. 

The second movement, in A minor, is laid out on the simplest of musical plans, 
ABAB, with the B sections appearing in contrasting keys, first F major, then 
A major. This pattern can be seen as an abridged sonata form without a development 
section, an arrangement found quite commonly in slow movements. Yet the flow of 
ideas is so lavish and imaginative that one scarcely notices the straightforwardness of 
the design in the poetry of the elaboration. 

The scherzo, too, is elaborated in extenso as a full-scale sonata form, a far cry from 
the binary dance movement of earlier symphonies (though akin in this sense to the 
scherzo of Beethoven's Ninth Symphony). For the second theme of the scherzo and 
also in the Trio, Schubert introduces themes that truly waltz, lilting in the style that 
was to become the hallmark of Vienna for a century (we forget that the symphony 
was composed at precisely the time when Johann Strauss the elder and his room- 
mate — later rival — Josef Lanner were so successfully introducing waltzes for dancing 
at Viennese dining establishments, and in so doing we overlook Schubert as a pioneer 
of the Viennese waltz). 

The last movement is nothing short of colossal in time span, energy, and imagina- 
tive power. This music astonished the players who first attempted to perform the 
symphony and probably persuaded them to give it up. Two separate motives — one 
dotted, one in triplet rhythm — stand at the head of the movement as a call to atten- 
tion and a forecast of things to come. Both play a role in the opening theme, which 
grows with fierce energy to the dominant cadence. After a pause, a brilliantly simple 
new idea — four repeated notes in the unison horns — generates an independent march- 
like theme that shows off its possibilities later on when it comes to dominate the 
extended development. (When Mendelssohn attempted to rehearse the symphony for a 
first London performance, the first violinists collapsed in laughter when they came to 
the eighty-eight consecutive measures of triplet eighth-notes that accompany the sec- 
ond theme, with the measured tread of woodwinds and brass.) The opening dotted 
motive foreshadows the recapitulation with increasing intensity, though when it 
arrives, Schubert arranges matters so as to bring it back in the completely unexpected 
key of E-flat! The first section of this recapitulation is abridged, but it works around 
to C major for the more lyric march of the second theme. This closes quietly on a 
tremolo C in the cellos; they sink down two steps to A, starting the massive coda, 
which reworks the materials nearly as extensively as the development section in the 
middle of the movement. The mood passes from mystery and darkness to the glorious 
sunshine of C major as the symphony ends in a blaze of glory. (Most scores since the 
first publication in 1840 put a diminuendo mark under the unison final note, and 
some conductors have rigorously followed this nonsensical indication, making the 
strong final chord fade gradually into a puny silence. What Schubert actually wrote 
was an accent mark, but here as in many other places, he made it so big that editors 
have misread his intention in the manuscript.) 

-S.L. 



Week 3 



Hi 



More . . . 

Prokofiev has long suffered from a lack of balanced critical evaluation both in Russia 
and in the West; Soviet historians tend to attack those works written while the com- 
poser was in the "decadent" West as "formalistic" and unmusical, while European 
and American critics tend to criticize the works of Prokofiev's later years, after he 
had returned to Russia, as responses to the pressure of "official" standards of musical 
style. By far the most balanced general study to date is the newest, Sergei Prokofiev: 
A Biography, by Harlow Robinson (Viking), rich in biographical detail, more cursory 
but still useful in musical discussion. A fundamental and very reasonable book is 
Music and Musical Life in Soviet Russia, 1917-1970 by Boris Schwarz (Norton paper- 
back), which is filled with a broad range of fascinating material, though, of course, 
Prokofiev is only one of many players. An updated edition carries the story forward to 
1980 (University of Indiana). Of the older Prokofiev literature, the standard Soviet 
biography by Israel Nestyev, Prokofiev (Standard), has much information but strong 
biases against the composer's pre-Soviet period. On the other hand, Victor SerofPs 
Sergei Prokofiev: A Soviet Tragedy is little more than a hatchet job from the opposite 
point of view and is by no means scrupulously accurate. Prokofiev's earliest years, 
through his conservatory days, are richly illuminated in his memoir, Prokofiev by 
Prokofiev (Doubleday). Martha Argerich has recorded the Prokofiev Third Piano Con- 
certo with Claudio Abbado and the Berlin Philharmonic (DG, coupled with the Ravel 
Concerto in G). Other recordings of interest include Vladimir Ashkenazy's reading 
with Andre Previn and the London Symphony (Angel, coupled with the Bartok Con- 
certo for Orchestra), Gary Graffman's with George Szell and the Cleveland Orchestra 
(CBS, coupled with Prokofiev's First Concerto and Piano Sonata No. 3), and Jon 
Kimura Parker's with Andre Previn and the London Philharmonic (Telarc, coupled 
with Tchaikovsky's Piano Concerto No. 1). 




* Hoiver Records **- 

has the largest 

selection of 

Classical, Opera and 

(Baroque music 

in (Boston. 

(Located 3 blocks from Symphony Matt) 



1MUIR RKQRDSWUKfl 



Mass. Ave. At Newbury 
In Back Bay 




Hynes Convention Center/ICA (J) Stop on the Greenline 



36 




A TRADITION OF FINANCIAL COUNSEL 
OLDER THAN THE U.S. DOLLAR. 

State Street has been providing quality financial service since 1792. 

That's two years longer than the dollar has been the official currency of 
the United States. 

During that time, we have managed the assets of some of New 
England's wealthiest families. And provided investment advice and 
performance tailored to each client's individual goals and needs. 

Today our Personal Trust Division can extend that service to you. 

We've been helping people manage their money for almost 200 years. 
And you can only stay in business that long by offering advice of the 
highest quality. 

Let us help you get the highest performance from your assets. To enjoy 
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For more information contact Peter Talbot at 617-654-3227. 

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225 Franklin Street, Boston, MA 02101. Offices in Boston, New York, Los Angeles, London, Munich, Brussels, 

Tokyo, Sydney, Hong Kong. Member FDIC. Copyright State Street Boston Corporation, 1989. 





TT 



"Wt~o^ 



Carleton-Willard Village is 
an exceptional continuing 
care retirement community. 
Gracious independent living 
accommodations and fully 
licensed, long-term health 
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Owned and operated by Carleton-Willard 
Homes, Inc., a non-profit corporation 



Schubert is the subject of a biography by Maurice J.E. Brown (Da Capo) and of a 
whole series of publications by Otto Erich Deutsch, whose very name — or initial, any- 
way—symbolizes Schubert research through the "D." numbers of his chronological 
catalogue of the composer's works. One of the most interesting of Deutsch's many 
contributions is a biographical look at Schubert through a kaleidoscope, as it were, of 
the recollections of anyone who knew him and who ever recorded his or her memories. 
It is called Schubert: Memoirs by his Friends (Da Capo), and it contains, among many 
other things, recollections by Wilhelmina von Chezy and George Grove's account of 
his happy discovery in Eduard Schneider's dusty closet. The latest detailed work on 
Schubert's biography comes from Maynard Solomon, whose psycho-biography of 
Beethoven is one of the most useful — and carefully documented — of contributions to 
that genre. His article, "Franz Schubert and the Peacocks of Benvenuto Cellini," in 
19th-century Music for Spring, 1989, attracted considerable attention for its picture 
of Schubert as a homosexual libertine. John Reed's Schubert: The Final Years (Faber 
and Faber) offered convincing circumstantial proof that the Great C major symphony 
was essentially the same work as the "lost" work of 1825, even before the new physi- 
cal evidence confirmed it. The most important recent detailed findings have been 
reported by Michael Griffel, in his "Reappraisal of Schubert's Composition," in the 
April 1977 issue of the Musical Quarterly and in Robert Winter's evaluation of the 
new edition of the Deutsch thematic catalogue in 19th-century Music (1983). The 
latter journal also published an article of fundamental importance in reshaping our 
view of Schubert's own musical world: Otto Biba's "Schubert's Position in Viennese 
Musical Life" (1980), in which the author demonstrates that Schubert was neither as 
impoverished or as unknown in Vienna as we have been wont to believe. 

Sir Colin Davis has recorded the Great Symphony in C with the Boston Symphony 
Orchestra in a performance that is not only a splendid reading but also one of the 
very few that takes all of the repeats in this massive score (Philips), but it has not 
yet been reissued on compact disc. Roger Norrington's recent recording with the 
London Classical Players is another that takes all the repeats, as might be expected 
(EMI). An older BSO recording, conducted by William Steinberg, is available on CD 
(Victrola). Arturo Toscanini's exciting performance with the NBC Symphony is cur- 
rently out of the catalogues (it is due for reissue as part of RCA's "Toscanini Collec- 
tion," as is the conductor's earlier recording with the Philadelphia Orchestra), but 
George Szell's splendid 1960 performance with the Cleveland Orchestra has been reis- 
sued on a CBS compact disc; it is also still available as an Odyssey LP. Two distin- 
guished older recordings have been reissued on compact disc: a live-performance 
recording from 1940 with Willem Mengelburg conducting the Concertgebouw Orches- 
tra (Philips) and Wilhelm Furtwangler's with the Berlin Philharmonic (DG). Charles 
Mackerras leads the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment in a performance on 
period instruments (Virgin Classics). Of the most recent recordings, I especially like 
the one by Christoph von Dohnanyi and the Cleveland Orchestra (Telarc, also avail- 
able as a compact disc). The Great C major Symphony is, of course, also included in a 
super-complete set by the Academy of St. Martin-in-the-Fields under the direction of 
Neville Marriner (Philips, six CDs), containing all the completed symphonies, plus 
finished versions of the E major symphony and the Unfinished, and several remark- 
able late sketches that Schubert left at his death. It is also available as a single disc 
from that set, coupled with the late sketches, some of which, astonishingly, seem to 
prefigure Gustav Mahler by nearly three-quarters of a century. 

-S.L. 



37 



Week 3 



IT'S QUITE OBVIOUS WHY SOME OF TODAY'S 

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38 




Martha Argerich 

One of the world's most renowned artists, pianist Martha Argerich 
is a familiar presence in the concert halls of Europe, the Soviet 
Union, the Near East, and the Par East. In North America, she 
has performed as guest soloist with such orchestras as the Boston 
Symphony, Chicago Symphony, Los Angeles Philharmonic, Mont- 
real Symphony, National Symphony, New York Philharmonic, Phil- 
adelphia Orchestra, and Toronto Symphony. She has also per- 
formed as guest soloist with the major orchestras of the United 
States and Canada. Ms. Argerich's discography includes more than 
a dozen Deutsche Grammophon recordings, encompassing works by 
Bach, Bartok, Beethoven, Brahms, Chopin, Falla, Franck, Schubert, Schumann, and 
Tchaikovsky. She has recorded Chopin and Schumann duos for piano and cello with Mstis- 
lav Rostropovich, and Beethoven and Schumann sonatas with Gidon Kremer. Among her 
most recent recordings are a Schumann collection featuring Kfeisleriana and Kinderscenen, 
Bach cello sonatas with Mischa Maisky, the Ravel Piano Concerto in G with Claudio 
Abbado and the London Symphony, and the second installment in a projected complete 
cycle of Beethoven violin sonatas with Gidon Kremer. Ms. Argerich plans to record 
Beethoven's piano trios with Messrs. Kremer and Maisky in the near future. Born in 1941, 
Martha Argerich gave her first professional performance at the age of eight, in Buenos 
Aires, her native city. She later moved to Europe, to continue her studies with Friedrich 
Gulda, Nikita Magaloff, Madame Dinu Lipatti, and Arturo Benedetti Michelangeli, among 
others. At sixteen, in the space of three weeks, she won both the Geneva International 
Competition and the Ferruccio Busoni International Competition in Bolzano, Italy. In 
1965, upon returning from a self-imposed retreat, she became the first artist from the 
western hemisphere to win first prize at the Chopin Competition in Warsaw. This success 
led to her United States debut, in 1966, on Lincoln Center's "Great Performers" series. 
Ms. Argerich has performed with the Boston Symphony Orchestra on two previous occa- 
sions, both times under the direction of Seiji Ozawa: as soloist in Prokofiev's Third Piano 
Concerto in October 1979, and in Schumann's Piano Concerto in December 1981. 



For rates and 
information on 
advertising in the 
Boston Symphony, 
Boston Pops, 
and 

Tanglewood program books 
please contact: 



BOSTON 

SYMPHONY 

ORCHESTRA 

SEIJI OZAWA 

Musk Director jT , \8< 



<$ 



STEVE GANAK AD REPS 
51 CHURCH STREET 
BOSTON, MASS. 02116 



(617)-542-6913 



39 






BUSINESS 




Business and Professional 
Leadership Association 



The Boston Symphony Orchestra wishes to acknowledge this distinguished group of 
corporations and professional organizations for their outstanding and exemplary- 
support of the orchestra's needs during the past or current fiscal year. 



CORPORATE SPONSORSHIPS 

$25,000 and above 

Digital Equipment Corporation 

Boston Pops Orchestra Public Television Broadcasts 

NEC 

Boston Symphony Orchestra North American Tour 1991 

Boston Symphony Orchestra European Tour 1991 

NYNEX Corporation 
WCVB-TV, Channel 5 Boston and WCRB 102.5 FM 

Salute to Symphony 1990 

The Boston Company 

Opening Night At Symphony 1990 

BayBanks, Inc. 

Opening Night at Pops 1990 

Lexus 
A Division of Toyota Motor Sales U.S.A., Inc. 

Tanglewood Opening Night 1990 

TDK Electronics Corporation 

Tanglewood Tickets for Children 1990 

Bank of Boston 
Country Curtains and The Red Lion Inn 

BSO Single Concert Sponsors 1990 



For information on these and other corporate funding opportunities, contact 
Madelyne Cuddeback, BSO Director of Corporate Sponsorships, Symphony Hall, 
Boston, MA 02115, (617) 638-9254. 



40 



1990-91 Business Honor Roll (SI 0,000 and Above) 



Advanced Management Associates 
Harvey Chet Krentzman 

Analog Devices, Inc. 
Ray Stata 

AT&T Network Systems 
John F. McKinnon 

Bank of Boston 
Ira Stepanian 

Barter Connections 
Kenneth C. Barron 

BayBanks, Inc. 
William M. Crozier, Jr. 

Bingham, Dana & Gould 
Joseph Hunt 

Bolt Beranek & Newman 
Stephen R. Levy 

The Boston Company 
Christopher M. Condron 

Boston Edison Company 
Stephen J. Sweeney 

The Boston Globe 
William 0. Taylor 

Boston Herald 
Patrick J. Purcell 

Bull HN Information Systems, Inc. 
Roland D. Pampel 

Cahners Publishing Company 
Ron Segel 

Connell Limited Partnership 
William F. Connell 

Coopers & Lybrand 
William K. O'Brien 

Country Curtains 
Jane P. Fitzpatrick 

Delia Femina, McNamee, Inc. 
Michael H. Reingold 

Deloitte & Touche 
James T. McBride 

Digital Equipment Corporation 
Kenneth G. Olsen 

Dynatech Corporation 
J. P. Barger 

Eastern Enterprises 
Ronald S. Ziemba 

EG&G, Inc. 
John M. Kucharski 

The First Boston Corporation 
Malcolm MacColl 

General Cinema Corporation 
Richard A. Smith 



The Gillette Company 
Colman M. Mockler, Jr. 

Grafacon, Inc. 
H. Wayman Rogers, Jr. 

GTE Products Corporation 
Dean T. Langford 

Hill, Holliday, Connors, Cosmopulos, Inc. 
Jack Connors, Jr. 

The Henley Group 
Paul M. Montrone 

Houghton Mifflin Company 
Nader F. Darehshori 

IBM Corporation 
Paul J. Palmer 

John Hancock Mutual Life Insurance Company 
E. James Morton 

Lexus 

A Division of Toyota Motor Sales, U.S.A., Inc. 
J. Davis Illingworth 

Liberty Mutual Insurance Group 
Gary L. Countryman 

Loomis-Sayles & Company, Inc. 
Charles J. Finlayson 

McKinsey & Company 
Robert P. O'Block 

Morse Shoe, Inc. 
Manuel Rosenberg 

NEC Corporation 
Tadahiro Sekimoto 

NEC Deutschland GmbH 
Masao Takahashi 

Nestle-Hills Brothers Coffee Company 
Ned Dean 

The New England 
Edward E. Phillips 

New England Telephone Company 
Paul C. O'Brien 

Northern Telecom, Inc. 
Brian Davis 

Nynex Corporation 
William C. Ferguson 

PaineWebber, Inc. 
James F. Cleary 

KPMG Peat Marwick 
Robert D. Happ 

Polaroid Corporation 
I.M. Booth 

Prudential-Bache Capital Funding 
David F. Remington 



41 






w&; 



1990-91 Business Honor Roll (continued) 



Raytheon Company 
Thomas L. Phillips 

The Red Lion Inn 
John H. Fitzpatrick 

Shawmut Bank, N.A. 
John P. Hamill 

The Stop & Shop Companies, Inc. 
Lewis Schaeneman 



TDK Electronics Corporation 
Takashi Tsujii 

USTrast 
James V. Sidell 

WCRB-102.5 FM 
Richard L. Kaye 

WCVB-TV, Channel 5 Boston 
S. James Coppersmith 



i I j 



Dinner at 6. 

Symphony at 8. 

Parking at $ 5. 

Make dinner at Boodle's part of 
your night out at the Symphony. 
When you do, you'll not only enjoy 
an award winning dining experi- 
ence from Boston's authentic grill, 
you'll also get special parking 
privileges at the Back Bay Hilton's 
private garage. 

Just show us your tickets at dinner 
on the night of the performance 
and park your car for just $5. And 
with a deal like that, a night at the 
Symphony never sounded better. 




BOODLE'S 



OF • BOSTON 

An Authentic Grill 

Lunch and dinner daily. In Boston's Back Bay Hilton. 
Phone (617) BOODLES. 



St. 'Botptph Restaurant 




A Charming 19th Century Brick 
Townhouse serving fine continental 
cuisine in contemporary informal elegance. 
Offering lunch and dinner with a variety 
of fresh seafood specials daily. Located 
minutes away from Huntington Theatre 
and Symphony Hall. 

99 St. Botolph Street 266-3030 
behind the Colonnade Hotel 

Daily 11:30 - Midnight 



"Nationally Outstanding" 

-Esquire Magazine 




42 







BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONAL LEADERSHIP ASSOCIATION 

The Boston Symphony Orchestra gratefully acknowledges these Business Leaders for their 
generous and valuable support totaling $1,250 and above during the past fiscal year. Names 
which are both capitalized and underscored in this listing make up the Business Honor Roll 
denoting support of $10,000 and above. Capitalization denotes support of $5,000-$9,999, and 
an asterisk indicates support of $2,500-$4,999. 



Accountants 

ARTHUR ANDERSEN & CO. 
William F. Meagher 

Charles E. DiPesa & Company 
William F. DiPesa 

COOPERS & LYBRAND 



William K. O'Brien 
DELOITTE & TOUCHE 



James T. McBride 
ERNST & YOUNG 



Thomas M. Lankford 
KMPG PEAT MARWICK 



Robert D. Happ 

Theodore S. Samet & Company 
Theodore S. Samet 

Advertising/Public Relations 

Arnold Advertising 
Edward Eskandarian 

DELLA FEMINA, MCNAMEE, 
INC. 
Michael H. Reingold 

Elysee Public Relations 
Tanya Keller Dowd 

HILL, HOLLIDAY, CONNORS, 



COSMOPULOS, INC. 



Jack Connors, Jr. 

Ingalls, Quinn & Johnson 
Bink Garrison 



Aerospace 

Northrop Corporation 
Kent Kresa 

Architects 

Cambridge Seven Associates 
Charles Redman 

LEA Group 
Eugene R. Eisenberg 

Automotive 

J.N. Phillips Glass 
Company, Inc. 
Alan L. Rosenfeld 

Lexus 

A Division of Toyota Motor 
Sales U.S.A., Inc. 
J. Davis Illingworth 



Banking 

BANK OF BOSTON 
Ira Stepanian 

*Bank of New England 
Corporation 
Lawrence K. Fish 

*Baybanks, Inc. 
William M. Crozier, Jr. 

THE BOSTON COMPANY 
Christopher M. Condron, Jr. 

Cambridge Trust Company 
Lewis H. Clark 

CITICORP/CITIBANK 
Walter E. Mercer 

First National Bank of Chicago 
Robert E. Gallery 

* Rockland Trust Company 

John F. Spence, Jr. 

SHAWMUT BANK, N.A. 
John P. Hamill 

* State Street Bank & 
Trust Company 

William S. Edgerly 

USTRUST 
James V. Sidell 

Wainwright Bank & Trust Company 
John M. Plukas 



Building/Contracting 

*Harvey Industries, Inc. 
Frederick Bigony 

J.F. White Contracting Company 
Philip Bonanno 

Lee Kennedy Co., Inc. 
Lee M. Kennedy 

*Moliterno Stone Sales, Inc. 
Kenneth A. Castellucci 

* National Lumber Company 
Louis L. Kaitz 

PERINI CORPORATION 
David B. Perini 



Consumer Goods/Distributors 

BARTER CONNECTIONS 
Kenneth C. Barron 

FAIRWINDS GOURMET COFFEE 
COMPANY 
Michael J. Sullivan 

43 



Lindenmeyr Munroe 

NESTLE-HILLS BROTHERS 
COFFEE COMPANY 
Ned Dean 

O'Donnell-Usen Fisheries 
Arnold S. Wolf 

Welch's 
Everett N. Baldwin 



Education 

BENTLEY COLLEGE 

Gregory Adamian 

Electrical/HVAC 

*p.h. mechanical Corporation 
Paul A. Hayes 

*R & D Electrical Company, Inc. 
Richard D. Pedone 

Electronics 

Alden Electronics, Inc. 
Joseph Girouard 

*Analytical Systems 
Engineering Corporation 
Michael B. Rukin 

PARLEX CORPORATION 
Herbert W. Pollack 

Energy 

CABOT CORPORATION 

Samuel W. Bodman 

Engineering 

Goldberg-Zoino & Associates, Inc. 
Donald T. Goldberg 

The Thompson & Lichtner 
Company, Inc. 
John D. Stelling 

Entertainment/Media 

GENERAL CINEMA CORPORATION 

Richard A. Smith 

National Amusements, Inc. 
Sumner M. Redstone 



Finance/Venture Capital 

*3i Corporation 

Ivan N. Momtchiloff 





Boston's North Shore 
COLE'S ISLAND ESTATE-27 ACRES WATERERONT 

Wonderful c. 1930 14-room Manor House on 27 acres 
with 758 ' of waterfront with pier plus a 3 bedroom Car- 
riage House with 3-bay garage. All with sweeping views 
over Essex Bay, Crane's Beach, the Adantic Ocean & 
N . H. coast. A rare opportunity. $ 1 ,900,000 

Call ANNISQUAM VILLAGE REALTY 508/283-5658 
or LANDVEST 617/723-1800 



Cape Cod, East Orleans 
SPECTACULAR WATERFRONT ESTATE 

Breathtaking views, beautiful gardens plus a spectacular 
main residence, guest house & 350 ' of private water 
frontage. Perfect for entertaining with patios, decks, 
bars & cabana plus wonderful kitchen, dramatic foyer, 
billiard room, private gym area & so much more. Choice 
location. $1,500,000 




Concord, Massachusetts 
"PUNKATASSET FARM" ON 
MONUMENT STREET 

Grandly sitting on 4 acres atop a hill, the original farm- 
house aates c.1685 with wonderful period features 8c 
was significandy enlarged in the late 19th century in a 
very grand snlr. The property abuts conservauon land 
with miles of riding, hiking & skiing trails & overlooks 
protected farmland & orchards. The grounds include a 
swimming pool, caretaker's house bam & stable. 
Call LANDVEST 617/723-1800 oi $2,250,000 

SENKLER Sc ASSOC. 508/369-3600 



Little Compton, Rhode Island 
59 ACRE PENINSULA - "SISSON FARM" AT 
GOOSEWING BEACH 

Perhaps the choicest large property along the southern 
New England coast. Surrounded by water on 3 sides in- 
cluding 4,580' of pond frontage, extraordinary water 
views, rolling pastures & old stonewalls abutting 
Goosewing Beach, a beautiful sand beach & wildlife 
sanctuary. Property includes a summer cottage, farm- 
house, 3-story bam & 2 equipment sheds. Choice loca- 
tion near yachting, tennis & golf. Price Upon Request 
Call LANDVEST 617/723-1800 



THE NEXT LEVEL OF SERVICE 

Ten Post Office Square, Boston, Massachusetts 02109; (617) 723-1800 




BBH W jil 



Carson Limited Partnership 
Herbert Carver 

THE FIRST BOSTON 
CORPORATION 
Malcolm MaeColl 

GE CAPITAL CORPORATE 
FINANCE GROUP 
Richard A. Goglia 

KRUPP COMPANIES 
George Krupp 



Food Service/Industry 

Au Bon Pain 
Louis I. Kane 

*Boston Showcase Company 
Jason E. Starr 

Cordel Associates, Inc. 
James B. Hangstefer 

Johnson O'Hare Co., Inc. 
Harry O'Hare 



Footwear 

Converse, Inc. 
Gilbert Ford 

J. Baker, Inc. 
Sherman N. Baker 

* Jones & Vining, Inc. 
Sven A. Vaule, Jr. 

MORSE SHOE, INC. 



Manuel Rosenberg 

Reebok International Ltd. 
Paul Fireman 

The Rockport Corporation 
Anthony Tiberii 

THE STRIDE RITE 
CORPORATION 
Arnold S. Hiatt 



Furnishings/Housewares 

ARLEY MERCHANDISE 
CORPORATION 
David I. Riemer 

BBF Corporation 
Boruch B. Frusztajer 

COUNTRY CURTAINS 



Jane P. Fitzpatrick 

*Jofran Sales, Inc. 
Robert D. Roy 

Graphic Design 

CLARK/LINSKY DESIGN 
Robert H. Linsky 

INDEPENDENT DESIGN 
Patrick White 



High Technology/Electronics 

Alden Products Company 
Betsy Alden 

ANALOG DEVICES, INC. 
Ray Stata 

*Aritech Corp. 
James A. Synk 

Automatic Data Processing 
Arthur S. Kranseler 

BOLT BERANEK AND 
NEWMAN, INC. 
Stephen R. Levy 

BULL HN INFORMATION 
SYSTEMS, INC. 



Roland D. Pampel 

*Cerberus Technologies, Inc. 
George J. Grabowski 

Costar Corporation 
Otto Morningstar 

CSC PARTNERS, INC. 
Paul J. Crowley 

DIGITAL EQUIPMENT 
CORPORATION 
Kenneth G. Olsen 

DYNATECH CORPORATION 
J. P. Barger 

EG&G, INC. 
John M. Kucharski 

EMC CORPORATION 
Richard J. Egan 

Helix Technology Corporation 
Robert J. Lepofsky 

THE HENLEY GROUP 
Paul M. Montrone 

HEWLETT PACKARD COMPANY 
Ben L. Holmes 

IBM CORPORATION 
Paul J. Palmer 

*Intermetrics Inc. 
Joseph A. Saponaro 

IONICS, INC. 
Arthur L. Goldstein 

* Lotus Development Corporation 
Jim P. Manzi 

*M/A-Com, Inc. 
Robert H. Glaudel 

MILLIPORE CORPORATION 
John A. Gilmartin 

*The MITRE Corporation 
Charles A. Zraket 

NEC CORPORATION 
Tadahiro Sekimoto 

NEC DEUTSCHLAND GmbH 
Masao Takahasi 

*Orion Research, Inc. 
Alexander Jenkins III 

45 



POLAROID CORPORATION 
I.M. Booth 

PRIME COMPUTER, INC. 

John Shields 

* Printed Circuit Corporation 
Peter Sarmanian 

RAYTHEON COMPANY 
Thomas L. Phillips 

SofTech, Inc. 
Justus Lowe, Jr. 

*TASC 
Arthur Gelb 

TDK ELECTRONICS 
CORPORATION 
Takashi Tsujii 

THERMO ELECTRON 
CORPORATION 

George N. Hatsopoulos 

XRE Corporation 
John K. Grady 



Hotels/Restaurants 

57 Park Plaza Hotel 
Nicholas L. Vinios 

*Back Bay Hilton 
Carol Summerfield 

*Boston Marriott Copley Place 
Jurgen Giesbert 

THE RED LION INN 
John H. Fitzpatrick 

*Sheraton Boston Hotel & Towers 
Steve Foster 

*Sonesta International 
Hotels Corporation 
Paul Sonnabend 

*The Westin Hotel, Copley Place 
David King 



Industrial Distributors 

*Alles Corporation 
Stephen S. Berman 

Brush Fibers, Inc. 
Ian P. Moss 

*E astern Refractories Company 
David S. Feinzig 

Millard Metal Service Center 
Donald Millard, Jr. 

Insurance 

*American Title Insurance Company 
Terry E. Cook 

*Arkwright 
Enzo Rebula 

Caddell & Byers 
John Dolan 



THE BSO 
ANNOUNCES AN 




HOLIDAY" 
PROGRAM 







DECEMBER 19, 1990 

Give your company an early Christmas present by treating your 

management, employees, customers, vendors, and friends to a 

special evening at Pops in a unique holiday program. This 

program, available to only 116 businesses and professional 

organizations at $3,500 per company, includes 16 seats, 

pre-concert hors d'oeuvres and a traditional Pops gourmet dinner. 

Please join the New England business community for this 

celebrated holiday tradition! 

For information on "A Company Christmas at Pops": 

James F. Cleary, Managing Director, PaineWebber, Inc. (439-8000) 

ChetKrentzman, President, Advanced Management Associates (332-3141) 

William F. Meagher, Managing Partner, Arthur Andersen & Co. (330-4300) 

William D. Roddy, Vice President and General Manager, Neiman Marcus (536-3600) 

Michael H. Reingold, President, Delia Femina, McNamee WCRS, Inc. (737-6450) 

Peter N. Cerundolo, BSO Corporate Development Office (638-9252) 

46 



CAMERON & COLBY CO., INC. 
Lawrence S. Doyle 

*Charles H. Watkins & Company 
Paul D. Bertrand 

Chubb Group of Insurance Cos. 
John Gillespie 

FRANK B. HALL & CO. OF 
MASSACHUSETTS, INC. 
William F. Newell 

* International Insurance Group 
John Perkins 

JOHN HANCOCK MUTUAL 
LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY 
E. James Morton 

*Johnson & Higgins of 
Massachusetts, Inc. 
Robert A. Cameron 

'Keystone Provident Life 
Insurance Company 
Robert G. Sharp 

Lexington Insurance Company 
Kevin H. Kelley 

LIBERTY MUTUAL INSURANCE 
GROUP 
Gary L. Countryman 

THE NEW ENGLAND 
Edward E. Phillips 

SAFETY INSURANCE COMPANY 
Richard B. Simches 

Sedgwick James of 
New England, Inc. 
P. Joseph McCarthy 

Sullivan Risk Management Group 
John H. Sullivan 

*Sun Life Assurance Company 
of Canada 
Paul Vaskas 



Investments 

*Baring International Investment, Ltd. 
John F. McNamara 

Bear Stearns & Company, Inc. 
Keith H. Kretschmer 

Essex Investment Management 
Company, Inc. 
A. Davis Noble, Jr. 

*Goldman, Sachs & Company 
Peter D. Kiernan 

KAUFMAN & COMPANY 
Sumner Kaufman 

LOOMIS-SAYLES & COMPANY, 
INC. 



Charles J. Finlayson 

PAINEWEBBER, INC. 
James F. Cleary 



PAINEWEBBER CAPITAL 
MARKETS 
Joseph F. Patton 

SALOMON INC. 
John V. Carberry 

*Spaulding Investment Company 
C.H. Spaulding 

* State Street Development 
Management Corp. 
John R. Gallagher III 

TUCKER ANTHONY, INC. 

John Goldsmith 

Whitman & Evans, Art Investments 
Eric F. Mourlot 

*Woodstoek Corporation 
Nelson J. Darling, Jr. 



Legal 

BINGHAM, DANA & GOULD 
Joseph Hunt 

*Choate, Hall & Stewart 
Robert Gargill 

Dickerman Law Offices 
Lola Dickerman 

*Fish & Richardson 
Robert E. Hillman 

* Gaston & Snow 

Richard J. Santagati 

GOLDSTEIN & MANELLO 
Richard J. Snyder 

GOODWIN, PROCTER AND HOAR 
Robert B. Fraser 

*Hemenway & Barnes 
John J. Madden 

Hubbard & Ferris 
Charles A. Hubbard 

*Joyce & Joyce 
Thomas J. Joyce 

*Lynch, Brewer, Hoffman & Sands 
Owen B. Lynch 

MINTZ, LEVIN, COHN, FERRIS, 
GLOVSKY & POPEO, P.C. 
Francis X. Meaney 

Nissenbaum Law Offices 
Gerald L. Nissenbaum 

*Nutter, McClennen & Fish 
John K. P. Stone III 

PALMER & DODGE 
Robert E. Sullivan 

*Rackemann, Sawyer & Brewster 
Stephen Carr Anderson 

Sarrouf, Tarricone & Flemming 
Camille F. Sarrouf 

Weiss, Angoff, Coltin, Koski & 
Wolf, P.C. 
Dudley A. Weiss 



Management/Financial/Consulting 

ADVANCED MANAGEMENT 
ASSOCIATES 
Harvey Chet Krentzman 

*Bain & Company, Inc. 
William W. Bain 

THE BOSTON CONSULTING 
GROUP 
Jonathan L. Isaacs 

*Corporate Decisions 
David J. Morrison 

*Haynes Management, Inc. 
G. Arnold Haynes 

Index Group 
David G. Robinson 

Irma Mann Strategic Marketing 
Irma Mann Stearns 

Jason M. Cortell 
& Associates, Inc. 
Jason M. Cortell 

Lochridge & Company, Inc. 

Richard K. Lochridge 
MCKINSEY & COMPANY 

Robert P. O'Block 

The Pioneer Group, Inc. 

William H. Keogh 
PRUDENTIAL-BACHE 
CAPITAL FUNDING 

David F. Remington 

*Rath & Strong 
Dan Ciampa 

* Towers Perrin 

J. Russell Southworth 

*William M. Mercer, Inc. 
Chester D. Clark 

*The Wyatt Company 
Paul R. Daoust 

Yankelovich Clancy Shulman 
Kevin Clancy 

Manufacturer's Representatives 

*Ben Mac Enterprises 
Larry Benhardt 
Thomas McAuliffe 

*Paul R. Cahn Associates, Inc. 
Paul R. Cahn 

Manufacturing/Industry 

*AGFA Corporation 
Ken Draeger 

*AMCEL Corporation 
Lloyd Gordon 

*Avedis Zildjian Company 
Armand Zildjian 

The Biltrite Corporation 
Stanley J. Bernstein 

Boston Acoustics, Inc. 
Frank Reed 




■■-.■■■■'', 










Congratulations to the 
Boston Symphony Orchestra 
on yet another wonderful 
season of magical music. 

Jordan marsh 

A TRADITION SINCE 1851 



48 



*C.R. Bard, Inc. 
Robert H. McCaffrey 



♦Century Manufacturing Company 
Joseph Tiberio 

* Chelsea Industries, Inc. 
Ronald G. Casty 



Media 

THE BOSTON GLOBE 
William 0. Taylor 

BOSTON HERALD 



Patrick J. Purcell 

PEOPLE MAGAZINE 
CONNELL LIMITED PARTNERSHIP Peter Krieger 
William F. Connell 



Dennison Manufacturing Company 
Nelson G. Gifford 

ERVING PAPER MILLS 
Charles B. Housen 

*PLEXcon Company, Inc. 
Mark R. Ungerer 

*Georgia-Pacific Corp. 
Maurice W. Kring 
THE GILLETTE COMPANY 
Col man M. Mockler, Jr. 

GTE PRODUCTS CORPORATION 
Dean T. Langford 

HARVARD FOLDING BOX 
COMPANY, INC. 
Melvin A. Ross 

H.K. Webster Company, Inc. 
Dean K. Webster 

! HMK Group Companies, Ltd. 
Joan L. Karol 

Hudson Lock, Inc. 
Norman Stavisky 

♦Industrial Filter and Equipment 
Corporation 
Donald R. Patnode 

Kendall Company 
J. Dale Sherratt 

LEACH & GARNER COMPANY 
Philip F. Leach 

Leggett & Piatt, Inc. 
Alexander M. Levine 

NEW ENGLAND BUSINESS 
SERVICE, INC. 
Richard H. Rhoads 

*Parks Corporation 
Lee Davidson 

* Pierce Aluminum 
Robert W. Pierce 

"Statler Tissue Company 
Leonard Sugerman 

Superior Brands, Inc. 
Richard J. Phelps 

Tech Pak, Inc. 
J. William Flynn 

Textron, Inc. 
B.F. Dolan 

Wire Belt Company of America 
F. Wade Greer 



WCRB- 102.5 FM 
Richard L. Kaye 

WCVB-TV, CHANNEL 5 BOSTON 

S. James Coppersmith 

Personnel 

TAD TECHNICAL SERVICES 
CORPORATION 
David J. McGrath, Jr. 



Printing 

'Bowne of Boston, Inc. 
Donald J. Cannava 

Customforms, Inc. 
David A Granoff 

DANIELS PRINTING COMPANY 

Lee S. Daniels 

'Espo Litho Co., Inc. 
David M. Fromer 

George H. Dean Company 
Earl Michaud 

GRAFACON, INC. 
H. Wayman Rogers, Jr. 



Publishing 

Addison-Wesley Publishing Company, 
Inc. 
Warren R. Stone 

CAHNERS PUBLISfflNG COMPANY 

Ron Segel 

HOUGHTON MIFFLIN COMPANY 
Nader F. Darehshori 

Little, Brown & Company 
Kevin L. Dolan 



Hilon Development Corporation 
Joan Eliachar 

*John M. Corcoran & Company 
John M. Corcoran 

Keller Co., Inc. 
Joseph P. Keller 

*Leggat McCall Properties, Inc. 
Dennis F. Callahan 

Northland Investment Corporation 
Robert A. Danziger 

Tetlow Realty Associates 
Richard J. Gilbert 

*Trammell Crow Company 
Arthur DeMartino 

Urban Investment & Development 
Rudy K. Umscheid 

♦Windsor Building Associates 
Mona F. Freedman 



Retail 

♦Channel Home Centers, Inc. 
Malcolm L. Sherman 

FILENE'S 
David P. Mullen 

♦Jordan Marsh Company 
Richard F. Van Pelt 

Karten's Jewelers 
Joel Karten 

♦Neiman Marcus 
William D. Roddy 

Out of Town News, Inc. 
Sheldon Cohen 

♦Saks Fifth Avenue 
Alison Strieder Mayher 

THE STOP & SHOP COMPANIES, 
INC. 



Real Estate/Development 

♦Boston Capital Partners 
Christopher W. Collins 
Herbert F. Collins 
Richard J. DeAgazio 
John P. Manning 

♦Combined Properties, Inc. 
Stanton L. Black 

♦The Flatley Company 
Thomas J. Flatley 

Heafitz Development Company 
Lewis Heafitz 

49 



Lewis Schaeneman 

TJX COMPANIES 
Ben Cammarata 



Science/Medical 

Baldpate Hospital, Inc. 
Lucille M. Batal 

Blake & Blake Genealogists 
Richard A. Blake, Jr. 

CHARLES RrVER 
LABORATORIES, INC. 
Henry L. Foster 

♦CompuChem Corporation 
Gerard Kees Verkerk 

JA. WEBSTER, INC. 

John A. Webster 

♦Portsmouth Regional Hospital 
William J. Schuler 




Dear Patron of the Orchestra: 

For many years the Boston Sym- 
phony Orchestra has been known 
as the "aristocrat of American 
orchestras." There is indeed a 
distinctive "BSO sound" that has 
earned worldwide acclaim and has 
attracted the greatest musicians to 
audition for membership in the 
orchestra. 

An important ingredient in the 
creation of this unique sound is 
having the finest musical instruments 
on the BSO's stage. However, the cost of many of these instruments 
(especially in the string sections) has become staggeringly high, and it is 
incumbent upon the Symphony to take steps to assure that musicians in 
key positions who do not themselves own great instruments have access 
to them for use in the orchestra. 




Two recent initiatives have been taken to address this concern: First, in 
1988, the Boston Safe Deposit and Trust Company stepped forward 
with a creative loan program that is making it possible for players to 
borrow at one and a half percent below prime to purchase instruments. 
Second, last fall, the incentive of a Kresge Foundation challenge grant 
helped launch our effort to raise a fund of $1 million for the Orchestra 
to draw upon from time to time to purchase instruments for use by the 
players. The BSO in this case would retain ownership. 

Donations of both outright gifts and instruments are being sought to 
establish the BSO's Instrument Acquisition Fund. Fine pianos, 
period instruments, special bows, heirloom violins, etc. all make 
ideal gifts. Opportunities for naming instruments and for other 
forms of donor recognition may be available according to the wishes 
of the donor. 

If you are interested in this program please contact me or Joyce Serwitz 
in the orchestra's Development Office at (617) 638-9273. Your support 
will help make a difference that will be music to our ears! 

George H. Kidder 
President 



50 




m 



Services 

Don Law Productions 
Don Law 

EASTERN ENTERPRISES 



Ronald S. Ziemba 

Giltspur Exhibits/Boston 
Thomas E. Knott 

Shaughnessy & Ahern Co. 
John J. Shaughnessy 

Wild Acre Inns, Inc. 
Bernard S. Yudowitz 



Software/Information Services 

International Data Group 
Patrick J. McGovern 

Phoenix Technologies Foundation 
Neil Colvin 



Travel/Transportation 

*Crimson Travel Service/ 
Thomas Cook 
David Paresky 

* Heritage Travel, Inc. 
Donald R. Sohn 



Telecommunications 

AT&T 
Robert Babbitt 

*AT&T 

Glenn Swift 

AT&T NETWORK SYSTEMS 
John F. McKinnon 

CELLULAR ONE 
Charles Hoffman 



NEW ENGLAND TELEPHONE 
COMPANY 
Paul C. O'Brien 

NORTHERN TELECOM, INC. 
Brian Davis 

NYNEX CORPORATION 
William C. Ferguson 

Utilities 

BOSTON EDISON COMPANY 
Stephen J. Sweeney 

New England Electric System 
Joan T. Bok 



You are cordially invited to sample our 

Symphony OvCenu 

at 

The Cafe, Promenade 




for Reservations Call, 617-424-7000 

educed parking rates when dining at c The Colonnade for 

Symphony Matrons. 



tPfiP 



The Colonnade Oiotelis Cocated at 120 Huntington Avenue, 'Boston 



51 



Next Program . . . 

Thursday, October 25, at 8 
Friday, October 26, at 2 
Saturday, October 27, at 8 
Tuesday, October 30, at 8 

WITOLD LUTOSKAWSKI conducting 



ALL-LUTOSJAWSKI PROGRAM 



Livre pour orchestre (1968) 



l er Chapitre- 

l er Intermede — 

2™e Chapitre- 

2 me Intermede — 

3 m e Chapitre- 

3 me Intermede et Chapitre final 

Chain 2, Dialogue for violin and orchestra (1985) 

1. Ad libitum 

2. A battuta 

3. Ad libitum 

4. A battuta 

RONAN LEFKOWITZ 



INTERMISSION 



Concerto for Piano and Orchestra (1987) 

1. Dotted quarter-note = ca. 110 

2. Presto. Quarter-note = ca. 160 

3. Largo (Quarter-note = 40-45) 

4. Quarter-note = ca. 84 

ANTHONY DI BONAVENTURA 



Single tickets for all Boston Symphony Orchestra concerts throughout the season 
are available at the Symphony Hall box office, or by calling "Symphony-Charge" at 
(617) 266-1200, Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m. until 6 p.m., to charge 
tickets instantly on a major credit card, or to make a reservation and then send 
payment by check. Please note that there is a $1.75 handling fee for each ticket 
ordered by phone. 



52 



■ s£.. 



nm 



»\ 




■•''•••'■■■■•' 



Coming Concerts . . . 



Thursday 'A' -October 25, 8-9:45 
Friday 'A' -October 26, 2-3:45 
Saturday 'B'- October 27, 8-9:45 
Tuesday 'C- October 30, 8-9:45 
WITOLD LUTOSJAWSKI conducting 
RONAN LEFKOWITZ, violin 
ANTHONY DI BONAVENTURA, piano 

ALL- Livre pour Orchestre 

LUTOSJAWSKI Chain II, for violin and 
PROGRAM orchestra 

Piano Concerto 



If you'd like 

toowna 

one-of-a-kind 

treasure, 

just raise your 

hand 



SKINNER 

Auctioneers and Appraisers 
of Antiques and Fine Art 




357 Main Street 2 Newbury Street 
Bolton, MA 01740 Boston, MA 02116 
508-779-6241 617-236-1700 



Thursday, November 1, at 10:30 a.m. 

Open Rehearsal 
Evans Mirageas will discuss the program 

at 9:30 in Symphony Hall. 
Thursday 'D' — November 1, 8-10 
Friday 'B' — November 2, 2-4 
Saturday 'A' — November 3, 8-10 
Tuesday 'B'- November 6, 8-10 

KURT SANDERLING conducting 
ALICIA DE LARROCHA, piano 



HAYDN 



MOZART 



BEETHOVEN 



Overture to La fedeltd 

premiata 
Piano Concerto No. 25 

in C, K.503 
Symphony No. 6, Pastoral 



Thursday 'C- November 8, 8-9:50 
Friday 'A' -November 9, 2-3:50 
Saturday 'B'- November 10, 8-9:50 

KURT SANDERLING conducting 

MOZART Symphony No. 25 

SHOSTAKOVICH Symphony No. 10 

Wednesday, November 14, at 7:30 

Open Rehearsal 
Steven Ledbetter will discuss the program 

at 6:30 in Symphony Hall. 
Thursday 'A' — November 15, 8-10:05 
Friday 'B'- November 16, 2-4:05 
Saturday 'A' -November 17, 8-10:05 

CATHERINE COMET conducting 
HEINRICH SCHIFF, cello 



WUORINEN 
RAVEL 

SAINT-SAENS 
FAURE 

SHOSTAKOVICH 



Machault mon chou 
Valses nobles et 

sentimentales 
Cello Concerto No. 1 
EUgie for cello and 

orchestra 
Symphony No. 1 



Thursday 'C- Wednesday , November 21, 8-10:05 
Friday 'A' — November 23, 2-4:05 
Saturday 'B' -November 24, 8-10:05 
Tuesday 'B'- November 27, 8-10:05 

MAREK JANOWSKI conducting 
CHRISTIAN TETZLAFF, piano 

SCHUMANN Violin Concerto 

BRUCKNER Symphony No. 7 

Programs and artists subject to change. 



53 




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Available in gourmet shops and served in 

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For information about our specialty coffees, 

call toll free 1-800-645-4515. 



54 






Symphony Hall Information 



FOR SYMPHONY HALL CONCERT AND 
TICKET INFORMATION, call (617) 266- 
1492. For Boston Symphony concert program 
information, call "C-O-N-C-E-R-T" (266-2378). 

THE BOSTON SYMPHONY performs ten 
months a year, in Symphony Hall and at Tan- 
glewood. For information about any of the 
orchestra's activities, please call Symphony 
Hall, or write the Boston Symphony Orches- 
tra, Symphony Hall, Boston, MA 02115. 

THE NEWLY REFURBISHED EUNICE S. 
AND JULIAN COHEN WING, adjacent to 
Symphony Hall on Huntington Avenue, may be 
entered by the Symphony Hall West Entrance 
on Huntington Avenue. 

FOR SYMPHONY HALL RENTAL INFOR- 
MATION, call (617) 638-9240, or write the 
Function Manager, Symphony Hall, Boston, 
MA 02115. 

THE BOX OFFICE is open from 10 a.m. 
until 6 p'.m. Monday through Saturday; on con- 
cert evenings it remains open through intermis- 
sion for BSO events or just past starting-time 
for other events. In addition, the box office 
opens Sunday at 1 p.m. when there is a con- 
cert that afternoon or evening. Single tickets 
for all Boston Symphony subscription concerts 
are available at the box office. For outside 
events at Symphony Hall, tickets are available 
three weeks before the concert. No phone 
orders will be accepted for these events. 

TO PURCHASE BSO TICKETS: American 
Express, MasterCard, Visa, a personal check, 
and cash are accepted at the box office. To 
charge tickets instantly on a major credit card, 
or to make a reservation and then send pay- 
ment by check, call "Symphony-Charge" at 
(617) 266-1200, Monday through Saturday 
from 10 a.m. until 6 p.m. There is a handling 
fee of $1.75 for each ticket ordered by phone. 

GROUP SALES: Groups may take advantage of 
advance ticket sales. For BSO concerts at Sym- 
phony Hall, groups of twenty-five or more may 
reserve tickets by telephone and take advantage 
of ticket discounts and flexible payment options. 
To place an order, or for more information, call 
Group Sales at (617) 638-9345. 

IN CONSIDERATION of our patrons and 
artists, children under four will not be admit- 
ted to Boston Symphony Orchestra concerts. 



THE SYMPHONY SHOP is located in the 
Cohen Wing at the West Entrance on Hunting- 
ton Avenue and is open Tuesday, Thursday, and 
Friday from 11 a.m. until 3 p.m., Saturday from 
1 p.m. until 6 p.m., and from one hour before 
each concert through intermission. The shop car- 
ries BSO and musical-motif merchandise and 
gift items such as calendars, clothing, appoint- 
ment books, drinking glasses, holiday ornaments, 
children's books, and BSO and Pops recordings. 
A selection of Symphony Shop merchandise is 
also available during BSO concert hours outside 
the Cabot-Cahners Room in the Massachusetts 
Avenue corridor. All proceeds benefit the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra. For merchandise informa- 
tion, please caU (617) 267-2692. 

TICKET RESALE: If for some reason you 
are unable to attend a Boston Symphony con- 
cert for which you hold a ticket, you may make 
your ticket available for resale by calling the 
switchboard. This helps bring needed revenue 
to the orchestra and makes your seat available 
to someone who wants to attend the concert. A 
mailed receipt will acknowledge your tax-deduct- 
ible contribution. 

RUSH SEATS: There are a limited number of 
Rush Seats available for the Friday-afternoon, 
Tuesday-evening, and Saturday-evening Boston 
Symphony concerts (subscription concerts only). 
The low price of these seats is assured through 
the Morse Rush Seat Fund. The tickets for Rush 
Seats are sold at $6 each, one to a customer, on 
Fridays as of 9 a.m. and Saturdays and Tues- 
days as of 5 p.m. 

PARKING: The Prudential Center Garage 
offers a discount to any BSO patron with a 
ticket stub for that evening's performance. 
There are also two paid parking garages on 
Westland Avenue near Symphony Hall. 
Limited street parking is available. As a spe- 
cial benefit, guaranteed pre-paid parking near 
Symphony Hall is available to subscribers who 
attend evening concerts on Tuesday, Thursday, 
Friday, or Saturday. For more information, 
call the Subscription Office at (617) 266-7575. 

LATECOMERS will be seated by the ushers 
during the first convenient pause in the pro- 
gram. Those who wish to leave before the end 
of the concert are asked to do so between pro- 
gram pieces in order not to disturb other 
patrons. 



55 



SMOKING IS NOT PERMITTED in any 
part of the Symphony Hall auditorium or in 
the surrounding corridors. It is permitted only 
in the Cabot-Cahners and Hatch rooms, and in 
the main lobby on Massachusetts Avenue. 

CAMERA AND RECORDING EQUIPMENT 
may not be brought into Symphony Hall dur- 
ing concerts. 

FIRST AID FACILITIES for both men and 
women are available. On-call physicians attend- 
ing concerts should leave their names and seat 
locations at the switchboard near the Massa- 
chusetts Avenue entrance. 

WHEELCHAIR ACCESS to Symphony Hall 
is available via the Cohen Wing, at the West 
Entrance. Wheelchair-accessible restrooms are 
located in the main corridor of the West 
Entrance, and in the first-balcony passageway 
between Symphony Hall and the Cohen Wing. 

ELEVATORS are located outside the Hatch 
and Cabot-Cahners rooms on the Massachu- 
setts Avenue side of Symphony Hall, and in 
the Cohen Wing. 

LADIES' ROOMS are located on the orches- 
tra level, audience-left, at the stage end of the 
hall, on both sides of the first balcony, and in 
the Cohen Wing. 

MEN'S ROOMS are located on the orchestra 
level, audience-right, outside the Hatch Room 
near the elevator, on the first-balcony level, 
audience-left, outside the Cabot-Cahners Room 
near the coatroom, and in the Cohen Wing. 

COATROOMS are located on the orchestra 
and first-balcony levels, audience-left, outside 
the Hatch and Cabot-Cahners rooms, and in 
the Cohen Wing. The BSO is not responsible 
for personal apparel or other property of 
patrons. 

LOUNGES AND BAR SERVICE: There are 
two lounges in Symphony Hall. The Hatch 
Room on the orchestra level and the Cabot- 
Cahners Room on the first-balcony level serve 



drinks starting one hour before each perform- 
ance. For the Friday-afternoon concerts, both 
rooms open at 12:15, with sandwiches available 
until concert time. 

BOSTON SYMPHONY BROADCASTS: Con- 
certs of the Boston Symphony Orchestra are 
heard by delayed broadcast in many parts of 
the United States and Canada, as well as 
internationally, through the Boston Symphony 
Transcription Trust. In addition, Friday- 
afternoon concerts are broadcast live by 
WGBH-FM (Boston 89.7); Saturday-evening 
concerts are broadcast live by both WGBH-FM 
and WCRB-FM (Boston 102.5). Live broad- 
casts may also be heard on several other public 
radio stations throughout New England and 
New York. 

BSO FRIENDS: The Friends are annual 
donors to the Boston Symphony Orchestra. 
Friends receive BSO, the orchestra's newslet- 
ter, as well as priority ticket information and 
other benefits depending on their level of giv- 
ing. For information, please call the Develop- 
ment Office at Symphony Hall weekdays 
between 9 and 5, (617) 638-9251. If you are 
already a Friend and you have changed your 
address, please send your new address with 
your newsletter label to the Development Office, 
Symphony Hall, Boston, MA 02115. Including 
the mailing label will assure a quick and accu- 
rate change of address in our files. 

BUSINESS FOR BSO: The BSO's Business 
& Professional Leadership program makes it 
possible for businesses to participate in the life 
of the Boston Symphony Orchestra through a 
variety of original and exciting programs, 
among them "Presidents at Pops," "A Com- 
pany Christmas at Pops," and special-event 
underwriting. Benefits include corporate recog- 
nition in the BSO program book, access to the 
Higginson Room reception lounge, and priority 
ticket service. For further information, please 
call the BSO Corporate Development Office at 
(617) 638-9250. 



56 



m 



M 




When Marjory and Robert take to the 
dance floor at Fox Hill Village, people say 
they move just like Fred Astaire and 
Ginger Rogers. Such grace and style. 
Such flawless execution. 

The same can be said of Fox Hill Village. 
Set amid 83 gracefully wooded acres, 
Fox Hill Village offers a style of retire 
ment living that's beyond compare. 
With an ever- changing schedule of 
social activities. 




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Plus, a flawless array of services and 
amenities designed for those whose 
best years are yet to come. 

Yet Fox Hill Village is surprisingly 
affordable, with prices from $170,000 
and a unique cooperative plan which 
lets you retain the many investment 
and tax benefits of home ownership. 

Come see for yourself. Call (617) 
329-4433 today while preferred 
units are still available. 



10 Longwood Drive, Westwood, MA 02090 

Sponsored in part by The Massachusetts General Hospital Health Services Corp. 



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IF 



BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

Seiji Ozawa, Music Director 
Grant Llewellyn and Robert Spano, 
Assistant Conductors 
One Hundred and Tenth Season, 1990-91 

SUPPER CONCERT H 




£*-**£ 



Thursday, October 11, at 6 
Tuesday, October 16, at 6 

TATIANA DIMTTRIADES, violin 
MICHAEL ZARETSKY, viola 
JONATHAN MILLER, cello 
JOHN STOVALL, double bass 
RANDALL HODGKINSON, piano 



SCHUBERT 



Quintet in A for piano, violin, viola, cello, 
and double bass, D.667, Trout 



Allegro vivace 

Andante 

Scherzo: Presto 

Theme and Variations: Andantino— Allegretto 

Finale: Allegro giusto 



Baldwin piano 

Please exit to your left for supper following the concert. 

The performers appreciate your not smoking during the concert. 



Week 3 



Franz Schubert 

Quintet in A for piano, violin, viola, cello, and double bass, D.667, Trout 

During the summer of 1819, Schubert took a vacation trip with his friend Johann 
Michael Vogl to Linz and Steyr, in Upper Austria. Schubert was delighted to 
discover that his host in Steyr had eight daughters, "almost all pretty," as he wrote 
his brother. "You can see that there is plenty to do." In addition to being 
decorative, the girls were also musical, and many evenings were spent performing 
Schubert's songs and piano pieces. One particularly favored song, Die Forelle ("The 
Trout"), composed two years earlier, was so popular at these parlor concerts that 
when a local amateur cellist of some means, Sylvester Paumgartner, commissioned 
a quintet from Schubert for the same performing ensemble as Hummel's Opus 87— 
piano, violin, viola, cello, and double bass— he specifically requested a set of 
variations on Die Forelle as one of the movements. 

The work that resulted has long been Schubert's most popular chamber 
composition— neither his most dramatic nor his most far-reaching, but certainly one 
of his most lovable (and that is saying a lot!). In a letter to his brother during this 
vacation, Schubert wrote, "The country round Steyr is unimaginably lovely." The 
companionship was pleasant, too, and Schubert always delighted in casual music- 
making. All of these pleasures, natural and social, seem to have been captured in 
this frank and openhearted score. So much satisfaction did he find in his 
circumstances and his composing that he produced not the usual four movements, 
but five. 

The triplet figure stated by the piano at the very beginning of the opening 
Allegro dominates the entire movement, bubbling along as a foil to the lyrical 
theme presented immediately after in the strings. The Andante exploits a typically 
Schubertian indolence, laying out its slow-movement sonata-form plan (i.e., one 
without a development section) in such a way that the second half is simply a 
repetition of the first half at a different level, calculated to end in the home key. 
Thus, a tranquil first theme in F major moves, with increasing decoration, to the 
second in the relatively bright key of D; an immediate restatement in the 
unexpected key of A-flat major proceeds in as nearly literal a repetition as possible 
to bring the second material back in the home key of F. The scherzo is vigorous 
and propulsive, becoming only slightly more relaxed in the Trio. 

The fourth movement, based on Die Forelle, is by far the best-known section of 
the quintet. Schubert's original song might conceivably have been a folksong 
imitation (if one considers only the opening stanzas), but where the poet describes 
the trickery by which the fisherman finally catches the wily trout, the composer 
wrote a more elaborate, expressively modulatory stanza. For the variation set, 
however, Schubert chose to use only the version of the tune that might be 
considered most like folk song. The theme— a simple harmonization of the tune in 
D major— is presented in strings alone; then the first three variations place it 
progressively in the treble (piano), a middle voice (viola), and bass (cello), while 
the other parts add increasingly lavish ornamentation. The fourth variation turns 
to a stormy D minor, which in turn leads to the most far-reaching of the variations, 
beginning in R-flat and hinting at far harmonic vistas before returning irresistibly 
to D major for the final Allegretto, which is also the only variation in the entire set 
to use the familiar piano figure that was so much a part of the original song. 

The closing movement is lively and exceedingly simple, once more creating its 



second half by copying the first half at a pitch level designed to return to the home 
key of A major at the end. A slightly martial character in the main theme yields 
finally to the bubbling triplets that had played so important a role in the first two 
movements as well. 

—Steven Ledbetter 



Born and raised in New York, Tatiana Dimi triad es attended the Pre-College Division of 
the Juilliard School She earned her bachelor's and master's degrees in music from the 
Indiana University School of Music, where she was awarded the Performer's Certificate in 
recognition of outstanding musical performance. A recipient of the Lili Boulanger 
Memorial Award, Ms. Dimitriades has also won the Guido Chigi Saracini Prize presented 
by the Accademia Musicale Chigiana of Siena, Italy, on the occasion of the Paganini 
Centenary, and the Mischa Pelz Prize of the National Young Musicians Foundation Debut 
Competition in Los Angeles. Her solo performances have included a Carnegie Recital 
Hall appearance sponsored by the Associated Music Teachers of New York and concerts 
with the Pro Arte Chorale on tour in Great Britain and Scotland, as well as an appearance 
as soloist in the Mendelssohn violin Concerto at the Grand Teton Music Festival. Ms. 
Dimitriades joined the Boston Symphony Orchestra at the beginning of the 1987-88 
season. 



Bom in the Soviet Union in 1946, violist Michael Zaretsky studied originally as a violinist 
at the Central Music School in Moscow and at the Music College of the Moscow State 
Conservatory. In 1965 he continued his education as a violist at the Moscow State 
Conservatory. After graduating he became a member of the Moscow Philharmonic String 
Quartet and, later, of the Moscow Radio and TV Symphony Orchestra. Mr. Zaretsky 
immigrated in 1972 to Israel, where he became principal violist of the Jerusalem 
Broadcasting Symphony Orchestra and a soloist of Israeli Radio. In 1973 he auditioned for 
Leonard Bernstein, who helped him obtain an immigration visa to the United States and 
brought him to Tanglewood. There, while a Fellow of the Tanglewood Music Center, he 
successfully auditioned for the Boston Symphony Orchestra, which he joined that fall. An 
established soloist and chamber music performer, Mr. Zaretsky has been soloist with the 
Boston Pops Orchestra, the Rhode Island Philharmonic, the Atlantic Symphony of Halifax, 
Nova Scotia, and with symphony orchestras at a number of universities and schools of 
music A former faculty member at Wellesley College, Boston Conservatory, and the 
International School of Music, Mr. Zaretsky now teaches at the Boston University School of 
Music and the Longy School of Music In 1983 he initiated an annual festival of Dmitri 
Shostakovich's music at Boston University. Mr. Zaretsky made his debut as a conductor 
leading the "Strictly Strings" Orchestra in Boston. For his achievement in teaching, he was 
elected to the Pi Kappa Lambda Chapter of the National Music Honor Society. 



After attending Pablo Casals' master class at the University of California at Berkeley, 
Jonathan Miller chose to abandon his study of literature there and devote himself 
completely to the cello. Nine years later, Casals publicly acclaimed him an outstanding 
exponent of Bach. In the intervening years, Mr. Miller trained with Bernard Greenhouse of 
the Beaux Arts Trio. Seeking out masters of different schools and styles, he also studied 
with Raya Garbousova, Leonard Rose, Harvey Shapiro, and Edgar Lustgarten, and played 
in master classes given by Gregor Piatigorsky, Pierre Fournier, and Mstislav Rostropovich. 
Before joining the Boston Symphony Orchestra in 1971, Mr. Miller held appointments as 
principal cellist of the Juilliard, Hartford, and San Diego symphony orchestras. He has 
been soloist with the Hartford Symphony, the Boston Pops Orchestra, and the 



Metropolitan Symphony Orchestra of Boston, and he has performed in chamber music 
concerto at Symphony Hall and at Tanglewood. A winner of the Jeunesses Musicales 
auditions he has toured the United States twice with the New York String Sextet, and he 
has appeared as a member of the Fine Arts Quartet. Mr. Miller is founder and music 
director of the Boston Artists' Ensemble, which has received grants from the National 
Endowment for the Arts, the New England Foundation for the Arts, and the Massachusetts 
Council for the Arts. Mr. Miller has taught at the New England Conservatory and at the 
Boston University Tanglewood Institute; he is currently on the faculty of the Boston 
Conservatory of Music. He performs on a 1728 Gofriller cello played at the beginning of 
this century by the cellist of the Flonzaley Quartet, one of the earliest celebrated American 
quartets. At the invitation of Mstislav Rostropovich, Mr. Miller performed as a soloist at 
the 1990 American Cello Congress held this past June. 

Born in 1958 in Casper, Wyoming, bass player John Stovall studied I piano while in grade 
school and higfr school; he began playing the double bass while in high school. Mr. Stovall 
began his college studies in 1978 with Stuart Sankey at the University of Texas, then 
transferred to me New England Conservatory of Music to study with BSO assistant 
principal bass player Lawrence Wolfe; he received his bachelor's degree m double bass 
Performance from the New England Conservatory in 1983. Followmg a year as a freelance 
Performer in the Boston area, Mr. Stovall played with the Houston Symphony, the New 
Means Symphony, and the Indianapolis Symphony before joining the Boston Symphony 
Orchestra at the start of the 1988-89 season. A Tanglewood Music Center FeUow during 
the summers of 1981 and 1982, he has also participated in the Grand Teton Music Festival, 
the Aspen Music Festival, and the Congress of Strings in Seattle, Washington. 

Pianist Randall Hodgkinson won the International American Music C«rq>etition 
sponsored by Carnegie Hall and the Rockefeller Foundation m 1981 and mack ^formal 
New York recital debut at Alice Tully Hall under that competition s auspices m 1986^ 
Among other, earlier honors, he took top prize in the J.S. Bach hta"**"* C °^** 
and wL recipient of the Cabot Award while a Fellow of the Tanglewood Music Center m 
1971. Recent drears have brought a series of successful debuts with orchesrra^nclu^ng 
collaborations with such conductors as Leonard Bernstein and Gunther Schuller. He made 
his European orchestral debut in 1985 with the Santa Cecilia Orchestra of Rorne^ 
perforrrungMacDowell's Piano Concerto No. 2 and the European premiere of Duke 
Smgton'sW World A-Comin Concerto, reflecting his keen ^ &tm ^^ m ^ n 
Othefrecent engagements have included appearances wi* the Boston Pops £**£ « 
appearance with the Iceland Philharmonic in Rejkjavik, performances at the Eastern ^Music 
Festival, Music Mountain, and Tokyo's Interlink Festival, a midwestern tour with ttie Ohio 
Chamber Orchestra, a tour of Eastern Europe with Boston Musica Viva, and recital 
appearances throughout the United States. A featured artist on the Bosendorto Concert 
Seriesaired on WN^C-FM in New York City, he has recorded for the Nonesuch, CRI, and 
New World labels. Mr. Hodgkinson earned his bachelor's degree, master s degree, and 
artist diploma from the New England Conservatory of Music; h ^ a P^^' S *^ 
were Veronica Jochum and Russell Sherman. He is currently on the Conservatory s piano 
faculty and is also a Music Tutor at Harvard University. 



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110th Season 

19 9 0-91 




Boston Symphony Orchestra 

Seiji Ozawa, Music Director 

90th Anniversary of Symphony Hall 



■ 



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Only The few 
will own an aldemars. 




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an Audemars Piguet. Only the few will recognize wn 

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THE MALL AT CHESTNUT HILL • SOUTH SHORE PLAZA 




Seiji Ozawa, Music Director 
Grant Llewellyn and Robert Spano, 

Assistant Conductors 
One Hundred and Tenth Season, 1990-91 



Trustees of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Inc. 

Nelson J. Darling, Jr., Chairman Emeritus 



J. P. Barger, Chairman 

Mrs. Lewis S. Dabney, Vice-Chairman 

Mrs. John H. Fitzpatrick, Vice-Chairman 



George H. Kidder, President 

Archie C. Epps, Vice-Chairman 

William J. Poorvu, Vice-Chairman and Treasurer 



David B. Arnold, Jr. 
Peter A. Brooke 
James F. Cleary 
John F. Cogan, Jr. 
Julian Cohen 
William M. Crozier, Jr. 
Mrs. Michael H. Davis 
Mrs. Eugene B. Doggett 

Trustees Emeriti 

Vernon R. Alden 
Philip K. Allen 
Allen G. Barry 
Leo L. Beranek 
Mrs. John M. Bradley 
Abram T. Collier 

Other Officers of the Corporation 

John Ex Rodgers, Assistant Treasurer 
Daniel R. Gustin, Clerk 



Avram J. Goldberg 
Mrs. R. Douglas Hall III 
Francis W. Hatch 
Julian T. Houston 
Mrs. Bela T. Kalman 
Mrs. George I. Kaplan 
Harvey Chet Krentzman 
R. Willis Leith, Jr. 



Mrs. Harris Fahnestock 
Mrs. John L. Grandin 
E. Morton Jennings, Jr. 
Albert L. Nickerson 
Thomas D. Perry, Jr. 
Irving W. Rabb 



Mrs. August R. Meyer 
Mrs. Robert B. Newman 
Peter C. Read 
Richard A. Smith 
Ray Stata 

William F. Thompson 
Nicholas T. Zervas 



Mrs. George R. Rowland 
Mrs. George Lee Sargent 
Sidney Stoneman 
John Hoyt Stookey 
John L. Thorndike 



Michael G. McDonough, Assistant Treasurer 



Administration 

Kenneth Haas, Managing Director 

Daniel R. Gustin, Assistant Managing Director and Manager of Tanglewood 

Michael G. McDonough, Director of Finance and Business Affairs 

Evans Mirageas, Artistic Administrator 

Anne H. Parsons, Orchestra Manager 

Caroline Smedvig, Director of Public Relations and Marketing 

Josiah Stevenson, Director of Development 

Robert Bell, Manager of 

Information Systems 
Peter N. Cerundolo, Director of 

Corporate Development 
Madelyne Cuddeback, Director of 

Corporate Sponsorships 
Patricia Forbes Halligan, Personnel 

Administrator 
Sarah J. Harrington, Budget Manager 
Margaret Hillyard-Lazenby, 

Director of Volunteers 
Russell M. Hodsdon, Manager of Box Office 
Bernadette M. Horgan, Public Relations 

Coordinator 
Craig R. Kaplan, Controller 
Nancy A. Kay, Director of Sales & 

Marketing Manager 
John M. Keenum, Director of 

Tanglewood Music Center Development 



Patricia Krol, Coordinator of Youth Activities 
Steven Ledbetter, Musicologist & 

Program Annotator 
Michelle R. Leonard, Media and Production 

Manager, Boston Symphony Orchestra 
Marc Mandel, Publications Coordinator 
John C. Marksbury, Director of 

Foundation and Government Support 
Julie-Anne Miner, Manager of Fund 

Reporting 
Richard Ortner, Administrator of 

Tanglewood Music Center 
Scott Schillin, Assistant Manager, 

Pops and Youth Activities 
Joyce M. Serwitz, Director of Major Gifts/ 

Assistant Director of Development 
Cheryl L. Silvia, Function Manager 
Susan E. Tomlin, Director of Annual Giving 



Programs copyright ©1990 Boston Symphony Orchestra, Inc. 
Cover by Jaycole Advertising, Inc./Cover photo by Ira Wyman 



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Board of Overseers of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Inc. 

John F. Cogan, Jr., Chairman 

Mrs. Ray A. Goldberg, Vice-Chairman 

Mrs. R. Douglas Hall III, Secretary 



Mrs. Herbert B. Abelow 

Harlan Anderson 

Mrs. David Bakalar 

Bruce A. Beal 

Mrs. Leo L. Beranek 

Lynda Schubert Bodman 

Donald C. Bowersock, Jr. 

William M. Bulger 

Mrs. Levin H. Campbell 

Earle M. Chiles 

Mrs. C. Thomas Clagett, Jr. 

James F. Cleary 

William H. Congleton 

William F. Connell 

Walter J. Connolly, Jr. 

S. James Coppersmith 

Albert C. Cornelio 

Phyllis Curtin 

Alex V. d'Arbeloff 

Phyllis Dohanian 

Hugh Downs 

Goetz B. Eaton 

Edward Eskandarian 

Katherine Fanning 

Peter M. Flanigan 

Dean Freed 

Eugene M. Freedman 

Peter H.B. Frelinghuysen 

Mrs. James Garivaltis 

Mark R. Goldweitz 



Haskell R. Gordon 

Steven Grossman 

John P. Hamill 

Daphne P. Hatsopoulos 

Joe M. Henson 

Mrs. Marilyn Brachman Hoffman 

Ronald A. Homer 

Lola Jaffe 

Anna Faith Jones 

H. Eugene Jones 

Susan B. Kaplan 

Mrs. S. Charles Kasdon 

Richard L. Kaye 

Robert D. King 

Mrs. Gordon F. Kingsley 

Allen Z. Kluchman 

Koji Kobayashi 

Mrs. Carl Koch 

David I. Kosowsky 

Robert K. Kraft 

George Krupp 

Mrs. Hart D. Leavitt 

Laurence Lesser 

Stephen R. Levy 

Frederick H. Lovejoy, Jr. 

Mrs. Charles P. Lyman 

Mrs. Harry L. Marks 

C. Charles Marran 

Nathan R. Miller 



Mrs. Thomas S. Morse 

Richard P. Morse 

E. James Morton 

David G. Mugar 

David S. Nelson 

Mrs. Hiroshi H. Nishino 

Robert P. O'Block 

Paul C. O'Brien 

Vincent M. O'Reilly 

Andrall E. Pearson 

John A. Perkins 

Daphne Brooks Prout 

Millard H. Pryor, Jr. 

Keizo Saji 

Roger A. Saunders 

Mrs. Raymond H. Schneider 

Mark L. Selkowitz 

Malcolm L. Sherman 

Mrs. Donald B. Sinclair 

W. Davies Sohier, Jr. 

Ralph Z. Sorenson 

Ira Stepanian 

Mrs. Arthur I. Strang 

Mark Tishler, Jr. 

Roger D. Wellington 

Robert A. Wells 

Mrs. Thomas H.P. Whitney 

Margaret Williams-DeCelles 

Mrs. John J. Wilson 






Overseers Emeriti 

Mrs. Weston W. Adams 
Mrs. Frank G. Allen 
Mrs. Richard Bennink 
Mary Louise Cabot 
Johns H. Congdon 
Mrs. Thomas J. Galligan 
Mrs. Richard D. Hill 
Susan M. Hilles 



Mrs. Louis I. Kane 
Leonard Kaplan 
Benjamin H. Lacy 
Mrs. James F. Lawrence 
Hanae Mori 

Mrs. Stephen V.C. Morris 
Stephen Paine, Sr. 
David R. Pokross 



Mrs. Peter van S. Rice 
Mrs. Jerome Rosenfeld 
Mrs. William C. Rousseau 
Francis P. Sears, Jr. 
Mrs. Edward S. Stimpson 
Luise Vosgerchian 
Mrs. Donald B. Wilson 



Symphony Hall Operations 

Robert L. Gleason, Facilities Manager 
James E. Whitaker, House Manager 

Cleveland Morrison, Stage Manager 

Franklin Smith, Supervisor of House Crew 

Wilmoth A. Griffiths, Assistant Supervisor of House Crew 

William D. McDonnell, Chief Steward 

H.R. Costa, Lighting 



Officers of the Boston Symphony Association of Volunteers 

Susan D. Hall, President 

Thelma E. Goldberg, Executive Vice-President 

Joan Erhard, Secretary 

Patricia A. Maddox, Treasurer 

Betty Sweitzer, Nominating Chairman 



Vice-Presidents 

Helen Doyle, Hall Services 
Goetz B. Eaton, Fundraising 
Charles W. Jack, Adult Education 
Pat Jensen, Membership 
Maureen Hickey, Tanglewood 

Chairmen of Regions 

Krista Kamborian Baldini 
Judy Clark 
Joan Erhard 
Bettina Harrison 



Marilyn Larkin, Tanglewood 

Patricia A. Newton, Regions 

Carol Scheifele-Holmes, Public Relations 

F. Preston Wilson, Development 

Pat Woolley, Youth Activities 



Helen Lahage 
Ginny Martens 
Paula Murphy 
Pamela S. Nugent 



Beverly J. Pieper 
Patricia L. Tambone 
Arline Ziner 



Business and Professional Leadership Association 
Board of Directors 



Harvey Chet Krentzman, Chairman 



James F. Cleary, BPLA President 



Members 

J. P. Barger 
Leo L. Beranek 
William F. Connell 
Nelson J. Darling, Jr. 



Thelma E. Goldberg 
Joe M. Henson 
George H. Kidder 
Vincent M. O'Reilly 



Malcolm L. Sherman 
Ray Stata 
Stephen J. Sweeney 
Roger D. Wellington 



Boston Symphony Orchestra concerts are funded in part by the National 
Endowment for the Arts and the Massachusetts Cultural Council, a state agency. 



Celebrating the 90th Anniversary of Symphony Hall 




On display in the first-floor Huntington Avenue corridor of the Cohen Wing is an archival 
exhibit celebrating the 90th anniversary of Symphony Hall. In addition to newspaper accounts 
of the building's opening in 1900, the exhibit includes period photographs and a tribute to 
acoustician Wallace Clement Sabine. 

Articles on various aspects of Symphony Hall will be featured in the BSO program book 
throughout the season. The cover photograph shows the cartouche directly above the 
Symphony Hall stage. Whereas numerous European halls traditionally highlighted various 
composers' names, Beethoven became the only composer whose name was inscribed on any of 
the plaques that trim the stage and balconies of Symphony Hall. The others were left empty 
since, at the time the Hall was opened, it was felt that only Beethoven's popularity would 
remain unchanged. 



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BSO 



Witold Lutosjawski to be Honored 
at New England Conservatory 

While in Boston to conduct the Boston Sym- 
phony Orchestra, composer Witold Lutos/awski 
will be honored at the New England Conserva- 
tory of Music with a concert of his own music 
on Monday, October 29, at 8 p.m. at Jordan 
Hall; admission is free. Entitled "Homage to 
Lutosjawski," the program will include the 
composer's Five Songs (1957), Mini Overture 
(1982), Trois Poemes d'Henri Michaux (1963), 
and Concerto for Orchestra (1954). The par- 
ticipants include the New England Conserva- 
tory Symphony Orchestra, Pascal Verrot, 
music director; the NEC Chorus, Tamara 
Brooks, music director; and the NEC Wind 
Ensemble, Frank L. Battisti, music director. 
Mezzo-soprano Johanne Blank and pianist 
Kayo Iwama will perform the Five Songs. 
John Heiss is the artistic coordinator. For 
further information, call (617) 262-1120. 

Boston Symphony Chamber Players 
at Jordan Hall, Sunday, November 11, 
at 3 p.m. 

The Boston Symphony Chamber Players, with 
pianist Gilbert Kalish, open their 1990-91 sub- 
scription season at Jordan Hall on Sunday, 
November 11, at 3 p.m. Baritone Sanford 
Sylvan is featured in John Harbison's Words 
from Paterson, on a program also including 
Piston's Divertimento for strings and winds 
and Beethoven's Septet in E-flat for strings 
and winds, Opus 20. Single tickets are $16, 
$12, and $9, available on the day of the con- 
cert at the Jordan Hall box office, or in 
advance at the Symphony Hall box office or by 
calling SymphonyCharge at (617) 266-1200. 

Subscriptions at $42, $32, and $24 for the 
Chamber Players' three-concert series are still 
available; for complete subscription information, 
see page 20 of this program book. 

The Symphony Shop Celebrates the New 
BSO Season in a New Location 

Now in an attractive street-level storefront 
location at Symphony Hall's West Entrance on 
Huntington Avenue, the new, expanded Sym- 
phony Shop opened its doors for the 1990 
Opening Night at Pops concert. The Shop con- 



tinues to offer exclusive Boston Symphony and 
Boston Pops merchandise as well as recordings 
and other items with a musical motif. Business 
was brisk throughout the Pops season, and the 
BSAV anticipates a successful fall. One special 
piece of new merchandise is itself worth a visit 
to the Shop — an exquisite Swiss music box 
that is the only one of its kind available in the 
United States. Crafted by the Reuge Music 
Company, the music box is made of rosewood 
with a Chinese lacquer finish. The box plays 
Viennese waltzes every hour on the hour, and 
the interior of the box lights up to reveal three 
elegant dancers, costumed in handmade 
dresses of silk, feathers, and pearls. Notewor- 
thy for its musical precision as well, the music 
box features two combs that provide 142 notes. 
If you are not able to visit the Shop on the 
hour, you can activate the music at any time 
with a quarter. Other new merchandise 
includes the 1991 BSO datebook and address 
book, both leatherbound, a Quill pen, clothing 
in such fashion colors as teal, magenta, water- 
melon, and jade, and the return, by popular 
demand, of the black t-shirt and sweatshirt 
with gold foil colophon. The Symphony Shop is 
open Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday from 11 
a.m. to 3 p.m., Saturday from 1 p.m. to 6 
p.m., and from one hour before every Sym- 
phony Hall concert through intermission. 

With Thanks 

We wish to express special gratitude to Rich- 
ard P. and Claire W. Morse, major donors of 
the Rush Seats Program through the Morse 
Rush Seats Fund. A limited number of these 
generously underwritten tickets for the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra's Tuesday-evening, 
Friday-afternoon, and Saturday-evening sub- 
scription concerts are made available at $6. 

Symphony Spotlight 

This is one in a series of biographical sketches 
that focus on some of the generous individuals 
who have endowed chairs in the Boston Sym- 
phony Orchestra. Their backgrounds are varied, 
but each felt a special commitment to the Bos- 
ton Symphony Orchestra. 

Sylvia Shippen Wells Chair 

Sylvia Shippen Wells was born in Boston, the 
daughter of the late Reverend and Mrs. 
Eugene R. Shippen. She attended Wheelock 
College and in 1928 married John M. Wells. 
They moved to Southbridge, Massachusetts, 



References furnished 
on request 



Armenta Adams 
American Ballet Theater 
Michael Barrett 
John Bayless 
Leonard Bernstein 
William Bolcom 
Jorge Bolet 

Boston Pops Orchestra 
Boston Symphony 

Chamber Players 
Boston Symphony 

Orchestra 
Boston University School 

of Music 
Brooklyn Philharmonic 
Dave Brubeck 
Aaron Copland 
John Corigliano 
Phyllis Curtin 
Rian de Waal 
Michael Feinstein 
Lukas Foss 
Philip Glass 
Karl Haas 
John F. Kennedy Center 

for Performing Arts 



David Korevaar 
Garah Landes 
Michael Lankester 
Elyane Laussade 
Marion McPartland 
John Nauman 
Seiji Ozawa 
Luciano Pavarotti 
Alexander Peskanov 
Andre Previn 
Steve Reich 
Santiago Rodriguez 
George Shearing 
Bright Sheng 
Leonard Shure 
Abbey Simon 
Stephen Sondheim 
Herbert Stessin 
Tanglewood Music 

Center 
Nelita True 
Craig Urquhart 
Earl Wild 
John Williams 
Yehudi Wyner 
and 200 others 



BALDWIN 

OF 

BOSTON 

98 Boylston, Boston, MA 02116, (617) 482-2525 




■ 



where she became active in community affairs, 
but she always maintained her great interest in 
and devotion to the Boston Symphony Orches- 
tra. Mr. Wells founded and from 1940 until 
1960 successfully ran his own company, 
Harvey- Wells Electronics. He has also been 
extremely involved in amateur radio and avia- 
tion; in 1939 he was named chairman of the 
Massachusetts Aeronautics Commission by 
Governor Leverett Saltonstall. He is an active 
member of many organizations, such as the 
Friends of the BSO and Tanglewood. "My rea- 
son for endowing the principal timpani chair in 
honor of Sylvia, who died in 1973," said Mr. 
Wells, "was that I wanted to keep her memory 
alive for me and for others, since she was such 
a staunch supporter of the BSO all her life." 

BSO Members in Concert 

The Boston Composers String Quartet, which 
includes BSO violinist James Cooke, performs 
music of LutosZawski, Smetana, and Harbison 
on Sunday, October 28, at 2 p.m. at Boston 
University's Tsai Performance Center, 685 
Commonwealth Avenue in Boston. Admission 
is $8. 

BSO associate concertmaster Tamara 
Smirnova-Sajfar will perform the Tchaikovsky 
Violin Concerto with the Wellesley Symphony 
Orchestra on Sunday, October 28, at 3 p.m. at 
Massachusetts Bay Community College, 50 
Oakland Street in Wellesley Hills, near the 
junction of Rtes. 16 and 9. Robert Prins con- 
ducts a program also including Dvorak's Car- 
nival Overture and Mozart's Symphony 
No. 41, Jupiter. Tickets are priced at $10 and 
$7. Call (617) 444-0091 or 431-1314 for fur- 
ther information. 

BSO violist Michael Zaretsky performs 
Schnittke's Viola Concerto with the Boston 
University Symphony Orchestra at BU's Tsai 
Performance Center, 685 Commonwealth Ave- 
nue in Boston, on Friday, November 2, at 
8 p.m. Also on the program are Busoni's 
Berceuse elegiaque and Elgar's Symphony No. 2; 
David Hoose conducts. General admission is 
$5 ($3 seniors and students). 

The John Oliver Chorale opens its 1990-91 
subscription season with Swiss composer 
Frank Martin's Requiem and the United States 
premiere of Martin's Pilate on Saturday, 
November 3, at 8 p.m. at St. Paul's Church in 
Cambridge, at Bow and Arrow streets. The 
soloists are soprano Dominique Labelle, mezzo- 
soprano Gloria Raymond, tenor Paul Kirby, 



baritone Paul Rowe, and bass Donald Wilkin- 
son. Single tickets are $20, $14, and $5; sea- 
son subscriptions are also available. For fur- 
ther information, call (617) 325-0886. 

Max Hobart leads the North Shore Philhar- 
monic in the ballet music from Gounod's 
Faust, Mozart's Violin Concerto No. 4 with 
soloist Ayano Ninomiya, and Beethoven's Sym- 
phony No. 1 on Sunday, November 4, at Salem 
High School. Tickets are $9 ($7 seniors). For 
further information, call 1-631-6513. 

Ronald Knudsen leads the Newton Sym- 
phony Orchestra in the opening concert of its 
25th Anniversary Season on Sunday, Novem- 
ber 4, at 8 p.m. at Aquinas Junior College, 
15 Walnut Park in Newton. Sanford Sylvan is 
soloist in the world premiere of Charles Fus- 
sell's Wilde, a Symphony for Baritone and 
Orchestra, commissioned by the Newton Sym- 
phony Orchestra, on a program also including 
the Mussorgsky/Ravel Pictures at an Exhibi- 
tion. Single tickets are $14 and $12; season 
subscriptions are also available. Call 
(617) 965-2555 for further information. 

Violist Patricia McCarty and pianist Ellen 
Weckler will present a recital on Friday, 
November 9, at 8 p.m. at the Pickman Concert 
Hall at the Longy School of Music of Cam- 
bridge. The American Music Week program 
will include sonatas by Hovhaness, Lieber- 
mann, and Foote, and the world premiere of a 
work by Elizabeth Vercoe. Admission is $8 ($4 
seniors and students). Call (617) 720-3434 for 
further information. 



BSO Guests on WGBH-FM-89.7 

In the coming weeks, Morning pro Musica with 
Robert J. Lurtsema will feature live perform- 
ances and interviews with BSO members and 
guest conductors: principal trumpet Charles 
Schlueter will perform with pianist Deborah 
DeWolf Emery on Friday, October 26; com- 
poser Witold LutosZawski, who will lead the 
orchestra in a program of his own works, 
appears on Tuesday, October 30; Mark Kroll, 
frequent harpsichordist with the orchestra, will 
perform on Thursday, November 1; guest con- 
ductor Kurt Sanderling, who will lead music of 
Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven, appears on 
Monday, November 5; and guest conductor 
Marek Janowski, who will lead music of 
Schumann and Bruckner, appears on Monday, 
November 26. All performances and interviews 
begin at 11 a.m. 



In Memoriam 

Leonard Bernstein 
August 25, 1918 -October 14, 1990 




The loss of Leonard Bernstein is felt deeply by millions around the world, and partic- 
ularly in his birthplace, the state of Massachusetts. He was born in Lawrence, raised 
in Brookline, and graduated from Harvard. The first orchestral concert he attended 
was played by the Boston Pops Orchestra under the direction of Arthur Fiedler. 

The Boston Symphony Orchestra was privileged to share a unique association with 
Leonard Bernstein spanning more than five decades. In 1939, having just graduated 
from Harvard, he led Brahms' Academic Festival Overture on Boston's Charles River 
Esplanade, after winning a prize in a newspaper competition. In 1940 he was 
accepted by then BSO Music Director Serge Koussevitzky, his most influential men- 
tor, into the first class of the Tanglewood Music Center, where Mr. Bernstein contin- 
ued to teach, conduct, and provide spiritual guidance through this past summer. His 
concert appearances as conductor and pianist with the Boston Symphony Orchestra at 
Symphony Hall and at Tanglewood spanned the years 1944 to 1990. As an Advisor to 
Tanglewood in the early 1970s he shared responsibility for its artistic direction with 
Seiji Ozawa and Gunther Schuller. Mr. Bernstein composed two works for the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra: his Symphony No. 3, Kaddish, commissioned for the orchestra's 
75th anniversary, and his Divertimento for Orchestra, commissioned for the BSO's 
centennial in 1981. Tanglewood was the site of his seventieth birthday celebration in 
1988, and of his final conducting appearances this past August. In addition, Mr. 
Bernstein was a significant influence upon the career of Seiji Ozawa, whose first pro- 
fessional position was as Mr. Bernstein's assistant with the New York Philharmonic. 

But his musical influence stretched far beyond the confines of Boston and 
Massachusetts — farther, in fact, than that of any previous American composer or con- 
ductor. He was greatly talented in so many ways that he seems to have lived several 
lives simultaneously. A natural conductor, he was the first American to be named 
music director of a major American symphony orchestra, the New York Philharmonic, 
only one of many firsts that he enjoyed in a career lasting nearly a half-century, and 
that took him to the pinnacle of his profession. He actively promoted the work of 
many American composers, and he was more responsible, perhaps, than any other 
single person for making Mahler's works part of the standard repertory. And he 



■ 



attracted a new audience to classical music through his remarkable gifts as a teacher, 
especially in his "Omnibus" and "Young People's Concerts" television shows, which 
reached audiences in places where a live symphony orchestra would scarcely be found. 
Who can count the number of musicians and music lovers who found their way to this 
art through Leonard Bernstein's informative yet congenial introduction? 

As a composer he steadfastly avoided confinement to genre; he would create a sym- 
phony at the same time he was working on a Broadway show. This was a stumbling 
block to many friends and admirers who wished he might concentrate solely on con- 
cert music or, alternatively, on the musical theater. But his gifts, his love for all kinds 
of music, his sense of the theater, and his pride in being an American all contributed 
to making him the kind of composer who would follow the path of his own all- 
embracing muse. In addition to his three symphonies (Jeremiah, The Age of Anxiety, 
and Kaddish), his ballets (Fancy Free, Facsimile, The Dybbuk), his film score (On the 
Waterfront), his violin concerto (Serenade [after Plato's Symposium]), his theatrical 
and controversial Mass, his operas (Trouble in Tahiti and its sequel A Quiet Place), 
his song cycles (including Songfest and Arias and Barcarolles), and many other 
smaller works, he left an imperishable series of Broadway shows (On the Town, Won- 
derful Toum, Candide, and above all, West Side Story). 

He was a superb pianist who only occasionally demonstrated this talent in concert 
or on recording. In addition he had an astonishing musical memory that allowed him 
to sit down at the piano and play without music almost any work in the literature 
that he might want to discuss. This gift was revealed most often to the lucky few who 
had the opportunity to study conducting with him. And to those young musicians — 
conductors, composers, singers, and instrumentalists — in whom he discerned special 
talent, he showed an unfailing generosity with advice, opportunities to gain experi- 
ence, and recommendations. 

Music was, without question, the core of his being. Yet Leonard Bernstein was a 
remarkably well-rounded human being with a penetrating mind and a quick sense of 
humor. He read avidly, remembered and quoted poetry almost as much as he did 
music, learned languages quickly, thrived on word games and puzzles. Throughout his 
life he fought for causes in which he believed. He carried the light of his music and 
his brilliance around the world both in personal appearances and through electronic 
media. 

A ceaseless dynamo of activity until almost the very end, Leonard Bernstein lived 
life enthusiastically. A serious student of the scriptures, he knew that once he passed 
the allotted "threescore years and ten" in 1988, he was living on time borrowed from 
God. But he filled his seventy-two years with adventure and achievement enough to 
fill four or five ordinary fives. Even so, those whose lives were touched by him — even 
distantly through a recording or a television show or attendance at his concerts — 
hoped that his recently announced retirement from conducting would give him rest, 
rejuvenation, and many years in which to continue his composition and teaching. It 
was not to be. We mourn the loss of so strong a beacon, even as we remember with 
gratitude the gifts he has given us. 





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Seiji Ozawa 

Seiji Ozawa was named music director of the Boston Sym- 
phony Orchestra in 1973 following a year as the orchestra's 
music adviser; he is now in his eighteenth year as the BSO's 
music director. With the Boston Symphony Orchestra he 
has led concerts in Europe, Japan, and throughout the 
United States; in March 1979 he and the orchestra made an 
historic visit to China for a significant musical exchange 
entailing coaching, study, and discussion sessions with Chi- 
nese musicians, as well as concert performances, becoming 
the first American performing ensemble to visit China since 
the establishment of diplomatic relations. This spring Mr. 

Ozawa will lead the orchestra on a seven-city North American tour; a tour to seven 

European cities will follow the 1991 Tanglewood season. 

Mr. Ozawa pursues an active international career, appearing regularly with the 
Berlin Philharmonic, the Orchestre de Paris, the French National Orchestra, the 
Vienna Philharmonic, the Philharmonia of London, and the New Japan Philharmonic. 
Recent appearances conducting opera have included La Scala, Salzburg, the Vienna 
Staatsoper, and the Paris Opera; he has also conducted at Covent Garden. In 1983, 
at the Paris Opera, he conducted the world premiere of Olivier Messiaen's St. Francis 
ofAssisi. 

Mr. Ozawa has a distinguished list of recorded performances to his credit, with the 
Boston Symphony Orchestra, the Berlin Philharmonic, the London Philharmonic, the 
Philharmonia of London, the Orchestre National, the Orchestre de Paris, the Saito 
Kinen Orchestra, the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, the San Francisco Symphony, 
and the Toronto Symphony Orchestra, among others. His recordings appear on the 
CBS, Deutsche Grammophon, EMI/Angel, Erato, Hyperion, New World, Philips, 
RCA, and Telarc labels. 

Born in 1935 in Shenyang, China, to Japanese parents, Seiji Ozawa studied West- 
ern music as a child and later graduated with first prizes in composition and conduct- 
ing from Tokyo's Toho School of Music, where he was a student of Hideo Saito. In 

1959 he won first prize at the International Competition of Orchestra Conductors 
held in Besangon, France, and was invited to Tanglewood by Charles Munch, then 
music director of the Boston Symphony Orchestra and a judge at the competition. In 

1960 he won the Tanglewood Music Center's highest honor, the Koussevitzky Prize 
for outstanding student conductor. 

While a student of Herbert von Karajan in West Berlin, Mr. Ozawa came to the 
attention of Leonard Bernstein. He accompanied Mr. Bernstein on the New York 
Philharmonic's 1961 tour of Japan and was made an assistant conductor of that 
orchestra for the 1961-62 season. In January 1962 he made his first professional 
concert appearance in North America, with the San Francisco Symphony. Mr. Ozawa 
was music director of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra's Ravinia Festival for five 
summers beginning in 1964, music director of the Toronto Symphony Orchestra 
from 1965 to 1969, and music director of the San Francisco Symphony from 1970 to 
1976, followed by a year as that orchestra's music adviser. In 1970 he was named an 
artistic director of the Boston Symphony Orchestra's Tanglewood Festival. 

Seiji Ozawa has won an Emmy for the Boston Symphony Orchestra's "Evening at 
Symphony" PBS television series. He holds honorary doctor of music degrees from 
the University of Massachusetts, the New England Conservatory of Music, and 
Wheaton College in Norton, Massachusetts. 



11 






Music Directorship endowed by 
John Moors Cabot 

BOSTON SYMPHONY 

ORCHESTRA 

1990-91 

First Violins 

Malcolm Lowe 

Concertmaster 
Charles Munch chair 

Tamara Smirnova-Sajfar 

Associate Concertmaster 
Helen Horner Mclntyre chair 

Max Hobart 

Assistant Concertmaster 

Robert L. Beal, and 

Enid L. and Bruce A. Beal chair 

Lucia Lin 

Acting Assistant Concertmaster 
Edward and Bertha C Rose chair 

Bo Youp Hwang 

John and Dorothy Wilson chair, 
fully funded in perpetuity 

Max Winder 

Forrest Foster Collier chair 

Fredy Ostrovsky 

Dorothy Q. and David B. Arnold, Jr., 
chair, fully funded in perpetuity 

Gottfried Wilfinger 



* Participating in a system of rotated 
seating within each string section 
%0n sabbatical leave 



Leo Panasevich 

Carolyn and Ceorge Rowland chair 

Sheldon Rotenberg 

Muriel C. Kasdon and 
Marjorie C Paley chair 

Alfred Schneider 
Raymond Sird 
Ikuko Mizuno 
Amnon Levy 

Second Violins 

Marylou Speaker Churchill 

Fahnestock chair 

Vyacheslav Uritsky 

Charlotte and Irving W. Rabb chair 

Ronald Knudsen 

Edgar and Shirley Grossman chair 

Joseph McGauley 

Leonard Moss 
*Harvey Seigel 
*Jerome Rosen 

* Sheila Fiekowsky 
Ronan Lefkowitz 

* Nancy Bracken 
*Jennie Shames 
*Aza Raykhtsaum 
*Valeria Vilker Kuchment 
*Bonnie Bewick 
*Tatiana Dimitriades 
*James Cooke 
*Si-Jing Huang 

Violas 

Burton Fine 

Charles S. Dana chair 

Patricia McCarty 

Anne Stoneman chair, 
fully funded in perpetuity 

^Ronald Wilkison 

Lois and Harlan Anderson chair 

Robert Barnes 




12 




Jerome Lipson 

Joseph Pietropaolo 

Michael Zaretsky 

Marc Jeanneret 
*Mark Ludwig 
*Rachel Fagerburg 
*Edward Gazouleas 

Cellos 

Jules Eskin 

Philip R. Allen chair 

Martha Babcock 

Vernon and Marion Alden chair 

Sato Knudsen 

Esther 8. and Joseph M. Shapiro chair 

Joel Moerschel 

Sandra and David Bakalar chair 

* Robert Ripley 
Luis Leguia 

Robert Bradford Newman chair 

tCarol Procter 

Lillian and Nathan R. Miller chair 

* Ronald Feldman 

Charles and JoAnne Dickinson chair 

* Jerome Patterson 

* Jonathan Miller 

Basses 

Edwin Barker 

Harold D. Hodgkinson chair 

Lawrence Wolfe 

Maria Nistazos Stata chair, 
fully funded in perpetuity 

Joseph Hearne 
Bela Wurtzler 
John Salkowski 

* Robert Olson 
*James Orleans 
*Todd Seeber 
*John Stovall 

Flutes 



Walter Piston chair 

Leone Buyse 

Acting Principal Flute 
Marian Oray Lewis chair 

Fenwick Smith 

Myra and Robert Kraft chair 

Piccolo 

Geralyn Coticone 

Evelyn and C. Charles Marran chair 



Oboes 

Alfred Genovese 

Mildred B. Remis chair 

Wayne Rapier 
Keisuke Wakao 

English Horn 

Laurence Thorstenberg 

Beranek chair, 

fully funded in perpetuity 

Clarinets 

Harold Wright 

Ann S.M. Banks chair 

Thomas Martin 

Bass Clarinet 

Craig Nordstrom 

Farla and Harvey Chet 
Krentzman chair 

Bassoons 

Richard Svoboda 

Edward A. Taft chair 

Roland Small 
Richard Ranti 

Contrabassoon 

Richard Plaster 

Helen Rand Thayer chair 

Horns 

Charles Kavalovski 

Helen Sagoff Slosberg chair 

Richard Sebring 

Margaret Andersen Congleton chair 

Daniel Katzen 
Jay Wadenpfuhl 
Richard Mackey 
Jonathan Menkis 

Trumpets 

Charles Schlueter 

Roger Louis Voisin chair 

Peter Chapman 

Ford H. Cooper chair 

Timothy Morrison 
Steven Emery 



Trombones 

Ronald Barron 

J. P. and Mary B. Barger chair, 
fully funded in perpetuity 

Norman Bolter 

Bass Trombone 

Douglas Yeo 

Tuba 

Chester Schmitz 

Margaret and William C. 
Rousseau chair 

Timpani 

Everett Firth 

Sylvia Shippen Wells chair 

Percussion 

Arthur Press 

Assistant Timpanist 
Peter Andrew Lurie chair 

Thomas Gauger 

Peter and Anne Brooke chair 

Frank Epstein 

Harp 

Ann Hobson Pilot 

Willona Henderson Sinclair chair 

Sara Schuster Ericsson 



Personnel Managers 

Lynn Larsen 
Harry Shapiro 

Librarians 

Marshall Burlingame 
William Shisler 
James Harper 

Stage Manager 

Position endowed by 
Angelica Lloyd Clagett 

Alfred Robison 



13 



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Your place for a beautifully orchestrated season 



14 



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I , : '-w- 




BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

Seiji Ozawa, Music Director 

Grant Llewellyn and Robert Spano, 
Assistant Conductors 

One Hundred and Tenth Season, 1990-91 

Thursday, October 25, at 8 
Friday, October 26, at 2 
Saturday, October 27, at 8 
Tuesday, October 30, at 8 

WITOLD LUTOS^AWSKI conducting 




ALL-LUTOSEAWSKI PROGRAM 

Livre pour orchestre (1968) 
ler Chapitre- 
l er Intermede — 
2 me Chapitre- 
2™e Intermede - 
3 me Chapitre- 
3 me Intermede et Chapitre final 

Chain 2, Dialogue for violin and orchestra (1985) 

1. Ad libitum 

2. A battuta 

3. Ad libitum 

4. A battuta 

RONAN LEFKOWITZ 



INTERMISSION 



Concerto for Piano and Orchestra (1987) 

1. Dotted quarter-note = ca. 110 

2. Presto. Quarter-note = ca. 160 

3. Largo (Quarter-note = 40-45) 

4. Quarter-note = ca. 84 

ANTHONY DI BONAVENTURA 



We regret that Emanuel Ax is unable to appear at the Thursday, Friday, and 
Saturday concerts as originally scheduled. However, we are fortunate that Anthony 
di Bonaventura has been able to add these dates to his schedule with us this week. 



The afternoon concert will end about 3:50 and the evening concerts about 9:50. 

RCA, Deutsche Grammophon, Philips, Telarc, Sony Classical/CBS Masterworks, EMI/Angel, 

New World, Erato, and Hyperion records 
Baldwin piano 
Anthony Di Bonaventura plays the Steinway piano. 

The program books for the Friday-afternoon series are given in loving memory of Mrs. Hugh 
Bancroft by her daughters Mrs. A. Werk Cook and the late Mrs. William C. Cox. 



15 



Week 4 



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Witold Lutosfawski 

Livre pour Orchestre 

Chain 2, Dialogue for violin and orchestra 

Concerto for Piano and Orchestra 




Witold Lutoslawski was born in Warsaw, Poland, 
on January 25, 1913, and lives there. He composed 
his Livre pour orchestre on a commission from the 
town of Hagen, Germany, where it was first per- 
formed on November 18, 1968, by the Stadtisches 
Orchester, Hagen, under the direction of Berthold 
Lehmann, to whom the score is dedicated. The 
American premiere was given by the Pittsburgh 
Symphony Orchestra under the direction of Donald 
Johanos on October 1, 1971. These are the first per- 
formances by the Boston Symphony Orchestra. The 
score calls for three flutes (second and third dou- 
bling piccolo), three oboes, three clarinets, three bas- 
soons (third doubling contrabassoon), three trum- 
pets, four horns, three trombones and tuba, timpani, 
two xylophones, five tom-toms, vibraphone, side drum, gong, tam-tam, bells, glocken- 
spiel, tenor drum, two suspended cymbals, bass drum, celesta, harp, piano, and strings. 
The work lasts about twenty-one minutes. 

Witold Lutoslawski* celebrated his seventy-seventh birthday in January. His career 
has encompassed a wide range of musical approaches from the Symphonic Variations 
of a half-century ago to the recently completed Piano Concerto. As a native and life- 
long resident of Warsaw, he has been, along with his younger compatriot Krzysztof 
Penderecki, a symbol of Polish music in our time, having shown the most consistently 
fertile musical imagination of any of his countrymen. He has shown that the artist 
can dare even in a political environment that until very recently was most unsympa- 
thetic to advances in the arts. 

LutosJawski's birth preceded by only a year and a half the outbreak of World War 
I, which had devastating consequences for his native country, surrounded as it was by 
participants on opposite sides of the war, who found Poland an all-too-convenient 
middle ground for their predations. The composer's father, Jozef Lutosjawski, had 
long been active in nationalist politics. His work with the National Democrats put 
him at the opposite end of the spectrum from the Bolsheviks, who were busily taking 
over Russia during the last phase of the war. Polish soldiers had principally been used 
by the Tsarist regime to resist the Bolsheviks. Jozef and his brother, while working to 
use the far northern base of Murmansk, held by the Allies in 1918 as a potential port 
of evacuation for Polish soldiers, were arrested by the Bolsheviks in April 1918 and 
charged with counterrevolutionary activities. A few days before their scheduled trial 
that September, they were led out with a large group of fellow prisoners and executed. 

Jozef Lutos/awski had been both a Polish nationalist and an ardent amateur musi- 
cian. He loved to play Beethoven and Chopin, and he clearly passed this love on to his 
son, who, at the age of six, demanded to be given piano lessons. Soon after beginning 
his studies, he also started improvising seriously at the keyboard and composing. At 
the age of eleven, he began to hear music more recent than that of his father's idols 
Beethoven and Chopin and found himself "intoxicated" by the music of Scriabin and 



* Pronounced, roughly, VEE-tolt Loo-toh-SWUV-skee. In Polish, the second "1" in his last name 
bears an accent mark crossing the stem of the letter. That crossed 1 is pronounced half way 
between our "w" and a glottal "1." 



17 



Week 4 



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by Karol Szymanowski's Third Symphony, the most modern composition he could 
hear in what was then rather a musical backwater. In 1926 he began studying the 
violin, though he never became as proficient on that instrument as he was on the 
piano. The following year he entered the Warsaw Conservatory. Soon he began to 
take lessons in composition with a skilled but conservative master, Witold Maliszew- 
ski, who had been a student of Rimsky-Korsakov's in St. Petersburg. For a time he 
studied mathematics at the university along with music at the conservatory, but even- 
tually he chose to concentrate on the latter. He received his diploma in piano in 1936 
and in composition the following year. 

Though he had had some small public performances earlier, Lutosjawski's first 
major appearance as a composer was with the premiere of his Symphonic Variations, 
first on a radio broadcast in April 1939, then in a concert in Cracow on June 17. 
Despite the interest that the work aroused, the timing could not have been worse: 
only ten weeks later, Adolf Hitler invaded Poland. Lutosjawski recalled what the next 
years were like: 

When the Nazis entered Warsaw, Polish music stopped. After the Jews and gyp- 
sies, we Slavs were hated most by them. They took over the orchestras, kept 
most of the Polish musicians, but German conductors and repertory were 
imported. Poles boycotted their concerts but we arranged clandestine meetings in 
rooms, daring imprisonment to play chamber music or premiere some of our 
things. 

During this dark time, the cafes of Warsaw provided a kind of underground public 
forum for those who knew what was going on. LutosZawski played regularly, often in 
a piano duo with fellow composer Andzrej Panufnik. The two composers arranged a 
great deal of serious music for themselves to play— works by Bach, Ravel, Bizet, 
Debussy, Szymanowksi, and others. One piece, Lutosjawski's Variations on a Theme 
of Paganini, though intended as a wartime makeshift, has become one of his most 



Find out 
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The Admission Office 
The Williston 
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Box 30 

19 Payson Avenue 
Easthampton, 
Massachusetts, 01027 
Fax: 413/527-9494 



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ENJOYA 
SPLENDID SEASON 
OF CHAMBER WORKS 

Join the principal players of the Boston Symphony 
Orchestra and experience chamber music at its best 
with one of the world's finest ensembles. 

BOSTON SYMPHONY CHAMBER PLAYERS 
THREE SUNDAY AFTERNOONS AT 3:00PM 

JORDAN HALL 

AT NEW ENGLAND CONSERVATORY 

$42.00, $32.00, $24.00 
GILBERT KALISH, pianist 

November 11. 1990 

PISTON Divertimento for strings and winds 
HARBISON Words from Paterson' 

with SANFORD SYLVAN, baritone 
BEETHOVEN Septet in E-flat for strings and 

winds, Op. 20 

February 3. 1991 

HAYDN Trio in E for piano, violin, and cello, 

Hob. XV:28 
BRAHMS Trio in E-flat for horn, violin, 

and piano, Op. 40 
KELLAWAY 'Esque,' for trombone and double bass 
SHOSTAKOVICH Quintet in G minor for piano and 

strings, Op. 57 

March 10. 1991 

WYNER New work for brass and percussion 

(world premiere) 
PISTON Quintet for piano and strings 
SCHUBERT String Quintet in C, D.956 

SUBSCRIBE NOW TO THE 1990-91 SEASON! 



Order your tickets now! 

Call the Subscription Office at (617) 266-7575, 
Monday through Friday, 9am until 5pm. 



20 



frequently performed compositions. During the same period, LutosZawski composed 
many resistance songs, usually (for obvious reasons) under a pseudonym or anonymously. 

When the war ended, LutosZawski, hard at work on his First Symphony, took a 
position with the Polish Radio in order to pay the bills; there he produced a large 
quantity of functional music including popular songs composed under the name "Der- 
wid." He attached no artistic significance to this music, but used the steady job to 
support himself while working on the compositions he wanted to write. 

Gradually he came to be recognized as the leading composer of his generation, 
though a major setback came during the dark times beginning in the late 1940s, when 
Poland was refashioned as a Socialist state largely under the control of Moscow. The 
same issues of artistic freedom and governmental control raised by the infamous 1948 
Zhdanov denunciation of Shostakovich, Prokofiev, and others in Russia were echoed in 
the satellite countries. LutosZawski' s First Symphony was the first Polish work to be 
officially censured by the government and removed from the repertoire. He survived 
only by continuing his work on the radio, writing children's songs and similar works 
"for which there was a social need." He continued privately with the work that he 
considered important, but only a few larger compositions, folkloric in character, were 
heard in public. But these culminated in his most important composition of that 
period, the Concerto for Orchestra, completed in 1954, a brilliantly colored and effec- 
tive homage to Bartok and to Polish folk music. It has become one of the most fre- 
quently performed and recorded of his works. 

By the middle 1950s, after the death of Stalin somewhat relaxed the icy grip of 
state artistic control, Polish composers responded faster, perhaps, than those of any 
other eastern European country, and, despite the appearance of talented younger 
composers, LutosZawski assumed and retains a prominent position in contemporary 
musical life. 

Lutoslawski's work for string orchestra whose title literally means Music of Mourn- 
ing, though it is usually translated Funeral Music (1958), had an extraordinary effect 
when it was heard in the international festival called "Polish Autumn" in September 
1958. Within a year the work had been performed in many other places (including 
Boston), and LutosZawski' s name spread far abroad. 

The neo-classical approach which had dominated in his work through the 1950s 
was about to change quite dramatically— because of a chance encounter with an 
American composition. In 1960 LutosZawski happened to hear part of a radio broad- 
cast featuring the music of John Cage. All he heard was an excerpt of Cage's Con- 
certo for Piano and Orchestra, but, as he said, "those few minutes were to change my 
fife decisively." As he went on to explain, 

Composers often do not hear the music that is being played; it only serves as 
an impulse for something quite different — for the creation of music that only 
fives in their imagination. It is a sort of schizophrenia— we are listening to some- 
thing and at the same time creating something else. 

That is how it happened with Cage's Piano Concerto. While listening to it, I 
suddenly realized that I could compose music differently from that of my past. 
That I could progress toward the whole not from the little detail but the other 
way around — I could start out from the chaos and create order in it, gradually. 

Having started from the Bartokian models, often built on diatonic melodies and folk 
tunes harmonized in a nonfunctional way, he had been very gradually moving toward 
the avant-garde in works of brilliant color and evocative effect, slowly developing his 
own chromatic harmonic system, related to twelve-tone technique, but giving preemi- 
nence to a particular chord. The Funeral Music, his 1958 homage to Bela Bartok, 
marked a kind of arrival point in his work, and the early '60s saw the creation of a 
number of substantial compositions of varying character. Venetian Games (1960-61) 



21 



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22 






was the breakthrough piece of his mature style; it was performed all over the world 
following its premiere at the Venice Biennale in 1961. 

The following year Aaron Copland telephoned Lutoslawski and invited him to spend 
the summer as composer-in-residence at Tanglewood. There he met many other 
American composers, including Leon Kirchner, Lukas Foss, Irving Fine, and Arthur 
Berger. He traveled around the country after the Tanglewood season, learning about 
developments in electronic music and meeting the grand old man of the avant-garde, 
Edgard Varese. He began to create a still-growing series of remarkable mature works, 
of which the first fruits were Three Poems of Henri Michaux (begun at Tanglewood in 
1962, completed 1963), Paroles tissees (1965), and especially the brilliantly colorful 
Second Symphony (1967). 

Cage's contribution to this mature style was really just an intellectual idea rather 
than a specific musical influence: the notion of chance. During the last thirty years, 
Lutosjawski has made frequent use in his scores of "aleatoric" passages, alternating 
with explicitly composed sections. The term "aleatoric" (derived from the Latin word 
for "dice") has been used to apply to "chance music" or music that is somehow "inde- 
terminate." Cage's music, for example, may vary from one performance to the next in 
almost every detail — the kinds of musical events, choice of pitches, their volume or 
timing or character, their number, their coordination with one another, and so on. 

LutosZawski's use of chance elements is far more controlled. As he mentions in his 
commentary on the Piano Concerto (printed below), his "chance" sections are specifi- 
cally notated for each instrument with regard to the pitches to be played. Only the 
relationship with the other parts of the orchestra is not always precisely determined. 
In many of his mature pieces (including all three included on the present program), 
the sections that the conductor beats in the normal way, with all the parts "lined up," 
are contrasted with passages in a free, ad libitum rhythm, in which each instrument's 
entrance may be cued by the conductor, but the speed at which the part plays after 
that is more or less up to the individual player. Sometimes these free sections of 
"macrorhythm" are rather lengthy, sometimes quite short. They blend into one 
another in a smooth and flexible way, so that the listener may not even realize, in a 
given performance (without watching whether the conductor is beating), which sec- 
tions partake of the free rhythm. Lutosjawski refers to this kind of rhythmic section 
with the intriguing image of a "sculpture of which the material suddenly becomes 
fluid." Elsewhere, in commenting on this development, which plays some role in 
almost all of his later work, he commented, 

In my music up until the Livre pour Orchestre I realized that there was one ele- 
ment which was lacking, an aspect of my musical personality which was not rep- 
resented in my compositions — the irrational. 

The first sketches for Livre pour orchestre, which came immediately after the Sec- 
ond Symphony, came from the composer's plan to write a series of unrelated charac- 
ter pieces for orchestra, rather in the manner (though not the musical style!) of a 
Baroque suite. (Some French Baroque composers wrote "livres" of harpsichord music, 
for example.) When the commission came from the orchestra in Hagen, Lutosjawski 
used some of this material as the basis of his piece. His "book" consists of four 
"chapters" linked by interludes. The first three chapitres are quite short and of vary- 
ing character, interrupted briefly by the ad libitum sections. Each is a brilliant play 
on textures, beginning with flowing string sounds moving in quarter-tones and glis- 
sandi (sliding from one pitch to the next), interrupted by the brass, then returning to 
the strings. The first intermezzo shimmers in the kaleidoscopic rotation of three clari- 
nets. The second "chapter" is largely rhythmic in effect, beginning with pizzicato 
strings. Other instruments take part with fast-moving changes of color. The second 
intermezzo is similar to the first, but with two flutes and harp. A set rhythmic pat- 
tern determines when the string groups will enter at the beginning of the third "chap- 



23 



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ter." Brass and woodwinds, and later percussion instruments, add their own textures 
and materials. 

By now we are accustomed to hearing a brief intermezzo after the main movement. 
But this time, the intermezzo grows, takes on weight, receives commentary from a 
larger, growing number of instruments. In fact, the third intermezzo eventually builds 
to turn into the final "chapter," the climactic moment near the very end of the piece. 
What begins as "relaxation" from the main material of the piece slowly turns into 
preparation for the climax, through sustained, singing sonorities in the strings (gradu- 
ally expanding from two solo cellos at the beginning to the full string ensemble (with 
parallel passages for brass and woodwinds en route) to an intensification by means of 
small rhythmic figures played increasingly faster. This culminates in a dramatic 
moment when the entire orchestra suddenly— and for the first time in this section — 
begins to play together metrically. A series of brief pauses seems to be holding back 
the climax, but suddenly the full orchestra enters "tutta forza ma cantabile" ("full 
force, but with a singing tone"), an exhilarating outburst of energy. The brass instru- 
ments each play their final phrase, bells in the air, and gradually drop away, leaving a 
slow, hushed procession of chords in the strings, over which two flutes dialogue and 
twelve solo violins achieve a gentle, shimmering conclusion. 



Lutoslawski composed Chain 2, subtitled "Dialogue for violin and orchestra, " for Paul 
Sacher, who conducted the Collegium Musicum Zurich in the first performance on Jan- 
uary 31, 1986. The American premiere took place during the 1987 Festival of Contem- 
porary Music at Tanglewood on August 2 that year. Ronan Lefkowitz was the soloist, 
with Carl St. Clair conducting the Tanglewood Music Center Orchestra. These are the 
first performances by the Boston Symphony Orchestra. In addition to the solo violin, the 
score calls for two flutes (both doubling piccolo), two oboes (second doubling English 
horn), two clarinets (second doubling bass clarinet), two bassoons, two trumpets, two 
trombones, timpani, tubular bells, marimba, xylophone, vibraphone, five tom-toms, two 
bongos, snare drum, piano (doubling celesta), and strings. The work lasts about nine- 
teen minutes. 

Lutosjawski's music is innately colorful. In particular when dealing with a soloist 
and a large ensemble together (as here, in Chain 2), LutosZawski exploits the innate 
tensions between the characteristics of solo or chamber music (expressive freedom and 
clarity) and orchestral music (contrast, timbral variety). 

Chain 2, composed in 1985, is only one of the most recent of an extraordinary line 
of twentieth-century compositions whose existence is due to a commission from the 
Swiss conductor Paul Sacher (b.1906). Among the more than eighty works that 
Sacher commissioned and premiered are to be found Bartok's Music for Strings, Per- 
cussion, and Celesta, his Divertimento, Hindemith's Harmonie der Welt, Honegger's 
Second and Fourth symphonies, Frank Martin's Petite symphonie concertante, 
Strauss's Metamorphosen, Stravinsky's Concerto in D, and pieces by Britten, Henze, 
Malipiero, Tippett, and many others. 

By their very nature concertos tend to emphasize a dialectical approach, a form of 
argumentation between the soloist and the full ensemble. Lutosjawski's piece treats 
this aspect more explicitly, perhaps, than most concertos, in that his discourse con- 
cerns not only the conventional conflict of volume or velocity between large forces and 
small, but also the soloist's greater flexibility and expressive freedom as opposed to 
the ensemble's need to play together. 

This conflict is represented in part by the sections of the work that are rhythmi- 
cally strict on the one hand and rhythmically free on the other. Rather like the 
Baroque prelude and fugue, in which a passage of improvisatory character is followed 



25 



Week 4 



by one of very strict construction, LutosJawski divides his work into sections of rhyth- 
mic freedom {Ad libitum, "at one's pleasure"), with a kind of improvisatory character, 
and sections in which the temporal relationships are precisely noted (A battuta, "with 
the beat"). In this sense, Chain 2 comprises two cycles of freedom and strictness in 
its four movements, which alternate between "Ad libitum" and "A battuta." In the 
"Ad libitum" sections, the soloist leads the way, while the remaining instruments 
(cued, as necessary, by the conductor) comment on the violin's ruminations. The 
orchestral comments often come by section, though each of the instruments within a 
section is playing at its own pace. The metrically precise movements are vigorous and 
motoric. At the climax of the final movement, the orchestra, in one last tutti outburst 
"ad libitum" attempts to overcome the soloist, who returns with a passionate impro- 
visatory line that calms the brute forces and suddenly leads off a final, brief but bril- 
liant Presto to conclude the work." 



Lutoslawski's Concerto for Piano and Orchestra was commissioned by the Salzburg Fes- 
tival. It was first performed at the Kleines Festspielhaus in Salzburg on August 19, 
1988, by the Symphony Orchestra of the Austrian Radio, Vienna, with the composer 
conducting. Krystian Zimerman, to whom the score is dedicated, was the soloist. Zimer- 
man also gave the American premiere, with the New York Philharmonic under the 
direction of Zubin Mehta, on December 3, 1988. These are the first performances by the 
Boston Symphony Orchestra. In addition to the solo piano, the score calls for three 
flutes (second and third doubling piccolos), three oboes, three clarinets (one doubling 
E-flat clarinet, one doubling bass clarinet), three bassoons (third doubling contrabas- 
soon), four trumpets, two horns, three trombones and tuba, xylophone, three tam-tams, 
two bongos, four tom-toms, tambourine, bass drum, harp, and strings. The duration is 
about twenty-seven minutes. 

The most recent of Lutoslawski's works on this program, the Concerto for Piano 
and Orchestra is no less inventive in its treatment of the instrumental forces available 
than the earlier works, but it makes less use of the "irrational" element so prominent 
in Chain 2 and offers instead a modern equivalent of the great romantic piano con- 
certo, one of the very few to have four movements rather than three. (Its best-known 
predecessor in that regard is Brahms's Second Piano Concerto, with what its com- 
poser called a "tiny" scherzo, a jest that Lutosjawski might have made himself. 

— Steven Ledbetter 



The composer's program note for the Concerto for Piano and Orchestra appears here as 
translated from the German by Benjamin Folkman for the program book of the New 
York Philharmonic. 

My Piano Concerto is made up of four movements, which are played without pause, 
although each of these movements has its own distinct conclusion. 

The first movement consists of four segments. In the first and third of these, the 
motifs introduced are to some extent casual, light, often rather capricious, never 
totally serious. By contrast, the second and fourth segments are filled with a broad 
cantilena, which finally leads to the climax of the entire movement. 

The second movement represents a kind of moto perpetuo — a rapid "hunt" played 
by the piano against the background of the orchestra, which suddenly calms, prepar- 
ing for the third movement. 

The third movement opens with a recitative for solo piano, after which the soloist, 
still without orchestral accompaniment, intones a songful largo theme. The middle 



26 



section, which begins with the entrance of the orchestra, is distinguished from the 
opening by its more powerful, sporadically dramatic character. The cantilena, without 
orchestral accompaniment, returns to conclude this movement. 

The fourth movement, from a structural viewpoint, represents an allusion to the 
Baroque form of the chaconne. Its theme (always played by the orchestra) is made up 
of short staccato-like notes separated by pauses, and not — as in the traditional 
chaconne — of chords. This theme, repeated many times, represents only one layer of 
the musical discourse. Against this background, the piano continually introduces new 
episodes. The two layers are interwoven according to the principles of "chain-form," 
i.e., the beginnings and endings of the piano episodes do not coincide with the begin- 
nings and endings of the theme statements. Agreement is reached only once, toward 
the end of the work. For the last time, the theme appears, in shortened form (no 
pauses), and is played by full orchestra without the piano. A short piano recitative 
follows (fortissimo) against an orchestral background, after which a brief coda (Presto) 
concludes the work. 

The element of chance is given somewhat more restricted scope in the Piano Con- 
certo than in my other works. It is, as always, strictly controlled according to the 
principles of pitch-organization (harmonic, melodic, etc.). I sought to demonstrate how 
this was possible in an article published in the journal Melos (No. 1) in 1969, and I 
will not repeat the substance of my explanation here. It will be useful, however, to 
bear one point in mind: there is no improvisation in my music. Everything that is to 
be played is notated in full detail and must be precisely realized by the performers. 
The sole, though basic, difference between the ad libitum (non-conducted) sections 
and sections notated in the traditional manner (divided into bars of designated meter) 
stems from the fact that in the former case, there is no overall scheme of subdividing 
time to guide the various players. In other words, each plays his part as if he were 
playing alone and does not coordinate with the other performers. The result is a dis- 
tinctly "elastic" synthesis of complex, capricious rhythms, which cannot be produced 
by any other method. 

All of this discussion deals with an issue that is not at all of prime importance, 
namely, the means used by the composer to reach his goal. What, however, is this 
goal? To this question, only the music itself can give an answer. Fortunately, words 
cannot express it. If that were possible, if a piece of music could be precisely 
recounted in words, then music would be a wholly superfluous art. 

— Witold Lutosjawski 




27 



More . . . 

The most extended source of information in English about Witold LutosZawski is com- 
poser Steven Stucky's book Lutoslawski and His Music (Cambridge). Though the 
musical discussion is quite technical, the author's sympathetic observations are helpful 
and informative, and the biographical material is absorbing. Stucky discusses the early 
works briefly and emphasizes the works of Lutosiawski's maturity up to his cutoff date of 
1976 (which means that Chain 2 and the Piano Concerto are not mentioned). 

Lutoslawski is exceptionally well represented in the current recording catalogues, 
partly because the Polish label Muza recently issued six compact discs (available indi- 
vidually) covering a very large part of his output between 1937 and 1986. The record- 
ings were all made in live performances in Poland over the years, and the performers 
include the composer himself or his close associates, such as the conductor Witold 
Rowicki. Though the sound quality varies, the series offers an unprecedented opportu- 
nity to make the acquaintance of LutosZawski's music in depth. The performances 
are, in many cases, exciting, dramatic, powerfully of the moment. Five of the discs 



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contain orchestral works, the sixth chamber music. Here is a brief resume of the six 
discs: vol. I, Lacrimosa, for soprano, orchestra, and chorus (1937), Symphony No. 1 
(1941-47), Concerto for Orchestra (1950-54), Funeral Music, for string orchestra 
(1955-58); vol. II, Venetian Games, for chamber orchestra (1961), Trois poemes 
d'Henri Michaux, for mixed chorus and orchestra (1963), and Symphony No. 2 
(1965-67); vol. Ill, Postludium No. 1 for orchestra (1958), Paroles tissees, for tenor, 
strings, harp, piano, and percussion (1965), Cello Concerto (1970), and Livre pour 
orchestre (1968); vol. IV, Preludes and Fugue for thirteen solo strings (1972), 
Mi-Parti for orchestra (1976), and Novelette for orchestra (1979); vol. V, Symphony 
No. 3 (1972-3), Chain 1 (1983), Chain 2 (1984), and Chain 3 (1986); vol. VI, Two 
Studies for piano (1940-41), Variations on a Theme of Paganini, for two pianos 
(1943), Five Songs for soprano and orchestra (1956-57), String Quartet (1965), 
Epitaph, for oboe and piano (1979), Grave, for cello and piano (1981), and Partita 
for violin and piano (1984). 

Works not included in the Muza series that have been recorded and deserve men- 
tion include the Dance Preludes for clarinet, harp, piano, percussion, and string 
orchestra (1955), and the Concerto for oboe, harp, and chamber orchestra (1980), 
available in performances conducted by the composer with the Bavarian Radio 
Orchestra and Eduard Brunner as the soloist in the former, Heinz and Ursula Hol- 
liger in the latter; the same disc includes a splendid performance by Heinrich Schiff of 
the Cello Concerto (Philips). (In terms of the number of recordings alone, the Dance 
Preludes is the number one hit of Lutoslawski's output, being represented by no fewer 
than seven different recorded performances in the current catalogue. Next most popu- 
lar is the Concerto for Orchestra, which, in addition to the recording in vol. I of the 
Muza series, is available in a performance by the Cleveland Orchestra under Chris- 
toph von Dohnanyi (London, coupled with Bartok's Concerto for Orchestra) and by 
the Oregon Symphony Orchestra under James DePriest (Delos, coupled with 
Respighi's Feste romane and Strauss's Don Juan). 

Les Espaces du sommeil, for baritone and orchestra (1975) enjoys two fine recorded 
performances, one with Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau (who commissioned the piece) and 
the Berlin Philharmonic conducted by the composer (Philips), the other by John 
Shirley-Quirk and the Los Angeles Philharmonic conducted by Esa-Pekka Salonen 
(CBS); both are coupled with strong performances of the Third Symphony; Salonen's 
CD also includes a brilliant recording of Messiaen's Turangalila Symphony. Chain 2 
has been recorded by Anne-Sophie Mutter with the composer conducting the BBC 
Symphony Orchestra (DG); the same disc also includes LutosZawski's Partita for vio- 
lin, orchestra, and obbligato piano and Stravinsky's Violin Concerto. 

-S.L. 



29 



Week 4 







Congratulations to the 
Boston Symphony Orchestra 
on yet another wonderful 
season of magical music. 

Jordan marsh 

A TRADITION SINCE 1851 



30 




Ronan Lefkowitz 

Born in Oxford, England, Ronan Lefkowitz joined the Boston Sym- 
phony Orchestra in 1976. Mr. Lefkowitz is a graduate of Brookline 
High School and Harvard College. His most notable teachers 
included Gerald Gelbloom, Max Rostal, Luise Vosgerchian, Joseph 
Silverstein, and Szymon Goldberg. While in high school he was con- 
certmaster of and a frequent soloist with the Greater Boston Youth 
Symphony Orchestra. He was also concertmaster of the Interna- 
tional Youth Symphony Orchestra under Leopold Stokowski. In 
1972 Mr. Lefkowitz won the Gingold- Silverstein Prize at the Tan- 
glewood Music Center, where he is now a part-time faculty mem- 
ber. In 1984 he helped establish and endow the Gerald Gelbloom Fellowship for a student 
of violin at the Tanglewood Music Center. Also in 1984 he was featured on the PBS televi- 
sion program "Evening at Pops" as a soloist with three of his Boston Symphony colleagues 
in a performance of Vivaldi's Concerto for Four Violins. In 1986 Mr. Lefkowitz joined the 
contemporary music group Collage. The following summer he performed the American pre- 
miere of Witold Lutos/awski's Chain 2 for violin and chamber orchestra as part of the 
annual Festival of Contemporary Music at Tanglewood; as a result, he was invited to per- 
form the piece on this week's Boston Symphony concerts under the composer's direction. 
Most recently, Mr. Lefkowitz has been involved with the Terezin Chamber Music Founda- 
tion, directed by BSO colleague Mark Ludwig, which seeks to find, perform, and record 
music written in the early 1940s by such composers as Gideon Klein, Hans Krasa, Viktor 
Ullmann, and Pavel Haas during their internment at the Theresienstadt concentration 
camp. Last month Mr. Lefkowitz recorded two compact discs of chamber music by Arthur 
Foote and Samuel Coleridge-Taylor for Koch International with Harold Wright, Virginia 
Eskin, and the Hawthorne String Quartet, of which he is first violinist, and which will tour 
Europe in January with Terezin Foundation repertoire. Mr. Lefkowitz has recently partici- 
pated in two concerts with Yo-Yo Ma: a benefit at Harvard last spring for Philips Brooks 
House, and a Tanglewood performance of the Ives Piano Trio with Gilbert Kalish this past 
summer. 



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■■.■■■■■"■■"■■■, 






Dear Patron of the Orchestra: 

For many years the Boston Sym- 
phony Orchestra has been known 
as the "aristocrat of American 
orchestras." There is indeed a 
distinctive "BSO sound" that has 
earned worldwide acclaim and has 
attracted the greatest musicians to 
audition for membership in the 
orchestra. 



An important ingredient in the 
creation of this unique sound is 
having the finest musical instruments 
on the BSO's stage. However, the cost of many of these instruments 
(especially in the string sections) has become staggeringly high, and it is 
incumbent upon the Symphony to take steps to assure that musicians in 
key positions who do not themselves own great instruments have access 
to them for use in the orchestra. 




Two recent initiatives have been taken to address this concern: First, in 
1988, the Boston Safe Deposit and Trust Company stepped forward 
with a creative loan program that is making it possible for players to 
borrow at one and a half percent below prime to purchase instruments. 
Second, last fall, the incentive of a Kresge Foundation challenge grant 
helped launch our effort to raise a fund of $1 million for the Orchestra 
to draw upon from time to time to purchase instruments for use by the 
players. The BSO in this case would retain ownership. 

Donations of both outright gifts and instruments are being sought to 
establish the BSO's Instrument Acquisition Fund. Fine pianos, 
period instruments, special bows, heirloom violins, etc. all make 
ideal gifts. Opportunities for naming instruments and for other 
forms of donor recognition may be available according to the wishes 
of the donor. 

If you are interested in this program please contact me or Joyce Serwitz 
in the orchestra's Development Office at (617) 638-9273. Your support 
will help make a difference that will be music to our ears! 

George H. Kidder 
President 






32 




Anthony di Bonaventura 

Anthony di Bonaventura has performed in twenty-five countries, 
appearing in recital and with such major orchestras as the Phila- 
delphia Orchestra, the New York Philharmonic, the Chicago Sym- 
phony, the Pittsburgh Symphony, the Royal Philharmonic, and the 
Vienna Symphony. He is making his Boston Symphony Orchestra 
debut with this week's performances. He has appeared on Lincoln 
_ Center's "Great Performers" series and at the festivals of Ann 
^^g4fl[ ^^r A I Arbor, Saratoga, Bergen, Graz, Spoleto, Lucca, Zagreb, Donaue- 
I schingen, and Almeida. During his second tour of Australia he was 
H ■ I soloist for the concerts that opened the Sydney Opera House. This 
season, his concert schedule includes recitals and orchestral performances throughout the 
United States. In October 1986, Mr. di Bonaventura gave the world premiere of the Ligeti 
Concerto with Leonard Slatkin and the Saint Louis Symphony in St. Louis, New Haven, 
and Carnegie Hall. Other composers who have written expressly for him include Vincent 
Persichetti, Luciano Berio, Milko Kelemen, and Alberto Ginastera. Mr. di Bonaventura 
was soloist for the Netherlands premiere of Witold LutosZawski's Piano Concerto in 
November 1989 with the Rotterdam Philharmonic in Rotterdam and The Hague; Messrs. 
LutosZawski and di Bonaventura will collaborate in the concerto again next month in 
Vienna, with the Polish National Radio Symphony Orchestra. Mr. di Bonaventura has 
recorded for Columbia, RCA, the Connoisseur Society, and Sine Qua Non; his album of 
Debussy Etudes has won particular acclaim. Acknowledged as a master teacher of interna- 
tional stature, Mr. di Bonaventura is professor of music and chairman of the piano depart- 
ment at Boston University's School for the Arts and founder-director of the Piano Insti- 
tute at Colby College in Maine. He has given master classes at such institutions as 
U.C.L.A., the University of Michigan, the Eastman School of Music, the University of Tor- 
onto, and the Yamaha School in Singapore. Anthony di Bonaventura began studying piano 
at three, gave his first professional concert at four, won a scholarship to New York's Music 
School Settlement at six, and appeared as soloist with the New York Philharmonic at thir- 
teen. He became a pupil of Isabelle Vengerova at sixteen and later entered the Curtis 
Institute, from which he graduated with highest honors. He won enthusiastic acclaim from 
both critics and audiences early in his career; his performances in an early European tour 
led to his selection by Otto Klemperer to perform the complete Beethoven concertos at the 
London Beethoven Festival. 



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33 



BUSINESS 




Business and Professional 
Leadership Association 



The Boston Symphony Orchestra wishes to acknowledge this distinguished group of 
corporations and professional organizations for their outstanding and exemplary 
support of the orchestra's needs during the past or current fiscal year. 



CORPORATE SPONSORSHIPS 
$25,000 and above 

Digital Equipment Corporation 

Boston Pops Orchestra Public Television Broadcasts 

NEC 

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Boston Symphony Orchestra European Tour 1991 

NYNEX Corporation 
WCVB-TV, Channel 5 Boston and WCRB 102.5 FM 

Salute to Symphony 1990 

The Boston Company 

Opening Night At Symphony 1990 

BayBanks, Inc. 

Opening Night at Pops 1990 

Lexus 
A Division of Toyota Motor Sales U.S.A., Inc. 

Tanglewood Opening Night 1990 

TDK Electronics Corporation 

Tanglewood Tickets for Children 1990 

Bank of Boston 
Country Curtains and The Red Lion Inn 

BSO Single Concert Sponsors 1990 



For information on these and other corporate funding opportunities, contact 
Madelyne Cuddeback, BSO Director of Corporate Sponsorships, Symphony Hall, 
Boston, MA 02115, (617) 638-9254. 



34 










1990-91 Business Honor Roll ($10,000 and Above) 


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Dean T. Langford 


Bank of Boston 


Hill, Holliday, Connors, Cosmopulos, Inc. 


Ira Stepanian 


Jack Connors, Jr. 


Barter Connections 


The Henley Group 


Kenneth C. Barron 


Paul M. Montrone 


BayBanks, Inc. 


Houghton Mifflin Company 


William M. Crozier, Jr. 


Nader F. Darehshori 


Bingham, Dana & Gould 


IBM Corporation 


Joseph Hunt 


Paul J. Palmer 


Bolt Beranek & Newman 


John Hancock Mutual Life Insurance Company 


Stephen R. Levy 


E. James Morton 


The Boston Company 


Lexus 


Christopher M. Condron 


A Division of Toyota Motor Sales, U.S.A., Inc. 


Boston Edison Company 


J. Davis Ulingworth 


Stephen J. Sweeney 


Liberty Mutual Insurance Group 


The Boston Globe 


Gary L. Countryman 


William 0. Taylor 


Loomis-Sayles & Company, Inc. 


Boston Herald 


Charles J. Finlayson 


Patrick J. Purcell 


McKinsey & Company 


Bull HN Information Systems, Inc. 


Robert P. O'Block 


Roland D. Pampel 


Morse Shoe, Inc. 


Cahners Publishing Company 


Manuel Rosenberg 


Ron Segel 


NEC Corporation 


Connell Limited Partnership 


Tadahiro Sekimoto 


William F. Connell 






NEC Deutschland GmbH 


Coopers & Lybrand 


Masao Takahashi 


William K. O'Brien 






Nestle-Hills Brothers Coffee Company 


Country Curtains 


Ned Dean 


Jane P. Fitzpatrick 





Delia Femina, McNamee, Inc. 
Michael H. Reingold 

Deloitte & Touche 
James T. McBride 

Digital Equipment Corporation 
Kenneth G. Olsen 

Dynatech Corporation 
J. P. Barger 

Eastern Enterprises 
Ronald S. Ziemba 

EG&G, Inc. 
John M. Kucharski 

The First Boston Corporation 
Malcolm MacColl 

General Cinema Corporation 
Richard A. Smith 



The New England 
Edward E. Phillips 

New England Telephone Company 
Paul C. O'Brien 

Northern Telecom, Inc. 
Brian Davis 

Nynex Corporation 
William C. Ferguson 

PaineWebber, Inc. 
James F. Cleary 

KPMG Peat Marwick 
Robert D. Happ 

Polaroid Corporation 
I.M. Booth 

Prudential-Bache Capital Funding 
David F. Remington 

35 



1990-91 Business Honor Roll (continued) 



Raytheon Company 
Thomas L. Phillips 

The Red Lion Inn 
John H. Fitzpatrick 

Shawmut Bank, N.A. 
John P. Hamill 

The Stop & Shop Companies, Inc. 
Lewis Schaeneman 



TDK Electronics Corporation 
Takashi Tsujii 

USTrust 
James V. Sidell 

WCRB-102.5 FM 
Richard L. Kaye 

WCVB-TV, Channel 5 Boston 
S. James Coppersmith 



Dinner at 6. 

Symphony at 8. 

Parking at $ 5. 

Make dinner at Boodle's part of 
your night out at the Symphony. 
When you do, you'll not only enjoy 
an award winning dining experi- 
ence from Boston's authentic grill, 
you'll also get special parking 
privileges at the Back Bay Hilton's 
private garage. 

Just show us your tickets at dinner 
on the night of the performance 
and park your car for just $5. And 
with a deal like that, a night at the 
Symphony never sounded better. 



BOODLE'S 

OF • BOSTON 

An Authentic Grill 

Lunch and dinner daily. In Boston's Back Bay Hilton. 
Phone (617) BOODLES. 



St. (Botptvfi Restaurant 



*H! gild 



A Charming 19th Century Brick 
Townhouse serving fine continental 
cuisine in contemporary informal elegance. 
Offering lunch and dinner with a variety 
of fresh seafood specials daily. Located 
minutes away from Huntington Theatre 
and Symphony Hall. 

99 St. Botolph Street 266-3030 
behind the Colonnade Hotel 

Daily 11:30 - Midnight 



"Nationally Outstanding" 

-Esquire Magazine 




Serving Dinner Nightly 



In The Charles Hotel 
One Bennett at Eliot Street 
Cambridge, MA 02138 
Reservations (617) 864-1200 



36 



BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONAL LEADERSHIP ASSOCIATION 



The Boston Symphony Orchestra gratefully acknowledges these Business Leaders for their 
generous and valuable support totaling $1,250 and above during the past fiscal year. Names 
which are both capitalized and underscored in this listing make up the Business Honor Roll 
denoting support of $10,000 and above. Capitalization denotes support of $5,000-$9,999, and 
an asterisk indicates support of $2,500-$4,999. 



Accountants 

ARTHUR ANDERSEN & CO. 
William F. Meagher 

''Charles E. DiPesa & Company 
William F. DiPesa 

COOPERS & LYBRAND 



William K. O'Brien 
DELOITTE & TOUCHE 



James T. McBride 
ERNST & YOUNG 



Thomas M. Lankford 

KMPG PEAT MARWICK 
! Robert D. Happ 

r Theodore S. Samet & Company 
Theodore S. Samet 

Tofias, Fleishman, Shapiro 
& Company 
Tony Lao 

Advertising/Public Relations 

'Arnold Advertising 
Edward Eskandarian 

DELLA FEMINA, MCNAMEE, 
INC. 

Michael H. Reingold 

Elysee Public Relations 
Tanya Keller Dowd 

HILL, HOLLIDAY, CONNORS, 



COSMOPULOS, INC. 



Jack Connors, Jr. 

Ingalls, Quinn & Johnson 
Bink Garrison 

Aerospace 

'Northrop Corporation 
Kent Kresa 

Architects 

Cambridge Seven Associates 
Charles Redman 

LEA Group 
Eugene R. Eisenberg 

Automotive 

J.N. Phillips Glass 
Company, Inc. 
Alan L. Rosenfeld 

Lexus 

A Division of Toyota Motor 
Sales U.S.A., Inc. 
J. Davis Illingworth 



Banking 

BANK OF BOSTON 
Ira Stepanian 

*Bank of New England 
Corporation 
Lawrence K. Fish 

*Baybanks, Inc. 
William M. Crozier, Jr. 

THE BOSTON COMPANY 
Christopher M. Condron, Jr. 

Cambridge Trust Company 
Lewis H. Clark 

CITICORP/CITIBANK 
Walter E. Mercer 

First National Bank of Chicago 
Robert E. Gallery 

* Rockland Trust Company 

John F. Spence, Jr. 

SHAWMUT BANK, NLA. 
John P. Hamill 

* State Street Bank & 
Trust Company 

William S. Edgerly 

USTRUST 
James V. Sidell 

Wainwright Bank & Trust Company 
John M. Plukas 



Building/Contracting 

*Harvey Industries, Inc. 
Frederick Bigony 

J.F. White Contracting Company 
Philip Bonanno 

Lee Kennedy Co., Inc. 
Lee M. Kennedy 

*Moliterno Stone Sales, Inc. 
Kenneth A. Castellucci 

* National Lumber Company 
Louis L. Kaitz 

PERINI CORPORATION 
David B. Perini 



Consumer Goods/Distributors 

BARTER CONNECTIONS 
Kenneth C. Barron 

FAIRWINDS GOURMET COFFEE 
COMPANY 
Michael J. Sullivan 



Lindenmeyr Munroe 

NESTLE-HILLS BROTHERS 
COFFEE COMPANY 
Ned Dean 

O'Donnell-Usen Fisheries 
Arnold S. Wolf 

Welch's 
Everett N. Baldwin 



Education 

BENTLEY COLLEGE 
Gregory Adamian 

Electrical/HVAC 

*p.h. mechanical Corporation 
Paul A. Hayes 

*R & D Electrical Company, Inc. 
Richard D. Pedone 

Electronics 

Alden Electronics, Inc. 
Joseph Girouard 

*Analytical Systems 
Engineering Corporation 
Michael B. Rukin 

PARLEX CORPORATION 
Herbert W. Pollack 

Energy 

CABOT CORPORATION 
Samuel W. Bodman 

Engineering 

Goldberg-Zoino & Associates, Inc. 
Donald T. Goldberg 

The Thompson & Lichtner 
Company, Inc. 
John D. Stelling 

Entertainment/Media 

GENERAL CINEMA CORPORATION 
Richard A. Smith 

National Amusements, Inc. 
Sumner M. Redstone 



Finance /Venture Capital 

f 3i Corporation 
Ivan N. Momtchiloff 




Carson Limited Partnership 
Herbert Carver 

THE FIRST BOSTON 
CORPORATION 
Malcolm MacColl 

GE CAPITAL CORPORATE 
FINANCE GROUP 
Richard A. Goglia 

KRUPP COMPANIES 

George Krupp 



Food Service/Industry 

Au Bon Pain 
Louis I. Kane 

* Boston Showcase Company 
Jason E. Starr 

Cordel Associates, Inc. 
James B. Hangstefer 

Johnson O'Hare Co., Inc. 
Harry O'Hare 



Footwear 

Converse, Inc. 
Gilbert Ford 

J. Baker, Inc. 
Sherman N. Baker 

*Jones & Vining, Inc. 
Sven A. Vaule, Jr. 

MORSE SHOE, INC. 
Manuel Rosenberg 

* Reebok International Ltd. 
Paul Fireman 

*The Rockport Corporation 
Anthony Tiberii 

THE STRIDE RITE 
CORPORATION 

Arnold S. Hiatt 



Furnishings/Housewares 

ARLEY MERCHANDISE 
CORPORATION 
David I. Riemer 

BBF Corporation 
Boruch B. Frusztajer 

COUNTRY CURTAINS 
Jane P. Fitzpatrick 

*Jofran Sales, Inc. 
Robert D. Roy 

Graphic Design 

CLARK/LINSKY DESIGN 
Robert H. Linsky 

INDEPENDENT DESIGN 
Patrick White 



High Technology/Electronics 

Alden Products Company 
Betsy Alden 

ANALOG DEVICES, INC. 
Ray Stata 

*Aritech Corp. 
James A. Synk 

Automatic Data Processing 
Arthur S. Kranseler 

BOLT BERANEK AND 

NEWMAN, INC. 



Stephen R. Levy 

BULL HN INFORMATION 
SYSTEMS, INC. 
Roland D. Pampel 

*Cerberus Technologies, Inc. 
George J. Grabowski 

Costar Corporation 
Otto Morningstar 

CSC PARTNERS, INC. 
Paul J. Crowley 

DIGITAL EQUIPMENT 
CORPORATION 

Kenneth G. Olsen 

DYNATECH CORPORATION 
J.P. Barger 

EG&G, INC. 
John M. Kucharski 

EMC CORPORATION 
Richard J. Egan 

Helix Technology Corporation 
Robert J. Lepofsky 

THE HENLEY GROUP 
Paul M. Montrone 

HEWLETT PACKARD COMPANY 
Ben L. Holmes 

IBM CORPORATION 
Paul J. Palmer 

*Intermetrics Inc. 
Joseph A. Saponaro 

IONICS, INC. 
Arthur L. Goldstein 

* Lotus Development Corporation 

Jim P. Manzi 

*M/A-Com, Inc. 
Robert H. Glaudel 

MILLIPORE CORPORATION 

John A. Gilmartin 

*The MITRE Corporation 
Charles A. Zraket 

NEC CORPORATION 
Tadahiro Sekimoto 

NEC DEUTSCHLAND GmbH 
Masao Takahasi 

* Orion Research, Inc. 

Alexander Jenkins III 



POLAROID CORPORATION 
I.M. Booth 

PRIME COMPUTER, INC. 
John Shields 

*Printed Circuit Corporation 
Peter Sarmanian 

RAYTHEON COMPANY 
Thomas L. Phillips 

SofTech, Inc. 
Justus Lowe, Jr. 

*TASC 
Arthur Gelb 

TDK ELECTRONICS 
CORPORATION 

Takashi Tsujii 

THERMO ELECTRON 
CORPORATION 

George N. Hatsopoulos 

XRE Corporation 
John K. Grady 



Hotels/Restaurants 

57 Park Plaza Hotel 
Nicholas L. Vinios 

*Back Bay Hilton 
Carol Summerfield 

*Boston Marriott Copley Place 
Jurgen Giesbert 

THE RED LION INN 
John H. Fitzpatrick 

*Sheraton Boston Hotel & Towers 
Steve Foster 

*Sonesta International 
Hotels Corporation 
Paul Sonnabend 

*The Westin Hotel, Copley Place 
David King 

Industrial Distributors 

*Alles Corporation 
Stephen S. Berman 

Brush Fibers, Inc. 
Ian P. Moss 

* Eastern Refractories Company 
David S. Feinzig 

Millard Metal Service Center 
Donald Millard, Jr. 



Insurance 

*American Title Insurance Company 
Terry E. Cook 

*Arkwright 
Enzo Rebula 

Caddell & Byers 
John Dolan 



38 



CAMERON & COLBY CO., INC. 
Lawrence S. Doyle 

♦Charles H. Watkins & Company 
Paul D. Bertrand 

Chubb Group of Insurance Cos. 
John Gillespie 

FRANK B. HALL & CO. OF 
MASSACHUSETTS, INC. 
William F. Newell 

'International Insurance Group 
John Perkins 

JOHN HANCOCK MUTUAL 
LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY 
E. James Morton 

♦Johnson & Higgins of 
Massachusetts, Inc. 
Robert A. Cameron 

'Keystone Provident Life 
Insurance Company 
Robert G. Sharp 

Lexington Insurance Company 
Kevin H. Kelley 

LIBERTY MUTUAL INSURANCE 



GROUP 



Gary L. Countryman 
THE NEW ENGLAND 



Edward E. Phillips 

SAFETY INSURANCE COMPANY 
Richard B. Simches 

Sedgwick James of 
New England, Inc. 
P. Joseph McCarthy 

Sullivan Risk Management Group 
John H. Sullivan 

Sun Life Assurance Company 
of Canada 
Paul Vaskas 

Investments 

Baring International Investment, Ltd. 
John F. McNamara 

Bear Stearns & Company, Inc. 
Keith H. Kretschmer 

Essex Investment Management 
Company, Inc. 
Joseph C. McNay 

♦Goldman, Sachs & Company 
Peter D. Kiernan 

KAUFMAN & COMPANY 
Sumner Kaufman 

LOOMIS-SAYLES & COMPANY, 



INC. 
Charles J. Finlayson 

PAINEWEBBER, INC. 



James F. Cleary 

PAINEWEBBER CAPITAL 
MARKETS 
Joseph F. Patton 



SALOMON INC. 
John V. Carberry 

♦Spaulding Investment Company 
C.H. Spaulding 

♦State Street Development 
Management Corp. 
John R. Gallagher III 

TUCKER ANTHONY, INC. 
John Goldsmith 

Whitman & Evans, Art Investments 
Eric F. Mourlot 

♦Woodstock Corporation 
Nelson J. Darling, Jr. 

Legal 

BINGHAM, DANA & GOULD 
Joseph Hunt 

♦Choate, Hall & Stewart 
Robert Gargill 

Dickerman Law Offices 
Lola Dickerman 

♦Fish & Richardson 
Robert E. Hillman 

♦Gaston & Snow 

Richard J. Santagati 

GOLDSTEIN & MANELLO 
Richard J. Snyder 

GOODWIN, PROCTER AND HOAR 
Robert B. Fraser 

♦Hemenway & Barnes 
John J. Madden 

Hubbard & Ferris 
Charles A. Hubbard 

♦Joyce & Joyce 
Thomas J. Joyce 

♦Lynch, Brewer, Hoffman & Sands 
Owen B. Lynch 

MINTZ, LEVTN, COHN, FERRIS, 
GLOVSKY & POPEO, P.C. 
Francis X. Meaney 

Nissenbaum Law Offices 
Gerald L. Nissenbaum 

♦Nutter, McClennen & Fish 
John K P. Stone III 

PALMER & DODGE 
Robert E. Sullivan 

♦Rackemann, Sawyer & Brewster 
Stephen Carr Anderson 

Sarrouf, Tarricone & Flemming 
Camille F. Sarrouf 

Weiss, Angoff, Coltin, Koski & 
Wolf, P.C. 
Dudley A. Weiss 

Management/Financial/Consulting 

ADVANCED MANAGEMENT 
ASSOCIATES 
Harvey Chet Krentzman 

39 



♦Bain & Company, Inc. 
William W. Bain 

THE BOSTON CONSULTING 
GROUP 
Jonathan L. Isaacs 

♦Corporate Decisions 
David J. Morrison 

♦Haynes Management, Inc. 
G. Arnold Haynes 

Index Group 
David G. Robinson 

Irma Mann Strategic Marketing 
Irma Mann Stearns 

Jason M. Cortell 
& Associates, Inc. 
Jason M. Cortell 

Lochridge & Company, Inc. 
Richard K. Lochridge 

MCKINSEY & COMPANY 
Robert P. O'Block 

Merrill Lynch & Co., Inc. 
Paul Fahrenbach 

The Pioneer Group, Inc. 
John F. Cogan, Jr. 

PRUDENTIAL-BACHE 
CAPITAL FUNDING 
David F. Remington 

♦Rath & Strong 
Dan Ciampa 

♦Towers Perrin 

J. Russell Southworth 

♦William M. Mercer, Inc. 
Chester D. Clark 

♦The Wyatt Company 
Paul R. Daoust 

Yankelovich Clancy Shulman 
Kevin Clancy 



Manufacturer's Representatives 

''Ben Mac Enterprises 
Larry Benhardt 
Thomas McAuliffe 

"Paul R. Cahn Associates, Inc. 
Paul R. Cahn 



Manufacturing/Industry 

♦AGFA Corporation 
Ken Draeger 

♦AMCEL Corporation 
Lloyd Gordon 

♦Avedis Zildjian Company 
Armand Zildjian 

The Biltrite Corporation 
Stanley J. Bernstein 

Boston Acoustics, Inc. 
Frank Reed 



'C.R. Bard, Inc. 
Robert H. McCaffrey 



* Century Manufacturing Company 
Joseph Tiberio 

*Chelsea Industries, Inc. 
Ronald G. Casty 



Media 

THE BOSTON GLOBE 
William 0. Taylor 

BOSTON HERALD 



Patrick J. Purcell 

PEOPLE MAGAZINE 
CONNELL LIMITED PARTNERSHIP Peter Krieger 

William F. Connell " WCRB _ 102-5FM 

Dennison Manufacturing Company 

Nelson G. Gifford 



Richard L. Kaye 
WCVB-TY, CHANNEL 5 BOSTON 



ERVING PAPER MILLS 
Charles B. Housen 

*FLEXcon Company, Inc. 
Mark R. Ungerer 

* Georgia-Pacific Corp. 

Maurice W. Kring 

THE GILLETTE COMPANY 
Colman M. Mockler, Jr. 

GTE PRODUCTS CORPORATION 
Dean T. Langford 

HARVARD FOLDING BOX 
COMPANY, INC. 
Melvin A. Ross 

H.K. Webster Company, Inc. 
Dean K. Webster 

*HMK Group Companies, Ltd. 
Joan L. Karol 

Hudson Lock, Inc. 
Norman Stavisky 

""Industrial Filter and Equipment 
Corporation 
Donald R. Patnode 

Kendall Company 
J. Dale Sherratt 

LEACH & GARNER COMPANY 
Philip F. Leach 

Leggett & Piatt, Inc. 
Alexander M. Levine 

NEW ENGLAND BUSINESS 
SERVICE, INC. 
Richard H. Rhoads 

*Parks Corporation 
Lee Davidson 

* Pierce Aluminum 

Robert W. Pierce 

*Statler Tissue Company 
Leonard Sugerman 

Superior Brands, Inc. 
Richard J. Phelps 

*Tech Pak, Inc. 
J. William Flynn 

Textron, Inc. 
B.F. Dolan 

Wire Belt Company of America 
F. Wade Greer 



S. James Coppersmith 



Personnel 

TAD TECHNICAL SERVICES 
CORPORATION 
David J. McGrath, Jr. 



Printing 

*Bowne of Boston, Inc. 
Donald J. Cannava 

Customforms, Inc. 
David A. Granoff 

DANIELS PRINTING COMPANY 
Lee S. Daniels 

*Espo Litho Co., Inc. 
David M. Fromer 

George H. Dean Company 
Earl Michaud 

GRAFACON, INC. 
H. Wayman Rogers, Jr. 



Publishing 

Addison-Wesley Publishing Company, 
Inc. 
Warren R. Stone 

CAHNERS PUBLISHTNG COMPANY 
Ron Segel 

HOUGHTON MIFFLIN COMPANY 
Nader F. Darehshori 

Little, Brown & Company 
Kevin L. Dolan 



Real Estate/Development 

* Boston Capital Partners 

Christopher W. Collins 
Herbert F. Collins 
Richard J. DeAgazio 
John P. Manning 

* Combined Properties, Inc. 

Stanton L. Black 

*The Flatley Company 
Thomas J. Flatley 

Heafitz Development Company 
Lewis Heafitz 



Hilon Development Corporation 
Joan Eliachar 

* John M. Corcoran & Company 
John M. Corcoran 

Keller Co., Inc. 
Joseph P. Keller 

*Leggat McCall Properties, Inc. 
Dennis F. Callahan 

Northland Investment Corporation 
Robert A. Danziger 

Tetlow Realty Associates 
Richard J. Gilbert 

*Trammell Crow Company 
Arthur DeMartino 

Urban Investment & Development 
Rudy K. Umscheid 

*Windsor Building Associates 
Mona F. Freedman 



Retail 

*Channel Home Centers, Inc. 
Malcolm L. Sherman 

FILENE'S 
David P. Mullen 

* Jordan Marsh Company 
Richard F. Van Pelt 

Karten's Jewelers 
Joel Karten 

*Neiman Marcus 
William D. Roddy 

Out of Town News, Inc. 
Sheldon Cohen 

*Saks Fifth Avenue 
Alison Strieder Mayher 

THE STOP & SHOP COMPANIES, 
INC. 
Lewis Schaeneman 

TJX COMPANIES 
Ben Cammarata 



Science/Medical 

Baldpate Hospital, Inc. 
Lucille M. Batal 

Blake & Blake Genealogists 
Richard A. Blake, Jr. 

CHARLES RD7ER 
LABORATORIES, INC. 
Henry L. Foster 

"CompuChem Corporation 
Gerard Kees Verkerk 

J.A. WEBSTER, INC. 
John A. Webster 

"Portsmouth Regional Hospital 
William J. Schuler 



40 




;ie.\ 



A TRADITION OF FINANCIAL COUNSEL 
OLDER THAN THE U.S. DOLLAR. 

State Street has been providing quality financial service since 1792. 

That's two years longer than the dollar has been the official currency of 
the United States. 

During that time, we have managed the assets of some of New 
England's wealthiest families. And provided investment advice and 
performance tailored to each client's individual goals and needs. 

Today our Personal Trust Division can extend that service to you. 

We've been helping people manage their money for almost 200 years. 
And you can only stay in business that long by offering advice of the 
highest quality. 

Let us help you get the highest performance from your assets. To enjoy 
today and to pass on to future generations. 

For more information contact Peter Talbot at 617-654-3227. 

State Street. Known for quality? 



Estate Street 



State Street Bank and Trust Company, wholly-owned subsidiary of State Street Boston Corporation, 

225 Franklin Street, Boston, MA 02101. Offices in Boston, New York, Los Angeles, London, Munich, Brussels, 

Tokyo, Sydney, Hong Kong. Member FDIC. Copyright State Street Boston Corporation, 1989. 









^*NT TO %^ 



Carleton-Willard Village is 
an exceptional continuing 
care retirement community. 
Gracious independent living 
accommodations and fully 
licensed, long-term health 
care facilities exist in a 
traditional New England 
environment. 

CARUTON-WlliARD VILLAGE 
100 Old Billerica Rd. 
Bedford, MA 01730 
(617) 275-8700 

Owned and operated by Carleton-Willard 
Homes, Inc., a non-profit corporation 






Services 

*Don Law Productions 
Don Law 

EASTERN ENTERPRISES 

Ronald S. Ziemba 

*Giltspur Exhibits/Boston 
Thomas E. Knott 

Shaughnessy & Ahern Co. 
John J. Shaughnessy 

Wild Acre Inns, Inc. 
Bernard S. Yudowitz 



Software/Information Services 

* International Data Group 
Patrick J. McGovern 

*Phoenix Technologies Foundation 
Neil Colvin 



Travel/Transportation 

* Crimson Travel Service/ 
Thomas Cook 

David Paresky 

* Heritage Travel, Inc. 

Donald R. Sohn 



Telec ommunic ations 

AT&T 
Robert Babbitt 

*AT&T 

Glenn Swift 

AT&T NETWORK SYSTEMS 
John F. McKinnon 

CELLULAR ONE 
Charles Hoffman 



NEW ENGLAND TELEPHONE 
COMPANY 
Paul C. O'Brien 

NORTHERN TELECOM, INC. 
Brian Davis 

NYNEX CORPORATION 

William C. Ferguson 

Utilities 

BOSTON EDISON COMPANY 

Stephen J. Sweeney 

New England Electric System 
Joan T. Bok 



You are cordially invited to sample, our 

Symphony (Menu 

at 

The Cafe (Promenade 




(For "Reservations Call, 617-424-7000 

Reduced partying rates when dining at c The Colonnade for 

Symphony Matrons. 



W/sfl 



The Colonnade, Hotel is located at 120 Huntington Avenue, Boston 



41 





Without You y 
This Is The Whole Picture, 



This year, there is an $11 million difference 
between what the BSO will earn — and what 
we must spend to make our music. 

Your gift to the Boston Symphony Annual 
Fund will help us make up that difference. 

It will help us continue to fund outreach, 



educational and youth programs, and to attract 
the world's finest musicians and guest artists. 

Make your generous gift to the Annual 
Fund — and become a Friend of the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra today. Because without 
you, the picture begins to fade. 



r 



~i 



Yes, I want to keep great music alive. 

I'd like to become a Friend of the BSO for the 1990-91 season. (Friends' benefits 

begin at $50.) Enclosed is my check for $ payable to the Boston 

Symphony Annual Fund. 



Name 



Tel. 



Address. 
City 



State 



Zip 



L 



Please send your contribution to: Susan E. Tomlin, Director of Annual Giving, 

Boston Symphony Orchestra, Symphony Hall, Boston, MA 02115. 

A portion of your gift may not be tax-deductible. For information call (617) 638-9251. 




KEEP GREAT MUSIC AU VE 



_l 



42 



I 



/Boston 

Symphony 

Annual 

Fun 



KEEP GREAT MUSIC ALIVE 



The Higginson Society 

The Boston Symphony Orchestra is grateful to 
the following contributors for their generous sup- 
port during the 1989-90 season. These patrons 
have each donated $1,500 or more to either the 
Boston Symphony Annual Fund or one or more 
of the Capital Gift programs. Gifts to the 
Annual Fund are unrestricted and are applied 
directly to the Orchestra's operating budget. 
Capital Gifts are restricted and may be added to 
the Orchestra's endowment or designated for the 
physical enhancement of the BSO facilities. This 
list acknowledges contributions received between 
September 1, 1989 and August 31, 1990. 



Annual Fund Contributors 




Patrons 



Mr. and Mrs. J. P. Barger 
Mr. and Mrs. John Barnard, Jr. 
Earle M. Chiles 

Mr. and Mrs. Lewis S. Dabney 
Mr. and Mrs. Nelson J. Darling, Jr. 
Dr. and Mrs Charles C. Dickinson 
Mrs. Harris Fahnestock 
The Honorable and Mrs. John H. 
Fitzpatrick 



Sponsors 



Mr. and Mrs. Harlan E. Anderson 
Mr. and Mrs. John M. Bradley 
Roger and Florence Chesterton-Norris 
Mr. and Mrs. Eugene H. Clapp II 
Mr. and Mrs. John F. Cogan, Jr. 
Haskell and Ina Gordon 
Mr. and Mrs. James H. Grew 



Fellows 



Mr. and Mrs. Robert W. Adams 

Mrs. Weston W. Adams 

Mr. and Mrs. Vernon R. Alden 

Mr. and Mrs. David B. Arnold, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth C. Barron 

Mrs. Richard E. Bennink 

James K. Beranek 

W. Walter Boyd 

Mrs. Helene R. Cahners-Kaplan 

Dr. and Mrs. Stewart H. Clifford 

Mr. and Mrs. William H. Congleton 

Mr. and Mrs. John L. Cooper 

Mrs. Pierre De Beaumont 

Mrs. Charles Freedom Eaton, Jr. 



Mr. and Mrs. Richard M. Fraser 
Mrs. Kenneth J. Germeshausen 
Mrs. Henry M. Greenleaf 
Mr. and Mrs. Francis W. Hatch 
Ms. Susan Morse Hilles 
Mr. and Mrs. George H. Kidder 
Dr. and Mrs. Edwin H. Land 
Mr. and Mrs. R. Willis Leith, Jr. 



Mrs. Henry S. Hall, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Bayard Henry 
Ms. Susan B. Kaplan 

and Mr. Ami Trauber 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert D. King 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles P. Lyman 
Mr. and Mrs. William B. Moses, Jr. 



Mr. and Mrs. William Elfers 

Mr. and Mrs. Dean W. Freed 

Mrs. Robert G. Fuller 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas J. Galligan, Jr. 

John Gamble 

Mrs. Morton R. Godine 

Mr. and Mrs. John L. Grandin, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard D. Hill 

Mr. and Mrs. Amos B. Hostetter, Jr. 

Mrs. Louise Shonk Kelly 

Mr. and Mrs. Carl Koch 

Mr. and Mrs. John M. Kucharski 

Mr. and Mrs. Stephen R. Levy 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. Millar 

43 



Mrs. Ellis Little 

Robert W. MacPherson 

Mrs. August R. Meyer 

Mrs. Robert B. Newman 

Mrs. James H. Perkins 

Mrs. George R. Rowland 

William F. and Juliana W. Thompson 

Anonymous (1) 



Mr. and Mrs. Thomas A. Rosse 
Mrs. Donald B. Sinclair 
Dr. and Mrs. W. Davies Sohier 
Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Stoneman 
Charles M. Werly 
Anonymous (6) 



Robert M. Morse 

Mr. and Mrs. E. James Morton 

David B. Perini 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. Remis 

Mr. and Mrs. Francis P. Sears, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Malcolm L. Sherman 

Dr. and Mrs. Fredrick J. Stare 

Miss Elizabeth B. Storer 

Mrs. Patricia Hansen Strang 

Stephen Tilton 

Mrs. Roland von Weber 

Dr. and Mrs. Nicholas T. Zervas 

Mr. and Mrs. Erwin N. Ziner 

Anonymous (3) 



Members 




Mr. and Mrs. William F. Achtmeyer 

Mrs. Frank G. Allen 

Mrs. Charles Almy 

Mr. and Mrs. James B. Ames 

Mr. and Mrs. David L. Anderson 

Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth A. Anderson 

Professor and Mrs. Rae D. Anderson 

Mrs. Julius H. Appleton 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry Axelrod 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald P. Babson 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard B. Bailey 

Mr. and Mrs. Vincent Bajakian 

Mr. and Mrs. David Bakalar 

Dr. and Mrs. William H. Baker 

Mrs. Norman V. Ballou 

Mr. and Mrs. Clifford B. Barrus, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Allen G. Barry 

Thomas R. Bateman 

Mr. and Mrs. John E. Beard 

Mr. and Mrs. George W. Berry 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael B. Bever 

Mr. and Mrs. Jordan Birger 

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel W. Bodman III 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael J. Bohnen 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald C. Bowersock, Jr. 

Mrs. Alexander H. Bright 

Mr. and Mrs. Peter A. Brooke 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard A. Brown 

Mr. and Mrs. William L. Brown 

Mr. and Mrs. Allan T. Buros 

Dr. and Mrs. Paul A. Buttenweiser 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas D. Cabot 

Mr. and Mrs. Stanford Calderwood 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold Caro 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Carr 

Charles Christenson 

James Russell Clarke, Jr. 

Mrs. Nicholas B. Clinch 

Ms. Mary Hart Cogan 

Mr. and Mrs. Stephen E. Coit 

Mr. and Mrs. I.W. Colburn 

Mr. and Mrs. Aaron H. Cole 

Mr. and Mrs. Abram T. Collier 

Mr. and Mrs. Marvin A. Collier 

Charles A. Coolidge, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry E. Cooper III 

Mrs. John Crocker 

Mr. and Mrs. William M. Crozier, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ronald C. Curhan 

Mr. and Mrs. Eric Cutler 

Mrs. Dimitri d'Arbeloff 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles H. Davis II 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael H. Davis 

Mr. and Mrs. Stanton W. Davis 

Miss Amy Davol 

Mr. and Mrs. Allen F. Dickerman 



Mr. and Mrs. John H. Dickison 

Mr. and Mrs. Eugene B. Doggett 

Ms. Phyllis Dohanian 

Mr. and Mrs. William R. Driver, Jr. 

Dr. Richard W. Dwight 

Mr. and Mrs. Goetz B. Eaton 

Mrs. Otto Eckstein 

Mrs. Alexander Ellis, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard S. Emmet 

Mr. and Mrs. Bradford M. Endicott 

Mrs. Priscilla Endicott 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward Eskandarian 

Mrs. Sewall H. Fessenden 

John and Barbara Fibiger 

Miss Anna E. Finnerty 

Mr. and Mrs. Maynard Ford 

Dr. and Mrs. Henry L. Foster 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. V. French 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Gable 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas P. Gerrity 

Dr. and Mrs. Donald B. Giddon 

Arthur S. Goldberg 

Carol R. and Avram J. Goldberg 

Professor and Mrs. Ray A. Goldberg 

Mr. and Mrs. Jordan L. Golding 

Mr. and Mrs. Mark R. Goldweitz 

Mrs. Sylvan A. Goodman 

Mrs. Harry N. Gorin 

Mrs. Stephen W. Grant 

Mr. and Mrs. E. Brainard Graves 

Mr. and Mrs. Daniel S. Gregory 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry R. Guild, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Graham Gund 

Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth G. Haas 

Mr. and Mrs. R. Douglas Hall III 

Mrs. N. Penrose Hallowell, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. James B. Hangstefer 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul F. Hannah 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry R. Hauser 

Daniel P. Hays 

Noah T. Herndon 

Mrs. Waldo H. Holcombe 

Mrs. Harrison D. Horblit 

Mr. and Mrs. Daniel A. Hosage 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles A. Hubbard 

Mrs. Charmienne Hughes 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter Hunnewell 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Hyman 

Dr. and Mrs. Robert A. Indeglia 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert F. Jasse 

E. Morton Jennings 

Mrs. Dewitt John 

Theodore Jones 

Mrs. Albert S. Kahn 

Mr. and Mrs. Bela T. Kalman 

Dr. and Mrs. S. Charles Kasdon 



Mr. and Mrs. Gordon F. Kingsley 

Mr. and Mrs. William Kopans 

Ms. Cynthia Kosowsky 

Dr. and Mrs. Arthur R. Kravitz 

Edward J. Kutlowski 

Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin H. Lacy 

Mr. and Mrs. David L. Landay 

Mr. and Mrs. Allen Latham, Jr. 

Mrs. James F. Lawrence 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert A. Lawrence 

Dr. and Mrs. Brian W. A. Leeming 

Mr. and Mrs. Irving Levy 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward Linde 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph P. Lombard 

Mr. and Mrs. John F. Magee 

Mr. and Mrs. Gael Mahony 

Mr. and Mrs. Satoru Masamune 

Mr. and Mrs. Amos C. Mathews 

Dr. Clinton F. Miller and 

Ms. Adele Wick 
Mrs. Dudley L. Millikin 
Mr. and Mrs. Adolf F. Monosson 
Mrs. Olney S. Morrill 
Mr. and Mrs. Wells Morss 
David G. Mugar 

Mr. and Mrs. Gerard F. Murphy 
Miss Alice B. Newell 
Mr. and Mrs. Albert L. Nickerson 
Mr. and Mrs. Rodger P. Nordblom 
Mrs. Richard P. Nyquist 
Miss Mary-Catherine O'Neill 
Mrs. Andrew Oliver 
Miss Grace Marshall Otis 
Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Davies Paine 
Mr. and Mrs. Walter H. Palmer 
Gary M. Palter 
Miss Harriet F. Parker 
Mrs. Brackett Parsons 
Dr. and Mrs. Oglesby Paul 
Mr. and Mrs. George W. Pearce 
Mr. and Mrs. Andrall E. Pearson 
Mr. and Mrs. Edward E. Phillips 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas L. Phillips 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard D. Phippen 
Mr. and Mrs. John R. Pingree 
Mrs. Hollis Plimpton, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. David R. Pokross 
Mr. and Mrs. William J. Poorvu 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard Preston 
Mr. and Mrs. Irving W. Rabb 
Mr. and Mrs. Peter C. Read 
Mr. and Mrs. David F. Remington 
Mr. and Mrs. Eugene J. Ribakoff 
Mr. and Mrs. David G. Robinson 
Mr. and Mrs. John Ex Rodgers 
Mr. and Mrs. Jerome Rosenfeld 



44 



Br. Jordan S. Ruboy 

Vlr. and Mrs. Robert Saltonstall 

Mr. and Mrs. Albert J. Sandler 

Mrs. George Lee Sargent 

Mr. and Mrs. John G. Schmid 

VIr. and Mrs. Paul A. Schmid 

Mr. and Mrs. George G. Schwenk 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael S. Scott Morton 

\lan H. Scovell 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles N. Shane 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert A. Sinclair 

Mr. and Mrs. Jeffrey P. Somers 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles H. Spaulding 

Mrs. Irma Mann Stearns and 

Dr. Norman Stearns 
Mr. and Mrs. Thornton Stearns 
Mr. and Mrs. Ira Stepanian 
Mr. and Mrs. Herbert B. Stern 
Mrs. Edward S. Stimpson 
Mr. and Mrs. Harris E. Stone 



Mr. and Mrs. Vernon R. Alden 

Mrs. and Mrs. Philip M. Allen 

Professor and Mrs. Rae D. Anderson 

Mr. and Mrs. Stephen H. Anthony 

Mr. and Mrs. Marshall Armstrong 

Mr. and Mrs. David B. Arnold, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Sherwood E. Bain 

Mr. and Mrs. J. P. Barger 

Dr. and Mrs. Leo L. Beranek 

Caroline Thayer Bland 

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel W. Bodman III 

Mrs. Ralph Bradley (d) 

Mrs. Alexander H. Bright 

Mr. and Mrs. Peter A. Brooke 

Ms. Phyllis Brooks 

Mrs. Helene R. Cahners-Kaplan 

Eleanor L. Campbell 

Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Gene Casty 

Mr. and Mrs. C. Thomas Clagett, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. James F. Cleary 

Mrs. George H. A. Clowes 

Mr. and Mrs. John F. Cogan, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Julian Cohen 

Mr. and Mrs. Abram T. Collier 

Mr. and Mrs. William H. Congleton 

Mr. and Mrs. William F. Connell 

Mrs. A. Werk Cook 

Mr. and Mrs. Lewis S. Dabney 

Mr. and Mrs. Nelson J. Darling, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael H. Davis 

Mrs. John E. Dawson 

Mr. and Mrs. Eugene B. Doggett 

Mrs. Charles Freedom Eaton, Jr. 



Mr. and Mrs. Henry S. Stone 
Mr. and Mrs. James W. Storey 
Dr. and Mrs. Nathan B. Talbot 
Mr. and Mrs. John F. Taplin 
Mrs. Charles H. Taylor 
Mr. and Mrs. William 0. Taylor 
Mr. and Mrs. Theodore H. Teplow 
Mrs. David Terwilliger 
Dr. and Mrs. Richard H. Thompson 
Mr. and Mrs. John L. Thorndike 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard K. Thorndike 
Mr. and Mrs. W. Nicholas Thorndike 
Mr. and Mrs. Alan J. Tichnor 
Mr. and Mrs. John Tillinghast 
Dr. and Mrs. Eugene J. Tillman 
Mrs. Richard F. Treadway 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. Trippe 
Mrs. George C. Underwood 
Mr. and Mrs. John H. Valentine 
Mr. and Mrs. Roger Voisin 



Mrs. Evelyn R. Wagstaff-Callahan 

Mrs. H. Saint John Webb 

Mr. and Mrs. Stephen R. Weber 

Mrs. Barrett Wendell, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Wengren 

Miss Barbara West 

Mrs. Joan D. Wheeler 

Stetson Whitcher 

Dr. and Mrs. Harold J. White 

Robert W. White 

Mrs. Florence T. Whitney 

Richard T. Whitney 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas H. P. Whitney 

Mrs. Margaret A. Williams-DeCelles 

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph B. Williams 

Mrs. Shepard F. Williams 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas B. Williams 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald B. Wilson 

Miss Elizabeth Woolley 

Anonymous (15) 



Capital Gifts Contributors 

Mr. and Mrs. Goetz B. Eaton 
The Honorable and 

Mrs. John H. Fitzpatrick 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard M. Fraser 
Mrs. Kenneth J. Germeshausen 
Carol R. and Avram J. Goldberg 
Mr. and Mrs. John L. Grandin, Jr. 
Barbara and Steven Grossman 
Catherine Louise Hagney (d) 
Frank and Cait Hoare Hagney (d) 
Mrs. Henry M. Halvorson 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. Hargrove 
Mr. and Mrs. Francis W. Hatch 
Mr. and Mrs. George Hatsopoulos 
Mr. and Mrs. George F. Hodder 
Mr. and Mrs. Bela T. Kalman 
Mr. and Mrs. Stanley H. Kaplan 
Mr. and Mrs. George H. Kidder 
Mr. and Mrs. Carl Koch 
Dr. and Mrs. David I. Kosowsky 
Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Chet Krentzman 
Mr. and Mrs. George F. Krim 
Mr. and Mrs. R. Willis Leith, Jr. 
Dr. and Mrs. Clinton N. Levin 
Mr. and Mrs. Caleb Loring, Jr. 
Mrs. Frederick H. Lovejoy, Sr. 
Dr. and Mrs. Frederick H. Lovejoy, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles P. Lyman 
Mr. and Mrs. Harry L. Marks 
Charlotte N. May 
Mrs. August R. Meyer 
Mr. and Mrs. Nathan R. Miller 
Mr. and Mrs. Paul M. Montrone 



Mr. and Mrs. Richard P. Morse 

Mr. and Mrs. William B. Moses, Jr. 

Mrs. Robert B. Newman 

Mr. and Mrs. Albert L. Nickerson 

Dr. Peter L. Page 

Mr. and Mrs. John A. Perkins 

Miss Pauline Perry 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas D. Perry, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Pierce 

Mr. and Mrs. William J. Poorvu 

Mr. and Mrs. Irving W. Rabb 

Mr. and Mrs. Peter C. Read 

Mr. and Mrs. David Riemer 

Mr. and Mrs. Jerome Rosenfeld 

Mr. and Mrs. William C. Rousseau 

Mrs. George R. Rowland 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael B. Salke 

Mrs. George Lee Sargent 

Mr. and Mrs. Francis P. Sears, Jr. 

Dr. and Mrs. W. Davies Sohier 

Dr. Sylvia Spiller 

Mr. and Mrs. Ray Stata 

Mr. and Mrs. Thornton Stearns 

Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Stoneman 

Miss Elizabeth B. Storer 

William F. and Juliana W. Thompson 

Mr. and Mrs. John L. Thorndike 

Lewis H. Weinstein 

Miss Christine White 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas H. P. Whitney 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald B. Wilson 

Mrs. John J. Wilson 

Anonymous (8) 



45 



The Shape of 
Things to Come. 




The lure of pure 
geometry: the per- 
fect circle, sparked 
by a blue mineral 
glass bezel; a 
rosy hexagon 
dazzled by 
diamonds; and 
the drama of dark- 
ness in the simplest 
octagon. Pure geometry. 
Pure delight. All with 
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finished in 22K gold. 



E.R HO?! 1 



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AVAILABLE 



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429 WASHINGTON ST., BOSTON, MA 

ALL MAJOR CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED 
MAIL OR PHONE ORDERS 542-3902 OPEN MON. AND THURS. TILL 7 






© Seiko Time 1990 



46 



Friends of the Boston Symphony Orchestra 

Friends 

$750 - $1,499 



Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Abeles 
Miss Barbara Adams 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles F. Adams 
Ms. Joan K. Alden 
Mr. and Mrs. Philip K. Allen 
Mr. and Mrs. Walter Amory 
Mr. and Mrs. John E. Andrews II 
Mrs. Elsie J. Apthorp 
Ms. Sarah Webb Armstrong 
Mr. and Mrs. Hazen H. Ayer 
Mrs. Richard Baer 
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Barnes 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert B. M. Barton 
Mr. and Mrs. W. Bentinek-Smith 
Mrs. Arthur W. Bingham 
Peter M. Black 
Bartol Brinkler 
Blair Brown 

Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Brown 
Mrs. Karl Burajck 
Dr. and Mrs. Bradford Cannon 
George A. Chamberlain III 
Mrs. Barbara S. Chase 
Mr. and Mrs. Paul C. Child 
Mrs. Edward D. Churchill 
Mrs. William Claflin in 
Mrs. George H. A. Clowes 
Mr. and Mrs. Loring W. Coleman 
Victor Constantiner 
Dr. and Mrs. Perry J. Culver 
Mr. and Mrs. A.T. Daignault 
Mr. and Mrs. Morris F. Darling 
Mrs. F. Stanton Deland, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Devens 
Mrs. Franklin Dexter 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard P. Dober 
Mr. and Mrs. Armen Dohanian 
Richard R. Downey 
Mrs. Henri A. Erkelens 
Paul H. Farris 
Dr. Harvey V. Fineberg 
and Dr. Mary E. Wilson 



Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Fisher 

Stefan M. Freudenberger 

Dr. and Mrs. Orrie M. Friedman. 

Robert P. Giddings 

Mr. and Mrs. Nelson Gore 

Mrs. Charles D. Gowing 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold K. Gross 

Mrs. Carl W. Haffenreffer 

Robert L. Harris 

Mr. and Mrs. Milan A. Heath, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ulf B. Heide 

Mr. and Mrs. Edwin W. Hiam 

Mrs. Richard R. Higgins 

Mrs. Petie Hilsinger 

Gordon Holmes 

Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Homer 

Mr. and Mrs. Howland B. Jones, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Keohane 

Mrs. F. Danby Lackey 

Mr. and Mrs. Maurice Lazarus 

Mrs. George C. Lee 

Mrs. Emily Saltonstall Lewis 

Richard 0. Lodewick 

Graham Atwell Long 

Mr. and Mrs. Caleb Loring, Jr. 

Mrs. Victor A. Lutnieki 

Mrs. Carlton R. Mabley 

Mrs. David S. McLellan 

Mrs. Patricia Mcleod 

Dr. and Mrs. Gordon S. Myers 

Mr. and Mrs. Andrew L. Nichols 

Ms. Mariko Noda 

Mr. and Mrs. William J. O'Connor 

Mrs. George A. Ott 

Mrs. Robert W. Palm 

Mr. and Mrs. Christopher A. Pantaleoni 

Sang-Seek Park 

Dr. and Mrs. Jack S. Parker 

Mr. and Mrs. John A. Perkins 

Mr. and Mrs. Malcolm D. Perkins 

Mrs. Paul Pigors 



Mr. and Mrs. Robert P. Pitts 

Mr. and Mrs. Albert Pratt 

Nathaniel Pulsifer 

Sumner M. Redstone 

Ms. Patricia B. Rice 

Mr. and Mrs. David Rockefeller, Jr. 

Alford Paul Rudnick 

Mrs. Louis Rudolph 

Mrs. Wilbert R. Sanger 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. Scully 

Mr. and Mrs. Maurice Segall 

George C. Seybolt 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Shenton 

Ms. Barbara C. Sidell 

Marshall H. Sirvetz 

Mrs. Gordon Smith 

Mrs. Lawrence Snell 

Mrs. William B. Snow 

Charlotte and Ralph Z. Sorenson 

Dr. and Mrs. Lamar Soutter 

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel R. Spiker 

Mr. and Mrs. John K. Spring, Sr. 

Dr. and Mrs. Walter St. Goar 

Mr. and Mrs. Maximilian Steinmann 

Mr. & Mrs. Josiah Stevenson IV 

Mrs. Anson P. Stokes 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Swiniarski 

Toshitsugu Takeuchi 

Mr. and Mrs Anthony A. Tambone 

Mrs. John I. Taylor 

G. Robert Tod 

Ms. Mary Vance Trent 

Miss Alice Tully 

Mr. and Mrs. George R. Walker 

Mrs. Sue S. Watson 

Mrs. George Macy Wheeler 

Mrs. M. L. Wilding- White 

Ms. Katharine Winthrop 

Ms. Elizabeth Wolfe 

Anonymous (11) 



Friends 

$350 



Mrs. Herbert Abrams 

Mrs. John Q. Adams 

Mr. and Mrs. Ralf A. Adolfsson 

Dr. and Mrs. Alex F. Althausen 

Mr. and Mrs. Oliver F. Ames 

Mrs. L. Hathaway Amsbary 

Theodore Anastos 

Mr. and Mrs. Raymond P. Atwood 

Joseph S. Banks 

Miss Anahid Barmakian 

Mr. and Mrs. Frederick E. Barstow 

Dr. and Mrs. Marshall K. Bartlett 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael E. Barton 

Ms. Norma Jean Bassett 



Mrs. James E. Batehelder 

Mr. and Mrs. Sherman C. Bedford 

Dr. and Mrs. A. Robert Bellows 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Benka 

Mrs. Estelle Berman 

William I. Bernell 

Dr. and Mrs. Benjamin E. Bierbaum 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter W. Birge HI 

Mr. and Mrs. George Blagden 

Miss Rhoda C. Bonville 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry K. Bramhall, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. John D. Brewer, Jr. 

Mrs. Adrian J. Broggini 

Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd Millard Bunting III 



Mr. and Mrs. Paul C. Cabot 

Miss Hannah C. Campbell 

Mr. and Mrs. Daniel S. Cheever 

Mrs. Putnam Cilley 

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel B. Coco 

Mrs. Gilman W. Conant 

Dr. Charles L. Cooney 

and Ms. Peggy Reiser 
Marc H. Cramer 
Mrs. and Mrs. David C. Crockett 
Dr. Mary Jean Crooks 
Mrs. Ernest B. Dane, Jr. 
Mrs. Brenton H. Dickson III 
Tom DiPietro 



47 



& 



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(508) 744-4050 (617) 524-7228 

Prime Living Senior Communities 



J) 



48 



Ms. Victoria J. Dodd 

Paul Doguereau 

Mrs. Malcolm Donald 

Elbert Drazy 

Mr. and Mrs. F. C. Dumaine 

John Dwinell 

Ms. Majorie C. Dyer 

Jerome Eaton 

Mrs. Phillip Eiseman 

Mr. and Mrs. William V. Ellis 

Mrs. Romeyn Everdell 

Mr. and Mrs. Leroy Fadem 

Mr. and Mrs. Murray W. Finard 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis Antony Fisher 

Mr. and Mrs. James T. Flynn 

Dr. and Mrs. Eric T. Fossel 

Miss Elaine Foster 

Dr. and Mrs. Henry L. Foster 

Ms. Suzanne Freedman 

Edward B. Galligan 

Mrs. Charles Mack Ganson 

Miss Eleanor Garfield 

Mrs. Joseph Gaziano 

Mr. and Mrs. John R. Ghublikian 

Mr. and Mrs. A. Edward Giberti 

Richard B. Gladstone 

Alan R. Goff 

Malcolm H. Goodman 

Mrs. Joel T. Gormley 

Martin Gottlieb 

Dr. and Mrs. Paul E. Gray 

Dr. and Mrs. Mortimer S. Greenberg 

George L. Greenfield 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold R. Grimes 

Mr. and Mrs. Morton S. Grossman 

Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Gruner 

Edward N. Guleserian 

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph L. Gustin, Jr. 

William E. Haible 

Ms. Susan C. Hammond 

Mr. and Mrs. John Mason Harding 

Mr. and Mrs. Albert H. Hardt 

Mr. and Mrs. Baron M. Hartley 

Ms. Jeanne M. Hartley 

Mrs. Elizabeth S. Hawes 

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Hayden 

Mrs. Harold L. Hazen 

Mrs. Donald C. Heath 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul J. Hickey 

Richard A. Hicks 

Mr. and Mrs. Denny F. High 

Mr. and Mrs. Winston R. Hindle, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph D. Hinkle 

Mrs. Louise P. Hook 

Miss Isabel B. Hooker 

Mrs. Joseph Howe 

Mrs. David H. Howie 

Roger H. Howland 

Dr. Richard F. Hoyt, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. James F. Hunnewell 

Martin L. Jack 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Jackson, Jr. 

Miss Elizabeth B. Jackson 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry B. Jackson 

Mrs. Paul M. Jacobs 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul Jameson 

Dr. and Mrs. Charles F. Kane 

Ms. Sarah Kantor 



Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Kaplan 

Mrs. Sidney L. Kaye 

Mrs. Prescott L. Kettell 

Mr. and Mrs. James E. Kimball II 

Mr. and Mrs. Allen Kluchman 

Mr. and Mrs. Russel W. Knight 

Dr. and Mrs. Willaim Kornfield 

Mr. and Mrs. James N. Krebs 

Dr. Barry M. Lamont 

Dr. and Mrs. John H. Lamont 

Mr. and Mrs. W. Loeber Landau 

Mr. and Mrs. Roger Landay 

Mr. and Mrs. Gene Landy 

Miss Elizabeth Lathrop 

Dr. and Mrs. William B. Latta 

Mrs. Paul B. Le Baron 

Mr. and Mrs. Phillip F. Leach 

Dr. and Mrs. Thomas Levitt, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. David S. Lee 

Dr. Lucy Lee 

Mrs. Tudor Leland 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard L. Leonard 

John M. Loder 

Ms. Anne Lovett 

Christopher Lydon 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Lyman, Jr. 

Leonard Lynch, Jr. 

Miss Ann E. Macdonald 

Douglas N. MacPherson 

Ms. Nancy F. Madden 

Charles Francis Mahoney 

Mr. and Mrs. William S. Malcom 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald Malpass, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. William M. Marcus 

Mr. and Mrs. William Margolis 

Dr. Judith Marquis 

and Mr. Keith F. Nelson 
Gerald A. Mata 

Mr. and Mrs. Gerald M. Mayer, Jr. 
Dr. and Mrs. William M. McDermott 
Mrs. Roy R. Merchant, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert W. Meserve 
Mr. and Mrs. Bernard F. Meyer 
Mr. and Mrs. Leon D. Michelove 
Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Moulton 
Mr. and Mrs. Michael Mulroy 
Takashi Nakajima 
Reverend Joseph James O'Hare ni 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard T. O'Rourke 
Mrs. George Olmsted 
Ms. Helen R. Pall 
Ms. Mary B. Parent 
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph M. Paresky 
Richard Parker 
Mrs. Helen W. Parsons 
Mrs. Martha Patrick 
Mrs. Marion L. Peirson 
Willis Peligian 

H. Angus and Genevieve T. Perry 
Anthony M. Pisani 
Mr. and Mrs. Leo M. Pistorino 
Mr. Anthony Piatt 

and Ms. Nancy Goodwin 
Dr. and Mrs. Alfred Pope 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard Prouty 
Mr. and Mrs. Millard H. Pyror, Jr. 
Dr. Michael C.J. Putnam 
Richard Quinn 



Mrs. J. C. Rauscher 

Mrs. Fairfield E. Raymond 

Mr. and Mrs. John Re 

Mrs. Eugene E. Record 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter J. Riley III 

Paul Rosenberg 

Alan L. Rosenfield 

Mrs. Benjamin Rowland 

Ms. Julia R. Rowse 

Mr. and Mrs. Peter G. Russell 

Mr. and Mrs. Ernest J. Sargeant 

John H. Saxe 

Mrs. Janos Scholz 

Mr. and Mrs. Marvin G. Schorr 

Mr. and Mrs. Phillip H. Seaver 

Mr. and Mrs. George E. Senkler 

Leslie and Howard Shapiro 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. Siegfried 

Mrs. Jeanette S. Simon 

Mr. and Mrs. Edgar A. Smith 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward J. Smith 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph J. Snyder 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph P. Solomon 

Mr. and Mrs. David Squire 

Dr. and Mrs. David G. Stahl 

Dr. and Mrs. Glenn D. Steele, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Joel Stein 

Mr. and Mrs. Jay Stempel 

Mr. and Mrs. Galen L. Stone 

Dr. and Mrs. Somers H. Sturgis 

Mr. and Mrs. Elliot M. Surkin 

Dr. and Mrs. William H. Sweet 

Timothy G. Taylor 

Mr. and Mrs. Everett A. TenBrook 

Mrs. Alfred Thomas 

Mrs. Charlotte E. Thompson 

Mr. and Mrs. Philip W. Trumbull 

Mr. and Mrs. Victor M. Tyler 

Mrs. Howard Ulfelder 

Mr. and Mrs. Jack H. Vernon 

Dr. and Mrs. Ingvars J. Vittands 

Mr. and Mrs. William G. Walker 

Mrs. Phyllis Waite-Watkins 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter Watson II 

Mr. and Mrs. John P. Weitzel 

Mrs. Mark R. Werman 

Julien Vose Weston 

Mrs. Edith G. Weyerhaeuser 

Mrs. Betty Wheeler 

Mr. and Mrs. John W. White 

Mrs. Ogden White 

Mr. and Mrs. Amos N. Wilder 

Ms. Marion Williams 

Mr. and Mrs. Dudley Willis 

Mr. and Mrs. Keith G. Willoughby 

Howard Wilson 

Mr. and Mrs. Leslie J. Wilson 

Mrs. Margaret W. Winslow 

Ms. Mary Wolfson 

Mr. and Mrs. E. S. Wood 

Dr. and Mrs. Edward F. Woods 

Mr. and Mrs. John M. Woolsey, Jr. 

Mrs. Frederic P. Worthen 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul I. Wren 

Mr. and Mrs. John H. Wylde 

Ms. Suzanne Zaff 

Dr. and Mrs. Harvey Zarren 

Anonymous (24) 



49 



* J8PB^^J*"^B Mat 



s^^^fcs**^^^ 







One 

Boodakian leads 

to another. 

Krikor...Levon...Mikhayel...Haratoun... 
Michael. ..Stephan... Sherry.. .Scott. ..Paul 

From the secrets of a weave, to the 'hand' of a wool, 

to the finest intricacies of the art 

...each generation in this Oriental rug family of ours helps to train another. 

Big as the family business has grown, the family has grown with it. 

So whether you want to buy, sell, clean or repair a rug, 

there's always a Boodakian to talk to. 

Whose personal attention you can count on and 

whose expertise you can trust. 

Dependability like this is worth going out of your way for. 
Which probably explains why one Boodakian customer still leads to another. 

And has for over 50 years. 



Ivoko Boodakian &aS 



onsin, 



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Winchester, AAA 



(617) 729-5566 

Closed Sunday & Monday 



Hours: Tu-Sat 9:30-5 
Thur & Fri 'til 9 



50 









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Friends 






$250 - $349 






Mr. and Mrs. Richard M. Adams 


Miss Stephanie Chamberlain 


Mrs. Edward L. Francis 


Edward Addison 


Mr. and Mrs. Hugh M. Chapin 


Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Richard Frank 


Mr. and Mrs. Jack Adelson 


Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. Chatfield 


Mr. and Mrs. Harry Freedman 


Mrs. Nelson Aldrich 


Dr. F. Sargent Cheever 


Mr. and Mrs. Marc Friedlander 


Mrs. Theodore Ames 


Mr. and Mrs. Richard N. Cheever 


Barry L. Friedman 


Mr. and Mrs. John A. Anderson, Jr. 


Mr. and Mrs. Charles Y. Chittick, Jr. 


Mrs. John Furman 


Steven B. Andrus 


Mrs. Miles Nelson Clair 


Mr. and Mrs. Steve Ganak 


Ms. Jill A. Angel 


Roger E. Clapp 


Richard D. Gass 


Richard D. Angel 


Mr. and Mrs. Ernest C. Clark, Jr. 


Ara and Pamela Gechijian 


Mr. and Mrs. David Auerbach 


Mrs. Ronald C. Clark 


Rabbi and Mrs. Everett E. Gendler 


Lloyd Axelrod, MD and Eleanor C. Axelrod 


Dr. and Mrs. Robert B. Clarke 


Mr. and Mrs. Paul B. Gilbert 


James C. Ayer 


Mr. and Mrs. Charles C. Colby HI 


Mr. and Mrs. John Gilmartin 


Mr. and Mrs. Richard P. Baccari 


Mrs. Donald W. Comstock 


Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Glasser 


Dr. and Mrs. George P. Baker, Jr. 


Johns H. Congdon 


Alan Goldberg 


Mr. and Mrs. Spencer H. Baker 


Thomas E. Connolly 


Mr. and Mrs. Charles M. Goldman 


Yonathan Bard 


Woolsey S. Conover 


Mr. and Mrs. Macey J. Goldman 


Mr. and Mrs. Brewster Barnard 


Mr. and Mrs. John Cook 


Mrs. Barbara J. Goldsmith 


Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Barnes 


Mr. and Mrs. James Cooke 


Mr. and Mrs. Arnold Goldstein 


Dr. and Mrs. Joseph R. Barrie 


Mr. and Mrs. Sheldon Cooperman 


Frederick Goldstein 


Ms. Margaret E. Bass 


Lucy A. and James E. Coppola 


Mrs. John D. Gordan, Jr. 


Mr. and Mrs. Nathaniel B. Bates 


Mr. and Mrs. Allan M. Cormaek 


Mr. and Mrs. William H. Gorham 


Mr. and Mrs. Edward H. Bauerband, Jr. 


Robert E. Corriveau 


Kevin J. Gorny 


Dr. and Mrs. Martin D. Becker 


Mr. and Mrs. Jason M. Cortell 


Mr. and Mrs. Thomas E. Gottwald 


Mr. and Mrs. F. Gregg Bemis 


Mrs. Robert W. Costello 


Dr. Robert A. Gough, Jr. 


Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Berman 


Dr. and Mrs. J. Holland Cotter 


Dr. Ekkehard Grampp 


Mrs. David W. Bernstein 


Mr. and Mrs. David Baer Cotton 


Ms. Margaret M. Grant 


Mrs. V. Stoddard Bigelow 


Mr. and Mrs. John C. Coughlin, Jr. 


Mr. and Mrs. Raymond C. Green 


Mrs. Charles S. Bird HI 


Paul M. Crowe 


Mr. and Mrs. Nathan Greenberg 


Maxwell V. Blum 


Mr. and Mrs. Robert Cushman 


John H. Griffin 


Mrs. Anne C. Booth 


Arnold R. Cutler 


Mr. and Mrs. James G. Groninger 


Mr. and Mrs. I. Macallister Booth 


Jan E. Dabrowski, Esq. 


Ms. Mona Gross 


Jeffrey and Margie Borenstein 


Mr. and Mrs. John D. Dalton 


Mrs. Helen Grossman 


Morris B. Bornstein 


Mr. and Mrs. Robert Danziger 


Mr. and Mrs. John Grover 


Gustavo Bottan 


Mrs. Elizabeth K. Darlington 


Mr. and Mrs. Arnold Gurin 


Mr. and Mrs. Bruce A. Bouton 


Mrs. Freeman I. Davison, Jr. 


Mrs. Lyman P. Gutterson 


Senator Walter J. Boverini 


James De Jesu and Marion De Jesu 


Edward Guzovsky 


Raymond A. Bowman 


Dr. and Mrs. Roman W. DeSanctis 


Mr. and Mrs. John C. Hass 


James C. Boyd 


Dr. and Mrs. Norman H. Diamond 


Mr. and Mrs. Arthur T. Hadley 


Lee C. Bradley HI 


Mrs. Dominic P. Dimaggio 


Mrs. Frederick W. Haffenreffer 


Mr. and Mrs. Daniel M. Braude 


Miss Catherine-Mary Donovan 


Mr. and Mrs. George A. Hall 


Mrs. Edward P. Breau 


Dr. and Mrs. Barry C. Dorn 


Mrs. Ariel Halpern 


John H. Brooks, Jr. 


Mr. and Mrs. Melbourne S. Dorr 


Mr. and Mrs. Harley L. Hansen 


Mr. and Mrs. E. Burton Brown 


Thomas B. Draper 


Donald Harding 


Mr. and Mrs. Jacob B. Brown, Jr. 


Mr. and Mrs. John P. Driscoll, Jr. 


Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. Hargrove 


Mr. and Mrs. Robert Vance Brown 


Mr. and Mrs. Michael Dziekan 


Frank L. Harrington 


Mr. and Mrs. Donald Brack 


Reverend and Mrs. William S. Eaton 


Mrs. Arthur W. Harris 


Reverend Thomas W. Buckley 


Mrs. Gladys A. Eggiman 


Mr. and Mrs. Steven Harth 


Mr. and Mrs. Richard B. Bunn 


Dr. and Mrs. John P. Eliopoulos 


Arthur L. Hatcher, Jr. 


Betty 0. and Richard S. Burdick 


Charles H. Ellis, Jr. 


Mrs. Richard C. Hayes 


Frank Burge 


Mrs. William P. Ellison 


William Hardy Hayes 


Mr. and Mrs. Rodman Burr 


Mrs. Gardner G. Emmons 


Mr. and Mrs. G. Arnold Haynes 


Mr. and Mrs. Walter M. Cabot 


Mr. and Mrs. Gerald S. Epstein 


Mr. and Mrs. Richard H. Heaton 


Dr. Charlotte C. Campbell 


Mr. and Mrs. Steven S. Feinberg 


Frank Hegarty 


Richard P. Campbell 


Judith and Roger Feingold 


Mrs. Patricia L. Heilner 


Mr. and Mrs. David A. Cane 


Martin P. Feldman 


Mr. and Mrs. Robert P. Henderson 


Leon M. Cangiano, Jr. 


William W. Fenniman 


Gardner Hendrie 


Mr. and Mrs. James Carangelo 


Paul W. Finnegan 


Mr. and Mrs. Jerome S. Hertz 


David Carder III 


Mr. and Mrs. Niles D. Flanders 


Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence A. Hicks 


Mr. and Mrs. David H. Carls 


Dr. and Mrs. Brent P. Fletcher 


Mr. and Mrs. Robert W. Hinman 


Ray F. Carmichael 


F. Murray Forbes, Jr. 


Ms. Roberta Hirsh 


Dorothy and Herbert Carver 


Mr. and Mrs. Sumner J. Foster 


Mrs. Karl J. Hirshman 


Mr. and Mrs. Edward F. Carye 


Dr. and Mrs. John A. Fox 


John W. F. Hobbs, Jr. 


John Caswell 


Mrs. Marie H. Fox 


Ms. Linda M. Holbrook 


Mrs. Ephron Catlin 


Walter S. Fox, Jr. 

51 


Mr. and Mrs. H. Brian Holland 







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For Lunch. Dinner. Lodging. 
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Jones Rd., Falmouth, MA 02541 • 508/548-2300 




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has the largest 

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in Boston. 

(Located 3 Blocks from Symphony Matt) 



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Mass. Ave. At Newbury 
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52 






Mr. and Mrs. Paul M. Holland 

Mr. and Mrs. James Hollis III 

Ms. Charlotte Hollister 

Miss Majorie B. Holman 

Ross G. Honig 

Alfred Hoose 

Ms. Gertrude D. Houghton 

Dr. and Mrs. Terry Howard 

Mr. and Mrs. Christopher W. Hurd 

Constantine Hutchins, Jr. 

Dr. and Mrs. Roger L. Hybels 

Mark Hyman, Jr. 

Joseph Ineandela 

Mr. and Mrs. R. Blake Ireland 

Mr. and Mrs. Jonathan Issaes 

Mr. and Mrs. David 0. Ives 

Dr. and Mrs. Neil D. Jackson 

Richard F. Jarrell 

Mrs. H. Alden Johnson, Jr. 

Mrs. Kathleen Minadeo Johnson 

Walter J. Johnson 

Paul and Barbara Jaskow 

Ms. Jacqueline M. Jung 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward M. Kaplan 

William W. Karatz 

Mrs. Charles Kassel 

Mr. and Mrs. Stanley W. Katz 

Dean Kauffman 

Sumner Kaufman 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert J. Kaufmann 

William E. Kelly 

Dr. Samuel H. Kim 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard W. Kimball 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas E. King 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry E. Kloss 

Ms. Marilyn Bone Kloss 

Mr. and Mrs. David C. Knapp 

Mr. and Mrs. David Knight 

Mr. and Mrs. Eliot Knowles 

Dr. Ruth B. Kundsin 

Mr. and Mrs. Melvin Kutchin 

Ms. Celia A. Lacey-Anzuoni 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward H. Ladd 

James R. Lajoie 

Ms. Michele Landes 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard E. Lang 

Mrs. William L. Langer 

Mr. and Mrs. Eugene D. Lattimier 

Mrs. Edward W. Lawrence 

Burke and Barbara Leahey 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard A. Leahy 

Mrs. Marie J. Leonhardt 

Richard Leventhal 

Dr. and Mrs. Elia Lipton 

Mrs. Laurence M. Lombard 

Mrs. Robert P. Loring 

Ms. Cynthia Gail Lovell 

Mrs. George H. Lyman, Jr. 

Mrs. Richard W. Lyman 

Dr. George D. Lynch 

John F. Macauley 

Mr. and Mrs. David D. Mackintosh 

Mr. and Mrs. David Macneill 

Dr. and Mrs. Hywel Madoc-Jones 

David Malkin 

Mr. and Mrs. John F. Malloy 

Ms. Therese A. Maloney 

Miss Ellen J. Mandigo 



Hugo J. Marchi 

Dr. Pamela Marron 

Mr. and Mrs. Franklin J. Marryott 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul D. May 

Ms. Joanne M. McCarthy 

Mr. and Mrs. Kevin J. McCarthy 

Mrs. Maurice McCarthy 

John P. McGonagle 

Mr. and Mrs. Raymond W. McKittrick 

Mr. and Mrs. James Messing 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry H. Meyer, Jr. 

Dr. and Mrs. Alan S. Michaels 

Ms. Judith Ann Miller 

Dr. and Mrs. Michael B. Millis 

James A. Mitchell 

John M. Morss 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward Motley 

R.E. Moulton, Jr. 

Ms. Martha S. Mugar 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward R. Murphy 

John J. Murphy 

Ms. Janet H. Murrow 

Mrs. Ellen Dana Nagler 

Koichi Naruse 

Dr. and Mrs. Paul P. Nesbeda 

Mr. and Mrs. Horace S. Nichols 

Joseph J. Nicholson 

Kevin T. Nolan 

Mr. and Mrs. Geoffrey Nunes 

Richard O'Neil 

Mr. and Mrs. Jason S. Orlov 

Miss Esther E. Osgood 

Mr. and Mrs. Hyman Ossoff 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael Ossoff 

Seiichiro Ota 

Richard B. Packard 

Mrs. Milton S. Page 

Dr. and Mrs. Simon Parisier 

Mr. and Mrs. William Park 

Franklin E. Parker 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Harry Parker 

Mr. and Mrs. Peter Pattison 

Dr. and Mrs. Anthony S. Patton 

Edward L. Pattullo 

Mr. and Mrs. Francis W. Peabody 

C.L. Pecchenino 

Mr. and Mrs. John Peirce 

Mr. and Mrs. John B. Pepper 

Mr. and Mrs. Guido R. Perera, Jr. 

Mr. Edward Perry and Ms. Cynthia Wood 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward Lee Perry 

Mr. and Mrs. Marvin D. Perry 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard G. Peters 

Ms. Nancy Peterson 

Raul and Viive Pettai 

Ms. Margaret D. Philbrick 

Mr. and Mrs. William E. Phillips 

Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin S. Phinney 

Mr. and Mrs. Laurence A. Pierce 

Mr. and Mrs. Alvar W. Polk, Jr. 

Edward E. Pomfret 

Dr. Phillip J. Porter 

Mrs. John H. Privitera 

Dr. and Mrs. James M. Rabb 

Mr. and Mrs. Norman S. Rabb 

Ms. Nancy Winship Rathborne 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert V. Reece 

John R. and Laura Eby Regier 



Mr. and Mrs. Peter Remis 

Miss Jeanette W. Renshaw 

Dr. and Mrs. George B. Reservitz 

Mary Bartlett Reynolds 

Mr. and Mrs. Bernard A. Riemer 

Mrs. Karl Reimer 

Ms. Judith Rist 

Ms. Marcia A. Rizzotto 

Mr. and Mrs. Owen W. Robbins 

Mr. and Mrs. Hugo D. Rockett 

Mr. and Mrs. Allan Romanow 

Stephen R. and Barbara Roop 

Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Rosen 

Dr. and Mrs. Kenneth M. Rosenfeld 

Ms. Fran V. Ross 

William C. Rothert 

Dr. and Mrs. A. Daniel Rubenstein 

David T. Rubin 

Mrs. Howard Rubin 

Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence G. Rubin 

Mr. and Mrs. Milton B. Rubin 

Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Sandberg 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald Sandstrom 

Stephen Santis 

John H. Saxe 

Ms. Carol Scheifele-Holmes 

Mr. and Mrs. Pieter Schiller 

Robert W. Schlundt 

Henry L. P. Schmelzer 

Ms. Carole M. Schnizer 

Peter Schofield 

Dr. and Mrs. Leslie R. Schroeder 

Mr. and Mrs. Kent Schubert 

Mr. and Mrs. John C. Scully 

Mr. and Mrs. Douglas H. Sears 

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Sepinuck 

Mrs. Freema Shapiro 

Dr. and Mrs. Jerome H. Shapiro 

Mr. and Mrs. William H. Shepard 

Mr. and Mrs. Jack Shirman 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward C. Shotwell 

Mr. and Mrs. Joel P. Shriberg 

Ms. Jane Sibley 

Phyllis and Kenneth Sisson 

Mr. and Mrs. Wallace Sisson 

Dr. and Mrs. Edward L. Sleeper 

Mr. and Mrs. David Slye 

Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin F. Smith 

Mr. and Mrs. W. Thomas Smith 

Mrs. Hrisafie M. Sophocles 

Dr. and Mrs. Arthur S. Spangler, Jr. 

Mrs. Josiah A. Spaulding 

Mrs. Hester D. Sperduto 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. Stampler 

James F. Steen 

Norman Stein 

Alan Steinert 

Dr. and Mrs. Goodwill M. Stewart 

Mrs. Phillip C. Stolar 

Mr. and Mrs. James F. Stone 

Edward T. Sullivan 

Joseph A. Sullivan, Jr. 

Richard A. Swartz 

Hideotoshi Tanaka 

Mrs. Charles L. Taylor 

Marc Teller 

Robert Tello 

Mr. and Mrs. John Larkin Thompson 



53 





SPECIAL OFFER 


BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


10% OFF 
on all T-shirts and 


l ^ 


sweatshirts 




at the Symphony Shop 


! Hours: 


with this coupon. 


! Tuesday, Thursday, 




Friday, 11 AM -3 PM 




Saturday, 1 PM - 6 PM 




J All concert hours 




Tel. (617) 638-9383 


Offer valid until January 1, 1991. 



We Would Like To Buy From You 

ROY K. EYGES INC 

Buying & Selling Since 1941 



Estate Jewelry • Period Jewelry 

Diamonds • Colored Stones • Antique Silver 

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Hollow Ware • Bric-a-Brack • Art Objects 

Buyers and Appraisers of Jewelry, Silver and Antiques 
Members of the Appraisers Association of America 

247-8400 

Hours: Monday-Saturday 10am-5pm 
38 Newbury Street, 2nd floor, Boston 



54 



Mr. and Mrs. Mark Tishler 

Richard P. Tlapa 

Donald and Frances Trott 

Ms. Judith R. Tucker 

C. Robert Tully 

Dr. Robert 0. VaJerio 

Allan Van Gestel 

David L. VanDerMeid 

Reverend George D. Vartzelis 

Mr. and Mrs. Gordon F. Vawter 

Professor and Mrs. Evon Z. Vogt 

Robert A. Vogt 

Mr. and Mrs. Augustus F. Wagner, Jr. 

Mrs. Charles F. Walcott 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas S. Walker 



Ms. Joyce A. Warchol 

Mrs. John Ware, Jr. 

Mrs. John C. B. Washburn 

Ms. Catherine Weary Steets 

Ms. Leslie H. Weisman 

Mrs. Phillip S. Weld 

Mr. and Mrs. Roger U. Wellington 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold Wernick 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard S. West 

Mr. and Mrs. Mark C. Wheeler 

Clark and Nancy Whitcomb 

Mrs. Constance V. R. White 

John White 

Mr. and Mrs. Carl J. Wiedemann 



Mrs. Morrill Wiggin 

Edward G. Williams 

Mr. and Mrs. Alexander M. Wilson 

Mr. and Mrs. David J. Winstanley 

Mrs. Charlotte Wolf 

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel J. Wolstadter 

Mr. and Mrs. Rawson Lyman Wood 

Mr. and Mrs. John Woodman 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Woods 

Mrs. Whitney Wright 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. Zeller 

Mrs. Vincent C. Ziegler 

Mr. and Mrs. Barry Zimman 

Anonymous (22) 



Contributions were made to the Boston Symphony Orchestra during the 
1990 fiscal year in honor of the following individuals: 



Dr. Leo L. Beranek 

Alexander Brown 

Virginia W. Cabot 

Mrs. Helene R. Cahners-Kaplan 

Madeline Carey 

Julian Cohen 

Nelson J. Darling, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Fagan 



Charles T. Francis 

Robert Frank 

Mr. and Mrs. Haskell Gordon 

Julian Greenfield 

Mr. and Mrs. Hootstein 

George E. Judd 

George Kaplan 

Richard L. Kaye 



Mrs. Robert H. P. Kennard 
Dr. and Mrs. Arthur Kravitz 
Mildred Lee 
Edward Levanthal 
Chris and Linda Sprague 
Margaret Whitney 
Mrs. Ethel Smith 



Contributions were made to the Boston Symphony Orchestra during the 1990 
fiscal year in memory of the following individuals: 



Maximi Bourni Anastos, M.D. 

Hannah G. Ayer 

Sam Barish 

Richard Burgin 

Charles F. Cassell 

Richard Connor 

Anne Dareshori 

Hope S. Dean 

Eleanor K. Dickinson 

Haim Eliachar 

Lois Whitney Forbes 

-Edward L. Francis 

Robert Frank 

Jean Riddle-Gerry 



Paul S. Gottlieb 
Dorothy Green 
Gladys Gwritzman 
Mrs. Winifred Idell 
Leroy S. Kenfield 
Louis E. Kopito 
Paulie Kripke 
Clement R. Lawson 
Mary Leibovici 
Lucille Leland 
Muriel G. S. Lewis 
Mrs. Robert C. Madden 
Paul Mellen 



Vincent K. Overlook 
Wendy Patrick 
Harold Putnam, Jr. 
Marshall J. Ross 
Mrs. Emily Z. Shuffer 
Gertrude Spiller 
Chester St. Clair 
Stanley Swaebe 
Miss Madeline Trent 
Edward A. Weeks 
Mrs. Lyon Weyborn 
Roger D. Whittemore 
Mrs. Nathaniel Whittier 



55 




The King of Swing and his dance band had the kids of the '30s dancing in the aisles. The 
sweet, sultry sounds of his clarinet charmed and thrilled a generation. He was a musician's 
musician, a man consumed by his craft. At MacDonald & Evans, we bring the same kind 
of devotion to our work that Benny Goodman did to his. 

Naturally, we have the latest in cutting-edge equipment — a Hell digital color scanner, 
computerized stripping, five- and six-color presses, in-house perfect binding, and the like. 
But it's not the equipment that makes MacDonald & Evans a quality printer. It's how we 
use it. Our people have the skill, knowledge, and experience to 
turn even the most ordinary printing job into a work of art. 

We'd like the chance to prove what we can do for you. 
For more information or to see samples of our work, give 
us a call. You'll find we're playing your song. 

The proof is in the performance. 

One Rex Drive • Braintree, Massachusetts 02184 
Phone: (617) 848-9090 • Fax: (617) 843-5540 

56 




The Boston Symphony Orchestra gratefully acknowledges the following donors whose very 
generous support made possible the successful completion of the $7.2 million Symphony Hall 
Renovation Program. 



INDIVIDUALS 

Mr. and Mrs. Vernon R. Alden 
Mr. and Mrs. Stephen H. Anthony 
Mr. and Mrs. David B. Arnold, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Axelrod 
Mr. and Mrs. Hazen Ayer 
Mr. and Mrs. J.P. Barger 
Mrs. Gabriella Beranek 
Mr. and Mrs. Samuel W. Bodman 
Mr. and Mrs. John M. Bradley 
Mrs. Alexander H. Bright 
Mr. and Mrs. Peter A. Brooke 
Mr. and Mrs. C. Thomas Clagett 
Mr. and Mrs. James F. Cleary 
Mr. and Mrs. Julian Cohen 
Mr. and Mrs. Abram T. Collier 
Mr. and Mrs. William H. Congleton 
Mr. and Mrs. William F. Connell 
Mrs. A. Werk Cook 
Mr. and Mrs. Lewis S. Dabney 
Mr. and Mrs. Nelson J. Darling, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Michael H. Davis 
Mr. and Mrs. Eugene B. Doggett 
Ms. Phyllis Dohanian 
Mr. and Mrs. Goetz B. Eaton 
Mr. and Mrs. Archie C. Epps 
Mr. and Mrs. Edward Eskandarian 
Mrs. Harris Fahnestock 
Mr. and Mrs. John H. Fitzpatrick 
Allyn B. and Lois W. Forbes 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard Fraser 
Mr. and Mrs. Dean Freed 
Carol R. and Avram J. Goldberg 
Professor & Mrs. Ray A. Goldberg 
Mr. and Mrs. Jordan L. Golding 
Mr. and Mrs. Haskell R. Gordon 
Mr. and Mrs. John L. Grandin 
Mr. and Mrs. R. Douglas Hall, III 
Mr. and Mrs. Francis W. Hatch 
Ms. Susan Morse Hilles 
Mr. Frederick Johnson 
Mr. and Mrs. Bela T. Kalman 
Dr. and Mrs. S. Charles Kasdon 
Senator Edward M. Kennedy 
Mr. and Mrs. George H. Kidder 
Mr. and Mrs. Gordon F. Kingsley 



Mr. and Mrs. Carl Koch 

Mr. and Mrs. David I. Kosowsky 

Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Chet 

Krentzman 
Mr. and Mrs. R. Willis Leith 
Mr. and Mrs. Caleb Loring 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles P. Lyman 
Mr. and Mrs. George Macomber 
Mr. and Mrs. William D. Manice 
Mr. and Mrs. C. Charles Marran 
Mrs. August R. Meyer 
Mr. and Mrs. Nathan R. Miller 
Mr. and Mrs. Paul M. Montrone 
New Hampshire Bus Group 
Mrs. Robert B. Newman 
Mr. and Mrs. Albert L. Nickerson 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert P. O'Block 
Mr. and Mrs. David R. Pokross 
Mr. and Mrs. William J. Poorvu 
Mr. and Mrs. Irving W. Rabb 
Sidney & Esther Rabb Charitable 

Foundation 
Sidney R. Rabb Charitable Trust 

Helene R. Cahners-Kaplan— Trustee 

Carol R. Goldberg— Trustee 
Mr. and Mrs. Peter C. Read 
Mr. and Mrs. Jerome Rosenfeld 
Mr. and Mrs. Daniel E. Rothenberg 
Mr. and Mrs. William C. Rousseau 
Mrs. George Rowland 
Mrs. George Lee Sargent 
Mr. and Mrs. Roger A. Saunders 
Mr. and Mrs. Francis P. Sears, Jr. 
Mr. Robert Segel 
Mrs. Donald B. Sinclair 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard A. Smith 
Dr. and Mrs. W. Davies Sohier 
Mr. and Mrs. Ray Stata 
Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Stoneman 
Miss Elizabeth Storer 
Mr. and Mrs. William F. Thompson 
Mr. and Mrs. John L. Thorndike 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas H.P. Whitney 
Roger D. Whittemore, Jr. 

Memorial Fund 



Mrs. Margaret A. Williams-DeCelles 
Mr. and Mrs. Donald B. Wilson 
Mrs. John J. Wilson 
Mr. Fumihiko Yonezawa 
Mr. and Mrs. Erwin N. Ziner 



CORPORATIONS 

Arthur Andersen & Company 

Bank of Boston 

Bank of New England Corporation 

BayBanks, Inc. 

Coopers & Lybrand 

Deluxe Check Printers 

Dynatech Corporation 

Ernst and Young 

The Gillette Company 

John Hancock Mutual Life Insurance 

Company 

The Henley Group 

Liberty Mutual Insurance Company 

Polaroid Corporation 

Price Waterhouse 

Raytheon Company 

Shawmut Bank, N.A. 

State Street Bank and Trust Company 

Charles H. Watkins & Co., Inc. 



FOUNDATIONS 

Chiles Foundation 

Clowes Foundation 

The George B. Henderson Foundation 

Rita & Stanley H. Kaplan Foundation 

Kresge Foundation 

Levy Foundation 

Amelia Peabody Charitable Fund 

Amelia Peabody Foundation 

Schrafft Foundation 

Seth Sprague Foundation 

Stevens Foundation 

Edwin S. Webster Foundation 

Weyerhauser Trust 

Yawkey Foundation II 



57 



The Boston Symphony Orchestra gratefully acknowledges those who have established Named 
Endowment Funds. These Funds support the Endowed Orchestra Chair program, the Tan- 
glewood Music Center Fellowship program, the Youth Activities program and the Musical 
Programming and Instrument Acquisition Funds. Named Fund's also provide unrestricted 
endowment for general support of annual operations. Named Endowment Funds can be ere 
ated with a minimum contribution of $10,000. Additional contributions and market value 
appreciation enhance the Funds' value. 



Maurice Abravanel Scholarship Fund 
George W. and 

Florence N. Adams Fund 
Vernon P. and 

Marion P. Alden Chair Fund 
Philip R. and 

Anne Allen Chair Fund 
Anderson Family Fund 
Dorothy Q. and 

David B. Arnold, Jr. Chair Fund 
Mr. and Mrs. David B. Arnold, Jr. 

Fellowship Fund 
Ethan Ayer Fund 
Mrs. Paul T. Babson 

Fellowship Fund 
Sandra and David Bakalar 

Chair Fund 
Jane W. Bancroft Fellowship Fund 
Jane W. Bancroft Fund 
Anne S. M. Banks Chair Fund 
Kathleen H. Banks Fellowship Fund 
Talcott M. Banks Memorial Fund 
Mary and J. P. Barger Chair Fund 
BayBanks Fellowship Fund 
Robert L. Beal, and Enid 

and Bruce A. Beal Chair Fund 
Leo L. Beranek Chair Fund 
Leo L. Beranek Fellowship Fund 
Berkshire Chair Fund 
Leonard Bernstein Fellowship Fund 
Caroline Thayer Bland Fund 
Boston Symphony Orchestra Musical 

Instrument Acquisition Fund 
Edward and Lois Bowles 

Master Teacher Fund 
John and Jane Bradley 

Family Fund 
Eleanor Cabot Bradley Fund 
Frederic and Juliette Brandi 

Fellowship Fund 
Peter A. Brooke Family Chair Fund 
Brookline Youth Concerts Awards 

Committee Fellowship Fund 
Rosamond Sturgis Brooks 

Memorial Fellowship Fund 
Richard Burgin Chair Fund 
William S. Busiek 

Broadcast Booth Fund 
John Moors Cabot Chair Fund 



Virginia Wellington Cabot 

Concert Fund 
Henry B. Cabot Memorial Fund 
Helene R. and 

Norman L. Cahners Chair Fund 
Helene R. and Norman L. Cahners 

Fellowship Fund 
Marion Callanan Memorial 

Fellowship Fund 
Calvert Trust Guest Soloist Fund 
Richard B. Carter Fund 
Stanley Chappie Fellowship Fund 
Alfred E. Chase Fellowship Fund 
Angelica Lloyd Clagett Chair Fund 
Angelica Lloyd Clagett 

Youth Concerts Fund 
Clowes Fellowship Fund 
George H. A. Clowes, Jr. Fund 
John F. Cogan, Jr. Fund 
Julian and Eunice S. Cohen Fund 
Nat Cole Memorial Fellowship Fund 
Abram T. Collier Chair Fund 
Andre Come Fellowship Fund 
Commissioning New Works Fund 
Caroline G. Congdon 

Memorial Fellowship Fund 
Margaret Andersen Congleton 

Chair Fund 
Arthur P. Contas Fund 

for the Commissioning of 

New Works 
Eugene Cook Scholarship Fund 
Charles A. Coolidge, Jr. Fund 
Ford H. Cooper Chair Fund 
Dorothy and Montgomery Crane 

Fellowship Fund 
William E. Crofut 

Family Scholarship Fund 
Charles E. Culpeper 

Foundation Fellowship Fund 
Charles E. Culpeper 

Tanglewood Music Center 

Faculty Chairman Fund 
Anna W. Cutler Fund 
Eleanor Naylor Dana 

Visiting Artists Fund 
Darling Family Fellowship Fund 
DARTS Fund 
Deborah B. and Michael H. Davis Fund 

58 



Omar Del Carlo 

Tanglewood Fellowship Fund 
Charles and JoAnne Dickinson Chair Fund 
Harry Ellis Dickson Fund 

for Youth Concerts 
Nina L. and Eugene B. Doggett Fund 
Carlotta M. Dreyfus Fellowship Fund 
Charles F. and Elizabeth Y. Eaton Fund 
Otto Eckstein Family Fellowship Fund 
Ethel Barber Eno Fellowship Fund 
Esplanade Concerts Funds 
Arthur Fiedler Boston Pops Fund 
Arthur Fiedler Financial Aid Fund 
Fitzpatrick Fund 
Allyn B. Forbes Memorial Fund 
Dr. Marshall N. Fulton 

Memorial Fellowship Fund 
Judy Gardiner Fellowship Fund 
Juliet Esselborn Geier Fellowship Fund 
Gerald Gelbloom Memorial 

Fellowship Fund 
Dr. and Mrs. Kenneth J. Germeshausen 

Youth Concerts Fund 
Ann and Gordon Getty Fund 
Armando A. Ghitalla Fellowship Fund 
Marie L. Audet and Fernand Gillet 

Concert Fund 
Fernand Gillet Memorial 

Fellowship Fund 
Marie Gillet Memorial Fellowship Fund 
Haskell and Ina Gordon Fellowship Fund 
Gordon/Rousmaniere/Roberts Fund 
Florence Gould Foundation 

Fellowship Fund 
Grainger Foundation Fund 
John and Susanne Grandin 

Fellowship Fund 
Edgar and Shirley Grossman 

Chair Fund 
Abigail and Robert T. Hamlin Fund 
Luke B. Hancock Foundation 

Fellowship Fund 
Margaret L. and Robert G. Hargrove Fund 
Hatsopoulos Family Fund 
William Randolph Hearst Fellowship Fund 
Heifetz Scholarship Fund 
Henry L. Higginson FundGeorge F. and 

Elsie Barnard Hodder Fund 
Harold D. Hodglrinson Chair Fund 






Mickey L. Hooten Memorial Fund 
Mark M. Horblitt Trust Fund 
Henry Hornblower Fund 
F. Donald Hudson Fund 
Emma L. Hutchins Memorial Fund 
CD. Jackson Fellowship Fund 
Grace B. Jackson Prize Fund 
Paul Jacobs Memorial 

Commissions Fund 
Lola and Edwin Jaffe 

Fellowship Fund 
Leah Jansizian Memorial 

Scholarship Fund 
Japanese Fellowship Fund 
Adele Wentworth Jones Trust Fund 
Kalman Fund 
Susan B. Kaplan and 

Ami Trauber Fellowship Fund 
Miriam Ann Kenner Memorial 

Scholarship Fund 
Amey P. Ketchum Memorial Fund 
Mr. and Mrs. Allen Kluchman 

Fellowship Fund 
Dr. John H. Knowles Memorial 

Fellowship Fund 
Jean Koch Fund 
Koussevitzky Tanglewood Music 

Center Scholarship Fund 
Robert and Myra Kraft Chair Fund 
Louis Krasner Fund 
Harvey C. and Farla Krentzman 

Chair Fund 
William Kroll Memorial 

Fellowship Fund 
Bernice and Lizbeth Krupp 

Fellowship Fund 
Philip and Bernice Krupp 

Fellowship Fund 
Felicia and Harry Kutten 

Commissioning Fund for 

Youth Concerts 
La Croix Family Fund 
Paul Jacobs Memorial 

Fellowship Fund 
Leith Family Fund 
I. Norman Levin Trust Fund 
Dorothy Lewis Fellowship Fund 
Lovejoy Family Fund 
Dr. and Mrs. Frederick H. 

Lovejoy, Jr. Fund 
Lucy Lowell Fellowship Fund 
Edward E. MacCrone 

Youth Trust Fund 
Nancy Lurie Marks 

Foundation Chair Fund 
Evelyn and C. Charles Marran 

Chair Fund 



jL 



Marian Douglas Martin 

Master Teacher Fund, 

endowed by Marilyn B. Hoffman 
Fannie Peabody Mason Fund 
Robert G. McClellan & IBM 

Matching Grants Fellowship Fund 
Andrew Mellon Foundation 

Trust Fund 
Merrill Lynch Fellowship Fund 
Charles E. Merrill 

Tanglewood Music Center Fund 
Lillian and Nathan R. Miller 

Chair Fund 
Charles L. Moore Fund 
Stephen and Persis Morris 

Fellowship Fund 
Richard P. and Claire Morse Fund 

for Youth Concerts 
Ruth S. Morse Fellowship Fund 
Morse Rush Tickets Fund 
Charles Munch Memorial Chair Fund 
Newman Family Chair Fund 
Albert L. and Elizabeth Nickerson 

Fellowship Fund 
Northern California Audition Fund 
Northern California Fellowship Fund 
Opera Training Program Fund 
Seiji Ozawa Fellowship Fund 
Richard Paine Family Fund 
Theodore Edson Parker 

Fellowship Fund 
Joanne and Andrall Pearson 

Scholarship Fund 
Marion G. Perkins Fund 
Frank R. and 

Margaret J. Peters Fund 
Harold W. Pierce Charitable Fund 
Walter Piston Chair Fund 
David R. and Muriel K. Pokross 

Fellowship Fund 
William and Lia Poorvu 

Fellowship Fund 
William and Lia Poorvu Fund 
Beatrice Sterling Procter 

Master Teacher Chair Fund 
Daphne Brooks Prout 

Fellowship Fund 
Claire and Millard Pryor 

Scholarship Fund 
Charlotte F. and Irving W. Rabb 

Chair Fund 
Readers Digest Fellowship Fund 
Mildred B. Remis Chair Fund 
Harry and Mildred Remis 

Fellowship Fund 
Vladimir Resnikoff Fund 
Peggy Rockefeller Fellowship Fund 
Bertha and Edward Rose Chair Fund 

59 



Rotenberg/Carlyle Foundation 

Library Fund 
Margaret and William C. Rousseau 

Chair Fund 
Carolyn and George R. Rowland Chair Fund 
Carolyn and George R. Rowland 

Fellowship Fund in Honor of 

Eleanor Panasevich 
Helena Rubinstein Fund 
Lawrence J. and 

Anne Cable Rubenstein Fund 
Sara H. Sabbagh and 

Hasib J. Sabbagh Chair Fund 
Mary B. Saltonstall Fund 
Morris A Schapiro Fellowship Fund 
Hannah and Raymond Schneider 

Fellowship Fund 
Esther and Joseph Shapiro Chair Fund 
Malcolm and Barbara Sherman Fund 
Asher J. Shuffer Fellowship Fund 
W. H. Sinclair Chair Fund 
Helen Slosberg Chair Fund 
Richard A Smith Family Fund 
Mary H. Smith Scholarship Fund 
Albert Spaulding Fellowship Fund 
Jason Starr Fellowship Fund 
Starr Foundation Fellowship Fund 
Ray and Maria Stata Chair Fund 
Tanglewood Programmers and Ushers 

Scholarship Fund 
Anne Stoneman Chair Fund 
Miriam and Sidney Stoneman 

Fellowship Fund 
Roberta Strang Fund 
Surdna Foundation Fellowship Fund 
Surdna Foundation Master Teacher 

Chair Fund 
Taft Memorial Chair Fund 
Tanglewood Music Center 

Composition Program Fund 
Tappan Dixey Brooks 

Memorial Fellowship 
William F. and Juliana W. Thompson 

Fellowship Fund 
R. Amory Thorndike 

Fellowship Fund 
Augustus Thorndike Fellowship Fund 
Tisch Foundation Scholarship Fund 
Edyth and Irving Usen Fund 
Roger L. Voisin Chair Fund 
Sherman Walt Memorial Fund 
Leo Wasserman Fellowship Fund 
Mrs. Edwin S. Webster Fund 
Katherin Lane Weems Fund 
Roger D. and Diana G. Wellington Fund 
Sylvia Shippen Wells Chair Fund 
Alonzo A and Georgia B. West Fund 
John and Dorothy Wilson Chair Fund 



1 1 Ik 



Next Program . . . 



Thursday, November 1, at 8 
Friday, November 2, at 2 
Saturday, November 3, at 8 
Tuesday, November 6, at 8 

KURT SANDERLING conducting 



HAYDN 
MOZART 



Overture to La fedeltd premiata 

Piano Concerto No. 25 in C, K.503 

Allegro maestoso 

Andante 

[Allegretto] 

ALICIA DE LARROCHA 



INTERMISSION 



BEETHOVEN 



Symphony No. 6 in F, Opus 68, Pastoral 

Awakening of happy feelings upon reaching 
the countryside. Allegro non troppo 

Scene at the brook. Andante molto mosso 

Cheerful gathering of the country folk. 
Allegro — 

Thunderstorm. Allegro — 

Shepherd's song. Happy, grateful feelings 
after the storm. Allegretto 



Single tickets for all Boston Symphony Orchestra concerts throughout the season 
are available at the Symphony Hall box office, or by calling "Symphony-Charge" at 
(617) 266-1200, Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m. until 6 p.m., to charge 
tickets instantly on a major credit card, or to make a reservation and then send 
payment by check. Please note that there is a $1.75 handling fee for each ticket 
ordered by phone. 



60 



Coming Concerts 



Thursday, November 1, at 10:30 a.m. 

Open Rehearsal 
Evans Mirageas will discuss the program 

at 9:30 in Symphony Hall. 
Thursday 'D'- November 1, 8-10 
Friday 'B' — November 2, 2-4 
Saturday 'A' -November 3, 8-10 
Tuesday 'B' — November 6, 8-10 

KURT SANDERLING conducting 
ALICIA DE LARROCHA, piano 



HAYDN 



MOZART 



BEETHOVEN 



Overture to La fedeltd 

premiata 
Piano Concerto No. 25 

in C, K.503 
Symphony No. 6, Pastoral 



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Thursday 'C- November 8, 8-9:50 
Friday 'A' -November 9, 2-3:50 
Saturday 'B'- November 10, 8-9:50 

KURT SANDERLING conducting 
MOZART Symphony No. 25 

SHOSTAKOVICH Symphony No. 10 

Wednesday, November 14, at 7:30 

Open Rehearsal 
Steven Ledbetter will discuss the program 

at 6:30 in Symphony Hall. 
Thursday 'A' -November 15, 8-10:05 
Friday 'B'- November 16, 2-4:05 
Saturday 'A' -November 17, 8-10:05 
CATHERINE COMET conducting 
HEINRICH SCHIFF, cello 

WTJORINEN 
RAVEL 



SAINT-SAENS 
FAURE 



Machault mon chou 
Valses nobles et 

sentimentales 
Cello Concerto No. 1 
EUgie for cello and 

orchestra 
SHOSTAKOVICH Symphony No. 1 

Thursday 'C- Wednesday, November 21, 8-10:05 
Friday 'A' -November 23, 2-4:05 
Saturday 'B'- November 24, 8-10:05 
Tuesday 'B'- November 27, 8-10:05 

MAREK JANOWSKI conducting 
CHRISTIAN TETZLAFF, piano 

SCHUMANN Violin Concerto 

BRUCKNER Symphony No. 7 

Wednesday, December 5, at 7:30 

Open Rehearsal 
Marc Mandel will discuss the program 

at 6:30 in Symphony Hall. 
Thursday 'A' -December 6, 8-10:05 
Friday 'B' -December 7, 2-4:05 
Saturday 'B' -December 8, 8-10:05 

SEIJI OZAWA conducting 
PETER SERKIN, piano 
TANGLE WOOD FESTIVAL CHORUS, 
JOHN OLIVER, conductor 

VERDI Four Sacred Pieces 

SCHOENBERG Piano Concerto 
BEETHOVEN Choral Fantasy 

Programs and artists subject to change. 



61 



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Next time, before you go to the symphony, have dinner at Newbury's 
Steak House. You'll find char-broiled steaks, fresh seafood and chicken, 
a great salad bar, and ever greater prices. Plus discounted parking. All 
less than a ten minute walk away. 



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62 



Symphony Hall Information . . . 



FOR SYMPHONY HALL CONCERT AND 
TICKET INFORMATION, caU (617) 266- 
1492. For Boston Symphony concert program 
information, call "C-O-N-C-E-R-T" (266-2378). 

THE BOSTON SYMPHONY performs ten 
months a year, in Symphony Hall and at Tan- 
glewood. For information about any of the 
orchestra's activities, please call Symphony 
Hall, or write the Boston Symphony Orches- 
tra, Symphony Hall, Boston, MA 02115. 

THE NEWLY REFURBISHED EUNICE S. 
AND JULIAN COHEN WING, adjacent to 
Symphony Hall on Huntington Avenue, may be 
entered by the Symphony Hall West Entrance 
on Huntington Avenue. 

FOR SYMPHONY HALL RENTAL INFOR- 
MATION, call (617) 638-9240, or write the 
Function Manager, Symphony Hall, Boston, 
MA 02115. 

THE BOX OFFICE is open from 10 a.m. 
until 6 p.m. Monday through Saturday; on con- 
cert evenings it remains open through intermis- 
sion for BSO events or just past starting-time 
for other events. In addition, the box office 
opens Sunday at 1 p.m. when there is a con- 
cert that afternoon or evening. Single tickets 
for all Boston Symphony subscription concerts 
are available at the box office. For outside 
events at Symphony Hall, tickets are available 
three weeks before the concert. No phone 
orders will be accepted for these events. 

TO PURCHASE BSO TICKETS: American 
Express, MasterCard, Visa, a personal check, 
and cash are accepted at the box office. To 
charge tickets instantly on a major credit card, 
or to make a reservation and then send pay- 
ment by check, call "Symphony-Charge" at 
(617) 266-1200, Monday through Saturday 
from 10 a.m. until 6 p.m. There is a handling 
fee of $1.75 for each ticket ordered by phone. 

GROUP SALES: Groups may take advantage of 
advance ticket sales. For BSO concerts at Sym- 
phony Hall, groups of twenty-five or more may 
reserve tickets by telephone and take advantage 
of ticket discounts and flexible payment options. 
To place an order, or for more information, call 
Group Sales at (617) 638-9345. 

IN CONSIDERATION of our patrons and 
artists, children under four will not be admit- 
ted to Boston Symphony Orchestra concerts. 



THE SYMPHONY SHOP is located in the 
Cohen Wing at the West Entrance on Hunting- 
ton Avenue and is open Tuesday, Thursday, and 
Friday from 11 a.m. until 3 p.m., Saturday from 
1 p.m. until 6 p.m., and from one hour before 
each concert through intermission. The shop car- 
ries BSO and musical-motif merchandise and 
gift items such as calendars, clothing, appoint- 
ment books, drinking glasses, holiday ornaments, 
children's books, and BSO and Pops recordings. 
A selection of Symphony Shop merchandise is 
also available during BSO concert hours outside 
the Cabot-Cahners Room in the Massachusetts 
Avenue corridor. All proceeds benefit the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra. For merchandise informa- 
tion, please call (617) 267-2692. 

TICKET RESALE: If for some reason you 
are unable to attend a Boston Symphony con- 
cert for which you hold a ticket, you may make 
your ticket available for resale by calling the 
switchboard. This helps bring needed revenue 
to the orchestra and makes your seat available 
to someone who wants to attend the concert. A 
mailed receipt will acknowledge your tax-deduct- 
ible contribution. 

RUSH SEATS: There are a limited number of 
Rush Seats available for the Friday-afternoon, 
Tuesday-evening, and Saturday-evening Boston 
Symphony concerts (subscription concerts only). 
The low price of these seats is assured through 
the Morse Rush Seat Fund. The tickets for Rush 
Seats are sold at $6 each, one to a customer, on 
Fridays as of 9 a.m. and Saturdays and Tues- 
days as of 5 p.m. 

PARKING: The Prudential Center Garage 
offers a discount to any BSO patron with a 
ticket stub for that evening's performance. 
There are also two paid parking garages on 
Westland Avenue near Symphony Hall. 
Limited street parking is available. As a spe- 
cial benefit, guaranteed pre-paid parking near 
Symphony Hall is available to subscribers who 
attend evening concerts on Tuesday, Thursday, 
Friday, or Saturday. For more information, 
call the Subscription Office at (617) 266-7575. 

LATECOMERS will be seated by the ushers 
during the first convenient pause in the pro- 
gram. Those who wish to leave before the end 
of the concert are asked to do so between pro- 
gram pieces in order not to disturb other 
patrons. 



63 



SMOKING IS NOT PERMITTED in any 
part of the Symphony Hall auditorium or in 
the surrounding corridors; it is permitted only 
in the Hatch Room and in the main lobby on 
Massachusetts Avenue. Please note that 
smoking is no longer permitted in the Cabot- 
Cahners Room. 

CAMERA AND RECORDING EQUIPMENT 

may not be brought into Symphony Hall dur- 
ing concerts. 

FIRST AID FACILITIES for both men and 
women are available. On-call physicians attend- 
ing concerts should leave their names and seat 
locations at the switchboard near the Massa- 
chusetts Avenue entrance. 

WHEELCHAIR ACCESS to Symphony HaU 
is available via the Cohen Wing, at the West 
Entrance. Wheelchair-accessible restrooms are 
located in the main corridor of the West 
Entrance, and in the first-balcony passageway 
between Symphony Hall and the Cohen Wing. 

ELEVATORS are located outside the Hatch 
and Cabot-Cahners rooms on the Massachu- 
setts Avenue side of Symphony Hall, and in 
the Cohen Wing. 

LADIES' ROOMS are located on the orches- 
tra level, audience-left, at the stage end of the 
hall, on both sides of the first balcony, and in 
the Cohen Wing. 

MEN'S ROOMS are located on the orchestra 
level, audience-right, outside the Hatch Room 
near the elevator, on the first-balcony level, 
audience-left, outside the Cabot-Cahners Room 
near the coatroom, and in the Cohen Wing. 

COATROOMS are located on the orchestra and 
first-balcony levels, audience-left, outside the 
Hatch and Cabot-Cahners rooms, and in the 
Cohen Wing. The BSO is not responsible for 
personal apparel or other property of patrons. 

LOUNGES AND BAR SERVICE: There are 
two lounges in Symphony Hall. The Hatch 
Room on the orchestra level and the Cabot- 



Cahners Room on the first-balcony level serve 
drinks starting one hour before each perform- 
ance. For the Friday-afternoon concerts, both 
rooms open at 12:15, with sandwiches available 
until concert time. 

BOSTON SYMPHONY BROADCASTS: Con- 
certs of the Boston Symphony Orchestra are 
heard by delayed broadcast in many parts of the 
United States and Canada, as well as interna- 
tionally, through the Boston Symphony Tran- 
scription Trust. In addition, Friday-afternoon 
concerts are broadcast live by WGBH-FM (Bos- 
ton 89.7); Saturday-evening concerts are broad- 
cast live by both WGBH-FM and WCRB-FM 
(Boston 102.5). Live broadcasts may also be 
heard on several other public radio stations • 
throughout New England and New York. 

BSO FRIENDS: The Friends are annual 
donors to the Boston Symphony Orchestra. 
Friends receive BSO, the orchestra's newslet- 
ter, as well as priority ticket information and 
other benefits depending on their level of giv- 
ing. For information, please call the Develop- 
ment Office at Symphony Hall weekdays 
between 9 and 5, (617) 638-9251. If you are 
already a Friend and you have changed your 
address, please send your new address with 
your newsletter label to the Development Office, 
Symphony Hall, Boston, MA 02115. Including 
the mailing label will assure a quick and accu- 
rate change of address in our files. 

BUSINESS FOR BSO: The BSO's Business 
& Professional Leadership program makes it 
possible for businesses to participate in the life 
of the Boston Symphony Orchestra through a 
variety of original and exciting programs, 
among them "Presidents at Pops," "A Com- 
pany Christmas at Pops," and special-event 
underwriting. Benefits include corporate recog- 
nition in the BSO program book, access to the 
Higginson Room reception lounge, and priority 
ticket service. For further information, please 
call the BSO Corporate Development Office at 
(617) 638-9250. 



64 



I": 




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dance floor at Fox Hill Village, people say 
they move just like Fred Astaire and 
Ginger Rogers. Such grace and style. 
Such flawless execution. 

The same can be said of Fox Hill Village 
Set amid S3 gracefully wooded acres. 
Fox Hill Village offers a style of retire- 
ment living that's beyond compare. 
With an ever- changing schedule of 
social activities. 




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Plus, a flawless array of services and 
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Yet Fox Hill Village is surprisingly 
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and a unique cooperative plan which 
lets you retain the many investment 
and tax benefits of homeownership. 

Come see for yourself. Call (617) 
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£■ ^L^^^^j^M^ 


ssa^sspsi^^i^itJB^^is 


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Boston Symphony Orchestic 

Seiji Ozawa, Music Director 


i 


90th Annivers 


>ary of Symphony Hall 












Only the few 
Will Own an Audemars 





Classic Straps: Automatic 

with date and second-hand in 18K gold. 



Perpetual Calendar: 

Day, date, month and moon phase in 18K gold. 



Unly the few will seek the exclusivity that comes with owning 
an Audemars Piguet. Only the few will recognize n* 

more than a century of technical in- rW 

novation; today, that innovation is 
reflected in our ultra- thin mech- 
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new watch with dual time zones. Only the few will appreciate The CEO 
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330 BOYLSTON ST., BOSTON, MASS. 02116 (617) 267-9100 • 1-800-225-7088 
THE MALL AT CHESTNUT HILL • SOUTH SHORE PLAZA 



BOSTON 

SYMPHONY 

t ORCHESTRA, 

SEIJI OZAWA y 



Seiji Ozawa, Music Director 
Grant Llewellyn and Robert Spano, 

Assistant Conductors 
One Hundred and Tenth Season, 1990-91 



Trustees of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Inc. 

Nelson J. Darling, Jr., Chairman Emeritus 



J. P. Barger, Chairman 

Mrs. Lewis S. Dabney, Vice-Chairman 

Mrs. John H. Fitzpatrick, Vice-Chairman 



George H. Kidder, President 

Archie C. Epps, Vice-Chairman 

William J. Poorvu, Vice-Chairman and Treasurer 



David B. Arnold, Jr. 
Peter A. Brooke 
James F. Cleary 
John F. Cogan, Jr. 
Julian Cohen 
William M. Crozier, Jr. 
Mrs. Michael H. Davis 
Mrs. Eugene B. Doggett 

Trustees Emeriti 

Vernon R. Alden 
Philip K. Allen 
Allen G. Barry 
Leo L. Beranek 
Mrs. John M. Bradley 
Abram T. Collier 

Other Officers of the Corporation 

John Ex Rodgers, Assistant Treasurer 
Daniel R. Gustin, Clerk 



Avram J. Goldberg 
Mrs. R. Douglas Hall III 
Francis W. Hatch 
Julian T. Houston 
Mrs. Bela T. Kalman 
Mrs. George I. Kaplan 
Harvey Chet Krentzman 
R. Willis Leith, Jr. 



Mrs. Harris Fahnestock 
Mrs. John L. Grandin 
E. Morton Jennings, Jr. 
Albert L. Nickerson 
Thomas D. Perry, Jr. 
Irving W. Rabb 



Mrs. August R. Meyer 
Mrs. Robert B. Newman 
Peter C. Read 
Richard A. Smith 
Ray Stata 

William F. Thompson 
Nicholas T. Zervas 



Mrs. George R. Rowland 
Mrs. George Lee Sargent 
Sidney Stoneman 
John Hoyt Stookey 
John L. Thorndike 



Michael G. McDonough, Assistant Treasurer 



Administration 

Kenneth Haas, Managing Director 

Daniel R. Gustin, Assistant Managing Director and Manager of Tanglewood 

Michael G. McDonough, Director of Finance and Business Affairs 

Evans Mirageas, Artistic Administrator 

Anne H. Parsons, Orchestra Manager 

Caroline Smedvig, Director of Public Relations and Marketing 

Josiah Stevenson, Director of Development 

Robert Bell, Manager of 

Information Systems 
Peter N. Cerundolo, Director of 

Corporate Development 
Madelyne Cuddeback, Director of 

Corporate Sponsorships 
Patricia Forbes Halligan, Personnel 

Administrator 
Sarah J. Harrington, Budget Manager 
Margaret Hillyard-Lazenby, 

Director of Volunteers 
Russell M. Hodsdon, Manager of Box Office 
Bernadette M. Horgan, Public Relations 

Coordinator 
Craig R. Kaplan, Controller 
Nancy A. Kay, Director of Sales & 

Marketing Manager 
John M. Keenum, Director of 

Tanglewood Music Center Development 



Patricia Krol, Coordinator of Youth Activities 
Steven Ledbetter, Musicologist & 

Program Annotator 
Michelle R. Leonard, Media and Production 

Manager, Boston Symphony Orchestra 
Marc Mandel, Publications Coordinator 
John C. Marksbury, Director of 

Foundation and Government Support 
Julie-Anne Miner, Manager of Fund 

Reporting 
Richard Ortner, Administrator of 

Tanglewood Music Center 
Scott Schillin, Assistant Manager, 

Pops and Youth Activities 
Joyce M. Serwitz, Director of Major Gifts/ 

Assistant Director of Development 
Cheryl L. Silvia, Function Manager 
Susan E. Tomlin, Director of Annual Giving 



Programs copyright ©1990 Boston Symphony Orchestra, Inc. 
Cover by Jaycole Advertising, Inc./Cover photo by Ira Wyman 



Board of Overseers of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Inc. 

John F. Cogan, Jr., Chairman 

Mrs. Ray A. Goldberg, Vice-Chairman 

Mrs. R. Douglas Hall III, Secretary 



Mrs. Herbert B. Abelow 

Harlan Anderson 

Mrs. David Bakalar 

Bruce A. Beal 

Mrs. Leo L. Beranek 

Lynda Schubert Bodman 

Donald C. Bowersock, Jr. 

William M. Bulger 

Mrs. Levin H. Campbell 

Earle M. Chiles 

Mrs. C. Thomas Clagett, Jr. 

James F. Cleary 

William H. Congleton 

William F. Connell 

Walter J. Connolly, Jr. 

S. James Coppersmith 

Albert C. Cornelio 

Phyllis Curtin 

Alex V. d'Arbeloff 

Phyllis Dohanian 

Hugh Downs 

Goetz B. Eaton 

Edward Eskandarian 

Katherine Fanning 

Peter M. Flanigan 

Dean Freed 

Eugene M. Freedman 

Peter H.B. Frelinghuysen 

Mrs. James Garivaltis 

Mark R. Goldweitz 



Haskell R. Gordon 

Steven Grossman 

John P. Hamill 

Daphne P. Hatsopoulos 

Joe M. Henson 

Mrs. Marilyn Brachman Hoffman 

Ronald A. Homer 

Lola Jaffe 

Anna Faith Jones 

H. Eugene Jones 

Susan B. Kaplan 

Mrs. S. Charles Kasdon 

Richard L. Kaye 

Robert D. King 

Mrs. Gordon F. Kingsley 

Allen Z. Kluchman 

Koji Kobayashi 

Mrs. Carl Koch 

David I. Kosowsky 

Robert K. Kraft 

George Krupp 

Mrs. Hart D. Leavitt 

Laurence Lesser 

Stephen R. Levy 

Frederick H. Lovejoy, Jr. 

Mrs. Charles P. Lyman 

Mrs. Harry L. Marks 

C. Charles Marran 

Nathan R. Miller 



Mrs. Thomas S. Morse 

Richard P. Morse 

E. James Morton 

David G. Mugar 

David S. Nelson 

Mrs. Hiroshi H. Nishino 

Robert P. O'Block 

Paul C. O'Brien 

Vincent M. O'Reilly 

Andrall E. Pearson 

John A. Perkins 

Daphne Brooks Prout 

Millard H. Pryor, Jr. 

Keizo Saji 

Roger A. Saunders 

Mrs. Raymond H. Schneider 

Mark L. Selkowitz 

Malcolm L. Sherman 

Mrs. Donald B. Sinclair 

W. Davies Sohier, Jr. 

Ralph Z. Sorenson 

Ira Stepanian 

Mrs. Arthur I. Strang 

Mark Tishler, Jr. 

Roger D. Wellington 

Robert A. Wells 

Mrs. Thomas H.P. Whitney 

Margaret Williams-DeCelles 

Mrs. John J. Wilson 



Overseers Emeriti 

Mrs. Weston W. Adams 
Mrs. Frank G. Allen 
Mrs. Richard Bennink 
Mary Louise Cabot 
Johns H. Congdon 
Mrs. Thomas J. Galligan 
Mrs. Richard D. Hill 
Susan M. Hilles 



Mrs. Louis I. Kane 
Leonard Kaplan 
Benjamin H. Lacy 
Mrs. James F. Lawrence 
Hanae Mori 

Mrs. Stephen V.C. Morris 
Stephen Paine, Sr. 
David R. Pokross 



Mrs. Peter van S. Rice 
Mrs. Jerome Rosenfeld 
Mrs. William C. Rousseau 
Francis P. Sears, Jr. 
Mrs. Edward S. Stimpson 
Luise Vosgerchian 
Mrs. Donald B. Wilson 



Symphony Hall Operations 

Robert L. Gleason, Facilities Manager 
James E. Whitaker, House Manager 

Cleveland Morrison, Stage Manager 

Franklin Smith, Supervisor of House Crew 

Wilmoth A. Griffiths, Assistant Supervisor of House Crew 

William D. McDonnell, Chief Steward 

H.R. Costa, Lighting 



Officers of the Boston Symphony Association of Volunteers 

Susan D. Hall, President 

Thelma E. Goldberg, Executive Vice-President 

Joan Erhard, Secretary 

Patricia A. Maddox, Treasurer 

Betty Sweitzer, Nominating Chairman 



Vice-Presidents 

Helen Doyle, Hall Services 
Goetz B. Eaton, Fundraising 
Charles W. Jack, Adult Education 
Pat Jensen, Membership 
Maureen Hickey, Tanglewood 

Chairmen of Regions 

Krista Kamborian Baldini 
Judy Clark 
Joan Erhard 
Bettina Harrison 



Marilyn Larkin, Tanglewood 

Patricia A. Newton, Regions 

Carol Scheifele-Holmes, Public Relations 

F. Preston Wilson, Development 

Pat Woolley, Youth Activities 



Helen Lahage 
Ginny Martens 
Paula Murphy 
Pamela S. Nugent 



Beverly J. Pieper 
Patricia L. Tambone 
Arline Ziner 



Business and Professional Leadership Association 
Board of Directors 



Harvey Chet Krentzman, Chairman 



James F. Cleary, BPLA President 



Members 

J. P. Barger 
Leo L. Beranek 
William F. Connell 
Nelson J. Darling, Jr. 



Thelma E. Goldberg 
Joe M. Henson 
George H. Kidder 
Vincent M. O'Reilly 



Malcolm L. Sherman 
Ray Stata 
Stephen J. Sweeney 
Roger D. Wellington 



Boston Symphony Orchestra concerts are funded in part by the National 
Endowment for the Arts and the Massachusetts Cultural Council, a state agency. 



Celebrating the 90th Anniversary of Symphony Hall 




On display in the first-floor Huntington Avenue corridor of the Cohen Wing is an archival 
exhibit celebrating the 90th anniversary of Symphony Hall. In addition to newspaper accounts 
of the building's opening in 1900, the exhibit includes period photographs and a tribute to 
acoustician Wallace Clement Sabine. 

Articles on various aspects of Symphony Hall will be featured in the BSO program book 
throughout the season. The cover photograph shows the cartouche directly above the 
Symphony Hall stage. Whereas numerous European halls traditionally highlighted various 
composers' names, Beethoven became the only composer whose name was inscribed on any of 
the plaques that trim the stage and balconies of Symphony Hall. The others were left empty 
since, at the time the Hall was opened, it was felt that only Beethoven's popularity would 
remain unchanged. 





nstrument, 
It s How 
You Play It. 






X 





The Duke was a man of wit, taste, and elegance. The piano virtuoso of the Big Band Era 
ticked the ivories with a spareness of style that belied his power, emotion, and originality. 
Yet while he often improvised, he never compromised. At MacDonald & Evans, we bring 
the same kind of devotion to our work that Duke Ellington did to his. 

Naturally, we have the latest in cutting-edge equipment — a Hell digital color scanner, 
computerized stripping, five- and six-color presses, in-house perfect binding, and the like. 
But it's not the equipment that makes MacDonald & Evans a quality printer. It's how we 
use it. Our people have the skill, knowledge, and experience to 
turn even the most ordinary printing job into a work of art. 

We'd like the chance to prove what we can do for you. 
For more information or to see samples of our work, give 
us a call. You'll find we're playing your song. 

The proof is in the performance. 

One Rex Drive • Braintree, Massachusetts 02184 
Phone: (617) 848-9090 • Fax: (617) 843-5540 

4 




BSO 



Boston Symphony Chamber Players 
at Jordan Hall, Sunday, November 11, 
at 3 p.m. 

The Boston Symphony Chamber Players, with 
pianist Gilbert Kalish, open their 1990-91 sub- 
scription season at Jordan Hall on Sunday, 
November 11, at 3 p.m. Baritone Sanford 
Sylvan is featured in John Harbison's Words 
from Paterson, on a program also including 
Piston's Divertimento for strings and winds 
and Beethoven's Septet in E-flat for strings 
and winds, Opus 20. Single tickets are $16, 
$12, and $9, available on the day of the con- 
cert at the Jordan Hall box office, or in 
advance at the Symphony Hall box office or by 
calling SymphonyCharge at (617) 266-1200. 

Subscriptions at $42, $32, and $24 for the 
Chamber Players' three-concert series are still 
available; for complete subscription information, 
see page 14 of this program book. 

With Thanks 

We wish to express special gratitude to Rich- 
ard P. and Claire W. Morse, major donors of 
the Rush Seats Program through the Morse 
Rush Seats Fund. A limited number of these 
generously underwritten tickets for the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra's Tuesday-evening, 
Friday-afternoon, and Saturday-evening sub- 
scription concerts are made available at $6. 

Symphony Spotlight 

This is one in a series of biographical sketches 
that focus on some of the generous individuals 
who have endowed chairs in the Boston Sym- 
phony Orchestra. Their backgrounds are varied, 
but each felt a special commitment to the Bos- 
ton Symphony Orchestra. 

Willona Henderson Sinclair Chair 

Donald Sinclair was one of the nation's early 
pioneers in the development and manufacture 
of electrical measuring instruments and auto- 
mated test systems. He was also a dedicated 
public servant — a man who left his mark on a 
large number of professional, civic, and cul- 
tural activities and a devoted husband to 
Willona Sinclair. 

Both Donald and Willona were very inter- 
ested in music. They began attending Sym- 



phony Hall concerts in 1932 and always 
enjoyed attending them together. Donald Sin- 
clair gave his wife the , Willona Henderson Sin- 
clair Chair as a fiftieth wedding anniversary 
gift, which was very meaningful for her. Before 
he died in 1985, Dr. Sinclair was chairman 
emeritus of GenRad Inc. He was an Overseer 
of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, a Trustee 
of the Wang Center, and the proud father of 
four children. Mrs. Sinclair was chairman of 
the BSO's Stage Door lecture series and of the 
Pre- Symphony Suppers. An Overseer of the 
BSO, she was also active in the BSO's 100th 
anniversary festivities and the 90th-year fund 
drive. The Willona Henderson Chair, which 
endows the principal harp position, is currently 
held by Ann Hobson Pilot. 

Art Exhibits in the Cabot-Cahners Room 

For the seventeenth year, a variety of Boston- 
area galleries, museums, schools, and non- 
profit artists' organizations are exhibiting their 
work in the Cabot- Cahners Room on the first- 
balcony level of Symphony Hall. On display 
through November 19 are works from the Car- 
negie Hall Photo Exhibition, to be followed by 
works from the Dyansen Gallery (November 
19 -December 14) and the Water Street Gallery 
(December 14- January 17). These exhibits are 
sponsored by the Boston Symphony Associa- 
tion of Volunteers, and a portion of each sale 
benefits the orchestra. Please contact the Vol- 
unteer Office at (617) 638-9390, for further 
information. 

Suppers at Symphony Hall 

The Boston Symphony Association of Volun- 
teers is pleased to continue its sponsorship of 
the BSO's evening series of pre-concert events. 
"Supper Talks" combine a buffet supper at 
6:30 p.m. in the Cohen Wing's Higginson Hall 
with an informative talk by a BSO player or 
other distinguished member of the music com- 
munity. "Supper Concerts" offer a chamber 
music performance given by members of the 
Boston Symphony Orchestra in the Cabot- 
Cahners Room at 6 p.m., followed by a buffet 
supper served in Higginson Hall. Doors open 
for all Suppers at 5:30 p.m. for a la carte 
cocktails and conversation. These events are 
offered on an individual basis, even to those 
who are not attending that evening's BSO con- 
cert. Speakers for upcoming Supper Talks 
include BSO violinist Si-Jing Huang (Tuesday, 
November 6), BSO percussionist Frank 
Epstein (Thursday, November 8), and BSO 



References furnished 
on request 



Armenta Adams 
American Ballet Theater 
Michael Barrett 
John Bayless 
Leonard Bernstein 
William Bolcom 
Jorge Bolet 

Boston Pops Orchestra 
Boston Symphony 

Chamber Players 
Boston Symphony 

Orchestra 
Boston University School 

of Music 
Brooklyn Philharmonic 
Dave Brubeck 
Aaron Copland 
John Corigliano 
Phyllis Curtin 
Rian de Waal 
Michael Feinstein 
Lukas Foss 
Philip Glass 
Karl Haas 
John F. Kennedy Center 

for Performing Arts 



David Korevaar 
Garah Landes 
Michael Lankester 
Elyane Laussade 
Marion McPartland 
John Nauman 
Seiji Ozawa 
Luciano Pavarotti 
Alexander Peskanov 
Andre Previn 
Steve Reich 
Santiago Rodriguez 
George Shearing 
Bright Sheng 
Leonard Shure 
Abbey Simon 
Stephen Sondheim 
Herbert Stessin 
Tanglewood Music 

Center 
Nelita True 
Craig Urquhart 
Earl Wild 
John Williams 
Yehudi Wyner 
and 200 others 



BALDWIN 

OF 

BOSTON 

98 Boylston, Boston, MA 02116, (617) 482-2525 




violinist Ronald Knudsen and BSO cellist Sato 
Knudsen, who are father and son (Thursday, 
November 15). Upcoming Supper Concerts will 
feature music of Beethoven and Hofmann 
(November 3) and music of Mozart and Max- 
well Davies (January 3 and 8). The suppers 
are priced at $22 per person for an individual 
event, $61 for any three, or $118 for any six. 
Advance reservations must be made by mail. 
For reservations the week of the Supper, 
please call (617) 638-9390. All reservations 
must be made at least 48 hours prior to the 
Supper. For further information, please call 
(617) 266-1492, ext. 516. 

BSO Guests on WGBH-FM-89.7 

In the coming weeks, Morning pro Musica with 
Robert J. Lurtsema will feature live interviews 
with BSO guest conductors and soloists: guest 
conductor Kurt Sanderling, who will lead the 
orchestra in two programs, appears on Monday, 
November 5; guest conductor Catherine Comet, 
music director of the American Symphony 
Orchestra, and cellist Heinrich Schiff, both 
making their BSO debuts, appear on Friday, 
November 16; and guest conductor Marek Jan- 
owski, who will lead music of Schumann and 
Bruckner, appears on Monday, November 26. 
All interviews begin at 11 a.m. 

BSO Members in Concert 

BSO violist Michael Zaretsky performs 
Schnittke's Viola Concerto with the Boston 
University Symphony Orchestra at BU's Tsai 
Performance Center, 685 Commonwealth Ave- 
nue in Boston, on Friday, November 2, at 
8 p.m. Also on the program are Busoni's 
Berceuse elegiaque and Elgar's Symphony No. 2; 
David Hoose conducts. General admission is 
$5 ($3 seniors and students). 

The John Oliver Chorale opens its 1990-91 
subscription season with Swiss composer 
Frank Martin's Requiem and the United States 
premiere of Martin's Pilate on Saturday, 
November 3, at 8 p.m. at St. Paul's Church in 
Cambridge, at Bow and Arrow streets. The 



soloists are soprano Dominique Labelle, mezzo- 
soprano Gloria Raymond, tenor Paul Kirby, 
baritone Paul Rowe, and bass Donald Wilkin- 
son. Single tickets are $20, $14, and $5; sea- 
son subscriptions are also available. For fur- 
ther information, call (617) 325-0886. 

Max Hobart leads the North Shore Philhar- 
monic in the ballet music from Gounod's 
Faust, Mozart's Violin Concerto No. 4 with 
soloist Ayano Ninomiya, and Beethoven's Sym- 
phony No. 1 on Sunday, November 4, at Salem 
High School. Tickets are $9 ($7 seniors). For 
further information, call 1-631-6513. 

Ronald Knudsen leads the Newton Sym- 
phony Orchestra in the opening concert of its 
25th Anniversary Season on Sunday, Novem- 
ber 4, at 8 p.m. at Aquinas Junior College, 
15 Walnut Park in Newton. Sanford Sylvan is 
soloist in the world premiere of Charles Fus- 
sell's Wilde, a Symphony for Baritone and 
Orchestra, commissioned by the Newton Sym- 
phony Orchestra, on a program also including 
the Mussorgsky/Ravel Pictures at an Exhibi- 
tion. Single tickets are $14 and $12; season 
subscriptions are also available. Call 
(617) 965-2555 for further information. 

Violist Patricia McCarty and pianist Ellen 
Weckler will present a recital on Friday, 
November 9, at 8 p.m. at the Pickman Concert 
Hall at the Longy School of Music of Cam- 
bridge. The American Music Week program 
will include sonatas by Hovhaness, Lieber- 
mann, and Foote, and the world premiere of a 
work by Elizabeth Vercoe. Admission is $8 ($4 
seniors and students). Call (617) 720-3434 for 
further information. 

Collage New Music, Frank Epstein, music 
director, performs the world premiere of Henri 
Lazarof's Divertimento, the Boston premieres 
of Andrew Imbrie's Dream Sequence and Jan 
Swafford's They Who Hunger, and Luciano 
Berio's Sequenza for Solo Voice on Monday, 
November 12, at 8 p.m. at the Longy School 
of Music in Cambridge. David Hoose conducts, 
with soprano Joan Heller as the featured solo- 
ist. General admission is $10 ($5 students 
and seniors). For further information, call 
(617) 776-3166. 



In Memoriam 

Leonard Bernstein 
August 25, 1918 -October 14, 1990 




The loss of Leonard Bernstein is felt deeply by millions around the world, and partic- 
ularly in his birthplace, the state of Massachusetts. He was born in Lawrence, raised 
in Brookline, and graduated from Harvard. The first orchestral concert he attended 
was played by the Boston Pops Orchestra under the direction of Arthur Fiedler. 

The Boston Symphony Orchestra was privileged to share a unique association with 
Leonard Bernstein spanning more than five decades. In 1939, having just graduated 
from Harvard, he led Brahms' Academic Festival Overture on Boston's Charles River 
Esplanade, after winning a prize in a newspaper competition. In 1940 he was 
accepted by then BSO Music Director Serge Koussevitzky, his most influential men- 
tor, into the first class of the Tanglewood Music Center, where Mr. Bernstein contin- 
ued to teach, conduct, and provide spiritual guidance through this past summer. His 
concert appearances as conductor and pianist with the Boston Symphony Orchestra at 
Symphony Hall and at Tanglewood spanned the years 1944 to 1990. As an Advisor to 
Tanglewood in the early 1970s he shared responsibility for its artistic direction with 
Seiji Ozawa and Gunther Schuller. Mr. Bernstein composed two works for the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra: his Symphony No. 3, Kaddish, commissioned for the orchestra's 
75th anniversary, and his Divertimento for Orchestra, commissioned for the BSO's 
centennial in 1981. Tanglewood was the site of his seventieth birthday celebration in 
1988, and of his final conducting appearances this past August. In addition, Mr. 
Bernstein was a significant influence upon the career of Seiji Ozawa, whose first pro- 
fessional position was as Mr. Bernstein's assistant with the New York Philharmonic. 

But his musical influence stretched far beyond the confines of Boston and 
Massachusetts — farther, in fact, than that of any previous American composer or con- 
ductor. He was greatly talented in so many ways that he seems to have lived several 
lives simultaneously. A natural conductor, he was the first American to be named 
music director of a major American symphony orchestra, the New York Philharmonic, 
only one of many firsts that he enjoyed in a career lasting nearly a half-century, and 
that took him to the pinnacle of his profession. He actively promoted the work of 
many American composers, and he was more responsible, perhaps, than any other 
single person for making Mahler's works part of the standard repertory. And he 



^ 



attracted a new audience to classical music through his remarkable gifts as a teacher, 
especially in his "Omnibus" and "Young People's Concerts" television shows, which 
reached audiences in places where a live symphony orchestra would scarcely be found. 
Who can count the number of musicians and music lovers who found their way to this 
art through Leonard Bernstein's informative yet congenial introduction? 

As a composer he steadfastly avoided confinement to genre; he would create a sym- 
phony at the same time he was working on a Broadway show. This was a stumbling 
block to many friends and admirers who wished he might concentrate solely on con- 
cert music or, alternatively, on the musical theater. But his gifts, his love for all kinds 
of music, his sense of the theater, and his pride in being an American all contributed 
to making him the kind of composer who would follow the path of his own all- 
embracing muse. In addition to his three symphonies {Jeremiah, The Age of Anxiety, 
and Kaddish), his ballets (Fancy Free, Facsimile, The Dybbuk), his film score {On the 
Waterfront), his violin concerto (Serenade [after Plato's Symposium]), his theatrical 
and controversial Mass, his operas (Trouble in Tahiti and its sequel A Quiet Place), 
his song cycles (including Songfest and Arias and Barcarolles), and many other 
smaller works, he left an imperishable series of Broadway shows (On the Town, Won- 
derful Town, Candide, and above all, West Side Story). 

He was a superb pianist who only occasionally demonstrated this talent in concert 
or on recording. In addition he had an astonishing musical memory that allowed him 
to sit down at the piano and play without music almost any work in the literature 
that he might want to discuss. This gift was revealed most often to the lucky few who 
had the opportunity to study conducting with him. And to those young musicians — 
conductors, composers, singers, and instrumentalists — in whom he discerned special 
talent, he showed an unfailing generosity with advice, opportunities to gain experi- 
ence, and recommendations. 

Music was, without question, the core of his being. Yet Leonard Bernstein was a 
remarkably well-rounded human being with a penetrating mind and a quick sense of 
humor. He read avidly, remembered and quoted poetry almost as much as he did 
music, learned languages quickly, thrived on word games and puzzles. Throughout his 
life he fought for causes in which he believed. He carried the light of his music and 
his brilliance around the world both in personal appearances and through electronic 
media. 

A ceaseless dynamo of activity until almost the very end, Leonard Bernstein lived 
life enthusiastically. A serious student of the scriptures, he knew that once he passed 
the allotted "threescore years and ten" in 1988, he was living on time borrowed from 
God. But he filled his seventy-two years with adventure and achievement enough to 
fill four or five ordinary lives. Even so, those whose lives were touched by him — even 
distantly through a recording or a television show or attendance at his concerts — 
hoped that his recently announced retirement from conducting would give him rest, 
rejuvenation, and many years in which to continue his composition and teaching. It 
was not to be. We mourn the loss of so strong a beacon, even as we remember with 
gratitude the gifts he has given us. 



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Seiji Ozawa 

Seiji Ozawa was named music director of the Boston Sym- 
phony Orchestra in 1973 following a year as the orchestra's 
music adviser; he is now in his eighteenth year as the BSO's 
music director. With the Boston Symphony Orchestra he 
has led concerts in Europe, Japan, and throughout the 
United States; in March 1979 he and the orchestra made an 
historic visit to China for a significant musical exchange 
entailing coaching, study, and discussion sessions with Chi- 
nese musicians, as well as concert performances, becoming 
the first American performing ensemble to visit China since 
the establishment of diplomatic relations. This spring Mr. 

Ozawa will lead the orchestra on a seven-city North American tour; a tour to seven 

European cities will follow the 1991 Tanglewood season. 

Mr. Ozawa pursues an active international career, appearing regularly with the 
Berlin Philharmonic, the Orchestre de Paris, the French National Orchestra, the 
Vienna Philharmonic, the Philharmonia of London, and the New Japan Philharmonic. 
Recent appearances conducting opera have included La Scala, Salzburg, the Vienna 
Staatsoper, and the Paris Opera; he has also conducted at Covent Garden. In 1983, 
at the Paris Opera, he conducted the world premiere of Olivier Messiaen's St. Francis 
of Assist. 

Mr. Ozawa has a distinguished list of recorded performances to his credit, with the 
Boston Symphony Orchestra, the Berlin Philharmonic, the London Philharmonic, the 
Philharmonia of London, the Orchestre National, the Orchestre de Paris, the Saito 
Kinen Orchestra, the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, the San Francisco Symphony, 
and the Toronto Symphony Orchestra, among others. His recordings appear on the 
CBS, Deutsche Grammophon, EMI/Angel, Erato, Hyperion, New World, Philips, 
RCA, and Telarc labels. 

Born in 1935 in Shenyang, China, to Japanese parents, Seiji Ozawa studied West- 
ern music as a child and later graduated with first prizes in composition and conduct- 
ing from Tokyo's Toho School of Music, where he was a student of Hideo Saito. In 

1959 he won first prize at the International Competition of Orchestra Conductors 
held in Besangon, France, and was invited to Tanglewood by Charles Munch, then 
music director of the Boston Symphony Orchestra and a judge at the competition. In 

1960 he won the Tanglewood Music Center's highest honor, the Koussevitzky Prize 
for outstanding student conductor. 

While a student of Herbert von Karajan in West Berlin, Mr. Ozawa came to the 
attention of Leonard Bernstein. He accompanied Mr. Bernstein on the New York 
Philharmonic's 1961 tour of Japan and was made an assistant conductor of that 
orchestra for the 1961-62 season. In January 1962 he made his first professional 
concert appearance in North America, with the San Francisco Symphony. Mr. Ozawa 
was music director of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra's Ravinia Festival for five 
summers beginning in 1964, music director of the Toronto Symphony Orchestra 
from 1965 to 1969, and music director of the San Francisco Symphony from 1970 to 
1976, followed by a year as that orchestra's music adviser. In 1970 he was named an 
artistic director of the Boston Symphony Orchestra's Tanglewood Festival. 

Seiji Ozawa has won an Emmy for the Boston Symphony Orchestra's "Evening at 
Symphony" PBS television series. He holds honorary doctor of music degrees from 
the University of Massachusetts, the New England Conservatory of Music, and 
Wheaton College in Norton, Massachusetts. 



11 





Music Directorship endowed by 
John Moors Cabot 

BOSTON SYMPHONY 

ORCHESTRA 

1990-91 

First Violins 

Malcolm Lowe 

Concertmaster 
Charlies Munch chair 

Tamara Smirnova-Sajfar 

Associate Concertmaster 
Helen Horner Mclntyre chair 

Max Hobart 

Assistant Concertmaster 

Robert L. Beal, and 

Enid L. and Bruce A. Beal chair 

Lucia Lin 

Acting Assistant Concertmaster 
Edward and Bertha C. Rose chair 

Bo Youp Hwang 

John and Dorothy Wilson chair, 
fully funded in perpetuity 

Max Winder 

Forrest Foster Collier chair 

Fredy Ostrovsky 

Dorothy Q. and David B. Arnold, Jr., 
chair, fully funded in perpetuity 

Gottfried Wilfinger 



* Participating in a system of rotated 
seating within each string section 
%0n sabbatical leave 



Leo Panasevich 

Carolyn and George Rowland chair 

Sheldon Rotenberg 

Muriel C. Kasdon and 
Marjorie C. Paley chair 

Alfred Schneider 
Raymond Sird 
Ikuko Mizuno 
Amnon Levy 

Second Violins 

Marylou Speaker Churchill 

Fahnestock chair 

Vyacheslav Uritsky 

Charlotte and Irving W. Rabb chair 

Ronald Knudsen 

Edgar and Shirley Grossman chair 

Joseph McGauley 
Leonard Moss 
*Harvey Seigel 

* Jerome Rosen 

* Sheila Fiekowsky 
Ronan Lefkowitz 

* Nancy Bracken 

* Jennie Shames 
*Aza Raykhtsaum 
*Valeria Vilker Kuchment 
*Bonnie Bewick 
*Tatiana Dimitriades 
*James Cooke 
*Si-Jing Huang 

Violas 

Burton Fine 

Charles 8. Dana chair 

Patricia McCarty 

Anne Stoneman chair, 
fully funded in perpetuity 

tRonald Wilkison 

Lois and Harlan Anderson chair 

Robert Barnes 




12 




Jerome Lipson 
Joseph Pietropaolo 
Michael Zaretsky 
Marc Jeanneret 
*Mark Ludwig 

* Rachel Fagerburg 
*Edward Gazouleas 

Cellos 

Jules Eskin 

Philip R. Allen chair 

Martha Babcock 

Vernon and Marion Alden chair 

Sato Knudsen 

Esther S. and Joseph M. Shapiro chair 

Joel Moerschel 

Sandra and David Bakalar chair 

*Robert Ripley 
Luis Leguia 

Robert Bradford Newman chair 

$Carol Procter 

Lillian and Nathan R. Miller chair 

* Ronald Feldman 

Charles and JoAnne Dickinson chair 

* Jerome Patterson 

* Jonathan Miller 

Basses 

Edwin Barker 

Harold D. Hodgkinson chair 

Lawrence Wolfe 

Maria Nistazos Stata chair, 
fully funded in perpetuity 

Joseph Hearne 
Bela Wurtzler 
John Salkowski 
*Robert Olson 

* James Orleans 
*Todd Seeber 
*John Stovall 

Flutes 



Walter Piston chair 

Leone Buyse 

Acting Principal Flute 
Marian Gray Lewis chair 

Fenwick Smith 

Myra and Robert Kraft chair 

Piccolo 

Geralyn Coticone 

Evelyn and C. Charles Marran chair 



Oboes 

Alfred Genovese 

Mildred B. Remis chair 

Wayne Rapier 
Keisuke Wakao 

English Horn 

Laurence Thorstenberg 

Beranek chair, 

fully funded in perpetuity 

Clarinets 

Harold Wright 

Ann S.M. Banks chair 

Thomas Martin 

Bass Clarinet 

Craig Nordstrom 

Farla and Harvey Chet 
Krentzman chair 

Bassoons 

Richard Svoboda 

Edward A. Taft chair 

Roland Small 
Richard Ranti 

Contrabassoon 

Richard Plaster 

Helen Rand Thayer chair 

Horns 

Charles Kavalovski 

Helen Sagojf Slosberg chair 

Richard Sebring 

Margaret Andersen Congleton chair 

Daniel Katzen 
Jay Wadenpfuhl 
Richard Mackey 
Jonathan Menkis 

Trumpets 

Charles Schlueter 

Roger Louis Voisin chair 

Peter Chapman 

Ford H. Cooper chair 

Timothy Morrison 
Steven Emery 



Trombones 

Ronald Barron 

J. P. and Mary B. Barger chair, 
fully funded in perpetuity 

Norman Bolter 

Bass Trombone 

Douglas Yeo 

Tuba 

Chester Schmitz 

Margaret and William C. 
Rousseau chair 

Timpani 

Everett Firth 

Sylvia Shippen Wells chair 

Percussion 

Arthur Press 

Assistant Timpanist 
Peter Andrew Lurie chair 

Thomas Gauger 

Peter and Anne Brooke chair 

Frank Epstein 

Harp 

Ann Hobson Pilot 

Willona Henderson Sinclair chair 

Sarah Schuster Ericsson 



Personnel Managers 

Lynn Larsen 
Harry Shapiro 

Librarians 

Marshall Burlingame 
William Shisler 
James Harper 

Stage Manager 

Position endowed by 
Angelica Lloyd Clagett 

Alfred Robison 



13 




ENJOY A 
SPLENDID SEASON 
OF CHAMBER WORKS 

Join the principal players of the Boston Symphony 
Orchestra and experience chamber music at its best 
with one of the world's finest ensembles. 

JORDAN HALL at the New England Conservatory 
THREE SUNDAY AFTERNOONS AT 3:00PM 

BOSTON SYMPHONY CHAMBER PLAYERS 

with GILBERT KALISH, p ianist 

November 11. 1990 

PISTON Divertimento for strings and winds 
HARBISON Words from Paterson' 

with SANFORD SYLVAN, baritone 
BEETHOVEN Septet in E-flat for strings and 

winds, Op. 20 

February 3. 1991 

HAYDN Trio in E for piano, violin, and cello, 

Hob. XV28 
BRAHMS Trio in E-flat for horn, violin, 

and piano, Op. 40 
KELLAWAY 'Esque,' for trombone and double bass 
SHOSTAKOVICH Quintet in G minor for piano and 

strings, Op. 57 

March 10. 1991 

WYNER New work for brass and percussion 

(world premiere) 
PISTON Quintet for piano and strings 
SCHUBERT String Quintet in C, D.956 

SUBSCRIBE NOW! 

All three concerts for only $42.00, $32.00, $24.00 
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Monday through Saturday, 10am - 6pm. 



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A Brief History of the Boston Symphony Orchestra 



Now in its 110th season, the Boston Sym- 
phony Orchestra gave its inaugural concert 
on October 22, 1881, and has continued to 
uphold the vision of its founder, the philan- 
thropist, Civil War veteran, and amateur 
musician Henry Lee Higginson, for more 
than a century. Under the leadership of Seiji 
Ozawa, its music director since 1973, the 
Boston Symphony Orchestra has performed 
throughout the United States, as well as in 
Europe, Japan, and China, and it reaches 
audiences numbering in the millions through 
its performances on radio, television, and 
recordings. It plays an active role in com- 
missioning new works from today's most 
important composers; its summer season at 
Tanglewood is regarded as one of the most 
important music festivals in the world; it 
helps to develop the audience of the future 
through the Boston Symphony Youth Con- 
certs and through a variety of outreach pro- 
grams involving the entire Boston commu- 
nity; and, during the Tanglewood season, it 
sponsors one of the world's most important 
training grounds for young composers, con- 
ductors, instrumentalists, and vocalists, the 
Tanglewood Music Center, which celebrated 
its fiftieth anniversary this past summer. 
The orchestra's virtuosity is reflected in 
the concert and recording activities of the 
Boston Symphony Chamber Players — the 
world's only permanent chamber ensemble 
made up of a major symphony orchestra's 



principal players — and the activities of the 
Boston Pops Orchestra have established an 
international standard for the performance 
of lighter kinds of music. Overall, the mis- 
sion of the Boston Symphony Orchestra is 
to foster and maintain an organization dedi- 
cated to the making of music consonant 
with the highest aspirations of musical art, 
creating performances and providing educa- 
tional and training programs at the highest 
level of excellence. This is accomplished with 
the continued support of its audiences, 
governmental assistance on both the federal 
and local levels, and through the generosity 
of many foundations, businesses, and 
individuals. 

Henry Lee Higginson dreamed of found- 
ing a great and permanent orchestra in his 
home town of Boston for many years before 
that vision approached reality in the spring 
of 1881. The following October, the first 
Boston Symphony Orchestra concert was 
given under the direction of conductor Georg 
Henschel, who would remain as music direc- 
tor until 1884. For nearly twenty years Bos- 
ton Symphony concerts were held in the Old 
Boston Music Hall; Symphony Hall, the 
orchestra's present home, and one of the 
world's most highly regarded concert halls, 
was opened in 1900. Henschel was suc- 
ceeded by a series of German-born and 
-trained conductors— Wilhelm Gericke, 
Arthur Nikisch, Emil Paur, and Max 




The first photograph, actually a collage, of the Boston Symphony Orchestra under Georg Henschel, 
taken 1882 



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16 



Fiedler — culminating in the appointment of 
the legendary Karl Muck, who served two 
tenures as music director, 1906-08 and 
1912-18. Meanwhile, in July 1885, the 
musicians of the Boston Symphony had 
given their first "Promenade" concert, offer- 
ing both music and refreshments, and ful- 
filling Major Higginson's wish to give "con- 
certs of a lighter kind of music." These 
concerts, soon to be given in the springtime 
and renamed first "Popular" and then 
"Pops," fast became a tradition. 

In 1915 the orchestra made its first 
transcontinental trip, playing thirteen con- 
certs at the Panama-Pacific Exposition in 
San Francisco. Recording, begun with RCA 
in 1917, continued with increasing fre- 
quency, as did radio broadcasts. In 1918 
Henri Rabaud was engaged as conductor; he 
was succeeded a year later by Pierre Mon- 
teux. These appointments marked the begin- 
ning of a French-oriented tradition that 
would be maintained, even during the 
Russian-born Serge Koussevitzky's time, 
with the employment of many French- 
trained musicians. 

The Koussevitzky era began in 1924. His 
extraordinary musicianship and electric per- 
sonality proved so enduring that he served 
an unprecedented term of twenty-five years. 
Regular radio broadcasts of Boston Sym- 
phony Orchestra concerts began during 
Koussevitzky's years as music director. In 
1936 Koussevitzky led the orchestra's first 
concerts in the Berkshires; a year later he 
and the players took up annual summer res- 
idence at Tanglewood. Koussevitzky passion- 
ately shared Major Higginson's dream of "a 
good honest school for musicians," and in 
1940 that dream was realized with the 
founding of the Berkshire Music Center 
(now called the Tanglewood Music Center). 

In 1929 the free Esplanade concerts on 
the Charles River in Boston were inaugu- 
rated by Arthur Fiedler, who had been a 
member of the orchestra since 1915 and 
who in 1930 became the eighteenth conduc- 
tor of the Boston Pops, a post he would 
hold for half a century, to be succeeded by 
John Williams in 1980. The Boston Pops 
Orchestra celebrated its hundredth birthday 
in 1985 under Mr. Williams's baton. 



Charles Munch followed Koussevitzky as 
music director in 1949. Munch continued 
Koussevitzky's practice of supporting con- 
temporary composers and introduced much 
music from the French repertory to this 
country. During his tenure the orchestra 
toured abroad for the first time and its con- 
tinuing series of Youth Concerts was initi- 
ated. Erich Leinsdorf began his seven-year 
term as music director in 1962. Mr. Leins- 
dorf presented numerous premieres, restored 
many forgotten and neglected works to the 
repertory, and, like his two predecessors, 
made many recordings for RCA; in addition, 
many concerts were televised under his 
direction. Leinsdorf was also an energetic 
director of the Tanglewood Music Center, 
and under his leadership a full-tuition fel- 
lowship program was established. Also dur- 
ing these years, in 1964, the Boston Sym- 
phony Chamber Players were founded. 

William Steinberg succeeded Leinsdorf in 
1969. He conducted a number of American 
and world premieres, made recordings for 
Deutsche Grammophon and RCA, appeared 
regularly on television, led the 1971 Euro- 
pean tour, and directed concerts on the east 
coast, in the south, and in the mid-west. 

Seiji Ozawa, an artistic director of the 
Tanglewood Festival since 1970, became the 
orchestra's thirteenth music director in the 
fall of 1973, following a year as music 
adviser. Now in his eighteenth year as music 
director, Mr. Ozawa has continued to solid- 
ify the orchestra's reputation at home and 
abroad, and he has reaffirmed the orches- 
tra's commitment to new music through a 
series of centennial commissions marking 
the orchestra's 100th birthday, a series of 
works celebrating the fiftieth anniversary of 
Tanglewood Music Center, and recent works 
commissioned from such prominent compos- 
ers as John Cage, Hans Werner Henze, 
Peter Lieberson, and Bernard Rands. Under 
his direction the orchestra has also expanded 
its recording activities to include releases on 
the Philips, Telarc, CBS, EMI/Angel, Hype- 
rion, New World, and Erato labels. 

Today, the Boston Symphony Orchestra, 
Inc., presents more than 250 concerts annu- 
ally. It is an ensemble that has richly ful- 
filled Higginson's vision of a great and per- 
manent orchestra in Boston. 



17 



The Shape of 
Things to Come 



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BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

Seiji Ozawa, Music Director 

Grant Llewellyn and Robert Spano, 
Assistant Conductors 

One Hundred and Tenth Season, 1990-91 

Thursday, November 1, at 8 
Friday, November 2, at 2 
Saturday, November 3, at 8 
Tuesday, November 6, at 8 

KURT SANDERLING conducting 




HAYDN 



Overture to La fedelta premiata 



MOZART 



Piano Concerto No. 25 in C, K.503 

Allegro maestoso 

Andante 

[Allegretto] 

ALICIA DE LARROCHA 



INTERMISSION 



BEETHOVEN 



Symphony No. 6 in F, Opus 68, Pastoral 

Awakening of happy feelings upon reaching 
the countryside. Allegro non troppo 

Scene at the brook. Andante molto mosso 

Cheerful gathering of the country folk. 
Allegro — 

Thunderstorm. Allegro — 

Shepherd's song. Happy, grateful feelings 
after the storm. Allegretto 



The Tuesday-evening concert is given in celebration of the life 
of Richard Lawrence Brown. 



The afternoon concert will end about 4 and the evening concerts about 10. 

RCA, Deutsche Grammophon, Philips, Telarc, Sony Classical/CBS Masterworks, EMI/Angel, 
New World, Erato, and Hyperion records 

Baldwin piano 

Alicia de Larrocha plays the Steinway piano. 

Please be sure the electronic signal on your watch or pager is switched off 
during the concert. 

The program books for the Friday-afternoon series are given in loving memory of Mrs. Hugh 
Bancroft by her daughters Mrs. A. Werk Cook and the late Mrs. William C. Cox. 



19 



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Joseph Haydn 

Overture to La fedelta premiata 




Franz Joseph Haydn was born in Rohrau, Lower 
Austria, on March 31, 1732, and died in Vienna on 
May 31, 1809. He composed his opera buffa La 
fedelta premiata ("Constancy rewarded") in 1 780 
for the opening of the new opera house at Eszter- 
hdza. The first performance took place on February 
25, 1781. These are the first performances by the 
Boston Symphony Orchestra of any music from the 
opera. The score calls for flute, two oboes, two bas- 
soons, two horns, timpani, and strings. 

For all Haydn's fame today and for all our 
familiarity with some dozens of masterworks in 
the genres of the symphony, the string quartet, the 
piano trio, the piano sonata, the Mass, and the 
oratorio, we remain largely ignorant of a very sub- 
stantial part of his enormous output. No significant aspect of his work has been less 
available until quite recently than his operas. During the last two decades, Antal 
Dorati recorded most of Haydn's operas, and others have followed suit. More and 
more they are coming to be mounted on the stage as well, giving us the opportunity 
to judge their theatrical effectiveness directly. But still to most people Haydn remains 
the "father of the symphony" and the "father of the string quartet" (which, we might 
suppose, is quite enough paternity for any man). Yet of the thirty years he spent in 
the service of the Prince Nikolaus Eszterhazy, the last half was primarily devoted to 
opera. 

The taste in Eszterhaza ran toward light works, while Haydn himself was moving 
in the direction of greater seriousness, increasingly attempting the difficult fusion of 
the comic and the expressive. It is a mixture that Mozart perfected in his three Ital- 
ian operas to librettos by Lorenzo da Ponte, but Haydn was already tilling the same 
field a decade earlier, and he described several of his operas, including La fedelta pre- 
miata, as u dramma giocoso" the same description Mozart gave to Don Giovanni. His 
operas seem to have been highly regarded by the critics, at least, if not always popu- 
lar successes. In 1784 La fedelta premiata was mounted in Vienna (sung in German 
as Die belohnte Treue) by the troupe of Emanuel Schikaneder, later to be the librettist 
of Hie Magic Fhite. A journalist writing for the Wienerische Kronik (Vienna Chroni- 
cle) marveled at Haydn's versatility and lamented that he was "just as unappreciated 
as Handel whom the English, after his death, gave a place in the royal vaults of 
Westminster [Abbey] so that, as a wit observed, posterity could know where the kings 
of England lie." Haydn himself was proud of his operatic work, though after hearing 
Mozart's great Da Ponte operas, he generously noted that the younger man surpassed 
him in this field. 

At Eszterhaza, La fedelta premiata was performed repeatedly over a period of 
years. Haydn regarded it with special affection, and with good reason, since its scope 
and variety surpass anything else he composed in that period. The story of La fedelta 
premiata is as complicated as most operatic plots and need not detain us here except 
to note that, as the title already tells us, virtue is rewarded in the end after severe 
sacrifice. The opera deals with a sacrifice to be made to the goddess Diana, the hunt- 
ress; this fact motivates Haydn's overture, a wonderful, galloping evocation of the 
hunt. Haydn himself was so pleased with it that he reused it as the finale to Sym- 
phony No. 73. 

— Steven Ledbetter 



21 



Week 5 



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Wolfgang Amade Mozart 

Piano Concerto No. 25 in C, K503 




Johannes Chrysostomus Wolfgang Gottlieb Mozart, 
who began calling himself Wolfgang Amadeo about 
1 770 and Wolfgang Amade in 1 777, was born in 
Salzburg, Austria, on January 27, 1756, and died 
in Vienna on December 5, 1791. He completed the 
C major concerto, K.503, on December 4, 1786, and 
may have played the first performance in Vienna 
later that month. Sebastian Bach Mills played the 
first American performance with Carl Bergmann 
and the Philharmonic Society at the Academy of 
Music in New York on November 4, 1865. Carl 
Baermann was soloist and Georg Henschel the con- 
ductor for the first Boston Symphony performance 
in March 1883. It then disappeared from the Boston 
Symphony repertory until July 1962, when Claude 
Frank played it under Charles Munch at Tanglewood. Since then, BSO performances 
have featured Stephen Bishop under the direction of Colin Davis, Malcolm Frager under 
Andrew Davis, Rudolf Firkusny under Herbert Blomstedt, Garrick Ohlsson under 
James Conlon, and, on the most recent subscription concerts, in February 1987, Radu 
Lupu under Kurt Masur. Alicia de Larrocha was soloist for the most recent Tanglewood 
performance in July 1990, under Pascal Verrot. The concerto is scored for solo piano 
with orchestra of one flute, two each of oboes, bassoons, horns, and trumpets, timpani, 
and strings. Mozart left no cadenzas for this concerto; Alicia de Larrocha plays a first- 
movement cadenza by Robert Casadesus. 

In just under three years, Mozart wrote twelve piano concertos. It is the genre that 
absolutely dominates his work schedule in 1784, 1785, and 1786, and what he poured 
out — almost all of it for his own use at his own concerts — is a series of masterpieces 
that delight the mind, charm and seduce the ear, and pierce the heart. They are the 
ideal realization of what might be done with the piano concerto. Beethoven a couple of 
times reaches to where Mozart is, and perhaps Brahms, too, but still, in this realm 
Mozart scarcely knows peers. K.503 is the end of that run. It comes at the end of an 
amazing year, amazing even for Mozart, that had begun with work on The Impresario 
and Figaro, and whose achievements include the A major piano concerto, K.488, and 
the C minor, K.491, the E-flat piano quartet, the last of his horn concertos, the trios 
in G and B-flat for piano, violin, and cello, as well as the one in E-flat with viola and 
clarinet, and the sonata in F for piano duet, K.497. Together with the present con- 
certo he worked on the Prague Symphony, finishing it two days later, and before the 
year was out he wrote one of the most personal and in every way special of his mas- 
terpieces, the concert aria for soprano with piano obbligato and orchestra, u Ch'io mi 
scordi di te" K.505. 

Such a list does not reflect how Mozart's life had begun to change. On March 3, 
1784, for example, he could report to his father that he had twenty- two concerts in 
thirty-eight days: "I don't think that this way I can possibly get out of practice." A 
few weeks later, he wrote that for his own series of concerts he had a bigger subscrip- 
tion list than two other performers put together, and that for his most recent appear- 
ance the hall had been "full to overflowing." In 1786, the fiscal catastrophes of 1788, 
the year of the last three symphonies, were probably unforeseeable, and one surpass- 
ing triumph still lay ahead of him, the delirious reception by the Prague public of Don 
Giovanni in 1787. Figaro was popular in Vienna, but not more than other operas by 
lesser men, and certainly not enough to buoy up his fortunes for long. Perhaps it is 



23 



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even indicative that we know nothing about the first performance of K.503. Mozart 
had planned some concerts for December 1786, and they were presumably the occa- 
sion for writing this concerto, but we have no evidence that these appearances actu- 
ally came off. 

What has changed, too, is Mozart's approach to the concerto. It seems less oper- 
atic than before, and more symphonic. The immediately preceding one, the C minor, 
K.491, completed March 24, 1786, foreshadows this, but even so, K.503 impresses as 
a move into something new. Its very manner is all its own. For years, and until not so 
long ago, it was one of the least played of the series, and it was as though pianists 
were reluctant to risk disconcerting their audiences by offering them Olympian gran- 
deur and an unprecedented compositional richness where the expectation was chiefly 
of charm, operatic lyricism, and humor. 

This is one of Mozart's big trumpets-and-drums concertos, and the first massive 
gestures make its full and grand sonority known. But even so formal an exordium 
becomes a personal statement at Mozart's hands — "cliche becomes event," as Adorno 
says about Mahler — and across the seventh measure there falls for just a moment the 
shadow of the minor mode. And when the formal proclamations are finished, the 
music does indeed take off in C minor. Such harmonic — and expressive — ambiguities 
inform the whole movement. Mozart always likes those shadows, but new here are 
the unmodulated transitions from major to minor and back, the hardness of his chiar- 
oscuro. The first solo entrance is one of Mozart's most subtle and gently winsome. 
The greatest marvel of all is the development, which is brief but dense, with a breath- 
taking harmonic range and an incredible intricacy of canonic writing. The piano has a 
delightful function during these pages, proposing ideas and new directions, but then 
settling back and turning into an accompanist who listens to the woodwinds execute 
what he has imagined. (And how keenly one senses Mozart's own presence at the key- 
board here!) 

The Andante is subdued, formal and a little mysterious at the same time, like a 
knot garden by moonlight, and remarkable too for the great span from its slowest 
notes to its fastest. For the finale, Mozart goes back to adapt a gavotte from his then 
five-year-old opera Idomeneo. In its courtly and witty measures, there is nothing to 
prepare us for the epiphany of the episode in which the piano, accompanied by cellos 
and basses alone (a sound that occurs nowhere else in Mozart), begins a smiling and 
melancholy song that is continued by the oboe, the flute, the bassoon, and in which 
the cellos cannot resist joining. Lovely in itself, the melody grows into a music whose 
richness of texture and whose poignancy and passion astonish us even in the context 
of the mature Mozart. From that joy and pain Mozart redeems us by leading us back 
to his gavotte and from there into an exuberantly inventive, brilliant ending. 

— Michael Steinberg 

Now Artistic Adviser of the Minnesota Orchestra, Michael Steinberg was the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra's Director of Publications from 1976 to 1979. 



25 



Week 5 



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Ludwig van Beethoven 

Symphony No. 6 in F, Opus 68, Pastoral 




Ludwig van Beethoven was baptized in Bonn, Ger- 
many, on December 17, 1 770, and died in Vienna 
on March 26, 1827. Beethoven did the bulk of the 
composing of the Sixth during the fall of 1807 and 
the early part of 1808 (a few sketches go back as far 
as 1803); he had sold the symphony to the publisher 
Breitkopf & Hartel by September 1808. The Sixth 
Symphony was first performed — along with the 
Fifth Symphony, the Fourth Piano Concerto, the 
Choral Fantasy, and several movements of the Mass 
in C, Opus 86, all in their premiere performances 
as well — on December 22, 1808, at the Theater-an- 
der-Wien in Vienna. The first American perform- 
ance took place in Philadelphia on November 26, 
1829, at a concert of the Musical Fund Society, 
Charles Hupfeld conducting. Henry Schmidt led the first Boston performance, given by 
the Academy of Music at the Odeon on January 15, 1842. Forty years later the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra played the Pastoral Symphony under Georg Henschel in the 
inaugural season on January 6, 1882. Since then the BSO has performed it under the 
baton of Wilhelm Gericke, Arthur Nikisch, Emil Paur, Karl Muck, Max Fiedler, Henri 
Rabaud, Pierre Monteux, Serge Koussevitzky, Richard Burgin, Bruno Walter, Charles 
Munch, Lorin Maazel, Erich Leinsdorf Joseph Krips, William Steinberg, Ferdinand 
Leitner, Leonard Bernstein, Seiji Ozawa, Michael Tilson Thomas, who gave the orches- 
tra's most recent Tanglewood performance in August 1984, Klaus Tennstedt, and Ber- 
nard Haitink, who gave the most recent subscription performances in April and May 
1989. The most recent Tanglewood performance was given by Roger Norrington and the 
London Classical Players in August 1989. The symphony is scored for two flutes and 
piccolo, pairs of oboes, clarinets, bassoons, horns, trumpets, and trombones, plus tim- 
pani and strings. 

The delight that Beethoven took in the world of nature is attested by countless 
stories from many periods of his life. When in Vienna he never failed to take his daily 
walk around the ramparts (which would then have afforded a much more rural view 



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than the same walk does today— especially because the ramparts themselves have 
been removed and turned into the giant Ringstrasse, the multi-lane thoroughfare that 
girdles the old center of Vienna), and during his summers spent outside of town he 
would be outdoors most of the day. The notion of treating the natural world in music 
seems to have occurred to him as early as 1803, when he wrote down in one of his 
sketchbooks a musical fragment in 12/8 time (the same meter used in the Pastoral 
Symphony for the "Scene at the brook") with a note: "Murmur of the brook." Under- 
neath the sketch he added, "The more water, the deeper the tone." Other musical 
ideas later to end up in the Sixth Symphony appear in Beethoven's sketchbooks spo- 
radically in 1804 and during the winter of 1806-07, when he worked out much of the 
thematic material for all of the movements but the second. But it wasn't until the fall 
of 1807 and the spring of 1808 that he concentrated seriously on the elaboration of 
those sketches into a finished work; the piece was apparently completed by the sum- 
mer of 1808, since on September 14 he reached an agreement with the publisher 
Breitkopf & Hartel for the sale of this symphony along with four other major works. 

One thing that aroused discussion of the new 'symphony— a debate that lasted for 
decades— was the fact that Beethoven provided each movement of the work with a 
program, or literary guide to its meaning. His titles are really only brief images, just 
enough to suggest a setting: 

I. Awakening of happy feelings upon reaching the countryside. 

II. Scene at the brook. 

III. Cheerful gathering of the country folk. 

IV. Thunderstorm. 

V. Shepherd's song. Happy, grateful feelings after the storm. 

Many romantic composers and critics saw in this program a justification for the most 
abstruse kinds of storytelling in symphonic writing, but the program is certainly not 
necessary for an understanding of the music as Beethoven finally left it, for there is 
nothing here that departs from expectation simply for narrative reasons. Still, there 
have been some unlikely, even bizarre attempts to illustrate the symphony, which go 
from an 1829 production in London with six actors and a ballet company up to the 
detailed Disney scenario for Fantasia, replete with amorous centaurs, cupids, and a 
mighty Zeus throwing thunderbolts until he is tired and then curling up for a nap 
under a convenient cloud — a far cry from the composer's intentions. 

Much more important for an understanding of Beethoven's view than the headings 
of the movements is the note that Beethoven caused to be printed in the program of 
the first performance: "Pastoral Symphony, more an expression of feeling than paint- 
ing." He never intended, then, that the symphony be considered an attempt to repre- 
sent events in the real world, an objective narrative, in musical guise. Rather, this 
symphony provided yet again what all of his symphonies had offered: subjective moods 
and impressions captured in harmony, melody, color, and the structured passage of 
time. 

Beethoven's sketchbooks reveal that he was working on his Fifth and Sixth sym- 
phonies at the same time; they were finished virtually together, given consecutive opus 
numbers (67 and 68), and premiered on the same concert (where they were actually 
reversed in numbering— with the Pastoral Symphony, given first on the program, 
identified as "No. 5"). Yet no two symphonies are less likely to be confused, even by 
the most casual listener — the Fifth, with its demonic energy, tense harmonies, and 
powerful dramatic climaxes on the one hand, and the Sixth, with its smiling and 
sunny air of relaxation and joy on the other. Nothing shows more clearly the range of 
Beethoven's work than these two masterpieces, twins in their gestation, but not 
identical — rather fraternal twins of strongly differentiated characters. Popular biogra- 
phies of Beethoven tend to emphasize the heaven- storming, herioc works of the middle 
period — the Eroica and Fifth symphonies, the Egmont Overture, the Emperor Con- 



29 



Week 5 







Congratulations to the 
Boston Symphony Orchestra 
on yet another wonderful 
season of magical music. 

Jordan marsh 

A TRADITION SINCE 1851 



30 



UKuDD 




certo, the Razumovsky string quartets, the Waldstein and Appassionato, sonatas — at 
the expense of other aspects of his art. On the other hand, some critics of a "neo- 
classical" orientation claim to find the even-numbered symphonies including the Pasto- 
ral to be more successful than the overtly dramatic works. Both views are equally 
one-sided and give a blinkered representation of Beethoven — his art embraces both 
elements and more, as is clear from the intertwining conception and composition of 
the Fifth and Sixth symphonies. 

Even in works of such contrasting character, Beethoven's concern for balance and 
for carefully articulated musical architecture remains evident, though the means by 
which he achieves these ends are quite different. The Fifth Symphony deals in har- 
monic tensions — dissonant diminished- seventh and augmented- sixth chords that color 
the mood almost throughout. The harmonic character of the Sixth Symphony is alto- 
gether more relaxed. Beethoven builds his extensive musical plan on the very simplest 
harmonies, on the chord relations that harmony students learn in the first few days of 
the course — tonic, dominant, and subdominant. The symphony revels in major triads 
from the very beginning, and the diminished-seventh chord is withheld until the thun- 
derstorm of the fourth movement. As in the Fifth Symphony, the melodic material of 
the first movement is derived from the very beginning of the work, but rather than 




31 



mzft 







Without You, 
This Is The Whole Picture, 



This year, there is an $ 1 1 million difference 
between what the BSO will earn — and what 
we must spend to make our music. 

Your gift to the Boston Symphony Annual 
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It will help us continue to fund outreach, 



educational and youth programs, and to attract 
the world's finest musicians and guest artists. 

Make your generous gift to the Annual 
Fund — and become a Friend of the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra today. Because without 
you, the picture begins to fade. 



Yes, I want to keep great music alive. 

I'd like to become a Friend of the BSO for the 1990-91 season. (Friends' benefits 

begin at $50.) Enclosed is my check for $ payable to the Boston 

Symphony Annual Fund. 



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Please send your contribution to: Susan E. Tomlin, Director of Annual Giving, 

Boston Symphony Orchestra, Symphony Hall, Boston, MA 02115. 

A portion of your gift may not be tax-deductible. For information call (617) 638-9251. 




KEEP GREAT MUSIC ALIVE 



"J 



32 



piling 1 up in urgent search of a climactic goal, the thematic motives that arise from 
the opening measures of the Pastoral Symphony — there are at least four of them — 
are repeated often in a leisurely way that implies no hurry to get anywhere. Still, for 
all the apparent ease of passage, our course through the first movement is perfectly 
balanced with slow swings from tonic to dominant and back or lengthy phrases reiter- 
ating a single chord, then jumping to another, rather distant chord for more repeti- 
tion. The fact that all this sheer repetition does not lead to fatigue or exasperation on 
the listener's part is tribute to Beethoven's carefully planned and varied orchestral 
colors and textures. Indeed, George Grove remarked in his study of this symphony 
that Beethoven "is steeped in Nature itself; and when the sameness of woods, fields, 
and streams can be distasteful, then will the Pastoral Symphony weary its hearers." 

Through the exposition and much of the development in the first movement, 
Beethoven seems to have had little difficulty in sketching the symphony. But in plan- 
ning the retransition — the passage that returns to the home key for the beginning of 
the recapitulation — he encountered difficulties and sketched several possible courses. 
In the one finally used, Beethoven moves quickly from the rather distant key of E 
major by regular steps of closely related keys: A, D, G minor, to C, the dominant of 
the home key of F. Here we expect him to prolong the harmonic tension and give us a 
crashing, dynamic arrival at the home key— but he sidesteps. Instead, he slips past F 
to the subdominant, B-flat, and quietly returns home by that most unusual course 
(the subdominant to tonic progression is the same one that produces an "Amen" — it 
is relaxed, not at all dramatic). 

After sketching that version, Beethoven apparently suffered a momentary loss of 
nerve. Perhaps the return home was not clearly enough marked? It certainly differed 
from the corresponding point in most of his middle-period works. So he tried again 
and sketched a return by way of the dominant to a fortissimo statement of the main 
theme in the full orchestra. Further reconsideration apparently led him to realize that 
the louder, more powerful return was simply too strong for a movement as genial and 
relaxed as this one was, but he found a way of having his cake and eating it too. He 
returned to the original version, using the quieter subdominant approach to his home 
key; but, once having achieved F major, he could generate a loud statement in the 
orchestra by way of dominant harmony without its receiving undue weight, since it 
was no longer the return. Thus he reworked the more "dramatic" sketch and embed- 
ded it into the body of the recapitulation. This detail illustrates Beethoven's own 
sense of the kind of expressive character the Pastoral Symphony was turning out to 
have, and his determination to keep all parts of it consistent with its character, how- 
ever much it might diverge from our expectations on the basis of his other works. 
This, of course, is the mark of a great composer: the so-called "standard" forms are 
not simply molds into which he pours so many tunes, but rather they are an organic 
response to the musical ideas generated from the very beginning of the piece. 

One idea that does not appear at the very beginning but grows in importance 
throughout is a little figure of repeated notes in triplets first heard as a punctuation 
in clarinets and bassoons. As the movement progresses, that triplet rhythm insinuates 
itself more and more into the musical fabric until, by the beginning of the recapitula- 
tion, it is running along in counterpoint to the themes heard at the outset, and just 
before the close of the movement, the solo clarinet takes off on triplet arpeggios in 
what is virtually a cadenza. 

The second movement is richly but delicately scored, with two muted solo cellos 
providing a background murmur along with second violins and violas, while the first 
violins and woodwinds embellish the melodic flow with a rich array of turns and trills. 
No one familiar with traditional means of musical expression in western music can 
fail to recognize the bucolic leisure of this Andante, even if Beethoven had never pro- 
vided a title for the movement. The gentle running of water, bird song, soft breezes, 



33 



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and rustling leaves are all implicit in this music. At the same time, the richness of 
material is most satisfying. Beethoven is in no hurry to get through it, and his sense 
of architectural balance remains engaged. Even the one explicitly "programmatic" 
passage — the song of nightingale, quail, and cuckoo labeled as such in the flute, oboe, 
and clarinet just before the end of the movement — fits perfectly well as a purely musi- 
cal passage (how many real birds sing in classical four-measure phrases?). 

Only twice in Beethoven's symphonic output did he link the movements of a sym- 
phony so that they would be performed without a break. Significantly, this happened 
in two symphonies composed almost simultaneously— the Fifth and the Sixth. In the 
Fifth Symphony, the scherzo is connected to the finale by an extended, harmonically 
tense passage demanding resolution in the bright C major of the closing movement. 
Much the same thing happens in the Pastoral Symphony, although the level of tension 
is not nearly so high, and the linking passage has grown to a full movement itself. 
But here again we see that the supposedly romantic, form-breaking elements of the 
Pastoral Symphony do not depend on the composer's program to make sense: the 
scherzo, a real dance movement in F major, is interrupted just at its last chord by a 
dramatic Allegro in F minor. The violence of that extended passage gradually dies 
down and returns to the major mode for the final passage of rustic simplicity, a 
release from the tension of the Allegro whether or not one thinks of it as "grateful 
feelings after the storm." In both symphonies the transition moves from harmonic 
darkness and tension to the light of a major key established at the beginning of a new 
movement. It is characteristic of Beethoven to demonstrate that he can reach his goal 
in two opposing ways: in the Fifth, by way of a massive crescendo to a powerful for- 
tissimo point of arrival; in the Sixth, by a steady decrescendo from the height of the 
"storm" to the tranquility of the clear weather that follows. 

All three movements are filled with felicitous touches. The dance has a delightfully 
quirky offbeat strain for solo oboe, with the occasional appearance of a bassoon 
accompaniment consisting of three notes. This is supposed to be an intentional carica- 
ture of a village band that Beethoven encountered at a tavern near Modling. 

The storm is imaginatively and picturesquely scored, providing a veritable quarry of 
techniques that were mined by composers for decades. Berlioz spoke of Beethoven's 
orchestration here with the greatest admiration, and he helped himself to such devices 
as the thick, "stormy" sound produced by double basses running up a four-note frag- 
ment of the scale in the same time that the cellos run up a five-note fragment, so that 
they are together only on the very first note, and the remainder produces atmospheric 
dissonance. Beethoven withheld his big orchestral guns to this point. The trumpets 
had not played in the symphony until the middle of the third movement. Now trom- 
bones and timpani appear for the first time (the timpani, in fact, play only here), and 
the piccolo joins in at the height of the storm. 

As the storm ends, a ranz des vaches or Swiss herdsman's song introduces the final 
major key movement and the "hymn of thanksgiving." The ranz des vaches, a melody 
borrowed by Beethoven for this spot, unmistakably identifies the setting in a world of 
pastoral simplicity. Its use here was an afterthought on the composer's part, but it 
was a highly appropriate one, since the first theme of the movement proper (heard in 
the violins) is part of the same family group — an arpeggiation of the major triad in a 
different position. Thus, once more, an element that might be labeled "programmatic" 
can be seen to nestle snugly and fittingly into what Tovey has called "a perfect classi- 
cal symphony." 

-S.L. 



35 



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More . . . 

Jens Peter Larsen's excellent Haydn article in The New Grove (with work-list and 
bibliography by Georg Feder) has been reprinted separately (Norton, available in 
paperback). Rosemary Hughes's Haydn in the Master Musicians series (Littlefield 
paperback) is a first-rate short introduction. The longest study (hardly an introduc- 
tion!) is H.C. Robbins Landon's mammoth, five-volume Haydn: Chronology and Works 
(Indiana); it will be forever an indispensable reference work, though its sheer bulk and 
the author's tendency to include just about everything higgledy-piggledy make it 
rather hard to digest. He offers an extensive and enthusiastic discussion of La fedelta 
premiata in the second volume. Though he does not discuss the operas, no consider- 
ation of Haydn should omit Charles Rosen's brilliant study The Classical Style 
(Viking; also a Norton paperback). La fedelta premiata was recorded by Antal Dorati 
as part of his extended series of Haydn's operas, but it is currently out of print and 
no other version of either the opera as a whole or its overture is now available. 

Stanley Sadie's fine Mozart article in The New Grove has been published separately 
by Norton (available in paperback); Sadie is also the author of Mozart (Grossman, 
also paperback), a convenient brief life-and-works survey with nice pictures. Alfred 
Einstein's classic Mozart: The Man, The Music is still worth knowing (Oxford paper- 
back). Wolfgang Hildesheimer's Mozart (Farrar Straus Giroux, available also as a 
Vintage paperback), though frustrating to read since it is built up out of many short 
sections dealing primarily with Mozart's character, personality, and genius, provides a 
stimulating point of view for readers who have not followed the recent specialist liter- 
ature on the composer. Donald Francis Tovey analyzed many of the major concertos 
in his Essays in Musical Analysis (Oxford, also paperback). Cuthbert Girdlestone's 
Mozart and his Piano Concertos (Dover paperback) contains much information rather 
buried in decoratively elegant descriptions. The Mozart Companion, edited by H.C. 
Robbins Landon and Donald Mitchell (Norton paperback), contains two major chap- 
ters on the concertos: Friedrich Blume discusses their sources, Robbins Landon their 
musical origin and development. Philip Radcliffe's Mozart Piano Concertos is a brief 
contribution to the useful BBC Music Guides series (University of Washington paper- 
back). Any serious consideration of Mozart's music must include Charles Rosen's 
splendid study The Classical Style (Viking; also Norton paperback). His discussion of 
the piano concertos is especially masterful. 

The Norton Critical Scores series includes a volume, edited by Joseph Kerman, 
devoted to K.503 with a complete study score of the work and a selection of informa- 
tive analyses and other essays (Norton paperback). There are a number of distin- 
guished recordings of K.503, two of them by pianists who have recently completed 
traversals of the entire series: Murray Perahia's reading with the English Chamber 
Orchestra is spacious and lyrical (CBS), and Alfred Brendel's with the Academy of 
St. Martin-in-the-Fields under the direction of Neville Marriner is elegant in its sensi- 
bility and refinement (Philips). Another fine recording that emphasizes the grandeur 
of K.503 is Vladimir Ashkenazy's with the Philharmonia Orchestra (London, available 
on compact disc, coupled with the Coronation Concerto). If you prefer historical 
instruments, Malcolm Bilson's reading with the English Baroque Soloists under the 
direction of John Eliot Gardiner is splendid (DG, also coupled with the Coronation 
Concerto). Not to be overlooked is the classic older recording by Leon Fleisher with 
George Szell and the Cleveland Orchestra, coupled with an equally irreplaceable per- 
formance of Beethoven's Fourth Piano Concerto (CBS). 

The excellent Beethoven article by Alan Tyson and Joseph Kerman in The New 
Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians is a short book in itself, and it has been 
reissued as such (Norton paperback). The standard Beethoven biography is Thayer's 
Life of Beethoven, written in the nineteenth century but revised and updated by Elliot 



37 



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Forbes (Princeton, available in paperback). It has been supplemented by Maynard 
Solomon's Beethoven, which makes informed and thoughtful use of the dangerous 
techniques of psychohistory to produce one of the most interesting of all the hundreds 
of Beethoven books (Schirmer, available in paperback). There have, of course, been 
many studies of the symphonies. George Grove's Beethoven and his Nine Symphonies, 
though written nearly a century ago from a now-distant point of view, is filled with 
perceptive observations (Dover paperback). Basil Lam's chapter on Beethoven in the 
first volume of The Symphony, edited by Robert Simpson, is enlightening (Penguin), 
as is Simpson's own concise contribution to the BBC Music Guides, Beethoven Sym- 
phonies (University of Washington paperback). Donald Francis Tovey's classic essays 
appear in Essays in Musical Analysis (Oxford, available in paperback). One of the 
most enlightening of all discussions of Beethoven's sketches and the light they throw 
on his process of composition is Philip Gossett's "Beethoven's Sixth Symphony: 
Sketches for the First Movement" in Journal of the American Musicological Society 
for Summer 1974. Though necessarily technical, the article deals with certain funda- 
mental problems and analyzes, among other things, the way Beethoven sketched and 
worked out the return to the first-movement recapitulation discussed in the program 
note. 

Recordings of Beethoven's works are, if anything, even more numerous than writ- 
ings about him. Several complete cycles of the nine symphonies exist on compact disc, 
including distinguished sets from Leonard Bernstein and the Vienna Philharmonic 
(DG, six CDs) and no fewer than three different sets — from the 1960s, 1970s, and 
1980s— by Herbert von Karajan with the Berlin Philharmonic (DG). I've always pre- 
ferred the earliest of these, originally issued in 1963, which has the advantage of 
being recorded on five CDs (the others are on six). Toscanini's famous cycle with the 
NBC Symphony (RCA, five discs) is now available complete. Newer versions include a 
solid series by Christoph von Dohnanyi with the Cleveland Orchestra (Telarc, five 
discs) and Roger Norrington's exciting performances on historical instruments with 
nineteenth-century seating (Angel, six discs). Individually, the Pastoral Symphony has 
been very well treated on recordings. Kurt Sanderling has recorded it with the Phil- 
harmonia Orchestra (Angel, coupled with the Egmont and Coriolan overtures). Some 
classic older readings have been reissued on compact discs — among them Bruno 
Walter's 1960 performance with the Columbia Symphony Orchestra, a mellow, glow- 
ing performance (CBS, coupled with the Leonore Overture No. 2). One of Otto 
Klemperer's most famous recordings, too, is of this symphony, now reissued on CD 
with music from Egmont, including vocal selections performed by Birgit Nilsson 
(Angel). New performances include an unmannered, genial reading by Vladimir 
Ashkenazy with the Philharmonia Orchestra (London). 

-S.L. 



39 



Week 5 



9 







OFFICERS 




H. GILMAN NICHOLS 
President 

JOHN L. THORNDIKE 
JOHN W. COBB 
DANIEL A. PHILLIPS 
JOHN M. MEYER 
ROBERT N. KARELITZ 
JONATHAN R. PHILLIPS 
JOHN F. WINCHESTER 
DOUGLAS R. SMITH-PETERSEN 
EDWARD P. THOMPSON 
RICHARD W. STOKES 
GEORGE BLAGDEN 
LAURA N. RIGSBY 
SUSAN R. GUNDERSON 
CHARLES R. EDDY, JR. 
FREDERIC C.R. STEWARD 
WILLIAM J. O'KEEFE 
GEORGE L. GRAY 


CHARXES C.J. PLATT 
ANTHONY B. BOVA 
FRANK WOODARD III 
JAMES J. ROCHE 
ARTHUR C. PICKETT 
JONATHAN B. LORING 
DENISE CRONIN 
ALTON L. CIRIELLO, JR. 
STEVEN H. BRAVEMAN 
J. BRIAN POTTS 
MARY JANE SMITH 
NANCY B. SMITH 
ELLEN COPE-FLANAGAN 
DONALD P. LEE 
JOHN R. LAYTON 
SARAH A. PHILLIPS 
ROSALYN M. SOVIE 
MAUREEN W. BURKE 


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40 




Kurt Sanderling 

Born in 1912, Kurt Sanderling received his musical training in 
Berlin. He began as a pianist, accompanying Lieder recitals and 
coaching singers at the Berlin State Opera. Klemperer, Kleiber, 
Blech, and Furtwangler, all conducting in Berlin during those 
years, were formative influences on his development as a conductor. 
In 1936 Mr. Sanderling emigrated from Germany, serving first as 
conductor of the Moscow Radio Orchestra, then as music director 
of the Kharkov Philharmonic. In 1942 he was appointed permanent 
conductor of the Leningrad Philharmonic, a post he shared with 
Yevgeny Mravinsky until 1960. After World War II Mr. Sanderling 
made the first of his tours of Europe with the Leningrad Philharmonic. In 1960 he 
returned to Berlin to become music director of the Berlin Symphony Orchestra, leading 
that orchestra to international renown; as his international stature grew, concert tours 
with that ensemble took him to most of Europe and to Japan. From 1964 to 1967 he also 
conducted the Staatskapelle of Dresden. Mr. Sanderling' s wide repertoire ranges from the 
baroque to the contemporary, and he has been kept constantly busy as a guest conductor 
with major orchestras in Europe, Japan, North America, Canada, and Australia. In 1972 
he became the first guest conductor to lead the Philharmonia Orchestra of London after 
the retirement of Otto Klemperer. Since then he has conducted several times a year in 
London, and in 1981 he recorded the complete Beethoven symphonies with the Philharmo- 
nia. Mr. Sanderling's other recordings include the complete Brahms symphonies with the 
Staatskapelle of Dresden, the complete symphonies of Sibelius, the Fifth, Sixth, Eighth, 
Tenth, and Fifteenth symphonies of Shostakovich, Mahler's Ninth and Tenth symphonies, 
and Tchaikovsky's Fourth Symphony, which won the Grand Prix du Disque. In 1977 Mr. 
Sanderling retired as music director of the Berlin Symphony. He has since devoted his 
energies to appearing worldwide as a guest conductor, appearing regularly at the major 
European festivals in Prague, Salzburg, Warsaw, and Vienna, and in North America with 
such orchestras as the Los Angeles Philharmonic, the New York Philharmonic, the Boston 
Symphony, the St. Louis Symphony, the National Symphony, and the San Francisco Sym- 
phony. In addition to his BSO concerts, his 1990-91 schedule in North America includes 
appearances with the Los Angeles Philharmonic, the Cleveland Orchestra, the National 
Symphony, and the St. Louis Symphony. Mr. Sanderling made his Boston Symphony debut 
with two subscription programs in January 1988. 



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STEVE GANAK AD REPS 
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41 



Dear Patron of the Orchestra: 



For many years the Boston Sym- 
phony Orchestra has been known 
as the "aristocrat of American 
orchestras." There is indeed a 
distinctive "BSO sound" that has 
earned worldwide acclaim and has 
attracted the greatest musicians to 
audition for membership in the 
orchestra. 



An important ingredient in the 
creation of this unique sound is 
having the finest musical instruments 
on the BSO's stage. However, the cost of many of these instruments 
(especially in the string sections) has become staggeringly high, and it is 
incumbent upon the Symphony to take steps to assure that musicians in 
key positions who do not themselves own great instruments have access 
to them for use in the orchestra. 




Two recent initiatives have been taken to address this concern: First, in 
1988, the Boston Safe Deposit and Trust Company stepped forward 
with a creative loan program that is making it possible for players to 
borrow at one and a half percent below prime to purchase instruments. 
Second, last fall, the incentive of a Kresge Foundation challenge grant 
helped launch our effort to raise a fund of $1 million for the Orchestra 
to draw upon from time to time to purchase instruments for use by the 
players. The BSO in this case would retain ownership. 

Donations of both outright gifts and instruments are being sought to 
establish the BSO's Instrument Acquisition Fund. Fine pianos, 
period instruments, special bows, heirloom violins, etc. all make 
ideal gifts. Opportunities for naming instruments and for other 
forms of donor recognition may be available according to the wishes 
of the donor. 

If you are interested in this program please contact me or Joyce Serwitz 
in the orchestra's Development Office at (617) 638-9273. Your support 
will help make a difference that will be music to our ears! 

George H. Kidder 
President 



42 



HP 



■ ■ ■ 




Alicia de Larrocha 

A favorite of audiences throughout the world, Spanish pianist 
Alicia de Larrocha has toured the United States three times each 
year since her return here in 1965, building a devoted audience for 
her performances in recital, with orchestra, and in chamber music. 
She plays regularly with the great orchestras and on the most pres- 
tigious recital series, and her catalogue of unique recordings is 
available worldwide. A native of Barcelona, Mme. de Larrocha gave 
her first public performance in 1929, when she was six. Arthur 
Rubinstein, a close friend of her teacher, encouraged her to con- 
tinue her studies with Frank Marshall, who was then head of the 
Marshall Academy founded in her native city by Enrique Granados, the same institute for 
which Mme. de Larrocha serves as third president today. In 1947 she first toured outside 
of Spain; she made her British debut in 1953, followed by her American debut in 1955 
with the Los Angeles Philharmonic under Alfred Wallenstein. Although she subsequently 
received the Paderewski Prize in London, as well as international honors for her early 
recordings of music by Granados and Albeniz, it was only in 1965, on her return visit to 
the United States for what amounted to a second debut here, that she earned her reputa- 
tion as one of the world's great classical artists. Now an exclusive recording artist for 
BMG Classics on the RCA Victor Red Seal label, Mme. de Larrocha is recording the com- 
plete Mozart piano sonatas and has begun recording the Mozart piano concertos for that 
label. Previously she recorded extensively for London/Decca, winning three Grammy 
awards, two of them in successive years: in 1974, for Best Classical Solo Performance, for 
Albeniz's Iberia, and in 1975, for Best Soloist with Orchestra, for Ravel's two piano con- 
certos and Paure's Fantaisie. She received her third Grammy in 1989, for her digital 
recording of Iberia. In 1978 she received the Dutch Edison Prize for her complete record- 
ing of Granados' Goyescas, which also won the 1979 Deutsche Schallplattenpreis. That 
same year, Musical America honored the fiftieth anniversary of her debut by naming her 
"Musician of the Year." In 1982 the City of Barcelona awarded Mme. de Larrocha the 
Medallo d'Oro for artistic merit, and the Spanish National Assembly honored her with its 
gold medal "al merito en las bellas artes," which was presented to her by King Juan Carlos 
at a formal reception in Madrid. In 1989 she celebrated the Diamond Jubilee of her per- 
forming career. Alicia de Larrocha is also an honorary member of the Los Lazos de Dama 
of the Spanish Order of Civil Merit, and of the Order of Isabella la Catolica. Mme. de 
Larrocha made her Boston Symphony Orchestra debut in November 1971 and appeared 
with the orchestra most recently at Tanglewood this past summer. 



Boston's distinctive 

new store for 

garden, terrace, and home 

accessories. 



T.WYATT 



106 Charles Street 

BOSTON 



CAREY* 



LIMOUSINE 

• CHAUFFEUR DRIVEN SEDANS, 
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FOR ALL OCCASIONS 

• EXECUTIVE SERVICE 

Est. 1924 

623-8700 

24 HR. SERVICE/BOSTON AREA 

A&A LIMOUSINE RENTING INC. 
161 BROADWAY— SOMERVILLE, MA 

SERVICE IN 300 CITIES • 60 COUNTRIES • 6 CONTINENTS 

MAJOR CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED 

NATIONWIDE 1-800-336-4646 



43 






BUSINESS 




Business and Professional 
Leadership Association 



The Boston Symphony Orchestra wishes to acknowledge this distinguished group of 
corporations and professional organizations for their outstanding and exemplary 
support of the orchestra's needs during the past or current fiscal year. 



CORPORATE SPONSORSHIPS 
$25,000 and above 

Digital Equipment Corporation 

Boston Pops Orchestra Public Television Broadcasts 

NEC 

Boston Symphony Orchestra North American Tour 1991 

Boston Symphony Orchestra European Tour 1991 

NYNEX Corporation 
WCVB-TV, Channel 5 Boston and WCRB 102.5 FM 

Salute to Symphony 1990 

The Boston Company 

Opening Night At Symphony 1990 

Bay Banks, Inc. 

Opening Night at Pops 1990 

Lexus 
A Division of Toyota Motor Sales U.S.A., Inc. 

Tanglewood Opening Night 1990 

TDK Electronics Corporation 

Tanglewood Tickets for Children 1990 

Bank of Boston 
Country Curtains and The Red Lion Inn 

BSO Single Concert Sponsors 1990 



For information on these and other corporate funding opportunities, contact 
Madelyne Cuddeback, BSO Director of Corporate Sponsorships, Symphony Hall, 
Boston, MA 02115, (617) 638-9254. 



Ga 



44 



1990-91 Business Honor Roll ($10,000 and Above) 



Advanced Management Associates 
Harvey Chet Krentzman 

Analog Devices, Inc. 
Ray Stata 

AT&T Network Systems 
John F. McKinnon 

Bank of Boston 
Ira Stepanian 

Barter Connections 
Kenneth C. Barron 

BayBanks, Inc. 
William M. Crozier, Jr. 

Bingham, Dana & Gould 
Joseph Hunt 

Bolt Beranek & Newman 
Stephen R. Levy 

The Boston Company 
Christopher M. Condron 

Boston Edison Company 
Stephen J. Sweeney 

The Boston Globe 
William 0. Taylor 

Boston Herald 
Patrick J. Purcell 

Bull HN Information Systems, Inc. 
Roland D. Pampel 

Cahners Publishing Company 
Ron Segel 

Connell Limited Partnership 
William F. Connell 

Coopers & Lybrand 
William K. O'Brien 

Country Curtains 
Jane P. Fitzpatrick 

Delia Femina, McNamee, Inc. 
Michael H. Reingold 

Deloitte & Touche 
James T. McBride 

Digital Equipment Corporation 
Kenneth G. Olsen 

Dynatech Corporation 
J. P. Barger 

Eastern Enterprises 
Ronald S. Ziemba 

EG&G, Inc. 
John M. Kucharski 

The First Boston Corporation 
Malcolm MacColl 

General Cinema Corporation 
Richard A. Smith 



The Gillette Company 
Colman M. Mockler, Jr. 

Graf aeon, Inc. 
H. Wayman Rogers, Jr. 

GTE Products Corporation 
Dean T. Langford 

Hill, Holliday, Connors, Cosmopulos, Inc. 
Jack Connors, Jr. 

The Henley Group 
Paul M. Montrone 

Houghton Mifflin Company 
Nader F. Darehshori 

IBM Corporation 
Paul J. Palmer 

John Hancock Mutual Life Insurance Company 
E. James Morton 

Lexus 

A Division of Toyota Motor Sales, U.S.A., Inc. 
J. Davis Illingworth 

Liberty Mutual Insurance Group 
Gary L. Countryman 

Loomis-Sayles & Company, Inc. 
Charles J. Finlayson 

McKinsey & Company 
Robert P. O'Block 

Morse Shoe, Inc. 
Manuel Rosenberg 

NEC Corporation 
Tadahiro Sekimoto 

NEC Deutschland GmbH 
Masao Takahashi 

Nestle-Hills Brothers Coffee Company 
Ned Dean 

The New England 
Edward E. Phillips 

New England Telephone Company 
Paul C. O'Brien 

Northern Telecom, Inc. 
Brian Davis 

Nynex Corporation 
William C. Ferguson 

PaineWebber, Inc. 
James F. Cleary 

KPMG Peat Marwick 
Robert D. Happ 

Polaroid Corporation 
I.M. Booth 

Prudential-Bache Capital Funding 
David F. Remington 



45 



fyjrklfl «C«v!5*af » * * w "tAJ^SabSfev ^fettsS?" 


■■■«•■ 


1990-91 Business Honor Roll (continued) 


Raytheon Company 
Thomas L. Phillips 


TDK Electronics Corporation 
Takashi Tsujii 


The Red Lion Inn 
John H. Fitzpatrick 


USTrust 
James V. Sidell 


Shawmut Bank, N.A. 
John P. Hamill 


WCRB-102.5 FM 
Richard L. Kaye 


The Stop & Shop Companies, Inc. 
Lewis Schaeneman 


WCVB-TV, Channel 5 Boston 
S. James Coppersmith 






Dinner at 6. 

Symphony at 8. 

Parking at $ 5. 

Make dinner at Boodle's part of 
your night out at the Symphony. 
When you do, you'll not only enjoy 
an award winning dining experi- 
ence from Boston's authentic grill, 
you'll also get special parking 
privileges at the Back Bay Hilton's 
private garage. 

Just show us your tickets at dinner 
on the night of the performance 
and park your car for just $5. And 
with a deal like that, a night at the 
Symphony never sounded better. 




BOODLE'S 



OF • BOSTON 

An Authentic Grill 

Lunch and dinner daily. In Boston's Back Bay Hilton. 
Phone (617) BOODLES. 



St. Qotplvh Restaurant 




A Charming 19th Century Brick 
Townhouse serving fine continental 
cuisine in contemporary informal elegance. 
Offering lunch and dinner with a variety 
of fresh seafood specials daily. Located 
minutes away from Huntington Theatre 
and Symphony Hall. 

99 St. Botolph Street 266-3030 
behind the. Colonnade Hotel 

Daily 11:30 - Midnight 



"Nationally Outstanding" 

-Esquire Magazine 




46 




A TRADITION OF FINANCIAL COUNSEL 
OLDER THAN THE U.S. DOLLAR. 

State Street has been providing quality financial service since 1792. 

That's two years longer than the dollar has been the official currency of 
the United States. 

During that time, we have managed the assets of some of New 
England's wealthiest families. And provided investment advice and 
performance tailored to each client's individual goals and needs. 

Today our Personal Trust Division can extend that service to you. 

We've been helping people manage their money for almost 200 years. 
And you can only stay in business that long by offering advice of the 
highest quality. 

Let us help you get the highest performance from your assets. To enjoy 
today and to pass on to future generations. 

For more information contact Peter Talbot at 617-654-3227. 

State Street. Known for qualityf 




State Street Bank and Trust Company, wholly-owned subsidiary of State Street Boston Corporation, 

225 Franklin Street, Boston, MA 02101. Offices in Boston, New York, Los Angeles, London, Munich, Brussels, 

Tokyo, Sydney, Hong Kong. Member FDIC. Copyright State Street Boston Corporation, 1989. 




Carleton-Willard Village is 
an exceptional continuing 
care retirement community. 
Gracious independent living 
accommodations and fully 
licensed, long-term health 
care facilities exist in a 
traditional New England 
environment. 




^w«r^ 






! 1 1 



100 Old Billerica Rd. 
Bedford, MA 01730 
(617) 275-8700 

Owned and operated by Carleton-Willard 
Homes, Inc., a non-profit corporation 



BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONAL LEADERSHIP ASSOCIATION 



The Boston Symphony Orchestra gratefully acknowledges these Business Leaders for their 
generous and valuable support totaling $1,250 and above during the past fiscal year. Names 
which are both capitalized and underscored in this listing make up the Business Honor Roll 
denoting support of $10,000 and above. Capitalization denotes support of $5,000-$9,999, and 
an asterisk indicates support of $2,500-$4,999. 



Accountants 

ARTHUR ANDERSEN & CO. 
William F. Meagher 

'Charles E. DiPesa & Company 
William F. DiPesa 

COOPERS & LYBRAND 



William K. O'Brien 
DELOITTE & TOUCHE 



James T. McBride 
ERNST & YOUNG 



Thomas M. Lankford 
KMPG PEAT MARWICK 



Robert D. Happ 

Theodore S. Samet & Company 
Theodore S. Samet 

Tofias, Fleishman, Shapiro 
&Co., P.C. 
Allan Tofias 

Advertising/Public Relations 

Arnold Advertising 
Edward Eskandarian 

DELLA FEMINA, MCNAMEE, 
INC. 
Michael H. Reingold 

Elysee Public Relations 
Tanya Keller Dowd 

HILL, HOLLIDAY, CONNORS, 



COSMOPULOS, INC. 



Jack Connors, Jr. 

Ingalls, Quinn & Johnson 
Bink Garrison 

Aerospace 

Northrop Corporation 
Kent Kresa 

b'chitects 

Cambridge Seven Associates 
Charles Redman 

LEA Group 
Eugene R. Eisenberg 

Automotive 

J.N. Phillips Glass 
Company, Inc. 
Alan L. Rosenfeld 

Lexus 

A Division of Toyota Motor 
Sales U.S.A., Inc. 
J. Davis Illingworth 



Banking 

BANK OF BOSTON 
Ira Stepanian 

*Bank of New England 
Corporation 
Lawrence K. Fish 

BAYBANKS, INC. 
William M. Crozier, Jr. 

THE BOSTON COMPANY 
Christopher M. Condron, Jr. 

Cambridge Trust Company 
Lewis H. Clark 

CITICORP/CITIBANK 
Walter E. Mercer 

First National Bank of Chicago 
Richard Spencer 

*Rockland Trust Company 
John F. Spence, Jr. 

SHAWMUT BANK, N.A. 
John P. Hamill 

* State Street Bank & 
Trust Company 
William S. Edgerly 

USTRUST 
James V. Sidell 

Wainwright Bank & Trust Company 
John M. Plukas 



Building/Contracting 

* Harvey Industries, Inc. 

Frederick Bigony 

J.F. White Contracting Company 
Philip Bonanno 

Lee Kennedy Co., Inc. 
Lee M. Kennedy 

*Moliterno Stone Sales, Inc. 
Kenneth A. Castellucci 

* National Lumber Company 

Louis L. Kaitz 

PERINI CORPORATION 
David B. Perini 



Consumer Goods/Distributors 

BARTER CONNECTIONS 
Kenneth C. Barron 

FADIWINDS GOURMET COFFEE 
COMPANY 
Michael J. Sullivan 

47 



Lindenmeyr Munroe 

NESTLE-HILLS BROTHERS 
COFFEE COMPANY 
Ned Dean 

O'Donnell-Usen Fisheries 
Arnold S. Wolf 

Welch's 
Everett N. Baldwin 



Education 

BENTLEY COLLEGE 
Gregory Adamian 

Electrical/HVAC 

*p.h. mechanical Corporation 
Paul A. Hayes 

*R & D Electrical Company, Inc. 
Richard D. Pedone 

Electronics 

Alden Electronics, Inc. 
Joseph Girouard 

*Analytical Systems 
Engineering Corporation 
Michael B. RuMn 

PARLEX CORPORATION 
Herbert W. Pollack 

Energy 

CABOT CORPORATION 
Samuel W. Bodman 

Engineering 

Goldberg-Zoino & Associates, Inc. 
Donald T. Goldberg 

The Thompson & Lichtner 
Company, Inc. 
John D. Stelling 

Entertainment/Media 

GENERAL CINEMA CORPORATION 
Richard A. Smith 

National Amusements, Inc. 
Sumner M. Redstone 

Finance/Venture Capital 

*3i Corporation 

Ivan N. Momtchiloff 




48 



m 



Carson Limited Partnership 
Herbert Carver 

THE FIRST BOSTON 
CORPORATION 
Malcolm MacColl 

GE CAPITAL CORPORATE 
FINANCE GROUP 
Richard A. Goglia 

KRUPP COMPANIES 

George Krupp 

Food Service/Industry 

Au Bon Pain 
Louis I. Kane 

Boston Showcase Company 
Jason E. Starr 

Cordel Associates, Inc. 
James B. Hangstefer 

Johnson O'Hare Co., Inc. 
Harry O'Hare 



Footwear 

Converse, Inc. 
Gilbert Ford 

J. Baker, Inc. 
Sherman N. Baker 

Jones & Vining, Inc. 
Sven A. Vaule, Jr. 

MORSE SHOE, INC. 



Manuel Rosenberg 

Reebok International Ltd. 
Paul Fireman 

The Rockport Corporation 
Anthony Tiberii 

THE STRIDE RITE 
CORPORATION 
Arnold S. Hiatt 



urnishing9/Housewares 

OILEY MERCHANDISE 
CORPORATION 
David I. Riemer 

SBF Corporation 
Boruch B. Frusztajer 

COUNTRY CURTAINS 



Jane P. Fitzpatrick 

ofran Sales, Inc. 
Robert D. Roy 

graphic Design 

'LARK/LINSKY DESIGN 
Robert H. Linsky 

^DEPENDENT DESIGN 
Patrick White 



High Technology/Electronics 

Alden Products Company 
Betsy Alden 

ANALOG DEVICES, INC. 
Ray Stata 

*Aritech Corp. 
James A. Synk 

Automatic Data Processing 
Arthur S. Kranseler 

BOLT BERANEK AND 

NEWMAN, INC. 



Stephen R. Levy 

BULL HN INFORMATION 
SYSTEMS, INC. 
Roland D. Pampel 

*Cerberus Technologies, Inc. 
George J. Grabowski 

Costar Corporation 
Otto Morningstar 

CSC PARTNERS, INC. 
Paul J. Crowley 

DIGITAL EQUIPMENT 
CORPORATION 
Kenneth G. Olsen 

DYNATECH CORPORATION 
J. P. Barger 

EG&G, INC. 
John M. Kucharski 

EMC CORPORATION 
Richard J. Egan 

Helix Technology Corporation 
Robert J. Lepofsky 

THE HENLEY GROUP 
Paul M. Montrone 

HEWLETT PACKARD COMPANY 
Ben L. Holmes 

IBM CORPORATION 
Paul J. Palmer 

*Intermetrics Inc. 
Joseph A. Saponaro 

IONICS, INC. 
Arthur L. Goldstein 

* Lotus Development Corporation 
Jim P. Manzi 

*M/A-Com, Inc. 
Robert H. Glaudel 

MILLIPORE CORPORATION 
John A. Gilmartin 

*The MITRE Corporation 
Charles A. Zraket 

NEC CORPORATION 
Tadahiro Sekimoto 

NEC DEUTSCHLAND GmbH 
Masao Takahasi 

*Orion Research, Inc. 
Alexander Jenkins III 

49 



POLAROID CORPORATION 
I.M. Booth 

PRIME COMPUTER, INC. 

John Shields 

*Printed Circuit Corporation 
Peter Sarmanian 

RAYTHEON COMPANY 
Thomas L. Phillips 

SofTech, Inc. 
Justus Lowe, Jr. 

*TASC 
Arthur Gelb 

TDK ELECTRONICS 
CORPORATION 
Takashi Tsujii 

THERMO ELECTRON 
CORPORATION 

George N. Hatsopoulos 

XRE Corporation 
John K. Grady 



Hotels/Restaurants 

57 Park Plaza Hotel 
Nicholas L. Vinios 

*Back Bay Hilton 
Carol Summer-field 

*Boston Marriott Copley Place 
Jurgen Giesbert 

THE RED LION INN 
John H. Fitzpatrick 

*Sheraton Boston Hotel & Towers 
Steve Foster 

*Sonesta International 
Hotels Corporation 
Paul Sonnabend 

*The Westin Hotel, Copley Place 
David King 

Industrial Distributors 

*Alles Corporation 
Stephen S. Berman 

Brush Fibers, Inc. 
Ian P. Moss 

* Eastern Refractories Company 
David S. Feinzig 

Millard Metal Service Center 
Donald Millard, Jr. 



Insurance 

*American Title Insurance Company 
Terry E. Cook 

*Arkwright 
Enzo Rebula 

Caddell & Byers 
John Dolan 




Gracious. Glorious 

For Lunch. Dinner. Lodging. 
Weddings. Parties. Meetings. 

0ommessettlnn 

^ / On Cape Cod %*s 



Jones Rd., Falmouth, MA 02541 • 508/548-2300 



The Admission Office 
The Williston 
Northampton School 
Box 30 

19 Payson Avenue 
Easthampton, 
Massachusetts, 01027 
Fax: 413/527-9494 



If you're not at The Williston 
Northampton School, you're missing 
a wealth of academic and 
extracurricular opportunities. 

You're missing out on high school 
classes of 15 students. You're missing 
teachers who live with you and take 
part in your life. 



413/527-1520 



Call us. 

Find out what you're 
missing. 

The Williston Northampton School. 



More than 30 percent of our students receive academic scholarships or need-based financial aid. We are an independent school and welcome 
young men and women of any race, religion, or national origin. 



50 



CAMERON & COLBY CO., INC. 

Lawrence S. Doyle 
Charles H. Watkins & Company 

Paul D. Bert rand 
Chubb Group of Insurance Cos. 

John Gillespie 

FRANK B. HALL & CO. OF 
MASSACHUSETTS, INC. 

William F. Newell 

International Insurance Group 
John Perkins 
JOHN HANCOCK MUTUAL 



LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY 



E. James Morton 

Johnson & Higgins of 
Massachusetts, Inc. 
Robert A. Cameron 

Keystone Provident Life 
Insurance Company 
Robert G. Sharp 

Lexington Insurance Company 
Kevin H. Kelley 
LIBERTY MUTUAL INSURANCE 



tflOUP 



Gary L. Countryman 
THE NEW ENGLAND 



Edward E. Phillips 

SAFETY INSURANCE COMPANY 
Richard B. Simches 

Sedgwick James of 

^ew England, Inc. 

P. Joseph McCarthy 

■Sullivan Risk Management Group 

John H. Sullivan 

5un Life Assurance Company 
f Canada 
David D. Horn 

nvestments 

Jaring International Investment, Ltd. 
John F. McNamara 

tear Stearns & Company, Inc. 
Keith H. Kretschmer 

issex Investment Management 
Jompany, Inc. 
Joseph C. McNay 

TDELITY INVESTMENTS/ 
TDELITY FOUNDATION 

oldman, Sachs & Company 
Peter D. Kiernan 

AUFMAN & COMPANY 
Sumner Kaufman 

OOMIS-SAYLES & COMPANY, 



5c. 

Charles J. Finlayson 
AINEWEBBER, INC. 



Tames F. Cleary 

AINEWEBBER CAPITAL 

ARKETS 

loseph F. Patton 



SALOMON INC. 
John V. Carberry 

*Spaulding Investment Company 
C.H. Spaulding 

* State Street Development 
Management Corp. 

John R. Gallagher HI 

TUCKER ANTHONY, INC. 
John Goldsmith 

Whitman & Evans, Art Investments 
Eric F. Mourlot 

*Woodstock Corporation 
Nelson J. Darling, Jr. 

Legal 

BINGHAM, DANA & GOULD 
Joseph Hunt 

*Choate, Hall & Stewart 
Robert Gargill 

Dickerman Law Offices 
Lola Dickerman 

*Fish & Richardson 
Robert E. Hillman 

* Gaston & Snow 

Richard J. Santagati 

GOLDSTEIN & MANELLO 
Richard J. Snyder 

GOODWTN, PROCTER AND HOAR 
Robert B. Fraser 

*Hemenway & Barnes 
John J. Madden 

Hubbard & Ferris 
Charles A. Hubbard 

* Joyce & Joyce 

Thomas J. Joyce 

* Lynch, Brewer, Hoffman & Sands 

Owen B. Lynch 

MINTZ, LEVIN, COHN, FERRIS, 
GLOVSKY & POPEO, P.C. 
Francis X. Meaney 

Nissenbaum Law Offices 
Gerald L. Nissenbaum 

* Nutter, McClennen & Fish 

John K. P. Stone III 

PALMER & DODGE 
Robert E. Sullivan 

*Rackemann, Sawyer & Brewster 
Stephen Carr Anderson 

Sarrouf, Tarricone & Flemming 
Camille F. Sarrouf 

Weiss, Angoff, Coltin, Koski & 
Wolf, P.C. 
Dudley A. Weiss 

Management/Financial/Consulting 

ADVANCED MANAGEMENT 
ASSOCIATES 
Harvey Chet Krentzman 

51 



* Arthur D. Little, Inc. 

John Magee 
*Bain & Company, Inc. 
William W. Bain 

THE BOSTON CONSULTING 
GROUP 
Jonathan L. Isaacs 

* Corporate Decisions 

David J. Morrison 

*Haynes Management, Inc. 
G. Arnold Haynes 

Index Group 
David G. Robinson 

Irma Mann Strategic Marketing 
Irma Mann Stearns 

Jason M. Cortell 
& Associates, Inc. 
Jason M. Cortell 

Lochridge & Company, Inc. 

Richard K. Lochridge 
MCKINSEY & COMPANY 

Robert P. O'Block 

Merrill Lynch & Co., Inc. 
Paul Fahrenbach 

The Pioneer Group, Inc. 
John F. Cogan, Jr. 

PRUDENTIAL-BACHE 
CAPITAL FUNDING 
David F. Remington 

*Rath & Strong 
Dan Ciampa 

* Towers Perrin 

J. Russell Southworth 

*William M. Mercer, Inc. 
Chester D. Clark 

*The Wyatt Company 
Paul R. Daoust 

Yankelovich Clancy Shulman 
Kevin Clancy 

Manufacturer's Representatives 

*Ben Mac Enterprises 
Larry Benhardt 
Thomas McAuliffe 

*Paul R. Cahn Associates, Inc. 
Paul R. Cahn 

Manufacturing/Industry 

*AGFA Corporation 
Ken Draeger 

*AMCEL Corporation 
Lloyd Gordon 

*Avedis Zildjian Company 
Armand Zildjian 

The Biltrite Corporation 
Stanley J. Bernstein 

Boston Acoustics, Inc. 
Frank Reed 






1 * 



THE BSO 
ANNOUNCES AN 




HOLIDAY" 
PROGRAM 




DECEMBER 19, 1990 

Give your company an early Christmas present by treating your 

management, employees, customers, vendors, and friends to a 

special evening at Pops in a unique holiday program. This 

program, available to only 116 businesses and professional 

organizations at $3,500 per company, includes 16 seats, 

pre-concert hors d'oeuvres and a traditional Pops gourmet dinner. 

Please join the New England business community for this 

celebrated holiday tradition! 

For information on "A Company Christmas at Pops": 

James F. Cleary, Managing Director, PaineWebber, Inc. (439-8000) 

Chet Krentzman, President, Advanced Management Associates (332-3141) 

William F. Meagher, Managing Partner, Arthur Andersen & Co. (330-4300) 

William D. Roddy, Vice President and General Manager, Neiman Marcus (536-36C 

Michael H. Reingold, President, Delia Femina, McNamee WCRS, Inc. (737-6450 

Peter N. Cerundolo, BSO Corporate Development Office (638-9252) 



52 



"C.R. Bard, Inc. 
Robert H. McCaffrey 

"Century Manufacturing Company 
Joseph Tiberio 

"Chelsea Industries, Inc. 
Ronald G. Casty 



Media 

THE BOSTON GLOBE 
William O. Taylor 

BOSTON HERALD 



Patrick J. Purcell 

PEOPLE MAGAZINE 
CONNELL LIMITED PARTNERSHIP Peter Krieger 

102.5 PM 



William P. Connell 



Dennison Manufacturing Company 
Nelson G. Gifford 

ERVING PAPER MILLS 
Charles B. Housen 

TLEXcon Company, Inc. 
Mark R. Ungerer 

Georgia-Pacific Corp. 
Maurice W. Kring 
THE GILLETTE COMPANY 



Colman M. Mockler, Jr. 
GTE PRODUCTS CORPORATION 



Dean T. Langford 

HARVARD FOLDING BOX 
COMPANY, INC. 
Melvin A. Ross 

H.K. Webster Company, Inc. 
Dean K. Webster 

HMK Group Companies, Ltd. 
Joan L. Karol 

Budson Lock, Inc. 
Norman Stavisky 

Industrial Filter and Equipment 
Corporation 
Donald R. Patnode 

Kendall Company 
J. Dale Sherratt 

jEACH & GARNER COMPANY 
Philip F. Leach 

jeggett & Piatt, Inc. 
Alexander M. Levine 

vIEW ENGLAND BUSINESS 
SERVICE, INC. 
Richard H. Rhoads 

'arks Corporation 
Lee Davidson 

ierce Aluminum 
Robert W. Pierce 

tatler Tissue Company 
Leonard Sugerman 

uperior Brands, Inc. 
Richard J. Phelps 

ech Pak, Inc. 
J. William Flynn 

extron, Inc. 
3.F. Dolan 

Ire Belt Company of America 
Wade Greer 



5-3601 

ft 



WCRB 
Richard L. Kaye 

WCVB-TV, CHANNEL 5 BOSTON 
S. James Coppersmith 

Personnel 

TAD TECHNICAL SERVICES 
CORPORATION 
David J. McGrath, Jr. 



Printing 

*Bowne of Boston, Inc. 
Donald J. Cannava 

Customforms, Inc. 
David A. Granoff 

DANIELS PRINTING COMPANY 
Lee S. Daniels 

*Espo Litho Co., Inc. 
David M. Fromer 

George H. Dean Company 
Earl Michaud 

GRAFACON, INC. 



H. Wayman Rogers, Jr. 



Publishing 

Addison-Wesley Publishing Company, 
Inc. 
Warren R. Stone 

CAHNERS PUBLISHING COMPANY 

Ron Segel 

HOUGHTON MIFFLIN COMPANY 
Nader F. Darehshori 

Little, Brown & Company 
Kevin L. Dolan 



Hilon Development Corporation 
Joan Eliachar 

*John M. Corcoran & Company 
John M. Corcoran 

Keller Co., Inc. 
Joseph P. Keller 

*Leggat McCall Properties, Inc. 
Dennis F. Callahan 

Northland Investment Corporation 
Robert A. Danziger 

Tetlow Realty Associates 
Richard J. Gilbert 

*Trammell Crow Company 
Arthur DeMartino 

Urban Investment & Development 
Rudy K. Umscheid 

*Windsor Building Associates 
Mona F. Freedman 



Retail 

*Channel Home Centers, Inc. 
Malcolm L. Sherman 

FILENE'S 
David P. Mullen 

*Jordan Marsh Company 
Richard F. Van Pelt 

Karten's Jewelers 
Joel Karten 

*Neiman Marcus 
William D. Roddy 

Out of Town News, Inc. 
Sheldon Cohen 

*Saks Fifth Avenue 
Alison Strieder Mayher 

THE STOP & SHOP COMPANIES, 
INC. 



Real Estate/Development 

* Boston Capital Partners 

Christopher W. Collins 
Herbert F. Collins 
Richard J. DeAgazio 
John P. Manning 

* Combined Properties, Inc. 

Stanton L. Black 

*The Flatley Company 
Thomas J. Flatley 

Heafitz Development Company 
Lewis Heafitz 



53 



Lewis Schaeneman 

TJX COMPANIES 
Ben Cammarata 



Science/Medical 

Baldpate Hospital, Inc. 
Lucille M. Batal 

Blake & Blake Genealogists 
Richard A. Blake, Jr. 

CHARLES RD7ER 
LABORATORIES, INC. 
Henry L. Foster 

*CompuChem Corporation 
Gerard Kees Verkerk 

J.A. WEBSTER, INC. 
John A. Webster 

* Portsmouth Regional Hospital 
William J. Schuler 






c PP/iat better tocu^ to start t/i& ctqw? 

QBcrd&on^, mu&io, ct cowforta£/& comfeanlofi/, 

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asS£n^oftA&a>eatA€rfmttern& } cmdtAesi/ — 



mares/nu&ic. 




^America >& most /i&teaed ' to~broyrams of 
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54 



I Services 

Don Law Productions 
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Thomas E. Knott 

Shaughnessy & Ahern Co. 
John J. Shaughnessy 

Wild Acre Inns, Inc. 
Bernard S. Yudowitz 



Software/Information Services 

International Data Group 
Patrick J. McGovern 

Phoenix Technologies Foundation 
Neil Colvin 



Travel/Transportation 

* Crimson Travel Service/ 
Thomas Cook 
David Paresky 

*Heritage Travel, Inc. 
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Telecommunications 

AT&T 
Robert Babbitt 

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John F. McKinnon 

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NEW ENGLAND TELEPHONE 
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55 



Next Program . . . 



Thursday, November 8, at 8 
Friday, November 9, at 2 
Saturday, November 10, at 8 

KURT SANDERLING conducting 

MOZART 



SHOSTAKOVICH 



Symphony No. 25 in G minor, K.183(173dB) 

Allegro con brio 
Andante 
Menuetto 
Allegro 



INTERMISSION 

Symphony No. 10 

Moderato 
Allegro 
Allegretto 
Andante —Allegro 




BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 



Hours: 

Tuesday, Thursday, 

Friday, 11 AM -3 PM 
Saturday, 1 PM - 6 PM 
All concert hours 
Tel. (617) 638-9383 



SPECIAL OFFER 

10% OFF 

on all T-shirts and 

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at the Symphony Shop 

with this coupon. 



Offer valid until January 1, 1991. 



56 



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Coming Concerts 



Thursday 'C - November 8, 8-9:50 
Friday 'A' - November 9, 2-3:50 
Saturday 'B' -November 10, 8-9:50 

KURT SANDERLING conducting 
MOZART Symphony No. 25 

SHOSTAKOVICH Symphony No. 10 

Wednesday, November 14, at 7:30 

Open Rehearsal 
Steven Ledbetter will discuss the program 

at 6:30 in Symphony Hall. 
Thursday A' — November 15, 8-10:05 
Friday 'B'- November 16, 2-4:05 
Saturday 'A' - November 17, 8-10:05 

CATHERINE COMET conducting 
HEINRICH SCHIFF, cello 

WUORINEN 
RAVEL 



SAINT-SAENS 
FAURE 



Machault mon chou 
Valses nobles et 

sentimentales 
Cello Concerto No. 1 
Elegie for cello and 

orchestra 
SHOSTAKOVICH Symphony No. 1 

Thursday 'C- Wednesday, November 21, 8-10:05 
Friday A' -November 23, 2-4:05 
Saturday 'B'- November 24, 8-10:05 
Tuesday 'B'- November 27, 8-10:05 

MAREK JANOWSKI conducting 
CHRISTIAN TETZLAFF, piano 

SCHUMANN Violin Concerto 

BRUCKNER Symphony No. 7 

Wednesday, December 5, at 7:30 

Open Rehearsal 
Marc Mandel will discuss the program 

at 6:30 in Symphony Hall. 
Thursday A' -December 6, 8-10:05 
Friday 'B'- December 7, 2-4:05 
Saturday 'B' -December 8, 8-10:05 

SEIJI OZAWA conducting 
PETER SERKIN, piano 
TANGLEWOOD FESTIVAL CHORUS, 
JOHN OLIVER, conductor 

VERDI Four Sacred Pieces 

SCHOENBERG Piano Concerto 
BEETHOVEN Choral Fantasy 

Programs and artists subject to change. 



57 



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Est. 1881 



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Write for Centennial Brochure: The Boston Home, IllC. 

David W. Lewis, Treasuiei 2049-2061 Dorchester Avenue 

John Bigelow, Assistant Treasurer Boston, Massachusetts 02124 

617/825-3905 



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For information about our specialty coffees. 

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58 



^^H 



Symphony Hall Information . . . 



FOR SYMPHONY HALL CONCERT AND 
TICKET INFORMATION, call (617) 266- 
1492. For Boston Symphony concert program 
information, call "C-O-N-C-E-R-T" (266-2378). 

THE BOSTON SYMPHONY performs ten 
months a year, in Symphony Hall and at Tan- 
glewood. For information about any of the 
orchestra's activities, please call Symphony 
Hall, or write the Boston Symphony Orches- 
tra, Symphony Hall, Boston, MA 02115. 

THE NEWLY REFURBISHED EUNICE S. 
AND JULIAN COHEN WING, adjacent to 
Symphony Hall on Huntington Avenue, may be 
entered by the Symphony Hall West Entrance 
on Huntington Avenue. 

FOR SYMPHONY HALL RENTAL INFOR- 
MATION, call (617) 638-9240, or write the 
Function Manager, Symphony Hall, Boston, 
MA 02115. 

THE BOX OFFICE is open from 10 a.m. 
until 6 p.m. Monday through Saturday; on con- 
cert evenings it remains open through intermis- 
sion for BSO events or just past starting-time 
for other events. In addition, the box office 
opens Sunday at 1 p.m. when there is a con- 
cert that afternoon or evening. Single tickets 
for all Boston Symphony subscription concerts 
are available at the box office. For outside 
events at Symphony Hall, tickets are available 
three weeks before the concert. No phone 
orders will be accepted for these events. 

TO PURCHASE BSO TICKETS: American 
Express, MasterCard, Visa, a personal check, 
and cash are accepted at the box office. To 
charge tickets instantly on a major credit card, 
or to make a reservation and then send pay- 
ment by check, call "Symphony-Charge" at 
(617) 266-1200, Monday through Saturday 
from 10 a.m. until 6 p.m. There is a handling 
fee of $1.75 for each ticket ordered by phone. 

GROUP SALES: Groups may take advantage of 
advance ticket sales. For BSO concerts at Sym- 
phony Hall, groups of twenty-five or more may 
reserve tickets by telephone and take advantage 
of ticket discounts and flexible payment options. 
To place an order, or for more information, call 
Group Sales at (617) 638-9345. 

IN CONSIDERATION of our patrons and 
artists, children under four will not be admit- 
ted to Boston Symphony Orchestra concerts. 



THE SYMPHONY SHOP is located in the 
Cohen Wing at the West Entrance on Hunting- 
ton Avenue and is open Tuesday, Thursday, and 
Friday from 11 a.m. until 3 p.m., Saturday from 
1 p.m. until 6 p.m., and from one hour before 
each concert through intermission. The shop car- 
ries BSO and musical-motif merchandise and 
gift items such as calendars, clothing, appoint- 
ment books, drinking glasses, holiday ornaments, 
children's books, and BSO and Pops recordings. 
A selection of Symphony Shop merchandise is 
also available during BSO concert hours outside 
the Cabot-Cahners Room in the Massachusetts 
Avenue corridor. All proceeds benefit the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra. For merchandise informa- 
tion, please call (617) 267-2692. 

TICKET RESALE: If for some reason you 
are unable to attend a Boston Symphony con- 
cert for which you hold a ticket, you may make 
your ticket available for resale by calling the 
switchboard. This helps bring needed revenue 
to the orchestra and makes your seat available 
to someone who wants to attend the concert. A 
mailed receipt will acknowledge your tax-deduct- 
ible contribution. 

RUSH SEATS: There are a limited number of 
Rush Seats available for the Friday-afternoon, 
Tuesday-evening, and Saturday-evening Boston 
Symphony concerts (subscription concerts only). 
The low price of these seats is assured through 
the Morse Rush Seat Fund. The tickets for Rush 
Seats are sold at $6 each, one to a customer, on 
Fridays as of 9 a.m. and Saturdays and Tues- 
days as of 5 p.m. 

PARKING: The Prudential Center Garage 
offers a discount to any BSO patron with a 
ticket stub for that evening's performance. 
There are also two paid parking garages on 
Westland Avenue near Symphony Hall. 
Limited street parking is available. As a spe- 
cial benefit, guaranteed pre-paid parking near 
Symphony Hall is available to subscribers who 
attend evening concerts on Tuesday, Thursday, 
Friday, or Saturday. For more information, 
call the Subscription Office at (617) 266-7575. 

LATECOMERS will be seated by the ushers 
during the first convenient pause in the pro- 
gram. Those who wish to leave before the end 
of the concert are asked to do so between pro- 
gram pieces in order not to disturb other 
patrons. 



59 



SMOKING IS NOT PERMITTED in any 

part of the Symphony Hall auditorium or in 
the surrounding corridors; it is permitted only 
in the Hatch Room and in the main lobby on 
Massachusetts Avenue. Please note that 
smoking is no longer permitted in the Cabot- 
Cahners Room. 

CAMERA AND RECORDING EQUIPMENT 
may not be brought into Symphony Hall dur- 
ing concerts. 

FIRST AID FACILITIES for both men and 
women are available. On-call physicians attend- 
ing concerts should leave their names and seat 
locations at the switchboard near the Massa- 
chusetts Avenue entrance. 

WHEELCHAIR ACCESS to Symphony Hall 
is available via the Cohen Wing, at the West 
Entrance. Wheelchair-accessible restrooms are 
located in the main corridor of the West 
Entrance, and in the first-balcony passageway 
between Symphony Hall and the Cohen Wing. 

ELEVATORS are located outside the Hatch 
and Cabot-Cahners rooms on the Massachu- 
setts Avenue side of Symphony Hall, and in 
the Cohen Wing. 

LADIES' ROOMS are located on the orches- 
tra level, audience-left, at the stage end of the 
hall, on both sides of the first balcony, and in 
the Cohen Wing. 

MEN'S ROOMS are located on the orchestra 
level, audience-right, outside the Hatch Room 
near the elevator, on the first-balcony level, 
audience-left, outside the Cabot-Cahners Room 
near the coatroom, and in the Cohen Wing. 

COATROOMS are located on the orchestra and 
first-balcony levels, audience-left, outside the 
Hatch and Cabot-Cahners rooms, and in the 
Cohen Wing. The BSO is not responsible for 
personal apparel or other property of patrons. 

LOUNGES AND BAR SERVICE: There are 
two lounges in Symphony Hall. The Hatch 
Room on the orchestra level and the Cabot- 



Cahners Room on the first-balcony level serve 
drinks starting one hour before each perform- 
ance. For the Friday- afternoon concerts, both 
rooms open at 12:15, with sandwiches available 
until concert time. 

BOSTON SYMPHONY BROADCASTS: Con- 
certs of the Boston Symphony Orchestra are 
heard by delayed broadcast in many parts of the 
United States and Canada, as well as interna- 
tionally, through the Boston Symphony Tran- 
scription Trust. In addition, Friday-afternoon 
concerts are broadcast live by WGBH-FM (Bos- 
ton 89.7); Saturday-evening concerts are broad- 
cast live by both WGBH-FM and WCRB-FM 
(Boston 102.5). Live broadcasts may also be 
heard on several other public radio stations 
throughout New England and New York. 

BSO FRIENDS: The Friends are annual 
donors to the Boston Symphony Orchestra. 
Friends receive BSO, the orchestra's newslet- 
ter, as well as priority ticket information and 
other benefits depending on their level of giv- 
ing. For information, please call the Develop- 
ment Office at Symphony Hall weekdays 
between 9 and 5, (617) 638-9251. If you are 
already a Friend and you have changed your 
address, please send your new address with 
your newsletter label to the Development Office, 
Symphony Hall, Boston, MA 02115. Including 
the mailing label will assure a quick and accu- 
rate change of address in our files. 

BUSINESS FOR BSO: The BSO's Business 
& Professional Leadership program makes it 
possible for businesses to participate in the life 
of the Boston Symphony Orchestra through a 
variety of original and exciting programs, 
among them "Presidents at Pops," "A Com- 
pany Christmas at Pops," and special-event 
underwriting. Benefits include corporate recog- 
nition in the BSO program book, access to the 
Higginson Room reception lounge, and priority 
ticket service. For further information, please 
call the BSO Corporate Development Office at 
(617) 638-9250. 



60 




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BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

Seiji Ozawa, Music Director 
Grant Llewellyn and Robert Spano, 
Assistant Conductors 
One Hundred and Tenth Season, 1990-91 




SUPPER CONCERT III 

Thursday, November 1, at 6 
Friday, November 2, at 12 noon 

VYACHESLAV URITSKY, violin 
SATO KNUDSEN, cello 
TATIANA YAMPOLSKY, piano 



HOFMANN 



Duo in D for violin and cello 



Poco Adagio 

Tempo di Menuetto [Moderato] 

Allegro [non troppo] 



BEETHOVEN 



Trio in G for piano, violin, and 
cello, Opus 1, No. 2 

Adagio— Allegro vivace 
Largo con espressione 
Scherzo. Allegro 
Finale. Presto 



Baldwin piano 

The performers appreciate your not smoking during the concert. 



Week 5 



Leopold Hofmann 

Duo in D for violin and cello 



Joseph Haydn was an enormously prolific composer, but he didn't write 
everything that has come down in his name. During his lifetime, most music 
circulated in manuscript copies, and it was easy enough for someone to add a 
composer's name erroneously to an unidentified manuscript. This might happen 
quite innocently, in the thought that the piece really had been written by the person 
whose name was belatedly inscribed on the score. But at least equally often errors 
of attribution occurred because publishers wanted to sell the music, and they knew 
that certain names worked well at moving the music out of the shop and into the 
hands of the paying customer. No name worked this magic better than Haydn's. 
There are dozens, even hundreds of compositions large and small attributed to 
him, many of which are quite clearly by someone else. 

How do we know, in cases of disputed identity, who wrote a given piece? The 
most important evidence, of course, is a manuscript in the composer's own hand 
and signed by him. In the absence of that, we sometimes have the composer's own 
thematic catalogue, a listing of pieces composed during a given period of time 
identified by the first phrase or so of the theme. Haydn and Mozart both kept such 
catalogues for some part of their lives, though by no means systematically. 

One of the most useful sources of information is the series of annual catalogues 
of the publisher J.G. Breitkopf, who between 1760 and 1787 issued thematic lists of 
music he had for sale, whether in print or manuscript copies. The 1768 Breitkopf 
catalogue lists the piece to be heard here as the first of two "Duetti di Leop. 
Hoffmann [sic]." In the early 1780s it was published in England under the title "A 
Favorite Duett for a Violin & a Violoncello composed by Giuseppe Haydn of 
Vienna." This can scarcely have been an authentic work of Haydn's, for he had as 
yet no English connections. More likely the English publisher Forster decided that 
Haydn's name would attract more sales than Hofmann's, or he himself was the 
victim of an error. The probability is far stronger that this little duo is by Leopold 
Hofmann than by the famous Haydn. (Anthony van Hoboken, who catalogued 
Haydn's music, lists it among the dubious or inauthentic works with the catalogue 
number VI:D1.) 

In his own lifetime (1738-1793), Hofmann enjoyed a considerable fame as a 
symphonist, violinist, organist, and teacher, ranking not far below Haydn himself. 
He received a number of honors and awards, but to Haydn Hofmann was a 
braggart "who believes he alone has achieved Parnassus." Ironically, the works by 
Hofmann heard most often today include the present duo and a flute concerto, 
both once believed to be by Haydn! 

—Steven Ledbetter 



Ludwig van Beethoven 

Trio in G for piano, violin, and cello, Opus 1, No. 2 



Beethoven published a number of pieces early in his career before issuing 
something that he deemed worthy of an opus number. There has long been the 
suspicion that Beethoven brought one or more of the three trios eventually 
published as Opus 1, already finished, with him from Bonn to Vienna in 1792. 
Although there may be something in this idea, there are also a number of sketches 
in the so-called "Kafka" sketchbook, dating from Beethoven's earliest Vienna 
period, which suggest that much work on them was done in his new home. 

These trios were first performed at one of the soirees of Beethoven's patron 
Prince Lichnowsky (to whom the published set would be dedicated) in the 
presence of Haydn late in 1793 or 1794, shortly before Haydn left for England. 
Haydn spoke warmly of the works, but advised Beethoven not to publish the trio 
in C minor, which he felt was too advanced to be accepted by the general public. 
Beethoven was somewhat angered by Haydn's remarks and ascribed them to 
jealousy on the part of the older composer. But perhaps, once the heat of passion 
had cooled, he looked at the compositions again and decided that they needed 
further revision. In any case, he did not rush into print. It was another year and a 
half before their publication, when Beethoven chose to identify them as "Opus 1," 
an explicit sign that he was now ready to be taken seriously as a composer. 

The G major trio is perhaps the least known of the three, suffering the common 
fate of middle siblings. The E-flat trio (No. 1) is the first published Beethoven work 
with an opus number, the C minor trio (No. 3) is the most daring and 
"Beethovenian." The second trio, a work of charm and wit, tends to get 
overlooked. 

The first movement opens with an Adagio ranging through a wide circle of keys 
before firmly establishing the tonic, G. The Allegro vivace that follows begins 
wittily out of key and finds its way home with a well-calculated flourish (the 
"Kafka" sketchbook contains an early version of this passage, revealing how much 
Beethoven improved its sense of timing in working out the details). The Largo is a 
tender and lyrical movement in a bright E major, the unusual choice of key 
indicating the young composer's determination to stretch the boundaries of 
harmonic possibility. This music, too, seems to have been conceived after 
Beethoven's arrival in Vienna, because a sketch of the theme is intermingled with 
the counterpoint exercises that Beethoven wrote during his studies with 
Albrechtsberger. The scherzo begins and ends quietly, an unusual move, especially 
for a young composer. The finale ripples with wit and energy, racing along in its 
2/4 Presto to the lively conclusion. 

-S.L. 






When Vyacheslav Uritsky applied for emigration from Russia to the United States, he 
was immediately dismissed from the Moscow Philharmonic, with which he had been a 
first violinist for fourteen years. After waiting three months in Moscow and three more 
months in Rome, he arrived in the United States with his wife and daughter just one 
day before his scheduled Boston Symphony Orchestra audition in April 1975. Born in 
Kherson, Russia, Mr. Uritsky grew up in Odessa, a town of strong musical traditions. 
He began his musical training there with Olga Goldbown and continued at the Odessa 
State Conservatory with Leonid Lambersky. Following his graduation from the 
conservatory, he became a member of the Moscow Philharmonic and the Moscow 
Philharmonic Soloist Ensemble and toured Europe, Asia, and the United States. 
Formerly a chamber music coach at the Gnesin Institute of Music, and a frequent 
performer of chamber music throughout New England, Mr. Uritsky is currently on the 
faculties of the New England Conservatory of Music and the Boston University 
Tanglewood Institute. He joined the Boston Symphony Orchestra's second violin 
section in 1975 and became assistant principal of that section two years later. 



Born in Baltimore in 1955, cellist Sato Knudsen joined the Boston Symphony Orchestra 
in 1983. His teachers included David Soyer at Bowdoin College and Stephen Geber, 
Robert Ripley, and Madeleine Foley at the New England Conservatory of Music. He 
also attended the Piatigorsky Seminar in Los Angeles and was a Fellow for two 
summers at the Tanglewood Music Center. Before joining the Boston Symphony 
Orchestra, Mr. Knudsen was associate principal cellist of the San Antonio Symphony for 
three years; prior to that he performed with the Boston Pops Orchestra, Boston Opera 
Company, New Hampshire Symphony, and Worcester Symphony. As cellist with the 
Anima Piano Trio, he performed at Carnegie Recital Hall and Jordan Hall, throughout 
New England, and on radio stations WQXR-FM in New York and WGBH-FM in Boston. 
As of the 1988-89 season, Mr. Knudsen has occupied the Esther S. and Joseph M. 
Shapiro Chair in the second stand of the Boston Symphony Orchestra's cello section. 



A Russian pianist of Armenian origin, Tatiana Yampolsky began her musical studies at 
the age of five and made her debut when she was twelve, at the Large Hall of the 
Moscow Conservatory. Ms. Yampolsky graduated with honors from the Moscow 
Conservatory, where she studied with the prominent Soviet pianists Yakov Flier and 
Dmitry Bashkirov, and received her degree in both concert performance and piano 
teaching. Ms. Yampolsky performed in concerts throughout the Soviet Union, playing 
in recitals, with orchestra, and for Moscow Broadcasting. Since emigrating to the 
United States, she has performed in many recitals and concerts; she has also appeared 
as soloist with a number of orchestras, including the Boston Pops Orchestra and the 
Atlantic Symphony of Canada, and been pianist with the Boston Symphony Orchestra. 
In addition to her concert career, Tatiana Yampolsky teaches advanced students referred 
to her by the Harvard University Music Department. A resident of Newton, she is a 
faculty member at the Longy School of Music in Cambridge. 



110th Season 

19 9 0-91 




Boston Symphony Orchestra 

Seiji Ozawa, Music Director 

90th Anniversary of Symphony Hall 






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330 BOYLSTON ST., BOSTON, MASS. 02116 (617) 267-9100 * 1-800-225-7088 
THE MALL AT CHESTNUT HILL • SOUTH SHORE PLAZA 



! 




Seiji Ozawa, Music Director 
Grant Llewellyn and Robert Spano, 

Assistant Conductors 
One Hundred and Tenth Season, 1990-91 



Trustees of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Inc. 

Nelson J. Darling, Jr., Chairman Emeritus 



J. P. Barger, Chairman 

Mrs. Lewis S. Dabney, Vice-Chairman 

Mrs. John H. Fitzpatrick, Vice-Chairman 



George H. Kidder, President 

Archie C. Epps, Vice-Chairman 

William J. Poorvu, Vice-Chairman and Treasurer 



David B. Arnold, Jr. 
Peter A. Brooke 
James F. Cleary 
John F. Cogan, Jr. 
Julian Cohen 
William M. Crozier, Jr. 
Mrs. Michael H. Davis 
Mrs. Eugene B. Doggett 

Trustees Emeriti 

Vernon R. Alden 
Philip K. Allen 
Allen G. Barry 
Leo L. Beranek 
Mrs. John M. Bradley 
Abram T. Collier 



Avram J. Goldberg 
Mrs. R. Douglas Hall III 
Francis W. Hatch 
Julian T. Houston 
Mrs. Bela T. Kalman 
Mrs. George I. Kaplan 
Harvey Chet Krentzman 
R. Willis Leith, Jr. 



Mrs. Harris Fahnestock 
Mrs. John L. Grandin 
E. Morton Jennings, Jr. 
Albert L. Nickerson 
Thomas D. Perry, Jr. 
Irving W. Rabb 

Other Officers of the Corporation 

John Ex Rodgers, Assistant Treasurer Michael G. 

Daniel R. Gustin, Clerk 



Mrs. August R. Meyer 
Mrs. Robert B. Newman 
Peter C. Read 
Richard A. Smith 
Ray Stata 

William F. Thompson 
Nicholas T. Zervas 



Mrs. George R. Rowland 
Mrs. George Lee Sargent 
Sidney Stoneman 
John Hoyt Stookey 
John L. Thorndike 



McDonough, Assistant Treasurer 



Administration 

Kenneth Haas, Managing Director 

Daniel R. Gustin, Assistant Managing Director and Manager of Tanglewood 

Michael G. McDonough, Director of Finance and Business Affairs 

Evans Mirageas, Artistic Administrator 

Anne H. Parsons, Orchestra Manager 

Caroline Smedvig, Director of Public Relations and Marketing 

Josiah Stevenson, Director of Development 



Robert Bell, Manager of 

Information Systems 
Peter N. Cerundolo, Director of 

Corporate Development 
Madelyne Cuddeback, Director of 

Corporate Sponsorships 
Patricia Forbes Halligan, Personnel 

Administrator 
Sarah J. Harrington, Budget Manager 
Margaret Hillyard-Lazenby, 

Director of Volunteers 
Russell M. Hodsdon, Manager of Box Office 
Bernadette M. Horgan, Public Relations 

Coordinator 
Craig R. Kaplan, Controller 
Nancy A. Kay, Director of Sales & 

Marketing Manager 
John M. Keenum, Director of 

Tanglewood Music Center Development 



Patricia Krol, Coordinator of Youth Activities 
Steven Ledbetter, Musicologist & 

Program Annotator 
Michelle R. Leonard, Media and Production 

Manager, Boston Symphony Orchestra 
Marc Mandel, Publications Coordinator 
John C. Marksbury, Director of 

Foundation and Government Support 
Julie-Anne Miner, Manager of Fund 

Reporting 
Richard Ortner, Administrator of 

Tanglewood Music Center 
Scott Schillin, Assistant Manager, 

Pops and Youth Activities 
Joyce M. Serwitz, Director of Major Gifts/ 

Assistant Director of Development 
Cheryl L. Silvia, Function Manager 
Susan E. Tomlin, Director of Annual Giving 



Programs copyright ©1990 Boston Symphony Orchestra, Inc. 
_Jaucole Advertising, Inc./Cover photo by Ira Wyman 



Board of Overseers of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, 


Inc. 


John F. Cogan, Jr., Chairman 






Mrs. Ray A. Goldberg, Vice-Chairman 




Mrs. R. Douglas Hall III, Secretary 




Mrs. Herbert B. Abelow 


Haskell R. Gordon 


Mrs. Thomas S. Morse 


Harlan Anderson 


Steven Grossman 


Richard P. Morse 


Mrs. David Bakalar 


John P. Hamill 


E. James Morton 


Bruce A. Beal 


Daphne P. Hatsopoulos 


David G. Mugar 


Mrs. Leo L. Beranek 


Joe M. Henson 


David S. Nelson 


Lynda Schubert Bodman 


Mrs. Marilyn Brachman Hoffman 


Mrs. Hiroshi H. Nishino 


Donald C. Bowersock, Jr. 


Ronald A. Homer 


Robert P. O'Block 


William M. Bulger 


Lola Jaffe 


Paul C. O'Brien 


Mrs. Levin H. Campbell 


Anna Faith Jones 


Vincent M. O'Reilly 


Earle M. Chiles 


H. Eugene Jones 


Andrall E. Pearson 


Mrs. C. Thomas Clagett, Jr. 


Susan B. Kaplan 


John A. Perkins 


James F. Geary 


Mrs. S. Charles Kasdon 


Daphne Brooks Prout 


William H. Congleton 


Richard L. Kaye 


Millard H. Pryor, Jr. 


William F. Connell 


Robert D. King 


Keizo Saji 


Walter J. Connolly, Jr. 


Mrs. Gordon F. Kingsley 


Roger A. Saunders 


S. James Coppersmith 


Allen Z. Kluchman 


Mrs. Raymond H. Schneider 


Albert C. Cornelio 


Koji Kobayashi 


Mark L. Selkowitz 


Phyllis Curtin 


Mrs. Carl Koch 


Malcolm L. Sherman 


Alex V. d'Arbeloff 


David I. Kosowsky 


Mrs. Donald B. Sinclair 


Phyllis Dohanian 


Robert K. Kraft 


W. Davies Sohier, Jr. 


Hugh Downs 


George Krupp 


Ralph Z. Sorenson 


Goetz B. Eaton 


Mrs. Hart D. Leavitt 


Ira Stepanian 


Edward Eskandarian 


Laurence Lesser 


Mrs. Arthur I. Strang 


Katherine Fanning 


Stephen R. Levy 


Mark Tishler, Jr. 


Peter M. Flanigan 


Frederick H. Lovejoy, Jr. 


Roger D. Wellington 


Dean Freed 


Mrs. Charles P. Lyman 


Robert A. Wells 


Eugene M. Freedman 


Mrs. Harry L. Marks 


Mrs. Thomas H.P. Whitney 


Peter H.B. Frelinghuysen 


C. Charles Marran 


Margaret Williams-DeCelles 


Mrs. James Garivaltis 


Nathan R. Miller 


Mrs. John J. Wilson 


Mark R. Goldweitz 






ij Overseers Emeriti 

1 [ 






Mrs. Weston W. Adams 


Mrs. Louis I. Kane 


Mrs. Peter van S. Rice 


Mrs. Frank G. Allen 


Leonard Kaplan 


Mrs. Jerome Rosenfeld 


Mrs. Richard Bennink 


Benjamin H. Lacy 


Mrs. William C. Rousseau 


Mary Louise Cabot 


Mrs. James F. Lawrence 


Francis P. Sears, Jr. 


Johns H. Congdon 


Hanae Mori 


Mrs. Edward S. Stimpson 


Mrs. Thomas J. Galligan 


Mrs. Stephen V.C. Morris 


Luise Vosgerchian 


Mrs. Richard D. Hill 


Stephen Paine, Sr. 


Mrs. Donald B. Wilson 


Susan M. Hilles 


David R. Pokross 





1 1 



Symphony Hall Operations 

Robert L. Gleason, Facilities Manager 
James E. Whitaker, House Manager 

Cleveland Morrison, Stage Manager 

Franklin Smith, Supervisor of House Crew 

Wilmoth A. Griffiths, Assistant Supervisor of House Crew 

William D. McDonnell, Chief Steward 

H.R. Costa, Lighting 



Officers of the Boston Symphony Association of Volunteers 

Susan D. Hall, President 

Thelma E. Goldberg, Executive Vice-President 

Joan Erhard, Secretary 

Patricia A. Maddox, Treasurer 

Betty Sweitzer, Nominating Chairman 



Vice-Presidents 

Helen Doyle, Hall Services 
Goetz B. Eaton, Fundraising 
Charles W. Jack, Adult Education 
Pat Jensen, Membership 
Maureen Hickey, Tanglewood 

Chairmen of Regions 

Krista Kamborian Baldini 
Judy Clark 
Joan Erhard 
Bettina Harrison 



Marilyn Larkin, Tanglewood 

Patricia A. Newton, Regions 

Carol Scheifele-Holmes, Public Relations 

F. Preston Wilson, Development 

Pat Woolley, Youth Activities 



Helen Lahage 
Ginny Martens 
Paula Murphy 
Pamela S. Nugent 



Beverly J. Pieper 
Patricia L. Tambone 
Arline Ziner 



Business and Professional Leadership Association 
Board of Directors 

Harvey Chet Krentzman, Chairman James F. Cleary, BPLA President 



Members 

J. P. Barger 
Leo L. Beranek 
William F. Connell 
Nelson J. Darling, Jr. 



Thelma E. Goldberg 
Joe M. Henson 
George H. Kidder 
Vincent M. O'Reilly 



Malcolm L. Sherman 
Ray Stata 
Stephen J. Sweeney 
Roger D. Wellington 



Boston Symphony Orchestra concerts are funded in part by the National 
Endowment for the Arts and the Massachusetts Cultural Council, a state agency. 



Celebrating the 90th Anniversary of Symphony Hall 




On display in the first-floor Huntington Avenue corridor of the Cohen Wing is an archival 
exhibit celebrating the 90th anniversary of Symphony Hall. In addition to newspaper accounts 
of the building's opening in 1900, the exhibit includes period photographs and a tribute to 
acoustician Wallace Clement Sabine. 

Articles on various aspects of Symphony Hall will be featured in the BSO program book 
throughout the season. The cover photograph shows the cartouche directly above the 
Symphony Hall stage. Whereas numerous European halls traditionally highlighted various 
composers' names, Beethoven became the only composer whose name was inscribed on any of 
the plaques that trim the stage and balconies of Symphony Hall. The others were left empty 
since, at the time the Hall was opened, it was felt that only Beethoven's popularity would 
remain unchanged. 



I I 



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on 


request 


Armenta Adams 


David Korevaar 


American Ballet Theater Garah Landes 


Michael Barrett 


Michael L^ikester 


John Bayless 


Elyane Laussade 


Leonard Bernstein 


Marion McPartland 


William Bolcom 


John Nauman 


Jorge Bolet 


Seiji Ozawa 


Boston Pops Orchestra Luciano Pavarotti 


Boston Symphony 


Alexander Peskanov 


Chamber Players 


Andre Previn . rr ^^ 


Boston Symphony 


Steve Reich 


Orchestra 


Santiago Rodriguez 


Boston University School George Shearing 


of Music 


Bright Sheng 


Brooklyn Philharmonic Leonard Shure 


Dave Brubeck 


pi Abbey Simon 


Aaron Copland 


| Stephen Sondheim 


John Cprigliano 


I Herbert Stessin 


PhylliJj|urtin 


Tanglewood Mi||ic 


Rian de Waal 


Center 


Michael 1 Feinstein 


^Nelita True 


Lukas Foss 


Craig Urquhart 


Philip Glass 


Earl Wild 


Karl Haas 


John Williams 


John F. Kennedy Center Yehudi Wyner 


for Performing Arts 


and 200 others 




I! 1 


BALDWIN 

OF 

BOSTON 


98Boylston,Bosi 


ton, MA 02116, (617) 482-2525 



■ 



BSO 



Northwest Airlines to Sponsor 
Holiday Pops Concerts 

The Boston Symphony Orchestra is pleased to 
announce that Northwest Airlines is the corpo- 
rate sponsor of the 1990 Holiday Pops Con- 
certs, which include nine evening and matinee 
Christmas Pops performances between Decem- 
ber 18 and 24 and the New Year's Eve Gala. 
Remaining tickets will go on public sale Mon- 
day, November 19. 

Boston Symphony Chamber Players 
at Jordan Hall, Sunday, November 11, 
at 3 p.m. 

The Boston Symphony Chamber Players, with 
pianist Gilbert Kalish, open their 1990-91 sub- 
scription season at Jordan Hall on Sunday, 
November 11, at 3 p.m. Baritone Sanford 
Sylvan is featured in John Harbison's Words 
from Paterson, on a program also including 
Piston's Divertimento for strings and winds 
and Beethoven's Septet in E-flat for strings 
and winds, Opus 20. Single tickets are $16, 
$12, and $9, available on the day of the con- 
cert at the Jordan Hall box office, or in 
advance at the Symphony Hall box office or by 
calling SymphonyCharge at (617) 266-1200. 

Subscriptions at $42, $32, and $24 for the 
Chamber Players' three-concert series are still 
available; for complete subscription information, 
see page 34 of this program book. 

Symphony Spotlight 

This is one in a series of biographical sketches 
that focus on some of the generous individuals 
who have endowed chairs in the Boston Sym- 
phony Orchestra. Their backgrounds are varied, 
but each felt a special commitment to the Bos- 
ton Symphony Orchestra. 

Willona Henderson Sinclair Chair 

Donald Sinclair was one of the nation's early 
pioneers in the development and manufacture 
of electrical measuring instruments and auto- 
mated test systems. He was also a dedicated 
public servant — a man who left his mark on a 
large number of professional, civic, and cul- 
tural activities and a devoted husband to 
Willona Sinclair. 

Both Donald and Willona were very inter- 



ested in music. They began attending Sym- 
phony Hall concerts in 1932 and always 
enjoyed attending them together. Donald Sin- 
clair gave his wife the Willona Henderson Sin- 
clair Chair as a fiftieth wedding anniversary 
gift, which was very meaningful for her. Before 
he died in 1985, Dr. Sinclair was chairman 
emeritus of GenRad Inc. He was an Overseer 
of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, a Trustee 
of 4;he Wang Center, and the proud father of 
four children. Mrs. Sinclair was chairman of 
the BSO's Stage Door lecture series and of the 
Pre-Symphony Suppers. An Overseer of the 
BSO, she was also active in the BSO's 100th 
anniversary festivities and the 90th-year fund 
drive. The Willona Henderson Chair, which 
endows the principal harp position, is currently 
held by Ann Hobson Pilot. 

With Thanks 

We wish to express special gratitude to Rich- 
ard P. and Claire W. Morse, major donors of 
the Rush Seats Program through the Morse 
Rush Seats Fund. A limited number of these 
generously underwritten tickets for the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra's Tuesday-evening, 
Friday-afternoon, and Saturday-evening sub- 
scription concerts are made available at $6. 

"A Company Christmas at Pops" 
Slated for December 19 

"A Company Christmas at Pops" 1990, featur- 
ing the Boston Pops Orchestra, will take place 
Wednesday evening, December 19. William F. 
Meagher, Managing Partner of Arthur Ander- 
son & Co., is chairman of the 1990 "A Com- 
pany Christmas at Pops" committee, with 
William D. Roddy, Vice-President and General 
Manager of Neiman Marcus, serving as com- 
mittee vice-chairman. Now in its seventh year, 
"A Company Christmas" has become a favorite 
holiday tradition in the Boston-area business 
community, with more than 100 of the area's 
leading businesses and their guests participat- 
ing in this festive event. In the spirit of the 
season, the BSO hosts 200 underprivileged 
children and their chaperones for the evening, 
which includes a surprise visit by Santa Claus. 
A limited number of "A Company Christmas at 
Pops" sponsorships are still available. The 
$3,500 package includes sixteen seats for the 






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concert, complete with cocktails and a gourmet 
supper; half-packages are also available. For 
further information please call Marie Petti- 
bone, the BSO's Assistant Director of Corpo- 
rate Development, at (617) 638-9278. 

BSO Guests on WGBH-FM-89.7 

In the coming weeks, Morning pro Musica with 
Robert J. Lurtsema will feature live interviews 
with BSO guest conductors and soloists: guest 
conductor Catherine Comet, music director of 
the American Symphony Orchestra, and cellist 
Heinrich Schiff, both making their BSO 
debuts, appear on Friday, November 16; and 
guest conductor Marek Janowski, who will lead 
music of Schumann and Bruckner, appears on 
Monday, November 26. All interviews begin at 
11 a.m. 

Art Exhibits in the Cabot-Cahners Room 

For the seventeenth year, a variety of Boston- 
area galleries, museums, schools, and non- 
profit artists' organizations are exhibiting their 
work in the Cabot-Cahners Room on the first- 
balcony level of Symphony Hall. On display 
through November 19 are works from the Car- 
negie Hall Photo Exhibition, to be followed by 
works from the Dyansen Gallery (November 
19-December 14) and the Water Street Gallery 
(December 14- January 17). These exhibits are 
sponsored by the Boston Symphony Associa- 
tion of Volunteers, and a portion of each sale 
benefits the orchestra. Please contact the Vol- 
unteer Office at (617) 638-9390, for further 
information. 



ist. General admission is $10 ($5 students 
and seniors). For further information, call 
(617) 776-3166. 

The 21-member New England Trombone 
Choir at New England Conservatory directed 
by BSO bass trombonist Douglas Yeo, and the 
NEC Percussion Ensemble directed by BSO 
percussionist Frank Epstein, will give their 
combined annual "Skin 'n Bones" concert on 
Monday, November 19, at 8 p.m. at Jordan 
Hall. Featured on the program will be two 
world premieres for trombones and percus- 
sion—Charles Fussell's Last Trombones and 
David P. Jones' Messalonskee Nocturne — as 
well as the American premiere of Bloodstone by 
Michiko Nakazawa. Also on the program is 
music of John Heiss, Ruth Loman, George 
Hamilton Green, and Anton Bruckner. Admis- 
sion is free. For further information, call 
262-1120. 

Harry Ellis Dickson leads the Boston Classi- 
cal Orchestra on Wednesday, November 28, 
and Friday, November 30, at 8 p.m. in Old 
South Meeting House, 310 Washington Street. 
BSO violinist Amnon Levy is featured in Men- 
delssohn's Violin Concerto on a program also 
including the same composer's FingaVs Cave 
Overture and Haydn's Symphony No. 92, 
Oxford. Tickets are $18 and $12 ($8 students 
and seniors). For further information, call 
(617) 426-2387. 



BSO Members in Concert 

Violist Patricia McCarty and pianist Ellen 
Weckler will present a recital on Friday, 
November 9, at 8 p.m. at the Pickman Concert 
Hall at the Longy School of Music of Cam- 
bridge. The American Music Week program 
will include sonatas by Hovhaness, Lieber- 
mann, and Foote, and the world premiere of a 
work by Elizabeth Vercoe. Admission is $8 ($4 
seniors and students). Call (617) 720-3434 for 
further information. 

Collage New Music, Frank Epstein, music 
director, performs the world premiere of Henri 
Lazarof s Divertimento, the Boston premieres 
of Andrew Imbrie's Dream Sequence and Jan 
Swafford's They Who Hunger, and Luciano 
Berio's Sequenza for Solo Voice on Monday, 
November 12, at 8 p.m. at the Longy School 
of Music in Cambridge. David Hoose conducts, 
with soprano Joan Heller as the featured solo- 



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Seiji Ozawa 

Seiji Ozawa was named music director of the Boston Sym- 
phony Orchestra in 1973 following a year as the orchestra's 
music adviser; he is now in his eighteenth year as the BSO's 
music director. With the Boston Symphony Orchestra he 
has led concerts in Europe, Japan, and throughout the 
United States; in March 1979 he and the orchestra made an 
historic visit to China for a significant musical exchange 
entailing coaching, study, and discussion sessions with Chi- 
nese musicians, as well as concert performances, becoming 
the first American performing ensemble to visit China since 
the establishment of diplomatic relations. This spring Mr. 

Ozawa will lead the orchestra on a seven-city North American tour; a tour to seven 

European cities will follow the 1991 Tanglewood season. 

Mr. Ozawa pursues an active international career, appearing regularly with the 
Berlin Philharmonic, the Orchestre de Paris, the French National Orchestra, the 
Vienna Philharmonic, the Philharmonia of London, and the New Japan Philharmonic. 
Recent appearances conducting opera have included La Scala, Salzburg, the Vienna 
Staatsoper, and the Paris Opera; he has also conducted at Covent Garden. In 1983, 
at the Paris Opera, he conducted the world premiere of Olivier Messiaen's St. Francis 
of Assisi. 

Mr. Ozawa has a distinguished list of recorded performances to his credit, with the 
Boston Symphony Orchestra, the Berlin Philharmonic, the London Philharmonic, the 
Philharmonia of London, the Orchestre National, the Orchestre de Paris, the Saito 
Kinen Orchestra, the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, the San Francisco Symphony, 
and the Toronto Symphony Orchestra, among others. His recordings appear on the 
CBS, Deutsche Grammophon, EMI/Angel, Erato, Hyperion, New World, Philips, 
RCA, and Telarc labels. 

Born in 1935 in Shenyang, China, to Japanese parents, Seiji Ozawa studied West- 
ern music as a child and later graduated with first prizes in composition and conduct- 
ing from Tokyo's Toho School of Music, where he was a student of Hideo Saito. In 

1959 he won first prize at the International Competition of Orchestra Conductors 
held in Besancon, France, and was invited to Tanglewood by Charles Munch, then 
music director of the Boston Symphony Orchestra and a judge at the competition. In 

1960 he won the Tanglewood Music Center's highest honor, the Koussevitzky Prize 
for outstanding student conductor. 

While a student of Herbert von Karajan in West Berlin, Mr. Ozawa came to the 
attention of Leonard Bernstein. He accompanied Mr. Bernstein on the New York 
Philharmonic's 1961 tour of Japan and was made an assistant conductor of that 
orchestra for the 1961-62 season. In January 1962 he made his first professional 
concert appearance in North America, with the San Francisco Symphony. Mr. Ozawa 
was music director of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra's Ravinia Festival for five 
summers beginning in 1964, music director of the Toronto Symphony Orchestra 
from 1965 to 1969, and music director of the San Francisco Symphony from 1970 to 
1976, followed by a year as that orchestra's music adviser. In 1970 he was named an 
artistic director of the Boston Symphony Orchestra's Tanglewood Festival. 

Seiji Ozawa has won an Emmy for the Boston Symphony Orchestra's "Evening at 
Symphony" PBS television series. He holds honorary doctor of music degrees from 
the University of Massachusetts, the New England Conservatory of Music, and 
Wheaton College in Norton, Massachusetts. 



■■■'- 1 



Wb&i, 






MM 





Music Directorship endowed by 
John Moors Cabot 

BOSTON SYMPHONY 

ORCHESTRA 

1990-91 

First Violins 

Malcolm Lowe 

Concert-master 
Charles Munch chair 

Tamara Smirnova-Sajfar 

Associate Concertmaster 
Helen Horner Mclntyre chair 

Max Hobart 

Assistant Concertmaster 

Robert L. Beat, and 

Enid L. and Bruce A. Beat chair 

Lucia Lin 

Acting Assistant Concertmaster 
Edward and Bertha C. Rose chair 

Bo Youp Hwang 

John and Dorothy Wilson chair, 
fully funded in perpetuity 

Max Winder 

Forrest Foster Collier chair 

Fredy Ostrovsky 

Dorothy Q. and David B. Arnold, Jr., 
chair, fully funded in perpetuity 

Gottfried Wilfinger 



* Participating in a system of rotated 
seating within each string section 
%On sabbatical leave 



Leo Panasevich 

Carolyn and George Rowland chair 

Sheldon Rotenberg 

Muriel C. Kasdon and 
Marjorie C. Foley chair 

Alfred Schneider 
Raymond Sird 
Ikuko Mizuno 
Amnon Levy 

Second Violins 

Marylou Speaker Churchill 

Fahnestock chair 

Vyacheslav Uritsky 

Charlotte and Irving W. Rabb chair 

Ronald Knudsen 

Edgar and Shirley Grossman chair 

Joseph McGauley 
Leonard Moss 

* Harvey Seigel 
*Jerome Rosen 

* Sheila Fiekowsky 
Ronan Lefkowitz 

*Nancy Bracken 
*Jennie Shames 
*Aza Raykhtsaum 
*Valeria Vilker Kuchment 
*Bonnie Bewick 
*Tatiana Dimitriades 

* James Cooke 
*Si-Jing Huang 

Violas 

Burton Fine 

Charles 8. Dana chair 

Patricia McCarty 

Anne Stoneman chair, 
fully funded in perpetuity 

^Ronald Wilkison 

Lois and Harlan Anderson chair 

Robert Barnes 




10 




Jerome Lipson 

Joseph Pietropaolo 

Michael Zaretsky 

Mare Jeanneret 
*Mark Ludwig 
*Rachel Fagerburg 
*Edward Gazouleas 

Cellos 

Jules Eskin 

Philip R. Allen chair 

Martha Babcock 

Vernon and Marion Alden chair 

Sato Knudsen 

Esther S. and Joseph M. Shapiro chair 

Joel Moerschel 

Sandra and David Bakalar chair 

*Robert Ripley 
Luis Leguia 

Robert Bradford Newman chair 

tCarol Procter 

Lillian and Nathan R. Miller chair 

*Ronald Peldman 

Charles and JoAnne Dickinson chair 

* Jerome Patterson 

* Jonathan Miller 

Basses 

Edwin Barker 

Harold D. Hodgkinson chair 

Lawrence Wolfe 

Maria Nistazos Stata chair, 
fully funded in perpetuity 

Joseph Hearne 

Bela Wurtzler 

John Salkowski 
*Robert Olson 
*James Orleans 
*Todd Seeber 
*John Stovall 

Flutes 



Walter Piston chair 

Leone Buyse 

Acting Principal Flute 
Marian Gray Lewis chair 

Fenwick Smith 

Myra and Robert Kraft chair 

Piccolo 

Geralyn Coticone 

Evelyn and C. Charles Marran chair 



Oboes 

Alfred Genovese 

Mildred B. Remis chair 

Wayne Rapier 
Keisuke Wakao 

English Horn 

Laurence Thorstenberg 

Beranek chair, 

fully funded in perpetuity 

Clarinets 

Harold Wright 

Ann S.M. Banks chair 

Thomas Martin 

Bass Clarinet 

Craig Nordstrom 

Farla and Harvey Chet 
Krentzman chair 

Bassoons 

Richard Svoboda 

Edward A. Taft chair 

Roland Small 
Richard Ranti 

Contrabassoon 

Richard Plaster 

Helen Rand Thayer chair 

Horns 

Charles Kavalovski 

Helen Sagoff Slosberg chair 

Richard Sebring 

Margaret Andersen Congleton chair 

Daniel Katzen 
Jay Wadenpfuhl 
Richard Mackey 
Jonathan Menkis 

Trumpets 

Charles Schlueter 

Roger Louis Voisin chair 

Peter Chapman 

Ford H. Cooper chair 

Timothy Morrison 
Steven Emery 



Trombones 

Ronald Barron 

J. P. and Mary B. Barger chair, 
fully funded in perpetuity 

Norman Bolter 

Bass Trombone 

Douglas Yeo 

Tuba 

Chester Schmitz 

Margaret and William C. 
Rousseau chair 

Timpani 

Everett Firth 

Sylvia Shippen Wells chair 

Percussion 

Arthur Press 

Assistant Timpanist 
Peter Andrew Lurie chair 

Thomas Gauger 

Peter and Anne Brooke chair 

Frank Epstein 

Harp 

Ann Hobson Pilot 

Willona Henderson Sinclair chair 

Sarah Schuster Ericsson 



Personnel Managers 

Lynn Larsen 
Harry Shapiro 

Librarians 

Marshall Burlingame 
William Shisler 
James Harper 

Stage Manager 

Position endowed by 
Angelica Lloyd Clagett 

Alfred Robison 



11 




I ill 



: I 



Congratulations to the 
Boston Symphony Orchestra 
on yet another wonderful 
season of magical music. 

iordan marsh 

A TRADITION SINCE 1851 



12 



A Brief History of the Boston Symphony Orchestra 



Now in its 109th season, the Boston Sym- 
phony Orchestra gave its inaugural concert 
on October 22, 1881, and has continued to 
uphold the vision of its founder, the philan- 
thropist, Civil War veteran, and amateur 
musician Henry Lee Higginson, for more 
than a century. Under the leadership of Seiji 
Ozawa, its music director since 1973, the 
Boston Symphony Orchestra has performed 
throughout the United States, as well as in 
Europe, Japan, and China, and it reaches 
audiences numbering in the millions through 
its performances on radio, television, and 
recordings. It plays an active role in com- 
missioning new works from today's most 
important composers; its summer season at 
Tanglewood is regarded as one of the most 
important music festivals in the world; it 
helps to develop the audience of the future 
through the Boston Symphony Youth Con- 
certs and through a variety of outreach pro- 
grams involving the entire Boston commu- 
nity; and, during the Tanglewood season, it 
sponsors one of the world's most important 
training grounds for young composers, con- 
ductors, instrumentalists, and vocalists, the 
Tanglewood Music Center, which celebrates 
its fiftieth anniversary in 1990. The orches- 
tra's virtuosity is reflected in the concert 
and recording activities of the Boston Sym- 
phony Chamber Players — the world's only 
permanent chamber ensemble made up of a 
major symphony orchestra's principal play- 



ers — and the activities of the Boston Pops 
Orchestra have established an international 
standard for the performance of lighter 
kinds of music. Overall, the mission of the 
Boston Symphony Orchestra is to foster and 
maintain an organization dedicated to the 
making of music consonant with the highest 
aspirations of musical art, creating perform- 
ances and providing educational and training 
programs at the highest level of excel- 
lence. This is accomplished with the con- 
tinued support of its audiences, governmen- 
tal assistance on both the federal and local 
levels, and through the generosity of many 
foundations, businesses, and individuals. 

Henry Lee Higginson dreamed of found- 
ing a great and permanent orchestra in his 
home town of Boston for many years before 
that vision approached reality in the spring 
of 1881. The following October, the first 
Boston Symphony Orchestra concert was 
given under the direction of conductor Georg 
Henschel, who would remain as music direc- 
tor until 1884. For nearly twenty years Bos- 
ton Symphony concerts were held in the Old 
Boston Music Hall; Symphony Hall, the 
orchestra's present home, and one of the 
world's most highly regarded concert halls, 
was opened in 1900. Henschel was suc- 
ceeded by a series of German-born and 
-trained conductors— Wilhelm Gericke, 
Arthur Nikisch, Emil Paur, and Max 
Fiedler — culminating in the appointment of 




The first photograph, actually a collage, of the Boston Symphony Orchestra under Georg Henschel, 
taken 1882 



13 



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the legendary Karl Muck, who served two 
tenures as music director, 1906-08 and 
1912-18. Meanwhile, in July 1885, the 
musicians of the Boston Symphony had 
given their first "Promenade" concert, 
offering both music and refreshments, and 
fulfilling Major Higginson's wish to give 
"concerts of a lighter kind of music." These 
concerts, soon to be given in the springtime 
and renamed first "Popular" and then 
"Pops," fast became a tradition. 

In 1915 the orchestra made its first 
transcontinental trip, playing thirteen con- 
certs at the Panama-Pacific Exposition in 
San Francisco. Recording, begun with RCA 
in 1917, continued with increasing fre- 
quency, as did radio broadcasts. In 1918 
Henri Rabaud was engaged as conductor; he 
was succeeded a year later by Pierre Mon- 
teux. These appointments marked the begin- 
ning of a French-oriented tradition that 
would be maintained, even during the 
Russian-born Serge Koussevitzky's time, 
with the employment of many French- 
trained musicians. 

The Koussevitzky era began in 1924. His 
extraordinary musicianship and electric per- 
sonality proved so enduring that he served 
an unprecedented term of twenty-five years. 
Regular radio broadcasts of Boston Sym- 
phony Orchestra concerts began during 
Koussevitzky's years as music director. In 
1936 Koussevitzky led the orchestra's first 
concerts in the Berkshires; a year later he 
and the players took up annual summer res- 
idence at Tanglewood. Koussevitzky passion- 
ately shared Major Higginson's dream of "a 
good honest school for musicians," and in 
1940 that dream was realized with the 
founding of the Berkshire Music Center 
(now called the Tanglewood Music Center). 

In 1929 the free Esplanade concerts on 
the Charles River in Boston were inaugu- 
rated by Arthur Fiedler, who had been a 
member of the orchestra since 1915 and 
who in 1930 became the eighteenth conduc- 
tor of the Boston Pops, a post he would 
hold for half a century, to be succeeded by 
John Williams in 1980. The Boston Pops 
Orchestra celebrated its hundredth birthday 
in 1985 under Mr. Williams's baton. 



Charles Munch followed Koussevitzky as 
music director in 1949. Munch continued 
Koussevitzky's practice of supporting con- 
temporary composers and introduced much 
music from the French repertory to this 
country. During his tenure the orchestra 
toured abroad for the first time and its con- 
tinuing series of Youth Concerts was initi- 
ated. Erich Leinsdorf began his seven-year 
term as music director in 1962. Mr. Leins- 
dorf presented numerous premieres, restored 
many forgotten and neglected works to the 
repertory, and, like his two predecessors, 
made many recordings for RCA; in addition, 
many concerts were televised under his 
direction. Leinsdorf was also an energetic 
director of the Tanglewood Music Center, 
and under his leadership a full-tuition fel- 
lowship program was established. Also dur- 
ing these years, in 1964, the Boston Sym- 
phony Chamber Players were founded. 

William Steinberg succeeded Leinsdorf in 
1969. He conducted a number of American 
and world premieres, made recordings for 
Deutsche Grammophon and RCA, appeared 
regularly on television, led the 1971 Euro- 
pean tour, and directed concerts on the east 
coast, in the south, and in the mid-west. 

Seiji Ozawa, an artistic director of the 
Tanglewood Festival since 1970, became the 
orchestra's thirteenth music director in the 
fall of 1973, following a year as music 
adviser. Now in his seventeenth year as 
music director, Mr. Ozawa has continued to 
solidify the orchestra's reputation at home 
and abroad, and he has reaffirmed the 
orchestra's commitment to new music 
through his program of centennial commis- 
sions and a newly initiated program includ- 
ing such prominent composers as John 
Cage, Hans Werner Henze, Peter Lieberson, 
and Bernard Rands. Under his direction the 
orchestra has also expanded its recording 
activities to include releases on the Philips, 
Telarc, CBS, EMI/Angel, Hyperion, New 
World, and Erato labels. 

Today, the Boston Symphony Orchestra, 
Inc., presents more than 250 concerts annu- 
ally. It is an ensemble that has richly ful- 
filled Higginson's vision of a great and per- 
manent orchestra in Boston. 



15 







Without You, 
This Is The Whole Picture, 



i i 



This year, there is an $11 million difference 
between what the BSO will earn — and what 
we must spend to make our music. 

Your gift to the Boston Symphony Annual 
Fund will help us make up that difference. 

It will help us continue to fund outreach, 



educational and youth programs, and to attract 
the world's finest musicians and guest artists. 

Make your generous gift to the Annual 
Fund — and become a Friend of the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra today. Because without 
you, the picture begins to fade. 



r 



Yes, I want to keep great music alive. 
I'd like to become a Friend of the BSO for the 1990-91 season. (Friends' benefits 

begin at $50.) Enclosed is my check for $ payable to the Boston 

Symphony Annual Fund. 



~i 



Name 



Tel. 



Address. 
City 



State 



Zip 



L 



Please send your contribution to: Susan E. Tomlin, Director of Annual Giving, 

Boston Symphony Orchestra, Symphony Hall, Boston, MA 02115. 

A portion of your gift may not be tax-deductible. For information call (617) 638-9251. 




KEEP GREAT MUSIC AL1 VE 



"J 



16 



BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

Seiji Ozawa, Music Director 

Grant Llewellyn and Robert Spano, 

Assist a nt Conductors 
One Hundred and Tenth Season, 1990-91 

Thursday, November 8, at 8 
Friday, November 9, at 2 
Saturday, November 10, at 8 

KURT SANDERLING conducting 




SYMPHONY 
.ORCHESTRA, 

SEIJI OZAVA/ 



MOZART 



Symphony No. 25 in G minor, K183(173dBj 

Allegro eon brio 
Andante 
Menuetto 
Allegro 



INTERMISSION 



SHOSTAKOVICH 



Symphony No. 10 

Moderate 
Allegro 
Allegretto 
Andante —Allegro 



The afternoon concert will end about 3:50 and the evening concerts about 9:50. 

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Baldwin piano 

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Symphony No. 25 in G minor, K.183(173dB) 




Johannes Chrysostomus Wolfgang Gottlieb Mozart, 
who began calling himself Wolfgang Amadeo about 
1 770 and Wolfgang Amade in 1 777, was born in 
Salzburg, Austria, on January 27, 1756, and died 
in Vienna on December 5, 1791. He composed the 
"little" G minor symphony in Salzburg in 1773; it 
was almost certainly performed in Salzburg at that 
time, though no date of performance is known. It 
was also probably performed in Vienna about ten 
years later. The Boston Symphony Orchestra gave 
the first American performances on October 2 7 and 
28, 1899, under Wilhelm Gericke; at that time the 
early symphonies of Mozart were so little known 
that reviewer Philip Hale, writing in the Boston 
Journal, described the work as having been 
"exhumed by Gericke. " It was not performed again at BSO concerts until Leonard 
Bernstein programmed it in 1948, followed by Erich Leinsdorf in 1963, Joseph Silver- 
stein in 1975, and, most recently, Kurt Masur, in February 1982. The score calls for 
two oboes, two bassoons, four horns, and strings. 

Much ink has been spilled over the fact that this wonderful symphony, patroniz- 
ingly called the "little G minor" to distinguish it from the later K.550 (admittedly one 
of the glories of music), was Mozart's first symphony in a minor key. It came at a 
time when many Austrian composers, Haydn among them, as well as such lesser 
lights as d'Ordonez and Vanhal, were all trying their wings with one, or two, or per- 
haps just a few more minor-key symphonies. It is rather hard for us — standing as we 
do on the far side of the romantic gulf —to imagine a musical culture in which just 
about everything was cheery, chipper, and decoratively major-key. Weltschmerz was 
simply not a subject for music, at least not during a particular rather restricted 
period of time that we most often refer to as "rococo" (following our customary musi- 
cal practice of stealing terminology from the art historians). There had been highly 
complicated and expressive music exploiting minor keys during the Baroque era, but 
the swing of taste in the mid-century had driven out anything that might be too seri- 
ous, and a frivolous backlash ensued. Eventually that palled, and the important com- 
posers experimented, at least briefly, with the minor keys once again. This has been 
labeled the Sturm und Drang, or "storm and stress" period. It has sometimes been 
referred to as the "romantic crisis," but no emotional crisis has ever been resolved 
with less strain — and without even the necessity of consulting a psychiatrist! The 
composers involved each wrote a handful of symphonies in minor keys and declared 
themselves cured. 

Yet they did amass a certain degree of lasting expressive capital in the process. 
This confluence of cheery rococo decorations with the stormy effusions of the "roman- 
tic crisis" resulted finally in the creation of the mature classical style, in which com- 
posers could move freely and with great expressive effect between extremes of mood, 
in a way that would have been impossible a generation earlier. The new, mature style 
was fully exploited by Mozart and Haydn in the works that we consider the most 
treasurable, those compositions that still form the core repertory of our musical lives. 

As for the oft-made assertion that the "little G minor" was Mozart's introduction 
to this expressive world in the realm of the symphony, writers have overlooked the 
earlier Sinfonia in D minor (K. 118 [74c]) composed three years before. Indeed, even 
as a child of seven Mozart had shown his awareness of these realms: when visiting 



19 



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England, he wrote a keyboard piece in G minor (K.15p) in which the keyboard was 
treated in quite a symphonic manner with all of the gestures that became stereotyped 
in — and were claimed as the invention of— the later period. 

We don't know why Mozart composed this particular work, but it was certainly 
done with an impending performance in view, since his eminent practicality prevented 
him from writing music for its own sake as a theoretical exercise. The first perform- 
ance, then, certainly took place in Salzburg soon after the work's completion. That 
Mozart thought highly of it is clear from a letter that he wrote from Vienna a decade 
later, on January 4, 1783, urgently asking his father to send some of the scores he 
had left in Salzburg; this G minor symphony was among them. Since he thanked his 
father for a package that arrived on February 15, we can assume that the scores 
came then and were presumably used for a performance sometime that spring. And by 
that time he had completed the Hqffher Symphony, one of the earliest of his later 
symphonies to have remained almost continuously in the repertory, so that if he 
expressed himself willing to introduce the earlier G minor symphony to Vienna, he 
must have done so out of a justifiable pride at his achievement of a decade earlier. 

The symphony opens with the dramatic gestures characteristic of this "romantic 
crisis": stormy syncopations, dramatic tremolos, daring (for the time) chromaticism, 
passionately leaping thematic ideas. And yet already Mozart is the master of the 
means of expression that in the hands of a lesser composer might have been repeated 
in stereotyped fashion. The opening theme, played with the strings vigorously synco- 
pated, returns soon after in the plangent solo oboe over the lightest of unsyncopated 
string accompaniments, thus turning fierceness to lamentation. Slashing rhythmic 
figures passed between the violins and cellos mark a return to fierceness soon after. 
Mozart demonstrates similar control of his expressive moods in the slow movement, a 
miniature sonata form, in which the color darkens magically during an unexpected 
harmonic extension in the recapitulation. 

After the vigorous G minor of the Menuetto, the open-air rusticity of the Trio, 
which is played entirely by wind instruments and in the major mode, is a welcome 
bright relief. The finale returns to the fierceness of the opening movement, eschewing 
a shift to G major for a lighter, "sociable" ending and continuing the string syncopa- 
tions of the beginning. And yet here too Mozart demonstrates his unexcelled ability to 
shift moods with the utmost naturalness between one phrase and the next, with a 
lighter lyric idea filled with those pensively rising Mozartean chromaticisms. Nonethe- 
less, most of the movement remains a field of combat for intense contrapuntal treat- 
ment of the principal ideas. 

— Steven Ledbetter 



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Dmitri Shostakovich 

Symphony No. 10, Opus 93 




Dmitri Dmitrievich Shostakovich was born in St. 
Petersburg (now Leningrad) on September 25, 1906, 
and died in Moscow on August 9, 1975. He began 
the Tenth Symphony in July 1953 and completed it 
on October 27 that year. It received its first per- 
formance less than two months later, on December 
17 in Leningrad under the direction of Yevgeny 
Mravinsky. Dimitri Mitropoulos led the New York 
Philharmonic in the American premiere on October 
14, 1954. The first Boston performance was given 
by the New England Conservatory Orchestra under 
James Dixon on February 10, 1960. The first per- 
formances by the Boston Symphony Orchestra took 
place on October 19 and 20, 1962, under the direc- 
tion of Erich Leinsdorf who also conducted it on 
tour in the months following. Since then, the orchestra has performed it under Seiji 
Ozawa — on subscription concerts in November 1980 and April 1984, with performances 
also at Amherst, Carnegie Hall, Tanglewood, and in Europe that year— and under 
Andrew Davis, at Tanglewood in July 1988. The symphony is scored for a large orches- 
tra consisting of two flutes and two piccolos, three oboes and English horn, three clari- 
nets and E-fiat clarinet, three bassoons and contrabassoon, four horns, three trumpets, 
three trombones and tuba, timpani, bass drum, triangle, snare drum, cymbals, tambou- 
rine, tam-tam, and strings. 

Shostakovich made his impressive debut as a symphonic composer at the age of 
nineteen with a work of real talent — and more — that established him overnight as a 
new Russian composer of significance. During the next two decades he produced eight 
more symphonies, as well as operas, ballets, incidental music, film scores, and music 
for piano and chamber ensembles. His success during these years suffered vicissitudes 
far beyond the normal ones that composers have to deal with in presenting new 
works — the problems of unsympathetic and uncomprehending audiences or perhaps 
insufficiently prepared performances. These additional difficulties were of a political 
nature. Like all Soviet artists, Shostakovich was expected to produce works that 
served to educate and enlighten the proletariat, to engender uniform enthusiasm for 
the revolution or the state, to serve, in short, a didactic or propagandist^ function 
over and above the purely musical one. 

The 1920s in Russia had actually been an era of some flexibility and experimenta- 
tion in all the arts, but by 1932 a new temper was apparent in the ruling forces, one 
that caused composers to produce works that were no longer simply "music" but 
rather "Soviet music"; this period of regimentation lasted until the death of Stalin in 
1953, and no composer — at least none who survived Stalin's purges— was more 
affected by it than Shostakovich. The first blow came quite unexpectedly when in Jan- 
uary 1936 Pravda printed an editorial, apparently coming directly from Stalin, 
attacking Shostakovich's opera Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk District as "muddle instead 
of music." Ten days later another attack, this time of a ballet score, appeared in the 
same paper. The combined assault was too much for Shostakovich; when his Fourth 
Symphony was placed in rehearsal later in the year, it quickly became apparent that 
the score, perhaps his most "difficult" and elaborate, would only get him into still 
greater trouble, and he withdrew the performance. According to the composer's 
recently published memoirs, he lived from that time on in the continual fear of death, 
never knowing when Stalin's instability might result in his arrest or worse. (In the 
end, the Fourth Symphony was not performed until after Stalin's death.) 



23 



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Shostakovich "redeemed" himself with the Fifth Symphony and went on to write 
the Sixth and the three wartime symphonies before a new period of official disfavor 
almost caused him to cease symphonic writing forever. The basic problem was that 
symphonies, as large-scale public statements by a composer, were simply too open to 
political interpretation. The whole idea may be generally foreign to us, but nothing is 
more characteristic of the Soviet approach to the art. So Shostakovich found that he 
was continually being second-guessed, that ideas or motives or intentions were being 
read into his symphonic works by political functionaries, something that could be 
extremely dangerous if the symphony were viewed as anything other than optimistic 
and heroic. 

Moreover, although Stalin was not notably musical, he recognized the value of 
artistic propaganda and sought glorification in works of art. The Ninth Symphony 
was expected to be a grandiose post-war celebration, but Shostakovich abandoned the 
attempt to produce what was expected of him (apparently after trying twice to come 
up with something appropriate) and produced instead a witty and relatively light- 
hearted work. 

When my Ninth was performed, Stalin was incensed. He was deeply offended, 
because there was no chorus, no soloist. And no apotheosis. There wasn't even a 
paltry dedication. It was just music, which Stalin didn't understand very well and 
which was of dubious content. 

People will say that this is hard to believe, that the memoirist is twisting 
things here, and that the leader and teacher certainly didn't have time in those 
difficult postwar days to worry about symphonies and dedications. But the absur- 
dity is that Stalin watched dedications much more closely than he watched affairs 
of state. 

Chamber music was much less likely to be interpreted in this way, since the 
reduced forces that were required somehow forced the recognition of its purely abstact 
musical character, possibly because chamber music generally attracts smaller audi- 
ences and can therefore avoid the necessity of appealing to "the people" as a whole. 
Thus, after the Ninth Symphony in 1945 until the death of Stalin in 1953, Shostak- 
ovich limited himself to smaller works for the most part — several string quartets and 
the retrospective set of twenty-four preludes and fugues — and to film scores, in which 
the drama of the film itself would carry the approved political message. 

In July 1953, four months after Stalin's death, Shostakovich began the composition 
of his Tenth Symphony at his dacha in Komarovo; he finished the work in September, 
and its first performance took place within three months. The symphony is now 
widely regarded as Shostakovich's finest work in the genre, with a successful union of 
expressive qualities and technical means. It is also representative of the long tradition 
of the four-movement symphony for orchestra alone, to which Shostakovich did not 
return until the Fifteenth Symphony of 1971, the intervening works all having vocal 
elements as well. The appearance of the Tenth Symphony aroused a heated debate 
among Soviet musicians. Its manifestly personal expression raised once again the 
issue of the artist's role: could he express himself subjectively as an individual rather 
than objectively as one element of a collective group? By and large, Soviet music was 
still expected to be optimistic (the prevailing mood of the music was more important 
in some circles than the technical quality), to reflect "the truth of our life," as one 
critic put it. By this measuring stick, Shostakovich's Tenth runs dangerously close to 
the border of the unacceptable. But one result of the discussion was the awarding to 
the composer of the country's highest artistic honor, the title "People's Artist of the 
U.S.S.R.," a clear sign of the relative liberation of creative thought, though still 
within fairly strict bounds, in post-Stalin Russia. 

A Before the debate in the Composer's Union, Shostakovich spoke of the symphony 
with a modesty that seems overdone, possibly with the intention of disarming any 



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attacks by "confessing" certain faults in the piece (some sections too short, some too 
long), to which he added, "It would be very valuable to have the comrades' opinions 
on this." But at that time he did not reveal anything about the immediate impetus for 
writing what many felt instinctively to be a highly personal work. When asked 
whether the symphony had a program, he responded (evasively) with a smile, "No, let 
them listen and guess for themselves." Even in the relative liberation of late 1953 he 
could certainly not feel safe in revealing the statement that appears in his posthu- 
mously published memoirs: 

I couldn't write an apotheosis to Stalin. I simply couldn't. I knew what I was in 
for when I wrote the Ninth. But I did depict Stalin in music in my next sym- 
phony, the Tenth. I wrote it right after Stalin's death, and no one has yet 
guessed what the symphony is about. It's about Stalin and the Stalin years. The 
second part, the scherzo, is a musical portrait of Stalin, roughly speaking. Of 
course, there are many other things in it, but that's the basis. 

The first three movements are unified by a motive consisting of the first three steps 
of the minor scale. Shostakovich chooses to write a moderately slow first movement, 



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not a grand Allegro; this Moderato is conceived in a lyric and contrapuntal vein, 
beginning with a twisting slow theme in cellos and basses that occasionally resembles 
a basso ostinato. After an opening paragraph for strings alone, the solo clarinet intro- 
duces a lyrical melody that gradually expands outward and then contracts again to 
the note on which it began. These materials are used to build up the first orchestral 
tutti, which then dissolves into individual sections: strings, followed by brass, followed 
by solo clarinet expanding upon its first statement before leading to a new motive, 
introduced by the solo flute in a low register: a hovering, rocking figure in eighth- 
notes that keeps moving away from the first pitch and then returning to it. The rest 
of the movement is developed with great imagination and economy of means from 
these three motives, the overall pattern being a kind of arch, dynamically speaking, 
growing from the opening piano to extended forte in the middle before collapsing to 
the level of the beginning. 

The second movement has been variously interpreted, even by Soviet musicians, in 
strongly antithetical ways. One view claimed that the movement "expresses again the 
inexhaustible forces of life," while another, at the opposite pole, discerns rather "the 
onslaught of the powers of darkness and death." The sinister character of its perpet- 
ual motion, built on a single motive, is exhilarating and threatening at the same time, 
with an evident parodistic intent. Shostakovich's address to the Composer's Union 
preceding the debate on the Tenth Symphony was a model of evasion: "The second 
movement, in my opinion, answers my purpose in the main, and occupies its intended 
place in the cycle." Not a word, of course, about a musical depiction of Stalin; the 
undercurrent of brutality in the music would have made such a confession most 
unwise. 

The third movement, which begins as a pensive waltz of sombre character, is an 
early example of Shostakovich's practice of composing his personal motto DSCH into 
his music, something that happens also in the Violin Concerto and the Eighth String 
Quartet. (DSCH stands for the German transliteration of the composer's name, 
Dmitri Schostakovitsch, which is then translated into musical pitches according to 
German terminology: D, S [ = Es, or E-flat], C, H [ = B-natural]; the resulting four- 
note motive fits naturally into the key of C minor or its near relations.) 

The finale consists of a long, slow introduction followed by a vigorous Allegro, less 
hysterical than the forced rejoicing of the last movement of the Fifth Symphony, but 
fundamentally outgoing nonetheless, despite frequent reminders of the DSCH motto. 
That reference to the third movement, along with the slow introduction, helps prevent 
the sheer youthful energy of the Allegro from allowing us to forget the very different 
character of the first three movements. Here, as throughout the work, Shostakovich 
has kept his own counsel, telling us things through the musical elements of melody, 
harmony, and rhythm that he could not say in words. 

-S.L. 



29 



Week 6 



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At The Thimp Shuttle, we have the largest fleet of back-up planes in the shuttle business. Which 
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30 



More . . . 

Stanley Sadie's fine Mozart article in The New Grove has been published separately 
by Norton (available in paperback); Sadie is also the author of Mozart (Grossman, 
also paperback), a convenient brief life-and-works survey with nice pictures. Alfred 
Einstein's classic Mozart: The Man, The Music is still worth knowing (Oxford paper- 
back). Wolfgang Hildesheimer's Mozart (Farrar Straus Giroux, available also as a 
Vintage paperback), though frustrating to read since it is built up out of many short 
sections dealing primarily with Mozart's character, personality, and genius, provides a 
stimulating point of view for readers who have not followed the recent specialist liter- 
ature on the composer. The most thorough and extended discussion of Mozart's sym- 
phonies is Neal Zaslaw's splendid new book, Mozart's Symphonies (Oxford), which 
assembles just about everything known about each piece: its compositional history, 
performances in Mozart's day, and analytical commentary. There are chapters on the 
Mozart symphonies by Jens Peter Larsen in The Mozart Companion, edited by Donald 
Mitchell and H.C. Robbins Landon (Norton paperback), and by Hans Keller in The 
Symphony, edited by Robert Simpson (Pelican paperback). 

It was recordings of the Mozart symphonies in the historical-instrument perform- 
ances by the Academy of Ancient Music under the direction of Christopher Hogwood 
(Oiseau-Lyre) that sparked the modern interest in attempts to reconstruct historical 
styles, sounds, and settings of the classical repertory, including the number of players 
and their physical placement (neither size nor arrangement was standardized in 
Mozart's day, different cities and different ensembles having their own character, 
largely for accidental reasons). Hogwood's performances of the complete Mozart 
symphonies— which include about half again as many works as other "complete" sets 
(owing to a broader definition of the term symphony) — are available on seventeen 
compact discs divided into seven volumes; K.183 is found in volume 4 of the series. 
Other conductors with sets of the traditional forty-one Mozart symphonies currently 
available include Erich Leinsdorf with the Philharmonic Symphony Orchestra of Lon- 
don (MCA, eight CDs) and Neville Marriner with the Academy of St. Martin-in-the- 
Fields (Philips, twelve CDs). Among the individual recordings, recommended perform- 
ances include those of Charles Mackerras with the Prague Chamber Orchestra 
(Telarc, coupled with symphonies 28 and 29), Jeffrey Tate with the English Chamber 
Orchestra (Angel, coupled with symphonies 27 and 31), and a series of recordings 
made live in Salzburg in 1956 with Bruno Walter and the Vienna Philharmonic 



WHERE TO ACQUIRE 

GOOD TASTE WHEN YOU'RE 

NOT AT THE SYMPHONY. 



Next time, before you go to the symphony have dinner at Newbury's 
Steak House. You'll find char-broiled steaks, fresh seafood and chicken, 
a great salad bar, and ever greater prices. Plus discounted parking. All 
less than a ten minute walk away. FT T nn7 7-nT Tn , 7 »^, 

MEWBURYS 

—STEAK HOUSE— 



94 Massachusetts Ave. (corner of Newbury St. 
536-0184 • Serving noon to midnight 



31 




Perfect Harmony 

Retirement living in tune with your dreams. 

Comfort, security, companion- Discover new interests, activities, 

ship. Your own apartment home friends. You'll have independence, 

on a magnificently landscaped freedom, and peace of mind, with 

historic estate. Fuller Village in complete health care right there 

Milton offers gracious living and for you, any time, all the time at 

dining — full of pleasure, free of the finest life care community in 

responsibilities — New England. 

so you can enjoy the J| ffiNfiKSte. Make perfect har- 

things you've always 4bI^W1B^HL mony of these 

loved. Garden paths, jM^^iM^JA Bk wonderful years, 

indoor pool, putting p| tt t prA/fT T APF even ^ e y° n( ^ y° ur 
green, library. v .^_ ^ , = dreams. 



Look forward to a Fuller lifestyle. 

FULLER VILLAGE IN MILTON 
617-333-0026 



32 






ftps 






(Nuova Era, three discs, including symphonies 29, 35, 36, 38, 39, 40, and the 
D minor piano concerto). 

Boris Schwarz's Shostakovich article in The New Grove has been reprinted, along 
with the articles on Rimsky-Korsakov, Scriabin, Rachmaninoff, and Prokofiev, in The 
New Grove Russian Masters 2 (Norton, available in paperback); the Shostakovich piece 
benefits especially, in this reprint, from a revised work-list and a much-enlarged bibli- 
ography prepared by Laurel E. Fay. The smallest book about Shostakovich is one of 
the most informative: Norman Kay's Shostakovich (Oxford) summarizes his musical 
style through the Twelfth String Quartet of 1968. Brief but sympathetic and 
informed discussion of all of Shostakovich's symphonic works is to be found in Hugh 
Ottaway's Shostakovich Symphonies in the BBC Music Guides series (University of 
Washington paperback). The best general study of music in Soviet Russia is Boris 
Schwarz's Music and Musical Life in Soviet Russia, 1917-1980 (University of Indiana 
Press; the older edition, with a cutoff date of 1970, is available as a Norton paper- 
back). As with Prokofiev, but for different reasons, political strains make it hard to 
find a solidly documented, reliable biographical study of the composer. A highly con- 
troversial light was cast on Shostakovich by the publication in English of Testimony: 
The Memoirs of Dmitri Shostakovich, "as related to and edited by" Solomon Volkov 
(Harper & Row, available in paperback). The reliability of these memoirs is a matter 
of serious doubt, yet on publication the book was hailed in the West as an authentic 
view of the composer's recollections, while the Russians insist that the book is a fake. 
Volkov claims to have smuggled out of Russia pages dictated to him by the composer 
and authenticated with his initials. It is true that Shostakovich wrote on the first 
page of each chapter u Chital [Read]. D.S." But there is no way of telling how many 
pages he read, and the American musicologist Laurel Fay, a leading Shostakovich 
specialist, has shown that, despite Volkov' s claims to have drawn entirely on extensive 
interviews with Shostakovich and to have used no previously published material, the 
beginning of every chapter — precisely the pages Shostakovich initialed — is simply a 
copy of material that was already printed in the Soviet Union; the "revelations" of the 
book appear much farther back in each chapter, where we have no evidence that Shos- 
takovich ever saw, much less approved them. (Laurel Fay's review of Testimony was 
published in the Russian Review for October 1980, pp. 484-93.) A more recent vol- 
ume, D. Shostakovich About Himself and His Times, compiled by Mikhail Iakovlev 
(Moscow: Progress Publishers, 1980), is a generous collection of the composer's own 
words in speeches and writings over many years; while far less "sensational" than the 
purported memoirs, it is also more balanced and accurate in its portrayal of the "offi- 
cial" and public side of a very private man. Recommended among the currently avail- 
able recordings of Shostakovich's Tenth Symphony are those of Gennady Rozhdest- 
kensky with the USSR Ministry of Culture Symphony Orchestra (Melodiya, coupled 
with Hamlet), Neeme Jarvi with the Scottish National Orchestra (Chandos, coupled 
with Ballet Suite No. 4), Herbert von Karajan with the Berlin Philharmonic (DG), 
and Semyon Bychkov with the same ensemble (Philips). 

-S.L. 



33 



Week 6 



BhHBS 




KJBKQh$I 


i^Wfw 


Mm '. ffl 








II I 






ENJOY A 
SPLENDID SEASON 
OF CHAMBER WORKS 

Join the principal players of the Boston Symphony 
Orchestra and experience chamber music at its best 
with one of the world's finest ensembles. 

JORDAN HALL at the New England Conservatory 
THREE SUNDAY AFTERNOONS AT 3:00PM 

BOSTON SYMPHONY CHAMBER PLAYERS 

with GILBERT KALISH, p ianist 

November 11. 1990 

PISTON Divertimento for strings and winds 
HARBISON Words from Paterson' 

with SANFORD SYLVAN, baritone 
BEETHOVEN Septet in E-flat for strings and 

winds, Op. 20 

February 3. 1991 

HAYDN Trio in E for piano, violin, and cello, 

Hob. XV28 
BRAHMS Trio in E-flat for horn, violin, 

and piano, Op. 40 
KELLAWAY 'Esque,' for trombone and double bass 
SHOSTAKOVICH Quintet in G minor for piano and 

strings, Op. 57 

March 10. 1991 

WYNER New work for brass and percussion 

(world premiere) 
PISTON Quintet for piano and strings 
SCHUBERT String Quintet in C, D.956 

SUBSCRIBE NOW! 

All three concerts for only $42.00, $32.00, $24.00 
To subscribe call the Subscription Office at 
(617) 266-7575, Monday through Friday, 9am - 5pm. 



Single Tickets also available for $16.00, $12.00, $9.00 
Call SymphonyCharge at (617) 266-1200, 
Monday through Saturday, 10am - 6pm. 



34 




A TRADITION OF FINANCIAL COUNSEL 
OLDER THAN THE U.S. DOLLAR. 

State Street has been providing quality financial service since 1792. 

That's two years longer than the dollar has been the official currency of 
the United States. 

During that time, we have managed the assets of some of New 
England's wealthiest families. And provided investment advice and 
performance tailored to each client's individual goals and needs. 

Today our Personal Trust Division can extend that service to you. 

We've been helping people manage their money for almost 200 years. 
And you can only stay in business that long by offering advice of the 
highest quality. 

Let us help you get the highest performance from your assets. To enjoy 
today and to pass on to future generations. 

For more information contact Peter Talbot at 617-654-3227. 

State Street. Known for quality? 



^State Street 



State Street Bank and Trust Company, wholly-owned subsidiary of State Street Boston Corporation, 

225 Franklin Street, Boston, MA 02101. Offices in Boston, New York, Los Angeles, London, Munich, Brussels, 

Tokyo, Sydney, Hong Kong. Member FDIC. Copyright State Street Boston Corporation, 1989. 





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Carleton-Wlllard Village is 
an exceptional continuing 
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Gracious independent living 
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Bedford, MA 01730 

(617) 275-8700 

Owned and operated by Carleton-Willard 

Homes, Inc., a non-profitcorporation 




Kurt Sanderling 

Born in 1912, Kurt Sanderling received his musical training in 
Berlin. He began as a pianist, accompanying Lieder recitals and 
coaching singers at the Berlin State Opera. Klemperer, Kleiber, 
Blech, and Purtwangler, all conducting in Berlin during those 
years, were formative influences on his development as a conductor. 
In 1936 Mr. Sanderling emigrated from Germany, serving first as 
conductor of the Moscow Radio Orchestra, then as music director 
of the Kharkov Philharmonic. In 1942 he was appointed permanent 
conductor of the Leningrad Philharmonic, a post he shared with 
Yevgeny Mravinsky until 1960. After World War II Mr. Sanderling 
made the first of his tours of Europe with the Leningrad Philharmonic. In 1960 he 
returned to Berlin to become music director of the Berlin Symphony Orchestra, leading 
that orchestra to international renown; as his international stature grew, concert tours 
with that ensemble took him to most of Europe and to Japan. From 1964 to 1967 he also 
conducted the Staatskapelle of Dresden. Mr. Sanderling' s wide repertoire ranges from the 
baroque to the contemporary, and he has been kept constantly busy as a guest conductor 
with major orchestras in Europe, Japan, North America, Canada, and Australia. In 1972 
he became the first guest conductor to lead the Philharmonia Orchestra of London after 
the retirement of Otto Klemperer. Since then he has conducted several times a year in 
London, and in 1981 he recorded the complete Beethoven symphonies with the Philharmo- 
nia. Mr. Sanderling' s other recordings include the complete Brahms symphonies with the 
Staatskapelle of Dresden, the complete symphonies of Sibelius, the Fifth, Sixth, Eighth, 
Tenth, and Fifteenth symphonies of Shostakovich, Mahler's Ninth and Tenth symphonies, 
and Tchaikovsky's Fourth Symphony, which won the Grand Prix du Disque. In 1977 Mr. 
Sanderling retired as music director of the Berlin Symphony. He has since devoted his 
energies to appearing worldwide as a guest conductor, appearing regularly at the major 
European festivals in Prague, Salzburg, Warsaw, and Vienna, and in North America with 
such orchestras as the Los Angeles Philharmonic, the New York Philharmonic, the Boston 
Symphony, the St. Louis Symphony, the National Symphony, and the San Francisco Sym- 
phony. In addition to his BSO concerts, his 1990-91 schedule in North America includes 
appearances with the Los Angeles Philharmonic, the Cleveland Orchestra, the National 
Symphony, and the St. Louis Symphony. Mr. Sanderling made his Boston Symphony debut 
with two subscription programs in January 1988. 



CAREY* 



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35 






Ill 



BUSINESS 




Business and Professional 
Leadership Association 



The Boston Symphony Orchestra wishes to acknowledge this distinguished group of 
corporations and professional organizations for their outstanding and exemplary 
support of the orchestra's needs during the past or current fiscal year. 



CORPORATE SPONSORSHIPS 
$25,000 and above 

Digital Equipment Corporation 

Boston Pops Orchestra Public Television Broadcasts 

NEC 

Boston Symphony Orchestra North American Tour 1991 

Boston Symphony Orchestra European Tour 1991 

NYNEX Corporation 
WCVB-TV, Channel 5 Boston and WCRB 102.5 FM 

Salute to Symphony 1990 

The Boston Company 

Opening Night At Symphony 1990 

BayBanks, Inc. 

Opening Night at Pops 1990 

Lexus 
A Division of Toyota Motor Sales U.S.A., Inc. 

Tanglewood Opening Night 1990 

TDK Electronics Corporation 

Tanglewood Tickets for Children 1990 

Bank of Boston 
Country Curtains and The Red Lion Inn 

BSO Single Concert Sponsors 1990 



For information on these and other corporate funding opportunities, contact 
Madelyne Cuddeback, BSO Director of Corporate Sponsorships, Symphony Hall, 
Boston, MA 02115, (617) 638-9254. 



36 



■ TV* 1 , 



<•„,/ 










1990-91 Business 


Honor Roll ($10,000 and Above) 


Advanced Management Associates 


The Gillette Company 


Harvey Chet Krentzman 


Colman M. Mockler, Jr. 


Analog Devices, Inc. 


Grafacon, Inc. 


Ray Stata 


H. Wayman Rogers, Jr. 


AT&T Network Systems 


GTE Products Corporation 


John F. McKinnon 


Dean T. Langford 


Bank of Boston 


Hill, Holliday, Connors, Cosmopulos, Inc. 


Ira Stepanian 


Jack Connors, Jr. 


Barter Connections 


The Henley Group 


Kenneth C. Barron 


Paul M. Montrone 


BayBanks, Inc. 


Houghton Mifflin Company 


William M. Crozier, Jr. 


Nader F. Darehshori 


Bingham, Dana & Gould 


IBM Corporation 


Joseph Hunt 


Paul J. Palmer 


Bolt Beranek & Newman 


John Hancock Mutual Life Insurance Company 


Stephen R. Levy 


E. James Morton 


The Boston Company 


Lexus 


Christopher M. Condron 


A Division of Toyota Motor Sales, U.S.A., Inc. 


Boston Edison Company 


J. Davis Illingworth 


Stephen J. Sweeney 


Liberty Mutual Insurance Group 


The Boston Globe 


Gary L. Countryman 


William 0. Taylor 


Loomis-Sayles & Company, Inc. 


Boston Herald 


Charles J. Finlayson 


Patrick J. Purcell 


McKinsey & Company 


Bull HN Information Systems, Inc. 


Robert P. O'Block 



Roland D. Pampel 

Cahners Publishing Company 
Ron Segel 

Connell Limited Partnership 
William F. Connell 

Coopers & Lybrand 
William K. O'Brien 

Country Curtains 
Jane P. Fitzpatrick 

Delia Femina, McNamee, Inc. 
Michael H. Reingold 

Deloitte & Touche 
James T. McBride 

Digital Equipment Corporation 
Kenneth G. Olsen 

Dynatech Corporation 
J. P. Barger 

Eastern Enterprises 
Ronald S. Ziemba 

EG&G, Inc. 
John M. Kucharski 

The First Boston Corporation 
Malcolm MacColl 

General Cinema Corporation 
Richard A. Smith 



Morse Shoe, Inc. 
Manuel Rosenberg 

NEC Corporation 
Tadahiro Sekimoto 

NEC Deutschland GmbH 
Masao Takahashi 

Nestle-Hills Brothers Coffee Company 
Ned Dean 

The New England 
Edward E. Phillips 

New England Telephone Company 
Paul C. O'Brien 

Northern Telecom, Inc. 
Brian Davis 

Nynex Corporation 
William C. Ferguson 

Paine Webber, Inc. 
James F. Cleary 

KPMG Peat Marwick 
Robert D. Happ 

Polaroid Corporation 
I.M. Booth 

Prudential-Bache Capital Funding 
David F. Remington 

37 



1990-91 Business Honor Roll (continued) 



Raytheon Company 
Thomas L. Phillips 

The Red Lion Inn 
John H. Fitzpatrick 

Shawmut Bank, N.A. 
John P. Hamill 

The Stop & Shop Companies, Inc. 
Lewis Schaeneman 



TDK Electronics Corporation 
Takashi Tsujii 

USTrust 
James V. Sidell 

WCRB-102.5 FM 
Richard L. Kaye 

WCVB-TV, Channel 5 Boston 
S. James Coppersmith 



Dinner at 6. 

Symphony at 8. 

Parking at $ 5. 

Make dinner at Boodle's part of 
your night out at the Symphony. 
When you do, you'll not only enjoy 
an award winning dining experi- 
ence from Boston's authentic grill, 
you'll also get special parking 
privileges at the Back Bay Hilton's 
private garage. 

Just show us your tickets at dinner 
on the night of the performance 
and park your car for just $5. And 
with a deal like that, a night at the 
Symphony never sounded better. 




OF • BOSTON 

An Authentic Grill 

Lunch and dinner daily. In Boston's Back Bay Hilton. 
Phone (617) BOODLES. 



St. (BotpCph Restaurant 




A Charming 19th Century Brick 
Townhouse serving fine continental 
cuisine in contemporary informal elegance. 
Offering lunch and dinner with a variety 
of fresh seafood specials daily. Located 
minutes away from Huntington Theatre 
and Symphony Hall. 

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behind the Colonnade Hotel 

Daily 11:30 - Midnight 



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-Esquire Magazine 




Serving Dinner Nightly 



In The Charles Hotel 
One Bennett at Eliot Street 
Cambridge, MA 02138 
Reservations (617) 864-1200 



38 



BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONAL LEADERSHIP ASSOCIATION 

The Boston Symphony Orchestra gratefully acknowledges these Business Leaders for their 
generous and valuable support totaling $1,250 and above during the past fiscal year. Names 
which are both capitalized and underscored in this listing make up the Business Honor Roll 
denoting support of $10,000 and above. Capitalization denotes support of $5,000-$9,999, and 
an asterisk indicates support of $2,500-$4,999. 



Accountants 

ARTHUR ANDERSEN & CO. 
William F. Meagher 

Charles E. DiPesa & Company 
William F. DiPesa 

COOPERS & LYBRAND 



William K. O'Brien 
DELOITTE & TOUCHE 



James T. McBride 
ERNST & YOUNG 



Thomas M. Lankford 
KMPG PEAT MARWICK 



Robert D. Happ 

Theodore S. Samet & Company 
Theodore S. Samet 

Tofias, Fleishman, Shapiro 
& Co., P.C. 
Allan Tofias 

4dvertising/Public Relations 

.\rnold Advertising 
Edward Eskandarian 

DELLA FEMINA, MCNAMEE, 

[NO 
Michael H. Reingold 

Elysee Public Relations 
Tanya Keller Dowd 

SILL, HOLLIDAY, CONNORS, 



!OSMOPULOS, INC. 



Jack Connors, Jr. 

ngalls, Quinn & Johnson 
Bink Garrison 

Aerospace 

Northrop Corporation 
Kent Kresa 

Architects 

Cambridge Seven Associates 
Charles Redman 

iEA Group 

Eugene R. Eisenberg 

Automotive 

r .N. Phillips Glass 
Company, Inc. 
Alan L. Rosenfeld 

jexus 

l Division of Toyota Motor 

Sales U.S.A., Inc. 

J. Davis Illingworth 



Banking 

BANK OF BOSTON 
Ira Stepanian 

*Bank of New England 
Corporation 
Lawrence K. Fish 

BAYBANKS, INC. 
William M. Crozier, Jr. 

THE BOSTON COMPANY 
Christopher M. Condron, Jr. 

Cambridge Trust Company 
Lewis H. Clark 

CITICORP/CITIBANK 
Walter E. Mercer 

First National Bank of Chicago 
Richard Spencer 

*Rockland Trust Company 
John F. Spence, Jr. 

SHAWMUT BANK, N.A. 
John P. Hamill 

* State Street Bank & 
Trust Company 
William S. Edgerly 

USTRUST 
James V. Sidell 

Wainwright Bank & Trust Company 
John M. Plukas 



Building/C ontr ac ting 

*Harvey Industries, Inc. 
Frederick Bigony 

J.F. White Contracting Company 
Philip Bonanno 

Lee Kennedy Co., Inc. 
Lee M. Kennedy 

*Moliterno Stone Sales, Inc. 
Kenneth A. Castellucci 

* National Lumber Company 
Louis L. Kaitz 

PERINI CORPORATION 
David B. Perini 



Consumer Goods/Distributors 

BARTER CONNECTIONS 
Kenneth C. Barron 

FAIRWINDS GOURMET COFFEE 
COMPANY 
Michael J. Sullivan 

39 



Lindenmeyr Munroe 

NESTLE JJILLS BROTHERS 
COFFEE COMPANY 
Ned Dean 

O'Donnell-Usen Fisheries 
Arnold S. Wolf 

Welch's 
Everett N. Baldwin 



Education 

BENTLEY COLLEGE 

Gregory Adamian 

Electrical/HVAC 

*p.h. mechanical Corporation 
Paul A. Hayes 

*R & D Electrical Company, Inc. 
Richard D. Pedone 

Electronics 

Alden Electronics, Inc. 
Joseph Girouard 

* Analytical Systems 
Engineering Corporation 
Michael B. Rukin 

PARLEX CORPORATION 
Herbert W. Pollack 

Energy 

CABOT CORPORATION 

Samuel W. Bodman 

Engineering 

Goldberg-Zoino & Associates, Inc. 
Donald T. Goldberg 

The Thompson & Lichtner 
Company, Inc. 
John D. Stelling 

Entertainment/Media 

GENERAL CINEMA CORPORATION 
Richard A. Smith 

National Amusements, Inc. 
Sumner M. Redstone 

Finance /Venture Capital 

*3i Corporation 
Ivan N. Momtchiloff 



;-#i« 








SPECIAL OFFER 


BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


10% OFF 
on all T-shirts and 


! ^p 


sweatshirts 




at the Symphony Shop 


! Hours: 


with this coupon. 


! Tuesday, Thursday, 




Friday, 11 AM -3 PM 




Saturday, 1 PM - 6 PM 




| All concert hours 




Tel. (617) 638-9383 


Offer valid until January 1, 1991. 



We Would Like To Buy From You 

ROY K. EYGES INC 

Buying & Selling Since 1941 



Estate Jewelry • Period Jewelry 

Diamonds • Colored Stones • Antique Silver 

Sterling Silver • Flatware (Assorted Patterns) 

Hollow Ware • Bric-a-Brack • Art Objects 

Buyers and Appraisers of Jewelry, Silver and Antiques 
Members of the Appraisers Association of America 

247-8400 

Hours: Monday-Saturday 10am-5pm 
38 Newbury Street, 2nd floor, Boston 



40 



Carson Limited Partnership 
Herbert Carver 

THE FIRST BOSTON 



CORPORATION 



Malcolm MacColl 

GE CAPITAL CORPORATE 
FINANCE GROUP 
Richard A. Goglia 

KRUPP COMPANIES 

George Krupp 



Food Service/Industry 

Au Bon Pain 
Louis I. Kane 

Boston Showcase Company 
Jason E. Starr 

Cordel Associates, Inc. 
James B. Hangstefer 

Johnson O'Hare Co., Inc. 
Harry O'Hare 



Footwear 

Converse, Inc. 
Gilbert Ford 

J. Baker, Inc. 
Sherman N. Baker 

Jones & Vining, Inc. 
Sven A. Vaule, Jr. 

MORSE SHOE, INC. 



Manuel Rosenberg 

Reebok International Ltd. 
Paul Fireman 

The Rockport Corporation 
Anthony Tiberii 

THE STRIDE RITE 
CORPORATION 
Arnold S. Hiatt 



Furnishings/Housewares 

ARLEY MERCHANDISE 
CORPORATION 
David I. Riemer 

BBF Corporation 
Boruch B. Frusztajer 

COUNTRY CURTAINS 



Jane P. Fitzpatrick 

Jofran Sales, Inc. 
Robert D. Roy 

Graphic Design 

CLARK/LINSKY DESIGN 
Robert H. Linsky 

INDEPENDENT DESIGN 

Patrick White 



High Technology/Electronics 

Alden Products Company 
Betsy Alden 

ANALOG DEVICES, INC. 
Ray Stata 

*Aritech Corp. 
James A. Synk 

Automatic Data Processing 
Arthur S. Kranseler 

BOLT BERANEK AND 
NEWMAN, INC. 



Stephen R. Levy 

BULL HN INFORMATION 
SYSTEMS, INC. 
Roland D. Pampel 

*Cerberus Technologies, Inc. 
George J. Grabowski 

Costar Corporation 
Otto Morningstar 

CSC PARTNERS, INC. 
Paul J. Crowley 

DIGITAL EQUIPMENT 
CORPORATION 
Kenneth G. Olsen 

DYNATECH CORPORATION 
J. P. Barger 

EG&G, INC. 
John M. Kucharski 

EMC CORPORATION 
Richard J. Egan 

Helix Technology Corporation 
Robert J. Lepofsky 

THE HENLEY GROUP 
Paul M. Montrone 

HEWLETT PACKARD COMPANY 
Ben L. Holmes 

IBM CORPORATION 
Paul J. Palmer 

*Intermetrics Inc. 
Joseph A. Saponaro 

IONICS, INC. 

Arthur L. Goldstein 

* Lotus Development Corporation 

Jim P. Manzi 

*M/A-Com, Inc. 
Robert H. Glaudel 

MILLIPORE CORPORATION 
John A. Gilmartin 

*The MITRE Corporation 
Charles A. Zraket 

NEC CORPORATION 

Tadahiro Sekimoto 

NEC DEUTSCHLAND GmbH 
Masao Takahasi 

* Orion Research, Inc. 

Alexander Jenkins III 

41 



POLAROID CORPORATION 
I.M. Booth 

PRIME COMPUTER, INC. 

John Shields 

* Printed Circuit Corporation 
Peter Sarmanian 

RAYTHEON COMPANY 

Thomas L. Phillips 

SofTech, Inc. 
Justus Lowe, Jr. 

*TASC 
Arthur Gelb 

TDK ELECTRONICS 
CORPORATION 
Takashi Tsujii 

THERMO ELECTRON 
CORPORATION 

George N. Hatsopoulos 

XRE Corporation 
John K. Grady 



Hotels/Restaurants 

57 Park Plaza Hotel 
Nicholas L. Vinios 

*Back Bay Hilton 
Carol Summerfield 

*Boston Marriott Copley Place 
Jurgen Giesbert 

THE RED LION INN 
John H. Fitzpatrick 

*Sheraton Boston Hotel & Towers 
Steve Foster 

*Sonesta International 
Hotels Corporation 
Paul Sonnabend 

*The Westin Hotel, Copley Place 
David King 

Industrial Distributors 

*Alles Corporation 
Stephen S. Berman 

Brush Fibers, Inc. 
Ian P. Moss 

* Eastern Refractories Company 
David S. Feinzig 

Millard Metal Service Center 
Donald Millard, Jr. 

Insurance 

*American Title Insurance Company 
Terry E. Cook 

*Arkwright 
Enzo Rebula 

Caddell & Byers 
John Dolan 



'■•'•■■- 



W 






Beacon Street, Brookline, MA 02146 • (617)738-5700 



42 



CAMERON & COLBY CO., INC. 

Lawrence S. Doyle 
"Charles H. Watkins & Company 

Paul D. Bert rand 

Chubb Group of Insurance Cos. 
John Gillespie 

FRANK B. HALL & CO. OP 
MASSACHUSETTS, INC. 
William F. Newell 

International Insurance Group 
John Perkins 
JOHN HANCOCK MUTUAL 



LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY 



E. James Morton 

Johnson & Higgins of 
Massachusetts, Inc. 
Robert A. Cameron 

Keystone Provident Life 
Insurance Company 
Robert G. Sharp 

Lexington Insurance Company 
Kevin H. Kelley 

LIBERTY MUTUAL INSURANCE 



GROUP 



Gary L. Countryman 
THE NEW ENGLAND 



Edward E. Phillips 

SAFETY INSURANCE COMPANY 
Richard B. Simches 

Sedgwick James of 
New England, Inc. 
P. Joseph McCarthy 

Sullivan Risk Management Group 
John H. Sullivan 

Sun Life Assurance Company 
of Canada 
David D. Horn 

Investments 

Baring International Investment, Ltd. 
John F. McNamara 

Bear Stearns & Company, Inc. 
Keith H. Kretschmer 

Essex Investment Management 
Company, Inc. 
Joseph C. McNay 

FIDELITY INVESTMENTS/ 
FIDELITY FOUNDATION 

Goldman, Sachs & Company 
Peter D. Kiernan 

KAUFMAN & COMPANY 
Sumner Kaufman 

LOOMIS-SAYLES & COMPANY, 



INC. 



Charles J. Finlayson 

PAINEWEBBER, INC. 

James F. Cleary 

PAINEWEBBER CAPITAL 
MARKETS 
Joseph F. Patton 



SALOMON INC. 
John V. Carberry 

*Spaulding Investment Company 
C.H. Spaulding 

* State Street Development 
Management Corp. 

John R. Gallagher III 

TUCKER ANTHONY, INC. 
John Goldsmith 

Whitman & Evans, Art Investments 
Eric F. Mourlot 

*Woodstock Corporation 
Nelson J. Darling, Jr. 

Legal 

BINGHAM, DANA & GOULD 
Joseph Hunt 

*Choate, Hall & Stewart 
Robert Gargill 

Dickerman Law Offices 
Lola Dickerman 

*Fish & Richardson 
Robert E. Hillman 

* Gaston & Snow 

Richard J. Santagati 

GOLDSTEIN & MANELLO 
Richard J. Snyder 

GOODWIN, PROCTER AND HOAR 
Robert B. Fraser 

*Hemenway & Barnes 
John J. Madden 

Hubbard & Ferris 
Charles A. Hubbard 

* Joyce & Joyce 

Thomas J. Joyce 

*Lynch, Brewer, Hoffman & Sands 
Owen B. Lynch 

MINTZ, LEVTN, COHN, FERRIS, 
GLOVSKY & POPEO, P.C. 
Francis X. Meaney 

Nissenbaum Law Offices 
Gerald L. Nissenbaum 

* Nutter, McClennen & Fish 

John K. P. Stone III 

PALMER & DODGE 
Robert E. Sullivan 

*Rackemann, Sawyer & Brewster 
Stephen Carr Anderson 

Sarrouf, Tarricone & Flemming 
Camille F. Sarrouf 

Weiss, Angoff, Coltin, Koski & 
Wolf, P.C. 
Dudley A. Weiss 

Management/Financial/Consulting 

ADVANCED MANAGEMENT 
ASSOCIATES 
Harvey Chet Krentzman 

43 



*Arthur D. Little, Inc. 

John Magee 
*Bain & Company, Inc. 

William W. Bain 

THE BOSTON CONSULTING 
GROUP 

Jonathan L. Isaacs 

*Corporate Decisions 
David J. Morrison 

*Haynes Management, Inc. 
G. Arnold Haynes 

Index Group 
David G. Robinson 

Irma Mann Strategic Marketing 
Irma Mann Stearns 

Jason M. Cortell 
& Associates, Inc. 
Jason M. Cortell 

Lochridge & Company, Inc. 

Richard K. Lochridge 
MCK3NSEY & COMPANY 

Robert P. O'Block 

Merrill Lynch & Co., Inc. 
Paul Fahrenbach 

The Pioneer Group, Inc. 
John F. Cogan, Jr. 

PRUDE NTIAL-BACHE 
CAPITAL FUNDING 
David F. Remington 

*Rath & Strong 
Dan Ciampa 

* Towers Perrin 

J. Russell Southworth 

*William M. Mercer, Inc. 
Chester D. Clark 

*The Wyatt Company 
Paul R. Daoust 

Yankelovich Clancy Shulman 
Kevin Clancy 

Manufacturer's Representatives 

*Ben Mac Enterprises 
Larry Benhardt 
Thomas McAuliffe 

*Paul R. Cahn Associates, Inc. 
Paul R. Cahn 

Manufacturing/Industry 

*AGFA Corporation 
Ken Draeger 

*AMCEL Corporation 
Lloyd Gordon 

*Avedis Zildjian Company 
Armand Zildjian 

The Biltrite Corporation 
Stanley J. Bernstein 

Boston Acoustics, Inc. 
Frank Reed 



GUILD, MONRAD & OATES, INC. 

Family Investment Advisers 



50 Congress Street 

Boston, Massachusetts 02109 

Telephone: (617) 523-1320 



For Those Who Want 

Specialized Individual Attention and Care 

in the Management of Investments 

and Tax and Estate Planning 



Henry R. Guild, Jr. Ernest E. Monrad William A. Oates, Jr. Robert B. Minturn, Jr. 




-► lower 'Records **- 

has the largest 

selection of 

Classical, Opera and 

'Baroque music 

in (Boston. 

(Located 3 blocks from Symphony Matt) 



in rawisMMn 



Mass. Ave. At Newbury 
In Back Bay 




Hynes Convention Center/ICA (J) Stop on the Greenline 



44 



C.R. Bard, Inc. 
Robert H. McCaffrey 

Century Manufacturing Company 
Joseph Tiberio 

Chelsea Industries, Inc. 
Ronald G. Casty 



Media 

THE BOSTON GLOBE 
William O. Taylor 

BOSTON HERALD 



Patrick J. Purcell 

PEOPLE MAGAZINE 
CONNELL LIMITED PARTNERSHIP Peter Krieger 
William F. Connell 



Dennison Manufacturing Company 
Nelson G. Gifford 

ERVING PAPER MILLS 
Charles B. Housen 

FLEXcon Company, Inc. 
Mark R. Ungerer 

Georgia-Pacific Corp. 
Maurice W. Kring 

THE GILLETTE COMPANY 



Colman M. Mockler, Jr. 
GTE PRODUCTS CORPORATION 



Dean T. Langford 

HARVARD FOLDING BOX 
COMPANY, INC. 
Melvin A. Ross 

H.K. Webster Company, Inc. 
Dean K. Webster 

HMK Group Companies, Ltd. 
Joan L. Karol 

Hudson Lock, Inc. 
Norman Stavisky 

Industrial Filter and Equipment 
Corporation 
Donald R. Patnode 

Kendall Company 
J. Dale Sherratt 

LEACH & GARNER COMPANY 
Philip F. Leach 

Leggett & Piatt, Inc. 
Alexander M. Levine 

NEW ENGLAND BUSINESS 
SERVICE, INC. 
Richard H. Rhoads 

Parks Corporation 
Lee Davidson 

Pierce Aluminum 
Robert W. Pierce 

Statler Tissue Company 
Leonard Sugerman 

Superior Brands, Inc. 
Richard J. Phelps 

Tech Pak, Inc. 
J. William Flynn 

Textron, Inc. 
B.F. Dolan 

Wire Belt Company of America 
F. Wade Greer 



WCRB- 102.5 FM 
Richard L. Kaye 

WCVB-TV, CHANNEL 5 BOSTON 

S. James Coppersmith 



Personnel 

TAD TECHNICAL SERVICES 
CORPORATION 

David J. McGrath, Jr. 



Printing 

*Bowne of Boston, Inc. 
Donald J. Cannava 

Customforms, Inc. 
David A. Granoff 

DANIELS PRINTING COMPANY 
Lee S. Daniels 

*Espo Litho Co., Inc. 
David M. Fromer 

George H. Dean Company 
Earl Michaud 

GRAFACON, INC. 



H. Wayman Rogers, Jr. 



Publishing 

Addison- Wesley Publishing Company, 
Inc. 
Warren R. Stone 

CAHNERS PUBLISHING COMPANY 

Ron Segel 

HOUGHTON MIFFLIN COMPANY 
Nader F. Darehshori 

Little, Brown & Company 
Kevin L. Dolan 



Hilon Development Corporation 
Joan Eliachar 

*John M. Corcoran & Company 
John M. Corcoran 

Keller Co., Inc. 
Joseph P. Keller 

*Leggat McCall Properties, Inc. 
Dennis F. Callahan 

Northland Investment Corporation 
Robert A. Danziger 

Tetlow Realty Associates 
Richard J. Gilbert 

*Trammell Crow Company 
Arthur DeMartino 

Urban Investment & Development 
Rudy K. Umscheid 

*Windsor Building Associates 
Mona F. Freedman 



Retail 

*Channel Home Centers, Inc. 
Malcolm L. Sherman 

FILENE'S 
David P. Mullen 

*Jordan Marsh Company 
Richard F. Van Pelt 

Karten's Jewelers 
Joel Karten 

*Neiman Marcus 
William D. Roddy 

Out of Town News, Inc. 
Sheldon Cohen 

*Saks Fifth Avenue 
Alison Strieder Mayher 

THE STOP & SHOP COMPANIES, 
INC. 

Lewis Schaeneman 

TJX COMPANIES 
Ben Cammarata 



Real Estate/Development 

* Boston Capital Partners 

Christopher W. Collins 
Herbert F. Collins 
Richard J. DeAgazio 
John P. Manning 

* Combined Properties, Inc. 

Stanton L. Black 

*The Flatley Company 
Thomas J. Flatley 

Heafitz Development Company 
Lewis Heafitz 



Science/Medical 

Baldpate Hospital, Inc. 
Lucille M. Batal 

Blake & Blake Genealogists 
Richard A. Blake, Jr. 

CHARLES RD7ER 
LABORATORIES, INC. 
Henry L. Foster 

*CompuChem Corporation 
Gerard Kees Verkerk 

J.A. WEBSTER, INC. 
John A. Webster 

*Portsmouth Regional Hospital 
William J. Schuler 










Dear Patron of the Orchestra: 

For many years the Boston Sym- 
phony Orchestra has been known 
as the "aristocrat of American 
orchestras." There is indeed a 
distinctive "BSO sound" that has 
earned worldwide acclaim and has 
attracted the greatest musicians to 
audition for membership in the 
orchestra. 

An important ingredient in the 
creation of this unique sound is 
having the finest musical instruments 
on the BSO's stage. However, the cost of many of these instruments 
(especially in the string sections) has become staggeringly high, and it is 
incumbent upon the Symphony to take steps to assure that musicians in 
key positions who do not themselves own great instruments have access 
to them for use in the orchestra. 




Two recent initiatives have been taken to address this concern: First, in 
1988, the Boston Safe Deposit and Trust Company stepped forward 
with a creative loan program that is making it possible for players to 
borrow at one and a half percent below prime to purchase instruments. 
Second, last fall, the incentive of a Kresge Foundation challenge grant 
helped launch our effort to raise a fund of $1 million for the Orchestra 
to draw upon from time to time to purchase instruments for use by the 
players. The BSO in this case would retain ownership. 

Donations of both outright gifts and instruments are being sought to 
establish the BSO's Instrument Acquisition Fund. Fine pianos, 
period instruments, special bows, heirloom violins, etc. all make 
ideal gifts. Opportunities for naming instruments and for other 
forms of donor recognition may be available according to the wishes 
of the donor. 

If you are interested in this program please contact me or Joyce Serwitz 
in the orchestra's Development Office at (617) 638-9273. Your support 
will help make a difference that will be music to our ears! 

George H. Kidder 
President 



46 



Services 

*Don Law Productions 
Don Law 

EASTERN ENTERPRISES 
Ronald S. Ziemba 

'Giltspur Exhibits/Boston 
Thomas E. Knott 

Shaughnessy & Ahern Co. 
John J. Shaughnessy 

Wild Acre Inns, Inc. 
Bernard S. Yudowitz 



Software/Information Services 

International Data Group 
Patrick J. McGovern 

Phoenix Technologies Foundation 
Neil Colvin 



Travel/Transportation 

* Crimson Travel Service/ 
Thomas Cook 
David Paresky 

*Heritage Travel, Inc. 
Donald R. Sohn 



Telecommunications 

AT&T 
Robert Babbitt 

*AT&T 

Glenn Swift 

AT&T NETWORK SYSTEMS 
John F. McKinnon 

CELLULAR ONE 

Charles Hoffman 



NEW ENGLAND TELEPHONE 
COMPANY 
Paul C. O'Brien 

NORTHERN TELECOM, INC. 
Brian Davis 

NYNEX CORPORATION 
William C. Ferguson 

Utilities 

BOSTON EDISON COMPANY 
Stephen J. Sweeney 

New England Electric System 
Joan T. Bok 



you are cordially invited to sample our 

Symphony Menu 

at 

( The Cafe (Promenade 




7 or Reservations Call, 61} r -424 -7000 

Reduced parting rates when dining at lUie Colonnade for 

Symphony Matrons. 



*PjiP 



The Colonnade Hotel is tocaud at 120 Huntington Avenue, Boston 



47 



OK 



HRm 







Next Program . . . 



Thursday, November 15, at 8 
Friday, November 16, at 2 
Saturday, November 17, at 8 

CATHERINE COMET conducting 



WUORINEN 
RAVEL 

SAINT-SAENS 



FAURE 



Machault mon chou 

Valses nobles et sentimentales 

Cello Concerto No. 1 in A minor, Opus 33 

Allegro non troppo— Allegretto con moto — 
Come prima 

HEINRICH SCHIFF 

Elegie, Opus 24, for cello and orchestra 
Mr. SCHIFF 



INTERMISSION 



SHOSTAKOVICH 



Symphony No. 1 in F minor, Opus 10 

Allegretto— Allegro non troppo 

Allegro 

Lento 

Allegro molto 



Single tickets for all Boston Symphony Orchestra concerts throughout the season 
are available at the Symphony Hall box office, or by calling "Symphony-Charge" at 
(617) 266-1200, Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m. until 6 p.m., to charge 
tickets instantly on a major credit card, or to make a reservation and then send 
payment by check. Please note that there is a $1.75 handling fee for each ticket 
ordered by phone. 



48 



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SKINNER 

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of Antiques and Fine Art 




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Bolton, MA 01740 Boston, MA 02116 
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finest companies in New 

England and we've ^ 

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Call me at 734-2100 

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■ 



Coming Concerts . . . 



SAINT-SAENS 
FAURE 



Wednesday, November 14, at 7:30 

Open Rehearsal 
Steven Ledbetter will discuss the program 

at 6:30 in Symphony Hall. 
Thursday 'A' -November 15, 8-10:05 
Friday 'B'- November 16, 2-4:05 
Saturday 'A' -November 17, 8-10:05 

CATHERINE COMET conducting 
HEINRICH SCHIFF, cello 

WUORINEN Machault mon chou 

RAVEL Valses nobles et 

sentimentales 
Cello Concerto No. 1 
ftlegie for cello and 
orchestra 
SHOSTAKOVICH Symphony No. 1 

Thursday 'C- Wednesday . November 21, 8-10:05 
Friday 'A' -November 23, 2-4:05 
Saturday 'B'- November 24, 8-10:05 
Tuesday 'B'- November 27, 8-10:05 

MAREK JANOWSKI conducting 
CHRISTIAN TETZLAFF, piano 

SCHUMANN Violin Concerto 

BRUCKNER Symphony No. 7 

Wednesday, December 5, at 7:30 

Open Rehearsal 
Marc Mandel will discuss the program 

at 6:30 in Symphony Hall. 
Thursday 'A' -December 6, 8-10:05 
Friday 'B'- December 7, 2-4:05 
Saturday 'B' -December 8, 8-10:05 

SEIJI OZAWA conducting 
PETER SERKIN, piano 
TANGLEWOOD FESTIVAL CHORUS, 
JOHN OLIVER, conductor 

VERDI Four Sacred Pieces 

SCHOENBERG Piano Concerto 
BEETHOVEN Choral Fantasy 

Tuesday 'C- December 11, 8-10 
Friday Evening— December 14, 8-10 
Saturday 'A' — December 15, 8-10 
SEIJI OZAWA conducting 
TCHAIKOVSKY The Nutcracker (complete) 

Programs and artists subject to change. 



49 




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Weddings. Parties. Meetings. 

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Jones Rd., Falmouth, MA 02541 • 508/548-2300 



The Admission Office 
The Williston 
Northampton School 

Box 30 

1 9 Payson Avenue 

Easthampton, 

Massachusetts, 01027 

Fax: 413/527-9494 



If you're not at The Williston 
Northampton School, you're missing 
a wealth of academic and 
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You're missing out on high school 
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More than 30 percent of our students receive academic scholarships or need-based financial aid. We are an independent school and welcome 
young men and women of any race, religion, or national origin. 



50 



Symphony Hall Information 



FOR SYMPHONY HALL CONCERT AND 
TICKET INFORMATION, call (617) 266- 
1492. For Boston Symphony concert program 
information, call "C-O-N-C-E-RrT" (266-2378). 

THE BOSTON SYMPHONY performs ten 
months a year, in Symphony Hall and at Tan- 
glewood. For information about any of the 
orchestra's activities, please call Symphony 
Hall, or write the Boston Symphony Orches- 
tra, Symphony Hall, Boston, MA 02115. 

THE NEWLY REFURBISHED EUNICE S. 
AND JULIAN COHEN WING, adjacent to 
Symphony Hall on Huntington Avenue, may be 
entered by the Symphony Hall West Entrance 
on Huntington Avenue. 

FOR SYMPHONY HALL RENTAL INFOR- 
MATION, call (617) 638-9240, or write the 
Function Manager, Symphony Hall, Boston, 
MA 02115. 

THE BOX OFFICE is open from 10 a.m. 
until 6 p.m. Monday through Saturday; on con- 
cert evenings it remains open through intermis- 
sion for BSO events or just past starting-time 
for other events. In addition, the box office 
opens Sunday at 1 p.m. when there is a con- 
cert that afternoon or evening. Single tickets 
for all Boston Symphony subscription concerts 
are available at the box office. For outside 
events at Symphony Hall, tickets are available 
three weeks before the concert. No phone 
orders will be accepted for these events. 

TO PURCHASE BSO TICKETS: American 
Express, MasterCard, Visa, a personal check, 
and cash are accepted at the box office. To 
charge tickets instantly on a major credit card, 
or to make a reservation and then send pay- 
ment by check, call "Symphony-Charge" at 
(617) 266-1200, Monday through Saturday 
from 10 a.m. until 6 p.m. There is a handling 
fee of $1.75 for each ticket ordered by phone. 

GROUP SALES: Groups may take advantage of 
advance ticket sales. For BSO concerts at Sym- 
phony Hall, groups of twenty-five or more may 
reserve tickets by telephone and take advantage 
of ticket discounts and flexible payment options. 
To place an order, or for more information, call 
Group Sales at (617) 638-9345. 

IN CONSIDERATION of our patrons and 
artists, children under four will not be admit- 
ted to Boston Symphony Orchestra concerts. 



THE SYMPHONY SHOP is located in the 
Cohen Wing at the West Entrance on Hunting- 
ton Avenue and is open Tuesday, Thursday, and 
Friday from 11 a.m. until 3 p.m., Saturday from 
1 p.m. until 6 p.m., and from one hour before 
each concert through intermission. The shop car- 
ries BSO and musical-motif merchandise and 
gift items such as calendars, clothing, appoint- 
ment books, drinking glasses, holiday ornaments, 
children's books, and BSO and Pops recordings. 
A selection of Symphony Shop merchandise is 
also available during BSO concert hours outside 
the Cabot-Cahners Room in the Massachusetts 
Avenue corridor. All proceeds benefit the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra. For merchandise informa- 
tion, please call (617) 267-2692. 

TICKET RESALE: If for some reason you 
are unable to attend a Boston Symphony con- 
cert for which you hold a ticket, you may make 
your ticket available for resale by calling the 
switchboard. This helps bring needed revenue 
to the orchestra and makes your seat available 
to someone who wants to attend the concert. A 
mailed receipt will acknowledge your tax-deduct- 
ible contribution. 

RUSH SEATS: There are a limited number of 
Rush Seats available for the Friday-afternoon, 
Tuesday-evening, and Saturday-evening Boston 
Symphony concerts (subscription concerts only). 
The low price of these seats is assured through 
the Morse Rush Seat Fund. The tickets for Rush 
Seats are sold at $6 each, one to a customer, on 
Fridays as of 9 a.m. and Saturdays and Tues- 
days as of 5 p.m. 

PARKING: The Prudential Center Garage 
offers a discount to any BSO patron with a 
ticket stub for that evening's performance. 
There are also two paid parking garages on 
Westland Avenue near Symphony Hall. 
Limited street parking is available. As a spe- 
cial benefit, guaranteed pre-paid parking near 
Symphony Hall is available to subscribers who 
attend evening concerts on Tuesday, Thursday, 
Friday, or Saturday. For more information, 
call the Subscription Office at (617) 266-7575. 

LATECOMERS will be seated by the ushers 
during the first convenient pause in the pro- 
gram. Those who wish to leave before the end 
of the concert are asked to do so between pro- 
gram pieces in order not to disturb other 
patrons. 



51 



m 



■ 



SMOKING IS NOT PERMITTED in any 
part of the Symphony Hall auditorium or in 
the surrounding corridors; it is permitted only 
in the Hatch Room and in the main lobby on 
Massachusetts Avenue. Please note that 
smoking is no longer permitted in the Cabot- 
Cahners Room. 

CAMERA AND RECORDING EQUIPMENT 
may not be brought into Symphony Hall dur- 
ing concerts. 

FIRST AID FACILITIES for both men and 
women are available. On-call physicians attend- 
ing concerts should leave their names and seat 
locations at the switchboard near the Massa- 
chusetts Avenue entrance. 

WHEELCHAIR ACCESS to Symphony Hall 
is available via the Cohen Wing, at the West 
Entrance. Wheelchair-accessible restrooms are 
located in the main corridor of the West 
Entrance, and in the first-balcony passageway 
between Symphony Hall and the Cohen Wing. 

ELEVATORS are located outside the Hatch 
and Cabot-Cahners rooms on the Massachu- 
setts Avenue side of Symphony Hall, and in 
the Cohen Wing. 

LADIES' ROOMS are located on the orches- 
tra level, audience-left, at the stage end of the 
hall, on both sides of the first balcony, and in 
the Cohen Wing. 

MEN'S ROOMS are located on the orchestra 
level, audience-right, outside the Hatch Room 
near the elevator, on the first-balcony level, 
audience-left, outside the Cabot-Cahners Room 
near the coatroom, and in the Cohen Wing. 

COATROOMS are located on the orchestra and 
first-balcony levels, audience-left, outside the 
Hatch and Cabot-Cahners rooms, and in the 
Cohen Wing. The BSO is not responsible for 
personal apparel or other property of patrons. 

LOUNGES AND BAR SERVICE: There are 
two lounges in Symphony Hall. The Hatch 
Room on the orchestra level and the Cabot- 



Cahners Room on the first-balcony level serve 
drinks starting one hour before each perform- 
ance. For the Friday- afternoon concerts, both 
rooms open at 12:15, with sandwiches available 
until concert time. 

BOSTON SYMPHONY BROADCASTS: Con- 
certs of the Boston Symphony Orchestra are 
heard by delayed broadcast in many parts of the 
United States and Canada, as well as interna- 
tionally, through the Boston Symphony Tran- 
scription Trust. In addition, Friday-afternoon 
concerts are broadcast live by WGBH-FM (Bos- 
ton 89.7); Saturday-evening concerts are broad- 
cast live by both WGBH-FM and WCRB-FM 
(Boston 102.5). Live broadcasts may also be 
heard on several other public radio stations 
throughout New England and New York. 

BSO FRIENDS: The Friends are annual 
donors to the Boston Symphony Orchestra. 
Friends receive BSO, the orchestra's newslet- 
ter, as well as priority ticket information and 
other benefits depending on their level of giv- 
ing. For information, please call the Develop- 
ment Office at Symphony Hall weekdays 
between 9 and 5, (617) 638-9251. If you are 
already a Friend and you have changed your 
address, please send your new address with 
your newsletter label to the Development Office, 
Symphony Hall, Boston, MA 02115. Including 
the mailing label will assure a quick and accu- 
rate change of address in our files. 

BUSINESS FOR BSO: The BSO's Business 
& Professional Leadership program makes it 
possible for businesses to participate in the life 
of the Boston Symphony Orchestra through a 
variety of original and exciting programs, 
among them "Presidents at Pops," "A Com- 
pany Christmas at Pops," and special-event 
underwriting. Benefits include corporate recog- 
nition in the BSO program book, access to the 
Higginson Room reception lounge, and priority 
ticket service. For further information, please 
call the BSO Corporate Development Office at 
(617) 638-9250. 




When Marjory and Robert take to the 
dance floor at Fox Hill Village, people say 
they move just like Fred Astaire and 
Ginger Rogers. Such grace and style. 
Such flawless execution. 

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Set amid 83 gracefully wooded acres, 
Fox Hill Village offers a style of retire 
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With an ever-changing schedule of 
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Plus, a flawless array of services and 
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best years are yet to come. 

Yet Fox Hill Village is surprisingly 
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and tax benefits of home ownership. 

Come see for yourself. Call (617) 
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SHREVE.CRUMP &>LOW 





Seiji Ozawa, Music Director 
Grant Llewellyn and Robert Spano, 

Assistant Conductors 
One Hundred and Tenth Season, 1990-91 



Trustees of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Inc. 



Nelson J. Darling, Jr., Chairman Emeritus 

J. P. Barger, Chairman 

Mrs. Lewis S. Dabney, Vice-Chairman 

Mrs. John H. Fitzpatrick, Vice-Chairman 



George H. Kidder, President 

Archie C. Epps, Vice-Chairman 

William J. Poorvu, Vice-Chairman and Treasurer 



David B. Arnold, Jr. 
Peter A. Brooke 
James F. Cleary 
John F. Cogan, Jr. 
Julian Cohen 
William M. Crozier, Jr. 
Mrs. Michael H. Davis 
Mrs. Eugene B. Doggett 

Trustees Emeriti 

Vernon R. Alden 
Philip K. Allen 
Allen G. Barry 
Leo L. Beranek 
Mrs. John M: Bradley 
Abram T. Collier 

Other Officers of the Corporation 

John Ex Rodgers, Assistant Treasurer 
Daniel R. Gustin, Clerk 



Avram J. Goldberg 
Mrs. R. Douglas Hall III 
Francis W. Hatch 
Julian T. Houston 
Mrs. Bela T. Kalman 
Mrs. George I. Kaplan 
Harvey Chet Krentzman 
R. Willis Leith, Jr. 



Mrs. Harris Fahnestock 
Mrs. John L. Grandin 
E. Morton Jennings, Jr. 
Albert L. Nickerson 
Thomas D. Perry, Jr. 
Irving W. Rabb 



Mrs. August R. Meyer 
Mrs. Robert B. Newman 
Peter C. Read 
Richard A. Smith 
Ray Stata 

William F. Thompson 
Nicholas T. Zervas 



Mrs. George R. Rowland 
Mrs. George Lee Sargent 
Sidney Stoneman 
John Hoyt Stookey 
John L. Thorndike 



Michael G. McDonough, Assistant Treasurer 



Administration 

Kenneth Haas, Managing Director 

Daniel R. Gustin, Assistant Managing Director and Manager of Tanglewood 

Michael G. McDonough, Director of Finance and Business Affairs 

Evans Mirageas, Artistic Administrator 

Anne H. Parsons, Orchestra Manager 

Caroline Smedvig, Director of Public Relations and Marketing 

Josiah Stevenson, Director of Development 

Robert Bell, Manager of 

Information Systems 
Peter N. Cerundolo, Director of 

Corporate Development 
Madelyne Cuddeback, Director of 

Corporate Sponsorships 
Patricia Forbes Halligan, Personnel 

Administrator 
Sarah J. Harrington, Budget Manager 
Margaret Hillyard-Lazenby, 

Director of Volunteers 
Russell M. Hodsdon, Manager of Box Office 
Bernadette M. Horgan, Public Relations 

Coordinator 
Craig R. Kaplan, Controller 
Nancy A. Kay, Director of Sales & 

Marketing Manager 
John M. Keenum, Director of 

Tanglewood Music Center Development 



Patricia Krol, Coordinator of Youth Activities 
Steven Ledbetter, Musicologist & 

Program Annotator 
Michelle R. Leonard, Media and Production 

Manager, Boston Symphony Orchestra 
Marc Mandel, Publications Coordinator 
John C. Marksbury, Director of 

Foundation and Government Support 
Julie-Anne Miner, Manager of Fund 

Reporting 
Richard Ortner, Administrator of 

Tanglewood Music Center 
Scott Schillin, Assistant Manager, 

Pops and Youth Activities 
Joyce M. Serwitz, Director of Major Gifts/ 

Assistant Director of Development 
Cheryl L. Silvia, Function Manager 
Susan E. Tomlin, Director of Annual Giving 



Programs copyright ©1990 Boston Symphony Orchestra, Inc. 
Cover by Jaycole Advertising, Inc./Cover photo by Ira Wyman 



Board of Overseers of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Inc. 

John F. Cogan, Jr., Chairman 

Mrs. Ray A. Goldberg, Vice-Chairman 

Mrs. R. Douglas Hall III, Secretary 



Mrs. Herbert B. Abelow 

Harlan Anderson 

Mrs. David Bakalar 

Bruce A. Beal 

Mrs. Leo L. Beranek 

Lynda Schubert Bodman 

Donald C. Bowersock, Jr. 

William M. Bulger 

Mrs. Levin H. Campbell 

Earle M. Chiles 

Mrs. C. Thomas Clagett, Jr. 

James F. Cleary 

William H. Congleton 

William F. Connell 

Walter J. Connolly, Jr. 

S. James Coppersmith 

Albert C. Cornelio 

Phyllis Curtin 

Alex V. d'Arbeloff 

Phyllis Dohanian 

Hugh Downs 

Goetz B. Eaton 

Edward Eskandarian 

Katherine Fanning 

Peter M. Flanigan 

Dean Freed 

Eugene M. Freedman 

Peter H.B. Frelinghuysen 

Mrs. James Garivaltis 

Mark R. Goldweitz 



Haskell R. Gordon 

Steven Grossman 

John P. Hamill 

Daphne P. Hatsopoulos 

Joe M. Henson 

Mrs. Marilyn Brachman Hoffman 

Ronald A. Homer 

Lola Jaffe 

Anna Faith Jones 

H. Eugene Jones 

Susan B. Kaplan 

Mrs. S. Charles Kasdon 

Richard L. Kaye 

Robert D. King 

Mrs. Gordon F. Kingsley 

Allen Z. Khichman 

Koji Kobayashi 

Mrs. Carl Koch 

David I. Kosowsky 

Robert K. Kraft 

George Krupp 

Mrs. Hart D. Leavitt 

Laurence Lesser 

Stephen R. Levy 

Frederick H. Lovejoy, Jr. 

Mrs. Charles P. Lyman 

Mrs. Harry L. Marks 

C. Charles Marran 

Nathan R. Miller 



Mrs. Thomas S. Morse 

Richard P. Morse 

E. James Morton 

David G. Mugar 

David S. Nelson 

Mrs. Hiroshi H. Nishino 

Robert P. O'Block 

Paul C. O'Brien 

Vincent M. O'Reilly 

Andrall E. Pearson 

John A. Perkins 

Daphne Brooks Prout 

Millard H. Pryor, Jr. 

Keizo Saji 

Roger A. Saunders 

Mrs. Raymond H. Schneider 

Mark L. Seiko witz 

Malcolm L. Sherman 

Mrs. Donald B. Sinclair 

W. Davies Sohier, Jr. 

Ralph Z. Sorenson 

Ira Stepanian 

Mrs. Arthur I. Strang 

Mark Tishler, Jr. 

Roger D. Wellington 

Robert A. Wells 

Mrs. Thomas H.P. Whitney 

Margaret Williams-DeCelles 

Mrs. John J. Wilson 



Overseers Emeriti 

Mrs. Weston W. Adams 
Mrs. Frank G. Allen 
Mrs. Richard Bennink 
Mary Louise Cabot 
Johns H. Congdon 
Mrs. Thomas J. Galligan 
Mrs. Richard D. Hill 
Susan M. Hilles 



Mrs. Louis I. Kane 
Leonard Kaplan 
Benjamin H. Lacy 
Mrs. James F. Lawrence 
Hanae Mori 

Mrs. Stephen V.C. Morris 
Stephen Paine, Sr. 
David R. Pokross 



Mrs. Peter van S. Rice 
Mrs. Jerome Rosenfeld 
Mrs. William C. Rousseau 
Francis P. Sears, Jr. 
Mrs. Edward S. Stimpson 
Luise Vosgerchian 
Mrs. Donald B. Wilson 



Symphony Hall Operations 

Robert L. Gleason, Facilities Manager 
James E. Whitaker, House Manager 

Cleveland Morrison, Stage Manager 

Franklin Smith, Supervisor of House Crew 

Wilmoth A. Griffiths, Assistant Supervisor of House Crew 

William D. McDonnell, Chief Steward 

H.R. Costa, Lighting 



Officers of the Boston Symphony Association of Volunteers 

Susan D. Hall, President 

Thelma E. Goldberg, Executive Vice-President 

Joan Erhard, Secretary 

Patricia A. Maddox, Treasurer 

Betty Sweitzer, Nominating Chairman 



Vice-Presidents 

Helen Doyle, Hall Services 
Goetz B. Eaton, Fundraising 
Charles W. Jack, Adult Education 
Pat Jensen, Membership 
Maureen Hickey, Tanglewood 

Chairmen of Regions 

Krista Kamborian Baldini 
Judy Clark 
Joan Erhard 
Bettina Harrison 



Marilyn Larkin, Tanglewood 

Patricia A. Newton, Regions 

Carol Scheifele-Holmes, Public Relations 

F. Preston Wilson, Development 

Pat Woolley, Youth Activities 



Helen Lahage 
Ginny Martens 
Paula Murphy 
Pamela S. Nugent 



Beverly J. Pieper 
Patricia L. Tambone 
Arline Ziner 



Business and Professional Leadership Association 
Board of Directors 



Harvey Chet Krentzman, Chairman 



James F. Cleary, BPLA President 



Members 

J.P. Barger 
Leo L. Beranek 
William F. Connell 
Nelson J. Darling, Jr. 



Thelma E. Goldberg 
Joe M. Henson 
George H. Kidder 
Vincent M. O'Reilly 



Malcolm L. Sherman 
Ray Stata 
Stephen J. Sweeney 
Roger D. Wellington 



Boston Symphony Orchestra concerts are funded in part by the National 
Endowment for the Arts and the Massachusetts Cultural Council, a state agency. 



Celebrating the 90th Anniversary of Symphony Hall 




On display in the first-floor Huntington Avenue corridor of the Cohen Wing is an archival 
exhibit celebrating the 90th anniversary of Symphony Hall. In addition to newspaper accounts 
of the building's opening in 1900, the exhibit includes period photographs and a tribute to 
acoustician Wallace Clement Sabine. 

Articles on various aspects of Symphony Hall will be featured in the BSO program book 
throughout the season. The cover photograph shows the cartouche directly above the 
Symphony Hall stage. Whereas numerous European halls traditionally highlighted various 
composers' names, Beethoven became the only composer whose name was inscribed on any of 
the plaques that trim the stage and balconies of Symphony Hall. The others were left empty 
since, at the time the Hall was opened, it was felt that only Beethoven's popularity would 
remain unchanged. 

3 



References furnished 
on request 



Armenta Adams 
American Ballet Theater 
Michael Barrett 
John Bayless 
Leonard Bernstein 
William Bolcom 
Jorge Bolet 

Boston Pops Orchestra 
Boston Symphony 

Chamber Players 
Boston Symphony 

Orchestra 
Boston University School 

of Music 
Brooklyn Philharmonic 
Dave Brubeck 
Aaron Copland 
John Corigliano 
Phyllis Curtin 
Rian dl Waal 
Michael Feins tein 
Lukas Foss 
Philip Glass 
Karl Haas 
John F. Kennedy Center 

for Performing Arts 



David Korevaar 
Garah Landes 
Michael Lankester 
Elyane Laussade 
Marion McPartland 
John Nauman 
Seiji Ozawa 
Luciano Pavarotti 
Alexander Peskanov 
Andre Previn 
Steve Reich 
Santiago Rodriguez 
George Shearing 
Bright Sheng 
Leonard Shure 
Abbey Simon 
Stephen Sondheim 
Herbert Stessin 
Tanglewood Music 

Center 
Nelita True 
Craig Urquhart 
Earl Wild 
John Williams 
Yehudi Wyner 
and 200 others 



BALDWIN 

OF 

BOSTON 

98 Boylston, Boston, MA 02116, (617) 482-2525 




BSO 




A Ninetieth-Birthday Tribute 
to Aaron Copland 

To many listeners, 
Aaron Copland (born 
November 14, 1900) is 
the epitome and foun- 
tainhead of American 
music. Following stud- 
ies with Nadia Bou- 
langer in France he 
returned to America, 
where Boulanger 
helped him make the 
acquaintance of her friend Serge Koussevitzky. 
The new conductor of the Boston Symphony 
Orchestra and the young American composer 
hit it off at once. Many of Copland's early 
works received their world premieres here in 
Boston, and he quickly became established as 
the leading American composer of his genera- 
tion. Always an exceedingly warmhearted and 
generous man, Copland constantly brought to 
Koussevitzky' s attention the music of other 
worthy young composers. Thus Copland, 
almost as much as Koussevitzky himself, was 
responsible for the extraordinary burst of 
American symphonic writing in the '30s and 
'40s. 

In 1940 Copland became the Dean of the 
Faculty at the newly-founded Berkshire Music 
Center. In that position for a quarter-century, 
he taught a new generation of composers, from 
the United States and increasingly from Latin 
America and the rest of the world. Meanwhile 
he composed symphonies, piano music, cham- 
ber music, songs, ballets, and film scores of 
high quality. His works include some of the 
most-loved by any American composer. 

If the United States shared the Japanese 
custom of naming its finest artists to be "living 
treasures," Aaron Copland would have been so 
named many years ago. This week, as he turns 
ninety, let us thank him for his long, fruitful 
friendship with the BSO and his inspiring con- 
tributions to American music. 

"A Company Christmas at Pops" 
Slated for December 19 

"A Company Christmas at Pops" 1990, featur- 
ing the Boston Pops Orchestra, will take place 
Wednesday evening, December 19. William F. 



Meagher, Managing Partner of Arthur Ander- 
son & Co., is chairman of the 1990 "A Com- 
pany Christmas at Pops" committee, with 
William D. Roddy, Vice-President and General 
Manager of Neiman Marcus, serving as com- 
mittee vice-chairman. Now in its seventh year, 
"A Company Christmas" has become a favorite 
holiday tradition in the Boston-area business 
community, with more than 100 of the area's 
leading businesses and their guests participat- 
ing in this festive event. In the spirit of the 
season, the BSO hosts 200 underprivileged 
children and their chaperones for the evening, 
which includes a surprise visit by Santa Claus. 
A limited number of "A Company Christmas at 
Pops" sponsorships are still available. The 
$3,500 package includes sixteen seats for the 
concert, complete with cocktails and a gourmet 
supper; half-packages are also available. For 
further information please call Marie Petti- 
bone, the BSO's Assistant Director of Corpo- 
rate Development, at (617) 638-9278. 

Symphony Spotlight 

This is one in a series of biographical sketches 
that focus on some of the generous individuals 
who have endowed chairs in the Boston Sym- 
phony Orchestra. Their backgrounds are varied, 
but each felt a special commitment to the Bos- 
ton Symphony Orchestra. 

Angelica Lloyd Clagett 
Stage Manager Position 

Angelica Lloyd Clagett served on the BSO's 
Board of Overseers from 1973 to 1976 and 
resumed her tenure as Overseer in 1985. Mrs. 
Clagett describes her involvement with the 
Boston Symphony Orchestra that led to her 
decision to create an endowment for the stage 
manager's position: "In 1971 I agreed to organ- 
ize Pre-Symphony Suppers for the BSO Coun- 
cil of Friends, which were held in the basement 
of Symphony Hall. Basements are basements, 
and the task of making it into an attractive 
dining area seemed almost too formidable to 
contemplate. But with the help of our energetic 
and talented committee, we did just that, and 
the Suppers became very popular events. They 
also enabled me to get to know the mainte- 
nance crew of the hall, headed by orchestra 
stage manager Al Robison, and I realized very 
quickly that there would be no concerts with- 
out this extremely efficient group who did so 
much to make all BSO events run smoothly. 
What more appropriate way for me to express 
my gratitude for my years of association with 
the BSO than to honor Al Robison by endow- 
ing his position." 




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617-333-0026 



Northwest Airlines to Sponsor 
Holiday Pops Concerts 

The Boston Symphony Orchestra is pleased to 
announce that Northwest Airlines is the corpo- 
rate sponsor of the 1990 Holiday Pops Con- 
certs, which include nine evening and matinee 
Christmas Pops performances between Decem- 
ber 18 and 24 and the New Year's Eve Gala. 
Remaining tickets will go on public sale Mon- 
day, November 19. 

Art Exhibits in the Cabot-Cahners Room 

For the seventeenth year, a variety of Boston- 
area galleries, museums, schools, and non- 
profit artists' organizations are exhibiting their 
work in the Cabot-Cahners Room on the first- 
balcony level of Symphony Hall. On display 
through November 19 are works from the Car- 
negie Hall Photo Exhibition, to be followed by 
works from the Dyansen Gallery (November 
19-December 14) and the Water Street Gallery 
(December 14- January 17). These exhibits are 
sponsored by the Boston Symphony Associa- 
tion of Volunteers, and a portion of each sale 
benefits the orchestra. Please contact the Vol- 
unteer Office at (617) 638-9390, for further 
information. 

BSO Members in Concert 

BSO violinist Amnon Levy will perform the 
Boston premiere of Busoni's Violin Concerto 
on Sunday, November 18, at 8 p.m. with the 
Brookline Symphony Orchestra, David Calla- 
han, music director, at Boston University's 
Tsai Performance Center, 855 Commonwealth 
Avenue in Boston. The program also includes 
Schumann's Overture to Genoveva, Copland's 
Quiet City, and Beethoven's Symphony No. 1. 
Tickets are $8 ($5 seniors and students). For 
further information, call (617) 731-3644. 

The 21-member New England Trombone 
Choir at New England Conservatory directed 
by BSO bass trombonist Douglas Yeo, and the 
NEC Percussion Ensemble directed by BSO 
percussionist Frank Epstein, will give their 
combined annual "Skin 'n Bones" concert on 
Monday, November 19, at 8 p.m. at Jordan 
Hall. Featured on the program will be two 
world premieres for trombones and percus- 
sion—Charles Fussell's Last Trombones and 
David P. Jones' Messalonskee Nocturne — as 
well as the American premiere of Bloodstone by 



Michiko Nakazawa. Also on the program is 
music of John Heiss, Ruth Loman, George 
Hamilton Green, and Anton Bruckner. Admis- 
sion is free. For further information, call 
262-1120. 

Harry Ellis Dickson leads the Boston Classi- 
cal Orchestra on Wednesday, November 28, 
and Friday, November 30, at 8 p.m. in Old 
South Meeting House, 310 Washington Street. 
BSO violinist Amnon Levy is featured in Men- 
delssohn's Violin Concerto on a program also 
including the same composer's FingaVs Cave 
Overture and Haydn's Symphony No. 92, 
Oxford. Tickets are $18 and $12 ($8 students 
and seniors). For further information, call 
(617) 426-2387. 

Max Hobart leads the Civic Symphony 
Orchestra on Sunday, December 2, at 3 p.m. 
at Jordan Hall. The program includes 
Beethoven's Leonore Overture No. 3, the world 
premiere of Weinstein's Serenade for Horn and 
Orchestra (commissioned by the Civic Sym- 
phony Orchestra) and Strauss's Horn Concerto 
No. 1, both featuring soloist Eric Ruske, 
Fine's Blue Towers, and the Boston premiere 
of Mussorgsky's Pictures at an Exhibition in 
the orchestration by Leopold Stokowski. Tick- 
ets are $12 and $8 (reduced price tickets for 
students and seniors will be available the day 
of the concert). For further information, call 
(617) 566-2219. 

The Boston Artists' Ensemble performs 
Brahms 's Piano Quartet in C minor, Op. 60, 
and Schubert's Trout Quintet for piano and 
strings on Friday, December 7, at 8 p.m. at 
the Chapel Gallery of the Second Church in 
Newton, and on Sunday, December 9, at 2:30 
p.m. at the Peabody Museum in Salem. The 
performers include BSO members Tatiana 
Dimitriades, violin, Jonathan Miller, cello, and 
John Stovall, double bass, with Steven Ansell, 
viola, and Randall Hodgkinson, piano. Tickets 
are $12 ($10 students and seniors). For fur- 
ther information, call (617) 527-8662. 

With Thanks 

We wish to express special gratitude to Rich- 
ard P. and Claire W. Morse, major donors of 
the Rush Seats Program through the Morse 
Rush Seats Fund. A limited number of these 
generously underwritten tickets for the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra's Tuesday-evening, 
Friday-afternoon, and Saturday-evening sub- 
scription concerts are made available at $6. 



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