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Full text of "Boston Symphony Orchestra concert programs, Summer, 1977, Tanglewood"

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SMIRNOFF®VODKA.80&100 PROOF. DISTILLED FROM GRAIN. ST E.PIERRESMIRNOFFFLS. (DIVISION OF H EUBLE I N. INCORPORATED ) HARTFORD. CON NECTICUT 



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BOSTON 

SYMPHONY 

ORCHESTRA 

SEIJl OZAWA 

Music Dirtdor 



Seiji Ozawa, Music Director 

Colin Davis, Principal Guest Conductor 
Joseph Silverstein, Assistant Conductor 

Ninety- Sixth Season 1976-1977 

The Trustees of the Boston Symphony Orchestra Inc. 

Talcott M. Banks, President 

President Sidney Stoneman, Vice-President 

Vice-President John L. Thorndike, Treasurer 



Philip K. Allen, Vice- 
Mrs. Harris Fahnestock, 

Vernon R. Alden 

Allen G. Barry 

Dr. Leo L. Beranek 

Mrs. John M. Bradley 

Richard P. Chapman 

Dr. George Clowes 

Abram T. Collier 

Henry A. Laughlin 



Nelson J. Darling, Jr. 

Archie C. Epps III 

E. Morton Jennings, Jr. 

Edward M. Kennedy 

George Kidder 
Edward G. Murray 

Trustees Emeriti 

Harold D. Hodgkinson 



Albert L. Nickerson 

Mrs. James H. Perkins 

Irving W. Rabb 

Paul C. Reardon 

David Rockefeller Jr. 

Mrs. George Lee Sargent 

John Hoyt Stookey 

John T. Noonan 



Administration of the Boston Symphony Orchestra 



Thomas D. Perry, Jr 

Executive Director 

Gideon Toeplitz 

Assistant Manager 

Joseph M. Hobbs 

Director of Development 

Richard C. White 

Assistant to the Manager Administrator of Youth Activities Advisor for the Music Director 

Donald W. Mackenzie James F. Kiley 

Operations Manager, Symphony Hall Operations Manager, Tanglewood 

Michael Steinberg 

Director of Publications 

Programs copyright ® 1977 Boston Symphony Orchestra Inc. 



Thomas W. Morris 

Manager 

Daniel R. Gustin 

Assistant Manager 

Walter Hill Dinah Daniels 

Director of Business Affairs Director of Promotion 

Anita R. Kurland Niklaus Wyss 



Contents: 



page 

Tanglewood 4 

Seiji Ozawa 7 

Map 8 

Information 9 



page 

Programs 11-36 

Berkshire Music Center 39 

Friends 41, 42 



The Board of Overseers of the Boston Symphony Orchestra Inc. 

Dr. Leo L. Beranek 



Mrs. Norman L. Cahners 
Vice Chairman 

Charles F. Adams 

Mrs. Frank G. Allen 

Mrs. Richard Bennink 

David W. Bernstein 

David Bird 

Gerhard Bleicken 

Frederick Brandi 

Curtis Buttenheim 

Mrs. Henry B. Cabot 

Mrs. Mary Louise Cabot 

Levin H. Campbell, III 

Johns H. Congdon 

Arthur P. Contas 

Robert Cushman 

Michael J. Daly 

Mrs. C. Russell Eddy 

Paul Fromm 

Carlton P. Fuller 

Mrs. Thomas J. Galligan, Jr. 



Chairman 

Weston P. Figgins 
Vice Chairman 

Mrs. Thomas Gardinei 

Mrs. James Garivaltis 

Mrs. Robert Gibb 

Jordan Golding 

Mrs. John L. Grandin 

Mrs. R. Douglas Hall, III 

Mrs. Howard E. Hansen 

Bruce Harriman 

Mrs. Richard D. Hill 

Mrs. Amory Houghton, Jr 

Richard S. Humphrey, Jr. 

Mrs. Jim Lee Hunt 

Mrs. Louis I. Kane 

Leonard Kaplan 

Benjamin Lacy 

Mrs. James F. Lawrence 

Roderick MacDougall 

John S. McLennan 

Colman M. Mockler, Jr. 

Mrs. Elting E. Morison 

Richard P. Morse 



Mrs. Arthur I. Strang 

Secretary 

David G. Mugar 

Dr. Barbara W. Newell 

Stephen Paine 

Harry Remis 

Mrs. Peter van S. Rice 

Mrs. Samuel L. Rosenberry 

Mrs. Jerome Rosenfeld 

Mrs. George Rowland 

Mrs. A. Lloyd Russell 

Mrs. William Ryan 

Francis P. Sears, Jr. 

William A. Selke 

Gene Shalit 

Samuel L. Slosberg 

Richard A. Smith 

Mrs. Edward S. Stimpson 

Mrs. Richard H. Thompson 

D. Thomas Trigg 

Roger Woodworth 




Boston 

K University 

Tknglewood 
Institute 



Norman DelloJoio, 

Executive Director 



Summer Instrumental and Vocal Programs for the outstanding high school/ 
college-age musician. Private study with master artists including members of the 
faculty of the Boston University School of Music and the Boston Symphony 
Orchestra. Chamber music, orchestral and vocal performances atTanglewood. 

For information: Boston University Tanglewood Institute, 
855 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02215. 

A program offered by the Boston University School for the Arts in association 
with the Berkshire Music Center/Boston Symphony Orchestra. 
Twelfth Season 




The Berkshires are a perfect place ... for people, 
for families and for businesses. The kind of place 
where an unsurpassed quality of life is available. 

In the Berkshires the average commute is 10 
minutes. Golf courses, tennis clubs, ski resorts, 
theatres, lakes, and fine restaurants are at your 
doorstep. We provide excellent schools — both public 
and private — and the Berkshires are the perfect place 
to raise a family. 

It's no accident that titans of industry have lived 
and worked in the Berkshires. Our labor force still 
believes in a day's work for a day's pay. And the 
Berkshires offer a readily available pool of labor. Our 
schools offer vocational programs and governmental 
training dollars are available. 

Most important, we want businesses to locate in 
the Berkshires. That's why our banks have launched 
a program of financial assistance to attract new 
industry and the County funds a full-time organization 
to assist you. 



If you have the opportunity to move a business, 
or influence a business relocation, consider the 
Berkshires. At Berkshire County Development 
Commission, we have compiled data to prove that 
the Berkshires add up for business reasons. Come see 
us or write on your letterhead for more information. 
Or, if you know of a business contemplating 
relocation, let us know. We welcome \jour business. 



the Berkshires 

Alan C. Marden 

Berkshire County Development Commission 

205 West Street 

Pittsfield, Massachusetts 01201 



Phone: (413) 499-4474 



'I 



U 



Definitely not 
to be missed... 

"Herbert Kupferberg's Tanglewood 
is bursting with information that 
even some of us who worked there 
had missed ... It catches the spirit 
and truth of that beautiful place." 
— Francis Robinson, 
N.Y. Metropolitan Opera 

"Reads as excitingly as a who- 
done-it!" — Julius Rudel, 

New York City Opera 

"Unquestionably the definitive 
Tanglewood history to date." 

— Christian Science Monitor. 



TANGLEWOOD 




Herbert 
Kupferberg 

8x10. 280 pages. 
Over 150 photos. 
Index. $9.95 paperback. 
McGRAW-HILL BOOK COMPANY 



H 



HANCOCK SHAKER 
VILLAGE 

Original 18th Century 
Village Restored 

Open daily 9:30-5:00 

Adults $3 Children $1 

Annual Kitchen Festival 
Week of August 1st 

Route 20 Five miles West 
of Pittsfield, Mass. 



Tanglewood 

In August, 1934, a group of music- 
loving summer residents of the Berk- 
shires organized a series of three 
outdoor concerts at Interlaken, to be 
given by members of the New York 
Philharmonic under the direction of 
Henry Hadley. The venture was so 
successful that the promoters incor- 
porated the Berkshire Symphonic 
Festival and repeated the experiment 
during the next summer. 

The Festival committee then invited 
Serge Koussevitzky and the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra to take part in the 
following year's concerts. The Orches- 
tra's Trustees accepted and on August 
13, 1936, the Boston Symphony gave 
its first concert in the Berkshires (at 
Holmwood, a former Vanderbilt estate, 
later the Foxhollow School). The series, 
again consisting of three concerts, was 
given under a large tent, and a total of 
nearly 15,000 people attended. 

In the winter of 1936, Mrs. Gorham 
Brooks and Miss Mary Aspinwall 
Tappan offered Tanglewood, the Tap- 
pan family estate, with its buildings and 
210 acres of lawns and meadows, as a 
gift to Koussevitzky and the Orchestra. 
The offer was gratefully accepted, and 
on August 12, 1937, the Festival's 
largest crowd thus far assembled under 
a tent for the first Tanglewood concert, 
a program of music by Wagner. 

As Koussevitzky began The Ride of the 
Valkyries, a storm erupted, overpowering 
the music and causing the concert to be 
interrupted three times before the first 
half could be completed. The second half 
of the program had to be changed, 
because of water damage to some of the 
instruments, and when the concert 
ended, Miss Gertrude Robinson Smith, 
one of the Festival's founders, came to 
the stage and told the audience that the 
storm had demonstrated the needfor a 
permanent structure. 

A hundred thousand dollars, she said, 
would be needed for this purpose, and 
the response to her plea was so generous 
that within a short time the amount was 
fully subscribed. Plans for the Music 
Shed were drawn up by the eminent 



architect Eliel Saarinen, and, as modi- 
fied by Josef Franz of Stockbridge, who 
also directed construction, it was com- 
pleted on June lb, 1938, a month ahead 
of schedule. Seven weeks later, Serge 
Koussevitzky led the inaugural concert, 
which included a performance of Beet- 
hoven's Ninth Symphony. By 1941, the 
Theatre-Concert Hall, the Chamber 
Music Hall and several small studios — 
all part of the Berkshire Music Center, 
which had begun operations the pre- 
ceding year — were finished, and the 
Festival had so expanded its activities 
and its reputation for excellence that it 
attracted nearly 100,000 visitors. 

Today Tanglewood annually draws 
close to a quarter of a million visitors; 
in addition to the twenty-four regular 
concerts of the Boston Symphony, there 
are weekly "Prelude" concerts and open 
rehearsals, the annual Festival of 
Contemporary Music, and almost daily 
concerts by the gifted young musicians 
of the Berkshire Music Center. Arthur 
Fiedler and the Boston Pops perform 
each summer, and the Festival also 
includes a series of concerts by popular 
artists. The season offers not only a 
vast quantity of music but also a vast 
range of musical forms and styles, all 
of it presented with a regard for artistic 
excellence that makes the Festival 
unique. Tanglewood and the Berkshire 
Music Center, projects with which 
Koussevitzky was involved until his 
death, have become a fitting shrine to 
his memory, a living embodiment of 
the vital, humanistic tradition that was 
his legacy. 





U ATTIC 

FM 90.3 mHz 

We bring you fine music 
AND dozens of interesting 
events — live and without 
commercials. Sit in with us 
at the National Press Club, 
where the next day's head- 
lines are often made. Enjoy 
"All Things Considered,'' a 
fascinating m agazine of news 
and issues. (Nothingelse like it 
in broadcasting !) Savor some 
of the most satisfying thea- 
tre productions ever aired. 
Revel in delightful, intelligent 
conversation. 

Listen . . . and if you 

like what you hear, 

write for our free monthly 

program directory. 

WAMC 
Albany Medical College 
Albany, New York 12208 







npr 



National Public Radio 

for eastern New York 
and western New England 



The Shed under construction in 1938 



Why do I work seven days a week? 
That's all there are. Besides 
if you really love what you do 

it's not work. 




Artists in the Night 
Hayes Burnett plays 
a great mix of jazz 
sounds. Mon-Fri 
ll-2:30am 




Robert J. Lurtsema 

Host, Morning Pro Musica 

Everyday 7am-Noon 




The Boston 
Symphony Orchestra 
at Tanglewood 
Fridays at 9pm, 
Saturdays at 
8:30pm, Sundays 

30pm 

and August 



The Spider's Web 
— our storybook for 
the entire family 
Mon-Fri. 7:30pm 



All Things Considered 

— the best news 
program of its kind 

— every day at 5pm 



'GBH Radio 
89.7FM 

Radio that makes sense 
of your day. 



Seiji Ozawa 

Seiji Ozawa became Music Director of 
the Boston Symphony Orchestra in the 
fall of 1973. He is the thirteenth con- 
ductor of the Orchestra since its found- 
ing in 1881. 

He was born in Hoten, Manchuria in 
1935, and studied both Western and 
Oriental music as a child. He attended 
Toho School of Music in Tokyo and 
graduated with first prizes in composi- 
tion and conducting. Shortly after his 
graduation, he won first prize at the 
International Competition of Conduc- 
ting at Besancon, France, and was in- 
vited by Charles Munch, then Music 
Director of the Boston Symphony and a 
judge at the competition, to spend a 
summer studying at Tanglewood. 

In 1964 and for the next five seasons, 
Mr. Ozawa was Music Director of the 
Ravinia Festival. At the beginning of the 
1965- 66 season he became Music Direc- 
tor of the Toronto Symphony, a posi- 
tion he relinquished four seasons later 
to study and guest conduct. In 1970 he 
accepted the position of Artistic Direc- 



tor of the Berkshire Music Festival, and 
in December of the same year he began 
his inaugural season as Conductor and 
Music Director of the San Francisco 
Symphony Orchestra, titles that he held 
concurrently with his position as Music 
Director of the Boston Symphony. In 
the spring of 1976 he resigned his San 
Francisco position although he remained 
Honorary Conductor for the 
1976-77 season. 

Mr. Ozawa 's recordings include: on 
the Deutsche Grammophon label, Ber- 
lioz's Symphonie fanlastique, La damnation de 
Faust, Romeo et Juliette (which was 
awarded a Grand Prix du Disque), Ives's 
Symphony No. 4 and Central Park in the 
Dark, and de Falla's Three-cornered Hat, 
and, on the New World Records label, 
Griffes's Songs of Fiona McLeod. Record- 
ings soon to be released are: Bartok's 
Miraculous Mandarin Suite and Music for 
Percussion, Strings, and Celeste, Tchaikov- 
sky's Symphony No. 5, Brahms's Sym- 
phony No. 1, and Rimsky-Korsakov's 
Sheherazade on Deutsche Grammophon, 
and Session's When Lilac's Last in the Door- 
yard Bloom'd on New World Records. 



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DEERSKIN 

TRADING POST 

615 Pittsfield-Lenox Road (Rte. 20) Lenox, Mass. 

Coupon good thru Oct. 1. 1977. Discount does not apply to sale merchandise. 



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For 105 years we've been serious 
about people who make music. 

In 1872 Boston University established the first professional music program 
within an American university to train creative and talented students for 
careers in music. 105 years later the Boston University School of Music is 

still doing what it does best. 




• Performance • Music Education • History and Literature • Theory and Composition 



strings 

Walter Eisen berg, violin 
Madeline Foley, chamber music 
'Gerald Gelbloom, violin 

* Bernard Kadinoff, viola 
Endel Kalam, chamber music 

'Robert Karol, viola 

* Eugene Lehner, chamber music 

* Leslie Martin, string bass 
George Neiknig, cello 

'Mischa Nieland, cello 

Leslie Pamas, cello 
'Henry Portnoi, string bass 
' William Rhein, string bass 

Kenneth Sarch, violin 

* Roger Shermont, violin 
•Joseph Silverstein, violin 

Roman Totenberg, violin 
Walter Trampler, viola 

* Max Winder, viohn 
'Lawrence Wolfe, string bass 



woodwinds 

Edward Avedisian, clarinet 
'PasqualeCardillo, clarinet 
'Donot Anthony Dwyer, flute 

Roderick Ferland, saxophone 
•Ralph Gomberg, oboe 
•John Holmes, oboe 
•Phillip Kaplan, flute 
•James Pappoutsakis, flute 
•Richard Plaster, bassoon 
•Matthew Ruggiero, bassoon 
'Felix Viscuglia, clarinet 
'Sherman Walt, bassoon 
'Harold Wright, clarinet 

brass 

* Ronald Barron, trombone 

* Norman Bolter, trombone 
Peter Chapman, trumpet 
John Coffey, tromboneltuba 

* Armando Ghitalla, trumpet 



brass (cont.) 

Paul Gay, trombone 
' Gordon Hallberg, tromboneltuba 
'Charles Kavaloski, French horn 

Charles A. Lewis, Jr., trumpet 
'David Ohanian, French horn 

Samuel Pilafian, tuba 
'Rolf Smedvig, trumpet 
'Harry Shapiro, French horn 
'Roger Voisin, trumpet 
'Charles Yancich, French horn 

percussion 

'Thomas Gauger 
'Charles Smith 

harp 

Lucile Lawrence 

piano 

Mana Clodes 

Anthony di Bonaventura 

Lenore Engdahl 

Bela Boszormenyi-Nagy 

Phillip Oliver, staff accompanist 

Edith Steams 

Frednk Wanger 

organ 

George Faxon 
Jack Fisher 
Max Miller 

harpsichord 

Joseph Payne 

voice 

Eunice Alberts, contralto 
Germaine Arosa, diction 
Mary Davenport, contralto 
Ellalou Dimmock, soprano 
Maeda Freeman, mezzo 
Robert Gartside, tenor 
Mac Morgan, baritone 
Chloe Owen, soprano 
Allen Rogers, vocal coaching 
Barbara Stevenson, soprano 
Wilma Thompson, mezzo 



music history and literature 

Karol Berger 
Murray Lefkowitz 
Joel Sheveloff 

theory and composition 

David Carney 
David Del Tredici 
John Goodman 
Alan MacMillan 
Joyce Mekeel 
Malloy Miller 
Gardner Read 
Allen Schindler 
Robert Sirota 
Tison Street 

music education 

Lee Chnsman 
Phyllis Elhady Hoffman 
Allen Lannom 
JackO Lemons 
Mary Ann Norton 

musical organizations 

Adelaide Bishop, opera 
Warren Wilson, opera 
Joseph Huszti, chorus 
'Joseph Silverstein, orchestra 

* Roger Voisin, wind ensemble 

boston symphony orchestra 
woodwind quintet in residence 

'Doriot Anthony Dwyer, flute 

* Ralph Gomberg, oboe 
'Harold Wright, clarinet 
'Sherman Walt, bassoon 
'Charles Kavaloski, French horn 

empire brass quintet 
in residence 

Charles A. Lewis, Jr., trumpet 

* Rolf Smedvig, trumpet 
'David Ohanian, French horn 
'Norman Bolter, trombone 

Samuel Pilafian, tuba 



•Member of the Boston Symphony Orchestra 



Boston University School of Music 

Wilbur EX Fullbright, Director • Robert Lee Tipps, Assistant to Director 
offering degrees at the bachelor, master, and doctoral levels. 

School for the Arts: Music, Theatre, Visual Arts • Norman Dello Joio, Dean 
855 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 



10 



Tanglewood 1977 



Weekend Prelude 

Pinchas Zukerman, violin 
Eugenia Zukerman, flute 
Jules Eskin, cello 
John Gibbons, harpsichord 



Friday, 8 July at 7 



C.P.E. BACH Trio in A major 
Allegro 
Adagio 
Allegro 



HOFFMEISTER Duo for Violin and Flute 
Allegro 
Romance 
Allegro 



TELEMANN 



Trio Sonata in A minor 

Largo 

Vivace 

Affettuoso 

Allegro 



The harpsichord used in this performance was made by Carl Fudge. 



11 




gr^ 



First violins 

Joseph Silverstein 

Concertmaster 
Charles Munch chair 

Emanuel Borok 

Assistant Concertmaster 
Helen Horner Mclntyre chair 

Max Hobart 

Rolland Tapley 

Roger Shermont 

Max Winder 

Harry Dickson 

Gottfried Wilfinger 

Fredy Ostrovsky 

Leo Panasevich 

Sheldon Rotenberg 

Alfred Schneider 

Gerald Gelbloom 

Raymond Sird 

Ikuko Mizuno 

Cecylia Arzewski 

Amnon Levy 

Bo Youp Hwang 

Second violins 

Victor Yampolsky 

Fahnestock chair 

Marylou Speaker 
Michel Sasson 
Roland Knudsen 
Leonard Moss 
Vyacheslav Uritsky 
Laszlo Nagy 
Michael Vitale 
Darlene Gray 
Ronald Wilkison 
Harvey Seigel 
Jerome Rosen 
Sheila Fiekowsky 
Gerald Elias 
Ronan Lefkowitz 

Violas 

Burton Fine 

Charles S. Dana chair 
Reuben Green 
Eugene Lehner 
George Humphrey 
Jerome Lipson 

12 



Robert Karol 
Bernard Kadinoff 
Vincent Mauricci 
Earl Hedberg 
Joseph Pietropaolo 
Robert Barnes 
Michael Zaretsky 

Cellos 

Jules Eskin 

Philip R. Allen chair 
Martin Hoherman 
Mischa Nieland 
Jerome Patterson 
Robert Ripley 
Luis Leguia 
Carol Procter 
Ronald Feldman 
Joel Moersch'el 
Jonathan Miller 
Martha Babcock 

Basses 

William Rhein 
Acting Principal 
Harold D. Hodgkinson chair 
Joseph Hearne 
Bela Wurtzler 
Leslie Martin 
John Salkowski 
John Barwicki 
Robert Olson 
Lawrence Wolfe 
Henry Portnoi 

Flutes 

Doriot Anthony Dwyer 

Walter Piston chair 

James Pappoutsakis 
Paul Fried 

Piccolo 

Lois Schaefer 

Oboes 

Ralph Gomberg 

Mildred B. Remis chair 
Wayne Rapier 

English Horn 

Laurence Thorstenberg 

Clarinets 

Harold Wright 

Ann 5.M. Banks chair 

Pasquale Cardillo 
Peter Hadcock 

E-flat clarinet 

Bass Clarinet 

Felix Viscuglia 



Bassoons 

Sherman Walt 

Edward A. Taft chair 
Roland Small 
Matthew Ruggiero 

Contra bassoon 

Richard Plaster 

Horns 

Charles Kavalovski 

Helen Sagoff Slosberg chair 

Charles Yancich 
Peter Gordon 
David Ohanian 
Richard Mackey 
Ralph Pottle 

Trumpets 

Armando Ghitalla 
Andre Come 
Rolf Smedvig 
Gerard Goguen 

Trombones 

Ronald Barron 
Norman Bolter 
Gordon Hallberg 
William Gibson 

Tuba 

Chester Schmitz 

Timpani 

Everett Firth 

Sylvia Shippen Wells chair 

Percussion 

Charles Smith 
Arthur Press 

Assistant timpanist 
Thomas Gauger 
Frank Epstein 

Harps 

Bernard Zighera 
Ann Hobson 

Personal Managers 

William Moyer 
Harry Shapiro 

Librarians 

Victor Alpert 
William Shisler 

Stage Manager 

Alfred Robison 



BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

Seiji Ozawa, Music Director 
Colin Davis, Principal Guest Conductor 
Joseph Silverstein, Assistant Conductor 
Tanglewood 1977 




The Serge Koussevitzky Memorial Concert 



Friday, 8 July at 9 

LEONARD BERNSTEIN, conductor 

BACH Magnificat, BWV 243 

Magnificat anima mea Dominum 
Et exsultavit spiritus meus 
Quia respexit humilitatem 
Omnes generationes 
Quia fecit mihi magna 
Et misericordia 



Fecit potentiam 
Deposuit potentes 
Esurientes implevit bonis 
Suscepit Israel 
Sicut locutus est 
Gloria Patri 



BENITA VALENTE, soprano 
GWENDOLYN KILLEBREW, mezzo-soprano 
DANIEL COLLINS, countertenor 
KENNETH RIEGEL, tenor 
JOHN CHEEK, baritone 
TANGLEWOOD FESTIVAL CHORUS, 
JOHN OLIVER, conductor 



INTERMISSION 



HAYDN Missa in angustiis (Nelson Mass) 
Kyrie 
Gloria 
Credo 
Sanctus 
Agnus Dei 

BENITA VALENTE, soprano 
GWENDOLYN KILLEBREW, mezzo-soprano 
KENNETH RIEGEL, tenor 
JOHN CHEEK, baritone 
TANGLEWOOD FESTIVAL CHORUS, 
JOHN OLIVER, conductor 



Seiji Ozawa and the Boston Symphony Orchestra 

record exclusively for Deutsche Grammophon. 

Baldwin piano 

The harpsichord used in this evening's performance was built by Carl Fudge. 

The positive organ has been provided by the Andover Organ Company. 



13 



Notes 



Johann Sebastian Bach 

Magnificat, BWV 243 



Johann Sebastian Bach was 
1685 in Eisenach and died i 
1750. The present version 
probably dates from about 
this performance, the solo 
soprano II are assigned to 
and those marked alto to the 
Morehead plays the organ 
the harpsichord. 



born on 21 March 
n Leipzig on 28 July 
of the Magnificat 
1732 or 1733. In 

parts Bach marks 

the mezzo-soprano 
countertenor. Philip 

and John Gibbons 



The text of the Magnificat is taken 
from the Gospel according to Saint Luke 
(I, 46-55), to which the doxology is 
added. The annunciation has just taken 
place — "Behold, thou shalt conceive in 
thy womb, and bring forth a son, and 
shalt call his name Jesus" — and the 
angel has told Mary that her cousin 
Elisabeth has also conceived (the boy to 
whom she will give birth is John the 
Baptist). Mary sets out to visit Elisabeth 
at her house in Juda and after the 
salutation to her cousin, she speaks the 
words of praise and thanksgiving that 
begin, "My soul doth magnify the Lord." 
Part of the Office of Vespers, in Bach's 
day the Magnificat was normally sung in 
German and in psalm- tone, but on high 
feast days it was sung in Latin and 
fully composed. 

Most likely Bach wrote this music 
originally for Christmas 1723, his first 
in Leipzig. It was then in E flat major, 
slightly different in orchestration, and 
substantially different in shape, for it 
included four inserts appropriate to the 
season, two in German and two in 
Latin. On some later occasion, Bach, 
so to speak, normalized the Magnificat 
by removing the four numbers that 
bound it specifically to Christmas. He 
also transposed it to D major, the stan- 
dard key for brilliant trumpet -and - 
drum music, and he added flutes to 
the orchestra. The Magnificat is extra- 
ordinary in its concision, and there is no 
work in which Bach's principles (or 
habits) of text-setting are more 
vividly realized. 



Magnificat anima mea Dominum: all forces 
— three trumpets with drums, two each 
of flutes and oboes, strings, keyboards, 
bassoons to reinforce the bass, five- 
part chorus (in Bach's own performan- 
ces, the soloists would have been mem- 
bers of the chorus) — are on hand for 
the most brilliant effect. The movement 
is short, but enclosing the just 45 mea- 
sures of singing between orchestral ri- 
tornelli makes it come across as spacious 
and grand. Bach's choice to begin the 
setting of Mary's words with sopranos 
only is surely symbolic. 

Et exsultavit spiritus meus: an aria for 
soprano II, accompanied by strings. 

Quia respexit humilitatem and omnes gene- 
rationes: this begins as a duet for soprano I 
with oboe d'amore. First they share 
material, but at the words ecce enim ex hoc 
beatam the soprano moves into a simpler, 
slightly more declamatory style. If you 
look at the full text on page 15, you see 
that in Latin, the subject, omnes gene- 
rations, comes at the end of the sentence. 
Bach takes magnificent and dramatic 
advantage of this syntactic feature: when 
the words omnes generationes — all gene- 
rations — arrive, they do so in the voices 
of the full chorus. Bach gives them tidal 
force with his tightly piled up entrances, 
often with each voice coming in on a 
higher scale degree than the one before, 
with his tremendous march across key 
after key in hardly more than a minute's 
music, with his dramatic pause near the 
end (followed by the sound, so rare in 
Bach, of unaccompanied voices), and 
indeed by insisting that it is omnes, omnes 
generationes. 

Quia fecit mihi magna: after the drama 
and the polyphonic swirl of omnes gene- 
rationes comes the Magnificat's simplest 
aria, the voice accompanied only by bass 
instruments and keyboard. 

Et misericordia: the music sways in a 
gentle 12/8 meter, the accompanying 
strings are muted, and near the end, the 
tenor graphically evokes the fear 
in timentibus. 

Fecit potentiam: an astounding collision 
here of the declamatory chordal style 
with dazzling coloraturas (it's the tenors 
against everyone else at first, but each 



14 



section of the chorus gets its turn at the 
brilliant sixteenth-notes sooner or later.) 
The proud whom God scatters are dis- 
posed of in one contemptuous shout 
of superbos. 

Deposuii potent es: another duet, quite 
militant, for all the violins in unison and 
the solo tenor. 

Esurientes implevit bonis: in this alto aria 
it is not only the rich who are "sent 
empty away," but also the two flutes, 
who, in Bach's most playful bit of mu- 
sical symbolism, are deprived of their 
final cadence. 

Suscepit Israel: the three high solo voices 
weave a lovely and gentle imitative 
texture. The melody played across their 
serene singing by the oboes is the tune 
members of the Leipzig congregation 
would have recognized as one to which 



the German Magnificat — Meine Seel' erhebt 
den Herrn — was sung. You may recognize 
it from Mozart's Requiem, where the sopra- 
nos sing it on the words Te-decet hymnus. 

Sicut locutus est: a choral fugue, de- 
liberately and satisfyingly prosaic and 
foursquare, in contrast to the Suscepit 
Israel just finished and the flamboyant 
Gloria to come. 

Gloria Patri: the shouts of Gloria rise 
like flames (and how canny Bach is about 
knowing just when to bring in the 
trumpets and drums which we haven't 
heard since the end of Fecit potentiam.) 
And to end, he gives us the magnificent 
literalmindedness of his reading of "as 
it was in the beginning." 

— Michael Steinberg 



Chorus Magnificat anima mea Dominim, 

Aria et exsultavit spiritus meus in 

(soprano II) Deo salutari meo, 

Aria quia respexit humilitatem ancillae 

(soprano I) suae; ecce enim ex hoc beatam 

me dicent 



Chorus omnes generationes, 

Aria quia fecit mihi magna qui potens 

(bass) est et sanctum nomen ejus; 

Duet (alto et misericordia ejus a progenie 

and tenor) in progenies timentibus eum. 

Chorus Fecit potentiam in brachio suo; 

dispersit superbos mente cordis sui. 

Aria Deposuit potentes de sede et 

(tenor) exaltavit humiles. 

Aria Esurientes implevit bonis, 

(alto) et divites dimisit inanes. 

Trio Suscepit Israel puerum suum, 

(soprano I, recordatus misericordiae suae, 

soprano II, 
and alto) 

Chorus sicut locutus est ad patres 

nostros, Abraham et semini 
ejus in saecula. 

Chorus Gloria Patri, et Filio, et Spiritui 

Sancto: sicut erat in principio, et 
nunc, et semper, et in saecula 
saeculorum. Amen. 



My soul doth magnify the Lord, 

And my spirit hath rejoiced in 
God my Saviour. 

For He hath regarded the low estafe 
of His handmaiden: for, behold, from 
henceforth all generations shall call 
me blessed. 



For He that is mighty hath done to me 
great things; and holy is His name. 

And His mercy is on them that fear Him 
from generation to generation. 

He hath shewed strength with His arm; 
He hath scattered the proud in the 
imagination of His heart. 

He hath put down the mighty from their 
seats, and exalted them of low degree. 

He hath filled the hungry with good 
things; and the rich He hath sent 
empty away. 

He hath holpen His servant Israel, 
in remembrance of His mercy; 



As He spake to our fathers, 
to Abraham, and to his seed 
for ever. 

Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, 
and to the Holy Ghost: as it was in the 
beginning, is now, and ever shall be, 
world without end. Amen. 



15 



Notes 

Joseph Haydn 

Missa in angustiis 

Franz Joseph Haydn was born in Rohrau, 
Lower Austria, on 31 March or 1 April 1732 
and died in Vienna on 31 May 1809. He began 
this Mass on 10 July 1798 and completed it a 
little more than seven weeks later, on 31 August. 
He himself played the organ at the first' per- 
formance at Eisenstadt on 1 5 September. 

Angustiis means narrow or straitened 
places. Haydn gave his D minor Mass of 
1798 that title when he entered it into 
the catalogue he kept of his own works 
(the autograph manuscript itself simply 
says Missa) and he referred to the anxi- 
eties of war that possessed Europe dur- 
ing that summer. Napoleon had escaped 
the British naval blockade of the harbor 
at Toulon and was heading for Egypt. 
Through all of July, Admiral Nelson 
searched the Mediterranean for Napo- 
leon's troopships. On 1 August he found 
them in the Bay of Abukir, just north- 
east of Alexandria, and in a two-day 
battle completely smashed the French 
fleet, a rare victory in a long and dis- 
couraging war. The news traveled slow- 
ly, by ship to Sicily, then by courier 
through Italy and into Austria, reaching 
Vienna on the day of the first per- 
formance of the Missa down in Eisen- 
stadt, 30 or so miles below the capital. 
Nelson and the victory at Abukir then 
had nothing to do with the composition, 
but the timing was such, and the im- 
pression made by Nelson's relief for the 
time being of the angustiis, that from the 
beginning the work was known as the 
Nelson Mass. A few years later, Haydn 
was actually to meet Nelson. With Lady 
Hamilton — do you remember That Ham- 
ilton Woman, the 1941 film with Lau- 
rence Olivier and Vivien Leigh? — the 
great admiral visited the Esterhazys at 
Eisenstadt in September 1800. The 
Haydn scholar, H.C. Robbins Landon, 
tells the story: "Nelson, who was a shy 
Englishman, asked Haydn for some- 
thing to remember him by; and Haydn 
gave the Admiral his pen; whereupon 
Nelson took out his gold watch, which 

16 




Joseph Haydn 

he had carried at Abukir, and thrust it 
in Haydn's hand. But Lady Hamilton 
would not leave Haydn's side; Haydn 
wrote a Cantata for her, entitled Lines 
from the Battle of the Nile; and she sang 
several of Haydn's songs . . . The day 
after, [Nelson and Lady Hamilton] heard 
Haydn conduct his great Te Deum and 
the Nelson Mass in the Church on the 
Hill at Eisenstadt, which had witnessed 
the first performance of the Mass cele- 
brating (though neither Haydn nor Nel- 
son then knew it) the battle of Abukir." 
Haydn knew Eisenstadt well, for he 
had served the Esterhazy family, first as 
Vice-Capellmeister, then as Capell- 
meister, for nearly thirty years. In Sep- 
tember 1790, the 76-year old Prince 
Nicholas Esterhazy died, his son dis- 
banded the musical household, and 
Haydn, with a pension and the con- 
tinuance of his Capellmeister title as a 
sinecure, moved to Vienna, to begin at 
nearly sixty years of age a glorious 
career as a great public figure in Europe's 
musical life. In the 1790's, he wrote the 
twelve symphonies for London, four- 
teen great string quartets, a half dozen 
amazing trios and three extraordinary 
piano sonatas, some lovely songs to 
texts in English, and, after most of his 
instrumental music was finished, a 
series of choral works including six 
masses and the two oratorios, The 
Creation and The Seasons. (All that 
actually takes us as far as 1802.) The 
masses from this most wondrously ripe 
time in Haydn's life were written in 



consequence of his continuing associa- 
tion with the Esterhazy family, for it 
was the custom of Prince Nicholas II 
each year to commission a mass for 
performance on the Sunday following 
the name day of his wife, Maria 
Josepha Hermenegild, Princess 
Liechtenstein- Esterhazy. Beethoven's 
first Mass, the C major of 1807, was also 
written for such an occasion. 

Haydn had written a number of 
masses earlier on, and at least one of 
those, the Mariazell Mass of 1782, is 
outstanding. But these six late master- 
pieces are something else again. The 
Nelson comes third in the series, being 
preceded by the Missa in tempore belli 
(Mass in Time of War) and the Mass 
for St. Bernard of Offida (he and the 
Princess almost share a name day, and 
in 1796 they shared a dedicatory mass), 
and followed by the Theresa Mass, to be 
performed here on Sunday afternoon, 
17 July, the Creation Mass, and the Wind- 
band Mass. 

Within a basic convention, the masses 
are as vividly differentiated as the sym- 
phonies and quartets. The Nelson Mass 
stands out at once by being in a minor 
key, by the forceful "military" figures 
that begin in trumpets and drums in the 
second measures, by virtue of a pe- 







Admiral Lord Nelson (17 58-1 805) 



culiarly mordant sonority. Haydn's or- 
chestra here is curiously constituted: 
along with strings, plus bassoon to re- 
inforce the bass line, he has only trum- 
pets and drums, plus organ. But the 
organist — it was Haydn himself at the 
first performance — is not engaged 
merely in accompaniment discreetly 
filled out from figured bass; rather, he 
has much of the time a real obbligato 
part, and those high chords that ring 
through the first ten measures make a 
startling and brilliant effect. Later on, 
in the Qui tollis portion of the Gloria, 
the organ comments with touching 
pathos on the miserere nobis of the bass 
soloist and the chorus. Even during 
Haydn's lifetime, in 1803, Breitkopf and 
Hartel in Leipzig published a score of 
the Nelson Mass in which these special 
sounds were blotted out, that is, with 
the high trumpet parts taken down into 
a more reticent register, and with every- 
thing soloistic in the organ part re- 
assigned to flutes, oboes, and horns. 
It was only in 1962 that Haydn's original 
text was made available again in score 
and began to circulate in performance. 
The Leipzig editors were not alone in 
their doubts about Haydn's scoring: 
Count Zinzendorf, a Viennese musical 
amateur who went to hundreds of con- 
certs and operas each year and who 
seems to have disliked almost everything 
of Haydn's and Mozart's that he heard, 
put in his diary only that the Nelson Mass 
was "very noisy." 

The Kyrie is a highly concentrated 
movement with a virtuosic solo part for 
soprano. It is also the soprano who 
starts the Gloria, and now Haydn takes 
us into D major for the first time. He 
makes a big division at Qui tollis, where 
he brings the first slow music and opens 
up yet another harmonic region, B flat 
major. Quoniam tu solus sanctus returns to 
the opening music. It was the custom to 
end the Gloria with a fugue, and Haydn 
launches a joyously energetic one on in 
gloria Dei Patris. 

The Credo starts with an allegro still 
faster, and the texture is the most hard 
and linear yet: only octaves in the or- 
chestra's introductory measures, and 
the voices, as Haydn takes pains to mark 



17 



in his score, enter in canon, sopranos 
and tenors leading off, altos and basses 
singing the same music one bar later and 
a fifth lower. Slow music again for Et 
incarnatus est and in another new key, 
G major, and for the Et resurrexit the 
surprise of music in a minor key. The 
surprises abound, for instance, the static 
declamation in the voices of Et in spiritum 
sanctum with all the activity relegated to 
the orchestra (and the same thing, but 
in more remote harmonies, for the clause 
about the one holy Catholic and aposto- 
lic church), the entirely unexpected and 
touching first utterance of the words et 
vitam venturi, and the tersely energetic 
drive to the end. 

Where Haydn's listeners would have 
expected the Benedictus to be a rather 



gentle movement, they must have been 
astonished yet again by the minor key 
and by the inescapable and forceful 
trumpets and drums: the sense of angus- 
tiis in this music is overwhelming, and 
Haydn saves for the end a shock that 
stuns as much today as it evidently did 
in 1798. (Popular anecdote long had it 
that these trumpets and drums were 
added in response to the news from 
Abukir, but from the dates we see that 
that cannot be.) As is usual in Haydn's 
masses, a slow Agnus Dei leads into a 
quick Dona nobis pacem, though one more 
highly charged and more intricate in 
texture than is Haydn's norm. 

— M.S. 



Kyrie eleison. 
Christe eleison. 
Kyrie eleison. 



Lord, have mercy upon us. 
Christ, have mercy upon us. 
Lord, have mercy upon us. 



Gloria in excelsis Deo. 

Et in terra pax hominibus bonae voluntatis. 

Laudamus te, benedicimus te, adoramus te, 

glorificamus te; gratias agimus tibi propter 

magnam gloriam tuam; Domine Deus, Rex 

coelistis, Deus pater omnipotens. 

Domine fili unigenite Jesu Christe; Domine 

Deus agnus Dei, filius Patris; 

Qui tollis peccata mundi, miserere nobis. 

Qui tollis peccata mundi, suscipe depreca- 

tionem nostram. Qui sedes ad dexteram 

Patris miserere nobis; 

Quoniam tu solus sanctus, tu solus Dominus, 
to solus altissimus Jesu Christe, cum sancto 
spiritu in gloria Dei Patris. 
Amen. 



Glory be to God on high, 
and in earth peace to men of good will. 
We praise thee, we bless thee, we worship 
thee, we glorify thee, we give thanks to thee 
for thy great glory, O Lord God, heavenly 
King, God the Father Almighty. 
O Lord, the only- begotten Son Jesus Christ; 
O Lord God, Lamb of God, Son of the Father 
that takest away the sins of the world, have 
mercy upon us. Thou that takest away the 
sins of the world, receive our prayer. Thou 
that sittest at the right hand of God the 
Father, have mercy upon us. 

For thou only art holy; thou only art the Lord; 
thou only, O Christ, with the Holy Ghost, art 
most high in the glory of God the Father. 
Amen. 



Credo in unum Deum, Patrem omnipoten- 
tem, factorem coeli et terrae, visibilium 
omnium et invisibilium; 

Et in unum Dominum Jesu Christum, filium 
Dei unigenitum, et ex Patre natum ante 
omnia saecula, Deum de Deo, lumen de 
lumine, Deum verum de Deo vero, genitum, 
non factum, consubstantialem Patris per 
quern omnia facta sunt; 

Qui propter nos homines et propter nostram 
salutem descendit de coelis, 

Et incarnatus est de Spiritu Sancto ex Maria 
Virgine, et homo factus est; 



I believe in one God, the Father Almighty, 
Maker of heaven and earth, And of all things 
visible and invisible: 

And in one Lord Jesus Christ, the only- 
begotten Son of God, Begotten of his Father 
before all worlds, God of God, Light of Light, 
Very God of Very God, Begotten not made, 
Being of one substance with the Father, By 
whom all things were made: 

Who for us men, and for our salvation came 
down from heaven, 

And was incarnate by the Holy Ghost of the 
Virgin Mary, And was made man, 



18 



Crucifixus etiam pro nobis, sub Pontio Pilato 
passus et sepultus est; 

Et resurrexit tertia die secundam Scripturas; 
Et ascendit in coelum; sedet ad dexteram 
Patris, et iterum venturas est cum gloria 
judicare vivos et mortuos, cujus regni non 
erit finis; 

Et in Spiritum Sanctum, Dominum et vivi- 
ficantem, qui ex Patre Filioque procedit, qui 
cum Patre et Filio simul adoratur et conglori- 
ficatur, qui locutus est per Prophetas, et in 
unam sanctam catholicam et apostolicam 
ecclesiam, confiteor unum baptisma in remis- 
sionem peccatorum, et exspecto resurrec- 
tionem mortuorum. 

Et vitam venturi saeculi. Amen. 



And was crucified also for us under Pontius 
Pilate. He suffered and was buried, 

And the third day he rose again according to 
the Scriptures, And ascended into heaven, 
and sitteth on the right hand of the Father. 
And he shall come again with glory to judge 
both the quick and the dead: Whose kingdom 
shall have no end. 

And I believe in the Holy Ghost, The Lord 
and Giver of life, Who proceedeth from the 
Father and the Son, Who with the Father and 
Son together is worshipped and glorified, 
Who spake by the Prophets. And I believe one 
Catholic and Apostolic Church. I acknowledge 
one Baptism for the remission of sins. And I 
look for the Resurrection of the dead, 

And the life of the world to come. Amen. 



Sanctus, sanctus, sanctus, Donimus Deus 

Sabaoth. 

Pleni sunt coeli et terra gloria tua; 

Osanna in excelsis. 

Benedictus qui venit in nomine Domini. 

Osanna in excelsis. 



Holy, holy, holy, Lord God of hosts, 
heaven and earth are full of thy glory. 
Hosanna in the highest. 

Blessed is he that cometh in the name of the 
Lord. Hosanna in the highest. 



Agnus Dei, qui tollis peccata mundi, miserere 

nobis. 

Agnus Dei, qui tollis peccata mundi, dona 

nobis pacem. 



O Lamb of God, who takest away the sins of 
the world, have mercy upon us. 
O Lamb of God, who takest away the sins of 
the world, give us peace. 




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20 




BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

Seiji Ozawa, Music Director 
Colin Davis, Principal Guest Conductor 
Joseph Silverstein, Assistant Conductor 
Tanglewood 1977 

Saturday, 9 July at 8:30 

PINCHAS ZUKERMAN, conductor and soloist 



BACH Brandenburg Concerto No. 1 in F, BWV 1046 
[Allegro] 
Adagio 
Allegro 
Menuet — Trio — Menuet — Polonaise — Menuet — Trio — Menuet 

CHARLES KAVALOVSKI, PETER GORDON, horns 
RALPH GOMBERG, LAURENCE THORSTENBERG, 
STUART DUNKEL, oboes 
SHERMAN WALT, bassoon 
PINCHAS ZUKERMAN, violin 

BACH Violin Concerto in E, BWV 1042 
Allegro 
Adagio 
Allegro assai 
PINCHAS ZUKERMAN, violin 

INTERMISSION 

BACH Brandenburg Concerto No. 3 in G, BWV 1048 
[Allegro] 
Allegro 

PINCHAS ZUKERMAN, JOSEPH SILVERSTEIN, 

EMANUEL BOROK, violins 

BURTON FINE, REUBEN GREEN, EUGENE LEHNER, violas 

JULES ESKIN, MARTIN HOHERMAN, 

JEROME PATTERSON, cellos 

BACH Brandenburg Concerto No. 5 in D, BWV 1050 
Allegro 
Affettuoso 
Allegro 

DORIOT ANTHONY DWYER, flute 
PINCHAS ZUKERMAN, violin 
JOHN GIBBONS, harpsichord 



Seiji Ozawa and the Boston Symphony Orchestra 

record exclusively for Deutsche Grammophon. 

Baldwin piano 

The harpsichord used in this evening's performance was built by Carl Fudge. 



21 



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knowledgeable than anyone else 
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knowledge!' 

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criticize the critics* that's what they said 
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22 





BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

Seiji Ozawa, Music Director 

Colin Davis, Principal Guest Conductor 
Joseph Silverstein, Assistant Conductor 
Tanglewood 1977 

Sunday, 10 July at 2:30 

PINCHAS ZUKERMAN, conductor and soloist 



BACH Brandenburg Concerto No. 4 in G, BWV 1049 
Allegro 
Andante 
Presto 

PINCHAS ZUKERMAN, violin 

DORIOT ANTHONY DWYER, JAMES PAPPOUTSAKIS, flutes 

BACH Violin Concerto in A minor, BWV 1041 
[Allegro] 
Andante 
Allegro assai 

PINCHAS ZUKERMAN, violin 

INTERMISSION 

BACH Brandenburg Concerto No. 6 in B flat, BWV 1051 
[Allegro] 

Adagio, ma non tanto 
Allegro 

PINCHAS ZUKERMAN, BURTON FINE, violas 
JULES ESKIN, MARTIN HOHERMAN, 
JEROME PATTERSON, cellos 

BACH Brandenburg Concerto No. 2 in F, BWV 1047 
[Allegro] 
Andante 
Allegro assai 

ARMANDO GHITALLA, trumpet 
DORIOT ANTHONY DWYER, flute 
RALPH GOMBERG, oboe 
PINCHAS ZUKERMAN, violin 



Seiji Ozawa and the Boston Symphony Orchesta 

record exclusively for Deutsche Grammophon. 

Baldwin piano 

The harpsichord used in this afternoon's performance was built by Carl Fudge. 



23 




wrod 



does not end on Sunday. It's only the beginning. 



This Week At The 
Berkshire Music Center: 



Monday, July 11 at 8:30 pm: 

Leonard Bernstein conducts the Berkshire Music Center Orchestra in a 
'concert synthesis' of Wagner's Tristan and Isolde, with tenor James King 
and soprano Ingrid Bjoner. 



Thursday, July 14 at 8:30 pm: 

Boston University Chamber Music concert. 

Saturday, July 16 at 2:30 pm: 

Vocal Music recital 



These events are open to the public by making a contribution, $2.00 
minimum, to the Berkshire Music Center at the main gate, or by becoming 
a Friend of Music at Tanglewood. 



24 



Notes 



Johann Sebastian Bach 

The six Brandenburg Concertos 
and the concertos for solo violin 

Johann Sebastian Bach was born on 21 March 
1685 in Eisenach and died in Leipzig on 28 July 
1750. He wrote these concertos around 1720. 
In these performances, the accompaniments are 
played by John Gibbons, harpsichord, Jules 
Eskin, cello, and William Rhein, bass. 

To his Royal Highness My Lord Cretien 
Louis, Margrave of Brandenbourg 
&c, &c, &c 
Your Royal Highness, 

As I had a couple of years ago the pleasuring 
of appearing before Your Royal Highness, by 
virtue of Your Highness 's commands, and as 1 
noticed then that Your Highness took some 
pleasure in the small talents which Heaven has 
given me for Music, and as in taking leave 
of Your Royal Highness, Your Highness deigned 
to honor me with the command to send Your 
Highness some pieces of my Composition: 1 have 
then, in accordance with Your Highness's most 
gracious orders, taken the liberty of rendering my 
most humble duty to Your Royal Highness with 
the present Concertos, which 1 have adapted to 
several instruments; begging Your Highness 
most humbly not to judge their imperfection with 
the rigour of that fine and delicate taste which 
the whole world knows Your Highness has for 
musical pieces; but rather to infer from them 
the benign Consideration to the profound respect 
and the most humble obedience which 1 try to 
show Your Highness therewith. For the rest, 
Sire, 1 beg Your Royal Highness's gracious 
favour toward me, and to be assured that nothing 
is so close to my heart as the wish that I may be 
employed on occasions more worthy of Your 
Royal Highness and of Your Highness's 
service — 1, who without an equal in zeal, am, 

Sire, Your Royal Highness's most humble and 
obedient servant 

Jean Sebastien Bach 
Cothen, 24 March 1721 

Bach's years as Capellmeister to His 
Most Serene Highness the Reigning 
Prince of Anhalt- Cothen present some 
puzzles to students of his music. Bach 
was at Cothen from 1717 until 1723, the 
year of his removal to Leipzig, where he 



took charge of the music at the churches 
of Saints Thomas and Nicholas. Later, 
Bach was to say that he intended to 
spend the rest of his life at Cothen, an 
all but invisible principality about 90 
miles southwest of Berlin, but that in 
December 1721 his Serenissimus had mar- 
ried, whereupon "the musical interests 
of the said Prince had become somewhat 
lukewarm, especially as the new Princess 
seemed to be alien to the muses." The 
obvious thing, then, has been to date 
Bach's discontent with Cothen from 
early in 1722; yet his restlessness seems 
to go back rather longer. Perhaps it 
began with the shock of his wife's sud- 
den death in July 1720. We know that 
later that year he made a serious effort 
to become organist at St. James's, Ham- 
burg, and the Brandenburg dedication 
may also suggest he was looking for 
a job. 

The "couple of years" to which Bach 
refers in his dedicatory letter would take 
us back to 1719, and in fact on 1 March 
of that year, Bach was paid 130 Thaler 
to cover the expenses of a journey to 
Berlin where he was to collect a newly 
built harpsichord. That presumably was 
when Bach met the Margrave of Bran- 
denburg and played for him (Branden- 
burg is the Prussian province immedi- 
ately to the north of Berlin: its capital 
was Potsdam). For all the extravagance 
of the language, Bach's remarks about 
the Margrave's "fine and delicate taste" 
have some foundation in truth. We 
learn from Bach's biographer, Philipp 
Spitta, that the Margrave was "especial- 
ly devoted to music, over and above the 
ordinary aristocratic dabbling" and that 
he spent a lot of money on it. When he 
died in 1734, his large music library was 
sold, Bach's manuscript being included 
as a part of a large and very cheap job 
lot. It bears no traces of use. Perhaps 
the Brandenburg orchestral resources 
were reduced between 1719 and 1721; 
perhaps Bach had overestimated them 
in the first place. Unlikely as it seems 
from the dedication (and Spitta's re- 
marks), it could simply have been lack of 
appreciation, and we know nothing of 
any payment, gift, or acknowledgement 
made to the composer. 



25 



The presentation is as to a connois- 
seur, but Bach did not write the con- 
certos especially for Brandenburg. 
Rather, he picked from his Cothen rep- 
ertory, making some revisions while he 
was at it, and as usual when assembling 
a collection, he strove to make its mem- 
bers as diverse as possible. Musicians 
have always been struck by the wonder- 
ful timbral variety of the Brandenburgs. 
No doubt Bach wishes to impress his 
prospective patron with the coloristic 
possibilities a composer on his plane of 
imagination and technique could draw 
from a band of relatively modest num- 
bers. Variety for the sake of charm and 
entertainment was surely in the fore- 
front of Bach's mind, but as he worked, 
he must have become fascinated as well 
with all the compositional possibilities 
that his varied instrumentations 
suggested. 

The ingenious Vivaldi, from whom 
Bach learned so much about concerto 
writing and whom he surpassed so as to 
make their two names incommensur- 
able, often wrote concertos with color- 
ful instrumental combinations. These 
works can be striking indeed, and not 
least for the flair with which their 
idiomatic solos are fashioned. But a 
comparison of one of Vivaldi's concertos 
for the orchestra at Dresden with the 
first Brandenburg, having an almost 
identical orchestration, reveals an as- 
tonishing difference in concept. An oboe, 
a violin, a pair of horns, stimulate Vival- 
di's imagination, and he invents for each 
something that is apt and grateful. But 
solos aside, the instrumentation hardly 
matters. It is decorative, incidental to 
the musical thought, while every note of 
Bach's concerto is a richly responsive 
exploitation of all the textural contrasts 
his chosen ensemble can provide. 

At a time when many composers drew 
music, as it were, from the nature of 
specific instruments, Bach was the first 
to respond in that way to the orchestra 
as such. Again and again in the Bran- 
denburgs, he defines and articulates the 
succession of musical events by textural- 
timbral means: as music, it is, so to 
speak, "about" its textures, its color, its 
instrumentation. 



Concerto No. 1 in F for "two Hunting Horns, 
three oboes, and Bassoon, Solo Violino Piccolo, 
two Violins, one Viola and Violoncello, with 
Figured Bass." 

According to the German scholar, 
Heinrich Besseler, who has made some 
bold conjectures for a Cothen chron- 
ology, this was the third of the Branden- 
burgs to be composed: for its first ver- 
sion, in which it lacks the Menuet, he 
assigns the date of Summer 1718*. It is 
the most complex of the set in sound 
and form. The Violino Piccolo is tuned a 
minor third higher than an ordinary 
violin, thus sounding shriller and pos- 
sessing its own peculiar repertory of 
multiple stops. It is the primary solo 
instrument. One oboe joins it in duet 
for the Adagio, but in general the six 
wind players together form something 
like a secondary solo group. In the 
Adagio, the bass entrance of the melody 
leads to a famous harmonic collision, 
the most emphatic example of Bach's 
constant and expressive play with the 
magic of "false relations." 

The orchestral possibilities frequently 
lead Bach into a nine -layered polyphony. 
Nowhere in the Brandenburgs is Bach's 
concern with textures more explicitly 
set forth than in the Adagio's last mea- 
sures with their separation on succes- 
sive beats into bass, oboes, and un- 
supported high strings. The concerto 
finds an unexpected formal extension in 
the Menuet with its three contrasting 
interludes: a true Trio for oboes and 
bassoon, a Polonaise for strings only 
and in quicker tempo, and then, in a 
new meter, a virtuosic passage for the 
two horns playing against all the oboes 
in unison. Thus the work crystallizes 
in this final divertissment those fastidi- 
ously structured timbral sequences that 
are its most basic and serious compo- 
sitional concern. 

Concerto in E major for solo violin, with 
violins, violas, and figured bass. 

Here we have one of Bach's Cothen 
concertos that did not get selected for 
the package to Potsdam. Written about 

*A11 chronological references to the Branden- 
burg Concertos hereafter are according 
to Besseler. 



26 



1720, it also exists in a transcription for 
solo harpsichord with strings, trans- 
posed down to D major. The two Al- 
legros are lighter than most of Bach's, 
especially the all but waltzing final ron- 
do. Between them comes a deeply serious 
Adagio over one of Bach's characteristic 
roaming ostinato basses, and it reaches 
extraordinary heights of pathos in the 
rhetorical declamation of the violin solo. 

Concerto No. 3 in G for "three Violins, 
three violas, and three Violoncelli with Bass 
for the Harpsichord." 

If Brandenburg No. 1 has a move- 
ment too many, this, the second to be 
written, has one too few. Between the 
two Allegros there is only a pair of 
chords marked Adagio. We do not know 
what Bach intended, but one solution is 
to have a decorative improvisation lead 
to the cadence Bach has provided.* This 
concerto has no players specifically and 
constantly designated as soloists, but 
Bach can arrange his nine voices into 
more different combinations than any 
orthodox solo group could allow. All 
the players at some point share the 
soloistic burden and all contribute to the 
tutti or ripieno in what is perhaps the 
most elaborately inventive of the Bran- 
denburgs. At Cothen, this concerto 
would have been performed by eleven 
players, the three-times-three soloists 
plus bass and harpsichord. In this per- 
formance it will be played by all the 
strings present, with the nine named 
players emerging for those passages 
most inescapably soloistic. 

Concerto No. 5 in D for "one Transverse 
Flute, one principal Violin, one Violin and 
one Viola in the orchestra, Violoncello, Bass, 
and Solo Harpsichord." 

Bach himself must have played this 
concerto on the harpsichord he fetched 
from Berlin in 1719. It was the last of 
the set to be composed, probably late in 
1720. It is the first known concerto to 
feature a keyboard solo. The harpsi- 

*A less convincing solution, though it has had 
advocates as eminent — and as diverse — as 
Serge Koussevitzky, Benjamin Britten, Ye- 
hudi Menuhin, Thruston Dart, and Neville 
Marriner, is to borrow a slow movement 
from elsewhere in Bach and to interpolate 
it here. 




*»•••■»•••%•■• > 



V<jy OJ'Jnth 

Castle and park at Cothen where the Brandenburg 
Concertos were written. 

chord's new dominance is asserted by 
the brilliant 65-bar cadenza at the end 
of the first movement, and no vague 
rhapsody this: there is not a more 
soundly built coda in the literature. 
During the Affettuoso the orchestra is 
silent, but the concerto contrast con- 
tinues: sometimes the harpsichord is 
soloistic (usually in duet with either 
flute or violin), but at the beginning and 
end, and three times between, it provides 
a quasi-tutti effect with its figured bass 
accompaniments. In performance at 
Cothen, the second violinist would have 
taken over the viola stand where Bach 
normally played, hence no second violin 
part in this piece. 

Concerto No. 4 in G for "Principal Violin, 
two Recorders, two Violins, one Viola and Bass 
in the Orchestra, Violoncello, and Figured Bass." 

Last but one to be composed, this 
concerto has interesting solo- tutti bal- 
ances. In the first movement the violin 
dominates and the recorders (whose 
parts are played on flutes in this per- 
formance) are secondary. In the An- 
dante the recorders dominate, while the 
violin provides their bass in the vigorous 
dialogue with full orchestra, used in 
only this one of the Brandenburg "slow" 
movements. The orchestra then plays 
its largest role in the quick fugal finale, 
but no violinist negotiating Bach's scales 
at about a dozen notes per second will 
feel that Bach has neglected the soloists. 

Concerto in A minor for solo violin, with 
violins, violas, and figured bass. 

Another concerto that didn't make it 
to Brandenburg. As in the other Violin 
Concerto, two fast movements enclose 
an expressive slow movement over a 
migrating ostinato bass. No stigma at- 



27 



taches to the exclusion of the two solo 
cbncertos from the Brandenburg col- 
lection: they are members of a 
different family. 

Concerto No. 6 in B flat for "two Violas, two 
Violas da Gamba, Violoncello, Bass, and 
Harpsichord." 

This concerto is the earliest of the set 
(1717?). The new sound here is actually 
an old one, that of the gambas — one. of 
them to be played by the "Serenissimus" — 
contrasted here with their modern re- 
placement, the violoncello. (In this per- 
formance, however, both viola da gamba 
parts are played on the cello.) The Adagio 
of this work is an impassioned vocal 
duet like the Adagio in No. 1, its finale a 
Gigue as in No. 5. But how different the 
Adagios and gigues are, how varied 
Bach is even when the same labels must 
serve. The first movement's closely 
woven canon between the two violas is 
one of Bach's most renowned lours deforce. 

Concerto No. 1 in F for "one Trumpet, one 
Flute, one Oboe, one Violin, all solo, and two 



Violins, one Viola and Bass in the Orchestra 
with Violoncello and Bass for the Harpsichord." 
In the two Brandenburgs for strings 
alone, Bach sets himself the challenge of 
creating contrast where none explicitly 
exists. The present concerto, composed 
early in 1719 as the fourth of the set, 
is the opposite of these, for here Bach 
assumes the task of intergrating his 
most heterogeneous consort. No wonder 
that the dynamics are marked in un- 
precedented detail. The Andante is for 
the three gentler- voiced soloists with 
figured bass only. Here is another beau- 
tifully made passage that attests to 
Bach's fastidious concern with texture 
as structure: the pathetic three -note 
sighs are at their last appearances so 
consistently voiced as to be in fact serial 
in their instrumentation. What is best 
remembered about this concerto is the 
trumpet part, the zenith of the whole 
clarino tradition, and on the right day 
the most spectacular sound in all of 
Baroque music. 

— Michael Steinberg 




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29 



Guest Artists 



Leonard Bernstein 

Leonard Bernstein has been associa- 
ted with Boston and the Boston Sym- 
phony throughout his life. Born in 
Lawrence, Massachusetts, he graduated 
from Harvard in 1939, after which he 
continued his studies at the Curtis 
Institute with Fritz Reiner, Isabelle 
Vengerova, and Randall Thompson. 
He was also at the Berkshire Music 
Center at Tanglewood for several 
summers as a student and assistant to 
Serge Koussevitzky. 

Music Director of the New York Phil- 
harmonic from 1958 to 1969, and 
Laureate Conductor in the years since, 
Mr. Bernstein has received wide acclaim 
as conductor, composer, pianist, teacher, 
lecturer, and author. 

Among Mr. Bernstein's compositions 
are the Jeremiah Symphony, the Age of 
Anxiety Symphony, the Serenade for 
Violin, Strings, and Percussion, the Kad- 
dish Symphony, the Chichester Psalms for 
chorus and orchestra; the ballets Fancy 
Free and Facsimile; the one -act opera 
Trouble in Tahiti; and the score for the 
film On The Waterfront. For the Broadway 
theater he has contributed the scores 
to On The Town, Wonderful Town, 
Candide, and West Side Story. His recent 
compositions are Mass, which opened 
the John F. Kennedy Center for the 
Performing Arts in Washington, D.C. 
and Dyhbuk, a ballet given its world 
premiere by the New York City Ballet. 

The author of the books The 
Joy of Music, Leonard Bernstein's Young 
People's Concerts and The Infinitive Variety 
of Music, Mr. Bernstein has been the 
Charles Eliot Norton Professor of Poetry 
at Harvard University, and his six lectures, 
entitled The Unanswered Question were 
shown nation wide on PBS Television 
last year. The lectures have been pub- 
lished by Harvard University Press, and 
are available on Columbia Records. 

A frequent participant in Public 
Television's Great Performances series, 
Mr. Bernstein recently received 
an Emmy Award for the Outstanding 

30 




Classical Music Program of the 1975-76 
season. He will next be seen on national 
PBS stations 13 July 1977 conducting a 
performance of Liszt's Faust Symphony 
with the Boston Symphony. 

Benita Valente 

California born soprano Benita Va- 
lente attended the Curtis Institute and 
studied voice with Margaret Harshaw. 
She has also worked with Martial 
Singher and the late Lotte Lehmann. 
She has performed with the New York 
Philharmonic, the Boston Symphony, 
the Philadelphia Orchestra, the Minne- 
sota Orchestra, and the Detroit Sym- 







phony. In 1973 she made her debut at 
the Metropolitan Opera as Pamina in 
The Magic Flute. She has since performed 
there as Nannetta in Falstaff and Susanna 
in The Marriage of Figaro. Miss Valente 
has also performed with the Opera 
Company of Boston, the Opera Society 
of Washington, the Houston Opera, the 
Ottawa Opera, and the Caramoor and 
Wolf Trap Farm Festivals. She has per- 
formed abroad in Monteverdi's Orfeo 
with the Netherlands Opera, in Purcell's 
Fairy Queen in Vienna as well as in per- 
formances with the Frankfurt Opera, 
the Strasbourg Opera, and the Paris 
Radio Orchestra. Some of her summer 
festival appearances have been at the 
Cincinnati May Festival, Tanglewood, 
Robin Hood Dell, Ravinia, Casal's Cen- 
tenary in Mexico, and four consecutive 
seasons in Lincoln Center's Mostly 
Mozart Festival. Her most recent ap- 
pearance with the BSO was last 
April in performances of Beethoven's 
Mass in C major conducted by 
Colin Davis. 

Gwendolyn Killebrew 

Born into a musical family, Gwendo- 
lyn Killebrew began piano lessons when 
she was five. She later studied organ 
and French horn and participated in 
orchestra, band and choral music in high 
school. In 1963, while studying at 
Temple University, she was chosen to 
be a soloist with the Philadelphia Or- 




chestra conducted by Pablo Casals in his 
oratorio El Pesebre. She studied with 
Hans Heinz at the Julliard and in 1966 
won First Prize in the Belgian Inter- 
national Vocal Competition. She has 
been artist-in-residence at the Dart- 
mouth Congregation of the Arts, where 
she performed contemporary works with 
composers Hans Werner Henze, Frank 
Martin and Aaron Copland. 

She is active in both concert and 
opera, and has sung at the world's great 
music centers and festivals. Her many 
orchestral appearances have included 
the New York Philharmonic, Seattle 
Symphony, Dallas Symphony, Pitts- 
burgh Symphony, Los Angeles Phil- 
harmonic, St. Louis Symphony, Mil- 
waukee Symphony, as well as the Bos- 
ton Symphony Orchestra. 

Daniel Collins 

Daniel Collins was raised in Amherst, 
Massachusetts and received his musical 
training at the New England Conser- 
vatory from which he holds a master's 
degree. He is also a charter member of 
the Ensemble for Early Music. In addition 
to his participation in Renaissance 
masques and medieval dramas, Daniel 
Collins sings many of the early operas. 
He received enthusiastic reviews for his 
Ottone in Monteverdi's L'incoronazione di 
Poppea at his La Scala debut in 1975; for 
Idraspe in Cavalli's L'Erismena, which he 
performed all over Holland and in Brus- 




31 



sels; for Joad in Handel's Athalia; for 
Apollo in the Pro Musica's production 
of Marco da Gagliano's La Dafne; and for 
Oberon in Benjamin Britten's A Mid- 
summer Night's Dream. In these roles he 
appeared at the Netherlands Opera, the 
Theatre Royal de la Monnaie in Brussels, 
the festivals of Holland, Corfu, and Spo- 
leto, at the Stamford University Summer 
Festival, at the New England Conser- 
vatory of Music, the Eastman School of 
Music, and at the University of Pitts- 
burgh. In concert, Mr. Collins has ap- 
peared with a number of choral organi- 
zations including the Handel and Haydn 
Society, the Cambridge Society for Early 
Music, the Abbey Singers, Clarion Con- 
certs and Musica Sacra. He also toured 



for five years with the New York Pro 
Musica before the group disbanded in 
1974. Collins has recorded for Decca, 
Turnabout, and the Musical Heritage 
Society. 

Kenneth Riegel 

A native of Pennsylvania, Kenneth 
Riegel first came to the attention of the 
music world with his performance of 
the title role in the New York premiere 
of Henze's The Young Lord. Mr. Riegel 
made his Metropolitan Opera debut in 
1973 in the premiere performances of 
Les Troyens by Berlioz under the direction 
of Rafael Kubelik, and has since been 
heard with the Met in their productions 




□ 



llJUIal 



DC 



4^2^.0== 




frtfi 




Twin Fires Arcade 

12 unique and exciting shops dealing in 

Antiques 

to include 

Prized Acquisitions from London 

Early Welsh, Georgian & Victorian unfinished pine furniture 
and numerous, assorted & interesting accent and decorator 

pieces from England 

The Arcade is a re-creation of mid-1 800's shops and "stalls" of Camden Passage, Islington, 

London, England, and is located indoors in a recently refurbished barn on the former 

Walter Pritchard Eaton estate at the junction of Under Mountain Road (Rt. 41) and 

Berkshire School Road - Sheffield, Massachusetts 

413-229-8307 

From N.Y.Taconic to Route 23, turn right (6 miles) to Route 41, turn right 3 miles to Berkshire School Rd. 

in Sheffield, turn left 1 block on left is Barn. 

From Conn. Route 7 into Sheffield, turn left into Berkshire School Rd. to end of road — on right is 

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From Mass. (Tangiewood) Route 7 into Sheffield, turn right on Berkshire School Rd. to end of road — on 

right is Barn. 




32 




of Wozzeck, Meistersinger, and Fidelio. Dur- 
ing the 1976-77 season he sang the role 
of Tamino in Magic Flute, and Narraboth 
in Solotne. Recent debuts for Mr. Riegel 
include Salzburg Festival performances, 
the Flanders Festival Dream of Gerontius, 
and the Tulsa Opera production of Mas- 
senet's Manon, and he appeared in a 
film of Mahler's Eighth with Leonard 
Bernstein. He has also performed in that 
piece with the New York Philharmonic 
and at the Ravinia Festival. Mr. Riegel 
has recorded Haydn's Wind- band Mass 
with Leonard Bernstein and the New 
York Philharmonic, and Cari Orff's Car- 
mina Burana with Michael Tilson Thomas 
and the Cleveland Orchestra for Co- 
lumbia Records. He appeared recently 
at the Mahler Festival with the New 
York Philharmonic under the direction 
of Pierre Boulez. 

John Cheek 

John Cheek is a native of North Caro- 
lina and received his Bachelor of Music 
degree from the North Carolina School 
of Arts. He has also earned the Diploma 
of Merit at the Accademia Musicale Chi- 
giana under the tutelage of Gino Bechi. 
Mr. Cheek has been a soloist with 
many of this country's major op- 
eratic and symphonic organizations and 
has appeared as soloist with the U.S. 
Army Chorus. He has performed with 




the Buffalo Philharmonic as Alfonso in 
Cos) fan tutte conducted by Michael Tilson 
Thomas, in Handel's Messiah with the 
National Symphony, Brahms' Requiem in 
Carnegie Hall with the Collegiate 
Chorale, as well as in the Michigan 
Opera production of Barber of Seville, and 
Floyd's Bilby's Doll with the Omaha 
Opera. Mr. Cheek appeared at the Wolf 
Trap Festival on three separate occasions 
last summer and during this past season 
has performed with the Miami Opera 
in Macbeth, appeared in Don Giovanni with 
the Omaha Opera and in Bach's St. John 
Passion with the Minnesota Orchestra 
conducted by Raymond Leppard. 



Pinchas Zukerman 

Pinchas Zukerman was born in Israel 
in 1948. He began his violin studies 
with his father at the age of seven. The 
next year he entered the Israel Con- 
servatory and the Academy of Music 
in Tel Aviv, where he studied with Ilona 
Feher. Shortly thereafter, he received a 
scholarship from the American-Israel 
Cultural Foundation. In 1961 at the 
recommendation of Isaac Stern and 
Pablo Casals, he sought advanced studies 
in the United States. With the Founda- 
tion's continued assistance, he entered 
Juilliard and studied with Ivan Galamian. 
He later received scholarships from Juil- 



33 




Hard and the Helena Rubinstein 
Foundation. 

In 1967 he entered and won the 
twenty-fifth Leventritt International 
Competition. Two years later he made 
his debut with Leonard Bernstein and 
the New York Philharmonic. Zukerman 
has devoted much time to chamber 
music. He has performed with violinist 
Isaac Stern and pianist Daniel Baren- 
boim as well as with his flutist 
wife, Eugenia. He is also a violist 
and conductor. 

Zukerman has recorded for Angel, 
Columbia, and Deutsche Grammophon 
lables. Two of his most recent Columbia 
releases are the complete Brahms violin- 
viola sonatas with Daniel Barenboim 
and Elgar's Violin Concerto with the 
London Philharmonic conducted by 
Mr. Barenboim. 

Pinchas and Eugenia Zukerman live in 
New York City with their daughters, 
Arianna, aged 4, and Natalia, aged one 
and a half. 




ticipated at the Festival of Two Worlds 
at Spoleto, Italy, for three summers. In 
February 1976 Mrs. Zukerman per- 
formed as a guest artist with Jean- 
Pierre Rampal and the Chamber Music 
Society of Lincoln Center. In March of 
the same year she, her husband, violin- 
ist Pinchas Zukerman, and Rampal per- 
formed in Carnegie Hall. Mrs. Zuker- 
man has toured in Europe with the 
English Chamber Orchestra, conducted 
by Mr. Zukerman, and she has per- 
formed in Germany with the Hamburg 
Bach Solisten and in the United States 
with the St. Paul Chamber Ensemble. 
Because of her interest in chamber music, 
Eugenia Zukerman has formed a trio 
with pianist Jerome Lowenthal and cellist 
Jeffrey Solow, and also a partnership 
with guitarist Carlos Bonell. She and 
Bonell will tour throughout the United 
States in 1977-78. Eugenia and Pinchas 
Zukerman live in New York City with 
their daugherts, Arianna, born in 1972, 
and Natalia, born in 1975. 



Eugenia Zukerman 

Eugenia Zukerman was born in Cam- 
bridge, Massachusetts. She attended the 
Juilliard School where she studied with 
Julius Baker. In March 1971 she made 
her formal debut at Town Hall in New 
York City. Since then she has per- 
formed with the Los Angeles Phil- 
harmonic, the Royal Philharmonic, the 
English Chamber Orchestra, the Israel 
Chamber Orchestra, and she has par- 



John Gibbons 

A graduate of the New England Con- 
servatory of Music and a student of 
Gustav Leonhardt, John Gibbons has 
been a frequent performer with the 
Boston Symphony Orchestra. He is an 
active recitalist with both harpsichord 
and fortepiano, and is most familiar to 
Boston audiences as a featured per- 
former in the Early Music Series of the 



34 



Museum of Fine Arts, where he is Harp- 
sichordist to the Collection of Early 
Musical Instruments. He is participating 
this summer in the music festivals at 
Castle Hill and Monadnock, and recital 
appearances next year include the 
Smithsonian Institution in Washington. 
Mr. Gibbons has recorded an album of 
harpsichord music by Jacques Duphly 
and C.P.E. Bach for Cambridge Records. 



|*«UMH*tf 





Allan Albert, Artistic Director 

BERKSHIRE PLAYHOUSE 

July 6-1 7 

WILLIAM ATHERTON 
GILDARADNER 
Dunning & Abbott's CHRIS SARANDON 
BROADWAY JILL HAWORTH 



Saul Bellow's July 20-31 
THE LAST ANALYSIS RON LEIBMAN 



Rodgers & Hart's Aug. 3-14 
I MARRIED AN ANGEL PHYLLIS NEWMAN 



William Inge's Aug. 1 7-28 
COME BACK, DANA ANDREWS 
LITTLE SHEBA ESTELLE PARSONS 



UNICORN THEATRE, 

Three New Musicals 

July 7-24 July 26-August 1 4 
THE WHALE SHOW A FABLE 

by Jean-Claude van Italie 
August 16-28 and Richard Peaslee 
THE CASINO 



PROPOSITION THEATRE 

July 8-August 28 
THE PROPOSITION 



Performance Times for the Playhouse 

Evgs. Wed.. Thurs.. Fri. 8 30 p m.: Sat. 9 p.m.: Sun. 7 p.m. 

Mats. Thurs. 2 p.m.; Sat. 5 p.m.: Sun 3 p.m. 

Prices for the Playhouse 

Broadway, The Last Analysis, Come Back, Little Sheba 

Fri. & Sat. (9 p.m. perf. only) $8.95. 7.50: 
All other perfs. $7.95.6.50 
I Married An Angel 

Fri. & Sat. (9 p.m. pert only) $9 95 8 50: 

All other perfs. $8.95, 7.50 

MAIL ORDERS FILLED PROMPTLY 1 

Berkshire Theatre Festival, Stockbndge Mass 

01262 Enclose stamped self-addressed envelope 

RESERVE BY PHONE 1 Call 413 • 298-5536 or 298-4800 



Jules Eskin 

Jules Eskin, Principal Cello of the 
Boston Symphony Orchestra, came to 
the Orchestra from Cleveland where 
for three years he was principal cello 
of that city's orchestra. A native Phila- 
delphian, he studied at the Curtis In- 
stitute, and his teachers have included 
Gregor Piatigorsky, Leonard Rose and 
Janos Starker. Winner of the 1954 
Naumburg Foundation Award, he made 
his Town Hall debut that same year. A 
participant for many years in the Casals 
and Marlboro Festivals, he is a teacher at 
the New England Conservatory and the 
Berkshire Music Center at Tanglewood. 
He is also a member of the Boston 
Symphony Chamber Players. 



35 



Tanglewood Festival Chorus 

The Tanglewood Festival Chorus was 
formed under the joint auspices of the 
Berkshire Music Center and Boston 
University in 1970. The director since 
its foundation, John Oliver, is director 
of choral and vocal activities for Tangle- 
wood, a member of the MIT faculty 
and director of the MIT Choral Society. 
The Festival Chorus made its debut at 
Symphony Hall in a 1970 performance 
of Beethoven's Ninth Symphony, and 
has since taken part in concert directed 
by William Steinberg, Seiji Ozawa, Eu- 
gene Ormartdy, Colin Davis, Arthur 
Fiedler, and Michael Tilson Thomas. 
Members of the chorus come from the 
Greater Boston area and from all walks 
of life, and they rehearse throughout 
the year. The Chorus's first appearance 
on records, in the Boston Symphony's 
Damnation of Faust, conducted by Seiji 
Ozawa, was nominated for a Grammy 




as the best choral recording of the 
year. Their most recent appearance with 
the BSO was in April, when they 
sang Roger Session's When Lilacs 
Last in the Dooryard Bloom'd under 
Seiji Ozawa's direction. 



Sopranos 

Margaret Aquino 
Cynthia Armstrong 
Deborah London Berg 
Marie-Christine Casey 
Susan Chapman 
Margo Connor 
Susan R. Cook 
Lou Ann David 
Kathrin Davidovich 
Rebecca Flewelling 
Yvonne Frazier 
Marilyn L. Haskel 
Alice Honner 
Beth Howard 
Frances Kadinoff 
Carole Stevenson Kane 
Vivian LaMorder 
Barbara Levy 
Joyce Lucia 

Virginia Lambert Mason 
Betsy Moyer 
H. Diane Norris 
Joan Pernice 
Nancy Peterson 
Gail Ransom 
Rhonda Rivers 
Judith L. Rubenstein 
Barbara A. Scales 
Bette L. Snitzer 
Ann K. Staniewicz 
Jane Stein 
Janet Wade 
Pamela Wolfe 



Altos 

Mary Bennett 
Skye Burchesky 
Anne Butler 
Bette Carey 
Doris Halvorson Coe 
Elizabeth H. Colt 
Mary Crowe 
Mary Curtin 
Catherine Diamond 
Ann Ellsworth 
June Fine 
Roberta A. Gilbert 
Thelma Hayes 
Donna Hewitt 
Beth Holmgren 
Karol Hommen 
Leah Jansizian 
Alison D. Kohler 
Dorothy Love 
Sharron J. Lovins 
Nina Saltus 
Frances Schopick 
Janet Shapiro 
Amy Wing Sheridan 
Lynne Stanton 
Nancy Stevenson 
Laurie Stewart 
Florence A. St. George 
Lisa Tatlock 
Kathi Tighe 
Susan Watson 
Maria E. Weber 
Mary J. Westbrook 



Tenors 

Kent E. Berwick 
Paul Blanchard 
Sewell E. Bowers, Jr. 
Albert R. Demers 
Paul Foster 
Robert Greer 
Dean A. Hanson 
Wayne Henderson 
John Henry 
James P. Hepp 
Jeffrey Hoffstein 
Richard P. Howell 
Peter Krasinski 
Paul Kowal 
Gregg Lange 
Henry L. Lussier, Jr. 
Jack Maclnnis 
Al Newcomb 
Ray Parks 
Andrew Roudenko 
Vladimir Roudenko 
Peter D. Sanborn 
Robert W. Schlundt 
William Severson 
John Smith 
Douglas Thompson 



Basses 

Peter Anderson 
Antone Aquino 
Mitchell Brauner 
Richard Breed 
Neil Clark 
John W. Ehrlich 
Bill Good 
Carl D. Howe 
Daniel J. Kostreva 
Henry Magno, Jr. 
Martin Mason 
Jim Melzer 
Frank G. Mihovan 
John P. Murdock 
Jules Rosenberg 
Peter Rothstein 
Robert Schaffel 
Frank Sherman 
Richard M. Sobel 
Douglas Strickler 
Jean Renard Ward 
Nathaniel Watson 
Pieter Conrad White 
Robert T. Whitman 
Howard J. Wilcox 



36 



Coming concerts: 



Have a 

face to face 

folk with 

Elizabeth Grady 




Introducing our new half hour 
rmamrenance trearmenr for young 
normal heolrhyskin. only $10. 

Our regular one hour facial pore 
cleansmgssrill only $1 7. 50. 

Never a charge for consultation/ 
skin analysis. Call Ms. Grady for an 
appoinrmenr 536-4447, 39 Newbury 
Srreer, Dosron. 



ELIZABETH 
GB4DY 

k FACE FIRST > 



a 



If music 

be the food 

of love, 

play on! 

^H^ OGDEN FOOD SERVICES 

Providing food and drink. 
Enjoy our assortment of wine and cheese. 



99 



Friday, 15 July at 7 (Weekend Prelude) 

SCHUTZ 

Deutsches Magnificat, for double chorus 

MENDELSSOHN 

Der zweiundzwanzigste Psalm, Mein Gott, 

warum hast du mich verlassen?, 

for double chorus 

CHERYL STUDER, soprano 

JANICE MYERSON, mezzo-soprano 

KIM SCOWN, tenor 

BEN HOLT, bass 

BACH 

Motet III, Jesu, meine Freude, with cello, 
double bass and organ 

TANGLEWOOD FESTIVAL CHORUS, 
JOHN OLIVER, conductor 

Friday, 15 July at 9 

SEIJI OZAWA, conducting 

MOZART 

Symphony No. 36 in C, Linz, K. 425 
The Impresario, K. 486 
RERI GRIST, soprano 
ELIZABETH PARCELLS, soprano 
NEIL ROSENSHEIN, tenor 
MAC MORGAN, narrator 

Saturday, 16 July at 8:30 

NEVILLE MARRINER conducting 

MENDELSSOHN 

Symphony for Strings No. 9 in C 

Piano Concerto No. 2 in D minor, 

Op. 40 

TAMAS VASARY, piano 

Symphony No. 4 in A, Op. 90 Italian 

Sunday, 17 July at 2:30 

SEIJI OZAWA conducting 

HAYDN 

Overture to Armida 

Violin Concerto No. 1 in C 

JOSEPH SILVERSTEIN, violin 

Mass No. 10 in B flat, Theresienmesse 

RERI GRIST, soprano 

GWENDOLYN KILLEBREW, mezzo 

JOHN ALER, tenor 

VICTOR BRAUN, baritone 



37 




One of Soviet Georgia's senior citizens thought 

Dannori was an excellent yogurt. She ought to know. 

She's been eating yogurt for 137 years. 



CAMACHICH KVITZINIA. PHOTOGRAPHED IN ATRARA. SOVIET GEORGIA. 



38 






The Berkshire Music Center 

"One more thing should come from this scheme, 
namely, a good honest school of musicians." 

— Henry Lee Higginson, on founding the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra. 

The late Serge Koussevitzky fervent- 
ly shared Henry Lee Higginson's vision 
of a "good honest school for musicians" 

— an academy where young musicians 
could extend their artistic training and 
broaden their experience under the 
guidance of eminent professionals. 
More than any other person, it was 
Koussevitzky who made the vision a 
reality; he was Director of the Berkshire 
Music Center from its founding in 1940 
until his death in 1951, and his vigorous 
leadership has remained an inspiring 
example in the years since. 

Serge Koussevitzky was succeeded by 
Charles Munch, and it is a mark of the 
Center's success that the Boston Sym- 
phony's present Music Director, Seiji 
Ozawa, studied here during the Munch 
era. Alumni of the Center are among 
the most prominent and active mem- 
bers of the music world; more than ten 
percent of the members of this country's 
major orchestras are graduates of the 
Center, as are many of the world's 
notable conductors, instrumental solo- 
ists and singers. 

Today the primary responsibility for 
the Center's direction is in the hands of 
Gunther Schuller, composer, writer, 
conductor and President of the New 
England Conservatory until June 1977. 
Average enrollment is somewhat over 
400 each summer, of which approxi- 
matelyl40 are members of the Center's 
Fellowship Program; this provides free 
tuition (and in many cases free board 
and expenses) for instrumentalists, 
singers, conductors and composers of 
post-graduate calibre. In addition to the 
Fellowship Program, Boston University, 
through its Tanglewood Institute, offers 
several college-credit programs for tal- 
ented high school musicians; the noted 
soprano Phyllis Curtin directs a singers' 
seminar highlighted by her own master 
classes. Finally, each summer the Cen- 
ter's Festival of Contemporary Music 
(August 13-17 this year), presented in 



cooperation with the Fromm Music 
Foundation at Harvard, offers a broad 
spectrum of the most advanced music of 
today's composers in a gala week of 
performances. 

The Boston Symphony's Concert- 
master and Assistant Conductor Joseph 
Silverstein heads a faculty that includes 
principal players and members of the 
Orchestra and faculty members of Bos- 
ton University's School of Fine Arts, 
plus leading soloists, conductors and 
composers. The Center has numerous 
studios for practice and chamber music, 
and an extensive library of music litera- 
ture and scores. Rehearsals and con- 
certs of the Berkshire Music Center 
Orchestra and other student groups 
take place mostly in the Theatre- 
Concert Hall, while lectures, seminars, 
conducting classes, vocal and choral re- 
hearsals, composers' forums and cham- 
ber music concerts take place in the 
Chamber Music Hall, in the West Barn, 
in the Hawthorne Cottage, on the Re- 
hearsal Stage, and in the small studios 
both on the Tanglewood grounds and in 
buildings leased in Lenox. Each summer 
the Baldwin Piano and Organ Company 
generously provides over 100 keyboard 
instruments for individual practice; 
other instruments — percussion, for ex- 
ample — are provided by the Orchestra. 

The Boston Symphony is assisted in 
supporting the Center by the National 
Endowment for the Arts, a Federal 
agency, as well as by individual and 
corporate sponsors. Scholarships are 
awarded to the majority of the students, 
who are chosen by audition on a com- 
petitive basis. The cost of the scholar- 
ship program is large and adds sub- 
stantially to the Orchestra's yearly 
deficit — one major reason for the estab- 
lishment of the Friends of Music at 
Tanglewood, a group that provides 
critical support for the Center. A brief 
account of members' privileges is printed 
on page 41, and more information may 
be had at the Friend's Office near the 
Main Gate. We invite you to see and 
hear for yourself the remarkable calibre 
of the Center's young musicians. 

39 



Tanglewood 
Talks & Walks 



Tanglewood Talks & Walks are a fasci- 
nating series of five Thursday lecture- 
luncheons at noon in the Tanglewood 
Tent, followed by a special guided tour 
of Tanglewood. Guest speakers include 
the musicians, conductors, and staff 
of the Boston Symphony Orchestra and 
Berkshire Music Center. Bring a lunch — 
well provide the refreshments. Please 
call the Tanglewood Friends Office at 
(413) 637-1600 for reservations. $2 con- 
tribution to the public, free to Friends 
of Tanglewood. 

LUNCHEON* 12:15 
TALK 1:00 
WALK 1:30 

1977 Tanglewood Talks & Walks 

14 JULY— VICTOR YAMPOLSKY 

Principal Second Violin 
Boston Symphony Orchestra 

28 JULY— JAMES F. KILEY 

Operations Manager, 
Tanglewood 

4 AUGUST — PASQUALE CARDILLO 

Clarinet, 

Boston Symphony Orchestra; 
Principal Clarinet, 
Boston Pops Orchestra 

18 AUGUST— BETSY JOLAS 
Composer in Residence, 

Berkshire Music Center 

25 AUGUST— CAROL PROCTER 

Cello, 

Boston Symphony Orchestra 



Friends of Music at Tanglewood 

Lenox, Massachusetts 01240 

(413) 637-1600 



40% OFF LIST 

on all 

D.G. and PHILLIPS 




910 South St. • Pittsfleld, Mass. 01201 

At least 1/3 off all records at all times 

11:30 - 6:00 Monday thru Saturday 

Stop in & let us put you 

on our mailing list. 



QatewSyg Inii 

and R§gtau&nt 



637-2532 
Reservations Preferred 



1 Walker St.. 
Lenox, Ma 



In the Heart of Lenox 

Serving Breakfast 

Lunch. Dinner &. Late Supper 

Especially Prepared for You 

by Internationally Renowned 

Chef-Owner, Gerhard Schmid 

Cafe Hour on the Terrace 

Throughout the Tanglewood Season 

Cocktail Lounge Ample Free Parking 



\77\ was a Bood 

year for our Lobster Pie. 

This year 

it's even better. 




Publick House 

Good Yank;: cooking, drink and lodging. 
On ths Common -Sturbndj: Mass.- (61 7 M7-33U 



40 



The Friends of Music 
At Tanglewood 

Membership provides you with exciting 

opportunities and privileges all year long. 

It's the secret buy of the Berkshires! 



Free Berkshire Music 
Center Concerts: 

There are over 40 concerts each sum- 
mer performed by the members of the 
Berkshire Music Center, the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra's summer academy 
for the advanced study of music. These 
outstanding mid-week concerts include 
chamber music recitals, full orchestra 
concerts, vocal and choral programs, 
and the annual Festival of Contem- 
porary Music, Tanglewood's "festival 
within a festival." Friends Concert 
Memberships for individuals and 
families are available for $25.00. 

Advance program information and 
ticket ordering forms: 

Approximately one month before the 
public sale of seats in the early spring, 
Friends will be sent the advance Berk- 
shire Festival programs and a priority 
ticket application. Friends will also re- 
ceive the monthly Boston Symphony 
Orchestra publication, BSO. 



Tent Membership: 

The Tanglewood Tent, available to con- 
tributors of $75 and over, provides a 
hospitable gathering place behind the 
Music Shed where food and drink may be 
purchased on concert days. Hot buffet 
dinners are served on Saturday evenings 
beginning at 6:30 p.m. (Reservations 
must be made through the Friends 
Office no later than the Thursday after- 
noon preceding each Saturday 
evening buffet.) 

Special parking for Friends: 

Two convenient reserved parking areas 
are available to all donors of $150 or 
more for all Boston Symphony Orches- 
tra concerts: either the Box Parking Lot 
(Hawthorne Street entrance), or the 
Tent Parking Lot (West Street entrance). 

For information, contact: 
Friends of Music at Tanglewood 
Lenox, Ma. 01240 
(413) 637-1600 



Ji 






SL 




"%' ▼arabis 



BookgWu 



CONTEMPORARY 
AMERICA DE5IGN 



OUTSTANDING CRAFTS 
TO GIVE OR TO TREASURE 




DISTINCTIVE FOOD 
DELIGHTFUL AMHENCE 



I22XOIC I II M. PITTM II Lit 



41 



CHESIE^MJDD 



STOCKBRIDGE 




Summer Estate of 
DANIEL CHESTER FRENCH 

Sculptor of the 

Lincoln Memorial 

Studio, Residence, Barn 

Sculpture Gallery, Period 

Garden, Nature Trail 

Daily 10-5 

May - October 

off Rte. 183, Glendale 

a property of 
the National Trust for Historic Preservation 



THE 
OLD CORNER HOUSE 



&Mk 




Paintings by 

NORMAN ROCKWELL 

On permanent exhibit 

Open Year Round — Daily 10-5 p.m. 

Except Tuesdays 

Adults $1.00 Children 25C 



The Executive Committee 

Tanglewood Council of the 

Boston Symphony Orchestra 

Mrs. James Garivaltis 
Mr. Curtis Buttenheim 

Co- Chairmen 

Mr. John Kittredge 

Secretary /Treasurer 

Mrs. Stephen V.G. Morris 

Mrs. Murray Klein 

Talks and Walks 

Mr. Colin MacFadyen 
Mr. Ashley Smith 

Business 

Mrs. Kelton M. Burbank 
Mrs. John Kittredge 

Benefits 

Mrs. Charles Capers 

Receptions 

Mr. Robert A. Wells 

Community Affairs 

Mrs. D.H. Potter 

Mr. William Harris 

Tent 

Mrs. Jean Massimiano 
Mr. Joseph Duffy 

Sales and Information 

Mrs. Gary A. Lopenzina 
Mrs. William H. Ryan 

Student Affairs 

Mrs. Archie Peace 

Foreign Students 

Mrs. John Kittredge 

Tanglewood- Boston Liaison 

Mrs. A. Lloyd Russell 

Boston -Tanglewood Liaison 

Mr. Peter van S. Rice 
Mrs. John S. McLennan 

Nominating 



42 



cP^^y 




4 *- V <- 



CURTAINS 

Ar ThE Red Li»n Inn 

STOCKBPIDGE MASSACHUSETTS 

012P2 

Monday thru Saturday 10 A.M.- 5 P. \t 
Send lor I'rev Catalog 



VISIT BERKSHIRE LAKES ESTATES 

EXPERIENCE COUNTRY LIVING 

AT ITS BEST! 

Small Lakefront Community 

Swim and boat on 2 crystal clear mountain 
lakes. Play tennis, badminton, volleyball 
and basketball on community courts. Live 
in privacy adjacent to a large state forest. 

Berkshire Lakes Estates 

Yokum Pond Road 

Becket, Mass. 01223 

Tel. 413-623-8747 

TO VISIT: Mass. Turnpike to Lee, Mass.-Rt. 20 
East. Continue 4 miles to Belden's Tavern. Left 
for 2 miles to Berkshire Lakes Estates. 



What's 
Happening 

in the 

Derkshires? 

Phone Toll-Free 

and Find Out! 



Things to do today - exhibits, arts, music, 
theatre, ballet, garden shows, special tours, 
all the current events in the Berkshires. 



SOUTHERN BERKSHIRES 

526-7677 

From Great Bamngton, 
Sheffield, West StockDndge 



CENTRAL BERKSHIRES NORTHERN BERKSHIRES 

637-7677 662-7677 

From Stockbridge. Lee. From Williamstown, 

Lenox. Pirtsfleld Adams. North Adams 

A service of the Berkshire Vacation Bureau 
205 West St., Pittsfield, Mass. 

(A Division of the Berkshire Hills Conference). 




Williamstown 
Theatre festival 




Nikos Psacharopoulos 

Our 23rd Season Includes: 

Misalliance, Sherlock Holmes. Alter the Fall, 

Platonov and Learned Ladies 

June 30 - August 27 

Phone Reservations: 413-458-8146 

P.O. Box 517, Williamstown, Ma. 02167 



"unicuxc/ cutui' cajicJU^ nauia^ ccuauW 



Brunch 

Picnic 
Baskets 




Dinner 

After-Concert 
Supper 



J. Perspico Factor 
Restaurant 

Open Till 1 A.M. 

25 Church St. • Lenox, Mass. 
637-2996 



43 



WeCurtisHotel 

Food & Lodging 
LENOX, 637-0016 



A BOOK "TO DO" NOT 
"JUST TO READ" 




A BERKSHIRE SOURCEBOOK 



Your personal guide to Berkshire County: 
its history, geography and major land 
marks. Available at area bookstores and 
gift shops for just $ 2.95. Published by The 
Junior League of Berkshire County, Inc. 



WILL 



HE 



AMSVILLE- 



INN 




>^*M^=*» 



A fine, small Inn featuring 
superb Country French Cuisine 

LUNCH • DINNER 
Light Supper After Tanglewood 

Rte. 41 , between W. Stockbridge 

and Gt. Barrington 

Reservations Recommended by 

413-274-6580 INN PERSPECTIVE 



jflmen 
DElFsHOP 

SANDWICHES • CATERING 
TAKE OUT SERVICE 

115 Elm Street, Pittsfield, Massachusetts. 
Tel. 442-5927 

Featuring Hot Pastrami & Hot Corned Beef 

Sandwiches 

Hebrew National Delicatessen • Rolls & Bagels 
baked daily • Imported & Domestic cheeses 

• Lox & smoked fish • Barbecued chicken 

• Fresh made salads • Party Platters 

Open Daily 8 to 6 



The new home of 
the world famous 
Alices Restaurant 




AT AVALOCH 



Breakfast • Brunch 

• Lunch • Dinner 

• Late Supper • Cocktail Lounge 

• Entertainment • MOTEL 

• tennis • pool 

across the road from Tanglewood 
rte. 183 Lenox 637-0897 



The Sunshine Stage, 

Holliston Theatre, Route 183, 
Lenox, Mass. 01240. Tel. 413-637-0534. 

Year round professional regional theatre featuring 
plays, films and children's theatre. Cafe on prem- 
ises. Frank Bessell, Artistic Director. 



THECLOTHESLOFT 

"Fine Sportswear Outlet" 

179 Main Street, Great Barrington 
164 North Street, Pittsfield 



ia little jewel in the Berkshires " C%?gt>.<iM*ti<i.v7eA//jet& 
(413)243-0181 or 637-2644 
Comfortable rooms, good food and drink in 
a country atmosphere. 
Open Daily Lunch & Dinner 
* Tony Ferrelli Innkeeper 



VUpPU VpMXE 



-XT 
Accommodations for private parties. We //* 
cater to parties, banquets and social 
gatherings. Orders to take out. 

Chinese Polynesian Restaurant J^j 

LENOX. MASS. For Reservations ^*' 

(413)4434745 

Open Daily 1 1 30 til 10 pm. Fit & Sat til 1 am 




flUdStonettUUforp 



Route 8, Grove St., Adams, Ma. 

HANDPRINT WALLPAPER 

Factory Outlet 

Open Mon-Fri 10-4, Sat 9-1 2:30 




^T°WlE(iTLB[(3L 

' FANTASY MAN 



Food, drink, lodging. Live music week 
ends. After concert, a 10 minute 
walk from the Lion's Gate. 
WHEATLEIGH 637-0610 




Fashion Doesn 't Stop At Size 14 
BEAUTIFUL CLOTHES FOR 
' TRE LARGE SIZE WOMEN 

&IFF0R0BE AND JUNIORS 

^* 179 mfilR STREET 413'528'3118 

Gt. Barrington 



& 



44 



WHY WAIT TO ENTER COLLEGE? 
SIMON'S ROCK EARLY COLLEGE 

Designed for the student who wishes to avoid the 

duplication of high school and college work 

Liberal Arts - B.A. and A. A. Degrees - Fully Accredited 

The interest of those who have completed the 10th or 1 1th 
grade of high school is invited 

Admissions Office 

Simon's Rock Early College 

Great Barrington, MA 01230 

Telephone: 413-528-0771 



>fc 



Tanglewood 
Tradition 



Our outdoor Courtyard 
— colorfully abounding 
with Impatient plants — 
serves luncheons, 
dinners, snacks and 
drinks. Our indoor 
Lion's Den features sandwiches, 
drinks and live entertainment. 
Both are open till 1 a.m. Phone: 
413-298-5545. Route 7, Stockbridge, 
Massachusetts. Since 1773. 

ife The Red Lion Inn 




J\\jCuuas (jL/lxitrieu/ UViiuxttcA/ 



Route 57 



Tolland, Mass. 



Telephone 413 - 258-4538 

A wide selection of antiques ranging 

from furniture, china and paintings. 

We also feature an extensive 

collection of primitive art 

from New Guinea. 

Open by appointment every day 
except Sunday. 



To reach a 

mature audience who 

attend Boston Symphony, 

Pops and Tanglewood, 

call Steve Ganak Ad Reps, 

Statler Office Bldg., 

Boston, Mass. 02116 

617-542-6913 



If you'd like your own tote bag showinjdpou 
support public broadcasting (other sTd«4fts the 
Channel 17 logo), clip and send to; WMHT, 
Box 17, Schenectady, Ny 12301. 

'~ $60 Sustaining Member 

Z $30 Regular Member 



y%J»Jt' 



Name 



Address 



City 



IV 



State 



Zip 



45 




Tssmrnanm 

We OPERA HOUSE 




36 Luxury Rooms 

FOOD-DRINK -LODGING 

Exit 16-1-91 
Holvoke, Mass 

(41 3) 532-9494 




Located in the Township of Becket, Mass. 

Norman Walker, Di'ector 

Grace Badorek, Comptroller 

Donald Westwood, Promotional Director 



FIRST WEEK— July 5—9 
Eight Soloists from the 
Royal Danish Ballet 

SECOND WEEK- 
July 12—16 
Cultural Center of the 
Philippines Dance Co. 

(American debut 
of the Company) 

THIRD WEEK— July 19 — 23 
Teodoro Morca 
(Flamenco in Concert) 
Jacob's Pillow Dancers, 

Classical Pas de Deux 

FOU RTH WEEK — 

July 26—30 

Anne Marie DeAngelo 

and Lawrence Rhodes 

May O'Donnell 

Concert Dance Company 

Bhaskar (dances o'< India) 

FIFTH WEEK— August 2—6 
Twyla Tharp 
Dancers and Dances 



SEVENTH WEEK— ' 

August 16—20 

Dennis Wayne's Dancers 

EIGHTH WEEK— 

August 23—27 

Contemporary Dancers 

of Winnipeg 

(United States debut 

of the Company) 

Joyce Cuoco & Youri Vamos 

Jacob's Pillow Dancers 

Special Added Event 
September 2—4 
Hartford Ballet 

Performances: Perform- 
ances are held Tuesday 
through Saturday, Curt- 
ain times: Tuesday, 
7:30 p.m., Wednesday, 
Friday and Saturday, 
8.40 p.m., Thursday and 
Saturday Matinees: 
3:00 p.m. Tickets: 
$8.00 and $6.00. Avail- 
able at Ticketron, 
Bloomingdale's or the 
Jacob's Pillow Box Office 



SIXTH WEEK— August 9—13 
Ohio Ballet Company 

How to Reach Jacob's Pillow: 

Approx.150 miles from Boston near Tangle- 
wood. Lee-Pittsfield exit on the Mass. Turnpike. 
Public transportation from Boston via 
Greyhound to L^e, Mass. 

America's FIRST Dance Festival 



i 



Jacob's Pillow Dance Festival 
Mailing Address: Box 287, Lee, Mass. 01238 

(413) 243-0745 



) 



Tkfyrdova Mu$eun\ 
Sumjnef Concert^ 

Gospel singers, Ukrainian dancers, 
Mime, Big Band jazz, Folk singers... 

DE CORDOVA AMPHITHEATER 
Sandy Pond Rd., Lincoln, MA. 

Concerts 3:30pm 
Tickets: $2.50 
for info call 
259-8355 



Ad was placed in cooperation w 
the Middlesex County Tourism & 
Development Council, Inc. 





erksbire 

ummer festival 

6 days 5 nights 1 1 meals 




Per person dbl occup 
plus tx & tips 



189 



50 



Delux Accommodations 

All admissions to: TANGLEWOOD, 
BERKSHIRE PLAYHOUSEJACOB'S 
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or caN direct for free brochure to 

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46 



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The C. F. Peters music publishing tradition since 1800 has been built on providing the 
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47 




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Gilbert Kalish • Seiji Ozawa • Andre Previn 

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^ 




Seiji Ozawa, Music Director 

Colin Davis, Principal Guest Conductor 
Joseph Silverstein, Assistant Conductor 

Ninety- Sixth Season 1976-1977 



The Trustees of the Boston Symphony Orchestra Inc. 

Talcott M. Banks, President 

President Sidney Stoneman, Vice-President 

Vice-President John L. Thorndike, Treasurer 



Philip K. Allen, Vice 
Mrs. Harris Fahnestock, 






Vernon R. Alden 

Allen G. Barry 

Dr. Leo L. Beranek 

Mrs. John M. Bradley 

Richard P. Chapman 

Dr. George Clowes 

Abram T. Collier 

Henry A. Laughlin 



Nelson J. Darling, Jr. 

Archie C. Epps III 

E. Morton Jennings, Jr. 

Edward M. Kennedy 

George Kidder 
Edward G. Murray 

Trustees Emeriti 

Harold D. Hodgkinson 



Albert L. Nickerson 

Mrs. James H. Perkins 

Irving W. Rabb 

Paul C. Reardon 

David Rockefeller Jr. 

Mrs. George Lee Sargent 

John Hoyt Stookey 

John T. Noonan 



Administration of the Boston Symphony Orchestra 



Thomas D. Perry, Jr. 

Executive Director 






Thomas W. Morris 

Manager 

Gideon Toeplitz Daniel R. Gustin 

Assistant Manager Assistant Manager 

Joseph M. Hobbs Walter Hill Dinah Daniels 

Director of Development Director of Business Affairs Director of Promotion 

Richard C. White Anita R. Kurland Niklaus Wyss 

Assistant to the Manager Administrator of Youth Activities Advisor for the Music Director 

Donald W. Mackenzie James F. Kiley 

Operations Manager, Symphony Hall Operations Manager, Tanglewood 

Michael Steinberg 

Director of Publications 

Programs copyright ® 1977 Boston Symphony Orchestra Inc. 



Contents: 



page 

Tanglewood 4 

Seiji Ozawa 7 

Map 8 

Information 9 



page 

Programs 11-45 

Berkshire Music Center 47 

Friends 49, 50 



The Board of Overseers of the Boston Symphony Orchestra Inc. 

Dr. Leo L. Beranek 

Chairman 



Mrs. Norman L. Cahners 
Vice Chairman 

Charles F. Adams 

Mrs. Frank G. Allen 

Mrs. Richard Bennink 

David W. Bernstein 

David Bird 

Gerhard Bleicken 

Frederick Brandi 

Curtis Buttenheim 

Mrs. Henry B. Cabot 

Mrs. Mary Louise Cabot 

Levin H. Campbell, III 

Johns H. Congdon 

Arthur P. Contas 

Robert Cushman 

Michael J. Daly 

Mrs. C. Russell Eddy 

Paul Fromm 

Carlton P. Fuller 

Mrs. Thomas ]. Galligan, Jr. 



Weston P. Figgins 
Vice Chairman 

Mrs. Thomas Gardinei 

Mrs. James Garivaltis 

Mrs. Robert Gibb 

Jordan Golding 

Mrs. John L. Grandin 

Mrs. R. Douglas Hall, III 

Mrs. Howard E. Hansen 

Bruce Harriman 

Mrs. Richard D. Hill 

Mrs. Amory Houghton, Jr 

Richard S. Humphrey, Jr. 

Mrs. Jim Lee Hunt 

Mrs. Louis I. Kane 

Leonard Kaplan 

Benjamin Lacy 

Mrs. James F. Lawrence 

Roderick MacDougall 

John S. McLennan 

Colman M. Mockler, Jr. 

Mrs. Elting E. Morison 

Richard P. Morse 



Mrs. Arthur I. Strang 

Secretary 

David G. Mugar 

Dr. Barbara W. Newell 

Stephen Paine 

Harry Remis 

Mrs. Peter van S. Rice 

Mrs. Samuel L. Rosenberry 

Mrs. Jerome Rosenfeld 

Mrs. George Rowland 

Mrs. A. Lloyd Russell 

Mrs. William Ryan 

Francis P. Sears, Jr. 

William A. Selke 

Gene Shalit 

Samuel L. Slosberg 

Richard A. Smith 

Mrs. Edward S. Stimpson 

Mrs. Richard H. Thompson 

D. Thomas Trigg 

Roger Woodworth 




Boston 

University 

Tanglewood 
Institute 



Norman Dello Joio, 

Executive Director 



Summer Instrumental and Vocal Programs for the outstanding high school/ 
college-age musician. Private study with master artists including members of the 
faculty of the Boston University School of Music and the Boston Symphony 
Orchestra. Chamber music, orchestral and vocal performances at Tanglewood. 

For information: Boston University Tanglewood Institute, 
855 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02215. 

A program offered by the Boston University School for the Arts in association 
with the Berkshire Music Center/Boston Symphony Orchestra. 

Twelfth Season 




The Berkshires are a perfect place ... for people, 
for families and for businesses. The kind of place 
where an unsurpassed quality of life is available. 

In the Berkshires the average commute is 10 
minutes. Golf courses, tennis clubs, ski resorts, 
theatres, lakes, and fine restaurants are at your 
doorstep. We provide excellent schools — both public 
and private — and the Berkshires are the perfect place 
to raise a family. 

It's no accident that titans of industry have lived 
and worked in the Berkshires. Our labor force still 
believes in a day's work for a day's pay. And the 
Berkshires offer a readily available pool of labor. Our 
schools offer vocational programs and governmental 
training dollars are available. 

Most important, we want businesses to locate in 
the Berkshires. That's why our banks have launched 
a program of financial assistance to attract new 
industry and the County funds a full-time organization 
to assist you. 



If you have the opportunity to move a business, 
or influence a business relocation, consider the 
Berkshires. At Berkshire County Development 
Commission, we have compiled data to prove that 
the Berkshires add up for business reasons. Come see 
us or write on your letterhead for more information. 
Or, if you know of a business contemplating 
relocation, let us know. We welcome your business. 



the Berkshires 

Alan C. Marden 

Berkshire County Development Commission 

205 West Street 

Pittsfield, Massachusetts 01201 

Phone: (413) 499-4474 



44 



Definitely not 
to be missed... 

"Herbert Kupferberg's Tanglewood 
is bursting with information that 
even some of us who worked there 
had missed ... It catches the spirit 
and truth of that beautiful place." 
— Francis Robinson, 
• N.Y. Metropolitan Opera 

"Reads as excitingly as a who- 

done-it!" — Julius Rudel, 

New York City Opera 
"Unquestionably the definitive 
Tanglewood history to date." 

— Christian Science Monitor. 



TANGLEWOOD 




by MS 

Herbert 

Kupferberg 

8x10. 280 pages. 
Over 150 photos. 
Index. $9.95 paperback. 
McGRAW-HILL BOOK COMPANY 



HANCOCK SHAKER 
VILLAGE 

Original 18th Century 
Village Restored 

Open daily 9:30-5:00 

Adults $3 Children $1 

Annual Kitchen Festival 
Week of August 1st 

Route 20 Five miles West 
of Pittsfield, Mass. 



Tanglewood 

In August, 1934, a group of music- 
loving summer residents of the Berk- 
shires organized a series of three 
outdoor concerts at Interlaken, to be 
given by members of the New York 
Philharmonic under the direction of 
Henry Hadley. The venture was so 
successful that the promoters incor- 
porated the Berkshire Symphonic 
Festival and repeated the experiment 
during the next summer. 

The Festival committee then invited 
Serge Koussevitzky and the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra to take part in the 
following year's concerts. The Orches- 
tra's Trustees accepted and on August 
13, 1936, the Boston Symphony gave 
its first concert in the Berkshires (at 
Holmwood, a former Vanderbilt estate, 
later the Foxhollow School). The series, 
again consisting of three concerts, was 
given under a large tent, and a total of 
nearly 15,000 people attended. 

In the winter of 1936, Mrs. Gorham 
Brooks and Miss Mary Aspinwall 
Tappan offered Tanglewood, the Tap- 
pan family estate, with its buildings and 
210 acres of lawns and meadows, as a 
gift to Koussevitzky and the Orchestra. 
The offer was gratefully accepted, and 
on August 12, 1937, the Festival's 
largest crowd thus far assembled under 
a tent for the first Tanglewood concert, 
a program of music by Wagner. 

As Koussevitzky began The Ride of the 
Valkyries, a storm erupted, overpowering 
the music and causing the concert to be 
interrupted three times before the first 
half could be completed. The second half 
of the program had to be changed, 
because of water damage to some of the 
instruments, and when the concert 
ended, Miss Gertrude Robinson Smith, 
one of the Festival's founders, came to 
the stage and told the audience that the 
storm had demonstrated the needfor a 
permanent structure. 

A hundred thousand dollars, she said, 
would be needed for this purpose, and 
the response to her plea was so generous 
that within a short time the amount was 
fully subscribed. Plans for the Music 
Shed were drawn up by the eminent 



architect Eliel Saarinen, and, as modi- 
fied by Josef Franz of Stockbridge, who 
also directed construction, it was com- 
pleted on June 16, 1938, a month ahead 
of schedule. Seven weeks later, Serge 
Koussevitzky led the inaugural concert, 
which included a performance of Beet- 
hoven's Ninth Symphony. By 1941, the 
Theatre-Concert Hall, the Chamber 
Music Hall and several small studios — 
all part of the Berkshire Music Center, 
which had begun operations the pre- 
ceding year — were finished, and the 
Festival had so expanded its activities 
and its reputation for excellence that it 
attracted nearly 100,000 visitors. 

Today Tanglewood annually draws 
close to a quarter of a million visitors; 
in addition to the twenty-four regular 
concerts of the Boston Symphony, there 
are weekly "Prelude" concerts and open 
rehearsals, the annual Festival of 
Contemporary Music, and almost daily 
concerts by the gifted young musicians 
of the Berkshire Music Center. Arthur 
Fiedler and the Boston Pops perform 
each summer, and the Festival also 
includes a series of concerts by popular 
artists. The season offers not only a 
vast quantity of music but also a vast 
range of musical forms and styles, all 
of it presented with a regard for artistic 
excellence that makes the Festival 
unique. Tanglewood and the Berkshire 
Music Center, projects with which 
Koussevitzky was involved until his 
death, have become a fitting shrine to 
his memory, a living embodiment of 
the vital, humanistic tradition that was 
his legacy. 





liiAmc 

FM 90.3 mHz 

We bring you fine music 
AND dozens of interesting 
events — live and without 
commercials. Sit in with us 
at the National Press Club, 
where the next day's head- 
lines are often made. Enjoy 
"All Things Considered," a 
fascinating magazine of news 
and issues. (Nothingelse like it 
in broadcasting !) Savor some 
of the most satisfying thea- 
tre productions ever aired. 
Revel in delightful, intelligent 
conversation. 

Listen . . . and if you 

like what you hear, 

write for our free monthly 

program directory. 

WAMC 
Albany Medical College 
Albany, New York 12208 







npr 



National Public Radio 

for eastern New York 
and western New England 



The Shed under construction in 193 8 



Why do I work seven days a week? 
That's all there are. Besides 
if you really love what you do 

it's not work. 




Artists in the Night 
Hayes Burnett plays 
a great mix of jazz 
sounds. Mon-Fri 
ll-2:30am 




Robert J. Lurtsema 

Host, Morning Pro Musica 

Everyday 7am-Noon 




The Boston 
Symphony Orchestra 
at Tanglewood 
Fridays at 9pm, 
Saturdays at 
8:30pm, Sundays 
°:30pm 
and August 



The Spider's Web 
— our storybook for 
the entire family 
Mon-Fri. 7:30pm 



All Things Considered 

— the best news 
program of its kind 

— every day at 5pm 



'GBH Radio 
89.7FM 

Radio that makes sense 
of your day. 



Seiji Ozawa 

Seiji Ozawa became Music Director of 
the Boston Symphony Orchestra in the 
fall of 1973. He is the thirteenth con- 
ductor of the Orchestra since its found- 
ing in 1881. 

He was born in Hoten, Manchuria in 
1935, and studied both Western and 
Oriental music as a child. He attended 
Toho School of Music in Tokyo and 
graduated with first prizes in composi- 
tion and conducting. Shortly after his 
graduation, he won first prize at the 
International Competition of Conduc- 
ting at Besancon, France, and was in- 
vited by Charles Munch, then Music 
Director of the Boston Symphony and a 
judge at the competition, to spend a 
summer studying at Tanglewood. 

In 1964 and for the next five seasons, 
Mr. Ozawa was Music Director of the 
Ravinia Festival. At the beginning of the 
1965-66 season he became Music Direc- 
tor of the Toronto Symphony, a posi- 
tion he relinquished four seasons later 
to study and guest conduct. In 1970 he 
accepted the position of Artistic Direc- 



tor of the Berkshire Music Festival, and 
in December of the same year he began 
his inaugural season as Conductor and 
Music Director of the San Francisco 
Symphony Orchestra, titles that he held 
concurrently with his position as Music 
Director of the Boston Symphony. In 
the spring of 1976 he resigned his San 
Francisco position although he remained 
Honorary Conductor for the 
1976-77 season. 

Mr. Ozawa's recordings include: on 
the Deutsche Grammophon label, Ber- 
lioz's Symphonie fantastique, La damnation de 
Faust, Romeo et Juliette (which was 
awarded a Grand Prix du Disque), Ives's 
Symphony No. 4 and Central Park in the 
Dark, and de Falla's Three-cornered Hat, 
and, on the New World Records label, 
Griffes's Songs of Fiona McLeod. Record- 
ings soon to be released are: Bartok's 
Miraculous Mandarin Suite and Music for 
Percussion, Strings, and Celeste, Tchaikov- 
sky's Symphony No. 5, Brahms's Synv 
phony No. 1, and Rimsky-Korsakov's 
Sheherazade on Deutsche Grammophon, 
and Session's When Lilac's Last in the Door- 
yard Bloom'd on New World Records. 



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DEERSKIN 

TRADING POST 

615 Pittsfield-Lenox Road (Rte. 20) Lenox, Mass. 

Coupon good thru Oct. 1, 1977. Discount does not apply to sale merchandise. 



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For 105 years we've been serious 
about people who make music. 

In 1872 Boston University established the first professional music program 
within an American university to train creative and talented students for 
careers in music. 105 years later the Boston University School of Music is 

still doing what it does best. 

• Performance • Music Education • History and Literature • Theory and Composition 



strings 

Walter Eisenberg, violin 
Madeline Foley, chamber music 

'Gerald Gelbloom, violin 

'Bernard Kadinoff, viola 
Endel Kalam, chamber music 

'Robert Karol, viola 

•Eugene Lehner, chamber music 

* Leslie Martin, string bass 
George Neikrug, cello 

'Mischa Nieland, cello 
Leslie Pamas, cello 
•Henry Portnoi, string bass 

* William Rhein, string bass 
Kenneth Sarch, violin 

* Roger Shermont, violin 
•Joseph Silverstein, violin 

Roman Totenberg, violin 
Walter Trampler, viola 

* Max Winder, violin 
•Lawrence Wolfe, string bass 



woodwinds 

Edward Avedisian, clarinet 
•PasqualeCardillo, clarinet 
•Donot Anthony Dwyer, flute 

Roderick Ferland, saxophone 

• Ralph Gomberg, oboe 
•John Holmes, oboe 

• Phillip Kaplan, flute 

• James Pappoutsakis, flute 
•Richard Plaster, bassoon 

• Matthew Ruggiero, bassoon 
•Felix Viscuglia, clarinet 
•Sherman Walt, bassoon 
•Harold Wright, clarinet 

brass 

• Ronald Barron, trombone 

• Norman Bolter, trombone 
Peter Chapman, trumpet 
John Coffey, tromboneltuba 

'Armando Ghitalla, trumpet 



brass (cont.) 

Paul Gay, trombone 
'Gordon Hallberg, tromboneltuba 
•Charles Kavaloski, French horn 

Charles A. Lewis, Jr., trumpet 

* David Ohanian, French hom 
Samuel Pilafian, tuba 

•Rolf Smedvig, trumpet 
•Harry Shapiro, French hom 

* Roger Voisin, trumpet 
'Charles Yancich, French hom 

percussion 

'Thomas Gauger 
'Charles Smith 

harp 

Lucile Lawrence 

piano 

Maria Clodes 

Anthony di Bonaventura 

Lenore Engdahl 

Bela Boszormenyi-Nagy 

Phillip Oliver, staff accompanist 

Edith Steams 

Frednk Wanger 

organ 

George Faxon 
Jack Fisher 
Max Miller 

harpsichord 

Joseph Payne 

voice 

Eunice Alberts, contralto 
Germaine Arosa, diction 
Mary Davenport, contralto 
Ellalou Dimmock, soprano 
Maeda Freeman, mezzo 
Robert Gartside, tenor 
Mac Morgan, baritone 
Chloe Owen, soprano 
Allen Rogers, vocal coaching 
Barbara Stevenson, soprano 
Wilma Thompson, mezzo 



music history and literature 

Karol Berger 
Murray Lefkowitz 
Joel Sheveloff 

theory and composition 

David Carney 
David Del Tredici 
John Goodman 
Alan MacMillan 
Joyce Mekeel 
Malloy Miller 
Gardner Read 
Allen Schindler 
Robert Sirota 
Tison Street 

music education 

Lee Chrisman 
Phyllis Elhady Hoffman 
Allen Lannom 
Jack O. Lemons 
Mary Ann Norton 

musical organizations 

Adelaide Bishop, opera 
Warren Wilson, opera 
Joseph Huszti, chorus 
'Joseph Silverstein, orchestra 

* Roger Voisin, wind ensemble 

boston symphony orchestra 
woodwind quintet in residence 

* Doriot Anthony Dwyer, flute 
'Ralph Gomberg, oboe 

* Harold Wright, clarinet 
'Sherman Walt, bassoon 

* Charles Kavaloski, French horn 

empire brass quintet 
in residence 

Charles A. Lewis, Jr., trumpet 

* Rolf Smedvig, trumpet 
•David Ohanian, French hom 
•Norman Bolter, trombone 

Samuel Pilafian, tuba 



'Member of the Boston Symphony Orchestra 



Boston University School of Music 

Wilbur EX Fullbright, Director • Robert Lee Tipps, Assistant to Director 
offering degrees at the bachelor, master, and doctoral levels. 

School for the Arts: Music, Theatre, Visual Arts • Norman Dello Joio, Dean 
855 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 



10 



Tanglewood 1977 



Weekend Prelude 

Tanglewood Festival Chorus 
John Oliver, conductor 



Friday, 15 July at 7 



SCHUTZ 



The German Magnificat 



MENDELSSOHN Psalm 22, Mein Gott, warum hast du mich verlassen? 

for double chorus and soloists 



BACH 



Motet, Jesu, mein Freude 



CHERYL STUDER, soprano 
JANICE MYERSON, mezzo-soprano 
KIM SCOWN, tenor 
BEN HOLT, bass 

CAROL PROCTER, cello 
LAWRENCE WOLFE, bass 
PHILIP MOREHEAD, organ 



11 



Schutz: The German Magnificat 

Meine Steele erhebt den Herren und mein 
Geist freuet sich Gottes, meines 
Heilandes, denn er hat die Niedrigkeit 
seiner Magd angesen; 

Siehe, von nun an, werden mich selig 
preisen alle Kindeskind; 

Denn er hat grosse Ding an mir getan, der 
da machtig ist und des Name heilig ist. 

Er iibet Gewalt mit seinem Arm, und zer- 
streuet die hoffartig sind in ihres 
Herzens Sinn. 

Er stosset die Gewaltigen vom Stuhl und 
erhohet die Niedrigen. 

Die Hungerigen fiillet er mit Giitern, und 
lasset die Reichen leer. 

Er denket der Barmherzigkeit und helft 
seinem Diener Israel auf, wie er geredt hat 
unsern Vatern, Abraham, und seinem 
Samen ewiglich. 

Ehre sei dem Vater und dem Sohn un auch 
der Heiligen Geiste, wie es war im Anfang, 
jetzt und immer dar und von Ewigkeit zu 
Ewigkeit, Amen. 



My soul doth magnify the Lord, and my spirit 
hath rejoiced in God my savior, for he hath 
regarded the lowliness of his handmaiden. 

For behold from henceforth all generations 
shall call me blessed. 

For he that is mighty hath magnified me; and 
holy is his name. 

He hath showed strength with his arm, he 
hath scattered the proud in the imagination 
of their hearts. 

He hath put down the mighty from their seat, 
and hath exalted the humble and meek. 

He hath filled the hungry with good things, 
and the rich he hath sent empty away. 

He remembering his mercy hath holpen his 
servant Israel; as he promised to our 
forefathers, Abraham and his seed, 
for ever. 

Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, and to 
the Holy Ghost; as it was in the beginning, 
is now, and ever shall be, world without 
end. Amen. 



Mendelssohn: Psalm 22 

Mein Gott, mein Gott, warum hast du mich 

verlassen? Ich heule, aber meine Hilfe ist 

fern. 
Mein Gott, des Tages rufe ich, so antwortest 

du nicht; und des Nachts schweige ich 

auch nicht. 
Aber du bist heilig, der du wohnest unter 

dem Lobe Israels. 
Unsre Vater hofften auf dich, und da sie 

hofften, halfest du ihnen aus. 
Zu dir schrieen sie, und wurden errettet, sie 

hofften auf dich und wurden nicht zu 

Schanden. 
Ich aber bin ein Wurm, und kein Mensch, ein 

Spott der Leute und Verachtung des Volks. 
Alle, die mich sehen, spotten meiner, sperren 

das Maul auf und schiitteln den Kopf, 
Er klage es dem Herrn, der helfe ihm aus, 

und errette ihn, hat er Lust zu ihm. 

Ich bin ausgeschiittet wie Wasser, alle meine 
Gebeine haben sich getrennt. Mein Herz 
ist in meinem Leibe wie zerschmolzenes 
Wachs. 

Meine Krafte sind vertrocknet wie eine 
Scherbe, und meine Zunge klebt am 
Gaumen, und du legst mich in des Todes 
Staub. 



My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken 

me? Why art thou so far from helping me, 

and from the words of my roaring? 
My God, I cry in the daytime, but thou 

hearest not; and in the night season, and 

am not silent. 
But thou art holy, O thou that inhabitest the 

praises of Israel. 
Our fathers trusted in thee; they trusted, and 

thou didst deliver them. 
They cried unto thee, and were delivered; 

they trusted in thee, and were not 

confounded. 
But I am a worm, and no man; a reproach of 

men and despised of the people. 
All they that see me laugh me to scorn; they 

shoot out their lips, they shake the head. 
He trusted on the Lord that he would deliver 

him; let him deliver him; seeing he 

delighted in him. 
I am poured out like water, and all my bones 

are out of joint; my heart is like wax; it 

is melted in the midst of my bowels. 

My strength is dried up like a potsherd, and 
my tongue cleaveth to my jaws; and thou 
hast brought me into the dust of death. 



12 



Denn Hunde haben mich umgeben und der 

Bosen Rotte hat sich um mich gemacht. 

Sie haben meine Hande und Fiisse 

durchgraben. 
Sie teilen meine Kleider unter sich, und 

werfen das Los um mein Gewand. 
Aber du, Herr, sei nicht feme. Meine Starke 

eile mir zu helfen. 
Errette meine Seele vom Schwert, meine ein- 

same von den Hunden. 
Hilf mir aus dem Rachen des Lowen, und 

errette mich von den Einhornern. 
Ruhmet den Herrn, die ihr ihn fiirchtet! Es 

ehre ihn aller Same Jacobs, und vor ihm 

sich aller Same Israels, 
Denn er hat nicht verachtet noch verschmaht 

das Elend des Armen, und sein Antlitz 

nicht vor ihm verborgen, und da er zu ihm 

schrie, hdrte er es. 
Dich will ich preisen in der grossen 

Gemeinde, ich will meine Gelubde 

bezahlen vor denen, die ihn furchten. 
Die Elenden sollen essen, dass sie satt 

werden, und die nach dem Herrn fragen, 

werden ihn preisen. Euer Herz soil 

ewiglich leben. 
Es werde gedacht aller Welt Ende, dass sie 

sich zum Herrn bekehren, und vor ihm 

anbeten alle Geschlechter der Heiden. 

Denn der Herr hat ein Reich, und er herrscht 
unter den Heiden. 



For dogs have compassed me; the assembly of 
the wicked have inclosed me; they pierced 
my hands and my feet. 

They part my garments among them, and 

cast lots upon my vesture. 
But be thou not far from me, O Lord; O my 

strength, haste thee to help me. 
Deliver my soul from the sword; my darling 

from the power of the dog. 
Save me from the lion's mouth; for thou hast 

heard me from the horns of the unicorns. 
Ye that fear the Lord, praise him; all ye the 

seed of Jacob, glorify him; and fear him, 

all ye the seed of Israel. 
For he hath not despised nor abhorred the 

affliction of the afflicted; neither hath 

he hid his face from him; but when he 

cried unto him, he heard. 
My praise shall be of thee in the great 

congregation; I will pay my vows before 

them that fear him. 
The meek shall eat and be satisfied; they shall 

praise the Lord that seek him; your heart 

shall live for ever. 

All the ends of the world shall remember 
and turn unto the Lord; and all the 
kindreds of the nations shall worship 
before thee. 

For the kingdom is the Lord's; and he is the 
governor among the nations. 



Bach: Jesu, meine Freude 

I. Chorale 

Jesu, meine Freude, meines Herzens Weide, 

Jesu, meine Zier, 
Ach, wie lang, ach, lange ist dem Herzen 

bange, und verlangt nach dir! 
Gottes Lamm, mein Brautigam, ausser dir 

soil mir auf Erden nichts sonst liebers 

werden. 

II. 

Es ist nun nichts verdammliches an denen, 
die in Christo Jesus sind; die nicht 
nach dem Fleische wandeln, sondern nach 
dem Geist. 

III. Chorale 

Unter deinem Schirmen bin ich vor den 

Stiirmen aller Feinde frei. 
Lass den Satan wittern, lass den Feind 

erbittern, mir steht Jesus bei! 
Ob es itzt gleich kracht und blitzt, ob 

gleich Siind und Holle schrecken; Jesus 

will mich decken. 



Jesus, my joy, my heart's treasure, Jesus, 

my crown, 
Ah, how long, ah, long, is the heart's 

anguishing and longing for thee! 
God's lamb, my Bridegroom, nothing on 

earth shall be more precious to me. 



There is therefore now no condemnation to 
them which are in Christ Jesus, who walk 
not after the flesh, but after the Spirit. 



Under thy protection am I free from the 

storms of all my enemies. 
Let Satan creep around, let the Enemy 

threaten, Jesus will stand by me. 
Though thunder and lightning may crash, 

though sin and hell may frighten me, Jesus 

will protect me. 



13 



IV. 

Denn das Gesetz des Geistes, der da lebendig 
machet in Christo Jesu hat mich frei 
gemacht von den Gesetz der Siinde und 
des Todes. 

V. 

Trotz dem alten Drachen, trotz des Todes 

Rachen, trotz der Furcht darzu! 
Tobe, Welt, und springe, ich steh hier und 

singe in gar sichrer Ruh! 
Gottes macht halt mich in Acht; Erd und 

Abgrund muss verstummen, ob sie noch 

so brummen. 

VI. 

Ihr aber seid nicht fleischlich sondern geist- 

lich, so anders Gottes Geist in euch wohnet. 

Wer aber Christi Geist nicht hat, der ist 

nicht sein. 

VII. Chorale 

Weg mit alien Schatzen, du bist mein 

Ergotzen, Jesu meine Lust! 
Weg ihr eitlen Ehren, ich mag euch nicht 

horen, bleibt mir unbewusst! 
Elend, Not, Kreuz, Schmach und Tod soil 

mich, ob ich viel muss leiden, nicht von 

Jesu scheiden. 

VIII. 

So aber Christus in euch ist, so ist der Leib 
zwar tot um der Siinde willen; der Geist 
aber ist das Leben um der Gerechtigkeit 
willen. 

IX. 

Gute Nacht, o Wesen das die Welt erlesen, 

mir gefallst du nicht! 
Gute Nacht, ihr Sunden, bleibet weit 

dahinten, kommt nicht mehr ans Licht! 
Gute Nacht, du Stolz und Pracht! 
Dir sei ganz, du Lasterleben, gute Nacht, 

gegeben! 

X. 

So nun der Geist des der Jesum von den 
Toten auferwecket hat, in euch wohnet, so 
wird auch derselbige, der Christum von 
den Toten auferwecket hat, eure 
sterbliche Leiber lebendig machen, um des 
willen, dass sein Geist in euch wohnet. 

XI. 

Weicht, ihr Trauergeister, denn mein 

Freudenmeister, Jesus, tritt herein. 
Denen, die Gott leiben, muss auch ihr Betrii- 

ben lauter Wonne sein. 
Duld ich schon hier Spott und Hohn, den- 

noch bleibst du auch im Leide, 

Jesu, Meine Freude. 



For the law of the spirit of life in Christ 
Jesus hath made me free from the law of 
sin and death. 



Despite the old dragon, despite death's 

raging, despite fear as well, 
Rage, world, and spring, I stand here and sing 

in absolutely secure peace. 
God's power protects me, earth and abyss 

must be silenced, tho' they ever grumble. 



But ye are not in the flesh, but in the Spirit, 
if so be that the Spirit of God dwell in you. 
Now if any man have not the Spirit of 
Christ, he is not of His. 

Away with all earthly treasures! Thou art my 

delight, Jesus, my joy! 
Away you vain glories, I will not hear ye, 

I will not acknowledge you. 
Misery, need, affliction, humiliation and death 

shall, though I bear a great load, not part 

me from Jesus. 

And if Christ be in you, the body is dead 
because of sin; but the Spirit is life because 
of righteousness. 



Good night, oh worldly life, you do not please 

me. 
Good night, ye sins, keep ye far behind me, 

come no more into the light! 
Good night, you pride and pomp. 
You wicked life, your time is finished, 

good night! 

But if the Spirit of Him that raised up Jesus 
from the dead dwell in you, he that raised 
up Christ from the dead shall also quicken 
your mortal bodies by His Spirit that 
dwelleth in you. 



Retreat, ye thoughts of sadness, for my Lord 

of gladness, Jesus enters in. 
For them that love God, shall their sorrows 

be as great joy. 
Though I suffer mockery and scorn, yet you 

are still in torment, Jesus, my joy. 



14 



dp 



*VC 



MM 



fca. 



THE 

BOSTON 

SYMPHONY 

CHAMBER 

PLAYERS 



'/' 



Three Sundays that can help you 

face Monday 

The Brahms Quintet op. 115. Stra- 
vinsky's L'Histoire de Soldat. The 
Schubert E Flat Piano Trio. These 
and other major chamber music 
works make up the Boston Sym- 
phony Chamber Players 1977-78 
program. 

The twelve principal players of 
the Boston Symphony Orchestra 
will perform at Jordan Hall at 4:00 
p.m. on Nov. 6, 1977 and Feb. 19 and 
April 9, 1978. Gilbert Kalish will be 
the guest pianist. 
For complete program information, write to Subscription Office, 
Symphony Hall, Boston, Mass. 02115, or call 266-1492. 



15 



a^ 



BOSTON 

SYMPHONY 

ORCHESTRA 

SEIJl OZAWA // s 

Music Director ^^m| 



First violins 

Joseph Silverstein 

Concertmaster 

Charles Munch chair 

Emanuel Borok 

Assistant Concertmaster 
Helen Horner Mclntyre chair 

Max Hobart 

Rolland Tapley 

Roger Shermont 

Max Winder 

Harry Dickson 

Gottfried Wilfinger 

Fredy Ostrovsky 

Leo Panasevich 

Sheldon Rotenberg 

Alfred Schneider 

Gerald Gelbloom 

Raymond Sird 

Ikuko Mizuno 

Cecylia Arzewski 

Amnon Levy 

Bo Youp Hwang 

Second violins 

Victor Yampolsky 

Fahnestock chair 

Marylou Speaker 
Michel Sasson 
Roland Knudsen 
Leonard Moss 
Vyacheslav Uritsky 
Laszlo Nagy 
Michael Vitale 
Darlene Gray 
Ronald Wilkison 
Harvey Seigel 
Jerome Rosen 
Sheila Fiekowsky 
Gerald Elias 
Ronan Lefkowitz 

Violas 

Burton Fine 

Charles S. Dana chair 
Reuben Green 
Eugene Lehner 
George Humphrey 
Jerome Lipson 

16 



Robert Karol 
Bernard Kadinoff 
Vincent Mauricci 
Earl Hedberg 
Joseph Pietropaolo 
Robert Barnes 
Michael Zaretsky 

Cellos 

Jules Eskin 

Philip R. Allen chair 
Martin Hoherman 
Mischa Nieland 
Jerome Patterson 
Robert Ripley 
Luis Leguia 
Carol Procter 
Ronald Feldman 
Joel Moerschel 
Jonathan Miller 
Martha Babcock 

Basses 

William Rhein 
Acting Principal 

Harold D. Hodgkinson chair 
Joseph Hearne 
Bela Wurtzler 
Leslie Martin 
John Salkowski 
John Barwicki 
Robert Olson 
Lawrence Wolfe 
Henry Portnoi 

Flutes 

Doriot Anthony Dwyer 

Walter Piston chair 

James Pappoutsakis 
Paul Fried 

Piccolo 

Lois Schaefer 

Oboes 

Ralph Gomberg 

Mildred B. Rem is chair 

Wayne Rapiej 

English Horn 

Laurence Thorstenberg 

Clarinets 

Harold Wright 

Ann 5.M. Banks chair 

Pasquale Cardillo 
Peter Hadcock 

E-flat clarinet 

Bass Clarinet 

Felix Viscuglia 



Bassoons 

Sherman Walt 

Edward A. Taft chair 

Roland Small 
Matthew Ruggiero 

Contra bassoon 

Richard Plaster 

Horns 

Charles Kavalovski 

Helen Sagoff Slosberg chair 

Charles Yancich 
Peter Gordon 
David Ohanian 
Richard Mackey 
Ralph Pottle 

Trumpets 

Armando Ghitalla 

Roger Louis Voisin chair 

Andre Come 
Rolf Smedvig 
Gerard Goguen 

Trombones 

Ronald Barron 
Norman Bolter 
Gordon Hallberg 
William Gibson 

Tuba 

Chester Schmitz 

Timpani 

Everett Firth 

Sylvia Shippen Wells chair 

Percussion 

Charles Smith 
Arthur Press 

Assistant timpanist 
Thomas Gauger 
Frank Epstein 

Harps 

Bernard Zighera 
Ann Hobson 

Personnel Managers 

William Moyer 
Harry Shapiro 

Librarians 

Victor Alpert 
William Shisler 

Stage Manager 

Alfred Robison 



I ■ 



■I 






BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

Seiji Ozawa, Music Director 
Colin Davis, Principal Guest Conductor 
Joseph Silverstein, Assistant Conductor 
Tanglewood 1977 

Friday, 15 July at 9 




SEIJI OZAWA, conductor 

MOZART Symphony No. 36 in C major, K. 425, Linz 
Adagio — Allegro spiritoso 
Poco Adagio 
Menuetto 
Presto 



INTERMISSION 



MOZART Der Schauspiel- director (The Impresario), 
comedy in one act, K. 486 
sung text by Gottlieb Stephanie the Younger 
spoken text by Deborah Trustman 



Herr Buff, an impresario 
Mme. Herz, an aging soprano 
Mile. Silberklang, an ambitious 
young soprano 
Herr Vogelsang, a tenor 



MAC MORGAN 
RERI GRIST 

ELIZABETH PARCELLS 
NEIL ROSENSHEIN 



Seiji Ozawa and the Boston Symphony Orchestra record exclusively 
for Deutsche Grammophon. 
Baldwin piano 



17 



Notes 



Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart 

Symphony No. 36 in C major, 
K. 425, Linz 

Johannes Chryostomus Wolfgangus Theo- 
philus Mozart was born in Salzburg on 27 
January 1756 and died in Vienna on 5 De- 
cember 1791. Incredible though it seems, he 
composed the Linz Symphony in something 
like four days, beginning some time after his 
arrival in Linz at 9 a.m. on 30 October 1 783, 
and having it ready for performance by 
4 November. 

Linz is Austria's third largest city, 
industrial, not especially attractive, but 
renowned for a heady chocolate, al- 
mond, and jam cake, and for this sym- 
phony of Mozart's. Wolfgang and Con- 
stanze Mozart visited there for three 
weeks in the fall of 1783 as guests 
of Count Johann Joseph Thun, an old 
friend of the Mozart family. They had 
gone from Vienna to Salzburg to pre- 
sent Constanze to Wolfgang's father 
and in the hope of reconciling him to 
their marriage. Leopold Mozart, how- 
ever, was adamantly difficult, and the 
young couple, though unhappy about 
the storm clouds chez Papa, were re- 
lieved to get away. When they got to 
Linz after stops at Vocklabruck, Lam- 
bach (where Mozart arrived just in 
time to accompany the Agnus Dei at 
Mass), and Ebelsberg, they were met 
at the city gates by a servant of the 
Thun household, to make sure they 
not stop at an inn, but go instead to 
the family's house in Minorite Square. 
A concert was arranged to take place 
in the theater on Tuesday, 4 November, 
and since Mozart, as he reported next 
day in a letter to his father, had no 
symphony with him, he had to "work 
on a new one at head-over-heels speed." 

It is a grandly inventive work that 
Mozart made in such a hurry. For the 
first time, he begins a symphony with 
a slow introduction, declamatory at 
first, then yielding and full of pathos, 
and cannily creating suspense. The al- 
legro to which it leads is energetic, 



festive, with a touch of the march about 
it. And how delightful the first theme 
is, with those slow notes that so care- 
fully do not prepare us for the sudden 
rush of the third and fourth bars. Only 
the recapitulation — more of a repeat 
than the continuation or development 
we are apt to expect from Mozart at 
this point in his life — reminds us of 
the daunting deadline against which 
we wrote. 

The "adagio" is modified by "poco," 
but to have a slow movement be any 
kind of adagio at all is rare enough in 
Mozart. Touched by the six-eight lilt 
of the siciliano, it is in F major, but 
yearns always for minor- mode har- 
monies. It seems to look ahead to the 
wonderful slow movement — plain "ada- 
gio" and quite openly in a minor key — 
of the A major Piano Concerto, K. 488, 
written two and a half years later (to 
be played at the concert here on Sunday 
afternoon, 24 July). 

The minuet is courtly and the trio, 
with its delicious scoring for oboe an 
octave above the violins and for bassoon 
an octave below (or sometimes in canon 
and sometimes a sixth below), is de- 
murely rustic. The finale brings back 
the first allegro's exuberance but in 
heightened form. 

— Michael Steinberg 

Der Schauspiel- director , (The Impresario), 
comedy in one act, K. 486 

From the Wiener Zeitung, 

8 February 1786: 

"On Tuesday, H.M. the Emperor gave 
a festivity at Schonbrunn for the exalted 
Governor-General of the I. & R. Nether- 
lands and a gathering of the local no- 
bility. Forty cavaliers . . . being invited, 
they made their choice of ladies, left 
the Hofburg at 3 o'clock in pairs for 
Schonbrunn in barouches and closed 
carriages, with His Imp. Maj., who con- 
ducted Her Serene Highness the Arch- 
duchess Christina, and there alighted 
at the Orangerie. This had been pre- 
pared most lavishly and prettily for 
luncheon with which to receive the 
guests. The table, below the orange 
trees, was most charmingly decorated 
with local and exotic flowers, blossoms, 



18 



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UL "** t^ *r* iyfy *» ^.* Vux JT^i/JL za <y± i+~~ s~~ i*-V~ a-/»***- ^ ^' <u- - Zi 




Mozart's autographed manuscript of Madame Herts aria. The introductory measures for solo bassoon and oboe 
which Mozart added for the Vienna performances are not yet present. 



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20 




Gottlieb Stephanie the younger, who wrote the original 

libretto for Der Schauspiel-director. 

I 

and fruit. While His Imp. Maj. partook 

of the meal with the exalted visitors 
and guests, the Imperial and Royal 
Chamber Music was to be heard in wind 
instruments. The repast concluded, there 
was a performance by the actors of the 
I. & R. National Theater on the stage 
erected at one end of the Orangerie 
of a play with arias, especially composed 
for this festivity, and entitled Der Schau- 
spiel-director. At its conclusion, the 
company of Court Opera singers, on the 
Italian stage erected at the other end of 
the Orangerie, gave an opera huffa like- 
wise quite newly written for this oc- 
casion, and with the title of Prima la 
musica e pox le parole. All this time, the 
Orangerie was most gloriously illumi- 
nated with numerous lights from 
candelabras and brackets. At 9 o'clock, 
the whole company returned to town in 
the same order, with each coach ac- 
companied by grooms with links." 

The Wiener Zeitung's society reporter 
did not mention the composer or libret- 
tist of either entertainment. For Der 
Schauspiel-director, the composer was of 
course Mozart, working to a text by 
Gottlieb Stephanie the younger (to dis- 
tinguish him from his step- brother 
Gottlob), an actor, director, and prolific, 
thoroughly trivial playwright, originally 
from Breslau but long settled in Vienna, 
and best remembered as the librettist 
of Mozart's Abduction from the Seraglio. The 
composer of Prima la musica e poi le parole 
(First the music and then the words) was 
Antonio Salieri, who was to live long 
enough to give composition lessons to 
Schubert and Liszt, and to be calumnied 
as the alleged poisoner of Mozart, while 



the librettist was the accomplished 
Giambattista Casti. (Opera buffs will 
recognize Prima la musica as an ancestor 
of Capriccio by Richard Strauss and 
Clemens Krauss.) At the Orangerie 
party, Prima la musica, with its easily 
recognizable sendups of prominent 
figures of the Viennese theatrical world, 
enjoyed the greater success, though Der 
Schauspiel-director pleased at its brief run 
of public performance in Vienna soon 
after the Schonbrunn bash. 

The Emperor Joseph II paid the piper 
and called the tune, or at least the 
words: the scenarios for both operas 
were suggested, indeed outlined in great 
detail, by His Imperial Majesty. The 
original libretto of Der Schauspiel-director 
is a pretty numbing affair. First of all, it 
is long, long, long: about 800 lines of 
spoken dialogue come between the 
Overture and the first aria. The situation 
itself is amusing. An impresario tries to 
assemble an opera company, but has'a 
hard time of it because of assorted 
interferences stemming from the sexual 
dalliances and well- nourished egos of 
two rival sopranos. Stephanie's working 
out of the Imperial scenario is filled, 
though, with non-essential characters 
who engage in spacious discussion of a 
range of subjects from economics of 
theater to the present deplorable taste 
for the works of William Shakespeare 
to plain gossip (not to mention inter- 
polated scenes from other plays). The 
original text has almost certainly not 
been given in full since Schonbrunn. 
Goethe was the first to adapt the work — 
that was in 1791 — and since then, there 
has been no end to attempts to provide 
workable framework for Mozart's music. 

Our version leaves Mozart's music 
and Stephanie's sung texts absolutely 
alone. For the rest, the poet Deborah 
Trustman has written a text that gives 
the essence of the original scenario and 
provides proper occasion for Mozart's 
four vocal numbers to appear. Hen- 
Buff, who is both singer and impresario, 
is trying to cast an opera, and his house 
tenor, Herr Vogelsang (birdsong), is 
helping him get through the auditions. 
First on the schedule is a soprano he 
knows well from many years ago, Ma- 

21 



dame Herz (heart), whose specialty is 
pathos. Next is a young coloratura so- 
prano very much on the professional 
make, Mademoiselle Silberklang (silver- 
tone).* So at least it should be, but by 
administrative slip-up, the two ladies 
appear simultaneously, making no bones 
about the less than high regard in which 
they hold each other. Each sings her 
audition aria, Mme. Herz seeking to 
touch and Mile. Silberklang to charm. 

*Mozart wrote this role for Caterina Cava- 
lieri, the soprano for whose "facile gullet" 
(gelaufige Gurgel) he designed the part of Kon- 
stanze in The Abduction from the Seraglio and for 
whom he interpolated Mi tradi at the Vienna 
premiere of Don Giovanni. 



Der Schauspieldirektor 

Madame Herz's aria: 

Da schlagt die Abschiedstunde, 

um grausam uns zu trennen; 

wie werd' ich leben konnen, 

o, Damon, ohne dich? 

Ich will dich begleiten, 

im Geist dir zur Seiten 

schweben um dich! 

Und du, vielleicht auf ewig 

vergisst dafiir auf mich! 

Doch nein, wie fallt mir so was ein! 

Du kannst gewiss nicht treulos sein. 

Ein Herz, das so der Abschied kranket, 
dem ist kein Wankelmut bekannt, 
wohin es auch das Schicksal lenket! 
Nichts trennt das festgekniipfte Band. 

Mademoiselle Silberklang's aria: 

Bester Jiingling! Mit Entziicken 
nehm' ich deine Liebe an, 
da in deinen holden Blicken 
ich mein Gliick entdecken kann. 
Aber ach! Wenn diistres Leiden 
unsrer Liebe folgen soil, 
lohnen dies der Liebe Freuden? 
Jiingling, das bedenke wohl! 

Nichts ist mir so wert und teuer 
als dein Herz und deine Hand; 
voll vom reinsten Liebesfeuer 
geb' ich dir mein Herz zum Pfand. 



(If the situation is funny, the music is 
not: Mme. Herz's farewell to Damon is 
a most lovely song, and not least so the 
introduction for solo bassoon and oboe 
that was apparently an afterthought for 
the production in Vienna.) In the trio 
that erupts after the arias, Herr Vogel- 
sang, with little effect, chides the so- 
pranos and tries to restrain them. Herr 
Buff gains control of the situation, and 
in the final quartet — one in which each 
soloist has a verse leading to a refrain in 
ensemble — all agree that an artist must 
balance the proper claims both of mod- 
esty and of ego (as Goethe once said, 
"Do we truly live if others live too?"). 

— M.S. 



The Impresario 



Now strikes the hour of farewell, 

cruelly to part us. 

How ever shall I be able to live 

without you, oh Damon? 

I want to accompany you, 

and in spirit 

hover about you. 

And you, perhaps 

you will forget me for ever. 

But no, how can I even think of such a thing? 

You surely cannot be faithless. 

A heart so hurt by parting 

knows nothing of inconstancy, 

no matter where destiny may lead it. 

Nothing can sever the tightly knit bond. 



Dearest youth, with delight 

I accept your love, 

for it is in your charming glances 

that I can discover my happiness. 

But oh, if dark sorrow 

were the consequence of our love, 

could love's joys make it up to us? 

Dear youth, think on it well! 

Nothing is so precious and dear to me 
As your heart and your hand. 
Filled with the purest ardor of love, 
I give you my heart as pledge. 



Trio for Mademoiselle Silberklang, Madame Herz, and Herr Vogelsang: 



Ich bin die erste Sangerin. 
Das glaub' ich, ja, nach Ihrem Sinn. 
Das sollen Sie mir nicht bestreiten! 
Ich will es Ihnen nicht bestreiten. 



I am the prima donna. 

Ha, I believe that, that's what you say. 

I won't let you dispute that. 

I wouldn't want to dispute that. 



22 



. V: Ei, lassen Sie sich doch bedeuten! 
S: Ich bin von keiner zu erreichen, 

das wird mir jeder eingestehn. 
H: Gewiss, ich habe Ihresgleichen 

noch nie gehort und nie gesehn. 
V: Was wollen Sie sich erst entriisten, 

mit einem leeren Vorzug briisten? 

Ein jedes hat besondern Wert. 
S: Mich lobt ein jeder, der mich hort! 
H: Mich lobt ein jeder, der mich hort! 

H: Adagio, adagio, adagio! 
S: Allegro, allegrissimo! 
V: Pian, piano, pianissimo, pianississimo! 

V: Kein Kiinstler muss den andern tadeln, 
es setzt die Kunst zu sehr herab. 

H: Wohlan, nichts kann die Kunst mehr 
adeln! Ich steh' von meiner Ford' rung ab. 

S: Ganz recht, nichts kann die kunst mehr 
adeln! Ich stehe ebenfalls nun ab. 

H: Ich bin die erste! Ich, ich, ich! 
S: Ich bin die erste! Ich, ich, ich! 
H: Adagio, adagio, adagio! 
S: Allegro, allegrissimo! 
V: Ei, ei, piano, pianissimo, 

calando, mancando, 

diminuendo, decrescendo, 



V: . Now do listen to reason. 

S: I cannot be approached by anyone, 

everybody will admit that. 
H: And that's for sure, never have I heard 

or seen anyone like you. 
V: But why bother to get indignant 

and put on airs over empty privileges? 

Each is valuable in her own way. 
S: To hear me is to praise me. 
H: To hear me is to praise me. 



pian, piano, pianissimo 



Adagio, adagio, adagio! 

Allegro, allegrissimo! 

Pian, piano, pianissimo, pianississimo! 



V: No artist should run down a colleague, 
that debases art itself too much. 

H: All right then, nothing can ennoble art 
more. I renounce my demands. 

S: Quite true, nothing can ennoble art more, 
I too renounce. 



I am the first! I, I, I! 
I am the first! I, I, I! 
Adagio, adagio, adagio! 
Allegro, allegrissimo! 
Now, now, piano, pianissimo 
calando, mancando, 
diminuendo, decrescendo, 
pian, piano, pianissimo. 



H, S, 



Finale for Mademoiselle Silberklang, Madame Herz, 

S: Jeder Kiinstler strebt nach Ehre, 

wiinscht der einzige zu sein; 

und wenn dieser Trieb nicht ware, 

bleibe jede Kunst nur klein. 
H, S, V: Kiinstler miissen freilich streben. 

stets des Vorzugs wert zu sein; 

doch sich selbst den Vorzug geben, 

uber andre sich erheben, 

mach den grossten Kiinstler klein. 
V: Einigkeit ruhm ich vor alien 

andern Tugenden uns an; 

denn das Ganze muss gefallen 

und nicht bloss ein einzlner Mann. 
H, S, V: Kiinstler miissen . . . 

H: Jedes leiste, was ihm eigen, 

halte Kunst, Natur gleich wert; 

lasst das Publikum dann zeigen, 

wem das grosste Lob gehort. 
H, S, V: Kiinstler miissen . . . 

B: Ich binhier unter diesen Sangern 

der erste Buffo, das ist klar. 

Ich heisse Buff, nur um ein O 

brauch' ich den Namen zu verlangern, 

so heiss' ich ohne Streit: Buffo. 

Ergo bin ich der erste Buffo; 

und das wie ich kein's singen kann, 

sieht man den Herren doch wohl an? 



H, S, V: Kiinstler miissen 



Herr Vogelsang, and Herr Buff: 

S: Every artist covets honor 

and really wants to be the only one, 

and without that drive, 

art would remain a small sort of thing. 

V: Nevertheless, artists must strive 
to be worthy of preferment; 
but to give preferment to yourself, 
to push yourself ahead of others, 
that only diminishes the greatest artist. 

V: I commend unity 

above all other virtues; 

for it is the whole that must please, 

not just one single performer. 

V: Nevertheless, artists must . . . 

H: Let each accomplish what suits her 
best, valuing art and nature equally; 
then let the audience decide 
who merits the greatest praise. 

V: Nevertheless, artists must . . . 

B: Among these singers, I am 
the primo buffo, that is clear. 
My name is Buff, and only by one O 
need I lengthen my name, and then 
beyond duspute I'm called Buffo. 
Ergo, I am the primo buffo, 
and that I can sing like no one else 
here is surely something you can 
read on their faces. 
H, S, V: Nevertheless, artists must . . . 



H, S, 



H, S, 



23 



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24 



BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

Seiji Ozawa, Music Director 

Colin Davis, Principal Guest Conductor 
Joseph Silverstein, Assistant Conductor 
Tanglewood 1977 

Saturday, 16 July at 8:30 




NEVILLE MARRINER, conductor 

MENDELSSOHN. Symphony for strings, No. IX in C 

Grave — Allegro 
Andante 
Scherzo 
Allegro vivace 

MENDELSSOHN Piano Concerto No. 2 in D minor, Opus 40 

Allegro appassionato 
Adagio 
Finale: Presto scherzando 

TAMAS VASARY 



INTERMISSION 

MENDELSSOHN Symphony No. 4 in A, Italian 

Allegro vivace 
Andante con moto 
Con moto moderato 
Saltarello: Presto 



Seiji Ozawa and the Boston Symphony Orchestra record exclusively 
for Deutsche Grammophon. 
Baldwin piano 



25 



Notes 

Felix Mendelssohn- Bartholdy 

Symphony for Strings No. IX in C 

Piano Concerto No. 2 in D minor, 

Opus 40 

Symphony No. 4 in A, Opus 90, 

Italian 

Jakob Ludwig Felix Mendelssohn was born in 
Hamhurg on 3 February 1809 and died in 
Leipzig on 4 November 1847. Bartholdy was 
the name of the composer's maternal Uncle 
Jakob, who had changed his own name from 
Salomon and taken on Bartholdy from the 
previous owner of a piece of real estate he bought 
in Berlin. It was he who most persistently urged 
the family's conversion to Luther anism: the name 
was added to Mendelssohn — to distinguish the 
Protestant Mendelssohns from the Jewish ones — 
when Felix's father actually took that step in 
1812, the children having been baptized as early 
at 1816. Mendelssohn wrote the three works 
on this evening's program in 1823, 1837, and 
1832 respectively. These performances of the 
Symphony for Strings and of the D minor Piano 
Concerto are the first by the Boston Sym- 
phony Orchestra. 

Mendelssohn is the most astonishing 
of all the composing prodigies. Mozart 
was to go much farther, but as a teen- 
ager not even he surpasses — or often 
equals — Mendelssohn in assurance and 
certainly not in individuality. To think 
of the young Mendelssohn is to think 
first of all of the Octet for Strings, 
written 1825, the year he turned 16, and 
of the overture for Shakespeare's Mid- 
summer Night's Dream, the work of a boy 
of 17. He has found a voice unmis- 
takably his own and he uses it with the 
confidence of a seasoned professional. 
In a way he was just that. By time 
he composed the Octet he had seen, 
heard, read a lot. He had composed a 
lot, too. All advantages were his. Moses 
Mendelssohn,* his grandfather, was a 
philosopher and literary man of great 
stature — something like a Martin Buber 

*It is with him that the name Mendelssohn 
comes into the family. His father's name was 
Mendel Dessau, and he styled himself Moses 
Ben Mendel, Moses the son of Mendel. 




Mendelssohn at about the time he wrote the Symphony 
for Strings, drawn by the painter and family friend, 
Wilhelm Hensel. 

of his time, it has been suggested — who 
has an enduring monument in the title 
role of Lessing's profound and humorous 
Nathan the Wise. His father was a highly 
regarded and prosperous banker. His 
mother played the piano, sang, drew, 
and read French, Italian, English, and 
Greek authors in the original. His sister 
Fanny, four years older than himself, 
surprised the family when she was 13 by 
giving them a performance, from 
memory, of the whole of Bach's Well- 
tempered Clavier. (She, the person to whom 
Felix was closest all his life and whose 
early death without doubt hastened his, 
is one of the lost women of 19th-century 
history: her father, the firmly patri- 
archal Abraham Mendelssohn, insisted 
that music could only be an embellish- 
ment on the surface of her life and 
never its "fundamental bass." He 
managed, however, to ignore the letters 
from Uncle Jakob Bartholdy, now 
Consul in Rome, who advised against 
Felix's being allowed to become a pro- 
fessional musician, "which is after all no 
kind of career, no life, no goal.") 

With Fanny to one side of him and 
Rebecka and Paul, two and four years 
younger, on the other, Felix was the 
Crown Prince. At ten, after three years' 



26 



study with the highly competent Lud- 
wig Berger, he gave his first recital at 
the piano. He traveled widely with his 
family, turned into an accomplished lin- 
guist, and learned to execute the elegant 
drawings that adorn his letters and 
journals. He became the pupil and pro- 
tege of Carl Zelter, composer, choral 
conductor, and partner in a prolific cor- 
respondence with Goethe, and it was 
through Zelter that the boy met Goethe 
himself, improvising for him at the 
piano and thoroughly enjoying his rather 
flirtatious friendship with that 72-year- 
old Olympian eminence. 

Dated compositions by Mendelssohn 
exist from just before his eleventh birth- 
day in 1820. Twelve early symphonies — 
we use Roman numerals to distinguish 
them from the five "grown-up" sym- 
phonies — were written from 1821 to 
1823. He meant them for Sunday mu- 
sicales at home and was by no means in 
favor of having them played elsewhere 
or published. The discovery of Men- 
delssohn's pre- Octet works has been a 
development since the end of World 
War II, the harvest including, along with 
the symphonies, a D minor Violin Con- 
certo which Yehudi Menuhin was the 
first to play and record, and two con- 
certos for two pianos (composed, of 
course, for himself and Fanny). The 
Symphony No. IX was the first of the 
twelve to be published, and that hap- 
pened only in 1962. It is an ambitious, 
accomplished, original work. A solemn 
introduction in C minor precedes the C 
major allegro, and Zelter may well have 
worried about the unruliness that had 
the boy swing into A major for the 
recapitulation of his second theme. 
Perhaps, though, he understood it as 
preparation for the fairly remote E major 
in which the second movement is set 
(a very Haydnesque choice). Here Men- 
delssohn gives us something striking 
indeed, an ethereal music for four solo 
violins, spelled by some learned fugal 
writing for the lower strings by them- 
selves, then a reprise of the violin music, 
with the whole orchestra brought to- 
gether only in the coda. The typically 
elfin Mendelssohn scherzo is at least 
suggested in the next movement, whose 



trio includes a souvenir of the yodeling 
Felix would have heard on the family's 
trip to Switzerland — new territory for 
tourists then — in 1822. The finale is 
properly exuberant, if not absolutely 
successful at the last in its attempt to 
get faster and faster. 

By 1837, when Mendelssohn com- 
posed his D minor Piano Concerto for 
the Birmingham Festival — "the people 
made such a fuss over me that I am quite 
dumbfounded; I believe they clapped 
their hands and stamped for at least 
ten minutes afterwards" — he was an 
international celebrity. The years were 
filled with more travels, meetings and 
friendships with the great and famous, 
with hard work — he had written the 
oratorio Saint Paul, the Italian, Scotch, and 
Reformation symphonies, the superb and 
neglected First Walpurgis Night, string 
quartets, overtures, the first Songs With- 
out Words, had conducted the significant 
revival of Bach's St. Matthew Passion, taken 
on leadership of the Lower Rhenish 
Music Festival in Diisseldorf and of the 
Gewandhaus concerts in Leipzig — and 
with success, success, success. The oc- 
casional professional mishap, like his 
failure to land the directorship of the 
Berlin Singakadamie after Zelter's 
death, stands out as an exception in 
a period that brought him honor after 
honor. Yes, Zelter had died in 1832 just 
eight weeks after Goethe, and so in 
1835 had Abraham Mendelssohn. Fanny 
had been married since 1829. In 1836 
in Frankfurt, Felix met Cecile Jean- 
renaud, the proper and exceedingly 
pretty daughter of a French Protestant 
clergyman. Her impact was considerable: 
"I can neither compose, nor write letters, 
nor play the piano!" On 28 March 1837, 
they were married, and before long, 
things were back to normal within the 
not too romantic breast of the extra- 
ordinarily equilibrated young man. 
Writing during their honeymoon, Felix 
reported to Fanny that he had "a book 
of songs without words . . . nearly ready 
for printing," and further, "I have almost 
finished a string quartet and shall soon 
begin another. I am in the proper vein 
for working just now." The D minor 
Piano Concerto, too, is among the works 



27 



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Mendelssohn's sketch for the opening of the 
D minor Concerto. 

sketched during those weeks. "[It] is 
nothing special as a composition/' he 
wrote, "but the last movement is so 
effective as fireworks that I often have 
to laugh, and Cecile cannot hear it often 
enough." No wonder the jealous sisters 
worried about their brother, whom they 
found "definitely changed." 

In spite of Cecile and the Birmingham 
foot-stompers, the D minor Concerto 
has never shared the public favor en- 
joyed from the beginning by the G 
minor, which in 1830 he dashed off 
"almost negligently" for the beautiful 
18- year old Delphine von Schauroth, 
and of which he was also inclined to 
speak harshly. It shares certain features 
with the earlier, perhaps more impul- 
sive piece, among them the immediate 
entrance of the soloist and the linking 
of all the movements in unbroken se- 
quence (the latter being an issue that 
preoccupied Mendelssohn in several of 
his large works). Starting out with one 
of his favorite classical concertos in his 
mind, Mozart's in D minor, Mendelssohn 
reminds us again how deeply classical 
he is in orientation: his expression of 
passion comes closer to the Sturm und 
Drang gestures of Haydn and Mozart 
in the 1770s than to the Romantic 
manner of his contemporaries like 



Chopin and Schumann. He writes 
fluently, engagingly, sometimes bril- 
liantly in that mixture of the learned 
manner and the salon style that he made 
so unmistakably his own. The lyric mu- 
sic especially appeals — the second theme 
of the Allegro appassionato and the spa- 
ciously contemplative Adagio. And with- 
out doubt, the busy- work of the finale 
achieves just what it is meant to do. Not, 
to be sure, his most personal statement, 
the D minor Concerto still delights by 
its elegance and its masterful piano 
style. It deserves a better fate than its 
general neglect. 

It is hard to imagine that any musician 
has ever had trouble with the Italian 
Symphony — unless it was sheer envy. 
The surprising exception is Mendelssohn 
himself, who revised the work after its 
first performance in London in 1833 (in 
the same Hanover Square Rooms where 
Haydn led the premieres of his last 
twelve symphonies in the 1790s), but 
remained dissatisfied, refusing to per- 
mit further performance or publication 
during his lifetime. We have no clue as 
to what displeased him. He began work 
on it during an extended journey 
through Italy in 1830-31 and referred 
to it as his "Italian symphony," also 
remarking that it was the most cheerful 
piece he had yet composed. Occasion to 
complete the piece was provided by a 
resolution passed 5 November 1832 by 
the general membership of the London 
Philharmonic Society "that Mr. Men- 
delssohn -Bartholdy be requested to 
compose a symphony, an overture and a 
vocal piece for the Society, for which 
he be offered the sum of one hundred 
guineas." The public success of the new 
symphony was immense. Paganini was 
in the audience and he was so taken by 
Mendelssohn's playing of Mozart's D 
minor Concerto, K. 466, that he sug- 
gested that the two ought to play all 
the Beethoven sonatas together. Alas, 
because Paganini soon had to submit 
to surgery on his venereally infected 
larynx that extraordinary event never 
came about. 

That the new symphony made such a 
splash is no wonder. It presents one 
captivating invention after another, 



28 



from that energizing tattoo of wind 
chords with which it opens; the bound- 
ing violin melody that begins seconds 
later; the architectural genius of the 
first movement, where the material that 
leads to the exposition's repeat comes 
back only in the coda; the out-of-phase 
recapitulation (a sort of Mendelssohnian 
house specialty) with the melody re- 
appearing while the bass is still making 
its way back to the tonic; the chaste 
processional of the Andante; the deli- 
cate, and surely quite un-Italian, minuet 
with its enchanting, lightly sentimental 
close; finally, that rarity, a minor key 
finale to a symphony in major. A sal- 
tarello is literally a leaping dance, but 
the continuously running music that 
begins a minute or so into the move- 
ment is that of a tarantella, so named 
because it was believed that the only 
cure for the bite of the tarantula was to 
keep the patient in perpetual motion. 
The tarantula, it seems, has been ma- 
ligned, and its bite, though painful, is 
harmless. At harvest time, though, fid- 
dlers would walk through the fields of 
Italy, hoping for therapeutic engage- 




Mendelssohn as imagined by Aubrey Beardslee, who 
was born 25 years after the composer's death. 

ments, and who after all would wish to 
knock anything that provides musicians 
with honest and gainful employment? 

— Michael Steinberg 




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BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

Seiji Ozawa, Music Director 
Colin Davis, Principal Conductor 
Joseph Silverstein, Assistant Conductor 
Tanglewood 1977 

Sunday, 17 July at 2:30 

SEIJI OZAWA, conductor 

HAYDN Overture to Armida 

HAYDN Violin Concerto No. 1 in C major 
(cadenzas by SILVERSTEIN) 
Allegro moderato 
Adagio 
Finale: Presto 

JOSEPH SILVERSTEIN 

INTERMISSION 




HAYDN Mass in B flat, Theresa 
Kyrie 
Gloria 
Credo 
Sanctus 
Agnus Dei 

RERI GRIST, soprano 

GWENDOLYN KILLEBREW, mezzo-soprano 

JOHN ALER, tenor 

VICTOR BRAUN, baritone 

TANGLEWOOD FESTIVAL CHORUS, 

JOHN OLIVER, conductor 



Seiji Ozawa and the Boston Symphony Orchestra record exclusively 

for Deutsche Grammophon. 

Baldwin piano 

The harpsichord played at this afternoon's concert was built by Carl Fudge, 

and the organ was supplied by the Andover Organ Company. 



31 




wrod 



does not end on Sunday. It's only the beginning. 



This Week At The 
Berkshire Music Center: 



Wednesday, July 20 at 8:30 pm: 

Berkshire Music Center Vocal Music Recital 

Thursday, July 21 at 8:30 pm: 

Berkshire Music Center Orchestra, Conducting Fellows 

Saturday, July 23 at 2:30 pm: 

Boston University Young Artists Program Chamber Music Concert 

Sunday, July 24 at 10:00 am: 

Berkshire Music Center Chamber Music Concert 



These events are open to the public by making a contribution, $2.00 
minimum, to the Berkshire Music Center at the main gate, or by becoming 
a Friend of Music at Tanglewood. 



32 



Notes 



Joseph Haydn 

Overture to Armida 

Violin Concerto No. 1 in C 

Mass in B flat, Theresa 

Franz Joseph Haydn was born in Rohrau, 
Lower Austria, on 3 1 March or 1 April 1 732 
and died in Vienna on 3 1 May 1809. The 
three works on this program were written in 
1783, in the early 1760s, and in 1799 
respectively. At this afternoon's concert, Jerome 
Rosen plays the harpsichord and Philip More- 
head, the organ. 

"If anyone had told Haydn that, al- 
though he was destined for immortality, 
thousands would remain unaware that 
he had ever written a note of opera, 
he would have been blankly incredu- 
lous." Thus does Rosemary Hughes be- 
gin the chapter on vocal works in her 
admirable Haydn biography. (She does 
not, unfortunately, help much by de- 
voting only three paragraphs to Haydn's 
twenty operas.) At this concert, we 
meet Haydn as he works in three genres 
in which his work is in varying degrees 
relatively little known. Opera is the 
most lost of these genres, though last 
year's Philips recording of La fedeltd pre- 
miata (Fidelity Rewarded) has certainly jolt- 
ed the curiosity of a lot of us, as I don't 
doubt the forthcoming album of La vera 
costanza (True Constancy) will, too. Opera 
was important in the Esterhazy house- 
hold Haydn served from 1761 until 
1790, the theater itself being splendid* 
and the performance standard high. 
Armida, composed 1783, was the last of 
Haydn's operas for Esterhaza, and its 
story, drawn from the epic poem Jeru- 
salem Liberated by the 16th-century 
writer, Torquato Tasso, is one of male 
heroism brought into conflict with fe- 
male sorcery. Haydn's is one of about 
forty operas based on the story of the 
beautiful Queen Armida, a list that 

*There were actually two opera houses at 
Esterhaza, one that burned down in Novem- 
ber 1779 and a new one that was inaugurated 
with the first performance of La fedelta pre- 
miata on 25 February 1781. In the interim, 
opera was given in the marionette theater. 



includes famous operas of Lully, Handel 
(his is called Rinaldo), and Gluck, and also 
the last work Dvorak completed. 
Haydn's overture, with whose first 
measures those of the padlock quintet 
in The Magic Flute are as good as iden- 
tical, is a vivacious movement in B flat 
major and 4/4 time, interrupted briefly 
by a gentler music in triple meter. The 
scoring is for flute, two each of oboes, 
bassoons, and horns, plus strings. 

Of Haydn's concertos, just a few have 
claimed places in the repertory — the D 
major Cello Concerto, joined now by the 
recently rediscovered one in C major, 
and those two delightful late works, the 
Sinfonia Concertante of 1792 for violin, 
cello, oboe, and bassoon, and the Trum- 
pet Concerto of 1796. The rest we hear 
but rarely, and in any event, several of 
the works, including a concerto for two 
horns and another for bass, are lost. 
Though strong players wandered in and 
out of the Esterhazy orchestra over the 
years — what Haydn wrote for them in 
the symphonies is ample evidence — 
there seems not to have been much call 
for solo concertos. In any event, the idea 
of concerto seems to have engaged his 
imagination less than the more internal- 
ized dialectic of the string quartet and 
the symphony, perhaps not because, as 
one commentator has suggested, he was 
naturally democratic by temperament, 
but because he was, by his admission, 
"no wizard" as a performer. The out- 
standing concerto composers from Vi- 
valdi to Brahms were, with few excep- 
tions like Tchaikovsky, virtuosi. 

Haydn listed the C major Violin Con- 
certo in his own catalogue as "fatto per 
il Luigi." Luigi was Aloisio Luigi To- 
masini, born 1741 in Pesaro, and brought 
at 18 to Eisenstadt to serve Prince Paul 
Anton Esterhazy as violinist and valet. 
By time Haydn joined the household 
as Vice- Capellmeister, Tomasini had been 
excused from his duties as personal 
servant, sent to spend a year in Venice 
to advance his musical education, and 
was soon to advance to concert- 
master. He became a reputable composer, 
played concerts around Europe, and, 
except for a brief interval in the early 
1790s, remained in the service of the 



33 



Esterhazy family until his death in 1808. 
In the first symphonies that Haydn 
wrote for the Esterhazy orchestra, the 
Morning, Noon, and Night trilogy of 1761, 
he paid tribute to Tomasini's skill in a 
series of musically challenging solos. We 
don't know for what occasion he wrote 
this concerto — it may have been to 
celebrate Tomasini's promotion to con- 
certmaster — but we can be fairly sure 
that it was done by 1765. The work is a 
charming hybrid from that period, still 
so unsorted-out by the historians, when 
the new manner we now call "classical" 
was in the process of breaking away 
from the Baroque. The two quick move- 
ments look forward, but the beautiful 
adagio aria, so effectively set between 
framing groups of three measures each, 
is an extension of the sort of slow 
movement we know from Vivaldi's 
Winter and Spring. 

With the so-called Theresa Mass, we 
get to the fully matured, the great 
Haydn. But this work, too, was written 
for the Esterhazys, and Luigi Tomasini 
will have sat at the concertmaster's desk 



when Haydn conducted the first per- 
formance in the Church on the Hill at 
Eisenstadt on 8 September 1799. Like 
the Nelson Mass, sung here Friday of last 
weekend, the Theresa is misnamed, but 
if there is at least some connection 
between Lord Nelson and the atmo- 
sphere that informs the Missa in angus- 
tiis (Mass in Time of Angst[?]), as Haydn 
called it, there is none whatever be- 
tween the present work and any Theresa. 
It was at one time assumed that Haydn 
wrote this work for Marie Therese, wife 
of the Emperor Franz II, but that seems 
to be founded on confusion with the Te 
Deum of the same year, which was com- 
posed for the Empress. All six of Haydn's 
late masses, of which the earliest is the 
Missa in tempore belli (Mass in Time of War) 
of 1796 and the last the Wind-hand Mass 
of 1802, were written for the same pur- 
pose, and that was to celebrate the 
name day of Maria Josepha Hermene- 
gild, wife of Prince Nicholas II Esterhazy. 
When Nicholas I died in 1790, his son, 
Paul Anton II, dissolved the musical 
establishment, and that was the oc- 




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34 



casion for Haydn, after a brief stay in 
Vienna, to go on his two long and 
triumphal journeys to England. The 29- 
year-old Nicholas II, when he succeeded 
Paul Anton in 1794, restored music to 
at least something approaching the im- 
portant position it had formerly held 
in the household, and the enduring 
monument to his patronage are the six 
name day masses of Haydn, to which 
we must add the C major Mass of 
Beethoven, written for the same pur- 
pose in 1807. One imagines that it must 
have given Haydn special pleasure to 
return to Eisenstadt, no longer a servant, 
but universally recognized as the greatest 
of living composers (a place he himself 
would unhesitatingly have assigned to 
his beloved Mozart until the latter's 
death in December 1791), and the holder, 
to boot, of an honorary doctorate from 
Oxford University. And part of the 
pleasure would have been composing 
for the warmly gracious Princess, who 
not only valued his art but who, now 
that his dear friend Marianne von Gen- 
zinger was gone, knew better than any- 
one how to provide for the comfort of 
his aging person, making sure that the 
supply of Malaga wine didn't run out 
and paying the occasional medical bills. 
Like the Nelson Mass, the Theresa Mass 
has trumpets and drums in the or- 
chestra (though only two of the latter), 
plus a pair of clarinets, strings, and 
organ. The sound is far milder, though, 
with the trumpets neither as high nor as 
prominent as in the earlier work, being 
saved here primarily for reinforcement 
of tutti passages, and with the organ 
likewise kept in the background as an 
accompanying instrument. The musical 
content itself is of density and strength. 
The Kyrie has a solemn adagio intro- 
duction, and the allegro starts in an 
energetic fugal style that is relaxed but 



not really abandoned for the more lyrical 
setting of the words Christe eleison. The 
Gloria is big and jubilant, and how ef- 
fective those few moments are in which 
Haydn allows the trumpets and drums 
some prominence. In contrast to Haydn's 
usual practice, the Qui tollis is forceful 
and quick, with almost non-stop triplets 
in the violins, and a miraculous hush 
and change of harmonic perspective on 
suscipe deprecationem nostram. 

The Credo again is large in style and 
forthright, with enormous energy in 
the busy sixteenth- note figurations of 
the violins (Wagner — and this can only 
be coincidence — starts the congrega- 
tional hymn at the beginning of Meister- 
singer with the same phrase). With the 
Incarnaius, Haydn gives us the first slow 
music since the Kyrie, and also the first 
extended passage for the four soloists 
without chorus. In an astonishing stroke, 
Haydn continues in minor for the account 
of the resurrection. For the clauses about 
the Holy Ghost, words that don't usually 
inspire composers especially, Haydn finds 
one of his most wonderfully soaring 
phrases: the alto sings it first on et in 
Spiritum Sanctum, with the soprano con- 
tinuing, the bass later picking it up for 
qui locutus est, the tenor for confiteor, and 
the soprano once more on el exspedo. That 
et vitam venturi is set fugally is a matter of 
custom, but the vigor and tightness of 
this fugue are altogether particular. 
Among the wonders yet to come are the 
sunshine of G major (where we haven't 
been yet) when the Benedictus arrives and 
the astonishing breadth with which that 
movement is imagined and composed, 
the stern minor- mode beginning of the 
Agnus Dei, and the exuberant high spirits 
with which he brings this, one of the 
greatest of his works, to its close. 

— Michael Steinberg 



Kyrie eleison. 
Christe eleison. 
Kyrie eleison. 



Lord, have mercy upon us. 
Christ, have mercy upon us. 
Lord, have mercy upon us. 



Gloria in excelsis Deo. 

Et in terra pax hominibus bonae voluntatis. 
Laudamus te, benedicimus te, adoramus te, 
glorificamus te; gratias agimus tibi propter 



Glory be to God on high, 
and in earth peace to men of good will. 
We praise thee, we bless thee, we worship 
thee, we glorify thee, we give thanks to thee 



35 



magnam gloriam tuam; Domine Deus, Rex 
coelistis, Deus pater omnipotens. 
Domine fili unigenite Jesu Christe; Domine 
Deus agnus Dei, filius Patris; 
Qui tollis peccata mundi, miserere nobis. 
Qui tollis peccata mundi, suscipe depreca- 
tionem nostram. Qui sedes ad dexteram 
Patris miserere nobis; 

Quoniam tu solus sanctus, tu solus Dominus, 
to solus altissimus Jesu Christe, cum sancto 
spiritu in gloria Dei Patris. 
Amen. 



for thy great glory, O Lord God, heavenly 
King, God the Father Almighty. 
O Lord, the only- begotten Son Jesus Christ; 
O Lord God, Lamb of God, Son of the Father 
that takest away the sins of the world, have 
mercy upon us. Thou that takest away the 
sins of the world, receive our prayer. Thou 
that sittest at the right hand of God the 
Father, have mercy upon us. 

For thou only art holy; thou only art the Lord; 
thou only, O Christ, with the Holy Ghost, art 
most high in the glory of God the Father. 
Amen. 



Credo in unum Deum, Patrem omnipoten- 
tem, factorem coeli et terrae, visibilium 
omnium et invisibilium; 

Et in unum Dominum Jesu Christum, filium 
Dei unigenitum, et ex Patre natum ante 
omnia saecula, Deum de Deo, lumen de 
lumine, Deum verum de Deo vero, genitum, 
non factum, consubstantialem Patris per 
quern omnia facta sunt; 

Qui propter nos homines et propter nostram 
salutem descendit de coelis, 

Et incarnatus est de Spiritu Sancto ex Maria 
Virgine, et homo factus est; 

Crucifixus etiam pro nobis, sub Pontio Pilato 
passus et sepultus est; 

Et resurrexit tertia die secundam Scripturas; 
Et ascendit in coelum; sedet ad dexteram 
Patris, et iterum venturas est cum gloria 
judicare vivos et mortuos, cujus regni non 
erit finis; 

Et in Spiritum Sanctum, Dominum et vivi- 
ficantem, qui ex Patre Filioque procedit, qui 
cum Patre et Filio simul adoratur et conglori- 
ficatur, qui locutus est per Prophetas, et in 
unam sanctam catholicam et apostolicam 
ecclesiam, confiteor unum baptisma in remis- 
sionem peccatorum, et exspecto resurrec- 
tionem mortuorum. 

Et vitam venturi saeculi. Amen. 



I believe in one God, the Father Almighty, 
Maker of heaven and earth, And of all things 
visible and invisible: 

And in one Lord Jesus Christ, the only- 
begotten Son of God, Begotten of his Father 
before all worlds, God of God, Light of Light, 
Very God of Very God, Begotten not made, 
Being of one substance with the Father, By 
whom all things were made: 

Who for us men, and for our salvation came 
down from heaven, 

And was incarnate by the Holy Ghost of the 
Virgin Mary, And was made man, 

And was crucified also for us under Pontius 
Pilate. He suffered and was buried, 

And the third day he rose again according to 
the Scriptures, And ascended into heaven, 
and sitteth on the right hand of the Father. 
And he shall come again with glory to judge 
both the quick and the dead: Whose kingdom 
shall have no end. 

And I believe in the Holy Ghost, The Lord 
and Giver of life, Who proceedeth from the 
Father and the Son, Who with the Father and 
Son together is worshipped and glorified, 
Who spake by the Prophets. And I believe one 
Catholic and Apostolic Church. I acknowledge 
one Baptism for the remission of sins. And I 
look for the Resurrection of the dead, 

And the life of the world to come. Amen. 



Sanctus, sanctus, sanctus, Donimus Deus 

Sabaoth. 

Pleni sunt coeli et terra gloria tua; 

Osanna in excelsis. 

Benedictus qui venit in nomine Domini. 

Osanna in excelsis. 



Holy, holy, holy, Lord God of hosts, 
heaven and earth are full of thy glory. 
Hosanna in the highest. 
Blessed is he that cometh in the name of the 
Lord. Hosanna in the highest. 



Agnus Dei, qui tollis peccata mundi, miserere 

nobis. 

Agnus Dei, qui tollis peccata mundi, dona 

nobis pacem. 



O Lamb of God, who takest away the sins of 
the world, have mercy upon us. 
O Lamb of God, who takest away the sins of 
the world, give us peace. 



36 



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37 



Guest Artists 



Tanglewood Festival Chorus 

The Tanglewood Festival Chorus was 
formed under the joint auspices of the 
Berkshire Music Center and Boston 
University in 1970. The director since 
its foundation, John Oliver, is director 
of choral and vocal activities for Tangle- 
wood, a member of the MIT faculty 
and director of the MIT Choral Society. 
The Festival Chorus made its debut at 
Symphony Hall in a 1970 performance 
of Beethoven's Ninth Symphony, and 
has since taken part in concert directed 
by William Steinberg, Seiji Ozawa, Eu- 
gene Ormandy, Colin Davis, Arthur 
Fiedler, and Michael Tilson Thomas. 
Members of the chorus come from the 
Greater Boston area and from all walks 
of life, and they rehearse throughout 
the year. The Chorus's first appearance 
on records, in the Boston Symphony's 




Damnation of Faust, conducted by Seiji 
Ozawa, was nominated for a Grammy 
as the best choral recording of the 
year. Their most recent appearance with 
the BSO was in April, when they 
sang Roger Sessions' When Lilacs 
Last in the Dooryard Bloom'd under 
Seiji Ozawa's direction. 



Sopranos 

Margaret Aquino 
Cynthia Armstrong 
Deborah London Berg 
Marie-Christine Casey 
Susan Chapman 
Margo Connor 
Susan R. Cook 
Lou Ann David 
Kathrin Davidovich 
Rebecca Flewelling 
Yvonne Frazier 
Marilyn L. Haskel 
Alice Honner 
Beth Howard 
Frances Kadinoff 
Carole Stevenson Kane 
Vivian LaMorder 
Barbara Levy 
Joyce Lucia 

Virginia Lambert Mason 
Betsy Moyer 
H. Diane Norris 
Joan Pernice 
Nancy Peterson 
Gail Ransom 
Rhonda Rivers 
Judith L. Rubenstein 
Barbara A. Scales 
Bette L. Snitzer 
Ann K. Staniewicz 



Jane Stein 
Janet Wade 
Pamela Wolfe 

Altos 

Mary Bennett 
Skye Burchesky 
Anne Butler 
Bette Carey 
Doris Halvorson Coe 
Elizabeth H. Colt 
Mary Crowe 
Mary Curtin 
Catherine Diamond 
Ann Ellsworth 
June Fine 

Roberta A. Gilbert 
Thelma Hayes 
Donna Hewitt 
Beth Holmgren 
Karol Hommen 
Leah Jansizian 
Alison D. Kohler 
Dorothy Love 
Sharron J. Lovins 
Nina Saltus 
Frances Schopick 
Janet Shapiro 
Amy Wing Sheridan 
Lynne Stanton 
Nancy Stevenson 



Laurie Stewart 
Florence A. St. George 
Lisa Tatlock 
Kathi Tighe 
Susan Watson 
Maria E. Weber 
Mary J. Westbrook 

Tenors 

Kent E. Berwick 
Paul Blanchard 
Sewell E. Bowers, Jr. 
Albert R. Demers 
Paul Foster 
Robert Greer 
Dean A. Hanson 
Wayne Henderson 
John Henry 
James P. Hepp 
Jeffrey Hoffstein 
Richard P. Howell 
Peter Krasinski 
Paul Kowal 
Gregg Lange 
Henry L. Lussier, Jr. 
Jack Maclnnis 
Al Newcomb 
Ray Parks 
Andrew Roudenko 
Vladimir Roudenko 
Peter D. Sanborn 



Robert W. Schlundt 
William Severson 
John Smith 
Douglas Thompson 

Basses 

Peter Anderson 
Antone Aquino 
Mitchell Brauner 
Richard Breed 
Neil Clark 
John W. Ehrlich 
Bill Good 
Carl D. Howe 
Daniel J. Kostreva 
Henry Magno, Jr. 
Martin Mason 
Jim Melzer 
Frank G. Mihovan 
John P. Murdock 
Jules Rosenberg 
Peter Rothstein 
Robert Schaffel 
Frank Sherman 
Richard M. Sobel 
Douglas Strickler 
Jean Renard Ward 
Nathaniel Watson 
Pieter Conrad White 
Robert T. Whitman 
Howard J. Wilcox 



38 



Reri Grist 

Soprano Reri Grist of New York City 
attended the New York High School of 
Music and Art, and Queens College 
where she earned a B.A. in music. She 
has appeared with the Metropolitan 
Opera as Rosina in The Barber of Seville 
(her debut, 1966), Sofie in Der Rosen- 
kavalier, Adina in L'Elisir d'amore, Olympia 
in Tales of Hoffman, the Oscar in Un ballo 
in maschera, Norina in Don Pasquale, and 
Gilda in Rigoletto. She has performed at 
the Koln Opera, Milano's Piccolo Scala, 
the Holland Festival, the Salzburg Easter 
Festival, the Spoleto Festival, the Zurich 
Opera, and the Vancouver, New York, 
and Santa Fe operas, as well as with the 
New York Philharmonic, and the San 
Francisco, Toronto and New Jersey sym- 
phonies. She has recorded for Angel, 
Columbia, Deutsche Grammophon, 
RCA, and Vanguard labels. 



Elizabeth Parcells 

Elizabeth Parcells of Boston graduated 
from New England Conservatory in 
1974. She has studied with Willis Pater- 
son, Elsie Inselman, Elizabeth Marion, 
Janice Harsanyi, and Mark Pearson. She 
has been a soloist with the Colleguim 
Musicum conducted by Daniel Pink- 
ham, the New England Conservatory 
Chorus conducted by Lorna Cooke 
DeVaron, the Opera Theater directed 
by David Bartholomew, and the Con- 
servatory Orchestra and Contemporary 
Ensemble conducted by Gunther Schul- 
ler. In and around Boston, Miss Par- 
cells has performed at Kings Chapel 
under Daniel Pinkham, with the Handel 
and Haydn Society under Thomas Dunn, 
the Cecilia Society under Donald Tee- 
ters, the Cambridge Society for Early 
Music under Iva Dee Hiatt, the Master- 
works Chorale under Allen Lannom, 
the Brandeis Chorale, the Concord 
Symphony, and the Boston Pops under 
Arthur Fiedler. She has spent previous 
summers at Tanglewood in the Phyllis 
Curtin Seminar and at the Berkshire 
Music Center. In 1975 and 1976 she 
placed second in the Metropolitan Opera 
New England Regional Auditions. 




Neil Rosenshein 

A native of New York City and an 
American-trained tenor, Neil Rosen- 
shein made his professional debut three 
years ago as Count Almavia in The 
Barber of Seville with the Opera Association 
of Florida. After his many and varied 
performances at the 1974 Wolf Trap 
Festival, he toured with Sarah Caldwell 
and the Opera Company of Boston. Of 
his many appearances during the 1974- 
75 season were his debut with Seiji 
Ozawa and the BSO in Boston and New 
York singing all tenor parts in L'Enfant 
et les sortileges, and his performance in 
the concert version of Stravinsky's The 

39 




Rake's Progress with the Gardner Museum 
Series of Boston conducted by John 
Moriarty. In 1975 Rosenshein sang the 
title role in L'Ormindo at both the Cara- 
moor Festival and with the BSO at 
Tanglewood conducted by Seiji Ozawa. 
In 1975-76 he sang with Sarah Cald- 
well and the Opera Company of Boston, 
the Syracuse Opera Company, the San 
Francisco Spring Opera, the Albuquer- 
que Opera Theater, and the Wolf Trap 
Festival. During 1976-77 he appeared 
with the San Francisco Opera, and in 
Boston and New York he sang in the 
BSO November performance of Handel's 
Messiah conducted by Colin Davis. 




Opera Company of Boston in their pro- 
duction of Fidelio, and in a recital at 
Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia. 
He currently teaches voice at B.U. School 
for the Arts. 

Deborah Trustman 

Deborah Trustman's work has been 
published in Poetry magazine. She comes 
from a musical background, is a graduate 
of Radcliffe College, and is on the staff 
of Harvard University's Office for the 
Arts. She wrote her Impresario text 
especially for this performance. 
The license- plate on her Porsche 
says MOZART. 



Mac Morgan 

Mac Morgan earned a BA and Artistic 
degree from Eastman School of Music. 
Since his graduation he has appeared 
with the Goldovsky Opera Theatre, the 
New York City Center Opera, the Pitts- 
burgh, Atlanta, and Miami opera com- 
panies, and on NBC and CBS television. 
During the summer of 1975 he taught 
at the Boston University Tanglewood 
Institute, conducted four master classes, 
and sang in Berlioz's L'Enfance de Christ 
and Mendelssohn's Elijah with the School 
for the Arts Chorus and Orchestra. 
During 1975-76 he appeared with the 
Bach- Festival in Winter Park, Florida in 
performances of Bach's St. Matthew 
Passion and Mozart's Requiem, with the 




40 




Neville Marriner 

Neville Marriner's early career was 
that of a violinist. He studied in London 
and Paris, and subsequently became a 
member of the Boyd Neel Orchestra, 
the London Mozart Players, the Phil- 
harmonia, and the London Symphony, 
as well as of many chamber ensembles. 
In 1956, he founded the Academy of St. 
Martin-in-the-Fields, based originally 
at the beautiful Georgian church in Lon- 
don by that name, and now the most 
comprehensively recorded chamber or- 
chestra. It was Pierre Monteux who 
encouraged Marriner to study conduc- 
ting. In 1969, Marriner also became 
conductor of the Los Angeles Chamber 
Orchestra. He has toured widely with 
both his orchestras and has appeared as 
guest conductor with many important 
orchestras in Europe, North America, 
and Japan. He conducted the Boston 
Symphony at Tanglewood in 1975 and 
1976, and for the first time in Sym- 
phony Hall in December of 1976. His 
records are on Argo, Angel, Colum- 
bia, and also Philips, with whom he has 
recently signed an exclusive contract. 

Tamas Vasary 

Hungarian pianist Tamas Vasary, born 
in 1933, made his concert debut when he 
was eight years old, and gave his first 
recital when he was nine. He became 
Zolan Kodaly's protege at the Franz 



Liszt Academy when he was fifteen, and 
a member of its faculty when he was 
twenty. Concurrently with his teaching 
position, he performed throughout 
Hungary and Eastern Europe. He won 
the Queen Elisabeth of Belguim Prize 
in 1956, the Bach and Paderewski medals 
in London in 1960 as well as compe- 
titions in Paris and Rio de Janiero. After 
his 1961 London debut, he performed 
in the United States with the Cleveland 
Orchestra conducted by George Szell 
at Carnegie Hall. Since then he has 
appeared with the New York Philhar- 
monic, the St. Louis Symphony, the 
Berlin Philharmonic, the Vienna Sym- 
phony, the Orchestre de Paris, the Or- 
chestra de la Suisse Romande, the London 
Symphony, the London Philharmonic, 
the Royal Philharmonic, and the New 
Philharmonia, under conductors such as 
Ansermet, Dorati, Ceccato, Commissiona, 
Fricsay, Kempe, Previn, and Solti. After 
his conducting debut in Paris with the 
Orchestre Lamoureux in 1973, Vasary 
conducted the Liszt Chamber Orchestra 
of Budapest in a tour of France which 
opened at the Menton Festival. His 
Deutsche Grammophon recordings 
include works by Chopin, Debussy, 
Liszt, and Rachmaninoff. 




41 




Joseph Silverstein 

Joseph Silverstein joined the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra in 1955 at the age 
of 23. He has been Assistant Conductor 
since the beginning of the 1971-72 sea- 
son, and Concertmaster since 1962. A 
native of Detroit, he began his musical 
studies with his father, a violin teacher, 
and later attended the Curtis Institute. 
His teachers have included Joseph 
Gingold, Mischa Mischakoff and 
Efrem Zimbalist. 

Mr. Silverstein has appeared as soloist 
with the orchestras of Detroit, Den- 
ver, Los Angeles, New York, Indianap- 
olis, Milwaukee, Philadelphia and Ro- 
chester, and abroad in Jerusalem and 




B 


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M 



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Twin Fires Arcade 

12 unique and exciting shops dealing in 

Antiques 

to include 

Prized Acquisitions from London 

Early Welsh, Georgian & Victorian unfinished pine furniture 
and numerous, assorted & interesting accent and decorator 

pieces from England 

The Arcade is a re-creation of mid-1800's shops and "stalls" of Camden Passage, Islington, 

London, England, and is located indoors in a recently refurbished barn on the former 

Walter Pritchard Eaton estate at the junction of Under Mountain Road (Rt. 41) and 

Berkshire School Road - Sheffield, Massachusetts 

413-229-8307 

From N.Y. Taconic to Route 23, turn right (6 miles) to Route 41, turn right 3 miles to Berkshire School Rd. 

in Sheffield, turn left 1 block on left is Barn. 

From Conn. Route 7 into Sheffield, turn left into Berkshire School Rd. to end of road — on right is 

Twin Fires Antiques. 

From Mass. (Tanglewood) Route 7 into Sheffield, turn right on Berkshire School Rd. toend of road on 

right is Barn. 




42 



Brussels. He appears regularly as soloist 
with the Boston Symphony and con- 
ducts the Orchestra frequently. He has 
also conducted, among others, the Los 
Angeles Philharmonic, the Rochester 
Philharmonic and the Jerusalem Sym- 
phony. In 1959 he was one of the 
winners of the Queen Elisabeth of Bel- 
gium International Competition, and in 
1960 he won the Walter W. Naum- 
burg Award. 

Mr. Silverstein is first violinist and 
music director of the Boston Symphony 
Chamber Players and led their 1967 
tour to the Soviet Union, Germany and 
England. He has participated with this 
group in many recordings for RCA 
Victor and Deutsche Grammophon and 
recently recorded works of Mrs. H.H.A. 
Beach and Arthur Foote for New World 
Records with pianist Gilbert Kalish. He 
is Chairman of the Faculty of the Berk- 
shire Music Center at Tanglewood, and 
Assistant Professor of Music at 
Boston University. 

Last fall, Mr. Silverstein led the Bos- 
ton University Symphony Orchestra to 
a silver medal prize in the Herbert von 
Karajan Youth Orchestra Competition 
in Berlin. 

Gwendolyn Killebrew 

Born into a musical family, Gwendo- 
lyn Killebrew began piano lessons when 
she was five. She later studied organ 
and French horn and participated in 
orchestra, band and chorus in high 
school. In 1963, while studying at 
Temple University, she was chosen to 
be a soloist with the Philadelphia Or- 
chestra conducted by Pablo Casals in his 
oratorio EI Pesebre. She studied with 
Hans Heinz at Juilliard and in 1966 
won First Prize in the Belgian Inter- 
national Vocal Competition. She has 
been artist-in-residence at the Dart- 
mouth Congregation of the Arts, where 
she performed contemporary works with 
composers Hans Werner Henze, Frank 
Martin and Aaron Copland. 

She is active in both concert and 
opera, and has sung at the world's great 
music centers and festivals. Her many 
orchestral appearances have included 
the New York Philharmonic, Seattle 




Symphony, Dallas Symphony, Pitts- 
burgh Symphony, Los Angeles Phil- 
harmonic, St. Louis Symphony, Mil- 
waukee Symphony, as well as the Bos- 
ton Symphony Orchestra. 

John Aler 

Born in Baltimore, John Aler holds 
bachelor's and master's degrees in voice 
from Catholic University in Washing- 
ton. He has sung with most of the 
musical institutions of the Baltimore- 
Washington area — the Opera Society of 
Washington, the Washington Oratorio 
Society, the Choral Arts Society of 
Washington, the Baltimore Opera (in 
whose national contest he won second 
prize), and the Choral Arts Society 
of Baltimore. 

He has also been soloist with the 
Boston Symphony, the Boston Phil- 
harmonia, the Atlanta Symphony, the 
Brooklyn Philharmonia, the Buffalo Phil- 
harmonic, the Greenwich Choral So- 
ciety, the Rhode Island Civic Chorale, 
and the Pro Arte Chorale. He has 
appeared during the summer at the 
festivals of Tanglewood, Newport and 
Cabrillo. He was invited to the American 
Opera Center of the Juilliard School to 
sing in Gian Carlo Menotti's production 
of Don Pasquale, and also was heard in 
Samuel Barber's Anthony and Cleopatra. 

He recently won the first prize of 
the 1975 Concurso Internacional in San- 

43 




R6£ 



tiago, Chile, the first prize of the 
National Arts Club Competition, and 
was a finalist in the 1975 Metropolitan 
Opera National Auditions. During June 
of this year, Mr. Aler won first prize 
for men in the prestigious Concours 
International de Paris and a special award 
for French Art Songs. 

Victor Braun 

Victor Braun was born in Windsor, 
Ontario. He studied voice at the Uni- 
versity of Western Ontario in London 
and at the Royal Conservatory of Music, 
University of Toronto. In 1956 he joined 
the Canadian Opera Company. He won 
the International Mozart Competition 




Allan Albert, Artistic Director 
BERKSHIRE PLAYHOUSE — 

July 6-17 

WILLIAM ATHERTON 
GILDARADNER 
Dunning & Abbott's CHRIS SARANDON 
BROADWAY JILL HAWORTH 



Saul Bellow's 
THE LAST ANALYSIS 



Rodgers & Hart's 
I MARRIED AN ANGEL 



William Inge's 

COME BACK, 

LITTLE SHEBA 



July 20-31 
RONLEIBMAN 



Aug. 3-14 
PHYLLIS NEWMAN 



Aug. 17-28 
DANA ANDREWS 
ESTELLE PARSONS 



UNICORN THEATRE, 

Three New Musicals 

July 7-24 July 26-August 1 4 
THE WHALE SHOW A FABLE 

by Jean-Claude van Italie 
August 1 6-28 and Richard Peaslee 
THE CASINO 



PROPOSITION THEATRE 

July 8-August 28 
THE PROPOSITION 



Performance Times for the Playhouse 

Evgs.: Wed., Thurs., Fri. 8:30 p.m.; Sat. 9 p.m.; Sun. 7 p.m. 

Mats.; Thurs. 2 p.m.; Sat. 5 p.m.; Sun. 3 p.m. 

Prices for the Playhouse 

Broadway, The Last Analysis, Come Back, Little Sheba 

Fri. & Sat. (9 p.m. pert, only) $8.95. 7.50; 
All other perfs. S7.95. 6.50 
I Married An Angel 

Fri. & Sat. (9 p.m. pert, only) $9.95. 8.50: 

All other perfs. $8.95, 7.50 

MAIL ORDERS FILLED PROMPTLY! 

Berkshire Theatre Festival, Stockbridge. Mass. 

01262. Enclose stamped, self-addressed envelope. 

RESERVE BY PHONE! Call 413 • 298-5536 or 298-4800 



in Vienna and made his debut at the 
Frankfurt Opera House in 1963. Since 
then, he has performed at La Scala, the 
San Francisco Opera, the Royal Opera 
House, Covent Garden, and the Canadian 
Opera Company. He has appeared in re- 
citals, oratorios, and concerts under con- 
ductors such as Ancerl, Klemperer, and 
Ozawa. Under Georg Solti, he sang 
Wolfram in the complete recording of 
Tannhauser. In recent years he has been 
the leading baritone of both the Ba- 
varian State Opera in Munich and the 
Cologne Opera. Ford in Falstaff, Jocha- 
naan in Salome, and Golaud in Pelleas and 
Melisande have been among his major 
roles. In March 1977 he made his Boston 
debut in Russian with the Opera Com- 
pany of Boston. 



44 



Coming concerts: 



Have a 

face to face 

folk with 

Elizabeth Grady 




Introducing our new half hour 
momrenonce rrearmenr for young, 
normal healthy skin, only $10. 

Our regular one hour facial pore 
cleansings still only $1 7. 50. 

Never a charge for consultation/ 
skin analysis. Call Ms. Grady for an 
appointment 536-4447. 39 Newbury 
Street Boston. 



ELIZ4BEH 
GB4DY 

k FACE FIRST A 



"If music 

be the food 

of love, 

play on! 



^H^ OGDEN FOOD SERVICES 

Providing food and drink. 
Enjoy our assortment of wine and cheese 



Friday, 22 July at 7 (Weekend Prelude) 

SCHUBERT 

Quintet in C, D. 956 

BOSTON SYMPHONY CHAMBER 
PLAYERS AND TASHI 



Friday, 22 July at 9 

SEIJI OZAWA conducting: 

RAVEL 

Alborada del Gracioso 

CHAUSSON 

Poeme de I'amour et de la mer 
SHIRLEY VERRETT, soprano 

RIMSKY-KORSAKOV 

Scheherazade 



Saturday, 23 July at 8:30 

SARAH CALDWELL conducting: 

BERLIOZ 

Scenes from Les Troyens 
SHIRLEY VERRETT, soprano 

STRAVINSKY 

Petrushka (1911) 



Sunday, 24 July at 2:30 

SEIJI OZAWA conducting: 

MOZART 

Piano Concerto in A, K. 488 
PETER SERKIN, piano 

TAKEMITSU 

Quatrain 

TASHI— Richard Stoltzman, 

Ida Kavafian, 

Fred Sherry, 

Peter Serkin 

FALLA 

The Three Cornered Hat 

BEVERLY MORGAN, mezzo-soprano 



45 




One of Soviet Georgia's senior citizens thought 

Dannori was an excellent yogurt. She ought to know. 

She's been eating yogurt for 137 years. 



CAMACHICH KVITZINIA. PHOTOGRAPHED IN ATRARA. SOVIET GEORGIA. 



46 



The Berkshire Music Center 

"One more thing should come from this scheme, 
namely, a good honest school of musicians." 

— Henry Lee Higginson, on founding the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra. 

The late Serge Koussevitzky fervent- 
ly shared Henry Lee Higginson's vision 
of a "good honest school for musicians" 

— an academy where young musicians 
could extend their artistic training and 
broaden their experience under the 
guidance of eminent professionals. 
More than any other person, it was 
Koussevitzky who made the vision a 
reality; he was Director of the Berkshire 
Music Center from its founding in 1940 
until his death in 1951, and his vigorous 
leadership has remained an inspiring 
example in the years since. 

Serge Koussevitzky was succeeded by 
Charles Munch, and it is a mark of the 
Center's success that the Boston Sym- 
phony's present Music Director, Seiji 
Ozawa, studied here during the Munch 
era. Alumni of the Center are among 
the most prominent and active mem- 
bers of the music world; more than ten 
percent of the members of this country's 
major orchestras are graduates of the 
Center, as are many of the world's 
notable conductors, instrumental solo- 
ists and singers. 

Today the primary responsibility for 
the Center's direction is in the hands of 
Gunther Schuller, composer, writer, 
conductor and President of the New 
England Conservatory until June 1977. 
Average enrollment is somewhat over 
400 each summer, of which approxi- 
matelyl40 are members of the Center's 
Fellowship Program; this provides free 
tuition (and in many cases free board 
and expenses) for instrumentalists, 
singers, conductors and composers of 
post-graduate calibre. In addition to the 
Fellowship Program, Boston University, 
through its Tanglewood Institute, offers 
several college- credit programs for tal- 
ented high school musicians; the noted 
soprano Phyllis Curtin directs a singers' 
seminar highlighted by her own master 
classes. Finally, each summer the Cen- 
ter's Festival of Contemporary Music 
(August 13-17 this year), presented in 



cooperation with the Fromm Music 
Foundation at Harvard, offers a broad 
spectrum of the most advanced music of 
today's composers in a gala week of 
performances. 

The Boston Symphony's Concert- 
master and Assistant Conductor Joseph 
Silverstein heads a faculty that includes 
principal players and members of the 
Orchestra and faculty members of Bos- 
ton University's School of Fine Arts, 
plus leading soloists, conductors and 
composers. The Center has numerous 
studios for practice and chamber music, 
and an extensive library of music litera- 
ture and scores. Rehearsals and con- 
certs of the Berkshire Music Center 
Orchestra and other student groups 
take place mostly in the Theatre- 
Concert Hall, while lectures, seminars, 
conducting classes, vocal and choral re- 
hearsals, composers' forums and cham- 
ber music concerts take place in the 
Chamber Music Hall, in the West Barn, 
in the Hawthorne Cottage, on the Re- 
hearsal Stage, and in the small studios 
both on the Tanglewood grounds and in 
buildings leased in Lenox. Each summer 
the Baldwin Piano and Organ Company 
generously provides over 100 keyboard 
instruments for individual practice; 
other instruments — percussion, for ex- 
ample — are provided by the Orchestra. 

The Boston Symphony is assisted in 
supporting the Center by the National 
Endowment for the Arts, a Federal 
agency, as well as by individual and 
corporate sponsors. Scholarships are 
awarded to the majority of the students, 
who are chosen by audition on a com- 
petitive basis. The cost of the scholar- 
ship program is large and adds sub- 
stantially to the Orchestra's yearly 
deficit — one major reason for the estab- 
lishment of the Friends of Music at 
Tanglewood, a group that provides 
critical support for the Center. A brief 
account of members' privileges is printed 
on page 41, and more information may 
be had at the Friend's Office near the 
Main Gate. We invite you to see and 
hear for yourself the remarkable calibre 
of the Center's young musicians. 

47 



Tanglewood 
Talks & Walks 



Tanglewood Talks & Walks are a fasci- 
nating series of five Thursday lecture- 
luncheons at noon in the Tanglewood 
Tent, followed by a special guided tour 
of Tanglewood. Guest speakers include 
the musicians, conductors, and staff 
of the Boston Symphony Orchestra and 
Berkshire Music Center. Bring a lunch — 
we'll provide the refreshments. Please 
call the Tanglewood Friends Office at 
(413) 637-1600 for reservations. $2 con- 
tribution to the public, free to Friends 
of Tanglewood. 

LUNCHEON 12:15 
TALK 1:00 
WALK 1:30 

1977 Tanglewood Talks & Walks 

14 JULY— VICTOR YAMPOLSKY 

Principal Second Violin 
Boston Symphony Orchestra 

28 JULY— JAMES F. KILEY 

Operations Manager, 
Tanglewood 

4 AUGUST— PASQUALE CARDILLO 

Clarinet, 

Boston Symphony Orchestra; 
Principal Clarinet, 
Boston Pops Orchestra 

18 AUGUST— BETSY JOLAS 

Composer in Residence, 
Berkshire Music Center 

25 AUGUST— CAROL PROCTER 

Cello, 

Boston Symphony Orchestra 



Friends of Music at Tanglewood 

Lenox, Massachusetts 01240 

(413) 637-1600 



Rensselaerville 
Piano Festival 

July 18 -July 30 

The Institute 
on Man and Science 

Rensselaerville, New York 

DOROTHY TAUBMAN, Musical Director 
ENID STETTNER, Administrative Director 

July 18 • Paul Tobias. Cellist 

Elizabeth Moschelli, Pianist 
July 19 • Jonathan Feldman, Pianist 
July 20 • Jocheved Kaplinsky, Pianist 
July 21 • Julia Hoetzman, Pianist 
July 22 • Natan Brand. Pianist 
July 23 • Samuel Baron, Flutist 

Carol Baron, Pianist 
July 24 • Edna Golandsky, Pianist 
July 25 • Katherine Teves, Pianist 
July 26 • Joshua Pierce, Pianist 
July 27 • Steven DeGroote, Pianist 
July 29 • Nina Tichman, Pianist 
July 30 • Zitta Finkelstein, Pianist 

Ail Concerts at 8:00 RM. 
Kawai official piano 

Admission $3.00 
For Tickets or Reservations 

(518) 239-4635 
or write Enid Stettner, 
Rensselaerville, N.Y 12147 



1771 was a sood 

year for our Lobster Pie, 

This year 

it's even better. 




Publick House 

Good Yankee cooking, drink and lodging. 
On the Common — Sturbridge. Mass.— (617) 347-3313 



48 



The Friends of Music 
At Tanglewood 

Membership provides you with exciting 

opportunities and privileges all year long. 

It's the secret buy of the Berkshires! 



Free Berkshire Music 
Center Concerts: 

There are over 40 concerts each sum- 
mer performed by the members of the 
Berkshire Music Center, the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra's summer academy 
for the advanced study of music. These 
outstanding mid-week concerts include 
chamber music recitals, full orchestra 
concerts, vocal and choral programs, 
and the annual Festival of Contem- 
porary Music, Tanglewood's "festival 
within a festival/' Friends Concert 
Memberships for individuals and 
families are available for $25.00. 

Advance program information and 
ticket ordering forms: 

Approximately one month before the 
public sale of seats in the early spring, 
Friends will be sent the advance Berk- 
shire Festival programs and a priority 
ticket application. Friends will also re- 
ceive the monthly Boston Symphony 
Orchestra publication, BSO. 



Tent Membership: 

The Tanglewood Tent, available to con- 
tributors of $75 and over, provides a 
hospitable gathering place behind the 
Music Shed where food and drink may be 
purchased on concert days. Hot buffet 
dinners are served on Saturday evenings 
beginning at 6:30 p.m. (Reservations 
must be made through the Friends 
Office no later than the Thursday after- 
noon preceding each Saturday 
evening buffet.) 

Special parking for Friends: 

Two convenient reserved parking areas 
are available to all donors of $150 or 
more for all Boston Symphony Orches- 
tra concerts: either the Box Parking Lot 
(Hawthorne Street entrance), or the 
Tent Parking Lot (West Street entrance). 

For information, contact: 
Friends of Music at Tanglewood 
Lenox, Ma. 01240 
(413) 637-1600 



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49 



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STOCKBRIDGE 




Summer Estate of 
DANIEL CHESTER FRENCH 

Sculptor of the 
Lincoln Memorial 

Studio, Residence, Barn 

Sculpture Gallery, Period 

Garden, Nature Trail 

Daily 10-5 

May - October 

off Rte. 183, Glendale 

a property of 

the National Trust for Historic Preservation 



THE 
OLD CORNER HOUSE 



*: y%x&. . 




Paintings by 

NORMAN ROCKWELL 

On permanent exhibit 

Open Year Round — Daily 10-5 p.m. 

Except Tuesdays 

Adults $1.00 Children 25< 



The Executive Committee 

Tanglewood Council of the 

Boston Symphony Orchestra 

Mrs. James Garivaltis 

Mr. Curtis Buttenheim 

Co- Chairmen 

Mr. John Kittredge 

Secretary /Treasurer 

Mrs. Stephen V.G. Morris 
Mrs. Murray Klein 

Talks and Walks 

Mr. Colin MacFadyen 
Mr. Ashley Smith 

Business 

Mrs. Kelton M. Burbank 
Mrs. John Kittredge 

Benefits 

Mrs. Charles Capers 

Receptions 

Mr. Robert A. Wells 

Community Affairs 

Mrs. D.H. Potter 
Mr. William Harris 

Tent 

Mrs. Jean Massimiano 
Mr. Joseph Duffy 

Sales and Information 

Mrs. Gary A. Lopenzina 
Mrs. William H. Ryan 

Student Affairs 

Mrs. Archie Peace 

Foreign Students 

Mrs. John Kittredge 

Tanglewood- Boston Liaison 

Mrs. A. Lloyd Russell 
Boston- Tanglewood Liaison 

Mr. Peter van S. Rice 
Mrs. John S. McLennan 

Nominating 



50 



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G° U *% 




CUETAINS 

At TkE Rf:d Lion Inn 

STOCKBR1DGE MASSACHUSETTS 

Monday thru Saturday 10 A.M.-5 P. U. 
Send for Frvv Catalog 



VISIT BERKSHIRE LAKES ESTATES 

EXPERIENCE COUNTRY LIVING 

AT ITS BEST! 

Small Lakefront Community 

Swim and boat on 2 crystal clear mountain 
lakes. Play tennis, badminton, volleyball 
and basketball on community courts. Live 
in privacy adjacent to a large state forest. 

Berkshire Lakes Estates 

Yokum Pond Road 

Becket, Mass. 01223 

Tel. 413-623-8747 

TO VISIT: Mass. Turnpike \p Lee, Mass.-Rt. 20 
East. Continue 4 miles to Belden's Tavern. Left 
for 2 miles to Berkshire Lakes Estates. 



What's 
Happening 

in the 

Berkshires? 

Phone Toil-Free 

and Find Out! 



Things to do today - exhibits, arts, music, 
theatre, ballet, garden shows, special tours, 
all the current events in the Berkshires. 



SOUTHERN BERKSHIRES 

528-7677 

From Great Barnngton, 
Sheffield, West StockDndge 



CENTRAL BERKSHIRES NORTHERN BERKSHIRES 

637-7677 662-7677 




FromStockbndge, Lee. 
Lenox. Prrtsfield 



From Williamstown. 
Adams. North Adams 



A service of the Berkshire Vacation Bureau 
205 West St., Pittsfield, Mass. 

(A Division of the Berkshire Hills Conference). 



Williamstown 
Theatre Festival 




Nikos Psacharopoulos 

Our 23rd Season Includes: 

Misalliance. Sherlock Holmes. Alter the Fall, 

Platonov and Learned Ladies 

June 30 - August 27 

Phone Reservations: 413-458-8146 

PO. Box 517. Williamstown, Ma. 02167 



"uruou-e/ cu\A cajxAaAu ruxul& cLUbine?' 



Brunch 

Picnic 
Baskets 




Dinner 

After-Concert 
Supper 



J. Perspico Factor 
Restaurant 

Open Till 1 A.M. 

25 Church St. • Lenox, Mass. 
637-2996 



51 



We Curtis Hotel 

Food & Lodging 
LENOX, 637-0016 



A BOOK "TO DO" NOT 
"JUST TO READ" 




ABERKSHIRE SOURCEBOOK 



Your personal guide to Berkshire County: 
its history, geography and major land- 
marks. Available at area bookstores and 
gift shops for just $ 2,95. Published by The 
Junior League of Berkshire County, Inc. 



WILL 



HE 



AMSV1LLE- 



INN 




i>34*MfSfc 



A fine, small inn featuring 
superb Country French Cuisine 

LUNCH • DINNER 
Light Supper After Tanglewood 

Rte. 41 , between W. Stockbridge 
and Gt. Barrington 

Reservations Recommended by 

413-274-6580 INN PERSPECTIVE 



DELI -SHOP 

SANDWICHES • CATERING 
TAKE OGT SERVICE 

1 15 Elm Street, Pittsfield, Massachusetts. 
Tel. 442-5927 

Featuring Hot Pastrami & Hot Corned Beef 
Sandwiches 

Hebrew National Delicatessen • Rolls & Bagels 
baked daily • Imported & Domestic cheeses 

• Lox & smoked fish • Barbecued chicken 

• Fresh made salads • Party Platters 

Open Daily 8 to 6 



The new home of 
the world famous 
Alices Restaurant 




AT flVflLOCH 



Breakfast • Brunch 

• Lunch • Dinner 

• Late Supper • Cocktail Lounge 

• Entertainment • MOTEL 

• tennis • pool 

across the road from Tanglewood 
rte. 183 Lenox 637-0897 



The Sunshine Stage, 

Holliston Theatre, Route 183, 
Lenox, Mass. 01240. Tel. 413-637-0534. 

Year-round professional regional theatre featuring 
plays, films and children's theatre. Cafe on prem- 
ises. Frank Bessell, Artistic Director. 



THECLOTHESLOFT 

"Fine Sportswear Outlet" 

179 Main Street, Great Barrington 
164 North Street, Pittsfield 



a little jewel in the Berkshires" cJQse .zW>aj.H7< > A/sM?rfb 



I a 

(413)243-0181 or 637-2644 

At Comfortable rooms, good food and drink in 
IT a country atmosphere. 

1^ Open Daily Lunch & Dinner 

^^^ Tony Ferrelli Innkeeper 



VUyPU VgflflZE 



Accommodations for private parties. We 
cater to parties, banquets and social 
gatherings. Orders to take out. 

Chinese Polynesian Restaurant * 

LENOX, MASS. For Reservations ^* 

(413)443-4745 

Open Daily 1 1 :30 'til 10 pm. Fri. & Sat til 1 am 




^IdStonemitlforp 



Route 8, Grove St., Adams, Ma. 

HANDPRINT WALLPAPER 

Factory Outlet 

Open Mon-Fri 10-4, Sat 9-1 2:30 




' FANTASY MAN 



Food, drink, lodging. Live music week 
ends. After concert, a 10 minute 
walk from the Lion's Gate. 
WHEATLEIGH 637-0610 




Fashion Doesn 't Stop At Size 14 

BEAUTIFUL CLOTHES FOR 

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52 



WHY WAIT TO ENTER COLLEGE? 
SIMON'S ROCK EARLY COLLEGE 

Designed for the student who wishes to avoid the 

duplication of high school and college work 

Liberal Arts - B.A. and A. A. Degrees - Fully Accredited 

The interest of those who have completed the 10th or 1 1th 
grade of high school is invited 

Admissions Office 

Simon's Rock Early College 

Great Barrington, MA 01230 

Telephone: 413-528-0771 




Tanglewood 
Tradition 



Our outdoor Courtyard 
— colorfully abounding 
with Impatient plants — 
serves luncheons, 
dinners, snacks and 
drinks. Our indoor 
Lion's Den features sandwiches, 
drinks and live entertainment. 
Both are open till 1 a.m. Phone: 
413-298-5545. Route 7, Stockbridge, 
Massachusetts. Since 1773. 

£& The Red Lion Inn 




tJ\\jOAA& (SJrulruiLV LtriiicLtuzA' 



Route 57 



Tolland, Mass. 



Telephone 413 - 258-4538 

A wide selection of antiques ranging 

from furniture, china and paintings. 

We also feature an extensive 

collection of primitive art 

from New Guinea. 

Open by appointment every day 
except Sunday. 



To reach a 

mature audience who 

attend Boston Symphony, 

Pops and Tanglewood, 

call Steve Ganak Ad Reps, 

Statler Office Bldg., 

Boston, Mass. 02116 

617-542-6913 



* 



If you'd like your own tote bag showi 
support public broadcasting (other ~ 
Chanrtel 17 logo), cl»3nd send to/W 
Box 17, Schenectady, NX 1230/. 

G $60 Sustaining Me 

□ $30 Regular Member 

Name 





53 



WEI 

; 1 ■ ,•„..>. 


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... I 1 '• ■ 




|7o CHURCH STREET LENOX. MASS. 413-637-2319 | 



TUBE FEDLAR INN 1 

*.1d OPERA HOUSE 




36 Luxury Rooms 

FOOD«DR!MK 'LODGING 

Exit 16-1-91 
Holvoke, Mass 

(413) 532-9494 




Located in the Township of Becket, Mass. 

Norman Walker, Director 

Grace Badorek, Comptroller 

Donald Westwood, Promotional Director 



FIRST WEEK— July 5 — 9 
Eight Soloists from the 
Royal Danish Ballet 

SECOND WEEK- 
July 12—16 
Cultural Center of the 
Philippines Dance Co. 

(American debut 
of the Company) 

THIRD WEEK— July 19—23 
Teodoro Morca 
(Flamenco in Concert) 
Jacob's Pillow Dancers, 
Classical Pas de Deux 

FOU RTH WEEK — 

July 26 — 30 

Anne Marie DeAngelo 

and Lawrence Rhodes 

May O'Donnell 

Concert Dance Company 

Bhaskar (dances o' India) 

FIFTH WEEK— August 2—6 
Twyla Tharp 
Dancers and Dances 

SIXTH WEEK— August 9—13 
Ohio Ballet Company 

How to Reach Jacob's Pillow: 

Approx.150 miles from Boston near Tangle- 
wood. Lee-Pittsfield exit on the Mass. Turnpike. 
Public transportation from Boston via 
Greyhound to l_-e, Mass. 

America's FIRST Dance Festival 



SEVENTH WEEK— 

August 16—20 

Dennis Wayne's Dancers 

EIGHTH WEEK— 

August 23—27 

Contemporary Dancers 

of Winnipeg 

(United States debut 

of the Company) 

Joyce Cuoco & Youri Vamos 

Jacob's Pillow Dancers 

Special Added Event 
September 2 — 4 
Hartford Ballet 

Performances: Perform- 
ances are held Tuesday 
through Saturday, Curt- 
ain times: Tuesday, 
7:30 p.m., Wednesday, 
Friday and Saturday, 
6.40 p.m., Thursday and 
Saturday Matinees: 
3:00 p.m. Tickets: 
S8.00 and $6.00. Avail- 
able at Ticketron, 
Bloomingdale's or the 
Jacob's Pillow Box Office 



I 



Jacob's Pillow Dance Festival 
Mailing Address: Box 287, Lee, Mass. 01238 

(413) 243-0745 



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Sumrnsf Concert^ 

Gospel singers, Ukrainian dancers, 
Mime, Big Band Jazz, Folk singers... 

DE CORDOVA AMPHITHEATER 
Sandy Pond Rd., Lincoln, MA. 

Concerts 3:30pm 
Tickets:$2.50 
for info call 
259-8355 



Ad was placed in cooperation with 
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54 



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The 

Impresario 



Words by 

Deborah Trustman 



©copyright 197 7 Deborah Trustman all rights reserved 



OVERTURE 



The Impresario, Herr Buff, sweeps on stage wearing a purple cap and accompanied by Herr 
Vogelsang, a tenor. 

Ah, good day, my dear Herr Vogelsang, 

How kind of you to come along 

today and listen 

to these sopranos audition. 

We must begin to plan the coming season 

— good singers are soon booked — with good reason, 

and to my mind 

these ladies are the best we'll find, 

and they are asking fees that fit 

our projected budget's deficit. 

Madame .Herz has been invited first, 
I know there can be nothing worse 
than two sopranos singing in one room, 
Miss Silberklang is due at noon. 

You are young, you do not know the ways 

jealous prima donnas can behave 

to make one pay attention 

to their talents. I mention 

this, since frequently we must 

tolerate their histrionic fuss. 

They rage thus and they call it art; 

they tell you that it's written in the part 

and that an artist must subsume her personality 

to perform. 

Their passion's target's me; 
it's aimed appropriately. 
I fashion the artistic entity, 
I guard the musical integrity. 
Succeed or fail, it's due to me. 
Besides, I have the money. 

I demand that musically 

the quality be high, but serendipity 

is rare, and full houses we ensure 

by playing operas we've heard before. 

It's a rare audience that will endure 

contemporary sound. I produce secure 

old-fashioned works my patrons love to hear 

or my accounts would soon be in arrears. 

If I make certain 

at the last curtain 

that most of the crowd 

is humming aloud, 

they will come back again 

and again and again 

in spite of the rain. 

You accuse me of timidity, 
but my basic sin's cupidity, 
Herr Vogelsang, you must excuse 
my philosophic rambling. I muse; 



TANGLEWOOD 1977 



Friday, 15 July 



The mezzo-soprano solo in the Mendelssohn Psalm will be sung 
by Kathryn Asman. 



nostalgic I we not 

Madame Her/ tor years, but 

she used to be extremely pretty. 

I sang with her once in ttte. 

I m sure she has not changed 

She p an extraordinary range 

and she was passionate, artistically, of course. 

She sang with great dramatic force 

in German. She said that sounded closest to the truth. 

They let her do it in her youth. 

She wanted opera to be esoteric; 

I m translation it was simply barbaric. 
Perhaps it's well the public does not understand 
the lyrics: they are frequently inane or bland. 
Music by itself should lift the spirits 
Comprehension would impair its 
function. 

And, my dear Herr Vogelsang, 
Madame Herz has long been Number One. 
Her manner's quite effusive, 
but her ego's not conducive 
to collaboration. 

That you will see — that needs no elaboration. 
She's late already We'll soon be in a bind. 
1 knew she'd never come on time. 
She'll rush in breathless, hair dishevelled, 
and claim that I'm a nasty devil, 
to wake her up at such an early hour. 
She cannot vocalize, her voice is sour, 
and, anyway, she's no silly ingenue 
grabbing at a chance for a debut. 

Ill be patient. 111 remind her 

of a tune in G minor, 

a mournful key, that aria 

from Damone e Rognone, an early opera 

by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. 

She's sung it for years, it's close to her heart. 

By the way, I do not know Miss Silberklang, 

but I have friends who heard her when she sang 

here last summer, some of that modern stuff 

that strains the voice and makes its edges rough. 

As to her artistic temperament, 

I remain completely ignorant. 

The two sopranos, Mme. Herz and Miss Silberklang, enter simultaneously from opposite sides 
the stage. They are dressed m clashing colors. They see each other and stop short. They stand 
facing each other, threateningly. The Impresario rushes between them. He grasps Mme. Herz's 
hand and bends over it. 

Dear Madame Herz, I kiss your hand! 
We have not met for years! How can 

jch time have passed? How well you look! 
Your charm is undiminished! I took 
you for an ingenue! 
Do you recall what time we made our rendezvous? 



i ild Butt you i annol impress 
me with rhetoru Vain arabesque, 

it is grist foi my mill 
\ i low 11 yOU arc still 

Shi is early I'm on time, more 01 less 

Impresario 

Now, Madame Her/, you know you're late, 

and I beg you, please do not berate 

me for your charming peccadillos 

Your waist stays slender as ,1 willow, 

C ome, come my Jew what will you sing for us, 

a bit of sweet insouciant flutt, 

or that gorgeous, heart-rending farewell 

from . nt th.it you d^ so well? 

Herz 

(smiling but. naturlic h 



MADAME HERZ'S ARIA 

Madame Herz, with what exquisite tenderness 

you sing that moving ana I must confess 

1 find myself quite touched. This >s so unexpected 

If I had the luck to find lo\ (""directed 

at me — in real life, of course —we'd never part 

I must remind myself that this is only art 

Back to business. I must collect 
myself. Miss Silberklang. I am correct, 
we've never met ? 

1 1' Mme Herz) My dear, this ladv is a colleague, not a threat. 
(To Miss Silberklang) I'm sorry that I inconvenience you 

[o Mme. Herz) But I fear we really should continue. 
Please go, if you'd prefer. 
Please stay, but I defer 
to you You have my total sympathy 

There is no question of supremacy 

We work together here 

I t ry to make it cle.u 

what matters is the whole 

What good is it if every separate role 

is sung as in recital? 

I he drama's lost, the vital 

tension's gone. The audience demands 

its money back, and that I cannot stand. 

Miss Silberklang, you have a first-rate reputation 
and looking at this resume, youi education's 

sound I suppose, in order to suggest 

the purest musicality, you are singing the Urtext? 

Silberklang 
(grimlyl Natiirlich. 



MISS s|| Ml KKI \N(,'S \KI \ 



]mprx 

Wh.it \ irtuosit) ' 

Wh.it luminosity 

of tone! Wli.it t.u ilit) 

what agility! 

Such intelligence! 

Such innocence! 

Such delight 1 

\lv friends were right! 

i ou can men a< t' 

You're not another vocal .nroh.it 

who leaps from note to note 

sounding frigid and remote 

To my increased surprise I see 

that you demand a tiny fee! 

Ml hire you. Miss Silberklang 

but I think you ought to change your name 

to -omething short a syllable that will. 

if you would c\uise me, sell. 

I can see a great career 
tor you, my dear! 
Your youthful vigor, 

coupled with my biggei 

reputation 

a combination 

that cannot lose! 

You will not refuse! 

I am sure of it 

I — I mean — we will profit! 

You'll be the sensation 

of the next generation 1 

Ah, Susanna, 

Ah, Pamina, 

Fiordiligi, Cherubino 1 

Critics will have reason to esteem you! 

Madame Herz, you fume! 

I assure you there is room 

for your capricious temperament; 

your position here is permanent! 

I'll let you pick the music, 

take any part, you choose it, 

as you wish, 

if you insist. 

Miss Silberklang, you rage! 

It's unbecoming at your age 

to show a violent temper. 

Do not try to simper! 

You know I can't afford 

to let you go Soon you'll be adored, 

a prima donna of my making, 

but what a risk I'm taking! 

They both demand stage center! 



Madame Herz, be calm 

Miss Silberklang, what's wrong 7 

This is out of my control! 

I feel I'm losing hold! 

There is no cause for strife. 

Art is pure delight! 

I must be getting old! 

Herr Vogelsang, please help me 

1 know this is not healthy 

Is there something you can do? 

I put my faith in you! 

Please come to my rescue! 

Herz 

I'm the better of the two! 

Silberklang 

I'm the better of the two! 

Herr Vogelsang throws up his hands. 

TRIO 

Impresario 

Please, I've had enough! 

If your enmity is such 

I will let you go. 

After all, I run this show. 

It must go on without you if 

you cannot patch this petty rift 

You are, each of you, superb 

I've hardly ever heard 

two such lovely voices blending 

And now, I want a happy ending. 
Our sole concern is for our art, 
and everyone must shape his part 
to enhance the operatic whole. 
This is our concerted goal. 

But while you vent your vanitv. 

while you babble your inanities, 

you're forgetting who 1 am 

I am the quintessential ham. 

I am your Impresario 

an unfulfilled Lothario 

I am, in short, your clownish Faust, 

and I bring up and down the house. 

QUARTET 



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SMIRNOFF®VODKA.80&100 PROOF. DISTI LLED FROM GRAIN. STE. PIERRE SMIRNOFF FLS. (DIVISION OF HEUBLEIN. INCORPORATED ) HARTFORD. CONNECTICUT 




Seiji Ozawa, Music Director 

Colin Davis, Principal Guest Conductor 
Joseph Silverstein, Assistant Conductor 

Ninety- Sixth Season 1976-1977 



The Trustees of the Boston Symphony Orchestra Inc. 

Talcott M. Banks, President 

President Sidney Stoneman, Vice-President 

Vice-President John L. Thorndike, Treasurer 



Philip K. Allen, Vice 
Mrs. Harris Fahnestock, 



Vernon R. Alden 

Allen G. Barry 

Dr. Leo L. Beranek 

Mrs. John M. Bradley 

Richard P. Chapman 

Dr. George Clowes 

Abram T. Collier 

Henry A. Laughlin 



Nelson J. Darling, Jr. 

Archie C. Epps III 

E. Morton Jennings, Jr. 

Edward M. Kennedy 

George Kidder 
Edward G. Murray 

Trustees Emeriti 

Harold D. Hodgkinson 



Albert L. Nickerson 

Mrs. James H. Perkins 

Irving W. Rabb 

Paul C. Reardon 

David Rockefeller Jr. 

Mrs. George Lee Sargent 

John Hoyt Stookey 

John T. Noonan 



Administration of the Boston Symphony Orchestra 



Thomas D. Perry, Jr. 

Executive Director 



Thomas W. Morris 

Manager 

Gideon Toeplitz Daniel R. Gustin 

Assistant Manager Assistant Manager 

Joseph M. Hobbs Walter Hill Dinah Daniels 

Director of Development Director of Business Affairs Director of Promotion 

Richard C. White Anita R. Kurland Niklaus Wyss 

Assistant to the Manager Administrator of Youth Activities Advisor for the Music Director 

Donald W. Mackenzie James F. Kiley 

Operations Manager, Symphony Hall Operations Manager, Tanglewood 

Michael Steinberg 

Director of Publications 

Programs copyright ® 1977 Boston Symphony Orchestra Inc. 



Contents: 

page 



Tanglewood 4 

Seiji Ozawa 7 

Map 8 

Information 9 



page 



Programs 11-45 

Berkshire Music Center 47 

Friends 49, 50 



The Board of Overseers of the Boston Symphony Orchestra Inc. 

Dr. Leo L. Beranek 

Chairman 



Mrs. Norman L. Cahners 
Vice Chairman 

Charles F. Adams 

Mrs. Frank G. Allen 

Mrs. Richard Bennink 

David W. Bernstein 

David Bird 

Gerhard Bleicken 

Frederick Brandi 

Curtis Buttenheim 

Mrs. Henry B. Cabot 

Mrs. Mary. Louise Cabot 

Levin H. Campbell, III 

Johns H. Congdon 

Arthur P. Contas 

Robert Cushman 

Michael J. Daly 

Mrs. C. Russell Eddy 

Paul Fromm 

Carlton P. Fuller 

Mrs. Thomas J. Galligan, Jr. 



Weston P. Figgins 
Vice Chairman 

Mrs. Thomas Gardinei 

Mrs. James Garivaltis 

Mrs. Robert Gibb 

Jordan Golding 

Mrs. John L. Grandin 

Mrs. .R. Douglas Hall, III 

Mrs. Howard E. Hansen 

Bruce Harriman 

Mrs. Richard D. Hill 

Mrs. Amory Houghton, Jr 

Richard S. Humphrey, Jr. 

Mrs. Jim Lee Hunt 

Mrs. Louis I. Kane 

Leonard Kaplan 

Benjamin Lacy 

Mrs. James F. Lawrence 

Roderick MacDougall 

John S. McLennan 

Colman M. Mockler, Jr. 

Mrs. Elting E. Morison 

Richard P. Morse 



Mrs. Arthur I. Strang 

Secretary 

David G. Mugar 

Dr. Barbara W. Newell 

Stephen Paine 

Harry Remis 

Mrs. Peter van S. Rice 

Mrs. Samuel L. Rosenberry 

Mrs. Jerome Rosenfeld 

Mrs. George Rowland 

Mrs. A. Lloyd Russell 

Mrs. William Ryan 

Francis P. Sears, Jr. 

William A. Selke 

Gene Shalit 

Samuel L. Slosberg 

Richard A. Smith 

Mrs. Edward S. Stimpson 

Mrs. Richard H. Thompson 

D. Thomas Trigg 

Roger Woodworth 




Boston 
University 
langlewood 
Institute 



Norman DelloJoio, 

Executive Director 



Summer Instrumental and Vocal Programs for the outstanding high school/ 
college-age musician. Private study with master artists including members of the 
faculty of the Boston University School of Music and the Boston Symphony 
Orchestra. Chamber music, orchestral and vocal performances atTanglewood. 

For information: Boston University Tanglewood Institute, 
855 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02215. 

A program offered by the Boston University School for the Arts in association 
with the Berkshire Music Center/Boston Symphony Orchestra. 
Twelfth Season 




The Berkshires are a perfect place ... for people, 
for families and for businesses. The kind of place 
where an unsurpassed quality of life is available. 

In the Berkshires the average commute is 10 
minutes. Golf courses, tennis clubs, ski resorts, 
theatres, lakes, and fine restaurants are at your 
doorstep. We provide excellent schools — both public 
and private — and the Berkshires are the perfect place 
to raise a family 

It's no accident that titans of industry have lived 
and worked in the Berkshires. Our labor force still 
believes in a day's work for a day's pay. And the 
Berkshires offer a readily available pool of labor. Our 
schools offer vocational programs and governmental 
training dollars are available. 

Most important, we want businesses to locate in 
the Berkshires. That's why our banks have launched 
a program of financial assistance to attract new 
industry and the County funds a full-time organization 
to assist you. 



If you have the opportunity to move a business, 
or influence a business relocation, consider the 
Berkshires. At Berkshire County Development 
Commission, we have compiled data to prove that 
the Berkshires add up for business reasons. Come see 
us or write on your letterhead for more information. 
Or, if you know of a business contemplating 
relocation, let us know. We welcome your business. 



the Berkshires 

Alan C. Marden 

Berkshire County Development Commission 

205 West Street 

Pittsfield, Massachusetts 01201 

Phone: (413) 499-4474 



U 



Definitely not 
to be missed... 

"Herbert Kupferberg's Tanglewood 
is bursting with information that 
even some of us who worked there . 
had missed It catches the spirit 
and truth of that beautiful place." 
— Francis Robinson, 
N.Y. Metropolitan Opera 

"Reads as excitingly as a who- 
done-it!" — Julius Rudel, 

New York City Opera 
"Unquestionably the definitive 
Tanglewood history to date." 
— Christian Science Monitor. 



TANGLEWOOD 




by m 

Herbert 
Kupferberg 

8x10. 280 pages. 
Over 150 photos. 
Index. $9.95 paperback. 
McGRAW-HILL BOOK COMPANY 



HANCOCK SHAKER 
VILLAGE 

Original 18th Century 
Village Restored 

Open daily 9:30-5:00 

Adults $3 Children $1 

Annual Kitchen Festival 
Week of August 1st 

Route 20 Five miles West 
of Pittsfield, Mass. 



Tanglewood 

In August, 1934, a group of music- 
loving summer residents of the Berk- 
shires organized a series of three 
outdoor concerts at Interlaken, to be 
given by members of the New York 
Philharmonic under the direction of 
Henry Hadley. The venture was so 
successful that the promoters incor- 
porated the Berkshire Symphonic 
Festival and repeated the experiment 
during the next summer. 

The Festival committee then invited 
Serge Koussevitzky and the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra to take part in the 
following year's concerts. The Orches- 
tra's Trustees accepted and on August 
13, 1936, the Boston Symphony gave 
its first concert in the Berkshires (at 
Holmwood, a former Vanderbilt estate, 
later the Center at Foxhollow). The series, 
again consisting of three concerts, was 
given under a large tent, and a total of 
nearly 15,000 people attended. 

In the winter of 1936, Mrs. Gorham 
Brooks and Miss Mary Aspinwall 
Tappan offered Tanglewood, the Tap- 
pan family estate, with its buildings and 
210 acres of lawns and meadows, as a 
gift to Koussevitzky and the Orchestra. 
The offer was gratefully accepted, and 
on August 12, 1937, the Festival's 
largest crowd thus far assembled under 
a tent for the first Tanglewood concert, 
a program of music by Wagner. 

As Koussevitzky began The Ride of the 
Valkyries, a storm erupted, overpowering 
the music and causing the concert to be 
interrupted three times before the first 
half could be completed. The second half 
of the program had to be changed, 
because of water damage to some of the 
instruments, and when the concert 
ended, Miss Gertrude Robinson Smith, 
one of the Festival's founders, came to 
the stage and told the audience that the 
storm had demonstrated the need for a 
permanent structure. 

A hundred thousand dollars, she said, 
would be needed for this purpose, and 
the response to her plea was so generous 
that within a short time the amount was 
fully subscribed. Plans for the Music 
Shed were drawn up by the eminent 



architect Eliel Saarinen, and, as modi- 
fied by Josef Franz of Stockbridge, who 
also directed construction, it was com- 
pleted on June lt>, 1938, a month ahead 
of schedule. Seven weeks later, Serge 
Koussevitzky led the inaugural concert, 
which included a performance of Beet- 
hoven's Ninth Symphony. By 1941, the 
Theatre-Concert Hall, the Chamber 
Music Hall and several small studios — 
all part of the Berkshire Music Center, 
which had begun operations the pre- 
ceding year — were finished, and the 
Festival had so expanded its activities 
and its reputation for excellence that it 
attracted nearly 100,000 visitors. 

Today Tanglewood annually draws 
close to a quarter of a million visitors; 
in addition to the twenty-four regular 
concerts of the Boston Symphony, there 
are weekly "Prelude" concerts and open 
rehearsals, the annual Festival of 
Contemporary Music, and almost daily 
concerts by the gifted young musicians 
of the Berkshire Music Center. Arthur 
Fiedler and the Boston Pops perform 
each summer, and the Festival also 
includes a series of concerts by popular 
artists. The season offers not only a 
vast quantity of music but also a vast 
range of musical forms and styles, all 
of it presented with a regard for artistic 
excellence that makes the Festival 
unique. Tanglewood and the Berkshire 
Music Center, projects with which 
Koussevitzky was involved until his 
death, have become a fitting shrine to 
his memory, a living embodiment of 
the vital, humanistic tradition that was 
his legacy. 





IMIilC 

FM SO. 3 mHz 

We bring you fine music 
AND dozens of interesting 
events — live and without 
commercials. Sit in with us 
at the National Press Club, 
where the next day's head- 
lines are often made. Enjoy 
"All Things Considered," a 
fascinating magazine of news 
and issues. (Nothing else like it 
in broadcasting !) Savor some 
of the most satisfying thea- 
tre productions ever aired. 
Revel in delightful, intelligent 
conversation. 

Listen . . . and if you 

like what you hear, 

write for our free monthly 

program directory. 

WAMC 
Albany Medical College 
Albany, New York 12208 










npr 



National Public Radio 

for eastern New York 
and western New England 



mmmmmmn 

The Shed under construction in 193 8 



Why do I work seven days a week? 
That's all there are. Besides 
if you really love what you do 

it's not work. 




Robert J. Lurtsema 

Host, Morning Pro Musica 

Everyday 7am-Noon 




Artists in the Night 
Hayes Burnett plays 
a great mix of jazz 
sounds. Mon-Fri 



ll-2:30am 




The Boston 
Symphony Orchestra 
at Tanglewood 
Fridays at 9pm, 
Saturdays at 
8:30pm, Sundays 
at 2:30pm 
July and August 



The Spider's Web 
— our storybook for 
the entire family 
Mon-Fri. 7:30pm 



All Things Considered 

— the best news 
program of its kind 

— every day at 5pm 



'GBH Radio 
89.7FM 

Radio that makes sense 
of your day. 



Seiji Ozawa 

Seiji Ozawa became Music Director of 
the Boston Symphony Orchestra in the 
fall of 1973. He is the thirteenth con- 
ductor of the Orchestra since its found- 
ing in 1881. 

He was born in Hoten, Manchuria in 
1935, and studied both Western and 
Oriental music as a child. He attended 
Toho School of Music in Tokyo and 
graduated with first prizes in composi- 
tion and conducting. Shortly after his 
graduation, he won first prize at the 
International Competition of Conduc- 
ting at Besancon, France, and was in- 
vited by Charles Munch, then Music 
Director of the Boston Symphony and a 
judge at the competition, to spend a 
summer studying at Tanglewood. 

In 1964 and for the next five seasons, 
Mr. Ozawa was Music Director of the 
Ravinia Festival. At the beginning of the 
1965- 66 season he became Music Direc- 
tor of the Toronto Symphony, a posi- 
tion he relinquished four seasons later 
to study and guest conduct. In 1970 he 
accepted the position of Artistic Direc- 



tor of the Berkshire Music Festival, and 
in December of the same year he began 
his inaugural season as Conductor and 
Music Director of the San Francisco 
Symphony Orchestra, titles that he held 
concurrently with his position as Music 
Director of the Boston Symphony. In 
the spring of 1976 he resigned his San 
Francisco position although he remained 
Honorary Conductor for the 
1976-77 season. 

Mr. Ozawa's recordings include: on 
the Deutsche Grammophon label, Ber- 
lioz's Symphonie fantastique, La damnation de 
Faust, Romeo et Juliette (which was 
awarded a Grand Prix du Disque), Ives's 
Symphony No. 4 and Central Park in the 
Dark, and de Falla's Three-cornered Hat, 
and, on the New World Records label, 
Griffes's Songs of Fiona McLeod. Record- 
ings soon to be released are: Bartok's 
Miraculous Mandarin Suite and Music for 
Percussion, Strings, and Celeste, Tchaikov- 
sky's Symphony No. 5, Brahms's Sym- 
phony No. 1, and Rimsky-Korsakov's 
Sheherazade on Deutsche Grammophon, 
and Session's When Lilac's Last in the Door- 
yard Bloom'd on New World Records. 



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For 105 years we've been serious 
W about people who make music. 

In 1872 Boston University established the first professional music program 
within an American university to train creative and talented students for 
careers in music. 105 years later the Boston University School of Music is 
still doing what it does best. 

• Performance • Music Education • History and Literature • Theory and Composition 



strings 

Walter Eisenberg, violin 
Madeline Foley, chamber music 

'Gerald Gelbloom, violin 

'Bernard Kadinoff, viola 
Endel Kalam, chamber music 

'Robert Karol, viola 

'Eugene Lehner, chamber music 

* Leslie Martin, string bass 
George Neikrug, cello 

'Mischa Nieland, cello 

Leslie Pamas, cello 
'Henry Portnoi, string bass 
' William Rhein, string bass 

Kenneth Sarch, violin 

* Roger Shermont, violin 

* Joseph Silverstein, violin 
Roman Totenberg, violin 
Walter Trampler, viola 

* Max Winder, violin 
'Lawrence Wolfe, string bass 



woodwinds 

Edward Avedisian, clarinet 
'PasqualeCardillo, clarinet 
'Doriot Anthony Dwyer, flute 

Roderick Ferland, saxophone 

* Ralph Gomberg, oboe 

* John Holmes, oboe 
•Phillip Kaplan, flute 
'James Pappoutsakis, flute 
•Richard Plaster, bassoon 

* Matthew Ruggiero, bassoon 

* Felix Viscuglia, clarinet 
•Sherman Walt, bassoon 
•Harold Wright, clarinet 

brass 

* Ronald Barron, trombone 

* Norman Bolter, trombone 
Peter Chapman, trumpet 
John Coffey, tromboneltuba 

* Armando Ghitalla, trumpet 



brass (cont.) 

Paul Gay, trombone 
'Gordon Hallberg, tromboneltuba 
•Charles Kavaloski, French horn 

Charles A. Lewis, Jr., trumpet 

* David Ohanian, French horn 
Samuel Pilafian, tuba 

* Rolf Smedvig, trumpet 
'Harry Shapiro, French hom 

* Roger Voisin, trumpet 
'Charles Yancich, French hom 

percussion 

'Thomas Gauger 
'Charles Smith 

harp 

Lucile Lawrence 

piano 

Maria Clodes 

Anthony di Bonaventura 

Lenore Engdahl 

Bela Boszormenyi-Nagy 

Phillip Oliver, staff accompanist 

Edith Steams 

Fredrik Wanger 

organ 

George Faxon 
Jack Fisher 
Max Miller 

harpsichord 

Joseph Payne 

voice 

Eunice Alberts, contralto 
Germaine Arosa, diction 
Mary Davenport, contralto 
Ellalou Dimmock, soprano 
Maeda Freeman, mezzo 
Robert Gartside, tenor 
Mac Morgan, baritone 
Chloe Owen, soprano 
Allen Rogers, vocal coaching 
Barbara Stevenson, soprano 
Wilma Thompson, mezzo 



music history and literature 

Karol Berger 
Murray Lefkowitz 
Joel Sheveloff 

theory and composition 

David Carney 
David Del Tredici 
John Goodman 
Alan MacMillan 
Joyce Me keel 
Malloy Miller 
Gardner Read 
Allen Schindler 
Robert Sirota 
Tison Street 

music education 

Lee Chnsman 
Phyllis Elhady Hoffman 
Allen Lannom 
Jack O. Lemons 
Mary Ann Norton 

musical organizations 

Adelaide Bishop, opera 
Warren Wilson, opera 
Joseph Huszti, chorus 
•Joseph Silverstein, orchestra 

* Roger Voisin, wind ensemble 

boston symphony orchestra 
woodwind quintet in residence 

* Doriot Anthony Dwyer, flute 
'Ralph Gomberg, oboe 

* Harold Wright, clarinet 

* Sherman Walt, bassoon 

* Charles Kavaloski, French horn 

empire brass quintet 
in residence 

Charles A: Lewis, Jr., trumpet 

* Rolf Smedvig, trumpet 
'David Ohanian, French hom 

* Norman Bolter, trombone 
Samuel Pilafian, tuba 



' Member of the Boston Symphony Orchestra 



Boston University School of Music 

Wilbur EX Fullbright, Director • Robert Lee Tipps, Assistant to Director 
offering degrees at the bachelor, master, and doctoral levels. 

School for the Arts: Music, Theatre, Visual Arts • Norman Dello Joio, Dean 
855 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 



10 



Tanglewood 1977 



Weekend Prelude 



Friday, 22 July at 7 



BOSTON SYMPHONY CHAMBER PLAYERS and TASHI 



SCHUBERT Quintet in C, D. 956 

Allegro ma non troppo 

Adagio 

Scherzo: Presto 

Trio: Andante sostenuto 
Allegretto 






JOSEPH SILVERSTEIN and IDA KAVAFIAN, violins 

BURTON FINE, viola 

JULES ESKIN and FRED SHERRY, cellos 



The Boston Symphony Chamber Players record exclusively 
for Deutsche Grammophon. 
Baldwin piano 



11 



s$ 



* 



>* 



BOSTON 

SYMPHONY 

ORCHESTRA 

SEIJl OZAWA A 



\h 



Director 



First violins 

Joseph Silverstein 

Concertmaster 
Charles Munch chair 

Emanuel Borok 

Assistant Concertmaster 
Helen Horner Mclntyre chair 

Max Hobart 
Rolland Tapley 
Roger Shermont 
Max Winder 
Harry Dickson 
Gottfried Wilfinger 
Fredy Ostrovsky 
Leo Panasevich 
Sheldon Rotenberg 
Alfred Schneider 
Gerald Gelbloom 
Raymond Sird 
Ikuko Mizuno 
Cecylia Arzewski 
Amnon Levy 
Bo Youp Hwang 

Second violins 

Victor Yampolsky 

Fahnestock chair 

Marylou Speaker 
Michel Sasson 
Ronald Knudsen 
Leonard Moss 
Vyacheslav Uritsky 
Laszlo Nagy 
Michael Vitale 
Darlene Gray 
Ronald Wilkison 
Harvey Seigel 
Jerome Rosen 
Sheila Fiekowsky 
Gerald Elias 
Ronan Lefkowitz 

Violas 

Burton Fine 

Charles S. Dana chair 

Reuben Green 
Eugene Lehner 
George Humphrey 



Jerome Lipson 
12 



Robert Karol 
Bernard Kadinoff 
Vincent Mauricci 
Earl Hedberg 
Joseph Pietropaolo 
Robert Barnes 
Michael Zaretsky 

Cellos 

Jules Eskin 

Philip R. Allen chair 
Martin Hoherman 
Mischa Nieland 
Jerome Patterson 
Robert Ripley 
Luis Leguia 
Carol Procter 
Ronald Feldman 
Joel Moerschel 
Jonathan Miller 
Martha Babcock 

Basses 

William Rhein 
Acting Principal 

Harold D. Hodgkinson chair 
Joseph Hearne 
Bela Wurtzler 
Leslie Martin 
John Salkowski 
John Barwicki 
Robert Olson 
Lawrence Wolfe 
Henry Portnoi 

Flutes 

Doriot Anthony Dwyer 

Walter Piston chair 

James Pappoutsakis 
Paul Fried 

Piccolo 

Lois Schaefer 

Oboes 

Ralph Gomberg 

Mildred B. Remis chair 
Wayne Rapier 

English Horn 

Laurence Thorstenberg 

Clarinets 

Harold Wright 

Ann 5.M. Banks chair 

Pasquale Cardillo 
Peter Hadcock 

E-flat clarinet 

Bass Clarinet 

Felix Viscuglia 



Bassoons 

Sherman Walt 

Edward A. Taft chair 

Roland Small 
Matthew Ruggiero 

Contra bassoon 

Richard Plaster 

Horns 

Charles Kavalovski 

Helen Sagoff Slosberg chair 

Charles Yancich 
Peter Gordon 
David Ohanian 
Richard Mackey 
Ralph Pottle 

Trumpets 

Armando Ghitalla 

Roger Louis Voisin chair 

Andre Come 
Rolf Smedvig 
Gerard Goguen 

Trombones 

Ronald Barron 
Norman Bolter 
Gordon Hallberg 
William Gibson 

Tuba 

Chester Schmitz 

Timpani 

Everett Firth 

Sylvia Shippen Wells chair 

Percussion 

Charles Smith 
Arthur Press 

Assistant timpanist 
Thomas Gauger 
Frank Epstein 

Harps 

Bernard Zighera 
Ann Hobson 

Personnel Managers 

William Moyer 
Harry Shapiro 

Librarians 

Victor Alpert 
William Shisler 

Stage Manager 

Alfred Robison 



BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

Seiji Ozawa, Music Director 

Colin Davis, Principal Guest Conductor 
Joseph Silverstein, Assistant Conductor 
Tanglewood 1977 

Friday, 22 July at 9 

SEIJI OZAWA, conductor 




^ :' ^ 



RAVEL 



Alborada del gracioso 



CHAUSSON 



Poeme de I'amour et de la mer 

La fleur des eaux 
Interlude 

La mort de I'amour 

SHIRLEY VERRETT 



INTERMISSION 



RIMSKY-KORSAKOV 



Sheherazade Symphonic Suite, Opus 35 
I Largo e maestoso — Allegro non troppo 
Lento — Andantino — Allegro molto — 
Vivace scherzando — Allegro molto 
ed animato 

Andantino quasi allegretto 
Allegro molto e frenetico — Vivo — 
Spiritoso — Allegro non troppo maestoso 



II 



III 
IV 



Seiji Ozawa and the Boston Symphony Orchestra record exclusively 
for Deutsche Grammophon. 
Baldwin piano 



13 



Notes 



Maurice Ravel 

Alborada del Gracioso 

Joseph Maurice Ravel was born in Ciboure near 
Saint ]ean-de-Luz in the Department of Basses- 
Pyrenees on 7 March 1875 and died in Paris 
on 28 December 1937. He composed Alborada 
del Gracioso as a piano piece in 1905 as the 
fourth of a set of five pieces called Miroirs, and it 
had its first performance in 1906 by Ricardo 
Vines. Ravel made the orchestral transcription of 
the Alborada in 1918, Rhene- Baton con- 
ducting the premiere in Paris, 17 May 1919. 

An alborada — from the Spanish alba, 
dawn — is an aubade, the morning 
counterpart of a serenade, and a gracioso 
is a jester. This Jester's Aubade is one of 
the first of Ravel's essays in Spanish 
music, Rapsodieespagnole, the opera L'Heure 
espagnole, Bolero, and the song cycle Don 
Quichotte a Dulcinee being the most sig- 
nificant examples to follow. In the set 
of Miroirs for piano, the Alborada is 
preceeded by Noctuelles (Night Moths), 
Oiseaux tristes (Mournful Birds), and line 
Barque sur I'ocean (A Boat on the Ocean), and 
followed by La Vallee des cloches (The Valley 
of the Bells). Each of the pieces is dedicated 
to a member of the Apaches, French turn- 
of- the- century slang for underworld 
hooligans, and a name adopted by a 
group of young men who were pro- 
ponents of advance-guard tendencies in 
the arts and who enjoyed seeing them- 
selves as members of a put- upon, en- 
lightened minority, sworn enemies of a 
stuffy bourgeoisie. The poet Tristan 
Klingsor, the conductor Desire- Emile 
Inghelbrecht, the pianist Ricardo Vines, 
the composers Maurice Delage, Manuel 
de Falla, Florent Schmitt, of course 
Ravel himself, the critics M.D. Calvo- 
coressi and Emile Vuillermoz, were 
among the more famous Apaches. Calvo- 
coressi, an effective propagandist on 
behalf of Russian music and later author 
of an important Mussorgsky biography, 
was the dedicatee of Alborada del Gracioso. 

As a piano piece, the Alborada dazzles 
us by its extreme difficulty (in which it 
is rivaled in Ravel's works only by Scarbo 
in Gaspard de la nuit and the piano tran- 



scription of La valse) and by Ravel's 
uncanny ability to make a piano sound 
like guitars and castanets. The orchestral 
transcription, made when Ravel, re- 
cently discharged from service in the 
military ambulance corps, felt too fa- 
tigued for original composition, is an- 
other enchanting exercise in instrumental 
mimicry: strings (not necessarily pizzi- 
cato either) and harps click and slap, 
while the bassoon gets to recite the 
pathos-laden addresses of the jester to 
his lady. That "speaking" plea is a lyric 
interlude in a quick and brilliant play 
of orchestral wit. 

— Michael Steinberg 

Ernest Chausson 

Poeme de I'amour et de la mer 
(Poem of love and the sea), Opus 19 

Ernest Am'ed'ee Chausson was born in Paris on 
21 January 1855 and died at Limay near 
Mantes-la-Jolie in the Department of Seine- et- 
Oise on 10 June 1899. He worked on the 
Poeme de I'amour et de la mer between 
1882 and 1893, and the songs, which are 
dedicated to the composer Henri Duparc, were 
first performed in 1893. This performance is 
the first by the Boston Symphony Orchestra. 

Chausson was 24, a husband and 
father, when he entered the Paris Con- 
servatory to study composition with 
Jules Massenet. His own father, a con- 
tractor who had become wealthy in the 
wake of Baron Haussmann's rebuilding 
of Paris during the Second Empire, in- 
sisted he complete an education in the 
law so as to have a profession both 
respectable and financially dependable. 
A few traces of Massenet's sweetness 
can be found here and there in the 
Poeme de I'amour et de la mer (perhaps at 
Et nous n'irons plus courir in the temps des 
Was section of the second song), but the 
encounter that changed Chausson's life 
was that with Cesar Franck, whose 
pupil — more than pupil, disciple — he 
became in 1883. Both men were un- 
assuming, unskilled in the manipulation 
of the official music world, unnoticed. 
Like Franck, Chausson only gained 
grudging recognition at the end of his 
life. Even at best, he never enjoyed 
critical esteem of more than moderate 



14 



proportions. Whereas critical reception 
today is one of mild condescension, in 
Chausson's own day it was one, usually, 
of elaborate hostility (that he was an 
enthusiastic Wagnerian at a time when 
the Franco- Prussian was was still a 
recent memory did not help). In Franck, 
Chausson found a nature akin to his 
own, and in the warmth of the older 
man's sympathy, the poetry of Chaus- 
son's style attained its full flowering. 
Chausson became part of the bande a 
Franck, the zealous circle that included 
Duparc, Vincent d'Indy, Guillaume Le- 
keu, and Guy Ropartz. Like Franck, he 
was recognized for what he was only 
within a small group of friends. Fortu- 
nately, his friends included performers 
as influential as the violinist Eugene 
Ysaye and the conductor Edouard Co- 
lonne, and as a result of their efforts, he 
began at last to be more generally known. 
A great moment in his life came when 
Arthur Nikisch conducted his Symphony 
in B flat in Paris in 1897. Upon that 
occasion, the critics bestowed their tardy 
recognition upon Chausson. For the 



rest, he lived a quiet life with his family, 
with friends who included Colette, Gide, 
Mallarme, Manet, Renoir, Debussy, 
Faure, was generous to younger col- 
leagues in need, and was interested in 
the work of fellow-composers even 
when no one else seemed interested in 
what he was doing. All that came to an 
end when at 44, he lost his life in a 
bicycle accident just outside the gate of 
his country house. 

He had composed three operas, two of 
which are still unpublished, a symphony, 
the Poeme for violin and orchestra that 
remains his most famous work, a Con- 
certo for violin, piano, and string quar- 
tet, the Chanson perpetuelle for voice and 
orchestra, a number of songs for voice 
and piano. His music is gently melan- 
choly, with a lovely sense of orchestral 
style. The Poeme de I 'amour et de la mer is set 
to verses by an old friend, Maurice 
Bouchor, another artist forced into law 
school by a cautious father (he also set 
other poems by Bouchor as well as some 
of his Shakespeare translations). The 
work is actually a pair of songs of 




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15 



approximately equal length, separated 
by a brief orchestral interlude that intro- 
duces a melody to which the words 
Le temps des lilas et le temps des roses/Ne 
reviendra plus a ce printemps-ci will later be 



set. The temps des lilas portion of La mortde 
I'amour was published separately and it 
was the first of Chausson's songs to 
become widely known in the salons 
of Paris. 

— Jordan Whitelaw/M.S. 



Poeme de I'amour et de la mer 



La fleur des eaux 



L'air est pleine d'une odeur exquise 

de lilas 
Qui, fleurissarit du haut des murs jusques 

en bas, 
Embaument les cheveux des femmes. 
La mer au grand soleil va tout s'embraser, 
Et sur le sable fin qu'elles viennent baiser 
Roulent d'eblouissantes lames. 
O ciel qui de ses yeux dois porter 

la couleur, 
Brise qui vas chanter dans les lilas en fleur 
Pour en sortir tout embaumee, 
Ruisseaux, qui mouillerez sa robe, 
O verts sentiers, 
Vous qui tressaillerez sous ses chers 

petits pieds, 
Faites-moi voir ma bien-aimee! 
Et mon coeur s'est leve par ce matin d'ete, 

Car une belle enfant etait sur le rivage, 
Laissant errer sur moi des yeux pleins de 

clarte, 
Et qui me souriait d'un air tendre 

et sauvage. 
Toi que transfiguraient la Jeunesse 

et 1' Amour, 
Tu m'apparus alors comme Tame 

des choses; 
Mon coeur vola vers toi, tu le pris sans 

retour, 
Et du ciel entr'ouvert pleuvaient sur nous 

des roses. 
Quel son lamentable et sauvage 
Va sonner llieure de l'adieu! 
La mer roule sur le rivage, 
Moqueuse, et se souciant peu 
Que ce soit llieure de l'adieu! 

Des oiseaux passent, l'aile ouverte, 
Sur l'abime presque joyeux; 
Au grand soleil la mer est verte, 
Et je saigne, silencieux, 
En regardant briller les cieux. 
Je saigne en regardant ma vie 
Qui va s 'eloigner sur les flots; 
Mon ame unique m'est ravie 
Et la sombre clameur des flots 
Couvre le bruit de mes sanglots. 
Qui sait si cette mer cruelle 
La ramenera vers mon coeur? 
Mes regards sont fixes sur elle, 



The flower of the waters 

The air is full of an exquisite scent 

of lilac 
which, blossoming from top to bottom of 

the walls, 
perfumes the women's hair. 
The sea in the bright sunlight is all aglow, 
and on the fine sand that they come to kiss 
roll dazzling waves. 
O sky that must take your color from 

her eyes 
breeze that will sing in the lilacs in bloom 
to issue from them all scented, 
brooks, that will dampen her dress, 

green paths, 

you who will tremble beneath her dear 

little feet, 
show me my beloved! 
And my heart was uplifted on this 
summer morning 

for a beautiful child was on the beach, 
letting eyes filled with brightness stray 

over me, 
and smiling at me with a look that was 

tender and shy, 
You whom Youth and Love transfigured, 

you appeared to me then as the soul 

of things; 
my heart flew towards you, you took it 

for ever, 
and from the half- opened sky roses 

rained upon us. 
What a mournful, wild sound 
will sound the hour for farewell! 
The sea rolls along the shore, 
Mocking, and caring not 
That this is the hour of parting! 

Birds pass by, wings outspread, 

almost joyful over the deep; 

in the bright sunlight the sea is green, 

and, silent, I bleed, 

watching the skies shine. 

1 bleed as I look at my life 
about to go away over the waves; 
my very soul is taken from me 
and the dull clamor of the waves 
drowns the noise of my sobs. 
Who knows if this cruel sea 

will bring her back to my heart? 
My eyes are fixed on her; 



16 



La mer chante, et le vent moqueur 
Raille I'angoisse de mon coeur. 

La mort de l'amour 

Bientot l'tle bleue et joyeuse 

Parmi les rocs m'apparaitra: 

L'ile sur l'eau silencieuse 

Comme un nenuphar flottera. 

A travers la mer d'amethyste 

Doucement glisse le bateau 

Et je serai joyeux et triste 

De tant me souvenir, 

Bientot! 

Le vent roulait les feuilles mortes; 

mes pensees 
Roulaient comme les feuilles mortes, 

dans la nuit. 
Jamais si doucement au ciel noir 

n'avaient lui 
Les milles roses d'or d'ou tombent 

les rosees! 
Une danse effrayante, et les 

feuilles froissees, 
Et qui rendaient un son 

metallique, valsaient, 
Semblaient gemir sous les etoiles, 

et disaient 
L'inexprimable horreur des 

amours trepasses. 
Les grands hetres d'argent que 

la lune baisait 
Etaient des spectres: moi, tout mon sang 

se glacait, 
En voyant mon aimee 

etrangement sourir. 
Comme des fronts de morts nos fronts 

avaient pali. 
Et, muet, me penchant vers elle, je pus lire 

Ce mot fatal ecrit dans ses grands yeux: 
l'oubli. 

Le temps des lilas et le temps des roses 
Ne reviendra plus a ce printemps-ci; 
Le temps des lilas et le temps des roses 
Est passe, le temps des oeillets aussi. 
Le vent a change, les cieux sont moroses, 

Et nous n'irons plus courir, et cueillir 
Les lilas en fleur et les belles roses; 
Le printemps est triste et ne peut fleurir. 
Oh! joyeux et doux printemps de l'annee, 
Qui viens, l'an passe, nous ensoleiller, 
Notre fleur d'amour est si bien fanee, 
Las! que ton baiser ne peut l'eveiller! 
Et toi, que fais-tu? pas de fleurs ecloses, 

Point de gai soleil ni d'ombrages frais; 
Le temps des lilas et le temps des roses 
Avec notre amour est mort a jamais. 



the sea sings and the mocking wind 
jeers at the anguish in my heart. 

The death of love 

Soon the blue and joyful isle 

will appear among the rocks: 

the isle will float upon the still water 

like a water-lily. 

Across the amethyst sea 

softly glides the boat, 

and I shall be joyful and sad 

with so much to remember 

soon! 

The wind rolled the dead leaves along; 

my thoughts 
rolled along like the dead leaves, in 

the night 
never so softly in the dark sky 

had gleamed 
the thousand golden roses from which 

the dews fall! 
A dreadful dance, and the 

crumpled leaves, 
which gave out a metallic 

sound, waltzed, 
seemed to moan beneath the stars, 

and told 
the inexpressible horror of dead loves. 

The great silver beeches kissed by 

the moon 
were spectres: as for me, all my 

blood froze 
at seeing my beloved smile strangely. 

Like the faces of the dead, our faces had paled. 

And speechless, bending over her, 

I could read 
This fatal word written in her large eyes: 

oblivion. 

The season of lilac and roses 
will return no more this spring; 
The season of lilac and roses 
is over, the season of pinks too. 
The wind has changed, the skies 

are sullen, 
and no more shall we run and gather 
the lilac in bloom and the lovely roses; 
the springtime is sad and cannot blossom. 
Oh, joyful and soft springtime of the year 
that came last year to bathe us in sunshine, 
our flower of love is so far faded 
that, alas, your kiss cannot awaken it! 
And you, what do you do? no 

flowers out, 
no cheerful sun or cool shady places; 
the season of lilac and roses, 
with our love, is dead for ever. 

— Maurice Bouchor 

17 



Nikolay Rimsky-Korsakov 

Sheherazade Symphonic Suite, Opus 35 

Nicolay Andreyevich Rimsky-Korsakov was 
born in Tikhvin in the Government of Novgo- 
rod on 18 March 1844 and died in St. Peters- 
burg on 21 June 1908. He composed Shehera- 
zade in the summer of 1888 and conducted the 
first performance in St. Petersburg on 22 October 
that year. He dedicated the score to Vladimir 
Vassilievich Stasov, the critic who in 1867 first 
grouped Qui, Borodin, Balakirev, Mussorgsky, 
and Rimsky-Korsakov as "the mighty handful." 

As the scion of an old seagoing family 
with a distinguished ancestry of braid 
and brass, Rimsky donned naval uniform 
as a matter of course when he was 
seventeen. But from 1865 forward he 
drew shore duty in St. Petersburg, and 
almost at once he gravitated to the 
musical group therapy of Mily Bala- 
kirev's salon. There he picked up all 
sorts of smatterings, and even produced, 
not without assistance, the symphonic 
poem Sadko (not to be confused with the 
opera of the same title, which came 
three decades later). 

Not until he was twenty- seven, how- 
ever, did Rimsky get down to learning 
the musical craft systematically, and 
under circumstances without parallel in 
the history of the tonal art. The short of 
this fantastic story is as follows. In 1871 
the St. Petersburg Conservatory got a 
new director, one M. P. Azanchevsky. 
He had heard Sadko, and liked it. Sadko 
was, in fact, all he knew about Rimsky. 
But for him it was enough. One of his 
first executive acts was to seek out the 
young officer (Rimsky did not shed his 
uniform until 1873) and invite him to 
join the faculty as a full professor of 
composition. Evidently the director was 
quite unaware of Rimsky's technical 
incompetence, and the latter's embar- 
rassed reluctance only made Azanchev- 
sky more determined to get him. 'Had I 
ever studied at all/ Rimsky recalled long 
years afterward, 'had I possessed a frac- 
tion more of knowledge than I actually 
did, it would have been obvious to me 
that I could not and should not accept 
the proffered appointment. ... I was a 
dilettante and knew nothing. This I 
frankly confess and attest before the 

18 



world.' But all of Rimsky's friends urged 
him to take the job, even though it was 
to include conducting the school orches- 
tra — and Rimsky had never stood before 
one in his life! 

Rimsky did accept the professorship, 
'my own delusions, perhaps,' having 
prevailed. Whereupon, in darkest 
secrecy, he started studying. Somehow 
he made enough headway before the fall 
term opened to stand before his classes 
unafraid, and for the rest of the aca- 
demic year he managed to keep at least 
a step ahead of the brightest students. 
The hoax was indefensible, but Rimsky 
carried it off brilliantly. He not only 
justified his self-confidence but also, in 
time, earned the highest esteem of his 
peers. He was to serve uninterruptedly 
at the St. Petersburg Conservatory until 
his death thirty- seven years later — 
except for a few months in the ferment 
of 1905 when he was relieved of his 
duties for defending the academic rights 
of revolutionary students. (It is clear 
enough to any close reader of the Chronicle 
that he took his stand as a matter of 
principle, not politics; but the official 
Soviet perception of this episode is of 
course altogether different.) 

Nor did Rimsky's assiduous pedagogi- 
cal career detract from his steady cre- 
ative growth, which continued to the 
very end. On the contrary, he started 
composing what is probably his greatest 
work, Coq d'or, only after completing his 
memoirs, on the last page of which he 
suggests (at the age of sixty- two) that it 
might be 'high time to write finis to 
my career. . . .' 

Like most of Rimsky's music the sym- 
phonic suite Sheherazade was turned out 
between semesters. In the spring of 
1888 he had sketched two pieces. One 
would become the Russian Easter Overture; 
the other, not yet clearly in his mind, 
would be based on certain episodes from 
the 'Arabian Nights' collection. It took 
shape quickly once he was ensconced in 
his retreat for that summer, which was 
a friend's estate at Nezhgovitzy, on Lake 
Cherementz. The score seems to have 
been polished to perfection in less than 
a month; the movements are dated 4, 11, 
16, and 26 July respectively. 



A surfeit of nonsense has been written 
about the supposed programmatic con- 
tent of Sheherazade. All of it, to be cha- 
ritable, may be traced to the following 
few lines, which appeared as a preface 
to the earliest published score: 

'The Sultan Shahriar, persuaded of 
the falseness and the faithlessness of 
women, has sworn to put to death each 
one of his wives after the first night. But 
the Sultana Sheherazade saved her life 
by interesting him in tales which she 
told him during one thousand and one 
nights. Pricked by curiosity, the Sultan 
put off his wife's execution from day to 
day, and at last gave up entirely his 
bloody plan. 

'Many marvels were told Shahriar by 
the Sultana Sheherazade. For her stories 
the Sultana borrowed from the poets 
their verses, from folk songs their 
words; and she strung together tales 
and adventures.' 

Rimsky remarked that he had been 
thinking of such 'unconnected episodes' 
as 'the fantastic narrative of Prince Ka- 
landar, the Prince and the Princess, the 
Baghdad festival, and the ship dashing 



against the rock with the bronze rider 
upon it.' He also spoke of the solo violin 
as 'delineating Sheherazade herself tell- 
ing her wondrous tales to the stern 
Sultan.' But in his later years Rimsky 
was impelled to forswear any intentions 
of a specific program, and he even went 
so far as to renounce the outline implicit 
in the movement designations: 

'In composing Sheherazade I meant these 
hints to direct but lightly the hearer's 
fancy on the path which my own fancy 
had traveled, and to leave more minute 
and particular conceptions to the will 
and mood of each listener. All I had 
desired was that the hearer, if he liked 
my piece as symphonic musk, should carry 
away the impression that it is beyond 
doubt an Oriental narrative of 
some numerous and varied fairy- 
tale wonders. . . .' 

Rimsky's disclaimer did not stop the 
flow of words about Sheherazade. But at 
no time since the premiere has there ever 
been a shortage of listeners who 'like' the 
piece, either because of its 'story' or in 
spite of it. 

from notes by James Lyons 




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20 



BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

Seiji Ozawa, Music Director 

Colin Davis, Principal Guest Conductor 
Joseph Silverstein, Assistant Conductor 
Tanglewood 1977 

Saturday, 23 July at 8:30 
SARAH CALDWELL, conductor 




BERLIOZ from Les Troyens 

Trojan March 

Recitative and aria: Les Grecsont disparu! — Malheureux Roi! 

Gauntlet Combat and Wrestlers' Dance 

Aria: Non, je ne verrai pas 

Act I finale: Trojan March 

Royal Hunt and Storm 

Scene: Les Troyens sont partis! — Dieux immortels! 

Monologue: Ah! Ah! Je vais mourir . . . 

Aria: Adieu, fiere cite 

Lamento (from Les Troyens a Carthage) 

Scene: Pluton semhle m'etre propice 

Imprecation: Ah! des destins ennemis — Rome immortelle! 

SHIRLEY VERRETT 



INTERMISSION 



STRAVINSKY Petrushka (1911 version) 

The Shrove-Tide Fair 

Petrushka's Room 

The Moor's Room 

The Shrove-Tide Fair (towards evening) 

Jerome Rosen, piano 



Seiji Ozawa and the Boston Symphony Orchestra record exclusively 
for Deutsche Grammophon. 
Baldwin piano 



21 



Notes 



Hector Berlioz 

from Les Troyens 

Louis- Hector Berlioz was born at La Cote- 
Saint-Andre in the Department of here on 
11 December 1803 and died in Paris on 
8 March 1869. By 1850 he was confident he 
would at some point compose a work based on 
Virgil's Aeneid. In April, May and June 
1856, he wrote a libretto for a five-act 
opera, Les Troyens, even composing the 
music of the love duet, Nuit d'ivresse, at 
the same time. Work on the music essen- 
tially occupied him from August 18 56 
until April 1858, though he made changes 
and additions until 1864. Since prospects 
for a proper performance seemed hope- 
less, he divided the work into two operas, 
La prise de Troie (The Capture of Troy), 
consisting of the first two acts of Les Troyens, 
and Les Troyens a Carthage, comprising 
the remainder. In his lifetime, however, Berlioz 
was only to see Les Troyens a Carthage, 
which was given at the Paris Opera on 4 Novem- 
ber 1863, brutally cut, and subjected to more 
mutilations during the course of its run. More or 
less complete performances of Les Troyens 
were given in concert in Paris by both 
Edouard Colonne and Jules-Etienne Pasdeloup 
on the same day, 7 December 1879. The first 
full staging of La Prise de Troie and Les 
Troyens a Carthage as a two- evening se- 
quence was given in Karlsruhe under Felix 
Mottl in 1890. The first relatively complete 
Les Troyens in its original form was the 
production under Rafael Kubelik at Covent 
Garden, London, in 1957, though the first truly 
complete staged performance was that given on 
the centenary of the composer's death by the 
Scottish Opera under Alexander Gibson in 
Glasgow on 3 May 1969. This evening's 
conductor, Sarah Caldwell, was responsible for 
the staging and conducting of the first full 
performance in this country by The Opera Com- 
pany of Boston in 1972. 

"Whatever fate awaits it, I now feel 
nothing but happiness at having com- 
pleted it." So Berlioz wrote in a letter of 
June 1859. A little over a year before, 
he had declared: "It matters little what 
happens to the work, whether it is even 
performed or not. My musical and Vir- 

22 



gilian passions will have been gratified, 
and I shall at least have shown what I 
think can be done with a classical subject 
on a large scale." At no time can Berlioz 
have entertained much hope for the 
success, or even the performance of 
Les Troyens, but that Virgilian passion had 
to be gratified, the declaration of love in 
music made. Perhaps he thought of it as 
payment of a debt. As a boy, he had 
studied Latin with his father, a humane 
and prosperous physician, and when, in 
middle years, he wrote his memoirs, he 
told the story of how "it was Virgil who 
first found the way to my heart and 
opened my budding imagination, by 
speaking to me of epic passions for 
which instinct had prepared me. How 
often, construing to my father the fourth 
book of the Aeneid, did I feel my heart 
swell and my voice falter and break! One 
day, I remember, I was disturbed from 
the start of the lesson by the line At 
regina gravi jamdudum saucia cura ("Now the 
Queen for some time had felt the deep 
wounds of love'). 

"Somehow or other I struggled on 
until we came to the great turning- 
point of the drama. But when I reached 
the scene in which Dido expires on the 
funeral pyre, surrounded by the gifts 
and weapons of the perfidious Aeneas, 
and pours forth on the bed — 'that bed 
with all its memories' — the bitter stream 
of her life - blood, and I had to pronounce 
the despairing utterances of the dying 
queen 'thrice raising herself upon her 
elbow, thrice falling back,' and to de- 
scribe her wound and the disastrous 
love that convulsed her to the depth of 
her being, the cries of her sister and her 
nurse and her distracted women, and 
that agony so terrible that the gods 
themselves are moved to pity and send 
Iris to end it, my lips trembled and the 
words came with difficulty, indistinctly. 
At last, at the line Quaesivit coelo lucem 
ingemuitque reperta, at that sublime image 
— as Dido 'sought light from heaven and 
moaned at finding it' — I was seized with 
a nervous shudder and stopped dead; I 
could not have read another word. My 
father, seeing how confused and em- 
barrassed I was by such emotion, but 
pretending not to have noticed any- 



thing, rose abruptly and shut the book. 
'That will do, my boy,' he said, 'I'm tired.' 
I rushed away, out of sight of every- 
body, to indulge my Virgilian grief." 

At 52, a whole series of boldly imag- 
ined, brilliantly achieved works behind 
him — the Symphonie fantastique, the Re- 
quiem (to be performed here under Seiji 
Ozawa's direction on Friday, 19 August), 
Romeo et Juliette, Nuits d'et'e, La Damnation de 
Faust, the Te Deum, Tristia, L'Enfance du 
Christ — he was ready to deal with the 
Aeneid, ready to undertake a dramatic 
work on an unprecedented scale. (Tristan 
und Isolde and Die Meistersinger, each of 
which has about the same amount of 
music as Les Troyens, were still in the 
future, and Wagner at that point seemed 
to have abandoned Der Ring des Nibelun- 
gen.) Using Shakespeare's history plays 
as models in structure and rhetoric, Ber- 
lioz prepared his text, drawing on the 
second book of Virgil's epic for his first 
two acts and on the first and fourth 
for the other three. 



The series of scenes performed this 
evening begins with the concert version 
of the Trojan March that Berlioz pre- 
pared in 1864. The music is heard several 
times in the opera, usually with voices, 
never as a set number with a clear be- 
ginning and end. In what was actually 
his last effort at composition, Berlioz 
detaches it from its various dramatic 
contexts and makes it into an indepen- 
dent concert piece. 

The action of Les Troyens begins with 
the mystery of the Greeks' sudden de- 
parture from Troy after ten years of 
siege. To the Trojans, it is a matter not 
of mystery but for unbridled rejoicing; 
they do all they can to find a benign 
explanation for the immense wooden 
horse the Greeks have left behind. Only 
King Priam's daughter, Cassandra, 
whose curse it is to see into the future 
and not be believed, prophesies disaster. 
(Cassandra, as the figure who so power- 
fully dominates the first two acts of Les 
Troyens, is Berlioz's own poetic inven- 
tion, developed from what are no more 
than hints in the Aeneid.) 



It is evening, and the celebration con- 
tinues. Wrestlers entertain the King and 
the people. 

In the aria Non, je ne verrai pas, Cas- 
sandra expresses her anguish at watch- 
ing the Trojans rush headlong toward 
their destruction. 

On the King's orders, the wooden 
horse is dragged from the abandoned 
Greek camp into the gates of the city. 
Cassandra describes the procession. For 
a moment, the people's hearts are 
stopped when the clash of arms is heard 
from within the belly of the horse. 
Cassandra makes one last attempt to 
persuade the Trojans that the beast is a 
trap, but she is not heeded. The march 
music ceases. The trap has closed 
on Troy. 

Time has passed. Troy has been sacked. 
Cassandra has prophesied that Aeneas, 
son of the goddess Aphrodite and of 
Anchises, King of Dardanus, will found 
a new Troy in Italy. Corebus, to whom 
she has been betrothed, is killed in 
battle, and she takes her own life. Aeneas 
escapes with a few men, with treasure 
and his household gods, and bearing his 
aged father on his shoulders, eventually 
to land in Carthage, on the North coast 
of Africa. It is there that the last three 
acts of Les Troyens take place. Queen of 
Carthage is Dido, who had escaped 
there from Tyre, where her brother had 
murdered her husband. (It is Virgil who 
ties the fates of Dido and Aeneas to- 
gether: in "real life," as nearly as we can 
make it out, the sack of Troy would have 
happened about 1100 B.C. and the found- 
ing of the Carthaginian kingdom in the 
8th century B.C.) Soon after the arrival 
of the Trojan refugees, Dido and Aeneas 
go on a hunt in a forest outside Car- 
thage. Naiads appear and vanish. Hunt- 
ing calls are heard. Hunters and dogs 
pass. It begins to rain, the storm grows 
into a tempest, with sheet lightning, 
hail, and thunder. Dido and Aeneas 
appear and take shelter in a cave where 
they will acknowledge and consummate 
their love. Forest nymphs run back and 
forth, gesticulating wildly, reminding 



23 



"Very impressive, perhaps more 
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"Young, but knows what he's doing, 
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the unheeding Aeneas of his destiny 
with their cries of Italie! Satyrs, sylvans, 
and fauns perform grotesque dances as 
the storm becomes fiercer, brooks turn- 
ing into torrents, a tree catching fire as 
it is struck by lightning. Then the storm 
passes and the clouds lift. We hear The 
Royal Hunt and Storm, perhaps Ber- 
lioz's most poetically and vividly evoca- 
tive piece of writing for orchestra, in his 
own concert version, which omits the 
voices of the forest nymphs. 

Aeneas has tarried long in Carthage. 
His sense of mission is clear and he 
understands that his and Dido's love 
must give way before his destiny. Dido 
is prepared to beg Aeneas for a few more 
days, but Iopas, a Tyrian poet at her 
court, brings the news that the Trojan 
fleet has put to sea. In the scene Dieux 
immortels!, Dido rages against Aeneas, 
first commanding the Carthaginians to 
follow the Trojans, then commanding a 
pyre be raised for the burning of her and 
Aeneas' gifts to each other. 

Dido determines on suicide, praying 
again for the return of Aeneas, then 
bidding farewell to her city, her sister, 
her people, and to the skies beneath 
which she loved Aeneas. At the words 
aux nuiis d'ivresse et d'extase infinie, Berlioz 
returns to the music to which she and 
Aeneas had sung those words in their 
love duet at the end of Act IV. (The 
historical Dido also took her own life, 
but she did it to escape marriage with 
Iarbas, the chieftain from whom she had 
purchased the property on which she 
founded and raised to prosperity the 
city of Carthage.) 

When Berlioz split Les Troyens in two, 
he provided Les Troyens a Carthage with a 
new overture, a solemn slow movement, 
to which he gave the title Lamento. 

A pyre has been erected in Dido's 
garden, and on it have been placed her 
nuptial bed, a helmet, a sword, a toga, a 
bust of Aeneas. Dido's sister unlooses 
the Queen's hair and bares her left foot. 
After carrying out the other rituals 
appropriate to the occasion, Dido ascends 
the pyre, weakens for a moment as she 



gazes on Aeneas' armor, prostrates her- 
self on the bed amid uncontrollable sobs, 
prophesies that from her ashes the Car- 
thaginian avenger Hannibal will be born, 
and then stabs herself. 

As she dies, Dido sees that Carthage 
will, after all, perish, that it is Rome that 
will be eternal. On stage, "a distant 
radiance shows the Capitol, with the 
word ROMA in shining letters on the 
pediment. In front of the Capitol pass 
legions and an Emperor surrounded by 
poets and artists. During this apothe- 
osis, which is invisible to the Carthagin- 
ians, the Trojan March resounds in the 
distance; handed down by tradition to 
the Romans, it has become their trium- 
phal anthem." (With staggering skill and 
daring, Hannibal with his army that 
included 38 elephants invaded Italy by 
way of Spain, the Pyrenees, and the 
Alps, handing the Romans tremendous 
defeats in 217 and 216 B.C. at the 
battles of Lake Trasimeno and Cannae. 
He was within 100 miles of Rome, but 
his supplies and the energies of his 
depleted army gave out. He advanced 
no further. In 203 B.C., he was forced 
to abandon Italy, and in 202, he was 
finally defeated by Scipio Africanus. 
Hannibal died by suicide in 183, and in the 
Third Punic War, 149-146, the Romans 
razed Carthage and turned the territory 
— now Tunis — into a Roman province.) 

— Michael Steinberg 




Hector Berlioz in 1867 



25 



Cassandra: 



Les Grecs ont disparu! . . . mais quel 

dessein fatal 
Cache de ce depart l'etrange promptitude? 

Tout vient justifier ma sombre inquietude! 
J'ai vu l'ombre d'Hector parcourir 

nos remparts 
Comme un veilleur de nuit, j'ai vu ses 

noirs regards 
Interroger au loin le.detroit de Sigee . . . 

Malheur! dans la folie et l'ivresse plongee 
La foule sort des murs, et Priam la conduit! 

Malheureux Roi! dans l'eternelle nuit, 
C'en est done fait, tu vas descendre! 
Tu ne m'ecoutes pas, tu ne veux ■ 

rien comprendre, 
Malheureux peuple, a l'horreur qui me suit! 

Chorebe, helas, oui, Chorebe lui-meme 
Croit ma raison perdue! . . . A ce nom 

mon effroi 
Redouble! O Dieux! Chorebe! il m'aime! 

II est aime! mais plus daymen pour moi. 
Plus d'amour, de chants d'allegresse, 
Plus de doux reves de tendresse! 
De l'affreux destin qui m'opresse 
II faut subir l'inexorable loi! 

Chorebe! . . . il faut qu'il parte et quitte 
la Troiade. 



The Greeks have vanished. But what 

dread plan 
Lies hidden behind this strangely 

sudden departure? 
All is bearing out my grim forebodings! 
I saw Hector's spirit pacing our ramparts 

Like a watchman of the night; I saw his 

darkened eyes 
Staring far off towards the straits 

of Sigeium . . . 
Woe betide them! Drunk with madness 
The people leave the city — Priam at 

their head! 

Ill-fated King! The die is cast, 

You must go down to everlasting night. 

Ill-fated race, you heed me not, nor wish 

To know anything of the terror that 

haunts me. 
Alas, Corebus too, Corebus himself 
Thinks me out of my mind. At the thought 

of him 
My dread redoubles. God! Corebus — 

he loves me, 
I love him. But there will be no marrying 
For me, no love, no joyful hymns, 
No more tender dreams of happiness. 
The grim fate that bears me down 
Must be submitted to: there is no escape. 

Corebus! . . . He must leave the Troiad. 



Cassandra: 

Non, je ne verrai pas la deplorable fete 
Ou s'enivre, en espoir d'un brillant avenir, 
Ce peuple condamne, que rien, helas! n'arrete 
Sur la pente du gouffre. O cruel souvenir! 

Gloire de la Patrie! . . . Et voir s'evanouir 
Du bonheur le plus pur la seduisante image! 
O Chorebe! O Priam! . . . Vains efforts 

de courage, 
Des pleurs d'angoisse inondent mon visage! 

De mes sens eperdus . . . est-ce une illusion? 
Les choeurs sacres d'llion! 

Arretez! arretez! Oui, la flamme, 

la hache! 
Fouillez le flanc du monstrueux cheval! 
Laocoon! ... les Grecs! . . . il cache 
Un piege infernal . . . 
Ma voix se perd! . . . plus d'esperance! 
Vous etes sans pitie, grands dieux, 
Pour ce peuple en demence! 
O digne emploi de la toute-puissance, 
Le conduire a l'abime en lui fermant les yeux! 



No, I cannot watch their pitiful rejoicing, 
This doomed people, drunk with the hopes 
Of a dazzling future, plunging to destruction, 
With nothing, alas, that can stop them. Oh 

bitter memories! 
My country's glory . . . And to see vanish 
My cherished dream of purest happiness! 
Oh Corebus, oh Priam! I can resist no more, 

Tears of anguish flow down unhindered. 

Can it be true? Can I believe my ears? 
The sacred hymn of Ilium! 

Stop, stop! Fire, an axe! 

Search the monstrous horse! 

Laocoon . . .The Greeks! ... It hides 

A deadly trap . . . 

My voice grows faint. 

Great gods, you have no pity 

For this demented people 

Oh noble exercise of omnipotence, 

Thus to lead them blindfold to the abyss! 



26 



lis entrent, e'en est fait, le destin tient 



sa proie 



Soeur d'Hector, va mourir sous les debris 
de Troie! 



They enter, it is done; fait has seized 

its victim! 
Sister of Hector, go, die beneath the ruins 

of Troy! 



Iopas: 

Les Troyens sont partis! 



The Trojans have gone! 



Dido: 
Qu'entends-je? 

Dieux immortels! il part! Armez-vous, 

Tyriens! 
Carthaginois, courez, poursuivez 

les Troyens! 
Courbez-vous sur les rames, 
Volez sur les eaux, 
Lancez des flammes, 
Brulez leurs vaisseaux! 
Que la ville entiere . . . 
Que dis-je? . . . impuissante fureur! 
Subis ton sort et desespere, 
Devore ta douleur, 
O malheureuse! 

Et voila done la foi de cette ame pieuse! 
J'offrais un trone! . . . Ah! je devais alors 
Exterminer la race vagabonde 
De ces maudits, et disperser sur l'onde 
Les debris de leurs corps! 
C'est alors qu'il fallait prevoir leur perfidie, 
Livrer leur flotte a l'incendie, 
Et me venger d'Enee et lui servir enfin 

Les membres de son fils en un hideux festin! 
A moi, dieux des enfers! l'Olympe 

est inflexible! . . . 
Aidez-moi! que par vous mon coeur 

soit enflamme 
D'une haine terrible 
Pour ce fugitif que j'aimai! 
Du pretre de Pluton, qu'on reclame l'office! 
Pour apaiser mes douloureux transports, 
A l'instant meme offrons un sacrifice 
Aux sombres deites de l'empire des morts! 
Qu'on eleve un bucher! 
Que les dons du perfide 
Et ceux que je lui fis, 

Dans la flamme livide, 

Souvenirs detestes, disparaissent! . . . Sortez! 

Anna, suivez Narbal. 

Je suis reine et j'ordonne; 
Laissez-moi seule, Anna. 



What are you saying? 

Immortal gods — he's gone! Tyrians, to arms! 

Carthaginians, hurry, pursue the Trojans: 

Bend to the oars, 

Fly over the water, 

Hurl flames, 

Burn their ships! 

Let the whole city . . . 

What am I saying? Pitiful rage! 

Submit to your fate, abandon hope, 

Choke back your grief, 

Wretched one! 

So this is the faith of that pious soul! 

I offered a throne . . . Ah, I ought rather 

To have wiped out that accursed race 

Of wanderers and scattered on the sea 

What was left of their corpses. 

I should have foreseen their treachery then, 

And set fire to their fleet, 

Avenged myself on Aeneas and, to end, 

served him 
His own son's limbs for a hideous banquet. 
To me now, gods of Hades; Olympus 

is inexorable. 
Help me; inflame my heart 

With a burning hatred 

For this fugitive whom I loved. 

Let the aid of Pluto's priest be invoked. 

To assuage my torments 

Let us at once offer a sacrifice 

To the dark deities of the kingdom of the dead. 

Let a pyre be raised, 

And on it the traitor's gifts 

And those I gave to him, 

Hateful memorials, 

Vanish in the livid flames. Now go! 

Anna, go with Narbal. 

I am Queen, and I command it: 
Anna, leave me. 



27 



Ah! Ah! 

je vais mourir . . . 

Dans ma douleur immense submergee 

Et mourir non vengee! . . . 

Mourons pourtant! Oui, puisse-t-il fremir 

A la lueur lointaine de la flamme de 

mon bucher! 
S'il reste dans son ame quelque chose 

dliumain, 
Peut-etre il pleurera sur mon affreux destin. 
Lui, me pleurer! . . . 
Enee! . . . Enee! ... 
Oh! mon ame te suit, 
A son amour enchainee, 
Esclave, elle l'emporte en l'eternelle nuit . . . 
Venus! rends- moi ton fils! Inutile priere 
D'un coeur qui se dechire! ... A la mort 

tout entiere 
Didon n'attend plus rien que de la mort. 

Adieu, fiere cite, qu'un genereux effort 
Si promptement eleva florissante; 
Ma tendre soeur qui me suivis errante, 
Adieu, mon peuple, adieu; adieu, 

rivage venere, 
Toi qui jadis m'accueillis suppliante; 

Adieu, beau ciel d'Afrique, astres que 

j'admirai 
Aux nuits d'ivresse et d'extase infinie; 

Je ne vous verrai plus, ma carriere est finie! 



Ah! Ah! 

I am going to die, 

Drowned in my great grief — 

And die unavenged! 

Yet I must die. Could he but tremble 

When he sees from afar the glow of my 

funeral pyre! 
If any human feeling is left in his heart, 

Perhaps he will weep at my pitiful fate. 

He weep for me! 

Aeneas, Aeneas! 

Oh, my soul flies after you; 

Chained to its love, 

It bears it down to everlasting night. 

Venus, give me back your son! Futile prayer 

Of a heart torn asunder. To death devoted, 

Dido has nothing more to look for but death. 

Farewell, proud city, raised. 
By selfless toil so swiftly to prosperity. 
My gentle sister, who shared my wanderings, 
Farewell, my people, farewell, and you, 

blessed shore 
Which welcomed me when I begged 

for refuge; 
Farewell, fair skies of Africa, stars I gazed on 

in wonder 
On those nights of boundless ecstasy 

and rapture — 
I shall see you no more, my career is ended. 



Dido: 

Pluton . . . semble m'etre propice . . . 
En ce cruel instant . . . Narbal . . . ma soeur . . . 
C'en est fait . . . achevons le pieux sacrifice . . . 
Je sens rentrer le calme . . . dans mon coeur. 
D'un malheureux amour, funestes gages, 
Dans la flamme emportez avec vous 

mes chagrins! 
Ah! 

Mon souvenir vivra parmi les ages. 
Mon peuple accomplira d'heroi'ques destins. 
Un jour sur la terre africaine, 
II naitra de ma cendre un glorieux vengeur . . . 
J'entends deja tonner son nom vainqueur . . . 

Annibal! Annibal! d'orgueil mon ame 

est pleine! 
Plus de souvenirs amers! 
C'est ainsi qu'il concient de descendre 

aux enfers! 

Dido: 

Ah! Des destins ennemis . . . implacable 
fureur . . . Carthage perira! 
Rome . . . Rome . . . immortelle! 



Pluto — seems to be propitious — 
In this bitter moment — Narbal, my sister — 
All is over — let us finish the holy sacrifice — 
I feel peace returning — to my heart. 
You, sad pledges of an unhappy love, 
Take with you into the flames all my grief. 

Ah! 

My memory will live throughout the ages, 

My people will fulfil a heroic destiny. 

One day in the land of Africa 

From my ashes a glorious avenger will be born. 

Already I hear the thunder of his 

conquering name — 
Hannibal, Hannibal! My soul swells 

with pride! 
No more bitter memories; 
Thus it is fitting to go down to the 

shades below! 



Ah! The fates are against us . . . their hate 
Unrelenting . . . Carthage will perish! 
Rome . . . Rome . . . eternal! 



28 



Igor Stravinsky 
Petrushka 

Igor Fedorovich Stravinsky was bom at Oranien- 
baum, Russia, on 5 June (old style) or 17 June 
(new style) 1882 and died in New York City 
on o April 1971. He composed Petrushka 
between August 1910 and 26 May 1911, the 
first performance being given by Serge Diaghi- 
lev's Russian Ballet in Paris on 13 June 1911. 
Scenario, sets, and costumes were by Alexandre 
Benois, whose name appears on the title-page as 
co-author of these "scenes burlesques" and 
to whom the music is dedicated. The choreo- 
graphy was by Michel Fokine. Pierre Monteux 
conducted, and the principal roles were taken by 
Vaslav Nijinsky as Petrushka, Tamara Karsa- 
rina as the Ballerina, Alexander Orlov as the 
Moor, and Enrico Cecchetti as the Magician. 
In 1946, Stravinsky reorchestrated Petrushka, 
reducing the numbers of woodwinds, horns, 
trumpets, and harps, the new edition being 
generally identified by its date of publication as 
"the 1947 version." At these performances 
Sarah Caldwell conducts the 1911 score. 

The Firebird had an immense success 
when Diaghilev produced it at the Paris 
Opera: on 25 June 1910, Stravinsky be- 
came a celebrity — for life. During the 
last days of finishing the Firebird orches- 
tration, he had a dream in which he had 
witnessed "a solemn pagan rite: wise 
elders, seated in a circle, watching a 
young girl dance herself to death. They 
were sacrificing her to propitiate the 
god of spring." This suggested music, 
which indeed he began to compose — a 
perplexing task, as it turned out, for, 
while he could play the complex rhythms 
he imagined, he did not know how to 
write them down. He thought of the 
work as a symphony, but when he 
played the music to Diaghilev, that great 
impresario at once saw its possibilities 
for dance. Eager to consolidate the suc- 
cess of The Firebird, he urged Stravinsky 
to forge ahead with The Rite of Spring. 
Stravinsky agreed, but found that what 
he really wanted after Firebird was the 
change and refreshment of writing a 
sort of Konzertstiick for piano and or- 
chestra; "In composing the music, I had 
in mind a distinct picture of a puppet, 
suddenly endowed with life, exasperating 
the patience of the orchestra with dia- 



bolical cascades of arpeggi. The orchestra 
in turn retaliates with menacing trumpet- 
blasts. The outcome is a terrific noise 
which reaches its climax and ends in the 
sorrowful and querulous collapse of the 
poor puppet." This — a portion called 
Petrushka's Cry ("after Petrushka, the im- 
mortal and unhappy hero of every fair in 
all countries") and the Russian Dance — 
was the music Stravinsky played for the 
astonished Diaghilev, who had gone to 
visit the composer at Lausanne, ex- 
pecting of course to find him hard at 
work on The Rite of Spring. Once again, 
Diaghilev was quick to perceive the 
possibilities of what Stravinsky was up 
to. Quickly, the two sketched the out- 
lines of a ballet, agreed on a commission 
fee of 1,000 roubles, and decided that 
the scenario should be worked out by 
Alexandre Benois, the painter who had 
been one of Diaghilev's original advisers 
at the founding of the Russian ballet, 
who had conceived or designed some of 
the most famous of the Diaghilev pro- 
ductions, including Sheherazade and Les 
Sylphides, and who had loved puppet 
theater since boyhood. Stravinsky lost 
some weeks of working time when he 
came down with nicotine poisoning in 
February 1911, but for the rest, the 
collaboration went smoothly, and on 
26 May, in his room at the Albergo 
d'ltalia, Rome — the Ballet was playing 
an engagement at the Costanzi Theater 
— the last bars were written down. Just 
18 days later Petrushka went on stage, 
and it was yet another triumph. The 
Paris orchestra required a little per- 
suading at first, and not long after, the 
Vienna Philharmonic told Monteux the 
score was Schweinerei and tried to sabo- 
tage its performance. (They could not 
foresee what would be in store for them 
when Stravinsky returned to his project 
about spring in pagan Russia.) 

The first and last scenes are public, the 
middle two private. The curtain rises to show 
Admiralty Square, St. Petersburg, in the 1830s. 
It is a sunny winter's day, and the Shrove- 
Tide Fair is in progress. Crowds move about. Not 
everyone is quite sober. Two rival street dancers, 
one with an organ-grinder and the other with 
a music-box, entertain. Drummers draw the 
crowd's attention to an old magician, who 



29 



descends from his theatre, plays the flute, and 
presents his three puppets, Petrushka, the Bal- 
lerina, and the Moor. Touching them with his 
flute, he brings them to life, and, to the amaze- 
ment of all, they too step down from the theater 
and perform a Russian dance in the midst of 
the crowd. 

The second scene is set in Petrushka 's room. 
Its walls are black, decorated with stars and a 
crescent moon. The door leading to the Ballerina's 
room has devils painted on it. A scowling portrait 
of the Magician dominates the space. When the 
curtain rises, the door of the cell is opened and a 
large foot kicks Petrushka inside. The preface to 
the score tells us that "while the Magician's 
magic has imbued all three puppets with human 
feelings and emotions, it is Petrushka who feels 
and suffers most. Bitterly conscious of his ugli- 
ness and grotesque appearance, he feels himself to 
be an outsider, and he resents the way he is 
completely dependent on his cruel master. He 
tries to console himself by falling in love with the 
Ballerina. She comes to visit him and succeeds in 
distracting him from the coconut with which he is 
is frightened by his uncouth antics and she flees. 
In his despair, Petrushka curses the Magician 
and hurls himself at his portrait, but succeeds 
only in tearing a hole in the cardboard wall 
of his cell." 

Scene Three takes us to the Moor's room, 
papered with a pattern of green palm-trees and 
fantastic fruits against a red ground. The Moor 
is brutal and stupid, but attractive to the 
Ballerina. She comes to visit him and succeeds 
in distracting from the coconut with which he is 
playing. Their scene together is interrupted by the 
jealously enraged Petrushka, whom, however, 
the Moor quickly throws out. 

The last scene takes us back to the fairgrounds, 
but it is now evening. Wetnurses dance, then a 
peasant with a trained bear, and after that a 
fairly boiled merchant with two gypsy girls. 
Coachmen and stable-boys appear, first doing a 
dance by themselves and then one with the 
wetnurses. Finally, a group of masqueraders 
comes in, including a devil, goats, and pigs. 
Shouts are heard from the little theater. The scene 
of something wrong spreads to the dancers, who 
gradually stop their swirling. Petrushka runs 
from the theater, pursued by the Moor, whom 
the Ballerina is trying to restrain. The Moor 
catches up with Petrushka and strikes him with 
his sabre. Petrushka falls, his skull broken. Ashe 
plaintively dies, a policeman goes to fetch the 
magician. He arrives, picks up the corpse, shakes 



it. The crowd disperses. The magician drags 
Petrushka toward the theater, but above the little 
structure, Petrushka s ghost appears, threatening 
the magician and thumbing his nose at him. 
Terrified, the magician drops the puppet and 
hurries away. 

Five of the melodies heard in the two 
fairground scenes are actual Russian 
folksongs. The waltzes sentimentally 
played on cornet, flutes, and harps in 
the third tableau are by Joseph Lanner, 
Austrian violinist and composer, friend 
and colleague of Johann Strauss Sr. In 
the opening scene, the music for the 
first street-dancer — the tune for flutes 
and clarinets, accompanied on the tri- 
angle — is one Stravinsky heard played 
regularly on a barrel-organ outside his 
hotel room in Beaulieu. It is a music- 
hall song called Elle avait un jambe en bois. 
Later it turned out that the song was in 
copyright, and arrangements were made 
for Emile Spencer, its composer, to be 
paid a royalty whenever Petrushka was 
played.* Of the two sections that Stra- 
vinsky first played for Diaghilev in Au- 
gust 1910, the Russian Dance is of 
course the one that occurs in the first 
scene. Petrushka's Cry became the music 
for the scene in Petrushka's room. Those 
are the two places in which Petruskha is 
closest to retaining its originally imag- 
ined character as a Konzertstiick for piano 
and orchestra. One of the undeniable 
peculiarities of the finished Petrushka 
score is the way Stravinsky managed 
gradually to forget all about the piano, 
an inattention for which, to some extent, 
he made amends in his 1946-47 rescoring. 

— M.S. 

*Forty-four years later, Stravinsky again 
found that unwittingly he had taken on a 
collaborator. The Greeting Prelude he wrote for 
Monteux's 80th birthday, and which was 
first performed for Monteux by the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra under Charles Munch 
on 4 April 1955, is based on Happy Birthday. 
Stravinsky assumed "this melody to be in the 
category of folk music, too, or, at least, to be 
very old and dim in origin. As it turned out, 
the author [Clayton F. Summy] was alive, 
but, graciously, did not ask for an indemnity." 



30 



BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

Seiji Ozawa, Music Director 

Colin Davis, Principal Conductor 
Joseph Silverstein, Assistant Conductor 
Tanglewood 1977 

Sunday, 24 July at 2:30 
SEIJI OZAWA, conductor 



MOZART Piano Concerto No. 23 in A major, K. 488 

(cadenza by MOZART) 

Allegro 
Adagio 
Allegro assai 

PETER SERKIN 

TAKEMITSU Quatrain for clarinet, violin, cello, piano, 
and orchestra 

TASHI: 

Richard Stoltzman 
Ida Kavafian 
Fred Sherry 
Peter Serkin 



INTERMISSION 




FALLA 



The Three- Cornered Hat 

Introduction 
Afternoon: 

Dance of the Miller's Wife (Fandango) 

The Grapes 
Night: 

The Neighbors' Dance (Seguidillas) 

The Miller's Dance (Farruca) 

The Corregidor's Dance 

Final Dance (Jota) 

BEVERLY MORGAN, mezzo-soprano 



Seiji Ozawa and the Boston Symphony Orchestra record exclusively 

for Deutsche Grammophon. 

Baldwin piano 

Peter Serkin plays the Steinway piano 



31 




wrod 



does not end on Sunday. It's only the beginning. 



This Week At The 
Berkshire Music Center: 



Sunday, July 24 at 8:30 pm: 

Boston University Young Artists Program 
Chamber Music Concert 

Monday, July 25 at 8:30 pm: 

Berkshire Music Center 
Composer's Forum 

Wednesday, July 27 at 8:30 pm: 

Boston University Young Artists Orchestra 

Henry Charles Smith, conductor 

Mendelssohn: Symphony No. 5 'Reformation 7 

Hovhannes.: 'Mysterious Mountain' op. 132 

Sibelius: Symphony No. 1, op. 39 

Thursday, July 28 at 8:30 pm: 

Berkshire Music Center Orchestra Concert 

Seiji Ozawa, conductor 

Haydn: Symphony No. 60 'II Distratto' 

Berlioz: Symphonie Fantastique 

Saturday, July 30 at 2:30 pm: 

Boston University Young Artists Vocal Program Concert 

Joseph Huszti, conductor 

Sunday, July 31 at 10:00 am: 

Berkshire Music Center Chamber Music Concert 



These events are open to the public by making a contribution, $2.00 
minimum, to the Berkshire Music Center at the main gate, or by becoming 
a Friend of Music at Tanglewood. 



32 



Notes 



Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart 

Piano Concerto No. 23 in A, K. 488 

Johannes Chrysostomus Wolfgangus Theophilus 
Mozart was born in Salzburg on 27 January 
17 5 1 and died in Vienna on 5 December 1791. 
He completed the A major Concerto, K. 488, on 
2 March 17 86 and played it Vienna soon after. 

Figaro was the big project for the 
Spring of 1786, and it was ready on 29 
April for performance on 1 May, but 
Mozart repeatedly interupted himself to 
dash off his one-acter The Impresario for 
a party at the Imperial palace of Schon- 
brunn and to prepare three concertos 
for himself to play at concerts in Lent. 
The A major is the middle one of the 
three, being preceded by the spacious 
E flat, K. 482, completed at the end of 
December, and being followed just three 
weeks later by the sombre C minor, 
K. 491. Its neighbors are bigger. Both 
have trumpets and drums, and the C 
minor is one of the relatively rare works 
to allow itself both oboes and clarinets. 
The A major adds just one flute, plus 
pairs of clarinets, bassoons, and horns 
to the strings, and with the last in the 
whole series, K. 595 in B flat (January 
1791), it is the most chamber- musical of 
Mozart's mature piano concertos. It is 
gently spoken and, at least until the 
finale, shows little ambition in the di- 
rection of pianistic brilliance. Lyric and 
softly moonlit — as the garden scene of 
Figaro might be, were there no sexual 
menace in it — it shares something in 
atmosphere with later works in the 
same key, the great Violin Sonata, 
K. 526, the Clarinet Quintet, and the 
Clarinet Concerto. 

The first movement is music of a 
lovely and touching gallantry. Its second 
chord, darkened by the unexpected G 
natural in the second violins, already 
suggests the melancholy that will cast 
fleeting shadows throughout the con- 
certo and dominate its slow movement 
altogether. The two main themes are 
related more than they are contrasted, 



and part of what is at once fascinating 
and delightful is the difference in the 
way Mozart's scores them. He begins 
both with strings alone. The first, he 
continues with an answering phrase 
for winds alone, punctuated twice by 
forceful string chords, and that leads to 
the first passage for the full orchestra. 
But now that the sound of the winds has 
been introduced and established, Mozart 
can proceed more subtly. In the new 
theme, a bassoon joins the violins nine 
measures into the melody, and, as 
though encouraged by that, the flute 
appears in mid-phrase, softly to add its 
sound to the texture, with horns and 
clarinets arriving just in time to re- 
inforce the cadence. When the same 
melody reappears about a minute and a 
half later, the piano, having started it 
off, is happy to retire and leave it to 
the violins and bassoon and flute who" 
had invented it in the first place, but it 
cannot after all refrain from doubling 
the descending scales with quiet broken 
octaves, adding another unobtrusively 
achieved, perfectly gauged touch of 
fresh color. 

Slow movements in minor keys are 
surprisingly uncommon in Mozart, and 
this one is in fact the last he writes. An 
adagio marking is rare, too, and this 
movement is an altogether astonishing 
transformation of the lilting siciliano 
style. The orchestra's first phrase harks 
back to Wer ein Liebchen hat gefunden (He 
who has found a sweetheart), Osmin's ani- 
madversions in The Abduction from the 
Seraglio on the proper treatment of wom- 
en, but nothing in the inner life of that 
grouchy, fig -picking harem steward 
could ever have motivated the exquisite 
dissonances brought about here by the 
bassoon's imitation of clarinet and violins. 
Throughout, Mozart the pianist imag- 
ines himself as the ideal opera singer — 
only the Andante in the famous C major 
Concerto, K. 467, is as vocal — and a 
singer, furthermore, proud of her flaw- 
lessly achieved changes of register and 
of her exquisitely cultivated taste in 
expressive embellishment. 

After the restraint of the first move- 
ment and the melancholia of the second, 
Mozart gives us a finale of captivating 



33 



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Friday, 5 August at 7:00 
(Weekend Prelude) 

SCHUMANN 

Carnival Jest from Vienna 
PROKOFIEV 

Sonata No. 7, Op. 83 
MISHA DICHTER, piano 



Friday, 5 August at 9:00 
ANDRE PREVIN conducting: 

VAUGHAN WILLIAMS 

Overture to The Wasps 
HUMMEL 

Trumpet Concerto in E 

ARMANDO GHITALLA 
RACHMANINOFF 

Symphony No. 2 in E minor, Op. 27 



Saturday, 6 August at 8:30 
KAZUYOSHI AKIYAMA conducting: 

ROSSINI 

Overture to II Signor Bruschino 
SCHUMANN 

Piano Concerto in A minor, Op. 54 

MISHA DICHTER 
MUSSORGSKY 

Pictures at an Exhibition (arr. Ravel) 



Sunday, 7 August at 2:30 
ANDRE PREVIN conducting: 

HAYDN 

Symphony No. 87 in A 
PROKOFIEV 

Romeo and Juliet (excerpts) 



35 



hand the point of departure. I do not try 
in any way to express myself through 
these sounds but, by reacting with them, 
the work springs forth itself. 

For several years I have composed a 
number of works for traditional Japanese 
instruments, in particular the shakuha- 
chi and biwa, mainly because I have 
rediscovered through them the genius 
of two particular interpreters. But there 
is no profound reason which could log- 
ically explain my attraction to the music 
of my country, except perhaps a slight 
curiosity and musical interest. 

At first, the sonorities of traditional 
Japanese music meant no more to me 
than something novel and quaint. But 
gradually these sonorities came to pose 
a fundamental problem and I was to 
consider them seriously, though with- 
out ever arriving at the solution, be- 
cause the particular freedom of this 
music escapes the will and control of the 
composer since it can only be realized 
through the actual musical instrument. 

One cannot translate into theory a 
swift or striking attack, if only because 
it would happen too suddenly, like light- 
ning, too complex to grasp. Such sonor- 
ity, developing of its own accord, gives 
rise to silences of tremendous meta- 
physical tension. It is the same with the 
'Itcho' which punctuates the action in 
No Theatre, where musical sound and 
the negative sound of silence, without 
having any directly vital relationship 
with the expressive aims, nevertheless 
set up a violent resistance and create 
an intangible balance. 

To repeat the point: the complexity of 
lightning sound and the Japanese sensi- 
tivity towards this particular refinement 
has given simple silence an extraordinary 
significance and great musical weight. 

To make the void of silence live is to 
make the infinity of sounds. Sound and 
silence are equal. But this conception 
cannot work without extracting to the 
full the expressive potential of a musical 
sound or phrase which will then become 
an abstract, anonymous entity freely 
offered to the executant. The virtuoso 
of the shakuhachi dreams of a perfect, 
sublime sound, like that of the wind in 
the bamboos, and in that is the full 



expression of belief in Japanese music. 
The inner complexities of a natural 
sound are akin to nothingness. 

What more can one say? If I recon- 
struct the language of our traditional art 
I will always remain alien to historical 
cause and conversely, if I westernize 
the original sound incantation, I would 
divest it of all emotional power. 

It is necessary then to abandon the 
sounds of classical tradition, on the basis 
that they elude our present day ideas 
and authority? Even if that is the case, I 
must confess that they affect and satisfy 
me as much as the sounds of any 
other music. . . 

It would be wrong to believe that 
expressiveness artificially born of a 
composer's skill, and innovation in 
method and form, guarantee the worth 
of a creative personality. Musical sound 
which freely approaches natural noise 
and therefore nothingness, escapes all 
criticism of its kind and poses a problem 
otherwise more general. 

I would like to develop in two direc- 
tions at once, as a Japanese in tradition 
and as a Westerner in innovation. Deep 
within myself I would like to keep two 
musical genres, both of which have their 
own rightful form. Making use of these 
basically incompatible elements at the 
heart of many processes in composition 
is, in my view, only the first stage. I 
don't want to resolve this fruitful con- 
tradiction; on the contrary I want to 
make the two blocks fight each other. In 
this way I avoid isolating myself from 
tradition whilst advancing into the 
future with each new work. I would like 
to achieve a sound as intense as silence . . . 

— Toru Takemitsu 

Manuel de Falla 

The Three- Cornered Hat 

Manuel de Falla was born in Cadiz, Spain, 
on 23 November 1876 and died at Alta 
Gracia in the province of Cordoba, Argentina, 
on 14 November 1946. 

In the history of 20th-century the- 
atrical dance, Manuel de Falla 's The Three- 
Cornered Hat can claim a place as signifi- 
cant as Stravinsky's Petrushka. Both 



36 



works were produced by the great im- 
presario Serge Diaghilev and performed 
by his Ballets Russes. Both broke with 
earlier thematic traditions that peopled 
the art form with princes, wraiths, and 
swans. And most importantly, perhaps, 
both portrayed the bourgeoisie with a 
sympathetic understanding. The bustling 
street scene that frames the puppet 
show in Petrushka surely approximates 
the pre-Lenten revels that delighted 
St. Petersburg, just as the characters in 
The Three- Cornered Hat accurately reflect 
the attitudes and aspirations of 
rustic Andalusia. 

The ballet, which was premiered under 
the baton of Ernest Ansermet at the 
Alhambra Theatre in London on 22 July 
1919, was an immediate success, and 
like all of Diaghilev's most fertile in- 
spirations, it was a thorough-going syn- 
thesis of music, drama, dance and decor. 
Leonide Massine choreographed a sce- 
nario drawn from El Sombrero de Tres 
Picos, a story written in 1874 by the 
Spanish poet Pedro Antonio de Alarcon 
(the same story, incidentally, used by 
Hugo Wolf for his opera Der Corregidor.) 
Picasso designed sparse and atmo- 
spheric costumes and sets in pale pink, 
white, blue and grey that Cecil Beaton 
would later characterize as "the common 
denominator of the Spanish country- 
side," so tellingly essential were their 
gestures. 

But it is the score by Falla for which 
the work is best remembered. A first 
version of the piece, known as The 
Corregidor and the Miller's Wife was per- 
formed in 1917 in Madrid's Teatro Eslava 
as a segment of a two-part pantomime. 
Later that year, Diaghilev met the com- 
poser and convinced him that as the 
work stood, it was too skimpy to sup- 
port a theatrical structure. Falla thus 
strengthened his score in substance and 
in scope. 

The deftly-drawn sketch became a 
full-blooded diptych; its fabric was en- 
riched with instrumental references to 
the action on stage, and its shape was 
enlarged through the inclusion of bril- 
liantly orchestrated national dances, in 
particular a Farucca and a Jota. 



The ballet is based on a folk tale that 
shares the spirit of Beaumarchais, his 
brio and his deep respect for the re- 
sourcefulness and native wit of society's 
second stratum. Indeed, Figaro, Susanna 
and the Count Almaviva are quickly 
called to mind by the escapades of the 
Miller, his Wife and the Corregidor, a 
provincial magistrate whose symbol is a 
three-cornered hat. 

The curtain still closed, the ballet 
begins with a flourish of trumpets. This 
echoes the traditional fanfare that is 
sounded when a torero enters a bull 
ring, and thus we are prepared when 
the curtain opens to reveal a scene 
inspired by the grim entertainment of 
the corrida, painted by Picasso on a 
secondary drapery: a group of spectators 
coolly observe as a slain animal is hauled 
away and a fresh torero arrives in the 
arena. Almost as if moved by this melan- 
choly spectacle, a mezzo-soprano sings 
a plaintive exhortation, punctuated by 
repeated cries of "Ole!" and by the 
rhythmic clapping of hands: Casadita, 
Casadita, cierra con tranca la puerta: que 
aunque el diablo est'e dormido a lo mejor 
se despierta! (Little wife, little wife, 
secure your door with a crossbeam; 
for though the Devil may now be 
sleeping, you can be sure he will awake!) 

The drop-curtain rises on Part One, 
which is set by the Miller's house. While 
the Miller futilely tries to teach a pet 
blackbird to imitate the striking of a 
clock — depicted in the orchestra by a 
dialogue between a trumpet and a pic- 
colo — his coquettish Wife approaches. 
Briefly, teasingly they dance, but leisure 
must give way to labor. The Miller 
busies himself at his well, and occupied, 
is oblivious when a young nobleman 
appears. The Miller's Wife is a willing 
partner in an amorous flirtation, which 
continues until her husband looks up 
from his work. 

His anger subsides as the ancient 
Corregidor and his entourage near. The 
old man himself, as vain as he is vilified, 
decides to court the Miller's Wife as she 
dances a Fandango. Suddenly he interupts 
and suggests that she join him in a 
slower-paced minuet. She agrees, but 
teasingly she holds a bunch of grapes 

37 



ever just out of his reach; the Corregi- 
dor keeps grasping for them, eventually 
lunges, trips, and flounders. The Miller 
who has watched this farce in hiding, 
rejoins his Wife in the Fandango while 
the Corregidor storms off, humiliated 
and enraged. 

Part Two takes place later that day, 
which marks the Feast of St. John. 
Neighbors meet to celebrate at the Mil- 
er's house, and they join in a Seguidillas, 
the traditional dance of Andalusia. The 
Miller then performs the virtuoso Farucca, 
and by the end of the festivities, dusk 
has faded to darkness. 

While drinking a final toast, the party 
hears the menacing steps of soldiers and 
a knock on the door (which Falla whim- 
sically represents with a referance to the 
initial motto of Beethoven's Fifth Sym- 
phony). The Corregidor has sent his 
men to arrest the Miller on unspecified 
charges. Protests unavailing, he is 
dragged away, his guests depart, and his 
Wife is left alone. 

The Corregidor's intentions soon be- 
come apparent; with the Miller gone, he 
will woo his Wife. He dances for pleasure 
on the bridge outside the Miller's house. 
Hearing the noise, the Wife goes to 
investigate. In the darkness she slips 
accidentally into the old man's arms, but 
in the struggle that ensues, the Corregi- 
dor looses his footing and falls into 
the water. 

A classic mix-up follows, with the 
Corregidor dressed in the Miller's clothes 
and the Miller, who has escaped from jail, 
dressed in the Corregidor's. A further 
confusion occurs when the police re- 
arrest the fugitive "Miller." 

As in all good fables, however, the real 
Miller and his Wife are happily reunited, 
while the Corregidor is soundly battered 
and disgraced. In celebration of his down- 



Allan Albert, Artistic Director 

.BERKSHIRE PLAYHOUSE, 

July 6-1 7 

WILLIAM ATHERTON 
GILDA RADNER 
Dunning & Abbott's CHRIS SARANDON 
BROADWAY JILLHAWORTH 



Saul Bellow's July 20-31 
THE LAST ANALYSIS RON LEIBMAN 



Rodgers & Hart's Aug. 3-14 
I MARRIED AN ANGEL PHYLLIS NEWMAN 



William Inge's Aug. 17-28 
COMEBACK, DANA ANDREWS 
LITTLE SHEBA ESTELLE PARSONS 



UNICORN THEATRE 

Three New Musicals 

July 7-24 July 26-August 1 4 
THE WHALE SHOW A FABLE 

by Jean-Claude van Italie 
August 1 6-28 and Richard Peaslee 
THE CASINO 



.PROPOSITION THEATRE 

July 8-August 28 
THE PROPOSITION 



Performance Times for the Playhouse 

Evgs.: Wed., Thurs., Fri. 8:30 p.m.; Sat. 9 p.m.; Sun. 7 p.m. 

Mats.: Thurs. 2 p.m.; Sat. 5 p.m.; Sun. 3 p.m. 

Prices for the Playhouse 

Broadway, The Last Analysis, Come Back, Little Sheba 

Fri. & Sat. (9 p.m. pert, only) $8.95. 7.50; 
All other perfs. $7.95. 6.50 
I Married An Angel 

Fri. & Sat. (9 p.m. pert, only) $9.95. 8.50: 

All other perfs. $8.95, 7.50 

MAIL ORDERS FILLED PROMPTLY! 

Berkshire Theatre Festival, Stockbridge. Mass. 

01262. Enclose stamped, self-addressed envelope 

RESERVE BY PHONE 1 Call 413 • 298-5536 or 298-4800 



fall, the townspeople join in a festive 
Jota which brings the work to its 
spirited end. 

— George Gelles 

George Gelles, a Berkshire Music Center 
alumnus (1960), is a horn player, music critic, 
and dance critic. His program note appears on the 
new Deutsche Grammophon recording 2530 823 
of The Three- Cornered Hat by Seiji Ozawa 
and the Boston Symphony Orchestra, and it is 
used here by the author's kind permission and 
that of Polydor International GmbH. 



Casadita, casadita, 

cierra con tranca la puerta; 

que aunque el diablo este dormido 

ia lo mejor se despierta! 



Little wife, little wife, 

Fasten your door with a bar; 

Even if the Devil is asleep now, 

When you least expect it, hell wake up! 



Por la noche canta el cuco 
advirtiendo a los casados 
que corran bien los cerrojos 
ique el diablo esta desvelado! 



The cuckoo sings in the night 
Warning husbands 
To fasten their latches well, 
For the Devil is vigilant! 



38 



Guest Artists 



Tashi 

The group TASHI, whose name means 
"Good Fortune," made its debut in New 
York in 1973. They have appeared world- 



wide including performances in North 
and South America, Europe, and the Far 
East, and have inspired the works of 
several contemporary composers inclu- 
ding Takemitsu. In September 1976, the 
group performed the World Premiere of 
Tashi, a piece by Charles Wuorinen, with 
the Cleveland Orchestra conducted by 
the composer. 




Shirley Verrett 

New Orleans-born soprano Shirley 
Verrett grew up in Los Angeles. She 
studied accounting in college, sold real 
estate for a short time, and then began 
serious voice studies with Anna Fitziu. 
She later continued with Miriam Szekely- 
Freschl at Juilliard. As she worked to- 
wards her Juilliard degree, she per- 
formed in Benjamin Britten's Rape of 
Lucretia, and Nabokov's Death of Rasputin 
at the Cologne Opera. In 1962 she sang 
at the New York Philharmonic concert 
at the opening of Lincoln Center and 
participated in the Spoleto Festival. Her 
many performances since then include 
Carmen with the Bolshoi Opera; De- 
lilah, Princess Eboli, and Queen Eliza- 
beth I in Donizetti's Maria Stuarda at La 
Scala; Amneris, Orfeo, and Azucena at 
Covent Garden; and Princess Eboli at 
the Vienna State Opera. Among her 
roles at the Metropolitan Opera, after 
her 1968 debut as Carmen, were Cas- 
sandra and Dido in Berlioz's Les Troyens. 



After her performance in Donizetti's La 
Favorita with the Dallas Civic Opera, she 
made her San Francisco debut as Selika 
in Meyerbeer's L'Africaine. She has also 
appeared as Lady Macbeth in the 1976 
production of Macbeth by the Opera 




39 



Company of Boston. Some of her re- 
cordings are: Neocle in The Siege of Cor- 
nith (Angel), Macbeth (Deutsche Gram- 
mophon), the complete Orfeo (RCA), and 
Anna Bolena and Norma (ABC-Westmin- 
ister). Miss Verrett lives in New York 
City with her husband and five-year- 
old daughter. 

Sarah Caldwell 

Sarah Caldwell was giving violin re- 
citals before she was ten. Born in Mary- 
ville, Missouri, and brought up in Ar- 
kansas, she was graduated from high 
school at 14 and went on to study at 
Hendricks College and the University of 
Arkansas, coming finally as a scholar- 
ship student to the New England Con- 
servatory. It was there that she dis- 
covered her love for opera. Her first 
production, when she was not yet 20, 
was of Vaughan Williams' Riders to the Sea 
at Tanglewood. Following that perfor- 
mance, Serge Koussevitzky appointed 
her to the faculty of the Berkshire Music 
Center's opera department. Later, in 
1957, while on the staff of the opera 
department at Boston University, Miss 
Caldwell founded the Boston Opera 
Group, whose first production was the 
enthusiastically received American pre- 
miere of Offenbach's Voyage to the Moon (a 
work she was many years later to per- 
form at the White House for an 
audience of astronauts and space scien- 



tists). Her company, now called The 
Opera Company of Boston, has pro- 
duced more than 40 works, including, 
along with standard repertory, Luigi 
Nono's Intolleranza, Schoenberg's Moses 
and Aron, Rameau's Hippolyte e Aricie, The 
Trojans and Benvenuto Cellini by Berlioz, 
Prokofiev's War and Peace, and Lulu by 
Alan Berg. She has staged several works 
for the New York City Opera. Miss 
Caldwell made her debut as an orches- 
tral conductor when she opened the 
1975-76 season of the Milwaukee Sym- 
phony. Since, she has conducted the 
New York Philharmonic in a Pension 
Fund concert of music by women com- 
posers, the New Orleans Philharmonic- 
Symphony, the Indianapolis Symphony, 
and the Pittsburgh Symphony. In Janu- 
ary of 1976 she made her Metropolitan 
Opera debut conducting Verdi's La Tra- 
viata, and in January of 1977, she con- 
ducted her first concerts with the 
Boston Symphony. 

Peter Serkin 

Pianist Peter Serkin made his first 
public appearance at the age of twelve in 
a performance of the Haydn Concerto in 
D major, conducted by Alexander 
Schneider at the Marlboro Music Fes- 
tival. He has appeared with such major 
orchestras as the Amsterdam Concert- 
gebouw, the Cleveland and Philadelphia 
orchestras, the Chicago, Toronto, Bos- 





40 



ton and San Francisco symphonies, and 
the New York Philharmonic, and with 
chamber music ensembles including the 
Budapest, Guarneri, and Galimir string 
quartets and also at the Casals Festivals 
in Prades and Puerto Rico. He has a 
recently released recording on RCA of 
Vingt regards sur L'Enfant Jesus by Olivier 
Messiaen and has also recorded per- 
formances of six concertos by Mozart 
with the English Chamber Orchestra 
under Alexander Schneider. 

Beverly Morgan 

Mezzo-soprano Beverly Morgan at- 
tended Mt. Holyoke College and gradu- 
ated with honors from the New England 
Conservatory (both B.M. and M.M.). 
During recent summers Ms. Morgan 
has attended the Aspen Music Festival, 
the S.M.U. and Oglebay Institute Opera 
Workshops with Boris Goldovsky, and 
the Berkshire Music Center at Tangle- 
wood as a Vocal Fellow. Ms. Morgan 
studied with Gladys Miller, Phyllis Cur- 
tin, Dean Wilder and Thomas Paul. Her 
vocal coaches have included Allen 
Rogers, Terry Decima, Martin Smith, 
and Tamara Brooks. Ms. Morgan has 
appeared with the New England Con- 
servatory Orchestra, with the Boston 
Pops Orchestra, and several times dur- 
ing the Fromm Festival at Tanglewood, 
most recently in the American premiere 
performance of Oliver Knussen's Trum- 
pets in 1975. Ms. Morgan recently won 
the Financial Federal Musical Showcase 
Competition in Miami and will return to 
Florida in October for a performance 
with the Miami Senior Symphony. Her 
last BSO appearance was in the opening 
concerts of the 1976-77 season in a 
performance of Falla's Three Cornered Hat, 
which was conducted by Seiji Ozawa. 

Richard Stoltzman 

Clarinetist Richard Stoltzman has ap- 
peared frequently in recital and chamber 
music performances throughout the 
United States and Europe. He has re- 
corded for the Marlboro Recording So- 
ciety. He has performed as guest artist 
with leading quartets including the Am- 
adeus, Guarneri, and Vermeer string 



quartets and also with the Lincoln Cen- 
ter Chamber Music Society. In addition, 
he has frequently participated at the 
Marlboro Music Festival and has toured 
the United States with the "Music from 
Marlboro" tours. Mr. Stoltzman holds a 
Master of Music degree from Yale Uni- 
verstiy and has studied with Keith Wil- 
son and Kalmen Opperman; he is 
presently a member of the faculty of the 
California Institute of the Arts. He is 
also a member of the National Advisory 
Board of Young Audiences, Inc. 

Ida Kavafian 

Violinist Ida Kavafian was born in 
Istanbul, Turkey, of Armenian descent. 
She has studied with Ara Zerounian, 
Mischa Mischakoff and Ivan Galamian. 
In October 1973 she won first prize at 
the Vianna da Motta International Vio- 
lin Competition in Lisbon, Portugal, and 
then gave recitals throughout Europe 
during the 1974-75 season. She has 
appeared frequently in recital, on tele- 
vision and with numerous orchestras; in 
1972 she was soloist with the New York 
Chamber Orchestra at Lincoln Center's 
Mostly Mozart Festival; she has par- 
ticipated in the Casals Festival in Puerto 
Rico and has been heard with the Lin- 
coln Center Chamber Music Society in 
New York, Boston, and Washington. She 
is a graduate of the Juilliard School, 
where she earned a Master of Music 
degree and was a student of Oscar 
Shumsky. 

Fred Sherry 

Fred Sherry studied cello at the Juil- 
liard School with Leonard Rose. He 
made his New York debut, presented by 
Young Concert Artists, in 1969. He has 
been cellist of the Contemporary Cham- 
ber Ensemble and the Juilliard Ensemble 
with whom he has toured extensively in 
Europe and the United States. He has 
had works written for him by Charles 
Wuorinen (with whom he also per- 
forms) and Peter Lieberson, and has 
worked with Luciano Berio, Elliott Car- 
ter, and Pierre Boulez on their music. He 
is a founding member of Speculum Mu- 
sicae and is also a member of the Galimir 



41 



String Quartet and the Group for Con- 
temporary Music. Mr. Sherry has 
recorded for RCA Victor, Nonesuch, 
and Philips. 

The Boston Symphony 

Chamber Players 

The Boston Symphony Orchestra es- 
tablished a new and expanded role for its 
first-desk players with the creation of 
the Boston Symphony Chamber Players 
in 1964. Comprised of the principal 
string, woodwind, and brass players and 
the solo tympanist, the Chamber Players 
have made several national and inter- 
national tours in addition to their annu- 
al local appearances. The group is flex- 
ible in size and is joined from time to 
time by guest artists and other members 
of the Orchestra, making it possible for 



the Chamber Players to perform vir- 
tually any work from the vast range of 
the chamber music literature. Pianist 
Gilbert Kalish, Claude Frank, Richard 
Goode, Michael Tilson Thomas, Peter 
Serkin, Lorin Hollander, and Alexis Weis- 
senberg have performed with the group, 
and other guest artists have ranged 
from sopranos Bethany Beardslee and 
Phyllis Curtin to the Joshua Light Show. 
The Chamber Players have toured 
Europe three times, and they have given 
concerts in the Soviet Union, the U.S. 
Virgin Islands, and South America. They 
have recorded for both RCA Victor and 
Deutsche Grammophon records. Their 
latest release on the DGG label, for 
whom they now record exclusively, is 
the complete chamber music of Igor 
Stravinsky. 







42 



Coming concerts: 



Have a 

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talk with 

Elizabeth Grady 




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Our regular one hour facial pore 
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Enjoy our assortment of wine and cheese. 



99 



BEETHOVEN WEEKEND 



Friday, 29 July at 7 (Weekend Prelude) 

BEETHOVEN 

Trio in G, Op. 121a, Kakadu 
Quintet in E flat for Piano & Winds, 
Op. 16 

PETER SERKIN, piano 

BOSTON SYMPHONY CHAMBER 

PLAYERS 



Friday, 29 July at 8:30 

KLAUS TENNSTEDT conducting: 

BEETHOVEN 

Overture to Prometheus, Op. 43 
Piano Concerto No. 4 in G, Op. 58 
PETER SERKIN 
Symphony No. 7 in A, Op. 92 



Saturday, 30 July at 8:30 

KLAUS TENNSTEDT conducting: 

BEETHOVEN 

Concerto in C for Violin, Cello, Piano, 

Op. 56 

JOSEPH SILVERSTEIN 

JULES ESKIN 

PETER SERKIN 

Symphony No. 3 in E flat, 

Op. 55, Eroica 



Sunday, 31 July at 2:30 

KLAUS TENNSTEDT conducting: 

BEETHOVEN 

Overture to Fidelio, Op. 72 
Symphony No. 2 in D, Op. 36 
Violin Concerto in D, Op. 61 
JOSEPH SILVERSTEIN 



43 




^mjdccj: *- — — tr —■ 




Twin Fires Arcade 

12 unique and exciting shops dealing in 

Antiques 

to include 

Prized Acquisitions from London 

Early Welsh, Georgian & Victorian unfinished pine furniture 
and numerous, assorted & interesting accent and decorator 

pieces from England 

The Arcade is a re-creation of mid-1 800's shops and "stalls" of Camden Passage, Islington, 

London, England, and is located indoors in a recently refurbished barn on the former 

Walter Pritchard Eaton estate at the junction of Under Mountain Road (Rt. 41) and 

Berkshire School Road - Sheffield, Massachusetts 

413-229-8307 

From N.Y.Taconic to Route 23, turn right (6 miles) to Route 41, turn right 3 miles to Berkshire School Rd. 

in Sheffield, turn left 1 block on left is Barn. 

From Conn. Route 7 into Sheffield, turn left into Berkshire School Rd. to end of road — on right is 

Twin Fires Antiques. 

From Mass. (Tanglewood) Route 7 into Sheffield, turn right on Berkshire School Rd. to end of road — on 

right is Barn. 




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x record 
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Reservations Preferred Lenox, Ma 

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Serving Breakfast 

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by Internationally Renowned 

Chef-Owner, Gerhard Schmid 

Cafe Hour on the Terrace 

Throughout the Tanglewood Season 

Cocktail Lounge Ample Free Parking 



44 



Own this four-season 
rustic contemporary home. 




Would you be interested in owning an affordable retreat 
intheBERKSHIRES? 

We can build to your plans and specifications or will 
custom design a house for you at a guaranteed contract 
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invest in the fabulous Berkshires, attrac- 
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And when you are ready to consider 
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45 










One of Soviet Georgia's senior citizens thought 

Dannori was an excellent yogurt. She ought to know. 

She's been eating yogurt for 137 years. 



CAMACHICH KVITZINIA PHOTOGRAPHED IN ATRARA. SOVIET GEORGIA. 



46 



The Berkshire Music Center 



"One more thing should come from this scheme, 
namely, a good honest school of musicians." 

— Henry Lee Higginson, on founding the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra. 

The late Serge Koussevitzky fervent- 
ly shared Henry Lee Higginson's vision 
of a "good honest school for musicians' 7 

— an academy where young musicians 
could extend their artistic training and 
broaden their experience under the 
guidance of eminent professionals. 
More than any other person, it was 
Koussevitzky who made the vision a 
reality; he was Director of the Berkshire 
Music Center from its founding in 1940 
until his death in 1951, and his vigorous 
leadership has remained an inspiring 
example in the years since. 

Serge Koussevitzky was succeeded by 
Charles Munch, and it is a mark of the 
Center's success that the Boston Sym- 
phony's present Music Director, Seiji 
Ozawa, studied here during the Munch 
era. Alumni of the Center are among 
the most prominent and active mem- 
bers of the music world; more than ten 
percent of the members of this country's 
major orchestras are graduates of the 
Center, as are many of the world's 
notable conductors, instrumental solo- 
ists and singers. 

Today the primary responsibility for 
the Center's direction is in the hands of 
Gunther Schuller, composer, writer, 
conductor and President of the New 
England Conservatory until June 1977. 
Average enrollment is somewhat over 
400 each summer, of which approxi- 
matelyl40 are members of the Center's 
Fellowship Program; this provides free 
tuition (and in many cases free board 
and expenses) for instrumentalists, 
singers, conductors and composers of 
post-graduate calibre. In addition to the 
Fellowship Program, Boston University, 
through its Tanglewood Institute, offers 
several college- credit programs for tal- 
ented high school musicians; the noted 
soprano Phyllis Curtin directs a singers' 
seminar highlighted by her own master 
classes. Finally, each summer the Cen- 
ter's Festival of Contemporary Music 
(August 13-17 this year), presented in 



cooperation with the Fromm Music 
Foundation at Harvard, offers a broad 
spectrum of the most advanced music of 
today's composers in a gala week of 
performances. 

The Boston Symphony's Concert- 
master and Assistant Conductor Joseph 
Silverstein heads a faculty that includes 
principal players and members of the 
Orchestra and faculty members of Bos- 
ton University's School of Fine Arts, 
plus leading soloists, conductors and 
composers. The Center has numerous 
studios for practice and chamber music, 
and an extensive library of music litera- 
ture and scores. Rehearsals and con- 
certs of the Berkshire Music Center 
Orchestra and other student groups 
take place mostly in the Theatre- 
Concert Hall, while lectures, seminars, 
conducting classes, vocal and choral re- 
hearsals, composers' forums and cham- 
ber music concerts take place in the 
Chamber Music Hall, in the West Barn, 
in the Hawthorne Cottage, on the Re- 
hearsal Stage, and in the small studios 
both on the Tanglewood grounds and in 
buildings leased in Lenox. Each summer 
the Baldwin Piano and Organ Company 
generously provides over 100 keyboard 
instruments for individual practice; 
other instruments — percussion, for ex- 
ample — are provided by the Orchestra. 

The Boston Symphony is assisted in 
supporting the Center by the National 
Endowment for the Arts, a Federal 
agency, as well as by individual and 
corporate sponsors. Scholarships are 
awarded to the majority of the students, 
who are chosen by audition on a com- 
petitive basis. The cost of the scholar- 
ship program is large and adds sub- 
stantially to the Orchestra's yearly 
deficit — one major reason for the estab- 
lishment of the Friends of Music at 
Tanglewood, a group that provides 
critical support for the Center. A brief 
account of members' privileges is printed 
on page 41, and more information may 
be had at the Friends' Office near the 
Main Gate. We invite you to see and 
hear for yourself the remarkable calibre 
of the Center's young musicians. 

47 



Tanglewood 

Talks & Walks 



Tanglewood Talks & Walks are a fasci- 
nating series of five Thursday lecture- 
luncheons at noon in the Tanglewood 
Tent, followed by a special guided tour 
of Tanglewood. Guest speakers include 
the musicians, conductors, and staff 
of the Boston Symphony Orchestra and 
Berkshire Music Center. Bring a lunch— 
we'll provide the refreshments. Please 
call the Tanglewood Friends Office at 
(413) 637-1600 for reservations. $2 con- 
tribution to the public, free to Friends 
of Tanglewood. 

LUNCHEON 12:15 
TALK 1:00 
WALK 1:30 

1977 Tanglewood Talks & Walks 

14 JULY — VICTOR YAMPOLSKY 

Principal Second Violin 
Boston Symphony Orchestra 

28 JULY— JAMES F. KILEY 

Operations Manager, 
Tanglewood 

4 AUGUST — PASQUALE CARDILLO 

Clarinet, 

Boston Symphony Orchestra; 
Principal Clarinet, 
Boston Pops Orchestra 

18 AUGUST— BETSY JOLAS 

Composer in Residence, 
Berkshire Music Center 

25 AUGUST— CAROL PROCTER 

Cello, 

Boston Symphony Orchestra 



Friends of Music at Tanglewood 

Lenox, Massachusetts 01240 

(413) 637-1600 



Rensselaerville 
Piano Festival 

July 18 -July 30 

The Institute 
on Man and Science 

Rensselaerville, New York 

DOROTHY TAUBMAN. Musical Director 
ENID STETTNER. Administrative Director 

July 18 • Paul Tobias. Cellist 

Elizabeth Moschelli. Pianist 
July 19 • Jonathan Feldman. Pianist 
July 20 • Jocheved Kaplinsky. Pianist 
July 21 • Julia Hoetzman, Pianist 
July 22 • Natan Brand. Pianist 
July 23 • Samuel Baron. Flutist 

Carol Baron. Pianist 
July 24 • Edna Golandsky. Pianist 
July 25 • Katherine Teves, Pianist 
July 26 • Joshua Pierce. Pianist 
July 27 • Steven DeGroote. Pianist 
July 29 • Nina Tichman. Pianist 
July 30 • Zitta Finkelstein. Pianist 

All Concerts at 8:00 PM. 
Kawai official piano 

Admission $3.00 
For Tickets or Reservations 
(518) 239-4635 
or write Enid Stettner, 
Rensselaerville. N.Y 12147 



1771 was a good 

year for our Lobster Pie. 

This year 

it's even better. 




Publick House 



Good Yankee cooking, drink and lodging. 
On the Common — Sturhndge. Mass.— t>17 347-3313 



48 



The Friends of Music 
At Tanglewood 

Membership provides you with exciting 

opportunities and privileges all year long. 

It's the secret buy of the Berkshires! 



Free Berkshire Music 
Center Concerts: 

There are over 40 concerts each sum- 
mer performed by the members of the 
Berkshire Music Center, the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra's summer academy 
for the advanced study of music. These 
outstanding mid-week concerts include 
chamber music recitals, full orchestra 
concerts, vocal and choral programs, 
and the annual Festival of Contem- 
porary Music, Tanglewood's "festival 
within a festival/' Friends Concert 
Memberships for individuals and 
families are available for $25.00. 

Advance program information and 
ticket ordering forms: 

Approximately one month before the 
public sale of seats in the early spring, 
Friends will be sent the advance Berk- 
shire Festival programs and a priority 
ticket application. Friends will also re- 
ceive the monthly Boston Symphony 
Orchestra publication, BSO. 



Tent Membership: 

The Tanglewood Tent, available to con- 
tributors of $75 and over, provides a 
hospitable gathering place behind the 
Music Shed where food and drink may be 
purchased on concert days. Hot buffet 
dinners are served on Saturday evenings 
beginning at 6:30 p.m. (Reservations 
must be made through the Friends 
Office no later than the Thursday after- 
noon preceding each Saturday 
evening buffet.) 

Special parking for Friends: 

Two convenient reserved parking areas 
are available to all donors of $150 or 
more for all Boston Symphony Orches- 
tra concerts: either the Box Parking Lot 
(Hawthorne Street entrance), or the 
Tent Parking Lot (West Street entrance). 

For information, contact: 
Friends of Music at Tanglewood 
Lenox, Ma. 01240 
(413) 637-1600 



Ji 









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49 



CHESIEF^ODD 



STOCKBRIDGE 




Summer Estate of 
DANIEL CHESTER FRENCH 

Sculptor of the 
Lincoln Memorial 

Studio, Residence, Barn 

Sculpture Gallery, Period 

Garden, Nature Trail . 

Daily 10-5 

May - October 

off Rte. 183, Glendale 

a property of 

the National Trust for Historic Preservation 



THE 
OLD CORNER HOUSE 







Paintings by 

NORMAN ROCKWELL 

On permanent exhibit 

Open Year Round — Daily 10-5 p.m. 

Except Tuesdays 

Adults $1.00 Children 25< 



The Executive Committee 

Tanglewood Council of the 

Boston Symphony Orchestra 

Mrs. James Garivaltis 

Mr. Curtis Buttenheim 

Co- Chairmen 

Mr. John Kittredge 

Secretary /Treasurer 

Mrs. Stephen V.C. Morris 
Mrs. Murray Klein 

Talks and Walks 

Mr. Colin MacFadyen 
Mr. Ashley Smith 

Business 

Mrs. Kelton M. Burbank 
Mrs. John Kittredge 

Benefits 

Mrs. Charles Capers 

Receptions 

Mr. Robert A. Wells 

Community Affairs 

Mrs. D.H. Potter 
Mr. William Harris 

Tent 

Mrs. Jean Massimiano 
Mr. Joseph Duffy 

Sales and Information 

Mrs. Gary A. Lopenzina 
Mrs. William H. Ryan 

Student Affairs 

Mrs. Archie Peace 
Foreign Students 

Mrs. John Kittredge 

Tanglewood- Boston Liaison 

Mrs. A. Lloyd Russell 

Boston- Tanglewood Liaison 

Mr. Peter van S. Rice 
Mrs. John S. McLennan 

Nominating 



50 



L/ILatie (jUruirtcu LXnii. 



Route 57 



CLLLUa 

Tolland, Mass. 



Telephone 413 - 258-4538 

A wide selection of antiques ranging 

from furniture, china and paintings. 

We also feature an extensive 

collection of primitive art 

from New Guinea. 

Open by appointment every day 
except Sunday. 



VISIT BERKSHIRE LAKES ESTATES 

EXPERIENCE COUNTRY LIVING 

AT ITS BEST! 

Small Lakefront Community 

Swim and boat on 2 crystal clear mountain 
lakes. Play tennis, badminton, volleyball 
and basketball on community courts. Live 
in privacy adjacent to a large state forest. 

Berkshire Lakes Estates 

Yokum Pond Road 

Becket, Mass. 01223 

Tel. 413-623-8747 

TO VISIT: Mass. Turnpike to Lee, Mass.-Rt. 20 
East. Continue 4 miles to Belden's Tavern. Left 
for 2 miles to Berkshire Lakes Estates. 



What's 

Happening 

in the 
Derkshires? 

Phone Toil-Free 

and Find Out! 



Things to do today - exhibits, arts, music, 
theatre, ballet, garden shows, special tours, 
all the current events in the Berkshires. 



SOUTHERN BERKSHIRES 

528-2677 

From Great Bamngton, \ 

Sheffield. West Stockbridge 



CENTRAL BERKSHIRES NORTHERN BERKSHIRES 

637-2677 662-2677 




From Stockbridge. Lee, 
Lenox. Prrtsfiekj 



From Wilhamstown. 
Adams. North Adams 



A service of the Berkshire Vacation Bureau 
205 West St., Pittsf ield, Mass. 

(A Division of the Berkshire Hills Conference) 



Williemstown 
Theatre festival 




Nikos Psacharopoulos 
Our 23rd Season Includes 
Misalliance Sherlock Holmes. Alter the Fall. 
Pialonov and Learned Ladies 

June 30 - August 27 

Phone Reservations 413-458-8146 

PO Box 517. Wilhamstown. Ma 02167 



uruxuxc ortd creatine fxcuxte ctu&tne" 



Brunch 

Picnic 
Baskets 




Dinner 

After-Concert 
Supper 



J. Perspico Factor 
Restaurant 

Open Till 1 A.M. 

25 Church St. • Lenox, Mass. 
637-2996 



51 



We Curtis Hotel 

Food & Lodging 
LENOX, 637-0016 



A BOOK "TO DO" NOT 
"JUST TO READ" 




ABERKSHIRE SOURCEBOOK 



Your personal guide to Berkshire County: 
its history, geography and major land- 
marks. Available at area bookstores and 
gift shops for just s 2.95. Published by The 
Junior League of Berkshire County, Inc. 



s b me i s 

deCTshop 

SANDWICHES • CATERING 
TAKE OUT SERVICE 

1 15 Elm Street, Pittsfreld, Massachusetts. 
Tel. 442-5927 

Featuring Hot Pastrami & Hot Corned Beef 
Sandwiches 

Hebrew National Delicatessen • Rolls & Bagels 
baked daily • Imported & Domestic cheeses 

• Lox & smoked fish • Barbecued chicken 

• Fresh made salads • Party Platters 

Open Daily 8 to 6 



WILL 



HE 



AMSVILL& 



INN 




A fine, small inn featuring 
superb Country French Cuisine 

LUNCH • DINNER 
Light Supper After Tanglewood 

Rte. 41 , between W. Stockbridge 

and Gt. Barrington 

Reservations Recommended by 

413-274-6580 INN PERSPECTIVE 



The new home of 
the world famous 
Alices Restaurant 




AT flVflLOCH 



Breakfast • Brunch 

• Lunch • Dinner 

• Late Supper • Cocktail Lounge 

• Entertainment • MOTEL 

• tennis • pool 

across the road from Tanglewood 
rte. 183 Lenox 637-0897 



The Sunshine Stage, 

Holllston Theatre. Route 183, 
Lenox. Mass. 01240. Tel. 413-637-0534. 

Year round professional regional theatre featuring 
plays, films and children's theatre. Cafe on prem 
ises. Frank Bessell, Artistic Director. 



THECLOTHESLOFT 

"Fine Sportswear Outlet" 

179 Main Street, Great Barrington 
164 North Street, Pittsfield 



"a little tewel in the Berkshires" C#Zee.<:W>(/±H7<'A//.u^rf<i 

(413)243-0181 or 637-2644 

'Comfortable rooms, good food and drink in 

a country atmosphere. 

Open Daily Lunch & Dinner 

Tony Ferrelli Innkeeper 



vuyvu vgxv/E 



-tr 

Accommodations for private parties. We 
cater to parties, banquets and social 
gatherings. Orders to take out. 

Chinese Polynesian Restaurant j±\ 

LENOX. MASS. For Reservations 
(413)443-4745 

Open Daily 1 1 30 'til 10 pm. Fri. & Sat 'til 1 am 




(BldStonettUMorp 



Route 8, Grove St., Adams, Ma. 

HANDPRINT WALLPAPER 

Factory Outlet 

OpenMon-Fri 10-4, Sat 9-1 2:30 




fi'WffiflTLHGIL 

' FANTASY MAN 
Food, drink, lodging. Live music week 
ends. After concert, a 10 minute 
walk from the Lion's Gate. 

WHEATLE1GH 637-0610 ^ 




Fashion Doesn 't Stop At Size 14 

BEAUTIFUL CLOTHES FOR 

T r E LARGE SIZE WOMEN 

Ctoffqrobe * n ° "* 

* 179 mfllR STREET 413528 3118 
Gt. Barrington 



&> 



52 



WHY WAIT TO ENTER COLLEGE? 
SIMONS ROCK EARLY COLLEGE 

Designed for the student who wishes to avoid the 

duplication of high school and college work 

Liberal Arts - B.A. and A. A. Degrees - Fully Accredited 

The interest of those who have completed the 10th or 11 th 
grade of high school is invited 

Admissions Office 

Simon's Rock Early College 

Great Barrington, MA 01230 

Telephone: 413-528-0771 




Tanglewood 
Tradition 



Our outdoor Courtyard 
— colorfully abounding 
with Impatient plants — 
serves luncheons, 
dinners, snacks and 
drinks. Our indoor 
Lion's Den features sandwiches, 
drinks and live entertainment. 
Both are open till 1 a.m. Phone: 
413-298-5545. Route 7, Stockbridge, 
Massachusetts. Since 1773. 

&& The Red Lion Inn 




To reach a 

mature audience who 

attend Boston Symphony, 

Pops and Tanglewood, 

call Steve Ganak Ad Reps, 

Statler Office Bldg., 

Boston, Mass. 02116 

617-542-6913 




* 



If you'd like your own tote bag showi 
support public broadcasting (other ^! 
Channel 17 logo), clipand send to/W 
Box 17, Schenectady, NY 1230T. 

G $60 Sustaining M 

$30 Regular Mem 




u 

sthe 



HT, 



im 



Name 



Address 






IV M 



City 



State 



Zip 



53 




tube four m I 

lie OPERA HOUSE 




36 Luxury Rooms 

FOOD-DRINK •LODGING 

Exit 16-1-91 
Holvoke, Mass. 

(413) 532-9494 




Located in the Township of Becket, Mass. 

Norman Walker, Director 

Grace Badorek, Comptroller 

Donald Westwood, Promotional Director 



FIRST WEEK— July 5—9 
Eight Soloists from the 
Royal Danish Ballet 

SECOND WEEK- 
July 12—16 
Cultural Center of the 
Philippines Dance Co. 

(American debut 
of t he Company) 

THIRD WEEK— July 19 — 23 
Teodoro Morca 
(Flamenco in Concert) 
Jacob's Pillow Dancers, 

Classical Pas de Deux 

FOURTH WEEK — 

July 26—30 

Anne Marie DeAngelo 

and Lawrence Rhodes 

May O'Donnell 

Concert Dance Company 

Bhaskar (dances o; India) 

FIFTH WEEK — August 2—6 
Twyla Tharp 
Dancers and Dances 



SEVENTH WEEK— 

August 16—20 

Dennis Wayne's Dancers 

EIGHTH WEEK— 

August 23—27 

Contemporary Dancers 

of Winnipeg 

(United States debut 

of the Company) 

Joyce Cuoco & Youri Vamos 

Jacob's Pillow Dancers 

Special Added Event 
September 2—4 
Hartford Ballet 

Performances: Perform- 
ances are held Tuesday 
through Saturday, Curt- 
ain times: Tuesday, 
7:30 p.m., Wednesday, 
Friday and Saturday, 
8.40 p.m., Thursday and 
Saturday Matinees: 
3:00 p.m. Tickets: 
$8.00 and $6.00. Avail- 
able at Ticketron, 
Bloomingdale's or the 
Jacob's Pillow Box Office 



SIXTH WEEK— August 9—13 
Ohio Ballet Company 

How to Reach Jacob's Pillow: 

Approx.150 miles from Boston near Tangle- 
wood. Lee-Pittsfield exit on the Mass. Turnpike. 
Public transportation from Boston via 
Greyhound to L^e, Mass. 

America's FIRST Dance Festival 



i 



Jacob's Pillow Dance Festival 
Mailing Address: Box 287, Lee, Mass. 01238 

(413) 243-0745 



) 



VeCordova Museuni 
Sumn\ef Concert^ 

Gospel singers, Ukrainian dancers, 
Mime, Big Band Jazz, Folk singers... 

DE CORDOVA AMPHITHEATER 
Sandy Pond Rd., Lincoln, MA. 

Concerts 3:30pm 
Tickets:$2.50 
for info call 
259-8355 



Ad was placed in cooperation wi 
the Middlesex County Tourism & 
Development Council, Inc. 





erksbire 

ummer festival 

6 days 5 nights 11 meals 




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All admissions to: TANGLEWOOD, 
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55 




Introducing the Bose 901® 
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The 901 Series III reproduces 
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For a full color 901 III 
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Patents issued and pending. Copyright © 
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56 




Accompanist to 

Leonard Bernstein • Arthur Fiedler 

Gilbert Kalish • Seiji Ozawa • Andre Previn 

Gunther Schuller • YehudiWyner 



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SMIRNOFF® VODKA. 80 & 100 PROOF. DISTILLED FROM GRAIN. STE. PIERRE SMIRNOFF FLS. (DIVISION OF HEUBLEIN. INCORPORATED ) HARTFORD. CON NECTI CUT 



BOSTON 

SYMPHONY 

ORCHESTRA 

SEI[1 OZAWA JL 



IU Pirc, /,ir 



/I 



Seiji Ozawa, Music Director 

Colin Davis, Principal Guest Conductor 
Joseph Silverstein, Assistant Conductor 

Ninety- Sixth Season 1976-1977 



The Trustees of the Boston Symphony Orchestra Inc. 

Talcott M. Banks, President 

President Sidney Stoneman, Vice-President 

Vice-President John L. Thorndike, Treasurer 



Philip K. Allen, Vice 
Mrs. Harris Fahnestock, 



Vernon R. Alden 

Allen G. Barry 

Dr. Leo L. Beranek 

Mrs. John M. Bradley 

Richard P. Chapman 

Dr. George Clowes 

Abram T. Collier 

Henry A. Laughlin 



Nelson J. Darling, Jr. 

Archie C. Epps III 

E. Morton Jennings, Jr. 

Edward M. Kennedy 

George Kidder 
Edward G. Murray 

Trustees Emeriti 

Harold D. Hodgkinson 



Albert L. Nickerson 

Mrs. James H. Perkins 

Irving W. Rabb 

Paul C. Reardon 

David Rockefeller Jr. 

Mrs. George Lee Sargent 

John Hoyt Stookey 

John T. Noonan 



Administration of the Boston Symphony Orchestra 



Thomas D. Perry, Jr. 

Executive Director 



Thomas W. Morris 
Manager 

Gideon Toeplitz Daniel R. Gustin 

Assistant Manager Assistant Manager 

Joseph M. Hobbs Walter Hill Dinah Daniels 

Director of Development Director of Business Affairs Director of Promotion 

Richard C. White Anita R. Kurland Niklaus Wyss 

Assistant to the Manager Administrator of Youth Activities Advisor for the Music Director 

Donald W. Mackenzie James F. Kiley 

Operations Manager, Symphony Hall Operations Manager, Tanglewood 

Michael Steinberg 
Director of Publications 

Programs copyright ® 1977 Boston Symphony Orchestra Inc. 



Contents: 



page 

Tanglewood 4 

Seiji Ozawa 7 

Map 8 

Information 9 



page 

Programs 11-35 

Berkshire Music Center 39 

Friends 41, 42 



The cover photo is by Walter H. Scott, Stockbridge. 



The Board of Overseers of the Boston Symphony Orchestra Inc. 

Dr. Leo L. Beranek 



Mrs. Norman L. Cahners 
Vice Chairman 

Charles F. Adams 

Mrs. Frank G. Allen 

Mrs. Richard Bennink 

David W. Bernstein 

David Bird 

Gerhard Bleicken 

Frederick Brandi 

Curtis Buttenheim 

Mrs. Henry B. Cabot 

Mrs. Mary Louise Cabot 

Levin H. Campbell, III 

Johns H. Congdon 

Arthur P. Contas 

Robert Cushman 

Michael J. Daly 

Mrs. C. Russell Eddy 

Paul Fromm 

Carlton P. Fuller 

Mrs. Thomas J. Galligan, Jr. 



Chairman 

Weston P. Figgins 
Vice Chairman 

Mrs. Thomas Gardinei 

Mrs. James Garivaltis 

Mrs. Robert Gibb 

Jordan Golding 

Mrs. John L. Grandin 

Mrs. R. Douglas Hall, III 

Mrs. Howard E. Hansen 

Bruce Harriman 

Mrs. Richard D. Hill 

Mrs. Amory Houghton, Jr 

Richard S. Humphrey, Jr. 

Mrs. Jim Lee Hunt 

Mrs. Louis I. Kane 

Leonard Kaplan 

Benjamin Lacy 

Mrs. James F. Lawrence 

Roderick MacDougall 

John S. McLennan 

Colman M. Mockler, Jr. 

Mrs. Elting E. Morison 

Richard P. Morse 



Mrs. Arthur I. Strang 

Secretary 

David G. Mugar 

Dr. Barbara W. Newell 

Stephen Paine 

Harry Remis 

Mrs. Peter van S. Rice 

Mrs. Samuel L. Rosenberry 

Mrs. Jerome Rosenfeld 

Mrs. George Rowland 

Mrs. A. Lloyd Russell 

Mrs. William Ryan 

Francis P. Sears, Jr. 

William A. Selke 

Gene Shalit 

Samuel L. Slosberg 

Richard A. Smith 

Mrs. Edward S. Stimpson 

Mrs. Richard H. Thompson 

D. Thomas Trigg 

Roger Woodworth 




„ Boston 
University 

Tanglewood 
Institute 



Norman DelloJoio, 

Executive Director 



Summer Instrumental and Vocal Programs for the outstanding high school/ 
college-age musician. Private study with master artists including members of the 
faculty of the Boston University School of Music and the Boston Symphony 
Orchestra. Chamber music, orchestral and vocal performances at Tanglewood. 

For information: Boston University Tanglewood Institute, 
855 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02215. 

A program offered by the Boston University School for the Arts in association 
with the Berkshire Music Center/Boston Symphony Orchestra. 
Twelfth Season 




The Berkshires are a perfect place ... for people, 
for families and for businesses. The kind of place 
where an unsurpassed quality of life is available. 

In the Berkshires the average commute is 10 
minutes. Golf courses, tennis clubs, ski resorts, 
theatres, lakes, and fine restaurants are at your 
doorstep. We provide excellent schools — both public 
and private — and the Berkshires are the perfect place 
to raise a family. 

It's no accident that titans of industry have lived 
and worked in the Berkshires. Our labor force still 
believes in a day's work for a day's pay. And the 
Berkshires offer a readily available pool of labor. Our 
schools offer vocational programs and governmental 
training dollars are available. 

Most important, we want businesses to locate in 
the Berkshires. That's why our banks have launched 
a program of financial assistance to attract new 
industry and the County funds a full-time organization 
to assist you. 



If you have the opportunity to move a business, 
or influence a business relocation, consider the 
Berkshires. At Berkshire County Development 
Commission, we have compiled data to prove that 
the Berkshires add up for business reasons. Come see 
us or write on your letterhead for more information. 
Or, if you know of a business contemplating 
relocation, let us know. We welcome your business. 



the Berkshires 

Alan C. Marden 

Berkshire County Development Commission 

205 West Street 

Pittsfield, Massachusetts 01201 

Phone: (413) 499-4474 



it 



Definitely not 
to be missed... 

"Herbert Kupferberg's Tanglewood 
is bursting with information that 
even some of us who worked there 
had missed It catches the spirit 
and truth of that beautiful place." 
— Francis Robinson. 
N.Y. Metropolitan Opera 

"Reads as excitingly as a who- 
done-it!" — Julius Rudel, 

New York City Opera 

"Unquestionably the definitive 
Tanglewood history to date." 

— Christian Science Monitor. 



TANGLEWOOD 




by "I 

Herbert 

Kupferberg 

8x10. 280 pages 
Over 150 photos. 
Index. $9.95 paperback. 
McGRAW-HILL BOOK COMPANY 



HANCOCK SHAKER 
VILLAGE 

Original 18th Century 
Village Restored 

Open daily 9:30-5:00 

Adults $3 Children $1 

Annual Kitchen Festival 
Week of August 1st 

Route 20 Five miles West 
of Pittsfield, Mass. 



Tanglewood 

In August, 1934, a group of music- 
loving summer residents of the Berk- 
shires organized a series of three 
outdoor concerts at Interlaken, to be 
given by members of the New York 
Philharmonic under the direction of 
Henry Hadley. The venture was so 
successful that the promoters incor- 
porated the Berkshire Symphonic 
Festival and repeated the experiment 
during the next summer. 

The Festival committee then invited 
Serge Koussevitzky and the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra to take part in the 
following year's concerts. The Orches- 
tra's Trustees accepted and on August 
13, 1936, the Boston Symphony gave 
its first concert in the Berkshires (at 
Holmwood, a former Vanderbilt estate, 
later the Center at Foxhollow). The series, 
again consisting of three concerts, was 
given under a large tent, and a total of 
nearly 15,000 people attended. 

In the winter of 1936, Mrs. Gorham 
Brooks and Miss Mary Aspinwall 
Tappan offered Tanglewood, the Tap- 
pan family estate, with its buildings and 
210 acres of lawns and meadows, as a 
gift to Koussevitzky and the Orchestra. 
The offer was gratefully accepted, and 
on August 12, 1937, the Festival's 
largest crowd thus far assembled under 
a tent for the first Tanglewood concert, 
a program of music by Wagner. 

As Koussevitzky began The Ride of the 
Valkyries, a storm erupted, overpowering 
the music and causing the concert to be 
interrupted three times before the first 
half could be completed. The second half 
of the program had to be changed, 
because of water damage to some of the 
instruments, and when the concert 
ended, Miss Gertrude Robinson Smith, 
one of the Festival's founders, came to 
the stage and told the audience that the 
storm had demonstrated the need for a 
permanent structure. 

A hundred thousand dollars, she said, 
would be needed for this purpose, and 
the response to her plea was so generous 
that within a short time the amount was 
fully subscribed. Plans for the Music 
Shed were drawn up by the eminent 



architect Eliel Saarinen, and, as modi- 
fied by Josef Franz of Stockbridge, who 
also directed construction, it was com- 
pleted on June 16, 1^38, a month ahead 
of schedule. Seven weeks later, Serge 
Koussevitzky led the inaugural concert, 
which included a performance of Beet- 
hoven's Ninth Symphony. By 1941, the 
Theatre-Concert Hall, the Chamber 
Music Hall and several small studios — 
all part of the Berkshire Music Center, 
which had begun operations the pre- 
ceding year — were finished, and the 
Festival had so expanded its activities 
and its reputation for excellence that it 
attracted nearly 100,000 visitors. 

Today Tanglewood annually draws 
close to a quarter of a million visitors; 
in addition to the twenty-four regular 
concerts of the Boston Symphony, there 
are weekly "Prelude" concerts and open 
rehearsals, the annual Festival of 
Contemporary Music, and almost daily 
concerts by the gifted young musicians 
of the Berkshire Music Center. Arthur 
Fiedler and the Boston Pops perform 
each summer, and the Festival also 
includes a series of concerts by popular 
artists. The season offers not only a 
vast quantity of music but also a vast 
range of musical forms and styles, all 
of it presented with a regard for artistic 
excellence that makes the Festival 
unique. Tanglewood and the Berkshire 
Music Center, projects with which 
Koussevitzky was involved until his 
death, have become a fitting shrine to 
his memory, a living embodiment of 
the vital, humanistic tradition that was 
his legacy. 





IMIilC 

FM 90.3 mHz 

We bring you fine music 
AND dozens of interesting 
events — live and without 
commercials. Sit in with us 
at the National Press Club, 
where the next day's head- 
lines are often made. Enjoy 
"All Things Considered," a 
fascinating m agazine of news 
andissues. (Nothingelselikeit 
in broadcasting !) Savor some 
of the most satisfying thea- 
tre productions ever aired. 
Revel in delightful, intelligent 
conversation. 

Listen . . . and if you 

like what you hear, 

write for our free monthly 

program directory. 

WAMC 
Albany Medical College 
Albany, New York 12208 







npr 



National Public Radio 

for eastern New York 
and western New England 



The Shed under construction in 1938 



Why do I work seven days a week? 
That's all there are. Besides 
if you really love what you do 

it's not work. 




Robert J. Lurtsema 

Host, Morning Pro Musica 

Everyday 7am-Noon 




Artists in the Night 
Hayes Burnett plays 
a great mix of jazz 
sounds. Mon-Fri 
ll-2:30am 




The Boston 
Symphony Orchestra 
at Tanglewood 
Fridays at 9pm, 
Saturdays at 
8:30pm, Sundays 

30pm 

and August 



The Spider's Web 
— our storybook for 
the entire family 
Mon-Fri. 7:30pm 



All Things Considered 

— the best news 
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— every day at 5pm 



'GBH Radio 
89.7FM 

Radio that makes sense 
of your day. 



Seiji Ozawa 

Seiji Ozawa became Music Director of 
the Boston Symphony Orchestra in the 
fall of 1973. He is the thirteenth con- 
ductor of the Orchestra since its found- 
ing in 1881. 

He was born in Hoten, Manchuria in 
1935, and studied both Western and 
Oriental music as a child. He attended 
Toho School of Music in Tokyo and 
graduated with first prizes in composi- 
tion and conducting. Shortly after his 
graduation, he won first prize at the 
International Competition of Conduc- 
ting at Besancon, France, and was in- 
vited by Charles Munch, then Music 
Director of the Boston Symphony and a 
judge at the competition, to spend a 
summer studying at Tanglewood. 

In 1964 and for the next five seasons, 
Mr. Ozawa was Music Director of the 
Ravinia Festival. At the beginning of the 
1965-66 season he became Music Direc- 
tor of the Toronto Symphony, a posi- 
tion he relinquished four seasons later 
to study and guest conduct. In 1970 he 
accepted the position of Artistic Direc- 



tor of the Berkshire Music Festival, and 
in December of the same year he began 
his inaugural season as Conductor and 
Music Director of the San Francisco 
Symphony Orchestra, titles that he held 
concurrently with his position as Music 
Director of the Boston Symphony. In 
the spring of 1976 he resigned his San 
Francisco position although he remained 
Honorary Conductor for the 
1976-77 season. 

Mr. Ozawa's recordings include: on 
the Deutsche Grammophon label, Ber- 
lioz's Symphonie fantastique, La damnation de 
Faust, Romeo et Juliette (which was 
awarded a Grand Prix du Disque), Ives's 
Symphony No. 4 and Central Park in the 
Dark, and de Falla's Three-cornered Hat, 
and, on the New World Records label, 
Griffes's Songs of Fiona McLeod. Record- 
ings soon to be released are: Bartok's 
Miraculous Mandarin Suite and Music for 
Percussion, Strings, and Celeste, Tchaikov- 
sky's Symphony No. 5, Brahms's Sym- 
phony No. 1, and Rimsky-Korsakov's 
Sheherazade on Deutsche Grammophon, 
and Session's When Lilac's Last in the Door- 
yard Bloom'd on New World Records. 



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For 105 years we've been serious 
about people who make music. 

In 1872 Boston University established the first professional music program 
within an American university to train creative and talented students for 
careers in music. 105 years later the Boston University School of Music is 

still doing what it does best. 

• Performance • Music Education • History and Literature • Theory and Composition 



strings 

Walter Eisenberg, violin 
Madeline Foley, chamber music 

'Gerald Gelbloom, violin 

'Bernard Kadinoff, viola 
Endel Kalam, chamber music 

•Robert Karol, viola 

'Eugene Lehner, chamber music 

* Leslie Martin, string bass 
George Neikrug, cello 

'Mischa Nieland, cello 

Leslie Parnas, cello 
'Henry Portnoi, string bass 
' William Rhein, string bass 

Kenneth Sarch, violin 

* Roger Shermont, viohn 
'Joseph Silverstein, violin 

Roman Totenberg, violin 

Walter Trampler, viola 
'Max Winder, violin 
'Lawrence Wolfe, string bass 



woodwinds 

Edward Avedisian, clarinet 
'Pasquale CardUlo, clarinet 
'Donot Anthony Dwyer, flute 

Rodenck Ferland, saxophone 
'Ralph Gomberg, oboe 
"John Holmes, oboe 

* Phillip Kaplan, flute 
'James Pappoutsakis, flute 
'Richard Plaster, bassoon 
'Matthew Ruggiero, bassoon 
'Felix Viscuglia, clarinet 
'Sherman Walt, bassoon 
'Harold Wright, clarinet 

brass 

•Ronald Barron, trombone 
' Norman Bolter, trombone 
Peter Chapman, trumpet 
John Coffey, tromboneituba 

• Armando GhitaJla, trumpet 



brass |cont.) 

Paul Gay, trombone 
'Gordon Hallberg, trombone tuba 
'Charles Kavaloski, French horn 

Charles A. Lewis, Jr., trumpet 
'David Ohanian, French horn 

Samuel Pilafian, tuba 
' Rolf Smedvig, trumpet 
'Harry Shapiro, French horn 
'Roger Voisin, trumpet 
'Charles Yancich, French horn 

percussion 

'Thomas Gauger 
'Charles Smith 

harp 

Lucile Lawrence 

piano 

ManaClodes 

Anthony di Bonaventura 

Lenore Engdahl 

Bela Boszormenyi-Nagy 

Phillip Oliver, staff accompanist 

Edith Steams 

Frednk Wanger 

organ 

George Faxon 
Jack Fisher 
Max Miller 

harpsichord 

Joseph Payne 

voice 

Eunice Alberts, contralto 
Germaine Arosa, diction 
Mary Davenport, contralto 
Ellalou Dimmock, soprano 
Maeda Freeman, mezzo 
Robert Gartside, tenor 
Mac Morgan, baritone 
Chloe Owen, soprano 
Allen Rogers, vocal coaching 
Barbara Stevenson, soprano 
Wilma Thompson, mezzo 



music history and literature 

Karol Berger 
Murray Lefkowitz 
Joel Sheveloff 

theory and composition 

David Carney 
David Del Tredici 
John Goodman 
Alan MacMillan 
Joyce Mekeel 
Malloy Miller 
Gardner Read 
Allen Schindler 
Robert Sirota 
Tison Street 

music education 

Lee Chnsman 
Phyllis Elhady Hoffman 
Allen Lannom 
Jack O. Lemons 
Mary Ann Norton 

musical organizations 

Adelaide Bishop, opera 

Warren Wilson, opera 

Joseph Huszti, chorus 
'Joseph SUverstein, orchestra 
' Roger Voisin, wind ensemble 

boston symphony orchestra 
woodwind quintet in residence 

'Donot Anthony Dwyer, flute 
'Ralph Gomberg, oboe 
'Harold Wright, clarinet 
'Sherman Walt, bassoon 
'Charles Kavaloski, French horn 

empire brass quintet 
in residence 

Charles A. Lewis, Jr., trumpet 
1 Rolf Smedvig, trumpet 
'David Ohanian, French horn 

Norman Bolter, trombone 

Samuel Pilafian, tuba 



'Member of the Boston Symphony Orchestra 



Boston University School of Music 

Wilbur D Fullbright, Director • Robert Lee Tipps, Assistant to Director 
offering degrees at the bachelor, master, and doctoral levels. 

School for the Arts: Music, Theatre, Visual Arts • Norman Dello Joio, Dean 

855 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 



10 



Tanglewood 1977 



Weekend Prelude 

Peter Serkin 

and the 

Boston Symphony Chamber Players 



Friday, 29 July at 7 



BEETHOVEN Variations on Wenzel Muller's song, 
kh bin der Schneider Kakadu, Opus 121a 

PETER SERKIN, piano 
JOSEPH SILVERSTEIN, violin 
JULES ESKIN, cello 



BEETHOVEN Quintet in E flat for piano with wind instruments, 
Opus 16 

Grave — Allegro, ma non troppo 

Andante cantabile 

Rondo: Allegro ma non troppo 

PETER SERKIN, piano 
RALPH GOMBERG, oboe 
HAROLD WRIGHT, clarinet 
SHERMAN WALT, bassoon 
CHARLES KAVALOVSKI, horn 



The Boston Symphony Chamber Players record exclusively 
for Deutsche Grammophon. 
Baldwin piano 



11 



^i 



&r* 



BOSTON 

SYMPHONY 

ORCHESTRA 

SEIJl OZAWA J( s 



\h 



Director 



First violins 

Joseph Silverstein 

Concertmaster 

Charles Munch chair 

Emanuel Borok 

Assistant Concertmaster 
Helen Horner McJntyre chair 

Max Hobart 
Rolland Tapley 
Roger Shermont 
Max Winder 
Harry Dickson 
Gottfried Wilfinger 
Fredy Ostrovsky 
Leo Panasevich 
Sheldon Rotenberg 
Alfred Schneider 
Gerald Gelbloom 
Raymond Sird 
Ikuko Mizuno 
Cecylia Arzewski 
Amnon Levy 
Bo Youp Hwang 

Second violins 

Victor Yampolsky 

Fahnestock chair 
Marylou Speaker 
Michel Sasson 
Ronald Knudsen 
Leonard Moss 
Vyacheslav Uritsky 
Laszlo Nagy 
Michael Vitale 
Darlene Gray 
Ronald Wilkison 
Harvey Seigel 
Jerome Rosen 
Sheila Fiekowsky 
Gerald Elias 
Ronan Lefkowitz 

Violas 

Burton Fine 

Charles 5. Dana chair 
Reuben Green 
Eugene Lehner 
George Humphrey 
Jerome Lipson 

12 



Robert Karol 
Bernard Kadinoff 
Vincent Mauricci 
Earl Hedberg 
Joseph Pietropaolo 
Robert Barnes 
Michael Zaretsky 

Cellos 

Jules Eskin 

Philip R. Allen chair 
Martin Hoherman 
Mischa Nieland 
Jerome Patterson 
Robert Ripley 
Luis Leguia 
Carol Procter 
Ronald Feldman 
Joel Moerschel 
Jonathan Miller 
Martha Babcock 

Basses 

William Rhein 

Acting Principal 

Harold D. Hodgkinson chair 

Joseph Hearne 

Bela Wurtzler 

Leslie Martin 

John Salkowski 

John Barwicki 

Robert Olson 

Lawrence Wolfe 

Henry Portnoi 

Flutes 

Doriot Anthony Dwyer 

Walter Piston chair 

James Pappoutsakis 
Paul Fried 

Piccolo 

Lois Schaefer 

Oboes 

Ralph Gomberg 

Mildred B. Remis chair 

Wayne Rapier 

English Horn 

Laurence Thorstenberg 

Clarinets 

Harold Wright 

Ann 5.M. Banks chair 
Pasquale Cardillo 

Peter Hadcock 

E-flat clarinet 



Bass Clarinet 

Felix Viscuglia 



Bassoons 

Sherman Walt 

Edward A. Taft chair 

Roland Small 
Matthew Ruggiero 

Contra bassoon 

Richard Plaster 

Horns 

Charles Kavalovski 

Helen Sagoff Slosherg chair 

Charles Yancich 
Peter Gordon 
David Ohanian 
Richard Mackey 
Ralph Pottle 

Trumpets 

Armando Ghitalla 

Roger Louis Voisin chair 

Andre Come 
Rolf Smedvig 
Gerard Goguen 

Trombones 

Ronald Barron 
Norman Bolter 
Gordon Hallberg 
William Gibson 

Tuba 

Chester Schmitz 

Timpani 

Everett Firth 

Sylvia Shippen Wells chair 

Percussion 

Charles Smith 
Arthur Press 

Assistant timpanist 
Thomas Gauger 
Frank Epstein 

Harps 

Bernard Zighera 
Ann Hobson 

Personnel Managers 

William Moyer 
Harry Shapiro 

Librarians 

Victor Alpert 
William Shisler' 

Stage Manager 

Alfred Robison 



BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

Seiji Ozawa, Music Director 
Colin Davis, Principal Conductor 
Joseph Silverstein, Assistant Conductor 
Tanglewood 1977 

Friday, 29 July at 9 




KLAUS TENNSTEDT, conductor 



BEETHOVEN Overture to The Creatures of Prometheus, Opus 43 



BEETHOVEN Piano Concerto No. 4 in G major, Opus 58 
(cadenzas by Beethoven) 

Allegro moderato 
Andante con moto 
Rondo: Vivace 

PETER SERKIN 



INTERMISSION 



BEETHOVEN Symphony No. 7 in A major, Opus 92 

Pocco sostenuto — Vivace 

Allegretto 

Presto 

Allegro con brio 



Seiji Ozawa and the Boston Symphony Orchestra record exclusively 
for Deutsche Grammophon. 
Baldwin piano 



13 



"Very impressive, perhaps more 
knowledgeable than anyone else 
writing in Boston now.' 9 

"Young, but knows what he's doing, 
works hard all the time to expand nis 
knowledge!' 

"Should be read!' 



When performers got the opportunity to 
criticize the critics* that's what they said 
about Thor Eckert, music critic for The 
Christian Science Monitor. 

Readers have come to depend on the 
Monitor's perceptive coverage of the 
arts, as well as its fair, balanced 
coverage of national and international 
news. To subscribe to this award-winning 
daily newspaper, just call toll free: 
800-225-7090. (In Massachusetts, call 
collect 617-262-2300.) 
Or use the coupon below. 

*The Real Paper, November 13, 1976. 



News.The way you need it. 

™i -CHRISTIAN SOENCE MOMTOR, 

THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR 
Box 125, Astor Station, Boston, MA, U.S.A. 02123 

Please start the Monitor coming in the mail every Monday through Friday for: 

□ 3 months $12.50 rj 6 months $25 rj 9 months $37.50 rj One year, only $45- 

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Name (please print) 
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'Outside U.S.A. use current local exchange rate. 

14 



State_ 



ZIP 



BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

Seiji Ozawa, Music Director 

Colin Davis, Principal Guest Conductor 
Joseph Silverstein, Assistant Conductor 
Tanglewood 1977 

Saturday, 30 July at 8:30 




KLAUS TENNSTEDT, conductor 



BEETHOVEN Concerto in C major for piano, violin, and cello, 
Opus 56 

Allegro 

Largo 

Rondo alia polacca 

PETER SERKIN, piano 
JOSEPH SILVERSTEIN, violin 
JULES ESKIN, cello 



INTERMISSION 



BEETHOVEN Symphony No. 3 in E flat, Opus 55, Sinfonia eroica 

Allegro con brio 
Marcia funebre: Adagio assai 
Scherzo: Allegro vivace 
Finale: Allegro molto 



Seiji Ozawa and the Boston Symphony Orchestra record exclusively 
for Deutsche Grammphon. 
Baldwin piano 



15 



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16 



BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

Seiji Ozawa, Music Director 

Colin Davis, Principal Guest Conductor 
Joseph Silverstein, Assistant Conductor 
Tanglewood 1977 

Sunday, 31 July at 2:30 




KLAUS TENNSTEDT, conductor 



BEETHOVEN Overture to Fidelio 



BEETHOVEN Symphony No. 2 in D, Opus 36 

Adagio molto — Allegro con brio 
Larghetto 
Scherzo: Allegro 
Allegro molto 



INTERMISSION 



BEETHOVEN Violin Concerto in D, Opus 61 
(cadenzas by Silverstein) 

Allegro ma non troppo 

Larghetto 

Rondo: Allegro 

JOSEPH SILVERSTEIN 



Seiji Ozawa and the Boston Symphony Orchestra record exclusively 
for Deutsche Grammophon. 
Baldwin piano 



17 




wrod 



does not end on Sunday. It's only the beginning. 



This Week At The 
Berkshire Music Center: 



Sunday, July 31 at 10:00 am: 

Berkshire Music Center Chamber Music Concert 

Sunday, July 31 at 8:30 pm: 

Boston University Young Artists Program 
Chamber Music Concert 

Monday, August 1 at 8:30 pm: 

Berkshire Music Center Vocal Music Recital 

Wednesday, August 3 at 8:30 pm: 

Berkshire Music Center Orchestra 
Conducting Fellows 

Thursday, August 4 at 8:30 pm: 

Berkshire Music Center Vocal Music Recital 

Saturday, August 6 at 2:30 pm: 

Berkshire Music Center Chamber Music Concert 

Sunday, August 7 at 10:00 am: 

Boston University Young Artists Program 
Chamber Music Concert 



These events are open to the public by making a contribution, $2.00 
minimum, to the Berkshire Music Center at the main gate, or by becoming 
a Friend of Music at Tanglewood. 



18 



Notes 



Ludwig van Beethoven 

Ludwig van Beethoven was born probably on 
lo December 1 7 70, certainly in Bonn, and died 
on 26 March 1827 in Vienna. The uncertainty 
about Beethoven's birthday stems from our hav- 
ing as the most nearly definite record of his 
birth the certificate of baptism, which is dated 
17 December 17 70. Beethoven himself would 
probably have given you 1772 as the year of his 
birth. The vanity was not his but that of his 
father, who tried to present the boy as a prodigy 
in the manner of Mozart and therefore falsified 
his age. It does appear, in any event, that the 
composer went through life believing himself 
to be two years younger than he was, though 
in later years, the subject of his age was one on 
which he was exceedingly touchy and which 
generally he refused to discuss at all. Particulars 
about the dates of the compositions performed at 
these concerts will be found in the note below. 

This is the 150th anniversary of Bee- 
thoven's death. The event has been 
almost entirely ignored, and for good 
reason: the world of music is a perpetual 
Beethoven festival anyhow. True, in 
1970 we celebrated Beethoven's 200th 
birthday with limitless application and 
vigor, and it nearly drove us all mad. 
That deluge of recordings, books, ar- 
ticles, complete cycles in concert of so- 
natas, symphonies, and quartets, showed 
how hard it can be to make fresh re- 
sponse when something is as familiar as 
most of Beethoven's music. Recognition 
and acknowledgement of recognition 
come more readily than shock. And 
there's the trouble. The Eroica starts, or 
the Seventh or even the Ninth, and for 
most listeners — or "listeners" — it 
means that the Ero/ca-button is pressed (or 
the Seventh- or Ninth-button) and 
we respond as we have learned to re- 
spond to those pieces. We are apt, that 
is, to respond to the fact of the per- 
formance more than to the piece itself. 
It's like driving the Massachusetts 
Turnpike: the familiar landmarks go 
by — Route 128, Natick, Framingham, 
Worcester, the Hartford turn-off, 
Palmer-Ware, and so on — and that's 
all very reassuring. Which is the 



is the very thing it ought not to be. For 
performers it's not less difficult. The 
most dedicated and responsible pianists 
and quartet players need to get away 
from the Appassionata and from Opus 131 
once in a while — to get away and re- 
consider. For orchestra players it's par- 
ticularly hard to look at yet another Eroica 
performance as an exciting event, though 
there are conductors who can make it 
happen. Most Beethoven performances 
are, in a sense, automatic. They sound 
as though they have come about not as 
a result of fresh and searching study, 
but because "we know that that's how 
the piece goes." I am not saying we 
should have eccentric performances or 
ones that seek originality for its own 
sake, but we do want to come closer to 
the ideal of playing the classics as though 
they were new. Accents get blunted 
with the passage of years, and dynamics 
are flattened out. (How many conduc- 
tors insist on and how many orchestras 
deliver a true, breath- stopping pianis- 
simo?) Most particularly, many of the 
traditional tempi — they, too, responses 
to convenience and habit — need to be 
reconsidered in the light of what the 
scores say and imply. 

To his contemporaries, Beethoven was 
a shocking artist. Some of those con- 
temporaries delighted in that quality; 
some resisted it from the beginning; 
some went along up to a point, to lose 
contact and wax censorious a bit later 
(the Eroica marked the parting of ways to 
many of his early followers). E.T.A. 
Hoffmann, that vital and original writer, 
musician, and artist, who, among other 
accomplishments, produced the first 
body of valuable Beethoven criticism, 
recognized the shocking newness of 
Beethoven's music, but, also recog- 
nizing Beethoven's "self-possession," 
suggested to his critical colleagues that 
if they failed to see merit in what he was 
doing, the fault was most likely to be 
found in their own limited perceptions. 
But in the 170 or so years that have 
passed, we have gotten to be awfully 
comfortable with Beethoven, comfort- 
able, unshocked, and unshockable. Often, 
he traces for us the path from stress to 
victory — and the very idea that music 



19 




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20 



might, without words, aspire to such a 
task is part of its newness — but the 
victory is diminished if we have not 
truly experienced the stress. That would 
surely provoke one of his famous and 
terrifying rages. He would want to chal- 
lenge us still, to jolt and unsettle us— in 
the end to make the reassurance the 
firmer and deeper for it. To do that, he 
would have us listen — not overhear, not 
nod to familiar landmarks in pleased 
recognition, but listen as though for the 
first time and as though it might be 
the last. 

Beethoven is of all composers the one 
who most insistently tells us that we 
can't do without him. From that insis- 
tence — to which we respond so gladly — 
grows the paradox that the more time 
we spend in the presence of his music, 
the harder it is truly to hear it. That is 
the crux of his challenge to audiences 
and performers alike. 

The Kakadu Variations and the Quintet 

We don't know when the Kakadu Vari- 
ations were written, nor even whether 
the composition reached its present form 
all at once or by stages. The high opus 
number, 121a, reflects the date of pub- 
lication, which is 1824. The theme is a 
song, Ich bin der Schneider Kakadu (J am the 
tailor Cockatoo), from a Singspiel, an opera 
in somewhat popular style and with 
spoken dialogue between the musical 
numbers, by Wenzel Muller, most of 
whose immensely successful career took 
place in Vienna and most of whose 
music is for the theater. The work lch bin 
der Schneider Kakadu comes from, Die 
Schwestern von Frag (The Sisters from Prague), 
was first produced in 1794, and it is 
likely that Beethoven would have written 
the variations when the song was a 
current hit, whistled by delivery boys, 
professors, and chamberlains. Die Schwe- 
stern von Prag was revived in 1806, 1813, 
and 1814, but in 1816, Beethoven re- 
ferred to the variations as being one of 
his early works, "though not to be 
counted among the deplorable ones." 
The introductory Adagio assai, discon- 
certingly mature and grand for context 
and function, gets special mention in 



Beethoven's own superscription on the 
first page ("Variations with an intro- 
duction and coda"— actually Anhang, 
which means "appendix") and on the 
title page of the first edition ("Adagio, 
variations, and rondo"). 

In 1794, Beethoven was a relatively 
new arrival in Vienna. He had been 
there once in 1787 and had returned in 
1792. The idea was for him to study 
there — "through unremitting diligence 
may you receive the spirit of Mozart at the 
hands of Haydn," Count Waldstein wrote 
into his album at his departure from 
Bonn — but it turned out to be a removal 
for good. He studied with Haydn, with 
an experienced and accomplished theater 
composer by name of Johann Schenk, 
with the eminent Antonio Salieri (learn- 
ing Italian in order to do that), and with 
the excellent pedagogue, Johann Georg 
Albrechtsberger. In 1795, the publish- 
ing firm of Artaria & Co. issued his 
official Opus 1, three trios for piano, 
violin, and cello (Haydn had counselled 
withholding the third in the set, ap- 
parently fearing that its probable shock* 
waves would damage the supposedly 22- 
year-old composer's budding career). He 
was beginning to make an enviable name 
for himself as a pianist, playing connois- 
seurs' music like the preludes and fugues 
of Sebastian Bach as well as more current 
repertory like Mozart's D minor Con- 
certo (for which he wrote a set of caden- 
zas that are still played), and raising 
goosebumps with his fantastic improvi- 
sations. 

It was for one of his own concerts 
that he composed the Quintet in E flat 
for piano and winds, Opus 16. 1796-97 
would be about the right date, though 
the first movement may go back as far as 
1794, and the Septet, which was for 
many years to be his most popular piece, 
the E flat Piano Sonata, Opus 7, the C 
major Piano Concerto, and the first 
string quartets would have been in the 
works at the same time. The first per- 
formance of the Quintet was given in 
Vienna on 6 April 1797. Of a per- 
formance in 1804 it is told that at one of 
the holds in the last movement that 
occur before the main theme comes 
back, "Beethoven suddenly began to 

21 



ft*. 



"the 

BOSTON 

SYMPHONY 

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PLAYERS 



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The Brahms Quintet op. 115. Stra- 
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and other major chamber music 
works make up the Boston Sym- 
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program. 

The twelve principal players of 
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p.m. on Nov. 6, 1977 and Feb. 19 and 
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the guest pianist. 
For complete program information, write to Subscription Office, 
Symphony Hall, Boston, Mass. 02115, or call 266-1492. 



22 



improvise, took the Rondo for a theme 
and entertained himself and his audi- 
ence for a considerable time, though not 
the other players. They were displeased 
and Ramm [the famous and superb 
oboist for whom Mozart wrote his Quar- 
tet and Sinfonia concertante] was even very 
angry. It was really very comical to see 
them, momentarily expecting the per- 
formance to be resumed, put their in- 
struments to their mouths, only to put 
them down again. At last, Beethoven 
was satisfied and dropped into the Rondo. 
The whole company was transported 
with delight." Beethoven dedicated the 
work, to Prince Joseph zu Schwarzen- 
berg, an amateur and patron whose 
name lives in some glory because it was 
in his palace that Haydn's Creation and 
Seasons were first givenin 1798 and 1801. 

The Prometheus Overture 

The ballet, The Creatures of Prometheus, 
whose score consists of sixteen numbers* 
after the Overture, was first produced 
in Vienna on 28 March 1801, repeated 
thirteen times that year and nine the 
next. The choreographer was Salvatore 
Vigano, a Neapolitan dancer who had 
worked in Vienna off and on since 1793, 
and who was renowned for investing 
with a certain dramatic seriousness an 
art form otherwise regarded as deco- 
rative at best and catering to the las- 
civious concerns of those who watched 
it. The Overture starts magnificently on 
a chord on which no piece ought to start, 
especially not in 1801, and moves quick- 
ly into a swirling perpetuum mobile. If 
Mozart's Quintet, K. 452, is the in- 
spiration of Beethoven's, so is the over- 
ture to Cost fan tutti the model for the 
one to Prometheus. In both instances, 
Beethoven is quite as much himself as 
he is in debt. 

The Piano Concerto No. 4 in G major 

In 1802, Beethoven mentioned rue- 
fully that he was "not always able to 

*The theme of the ballet's finale yielded two 
sets of variations; an independent one for 
piano, Opus 35 (1802), and the last move- 
ment of the Eroica (1803). 



escape indolence." What in the world 
can he have meant? Except for the 
Seventh Symphony, the big works on 
these three orchestral programs come 
from a five-year period, 1802-06, in 
which he completed the three Piano 
Sonatas, Opus 31, the Symphony No. 2, 
the three Violin Sonatas, Opus 30, the 
Piano Variations, Opus 34 and Opus 35, 
and the C minor Piano Concerto (all in 
1802); the Kreutzer Sonata, the oratorio, 
Christ on the Mount of Olives, and the 
Sinfonia eroica (1803); the Triple Con- 
certo, the Waldstein Sonata, and the F 
major Sonata, Opus 54 (1804); the Ap- 
passionata and the first version of Fidelio 
(1805); the first revision of Fidelio or 
Leonore, the Fourth Piano Concerto, the 
Fourth Symphony, the Violin Concerto, 
the three Rasumovsky Quartets, Opus 
59, and the 32 Variations in C minor for 
piano (1806).* Of course it was also a 
period in which he wrote: "For some 
time I have been gaining more than ever 
in physical strength and in mental 
strength too. Each day I come closer to 
my goal, which I can sense but don't 
know how to describe." What was also 
growing was the deafness which had 
begun to trouble him about 1798 and 
which by 1801 had advanced to the point 
where he had to confide in his closest 
friends. But to one of those friends he 
also wrote: "I live only in my notes, and 
with one work barely finished, the other 
is already started; the way I now write, I 
often find myself working on three, 
four things at once." Energy for work 
and for life was limitless, and if he knew 
the despair that speaks in the will he 
wrote at Heiligenstadt in 1802, he also 
knew a state of mind in which he could 
say that he would "seize fate by 
the throat." 

When Beethoven was soloist at the 
first public performance of the G major 

*Actually the next three years were not bad 
either: the C major Mass and the Coriolan 
Overture were completed in 1807; the Fifth 
and Pastoral symphonies, the A major Cello 
Sonata, and the two Trios, Opus 70, in 1808; 
and the Choral Fantasy, the Emperor Con- 
certo, the E flat Quartet, Opus 74, and the 
Piano Sonatas, Opus 78 and Opus 79, in 
1809. 



23 



Concerto on 22 December 1808, it was 
the last time he dared appear in a con- 
certo. The work was over two years old 
then and had already had several private 
performances, all with the composer as 
soloist, the first of them in the palace of 
Prince Lobkowitz in March 1807. The 
score is dedicated to the Archduke Ru- 
dolph, born 1788 as the youngest son of 
the Emperor Leopold II. The Archduke 
had become Beethoven's pupil in piano 
and composition about 1804 and he can 
claim the most impressive list of dedica- 
tions of any of the composer's friends 
and patrons — besides the present work, 
the Emperor Concerto, the Farewell So- 
nata, the last violin sonata, the Archduke 
Trio, the Hammerklavier Sonata as well as 
Opus 111, the Missa solemnis (meant for 
his installation as Archbishop of Ol- 
miitz, though delivered nearly four 
years too late), and the Great Fugue, 
both in its original form for string 
quartet and in the setting for piano 
four-hands. 

Here is another astounding beginning. 
In this, the most gently spoken and poetic 
of his concertos, Beethoven proposes the 



most radical solution of all to the prob- 
lem of the first solo entrance: he begins 
with a statement by the piano alone. 
What the piano says is as remarkable as 
the fact that it says anything at all at 
that point: the whole phrase is arresting 
in its subtle rhythmic imbalance, but 
still more wonderful is the orchestra's 
hushed response, harmonically both re- 
mote and far-seeing. The persistent 
three -note upbeat makes this music 
tenderly cousin to the Fifth Symphony 
(in progress at the same time). The 
second movement, which Liszt likened 
to Orpheus taming the beasts, has be- 
come the concerto's most famous. The 
orchestra is loud, staccato, in stark oc- 
taves. The piano is soft, legato, songful, 
richly harmonized. At the end, after a 
truly Orphic cadenza — and Beethoven 
almost persuades us that he invented 
the trill expressly for this moment — the 
orchestra has learned the piano's way. 
And so into the lyric and witty finale. 

The Symphony No. 7 in A major 

The Seventh comes as far after the 
1802-06 span as the two chamber pieces 




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A life mask of Beethoven taken by F. Klein around 
the time of the Seventh Symphony. 

come before it. Beethoven worked on it 
from the fall of 1811 until the spring of 

1812. The premiere took place at the 
University of Vienna on 8 December 

1813. It was perhaps the most wildly 
successful concert of Beethoven's ca- 
reer, though what stirred up the excite- 
ment was not Opus 92, the Seventh 
Symphony, as much as Opus 91, Welling- 
ton's Victory or the Battle of Vittoria, written 
for a mechanical instrument called the 
Panharmonicon, the invention of Johann 
Nepomuk Malzel, one of the first to 
build a practical metronome. Between 
the Seventh and Wellington's Victory, a 
mechanical trumpeter, another gadget 
of Malzel's, played marches written for 
the occasion by Dussek and Pleyel. So 
great was the success that the entire 
program was repeated later that month, 
in January, and in February. (The critic 
of the Wiener Zeitung referred to the 
Seventh as having been composed "as a 
companion-piece" to Wellington's Victory.) 
The public liked the companion-piece 
too, and the composer Louis Spohr, one 
of the violinists in the orchestra in that 
series of concerts, reports that the second 
movement was encored each time. 

Beethoven dedicated the Seventh to 
Count Moritz von Fries, a young banker 
and art collector, who also received the 
dedications of the Violin Sonatas, Opus 
23 and Opus 24 (Spring), the C major 
Quintet, Opus 29, as well as of Haydn's 
last, incomplete Quartet, Opus 103, and 
of Schubert's song, Gretchen am Spinnrade. 



The Triple Concerto 

Beethoven began this remarkable 
work late in 1803 and finished it in the 
summer of 1804. According to Anton 
Schindler, who became Beethoven's am- 
anuensis in 1819, the solo parts were 
intended for the Archduke Rudolph, the 
violinist Carl August Seidler, and the 
cellist Anton Kraft. Schindler is not 
always absolutely to be depended upon, 
but here he seems plausible. The piano 
part is relatively easy, astoundingly so 
for a concerto by the mature Beethoven, 
and the cello part is as taxing as any in 
the repertory. Kraft, born 1749, studied 
philosophy and law at the University of 
Prague, but in 1778 became a cellist in 
the orchestra Haydn directed for the 
Esterhazy household. Haydn wrote his 
D major Concerto for him (in fact this 
work was for a time attributed to Kraft), 
and he was also the first to play Mozart's 
E flat Divertimento, K. 563. Beginning 
1796, he was principal cellist in the 
private orchestra of Prince Lobkowitz in 
Vienna. Seidler, about whom little is 
known, was a violinist in the Archduke's 
musical establishment. Presumably, a 
private performance would have been 
given in or close to 1804, but we have no 
definite information. Another puzzle 
— if, that is, the Concerto was 
really intended for the Archduke — is 
that the dedication is to Prince Franz 
Joseph von Lobkowitz, to whom Bee- 
thoven also inscribed the Quartets, 
Opus 18, the Eroica, Fifth and Pastoral 
symphonies, the Quartet, Opus 74, and 
the song cycle, An die feme Geliebte (To the 
Far Away Beloved). The first public per- 
formance of the Triple Concerto oc- 
curred in May 1808. It was not a success, 
and the report has it that the soloists, 
unnamed in the newspaper, had been 
rather casual about preparing their parts. 

Here we have an unpopular Bee- 
thoven work. It is formal, reserved, 
spacious, rich in themes of which many 
are characterized by a certain studied 
neutrality because here procedures and 
questions of design interest Beethoven 
more than statements and gestures. 
"[Its] indiscretion . . . consists in com- 
bining a problem that makes for dryness 



25 




Prince Lobkowitz, to whom the Triple Concerto and the 
Eroica are dedicated. 

of matter with a problem that makes for 
exceptional length/' says Donald Francis 
Tovey in his essay on the work (in 
Vol. Ill of Essays in Musical Analysis, a 
superb combination of description, an- 
alysis, and defense). What makes for 
exceptional length is the very fact of its 
being a concerto for three instruments, 
and the necessity, therefore, of a design 
that allows the piano its own presen- 
tation of each idea and the violin and 
cello, usually together, another. (It is 
mildly too bad we know so little 
about the background of this work: it 
would be interesting to learn more of 
what moved Beethoven to tackle an 
unprecedented concerto combination — 
one, for that matter, hardly emulated 
either.) The hushed and stalking open- 
ing is very impressive indeed, and much 
of what is unfolded during the or- 
chestral ritornello reveals, whether in 
his most Grecian manner or his most 
kinetic, what Tovey calls "the unap- 
proachable Beethoven." Here, too, 
the first solo entrance is exquisitely 
imagined, the cello giving the first 
theme, but a breath later than you 
expect it and with a magical trans- 
formation of character. 

In later years, Beethoven returns to 
writing slow movements on a large 
scale. Here, as in the final version of 
the Waldstein Sonata, the Fourth Piano 
Concerto, and the Violin Concerto, he is 
interested in having a slow movement 
that is short, intense, non-developmental, 



and preludial to the finale. It takes the 
form here of an eloquent, very slow 
Largo, beautifully scored, with an 
accompaniment confined to muted 
strings and just a few carefully chosen 
notes for horns, clarinets, and bassoons, 
and in a key — A flat major — mysteriously 
remote from the areas so possessively 
explored in the first movement. With- 
out break, this spills into a witty polo- 
naise of enchanting elegance, one that 
even within its first theme reconquers 
the harmonic spaces of the first 
movement. 

Two other features and one detail 
might be pointed out. First, Beethoven 
is interested here in figuration for its 
own sake. Especially in the finale, the 
passage-work is inventive, varied, and 
rewards the most attentive listening (in 
this respect the Triple Concerto is an 
important study for the later Violin 
Concerto and particularly the Emperor.) 
The other feature is the remarkable 
prevalence throughout of pianissimo: only 
when this is realized in performance is 
there any hope of conveying the shape 
of this work and the variety of its detail: 
the Angel recording with von Karajan, 
Richter, Oistrakh, and Rostropovich 
beautifully demonstrates this in the 
positive sense. One of the striking, highly 
characteristic quirks is the final pedaling 
instruction so the in the last two 
measures the piano's sound continues 
across the silence of the other players. 
To conclude by quoting Tovey once 
more: "If [the Triple Concerto] were not 
by Beethoven, but by some mysterious 
composer who had written nothing else 
and who had the romantic good fortune 
to die before it came to performance, the 
very people who most blame Beethoven 
for writing below his full powers would 
be the first to acclaim it as the work of a 
still greater composer." 

The Sinfonia eroica 

Beethoven composed this Heroic Sym- 
phony between May and November 
1803, with some polishing yet to be 
done early in 1804. It was privately 
performed chez Lobkowitz* in the sum- 
mer of 1804 and publicly for the first 



26 



time on 7 April 1805 at a concert put on 
by Franz Clement, whom we shall meet 
again in the account of the Violin Con- 
certo. It was in May 1804 that Na- 
poleon, who had been acceptable to 
Beethoven as a military dictator as long 
as he called himself First Consul, had 
himself crowned Emperor, and the dis- 
appointed and angry composer erased 
the words "intitolata Bonaparte" from the 
title page. Beethoven blew hot and cold 
about that. At the end of August he 
told his publisher that the symphony 
"is really called 'Ponaparte' (sic)" and in 
1810 he considered dedicating the C 
major Mass to the Emperor, then at the 
zenith of his power. The score as 
printed tells us that this is a "heroic 
symphony . . . composed to celebrate the 
memory of a great man." 

"I'll pay another Kreuzer if the thing 
will only stop," a gallery wit called at the 
premiere. One reviewer conceded that 
in this "tremendously expanded, daring, 
and wild fantasia" there was no lack of 
"startling and beautiful passages in which 
the energetic and talented composer 
must be recognized," but he felt that 
the work "loses itself in lawlessness . . . 
This reviewer belongs to Herr van 
Beethoven's sincerest admirers, but in 
this composition he must confess that 
he finds too much that is glaring and 
bizarre, which hinders greatly one's 
grasp of the whole, and a sense of unity 
is almost completely lost." (Happily, he 
found that satisfaction in another E flat 
symphony on the same program, one by 
Anton Franz Joseph Eberl.) Another 
critic, deploring the composer's ways of 
achieving "a certain undesirable origi- 
nality," pointing out that "genius pro- 
claims itself not in the unusual and 
fantastic but in the beautiful and the 
sublime," proclaiming the new sym- 
phony with its "inordinate length" to be 
"unendurable to the mere music-lover," 
expressed the wish "that Herr v. B. 
would employ his acknowledgedly great 
talents in giving us works like his sym- 
phonies in C and D, his ingratiating 
Septet in E flat, the intellectual Quintet 

*In a room 54 feet by 24! This startling 
information comes from Elliot Forbes's edition 
of Thayer's Life of Beethoven. 




A portrait of Beethoven by W.f. Mahler around the 
time of the Eroica. 

in C, and others of his early works 
which have placed him for ever in the 
ranks of the foremost instrumental 
composers . . . the public and Herr van 
Beethoven, who conducted, were not 
satisfied with each other on this evening. 
The public thought the symphony too 
heavy, too long, and himself too dis- 
courteous because he did not nod his 
head in recognition of the applause 
which came from a portion of the au- 
dience. For his part, Beethoven found 
that the applause was not strong enough." 
Indeed, Beethoven had given his pub- 
lic, lay and professional, plenty to be 
upset about — a symphony unpreceden- 
ted in length, in the complexity of its 
polyphony, in the unbridled force of its 
rhetoric, in the weirdness of details like 
the famous "wrong" horn entrance in 
the first movement (the horn already on 
the home chord while the violins are 
still preparing that chord with a dis- 
sonance). "If one only knew what you 
had in mind in your music," said the 
dramatist, Franz Grillparzer, to Beetho- 
ven. "After all, the censors can't touch 
a musician." 



The Fidelio Overture 

Just because it cost him so much pain, 
Fidelio, his one completed opera, was a 
favorite child of Beethoven's. The first 
version was begun in 1803, completed in 
1805, and performed on 20 November 



27 




28 



that year. A revised version was given 
on 29 March 1806. Early in 1814, Bee- 
thoven returned to the score once more 
and gave it a thorough reworking to 
produce the version we usually see to- 
day. Four overtures exist. The one called 
Leonore No. 1, written 1805, was tried out 
by the Lobkowitz orchestra, found too 
light for the opera, and put away, never 
to reappear in the composer's lifetime. It 
was published posthumously and as- 
signed the opus number 138. Leonore 
No. 2 began the opera at its very first 
performance in 1805 (the original title 
of the work is Leonore, but in its first and 
third editions it was staged as Fidelio, the 
name the heroine assumes when she 
disguises herself as a young man in 
order to rescue her husband from politi- 
cal prison.) Leonore No. 3 was composed 
for the 1806 revision, and the one being 
played this afternoon goes with the final 
score of 1814. Beethoven saved its writ- 
ing till last. It was the easiest part of the 
job, he said, because it was a matter of 
making something entirely new, not the 
irksome fixing of something old. He 
didn't, however, allow himself quite 
enough time. At dinner, two or three 
nights before the premiere, he began to 
scribble on the back of a menu, saying "I 
have the idea for my overture." When 
Beethoven didn't show up for the dress 
rehearsal on the morning of the per- 
formance, Georg Friedrich Treitschke, 
the librettist of the new version, went to 
his apartment to fetch him, "but he lay 
in bed sleeping soundly, a goblet of wine 
with a biscuit in it beside him, the sheets 
of the overture scattered on bed and floor. 
A burnt-out candle showed that he had 
worked far into the night, but the im- 
possibility of completing the overture 
was plain." The overture to The Ruins of 
Athens was substituted that night and 
the real Fidelio Overture was heard for 
the first time at the performance three 
days later, 26 May, when it was received 
"with tumultuous applause." In it, Bee- 
thoven returned to the modest scale of 
the rejected Leonore No. 1, producing a 
superb piece, taut, and successful in 
meeting the difficult requirement of 
introducing both the drama as a whole 
and its relatively light opening scene. 




A miniature of Beethoven by Hornemann at the time 
of the Second Symphony. 

The Symphony No. 2 in D major 

Beethoven completed this work around 
October 1802. Its first performance took 
place on 5 April 1803 at a concert that 
also introduced the Piano Concerto No. 
3 in C minor and the oratorio, Christ on 
the Mount of Olives. The already popular 
First Symphony was also on the pro- 
gram. A critic commented that "the First 
Symphony is better than the later one 
because it is developed with lightness 
and is less forced, while in the Second 
the striving for the new and surprising 
is already more apparent" (cf. the Eroica 
review quoted on page 27). A curiosity 
exists in the form of Beethoven's own 
transcription of the work for piano, 
violin, and cello. The score is dedicated 
to Prince Carl von Lichnowsky, a friend 
and contemporary of Mozart's, highly 
esteemed by Beethoven, who also dedi- 
cated the Trios, Opus 1, the Pathetique 
Sonata, and the A flat Sonata, Opus 26, 
to him. 

Beethoven produced this exuberant 
symphony at the same time he was 
experiencing the misery behind his Hei- 
ligenstadt will of October 1802— "as the 
leaves of autumn fall and are withered 
— so likewise has my hope been blighted 
... even the high courage — which has 
often inspired me in the beautiful days 
of summer — has disappeared." The Vi- 



29 



ennese reviewer was not wrong in not- 
ing a world of difference between the 
Second Symphony and the C major of 
1799-1800. There is something fierce in 
the high spirits of the first and last 
movements, in, for instance, the chro- 
matic upward march of the basses in the 
coda of the first movement, or the 
impudence of the finale's first gesture, 
or the whole coda — almost as long as 
any he was ever to write — in that 
movement. What would Schubert have 
done without this work — particularly 
its second movement — to lean on? 

The Violin Concerto 

Written "par Clemenza pour Clement primo 
violino e direttore al theatro de Vienna," this 
Violin Concerto, still the one that sets 
the standard for those that have come 
along since, was completed in 1806 and 
played on 23 December that year. The 
soloist was the Franz Clement of Bee- 
thoven's punning title page, an admired 
and brilliant player, then 26. He was 
concertmaster at the original Fidelio and 
at the first meeting to discuss cuts and 
revisions, he astounded the company by 
playing the entire score from memory. 
Later, something went sour between 
him and Beethoven, for the latter was 
adamant about not having him as con- 
certmaster at the 1824 concert at which 
the Ninth Symphony had its premiere. 

Again, an amazing opening, not only 
the soft kettledrum beats themselves, 
but what grows from them, their almost 
immediate and so ambiguous imitations 
by the violins on a strange pitch, or 
much later their ominously insistent 
presence in the "speaking" G minor part 
of the development.* The solo entrance, 
where the violin, with wonderful and 
quiet authority arises spaciously from 
the receding orchestra, is another beau- 
tiful stroke of fantasy. So is the orches- 
tra's unexpectedly quiet resumption 
after the first movement's cadenza, a 
poetic effect already tried earlier that 
same year in the Fourth Piano Concerto 
and imitated, if possible to even lovelier 

*Here is an example of where tradition, in 
this case a maundering along in no tempo 
whatever, causes the piece as a whole to 
become unglued. 

30 




Prince Lichnowsky, to whom the Second Symphony 
is dedicated. 

effect, by Brahms in his Violin Con- 
certo. And what you sense throughout 
the first movement is utter security in 
working on the largest possible scale, 
something Beethoven could not have 
achieved without the previous experi- 
ence with the Triple Concerto. The slow 
movement — but only larghetto, not adagio 
— is the still point. A series of serene 
variations with two interludes, it leads 
by way on another cadenza into the 
amiable, amusing finale. 

The Triple Concerto (in the finale) 
and the Emperor (in the first movement) 
have built-in cadenzas, and Beethoven 
also at some point wrote out cadenzas 
for the first four piano concertos. But 
Clement will have wanted to improvise 
his own for the Violin Concerto — which 
according to Beethoven's pupil, Czerny, 
he received only two days before the 
first performance — and Beethoven 
found no later occasion to write any.* 
Most violinists nowadays use Joachim 
or Kreisler, but for this concert Joseph 
Silverstein has composed new ones: 
aptly, they are not so much excursions 
in bravura as responses to the first 
movement's harmony and poetry. 

— Michael Steinberg 

*Not quite true. In 1807, at the suggestion of 
Muzio Clementi, Beethoven made a perverse 
but fascinating transcription of this concerto 
for piano and orchestra, and for that he wrote 
some terrific cadenzas, with the drums join- 
ing in! The Violin Concerto is dedicated to 
Stephan von Breuning, a boyhood friend 
from Bonn who had also been living in 
Vienna since 1800, and the piano version is 
dedicated to von Breuning 's wife, Julie. 



Guest Artists 



Klaus Tennstedt 

Klaus Tennstedt was born in 1926 in 
Merseburg, Germany, and studied piano, 
violin, and composition at the Leipzig 
Conservatory. In 1948, he became con- 
certmaster in Halle, where he later con- 
ducted. Subsequently he held conduct- 
ing appointments in Karl-Marx-Stadt, 
with the Dresden Opera, and in Schwer- 
rin, as well as guest conducting exten- 
sively in the German Democratic Re- 
public and in Eastern Europe. He escaped 
to the West in 1971 and later that year 
became General Music Director at Kiel, a 
post he resigned last year because of 
growing demands on his time in America 
and Europe. In 1974, he made his United 
States debut with the Boston Symphony. 
Last season he added the Chicago, De- 
troit, and National (Washington, D.C.) 
symphony orchestras, the New York 
Philharmonic, and the Philadelphia Or- 
chestra to the list of his guest engage- 
ments. This fall he will record three 
Mahler symphonies in London. He ap- 
peared at Tanglewood in 1975 and 1976, 
as well as returning to the Boston Sym- 
phony in Symphony Hall last January. 

Joseph Silverstein 

Joseph Silverstein joined the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra in 1955 at the age 
of 23. He has been Assistant Conductor 
since the beginning of the 1971-72 
season, and Concertmaster since 1962. 
A native of Detroit, he began his musical 
studies with his father, a violin teacher, 
and later attended the Curtis Institute. 
His teachers have included Joseph 
Gingold, Mischa Mischakoff, and Efrem 
Zimbalist. 

Mr. Silverstein has appeared as soloist 
with the orchestras of Detroit, Denver, 
Los Angeles, New York, Indianapolis, 
Milwaukee, and Rochester, and abroad 
in Jerusalem and Brussels. He appears 
regularly as soloist with the Boston 
Symphony and conducts the Orchestra 
frequently. He has also conducted, 
among others, the Los Angeles Phil- 
harmonic, the Rochester Philharmonic 




and the Jerusalem Symphony. In 1959 
he was one of the winners of the Queen 
Elisabeth of Belgium International Com- 
petition and in 1960 he won the Walter 
W. Naumburg Award. 

Mr. Silverstein is first violinist and 
music director of the Boston Symphony 
Chamber Players and led their 1967. 
tour to the Soviet Union, Germany and 
England. He has participated with this 
group in many recordings for RCA 
and Deutsche Grammophon and re- 
cently recorded works of Mrs. H.H.A. 
Beach and Arthur Foote for New World 
Records in collaboration with pianist 
Gilbert Kalish. He is Chairman of the 
Faculty of the Berkshire Music Center 
at Tanglewood, and Assistant Professor 
of Music at Boston University. 

With Mr. Silverstein conducting, the 
Boston University Symphony Orches- 




31 



tra recently received a silver medal in 
the Herbert von Karajan Youth Or- 
chestra Competition in Berlin. 

Peter Serkin 

Pianist Peter Serkin made his first 
public appearance at the age of twelve in 
a performance of the Haydn Concerto 
in D major, conducted by Alexander 
Schneider at the Marlboro Music Festi- 




val. He has since appeared with the 
Amsterdam Concertgebouw, the Cleve- 
land and Philadelphia orchestras, the 
Chicago, Toronto, Boston, and San 
Francisco symphonies, and the New 
York Philharmonic, and with chamber 
music ensembles including the Buda- 
pest, Guarneri, and Galimir string quar- 
tets, as well as the Casals Festivals in 
Prades and in Puerto Rico. He has a 
recently released recording on RCA of 
Vingt Regards sur L'Enfant Jesus by Olivier 
Messiaen and has also recorded per- 
formances of six Mozart concertos with 
the English Chamber Orchestra under 
Alexander Schneider. 

Jules Eskin 

Jules Eskin, Principal Cello of the 
Boston Symphony Orchestra, came to 
the Orchestra from Cleveland where 
for three years he was principal cello 
of that city's orchestra. A native Phila- 
delphian, he studied at the Curtis In- 
stitute, and his teachers have included 
Gregor Piatigorsky, Leonard Rose, and 




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32 



Janos Starker. Winner of the 1954 
Naumburg Foundation Award, he made 
his Town Hall debut that same year. A 
participant for many years in the Casals 
and Marlboro Festivals, he is a teacher at 
the New England Conservatory and the 
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He is also a member of the Boston 
Symphony Chamber Players. 

The Boston Symphony 

Chamber Players 

The Boston Symphony Orchestra es- 
tablished a new and expanded role for its 
first-desk players with the creation of 
the Boston Symphony Chamber Players 
in 1964. Comprised of the principal 
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have made several national and inter- 
national tours in addition to their annu- 
al local appearances. The group is flex- 
ible in size and is joined from time to 
time by guest artists and other members 
of the Orchestra, making it possible for 
the Chamber Players to perform vir- 
tually any work from the vast range of 
the chamber music literature. Pianists 
Gilbert Kalish, Claude Frank, Richard 
Goode, Michael Tilson Thomas, Peter 
Serkin, Lorin Hollander, and Alexis Weis- 




senberg have performed with the group, 
and other guest artists have ranged 
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The Chamber Players have toured 
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concerts in the Soviet Union, the United 
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Deutsche Grammophon records. Their 
latest release on the DGG label, for 
whom they now record exclusively, is 
the complete chamber music of Igor 
Stravinsky, including the concert suite 
from L'Histoire du soldat. 




33 



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99 



Friday, 5 August at 7:00 
(Weekend Prelude) 

SCHUMANN 

Carnival Jest from Vienna 
PROKOFIEV 

Sonata No. 7, Op. 83 
MISHA DICHTER, piano 



Friday, 5 August at 9:00 
ANDRE PREVIN conducting: 

VAUGHAN WILLIAMS 

Overture to The Wasps 
HUMMEL 

Trumpet Concerto in E 

ARMANDO GHITALLA 
RACHMANINOFF 

Symphony No. 2 in E minor, Op. 27 



Saturday, 6 August at 8:30 
KAZUYOSHI AKIYAMA conducting: 

ROSSINI 

Overture to 11 Signor Bruschino 
SCHUMANN 

Piano Concerto in A minor, Op. 54 

MISHA DICHTER 
MUSSORGSKY 

Pictures at an Exhibition (arr. Ravel) 



Sunday, 7 August at 2:30 

ANDRE PREVIN conducting: 

HAYDN 

Symphony No. 87 in A 
PROKOFIEV 

Romeo and Juliet (excerpts) 



35 




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What's so great about Thursday? 

The best thing about Thursday everywhere else 
is that the next day is Friday. But here in Boston, 
it's the Boston Symphony Orchestra presenting 
four separate concert series. 

We begin the day at 11:00 a.m. with a three-con- 
cert Thursday AM' series featuring the works of 
Respighi, Debussy, Shostakovich, Brahms and 
Stravinsky. Before each concert, Director of Publi- 
cations, Michael Steinberg, will host an informal 
discussion ot the program in the Cabot-Cahners 
Room. Coffee and doughnuts are on the Hall. 

The six-concert 8:30 p.m. Thursday A' series 
presents conductors Seiji Ozawa, Gennady Ro/.h- 
destvensky, Kazuyoshi Akiyama and Klaus Tenn- 
stedt and guest soloists Itzhak Perlman and Radu 
Lupu. 

Seiji Ozawa and Colin Davis will conduct the 
three-concert 8:30 p.m. Thursday 'B' series, which 
presents soloists Joseph Silverstein, Alexis Weissen- 
berg, Gidon Kremer and Barbara Hendricks. 

The ten-concert 7:30 p.m. Thursday '10' series 
will feature the complete "Beatrice and Benedict" 
by Berlioz. Seiji Ozawa, Colin Davis, Klaus Tenn- 
stedl, Ravmond Leppard, Kazuvoshi Akivama, Scr- 
giu Commissiona and Gennady Rozhdestvcnskv 
will conduct the orchestra, with many world- 
renowned guest soloists. 

For complete program information, write to Subscription Office, 
Symphony Hall, Boston, Mass. 02115, or call 266-1492. 



37 




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38 



The Berkshire Music Center 



"One more thing should come from this scheme, 
namely, a good honest school of musicians." 

— Henry Lee Higginson, on founding the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra. 

The late Serge Koussevitzky fervent- 
ly shared Henry Lee Higginson's vision 
of a "good honest school for musicians" 

— an academy where young musicians 
could extend their artistic training and 
broaden their experience under the 
guidance of eminent professionals. 
More than any other person, it was 
Koussevitzky who made the vision a 
reality; he was Director of the Berkshire 
Music Center from its founding in 1940 
until his death in 1951, and his vigorous 
leadership has remained an inspiring 
example in the years since. 

Serge Koussevitzky was succeeded by 
Charles Munch, and it is a mark of the 
Center's success that the Boston Sym- 
phony's present Music Director, Seiji 
Ozawa, studied here during the Munch 
era. Alumni of the Center are among 
the most prominent and active mem- 
bers of the music world; more than ten 
percent of the members of this country's 
major orchestras are graduates of the 
Center, as are many of the world's 
notable conductors, instrumental solo- 
ists and singers. 

Today the primary responsibility for 
the Center's direction is in the hands of 
Gunther Schuller, composer, writer, 
conductor and President of the New 
England Conservatory until June 1977. 
Average enrollment is somewhat over 
400 each summer, of which approxi- 
matelyl40 are members of the Center's 
Fellowship Program; this provides free 
tuition (and in many cases free board 
and expenses) for instrumentalists, 
singers, conductors and composers of 
post-graduate calibre. In addition to the 
Fellowship Program, Boston University, 
through its Tanglewood Institute, offers 
several college- credit programs for tal- 
ented high school musicians; the noted 
soprano Phyllis Curtin directs a singers' 
seminar highlighted by her own master 
classes. Finally, each summer the Cen- 
ter's Festival of Contemporary Music 
(August 13-17 this year), presented in 



cooperation with the Fromm Music 
Foundation at Harvard, offers a broad 
spectrum of the most advanced music of 
today's composers in a gala week of 
performances. 

The Boston Symphony's Concert- 
master and Assistant Conductor Joseph 
Silverstein heads a faculty that includes 
principal players and members of the 
Orchestra and faculty members of Bos- 
ton University's School of Fine Arts, 
plus leading soloists, conductors and 
composers. The Center has numerous 
studios for practice and chamber music, 
and an extensive library of music litera- 
ture and scores. Rehearsals and con- 
certs of the Berkshire Music Center 
Orchestra and other student groups 
take place mostly in the Theatre- 
Concert HalL while lectures, seminars, 
conducting classes, vocal and choral re- 
hearsals, composers' forums and cham- 
ber music concerts take place in the 
Chamber Music Hall, in the West Barn, 
in the Hawthorne Cottage, on the Re- 
hearsal Stage, and in the small studios 
both on the Tanglewood grounds and in 
buildings leased in Lenox. Each summer 
the Baldwin Piano and Organ Company 
generously provides over 100 keyboard 
instruments for individual practice; 
other instruments — percussion, for ex- 
ample — are provided bv the Orchestra. 

The Boston Symphony is assisted in 
supporting the Center by the National 
Endowment for the Arts, a Federal 
agency, as well as by individual and 
corporate sponsors. Scholarships are 
awarded to the majority of the students, 
who are chosen by audition on a com- 
petitive basis. The cost of the scholar- 
ship program is large and adds sub- 
stantially to the Orchestra's yearly 
deficit — one major reason for the estab- 
lishment of the Friends of Music at 
Tanglewood, a group that provides 
critical support for the Center. A brief 
account of members' privileges is printed 
on page 41, and more information may 
be had at the Friends' Office near the 
Main Gate. We invite you to see and 
hear for yourself the remarkable calibre 
of the Center's young musicians. 

39 



Tanglewood 
Talks & Walks 



Tanglewood Talks & Walks are a fasci- 
nating series of five Thursday lecture- 
luncheons at noon in the Tanglewood 
Tent, followed by a special guided tour 
of Tanglewood. Guest speakers include 
the musicians, conductors, and staff 
of the Boston Symphony Orchestra and 
Berkshire Music Center. Bring a lunch — 
well provide the refreshments. Please 
call the Tanglewood Friends Office at 
(413) 637-1600 for reservations. $2 con- 
tribution to the public, free to Friends 
of Tanglewood. 

LUNCHEON 12:15 
TALK 1:00 
WALK 1:30 

1977 Tanglewood Talks & Walks 



4 AUGUST— PASQUALE CARDILLO 

Clarinet, 

Boston Symphony Orchestra; 
Principal Clarinet, 
Boston Pops Orchestra 




Arthur Press, BSO percussionist, in an 
instrumental demonstration for the 
DAYS IN THE ARTS participants. 

Earl Ostroff, photographer 



18 AUGUST— BETSY JOLAS 

Composer in Residence, 
Berkshire Music Center 



25 AUGUST— CAROL PROCTER 

Cello, 

Boston Symphony Orchestra 



Friends of Music at Tanglewood 

Lenox, Massachusetts 01240 

(413) 637-1600 



1771 was a sood 

year for our Lobster Pie. 

This year 

it's even better. 




Publick House 

Good Yankee cooking, drink and lodging. 
On the Common — Sturbndge. Mass. — \b\7 '■ Z47 2>3\3i 



40 



The Friends of Music 
At Tanglewood 

Membership provides you with exciting 

opportunities and privileges all year long. 

It's the secret buy of the Berkshires! 



Free Berkshire Music 
Center Concerts: 

There are over 40 concerts each sum- 
mer performed by the members of the 
Berkshire Music Center, the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra's summer academy 
for the advanced study of music. These 
outstanding mid-week concerts include 
chamber music recitals, full orchestra 
concerts, vocal and choral programs, 
and the annual Festival of Contem- 
porary Music, Tanglewood's "festival 
within a festival." Friends Concert 
Memberships for individuals and 
families are available for $25.00. 

Advance program information and 
ticket ordering forms: 

Approximately one month before the 
public sale of seats in the early spring, 
Friends will be sent the advance Berk- 
shire Festival programs and a priority 
ticket application. Friends will also re- 
ceive the monthly Boston Symphony 
Orchestra publication, BSO. 



Tent Membership: 

The Tanglewood Tent, available to con- 
tributors of $75 and over, provides a 
hospitable gathering place behind the 
Music Shed where food and drink may be 
purchased on concert days. Hot buffet 
dinners are served on Saturday evenings 
beginning at 6:30 p.m. (Reservations 
must be made through the Friends 
Office no later than the Thursday after- 
noon preceding each Saturday 
evening buffet.) 

Special parking for Friends: 

Two convenient reserved parking areas 
are available to all donors of $150 or 
more for all Boston Symphony Orches- 
tra concerts: either the Box Parking Lot 
(Hawthorne Street entrance), or the 
Tent Parking Lot (West Street entrance). 

For information, contact: 
Friends of Music at Tanglewood 
Lenox, Ma. 01240 
(413) 637-1600 



Jl 



THE 4. vl. 1. 1 III A 



SL 





F% ik ^rc>rabis 



Boolraloi'c 



CONTEMPORARY 
AMERICAN DE5IGN 



OUTSTANDING CRAFTS 
TO GIVE OR TO TREASURE 




DISTINCTIVE FOOD 
DELIGHTFUL AMBIENCE 



I22XOIC I II XI. PITTM It-Lit 



41 




<»>» 



STOCKBRIDGE 




Summer Estate of 
DANIEL CHESTER FRENCH 

Sculptor of the 
Lincoln Memorial 

Studio, Residence, Barn 

Sculpture Gallery, Period 

Garden, Nature Trail 

Daily 10-5 

May - October 

off Rte. 183, Glendale 

a property of 

the National Trust for Historic Preservation 



THE 
OLD CORNER HOUSE 




Paintings by 

NORMAN ROCKWELL 

On permanent exhibit 

Open Year Round — Daily 10-5 p.m. 

Except Tuesdays 

Adults $1.00 Children 25< 



The Executive Committee 

Tanglewood Council of the 

Boston Symphony Orchestra 

Mrs. James Garivaltis 

Mr. Curtis Buttenheim 

Co- Chairmen 

Mr. John Kittredge 

Secretary /Treasurer 

Mrs. Stephen V.C. Morris 
Mrs. Murray Klein 

Talks and Walks 

Mr. Colin MacFadyen 

Mr. Ashley Smith 

Business 

Mrs. Kelton M. Burbank 
Mrs. John Kittredge 

Benefits 

Mrs. Charles Capers 

Receptions 

Mr. Robert A. Wells 

Community Affairs 

Mrs. D.H. Potter 

Mr. William Harris 

Tent 

Mrs. Jean Massimiano 
Mr. Joseph Duffy 

Sales and Information 

Mrs. Gary A. Lopenzina 
Mrs. William H. Ryan 

Student Affairs 

Mrs. Archie Peace 

Foreign Students 

Mrs. John Kittredge 

Tanglewood- Boston Liaison 

Mrs. A. Lloyd Russell 

Boston- Tanglewood Liaison 

Mr. Peter van S. Rice 
Mrs. John S. McLennan 

Nominating 



42 



i)\voaaji (jL/ rutrtfeu, LXnturttCA/ 



Route 57 



Tolland, Mass. 



Telephone 413 - 258-4538 

A wide selection of antiques ranging 

from furniture, china and paintings. 

We also feature an extensive 

collection of primitive art 

from New Guinea. 

Open by appointment every day 
except Sunday. 



VISIT BERKSHIRE LAKES ESTATES 

EXPERIENCE COUNTRY LIVING 

AT ITS BEST! 

Small Lakefront Community 

Swim and boat on 2 crystal clear mountain 
lakes. Play tennis, badminton, volleyball 
and basketball on community courts. Live 
in privacy adjacent to a large state forest. 

Berkshire Lakes Estates 

Yokum Pond Road 

Becket, Mass. 01223 

Tel. 413-623-8747 

TO VISIT: Mass. Turnpike to Lee, Mass.-Rt. 20 
East. Continue 4 miles to Belden's Tavern. Left 
for 2 miles to Berkshire Lakes Estates. 



What's 
Happening 

in the 
Derkshires? 

Phone Toll- Free 

and Find Out! 



Things to do today - exhibits, arts, music, 
theatre, ballet, garden shows, special tours, 
all the current events in the Berkshires. 



SOUTHERN BERKSHIRES 

528-2677 

From Great Barnngton. \ 

Sheffield. West Stockbridge 



CENTRAL BERKSHIRES NORTHERN BERKSHIRES 

607-2677 662-2677 




From Stockbridge. Lee 
Lenox. PrttstiekJ 



From Wilhamstown. 
Adams. North Adams 



A service of the Berkshire Vacation Bureau 
205 West St., Pittsfield, Mass. 

(A Division of the Berkshire Hills Conference). 



Williamstown 
Theatre Festival 




Nikos Psacharopoulos 

Our 23rd Season Includes: 

Misalliance. Sherlock Holmes. Alter ihe Fall. 

Pialonov and Learned Ladies 

June 30 - August 27 

Phone Reservations 413-458-8146 
PO Box 517. Wilhamstown, -Ma 02167 



"uruxuxe and cuicJU^a txautey cuuMMe<" 



Brunch 

Picnic 
Baskets 




Dinner 

After-Concert 
Supper 



J. Perspico Factor 
Restaurant 

Open Till 1 A.M. 

25 Church St. • Lenox, Mass. 
637-2996 



43 



We Curtis Hotel 

Food & Lodging 
LENOX, 637-0016 



A BOOK "TO DO" NOT 
"JUST TO READ" 




A BERKSHIRE SOURCEBOOK 



Your personal guide to Berkshire County: 
its history, geography and major land- 
marks. Available at area bookstores and 
gift shops for just s 2.95. Published by The 
Junior League of Berkshire County, Inc. 



SHIDEL'S 

DELI -SHOP 

SANDWICHES • CATERING 
TAKE OUT SERVICE 

1 15 Elm Street. Pittsfreld. Massachusetts. 
Tel. 442-5927 

Featuring Hot Pastrami & Hot Corned Beef 

Sandwiches 

Hebrew National Delicatessen • Rolls & Bagels 
baked daily • Imported & Domestic cheeses 

• Lox & smoked fish • Barbecued chicken 

• Fresh made salads • Party Platters 

Open Daily 8 to 6 



WILL 



HE 



AMSVILLEjE 



INN 




in ii Hipp, 

A fine, small inn featuring 
superb Country French Cuisine 

LUNCH • DINNER 
Light Supper After Tanglewood 

Rte. 41 , between W. Stockbridge 
and Gt. Barrington 

Reservations Recommended by 

413-274-6580 INN PERSPECTIVE 



Thenewhomeof 
the world famous 
Alices Restaurant 




AT AVALOCH 



Breakfast • Brunch 

• Lunch • Dinner 

• Late Supper • Cocktail Lounge 

• Entertainment • MOTEL 

• tennis • pool 

across the road from Tanglewood 
rte. 183 Lenox 637-0897 



The Sunshine Stage, 

Holliston Theatre, Route 183, 
Lenox. Mass. 01240. Tel. 413-637-0534. 

Year-round professional regional theatre featuring 
plays, films and children's theatre Cafe on prem 
ises. Frank Bessell. Artistic Director. 



THECLOTHESLOFT 

"Fine Sportswear Outlet" 

179 Main Street, Great Barrington 
164 North Street. Pittsfield 



■ "a little \ewel in the Berkshires C*^&>.<S/{'></±i<7<'A//<H'Cr<i 

(413)243-0181 or 637-2644 

JK Comfortable rooms, good food and drink in 
Y a country atmosphere. 

Open Daily Lunch & Dinner 

^^^ Tony Ferrelli Innkeeper 



vuypuvjpiME 



-#" 

Accommodations for private parties. We /f^ 
cater to parties, banquets and social 
gatherings. Orders to take out. 

Chinese Polynesian Restaurant^l 

LENOX. MASS. For Reservations 
(413)4434745 

Open Daily 1 1 30 til 10 pm. Fn & Sat til 1 am 




(Nd Stone mitltorp 

Route 8, Grove St., Adams, Ma. 
HANDPRINT WALLPAPER 

Factory Outlet 

OpenMon-Fri 10-4, Sat 9-1 2:30 




0T 




FANTASY MANSE 

Food, drink, lodging. Live music week 
ends. After concert, a 10 minute 
walk from the Lion's Gate. 

WHEATLEIGH 637-0610 ^ 




Fashion Doesn 't Stop At Size 1 4 
BEAUTIFUL CLOTHES FOR 

C T R E LARGE SIZE WOMEN 

179 ifmiR street 413 m 528'3118 



©a. 



St. Barrington 



44 



WHY WAIT TO ENTER COLLEGE? 
SIMONS ROCK EARLY COLLEGE 

Designed for the student who wishes to avoid the 

duplication of high school and college work 

Liberal Arts - B.A. and A. A. Degrees - Fully Accredited 

The interest of those who have completed the 10th or 1 1th 
grade of high school is invited 

Admissions Office 

Simon's Rock Early College 

Great Barrington, MA 01230 

Telephone: 413-528-0771 




Tanglewood 
Tradition 



Our outdoor Courtyard 
— colorfully abounding 
with Impatient plants — 
serves luncheons, 
dinners, snacks and 
drinks. Our indoor 
Lion's Den features sandwiches, 
drinks and live entertainment. 
Both are open till 1 a.m. Phone: 
413-298-5545. Route 7, Stockbridge, 
Massachusetts. Since 1773. 

<i& The Red Lion Inn 




G°°P£> 




CURTAINS 

At ThE Red Lipn Inn 

STOCKBRIDGE MASSACHUSETTS 

ouer 

Monilay thru Saturday 10 -1.A/.-5 P. \f. 
Send for free Catalog 



To reach a 

mature audience who 

attend Boston Symphony, 

Pops and Tanglewood, 

call Steve Ganak Ad Reps, 

Statler Office Bldg., 

Boston, Mass. 02116 

617-542-6913 




If you'd like your own tote bag showi 
support public broadcasting (other 
Channel 17 logo), cliptthd send to: W 
Box 17, Schenectady, NX 12301. 

'Z $60 Sustaining Member 

□ $30 Regular Member 

Name _ 




u 

sthe 



HT, 






Address 



City 



State 



Zip 



45 




7ANEEE PEDLAR INN 1 

»JJ* OPERA HOUSE 

36 Luxury Rooms 

FOOD-DRIMK •LODGING 

Exit 16-1-91 
Holvoke, Mass. 

(413) 532-9494 





Located in the Township of Becket, Mass. 

Norman Walker, Director 

Grace Badorek, Comptroller 

Donald Westwood, Promotional Director 



FIRST WEEK— July 5—9 
Eight Soloists from the 
Royal Danish Ballet 

SECOND WEEK- 
July 12—16 
Cultural Center of the 
Philippines Dance Co. 

(American debut 
of the Company) 

THIRD WEEK— July 19—23 
Teodoro Morca 
(Flamenco in Concert) 
Jacob's Pillow Dancers, 

Classical Pas de Deux 

FOU RTH WEEK— 

July 26—30 

Anne Marie DeAngelo 

and Lawrence Rhodes 

May O'Donnell 

Concert Dance Coinpany 

Bhaskar (dances of India) 

FIFTH WEEK— August 2—6 
Twyla Tharp 
Dancers and Dances 

SIXTH WEEK— August 9—13 
Ohio Ballet Company 



SEVENTH WEEK— 

August 16—20 

Dennis Wayne's Dancers 

EIGHTH WEEK— 

August 23 — 27 

Contemporary Dancers 

of Winnipeg 

(United States debut 

of the Company) 

Joyce Cuoco & Youri Vamos 

Jacob's Pillow Dancers 

Special Added Event 
September 2—4 
Hartford Ballet 

Performances: Perform- 
ances are held Tuesday 
through Saturday, Curt- 
ain times: Tuesday, 
7:30 p.m., Wednesday, 
Friday\and Saturday, 
6.40 p.m., Thursday and 
Saturday Matinees: 
3:00 p.m. Tickets: 
$8.00 and $6.00. Avail- 
able at Ticketron, 
Bloomingdale's or the 
Jacob's Pillow Box Office 



How to Reach Jacob's Pillow: 

Approx.150 miles from Boston near Tangle- 
wood. Lee-Pittsfield exit on the Mass. Turnpike. 
Public transportation from Boston via 
Greyhound to L^e, Mass. 

America's FIRST Dance Festival 



i 



Jacob's Pillow Dance Festival 
Mailing Address: Box 287, Lee, Mass. 01238 

(413) 243-0745 



) 



TkCordova Museunx 
$unrn\ef £oncert$ 

Gospel singers, Ukrainian dancers, 
Mime, Big Band Jazz, Folk singers... 

DE CORDOVA AMPHITHEATER 
Sandy Pond Rd., Lincoln, MA. 

Concerts 3:30pm 
Tickets:$2.50 
for info call 
259-8355 



Ad was placed in cooperation wi 
the Middlesex County Tourism & 
Development Council, Inc. 





erksbire 

umroer festival 

6 days 5 nights 11 meals 




Per person dbl occup 
plus tx & tips 



189 



50 



Delux Accommodations 

All admissions to: TANGLEWOOD, 
BERKSHIRE PLAYHOUSE,JACOB'S 
PILLOW, STORROWTON 

plus Naumkeag. . . Chesterwood. . .Corner 
House. ..Hancock Shaker Village. ..Scenic 
tours... Swimming... tennis... golf... & more 

r~Wtfte or call direct for free brochure to 

Oak ri Spruce resort—] 

south toe, ma. 01260 • 1-800-628-5073 



46 



^v^-^^^ ^r^ 



Em* EDITION PETERS ^^32 



^«B5^ 




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If you are a Music Lover, 

you will enjoy these free publications. 



EDITION PETERS COMPLETE CATALOGUE 

This new Complete Catalogue lists over 10,000 classical and contemporary 
publications for all instruments. In addition to providing an educational 
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and student alike in giving a glimpse of the master composers 
themselves— for interspersed throughout the catalogue are various 
sections highlighting a different composer's facsimile manuscript and his 
written thoughts. 



COMPLETE CATALOGUE 



PIANO CEMBALO ORGAN VIOLIN VIOLA 



CELLO BASS RECORDER FLUTE OBOE 



RINET BASSOON BRASS PERCUSSION 



HARP VOCAL CHORAL SCORES BOOKS 



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V 




PETERS NOTES NEWSLETTER 

The C. F. Peters music publishing tradition since 1800 has been built on providing the 
public with quality publications and service . . . our new, semiannual Peters Notes 
Newsletter strengthens this tradition. Each issue details our publishing activities and 
presents pertinent articles and news in many different areas in an effort to assist the 
music educator, librarian, professional and student in their work. 



CONTEMPORARY MUSIC CATALOGUE 

Our new Contemporary Music Catalogue has already met with such enthusiastic response by 
teachers, students, performers and composers of contemporary music that it is now in its 
second printing. The catalogue is an alphabetical listing, by composer, of approximately 1500 
contemporary compositions by more than 160 composers (primarily American)— featuring 45 
biographical sketches and handwritten statements on music. 



Contemporary 
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CATALOGUE 



C. F. PETERS CORPORATION, 373 Park Avenue South, New York, N.Y. 10016 

Dear Friends at C. F. Peters, 

Please rush to me the following publications: D Edition Peters Complete Catalogue 

D PETERS NOTES Newsletter 
D Contemporary Music Catalogue 



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47 




Introducing the Bose 901® 
Series III: the most innovative new 
speaker since the legendary 
Bose 901 was introduced in 1968. 
The 901 Series III reproduces 
music with spaciousness and 
realism unequalled, we believe, by 
any other speaker. Yet, due to its 
new, ultra-high-efficiency drivers, 
the 901 Series III requires less than 
V3 as much power as the original 
901 : that means, for example, it 
can produce the same sound vol- 
ume with a 15 watt amplifier as the 
original 901 with a 50 watt ampli- 
fier. Outstanding bass perform- 
ance is made possible by the 
unique injection molded Acoustic 
Matrix™ enclosure (shown in this 
photograph of the 901 III with its 
grille and walnut veneer cabinet 
panels removed). To fully appreci- 
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ask a Bose dealer to play the 901 



Series III in comparison to any 
other speaker, regardless of size or 
price. 

For a full color 901 HI 
brochure, write Bose, Dept. BSO, 
The Mountain, Framingham, 
Massachusetts 
01701. 




Patents issued and pending. Copyright © 
1977 Bose Corp. Cabinets are walnut veneer. 
Pedestals optional at extra cost. 



48 




LOST & FOUND. 

Lose yourself in Berlioz' Beatrice and Benedict , 
in Stravinsky's Concerto for Violin in D, lost in Tip- 
pett's A Child of Our Time Oratorio. Let your mind 
empty and let it be refreshed by music. Lose your- 
self to the Boston Symphony Orchestra; to Seiji 
Ozawa, Colin Davis, Itzhak Perlman and Andre 
Watts. 

Who knows? By losing yourself for a few hours, 
you might find yourself forever. 

October 26/27, 1977 

SEIJI OZAWA, Conductor 

Berlioz: Beatrice and Benedict (complete) 

Sheila Armstrong, Frederica von Stade, Gwendolyn Killebrew, 

Stuart Burrows, David Arnold, Douglas Lawrence, Rohan McCullough, 

William Roerick.Tanglewood Festival Chorus, John Oliver, Conductor. 

January 18/19, 1978 

COLIN DAVIS, Conductor 

Mozart: Symphony No. 36 'Linz' 

Tippett: A Child of Our Time (Oratorio) 

Teresa Zylis-Gara, Lili Chookasian, Alexander Stevenson, Norman Bailey, 

Tanglewood Festival Chorus, John Oliver, Conductor 

February 8/9, 1978 

SEIJI OZAWA, Conductor 

Bach: Concerto for Violin in A 

Stravinsky: Concerto for Violin in D 

Itzhak Perlman 

Brahms: Symphony No. 3 in F 

April 19/20, 1978 

SEIJI OZAWA, Conductor 

Respighi: Ancient Airs and Dances, Suite No. 2 

Saint-Saens: Piano Concerto No. 2 in G 

Andre Watts 

Nielsen: Symphony No. 4 'Inextinguishable' 

Carnegie Hall Series Ticket Prices: S35, 30, 23, 19, and 14. 

Tickets available by writing Subscription Oflice, Symphony Hall, 

Boston, Mass. 02115. 

Four Wednesday/Thursday Evenings 
at 8:00 at Carnegie Hall. 



Please send me # 



series subseriptions at $- 



each. 



Enclosed is my check for S 



NAME 



ADDRESS 



ZIP 



l_ P 



PHONE 



J 




Accompanist to 

Leonard Bernstein • Arthur Fiedler 

Gilbert Kalish • Seiji Ozawa • Andre Previn 

Gunther Schuller • YehudiWyner 






This is 







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MARCA 



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Castel Ruboun Lambrusco 

Nawinwhiteaswdlasred. 

Imported by Pastene Wine & Spirits Ca, Inc., SomerviUe, MA 02143 



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.MliNOFF® VODKA. 80 & 100 PROOF. DISTILLED FROM GRAIN. STE. PIERRE SMIRNOFF FLS. (DIVISION OF H EUBLEIN. I NCORPORATED ) HARTFORD. CONNECTICUT 



' -<*£sv " ' 




Seiji Ozawa, Music Director 

Colin Davis, Principal Guest Conductor 
Joseph Silverstein, Assistant Conductor 

Ninety- Sixth Season 1976-1977 



The Trustees of the Boston Symphony Orchestra Inc. 

Talcott M. Banks, President 

President Sidney Stoneman, Vice-President 

Vice-President John L. Thorndike, Treasurer 



Philip K. Allen, Vice 
Mrs. Harris Fahnestock, 



Vernon R. Alden 

Allen G. Barry 

Dr. Leo L. Beranek 

Mrs. John M. Bradley 

Richard P. Chapman 

Dr. George Clowes 

Abram T. Collier 

Henry A. Laughlin 



Nelson J. Darling, Jr. 

Archie C. Epps III 

E. Morton Jennings, Jr. 

Edward M. Kennedy 

George Kidder 
Edward G. Murray 

Trustees Emeriti 

Harold D. Hodgkinson 



Albert L. Nickerson 

Mrs. James H. Perkins 

Irving W. Rabb 

Paul C. Reardon 

David Rockefeller Jr. 

Mrs. George Lee Sargent 

John Hoyt Stookey 

John T. Noonan 



Administration of the Boston Symphony Orchestra 



Thomas D. Perry, Jr. 

Executive Director 



Thomas W. Morris 

Manager 

Gideon Toeplitz Daniel R. Gustin 

Assistant Manager Assistant Manager 

Joseph M. Hobbs Walter Hill Dinah Daniels 

Director of Development Director of Business Affairs Director of Promotion 

Richard C. White Anita R. Kurland Niklaus Wyss 

Assistant to the Manager Administrator of Youth Activities Advisor for the Music Director 

Donald W. Mackenzie James F. Kiley 

Operations Manager, Symphony Hall Operations Manager, Tanglewood 

Michael Steinberg 

Director of Publications 

Programs copyright ® 1977 Boston Symphony Orchestra Inc. 



Contents: 



page 

Tanglewood 4 

Seiji Ozawa 7 

Map 8 

Information 9 



page 

Programs 11-36 

Berkshire Music Center 40 

Friends 42, 43 



The cover photo is by Walter H. Scott, Stockbridge. 



The Board of Overseers of the Boston Symphony Orchestra Inc. 

Dr. Leo L. Beranek 

Chairman 



Mrs. Norman L. Cahners 
Vice Chairman 

Charles F. Adams 

Mrs. Frank G. Allen 

Mrs. Richard Bennink 

David W. Bernstein 

David Bird 

Gerhard Bleicken 

Frederick Brandi 

Curtis Buttenheim 

Mrs. Henry B. Cabot 

Mrs. Mary Louise Cabot 

Levin H. Campbell, III 

Johns H. Congdon 

Arthur P. Contas 

Robert Cushman 

Michael J. Daly 

Mrs. C. Russell Eddy 

Paul Fromm 

Carlton P. Fuller 

Mrs. Thomas J. Galligan, Jr 



Weston P. Figgins 

Vice Chairman 

Mrs. Thomas Gardinei 

Mrs. James Garivaltis 

Mrs. Robert Gibb 

Jordan Golding 

Mrs. John L. Grandin 

Mrs. R. Douglas Hall, III 

Mrs. Howard E. Hansen 

Bruce Harriman 

Mrs. Richard D. Hill 

Mrs. Amory Houghton, Jr 

Richard S. Humphrey, Jr. 

Mrs. Jim Lee Hunt 

Mrs. Louis I. Kane 

Leonard Kaplan 

Benjamin Lacy 

Mrs. James F. Lawrence 

Roderick MacDougall 

John S. McLennan 

Colman M. Mockler, Jr. 

Mrs. Elting E. Morison 

Richard P. Morse 



Mrs. Arthur I. Strang 

Secretary 

David G. Mugar 

Dr. Barbara W. Newell 

Stephen Paine 

Harry Remis 

Mrs. Peter van S. Rice 

Mrs. Samuel L. Rosenberry 

Mrs. Jerome Rosenfeld 

Mrs. George Rowland 

Mrs. A. Lloyd Russell 

Mrs. William Ryan 

Francis P. Sears, Jr. 

William A. Selke 

Gene Shalit 

Samuel L. Slosberg 

Richard A. Smith 

Mrs. Edward S. Stimpson 

Mrs. Richard H. Thompson 

D. Thomas Trigg 

Roger Woodworth 




Boston 
University 

Tanglewood 
Institute 



Norman DelloJoio, 

Executive Director 



Summer Instrumental and Vocal Programs for the outstanding high school/ 
college-age musician. Private study with master artists including members of the 
faculty of the Boston University School of Music and the Boston Symphony 
Orchestra. Chamber music, orchestral and vocal performances at Tanglewood. 

For information: Boston University Tanglewood Institute, 
855 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02215. 

A program offered by the Boston University School for the Arts in association 
with the Berkshire Music Center/Boston Symphony Orchestra. 
Twelfth Season 



^ #^ •' j# The reasons you visit 

tfhe Berkshires 






move your business 
■ to the Berkshires^ 



■ 



The Berkshires are a perfect place ... for people, 
for families and for businesses. The kind of place 
where an unsurpassed quality of life is available. 

In the Berkshires the average commute is 10 
minutes. Golf courses, tennis clubs, ski resorts, 
theatres, lakes, and fine restaurants are at your 
doorstep. We provide excellent schools — both public 
and private — and the Berkshires are the perfect place 
to raise a family. 

It's no accident that titans of industry have lived 
and worked in the Berkshires. Our labor force still 
believes in a day's work for a day's pay. And the 
Berkshires offer a readily available pool of labor. Our 
schools offer vocational programs and governmental 
training dollars are available. 

Most important, we want businesses to locate in 
the Berkshires. That's why our banks have launched 
a program of financial assistance to attract new 
industry and the County funds a full-time organization 
to assist you. 



If you have the opportunity to move a business, 
or influence a business relocation, consider the 
Berkshires. At Berkshire County Development 
Commission, we have compiled data to prove that 
the Berkshires add up for business reasons. Come see 
us or write on your letterhead for more information. 
Or, if you know of a business contemplating 
relocation, let us know. We welcome \^our business. 



the Berkshires 

Alan C. Marden 

Berkshire County Development Commission 

205 West Street 

Pirtsfield, Massachusetts 01201 

Phone: (413) 499-4474 



U 



Definitely not 
to be missed... 

'Herbert Kupferberg's Tanglewood 
is bursting with information that 
even some of us who worked there 
had missed It catches the spirit 
and truth of that beautiful place." 
— Francis Robinson, 
N.Y. Metropolitan Opera 

'Reads as excitingly as a who- 
done-it!" — Julius Rudel, 

New York City Opera 

'Unquestionably the definitive 
Tanglewood history to date." 

— Christian Science Monitor. 



TANGLEWOOD 




by 

Herbert 
Kupferberg 

8x10. 280 pages. 
Over 150 photos. 
Index. $9.95 paperback. 
McGRAW-HILL BOOK COMPANY 



HANCOCK SHAKER 
VILLAGE 

Original 18th Century 
Village Restored 

Open daily 9:30-5:00 

Adults $3 Children $1 

Annual Kitchen Festival 
Week of August 1st 

Route 20 Five miles West 
of Pittsfield, Mass. 



Tanglewood 

In August, 1934, a group of music- 
loving summer residents of the Berk- 
shires organized a series of three 
outdoor concerts at Interlaken, to be 
given by members of the New York 
Philharmonic under the direction of 
Henry Hadley. The venture was so 
successful that the promoters incor- 
porated the Berkshire Symphonic 
Festival and repeated the experiment 
during the next summer. 

The Festival committee then invited 
Serge Koussevitzky and the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra to take part in the 
following year's concerts. The Orches- 
tra's Trustees accepted and on August 
13, 1936, the Boston Symphony gave 
its first concert in the Berkshires (at 
Holmwood, a former Vanderbilt estate, 
later the Center at Foxhollow). The series, 
again consisting of three concerts, was 
given under a large tent, and a total of 
nearly 15,000 people attended. 

In the winter of 1936, Mrs. Gorham 
Brooks and Miss Mary Aspinwall 
Tappan offered Tanglewood, the Tap- 
pan family estate, with its buildings and 
210 acres of lawns and meadows, as a 
gift to Koussevitzky and the Orchestra. 
The offer was gratefully accepted, and 
on August 12, 1937, the Festival's 
largest crowd thus far assembled under 
a tent for the first Tanglewood concert, 
a program of music by Wagner. 

As Koussevitzky began The Ride of the 
Valkyries, a storm erupted, overpowering 
the music and causing the concert to be 
interrupted three times before the first 
half could be completed. The second half 
of the program had to be changed, 
because of water damage to some of the 
instruments, and when the concert 
ended, Miss Gertrude Robinson Smith, 
one of the Festival's founders, came to 
the stage and told the audience that the 
storm had demonstrated the need for a 
permanent structure. 

A hundred thousand dollars, she said, 
would be needed for this purpose, and 
the response to her plea was so generous 
that within a short time the amount was 
fully subscribed. Plans for the Music 
Shed were drawn up by the eminent 



architect Eliel Saarinen, and, as modi- 
fied by Josef Franz of Stockbridge, who 
also directed construction, it was com- 
pleted on June 16, 1938, a month ahead 
of schedule. Seven weeks later, Serge 
Koussevitzky led the inaugural concert, 
which included a performance of Beet- 
hoven's Ninth Symphony. By 1941, the 
Theatre-Concert Hall, the Chamber 
Music Hall and several small studios — 
all part of the Berkshire Music Center, 
which had begun operations the pre- 
ceding year — were finished, and the 
Festival had so expanded its activities 
and its reputation for excellence that it 
attracted nearly 100,000 visitors. 

Today Tanglewood annually draws 
close to a quarter of a million visitors; 
in addition to the twenty-four regular 
concerts of the Boston Symphony, there 
are weekly "Prelude" concerts and open 
rehearsals, the annual Festival of 
Contemporary Music, and almost daily 
concerts by the gifted young musicians 
of the Berkshire Music Center. Arthur 
Fiedler and the Boston Pops perform 
each summer, and the Festival also 
includes a series of concerts by popular 
artists. The season offers not only a 
vast quantity of music but also a vast 
range of musical forms and styles, all 
of it presented with a regard for artistic 
excellence that makes the Festival 
unique. Tanglewood and the Berkshire 
Music Center, projects with which 
Koussevitzky was involved until his 
death, have become a fitting shrine to 
his memory, a living embodiment of 
the vital, humanistic tradition that was 
his legacy. 





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at Tanglewood 
Fridays at 9pm, 
Saturdays at 
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and August 



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Seiji Ozawa 

Seiji Ozawa became Music Director of 
the Boston Symphony Orchestra in the 
fall of 1973. He is the thirteenth con- 
ductor of the Orchestra since its found- 
ing in 1881. 

He was born in Hoten, Manchuria in 
1935, and studied both Western and 
Oriental music as a child. He attended 
Toho School of Music in Tokyo and 
graduated with first prizes in composi- 
tion and conducting. Shortly after his 
graduation, he won first prize at the 
International Competition of Conduc- 
ting at Besancon, France, and was in- 
vited by Charles Munch, then Music 
Director of the Boston Symphony and a 
judge at the competition, to spend a 
summer studying at Tanglewood. 

In 1964 and for the next five seasons, 
Mr. Ozawa was Music Director of the 
Ravinia Festival. At the beginning of the 
1965-66 season he became Music Direc- 
tor of the Toronto Symphony, a posi- 
tion he relinquished four seasons later 
to study and guest conduct. In 1970 he 
accepted the position of Artistic Direc- 



tor of the Berkshire Music Festival, and 
in December of the same year he began 
his inaugural season as Conductor and 
Music Director of the San Francisco 
Symphony Orchestra, titles that he held 
concurrently with his position as Music 
Director of the Boston Symphony. In 
the spring of 1976 he resigned his San 
Francisco position although he remained 
Honorary Conductor for the 
1976-77 season. 

Mr. Ozawa 's recordings include: on 
the Deutsche Grammophon label, Ber- 
lioz's Symphonie fantastique, La damnation de 
Faust, Romeo el Juliette (which was 
awarded a Grand Prix du Disque), Ives's 
Symphony No. 4 and Central Park in the 
Dark, and de Falla's Three-cornered Hat, 
and, on the New World Records label, 
Griffes's Songs of Fiona McLeod. Record- 
ings soon to be released are: Bartok's 
Miraculous Mandarin Suite and Music for 
Percussion, Strings, and Celeste, Tchaikov- 
sky's Symphony No. 5, Brahms's Sym- 
phony No. 1, and Rimsky-Korsakov's 
Sheherazade on Deutsche Grammophon, 
and Session's When Lilac's Last in the Door- 
yard Bloom'd on New World Records. 



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For 105 years we've been serious 
W about people who make music. 

In 1872 Boston University established the first professional music program 
within an American university to train creative and talented students for 
careers in music. 105 years later the Boston University School of Music is 

still doing what it does best. 

• Performance • Music Education • History and Literature • Theory and Composition 



strings 

Walter Eisenberg, viohn 

Madeline Foley, chamber music 
'Gerald Gelbloom, violin 
'Bernard Kadinoff, viola 

Endel Kalam, chamber music 
'Robert Karol, viola 
'Eugene Lehner, chamber music 
' Leslie Martin, string bass 

George Neikrug, cello 
' Mischa Nieland, cello 

Leslie Pamas, cello 
'Henry Portnoi ^tnngbass 

William Rhein, string bass 

Kenneth Sarch, violin 
'Roger Shermont. viohn 
'Joseph Silverstein, viohn 

Roman Totenberg violin 

Waiter Trampler, viola 

Max Winder viohn 
'Lawrence Wolfe, string bass 



woodwinds 

Edward Avedisian, clarinet 
'Pasquale Cardillo clarinet 
'Donot Anthony Dwyer, flute 

Rodenck Ferland, saxophone 
"Ralph Gomberg, oboe 
'John Holmes, oboe 
'Phillip Kaplan, flute 
' James Pappoutsakis, flute 
'Richard Plaster, bassoon 
"Matthew Ruggiero, bassoon 
' Felix Viscuglia, clarinet 
' Sherman Walt, bassoon 
'Harold Wright, clarinet 

brass 

'Ronald Banon. trombone 
' Norman Bolter, trombone 
Peter Chapman, trumpet 
John Coffey, trombone tuba 
' Armando Ghitalla, trumpet 



brass (cont.l 

Paul Gay, trombone 
'Gordon Hallberg, trombone tuba 
'Charles Kavaloski, French hom 

Charles A. Lewis, Jr., trumpet 
"David Ohaman, French hom 

Samuel Pilaiian, tuba 
'Rolf Smedvig, trumpet 
'Harry Shapiro, French hom 
' Roger Voisin, trumpet 
' Charles Yancich, French hom 

percussion 

'Thomas Gauger 
'Charles Smith 

harp 

Lucile Lawrence 

piano 

Mana Clodes 

.Anthony di Bonaventura 

Lenore Engdahl 

Bela Boszormenyi-Nagy 

Phillip Oliver, staff accompanist 

Edith Steams 

Frednk Wanger 

organ 

George Faxon 
Jack Fisher 
Max Miller 

harpsichord 

Joseph Payne 

voice 

Eunice Alberts, contralto 
Germaine Aiosa, diction 
Mary Davenport, contralto 
Ellalou Dimmock, soprano 
Maeda Freeman, mezzo 
Robert Gartside, tenor 
Mac Morgan, baritone 
Chloe Owen, soprano 
Allen Rogers, vocal coaching 
Barbara Stevenson, soprano 
Wilma Thompson, mezzo 



music history and literature 

Karol Berger 
Murray Lefkowitz 
Joel Sheveloff 

theory and composition 

David Carney 
David Del Tredici 
John Goodman 
Alan Mac.Millan 
Joyce Mekeel 
Malloy Miller 
Gardner Read 
Allen Schindler 
Robert Sirota 
Tison Street 

music education 

Lee Chnsman 
Phyllis Elhady Hoffman 
Allen Lannom 
Jack O Lemons 
Mary Ann Norton 

musical organizations 

Adelaide Bishop, opera 

Warren Wilson, opera 

Joseph Huszti, chorus 
'Joseph Silverstein, orchestra 
' Roger Voism, wind ensemble 

boston symphony orchestra 
woodwind quintet in residence 

'Donot Anthony Dwyer, flute 

' Ralph Gomberg, oboe 

'Harold Wright, clarinet 

' Sherman Walt, bassoon 

' Charles Kavaloski, French hom 

empire brass quintet 
in residence 

Charles A. Lewis, Jr., trumpet 
' Rolf Smedvig, trumpet 
'David Ohaman, French hom 
'Norman Bolter, trombone 

Samuel Pilafian, tuba 



'Member of the Boston Symphony Orchestra 



Boston University School of Music 

Wilbur Dl Fullbright, Director • Robert Lee Tipps, Assistant to Director 
offering degrees at the bachelor, master, and doctoral levels. 

School for the Arts: Music, Theatre, Visual Arts • Norman Dello Joio, Dean 

855 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 



10 



Tanglewood 1977 



Weekend Prelude 



Friday, 5 August at 7 



MISHA DICHTER, pianist 



SCHUMANN Carnival Jest from Vienna — Fantasy Pictures, Opus 26 

Allegro: very vivacious 

Romanze: fairly slow 

Scherzino 

Intermezzo: with greatest energy 

Finale: extremely vivacious 



PROKOFIEV Sonata No. 7 in B flat, Opus 83 

Allegro inquieto 
Andante caloroso 
Precipitato 



Misha Dichter plays the Steinway 



11 



■<i 



tSfjfr 



BOSTON 

SYMPHONY 

ORCHESTRA 

SEIJl OZAWA 



M 



usic Director 



First violins 

Joseph Silverstein 

Concerimaster 

Charles Munch chair 

Emanuel Borok 

Assistant Concerimaster 
Helen Horner Mclntyre chair 

Max Hobart 

Rolland Tapley 

Roger Shermont 

Max Winder 

Harry Dickson 

Gottfried Wilfinger 

Fredy Ostrovsky 

Leo Panasevich 

Sheldon Rotenberg 

Alfred Schneider 

Gerald Gelbloom 

Raymond Sird 

Ikuko Mizuno 

Cecylia Arzewski 

Amnon Levy 

Bo Youp Hwang 

Second violins 

Victor Yampolsky 

Fahnestock chair 

Marylou Speaker 
Michel Sasson 
Ronald Knudsen 
Leonard Moss 
Vyacheslav Uritsky 
Laszlo Nagy 
Michael Vitale 
Darlene Gray 
Ronald Wilkison 
Harvey Seigel 
Jerome Rosen 
Sheila Fiekowsky 
Gerald Elias 
Ronan Lefkowitz 

Violas 

Burton Fine 

Charles 5. Dana chair 

Reuben Green 
Eugene Lehner 
George Humphrey 
Jerome Lipson 

12 



Robert Karol 
Bernard Kadinoff 
Vincent Mauricci 
Earl Hedberg 
Joseph Pietropaolo 
Robert Barnes 
Michael Zaretsky 

Cellos 

Jules Eskin 

Philip R. Allen chair 

Martin Hoherman 
Mischa Nieland 
Jerome Patterson 
Robert Ripley 
Luis Leguia 
Carol Procter 
Ronald Feldman 
Joel Moerschel 
Jonathan Miller 
Martha Babcock 

Basses 

William Rhein 
Acting Principal 
Harold D. Hodgkinson chair 
Joseph Hearne 
Bela Wurtzler 
Leslie Martin 
John Salkowski 
John Barwicki 
Robert Olson 
Lawrence Wolfe 
Henry Portnoi 

Flutes 

Doriot Anthony Dwyer 

Waller Piston chair 

James Pappoutsakis 
Paul Fried 

Piccolo 

Lois Schaefer 

Oboes 

Ralph Gomberg 

Mildred B. Remis chair 

Wayne Rapier 

English Horn 

Laurence Thorstenberg 



Clarinets 

Harold Wright 

Ann 5.M. Banks chair 
Pasquale Cardillo 
Peter Hadcock 

E-flat clarinet 

Bass Clarinet 

Felix Viscuglia 




Bassoons 

Sherman Walt 

Edward A. Taft chair 
Roland Small 
Matthew Ruggiero 

Contra bassoon 

Richard Plaster 

Horns 

Charles Kavalovski 
Helen Sagoff Slosberg chair 

Charles Yancich 

Peter Gordon 

David Ohanian 

Richard Mackey 

Ralph Pottle 

Trumpets 

Armando Ghitalla 

Roget Louis I 'oisin chair- 
Andre Come 
Rolf Smedvig 
Gerard Goguen 

Trombones 

Ronald Barron 
Norman Bolter 
Gordon Hallberg 
William Gibson 

Tuba 

Chester Schmitz 

Timpani 

Everett Firth 

Sylvia Shippen Wells chair 

Percussion 

Charles Smith 
Arthur Press 

Assistant timpanist 
Thomas Gauger 
Frank Epstein 

Harps 

Bernard Zighera 
Ann Hobson 

Personnel Managers 

William Moyer 
Harry Shapiro 

Librarians 

Victor Alpert 
William Shisler 

Stage Manager 

Alfred Robison 



BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

Seiji Ozawa, Music Director 
Colin Davis, Principal Conductor 
Joseph Silverstein, Assistant Conductor 
Tanglewood 1977 

Friday, 5 August at 9 




ANDRE PREVIN, conductor 



VAUGHAN WILLIAMS Overture to The Wasps 



HUMMEL 



Trumpet Concerto in E 

Allegro con spirito 

Andante 

Rondo 

ARMANDO GHITALLA 



INTERMISSION 



RACHMANINOFF 



Symphony No. 2 in E minor, Opus 27 

Largo — Allegro moderato 
Allegro molto 
Adagio 
Allegro vivace 



Seiji Ozawa and the Boston Symphony Orchestra record exclusively 
for Deutsche Grammophon. 
Baldwin piano 



13 



"Very impressive, perhaps more 
knowledgeable than anyone else 
writing in Boston now." 

"Young, but knows what he's doing, 
works nard all the time to expand his 
knowledge!' 

"Should be read'.' 



When performers got the opportunity to 
criticize the critics* that's what they said 
about Thor Eckert, music critic for The 
Christian Science Monitor. 

Readers have come to depend on the 
Monitor's perceptive coverage of the 
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Or use the coupon below. 

*The Real Paper, November 13, 1976. 



News.The way you need it.l 

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Notes 



Ralph Vaughan Williams 

Overture to The Wasps 

Ralph* Vaughan Williams was born at Down 
Ampney, Gloucestershire, on 12 October 1872 
and died in London on 26 August 1958. He 
wrote incidental music for a Cambridge Uni- 
versity production of Aristophanes' The Wasps 
in 1909 and adapted some of it as a concert 
suite in 1912. At Cambrideg he had just 
25 players, but the suite, from which the version 
of the Overture heard tonight is taken, calls 
for full orchestra. 

Ursula Vaughan Williams begins her 
biography of the composer thus: "Ralph 
Vaughan Williams was, on his father's 
side, of mixed English and Welsh decent. 
On his mother's side he came from the 
families of Wedgwoodt and Darwin, so 
often intermarried. He drew his in- 
heritance partly from Celtic sources, 
from a family chiefly of lawyers and 
parsons, and partly from the strong and 
inventive stock of craftsmen, manu- 
facturers, and scientists." Before he was 
ten, Ralph took and passed an Edin- 
burgh University correspondence course 
in music, and, in his music-loving house- 
hold, he had his aunt Sophy Wedgwood 
to give him lessons in piano and basic 
theory. He went to Charterhouse, the 
Royal College of Music, and Trinity 
College, Cambridge. He played organ 
with interest and piano out of necessity. 
He studied in Berlin with Max Bruch, 
and at 35 he took time off from work 
and career to sharpen his technique 
with some months of lessons with Ravel. 
In 1909, the year he was invited to 
compose the music for the Cambridge 
University Greek Play, he completed his 
Sea Symphony on Walt Whitman texts. 
He had joined the Folk- Song Society 
and had begun collecting Norfolk songs, 

'Ursula Vaughan Williams, the composer's 
widow, notes: "Ralph's name was pronounced 
Rafe, any other pronunciation used to in- 
furiate him." 

tThe action of The Wasps requires that china 
be broken at a certain point. Vaughan Williams 
insisted that only Wedgwood made the 
proper sound. 



a critical step that led him to the finding 
of his own musical language; he had 
come to know and love music of early 
English masters like Byrd and Purcell, 
editing the latter's Welcome Odes for the 
Purcell Society; he had put considerable 
energy into elevating the standards of 
amateur choral singing, had contributed 
articles on conducting and fugue to a 
new edition of Grove's Dictionary of Music 
and Musicians (they are still to be found in 
the current Fifth Edition of 1954), and 
had prepared a new edition of the English 
Hymnal. He was beginning to note down 
ideas for a quietly revolutionary master- 
piece, the Fantasia on a Theme of Thomas Tallis. 
Three of his masters at the Royal 
College, Sir Hubert Parry, Sir Charles 
Villiers Stanford, and Dr. Charles Wood, 
had written for the Cambridge Greek 
Play in earlier years, and Vaughan Wil- 
liams perceived his own invitation as a 
signal honor. The play in 1909 was 
Aristophanes' The Wasps, written in 
422 B.C. and satirizing the Athenians' 
litigiousness, a passion nurtured by the 
fact that they were well paid for court 
and jury duty. A house dog is tried for 
the theft of a cheese — mortar, pestle, 
and other kitchen implements testifying 
to the excellence of his character — and 
the absurdity of this event serves to 
cure the elderly Philocleon, a sort of 
career juryman, of his passion for liti- 
gation. It is Philocleon's son Bdelycleon 
who has staged this trial, and the big 
tune in the middle of the Overture, a 
tune that just reeks of roast beef and 
that is surely more WASP than wasp, is 
associated in the play with the eventual 
reconciliation of father and son. 

— Michael Steinberg 

Johann Nepomuk Hummel 

Trumpet Concerto in E 

Johann Nepomuk Hummel was born in Press- 
burg, now Bratislava, in Western Slovakia on 
14 November 17 78 and died on 17 October 
1837 in Weimar. He completed this concerto on 
8 December 1803, and the Viennese trumpeter, 
Anton Weidinger, performed it for the first time 
on New Year's Day, 1804. 

The problem with the trumpet in 
the eighteenth century was how to get it 



15 





f 



]ohann Nepomuk Hummel 

relatively easily or at least reliably to 
produce notes outside the natural har- 
monic series. Early in the nineteenth 
century, a satisfactory valve mechanism 
was constructed, and the modern trum- 
pet was born. A keyed trumpet repre- 
sented a transitional stage on the jour- 
ney toward that happy and useful solu- 
tion, and it found a persuasive champion 
in the Viennese virtuoso, Anton Wei- 
dinger, 1767-1852. To Weidinger's art 
and to the new possibilities of his instru- 
ment there are two delightful monu- 
ments, the concerto Haydn wrote for 
him in 1796 and the one by Hummel. 

Hummel had been a protege of Haydn's 
while on concert tour to London as a 
boy. Before that, between ages eight 
and ten, he had lived with the Mozart 
family for two years, and his other 
principal teachers were two men to 
whom Beethoven turned for guidance 
when he settled in Vienna, Johann Georg 
Albrechtsberger and Antonio Salieri. 
Hummel's first teacher was his father, 
who conducted both at the theater and 
at a military academy in Pressburg, then 
the capital of Hungary (its Hungarian 
name is Pozsowy). He undertook his 
first concert tour at ten, and his activi- 
ties as pianist and conductor took him 
eventually all over Europe. On Haydn's 
recommendation, he became music 
director to the Esterhazy family in 1804, 
but was obliged to give up the post in 
1811 for dereliction of duty, caused by 



the growing demands on his time made 
by his career as virtuoso. A brief tenure 
at the court of Wurttemberg fared no 
more happily, but he at last settled well 
in Weimar, where his contract included 
a provision that allowed him three 
months' touring time each year. Com- 
posers might remember him more grate- 
fully than no doubt most of them do as 
an early and vigorous advocate of 
authors' rights and fair copyright laws. 
He is reputed to have been an extra- 
ordinary pianist, the last major repre- 
sentative of the fluently elegant style 
practised at an ideal level by Mozart, and 
even then being replaced by the more 
forceful manner of Beethoven. At his 
mature best — for example, in the Sep- 
tet, Opus 74, the F sharp minor Piano 
Sonata, Opus 81, the A minor and B 
minor Piano Concertos, Opus 85 and 
89 — he is an inventive composer capable 
of an astonishing strength and range of 
expression. In the Trumpet Concerto, 
we meet him as an accomplished, charm- 
ing, sometimes delightfully original 
speaker of the classical language within 
whose borders he learned his craft. Noth- 
ing is casual, and Hummel communicates 
an infectious relish at writing for a daz- 
zling virtuoso. The Andante is not just 
Mozartian, it is in detail after detail an 
imitation of one of Mozart's greatest 
slow arias, the second movement of the 
C major Piano Concerto, K. 467. If the 
Mozart were lost, we would find Hum- 
mel's Andante one of the most amazing 
pages in the literature. As it is, we can 
hear how he doesn't quite make it, which 
need not keep us from being affected by 
the grace of what he did write, nor by the 
need to express his admiration and love 
for music whose actual composing he will 
almost have witnessed and which he 
himself played often, probably most 
beautifully. 

— M.S. 




An early 19th-century keyed trumpet of the type 
Anton Weidinger played in Hummel's concerto. 



16 






Sergey Rachmaninoff 

Symphony No. 2 in E minor, 
Opus 27 

Sergey Vasilyevich Rachmaninoff was born in 
Oneg in the Novgorod district on 2 April 1873 
and died in Beverly Hills, California, on 28 
March 1943. He composed the Symphony 
No. 2 in E minor between October 1906 and 
April 1907 and conducted the first performance 
in St. Petersburg on 26 January 1908. 

After he had finished this work, Rach- 
maninoff swore he would never write 
another symphony. It was almost 30 
years before he changed his mind and 
began work on his third and last sym- 
phony. Meanwhile, the wonder was 
that he had written No. 2. The premiere 
in 1897 of his Symphony No. 1, ap- 
parently horrendously conducted by 
Alexander Glazunov, was such a di- 
saster that it took three years of psycho- 
therapy and hypnosis before he could 
again face writing a large-scale work. 
It was the instantly popular Piano Con- 
certo No. 2 in C minor that freed him 
then, but even so, it was a while before 
the notion of "symphony" ceased to 
make him shudder. 

When he wrote this E minor Sym- 
phony, he was living in Dresden, where 
he also composed The Isle of the Dead after 
the Bocklin painting he had seen in the 
museum there and, for his first Ameri- 
can tour in 1909, the Piano Concerto 
No. 3 in D minor.* He was in his fifth 
year of marriage, a father (his second 
daughter, Tatiana, was born about the 
time the symphony was completed), an 
experienced composer in many genres, 
an unsurpassed and scarcely equalled 
pianist, and a highly esteemed con- 
ductor. As a composer, he was not only 
experienced, but original, with a tone 
of voice and a melodic style all is own 
and, as a number of attempts, par- 
ticularly in film studios, have proved, 
inimitable. In his Preludes and Etudes- 
Tableaux for piano, he developed an 
impressive skill at composing a highly 

*He introduced that work in New York with 
Gustav Mahler conducting, but for his first 
appearances with the Boston Symphony in 
November and December 1909, he chose the 
earlier C minor Concerto. 



economical sort of music, but in his 
symphonies and concertos he preferred, 
at least at this point in his development, 
a more expansive manner. 

Expansive enough to have disturbed 
conductors into making many cuts. 
Some of the standard cuts consist of 
petty impatiences like reducing the four 
measures of accompaniment at the start 
of the first Allegro to two, but they 
have also included such brutal and in- 
comprehensible surgery as the removal 
of the entire principal theme from the 
recapitulation of the Adagio. Cuts do 
not solve formal problems: they merely 
shorten the amount of time you have 
to spend dealing with them. Indeed, 
though it seems paradoxical, a work 
may feel longer when it is cut because 
the proportions are off and the distri- 
bution of light and shade is all wrong 
(the Adagio of this symphony presents 
a striking example). Rachmaninoff him- 
self seems to have sanctioned certain 
cuts, though not until the 1930s, and 
the question of how many he sanctioned 
and with how much conviction and 
enthusiasm is still unclear. In any event, 
a number of conductors have opened 
the cuts in recent years and have dis- 
covered that the piece not only "goes" 
that way, but goes better. At this concert, 
Mr. Previn will give the work complete. 

The first phrase you hear in cellos 
and basses is a motto that turns out to 
dominate the symphony, sometimes on 
the surface, sometimes beneath it. Both 
the slow introduction and the restless 
Allegro to which it leads are its off- 
spring. The scherzo is particularly bril- 
liant as orchestral writing, and inci- 
dentally one of the critical canards that 
wants most urgently to be laid to well- 
deserved rest is the one that presents 
Rachmaninoff as truly at home only 
when writing for the piano and main- 
tains that his orchestral texture is mere 
transcribed piano music. On the con- 
trary, not only is his orchestration 
thoroughly idiomatic in its generous 
way, it is often virtually untranscribable 
for piano. The beautiful Adagio is an 
example. Here Rachmaninoff's melodic 
genius is working at full power, and the 
lovely clarinet solo that emerges so 



17 




Rachmaninoff shortly before his death in 1943. 



tenderly from the passionate introduc- 
tory measures is a wonderful instance of 
the composer's way of expanding an 
idea on and on. It takes twenty- three 
measures to say its say, never repeating 
itself literally, though circling, as many 
Russian tunes are apt to do, about a few 
notes within a limited range. (This is the 
theme whose second appearance, now 
in the violins, used to be cut.) The 
headlong finale has not only another of 
Rachmaninoff's most stirring melodies, 
but also an amazing passage, a network 
of descending scales, slow and fast, high 
and low, syncopated and straight, that 
generate such a swirl of sound that all 
the bells in Russia seem to be ringing. 

— M.S. 




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BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

Seiji Ozawa, Music Director 
Colin Davis, Principal Guest Conductor 
Joseph Silverstein, Assistant Conductor 
Tanglewood 1977 

Saturday, 6 August at 8:30 
KAZUYOSHI AKIYAMA, conductor 



v tOj 



*** 



BOSTON 

SYMPHONY 

ORCHESTRA 

SEIfl OZAWA 
Mwiif DirtOor 



.-"^l' - 



ROSSINI 



Overture to 11 Signor Bruschino 






SCHUMANN Piano Concerto in A minor, Opus 54 

Allegro affettuoso 

Intermezzo: Andantino grazioso 

Allegro vivace 

MISHA DICHTER 



INTERMISSION 









MUSSORGSKY Pictures at an Exhibition 

orchestrated by RAVEL 

Promenade 

Gnomus 

II vecchio castello 

Promenade — Tuileries 

Bydlo 

Promenade — Ballet of Chicks in Their Shells 

Samuel Goldenberg and Shmuel 

The Market at Limoges 

Catacombae: Sepulchrum Romanum 

Cum mortuis in lingua mortua 

The Hut on Chicken Legs 

The Great Gate of Kiev 



Seiji Ozawa and the Boston Symphony Orchestra record exclusively 

for Deutsche Grammophon. 

Baldwin piano 

Misha Dichter plays the Steinway 



19 



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Notes 



Gioachino Rossini 

Overture to 11 Signor Bruschino 

Gioachino Antonio Rossini was born in Pesaro 
Ott 29 February 1792 and died in Passy, a 
suburb of Paris, on 13 November 1868. The 
normal spelling of his first name is "Gioacchino, " 
but Rossini himself almost invariably wrote 
"Gioachino." II Signor Bruschino, ossia II 
figlio per azzado (Mr. Horse-brush, or 
The Adventitious Son) a one-act farce on a 
libretto by Giuseppe Maria Poppa and based 
on a French comedy by Alisan de Chazet and 
E.T.M. Ourry, was composed in 1812 and 
first produced in Venice in January 1813. 

Rossini at twenty-one was definitely 
an emergent and a busy composer. In 
the last three years he had written eight 
operas, five of them one -act opere buffe 
produced at the Teatro Moise in Venice. 
These included 11 cambiale de matrimonio 
(1810), L'lnganno felice (1812), La scala di 
seta (1812), L'Occasione fa il ladro (1812), 
and II Signor Bruschino (1813). The libret- 
tos for three of these were by Foppa. 
Rossini was indeed being pressed for 
scores. He had written Giro di Babilonia 
for Ferrara in March, 1812, and for La 
Scala at Milan, La pielra del paragone and 
L'Aureliano in Palmira. Meanwhile, within 
two weeks after the performance of 11 
Signor Bruschino his tragic opera Tancredi 
was produced at the neighboring Teatro 
Fenice in Venice, causing great excite- 
ment and thereby proving Rossini to be 
in a higher class than a purveyor of small 
and casual farcical pieces. The blame for 
the shortness of life of 11 Signor Bruschino 
must be laid partly to the composer's too 
obliging fertility. L'ltaliana in Algeri, a 
two-act opera buff a, performed in Venice 
(at the San Benedetto) on May 22, 1813, 
further helped to blank out the memory 
of 11 Signor Bruschino. 

Some say that the failure of 11 Signor 
Bruschino was due to Foppa's nonsensical 
libretto, as if operas with equally non- 
sensical librettos were not often readily 
swallowed by Italian audiences. As usual, 
the first soprano is in love with the first 
tenor, but is opposed by her guardian, 
in this case also by Signor Bruschino (a 



buffo part), who wishes her to marry 
his worthless son, the "adventitious 
son" of the subtitle. The more desirable 
suitor (also as usual) impersonates the 
junior Bruschino and tricks the old man 
into giving his blessing. 

Famous men with witty tongues are 
survived by anecdotes of what they 
have said or done, stories which are 
improved in the telling and which may 
or may not have happened. Such a tale 
has been used by the early biographers 
of Rossini (Azevedo, Edward, Chouquet) 
to enliven their narrative in reference to 
this opera. Rossini is said to have had a 
grudge against Cera, the impresario at 
the Moise, for pressing his contract with 
an inferior libretto and to have taken his 
revenge by making the second violins 
rap with their bows on their lamps to 
mark the beat of the overture, by strain- 
ing the low range of the sopranos and 
the high range of the contraltos, by 
introducing a funeral march into a comic 
scene, and in the finale by writing an 
endless repetition of the syllables "tito — 
tito — tito." 

These stories have drawn the special 
attention of posterity to a little farce 
which had been hardly noticed in its 
day. It became the task of Giuseppe 
Radiciotti in his thorough-going three- 
volume biography (1927-29), to examine 
the score and the record of correspon- 
dence, so disposing of the story al- 
together. The singers' parts are not 
awkwardly placed. The slow passage 
referred to is not ineffective, the re- 
peated syllables at the end are within the 
custom of all such finales. In having the 
players rap on their stands in the over- 
ture, the composer was obviously not 
sabotaging his own music, but adding a 
gag for an extra laugh. "I admit," writes 
Radiciotti, "that the libretto is a silly 
piece of buffoonery, but it is hardly 
worse than many other librettos that 
pleased the Italian public in that day. 
As for the music, I have verified the fact 
that it is not at all mediocre." He here 
proceeds to point out several numbers 
of "charm and grace," notably the arias 
by the two lovers. 

Rossini in Paris, at 65, was loathe to 
stand behind his early work. When J/ 

21 



Signor Bruschino was revived in Paris in 
1857 at the Bouffes-Parisiens, he would 
have nothing to do with it. Although 
he allowed Offenbach to do as he pleased, 
he did not even attend a rehearsal. "I 
gave you permission," he said, "to do 
what you have done, but I refuse abso- 
lutely to become an accomplice." 

—John N. Burk 

Robert Schumann 

Piano Concerto in A minor, Opus 54 

Robert Alexander Schumann was born in Zwickau, 
Saxony, on 8 June 1810 and died in Endenich 
on 29 July 1856. As early as 1833, he had 
plans for an A minor piano concerto, but it was 
not until 1841 that he completed — in somewhat 
different form — the first movement of the present 
concerto, then an independent piece entitled Con- 
cert Fantasy in A minors The revision of the 
Concert Fantasy and the addition of the inter- 
mezzo finale were completed in July 1845. On 
4 December of that year, in Dresden, Clara 
Schumann gave the first performance of the 
complete concerto, Ferdinand Hiller conducting. 

"And are you a musician, too?" they 
used to ask Robert Schumann when he 
went along on his wife's concert tours. 
Clara Wieck — Clara Schumann from 
12 September 1840 on — was a cele- 
brated pianist from her youth. She must 
have been a remarkable one, too, re- 
nowned through her long life — she died 
in 1896 — for her musical intelligence, 
sensibility, warm communicativeness, 
and a truly uncommon ear for pianistic 
euphony. She was a gifted and skilled 
composer, and Brahms, who was in love 
with her when he was in his early 
twenties and she in her middle thirties, 
never ceased to value her musical judge- 
ment. Robert Schumann's courtship of 
her was difficult, and her marriage to 
him, though happy, no less so. Her 
father, Friedrich Wieck, was a cele- 
brated piano pedagogue, and Schumann 
took lessons from him in 1828 when he 
was an unwilling and easily distracted 
law student at the University of Leipzig. 
Clara was nine when they met, and 
already beginning a career. In 1830, 
after a period of study at Heidelberg, 
Schumann returned to Leipzig and to 
Wieck, soon published his Opus 1, a set 



of variations for piano, and invented a 
gadget that, meant to strengthen the 
little finger of his right hand, succeeded 
in injuring it permanently and putting 
and end to his hopes for a pianistic 
career. He became attached to another 
of Wieck's pupils, Ernestine von Fricken, 
the inspiration of Carnaval and the Etudes 
symphoniaues , but came to realize that he 
was seriously in love with the sixteen- 
year-old Clara. Between that realization 
and their marriage stood a five-year period 
of Clara's encouraging Robert's advances 
but refusing to marry without financial 
security and her father's permission, of 
anger, despair, heavy drinking, of a 
whole series of lawsuits, and of fantastic 
fertility in composition: the Davidsbund- 
lertanze (Dances of the Davidites), the C major 
Fantasy, Kreisleriana, the Scenes from Child- 
hood, as well as the great song collections, 
Myrthen (Myrtles), Dichterliebe (Poet's Love), 
Frauenliebe und Leben (Woman's Love and Life), 
and the Heine and Eichendorff Lieder- 
kreise (song cycles), are among the works 
Schumann poured out during those years. 
Now thirty years old, Robert had writ- 
ten — or at least completed — only piano 
music and songs, and it was Clara who 
urged him at this point to conquer the 
world of orchestral music as well. Heed- 
ing her, he went ahead and in 1841 
produced a Concert Fantasy with Or- 
chestra for her and also wrote two 
symphonies, the first version of the D 
minor (best known now in its recension 
of 1851) and the Spring. Neither pub- 



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SYMPHONY 

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23 




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THE LAST ANALYSIS RON LEIBMAN 



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lishers nor orchestras could be interested 
in the Fantasy, and so Schumann ex- 
panded the work into a full-length con- 
certo. In doing so he revised the original 
Fantasy, making choices, as almost with- 
out exception he was apt to do whenever 
he had second thoughts, in the direction 
of safety and conventionality. One can 
only speculate whether the revisions of 
the Concert Fantasy, or of the Davids- 
biindlertanze or Kreisleriana, reflect Schu- 
mann's own musical convictions or 
whether they are responses to the urg- 
ings of the conservative Clara.* 

The opening is as dramatic as can be, 
both the cascade of piano chords itself, 
and the contrast between it and the 
wistful oboe tune it turns out to intro- 
duce. (The twenty- five year old Grieg 
would remember all that very precisely 
when it came time for him to write 
his own A minor Concerto in 1868.) The 
oboe theme dominates the entire move- 
ment, turning up in C major at the point 
where one might expect a new theme, 
being transformed into the subject of a 
tender conversation piano and clarinet 
have together in a remote and mellow A 
flat major (and how lovely a tribute those 
pages are to Clara's singing tone), and, 
after the sweeping cadenza, into the 
quick march, all suppressed excitement, 
that ends the movement. The middle 
movement is of a type really invented 
by Beethoven, small-scale, and an intro- 
duction or transition to a much big- 
ger finale. In tone of voice, though, 
this movement — which does, after all, 
admit to being an intermezzo — is all 
Schumann, in the demure opening as 
much as in the brief but full-throated 
cello episode. And it is the principal idea 
of the first movement that now re- 
appears to effect the transition into the 
enthusiastically energetic finale. "I can't 
write a concerto for virtuosi and have to 
think of something else," wrote Schu- 

*The American pianist, Malcolm Frager, has 
twice played the Schumann Concerto at 
Tanglewood with the first movement re- 
stored to its original form, once at a reading 
rehearsal with the Berkshire Music Center in 
1967 and then in public performance with 
the Boston Symphony in 1968. Erich Leins- 
dorf conducted on both occasions. 



mann. But it "sits" so beautifully and 
goes so brilliantly that we have to make 
a real effort of imagination to under- 
stand how puzzling it seemed for Schu- 
mann to have chosen to build a monu- 
ment to Clara's taste, intelligence, and 
sense of poetry, rather than to the 
fleetness of her fingers. 

— Michael Steinberg 

Modest Mussorgsky 

Pictures at an Exhibition 
orchestrated by Ravel 

Modest Petrovich Mussorgsky was born at 
Karevo, district of Toropeta, government of 
Pskov, on 21 March 1839 and died in St. 
Petersburg on 28 March 1881. He composed 
Pictures at an Exhibition as a set of piano 
pieces in June 1874. Maurice Ravel made his 
orchestral transcription in the summer of 1922 
for Serge Koussevitzky, who two years later 
would begin a twenty- five-year tenure as music 
director of the Boston Symphony. Koussevitzky 
introduced the Ravel version at one of his own 
concerts in Paris on 22 October 1922 and 
brought it to Boston early in his first season, 
on 7 November 1924. 

It was Ravel, the Frenchman, who 
told Koussevitzky, the Russian, about 
these fascinating pieces and fired his 
enthusiasm. The Pictures were quite un- 
known then, and Mussorgsky's pub- 
lisher, Bessel, had so little faith in them 
that they stipulated that Ravel's tran- 
scription be for Koussevitzky's personal 
use only since clearly there was nothing 
in it for them. The Mussorgsky- Ravel 
Pictures quickly became a Koussevitzky 
specialty, and his frequent and brilliant 
performances, especially his fantastic 
1930 recording with the Boston Sym- 
phony, turned the work into an in- 
dispensable repertory item. What would 
particularly have pleased Ravel is that 
the popularity of "his" Pictures at an 
Exhibition led pianists to rediscover Mus- 
sorgsky's. In transcribing the Pictures, 
Ravel had been anticipated by V.V. 
Tushmalov as early as 1891 and by 
Sir Henry J. Wood in 1920, and, during 
the period his version was available only 
to Koussevitzky, by Leonidas Leonardi 
("whose idea of the art," remarked a 
contemporary critic, "is very remote"), 



25 



Lucien Cailliet, and Leopold Stokowski 
— not to forget the electronic version by 
Tomita or the rock one of Emerson, 
Lake & Palmer.* Ravel's edition is the 
sole survivor, and for good reason: his is 
Mussorgsky's peer, and his transcription 
stands as the model of what we would 
ask in probity, technical brilliance, fan- 
tasy, imaginative insight, and concern 
for the name on the left of the hyphen. 
The Pictures are "really" Victor Hart- 
mann's. He was a close and important 
friend to Mussorgsky, and his death at 
only 39 in the summer, of 1873, was an 
occasion of profound and tearing grief 
for the composer. The critic Stasov or- 
ganized a post- humous exhibition of 
Hartmann's drawings, paintings, and 
architectural sketches in St. Petersburg 
in the spring of 1874, and by 22 June, 
Mussorgsky, having worked at high 
intensity and speed, completed his 

"One of the more unnecessary transcriptions 
of Pictures at an Exhibition — or of anything 
else — is that by Vladimir Horowitz, who 
made a new version for piano! 



tribute to his friend. He imagined him- 
self "roving through the exhibition, now 
leisurely, now briskly in order to come 
close to a picture that had attracted his 
attention, and at times sadly, thinking of 
his departed friend." That roving music, 
which opens the suite, he calls Promenade, 
and his designation of it as being "nel 
modo russico" is a redundancy. 

Gnomus: according to Stasov, "a child's 
plaything, fashioned, after Hartmann's 
design in wood, for the Christmas tree 

at the Artists' Club It is something in 

the style of the fabled Nutcracker, the 
nuts being inserted into the gnome's 
mouth. The gnome accompanies his 
droll movements with savage shrieks." 

II vecchio castello (The Old Castle): 
There was no item by that title in the 
exhibition, but it presumably refers to 
one of several architectural water colors 
done on a trip of Hartmann's to Italy. 
Stasov tells us that the piece represents 
a medieval castle with a troubadour 
standing before it. Ravel decided basic- 
ally to make his orchestra the size of the 
one Rimsky-Korsakov used in his edition 




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26 



of Boris Godunov, the most famous of 
earlier orchestrations of Mussorgsky, 
but not, alas, as honorable as Ravel's. 
He went beyond those bounds in adding 
percussion and, most remarkably, in his 
inspired use of the alto saxophone here. 
In this movement, Ravel makes one of 
his rare compositional changes, adding 
an extra measure of accompaniment 
between the first two phrases of 
the melody. 

Tuileries: the park in Paris, swarming 
with children and their nurses. Mus- 
sorgsky reaches this picture by way of 
a Promenade. 

Bydlo: the word is Polish for cattle. 
Mussorgsky explained to Stasov that 
the picture represents an ox-drawn 
wagon with enormous wheels, but add- 
ing that "the wagon is not inscribed on 
the music; that is purely between us." 

Ballet of Chicks in Their Shells: a 

costume design for a ballet, Trilby, with 
choreography by Petipa and music by 
Gerber, and given in St. Petersburg in 
1871 (no connection with George du 
Maurier's famous novel, which was not 
published until 1893.) A scene with 
child dancers was de rigueur in a Petipa 
spectacular. Here we have canaries "en- 
closed in eggs as in suits of armor, 
with canary heads put on like helmets." 
The Ballet is preceded by a short 
Promenade. 

Samuel Goldenberg and Shmuel: 
Mussorgsky owned two drawings by 
Hartmann entitled A rich Jew wearing a 
fur hat and A poor Jew: Sandomierz. Hart- 
mann had spent a month of 1868 at 
Sandomierz in Poland. Mussorgsky's 
manuscript has no title, and Stasov 
provided one, Two Polish Jews, one rich, 
one poor, and he seems later to have 
added the names of Goldenberg and 
Shmuel. Another small alteration here: 
Mussorgsky ends with a long note, but 
Ravel has his Goldenberg dismiss the 
whining Shmuel more abruptly. 

The Market at Limoges: Mussorgsky 
jots some imagined conversation in the 
margin of the manuscript: "Great news! 
M. de Puissangeout has just recovered 
his cow . . . Mme. de Remboursac has 
just acquired a beautiful new set of 
teeth, while M. de Pantaleon's nose, 




Modest Mussorgsky 

which is in his way, is as much as ever 
the color of a peony." With a great rush 
of wind, Mussorgsky plunges us directly 
into the 

Catacombae — Sepulchrum Romanum: 
the picture shows the interior of cata- 
combs in Paris with Hartmann, a friend, 
and a guide with a lamp. Mussorgsky 
adds this marginal note: "The creative 
spirit of the dead Hartmann leads me 
towards skulls, apostrophizes them — 
the skulls are illuminated gently 
from within." 

Cum mortuis in lingua mortua: a 
ghostly transformation of the Prome- 
nade, to be played con lamento. 

The Hut on Chicken Legs: a clock in 
fourteenth -century style, in the shape of 
a hut with cock's heads and on chicken 
legs, done in metal. Mussorgsky as- 
sociated this with the witch Baba Yaga, 
who flew about in a mortar in chase 
of her victims. 

The Great Gate of Kiev: a design for 
a series of stone gates that were to have 
replaced the wooden city gates, "to com- 
memorate the event of 4 April 1886." 
The "event" was the escape of Tsar 
Alexander II from assassination. The 
gates were never built, and Mussorg- 
sky's majestic vision seems quite re- 
moved from Hartmann's plan for a 
structure decorated with tinted brick, 
with the imperial eagle on top and, to 
one side, a three- storey belfry with a 
cupola in the shape of a Slavic helmet. 

— M.S. 



27 







One of Soviet Georgia's senior citizens thought 

Dannon was an excellent yogurt. She ought to know. 

She's been eating yogurt for 137 years. 



CAMACHICH KVITZINIA. PHOTOGRAPHED IN ATRARA. SOVIET GEORGIA. 



28 



BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

Seiji Ozawa, Music Director 

Colin Davis, Principal Guest Conductor 
Joseph Silverstein, Assistant Conductor 
Tanglewood 1977 

Sunday, 7 August at 2:30 




ANDRE PREVIN, conductor 



HAYDN Symphony No. 87 in A 

Vivace 
Adagio 
Menuet 
Finale: Vivace 



INTERMISSION 



PROKOFIEV from Romeo and Juliet, Opus 64 

Introduction 

Montagues and Capulets 

Juliet — the young girl 

Dance 

Masks 

Romeo and Juliet 

The death of Tybalt 

Dance of the girls from the Antilles 

Romeo in Juliet's tomb 

The death of Juliet 



Seiji Ozawa and the Boston Symphony Orchestra record exclusively 
for Deutsche Grammophon. 
Baldwin piano 



29 




wrod 



does not end on Sunday. It's only the beginning. 



This Week At The 
Berkshire Music Center: 






Sunday, August 7 at 10:00 am: 

Berkshire Music Center Chamber Music Concert 

Sunday, August 7 at 8:30 pm: 

Boston University Young Artists Program 
Chamber Music Concert 

Monday, August 8 at 8:30 pm: 
Berkshire Music Center Composers' Forum 
Music by Aram Gharabekian, Marjorie Merryman, 
Rodney Rogers and Jan Swafford 

Wednesday, August 10 at 8:30 pm: 

Berkshire Music Center Chamber Music Concert 

Thursday, August 11 at 8:30 pm: 

Boston University Young Artists Program 

Chamber Music Concert 

Friday, August 12 at 2:30 pm: 
TANGLEWOOD ON PARADE 

Berkshire Music Center events all afternoon beginning 
at 2:30 pm; Gala evening concert at 8:30 pm with the 
Boston Symphony Orchestra conducted by Arthur Fiedler, 
Joseph Silverstein, Seiji Ozawa and Gunther Schuller. 
(Berkshire Festival tickets required.) 

August 13 through 17: 

FESTIVAL OF CONTEMPORARY MUSIC (See p. 2>S) 

Sunday, August 14 at 10:00 am: 

Berkshire Music Center Chamber Music Concert 



These events are open to the public by making a contribution, $2.00 
minimum, to the Berkshire Music Center at the main gate, or by becoming 
a Friend of Music at Tanglewood. 



30 



Notes 



Joseph Haydn 

Symphony No. 87 in A 

Franz Joseph Haydn was born in Rohrau, 
Lower Austria, on 31 March or 1 April 1732 
and died in Vienna, 31 May 1809. He wrote 
the symphony No. 8 7 in 1785, and it was 
probably performed for the first time in Paris 
two years later. 

When Haydn emerged in 1790 from 
nearly thirty years' service to the Ester- 
hazy family and became, for the first 
time really, part of public musical life, 
he discovered that he was considerably 
more famous than he had imagined. For 
Esterhazy, he had composed symphonies, 
operas, concertos, string quartets, and 
innumerable trios featuring an esoteric 
and short-lived stringed instrument 
called the baryton which his employer 
played, and in recent years there had 
been the occasional commission from 
outside. Now he found that his music 
had circulated widely, in manuscript 
copies in private libraries, and also in 
printed editions. (From the latter, Haydn 
mostly derived no income, except where 
he had negotiated the sale himself, and 
it is likely that he didn't even know of 
the existence of many of them.) Most 





'-/ r-'fxMr 



Count Claude Francois Marie d'Ogny provided 
financial support for the Haydn symphonies com- 
missioned for the Olympic Lodge concerts. 



Portrait of Haydn, oil painting by 
Ludwig Guttenbrunn. 

particularly, there was a Haydn vogue in 
Paris, where his Quartets, Opus 1, had 
been published as early as 1764, and by 
the middle 70s, more than a dozen 
French publishers were issuing Haydn's 
music. An additional bit of evidence 
of Haydn's popularity in France can be 
found in the proliferation of spurious 
works published there under his name. 
Certainly by the 80s, Haydn was in 
correspondence with patrons, publish- 
ers, and concert managers in Paris, and 
a whole run of symphonies, Nos. 82 
through 92, were expressly composed 
for that city. No. 87 is one of six 
commissioned for the Olympic Lodge 
concerts, sponsored by the freemasons 
— Haydn himself became a member in 
Vienna in 1785 — and supported finan- 
cially by the Count d'Ogny, Postmaster 
General of France, and the owner of an 
immense music library. For each of the 
six symphonies written for Le Concert 
de la Loge Olympique, Haydn was paid 
25 louis d'or, probably by some margin 
the largest sum he had ever received for 
any one work. The Loge Olympique 

31 



symphonies are Nos. 82-87. We do not 
know the order of their composition, 
but Haydn did request of his Viennese 
publisher, Artaria, that they appear in 
order 87, 85, 83, 84, 86, 82. (The numbers 
are not Haydn's but were assigned by 
Eusebius Mandyczewski, the scholar 
who at the beginning of the present 
century first tried to bring order into 
the uncharted territory of Haydn 
symphonies.) 

Like Nos. 83, 84, and 85, No. 87 is 
scored for flute, two oboes, two bas- 
soons, two horns, and. strings, a com- 
bination to which the other two d'Ogny- 
Olympique symphonies add trumpets 
and drums. Paris orchestras were large, 
and that of the Loge Olympique had 
40 violins and 10 basses (more in both 
departments than the Boston Sympho- 
ny). The Paris symphonies are, all of 
them, wonderfully inventive. One 
imagines that the quick-witted audience 
will particularly have enjoyed the play 
with silence in the first movement, the 
expansive and hymnlike Adagio, and the 
charmingly odd gait of the Trio. 

— Michael Steinberg 

Sergey Prokofiev 

from Romeo and Juliet 

Sergey Sergeyevich Prokofiev was born in Sont- 
sovka, Ekaterinoslav Government, on 23 April 
1891 and died at Nikolina Gora outside Mos- 
cow on 5 March 1953. He composed Romeo 
and Juliet in 193 5, and the work had its 
stage premiere in Brno, Czechoslovakia, though 
not until 1938. Most of the excerpts chosen 
hy Mr. Previn for this concert are included 
in the two concert suites Prokofiev drew from his 
complete score in 193 5-36 and first performed 
in 1936 and 1937. The Suite No. 2, which 
includes Montagues and Capulets, Juliet 
— the young girl, Dance, Dance of the 
girls from the Antilles, and Romeo in 
Juliet's tomb was introduced in this country in 
193 8 by the Boston Symphony, the composer 
conducting. 

"In the latter part of 1934 there was 
talk of the Kirov Theater of Leningrad 
staging a ballet of mine," writes Pro- 
kofiev in his 1946 autobiographical 
sketch. "I was interested in a lyrical 

32 




Prokofiev 

subject. Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet 
was suggested. But the Kirov Theatre 
backed out and I signed a contract with 
the Moscow Bolshoi Theater instead. 
In the spring of 1935, Radlov [a director 
in legitimate theater, renowned for his 
Shakespeare productions] and I worked 
out a scenario, consulting with the cho- 
reographer on questions of ballet tech- 
nique. The music was written in the 
course of the summer, but the Bolshoi 
Theater declared it impossible to dance 
to, and the contract was broken. 

"There was quite a fuss at the time 
about our attempts to give Romeo and 
Juliet a happy ending — in the last act 
Romeo arrives a minute earlier, finds 
Juliet alive, and everything ends well. 
The reasons for this bit of barbarism 
were purely choreographic: living people 
dance, the dying cannot. . . . Curiously 
enough, whereas the report that Proko- 
fiev was writing a ballet on Romeo and 
Juliet with a happy ending was received 
quite calmly in London, our own Shake- 
speare scholars proved more Catholic 
than the Pope and rushed to Shake- 
speare's defense. But what really caused 









me to change my mind about the whole 
thing was the remark someone made to 
me about the ballet: 'Strictly speaking, 
your music does not express real joy at 
the end.' That was quite true. After 
several conferences with the choreog- 
raphers, it was found that the tragic 
ending could be expressed in the dance, 
and in due time the music for that 
ending was written. 

". . .The ballet itself was rather un- 
lucky. In 1937, the Leningrad Ballet 
School signed an agreement undertaking 
to produce it on the occasion of its 200th 
anniversary, and in 1938, the Brno 
Opera agreed to stage it, too. The Ballet 
School violated the agreement, and so 
the premiere took place in Brno in 
December 1938. The Kirov produced 
the ballet in January 1940 with all the 
mastery for which its dancers are famed 
— although with some slight divergen- 
cies from the original version. One might 
have appreciated their skill more, had 
the choreographer adhered more closely 
to the music. Owing to the peculiar 
acoustics of the Kirov Theater and the 
need to make the rhythms as clear-cut 
as possible for the dancers I was obliged 
to alter a good deal of the orchestration. 
This explains why the same parts in 
the concert suites are more translucent 
than in the ballet score. " 

The Kirov choreographer whom the 
still angry Prokofiev does not name was 
Leonid Lavrovsky. The Romeo and Juliet 
were Konstantin Sergeyev and Galina 
Ulanova. Juliet was the role with which 
Ulanova eventually became most identi- 
fied, yet to begin with, she was as much 
thrown by the unfamiliar music with 
its "unusual orchestration . . . chamber 
quality . . . and frequent changes of 
rhythm." Prokofiev, for his part, was 
irritated with the dancers. "I know what 
you want," he shouted at them one 
morning, "You want drums, not music!" 
Bit by bit, dancers and composer found a 
meeting place and, as Ulanova reports, 
"Prokofiev began to see that we were 
not altogether deaf to good music and 
that we did have the power of giving 
visual expression to that music. And 
once he had acquired faith in us, his 
attitude changed. Gradually that air of 




Epilogue to the ballet Romeo and Juliet. 

chill aloofness we had so much resented 
at first disappeared. He began to listen 
to our remarks with increasing interest 
and attention, and before long a sym- 
pathy which soon turned to warm and 
genuine affection sprang up between 
the ballet dancers and the composer." 

— M.S. 




Scene from the Second Act of the ballet Romeo 
and Juliet. Ulanova is Juliet. 

33 



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34 



Guest Artists 






Andre Previn 

Andre Previn, born in Berlin, studied 
piano at the Berlin Conservatory. He 
moved with his family to California in 
1939, and at the age of 16, joined the 
Music Department of MGM where he 
won four Academy Awards. He studied 
conducting with Pierre Monteux and 
composition with Joseph Achron and 
Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco. He was 
Conductor-in-Chief of the Houston 
Symphony Orchestra for several sea- 
sons, and has appeared as guest con- 
ductor with the Cleveland and Philadel- 
phia orchestras, the Chicago, Detroit, 
Minnesota, St. Louis, and Toronto sym- 
phonies, and the Los Angeles, Pitts- 
burgh, and New York philharmonics. 
His contract as Principal Conductor of 
the London Symphony Orchestra was 
recently renewed for an indefinite time. 
Since his first recordings with the Lon- 
don Symphony Orchestra for RCA in 
1965, he has recorded works by Nielsen, 
Strauss, Rachmaninoff, Shostakovich, 
Tchaikovsky, Walton, and the complete 
cycle of Vaughan Williams symphonies. 
Mr. Previn also records for EMI (Angel 
Records) and has a long-term contract 
with BBC Television. 





Armando Ghitalla 

Armando Ghitalla, Principal Trumpet 
of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, has 
been a member of the Orchestra since 
1951. Born in Alpha, Illinois, he studied 
at Illinois Wesleyan and New York uni- 
versities and graduated from the Juil- 
liard School of Music. Before coming 
to Boston, he was Principal Trumpet of 
the New York City Center Opera and 
Ballet Orchestra, and with the Houston 
Symphony, as well as soloist with Paul 
Lavalle's Band of America. He has ap- 
peared on numerous occasions as soloist 
with the Boston Symphony and other 
orchestras, including the Miami Phil- 
harmonic, the Richmond Symphony, 
and the London Philomusica Orchestra. 
He teaches at Boston University and 
at the Berkshire Music Center 
at Tanglewood. 

Misha Dichter 

Thirty-one-year-old Misha Dichter 
emigrated to the United States with his 
Polish-born parents in 1948 through 
Shanghai, his birthplace. At age six, he 
began piano studies with Aubi Tzerko 
in Los Angeles, and later continued with 
Rosina Lhevinne at the Juilliard School. 
While at Juilliard he won the Beethoven 
Concerto Competition and received the 
Joseph Lhevinne Scholarship. He then 
travelled to Moscow, where he won the 
Silver Medal of the Tchaikovsky Com- 

35 




petition. After his return to America, 
he performed with the Boston Sym- 
phony under Erich Leinsdorf at the 
Berkshire Music Center at Tanglewood, 
and has since toured throughout the 
United States, the Middle East, the Far 
East, the Soviet Union, and Europe. 
During the 1976-77 season he appeared 
with the Pittsburgh Symphony, the St. 
Paul Chamber Orchestra, the Musica 
Aeterna Orchestra in New York, the 
Houston Symphony, the San Francisco 
Symphony and the National Symphony 
in Washington, D.C., and gave recitals 
in Montreal, Chicago, New York, and 
Philadelphia. In addition to his Tangle- 
wood appearance with the Boston Sym- 
phony, Mr. Dichter's 1977 summer 
schedule includes performances with 
the Detroit Symphony at the Meadow- 
brook Festival, with the Los Angeles 
Philharmonic at the Hollywood Bowl, 
and with the Chicago Symphony at 
the Ravina Festival. 

Kazuyoshi Akiyama 

Kazuyoshi Akiyama, Conductor of 
the Tokyo Symphony Orchestra, was 
born in that city in 1941. He studied 
at the Toho School of Music and gradu- 
ated from the Toho University in 1963. 
In 1964 he both made his conducting 
debut with the Tokyo Symphony Or- 
chestra and became its permanent con- 
ductor. He is also Music Director of 
the Vancouver Symphony, the American 
Symphony, and the Osaka Philharmonic, 




and Principal Guest Conductor of the 
Japan Philharmonic. He was Principal 
Conductor of the Toho String Orches- 
tra during their 1964 and 1974 United 
States tour and their 1970 European 
tour, as well as Principal Conductor of 
the New Japan Philharmonic on their 
1974 U.S. tour. He has recorded with 
the Tokyo Symphony Orchestra, the 
Yomiuri Symphony Orchestra, and the 
Japan Philharmonic Orchestra. His 
four- record Columbia album of the 
complete orchestral works of Japanese 
composer Minoru Miki won first prize 
in Japan's November Arts Festival. Mr. 
Akiyama received the Torii Music Prize 
of Japan in 1974 for his contributions 
to Japanese music. 



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36 



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TANGLEWOOD ON PARADE 

Friday, 12 August at 9:00 

THE BOSTON SYMPHONY 
ORCHESTRA with ARTHUR FIEDLER, 
SEIJI OZAWA, GUNTHER SCHULLER, 
and JOSEPH SILVERSTEIN conducting. 

Program to include: 
ROSSINI 

Overture to William Tell 
MOZART 

Serenade No. 8, K. 286 in D Nolturno 
L. MOZART 

The Toy Symphony 
TCHAIKOVSKY 

Swan Lake excerpts 
TCHAIKOVSKY 

1812, Overture Solennelle 



Saturday, 13 August at 8:30 
SEIJI OZAWA conducting: 

VIVALDI 

Piccolo Concerto in C 

LOIS SCHAEFER 

Bassoon Concerto in F 

SHERMAN WALT 
SESSIONS 

When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom'd 

ESTHER HINDS, soprano 

FLORENCE QUIVAR, mezzo-soprano 

DOMINIC COSSA, baritone 

TANGLEWOOD FESTIVAL CHORUS, 

JOHN OLIVER, conductor 



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Sunday, 14 August at 2:30 

GUNTHER SCHULLER and 
SEIJI OZAWA conducting: 

MENDELSSOHN 

Overture The Hebrides (Fingals Cave) 

Op. 26 
SCHULLER 

Violin Concerto 

ZVI ZEITLIN 
TCHAIKOVSKY 

Symphony No. 5 in E minor, Op. 64 



37 



THE FESTIVAL OF CONTEMPORARY MUSIC: 

AN EXTRAORDINARY 
PRESENTATION 
OF TODAY'S MUSIC. 



AUGUST 13-17 sponsored by the Berkshire Music Center in 
cooperation with the Fromm Music Founda- 
tion at Harvard. 

This year's Festival includes: a full concert by 
the Berkshire Music Center Orchestra; two 
works at two Boston Symphony concerts; 
chamber music concerts featuring vocal, 
choral, and instrumental music performed by 
the Boston Symphony Chamber Players and 
the Fellows of the Berkshire Music Center. 

PREVIEW THE 1977 FESTIVAL OF CONTEMPORARY MUSIC, prior to the 

first concert of the Festival, with Paul Fromm, 
Gunther Schuller and Michael Steinberg 
on SATURDAY, AUGUST 13 at 1 :30 pm. Bring 
a lunch and join them in the tent 
at Tanglewood. 

ADMISSION is by membership in the Friends of Music at 
Tanglewood or a $2.00 contribution at 
the main gate. (Regular Berkshire 
Festival tickets are required for the 
Boston Symphony concerts on 
Aug. 13 & 14). 

A complete program schedule 
is available at the main gate. 




Tanglew<©d 



38 



Tanglewood 
Talks & Walks 



Tanglewood Talks & Walks are a fasci- 
nating series of five Thursday lecture- 
luncheons at noon in the Tanglewood 
Tent, followed by a special guided tour 
of Tanglewood. Guest speakers include 
the musicians, conductors, and staff 
of the Boston Symphony Orchestra and 
Berkshire Music Center. Bring a lunch — 
we'll provide the refreshments. Please 
call the Tanglewood Friends Office at 
(413) 637-1600 for reservations. $2 con- 
tribution to the public, free to Friends 
of Tanglewood. 

LUNCHEON 12:15 
TALK 1:00 
WALK 1:30 



1977 Tanglewood 
Talks & Walks 



18 AUGUST 

BETSY JOLAS 



Composer in Residence, 
Berkshire Music Center 



25 AUGUST 



CAROL PROCTER 



Cello, 

Boston Symphony Orchestra 



Friends of Music at Tanglewood 

Lenox, Massachusetts 01240 

(413) 637-1600 



DAYS 
IN THE 

r\l\ 1 S/ a cooperative 
venture of the Boston Symphony Or- 
chestra and the Boston Public Schools, 
is designed to give middle school students 
from the city and three suburban com- 
munities an all-encompassing arts and 
integration experience. Funded by the 
Massachusetts Department of Education, 
Bureau of Equal Educational Opportunity, 
the program offers 50 children weekly 
over a seven week period the opportunity 
to spend five days at Tanglewood. By 
utilizing the cultural and natural re- 
sources of the Berkshires, the participants 
share a variety of unique and meaning- 
ful activities: a rehearsal and concert at 
Tanglewood, instrument demonstrations 
by members of the Boston Symphony 
and the Berkshire Music Center, a dance 
workshop at Jacob's Pillow, trips to the 
Clark Institute, Chesterwood, Rockwell 
Museum, Berkshire Garden Centre, at- 
tendance at a theatrical performance or 
dance concert, as well as sports and 
swimming daily. In addition, the young- 
sters take part in small informal art 
workshops, led by members of the Days 
in the Arts staff, each of whom has 
expertise in some area of the arts. 

The key to the great success of the 
program has been two-fold: a low key 
exposure to the arts as a part of a 
typical day's experiences, and the mag- 
nificent physical and asthetic attributes 
of Tanglewood and the Berkshires. 



THE 
OLD CORNER HOUSE 




Paintings by 

NORMAN ROCKWELL 

On permanent exhibit 

Open Year Round — Daily 10-5 p.m. 

Except Tuesdays 

Adults $1.00 Children 25* 



39 



The Berkshire Music Center 



"One more thing should come from this scheme, 
namely, a good honest school of musicians." 

— Henry Lee Higginson, on founding the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra. 

The late Serge Koussevitzky fervent- 
ly shared Henry Lee Higginson's vision 
of a "good honest school for musicians' 7 

— an academy where young musicians 
could extend their artistic training and 
broaden their experience under the 
guidance of eminent professionals. 
More than any other person, it was 
Koussevitzky who made the vision a 
reality; he was Director of the Berkshire 
Music Center from its founding in 1940 
until his death in 1951, and his vigorous 
leadership has remained an inspiring 
example in the years since. 

Serge Koussevitzky was succeeded by 
Charles Munch, and it is a mark of the 
Center's success that the Boston Sym- 
phony's present Music Director, Seiji 
Ozawa, studied here during the Munch 
era. Alumni of the Center are among 
the most prominent and active mem- 
bers of the music world; more than ten 
percent of the members of this country's 
major orchestras are graduates of the 
Center, as are many of the world's 
notable conductors, instrumental solo- 
ists and singers. 

Today the primary responsibility for 
the Center's direction is in the hands of 
Gunther Schuller, composer, writer, 
conductor and President of the New 
England Conservatory until June 1977. 
Average enrollment is somewhat over 
400 each summer, of which approxi- 
matelyl40 are members of the Center's 
Fellowship Program; this provides free 
tuition (and in many cases free board 
and expenses) for instrumentalists, 
singers, conductors and composers of 
post-graduate calibre. In addition to the 
Fellowship Program, Boston University, 
through its Tanglewood Institute, offers 
several college-credit programs for tal- 
ented high school musicians; the noted 
soprano Phyllis Curtin directs a singers' 
seminar highlighted by her own master 
classes. Finally, each summer the Cen- 
ter's Festival of Contemporary Music 
(August 13-17 this year), presented in 

40 



cooperation with the Fromm Music 
Foundation at Harvard, offers a broad 
spectrum of the most advanced music of 
today's composers in a gala week of 
performances. 

The Boston Symphony's Concert- 
master and Assistant Conductor Joseph 
Silverstein heads a faculty that includes 
principal players and members of the 
Orchestra and faculty members of Bos- 
ton University's School of Fine Arts, 
plus leading soloists, conductors and 
composers. The Center has numerous 
studios for practice and chamber music, 
and an extensive library of music litera- 
ture and scores. Rehearsals and con- 
certs of the Berkshire Music Center 
Orchestra and other student groups 
take place mostly in the Theatre- 
Concert Hall, while lectures, seminars, 
conducting classes, vocal and choral re- 
hearsals, composers' forums and cham- 
ber music concerts take place in the 
Chamber Music Hall, in the West Barn, 
in the Hawthorne Cottage, on the Re- 
hearsal Stage, and in the small studios 
both on the Tanglewood grounds and in 
buildings leased in Lenox. Each summer 
the Baldwin Piano and Organ Company 
generously provides over 100 keyboard 
instruments for individual practice; 
other instruments — percussion, for ex- 
ample — are provided by the Orchestra. 

The Boston Symphony is assisted in 
supporting the Center by the National 
Endowment for the Arts, a Federal 
agency, as well as by individual and 
corporate sponsors. Scholarships are 
awarded to the majority of the students, 
who are chosen by audition on a com- 
petitive basis. The cost of the scholar- 
ship program is large and adds sub- 
stantially to the Orchestra's yearly 
deficit — one major reason for the estab- 
lishment of the Friends of Music at 
Tanglewood, a group that provides 
critical support for the Center. A brief 
account of members' privileges is printed 
on page 41, and more information may 
be had at the Friends' Office near the 
Main Gate. We invite you to see and 
hear for yourself the remarkable calibre 
of the Center's young musicians. 



; 




Isaac Witkin, sculptor 

Selections from Isaac Witkin's Spill Series, 
sculpture created with the molten overflow of 
industrial steel, may be seen at the Glass House, 
Tanglewood's exhibition room, located at the 
Main Gate. 

Isaac Witkin was born in Johannes- 
burg, South Africa, in 1936 and moved 
to England in 1956. From 1957 to 1960 
he studied with the English sculptor 
Anthony Caro at St. Martin's School of 
Art in London. He has since been assis- 
tant to Henry Moore and has taught at 
St. Martin's School of Art, Maidstone 
College of Art in Kent, Ravensbourn 
School of Art, and Parsons School of 
Design in New York City. He has pre- 
sented his works in one-man and group 
exhibitions in Europe, Australia, and 
America, and is now represented by the 
Marlborough Gallery in New York. 
Currently he is on leave of absence from 
his position of artist-in-residence at Ben- 
nington College in Vermont to organize 
a state-sponsored sculptors' workshop 
in Binghamton, New York. 



What's 
Happening 

in the 

Derkshires? 

Phone Toil-Free 

and Find Out! 



Things to do today - exhibits, arts, music, 
theatre, ballet, garden shows, special tours, 
all the current events in the Berkshires. 



SOUTHERN BERKSHIRES 

528-2677 

From Great Bamngton. 
Sheffield, West Stockbndge 

CENTRAL BERKSHIRES NORTHERN BERKSHIRES 

637-2677 662-2677 




From Stockbndge. Lee. 
Lenox. Pittsfield 



From Williamstown. 
Adams. North Adams 



A service of the Berkshire Vacation Bureau 
205 West St., Pittsfield, Mass. 

(A Division of the Berkshire Hills Conference). 



TanglewflDd 

THE FESTIVAL OF CONTEMPORARY MUSIC: 

AN EXTRAORDINARY 
PRESENTATION 
OF TODAY'S MUSIC. 

Sponsored by the Berkshire Music Center 
and the Fromm Music Foundation at Harvard. 
For further information call or write: Friends 
of Music at Tanglewood, Lenox, Mass. 01240 
Phone number: (413) 637-1600 



41 



CHESllF^GDD 

STOCKBRIDGE 




Summer Estate of 
DANIEL CHESTER FRENCH 

Sculptor of the 

Lincoln Memorial 

Studio, Residence, Barn 

Sculpture Gallery, Period 

Garden, Nature Trail 

Daily 10-5 

May - October 

off Rte. 183, Glendale 

a property of 
the National Trust for Historic Preservation 



1771 was a good 

year for our Lobster Pie. 

This year 

it's even better. 




Publick House 

Good Yankee cooking, drink and lodging. 
On the Common — Sturbridge, Mass. — (617) 347-3313 



The Executive Committee 

Tanglewood Council of the 

Boston Symphony Orchestra 

Mrs. James Garivaltis 

Mr. Curtis Buttenheim 

Co- Chairmen 

Mr. John Kittredge 

Secretary /Treasurer 

Mrs. Stephen V.C. Morris 
Mrs. Murray Klein 

Talks and Walks 

Mr. Colin MacFadyen 
Mr. Ashley Smith 

Business 

Mrs. Kelton M. Burbank 
Mrs. John Kittredge 

Benefits 

Mrs. Charles Capers 

Receptions 

Mr. Robert A. Wells 

Community Affairs 

Mrs. D.H. Potter 
Mr. William Harris 

Tent 

Mrs. Jean Massimiano 
Mr. Joseph Duffy 

Sales and Information 

Mrs. Gary A. Lopenzina 
Mrs. William H. Ryan 

Student Affairs 

Mrs. Archie Peace 

Foreign Students 

Mrs. John Kittredge 

Tanglewood- Boston Liaison 

Mrs. A. Lloyd Russell 

Boston- Tanglewood Liaison 

Mr. Peter van S. Rice 
Mrs. John S. McLennan 

Nominating 



42 



The Friends of Music 
At Tanglewood 

Membership provides you with exciting 

opportunities and privileges all year long. 

It's the secret buy of the Berkshires! 



Free Berkshire Music 
Center Concerts: 

There are over 40 concerts each sum- 
mer performed by the members of the 
Berkshire Music Center, the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra's summer academy 
for the advanced study of music. These 
outstanding mid-week concerts include 
chamber music recitals, full orchestra 
concerts, vocal and choral programs, 
and the annual Festival of Contem- 
porary Music, Tanglewood's "festival 
within a festival." Friends Concert 
Memberships for individuals and 
families are available for $25.00. 

Advance program information and 
ticket ordering forms: 

Approximately one month before the 
public sale of seats in the early spring, 
Friends will be sent the advance Berk- 
shire Festival programs and a priority 
ticket application. Friends will also re- 
ceive the monthly Boston Symphony 
Orchestra publication, BSO. 



Tent Membership: 

The Tanglewood Tent, available to con- 
tributors of $75 and over, provides a 
hospitable gathering place behind the 
Music Shed where food and drink may be 
purchased on concert days. Hot buffet 
dinners are served on Saturday evenings 
beginning at 6:30 p.m. (Reservations 
must be made through the Friends 
Office no later than the Thursday af ter- 
noon preceding each Saturday 
evening buffet.) 

Special parking for Friends: 

Two convenient reserved parking areas 
are available to all donors of $150 or 
more for all Boston Symphony Orches- 
tra concerts: either the Box Parking Lot 
(Hawthorne Street entrance), or the 
Tent Parking Lot (West Street entrance). 

For information, contact: 
Friends of Music at Tanglewood 
Lenox, Ma. 01240 
(413) 637-1600 



Tin- <: a 1. 1. 1- it i a 



lithi 



fcflfc 



HtxJtuloi'K 



arabis 

CONTEMPOR/^/ 
AMERICAN DESIGN 



OUTSTANDING CRAFTS 
TO GIVE OR TO TREASURE 



DISTINCTIVE FOOD 
DELIGHTFUL AMBIENCE 



I22XOIC I II M. PITTXI II Lift 



43 



'We Curtis Hotel 

Food & Lodging 
LENOX, 637-0016 



A BOOK "TO DO" NOT 
"JUST TO READ" 




A BERKSHIRE SOURCEBOOK 



Your personal guide to Berkshire County: 
its history, geography and major land 
marks. Available at area bookstores and 
gift shops for just 5 2.95. Published by The 
Junior League of Berkshire County, Inc. 



delTshop 

SANDWICHES • CATERING 
TAKE OCT SERVICE 

1 15 Elm Street. Pittsfreld, Massachusetts. 
Tel. 442-5927 

Featuring Hot Pastrami & Hot Corned Beef 
Sandwiches 

Hebrew National Delicatessen • Rolls & Bagels 
baked daily • Imported & Domestic cheeses 

• Lox & smoked fish • Barbecued chicken 

• Fresh made salads • Party Platters 

Open Daily 8 to 6 



The new home of 
the world famous 
Alices Restaurant 



WILL 



HE 



AMSVILLE- 



INN 




.*itt 



A fine, small inn featuring 
superb Country French Cuisine 

LUNCH • DINNER 
Light Supper After Tanglewood 

Rte. 41 , between W. Stockbridge 
and Gt. Barrington 

Reservations Recommended by 

413-274-6580 INN PERSPECTIVE 




AT AVALOCH 



Breakfast • Brunch 

• Lunch • Dinner 

• Late Supper • Cocktail Lounge 

• Entertainment • MOTEL 

• tennis • pool 

across the road from Tanglewood 
rte. 183 Lenox 637-0897 



The Sunshine Stage, 

Holliston Theatre, Route 183, 
Lenox. Mass. 01240. Tel. 413-637-0534. 

Year-round professional regional theatre featuring 
plays, films and children's theatre. Cafe on prem 
ises. Frank Bessell. Artistic Director. 



THECLOTHESLOFT 

"Fine Sportswear Outlet" 

179 Main Street. Great Barrington 
164 North Street, Pittsfield 



If br> Jlif X.. 

I 'a little jewel in the Berkshires OX^ee.<S/fa(/.XM?cA{/<n*Tt<i 

(413)243-0181 or 637-2644 

JK Comfortable rooms, good food and drink in 

a country atmosphere. 
1 Open Daily Lunch & Dinner 

^^^ Tony Ferrelli Innkeeper 



*BU*JFU VKpMfE 



Accommodations for private parties. We 
cater to parties, banquets and social 
gatherings. Orders to take out. 

Chinese Polynesian Restaurant mI 

LENOX. MASS. For Reservations 
(413)443-4745 

Open Daily 1 1 30 til 10 pm. Fn & Sat til 1 am 




Old&onelttsiUtorp 



Route 8, Grove St., Adams, Ma. 

HANDPRINT WALLPAPER 

Factory Outlet 

OpenMon-Fri 10-4, Sat 9-1 2:30 




1 FANTASY MAN 



Food, drink, lodging. Live music week 
ends. After concert, a 10 minute 
walk from the Lion*s Gate. 
WHEATLEIGH 637-0610 




Fashion Doesn't Stop At Size 14 

BEAUTIFUL CLOTHES FOR 

i _Tr}E LARGE SIZE WOMEN 

^IFrORQBE^, ^' ^ 

w 179 IrTKiR STREET 41o'DZoo11o 
Gt. Barrington 



®2 



44 



WHY WAIT TO ENTER COLLEGE? 
SIMONS ROCK EARLY COLLEGE 

Designed for the student who wishes to avoid the 

duplication of high school and college work 

Liberal Arts - B.A. and A. A. Degrees - Fully Accredited 

The interest of those who have completed the 10th or 11 th 
grade of high school is invited 

Admissions Office 

Simon's Rock Early College 

Great Barrington, MA 01230 

Telephone: 413-528-0771 




Tanglewood 
Tradition 



Our outdoor Courtyard 
— colorfully abounding 
with Impatient plants — 
serves luncheons, 
dinners, snacks and 
drinks. Our indoor 
Lion's Den features sandwiches, 
drinks and live entertainment. 
Both are open till 1 a.m. Phone: 
413-298-5545. Route 7, Stockbridge, 
Massachusetts. Since 1773. 

&S& The Red Lion Inn 




Williamstown 
Theatre festival 




Nikos Psacharopoulos 

Our 23rd Season Includes: 

Misalliance. Sherlock Holmes. After the Fall. 

Platonov and Learned Ladies 

June 30 - August 27 

Phone Reservations: 413-458-8146 
P.O. Box 517, Williamstown, Ma. 02167 



G°°P^ 




CURTAINS 

At TkE Red Lisn Inn 

STOCKBRIDGE MASSACHUSETTS 

012P2 

Monday ihru Saturday 10 A.M.- 5 P. M. 
Send h>r Free Catalog 




If you'd like your own tote bag showiQgjrou 
support public broadcasting (other &i&IHs the 
Channel 17 logo), clipand send to: WMHT, 
Box 17, Schenectady, NX 12301. 

□ $60 Sustaining Member 

□ $30 Regular Member 

Name 



Address 



City 



WMHT 



State 



Zip 




Located in the Township of Becket, Mass. 

Norman Walker, Director 

Grace Badorek, Comptroller 

Donald Westwood, Promotional Director 



FIRST WEEK— July 5—9 
Eight Soloists from the 
Royal Danish Ballet 

SECOND WEEK- 
July 12 — 16 
Cultural Center of the 
Philippines Dance Co. 

(American debut 
of the Company) 

THIRD WEEK-July 19 — 23 
Teodoro Morca 
(Flamenco in Concert) 
Jacob's Pillow Dancers, 
Classical Pas de Deux 

FOU RTH WEEK- 
July 26—30 
Anne Marie DeAngelo 
and Lawrence Rhodes 
May O'Donnell 
Concert Dance Company 
Bhaskar (dances o' India) 

FIFTH WEEK— August 2—6 
Twyla Tharp 
Dancers and Dances 

SIXTH WEEK— August 9-13 
Ohio Ballet Company 



SEVENTH WEEK — 

August 16—20 

Dennis Wayne's Dancers 

EIGHTH WEEK— 

August 23 — 27 

Contemporary Dancers 

of Winnipeg 

(United States debut 

of the Company) 

Joyce Cuoco & Youri Vamos 

Jacob's Pillow Dancers 

Special Added Event 
September 2—4 
Hartford Ballet 

Performances: Perform- 
ances are held Tuesday 
through Saturday, Curt- 
ain times: Tuesday, 
7:30 p.m., Wednesday, 
Friday and Saturday, 
8.40 p.m., Thursday and 
Saturday Matmees: 
3:00 p.m. Tickets: 
$8.00 and $6.00. Avail- 
able at Ticketron, 
Bloomingdale's or the 
Jacob's Pillow Box Office 



J\\^xaajQ/ (XJrutnaub LUxUatteA/ 



Route 57 



Tolland, Mass. 



Telephone 413 - 258-4538 

A wide selection of antiques ranging 

from furniture, china and paintings. 

We also feature an extensive 

collection of primitive art 

from New Guinea. 

Open by appointment every day 
except Sunday. 



How to Reach Jacob's Pillow: 

Approx.150 miles from Boston near Tangle- 
wood. Lee-Pittsfield exit on the Mass. Turnpike. 
Public transportation from Boston via 
Greyhound to L"e, Mass. 

America's FIRST Dance Festival 



i 



Jacob's Pillow Dance Festival 
Mailing Address: Box 287, Lee, Mass. 01238 

(413) 243-0745 



j 



"ixrvuuxe and <yvealvl& naxjXn cxiA&u\&' 



Brunch 

Picnic 
Baskets 




Dinner 

After-Concert 
Supper 



J. Perspico Factor 
Restaurant 

Open Till 1 A.M. 

25 Church St. • Lenox, Mass. 
637-2996 




erksbire 

ummer festival 

6 days 5 nights- 1 1 meals 




Per person dbl occup 
plus tx & tips 



189 



50 



Delux Accommodations 

All admissions to: TANGLEWOOD, 
BERKSHIRE PLAYHOUSE.JACOB S 
PILLOW, STORROWTON 

plus Naumkeag...Chesterwood... Corner 
House. ..Hancock Shaker Village. ..Scenic 
tours... Swimming... tennis... golf... & more 

l~~ VrVrte or call direct for free brochure to 



\Qakn Spruce resort— 

sixith lee, ma. 01260 ■ 1-800-628-5073 



VISIT BERKSHIRE LAKES ESTATES 
EXPERIENCE COUNTRY LIVING 
AT ITS BEST! 

Small Lakefront Community 

Swim and boat on 2 crystal clear mountain 
lakes. Play tennis, badminton, volleyball 
and basketball on community courts. Live 
in privacy adjacent to a large state forest. 

Berkshire Lakes Estates 

Yokum Pond Road 

Becket, Mass. 01223 

Tel. 413-623-8747 

TO VISIT: Mass. Turnpike to Lee, Mass.-Rt. 20 
East. Continue 4 miles to Belden's Tavern. Left 
for 2 miles to Berkshire Lakes Estates. 



46 



^Mz£ 



^^m^ 



£&m^ 



m? EDITION PETERS *%m 



^P*W 




If you are a Music Lover, 

you will enjoy these free publications. 



EDITION PETERS COMPLETE CATALOGUE 

This new Complete Catalogue lists over 10,000 classical and contemporary 
publications for ail instruments. In addition to providing an educational 
overview of virtually all the noteworthy older composers and their 
compositional output, it is sure to be of special interest to both teacher 
and student alike in giving a glimpse of the master composers 
themselves— for interspersed throughout the catalogue are various 
sections highlighting a different composer's facsimile manuscript and his 
written thoughts. 



COMPLETE CATALOGUE 



PIANO CEMBALO ORGAN VIOLIN VIOLA 



CELLO BASS RECORDER FLUTE OBOE 



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C.F. PETERS CORPORATION • NEW YORK, N.Y. 



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PETERS NOTES NEWSLETTER 

The C. F. Peters music publishing tradition since 1800 has been built on providing the 
public with quality publications and service . . . our new, semiannual Peters Notes 
Newsletter strengthens this tradition. Each issue details our publishing activities and 
presents pertinent articles and news in many different areas in an effort to assist the 
music educator, librarian, professional and student in their work. 



CONTEMPORARY MUSIC CATALOGUE 

Our new Contemporary Music Catalogue has already met with such enthusiastic response by 
teachers, students, performers and composers of contemporary music that it is now in its 
second printing. The catalogue is an alphabetical listing, by composer, of approximately 1500 
contemporary compositions by more than 160 composers (primarily American)— featuring 45 
biographical sketches and handwritten statements on music. 




C. F. PETERS CORPORATION, 373 Park Avenue South, New York, N.Y. 10016 

Dear Friends at C. F. Peters, 

Please rush to me the following publications: □ Edition Peters Complete Catalogue 

□ PETERS NOTES Newsletter 

□ Contemporary Music Catalogue 



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□ Please add my name to your mailing list for future mailings. 



47 




Introducing the Bose 901® 
Series III: the most innovative new 
speaker since the legendary 
Bose 901 was introduced in 1968. 
The 901 Series III reproduces 
music with spaciousness and 
realism unequalled, we believe, by 
any other speaker. Yet, due to its 
new, ultra-high-efficiency drivers, 
the 901 Series III requires less than 
V3 as much power as the original 
901 : that means, for example, it 
can produce the same sound vol- 
ume with a 15 watt amplifier as the 
original 901 with a 50 watt ampli- 
fier. Outstanding bass perform- 
ance is made possible by the 
unique injection molded Acoustic 
Matrix™ enclosure (shown in this 
photograph of the 901 III with its 
grille and walnut veneer cabinet 
panels removed). To fully appreci- 
ate its spectacular performance, 
ask a Bose dealer to play the 901 



Series III in comparison to any 
other speaker, regardless of size or 
price. 

For a full color 901 III 
brochure, write Bose, Dept. BSO, 
The Mountain, Framingham, 
Massachusetts 
01701. 




Patents issued and pending. Copyright © 
1977 Bose Corp. Cabinets are walnut veneer. 
Pedestals optional at extra cost 



48 




Accompanist to 
Leonard Bernstein • Arthur Fiedler 

Gilbert Kalish • Seiji Ozawa • Andre Previn 

•v. 

Gunther Schuller • YehudiWyner 



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Tanglewood 



The Berkshire Music Center 

Gunther Schuller, Artistic Director 
Joseph Silverstein, Chairman of the Faculty 

Aaron Copland, Chairman of the Faculty Emeritus 
Phyllis Curtin, Artist-in-Residence for Vocal Music 

John Oliver, Head of Vocal Music Activities 
Gilbert Kalish, Head of Keyboard Activities 
Dennis Helmrich, Head Vocal Coach 
Daniel R. Gustin, Administrator 
Richard Ortner, Assistant Administrator 

Harry Shapiro, Orchestra Manager 
James Whitaker, Chief Coordinator 
Carol Woodworth, Carol Doty, Secretaries to the Faculty 
Lawrence Tarlow, Elizabeth Burnett, Librarians 



Festival of Contemporary Music 

presented in cooperation with 
The Fromm Music Foundation at Harvard 



Fellowship Program 
Contemporary Music Activities 

Gunther Schuller, Director 
Theodore Antoniou, Assistant Director 
Betsy Jolas, Jacob Druckman, 

Yehudi Wyner, Cuest Teachers 



The Berkshire Music Center 

is maintained for advanced study in music. 

Sponsored by the 

Boston Symphony Orchestra 

Seiji Ozawa, Music Director 
Thomas D. Perry, Jr., Executive Director 
Thomas W. Morris, Manager 
Michael Steinberg, Director of Publications 



Festival of 

Contemporary 

Music 



The Berkshire Music Center 

In 1940, the Berkshire Music Center 
was established at Tanglewood by the 
Boston Symphony Orchestra in fulfill- 
ment of the dream of Serge Kousse- 
vitzky, its Music Director, to provide an 
environment in which young musicians 
could continue their professional train- 
ing and add to their artistic experience 
through the guidance of eminent mu- 
sicians. The Center was developed un- 
der Koussevitzky's leadership until his 
death in 1951, when he was succeeded 
by Charles Munch. Erich Leinsdorf be- 
came the next Music Director in 1963, to 
be succeeded in 1970 by a tripartite 
directorship comprising two Artistic Di- 
rectors, Seiji Ozawa and Gunther Schul- 
ler, and Leonard Bernstein as Advisor. 
Seiji Ozawa became Music Director of 
the Boston Symphony in 1973, and now 
he and Gunther Schuller share respon- 
sibilities for the artistic direction of the 
Music Center. 

Since the founding of the Center, one 
of the principal sponsors of composers 
and contemporary music at Tangle- 
wood has been the Koussevitzky Music 
Foundation established in 1942 by Serge 
Koussevitzky, then Music Director of 
the Boston Symphony Orchestra, in 
memory of his wife, Natalie. 



Twenty Years at Tanglewood 

In 1957, when at the invitation of 
Aaron Copland, we first came to Tangle- 
wood, Serge Koussevitzky's commit- 
ment to the music of his contemporaries 
was already legendary. His espousal of 
contemporary music grew out of his 



unwavering belief that musical institu- 
tions cut off from the creative stream of 
their own day must atrophy, that a 
musical tradition which is not so much 
concerned with innovation as it is with 
preservation is dead. 

By coming here, by joining forces with 
the Berkshire Music Center, we become 
Koussevitzky's heirs. We received the 
legacy of his vision humbly, both as a gift 
and also as an obligation, as a precedent 
we felt impelled to follow. 

In the 1950s the performance of con- 
temporary music was still an isolated, 
self-contained activity which had little, 
if any, connection with organized con- 
cert life. Now, in the 1970s, we seem at 
last to have reached the point where it is 
no longer necessary to insist on the 
obvious, that the composers of our time 
must be given their rightful place in our 
musical life — not because of any moral 
imperatives, but because of their im- 
portant contributions to music as a liv- 
ing art. 

And yet it would be foolhardy to deny 
that the creative musicians' struggle for 
recognition today is still largely a struggle 
against the hegemony of the music of the 
past perpetuated by the non-composing 
musicians of the present. That is some- 
thing that the composers of the eigh- 
teenth and nineteenth centuries did not 
have to contend with. 

Happily, we can point to some hope- 
ful signs of change. While in the past, 
our contemporary music activities atthe 
Berkshire Music Center merely coex- 
isted with the summer concerts of the 
Boston Symphony, we are now entering 
a new era in which coexistence is giving 



Tanglewood 



way to collaboration. Since last year, 
owing to two enlightened musicians — 
Seiji Ozawa and Gunther Schuller — the 
Boston Symphony has been making two 
of their weekend concerts part of our 
annual Festival of Contemporary Music. 
This is more than a gesture of good will. 
It is an act of faith from which we can 
draw new impetus in our efforts to 
break down the barriers between tra- 
ditional music and new music, thus 
bringing us closer to a genuine musical 
culture that is rooted in the creative 
sources of music. 

— Paul Fromm, Director 
Fromm Music Foundation at Harvard 



Contemporary Music at 
Tanglewood 

The Contemporary Music Program at 
the Berkshire Music Center comprises 
two kinds of activity: the study and 
performance of contemporary music, 
and instruction in composition for a 
limited number of composers whose 
previous studies and experiences have 
prepared them for work on an advanced 
level. The program is headed by 
Gunther Schuller. Student composers 
not only receive instruction from Mr. 
Schuller and Betsy Jolas, but also 
participate in a series of seminars 
conducted by Ms. Jolas, Yehudi Wyner, 
and Theodore Antoniou. Compositions 
by the student composers are 
performed at various Berkshire Music 
Center concerts, and prepared, as are 
the concerts of the Festival of 
Contemporary Music, under the 
supervision of Mr. Schuller and Mr. 
Antoniou. 



The Festival 

The Festival of Contemporary Music 
was initiated in 1963. The generous 
support of the Fromm Music 
Foundation has made possible this 
week-long encounter with contem- 
porary music — an institution at 
Tanglewood, a festival within a Festival. 

Its purposes are manifold. It provides 
a forum for new ideas and directions in 
music and as such has become one of 
the most important annual events in the 
vital process of maintaining a lively 
contact between the composer and the 
performer, and in turn, their publics. 
Performance exists in effect only as the 
result of the composer's creative efforts. 
It therefore becomes the obligation of 
every performing musician to keep the 
life-stream of music — composition — 
flowing and alive. The young men and 
women who come to Tanglewood as 
Fellowship students, performing in 
addition to nineteenth century music a 
wide variety of contemporary music, are 
meeting this challenge as a part of their 
professional commitment to music in all 
its diversity. 

The Fromm Music Foundation and 
the Berkshire Music Center provide a 
stimulus to these activities by annually 
commissioning a number of works by 
young composers who have established 
themselves in their field. 

The Festival does not claim to be 
comprehensive or all-permissive, but 
has presented over the years a wide 
sampling of contemporary music from 
all countries and in all styles and 
concepts, ranging from young 
"unknowns" to the well-established 
twentieth century masters. 

— Gunther Schuller, Artistic Director 




THEODORE PRESSER COMPANY 

America's oldest music publisher, represents 
works by these distinguished contemporary 
composers: 






Roger Sessions 

composer of 
WHEN LILACS LAST 
IN THE DOOR YARD 
BLOOM'D 



Betsy Jolas 

composer of 
TALES OF A 
SUMMER SEA 



Richard Wernick 

recipient of 
the 1977 
Pulitzer Prize 



And: William Albright, Gilbert Amy, Georges Auric, Sol Berkowitz, 
William Bolcom, Pierre Boulez, Louis Calabro, Arthur Cunningham, John 
Downey, James Drew, Jacob Druckman, Maurice Durufle, Donald Erb, 
Jack Former, Jean Francaix, Iain Hamilton, Donald Harris, Lejaren Hiller, 
Sydney Hodkinson, Henri Lazarof, Robert Hall Lewis, Michio Mamiya, 
William Mayer, Olivier Messiaen, Marcel Mihalovici, Akira Miyoshi, 
Lawrence Moss, Serge Nigg, George Perle, Vincent Persichetti, Jean Rivier, 
George Rochberg, Manuel Rosenthal, Claudio Santoro, Jerzy Sapieyevski, 
Henri Sauguet, Peter Schickele, William Schuman, Ralph Shapey, Netty 
Simons, Ezra Sims, Robert Suderburg, Toru Takemitsu, Alexander 
Tcherepnin, Hugo Weisgall, Richard Yardumian. 

Our new Rental Catalog and individual composer brochures may be obtained by writing to: 
THEODORE PRESSER COMPANY* Dept.BK-l« Bryn Mawr, Pemia. 19010 



Tanglewood 



Saturday, 13 August at 2:30 

Members of the Berkshire Music Center Fellowship Program 

WILLIAM SCHUMAN The Young Dead Soldiers (1975) 

Lamentation for soprano, horn, eight winds & 

nine strings 

KAROLOS TRIKOLIDES, conductor 

CHERYL STUDER, soprano 

CHRISTOPHER TILLOTSON, horn 



DONALD MARTINO 



Seven Pious Pieces (1971) 

To his ever-loving God 

Mercy and Love 

His Ejaculation to God 

The Soule 

Eternitie 

Teares — To Death — Welcome what comes 

No coming to God without Christ 

Members of the Tanglewood Festival Chorus, 
JOHN OLIVER, conductor 



EDWARD COHEN 



Elegy 

Euridice 

Leda 

Epilogue 

MICHAEL MORGAN, conductor 
MIKKI SHIFF, mezzo-soprano 



INTERMISSION 



ELLIOTT CARTER 



WALTER PISTON 



Brass Quintet (1974) 

GUNTHER SCHULLER, conductor 

Divertimento for Nine Instruments (1946) 

Allegro 

Tranquillo 

Vivo 

BRUNO APREA, conductor 

performed in memory of the composer 1894-1976 



♦Commissioned by the Berkshire Music Center and 
the Fromm Music Foundation at Harvard; 
first performance. 

Baldwin piano 

Advent 

KLH 



AN IMPORTANT EVENT 
FOR MUSIC AND MUSICIANS 

IN AMERICA 



v^< 



We are pleased to announce the fonnati 



ation or V ~ — _ 



EUROPEAN AMERICAN MUSIC CORPORATION 

Created to administer in the U.S. the combined catalogues of Schott, 
Universal Edition, Joseph Boonin, Inc., E.C. Kerby, Ltd., and selected 
titles from the Barenrcitcr-Verlag this company will manage one of the 
richest treasuries of concert music in the world. Included in this compre- 
hensive repository are countless works of the masters from antiquity 
through the present day. 

The distribution of music from all publishers developed by the expert 
staff of our preceding company, — Joseph Boonin, Inc., — will not be 
interrupted. Librarians and managers of professional and school orchestras 
alike have come to depend on the unparalleled expertise of our personnel. 

An expanded publishing program of American compositions and editions 

is projected. 

/•'or information, catalogues, perusal material or terms, contact 
EUROPEAN AMERICAN MUSIC CORPORATION 

195 Allwood Road 

Clifton, NJ 07012 

201-7772680 212-868-1165 



Tanglewood 



Sunday, 14 August at 8:30 

Members of the Berkshire Music Center Fellowship Program 

THEODORE ANTONIOU, conductor 



PETER MAXWELL DAVIES Shakespeare Music (1964) 

Intrada; Pavan; Galliard; Miserere; 
Coranto; Passamezzo; Alman 



GILBERT AMY 



HENRI LAZAROF 



D'un desastre obscure (1971)* 

JANICE MEYERSON, mezzo soprano 
DAVID HOWARD, clarinet 

Third Chamber Concerto (1974) 



INTERMISSION 



WITOLD LUTOSLAWSKI 



YANNIS XENAKIS 



Preludes and Fugue, 

for thirteen solo strings (1972)* 

Persephassa, for six percussionists (1972) 



*First performance in the United States. 

Baldwin piano 

Advent 

KLH 



PERSPECTIVES OF 

NEW ML/SIC 



l et7ta 



Editor 

Benjamin Boretz 

Co-Editor 

Elaine Barkin 



Announcing the Publication of 
a Special Double Issue 



SOUNDS AND WORDS 
A Critical Celebration of Milton Babbitt at 60 

Articles, Commentaries, Compositions by 

Stephen Arnold Elaine Barkin Alex Bazelow 
Bethany Beardslee-Winham Arthur Berger 
Wallace Berry Frank Brickie Benjamin Boretz 
Martin Boykan Elliott Carter Edward T. Cone 
Carlton Gamer Graham Hair Michael Kassler 
Paul Lansky David Lewin Robert Pazur 
John Peel Michel Philippot Harold Powers 
John Rahn J.K. Randall Charles Rosen 

Seymour Shifrin Richard Swift 

Christopher Wintle Charles Wuorinen 

Vladimir Ussachevsky Mark Zuckerman 

and Milton Babbitt 



$13.50 one year 
$26.00 two years 
$38.00 three years 

published semi-annually by 
Perspectives of New Music, Inc. 
Annandale-on-Hudson. N.Y. 12504 



Tanglewood 



Monday, 15 August at 8:30 



BOSTON SYMPHONY CHAMBER PLAYERS 



ALBAN BERG 



ROGER SESSIONS 



YEHUDI WYNER 



Joseph Silverstein, violin 
Burton Fine, viola 
Jules Eskin, cello 
William Rhein, bass 
Doriot Anthony Dwyer, flute 
Ralph Gomberg, oboe 
Harold Wright, clarinet 
Sherman Walt, bassoon 
Charles Kavaloski, horn 
Armando Ghitalla, trumpet 
Ronald Barron, trombone 
Everett Firth, percussion 
Gilbert Kalish, guest pianist 

Adagio from the Chamber Concerto, 
in the version for clarinet, violin and 
piano (1925) 

Pieces for Piano (1976) 

Andante, leggero e grazioso 
Molto agitato 
Molto adagio 

in memory ot Luigi Dallapiccola 

Serenade (1958) 

Nocturne 
Toccata 

Capriccio — Aria 
Nocturne II 

conducted by the composer 



INTERMISSION 



BETSY JOLAS 



O Wall, a puppet opera 
for woodwind quintet (1976) 

conducted by the composer 



ARNOLD SCHOENBERG Chamber Symphony, Op. 9, 

in the quintet version 
by Anton Webern (1906-c. 1921 

Baldwin piano 

DGG and RCA Victor records 



Tanglewood 



Tuesday, 16 August at 8:30 

BERKSHIRE MUSIC CENTER ORCHESTRA 

GUNTHER SCHULLER, conductor 

WILLIAM THOMAS McKINLEY Concertino (1976) 



BETSY JOLAS 



7~a/es of a Summer Sea (1977)t 



GEORGE ANTHEIL 



A Jazz Symphony (1925) 

Andante — lulling 
Allegretto — capricious 
Tempestoso — stormy 
Adagio molto — pensive 



INTERMISSION 



ARMIN LOOS 



Percepts (1969) : 



ROGER SESSIONS 



Symphony No. 2 (1944-46) 

Molto agitato 

Allegretto capriccioso 

Adagio tranquillo ed espressivo 

Allegramente 



*First performance. 

"("Commissioned by the Fromm Music Foundation at Harvard 
for the 1977 Festival of Contemporary Music; first performance. 

Baldwin piano 



Tanglewood 



Wednesday, 17 August at 8:30 

Members of the Berkshire Music Center Fellowship Program 



ALEXANDER GOEHR Lyric Pieces, Op. 36 (1976)* 

Con forza 

Sostenuto ma non troppo lento 

Vivo ma pesante 

Largo pesante 

Largamente ma non troppo lento 

Scherzando 

MAXIMIANO VALDES, conductor 



THEODORE ANTONIOU Three Likes for solo clarinet (1973) 

JOHN FULLAM 



MICHAEL MARTIN 



Composition for Nine Instruments (1977)t 
GUNTHER SCHULLER, conductor 



INTERMISSION 



YOSHIHISA TAIRA 



Hierophonie V (1974)* 

NANAO YAMAMOTO, conductor 



SERGE GARANT 



Offrandes III (1973) 

THEODORE ANTONIOU, conductor 



*First performance in the United States. 

tCommissioned by the Berkshire Music Center and the Fromm Music Foundation 

at Harvard; first performance. 

Baldwin piano 



Berkshire Music Center 
Fellowship Program 1977 



Violins 

Diane Bischak, Detroit, Michigan 

Craig Burket, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey 

Alan H. Scovell Fellowship 
Nicole Bush, Sherman Oaks, California 
Diane Cataldo, Arlington, Massachusetts 

Adams Supermarket Fellowship 
Karen Clarke, Missoula, Montana 
Jolan Friedhoff, Portland, Oregon 

Fromm Fellowship 
Kim Golden, Chicago, Illinois 
Michael Hanson, Portland, Oregon 

Lee Savings Bank Fellowship 
Carol Heffelfinger, Kansas City, Missouri 

Leonard Bernstein Fellowship 
Peter jaffe, Berkeley, California 
Philip Johnson, Folsom, Pennsylvania 

Fromm Fellowship 
Martha Lewis, Lynchburg, Virginia 
Martha McPherson, Tallahassee, Florida 

Margaret Boyer Fellowship 
Philip Middleman, Louisville, Kentucky 

Rosamund Sturgis Brooks Memorial 

Fellowship 
Mayumi Ohira, San Francisco, California 
Mary O'Reilly, Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts 
Charles Pikler, Norwich, Connecticut 

Hon. and Mrs. Peter I. B. Lavan Fellowship 
Wendy Plank, Brightwaters, New York 

Berkshire County Savings Bank Fellowship 
Martha Royer, Wayne, Pennsylvania 
Wendy Scheidemantle, Nanuet, New York 

Seiji Ozawa Fellowship 
Randi Schonning, Ottawa, Ontario 
Alex Shum, Hong Kong 

Leonard Bernstein Fellowship 
Semmy Stahlhammer, Stockholm, Sweden 

U.S. Components, Inc. Fellowship 
Kathryn Stepulla, Southgate, Michigan 

Richard L. Kaye Fellowship 
Arthur Zadinsky, Newhall, California 

Fromm Fellowship 



Violas 

Katherine Askew, Houston, Texas 

Bradley Fellowship 
Marshall Fine, Newton, Massachusetts 
Paul Frankenfeld, Long Beach, California 

Frederick Brandi Trust Fellowship 
Stephanie Fricker, Rhinecliff, New Jersey 

Arthur M. Abell Fellowship 
Carol Hutter, Binghamton, New York 

Berkshire Fagle Fellowship 
Virginia Izzo, Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts 

Red Lion Inn Fellowship 
Lynn Johnson, Great Neck, New York 

Marian Voorhees Buttenheim Fellowship 
Betsy London, Cambridge, Massachusetts 

Berkshire Bank and Trust Company 

Fellowship 
Marie Peebles, Hamilton, Ontario 

Union Federal Savings Fellowship 
Meredith Snow, Port Jefferson, New York 

Fromm Fellowship 
Julie Westgate, Falcon Heights, Minnesota 

Leonard Bernstein Fellowship 



Cellos 

Timothy Butler, Washington, D.C. 

Red Lion Inn Fellowship 
Catherine Giles, London, England 

The English-Speaking Union/Youth & 

Music Fellowship 
Douglas Ischar, Boston, Massachusetts 

WCRB, Boston Fellowship 
Nancy Keevan, Bogota, Columbia 

Fromm Fellowship 
Martha Kiefer, Bethesda, Maryland 

Country Curtains, Inc. Fellowship 
Edwm Lee, Albuquerque, New Mexico 

First Agricultural National Bank of 

Berkshire County Fellowship 
Julia Lichten, New Haven, Connecticut 

Abe and Alice Marcus Fellowship 
Freya Oberle, Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts 

Fromm Fellowship 



Tanglewood 



Michael Peebles, Hamilton, Ontario 
Edgar Stern Memorial Fellowship 

Steven Shumway, Lawrence, Kansas 

Morris Finkelstein Memorial Fellowship 

Wyatt Sutherland, Jeffersonville, Indiana 

Basses 

Robert Caplin, Canaan, New York 

Stanley Chappie Fellowship 
Stephen D'Amico, San Mateo, California 

C. D. Jackson Master Award Fellowship 
Jonathan Jensen, Winnipeg, Manitoba 

Fromm Fellowship 
Keith Post, Wichita, Kansas 

Leo Wasserman Foundation Fellowship 
Jonathan Storck, East Setauket, New York 

Leonard Bernstein Fellowship 
Stephen Tramontozzi, Belmont, 

Massachusetts 

R. Amory Thorndike Fellowship 

Flutes 

Tyra Gilb, Berkeley, California 

Stanley Chappie Fellowship 
Marie Herseth, Bothell, Washington 

The Frelinghuysen Foundation Fellowship 
Wendy Rolfe, New York, New York 

Dr. and Mrs. Alexander B. Russell 

Fellowship 
Jacqueline Rosen, Carmel, California 

Leonard Bernstein Fellowship 
Debra Wendells, Seattle, Washington 

Fromm Fellowship 

Oboes 

Sandra Apeseche, Dearborn, Michigan 

Augustus Thorndike Fellowship 
William Bennett, New Haven, Connecticut 

Leonard Bernstein Fellowship 
Margot Golding, Fort Wayne, Indiana 

Ida and Eugene Schnell Fellowship 
Jean Landa, Washington, D.C. 

Leonard Bernstein Fellowship 
Avinoam Yosselevitch, Civataim, Israel 

Leonard Bernstein Fellowship 



Clarinets 

Katherine Betts, New Haven, Connecticut 

John M. Nalle Fellowship 
Michael Corner, Los Angeles, California 

Beinecke Fellowship 
John Fullam, Baldwin, New York 

U. S. Components, Inc. Fellowship 
Diane Heffner, Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts 
David Howard, Los Angeles, California 

Leonard Bernstein Fellowship 

Bassoons 

Matthew Karr, Toledo, Ohio 

Kandell Fellowship 
Dennis Michel, Lacey, Washington 
Susan Nigro, Chicago, Illinois 

Fromm Fellowship 
Richard Sharp, Jamica Plain, Massachusetts 
Braden Toan, Tappan, New York 

Beinecke Fellowship 

Horns 

Laurel Bennert, Stony Brook, New York 

Stephen and Persis Morris Fellowship 
Roger Kaza, Beaverton, Oregon 
Kirk Laughton, St. Catherine's, Ontario 

C. D. Jackson Master Award Fellowship 
Lawrence Ragent, San Mateo, California 
Christopher Tillotson, New York, New York 

Stuart Haupt Fellowship 
Richard Todd, Brea, California 

Fromm Fellowship 
Robert Ward, Schenectady, New York 

Koussevitzky Music Foundation 

Fellowship 

Trumpets 

Dennis Alves, Cumberland, Rhode Island 
Richard Henly, Havertown, Pennsylvania 

Fromm Fellowship 
Timothy Morrison, Beaverton, Oregon 

Kimberly-Clark Foundation Fellowship 
Larry Scofield, Lincolnwood. Illinois 
Carol Warner, St. Clair Shores, Michigan 

Beinecke Fellowship 



Trombones 

Mitchell Arnold, Fairfax, Virginia 
Donald Sanders, Jamaica Plain, 

Massachusetts 

The Olivia Foundation Fellowship 
Stephen Wilson, Chicago, Illinois 
Arthur Smith, New York, New York 

Koussevitzky Music Foundation 

Fellowship 

Tuba 

Craig Fuller, Columbus, Ohio 
Leo L. Beranek Fellowship 

Percussion 

John Boudler, Buffalo, New York 

Mead Corporation Fellowship 
Jeffrey Fischer, Acton, Massachusetts 

Selly A. Fisemann Memorial Fellowship 
Neil Grover, Bellmore, New York 
Patrick Hollenbeck, Binghamton, New York 

Leonard Bernstein Fellowship 
James Saporito, Ridgewood, New Jersey 
Richard Wind, Panorama City, California 

Koussevitzky Music Foundation Fellowship 

Harps 

Diane Evans, South Euclid, Ohio 
Stanley Home Products Fellowship 

Grace Paradise, Asbury Park, New Jersey 
Kathleen Hall Banks Fellowship 



Keyboard 

Martin Amlin, Dallas, Texas 

Ada Holding Miller/National Federation 

of Music Clubs Fellowship 
Elizabeth DiFelice, Tonawanda, New York 

Beinecke Fellowship 
Christopher O'Riley, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Asher ). Shuffer Memorial Fellowship 
William Rothstein, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 

Wulsin Fellowship 
Judith Lynn Stillman, Fresh Meadows, 

New York 

Carlotta M. Dreyfus Fellowship 
Alys Terrien-Queen, Framingham, 

Massachusetts 

Wulsin Fellowship 
Janice Weber, Ridgewood, New Jersey 

Koussevitzky Music Foundation Fellowship 
Barbara Weintraub, Sarasota, Florida 

Wulsin Fellowship 

Guitar 

David Ethan Sussman, Boston, Massachusetts 

Conductors 

Bruno Aprea, Rome, Italy 

Gertrude Robinson Smith Fellowship 
Michael Morgan, Washington, D.C. 

Dr. Merrill H. Ross Memorial Fellowship 
Karolos Trikolides, Athens, Greece 

Samuel Antek Memorial Fellowship 
Maximiano Valdes, Santiago, Chile 

Omar Del Carlo Fellowship 
Nanao Yamamoto, Tokyo, Japan 

Koussevitzky Memorial Fellowship 



Singers 

Kathryn Asman, New York, New York 
Ben Holt, Washington, D.C. 

Hodgkinson Fellowship 
Jennifer Leigh, Denver, Colorado 
Thomas H. Lloyd, New Haven, Connecticut 
Janice Meyerson, Omaha, Nebraska 

Leonard Bernstein Fellowship 
Elizabeth Parcells, Grosse Pointe Farms, 

Michigan 

High Fidelity/Musical America Fellowship 
Kim Scown, Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts 
Mikki Shiff, Coral Gables, Florida 

Berkshire Life Insurance Company 

Fellowship 
Dean Shoff, Groveton, New Hampshire 

Seven Hills Fellowship 
Cheryl Studer, Knoxville, Tennessee 

Florence Herzog Arginteanu Fellowship 
Sanford Sylvan, Syosset, New York 

C. D. Jackson Master Award Fellowship 
Kathy Wright, Rocky Mount, North Carolina 



Vocal Coaches 

Nancy Engleken, Goff, Kansas 
Country Curtains, Inc. Fellowship 

Susan Almasi Mandel, Princeton, New Jersey 
Wulsin Fellowship 

Jeffrey Stevens, Cambridge, Massachusetts 
C. D. Jackson Master Award Fellowship 

Composers 

Gisele Barreau, Paris, France 

Margaret Lee Crofts Fellowship 
Aram Gharabekian, Forest Hills, New York 
Matthew Harris, New Rochelle, New York, 
ASCAP-Rudolf Nissim Fellowship 
in Composition 

Marjorie Merryman, Somerville, 

Massachusetts 
Rodney Rogers, Scottsdale, Arizona 
Albert Sarko, Birmingham, Michigan 

Bruno Maderna Memorial Fellowship 
David Schimmel, Norman, Oklahoma 

Margaret Lee Crofts Fellowship 
Jan Swafford, Chattanooga, Tennessee 




Sg- EDITION PETERS *8ga 



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PUBLISHERS OF 
CONTEMPORARY MUSIC 

SINCE 1800 



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Feldman Finney Fiser Fisher Flanagan Fukushima Gideon Gilbert 
Glanville -Hicks Globokar Griffes Hampton Hannay Harrison Helm Helps 
Hiller Hoffman Hovhaness Huggler Hutcheson Ichiyanagi Imbrie Irino Ives 
Johnson Jones Kagel U. Kay Kelemen Knerr Kolb Kolman Korn Krul Lewis 
Ligeti Lloyd Lockwood London Lopatnikoff Loudova Luening Lybbert Macero 
Mamlok Mata Maves Mayuzumi McPhee Mechem Mekeel Mellnaes Mitchell 
Monnikendam Moran Nystedt Osborne Overton Palmer Parris Peeters 
Pender ecki Pinkham Pisk Porter Raxach G. Read T. L. Read Reck Reynolds 
Rhodes Riegger D.Riley Rorem Ross Sapieyevski Schifrin Schoenberg 
Schwantner Serebrier Shifrin Siegmeister Sinzheimer Smith Stevens Stout 
S.Stravinsky Surinach Sydeman Takahashi Takemitsu Tcherepnin Titcomb 
Townsend Trimble Ung Ussachevsky Verrall Villa-Lobos Walcha Wangenheim 
Whittenberg Willan Wilson Wishart Wolff Wolpe Woollen Wuorinen Young 
Yuasa Zador 

C.F.PETERS CORPORATION 

373 Park Avenue South New York, N.Y 10016 



A complimentary copy of our Contemporary Music Catalogue can be obtained 
directly from us upon request. 





Accompanist to 
Boston Symphony Orchestra 
Arthur Fiedler • Seiji Ozawa 
Boston Pops • Tanglewood 



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... _■__-. . K . - . , • 




Seiji Ozawa, Music Director 

Colin Davis, Principal Guest Conductor 
Joseph Silverstein, Assistant Conductor 

Ninety- Sixth Season 1976-1977 



The Trustees of the Boston Symphony Orchestra Inc. 

Talcott M. Banks, President | 

President Sidney Stoneman, Vice-President 

Vice-President John L. Thorndike, Treasurer 



Philip K. Allen, Vice 
Mrs. Harris Fahnestock, 






Vernon R. Alden 

Allen G. Barry 

Dr. Leo L. Beranek 

Mrs. John M. Bradley 

Richard P. Chapman 

Dr. George Clowes 

Abram T. Collier 

Henry A. Laughlin 



Nelson J. Darling, Jr. 

Archie C. Epps III 

E. Morton Jennings, Jr. 

Edward M. Kennedy 

George Kidder 
Edward G. Murray 

Trustees Emeriti 

Harold D. Hodgkinson 



Albert L. Nickerson 

Mrs. James H. Perkins 

Irving W. Rabb 

Paul C. Reardon 

David Rockefeller Jr. 

Mrs. George Lee Sargent 

John Hoyt Stookey 

John T. Noonan 



Administration of the Boston Symphony Orchestra 



Thomas D. Perry, Jr. 

Executive Director 



Thomas W. Morris 
Manager 

Gideon Toeplitz Daniel R. Gustin 

Assistant Manager Assistant Manager 

Joseph M. Hobbs Walter Hill Dinah Daniels 

Director of Development Director of Business Affairs Director of Promotion 

Richard C. White Anita R. Kurland Niklaus Wyss 

Assistant to the Manager Administrator of Youth Activities Advisor for the Music Director 

Donald W. Mackenzie James F. Kiley 

Operations Manager, Symphony Hall Operations Manager, Tanglewood 

Michael Steinberg 

Director of Publications 

Programs copyright ® 1977 Boston Symphony Orchestra Inc. 



Contents: 

page 



Tanglewood 4 

Seiji Ozawa 7 

Map 8 

Information 9 



page 



Programs 11-42 

Berkshire Music Center 46 

Friends 50, 51 



The cover photo is by Walter H. Scott, Stockbridge. 



The Board of Overseers of the Boston Symphony Orchestra Inc. 

Dr. Leo L. Beranek 

Chairman 



Mrs. Norman L. Cahners 

Vice Chairman 

Charles F. Adams 

Mrs. Frank G. Allen 

Mrs. Richard Bennink 

David W. Bernstein 

David Bird 

Gerhard BJeicken 

Frederick Brandi 

Curtis Buttenheim 

Mrs. Henry B. Cabot 

Mrs. Mary Louise Cabot 

Levin H. Campbell, III 

Johns H. Congdon 

Arthur P. Contas 

Robert Cushman 

Michael J. Daly 

Mrs. C. Russell Eddy 

Paul Fromm 

Carlton P. Fuller 

Mrs. Thomas J. Galligan, Jr. 



Weston P. Figgins 
Vice Chairman 

Mrs. Thomas Gardinei 

Mrg. James Garivaltis 

Mrs. Robert Gibb 

Jordan Golding 

Mrs. John L. Grandin 

Mrs. R. Douglas Hall, III 

Mrs. Howard E. Hansen 

Bruce Harriman 

Mrs. Richard D. Hill 

Mrs. Amory Houghton, Jr 

Richard S. Humphrey, Jr. 

Mrs. Jim Lee Hunt 

Mrs. Louis I. Kane 

Leonard Kaplan 

Benjamin Lacy 

Mrs. James F. Lawrence 

Roderick MacDougall 

John S. McLennan 

Colman M. Mockler, Jr. 

Mrs. Elting E. Morison 

Richard P. Morse 



Mrs. Arthur I. Strang 

Secretary 

David G. Mugar 

Dr. Barbara W. Newell 

Stephen Paine 

Harry Remis 

Mrs. Peter van S. Rice 

Mrs. Samuel L. Rosenberry 

Mrs. Jerome Rosenfeld 

Mrs. George Rowland 

Mrs. A. Lloyd Russell 

Mrs. William Ryan 

Francis P. Sears, Jr. 

William A. Selke 

Gene Shalit 

Samuel L. Slosberg 

Richard A. Smith 

Mrs. Edward S. Stimpson 

Mrs. Richard H. Thompson 

D. Thomas Trigg 

Roger Woodworth 




Boston 

University 

Tanglewood 
Institute 



Norman DelloJoio, 

Executive Director 



Summer Instrumental and Vocal Programs for the outstanding high school/ 
college-age musician. Private study with master artists including members of the 
faculty of the Boston University School of Music and the Boston Symphony 
Orchestra. Chamber music, orchestral and vocal performances at Tanglewood. 

For information: Boston University Tanglewood Institute, 
855 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02215. 

A program offered by the Boston University School for the Arts in association 
with the Berkshire Music Center/Boston Symphony Orchestra. 

Twelfth Season 



le reasons you visit 
<^the Berkshires 
may be the best reasons 
to move your business 

I to the Berkshires^ 



The Berkshires are a perfect place ... for people, 
for families and for businesses. The kind of place 
where an unsurpassed quality of life is available. 

In the Berkshires the average commute is 10 
minutes. Golf courses, tennis clubs, ski resorts, 
theatres, lakes, and fine restaurants are at your 
doorstep. We provide excellent schools — both public 
and private — and the Berkshires are the perfect place 
to raise a family. 

It's no accident that titans of industry have lived 
and worked in the Berkshires Our labor force still 
believes in a day's work for a day's pay. And the 
Berkshires offer a readily available pool of labor. Our 
schools offer vocational programs and governmental 
training dollars are available. 

Most important, we want businesses to locate in 
the Berkshires. That's why our banks have launched 
a program of financial assistance to attract new 
industry and the County funds a full-time organization 
to assist you. 



If you have the opportunity to move a business, 
or influence a business relocation, consider the 
Berkshires. At Berkshire County Development 
Commission, we have compiled data to prove that 
the Berkshires add up for business reasons Come see 
us or write on your letterhead for more information. 
Or, if you know of a business contemplating 
relocation, let us know. We welcome \^our business 



the Berkshires 

Alan C. Marden 

Berkshire County Development Commission 

205 West Street 

Pittsfield, Massachusetts 01201 

Phone: (413) 499-4474 



44 



Definitely not 
to be missed.., 

'Herbert Kupferberg's Tanglewood 
is bursting with information that 
even some of us who worked there 
had missed It catches the spirit 
and truth of that beautiful place." 
— Francis Robinson. 
N.Y. Metropolitan Opera 

'Reads as excitingly as a who- 
done-it!" — Julius Rudel, 

New York City Opera 

'Unquestionably the definitive 
Tanglewood history to date." 

— Christian Science Monitor. 



TANGLEWOOD 




by 

Herbert 
Kupferberg 

8x10. 280 pages. 
Cver 150 photos. 
Index. $9.95 paperback. 
McGRAW-HILL BOOK COMPANY 



HANCOCK SHAKER 
VILLAGE 

Original 18th Century 
Village Restored 

Open daily 9:30-5:00 

Adults $3 Children $1 

Annual Kitchen Festival 
Week of August 1st 

Route 20 Five miles West 
of Pittsfield, Mass. 



Tanglewood 

In August, 1934, a group of music- 
loving summer residents of the Berk- 
shires organized a series of three 
outdoor concerts at Interlaken, to be 
given by members of the New York 
Philharmonic under the direction of 
Henry Hadley. The venture was so 
successful that the promoters incor- 
porated the Berkshire Symphonic 
Festival and repeated the experiment 
during the next summer. 

The Festival committee then invited 
Serge Koussevitzky and the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra to take part in the 
following year's concerts. The Orches- 
tra's Trustees accepted and on August 
13, 1936, the Boston Symphony gave 
its first concert in the Berkshires (at 
Holmwood, a former Vanderbilt estate, 
later the Center at Foxhollow). The series, 
again consisting of three concerts, was 
given under a large tent, and a total of 
nearly 15,000 people attended. 

In the winter of 1936, Mrs. Gorham 
Brooks and Miss Mary Aspinwall 
Tappan offered Tanglewood, the Tap- 
pan family estate, with its buildings and 
210 acres of lawns and meadows, as a 
gift to Koussevitzky and the Orchestra. 
The offer was gratefully accepted, and 
on August 12, 1937, the Festival's 
largest crowd thus far assembled under 
a tent for the first Tanglewood concert, 
a program of music by Wagner. 

As Koussevitzky began The Ride of the 
Valkyries, a storm erupted, overpowering 
the music and causing the concert to be 
interrupted three times before the first 
half could be completed. The second half 
of the program had to be changed, 
because of water damage to some of the 
instruments, and when the concert 
ended, Miss Gertrude Robinson Smith, 
one of the Festival's founders, came to 
the stage and told the audience that the 
storm had demonstrated the need for a 
permanent structure. 

A hundred thousand dollars, she said, 
would be needed for this purpose, and 
the response to her plea was so generous 
that within a short time the amount was 
fully subscribed. Plans for the Music 
Shed were drawn up by the eminent 



architect Eliel Saarinen, and, as modi- 
fied by Josef Franz of Stockbridge, who 
also directed construction, it was com- 
pleted on June 16, 1938, a month ahead 
of schedule. Seven weeks later, Serge 
Koussevitzky led the inaugural concert, 
which included a performance of Beet- 
hoven's Ninth Symphony. By 1941, the 
Theatre-Concert Hall, the Chamber 
Music Hall and several small studios — 
all part of the Berkshire Music Center, 
which had begun operations the pre- 
ceding year — were finished, and the 
Festival had so expanded its activities 
and its reputation for excellence that it 
attracted nearly 100,000 visitors. 

Today Tanglewood annually draws 
close to a quarter of a million visitors; 
in addition to the twenty-four regular 
concerts of the Boston Symphony, there 
are weekly "Prelude" concerts and open 
rehearsals, the annual Festival of 
Contemporary Music, and almost daily 
concerts by the gifted young musicians 
of the Berkshire Music Center. Arthur 
Fiedler and the Boston Pops perform 
each summer, and the Festival also 
includes a series of concerts by popular 
artists. The season offers not only a 
vast quantity of music but also a vast 
range of musical forms and styles, all 
of it presented with a regard for artistic 
excellence that makes the Festival 
unique. Tanglewood and the Berkshire 
Music Center, projects with which 
Koussevitzky was involved until his 
death, have become a fitting shrine to 
his memory, a living embodiment of 
the vital, humanistic tradition that was 
his legacy. 

■ 





WAIilC 

FM 90.3 mHz 

We bring you fine music 
AND dozens of interesting 
events — live and without 
commercials. Sit in with us 
at the National Press Club, 
where the next day's head- 
lines are often made. Enjoy 
"All Things Considered," a 
fascinating magazine of news 
and issues. (Nothingelse like it 
in broadcasting !) Savor some 
of the most satisfying thea- 
tre productions ever aired. 
Revel in delightful, intelligent 
conversation. 

Listen . . . and if you 

like what you hear, 

write for our free monthly 

program directory. 

WAMC 
Albany Medical College 
Albany, New York 12208 







National Public Radio 

ry—v-^ for eastern New York 

I LJ and western New England 



The Shed under construction in 1938 



Why do I work seven days a week? 
That's all there are. Besides 
if you really love what you do 

it's not work. 




Robert J. Lurtsema 

Host, Morning Pro Musica 

Everyday 7am-Noon 




Artists in the Night 
Hayes Burnett plays 
a great mix of jazz 
sounds. Mon-Fri 
ll-2:30am 




The Boston 
Symphony Orchestra 
at Tanglewood 
Fridays at 9pm, 
Saturdays at 
8:30pm, Sundays 

30pm 

and August 



The Spider's Web 
— our storybook for 
the entire family 
Mon-Fri. 7:30pm 



All Things Considered 

— the best news 
program of its kind 

— every day at 5pm 



'GBH Radio 
89.7FM 

Radio that makes sense 
of your day. 



Seiji Ozawa 

Seiji Ozawa became Music Director of 
the Boston Symphony Orchestra in the 
fall of 1973. He is the thirteenth con- 
ductor of the Orchestra since its found- 
ing in 1881. 

He was born in Hoten, Manchuria in 
1935, and studied both Western and 
Oriental music as a child. He attended 
Toho School of Music in Tokyo and 
graduated with first prizes in composi- 
tion and conducting. Shortly after his 
graduation, he won first prize at the 
International Competition of Conduc- 
ting at Besancon, France, and was in- 
vited by Charles Munch, then Music 
Director of the Boston Symphony and a 
judge at the competition, to spend a 
summer studying at Tanglewood. 

In 1964 and for the next five seasons, 
Mr. Ozawa was Music Director of the 
Ravinia Festival. At the beginning of the 
1965-66 season he became Music Direc- 
tor of the Toronto Symphony, a posi- 
tion he relinquished four seasons later 
to study and guest conduct. In 1970 he 
accepted the position of Artistic Direc- 



tor of the Berkshire Music Festival, and 
in December of the same year he began 
his inaugural season as Conductor and 
Music Director of the San Francisco 
Symphony Orchestra, titles that he held 
concurrently with his position as Music 
Director of the Boston Symphony. In 
the spring of 1976 he resigned his San 
Francisco position although he remained 
Honorary Conductor for the 
1976-77 season. 

Mr. Ozawa's recordings include: on 
the Deutsche Grammophon label, Ber- 
lioz's Symphonie fantastique, La damnation de 
Faust, Romeo et Juliette (which was 
awarded a Grand Prix du Disque), Ives's 
Symphony No. 4 and Central Park in the 
Dark, and de Falla's Three-cornered Hat, 
and, on the New World Records label, 
Griffes's Songs of Fiona McLeod. Record- 
ings soon to be released are: Bartok's 
Miraculous Mandarin Suite and Music for 
Percussion, Strings, and Celeste, Tchaikov- 
sky's Symphony No. 5, Brahms's Sym- 
phony No. 1, and Rimsky-Korsakov's 
Sheherazade on Deutsche Grammophon, 
and Sessions' When Lilacs Last in the Door- 
yard Bloom'd on New World Records. 



P* ^n_Hli CLIP AND REDEEM AT DEERSKIN] 

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DEERSKIN 

TRADING POST 

615 Pittsfield-Lenox Road (Rte. 20) Lenox, Mass. 

Coupon good thru Oct. 1. 1977. Discount does not apply to sale merchandise. 



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For 105 years we've been serious 
about people who make music. 

In 1872 Boston University established the first professional music program 
within an American university to train creative and talented students for 
careers in music. 105 years later the Boston University School of Music is 

still doing what it does best. 

• Performance • Music Education • History and Literature • Theory and Composition 



strings 

Walter Eisen berg, vioUn 
Madeline Foley, chamber music 

'Gerald Gelbloom, violin 

'Bernard Kadinoff, viola 
Endel Kalam, chamber music 

* Robert Karol, viola 

* Eugene Lehner, chamber music 

* Leslie Martin, string bass 
George Neikrug, cello 

'Mischa Nieland, cello 
Leslie Pamas, cello 
'Henry Portnoi, string bass 

* William Rhein, string bass 
Kenneth Sarch, violin 

* Roger Shermont, violin 
'Joseph Silverstein, viohn 

Roman Totenberg, violin 

Walter Trampler, viola 
'Max Winder, violin 
'Lawrence Wolfe, string bass 



woodwinds 

Edward Avedisian, clarinet 
'Pasquale Cardillo, clarinet 
'Donot Anthony Dwyer, flute 

Rodenck Ferland, saxophone 

* Ralph Gomberg, oboe 
'John Holmes, oboe 
•Phillip Kaplan, flute 
•James Pappoutsakis, flute 
•Richard Plaster, bassoon 
'Matthew Ruggiero, bassoon 

• Felix Viscuglia, clarinet 

* Sherman Walt, bassoon 
'Harold Wright, clarinet 

brass 

• Ronald Barron, trombone 

• Norman Bolter, trombone 
Peter Chapman, trumpet 
John Coffey, tromboneltuba 

* Armando Ghitalla, trumpet 



brass |cont.) 

Paul Gay, trombone 
'Gordon Hallberg, tromboneltuba 
'Charles Kavaloski, French horn 

Charles A. Lewis, Jr., trumpet 
'David Ohanian, French horn 

Samuel Pilaiian, tuba 
' Rolf Smedvig, trumpet 
'Harry Shapiro, French horn 
'Roger Voisin, trumpet 
'Charles Yancich, French horn 

percussion 

'Thomas Gauger 
'Charles Smith 

harp 

Lucile Lawrence 

piano 

ManaClodes 

Anthony di Bonaventura 

Lenore Engdahl 

Bela Boszormenyi-Nagy 

Phillip Oliver, staff accompanist 

Edith Steams 

Frednk Wanger 

organ 

George Faxon 
Jack Fisher 
Max Miller 

harpsichord 

Joseph Payne 

voice 

Eunice Alberts, contralto 
Germaine Arosa, diction 
Mary Davenport, contralto 
Ellalou Dimmock, soprano 
Maeda Freeman, mezzo 
Robert Gartside, tenor 
Mac Morgan, baritone 
Chloe Owen, soprano 
Allen Rogers, vocal coaching 
Barbara Stevenson, soprano 
Wilma Thompson, mezzo 



music history and literature 

Karol Berger 
Murray Lefkowitz 
Joel Sheveloff 

theory and composition 

David Carney 
David Del Tredici 
John Goodman 
Alan MacMillan 
Joyce Me keel 
Malloy Miller 
Gardner Read 
Allen Schindler 
Robert Sirota 
Tison Street 

music education 

Lee Chnsman 
Phyllis Elhady Hoffman 
Allen Lannom 
Jack O. Lemons 
Mary Ann Norton 

musical organizations 

Adelaide Bishop, opera 
Warren Wilson, opera 
Joseph Huszti, chorus 
•Joseph Silverstein, orchestra 

* Roger Voisin, wind ensemble 

boston symphony orchestra 
woodwind quintet in residence 

"Donot Anthony Dwyer, flute 
•Ralph Gomberg, oboe 
"Harold Wright, clarinet 
•Sherman Walt, bassoon 
'Charles Kavaloski, French horn 

empire brass quintet 
in residence 

Charles A. Lewis, Jr., trumpet 

* Rolf Smedvig, trumpet 
'David Ohanian, French hom 
•Norman Bolter, trombone 

Samuel Pilaiian, tuba 



* Member of the Boston Symphony Orchestra 



Boston University School of Music 

Wilbur EX Fullbright, Director • Robert Lee Tipps, Assistant to Director 
offering degrees at the bachelor, master, and doctoral levels. 

School for the Arts: Music, Theatre, Visual Arts • Norman Dello Joio, Dean 
855 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 



10 



Tanglewood 1977 



Tanglewood on Parade! 



Friday, 12 August at 9 



ARTHUR FIEDLER, conductor 



ROSSINI 



Overture to William Tell 



W.A. MOZART 



Notturno in D for Four Orchestras, K. 286 
(upon the 200th anniversary of the premiere) 

Andante 

Allegretto grazioso 
Menuetto 

ARTHUR FIEDLER, SEIJI OZAWA, 
GUNTHER SCHULLER, and 
JOSEPH SILVERSTEIN, conductors 



LEOPOLD MOZART Toy Symphony 

(formerly attributed to Haydn) 

Allegro 
Menuet 
Finale: Allegro 

SEIJI OZAWA, GUNTHER SCHULLER, 
JOSEPH SILVERSTEIN, THOMAS D. 
PERRY, JR., and ALICE BROCK, soloists 



INTERMISSION 



TCHAIKOVSKY 



from Swan Lake 

Opening scene 

Czardas 

Dance of the Swans 

Valse 



TCHAIKOVSKY 



Ceremonial Overture, 1812 



Special thanks to Clayton L. Thomas, MD, Balloon School of Massa- 
chusetts, Inc., and to the Berkshire Highlanders Bagpipe Band sponsored 
by the Curtis Hotel. 

Seiji Ozawa and the Boston Symphony Orchestra record exclusively 
for Deutsche Grammophon. 
Baldwin piano 



11 



£V 



BOSTON 

SYMPHONY 

ORCHESTRA 

SEIJl OZAWA 

Music Director , 



First violins 

Joseph Silverstein 

Concertmaster 

Charles Munch chair 

Emanuel Borok 

Assistant Concertmaster 
Helen Horner Mclntyre chair 

Max Hobart 

Rolland Tapley 

Roger Shermont 

Max Winder 

Harry Dickson 

Gottfried Wilfinger 

Fredy Ostrovsky 

Leo Panasevich 

Sheldon Rotenberg 

Alfred Schneider 

Gerald Gelbloom 

Raymond Sird 

Ikuko Mizuno 

Cecylia Arzewski 

Amnon Levy 

Bo Youp Hwang 

Second violins 

Victor Yampolsky 

Fahnestock chair 

Marylou Speaker 
Michel Sasson 
Ronald Knudsen 
Leonard Moss 
Vyacheslav Uritsky 
Laszlo Nagy 
Michael Vitale 
Darlene Gray 
Ronald Wilkison 
Harvey Seigel 
Jerome Rosen 
Sheila Fiekowsky 
Gerald Elias 
Ronan Lefkowitz 

Violas 

Burton Fine 

Charles 5. Dana chair 
Reuben Green 
Eugene Lehner 
George Humphrey 
Jerome Lipson 

12 



Robert Karol 
Bernard Kadinoff 
Vincent Mauricci 
Earl Hedberg 
Joseph Pietropaolo 
Robert Barnes 
Michael Zaretsky 

Cellos 

Jules Eskin 

Philip R. Allen chair 
Martin Hoherman 
Mischa Nieland 
Jerome Patterson 
Robert Ripley 
Luis Leguia 
Carol Procter 
Ronald Feldman 
Joel Moerschel 
Jonathan Miller 
Martha Babcock 

Basses 

William Rhein 

Acting Principal 

Harold D. Hodgkinson chair 

Joseph Hearne 

Bela Wurtzler 

Leslie Martin 

John Salkowski 

John Barwicki 

Robert Olson 

Lawrence Wolfe 

Henry Portnoi 

Flutes 

Doriot Anthony Dwyer 

Walter Piston chair 

James Pappoutsakis 
Paul Fried 

Piccolo 

Lois Schaefer 

Oboes 

Ralph Gomberg 

Mildred B. Remis chair 
Wayne Rapier 

English Horn 

Laurence Thorstenberg 

Clarinets 

Harold Wright 

Ann 5.M. Banks chair 
Pasquale Cardillo 

Peter Hadcock 

E-flat clarinet 

Bass Clarinet 

Felix Viscuglia 



Bassoons 

Sherman Walt 

Edward A. Taft chair 
Roland Small 
Matthew Ruggiero 

Contra bassoon 

Richard Plaster 

Horns 

Charles Kavalovski 

Helen Sagoff Slosberg chair 

Charles Yancich 
Peter Gordon 
David Ohanian 
Richard Mackey 
Ralph Pottle 

Trumpets 

Armando Ghitalla 

Roger Louis Voisin chair 

Andre Come 
Rolf Smedvig 
Gerard Goguen 

Trombones 

Ronald Barron 
Norman Bolter 
Gordon Hallberg 
William Gibson 

Tuba 

Chester Schmitz 

Timpani 

Everett Firth 

Sylvia Shippen Wells chair 

Percussion 

Charles Smith 
Arthur Press 

Assistant timpanist 
Thomas Gauger 
Frank Epstein 

Harps 

Bernard Zighera 
Ann Hobson 

Personnel Managers 

William Moyer 
Harry Shapiro 

Librarians 

Victor Alpert 
William Shisler 

Stage Manager 

Alfred Robison 



Notes 



Tanglewood on Parade is our annual 
invitation to you to see what else we do 
here — that is, other than put on the 
weekend Boston Symphony Orchestra 
that have made Tanglewood the most 
important music festival in America and 
one that ranks with any in the world. 
During the week, when most of you 
cannot often be here, the place is full 
of music too. It comes from the Shed, 
where the Boston Symphony is getting 
ready for the coming weekend, but it 
also comes from the Theatre, the Cham- 
ber Music Hall, the Main House, and a 
dozen other rehearsal stages, barns, and 
studios, where the students of the Berk- 
shire Music Center are preparing for 
the next lesson, the next coaching ses- 
sion, the next concert. More than that, 
they are really preparing for their lives, 
preparing to take their places in the 
profession, just as many of the com- 
posers whose works are now published, 
performed, and recorded, and the per- 
formers who now conduct, play, and 
sing all over the world, were once stu- 
dents here — our own music director, 
Seiji Ozawa, to name just one. We are 
a school as well as a festival, or perhaps 
one could put it better by saying that 
being a school is part — a crucial part — 
of our being a festival. The Berkshire 
Music Center Orchestra, for example, 
has given concerts this summer under 
the direction of Leonard Bernstein (an- 
other of our alumni) and Seiji Ozawa, 
and will play next Tuesday evening 
under Gunther Schuller and on Satur- 
day afternoon, 27 August, under Klaus 
Tennstedt. Several times a week, the 
students in the Berkshire Music Cen- 
ter's Fellowship program and in Boston 
University's Tanglewood Institute give 
public concerts of chamber and vocal 
music. And tomorrow afternoon, there 
begins what has become one of the out- 
standing events in American musical 
life, the annual Festival of Contem- 
porary Music, sponsored jointly by the 
Berkshire Music Center and the Fromm 
Music Foundation at Harvard University. 



Tanglewood on Parade offers during 
the course of the day a sampler of what 
goes on here. (Though we should add 
that we do not have balloon service as 
part of everyday life.) We offer it a 
little bit in the spirit of bragging, but 
also a thank you to you, our indispens- 
able friends, and, most important, as an 
invitation to come back, an inducement 
perhaps, or even a seduction. Pick up 
one of our "snakes," those long stream- 
ers that give the schedule for the coming 
week, and see what is going here this 
weekend and in the next few days, and 
stop by the Friends' Office next to the 
box office by the Main Gate, find out 
what privileges you can be offered as 
part of a Friends of Tanglewood 
membership which in turn is so neces- 
sary to us in our effort to continue what 
we do, and admire — better yet, buy — 
the world's handsomest tee shirts 
and totebags. 

Because all this happens under the 
umbrella of the Boston Symphony, we 
traditionally end Tanglewood on Parade 
with a concert of specially chosen festive 
music played by the Symphony. So from 
all of us at Tanglewood, welcome, look 
around, and come back. 



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13 



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knowledgeable than anyone else 
writing in Boston now.' 9 

"Young, but knows what he's doing, 
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When performers got the opportunity to 
criticize the critics* that's what they said 
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14 



BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

Seiji Ozawa, Music Director 

Colin Davis, Principal Conductor 
Joseph Silverstein, Assistant Conductor 
Tanglewood 1977 

Saturday, 13 August at 8:30 




SEIJI OZAWA, conductor 



VIVALDI Piccolo Concerto in C, P. 79 

[Allegro] 
Largo 
Allegro molto 



LOIS SCHAEFER 



VIVALDI Bassoon Concerto in F, P. 318 

(cadenza by Walt) 

Allegro non molto 
Andante 
Allegro molto 

SHERMAN WALT 



INTERMISSION 



SESSIONS When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom 'd 

(Poem by Walt Whitman) 

ESTHER HINDS, soprano 
FLORENCE QUIVAR, mezzo-soprano 
DOMINIC COSSA, baritone 
TANGLEWOOD FESTIVAL CHORUS, 
JOHN OLIVER, conductor 



Seiji Ozawa and the Boston Symphony Orchestra record exclusively 
for Deutsche Grammophon. 
Baldwin piano 



15 




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Notes 



Antonio Vivaldi 

Concerto in C major for piccolo, 
P. 79 (F. VI, 4) 

Concerto in F major for bassoon, 
P. 318 (F. VIII, 8) 

Antonio Lucio Vivaldi was born in Venice 
on 4 March 1678 and died in Vienna on 26 or 

27 July 1741 (only the date of his burial — 

28 July — is known). Dates and other circum- 
stances of the composition or early performances 
of these two concertos are not established. The 
identifying P and F numbers refer respectively 
to the catalogues of Marc Pincherle and Antonio 
Fanna. Both concertos are scored for solo instru- 
ment with strings and figured bass. Jerome Rosen 
plays the harpsichord, which was built by 
Carl Fudge. 

In his lifetime, Vivaldi enjoyed re- 
nown as a composer of instrumental, of 
opera, and of sacred music, as a violin 
virtuoso, and as a bit of a character. One 
hundred years after his obscure death — 
forty years ago it wasn't even known 
that he died in Vienna! — he was for- 
gotten, as completely forgotten as could 
be. In the mid- nineteenth century, 
scholars began to rediscover him, but 
only as a by-product of burgeoning 
Bach research, for the German master 
had transcribed several works by his 
older Italian contemporary. A couple of 
pieces found their way into repertory, 
though in blown-up arrangements.* At 
the 200th anniversary of his death, 
scholars had some fair idea of who he 
was, but he was still not much of a name 
to the general public. In the late 1940s, 
the American violinist Louis Kaufman 
aroused interest by playing The Four 
Seasons on a CBS broadcast, a summer 
substitute in the slot occupied during 
the winter by the New York Philhar- 
monic- Symphony. f But it was with the 

*Koussevitzky was fond of such an arrange- 
ment — actually one of the more modest in 
the genre — by Alexander Siloti of the Con- 
certo in D minor, Opus 3, Nr. 11. The 
recording he made was for many years vir- 
tually the only one to be had of anything 
of Vivaldi's. 






\l 




cx^4j % 




Antonio Vivaldi, sketched by P.L Ghezzi, 1723 

arrival of the long-playing record, that 
period, as someone observed, when a 
tape recorder seemed to be running 24 
hours a day in Stuttgart, that Vivaldi 
came into his own once more. Or at least 
in part: an occasional performance of 
the Gloria aside, the vocal music is as 
neglected as ever. 

The concertos, of which there are 
over 500, are, to be sure, everywhere. 
Many of them were written for per- 
formance at the Ospedale della Pieta, a 
Venetian orphanage for girls with which 
Vivaldi was associated from about 1704 
until 1740, and which, like three other 
such establishments, I Mendicanti, Gli 
Incurabili, and L'Ospidaletto, was 
famous for the quality of the music 
there. Venice, as a seaport, the principal 
port of entry for trade with the Orient, 
as a place whose location put it always 
in the forefront of conflict with the 

tKoussevitzky also played two of the Seasons, 
presumably in their original form: Summer 
in 1928 and Spring in 1936. 

17 



Turks, was a city in which the care of 
orphans, foundlings, and unwanted il- 
legitimate children was an important 
sub-industry. Before joining the Pieta 
as music master, Vivaldi had studied 
violin with his father, a musician at 
St. Mark's Cathedral, and had become 
a priest. Congenital angina pectoris, 
however, made it impossible for him to 
celebrate mass. His fame as a composer 
grew: his operas were in demand, his 
music was published in Amsterdam, the 
commission for the famous Gloria came 
from the court of Louis XV in Paris. He 
traveled to important musical cities like 
Dresden, for whose orchestra he wrote 
a series of inventive concertos. Over the 
years, though, his relations with the 
Pieta eroded, and in 1740 he elected to 
leave. We know nothing about that last 
journey, where he went first, what 
plans or hopes he entertained. And 
Europe just then was torn by the War of 
the Austrian Succession. His name ap- 
pears in the Pieta account- books for 
the last time on 29 August 1740, and 
we next encounter Vivaldi in the Vien- 
nese burial- register for St. Stephen's 
parish, 28 July 1741. He died, according 
to the coroner's report, of an internal 
inflammation. 

The two concertos on this program 
may have been written for girls at the 
Pieta or possibly for private patrons 
elsewhere. Vivaldi wrote more concer- 
tos for violin (or violins) than for any- 
thing else, but he was friendly to many 
other instruments, including those that 
have precious little other solo reper- 
toire. The "Piccolo Concerto" is one of 
three for flautino, actually a sopranino 
recorder. And when, one wonders, 
listening to the on-and-on 16th-note 
figurations of the first movement, did 
Vivaldi think a player might breathe? 
For bassoon, then an instrument with 
only two keys, he wrote an astonishing 
36 solo concertos (plus a single move- 
ment of a 37th, a double concerto for 
bassoon with oboe, and a bassoon ar- 
rangement of an oboe concerto). Many 
of these works showed up in private 
collections that made their way into the 
Turin National Library earlier in this 
century. One of the title pages indicates 



that the music was written "for Gio- 
seppino Biancardi or bassoon." Perhaps 
this virtuoso, whose name was syn- 
onymous with bassoon, is the ghostly 
presence behind many of these con- 
certos. On the other hand, a visitor to 
the Pieta reported that there is "no 
musical instrument so large as to daunt 
the girls," and perhaps at some time that 
institution had a student extraordinarily 
skilled — and she would have had to be — 
on the bassoon. 

— Michael Steinberg 



Roger Sessions 

When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom'd 

Roger Huntington Sessions was born in Brook- 
lyn, New York, on 28 December 1896 and now 
lives in Princeton, New Jersey. When Lilacs 
Last in the Dooryard Bloom'd, commis- 
sioned by the University of California at Ber- 
keley in commemoration of the 100th anni- 
versary of its foundation, was completed on 
2 January 1970. The first performances took 
place at Berkeley on 23 and 24 May 1971, 
Michael Senturia conducting. The performers 
heard tonight gave the work in Boston last 
April, and their recording will be issued on 
the New World label in the fall. Sessions has 
dedicated the score to the memory of Martin 
Luther King Jr. and Robert F. Kennedy. 

When Roger Sessions composed When 
Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom'd, he used 
a copy of Leaves of Grass that he bought 
at the Harvard Coop in 1911. He was 
fourteen, and a freshman at the college. 
Though born in Brooklyn, he is by 
temperament and heritage a New En- 
glander who refers to Hadley, Massa- 
chusetts as "my ancestral hangout." 
Having started piano with his mother 
at four, he began composing at twelve, 
and a year later he had written his first 
opera Lancelot and Elaine. About then 
he was also ready to admit his vocation 
to his parents: 

"I suppose they were a little anxious 
about such a decision, and so, surrepti- 
tiously, they asked the advice of a lot of 
musicians, including Humperdinck, who 
was in New York at the time. My father 
was going to see Puccini but he didn't 



18 



succeed. I heard, years later in Italy, 
that Puccini had told a story of having 
been asked to see the music of a young 
boy in America and to advise his parents 
whether he ought to go on with it. He 
paced the floor all night and decided he 
couldn't take that responsibility, so he 
called off the appointment. I don't know 
whether it was I or not but I assume it 
was, because Puccini did call off the 
appointment." 

The reports being "generally favor- 
able," Sessions did go on, first, at Har- 
vard with Archibald Davison and Edward 
Burlingame Hill, then because outbreak 
of war interfered with a plan to go to 
Maurice Ravel in Paris, at Yale with 
Horatio Parker. As an instructor at 
Smith College, sure that he knew too 
little, he continued his eduction through 
books by Cherubini and d'Indy, and 
after that — crucially — by going to study 
with Ernest Bloch. Soon after, he be- 
came Bloch's assistant at the Cleveland 
Institute of Music and eventually suc- 
ceeded him as Director. In 1923, he 
composed incidental music for Andreyev's 
Black Maskers, the first score to make a 
reputation for him. From 1925 until 
1933, thanks to a series of grants and 
prizes, he lived in Paris, Berlin, and 
Florence, composing, among other 
works, his First Symphony, given its 
world premiere in Boston by Serge 
Koussevitzky in April 1927, and his 
Piano Sonata No. 1. During a six-month 
visit to New York in 1928, he became 
co-founder and co-director of the famous 
Copland-Sessions new-music concerts. 

When he returned for good in 1933, 
Sessions resumed his second career as 
teacher, to become the most important 
American teacher of composition in the 
last forty years: Leon Kirchner, Milton 
Babbitt, Hugo Weisgall, Vivian Fine, 
David Diamond, Edward T. Cone, Earl 
Kim, Andrew Imbrie, Donald Martino, 
John Harbison, and Fred Lerdahl are 
among his pupils. He worked briefly in 
New York and at Boston University, 
joined the Princeton faculty in 1935, 
spent seven years at the University of 
California at Berkeley, and eventually 
returned to Princeton, retiring in 1965. 
He has written several books as well as 




I 



i 



Roger Sessions 

countless articles and reviews. In 1968- 
69, he was Charles Eliot Norton profes- 
sor at Harvard, and in 1974, the Pulitzer 
Prize committee, coming belatedly to its 
senses, awarded Sessions — and, for the 
same reason, Duke Ellington — a special 
citation. He still teaches composition 
at the Juilliard School and has written 
nearly half his music in the last twenty 
years. His catalogue includes eight sym- 
phonies, three concertos, two operas, 
The Trial of Lucullus and Montezuma, the 
huge scena for soprano and orchestra, 
The Idyll of Theocritus, chamber music for 
various combinations, three piano sona- 
tas, a sonata for violin. He is now work- 
ing on his Ninth Symphony, something 
he regards "with both lack of super- 
stition and lack of pretension." 

His music is dense, active, highly 
energetic (in the intellectual sense as 
well as the physical). Almost nothing 
in it is neutral, and even accompanying 
figures are apt to be so specific as to take 
on a vivid life of their own. It throws 
events at you at a tremendous rate and 
it is, as John Harbison has put it, all 
"abundance and sublime wilfulness." Its 
style has changed over the years, there 
being nothing left now of the Stravin- 
skian surface of the 1927 Symphony, 
but those characteristics have not. And 
the work is, at its center, profoundly 
traditional in rhythm and phrasing, in 
the tensions and releases of its arching 
melodies, in its passionate commitment 
to what Sessions likes to call "the long 
line," in its expressive and ethical intent. 

The Whitman cantata continues a 
series of elegies begun with the Adagio 

19 



of the Second Symphony, during whose 
writing the death of President Roosevelt 
occurred, and including the Piano Sonata 
No. 3, which is the composer's response 
to the death of President Kennedy, and 
the Canons for String Quartet, "written 
on the high seas" in memoriam Igor 
Stravinsky. The way into the music is 
through the poem, as indeed the music 
is the way — or a way — into the words. 
The Civil War, in which Whitman served 
in the offices of the Paymaster, the 
Secretary of the Interior, and the 
Attorney- General, but also as a sort of 
nurse's aide and "consolant" in military 
hospitals, was a critical emotional ex- 
perience in his life. He always wanted to 
put together a book in which he might 
gather that experience. It would be part 
mosaic, part history, he thought, but he 
never brought it about. Abraham Lincoln 
was shot on 14 April 1865 and died early 
next day. When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard 
Bloom'd was the 46-year old Whitman's 
response to that death and to the pro- 
gress of the funeral train as it made its 
way across the country to Springfield, 
Illinois. It was published that Fall in 
Sequel to Drum-Taps and was eventually 
incorporated in Leaves of Grass. 

No American poet has been set to 
music more often than Whitman. Ses- 
sions himself first thought of setting 
Lilacs in the 1920s, but was dissatisfied 
with his sketches and put the plan 
aside until he felt more ready. He re- 
turned to Whitman in 1944, when he 
set Turn O Lihertad for mixed chorus with 
piano duet. The sonorous "musicality" 
in Whitman is seductive. The sometimes 
inflated rhetoric is a potential trap, and 
the recklessly large-breathed, quasi- 
Biblical rhythems can present grave dif- 
ficulties. And it is just there that Ses- 
sions is especially successful. His own 
art combines severity and control with 
the "abundance, sublime wilfulness, 
[and] Dionysian qualities" to which 
Harbison calls attention, and so, pro- 
jecting the poetry now in simple chordal 
declamation, now in the long, high-arched 
melodies of which he is the master, 
he conveys wonderfully the feel and the 
variety of Whitman's lines. (Hindemith, 
in his setting of When Lilacs Last in the 



Dooryard Bloom'd, completed in April 1946 
with Franklin D. Roosevelt in mind, 
rather strait-laces those lines, while 
Delius, in the lovely Sea Drift, delicately 
and tenderly responsive to the poet's 
emotional world, tends to let everything 
run awfully liquid.) 

Sessions divides the text into three 
sections. The first presents the three 
symbols about which Whitman builds 
his poem — lilac, star, and thrush — and 
it is introductory in character, and very 
short. The second describes the progress 
of the funeral train: it is pageantry and 
catalogues, public poetry, though ending 
in the quiet of 

"Sing on! sing on, you gray-brown 
bird! ..." 
The third is Whitman's loving contem- 
plation of Death: its focal point — and in 
fact that of the whole poem and the 
whole cantata — is the Carol: 

"Come, Lovely and soothing Death, 

Undulate round the world, serenely 
arriving, arriving, 

In the day, in the night, to all, to each 

Sooner or later, delicate Death." 
For this moment, the composer reserves 
the sound of the solo contralto, a sound 
he has let us hear just once and briefly, 
in the second part, at the lines 

"O how shall I warble myself for the 
dead one there I loved? 

And how shall I deck my song for the 
large sweet soul that is gone? 

And what shall my perfume be, to 
adorn the grave of him I love?" 

If you know the poem, you will notice 
that Sessions has made some cuts in the 
second and third parts of the cantata. 
Those parts of the poem, he points out, 
recapitulate and summarize, and that 
expressive and structural task is one he 
has chosen to turn over to the music 
itself, which can accomplish it even 
more powerfully and evocatively. (A 
few discrepancies in detail — "and" in 
place of "with," for instance — arose be- 
cause Sessions was working from mem- 
ory: some of these were later on caught 
and corrected, some were not.) From the 
beginning, Sessions establishes poetic 
and musical associations — of the figure 
flute and clarinet play in the first 
measure, for example, with the lilacs, or, 



20 



more broadly, with April ("fourth- 
month" in Whitman's Quaker-borrowed 
language) and Spring and renewal; of a 
characteristic sequence and flavor of 
harmonies with the star in the western 
sky; of the phrases for off-stage flute 
and piccolo, sometimes with xylophone, 
that evoke the song of the hermit thrush. 
Were there the space for it, one could 
point to detail after detail in which that 
network of associations is elaborated; 
to the wonderfully fluid way in which 
the composer moves the text in and out 
among the voices of the chorus and the 
soloists; to the special moments, like 
the undulating, swaying violin music 
for the "sea-winds blown from east and 



west," the vaulted melody with which 
the violins follow the phrase, "Night and 
day journeys a coffin," the "tolling, 
tolling bells' perpetual clang," the "glad 
serenades" and dances the poet proposes 
to Death, and the ecstasy in "I float this 
carol with joy, with joy to thee, O 
Death!"; the field after the battle and the 
obsessive explosive returns to the word 
"suffer'd," the mixture near the end, 
part doublings, part variants, of chorus 
and orchestra at "Yet each I keep, and all, 
retrievements out of the night," the last 
phrase for bass clarinet, also flute, trom- 
bone, clarinet, which does not cease so 
much as recede out of earshot. . . . 

— M.S. 




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21 



WHEN LILACS LAST IN THE DOORYARD BLOOM'D 



I 

When lilacs last in the dooryard bloom'd, 

And the great star early droop'd in the western sky in the night, 

I mourn'd — and yet shall mourn with ever-returning spring. 

O ever-returning spring! trinity sure to me you bring; 
Lilac blooming perennial, and drooping star in the west, 
And thought of him I love. 

O powerful, western, fallen star! 

O shades of night! O moody, tearful night! 

O great star disappear'd! O the black murk that hides the star! 

O cruel hands that hold me powerless! O helpless soul of me! 

O harsh surrounding cloud, that will not free my soul! 

In the dooryard fronting an old farm-house, near the white-wash'd palings, 
Stands the lilac bush, tall-growing, with heart-shaped leaves of rich green, 
With many a pointed blossom, rising, delicate, with the perfume strong I love, 

With ev'ry leaf a miracle and from this bush 

A sprig, with its flower, I break. 

In the swamp, in secluded recesses, 

A shy and hidden bird, 

Solitary, the thrush, 

The hermit, 

Sings by himself a song. 

Song of the bleeding throat! 

Death's outlet song of life — (for well, dear brother, I know, 

If thou wast not gifted to sing, thou would'st surely die.) 



II 

Over the breast of the spring, the land, amid cities, 

Amid lanes, and through old woods, where lately the violets peep'd from the ground, 

Amid the grass in the fields, passing the endless grass; 

Passing the yellow-spear'd wheat, 

Passing the apple-tree blows of white and pink in the orchards; 

Carrying a corpse to where it shall rest in the grave, 

Night and day journeys a coffin. 

Coffin that passes through lanes and streets, 

Through day and night, with the great cloud darkening the land, 

With the pomp of inloop'd flags, with the cities drap'd in black, 

With the show of the States themselves, as of crape-veil'd women, standing, 

With processions long and winding, and the flambeaus of the night, 

With the silent sea of faces, 

With the waiting depot, the arriving coffin, and the sombre faces, 

And the dirges through the night, with the thousand voices rising strong and solemn; 

Pour'd around the coffin, 

The dim-lit churches and the shuddering organs, 

And the tolling, tolling bells' perpetual clang; 

Here! coffin that slowly passes, 

I give you my sprig of lilac. 

(Nor for you, for one, alone- 
Blossoms and branches green to coffins all I bring : 
For fresh as the morning — this will I carol a song for you, O sane and sacred death. 

22 



All over bouquets of roses, v 

O death! 1 cover you over with roses and early lilies ; 
But mostly and now the lilac that blooms the first, 
With loaded arms I come, pouring for you, 
For you, and the coffins all of you, O death.) 

O western orb, sailing the heav'n! 

Now I know what you must have meant, 

As we walk'd up and down in the dark blue so mystic, 

As we walk'd in silence the transparent shadowy night, 

As I saw you had something to tell, as you bent to me night after night, 

As you droop'd from the sky low down, as if to my side, (while the other stars all look'd on ; ) 

As we wander'd together, I saw, ere you went, how full you were of woe; 

As I stood in the cold, transparent night, 

As I watch'd where you pass'd, 

And my soul, in its trouble, sank. 

Sing on, there in the swamp! 

O singer bashful and tender! I come — I understand you ; 

But a moment I linger — for the star, my departing comrade, holds me. 

O how shall I warble myself for the dead one there I loved? 

And how shall I deck my song for the large sweet soul that is gone? 

And what shall my perfume be, to adorn the grave of him I love? 

Sea-winds, blown from east and west, 

Blown from the eastern sea, and blown from the western sea, 

With these will I perfume the grave of him I love. 

O what shall the pictures be that I hang on the chamber walls, 
To adorn the burial-house of him I love? 

Pictures of growing spring, and farms, and homes, 

With the Fourth-month eve at sundown, and the gray smoke lucid and bright, 
With floods of yellow gold of the gorgeous, indolent, sinking sun, burning, expanding the air; 
With the fresh sweet herbage under foot, and the pale green leaves of the trees; 
In the distance the flowing glaze of the river, with a wind-dapple here and there- 
with ranging hills on the bank, with many a line against the sky, and shadows; 
And the city at hand, with dwellings so dense, and stacks of chimneys, 
And all the scenes of life, and the workshops, and the workmen homeward returning. 

Lo! body and soul! this land! 

Mighty Manhattan, with spires, and the sparkling and hurrying tides, and the ships; 

This varied and ample land — the South and the North in the light — Ohio's shores, and flashing 

Missouri, 
And ever the far-spreading prairies, cover'd with grass and corn. 

Lo! the most excellent sun, so calm and haughty ; 

The violet and purple morn, with just-felt breezes; 

The gentle, soft-born, measureless light ; 

The miracle, spreading, bathing all — the fulfill'd noon ; 

The coming eve, delicious — the welcome night, and the stars, 

Over my cities shining all, enveloping man and land. 

Sing on! sing on, you gray-brown bird! 

Sing from the swamps, the recesses — pour your chant 

Limitless out of the cedars and pines. 

Sing on, dearest brother — warble your 

Loud human song, with voice of uttermost woe. 

O liquid, and free, and tender! 

O wild and loose to my soul! O wondrous singer! 

You only I hear yet the star holds me, (but will soon depart; ) 

Yet the lilac, with its mastering odor, holds me. 



23 



Ill 



Now while I sat in the day, and look'd forth, 

In the close of the day, with its light, and the fields of spring, and the farmer preparing his crops, 

In the large unconscious scenery of my land, with its lakes and forests, 

In the heavenly aerial beauty, 

Under the arching heavens of the afternoon,' and the voices of children and women, 

The many-moving sea-tides, and ships how they sail'd, 

And the summer approaching with richness, and the fields all busy with labor, 

And the infinite separate houses, each with its daily usages; 

And the streets, how their throbbings throbb'd, and the cities pent — lo! 

Falling upon them all, and enveloping me with the rest, 

Appear'd the cloud, appear'd the long black cloud; 

And I knew Death, its thought, and the sacred knowledge of death. 

Then with the knowledge of death as walking one side of me, 

And the thought of death close-walking the other side of me, 

And, as holding the hands of companions, 

I fled forth to the hiding, receiving night, 

Down to the shores of the water, 

To the solemn shadowy cedars, and the ghostly pines so still. 

And the singer so shy, receiv'd us comrades three; 

And he sang what seem'd the carol of death, and a verse for him I love. 

And my spirit tallied the song. 

Come, lovely and soothing Death, 

Undulate round the world, serenely arriving, arriving, 

In the day, in the night, to all, to each, 

Sooner or later, delicate Death. 

Prais'd be the fathomless universe, 

For life and joy, and for objects and knowledge curious; 
And for love, sweet love — But praise! praise! praise! 
For the sure-en winding arms of cool-enfolding Death. 

Dark Mother, always gliding near, with soft feet, 

Have none chanted for thee a chant of fullest welcome? 

Then I chant it for thee — I glorify thee above all ; 

I bring thee a song that when thou must indeed come, come unfalteringly. 

Approach, strong Deliveress! 

When it is so — when thou hast taken them, I joyously sing the dead, 

Lost in the loving, floating ocean of thee, 

Laved in the flood of thy bliss, O Death. 

From me to thee glad serenades, 

Dances for thee I propose, saluting thee — adornments and feastings for thee; 
And the sights of the open landscape, and the high-spread sky, are fitting, 
And life and the fields, and the huge and thoughtful night. 

The night, in silence, under many a star; 

The ocean shore, and the husky whispering wave, whose voice I know; 

And the soul turneth to thee, O vast and well-veil'd Death, 

And the body gratefully nestling close to thee. 

Over the tree-tops I float thee a song! 

Over the rising and falling waves — over the myriad fields, and the prairies wide- 
Over the dense-pack'd cities all, and the teeming wharves and ways, 
I float this carol with joy, with joy to thee, O Death! 

To the tally of my soul, 

Loud and strong kept up the gray-brown bird, 

With pure, deliberate notes, spreading, filling the night. 



24 



Loud in the pines and cedars dim. 

Clear in the freshness moist, and the swamp-perfume; 

And I with my comrades there in the night. 

While my sight unclosed. 

As to long panoramas of visions. 

And I saw askant the armies, 

I saw, as in noiseless dreams, hundreds of battleflags; 

Borne through the smoke of the battle, and pierc'd with missiles, I saw them, 

And carried hither and yon through the smoke, and torn and bloody ; 

And at last for a few shreds left on the staffs, (and all in silence,) 

And the staffs all splinter'd and broken. 

I saw battle-corpses, myriads of them, 

And the white skeletons of young men — I saw them ; 

I saw the debris arid debris of all the slain soldiers of the war; 

And we saw they were not as was thought ; 

They themselves were fully at rest — they suffer'd not; 

The living remain'd and suffer'd — the mother suffer'd, 

And the wife and the child, and the musing comrade suffer'd, 

And the armies that remain'd suffer'd. 

Passing the visions, passing the night ; 

Passing, unloosing the hold of my comrades' hands ; 

Passing the song of the hermit bird, and the tallying song of my soul, 

Passing, I leave thee, lilac with heart-shaped leaves; 

I leave thee there in the dooryard, blooming, returning with spring. 

I cease from my song for thee; 

From my gaze on thee in the west, communing with thee, 

O comrade lustrous, with silver face in the night. 

Yet each I keep, and all, retrievements out of the night ; 
For the sweetest, wisest soul of all my days and lands . . . 
Lilac and star and bird, twined with the chant of my soul, 
There in the fragrant pines, and the cedars dusk and dim. 





Walt Whitman 



Qatev/Sy% Inii 

and I^jgtaufint 

637-2532 71 Walker St. 

Reservations Preferred Lenox, Ma 

In the Heart of Lenox 

Serving Breakfast 

Lunch, Dinner & Late Supper 

Especially Prepared for You 

by Internationally Renowned 

Chef Owner, Gerhard Schmid 

Cafe Hour on the Terrace 

Throughout the Tanglewood Season 

Cocktail Lounge Ample Free Parking 



25 



*THE 

BOSTON 

SYMPHONY 

CHAMBER 

PLAYERS 



/,V '> 



Three Sundays that can help you 

face Monday 

The Brahms Quintet op. 115. Stra- 
vinsky's L'Histoire du Soldat. The 
Schubert E Flat Piano Trio. These 
and other major chamber music 
works make up the Boston Sym- 
phony Chamber Players 1977-78 
program. 

The twelve principal players of 
the Boston Symphony Orchestra 
will perform at Jordan Hall at 4:00 
p.m. on Nov. 6, 1977 and Feb. 19 and 
April 9, 1978. Gilbert Kalish will be 
the guest pianist. 
For complete program information, write to Subscription Office, 
Svmphony Hall, Boston, Mass. 02115, or call 266-1492. 



26 



BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

Seiji Ozawa, Music Director 

Colin Davis, Principal Guest Conductor 
Joseph Silverstein, Assistant Conductor 
Tanglewood 1977 

Sunday, 14 August at 2:30 




v ' ' ^ ' *• 



GUNTHER SCHULLER, conductor 



MENDELSSOHN Overture The Hebrides (Fingal's Cave), Opus 26 



SCHULLER 



Concerto for Violin and Orchestra 

Moderato — Vigoroso 
Molto sostenuto 
Rondo: Presto giocoso 



ZVI ZEITLIN 



INTERMISSION 



SEIJI OZAWA, conductor 



TCHAIKOVSKY Symphony No. 5 in E minor, Opus 64 

Andante — Allegro con anima 
Andante cantabile, con alcuna licenza 
Valse: Allegro moderato 
Finale: Adante maestoso — Allegro vivace — 
Moderato assai e molto maestoso — Presto 



Seiji Ozawa and the Boston Symphony Orchestra record exclusively 
for Deutsche Grammophon. 
Baldwin piano 



27 




wrod 



does not end on Sunday. It's only the beginning. 



This Week At The 
Berkshire Music Center: 



Saturday, August 13 through 17: 

Festival of Contemporary Music (See page 44) 

Thursday, August 18 at 8:30 pm: 

Boston University Young Artist Program 
Chamber Music Concert 

Saturday, August 20 at 2:30 pm: 
Boston University Young Artist Program 
Chamber Music Concert 

Sunday, August 21 at 10:00 am: 

Berkshire Music Center Chamber Music Concert 

Sunday, August 21 at 8:30 pm: 

Berkshire Music Center Vocal Music Recital 

Monday, August 22 at 8:30 pm: 

Berkshire Music Center Chamber Music Concert 

Wednesday, August 24 at 8:30 pm: 
Boston University Young Artists Orchestra 
Henry Charles Smith, conductor 
Dello Joio: Variations, Chaconne and Finale 
Respighi: Gli Uccelli (The Birds) 
Mussorgsky- Ravel: Pictures at an Exhibition 

Thursday, August 25 at 8:30 pm: 
Berkshire Music Center Vocal Music Recital 

Saturday, August 27 at 2:30 pm: 
Berkshire Music Center Orchestra 
Klaus Tennstedt, conductor 
Mozart: Symphony no. 3 5 in D "Haffner" 
Bruckner: Symphony no. 4 in E flat 

Saturday, August 27 at 4:30 pm: 

Boston University Young Artists Program 
Chamber Music Concert 

These events are open to the public by making a contribution, $2.00 
minimum, to the Berkshire Music Center at the main gate, or by becoming 
a Friend of Music at Tanglewood. 



28 



Notes 



Felix Mendelssohn- Bartholdy 

Overture The Hebrides (Fingal's Cave) 

Jakob Ludwig Felix Mendelssohn was born in 
Hamburg on 3 February 1809 and died in 
Leipzig on 4 November 1847. Bartholdy was 
the name of an uncle who had changed his own 
name from Salomon. It was he who most per- 
sistently urged the family's conversion to Luther- 
anism: the name Bartholdy was added to Men- 
delssohn — to distinguish the Protestant Men- 
delssohns from the Jewish ones — when the 
composer's father actually took that step in 1822, 
the children having already been baptized in 
1816. The Hebrides Overture was completed 
in December 1831, revised twice, and first 
performed in Berlin on 10 January 1833, 
Mendelssohn conducting. 

The Hebrides are islands off the west 
coast of Scotland and, inhabited by a 
people more Norse than Gaelic, they 
bear names like Rhum, Iona, Staffa, 
Islay, Ulva, Eigg, Mull, and Muck. The 
name of Islay is revered by connoisseurs 



of Scotch whisky, and it is also there 
that Harris tweed is made. Fingal's Cave 
is to be found on the southwest shore of 
Staffa, a flooded room 227 feet by 42, 
rising to a height of 66 feet, its walls 
lined with hexagonal pillars of basalt 
lava. It became a tourist attraction in the 
1770s in the wake of the excitement 
over a stupendous literary forgery by a 
certain James Macpherson, who, in the 
1760s, had published what he said were 
translations of Gaelic epics and ballads 
by the third-century poet, Ossian. Mac- 
pherson used some genuine material, 
though all of it from centuries much 
later than the third, but he both mis- 
understood and misrepresented most of 
what he used and in any event added 
enormously more stuff of his own. 
(After his death, the Gaelic "originals" 
were published — he had left money in 
his will for that purpose — but they 
turned out to be translations of Mac^- 
pherson's English.) What is sure is that 
Macpherson, whose own literary career 
had failed, did his work with skill: the 
combination of ominously misty, doom- 
laden atmosphere and a style derived 




i. c 






c? 






t?W\ fgJ ./' 'jO ^Itff "jllfaTf j 2 | Sf? r WSJ? f M^U&BfcfiS 







Ln'f ,i, chimin 



Mendelssohn's autograph manuscript of The Hebrides Overture. In measure 3, the D in the 
basses was added by Charles Gounod, who assumed that Mendelssohn had forgotten it. 



29 







cfc 




-4, .'.5 



£.«/> r tc 






. L-J~. #81* 



lu>o %£...- >..Qi-.~ 
tu-Ji.jpjUM 
VjMM Qt„JL.... 



From the sketchbook Mendelssohn kept on his journey 
to Scotland in 1829. 

from the rolling and sonorous English 
of the King James version of the Bible 
made an immense impact. Dr. Johnson, 
David Hume, and Voltaire were among 
the doubters, but most of literary Europe 
debated whether Ossian was not actually 
a greater writer than Homer. Readers 
devoured Fingal, Temora, and the Fragments, 
and, as we can learn from Goethe's Wer- 
ther, the reading of Ossian to your girl 
was a recognized instrument of seduction. 
No question, Macpherson's work is cru- 
cial to the birth of Romantic sensibility. 
Mendelssohn, twenty years old and 
on his first trip to the British Isles, 
would not for the world have missed 
Fingal's Cave. He set out on this journey 
just after his triumphal and epoch- 
making revival of Bach's St. Matthew 
Passion in Berlin in the spring of 1829, 
his host in London and companion on 
the tour being his "one and only friend," 
Karl Klingemann, poet, amateur of the 
arts, and secretary to the Hanoverian 
legation in London. Scotland particu- 
larly moved and excited him — "When 
God Himself turns to landscape paint- 
ing, it turns out strangely beautiful 
everything looks so stern and robust, 



half enveloped in haze or smoke or fog" 
— and he found there the beginnings of 
two of his most beautiful compositions, 
the Scottish Symphony, which he would 
not finish until 1842, and the Hebrides 
Overture whose first theme he sketched 
then and there, and included in a 
letter home. 

He worked on it hard, long, and often, 
trying, as he once said, to get it to smell 
more of seagulls and fish oil than of 
counterpoint. The form in which we 
now have it is the third, and even then 
Mendelssohn seems to have entertained 
doubts, for, like the Scottish and Italian 
symphonies, it is one of the scores he 
would not release for publication in his 
lifetime. We can only be puzzled. "Fine- 
spun yet richly colored," Berlioz called 
it. The initial "lapping waves" idea, the 
one that came to him right at Fingal's 
Cave, suggests myriad transformations. 
The singing second theme (cellos and 
bassoons, with help now and again from 
the clarinets) is one of Mendelssohn's 
loveliest melodies; moreover, unlike 
most of his tunes in that vein it doesn't 
just peter out feebly, but is beautifully 
diverted into yet another view of the 
opening figure. All this is drastically and 
fascinatingly compressed in recapitula- 
tion to allow room for a storm, evocative 
and at the same time as neat as one of 
the pencil drawings in his travel diary. 
But the greatest wonder in the overture 
is the beginning of the development, 
where, after grand and formal fanfares, 
voices call across the water, a quietly 
ominous rustling fills the air, and vast 
and mysterious distances are suggested. 
Perhaps, as he sketched these strange 
and far- ranging key changes, he was 
remembering the parallel places in some 
of Mozart's piano concertos (for ex- 
ample K. 503 in C, which Malcolm 
Frager plays here on 20 August, or 
K. 595 in B flat), or perhaps he just 
found them as he relived the emotions 
of his journey to the Hebrides! Either 
way, here is a moment when sovereign 
craft and fantasy work magically in the 
cause of seagulls, fish oil, of Fingal, the 
legendary king of Morven, and the 
Ossianic mists. 

— Michael Steinberg 



30 



Gunther Schuller 

Concerto for Violin and Orchestra 

Gunther Schuller was born in New York City 
on 22 November 1925 and now lives in Newton 
Centre, Massachusetts. The Eastman School 
of Music in Rochester, New York, commissioned 
the Violin Concerto in honor of Zvi Zeitlin's 
appointment as first incumbent of the newly 
created Kilbourn professorship at the school. 
Schuller completed the work at 3:25 a.m. on 
1 June 1976. With Zeitlin as soloist and the 
composer conducting, the premiere took place at 
the Lucerne Festival in Switzerland on 25 
August 1976. Since then, Zeitlin has played the 
concerto with the Utah Symphony, the Rochester 
Philharmonic, on an Australian tour, and with 
the Halle Orchestra in Manchester, England, 
Schuller conducting all performances except the 
Australian ones, which were led by Willem 
van Otterloo. 

The 3:25 a.m. finishing time as noted 
on the final page of the score tells its 
own tale. Gunther Schuller, composer, 
conductor, horn player, teacher, writer, 
scholar, and general excitement center, 
prepared to deal with Wozzeck, White- 
man, Beethoven, Sousa, Rake's Progress, 
country fiddling, Carter, Ellington, Sho- 
stakovich, Dolphy, Monteverdi, is the 
completest musician we have, engaged 
with phenomenal energy in so many 
careers that he counts as our Number 
One musical conglomerate. He is much 
in demand as a composer, and some- 
times as many as a dozen commissions 
have been stacked up. So busy were 
both he and Zvi Zeitlin with their re- 
spective careers that the preliminary 
rehearsal of the Violin Concerto before 
their actual meeting with the orchestra 
in Lucerne took the form of Zeitlin's 
playing the entire violin part to Schuller 
over long-distance telephone from Santa 
Barbara, California to West Stockbridge. 

Schuller thinks of violin concertos as 
special works, remembering the many 
composers — Beethoven, Mendelssohn, 
Brahms, Elgar, Sibelius, Stravinsky, Berg, 
Schoenberg among them-who have 
made one singular, characteristic, and 
self-revealing statement in that genre. 
He approached this commission, there- 
fore, with a heightened sense of concern 



and responsibility. That the violin writ- 
ing itself is strikingly idiomatic and 
effective is no surprise, not only because 
Schuller's compositions are always in- 
formed by a lively sense of how instru- 
ments speak, but also because the sound 
of the violin is one with which he grew 
up, since his father played in the New 
York Philharmonic for 42 years. 

The first of three movements begins 
with a rather slow, harmonically static 
introduction, with the violin emerging 
almost imperceptibly from the orches- 
tra's dense and variegated buzzing and 
twittering. This rhapsodic entrada be- 
comes quieter and quieter, and when it 
has receded altogether, the main part 
of the movement, marked vigoroso, is 
launched. The concerto has no formal 
cadenza, but slower episodes, actually 
reminiscences of the introduction, have 
a cadenza-like function and effect. 

The second movement begins by pre- 
senting four kinds of music, a chorale 
for wind instruments; a melody for 
unaccompanied violin (with winds and 
tamtam joining at the very end); a brief 
passage for kettledrums, marimba, and 
vibraphone; and the violin melody again, 
this time accompanied from the begin- 
ning (first by its own double-stops). All 
that now returns in a quadruple variation, 
the wind chorale overlaid with nervous 
string figurations; the violin melody 
covering a greater range and given a 
new and delicate accompaniment; the 
percussion music translated into brass 
(this is marked "ghostly"); the restate- 
ment of the violin melody enriched both 
in harmony and texture. On the third 
look at the material, Schuller reverses 
the order of the first two elements, 
beginning with the violin melody, the 
beautiful harp accompaniment being 
carried over from the previous variation, 
and the solo being softly "shadowed" 
by the orchestral violins. Then comes 
the chorale, now given a sonorous and 
climactic statement by the full orchestra, 
after which the music dissolves into a 
very quiet coda for the solo violin, 
accompanied mostly by other solo strings 
and a very few woodwinds. 

Like the slow movement, the finale, 
which follows after the briefest possible 



31 




One of Soviet Georgia's senior citizens thought 

Dannori was an excellent yogurt. She ought to know. 

She's been eating yogurt for 137 years. 



CAMACHICH KVITZINIA. PHOTOGRAPHED IN ATRARA. SOVIET GEORGIA. 



32 



pause, is almost schematic in its formal 
clarity. It is a rondo, whose principal 
theme appears four times. On each of 
its reappearances it comes, as Schuller 
puts it, in a new garb, first in ragtime, 
then as country fiddling, finally as a 
waltz. At last there is just the ghost of a 
waltz, and just when silence seems about 
to take over, the brilliant and virutosic 
coda begins. 

— M.S. 



Piotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky 

Symphony No. 5 in E minor, 
Opus 64 

Piotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky was born at Votkinsk, 
district of Viatka, 25 April (old style) or 
7 May (new style) 1840 and died in St. Peters- 
burg on 6 (18) November 1893. He composed 
the Symphony No. 5 between May and August 
1888, himself conducting the premiere in St. 
Petersburg in November of that year. 

For a bit of historical perspective we 
quote part of the program note William 
Foster Apthorp wrote for the October 
1892 concerts at which Arthur Nikisch 
introduced the Tchaikovsky Fifth to 
Boston Symphony audiences. It was not 
four years since the premiere, and the 
composer was still alive, with The Nut- 
cracker vet to be produced and the Path'e- 
tique still to be written, Apthorp was this 
orchestra's program annota tor from 1892 
until 1901. He was also music critic for 
The Boston Evening Transcript, and Baker's 
Biographical Dictionary of Musicians notes 
that "his intemperate attacks on Tchai- 
kovsky elicited protests from his 
readers." 

Introducing the Fifth, he writes that 
"Tchaikovsky is one of the leading com- 
posers, some think the leading composer, 
of the present Russian school. He is fond 
of emphasizing the peculiar character of 
Russian melody in his works, plans his 
compositions in general on a large scale, 
and delights in strong effects. He has 
been criticized for the occasional excessive 
harshness of his harmony, for now and 
then descending to the trivial and tawdry 
in his ornamental figuration, and also 
for a tendency to develop comparatively 




Tchaikovsky at the time of the Fifth Symphony — 
the photo is autographed to Antonin Dvorak. 

insignificant material to inordinate length. 
But, in spite of the prevailing wild 
savagery of his music, its originality and 
the genuineness of its fire and sentiment 
are not to be denied." 

"The E minor symphony ... is an ex- 
cellent example of the composer's style. 
It is in the regular, traditional sym- 
phonic form, except that the first part of 
the first allegro movement is not repeated 
(a license which several contemporary 
composers tend more and more to 
adopt), and that the traditional scherzo 
is replaced by a waltz movement. But 
composers, ever since Beethoven, have 
been so fond of writing movements of 
various kinds to take the place of the 
regular minuet or scherzo that this can 
hardly be called a license on Tchaikov- 
sky's part. Hitherto, however, only Hec- 
tor Berlioz (in his Fantastic Symphony) 
has found a waltz movement worthy of 
the dignity of the symphonic form; and 
the present writer believes that Tchai- 
kovsky has been the first to imitate him 
in introducing a waltz into a symphony. 
The theme of the slow introduction to 
the first movement is of considerable 
importance, as it reappears again more 
than once in the course of the work. 

33 



The theme of the first allegro, as well as 
the manner in which it is accompanied at 
its first presentation, is eminently Rus- 
sian. The whole movement is an example 
of persistent and elaborate working out, 
such as is not too common nowadays, 
even with Tchaikovsky. The second 
(slow) movement is based upon two 
contrasted themes, the Slavic character 
of the first of which is unmistakable. 
The finale is preceded by a slow intro- 
duction, in which the theme of that to 
the first movement is recognized once 
more. This is followed by an allegro vivace, 
full of quasi- Cossack energy and fury — 
a movement thoroughly characteristic of 
the composer. The whole symphony is 
scored for full modern orchestra, al- 
though some instruments often em- 
ployed by orchestral writers today, such 
as the English horn, bass -clarinet, and 
harp, are conspicuous by their absence. 
But the general style of orchestration 
is essentially modern, and even ultra- 
modern." 

Wearing his Evening Transcript hat, 
Apthorp was not as cautious: "It is less 
untamed in spirit than the composer's 
B-flat minor Concerto, less recklessly 
harsh in its polyphonic writing, less in- 
dicative of the composer's disposition to 
swear a theme's way through a stone 
wall ... In the Finale we have all the un- 
tamed fury of the Cossack, whetting 
itself for deeds of atrocity, against all 
the sterility of the Russian steppes. The 
furious peroration sounds like nothing 
so much as a horde of demons struggling 
in a torrent of brandy, the music growing 
drunker and drunker. Pandemonium, 
delirium tremens, raving, and above all, 
noise worse confounded!" 

Tchaikovsky's own feelings about the 
Fifth blew hot and cold: "I am dreadfully 
anxious to prove not only to others, but 
also to myself, that I am not yet played 
out as a composer . . . the beginning was 
difficult; now however, inspiration 
seems to have come" ... "I have to 
squeeze it from my dulled brain" . . . "It 
seems to me that I have not blundered, 
that it has turned out well" ... "I have 
become convinced that this symphony 
is unsuccessful. There is something re- 



pulsive about it, a certain excess of 
gaudiness and insincerity, artificiality. 
And the public instinctively recognizes 
this. It was very clear to me that the 
ovations I received were directed at my 
previous work, but the symphony itself 
was incapable of attracting them or at 
least pleasing them. The realization of 
all this causes me an acute and agonizing 
sense of dissatisfaction with myself. 
Have I already, as they say, written 
myself out, and am I now able only to 
repeat and counterfeit my former style? 
Yesterday evening I looked through the 
Fourth Symphony . . . What a difference, 
how much superior and better it is! Yes, 
this is very, very sad!" . . . "The Fifth 
Symphony was magnificently played [in 
Hamburg, March 1889], and I like it far 
better now after having held a bad 
opinion of it for some time" . . . 

Since the Fourth, ten years had gone 
by, years in which Tchaikovsky's inter- 
national reputation was consolidated, 
in which he had come to feel the need to 
give up his teaching at the Moscow Con- 
servatory so as to have more time for 
composing, in which he had begun to be 
active as a conductor, had finished 
Eugene Onegin and three unsuccessful but 
not uninteresting operas (The Maid of 
Orleans, Mazeppa, and The Sorceress), and 
composed the Violin Concerto and the 
Second Piano Concerto, the three or- 
chestal suites and Mozartiana, the Italian 
Capriccio, the Serenade for Strings, the 1812 
Overture, the Vespers Service, the A 
minor Trio, the Manfred Symphony, and 
some of his most appealing songs, in- 
cluding Don Juan's Serenade and Amid the 
noise of the ball. 

The Fourth had been the symphony 
of triumph over fate and was in that 
sense, and admittedly, an imitation of 
Beethoven's Fifth. For Tchaikovsky's 
own Fifth, we have nothing as explicitly 
revealing as the correspondence in which 
he set out the program of the Fourth for 
his patroness, Nadezhda von Meek. 
There is, however, a notebook page 
outlining a scenario for the first move- 
ment: "Introduction. Complete resigna- 
tion before Fate, or, which is the same, 
before the inscrutable predestination of 



34 



Providence. Allegro (I) Murmurs, doubts, 
plaints, reproaches against xxx. (II) Shall I 
throw myself in the embraces of faith???" 
xxx is less likely to be a particular 
person than what he usually refers to in 
his diary as Z or as THAT — his homo- 
sexuality, which caused him deep pain 
and which, in addition, terrified him as 
a potential cause of scandal. To pursue 
Tchaikovsky's verbal plan through the 
first movement as he finally composed 
is fruitless. (He also disliked attempts to 
interpret musical processes in too literal 
— and literary — a manner.) Clearly, 
though, the theme with which the clari- 
nets in their lowest register begin the 
symphony has a function other than its 
musical one: it will recur as a cata- 
strophic interruption of the second 
movement's love song, as an energy-less 
ghost that faintly reproaches the languid 
dancers of the waltz, and — in a meta- 
morphosis that is perhaps the sympho- 
ny's least convincing musical and ex- 
pressive gesture — in majestic and blaz- 
ing E major triumph. 

Tchaikovsky's wonderful gift of 
melody (Apthorp's "peculiar [Russian] 
character" must refer to the way the 
tunes droop, which is not Boston-in- 
the- 1890s at all), his skill as well as his 
delight in "strong effects," the fire and 
the sentiment, these need neither intro- 
duction nor advocacy. A word, though, 
about the orchestra. Rimsky-Korsakov, 
discussing his own Sheherazade congra- 
tulates himself on the brilliance he has 
been able to achieve with an orchestra 
no larger than that normally used by 
Glinka. Tchaikovsky, too, produces 
remarkable effect with remarkable 
economy. Three flutes (one doubling 
piccolo), two each of the other wood- 
winds, four horns, two trumpets, three 
trombones and tuba, kettledrums, and 
strings — that is not an extravagant 
orchestra, but the brilliance and vivid- 
ness of its fortissimo is extraordinary. 
But what delight there is, above all, in his 
delicate passages — the color of the low 
strings in the introduction (with those 
few superbly calculated interventions of 
second violins), the beautifully placed 
octaves of clarinet and bassoon when 
the allegro begins its melancholy and 



graceful song, the growls into which 
that movement subsides (with the kettle- 
drum roll as the top note of the chord 
of cellos, basses, and bassoons), the low 
strings again in the measures before the 
famous and glorious horn tune, the 
sonority of those great, swinging, pizzi- 
cato chords that break the silence after 
the catastrophe, those faintly buzzing 
notes for stopped horns in the waltz, the 
enchantingly inventive filigree all through 
the middle part of that movement, those 
propulsive chuggings of cellos, basses, 
drums, and bassoons in the finale, the 
tough brilliance of the woodwind lines 
and the firmness of their basses. . . . 

Tchaikovsky had not of course written 
himself out: as soon as he returned from 
his journey to Prague (where the exper- 
ience of conducting the Fifth produced 
the most depressed of all his reports on 
that work — "there is something repul- 
sive about it . . ."), he began work on The 
Sleeping Beauty, and within another year 
his finest operatic score, The Queen of 
Spades, was on its way. 

— M.S. 




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36 



Guest Artists 



Arthur Fiedler 

The 1977 Boston Pops season marked 
the 48th year that a unique partnership 
— Arthur Fiedler and the Boston Pops — 
brought music lovers from all over the 
country and the world to Symphony 
Hall. At the close of the season, Mr. 
Fiedler had conducted the Pops for three 
seasons longer than all of his seventeen 
predecessors combined. 

Fiedler was born in Boston on 17 
December 1894. His father, Emanuel 
Fiedler, was an Austrian-born violinist 
who played in the Boston Symphony for 
twenty-five years. His mother gave 
young Arthur his first piano lessons, 
which he admits were along with the 
practicing, a chore. He was schooled at 
the Prince Grammar School, and Boston 
Latin until his father retired from the 
Orchestra and took the family back to 
Austria. He worked in publishing houses 
in Vienna and Berlin, and then entered 
the Royal Academy in Berlin to study 
violin, piano and conducting. 

Fiedler returned to Boston at the start 
of World War I, and in 1915 joined the 
BSO under Karl Muck. He was not only 
a violinist, but played as orchestra vio- 
list, pianist, organist, and percussionist 
as well. 

In 1924 he formed and was the con- 
ductor of the Boston Sinfonietta, a 
chamber orchestra made up of BSO 
members. Then in an effort to bring as 
much music to the public as possible, he 
initiated a campaign of several years for 
a series of free outdoor concerts. His 
efforts were rewarded in 1929 with the 
first Esplanade Concert on the Charles 
River. In 1953 to celebrate the twenty- 
fifth anniversary of those concerts, the 
Arthur Fiedler Foot Bridge was dedi- 
cated over what is now Storrow Drive. 
He was appointed the eighteenth con- 
ductor of the Boston Pops in 1930. 

Long a national figure, Fiedler has not 
only distinguished himself as a muscian 
and conductor, but as a leading citizen 
as well. On 10 January of this year, he 
was awarded the Presidential Medal of 
Freedom at a White House Ceremony. 




Mr. Fiedler has been closely associa- 
ted with the San Francisco Pops Orches- 
tra for the past twenty-six summers. 
In the United States he has conducted 
the Boston and Chicago Symphonies, 
the Cleveland and Philadelphia Orches- 
tras, and the New York Philharmonic. 
He has also led major orchestras in 
Europe, South America, Africa, Aus- 
tralia, and Canada. 

Gunther Schuller 

Gunther Schuller, New England Con- 
servatory's president from 1967 until 
this past June, was born in New York 
City on 22 November 1925. At age 
twelve he joined the St. Thomas Choir 
School as a boy soprano and began 
composition studies with Dr. T. Ter- 
tius Noble as well as flute, and later, 
French horn lessons. When he was six- 
teen, he began to play professionally, 
including the American premiere of 
Shostakovich's Seventh Symphony with 
the New York Philharmonic under Tos- 
canini, and a year later he joined the 
Ballet Theatre Orchestra under Antal 
Dorati. That year he also became solo 
French horn player with the Cincin- 
nati Symphony, and the next year he 
performed his own Horn Concerto with 
the symphony under Eugene Goosens. 
From the time he was nineteen until 
1959 he played with the Metropolitan 
Opera Orchestra. Since then he has 

37 




been guest conductor with the sym- 
phony orchestras of Boston, Cincinnati, 
Minnesota, Cleveland, Denver, New 
York, Chicago, Baltimore, Rochester, 
St. Louis, Los Angeles, Washington, San 
Francisco, Pittsburgh, Atlanta, Mon- 
treal, Vancouver, and in Europe, the 
BBC Symphony, the Philharmonic Or- 
chestra of London, the French Radio 
Orchestra, the Symphony Orchestra of 
the Bavarian Radio, and the Tonhalle 
Orchestra of Zurich. His compositions 
include; Symphony for Brass and Per- 
cussion, Concerto for Orchestra (com- 
missioned for the seventy- fifth anni- 
versary of the Chicago Symphony), 
Spectra (commissioned by Dimitri Mitro- 



poulos for the New York Philharmonic), 
Seven Studies on Themes of Paul Klee 
(commissioned by the Ford Foundation 
for the Minneapolis Orchestra), and 
The Visitation (written for the Hamburg 
State Opera). He was acting head of 
the Composition Department of the 
Berkshire Music Center from 1963 to 
1965 when he became head of the de- 
partment, succeeding Aaron Copland. 
Before becoming President of the New 
England Conservatory, he taught at 
Yale University, and in 1969 he became 
Artistic Director of the Berkshire Music 
Center with Seiji Ozawa. He has writ- 
ten two books which were published by 
Oxford University Press; Horn Technique 
(1962), and Early Jazz: Its Roots and Musical 
Development (1968). For the latter he 
received the ASCAP Deems Taylor 
Award for 1970, and he is currently 
working on a second volume. 

Lois Schaefer 

Lois Schaefer joined the Boston Sym- 
phony Orchestra in 1965. She studied 
at the New England Conservatory with 
Georges Laurent, who was for many 
years principal flute of the Boston Sym- 
phony. She was assistant first flute in 
the Chicago Symphony and first flute of 
the New York City Opera and has 
performed with the Boston Pops, the 
Chicago, Springfield, and RCA Victor 
Orchestras. Miss Schaefer is a member 
of the New England Harp Trio with 



Take the Music home with you — 

The complete selection of recorded classics you'll 

find at the Coop makes it possible to enjoy tonight's selected pieces whenever 

you like. Choose your favorite renditions from the 

many different recordings available. 




Harvard Sq., Cambridge 

New England's Largest Record Center 



38 




BSO members Carol Procter and 
Ann Hobson. 

Sherman Walt 

Sherman Walt, Principal Bassoon of 
the Boston Symphony Orchestra, 
studied music at the University of Min- 
nesota under the sponsorship of Dimitri 
Mitropoulos, and at the Curtis Institute, 
where his teachers included Ferdinand 
Del Negro and Marcel Tabuteau. Before 
joining the Orchestra in 1952, he was 
Principal Bassoonist of the Chicago 
Symphony. Mr. Walt currently teaches 
at Boston University, where he is Pro- 
fessor of Music, and also at the Berk- 
shire Music Center at Tanglewood. 



Esther Hinds 

Soprano Esther Hinds made herdebut 
with the New York City Opera as the 
First Lady in The Magic Flute. In 1974 
she sang Donna Elvira in Don Giovanni 
and Micaela in Carmen which she sang 
at the San Diego and Phoenix Opera 
Companies. She has also sung with 
Opera South and the Cincinnati Opera. 
Her other roles have included Strauss's 
Ariadne at the Juilliard School, Cio- 
Cio-San in Madama Butterfly with the 
Houston Opera, the Countess in Le 
none di Figaro, and Bess in Porgy 
and Bess with the Detroit and Hartford 
symphonies. She has sung throughout 
the United States, Japan, and Korea and 
has performed at the Aspen Music Fes- 
tival under Walter Susskind and James 
Levine, at the Dartmouth Music Festival, 
and at the University of Northern Colo- 
rado, as well as concerts in the New York 
City Parks with the Municipal Sym- 
phony of New York. In 1975, she sang 
Handel's Messiah with the Syracuse Sym- 
phony and in July of that year sang at 
the Spoleto Festival's Homage to Samuel 
Barber. She also sang the role of Cleo- 
patra under Gian-Carlo Menotti at the 
American Opera Center in the revised 
Antony and Cleopatra by Samuel Barber. 
Last April she performed and recorded 
Sessions's When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard 
Bloom'd with Seiji Ozawa and the 
Boston Symphony. 





39 




Florence Quivar 

Mezzo-soprano Florence Quivar is a 
member of both the Metropolitan and 
the New York City operas and has sung 
with many major American orchestras. 
She has performed in Alexander Nevsky 
with the Philadelphia Orchestra under 
Rostropovich and with the Los Angeles 
Philharmonic under Rozhdestvensky, as 
well as in Verdi's Requiem with the Cleve- 
land Orchestra under Lorin Maazel and 
again with the Los Angeles Philharmonic 
under Robert Shaw. Shortly after her 
1976 New York City Opera debut, Miss 
Quivar appeared with the Boston Sym- 
phony under Colin Davis in Handel's 
Messiah. In February 1977 she performed 
with both the Metropolitan and New 
York City operas, and in May, she made 
her Canadian debut with the Toronto 
Symphony in Berlioz's Romeo el Juliette 
conducted by Andrew Davis. She also 
appeared in the Cincinnati May Festival 
in Mendelssohn's Elijah under James 
Levine. As last year's May Festival she 
sang the role of Serena in Porgy and Bess 
and has recorded the work for London 
Records. She has also recorded Rossini's 
Stabat Mater with Thomas Schippers and 
the Cincinnati Symphony on Vox 
Records. Last April she performed and 
recorded with the Boston Symphony in 
Roger Sessions's When Lilacs Last in the 
Dooryard Bloom'd conducted by Seiji Ozawa. 



Dominic Cossa 

Baritone Dominic Cossa was born in 
Jessup, Pennsylvania, to opera -loving 
parents who had emigrated from Peru- 
gia, Italy. At the University of Scranton, 
he studied psychology, and it was after 
he had done graduate work in that sub- 
ject that he heard of the Metropolitan 
Opera Regional Auditions. Although he 
had never studied voice, knew no com- 
plete role and had learned only a few 
arias, he prepared Eri tu from Un hallo 
in maschera and entered the auditions. 
He finished third and caught the atten- 
tion of Anthony Marlowe, a judge who 
had once sung with the Met. Because 
Marlowe wrote to Cossa praising his 
voice, he decided to study with him. 
Three years later, Cossa auditioned for 
the New York City Opera and was 
immediately offered a contract for the 
fall season. He made his European debut 
as Sharpless in Madama Butterfly in the 
Teatro Nuovo in Milan, and after his 
return to the United States, he appeared 
with the Cincinnati Summer Opera, the 
San Francisco Spring Opera, the Fort 
Worth Opera, among others. At the 
same time he learned the repertoire 
with the Metropolitan Opera Studio, 
after winning its National Council Au- 
ditions. Since his 1970 Metropolitan 
Opera debut he has appeared with that 
company as Figaro in the Barber of Seville, 




40 



Marcello in La Boheme, Mercutio in Romeo 
et Juliette, and Valentin in Faust. He has 
also performed with the New York City 
Opera and the Metropolitan Opera in 
Europe, the Strasbourg Opera du Rhin, 
the Dallas Symphony, the Opera Com- 
pany of Philadelphia, the Chicago Sym- 
phony, the New Orleans and Vancouver 
operas, and the Greater Miami Opera 
Association. By special invitation, he 
sang Figaro in the special Olympic Games 
production of the Barber of Seville in 
Montreal. Last April he performed and 
recorded Roger Sessions's When Lilacs 
Last in the Dooryard Bloom'd with the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra conducted by 
Seiji Ozawa. 



Zvi Zeitlin 

Violinist Zvi Zeitlin, a Berkshire 
Music Center alumnus, was born in Rus- 
sia and grew up in Israel. At age eleven 
he received a full scholarship to the 
Juilliard School of Music where he 
studied with Sasha Jacobsen and Ivan 
Galamian. In addition to the traditional 
masterpieces, Zeitlin's repertoire includes 
twentieth -century pieces by Berg, Bloch, 
Ben-Haim, Starer, Stravinsky, and 
Schoenberg. For his rendition of the 
Schoenberg Concerto at the Vienna 
Festival, he earned the title "twelve- 
tone Paganini." He has performed with 



Allan Albert, Artistic Director 

.BERKSHIRE PLAYHOUSE, 

July 6-1 7 

WILLIAM ATHERTON 
GILDARADNER 
Dunning & Abbott's CHRIS SARANDON 
BROADWAY JILLHAWORTH 



Saul Bellow's July 20-31 
THE LAST ANALYSIS RON LEIBMAN 



Rodgers & Hart's Aug. 3-14 
I MARRIED AN ANGEL PHYLLIS NEWMAN 



William Inge's Aug. 1 7-28 
COMEBACK, DANA ANDREWS 
LITTLE SHEBA ESTELLE PARSONS 



UNICORN THEATRE, 

Three New Musicals 

July 7-24 July 26-August 1 4 
THE WHALE SHOW A FABLE 

by Jean-Claude van Italie 
August 1 6-28 and Richard Peaslee 
THE CASINO 



PROPOSITION THEATRE 

July 8-August 28 
THE PROPOSITION 



Performance Times for the Playhouse 

Evgs.: Wed., Thurs., Fri. 8:30 p.m.; Sat. 9 p.m.; Sun. 7 p.m. 

Mats.: Thurs. 2 p.m.; Sat. 5 p.m.; Sun. 3 p.m. 

Prices for the Playhouse 

Broadway, The Last Analysis, Come Back, Little Sheba 

Fri. & Sat. (9 p.m. pert, only) $8.95. 7.50; 
All other perfs. $7.95, 6.50 
I Married An Angel 

Fri. & Sat. (9 p.m. pert, only) $9.95, 8.50: 

All other perfs. $8.95, 7.50 

MAIL ORDERS FILLED PROMPTLY! 

Berkshire Theatre Festival, Stockbridge. Mass. 

01262. Enclose stamped, self-addressed envelope. 

RESERVE BY PHONE! Call 413 • 298-5536 or 298-4800 




the New York Philharmonic, the Chi- 
cago and San Francisco symphonies, 
the BBC Symphony Orchestra, the Halle 
Orchestra, and more recently, the Utah 
Symphony, the Los Angeles Philhar- 
monic, the National Symphony, and in 
Europe, the Concertgebouw Orchestra, 
the Vienna Philharmonic, the Brussels 
Philharmonic, and the Vienna Tonktinst- 
ler Orchestra. In August 1976 he per- 
formed the world premiere of the Schul- 
ler Violin Concerto at the Lucerne Festi- 
val and gave its American premiere in 
November with the Utah Symphony. 
Mr. Zeitlin is currently Professor of 
Violin at the Eastman School of Music, 
where he was appointed the first Kil- 
bourn Professor, the first distinguished 
chair to be founded by the conservatory. 



41 



Tanglewood Festival Chorus 

The Tanglewood Festival Chorus was 
formed under the joint auspices of the 
Berkshire Music Center and Boston 
University in 1970. The director since 
its foundation, John Oliver, is director 
of choral and vocal activities for Tangle- 
wood, a member of the MIT faculty 
and director of the MIT Choral Society. 
The Festival Chorus made its debut at 
Symphony Hall in a 1970 performance 
of Beethoven's Ninth Symphony, and 
has since taken part in concert directed 
by William Steinberg, Seiji Ozawa, Eu- 
gene Ormandy, Colin Davis, Arthur 
Fiedler, and Michael Tilson Thomas. 
Members of the chorus come from the 
Greater Boston area and from all walks 
of life, and they rehearse throughout 
the year. The Chorus's first appearance 
on records, in the Boston Symphony's 
Damnation of Faust, conducted by Seiji 
Ozawa, was nominated for a Grammy 




as the best choral recording of the 
year. Their most recent appearance 
with the BSO was four weeks ago 
in Haydn's Theresa Mass, Seiji Ozawa 
conducting. 



Sopranos 

Margaret Aquino 
Cynthia Armstrong 
Deborah London Berg 
Marie-Christine Casey 
Susan Chapman 
Margo Connor 
Susan R. Cook 
Lou Ann David 
Kathrin Davidovich 
Rebecca Flewelling 
Yvonne Frazier 
Marilyn L. Haskel 
Alice Honner 
Beth Howard 
Frances Kadinoff 
Carole Stevenson Kane 
Vivian LaMorder 
Barbara Levy 
Joyce Lucia 

Virginia Lambert Mason 
Betsy Moyer 
H. Diane Norris 
Joan Pernice 
Nancy Peterson 
Gail Ransom 
Rhonda Rivers 
Judith L. Rubenstein 
Barbara A. Scales 
Bette L. Snitzer 
Ann K. Staniewicz 



Jane Stein 
Janet Wade 
Pamela Wolfe 

Altos 

Mary Bennett 
Skye Burchesky 
Anne Butler 
Bette Carey 
Doris Halvorson Coe 
Elizabeth H. Colt 
Mary Crowe 
Mary Curtin 
Catherine Diamond 
Ann Ellsworth 
June Fine 
Roberta A. Gilbert 
Thelma Hayes 
Donna Hewitt 
Beth Holmgren 
Karol Hommen 
Leah Jansizian 
Alison D. Kohler 
Dorothy Love 
Sharron J. Lovins 
Nina Saltus 
Frances Schopick 
Janet Shapiro 
Amy Wing Sheridan 
Lynne Stanton 
Nancy Stevenson 



Laurie Stewart 
Florence A. St. George 
Lisa Tatlock 
Kathi Tig he 
Susan Watson 
Maria E. Weber 
Mary J. Westbrook 

Tenors 

Antone Aquino 
Kent E. Berwick 
Paul Blanchard 
Sewell E. Bowers, Jr. 
Richard Breed 
Albert R. Demers 
Paul Foster 
Robert Greer 
Dean A. Hanson 
Wayne Henderson 
James P. Hepp 
Jeffrey Hoffstein 
Richard P. Howell 
Peter Krasinski 
Gregg Lange 
Henry L. Lussier, Jr. 
Jack Maclnnis 
Al Newcomb 
Ray Parks 
Peter D. Sanborn 
Robert W. Schlundt 
William Severson 



John Smith 
Douglas Thompson 

Basses 

Peter Anderson 
Mitchell Brauner 
Neil Clark 
John W. Ehrlich 
Bill Good 
John Henry 
Carl D. Howe 
Daniel J. Kostreva 
Paul Kowal 
Henry Magno, Jr. 
Martin Mason 
Jim Melzer 
Frank G. Mihovan 
John P. Murdock 
Jules Rosenberg 
Peter Rothstein 
Andrew Roudenko 
Vladimir Roudenko 
Robert Schaffel 
Frank Sherman 
Richard M. Sobel 
Douglas Strickler 
Jean Renard Ward 
Nathaniel Watson 
Pieter Conrad White 
Robert T. Whitman 
Howard J. Wilcox 



42 



Coming concerts: 



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Friday, 19 August at 7 (Weekend Prelude) 

FAURE 

Five Songs 

L'Hiver a cess'e 
Apres un reve 
En sourdine 
Prison 
Fleur jetee 

BERLIOZ 

Nuits d'Et'e 

Villanelle 

Le Spectre de la rose 

Absence 

Au Cimetiere 

L'lle inconnue 
Zaide 
La mori d'Ophelie 

(Ballade d'apres Shakespeare) 
SUSAN DAVENNY WYNER, soprano 
YEHUDI WYNER, piano 

Friday, 19 August at 9 

SEIJI OZAWA conducting: 

BERLIOZ 

Requiem, Op. 5 (Grande Messedes Morts) 
BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
BERKSHIRE MUSIC CENTER 
ORCHESTRA AND BANDS 
TANGLEWOOD FESTIVAL CHORUS 
AND CHOIR, JOHN OLIVER conductor 
KENNETH RIEGEL, tenor 

Saturday, 20 August at 8:30 
ANDREW DAVIS conducting: 

MOZART 

Piano Concerto No. 25 in C, K. 503 

MALCOLM FRAGER, piano 
HOLST 

The Planets 

THE TANGLEWOOD CHOIR, 

JOHN OLIVER, conductor 

Sunday, 21 August at 2:30 
ANDREW DAVIS conducting: 

BERLIOZ 

Overture Le Corsaire 
BRITTEN 

Serenade for Tenor, Horn and Strings, 

Op. 31 

KENNETH RIEGEL, tenor 

CHARLES KAVALOVSKI, horn 
BRAHMS 

Symphony No. 4 in E minor, Op. 98 



43 



THE FESTIVAL OF CONTEMPORARY MUSIC: 

AN EXTRAORDINARY 
PRESENTATION 

OF TODAY'S MUSIC. 



AUGUST 13-17 sponsored by the Berkshire Music Center in 
cooperation with the Fromm Music Founda- 
tion at Harvard. 

This year's Festival includes: a full concert by 
the Berkshire Music Center Orchestra; two 
works at two Boston Symphony concerts; 
chamber music concerts featuring vocal, 
choral, and instrumental music performed by 
the Boston Symphony Chamber Players and 
the Fellows of the Berkshire Music Center. 

PREVIEW THE 1977 FESTIVAL OF CONTEMPORARY MUSIC, prior to the 

first concert of the Festival, with Paul Fromm, 
Gunther Schuller and Michael Steinberg 
on SATURDAY, AUGUST 13 at 1 :30 pm. Bring 
a lunch and join them in the tent 
at Tanglewood. 

ADMISSION is by membership in the Friends of Music at 
Tanglewood or a $2.00 contribution at 
the main gate. (Regular Berkshire 
Festival tickets are required for the 
Boston Symphony concerts on 
Aug. 13 & 14). 

A complete program schedule 
is available at the main gate. 




Tanglew<©d 



44 



Tanglewood 
Talks & Walks 



Tanglewood Talks & Walks are a fasci- 
nating series of five Thursday lecture- 
luncheons at noon in the Tanglewood 
Tent, followed by a special guided tour 
of Tanglewood. Guest speakers include 
the musicians, conductors, and staff 
of the Boston Symphony Orchestra and 
Berkshire Music Center. Bring a lunch — 
we'll provide the refreshments. Please 
call the Tanglewood Friends Office at 
(413) 637-1600 for reservations. $2 con- 
tribution to the public, free to Friends 
of Tanglewood. 

LUNCHEON 12:15 
TALK 1:00 
WALK 1:30 



1977 Tanglewood 
Talks & Walks 



18 AUGUST 

BETSY JOLAS 



Composer in Residence, 
Berkshire Music Center 



25 AUGUST 



CAROL PROCTER 



Cello, 

Boston Symphony Orchestra 



Friends of Music at Tanglewood 

Lenox, Massachusetts 01240 

(413) 637-1600 



DAYS 
IN THE 

rVlv 1 ^/ a cooperative 
venture of the Boston Symphony Or- 
chestra and the Boston Public Schools, 
is designed to give middle school students 
from the city and three suburban com- 
munities an all-encompassing arts and 
integration experience. Funded by the 
Massachusetts Department of Education, 
Bureau of Equal Educational Opportunity, 
the program offers 50 children weekly 
over a seven week period the opportunity 
to spend five days at Tanglewood. By 
utilizing the cultural and natural re- 
sources of the Berkshires, the participants 
share a variety of unique and meaning- 
ful activities: a rehearsal and concert at 
Tanglewood, instrument demonstrations 
by members of the Boston Symphony 
and the Berkshire Music Center, a dance 
workshop at Jacob's Pillow, trips to the 
Clark Institute, Chesterwood, Rockwell 
Museum, Berkshire Garden Centre, at- 
tendance at a theatrical performance or 
dance concert, as well as sports and 
swimming daily. In addition, the young- 
sters take part in small informal art 
workshops, led by members of the Days 
in the Arts staff, each of whom has 
expertise in some area of the arts. 

The key to the great success of the 
program has been two-fold: a low key 
exposure to the arts as a part of a 
typical day's experiences, and the mag- 
nificent physical and aesthetic attributes 
of Tanglewood and the Berkshires. 



THE 
OLD CORNER HOUSE 







Paintings by 

NORMAN ROCKWELL 

On permanent exhibit 

Open Year Round — Daily 10-5 p.m. 

Except Tuesdays 

Adults $1.00 Children 25C 



45 



The Berkshire Music Center 



"One more thing should come from this scheme, 
namely, a good honest school of musicians." 

— Henry Lee Higginson, on founding the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra. 

The late Serge Koussevitzky fervent- 
ly shared Henry Lee Higginson's vision 
of a "good honest school for musicians" 

— an academy where young musicians 
could extend their artistic training and 
broaden their experience under the 
guidance of eminent professionals. 
More than any other person, it was 
Koussevitzky who made the vision a 
reality; he was Director of the Berkshire 
Music Center from its founding in 1940 
until his death in 1951, and his vigorous 
leadership has remained an inspiring 
example in the years since. 

Serge Koussevitzky was succeeded by 
Charles Munch, and it is a mark of the 
Center's success that the Boston Sym- 
phony's present Music Director, Seiji 
Ozawa, studied here during the Munch 
era. Alumni of the Center are among 
the most prominent and active mem- 
bers of the music world; more than ten 
percent of the members of this country's 
major orchestras are graduates of the 
Center, as are many of the world's 
notable conductors, instrumental solo- 
ists and singers. 

Today the primary responsibility for 
the Center's direction is in the hands of 
Gunther Schuller, composer, writer, 
conductor and President of the New 
England Conservatory until June 1977. 
Average enrollment is somewhat over 
400 each summer, of which approxi- 
matelyl40 are members of the Center's 
Fellowship Program; this provides free 
tuition (and in many cases free board 
and expenses) for instrumentalists, 
singers, conductors and composers of 
post-graduate calibre. In addition to the 
Fellowship Program, Boston University, 
through its Tanglewood Institute, offers 
several college -credit programs for tal- 
ented high school musicians; the noted 
soprano Phyllis Curtin directs a singers' 
seminar highlighted by her own master 
classes. Finally, each summer the Cen- 
ter's Festival of Contemporary Music 
(August 13-17 this year), presented in 

46 



cooperation with the Fromm Music 
Foundation at Harvard, offers a broad 
spectrum of the most advanced music of 
today's composers in a gala week of 
performances. 

The Boston Symphony's Concert- 
master and Assistant Conductor Joseph 
Silverstein heads a faculty that includes 
principal players and members of the 
Orchestra and faculty members of Bos- 
ton University's School of Fine Arts, 
plus leading soloists, conductors and 
composers. The Center has numerous 
studios for practice and chamber music, 
and an extensive library of music litera- 
ture and scores. Rehearsals and con- 
certs of the Berkshire Music Center 
Orchestra and other student groups 
take place mostly in the Theatre- 
Concert Hall, while lectures, seminars, 
conducting classes, vocal and choral re- 
hearsals, composers' forums and cham- 
ber music concerts take place in the 
Chamber Music Hall, in the West Barn, 
in the Hawthorne Cottage, on the Re- 
hearsal Stage, and in the small studios 
both on the Tanglewood grounds and in 
buildings leased in Lenox. Each summer 
the Baldwin Piano and Organ Company 
generously provides over 100 keyboard 
instruments for individual practice; 
other instruments — percussion, for ex- 
ample — are provided by the Orchestra. 

The Boston Symphony is assisted in 
supporting the Center by the National 
Endowment for the Arts, a Federal 
agency, as well as by individual and 
corporate sponsors. Scholarships are 
awarded to the majority of the students, 
who are chosen by audition on a com- 
petitive basis. The cost of the scholar- 
ship program is large and adds sub- 
stantially to the Orchestra's yearly 
deficit — one major reason for the estab- 
lishment of the Friends of Music at 
Tanglewood, a group that provides 
critical support for the Center. A brief 
account of members' privileges is printed 
on page 41, and more information may 
be had at the Friends' Office near the 
Main Gate. We invite you to see and 
hear for yourself the remarkable calibre 
of the Center's young musicians. 




LOST & FOUND. 

Lose yourself in Berlioz' Beatrice and Benedict, 
in Stravinsky's Concerto for Violin in D, lost in Tip- 
pett's A Child of Our Time Oratorio. Let your mind 
empty and let it be refreshed by music. Lose your- 
self to the Boston Symphony Orchestra; to Seiji 
O/.awa, Colin Davis, Itzhak Perlman and Andre 
Watts. 

Who knows? By losing yourself for a few hours, 
you might find yourself forever. 

October 26/27, 1977 

SEIJI OZAWA, Conductor 

Berlioz: Beatrice and Benedict (complete) 

Sheila Armstrong, Frederica von Stade, Gwendolyn Killebrew, 

Stuart Burrows, David Arnold, Douglas Lawrence, Rohan McCullough, 

William Roerick.Tanglewood Festival Chorus, John Oliver, Conductor. 

Januarv 18/19, 1978 

COLIN DAVIS, Conductor 

Mozart: Symphony No. 36 Linz' 

Tippett: A Child of Our Time (Oratorio) 

Teresa Zylis-Gara, Lili Chookasian, Alexander Stevenson, Norman Bailey, 

Tanglewood Festival Chorus, John Oliver, Conductor 

February 8/9, 1978 

SEIJI OZAWA, Conductor 

Bach: Concerto for Violin in a 

Stravinsky: Concerto for Violin in D 

Itzhak Perlman 

Brahms: Symphony No. 3 in F 

April 19/20, 1978 

SEIJI OZAWA, Conductor 

Respighi: Ancient Airs and Dances, Suite No. 2 

Saint-Saens: Piano Concerto No. 2 in g 

Andre Watts 

Nielsen: Symphony No. 4 Inextinguishable' 

Carnegie Hall Series Ticket Prices: $35, 30, 23, 19. and 14. 

Tickets available by writing Subscription Office, Symphony Hall, 

Boston, Mass. 02115. 

Four Wednesday/Thursday Evenings 
at 8:00 at Carnegie Hall. 



Please send me & series subscriptions at $ 

Enclosed is mv check for S 

NAMK 



each. 



ADDRi SS 



ZIP 



LI 



PHONF. 



J 



47 



We are grateful to the Berkshire County businesses 

listed below for giving generously to help support 

Tanglewood and the Berkshire Music Center. 

Colin MacFadyen and Ashley Smith 

Co- Chairmen for Business Support 



Business Contributions 
and Pledges 

AbdaUa's Elm Street Mkt. 
Adam's Laundry 
Adam's Supermarket 
Alice's at Avaloch 
ALNASCO 
Arcadian Shop 
Arnold Print Works 
ASCAP 
John Astore 
Astro Beef 

A. W. Baldwin Co. 
Baldwin Piano 

Bardwell, D'Angelo, 

Bowlby Insurance 
Barnbrook Antiques 
Nat Beacco 
Ben's Shop 
Berkmatics Inc. 
Berkshire Aviation 

Enterprises 
Berkshire Bank 

and Trust 
Berkshire Beef 
Berkshire 

Broadcasting Co. 
Berkshire County 

Agency — Berkshire 

Life 
Berkshire County 

Savings Bank 
Berkshire Eagle 
Berkshire Frosted Foods 
Berkshire Gas Co. 
Berkshire Hardware 
Berkshire Hills Regional 

School District 
Berkshire Life Insurance 
Berkshire Paper Co. 
Berkshire Plate Glass Co. 
Berkshire Press, Inc. 
Berkshire Traveller 

Press 
BESSE — CLARKE 
Birchard Buick 
Bland Electric 
The Book Store 
Boosey and Hawkes 
Braun's Package Store 
C. T. Brigham 

Paper Products 
Brothership 

Clothing, Inc. 

Business Services 

for Medicine 
Butler Wholesale 

Products 
Butternut Basin 
Cain, Hibbard & 

Myers, Esq. 

B. Caligari and Son 
Camp Lenox 
Camp Mahkeenac 
Carr Hardware 

and Supply Co. 

Childs and Bishop 

Floor Covering 



City Savings Bank 
The Clark-Aiken Co. 
Clearwater 

Natural Foods 
Colt Insurance Agency 
Country Curtains 
Cramer Construction 
Crane and Co. 
Curtel Corp. 
D. E. Dapson 

Optician, Inc. 
Davis and Norton, Inc. 
Deacon Cook House 

Antiques 
Dee's Department Store 
Dery Funeral Home 
Dettinger Lumber Co. 
Different Drummer 
Dresser-Hull Co. 
Eastover 

East Lee Steak House 
Eaton Paper Co. 
1888 Shop 
Edward Karam 

Insurance 
Elaine's Specialty Shop 
Elise Farar 
England Bros. 
Exeter Dental 

Laboratory 
First Agricultural Bank 
First Albany Corp. 
Flying Cloud Inn 
Folklorica 

Friendly Ice Cream Corp. 
Gateways Restaurant 
General Electric 
Giftos Bros. 
Girrardi 

Distributors, Inc. 
Graphic Arts 
Guitian Realty 
J. W. Gull Oil & Coal 
Hagyard Pharmacy 
Hall's Auto Service 
Hellawell 

Cadillac- Oldsmobile 
David Herrick, Inc. 
High Fidelity/ 

Musical America 
High Lawn Farm 
Hoff's Mobil 
Holiday Inn 
Household Finance 
Howard Johnson's 
Ida and John's 
Isgood Realty 
ITAM Lodge #564 
Joe's Diner 
H. A. Johansson 
J. H. Johnson & Sons 
Johnson 

Lincoln -Mercury 
Katherine Meagher 

Dress Shop 
Kaufman Bros. 



Kelly-Dietrich, Inc. 

Kelly Fun House 

Kelly Funeral Home 

Kimberly-Clark 

William T. Lahart & Son 

Laurel Hill Motel 

Lee Audio 

Lee Ford 

Lee High School 

Lee Lime 

Lee National Bank 

Lee News 

Lee Pizza 

Lee Savings Bank 

Lenox Memorial 

High School 
Lenox National Bank 
Lenox Oil Co. 
Lenox Package Store 
Lenox Savings Bank 
Lenox Twin Maples 
Lenoxdale Package 

Store 
Ella Lerner Gallery 
Loeb's Foodtown 
Luau Hale Restaurant 
Colin MacFadyen 
Massachusetts 

Purchasing Group 
James H. Maxymillian 
McClellan Drug 
McCormick & Toole 

Insurance Agency 
Mead Corporation 
Miller Supply 
Minkler Insurance 
Mohawk Beverages, Inc. 
Mole & Mole 
Morgan Grampian 
Morgan House 
Morpheus Arms Motel 
Nejaime's 
North Adams Hoosac 

Savings Bank 
North Adams 

Transcript 
Oak 'n Spruce 
O'Connell 

Chevrolet, Inc. 
The Old Corner House 
J. T. Owens Apparel for 

Men & Boys 
Parker Tours, Inc. 
Penny Saver 
Pete's Chrysler Plymouth 
Petricca Construction 
Pittsfield Agency of 

Berkshire Life 
Pittsfield Co-operative 

Bank 
Pittsfield National Bank 
Pittsfield Supply 
Pleasant Valley Motel 
Prudential Lines, Inc. 
Quincy Lodge 
The Record Store 
The Red Lion Inn 



Research and 

Action, Inc. 
The Restaurant 
Reynolds, Barnes and 

Hebb, Inc. 
A. H. Rice Co. 
Rising Paper Company 
Robinson Leech 

Associates 
Rogers Jewelry 
Rose Agency & 

Tucker Assoc. 
D. O. Ruffer, Inc. 
Samel's Deli 
Sears, Roebuck and Co. 
Seven Hills 
Seven Arts Antiques 
Shaker's Food Store 
Shandoff's 

W. H. Shedd & Son, Inc. 
Shire Shop 

Smith's Rent-Alls, Inc. 
Jeffrey J. Sosne 
Sound of Music 
South Adams 

Savings Bank 
Southern Berkshire 

Chamber of 

Commerce 
Sprague Electric 

Company 
Stanley Home Products 
Steven's Inc. 
Stevenson & Co., Inc. 
Stockbridge Chamber of 

Commerce 
Stockbridge Fuel 

and Grain 
Stockbridge 

Pharmacy, Inc. 
The Stockpot 
Sunset Motel 
Swiss Chalet 
The Talbots, Inc. 
Town and Country 

Motor Lodge 
Union Federal Savings 
U. S. Components, Inc. 
Vee Records 
The Village Inn 
Vlada Boutique 
Warner Cable 
WBEC, Inc. 
WCRB, Inc. 

West Stockbridge 

Enterprises, Inc. 
Wheeler & Taylor, Inc. 
Wheeler's Package - Store 
White Hart Inn 
William Henry Inn 
Williams & Sons 

Country Store 
Williamstown National 

Bank 
Winard Advertising 

Agency, Inc. 
Yankee Motor Lodge 
Yellow Aster, Inc. 



48 




Isaac Witkin, sculptor 

Selections from Isaac Witkin's Spill Series, 
sculpture created with the molten overflow of 
industrial steel, may be seen at the Glass House, 
Tanglewood's exhibition room, located at the 
Main Gate. 

Isaac Witkin was born in Johannes- 
burg, South Africa, in 1936 and moved 
to England in 1956. From 1957 to 1960 
he studied with the English sculptor 
Anthony Caro at St. Martin's School of 
Art in London. He has since been assis- 
tant to Henry Moore and has taught at 
St. Martin's School of Art, Maidstone 
College of Art in Kent, Ravensbourn 
School of Art, and Parsons School of 
Design in New York City. He has pre- 
sented his works in one-man and group 
exhibitions in Europe, Australia, and 
America, and is now represented by the 
Marlborough Gallery in New York. 
Currently he is on leave of absence from 
his position of artist-in-residence at Ben- 
nington College in Vermont to organize 
a state-sponsored sculptors' workshop 
in Binghamton, New York. 



What's 
Happening 

in the 
Derkshires? 

Phone Toll- Free 

and Find Out! 



Things to do today - exhibits, arts, music, 
theatre, ballet, garden shows, special tours, 
all the current events in the Berkshires. 



/O 



SOUTHERN BERKSHIRES 

528-2677 

From Great Bamngton. >■ 

Sheffield. West Stockbridge 



CENTRAL BERKSHIRES NORTHERN BERKSHIRES 

607-2677 662-2677 




From Stockbridge. Lee. 
Lenox. Prrtsfield 



From Williamstown. 
Adams. North Adams 



A service of the Berkshire Vacation Bureau 
205 West St., Pittsfield, Mass. 

(A Division of the Berkshire Hills Conference). 



c/ILa^uz/ (JjrultxeAJb \JunJUcuiG&, 



Route 57 



Tolland, Mass. 



Telephone 413 - 258-4538 

A wide selection of antiques ranging 

from furniture, china and paintings. 

We also feature an extensive 

collection of primitive art 

from New Guinea. 

Open by appointment every day 
except Sunday. 



49 



CHESIEF^A3DD 



STOCKBRIDGE 




Summer Estate of 
DANIEL CHESTER FRENCH 

Sculptor of the 
Lincoln Memorial 

Studio, Residence, Barn 

Sculpture Gallery, Period 

Garden, Nature Trail 

Daily 10-5 

May - October 

off Rte. 183, Glendale 

a property of 
the National Trust for Historic Preservation 



1771 was a eood 

year for our Lobster Pie. 

This year 

it's even better. 




Publick House 

Good Yankee cooking, drink and lodging. 
On the Common — Sturbridge, Mass. — (617) 347-3313 



The Executive Committee 

Tanglewood Council of the 

Boston Symphony Orchestra 

Mrs. James Garivaltis 
Mr. Curtis Buttenheim 

Co- Chairmen 

Mr. John Kittredge 

Secretary /Treasurer 

Mrs. Stephen V.C. Morris 
Mrs. Murray Klein 

Talks and Walks 

Mr. Colin MacFadyen 
Mr. Ashley Smith 

Business 

Mrs. Kelton M. Burbank 
Mrs. John Kittredge 

Benefits 

Mrs. Charles Capers 

Receptions 

Mr. Robert A. Wells 

Community Affairs 

Mrs. D.H. Potter 
Mr. William Harris 

Tent 

Mrs. Jean Massimiano 
Mr. Joseph Duffy 

Sales and Information 

Mrs. Gary A. Lopenzina 
Mrs. William H. Ryan 

Student Affairs 

Mrs. Archie Peace 

Foreign Students 

Mrs. John Kittredge 

Tanglewood- Boston Liaison 

Mrs. A. Lloyd Russell 

Boston- Tanglewood Liaison 

Mr. Peter van S. Rice 
Mrs. John S. McLennan 

Nominating 



50 



The Friends of Music 
At Tanglewood 

Membership provides vou with exciting 

opportunities and privileges all year long. 

It's the secret buy of the Berkshires! 



Free Berkshire Music 
Center Concerts: 

There are over 40 concerts each sum- 
mer performed by the members of the 
Berkshire Music Center, the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra's summer academy 
for the advanced study of music. These 
outstanding mid-week concerts include 
chamber music recitals, full orchestra 
concerts, vocal and choral programs, 
and the annual Festival of Contem- 
porary Music, Tanglewood's "festival 
within a festival." Friends Concert 
Memberships for individuals and 
families are available for $25.00. 

Advance program information and 
ticket ordering forms: 

Approximately one month before the 
public sale of seats in the early spring, 
Friends will be sent the advance Berk- 
shire Festival programs and a priority 
ticket application. Friends will also re- 
ceive the monthly Boston Symphony 
Orchestra publication, BSO. 



Tent Membership: 

The Tanglewood Tent, available to con- 
tributors of $75 and over, provides a 
hospitable gathering place behind the 
Music Shed where food and drink may be 
purchased on concert days. Hot buffet 
dinners are served on Saturday evenings 
beginning at 6:30 p.m. (Reservations 
must be made through the Friends 
Office no later than the Thursday after- 
noon preceding each Saturday 
evening buffet.) 

Special parking for Friends: 

Two convenient reserved parking areas 
are available to all donors of $150 or 
more for all Boston Symphony Orches- 
tra concerts: either the Box Parking Lot 
(Hawthorne Street entrance), or the 
Tent Parking Lot (West Street entrance). 

For information, contact: 
Friends of Music at Tanglewood 
Lenox, Ma. 01240 
(413) 637-1600 



llll r.Al.l J-KIA 



lilh< 



ttffc 



II»<»kslor<: 



arabis 

CONTEMPORARY 
AMERICAN DESIGN 



OUTSTANDING CRAFTS 
TO GIVE OR TO TREASURE 



Bfe&r, 



DISTINCTIVE FOOD 
DELIGHTFUL AMBIENCE 



Wttlll 



SI. I»l I I XI II Lll 



51 



WeGurtisHotel 

Food & Lodging 
LENOX, 637-0016 



A BOOK "TO DO" NOT 
"JUST TO READ" 




A BERKSHIRE SOURCEBOOK 



Your personal guide to Berkshire County: 
its history, geography and major land- 
marks. Available at area bookstores and 
gift shops for just s 2.95. Published by The 
Junior League of Berkshire County, Inc. 



DELhSHOP 

SANDWICHES • CATERING 
TAKE OUT SERVICE 

1 15 Elm Street, Pittsfreld, Massachusetts. 
Tel. 442-5927 

Featuring Hot Pastrami & Hot Corned Beef 

Sandwiches 

Hebrew [National Delicatessen • Rolls & Bagels 
baked daily • Imported & Domestic cheeses 

• Lox & smoked fish • Barbecued chicken 

• Fresh made salads • Party Platters 

Open Daily 8 to 6 



The new home of 
the world famous 
Alices Restaurant 




THE 



Wl LLI AMSVI LLE- 



INN 




■■^&d&*%4=*** 



A fine, small inn featuring 
superb Country French Cuisine 

LUNCH • DINNER 
Light Supper After Tanglewood 

Rte. 41 , between W. Stockbridge 
and Gt. Barrington 

Reservations Recommended by 

413-274-6580 INN PERSPECTIVE 



AT AVALOCH 



Breakfast • Brunch 

• Lunch • Dinner 

• Late Supper • Cocktail Lounge 

• Entertainment • MOTEL 

• tennis • pool 

across the road from Tanglewood 
rte. 183 Lenox 637-0897 



The Sunshine Stage, 

Holliston Theatre, Route 183, 
Lenox, Mass. 01240. Tel. 413-637-0534. 

Year-round professional regional theatre featuring 
plays, films and children's theatre. Cafe on prem 
ises. Frank Bessell, Artistic Director. 



THECLOTHESLOFT 

"Fine Sportswear Outlet" 

179 Main Street, Great Barrington 
164 North Street, Pittsfield 



"a little jewel in the Berkshires" C*j?e.>!^hfS<i-><7t'A/s<jt'ft?i 

(413)243-0181 or 637-2644 

Comfortable rooms, good food and drink in 

a country atmosphere. 

Open Daily Lunch & Dinner 

Tony Ferrelli Innkeeper 



VUyFUVjflME 



-fir 

Accommodations for private parties. We 
cater to parties, banquets and social 
gatherings. Orders to take out. 

Chinese Polynesian Restaurant*. 

LENOX. MASS. For Reservations ^^ 

(413)4434745 

Open Daily 1 1 30 'til 10 pm. Fn & Sat 'til 1 am 




®ld£ton<>miUttorp 



Route 8, Grove St., Adams, Ma. 

HANDPRINT WALLPAPER 

Factory Outlet 

OpenMon-Fri 10-4, Sat 9-1 2:30 




' FANTASY MANSE 
Food, drink, lodging. Live music week 
ends. After concert, a 10 minute 
walk from the Lion's Gate. > 

WHEATLEIGH 637-0610 ty * 




Fashion Doesn't Stop At Size 14 

BEAUTIFUL CLOTHES FOR 

i _TnE LARGE SIZE WOMEN 

CmFFQROBE * N ° ™ R , S 

** 179 IflfllR STREET 413o28-3118 
Gt. Barrington 



5& 



52 



WHY WAIT TO ENTER COLLEGE? 
SIMON'S ROCK EARLY COLLEGE 

Designed for the student who wishes to avoid the 

duplication of high school and college work 

Liberal Arts - B.A. and A. A. Degrees - Fully Accredited 

The interest of those who have completed the 10th or 11 th 
grade of high school is invited 

Admissions Office 

Simon's Rock Early College 

Great Barrington, MA 01230 

Telephone: 413-528-0771 



Jfc 



Tanglewood 
Tradition 



Our outdoor Courtyard 
— colorfully abounding 
with Impatient plants— 
serves luncheons, 
dinners, snacks and 
drinks. Our indoor 
Lion's Den features sandwiches, 
drinks and live entertainment. 
Both are open till 1 a.m. Phone: 
413-298-5545. Route 7, Stockbridge, 
Massachusetts. Since 1773. 

&& The Red Lion Inn 




c&Pfy 




CURTAINS 

At Th e Red Lisn Inn 

STOCKBBIDGE MASSACHUSETTS 

OUP? 

Monday thru Saturday Hi A. \t.-5 P. I/. 
Send for free Catalog 



Williamstown 
Theatre festival 




Nikos Psacharopoulos 

Our 23rd Season Includes 

Misalliance, Sherlock Holmes. Alter the Fall. 

Platonov and Learned Ladies 

June 30 - August 27 

Phone Reservations: 413-458-8146 
P.O. Box 517, Williamstown, Ma 02167 



If you'd like your own tote bag showinj>apou 
support public broadcasting (other ^ttftrlras the 
Channel 17 logo), clip and send to; WMHT, 
Box 17, Schenectady, NJ 12301. 



G $60 Sustaining Mei 
n $30 Regular Member 

- 



Name 



Address 



City 



State 



Zip 



53 




Located in the Township of Becket, Mass. 

Norman Walker, Director 

Grace Badorek, Comptroller 

Donald Westwood, Promotional Director 



FIRST WEEK— July 5 — 9 
Eight Soloists from the 
Royal Danish Ballet 

SECOND WEEK- 
July 12—16 
Cultural Center of the 
Philippines Dance Co. 

(American debut 
of the Company) 

THI RD WEEK— July 19 — 23 
Teodoro Morca 
(Flamenco in Concert) 
Jacob's Pillow Dancers, 

Classical Pas de Deux 

FOU RTH WEEK — 

July 26—30 

Anne Marie DeAngelo 

and Lawrence Rhodes 

May O'Donnell 

Concert Dance Company 

Bhaskar (dances o' India) 

FIFTH WEEK — August 2—6 
Twyla Tharp 
Dancers and Dances 

SIXTH WEEK— August 9-13 
Ohio Ballet Company 



SEVENTH WEEK— 

August 16 — 20 

Dennis Wayne's Dancers 

EIGHTH WEEK — 

August 23—27 

Contemporary Dancers 

of Winnipeg 

(United States debut 

of the Company) 

Joyce Cuoco & Youri Vamos 

Jacob's Pillow Dancers 

Special Added Event 
September 2 — 4 
Hartford Ballet 

Performances: Perform- 
ances are held Tuesday 
through Saturday, Curt- 
ain times: Tuesday, 
7:30 p.m., Wednesday, 
Friday and Saturday, 
6.40 p.m., Thursday and 
Saturday Matinees: 
3:00 p.m. Tickets: 
$8.00 and S6.00. Avail- 
able at Ticket ron, 
Bloomingdale's or the 
Jacob's Pillow Box Office 



<J\Loaa£/ \Ju rutriQAJU \JLrdiauA2& 



Route 57 



Tolland, Mass. 



Telephone 413 - 258-4538 

A wide selection of antiques ranging 

from furniture, china and paintings. 

We also feature an extensive 

collection of primitive art 

from New Guinea. 

Open by appointment every day 
except Sunday. 




How to Reach Jacob's Pillow: 

Approx.150 miles from Boston near Tangle- 
wood. Lee-Pittsf ield exit on the Mass. Turnpike. 
Public transportation from Boston via 
Greyhound to L^e, Mass. 

America's FIRST Dance Festival 



i 



Jacob's Pillow Dance Festival 
Mailing Address: Box 287, Lee, Mass. 01238 

(413) 243-0745 



J 



erksbire 

ummer festival 

6 days 5 nights -1 1 meals 




Per person dbl occup 
plus tx & tips 



189 



50 



Delux Accommodations 

All admissions to: TANGLEWOOD, 
BERKSHIRE PLAYHOUSE. JACOB S 
PILLOW, STORROWTON 

plus Naumkeag...Chesterwood... Corner 
House. ..Hancock Shaker Village. ..Scenic 
tours... Swimming... tennis... golf... & more 

r~ VirWte or call direct for free brochure to 



Oak ri Spruce resort— 

south tee, ma.01260 • 1-800-628-5073 



"ixruxxu*/ and caaoXaAh yxoxAa cluma\a 



Brunch 

Picnic 
Baskets 




Dinner 

After-Concert 
Supper 



J. Perspico Factor 
Restaurant 

Open Till 1 A.M. 

25 Church St. • Lenox, Mass. 
637-2996 



VISIT BERKSHIRE LAKES ESTATES 

EXPERIENCE COUNTRY LIVING 

AT ITS BEST! 

Small Lakefront Community 

Swim and boat on 2 crystal clear mountain 
lakes. Play tennis, badminton, volle.yball 
and basketball on community courts. Live 
in privacy adjacent to a large state forest. 

Berkshire Lakes Estates 

Yokum Pond Road 

Becket, Mass. 01223 

Tel. 413-623-8747 

TO VISIT: Mass. Turnpike to Lee, Mass.-Rt. 20 
East. Continue 4 miles to Belden's Tavern. Left 
for 2 miles to Berkshire Lakes Estates. 



54 



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Newsletter strengthens this tradition. Each issue details our publishing activities and 
presents pertinent articles and news in many different areas in an effort to assist the 
music educator, librarian, professional and student in their work. 



CONTEMPORARY MUSIC CATALOGUE 

Our new Contemporary Music Catalogue has already met with such enthusiastic response by 
teachers, students, performers and composers of contemporary music that it is now in its 
second printing. The catalogue is an alphabetical listing, by composer, of approximately 1500 
contemporary compositions by more than 160 composers (primarily American)— featuring 45 
biographical sketches and handwritten statements on music. 






Contemporary 
Music 



CATALOGUE 



C. F. PETERS CORPORATION, 373 Park Avenue South, New York, N.Y. 10016 

Dear Friends at C. F. Peters, 

Please rush to me the following publications: □ Edition Peters Complete Catalogue 

D PETERS NOTES Newsletter 

□ Contemporary Music Catalogue 



name: 



(please print) 



address: 



zip 



□ Please add my name to your mailing list (or future mailings. 



55 




Introducing the Bose 901® 
Series III: the most innovative new 
speaker since the legendary 
Bose 901 was introduced in 1968. 
The 901 Series III reproduces 
music with spaciousness and 
realism unequalled, we believe, by 
any other speaker. Yet, due to its 
new, ultra-high-efficiency drivers, 
the 901 Series III requires less than 
V3 as much power as the original 
901 : that means, for example, it 
can produce the same sound vol- 
ume with a 15 watt amplifier as the 
original 901 with a 50 watt ampli- 
fier. Outstanding bass perform- 
ance is made possible by the 
unique injection molded Acoustic 
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panels removed). To fully appreci- 
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ask a Bose dealer to play the 901 



Series III in comparison to any 
other speaker, regardless of size or 
price. 

For a full color 901 III 
brochure, write Bose, Dept. BSO, 
The Mountain, Framingham, 
Massachusetts 
01701. 




Patents issued and pending. Copyright © 
1977 Bose Corp. Cabinets are walnut veneer. 
Pedestals optional at extra cost 



56 







Accompanist to 

Leonard Bernstein • Arthur Fiedler 

Gilbert Kalish • Seiji Ozawa • Andre Previn 

Gunther Schuller • YehudiWyner 




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SMIRNOFF®VODKA.80&100 PROOF. DISTI LLED FROM GRAIN. STE. PI ERRESMIRNOFFFLS. (DIVISION OF H EUBL El N. INCORPORATED ) HARTFORD. CONNECTICUT 




Seiji Ozawa, Music Director 

Colin Davis, Principal Guest Conductor 
Joseph Silverstein, Assistant Conductor 

Ninety- Sixth Season 1976-1977 



The Trustees of the Boston Symphony Orchestra Inc. 

Talcott M. Banks, President 

President Sidney Stoneman, Vice-President 

Vice-President John L. Thorndike, Treasurer 



Philip K. Allen, Vice 
Mrs. Harris Fahnestock, 



Vernon R. Alden 

Allen G. Barry 

Dr. Leo L. Beranek 

Mrs. John M. Bradley 

Richard P. Chapman 

Dr. George Clowes 

Abram T. Collier 

Henry A. Laughlin 



Nelson J. Darling, Jr. 

Archie C. Epps III 

E. Morton Jennings, Jr. 

Edward M. Kennedy 

George Kidder 
Edward G. Murray 

Trustees Emeriti 

Harold D. Hodgkinson 



Albert L. Nickerson 

Mrs. James H. Perkins 

Irving W. Rabb 

Paul C. Reardon 

David Rockefeller Jr. 

Mrs. George Lee Sargent 

John Hoyt Stookey 

John T. Noonan 



Administration of the Boston Symphony Orchestra 



Thomas D. Perry, Jr. 
Executive Director 



Thomas W. Morris 

Manager 

Gideon Toeplitz Daniel R. Gustin 

Assistant Manager Assistant Manager 

Joseph M. Hobbs Walter Hill Dinah Daniels 

Director of Development Director of Business Affairs Director of Promotion 

Richard C. White Anita R. Kurland Niklaus Wyss 

Assistant to the Manager Administrator of Youth Activities Advisor for the Music Director 

Donald W. Mackenzie James F. Kiley 

Operations Manager, Symphony Hall Operations Manager, Tanglewood 

Michael Steinberg 
Director of Publications 

Programs copyright ® 1977 Boston Symphony Orchestra Inc. 



Contents: 



page 

Tanglewood 4 

Seiji Ozawa 7 

Map 8 

Information 9 



page 

Programs 11-51 

Berkshire Music Center 52 

Friends 58, 59 



The cover photo is by Walter H. Scott, Stockbridge. 



The Board of Overseers of the Boston Symphony Orchestra Inc. 

Dr. Leo L. Beranek 

Chairman 



Mrs. Norman L. Cahners 
Vice Chairman 

Charles F. Adams 

Mrs. Frank G. Allen 

Mrs. Richard Bennink 

David W. Bernstein 

David Bird 

Gerhard Bleicken 

Frederick Brandi 

Curtis Buttenheim 

Mrs. Henry B. Cabot 

Mrs. Mary Louise Cabot 

Levin H. Campbell, III 

Johns H. Congdon 

Arthur P. Contas 

Robert Cushman 

Michael J. Daly 

Mrs. C. Russell Eddy 

Paul Fromm 

Carlton P. Fuller 

Mrs. Thomas J. Galligan, Jr 



Weston P. Figgins 

Vice Chairman 

Mrs. Thomas Gardinei 

Mrs. James Garivaltis 

Mrs. Robert Gibb 

Jordan Golding 

Mrs. John L. Grandin 

Mrs. R. Douglas Hall, III 

Mrs. Howard E. Hansen 

Bruce Harriman 

Mrs. Richard D. Hill 

Mrs. Amory Houghton, Jr 

Richard S. Humphrey, Jr. 

Mrs. Jim Lee Hunt 

Mrs. Louis I. Kane 

Leonard Kaplan 

Benjamin Lacy 

Mrs. James F. Lawrence 

Roderick MacDougall 

John S. McLennan 

Colman M. Mockler, Jr. 

Mrs. Elting E. Morison 

Richard P. Morse 



Mrs. Arthur I. Strang 

Secretary 

David G. Mugar 

•Dr. Barbara W. Newell 

Stephen Paine 

Harry Remis 

Mrs. Peter van S. Rice 

Mrs. Samuel L. Rosenberry 

Mrs. Jerome Rosenfeld 

Mrs. George Rowland 

Mrs. A. Lloyd Russell 

Mrs. William Ryan 

Francis P. Sears, Jr. 

William A. Selke 

Gene Shalit 

Samuel L. Slosberg 

Richard A. Smith 

Mrs. Edward S. Stimpson 

Mrs. Richard H. Thompson 

D. Thomas Trigg 

Roger Woodworth 




Boston 
w University 

Tanglewood 
Institute 



Norman Dello Joio, 

Executive Director 



Summer Instrumental and Vocal Programs for the outstanding high school/ 
college-age musician. Private study with master artists including members of the 
faculty of the Boston University School of Music and the Boston Symphony 
Orchestra. Chamber music, orchestral and vocal performances atTanglewood. 

For information: Boston University Tanglewood Institute, 
855 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02215. 

A program offered by the Boston University School for the Arts in association 
with the Berkshire Music Center/Boston Symphony Orchestra. 
Twelfth Season 



^ The reasons you visit 
.^he Berkshtres 
may be the best reasons 
to move your business 

* to the Berkshires^. 



*. 




The Berkshires are a perfect place ... for people, 
for families and for businesses. The kind of place 
where an unsurpassed quality of life is available. 

In the Berkshires the average commute is 10 
minutes. Golf courses, tennis clubs, ski resorts, 
theatres, lakes, and fine restaurants are at your 
doorstep. We provide excellent schools — both public 
and private — and the Berkshires are the perfect place 
to raise a family. 

It's no accident that titans of industry have lived 
and worked in the Berkshires. Our labor force still 
believes in a day's work for a day's pay. And the 
Berkshires offer a readily available pool of labor. Our 
schools offer vocational programs and governmental 
training dollars are available. 

Most important, we want businesses to locate in 
the Berkshires That's why our banks have launched 
a program of financial assistance to attract new 
industry and the County funds a full-time organization 
to assist you. 



i,il Itf^jfctil^i'W^i^lM'llirlMiiiili I i OIWiMWHI 



If you have the opportunity to move a business, 
or influence a business relocation, consider the 
Berkshires. At Berkshire County Development 
Commission, we have compiled data to prove that 
the Berkshires add up for business reasons. Come see 
us or write on your letterhead for more information. 
Or, if you know of a business contemplating 
relocation, let us know. We welcome your business. 



the Berkshires 

Alan C. Marden 

Berkshire County Development Commission 

205 West Street 

Pirtsfield, Massachusetts 01201 

Phone: (413)499-4474 



U 



Definitely not 
to be missed... 

"Herbert Kupferberg's Tanglewood 
is bursting with information that 
even some of us who worked there 
had missed It catches the spirit 
and truth of that beautiful place." 
— Francis Robinson, 
N.Y. Metropolitan Opera 

"Reads as excitingly as a who- 
done-it!" — Julius Rudel, 

New York City Opera 
"Unquestionably the definitive 
Tanglewood history to date." 
— Christian Science Monitor. 



TANGLEWOOD 




Kupferberg 

8x10. 280 pages. 
Cver 150 photos. 
Index. $9.95 paperback. 
McGRAW-HILL BOOK COMPANY 



HANCOCK SHAKER 
VILLAGE 

Original 18th Century 
Village Restored 

Open daily 9:30-5:00 

Adults $3 Children $1 

Annual Kitchen Festival 
Week of August 1st 

Route 20 Five miles West 
of Pittsfield, Mass. 



Tanglewood 

In August, 1934, a group of music- 
loving summer residents of the Berk- 
shires organized a series of three 
outdoor concerts at Interlaken, to be 
given by members of the New York 
Philharmonic under the direction of 
Henry Hadley. The venture was so 
successful that the promoters incor- 
porated the Berkshire Symphonic 
Festival and repeated the experiment 
during the next summer. 

The Festival committee then invited 
Serge Koussevitzky and the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra to take part in the 
following year's concerts. The Orches- 
tra's Trustees accepted and on August 
13, 1936, the Boston Symphony gave 
its first concert in the Berkshires (at 
Holmwood, a former Vanderbilt estate, 
later the Center at Foxhollow). The series, 
again consisting of three concerts, was 
given under a large tent, and a total of 
nearly 15,000 people attended. 

In the winter of 1936, Mrs. Gorham 
Brooks and Miss Mary Aspinwall 
Tappan offered Tanglewood, the Tap- 
pan family estate, with its buildings and 
210 acres of lawns and meadows, as a 
gift to Koussevitzky and the Orchestra. 
The offer was gratefully accepted, and 
on August 12, 1937, the Festival's 
largest crowd thus far assembled under 
a tent for the first Tanglewood concert, 
a program of music by Wagner. 

As Koussevitzky began The Ride of the 
Valkyries, a storm erupted, overpowering 
the music and causing the concert to be 
interrupted three times before the first 
half could be completed. The second half 
of the program had to be changed, 
because of water damage to some of the 
instruments, and when the concert 
ended, Miss Gertrude Robinson Smith, 
one of the Festival's founders, came to 
the stage and told the audience that the 
storm had demonstrated the need for a 
permanent structure. 

A hundred thousand dollars, she said, 
would be needed for this purpose, and 
the response to her plea was so generous 
that within a short time the amount was 
fully subscribed. Plans for the Music 
Shed were drawn up by the eminent 



architect Eliel Saarinen, and, as modi- 
fied by Josef Franz of Stockbridge, who 
also directed construction, it was com- 
pleted on June 16, 1938, a month ahead 
of schedule. Seven weeks later, Serge 
Koussevitzky led the inaugural concert, 
which included a performance of Beet- 
hoven's Ninth Symphony. By 1941, the 
Theatre-Concert Hall, the Chamber 
Music Hall and several small studios — 
all part of the Berkshire Music Center, 
which had begun operations the pre- 
ceding year — were finished, and the 
Festival had so expanded its activities 
and its reputation for excellence that it 
attracted nearly 100,000 visitors. 

Today Tanglewood annually draws 
close to a quarter of a million visitors; 
in addition to the twenty-four regular 
concerts of the Boston Symphony, there 
are weekly "Prelude" concerts and open 
rehearsals, the annual Festival of 
Contemporary Music, and almost daily 
concerts by the gifted young musicians 
of the Berkshire Music Center. Arthur 
Fiedler and the Boston Pops perform 
each summer, and the Festival also 
includes a series of concerts by popular 
artists. The season offers not only a 
vast quantity of music but also a vast 
range of musical forms and styles, all 
of it presented with a regard for artistic 
excellence that makes the Festival 
unique. Tanglewood and the Berkshire 
Music Center, projects with which 
Koussevitzky was involved until his 
death, have become a fitting shrine to 
his memory, a living embodiment of 
the vital, humanistic tradition that was 
his legacy. 





WAfflC 

FM 90.3 mHz 

We bring you fine music 
AND dozens of interesting 
events — live and without 
commercials. Sit in with us 
at the National Press Club, 
where the next day's head- 
lines are often made. Enjoy 
"All Things Considered," a 
fascinating magazine of news 
and issues. (Nothingelse like it 
in broadcasting !) Savor some 
of the most satisfying thea- 
tre productions ever aired. 
Revel in delightful, intelligent 
conversation. 

Listen . . . and if you 

like what you hear, 

write for our free monthly 

program directory. 

WAMC 
Albany Medical College 
Albany, New York 12208 







npr 



National Public Radio 

for eastern New York 
and western New England 



The Shed under construction in 193 8 



Why do I work seven days a week? 
That's all there are. Besides 
if you really love what you do 

it's not work. 




Robert J. Lurtsema 

Host, Morning Pro Musica 

Everyday 7am-Noon 




Artists in the Night 
Hayes Burnett plays 
a great mix of jazz 
sounds. Mon-Fri 



ll-2:30am 




The Boston 
Symphony Orchestra 
at Tanglewood 
Fridays at 9pm, 
Saturdays at 
8:30pm, Sundays 

30pm 

and August 



The Spider's Web 
— our storybook for 
the entire family 
Mon-Fri. 7:30pm 



All Things Considered 

— the best news 
program of its kind 

— every day at 5pm 



'GBH Radio 
89.7FM 

Radio that makes sense 
of your day. 



Seiji Ozawa 

Seiji Ozawa became Music Director of 
the Boston Symphony Orchestra in the 
fall of 1973. He is the thirteenth con- 
ductor of the Orchestra since its found- 
ing in 1881. 

He was born in Hoten, Manchuria in 
1935, and studied both Western and 
Oriental music as a child. He attended 
Toho School of Music in Tokyo and 
graduated with first prizes in composi- 
tion and conducting. Shortly after his 
graduation, he won first prize at the 
International Competition of Conduc- 
ting at Besancon, France, and was in- 
vited by Charles Munch, then Music 
Director of the Boston Symphony and a 
judge at the competition, to spend a 
summer studying at Tanglewood. 

In 1964 and for the next five seasons, 
Mr. Ozawa was Music Director of the 
Ravinia Festival. At the beginning of the 
1965-66 season he became Music Direc- 
tor of the Toronto Symphony, a posi- 
tion he relinquished four seasons later 
to study and guest conduct. In 1970 he 
accepted the position of Artistic Direc- 



tor of the Berkshire Music Festival, and 
in December of the same year he began 
his inaugural season as Conductor and 
Music Director of the San Francisco 
Symphony Orchestra, titles that he held 
concurrently with his position as Music 
Director of the Boston Symphony. In 
the spring of 1976 he resigned his San 
Francisco position although he remained 
Honorary Conductor for the 
1976-77 season. 

Mr. Ozawa's recordings include: on 
the Deutsche Grammophon label, Ber- 
lioz's Symphonie fantastique, La damnation de 
Faust, Romeo et Juliette (which was 
awarded a Grand Prix du Disque), Ives's 
Symphony No. 4 and Central Park in the 
Dark, and de Falla's Three-cornered Hat, 
and, on the New World Records label, 
Griffes's Songs of Fiona McLeod. Record- 
ings soon to be released are: Bartok's 
Miraculous Mandarin Suite and Music for 
Percussion, Strings, and Celeste, Tchaikov- 
sky's Symphony No. 5, Brahms's Sym- 
phony No. 1, and Rimsky-Korsakov's 
Sheherazade on Deutsche Grammophon, 
and Sessions' When Lilacs Last in the Door- 
yard Bloom'd on New World Records. 



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For 105 years we've been serious 
about people who make music. 

In 1872 Boston University established the first professional music program 
within an American university to train creative and talented students for 
careers in music. 105 years later the Boston University School of Music is 

still doing what it does best. 



• Performance • Music Education • History and Literature • Theory and Comp 



osition 



strings 

Walter Eisenberg, violin 

Madeline Foley, chamber music 
'Gerald Gelbloom, violin 
'Bernard Kadinoff, viola 

Endel Kalam, chamber music 
'Robert Karol, viola 
'Eugene Lehner, chamber music 

* Leslie Martin, string bass 
George Neikrug, cello 

'Mischa Nieland, cello 
Leslie Pamas, cello 
'Henry Portnoi, string bass 

* William Pvhein, string bass 
Kenneth Sarch, viohn 

* Roger Shermont, violin 

* Joseph Silverstein, violin 
Roman Totenberg, violin 
Walter Trampler, viola 

* Max Winder, viohn 
'Lawrence Wolfe, string bass 



woodwinds 

Edward Avedisian, clarinet 
'PasqualeCardillo, clarinet 
'Donot Anthony Dwyer, flute 

Rodenck Ferland, saxophone 
'Ralph Gomberg, oboe 
'John Holmes, oboe 

* Phillip Kaplan, flute 
'James Pappoutsakis, flute 
'Richard Plaster, bassoon 
'Matthew Ruggiero, bassoon 

* Felix Viscuglia, clarinet 
' Sherman Walt, bassoon 
'Harold Wright, clarinet 

brass 

* Ronald Barron, trombone 
'Norman Bolter, trombone 

Peter Chapman, trumpet 
John Coffey, tromboneltuba 
'Armando Ghitalla, trumpet 



brass (com.) 

Paul Gay, trombone 
'Gordon Hallberg, tromboneltuba 
'Charles Kavaloski, French horn 

Charles A. Lewis, Jr., trumpet 
'David Ohanian, French horn 

Samuel Pilafian, tuba 
'Rolf Smedvig, trumpet 
'Harry Shapiro, French horn 
* Roger Voisin, trumpet 
'Charles Yancich, French horn 

percussion 

'Thomas Gauger 
'Charles Smith 

harp 

Lucile Lawrence 

piano 

ManaClodes 

Anthony di Bonaventura 

Lenore Engdahl 

Bela Boszormenyi-Nagy 

Phillip Oliver, staff accompanist 

Edith Steams 

Fredrik Wanger 

organ 

George Faxon 
Jack Fisher 
Max Miller 

harpsichord 

Joseph Payne 

voice 

Eunice Alberts, contralto 
Germaine Arosa, diction 
Mary Davenport, contralto 
Ellalou Dimmock, soprano 
Maeda Freeman, mezzo 
Robert Gartside, tenor 
Mac Morgan, baritone 
Chloe Owen, soprano 
Allen Rogers, vocal coaching 
Barbara Stevenson, soprano 
Wilma Thompson, mezzo 



music history and literature 

Karol Berger 
Murray Lefkowitz 
Joel Sheveloff 

theory and composition 

David Carney 
David Del Tredici 
John Goodman 
Alan MacMillan 
Joyce Mekeel 
Malloy Miller . 
Gardner Read 
Allen Schindler 
Robert Sirota 
Tison Street 

music education 

Lee Chnsman 
Phyllis Elhady Hoffman 
Allen Lannom 
Jack O. Lemons 
Mary Ann Norton 

musical organizations 

Adelaide Bishop, opera 
Warren Wilson, opera 
Joseph Huszti, chorus 
'Joseph Silverstein, orchestra 

* Roger Voisin, wind ensemble 

boston symphony orchestra 
woodwind quintet in residence 

'Donot Anthony Dwyer, flute 
'Ralph Gomberg, oboe 
'Harold Wright, clarinet 

* Sherman Walt, bassoon 
'Charles Kavaloski, French horn 

empire brass quintet 
in residence 

Charles A. Lewis, Jr., trumpet 

* Rolf Smedvig, trumpet 

* David Ohanian, French horn 
'Norman Bolter, trombone 

Samuel Pilafian, tuba 



'Member of the Boston Symphony Orchestra 



Boston University School of Music 

Wilbur EX Fullbright, Director • Robert Lee Tipps, Assistant to Director 
offering degrees at the bachelor, master, and doctoral levels. 

School for the Arts: Music, Theatre, Visual Arts • Norman Dello Joio, Dean 
855 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 



10 



Tanglewood 1977 



Weekend Prelude 

Susan Davenny Wyner, soprano 
Yehudi Wyner, pianist 



Friday, 19 August at 7 



FAURE 



L'hiver a cesse 
Apres un reve 
En sourdine 
Prison 
Fleur jetee 



BERLIOZ from Nuits d'ete 
Villanelle 

Le spectre de la rose 
Absence 
Au cimetiere 
L'lle inconnue 

Zai'de 

La mort d'Ophelie 



Yehudi Wyner plays the Baldwin piano. 



11 



L'hiver a cesse 

L'hiver a cesse, la lumiere est tiede 

Et danse, du sol au firmament clair, 

II faut que le coeur le plus triste cede 

A l'immense joie eparse dans l'air. 

J'ai depuis un an le printemps dans Tame, 

Et le vert retour du doux floreal, 

Ainsi qu'une flamme entoure un flamme, 

Met de l'ideal sur mon ideal. 

Le ciel bleu prolonge, exhausse et couronne 

L'immuable azur oii rit.mon amour, 

La saison est belle et ma part est bonne, 
Et tous mes espoirs ont enfin leur tour. 
Que vienne l'ete! Que viennent encore 
L'automne et l'hiver! Et chaque saison 
Me sera charmante, 6 toi, que decore 
Cette fantaisie et cette raison! 

— Paul Verlaine 

Apres un reve 

Dans un sommeil que charmait ton image 
Je revais le bonheur, ardent mirage; 
Tes yeux etaient plus doux, ta voix pure 

et sonore. 
Tu rayonnais comme un ciel eclaire 

par l'aurore; 
Tu m'appelais, et je quittais le terre 
Pour m'enfuir avec toi vers la lumiere; 
Les cieux pour nous entr'ouvraient 

leurs nues, 
Splendeurs inconnues, lueurs divines 

entrevues . . . 
Helas! Helas, triste reveil des songes! 
Je t'appelle, 6 nuit, rends-moi tes mensonges; 

Reviens, reviens radieuse, 
Reviens, 6 nuit mysterieuse! 



Romain Bussine 



En sourdine 

Calmes dans le demi-jour 
Que les branches hautes font, 
Penetrons bien notre amour 
De ce silence profond, 
Melons nos ames, nos coeurs 
Et nos sens extasies, 
Parmi les vagues langueurs 
Des pins et des arbousiers. 
Ferme tes yeux a demi, 
Croise tes bras sur ton sein, 
Et de ton coeur endormi 
Chasse a jamais tout dessein, 
Laissons-nous persuader 
Au souffle berceur et doux 
Qui vient a tes pieds rider 
Les ondes des gazons roux. 
Et quand, solennel, le soir 
Des chenes noirs tombera, 
Voix de notre desespoir, 
Le rossignol chantera. 

12 



Winter is over 

Winter is over, the light is soft 

And dances from the earth to the clear sky; 

The saddest heart must now give way 

To the great joy scattered in the air. 

For a whole year I have had spring in my soul, 

And the green return of sweet blossom time, 

Like a flame surrounding a flame, 

Adds ideals to my ideal. 

The blue sky extends, heightens and crowns 

The unchangeable azure, where my 

love rejoices. 
The season is lovely and my share is good, 
And all my hopes at last have their day. 
Let Summer come! Let also come 
Autumn and Winter! And every season 
For me will be lovely, oh you, whom 
This fantasy and this thought adorn! 

After a dream 

In a slumber charmed by your image 
I dreamed of happiness, ardent mirage; 
Your eyes were more tender, your voice pure 

and clear. 
You were radiant like a sky brightened 

by sunrise; 
You were calling me, and I left the earth 
To flee with you towards the light; 
The skies opened their clouds for us, 

Splendors unknown, glimpses of divine 

light . . . 
Alas! Alas, sad awakening from dreams! 
I call to you, oh night, give me back your 

illusions; 
Return, return with your radiance, 
Return, oh mysterious night! 

Muted 

Serene in the twilight 

Created by the high branches, 

Let our love be imbued 

With this profound silence. 

Let us blend our souls, our hearts, 

And our enraptured senses, 

Amidst the faint languor 

Of the pines and arbutus. 

Half-close your eyes, 

Cross your arms on your breast, 

And from your weary heart 

Drive away forever all plans. 

Let us surrender 

To the soft and rocking breath 

Which comes to your feet and ripples 

The waves of the russet lawn. 

And when, solemnly, the night 

Shall descend from the black oaks, 

The voice of our despair, 

The nightingale, shall sing. 



Paul Verlaine 



Prison 

Le ciel est, par-dessus le toit, si bleu, 

si calme . . . 
Un arbre, par-dessus le toit, berce sa palme . . . 
La cloche, dans le ciel qu'on voit, 

doucement tinte, 
Un oiseau, sur l'arbre qu'on voit, chante 

sa plainte . . . 
Mon Dieu, mon Dieu! La vie est la simple 

et tranquille! 
Cette paisible rumeur la vient de la ville . . . 
Qu'as-tu fait, 6 toi que voila, pleurant 

sans cesse, 
Dis! qu'as-tu fait, toi que voila, de 

ta jeunesse? 

— Paul Verlaine 



Prison 

The sky above the roof is so blue, so calm . . . 

A tree above the roof rocks its branches . . . 
The bell, in the sky that one sees, softly tolls, 

A bird, on the tree that one sees, plaintively 

sings . . . 
My Lord, my Lord! Life is there, simple 

and quiet! 
That peaceful sound comes from the town . . . 
What have you done, oh you, who now 

weeps endlessly, 
Say — what have you done with your youth? 



Fleur jetee 

Emporte ma folie 

Au gre du vent, 

Fleur en chantant cueillie 

Et jetee en revant, 

Emporte ma folie 

Au gre du vent, 

Comme la fleur fauchee 

Perit I'amour. 

La main qui t'a touchee 

Fuit ma main sans retour, 

Que le vent qui te seche, 

O pauvre fleur, 

Tout a llieure si fraiche, 

Et demain sans couleur, 

Que le vent qui te seche, 

O pauvre fleur, 

Que le vent qui te seche, 

Seche mon coeur. 



A flower thrown away 

Carry away my passion 

At the will of the wind, 

Flower, gathered with a song 

And thrown away in a dream. 

Carry away my passion 

At the will of the wind, 

Like a cut flower 

Love perishes 

The hand that has touched you 

Shuns my hand forever; 

Let the wind that withers you 

Oh, poor flower, 

A while ago so fresh, 

And tomorrow colorless, 

Let the wind that withers you, 

Oh, poor flower 

Let the wind that withers you, 

Wither my heart. 



■Armand Silvestre 



Villanelle 

Quand viendra la saison nouvelle, 
Quand auront disparu les froids, 
Tous les deux nous irons, ma belle, 
Pour cueillir le muguet aux bois. 

Sous nos pieds egrenant les perles 
Que Ton voit au matin trembler, 
Nous irons ecouter les merles 
Siffler. 

Le printemps est venu, ma belle, 
C'est le mois des amants beni; 
Et l'oiseau, satinant son aile, 
Dit des vers au rebord du nid. 
Oh! viens done sur ce banc de mousse 
Pour parler de nos beaux amours, 
Et dis moi de ta voix si douce, 
Toujours! 



Villanella 

When the new season comes, 

when the cold has vanished, 

we shall go together, my fair one, 

to gather the lilies of the valley in the 

woods. 
Our feet scattering the pearls of dew 
that are seen trembling at morn, 
we shall go to hear the blackbirds 

warbling. 

The spring has come, my fair one, 
it is the month blessed by lovers; 
and the bird preening its wing, 
sings a refrain on the edge of the nest. 
Oh! Come then to this mossy bank 
to talk of the delights of our love, 
and say to me in your sweet voice, 



for 



ever! 



13 



Loin, bien loin, egarant nos courses, 

Faisons fuir le lapin cache, 

Et le daim, au miroir des sources, 

Admirant son grand bois penche; 
Puis chez nous, tout heureux, 

tout aises, 
En paniers enlacant nos doigts, 
Revenons rapportant des fraises 

Des bois! 



Far, very far, straying from our paths, 
let us put to flight the hidden rabbit, 
and the deer, in the mirror of the 

springs, 
admiring its great bending antlers; 
then towards home, quite happy, 

quite contented, 
with interlaced fingers for baskets, 
let us return bringing strawberries 

from the woods. 



Le spectre de la rose 

Souleve ta paupiere close 
Qu'effleure un songe virginal; 
Je suis le spectre d'une rose 
Que tu portais hier au bal. 
Tu me pris encore emperlee 
Des pleurs d'argent de l'arrosoir, 
Et parmi la fete etoilee 
Tu me promenas tout le soir. 

Oh toi, qui de ma mort fut cause, 
Sans que tu puisse le chasser, 
Toutes les nuits mon spectre rose 

A ton chevet viendra danser. 

Mais ne crains rien, je ne reclame 
Ni messe ni De Protundis; 
Ce leger parfum est mon ame, 
Et j'arrive du Paradis. 

Mon destin fut digne d'envie, 
Et pour avoir un sort si beau 
Plus d'un aurait donne sa vie, 
Car sur ton sein j'ai mon tombeau, 
Et sur l'albatre ou je repose 
Un poete avec un baiser ecrivit: 
Ci-git une rose que tous les rois 
vont jalouser. 



The Spectre of the Rose 

Open your sleeping eyes 

Lightly brushed by purest dreams; 

I am the spectre of a rose 

You wore at the ball last night. 

You took me still glistening 

With the watering-pot's silver tears 

And about the star-touched gathering 

Carried me the evening through. 

Oh, you, who caused my death. 
Powerless to banish it, 
Every night my rose-like spectre 
Will come to dance by your bed. 
But do not be afraid — I demand 
Neither mass nor De Profundis. 
This delicate perfume is my soul 
And I come from paradise. 

My destiny was to be envied 
And to have so beautiful a fate 
Many would have given up life itself. 
For my grave is on your breast 
And on the alabaster where I lie at rest 
With a kiss a poet has written: 
Here lies a rose that every king 
will envy. 



Absence 

Reviens, reviens, ma bien-aimee! 
Comme une fleur loin du soleil, 
La fleur de ma vie est fermee 
Loin de ton sourire vermeil! 
Entre nos coeurs, quelle distance! 
Tant d'espace entre nos baisers! 
O sort aimer, 6 dure absence! 
O grands desirs inapaises! 
Reviens, reviens, ma bien-aimee! 
Comme une fleur loin du soleil, 
La fleur de ma vie est fermee 
Loin de ton sourire vermeil! 
D'ici la-bas que de campagnes, 



Absence 

Come back, come back, my beloved! 
Like a flower far from the sun, 
The flower of my life is closed 
Far from your rosy smile! 
What distance between our hearts! 
What space between our kisses! 
Oh bitter fate, oh cruel absence! 
Oh great unappeased desires! 
Come back, come back, my beloved! 
Like a flower far from the sun, 
The flower of my life is closed 
Far from your rosy smile! 
From here to where you are, how wide 
the country; 



14 



Que de villes et de hameaux, 
Que de vallons et de montagnes, 
A lasser le pied des chevaux! 
Reviens, reviens, ma bien-aimee! 
Comme une fleur loin du soleil, 
La fleur de ma vie est fermee 
Loin de ton sourire vermeil! 



How many cities and hamlets, 
How many valleys and mountains, 
To tire the hoofs of the horses! 
Come back, come back, my beloved! 
Like a flower far from the sun, 
The flower of my life is closed 
Far from your rosy smile. 



Au cimetiere 

Connaissez-vous la blanche tombe 

Ou flotte avec un son plaintif 

L'ombre d'un if? 

Sur l'if, une pale colombe, 

Triste et seule, au soleil couchant, 

Chante son chant: 

Un air maladivement tendre, 

A la fois charmant et fatal, 

Qui vous fait mal, 

Et qu'on voudrait toujours entendre, 

Un air, comme en soupire aux cieux 

L'ange amoureux. 

On dirait que l'ame eveillee 
Pleure sous terre a l'unison 
De la chanson, 
Et du malheur d'etre oubliee 
Se plaint dans un roucoulement 
Bien doucement. 

Sur les ailes de la musique 
On sent lentement revenir 
Up souvenir: 

Une ombre, une forme angelique 
Passe dans un rayon tremblant, 
En voile blanc. 



In the Cemetery 

Do you know the white tomb 
Where the shadow of a yew tree 
Hovers with a plaintive sigh? 
On that yew a pale dove 
At sundown, sad and solitary, 
Sings its song: 

A sadly-tender refrain 

At once both delightful and deadly, 

That, though sorrow-filled, 

You would listen to forever — 

A song such as the amorous angel might sing 

In the heavens. 

One might say the awakened soul 
Is weeping beneath the earth 
In unison with the song, 
And in a gentle murmur 
Is complaining of the misery 
Of being forgotten. 

On the music's wings 
One feels a memory 
Slowly return — 
A shadow, an angelic form, 
Passes in a tremulous light 
Shrouded in a white veil. 



Les belles de nuit, demi-closes, 
Jettent leur parfum faible et doux 
Autour de vous, 
Et le fantome aux molles poses 
Murmure en vous tendant les bras: 
"Tu reviendras!" 



Flowers of the night, half-open 

Give forth their scent mild and sweet 

About you, 

And the phantom with its languid motion 

Whispers as it opens its arms to you: 

"You will return!" 



Oh! Jamais plus, pres de la tombe, 
Je n'irai quand descend le soir 
Au manteau noir, 
Ecouter la pale colombe 
Chanter sur la pointe de l'if 
Son chant plaintif! 



Oh, never again will I go near 

That tomb, when the sombre cloak 

Of night descends, 

To listen to the pale dove 

From the heights of the yew tree 

Sing its plaintive song! 



L'lle inconnue 

Dites, la jeune belle! 
Ou voulez-vous aller? 
La voile enfle son aile, 
La brise va souffler! 



The Unknown Isle 

Tell me, pretty young maid, 
Where would you like to go? 
The sail unfurls like a wing, 
The breeze is about to blow. 



15 



L'aviron est d'ivoire, 
Le pavilion de moire, 
La gouvernail d'or fin; 
J'ai pour lest une orange, 
Pour voile une aile d'ange, 
Pour mousse un seraphin. 

Dites, la jeune belle, . . . 

Est-ce dans la Baltique, 
Dans la mer Pacifique, 
Dans 1'ile de Java? 
Ou bien est-ce Norvege, 
Cueiller la fleur de neige, 
Ou la fleur d'Angsoka? 

Dites, dites, la jeune belle, 
Dites, ou voulez-vous aller? 

Menez-moi, dit la belle, 
A la rive fidele 
Ou Ton aime toujours, 
Cette rive, ma chere, 
On ne la connait guere 
Au pays des amours. 

Ou voulez-vous aller? 
La brise va souffler. 



The oar is of ivory, 
The flag of watered silk, 
The rudder of fine gold; 
For ballast I have an orange, 
For sail, an angel's wing, 
For ship's boy, a seraph. 

Tell me, pretty young maid, . . . 

Would it be to the Baltic, 

Or to the Pacific, 

Or to the isle of Java? 

Or else would it be to Norway, 

To pluck the snow flower? 

Or the flower of Angsoka? 

Tell me, tell me, pretty young maid, 
Tell me where you'd like to go? 

Take me, said the pretty young maid, 

To the faithful shore, 

Where love endures for ever. 

That shore, my dear, 

Is barely known 

In the realm of love. 

Where would you like to go? 
The breeze is about to blow. 



■Theophile Gautier 



Zaide 

"Ma ville, ma belle ville, 
C'est Grenade au frais jardin, 
C'est le palais d'Aladin, 
Qui vaut Courdoue et Seville. 

Tous ses balcons sont ouverts, 
Tous ses bassins diaphanes, 
Toute la cour des sultanes 
S'y tient sous les myrthes verts.' 

Ainsi pres de Zorai'de, 
A sa voix donnant l'essor, 
Chantait la jeune Zaide, 
Le pied dans ses mules d'or. 

"Ma ville, ma belle ville, 
C'est Grenade au frais jardin, 
C'est le palais d'Aladin, 
Qui vaut Cordoue et Seville." 

La reine lui dit: 

"Ma fille, d'ou viens tu done?" 

"Je n'en sais rien." 

"N'as tu done pas de famille?" 

"Votre amour est tout mon bien; 

O ma reine, j'ai pour pere 

Ce soleil plein de douceur; 

La sierra, c'est ma mere, 

Et les etoiles mes soeurs. 



Zaide 

"My city, my beautiful city — it is Grenada of 
the fresh gardens, it is Aladdin's palace that 
surpasses even Cordova and Seville. All the 
balconies are open, all the pools crystal clear. 
And the court of the Sultana is held under 
the green myrtle trees." 



Thus, sitting near Zorai'de, sang the young 
Zaide, her feet in her golden slippers. 



"My city, my beautiful city — it is Grenada of 
the fresh gardens, it is Aladdin's palace that 
surpasses even Cordova and Seville." 



The queen spoke to her, 

"My child, where did you come from?" 

"I do not know." 

"Have you no family?" 

"Your love is all I have. Oh, my queen, I have 

for a father the sun full of warmth; the 

mountain is my mother, and the stars are 

my sisters." 



16 



"Ma ville, ma belle ville, 
C'est Grenade au frais jardin, 
C'est le palais d'Aladin, 
Qui vaut Cordoue et Seville." 

Cependant sur la colline 
Zaide a la nuit pleurait: 
"Helas! je suis orpheline; 
De moi qui se chargerait?" 
Un cavalier vit la belle, 
La prit sur sa selle d'or; 
Grenade, helas! est loin d'elle, 
Mais Zaide y reve encore. 

Sa ville, sa belle ville, 

C'est Grenade au frais jardin, 

C'est le palais d'Aladin, 

Qui vaut Cordoue et Seville. 

— Roger de Beauvoir 



"My city, my beautiful city — it is Grenada 
of the fresh gardens, it is Aladdin's palace 
that surpasses even Cordova and Seville." 



But later, above on a hill, Zaide cried to the 
night, "Helas, I am an orphan: who will take 
care of me?" A cavalier saw her beauty and 
took her on his golden saddle; Grenada, alas, 
was far behind her, but Zaide dreams of it still. 



Her city, her beautiful city — it is Grenada of 
the fresh gardens, it is Aladdin's palace that 
surpasses even Cordova and Seville. 



La mort d'Ophelie 

Aupres d'un torrent Ophelie 
Cueillait, tout en suivant le bord, 
Dans sa douce et tendre folie, 
Des pervenches, des boutons d'or, 
Des iris aux couleurs d'opale, 
Et de ces fleurs d'un rose pale 
Qu'on appelle des doigts de mort. 

Puis, elevant sur ses mains blanches, 
Les riants tresors du matin, 
Elle les suspendait aux branches, 
Aux branches d'un saule voisin. 
Mais trop faible le rameau plie, 
Se brise, et la pauvre Ophelie 
Tombe, sa guirland a la main. 

Quelques instants sa robe enflee 
La tint encor sur le courant, 
Et, comme une voile gonflee, 
Elle flottait toujours chantant, 
Chantant quelque vieille ballade, 
Chantant ainsi qu'une na'iade, 
Nee au milieu de ce torrent. 

Mais cette etrange melodie 
Passa, rapide comme un son. 
Par les flots la robe alourdie 
Bientot dans l'abime profond 
Entraina la pauvre insensee, 
Laissant a peine commencee 
Sa melodieuse chanson. 

— Ernest Legouve (after Shakespeare) 



The Death of Ophelia 

Along the banks of a stream Ophelia wan- 
dered in her sweet and tender madness, 
cutting periwinkles, buttercups, iris the color 
of opals, and the pale rose flowers called 
dead men's fingers. 



Then lifting in her white hands all the 
cheerful treasures of the morning, she hung 
them on the branches of a nearby willow. 
But, too frail, the branch bent and broke, and 
poor Ophelia fell, her garland in her hand. 



For several instants her dress spread out 
and floated her on the current. Like a swell- 
ing sail she was carried along while singing 
some old ballad — singing like a naiad born in 
the middle of the stream. 



But that strange melody passed rapidly like 
a sound. Weighed down by the waves, her 
dress grew heavy and dragged the poor girl 
under into the vast depths — hardly had she 
begun her melodious song. 



17 




First violins 

Joseph Silverstein 

Concertmaster 
Charles Munch chair 
Emanuel Borok 

Assistant Concertmaster 
Helen Horner Mclntyre chair 

Max Hobart 
Rolland Tapley 
Roger Shermont 
Max Winder 
Harry Dickson 
Gottfried Wilfinger 
Fredy Ostrovsky 
Leo Panasevich 
Sheldon Rotenberg 
Alfred Schneider 
Gerald Gelbloom 
Raymond Sird 
Ikuko Mizuno 
Cecylia Arzewski 
Amnon Levy 
Bo Youp Hwang 

Second violins 

Victor Yampolsky 

Fahnestock chair 

Marylou Speaker 
Michel Sasson 
Ronald Knudsen 
Leonard Moss 
Vyacheslav Uritsky 
Laszlo Nagy 
Michael Vitale 
Darlene Gray 
Ronald Wilkison 
Harvey Seigel 
Jerome Rosen 
Sheila Fiekowsky 
Gerald Elias 
Ronan Lefkowitz 

Violas 

Burton Fine 

Charles 5. Dana chair 
Reuben Green 
Eugene Lehner 
George Humphrey 
Jerome Lipson 

18 



Robert Karol 
Bernard Kadinoff 
Vincent Mauricci 
Earl Hedberg 
Joseph Pietropaolo 
Robert Barnes 
Michael Zaretsky 

Cellos 

Jules Eskin 

Philip R. Allen chair 
Martin Hoherman 
Mischa Nieland 
Jerome Patterson 
Robert Ripley 
Luis Leguia 
Carol Procter 
Ronald Feldman 
Joel Moerschel 
Jonathan Miller 
Martha Babcock 

Basses 

William Rhein 

Acting Principal 

Harold D. Hodgkinson chair 

Joseph Hearne 

Bela Wurtzler 

Leslie Martin 

John Salkowski 

John Barwicki 

Robert Olson 

Lawrence Wolfe 

Henry Portnoi 

Flutes 

Doriot Anthony Dwyer 

Walter Piston chair 

James Pappoutsakis 
Paul Fried 

Piccolo 

Lois Schaefer 

Oboes 

Ralph Gomberg 

Mildred B. Remis chair 
Wayne Rapier 

English Horn 

Laurence Thorstenberg 

Clarinets 

Harold Wright 

Ann 5.M. Banks chair 

Pasquale Cardillo 
Peter Hadcock 

E-flat clarinet 

Bass Clarinet 

Felix Viscuglia 



Bassoons 

Sherman Walt 
Edward A. Taft chair 

Roland Small 

Matthew Ruggiero 

Contra bassoon 

Richard Plaster 

Horns 

Charles Kavalovski 

Helen Sagoff Slosberg chair 

Charles Yancich 
Peter Gordon 
David Ohanian 
Richard Mackey 
Ralph Pottle 

Trumpets 

Armando Ghitalla 

Roger Louis Voisin chair 

Andre Come 
Rolf Smedvig 
Gerard Goguen 

Trombones 

Ronald Barron 
Norman Bolter 
Gordon Hallberg 
William Gibson 

Tuba 

Chester Schmitz 

Timpani 

Everett Firth 

Sylvia Shippen Wells chair 

Percussion 

Charles Smith 
Arthur Press 

Assistant timpanist 
Thomas Gauger 
Frank Epstein 

Harps 

Bernard Zighera 
Ann Hobson 

Personnel Managers 

William Moyer 
Harry Shapiro 

Librarians 

Victor Alpert 
William Shisler 

Stage Manager 

Alfred Robison 



Berkshire Music Center Orchestra 



Violins 
Diane Bischak 
Craig Burket 
Nicole Bush 
Diane Cataldo 
Karen Clarke 
Jolan Friedhoff 
Kim Golden 
Michael Hanson 
Carol Heffelfinger 
Peter Jaffe 
Philip Johnson 
Martha Lewis 
Martha McPherson 
Philip Middleman 
Mayumi Ohira 
Mary O'Reilly 
Charles Pikler 
Wendy Plank 
Martha Royer 
Wendy Scheidemantle 
Randi Schonning 
Alex Shum 
Semmy Stahlhammer 
Kathryn Stepulla 
Arthur Zadinsky 

Violas 

Katherine Askew 
Marshall Fine 
Paul Frankenfeld 
Stephanie Fricker 
Carol Hutter 
Virginia Izzo 
Lynn Johnson 
Betsy London 
Marie Peebles 
Meredith Snow 
Julie Westgate 



Cellos 

Timothy Butler 
Catherine Giles 
Douglas Ischar 
Nancy Keevan 
Martha Kiefer 
Edwin Lee 
Julia Lichten 
Freya Oberle 
Michael Peebles 
Steven Shumway 
Wyatt Sutherland 

Basses 

Robert Caplin 
Steven D'Amico 
Jonathan Jensen 
Keith Post 
Jonathan Storck 
Stephen Tramontozzi 

Flutes 
Tyra Gilb 
Marie Herseth 
Wendy Rolfe 
Jacqueline Rosen 
Debra Wendells 

Oboes 

Sandra Apeseche 
William Bennett 
Margot Golding 
Jean Landa 
Avinoam Yosselevitch 

Clarinets 

Katherine Betts 
Michael Corner 
John Fullam 
Diane Heffner 
David Howard 



Bassoons 

Matthew Karr 
Dennis Michel 
Susan Nigro 
Richard Sharp 
Braden Toan 



Horns 

Laurel Bennert 
Roger Kaza 
Kirk Laughton 
Lawrence Ragent 
Christopher Tillotson 
Richard Todd 
Robert Ward 

Trumpets 

Dennis Alves 
Richard Henly 
Timothy Morrison 
Larry Scofield 
Carol Warner 
Gregory Whitaker 

Trombones 

Mitchell Arnold 
Donald Sanders 
Stephen Wilson 
Arthur Smith 

Tubas 

Craig Fuller 
Lawrence Tarlow 

Percussion 

John Boudler 
Jeffrey Fischer 
Neil Grover 
Patrick Hollenbeck 
James Saporito 
Richard Wind 



from the Boston University Young Artist Orchestra 



Trumpets 

Stephen Burns 
Justin Cohen 
Frank Herdman 



Trombones 

Paul Eachus 
Mark Hartman 
Michael Rooney 
Kirk Ruehl 



Tuba 

Kenneth Bourque 



19 



BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

Seiji Ozawa, Music Director 

Colin Davis, Principal Conductor 
Joseph Silverstein, Assistant Conductor 
Tanglewood 1977 

Friday, 19 August at 9 




SEIJI OZAWA, conductor 



BERLIOZ Requiem — Grande messe des morts, Opus 5 

Requiem et Kyrie (Introitus) 

Dies irae (Prosa) 

Quid sum miser 

Rex tremendae 

Quaerens me 

Lacrymosa 

Domine, Jesu Christe (Offertorium) 

Hostias 

Sanctus 

Agnus Dei 



BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

BERKSHIRE MUSIC CENTER ORCHESTRA, 

BOSTON UNIVERSITY YOUNG ARTISTS ORCHESTRA 

BRASS, TANGLEWOOD FESTIVAL CHORUS and CHOIR, 

JOHN OLIVER, conductor 

KENNETH RIEGEL, tenor 



Seiji Ozawa and the Boston Symphony Orchestra record exclusively 
for Deutsche Grammophon. 
Baldwin piano 



20 



Notes 



Hector Berlioz 

Requiem, Opus 5 

Louis-Hector Berlioz was born at La Cote- 
Saint -Andre in the Department of here on 1 1 
December 1803 and died in Paris on 8 March 
1869. He completed his Requiem on 29 June 
1837, and Francois-Antoine Habeneck con- 
ducted the first performance in the church of 
St. Louis -des-lnvalides, Paris, on 5 December 
that year. Gilbert -Louis Duprez was the tenor 
soloist. The first American performance was 
given under the direction of Leopold Damrosch 
in New York on 4 May 1881. 

Charles X of France, younger brother 
of Louis XVI, who had been guillotined 
in 1793, and of Louis XVIII, who had 
been titular monarch in 1795 and who 
had been installed as puppet king by the 
Allies both times they had sent Napoleon 
into exile, was the sort of man capable 
in the 1820s of a belief in Divine Right. 
Constitutional monarchy held no charms 
for him. He would rather hew wood, he 
insisted, than reign under the conditions 
with which his colleague in England had 
to put up. Three days of violent uprising 
in July 1830 put an end to his six-year 
reign. Under King Louis-Philippe, an 
annual commemorative service honored 
those who had lost their lives in the 
Revolution of 1830, and it was for one 
of those services that Comte Adrien 
de Gasparin, Minister of the Interior, 
commissioned a Requiem from the 33- 
year old Berlioz. "The text of the 
Requiem was a quarry I had long 
coveted," Berlioz recalled later. "Now at 
last it was mine, and I fell upon it with 
a kind of fury. My brain felt as though 
it would explode with pressure of ideas. 
The outline of one piece was barely 
sketched before the next formed itself 
in my mind. It was impossible to write 
fast enough . . ." Berlioz gratefully dedi- 
cated the score to de Gasparin, an act 
that gave him the greater pleasure be- 
cause by then that cultivated minister — 
"part of that small minority of French 
politicians interested in music, and of 
the still more select company who have 
a feeling for it" — was no longer in power. 



But if writing the Requiem was easy 
and a pleasure, almost nothing else was. 
The government Director of Fine Arts 
tried to abort the commission. Luigi 
Cherubini, the sort of composer to whom 
a less imaginative minister would have 
sent such a commission, was offended 
and, together with his pupils, in active 
opposition. It was decreed that the com- 
memorative service in July 1837 would 
have no music. Purchase orders and 
invoices and memoranda made their 
sluggish way from one government 
bureau to another, and it took five 
months for the copyists, the choristers 
who had already been in rehearsal, and 
Berlioz himself to get paid. At the point 
when there seemed to be no hope what- 
ever for a performance, the news came 
that Field-Marshal Damremont had been 
shot through the heart in the assault 
on the Algerian town of Constantine-* 
A service was to be held in the Invalides 
for Damremont and the others who 
were killed during the siege of Constan- 
tine. This came under the jurisdiction of 
the Minister of War, General Bernard, 
who was friendly to Berlioz, or at least 
was not against him, and suddenly the 
Requiem was on again. Bernard, how- 
ever, had one more nasty surprise to 
spring on the composer, which was that 
the performance would have to be con- 
ducted by Francois-Antoine Habeneck, 
chief conductor at the Opera, which 
made him politically the most powerful 
musician in Paris. He was one of the 
old-style conductors who worked, not 
from a score, but from a first violin 
part with other instrumental parts cued 
in, but he was an able musician and a 
thorough workman: Richard Wagner, 
far from easy to please, praised Ha- 
beneck's performance of the Beethoven 
symphonies as the best he had ever 
heard. For many reasons, Habeneck and 
Berlioz were not on good terms, and as 
one assays the evidence, it really does 
appear that Habeneck tried to sabotage 
the premiere of the Requiem by laying 

*In 1827, in the Kasbah of Algiers, one of the 
Turkish deys struck the French consul with a 
fly-swatter, setting off a series of incidents 
and reprisals that led to the French conquest 
and colonization of Algeria. 



21 



"Very impressive, perhaps more 
knowledgeable than anyone else 
writing in Boston now." 

"Youns, but knows what he's doing, 
works nard all the time to expand his 
knowledge!' 

"Should be read'.' 



When performers got the opportunity to 
criticize the critics* that's what they said 
about Thor Eckert, music critic for The 
Christian Science Monitor. 

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Haberneck 

down his baton and taking a pinch of 
snuff at the first measure — with its 
tempo change — of the Tuba Mirum.* 
"With my habitual mistrust I had stayed 
just behind Habeneck," reports Berlioz. 
"... I had been keeping my eye on him. 
In a flash I turned on my heel, sprang 
forward in front of him and, stretching 
out my arm, marked out the four great 
beats of the new tempo. The bands fol- 
lowed me and everything went off in 
order. I conducted the piece to the 
end . . . When, at the final words of the 
chorus, Habeneck saw that the Tuba 
Mirum was saved, he said, 'God, I was 
in a cold sweat. Without you we would 
have been lost.' 'I know,' I replied, look- 
ing him straight in the eye . . . The 
success of the Requiem was complete, 
despite all the intrigues and stratagems, 
blatant or underhand, official and un- 
official, which had been resorted to to 
stop it." 

Berlioz begins with chorus and an 
orchestra of woodwinds, French horns, 
and strings. He proposes specific num- 
bers — four flutes, two oboes, two En- 
glish horns, four clarinets, twelve French 

*That Habeneck took snuff at that point is 
certain. What is in question is whether hedid 
it out of negligence or malice. The matter is 
sensibly discussed by David Cairns in his 
edition of the Berlioz Memoirs, Alfred A. 
Knopf, New York, 1969. 



horns, eight bassoons, fifty violins, 
twenty each of violas and cellos, eigh- 
teen basses, and for the chorus, eighty 
women,* sixty tenors, and seventy 
basses, but adds that these numbers 
"are only relative, and one can, space 
permitting, double or triple the vocal 
forces and increase the orchestra pro- 
portionally. If one had an immense 
chorus of 700 or 800 voices, the entire 
group should sing only in the Dies lrae, 
the Tuba Mirum, and the Lacrymosa, using 
no more than 400 voices in the rest of 
the score," Berlioz uses both an expres- 
sive cantabile (e.g. Requiem aeternam and 
Te decei hymnus) and a quiet rhythmic 
declamation (e.g. et lux perpetua and Kyrie 
eleison). Indeed, when the voices first 
enter, he at once suggests both manners, 
the basses' melody being accompanied 
by the detached syllables of the tenors, 
who in turn are doubled by the bassoons 
playing the same melody legato. 

The Dies lrae begins with the same 
vocal and orchestral forces, and with 
striking contrast between the stern 
phrase of the cellos and basses (quite 
obsessive this will turn out to be) and 
the plaintive line of the sopranos and 
woodwinds. With the Tuba Mirum Ber- 
lioz, in a dramatic stroke, adds four 
brass groups, stationed north, east, west, 
south at the corners of the grand mass 
of singers and instrumentalists, 

*Altos have extended independent parts in 
the Quaerens me, the Sanctus, and the Agnus 
Dei only. 




Drawing of Berlioz by Horace Vernet (c. 183 1). 



23 



N.B. not at the corners of the audi- 
torium. Let Berlioz describe it: "First 
all four groups break in simultaneously 
. . . then successively, challenging and 
answering one another from a distance, 
the entries piling up, each a third higher 
than the one before. " It was here that 
"our hero of the snuffbox," as Berlioz 
calls him, made his disconcerting choice. 
Berlioz continues: "It is ... of the utmost 
importance to indicate the four beats of 
the new, slower tempo very clearly the 
moment it is reached; otherwise the 
great cataclysm, a musical representa- 
tion of the Last Judgment, prepared for 
with such deliberation and employing 
an exceptional combination of forces in 
a manner at that time unprecedented 
and not attempted since* — a passage 
which will, I hope, endure as a landmark 
in music — is mere noise and pandemo- 
nium, a monstrosity." As the movement 
proceeds, Berlioz unleashes as well an 
immense volume of percussion, four 
pairs of kettledrums, two bass drums, 
four tamtams, and ten cymbals. As Death 
and Nature stand astounded, the music 
falls into silence. (Some of this music is 
recycled from a Mass Berlioz wrote 
about 1824, most of which he destroyed.) 

The obsessive bass phrase from the 
beginning of the Dies Irae continues to 
sound through Quid sum miser, a brief 
and quiet movement in which the words 
are assigned almost entirely to the tenors, 
who are specifically asked to express 
humility and fear in their singing. 
English horns, bassoons, cellos, and 
basses accompany. 

Rex tremendae is another conception on 
a huge scale, and on the words Ne cadam 
in obscurum! the Day of Judgment brass 
and percussion intervene once more. 
But the thought of the fount of mercy 
brings quiet. 

Quaerens me — these are the lines of 
text that according to Donald Francis 
Tovey "Dr. Johnson sometimes tried to 
quote, but never without bursting into 
tears" — is sung by unaccompanied voices, 
and very softly throughout. 

Sheer terror whips through the 
"lamentable day" called up by the Lacry- 

*Berlioz is writing around 1848. 
24 




Berlioz by Prinzhofer (1845). 

mosa. After the gentle interlude of Pie 
]esu, the brass choirs and the percussion 
join to tie this movement to the earlier 
parts of the Dies Irae. The idea of thus 
using extra brass went back to 1831 and 
a never executed plan for an oratorio 
on The Last Day of the World; then, too, 
his letters indicate his concern for pre- 
senting this cataclysm with character- 
istic economy and precision. 

The Offertory, Domine, Jesu Christe, is 
another movement of the greatest 
delicacy. Almost to the end, the voices 
sing on two notes, and ony the word 
promisisti releases them. 

Hostias is for male voices with instru- 
mental punctuation. But what punctua- 
tion it is, that series of chords for high 
flutes with eight trombones swelling and 
receding on their deepest pedal notes! 

High solo violins, flute, and violas 
divided into four sections and playing 
"a very dense tremolo," accompany the 
tenor solo and the choral responses in 
the Sanctus. The Hosanna is fugued, and 
Berlioz implores the chorus to sing 
"without violence, sustaining the notes 
well instead of accenting them one by 
one." For the return of the Sanctus, 



Berlioz finds yet another of his most 
extraordinary and new sounds. At the 
first performance, the tenor solo was 
taken by Gilbert-Louis Duprez, the first 
Edgardo in Donizetti's Lucia di Lammer- 
moor and also Berlioz's first Benvenuto 
Cellini, in which opera he got lost when 
his wife's physician appeared in mid- 
performance to signal in pantomime the 
birth of a baby boy. 



In the Agnus Dei, as in several passages 
of the Dies lrae and the Offertory, Ber- 
lioz somewhat reorders the text. This is 
a movement of summation and of re- 
capitulation of words, musical themes, 
and textures. Woodwinds, trombones, 
and voices sing repeated Amens across 
the pianissimo arpeggios of the strings 
and the softly thudding punctuations 
of eight kettledrums. 

— Michael Steinberg 



Requiem 

Requiem aeternam dona eis, Domine, 
et lux perpetua luceat eis! 
Te decet hymnus, Deus, in Sion, 
et tibi reddetur votum in Jerusalem. 

Exaudi orationem meam: 

Ad te omnis caro veniet. 

Requiem aeternam dona defunctis, Domine, 

et lux perpetua luceat eis! 

Kyrie eleison! 

Christe eleison! 

Kyrie eleison! 



Requiem 

Grant them eternal rest, O Lord, 
and let everlasting light shine on them. 
To thee, O God, praise is meet in Zion, 
and unto thee shall the vow be performed 

in Jerusalem. 
Hearken unto my prayer: 
unto thee shall all flesh come. 
Grant the dead eternal rest, O Lord, 
and let everlasting light shine on them. 
Lord, have mercy upon us! 
Christ, have mercy upon us! 
Lord, have mercy upon us! 



Dies irae, dies ilia 
Solvet saeclum in favilla 
Teste David cum Sibylla. 

Quantus tremor est futurus 
Quando judex est venturus 
Cuncta stricte discussurus! 

Tuba, mirum spargens sonum 
Per sepulcra regionum, 
Coget omnes ante thronum. 

Mors stupebit et natura 
Cum resurget creatura 
Judicanti responsura. 

Liber scriptus proferetur 
In quo totum continetur 
Unde mundus judicetur. 

Judex ergo cum sedebit 
Quidquid latet apparebit: 
Nil inultum remanebit. 



The Day of Wrath, that day 
shall dissolve the world in ashes, 
as witnesseth David and the Sibyl. 

What trembling there shall be 

when the Judge shall come 

who shall thresh out all thoroughly! 

The trumpet, scattering a wondrous sound 
through the tombs of all lands, 
shall drive all unto the Throne. 

Death and Nature shall be astounded 
when the creature shall rise again 
to answer to the Judge. 

A written book shall be brought forth 

in which shall be contained all 

for which the world shall be judged. 

And therefore when the Judge shall sit, 
whatsoever is hidden shall be manifest, 
and naught shall remain unavenged. 



Quid sum miser tunc dicturus, 
Quern patronum rogaturus, 
Cum vix Justus sit securus? 



What shall I say in my misery? 
Whom shall I ask to be my advocate, 
when scarcely the righteous may be 
without fear? 



25 



Rex tremendae majestatis 
Qui salvandos salvas gratis; 
Salva me, fons pietatis. 

Recordare, Jesu pie, 
Quod sum causa tuae viae 
Ne me perdas ilia die. 

Confutatis maledictis 
Flammis acribus addictis, 
Voca me, 

Et de profundo lacu, 
Libera me de ore leonis, 
Ne cadam in obscuram, 
Ne absorbeat me Tartarus! 
Qui salvandos salvas gratis; 
Salva me, fons pietatis! 

Quaerens me sedisti lassus; 
Redemisti crucem passus. 
Tantus labor non sit cassus. 

Juste Judex ultionis 
Donum fac remissionis 
Ante diem rationis. 

Ingemisco tamquam reus: 
Supplicanti parce, Deus. 

Preces meae non sunt dignae, 
Sed tu, bonus, fac benigne, 
Ne perenni cremer igne. 

Qui Mariam absolvisti 
Et latronem exaudisti, 
Mihi quoque spem dedisti, 

Inter oves locum praesta 
Et ab haedis me sequestra, 
Statuens in parte dextra. 



King of awful majesty, 

who freely savest the redeemed, 

save me, O fount of mercy. 

Remember, merciful Jesu, 

that I am the cause of thy journey, 

lest thou lose me in that day. 

When the damned are confounded 

and devoted to sharp flames, 

call thou me, 

and from the bottomless pit 

and the mouth of the lion, deliver me, 

lest I fall into darkness, 

lest Tartarus swallow me. 

Who freely savest the redeemed, 

save me, O fount of mercy. 

Seeking me didst thou sit weary: 

thou didst redeem me, suffering the cross: 

let not such labor be in vain. 

just Judge of vengeance, 
give the gift of remission 
before the day of reckoning. 

1 groan as one guilty; 

Spare, O God, me, thy suppliant. 

My prayers are not worthy, 

but do thou, good Lord, show mercy, 

lest I burn in everlasting fire. 

Thou who didst absolve Mary 
and didst hear the thief's prayer, 
hast given hope to me also. 

Give me a place among thy sheep 
and put me apart from the goats, 
setting me on the right hand. 



Lacrymosa dies ilia 
Qua resurget ex favilla 
Homo reus judicandus. 

Pie Jesu, 

Dona eis requiem aeternam. 



Lamentable is that day 

on which guilty man shall arise 

from the ashes to be judged. 

Merciful, Jesu, 

Grant them eternal rest. 



Domine, Jesu Christe, Rex gloriae, 

libera animas omnium fidelium defunctorum 

de poenis! 

Domine, libera eis de poenis inferni 

et de profundo lacu! 

Libera eis, et sanctus Michael signifer 

repraesentet eas in lucem sanctam 
quam olim Abrahae promisisti 

et semini ejus. Amen. 
26 



O Lord, Jesu Christ, King of glory, 
deliver the sould of all the departed faithful 
from torment. 
O Lord, deliver them from the torments 

of hell 
and from the bottomless pit. 
Deliver them, and let Saint Michael the 

standard-bearer 
bring them forth into the holy light, 
which thou didst once promise unto 

Abraham 
and his seed. Amen. 



Hostias et preces tibi, Domino, 
laudis offerimus. 
Suscipe pro animabus illis 
quarum hodie memoriam facimus. 



To thee, O lord, we render our offerings 
and prayers with praises. 
Receive them for those souls 
which we commemorate today. 



Sanctus, sanctus, sanctus, Domine Deus 

Sabaoth. 
Pleni sunt coeli et terra gloria tua. 
Hosanna in excelsis. 



Holy, holy, holy, Lord God of Sabaoth. 

Heaven and earth are full of thy glory. 
Hosanna in the highest. 



Agnus Dei, qui tollis peccata mundi, 
dona eis requiem sempiternam! 



Lamb of God, that takest away the sins of 

the world, 
grant them eternal rest. 



Te decet hymnus, Deus, in Sion, 
et tibi reddetur votum in Jerusalem. 

Exaudi orationem meam! 
Ad te omnis caro veniet. 



To thee, O God, praise is meet in Zion. 
and unto thee shall the vow be performed 

in Jerusalem. 
Hearken unto my prayer: 
unto thee all flesh shall come. 



Requiem aeternam dona defunctis, Domine, 

et lux perpetua Iuceat eis! 

Requiem aeternam dona eis, Domine, 

et lux perpetua Iuceat eis 

cum Sanctis tuis in aeternum, Domine, 

quia pius es! Amen. 



Grand the dead eternal rest, O Lord, 
and let everlasting light shine on them. 
Grant them eternal rest, O Lord, 
and let everlasting light shine on them 
with thy Saints for ever, O Lord, 
for thou art merciful. Amen. 



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28 



BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

Seiji Ozawa, Music Director 

Colin Davis, Principal Guest Conductor 
Joseph Silverstein, Assistant Conductor 
Tanglewood 1977 



1 *V/lsv* * 

BOSTON 

SYMPHONY 

ORCHESTRA 

SEW OZAWA 

' Mum Dirrrfor 



Saturday, 20 August at 8:30 



ANDREW DAVIS, conductor 



MOZART Piano Concerto in C, K. 503 

Allegro maestoso 

Andante 

[Allegretto] 

MALCOLM FRAGER 



INTERMISSION 



HOLST The Planets 

Mars, the Bringer of War 
Venus, the Bringer of Peace 
Mercury, the Winged Messenger 
Jupiter, the Bringer of Jollity 
Saturn, the Bringer of Old Age 
Uranus, the Magician 
Neptune, the Mystic 

The Tanglewood Choir, 
John Oliver, conductor 



Seiji Ozawa and the Boston Symphony Orchestra record exclusively 

for Deutsche Grammophon. 

Baldwin piano 

Malcolm Frager plays the Steinway. 



29 



ate 



-M 



\) 



THE 

BOSTON 

SYMPHONY 

CHAMBER 

PLAYERS 



'? 



■^7/ 



vJ 



Three Sundays that can help you 

face Monday 

The Brahms Quintet op. 115. Stra- 
vinsky's L'Histoire du Soldat. The 
Schubert E Flat Piano Trio. These 
and other major chamber music 
works make up the Boston Sym- 
phony Chamber Players 1977-78 
program. 

The twelve principal players of 
the Boston Symphony Orchestra 
will perform at Jordan Hall at 4:00 
p.m. on Nov. 6, 1977 and Feb. 19 and 
April 9, 1978. Gilbert Kalish will be 
the guest pianist. 
For complete program information, write to Subscription Office, 
Symphony Hall, Boston, Mass. 02115, or call 266-1492. 



30 



Notes 



Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart 

Piano Concerto in C major, K. 503 

Johannes Chrysostomus Wolfgangus Theophilus 
Mozart — that is his full baptismal name — was 
born in Salzburg on 27 January 1 756 and died 
in Vienna on 5 December 1791. He completed 
the C major Concerto, K. 503, on 4 December 
1 786. He left no cadenzas for it, and Malcolm 
Frager makes his own. 

In just under three years, Mozart 
wrote twelve piano concertos. It is the 
genre that absolutely dominates his work 
schedule in 1784, 1785, and 1786, and 
what he poured out — almost all of it for 
his own use at his own concerts — is a 
series of masterpieces that delight the 
mind, charm and seduce the ear, and 
pierce the heart. They are the ideal 
realization of what might be done with 
the piano concerto. Beethoven a couple 
of times reaches to where Mozart is, and 
perhaps Brahms, too, but still, in this 
realm Mozart scarcely knows peers. 
K. 503 is the end of that run. It comes at 
the end of an amazing year, amazing even 
for Mozart, that had begun with work 
on The Impresario and Figaro, and whose 
achievements include the A major Piano 
Concerto, K. 488, and the C minor, 
K. 491, the E flat Piano Quartet, the 
last of his horn concertos, the Trios 
in G and B flat for piano, violin, and 
cello, as well as the one in E flat with 
viola and clarinet, and the piano duet 
Sonata in F, K. 497. Together with the 
present concerto he worked on the Prague 
Symphony, finishing it two days later, and 
before the year was out, he wrote one 
of the most personal and in every way 
special of his masterpieces, the concert 
aria for soprano with piano obbligato 
and orchestra, Ch'io mi scordi di te, K. 505. 

Such a list does not reflect how Mo- 
zart's life had begun to change. On 
3 March 1784, for example, he could 
report to his father that he had 22 
concerts in 38 days: "I don't think that 
this way I can possibly get out practice." 
A few weeks later, he wrote that for 
his own series of concerts he had a 



bigger subscription list than two other 
performers put together, and that for 
his most recent appearance the hall 
had been "full to overflowing." In 1786, 
the fiscal catastrophes of 1788, the year 
of the last three symphonies, were prob- 
ably unforeseeable, and one surpassing 
triumph still lay ahead of him, the de- 
lirious reception by the Prague public 
of Don Giovanni in 1787. Figaro was pop- 
ular in Vienna, but not more than other 
operas by lesser men, and certainly 
not enough to buoy up his fortunes 
for long. Perhaps it is even indicative 
that we know nothing about the first 
performance of K. 503. Mozart had 
planned some concerts for December 
1786, and they were presumably the 
occasion for writing this concerto, but 
we have no evidence that these ap- 
pearances actually came off. 

What has changed, too, is Mozart's 
approach to the concerto. It seems less 
operatic than before, and more sym- 
phonic. The immediately preceding one, 
the C minor, K. 491, completed 24 
March 1786, foreshadows this, but even 
so, K. 503 impresses as a move into 
something new. Its very manner is all 
its own. For years, and until not so long 
ago, it was one of the least-played of 
the series (currently K. 451 in D and 
K. 456 in B flat seem to be the step- 
children), and it was as though pianists 
were reluctant to risk disconcerting 
their audiences by offering them 
Olympian grandeur and an unprece- 
dented compositional richness where 
the expectation was chiefly of charm, 
operatic lyricism, and humor. 

This is one of Mozart's big trumpets- 
and-drums concertos, and the first mas- 
sive gestures make its full and grand 
sonority known. But even so formal an 
exordium becomes a personal statement 
at Mozart's hands — "cliche becomes 
event," as Adorno says about Mahler — 
and across the seventh measure there 
falls for just a moment the shadow of 
the minor mode. And when the formal 
proclamations are finished, the music 
does indeed take off in C minor. Such 
harmonic — and expressive — ambiguities 
inform the whole movement. Mozart 
always likes those shadows, but new 



31 



here are the unmodulated transitions 
from major to minor and back, the hard- 
ness of his chiaroscuro. The first solo en- 
trance is one of Mozart's most subtle and 
gently winsome. The greatest marvel 
of all is the development, which is brief 
but dense, with a breathtaking har- 
monic range and an incredible intricacy 
of canonic writing. The piano has a 
delightful function during these pages, 
proposing ideas and new directions, but 
then settling back and turning into ah 
accompanist who listens to the wood- 
winds execute what he has imagined. 
(And how keenly one senses Mozart's 
own presence at the keyboard here!) 

The Andante is subdued, formal and a 
little mysterious at the same time, like 
a knot garden by moonlight, and re- 
markable too for the great span from 
its slowest notes to its fastest. For the 
finale, Mozart goes back to adapt a 
gavotte from his then five-year old 
opera Idomeneo. In its courtly and witty 
measures, there is nothing to prepare us 
for the epiphany of the episode in which 
the piano, accompanied by cellos and 
basses alone (a sound that occurs no- 
where else in Mozart), begins a smiling 
and melancholy song that is continued 
by the oboe, the flute, the bassoon, and 
in which the cellos cannot resist joining. 
Lovely in itself, the melody grows into 
a music whose richness of texture and 
whose poignancy and passion astonish 
us even in the context of the mature 
Mozart. From that joy and pain Mozart 
redeems us by leading us back to his 
gavotte and from there into an exuber- 
antly inventive, brilliant ending. 

— Michael Steinberg 

Gustav Hoist 

The Planets, suite for large orchestra*, 
Opus 32 

Gustav Hoist was born — Gustavus Theodore 
von Hoist — in Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, 
England, on 21 September 18 74 and died in 
London on 25 May 1934. He wrote The 
Planets between 1914 and 1916, beginning 
with Mars (but before the outbreak of war in 
August), continuing with Venus and Jupiter 
that fall, writing Saturn, Uranus, and Nep- 



tune in 1915, and finishing with Mercury 
in 1916. The first performances were private, 
one of a two-piano arrangement both made 
and played by Vally Lasker and Norah Day, 
Hoist's assistants at St. Paul's School, where 
he was music master, and the other — of Mars, 
Mercury, Jupiter, Saturn, and Neptune 
only — by the Queen's Hall Orchestra under 
Dr. Adrian Boult on 29 September 1918. 
Venus was performed for the first time, along 
with Mercury and Jupiter, in London on 
22 November 1919, the composer conducting, 
and the first performance of the complete suite 
took place in London on 1 5 November 1920, 
Albert' Coates conducting. In January 1932, 
while a Visiting Professor at Harvard, Hoist 
conducted the Boston Symphony in a pair of 
concerts of his own music, including. The 
Planets. He reported then to Imogen Hoist, 
his daughter and future biographer: "The band 
treated me royally. At two of the rehearsals 
they insisted on staying half an hour extra and 
at every possible occasion they cheered me ... . 
The only fault of the orchestra was that they 
were over anxious. On Friday's concert there 
were half a dozen extraordinary slips in the 
Planets: in the Perfect Fool ballet the harpist 
missed a line, and the water music sounded quite 
modern: while in the St. Paul's Suite I broke 
a collar stud. But Saturday's concert was 
really good." 

Hoist's father was a piano teacher 
whose grandfather, who had once taught 
the harp to Imperial Grand Duchesses in 
St. Petersburg, had emigrated to England 
from Riga. His mother, a sweet lady 
whose jumpy nerves were upset by 
music, died young, and Gustav and his 
brother, Emil Gottfried (later a success- 
ful actor under the name of Ernest 
Cossard), were brought up by their 
Aunt Nina, who had once strewn rose 
petals for Franz Liszt to walk on. Gustav 
inherited his mother's over-strung 
nerves and later in life he was several 
times to come near mental collapse. He 
was a timid child, so nearsighted that 
as a grown man he could not, even when 
wearing spectacles, recognize members 
of his own family at six yards. His nights 
alternated between insomnia and night- 
mares. Much of his life he suffered from 
neuritis so severe that he had to dictate 
some of his music, portions of the densely 
intricate orchestral score of The Planets, 



32 



for example. He played violin and key- 
boards as a boy, but the neuritis put a 
stop to both, and other than occasional 
conducting, his last activity as a per- 
former was as trombonist in the Scottish 
Orchestra and with the Carl Rosa Opera 
Company from 1898 until 1903. He 
studied composition at the Royal College 
of Music, London, with Sir Charles 
Villiers Stanford, and it was as a com- 
poser and teacher that he really found 
himself. He taught most of his adult life, 
at the James Allen and St. Paul's girls' 
schools and at Morley College for Work- 
ing Men and Women. He kept the as- 
sociation with St. Paul's until his death 
— the alumnae used to identify them- 
selves to him by naming what Bach 
cantatas they had sung under his direc- 
tion — and it was in the soundproof 
room of the new music wing opened 
there in 1913, a very paradise where he 
could be not only undisturbed but also 
indulge in the near-crematorial tem- 
peratures he favored indoors, that he 
worked on The Planets. 

There was more to his heaven and 
earth than what he inherited from his 
Swedish and English ancestors (or his 
Spanish great-great-grandmother who 
had ended up as the wife of an Irish 
peer in County Killarney) or what he 
had learned at the Royal College. In his 
twenties, he became deeply involved in 
Indian philosophy and religion, and he 
taught himself Sanskrit so as to make 
his own translations of the Rig Veda. 
Between 1908 and 1912, he composed 
four sets of hymns from those ancient 
books of knowledge, and his most 
moving achievement is the opera Savitri, 
based on an incident in the fourth- 
century epic Mahabharata (there is an 
overwhelming recorded performance 
with Janet Baker). And some time after 
the turn of the century, he came into 
the thrall of astrology, something of 
which he was reluctant to speak, though 
he admitted that casting horoscopes for 
his friends was his "pet vice." The Planets 
are astrological. "As a rule I only study 
things that suggest music to me," Hoist 
once wrote," . . . recently the character 
of each planet suggested lots to me." 
And for the 1920 premiere, Hoist pro- 



vided this note: "These pieces were 
suggested by the astrological significance 
of the planets; there is no programme 
music in them, neither have they any 
connection with the deities of classical 
mythology bearing the same names. If 
any guide to the music is required the 
subtitle to each piece will be found 
sufficient, especially if it be used in a 
broad sense. For instance, Jupiter brings 
jollity in the ordinary sense, and also the 
more ceremonial type of rejoicing as- 
sociated with religions or national fes- 
tivities. Saturn brings not only physical 
decay, but also a vision of fulfillment. 
Mercury is the symbol of mind." 

Mars, the Bringer of War: the associa- 
tion of Mars and war goes back as far 
as history records. The planet's satel- 
lites are Phobos (fear) and Deimos 
(terror), and its symbol rjJ combines 
shield and spear. In Hoist, this comes" 
out as a fierce, remorseless allegro, in 
five violent beats to the bar. 

Venus, the Bringer of Peace: after the 
moon, Venus is the brightest object in 
our night sky.* The identification with 
Ishtar, Aphrodite's Babylonian prede- 
cessor, goes back to at least 3,000 B.C. 
To astrologers, "when the disorder of 
Mars is past, Venus restores peace and 
harmony" (Noel Jan Tyl, The Planets: 
Their Signs and Aspects, Vol. Ill of The 
Principles and Practice of Astrology, St. Paul, 
1974). Horn and flutes answer each 
other in this adagio. High violins have 
an extended song, but the dominant 
colors are the cool one of flutes, harps, 
and celesta. 

Mercury, the Winged Messenger: 
Hermes, god of cattle, sheep, and vege- 
tation, deity of dreams, and conductor 
of the dead, first assumes the role of 
messenger in the Odyssey. Mercury, his 
Roman counterpart, was primarily a god 
of merchandise and merchants, and his 
winged sandals and winged cap are 
taken over from Hermes. To astrologers, 
Mercury is "the thinker" (cf. Hoist's 
comment above). The composer makes 
this a virtuosic scherzo, unstable, 



*The Greeks called it Hesperus when it 
appeared in the Western sky. Cf. Ben Jonson's 
poem on page 41. 

33 



nervously changeable in meter and har- 
mony — in a word, mercurial. 

Jupiter, the Bringer of Jollity: the 

most massive of the planets, possessing 
twelve satellites (one of them larger 
than the planet Mercury), named for 
the light-bringer, the rain-god, thegod 
of thunderbolts, of the grape and the 
tasting of the new wine, of oaths, treaties, 
and contracts, and from whom we take 
the word "jovial." Jupiter, says Noel Tyl, 
"symbolizes expansiveness, scope of en- 
thusiasm, knowledge, honor, and op- 
portunity . . . [and] corresponds to for- 
tune, inheritance, bonanza." Hoist gives 
us an unmistakably English Jupiter, and 
in 1921 he took the big tune in the 
middle and set to it as a unison song 
with orchestra the words, "I vow to 
thee, my country." 

Saturn, the Bringer of Old Age: Sat- 
urn is the outermost of the planets 
known in ancient times. The god is as- 
sociated with Cronus and traditionally 
portrayed as an old man. To quote Tyl 
again, Saturn is "man's time on earth, his 
ambition, his strategic delay, his wisdom 
toward fulfillment, his disappointments 
and frustrations." Another adagio dom- 
inated by the sound of flutes and harps, 
like Venus in both characteristics, but 
static, full of the suggestion of bells, and 
serene at the last. This movement was 
Hoist's own favorite. 

Uranus, the Magician: the first planet 
discovered in the age of the telescope, 
specifically in 1781 by Sir William 
Herschel, who wanted to name it for 
George III.* In astrology, Uranus rules 
invention, innovation, and astrology it- 
self. Hoist begins with a triple invoca- 
tion (trumpets and trombones, then 
tubas, then timpani) and leads that way 
into a movement of galumphing dance. 
At the end, the apparitions disappear 
into the night. 

Neptune, the Mystic: Pluto, now wait- 
ing to be displaced as the farthest out 
planet by Planet X that the astronomers 
know about but haven't yet found, was 
discovered in 1930, so that when Hoist 

*Some astronomers wanted to call it Her- 
schel, but the name of Uranus was defini- 
tively assigned by the German astronomer, 
Johann Elert Bode. 




Hoist at the age of 59, a few months before his death. 

wrote his suite, Neptune, discovered in 
1846, was the extreme point in our 
system. t In astrology, Neptune means 
confusion and mystic rapport with other 
worlds. Neptune is invisible to the naked 
eye and to Hoist it speaks of distance, 
mystery, unanswerable questions. He 
makes of it another slow movement 
in swaying, irregular meter, softly dis- 
sonant in harmony, full of the sound 
of shimmering harps and celesta, and 
dissolving in the voices of an invisible 
chorus of women. 

— M.S. 



tDuring most of the next 20 years, Neptune 
will in fact be even more distant than Pluto. 



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34 



BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

Seiji Ozawa, Music Director 

Colin Davis, Principal Conductor 
Joseph Silverstein, Assistant Conductor 
Tanglewood 1977 

Sunday, 21 August at 2:30 



1 <*fflb 



tih ' 







ANDREW DAVIS, conductor 



BERLIOZ Overture The Corsair, Opus 21 



BRITTEN Serenade for tenor solo, horn and strings, Opus 31 

Prologue 

Pastoral (Cotton) 

Nocturne (Tennyson) 

Elegy (Blake) 

Dirge (anonymous, 15th century) 

Hymn (Jonson) 

Sonnet (Keats) 

Epilogue 



KENNETH RIEGEL, tenor 
CHARLES KAVALOVSKI, horn 



INTERMISSION 



BRAHMS Symphony No. 4 in E minor, Opus 98 

Allegro non troppo 
Andante moderato 
Allegro giocoso 
Allegro energico e passionato 



Seiji Ozawa and the Boston Symphony Orchestra record exclusively 
for Deutsche Grammophon. 
Baldwin piano 



35 




wand 



does not end on Sunday. It's only the beginning, 

This Week At The 
Berkshire Music Center: 



Saturday, August 20 at 2:30 pm: 
Boston University Young Artist Program 
Chamber Music Concert 

Sunday, August 21 at 10:00 am: 

Berkshire Music Center Chamber Music Concert 

Sunday, August 21 at 8:30 pm: 

Berkshire Music Center Vocal Music Recital 

Monday, August 22 at 8:30 pm: 

Berkshire Music Center Chamber Music Concert 

Wednesday, August 24 at 8:30 pm: 

Boston University Young Artists Orchestra 
Henry Charles Smith, conductor 
Dello Joio: Variations, Chaconne and Finale 
Respighi: Gli Uccelli (The Birds) 
Mussorgsky-Ravel: Pictures at an Exhibition 

Thursday, August 25 at 8:30 pm: 
Berkshire Music Center Vocal Music Recital 

Saturday, August 27 at 2:30 pm: 

Berkshire Music Center Orchestra 
Klaus Tennstedt, conductor 
Mozart: Symphony no. 35 in D "Haffner" 
Bruckner: Symphony no. 4 in E flat 

Saturday, August 27 at 4:30 pm: 

Boston University Young Artists Program 
Chamber Music Concert 

Sunday, August 28 at 10:00 am: 

Berkshire Music Center Chamber Music Concert 



These events are open to the public by making a contribution, $2.00 
minimum, to the Berkshire Music Center at the main gate, or by becoming 
a Friend of Music at Tanglewood. 



36 



Notes 



Hector Berlioz 

Overture The Corsair, Opus 21 
Louis-Hector Berlioz was born at La CoteSaint- 
Andr'e in the Department of here on 11 
December 1803 and died in Paris on 8 March 
1869. He composed the Corsair Overture 
probably in February 1831 revised it in 1844, 
conducting the first performance in Paris on 19 
January 1845. 

The title encites one to find in this 
overture the reckless adventurer of 
Byron's poem. Unfortunately for those 
who take such titles as reliable guides to 
the composer's intention, Berlioz called 
this Overture at its first performance La 
tour de Nice. Only later did he change the 
name to Le corsaire rouge,* and finally, Le 
corsaire. A close examination of titles in 
general as bestowed by the Romantics 
often reveals them as afterthoughts, a 
last minute dressing up of a piece of 
music with a colorful name for its 
readier consumption. And yet, Byron's 
Corsair, the searoving outlaw with his 
fine contempt of all men, his complete 
ruthlessness matched by a complete 
gallantry toward women, must have 
well fitted the composer's mood when 
he sketched the Overture on his journey 
to Rome in 1831 — if so he did. 

Berlioz makes no mention of this 
Overture in his memoirs, but the Signale 
on the occasion of a performance at 
Weimar in 1856 made the statement, 
presumably extracted from Berlioz, that 
is was composed in three days "during a 
voyage protracted by a storm." This 
would have been the voyage which 
Berlioz made from Marseilles to Livorno 
in February 1831, as part of his journey 
to Rome as a Prix de Rome winner. It was 
also during his Prix de Rome months that 
he composed the Overtures to Rob Roy 
and King Lear, his Lelio, and his revision 
of the Symphony fantastiaue. In his 
memoirs, Berlioz reveals that the poetry 
of Byron held him in captivation at this 

*Le corsaire rouge is the title of the French 
translation of James Fenimore Cooper's Red 
Rover. Like Schubert, Berlioz was an avid 
reader of Cooper. — M.S. 



time. He carried his Byron into St. 
Peter's Cathedral. "Never did I see St. 
Peter's without a thrill. It is so grand, so 
noble, so beautiful, so majestically calm! 
During the fierce summer heat I used to 
spend whole days there, comfortably 
established in a confessional, with 
Byron as my companion. 

"I sat enjoying the coolness and 
stillness, unbroken by any sound save 
the splashing of the fountains in the 
square outside, which was wafted up to 
me by an occasional breeze; and there, at 
my leisure, I sat drinking in that burning 
poetry. I followed the Corsair in his 
desperate adventures; I adored that 
inexorable yet tender nature — pitiless, 
yet generous — a strange combination of 
apparently contradictory feelings: love 
of woman, hatred of his kind. 

"Laying down my book to meditate, 
I would cast my eyes around, and, at- 
tracted by the light, they would be 
raised to Michelangelo's sublime cupola. 
What a sudden transition of ideas! From 
the cries and barbarous orgies of fierce 
pirates I passed in a second to the 
concerts of the seraphim, the peace of 
God, the infinite quietude of heaven. . . . 
then, falling to earth again, I sought on 
the pavement for traces of the noble 
poet's footsteps. . . ." 

Berlioz had sailed from Marseilles in a 
Scandinavian brig, and so had had his 
first experience of the sea. One of his 
travelling companions, a Venetian, "an 
underbred fellow, who spoke abomin- 
able French, claimed that he had com- 
manded Lord Byron's corvette during 
the poet's adventurous excursions in 
the Adriatic and the Grecian Archi- 
pelago. He gave us a minute description 
of the brilliant uniform Lord Byron had 
insisted on wearing, and the orgies in 
which they indulged." The craft carrying 
Berlioz was becalmed in the bay off Nice 
for three days, and then proceeded under 
a gale which nearly wrecked them. The 
quality of invention in the tales of his 
fellow traveler was surely more impor- 
tant to the eager listener than their 
veracity. In May, Berlioz set out from 
Rome by carriage for home at the devas- 
tating news that his beloved Camille 
Moke had married Pleyel. He reached 



37 



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Nice, recovered from his rage, which 
included avowed intentions of murder 
and suicide, and basked in that fair spot 
for three weeks before returning to 
Rome. It was a sort of mental con- 
valescence. He records that these days 
were the "happiest" in his life. There 
he drafted his Roi Lear Overture. When 
a police officer, looking upon him as a 
suspicious character, asked him what he 
was doing there, he answered: "Re- 
covering from a painless illness, I com- 
pose and dream and thank God for the 
sunshine, the beautiful sea, and the 
green hills." 

Memories of that earlier and more 
sanguine period must have returned to 
Berlioz when, in August 1844, he went 
once more to Nice (for convalescence 
from jaundice) and then revised his 
Byronic overture, naming it La tour de 
Nice. The Bellanda tower, last relic of a 
chateau long vanished, must have stood 
conspicuously before his vision on a 
promontory of that fair coast as his 
boat lay at anchor offshore fourteen 
years before. 

But the listener to Berlioz's Overture, 
like the police officer, would do well not 
to inquire too specifically into the nature 
of the dreams which may have produced 
the musical images — dreams compounded 
of Shakespeare, Byron, thwarted love, a 
host of fresh impressions gathered in 
Italy, and the immediate spell of a gleam- 
ing Mediterranean spring. 

—John N. Burk 



Benjamin Britten 

Serenade for tenor solo, horn and 
strings, Opus 31 

Benjamin Britten was born in Lowestoft, Suf- 
folk,, England, on 22 November 1913 and died 
in Aldeburgh on 4 December 1976. He wrote 
the Serenade in 1943 for the tenor Peter Pears 
and the horn player Dennis Brain, and it was 
first performed by them in London, 15 October 
1943, with Walter Goehr conducting. The work 
is an anthology of familiar poems about evening 
and night, and Britten uses the title "serenade" in 
its literal sense as an evening piece. Charles 
Cotton is not as well known as the other poets 



Britten set in the Serenade: a friend of Ben 
Jonson, John Donne, and Robert Herrick, he 
was born in 1030, lived the fifty-seven years 
of his life as a country squire, and contributed 
the section on fly-fishing to lzaak Walton's 
Compleat Angler. 

Pastoral makes use of little but a broken 
chord and a tiny repeated syncopation, 
yet the song is full of invention and 
atmosphere, a perfect twilight intro- 
duction to this night. The Tennyson is 
full of starry glitter and the last flashes 
of the sun. The accompaniment is 
characteristic. Spaced for the strings so 
that the utmost resonance is achieved, 
its darting rhythm looks at first dis- 
jointed, but an underlying logic reveals 
itself in the second and third verses. The 
cadenzas are Brittenish, simple but 
telling inventions which insist on a single 
pattern of thirds. Characteristic too is 
the plan which makes the string writing 
equally effective and well-placed in the 
first {con forza) and second (pp) verses, 
yet leaves out the lower strings in the 
second verse, to bring them back with 
full effect in the esultante third verse 
for their most important entry in the 
song. Such moments, it need hardly be 
pointed out, abound in Britten's music, 
where the skilled use of planned sound 
becomes the basis on which the imag- 
ination can build. So in the Elegy one 
notices the semitones in the basses at 
the end of the introduction, which, 



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39 



carried on by the voice's first phrase, are 
tremendously reinforced in the last two 
bars of the song — those strange 
squeezed slurs from open notes to stop- 
ped and back again. 

The Dirge follows straight on, the 
voice high and difficult, an ostinato of 
six bars against a fugato with a subject 
of four bars, in some entries lengthened 
to five. The rhythm throughout is fu- 
neral march, but with downbeats antici- 
pated or thrown away. The vocal 
ostinato outlines the common chord, 
the notes of which are important 
throughout the Serenade — and particu- 
larly in the Hymn which follows. No 
composer knows better how to use the 
varying timbres of the human voice. 
Just at G minor was as high a key as 
could be used for the Dirge, so B flat — 
no higher and no lower — sets the 
fioriture of the Hymn. The Ben Jonson 
poem which appears in so many anthol- 
ogies is called a Hymn to Diana, and in 
a programme note this suggests sol- 
emnity. Britten saw at once, however, 
that all these sibilants and short vowels 
can only be delivered softly and quickly. 
It is the one gay piece in the Serenade — 
and the only quick movement is a se- 
quence of eight. Light, silver and insub- 
stantial, it cannot disturb the nocturnal 
mood, which continues in the Sonnet to 
gather more and more intensity. This 
last song is perhaps the loveliest of all. 
With minimal material magically spread 
over the strings, it seems to wander 
casually to the edge of silence. The 
melismas are cunningly spaced and the 
voice part leads the modulations; the 
song is a model of economy. The utmost 
is extracted from the midnight essence. 
The horn Epilogue (it must be played on 
the natural harmonics, like the Prologue; 
it is all part of the design) winds the 
Serenade to stillness. 

— Peter Pears 



Pastoral 

The Day's grown old; the fainting Sun 
Has but a little way to run, 
And yet his Steedes, with all his skill, 
Scarce lug the Chariot down the hill. 

The shadows now so long so grow, 
That brambles like tall cedars show; 
Molehills seem mountains, and the ant 
Appears a monstrous elephant. 

A very little, little flock 

Shades thrice the ground that it would stock; 
Whilst the small stripling following them 
Appears a mighty Polypheme. 

And now on benches all are sat, 
In the cool air to sit and chat, 
Till Phoebus, dipping in the West, 
Shall lead the world the way to rest. 

Charles Cotton 



Nocturne 

The splendour falls on castle walls 
And snowy summits old in story: 
The long light shakes across the lakes, 
And the wild cataract leaps in glory: 

Blow, bugle, blow, set the wild echoes flying, 
Bugle, blow; answer, echoes, answer, dying. 

O hark, O hear, how thin and clear, 
And thinner, clearer, father going! 
O sweet and far from cliff and scar 
The horns of Elfland faintly blowing! 

Blow, let us hear the purple glens replying: 
Bugle blow; answer, echoes, answer, dying. 

O love, they die in yon rich sky, 
They faint on hill or field or river: 
Our echoes roll from soul to soul 
And grow for ever and for ever. 



From Benjamin Britten, a Commentary 
on his work by a group of specialists, 

ed. Donald Mitchell and Hans Keller, Philos- 
ophical Library, New York, 1953. Reprinted 
hy permission. 



Blow, bugle, blow, set the wild echoes flying; 
And answer, echoes, answer, dying. 

Alfred, Lord Tennyson 



40 



Elegy 

O Rose, thou art si< kj 
The invisible worm 
That flies in the night, 
In the howling storm, 
Has found out thy bed 
Of crimson joy; 
And his dark, secret love 
Does thy life destroy. 



William Blake 



Dirge 

This ae nighte, this ae nighte, 
Every nighte and alle, 
Fire and fleet and candle-lighte, 
And Christe receive thy saule. 

When thou from hence away art past, 
Every nighte and alle, 
To Whinnymuir thou com'st at last, 
And Christe receive thy saule. 

If ever thou gav'st hos'n and shoen, 
Every nighte and alle, 
Sit thee down and put them on, 
And Christe receive thy saule. 

If hos'n and shoen thou ne'er gav'st nane, 
Every nighte and alle, 

The whinnies shall prick thee to the bare bane, 
And Christe receive thy saule. 

From Whinnymuir when thou may'st pass, 
Every nighte and alle, 
To Brig o'Dread thou com'st at last, 
And Christe receive thy saule. 

From Brig o'Dread when thou may'st pass, 
Every nighte and alle, 
To Purgatory fire thou com'st at last, 
And Christe receive thy saule. 

If ever thou gav'st meat or drink, 
Every nighte and alle, 
The fire sail never make thee shrink, 
And Christe receive thy saule. 

If meat or drink thou ne'er gav'st nane, 
Every nighte and alle, 
The fire will burn thee to the bare bane, 
And Christe receive thy saule. 



This ae nighte, this ae nighte, 
Every nighte and alle, 
Fire and fleet and candle-lighte, 
And Christe receive thy saule. 



anonymous (15th century) 



Hymn to Diana 

Queen and huntress, chaste and fair, 
Now the sun is laid to sleep, 
Seated in thy silver chair, 
State in wonted manner keep: 
Hesperus entreats thy light, 
Goddess excellently bright. 

Earth, let not thy envious shade 
Dare itself to interpose; 
Cynthia's shining orb was made, 
Heav'n to clear when day did close: 
Bless us then with wished sight, 
Goddess excellently bright. 

Lay thy bow of pearl apart, 

And thy crystal shining quiver; 

Give unto the flying hart 

Space to breathe, how short so-ever: 

Thou that mak'st a day of night, 

Goddess excellently bright. 



Ben jonson 



Sonnet: To Sleep 



O soft embalmer of the still midnight, 
Shutting with careful fingers and benign 
Our gloom-pleas'd eyes, embower'd from 

the light, 
Enshaded in forgetfulness divine: 
O soothest Sleep: if so it please thee, close 
In midst of this thine hymn my willing eyes, 
Or wait the "Amen" ere thy poppy throws 
Around my bed its lulling charities. 

Then save me, or the passed day will shine 
Upon my pillow, breeding many woes, 
Save me from curious Conscience, that 

still lords 
Its strength for darkness, burrowing like 

a mole- 
Turn the key deftly in the oiled wards, 
And seal the hushed Casket of my Soul. 

John Keats 
41 



Johannes Brahms 

Symphony No. 4 in E minor, Opus 98 

Johannes Brahms was born in Hamburg, 7 May 
183 3, and died in Vienna on 3 April 1897. 
His first mention of the Fourth Symphony is in a 
letter of 19 August 1884 to his publisher, 
Fritz Simrock. The work must have been com- 
pleted about a year later, and in October 1885, 
he gave a two- piano reading of it with lgnaz 
Brull in Vienna for a small group of friends. 
Brahms conducted the first orchestral perfor- 
mance at Meiningen on 25 October 1885. The 
American premiere was to have been given by 
the Boston Symphony in November 1886. 
Wilhelm Gericke did, in fact, conduct the work 
at the public rehearsal on the 26th of that month, 
but cancelled the performance after making 
highly critical remarks to the audience about 
the new score. He finally conducted it a month 
later, but meanwhile Walter Damrosch had 
gotten ahead of him with a performance with the 
New York Symphony on 1 1 December. 

As always, Brahms announced work 
in progress with caution. To his pub- 
lisher he made only some vague noise 
about a need for paper with more staves. 
To Hans von Bulow he reported in 
September 1885: "Unfortunately, noth- 
ing came of the piano concerto that I 
should have liked to write. I don't know, 
the two earlier ones are too good or 
maybe too bad, but at any rate they are 
obstructive to me. But I do have a couple 
of entractes, put together they make 
what is commonly called a symphony. 
On tour with the Meiningen Orchestra, 
I have often imagined with pleasure 
how it would be to rehearse it with you, 
nicely and at leisure, and I'm still imagin- 
ing that now, wondering by the way 
whether it would have much of an 
audience." 

Meiningen, about 100 miles east and 
slightly north of Frankfurt, and now 
just over the border into the German 
Democratic Republic, was the capital of 
the tiny principality of Saxe-Meiningen. 
In the eighteenth century, when Johann 
Sebastian Bach's third cousin, Johann 
Ludwig Bach, was Capellmeister there, 
Meiningen's orchestra had an excellent 
reputation. The little town continued to 
have a vital theatrical and musical com- 
munity, and during the last part of the 



nineteenth century, when first Hans 
von Bulow and then Fritz Steinbach 
were its conductors, the Meiningen Or- 
chestra was one of Europe's elite musical 
organizations. Liszt, Wagner, and Brahms 
were associated with it, as was Max 
Reger in later years; Richard Strauss 
learned his trade as conductor with von 
Bulow and the Meiningen players; 
Richard Muhlfeld, the great clarinetist 
for whom Brahms wrote his two sona- 
tas, trio, and quintet, was in the orches- 
tra; and Donald Tovey began his career 
as a writer about music when he supplied 
the program notes for the orchestra's 
visit to London. 

Von Bulow was delighted to have 
Brahms come to Meiningen with his 
new symphony and he cautiously ex- 
plored the possibility of including com- 
poser and work on a tour of the Rhine- 
land and Holland. In due course, Brahms 
arrived at Meiningen, and the new sym- 
phony went into rehearsal. "Difficult, 
very difficult," reported von Bulow, 
adding a few days later, "No. 4 gigantic, 
altogether a law unto itself, quite new, 
steely individuality. Exudes unparal- 
leled energy from the first note to last." 
The premiere went well, and the audi- 
ence tried hard but unsuccessfully to get 
an encore of the scherzo. Von Bulow 
conducted a repeat performance a week 
later, after which the orchestra set off 
on its tour, with Brahms conducting the 
new symphony in Frankfurt, Essen, 
Elberfeld, Utrecht, Amsterdam, The 
Hague, Krefeld, Cologne, and Wiesbaden. 
It was liked and admired everywhere, 
though Vienna rather resisted the per- 
formance two months later by the Phil- 
harmonic under Richter, a performance 
unfortunately prepared nowhere near 
as well as the series in Meiningen. 

It is curious that while the public took 
to the Fourth, Brahms's friends, includ- 
ing professionals and near-professionals 
like Eduard Hanslick and Elisabeth von 
Herzogenberg had some difficulty with 
it. That can be explained. The public, 
except in Vienna, heard superbly realized 
performances, while Hanslick, for ex- 
ample, knew it first from a two-piano 
reading (he remarked it was like being 
beaten up by two tremendously intelli- 



42 




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Coach" Bags and Belts are made in New York City and are sold in fine stores throughout the world 
For catalogue write Coach Leatherware. 516 West 34th Street. New York 10001 

43 




What's so great about Thursday? 

The best thing about Thursday everywhere else 
is that the next. day is Friday. But here in Boston, 
it's the Boston Symphony Orchestra presenting 
four separate concert series. 

We begin the day at 11:00 a.m. with a three- 
concert Thursday 'AM' series featuring the works of 
Respighi, Debussy, Shostakovich, Brahms and 
Stravinsky. Before each concert, Director of Publi- 
cations, Michael Steinberg, will host an informal 
discussion of the program in the Cabot- Cahners 
Room. Coffee and doughnuts are on the Hall. 

The six-concert 8:30 p.m. Thursday 'A' series 
presents conductors Seiji Ozawa, Gennady Rozh- 
destvensky, Kazuyoshi Akiyama and Klaus Tenn- 
stedt and guest soloists Itzhak Perlman and 
Radu Lupu. 

Seiji Ozawa and Colin Davis will conduct the 
three-concert 8:30 p.m. Thursday 'B' series, which 
presents soloists Joseph Silverstein, Alexis Weissen- 
berg, Boris Belkin and Barbara Hendricks. 

The ten-concert 7:30 p.m. Thursday '10' series 
will feature the complete ''Beatrice and Benedict" 
by Berlioz. Seiji Ozawa, Colin Davis, Klaus Tenn- 
stedt, Raymond Leppard, Kazuyoshi Akiyama, Ser- 
giu Commissiona and Gennady Rozhdestvensky 
will conduct the orchestra, with many world- 
renowned guest soloists. 

For complete program information, write to Subscription Office, 
Symphony Hall, Boston, Mass. 02115, or call 266-1492. 



44 



gent and witty people) and Frau von 
Herzogenberg, cursing the difficult horn 
and trumpet transpositions, had to de- 
cipher it at the piano from the manu- 
script of Brahms's full score. Then, where 
the public would have chiefly perceived 
and been carried by the sweep of the 
whole, the professionals, with their 
special kind of connoisseurship and per- 
ception of detail, would have been more 
struck by what was — and is — genuinely 
difficult in the score. 

It is fascinating, for example, to learn 
that the opening was disconcerting to 
Joseph Joachim. Something preparatory, 
he suggests, even if it were only two 
measures of unison B, would help 
listeners find their way into the piece 
(in fact, reading his correspondence with 
Brahms, we learn that originally there 
were some preparatory measures which 
were struck out and destroyed). The 
second statement of the opening melody 
was difficult to unravel, the theme itself 
now given in broken octaves and in 
dialogue between second and first 
violins,* with elaborate decorative 
material in violas and woodwinds. Al- 
most everyone was upset over what 
seems now one of the most wonderful 
strokes in the work, the place where 
Brahms seems to make the conventional, 
classical repeat of the exposition in the 
ninth measure to change one chord, 
opening undreamed-of harmonic hori- 
zons, and only then, after so leisurely a 
start moving into the closely argued 
development. On the other hand, every- 
one admired the dreamily mysterious 
entry into the recapitulation — the long 
sequence of sighing one-measure phrases, 
subsiding, sinking into one of only four 
places marked ppp in all of Brahms's 
orchestral music, from which oboes, 
clarinets, and bassoons emerge in their 
severe yet gentle reediness to sound the 
first four notes of the opening melody 
in immense magnification, strings 
weaving an enigmatic garland about the 
last note. The next four notes are 
treated the same way, and then the 

*This place presents an excellent reason for 
reverting sometimes to the old seating of 
orchestras that had first and second violins 
on opposite sides of the stage. 



music's melancholy flow resumes in the 
expected way. 

For Brahms to build slow movement 
over the same keynote as the first move- 
ment is rare indeed; yet he does it here 
and finds an inspired way of celebrating 
simultaneously the continuity and the 
contrast of E minor (the first movement) 
and E major (the second). Horns play 
something beginning on E — a note we 
have well in our ears after the emphatic 
close of the Allegro — but which sounds 
like C major. It turns out to be some- 
thing more like the old Phrygian mode, 
and it is in any case fresh enough and 
ambiguous enough to accommodate the 
clarinets' hushed suggestion that one 
might place a G sharp over the E, thus 
inaugurating an idyllic E major. But the 
notion of a C major beginning is not 
forgotten and will be fully pursued in 
the massively rambunctious scherzo. 

For the finale, Brahms goes back to 
the E minor from which he began, but 
with a theme whose first chord is A 
minor and thus very close to the world 
of the just finished scherzo. Brahms's 
knowledge of Baroque and Renaissance 
music was extensive and, above all, pro- 
found, and so, when he writes a Passa- 
caglia, which must have seemed like 
sheer madness to the up-to-date 
Wagnerians, he does it like a man com- 
posing living music, with no dust of 
antiquarianism about it. He had been 
impressed by a cantata, then believed to 
be by Bach (listed as No. 150, Nach dir, 
Herr, verlanget mich), whose last move- 
ment is a set of variations over a re- 
peated bass, and he had maintained 
that something could still be done with 
such a bass, though the harmonies would 
probably have to be made richer. And of 
course he knew well the great Chaconne 
for violin solo. The finale of the Haydn 
Variations of 1873 was a brilliantly 
achieved trial run, but the scope of 
the grand and tragic finale of the Fourth 
Symphony is on another level altogether. 
Woodwinds and brasses, joined at the 
last by rolling drums, proclaim a se- 
quence of eight chords. The trombones 
have been saved for this moment, and 
even now it is characteristic that the 
statement is forte rather than fortissimo. 



45 



The movement falls into four large 
sections. First, twelve statements of the 
eight-bar set, with bold variations of 
texture, harmonic detail, and rhetoric. 
This phase subsides, to inaugurate a 
contrasting section, first in minor still, 
but soon to move into major, in which 
the measures are twice as long, the 
movement thus twice as slow. (Brahms 
is explicit here about wishing the beats, 
though there are now twice as many of 
them per measure, to move at the same 
speed as before: in other words, the 
double length of the measures is enough 
to make this "the slow movement" of 
the finale, and the conductor should not 
impose a further slowing down of his 
own.) Four of these bigger variations 



make up this section. The original pace 
is resumed with what appears to be a 
recapitulation. But strings intervene 
passionately midway through the eight- 
chord sequence, and the ensuing sixteen 
variations bring music more urgently 
dramatic than any yet heard in the sym- 
phony. The passion and energy are 
released in an extensive, still developing, 
still experiencing coda at a faster speed. 
Thus the symphony drives to its con- 
clusion, forward-thrusting yet measured, 
always new in detail yet organically 
unified, stern, noble, and with- that 
sense of inevitability that marks the 
greatest music. 

— M.S. 




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right is Barn 




46 



Guest Artists 



Susan Davenny Wyner 

Susan Davenny Wyner first appeared 
with the Boston Symphony in 1974 in 
Monteverdi's Vespers of 1610. She has 
since performed with the Orchestra in 
Beethoven's Missa Solemnis under Colin 
Davis, the nationally televised Mahler 
Second under Seiji Ozawa, and most 
recently in Handel's Messiah, given in 
Boston and New York last December. 
She has also appeared with the Cleve- 
land Orchestra in Mahler's Eighth Sym- 
phony under Erich Leinsdorf and in 
Bach's B Minor Mass and Beethoven's 
Egmont under Lorin Maazel. Her operatic 
repertoire includes Mimi of La Boheme, 
the Countess in Mozart's Marriage of 
Figaro, and Poppea of Monteverdi's L'ln- 
coronazione di Poppea. She recently re- 
corded lntermedio, lyric ballet for soprano 
and strings, which was written for her 
by her husband, Yehudi Wyner. 



Yehudi Wyner 

Composer, conductor, and pianist 
Yehudi Wyner teaches composition and 
coaches vocal and chamber music at the 
Berkshire Music Center. Until this year 
he taught composition and chamber 
music at Yale University, where he was 





chairman of the composition faculty 
from 1969 to 1973. He performs, tours, 
and records regularly as a keyboard 
artist with the Bach Aria Group, and he 
has been Music Director of the New 
Haven Opera Theater since 1968. His 
composition, lntermedio, lyric ballet for 
soprano and strings, was performed 
last year at Tanglewood's Festival of 
Contemporary Music, and its recent 
CRI recording received a Grammy 
Award nomination. Mr. Wyner con- 
ducts his own music in concerts and 
recordings and performs often with his 
wife, soprano Susan Davenny Wyner. 
In the past he has received commissions 
from the Fromm, Ford, and Kousse- 
vitzky foundations, the University of 
Michigan, Yale University, the National 
Endowment for the Arts, and this year 
he received a Guggenheim Fellowship. 



Kenneth Riegel 

A native of Pennsylvania, Kenneth 
Riegel first came to the attention of the 
music world with his performance of 
the title role in the New York premiere 
of Henze's The Young Lord. Mr. Riegel 
made his Metropolitan Opera debut in 
1973 in the premiere performances of 
Les Troyens by Berlioz under the direction 
of Rafael Kubelik, and has since been 
heard with the Met in their productions 
of Wozzeck, Meistersinger, and Fidelio. Dur- 
ing the 1976-77 season he sang the role 



47 





of Tamino in Magic Flute, and Narraboth 
in Solome. Recent debuts for Mr. Riegel 
include Salzburg Festival performances, 
the Flanders Festival Dream of Gerontius, 
and the Tulsa Opera production of Mas- 
senet's Manon, and he appeared in a 
film of Mahler's Eighth with Leonard 
Bernstein. He has also performed in that 
piece with the New York Philharmonic 
and at the Ravinia Festival. Mr. Riegel 
has recorded Haydn's Wind-band Mass 
with Leonard Bernstein and the New 
York Philharmonic, and Carl Orff's Car- 
mina Burana with Michael Tilson Thomas 
and the Cleveland Orchestra for Co- 
lumbia Records. He appeared recently 
at the Mahler Festival with the New 
York Philharmonic under the direction 
of Pierre Boulez. 



honors at the Geneva International Piano 
Competition (1955), the Michaels Me- 
morial Music Award in Chicago (1956), 
first place at the Queen Elisabeth of 
Belgium International Piano Competi- 
tion in Brussels and the Edgar M. Leven- 
tritt Competition in New York (both 
eleven years ago). He has since per- 
formed in over forty countries as well 
as with major American orchestras in- 
cluding the Boston Symphony with 
whom he has been a soloist for nine 
consecutive seasons. He performed at 
the White House for the King and 
Queen of Denmark at the invitation of 
President Eisenhower. He is married to 
the former Morag McPherson of Glas- 
gow, Scotland, and lives at their recently 
purchased, eighty-acre home in Lenox. 



Malcolm Frager 

Malcolm Frager was born in 1935 and 
gave his first recital in St. Louis when he 
was six. Four years later he performed a 
Mozart concerto with the St. Louis 
Symphony under Vladimir Golschmann. 
At fourteen he began studies with Carl 
Friedberg, a pupil of Clara Schumann 
and Brahms. In 1957he graduated magna 
cum laude from Columbia University 
where he majored in languages. He has 
won many honors and awards including 
the Prix d'Excellence at the American 
Conservatory at Fontainebleau (1952), 



Charles Kavalovski 

Charles Kavalovski, Principal Horn of 
the Boston Symphony, joined the or- 
chestra in 1972. He earned a doctorate 
degree in nuclear physics from the Uni- 
versity of Minnesota and has taught 
physics and conducted research at a 
number of colleges and universities. 
Formerly Principal Horn of the Denver 
Symphony, he now teaches at the Berk- 
shire Music Center. 



48 




Andrew Davis 

Andrew Davis was born in 1944 and 
received his early musical training at 
the Royal Academy of Music. From 
1963 to 1967, while reading for his 
Degree in Music at Cambridge, he was 
an Organ Scholar at Kings College 
where his experience as a keyboard player 
led to recording engagements with the 
Academy of St. Martin-in-the-Fields 
and the English Chamber Orchestra. 
In 1967 he received a scholarship which 
enabled him to study conducting in 
Rome with Franco Ferrara. After his 
return, the Royal Liverpool Philhar- 




Allan Albert, Artistic Director 

BERKSHIRE PLAYHOUSE 

July 6-17 

WILLIAM ATHERTON 
GILDARADNER 
Dunning & Abbott's CHRIS SARANDON 
BROADWAY JILLHAWORTH 



Saul Bellow's July 20-31 
THE LAST ANALYSIS RON LEIBMAN 



Rodgers & Hart's Aug. 3-1 4 
I MARRIED AN ANGEL PHYLLIS NEWMAN 



William Inge's Aug. 17-28 
COME BACK, DANA ANDREWS 
LITTLE SHEBA ESTELLE PARSONS 



• UNICORN THEATRE, 

Three New Musicals 

July 7-24 July 26-August 1 4 
THE WHALE SHOW A FABLE 

by Jean-Claude van Italie 
August 1 6-28 and Richard Peaslee 
THE CASINO 



PROPOSITION THEATRE 

July 8-August 28 
THE PROPOSITION 



Performance Times for the Playhouse 

Evgs.: Wed., Thurs., Fri. 8:30 p.m.; Sat. 9 p.m.; Sun. 7 p.m. 

Mats.: Thurs. 2 p.m.; Sat. 5 p.m.; Sun. 3 p.m. 

Prices for the Playhouse 

Broadway, The Last Analysis, Come Back, Little Sheba 

Fri. & Sat. (9 p.m. perf. only) $8.95. 7.50: 
All other perfs. $7.95, 6.50 
I Married An Angel 

Fri. & Sat. (9 p.m. perf. only) $9.95. 8.50: 

All other perfs. $8.95, 7.50 

MAIL ORDERS FILLED PROMPTLY! 

Berkshire Theatre Festival, Stockbrid^e. Mass. 

01262. Enclose stamped, self-addressed envelope. 

RESERVE BY PHONE! Call 413 • 298-5536 or 298-4800 



monic Orchestra chose him to take part 
in their conductor's seminar and a year 
later he was appointed Assistant Con- 
ductor of the BBC Scottish Symphony 
Orchestra. He made his Royal Festival 
Hall debut in 1970 when he replaced 
Eliahu Inbal on short notice to conduct 
Janacek's Glagolitic Mass with the BBC 
Symphony Orchestra. In February he 
was appointed Associate Conductor of 
the New Philharmonia, and he is now a 
regular conductor at the BBC Prome- 
nade concerts during the summer. In 
North America he has conducted the 
Cleveland Orchestra, the Cincinnati 
Symphony, the Seattle Symphony, the 
Los Angeles Philharmonic, the Chicago 
Symphony, the Boston Symphony, the 
Minnesota Orchestra, the Montreal 
Symphony, and the Toronto Symphony 
of which he has been Music Director 
and Conductor since the 1975-76 season. 



49 



Tanglewood Festival Chorus 

The Tanglewood Festival Chorus was 
formed under the joint auspices of the 
Berkshire Music Center and Boston 
University in 1970. The director since 
its foundation, John Oliver, is director 
of choral and vocal activities for Tangle- 
wood, a member of the MIT faculty 
and director of the MIT Choral Society. 
The Festival Chorus made its debut at 
Symphony Hall in a 1970 performance 
of Beethoven's Ninth Symphony, and 
has since taken part in concert directed 
by William Steinberg, Seiji Ozawa, Eu- 
gene Ormandy, Colin Davis, Arthur 
Fiedler, and Michael Tilson Thomas. 
Members of the chorus come from the 
Greater Boston area and from all walks 
of life, and they rehearse throughout 
the year. The Chorus's first appearance 
on records, in the Boston Symphony's 
Damnation of Faust, conducted by Seiji 
Ozawa, was nominated for a Grammy 




as the best choral recording of the 
year. Their most recent appearance 
with the BSO was four weeks ago 
in Haydn's Theresa Mass, Seiji Ozawa 
conducting. 



Sopranos 

Margaret Aquino 
Cynthia Armstrong 
Deborah London Berg 
Marie-Christine Casey 
Susan Chapman 
Margo Connor 
Susan R. Cook 
Lou Ann David 
Kathrin Davidovich 
Rebecca Flewelling 
Yvonne Frazier 
Marilyn L. Haskel 
Alice Honner 
Beth Howard 
Frances Kadinoff 
Carole Stevenson Kane 
Vivian LaMorder 
Barbara Levy 
Joyce Lucia 

Virginia Lambert Mason 
Betsy Moyer 
H. Diane Norris 
Joan Pernice 
Nancy Peterson 
Gail Ransom 
Rhonda Rivers 
Judith L. Rubenstein 
Barbara A. Scales 
Bette L. Snitzer 
Ann K. Staniewicz 



Jane Stein 
Janet Wade 
Pamela Wolfe 

Altos 

Mary Bennett 
Skye Burchesky 
Anne Butler 
Bette Carey 
Doris Halvorson Coe 
Elizabeth H. Colt 
Mary Crowe 
Mary Curtin 
Catherine Diamond 
Ann Ellsworth 
June Fine 
Roberta A. Gilbert 
Thelma Hayes 
Donna Hewitt 
Beth Holmgren 
Karol Hommen 
Leah Jansizian 
Alison D. Kohler 
Dorothy Love 
Sharron J. Lovins 
Nina Saltus 
Frances Schopick 
Janet Shapiro 
Amy Wing Sheridan 
Lynne Stanton 
Nancy Stevenson 



Laurie Stewart 
Florence A. St. George 
Lisa Tatlock 
Kathi Tighe 
Susan Watson 
Maria E. Weber 
Mary J. Westbrook 

Tenors 

Antone Aquino 
Kent E. Berwick 
Paul Blanchard 
Sewell E. Bowers, Jr. 
Richard Breed 
Albert R. Demers 
Paul Foster 
Robert Greer 
Dean A. Hanson 
Wayne Henderson 
James P. Hepp 
Jeffrey Hoffstein 
Richard P. Howell 
Peter Krasinski 
Gregg Lange 
Henry L. Lussier, Jr. 
Jack Maclnnis 
Al Newcomb 
Ray Parks 
Peter D. Sanborn 
Robert W. Schlundt 
William Severson 



John Smith 
Douglas Thompson 

Basses 

Peter Anderson 
Mitchell Brauner 
Neil Clark 
John W. Ehrlich 
Bill Good 
John Henry 
Carl D. Howe 
Daniel J. Kostreva 
Paul Kowal 
Henry Magno, Jr. 
Martin Mason 
Jim Melzer 
Frank G. Mihovan 
John P. Murdock 
Jules Rosenberg 
Peter Rothstein 
Andrew Roudenko 
Vladimir Roudenko 
Robert Schaffel 
Frank Sherman 
Richard M. Sobel 
Douglas Strickler 
Jean Renard Ward 
Nathaniel Watson 
Pieter Conrad White 
Robert T. Whitman 
Howard J. Wilcox 



50 



Tanglewood Choir 



Sopranos 

Adelaida 

Ace vedo- Anderson 
Priscilla Austin 
Jane Becker 
Sue Ann Blake 
Stephanie Branson 
Donna Claflin 
Carolyn Curtis 
Laura English-Robinson 
Kathleen Fink 
Teri Gemberling 
jane Gitschier 
Heidi Herbert 
Claudette Kiernan 
Carolyn Kiradjieff 
Peggy Lambert 
Deborah Lavin 
Mary Law 
Jennifer Leigh 
Deborah Martin 
Maija Murray 
Jeni Nicholson 
Amy David Olofson 
Elizabeth Parcells 
Patrice Pastore 
Joan Pease 
Shira Perlmutter 
Sandra Sherwood 
Diane Smith 
Penelope Smith 
Cheryl Studer 
Downing Whitesell 
Kathy Wright 



Altos 

Marylene Altieri 
Kathryn Asman 
Elizabeth Baldwin 
Carol Blodgett 
Bonni Carter 
Yvonne Chen 
Elizabeth Clark 
Muriel Crook 
Mary Doyle 
Dorrie Freedman 
Marina Golubow 
Margie Katz 
Anne Keaney 
Natalie Maxwell 
Kathleen McDougald 
Janice Meyerson 
Eve Minkoff 
Susan Moyle 
Kathryn Radcliffe 
Elizabeth Robin 
Mikki Shiff 
Helen Taylor 
Normandy Waddell 
Kimball Wheeler 

Tenors 

Larry Baker 
Michael Boone 
Ronald Cathcart 
Frederic Chrislip 
Jack Dennis 
Neal Goins 
Roger Hale 
George Harper 



Mark Hudgins 
Ron Jaffe 
David Jenkins 
Gary Jones 
Hyung Kim 
Edward Kiradjieff 
Malcolm Krongelb 
Sheldon Lee 
Eric Lipsitt 
Thomas Lloyd 
Michael Manugian 
William Masek 
Brian McConville 
David Meheri 
Ralph Mercer 
Stephen Montgomery 
Edmund Mroz 
Brian O'Connell 
Gregory Paris 
Kevin Perry 
Dwight Porter 
Ernest Preisig 
David Raisch 
David Redgrave 
William Richter 
Ronald Rouse 
Fred Sanders 
Paul Scharf 
Paul Schliesman 
Kim Scown 
Stephen Sears 
Dean Shoff 
John Sullivan 
Robert Yorke 



Basses 

David Ames 
Douglas Bond 
Uzee Brown 
Chris Cudlipp 
Robert Faucher 
Steve Gould 
Adam Grossman 
Mark Haberman 
Philip Harvey 
Roger Heath 
Doug Hines 
Bud Holloway 
Ben Holt 
David Johnson 
Theodore Jones 
Edward Klein 
Adam Kochanek 
Ray Komow 
David Kulle 
Daniel Lawlor 
Paul Levy 
Terry Lockhart 
Jeff Lyons 
Herbert Menzel 
Michael O'Brien 
Steve Owades 
Matthew Scott 
Philip Stoddard 
Sanford Sylvan 
Peter Wender 

Philip Morehead, 
accompanist 




IF YOU ENJOYED THE CONCERT, 

YOU SHOULD BE READING HIGH FIDELITY. 

Tanglewood music lovers also enjoy their music at home. They find 
High Fidelity magazine an indispensible aide for record collecting. 
Each issue contains test reports, record reviews and exciting fea- 
ture articles. 



If you're a regular at live performances, buy the Musical America 
version of High Fidelity and get 40 extra pages of news, reviews 
and reports on live music events all over the world— 

HIGH FIDELITY, dept. dzt, 1 sound ave., marion, ohio 43302 




G Payment enclosed 

□ OK. ri take High Fidelity at the special Tanglewood 
offer of 12 issues for $4.87 (regularly $8.95.) 



D Bill me 

D I'm a live performance buff. Send me 12 issues of 
the Musical America edition for $9— a savings of 
$9 off the regular price. 



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OR: Enter your High Fidelity order by calling, toll free, (800) 247-2160. 



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51 



The Berkshire Music Center 



"One more thing should come from this scheme, 
namely, a good honest school of musicians." 

— Henry Lee Higginson, on founding the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra. 

The late Serge Koussevitzky fervent- 
ly shared Henry Lee Higginson's vision 
of a "good honest school for musicians" 

— an academy where young musicians 
could extend their artistic training and 
broaden their experience under the 
guidance of eminent professionals. 
More than any other person, it was 
Koussevitzky who made the vision a 
reality; he was Director of the Berkshire 
Music Center from its founding in 1940 
until his death in 1951, and his vigorous 
leadership has remained an inspiring 
example in the years since. 

Serge Koussevitzky was succeeded by 
Charles Munch, and it is a mark of the 
Center's success that the Boston Sym- 
phony's present Music Director, Seiji 
Ozawa, studied here during the Munch 
era. Alumni of the Center are among 
the most prominent and active mem- 
bers of the music world; more than ten 
percent of the members of this country's 
major orchestras are graduates of the 
Center, as are many of the world's 
notable conductors, instrumental solo- 
ists and singers. 

Today the primary responsibility for 
the Center's direction is in the hands of 
Gunther Schuller, composer, writer, 
conductor and President of the New 
England Conservatory until June 1977. 
Average enrollment is somewhat over 
400 each summer, of which approxi- 
mately!40 are members of the Center's 
Fellowship Program; this provides free 
tuition (and in many cases free board 
and expenses) for instrumentalists, 
singers, conductors and composers of 
post-graduate calibre. In addition to the 
Fellowship Program, Boston University, 
through its Tanglewood Institute, offers 
several college -credit programs for tal- 
ented high school musicians; the noted 
soprano Phyllis Curtin directs a singers' 
seminar highlighted by her own master 
classes. Finally, each summer the Cen- 
ter's Festival of Contemporary Music 
(August 13-17 this year), presented in 

52 



cooperation with the Fromm Music 
Foundation at Harvard, offers a broad 
spectrum of the most advanced music of 
today's composers in a gala week of 
performances. 

The Boston Symphony's Concert- 
master and Assistant Conductor Joseph 
Silverstein heads a faculty that includes 
principal players and members of the 
Orchestra and faculty members of Bos- 
ton University's School of Fine Arts, 
plus leading soloists, conductors and 
composers. The Center has numerous 
studios for practice and chamber music, 
and an extensive library of music litera- 
ture and scores. Rehearsals and con- 
certs of the Berkshire Music Center 
Orchestra and other student groups 
take place mostly in the Theatre- 
Concert Hall, while lectures, seminars, 
conducting classes, vocal and choral re- 
hearsals, composers' forums and cham- 
ber music concerts take place in the 
Chamber Music Hall, in the West Barn, 
in the Hawthorne Cottage, on the Re- 
hearsal Stage, and in the small studios 
both on the Tanglewood grounds and in 
buildings leased in Lenox. Each summer 
the Baldwin Piano and Organ Company 
generously provides over 100 keyboard 
instruments for individual practice; 
other instruments — percussion, for ex- 
ample — are provided by the Orchestra. 

The Boston Symphony is assisted in 
supporting the Center by the National 
Endowment for the Arts, a Federal 
agency, as well as by individual and 
corporate sponsors. Scholarships are 
awarded to the majority of the students, 
who are chosen by audition on a com- 
petitive basis. The cost of the scholar- 
ship program is large and adds sub- 
stantially to the Orchestra's yearly 
deficit— one major reason for the estab- 
lishment of the Friends of Music at 
Tanglewood, a group that provides 
critical support for the Center. A brief 
account of members' privileges is printed 
on page 41, and more information may 
be had at the Friends' Office near the 
Main Gate. We invite you to see and 
hear for yourself the remarkable calibre 
of the Center's young musicians. 



coming concerts: 



Have a 

face to face 

folk with 

Elizabeth Grady 




Introducing our new holf hour 
maintenance rrearmenr for young, 
normal healthyskm, only $10. 

Our regular one hour facial pore 
cleansmgs srill only S 1 7. 50. 

Never a charge for consultation/ 
skin analysis. Call Ms. Grady for an 
appointment 536-4447. 39 Newbury 
Street Boston. 



EUZ4BETH 
GB4DY 

k FACE FIRST > 



Friday, 26 August at 7 
(Weekend Prelude) 

BARTOK 

Rhapsody No. 1 

BRAHMS 

Cello Sonata No. 1 in E minor, 
Opus 38 

JANOS STARKER, cello 
GILBERT KALISH, piano 



Friday, 26 August at 9 

SEIJI OZAWA conducting: 

BARTOK 

Music for Strings, Percussion 
and Celesta 

BRAHMS 

Piano Concerto No. 1 in D minor, 
Opus 15 

CLAUDIO ARRAU 



Saturday, 27 August at 8:30 
JOSEPH SILVERSTEIN conducting: 

DVORAK 

Symphony No. 8 in G, Opus 88 

SCHUMANN 

Cello Concerto in A minor 

JANOS STARKER 

STRAUSS 

Till Eulenspiegel's Merry Pranks 




-Mill PEDLAR INN 1 

*}• OPERA HOUSE 

36 Luxury Rooms 

FOOD'DRINK .LODGING 

Exit 16-1-91 
Holvoke, Mass 

(413) 532-9494 



Sunday, 28 August at 2:30 

SEIJI OZAWA conducting 

MAHLER 

Symphony No. 3 

BIRGIT FINNILA, contralto 
TANGLEWOOD FESTIVAL CHORUS, 
JOHN OLIVER, conductor 
BOSTON BOY CHOIR, 
THEODORE MARIER, conductor 



53 




One of Soviet Georgia's senior citizens thought 

Dannoh was an excellent yogurt. She ought to know. 

She's been eating yogurt for 137 years. 



CAMACHICH KVITZINIA. PHOTOGRAPHED IN ATRARA. SOVIET GEORGIA 



54 



Tanglewood 
Talks & Walks 



Tanglewood Talks & Walks are a fasci- 
nating series of five Thursday lecture- 
luncheons at noon in the Tanglewood 
Tent, followed by a special guided tour 
of Tanglewood. Guest speakers include 
the musicians, conductors, and staff 
of the Boston Symphony Orchestra and 
Berkshire Music Center. Bring a lunch — 
we'll provide the refreshments. Please 
call the Tanglewood Friends Office at 
(413) 637-1600 for reservations. $2 con- 
tribution to the public, free to Friends 
of Tanglewood. 

LUNCHEON 12:15 
TALK 1:00 
WALK 1:30 



1977 Tanglewood 
Talks & Walks 



25 AUGUST 

CAROL PROCTER 

Cello, 

Boston Symphony Orchestra 



Friends of Music at Tanglewood 

Lenox, Massachusetts 01240 

(413) 637-1600 



QatewGys h^l 

and tfgstau&nt 

637 2532 71 Walker St. 

Reservations Preferred Lenox, Ma 

In the Heart of Lenox 

Serving Breakfast 

Lunch, Dinner & Late Supper 

Especially Prepared for You 

by Internationally Renowned 

Chef-Owner, Gerhard Schmid 

Cafe Hour on the Terrace 

Throughout the Tanglewood Season 

Cocktail Lounge Ample Free Parking 



DAYS 
IN THE 

/\lv 1 ^/ a cooperative 
venture of the Boston Symphony Or- 
chestra and the Boston Public Schools, 
is designed to give middle school students 
from the city and three suburban com- 
munities an all-encompassing arts and 
integration experience. Funded by the 
Massachusetts Department of Education, 
Bureau of Equal Educational Opportunity, 
the program offers 50 children weekly 
over a seven week period the opportunity 
to spend five days at Tanglewood. By 
utilizing the cultural and natural re- 
sources of the Berkshires, the participants 
share a variety of unique and meaning- 
ful activities: a rehearsal and concert at 
Tanglewood, instrument demonstrations 
by members of the Boston Symphony 
and the Berkshire Music Center, a dance 
workshop at Jacob's Pillow, trips to the. 
Clark Institute, Chesterwood, Rockwell 
Museum, Berkshire Garden Centre, at- 
tendance at a theatrical performance or 
dance concert, as well as sports and 
swimming daily. In addition, the young- 
sters take part in small informal art 
workshops, led by members of the Days 
in the Arts staff, each of whom has 
expertise in some area of the arts. 

The key to the great success of the 
program has been two-fold: a low key 
exposure to the arts as a part of a 
typical day's experiences, and the mag- 
nificent physical and aesthetic attributes 
of Tanglewood and the Berkshires. 



THE 
OLD CORNER HOUSE 




Paintings by 

NORMAN ROCKWELL 

On permanent exhibit 

Open Year Round — Daily 10-5 p.m. 

Except Tuesdays 

Adults $1.00 Children 25* 



55 



We are grateful to the Berkshire County businesses 

listed below for giving generously to help support 

Tanglewood and the Berkshire Music Center. 

Colin MacFadyen and Ashley Smith 

Co- Chairmen for Business Support 



Business Contributions 
and Pledges 

Abdalla's Elm Street Mkt. 

Adam's Laundry 

Adam's Supermarket 

Alice's at Avaloch 

ALNASCO 

Arcadian Shop 

Arnold Print Works 

ASCAP 

John Astore 

Astro Beef 

A. W. Baldwin Co. 

Baldwin Piano 

Bardwell, D'Angelo, 
Bowlby Insurance 

Barnbrook Antiques 

N'at Beacco 

Ben's Shop 

Berkmatics Inc. 

Berkshire Aviation 

Enterprises 
Berkshire Bank 

and Trust 

Berkshire Beef 

Berkshire 

Broadcasting Co. 

Berkshire County 

Agencv — Berkshire 

Life 
Berkshire County 

Savings Bank 
Berkshire Eagle 
Berkshire Frosted Foods 
Berkshire Gas Co. 
Berkshire Hardware 
Berkshire Hills Regional 

School District 
Berkshire Life Insurance 
Berkshire Paper Co. 
Berkshire Plate Glass Co. 
Berkshire Press, Inc. 
Berkshire Traveller 

Press 
BESSE — CLARKE 
Birchard Buick 
Bland Electric 
The Book Store 
Boosey and Hawkes 
Braun's Package Store 
C. T. Brigham 

Paper Products 
Brothership 

Clothing, Inc. 
Business Services 

for Medicine 
Butler Wholesale 

Products 
Butternut Basin 
Cain, Hibbard & 

Myers, Esq. 
B. Caligari and Son 
Camp Lenox 
Camp Mahkeenac 
Carr Hardware 

and Supply Co. 
Childs and Bishop 

Floor Covering 



City Savings Bank 
The Clark-Aiken Co. 
Clearwater 

Natural Foods 
Colt Insurance Agency 
Country Curtains 
Cramer Construction 
Crane and Co. 
Curtel Corp. 
D. E. Dapson 

Optician, Inc. 
Davis and Norton, Inc. 
Deacon Cook House 

Antiques 
Dee's Department Store 
Dery Funeral Home 
Dettinger Lumber Co. 
Different Drummer 
Dresser-Hull Co. 
Eastover 

East Lee Steak House 
Eaton Paper Co. 
1888 Shop 
Edward Karam 

Insurance 
Elaine's Specialty Shop 
Elise Farar 
England Bros. 
Exeter Dental 

Laboratory 
First Agricultural Bank 
First Albany Corp. 
Flying Cloud Inn 
Folklorica 

Friendly Ice Cream Corp. 
Gateways Restaurant 
General Electric 
Giftos Bros. 
Girrardi 

Distributors, Inc. 
Graphic Arts 
Guitian Realty 
J. W. Gull Oil & Coal 
Hagyard Pharmacy 
Hall's Auto Service 
Hellawell 

Cadillac -Oldsmobile 
David Herrick, Inc. 
High Fidelity/ 

Musical America 
High Lawn Farm 
Hoff's Mobil 
Holiday Inn 
Household Finance 
Howard Johnson's 
Ida and John's 
Isgood Realty 
IT AM Lodge #564 
Joe's Diner 
H. A. Johansson 
J. H. Johnson & Sons 
Johnson 

Lincoln -Mercury 
Katherine Meagher 

Dress Shop 
Kaufman Bros. 



Kelly- Dietrich, Inc. 

Kelly Fun House 

Kelly Funeral Home 

Kimberly-Clark 

William T. Lahart & Son 

Laurel Hill Motel 

Lee Audio 

Lee Ford 

Lee High School 

Lee Lime 

Lee National Bank 

Lee News 

Lee Pizza 

Lee Savings Bank 

Lenox Memorial 

High School 
Lenox National Bank 
Lenox Oil Co. 
Lenox Package Store 
Lenox Savings Bank 
Lenox Twin Maples 
Lenoxdale Package 

Store 
Ella Lerner Gallery 
Loeb's Foodtown 
Luau Hale Restaurant 
Colin MacFadyen 
Massachusetts 

Purchasing Group 
James H. Maxymillian 
McClellan Drug 
McCormick & Toole 

Insurance Agency 
Mead Corporation 
Miller Supply 
Minkler Insurance 
Mohawk Beverages, Inc. 
Mole & Mole 
Morgan Grampian 
Morgan House 
Morpheus Arms Motel 
Nejaime's 
North Adams Hoosac 

Savings Bank 
North Adams 

Transcript 
Oak n Spruce 
O'Connell 

Chevrolet, Inc. 
The Old Corner House 
J. T. Owens Apparel for 

Men & Boys 
Parker Tours, Inc. 
Penny Saver 
Pete's Chrysler Plymouth 
Petricca Construction 
Pittsfield Agency of 

Berkshire Life 
Pittsfield Co-operative 

Bank 
Pittsfield National Bank 
Pittsfield Supply 
Pleasant Valley Motel 
Prudential Lines, Inc. 
Quincy Lodge 
The Record Store 
The Red Lion Inn 



Research and 

Action, Inc. 
The Restaurant 
Reynolds, Barnes and 

Hebb, Inc. 
A. H. Rice Co. 
Rising Paper Company 
Robinson Leech 

Associates 
Rogers Jewelry 
Rose Agency & 

Tucker Assoc. 
D. O. Ruffer, Inc. 
Samel's Deli 
Sears, Roebuck and Co. 
Seven Hills 
Seven Arts Antiques 
Shaker's Food Store 
Shandoff's 

W. H. Shedd & Son, Inc. 
Shire Shop 

Smith's Rent-Alls, Inc. 
Jeffrey J. Sosne 
Sound of Music 
South Adams 

Savings Bank 
Southern Berkshire 

Chamber of 

Commerce 
Sprague Electric 

Company 
Stanley Home Products 
Steven's Inc. 
Stevenson & Co., Inc. 
Stockbridge Chamber of 

Commerce 
Stockbridge Fuel 

and Grain 
Stockbridge 

Pharmacy, Inc. 
The Stockpot 
Sunset Motel 
Swiss Chalet 
The Talbots, Inc. 

Town and Country 

Motor Lodge 
Union Federal Savings 
U. S. Components, Inc. 
Yee Records 
The Village Inn 
Vlada Boutique 
Warner Cable 
WBEC, Inc. 
WCRB, Inc. 
West Stockbridge 

Enterprises, Inc. 
Wheeler & Taylor, Inc. 
Wheeler's Package Store 
White Hart Inn 
William Henry Inn 
Williams & Sons 

Country Store 
Williamstown National 

Bank 
Winard Advertising 

Agency, Inc 
Yankee Motor Lodge 
Yellow Aster, Inc. 



56 




Isaac Witkin, sculptor 

Selections from Isaac Witkin's Spill Series, 
sculpture created with the molten overflow of 
industrial steel, may be seen at the Glass House, 
Tanglewood's exhibition room, located at the 
Main Gate. 

Isaac Witkin was born in Johannes- 
burg, South Africa, in 1936 and moved 
to England in 1956. From 1957 to 1960 
he studied with the English sculptor 
Anthony Caro at St. Martin's School of 
Art in London. He has since been assis- 
tant to Henry Moore and has taught at 
St. Martin's School of Art, Maidstone 
College of Art in Kent, Ravensbourn 
School of Art, and Parsons School of 
Design in New York City. He has pre- 
sented his works in one-man and group 
exhibitions in Europe, Australia, and 
America, and is now represented by the 
Marlborough Gallery in New York. 
Currently he is on leave of absence from 
his position of artist-in-residence at Ben- 
nington College in Vermont to organize 
a state-sponsored sculptors' workshop 
in Binghamton, New York. 



What's 
Happening 

in the 

Derkshires? 

Phone Toll- Free 

and Find Out! 



Things to do today - exhibits, arts, music, 
theatre, ballet, garden shows, special tours, 
all the current events in the Berkshires. 



SOUTHERN BERKSHIRES 

528-2677 

From Great Barnngton. \ 

Sheffield. West Stockbndge 



CENTRAL BERKSHIRES NORTHERN BERKSHIRES 

637-2677 662-2677 




From Stockbndge. Lee. 
Lenox. Prrtstield 



From Wilhamstown 
Adams. North Adams 



A service of the Berkshire Vacation Bureau 
205 West St., Pittsfield, Mass. 

(A Division of the Berkshire Hills Conference) 



<J\\xlaa& (JJ ruttveAjb LXnXtatteA 



Route 57 



Tolland, Mass. 



Telephone 413 - 258-4538 

A wide selection of antiques ranging 

from furniture, china and paintings. 

We also feature an extensive 

collection of primitive art 

from New Guinea. 

Open by appointment every day 
except Sunday. 



57 



CHESTE^A/CJDD 

STOCKBRIDGE 




Summer Estate of 
DANIEL CHESTER FRENCH 

Sculptor of the 
Lincoln Memorial 

Studio, Residence, Barn 

Sculpture Gallery, Period 

Garden, Nature Trail 

Daily 10-5 

May - October 

off Rte. 183, Glendale 

a property of 
the National Trust for Historic Preservation 



1771 was a eood 

year for our Lobster Pie, 

This year 

it's even better. 




Publick House 

Good Yankee cooking, drink and lodging. 
On the Common — Sturbndgc, Mass.— bl7) 347-3313 



The Executive Committee 

Tanglewood Council of the 

Boston Symphony Orchestra 

Mrs. James Garivaltis 

Mr. Curtis Buttenheim 

Co- Chairmen 

Mr. John Kittredge 

Secretary /Treasurer 

Mrs. Stephen V.C. Morris 
Mrs. Murray Klein 

Talks and Walks 

Mr. Colin MacFadyen 

Mr. Ashley Smith 

Business 

Mrs. Kelton M. Burbank 
Mrs. John Kittredge 

Benefits 

Mrs. Charles Capers 

Receptions 

Mr. Robert A. Wells 

Community Affairs 

Mrs. D.H. Potter 

Mr. William Harris 

Tent 

Mrs. Jean Massimiano 
Mr. Joseph Duffy 

Sales and Information 

Mrs. Gary A. Lopenzina 
Mrs. William H. Ryan 

Student Affairs 

Mrs. Archie Peace 

Foreign Students 

Mrs. John Kittredge 

Tanglewood- Boston Liaison 

Mrs. A. Lloyd Russell 

Boston- Tanglewood Liaison . 

Mr. Peter van S. Rice 
Mrs. John S. McLennan 

Nominating 



58 



The Friends of Music 
At Tanglewood 

Membership provides you with exciting 

opportunities and privileges all year long. 

It's the secret buy of the Berkshires! 



Free Berkshire Music 
Center Concerts: 

There are over 40 concerts each sum- 
mer performed by the members of the 
Berkshire Music Center, the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra's summer academy 
for the advanced study of music. These 
outstanding mid-week concerts include 
chamber music recitals, full orchestra 
concerts, vocal and choral programs, 
and the annual Festival of Contem- 
porary Music, Tanglewood's "festival 
within a festival." Friends Concert 
Memberships for individuals and 
families are available for $25.00. 

Advance program information and 
ticket ordering forms: 

Approximately one month before the 
public sale of seats in the early spring, 
Friends will be sent the advance Berk- 
shire Festival programs and a priority 
ticket application. Friends will also re- 
ceive the monthly Boston Symphony 
Orchestra publication, BSO. 



Tent Membership: 

The Tanglewood Tent, available to con- 
tributors of $75 and over, provides a 
hospitable gathering place behind the 
Music Shed where food and drink may be 
purchased on concert days. Hot buffet 
dinners are served on Saturday evenings 
beginning at 6:30 p.m. (Reservations 
must be made through the Friends 
Office no later than the Thursday after- 
noon preceding each Saturday 
evening buffet.) 

Special parking for Friends: 

Two convenient reserved parking areas 
are available to all donors of $150 or 
more for all Boston Symphony Orches- 
tra concerts: either the Box Parking Lot 
(Hawthorne Street entrance), or the 
Tent Parking Lot (West Street entrance). 

For information, contact: 
Friends of Music at Tanglewood 
Lenox, Ma. 01240 
(413) 637-1600 



Ji 








arabis 



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lluokotoi'o 



CONTEMPORARY 
AMERICAN DESIGN 



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59 



WeQirtisHotel 

Food & Lodging 
LENOX, 637-0016 



A BOOK TO DO" NOT 
"JUST TO READ" 




A BERKSHIRE SOURCEBOOK 



Your personal guide to Berkshire County: 
its history, geography and major land 
marks. Available at area bookstores and 
gift shops for just s 2.95. Published by The 
Junior League of Berkshire County, Inc. 



sflmen 

delTshop 

SANDWICHES • CATERING 
TAKE OUT SERVICE 

115 Elm Street. Pittsfield. Massachusetts. 
Tel. 442-5927 

Featuring Hot Pastrami & Hot Corned Beef 

Sandwiches 

Hebrew National Delicatessen • Rolls & Bagels 
baked daily • Imported & Domestic cheeses 

• Lox & smoked fish • Barbecued chicken 

• Fresh made salads • Party Platters 

Open Daily 8 to 6 



WILL 



mE 



INN 




AMSVILL&^I* 

pi! as 



A fine, small inn featuring 
superb Country French Cuisine 

LUNCH • DINNER 

Light Supper After Tanglewood 

Rte. 41 , between W. Stockbridge 

and Gt. Barrington 

Reservations Recommended by 

413-274-6580 INN PERSPECTIVE 



Thenewhomeof 
the world famous 
Alices Restaurant 




AT AVflLOCH 



Breakfast • Brunch 

• Lunch • Dinner 

• Late Supper • Cocktail Lounge 

• Entertainment • MOTEL 

• tennis • pool 

across the road from Tanglewood 
rte. 183 Lenox 637-0897 



The Sunshine Stage, 

HolHston Theatre, Route 183, 
Lenox. Mass. 01240. Tel. 413-637-0534. 

Year round professional regional theatre featuring 
plays, films and children's theatre Cafe on prem- 
ises Frank Bessell. Artistic Director. 



THECLOTHESLOFT 

"Fine Sportswear Outlet" 

179 Main Street. Great Barrington 
164 North Street. Pittsfield 



I "a little tewel in the Berk shires OKj?V.c/'(-></i'H7<'/)//,u , crj 

(413)243-0181 or 637-2644 

JK Comfortable rooms, good food and drink in 
a country atmosphere. 
Open Daily Lunch & Dinner 

^^^ Tony Ferrelli Innkeeper 



vuyvu vgwvE 



-fir 

Accommodations for private parties. We 
cater to parties, banquets and social 
gatherings. Orders to take out. 

Chinese Polynesian Restaurantj^t 

LENOX. MASS. For Reservations 
(413)4434745 

Open Daily 11 30 til 10 pm. Fn & Sat til 1 am 




(IlldStonemiUltorp 

Route 8, Grove St., Adams, Ma. 

HANDPRINT WALLPAPER 
Factory Outlet 

OpenMon-Fri 10-4. Sat 9-1 2:30 




1 FANTASY MAN 
Food, drink, lodging. Live music week 
ends. After concert, a 10 minute 
walk from the Lion's Gate. 

WHEATLEIGH 637-0610 * 




Fashion Doesn 't Stop At Size 1 4 
BEAUTIFUL CLOTHES FOR 

e TY j Z LARGE SIZE WOMEN 

RIFF0R0BE ANDJUN,ORS 
179mKIR STREET 413528 31 18 



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60 



WHY WAIT TO ENTER COLLEGE? 
SIMON'S ROCK EARLY COLLEGE 

Designed for the student who wishes to avoid the 

duplication of high school and college work 

Liberal Arts - B.A. and A. A. Degrees - Fully Accredited 

The interest of those who have completed the 10th or 1 1th 
grade of high school is invited 

Admissions Office 

Simon's Rock Early College 

Great Barrington, MA 01230 

Telephone: 413-528-0771 



Jfc 



Tanglewood 
Tradition 



Our outdoor Courtyard 
— colorfully abounding 
with Impatient plants — 
serves luncheons, 
dinners, snacks and 
drinks. Our indoor 
Lion's Den features sandwiches, 
drinks and live entertainment. 
Both are open till 1 a.m. Phone: 
413-298-5545. Route 7, Stockbridge, 
Massachusetts. Since 1773. 

£& The Red Lion Inn 




<* v_.-SR- 



cP v £ T £y 




CURTAINS t 

At Ik E Red Lisn In n ^ 

STOCKBR1DCE MASSACHUSETTS , 

ou« r 

\loiulu\ thru Siiiurtltn 10 X.M.-5 P \t 
Si'thi fur lice ( 'ululufi 






Williamstown 
Theatre Festival 




Nikos Psacharopoulos 

Our 23rd Season Includes 

Misalliance Sherlock Holmes Alter the fan 

Platonov and Learned Ladies 

June 30 - August 27 

Phone Reservations 413-458-8146 
P.O. Box 517. Williamstown. Ma 02167 



*' 



If you'd like your own tote bag showinjdjou 
support public broadcasting (other stfcrefes the 
Chanrtel 17 logo), cliptind send to/WMHT, 
Box 17, Schenectady, NV 12301. 

Q $80 Sustaining Member 

□ $30 Regular Member 



Name 




*d*jL- 



&s 



Address 



City 



_ State 



Zip 



61 



f 



45th Season 



m 




\ 



*, Located in the Township of Becket, Mass. 
■E\ Norman Walker, Director 

Grace Badorek, Comptroller 

Donald Westwood, Promotional Director 



Fl RST WEEK- July b 9 
Eight Soloists from the 
Royal Danish Ballet 

SECOND WEEK 
July 12 16 
Cultural Center of the 
Philippines Dance Co. 
( An.er n_jn lebut 
'if the Company) 

THIRD .*. EEK July 19 23 
Teodoro Morca 
(Flamenco in Concert) 
Jacob's Pillow Dancers, 
Classical Pas de Deux 

FOU RTH WEEK 

July 2G 30 

Anne Mane DeAngelo 

and Lawrence Rhodes 

May O' Donnell 

Concert Dance Company 

Bhaskar (dances <)' India) 

FIFTH WEEK August 2 6 
Twyla Tharp 
Dancers and Dances 

13 



SEVENTH WEEK- 

August 16 20 

Dennis Wayne's Dancers 

EIGHTH WEEK- 

August 23 2? 

Contemporary Dancers 

of Winnipeg 

(United States debut 

of the Company) 

Joyce Cuoco & Youri Vamos 

Jacob's Pillow Dancers 

Special Added Event 
September 2 4 
Hartford Ballet 

Performances: Perform- 
ances are held Tuesday 
through Saturday, Curt- 
ain t imes: Tuesday, 
7:30 p.m., Wednesday, 
Friday and Saturday, 
G 40 P.m., Thursday and 
Saturday Matmees: 
3: 00 p.m. Tickets: 
$8.00 and $6.00. Avail- 
able at Ticket ron, 
Bioommgdale's or the 
Jacob's Pillow Box Office 



SIXTH WEEK August 9 
Ohio Ballet Company 

How to Reach Jacob's Pillow: 
Approx.150 miles from Boston near Tangle- 
wood. Lee-Pittsf ield exit on the Mass. Turnpike. 
Public transportation from Boston via 
Greyhound to L"e, Mass. 

America's FIRST Dance Festival 



i 



Jacob's Pillow Dance Festival 
Mailing Address: Box 287, Lee, Mass. 01238 

(413) 243-0745 



J 




DXHqiLC¥ 

discover 
the center and 
rediscover 

yourself 

Pick up a horse at our stables and ride across 
Foxhollow's 285 acre historic estate, formerly the 
country homes of Edith Wharton, Westinghouse 
and Vanderbilt. 

Visit our craft center where you can try your hand at 
pottery, painting, and jewelry making. Besides 
riding and crafts, there's golf, tennis, swimming, 
sailing, discussion groups, yoga, and more. 
We are a brand new country resort inn where you 
can have a new experience. To discover more call 
collect or write . . . 

The Center at Foxhollow 

Lenox, MA 01240 

(413) 637-2000 



unique cm 



Brunch 

Picnic 
Baskets 



a cxeoi<.\e haxtle 




Dinner 

After-Concert 
Supper 



J. Perspico Factor 
Restaurant 

Open Till 1 A.M. 

25 Church St. • Lenox, Mass. 
637-2996 



VISIT BERKSHIRE LAKES ESTATES 

EXPERIENCE COUNTRY LIVING 

AT ITS BEST! 

Small Lakefront Community 

Swim and boat on 2 crystal clear mountain 
lakes. Play tennis, badminton, volleyball 
and basketball on community courts. Live 
in privacy adjacent to a large state forest. 

Berkshire Lakes Estates 

YokumPond Road 

Becket, Mass. 01223 

Tel. 413-623-8747 

TO VISIT: Mass. Turnpike to Lee, Mass.-Rt. 20 
East. Continue 4 miles to Belden's Tavern. Heft 
for 2 miles to Berkshire Lakes Estates. 



62 



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m& EDITION PETERS *%m 



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If you are a Music Lover, 

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EDITION PETERS COMPLETE CATALOGUE 

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PETERS NOTES NEWSLETTER 

The C. F. Peters music publishing tradition since 1800 has been built on providing the 
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Newsletter strengthens this tradition. Each issue details our publishing activities and 
presents pertinent articles and news in many different areas in an effort to assist the 
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CONTEMPORARY MUSIC CATALOGUE 

Our new Contemporary Music Catalogue has already met with such enthusiastic response by 
teachers, students, performers and composers of contemporary music that it is now in its 
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63 




Introducing the Bose 901 s 
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The 901 Series III reproduces 
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the 901 Series III requires less than 
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original 901 with a 50 watt ampli- 
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For a full color 901 III 
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Patents issued and pending. Copyright © 
1977 Bose Corp. Cabinets are walnut veneer. 
Pedestals optional at extra cost 



64 



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Now in white as well as red. 

Imported by Pastene Wine & Spirits Co., Inc., Somerville, MA.Q2143 



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SMIRN0FF®VODKA.80&100 PROOF. DISTI LLED FROM GRAIN. STE. PI ER RE SMIRNOFF FLS. (DIVISION OF H EUBLEI N. I NCORPORATED ) HARTFORD. CONNECTICUT 




Seiji Ozawa, Music Director 

Colin Davis, Principal Guest Conductor 
Joseph Silverstein, Assistant Conductor 

Ninety- Sixth Season 1976-1977 



The Trustees of the Boston Symphony Orchestra Inc. 

Talcott M. Banks, President 

President Sidney Stoneman, Vice-President 

Vice-President John L. Thorndike, Treasurer 



Philip K. Allen, Vice 
Mrs. Harris Fahnestock, 

Vernon R. Alden 

Allen G. Barry 

Dr. Leo L. Beranek 

Mrs. John M. Bradley 

Richard P. Chapman 

Dr. George Clowes 

Abram T. Collier 



Nelson J. Darling, Jr. 

Archie C. Epps III 

E. Morton Jennings, Jr. 

Edward M. Kennedy 

George Kidder 
Edward G. Murray 



Albert L. Nickerson 

Mrs. James H. Perkins 

Irving W. Rabb 

Paul C. Reardon 

David Rockefeller Jr. 

Mrs. George Lee Sargent 

John Hoyt Stookey 



Trustees Emeriti 

Harold D. Hodgkinson John T. Noonan 

Administration of the Boston Symphony Orchestra 



Thomas D. Perry, Jr. 

Executive Director 



Thomas W. Morris 

Manager 

Gideon Toeplitz Daniel R. Gustin 

Assistant Manager Assistant Manager 

Joseph M. Hobbs Walter Hill Dinah Daniels 

Director of Development Director of Business Affairs Director of Promotion 

Richard C. White Anita R. Kurland Niklaus Wyss 

Assistant to the Manager Administrator of Youth Activities Advisor for the Music Director 

Donald W. Mackenzie James F. Kiley 

Operations Manager, Symphony Hall Operations Manager, Tanglewood 

Michael Steinberg 

Director of Publications 

Programs copyright ® 1977 Boston Symphony Orchestra Inc. 

Contents: 

page page 

Tanglewood 4 Programs 1 1-38 

Seiji Ozawa 7 Berkshire Music Center 46 

Map 8 Friends 47, 51 

Information 9 



The cover photo is by Walter H. Scott, Stockbridge. 



The Board of Overseers of the Boston Symphony Orchestra Inc. 

Dr. Leo L. Beranek 

Chairman 



Mrs. Norman L. Cahners 
Vice Chairman 

Charles F. Adams 

Mrs. Frank G. Allen 

Mrs. Richard Bennink 

David W. Bernstein 

David Bird 

Gerhard Bleicken 

Frederick Brandi 

Curtis Buttenheim 

Mrs. Henry B. Cabot 

Mrs. Mary Louise Cabot 

Levin H. Campbell, III 

Johns H. Congdon 

Arthur P. Contas 

Robert Cushman 

Michael J. Daly 

Mrs. C. Russell Eddy 

Paul Fromm 

Carlton P. Fuller 

Mrs. Thomas J. Galligan, Jr. 



Weston P. Figgins 
Vice Chairman 

Mrs. Thomas Gardinei 

Mrs. James Garivaltis 

Mrs. Robert Gibb 

Jordan Golding 

Mrs. John L. Grandin 

Mrs. R. Douglas Hall, III 

Mrs. Howard E. Hansen 

Bruce Harriman 

Mrs. Richard D. Hill 

Mrs. Amory Houghton, Jr 

Richard S. Humphrey, Jr. 

Mrs. Jim Lee Hunt 

Mrs. Louis I. Kane 

Leonard Kaplan 

Benjamin Lacy 

Mrs. James F. Lawrence 

Roderick MacDougall 

John S. McLennan 

Colman M. Mockler, Jr. 

Mrs. Elting E. Morison 

Richard P. Morse 



Mrs. Arthur I. Strang 

Secretary 

David G. Mugar 

•Dr. Barbara W. Newell 

Stephen Paine 

Harry Remis 

Mrs. Peter van S. Rice 

Mrs. Samuel L. Rosenberry 

Mrs. Jerome Rosenfeld 

Mrs. George Rowland 

Mrs. A. Lloyd Russell 

Mrs. William Ryan 

Francis P. Sears, Jr. 

William A. Selke 

Gene Shalit 

Samuel L. Slosberg 

Richard A. Smith 

Mrs. Edward S. Stimpson 

Mrs. Richard H. Thompson 

D. Thomas Trigg 

Roger Woodworth 




Boston 
University 

Tanglewood 
Institute 



Norman Dello Joio, 

Executive Director 



Summer Instrumental and Vocal Programs for the outstanding high school/ 
college-age musician. Private study with master artists including members of the 
faculty of the Boston University School of Music and the Boston Symphony 
Orchestra. Chamber music, orchestral and vocal performances at Tanglewood. 

For information: Boston University Tanglewood Institute, 
855 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 0221 5. 

A program offered by the Boston University School for the Arts in association 
with the Berkshire Music Center/Boston Symphony Orchestra. 
Twelfth Season 




The Berkshires are a perfect place ... for people, 
for families and for businesses. The kind of place 
where an unsurpassed quality of life is available. 

In the Berkshires the average commute is 10 
minutes. Golf courses, tennis clubs, ski resorts, 
theatres, lakes, and fine restaurants are at your 
doorstep. We provide excellent schools — both public 
and private — and the Berkshires are the perfect place 
to raise a family. 

It's no accident that titans of industry have lived 
and worked in the Berkshires. Our labor force still 
believes in a day's work for a day's pay. And the 
Berkshires offer a readily available pool of labor. Our 
schools offer vocational programs and governmental 
training dollars are available. 

Most important, we want businesses to locate in 
the Berkshires. That's why our banks have launched 
a program of financial assistance to attract new 
industry and the County funds a full-time organization 
to assist you. 



If you have the opportunity to move a business, 
or influence a business relocation, consider the 
Berkshires At Berkshire County Development 
Commission, we have compiled data to prove that 
the Berkshires add up for business reasons Come see 
us or write on your letterhead for more information. 
Or. if you know of a business contemplating 
relocation, let us know We welcome your business 



the Berkshires 

Alan C. Marden 

Berkshire County Development Commission 

205 West Street 

Pittsfield. Massachusetts 01201 

Phone: (413) 499-4474 



44 



Definitely not 
to be missed... 

"Herbert Kupferberg's Tanglewood 
is bursting with information that 
even some of us who worked there 
had missed ... It catches the spirit 
and truth of that beautiful place." 
— Francis Robinson, 
N.Y. Metropolitan Opera 
"Reads as excitingly as a who- 
done-it!" — Julius Rudel, 

New York City Opera 
"Unquestionably the definitive 
Tanglewood history to date." 
— Christian Science Monitor. 



TANGLEWOOD 




by 

Herbert 
Kupferberg 

8x10. 280 pages. 
Over 150 photos. 
Index. $9.95 paperback. 
McGRAW-HILL BOOK COMPANY 



m 



HANCOCK SHAKER 
VILLAGE 

Original 18th Century 
Village Restored 

Open daily 9:30-5:00 

Adults $3 Children $1 

Route 20 Five miles West 
of Pittsfield, Mass. 



Tanglewood 

In August, 1934, a group of music- 
loving summer residents of the Berk- 
shires organized a series of three 
outdoor concerts at Interlaken, to be 
given by members of the New York 
Philharmonic under the direction of 
Henry Hadley. The venture was so 
successful that the promoters incor- 
porated the Berkshire Symphonic 
Festival and repeated the experiment 
during the next summer. 

The Festival committee then invited 
Serge Koussevitzky and the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra to take part in the 
following year's concerts. The Orches- 
tra's Trustees accepted and on August 
13, 1936, the Boston Symphony gave 
its first concert in the Berkshires (at 
Holmwood, a former Vanderbilt estate, 
later the Center at Foxhollow). The series, 
again consisting of three concerts, was 
given under a large tent, and a total of 
nearly 15,000 people attended. 

In the winter of 1936, Mrs. Gorham 
Brooks and Miss Mary Aspinwall 
Tappan offered Tanglewood, the Tap- 
pan family estate, with its buildings and 
210 acres of lawns and meadows, as a 
gift to Koussevitzky and the Orchestra. 
The offer was gratefully accepted, and 
on August 12, 1937, the Festival's 
largest crowd thus far assembled under 
a tent for the first Tanglewood concert, 
a program of music by Wagner. 

As Koussevitzky began The Ride of the 
Valkyries, a storm erupted, overpowering 
the music and causing the concert to be 
interrupted three times before the first 
half could be completed. The second half 
of the program had to be changed, 
because of .water damage to some of the 
instruments, and when the concert 
ended, Miss Gertrude Robinson Smith, 
one of the Festival's founders, came to 
the stage and told the audience that the 
storm had demonstrated the need for a 
permanent structure. 

A hundred thousand dollars, she said, 
would be needed for this purpose, and 
the response to her plea was so generous 
that within a short time the amount was 
fully subscribed. Plans for the Music 
Shed were drawn up by the eminent 



architect Eliel Saarinen, and, as modi- 
fied by Josef Franz of Stockbridge, who 
also directed construction, it was com- 
pleted on June 16, 1938, a month ahead 
of schedule. Seven weeks later, Serge 
Koussevitzky led the inaugural concert, 
which included a performance of Beet- 
hoven's Ninth Symphony. By 1941, the 
Theatre-Concert Hall, the Chamber 
Music Hall and several small studios — 
all part of the Berkshire Music Center, 
which had begun operations the pre- 
ceding year — were finished, and the 
Festival had so expanded its activities 
and its reputation for excellence that it 
attracted nearly 100,000 visitors. 

Today Tanglewood annually draws 
close to a quarter of a million visitors; 
in addition to the twenty-four regular 
concerts of the Boston Symphony, there 
are weekly "Prelude" concerts and open 
rehearsals, the annual Festival of 
Contemporary Music, and almost daily 
concerts by the gifted young musicians 
of the Berkshire Music Center. Arthur 
Fiedler and the Boston Pops perform 
each summer, and the Festival also 
includes a series of concerts by popular 
artists. The season offers not only a 
vast quantity of music but also a vast 
range of musical forms and styles, all 
of it presented with a regard for artistic 
excellence that makes the Festival 
unique. Tanglewood and the Berkshire 
Music Center, projects with which 
Koussevitzky was involved until his 
death, have become a fitting shrine to 
his memory, a living embodiment of 
the vital, humanistic tradition that was 
his legacy. 





UlAlilC 

FM 90.3 mHz 

We bring you fine music 
AND dozens of interesting 
events — live and without 
commercials. Sit in with us 
at the National Press Club, 
where the next day's head- 
lines are often made. Enjoy 
"All Things Considered," a 
fascinating m agazine of news 
and issues. (Nothingelselikeit 
in broadcasting !) Savor some 
of the most satisfying thea- 
tre productions ever aired. 
Revel in delightful, intelligent 
conversation. 

Listen . . . and it you 

like what you hear, 

write tor our tree monthly 

program directory. 

WAMC 
Albany Medical College 
Albany, New York 12208 







npr 



National Public Radio 

for eastern New York 
and western New England 



The Shed under construction in 193 8 



Why do I work seven days a week? 
That's all there are. Besides 
if you really love what you do 

it's not work. 




Robert J. Lurtsema 

Host, Morning Pro Musica 

Everyday 7am-Noon 




Artists in the Night 
Hayes Burnett plays 
a great mix of jazz 
sounds. Mon-Fri 
ll-2:30am 




The Boston 
Symphony Orchestra 
at Tanglewood 
Fridays at 9pm, 
Saturdays at 
8:30pm, Sundays 

30pm 

and August 



The Spider's Web 
— our storybook for 
the entire family 
Mon-Fri. 7:30pm 



All Things Considered 

— the best news 
program of its kind 

— every day at 5pm 



'GBH Radio 
89.7FM 

Radio that makes sense 
of your day. 



Seiji Ozawa 

Seiji Ozawa became Music Director of 
the Boston Symphony Orchestra in the 
fall of 1973. He is the thirteenth con- 
ductor of the Orchestra since its found- 
ing in 1881. 

He was born in Hoten, Manchuria in 
1935, and studied both Western and 
Oriental music as a child. He attended 
Toho School of Music in Tokyo and 
graduated with first prizes in composi- 
tion and conducting. Shortly after his 
graduation, he won first prize at the 
International Competition of Conduc- 
ting at Besancon, France, and was in- 
vited by Charles Munch, then Music 
Director of the Boston Symphony and a 
judge at the competition, to spend a 
summer studying at Tanglewood. 

In 1964 and for the next five seasons, 
Mr. Ozawa was Music Director of the 
Ravinia Festival. At the beginning of the 
1965-66 season he became Music Direc- 
tor of the Toronto Symphony, a posi- 
tion he relinquished four seasons later 
to study and guest conduct. In 1970 he 
accepted the position of Artistic Direc- 



tor of the Berkshire Music Festival, and 
in December of the same year he began 
his inaugural season as Conductor and 
Music Director of the San Francisco 
Symphony Orchestra, titles that he held 
concurrently with his position as Music 
Director of the Boston Symphony. In 
the spring of 1976 he resigned his San 
Francisco position although he remained 
Honorary Conductor for the 
1976-77 season. 

Mr. Ozawa's recordings include: on 
the Deutsche Grammophon label, Ber- 
lioz's Symphonie fantastique, La damnation de 
Faust, Romeo et Juliette (which was 
awarded a Grand Prix du Disque), Ives's 
Symphony No. 4 and Central Park in the 
Dark, and de Falla's Three-cornered Hat, 
and, on the New World Records label, 
Griffes's Songs of Fiona McLeod. Record- 
ings soon to be released are: Bartok's 
Miraculous Mandarin Suite and Music for 
Percussion, Strings, and Celeste, Tchaikov- 
sky's Symphony No. 5, Brahms's Sym- 
phony No. 1, and Rimsky-Korsakov's 
Sheherazade on Deutsche Grammophon, 
and Sessions' When Lilacs Last in the Door- 
yard Bloom'd on New World Records. 



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Coupon good thru Oct 1 1 ( .>77 Discount docs nol apply to sale men handise 



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Jgy For 105 years we've been serious 
X W about people who make music. 

In 1872 Boston University established the first professional music program 
within an American university to train creative and talented students for 
careers in music. 105 years later the Boston University School of Music is 

still doing what it does best. 

• Performance • Music Education • History and Literature • Theory and Composition 



strings 

Walter Eisenberg, violin 
Madeline Foley, chamber music 

'Gerald Gelbloom, violin 

'Bernard Kadinoff, viola 
Endel Kalam, chamber music 

'Robert Karol, viola 

'Eugene Lehner, chamber music 

* Leslie Martin, string bass 
George Neikrug, cello 

'Mischa Nieland, cello 
Leslie Pamas, cello 
'Henry Portnoi, string bass 

* William Pvhein, string bass 
Kenneth Sarch, violin 

'Roger Shermont, viohn 
'Joseph Silverstein, violin 

Roman Totenberg, violin 

Walter Trampler, viola 
'Max Wmder, violin 
'Lawrence Wolfe, string bass 



woodwinds 

Edward Avedisian, clarinet 
'PasqualeCardillo, clarinet 
'Donot Anthony Dwyer, flute 

Rodenck Ferland, saxophone 
' Ralph Gomberg, oboe 
'John Holmes, oboe 
' Phillip Kaplan, flute 
' James Pappoutsakis, flute 
•Richard Plaster, bassoon 
'Matthew Ruggiero, bassoon 

* Felix Viscuglia, clarinet 
'Sherman Walt, bassoon 
'Harold Wright, clarinet 

brass 

•Ronald Barron, trombone 

* Norman Bolter, trombone 
Peter Chapman, trumpet 
John Coffey, tromboneltuba 

* Armando Ghitalla, trumpet 



brass (cont.) 

Paul Gay, trombone 
'Gordon Hallberg, tromboneltuba 
'Charles Kavaloski, French horn 

Charles A. Lewis, Jr., trumpet 
'David Ohanian, French horn 

Samuel Pilafian, tuba 

* Rolf Smedvig, trumpet 
'Harry Shapiro, French horn 

* Roger Voisin, trumpet 
'Charles Yancich, French horn 

percussion 

'Thomas Gauger 
'Charles Smith 

harp 

Lucile Lawrence 

piano 

ManaClodes 

Anthony di Bonaventura 

Lenore Engdahl 

Bela Boszormenyi-Nagy 

Phillip Oliver, staff accompanist 

Edith Steams 

Frednk Wanger 

organ 

George Faxon 
Jack Fisher 
Max Miller 

harpsichord 

Joseph Payne 

voice 

Eunice Alberts, contralto 
Germaine Arosa, diction 
Mary Davenport, contralto 
Ellalou Dimmock, soprano 
Maeda Freeman, mezzo 
Robert Gartside, tenor 
Mac Morgan, baritone 
Chloe Owen, soprano 
Allen Rogers, vocal coaching 
Barbara Stevenson, soprano 
Wilma Thompson, mezzo 



music history and literature 

Karol Berger 
Murray Lefkowitz 
Joel Sheveloff 

theory and composition 

David Carney 
David Del Tredici 
John Goodman 
Alan MacMillan 
Joyce Mekeel 
Malloy Miller 
Gardner Read 
Allen Schindler 
Robert Sirota 
Tison Street 

music education 

Lee Chnsman 
Phyllis Elhady Hoffman 
Allen Lannom 
Jack O. Lemons 
Mary Ann Norton 

musical organizations 

Adelaide Bishop, opera 
Warren Wilson, opera 
Joseph Huszti, chorus 
'Joseph Silverstein, orchestra 

* Roger Voisin, wind ensemble 

boston symphony orchestra 
woodwind quintet in residence 

'Doriot Anthony Dwyer, flute 
'Ralph Gomberg, oboe 

* Harold Wright, clarinet 
'Sherman Walt, bassoon 

* Charles Kavaloski, French horn 

empire brass quintet 
in residence 

Charles A. Lewis, Jr., trumpet 

* Rolf Smedvig, trumpet 
•David Ohanian, French horn 
•Norman Bolter, trombone 

Samuel Pilafian, tuba 



' Member of the Boston Symphony Orchestra 



Boston University School of Music 

Wilbur Di Fullbrigh t, Director • Robert Lee Tipps, Assistant to Director 
offering degrees at the bachelor, master, and doctoral levels. 

School for the Arts: Music, Theatre, Visual Arts • Norman Dello Joio, Dean 
855 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 



10 



Tanglewood 1977 



Weekend Prelude 

Janos Starker, cellist 
Gilbert Kalish, pianist 



Friday, 26 August at 7 



BARTOK Rhapsody No. 1 



BRAHMS Sonata No. 1 in E minor, Opus 38 

Allegro non troppo 
Allegretto quasi Menuetto 
Allegro 



Gilbert Kalish plays the Baldwin piano. 



11 



*■£_ 



$>-* 



BOSTON 

SYMPHONY 

ORCHESTRA 

SEIJl OZAWA /^ 
Music Director ^ \l| 



First violins 

Joseph Silverstein 

Concertmaster 

Charles Munch chair 

Emanuel Borok 

Assistant Concertmaster 
Helen Horner Mclntyre chair 

Max Hobart 
Rolland Tapley 
Roger Shermont 
Max Winder 
Harry Dickson 
Gottfried Wilfinger 
Fredy Ostrovsky 
Leo Panasevich 
Sheldon Rotenberg 
Alfred Schneider 
Gerald Gelbloom 
Raymond Sird 
Ikuko Mizuno 
Cecylia Arzewski 
Amnon Levy 
Bo Youp Hwang 

Second violins 

Victor Yampolsky 

Fahnestock cnair 

Marylou Speaker 
Michel Sasson 
Ronald Knudsen 
Leonard Moss 
Vyacheslav Uritsky 
Laszlo Nagy 
Michael Vitale 
Darlene Gray 
Ronald Wilkison 
Harvey Seigel 
Jerome Rosen 
Sheila Fiekowsky 
Gerald Elias 
Ronan Lefkowitz 

Violas 

Burton Fine 

Charles 5. Dana chair 

Reuben Green 
Eugene Lehner 
George Humphrey 
Jerome Lipson 

12 



Robert Karol 
Bernard Kadinoff 
Vincent Mauricci 
Earl Hedberg 
Joseph Pietropaolo 
Robert Barnes 
Michael Zaretsky 

Cellos 

Jules Eskin 

Philip R. Allen chair 
Martin Hoherman 
Mischa Nieland 
Jerome Patterson 
Robert Ripley 
Luis Leguia 
Carol Procter 
Ronald Feldman 
Joel Moerschel 
Jonathan Miller 
Martha Babcock 

Basses 

William Rhein 
Acting Principal 

Harold D. Hodgkmson chair 

Joseph Hearne 
Bela Wurtzler 
Leslie Martin 
John Salkowski 
John Barwicki 
Robert Olson 
Lawrence Wolfe 
Henry Portnoi 

Flutes 

Doriot Anthony Dwyer 

Walter Piston chair 

James Pappoutsakis 
Paul Fried 

Piccolo 

Lois Schaefer 

Oboes 

Ralph Gomberg 

Mildred B. Remis chair 

Wayne Rapier 

English Horn 

Laurence Thorstenberg 

Clarinets 

Harold Wright 

Ann 5.M. Banks chair 
Pasquale Cardillo 
Peter Hadcock 

E-flat clarinet 

Bass Clarinet 

Felix Viscuglia 



Bassoons 

Sherman Walt 

Edward A. Taft chair 

Roland Small 
Matthew Ruggiero 

Contra bassoon 

Richard Plaster 

Horns 

Charles Kavalovski 

Helen Sagoff Slosberg chair 

Charles Yancich 
Peter Gordon 
David Ohanian 
Richard Mackey 
Ralph Pottle 

Trumpets 

Armando Ghitalla 

Roger Louis Voisin chair 

Andre Come 
Rolf Smedvig 
Gerard Goguen 

Trombones 

Ronald Barron 
Norman Bolter 
Gordon Hallberg 
William Gibson 

Tuba 

Chester Schmitz 

Timpani 

Everett Firth 

Sylvia Shippen Wells chair 

Percussion 

Charles Smith 
Arthur Press 

Assistant timpanist 
Thomas Gauger 
Frank Epstein 

Harps 

Bernard Zighera 
Ann Hobson 

Personnel Managers 

William Moyer 
Harry Shapiro 

Librarians 

Victor Alpert 
William Shisler 

Stage Manager 

Alfred Robison 



BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

Seiji Ozawa, Music Director 

Colin Davis, Principal Guest Conductor 
Joseph Silverstein, Assistant Conductor 
Tanglewood 1977 

Friday, 26 August at 9 



BOSTON 

SYMPHONY 

ORCHESTRA 

SEIJI OZAWA 

i Mum ! 






SEIJI OZAWA, conductor 



BARTOK Music for String Instruments, Percussion and Celesta 

Andante tranquillo 

Allegro 

Adagio 

Allegro molto 



INTERMISSION 



BRAHMS Piano Concerto No. 1 in D minor, Opus 15 

Maestoso 

Adagio 

Allegro non troppo 



CLAUDIO ARRAU 



Seiji Ozawa and the Boston Symphony Orchestra record exclusively 

for Deutsche Grammophon. 

Baldwin piano 

Claudio Arrau plays the Steinway. 



13 



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14 



Notes 

Bela Bartok 

Music for String Instruments, 
Percussion and Celesta 

Bartok was born 25 March 1881 at Nagyszent- 
miklos, Hungary, and died 26 September 1945 
in New York City. Paul Sacher, founder and 
conductor of the Basel Chamber Orchestra, 
commissioned the Music for String Instru- 
ments, Percussion and Celesta and gave 
the first performance in Basel, 2 1 January 
1937, in celebration of his orchestra's tenth 
anniversary. Bartok had completed the score 
in Budapest, 7 September 193 6. John Bar- 
birolli introduced it to this country at concerts 
of the New York Philharmonic -Symphony 
Society on 28-29 October 1937. 

Introducing Music for String Instruments, 
Percussion and Celesta to his New York 
Herald-Tribune readers in 1937, Lawrence 
Gilman characterized Bartok thus: 
"Acrid, powerful, intransigent; the 
musician of darkly passionate imagina- 
tion, austerely sensuous, ruthlessly log- 
ical, a cerebral rhapsodist; a tone-poet 
who is both an uncompromising mod- 
ernist and the resurrector of an ancient 
past." If there is one quintessential Bar- 
tok composition, one work in which we 
can find all his strengths, the paradoxes 
in his music and the contradictions, the 
Music for String Instruments, Percussion and 
Celesta is it. 

In 1936, Bartok was fifty-five and at 
the summit of his powers and reputation. 
He had begun to compose at eight and 
had played the piano in public since he 
was ten. At twenty-six he had become 
professor of pianoforte at the Con- 
servatory in Budapest, succeeding his 
teacher, Istvan Thoman, and over 
the course of thirty years he had earned 
an enviable reputation as a collector and 
scholar of Hungarian, Rumanian, Bul- 
garian, and Arabic folk music. He 
was even a success as a composer. 
It is true that his last American 
years were wretched, medically and fis- 
cally, that he was discouraged to the 
point of giving up, that the support 
tendered by Serge Koussevitzky, who 
commissioned the Concerto for Orchestra 




Bela Bartok, 1932. 

for Boston, and by Yehudi Menuhin was 
literally life-saving. To imagine, how- 
ever, that Bartok's whole life was spent 
in the condition of unrecognized genius 
is to have the picture quite wrong. 
There were, to be sure, failures and 
frustrations, like Mengelberg's cancel- 
lation of the New York premiere of the 
Piano Concerto No. 1 on Bartok's first 
American tour, or the endless delays 
and unpleasantnesses that dogged the 
early career of The Miraculous Mandarin, 
but since the triumphant Budapest pre- 
miere in 1917 of his choreographic poem, 
The Wooden Prince, his importance was 
understood, he had a good contract with 
a first-rate publisher ("This is a splendid 
thing . . . [it] counts as my greatest 
success as a composer so far"), and his 
music was widely and well performed. 
He accepted Paul Sacher's commission 
on 27 June 1936, indicating in his letter 
that he was thinking of a work "for 
strings and percussion (thus, besides the 
strings, there would be piano, celesta, 
harp, xylophone, and percussion instru- 
ments)," and he completed the score 
ten weeks later, on 7 September. Though 
he seems to have entertained ideas about 
renaming the piece later, he retained its 
working title, Musique pour instruments a 
cordes, batterie et celeste en quatre mouvements. 
The other percussion turned out to be 
small drums, with and without snares, 
cymbals, tam-tam, bass drum, and kettle- 
drums. In the finale, the piano part is 

15 



sometimes for four hands, the third and 
fourth being those of the celesta player. 
Bartok wants the strings on stage in two 
separated groups, and in his score in- 
cludes a suggesting seating plan which 
puts first and second violins, first violas, 
and first cellos on the left, third and 
fourth violins, second violas, and second 
cellos on the right, basses across the 
back (firsts on the left, seconds on the 
right), and the other instruments in the 
middle, piano and celesta toward the 
left, harp and xylophone toward the right. 

First, a dark fugue. The instruments 
are muted and it is a long time before 
they rise from pianissimo. The gait is 
irregular and mystifying. The theme 
itself is constricted, its range only a 
fifth. The texture is dense and tight. 
Then, mutes are removed, the tempo 
quickens, kettledrums and cymbals join, 
and a thwack on the bass drum signals 
the arrival of a tearing climax. The 
music drops rapidly from this height: 
the mutes return, the celesta adds new 
and magic colors, and the sounds dis- 
appear into the silence from which they 
had come. 

That music is the source of most of 
the rest. The shapes in the second move- 
ment are derived from it, though this 
Allegro comes in as drastic contrast — 
quick, bright, inclined to be regular in 
its rhythms (though often and delight- 
fully syncopated). Piano and harp make 
their first appearance, and there is con- 
stant antiphonal play between the two 
string orchestras. At its recapitulation, 
the first theme is pushed together so 
that what took four beats before is 
allowed only three. 

The Adagio, beginning and ending with 
atmospheric dialogues of xylophone'and 
kettledrums, traverses many moods, 
successive phrases of the fugue subject 
heralding the appearance of each new 
section. The finale is country dance 
music: right at the beginning, the first 
orchestra strums, and the second has a 
headlong Bulgarian tune. Here, too, the 
first movement's theme returns, but 
transformed, its intervals stretched 
wide, its harmonies open and unambig- 
uous, and at the end, even the wild 
Bulgarian tune turns expansive in a 



harmonization and a rhythmic guise that 
might have been invented by Bartok's 
compatriot and friend, Zoltan Kodaly. 
And so this work is in Bartok's life a 
marker from which we can look both 
back and forward: the first movement 
is the summation of his endeavors from 
about 1919 into the middle thirties, the 
time of the tough, concentrated, often 
fiercely dissonant music of The Miracu- 
lous Mandarin, the Dance Suite, the two 
Sonatas for violin and piano, the first 
two Piano Concertos, the Quartets 
Nos. 3, 4, and 5, the Cantata profana, while 
the radical reinterpretation of that ma- 
terial in the finale anticipates the "easier" 
writing of the later years, of the Violin 
Concerto No. 2, the Concerto for Or- 
chestra, and the Piano Concerto No. 3. 

— Michael Steinberg 

Johannes Brahms 

Piano Concerto No. 1 in D minor, 
Opus 15 

Johannes Brahms was born in Hamburg, 7 May 
1833, and died in Vienna on 3 April 1897. 
He wrote his Piano Concerto No. 1 in 1858, 
using some material that goes back as far as 
1854 and that was originally intended for 
other purposes and designs. With Joseph Joachim 
conducting, Brahms himself played the first 
performance in Hanover on 22 January 1859. 
The first American performance was given 
13 November 1875 by Nannetta Falk-Auerbach, 
with Carl Bergmann leading the New York 
Philharmonic. 

Admit, when you think of Brahms, 
you probably think of him as he is in the 
famous von Beckerath drawing of him 
at the piano — and older man with grey 
hair and flowing white beard, stout, 
sure to light a cigar when he is finished 
playing, then off to a place called The 
Red Hedgehog for wine and smoke and 
conversation, gruff and sometimes out- 
right rude but still capable of turning 
on charm for the ladies, going for long 
walks, writing many letters, some of 
them distressingly arch, spending sum- 
mers composing in places with names 
like Portschach, Miirzzuschlag, and Bad 
Ischl, but unable to tolerate any of them 
more than three years in a row, and of 



16 




The famous von Beckerath drawing of Brahms. 

course writing solid masterpiece after 
solid masterpiece. 

Right enough, but it has nothing to do 
with the twenty-five-year old Brahms 
struggling to bring his D minor Piano 
Concerto to completion — "I have no 
judgment about this piece any more, nor 
any control over it," he writes to Joseph 
Joachim on 22 December 1857. Four 
years earlier, on 28 October 1853, Robert 
Schumann closed his career as music 
critic with the celebrated, oft-invoked 
article New Paths: "... I have always 
thought that some day, one would be 
bound suddenly to appear, one called to 
articulate in ideal form the spirit of his 
time, one whose mastery would not 




Johannes Brahms al twenty-five. 



reveal itself to us step by step, but -who, 
like Minerva, would spring fully armed, 
from the head ol Zeus. And he is i ome, 
a young man over whose cradle gra 

and heroes have stood watt h. 1 lis name 
is Johannes Brahms . . . and In |bean>| 
even outwardly those signs thai pro 
claim: here is one of the elect Ih.Jt 
year, Brahms had tonic to the Schu- 
manns in Diisseldorf as a shy, awkward, 
nearsighted young man, boyish in ap- 
pearance as well as manner (the beard 
was still twenty- two years away), blond, 
delicate, almost wispy. His two longest 
closest musical friendships began in 
1853— with the violinist, conductor, ^nd 
composer, Joseph Joachim, and with 
Clara Schumann. Both went through 
turbulent, painful stages, the one with 
Joachim much later, but that with Clara 
almost at once. On 27 February 1854, 
Robert Schumann, whose career as con- 
ductor had collapsed and who had begun 
to suffer from auditory and visual hallu- 
cinations, tried to drown himself, and 
five days later he was committed to an 
asylum in Endenich. Clara, pregnant 
with their seventh child, was desperate, 
and in the following weeks, Brahms s 
kindliness, friendship, and gratitude, 
were transmuted into the condition of 
being passionately in love with this 
gifted, strong, captivatingly charming 
and beautiful thirty - five - year old 
woman. Moreover, she returned his 
feeling. In their correspondence there is 
reference to "the unanswered question." 
Schumann's death in July 1856 was a 
turning point in Brahms's relations with 
Clara, though not the one for which he 
must have hoped. She seemed more 
married to Robert than ever, they pulled 
apart, and it took a while before they 
settled into the loving, nourishing friend- 
ship that endured until Clara's death 
in May \$Qb. 

All this time, the music we now know 
as the D minor Piano Concerto was in 
Brahms's head, occupying more and 
more pages of his notebooks, being tried 
OUt at the piano (or at two), sent to 
Joachim for criticism, discussed in letters. 
It is surely marked by the turmoil of 
those years, by Robert Schumann's 
madness and death, by Brahms's love 



17 



for Clara and hers for him, by their 
retreat from their passion. Its compo- 
sition was marked as well by purely 
musical troubles, by the mixed effect of 
the very young man's originality, his 
ambition, his inexperience (particularly 
with respect to writing for orchestra), 
his almost overpowering feeling for the 
past, his trembling sense of his own 
audacity at inserting himself into histo- 
ry as, somehow, a successor of Bach and 
Handel, Haydn and Mozart, Beethoven, 
Schubert, and Schumann. 

He set out in 1854 to write a sonata 
for two pianos, but by June of that 
year, he was already uncertain about it 
and wrote to Joachim: "I'd really like to 
put my D minor Sonata aside for a 
long time. I have often played the first 
three movements with Frau Schumann. 
(Improved.) Actually, not even two 
pianos are really enough for me ... I am 
in so confused and indecisive a frame of 
mind that I can't beg you enough for a 
good, firm response. Don't avoid a nega- 
tive one either, it could only be useful 
to me." In March he had traveled the 
few miles from Diisseldorf to Cologne 
in order to hear the Beethoven Ninth 
for the first time. More than twenty-two 
years would pass before he allowed him- 
self to complete a symphony and have it 
performed, but still, from then on, the 
idea of writing such a work gave him no 
peace. Before long, the sonata for which 
two pianos were not enough turned into 
the symphony it had really wanted to be 
in the first place (and the choice of 
D minor, the key of the Beethoven 
Ninth, for this sonata/symphony is no 
coincidence). He was reluctant, though, 
to face the idea of symphony, nor would 
the sonority of the piano go away. To 
turn the music into a piano concerto 
seemed to be the answer, and by April 
1856 he was sending drafts to Joachim. 

For nearly two years, bundles of 
manuscript went back and forth, with 
criticisms, pleas, suggestions, decisions 
to leave certain things alone after all, 
inquiries about horn transpositions, dis- 
cussion of the risk involved in assigning 
a solo to the third horn or of the 
advisability of omitting the piccolo 
altogether. In December 1857, he wrote 



the despairing sentence already quoted: 
"I have no judgment about this piece 
any more, nor any control over it," 
adding, "Nothing sensible will ever come 
of it." To which Joachim sensibly replied, 
"Aber Mensch, but I beg you, man, please 
for God's sake let the copyist get at the 
concerto." "I made more changes in the 
first movement," Brahms reported in 
March 1858 and even risked not sending 
them to Joachim. That good friend made 
his orchestra available for a reading 
rehearsal in Hanover in April, and bit 
by bit, Brahms came to face the inevi- 
table — he must let it go and perform it. 

The premiere in Hanover went well 
enough, but the performance in the 
more important city of Leipzig a few 
days later was a disaster: "No reaction 
at all to the first and second movements. 
At the end, three pairs of hands tried 
slowly to clap, whereupon a clear hissing 
from all sides quickly put an end to any 
such demonstration ... I think it's the 
best that could happen to one, it forces 
you to collect your thoughts and it raises 
courage. After all, I'm still trying and 
groping. But the hissing was really too 
much, yes?" 

"For all that," Brahms wrote in the 
same letter to Joachim, "one day, when 
I've improved its bodily structure, this 
concerto will please, and a second one 
will sound very different." He was right 
on both points (though, in fact, he 
revised only some details). He became a 
master. For the solemn, sarabande-like 
slow movement of the D minor Sym- 
phony- that -never -was, he found a 
beautiful use when he set to it the 
words, "For all flesh is as grass, and all 
the glory of man as the flower of grass" 
in his German Requiem. And who would 
want the D minor Concerto to be other 
than it is, great and with rough edges, 
daring and scarred, hard to make sound 
well, and holding in its Adagio, over 
which he once inscribed the words Bene- 
dictus qui venit in nomine Domini, all that 
in his painful, Werther-like loyalty and 
love he had felt about Robert and 
Clara Schumann? 

— M.S. 



18 



BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

Seiji Ozawa, Music Director 

Colin Davis, Principal Guest Conductor 
Joseph Silverstein, Assistant Conductor 
Tanglewood 1977 

Saturday, 27 August at 8:30 



BOSTON 

SYMPHONY 

ORCHESTRA 

SI 111 O/AWA 



JOSEPH SILVERSTEIN, conductor 



DVORAK Symphony No. 8 in G, Opus 88 

Allegro con brio 

Adagio 

Allegretto grazioso 

Allegro ma non troppo 



INTERMISSION 



SCHUMANN Cello Concerto in A minor, Opus 129 



Nicht zu schnell (not too fast) 

Langsam (slow) 

Sehr lebhaft (very lively) 

JANOS STARKER 



STRAUSS Till Eulenspiegel's Merry Pranks, after the old rogue's 

tale, set in rondo- form for large orchestra 



Seiji Ozawa and the Boston Symphony Orchestra record exclusively 
for Deutsche Grammophon. 
Baldwin piano 



19 




Coach® Belts are very well made 

out of very good leather 

and come in men's and women's sizes* 



Coach" Bags and Belts are made in New York City and are sold in fine stores throughout the world 
For catalogue write Coach Leatherware. 516 West 34th Street. New York 10001 . 

20 



Notes 



Antoin Dvorak 

Symphony No. 8 in G, Opus 88 

Antonin Dvorak was born at Muhlhausen 
(Nelahozeves), Bohemia, on 8 September 1841 
and died in Prague on 1 May 1904. He wrote 
his Symphony No. 8 between 26 August and 
8 November 1889 and conducted the first per- 
formance in Prague on 2 February 1890. 

When it comes to muddle over 
numbering of works, Dvorak can hold 
his own against all comers, Haydn and 
Schubert included. He himself some- 
times assigned the same opus number to 
different pieces, and his principal pub- 
lisher, Fritz Simrock, was inclined to 
assign deceptively high numbers to early 
works that he was just getting around 
to issuing, angering the composer and 
muddling our sense of chronology. The 
Symphony No. 8 in G is one that older 
listeners and record-collectors will re- 
member as No. 4. Dvorak wrote nine 
symphonies. Five were published in his 
lifetime, as of course Nos. 1 through 5, 
but even on its own terms that number- 
ing turns out to be wrong because the 
first of those five in order both of 
composition and performance, the 
F major, was only the third to be published 
and circulated for more than sixty years 
as No. 3. Only in the 1950s, with the 
appearance in print of all four early sym- 
phonies, did we begin to use the current, 
chronologically sensible numbering. 

This table may be helpful: 

new old 

number number ke y date 

1 C minor 1865 (Bells of 

Zlonice) 

2 B flat 1865 

3 E flat 1873 

4 D minor 1874 

5 3 F 1875 

6 1 D 1880 

7 2 D minor 1885 

8 4 G 1889 

9 5 E minor 1893 (New World) 



Dvorak's fame at home had begun 
with the performance in 1873 of his 
patriotic cantata Heirs of the White Moun- 
tains.* An international reputation was 
made for him by the first series of 
Slavonic Dances of 1878 and also by the 
Stabat Mater. The success in England of 
the latter work was nothing less than 
sensational, and Dvorak became a be- 
loved and revered figure there, particu- 
larly in the world of choir festivals, 
much as Mendelssohn had been in the 
century's second quarter (but see G. B. 
Shaw's reviews of Dvorak's sacred 
works). In the nineties, this humble 
man, who had picked up the first rudi- 
ments of music in his father's com- 
bination of butcher-shop and pub, 
played the fiddle at village weddings, 
and sat for years among the violas in 
the pit of the opera house in Prague (he 
was there for the first performance of 
Smetana's Bartered Bride), would conquer 
America as well, even serving for a 
while as Director of the National Con- 
servatory in New York. Johannes 
Brahms was an essential figure in 
Dvorak's rise, providing musical in- 
spiration, but also helping his younger 
colleague to obtain government stipends 
that gave him something more like the 
financial independence he needed, and, 
perhaps most crucially, persuading his 
own publisher, Simrock, to take him on.t 
Unlike Haydn and Beethoven, Dvorak 
never sold the same work to two differ- 
ent publishers, but on a few occasions, 
and in clear breach of contract, he fled 
the Simrock stable, succumbing to the 
willingness of the London firm of Novello 
to outbid their competition in Berlin. 
One of these works was the G major 
Symphony. 

*The defeat of the Bohemians by the Aus- 
trians at the battle of the White Mountain 
just outside Prague in 1620 led to the ab- 
sorption of Bohemia into the Habsburg em- 
pire, a condition that obtained until 28 Octo- 
ber 1918. 

tAfter talent, nothing matters so much to a 
young composer as having a responsible and 
energetic publisher to get the music into 
circulation. See, for example, Bela Bartok's 
remark on page 15. Many living composers 
could speak eloquently to this subject. 



21 




Antonin Dvorak in 1892. 

It had been four years since his last 
symphony, the magnificent — and very 
Brahmsian — D minor, No. 7. During 
those years he had made yet another 
attempt to make a success in opera, this 
time with a political-romantic work 
called The jacobin (and full, by the way, of 
superb music), he had revised the Violin 
Concerto into its present form, written 
a second and even finer series of Sla- 
vonic Dances, and had composed what 
is probably both his most admired and 
most performed piece of chamber music, 
the A major Piano Quintet, as well as 
the engaging Piano Quartet in E flat, 
Opus 87. 

The new symphony opens strikingly 
with an introduction in tempo, notated in 
G major like the main part of the move- 
ment, but actually in G minor. This 
melody, which sounds gloriously rich 
in cellos, clarinets, bassoons, and horns, 
was actually an afterthought of 
Dvorak's, and he figured out how most 
splendidly to bring it back at crucial 
points during the movement. After a 
broad Adagio, which spends quite some 
time in E flat before settling into its 
real home of C major, Dvorak gives us 
an enchanting quasi- scherzo, a loping 
sort of movement in minor. The middle 
part, in major, which comes back trans- 
formed to serve as a brief and quick 
coda, he borrowed from his 1874 comic 
opera The Stubborn Lovers. After this strong 

22 



taste of national flavor, Dvorak becomes 
more Czech than ever in the finale, 
which one might describe as sort of 
footloose variations, and which is full of 
delightful orchestral effects, the virtu- 
osic flute variation and the mad, high 
trilling of the horns from time to time 
being perhaps the most remarkable 
of these. 

— Michael Steinberg 



Robert Schumann 

Cello Concerto in A minor, Opus 129 

Robert Alexander Schumann was born in Zwickau, 
Saxony, on 8 June 1810 and died in Endenich 
near Bonn, 29 July 1856. He composed his 
Cello Concerto in October 1850, but the first 
performance was posthumous, given on 9 June 
1860 by Ludwig Ebert in honor of the com- 
poser's fiftieth birthday. 

It was in new surroundings, which 
might not have been considered favor- 
able for composition, that Schumann 
wrote his Concerto for Violoncello. 
About two months before, he had 
installed himself at Diisseldorf . He had 
accepted the post of orchestral and 
choral leader, not without some hesita- 
tion, for Mendelssohn, who had con- 
ducted there, spoke not too well of the 
quality of the musicians. But the duties 
were light enough not to tax his strength 
or to intrude seriously upon the realm 
of the creative imagination. 

The Schumanns, taking their farewell 
of Dresden, accordingly moved to the 
Rhine city on 2 September 1850. Clara 
was distressed at the noisy lodgings 
they were at first compelled to take, 
because her husband's failing health 
required a peaceful environment. But 
the local musicians gave the pair a 
heartening welcome, with a serenade, 
a combined concert, supper and. ball on 
7 September. Choral and orchestral re- 
hearsals began and promised well. This 
promise was not to be fulfilled; Schu- 
mann, unequal to the requirements of 
the position, later encountered friction 
which resulted in his forced resignation. 
But in October 1850, Schumann was 
still optimistic over his new situation. 
Neither the necessity of adjustment to 



new routine, nor the strain of making 
new acquaintances prevented him from 
composing industriously. A visit to 
Cologne and the Cathedral there on 
29 September made its impress upon 
the Rhenish Symphony, which he com- 
posed in November. 

Before this he composed his Concerto 
for Violoncello and Orchestra. The work 
was sketched between 10 and 16 Octo- 
ber; the full score completed by 24 Oc- 
tober. Clara Schumann entered in her 
diary, 16 November: "Robert is now at 
work on something. Ido not know what, 
for he has said nothing to me about it 
[this was the Symphony in E flat]. Last 
month he composed a concerto for vio- 
loncello that pleased me very much. It 
seems to me to be written in true violon- 
cello style." There is another reference 
to the Concerto the following year. 
"I have played Robert's Violoncello Con- 
certo again," Mme. Schumann wrote, 
11 October 1851, "and thus gave to 
myself a truly musical and happy hour. 
The romantic quality, the vivacity, the 
freshness and the humor, and also the 
highly interesting interweaving of vio- 
loncello and orchestra are indeed 
wholly ravishing, and what euphony 
and deep feeling there are in all the 
melodic passages!" 

Schumann himself does not seem to 
have been entirely satisfied. He con- 
templated a performance at one of the 
Diisseldorf concerts two years later 
(May, 1852), but apparently withdrew 
the work. He did not give it to a pub- 
lisher until 1854, and corrected the 
proofs early in that year, shortly before 
the sorrowful event which made re- 
straint necessary — his attempt at suicide 
by throwing himself into the river Rhine. 

In this concerto we glimpse the ex- 
perimental side to Schumann's tem- 
perament. He is interested here in com- 
pression and in new ways of connecting 
the parts of multi-movement compo- 
sitions. Both the initial woodwind chords 
and the wonderful cello melody to which 
they open the door have more than local 
functions. The idea of the chords per- 
vades the slow movement, and the cello 
theme turns into a recitative, shared 
fascinatingly and poignantly by soloist 



and orchestra, that forms the bridge 
from second movement to finale. Each 
movement is linked to the next and the 
middle one, though it sets out in glori- 
ously expansive song, has in itself some- 
thing of the character of bridge or inter- 
mezzo. The shift into six-eight time for 
the last pages of the finale is a device 
that Brahms obviously found worth 
imitating. Just before that happens in 
this concerto, Schumann introduces a 
brief cadenza. Cellists have often found 
it a problem — it is to begin with puz- 
zling as an idea and unsatisfying in effect 
that in a concerto whose solo line flies 
easily so high, dangerously high, the 
cadenza should be confined to the low 
register — and Janos Starker will sub- 
stitute one of his own. 

—John N. Burk/M.S: 

Richard Strauss 

Till Eulenspiegel's Merry Pranks, after 
the old rogue's tale, set in rondo 
form for large orchestra, Opus 28 

Richard Strauss was born in Munich on 11 June 
1 864 and died in Garmisch, 8 September 1 949. 
He completed Till Eulenspiegel on 6 May 
1895, and Franz Wullner conducted the first 
performance in Cologne on 5 November that 
year. The Boston Symphony, Emil Paur con- 
ducting, introduced the work in this country 
on 21 February 1896. 

There was a real Till Eulenspiegel, 
born early in the fourteenth century 
near Brunswick and gone to his reward 
— in bed, not on the gallows as in 
Strauss's tone poem — in 1350 at Molln 
in Schleswig-Holstein. Stories about 
him have been in print since the begin- 
ning of the sixteenth century, the first 
English version coming out around 1560 
under the title, Here beginneth a merye Jest 
of a man that was called Howleglas (Eule in 
German means owl and Spiegel mirror or 
looking-glass). The consistent and seri- 
ous theme behind his jokes and pranks, 
often in themselves distinctly on the 
coarse and even brutal side, is that here 
is an individual getting back at society, 
more specifically the shrewd peasant 
more than holding his own against a 
stuffy bourgeoisie and a repressive 



23 






fay 



[i.,«kfc-Ad».t^«^ f |1 




Strauss's autograph manuscript of Till Eulenspiegel, the beginning of the epilogue. 



clergy. The most famous literary version 
of Till Eulenspiegel is the one published 
in 1866 by the Belgian novelist, Charles 
de Coster: set in the period of the Inqui- 
sition in the sixteenth century, it is also 
the most explicitly politicized telling of 
the story, and it is the source of one 
of the great underground masterpieces 
of twentieth-century music, the oratorio 
Thyl Claes by the Russian -German com- 
poser, Vladimir Vogel. 

Strauss knew de Coster's book, and it 
seems also that in 1889 in Wiirzburg he 
saw an opera called Eulenspiegel by Cyrill 
Kistler, a Bavarian composer whose ear- 
lier opera Kunihild had a certain currency 
in the eighties and early nineties, and for 
which he was proclaimed as Wagner's 
heir. Indeed, Strauss's first idea was to 
compose an Eulenspiegel opera, an idea 
that appealed to him especially after the 
failure of his own exceedingly Wagnerian 
Guntram in 1894. He sketched a scenario 
and later commissioned another from 
Count Ferdinand von Sporck, the libret- 
tist of Kistler's Kunihild, but somehow 
the project never got into gear. "I have 
already put together a very pretty sce- 
nario," he wrote in a letter, "but the 
figure of Master Till does not quite 
appear before my eyes. The book of 
folk- tales only outlines a generalized 

24 



rogue with too superficial a dramatic 
personality, and developing his charac- 
ter in greater depth, taking into account 
his contempt for humanity, also pre- 
sents considerable difficulties." 

But if Strauss could not see Master 
Till, he could hear him, and before 
1894 was out, he had begun the tone 
poem that he finished on 6 May 1895. 
As always, he could not make up his 
mind whether he was engaged in tone 
painting or "just music." To Franz 
Wiillner, who was preparing the first 
performance, he wrote: "I really cannot 
provide a program for Eulenspiegel. Any 
words into which I might put the thoughts 
that the several incidents suggested to 
me would hardly suffice; they might 
even offend. Let me leave it, therefore, 
to my listeners to crack the hard nut the 
Rogue has offered them. By way of 
helping them to a better understanding, 
it seems enough to point out the two 
Eulenspiegel motives [Strauss jots down 
the opening of the work and the virtu- 
osic horn theme], which, in the most 
diverse disguises, moods, and situations, 
pervade the whole up to the catastrophe 
when, after being condemned to death, 
Till is strung up on the gibbet. For the 
rest, let them guess at the musical joke a 
Rogue has offered them." 



On the other hand, for Wilhelm Mauke, 
the most diligent of early Strauss exe- 
getes, the composer was willing to offer 
a more detailed scenario — Till among 
the market-women, Till disguised as a 
priest, Till paying court to pretty girls, 
and so forth — the sort of thing guaran- 
teed to have the audience anxiously 
reading the program book instead of 
listening to the music, probably con- 
fusing priesthood and courtship anyway, 
wondering which theme represents "Till 
confounding the Philistine pedagogues," 
and missing most of Strauss's dazzling 
invention in the process. (Also, if you've 
ever been shown in a music appreciation 
class how to "tell" rondo form, forget 
it now.) It is probably useful to identify 
the two Till themes, the very first violin 
melody and what the horn plays about 
fifteen seconds later*, and to say that 
the opening music is intended as a 
once- upon -a- time prologue that re- 
turns after the graphic trial and hanging 
as a charmingly formal epilogue (with 
rowdily humorous "kicker"). For the 
rest, Strauss's compositional ingenuity 
and orchestral bravura plus your 
attention and fantasy will see to the 
telling of the tale. 
—M.S . 

*It is told that Strauss's father, probably 
both the most virtuosic and the most 
artistic horn player of his time, protested the 
unplayability of this flourish. "But Papa," 
said the composer, "I've heard you warm up 
on it every day of my life." 



Allan-Albert, Artistic Director 

BERKSHIRE PLAYHOUSE 

July 6-1 7 

WILLIAM ATHERTON 
GILDA RADNER 
Dunning & Abbott's CHRIS SARANDON 
BROADWAY JILLHAWORTH 



Saul Bellow's July 20-31 
THE LAST ANALYSIS RON LEIBMAN 



Rodgers & Hart's Aug. 3-14 
I MARRIED AN ANGEL PHYLLIS NEWMAN 



William Inge's Aug. 1 7-28 
COME BACK, DANA ANDREWS 
LITTLE SHEBA ESTELLE PARSONS 



UNICORN THEATRE, 

Three New Musicals 

July 7-24 July 26-August 14 

THE WHALE SHOW A FABLE 

o by Jean-Claude van Italie 

August 1 6-28 and Richard Peaslee 
THE CASINO 



PROPOSITION THEATRE 

July 8-August 28 
THE PROPOSITION 



Performance Times for the Playhouse 

Evgs.: Wed., Thurs., Fri. 8:30 p.m.; Sat. 9 p.m.; Sun. 7 p.m. 

Mats.: Thurs. 2 p.m.; Sat. 5 p.m.; Sun. 3 p.m. 

Prices for the Playhouse 

Broadway, The Last Analysis, Come Back, Little Sheba 

Fri. & Sat. (9 p.m. pert, only) $8.95. 7.50; 
All other perfs. $7.95, 6.50 
I Married An Angel 

Fri. & Sat. (9 p.m. pert, only) $9.95. 8.50: 

All other perfs. $8.95, 7.50 

MAIL ORDERS FILLED PROMPTLY! 

Berkshire Theatre Festival, Stockbridge. Mass. 

01262 Enclose stamped, self-addressed envelope 

RESERVE BY PHONE! Call 413 • 298-5536 or 298-4800 



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26 



BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

Seiji Ozawa, Music Director 

Colin Davis, Principal Guest Conductor 
Joseph Silverstein, Assistant Conductor 
Tanglewood 1977 

Sunday, 28 August at 2:30 

SEIJI OZAWA, conductor 

MAHLER Symphony No. 3 
First Part 

1. Kraftig. Entschieden. 
Forceful. Decisive. 




INTERMISSION 



Second Part 

2. Tempo di Menuetto. Sehr massig. Ja nicht eilen! Grazioso. 
In minuet tempo. Very moderate. On no account hurry! Graceful. 

3. Comodo. Scherzando. Ohne Hast. 
Easy-going. Jesting. Without haste. 

4. Sehr langsam. Misterioso. Durchaus ppp. 
Very slow. Mysterious, ppp throughout. 

(words by Nietzsche) 

5. Lustig im Tempo und keck im Ausdruck. 
Cheerful in tempo and jaunty in expression. 

(words from The Boy's Magic Horn) 

6. Langsam. Ruhevoll. Empfunden. 
Slow. Peaceful. Deeply felt. 

BIRGIT FINNILA, contralto 
TANGLEWOOD FESTIVAL CHORUS, 
JOHN OLIVER, conductor 
BOSTON BOY CHOIR, 
THEODORE MARIER, conductor 



Seiji Ozawa and the Boston Symphony Orchestra record exclusively 
for Deutsche Gratnrnophon. 
Baldwin piano 



11 



fta. 



*THE 

BOSTON 

SYMPHONY 

CHAMBER 

PLAYERS 



fcj 



^ 



Three Sundays that can help you 

face Monday 

The Brahms Quintet op. 115. Stra- 
vinsky's L'Histoire du Soldat. The 
Schubert E Flat Piano Trio. These 
and other major chamber music 
works make up the Boston Sym- 
phony Chamber Players 1977-78 
program. 

The twelve principal players of 
the Boston Symphony Orchestra 
will perform at Jordan Hall at 4:00 
p.m. on Nov. 6, 1977 and Feb. 19 and 
April 9, 1978. Gilbert Kalish will be 
the guest pianist. 
For complete program information, write to Subscription Office, 
Symphony Hall, Boston, Mass. 02115, or call 266-1492. 



28 



Notes 



Gustav Mahler 

Symphony No. 3 

Gustav Mahler was born in Kalischt (Kaliste) 
near the Moravian border of Bohemia on 7 July 
I860 and died in Vienna, 18 May 1911. 
He did the main work on the Third Symphony 
in the summers of 1895, when he composed 
the second through sixth movements, and 1896, 
when he added the first. Two songs, Ablosung 
im Sommer (Relief in Summer) and Das 
himmlische Leben (Life in Heaven), pro- 
vide source material for some of the symphony, 
and they go back to about 1890 and February 
1892 respectively. Mahler made final revisions 
in May 1899. The symphony was introduced 
piecemeal. Arthur Nikisch conducted the second 
movement, then presented as Blumenstiick 
(Flower Piece), with the Berlin Philharmonic 
on 9 November 1896. Felix Weingartner gave 
the second, third, and sixth movements with the 
Royal Orchestra, Berlin, on 9 March 1897. 
With L Geller-Wolter singing the alto solos, 
Mahler himself conducted the first complete 
performance at the Festival of the Allgemeiner 
Deutscher Musikverein in Krefeld on 9 June 
1902. Ernst Kunwald introduced the Third 
Symphony in the United States at the Cincinnati 
May Festival, 9 May 1914. 

"Any ass can see that," said Brahms 
when someone pointed out the resem- 
blance of the big tune in the finale of his 
First Symphony to the one in Bee- 
thoven's Ninth. It is not recorded what 
Mahler said when someone — and some- 
one must have — remarked on his begin- 
ning the Third Symphony with the 
Brahms First, as it were. That, too, any 
ass can see, and we know what Mahler 
thought of such asses (cf . his song about 
the ass, the cuckoo, and the nightingale 
— Lob des hohen Verstandes (Praise of Lofty 
Intellect) — composed in June 1896, mid- 
way through his work on the Third 
Symphony). Mahler was neither forget- 
ful nor a plagiarist, and more than forty 
years ago Donald Francis Tovey as- 
serted the view than considered hetero- 
dox that "we cannot fall back upon the 
device of classifying Mahler as one of 
the conductor- composers who have 
drifted into composition through the 



urge to display their vast memories 
as experienced conductors." No, this 
beginning is allusion and reference, both 
to a particular monument of the sym- 
phonic tradition and to a type of trium- 
phal song. Mahler lived ambivalently in 
tradition, wanting at the same time 
to be part of it and, in Henry- Louis 
de la Grange's word, to "insult" it. The 
Third, the biggest of his symphonies as 
well as the most extraordinary in pro- 
portions and design, is the most massive 
of his insults. 

When Mahler visited Sibelius in 1907 — 
he was then near to completing his 
Eighth Symphony — the two composers 
argued about "the essence of symphony," 
Mahler rejecting his colleague's creed 
of severity, style, and logic, by counter^ 
ing with "No, a symphony must be like 
the world. It must embrace everything." 
Twelve years earlier, while actually at 
work on the Third, he had remarked 
that to "call it a symphony is really 
incorrect, as it does not follow the 
usual form. The term 'symphony' — to 
me this means creating a world with all 
the technical means available." 

The completion of the Second Sym- 
phony the previous summer had given 
him confidence: he was sure of being "in 
perfect control" of his technique. Now, 
in the summer of 1895, escaped for 
some months from his duties as principal 
conductor at the Hamburg Opera, in- 
stalled in his new one-room cabin in 
Steinbach on the Attersee some twenty 
miles east of Salzburg, with his sister 
Justine and his friend Natalie Bauer- 
Lechner to look after him (this most 
crucially meant silencing crows, water- 
birds, children, and whistling farmhands), 
Mahler set out to make a pantheistic 
world to which he gave the overall title 
The Happy Life — A Midsummer Night's Dream 
(adding "not after Shakespeare, critics 
and Shakespeare mavens please note"). 
Before he wrote any music he worked 
out a scenario in five sections, entitled 
What the forest tells me, What the trees tell me, 
What twilight tells me ("strings only" he 
noted), What the cuckoo tells me (scherzo), 
and What the child tells me. He changed all 
that five times during the summer as 
the music began to take shape in his 

29 



mind and, with a rapidity that astonished 
him, on paper as well. The Happy Life 
disappeared, to be replaced for a while 
by the Nietzschean Gay Science (first My 
Gay Science). The trees, the twilight, and 
the cuckoo were all taken out, their 
places taken by flowers, animals, and 
morning bells. He added What the night 
tells me and saw that he wanted to begin 
with the triumphal entry of summer, 
which would include an element of some- 
thing Dionysiac and even frightening. 
In less than three weeks he composed 
what are now the second, third, fourth, 
and fifth movements. He went on to the 
Adagio and, by time his composing vaca- 
tion came to an end on 20 August, he 
had made an outline of the first move- 
ment and composed two independent 
songs, Lied des Verfolgten in Turm (Song of the 
Prisoner in the Tower), and Wo die schonen 
Trompeten blasen (Where the beautiful trumpets 
sound). It was the richest summer of 
his life. 

In June 1896, he was back at Stein- 
bach. He had made some progress scoring 
the new symphony and he had compli- 
cated his life by an intense and stormy 
affair with a young, superlatively gifted 
dramatic soprano newly come to the 
Hamburg Opera, Anna von Mildenburg. 
He also discovered when he got to 
Steinbach that he had forgotten to bring 
the sketches of the first movement, and 
it was while waiting for them that he 
composed his little bouquet for critics 
Lob des hohen Verstandes. In due course the 
sketches arrived, and Mahler, as he 
worked on them, gradually realized that 
the Awakening of Pan and the Trium- 
phal March of Summer wanted to be 
one movement instead of two. He also 
saw, rather to his alarm, that the first 
movement was growing hugely, that it 
would be more than half an hour long, 
and that it was also getting louder and 
lo.uder. He deleted his finale, What the 
child tells me, which was the Life in Heaven 
song of 1892, putting it to work a few 
years later to serve as finale to the 
Fourth Symphony. That necessitated 
rewriting the last pages of the Adagio, 
which was now the last movement, but 
essentially the work was under control 
by the beginning of August. The Gay 



Science was still part of the title at the 
beginning of the summer, coupled with 
what had become A Midsummer Noon's 
Dream, but in the eighth and last of 
Mahler's scenarios, dated 6 August 1896, 
the superscription is simply A Mid- 
summer Noon's Dream, with the following 
titles given to the individual movements: 

First Part: 

Pan awakes. Summer comes marching in 
(Bacchic procession). 

Second Part: 

What the flowers in the meadow tell me 
What the animals in the forest tell me 
What humanity tells me 
What the angels tell me 
What love tells me 

At the premiere, the program page 
showed no titles at all, only tempo, 
generic, and character indications. 
"Beginning with Beethoven," wrote Mahler 
to the critic Max Kalbeck that year, 
"there is no modern music without its 
underlying program. — But no music 
is worth anything if you first have to 
tell the listener what experience lies 
behind it, respectively what he is 
supposed to experience in it. — And so 
yet again: pereat every program! — You 
just have to bring along ears and a 
heart and — not least — willingly sur- 
render to the rhapsodist. Some residue 
of mystery always remains, even 
for the creator." 

Writing at about the same time to 
the conductor Josef Krug-Waldsee, 
Mahler elaborated: "Those titles were 
an attempt on my part to provide non- 
musicians with something to hold on to 
and with a signpost for the intellectual, 
or better, the expressive content of the 
single movements and of their relation- 
ships to each other and to the whole. 
That it didn't work (as, in fact, it could 
never work) and that it led only to 
misinterpretations of the most horren- 
dous sort became painfully clear all too 
quickly. It's the same disaster that had 
overtaken me on previous and similar 
occasions, and now I have once and for 
all given up commenting, analyzing, all 
such expediencies of whatever sort. 
These titles . . . will surely say some- 
thing to you after you know the score. 



30 




Gustav Mahler, 1907. 

You will draw intimations from them 
about how I imagined the steady inten- 
sification of feeling, from the indistinct, 
unbending, elemental existence (of the 
forces of nature) to the tender forma- 
tion of the human heart, which in turns 
points toward and reaches a region 
beyond itself (God). 

"Please express that in your own 
language, without quoting those ex- 
tremely inadequate titles, and that way 
you will have acted in my spirit. I am 
very grateful that you asked me [about 
the titles], for it is by no means inconse- 
quential to me and for the future of my 
work how it is introduced into public life." 

Words a program annotator quotes at 
his peril. But the climate has changed in 
these seventy-five years and today's au- 
dience is very much inclined to come to 
Mahler with that willingness to surrender 
for which he hoped. We do well to ignore 
the "Titan" claptrap Mahler imposed on 
his First Symphony years after its com- 
position. When, however, we look at the 
titles in the Third Symphony, we are, 
even though they were finally rejected, 
looking at an attempt, or a series of 
attempts, to put into few words the 
material, the world of ideas, emotions, 
and associations that lay behind the 



choices Mahler made as he composed. 
We, too, can draw intimations from 
them, and then remove them as scaf- 
folding we no longer need. And with 
that, let us turn to a brief look at the 
musical object Mahler left us. 

The first movement accounts for 
roughly one third of the symphony's 
length. Starting with magnificent gaiety, 
it falls at once into a mood of tragedy — 
see-sawing chords of low horns and 
bassoons, the drumbeats of a funeral 
procession, cries and outrage. Myste- 
rious twitterings follows the suggestion 
of a distant quick march, and a grandly 
rhetorical recitative for the trombone. 
Against all that, Mahler poses a series 
of quick marches (the realization of 
what he had adumbrated earlier for just 
a few seconds), the sorts of tunes you 
can't believe you haven't known all your 
life and the sort that used to cause critics 
to complain of Mahler's "banality," elab- 
orated and scored with an astounding 
combination of delicacy and exuberance. 
Their swagger is rewarded by a collision 
with catastrophe, and the whole move- 
ment — with its outsize dimensions as 
classical a sonata form as Mahler ever 
made — is the conflict of the dark and the 
bright elements, culminating in the vic- 
tory of the latter. 

In the division of the work Mahler 
finally adopted, the first movement is 
the entire first section. What follows is, 
except for the finale, a series of shorter 
character pieces, beginning with the 
Blumenstuck, the first music he composed 
for this symphony. It is a delicately 
sentimental minuet with access, in its 
contrasting section, to slightly sinister 
sources of energy. Curiously, it antici- 
pates music not heard in the symphony 
at all, that is to say, the scurrying runs 
from the Life in Heaven song that was 
dropped from this design and finally 
made its way into the Fourth Symphony. 
In the last measures, Wagner's Parsifal 
flower -maidens make a ghostly ap- 
pearance in Mahler's Upper Austrian 
pastoral. 

In the third movement, Mahler draws 
on his song Ablosung im Sommer (Relief 
in Summer), whose text tells of waiting 
for Lady Nightingale to start singing as 



31 



soon as the cuckoo is through. The 
marvel here is the landscape with the 
posthorn, not only the lovely melody 
itself, but the way it is introduced (the 
magic transformation of the very 
"present" trumpet into distant posthorn, 
the gradual change of the posthorn's 
melody from fanfare to song, the inter- 
lude for flutes, and, as Arnold Schoen- 
berg points out, the accompaniment "at 
first with the divided high violins, then, 
even more beautiful if possible, with 
the horns." After the brief return of this 
idyll and before the snappy coda, Mahler 
makes spine-chilling reference to the 
"Great Summons" music in the Second 
Symphony's finale. 



Low strings rock to and fro, the harps 
accenting a few of their notes, the 
see-sawing horn chords from the first 
pages return, and a human voice intones 
the Midnight Song from Friedrich Nietz- 
sche's Thus spoke Zarathustra. (See page 34). 
Each of its eleven lines is to be imagined 
as coming between the strokes of mid- 
night. Pianississimo throughout, warns 
Mahler. The harmony is almost as static 
as the dynamics, being frozen in all but 
a few measures to a pedal D (the begin- 
ning and end, which frame that D in its 
own dominant, A, are exceptions, and 
so is the setting with solo violin of 
"Lust tiefer noch als Ewigkeit (Joy deeper still 
than heartbreak)." 




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32 



From here, the music moves forward 
without a break, and as abruptly and 
drastically as it changed from the scherzo 
to Nietzsche's midnight, so does it change 
from that darkness to the bells and 
angels of the fifth movement. The text 
comes from the folk-song collection Des 
Knaben Wunderhorn (The Boy's Magic Horn), 
though the interjections of "Du sollst ja 
nicht weinen (But you mustn't weep)" are 
Mahler's own. A three-part chorus of 
women's voices carries most of the text, 
though the contralto returns to take the 
part of the sinner. The boys' chorus, 
confined at first to bell noises, joins later 
in the exhortation "Liebe nur Gott (Only 
love God)" and for the final stanza. This 
movement, too, foreshadows the Life in 
Heaven that will not, in fact, occur until 
the Fourth Symphony: the solemnly 
archaic chords first heard at "Ich hab iiber- 
treten die Zehen Gebot (I have trespassed 
against the Ten Commandments)" will 
be associated in the later work with 
details of the domestic arrangement in 
that mystical, sweetly scurrile picture of 
heaven. Violins are silent in this softly 
sonorous movement. 

The delicate balance between the 
regions of F (the quick marches of the 
first movement, and the third and fifth 
movements) and D (the dirges in the 
first movement, the Nietzsche song, 
and, by extension, the minuet, which is 
in A major) is now and finally resolved 
in favor of D. Mahler perceived that 
the decision to end the symphony with 
an Adagio was one of the most special 
he made: "In Adagio movements," he 
explained to Natalie Bauer- Lechner, 
"everything is resolved in quiet. The 
Ixion wheel of outward appearances is 
at last brought to a standstill. In fast 
movements — Minuets, Allegros, even 
Andantes nowadays — everything is 
motion, change, flux. Therefore I have 
ended my Second and Third symphonies, 
contrary to custom ... with Adagios — 
the higher form as distinguished from 
the lower." 

A noble thought, but, not uniquely 
in Mahler, there is some gap between 
theory and reality. The Adagio makes its 
way at the last to a sure and grand 
conquest, but during its course — and 




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this is a movement, like the first, on a 
very large scale — Ixion's flaming wheel 
can hardly be conceived of as standing 
still. In his opening melody, Mahler 
invites association with the slow move- 
ment of Beethoven's last quartet, Opus 
135. Soon, though, the music is caught 
in "motion, change, flux," and before 
the final triumph, it encounters again 
the catastrophe that interrupted the 
first movement. The Adagio's original 
title, What love tells me, refers to Christian 
love, agape, and Mahler's drafts carry the 
superscription: "Behold my wounds! Let 
not one soul be lost." The performance 
directions, too, seem to speak to the 
issue of spirituality, for Mahler enjoins 
that the immense final bars with their 



33 



thundering kettledrums be played "not 
with brute strength, [but] with rich, 
noble tone" and that the last measure 
"not be cut off sharply" so that there 
is some softness to the edge between 



sound and silence at the end of this 
most riskily and gloriously comprehen- 
sive of Mahler's "worlds." 

— Michael Steinberg 



O Mensch ! Gib Acht! 

Was spricht die tiefe Mitternacht? 

Ich schlief! 

Aus tiefem Traum bin ich erwacht! 

Die Welt ist tief! 

Und tiefer als der Tag gedacht! 

Tief ist ihr Weh! 

Lust tiefer noch als Herzeleid! 

Weh spricht: Vergeh! 

Doch alle Lust will Ewigkeit! 

Will tiefe, tiefe Ewigkeit! 

Friedrich Nietzsche 

Es sungen drei Engel einen siissen 

Gesang, 
Mit Freuden es selig im Himmel klang; 

Sie jauchzten frohlich auch dabei, 

Dass Petrus sei von Siinden frei. 

Denn als der Herr Jesus zu Tische sass, 
Mit seinen zwolf Jtingern das Abendmal ass, 
So sprach der Herr Jesus: "Was stehst du 

denn hier? 
Wenn ich dich anseh', so weinest du mir." 

"Und sollt ich nicht weinen, du giitiger 

Gott 
Du sollst ja nicht weinen! 
Ich hab (ibertreten die Zehen Gebot; 

Ich gehe und weine ja bitterlich 
Du sollst ja nicht weinen! 
Ach komm und erbarme dich iiber 
mich!" 

"Hast du denn ubertreten die Zehen 

Gebot, 
So fall auf die Knie und bete zu Gott, 
Liebe nur Gott in alle Zeit, 
So wirst du erlangen die himmlische 

Freud." 

Die himmlische Freud ist eine selige 

Stadt, 
Die himmlische Freud, die kein End 

mehr hat; 
Die himmlische Freud war Petro bereit 
Durch Jesum und alien zur Seligkeit. 

from The Boy's Magic Horn 



Oh man, give heed! 

What does deep midnight say? 

I slept! 

From a deep dream have I waked 

The world is deep, 

And deeper than the day had thought! 

Deep is its pain! 

Joy deeper still than heartbreak! 

Pain speaks: Vanish! 

But all joy seeks eternity, 

Seeks deep, deep eternity. 



Three angels were singing a sweet song: 

With joy it resounded blissfully 

in heaven. 
At the same time they happily shouted 

with joy 
That Peter was absolved from sin. 

For as Lord Jesus sat at table, 

Eating supper with his twelve apostles, 

So spoke Lord Jesus: "Why are you standing 

here? 
When I look at you, you weep." 

"And should I not weep, you kind God! 

No, you mustn't weep. 

I have trespassed against the Ten 

Commandments. 
I go and weep, and bitterly 
No, you mustn't weep. 
Ah, come and have mercy on me!" 

"If you have trespassed against the Ten 

Commandments, 
Then fall on your knees and pray to God, 
Love only God for ever, 
And you will attain heavenly joy." 

Heavenly joy is a blessed city, 

Heavenly joy, that has no end. 

Heavenly joy was prepared for Peter 
By Jesus and for the salvation of all. 



34 



Guest Artists 



Janos Starker 

Budapest-born Janos Starker began 
cello studies at the age of six and per- 
forming in Hungary at ten. He attended 
Budapest's Franz Liszt Academy until 
he dropped out at fifteen. After World 
War II he became principal cellist with 
the Budapest Opera and Philharmonic 
Orchestra. Disillusioned with the poli- 
tical atmosphere of central Europe, he 
emigrated to the United States in 1948. 
He joined the Dallas Symphony as first 
cellist, later the Metropolitan Opera, 
and then the Chicago Symphony under 
the late Fritz Reiner, and in 1958, he 
joined the faculty of Indiana University 
in Bloomington, where he is now Dis- 
tinguished Professor. During the 1976-77 
season he performed music of twentieth- 
century composers including Kodaly, 
Debussy, Prokofiev, Barber, and Martinu 
and toured throughout the United States, 
Europe, and in Israel. His recordings 
include the complete Bach suites for 
unaccompanied cello, Peter Mennin's 
Concerto with the Louisville Orchestra, 
the Brahms trios with Julius Katchen 
and Josef Suk, and Ernest Bloch's Schelomo 
and Voice in the Wilderness with the Israel 
Philharmonic under Zubin Mehta. He 




has also recorded the Road to Cello Playing, 
an educational recording which demon- 
strates his system of study, and has 
developed the so-called Starker Bridge, 
a wooden bridge with cone-shaped holes 
which magnify the quality and quantity 
of a cello's tone. This is his first per- 
formance with the Boston Symphony. 



Gilbert Kalish 

Gilbert Kalish, born in 1935, studied 
piano with Leonard Shure, Isabella Ven- 
gerova, and Julius Hereford, and earned 
an A.B. at Columbia College. He has 
long been the pianist for the Contem- 
porary Chamber Ensemble and has per- 
formed twentieth-century concertos by 
Berg, Carter, Messiaen, and Stravinsky. 
He appears regularly with the Boston 
Symphony Chamber Players with 
whom he has toured in Europe and 
throughout the United States. As a 
soloist he has performed in the United 
States, Europe, Australia, and New Zea- 
land. He recently recorded three volumes 
of Haydn piano sonatas and the Concord 
sonata of Charles Ives for Nonesuch. 
He is currently Artist-in-Residence at 
the State University of New York at 
Stony Brook and Head of Keyboard 
Activities at the Berkshire Music Center 
at Tanglewood. 




35 





Claudio Arrau 

Chilean-born pianist Claudio Arrau, 
born in 1903, first performed at the age 
of five, and in 1910 was sent by the 
Chilean government to Berlin where he 
studied with Martin Krause. During 
1914-15 he gave recitals in Germany 
and Scandinavia, and after World War I 
he performed throughout Europe, re- 
turning to South America in 1921. He 
made his debut in the United States in 
1923 and with the Boston Symphony 
Orchestra in 1924. Between 1925 and 
1940 he lived primarily in Berlin and 
taught at Stern's Conservatory. In 1927 
he won the Grand Prix International des 
Pianistes at Geneva. In 1941 he settled 
in the United States, and has since made 
frequent tours. His most recent 1974- 
75 tour included the United States, 
Europe, South America, Tokyo, Sydney, 
Melbourne, Tel Aviv, Baalbek, and Te- 
heran. Among his recordings are Bee- 
thoven's thirty-two piano sonatas and 
five concertos, Brahms's concertos, and 
the complete Chopin works for piano 
and orchestra. He is currently recording 
the complete piano works of Schumann, 
as well as the major works of Liszt 
and Chopin, and he is also working on a 
new edition of Beethoven's piano so- 
natas for Peters in Frankfurt. His most 
recent appearance with the BSO in 1964 
was a performance of Mozart's Concerto 
in D major, K. 451. 



Joseph Silverstein 

Joseph Silverstein joined the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra in 1955 at the age 
of 23. He has been Assistant Conductor 
since the beginning of the 1971-72 sea- 
son, and Concertmaster since 1962. A 
native of Detroit, he began his musical 
studies with his father, a violin teacher, 
and later attended the Curtis Institute. 
His teachers have included Joseph 
Gingold, Mischa Mischakoff, and 
Efrem Zimbalist. 

Mr. Silverstein has appeared as soloist 
with the orchestras of Detroit, Den- 
ver, Los Angeles, New York, Indianap- 
olis, Milwaukee, Philadelphia and Ro- 
chester, and abroad in Jerusalem and 
Brussels. He appears regularly as soloist 
with the Boston Symphony and con- 
ducts the Orchestra frequently. He has 
also conducted, among others, the Los 
Angeles Philharmonic, the Rochester 
Philharmonic and the Jerusalem Sym- 
phony. In 1959 he was one of the 
winners of the Queen Elisabeth of Bel- 
gium International Competition, and in 
1960 he won the Walter W. Naum- 
burg Award. 

Mr. Silverstein is first violinist and 
music director of the Boston Symphony 
Chamber Players and led their 1967 
tour to the Soviet Union, Germany and 
England. He has participated with this 
group in many recordings for RCA 
Victor and Deutsche Grammophon and 



36 



recently recorded works of Mrs. H.H.A. 
Beach and Arthur Foote for New World 
Records with pianist Gilbert Kalish. He 
is Chairman of the Faculty of the Berk- 
shire Music Center at Tanglewood, and 
Assistant Professor of Music at 
Boston University. 

Last fall, Mr. Silverstein led the Bos- 
ton University Symphony Orchestra to 
a silver medal prize in the Herbert von 
Karajan Youth Orchestra Competition 
in Berlin. 



Birgit Finnila 

Contralto Birgit Finnila was born in 
western Sweden near Falkenberg. As a 
child she heard a great deal of chamber 
music performed at home, and at seven- 
teen she began voice studies in Goete- 
borg. Marriage and a new home in 
Finland interrupted her studies for two 
years until, upon returning to Goete- 
borg, she resumed her studies and made 
her debut there in 1963. After coaching 
with Roy Henderson in London, she 
soon began singing with European 
opera houses and orchestras including 
the London Philharmonia, the Halle 
Orchestra of Manchester, the Concert- 
gebouw of Amsterdam, the Berlin Phil- 
harmonic, the Prague and London sym- 




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phonies, and the orchestras of Oslo, 
Stockholm, and Copenhagen. She has 
also performed with the Israel Phil- 
harmonic, the Melbourne and Sydney 
orchestras, and in America with the 
New York and Los Angeles philharmonic 
orchestras, the Philadelphia and Min- 
nesota orchestras, the National, Detroit, 
Cincinnati, Baltimore, Houston, and San 
Francisco symphonies. Among her many 
recordings is Vivaldi's Juditha Triumphans, 
recorded in Berlin under Vittorio Negri, 
for which she received a Grand Prix du 
Disque. She performed with the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra last April in 
Mahler's Third Symphony. 



Boston Boy Choir 

The Boston Boy Choir of the Boston 
Archdiocesan Choir School, which was 
founded in 1963 under the patronage 
of the late Cardinal Cushing, is in resi- 
dence at St. Paul's Church in Cambridge. 
Members are students ranging in age 
from nine to fourteen who receive full 
academic training as well as an extensive 
musical education; its music director is 
Theodore Marier. The choir performs in 
the Boston area and throughout New 
England. Their most recent performance 
with the Boston Symphony was in 
Mahler's Third Symphony last April. 



37 



Tanglewood Festival Chorus 

The Tanglewood Festival Chorus was 
formed under the joint auspices of the 
Berkshire Music Center and Boston 
University in 1970. The director since 
its foundation, John Oliver, is director 
of choral and vocal activities for Tangle- 
wood, a member of the MIT faculty 
and director of the MIT Choral Society. 
The Festival Chorus made its debut at 
Symphony Hall in a 1970 performance 
of Beethoven's Ninth Symphony, and 
has since taken part in concert directed 
by William Steinberg, Seiji Ozawa, Eu- 
gene Ormandy, Colin Davis, Arthur 
Fiedler, and Michael Tilson Thomas. 
Members of the chorus come from the 
Greater Boston area and from all walks 
of life, and they rehearse throughout 
the year. The Chorus's first appearance 
on records, in the Boston Symphony's 
Damnation of Faust, conducted by Seiji 
Ozawa, was nominated for a Grammy 




as the best choral recording of the 
year. Their most recent appearance 
with the BSO was last week in Berlioz's 
Requiem, Seiji Ozawa conducting. 



Sopranos 

Margaret Aquino 
Cynthia Armstrong 
Deborah London Berg 
Marie-Christine Casey 
Susan Chapman 
Margo Connor 
Susan R. Cook 
Lou Ann David 
Kathrin Davidovich 
Rebecca Flewelling 
Yvonne Frazier 
Marilyn L. Haskel 
Alice Honner 
Beth Howard 
Frances Kadinoff 
Carole Stevenson Kane 
Vivian LaMorder 
Barbara Levy 
Joyce Lucia 

Virginia Lambert Mason 
Betsy Moyer 
H. Diane Norris 
Joan Pernice 
Nancy Peterson 
Gail Ransom 
Rhonda Rivers 
Judith L. Rubenstein 
Barbara A. Scales 
Bette L. Snitzer 
Ann K. Staniewicz 



Jane Stein 
Janet Wade 
Pamela Wolfe 

Altos 

Mary Bennett 
Skye Burchesky 
Anne Butler 
Bette Carey 
Doris Halvorson Coe 
Elizabeth H. Colt 
Mary Crowe 
Mary Curtin 
Catherine Diamond 
Ann Ellsworth 
June Fine 
Roberta A. Gilbert 
Thelma Hayes 
Donna Hewitt 
Beth Holmgren 
Karol Hommen 
Leah Jansizian 
Alison D. Kohler 
Dorothy Love 
Sharron J. Lovins 
Nina Saltus 
Frances Schopick 
Janet Shapiro 
Amy Wing Sheridan 
Lynne Stanton 
Nancy Stevenson 



Laurie Stewart 
Florence A. St. George 
Lisa Tatlock 
Kathi Tighe 
Susan Watson 
Maria E. Weber 
Mary J. Westbrook 

Tenors 

Antone Aquino 
Kent E. Berwick 
Paul Blanchard 
Sewell E. Bowers, Jr. 
Richard Breed 
Albert R. Demers 
Paul Foster 
Robert Greer 
Dean A. Hanson 
Wayne Henderson 
James P. Hepp 
Jeffrey Hoffstein 
Richard P. Howell 
Peter Krasinski 
Gregg Lange 
Henry L. Lussier, Jr. 
Jack Maclnnis 
Al Newcomb 
Ray Parks 
Peter D. Sanborn 
Robert W. Schlundt 
William Severson 



John Smith 
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Basses 

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Mitchell Brauner 
Neil Clark 
John W. Ehrlich 
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Carl D. Howe 
Daniel J. Kostreva 
Paul Kowal 
Henry Magno, Jr. 
Martin Mason 
Jim Melzer 
Frank G. Mihovan 
John P. Murdock 
Jules Rosenberg 
Peter Rothstein 
Andrew Roudenko 
Vladimir Roudenko 
Robert Schaffel 
Frank Sherman 
Richard M. Sobel 
Douglas Strickler 
Jean Renard Ward 
Nathaniel Watson 
Pieter Conrad White 
Robert T. Whitman 
Howard J. Wilcox 



38 







One of Soviet Georgia's senior citizens thought 

Dannoh was an excellent yogurt. She ought to know. 

She's been eating yogurt for 137 years. 



CAMACHICH KVITZINIA PHOTOGRAPHED IN ATRARA. SOVIET GEORGIA 



39 





William Gibson 



George Humphrey 




Robert Karol 




Farewell and thanks 

Five members of the 

Boston Symphony are leaving the 

orchestra at the end of 

the season that concludes with these 

concerts. They are trombonist 
William Gibson, who joined in 1955, 

violists George Humphrey and 

Robert Karol, who joined in 1934 and 

1950 respectively, bass player 

Henry Portnoi, who joined in 1943, 

and principal second violinist 

Victor Yampolsky, who joined in 1973. 




Victor Yampolsky 



51 

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41 



DAYS 
IN THE 

r\l\ 1 ^/ a cooperative 
venture of the Boston Symphony Or- 
chestra and the Boston Public Schools, 
is designed to give middle school students 
from the city and three suburban com- 
munities an all-encompassing arts and 
integration experience. Funded by the 
Massachusetts Department of Education, 
Bureau of Equal Educational Opportunity, 
the program offers 50 children weekly 
over a seven week period the opportunity 
to spend five days at Tanglewood. By 
utilizing the cultural and natural re- 
sources of the Berkshires, the participants 
share a variety of unique and meaning- 
ful activities: a rehearsal and concert at 
Tanglewood, instrument demonstrations 
by members of the Boston Symphony 
and the Berkshire Music Center, a dance 
workshop at Jacob's Pillow, trips to the 
Clark Institute, Chesterwood, Rockwell 
Museum, Berkshire Garden Centre, at- 
tendance at a theatrical performance or 
dance concert, as well as sports and 
swimming daily. In addition, the young- 
sters take part in small informal art 



THE 
OLD CORNER HOUSE 



&i/% 




Paintings by 

NORMAN ROCKWELL 

On permanent exhibit 

Open Year Round — Daily 10-5 p.m. 

Except Tuesdays 

Adults $1.00 Children 25« 



workshops, led by members of the Days 
in the Arts staff, each of whom has 
expertise in some area of the arts. 

The key to the great success of the 
program has been two-fold: a low-key 
exposure to the arts as a part of a 
typical day's experiences, and the mag- 
nificent physical and aesthetic attributes 
of Tanglewood and the Berkshires. 




I 
I 
I 

I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
L 



IF YOU ENJOYED THE CONCERT, 

YOU SHOULD BE READING HIGH FIDELITY. 

Tanglewood music lovers also enjoy their music at home. They find 
High Fidelity magazine an indispensible aide for record collecting. 
Each issue contains test reports, record reviews and exciting fea- 
ture articles. 



If you're a regular at live performances, buy the Musical America 
version of High Fidelity and get 40 extra pages of news, reviews 
and reports on live music events all over the world— 

HIGH FIDELITY, dept. D7T, 1 sound ave., marion, ohio 43302 




D Payment enclosed 

D OK. II take High Fidefty at the special Tanglewood 
offer of 12 issues for $4.87 (regularly $8.95.) 



G Bill me 

D I'm a live performance buff. Send me 12 issues of 
the Musical America edition for $9— a savings of 
$9 off the regular price. 



NAME. 



STREET. 



.APT. 



CITY. 



.STATE. 



.ZIP. 



OR: Enter your High Fidelity order by calling, toll free, (800) 247-2160. 



D7T 



42 



Hove a 

face to face 

folk with 

Elizabeth Grady 




Introducing our new half hour 
maintenance rrearmenr for young 
normal healthy skin only $10 

Our regular one hour facial pore 
cleansmgs srill only S 1 7. 50. 

Never a chcrge for consultation/ 
skin analysis. Call Ms. Grady for an 
appointment 536-4447. 39 Newbury 
Street Doston. 



ELIZABETH 
GB4DY 

K FACE FIRST > 



QatewSyg Imi 

and tfggtau&nt 



637-2532 
Reservations Preferred 



1 Walker St. 
Lenox, Ma 



In the Heart of Lenox 

Serving Breakfast 

Lunch, Dinner & Late Supper 

Especially Prepared for You 

by Internationally Renowned 

Chef-Owner, Gerhard Schmid 

Cafe Hour on the Terrace 

Throughout the Tanglewood Season 

Cocktail Lounge Ample Free Parking 




Joseph Silverstein conducts 

The Boston University 
Symphony Orchestra 

in Boston and Berlin 

"A shouting ovation and six returns 

to the stage. . ." 

Paul Moor 

The Boston Globe (from Berlin) 

This two- record stereo album captures the 
Silver Medal-winning performance of the 
only American orchestra invited to compete 
in the Herbert von Karajan Festival of 
Student Orchestras last season in Berlin, 
Germany. 

Selections include works performed by the 
92-piece orchestra in Berlin as well as at 
Symphony Hall, Boston, just prior to 
departure. 

Franz Joseph Haydn Symphony No 96 
in D major 

Richard Wagner Prelude to Die 
Meistersinger von Nurnberg 

Norman Dello Joio Meditations on 

Ecclesiastes for String Orchestra 
Bela Bartok Concerto for Orchestra 
Available in limited edition, $795 

7b order, write Boston University School 
for the Arts 
Department A 

855 Commonwealth Avenue 
Boston. Massachusetts 
02215 

Make checks payable to Boston University 
(Mail orders add 75? for postage and 
handling) 



43 



We are grateful to the Berkshire County businesses 

listed below for giving generously to help support 

Tanglewood and the Berkshire Music Center. 

Colin MacFadyen and Ashley Smith 

Co -Chairmen for Business Support 



Business Contributions 
and Pledges 

Abdalla's Elm Street Mkt. 
Adam's Laundry 
Adam's Supermarket 
Alice's at Avaloch 
ALNASCO 
Arcadian Shop 
Arnold Print Works 
ASCAP 
John Astore 
Astro Beef 

A. W. Baldwin Co. 
Baldwin Piano 

Bardwell, D'Angelo, 

Bowlby Insurance 
Barnbrook Antiques 
Nat Beacco 
Ben's Shop 
Berkmatics Inc. 
Berkshire Aviation 

Enterprises 
Berkshire Bank 

and Trust 
Berkshire Beef 
Berkshire 

Broadcasting Co. 
Berkshire County 

Agency — Berkshire 

Life 
Berkshire County 

Savings Bank 
Berkshire Eagle 
Berkshire Frosted Foods 
Berkshire Gas Co. 
Berkshire Hardware 
Berkshire Hills Regional 

School District 

Berkshire Life Insurance 

Berkshire Paper Co. 

Berkshire Plate Glass Co. 

Berkshire Press, Inc. 

Berkshire Traveller 
Press 

BESSE — CLARKE 
Birchard Buick 
Bland Electric 
The Book Store 
Boosey and Hawkes 
Braun's Package Store 
C. T. Brigham 

Paper Products 
Brothership 

Clothing, Inc. 
Business Services 

for Medicine 
Butler Wholesale 

Products 
Butternut Basin 
Cain, Hibbard & 

Myers, Esq. 

B. Caligari and Son 
Camp Lenox 
Camp Mahkeenac 
Carr Hardware 

and Supply Co. 

Childs and Bishop 

Floor Covering 



City Savings Bank' 
The Clark-Aiken Co. 
Clearwater 

Natural Foods 
Colt Insurance Agency 
Country Curtains 
Cramer Construction 
Crane and Co. 
Curtel Corp. 
D. E. Dapson 

Optician, Inc. 
Davis and Norton, Inc. 
Deacon Cook House 

Antiques 
Dee's Department Store 
Dery Funeral Home 
Dettinger Lumber Co. 
Different Drummer 
Dresser-Hull Co. 
Eastover 

East Lee Steak House 
Eaton Paper Co. 
1888 Shop 
Edward Karam 

Insurance 
Elaine's Specialty Shop 
Elise Farar 
England Bros. 
Exeter Dental 

Laboratory 
First Agricultural Bank 
First Albany Corp. 
Flying Cloud Inn 
Folklorica 

Friendly Ice Cream Corp. 
Gateways Restaurant 
General Electric 
Giftos Bros. 
Girrardi 

Distributors, Inc. 
Graphic Arts 
Guitian Realty 
J. W. Gull Oil & Coal 
Hagyard Pharmacy 
Hall's Auto Service 
Hellawell 

Cadillac -Oldsmobile 
David Herrick, Inc. 
High Fidelity/ 

Musical America 
High Lawn Farm 
Hoff's Mobil 
Holiday Inn 
Household Finance 
Howard Johnson's 
Ida and John's 
Isgood Realty 
IT AM Lodge #564 
Joe's Diner 
H. A. Johansson 
J. H. Johnson & Sons 
Johnson 

Lincoln-Mercury 
Katherine Meagher 

Dress Shop 
Kaufman Bros. 



Kelly- Dietrich, Inc. 

Kelly Fun House 

Kelly Funeral Home 

Kimberly-Clark 

William T. Lahart & Son 

Laurel Hill Motel 

Lee Audio 

Lee Ford 

Lee High School 

Lee Lime 

Lee National Bank 

Lee News 

Lee Pizza 

Lee Savings Bank 

Lenox Memorial 

High School 
Lenox National Bank 
Lenox Oil Co. 
Lenox Package Store 
Lenox Savings Bank 
Lenox Twin Maples 
Lenoxdale Package 

Store 
Ella Lerner Gallery 
Loeb's Foodtown 
Luau Hale Restaurant 
Colin MacFadyen 
Massachusetts 

Purchasing Group 
James H. Maxymillian 
McClellan Drug 
McCormick & Toole 

Insurance Agency 
Mead Corporation 
Miller Supply 
Minkler Insurance 
Mohawk Beverages, Inc. 
Mole & Mole 
Morgan Grampian 
Morgan House 
Morpheus Arms Motel 
Nejaime's 
North Adams Hoosac 

Savings Bank 
North Adams 

Transcript 
Oak 'n Spruce 
O'Connell 

Chevrolet, Inc. 
The Old Corner House 
J. T. Owens Apparel for 

Men & Boys 
Parker Tours, Inc. 
Penny Saver 
Pete's Chrysler Plymouth 
Petricca Construction 
Pittsfield Agency of 

Berkshire Life 

Pittsfield Co-operative 
Bank 

Pittsfield National Bank 
Pittsfield Supply 
Pleasant Valley Motel 
Prudential Lines, Inc. 
Quincy Lodge 
The Record Store 
The Red Lion Inn 



Research and 

Action, Inc. 
The Restaurant 
Reynolds, Barnes and 

Hebb, Inc. 
A. H. Rice Co. 
Rising Paper Company 
Robinson Leech 

Associates 
Rogers Jewelry 
Rose Agency & 

Tucker Assoc. 
D. O. Ruffer, Inc. 
Samel's Deli 
Sears, Roebuck and Co. 
Seven Hills 
Seven Arts Antiques 
Shaker's Food Store 
Shandoff's 

W. H. Shedd & Son, Inc. 
Shire Shop 

Smith's Rent-Alls, Inc. 
Jeffrey J. Sosne 
Sound of Music 
South Adams 
Savings Bank 

Southern Berkshire 

Chamber of 

Commerce 
Sprague Electric 

Company 
Stanley Home Products 
Steven's Inc. 
Stevenson & Co., Inc. 
Stockbridge Chamber of 

Commerce 
Stockbridge Fuel 

and Grain 
Stockbridge 

Pharmacy, Inc. 
The Stockpot 
Sunset Motel 
Swiss Chalet 
The Talbots, Inc. 

Town and Country 

Motor Lodge 
Union Federal Savings 
U. S. Components, Inc. 
Vee Records 
The Village Inn 
Vlada Boutique 
Warner Cable 
WBEC, Inc. 
WCRB, Inc. 
West Stockbridge 

Enterprises, Inc. 
Wheeler & Taylor, Inc. 
Wheeler's Package Store 
White Hart Inn 
William Henry Inn 
Williams & Sons 

Country Store 
Williamstown National 

Bank 
Winard Advertising 

Agency, Inc. 
Yankee Motor Lodge 
Yellow Aster, Inc. 



44 




Isaac Witkin, sculptor 

Selections from Isaac Witkin's Spill Series, 
sculpture created with the molten overflow of 
industrial steel, may be seen at the Glass House, 
Tanglewood's exhibition room, located at the 
Main Gate. 

Isaac Witkin was born in Johannes- 
burg, South Africa, in 1936 and moved 
to England in 1956. From 1957 to 1960 
he studied with the English sculptor 
Anthony Caro at St. Martin's School of 
Art in London. He has since been assis- 
tant to Henry Moore and has taught at 
St. Martin's School of Art, Maidstone 
College of Art in Kent, Ravensbourn 
School of Art, and Parsons School of 
Design in New York City. He has pre- 
sented his works in one-man and group 
exhibitions in Europe, Australia, and 
America, and is now represented by the 
Marlborough Gallery in New York. 
Currently he is on leave of absence from 
his position of artist-in-residence at Ben- 
nington College in Vermont to organize 
a state-sponsored sculptors' workshop 
in Binghamton, New York. 



What's 
Happening 

in the 

Derkshires? 

Phone Toll- Free 

and Find Out! 



Things to do today - exhibits, arts, music, 
theatre, ballet, garden shows, special tours, 
all the current events in the Berkshires. 



SOUTHERN BERKSHIRES 

528-2677 

From Great Barnngton, \ 

Sheffield. West Stockbndge 



CENTRAL BERKSHIRES NORTHERN BERKSHIRES 

607-2677 662-2677 




From Stockbndge. Lee 
Lenox. PrrtsfiekJ 



From Wilhamstown 
Adams. North Adams 



A service of the Berkshire Vacation Bureau 
205 West St., Pittsfield, Mass. 

(A Division of the Berkshire Hills Conference) 



UXLoaaas {JuruttveAJL/ ijwLicujLe& 



Route 57 



Tolland, Mass. 



Telephone 413 - 258-4538 

A wide selection of antiques ranging 

from furniture, china and paintings. 

We also feature an extensive 

collection of primitive art 

from New Guinea. 

Open by appointment every day 
except Sunday. 



45 



The Berkshire Music Center 



"One more thing should come from this scheme, 
namely, a good honest school of musicians." 

— Henry Lee Higginson, on founding the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra. 

The late Serge Koussevitzky fervent- 
ly shared Henry Lee Higginson's vision 
of a "good honest school for musicians" 

— an academy where young musicians 
could extend their artistic training and 
broaden their experience under the 
guidance of eminent professionals. 
More than any other person, it was 
Koussevitzky who made the vision a 
reality; he was Director of the Berkshire 
Music Center from its founding in 1940 
until his death in 1951, and his vigorous 
leadership has remained an inspiring 
example in the years since. 

Serge Koussevitzky was succeeded by 
Charles Munch, and it is a mark of the 
Center's success that the Boston Sym- 
phony's present Music Director, Seiji 
Ozawa, studied here during the Munch 
era. Alumni of the Center are among 
the most prominent and active mem- 
bers of the music world; more than ten 
percent of the members of this country's 
major orchestras are graduates of the 
Center, as are many of the world's 
notable conductors, instrumental solo- 
ists and singers. 

Today the primary responsibility for 
the Center's direction is in the hands of 
Gunther Schuller, composer, writer, 
conductor and President of the New 
England Conservatory until June 1977. 
Average enrollment is somewhat over 
400 each summer, of which approxi- 
matelyl40 are members of the Center's 
Fellowship Program; this provides free 
tuition (and in many cases free board 
and expenses) for instrumentalists, 
singers, conductors and composers of 
post-graduate calibre. In addition to the 
Fellowship Program, Boston University, 
through its Tanglewood Institute, offers 
several college-credit programs for tal- 
ented high school musicians; the noted 
soprano Phyllis Curtin directs a singers' 
seminar highlighted by her own master 
classes. Finally, each summer the Cen- 
ter's Festival of Contemporary Music 
(August 13-17 this year), presented in 

46 



cooperation with the Fromm Music 
Foundation at Harvard, offers a broad 
spectrum of the most advanced music of 
today's composers in a gala week of 
performances. 

The Boston Symphony's Concert- 
master and Assistant Conductor Joseph 
Silverstein heads a faculty that includes 
principal players and members of the 
Orchestra and faculty members of Bos- 
ton University's School of Fine Arts, 
plus leading soloists, conductors and 
composers. The Center has numerous 
studios for practice and chamber music, 
and an extensive library of music litera- 
ture and scores. Rehearsals and con- 
certs of the Berkshire Music Center 
Orchestra and other student groups 
take place mostly in the Theatre- 
Concert Hall, while lectures, seminars, 
conducting classes, vocal and choral re- 
hearsals, composers' forums and cham- 
ber music concerts take place in the 
Chamber Music Hall, in the West Barn, 
in the Hawthorne Cottage, on the Re- 
hearsal Stage, and in the small studios 
both on the Tanglewood grounds and in 
buildings leased in Lenox. Each summer 
the Baldwin Piano and Organ Company 
generously provides over 100 keyboard 
instruments for individual practice; 
other instruments — percussion, for ex- 
ample — are provided by the Orchestra. 

The Boston Symphony is assisted in 
supporting the Center by the National 
Endowment for the Arts, a Federal 
agency, as well as by individual and 
corporate sponsors. Scholarships are 
awarded to the majority of the students, 
who are chosen by audition on a com- 
petitive basis. The cost of the scholar- 
ship program is large and adds sub- 
stantially to the Orchestra's yearly 
deficit — one major reason for the estab- 
lishment of the Friends of Music at 
Tanglewood, a group that provides 
critical support for the Center. A brief 
account of members' privileges is printed 
on page 41, and more information may 
be had at the Friends' Office near the 
Main Gate. We invite you to see and 
hear foryourself the remarkable calibre 
of the Center's young musicians. 



The Friends of Music 
At Tanglewood 

Membership provides you with exciting 

opportunities and privileges all year long, 

It's the secret buy of the Berkshires! 



Free Berkshire Music 
Center Concerts: 

There are over 40 concerts each sum- 
mer performed by the members of the 
Berkshire Music Center, the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra's summer academy 
for the advanced study of music. These 
outstanding mid-week concerts include 
chamber music recitals, full orchestra 
concerts, vocal and choral programs, 
and the annual Festival of Contem- 
porary Music, Tanglewood's "festival 
within a festival." Friends Concert 
Memberships for individuals and 
families are available for $25.00. 

Advance program information and 
ticket ordering forms: 

Approximately one month before the 
public sale of seats in the early spring, 
Friends will be sent the advance Berk- 
shire Festival programs and a priority 
ticket application. Friends will also re- 
ceive the monthly Boston Symphony 
Orchestra publication, BSO. 



Tent Membership: 

The Tanglewood Tent, available to con- 
tributors of $75 and over, provides a 
hospitable gathering place behind the 
Music Shed where food and drink may be 
purchased on concert days. Hot buffet 
dinners are served on Saturday evenings 
beginning at 6:30 p.m. (Reservations 
must be made through the Friends 
Office no later than the Thursday after- 
noon preceding each Saturday 
evening buffet.) 

Special parking for Friends: 

Two convenient reserved parking areas 
are available to all donors of $150 or 
more for all Boston Symphony Orches- 
tra concerts: either the Box Parking Lot 
(Hawthorne Street entrance), or the 
Tent Parking Lot (West Street entrance). 

For information, contact: 
Friends of Music at Tanglewood 
Lenox, Ma. 01240 
(413) 637-1600 



i in: •: vi. 1. 1-: iti a 



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47 



We Curtis Hotel 

Food & Lodging 
LENOX, 637-0016 



A BOOK "TO DO" NOT 
"JUST TO READ" 




A BERKSHIRE SOURCEBOOK 



Your personal guide to Berkshire County: 
its history, geography and major land- 
marks. Available at area bookstores and 
gift shops for just $ 2.95. Published by The 
Junior League of Berkshire County, Inc. 



DELI -SHOP 

SANDWICHES • CATERING 
TAKE OUT SERVICE 

115 Elm Street. Pittsfteld. Massachusetts. 
Tel. 442-5927 

Featuring Hot Pastrami & Hot Corned Beef 

Sandwiches 

Hebrew (National Delicatessen • Rolls & Bagels 
baked daily • Imported & Domestic cheeses 

• Lox & smoked fish • Barbecued chicken 

• Fresh made salads • Party Platters 

Open Daily 8 to 6 



The new home of 
the world famous 
Alices Restaurant 



WILL 



"HE 

AMSVILLE- 

INN 




8 >34*M?Sfc 



A fine, small inn featuring 
superb Country French Cuisine 

LUNCH* DINNER 
Light Supper After Tanglewood 

Rte. 41 , between W. Stockbridge 
and Gt. Barrington 

Reservations Recommended by 

413-274-6580 INN PERSPECTIVE 




AT AVflLOCH 



Breakfast • Brunch 

• Lunch • Dinner 

• Late Supper • Cocktail Lounge 

• Entertainment • MOTEL 

• tennis • pool 

across the road from Tanglewood 
rte. 183 Lenox 637-0897 



The Sunshine Stage, 

HolHston Theatre, Route 183, 
Lenox, Mass. 01240. Tel. 413-637-0534. 

Year-round professional regional theatre featuring 
plays, films and children's theatre. Cafe on prem- 
ises Frank Bessell. Artistic Director. 



THECLOTHESLOFT 

"Fine Sportswear Outlet" 

179 Main Street, Great Barrington 
164 North Street, Pittsfield 



i ' 

I "a little jewel in the Berkshires" C*Sap <!^fi>a<i.iarA//M')rfli 

(413)243-0181 or 637-2644 

at Comfortable rooms, good food and drink in 
TT a country atmosphere. 

Open Daily Lunch & Dinner 
^^^ Tony Ferrelli Innkeeper 



-tcT 



Accommodations for private parties. We J* M 
cater to parties, banquets and social 
gatherings. Orders to take out. 

Chinese Polynesian Restaurant 

LENOX. MASS. For Reservations 
(413)443-4745 

Open Daily 1 1 30 'til 10 pm. Fn & Sat til 1 am 




^IdStonemiUforp 



Route 8, Grove St., Adams, Ma. 

HANDPRINT WALLPAPER 

Factory Outlet 

OpenMon-Fri 10-4, Sat 9-1 2:30 




frlfefITLH(aL 

9 FANTASY MAN 
Food, drink, lodging. Live music week 
ends. After concert, a 10 minute 
walk from the Lion's Gate. 



WHEATLE1GH 637-0610 



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^ BEAUTIFUL CLOTHES FOR 

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48 



WHY WAIT TO ENTER COLLEGE? 
SIMON'S ROCK EARLY COLLEGE 

Designed for the student who wishes to avoid the 

duplication of high school and college work 

Liberal Arts - B.A. and A. A. Degrees - Fully Accredited 

The interest of those who have completed the 10th or 11th 
grade of high school is invited 

Admissions Office 

Simon's Rock Early College 

Great Barrington, MA 01230 

Telephone: 413-528-0771 




Tanglewood 
Tradition 



Our outdoor Courtyard 
— colorfully abounding 
with Impatient plants— 
serves luncheons, 
dinners, snacks and 
drinks. Our indoor 
Lion's Den features sandwiches, 
drinks and live entertainment. 
Both are open till 1 a.m. Phone: 
413-298-5545. Route 7, Stockbridge, 
Massachusetts. Since 1773. 

'JS The Red Lion Inn 




Wjlliamstown 
Theatre festival 




Nikos Psacharopoulos 

Our 23rd Season Includes: 

Misalliance, Sherlock Holmes. Alter the Fall. 

Platonov and Learned Ladies 

June 30 - August 27 

Phone Reservations: 413-458-8146 
P.O. Box 517, Williamstown, Ma 02167 




If you'd like your own tote bag showijjgarpu 
support public broadcasting (other sttf&4fts the 
Channel 17 logo), cu>3nd send to; WMHT, 
Box 17, Schenectady, Ny 12301. 

HI $60 Sustaining Member 

□'■■^Regular Member 

— i 




Name 



Address 



City 



_ State 



Zip 



49 




Located in the Township of Becket, Mass. 

Norman Walker, Director 

Grace Badorek, Comptroller 

Donald Westwood, Promotional Director 



FIRST WEEK— July 5—9 
Eight Soloists from the 
Royal Danish Ballet 

SECOND WEEK- 
July 12—16 
Cultural Center of the 
Philippines Dance Co. 

(American debut 
of the Company) 

THIRD WEEK— July 19— 
Teodoro Morca 
(Flamenco in Concert) 
Jacob's Pillow Dancers, 
Classical Pas de Deux 

FOURTH WEEK — 

July 26—30 

Anne Marie DeAngelo 

and Lawrence Rhodes 

May O'Donnell 

Concert Dance Company 

Bhaskar (dances of India) 

FIFTH WEEK— August 2- 
Twyla Tharp 
Dancers and Dances 



23 



13 



SEVENTH WEEK— 

August 16—20 

Dennis Wayne's Dancers 

EIGHTH WEEK— 

August 23—27 

Contemporary Dancers 

of Winnipeg 

(United States debut 

of the Company) 

Joyce Cuoco & Youri Vamos 

Jacob's Pillow Dancers 

Special Added Event 
September 2—4 
Hartford Ballet 

Performances: Perform- 
ances are held Tuesday 
through Saturday, Curt- 
ain times: Tuesday, 
7:30 p.m., Wednesday, 
Friday and Saturday, 
6. 40 p.m., Thursday and 
Saturday Matinees: