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Full text of "California herald"

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SAN FRANCISCO 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 

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REFERENCE BOOK 

Not to be taken from the Library 



JiKtCIAL COLLECTION* 




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Official Publication of 
THE NATIVE DAUGHTERS of the GOLDEN WEST 




SEP1 EMBER, 1968 + 40<t 



THE OAKLAND BAY BRIDGE 



JUNIOR NDGW 
ACTIVITIES 

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<;oi Dl N POTF1 in I Nfl NO. 38 

The newly instituted Golden Pop- 
py Jr. Unit No. 38 of San Francisco 
is eagerly awaiting the Unit's first 
meeting in a regular meeting hall. 
Since its institution. June 5, the girls 
have been holding meetings in Ad- 
visor's homes and although they have 
accomplished B great deal at the home 
meetings and have made many plans 
for future events for their Unit, they 
are anxious to conduct regular meet- 
ings with officcrs's stations and per- 
form their floor work. 




Their meetings will be held the first 
Saturday of each month at the Native 
Sons Building, 414 Mason Street at 
1 p.m. At their first meeting in their 
hall they will initiate four members 
and will be very happy to initiate 
more if more applications are re- 
ceived. Golden Poppy Unit extends 
an invitation to the members of the 
Native Daughters to attend their 
meetings so that they can become 
better acquainted with the senior 
members of the Order and in turn, 
the senior members can get to know 
this fine Unit and observe the many 
activities they plan for their Unit's 
progress. 



EL CAMINO REAL 

Culminating their year of work, 
members of the History and Land- 
marks Committee of El Camino Real 
No. 324 attended the Santa Barbara 
Fiesta as special guests of PGP Eileen 
Dismuke. This is the second year 
they have attended in costume. 

Members of the committee are 
Marie Harrington, chairman and Ida 
Grossi, Audrey Hazelbusch, Esther 
Wilkinson, Bess Connor, Lyn Len- 
nox, Barbara Herman, Gloria Mel- 
lon, Helen Trammell and Carmen 
Miller. 



California Herald 

"PRESERVING THE PAST FOR THE FUTURE" 

Volume XVI September, 1968 Number 1 

CONTENTS THIS MONTH 

Junior NDGW Activities 2 

The Governor's Mansion, by Audrey D. Brown, PGP 3 

The Real Natives of California, by Clara M. Barton 4 

The Grand President's Corner 6 

The Weaver, by Sara L. Riley (Part II) 7 

Parlor News 8 

Junior Conference, by GT Marie C. Landini 12 

California Pioneers, by Addie Giles 13 

In Memoriam 13 

Watch for first installment of Leo's Dictionary in the October Issue. 




Sign of the Home that will stay young 

And so will the family that lives here, because the Medallion 
Home Emblem can mean gentle, whole-house electric heat- 
ing; a flameless, cool electric kitchen; and a readiness for the 
wonderful electric conveniences that are as near as tomorrow. 



J. J. FRIIS 
Publisher 



Southern California Edison 



leo j. Fans 

Editor 



JANE FRIIS 

Public Relations 



Published Monthly by J. J. Friis and Leo J. Friis, owners and publishers, Anaheim, 
California. All Rights Reserved. EDITORIAL AND GENERAL OFFICES: Anaheim, California. 
Mailing Address: P.O. Drawer 4243, Anaheim, California 92803. ADVERTISING OFFICE: 301 
N. Parton St., Santa Ana, Calif. 92701. CHANGE OF ADDRESS AND SUBSCRIPTIONS: Mail 
correspondence to CALIFORNIA HERALD, Circulation Department, P.O. Drawer 4243, Anaheim, 
Calif. 92803. When ordering change of address, please allow six weeks; please furnish 
old and new addresses including zip code. NDGW MEMBERS: please send Parlor Number 
also. POST OFFICE: RETURN REQUESTED. Please send magazine with address change 
to California Herald, P.O. Drawer 4243, Anaheim, California 92803. SUBSCRIPTION RATES: 
in U.S.A. (50 states), 40c a copy, 3.50 a year; $6.50 for two years; $8.25 for three years. 
Other countries: Please apply for rates. Entered as second-class matter at the Post Office at 
Anaheim, California, under the Act of March 3, 1879. No part of this magazine may be re- 
printed without specific permission. 

CALIFORNIA HERALD 



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ansion 



^TVhe Governor's Mansion, at 
HA 16th and H Streets, in Sacra- 
mento, was dedicated as California 
Registered Historical Landmark No. 
823 on August 10, 1968. 

This historic old home, which has 
been maintained by the State of Cali- 
fornia as a historical museum since 
Governor Reagan and family moved 
from it, was built by Albert Gallatin 
in 1877. The Sacramento Bee re- 
ported in December of that year that 
"This home is three stories high in 
addition to a brick basement, with 
an observatory above the third story, 
from which is afforded a magnificent 
view of the surrounding country. To- 
gether with its elegant grounds, a 
stylish stables, etc., when all are com- 
pleted this will prove to be one of 
the most imposing and attractive resi- 
dences in California. The building 
has 23 rooms of which eight are bed- 
rooms." 

Gallatin sold the home ten years 
later to Joseph Steffens. During the 
time that Governor Gage was in 
office, plans were made to either build 
or purchase a home for the governor 
of the state. However, it was not 
until 1903 that this residence was 
purchased from Steffens. Governor 
George C. Pardee and his family 
moved into the mansion in November 
of that year. The house was bought 
for $32,500 and an additional 
$35,000 was spent on furnishings 
and renovations. 

The following governors, in order 
of occupancy, have resided in the his- 
toric mansion: George C. Pardee, 
James N. Gillett, Hiram W. Johnson, 
William D. Stephens, Friend W. 
Richardson, Clement C. Young, 
James Rolph, Jr., Frank F. Merriam, 
Culbert L. Olson, Earl Warren, 
Goodwin J. Knight, Edmund G. 
"Pat" Brown, and Ronald Reagan. 

Several mariages took place in the 
mansion. Among these were Mrs. 
Randolph Zane (Barbara Stephens) 
who wed Dr. John N. Osburn in 
1921; Ruth Hilby married Warden 
Frank J. Smith in 1926 and Dorothy 
Olson who wed M. Bruce Benson 15 
years later. 

SEPTEMBER, 1968 



Si/ Audrey JZ>. ^rown, <?.£}.<?. 




Governor's Mansion at Sacramento; plaque marking it a Registered Histor- 
ical Landmark; principals in dedication, from left: Ray D. Hunter, Deputy 
Director of California Department of Parks and Recreation; PGP Audrey 
D. Brown, NDGW; PP Henry J. Lynch of Elk Grove Parlor 41, NSGW. 



The mansion was bombed in an 
attempt on Governor Stephens' life 
in 1917. Part of the building was 
wrecked in this episode. Governor 



Warren had the longest tenancy in 
the historic house, having resided 
there from 1943 to 1953. 

(Continued on Page 15) 

PAGE 3 



lsh& f^Z^ead sg / Vallves 



Ikivim; into the territory ot 
, the Redwoods Empire, one 
jffifr finds the road dipping into 
the eool and half-darkness of a series 
of groves of very tall and stately trees. 
The sun seems to pierce the gloom 
at times, turning the semi-darkness 
into long beams of light. 



These timeless giants, the Sequoias, 
are among the oldest living things on 
earth. No one knows when or where 
the first tree grew, but it is a known 
fact, that it was here long before Cal- 
ifornia began. The Sequoias grow 
in the center and northern part of 
the state and never alone. They stand 



in groves, large and small and many 
of which are far apart. Delightful 
camping sites have been established 
in many of them and each one has 
been given a name of some noted 
personage. Many of the tallest trees 
have been given titles. 

The countless layers within these 




Muir Redwoods 



CALIFORNIA HERALD 



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monarchs go arrowing high into the 
blue sky. The redwoods are indeed 
a triumph of nature, but unfortu- 
nately, they have become the pawns 
of man! The lumberman claimed to 
have needed its wood to construct 
homes, business buildings, furniture 
and numerous other constructions, 
but we who are native Californians 
will always resent hearing the axe as 
it fells these great and beloved trees, 
for truly, they are the "Kings of the 
Forests!" 

The coast redwood tree, known 
as the Sequoia Sempervirens, is said 
to be the tallest of all trees in exist- 
ence. It is always green, but unfor- 
tunately, it cannot be claimed as the 
largest or the oldest. This honor 
goes to its cousin, the Sierra Sequoia, 
or better known as Sequoia Gigantea 
(Great Tree). It is stronger in stature 
and has lived to be 5,000 years. 
However, the forests or groves of 
both redwoods have the same sing- 
ular resistance to termites, fire, 
shrinkage and the death defying 
storms. Many birds of every type 
have found a haven among the closely 
grown branches. 

John Muir once said, "As lumber, 
the coast redwoods were too good 
to live!" He became the founder and 
organizer of the Sierra Club, a lead- 
ing conservation and preservation or- 
ganization, and because of this, you 
will enter the beloved and well-known 
"John Muir Woods" which is an 
everlasting living mounument to that 
great man. 

When the Russians settled here in 
California in the 19th century, there 
were two million acres of coastal 
redwoods, but when men began to 
harvest them in 1852, those who 
loved the trees rebelled and planned 
at once to take some means in mak- 

SEPTEMBER, 1968 



ing the groves into parks. It seemed 
to be the only solution of keeping 
alive the remaining growth of the 
forests. It was in 1902 when the 
first park was proposed and actually 
realized. In 1918, several private 
citizens took it upon themselves to 
organize the state-wide "Save-the- 
Redwoods" League and during the 
half century, it had become more 
than successful in setting aside 
117,000 acres for the hundreds of 
state parks now in existence. But 
this was only the beginning of what 
was to come in a disastrous manner. 

The post-war housing boom felled 
many more trees under the axe men's 
tools. The lumberman decided to 
re-seed, but soon began to take an 
active interest in the various Parks 
throughout the northern part of the 
state. They too, were enjoying the 
shade of the Sequoia trees. They 
knew too, that the seedling planted 
would take many years to become 
timber. 

At this moment our senators and 
congressmen are making every effort 
to curtail the lumbermen's movements 
in destroying the trees in three dif- 
ferent sections where the groves are 
the thickest. These include Lost 
Man's Creek, Little Man's Creek and 
Mill Creek. Who were responsible 
for the naming of these three creeks 
is not known, but history reveals that 
Lost Man's Creek came into being, 
when a group of men, walking 
through the trees, found the body of 
a man who had undoubtedly become 
confused and lost. His clothes were 
ragged, his boots worn out and his 
water canteen empty. Little Man's 
Creek was named for a dwarf found 
wandering with a pack on his back, 
by a horseman. He died from the 
results of starvation soon after being 



found. Because a deserted mill was 
being inspected by some roving min- 
ers, it acquired that name. All three — 
Lost Man, Little Man and Mill Creek 
were found a very few feet from water 
filled creeks. The water from these 
streams seemed to have fed the trees' 
mammouth roots. Sixty-six thousand 
acres of groves were found on the 
sites of these three creeks and were 
immediately made into parks. 

Senator William Kent owned a 
vast acreage in Marin County. It 
included the center of Muir woods 
which with an appropriate ceremony, 
he presented it not only to the state, 
but to the nation and it is at this 
site, that the first picnic grounds were 
established. 

It is interesting to note that the 
tallest and one of the oldest trees 
stands 367 feet from the base of the 
trunk to its very top-most tip. This 
King of the Forests is located at Lost 
Man's Creek and it has become a 
beloved member of the true "Natives 
of California". 

If the full range of the redwoods 
is not preserved there will be a chap- 
ter missing and it will take another 
century to find out what that chapter 
might have been. 

At this writing, the largest National 
Park in the United States is being 
contemplated by members of both 
the Sierra Club and the Save-the- 
Redwoods League. It will take in 
all the groves, after the so-called 
"Tall Trees" have become noticeable 
for their timber. The lumbermen are 
meeting their match with the two or- 
ganizations who are striving to save 
all that remains of our California 
trees, under whose shade our out- 
of-state visitors have come to enjoy 
and gaze in wonder at what the state 
has to offer in the way of greatness. 



The Grand 
President's Corner 

HAZEL T. MALLETTE 



(.K WD PR1 SII1KNT 

Hazel r Mallette (Mrs, Bveral A.) 
45 Dunstonc Drive 
Oroville, California 95965 



(,R \NI) SI-CRFTARY 

Mar) I Mahoney (Mrs. Herbert J.) 

OflRce: 703 Market Street, Room 612 

San Francisco 94103 Dial 362 4127 
Res: 4125 Lincoln Way 

San Francisco 94122 



Vacation time is over! The chil- 
dren are back in school and the 
mothers are sighing with relief, and 
r e v, onder where the past few weeks 
have gone. 

It has been a busy time. We've 
participated in the birthday celebra- 
tion of San Francisco, the Commo- 
dore Sloat Memorial Ceremony in 
Monterey, a picnic in honor of Vet- 
erans at the Home in Yountville, the 
famous Santa Barbara Fiesta, dedi- 
cation of the Governor's Mansion in 
Sacramento, the birthday celebration 
of Sacramento at Sutter's Fort, dedi- 
cation in Oroville of the pioneer 
Braselton family home, presented the 
Roll of Honor to Alice Perry at our 
first official visit; the privilege of pre- 
senting a 12 by 18 foot California 
Bear Flag to the fabulous new ABC 
Marineworld in Redwood City on be- 
half of the NDGW; an outstanding 
day at Cal-Expo and the presentation 
of a cooler blanket to the winner of 
our first NDGW horse race there; 
the beautiful Admission Day parade 
and activities in Santa Rosa and Oak- 
land, even to the famous Tiki Luau 
in San Gabriel! Now it is time to 
settle down to our official visits and 
the pleasure of greeting all of you 
in your Parlors, renewing old friend- 
ships and of making new acquaint- 
ances. 

It is my hope to emphasize our 
California History and Landmark 
program so we may preserve the rich 
heritage that surrounds us. The Art 
Talent Committee will receive special 
attention in the effort to tie our gen- 
erations together and to give it the 
importance I feel it deserves. It is 
my wish to stablize our membership 
through a lapsation program to be 
presented by the Extension of the 



Order Committee, emphasizing re- 
newal of membership by those who 
have resigned or have been sus- 
pended. However, in no way, will 
our many other programs be ne- 
glected. 

I sincerely thank the Parlors for 
the many invitations to attend their 
installations. I only wish it had been 
possible to be with each and every 
one of you and to greet the corps of 
officers who will be serving our Order 
this coming term. My best wishes for 
an outstanding and progressive year. 

The Parlor bulletins are also appre- 
ciated. It gives us the insight into 
the activities and projects of the Par- 



lors — also the "Chit-chat"! 

It is an honor and privilege to serve 
our beloved Order and to be a rep- 
resentative of our members. To the 
principles of our Order — Love of 
Home, Devotion to our Flag, Vener- 
ation of the Pioneers and Abiding 
Faith in the Existence of God — I 
pledge myself. My heartfelt thank- 
you for allowing me to serve as your 
Grand President. May God grant 
me the wisdom to fulfill the obliga- 
tion which you have entrusted to me. 

In parting, remember, keep Cali- 
fornia's beauty and history foremost 
in the nation and in a little corner of 
your heart. 



ITINERARY 1968 

SEPTEMBER 

3 Laurel No. 6, Sierra Pines No. 275, Manzanita No. 29 .... Grass Valley* 

4 Columbia No. 70 (afternoon) French Corral* 

6 Alameda County Admission Day Dinner Dance 

9 Admission Day Parade Santa Rosa 

11 Olivia No. 309 Corning* 

14 NSGW - NDGW Tournament of Roses Tiki San Gabriel 

16 Plumas Pioneer No. 219 Quincy* 

17 Nataqua No. 152, Susanville No. 243 Susanville* 

18 Naomi No. 36 Downieville* 

21 Berkeley No. 150 (afternoon) Berkeley* 

23 EscholNo. 16 Napa* 

24 Centennial No. 295 Paradise* 

26 Eltapome No. 55 Weaverville* 

28 Childrens Foundation Luncheon Sacramento 

28 Soledad Pioneer Tea Soledad 

29 Soledad Fiesta 

OCTOBER 

1 Eschscholtzia No. 112 Etna* 

3 Mount Lassen No. 215, Alturas No. 159 Alturas* 

8 San Diego No. 208, Ilia M. Knox No. 320, 

Las Flores del Mar No. 301 Oceanside* 

9 Toluca No. 279, San Fernando Mission No. 280, 

El Camino Real No. 324 Granada Hills* 

11-12-13 NDGW Junior Conference Anaheim 

14 Santa Ana No. 235, Grace No. 242, Silver Sands No. 286 .... Santa Ana* 

16 Donner No. 193, Byron* 

18 Ruby No. 46, Princess No. 84, San Andreas No. 113 .... San Andreas* 
20 Mariposa No. 63, (afternoon) Mariposa* 

22 Dardanelle No. 66, Golden Era No. 99, Anona No. 164 .... Jamestown* 

23 Camp Far West No. 218, Marysville No. 162, Marysville* 

24 Fern No. 123, San Juan No. 315 Carmichael* 

26-27 Grand Officers Meeting San Francisco 

29 Ursula No. 1, Forrest No. 86, Chispa No. 40 lone* 

Asterisks mark Official Visits 

CALIFORNIA HERALD 



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Checks in almost like amount went 
to the Native Daughters' Home for, 
as we remembered the very young, 
we also remember the not-so-young. 
Here our threads are in tones of sil- 
very gray. 

Admission Day has always been 
a time of celebration for California's 
sons and daughters. For the Septem- 
ber 9, 1927 parade, Liberty Parlor 
planned to enter a float. For many 
weeks busy fingers created paper pop- 
pies enough to completely cover the 
20 foot boat and mast. Loads of 
second growth feathery asparagus 
greens were hauled from the delta 
to cover the under-pinnings. 

The boat, complete with grizzly 
bear on the prow and flags unfurling 
in the breeze, was hitched to a tractor 
almost obscured by the banner — 
Liberty Parlor No. 213, Elk Grove. 
Eighteen comely women attired in 
white with gold scarves and sailor-boy 
duck hats stepped jauntily into the 
boat on Front Street, Sacramento. 
But before the float had gone two 
blocks and had even taken its place 
in the line of march, a policeman un- 
ceremoniously waved the barque to 
the curb just before the mast engaged 
the overhead tension wires. 

The disappointment slapped as 
hard as any tidal wave. The tractor 
driver sent a bill for $14.50, but since 
they'd never entered the parade, the 
sailor girls refused to pay. Back came 
a letter saying, "Pay or be sued". 
The Parlor countered with the threat 
of legal counsel. As far as I could 
read, no further mention was made 
of the incident. The sisters evidently 
stuck to their guns, or oars in that 
case, and paddled out of stormy seas 
into calm waters. We have entered 
many parades since, and have won 
blue ribbons and trophies, but no 
float is as well remembered as the 
one that rivaled, "Mutiny on the 
Bounty". 

SEPTEMBER, 1968 



The red threads in the tapestry 
here may be for battle or enthusiasim, 
I cannot say. 

Revering our Pioneer Heritage, we 
take pride in marking places of his- 
toric value. Here the weaver's thread 
is a rich russet as he recalls the days 
of hydraulic mining at Michigan Bar. 
Not so long ago, hundreds of miners 
became rich from the hidden gold 
they washed out of those red hills. 

Another marker and another 
thread, this one as white as the sifted 
flour it represents, made in the Shel- 
don grist mill, and then threads of 
gray are interwoven to remind pos- 
terity of the clouds of dust that trailed 
the stage coaches as they slowed to 
a stop at the Sloughouse station. 

For the Memorial Grove in Elk 
Grove Park, some threads of green 
are added as we pause to remember. 
To name them all would take too 
long, but a sturdy granite rock sup- 
porting a bronze tablet tells the story 



of each site marked. On Memorial 
Day, a wreath placed on the gate of 
the 9 cemeteries in the district says 
that Liberty Parlor cares. 

Both state and national Hags have 
been given to several schools in our 
district, and to the Elk Grove Junior 
Grange, a national flag was presented. 

On occasion, a Liberty Parlor 
member has given a welcoming ad- 
dress to a class of new citizens in 
Federal Court, as flags of their new 
homeland were presented. 

On January 24, 1947, a rister 
spoke in favor of sponsoring Doris 
M. Gerrish for a grand officer. The 
parlor realizing the sterling qualities 
of Doris knew she would bring honor 
to the Parlor, as well as stature and 
dignity to the Order. In announcing 
her candidacy, letters asking for en- 
dorsement were sent to all Parlors 
with the announcement printed on a 
bell-shaped card; the slogan "Lib- 
erty's Belle Rings True". Doris won 
in the election for Grand Outside 
Sentinel. 

This new effort gave Liberty Parlor 
the opportunity of close cooperation 
as it planned Teas, Receptions, and 
Inter-Parlor visits. Each Grand Par- 
lor saw Doris advance one stop closer 
to the highest gift of the Order. 
It was in the city by the Golden Gate, 
June 1955, that Doris M. Gerrish 
became the 69th Grand President of 
the Native Daughters of the Golden 
West, a crowning glory to the years 
of unstinted labors. To Liberty it was 
(Continued on page 8) 




IOOF Hall on Elk Grove Blvd., Elk 
met here 



Grove. Liberty Parlor No. 213 NDGW 
for 50 years. 



THE WEAVER . . . 
(Continued front Page 7) 

a privilege to be her home Parlor. 
Royal purple threads picture this 
achievement 

When the State took over the 
Homeless Children project, known 
better as the Slate Adoption Agency, 
a new ami wonderful project was 
born — namerj . " I he Children* s 
Foundation". 

I here is a vast group of children, 
who. when in need do not qualify 
for county or charitable aid, and 
whose parents' finances cannot be 
stretched to meet extended medical 
care. These are the children who 
may receive help from The Children's 
Foundation. If yon arc asked to buy 
a Native Daughter calendar you are, 
in fact, given the opportunity of help- 
ing a child receive medical care in 
some form. Silver threads speak of 
hope. 




Fiftieth anniversary of Elk Grove 
Parlor. Escort team, in pink satin 
formats, carried sprays of golden arti- 
ficial flowers. 



The white Bible on our altar to- 
night was the gift of the 15 charter 
members in 1954. 

When Victory Parlor No. 216, 
Courtland surrendered its charter in 
November, 1964, Liberty Parlor 
gained both materially and in mem- 
bership. A welcoming party was 
held in January, 1965. 

We point with pride to our latest 
project: the establishment of a schol- 
arship to an Elk Grove High School 
senior, who has exemplified good cit- 
izenship, and plans to major in any 
phase of history or government. To 
picture this activity directed toward 
the youth of our community, the pat- 



Parlor 
News 



tern is livened with shades of green 
for growth. 

Just before the tapestry is cut from 
the loom, the weaver adds threads 
of glittering gold telling of dreams 
come true. And so this story-telling 
tapestry, 50 years in the making, has 
been on view tonight. Because it is 
a story from our hearts, it is very 
precious to the members of Liberty 
Parlor. Through its colors bright and 
clear can be traced the path of the 
torch since 1918. Now, as then, the 
flame is fed by high principles, com- 
passion and work. 

To you, Golden Members, who led 
the way unfalteringly, may we again 
say "All Hail!" 



This address was given at the 
celebration of Liberty Parlor's 
Golden Anniversary. 



FORT BRAGG 

Fort Bragg No. 210 installed new 
officers for 1968-69 when members 
met at the I.O.O.F. Hall. Upon 
entering the hall, the guest book be- 
longing to Rae Ash and entitled My 
Year As President was arranged on 
a gold covered table with a bud vase 
containing two artificial satin roses 
of gold and orange and with a black 
plume pen and holder for all mem- 
bers and guests to sign. Rae Ash 
was installed as the new president 
of Fort Bragg Parlor along with her 
corps of officers. DGP Elaine Hen- 
derson was the installing officer as- 
sisted by Ellen Kosticke, Betty Carr, 

The escort drill team consisted of 
members, Mmes. Allenby, Bazor, 
Carr, Cauckwell, Goble, Harrison, 
King, Moretti, Nordeen and Valley. 
The new president was escorted 
through the drill team by her daugh- 
ter, La Rae Ash. Diana Frassi sang 
the "Hymn to California" accom- 
panied by Evelyn Ritchie. 

The new SDDGP Edith Goble was 
escorted to the altar and introduced. 



Guests were also introduced by the 
new president. 

President Rae presented Past Pres- 
ident Linda Valley with her past 
president's pin and Linda, in turn, 
presented a gift from the parlor to 
retiring DGP Elaine Henderson. 

During the meeting before instal- 
lation, Country Fair Chairman Zita 
Patton reported that the Country Fair 
will be September 28 at Kalcvala Hall 
and tickets are ready for each mem- 
ber to start to sell. Best of luck to 
both teams and a reminder to the 
members that the losing team will 
put on a pot luck and entertain the 
winning team. Civic Participation 
Chairman, Beva Empe announced a 
meeting of the Paul Bunyon Com- 
mittee for the Labor Day Celebra- 
tion. Parlor representatives are Rae 
Ash and Linda Valley. 

Delegates Rae Ash and Betty Carr, 
who attended Grand Parlor at River- 
side gave their reports. Rae was as- 
sistant Grand Marshal at Grand Par- 
lor. 

Refreshments were served after in- 
stallation by Dora Baroni and her 
committee. Sandwiches, coffee, punch 
and cake, decorated by member 
Marie Richard's mother, Edna Jack- 
son. The cake was beautifully dec- 
orated in detail, with the Native 
Daughter's emblem and the golden 
poppies of California. The table was 
arranged with yellow and gold mari- 
golds. Linda Valley won the prize 
package. 



Grace Parlor No. 242 held instal- 
lation of officers at the I.O.O.F. Hall 
in Fullerton. The president's colors 
of yellow and green predominated 
in the rose laden room. Posters with 
her theme "Take Time" surrounded 
the giant clock in the hall. 

Installed were President Vera 
Popov and her corps of officers: 
Mmes. Gerola, Durken, Furman, Von 
Gruenegan, Wrigglesworth, Bennett, 
Wood. Baxter, Hill, Bean, Hunt, 
D'Angelo, Fruits, Hadewig and Miss 
Doris Jacobsen. 

The chairman of the evening was 
Erma Watts with Marty Popov, 
daughter of the incoming president 
as Bible escort. Christine Dysinger 
was in charge of the guest book. 

DGP Evelyn Sherman of Whittier 
No. 298 and her corps of officers 
installed. Delivering the obligation 
was PGP Anna Schiebusch, Los An- 

CALIFORNIA HERALD 



fries No. 124; PGP Mary Harden, 
Californiantt No. 247, Grand Marshal 
and GT Gertrude Doss, Whittier No. 
298, organist. Laura Saunders sane 




GT Gertrude Doss 

"Hymn to California" accompanied 
by G. Emery Dysinger. Estrellas de 
Oro Unit No. 37 did a beautiful job 
of escort work carrying out the new 
president's theme. Special guest was 
GOS Laura Blosdale of Beverly Hills 
No. 289. 

Refreshments were served in the 
dining room which was also decorated 
in yellow and green. 



HISTORICAL MONUMENT 

On August 11a historical monu- 
ment and plaque was dedicated in 
memory of the Braselton family, at 
Garden Ranch marking the homesite 
of the family. 




Monument at Garden Ranch (Oro- 
ville). 

The last member of the family, 
Mrs. Minnie Braselton-Fahey, in her 
will bequeathed to the Butte County 
Pioneer Memorial Association, a 
monetary gift and the homesite. The 
parlor of their home is now estab- 
lished in the Pioneer Relic Building 
in Oroville. The original wall paper 
on the parlor walls has been trans- 
ferred there, together with the beau- 
tiful furniture in cut velvet, the fam- 
ily organ, and large framed photos 
of members of the family. 

SEPTEMBER, 1968 




From left; GT Betty Read Curilich, 
GM Irene Bondanza, GP Hazel Mal- 
let te, GVP Nancy Conens, GTs Mar- 
ian McGuire and Marie C. Landini. 

Among speakers at the dedication 
were Grand President Hazel Mallette, 
NDGW, who spoke on History and 
Landmarks and GS Fred Dissmeyer, 
NSGW. 

Other Grand officers present were 
GVP Nancy Conens, GM Irene Bon- 
danza, GTs Marian E. McGuire, 
Betty Curilich and Marie Landini; 
PGPs Jewel McSweeney and Flor- 
ence D. Boyle. 



Golden State" was carried out dur- 
ing the evening. A unusual presi- 
dent's gift was presented to outgoing 
president Maxine South. It was a 
large clown's head with dollar bills 
portraying the clown's head. It was 
in keeping with her theme "Serving 
our Order with happiness". 

Congratulations were given Grand 
Trustee Gertrude Doss who was 
chairman of the very successful 20th 
birthday party for the Parlor. Some 
of the outstanding events include 
"white elephant sale", presentation of 
Bear Flag to Whittword Branch Li- 
brary, luncheon at General Electric 
Living Center, initiation of new mem- 
bers and a spaghetti feed for mem- 
bers, families and friends. 

A new project to build enthusiasm 
in California Herald for subscrip- 
tions is being instituted by Maxine 
South, chairman for Whittier Parlor. 
It will be a "California Herald Game 
of Concentration", with the winners 
receiving a year's subscription to the 
California Herald. The game has 
created a lot of enthusiasm in the 
Parlor and the chairman anticipates 
it will be a huge success. It is Mrs. 
South's aim that every member of the 



H lb. 




M PF ^ 






1 




" -"' \^ -»-; 





Pioneer Relic Building 



Gladys Leggett, a niece of the 
Braselton family and her son Elton 
Leggett Jr. were introduced. There 
were more than 100 in attendance. 
After the ceremonies all adiourned tr 
the Pioneer Relic Building in Oroville 
to view the Braselton Parlor. Punch 
and cookies were served. 



WHITTIER 

The installation of Carlotta Funk 
and her corps of officers was the be- 
ginning of an actively planned year 
for Whittier No. 298. The incoming 
president's theme, "Orchids for a 



Parlor receives the California Herald 
delivered at her home monthly. Pres- 
ident Carlotta Funk and GT Gertrude 
Doss have given their ardent support 
to the success of this unique parlor 
participation project for the Native 
Daughters of the Golden West's own 
magazine, the California Herald. 



2 


BACKS 
KAULBARS 




MORTUARY 


iX 


1617 W. La Palma at Euclid 
Anaheim 
772-1617 




-News Chronica] Photo 



— News-Press Photo 



LEFT — From left: The gavel is passed from Teresa L. Jones, Left to 
Layol Welter at recent installation of officers of Vallejo No. 195 NDGW. 
Standing in back of retiring and incoming presidents are Luella Muller left, 
SDDGP and Margaret Fagiani, DGP, who was installing officer. RIGHT: 
Diana Dorothy Russell wearing the robe of St. Barbara, the city's patron 
saint during the 1968 Old Spanish Days Celebration. 



VALLEJO 

Mrs. Layol Welter was installed 
president of Vallejo No. 195 in the 
Green Room of Veteran's Memorial 
Building. Installed to serve with her 
were Mmes. Jones, McFarland, 
Smith, Curry, Morrison, Woodard, 
Faven, Barenche, Azevedo and Miss 
O'Neill. Mmes. Low, Barskey and 
Gillasy will be installed later. DGP 
Margaret Fagiani, George C. Yount, 
No. 322 was the installing officer 
assisted by Mmes. Buttimer, Spenser, 
Dulinsky and Mathison. 

Honored guests included SDDGP 
Luella Muller, DGP Verona Mason 
NDGW and President John Combs, 
Jr. NSGW. Mrs. Welter also pre- 
sented her family including her hus- 
band, mother and daughters. Mem- 
bers from Eschol, La Junta and 
George C. Yount were present. 

A past president's pin was pre- 
sented to Frances Bickford. Mrs. 
Welter received a gift from her offi- 
cers. A white and gold altar cloth 
was presented to the Parlor by DGP 
Fagiani. 

Mary Curry served as entertain- 
ment chairman. Baskets of flowers 
and ferns were used as decoration. 
A horse shoe of white daisies and 
ribbon and banner reading "Good 



Luck" centered the table. Delicious 
refreshments were served. 



REINA DEL MAR 

July 31 marked the beginning of 
the new year for Mrs. James T. Hogg, 
as president and her corps of officers, 
with a beautiful ritual of installation. 
Mrs. Hogg is a third generation native 
of San Francisco, a parlor member 
since 1960; has served as outside and 
inside sentiel, recording secretary, and 
first, second and third vice president. 
She has been parlor chairman of the 
California Herald, mission restor- 
ation, bulletin, young women's activ- 
ities, conservation and safety com- 
mittees, and a member of the Las 
Fiesteras Dance Group. She was 
chosen to portray Saint Barbara dur- 
ing 1965 Old Spanish Days. She is 
a member of the Santa Barbara and 
National Humane Societies and the 
Santa Barbara Woman's Club. 

Also installed were Mmes. Burdick, 
Days, Fluker, Miller, Graham, Fraser, 
Stupak, Jr., Bell, Phillips, Miller and 
Hodgkins and the Misses Days and 
Sesma. The speaker of the evening 
was Jeremy H. Hass, who has done 
research for the restoration of the 
Royal Presidio de Santa Barbara. His 



topic was "Recent History of the 
Presidio Excavations." Mrs. William 
MacFarlane was chairman and Ame- 
lia Acres co-chairman for the event. 
DGP Douglas from El Aliso No. 314, 
was installing officer, assisted by 
Mmes. Carter, Perry, B o y n t o n, 
Brehm, Derbyshire, Everett and Ses- 
ma. Also participating were PGP 
Eileen Dismuke and Mmes. Joyal 
Griffiths, C u e 1 1 a r, Acevcs, Diaz, 
Schmitter and Wolfe; and the Misses 
Harrison and Joyal. 

Assisting with arrangements were 
Mmes. Joyal and Diaz, hostesses; H. 
T. Hodgkins, guest book; Janelle 
Belle, Lucille Meyerink and Mariana 
Schmitter, invitations; Emma Davies 
and Anita Joyal, refreshments; 
Amelia Acres and Schmitter, flowers 
and program; Mary Louise Days, 
publicity; and Miss Joyal, telephone. 
New committee chairmen were ap- 
pointed. 

The Parlor was active with the 
forerunner of "Old Spanish Days in 
Santa Barbara", the annual Pre-Fiesta 




Reina del Mar No. 126 Pre-Fiesta 
Tea. From left: Ambert Phillips, and 
Mariana Schmitter, co - chairmen; 
Mary Louise Days, Past President. 

Tea at Rockwood Inn. Miss Diana 
Dorothy Russell was presented as the 
city's patron saint for this year's 
Old Spanish Days Fiesta. Miss Rus- 
sell is a seventh generation Californ- 
ian and a fourth generation Santa 
Barbaran; as well as a third gener- 
ation member of Reina del Mar. She 
is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wil- 
liam W. Russell, and is a direct de- 
scendant of Capt. Jose Francisco 
Ortega, first commandante of the 
Presidio de Santa Barbara. 

History chairman Mariana Schmit- 
ter, assisted by Ambert Phillips and 
Mary Louise Days, arranged the pro- 

CALIFORNIA HERALD 




Las Fiesteras dance group of Reina 

del Mar during 1968 old Spanish 

days. 



gram. The Rev. Xavier Harris, OFM, 
speaking on the first educational facil- 
ities of the area; the Las Fiesteras 
dance group; Mrs. Arne Hvolboll, 
well-known singer, Arnold Diaz or- 
chestra, as well as Deriata and Tutde 
dancers provided the entertainment 
for the highly successful annual event. 
Reina del Mar's float with lovely 
Miss Diana Dorathy Russell repre- 
senting the city's patron saint, was 
entered in El Desfile Historico; while 
the Las Fiesteras dance group per- 
formed on each evening show of 
Noches de Ronda. St. Barbara ap- 
pearing at the opening of the per- 
formance each evening. Attending 
Miss Russell in her appearance at 
public events during the Old Spanish 
Days were Mrs. John E. Stupak, Jr., 
St. Barbara last year; Miss Mary 
Louise Days, St. Barbara in 1966; 
and Miss Patricia Joyal. On August 
10, during the last performance of 
Noches de Ronda, Reina del Mar 




From left: Ida Gross, Audrey Hasel- 

busch, Esther Wilkinson, Bess 

Conner. 



provided refershments for the enter- 
tainers; acting as hostesses were 
Mines. Phillips, Miller and Acres, Sr. 



MISSION 

DGP Ann Shaw of Golden Gate 
No. 185, and her corps of officers 
installed the officers of Mission No. 
227, when Theresa Estelita took the 
presidency. Nineteen years ago she 
had been president also. The parlors 
then were much more active with 
better attendance. However she is de- 
sirous of re-activating the Parlor and 
have a good year. 




Irene Bondanza 

DGP Bernardnette Sullivan of 
Golden Gate No. 185 was introduced 
and presented as the new deputy to 
Mission Parlor. Grand Officers help- 
ing with the installation ceremony 





GTs Marie C. Landini and Helen C McCarthy 

were: GS Mary C. Mahoney, GM 
Irene Bondanza, GTs Marie Landini 
and Helen McCarthy, and PGP Emily 
Ryan. 

Marie Derby was chairman of the 
evening. Mission Parlor and Minerva 
Parlor No. 2 are scheduled for the 
first San Francisco County official 
visit of Grand President Hazel Mal- 
lette, which will be held at Native 
Sons' building, Wednesday, Novem- 
ber 13. 



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SEPTEMBER, 1968 



JUNIOR CONFERENCE 

by Ci\ Marie C. Landing State Chairman, Junior NDQW 



The City of Anaheim, mecca of 
tourists from all over the world, will 
be the location of the Sixteenth An- 
nual Conference of the Junior Native 
Daughters of the Golden West, Oc- 
tober 12 and 13. 1968, at the Charter 
House Hotel. 

Registration on Saturday morning 
from 8:00 to 9:30 A.M., in the hotel 
lobby, will be followed by the morn- 
ing business session. Luncheon will 
be served at 12:30 P.M. in the Rain- 
bow Room. The highlight of the 
afternoon session will be the award- 



ing of prizes to the winners of the 
Essay, Year Book, Membership and 
Scholarship Contests. 

The swimming pool area will be 
the setting for the banquet at 7:00 
P.M. The installation of Junior State 
Officers, entertainment and refresh- 
ments will bring to a close the formal 
part of the conference, as Sunday will 
be "playday" at Disneyland! 

Plan to arrive early on Friday, 
October 11, as additional attractions 
in the vicinity are Knotts Berry Farm, 



Melodyland Theatre and the Wax 
Museum. There is an Olympic size 
pool at Charter House, so do bring 
your bathing suits. If you wish, you 
may register Friday night from 8:00 
to 9:00 P.M. 

The State Committee, Estrellas de 
Oro Unit (Junior hostesses) and their 
advisors, and the Mother Parlor, Cien 
Anos No. 303, Norwalk, all cordially 
invite you to attend. We are working 
diligently to make this an enjoyable 
and outstanding conference. We hope 
to greet many of you in Anaheim! 




— Photo, courtesy Disneyland 

A trip down the Rivers of America on the riverboat "Mark Twain" is just one of the happy voyages to take in the 
Magic Kingdom, Disneyland, Anaheim, California. 

PAGE 12 CALIFORNIA HERALD 



CALIFORNIA PIONEERS) 



BY ABBIE GILES 




The Pioneers have come and gone. 
They blazed the trail, we followed 

on 
To find a land that they had bought 
By toil and care, with danger 

fraught. 

They started out so young and gay, 
Determined then to win the day. 
They counted not fearful cost 
Of battles fought and loved ones 
lost. 

They waded on through blistering 

sands, 
Through waters deep, o'er 

mountains high, 
While pestilence and want and care 
Was lingering here, was waiting 

nigh. 

Some fell beside the wayside trail; 
They laid them there, then hurried 

on, 
Though hearts were crushed they 

must not fail, 
But with new courage carry on. 

At nights their hearts were filled 

with fear 
Of foes that lurked in ambush 

near. 

SEPTEMBER, 1968 



Oh, how they watched, and 

hoped and prayed 
That God would lead them on 

their way. 

When morning came with faith 

renewed, 
And valiant courage, on they 

pressed; 
It took the strong, the brave, 

the true 
To build an empire in the west. 



SEQUOIA 

With Mary Scott as general chair- 
man, Sequoia No. 272, observed its 
29th anniversary with a cocktail hour 
and dinner at the Claremont Hotel, 
Berkeley. Cocktails were enjoyed in 
the large cocktail lounge as members 
marveled at the expansive view from 
the large picture windows. 

Special guests included husbands 
of several members, Jeannette Ander- 
son, the president and PGP Edna C. 
Williams organizer of the Parlor, and 
its charter president. A few of the 
remaining charter members also at- 
tended. 




The long banquet table had center 
pieces of white and gold flowers, 
appropriate place cards and originally 
designed nut cups. Corsages were 
presented to both Miss Anderson and 
Mrs. Williams. The dinner was served 
as a smorgasbord from a well sup- 
plied table and wine was poured by 
the manager of the dining room. An 
informal reception was enjoyed fol- 
lowing the evening's activities. 




Not lost to those that love them, 
Not dead, just gone before; 

They still live in our memory, 
And will forever more. 

Annie T. Harris, San Jose No. 81, June 20. 
Callie M. Abbott, Golden Era No. 99, 

July 8. 
Delia W. Pengelly, Alturas No. 159, June 

23. 
Anne W. Melson, Vallejo No. 195, July 7. 
Mary T. Price, Occident No. 28, July 8. 
Mattie H. Slivkoff, Sebastopol No. 265, 

July 16. 

Irene B. O'Rand, Santa Maria No. 276, 

July 17. 
Rose G. Tooker, Aleli No. 102, July 18. 
Ethel M. Nelson, Encinal No. 156, July 18. 
Lulu W. Raftery, San Juan No. 315, Julv 

14. 

Ida A. McCrum, Reichling No. 97, July 

Jennie P. Strandridge, Forrest No. 86, Julv 

24. 
Mildred H. Thatcher, Rancho San Jose 

No. 307, July 12. 
Esther Larson, Orinda No. 56, July 11. 
Jeanne Court, Poppy Trail No. 266, July 

3. 



Left to right: Mary Scott, Edna C. 
Williams and Jeannette Anderson. 



the 



SQR 



store 



lincoln at lemon 
anaheim 



RICHMOND 

DGP Pauline Madera of Brooklyn 

No 159 installed the following offi- 
cen lor Richmond No. 147: Presi- 
dent Henrietta Frietas and her corps 
of officers which included Mmcs. 
Mamie Luis, Mary Zehrung, Louise 
Pern. Marion Carver, Leslie Brent- 
linuer. Maud Alexander. Lulu Flores, 
Josephine Lamble, Mary Kramer. 
Gladys Figueiredo, Georgia Parker, 
Florence Oliveria, Bcrnis Forsman 
and Miss Alice Alameda. 

For the coming year Claudia Evans 
will serve as deputy grand president 
to the Parlor. A social hour followed 
the installation. 



LUGONIA 

A delicious ham dinner was en- 
joyed by approximately 50 members 
and their families in the beautiful 
patio of one of the Parlor's new mem- 
bers. Thelma Bownds. This was in 
honor of Ora Riley, the out-going 
president of Lugonia No. 241. 




Dinner in honor of Ora Riley. Sylvia 
Gregory, right, serves dinner. At end 
of table is DGP Floretta Banks and 
Evelyn Leffen, 90 year old charter 
member to the Deputy's left. 

Ora had quite a busy year. The 
Parlor presented small State Flags to 
each of the newly naturalized citizens. 
This was greatly appreciated by them. 

GP June Goldie's official visit came 
early in the year, September 5. The 
day began with the re-dedication of 
the Sun Dial at the County Court 
House, luncheon at San Moritz in 
the San Bernardino Mountains and 
one new member, Thelma Bownds, 
being initiated that evening. 

October was "Courtesy Night". 
Halloween was the theme with mem- 




From left: Mrnes. Mahalia Lieb and 
Edwin Greenwald, Parlor President. 

bers and guests in costume. A deli- 
cious beef stew dinner was hostessed 
in November by VP Inez Cisneros. 
Two large baskets of food were given 
to a needy family and three boxes of 
toys, cosmetics, yarn, etc. were taken 
to Juvenile Hall by Irene Painter, 
Veteran and Welfare chairman. A 
Christmas party was enjoyed in De- 
cember. 

Fifteen past presiednts were hon- 
ored in February under the chair- 
manship of Judy Ritter. Each was 
given a corsage in the colors of her 
year by Judy. The Arrowhead Nut- 
cracker Comedy Band entertained, 
also a 17 year old blind girl played 
beautifully on an accordian. 

Four new members were initiated 
in March, Alberta Flowers, Louise 
Clough, Elsie Lamb and Mary Bur- 
tron. The Parlor entertained the Na- 
tive Sons with a "Pot Luck Dinner" 
and a program of slides of their home- 
lands were shown by two exchange 
field students from Peru and Uruguay. 

A Mexican Dinner was a financial 
success in April. The Parlor enter- 
tained the pioneers at the old Log 
Cabin with the Arrowhead nutcrack- 
ers. Refreshments were served. 

May was a busy month starting 
with a dinner and entertainment to 
honor mothers. State Flags were pre- 
sented to another group of naturalized 
citizens. Charter members, DGP 
Floretta Banks and SDDGP Ruby 
Meadows were honored and given 
lovely gifts. 

The Parlor was proud to present 
three scholarships in June. A mem- 
ber, Edith Diffebach was re-instated. 
Delegates Inez Cisneros and Marie 
Ritter attended Grand Parlor. 



UTOPIA 

Utopia No. 252 was hostess to a 
large assembly of members, families 
and friends at their public installation 
of Officers, August 13. The evening 
co-chairmen were GT Helen Mc- 
Carthy and Edith O'Connor who car- 
ried out the theme of the evening in 
the colors of the Order. 

The officers were installed by DGP 
Doris Stidhem from Genevieve No. 
132 and her installing team was: 
GVP Nancy Conens, GM Irene Bon- 
danza, GT Marie Landini, PGPs Ev- 
elyn I. Carlson, Orinda Giannini, 
Emily Ryan, Jewel McSweeney and 
members from the deputy's parlor. 
SDDGP Myrtle Ritterbush was also 
in attendance. Newly installed Pres- 
ident Patricia Cornell was presented 
with a bouquet of red gladioli an 
escorted from the altar by her daugh- 
ter Cindy Earl, a member of Golden 
Poppy Jr. Unit No. 38. 

DGP Doris Stidhem has been re- 
appointed to Utopia Parlor and the 
members are looking forward to 
another pleasant year of her unselfish 
service. The Parlor is proud that its 
member Edith O'Connor has been 
appointed DGP to Genevieve Parlor 
this year. Edith, accompanied by 
members from her Parlor, was for- 
mally introduced at Genevieve Par- 
lor's meeting August 15. 

1 1 i 

CARD OF THANKS 

PGP Annette Caiocca sends a thank- 
you to those who sent cards and re- 
membrances to her during her illness. 

1 1 1 

VERDUGO 

Verdugo No. 240, honored Mrs. 
Gussie Anderson, September 17, on 
the occasion of her 96th birthday. 

Mrs. Anderson was bom in San 
Francisco, in 1872. She has one 
daughter, Mrs. Hazel Baulet, three 
grandchildren and eighteen gTeat 
grandchildren. 

Mrs. Anderson has lived in Glen- 
dale over fifty years. She is a sixty- 
nine year member of the NDGW and 
is a life member of the organization. 
Mrs. Anderson also belongs to Glen- 
dale Emblem Club and holds a life 
membership with the club. She enjoys 
sewing, card parties and attending her 
club meetings. Gussie has a host of 
friends and has a great interest in 
life. Also honored the same evening 
will be Mrs. Ruby Kemp, who will 
be celebrating her 82nd birthday. 

CALIFORNIA HERALD 



MANSION . . . 
(Continued from page 3) 

The unveiling and dedication of 
the Landmark plaque were carried 
out under the auspices of Sutter Par- 
lor No. Ill, NDGW, and Elk Grove 
Parlor No. 41, NSGW. The cere- 
monies were planned so as to be a 
part of the Annual History Week in 
Sacramento and that evening the 
annual "Sacramento Birthday Din- 
ner" was held at Sutter's Fort. 

Henry Lynch, secretary of Elk 
Grove Parlor and PGP Audrey D. 
Brown (a member of Sutter Parlor) 
were co-chairmen of the event with 
Mr. Lynch acting as "Master of Cere- 
monies", the pledge of allegiance 
being led by Melvin Wise, a member 
ctf Elk Grove Parlor, and the invoca- 
tion being given by GT Rae Romin- 
ger. La Bandera No. 110. Greetings 
were brought to the guests by Richard 
H. Marriott, mayor of the city of 
Sacramento, followed by remarks by 
Hazel T. Mallette, Grand President, 
NDGW and GP Andrew M. Stodel, 
NSGW. 

The presentation of the plaque was 
made by PGP Audrey D. Brown. It 
was accepted by Ray B. Hunter, Dep- 
uty Director of the Department of 
Parks and Recreation, for the State of 
California. At the conclusion of the 
ceremony refreshments were served 
to more than 500 guests by Mrs. Otis 
Swan, president of Sutter Parlor No. 
Ill, and her committee: Mmes. 
Bandacorri, Brye, Burns, Conover, 
Frutos, Gutenberger, Muller, Mulli- 
gan, Wood and Miss Tilden. Pres- 
ident Robert Wilson, president of 
Elk Grove Parlor, and his committee 
of Native Sons assisted the Native 
Daughters. 

Among the distinguished guests 
were NDGW Grand Parlor officers: 
GP Hazel T. Mallette accompanied 
by her husband, GVP Nancy J. 
Conens, GM Irene Bondanza and 
husband, GTs Rae L. Rominger, 
Marie C. Landini, Betty Read Cur- 
ilich, Lila S. Hummel, Marian E. 
McGuire, and Helen C. McCarthy 
and husband. Also in attendance 
were PGPs Ethel C. Enos, Henrietta 
Toothaker, Jewel McSweeney and 
Doris M. Gerrish; SDDGP Mary 
Ehlers and DGP Florence Morris. 
Distinguished guests from the Native 
Sons included GP Andrew Stodel, 
Jr. PGP Joseph Perez, GVPs Richard 
Ritcheson, John Kurtz, David Mason 
III, GS Fred Dissmeyer, GTs Ernest 

SEPTEMBER, 1968 



Coleman and Ben S. Ferro and PGP 
Walter Bailey. Mmes. Perez, Kurtz, 
Dissmeyer and Ferro accompanied 
their husbands. 

The mansion is now California 
Registered Historical Landmark No. 
823. 



Two things bad for heart — running up 
stairs and running down people. 



An automobile can help you see the 
world, but you must decide which world. 



The trouble with Father Time is that 
he doesn't make round trips. 



He who is in love with himself has at 
least this advantage — he won't encounter 
many rivals in his love. 



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NOTE PAPER with matching envelopes. 
100 sheets, 50 envelopes, boxed. $1.25. 
Personalized with "From the Pen of and 
your name please add $3.19 . Pl ease add 
5% tax to order. MAIL-A-GIFT, Box H, 
c/o California Herald, P. O. Drawer 4243, 
Anaheim, Calif. 92803. 

WANTED — Back issues of California 
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Bradford, Placentia, California 92670. 

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Al . FtHIOOICAL DEf 



94102 




y^^nalt 



Gtm 



was 




OU !r^,&C 



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Through good fortune, a copy of Anaheim's first business directory has been found. It 
was printed in 1878, just twenty-one years after the founding of the town and is believed to be the 
only on in existence. 

This directory has been faithfully reproduced in "When Anaheim was 21", the latest book 
to be written by Leo J. Friis, well-known California historian. 

Using the anecdotal approach with sparkles of humor, the author describes Anaheim as it 
appeared in 1878 with its Chinese quarter, irrigation ditches and wineries. 



PIONEER PRESS / 301 N. Parton Street / Santa Ana, California 92701 

I enclose my check or money order (payable to Pioneer Press for copies of "When Anaheim was 21" at 

$7.50 plus 800 tax & mailing for each copy. Please send to: 

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Official Publication of 
THE NATIVE DAUGHTERS of the GOLDEN WEST 




OCTOBER, 1968 * 40<t 



GARDEN GROVE IN 1907 




California Heiald 

"PRESERVING THE PAST FOR THE FVURE" 
Volume XVI October, 1968 



^ooks in Review 



CONTENTS THIS MONTH 



by JZ>r. JLeo J. ^riis 

In an election year we can always 
expect a flood of books on politics. 
They have come. Three of them are 
studies of California government, 
statesmen and politicians. (Speaker 
of the House Reed once remarked 
that a statesman was only a "dead 
politician"). 

The first of these books is Cali- 
fornia's Prodigal Sons, (Univ. of Cal- 
ifornia Press, $6.95) by Spencer C. 
Olin, Jr., Assistant Professor of His- 
tory, University of California, Irvine. 
The subject matter of his study is that 
of the California Progressives during 
the years 1911-1917. 

The volume is reminiscent of 
George E. Mowry's The California 
Progressives, (Univ. of California 
Press, 1951), but differs in approach 
to the subject. Olin's book focuses 
on "practical politics rather than on 
ideology." Hence, it is more inter- 
esting and readable. One of the chap- 
ters, titled "Blunder Begets Blunder" 
reviews the defeat of Charles Evans 
Hughes in California in his bid for 
the presidency in 1916. 

1 am certain that this book will 
be on our library shelves long after 
the other two I shall mention have 
been forgotten. I say this, not be- 
cause I happen to know the author, 
but because his study reflects mature 
scholarship, is invaluable for refer- 
ence and is delightfully written. 

In his Dancing Bear, An Inside 
Look at California Politics, (The 
World Publishing Company, $6.50) 
Gladwin Hill has striven to give us 
an entertaining and factual book. The 
most striking thing about the volume 
is its dust jacket caricature of Senator 
Murphy, Governor Reagan and Ex- 
Vice-President Nixon as a team of 
vaudeville "hoofers". This is unfor- 
tunate, because it gives one the initial 



Books in Review, by Dr. Leo J. Friis 

The Padre and his Pools, by Ralph L. Milliken 

Admission Day, by Doris Perez 

Parlor News 

The Grand President's Corner 

Official NDGW Directory 

In Memoriam 

Junior NDGW Activities 

Leo's Dictionary, by Dr. Leo J. Friis (Part I) .. 



PHOTO CREDITS— Aerial view of Los Banos: U. S. Bureau of R 
on Cover: Goldie Sadler. 




Sign of the Home that will stay yong 

And so will the family that lives here, because the Med. ion 
Home Emblem can mean gentle, whole-house electric ' : 
ing; a flameless, cool electric kitchen; and a readiness fothe 
wonderful electric conveniences that are as near as tomoov 



Southern California Edison 



3. 3. FRIIS 
Publisher 



LEO 3. FRIIS 

Editor 



" 
ul Relate 



Published Monthly by J. J. Friis and Leo J. Friis, owners and pu sh 
MaiiinT a'hh %X S g eserv «l- EDITORIAL AND GENERAL OFFICES: AM 

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^ih ;„h w Jl en order| ns change of address, please allow six week 

a so post™ n a «irl SeS i.c'5, cl i; dine zip code - NDGW MEMBERS: please ser 



(Continued on Page 15) %^^t&K%^J£ 



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iree ye*» 
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may be " 



CA I i HERAU 



n^Jshe L-Sac)te &nb fits f^Joo^ 



L^os /_5> 



CttlGS 



l>H f<i.rA r k L,. yffjMiken / (ELutolot oft tL JlZtMiken JlZioSGUf 



ADRE ; ELIPE ARROYO DE LA 

Cue: a was a jolly old Fran- 
cisca who. for twenty - five 
;, live* and labored at Mission 
Juan iautista in Upper Cali- 
a. State delightful pools of 
r in tii were named in his hon- 
These e on the west side of the 



present Merced County in a stream 
known as the Los Banos Creek. 

Padre Arroyo, accompanied by a 
small band of well-trained Mission 
Indians, used to come over from time 
to time (1808 to 1833) to visit the 
swarms of wild Indians, then living 
all along the banks of the San Joaquin 



River. The distance was too great 
for the Padre and his companions to 
make the trip from the Mission to 
the river in one day. This necessi- 
tated camping out over night on the 
way. It was at some pools of water 
just above the present Menjoulet 

(Continued on Page 15) 




Aerial View of Los Banos 




California Herald 



'PRESERVING THE PAST FOR THE FUTURE" 



\..|l Ml XVI 



()( mm r. 1968 



Number 2 



( 3ooks in Review 

by J2r JLce ? JriU 



In .in election year we can always 
expert .1 iKkkI of books on politics. 
I lu\ have come. Three of them are 
studies of California government, 
statesmen and politicians. (Speaker 
of the House Reed once remarked 

that a statesman was DOIj a "dead 
politician" I. 

I he first of these hooks is Cali- 
forniefs Prodigal Sons, (Univ. of Cal- 
ifornia Press, $6.95 1 bj Spencer C. 

Olin. Jr . Assistant Processor of His- 
tory. University of California, Irvine. 
I he subject matter of his study is that 
of the California Progressives during 
the yean l l >l 1-1917. 

1 he volume is reminiscent of 
George B. Moury's The California 
Progressives, (Univ. of California 
Press. 1451 i. but ditfers in approach 
to the subject. Olin's book focuses 
on 'practical polities rather than on 
ideology." Hence, it is more inter- 
esting and readable. One of the chap- 
ters, titled "Blunder Begets Blunder" 
re v iews the defeat of Charles Evans 
Hughes in California in his bid for 
the presidency in 1916. 

I am certain that this book will 
be on our library shelves long after 
the other two I shall mention have 
been forgotten. I say this, not be- 
cause I happen to know the author, 
but because his study reflects mature 
scholarship, is invaluable for refer- 
ence and is delightfully written. 

In his Dancing Bear, An Inside 
Look at California Politics, (The 
World Publishing Company, $6.50) 
Gladwin Hill has striven to give us 
an entertaining and factual book. The 
most striking thing about the volume 
is its dust jacket caricature of Senator 
Murphy, Governor Reagan and Ex- 
Vice-President Nixon as a team of 
vaudeville 'hoofers". This is unfor- 
tunate, because it gives one the initial 



CONTENTS THIS MONTH 

Books in Review, bj Dr. I eo J. I riis 2 

I he Padre and his Pools. In Ralph L. Milliken 3 

Admission Day, bj Pons Perez 4 

Parlor News 5 

The Grand President's Corner 6j 

Official NDGW Directory 7 

In Memoriam 12 

Junior NDGW Activities 13 

Leo's Dictionary, by Dr. Leo J. Friis (Part I) 14 



PHOTO CREDITS — Aerial view of Los Banos: U. S. Bureau of Reclamation: Picture 
on Cover: Goldie Sadler. 




Sign of the Home that will stay young 

And so will the family that lives here, because the Medallion 
Home Emblem can mean gentle, whole-house electric heat- 
ing; a flameless, cool electric kitchen; and a readiness for the 
wonderful electric conveniences that are as near as tomorrow. 



J. J. FRIIS 
Publisher 



Southern California Edison 



LEO J. FRIIS 

Editor 



JANE FRUS 

Public Relations 



Published Monthly by J. J. Friis and Leo J. Friis, owners and publishers, Anaheim, 
California All Rights Reserved. EDITORIAL AND GENERAL OFFICES: Anaheim. California. 
Mailing Address: P.O. Drawer 4243, Anaheim, California 92803. ADVERTISING OFFICE: 301 
N. Parton St., Santa Ana. Calif. 92701. CHANGE OF ADDRESS AND SUBSCRIPTIONS: Mail 
r /r? SP Q, n Q d £ nce v.i CA LIFORNIA HERALD, Circulation Department, P.O. Drawer 4243, Anaheim, 
calif. 92803. When ordering change of address, please allow six weeks; please furnish 
and ,«".t w „ a il d . r - esses '"ceding zip code. NDGW MEMBERS: please send Parlor Number 
f. S °c»i£?rn T » £3SP D RE . TU n RN RE «|S!, l l ST f °'u ? ,ease send ma &™* "»K address change 
I m c . V !? n H ? rald ; P-°- "rawer 4243, Anaheim, California 92803. SUBSCRIPTION RATES: 
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Jheim, California, under the Act of March 3, 1879. No part of this magazine may be re- 



ICnntinueA nr, T>n ao 1 f I «naneim, i-aiiTornia, under the Ac 
(Continued on fage J5) printed without specific permission 



CALIFORNIA HERALD 



j^n& l^yaht^ anb fits L^yoo& 



L^os iz> 



etnas 



^ l^^ r k L. JlZtiMiken / €,utalot 4 th Al>Mik<zn JfLut 



-' r \ m)re Felipe Arroyo de la 
jt~ Cuesta was a jolly old Fran- 
ciscan who, for twenty - five 
years, lived and labored at Mission 
San Juan Bautista in Upper Cali- 
fornia. Some delightful pools of 
water in time were named in his hon- 
or. These lie on the west side of the 



present Merced County in a stream 
known as the Los Banos Creek. 

Padre Arroyo, accompanied by a 
small band of well-trained Mission 
Indians, used to come over from time 
to time (1808 to 1833) to visit the 
swarms of wild Indians, then living 
all along the banks of the San Joaquin 



River. The distance was too great 
for the Padre and his companions to 
make the trip from the Mission to 
the river in one day. This necessi- 
tated camping out over night on the 
way. It was at some pools of water 
just above the present Menjoulet 

(Continued on Page 15) 




Aerial View of Los Banos 



OCTOBER, 1968 




Tins m \w i mi Admission Da) 
celebration was held in the 
dtj oJ Santa Rosa with three days 
of outstanding e v e a t s. Activities 

started on Saturday morning with a 
bus irip to the Pacific das and Elec- 
tric Company at I lie Geysers and 

the statewide howling tournament. 
In the evening the civic banquet was 
held at the Villa Oiantecler. Hcalds- 
burg. which was attended by Grand 
Officers and Past Grand Presidents 
of both orders with city, county, state 
officials, guests and members of both 
orders. Monday morning several 
thousand spectators watched the out- 
standing and colorful parade replete 
with marching units, floats, decorated 
cars, and bands all depicting the 
parade theme "California — Our 
Golden State". 

Grand Marshals of the parade 
were Jack Henry and Irene Bon- 
dan/a. Leading the escort divisions 
of Grand Officers and Past Grand 
Presidents of both Native Sons of 
the Golden West and Native Daugh- 
ters of the Golden West were Grand 
Presidents Andrew Stodel and Hazel 
T. Mallette. The climax of the cele- 
bration was a barbecue held at the 
Founders Grove at the Sonoma Fair- 
grounds where the prize winning 
awards were presented. 

NDGW Award Winners in the pa- 
rade were: 

Largest Number In Line Of 
March: Guadalupe No. 153, Pied- 
mont No. 87, Santa Rosa No. 217. 

Best Appearing: Piedmont No. 87, 
Betsy Ross No. 238, Guadalupe No. 
153. 

Decorated Auto: Portola No. 172, 
Hayward No. 122. 

PAGE 4 



cAdtni*Hon 
Juay 

Jborh Perez 



Best rheme Portrayal: Betsy Ross 

No. 238, Orinda No. 56. 

Best Junior Unit, Best Appearing: 
Fruitvale Junior Unit No. 22. 

Drum Corps: Mission No. 227. 

Drill Team, Junior: Las Amiguitas 
Junior Unit No. 33. 

COMBINED NATIVE SONS AND 
NATIVE DAUGHTERS UNITS: 

Largest Number In The Line of 
March: Twin Peaks No. 185, NDGW 
and Twin Peaks No. 214, NSGW; 
Portola No. 172, NDGW and Pa- 
cific No. 10, NSGW. 

Best Appearing: Stockton No. 
256, NDGW and Stockton No. 7, 
NSGW; San Francisco No. 261, 
NDGW and San Francisco Parlor No. 
49, NSGW. 

Mixed Native Sons and Native 
Daughters Drum Corps: Guadalupe 
Parlor No. 153, NDGW and Guad- 
alupe Parlor No. 231, NSGW. 
111 

LONG BEACH 

On October 23, Long Beach No. 
154 made a presentation of a Cali- 




fornia State Flag in a brief Ceremony 
for the Inter-community Exceptional 
Children's Home. 



TIKI PARTY 

Approximately 450 Native Sons 
and Native Daughters of the Golden 
West attended the eighth annual Tiki 
party representating Parlors of both 



Orders from throughout the entire 
slate. I he enthusiastic and wonder- 
ful support by the membership to the 
[970 Tournament of Roses Float 
entry was well received by state chair- 
man for the Native Daughters, Jr. 
PGP June T. Goldie and Joe Bulling- 
ton, state chairman for the Native 
Sons float committee. Proceeds from 
the annual Tiki Party go towards the 
building of the float. 

Due to decisions reached by the 
Pasadena Tournament of Roses Com- 
mittee the Native Sons and Native 
Daughters will not be represented in 
the 1969 New Years parade. How- 
ever, an entry is assured in the 1970 
parade. Having been thus assured 
the Grand Parlor committee chairmen 
feel that by continuing to raise funds 
more money will be available towards 
the entry of a more representative and 
beautiful float which would have a 
greater award winning possibility. 

Chairman Joe Bullington introduc- 
ed from the Tiki stage to some 3,000 
people, the following Native Daughter 
Grand Officers: Grand President 
Hazel T. Mallette, GT Rae L. Ro- 
minger. Chairman of the Board of 
Grand Trustees, GTs Marie C. Lan- 
dini, Betty Read Curilich, Lila S. 
Hummel, Gertrude L. Doss, and 
GOS Laura C. Blosdale. Everal S. 
Mallette flew down from Oroville 
with Grand President Hazel Mallette 
to attend this popular event. 

Grand Parlor Native Sons intro- 
duced were GP Andrew D. Stodel 
and GM Jack Henry . 

NDGW chairmen of the Tiki event 
were Jr. PGP June T. Goldie, Phil- 
omena Wooster and Evelyn Henry, 
assisted by Joe Bullington and Native 
Son committee members. 



GRACE 

A hobo dinner was held by Grace 
Parlor on October 17 preceding the 
regular meeting. All of the "hobos" 
brought their own tin plates and uten- 
sils and a general good time was en- 
joyed. During the month of Septem- 
ber, the sewing group met at the park, 
enjoyed sewing and luncheon. On 
October 8 the group met at Ethelyn 
Furman's home. 



RIO HONDO 

Rio Hondo No. 284 enjoyed a 
"House Warming" dinner on Octo- 
ber 2 at the Odd Fellows Hall. 

CALIFORNIA HERALD 



CALIFORNIANA 

Members and friends of Calif orni- 
iina No. 247 held a luncheon at the 
La Golondrina Cafe on Olvera Street 
on September 24. Madame Consuelo 
DcBon/o joined the group for lunch 
and gave a very interesting talk on the 
bunding of Los Angeles. After lunch 




Senaida Sullivan 
Madrina of 
Los Angeles 



the group enjoyed browsing in the 
main shops. GOS Laura Blosdale 
and Madrina Senaida Sullivan were 
in attendance. 



LAUREL 

Laurel, Mcmzanita and Sierra Pines 
Parlors were hosts for a reception 
honoring Grand President Hazel Mal- 
lette. The reception was held in Grass 
Valley, September 3. About 55 mem- 
bers attended a dinner, then ad- 
journed to the lodge hall for the meet- 
ing and reception. 

Bessie Rush called the meeting to 
order and welcomed guests from 
Parlors in Berkeley, Downieville, 
Jackson, French Corral and the hosts' 
parlors. 




Grand Officers present were GT 
Rae Rominger, chairman of the board 
of trustees, and GTs Betty Read Cur- 
ilieh and Marian E. McGuire. DGPs 
and SDDGP Esther McClusky were 
introduced. 

The reception was held in con- 
junction with Manzanita's regular 
meeting. Laurel Parlor opened the 
meeting; Manzxmita Parlor's presi- 

OCTOBER, 1968 



Parlor 
NevA/s 



dent. Florence Elliott, conducted the 
business session. Each parlor had 
a spokesman, who reported on the 
many projects supported throughout 
the year. The coin drill netted $15.00 
which was turned over to the com- 
mittee on history and landmarks. 

Lillian Young, a 60 year member 
of Laurel Parlor received her Life 
Membership. Grand President Mal- 
lette also presented 50 year pins to 
Anna Tucker, Luvia Kilroy. and 
Gladys Blanchard. Mabel Lobecker 
was introduced as a long-time mem- 
ber of Manzanita Parlor. She attended 
regularly and is 91 years old. 

Esther McClusky, on behalf of 
the three host parlors, presented an 




Betty Read Curilich 



Marian McGuire 



antique frame containing gold to the 
Grand President. She was very gra- 
cious in accepting the gift. One of 
her projects this year would be to 
preserve history. Elsie Peard and 
her committee served delicious re- 
freshments. 



PLACERITA 

Placenta No. 277 began its twenty- 
fifty year with the installation of Mrs. 
Fred Gebers as president. Her theme 
for the term is "A Silver Year in Our 
Golden State". It was carried out 
in the white and silver floral decor- 
ations and refreshment tables, the 
gold and silver programs, the white 
rose and silver bowed corsages of the 
installing team, and the white formals 
with silver ribbons and shoes worn 
by her corps of officers. Mrs. Gebers 
herself was in a silver formal with 
white corsage. 

Mrs. Leland Smith conducted the 
ceremonies assisted by officers of To- 
luca No. 279, GOS Laura Blosdale 



and PCil' Mary Harden and organist 
Dorothy Dye. 

Cameron Iraser, grandson of Mrs. 
Gebers, escorted the Bible. Elaine 
Gebers and Becky Jones, presented 
the colors in their Camplire Girl un- 
iforms. Escorted to the altar and 
presented were GOS Laura Blosdale, 
GO Peggy Brandenburg and PGP 
Mary Barden. 

Officers installed were Mmes. 
Doyle. Blanchard, Anderson, Her- 
mann, Fraser, Wrankle, Stevens, 
Brandenburg, B o 1 d e 1 1 i, Cheadle, 
Whitley, Terry and Langenohl. Mrs. 
Wesley Jones was obligated as past 
president, while Mrs. William Bran- 
denburg and John Rumsey assumed 
the junior and senior past presidents' 
positions. Charter president Mrs. 
Clayton Atkinson served as chairman 
lor the evening, a post she will assume 
for the year. Committee chairmen for 
the event were Mmes. Blanchard and 
Stevens, refreshments; Doyle. Her- 
mann and Jones, decorations and 
corsages; and invitations, Forbes. 

i 1 i 

MISSION 

At Mission No. 22 it was an- 
nounced that the Drum Corps had 
won a $50 prize for appearing in the 
Admission Day parade at Santa Rosa. 

The official visit committee met 
with the committee from Minerva 
No. 2 on October 9 to further the 
plans for the Grand President's visit 
to the two parlors on November 13. 

Esther Krause announced that the 
bus trip to State Line scheduled for 
October 26-27 had a full load. On 
October 25 the SDDGP and her Dep- 
uties of San Francisco County hon- 
ored the Grand Officers at a recep- 
tion in Masonic Temple, San Fran- 
cisco. DGP Zelma Buckholz, partici- 
pated with the group. 

On September 27, Mission Parlor 
President's birthday, a "surprise" 
birthday party, with cake and the 
trimmings were served by a com- 
mittee following the regular meeting. 

i i 1 

ALELI 

Aleli No. 102 observed Admission 
Daj with a special program. Speaker 
for the evening was PP Ella Fahey 
whose topic was "California's State- 
hood". PP Anna Black sang "I Love 
You, California" and "Memories", 
accompanied by PP Claudina Clark. 

PP Edna Martin received her fifty- 
year pin, the presentation being made 
(Continued on Next Page) 



The Grand 
President's Corner 

% 

HAZEL T. MALLETTE 



I] PR] SIM 

MaOette (Mrs. Even] AJ 
•i> Dunstone Drive 
Oroville < alifornia 95965 



(Continued from page 5) 

by PP Rose Rfayner. rwenty-five 

yeai emblems were presented to Syl- 
via Crenshaw, Dorothy Tavernetti, 
Anna Raise, Melissa Pedroni, and 
Ann Welch. I nable to be present to 
receive their pins were Mmes. Little, 
Hartshorn, and Lyons. I he twenty- 
five year pins were presented by PP 
Mane Braxton, who was the presi- 
dent twenty-five years ago, assisted 
b> her marshal. PP Jessie Fisher. A 
silver trophy, presented to the Parlor 
when Edna Martin was president, was 
exhibited. It was the First Pri/e lor 
the Parlor's float in the Colmo del 
Rodeo Parade in 1927. 

Golden marigolds were used to 
deeorate the lodge hall and banquet 
room, where refreshments were 
served by a committee with Martha 
Nail as chairman. Visitors present in- 
eluded SDDGP Vivian Medeiros, 
DGP Helen Lyons, and represent- 
atives from San Juan Bautista. Copa 
de Oro and Mission Bell Parlors. 



POPPY TRAD 

The thirtieth birthday of Poppy 
Trail No. 266 was celebrated on 
September 17th by a gala evening 
attended by many distinguished guests 
and members of several different Par- 
lors. Grand Officers attending were 
Jr. PGP June Goldie, GTs Gertrude 
Doss and Lila Hummel, GOS Laura 
Blosdale, PGP Mary Barden, SDDGP 
Mildred McGee and DGP Evelyn 
Sherman. 



GR VND SECRETARY 

Mar) C. Mahoney (Mrs. Herbert J.) 

Office: 703 Market Street, Room 612 

San I-rancisco 94103 Dial 362 4127 
Res: 4125 I incoln Way 

San Francisco 94122 



ITINERARY 1968 



OCTOBER 

1 Eschscholtzia No. 112 Etna* 

3 Mount Lassen No. 215, Alturas No. 159 Alturas* 

8 San Diego No. 208, Ilia M. Knox No. 320, 

Las Flores del Mar No. 301 Oceanside* 

9 Toluca No. 279, San Fernando Mission No. 280, 

El Camino Real No. 324 Granada Hills* 

11-12-13 NDGW Junior Conference Anaheim 

14 Santa Ana No. 235. Grace No. 242, Silver Sands No. 286 .... Santa Ana* 

16 Donner No. 193, Byron* 

18 Ruby No. 46, Princess No. 84, San Andreas No. 113 .... San Andreas* 
20 Mariposa No. 63, (afternoon) Mariposa* 

22 Dardanelle No. 66, Golden Era No. 99, Anona No. 164 .... Jamestown* 

23 Camp Far West No. 218, Marysville No. 162, Marysville* 

24 Fern No. 123, San Juan No. 315 Carmichael* 

26-27 Grand Officers Meeting San Francisco 

29 Ursula No. 1, Forrest No. 86, Chispa No. 40 lone* 

Asterisks mark Official Visits 



Four Poppy Trail Parlor members 
were eligible for 25 year emblems — 
Castenia Cripe, Lucille Mur, Ger- 
trude Gatty and Mary Jarmuz. Jr. 
PGP June Goldie presented the em- 
blems. A new 50-star American Flag 




was presented from the Past Presi- 
dents of Poppy Trail to the Parlor. 
Past Presidents attending and partic- 
ipating in the presentation were Vida 
Wells, Castenia Cripe, Tessi Wooste- 
Frances Vena, Virginia Cook, Leola 
Butler, Philomena Wooster, Gene- 
vieve Bryant, Kittie Coughtry, Leona 
Carter, Lucia Baquera, Rose Lowery, 
Lillian Koeppel and Doris Lounsbury. 
Deputy Grand Presidents of Poppy 
Trail throughout the years and at- 
tending who were introduced were 
Muriel Fabrick, Beatrice Carney, 
Doris Lounsbury, Agnes Tighe, Vir- 
ginia Bennett and Helen Lugo. Form- 
er SDDGP Juanita Porter was present 
and several of the above named 
Grand Officers and Deputy Grand 
Presidents who also served as Super- 
visors throughout the years. 

(Continued on Page 11) 



REINA DEL MAR 

Reina del Mar observed Admission 
Day at historical landmark, The Cov- 
arrubias Adobe, Santa Barbara, with 
an afternoon program held in the 
charming setting of the patio. His- 
torian Rev. M. Geiger of the Santa 
Barbara Old Mission spoke on His- 
tory of Admission Day to many dis- 
tinguished guests, among them being 
members of early American families. 
PP Mary Louise Days, as chairman 
of history and landmarks committee, 
was assisted by PPs Miller, Griffith 
and Phillips, also Mmes. Graham, 
Ferrario, DeVito and Ruiz. Mmes. 
Harrison, Days and Acres circulated 
the guest books. The highlight of 
the afternoon was the parade of an- 
tique gowns and swimsuits modeled 
by Virginia Days, Nancy Fluker, 
Irene West, Lillian Fraser, Mariana 
Schmitter, Sarah Diaz, Mary Louise 
Days and Priscilla Sesma. President 
Bernice Hogg and Mary Louise Days 
graciously greeted each guest. 



THE LARGEST 

The University of California with 
its nine campuses has the largest en- 
rollment in the world. 

CALIFORNIA HERALD 



N.D.G.W. VI RECTO Ry 

GRAND OFFICERS — 1968-1969 

Grand President 

Hazel T. Mallette (Mrs. Everal A.) Gold of 
Ophir No. 190, 45 Dunstone Drive, Oroville 
95965. 

Junior Past Grand President 
June T. Goldie (Mrs. Wm. L.) San Gabriel Val- 
ley No. 281, 320 Rosemont Blvd., San 
Gabriel 91775. 

Grand Vice President 
Nancy J. Conens (Mrs.) Piedmont No. 87, 4311 
Allendale Ave., Oakland 94619. 
Grand Marshal 
Irene Bondanza (Mrs. Joseph) San Francisco 
No. 261, 2328 Union St., San Francisco 
94123. 

Grand Secretary 
Mary C. Mahoney (Mrs. Herbert J.) Golden 
Gate No. 158, 4125 Lincoln Way, San Fran- 
cicso 94122. Office, 703 Market St., Room 
612, San Francisco 94103. Telephone (415) 
362-4127. 

Chairman, Board of Grand Trustees 
Rae E. Rominger (Mrs.) La Bandera No. 110, 
2841 - 69th Ave., Sacramento 95822. 

Grand Trustees 

Sertrude L. Doss (Mrs. Curtis E.) Whittier No. 

298, 308 South Valencia, La Habra 90631. 
Marie C. Landini (Mrs. Anthony) San Jose No. 

81, 860 Warren Way, Palo Alto 94303. 
Betty Read Curilich (Mrs.) Ursula No. 1, 41 

Curilich Lane, Jackson 95642. 
_ila S. Hummel (Mrs. Leonard) La Tijera No. 

282, 836 E. Grand Ave., El Segundo 90245. 
Helen C. McCarthy (Mrs. James P.) Utopia No. 

252, 4064 - 18th St., San Francisco 94114. 
Vlarian E. McGuire (Mrs. Paul B.) Berkeley No. 

150, 652 Wildcat Road, Berkeley 94708. 

Grand Inside Sentinel 
vleredyth Burnett (Mrs. Paul) Dardanelle No. 
66, P. O. Box 1124, Sonora 95370. 

Grand Outside Sentinel 
.aura Blosdale (Mrs. Frank) Beverly Hills No. 
289, 1563 Brockton Ave., Los Angeles 90025. 

Grand Organist 

= eggy Brandenburg (Mrs.) Placerita No. 277, 
4800 Brandenburg PI., Tarzana 91356. 



PAST GRAND PRESIDENTS N.D.G.W. 

1931— Estelle M. Evans (Mrs. Ellis) Antioch 
No. 223, 314 West 5th Street, Antioch 
94509. 

1932— Evelyn I. Carlson (Mrs.) Dolores No. 169, 
1308 Hoover Street, Apt. 1, Menlo Park 
94025 

1934— Irma W. Laird (Mrs. Ralph) Alturas No. 
159, Alturas 96101 

.935 — Gladys E. Noce (Mrs. John) Amapola No. 
80, Box 281, Sutter Creek 95685 

.937— Florence D. Boyle (Mrs.) Gold of Ophir 
Parlor No. 190, P.O. Box 1743, Oroville 
95965 

1938— Ethel Begley (Mrs.) Marinita No. 198 
233 Prospect Ave., San Francisco 94110 

1940 — Orinda G. Giannini (Mrs. Raymond) Orin- 
da No. 56, 2822 35th Avenue, San Fran- 
cisco 94116 

1941 — Hazel B. Hansen (Mrs. Louis) Verdugo 
No. 240, 535 N. Howard Street, Glendale 
91206 

942— Clarice E. Gilchrist (Mrs.) Caliz de Oro 
No. 206, 25 Seaview Ave., Piedmont 
94611. 

943— Claire Lindsey (Mrs.) Golden Gate No. 
158, 911 Hillcroft Circle, Oakland 94610 

.944 — Mary B. Barden (Mrs. Harold) Californ- 
iana No. 247, 320 22nd St., Santa Monica 
90402 

945— Emily E. Ryan (Mrs.) Las Lomas No. 72, 
1371 - 48th Ave., Apt. 201, San Francisco 
94122 

946— Ethel C. Enos (Mrs.) Morada No. 199, 
Box 174, Modesto 95353 

947 — Loretta M. Cameron (Mrs.) Twin Peaks 
No. 185, 39 Chenery Street, San Fran- 
cisco 94131 

948 — Doris Treat Daley (Mrs.) San Andreas 
No. 113, 1025 North Madison St., Stock- 
ton 95202 

949 — Margaret M. Farnsworth (Mrs.) Vendome 
No. 100, Beverly Manor Convalescent 
Hospital, 2225 Dela Vina St., Santa Bar- 
bara 93101. 

950— Henrietta Toothaker (Miss) Woodland No. 
90, 723 Gibson Road, Woodland 95695 

951— Anna T. Schiebusch (Miss) Los Angeles 
No. 124, 320 W. Chestnut Avenue, San 
Gabriel 91776 

952 — Jewel McSweeney (Miss) El Vespero No. 
118, 2845 Van Ness Avenue, San Fran- 
cisco 94109 

953 — Elmarie H. Dyke (Mrs.) Junipero No. 
141, Box 300, Pacific Grove 93950 

iCTOBER, 1968 



1954 

1955— Doris M. Gerrish (Miss) Liberty No. 213, 

2709 7th Avenue, Sacramento 95818 
1956— Norma Hodson (Mrs. Theron) Phoebe A. 

Hearst No. 214, 139 N. Sherman Street, 

Manteca 95336 
1957— Audrey D. Brown (Mrs.) Sutter No. Ill, 

5608 Caleb, Sacramento 95819 
1958— Irma M. Caton (Mrs.) Argonaut No. 166, 

1166 Powell Street, Oakland 94608 
1959 — Eileen Dismuke (Mrs. Benjamin) Tierra 

de Oro No. 304, 1021 Dela Vina, Santa 

Barbara 93101 
1960 — Maxiene H. Porter (Mrs. Dale) La Tiiera 

No. 282, 6436 Elmdale Rd., Alexandria, 

Virginia 22312 
1961 — Edna C. Williams (Mrs. Don) Sequoia 

No. 272, 941 Norvell, El Cerrito 94530 
1962— Alice D. Shea (Mrs.) Minerva No. 2, 

1850 Woodhaven Way, Oakland 94611 
1963— Rhoda Roelling (Mrs. Elmer C.) Stirling 

No. 146, 2017 Chickie St., Antioch 94509 
1964 — Lee Brice (Mrs. W. Max) Marinita No. 

198, Res. 31, Box 41, San Quentin 94964 
1965 — Fern E. Adams (Mrs. Emmett C.) Berry- 

essa No. 192, P.O. Box 387, Willows 95988 
1966— Katie G. Jewett (Mrs. A. L.) El Pinal No. 

163, P.O. Box 685, Cambria 93428 
1967 — Annette Caicooa (Mrs. Julius Jr.) La 

Junta No. 203, 1624 Main St., St. Helena 

94574. 



PAST GRAND SECRETARY 

Irma S. Murray (Mrs. Arthur) Aloha No. 106, 
3320 Victor Ave., Oakland 94602. 

SUPERVISING D.D.G.P.S 1968-1969 

Appointed by Grand President Hazel T. Mal- 
lette 

District 

1— Humboldt County: Miss Edna Johnson, 

Reichling No. 97, 371 - 9th St., Fortuna 

95540. 
2 — Mendocino County: Mrs. Edith Goble, Fort 

Bragg No. 210, 2190 Sherwood Road, 

Fort Bragg 95437. 
3 — Siskiyou County: Mrs. Jessie Burcell, Es- 

chscholtzia No. 112, Box 311, Etna 96027. 
4 — Trinity, Shasta and Part Tehama Counties: 

Mrs. Patricia Griffin, Camellia No. 41, 3336 

Stingy Lane, Anderson 96007. 
5 — Modoc and Part Lassen Counties: Mrs. 

Zelma McGirr, Alturas No. 159, Box 1124, 

Alturas 96101. 
6 — Part Lassen County: Mrs. Louise A. Ben- 
nett, Nataqua No. 152, Milford 96121. 
7 — Butte, Glenn and part Tehama Counties: 

Mrs. Clara E. Staheli, Olivia No. 309, Rt. 1. 

Box 54, Corning 96021. 
8 — Yuba, Colusa and Sutter Counties: Mrs. 

Frances Wright, Camp Far West No. 218, 

1802 Linda Ave., Marysville 95901. 
9 — Plumas and Part Sierra Counties, Mrs. 

Dora Jane Compton, Imogen No. 134, Box 

37, Sattley 96124. 
10— Part Sierra County: Mrs. Juel V. Vahle, 

Naomi No. 36, Box 172, Downieville 95936. 
11 — Sonoma and Part Mendocino Counties: 

Mrs. Gladys G. Wing, Santa Rosa No. 217, 

1204 Stewart St., Santa Rosa 95404. 
12 — Napa, Lake and Part Solano Counties: Mrs. 

Loella H. Muller, Eshcol No. 16, 6 Monte- 

cito Blvd., Napa 94558. 
13 — Marin County: Mrs. Geojean H. Vedder, 

Marinita No. 198, 101 Trellis Drive, San 

Rafael 94903. 
14 — Nevada and Part Placer Counties: Mrs. 

Esther McCluskey, Laurel No. 6, 742 Zoin 

St., Nevada City 95959. 
15 — El Dorado and Part Placer Counties: Mrs. 

Helen A. Francisco, El Dorado No. 186, 

P. O. Box 291, Foresthill 95631. 
16 — Sacramento, Yolo and Part Solano Coun- 
ties: Mrs. Mary M. Ehlers, Rio Rito No. 253, 

1359 Palomer Circle, Sacramento 95831. 
17 — Amador County: Mrs. Hilda Esola, Amapola 

No. 80, Box 294, Sutter Creek 95685. 
18 — Calaveras County: Miss Addie L. Reid, 

San Andreas No. 113, Box 743, San An- 
dreas 95249. 
19 — Part Contra Costa County: Mrs. Helen 

Carey, Las Amigas No. 311, 3326 Johnson 

Road, Lafayette 94549. 
20 — Alameda, and Part Contra Costa Counties: 

Mrs. Dolores M. Ferenz, Hayward No. 122, 

3306 Alton Court, Fremont 94536. 
21— San Francisco County: Mrs. Myrtle E Rit- 

terbush. Buena Vista No. 68, 1277 Alemany 

Blvd., San Francisco 94112. 
22 — San Mateo County: Mrs. Mary Sousa. 

Bonita No. 10, 427 Third Ave., Redwood 

City 94063. 
23 — San Joaquin County: Mrs. Rozella Vote, 

Caliz de Oro No. 206, 805 Yerba Buena, 

Stockton 95207. 
24 — Tuolumne County: Mrs. Lucile Turman, 

Anona No. 164, 47 N. Washington St., 

Sonora 95370. 
25 — Merced, Stanislaus and Mariposa Counties: 

Mrs. Doris E. Hamilton, Morada No. 199, 

1311 "F" St., Modesto 95353. 



26— Santa Clara County: Miss Phyllis Ij 7m 

dall. Palo Alto No. 229, 1860 Foxworthy 

Ave., San Jose 95124. 
27 — Monterey, San Benito and Santa Cruz 

Counties: Mrs. Vivian Medeiros, Copa de 

Oro No. 105, Box 295, Tres Pinos 95075 
28 — San Luis Obispo County: Mrs. Filomena 

Valleau, San Luisita No. 108, Box 96,, Avila 

Beach 93424. 
29 — Madera and Part Fresno Counties: Mrs. 

Meredith R. Roberts, Fresno No. 187, 

1519 - 3rd St., Sanger 93657. 
30 — Part Fresno, Part Tulare and Kings Coun- 
ties: Mrs. Gerry Freeman, Coalinga No. 

270, Star Route 1, Box 15, Coalinga 93210. 
31 — Part Tulare and Kern Counties: Mrs. Elsie 

Parmelee, El Tejon No. 239, 260 Truxtun 

Ave., Bakersfield 93301. 
32 — Santa Barbara and Ventura Counties: 

Mrs. Mary Rule, La Purisima No. 327, 1401 

E. Maple Ave., Lompoc 93436. 
33 — Part Los Angeles County (Valley): Mrs. 

Mildred A. Kubler, El Camino Real No. 

324, 16545 Bircher St., Granada Hills 91344. 
34 — Part Los Angeles County (Central): Miss 

Ruth M. Payne, La Tijera No. 282, 230 E. 

Hyde Park Blvd., Inglewood 90302. 
35 — Part Los Angeles County (Eastern) Mrs. 

Mildred F. McGee, Whittier No. 298. 11532 

South Valley View Ave., Whittier 90604. 
36— Part Los Angeles County (Harbor): Mrs. 

Valda Vaughan, Rio Hondo No. 284, 8958 

Hunt Ave., South Gate 90280. 
37 — Riverside and San Bernardino Counties: 

Mrs. Helene H. McDaniel, Jurupa No. 296, 

3060 Canyon Crest Drive, Apt. 3, River- 
side 92507. 
38 — Orange County: Mrs. Estelle Germain, 

Santa Ana No. 235, 2222 N. Hesperian. 

Santa Ana 92706. 
39 — San Diego County: Mrs. Alice Whitehead, 

Las Flores del Mar No. 301, 811 N. Santa 

Fe Ave., Apt. 3, Vista 92083. 



STATE CHAIRMEN — 1968-1969 

Americanism and Civic Participation: Mrs. 
Senaida Sullivan, Beverly Hills No. 289. 
2400 Shenandoah St., Los Angeles 90034. 

Appeals, Grievances and Petitions: Mrs. Nel- 
lie Miller, Verdugo No. 240, 730 Patterson 
Ave., Glendale 91202. 

California History and Landmarks: Mrs. Flor- 
ence D. Boyle, PGP, Gold of Ophir No. 190, 
P. O. Box 1743, Oroville 95965. 

Sub-Committee, California History and Land- 
marks, Art Talent Contest: Mrs. Marie C. 
Landini, GT, San Jose No. 81, 960 Warren 
Way, Palo Alto 94303. 

Sub-Committee on Brochure — State Histori- 
cal Sites: Mrs. Loretta Trathen, Orinda No. 
56, 140 Stacey Lane, Grass Valley 95945. 

Sub-Committee on NDGW Historical Room: 
Mrs. Evelyn I. Carlson, PGP, Dolores No. 
169, 1308 Hoover St., Apt. 1, Menlo Park 
94025. 

Conservation and Safety: Mrs. Lola Viera, 
Plumas Pioneer No. 219, RFD 689, Quincy 
95971. 

Credentials: Mrs. Katie G. Jewett, PGP, El 
Pinal No. 163, Cambria 93428. 

Education and Scholarships: Miss Doris Ger- 
rish, PGP Liberty No. 213, 2709 - 7th Ave., 
Sacramento 95818. 

Extension of the Order: Mrs. Annette Caiocca, 
PGP. La Junta No. 203, 1624 Main St., 
St. Helena 94574. 

Finance: Mrs. Ethel C. Enos, PGP, Morada 
No. 199, Box 174, Modesto 95353. 

Grand Parlor Sessions: Mrs. June Painter, 
Lomitas No. 255, 22321 W. Sunset Ave.. 
Los Banos 93635. 

Historian of the Order: Mrs. Myrtle S. Degen, 
Aloha No. 106, 5550 Kales Ave., Oakland 
94618. 

Insurance: Mrs. Irma M. Caton, PGP, Argonaut 
No. 166. 1166 Powell St., Oakland 94608. 

Junior Native Daughters: Mrs. Helen C. Mc- 
Carthy, GT, Utopia No. 252, 4064 - 18th 
St., San Francisco 94114. 

Laws and Supervision: Mrs. Nancy J. Conens, 
GVP, Piedmont No. 87, 4311 Allendale 
Ave., Oakland 94619. 

Legislation: Mrs. Irma S. Murray, PGS, Aloha 
No. 106, 332 Victor Ave., Oakland 94602. 

Legislative Measures: Mrs. Betty Read Curilich, 
GT, Ursula No. 1, 41 Curilich Lane, Jack- 
son 95642. 

Leslye A. Hicks Home Health Fund: Mrs. Mar- 
garet M. Skelly, Yerba Buena No. 273, 
1336 Judah St., San Francisco 94122. 

Mission Restoration: Mrs. Margery S. Ed- 
munds, Woodland No. 90, 9 West Street, 
Woodland 95695. 

Mission Soledad Restoration: Mrs. Mary Silva, 
Mission Bell No. 316, 312 Copley Ave, King 
City 93930. 

Music: Mrs. Emily Len, Rio Hondo No. 284, 
8971 Burke Ave., South Gate 90280. 

NDGW Childrens Foundation: Mrs. Audrey D. 
Brown, PGP, Sutter No. Ill, 5608 Caleb, 
Sacramento 95819. Secretary: Miss Ethel- 
wynne Fraisher, San Fernando Mission No. 
280, 216 Alexander St., San Fernando 
91340. 



PAGE 7 



NDGW Home. Hi Baker St.. San Francisco 

•4117 Mzel B. Hansen. PGP, 

. N Howard SI 

dale 9126 v. irnore Bianchi. 

.'715 Wawona St., San 

FranciMo ^41 !«. 
NSCW NOGW Adoption Aaency: Mr. Barnard 
S. Spring St.. Los Angeles 

90013 
Official Publication: (tan Miss Doris Jacob- 
No 242. 237 S. Bradford. Pla 
I 

■ If Oro No. 304. 1021 
na St . Santa Barbara 93101. 
Pioneer Roster: Mrs Marian E. McGuire. GT, 
lay No ISO. 6S2 Wildcat Canyon Rd . 
:'0S. 
Printing and Supplies: Miss Alma Mullaney. 
' Buana No. 273, 1567 ■ 21st Ave. 
incisco 94122. 
Ritual and Manual of Instruction: Mrs. Vir- 

giiia McCombs. Morada No. 199. 1241 

Normandy Dr.. Modesto 95351. 
Roll of Honor: Mrs Fern Adams. PGP., Berry- 

assa No. 192. P. O. Box 387. Willows 95988. 
State of the Order: Mrs Edna C. Williams. PGP. 

Saauoia No. 272. 941 Norvell. El Cerrito 

94530 
Tournament of Roses Float: Mrs June T. 

Goldie. Jr. PGP. San Gabriel Valley No. 

281. 320 Rosemont Blvd.. San Gabriel 91775. 

Co-Chm .: Mrs. Philomena Wooster. Poppy 

Trail No. 266. 125 N. 18th St.. Montebello 

90640 
Transportation: Mrs. Norma Hodson. PGP. 

Phoebe A. Hearst No. 214. 139 N. Sherman 

Ave . Manteca 95336. 
Veterans Welfare: Miss Jewel McSweeney. 

PGP. El Vespero No. 118, 2845 Van Ness 

Ave.. San Francisco 94109. 
Welfare: Mrs. Rae L. Rommger. GT. La Ban- 
dera No. 110, 2841 69th Ave., Sacramento 

95822. 
Year Books: Mrs. Blanch Oechsel, California 

ana No. 247. 426 1' .• N. Cahuenga Blvd.. 

North Hollywood 91620. 
Young Womens Activities: Mrs. Stella Bentley. 

Placerita No. 277. 5009 Greenbush. Sher- 
man Oaks 91403. 
Father Junipero Serra Statue: Mrs. Eileen 

Dismuke. PGP. Tierra de Oro No. 34. 1021 

Dela Vina St., Santa Barbara 93101. 
Legal Advisor — Grand Parlor Sessions: Mrs. 

Evelyn St. John Monahan, Ilia M. Knox No. 

320. 1193 Merritt Dr.. El Cajon 92021. 



ALAMEDA COUNTY 

Angelita No. 32, Livermore — Meets 2nd Fri- 
day, Carnegie Bldg., 2155 Third St.; Mrs. An- 
gie Marsh, Rec. Sec, 1587 - 2nd St., Liver- 
more 94550. 

Piedmont No. 87, Oakland — Meets 1st and 
3rd Thursday, Veterans Bldg., 200 Grand Ave., 
Oakland; Mrs. Elza Paul, Rec. Sec, 6017 Mon- 
roe Ave., Oakland 94618. 

Aloha No. 106, Oakland— Meets 2nd and 4th 
Tuesday, Glenview Woman's Club, 1318 Glen- 
field Ave.. Oakland; Mrs. Zella Muha, Pres., 
1312 Acton. Berkeley 94706. 

Hayward No. 122, Hayward— Meets 2nd and 
4th Tuesday. Veterans' Memorial Bldg., 22737 
Main St., Hayward; Mrs. Doris Perez, Rec 
Sec. 21672 Knoll Way. Hayward 94546. 

Berkeley No. 150. Berkeley— Meets 2nd Mon- 
day. Berkeley City Club. 2315 Durant; Mrs. Rita 
Marshal. Rec. Sec, 609 Stannage Ave.. Albany 
94706. 

Bear Flag No. 151, Albany— Meets 1st and 3rd 
Tuesday. Maccabee Hall, 985 Kains Ave; Mrs. 
Rhea Campbell. Rec. Sec, 2110 Byron St.. 
Berkpiev 94706. 

Encinal No. 156, Alameda— Meets 2nd and 
4th Monday, Improvement Club, 1407 - 9th St 
Alameda; Mrs. Ruth Schmidt, Rec. Sec, 623 
Taylor Ave., Alameda 94501. 

Brooklyn No. 1S7, Oakland— Meets 1st and 
3rd Thursday, Danish Hall, 164 - 11th St.; Mrs 
Daveda Windfelt, Rec. Sec, 634 - 15th St., 
Oakland 94612. 

Argonaut No. 166, Emeryville— Meets 2nd 
and 4th Tueday. 4321 Salem St.; Mrs. Jose- 
phine Lauricella. Rec. Sec, 841 Santa Ray 
Avenue. Oakiand 94610. 

Bahia Vista No. 167, Oakland— Meets 1st and 
3rd Thursday, 410 11th Street Building; Mrs 
Dorothy Jordan, Rec. Sec, 1614 101st Ave.. 
Oakland 94603. 

Fruitvale No. 177, Oakland— Meets 2nd and 
4th Fridays. A.P.U.M.E.C. Hall, 3256 E. 14th 
St.; Mrs. Gertrude Borman, Rec. Sec , 1915 
- 108th Ave., Oakland 94603. 

El Cereso No. 207, San Leandro— Meets 2nd 
and 4th Wednesdays. Elks Hall, 350 Davis St.. 
San Leandro; Mrs. Florence Smith, Rec. Sec 
280 Best Ave., San Leandro 94577. 

Betsy Ross No. 23B, Newark— Meets 2nd and 
4th Wednesday. Newark Pavilion. 6420 Thorn 
ton Ave.; Mrs. Barbara Caminada, Rec. Sec , 
38536 Logan Dr.. Fremont 94536. 

Albany No. 260, Albany— Meets 2nd and 4th 
Wednesday, Maccabee Hall. 985 Kains Ave., 
Mrs. Delia Madding. Rec. Sec, P.O. Box 6102. 
Albany 94706. 

PAGE 8 



Sequoia No. 172, Berkeley— Meets 2nd and 
4th Thursday. Finnish Brotherhood Hall, 1970 
Chestnut St.: Mrs. Lola Bredhoft. Rec. Sec, 
1332 Carlotta St.. Berkeley 94703. 

V.iiiecito No. 308, Castro Valley— Meets 2nd 
and 4th Tuesday. 1109 "C" St.. Hayward; Mrs. 
lenney. Rec Sec, 2990 Barrett St., 
Oakland 94605. 

AMADOR COUNTY 

Ursula No. 1, Jackson— Meets 2nd and 4th 
Native Sons Hall. Court St.: Mrs. 
Eva E. Geis. Rec. Sec, 240 Walnut St., Jackson 
95642. 

Chispa No. 40. lone — Meets 1st and 3rd 
Tuesday. N.S.G.W. Hall; Mrs. Cynthia A. 
Phillips. Rec. Sec, P.O. Box 293. lone 95640. 

Amapola No. 80, Sutter Creek— Meets 2nd 
Thursday, N.S.G.W. Hall, Main St. Mrs. Hazel 
Marre, Rec. Sec, 15 Gopher Flat Road, Sutter 
Creek 95685 

Forrest No. 86, Plymouth— Meets 2nd and 
4th Tuesday, N.S.G.W. Hall; Miss Melba M. 
Withrow, Rec. Sec, RFD Box 24, Plymouth 
95669. 

BUTTE COUNTY 

Annie K. Bidwell No. 168, Chico— Meets 2nd 
and 4th Thursday, N.D. Hall, 316 W. 2nd St.. 
Chico; Miss Diane Parks. Rec. Sec, 418 Cherry 
St.. Chico 95926. 

Gold of Ophir No. 190, Oroville— Meets 1st 
and 3rd Wednesday, Monday Club, 2385 Mont- 

S ornery St.; Mrs. Zada Harkcom, P.O. Box 252, 
roville 95965. 

Centennial No. 295, Paradise — Meets 2nd and 
4th Tuesday, Cherokee I.O. O.F. Hall; Mrs. Hazel 
Jobe. Rec. Sec, 1704 Nunneley Road, Paradise 
95969. 

CALAVERAS COUNTY 

Ruby No. 46, Murphys — Meets 1st Friday, 
N.S.G.W. Hall; Mrs. Annie J. Voitich, Rec. 
Sec, P.O. Box 152, Murphys 95247. 

Princess No. 84, Angels Camp — Meets 2nd 
Wednesday. I.O. O.F. Hall; Mrs. Celia Beltramo, 
Rec. Sec, Box 302, Angels Camp 95222. 

San Andreas No. 113, San Andreas — Meets 
3rd Friday, Fraternal Hall; Mrs. Mabel Lively, 
Rec. Sec. Box 26, San Andreas 95249. 

COLUSA COUNTY 

Colus No. 194, Colusa — Meets 1st and 3rd 

Monday, N.D.G.W. - N.S.G.W. Hall; Mrs. Hazel 

Nordyke, Rec. Sec, 609 D Street, Colusa 95932. 

CONTRA COSTA COUNTY 

Stirling No. 146, Pittsburg— Meets 1st and 
3rd Wednesday, Veteran's Memorial Bldg., 9th 
and East; Mrs. Eleanor Hogan, Rec. Sec, 1337 
Columbia St., Pittsburg 94565. 

Richmond No. 147, Richmond — Meets 1st 
and 3rd Tuesday, Women's City Club, 1125 
Nevin Ave.; Mrs. Maud E. Alexander, Rec 
Sec, 219 Nicholl Ave., Richmond 94801. 

Donner No. 193, Byron— Meets 1st and 3rd 
Wednesday. I.O.O.F. Hall; Mrs. Catharine Arm- 
strong, Rec. Sec, P. O. Box 63, Byron 94514. 

Las Juntas No. 221, Martinez — Meets 1st 
and 3rd Wednesday, Kiwanis Youth Center, 
750 Allen St.; ,Mrs. Clarine Brusatory, Rec 
Sec, 3510 Estudillo St., Martinez 94553. 

Antioch No. 223. Antioch— Meets 1st and 3rd 
Monday, I.O.O.F. Hall; Mrs. Gloria Biglow, 
Rec. Sec, 2118 Alpha Way, Antioch 94509. 

Cerrito de Oro No. 306, El Cerrito— Meets 
1st and 3rd Wednesday, 6712 Portola Drive, El 
Cerrito; Mrs. Jennie Agresta, Rec Sec, 431 
Everett St., El Cerrito 94530. 

Carquinez No. 310, Crockett— Meets 3rd Tues- 
day, 464 Alhambra Ave., Crockett; Mrs. Mary 
Cerelli, Rec. Sec, 4214 Nevin Ave., Crockett 
94805. 

Las Amigas No. 311, Walnut Creek— Meets 
2nd and 4th Wednesday, Women's Club, Lin- 
coln Ave.; Mrs. Aretta Hughes, Rec. Sec, 3570 
O'Conner Drive. Lafayette 94549. 

Concord No. 323, Concord— Meets 1st and 3rd 
Thursday, Mt. Diablo Women's Club, 2619 Port 
Chicago Hwy; Mrs. Edith F. Ferriera, Rec. Sec, 
1497 Amador Ave., Concord 94520. 

EL DORADO COUNTY 

Marguerite No. 12, Placerville — Meets Third 
Wednesday, Eagles Hall, 215 Coloma St.; Mrs. 
Mary L. Lyons, Rec. Sec, 2876 Pleasant St., 
Placerville 95667. 

El Dorado No. 186, Georgetown — Meets 2nd 
Saturday afternoon, I.O.O.F. Hall, Mrs. Elsie 
M. Ford, Rec. Sec, Cool, California 95614. 

FRESNO COUNTY 

Fresno No. 187, Fresno — Meets 1st and 3rd 
Wednesday. Knights of Pythias Hall, 4867 
E. Fillmore Ave.; Mrs. Lois Smith Traber, Rec 
Sec, 620 E. Peralta, Fresno 93704. 

Coalinga No. 270, Coalinga— Meets 2nd and 
4th Monday, Eagle Hall, 156 W Durian; Mrs. 
Dora C. Phelps, Rec. Sec, 225' Pleasant St., 
Coalinga 93210. 

Wawona No. 271, Fresno— Meets 1st and 3rd 
Friday, Knights of Columbus Hall, 2540 Flora 
Dora St., Fresno; Mrs. Muriel Wells, Rec. Sec 
163 S. Woodrow Ave., Fresno 93702 



Selma No. 313, Selma— Meets 2nd Wednes I 
day, I.O.O.F. Hall, 1710 Tucker St.; Mrs. Alice I 
Clapham, Rec. Sec, 1427 Pine St., Selma 93662.1 



GLENN COUNTY 
Berryessa No. 192, Willows — Meets 1st and 
3rd Monday, I.O.O.F. Hall, 213-A N. Tehamal 
St.; Mrs. Elaine Barceloux, Rec. Sec, 639 
Merrill Ave., Willows 95988. 

HUMBOLDT COUNTY 

Occident No. 28, Eureka — Meets 1st and 3rd 
Wednesday. N.S.G.W. Hall, 623 -3rd St.; Mrs. 
Marion Jurrens, Rec. Sec, 1461 Summer St., 
Eureka. 95501. 

Oneonta No. 71, Ferndale — Meets 2nd and 
4th Thursdays, Danish Hall, Ocean Avenu 
Miss Margaret M. Smith, Rec. Sec, P. O. Box 
635. Ferndale 95536. 

Reichling No. 97, Fortuna — Meets 2nd and 
4th Tuesday, Rohner Grange Hall, Main St.; 
Mrs. Frances S. Lentz, Rec. Sec, 237 Newell 
Dr., Fortuna 95540. 

Areata No. 325, Areata — Meets 1st and 3rd 
Wednesday, Eagles Hall. 1005 11th St.; Mrs. 
Mary K. Foresti, Rec. Sec, 3446 Ribeiro Lane, 
Areata 95521. 



KERN COUNTY 

Miocene No. 228, Taft— Meets 1st and 3rd 
Monday, Veterans Memorial Bldg., Cedar and 
Taylor Sts.; Mrs. Violet M. Krisher, Rec. Sec, 
207 Cen'er St., Taft 93268. 

El Tejon No. 239, Bakersfield— Meets 2nd and 
4th Tuesday, Druids Hall, 501 Sumner St.; Mrs. 
Grace Acheson, Rec. Sec, 1307 Baldwin Road, 
Bakersfield 93304. 

Alila No. 321, Delano — Meets 2nd and 4th 
Monday, V.F.W. Hall, 4th & Lexington; Mrs. 
Louise Whitten, Rec. Sec, 1635 - 7th PI., 
Delano 93215. 



KINGS COUNTY 

Las Flores No. 262, Avenal — Meets 2nd and 
4th Thursday, Redman Hall, Tulare St.; Mrs. 
Jessie M. Measell. Rec. Sec, 101 W. Stanis- 
laus St., Avenal 93204. 

Ramona No. 283, Hanford — Meets 1st and 
3rd Tuesday, McCarthy Hall, 1000 N. Harris; 
Miss Glenda Griffith, Rec. Sec, P.O. Box 1586, 
Visalia 93277. 



LAKE COUNTY 
Clear Lake No. 135, Middletown— Meets 2nd 
and 4th Tuesday, Gibson Library, Mrs. Dor- 
othy Baldwin, Rec. Sec, P.O. Box 566, Middle- 
town 95461. 



LASSEN COUNTY 

Nataqua No. 152, Standish — Meets 3rd 
Wednesday, Standish Hall; Mrs. Gloria Farris, 
Rec Sec, Star Rt. 3, Box 67, Susanville 96130. 

Mount Lassen No. 215, Bieber — Meets 1st 
and 3rd Thursday, Legion Hall; Mrs. Marie 
Walsh, Rec. Sec, Bieber 96009. 

Susanville No. 243, Susanville— Meets 2nd 
Tuesday, Msgr. Moran's Hall. Weatherou St.; 
Miss Jennie Borghi, Rec. Sec, Box 54, 454 
Richmond Rd., Susanville 96130. 



LOS ANGELES COUNTY 

Los Angeles No. 124, Los Angeles— Meets 
1st and 3rd Wednesday, I.O.O.F. Temple, 1828 
S. Oak St.; Mrs. Pauline Brasher, Rec. Sec, 
2346 Portland St., Los Angeles 90007. 

Long Beach No. 154, Long Beach— Meets 1st 
and 3rd Thursday, Y.W.C.A., 550 Pacific Ave ; 
Mrs. Leola Temby, Rec. Sec, 1155 E. 20th St., 
Long Beach 90806. 

Rudecinda No. 230, San Pedro— Meets 1st 
and 3rd Wednesday, Womans' Club, 11th and 
Gaffey Sts.; Mrs. Rowena Wheeler, Rec Sec , 
1137 McDonald Ave.. Wilmington 90744 

Verdugo No. 240, Glendale— Meets 1st and 
3rd Tuesday, I.O.O.F. Hall, 520 Glen Oaks Blvd.; 
Mrs. Geraldine Leonetti, Rec. Sec, 726 Wing 
St., Glendale 91205. 

Californiana No. 247, Los Angeles— Meets 2nd 
Tuesday. Assistance League, 1370 N. St. An- 
drews PI.; Mrs. Blanch Oechsel, Rec. Sec, 
4261i 2 Cahuenga, North Hollywood 91602. 

Compton No. 258. Compton— Meets 1st and 
4th Tuesday, South Gate Civic Auditorium 
4900 Southern Ave., South Gate; Mrs. Marion 
Kelly, Rec Sec, 8442 Gainford, Downey 90240. 

Poppy Trail No. 266. Montebello— Meets 1st 
and 3rd Tuesday, I.O.O.F. Hall, 125 N. 5th St.; 
Miss Viola Salgado, Rec. Sec, 751 S. Mc- 
Donnell Ave., Los Angeles 90022. 
„».? '?.? eri,a No ' 277, Van Nuys— Meets 2nd and 
4th Wednesday. Encino Women's Club, Encino; 
MrS L »" en H ermann - Rec. Sec, 8103 Green- 
bush Ave., Van Nuvs 91402. 

Wilmington No. 278, Wilmington— Meets 2nd 
and 4th Tuesday, Woman's Club, Lakme and 
Denni Streets; Mrs. Agnes Seja, Rec. Sec, 
1050 Avalon Blvd., Wilmington 90744. 

CALIFORNIA HERALD 



Tolu.:a No. 279, BurbanK — Meets 2nd and 
4th Tuesday, Campo de Cahuenga; Mrs. Don- 
nabel Roher. Rec. Sec, 3520 Rosemary, Glen- 
dale 91208. 

San Fernando Mission No. 280, San Fernando 
—Meets 1st and 3rd Wednesday, San Fer- 
nando Womens Club, 552 N. Maclay Ave.; Mrs. 
Grace Trimble, Rec. Sec, Box 311, Newhall 
91321. 

San Gabriel Valley No. 281, San Gabriel- 
Meets 1st and 3rd Thursday, Vigari Adobe, 
616 Ramona; Mrs. June T. Goldie, Rec. Sec, 
320 Rosemont Blvd., San Gabriel 91775. 

La Tijera No. 282, Inglewood— Meets 1st and 
3rd Tuesday, 820 Java St., Inglewood; Mrs. 
Harriett Coleman, Rec. Sec, 10612 4th Ave., 
Inglewood 90305. 

Rio Hondo No. 284, Huntington Park— Meets 
1st and 3rd Wednesday, Ebell Clubhouse, 2502 
Clarendon; Mrs. Valda Vauehn, Rec. Sec, 8958 
Hunt Ave., South Gate 90280. 

Joshua Tree No. 288, Lancaster — Meets 1st 
and 3rd Tuesday, Fraternal Hall, 618 Oldfield; 
Mrs. Sunny Jones, Rec. Sec, 44620 N. Stan- 
ridge, Lancaster 93534. 

Beverly Hills No. 289, Beverly Hillls— Meets 
1st Wednesday, 9461 Wilshire Blvd.; Mrs. Olive 
D. Burke. Rec. Sec, 10507 Bradbury Rd., Los 
Angeles 90064. 

Pasadena No. 290, Pasadena — Meets 2nd and 
4th Thursdays, E. Pasadena American Legion 
Hall; Mrs. Lilly Westover, Rec. Sec, 1012 W. 
Duarte Rd., Apt. 17, Arcadia 91006. 

Whittier No. 298, Whittier— Meets 1st and 3rd 
Tuesday, Greenleaf Masonic Temple, 12001 W. 
Beverly Road; Mrs. Esther Vreeken, Rec. Sec, 
P.O. Box 15, Whittier 90608. 

Tierra del Rey No. 300, Hermosa Beach — 
Meets 1st and 3rd Monday, Neptunia Club, 920 
Highland Ave., Manhattan Beach; Barbara Car- 
ter, Rec. Sec, 1038 Elkgrove Ave., Apt .1, 
Venice 90291. 

Cien Anos No. 303, Norwalk — Meets 2nd and 
4th Wednesday, V.F.W. Hall 12634 Pioneer 
Blvd.; Mrs. Shirley Elofson, Rec. Sec, 12020 
Hebe Ave.. Norwalk 90650. 

Rancho San Jose, No. 307, Pomona — Meets 
2nd and 4th Tuesday, Assistance League, 693 
N. Palomares; Mrs. Senaida Baiz, Rec. Sec, 
214 Marywood Ave., Claremont 91711. 

El Camino Real No. 324, Granada Hills — 
Meets 2nd and 4th Wednesday, Granada Hills 
Womens Club. 10666 Whiteoak; Mrs. Marie 
Harrington. Rec. Sec, 11039 Memory Park Ave., 
Mission Hills 91340. 

MADERA COUNTY 

Madera No. 244. Madera— Meets 2nd and 4th 

Thursday, Women's Improvement Clubhouse; 

Mrs. Frances Hieuera, Rec. Sec, 321 South 

"B" St., Apt. 3, Madera 93637. 

MARIN COUNTY 

Sea Point No 196. Sausalito— Meets 1st and 
3rd Tuesday, Perry's Hall, 44A Caladonia St.; 
|Mrs. Hilda Juries, Rec. Sec, 66 Shell Rd., 
Mill Valley 94941. 

Marinita No. 198, San Rafael— Meets 2nd and 
4th Monday. Portuguese American Hall, 822 
jB St.. San Rafael; Mrs. Lee Brice, Rec. Sec, 
P.O. Box 41. San Quentin 94902. 

Fairfax No. 225, Fairfax— Meets 1st and 3rd 
Wednesday, American Legion Hall, San An- 
selmo; Mrs. Doris J. Crocker, Rec. Sec, 25 
Meernaa Ave., Fairfax 94930. 

Tamelpa No. 231, Mill Valley— Meets 1st and 
3rd Monday. I.O.O.F. Hall; Mrs. Elvira E. Bru- 
sati. Rec. Sec, 104 Mission Ave., San Rafael 
94901. 

MARIPOSA COUNTY 
Mariposa No. 63, Mariposa— Meets 1st Tues- 
day, Odd Fellows Hall; Rita Cavagnaro, Rec. 
Sec, Star Route, Mariposa 95338. 

MENDOCINO COUNTY 

Fort Bragg No. 210, Fort Bragg— Meets 2nd 

Thursday, I.O.O.F. Hall, Main St.; Mrs. Glenise 

Mallory. Rec. Sec, 180 Lyta Way, Fort Bragg 



95437. 

Ukiah No. 263, Ukiah— Meets 1st Monday 
Saturday Afternoon Club, Church and Oak, 
3rd Monday in Members Homes; Mrs. Dorothy 
Buchanan, Rec. Sec, P.O. Box 87, Talmase 
95481. 

MERCED COUNTY 

Veritas No. 75, Merced— Meets 1st and 3rd 
Tuesday, I.O.O.F. Hall; Mrs. Zelphia Dapelo, 
Rec. Sec, 151 W. 21st St., Merced 95340. 

Lomitas No. 255, Los Banos— Meets 1st and 
3rd Wednesday, D.E.S. Hall, "I" St.; Miss Mary 
Louise Cotta, Rec. Sec, 13780 S. Volta Rd., 
Los Banos 93635. 

Golden California No. 291, Gustine— Meets 
3rd Tuesday, I.O.O.F. Hall, 471 -4th Ave.; Mrs. 
Evelyn Nunes, Rec. Sec, 29431 W. Sullivan 
Rd., Gustine 95322. 

MODOC COUNTY 
Alturas No. 159, Alturas— Meets 1st Thurs- 
day, I.O.O.F. Hall, Main St.; Mrs. Hazel E. 
Schorch, Rec. Sec, 604 Park Ave., P.O. Box 
481, Alturas 96101. 

DCTOBER, 1968 



MONTEREY COUNTY 

Aleli No. 102, Salinas— Meets 2nd and 4th 
Thursday, I.O.O.F. Hall; Miss Rose Rhyner, 
Rec. Sec, 420 Soledad St., Salinas 93901. 

Junipero No. 141, Monterey— Meets 1st and 
3rd Tuesday, House of Four Winds, Callo 
Principal; Mrs. Mae Layton, Rec. Sec, 344 
Clay St., Monterey 93940. 

Mission Bell No. 316, Soledad— Meets 2nd 
and 4th Monday, Forester's Hall; Mrs. Kath- 
erine Hambey, Rec. Sec, Box 457, Soledad 
93960. 

NAPA COUNTY 

Eshcol No. 16, Napa— Meets 2nd and 4th 
Monday, N.S. Hall, 1st and Coombs; Mrs. Ruth 
Stofer, Rec. Sec, 1300 Thompson, Napa 94558. 

Cahstoga No 145, Caliscoga— Meels 2nd and 
4th Monday. St. Lukes Hall, Myrtle St.; Mrs. 
Ella Light, Rec. Sec, 1465 - 1st St., Calistoga 
94515. 

La Junta No 203, St. Helena— Meets 1st and 
3rd Tuesday, N.S.G.W. Hall, Spring St.; Mrs. 
Amelia Greenhow, Rec. Sec, 1522 Hudson 
Ave., St. Helena 94574. 

George C. Yount No. 322, Yountville— Meets 
1st and 3rd Wednesday, Grant Hall Recreation 
Bldg. Veterans Home; Mrs. Louise Komorow- 
ski, Rec. Sec, P.O. Box 91, Yountville 94599. 

NEVADA COUNTY 

Laurel No. 6, Nevada City— Meets 1st and 
3rd Wednesday, Veterans Memorial Building, 
N. Pine and Cottage; Mrs Marille Hopkins, 
Rec. Sec, Rt. 1, Box B-290, Nevada City 95959 

Manzanita No. 29, Grass Valley— Meets 1st 
and 3rd Tuesday, Auditorium Hall, Mill St.; 
Mrs. Elsie Peard, Rec. Sec, 120 High St.. 
Grass Valley 95945. 

Columbia No. 70, French Corral — Meets 1st 
Friday afternoon, Farrelley Hall; Mrs. Fannie 
M. Moulton, Rec. Sec, French Corral, Star 
Route, P.O., Smartsville 95977. 

ORANGE COUNTY 

Santa Ana No. 235, Santa Ana— Meets 2nd 
and 4th Monday, 6th & Baker; Mrs. Virginia 
Cilley, Rec. Sec, 815 S. Philadelphia, Anaheim 
92805. 

Grace No. 242, Fullerton— Meets 1st and 3rd 
Thursday, I.O.O.F. Hall, Lemon and Amerige; 
Mrs. Betty Bennett, Rec. Sec, 2127 Kathryn 
Way, Placentia 92670. 

Silver Sands No. 286, Huntington Beach- 
Meets 1st Tuesday, Lake Park Club House; 
Virginia Segelson, Rec. Sec, 303 13th St., 
Huntington Beach 92646. 

PLACER COUNTY 

Placer No. 138, Lincoln— Meets 2nd Wednes- 
day, The Womans Club, 499 E Street; Mrs 
Margaret Schmidt, Rec. Sec, P.O. Box 171, 
Lincoln 95648. 

Auburn No. 233, Auburn — Meets 3rd Monday, 
Veterans Memorial; Mrs. Anna E. Brown, Rec. 
Sec, 112 Aeolia Drive, Auburn 95603. 

Sierra Pines No. 275, Colfax— Meets 1st and 
3rd Thursday, Knights of Pythias Hall, Main 
St.; Mrs. Isabelle Eddy, Rec. Sec, P.O. Box 55, 
Colfax 95713. 

PLUMAS COUNTY 
Plumas Pioneer No. 219, Quincy— Meets 
1st and 3rd Monday, I.O.O.F. Hall, Main St.; 
Mrs. Lola O. Viera, Rec. Sec, R.F.D. Box 689. 
Quincy 95971. 

RIVERSIDE COUNTY 

Jurupa No. 296, Riverside— Meets 1st and 3rd 

Wednesday, I.O.O.F. Lodge, 3942 Jurupa Ave.; 

Mrs. Roberta Nolze, Rec. Sec, 13838 Nolze 

Place, Riverside 92508. 

SACRAMENTO COUNTY 

Califia No. 22, Sacramento — Meets 2nd and 
4th Tuesday, N.S.G.W. Hall, 11th and "J" Sts.; 
Mrs. Lillian Blackwell, Rec Sec, 3908 - 2nd 
Avenue, Sacramento 95817. 

La Bandera No. 110, Sacramento— Meets 1st 
and 3rd Thursday, NSGW Hall, 11th and Jay 
Sts., Sacramento; Mrs. Rae L. Rominger, Rec 
Sec, 2841 - 69th Ave., Sacramento 95822. 

Sutter No. 111, Sacramento — Meets 1st and 
3rd Tuesday, N.S.G.W. Hall, 11th and J Streets; 
Mrs. Wilma Gutenberger, Rec. Sec, 615 27th 
St.. Sacramento 95816. 

Fern No. 123, Folsom— Meets 1st and 3rd 
Tuesday, Community Club House; Mrs. Rose 
Marie Trammell, Rec. Sec, 9424 Golden Dr., 
Orangevale. Send mail to P.O. Box 326, 
Folsom 95630. 

Chabolla No. 171, Gait— Meets 3rd Thursday, 
Women's Club House, 5th & D St.; Mrs. Jea- 
nette Preston, Rec. Sec, 12911 E. Comstock, 
Stockton 95205. 

Liberty No. 213, Elk Grove— Meets 2nd and 
4th Friday, I.O.O.F. Hall, Elk Grove; Mrs. Ger- 
trude E. Hogaboom, Rec. Sec, P.O. Box 72 
Elk Grove 95624. 

Rio Rito No. 253, Sacramento— Meets 2nd 
and 4th Thursday, Y.L.I. Club House, 1400 27th 
St.; Mrs. Catherine Bennett, Rec. Sec, 1299 
8th Ave., Sacramento 95818. 



San Juan No. 315, Carmicnael— Meets 2nd 
and 4th Thursday, Veteran's Memorial Hall, 
Carmichael Park; Mrs. Lillian Gunderson, Rec 
95825 3441 Arde " CreeK R ° 8d ' Sacrarnen, ° 

SAN BENITO COUNTY 

Copa de Oro No. 105, Hollister— Meets 1st 

and 3rd Wednesday, I.O.O.F. Hall, 362 Fourth 

St.; Mrs. Evelyn Pivetti, Rec. Sec, 1258 West 

St., Hollister 95023. 

San Juan Bautista No. 179, San Juan Bau- 
tista— Meets 1st Wednesday, N.D.G.W. Adobe 
4th St.; Miss Sharon Johnston, Rec. Sec 99 
Lang St., San Juan Bautista 95045. 

SAN BERNARDINO COUNTY 
Lugonia No. 241, San Bernardino— Meets 2nd 
and 4th Thursday, N.S.G.W. Hall; Winnifred A 
92402 Se °" P '°' B °* 58, Sa " Bernardino 

Ontario No. 251, Ontario— Meets 1st and 3rd 
Tuesday, Ontario Women's Club, 738 N. Euclid- 
Mrs. Betty Clement, Rec. Sec, 976 East "H' : 
St., Ontario 91762. 

SAN DIEGO COUNTY 

^ a !!. 1 . D i e . 80 J No - 208, San Diego— Meets 2nd 
and 4th Monday, House of Hospitaltiy, Balboa 
Park; Mrs. Sarah Miller, Rec. Sec, 4117 
Georgia St., San Diego 92103. 

Las Flores Del Mar No. 301, Oceanside— 
Meets 2nd and 4th Tuesday, Community Center 
Bldg.; Mrs. Frances Van Wey, 325 Blue Springs 
Lane, Oceanside 92054. »k»"b» 

'J la , M V Knox No - 32 °- El Cajon— Meets 1st 
1? ?, rd T V e f a ' av ' Veterans Hall, 136 Chambers 
St.; Mrs. Letha M. Miller, Rec. Sec, 1547 E 
Washington Ave., Apt. 2, El Cajon 92020. 

SAN FRANCISCO COUNTY 

=,nrf'!!fh rVa v !"' 5 San Francisco-Meets 2nd 
and 4th Wednesday, N.S.G.W. Hall, 414 Mason 
St.; Mrs. Mary Oertwig, Rec Sec, 40 Pine- 
hurst Way, San Francisco 94127 

Ada No 3, San Francisco— Meets 2nd and 
4th Tuesday afternoon, N.S.G.W. Bldg 414 
m?? ",! 1 --; A ,rs - L J JCiUe Kimbark, Rec Sec" 

A •" ve " San Francisco 94116 

ln °' l * [ 1 !;' 56 i San Francisco— Meets 2nd 

fer nn/'n.l^ S i t arkS S " Uare Urban Cen- 
£h l i °Farrell St.; Mr S' Irmgard Wala- 

94117 " W CaM St " San Francisco 

,. B u T e . na v j sta No. 68, San Francisco— Meets 

3rd Thursday, N.D.G.W. Home, 555 Baker St- 

Mrs. Lillian Dowling. Rec Sec, 278 Silver Ave 

San Francisco 94112. 

,Jf\ L J" 1 l as *}."■ "• San Francisco— Meets 1st 

I? „ 3 / d I ue ? day ' N.D.G.W. Home, 555 Baker 

St.; Mrs Emily E. Ryan, Rec. Sec, 1371 - 48th 

Ave., Apt. 201, San Francisco 94122 

u Dar,na No 114, San Francisco— Meets 3rd 

Monday, Druids Hall, 44 Page St.; Mrs. Thelma 

~sco%4124 SeC ' 21 W3baSh TerraC6 ' San 

5nH f »n3 Pe «K *<?■ 'I 8 ' San Francisco-Meets 
2nd and 4th Tuesday, N.S.G.W. Bldg 414 
Mason St.; Miss Ruth McAdam, Rec. Sec, 120 
Romney Drive, South San Francisco 94080 
»„h e -, n !i vi -5u e N 5' 132 ' San Francisco— Meets 1st 
t?£* p? T K U . r S da . y ' NSGW Ha " 414 Ma s°n St 
Miss Elizabeth Brennan, Rec. Sec, 2066 Grove 
St., San Francisco 94117. 

Guadalupe No. 153, San Francisco— Meets 
2nd and 4th Monday, Dovre Hall, 3543 18th St • 
Ruth A. Stone, Rec. Sec, 270 Ellsworth St, 
San Francisco 94110. ' 

Golden Gate No. 158, San Francisco— Meets 
2nd and 4th Monday, N.S.G.W. Bldg 414 

™£ n fl St; Mrs - . Anne Plescia ' R ec Sec 1378 
-26th Ave., San Francisco 94122 

anS'U'/.fVS- 'I 9 ' San Francisco-Meets 2nd 
arid 4th Wednesday, NDGW Home, 555 Baker 
St.; Mrs Evelyn I. Carlson, Rec. Sec, 1308 
Hoover St., Apt. 1, Menlo Park 94025 
a „H°1°i a -r No J 72 ' San Francisco-Meets 1st 
I? M fd Tuesday N.S.G.W. Bldg., 414 Mason 
A»i M ,T.! n D ° ro,n y V.talie. Rec. Sec, 162 Cayuga 
Ave., San Francisco 94112 

2ndTnrt Pe /.h S t N °- J 85 ' S an Francisco-Meets 
if «. 4,h Tu esday, Dovre Hall, 3543 18th 
St.; Mrs. Irene Cashman, Rec Sec. 125 Rus- 
sia Ave., Apt. 2, San Francisco 94112 
•> J J"?,? S ^ Lick No- 220, San Francisco— Meets 
2nd Wednesday afternoon. Druids Temple, 44 
T« c S Y, Mr fi Jaredna Johnson, Rec Sec, 
423 So. Van Ness, San Francisco 94103 

=nH IS /, s .'i? n c N J'- 227, San Francisco— Meets 2nd 
and 4th Friday, N.S.G.W. Building. 414 Mason 
St.; Mrs. Bermce Short, Rec. Sec, 330 Foote 
Ave., San Francisco 94112. 

t U,0 ^ pia £"■ 252 ' San Francisco— Meets 2nd 
Tuesday, Dovre Hall. 3543 - 18th St.; Mrs. Helen 
C. Scanned. Rec. Sec, 4064 - 18th St., San 
Francisco 94114. 

San Francisco No. 261, San Francisco— 
Meets 1st and 3rd Wednesday, N.S.G.W. Bldg., 
ili„ ason St-: Mrs. Irene Bondanza, Rec. Sec, 
2328 Union St., San Francisco 94123. 

Yerba Buena No. 273, San Francisco— Meets 
1st Thursday afternoon, N.S.G.W. Bldg., 414 
Mason St., Mrs. Julia Bode. Rec Sec, 2535 
Taraval St., San Francisco 94116. 

PAGE 9 



SAN JOAQUIN COUNTY 
Joaquin No. V Stockton MhIi 2nd and 
Mill. (09 N. Hunter; 
Ini J Williamson. Rec. Sac. 510 E. 
■ ?04. 
El Pe»cade/o No. ■?. tucy-MMli 1st and 
. Hall. 234 E. 10th St ; 
Hoc. S«c, 2800 Cabnllo 
■ .J76 
Cain do Oro No. 20*. Stockton Moots 1st 
and Jul tn Castle Hall. 134 W 

Foster. Roc. Sec. 657 
-Ion 95204. 
Phoebe A Hoarst No 214. Manteca— Meets 
2nd and 4th Wednesday. MR PS. Hall. N. 
Grant St ; Mrs Norma Hodson. Rec. Sec. 139 
N Sherman. Manteca 95336. 

Stockton No Mi. Stockton Meets 1st and 
3rd Thursday. N S G W. Hall. 809 N. Hunter; 
.■0D«th Baker. Roc. Sec. 1702 S. 
American. Stockton 95206 

SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY 
San Miguel No. 94. San Miguel— Meets 2nd 

and 4th Wednesday, I. OOF. Hall, San Miguel; 

Mrs. Horiense Wright. Rec. Sec, P.O. Box 96. 

San Miguel 93451. 
San Luisita No. 108, San Luis Obispo— Meets 

1st and 3rd Tuesday. 1.0 OF. Hall. S20 Dana 

St.; Juamta L. Kiger. Rec. Sec, 2141 Broad 

St.. San Luis Obispo 93401. 

El Pinal No. 1M. Cambria— Meets 2nd and 

4th Tuesday, Masonic Temple; Mrs. Katie G. 
Hec Sec, P.O. Box 685, Cambria 

93428 

SAN MATEO COUNTY 

Bonita No. 10. Redwood City— Meets 2nd 
and 4th Thursday, Veterans Memorial Building, 
1455 Madison Ave ; Mrs. Louise Gibsen. Rec. 
Sec. 1558 Lago Street, San Mateo 94403. 

Vista del Mar No. 1SS, Hall Moon Bay- 
Meets 3rd Tuesday. IDES Hall, Main St.; 
Mrs. Marion Miramontes, Rec. Sec, P. O. Box 
496. Half Moon Bay 94019. 

Ano Nuevo No. ISO, Pescadero — Meets 3rd 
Wednesday. N.S.G.W. and N.D.G.W. Hall; Mrs. 
Alice Mattei. Rec. Sec, Willowside Farm, Pes- 
cadero 94060. 

El Carmelo No. 181. Daly City— Meets 1st 
and 3rd Wednesday. 22 Hillcrest Dr.; Mrs. 
Christine E. Hulme. Rec. Sec. 305 Hillcrest 
Blvd.. Millbrae 94030. 

Menlo No. 211, Menlo Park— Meets 1st and 
3rd Tuesday. Recreation Bldg.. Civic Center; 
Mrs. Lillian King. Rec. Sec, 1303 Fernside St., 
Redwood City 94061. 

San Bruno No. 246, San Bruno — Meets 2nd 
and 4th Thursday. Fireman's Hall, 618 San 
Mateo Ave.. San Bruno; Mrs. Rena LoReaux. 
Rec Sec. 838 Easton Ave., San Bruno 94066. 

La Paz No. 326, Pacilica— Meets 1st and 3rd 
Monday. Nick's Restaurant, 100 Rockaway 
Beach Ave.: Mrs. Rosamond Lanomarsino, Rec. 
Sec, 1034 Yosemite Ave., Pacifica 94044. 

SANTA BARBARA COUNTY 

Reina del Mar No. 126, Santa Barbara — 
Meets 1st and 3rd Tuesday, K. C. Hall, 925 
De La Vina St.; Mrs. Mamie Miller, Rec. Sec, 
3131 Calle Mariposa. Santa Barbara 93105. 

Santa Maria No. 276, Santa Maria — Meets 
1st and 3rd Tuesday, D.E.S. Club, 615 W. 
Chapel: Mrs. Blanche F. Powell, Rec. Sec, 
508 So. Lincoln St., Santa Maria 93454. 

Tierra de Oro No. 304, Santa Barbara — Meets 
1st and 3rd Thursday. Eagles Hall, 923 Bath 
St.; Mrs. Frances Ames. Rec. Sec, 3521 Ma- 
drone Drive. Santa Barbara 93105. 

La Purisima No. 327. Lomooc— Meets 1st and 
3rd Wednesday, 523 East Chestnut Ave.; Mrs. 
Mary Rule. Rec. Sec. 1401 E. Maple. Lompoc 
93436. 

SANTA CLARA COUNTY 

San Jose No. 81, San Jose— Meets 1st and 
3rd Thursday, Eagles' Hall, 148 N. 3rd St.; Mrs. 
Marie C. Landini, Rec. Sec, 860 Warren Way, 
Palo Alto 94303. 

Vendome No. 100, San Jose— Meets 1st and 
3rd Tuesday. I.O.O.F. Hall. 122 Race St.; Mrs. 
Susie T. Engfer, Rec Sec, 1301 Glen Eyrie, 
San Jose 95125. 

El Monte No. 205, Mountain view— Meets 
2nd and 4th Friday, Masonic Temple. Church 
and Franklin; Mrs. Henrietta Marcotte, Rec. 
Sec. 22415 Starling Dr.. Los Altos 94022 

Palo Alto No. 229. Palo Alto— Meets 1st and 
3rd Wednesday. Palo Alto Savings, 300 Hamil- 
ton Ave.: Mrs. Wealthy Falk, Rec Sec, 1934 
Capitol Ave.. Palo Alto 94303 

Gilroy No. 312, Gilroy— Meets 1st and 3rd 
Thursday. Salinas Valley Community Room 
Monterey St.; Miss Kathleen Holzhauer Rec 
Sec. P.O. Box 71. Gilroy 95020. 

Los Gatos No. 317, Los Gatos— Meets 4th 
Wednesday. 1st National Bank Bldg.; Mrs. Eola 
Howe. 2325 Winchester Blvd.. Campbell 95008. 

SANTA CRUZ COUNTY 
Santa Cruz No. 26, Santa Cruz— Meets 2nd 
and 4th Monday, B.P.W.C. Clubhouse, 240 Ply- 
mouth; Mrs. Ruby M. Bowen, Rec Sec 307 
Berkeley Way, Santa Cruz 95060. 

PAGE 10 



El Pajaro No. 35, Watsonville— Meets 2nd 
Tuesday. K. C. Hall; Mrs. Bernadine Lynch, 
Rec. Sec, 105 Hill Ave., Watsonville 95076. 

SHASTA COUNTY 

Camellia No. 41, Anderson— Meets 1st Tues- 
day. Masonic Hall, Center and Howard; Mrs. 
Rosemary McCabe, Rec. Sec, P. O. Box 104, 
Cottonwood 96022. 

Lasstn View No. 98, Shasta— Meets 2nd Fri- 
day. Masonic Hall; Jeanette Hall, Rec. Sec. 
P.O. Box 400. Redding 96001. 

Hiawatha No. 140, Redding— Meets 1st and 
3rd Wednesday, N.D.G.W. Hall 2322 California 
st : Mrs Flora E. Jordan, Rec Sec, 1604 Verda 
St., Redding 96001. 

SIERRA COUNTY 

Naomi No. 36, Downieville — Meets 2nd and 
4th Wednesday, N.D.G.W. Hall, Commercial St.: 
Mrs. Margaret Elaine Lambert, Rec. Sec, Box 
224, Downieville 95936 

Imogen No. 134, Sierraville— Meets 2nd and 
4th Wednesday. Coprens Hall: Mrs. Jennie 
Copren. Rec. Sec, Box 126, Sierraville 96126. 

SISKIYOU COUNTY 

Eschscholtzia No. 112, Etna— Meets 1st and 

3rd Tuesday. Masonic Hall, Main St.; Mrs. Kate 

Berthelsen, Rec. Sec, Star Route, Etna 96027. 

SOLANO COUNTY 

Vallejo No. 195, Vallejo— Meets 1st and 3rd 
Wednesday, Veterans Bldg., 444 Alabama St.; 
Mrs. Elvena B. Woodard, Rec. Sec, 302 Illinois 
St., Apt. A, Vallejo 94590. 

Mary E. Bell No. 224, Dixon— Meets 2nd and 
4th Thursday, I.O.O.F. Hall; Miss Floris Trip- 
lett, Rec. Sec, P.O. Box 233, Dixon 95620. 

Vacaville No. 293, Vacaville— Meets 1st and 
3rd Tuesday. Saturday Club House; Mrs. Vir- 
ginia Lee. Rec. Sec, 325 Neil St., Vacaville 
95688. 

SONOMA COUNTY 

Sonoma No. 209, Sonoma— Meets 2nd and 
4th Monday, I.O.O.F. Hall, Broadway St.; Mrs. 
Clare Geisner, Rec. Sec, 575 Studley St., 
Sonoma 95476. 

Santa Rosa No. 217, Santa Rosa— Meets 1st 
and 3rd Wednesday. N.S.G.W. Hall, 404 Men- 
docino Ave.; Mrs. Ruth Smith, Rec. Sec, 3243 
Magowan Dr., Santa Rosa 95405. 

Petaluma No. 222, Petaluma — Meets 2nd and 
4th Tuesday, Herman Sons Hall, 860 Western 
Ave.; Mrs. Olga Lavio, Rec. Sec, 4990 D St., 
Petaluma 94952. 

Sebastopol No. 265, Sebastopol — Meets 2nd 
and 4th Friday, I.O.O.F. Hall, McKinley Street; 
Mrs. Ilah Thorp. Rec. Sec, 436 Parquet St., 
Sebastopol 95472. 

Cotati No. 299, Cotati— Meets 2nd and 4th 
Thursday. Women's Club Hall; Mrs. Marie 
Baranzini, Rec. Sec, 8107 El Rancho Dr., 
Cotati 94928. 

STANISLAUS COUNTY 

Oakdale No. 125, Oakdale— Meets 1st and 
3rd Monday, Grange Hall, F and Lambuth; 
Mrs. Daisy Ulrich, Rec. Sec, 414 West G St., 
Oakdale 95361. 

Morada No. 199, Modesto — Meets 2nd and 
4th Wednesday, I.O.O.F. Hall, Scenic & Bodem 
St.; Mrs. Mary Clay, Rec. Sec, 225 Sunset 
Boulevard, Modesto 95351 

Eldora No. 248, Turlock— Meets 1st and 3rd 
Thursday, American Legion Hall; Mrs. Lillian 
Stammerjohan, Rec Sec, 5201 N. Tully Rd., 
Turlock, 95380. 

SUTTER COUNTY 

South Butte No. 226, Sutter— Meets 1st and 
3rd Monday, N.D.G.W. Hall; Mrs. Necia Correll, 
Rec. Sec, 418 Page Avenue, Yuba City 95991. 

Oak Leaf No. 285, Live Oak— Meets 2nd and 
4th Tuesday, Women's Clubhouse, "P" St.; Mrs. 
Maxine Dodge, Rec. Sec, 8991 S. Larkin Road, 
Live Oak 95953. 

TEHAMA COUNTY 

Berendos No. 23, Red Bluff— Meets 1st and 
3rd Thursday, N.D.G.W. Hall, 1439 Lincoln St • 
Mrs. Verona DeWitt, Rec Sec, 90 Gurnsey 
Ave., Red Bluff 96080. 

Olivia No. 309, Corning— Meets 2nd and 4th 
Wednesday, I.O.O.F. Hall, Solano St.; Mrs 
Reta Fees, Rec. Sec, 810 Almond St., Corning 
96021. s 

TRINITY COUNTY 

Eltapome No. 55, Weaverville— Meets 2nd 
and 4th Thursday, N.S.G.W. Hall; Mrs. Mar- 
garet J. Brown, Rec. Sec, P.O. Box 224 
Weaverville 96093. 

TULARE COUNTY 

,.5 h i! , !L r °l y No 292> Visalia— Meets 2nd and 
4th Wednesday, Visalia Women's Civic Club 
House, Johnson and Center; Mrs Lois Edwards 
Rec. Sec, 2840 Canary, Visalia 93277 



Tule Vista No. 305, Porterville— Meets 2nd 
and 4th Thursday. Porterville Women's Club, 
513 North "E" St.; Mrs. Ruth Olsen, Rec. Sec, 
681 W. Belleview, Porterville 93257. 

TUOLUMNE COUNTY 

Oardanelle No. 66, Sonora— Meets 1st Tues- 
day, I.O.O.F. Hall, Sonora; Mrs. Martha Mar- 
shall, Rec. Sec, 227 E. Lyons Street, Sonorai 
95370 

Golden Era No. 99, Columbia— Meets 1st and 
3rd Thursday, N.S.G.W. Hall; Miss Irene Ponce, 
Rec.Sec, Rt. 3. Box 644, Sonora 95370. 

Anona No. 164, Jamestown— Meets 2nd and 
4th Tuesday. Rebekah Hall: Mrs. Celia Car- 
horn. Rec. Sec. Box 123, Jamestown 95327. 

VENTURA COUNTY 

El Aliso No. 314, Santa Paula— Meets 1st 
Monday, Moose Lodge Hall. 700 E. Santa Bar- 
bara St., 3rd Monday, members homes; Mrs. 
Dorothy Douglas, Rec. Sec, 7294 Kodiak, Ven- 
tura 93003. 

Poinsettia No. 318, Ventura — Meets 2nd and 
4th Tuesday I.O.O.F. Hall, 516 E. Main St.; 
Mrs. Rita Preston, Rec. Sec, 5336 Queens 
St., Ventura 93003. 

YOLO COUNTY 

Woodland No. 90, Woodland— Meets 2nd and 
4th Tuesday, 547 First Street; Mrs. Elizabeth E. 
Elston, Rec. Sec, 920 Cross St., Woodland 
95695. 

YUBA COUNTY 

Marysville No. 162, Marysville — Meets 2nd i 
and 4th Wednesday, Jewish Center, 10th and 
Rameriz St.; Mrs. Evelyn D. Eden, Rec. Sec, 
669 Chestnut St., Yuba City 95991. 

Camp Far West No. 218, Wheatland— Meets 
3rd Tuesday, Masonic Temple, 4th & Front; 
Mrs. Shirley Ross, Rec. Sec, Rt. 1, Box 50, 
Wheatland 95692. 



CALIFORNIA HERALD 



POPPY TRAIL . . . 
Continued from Page 6) 

Parlors represented at the meeting 
vere Los Angeles No. 124, Long 
'ieach No. 154, Calif orniana No. 247, 
<?/,> Hondo No. 284, San Gabriel 
■alley No. 281, La Tijera No. 282, 
\isadcna No. 290, Beverly Hills No. 
>89 Whittier No. 298 and Cien Anos 
«Jo. 303. 

Delicious refreshments were served 
ifter the meeting with Kittie Coughtry 
is chairman. 



"AI.IFORNIANA 

President Helen M. Williams, pre- 
,ided at the luncheon meeting of Cali- 
omiana No. 247 at the Assistance 
^eague in Hollywood, September 
0th. PP Barbara Swain presented 
)r. Eugene Haskell who gave a 
Biightfull preview of the re-opening 
)f the MERCED THEATER (ad- 
oining Pico House at the historic 
>laza) October 4. 

Americanism and Civic Affairs 
Chairman Margaret Ann Kerr told of 
he successful outcome of Congres- 
ional legislation, which was pre- 
ented to 1967 Grand Parlor, unan- 
mously approved and followed up 
>y them, whereby a Bill has been en- 
icted by the Senate and House mak- 
ng in unlawful to desecrate the flag. 

Miss Kerr also urged to elect War- 
en H. Biscaliluz to the Superior 
rourt. County of Los Angeles, Office 
•io. 21, November 5. He received 
[15,149 more votes in the June 4 
>rimary election than his nearest of 
our opponents. He is the son of 
Sheriff Emeritus Eugene W. Biscailuz; 
najored in Political Science and grad- 
lated from USC Law School and was 
idmitted to the California State Bar 
n 1947. He also attended Harvard 
Law Sctool 1939-1940; served with 
JJSNR from Pearl Harbor Day to 
1946, 18 months of which was in 
pe South Pacific. He was admitted 
o practice before the Supreme Court 
>f the USA, April 9, 1956, and has 
erved as Deputy City Attorney of 
^os Angeles from May 6, 1956 to 
late. All expressed hearty approval. 



!L MONTE 

Irene Hatch was installed as pres- 
ident of El Monte No. 205, at the 
Masonic Hall. "America — Our 
leritage" will be her theme for the 
oming year. Also installed were her 

CTOBER, 1968 



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corps of officer*, Mines. Hebbs, 
Hatch, Morton, Cordoza, Lannessua, 

C'otta. Smith, Campbell, Marcette, 
Hawley. Conklin, Enderson and 
Ausane. Mrs. Hatch announced her 
chairmen, Betty Cordoza for the 
Childrens Foundation and Mary Au- 
sane for the California Herald. 

The hall was decorated in red, 
white and blue to follow the presi- 
dent's theme. The installing officer 
was DGP Eola Howe. Visitors in- 
cluded GT Marie C. Landini, PGP 
Evelyn I. Carlson, and SDDGP Phyl- 
lis Tindell. Following the installation 
cake, sandwiches, and coffee were 
served. 



JAMES LICK 

Mabel Walker and Mabel Fisher 
represented James Lick No. 220 and 
rode in the Admission Day Parade. 

At the September meeting of the 
Parlor, Mmes. Ghiselli, Fisher and 
Johnson served a delicious louncheon 
in celebration of California's birthday. 
Viola Williams became a new mem- 
ber of the parlor. Initiatory work was 
given by DGPs Ashbaugh, Knight, 
Stidhem and Marshal Glitner of 
Buena Vista Parlor. 



EL PINAL 

El Pinal No. 163, Cambria held 
installation of officers August 13 at 
the Masonic Temple. Officers in- 
stalled by DGP Vada Basham and 
her corps of officers from San Miguel 
No. 94 were: Mary C. Negranti, 
president, Margaret Soto, Beulah 
Richards, Althea Soto, Barbara Fis- 
calini, Elsie Soto, Estelle Fry, Katie 
G. Jewett, Ruth Brum, Lola Hand, 
Marian Negranti, Roberta Sutherland, 
Mary C. Warren, Anne Olivero, Mar- 
garet Boetcher and Donna Kingsley. 

After installation, refreshments 
were served at a beautifully decorated 
table, under the chairmanship of Katie 
Jewett and Anne Olivero. President 
Mary Negranti announced her com- 
mittees for the coming term and 
presented several new projects to be 
initiated during her term. 

1 i 1 

REINA DEL MAR 

Twenty-five year membership pins 
were presented to Mary Gandolfo, 
Irene Bell and Ida Vizzolini at the 
home of Mary Gandolfo. They were 
not able to attend the previous pre- 
sentation. 



With Winifred Mckee as general 
chairman, Sequoia No 272 installed 
ii-> new officer! \ large number i E 
members of other Parlors ant 
attended the ceremonies, I th( 
phj of Albany No. 260 was the in- 
stalling officer, assisted bj offit 
her Parlor, I ee Ann Pisciotta of the 
Albany Parlor was the organist. Dur- 
ing the activities, Mrs Murphj in- 
troduced the nevt deputj tor Sequoia, 
Doroth) I Mm ol B fo. 151. 

she also presented those assisting her. 
Special guests included PGPs Doris 
Gcrrish and Edna W illiams. 




From left: Dorothy D. Lynn, DGP, 

Mary Sum, president and Winifred 

W. Kee, chairman of installation. 



I he hall was decorated throughout 
with the St. Patrick's day theme. As 
Mar) Scott, the new president was 
escorted to the altar, everyone sang, 
"I Love the Name ol Mary" and 
"When Irish Eyes are Smiling." She 
carried a bouquet of carnations while 
her officers carried old-fashioned bou- 
quets. Gifts were presented to the 
officers, the two deputies and the as- 
sisting stall'. Jeannette Anderson, 
the out-going president, was given her 
press book compiled by Mrs. McKee 
and Clara Barton. Interesting talks 
were given by the two Past Grand 
Presidents and the new deputy. 

Refreshments were served in the 
banquet room from long tables dec- 
orated with summer blooms and St. 
Patrick's Day figures. Members of 
Sequoia Parlor assisted in serving the 
guests. 

Edna Williams, PGP, presented 
Lola Bredehoft and Eleanor Garri- 
son with their 25-year emblems. Both 
are past presidents of the Parlor and 
Mrs. Bredehoft is recording secretary. 

PAGE 12 



I I PINAL 

The 60th Anniversary of El Pinal 

Mo, 163 was observed on August 
24 at the Masonic Temple in < am 
i m i.i with a get together of Native 
Sons of the Golden West, their wives 
and Native Daughters with their hus- 
bands and guests. The evening started 
with a social hour at 7:00 P.M.. alter 
which a delicious dinner of turkey, 
ham and all the trimmings was served 
to 67 persons, under the chairman- 
ship of Betty Williams and Joan Jack- 
son. A beautiful birthday cake was 
also presented by these two girls, who 
worked so hard to make this evening 

a success. 

I atertainment followed, under the 
chairmanship of Margaret Nock. Sev- 
eral ballet dances were performed by 
Gail Warren, Joan Lorenz, Peggy 
Hamilton and Karen Goudy. Janet 
Horton entertained with her guitar 
and songs, after which all present 
joined in the singing of old songs. 
June Moeck of Los Angeles No. 124 
at the piano, led in singing "I Love 
you. California". Guests introduced 
by EI Pinal Parlor president Mary 
C. Negranti, were GP Hazel T. Mal- 
lette; Helen Pearson, Twin Peaks No. 
185 of San Francisco; PP Marvin 
Bassi of the NSGW, Cambria; and 
our own PGP Katie G. Jewett of El 
Pinal No. 163. 



IN MEMORIAM 




GP Hazel Mallette and PGP Katie G. Jewett 

GP Hazel Mallette expressed her 
pleasure on being present. Jack Soto, 
a 50 year member of the NSGW of 
Cambria was introduced. Also intro- 
duced were Agnes Soto, Marcella 
Porte, Anna Steiner and PGP Katie 
Jewett all charter members of El 
Pinal Parlor. A grand time was had 
by all present and El Pinal Parlor 
expresses its thanks to those who 
attended and those who worked so 
hard to make this 60th anniversary a 
very enjoyable evening. 




Not lost to those that love them, 
Not dead, just gone before; 

They still live in our memory, 
And will forever more. 



Kathryn C. Stone. Occident No. 28. August 

1. 
Charlotte A. Samuelson. Yerba Buena No. 

273, August 8. 
Lucy C. Mahoney, Berkeley No. 150, 

August 12. 
Helen M. Talbot, Stockton No. 256, Au- 
gust 9. 
Katie C. Gloster, Alturas No. 159, July 

28. 
Lillian S. Snow. Aloha No. 106. July 25. 
Mary L. Krogh, James Lick No. 220, 

August 8. 
Carol C. Scott. Tierra del Rey No. 300, 

July 29. 
Ella H. Gunning, Guadalupe No. 153 Au- 
gust 4. 
Lillian M. Lee, Dolores No. 169. August 

14. 
Irene Z. Drag, San Andreas No. 113 Au- 
gust 1 1. 
Verbenia P. Hall, Plumas Pioneer No. 219, 

August 11. 
Maud M. Bernard. Imogen No. 134 August 

3. 
Minnie A. Burke, Auburn No. 233, August 

21. 
Kathryn Q. Bransteter, Santa Rosa No. 

217. August 20. 
Matilda Bergscicker. Junipero No. 141, j 

July. 
Ethel D. Temby. Vallejo No. 195. August 

22. 
Mary F. George, Betsy Ross No. 238, 

August 13. 
Ruth W. Chambers, Suter No. Ill, August 

15. 
Odessa E. Wagner, Santa Ana No. 235, I 

August 24. 
Ida M. Allison, Woodland No. 90. August 

30. 
Elizabeth W. Bennetts, Sutter No. Ill, 

August 31. 
Sadie K. Foss, Fresno No. 187, September 

Helen Day. Veritas No. 75, August 31. 




CALIFORNIA HERALD 



REDMA DEL MAR 

Representatives of Reina del Mar 
3 arlor presented a United States flag 

Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital. 
The presentation was made by Mrs. 
*oman V. Schuld, and attended by 
vlmes. James T. Hogg, president; 




fresentation of flag to Santa Barbara 
Cottage Hospital. 

toy V. Miller, Americanism and 
Tivic Participation chairman, Paul J. 
filler and Walter J. Sevegney. The 
jft was accepted by Mrs. Harold L. 
halifoux, a member of the hospital's 
oard of directors; and Dr. William 
I. Stephenson, president of the med- 
:al staff. It was arranged for the 
lag to fly from the new flag pole in- 
tailed on the highest point of the hos- 
ital roof. 



AMES LICK 

Past SDDGP Frances Simas and 
er Lilac Deputies met at Castle 
anes for the social hour with dinner 
Dllowing. PGP Irma Caton was an 
onored guest. The group was sad- 
ened by the news that Katherine 
)avis, a former Lilac, had passed 
way. 

1 i 1 

SCHSCHOLTZIA 

GP Hazel Mallette paid an official 
isit to Eschscholtzia No. 1 12. She 
fas accompanied by GTs Rae L. Ro- 
linger and Marian E. McGuire. 

President Lucile Webster presided, 
lildred Hatfield became a member 
y initiation. The soloist was Colleen 
IcAllister. GP Mallette gave a most 
iteresting talk on the projects of the 
>rder. GTs Rominger and McGuire 
nd SDDGP Jessie Burcell also gave 
leasing remarks. Taking part in the 
resentation of the Grand President's 
lonetary gift were Mmes. Burcell, 
. Smith, Cross, B. Smith and Hen- 
ricks. 

Preceding the meeting, a dinner 
:rved by Scott Valley Grange mem- 

)CTOBER, 1968 



bers was enjoyed. The beautiful table 
and hall decorations were by Anita 
Tucker. 

The Grand officers were over-night 
guests of Doricc Young. 



Tamelpa No. 23 1 , of Mill Valley, 
will hold its annual Christmas bazaar 
on Saturday, November 16 at the 
Oddfellows Hall from 10:00 a.m. to 
5:00 p.m. Participating in this event 
with Tamelpa Parlor will be Seapoint 
No. 196 and Theta Rho. 

Co-chairmen of the bazaar are 
Mmes. Anthony Vargo and Lloyd 
Wilson, who are chairmen of the sew- 
ing club section which meets weekly 
and promises a wide selection of 
aprons, embroidered linens and dish- 
towels, tote bags, novelty items and 
Christmas decorations. There will 
also be plants, flower arrangements 
and a "new and next-to-new" white 
elephant table. Refreshments and 
baked goodies will be available dur- 
ing the sale. 






ND - NS INVITATION 

SDDGPs Myrtle Ritterbush and 
Joseph Urseno and their deputies ex- 
tend a cordial invitation to all Native 
Daughters and Sons, their families 
and friends to attend a reception 
honoring GPs Hazel T. Mallette and 
Andrew Stodel, October 25 at Mis- 
sion Masonic Temple, 2668 Mission 
Street. Special entertainment has 
been planned. There is ample free 
parking in rear of the Temple. 



JEWELERS 




JUNIOR NDGW | 
ACTIVITIES 

VJi5lSlSSlSSlSlSlSlSSSlSlSlSlSlSiSiSiSSiSlSlS^ 



Miss Kathy Slater, president of 
Sequoia Unit No. 27, Jr. Native 
Daughters was installed Junior State 
President on October 12 at the Junior 
Conference held at the Charter House 
in Anaheim. Miss Slater, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Walter Slater is a 
sophomore at Sequoia High School, 
Redwood City. 

Bonita Parlor No. 10, sponsors 
of the Sequoia Unit will have a recep- 
tion for the newly elected president 
following her installation. Mrs. Lil- 
lian Stetson is chairman advisor of 
the Unit. 



HIAWATHA 

Hiawatha No. 140 unable to par- 
ticipate in the Admission Day cele- 
bration in Santa Rosa, made plans 
for observation of the day locally. 
President Ruth Griffin, presented a 
California Bear Flag to the Deer 
Creek School and a similar flag was 
presented to Project City School. 
Both schools prepared Admission 
Day programs and had ceremonies 
for the presentations. 

On September 9, members of the 
order, their families and guests gath- 
ered at the Native Daughter Hall 
for a buffet dinner. The Honorable 
Richard B. Eaton, Judge of the Su- 
perior Court, well versed in the his- 
tory of our state and particularly the 
early days of our community, gave a 
most interesting talk. The program 
included readings by Mrs. Bertha 
Maynard who gave some of her orig- 
inal poems. The group enjoyed com- 
munity singing of favorite old songs 
and the State song, "I Love You, Cal- 
ifornia". The hall was attractively 
decorated with artifical California 
poppy bouquets and many small 
national flags and California Bear 
Flags. 



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LEO'S DICTIONARY 







STATE FLAG 

On June 14. 1846, during the Bear Flag 
Revolt, the Bear Flag u.is raised over Sonoma. 
I i Joseph \\ Revere lowered it on July 9 and in 
us place hoisted the stars and Stripes. 

IIk- Beaj Flag was given to sixteen year old 
John Elliot) Montgomery, captain's clerk on the 
i s s Portsmouth which his father, Commander 
John B. Montgomery commanded Young John 
wrote a letter to his mother in which he described 
the flag as having "a white field with a red border 
on the lower edge, a (iri/vly bear in the center 
with a star in the upper corner, the whole compos- 
ed oi [a] piece of white cotton with a Stripe of red 
Manuel, the white colloured with black berry juice 
Brk k dust ev oil; such was the first standard of 
liberty raised in California." John neglected to 
note that the flag also bore the words. "California 
Republic" and that the bear had a reddish color. 

On November 25, 1846, Dr. Robert B. 
Semple wrote to Commander Montgomery a let- 
ter on behalf of the executive committee of the 
Bear Naggers, giving him "the original Flag, first 
hoisted in the name of the 'Republic of Califor- 
nia" " to be deposited with the 'National Institute 
of the United States.' Montgomery replied that it 
was intended that the flag should be kept by his 
son, but added that if it came into his possession 
he would send it to the Secretary of the Navy. 
Young Montgomery was cither drowned or mur- 
dered and his father sent the flag to Secretary of 
the Navy John Y. Mason who in turn sent it to the 
Navy Yard at Boston. 

At the request of United States Senators 
John B. Weller and William M. Guinn of Cali- 
fornia. Secretary of Navy J. C. Dobbin delivered 
the Bear Flag to them to be given to the Society 
of California Pioneers. On September 8, 1855, 
Senator Weller presented the flag to the Society 1 
and on the following day its members carried it 
in the Admission Day parade in San Francisco. 
I lie Bear Flag was preserved by the Society until 
its destruction in the great fire of 1906. « 

By an act approved February 3, 1911, the 
State Legislature adopted the Bear Flag as the 
State Flag. This law read: 

"Section 1. The bear flag is hereby selected 
and adopted as the state flag of California. 

"Sec. 2. The said bear flag shall consist of a 
flag of a length equal to one and one-half of the 
width thereof; the upper five-sixths of the width 



thereof to he a white field, and the lower sixth 
of the width thereof to be a red stripe; there shal] 
appear in the white field in the upper left cornei 
a single red star, and at the bottom of the white 
field the words 'California Republic,' and in the 
center of the white field a California grizzly bear 
upon a grass plat, in the position of walking to- 
wards the left of the said feild; said bear shall be 
dark broken in color and in length, equal to 
one-third of said flag." 2 

The description of the flag in the 191 1 statute 
and in succeeding laws was not very definite, 
particularly with respect to the appearance of the 
bear, and resulted in different versions by differ- 
ent flag makers. Some of these bears were charac- 
terized as porcine and others as lupine. What was 
needed was one that was ursine. In 1952, Fred W. 
Links, Assistant Director of Finance of the State, 
consulted Tracy I. Storer and Lloyd P. Tevis, Jr., 
experts on grizzlies, to insure an authentic appear- 
ing bear. Don Greame Kelley, of the California 
Academy of Sciences, was commissioned to draw* 
an acceptable looking grizzly and furnish adequate 
color standards. 3 This was done and in 1953 the. 
new description of the flag was embraced in Sec- 
tion 420 of the Government Code together with an 
illustration of the flag itself. " 

1 John Adam Hussey, "New Light on the Original Bean 
Flag," California Historical Sociery Quarterly, Vol. 31, No. 
3, 205 if.; "History of the California Flag." California Blue 
Book 1950, Sacramento, 1950, 6 ff. 

2 Statutes of 1911, Chapter 9, 6 ff. 

Tracy I. Storer and Lloyd P. Tevis, Jr., Calif ornia\ 
Grizzly. Berkeley and Los Angeles. University of CaliforniaJ 
Press, 1955, 272-275. 

4 Statutes of 1953, Chapter 1140, 2638 ff. 

(To be continued) 
1 i i 

MARINITA PARLOR 

The 34th annual roll call of members of Mar- 
inita No. 198, was held recently following the. 
regular meeting at the Portuguese-American Hall 
in San Rafael. Chairman for the evening was Vera 
Milani, past president of the parlor twenty years* 
ago. 

Honored guests were Mmes. Angelina Griff- 
iths, Ann Martignoli, Vera Milani, and Margherita 
Cuthbert who all received their 25 year pins which 
were presented to them by PP Fredna Shields. 
Mrs. Shields had been parlor president 25 years 
ago when she had initiated some of the 25 yean 
members. 

Letters and acknowledgements were read: 
from members unable to attend roll call. About 
two-thirds of Marinita Parlor's membership re- 
eponded either this way or by being present at the 
annual roll call. 

Mary Reithenburg of Oakland was to have 
received her 50 year pin but was unable to attend 
this meeting. Marinita No. 198 was instituted 58 
years ago in une of 19 12 and four of the five char- 

CALIFORNIA HERALD 



ter members were present: Ann Spin- 
ney, Ann Andradc, Myra Murphy, 
and Lillian Hogan. 

Distinguished guests present on 
this night were PGP Lee Brice, DGP 
Caroline Faustine of Sea Point No. 
191, and SDDGP Georjean Vedder, 
Warinita. 

This annual roll call meeting is 
ooked forward to by all members, 
young and old, as it is a time when 
/ou see or hear from members who 
do not or are unable to attend mect- 
ngs. It was started 34 years ago and 
t is customery for the past president 
Df the parlor of 20 years ago to act 
is chairman for this night. Refresh- 
nents were served after the meeting 
jy Chairman Vera Milani and her 
.-ommittee. A regular good old-fash- 
oned "Gab" session was held. 



LOS BAN OS . . . 
Continued from page 3) 

juryon that they camped. Here there 
vas water and shade and wood for 
heir camp fires. It was an ideal 
amping place. In time the Mexican 
anchers around Mission San Juan 
Jautista began calling them "Los 
Janos del Padre Arroyo", "The Pools 
»f Padre Arroyo." 

When the Mexicans began making 
naps of the San Joaquin Valley, the 
reek wherein are the pools, was al- 
ways shown as "El Arroyo de los 
Janos del Padre Arroyo". But when 
he American settlers shortly after the 
old Rush began stumbling into this 
egion, they were too tongue-tied to 
oil off "El Arroyo de los Bafios del 
adre Arroyo" every time they 
wanted to speak of the creek. So they 
imply shortened the flowing Spanish 
Mo the crisp Yankee idiom: The 
-os Banos Crick." 

The United States Post Office De- 
railment, long after Padre Arroyo 
lad been gathered to his final resting 
dace at Mission Santa Ines, was 
bout to establish a post office in 
Creyenhagen's Store, a trading post 
»ut on the dry desolate plains of the 
Vest Side just west of the Los Banos 
?reek. The officials were at a loss 
jr a name of the new post office, 
'he name finally selected was a still 
arther shortening of "EI Arroyo de 
as Bafios del Padre Arroyo" — LOS 
JANOS. 

And so it is today. The name LOS 
iANOS is on everybody's tongue. 
x)s Banos is not only the name of 

JCTOBER, 1968 



a creek, it is the name of B post 
office that on November 10. 1973 
will have one bundled years of service 
to its credit. Most of all it is the name 
of a city, — LOS BANOS. Bach in 
its way will perpetuate the memory 
of the Padre and his pools as long as 
people choose to live, love, work, and 
play on the West Side. 



BOOKS . . . 
(Continued from Page 2) 

impression that the author is flippant, 
which I do not think he is. Moreover, 
he should not be blamed for the 
inspirations of some "smarty" book 
designer. While I'm about it, I might 
mention those little laughing bears 
used for a decoration in the book. 
Many printers have had these "spots" 
around their shops gathering dust for 
years. 

Hall is the head of the Los Angeles 
Bureau of The New York Times. His 
years of experience in the angles of 
California politics make him a val- 
uable contributor to the history of 
the California political stage. His 
appraisals of politicians are sincere, 
although you may not agree with 
some of the conclusions. 

The third of these political com- 
mentaries is that of Herbert L. Phil- 
lips' Big Wayward Girl (Doubleday 
& Company, Inc. $5.95). The author 
is a newspaper reporter of many 
years at Sacramento. Somehow, his 
book seems less hastily written than 
that of Hill. I like its arrangement of 
subject matter. 



I he great value of Hill's and Phil- 
lips' Studies lies in their descriptions 
of events they witnessed with t he- 
scrutinizing eye of a good newspaper 

man. 



4-3 ► '3enner Sheet l Hclal, Pne. 
"Stnct 1870" 

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Dorothy Y. Ulvestad, President j. Bernard Soto, Exec. Vice-Pres. 

construction loans t escrow i refinancing 1 collections 



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ANAHEIM 

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PRopect 2-1532 



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"A Full House of Insurance" 

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Phone (714) 635-7871 

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CALIFORNIA HERALD 


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Anaheim, California 92803 


HOIO'JICAL 






i/OLn 



K^A^nak 



etm 



was 




by /Leo <y~- *C/ i 



Through good fortune, a copy of Anaheim's first business directory has been found. It 
was printed in 1878, just twenty-one years after the founding of the town and is believed to be the 
only on in existence. 

This directory has been faithfully reproduced in "When Anaheim was 21", the latest book 
to be written by Leo J. Friis, well-known California historian. 

Using the anecdotal approach with sparkles of humor, the author describes Anaheim as it 
appeared in 1878 with its Chinese quarter, irrigation ditches and wineries. 



PIONEER PRESS / 301 N. Parton Street / Santa Ana, California 92701 

I enclose my check or money order (payable to Pioneer Press for copies of "When Anaheim was 21" 

$7.50 plus 80(2 tax & mailing for each copy. Please send to: 

Name „ „ 



Address . 
City 



..State 



Zip 



SrtL-IAL OULLtlllUNS 




Official Publication of 
THE NATIVE DAUGHTERS of the GOLDEN WEST 




MOVEMBER, 1968 + 40* 



SURFER. BILL SIL2LE ENJOYS SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA'S BLUE PACIFIC 




'3ooks in Review 

by JDr. JLeo J. "Jriis 

The Rev. Francis J. Weber. Ar- 
chivisl of the Roman Catholic Arch- 
diocese of I 08 Angeles, is one of the 
most scholarlj writers on California 

today. He specializes on various fa- 
cets o\ the Catholic Church in South- 
ern California which is a large field in 
itself. 

The hooks written by him. which 
1 shall discuss, are those owned and 
treasured by me. I first became 
acquainted with his writing when I 
purchased his Right Reverend Joseph 
Sadoc Alemany, O.P., Bishop of 
Monterey. Van Nuys. California His- 
torical Publications 1961. As in his 
other works. Father Weber writes 
tersely. He never produces a little 
book, although some of them are 
short. (As Dame Edith Sitwell once 
pointed out. there is a vast differ- 
ence.) 

I was next introduced to Father 
Weber's California's Reluctant Pre- 
late. The Life unci Times of Right 
Reverend T hade us Amat, CM., Daw- 
son Book Shop, 1964, which is a 
definitive study of this great bishop, 
who inspired the building of Saint 
Vibiana's Cathedral in Los Angeles. 

It is probable that Bishop Amat 
was a greater administrator than 
Bishop Francis Mora, but certainly 
no one was possessed of greater chris- 
tian piety and fortitude than the latter. 
To me, Francis Mora, Last of the 
Catalans, Los Angeles, Westernlore 
Press, 1967 is a very moving docu- 
ment. The little bishop was a favorite 
target of the A.P.A. in Los Angeles 
whose members frequently referred 
to him as "that damn old foreigner at 
Second and Main." Just before he 
left for his homeland, he preached a 
powerful sermon urging his listeners 
to set a good example for their de- 
tractors whom, he said, "are your 
brethren." 



California Herald 

"PRESERVING THE PAST FOR THE FUTURE" 

Voli mi \\ I November, 1968 Number 3 

CONTENTS THIS MONTH 

Books in Review, by Dr. Leo J. Friis 2 

Historic Salutations, by Margaret Ann Kerr 3 

Leo's Dictionary, by Dr. Leo J. Friis (Part II) 4 

The Grand President's Corner 6 

Parlor News 7 

Chapel In The Sea, by Rev. Francis J. Weber 8 

Governor Ronald Reagan Salutes NDGW, by Lillian M. Stratton 10 

Boy in a Green Beret, by Margaret F. Hayes 13 

Junior NDGW Activities 14 

Vendome Calling, by Amalia Vella 14 



PHOTO CREDITS — San Antonio de Padua, courtesy of Charles W. Bowers Memorial 
Museum. Hacienda Chapel in 1893, Delphine A. Caire; in 1939, Don Meadows: in 
1968. Allan Moore. Felipe de Neve, courtesy, Los Angeles Chamber of Commerce. 
Old Plaza Church. Christine Sterling. 



Bishop Mora died in Spain and 
although it had been his desire that 
he be buried in Los Angeles, the 
scene of his great labors, this was not 
to be until many years later when 
Father Weber found the Bishop's 
burial place and made the arrange- 
ments for the reburial in Calvary 
Cemetery. Through local newspapers 
I followed Father Weber in his quest. 
I have preserved many clippings of 
his journey and I rejoiced to read his 
great story of Bishop Mora's life. 
Incidentally, Father Weber is very 
modest in speaking of what he did. 

One of the best books in The Baja 
California Travels Series is The Mis- 
sions and Missionaries of Baja Cali- 



fornia by Father Weber, published in 
1968. In it he covers the eras of the 
Jesuits, Franciscans and Dominicans 
as well as the period following. 

Father Weber's latest book is San 
Fernando Mission, An Historical 
Perspective, Los Angeles Westernlore 
Press, 1968. The story starts with 
the mission's founding by Fray Fer- 
min Francisco de Lasuen and extends 
to the present day. I was particularly 
interested in the preservation work of 
the Landmarks Club, founded by 
Charles Lummis, as this organization 
did fine work at my neighbor mission 
of San Juan Capistrano before per- 
forming a similar task at San Fer- 
nando. 



J. J. FRIIS 
Publisher 



LEO J. FRIIS 

Editor 



JANE FRUS 
Public Relations 



_ ... Published Monthly by J. J. Friis and Leo J. Friis, owners and publishers, Anaheim, 
California All Rights Reserved. EDITORIAL AND GENERAL OFFICES: Anaheim, California. 
Mailing Address: P.O. Drawer 4243, Anaheim, California 92803. ADVERTISING OFFICE; 301 
N. Parton St., Santa Ana, Calif. 92701. CHANGE OF ADDRESS AND SUBSCRIPTIONS- Mail 
i 0r , l :f s P° n o d „ e " ce l .i CALIFORNIA HERALD, Circulation Department, P.O. Drawer 4243, Anaheim, 
calif. 92803. When ordering change of address, please allow six weeks: please furnish 
° an SLc?- w &2.'J?2 ses J ncludin e zip code. NDGW MEMBERS: please send Parlor Number 
fo SO c„,Z S „ T » ° h F . F, ^h : S n TU n RN RE ^ U . E , ST . ED \. ?'"" send magazine with address change 
to California Herald, P.O. Drawer 4243, Anaheim, California 92803. SUBSCRIPTION RATES- 
n»h^; ™1 J, ° sta '« s) ' Mc a C 0P V . J- 50 a year; $6.50 for two years; $8.25 for three years. 
?nSS»im r,T^ ! n F J ease H app JJI f0 / rates. Entered as second-class matter at the Post Office at 
Anaheim, California, under the Act of March 3, 1879. No part of this magazine may be re- 
printed without specific permission. 



CALIFORNIA HERALD 



^y\\isioti 



ouc 




a 



du£<z£i 




Old Plaza Church, Los Angeles, showing bell given my Captain Fitch. 



/Clir^HE Los Angeles Breakfast 

_JL Club hosted its annual salute 
to the City of Los Angeles on its 
187th birthday, September 4, and the 
State of California on its 1 1 8th birth- 
day, September 9. Native Sons and 
Daughters were special guests for the 
25th year. 

Joseph J. Miccichi, manager of the 
club, opened its 2,251st weekly 
broadcast over Radio Station KRKD- 
FM. Frank Konyi was at the piano 
and V. Kottman and James Keith 
were song leaders. Alma Chiapane- 
ca's group of musicians added great- 
ly to the Fiesta. 

Breakfast Clubbers Dr. Joseph N. 
Reynolds, John D. Roche, Sr., Remi 
E. Nadeau and Si Amestoy presided 
over successive portions of the pro- 
gram. Father Damian McHale gave 
the spiritual message. 

The Most Rev. John J. Ward, 
Auxiliary Bishop of Los Angeles, a 
native Angeleno, recently appointed 
a member of the State Historical 
Landmarks Commission by Gover- 
nor Reagan, quoted historic commun- 
ications from Fray Junipero Serra 
to the Government of Spain announc- 
ing the arrival of forty families who 
were the first setders of Los Angeles. 
There were reports of job training of 
Indians and compensation by the 
Spanish government. Civil authority 
was encouraged and the overland 
route to the north was charted. Tra- 
ditional upbringing opposed educa- 

NOVEMBER, 1968 




tons 



tion. The Plaza Church was built and 
foundations laid for a great city. 



k 



ylCjatnoiet L^A.1111 iS/^.^f 



Governor Felipe de Neve 



Special guests at the affair were 
Judge and Mrs. Mclntyre Faries, Pa- 
drino Hernando Cortright of El 
Pueblo Historical Landmarks Com- 
mission, Mrs. Senaida Sullivan, Ma- 
drina of Olvera Street, former GT 
and GO of the Grand Parlor, NDGW 
and PP of Beverly Hills Parlor No. 
289; Seiior and Senora Mario Vala- 
daz, the former being mayor of Ol- 
vera Street; Senora Consuelo Castillo 
de Bonzo, and Miss Margaret Cassi- 
dy, Secretary of the Historical Society 
of Southern California. 

Also present were PGP June T. 
Goldie, PGP Anna T. Schiebusch, 
PGP Mary Barden, GT Lila Hum- 
mel, GOS Laura Blosdale, PSP Past 
Presidents' Assn., Phyllis V. Hirst, 
GP Andrew W. Stodel and PGP El- 
dred Meyer, NSGW. DDGP J. J. 
Friis, publisher of the California Her- 
ald and PP of Santa Ana Parlor No. 
74, NSGW; Capt. Harold H. Barden, 
PP Santa Monica Bay Parlor, NSGW; 
Jack B. Curran, University No. 272 
and John Stretch, Hollenbeck No. 
319 NSGW; Pres. Helen Williams, 
PP Blanch C. Oechsel, Flora D. Mer- 
riless, Inez V. Hobbs, Irene P. Kuhl, 
Margaret Ann Kerr and Hazel B. 
Steckel all of Californiana No. 247; 
DGP Noma Stretch, Pres. Beverly 
Slobojan, PPs Shirley B. Dearborn, 
Martha Gristock, Elsie Camiden, Em- 
ma Kopple, Sophie Cubbison, Betty 
Lechlitner, Louise McNary, Juanita 
Porter, May Sherwood and Sophie 
Stewart, all of Los Angeles No. 124. 
From San Gabriel Valley No. 281 
were Pres. Irene Reidenbach and 
Vera Walsh; PP Frances Putnam of 
Toluca No. 279; Josephine Vgode of 
Verdugo No. 240 and Inter Parlor 
president James Lechlitner and Val 
Bray. 



LEO'S DICTIONARY 






I»ra.x--fc II 




Statue of San Antonio de Padua. Notice the many muagros 
hanging on the cord about his waist. 



MILAGRO 

Milagros are usually gold or silver objects 
which "are expressions of thanks for the interven- 
tion of the Saints." 

At the Charles W. Bowers Memorial Mu- 
seum in Santa Ana is a statue of San Antonio 
de Padua, which its donor states once stood in 
the church of Mission San Juan Capistrano. 
Around the waist of the statue is a very old 
cord to which are fastened several small silver 
objects depicting arms, legs, hearts and other 
parts of the body. These, according to the Rev. 



Maynard Geiger, O.F.M., are milagros or ex- 
votos which are "external signs of gratitude for 
having obtained relief or cure of the corresponding 
part of the body indicated by the milagro . . . The 
person would have directed his prayers to God 
through the intercession of San Antonio and 
having received the favor, thus expressed his 
gratitude by presenting to the image of the saint, 
the milagro or ex-voto. 'Ex-voto' is taken from 
the Latin meaning given 'as a result of a promise.' 
In this case milagro means miracle, but only in a 
very broad sense. Here, technically it should read: 
'favor, cure.' " ' 

CALIFORNIA HERALD 



It appears that milagros were often presented 
in anticipation of a cure or other fulfillment of a 
prayer. Mrs. Ana Begue de Packman, secretary 
emeritus of the Historical Society of Southern 
California, recalls that in early Los Angeles it 
was deemed imperative to "beg" for the necessary 
money to purchase a milagro. She says that her 
grandmother suffered from arthritis of the knees 
and in an effort to obtain a cure she importuned 
her relatives for money with which she com- 
missioned a local artisan, Santa Cruz, to fashion 
a milagro in the shape of a pair of small gold legs 
fastened together at the top with interlinking rings. 
This she presented with her prayers at the Plaza 
Church. 

The first milagro of the new world was as- 
sociated with Cortes who was stung by a ven- 
omous scorpion. He directed his attendants to 
capture the scorpion and not kill it. Cortes became 
very ill and at the point of death he "turned his 
eyes and spirit to the Virgin of Guadalupe and 
promised a jewel for her shrine if she would inter- 
vene and save his life." An Indian appeared, gave 
him a bitter potion to drink and applied a plaster 
to his swollen leg. Cortes recovered and fulfilled 
his vow by having an object made in the form of 
a scorpion, beautifully enamelled and set with 45 
smeralds. In the hollow of the milagro was placed 
the dried body of the scorpion. This object of art 
is now at the Instituto de Valencia de San Juan 
in Madrid. 2 



1 Letter from the Rev. Fr. Geiger, July 22, 1965. 

2 Mary L. Davis and Greta Pack, Mexican Jewelry, Aus- 
tin, University of Texas, 1963, 48-50, 70-74. 



DOLLAR, MORGAN 

A United States silver dollar authorized by 
the Bland-Allison Act of February 28, 1878. 

Its popular name is derived from George 
T. Morgan, special engraver of the Mint, who 
designed it. Its prescribed weight is 412.5 grains 
of silver, with a fineness of .900, which conforms 
with the specifications of the "standard dollar" 
as set forth in the Coinage Act of 1837. 

The model for the head of Liberty on the 
obverse of the coin was Anna W. Williams, an 
18 year old Philadelphia school teacher, blonde 
and pretty. Thomas Eakins, a distinguished 
artist, had seen Miss Williams in an art class and 
introduced her to Morgan who deemed her pro- 
file to be the best approach to "a true repre- 
sentative of American beauty." 

She reluctantly agreed to sit for Morgan. 
However, it does not appear that he was too 
successful in his efforts to capture her beauty 
on a coin. An item appearing in the New York 
Times on August 12, 1879, flatly announced 

NOVEMBER, 1968 



that, "It would be impossible to recognize" the 
head on the coin as bearing any likeness to Miss 
Williams. "The Grecian nose and the delicate 
lips," said the paper, "had their foundation in her 
features, but the full rounded chin resembles 
more that of the wife of Mr. Morgan. Don Taxay 
has criticized the head on the coin as giving "the 
impression of obesity." He characterizes the 
eagle on the reverse of the dollar as "poorly 
drawn and uninspiring." 

Morgan dollars were minted from 1X7K to 
1904. Under the terms of the Pittman Act of 
1918, their coinage was resumed in 1921 for 
one year. They were replaced by the Peace 
Dollar. 

Lindsay J. Neat, "The Mystery of the Silver Dollar Girl," 
Coinage, Dec, 1967, Vol. 3, No. 12, p. 49. Arthur Nussbaiim, 
A History of the Dollar, New York, Columbia University 
Press, 1957, 135. 136, 138, 151, 166, 167. Don Taxay, The 
V. S. Mint and Coinage, New York, Arco Publishing Com- 
pany, Inc., 1966, 270, 271. R. S. Yeoman. A Guide Hook o) 
United Slates Coins, 21st Rev. Ed. Racine, Whitman Pub- 
lishing Company, 1967, 150-153. 



CALABOOSE 

A jail. The word is derived from the Span- 
ish, calabozo, usually meaning a dungeon. 

Reminiscing upon his experiences in the Bear 
Flag Revolt, Gen. Mariano G. Vallejo said, "So 
they took me on horseback and put me in the 
calaboose at Sacramento." ' 

The following item appeared in the Nov. 
5, 1870, issue of the Anaheim Gazette: "During 
the week, three prisoners confined in the city 
calaboose, got free from their manacles, broke 
down the door, and fled during the night." 

1 Third Biennial Report of the State Board of Horticul- 
ture, Sacramento, 1888, p. 154. 



SOLDIERS' BOUNTY ACT 

By an act approved April 4, 1864, the 
California Legislature created a bounty to be 
paid every soldier enlisting for three years or for 
the duration of the Civil War in any military 
unit which was part of "a quota of the volunteers 
of the State, under the laws of Congress or the 
orders of the President of the United States." 

Every enlisted man received $160, $40 of 
which was paid at time of enlistment and $20 
at the end of each six months of service. Soldiers 
who had served in the army more than six months 
received an additional bounty of $140, $50 of 
which was paid at time of reenlistment and $40 
at the end of each six months service. In case 
of death or honorable discharge the full bounty 
was paid. 

To finance the bounty payments the State 
sold $1,494,000 bonds bearing 7% interest. 

California Statues. 1863-1864, p. 487: William C. Kink- 
houser. A Financial History of California. Berkeley, Inn 
of Calif. Press. 1913, p. 213, 214. 

PAGE 5 



The Grand 
President's Corner 




HAZEL T. MALLETTE 



JUNIOR NATIVE DAUGHTERS 
Stile OMicers — 1968I9G9 

President: Kathy Slater. Sequoia Unit No. 27. 

1216 Windsor Way. Redwood City 94061. 
Past President: Marsha Metzger. Estrellas de 

Oro Unit No. 37. 13128 Liggett St.. Norwalk 

90650. 
Vice President: Leealyn Baker, Fruitvale Unit 

No. 22, 3530 66th Ave.. Oakland 94605. 
Secretary: Jean Tulius. Argonaut Unit No. 3, 

2478 47th Ave., San Francisco 94116. 
Treasurer: Beverly Beckemeyer, Las Amigu- 

itas Unit No. 33. 242 Elaine Dr., Pleasanton 

Hill 94523. 
Marshal: Linda Cane. Menlo Unit No. 10. 3814 

Jefferson Ave.. Redwood City 94061. 
Trustees: Paula Ferguson, Argonaut Unit No. 

3. 471 Neilson St.. Berkeley 94707. Sharon 

Douglas. Fruitvale Unit No. 22, 970 Castle 

St.. San Leandro 94578. Robin Gilbert, 

Menlo Unit No. 10. 116 Nina Ct., Los Gatos 

95030. 
Sentinel: Jamey Maynard, Escholita Unit No. 

26. 142 Kerns Ct., Napa 94558. 
Organist: Kathy Koch. Sequoia Unit No. 27, 

1223 Dewey, Redwood City 94061. 



JUNIOR NATIVE DAUGHTER UNITS 

Argonaut Unit No. 3, Oakland — Advisor: Mrs. 
Helen Tullius, 2478 47th Ave., San Francisco 
94116. 

Menlo Unit No. 10, Menlo Park — Advisor: 
Mrs. Evelyn I. Carlson. PGP 1308 Hoover St., 
St.. Apt. 1, Menlo Park 94025. 

Camellia Unit No. 15, Anderson — Advisor: 
Mrs Berness Medford, 2430 Hospital Lane, 
Redding 96001. 

Fruitvale Unit No. 22, Oakland— Advisor: Mrs. 
Esther Ragon, 3479 Davis St., Oakland 94601. 

Escholita Unit No. 26, Napa — Advisor: Mrs. 
Gail Martin, 1433 Perkins St, Napa 94558. 

Sequoia Unit No. 27, Redwood City — Ad- 
visor: Mrs. Lillian Stetson, 1217 Connecticut 
Dr., Redwood City 94061. 

Las Amiguitas Unit No. 33, Walnut Creek- 
Advisor: Mrs. Marge Woodward. 2464 Casa Way. 
Walnut Creek 94596. 

Estrellas de Oro Unit No. 37, Norwalk— Ad- 
visor: Mrs. Mary Manges, 14514 Graystone, Nor- 
walk 90650. 

Golden Poppy Unit No. 38, San Francisco — 
Advisor: Mrs. Dorothy Bayless, 254 Eureka St , 
San Francisco 94114. 



*oe££ 



MILK 



Tastes so fresh because if fQ 



GRAND PRESIDENT 

Malletta (Mrs. Bvenl A.) 
i^ Dunstooe Driva 
Oroville, California 45965 



(iRANO SECRETARY 

Mary C. Mahoney (Mrs. Herbert J.) 

Office: 703 Market Street, Room 612 

San Francisco 94103 Dial 362-4127 
Res: 4125 Lincoln Way 

San Francisco 94122 



ITINERARY 1968 



11 

i: 

13 
14 
16 
18 
20 

21 
22 
26 

28 



1 

2 
10 
12 
17 



NOVEMBER 

Dedication, Centennial No. 295 Paradise*' 

Childrcns Foundation Breakfast, Northern Counties Chico 

Bcrrycssa No. 192 Willows*' 

Lomitas No. 255 Los Banos*' 

Berendos No. 23, Camellia No. 41, Hiawatha No. 140, 

Lassen View No. 98 Shasta*' 

Veteran's Day 

Woodland No. 90 Woodland*' 

Mission No. 227, Minerva No. 2 San Francisco* 1 

Menlo No. 211, Bonita No. 10, Redwood City* 

District 19 Luncheon — Part Contra Costa County 

Eldorado. 248, Oakland No. 125, Oakdale*' 

Wawona No. 271, Selma No. 313, Madera No. 244, 

Fresno No. 187, Fresno*' 

San Jose No. 81, Los Gatos No. 317, Vendome No. 100 San Jose* ' 

Orinela No. 56, Genevieve No. 132, San Francisco*' 

Stockton No. 256, El Pescadero No. 82, Caliz de Oro No. 

206, Joaquin No. 5 Stockton* - 

Thanksgiving 

DECEMBER 

Childrens Foundation Bruncheon San Francisco* 

Sea Point No. 196, Temelpa No. 231 Mill Valley* 

South Butte No. 226, Colus No. 194, Oak Leaf No. 285 .... Live Oak* 

Annie K. Bidwell No. 186 Chico* 

Poppy Trail No. 266, Rancho San Jose No. 307, 

Whittier No. 298 Whittier* 

Christmas 

Asterisks mark Official Visits 



LONG BEACH 

A California Bear Flag was pre- 
sented to the Long Beach Naval Hos- 
pital for the auditorium. Eileen 
Woodyard, as civic participation 
chairman, presented the flag to Cap- 
tain Paul R. Engel, Medical Corps 
United States Navy Commanding 




Officer. A California Bear Flag was 
also given to the Crippled Children's 
Society and a twin flag set presented 



for the podium to the Long Beach i 
Organists' Club. 

Coming events for the Long Beach 
Parlor include a fall banquet a 
Welch's on November 21, a bazaar 
and white elephant sale on December 
5 and the annual Christmas party on 
December 12. 

The "Chatterbox", Long Beach 
Parlor's Newsletter, urges everyone 
to subscribe to the California Herald ' 
— a nice gift for only $2.75. 



IL6ENFEL 

. MORTUARY , 

Faithful, Courteous. Service 
120 E.Broadway. Anaheim 

PHONE KE 5--4I05 



CALIFORNIA HERALD 



Parlor New/s 



EL DORADO 

El Dorado No. 186, Georgetown, 
has members who come to Parlor 
From some distance. Annie Jaeger 
and Annie Hoover come from Placer- 
ville, Elsie Ford and Georgia Gardner 
from Greenwood; Ann Larson, Au- 
burn and Helen Francisco, Forest 
Hill. 

A large doll, 64 years old, in good 
state of preservation was presented 
to Ann Larsen from Elizabeth Mur- 
dock and Ethel Breedlove, sisters 
who have owned the doll since early 
childhood. On October 6, many of 
the members attended a "birthday 
open-house" held at the Georgetown 
Hotel in honor of Alta Douglas of 
Auburn who was formerly recording 
secretary of the Parlor. John M. 
Westbrook, organist, entertained with 
many of the old-time songs. 

Preceding the October 12 meeting 
a delightful luncheon was served by 
Kathleen Flynn and Elnore Griffith. 
The table was decorated in Halloween 
theme. At the previous meeting 
Louise Schmeder, Ethel Breedlove 
and Elizabeth Murdock provided a 
delicious luncheon for the group. 



LOMITAS 

Twenty-five years ago this month 
Past Grand President Irma W. Laird 
instituted Lomitas Parlor No. 255, 
on November 27, 1933. Twenty-nine 
charter members were present, 12 
of whom are still members of the 



Order. One of these, Mrs. James 
(Leila) Ncgra, was presented a life 
membership in Lomitas Parlor in May 
of 1965. Velda Negra Randolph 
served as charter president. The cur- 
rent membership of the Parlor is 180. 
Annual installation of officers is 
hell in January in joint installation 
ceremonies with Los Banos Parlor 
No. 206, Native Sons of the Golden 
West. The parlor annually holds a 
fund raising fashion show, with fa- 
shions shown through the courtesy 
of Los Banos merchants, to a capacity 
crowd in the fairgrounds auditorium, 
a family potluck, honoring the Amer- 
ican Field Service exchange student 
residing in Los Banos, and a Mother's 
Day potluck, when members bring 
their mothers, daughters, or guest of 
their choice. A barbecue is held in 
July of each year with Lomitas Parlor 
honoring their outgoing and incoming 
deputies for the year. The Parlor 
hosts a Past Presidents Night with 
the current officers serving as host- 
esses to honor all past presidents of 
the Parlor. The Parlor holds a fund 
raising rummage sale, an attendance 
team dinner, with the team that had 
the most members attending for the 
entire year receiving a home cooked 
dinner from the losing team. A 



Christmas potluck with the annual 
exchange of gifts is enjoyed under 
Lomitas's tree. Gifts of food are 
given to a needy family in the area 




Sign of the Home that will stay young 

And so will the family that lives here, because the Medallion 
Home Emblem can mean gentle, whole-house electric heat- 
ing; a flameless, cool electric kitchen; and a readiness for the 
wonderful electric conveniences that are as near as tomorrow. 



*$ & & 



to enable them to prepare Thanks- 
giving and Christmas dinners. The 
parlor awards a scholarship to a 
graduating senior girl of the Los 
Banos High School, who is a Native 
Californian, and plans to become a 
teacher. Annually a Thanksgiving gift 
and Christmas gift is sent to the 
Native Daughter home. Each com- 
mittee as appointed by the President 
holds its own fund raising projects 
and activities to benefit the many 
parlor projects. 

The Parlor has in its possession the 
plaque awarded by Grand Parlor for 
having the largest gain in membership 
in the state for three consecutive 
years. Members are currently pre- 
paring to hold the 1969 Grand Par- 
lor Sessions of the Native Daughters 
of the Golden West June 15 through 
June 19, 1969. Mrs. Carl (June) 
Painter is the 1968-69 State Chair- 
man of Grand Parlor Sessions. 



PLACERITA 

"A Silver Year in our Golden 
State" was the theme of Mrs. Fred 
Gebers when she and her corps of 
officers were installed in Placerita 
Parlor for the 1968-1969 term. Pres- 
ident Gebers wore a lovely silver 
formal with white corsage. Other 
officers wore white formals with silver 
accent. 

Grand Officers present included 
GOS Laura Blosdale, GO Peggy 
Brandenburg and PGP Mary Barden. 
Charter President Mrs. Clayton At- 
kinson served as chairman for the 
evening. 




Southern California Edison 



From left: Mmes. Wesley Jones, John 
Rumsey, Fred Gebers, William Bran- 
denburg and Warren Elders. 



NOVEMBER, 1968 



PAGE 7 



v'jT/ih i hi k i hanncl Islands, K>- 
^v >lA catcd .'ir the ( 'alifornia shore- 
line .11 Santa Barbara, are peaks oi 
.in ancient mountain range whose val- 
leyi have been inundated, rince Pleia 
tocene times, bj me waters ol the 
Pacific Ocean, h channel, reaching 
depths of 6,000 feet, separates the 
mainland from these last nonconti- 
guous renin. mts of the Sant.i Monica 
mountains. 
On deai days, Santa Cruz, largest 

Of the insular Chain, stands out clearly 

on the horizon, about twent) miles 

ilue south of the coastline. I he is- 
land's graceful violet-hued peaks ap- 
pear to llo.it on the rim of the water- 
line, changing color tone with e; 
Successive alteration of the sun's de- 
scent. Limit, as the Indians called 





x^napel 



c Rm. J 




The Hacienda Chapel of the 



Santa Cruz Island, Santa Barbara, 
in 1893 by Father Gaspar Genna. 



The tiny insular chapel was inaugerc 



CALIFORNIA HERALD 




1 1 'tU 



their home, a mountainous terrain 
approximately twenty-two miles Ion 
and five and a half miles in averr 
breadth, has a superficial area of 
about 64,000 acres. 



The aborigines inhabiting Santa 
Cruz, possibly a branch of the ancient 
Chumash, were considerably superior 
to other California Indians in both 
physique and intelligence. Their ear- 



liest association with Christianity 
dates from the visit of Juan Rodri- 
guez Cabrillo in 1542. An affidavit 
made eighteen years after that voyage 
testifies to the presence of a priest 
with the expedition, though neither 
in the document nor elsewhere can 
be found anything about his identity. 
Periodical visitations by European 
adventurers in subsequent dcead- 
further ensconced the Christian tra- 
dition of that area which Sebastian 
Vizcaino designated "Isle de Gente 
Barbuda". 

The island's current appellation 
seemingly originated with the Juan 
Perez landing in 1769. It is related 
that a chaplain had left behind a staff 
on the island with a cross on it. 
When the Indians returned it, tl 
grateful cleric and his companion 
bestowed the Spanish equivalent of 
"Holy Cross" on the island to com- 
memorate the incident. 

(Continued on page 13) 





Governor Ronald Reagan Salutes 

State-wide NDGW on its 

Eighty-Second Anniversary 

by Lillian M. Stratton 



"» overnor Ronald Reagan, in 
I -f j an official communication 
&0& sent to the statewide Native 
Daughters of the Golden West, sa- 
luted the 82 year old woman's pa- 
triotic and humanitarian organiza- 
tion for its unceasing efforts for many 
years to preserve California's colorful 
history by marking the state's histor- 
ically important landmarks. 

The Governor's letter was received 
recently by Senaida Sullivan, of Los 
Angeles, state chairman of American- 
ism and Civic Participation for the 
Native Daughters of the Golden West. 
She is a past president of Beverly 
Hills Parlor. 

Governor Reagan, in his com- 
munication, also praised the Native 
Daughter's organization for its work 
in the field of education, particularly 
with scholarships. The NDGW main- 
tains a number of academic and bus- 
iness college scholarships to assist 
young persons, if they so desire, to 
continue their education. 

The official letter was sent by Gov- 
ernor Reagan in recognition of the 
Native Daughters of the Golden 
West's eighty-second anniversary 
year. It is the oldest women's patri- 
otic organization in California. It 
was founded in late September, 1886 
in the picturesque Mother Lode town 



of Jackson, to perpetuate the memory 
of the founders of this state. 

The Governor's letter, in full, reads 
as follows: 

"It is with great pleasure that I 
take this opportunity to extend greet- 
ings to the members of the Native 
Daughters of the Golden West. Your 
work in preserving and encouraging 
the preservation of the history of Cali- 
fornia is a valuable contribution to 
the heritage of our Golden State. 
Your projects of marking historical 
landmarks add to the enjoyment and 
education of every Californian. 

"Your work in the field of educa- 
tion, particularly scholarships, is to 
be commended and deserves the sup- 
port of all Californians. 

"I salute you, not only as one of 
the oldest organizations in the state 
of California, carrying on a tradition 
of preserving our history, but for your 
forward-looking programs to help the 
young grow up with full awareness of 
these traditions. 

Sincerely, 
Ronald Reagan 
Governor 

In addition to the historical and 
educational projects, the statewide 
Native Daughters of the Golden West 
also maintains an outstanding child 
welfare project — the NDGW Chil- 



dren's Foundation. This Foundation 
was organized sixteen years ago to 
give financial aid to average-income 
families unable at the time to provide 
crucial medical care, including sur- 
gery, or other health aids, for their 
children. Every one of the more than 
two hundred Native Daughter parlors 
located throughout California finan- 
cially support the NDGW Children's 
Foundation. 



SAN FERNANDO MISSION 

Carolyn Riggs was honored with 
a surprise dinner and evening filled 
with fun and mystery at the "Magic 
Castle" last month. The whole eve- 
ning topped a most busy and pro- 
ductive year with Carolyn as the 
president of San Fernando Mission 
No. 280. It was her parlor's way of 
saying, "Thank you and well done!" 

The evening began with an "Open 
Sesame" and a wink at the owl and 
then the fun began. The dinner was 
superb and the magic shows excellent. 
The museum and cellar offered more 
excitement and Myrna, the ghost who 
played the piano, was up to her old 
tricks. The members attending all 
expressed the same opinions as the 
past president when she said, "It was 
a wonderful evening and I had the 
best time ever." 

San Fernando Mission No. 280 
feels that Carolyn deserves thanks for 
her untiring work with the pioneer 
cemetery as well as her constant will- 
ingness to help in all parlor projects. 



TIERRA DE ORO 

Seventy-four members of the Na- 
tive Daughters of the Golden West 
representing the six Parlors in District 
32 (Santa Barbara and Ventura 
Counties ) , gathered for a "fun night" 
at the Eagles Hall in Santa Barbara, 
on October 17. Following a shared 
dinner, each Parlor presented short 
comical skits as their contribution to 
the evening's entertainment. The hall 
was decorated in autumn theme with 
corn stalks and pumpkins and the 
table centerpieces were miniature 
scare-crows. 

SDDGP Mary Rule of La Purisima 
No. 327, Lompoc, was chairman of 
the evening and introduced the Par- 
lors. Reina del Mar No. 126, Santa 
Barbara, was represented by 21 mem- 
bers including President B e r n i c e 
Hogg. Their DGP Ellen Guthrie of 

CALIFORNIA HERALD 



El Aliso was also introduced. Santa 
Maria No. 276, Santa Maria, was 
represented by 13 members including 
Meta Mehlschau, President and their 
DGP Jeanne Fredrick of Tierra de 
Oro Parlor. Tierra de Oro No. 304, 
had 13 members attending, President 
Eileen Dismuke, PGP included, and 
DGP Amelia Acres of Reina del Mar. 
Past President Shirley Carter rep- 
resenting President Natalie Boyton 
who was unable to attend, was pres- 
ent with four other members of El 
Aliso No. 314, Santa Paula, and DGP 
Lillian Fraser of Reina del Mar. Rep- 
resenting Poinsettia No. 318, Ven- 
tura, were eight members including 
President Carmelita Flores and DGP 
r\mbert Phillips of Reina del Mar. 
DGP Charity Righetti of Santa Maria 
was introduced with President Chris- 
line Hogan and 13 other members 
Df La Purisima No. 327, Lompoc. 



VAOMI 

A tea was held for Winnone and 
rhomas Mapel of Carmichael by 
Saomi No. 36, (she a member of 
San Juan No. 315 Carmichael) at 
Downieville Hall in appreciation of 
he many things they have done for 
Vaomi Parlor — especially the flag- 
tone sidewalk and walk to the steps 
)f the hall. 




am left: Juel Vahle, Mrs. Thomas 
Mapel and Thomas Mapel. 

The tea was well attended by local 
eople. Relatives of the Mapels at- 
mding were their daughter, Dorothy 
)wens and husband, John, and 
nother daughter, Leila Winonne Ver- 
"ess; also a cousin, Elwood Mac- 
Jougall and wife of Walnut Creek. 

Elaine Lambert acted as Master 
f Ceremonies; Juel Vahle, SDDGP; 
bbie Borne, DGP; Marilyn Hider, 
'. PP and Rose Eames, President, 

IOVEMBER, 1968 



poured tea or coffee. There was an 
abundance of cookies and dainty tea 
sandwiches. Two musical selections 
were given by Maxine Campbell with 
Elizabeth Costa accompaning at the 
piano. They were the "Sound of 
Music" and a version of "Oh, Su- 
sanna". 

The Mapels planted an azalia bush 
in front of the Hall to start a memory 
garden for the pioneers. 

Winonne is especially aware of 
the pioneers as her family is an old- 
time Forest City family. Her mother's 
name was Jessie Ann Hilgerman. 
They were also connected with the 
MacDougall family in this country. 



ORINDA 

Orinda No. 56 is now 78 years 
young and still going strong. A be- 
lated anniversary dinner was held 
during the month of October at the 
Non Commissioned Officers' Club, 
Presidio of San Francisco. A first 
at this club, the view of San Fran- 
cisco Bay afforded from the large 
glass windows, was magnificent. 

Approximately 40 members, in- 
vited guests and guests of the mem- 
bers met at 6:30 p.m., to enjoy a 
before-dinner cocktail and renew ac- 
quaintenances with members not seen 
recently. With the entrees of fried 
chicken and roast beef, all dined 
sumptuously with the many and var- 
ied side dishes. 

Included at the head table were 
President of Orinda, Jean Galli (who 



^2^ tenner Sljeel cMelal, P»c. 
"Since 1870" 

774-1843 

INDUSTRIAL SHEET METAL WORK 
210 Chestnut Anaheim 



ilie. 



MEMORIAL PARK • MAUSOLEUM 

CREMATORIUM • COLUMBARIUM 

I Orangewood Street at Santa Ana Freeway 

538-3583 



2 



BACKS 
KAULBARS 

MORTUARY 

1617 W. La Palma at Euclid 
Anaheim 
772-1617 



is recuperating from a serious illness); 
PGP Orinda Giannini, DGP Gladys 
Knight {Golden Gate Parlor), Romil- 
da Ralph (Orinda Parlor), Deputy 
to Darina Parlor and Esther Bloom, 
chairman of the anniversary dinner. 




PGP Orinda Giannini 

The entertainment segment of this 
affair was the showing of slides of a 
recent trip to Eastern Europe by one 
of the members. The audience was 
transported many thousands of miles 
away for an hour. The evening was 
festive and gay. When one cele- 
brates a 78th birthday there is reason 
to be happy and proud. In fact, the 
past 78 years were so grand, plans 
are being made for another 78 — and 
more. 



OFFICIAL VISIT 

Native Daughters of the Golden 
West are cordially invited to attend 
the official visit of Grand President 
Hazel T. Mallette to District 35, 
Poppy Trail No. 266, Whittier No. 
298, and Rancho San Jose No. 307 
on Tuesday, December 17, 8: 15 p.m., 
Elks Temple, 1417 W. Holt Avenue, 
Pomona. 

A chicken breast dinner (price 
$3.25) will be served at 7 p.m. at 
the Elks Temple. Send paid reser- 
vations to Edna Greenwald, 3655 
Lynoak Drive, Claremont by De- 
cember 12. 



LIBERTY 

Liberty Parlor which was instituted 
May 2, 1918 by PGP Ema Gett, cele- 
brated its fiftieth anniversary and 
held a reception for Grand President 
June T. Goldie. The invitations were 
white and gold. The programs fea- 
tured a liberty bell with the dates 
1918—1968 enclosed. The officers 
for 1968, the charter officers of 1918 
and names of the charter members 
were all listed. 

(Continued on Page J 3) 

PAGE 11 



LIBERTY PARLOR , , , 
i( (MtbUtfd from Page ID 

I he program featured a welcome 
b) PGP Dora M. Gerrish; pledge to 
me Bag, Hens Baker; invocation, 
Evelyn Curtis; historj of the Parlor, 
s.u.i PJley; presentation of 50-yeai 
pins in OP June I Ooldie to I Liz- 
abeth Foulks, Florence Markofer, 
Ann Kloss, \ ira Matins and Lucy 
Sefalmeyer and 4 l ) year members, 
Marj Waterman and fcgneda Lample. 
[he presentation to the Grand Pres- 
ident was made by Rna Wanner and 
the Liberty Parlor escort team. 

I he general chairman of the eve- 
ning was PGP Doris Gerrish assisted 
b] Muriel Blodgett and Dorothy 
Buscher. Acting as chairman of the 
v a r i u s committees were Mmes. 
Blodgett, Morse. Colton, Stout, Hog- 
aboom, Mathilda. Mosher. Buscher. 
Hall, Miles. Riley. Smedberg, Coote. 
Ostman and Melba Mosher. 

Members of the escort and drill 
team included Mmes. Busher. Hall. 
Miles. Smedberg, Zchnder, G. Mc- 
Shane. Saxon, Wanner, Mosher, Ost- 
man. L. McShane, Morse, Lent and 
Curtis. 

Dignitaries present were GP June 
Goldie. GP Joseph Perez, NSGW; 
GVP Hazel Mallette, GM Nancy 
Conens, GTs Virgilia McCombs, Rae 
Rominger. Irene Bondanza, Marie 
Landini, Betty Curilich, Lila Hum- 
mel. Marian McGuire, GOS Margery 
Edmonds. PGPs Evelyn Carlson, 
Ethel Enos, Henrietta Toothaker, 



Jewel MeSweeney, Doris Gerrish, 
Norma Hodson and Audrey Brown; 
SDDGP Maisie Diener and DGP 
Rose Marie Trammell. 

Liberty Parlor's home town is Elk 
Grove, B community which dates 
from pioneer days. The town was 
founded in 1850 by James Hall of 
I Ik drove. Missouri. It is said that 
he opened his F.Ik Grove House with 
an elks head painted over the door. 
1 Ik were plentiful in the vicinity in 
those early years. Liberty Parlor was 
instituted in the I.O.O.F. Temple 50 
years ago and the Parlor still meets 
in this historic building. 
i 1 * 

s\N FERNANDO MISSION 

"Ghosts of Famous Women" were 
out early this year, when San Fer- 
nando Mission No. 280, held its an- 
nual Courtesy Night in conjunction 
with a Halloween Party. Many fam- 
ous (and a few infamous) women 
were well represented by the hostess 
parlor and guests numbering well 
over 50. 

Courtesy officers for the evening 
were: President Dee Downs, El Ca- 
mino Real No. 324; Past President 
Dorothy Pedroza, Toluca No. 279; 
1st Vice President Ida Grossi, El 
Camino Real No. 324; 2nd Vice 
President Eunice Peterman, Verdugo 
No. 240; 3rd Vice President Edna 
Heartt. Pasadena No. 290; Recording 
Secretary Evelyn Henry, Placerita 
No. 277; Financial Secretary Rae 
Galvin. Poppy Trail No. 266; Treas- 




urer Elsie McCann, Verdugo No. 
240; Marshal, Hazel Bailly, Pasadena] 
No. 290; Organist Nellie Miller, Ver- " 
dugo No. 240; Trustees Lillian Kep- 
ler. Poppy Trail No. 266; Phyllis 
Hirst. Verdugo No. 240, and Pauline 
Pappas. Poppy Trail No. 266; Inside I 
Sentinel Beulah Hood, Verdugo No. 
240; Outside Sentinel Clarita Young, j 
Beverly Hills No. 289; Jr. Past Pres- 
ident Blanch Oechsel, Californiana 
No. 247; Sr. Past President Lillian 
Stratton. Beverly Hills No. 289. 

Other special guests included GOS 
Laura Blosdale of Beverly Hills No. 
289; PGP Mary N. Barden of Cam 
forniana No. 247; Senaida Sullivan 
of Beverly Hills No. 289 who is the* 
Madrina of Olvera Street, Los An- 
geles; DGP Rose Rumsey of Placerita* 
No. 277; SDDGP Mildred Kubler of 
El Camino Real No. 324 and Sara 
Fernando Mission Parlor's five new 
members: Lucille Arevalo, Joan^ 
Funk, Frances Hook, Patricia John- 
son and Barbara McLain. 

Prizes for costumes were won by 
Pocohantas, Miriam McPhee, for the 
most clever; Amelia Earhart, Idai 
Grossi, for the most authentic; Carrie 
Nation, Phyllis Hirst, for the bestlj 
represented and a special award to ^ 
Madame Butterfly, Pauline Pappas. 
The most difficult job of judging was \ 
ably handled by PGP Mary N. Bar- I 
den, Senaida Sullivan and Ethel- J 
wynne Fraisher. 

A Fashion Show of California Wo- 1 
men's styles of the past was presented I 
by Grace Trimble and members of I 
San Fernando Mission Parlor, with 
authentic dresses worn by the Indian i 
women, through the Spanish influence 
and up through the flapper era. Ethel- 
wynne Fraisher displayed her five: 
doll entries at the Pomona Fair with' 
their winning ribbons. Autumn flow- 
ers and orange tapers graced the. 
gold cloth covered tables and all 
gifts were wrapped in green withJ 
gold bows, helping to carry out the. 
theme. Carolyn Riggs was in charge: 
of the evening and the lovely salad 
bar with hot homemade rolls which 
were served for refreshments. 



For the past 50 years, Liberty Parlor No. 213, NDGW has met here in 
the I.O.O.F. Hall 'on Elk Grove Blvd.. Elk Grove. 




CALIFORNIA HERALC 



~?otj in a 



Gy/teen fS>etei 



by Margaret F. Hayes 

He clinched at Spring 

is his body fell 

o /nulled, blood-stained grass 

md the lethal shell 

eft a taste of hell 

m lips designed to laugh. 

4 whirling sun spilled all its heat 
i whirling world stood still 
is sudden fury slashed a path 
lown a teakwood-studded hill. 

He listened — listened — 
or sound of a running medic's thud 
nit lie heard only crack of guns 
rom a hill of trees in bud. 

t darkness came with smothering 

hand — 
he guns sounded far and faint. 

Vhen searching corpsmen shadowed 

in 

:> where the lone one lay 
is hands still clung to wilted blades 
s to a never-picked bouquet — 
? blades of young grass — 

seedless — sweet 
he color of his green beret. 



This lyric poem, "Boy in a 
Green Beret", by Margaret Hayes, 
took both top honors in the Chap- 
paral Poets' annual contest for 
lyric form and in the Graham Me- 
morial Contest. Mrs. Hayes is a 
past president of Santa Cruz Chap- 
ter, Chapparal Poets. 



AST PRESIDENTS 

With Esther Ragon, past State 
resident of the Past Presidents As- 
xiation in charge, the Past Presi- 
ent Association No. 2 entertained 
oberta Griffiths, the State president 
om Sonora, on October 28 in Oak- 
md. The hillbilly theme was carried 
ut in the decorations and table 
rttings. Those attending wore cal- 
o or gingham dresses. Each one 
>ok canned goods for the Thanks- 
ving basket which was raffled off 
uring the evening. 

The dinner consisted of mulligan 
ew, vegetable salad, French bread, 

OVEMBER, 1968 



coffee and cake. The bead table de- 
cor included a log cabin and fall 
(lowers, while the other tables had 
vases of fall flowers. The favors were 
small wicker baskets filled with can- 
dies. Seated at the head table were 
Mrs. Griffiths, Madeline C. King, 
State Secretary; Dorothy JordaTi, 
State Inside Sentinel and Secretary to 
Association No. 2; GVP Nancy 
Conens and several other state offi- 
cers. Special guest was PGP Evelyn 
I. Carlson who has been a member 
of the Past Presidents for 52 years. 
She is still active in both Orders 
Other state officers presented included 
Constance Warshaw, Marshal and 
two Past State Presidents, Mrs. Ragon 
and El vena Woodward. 

During the opening ceremonies of 
the meeting, and with the Junior Na- 
tive Daughters of Fruitvale Parlor as 
escorts, Mrs. Griffiths was taken to 
her station and presented with a cor- 
sage. Following, the Unit, accom- 
panied by Mrs. Conens at the piano 
sang everal numbers. Mrs. Griffiths 
gave a most inspiring and interesting 
talk about her experiences during 
her official visits. 

At the close of the evening's ac- 
tivities, a most humorous skit of a 
shot-gun wedding was presented. The 
large attendance gave the performers 
an ovation. Mrs. Conens presided at 
the piano. 

A gift from the Association was 
given to Mrs. Griffiths and small 
tokens were given to the honorees, 
at the close of the evening. 

On November 6, Association No. 
2 held its 57th anniversary dinner at 
the Farm House in Oakland. Dorothy 
Jordan was in charge. 



CHAPEL IN THE SEA . . . 
(Continued from Page 8) 

From the earliest years of the mis- 
sion era, the friars fully endorsed the 
Spanish government's policy against 
the forced removal from the Channel 
Islands of any Indians born there. At 
the same time, Father Junfpero Serra 
exhorted his confreres to exhibit 
every courtesy to the natives of that 
area during their occasional journeys 
to the mainland. In addition, Serra 
suggested to Teodora DeCroix, the 
usefulness of exploring the islands 
for likely sites of a future missionary 
foundation. 

In his report for 1805, Father 
Estevan Tapis pursued his predeces- 



sor's thoughts about inaugurating a 
mission on Santa Cruz to accommo- 
date inhabitanti living in that island's 
ten ranchcrias as well as the seven 
on neighboring Santa Rosa, a popu- 
lation he estimated at 1,800. The 
Franciscan presidente noted that the 
naked and superstitious, though 
friendly, natives "were not disposed 
to join a mission on the mainland, 
yet caused friars trouble by their in- 
tercourse with the channel neo- 
phytes." 

According to Tapis, the Indians 
were envious of the good fortune 
enjoyed by their counterparts on the 
mainland and had expessed a desire 
to have similar facilities in their own 
midst, unwilling as they naturally 
were to leave their insular habitat. 
Had such a project materialized, 
Tapis gave assurance that the resi- 
dents of Santa Rosa would move to 
Santa Cruz. 

The friar also pointed out than an 
insular mission would serve as an 
additional defense against the inter- 

(Continued on Page 15) 



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PAGE 13 



JUNIOR NDGW 
ACTIVITIES 

s?5?S?SS2Stt?SZS?KS?S?W! 



SEQI (II V I Ml 

Sequoia Inn No 27 held a re- 
ception .u the \ eterans Building 
October 2' honoring two local girls 
who were recently elected to Junior 
St. ue Offices. Kathy Slater, daughter 

Of Mr. and Mrs. Walter Slater of 

I2lr> Windsor Way, was elected 
Junior State President Kathj Koch, 

(.laughter ot Mr. and Mrs. Curtis Koclf 

ol 1223 Dewey Avenue, was elected 

Junior State Organist. 




From left: Kctthy Koch and Kathy 
Slater. 

Twelve girls and four advisors 
travelled to Anaheim for the annual 
Junior State Conference, where the 
girls were installed. Miss Slater had 
as her theme, "These are my favorite 
things", which included love of home, 
love of God, devotion to our flag, 
scholastic achievement and love of 
art. An escort team of eight girls 
from Sequoia Unit escorted Miss 
Slater to her station while Miss Koch 
played "These are my favorite things" 
from "Sound of Music". 

Miss Slater and Miss Koch have 
been friends since they started kinder- 
garten at Roosevelt School. Both 
girls are sophomores at Sequoia High 
School, where Miss Slater is active 
in Mixed Chorus and is a member of 
the rally committee. Miss Koch is 
active in A Cappella Choir and 
Treble Clef. She is a piano student 
of Miss Stephanie Hadtsch. 

The scrap book entered by the 
unit depicting their activities for the 
year was awarded first prize Follow- 
ing the reception the girls of Sequoia 
Unit held their annual Halloween pot- 
luck dinner. 




From left: GT Helen McCarthy; PGP 
Evtlyn I ( orison Kathy Slater pres- 
ident of Sequoia Unit No. 27. Jr. 
NDGW; Gloria Renee, VP of Bonita 
Parlor No. 10, sponsors of Sequoia 
I nit and GT Marie l.andini. State 
Chairman of Junior NDGW. 



MENLO JUNIORS 

The 16th annual conference of the 
Jr. NDGW held at Anaheim was at- 
tended by 13 Menlo Juniors and two 
advisors. Linda Cane was elected 
Junior State Marshal and Robin Gil- 
bert, Junior State Secretary. Linda 
Ucovic, Jr. State Secretary for the 
past two years was awarded the only 
Junior State Scholarship. She enters 
San Jose State College. Menlo Unit 
won 2nd prize ($10) and a certificate 
for their beautiful year book. 

Marsha Metzger presided in a very 
business-like manner at the confer- 
ence. A most productive and ex- 
cellent conference was provided by 
State Chairman Marie C. Landini 
and the Unit. The "fun" program 
scheduled at Disneyland was most 
enjoyable. 

Menlo Unit will have a luncheon 
November 16, celebrating its 27th 
birthday. Public installation will be 
December 6. A dime-a-dip dinner 
and a beautiful robe made and do- 
nated by Robin Gilbert netted the 
Menlo Unit $137 toward the con- 
ference trip. 

The Sequoia and Menlo Units sent 
telegrams to Mrs. Evelyn I. Carlson 
because of her absence from the con- 
ference. She has attended the pre- 
vious 15 conferences. 



SILVER SPUR AD 

PORTOLA NO. 172 wiU hold a Christmas 
Bazaar, December 3 at 414 Mason St., San 
Francisco, 2 — 9 p.m. The sewing group 
has made many hadmade articles and 
Christmas decorations for sale. Come and 
do your Christmas shopping with us. 



Vendome Calling 

by Amalia Vella 

"Bien venidas ami gas y hermanM 

fraternales". which means "Welcome 
friends and fraternal sisters". Ouj 
82nd Grand Parlor is now just reports 
on parlor minutes, but what a timeJ 
Hot? Yes it was, but how wonderful 
to be able to say one was a part oi 
it however small that part might have 
been. The golden chain of friendship 
was truly welded more securely to-i 
gether for our many subordinate par* 
lors which was proven when all oil 
the links were returned by each pan 
lor representative and fused together 
to be strung across the front of tha 
stage as proof of this friendship. 

I will now try to give you a ruru 
down on what these gals of mine fronJ 
Vendome Parlor 100 have been up 
to. Let's start with the spring of tha 
year and special days. Mrs. Petei 
Yakobovich, our organist sprung i 
special Valentine luncheon on friend! 
and members of Vendome for tha 
benefit of our beloved "L1TTLH 
ONE" as we lovingly call her, nona 
other than our own Irene Lial, bazaaJ 
sewing chairman. From this socialJ 
$90 was realized and Irene purchased 
materials for her "NIMBLE FINi 
GERS" bazaar sewing group to wort 
on. Susie Engfer, our recording sec< 
retary, planned "A DAY BY THE 1 
BAY" for the month of May. 
fabulous luncheon at the South Ba* 
Yacht Club, of which she and he: 
co-worker Florence Filben are mem 
bers. With many affiliates assistinj 
with decoration in colorful sprin; 
theme, serving, and kitchen police 
duties, Susie and Florence dedicatee 
themselves just to cooking. From 
this "Caper" Irene again received ai 
additional $160 for more supplies, se 
you see what I mean when I say i 
costs to put on the kind of bazaa 
and luncheon that Vendome sets uj 
come October. 

(Continued Next Month 



the 



SQR 



store 



lincoln at lemon 
anaheim 



CALIFORNIA HERAL 



HAPEL . . . 

^onlinued from Page 13) 

iping otter hunters who even then 
ere a cause of anxiety to civil au- 
lorities. The proposal was approved 
y Governor Jose Arrillaga, but be- 
»re it could be implemented, a series 
\ epidemics reduced the population 
;ncath that necessary to support an 
ltonomous foundation. From that 
me onwards, religious instruction 
»r the Indians was limited to that 
:ceived on rare visits to the main- 
nd and from neophytes occasionally 
airneying out to the islands. 

The disintegration of the native 
ice on Santa Cruz occurred more 
ipidly than it did on the mainland 
here the missions stood between the 
idians and foreign rapacity. De- 
putation of the islands accounts 
•r the use of Santa Cruz as a penal 
>lony in 1830. Thirty men, sent out 
ith a supply of cattle and fish hooks, 
ere left to live as best they could, 
tost managed to escape within a 
w years on crude rafts built of tree 
unks covered with hides and insu- 
ted with asphaltum. 

In 1869, Justinian Caire acquired 
;le to the island and built a home 
ere for his family. The hilly land- 
ape reminded Caire of his native 
rench Alps and the area around Li- 
ma, Italy, where he had spent his 
lildhood. 

I Caire asked Bishop Francis Mora 
i the Diocese of Monterey-Los An- 
gles for permission to erect a chapel 
r the use of his family and em- 
pyees. Through the intervention of 
ather Michael King, the request was 
[entually granted. Practically all 
e actual building materials were 
oduced on the island itself. Bricks 
ere baked from local clay. Stone 
as quarried by an Italian mason 
jri even the lime was prepared in 
(home-built kiln. The wrought-iron 
jnctuary railing was fashioned by a 
jcilian blacksmith. 

The little rectangular-shaped chap- 
( was finished in red brick. Carved 
fone quoins decorated the corners 
lid even a small belfry peeked out 
trough the shingled roof. The chapel 
fs located in the midst of a lovely 
jneyard. Colored glass windows 
toke the lines of the white plastered 

lis and gently vaulted ceiling. A 
pie wooden altar was placed be- 

ath a hand-carved ebony crucifix. 

Shortly after the httle chapel was 

mpleted in 1893, Bishop Mora del- 

3VEMBER, 1968 



egatcd a friend of the (aire family. 
Father Gaspar Genna, to inaugurate 
ceremonies in the new edifice by giv- 
ing a mission to the island's several 
dozen inhabitants. At the conclusion 
of the services, a solemn blessing was 
also imparted to the adjoining orch- 
ards and fields. 

The Caire family spent only part 
of each year on the island and no 
regular chaplain was ever appointed 
to care for the few Catholics residing 
there. Through the years, however, 
various priests have ventured out to 
Santa Cruz, more as sightseers than 
missionaries. One such visitor was 
Father Thomas Sherman, son of the 
famous Civil War general, who cele- 
brated Mass at Santa Cruz on Christ- 
mas Day in 1929. 




The Hacienda Chapel in 1968. 

At the invitation of Dr. Carey 
Stanton, President of the Santa Cruz 
Island Company, this writer and two 
companions flew to Santa Cruz on 
May 3, 1968 to make available the 
sacraments for those attached to the 



i s I a n d' s cattle-raising enterprise. 
I here we found, a short distance 
from the central ranch-house, through 
the old peach orchard, the tiny chapel 
of the Holy Cross, the remaining relic 
of another era, a monument to 426 
years association with the Christian 
tradition. It stands with its little bel- 
fry in the calm of a one-time vineyard 
where, in the fall, cattle are turned 
into to feed on the lingering red leaves 
clinging to the branches of the 
gnarled, thick trunks. 

There is an alluring yet inaccessible 
air about that far-away "Chapel in 
the Sea!" 




Diamonds — Silverware 

132 W. Lincoln / Anaheim / 533-3107 



BRIDGES - HIGHWAYS • DAMS • RAILROADS 



ROLfinDl REVnQLDS 



GRADING ([ftfl) CONTRACTOR 



Heavy 
Hauling 



535-4233 
505 S. Sunkist Ave. Anaheim 



SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION 



Dorothy Y. Ulvestad, President 

construction loans 

(Main Office) 

ANAHEIM 

117 W. Lincoln Avenue 

PRopect 2-1532 



J. Bernard Soto, Exec. Viee-Pres. 
refinancing y collections 



HUNTINGTON BEACH 

411 Main Street 
LEhigh C-C591 



BREA 

770 South Brea Blvd. 
Ph. 529-4571 




Suite 114 / 



A. P. M.BROWN, INC 

"A Full House of Insurance" 

Fire — Auto — Theft — Casualty 
Compensation — Bonds 

Phone (714) 635-7871 

280 N. Wilshire Ave. / Anaheim, California 92801 



— ADDRESS CORRECTION REQUESTED 

CALIFORNIA HERALD 
P. 0. Drawer 4243 
Anaheim, California 92803 



:Y -26 

CIVIC CENTER 

' . 1 '1102 
AT. PER ) [ !AL DEP1 • 




\^/^nak 



glitz 



was 




y~. -^-tiii 



Orange County 

Through 
Four Centuries 



Leo J. Friis 



This is the first history of Orange' 
County that has treated the county as> 
an entity rather than a collection ofl 
isolated communities. 

"Orange County Through Four Cen-! 
turies" takes the reader from 1542 toJ 
the present day. Leo J. Friis writes inj 
an easy-to-read, yet concise style. 

This book is superbly illustrated — | 
annotated and has a complete index. 
Cloth bound. 

$7.50* 



(*Plus 80c tax and mailing) 



Through good fortune, a copy of Anaheim's first business directory has been found. It 
was printed in 1878, just twenty-one years after the founding of the town and is believed to be the 
only on in existence. 

This directory has been faithfully reproduced in "When Anaheim was 21", the latest book 
to be written by Leo J. Friis, well-known California historian. 

Using the anecdotal approach with sparkles of humor, the author describes Anaheim as it 
appeared in 1878 with its Chinese quarter, irrigation ditches and wineries. 



PIONEER PRESS / 301 N. Parton Street / Santa Ana, California 92701 

I enclose my check or money order (payable to Pioneer Press) for copy(s) of "When Anaheim was 21" and 

copy(s) of "Orange County Through Four Centuries. Both books @ $7.50 plus 800 tax & mailing for 

each copy. Please send to: 



Name 

Address . 
City 



..State 



... Zip 



Official Publication of 
THE NATIVE DAUGHTERS of the GOLDEN WEST 




DECEMBER, 1968 + 40<t 



OLVERA STREET. OFF THE PLAZA. LOS ANGELES 




l 3ooks in Review 

by JZtr. JLeo J. "Jriis 

California's Bicentennial, which ac- 
tually Joes not take place until 1969, 
is being heralded with several worth- 
while hooks and several more may 
he expected in 8 short lime. 

I he first of these is An:a and the 
Northwest Frontier of New Spain 
h\ I N Bowman and R. F. Heiser. 
I OS Vngeles, Southwest Museum. 
1967 Anza will be remembered for 
his teat in escorting overland, a group 
ot settlers for California. The authors. 
both competent California historians. 
have collected material not easily 
available to the ordinary reader. 

In addition there is an interesting 
account of the discovery of Anza's 
burial place at Arizpe, Mexico, an 
event which attracted nation-wide at- 
tention in 1963. 

Dr. Heiser was one of the experts 
commissioned by the Chancellor of 
the University of California to iden- 
tify the remains of the great soldier. 

Richard F. Pourade has written 
The Call to California, San Diego, 
I'nion-Tribune Publishing Company. 
196S. a beautifully designed and 
printed book covering Portola's Sa- 
cred Expedition. The narrative of 
the volume is well known to those 
acquainted with the journals of Crespi 
and Costanso and the work of Bolton. 
Nevertheless the author had furnished 
the reading public with a fine piece of 
writing illustrated with fine photos 
and colored reproductions of well 
executed paintings. 

Particular mention should be made 
of "The Portola Expedition of 1769- 
1770" by Dr. Theodore E. Treutlein, 
professor of history at San Francisco 
State College. This article appears 
in the December, 1968, issue of the 
California Historical Society Quart- 
erly. It should not be ignored as 
just another Portola story (of which 

(Continued on Page 10) 



California Herald 

"PRESERVING THE PAST FOR THE FUTURE" 
Volume XVI December, 1968 Number 41 

CONTENTS THIS MONTH 

Books in Review, by Dr. Leo J. Friis 2! 

Christmas in the Mother Colony, by Dr. Leo J. Friis 3 1 

Rudolph, by Leo J. Friis 41 

The Grand President's Corner 61 

Leo's Dictionary, by Dr. Leo J. Friis % 

Jr. Unit News 9 

Fruitvale Juniors, by Leealyn Marie Baker 8j 

What the Jr. Native Daughters Means to Me, by Cheryl Patterson m 

Junior Conference, by GT Helen C. McCarthy, Jr. State Chm 9J 

Parlor News 10 

In Memoriam 14 

Vendome Calling, by Amalia Vella (Part II) 14 




Sign of the Home that will stay young 

And so will the family that lives here, because the Medallion 
Home Emblem can mean gentle, whole-house electric heat- 
ing; a flameless, cool electric kitchen; and a readiness for the 
wonderful electric conveniences that are as near as tomorrow. 



Southern California Edison 



J. J. FRIIS 
Publisher 



LEO J. FRIIS 
Editor 



JANE FRIIS 

Public Relations 



„ ,., Published Monthly by J. J. Friis and Leo J. Friis, owners and publishers, Anaheim, 
California. All Rights Reserved. EDITORIAL AND GENERAL OFFICES: Anaheim, California. 
Mailing Address: P.O. Drawer 4243, Anaheim, California 92803. ADVERTISING OFFICE; 301 
N. Parton SL, Santa Ana, Calif. 92701. CHANGE OF ADDRESS AND SUBSCRIPTIONS: Mail 
correspondence to CALIFORNIA HERALD, Circulation Department, P.O. Drawer 4243, Anahaim, 
Calif. 92803. When ordering change of address, please allow six weeks; please furnish 
, and ,„".i w „ addre sses including zip code, NDGW MEMBERS: please send Parlor Number 
also POST OFFICE: RETURN REQUESTED. Please send magazine with address change 
to California Herald, P.O. Drawer 4243, Anaheim, California 92803. SUBSCRIPTION RATES: 
in U.S.A. (50 states), 40c a copy, 3.50 a yean $6.50 for two years; $8.25 for three years. 
Other countries: Please apply for rates. Entered as second-class matter at the Post Office at 
Anaheim, California, under the Act of March 3, 1879. No part of this magazine may be re- 
printed without specific permission. 

CALIFORNIA HERALD 




Ohtizimm 



$ 






.1 "I 



b;y 

Dr.?. Leo J. Frji's 



ytfpMiifctttr^.. 



and offering prayers, all joined in 
singing lullabies to the newborn Infant 
Jesus. 

Unfortunately, this fine custom has 
become considerably curtailed in re- 
cent years, but it will not soon be for- 
gotten. 

Anaheim has another custom that 
I did not learn about until after a 
long residence here. No doubt this 
custom is so intensely personal in its 
nature that those who observe it sel- 
dom speak of it. 



4 



Anaheim has had two special 
^Jj| Christmas customs that 
touch the heart. For many years, res- 
idents of Mexican descent of the city 
participated in a religious ceremony 
which they called La Posada. (Po- 
sada is a Spanish word for lodging 
house or inn.) 

On nine consecutive evenings be- 
fore Christmas, a goodly number of 
people marched in procession through 
the streets of their immediate neigh- 
borhood, carrying lighted candles, 
saying prayers and singing hymns in 
anticipation of the coming of the 
Christ Child. At the head of the 
group marched a young woman and 
a young man who had assumed the 
roles of Mary and Joseph. They 
stopped at a house which had been 
selected as the "inn" for the evening, 
rapped on the door and asked ad- 
mittance. 

DECEMBER, 1968 



The head of the house and his wife 
appeared and refused their request, 
explaining that there was no room for 
them in the inn. Thereupon the 
friends accompanying Mary and Jo- 
seph begged earnestly that the young 
couple be admitted, explaining that 
they were poor and that the wife was 
soon to become a mother and needed 
shelter for herself and her baby. 

The innkeeper was adamant and 
only after more pleading did he relent. 
When the door was opened, all en- 
tered the house. The Rosary was 
said, a hymn was sung and more 
prayers offered. The ceremony ended 
with the passing of refreshments. 

On the following evening the group 
returned, thanked the innkeeper for 
his hospitality and marched in pro- 
cession to the next "inn." Christmas 
Eve was, of course, the climax of La 
Posada. After entering the house 




It was not until about fifteen years 
ago that I chanced to visit our pioneer 
cemetery during the Christmas holi- 
days. I saw more flowers there than 
on a Memorial Day. Predominating 
were poinsettia plants and wreaths of 
holly tied with big bows of red ribbon, 
dripping with sparkling ornaments. 

Then there were the little Christmas 
trees. I choked with emotion as I 




R 



^ 



sjdolph the Red-Nosed Rein- 
deer is the first important 
the American 
nee Clement 
Niaht Before 



addition to 
J tradition s i 
wrote "The 



Yuletid 

Moore 

Christmas" in 1818. 

Rudolph's creator, Robert L. May, 
had no idea that his sprightly animal 
elf would attain nation-wide popular- 
ity leading to financial independence. 
In later years he said jokingly, "This 
is the first time a reindeer ever drove 
the wolf from the door." 

Bob May was working in the ad- 
vertising department of Montgomery 
Ward in Chicago in 1938. Shortlv 
before Christmas he was asked to 
volunteer entertainment for the em- 
ployees annual party. He responded 
with a humorous parody which was 
enthusiastically received. It was par- 
ticularly enjoyed by May's boss. H. 
E. MacDonald. 

About two months after the holi- 
days, MacDonald called May to his 
office and said, "That parody you 
wrote for the Christmas party wasn't 
bad. It gave me the idea that maybe 

PAGE 4 



you could write some kind of Christ- 
mas story that we could use as a 
giveaway promotion in all our stores 
next Christmas. For instance, an an- 
imal story for kids. Have you read 
Ferdinand the Bull? Read it. and 
then let's see you come back with 
some bright idea." 

May returned to his desk to con- 
jure up an animal. Unconsciously 
his mind reverted to some of Santa's 
reindeer, as named by Clement 
Moore. Dancer, Prancer, and others. 
Ah, yes, a reindeer was most appro- 
priate for Christmas — but what kind 
of a reindeer? He must have a per- 
sonality all of his own. He must have 
some physical characteristic that 
makes him different from his fellows. 

What could be more suitable than 
a red nose — a nose not reddened by 
tippling, but colored by the icy winds 
of winter. At May's request, an artist 
friend, Denver Gillen, now a well- 
known magazine illustrator, sketched 
a reindeer "with a nose so red it 
glowed in the dark." May was pleased 
with the drawing. Now he must find 



an appropriate name. It should com- 
mence with "R" to be alliterative with 
"red-nosed reindeer." "Rollo" seemed 
hardly appropriate, nor did "Regi- 
nald." "Rudolph" was better. 

Now for a story. According to 
MacDonald's orders, Rudolph should! 
have something of the character on 
Ferdinand the Bull, a lonesome souli 
who loved to smell flowers, an animal 
scorned by others of his kind. And| 
so May began: 

'Twos the day before Christmas, and! 

all thru the hills 
The reindeer were playing . . . 
enjoying the spills. 

Of skating and coasting, and 

(limbing the willows 
And a hop-scotch and leap-frog 
(protected by pillows).' 

While ever so often they'd stop 

to call names 
At one little deer not allowed 

in their games: — 

"Ha. ha! Look at Rudolph! 

His nose is a sight!" 
"It's red as a beet!" Twice as 

long!" Twice as bright!" 

When May was ready to present 
his opus, MacDonald summoned the 
entire copy staff for an audition. The 
author was understandably nervous. 
"I knew kids liked it," he recalled, 
"I had tried it on my four-year-old, 
Barbara, and her friends. They 
laughed and enjoyed it as if someone 
else had written it. But to get up 
and read it to a room full of hard- 
boiled copywriters. . .!" 

After the reading of the story, Mac- 
Donald called for criticism. Mem- 
bers of the staff were wary of making 
any worthwhile observations. After > 
a few cautious remarks, several 
present offered suggestions ranging 
from mildly negative comments to 
proposals of discarding the entire 
story. The last of the copywriters to 
speak was Carl Hacker, who crashed 
his fist upon the table and roared, "I 
think every word and every line that 
Bob wrote is just perfect, and I think 
it would be a sin and a crime for any- 
one in this room — including you 
Mac, to change a line of it!" Mac- 
Donald suggested only a few minor 
changes and Rudolph was on his way 
to fame. 

Denver Gillen did the art work for 
the story. While it was not the cus- 
tom of Montgomery Ward to asso- 

CALIFORNIA HERALD 




ciate the name of one of its employees 
with any of its products, in this case 
MacDonald felt that adding the name 
of the author would give the story 
prestige, and so, from the beginning, 
Robert L. May has been closely as- 
sociated with Rudolph in the public 
mind. 

At Christmastime, 1939, 2,400,000 
copies of the story of Rudolph were 
given away at Montgomery Ward 
stores. May was lionized as an im- 
portant author. He recalls that "he 
was invited to parties he had never 
been invited to before." 

Rudolph went into temporary 
eclipse during World War II, but 
during the Christmas holidays in 1946 
Ward's distributed 3,600,000 more 
copies. During this entire period the 
copyright to the story was owned by 
Montgomery Ward. May had re- 
ceived only a $300 company bonus 
for his work. It was decided that 
! Rudolph had completed his career 
I as an advertising gimmick and the 
I question arose as to whom the pub- 
lishing rights should be given. At- 
torneys for the company strongly re- 
commended that they should be re- 
tained by Ward's. President Sewell 
Avery thought differently and he or- 
dered, "Let Bob May have it." and 
so the copyright was assigned to the 
author. 

May looked about for someone 
to print and distribute the book. Big 
publishers shunned the item, feeling 
that a story of which 6,000,000 
copies had been given away, could 
not possibly find any market. "How- 
ever" said May, "we were under- 
estimating this little rascal, Rudolph. 
He just seemed to sail over all ob- 
stacles in sight." 

Harry Elbaum, a publisher of chil- 
dren's books (of Maxton Publishers, 

DECEMBER, 1968 



now a part of the Follett Publishing 
Co.) was shown the story by his wife. 
He decided to print it. Later he con- 
fided to May that his decision was 
influenced by the fact that "all my 
life, I've been kidded about my own 
big, peculiar-looking nose." Irrespec- 
tive of his description of his own nose 
Elbaum had another nose for business 
and he judged rightly. Rudolph con- 
tinued to sell. 



gomery Ward after a breathing spell, 
he had another boss, as he was so 
forcibly reminded of the day when 
a small boy said to him, "I'll bet I 
know what your name is." 




Sales of the book skyrocketed when 
May persuaded his friend, song writer 
Johnny Marks to write a song about 
Rudolph. Columbia agreed to record 
the song. Mitch Miller, feeling that 
his voice was not well enough known, 
recommended that Gene Autry sing 
it. That is why Autry made the first 
recording. In December, 1949, the 
record rated Number Two on Hit 
Parade and in the following year it 
moved up to first place. 

Rudolph has proved a financial 
boon for May and his family. Al- 
though the author returned to Mont- 




May replied, "Well, that's pretty 
remarkable. I don't know your 
name." 

"Your name is Robert L. Maj and 
I bet I know who you work for." 

"Really? I'm surprised you know 
that." 

"You work for Rudolph the Red- 
Nosed Reindeer!" 



The Grand 
President's Corner 




(.KAND PRESIDENT 

Huzel T. Mallctte (Mrs. Evcral A.) 
45 Dunstone Drive 
Oroville, California 95965 



GRAND SECRETARY 

Mary C. Mahoney (Mrs. Herbert J.) 

Office: 703 Market Street, Room 612 

San Francisco 94103 Dial 362-4127 
Res: 4125 Lincoln Way 

San Francisco 94122 



1 

2 

10 

12 
25 



ITINERARY 1968 



DECEMBER 

Childrcns Foundation Bruncheon San Francisco*' 

Sea Point No. 196, Tamelpa No. 231 Mill Valley* 

South Butte No. 226, Colus No. 194, Oak Leaf No. 285 .... Live Oak*j 

Annie K. Bidwell No. 168 Chico* 

Christmas 



t;OOI) NEWS 

Grand President Hazel T. Mallette 
is home convalescing from her recent 
surgery. She sends thanks for the 
manj cards, (lowers, gifts and letters 
sent to her. 



sw FRANCISCO PARLOR 

San Francisco No. 261 was insti- 
tuted in October. 1936. by the late 
PGP Anne C. Thuesen. The annual 
birthday celebration was postponed 
this year until the banquet could be 
held at the new Castagnola's at Fish- 
erman's Wharf. Saturday November 
23. I96N. This was under the able 
direction of Marie L. Feil. 

Dignitaries present included: Pres- 
ident of San Francisco Parlor, Verna 
Cummings; PGP Anita Gillick, Twin 
Peaks No. 185; GM Irene Bondanza, 
San Francisco No. 261; GT Helen 
McCarthy. Utopia No. 272 and her 
husband, James; and PGP Jewel Mc- 
Sweeney; and San Francisco County 
Chairman of the Extension of the 
Order Committee. Eleanor Keneally. 
Minerva No. 2. In attendance was 
Past Governor General Past Presi- 
dents No. 1, NSGW, John J. Lewis. 
Two past deputies in attendance were 
Margaret Skelly and Ruth Trousdale. 
There were 16 charter members, 14 
Past Persidents of the Parlor and four 
San Francisco No. 49, NSGW, mem- 
bers present. In all there were 65 
present to enjoy this evening. 

Several November "babies" cele- 
brated their birthdays including Edna 



ITINERARY 1969 



JANUARY 

1 New Years 

7 Junipero No. 141 Monterey*] 

9 La Paz No. 326, San Bruno No. 246 San Bruno* 

10 El Monte No. 205, Palo Alto No. 229 Palo Alto*' 

15 Compton No. 258, Cien Anos No. 303, 

Rio Hondo No. 284 Huntington Park* 

16 Reina del Mar No. 126, Tierra de Oro No. 304 Santa Barbara* 

18 Gold Discovery Dinner San Francisco 

21 Pasadena No. 290, San Gabriel Valley No. 281, 

Verdugo No. 240, Glendale* 

22 Placerita No. 277 — 25th Anniversary Van Nuys*' 

25-26 Grand Officers Meeting San Francisco 

27 Twin Peaks No. 185, Utopia No. 252, 

Guadalupe No. 153 San Francisco* 

28 Alta No. 3 (afternoon) San Francisco* 

28 Richmond No. 147, Bear Flag No. 151, Albany No. 260, 

Sequoia No. 272, Cerrito de Oro No. 306, 

Argonaut No. 166 (evening) Oakland* 

Asterisks mark Official Visits 



Garaventa; Irene Bondanza; her twin 
Clarisse C. Meyer; Viola Brazell; 
Victoria Daneri and Flora Warwick. 
Also celebrating her birthday was a 
guest, Ella Tait of Minerva No 2. 
Among those present were Blanche 
Geminani and her husband, Louis of 
Rincon Parlor No. 72. NSGW (over 
60 years a member of the Native 
Sons) who were celebrating their 
60-year anniversary. 



COLUMBIA 

Columbia Parlor No. 70 enter- 
tained Grand President Hazel T. Mal- 
lette at a salad luncheon and pre- 



sented her with a money tree - 
quarters wrapped in orange paper 
and an engraved silver teaspoon. 

President Ruth Skoverski, pre- 
sented a California Bear Flag to Cub 
Scout Pack 158 of Camptonville. The 
Parlor made its usual donation to 
the Tournament of Roses Committee 
and to the Veterans Christmas Com- 
mittee of the Bay area; also ordered 
twenty - five Children's Foundation 
calendars. A Christmas party with 
exchange of gifts was held at the 
December meeting. President Ruth 
Skoverski obtained a small living 
Christmas tree for the occasion. 

Plans are being made to place a 
marker at the old schoolhouse in 
French Corral early next year. 

CALIFORNIA HERALD 



tiM&B DICTION'A.RT 



toy 




77ie Toyon, also known as California Holly 



TOYON 

An evergreen shrub or smail tree of the 
family Rosaceae bearing large panicles of creamy 
flowers which produce red (sometimes yellow) 
berries. According to Munz is "common on 
semi-dry, brushy slopes and in canyons below 
4,000 feet"; also in the coast region from Men- 
docino County southward into Lower California. 

Common names: tollon, toyon, toyen 
Christmas berry, California holly. The early 
California and Mexican name is tollon. 

Scientific names: phototinia arbuii 'folia 
Lindle; Heteromeles arbutifolia (Ait) M. Rocm. 



(For other names see Abrams.) The variety, 
macrocarpa Munz, is native to Santa Catalina 
and San Clemente Islands and is preferred for 
cultivation. 

Phototina is from the Greek photeinos. 
meaning "shining" and refers to shiny leaves. 
Arbutifolia means that the leaves, folia, are like 
those of the Arbutus family. Heteromeles is from 
the Greek heter (different) and mains (apple), 
meaning a different apple than the ordinary va- 
riety which is also a member of the rose family. 

(Continued on Page 11) 



DECEMBER, 1968 



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1 JR. UNIT NEWS 

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I HI II \ \l I II MORS 
bj Lm iImi Murii- H:ikiT 

ii Slate \ Ice Preudeol 

I ins h.is been .1 delightful, hard 
working term tor the Fruitvale Jun- 
iors with Marilyn Ann Baker, pres- 
ident; I eealyn Marie Maker, past 
president; Ann Mane Conway, Vice- 
president; Sharon I andl. Marshal; 
Veronica rlagen, Maureen Madsen 

and Susan Fleming, trustees; Judy 
Boyd, Sentinel. Sharon D U glas S, 

treasurei and Debbie Perry, secretary. 

The new president really got rolling 
with Mrs Marie C. i.andini's official 
\Mt \ Hawaiian theme w;is used 
and an enjoyable afternoon was 

shared. 




Mrs. Marie C. Lcnutini on her official 
visit and the Fruitvale Juniors. 



The girls have enjoyed many ex- 
eiting activities such as a family pic- 
nic, trip to Grand Parlor, game par- 
ties at homes, swimming parties, bar- 
becues, Mexican dinner at Advisor, 
Mrs. Ragan's home, S25 prize for 
the marching unit at Admission Day 
Parade, Halloween party and the 
Junior Conference. 

At the conference Marilyn Baker 
won second place in the essay con- 
test and Sharon Douglas took third. 
Two of Fruitvale's Juniors are state 
officers: Leealyn Marie Baker, Jr. 
State Vice President and Sharon 
Douglas, Jr. State Trustee. The Rag- 
onettes (choral group) were the en- 
tertainment at the Jr. State Officers' 
installation. It has been a busy but a 
most enjoyable term. 



si 01 01 v I Ml 

i -i. i l mi 27, Junior Native 
Daughters ol the Golden West were 
well represented at the annual Chil- 
drens Foundation Breakfast, spon- 
sored b) the Native Daughters of the 
Golden West, in the Grand Ballroom 
at the Fairmont Hotel in San Fran- 
cisco. Cathy Carpenter, president ol 
Sequoia Unit presented a donation 
from the unit. 

1 he following girls attended: Kathy 
Slater. Kathy Koch. Jan Stetson. 
1 on Lind, Debbie Smith, Stephanie 
Sycylo and Cathy Carpenter. Advis- 
ors and mothers attending were 
Mines, Stetson. Slater, Carpenter, 
Koch, Lind, Smith and Sycylo. 



GOLDEN POPPY UNIT 

Junior Golden Poppy Unit No. 38 
would like to say "Hello". Golden 
Poppy Unit is a new Unit in San 
Francisco which is just starting. Some 
of the activities of the Unit will be 
a rummage sale at San Francisco Cow 
Palace. Later there will be car 
washes, a pot luck dinner and a 
fashion show. Golden Poppy sends 
congratulations to the Juniors in Las 
Amiguitas Unit No. 33 for their in- 
stallation November 2. 



WHAT THE JUNIOR NATIVE 
DAUGHTERS MEANS TO ME 

by Cheryl Patterson 

Las Amiguitas Unit No. 33 

For many years I've been a dream- 
er. I suppose you could say all little 
girls dream, but I find I am one of 
the few experiencing my dreams com- 
ing true. Setting your goals, perse- 
vering and believing with all your 
heart, are a few of the ingredients 
which help make dreams reality; but 
one very important part is "good for- 
tune". In this category I am rich 
because I consider myself very for- 
tunate to have spent seven of my 
growing years in the Junior Native 
Daughters of the Golden West, which 
so greatly influenced my life. 

Standing on the threshold of wo- 
manhood, I look back with deep grat- 
itude on the influence the Junior Na- 
tive Daughters played in my life. 
Therefore, it is with humility and a 
feeling of inadequacy that I attempt 
to tell you what this fine organization 
means to me. 

What words are there which can 
exemplify love, loyalty, sharing, and 




Clieri I'aterson, right when she was 
Junior State President. Others pic- 
tured are from left: Sherri Borges, 
Las Amiguitas Jr. Unit No. 33 and 
GVP Nancy Conens. 

the riches of lasting friendships? It 
is something which I have been ac- 
customed to experiencing rather than 
talk about. It occurred to me that 
perhaps some of the nostalgia which 
I feel about the Juniors could be 
tinged just a little with the regret one 
feels whenever leaving behind a part 
of their past, but upon further exam- 
ination I know that this cannot be 
true, for there are tangible results of 
my relationship with the Junior Na- 
tive Daughters of the Golden West. 

During my first year my Unit vis- 
ited an orphanage. We had collected 
clothes for the children and then 
spent some time with them. This 
one experience influenced my life be- 
cause with that visit I resolved that 
some day I would work with other 
children. I had no idea of the struggle 
which would be necessary in order 
to realize this dream, but through 
other experiences in the Unit, both 
on local and State level, I learned 
that perserverance will be rewarded, 
and now I am entering my second 
year of college, studying toward my 
teaching credential. 

At thirteen, I learned through my 
Unit that goals worth reaching for 
are worth working for. I remember 
the joy of being elected Charter State 
Sentinel at my first Conference. I 
hoped to be the first girl to go through 
all the chairs at the State level. I was 
defeated in the next election for the 
office of State Marshal, but with the 
encouragement of my own Unit, this 
showed me that to be discouraged 
only meant a waste of time. I saw 
that the girl who won was a highly 
qualified girl and I could learn from 
the girls who were my Junior Sisters. 

CALIFORNIA HERALD 



resolved that I would learn and try 
,>r another State Office. I tried again 
nd was elected State Vice- President, 
hereby continuing on through the 
■tate Chairs. 1 remember the im- 
iossihle dream was not impossible 
nd that if you wish hard and set your 
ims. even though they may be as 
ligh as the stars, you can achieve 
ihese goals when surrounded by the 
caching of those dedicated to the 
idvancement of young girls every- 
where. 

Today I face another dream which 
Is proving to be the greatest challenge 
j>f my life. I'm putting myself through 
:ollege. It must be this way if I am 

realize that greatest dream of all 
lireams — to become a teacher and 
repay others for the experiences I've 
lad with those who have been my 
eachers. But I have learned, through 
he Junior Native Daughters, that 
his dream is not impossible. There 
s love, loyalty and friendship about 
ne, and with riches such as these, 
lothing is unattainable. 

So, when I say good-bye to my 
Junior Sisters, that part of me which 
is already an adult knows, that the 
.ichievement of my degree and the 
roll I will play in my future life, 
will be a constant reminder that be- 
muse of the Junior Native Daughters 

1 will experience the peace and con- 
tentment of having found my real 
niche in life. 

In spite of the attitude of other 
young people today, I harbor in my 
heart a gratitude and relief that I 
was spared the misery of bad in- 
fluences found in our schools and 
neighborhoods. My Unit kept us 
50 content that we never felt a need 
to look elsewhere for thrills or for 
"kicks". We never felt "out of the 
swing" of things because we didn't 
need the friendships of the "In" 
crowd. We were our own "In" crowd 
and we were happy knowing that we 
were "In" with what was "right". 
We had friendships everywhere — 
not just in our own Unit, or own 
schools, but because of our member- 
ship we had friendships in rival 
schools and in cities all over Cali- 
fornia. We knew a strong feeling of 
adequacy, security and confidence, 
and most of all, we knew a feeling of 
friendship. I only hope that when 
I have a daughter there will be an 
Order of Junior Native Daughters 
who can help me to guide her as I 
was guided. 

DECEMBER, 1968 



I am rich, indeed, because oi nn 
Unit — rich in memories of com 
munity service, parties, competition, 
building friendships, and the knowl- 
edge that we must never grow too 
old to learn. I can recall jokes, ar- 
guments, and giving in when proven 
we were wrong. I remember camp 
tires and earwigs in our outdoor 
breakfast, and a girdle fro/en in the 
deep freeze at a slumber party. I 
can recall faces of the old folks at 
Christmas and faces of orphans, and 
the letters of service men in Vietnam. 
I recall growing up in a secure world 
and I now know confidence as I face 
an unsure world. And all of these 
things spell out to me what the Junior 
Native Daughters of the Golden West 
has always been and what it must 
always continue to be. 

God bless you all; if thanks could 
be dollars you would be more fab- 
ulously rich materially than you al- 
ready are spiritually. 



This essay won first place award 
at the Junior Native Daughter con- 
ference held at Anaheim, Cali- 
fornia, October 12, 1968. 



Junior Conference 

by 
Helen C. McCarthy, G.T. 

State Chairman, Jr. N.D.G.W. 

The 16th Annual Conference of 
the Junior Native Daughters of the 
Golden West was held at the Charter 
House in Anaheim, October 12 and 
13. 

The business sessions on Saturday 
morning and afternoon were very 
productive, and presided over with 
efficiency by Junior State President 
Marsha Metzger of Estrellas de Oro 
Unit No. 37 of Norwalk and her 
corps of State Officers. 

Some of the highlights of the con- 
ference was the awarding of prizes to 
the winners of contests for: Best 
Year Book, Increase in Membership, 
Best Essay and for the first time the 
awarding of a Scholarship to a worthy- 
Junior Native Daughter. 

The results of the contest were: 
Year Book — Sequoia Unit No. 27; 
Membership — Estrellas de Oro Unit 
No. 37; Essay — Jr. State Past Presi- 
dent Cheryl Patterson, Las Amiguitas 
Unit No. 33; Scholarship — Jr. State 
Secretary Linda Ucovich, Menlo Unit 
No. 10. 



I he winning essay by Cheryl Pat- 
terson is printed in this issue for your 
reading pleasure, a pleasure that will 
till the reader with pride with the real- 
i/ation of the high caliber ol member- 
ship in the Junior Native Daughters. 
Another highlight of the day was the 
attendance at the morning session of 
the Grand President of the Native- 
Sons, Andrew Stodcl, who stated he 
was honored and privileged to be in 
attendance with a wonderful and 
gifted group of native born young 
ladies. 




helen c. McCarthy, gt 

A delicious luncheon was served 
in the Rainbow Room and the swim- 
ming pool area was the setting for 
the evening banquet. The grand finale 
of the day was the formal Installation 
of State Officers. State Chairman 
Marie C. Landini, GT installed the 
new State President, Kathy Slater of 
Sequoia Unit No. 27 of Redwood 
City, and her corps of State Officers. 

The festive ceremonies began with 
the presenting of the Bible and light- 
ing of candles at the Altar. The Bible 
was carried by the new State Presi- 
dent's sister, Debbie Slater and the 
candles were lit by Patty Stetson, 
daughter of one of the Advisors of 
Sequoia Unit, Lillian Stetson, and a 
sister of one of the Unit's members. 
State President Kathy was escorted 
to the Altar and her station by an 
escort team of eight members from 
her Unit, and State Organist Kathy 
Koch, a member of Sequoia Unit. 
played the piano for the escort. 

Also escorted and presented were: 
Grand President Hazel T. Mallette, 
Jr. PGP June T. Goldie, GVP Nancy 
J. Conens, GT Lila Hummel, a Jr. 
State Committee Member, GT Mar- 
ian McGuire, GT Helen C. McCar- 
thy, GIS Laura Blosdale. GO Peggy 
Brandenberg, Dolores Ferenz, 
SDDGP Alameda County and a Jr. 
State Committee Member, Advisor 

(Continued on Page 10) 

PAGE 9 



JUNIOR CONFERENCE . . . 
.nurd a, -m Page ■*) 

l ilh.in Stetson, the President ol Hk 
nita Parlor \.' 10, Loretta Mosley, 
.mil the Grand Marshal of the Native 
Sons. Jack Henrj 

Other Junioi State Officers installed 
were Past Presidenl Marsha Met* 
itrellas de Oro I nil No 17, 
Norwalk; Vice Presidenl I eealyn 
Baker, I ruitvale Unil No. 2:. < >ak 
land; Secretar) Jean rullius, \i>> 
gonaul Unil No, 3, Oakland; I iv.is 
nrer Beverly Beckemeyer, I as Am- 
iguitas l nil No. 33, Walnul (reck; 
Marshal l inda Cane, Menlo I oil 
No in. Menlo Park; rrustee— Paula 
Ferguson, Argonaut Unil No. 3, Oak- 
land; Trustee — Sharon Douglas. 
Fruitvale Unil No. 22. Oakland: 
l rustee Robin Gilbert, Menlo Unil 
No. 10, Menlo Park; Sentinel — 
Jamej Maynard, Escholita Unit No. 

26, Napa; and Organist — kathv 
Koch, Sequoia Unit No. 27. Redwood 
City. 



OFFICIAL VISIT 

Grand President Hazel Mallette of 
Gold of Ophir No. 190 made her 
official visit to Alturus No. 159 and 
\//. Lassen No. 215 Parlors in joint 
session. She was accompanied by 
Chairman of the Board of Grand 
Trustees Rae L. Rominger of La 
Bandera Parlor and GT Marion Mc- 
Guire of Berkeley Parlor. The meet- 
ing was held in the I.O.O.F. Hall 
wih a pot luck dinner preceding the 
meeting. The theme was "When the 
Bloom is on the Sage". Visitors were 
present from Gold of Ophir and 
Naomi Parlors. Three candidates 
were initiated for Alturas Parlor: 
Mmes. May Lalton, Bina Alphonse 
and Maxine Amistani. 

Since preservation of California 
history is the primal object of Grand 
President Mallette, Alturas Parlor, 
members of the California History 
and Landmark Committee met with 
the visitors and the Mayor of Alturas, 
Neil Phillips, and presented a unique 
set of tapes telling the complete ju- 
dicial history of Modoc County to 
the Modoc County Library. The 
tapes are narrated by former Judge 
A. K. Wylie who during his life-time 
knew personally all of the judges 
from G. F. Harris in 1874 to the 
present Judge Charles Leader in 
1968. Judge Wylie served the Modoc 



Parlor News 




Mildred Boyd, Alturas No. 159; GT 
Rae Rominger. Seated: Librarian 
Betty Malson; GT Marion McGuire; 
PGP Irma A. Laird and GP Hazel 
Mallette. 

County Court for twenty-four years. 
In giving the judicial history of the 
judicial system he has entwined the 
colorful history of Modoc County 
during the terms of each judge. Judge 
Wylie was ably assisted by Earl Dun- 
woody of Alturas who did all of the 
technical work of the recording Li- 
brarian Betty Malson accepted the 
tapes and they will be on file at the 
Modoc County Library for the use 
of any individual or for use in class- 
room teaching aids. 

A letter from Governor Ronald 
Reagan was read saluting the Native 
Daughters for carrying on a tradition 
of preserving the history of California 
and for a forward-looking program 
to assist the younger generation to 
grow up with full awareness of these 
traditions. 



BOOKS IN REVIEW . . . 
(Continued from Page 2) 

we doubtless will see plenty next 
year. ) 

Most writers have been rather 
vague in outlining the purpose of this 
great expedition, but not Dr. Treut- 
lein. What is more, he has presented 
an excellent documentation of the 
historical background of this explor- 
atory venture. Many readers will be 
interested in being introduced to Ad- 
miral Cabrera's Navigator's Hand- 
book published in Manila in 1734 
and used by the expedition as a guide. 



GENEVIEVE 

A "Surprise Appreciation Meet' 
was held by Genevieve No. 132 M 
honor past and present deputies ana 
officers for their service to Geneviev, 
Parlor and to the Order. PGP Eva 
elyn I. Carlson welcomed each memi 
ber. She also gave the history o 
Genevieve Parlor. Each of thos* 
honored told of her own work in th« 
Order and was presented with a beam 
tiful hand-made doll. The them* 
"The Dollies" and the dolls were orig- 
inated by President Doris Stidhemi 
The dolls were created from a bud] 
vase body, head scarf dresses and 
heads of styrofoam. The memben 
joined in singing "Hello Dolly". 

Included in those honored were 
PGPs Orinda Giannini and Emiljl 
Ryan, GM Irene Bondanza, GS Maryi 
Mahoney, GT Helen McCarthy and 
DGPs Constance Warshaw, Mildrec 
Ehlert, Irene Bold, Eleanore Bianchi.j 
Anita Gillichk, Genevieve Lanfried 
and Florence Conklin. 

Refreshments of hot foods were 
served in the "Grizzly Bear". The 
tables were beautifully decorated by 
Doris Stidhem and her committeeJ 
Among those who helped serve werej 
Helen Clifton, Meta Tracey and Irene 
Buckley. 



JAMES LICK 

It was an anniversary meeting for 
James Lick members and guests whem 
they met for luncheon and meeting 
in November. They celebrated the 
47th birthday and also initiated Hilda 
Bettie Murison. Deputies present 
from other San Francisco Parlors 
were DGPs Elizabeth Brennan,i 
Gladys Knight, Lucile Ashbaugh and, 
Doris Stidhem, and Past Deputy Rose 
Leitner. 

The following Past Supervisors and 
their Deputies wish every one a happy 
holiday: Vera Thompson, Mildred. 
Ehlert, Frances Simas, Ann Shaw, 
Lucile Ashbaugh, Emma O'Meara, 
Marie Feil. 



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CALIFORNIA HERALD 



.EO'S DICTIONARY . . . 
[Continued from Page 7) 

'he name macrocarpa is derived from the Greek 
■uikros (large) and karpos (fruit). 

Dr. Archibald Menzies, Scottish naturalist 
|nd surgeon on Capt. George Vancouver's Dis- 
overy, collected seeds and specimens of the 
oyon when the ship anchored off California in 
'792-1794. He introduced the plant to Europe. 

LeRoy Abrams, Illustrated Flora of the Pacific States, 
lantotd, Stanford Univ. Press. 1944, Vol. II, p. 475. Roland 
1. Aldcn and John D. lfft, "Early Naturalists in the Far 
Vest". Occasional Haras of the California Academy of 
deuces. No. XX, San Francisco, California Academy of 
nances, 1943, pp. 1 5«T. Ralph D. Cornell, Conspicuous Cal- 
I or ma Plants. Pasadena, San Pascual Press, 1938, pp. 104 
f. Leo J. Friis, "California's Christmas Gift," California Hei- 
•Id, Dec, 1954, Vol. 2, No. 4, p. 3 ff. Willis Linn Jepson. 
I Manual of the Flowering Plants oj California, Berkeley 
nd Los Angeles, Univ. of Calif., 1966, p. 508. Philip A. 
.tun/. I California Flora, Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Gar- 
ten, 1959, p. 794. Charles Sprague Sargent, Manual of the 
nt-s hi North America. Boston and New York, Houghton 
Mifflin, 1935, p. 392. 

3ENTE DE RAZON 

Literally, "people of reason". An early 
?alifornia term applied to people other than 
ndians. 

Fr. Felipe Arroyo de la Cuesta of Mission 
Jan Juan Bautista wrote on May 1, 1818, "The 
ndians regard us all without distinction — Euro- 
jeans, Americans, Asiatics, and Africans — as 
iente-de-Razon (people of reason), and they 
jrofess more affection for us than animosity." 
Dn April 23, 1820, Fr. Jose Maria Zalvidea 
■eported, "Many fail to comply with their Easter 
iuties, Indians as well as those de razon." Frs. 
Marcos Amestoy and Ramon Olbes of Mission 
san Gabriel stated on December 31, 1813, "The 
jeople of this province, known as the Gente de 
■azon (whites) are so lazy and indolent that they 
<now nothing more than to ride on horseback." 

See the following works by Fr. Zephyrin Engelhardl, 
3.F.M.: Mission San Juan Bautista, Santa Barbara, 1931, p. 
15; San Gabriel Mission, San Gabriel, 1927, p. Ill; Santa 
Barbara Mission, San Francisco, The James H. Barry Com- 
pany, 1923, p. 98. 




This poppy was collected by Adelbert von 
Chamisso, naturalist on the Russian ship, Rurik. 
which anchored in San Francisco Bay on October 
2, 1816, and remained there for a month. He 
named the plant Eschscholzia in honor of his 
friend, Dr. Johann Friedrich Eschscholz, surgeon 
on the Rurik:' It should be noted that "Cha- 
misso's name for the genus lacked the I that some- 
how has since attached itself. . ." * 

' Government Code, Sec. 421. Calif. States. 1943, ch. 134, 
p. 903. Based on Calif. Stats 1903, ch. 69. 

2 This quotation from California Review. March, 1903, is 
copied in California Blue Book or State Roster, 1903. 

■Chamisso was born in France in 1781. His name was 
originally Louis Charles Adelaide de Chamisso. See Roland 
H. Alden and John D. lfft, "Early Naturalists in the Far 
West," Occasional Papers of the California Academy of 
Sciences, No. XX, San Francisco, California Academy of 
Sciences, 1943, pp. 21-29. 

1 See Charles Francis Saunders, With the Flowers ami 
Trees in California, New York, Robert M. McBride & Com- 
pany, 3rd Prtg., 1923, p. 106 n. 4. According to Saunders. 
Chamisso's description of the plant appeared in Luis Nee's 
Horae Physicae, published in Madrid in 1820. It should be 
noted that Philip A. Munz and David D. Keck, in A Cali- 
fornia Flora. San Francisco, Santa Ana Botanic Garden, 
1959, pp. 196-198, spell the genus Fschscholzia. 



Peace on eaath 



STATE FLOWER 

"The golden poppy (Eschscholtzia) is the 
official State flower." ' 

"Among all the wild flowers which carpet 
California's plains and cloak her hills there is 
none so distinctly Californian as the Golden 
Poppy." 2 

The California Legislature designated the 
golden poppy the State flower by an act approved 
March 2, 1903. Eschscholtzia is the name of 
the genus of the plant. Eschscholtzia californica 
is the species commonly regarded as the State 
flower. Its common name is California Poppy. 
(No modern plant manual lists the name of 
"Golden Poppy." 

DECEMBER, 1968 




"Peace, peace on earth; for men shall love each other. 
Hosts shall go forth to bless, and not destroy: 
For men shall see in man a brother, 
And peace on earth fulfill the angel's joy." 

PAGE n 



CHRISTMAS IN 
MOTHER COLONY . . . 
(Continued lr,<m Pagt 

approached the grave oi .1 little girl 
At the lie. ni ol the nn> mound stood 
.1 little in tree covered with tinsel 
and loaded with wee, shining balls. 
At the top hung .1 doll wrapped in 
cellophane 

I .mi greatlj moved when I men- 
tall) relive tins experience. ( nristmas- 
tniK' is indeed .1 season ol joy, bul 
it also h.is its heartaches. 



MISSION |'\RI OR 

on Parlor No. 227 and Min- 
4o. 2 were first parlors in San 
Francisco Count) to have their official 
\isit. November 13. It came al .1 
time when sadness was in the group, 
because Grand President, Hazel Mal- 
lette entered the hospital for surgery. 
However, Grand \ ice President 
NanCA Cunens of Piedmont Parlor, 




GVP CONENS 

who is currently pinch - hitting for 
Grand President Mallette. did a fine 
job. General chairman for the eve- 
ning was PGP Alice Shea of Minerva. 
Inga Meyer was Mission's chairman. 

Other grand officers in attendance 
were GM Irene Bondanza, GS Mary 
Mahoney. GTs Marie Landini, Helen 
McCarthy and Marian McGuire. In 
attendance also were PGPs Emily 
Ryan. Jewel McSweeney and Alice 
Shea. Fourteen of the San Francisco 
County deputies acted as escort, while 
a message in song was given to GVP 
Nancy, by Tom Harrison, accompa- 
nied by Past Grand Organist, Fran- 
ces Simas, SDDGP Myrtle Ritter- 
busch of Biienu Vista No. 68 was 
unable to be present due to sickness 
in her family. 

Following Mission's last meeting 
in November, a ""surprise" birthday 
party was given a 32-year member, 
Caasi Heller, who was celebrating 
her 80th birthday. Mrs. Heller has 
been an active member in the parlor 



and present!) is the organist. The 
members presented her with personal 
gifts. 

Refreshments followed with a spe- 
cial birthda) cake. 

The annual bus trip to Reno is 

scheduled for the weekend of Janu u\ 

1969 Members are urged to 

invite friends to come along on this 

"fun trip." 



I OMTTAS 

With decorations of coral and jade, 
depicting 35 years, Lomitas No. 255 
celebrated the 35th anniversary of its 
installation during the official visit of 
Grand President Hazel Mallette. Pre- 
ceding the meeting, members wel- 
comed Mrs. Mallette at a dinner 
under the chairmanship of Mrs. Leo 
Helm. Mrs. Pete Triarte, president. 
presided over the business session. 

Escorted to the altar and presented 
were Grand President Mallette, GT 
Marian E. McGuire, GIS Meredvth 
Burnett, PGP Ethel C. Enos, SDDGP 
Doris Hamilton, DGP Margaret 
Peterson and life member Leila 
Negra. Under the chairmanship of 
First Vice President Connie Upshoff, 
each guest of honor was presented 
with a miniature topiary tree. Escorts 
for the occasion were Mmes. Loos, 
Carlucci, Giuntini, Comes. Lewis and 
Silva. 




GT McGUIRE 

A. V. Bettencourt, president of Los 
Banos No. 206, NSGW, presented 
Mrs. Mallette with a bouquet of red 
roses. GT Regalia, NSGW was pre- 
sented to the group. Mmes. Mello, 
Ferreira and Jorge accompanied by 
Mrs. Roxie Barker presented a mus- 
ical program. New members wel- 
comed included Mmes. Faradiso, 
Wardlow, Latronica, Favelo and Bet- 
tencourt. Mmes. Joe Cardoza and 
Oscar Tonolla were presented 25 year 
pins by the Grand President. 

Mrs. John J. Mattos presented the 
activities report containing the Par- 



lor's activities and donations. Mrs 
I velyn Benidettino presented th 
Grand President with a Thanksgivin 
basket and Christmas gift for th 
Native Daughter Home. 

Mmes Mattos and Ramos were i; 
charge of decorations and Mmes 
Mello and Teicheira headed the re 
Ireshment committee. At the conclu 
sion of the meeting the Grand Presi 
dent spoke on the state-wide project 
of the Order. 



GRAND PRESIDENTS HONORED 

The SDDGPs of San Franciscij 
County, Myrtle Ritterbush of Buen.l 
Vista and Joseph Usreno of Sout'j 
San Francisco Parlor and their DepJ 
uty Grand Presidents are more thai] 
pleased with the large number o 
members and friends who attended 
the reception honoring the Grann 
Presidents of both Orders: Hazel T 
Mallettte and Andrew Stodel. ThJ 
Native Daughter deputies wearing 
orange chiffon formals and carryinjj 
olive green muffs and the Native Soi 
Deputies in tuxedos formed the escorJ 
for the two honored guests. Several 
Grand Officers of both Orders wen] 
escorted to seats of honor. The PaS| 
Grand Presidents were also introJ 
duced and escorted to seats of honor 
The Past Supervisors were asked t« 
form a semi-circle where each wern 
introduced and the term they serveo 
as Supervising Deputy announced 




PGO Frances Simas was in charge 
of the music. The entertainment was 
furnished by the "Sweet Adelines" 
The same simple decorations were 
carried out in both the reception 
hall and the dining room. Sandwiches, 
miniature cream puffs and coffee were 
served by members of Buena Vistc 
and Portola Parlors. It has been 
eighteen years since a joint receptior 
was held. 

CALIFORNIA HERALC 



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MEMORIAL PARK • MAUSOLEUM 

CREMATORIUM • COLUMBARIUM 

Orangewood Street at Santa Ana Freeway 

538-3583 



OFFICIAL MSll 

The Official Visil oi Grand Presi- 
dent Hazel I . Mallette al Pomona 
with the participating Parlors 
Poppy Trail No. 266, Whittle) No, 
298 and Rancho San Jose No. 307 

originally scheduled lor December 
17, 1 968. has been postponed, 



CAUFORNIANA 

In the absence of President Helen 
Williams, on tour in the Caribbean, 
VP Anna I. (raw lord presided at 
the monthly luncheon of Californiana 
No. 247, at the Assistance League 
in Hollywood, November 12. VP 
Barbara Swain introduced Miss Mar- 
garet Ann Kerr who arranged the 
Veteran's Day observance and pre- 
sented Major Gerald D. Gantt, U.S. 
Army, who recently returned from 
active duty in Vietnam. His subject 
was "Civil Affairs — Psychological 
Aspects in Vietnam", as he saw them; 
where the Vietnamese under Amer- 
ican encouragement, guidance, super- 
vision and training are re-building 
their war-torn churches, orphanages, 
dwellings, industries, etc., with Amer- 
ican "know-how" and material if un- 
available there. The monumental res- 
toration of devastation experienced 
in Britain and Germany will there- 
fore not be required in Vietnam 
where reconstruction even on an im- 



proved basis is quickly done at min- 
imum Costs 

Miss Ken reviewed S7556 and 
MR 10480 which was passed by the 
House and Senate and the Speaker, 
which would prohibit desecration oi 
the Hag. It now awaits the signature 

ol President Johnson. This will afford 

legal recourse to authorities to pro- 
secute violations during demonstra- 
tions or otherwise. 

Luncheon adjourned to regular 
monthly meeting, at which DGP 
Norma Stretch was featured. 

i 1 i 
HIAWATHA 

At a recent meeting of Hiawatha 
No. 140. Redding, a program was 
presented in recognition of Founder's 
Day and in observance of the parlor's 
sixty-lifth birthday. 

Flora Jordan gave the history of 
the founding of the Order, and dis- 
played the picture of the founder, Lily 
Reichling Dyer. She concluded with 
the communication from Governor 
Reagan in recognition of our Order. 
Aurelia Shufileton gave the highlights 
of the institution of Hiawatha Parlor 
and many interesting events and ac- 
tivities of the parlor in the past 65 
years. 

Three charter members, who are 

no longer members of the order, 

were invited to attend the program. 

(Continued on Page 14) 





... „ f , 

to the world... 



FIT 

The stalT of the C a I i f o r n i a 
Herald have been down with flu. 
Sorry! Better luck next month. 

Merry Christmas and Happy 

New Year to all of you. 



DECEMBER, 1968 



HIAWATHA 

.muni from /'"'vi' 13) 

\Im> invited was Maida Donnell) >>i 
Camellia No. 41, Anderson, who 
served .is installing ni.usii.ii when 
the partoi was instituted. 

Refreshments of cake, fruil jello 
and coffee were served, ["he parlor's 
birthday cake «.is baked and decor- 
ated by Maybell Diestelhorst. [Tie 
h.ill was decorated with gilded gold 
p. ms. golden picks and baskets oi 

Ms \ irginia Banig in 
charge >>i ihc decorations 



IN MEMORIAM 



W'jC i t & 


^H 




o< -"■ 1 







Not lost to those that love them, 
Not dead, just gone before; 

They still live in our memory, 
And will forever more. 



Mar) B. McGuirk, Liberty No. 213 Oc- 
tober 3. 

Fsielle I Hicks, Santa Maria No. 276. 
October 4. 

Marjorie P. Held. La Bandera No. 1 10, 
October 1(1. 

Florence A. Yager. Twin Peaks No. 185. 
October 9. 

Rose Shattuck. Sutter No. 111. October 6. 

Emma M. Palm. Whittier No. 298, August 

Myrtle K. Fletcher. Whittier No. 298. 

Alta G. Brause. Piedmont No. 87, No- 
vember 17. 

Hattie L. Gaughran. Minerva No. 2. Sep- 
tember 25. 

Mary Louise Gill. La Tijera No. 282, Oc- 
tober 1 1 . 

Harriett F. James, Mariposa No. 63, Sep- 
tember 23. 

Emma B. Thode. Darina No. 114, August 
2. 

Phoebe U. Maguire. Laurel No. 6, Novem- 
ber 21. 

Theresa C. Ratto. Richmond No. 147, 
October 26. 

Mary S. King. Mission Bell No. 316, Oc- 
tober 2?. 

Carrie M. Purves, Rudecinda No 230 
October 31. 

Virginia M. Bruno, Caliz de Oro No 206 
October 22. 

Anna M. Feddersen. Golden Gate No. 158 
October 29. 

Ellen T. Garner, Mariposa No. 63. 

Lillian S. Fraser. Reina del Mar No. 126, 
November 1. 

Frances O. Ferrari. Marinita No. 198 Oc- 
tober 30. 

PAGE 14 



Elizabeth S Owens, Berendos No. 23. 
November J. 

Louisa P. Rosa. Donner No 193, Octobei 
29 

I >lnh I Dunphy, Eschscholtzia No 112, 
Novembei 6 

M.m B. Barbara, Morada No. 199, No- 
vember 5. 

i \ \k Donald Occident No 28, No- 
vember S 

Nan O'Neill, Laurel No 6, November 10, 

Mattie t . Edmonds, San Gabriel Vallej 
No, 281, Novembei 8. 

I ucille M. Castron, San Jose No. 81, No- 
vembi 

Mar) Jane ["urner, San Jose No. 81, No- 
vembei 9. 

Rose B. Chapman, Morada No. l l *y. No- 
\ ember 15. 

Elizabeth M LaRue, Berryessa No. 192, 
October 24. 

I ucille ( King, San love No 81, Novem- 
ber 17 

I orene K. Gwinn, Sutter No. 1 1 1, Novem- 
ber l l >. 

Manila Buckley, I iberty No. 213, Novem- 
ber 18. 

Sarah S. Scott. Fern No. 123. November 
23. 

I lossie D. Francis. II Dorado No. 186, 
November 24. 

May B. Whipple. Woodland No. 90. No- 
vember 22. 

Jennie C. Dieden, Aloha No. 106 

Julia I McDermott, Sonoma No. 209, 
November 24. 

Florence R. Gilardoni, Santa Rosa No. 
217. November 18. 

Mary M. Prola, San Jose No. 81. October 
25. 

Mary E. Palmer. Ursula No. 1. October 
14. 

May S. Overhouse, Aleli No. 102. Decem- 
ber 3. 

Gretta S. Murden, Piedmont No. 87, De- 
cember 7. 

Bessie K. Chace, Mt. Lassen No. 215, 
December 2. 

Hazel K. McArthur. Wilmington No. 278, 
December 4. 



Vendome Calling 

by A malt a Vella 

(Part 2) 

All work you say, not quite. The 
Vendomites have their fun excursions 
too. The annual "Ice Follies" is 
looked forward to each year. Leav- 
ing San Jose at 11:00 in the morning 
Vendomites travel t o Fisherman's 
Wharf in San Francisco where lunch 
is enjoyed, followed by browsing and 
shopping, then on to the Ice Follies. 
A surprise to all the group was the 
presentation of a gorgeous bouquet 
of American Beauty roses by the male 
star of the show to our litle 90-year 
young member, Susie Mattei. She 
was thrilled, surprised, and oh so 
very happy! It couldn't have hap- 
pened to a more deserving litde lady. 

Knowing how we all love to eat 
and what very fine cooks there are 
among my gals, a FAMILY NIGHT 
was held Pot Luck fashion. Papa, 



mama and chicks all turned out, and 
what a wonderful time every oni 
had. especially when they were priv-J 
ileged to view the telephone com* 
pany's most enlightening descriptive 
historical Santa Clara Valley film 
"Our Changing Valley". This covereq 
from the early horse and buggy dayq 
to the later gasoline buggy era. Ta 
cap off the evening, bingo was playea 
by the entire family for special gift 
prizes. 

Then along comes the "Spring Ha. 
Revue". This year it was themeq 
"SPRING DREAMS". These gah 
put so much time, effort and enthus- 
iasm into their chapeaus, that it i: 
too bad they couldn't all be winners 
For the most unusual and heady entn 
Spring Dreams of Harvest, Bessiei 
Ragan received top honors of tht< 
evening for prettiest hat; second place 
for the funniest hat went to Dreamt 
South of the Border by Mildred Nel- 
son; third place for the most origina; 
hat went to Helen Frusetta. Baske> 
of Dreams in a Spring Garden won 
for Betty Cardoza a prize, so you 
see what fun they have here at 
Vendome after all the work. 

Margaret Amann, president, hostec 
a garden party in her Juanita Avenufl 
home. There was such a crowd! Pros 
ceeds from this activity, which was 
the president's project, was presentee 
to the Crippled Childrens Society oi 
Santa Clara County to be used to- 
ward the purchase of a wheel chair 

The pioneer spirit flares up quits 
often in these nomads of the roadi 
and this time they hit the trail for 
the senior Charles Gordon's Shangri- 
La up Big Basin Road way in Bouldei 
Creek, up in the Santa Cruz moun-' 
tains, where nearly a hundred attend: 
ing had a ball eating, playing cards: 
swimming and just plain visiting aftei 
the scrumptious buffet table of po; 
luck dishes were consumed. Tbil 
is another annual event event lookec 
forward to and enjoying the many 
beautiful redwoods, giant woodwardis 
fern and other fine ferns growing oi 
our Vehna's woodland property. A 
goodly sum of $77 was made thiij 
time, all of which was spent for sew-j 
ing supplies long before it was madei 

The final big night was the instal- 
lation of the new slate of officers' 
Choosing as her talisman "KEY TC 
HAPPINESS — FAITH — HOPE 
— and CHARITY" Mrs. James 
Howard approached her station tc| 
accept her gavel July 16. The halj 
and dining room were beautifully 

CALIFORNIA HERALC 



ccoratcd in her chosen colors of soft 
'me green and pink. Following in- 
Itallation, all adjourned to the din- 
jig hall where the committees had 
verything in readiness for eating and 
iieeting the new slate of officers. 
! erenading Mrs. Howard as she was 
ibligatcd was Jennifer Curia who 
Jang May Each Day. On Mrs. How- 
Ird's executive staff are Mmes. Fi- 
ionc, Bartscher, Catania, Engfer, Sr., 
Morgan, Postier, Mattei, Lial, Gerino, 
Pox, Schmidt, Yakovich, and Miss 
lodriguez. GT Marie C. Landini 
las an honored guest. 
i Good fellowship is a blessed and 
herished thing and should be 
Warded and treasured, for one does 
j.ot come by it lightly. I do believe 
| have covered all the highlights to 
late which covers the first seven 




nonths of 1968. In these exciting 
>eriods, five bear flags have been 
)resented in formal ceremonies by 
iut Americanism and Civic Partici- 
mtion chairman Amalia Vella who 
las been accompanied and assisted 
>y very large representation of Ven- 
\ome affiliates. Recipients of these 
jeautiful Bear Flags have been one 
>f our newer hospitals, our local 
J.S.O., the Los Gatos Elks Club and 
wo of our local parochial schools. 
Now my dear friends, to each of 
he new presidents and her corps of 
>fficers, Salud y buen exito (Health 
ind Success). Till another time I 
vill say Adios, hasta luego (Farewell 
ill later). 

1 1 i 

DISTRICT FOUR 

Grand President Hazel Mallette 
nade her official visit to the four 
jarlors of District Four on Friday 
:vening, November 8. Parlors par- 
icipating were Camellia No. 41, An- 
lerson; Lassen View No. 98; Shasta. 
Herendos No. 23, Red Bluff and Hi- 
iwatha No. 140, Redding. The meet- 
ng held in the historic Masonic Hall 
n Shasta, was preceded by a dinner 
it the Riverview Country Club. 

Hiawatha Parlor conducted the 
initiation ceremonies for ten candi- 
iates: Mmes. Althea Barnett, Elsie 
Boner, Maxine Brooks, Dorothea 
Mazzini, Melba Parsons, Catherine 

DECEMBER, 19E8 



Porterfidd, Edith Ramsey, Ramona 
Rogers and Dorothy Scotl foi Hla 
watha Parlor and one candidate for 
( amellia Parlor. 

I wenty-five year membership pins 
were presented to Mrs. Edna Hen- 
riques and Mrs. Harriet Norton of 
Hiawatha Parlor and to Mrs. Donna 
Lucas of Camellia Parlor. At the 
opening of the meeting, Mrs. Maz 
zini sang the state song, / Love You 
California, accompanied by Mrs. 
Rosemary McCabc. Mrs. Corrine 
Litsch and Mrs. Nell White, attired 
as "Flower Children" (hippies) made 
the presentation to the Grand Pres- 
ident. 

Former members of the Order v/ho 
rejoined are Mrs. Boner, formerly 
of Dardanelle No. 6, Mrs. Ramsay, 
a former member of Tierra de Oro 
No. 304. Mrs. Porterfield and Mrs. 
Scott has been previous members 
of Hiawatha Parlor. Visiting mem- 
bers attended from Eltapome No. 
55, Mount Lassen No. 215, and Gold 
of Ophir No. 190. Ninety-seven 
members were in attendance. 



EL DORADO 

El Dorado No. 186, met at a reg- 
ular meeting November 23 in the 
V.F.W. Hall with Helen Francisco 
in the chair. There were thirteen 
members present. 

A number of get well cards were 
signed by all present to go to several 
members who were reported as not 
being their own good selves. 



I he appointment ol Elizabeth 
Murdock as a member of the com 

mittee on "Year Hooks" (Grand Par- 
lor) was received from Ha/el Mal- 
lette, Grand President. I he chairman 
of the committee on California His- 
tory and Land Marks, Georgia Gard- 
ner, suggested that the Parlor mark 
the site of the mining community of 
Georgia Slide, 2V5 miles north of 
Georgetown. It was so decided and 
will be a future project of the Parlor. 

A very nice luncheon provided by 
Lorraine Ross was served at a table 
decorated with assorted colored chry- 
santhemums preceding the meeting. 

A lovely potted Mum, donated by 
Cass Farnham, went to Loretta Mor- 
gan who held the lucky number. 

The annual Christmas party of the 
Parlor was held with a planned pot 
luck luncheon and the exchange of 
gifts. 




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ORANGE COUNTY THROUGH FOUR CENTURIES' 
From 1542 to present day. Written in easy to read, I 
concise style; Illustrated, Annotated and a complete Inde 
$7.50 (plus 800 tax and mailing). 



WHEN ANAHEIM WAS 21 

Using the anecdotal approach with sparkles of humor, the author d 

scribes Anaheim as it appeared in 1878 with its Chinese quarter, irrigatk 

ditches and wineries. Illustrated, Annotated, Index. No. 2 of Oranj 

County Pioneer Series. (This is Pioneer Press' newest book). 

$7.50 (plus 80c tax and mailing) 

THE CHARLES W. BOWERS MEMORIAL MUSEUM 
AND ITS TREASURES 

Indian treasures, animal traps, sea shells, statues and portraits are just a fe 
of the interesting items found in the fabulous book on the fine museum 
Santa Ana, California. Illustrated; Index. 
$2.00 (plus 40c tax and mailing). 

GEORGE WASHINGTON BARTER, PIONEER EDITOR 

Life and events in Anaheim from October 1870 to 1871. Barter was i 
early newspaper man. This is No. 1 of the Orange County Pioneer Series. 
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THE NATIVE DAUGHTERS of the GOLDEN WEST 




JAMUAQY, 1969 + 40* 



AERIAL VIEW OF BERKELEY 



,E,e i 



JR. UNIT NEWS 



MENLO Jl MOKs 

\ reoenl public installation of 
Menlo Junior officers attracted 
iK-.irls 90 guests when inula Ucovich 
became Junior President. The cere- 
monies «crc conducted by Joj Im- 
body, I ynn Scott, I inda Cane and 

k.itln Koch. Mis-- Cane is Junior 

St. itc Marshal. Miss Koch of Sequoia 

l nil served as pianist. 

I he Recreation Center was beau- 
tifully decorated in red and white 
velvet and ribboned lace. Red and 
white tapers graced the tables. Fav- 
ors were given the guests. GT Helen 
Md arthy, State Chairman of Jun- 
iors. GT Marie Landini. PGP Evelyn 
I. Carlson and Lois Cook, Native 
Daughter president were in attend- 
ance as were se\en Junior State offi- 
cii \ isitors were from San Francis- 
co. \\ alnut Creek. Oakland and Red- 
wood City. All congratulated Miss 
Ucovich as Junior president and as 
winner of the only Junior State 
scholarship award. She was also a- 
warded a $300 scholarship from the 
California State Employees Associa- 
tion. 

As a complete surprise to Mrs. 
Carlson, Jr. State Marshal Linda 
Cane presented Mrs. Carlson with a 
Junior advisor's regalia for her 27 
years of service to the Unit. 

Delicious refreshments were serv- 
ed following the ceremonies. 



I-Kl in VI K JUNIORS 

Officers installed at Fruitvale Jr. 
Unit's installation were Ann Marie 
Conway, president; Marilyn Baker, 
past president; Sharon Landt, vice- 
president; Veronica Hagen, marshal; 
Leealyn Baker, secretary; Sharon 
Douglas, treasurer; Susie Fleming, 
Debbie Perry, and Michele Fazzio, 
trustees: Maureen Madson, sentinel; 
Clover Sargenti. organist. State Vice 
President Leealyn Baker was the in- 
stalling officer. 

Many guests attended including 
PGP Evelyn I. Carlson. SDDGP Do- 
lores Ferenz; and Junior State Offi- 
(Continud on Page 12) 



California Herald 



'PRESERVING THE PAST FOR THE FUTURE" 



VOLl mi XVI January. 1969 



NUMBKR 5 



CONTENTS THIS MONTH 

Junior Unit Activities 21 

Pigeons of Palomar, by Nanette C. Thompson 3l 

Ancient Mi-Wuk Grinding Stone Inspires Creation 

of State Park, by Betty Read Curilich, G.T. 4< 

The Grand President's Corner 6( 

Leo's Dictionary, by Dr. Leo J. Friis, (Part IV) 71 

The Long and the Short of it, by Alice T. Smith 9 

Parlor News 101 

Humor 131 

California Missions, by J. J. Friis 14' 



PHOTO CREDITS— Ancient Mi-Wuk Grinding Stones, courtesy News and Views. Sani 
Francisco Mint. Friis collection of old engravings. Mision San Luis Rey: courtesy, Rev.. 
Francis J. Weber. San Juan Capistrano Mission, courtesy. Bowers Museum, Santa Ana.< 




Sign of the Home that will stay young 

And so will the family that lives here, because the Medallion 
Home Emblem can mean gentle, whole-house electric heat- 
ing; a flameless, cool electric kitchen; and a readiness for the 
wonderful electric conveniences that are as near as tomorrow. 



J. J. FRIIS 

Publisher 



Southern California Edison 



LEO J. FRJJS 
Editor 



JANE FRIIS 
Public Relations 



Published Monthly by J. J. Friis and Leo J. Friis, owners and publishers, Anaheim 
California. All Rights Reserved. EDITORIAL AND GENERAL OFFICES: Anaheim, California 
Mailing Address: P.O. Drawer 4243, Anaheim, California 92803. ADVERTISING OFFICE: 30J 
N. Parton St., Santa Ana, Calif. 92701. CHANGE OF ADDRESS AND SUBSCRIPTIONS: Mai 
correspondence to CALIFORNIA HERALD, Circulation Department, P.O. Drawer 4243, Anaheim 
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old and new addresses including zip code. NDGW MEMBERS: pleas* sand Parlor Numbe 
also. POST OFFICE: RETURN REQUESTED. Please send magazine with address changt 
to California Herald, P.O. Drawer 4243, Anaheim, California 92803. SUBSCRIPTION RATES 3 
in U.S.A. (50 states), 40c a copy, 3.50 a year; $6.50 for two years; $8.25 for three years. 
Other countries: Please apply for rates. Entered as second-class matter at the Post Office a 
Anaheim, California, under the Act of March 3, 1879. No part of this magazine may be re 
printed without specific permission. 

CALIFORNIA riERAL 



p. 



f 



eoris o 



ipai 



GMomctt 



any years before Palomar 
Mountain, in San Diego 
"ouniv. California, was selected as 
he site of the world's largest tele- 
cope, the mountain was known as 
he home of the band-tailed pigeons. 
Paauw", the Indian name for Palo- 
uar. was a favorite hunting and 
lamping ground for many bands of 
.ndians but their superstitions would 
Lot allow them to harm these birds. 
i The early settlers, who were often 
spainsh speaking people, named this 
<ow historic mountain Palomar, 
phich means pigeon roost or dove 
lot. Thus, Palomar was the original 
•panish name for the mountain and 
Incurred on early maps. 



bu yU emetic ' >. J^n> 



otmpson 



which, incidentally, was built more 
than sixty years ago by Ole and 
Clinton Bailey. The original beams 
were hand-hewn from trees on the 
mountain and it has been repaired 
through the years by the Bailev Earn- 
ily. 

Mr. Colville at one time downed 
eight birds with one shot and many 
times has enjoyed pigeon pie baked 
in the oven of his wood stove. While 
cleaning them he has found as many 
as six or eight acorns in one bird's 
craw. The acorns were swallowed 
shell and all. The pigeons were too 




■HHmBH 

A favorite roosting place of the 

years 

The late Bill Colville of Oceanside, 
jsed to spend his summers on Palo- 
Tiar in his picturesque little cabin 
jeneath the dogwood trees, a quarter 
jf a mile from what used to be Bail- 
ey's Palomar Mountain Resort. Mr. 
Colville had known the mountain 
since 1922 and told many people 
that he often had seen thousands of 
pigeons at one time, like a dark 
:loud, hovering over the old barn, 

JANUARY, 1969 



Band-Tailed pigeons some sixty 
ago. 

tough to fry so he soaked them in 
vinegar and soda for several hours 
before baking them. 

Until the turn of the century Pal- 
omar was known as "Smith Mount- 
ain" due to the fact that a man by 
the name of Smith settled there, es- 
tablishing a ranch. He raised cattle, 
hogs and sheep. On December 1, 
1901, in response to a petition from 
local citizens, the name Palomar was 



if, 



officially adopted by the Division of 
Geographic names in Washington. 
D. C. 

With the coming of the early Cali- 
fornians, the band-tailed pigeons 
were killed in such great numbers 
that at one time it was thought 
that they would become extinct but, 
in 1915, legislators passed a bill to 
protect them. There is now a limit 
of eight birds during the hunting sea- 
son which is set by the Federal Gov- 
ernment. 

The Band-Tailed Pigeon has a 
tail which is broad and rounded 
with a band of gray across the end, 
bordered above with black. The birds 
are fairly large and heavily built, 
usually about 1 5 V2 inches long. 
Their call somewhat resembles the 
hoot of an owl, oo-whoo or who-oo- 
whoo. They dine chiefly on acorns 
but will occasionally eat berries or 
grain. Their nests are usually built 
in isolated spots and as a rule they 
lay only one egg, making reproduc- 
tion a slower process than with most 
birds. 

The upper back of the male is 
brownish with bluish underparts 
and a white crescent on the back of 
the neck. The female is duller and 
grayer than the male bird, often 
lacking the neck patch. Band-tailed 
pigeons range from southern British 
Columbia and Montana to western 
Texas, wintering in the southwestern 
states and Mexico. They live in 
higher altitudes except when they are 
forced, by heavy snows, to go to the 
foothills for their food. 

Since Palomar is named for the 
Band-tailed pigeon, many old-timers 
refrain from hunting the birds be- 
cause they are just beginning to re- 
turn in numbers although there are 
still only a few compared to early 
days. 



(Znutduty Sto-ae 
Stale 'Pcwfc 




Indian Grinding Rock, now part of Cho-Se State Park 



CALIFORNIA HERALD 



f^ f T i Mm RS of Ursula Par 
'^^ '^^* lor No. 1 , Native 
laughters of the Golden West, 
ickson, working with the Amador 
OUnt) Historieal Society, brought 
) an audience numbering close to 
ine thousand, a resume of a culture 
hich is fast disappearing from Cali- 
irnia. 

i The program marked the dedica- 
on of the first State Park in Amador 
outnv. This park is located about 
.\elve miles northeast of Jackson. 
[embers of the Mi-Wuk Indian 
ribe, headed by Chief Frank Ful- 
■r, 74-year old Indian, a resident of 
"uolumne County, participated. It 
.as he who led the tribal members 
i a walk around the Indian Grind- 
ig Rock, circling the area four times 
.> culminate their own tribal dedica- 
ation ceremony. Miss Jacqueline 
Itewart, 19, of lone, Amador Coun- 
y, a Mi-Wuk Indian maiden, and 
n honor student at the University 
if Davis, spoke, creating interest in 
listory and the way of life of her 
eople. 

Mistress of ceremonies, Betty 
lead Curilich, Grand Trustee of the 
Native Daughters of the Golden 
Vest, introduced the speaker of the 
lay, Ray Hunter, Deputy Director 
if the Department of Parks and Re- 
reation. Following Mr. Hunter's re- 
narks, traditional Mi-Wuk Dances 
vere p r e s e n t e d by the California 
ndian Dance and Cultural Group. 

Five dances were presented by this 
ndian group, men, women and chil- 
Iren, attired in Indian Mi-Wuk 
ostume accented by feather head- 
lands, and beads. These traditional 
vli-Wuk dances included: Old Cer- 
nonial Tutor Dance, one of the Mi- 
Vuk Tribe's presentations; Whistle 
"kmce, by 76-year old Indian Billie. 
t was noted that while presenting a 
irogram of dances there was always 
i "fun" dance; Ceremonial Dance, 
>y the young boys who were learning 
he steps from the older men. The 
oungsters love to participate in such 
i program. Because the boys are 
ometimes bashful about dancing, the 
;irls step forward, which they did this 
lays, to show that they too, could 
lance; and The Rabbit Dunce (be- 
:ause of the leg-work in this presen- 
ation. the dance derived the name 
rom the animal the Indians imitat- 
■d). 

These dances numbers were fol- 
owed by a dedicatory address by 

'ANUARY, 1969 



Miss Stewart who said: "Mas (his 
Park and the Indian artifacts collect- 
ed here give to future generations an 
appreciation of our culture and may 
those who visit here depart with a 
feeling of respect for my people. 

"Onl} a short time ago as historv 
measures time." Miss Stewart said, 
"The Mi-Wuks were invaded by the 
white man who brought with him a 
culture totally incompatible with that 
of the Indian. The result is that the 

Mi-Wuk culture has almost dis- 
appeared from the earth." 

Centuries ago Cho-Se State His- 
torical Monument, known locally as 
the Indian Grinding Rocks, was the 
home of the almost extinct Mi-Wuk 
Indian tribe. Nearby, at one time, 
was a large Indian village, the people 
of which used the rock to grind the 
plentiful acorns that fell from the 
large oak trees surrounding the flats. 
It was because of their sweet flavor 
and lack of bitterneess, that the tribe 
sought the location for their village 
and used the limestone outcropping 
to grind the acorns. The rock mea- 
sures 173 feet in length and is 82 
feet in width. On the rock are mortar 
cups numbering 1,185 as well as 
363 petroglyph designs. It was in the 
mortar cups that seed bearing plants 
and the acorns were ground into a 
palatable food by pulvrization. 
This bedrock mortar is said to be the 
most outstanding example of its kind, 
in the Western United States, and is 
a monument to the past way of life 
which saw the acorn and other seed 
bearing plants as dominate items in 
the economy of the hunting and ga- 
thering culture of the California In- 
dians. 

During the ceremonies Betty Curi- 
lich, introduced guests and told of 
the development of the 40-acre park 
which cost $15,000 to build. Labor 
was supplied by inmates from the 
nearby California Youth Authority. 
While the grinding rock is the main 
attraction in the park there are facili- 
ties for 17 overnight campsites. 21 
camping sites with barbecues, a 
parking lot and rest rooms. The park 
is open year-round under the super- 
vision of rangers from the Division 
of Parks. 

During his remarks, Mr. Hunter 
indicated that more is yet to come at 
the Park for future plans include the 
construction of an Indian Museum, 
the erection of a model village where 
Mi-Wuk Indians will live during the 
day. and a round house such as those 



used by Indians in years past to per- 
form their tribal dances. 

During a brief speech, partly in 
Mi-Wuk. Frank Fuller, the only tri- 
bal Mi-Wuk chief still alive, indicat- 
ed that he did not know exactly 
what people are trying to do at the 
park, but that he would look favor- 
ably on the project if it would bene- 
fit his people. 

In addition to state and county 
officials, present at the dedication 
were Serefino Scapucino of Volcano 
and his sister, Mrs. Jen Nunes of 
San Jose, last remaining members of 
the family from whom the State ac- 
quired the property upon which the 
Grinding Rocks are located. 

The program was closed with an 
Indian interpretation of the Twenty- 
Third Psalm: 'The Great Father 
above a Shepherd Chief is. I am His 
and with Him I want not. He throws 
out to me a rope and the name of the 
rope is love and He draws me to 
where the grass is green and the 
water is not dangerous, and I eat and 
lie down and am satisfied. Sometimes 
my heart is very weak and falls down 
but He lifts me up again and draws 
me into a good road. His name is 
'WONDERFUL!' 

"Sometime, it may be very soon, it 
may be a long, long time. He will 
draw me into a valley. It is dark 
there, but I'll be afraid not, for it is 
in between those mountains that the 
Shepherd Chief will meet me and the 
hunger that I have in my heart all 
through this life will be satisfied. 

"Sometimes He makes the love 
rope into a whip, but afterwards He 
gives me a staff to lean upon. He 
spreads a table before me with all 
kinds of foods. He puts his hand up- 
on my head and all the "tired" is 
gone. My cup He fills till it runs over. 
What I tell is true. I lie not. These 
roads that are 'away ahead' will stay 
with me through this life and after: 
and afterwards I will go live in the 
Big Tepee and sit down with the 
Shepherd Chief forever." 




The Grand 
President's Corner 



GRAND PRESIDENT 

Ha/el T. Mallctte (Mrs. Evcral A.) 
45 Dunstone Drive 
Oroville, California 95965 



GRAND SECRETARY 

Marj C. Mahoney (Mrs. Herbert J.) 

Office: 703 Market Street, Room 612 

San Francisco 94103 Dial 362-4127 
Res: 4125 Lincoln Way 

San Francisco 94122 




|- 



ITINERARY 1969 



I W1I s I UK 

The December meeting was pre- 
ceded bj a Chr i st m a s luncheon. 
Each member brought food. Presi- 
dent Georgia Robinson came loaded 
down with hot goodies. Her hand- 
made gilt to each was lovely. The 
silver Christmas tree with the gifts 
under added much to th setting. PGP 
Emilj E. Ryan brought a large box 
of eand\ that was enjoyed by all. PP 
Anna Ghisilli brought ehoeolate can- 
dies wrapped to resemble tree orna- 
ments. Charter member Mabel Wal- 
ker who never misses a meeting had 
\er\ kind remarks regarding the past 
and present years. 

After lunch the regular meet- 
ing was held. James Lick members 
are very happ\ in getting ready for 
their first day-time official visit. The 
meetings have now been held from 
noon to three p.m. for over a year. 
Both weather and travel conditions 
are much better in the day time. DGP 
Elizabeth Brennan must like the day 
day meetings because she has only 
missed one and that time she was ill. 
Perhaps it's a little late to say "A 
Happy and Prosprous 1969 to all" 
but we do wish it. 



SAN FRANCISCO DEPUTIES 

Verna Cummins and her commit- 
tee have done it again. Such a won- 
derful Christmas dinner! Exchange of 
gifts followed. The meeting was held 
in the Native Sons Building. SDDGP 

PAGE 6 



JANUARY 

1 New Years 

7 Jwipero No. 141 Monterey' 

'> la l\i: No. 326. Sdn Bruno No. 246 San Bruno 1 I 

10 El Monte No. 205. Palo Alto No. 229 Palo Alto'J 

15 Compton No. 258, Cien Anas No. 303, 

Rio Hondo No. 284 Huntington Park] 

16 Reina del Mar No. 126. Tierra de Oro No. 304 Santa Barbara! 

18 Gold Discovery Dinner San Francisco J 

21 Pasadena No. 290, San Gabriel Valley No. 281, 

Verdugo No. 240, Glendale'l 

22 Placenta No. 277 — 25th Anniversary Van Nuys'J 

25-26 Grand Officers Meeting San Francisco ] 

27 Twin Peaks No. 185, Utopia No. 252, 

Guadalupe No. 153 San Francisco*! 

28 Aha No. 3 (afternoon) San Francisco'l 

28 Richmond No. 147. Bear Flag No. 151, Albany No. 260, 

Sequoia No. 272, Cerrito de Oro No. 306, 

Argonaut No. 166 (evening) Oaklandl 

FEBRUARY 

3 Stirling No. 148, Las Juntas No. 221, Antioch No 223 Antioch^ 

5 ElCarmeloNo. 181 Daly City ! 

6 Yerba Buena No. 273 (Afternoon) San Francisco' 

8 Brooklyn No. 157, Encinal No. 156, Piedmont No. 87 Oakland^ 

9 Deputv Grand Presidents' Breakfast at N. D. Home San Franciscc 

10 Mission Bell No. 316 Soledadi 

11 El Pajaro No. 35 Watsonville* 

17 N.D.G.W. Home Dinner 

18 Ano Nuevo No. 180, Vista del Mar No. 155 Half Moon Bay" 

19 Vallejo No. 195, George C. Yount No. 322 Yountville* 

25 Sonoma No. 209. Cotati No. 299, Petaluma No. 222 Petaluma 8 ! 

27 Las Flores No. 262. CoaUnga No. 270 Coalinga'i 

Asterisks mark Official Visits 



Myrtle Ritterbush was presented 
with a monetary gift from her girls. 
Myrtle's gift to each deputy was a 
beautiful bud vase with Christmas 
holly and greens from her yard. Kirk 
Ritterbush and Henry Feil did most 
of the servivng and had a special 
table for themselves. Henry acted 
as Santa Claus. It was a gala night 
that began with little goodies and 
champagne and ended with wonder- 
ful NDGW feelings of good will to 
all. Four deputies wre unable to at- 
tend because of illness. 



LU-ANN DEPUTIES 

Past Supervisors Ann Shaw ana 
Lucile Ashbaugh and their deputies 
met early in December for their an- 
nual get together. PGP Edna Willi 
iams was the guest of honor. PGI 
Maxiene Porter sent her regrets. Sh< 
lives too far away to be present. Af 
ter dinner the exchange of gift a: 
always created much fun and happi 
ness. The deputies received smal 
gifts from the Supervisors. Lucille 
Kimbark and Genevieve Landfriec 
were in charge of the evening. 

CALIFORNIA HERALI 



UO'8 SIOflONARY 



X>x*. X«eo J. Pi»ii( 
P:ii-t 1ST 




Firs! Home of the San Francisco Mini 



MUST, SAN FRANCISCO 

The San Francisco Mint was authorized by 
in act of Congress approved July 3, 1852. It 
was first housed in a three-story brick building, 
sixty feet square, situated at 630 Commercial 
Street. This structure, thoroughly remodeled, was 
originally the quarters of the assay firm of Curtis, 
Perry and Ward. 

The mint first received deposits on April 3, 
1854, and during that year coined $4,084,207, 
all in gold pieces. 

Its first officers were Dr. L. A. Birdsall, 
superintendent; Jacob R. Snyder, treasurer; Col. 
Agoston Harazthy, assayer; John Huston, melter 
and refiner and John M. Eckfeldt, coiner. 

The second home of the Mint was designed 
by A. B. Mullet and built at Fifth and Mission 
Streets. Its cornerstone, laid on May 26, 1870, 
contained a specimen of each coin struck at the 
first Mint. In the summer of 1874, when pro- 
duction was commenced, this Mint was consid- 
ered one of the finest in the world. 

JANUARY, 1969 



The San Francisco Mint was moved to its 
third home at Duboce and Buchanan Streets in 
1937 where it commenced operations on May 15. 
As an economy measure it was discontinued on 
March 24, 1955, and its machinery removed. A 
small section was still used for governmental as- 
say purposes where gold and silver could be 
received. 

The coin shortage commencing in 1963 
required relief and machinery was installed to 
make 1-cent and 5 -cent coin blanks. Pursuant to 
the Coinage Act of 1965, approved by President 
Johnson on July 23, the Mint was reactivated, 
but it did not commence using its historical "S" 
mint mark until January 1. 1968. 

NOTES 

"The Return of the S-Mint Mark," from an article 
released by the Office of Director of the Mint. Numismatic 
Digest, Sept.. 1968. Volume 4. No. 6, p. 10ft 

Lynn Glaser, "The First San Francisco Mint", Numis- 
matii News, Jan. 30, Feb. 27, 1967. 

"Burton Introduces Bill to Save San Francisco Mini as 
Monument," Coin World, Aug. 24, 1966. 

Lee Martin, "The Forgotten' San Francisco Mint," 
Coinage, Dec, 1966, Vol. 2, No. 12, p. 56ff. 

PAGE 7 




H -man 



M MAINTAIN that clothes 

J^ make the man tor woman), but 
history proves the reverse to be true, 
to wit. man makes the clothes. Cloth- 
lea grow from the needs of 
those who wear them. Consider first 
the pioneer woman: Accustomed as 
she was to doing all the housework 
for the family, without benefit of 
modem conveniences, besid. 
dening. even going into the fields 
and doing a man's work, does it 
appear rational that she should wear 
bare -foot sandals, a mini-skirt, and 
a bra? Clothes, to the woman of this 
era. were a protection from cold. 
snakes, mud. blazing sun. 
rain and many conditions to which 
women of I seldom sub- 

jected. 

So the pioneer woman wore full 
skirts to her ankles, many petticoats. 
all of equal length. long sleeves to 
protect her arms, sturdy high-but- 
toned shoes, and a sunbonnet. She 
seldom appeared without a large 
apron, which was more or less her 
trade-mark. No zippers raced up and 
down her back. Her dresses opened 
in front, so that she could easilv 
nurse the baby (there were no infant 
formulas to free her from this dutv 
in those days). The babies' dresses 
were long too. with many equally 

PAGE 8 



I IMS XSl 



TMI SHOT j 



_ . .._.__ t. sima 



long slips. Central heating being un- 
known, this was a means of keep- 
ing the baby's feet warm. So great 
amount of clothing seems cumber- 
some today, and would certainly 
slow us down. But these home-mak- 
ing, child-bearing, husband-helping 
women were not rushina around to 



out. . 

If 

ijm 

* 1 


11% 



The period immediately following 
Pioneer Woman. 

get through their work in time for a 
club-meeting or a bridge party, or a 
shopping trip. Comfort and utility 

I greater importance to them. 
But after several decades of hard 

:he ladies demanded a little 




i I 



7590 Costume 

fun. and so we come to the gay 90u 
These are identified by lace ruf- 
fles, ribbons and bows, and larga 
fluffy hats as a crowning gestured 
Long hours were consumed sewing 
peek-a-boo lace and insertion into] 
yokes and ruffles. This was a period] 
of gracious living, preceding the 
"good-gracious!" living which was 
to follow. The shoes of this mon 
frivolous period became lighter in 
weight, softer to wear, and were 
frequently low-cut to supplement 
the fancy dresses. Hosiery, formerly 
knitted of woolen or cotton thread] 

CALIFORNIA HERALD 




I 1920 outfit of brown chiffon vel- 
vet and chmy luce, complemented by 
ended bag and cerise satin slippers. 




Fancy opera cloak of the 1920 era. 
Gold, tight-fitting hat and smart, 
satin slippers with dainty straps com- 
plete the ensemble. 

JANUARY, 1969 



now appeared in silk or mercerized 
cotton, although little of the leg 
(properly referred to as "limb") 

was allowed to show in this period 
when modesty rode high. 

Moving along a couple of decades 
we reach the 20s. commonly refer- 
red to as the "jazz age". What have 
they done to the skirts'.' This part of 
the wardrobe has really travelled — 
up the leg, that is. No longer is the 
ankle the limit. The knee is now the 
goal, while the Charleston replaces 
the stately waltz. In the 20s under- 
girding was passe, to which the stock- 
ings, rolled below the knees testified. 
Mothers and daughters became diet- 
conscious as their more and more 
labor-saving devices were appear- 
ing. The boyish figure was the aim 
and end-all. The skimpy clothing 
could not hide that extra poundage, 
so it had to come off. The newly- 
bobbed hair-styling demanded the 
close-f i 1 1 i n g hat known as the 
"cloche". 

In the 30s the depression forced 
women again into hard work at home 
or out in the world where they could 
help maintain the family. Clothing 
again became simple and utilitarian, 
and piece by piece has been discard- 
ed in favor of sex appeal, until the 
female form is no longer mysterious. 

From where we now sit, nudity 
appears to be in the wings awaiting 
its cue. And that will put an end to 
"I've nothing to wear", and "I've 
nothing fit to put on". 



THE BASLER HOME 




A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS 
NEW YEAR TO YOU ALL! 



CONVALESCENT & ELDERLY 

24-Hour Nursing Service 

Excellent Meals ■ Tray Service 

LARGE CHEERFUL ROOMS 
ADJOINING BATHS & SUNDECKS 

Life Membership or Monthly Rates 

542-3514 

1015 N. Broadway Santa A 



535-3289 




RITZ 




CLEANERS and 


DYERS 


307 E. Lincoln 


Anaheim 



RAY 0. LINK 

Telephone 535-7221 

INSURANCE — SURETY BONDS 

M. E. BEEBE & CO. 

132 North Anaheim Boulevard 

Anaheim, California 



<Vifl*L 



eA 



Mower 7 J)r\op 
1215 W. Lincoln, Anaheim 535-4997 



UILGENFELn 

11 MORTUARY U 

Faithful. Courteous. Service 

120 E. Broadway. Anaheim 

PHONE KE 5-4105 



the 



SQR 



store 



lincoln at lemon 
anaheim 




M VUDI <.K\S— l^hX 

Mardi Gnu 1968 arrived late this 
year in s.m Francisco, bul the same 
happ) revelrj and gaj apiril prevail 

ed m spue >'i ''us change Onnda 
and Gtnevit vi No 132, the 
host parlon for the official visit of 
ilk Grand President became MAR 
Dl GR VS PARI OK. \l MBER 
o\i NIN1 m\ I K'H I rhe Ur- 
ban Center (meeting hall lor Omuhi 
Parlor) was humming with activitj 
and "fairlj bursting at the scams" 
during this gal} event. 



Parlor New/s 



performed the initiatory work. At 
ilk- stan of the evening, a •"tall, dark 
and handsome" accordianist serenad- 
ed .ill with some happy, lively and 
toe-tapping tunes. 
Since Grand President Ha/el I. 

\lallelte was in the hospital. Grand 
Vice-President, lovely Nancy C. 
( 'onens graciously performed 




There was a can-can girl. 




Balloons were in abundance and 
interspersed among the more sedate- 
ly dressed, one could see a court 
jester, a can-can- girl, a lovely man- 
darin, a svelt figure in a roman toga. 
a Spanish senorita, a young hulu 
dancer, and a "lady soldier" in a 
colorful and feminine military-dress- 
parade costume. (This latter costume 
— if we were to tell the truth — was a 
costume Orinda Parlor members 
wore when they marched with the 
Parlor's drill team in parades of 
past years.) 

Orinda Parlor's president, Jean 
Galli, executed the opening and 
closing ceremonies while Doris Stid- 
hem, president of Genevieve Parlor, 

PAGE 10 



the duties of Grand President and 
reigned over the Mardi Gras as a 
charming queen. 

Many distinguished Native Daugh- 
ters attended this festivity and among 
them were GM Irene Bondanza; GS 
Mary Mahoney; GTs Marie Landini 
and Helen McCarthy; PGPs Evelyn 
I. Carlson, Orinda Giannini, Claire 
Lindsey, Emily Ryan and Ethel 
Enos; SDDGP Myrtle Ritterbush; 
DGPs Gladys Knight and Edith O'- 
Connor, and many presidents of Na- 
tive Daughter parlors. 

To add to the excitement of this 
occasion, four new members were 
initiated into Orinda Parlor: Ethel 




a Spanish Senorita. . 




and Hula Girls 



Cosgrove, Letitia Surdez, A 1 y c e 
Crouere (sister-in-law of Betty Wea- 
ver of Orinda Parlor) and Kathlyn 
Riner (Granddaughter of President 
Jean Galli). As always, initiation 
was a very moving and inspirational 
ceremony. 

It must have been a proud mo- 
ment for Mary Lutes when GVP 
Nancy Conens presented her with a 
25-year pin. An announcment was 

CALIFORNIA HERALD 



node that Helen Heinaman was also 
year member but the pin could 
not be presented since she was in the 
hospital. 

Throughout the room were prize 
winning paintings from an Art Ton- 
test sponsored by the Native Daugh- 
ters and judged during Grand Parlor. 
GVP Nancy Conens, during her ad- 
dress, praised the young people who 
had participated in the Art Contest 
and spoke with pride of being able to 
aid these young hopefuls. 

During the evening, our costumed 
members tossed Gold Coins (choco- 
late, which came all the way from 
sunn) Italy). A magnificent punch 
and a gaily decorated cake were 
enjoyed by the more than one hun- 
dred Native Daughters who joined in 
the merriment of the Mardis Gras. 
1 Orinda Giannini and Alma Klahn 
co-chairwomen of Orinda and Irene 
ICrowley, chairwoman of Genievieve 
and members of their committees, 
are to be commended for making 
this evening so delightful. 



JUNIPERO 

Grand President Hazel T. Mall- 
ette made her official visit to Junipe- 
ro No. 141, Monterey, on January 7. 

Hostess at the dinner held in her 
honor was Mrs. LeRoy Henry, pre- 
sident of Junipero Parlor. Other 
official guests at the dinner were 
Grand Marshal Irene Bondanza, 
Grand Trustee Marie Landini, Past 
Grand President Elmarie Dyke, and 
the Deputy Grand President to Juni- 
pero Parlor Mrs. Harriet Chappell, 
from Aleli No. 102. 

Following the dinner initiation 
ceremonies were held in the House 
of the Four Winds that was decora- 
ted with ferms and California popp- 
ies. Four new members were taken 
into Junipero Parlor: Mrs. Wendell 
Bruening, Mrs. Garnet Wilson, Mrs. 
Kent Smith, and Miss Joan Leslie 
Hyler. 

The Grand President's message 
stressed the importance of preserv- 
ing our fast disappearing historical 
monuments and of marking not only 
those that qualify as State monu- 
ments but aiso those locations hav- 
ing local historical interest and im- 
portance. 

JANUARY, 1969 



60 YEAR MEMBER 

On February 10, IXS5, a daughter 
was born to Mr. and Mrs. David 
( assinelli, of San Andreas, ( California, 

The Cassinellis were members of 
sturdy pioneer families in this bustling 
community. As owners of the general 
store in what is now known as the 
"Old China Town section" thej were 
quite aware of the constant struggle 




Norma Cerruti 

of the civic fathers to overcome the 
pall which had settled upon the com- 
munity following the feverish activ- 
ities during the Gold Rush days. San 
Andreas is the County Seat of Cal- 
averas County, and students of Mark 
Twain lore will recall the fame which 
was brought to the county by his 
stories. However, truth is often much 
more exciting than fiction and the 
discovery of the second largest nugget 
in the world (192 lbs.) at Carson 
Hill, the "Fools Gold Rush" which 
brought hundreds of people to what 
is now known as Poverty Flat and 
the fact that the word Calaveras 
means skull all tend to romanticize 
this beautiful county. 

One year after the birth of Norma 
Cassinelli, in a neighboring county, 
Amador, a small group of women 
organized the first Parlor of the Native 
Daughters of the Golden West 
Twenty-three years later Norma be- 
came a member of San Andreas 



Parloi No. 1 13. The year 1908 be- 
came a double memory year for Nor- 
ma, as it also became her wedding 
year. Norma became the bride of 

Edward Cerruti. Though Norma has 

been widowed for many years, the 
beautiful memories of this enchanted 
1908 remain vivid. 

Vallecito Parlor is very proud of 
this devoted member, whom till last 
year was the Parlor Organist, pre- 
senting to her a Life Certificate of 
membership. It was a very pleasing 
occasion. Norma, though nearing her 
N4th birthday, is still very active. She 
knits bed-socks during the year which 
she presents to the guests in the local 
rest homes and hospitals. 

The table's main center-piece a 
silver Satellite in Orbit surrounded 
by gifts, was truly appropriate as Nor- 
ma was truly in orbit over the surprise 
party in her honor. 



THANKS 

Mrs. Louise Chironi, Portola No. 
172, sends grateful thanks to San 
Francisco Extension of the Order 
and to Chairman Ann Shaw for the 
donation of four pints of blood when 
her husband Al needed it. 



DOLORES 

A recent Christmas party under 
the chairmanship of Claire Brake 
was attended by 24 members and 
guests of the Parlor. The ornaments 
for the two beautifully decorated 
trees were made by Mrs. Brake's 
mother. She also made the dainty 
favors of reindeer pulling sleds of 
candies. Pizzas, chips, dips, and 
home-made cakes were enjoyed. 

On January 14, the Parlor's 60th 
anniversary birthday dinner was 
held at Marconi's Restaurant in San 
Francisco. PGP Evelyn I. Carlson 
and her capable committee were in 
charge. 



SA 1 



iS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION 



Dorothy Y. Ulvestad, President 

construction loans 1 

(Main Office) 

ANAHEIM 

117 W. Lincoln Avenue 

PRopect 2-1532 



J. Bernard Soto, Exec. Vice-Pres. 

refinancing 1 collections 



HUNTINGTON BEACH 

411 Main Street 

LEhigh 6-6591 



BREA 

770 South Brea Blvd. 
Ph. 529-4971 



JUNIOR NEWS . . . 
tinued from /'.<c< - , 1 
Kath) Slater, 1 inda ( ane, 
Kath) Koch, Bcverij Beckmeyer, 
I eealyn Baker and Sharon Douglas. 
Past Presidenl Marilyn Bakei was 
presented with hei pasl president's 
pm 

\\ Ikii the ceremonies were con- 
cluded, the Fruitvale Juniors enter- 
tained with selctiona ol songs, after 
which refreshments were served. 
< » 

SUJI 01 V II MORS 

I Ik- girls ol Sequoia I oil No. 27, 
had their annual Christmas part) on 
I ridaj night, December 20. This 
year the) decided to have a progres- 
sive dinner, starling at Nanc) Eckles' 
home foi soup ami ending at Kathj 
Koch's home where the) met with 
their mothers for dessert, exchanging 
of gifts and the singing of Christmas 
carols 

I he Inn's last project for the 
\ears was a trip to Napa to deliver 
Chrismas presents to the girls of one 
of the cottages at the state hospital. 
Each girl in Sequoia Unit has the 
name of a girl at the hospital and it 
is her continuing project to remember 
the girl on birthday, Christmas and 
other special occasions. 

Sequoia Unit wishes all a very 
happy New Year! 



d,-5^ CSomcr S^eei t Metal. ?nc. 
"Since 1870" 

774-1843 

INDUSTRIAL SHEET METAL WORK 
210 Chestnut Anaheim 



"3 



BACKS 
KAULBARS 

MORTUARY 

1617 W. La Palma at Euclid 
Anaheim 
772-1617 




Ml M O II MIIH I Ml 

Menlo Juniors met for their an- 
nual Christmas luncheon, I went) - 
unc girls were present. An exchange 
ol ( luistmas gifts and secret pal gifts 
was the highlight of the evening. 

Plans are now underway to send 
Valentine gifts to a Militar) Hospi- 
tal in Vietnam consisting of playing 
cards, combs, stationery, games. 
Shaving articles etc. I hese gifts were 
at the request of the Red Cross in 
Redwood City. 



LILLIAN SAM.STFR 

Reina del Mar Parlor deeply 
mourns the accidental death of be- 
loved member Lillian Sangster Fraser, 
who on November I, just before 6 
p.m., while she was in the crosswalk 
at an intersection which was not well 
illuminated was struck by a car and 
was pronounced dead on arrival at 
Cottage Hospital. As Deputy Grand 
President to El Aliso Parlor, she was 
en route to meet other Deputies to 
drive to Lompoc for a meeting called 
by SDDGP Mary Rule. 

Lillian Sangster was born on Sep- 
tember 17. 1902 and lived all her 
life in Santa Barbara. She joined 
Reina del Mar on May 1, 1923, 
worked her way through all the chairs 
and was elected president in 1952. 
After completing her term, she was 
appointed Deputy Grand President 
to Santa Maria No. 276. Thereafter 
she was elected treasurer and held 
that office until her death. She was 
appointed Deputy Grand President to 
El Aliso No. 314 for the 1968-69 
term. Her continued service to Reina 
del Mar displayed devoted loyalty, 
not only to the organization, but also 
to its principles. 

Surviving are a son, Thomas S. 
Tinsley of Santa Maria, and three 
sisters. Past President Mamie Miller, 
Past President Christina McCrae and 
Agnes Brockelsby. To Reina del Mar 
Parlor's membership, the loss of a 
friend is like that of a limb; time may 
heal the anguish of the wound, but 
the loss cannot be repaired. 



CITIZEN OF THE YEAR 

\inador County honored Betty | 
Read Curilich as "Amador Citizen of i 
the Year — 1968" when she was* 



Diamonds — Silverware 

132 W. Lincoln / Anaheim / 533-3107 
PAGE 12 





GT Betty Read Curilich 



chosen from four other women andJ 
thirteen men who had ben nomina-j 
ted for the honor. Mrs. Curilich is aj 
Grand Trustee of the Native Daugh-i 
ters of the Golden West and is a] 
member of Ursula Parlor No. 1,| 
Jackson. 



OFFICIAL VISIT 

Verdugo Parlor No. 240 will be 
hostess parlor for the official visit 
of Grand President Mrs. Everal 




GP MALLETTE 

Mallette, who will be honored oni 
her visit to Glendale on January 21. 
Unity Temple, 701 S. Central Ave. 
will be the setting for the formal af- 
fair where the meeting will be prece- 

CALIFORNIA HERALD 



«d hv a dinner at 6:30 P.M., honor- 

ig Mrs. Mallcttc and her accompa- 

ing (irand Officers, Mrs. Nancy 




GVP CONENS 

onens. Grand Vice President, Pied- 
\ont Parlor, Oakland; Mrs. Curtis 
loss. Grand Trustee, Whittier Par- 
ir, Whittier; Mrs. Leonard Hummel, 




GT DOSS GT HUMMELL 

irand Trustee, La Tijera Parlor, In- 
lewood; Mrs. Frank B 1 o s d a 1 e, 
irand Outside Sentinel, Beverly Hills 
'arlor, Beverly Hills; and Mrs. Peggy 
Jrandenberg, Grand Organist, Pla- 




GO BRANDENBERG 

erita Parlor, Van Nuys. Past Grand 
Presidents to be an attendance, Mrs. 
-ouis Hansen, Mrs. Katie Jewett, 
Mrs. Mary Barden, Mrs. Lyall Gol- 
Jie and Miss Anna T. Schiebusch. 

Chairman of the evening will be 
Vlrs. Louis Hansen of Verdugo No. 
240. Assisting her will be the presi- 
dents of the three participating par- 
ors, Mrs. Robert Kaiser of Verdugo, 
Mrs. Clara Lindsey of Pasadena and 

JANUARY, 1969 



Mrs. Irene Riedenbaek of San Gab- 
riel Valley. 
Exemplification of the ritualistic 

work will be participated in by the 
officers of the three parlors, Deputy 

Grand Presidents arc Mrs. Chet I ho- 
mas, DGP to Pasadena Parlor; Mrs. 




PGP IEWETT 



PGP GOLDIE 



Luica Barogue, DGP to Verdugo 
Parlor; and Mrs. Jean Rasnussen, 
DGP to San Gabriel Vallev Parlor. 




PGP Hazel Hansen, 
Chairman of the evening. 

Mrs. Mildred McGee, of Whittier 
No. 298, is the Supervising District 
Deputy Grand President to District 

No. 35. 



A miser isn't much fun to live with 
-but he makes a wonderful ancestor. 



"=1 



fUi.MOK 



Lie 



SHE 



3HE 



3QE 



3DE? 



After their can collided, one of the men 

handed the other a flask anil said: "Maybe 
you'd like a nip to calm your nerves? 

"Thanks.'' he said, and look a guzzle. 
"Here, you have one too." he added, hand- 
ing him the whiskey. 

"I'd rather not," he replied. "At least 
not until after the police have been here." 



The only thing more disturbing than a 
neighbor with a noisy old car is one with 
B quiet new one. 



t-olks arc funny. Everyone wants to 
live a long time — but nobody wants to 
get old. 



An Army private filling out a question- 
aire for a correspondence course, was 
stymied a bit by the question, "How long 
has your present emloyer been in bus- 
iness?" 

After a few minutes his eyes lighted up 
and he wrote, "Since 1776." 



Many so-called self-made men just mar- 
ried the right woman and she did the rest. 



BRIDGES - HIGHWAYS - DAMS - RAILROADS 



RDLflnillREVnOLDS 

GRADING (jfjfj) CONTRACTOR 



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"A Full House of Insurance" 

Fire — Auto — Theft — Casualty 
Compensation — Bonds 

Phone (714) 635-7871 



Suite 114 / 280 N. Wilshire Ave. / Anaheim, California 92801 




A Misidn San Luis Rev 



ylijissions 
h I 

Part I 




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A Ruins of Mission San Juan Capistrano in 1876 



W Mision San Fernando 




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lZ>Gok selections foom f^Jiotieet j^J 



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b> l.ero) Dotg 

Eari] Beginnings ol Garden Grove, 
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PROGRESSION LOR 
NLl ROI.OGIt ALLY 
HANDICAPPED CHILDREN 

by Thomas A. Edson, M.A. 

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explanation of each exercise. 
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SUCCESSFUL PERSON 

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Valuable psychological guide to ef- 
fective living. 
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Whether it is your Birthday or 
Anniversary in January or you are 
thinkino of my month of February, 
have a special day to remember 
with a book from Pioneer Press. 



Four Books bu, Southern 

California's Leading Historian 

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ORANGE COUNTY THROUGH FOUR CENTURIES] 

From 1542 to present day. Written in easy to read, yj 
concise style; Illustrated, Annotated and a complete Indd 
$7.50 (plus 800 tax and mailing). 

WHEN ANAHEIM WAS 21 

Using the anecdotal approach with sparkles of humor, the author & 

scribes Anaheim as it appeared in 1878 with its Chinese quarter, irrigatic 

ditches and wineries. Illustrated, Annotated, Index. No. 2 of Orany 

County Pioneer Series. (This is Pioneer Press' newest book). 

$7.50 (plus 80c tax and mailing) 

THE CHARLES W. BOWERS MEMORIAL MUSEUM 
AND ITS TREASURES 

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of the interesting items found in the fabulous book on the fine museum 
Santa Ana, California. Illustrated; Index. 
$2.00 (plus 400 tax and mailing). 

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Life and events in Anaheim from October 1870 to 1871. Barter was a 
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SPECIAL COLLECTIONS 




Official Publication of 
THE NATIVE DAUGHTERS of the GOLDEN WEST 





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' J2£M 


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. - ■«& M ~~«'««c tfa? ' 






-Sim 



FEBRUARY. 1969 + 40<t 



SANTA BARBARA'S PICTURESQUE COASTLINE 



j » mi i rar mr= 1 1 

JR. UNIT NEWS 



3 T 



(.01 1» n pom 1 mi 

\ 1 1 1 s 1 i,.! the Junior Native 
Daughters »f the Golden West, took 
place "ii Saturday evening, January 
is. when the Junior State officers in- 
stalled the newlj elected officers ol 
Golden Poppj Junioi 1 mi No. 38, in 
San I rancisco at I Ik- Native Daugh 
ten Home where the Golden Poppj 
l nil was instituted last June. 

kathv Slater. Junior State Presi- 
dent, from Sequoia Unil m Redwood 
City, w .is the installing officer. Kathy 
Koch, Junior State Organist, also 
from Sequoia Unit, provided the 
musical accompaniment lor Linda 
Cane. Junior State Marshal, from 
Menlo I nil No. 10. Menlo Park, as 
she earried out the floor work. Cher- 
rvl Patterson, a former Junior State 
President for Los Amiguitas Unit 
in Walnut ("reek, administered the 
obligation to the new officers. 

Other State officers participating 
in the installation were Leealyn Ba- 
ker. Vice President, from Fruitvale 
I nit \>> 22. Oakland; Jean Tullius, 
Secretary, from Argonaut Unit No. 
3. Oakland: Sharon Douglas, Trus- 
tee, from Fruitvale Unit No. 22, 
Oakland and Robin Gilbert, Trustee. 
from Menlo Unit No. 10, Menlo 
Park. Representing Sequoia Unit was 
Cathy Carpenter, Cindi Curry, Mar- 
garet Deto and Rene Nash; while 
Cecelia and Julie McLaughlin repre- 
sented Menlo Unit. 

Following the installation, refresh- 
ments were served by the members of 
( topia Parlor of San Francisco. 



MENLO JUNIORS 

The Menlo Junior Unit had a re- 
presentative group at the recent pub- 
lic installation of the officers of 
Golden Poppy Unit, in San Francis- 
co. Junior State Marshal Linda Cane 
of Menlo did the marshaling floor- 
work and Robin Gilbert, Junior 
State Trustee was introduced. 

The girls at present are interested 
in the hospitalized veterans in Viet- 
nam and for a Valentine gift to one 
ward, dozens and dozen of home- 
made cookies were sent. 

(Continued on Page 14) 

PAGE 2 



California Herald i 

"PRESERVING THE PAST FOR THE FUTURE" 

Volumi \\ 1 February, 1969 Number!! 

1 
CONTENTS THIS MONTH 

Junioi l nit News ' 

1 he Spanish Plan for the Colonization of California, by Dr. Leo J. Friis 

The Grand President's Corner ( 

Parlor News ' 

In Memoriam I 

Leo's Dictionary, by Dr. Leo J. Friis (Part V) 13 

Beautiful California, by Mrs. Henry Peake 14 




Sign of the Home that will stay young 

And so will the family that lives here, because the Medallion 
Home Emblem can mean gentle, whole-house electric heat- 
ing; a flameless, cool electric kitchen; and a readiness for the 
wonderful electric conveniences that are as near as tomorrow. 



J. J. FRUS 
Publisher 



Southern California Edison 



LEO J. FRUS 

Editor 



JANE FRUS 
Public Relations 



„ ,.„ Published Monthly by J. J. Friis and Leo J. Friis, owners and publishers, Anaheim,! 
California. All Rights Reserved. EDITORIAL AND GENERAL OFFICES: Anaheim, California. 
Mailing Address: P.O. Drawer 4243, Anaheim, California 92803. ADVERTISING OFFICEi 301 
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correspondence to CALIFORNIA HERALD, Circulation Department, P.O. Drawer 4243, Anaheim, 
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. an ^» n . ew addr «ses including zip code. NDGW MEMBERSi please send Parlor Number 
also POST OFFICE: RETURN REQUESTED. Please send magazine with address change 
to California Herald, P.O. Drawer 4241, Anaheim, California 92803. SUBSCRIPTION RATES: ' 
in U.S.A. (50 states), 40c a copy, 3.50 a year, $6.50 for two years; J8.2S for three years. 
Other countries: Please apply for rates. Entered as second-class matter at the Post Office at 
Anaheim, California, under the Act of March 3, 1879. No part of this magazine may be re- 
printed without specific permission. 

CALIFORNIA HERALD 




The Spanish Plan for 

the Colonization of 

California 



bi/ Dr. Leo J. Friis 



(6$ alifornia has launched the cel- 
nL* ebration of its Bicentennial, 
which invites one to review the man- 
ner in which the State was settled. 
Die plan of colonization used by the 
Spanish government was not a hap- 
hazard one, nor was it new. It had 
been tried and tested in other areas 
wer a long period of years. 

It is of interest to note that the 
California Supreme Court had had 
xcasion to discuss this system at 
some length. In the case of The City 
yf San Diego v. Cuyamaca Water 
Company, decided in 1930, it said: 
'We learn from public history, of 

FEBRUARY, 1969 



which we take judicial notice, that 
the civil settlement of Alta California 
was coequally contemplated by those 
who were officially in charge of the 
primary expedition which . . . had 
been put forth and provisioned for 
the discovery and occupancy of Alta 
California through the joint effort of 
Padre Junipero Serra and of Jose 
de Galvez, visitor-general of New 
Spain." 

The court continues: "In the broad 
and detailed plans and express de- 
crees of the latter, precise provision 
was made for the foundation and 
development of presidios, pueblos 



and missions in the as yet unknown 
region, and as possible, to proceed 
simultaneously as a result of the joint 
military, civil and religious expedi- 
tion then about to set forth." [Ref- 
erence is here, of course made to the 
Portola Expedition.] 

"The Court pointed out, "It may 
be fairly assumed that these joint 
settlements designed to be established 
simultaneously were also intended to 
function harmoniously and not to 
become involved in disputes over the 
respective jurisdication and property 
rights of each. This will appear to be 
(Continued on Page 4) 



BICENTENNIAL . . . 
i( ontinued from Page 

plain when the nature, functions and 
purposes «'t each of these founds 
iions is considered both historical]) 
and m the light of the Spanish and 
Mexican laws and regulations rela- 
tive to each." 

I'KI SIIUHS 

"Presidios," said the c ©urt, were 
purel) milharj foundations to be 
occupied bj soldiers, and to exist 
for the establishment of order for the 
protection of the pueblo and mission 
foundations. 

1*1 1 III us 

" I he pueblos, on the other hand 
were purel) civil and political foun- 
dations, as the term itself implies, 
being equivalent to the English word 




Felipe de Neve, Founder of the pueb- 
lo of Los Angeles Shoreline of early Monterey with Custom House and other early buildings 



CALIFORNIA HERALD 



town' and signifying a civil body^ 
orporate and politic, and intended, 
hrough the cultivation of the lands 
wlh which under the Spanish and 
Mexican laws is was to be vested. 
furnisli sustenance for its own in- 
labitants and for the presidios." 

LflSSIONS 

"Mission settlements, on the con- 
rary. were purely ecclesiastical 
foundations, made or to be made, in 
Aha California by monks or padres 

(Continued on page 8) 



filGHT — Santa Barbara, '•Queen 
>j the Missions" with Fr. Zephyrin 
Englehardt, well-known mission his- 
torian in foreground. BELOW — 
Mission San Fernando. 





FEBRUARY, 1969 



The Grand 
President's Corner 



GRAND PR1 MO! NT 

Hazel I Mallette (Mrs. I vera! \ I 
■i< Dunstone Drive 
Oroville, ( alifornia 9596S 




GRAND SECRETARY 

Mary C. Mahoney (Mrs. Herbert J.) 

Office: 703 Market Street. Room 612 

San Francisco 94103 Dial 362-4127 
Res: 4125 Lincoln Way 

San Francisco 94122 



WINTER i*l I I 

Grand President Hazel T. Mall- 
ette. was honored Friday night, Jan- 
uar> 10, at the hall of the Masonic 
Temple in Mountain View by "Win- 
ter Bell Parlors" (El Monte No. 205, 
Mountain View, and I'alo Alto No. 
:: i >. Palo Alto). 

Irene Hatch. President of El Monte 
Parlor and her officers conducted the 
opening and closing ceremonies and 
Palo Alto Parlor President. Angela 
Quetin and her corps of officers had 
charge of the initiation ceremonies. 
Christine Silva of Sunnyvale was in- 
itiated into El Monte Parlor. 

Present at "Winter Bell Parlors" 
were Grand President Hazel T. Mal- 
lette, Gold of Ophir No. 190; Grand 
Marshal. Irene Bondanza, San Fran- 
cisco No. 261; Grand Trustees, Marie 
C. Landini, Sun Jose No. 81, Helen 
C. McCarthy, Utopia No. 252, and 
Marian E. McGuire, Berkeley No. 
150; Past Grand President, Evelyn 
I. Carlson, Dolores No. 169; Super- 
vising District Deputy Grand Presi- 
dent, District 26, Santa Clara Coun- 
ty, Phyllis D. Tindell, Palo Alto No. 
229 and Deputy Grand Presidents 
who participated in the official visit 
Irene Lial. Vendometfo. 100, Depu- 
ty to El Monte Parlor and Mary Au- 
sano. El Monte No. 205 Deputy to 
Palo Alto Parlor. 

Many other members and guests 
were present from different Parlors. 
The hall was decorated with snow 
sprayed greenery and white bells by 
the decorating committee, Louise 
Cotta and Mary Hawley from El 



ITINERARY 1969 



FEBRUARY 

3 Stirling No. U.S. Las Juntas No. 221, Antioch No 223 Antioch 

5 ElCarmelo No. 181 Daly City 

6 Yerba Buena No. 273 (Afternoon) San Francisco 

9 Deputy Grand Presidents' Breakfast at N. D. Home San Francist 

8 Brooklyn No. 157. Encinal No. 156. Piedmont No. 87 Oakland 

10 Mission Bell No. 316 Soledadl 

11 El Pajaro No. 35 Watsonvillel 

17 N.D.G.W. Home Dinner 

18 Ano Nuevo No. 180, Vista del Mar No. 155 Half Moon Bay! 

19 Vallejo No. 195, George C. Yount No. 322 Yountville I 

24 Vacaville No. 293 Vacavillel 

25 Sonoma No. 209, Cotati No. 299, Petaluma No. 222 Petaluma I 

26 Copa de Oro No. 105, San Juan Bautista No. 179 .... San Juan Bautistal 

27 Las Flores No. 262, Coalinga No. 270 Avenall 



MARCH 

1 Leslye A. Hicks Home Fund Tea, 

N.D.G.W. Home San Francisco) 

2 Childrens Foundation Bruncheon, Alameda County 

3 Ukiah No. 263 Ukiahj 

4 La Junta No. 203 St. Helena 

5 Sebastopol No. 265, Santa Rosa No. 217 Santa Rosai 

6 La Bandera No. 110, Califia No. 22, Sutter No. Ill Sacramentoi 

8 District 26 — Santa Clara County Luncheon 

9 Contra Costa County Breakfast, N.D.G.W. Home San Francisco 

10 Santa Cruz No 26 Santa Cruz : 

12 El Pinal No. 163, San Luisita No. 108, 

San Miguel No. 94 San Miguel' 

13 Aleli No. 102 SalinasS 

15-16 Grand Officers Meeting San Francisco | 

18 Ontario No.251, Jurupa No. 296, 
Lugonia No. 241 San Bernardino'* 

19 La Tijera No. 282, Californium No. 247, 

Los Angeles No. 124, Beverly Hills No. 289 Beverly Hills* 

20 Joshua Tree No. 288 Lancaster* 

22 San Fernando Mission Tea 

23 Childrens Foundation Bruncheon Los Angeles 

26 Angelita No. 32, Betsy Ross No. 238 Newark* 

27 Liberty No. 213, Chabolla No. 171, Rio Rita No. 253 ... Sacramento* 

Asterisks mark Official Visits 



Monte Parlor. General chairmen of 
the evening were: Betty Cordoza, El 
Monte and Phyllis D. Tindell, Palo 



Alto. Following the offical visit, de- 
licious refreshments were served in 
the dining room. 



CALIFORNIA HERALD 



DOLORES 

Recently Dolores No. 169, under 
tie chairmanship of Lucile Ashbaugh 
Dolores' civic chairman), presented 
Bear Hag to the Lake Shore Gram- 
iiar School in San Francisco. The 
equest was made by the Principal 
or a new flag to replace the old one 
,>r display in the auditorium. 




Seven classes and teachers were in 
Attendance during the ceremonies. 
4rs. Ashbaugh presided with dig- 
nity and giving a short history of 
'mr State Flag and the interest the 
Native Daughters of the Golden West 
lias taken over the years on similar 
Occasions. 

I The ceremonies were followed by 
jnembers of the Student Party giving 

history of the American Flag: the 
3 stars, the 48 stars and the pre- 
ent 50 stars. It was an inspiring 
>ne hour to see and hear these young 
[tudents so engrossed in patriotism, 
irespect of our flag and love of 
ountry." 

On January 14 the Parlor celebrat- 
td its 60th birthday at dinner in San 
: rancisco. Thirty-five members 
vere in attendance including Deputy 
Tieresa Galvin and one of the Par- 
or's charter members, Selma McMul- 
in. 

The tables were lovely with gold 
unners, pink flowers and tall pink 
apers. A delicious decorated birth- 
lay cake was cut by President Betty 
vlarlin and charter member, Selma 
4cMullin. Dainty baskets of flowers 
vcre the gifts to each guest from Lu- 
ile Ashbaugh. 

PGP Evelyn I. Carlson and 
/ice President Melissa Hall were 
o-chairmen. 



HAWATHA 

Formal installation ceremonies 
vere held January 15 for the officers- 
:lect of Hiawatha No. 140. Seated in 

FEBRUARY, 1969 



Parlor News 

the rites were Mu/ie Winters, presi- 
dent; Ruth Griffin, past president; 
Frances Hume, first vice-president; 
Eda Mazzini, second vice-president; 
Catherine Porterfield, third vice-pre- 
sident; Anita Johnson, marshal; Mo- 
ra Jordan, recording secretary; Hilda 
Heryford, financial secretary; Beryl 
Shuffleton, treasurer; Clarice Pasley, 
organist; Freda Van Noy, inside sen- 
tinel; Leah Valentine, outside sentin- 
el; and board of trustees: Virginia 
Banigan, Ida Record and Maybellc 
Distelhorst. 

SDDGP Patricia Griffin of Camel- 
lia Parlor, Anderson, was the install- 
ing officer. The installing Marshal 
was Gertrude Treat; past president, 
Mazie Saunders; secretary, Lois Isley 
and organist, Rosemary M c C a b e. 
DGP Mazie Knighten had the honor 
of installing her mother, Mrs. Win- 
ters. 

Following the ceremonies, Viola 
Lowden and her committee served 
refreshments of sandwiches, cake 
and coffee. 



RAY 0. LINK 

Telephone 535-7221 

INSURANCE — SURETY BONDS 

M. E. BEEBE & CO. 

132 North Anaheim Boulevard 

Anaheim, California 



535-3289 




RITZ 




CLEANERS and 


DYERS 


307 E. Lincoln 


Anaheim 



JEWELERS 




Diamonds — Silverware 

132 W. Lincoln / Anaheim / 533-3107 



On rhursdaj evening, January 16 
DGP Mazie Knighten and her corps 

of acting Grand Officen from Hiawa- 
iha Parlor installed the officers of 

Bermdos Parlor No. 23, Red Bluff. 
Katie Kuney was seated as president 
of Berendos Parlor. 



OKINDA PARLOR 

Although Santa was well on his 
way home, his jolly spirit prevailed 
at Orinda's Christmas Party which 
was held on the December 27. Every- 
one seemed to be still enveloped in 
the aura of the holiday season. 
Thirty-three members and guests 
were present. 

Dinner was catered from the 
Tennessee Grill of San Francisco. 
The entree was roast chicken. Along 
with the enormous entree, the menu 
consisted of salad, vegetables, mashed 
potatoes, rolls and butter, sheet cake 
and coffee. It was a treat to be waited 
on so pleasantly. Two of the mem- 
bers brought, for the enjoyment of 
all, a huge box of chocolates and 
individual fruit cakes. 

It was rather a varied evening. To 
ward off the chill of the night air, hot 
apple cider was served and each 
person found a small box of candy 
as a favor at the table (a Christmas 
gift from Orituia Parlor). Santa's 
helpers passed out colorfully wrap- 
ped exchange gifts. Christmas carols 
and several games were enjoyed. 
Winners were awarded prizes of 
stationery and note paper. 

The committee consisted of Esther 
Bloom, chairwoman, Loretta Wis- 
cher and Eleanor Begovich. 

*• i 1 
DEPUTIES 

Under the chairmanship of 
Mary Barron the 1965-1966 San 
Francisco deputies had a party to 
honor PGP Katie G. Jewett. at the 
home of SDDGP Mildred Maita. 
Many deputies braved the elements 
to join in the merriment and deli- 
cious food brought by chairman 
Mary. A birthday cake was presented 
to PGP Katie. 

The highlight of the evening was 
the announcement by Mary Barron 
of her forthcoming marriage in Feb- 
ruary. GT Helen McCarthy will be 
chairman for the 1969 year. 



BICENTENNIAL . . . 
i( 'ontiitued fnm pagt 5) 

ol the Franciscan Order, and exist- 
ing and being conducted bj these foi 
the sole purpose of bringing the bless- 
Ingi and fruits »i Giristian civiliza- 
tion to the IndUui population of AJta 
California, theretofore in a state of 
barbarism 

\ mission foundation in its in- 
ception possessed and exercised none 
of the ordinary forms or properties 
of civil government, but was. and 
was lor a tune .it least to he. purely 



paternal in character, with such ma- 
terial possessions as were required 
for the maintenance and exercise of 
its ecclesiastical development. 

"The lands which were to he oc- 
cupied bj the missions were to be 
held in possession by the priests for 
the purpose of carrying forward the 
main object of the mission founda- 
tion, hut these lands were to be pos- 
sessed, occupied and cultivated only 
bj permission and were to be and 
remain the property of the nation 
and to be subject at all times to 
grants under the laws of Spain and 
Mexico relating to colonization." 



Rights of Pueblos 

Under the Spanish and Mexica 
law, pueblos had certain legal right* 
These were discussed at considerabl 
length by the Supreme Court in 189i 
in a dispute over rights in the wate 
of the Los Angeles River. The Citi 
of Los Angeles, which was establish 
cd as a Spanish pueblo in 178i 
continued to operate in a simila 
fashion during the Mexican perioc 
following independence from Spair 
The court ruled that any rights the 
Los Angeles had in the waters c 
the river under Spanish rule, wen 
owned by it during the Mexican rej 







Nine foot statue of Padre Junipero Sena dedicated by NSGW - NDGW in Cap 



CALIFORNIA HERALD 



ne and in turn were inherited by the 
ity under the American government, 
fhis decision was rendered in the 
Liit between the Vernon Irrigation 
iompany and the City of Los An- 
gles. 

j By way of illustration, the court 
ointed out that a Spanish and Mex- 
ban pueblo had the following rights: 

1. Montes or woodlands from 
rbich residents could obtain firc- 
Kood. 

2. Dehcsas — a tract of enclosed 
und where neighborhood cattle could 
e kept. 

3. Fuentes — Springs of water 




appropriated to the supply of the 
pueblo. (Southern Californians, at 
least, called a spring an ojo tic agua, 
meaning "eye of the water)." 

4. Ejidos — Commons, unen- 
closed, which could be used tor 
threshing grain or for recreation. 

5. Prados — Fields. 

6. Pastas — Pastures. 

7. Agnus — Waters. 

8. Salinas — Salt springs. 

9. Abrevedurus — Places to wa- 
ter cattle. 

10. Valdios — terminos; not devot- 
ed to special use. 



These rights were communal prop- 
erty subject to be administered by 
the pueblo authorities. As the Sup- 
reme Court said, "From the very 
foundations of the pueblo |l.os An- 
geles) in 1871, the right to all the 
waters of the [Los Angeles] river 
was claimed by the pueblo, and that 
right was recognized by all the owners 
of land on the stream, from its source 
. . . And the city, under various acts 
of the legislature, has succeeded to 
all the rights of the former pueblo." 
(Continued on Page 10) 




San Gabriel Mission 




nto. 

FEBRUARY, 1969 



Mision San Luis Obispo de Tolosa 



BICENTENNIAL 

inued from Page lJ > 
lu the same reasoning, the Su 
premc Court ruled thai the c it) oi 
s.m Diego had preferential rights in 
the waters >>i the s.m Diego River. 

Rights oi Missions ro l wds 

\s heretofore pointed out, undo* 
the laws oJ Mexico and Spain, the 
clergy had ^> title to lands which 
they and their Indian charges used. 
"It u.is upon this theory and assump- 
tion ili.it the so-called secularization 
of the mi-.sK.ns oi Alia California by 
officials ol the Mexican government 
was ordered and carried forward 
u> its disastrous conclusion." 

When California came into the 
possession o\' the United States, a 
1 and Commission was set up to de- 
termine the validity of rancho grants. 






TOP — Restored chapel and cloister of Mission 
Nuesta Senora de la Soledad. 
LEFT — Beautifully carved wooden statue of 
Nuestra Senora de la Soledad. RIGHT — Mission 
San Luis Rey. 



CALIFORNIA HERALD 




It ruled consistently, as did the 
United Slates Supreme Court, that 

the Roman Catholic Church had no 

property rights in lands formerly used 
by a mission except lor the church 
and appurtenant buildings, orchards 
and cemeteries. 

Without minimizing the unfortun- 
ate aspects of the secularization pro- 
grams, it should be pointed out that 
it was never intended that the mis- 
sions should continue on a per- 
manent basis. Missions were, as the 
word implies, instituted which pio- 
neered the establishment of formal 
religion in the communities where 
they were established. It was intended 
that ultimately they should be re- 
placed by secular churches and that 
the missionaries should be transfcrcd 
to other fields. 

That the Indians did not attain 
proficiency in education to properly 
govern themselves, should not be 
blamed on the missionaries. After 
all, it was remarkeable that two men 
at each mission were able to attend 
to the spiritual and material needs 
of the neophytes.They had no time 
to teach school nor were any teach- 
ers provided to assist them. 

LEFT — Medal struck by the United States 
mint, commemorating Father Serra, founder 
of the California Mission chain. BELOW — 
Ruins of Mission San Juan Capistrano in 
1876. 




h 



FEBRUARY, 1969 



IlliMI \ 

I Ik- Brsi meeting "i the new yeai 
foi Bonita Parloi brought .ill mem- 
ben to the realization ill u there is 
much !>> be done in the coming 
months, ["he p.ist few months have 
been mostlj holidaj activities, 

Due i" illness of Worth) Grand 
President Hazel Mallette, OVP 
Nancy Conens officiated .it the offi- 
cial visit which was a i<>im meeting 
with Menlo Parlor. SDDGF Mar) 
Sousa, .1 member of Bonita and 1 ois 
Cook president ol \fenlo acted as 
chairmen nf the evening, [he com 
mittee consisted of members of 

both Parlors. Benito's escort team 
was in charge Of the escort work. 

Grand Officers escorted to the altar 

For introduction were (i\l Irene Bon- 
clan/a; ("ils Marie 1 andini. Helen 
McCarthy and Marion Maguire; GS 
Mar\ Mahoncv and PGPs Evelyn 
I. Carlson and Jewel McSweeney. 
IXiPs C hristene Hulme of El Carme- 
lo and Florence Loveless of San Bru- 
no deputies to Bonita and Menlo re- 
spective!) were introduced and es- 
corted. Frances Maloney, Menlo' s 
charter member, was also presented. 
A coin march was held and the pro- 
ceeds donated to the Native Daugh- 
ters Historical Room. Memorial 
Building. Prizes were awarded to 
lucky winners, a beautiful painting 
being the door prize. Members and 
friends of seven county parlors were 
present to enjoy the afternoon. 

In December, a play was enacted 
by the young members of Bonita en- 
titled "Charlie Brown's Magic 
Christmas Tree" which brought on 
much laughter. Santa was on hand 
to distribute gifts to all present. Re- 
freshments were served at the con- 
clusion of the evening. 

Coming events are rummage sale, 
fashion show, card party, and obser- 
vance of Arbor Day. Other events 
will be announced later. 



IN MEMOKIAM 







MEMORIAL PARK • MAUSOLEUM 

CREMATORIUM • COLUMBARIUM 

[ Orangewood Street at Santa Ana Freeway 

538-3583 



Not lost to those that love them. 
Not ilead, just gone before ; 

They still live in our memory. 
And they will forever more. 



Nan Fit/patrick. Aha No. 3. Nov- 
ember 22, 1968. 
Edna B. Wiese. Copa de Oro No. 

105, December 1 I, 1968. 
Augusta B. Petersen, Vendome No. 

UK). December 10, 1968. 
Marv Patricia Boulais, Utopia No. 

'252, December 15, 1968. 
Caroline Scheifler, Portola No. 172. 

December 16, 1968. 
Alice H. McLeod, Joaquin No. 5, 

December 15, 1968. 
Louise P. Rich. Darina No. 144, 

December 23, 1968. 
Angie C. McCollam, Yerba Buena 
~ No. 273, December 16, 1968. 
Laura C. Giorgi, Reina del Mar No. 

126, November 18, 1968. 
Hazel Schibush, Buena Vista No. 68, 

November 13, 1968. 
Amelia M. Kirkpatrick, Marguerite 

No. 12, December 21, 1968. 
Viola May Maxwell, Annie K. Bid- 
well No. 168, December 23. 

1968. 
Hilda C. Biron, Bonita No. 10, De- 
ember 24, 1968. 
Bertha K. Brookins, Clear Lake No. 

135, December 27, 1968. 
Lenora E. Marciel, Vallecito No. 308, 

December 29, 1968. 
Doris Mary Gleim, Fresno No. 187, 

December 23, 1968. 
Lillian A. Candini, Phoebe A. Hearst 

No. 214, January 3, 1969. 
Ivy H. Mulvaney, Occident No. 28, 

December 31, 1968. 
Mamie N. Hazdovac, Junipero No. 

141, January 3, 1969. 
Vivion M. Bryant, La Tijera No. 282, 

January 1, 1969. 
Margaret R. Solomon, La Tijera No. 

282, January 2, 1969. 



Anita Dinnecn. Bear Flag No. 151 

January 4, 1969. 
Christine H. Hartwig, San Jose No 

SI. January 7, 1969. 
Mahle Harders, Golden Gate No 

158. January 2, 1969. 




Ahflt*L 



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3 
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BACKS 
KAULBARS 

MORTUARY 

1617 W. La Palma at Euclid 
Anaheim 
772-1617 



WHITTIER 

On February 19 (Wednesday) 
Whittier Parlor will have an "led 
Cream Social and Courtesy Night" at 
8:00 p.m., Greenleaf Masonic Tem-| 
pie, 12001 E. Beverly Blvd., Whittier.lj 

Guests will be asked to dress like'] 
the Junior lollipop set. Red andj 
white striped table cloths and bal-|| 
loons will be the decor. "Do-it-your-| 
self" ice cream sundaes will be thai 
refreshments and honky tonk musici 
the entertainment. 

Guests of honor will be Mildred 
McGee, SDDGP and Vera Walsh. 
DDGP; also the invited courtesy offi-j 
cers of the surrounding parlors. 

There will be door prizes and lots| 
of fun. A good attendance is expecM 
ed by President Carlotta Funk. Max-] 
ine South is in charge of the affairJ 



CLIFF ELLIOTT 

WfijL 535-3541 
1025 W. Lincoln Anaheim 



IL6ENFEL 

. MORTUARY , 

Faithful. Courteous. Service 
120 E. Broadway, Anaheim 

PHONE KE 5-4105 



CALIFORNIA HERALD 





BICnOMTAB-.T 




VARA 

"The vara is a Spanish and Mexican unit of 
linear measure which was employed generally in 
description of lands granted by those sovereign- 
ties. The vara also is found to have different val- 
ues, depending on locality and custom." ' 

In California the Mexican vara is recognized 
oy common consent to be 33 inches in length. 

In 1878 the United States Supreme Court 
said: "The standard Mexican vara is so near to 
33 inches (wanting according to the best mea 
surements, less than a hundreth of an inch of that 
quantity), that a standard vara measure laid on 
an American yard would so nearly correspond 
with 33 inches, that the difference could not be 
perceived by the naked eye. Hence in California, 
after its acquisition by the United States, a vara 
came to be considered as exactly equal to 33 
inches: and this result was sanctioned by the 
General Land-Office as early as 1852. The United 
States Surveyor-General of California, in a report 
to the Land-Office, dated at San Francisco, Nov- 
ember 14, 1851, said: 'All the grants, etc., of 
lots or lands in California, made either by the 
Spanish Government, or that of Mexico, refer to 
the "vara" of Mexico as the measure of length. 
By common consent here, that measure is con- 
sidered as being exactly equivalent to thirty- 
three American inches ... It is important that 

FEBRUARY, 1969 



the relative proportions of their measure should 
be clearly settled. I, therefore, have to ask the 
aid of the Department in doing so.' The com- 
missioner, in an answer to this letter, dated Wash- 
ington, March 5 1852, said: 'You state that by- 
common consent it [the Mexican vara] is con- 
sidered in California as exactly equivalent to 33 
American inches. I can see no reason why there 
should be any departure from this ratio, and agree 
with you that any important change in the length 
of the "vara" recognized and acted upon in Cal- 
ifornia would produce confusion.' ... It is un- 
derstood that the Department has always, since 
that time, acted upon this standard of value of 
the vara in respect to surveys in California . . ." s 

'Manual of Instructions for the Survey of the Public 
Lands of the United Stales 1947, Bureau of Land Manage- 
ment, GPO, Washington, 1967. pp. 466-467. 

'United States v. Perot, 98 U.S. 428, 25 Law. Ed 251, 

252. 

LEAGUE, MEXICAN 

In California the Mexican league (legua) is 
5,000 varas long, which is equivalent to 13,750 
feet. 

In California the Mexican square league con- 
tains 4,340.278 acres. 

"The old legal league, by the laws of Spain, 
and which was adopted in Mexico, consisted of 

(Continued on Page 14) 

PAGE 13 



LEO'S DICTIONARY . . . 
inued from Page /- 1 '' 

5,000 varas which makes the square league 
varas to the side, equivalent to 4. 1 

v \ \K \ 

i ,i« Ed 251, 

SOI Dll Ks HOI \l\ Vt I 

B) an ad approved April 4. ism. the Cali- 
fornia I egislature created a bounty to be paid 
tverj soldier ?nlisring for three years or for 
the duration of the Civil War in anj military unit 

which was p.in of "a quota oi the volunteers of 
the Si. ite. under the laws of Congress or the or- 
ders of tlie President of the United States."' 



Even enlisted man received $160, $40 ol] 
which was paid at time of enlistment and SZO a>j 
the end of each six months of service. Soldier; 
who had served in the army more than six month-' 
received an additional bounty of $140, $50 oil 
which was paid at time of rcenlistmcnt and $40|J 
at the end of each six months service. In case o!|. 
death or honorable discharge the full bounty) 
was paid. 

To finance the bounty payments the State! 
sold $1,494,000 in bonds bearing 7% interest. I 

California Statutes, 1863-1864, p. 487; William c l afl 
hauscr, A Financial History of California, Berkeley. Univ. |J 
of Calif. Press, 1913. p. 213. 214. 



II DIIKVIHI 

Despite the very wintry weather 
Saturday afternoon, January 11, El 
Dorado No. 186 held a regular 
meeting, at the VFW hall. President 
Helen Francisco presided. There 
were nine members present. 

Plans were completed for moving 
the place of meeting of the Parlor 
from the upper lOOF hall, where it 
has been a steady tenant for 58 
years since its institution in 1910, to 
the VFW hall where it has been 
meeting, temporarily, since the IOOF 
hall was condemned as a fire hazard. 
Plans were also discussed for the 
compiling of data for the yearbook 
of this Parlor by Elizabeth Mur- 
dock, chairman of that committee. 
She was also asked to write-up some 
of the early history and some of the 
activities, dances, entertainment, 
plays, and Fourth of July celebrations 
etc. of El Dorado Parlor No. 186. 
NDGW and Georgetown Parlor No. 
91, NSGW, that were held in the 
IOOF hall in those days, all of which 
will take some research. 

Georgia Gardner, of history and 
land-marks, reported on the progress 
of marking the site of the mining 
town of Georgia Slide, situated two 
and one-half miles north of George- 
town. This will be a future projeet 
of the parlor. 

A nice lunch, served by Georgia 
Gardner and Elsie Ford, preceded 
the meeting. 



MENLO JR. UNIT . . . 
(Continued from Page 2) 

On February 15 the Unit with 
their advisors attended a Valentine 
luncheon when the revealing of pals 
and the selection of new ones took 
place. Plans are now underway for 
the official visit of Mrs. Helen Mc- 
Carthy State Chairman of Juniors on 
April 18 to which all Native Daugh- 
ters are invited. 



Beautiful CaLiformia 

By mRS. henuy peak 

Dedicated to the memory of Clara 
Ann Poole Peake, who came to Cal- 
ifornia when a small child, in 1856. 

I was sitting by the window, 
With my memory book in hand; 
As I glanced back o'er the pages, 
'Twas like footprints in the sand. 

It was back in 1894 — 
It seems like yesterday — 
We moved to California, 
From our home in Iowa. 

Now Iowa is a grand old state — 
That's where the tall corn grows — 
I am proud to have been born there, 
It is not that, goodness knows. 

Yes, Iowa is a grand old state, 
So please don't get me wrong, 
But I love California, 
With her sunshine and her song. 



I love the grand old ocean, 
With its waters gold and blue; 
As you stand and gaze upon her, 
She just seems to welcome you. 

I love the grand old missions, 
Built of old adobe clay . . . 
Alessandro and Ramona 
Worshipped in San Luis Rey. 

One at San Juan Capistrano, 
That the swallows hold most dear. 
They come there by the thousands, 
On St. Joshph's Day each year. 

And then again on St. John's Day, 
They fly far out to sea, 
And where they spend their winters, . 
That's still a mystery. 

And the San Bernardino mountains, 
With their rocky peaks so high. 
And the pine trees with their 

branches 
Lifted upward to the sky. 

And there's ferns by the thousand, 
In the canyon's mossy bed; 
Snuggled to the mountain's bosom 
Is the famous Arrowhead. 

And the old Mojave desert, 
With it's sand dunes and oases, 
With the cactus and the Joshua tree 
And great wide open spaces. 

In the middle of this desert 

Is a very famous mine, 

Known as Twenty Mule Team Borax, 

Since the day of Fortynine. 

There's a Castle on this desert. 
That is known both far and wide, 
And with in its stately portals 
Death Valley Scotty did abide. 

CALIFORNIA HERALD 




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church at San Juan Capistrano where the Swallows come on Saint 
Joseph's day. 



There's San Francisco's Golden Gate, 
fhat is always open wide, 
knd extends a hearty welcome 
por ships to come inside. 

Farther north the giant redwoods, 
jitanding there so straight and tall — 
)f the proud and mighty forest, 
would crown her queen of all. 

love you, California, 
n December as in May, 
c rom the coast that borders Oregon 
To the San Diego Bay. 

Jut now let's all remember, 

Vs we go down through the years, 

"or the state of California, 

Ve owe the covered wagon pioneers. 



3ILYER 
SPUR 



So to them we are most grateful, 
God bless them, every one; 
But for their faith and courage, 
There would be no native daughters! 
There would be no native sons! 



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A new hook of exercises and helps 
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HOW TO BE A 
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by Bernard J. Oliver. Ph. D. 

Valuable psychological guide to ef- 
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$2.50 (plus 720 tax and mailing) 




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Whether it is your Birthday or 
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ORANGE COUNTY THROUGH FOUR CENTURIES I 

From 1542 to present day. Written in easy to read, yel 
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57.50 (plus 80c tax and mailing). 

WHEN ANAHEIM WAS 21 

Using the anecdotal approach with sparkles of humor, the author de-J 

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THE CHARLES W. BOWERS MEMORIAL MUSEUM 
AND ITS TREASURES 

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I JR. UNIT NEWS 



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"PRESERVING THE PAST FOR THE FUTURE" 



II MOD I Ml NO. 27 

red hearts decorated the 
tables on February I s . when fift) 
mothers and daughters attended the 
annual Valentine luncheon of the 
Junior Native Daughters, Sequioa 
Unit 27, in the fellowship hall at 
Messiah I utheran Church. Co-chair- 
men for the luncheon were Kathj 
Slatei and k.uln Koch, 




Colored slides of the units past 
activities were shown. The highlight 
of the program was when Jan Stetson 
presented an advisor's regalia to her 
mother, Mrs Lillian Stetson, chair- 
man advisor to the unit Other ad- 
visors to the unit are Mrs. Juanita 
Doyle, Mrs. Celeste Carpenter, Mrs. 
Barbara Slater and Mrs. Barbara 
Koch. 

A major activity of the unit was 
the official visit of Mrs. Helen Mc- 
Carthy. State Chairman of the Juniors 
on March 7. 



i 1 i 

LEO'S DICTIONARY will con- 
tinue in the April issue. 



&<B TOT 

by J.J. Friis 




Do you remember the old 

trolley car pulled by the 

good, faithful horse? 



•VTTTTTtTtTTTTTTTTTtTT+T+t' 



\..i i \n \\ I March, IM6M 



CONTENTS THIS MONTH 



"Do You Remember.'"' by J. J. Friis 

Junior Unit News 

Georgetown Still Lives. Bj Elizabeth Murdock 



Numbe:r 7 



Blessing of the Animals, by Jane Friis 4- 

The Grand President's Coiner 6 

Parlor News jl 

Redvvinged Blackbird, by Eugene McAllister 1 

In Memoriam 9 

Urban Renewal, by Margaret F. Hayes 13 

The Redwood, by Ruth T. Drury 15 



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Homes are available now in all price ranges. It will pay 
you to look for this emblem before you make a move. 




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CALIFORNIA HERALD 






*J t was in Georgetown, California 
£$ in the year 1861 that a man by 
the name of Olmstead erected a 
■ building as a gift for his new bride, 
. Mrs. Balsar, a widow. It was a typi- 
cal early day three-story structure. 
The two lower stories were used as 
i a hotel and the upper floor as a 

! lance hall. The hotel proved a poor 
investment. 
In 1870, Joseph Whiteside, who 
was very fortunate in mining for 
gold, purchased the building and con- 
verted it into an opera house, how- 
ever this did not prove to be a success 
either. 

A few \ears later two merchants, 
Ioenburger and Lane, acquired it. 
They in turn sold it to Memerito 
Lodge No. 37, l.O.O.F. It was then 
made into a two story affair: the up- 
per tloor a lodge room; the lower 
floor, a public hall. It was a well-ap- 
pointed lodge room, for those days 
and was used first by the Odd Fel- 
lows and later by the Rebekahs as 
I meeting place. Georgetown No. 91, 
Native Sons of the Golden West and 
El Dorado No. 186, Native Daugh- 
ters of the Golden West, were ten- 
ants throughout the years, until the 
hall was declared a fire hazard, in 
1968. Incidentally the restoration of 
the hall is now pending. 

This hall served the community, as 
the town hall and for many public 
meeting of various kinds. There have 
been business meetings, home talent 
shows, road shows, 4th of July cel- 
ebrations, political rallies, weddings 
and community Christmas trees. 
Many were the somber gatherings 
when the funeral of a beloved resi- 
dent was held from its portals. 

This story would not be complete 
without mention of the bell. It was 
also purchased by Joseph Whiteside 
and hung in the hall's belfry. For 
many years its clarion tone could be 
heard for a radius of miles when it 
was rung to summon people to these 
gatherings. As a fire alarm, it had 
no equal, when it came to sending 
chills down spines. It rang the old 

MARCH, 1969 



BY ELIZABETH MURDOCK 




The Balsar House located in Georgetown, El Dorado County, was built 

in 1861, now owned by the IOOF 



year out and the new year in for 
many years. There were the solemn 
occasions when it was used to toll 
the funeral dirge for some beloved 
person. It became an integral part 
of Georgetown, and was called the 
"Hall Bell". As time wore on it was 
evident that the belfry was no longer 
safe. The bell was then moved to a 
steel tower on Main Street, where it 
was to serve as a tire bell. 

On Saturday, April 13, 1935, a 
bronze plaque was placed on the hall 
and dedicated by El Dorado No. 186, 
Native Daughters of the Golden West. 
It identified the building as one of 
California's historical land-marks. 
The plaque was donated by Sadie 
Winn Brainard of Sacramento, whose 
grandfather General Winn founded 
the Order oi Native Sons of the Gold- 
en West. 

Past activities of El Dorado Parlor 
were often shared by the Native Sons 
of Georgetown Parlor. These included 
dances, dinners. 4th of July cele- 



brations, observance of Arbor Day. 
and many more such occasions. 

The annual Thanksgiving Ball, 
often a fancy dress affair, was eager- 
ly anticipated. On one such occasion. 
the members wore crepe paper dres- 
ses fashioned in a California poppy 
design. The petals of yellow formed 
the skirt. The bodice was rows of 
scalloped green crepe paper; members 
of Georgetown Parlor Native Sons 
were in attire that complemented the 
colorful scene for the Grand March. 
These dances were all night affairs 
with a chicken supper at mid-night. 

Then there were the Pioneer din- 
ners in honor of the men and wo- 
men, who arrived in California be- 
fore 1870. El Dorado Parlor began 
this custom in 1914. It was held 
yearly, as long as any pioneers sur- 
vived. There were 30 pioneers pres- 
ent at this first dinner. These gather- 
ings were very congenial along with 

(Continued on Page 12) 



/34 



fksstna o 



f 



i 



in& v^A^nLmGU. 



btf Chants ^~J tiii 




Olvera Street, just off the Plaza 



CALIFORNIA HERALD 



MARCH brings springtime and in 
i these early days of spring. 
Mother Nature calls new life into ex- 
Bistence. It is then that the humble 
, people in many lands bring their 
animals and pets to the Padre to have 
them blessed for their fertility and 
health. 

The ancient ceremony of the Bene- 
dicion de los animates (blessing of 
the animals) dates back to the days 
of San Antonio de Abad whose death 
is recorded in 356. It's on Sdbado de 
Gloria, the holy Saturday before Eas- 
ter, that the old custom is followed 
and gratitude is shown for the serv- 
ices of the animals to mankind. Mex- 
ican families gather in Olvera Street 
in Los Angeles and bring their ani- 
mals to receive the blessing. 

Year after year, the Mexican peo- 
ple have honored this old tradition. 
They begin assembling on the north 
end of Olvera street. The scene is 
one of gayety and excitement. Gar- 
lands of flowers are placed on the 
larger animals, ribbons and gay fes- 
toons on the bird cages and smaller 
animals. 

At half past one o'clock, the pro- 
cession makes its way to the patio 
of the old historical Church of Our 
Lady Queen of the Angels. The 
good father and his altar boys stand 
on a raised platform. The people 
file past leading their animals. The 
priest holds a gold receptacle filled 
with holy water. The glistening drops 
ol water fall on each animal as the 
padre chants the blessing "Almighty 
Father, we bless these animals for all 
they have done for us, in supplying 
our food, in carrying our burdens, 
providing us with clothing and com- 
panionship and rendering a service 
to the human race since the world 
began." 




The blessing of the animals lakes place each year on Holy Saturday 
in the Church patio 




Old Plaza Church in Los Angeles 



The Grand 
President's Corner 

% 

HAZEL T. MALLETTE 



MISSION 

I ven though the weekend was 
scheduled for ••nunc rain" two bus 

loads of passengers were on hand to 
go to Reno on Mission's annual "fun" 
trip Rain, sleet, snow forecast did 

not seem to deter their plans. Chains 
and snow did delaj the trip somewhat 
going "over the pass" — and there 
was realK a "snow" job at Reno- 
Sparks. Returning, the passes both 
were closed, so the group had a 
"snowy" return to San Francisco via 
the picturesque Feather River Can- 
yon. 

Esther Krausc and her committee 
deserve a vote of thanks for handling 
these "fun" trips to Reno each year 
lor the Parlor. 



I \SSKN MEW 

Installation of officers for 1969 
were held at the Western Star Mas- 
onic Lodge Hall in Shasta, California 
for Lassen View No. 98. The in- 
stallation was conducted by Bernice 
Medford. Deputy Grand President 
from Camellia Parlor, and her Grand 
Officers. The officers for 1969 in- 
clude Tressa Ferrel, President and 
Marv "Bobbi" Wilson, Nell Wristen, 
Wanda Smith, Ruby Norton, Nell 
White, Corrine Litsch, Jeanette Hall, 
Elta Proebstel, Roxie Nelson, Susie 
Connelly, Gladys Van Sant, and Bon- 
nie Proebstel. Visiting members were 
from Camilla Parlor. Anderson and 
Hiawatha Parlor of Redding. Refresh- 
ments were served in the dining room 
decorated in a red and white valen- 
tine theme. This was the 7 1 st installa- 
tion of officers for Lassen View Par- 
lor. 



GRAND PR] SID1 \l 

Mallettc (Mrs. I vera! A i 
■is Dunstone Drive 
Oroville, I alifornia 95965 



GRAND SECRETARY 

Mary ('. Mahoncy (Mrs. Herbert J.) 
Office: 703 Market Street. Room 612 

San Francisco 94103 Di;il 362-4127 
Res: 4125 Lincoln Way 

S;m Krancisco 94122 



ITINERARY 1969 

MARCH 

1 Leslye A. Hicks Home Fund lea, 

N.D.G.W. Home San Francisco 

2 Childrens Foundation Brunchcon, Alameda County 

3 Ukiah No. 263 Ukiah* 

4 La Junta No. 203 St. Helena* 

5 Sebastopol No. 265, Santa Rosa No. 217 Santa Rosa* 

6 La Bandera No. 1 10, Califia No. 22, Sutter No. Ill Sacramento* 

8 District 26 — Santa Clara County Luncheon 

9 Contra Costa County Breakfast, N.D.G.W. Home San Francisco 

10 Santa Cruz No 26 Santa Cruz* 

12 El Pinal No. 163, San Luisita No. 108, 

San Miguel No.94 San Miguel* 

13 Aleli No. 102 Salinas* 

15-16 Grand Officers Meeting San Francisco 

18 Ontario No.251, Jurupa No. 296, 

Lugonia No. 241 San Bernardino* 

19 La Tijera No. 282, Calif orniana No. 247, 

Los Angeles No. 124, Beverly Hills No. 289 Beverly Hills* 

20 Joshua Tree No. 288 Lancaster*' 

22 San Fernando Mission Tea 

23 Childrens Foundation Bruncheon Los Angeles 

25 Whittier No. 298, Rancho San Jose No. 307, 

Poppy Trail No. 266 Pomona* 

26 Angelita No. 32, Betsy Ross No. 238 Newark* 

27 Liberty No. 213, Chabolla No. 171, Rio Rita No. 253 .... Sacramento* 

APRIL 

1 Veritas No. 75, Golden California No. 291 Gustine* 

2 Copa de Oro No. 105, San Juan Bautista No. 179 ...San Juan Bautista* 

3 Gilroy No. 312 Gilroy* 

6 Easter 

7 Vallecito No. 308, El Cereso No. 207, 

Hayward No. 122 Hayward* 

8 Alta No. 3 (afternoon) San Francisco* 

9 Darina No. 114, James Lick No. 220 (afternoon) San Francisco* 

9 Concord No. 323, Carquinez No. 310, 

Las Amigas No. 311 Walnut Creek* 

10 Fort Bragg No. 210 Fort Bragg* 

12 Phoebe A. Hearst No. 214 — 50th Anniversary Manteca* 

13 Meet Your Neighbor Breakfast 

14 Clear Lake No. 135, Calistoga No. 145 Calistoga* 

16 Oneonta No. 71, Reichling No. 97, Areata No. 325, 

Occident No. 28 Eureka* 

19 District No. 22 DGP Luncheon 

20 Childrens Foundation Luncheon, San Joaquin Valley Fresno 

22 El Aliso No. 314, Poinsettia No. 318 Ventura* 

23 Ramona No. 283, Charter Oak No. 292 Visalia* 

25-26 Past Presidents Assembly Sonora 

27 Amapola No. 80 — 75th Anniversary Sutter Creek* 

28 El Vespero No. 118, San Francisco No. 261, 

Golden Gate No. 158 San Francisco* 

30 Morada No. 199 Modesto* 

Asterisks mark Official Visits 

CALIFORNIA HERALD 



BEAR FLAG PRESENTED 

A California Bear flag was pre- 
sented to the Coast Union high school 
student body by El Pinal Parlor in 
a ceremony held in the high school 
. gym. 

Mabel Flannery, chairman on 
Americanism and civic participation 
made the presentation. She was in- 
troduced by John V. Helton, com- 
mander of American Legion post 
No. 432 and gave an inspirational 
"Tribute to the Flag" written by 
! Henry L. Wintz and a brief history 
of the Bear flag. 



PQPIOP NCU/S Redwinged Blackbird 




The state flag was accepted for 
the Coast Union student body by 
Jim Buddell. 




PGP JEWETT 



Present and introduced were PGP 
Katie G. Jewett and Mary C. Neg- 
ranti, president of El Pinal No. 163. 



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Life Membership or Monthly Rates 

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MARCH, 1969 



PLACENTA 

Candlelight and posies is the theme 
chosen by Placenta No. 277, for 
their annual salad bar luncheon and 
fashion show on Saturday, March 
15. Mrs. Fred Gebers, president, 
and Mrs. John Rumsey, general 
chairman, greeted guests at noon in 
the Encino Women's Club house, 
4924 Paso Roblcs Ave., Encino. 

Goblets filled with multicolor 
posies and topped with a candle 
beautified each table. Birdcages 
abloom with spring flowers and feath- 
ered friends adorned the stage area. 
Festooned stamp trees also decorated 
the room. 

Bea Lewiston presented fashions 
from her North Hollywood shop. 
Models were members of Placenta 
under the direction of Mrs. Zilpha 
Archibald. Styles from sports clothes 
to evening wear were shown by 
Mmes. William Brandenburg, Ken 
Del Conte, Warren Ehlers, Wesley 
Fraser, Andrew Gutt, Ethel Somers, 
and Richard Terry. 

Assistant chairman were Mmes. 
Edward Boldetti, decorations; O'Neil 
Brandenburg and Wesley Jones, 
luncheon; Gutt and Jay Peak, bev- 
erages; Ehlers and John Wrankle, 
tickets; Clayton Atkinson and Don 
Williams, door prizes; Robert Her- 
man, share tickets; William Branden- 
burg, Peak, and John Swank, pro- 
grams; and Robert Stevens, hostesses. 
All salads were homemade by the 
various members. 

Proceeds from this event will aid 
the Parlor's various welfare projects. 
Ticket information chairman were 
Mrs. Rumsey, phone 363-4310 and 
Mrs. Ehlers, phone 365-1411. 



bu, Eugene McAllister 

That bird in the tree has been 

scolding me 
For perhaps an hour or more. 
We breakfast together in all 

kinds of weather 
On opposite sides of the door. 
The money I've spent just to 

keep him content 
Seems wasted when he's in this 

mood. 
And at times I despair and 1 

solemnly swear 
He will get no more of my food. 
He is raucous and bold and he 

just loves to scold, 
He is arrogant, selfish and 

narrow 
But I hope he will stay for I'm 

happy to say 
Every day he is bluffed by a 

sparrow. 



Editor's Note: The author, Mr. McAllister, 
sends along this interesting comment. "I've 
discovered some interesting personalities 
among those who share wild bird seed at 
the 'smorgasbird' table 1 can watch dur- 
ing breakfast." 



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OKIM) V 

I Ik- installation ol officers foi 
Orinda No N '>. although held on o 
veiv rain) .mil wind) evening, was .1 
lovel) and highl) successful evenl 
Genevieve Parks, chairman of the 
installation, and her committee, Ida 
Jones, Mice Mohaupt, Althea IX- 
metrak, Charlotte I udemann, Made- 
line Janowski, Vivian Hall and Irma 
Walaschek, developed, prepared and 
planned this evening with skill, pro 
fessionalism and exactness. I he grand 
hall at the Urban Center in San Fran- 
cisco (meeting place for Orinda Par- 
lor 1 was transformed into a fairyland 
of pmk Huff, to include manzanita 
trees sprouting pink buds. 

Installed b) Gladys Knight, Gol- 
den date Parlor. Deput) Grand Presi- 
dent to Orinda Parlor, were: Presi- 
dent. Esther Bloom and her corps 
of officers: Loretta Wischer, Rleanor 
Begovich, Vivian Hall, Genevieve 
Parks. Ida Jones. Betty Weaver, Ver- 
ena Friede, Alice Mohaupt. Made- 
line king. Irma Walaschek. Jean Gal- 
li. Althea Demetrak, Madeline Jan- 
owski and Romilda Ralph. 

Harry Harrison, an accomplished 
singer, entertained the audience with 
a Diedle) Of tunes. He was accompa- 
nied h\ Frances Simas of Minerva 

No. :.' 




Frances Simas 



The last to receive instructions on 
the duties of her position, the presi- 
dent was presented with a gorgeous 
bouquet of pink carnations. To add 
to the sweetness of that occasion, Mr. 
Harrison serenaded her and the other 
ladies. 

Behind the President's station was 
a large screen covered with pink ny- 
lon net and in large letters the first 
name of the newly-installed president. 
During the acceptance speech, the 
president was deeply moved by the 
enthusiasm and friendship extended 
to her in the past and praised the 
committee for their efforts in making 



this evening so outstanding. She said 
"The friendships which have devel- 
oped and the tasks which have been 

accomplished have helped to make 
mv years in the Native Daughters tre- 

mendousl) rewarding and meaning- 
ful. I have enjoyed being among 
1 1 lends with whom I have a common 
bond we all have had the special 
privilege of being born in California." 
Upon the completion of the accept- 
ance speech, the president presented 
DGP Gladys Knight with a gift on 
behalf of the members of Orinda Par- 
lor in appreciation for her help as 
deputy. 

The refreshments were tempting 
and delicious. There were pink place 
mats and pink napkins engraved with 
the president's name and the date of 
the installation. The pin-wheel sand- 
wiches were made by the committee 
members; a refreshing and colorful 
green punch was a popular item. The 
piece de resistance was the gigantic 
cake elaborately decorated with gold 
leaves, red roses, blue birds and a- 
cross the top of the white, creamy 
frosting in pink were the words "Con- 
gratulations Esther." 




GM Irene Bondanza 

The president was presented with 
many gifts, including a guest book 
which had been signed by all who 
attended the installation. Grand offi- 
cers attending were GS Mary Ma- 
honey and GM Irene Bondanza who 
officiated in her capacity during the 
evening. In addition Orinda Parlor's 
own PGP Orinda Giannini was pre- 
sent. 




PGP Orinda Giannini 



Since the writer of this article was 
installed as President, may I now 
switch to first person and repeat the 
conclusion of my acceptance speech. 
'This has been a thrilling and mem- 
orable evening — one to be remem- 
bered and treasured for always." 
Alter all, how many times in our days 
are we treated as a queen — or in- 
stalled as President of a Native 
Daughter's Parlor? 



SAN DIEGO PARLOR 

San Diego No. 208 has had a busy 
and fruitful fall and holiday season 
starting with a dime-a-dip dinner held 
on Admission Day. Margaret Helton 
was chairman of the event which 
benefited the Children's Foundation. 

On the last Sunday of September, 
Way and Means Chairman Barbara 
Dunn was in charge of the waffle 
breakfast held in the lovely patio of 
the residence of President Dorothy 
Mason. The combination of fresh air 
and the aroma of good food cooking, 
led to hearty appetites and a pleasant 
and successful morning. 

San Diego Parlor shared the honor 
of hosting the official visit of Grand 
President Hazel Mallette with the 
other two San Diego County Parlors. 
A social hour followed by dinner and 
a business meeting was held at Pen- 
asquitos Country Club. Marilyn Cross 
and Lottie Mustain from San Diego 
Parlor were initiated at the meeting 
and Yolande Hartley also from San 
Diego, received her 25 year emblem 
from the Grand President. It was a 
memorable evening for all in atten- 
dance. 

Some wild and eerie costumes 
showed up at the Hallowe'en party 
to help celebrate that spooky night. 
Judges, appointed by Chairman Gwen 
Hanlon, had a difficult time indeed 
naming the "best" for a prize. 

Lenora Beane, Barbara Dunn, 
Catherine Higdon and Ellen Stone 
formed a color guard which parti- 
cipated in the "Massing of the Col- 
ors" held in the new and magnificent 
San Diego Stadium on the first Sun- 
day of November. This event is al- 
ways an inspiring and impressive 
sight and those who participated are 
to be highly commended. 

Initiation of new member Florence 
Wheyland was the highlight of the 
first meeting of November which fell 
on Veteran's Day. A dime-a-dip din- 
ner and bazaar was held on Novem- 
ber 25 for the Thanksgiving cele- 

CAUFORNIA HERALD 



ration. Barbara Dunn w;is general 
lairman of the evening with Dorothy 
iltcr as bazaar chairman and Cath- 
rinc Higdon in charge of greeting 
irds. Welfare chairman Ellen Stone 
id asked that donations of food. 
othing and household items be 
rought for the family the Parlor had 
idopted" for Thanksgiving and 
hristmas. 

Gifts were exchanged, games play- 
J and refreshments served at the 
hristmas party. Evelyn Wurzell was 
hairman of the evening and a won- 
erful time was had by all. 




lot lost to those that love them, 
Not dead, just gone before; 

hey still live in our memory, 
And they will forever more. 



•mma C. Haggerty, Bear Flag No. 151 
December 

r'loisa M. Bowser, San Juan Bautista No. 
179. January 5. 

.adie M. Buchner, Eschscholtzia No. 112, 
January 12. 

.lildred Rasmussen. Encinal No. 156, 

January 13. 
enor B. Swank, Charter Oak No. 292, 
December 9, 1968 

ilary H. Ludden, Rancho San Jose No. 
56, January 10. 

Svelyn B. Theurer, Orinda No. 56, Jan- 
uary 1 0. 

letsie L. Katich, Genevieve No. 132, 
October 11, 1968. 

-elicia Heatley, Piedmont No. 87, Jan- 
uary 19. 

irna H. Jenkins, Piedmont No. 87. Jan- 
uary 20. 

Margaret Micheletti, El Carmelo No. 181, 
January 10. 

Mabel E. MacLean, Stockton No. 256, 
January 18. 

Myce A. Keeley, Morada No. 199. Jan- 
uary 22. 

Algie H. Gassett, Stockton No. 256, Jan- 
uary 5. 

Alta R. Lee, Plumas Pioneer No. 219, 
December 12. 

Lena B. Bello, Vista Del Mar No. 155. 
January 15. 

Addie R. Torroni, Mission Bell No. 316. 
December 18, 1968. 

Annie T. Heindel. El Dorado No 186, 
January 25. 

MARCH, 1969 



Lillian I'. Reid, S;mi;i < m/ No. 26 tan 

uarj 27. 
Ernestine Edwards, II Tejon No. 239, 

Octobei 16, 1968 

Ruby V. Rogers. II Tejon No. 239, Nov 

Mayme T. Moffitt, ( amellia No. 41, Jan- 

uarj 2 l *. 
Elsie K Ramsay, Verba Buena No. 273. 

January II. 
Loleta II. ( Oblentz, Sonoma No 209, 

January 31. 
Lillian VV. Waight. El Vcspem No. 118. 

January 27. 
Marj \. Dassow, Golden (late No. 158 

I ebi uar> 4. 
Adele S. Prankish, Ontario No. 251. Jan- 
uary 18. 
Jennie VV. Dunham, La Tijera No. 282, 

January 28. 
Tessie E. Sprague, Rio Hondo No. 284, 

January 29. 
Sarah C. Archer. Silver Sands No. 286. 

December 31. 1968. 



EI. DORADO 

A report on the progress of plac- 
ing a land mark by El Dorado Parlor 
at the site of the mining community 
of Georgia Slide, situated two and 
on half miles north of Georgetown, 
was favorable. 

The charter was draped, and a 
moment of silent prayer was observed 
in memory of Annie Thorsen Hein- 
del, who passed away recently. She 
was a charter member of El Dorado 
Parlor over the years. She was record- 
ing secretary for many terms. She 
was born at Dry Creek a community 
a few miles from Georgetown eighty- 
nine years ago. She taught school in 
El Dorado County for many years. 
The funeral was held under the aus- 
pices, of El Dorado Parlor. Despite 
the severe weather, four members at- 
tended to take part in the beautiful 
ritual service of the Parlor. As is 
the custom of the Parlor, a book 
will be placed in the Georgetown 
Branch Library, in her memory. 

A nice luncheon, was enjoyed, pre- 
ceding the meeting. It was served by 
the president at a table, decorated 
in a Valentine theme. 

The Parlor, moved from the IOOF 
hall after a tenancy of 59 years, to 
the V.F.W. hall, at this meeting. It 
was through the kindness of John 
Francisco, husband of the President. 
He furnished his pick-up, and did 
the work of moving the 59 years ac- 
cumulation of effects of the Parlor. 



Small boy looking at cageful of green 
parakeets: "Look, Mom! Some canaries 
that aren't ripe yet!" 



Too many people are taking advantage 
of the fact that it isn't human to be perfect. 



oil l< I vi visit 

I he Grand President, Hazel I 

Mallettc will make her official visit 
to District No. 35 on I uesdav March 
25, 1969, ill the I Iks Unipie. 1417 

West Holt Ave , Pomona. District 
35 includes the following Parlors: 
Whittier No. 2MX, Rancho San Jose 
No. 307, and Poppy Trail N( 
A chicken breast dinner (price 
S3. 25) will be served at 7:00 P.M. 
in the Elks Temple. Send paid res 
ervations to Edna Grenwald, 3655 
Lynoak Drive, Claremont by March 

20. I his Official visit was postponed 
from December 17. 1968. 



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CREMATORIUM • COLUMBARIUM 

[ Orangewood Street at Santa Ana Freeway 

538-3583 



WOMAN 01 mi M \K 

\lis l eo J (Jane) Friis, public 
relations director o( the California 
Herald , w.is selected "Woman of the 
^ ear" bj the Ebell Club ol Anaheim 
on March 3 She has .i long record 
ol public service as president and 
member ol many organizations in- 
cluding Red Cross, P.l .A., Ebell, 
and Assistance I eague. she is cur- 
rentlj president ol AJtrusa club of 

Santa Ana 



I II I Ml Mill KSIII1' 

When Grand President Ha/el I. 
Malletle made her official visit to 
Reina del Mar No. 126 and Tierra 
de Oro No. 304. Santa Barbara, on 
January 16, 1969 she also performed 
an extracurricular pleasant duty in 
connection with the presentation of 
a life membership to a long-time 
member of Vendome No. 100, San 
Jose. PGP Margaret M. Famsworth. 




Grand President Hazel T. Mallette 
presents Life Membership to PGP 
Margaret Famsworth, in Santa Bar- 
bara, on behalf of Vendome Parlor 
No. 100, San Jose. Mrs. Famsworth 
is confined to a rest home in Santa 
Barbara following a serious illness 
last fall. 

Vendome Parlor had forwarded 
the life membership to Past Grand 
President Eileen Dismuke with the 
request that she make the presenta- 
tion to PGP Margaret Famsworth on 
their behalf. Since the life member- 
ship arrived on the day of the official 
visit, arrangements were made for the 
Grand President to make the pres- 
entation. PGP Famsworth is con- 
fined to the Beverly Manor Conva- 
lescent Hospital, Santa Barbara, since 
a serious illness in September of last 



sj 




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Smart Dresses in all sizes and colors 

Chapeaux to complete each costume 

Lovelv accessories 



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Fullerton, California 




year, and the Grand President, ac- 
companied by GT Betty Read Curi- 
lich, her traveling companion, PGP 
Eileen Dismuke, DGP Amelia Acres, 
and President Bernice Hogg, of Reina 
del Mar No. 126, visited the con- 
valescent hospital for the presentation 
ceremony. 




PGP DISMUKE 



PGP Margaret M. Famsworth is 
a beloved member of Vendome No. 
100, as she is of the entire Santa 
Clara District, and is sadly missed in 
her Parlor and at the many events 
sponsored by Santa Clara County. 
We are certain her friends through- 



out the State of California will t| 
pleased to know that she has been s| 
honored by her Parlor and will joi! 
in congratulations and best wishej 
to her. 



One of the many worthwhile prq 
jects of the Native Daughters is th] 
presentation of California flags t 
non-profit organizations. LugonA 
No. 241, of San Bernardino, pre] 
sented an official California Stan 
Flag to Campus Crusade for Chris 
Arrowhead Springs. Campus Cn.| 
sade for Christ International, is offi 
cially headquartered at the Arrow 
head Springs site. Making the preset 
tation was Mrs. C. M. Noland, chain 
man of the Americanism and Civic 
Participation Committee of the Lua 
onia Parlor. Accepting the flag o 
behalf of the staff of Campus Cru 
sade was Col. John M. Fain, directc| 
of the Military Division of Campu 
for Christ. 

Mrs. Noland gave the history c 
the beginning of the Bear Flag, whic 
was researched by Past Grand Presi 

CALIFORNIA HERAL 




tear Flag Presented. From left: Fred Palmtag, Past President Arrowhead 
So. 110, NSGW; Mrs. Hollie Ritter, 1st VP Lugonia No. 241, NDGW; 
1rs. Manual Cisneros, President, Lugonia No. 241 , NDGW; Rose Brook,. 
)irevtor of Administrative Services, Campus Crusade for Christ; Mrs. C. M. 
.'aland, chairman of Americanism and Civic Participation of Lugonia Par- 
>r: Col. John M. Fain, Director of the Military Division of Campus Cru- 
nk jor Christ; Donald E. Van Linen, past president, Arrowhead No. 
110, NSGW. 



ent of N.S.G.W., David W. Stuart, 
frs. Manuel Cisneros, president of 

ugonia Parlor, gave a resume of the 
lany projects and accomplishments 
f the Native Daughters. 

A delicious luncheon was served 
) the Native Sons and Daughters, 
i one of the lovely dining rooms. 
,lr. Fred Littauer, director of Con- 
;rence Services of Campus Crusade 
M Christ and his wife told the Na- 
ive Sons and Daughters about the 
larvelous work being performed by 
lese dedicated young people in high 
:hools and colleges across the United 
|tates. A remark was made at this 
me, that the Native Daughters take 
are of the body (Childrens Foun- 
ation) and Campus Crusade for 
,'hrist takes care of the soul. 



tEINA DEL MAR 

President Bernice Hogg of Reina 
el Mar No. 126 appointed Past 
'resident Amelia Acres general chair- 
lan for the official visit of Grand 
resident Hazel T. Mallette jointly 
'ith Tierra de Oro Parlor. A planned 
hanksgiving dinner for members and 
leir family was held on November 
9, chairmaned by Betty Miller and 
ssisted by Past Presidents Ambert 
'hillips and Mamie Miller. Others 
:nding assistance were Margaret 
rraham, Past President Anita Joyal 
nd daughter Patricia, Lucille Meye- 
nk, Lynn Smith, Mariana Schmitter, 



Linda Wolf and Nanette Sevegney. 

At the December 3 meeting, mem- 
bers contributed food and toy gifts 
for distribution by the Council of 
Christmas Cheer, and the December 
17 meeting was devoted to a Christ- 
mas party for members and their 
young children, chairmaned by Past 
President Mariana Schmitter and as- 
sisted by Sarah Diaz, Past Presidents 
Lisalotte MacFarlane, and Amelia 
Acres. Entertainment was arranged 
by Vice President Beverly Sorenson 
and Mariana Schmitter provided a 
puppet show, together with the assis- 
tance of her husband Armand and 
son. There was musical selections 
rendered by the Cinco Belles quin- 
tette, of which Beverly Sorenson is a 
member, and singing of cards with 
the audience joining, and Santa 
Claus protrayed by Beverly Soren- 
son's husband Arthur, who distribut- 
ed gifts to the children in attendance. 
Refreshments were served at the con- 
clusion of the program, with Presi- 
dent Bernice Hogg presiding and as- 
sisted by Amelia Acres. 



GENEVIEVE 

The 67th anniversary dinner was 
attended by 42 guests and members 
from various parlors. 

It was held at the Montclair Rest- 
aurant "Gold Room" San Francisco. 
The decor color scheme was red, 
white and gold, so the clever dinner 



committee chairman Helen Buckley, 
and [fene Crowley, co-chairman 
carried out the table ;md corsage 
decorations, in the same colors. Irene 
made up all of the corsages, and ar- 
ranged the hcadtahlc centerpiece 
beautifully in red and white carna- 
tions which was complemented on 
each side by gold candlelahra. I he 
flowers were generously donated b) 
native son Louie Winant of LI ( am- 
elo Parlor. Attractive hand made- 
rose bud candy and nut place cups 
were fashioned by Helen. Fach also 
received a souvenir bronze bank. 

President Doris Stidhem welcomed 
all and introduced DGP F.dith O ( on 
nor, of Utopia. Two past presidents 
present were Irene Bald of Guada- 
lupe and Florence Conklin of Min- 
erva. Charter member May Miley 
(93 years young) was present again 
this year. Both she and Louise Haas 
who is a 65 year member were pre- 
sented with citations of service to the 
Native Daughters. 

(Continued on Page 12) 



535-3289 




RITZ 




CLEANERS and 


DYERS 


307 E. Lincoln 


Anaheim 



4£&\ tenner Sheet cMelal, Pnc. 
"Since 1870" 

774-1843 

INDUSTRIAL SHEET METAL WORK 
210 Chestnut Anaheim 



2 


BACKS 
KAULBARS 

MORTUARY 

1617 W. La Palma at Euclid 
Anaheim 
772-1617 




Diamonds — Silverware 

132 W. Lincoln / Anaheim / 533-3107 
PAGE 11 



GENEVIEVE 

'itinl from /'<iv' "' 

Mm. i Oiiimi, Helen Clifton, El- 
vira Desmond, and Vera Hosraer en- 
tertained b) reminiscing about com- 
ical events during the tragic 1906 
fire and earthquake, also all about 
the active drum corps, of Genevieve 
parioi <>i which the) were verj proud 
m .ill the parades. 

Gem vieve Parlor was delighted to 
have some «'i the Native sons again 
from the Following parlors: Les Craig 
i l um Peaks) I ouie Winanl 1 1 I 
Camelo) rhomas Brad] (South s.m 
Francisco) Charleton Chappele 
(South San Francisco) Gabrielle 
Moulm (Pacifica). I lu^ dinner was 
exceptional and a delicious birthday 
cake was served which climaxed a 

memorable evening. 



On February 20, a delightful buf- 
fet and game night was held in St. 
Francis Hall. A large croup attended. 



RESOL1 HON ON 

0( I \N Oil DKII LING 

WHEREAS. Tierra de Oro Parlor 
No. 304, Native Daughters of 
the Golden West, Santa Barbara, 
California, a unit of a statewide 
native-born women's organization 
devoted to the preservation of 
the historic and aesthetic values 
of the great State of California, 
has been concerned ever since 
plans were first made for place- 
ment of oil-drilling equipment and 
the ugly platforms necessary for 
such exploration in this area and, 

WHEREAS, we have watched with 
indignation the rising of these 
platforms, one by one, marring 
the beautiful seascape which it 
has been ours to enjoy as natives 
and adopted citizens of this area 
since childhood; and. 

WHEREAS, it is now evident that 
the plans made between the oil 
companies involved and the 
United States Government pro- 
vided that the oil drilling plat- 
forms would NOT MAR the 
beauty of the ocean on which 
they were to be placed; and. 

WHEREAS, it is also fully evident 
that these promises were prompt- 
ly ignored by the oil companies; 
and. 



WHEREAS, Promises were made 
that there would be no possibility 
Oi damage to the areas involved 
from oil exploration because of 
ample precautions being taken to 
avoid such damage; and. 

Will Rl AS. is is now unmistakenlv 
evident thai all of these promises 
likewise were empty, due to in- 
eptitude or sheer neglect; and. 

Will Rl AS, the beautiful Santa Bar- 
bara County coastline has been 
damaged irreparably, perhaps for 
all time to come; 

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RE- 
SOLVED, that Tierra de Oro 
Parlor No. 304, Native Daughters 
Of the Golden West. Santa' Bar- 
bara, in session assembled this 
Sixth day of February, Nineteen 
Hundred and Sixty-Nine, demand 
that the United States Govern- 
ment, through the President of the 
United States, the Congress of 
the United States, the Interior 
Department, and all agencies of 
the government concerned with 
the despoiling of one of the most 
beautiful scenic areas in the 
whole world, the Santa Barbara 
County Coastline, withdrawn all 
permits for oil exploration in the 
Santa Barbara Channel for all 
time to come; and, 

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, 
that the Government of the Unit- 
ed States hold the oil companies 
responsible for the desecration of 
the Santa Barbara Channel and 
for all compensation for damages 
in connection therewith; and, 

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, 
that a copy of this resolution be 
spread upon the minutes of the 
Parlor, and that copies of same 
be forwarded to: The President 
of the United States; the Secre- 
tary of the Interior; Senators 
George Murphy and Alan Crans- 
ton; Congressman Chas. M. 
Teague; Ronald Reagan, Gov- 
ernor of the State of California; 
Sen. Rob. J. Lagomarsino; As- 
semblyman Don MacGillivray; 
Mayor Gerald Firestone, City of 
Santa Barbara, and members of 
the City Council; The Chairman 
and members of the Santa Bar- 
bara County Board of Super- 
visors; the Santa Barbara Cham- 
ber of Commerce; The Commit- 
tee for Get Out Oil of Santa Bar- 
bara; the Native Daughter official 
magazine, the CALIFORNIA 



HERALD; and the Santa Ba 

bara News-Press. 
This resolution unanimously adoptd 
at a regular meeting of the membe! 
of Tierra de Oro Parlor No. 304, N1 
live Daughters of the Golden Weil 
Santa Barbara, February 6, 1969. 

Eileen G. Dismuke, PCl 



Preside 

Edith Webst 

Secreta 



I Seal ) 



GEORGETOWN . . . 
(Continued from page J) 

visiting, old times as well as ne 
were discussed. Many brought thu 
priceless relics, and keepsakes I 
display. Some brought hand-work I 
relatives made in years past. An ol 
lady, who had not been out of h 
yard in ten years was present an 
enjoyed her first car ride. Anoth| 
couple met and discovered they hcj 
been childhood sweethearts. Tr 
afternoon usually closed with tl| 
singing of some of the old songl; 
together with the expressions of gocfl 
luck, and farewell. Through it at 
however a feeling of pathos prevaile'l 

The 4th of July celebrations, J 
years past were high-lights, in whiclj 
both Native Sons, and Native Daug!: 
ters participated. On one such i\ 
occasion they sponsored the festiv 
ties that took place at the picnj 
grounds surrounding the town refl 
ervoir. In addition to the public pi 
nic, various sports were held. The II 
were swimming contests and fo«jj 
races for adults and children. It endt 
with an all night dance in the hal 
and a chicken supper at mid-night. ' 

Another 4th of July celebraticj] 
featured the children. The colorf > 
parade of floats carrying the chilqj 
ren as characters such as the goddeu 
of Liberty, George and Martha Wasl , 
ington and Uncle Sam, ended at 9 
Georgetown Grammar School whelj 
a fine patriotic program was give! 
by the school children. 

Arbor Day, was observed a nunl 
ber of years, when trees and shrul| 
were planted at various homes of I 
members. The first was in 193' 
when a sequoia was planted at thj 
new home of Mr. and Mrs. R. I 
Murdock in tribute to the bi-centen 
nial of the birthday of George Wasl 
ington. It was dubbed the Washinji 

CALIFORNIA HERALj] 



ID Sequoia. On one occasion eight 
:lver maples were planted to line 
e entrance drive-way of the George - 
fwn Pioneer Cemetery, they were 
idieated to the memory of the de- 
mised members of both Parlors, and 
t the Pioneers who are at rest there. 
Those early days bring back both 
• d and happy memories to those of 
I who have lived in Georgetown and 
Wed this community and its people. 




The many friends of Helen Knoles, 
last President of Pasadena No. 290, 

ill be r.addened to know that Helen 
nderwent surgery the last week in 

inuary for amputation of her right 

g at the knee. We are happy to re- 
port she is improving exceptionally 

ell and her morale is very good, 
jrue to her outstanding sense of hu- 
ior, she remarked to her daughter 
Well that's one way to get rid of 
pur corns and ingrown toe nails." 

Due to a serious heart condition 
lelen gave up her home in Pasadena 
1st year and moved North to live 
.ith her daughter. Her address is 
,202 Lynn, Sunnyvale, California 
4087. 



UL CARMELO 

On February 5, Grand President 
lazel T. Mallette paid her official 
isit to El Carmelo at the Parlor's 
itest meeting place "The House of 
parties" in Daly City. 

"Advance Into Spring" was the 
heme and the hall was artistically 
lecorated with numerous pastel 
pring arrangements on all the sta- 
ions, tables, etc. with paper spring 
lowers, large butterflies on the walls, 
md miscellaneous banquet greens, 
rwo large antique candelabra grac- 
rd the stations. An attractive bird 
:age on the piano and two large urns 
)f butterflies, added much to the 
lecor of this spring theme. 

Before entering into the activities 
)f the evening the Grand President 



URBAN RENEWAL 

bq Margaret F. Haqes 

A dust-cloud dervish swirled across Main Street 
And traffic crawled. The bree/elcss warmth of spring 
Denied the turbulence, but as I eased 
Along the block to where the gust had been 
I saw the cause. The bakery shop was gone 
The old New York whose gleaming cases held 
Delectablcs to tempt my great-grand-dame 
And in my youth still held .the charm of treats 
Uncommon to our frugal way of life. 

A panting giant of orange-colored steel 

Awaited throttle-urge to crash the heap 

Of shattered timber, tumbled brick. The shop 

Where consecration-like the chime of bell 

Announced a coming, now was gone. The roof, 

Almost intact, spread over broken walls 

As though a shroud were dropped on one just dead. 



was presented with a varigated green 
and yellow throated lady slipper or- 
chid correctly named "Cypripedium". 
It complemented her lovely pastel 
green formal. 




An escort team of eight members 
wearing new spring pastel formals, 
carrying butterflies with the body 
made of gold plastic and white nylon 
wings with large glass eyes, escorted 
the Grand President to the altar 
where she was presented and intro- 
duced by President Ann Biggio. 
Georgia Jacks sang "It Might As 



Well Be Spring" accompanied by 
Madeline Koskela. Also escorted 
were the following Grand Officers: 
GTS Marie Landini of San Jose No. 
81, Helen McCarthy of Utopia No. 
252, and Marian McGuire of Ber- 
keley No. 150 and PGP Evelyn I. 
Carlson of Dolores No. 1 69; SDDGPs 
Marie Sousa of San Mateo County 
and Myrtle Ritterbush of San Fran- 
cisco. In attendance to the above, 
six visiting deputies and thirteen Par- 
lors were represented. Each Grand 
Officer in turn was presented at the 
altar and given the gifts of the even- 
ing which were spring floral plants 
planted in small pot containers. All 
present received an attractive butter- 
fly napkin ring to take home. 

In spite of the terrible downpour 
and stormy weather there was a 
large attendance. Thirty-seven mem- 
bers of El Carmelo were present be- 
fore initiating three new candidates. 
(Continued on page 14) 





g\ 


N 


A H E 


1 M 




SAVINGS 


AND 


LOAN 


ASSOCIATION 


Dorothy Y. Ulvestad, President 






J. Bernard 


Soto, Exec. Vice-Pres. 


construction loans 


1 


escrow * 


refinancing 


i collections 


(Main Office) 












ANAHEIM 




HUNTE - ( , M ) n Id x 


BREA 


1ST W. Lincoln Avenue 






411 Main Street 


770 


South Brea Blvd. 


PRopect 2-1532 






LEhigh 6-S591 




Ph. 529-4971 



EL CARMELO . , . 

»( onlinued from /*i'v< 13) 

llk\ were Hilda de Martini, Mar) 
Markel and Frances Ketchei 

Reports ol 1 1 <■ amulo's activities 
and donations to the Parlor p 
were presented to the Grand Presi- 
denl in Christine Hulme and were 
gracious!) accepted b) her. I he rii- 
ualistic work and generosit) oi the 
Parlor were complimented. 

\n interesting talk on some of the 
(thirty-one) projects oi the Ordei 
Kplained b> die Grand Presi- 
dent foi the benefit oi those present 
especial!) for the newl) admitted 
members. All listened attentivel) and 
will select a project to then liking. All 
the grand officers and guests were 
most enthusiastic in their comments 
on the beautiful decorations on the 
tables, walls, and the colorful indi- 
vidual place settings with the hutter- 
B) napkin rings as an added gift 
for attending. 

I he Parlor's chapter member Ma- 
tilda Heering was presented. She is 
a fifty-nine (59) year member. A 
highlight of the evening was the pres- 
entation by the Grand President of a 
Bft) year emblem to Emma Schwarz. 
Twenty-five year pins were presented 
to Lucille Fitzpatrick and Halliet 
Michelsen. 

Chairman of the evening, Christ- 
tine Hulme welcomed all present and 
thanked them tor their attendance 
on such a stormy and rainy night. 
She introduced and thanked her as- 
sistants Anita Parton, Stella Arcimas, 
Helen Lewerenz, Jane Cuneo, Bea- 
trice Garvin and Marian Helene who 
were responsible for a great many of 
the props. Also a special thank you 
to all who helped serve, worked in 
the kitchen and in any way to help 
make the evening a success. 

The Parlor's gift to the Grand 
President was presented in an artistic 
miniature bird cage made from the 
leaves of the Reader's Digest mag- 
azine. Spring flowers drooped from 
the center top to bottom and a little 
blue bird with his head sticking out 
guarded the monetary gift. 

A delicious repast of chicken a 
la king on patty shells, home made 
angel food cakes, coffee and tea. 
were enjoyed to the fullest by all. 



When you make a mountain out of a 
mole hill, don't expect anyone to climb 
up to admire the view. 



PA1 u in 

I'alo Alto No. 229 may be one of 

the smaller parlors in the state, but 

is ver) alive and active. Spring oi 

1968 brought us a request from 

First v. P. Florence Mitchell to ful- 
fill the wish of her nephew in Platoon 
199 in South Viet Nam for a Calif- 
ornia Bear Rag. this was promptly 
purchased and shipped, and in due 




time a picture was sent back to Flor- 
ence, showing "our" flag bravel) fly- 
ing over the encampment with other 
state banners. The Parlor was ver) 
glad to make "one of our boys hap- 

py-" 

October found Palo Alto ho ting 
various parlors in a Hawaiian Guest 
Officers night. Palms and leis and 
appropriate refreshments, plus the 
beautiful music by Organist Alyce of 
Los Gatos No. 317 made the evening 
a memorable one. 




November brought the annual 
Thanksgiving dinner at President An- 
gela Quetin's home where members 
and guest enjoyed a lovely turkey 
dinner with all the trimmings. The 
turkey was furnished by President 
Angela and all other dishes were 
donated by members. A goodly sum 
was thus raised for the good of the 
Order. District Deputy Mary Assno 
and Supervising District Deputy, 
Phyllis Tindell were present also. 

December and Hong Kong Flu 
seemed to be synonymous but fifteen 
Palo Alto Parlor members and guests 
braved the elements to attend the 
Christmas Social and gift exchange 
at the home of Third V.P. Claire 
Honerlah. We were glad to have hol- 
iday fun and friendship, even though 
the hostess was rather groggy, hav- 
ing had the flu and barely recovered. 
Luckily no one present caught it 
from her. 



About this time notice came t 
William Cinquini son of Helen CI 
quini and nephew of Grand Trus-J 
Marie l.andini was with the Pe;l 
Corps in Ecuador. He had been woJ 
ing with the people in the small tol 
of Puyo near the jungles of the At 
a/on basin of Oriente, at 111 
feet elevation. It is nice to know soJ 
of the next generation are doj 
something good for mankind. 




GT MARIE LANDINI 

In January it was a pleasure 
greet Grand President Hazel T. M< 
lette on the occasion of her offic 
visit to a joint meeting with El Mc 
te No. 205. President Irene Hatch 
El Monte Parlor opened and clos 
the meeting and President Angt 
Quetin of Palo Alto Parlor condu 
ed the initiatory ceremony. 




GT McGUIRE 



GT McCarthy 



Flu also curtailed attendance 
this meeting but the Parlor was ha 
py to have PGP Evelyn I. Carho 
GM Irene Bondanza and GTs Mai 
Landini. Helen McCarthy and Mari; 
McGuire present. The theme of t) 
evening was "Winter Bells". Frostd 
greens and white mission bells we 
the decor for the hall and refreshme. 
tables. Beautifully mounted repoi 
for 1968 were presented to the Grar 
President by both Parlors and a mo 
ey gift was given which the Grar 
President said would be used to pu 
chase cut glass for her collectio 
Palo Alto Parlor took this opportu: 
ity to donate funds for the schola 

CALIFORNIA HERAI 



•lip funds of the Menlo Junior Na- 
Le Daughters No. 10, for the His- 
[rical Room at the NDGW Home. 
kI for the Childrens Foundation. 
February social meeting was held 
J the home of Nell McElhatton tor 
I Valentine Party. Adding to the 

Sirtv festivities was a severe thunder 
id lighting storm. Hail, severe wind 
I'd the loss of eleetrie current for 
p e to one hour. Hazel Ruddell 

•Iped out by bringing a coal-oil 

mp for light until service was re- 
imed. All were delighted to have 

ealthj Falk back with us. She has 
[•en ill too long. 

Genevieve Commerford has been 
try active these past months attend- 
[g the meetings of the Menlo Juniors 
id reporting back to the Parlor on 

eir activities. 

I On March 8, the District Lunch- 
in was held. It was a delightful 
icasion. 



THE REDWOOD 

by Ruth T. Dury 

hail thee, mighty monarch of the 

forest, 
ly rugged branch, thy aged crest, 

thousand years the winter's gale 
as bowed thy tops without avail; 

thousand years the summer breeze 
as murmured through thee, mighty 
trees; 

thousand years the sun's first ray 
as gilded thy tops at peep of day, 

he setting sun as it sank low 

as clothed thee with the afterglow. 

thousand years the moonlight 

bright, 
hen clear as crystal was the night, 

as silhouetted 'gainst the sky 

hy mighty figures, dark and high. 

thousand years by hill and dale, 
y babbling brook and mountain 
trail, 

tie violet blue hath dropped its head, 
nd Spring and the robin have come 
and fled; 

tie trillium, too, hath startled there 
, April days its blossom fair, 

nd laughed to see the sunbeams 

bright 
ight up the gloom of the green 

twilight, 

r hear the linnet's morning trill 
:ho far from hill to hill. 




is* w& (pi 

' -'.V. :„ • >f* J fe" , . '^3 "agS . : -.:-. ;. ■ 



mp ya o . y *;. 



A thousand years the Autumn's cold 
Has changed the leaves to red and 
gold, 

The Autumn breeze has shaken them 

down 
And left them lying sear and brown; 

The bird notes sweet have ceased to 

sound, 
The flowers have withered to the 

ground. 

But still thou standst amid it all. 
For thou, thou wert not born to I at It 

Beneath thy shade with fleeting tread 
The timid deer hath often fled 

When within the gloom of the wood- 
land depth 
He heard the red man's stealthy step; 

Beneath thy shade at night or day 
The crouching panther has downed 
its prey. 



But now the red man's rule is o'er: 
His swarthy face is seen no more: 

He cowers beneath the conqueror's 

tread. 
His wigwam burned, Ins warriors 

dead. 

Kingdoms and nations have come 
and gone. 

but sun, o monarch, thou livesl on. 

The powerful reigns of the kings of 

Old, 
With their marble halls and their 

vaults of gold, 

Seem to thee, in thy aged sway, 
The fanciful dream of one short day. 

When another thousand years are- 
past. 

Wilt thou still brave the winter's 
blast? 

Wilt thou still stand, stately, sublime, 
On and on to the end of time'.' 

Kditor's Note: Mrs. Drury spent her early 
life in the shadow of these great trees in 
Del Norte County. Mam limes has she 
walked Ihe Mill Creek trail down which 
Lady Bird Johnson walked at the time 
of the dedication of the Park. This poem 
was written when Mrs. Drury was 16 
years old. 



RICHMOND 

Richmond No. 147 held its annual 
party and dinner at Lu's in El Cer- 
rito. A gift exchange and the annual 
display of holiday hats worn by the 
members attending was enjoyed by 
all. The honored guest of the evening 
was Claudia Evans, DGP of Argon- 
aut Parlor No. 166. 



An expert in economics is a man who 
knows "tomorrow" why things he said 
"yesterday" didn't happen "today." 



The fellow who works so hard to get 
to the front, places himself in a good 
position to get kicked. 



Always put off until tomorrow what you 
"shouldn't do at all." 



Uneasy lies the head that tries to make 
a living without working for it. 



Some folks are like fences; they run 
around a lot without getting anywhere. 



Mother: "Well, son, were you a good 
boy in school today?" 

Son: "Sure. How much trouble can you 
get into standing in a corner all day?" 



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CALIFORNIA HERALD 
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JR. UNIT NEWS 



°T 



I vs UtOGI II 19 JK. I Ml NO. 33 

It was .1 \cr> happy 13th birthday 
part) for Las Amiguitas Jr. Unit No. 
33 ol Walnul deck which took place 
on Monday evening, March 3, in the 
Auditorium of Buena Vista School. 
I Ins event marked the official visit 
ol Grand Trustee Helen C. McCar- 
thy of ( 'topia Parlor, and state Chair- 
man of Junior Native Daughters to 
the Unit 

The auditorium was beautifully 
decorated to simulate an apple or- 
chard, with trees "growing" around 
the side walls of the auditorium, 
sparkling with red apples suspended 
from the branches beneath a "sky of 
blue" with a sprinkling of silver stars. 
Each station was decorated with bal- 
loons and lollipops and a huge silver 
cardboard birthday cake with thirteen 
candles rested at the foot of the Pres- 
ident's station. 

The Junior Officers of the Unit 
carried large candy lollipops with 
clown faces and were preceded in 
their entrance march by an escort 
team of eight members of the Moth- 
er Parlor. 

Escorted to their seat of honor by 
Marshal Beverly Beckemeyer and as- 
sisted by the Escort Team were Mrs. 
McCarthy, State Chairman of Junior 
Native Daughters; Kathy Slater of 
Sequoia Unit No. 27, Jr. State Presi- 
dent; Beverly Beckemeyer, Las Ami- 
guitas Unit No. 33, Jr. State Treasur- 
er; Robin Gilbert of Menlo Unit No. 
10 and Sharon Douglas of Fruitvale 
Unit No. 22, Jr. State Trustees; Ka- 
thy Koch of Sequoia Unit No. 27, Jr. 
State Organist; Cheri Patterson, Las 
Amiguitas Unit No. 33, Past Jr. 
State President; Mrs. Constance Baer, 
President of Las Amigas Parlor No. 
311; and Mrs. Marian E. McGuire 
of Berkeley No. 150, Grand Trustee 
of the Senior Order. 

Jr. President Kathy Trottier and 
her corps of officers initiated seven 
new members, Nadine Beckemeyer, 
Jenine Bond, Vicki Broadhead, Ka- 
thy Green, Charlotte Piper, Charlene 
Thomas and Nancy Le Valley into 
the Unit. Kathy Koch, Jr. State Or- 
ganist, very graciously added to the 
evening's ceremonies by her per- 
formances at the piano. 

(Continued on Page 12) 



California Herald 

"PRESERVING THE PAST FOR THE FUTURE" 
Yoi i mi XVI April. 1969 Number 

CONTENTS THIS MONTH 

Junior Unit News 

Dog Races at Sierra City, by Ruth Drury 

Early Exploration in Orange County, by Leo J. Friis 

The Grand President's Corner j 

Official Directory of NDGW Parlors 

Leo's Dictionary, by Leo J. Friis (part VI) I 

Parlor News II 

In Memorium I 

My Friend, by Pattie Gribble If 



Before you make 



amove 



be sure to see a Medallion Electric 
Home. After all, the trend is to 
electric living. A Medallion Home can mean: Flameless, 
electric heating with room-by-room temperature controls. 
An all-electric kitchen that stays clean and cool. Cool, re- 
freshing air conditioning throughout the house. Medallion 
Homes are available now in all price ranges. It will pay 
you to look for this emblem before you make a move. 




Southern California Edison 



J. J. FRIIS 

Publisher 



LEO J. FRIIS 
Editor 



JANE FRIIS 

Public Relations 



_ ... Published Monthly by J. J. Friis and Leo J. Friis, owners and publishers, Anaheim, 
California All Rights Reserved. EDITORIAL AND GENERAL OFFICES: Anaheim, California. 
Mailing Address: P.O. Drawer 4243, Anaheim, California 92803. ADVERTISING OFFICE: 301 
N. Parton St., Santa Ana, Calif. 92701. CHANGE OF ADDRESS AND SUBSCRIPTIONS: Mail 
^ or , r ? sp ^ n ol e , nce „i° CALIF °RNIA HERALD, Circulation Department, P.O. Drawer 4243, Anaheim, 
calif. 92803. When ordering change of address, please allow six weeks; please furnish 
= d an D n cT W n a r d i l ^ e l se i^ c " Jding zip code - NDGW MEMBERS: please send Parlor Number 
also POST OFFICE: RETURN REQUESTED. Please send magazine with address change 
to California Herald, P.O. Drawer 4243, Anaheim, California 92803. SUBSCRIPTION RATES: 
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Other countries: Please apply for rates. Entered as second-class matter at the Post Office at 
Anaheim, California, under the Act of March 3, 1879. No part of this magazine may be re- 
printed without specific permission. 

CALIFORNIA HERALD 



^£w/^ 



aces a 



t 



~J^>ietta C >t& 




l PZuik O^ 



flj) few years ago some of the 
'£& local residents thought it would 
x nice to have some winter activity 
hereabouts, — so they started work- 
ng on the dog-sled races. The local 
rhamber of Commerce sponsors 
hem and Bill Woods has been chair- 
nan of the committee from the begin- 
ling. The Sierra Nevada Dog Sled 
Drivers Association manages the 
aces. Races are held at Ebbetts 
'ass, Tahoe City, and Sierra City, 
rhe Chamber of Commerce in each 
irea sponsors the races and guaran- 
ees the prize money which ranges 
rom $500 to $1500. 

The drivers with their teams come 
rom many parts of the country: Ore- 
ion, Washington, Montana, Utah and 



from various places in California. 
This year there was a team from Al- 
aska. The teams are made up of Al- 
askan Huskies, Siberian Huskies, 
Samoyeds, some hounds and Irish 
Setters. Some teams are mixed of 
various breeds; one a combination of 
hounds and setters. One year some 
mushers from Canada brought some 
pet wolves. They tried to make sled 
dogs of them, but had little success. 

The drivers get cash prizes plus 
trophies. There is a perpetual trophy 
on which the winner's name is en- 
graved each year. It is left displayed 
at the Buckhorn Club in Sierra City. 

Besides the races there is the Snow- 
man Contest which goes on all morn- 
ing. It is surprising from what dis- 



tances the contestants come. This 
year the first prize winners were from 
San Francisco; second prize, San Bru- 
no; third, Sierra City; and fourth. 
Grass Valley. 

At the Sierra City Sled Dog Races 
members of Naomi Parlor No. 36, 
NDGW, assisted by husbands and 
members of the Chamber of Com- 
merce, furnish the refreshments booth 
each year. The booth is rigged up on 
a small trailer. Hot dogs, coffee, hot 
chocolate, soda pop, bouillon and 
sometimes sandwiches are served. 

This year the races at Sierra City 
had much competition from the ele- 
ments. On January 11, the first day, 
when a regular blizzard was blowing 
the snow straight in, one dog musher 
• 4 gal" came by for a hot cup of cof- 
fee. She remarked, "Well, I know we 
dog mushers are crazy to be out in 
such weather, but I think the Native 
Daughters can run us a close second." 

Here is an account of the 1969 
Dog Sled Races as published in the 
local paper, the Mountain Messen- 
ger: 

"Plagued by wind, snow and near- 
zero visibility, the fifth annual Sierra 
City Sled Dog Races, nevertheless, 
continued as scheduled, — almost." 

"One last-minute change had to be 
made when officials declared the 
weather too dangerous on Saturday 
for the Class 'C racers to go out on 
the trail. The last race scheduled for 
the day, Class 'C, was made up of 
sleds with three dogs driven by chil- 
dren and novices. Sunday was a dif- 
ferent story, however, when the 
weather showed a slight change for 
the better. The three mile Class 'C 
race was won by Sue Daniels of Nev- 
( Continued on Page 14) 



Earlq Exploration fn 
Orange Counti) 



yj£t ok \i\si of us. who were rear- 

Ji ed in other parts of the United 
States it is rather difficult to realize 
that onl) Bftj yean alter Columbus 
discovered America, white men set 

eyes upon what is now Orange Coun- 
ty. 

With two tiny ships, the San Sal- 
vador and the Victoria, Juan Rodri- 
guez Cabrillo. a Portuguese, sailed 
under the flag of Spain, made his way 
northerly along our coast, his desti- 
nation being the mythical Strait of 
Anian. called by the English the 
Northwest Passage. He entered San 
Diego Bay on September 28, 1545. 

Cabrillo was the first navigator to 
be buffeted by the contrary winds 
which made it difficult for early sail- 
ing ships to travel northward. The 
log of his important voyage cannot 
be found, but a condensed version of 
it refers to the mountains in the area 
of Orange County. No doubt he and 
his sailors saw Old Saddleback, the 
landmark frequently mentioned in 
modern coast pilots. Cabrillo was nev- 
er to return to Mexico from where 
his voyage started. He died from 
complications resulting from a frac- 



bq Leo J. Friis 



ture and was buried on San Miguel, 
one of the Channel Islands. 

It was not long before the Span- 
ish commenced sailing westward from 
Acapulco to the Philippines. On their 
return trips they followed the great 
circle route to the north and usually 
sighted the shores of California near 
Point Concepcion. From there they 
crept cautiously down the coast. It 
is interesting to visualize these un- 
wieldy ships sailing majestically past 
our Orange County shores. 

In 1602 Sebastian Viscaino sailed 
north for the purpose of finding har- 
bors on the California coast suit- 
able as places of refuge for the gal- 
leons in case of storm. He was also 
to search for the Strait of Anian. 
Fighting adverse winds he zigzagged 
up the coast and on December 16. 
1602, discovered a bay which he 
named El Puerto de Monte-Rey in 
honor of the Count of Monte-Rey. 
He was charmed with the harbor 
and praised it most highly. 

For more than 150 years Spain did 
nothing to strengthen its hold on Up- 
per California. With growing appre- 
hension that England or Russia might 



take possession of it, the decision wa 
made to colonize the land to whic 
it could lay no claim except that o 
discovery. 

King Charles III of Spain, a trul; 
great monarch, directed immediafc 
settlement of the country and Jos> 
de Galvez, his visitor-general of Nev 
Spain rushed preparations to earn 
out the Spanish plan of colonizatioi 
which time and experience had prov 
ed successful. This plan entailed th< 
establishment of missions to conver 
the Indians to Christianity, pueblo 
to care for the settlers and presidio, 
to accommodate the military. Gaspei 
de Portola, newly appointed Gov 
ernor of Alta and Baja California 
was placed in charge. The Francis 
can padres under Father Juniperc 
Serra. were to care for the spiritua 
needs of both Indians and Spanish 

It is the great pioneering work o; 
Governor Portola and Father Sern 
with which we are most interested in 
celebrating California's Bicentennial 
Four expeditions, two by sea and twe 
by land, journeyed from Mexico tc 
California. The ship, San Antonio 
entered San Diego Bay on April 1 1 




CALIFORNIA HERALD 




769, and the San Carlos cast anchor 
ight days later. 

The first land contingent, under 
'aptain Rivera, arrived at what is 
iow San Diego on May 14. One 
ection of the other land party, which 
ms led by Governor Portola, joined 
Rivera on June 29 and the rest, in- 
luding Father Serra, arrived on July 

On July 14, Portola and 62 of his 
len left San Diego for their long 
larch northward to explore the coun- 
ry and find the Bay of Monterey, 
^mong those who accompanied him 
vas Father Juan Crespi, who kept a 
aithful diary of the expedition and 
ecorded many details of interest to 
is today. In particular he made much 
nention of the trees, plants and 
lowers which he observed. Father 
Trespi had been a student of Father 
>erra at Palma, on the island of Mal- 
orca, Spain. 

After nine days of marching, Por- 
ola entered what is now Orange 
lounty and camped in the San Juan 
Valley near present day San Juan 
rapistrano. On July 24, the expedi- 
tion camped in the El Toro area and 
on the following day stopped in the 
Santiago Hills east of present day 
|Tustin. On July 27, the explorers 
reached a point near what is now the 
City of Orange. They crossed a 
stream which they called Santiago in 
honor of the patron saint of Spain. 
Father Crespi observed that the 
"creek comes down from the moun- 
tains and shows that it must have 
plenty of water in the rainy season." 
1 might parenthetically add that Fath- 
er Crespfs appraisal of plenty of 
water in Santiago Creek was amply 
demonstrated in the past few weeks. 

APRIL, 1969 



Leaving the Santiago (reck, the ex- 
pedition moved toward the Anaheim 
area. On July 28 the explorers came 
to the Santa Ana River which was 
then about 30 feet wide and IS inches 
deep. Crespi noted that "It is evi- 
dent from the sand on its banks that 
in the rainy season it must have great 
floods which would prevent crossing 
it." The place where the white men 
camped was in the vicinity of pre cut 
day Olive. Here they were greeted 
by a group of friendly Indians who 
by signs invited them to live with 
them. During this parley they were 
disturbed by a series of heavy earth- 
quakes. 

Upon crossing the Santa Ana Riv- 
er, which they did with some dif- 
ficulty by reason of the swiftness of 
the steram, the explorers marched 
northwesterly and camped near the 
mouth of Brea Canyon. From there 
they skirted the edge of the La Habra 
Valley and passed through the Puente 
Hills. 





San Francisco Bav 



The expedition failed to find Mon- 
terey Bay, but further north it dis- 
covered a much larger body of water, 
San Francisco Bay. Upon their re- 
turn the explorers retraced their steps 
until they reached the San Gabriel 
River. Instead of recrossing the Puen- 
te Hills they followed the San Gabriel 
southward to a point near present 
day Whittier and then travelled south- 
easterly toward their former camp on 
the Santa Ana River. We have every 
reason to believe that in doing so 
they marched through what is now 
Anaheim. 

Upon their return to San Diego 
they recounted their experiences. 
Probably with some embarassment, 
Governor Portola admitted that he 
had been unable to find Monterey 



Bay. Father Serra responded jokingly, 
"So you have been to Rome, but 
didn't sec the Pope." 

The Portola Expedition opened up 

California for settlement. In its wake 
came missions, pueblos and ranchos. 
The beautiful mission ol San Juan 
Capistrano was founded in 1776, just 
lour months alter the signing of the 
Declaration of Independence on the 
other side of our continent. 

Juan Pacifico Ontiveros was grant- 
ed Rancho San Juan Cajon de Santa 
Ana in 1837 and twenty years later 
sold 1 1 65 acres upon which to found 
the city of Anaheim. At that time the 
romantic pastoral period of California 
was coming to a close. In another 
decade both sides of the Santa Ana 
River would commence being sub- 
divided and sold to settlers. New cit- 
ies would spring up. 

As early as 1870 efforts had been 
made to secede from Los Angeles. 
In that year a bill to create the Coun- 
ty of Anaheim passed the Assembly, 
but failed in the Senate. Nearly 
twenty years more would elapse be- 
fore county division would become 
a reality. On March 11, just eighty 
years ago today, an act of the Legis- 
lature was approved to create the 
County of Orange. 

Much has transpired since that 
time, but it all began two hundred 
years ago when the first steps were 
made to settle California. 



This address was given by 
Leo J. Friis at Pearson Park in 
Anaheim, on March 11. 1969, 
at the planting of a magnolia 
tree by the Ebell Club of Ana- 
heim in commemoration of Cal- 
ifornia's Bicentennial. 




The Grand 
President's Corner 



l,K WD PR] SUM M 

Hazel I Mallettc (Mrs. Kveral 
43 Dunstone Drive 
Oroville, ( aliforaia 95965 




HAZEL T. MALLETTE 



GRAND SECRETARY 

Mary C. Mahoney (Mrs. Herbert J.) 
A.) Office: 70? Market Street. Room 612 

San Francisco 94103 Dial 362-4127 
Res: 4125 Lincoln Way 

San Francisco 94122 



01 I K I M VTffll 

California's Bi-Centennial and the 
founding of the California Missions 
In lather Junipero Serra was the 
theme chosen b) Reina del Mar No. 
126 and Tierra de Oro No. 304, 
when Grand President Hazel T. Mal- 
lettc made her official visit to Santa 
Barbara. 

The Meeting in the Eagles Hall was 
preceded by a eatered dinner at the 
["own House Party Center in Santa 
Barbara. The hall was decorated in 
lame hand crafted paper flowers and 
magnolia leaves in the colors of the 
evening — orange and olive green. 
The Board of Officers of each Par- 
lor, carrying flower hand pieces with 
green and orange streamers, were 
formally introduced by Ritual Chair- 
man. Mary Wegener, past president 
of Tierra de Oro. Hortensia Cuellar 
of Tierra de Oro was organist for the 
ritualistic ceremonies. 

Grand President Hazel T. Mallette 
was formally introduced at the altar 
and escorted to her seat of honor 
by Marshal Norma Grimm of Tierra 
de Oro. A passageway formed by 
the Escort Team consisted of Vera 
Smith, Linda Wolf, Patricia Joyal 
and Lotte MacFarlane of Reina del 
Mar. 

Also escorted were Jr. PGP June 
T. Goldie, GTs Betty Read Curilich 
and Lila S. Hummel, SDDGP Mary 
Rule; DGPs Ellen Guthrie and Ame- 
lia Acres. The presence of Past Grand 
President Eileen Dismuke was also 
acknowledged 

Eileen Dismuke, President of Tier- 
ra de Oro conducted the opening and 
closing ceremonies and Bernice Hogg, 
President of Reina del Mar conduct- 
ed the balloting and initiation cere- 
monies. 



ITINERARY 1969 



APRIL 



1 \eritas No. 75, Golden California No. 291 Gustine* 

2 Copa de Oro No. 105, San Juan Bautista No. 179 ...San Juan Bautista* 

3 Gilroy No. 312 Gilroy* 

6 Easter 

7 Vallecito No. 308, El Cereso No. 207, 

Hayward No. 122 Hayward* 

8 Alta No. 3 (afternoon) San Francisco* 

9 Darina No. 1 14, James Lick No. 220 (afternoon) San Francisco* 

9 Concord No. 323, Carquinez No. 310, 

La? Amigas No. 311 Walnut Creek*) 

10 Fort Bragg No. 210 Fort Bragg*! 

12 Phoebe A. Hearst No. 214 — 50th Anniversary Manteca*! 

13 Meet Your Neighbor Breakfast 

14 Clear Lake No. 135, Calistoga No. 145 Calistoga*! 

16 Oneonta No. 71, Reichling No. 97, Areata No. 325, 

Occident No. 28 Eureka*) 

19 District No. 22 DGP Luncheon 

20 Childrens Foundation Luncheon, San Joaquin Valley Fresno J 

22 El Aliso No. 314, Poinsettia No. 318 Ventura*! 

23 Ramona No. 283, Charter Oak No. 292 Visalia* 

25-26 Past Presidents Assembly Sonora \ 

27 Amapola No. 80 — 75th Anniversary Sutter Creek*lj 

28 El Vespero No. 118, San Francisco No. 261, 

Golden Gate No. 158 San Francisco*! 

30 Morada No. 199 Modesto* 



MAY 

3 Marguerite No. 12, El Dorado No. 186 Georgetown* 

9-10-11 Gold Spike Ceremonies Promontory, Utah 

13 Wilmington No. 278 — 25th Anniversary Wilmington*. 

14 Santa Maria No. 276, La Purisima No. 327 Lompoc* 

15 Rudecinda No. 230, Tierra Del Rey No. 300, 

Long Beach No. 154 Long Beach* 

17 Sacramento County District Luncheon 

19 El Tejon No. 239, Alila No. 321, Tide Vista No. 305, 

Miocene No. 228 Taft* 

20-21-22 NSGW Grand Parlor Riverside 

24 District No. 20, Deputy Grand Presidents Luncheon 

25 Alameda County Memorial Services 

26 Marinita No. 198, Fairfax No. 225 San Rafael* 

27 Fruitvale No. 177, Bahia Vista No. 167, Aloha No. 106 Oakland* 

28 Las Lomas No. 72, Buena Vista No. 68, 

Dolores No. 169 San Francisco* 

30 Memorial Day 

31 Gold of Ophir No. 190 — Homecoming Oroville* 

Asterisks mark Official Visits 



Many Native Daughters from the 
District and a bus load from San 
Gabriel Valley, came to attend the 



official visit. The following Parlor- 
were represented: Santa Maria. La 
(Continued on Page 15) 



CALIFORNIA HERALD 



N.d.G.W. DIRECTORY 

GRAND OFFICERS — 1968-1969 

Grand President 

szel T. Mallette (Mrs. Everal A.) Gold of 
> Ophir No. 190, 45 Dunstone Drive, Oroville 
, 95965. 

Junior Past Grand President 
ne T. Goldie (Mrs. Wm. L.) San Gabriel Val- 
ley No. 281, 320 Rosemont Blvd., San 
Gabriel 91775. 

Grand Vice President 
incy J. Conens (Mrs.) Piedmont No. 87, 4311 
Allendale Ave., Oakland 94619. 
Grand Marshal 
■ne Bondanza (Mrs. Joseph) San Francisco 
, No. 261, 2328 Union St., San Francisco 
I 94123. 

Grand Secretary 
ary C. Mahoney (Mrs. Herbert J.) Golden 
• Gate No. 158, 4125 Lincoln Way, San Fran- 
cicso 94122. Office, 703 Market St., Room 
612, San Francisco 94103. Telephone (415) 
362-4127. 
I Chairman, Board of Grand Trustees 
\e E. Rominger (Mrs.) La Bandera No. 110, 
' 2841 - 69th Ave., Sacramento 95822. 

Grand Trustees 

rtrude L. Doss (Mrs. Curtis E.) Whittier No. 
298, 308 South Valencia, La Habra 90631. 
.srie C. Landini (Mrs. Anthony) San Jose No. 
| 81, 860 Warren Way, Palo Alto 94303. 
;tty Read Curilich (Mrs.) Ursula No. 1, 41 
I Curilich Lane, Jackson 95642. 
<a S. Hummel (Mrs. Leonard) La Tijera No. 
282, 836 E. Grand Ave., El Segundo 90245. 
Men C. McCarthy (Mrs. James P.) Utopia No. 
I 252, 4064 - 18th St., San Francisco 94114. 
brian E. McGuire (Mrs. Paul B.) Berkeley No. 
, 150, 652 Wildcat Road, Berkeley 94708. 

Grand Inside Sentinel 

^redyth Burnett (Mrs. Paul) Dardanelle No. 
1 66, P. O. Box 1124, Sonora 95370. 

Grand Outside Sentinel 

ura Blosdale (Mrs. Frank) Beverly Hills No. 

1289, 1563 Brockton Ave., Los Angeles 90025. 
Grand Organist 
ggy Brandenburg (Mrs.) Placerita No. 277, 
i 4800 Brandenburg PL, Tarzana 91356. 



PAST GRAND PRESIDENTS N.D.G.W. 

31— Estelle M. Evans (Mrs. Ellis) Antioch 
No. 223, 314 West 5th Street, Antioch 
94509. 

32— Evelyn I. Carlson (Mrs.) Dolores No. 169, 
1308 Hoover Street, Apt. 1, Menlo Park 
94025 

(34 — Irma W. Laird (Mrs. Ralph) Alturas No. 
159, Alturas 96101 

35 — Gladys E. Noce (Mrs. John) Amapola No. 
80, Box 281, Sutter Creek 95685 

'37— Florence D. Boyle (Mrs.) Gold of Ophir 
Parlor No. 190, P.O. Box 1743, Oroville 
95965 

•38— Ethel Begley (Mrs.) Marinita No. 198 
233 Prospect Ave., San Francisco 94110 

140 — Orinda G. Giannini (Mrs. Raymond) Orin- 
da No. 56, 2822 35th Avenue, San Fran- 
cisco 94116 

•41 — Hazel B. Hansen (Mrs. Louis) Verdugo 
No. 240, 535 N. Howard Street, Glendale 
91206 

42— Clarice E. Gilchrist (Mrs.) Caliz de Oro 
No. 206, 25 Seaview Ave., Piedmont 
94611. 

'43 — Claire Lindsey (Mrs.) Golden Gate No. 
158, 911 Hillcroft Circle, Oakland 94610 

)44 — Mary B. Barden (Mrs. Harold) Californ- 
iana No. 247, 320 22nd St., Santa Monica 
90402 

'45 — Emily E. Ryan (Mrs.) Las Lomas No. 72, 
1371 - 48th Ave., Apt. 201, San Francisco 
94122 

146— Ethel C. Enos (Mrs.) Morada No. 199, 
Box 174, Modesto 95353 

147 — Loretta M. Cameron (Mrs.) Twin Peaks 
No. 185, 39 Chenery Street, San Fran- 
cisco 94131 

•48 — Doris Treat Daley (Mrs.) San Andreas 
No. 113, 1025 North Madison St., Stock- 
ton 95202 

149 — Margaret M. Farnsworth (Mrs.) Vendome 
No. 100, Beverly Manor Convalescent 
Hospital, 2225 Dela Vina St., Santa Bar- 
bara 93101. 

)50— Henrietta Toothaker (Miss) Woodland No. 
90, 723 Gibson Road, Woodland 95695 

)51— Anna T. Schiebusch (Miss) Los Angeles 
No. 124, 320 W. Chestnut Avenue, San 
Gabriel 91776 

)52— Jewel McSweeney (Miss) El Vespero No. 
118, 2845 Van Ness Avenue, San Fran- 
cisco 94109 

'53 — Elmarie H. Dyke (Mrs.) Junipero No. 
141, Box 300, Pacific Grove 93950 

IPRIL, 1969 



1954 

1955— Doris M. Gerrish (Miss) Liberty No. 213, 

2709 7th Avenue, Sacramento 95818 
1956 — Norma Hodson (Mrs. Theron) Phoebe A. 

Hearst No. 214, 139 N. Sherman Street, 

Manteca 95336 
1957— Audrey D. Brown (Mrs.) Sutter No. Ill, 

5608 Caleb, Sacramento 95819 
1958— Irma M. Caton (Mrs.) Argonaut No. 166, 

1166 Pawell Street, Oakland 94608 
1959 — Eileen Dismuke (Mrs. Benjamin) Tierra 

de Oro No. 304, 1021 Dela Vina, Santa 

Barbara 93101 
1960 — Maxiene H. Porter (Mrs. Dale) La Tijera 

No. 282, 6436 Elmdale Rd., Alexandria, 

Virginia 22312 
1961— Edna C. Williams (Mrs. Don) Sequoia 

No. 272, 941 Norvell, El Cerrito 94530 
1962— Alice D. Shea (Mrs.) Minerva No. 2, 

1850 Woodhaven Way, Oakland 94611 
1963— Rhoda Roelling (Mrs. Elmer C.) Stirling 

No. 146, 2017 Chickie St., Antioch 94509 
1964— Lee Brice (Mrs. W. Max) Marinita No. 

198, Res. 31, Box 41, San Quentin 94964 
1965— Fern E. Adams (Mrs. Emmett C.) Berry- 

essa No. 192, P.O. Box 387, Willows 95988 
1966— Katie G. Jewett (Mrs. A. L.) El Pinal No. 

163. P.O. Box 685, Cambria 93428 
1967— Annette Caicooa (Mrs. Julius Jr.) La 

Junta No. 203, 1624 Main St., St. Helena 

94574. 



PAST GRAND SECRETARY 

Irma S. Murray (Mrs. Arthur) Aloha No. 106. 
2128 Central Ave., Apt. A, Alameda 94501. 

SUPERVISING O.D.G.P.S 1968-1969 

Appointed by Grand President Hazel T. Mal- 
lette 

District 
1— Humboldt County: Miss Edna Johnson, 

Reichling No. 97, 371 - 9th St., Fortuna 

95540. 
2 — Mendocino County: Mrs. Edith Goble, Fort 

Bragg No. 210, 2190 Sherwood Road, 

Fort Bragg 95437. 
3 — Siskiyou County: Mrs. Jessie Burcell, Es- 

chscholtzia No. 112, Box 311, Etna 96027. 
4 — Trinity, Shasta and Part Tehama Counties: 

Mrs. Patricia Griffin, Camellia No. 41, 3336 

Stingy Lane, Anderson 96007. 
5 — Modoc and Part Lassen Counties: Mrs. 

Zelma McGirr, Alturas No. 159, Box 1124, 

Alturas 96101. 
6 — Part Lassen County: Mrs. Louise A. Ben- 
nett, Nataqua No. 152, Milford 96121. 
7 — Butte. Glenn and part Tehama Counties: 

Mrs. Clara E. Staheli. Olivia No. 309, Rt. 1, 

Box 54, Corning 96021. 
8 — Yuba, Colusa and Sutter Counties: Mrs. 

Frances Wright, Camp Far West No. 218, 

1802 Linda Ave., Marysville 95901. 
9 — Plumas and Part Sierra Counties, Mrs. 

Dora Jane Compton, Imogen No. 134, Box 

37, Sattley 96124. 
10 — Part Sierra County: Mrs. Juel V. Vahle. 

Naomi No. 36, Box 172, Downieville 95936. 
11 — Sonoma and Part Mendocino Counties: 

Mrs. Gladys G. Wing, Santa Rosa No. 217, 

1204 Stewart St.. Santa Rosa 95404. 
12 — Napa, Lake and Part Solano Counties: Mrs. 

Loella H. Muller, Eshcol No. 16, 6 Monte- 

cito Blvd., Napa 94558. 
13 — Marin County: Mrs. Geojean H. Vedder, 

Marinita No. 198, 101 Trellis Drive, San 

Rafael 94903. 
14 — Nevada and Part Placer Counties: Mrs. 

Esther McCluskey, Laurel No. 6, 742 Zoin 

St., Nevada City 95959. 
15 — El Dorado and Part Placer Counties: Mrs. 

Helen A. Francisco, El Dorado No. 186, 

P. O. Box 291, Foresthill 95631. 
16 — Sacramento. Yolo and Part Solano Coun- 
ties: Mrs. Mary M. Ehlers, Rio Rito No. 253, 

1359 Palomer Circle, Sacramento 95831. 
17 — Amador County: Mrs. Hilda Esola. Amapola 

No. 80. Box 294, Sutter Creek 95685. 
18 — Calaveras County: Miss Addie L. Reid. 

San Andreas No. 113, Box 743, San An- 
dreas 95249. 
19 — Part Contra Costa County: Mrs. Helen 

Carev, Las Amigas No. 311, 3326 Johnson 

Road, Lafayette 94549. 
20 — Alameda, and Part Contra Costa Counties: 

Mrs. Dolores M. Ferenz, Havward No. 122, 

3306 Alton Court, Fremont 94536. 
21 — San Francisco County: Mrs. Mvrtle E Rit- 

terbush. Buena Vista No. 68, 1277 Alemany 

Blvd., San Francisco 94112. 
22 — San Mateo County: Mrs. Mary Sousa, 

Bonita No. 10, 427 Third Ave., Redwood 

City 94063. 
23 — San Joaquin County: Mrs. Rozella Vote, 

Caliz de Oro No. 206, 805 Yerba Buena, 

Stockton 95207. 
24 — Tuolumne County: Mrs. Lucile Turman, 

Anona No. 164, 47 N. Washington St., 

Sonora 95370. 
25 — Merced, Stanislaus and Mariposa Counties: 

Mrs. Doris E. Hamilton, Morada No. 199, 
1311 "F" SL, Modesto 95353. 



26— Santa Clara County: Miss Phyllis D. Tin- 

dall, Palo Alto No. 229, 1860 Foxworthy 

Ave., San Jose 95124. 
27— Monterey, San Benito and Santa Cruz 

Counties: Mrs. Vivian Medeiros, Copa de 

Oro No. 105, Box 295, Tres Pinos 95075 
28— San Luis Obispo County: Mrs. Filomena 

Valleau, San Luisita No. 108, Box 96,, Avila 

Beach 93424. 
29 — Madera and Part Fresno Counties: Mrs. 

Meredith R. Roberts, Fresno No. 187, 

1519 - 3rd St., Sanger 93657. 
30 — Part Fresno, Part Tulare and Kings Coun- 

ties: Mrs. Gerry Freeman, Coalinga No. 

270, Star Route 1. Box 15, Coalinga 93210. 
31 — Part Tulare and Kern Counties: Mrs. Elsie 

Parmelee, El Tejon No. 239, 260 Truxtun 

Ave., Bakersfield 93301. 
32— Santa Barbara and Ventura Counties: 

Mrs. Mary Rule, La Purisima No. 327, 1401 

E. Maple Ave., Lompoc 93436. 
33— Part Los Angeles County (Valley), Mrs. 

Ruth M. Etz, Joshua Tree No. 288, 16245 

Elizabeth Lake Road, Palmdale 93550. 
34— Part Los Angeles County (Central): Miss 

Ruth M. Payne. La Tijera No. 282, 230 E. 

Hyde Park Blvd., Inglewood 90302. 
35— Part Los Angeles County (Eastern): Mrs. 

Mildred F. McGee, Whittier No. 298, 11532 

South Valley View Ave., Whittier 90604. 
36— Part Los Angeles County (Harbor): Mrs. 

Valda Vaughan, Rio Hondo No. 284, 8958 

Hunt Ave., South Gate 90280. 
37— Riverside and San Bernardino Counties: 

Mrs. Helene H. McDaniel, Jurupa No. 296, 

3060 Canyon Crest Drive, Apt. 3, River- 
side 92507. 
38— Orange County: Mrs. Estelle Germain, 

Santa Ana No. 235, 2222 N. Hesperian, 

Santa Ana 92706. 
39— ^an Diego County: Mrs. Alice Kelly Sr., 

Las Flores del Mar No. 301. 2452 Stockton 

Lane. Vista 92083. 



STATE CHAIRMEN — 1968-1969 

Adm sson Day (to serve Oct. 1. 1968 to Oct. 1, 
1969): Mrs. Doris Perez, 21672 Knoll Way, 
Hayward 94546. 

Sub-Committee on Bowling: Mrs. Lola Bred- 
ehoft, Sequoia No. 272, 1332 Carlotta St. 
Berke'ev 94550. 

Americanism and Civic Participation: Mrs. 
Senaida Sullivan, Beverly Hills No. 289. 
2400 Shenandoah St., Los Angeles 90034. 

Appeals. Grievances and Petitions: Mrs. Nel- 
lie Miller, Verdugo No. 240, 730 Patterson 
Ave.. Glendale 91202. 

Board of Control: Mrs. Hazel T. Mallette. GP. 
Gold of Oohir No. 190, 45 Dunston Drive, 
Oroville 95965. 

California History and Landmarks: Mrs. Flor- 
ence D. Boyle, PGP, Gold of Ophir No. 190, 
P. O. Box 1743. Oroville 95965. 

Sub-Committee, California History and Land- 
marks, Art Talent Contest: Mrs. Marie C. 
Landini, GT. San Jose No. 81, 960 Warren 
Way, Palo Alto 94303. 

Sub-Committee on Brochure — State Histori- 
cal Sites: Mrs. Loretta Trathen, Orinda No. 
56. 140 Stacey Lane. Grass Valley 95945. 

Sub-Committee on NOGW Historical Room: 
Mrs. Evelyn I. Carlson, PGP, Dolores No. 
169. 1308 Hoover St., Apt. 1, Menlo Park 
94025. 

Conservation and Safety: Mrs. Lola Viera, 
Plumas Pioneer No. 219, RFD 689, Quincy 
95971. 

Credentials: Mrs. Katie G. Jewett, PGP, El 
Pinal No. 163, Cambria 93428. 

Education and Scholarships: Miss Doris Ger- 
rish. PGP Liberty No. 213, 2709 - 7th Ave., 
Sacramento 95818. 

Extension of the Order: Mrs. Annette Caiocca, 
PGP. La Junta No. 203, 1624 Main St., 
St. Helena 94574. 

Finance: Mrs. Ethel C. Enos, PGP, Morada 
No. 199, Box 174, Modesto 95353. 

Grand Parlor Sessions: Mrs. June Painter, 
Lomitas No. 255, 22321 W. Sunset Ave., 
Los Banos 93635. 

Historian of the Order: Mrs. Myrtle S. Degen, 
Aloha No. 106, 5550 Kales Ave., Oakland 
94618. 

Insurance: Mrs. Irma M. Caton, PGP, Argonaut 
No. 166. 1166 Powell St., Oakland 94608. 

Junior Native Daughters: Mrs. Helen C. Mc- 
Carthy, GT, Utopia No. 252, 4064 - 18th 
St., San Francisco 94114. 

Laws and Supervision: Mrs. Nancy J. Conens, 
GVP, Piedmont No. 87, 4311 Allendale 
Ave.. Oakland 94619. 

Legislation: Mrs. Irma S. Murray, PGS, Aloha 
No. 106. 332 Victor Ave.. Oakland 94602. 

Legislative Measures: Mrs. Betty Read Curilich, 
GT. Ursula No. 1. 41 Curilich Lane, Jack- 
son 95642. 

Leslye A. Hicks Home Health Fund: Mrs. Mar- 
garet M. Skelly, Yerba Buena No. 273, 
1336 Judah St., San Francisco 94122. 

Mission Restoration: Mrs. Margery S. Ed- 
munds, Woodland No. 90, 9 West Street, 
Woodland 95695. 

Mission Soledad Restoration: Mrs. Mary Silva. 
Mission Bell No. 316, 312 Copley Ave, King 
City 93930. 

PAGE 7 



Mutic M^ I mil* Len. Rio Hondo No. 284. 
8971 Burke Ave , South Gate 90280. 

NOG* Childreni Foundation: Mrs. Audrey D. 
Brown. PGP. Sutter No. 111. S608 Caleb 
Sacramento 94819 Secretary: Miss Ethel- 
wynne Franher. San Fernando Mission No. 

280. 216 Alexander St.. San Fernando 
91340 

NOG* Homt. MS Baker St.. San Francisco 
t41t7: Chnv Mrs Hazel B. Hansen, PGP. 
Verdugo No. 240. 53S N. Howard St, Glen- 
dale 9126. Secretary: Mrs. Elenore Bianchi. 
El Vespero No. 118. 2715 Wawona St.. San 
Fran 

NSGW-NOGW Adoption Agency: Mr. Bernard 
G H.ss. 456 S. Spring St., Los Angeles 
90013. 

Official Publication: Chm.: Miss Doris Jacob- 
sen, Grace No. 242. 237 S. Bradford. Pla- 
centia 92670. Co-chm.: Mrs. Eileen Dis- 
muke. PGP. Tierra de Oro No. 304. 1021 
Dela Vina St, Santa Barbara 93101. 

Pioneer Roster: Mrs. Marian E. McGuire, GT, 
Berkeley No. 150, 652 Wildcat Canyon Rd„ 
Berkeley 94708. 

Printing and Supplies: Miss Alma Mullaney. 
Yerba Buena No. 273. 1567 - 21st Ave.. 
San Francisco 94122. 

Public Relations: Mrs Laura Blosdale, Beverly 
Hills No. 289, 1563 Brockton Ave., Los An- 
geles 90025. 

Ritual and Manual of Instruction: Mrs. Vir- 
giha McCombs. Morada No. 199, 1241 
Normandy Dr., Modesto 95351. 

Roll of Honor: Mrs. Fern Adams, PGP,, Berry- 
essa No. 192, P. O. Box 387, Willows 95988. 

State of the Order: Mrs. Edna C. Williams, PGP, 
Sequoia No. 272, 941 Norvell, El Cerrito 
94530. 

Tournament of Roses Float: Mrs. June T. 
Goldie. Jr. PGP. San Gabriel Valley No. 

281. 320 Rosemont Blvd., San Gabriel 91775. 
Co-Chm.: Mrs. Philomena Wooster. Poppy 
Trail No. 266, 125 N. 18th St., Montebello 
90640. 

Transportation: Mrs. Norma Hodson. PGP, 

Phoebe A. Hearst No. 214, 139 N. Sherman 

Ave.. Manteca 95336. 
Veterans Welfare: Miss Jewel McSweeney, 

PGP. El Vespero No. 118. 2845 Van Ness 

Ave.. San Francisco 94109. 
Welfare: Mrs. Rae L. Rominger, GT, La Ban- 
dera No. 110, 2841 69th Ave.. Sacramento 

95822. 
Year Books: Mrs. Blanch Oechsel, Californi- 

ana No. 247. 426Hi N. Cahuenga Blvd., 

North Hollywood 91620. 
Young Womens Activities: Mrs. Stella W. Mac- 

kinga, Placerita No. 277, 19205 Ave. of the 

Oaks Newhall 91321. 
Father Jumpero Serra Statue: Mrs. Eileen 

Dismuke. PGP. Tierra de Oro No. 304, 1021 

Dela Vina St.. Santa Barbara 93101. 
Legal Advisor — Grand Parlor Sessions: Mrs. 

Evelyn St. John Monahan. Ilia M. Knox No. 

320. 1193 Merritt Dr., El Cajon 92021. 

ALAMEDA COUNTY 

Angelita No. 32, Livermore— Meets 2nd Fri- 
day. Carnegie Bldg.. 2155 Third St.; Mrs. An- 
gie Marsh. Rec. Sec. 1587 - 2nd St., Liver- 
more 94550. 

Piedmont No. 87, Oakland— Meets 1st and 
3rd Thursday. Veterans Bldg., 200 Grand Ave., 
Oakland; Mrs. Elza Paul, Rec. Sec, 6017 Mon- 
roe Ave.. Oakland 94618. 

Hayward No. 122, Hayward— Meets 2nd and 
4th Tuesday, Veterans' Memorial Bldg., 22737 
Mam St.. Hayward; Mrs. Doris Perez, Rec. 
Sec. 21672 Knoll Way, Hayward 94546. 

Aloha No. 106, Oakland— Meets 2nd and 4th 
Tuesday. Montclair Women's Club, 1650 Moun- 
tain Blvd. Oakland; Mrs. Myrtle Degen, Act- 
ing Rec. Sec. 5550 Kales Ave., Oakland 94618. 

Berkeley No. 150, Berkeley— Meets 2nd Mon- 
day. Berkeley City Club. 2315 Durant; Mrs. 
Loretta Reynolds. Rec. Sec, 507 Cornell Ave. 
Albany 947C6. 

Bear Flag No. 151, Albany— Meets 1st and 3rd 
Tuesday, Maccabee Hall, 985 Kains Ave; Mrs. 
Rhea Campbell. Rec. Sec, 2110 Byron St., 
Berkeley 94706. 

Encinal No. 156, Alameda— Meets 2nd and 
4th Monday, Improvement Club. 1407 - 9th St 
Alameda; Mrs. Ruth Schmidt, Rec. Sec, 623 
Taylor Ave., Alameda 94501. 

Brooklyn No. 157, Oakland— Meets 1st and 
3rd Thursday, Danish Hall, 164 - 11th St.; Mrs. 
Daveda Windfelt, Rec. Sec, 634 - 15th St , 
Oakland 94612. 

Argonaut No. 166, Emeryville — Meets 2nd 
and 4th Tueday. 4321 Salem St.; Mrs. Jose- 
phine Launcella. Rec. Sec, 841 Santa Ray 
Avenue. Oakland 94610. 

Bahia Vista No. 167, Oakland— Meets 1st and 
3rd Thursday. 410 11th Street Building; Mrs. 
Dorothy Jordan. Rec. Sec, 1614 101st Ave., 
Oakland 94603. 

Fruitvale No. 177, Oakland— Meets 2nd and 
4th Fridays. Foothill Blvd.. Women's Club Hall, 
2535 Mason St., Oakland 94605. 

El Cereso No. 207, San Leandro — Meets 2nd 
and 4th Wednesdays. Elks Hall, 350 Davis St., 
San Leandro; Mrs. Florence Smith, Rec. Sec, 
280 Best Ave., San Leandro 94577. 

PAGE 8 



Betsy Ross No. 23t, Newark— Meets 2nd and 
4th Wednesday, Newark Pavilion, 6420 Thorn- 
inn Ave; Mrs. Barbara Caminada, Rec. Sec, 
38536 Logan Dr.. Fremont 94536. 

Albany No. 260, Albany— Meets 2nd and 4th 
Wednesday, Maccabee Hall. 985 Kains Ave., 
Mrs. Delia Madding, Rec. Sec, P.O. Box 6102, 
Albany 94706. _. , 

Sequoia No. 272, Berkeley— Meets 2nd and 
4th Thursday, Finnish Brotherhood Hall. 1970 
Chestnut St.; Mrs. Dorothy C. Coats. Rec. Sec, 
2619 Francisco Way, El Cerrito 94530. 

Vallecito No. 308. Castro Valley— Meets 2nd 
and 4th Tuesday. 1109 "C" St.. Hayward; Mrs. 
June T. Tenney. Rec. Sec, 2990 Barrett St.. 
Oakland 94605. 

AMADOR COUNTY 

Ursula No. 1, Jackson — Meets 2nd and 4th 
Tuesday. Native Sons Hall. Court St. Mrs. 
Evelyn Garbarini. Rec Sec. P.O. Box 253, Jack- 
son 9f642. 

Chispa No. 40. lone — Meets lit and 3rd 
Tuesday. N.S.G W. Hall; Mrs. Cynthia A. 
Phillips, Rec. Sec, P.O. Box 293. lone 95640. 

Amapola No. 80, Sutter Creek— Meets 2nd 
Thursday, N.S.G. W. Hall, Main St. Mrs. Hazel 
Marre, Rec. Sec, 15 Gopher Flat Road, Sutter 
Creek 95685 

Forrest No. 86, Plymouth— Meets 2nd and 
4th Tuesday. N.S.G.W. Hall; Miss Melba M. 
Withrow. Rec. Sec, RFD Box 24, Plymouth 
95669. 

BUTTE COUNTY 

Annie K. Bidwell No. 168, Chico— Meets 2nd 

and 4th Thursday, N.D. Hall, 316 W. 2nd St.; 

Mrs. Katherine La8reacht, Rec Sec, 383 East 

Sixth Ave.. Chico 95926. 

Gold of Ophir No. 190, Oroville — Meets 1st 
and 3rd Wednesday, Monday Club. 2385 Mont- 
gomery St.; Mrs. Zada Harkcom, P.O. Box 252, 
Oroville 95965. 

Centennial No. 295, Paradise — Meets 2nd and 
4th Tuesday, Cherokee I.O.O.F. Hall: Mrs. Hazel 
Jobe. Rec. Sec, 1704 Nunneley Road, Paradise 
95969. 

CALAVERAS COUNTY 

Ruby No. 46, Murphys — Meets 1st Friday, 
N.S.G.W. Hall; Mrs. Annie J. Voitich, Rec. 
Sec, P.O. Box 152, Murphys 95247. 

Princess No. 84, Angels Camp — Meets 2nd 
Wednesday. I.O.O.F. Hall; Mrs. Celia Beltramo, 
Rec. Sec, Box 302, Angels Camp 95222. 

San Andreas No. 113, San Andreas — Meets 
3rd Friday, Fraternal Hall; Mrs. Mabel Lively, 
Rec Sec, Box 26, San Andreas 95249. 

COLUSA COUNTY 

Colus No. 194, Colusa — Meets 1st and 3rd 

Monday, N.D.G.W. - N.S.G.W. Hall; Mrs. Hazel 

Nordyke. Rec. Sec, 609 D Street, Colusa 95932. 

CONTRA COSTA COUNTY 

Stiriling No. 146, Pittsburg— Meets 1st and 
3rd Wednesday, The Cellar (upstairs). 916 Cum- 
berland St., Pittsburg; Mrs. Eleanor Hogan, 
Rec. Sec, 1337 Columbia St., Pittsburg 94565. 

Richmond No. 147, Richmond — Meets 1st 
and 3rd Tuesday, Women's City Club, 1125 
Nevin Ave; Mrs. Maud E. Alexander, Rec. 
Sec. 219 Nicholl Ave., Richmond 94801. 

Conner No. 193, Byron — Meets 1st and 3rd 
Wednesday. I.O.O.F. Hall; Mrs. Catharine Arm- 
strong. Rec. Sec, P. O. Box 63, Byron 94514. 

Las Juntas No. 221, Martinez— Meets 1st 
and 3rd Wednesday, Kiwanis Youth Center, 
750 Allen St.; Mrs. Clarine Brusatory. Rec. 
Sec, 3510 Estudillo St., Martinez 94553. 

Antioch No. 223, Antioch — Meets 3rd Mon- 
day, IOOF Hall; Mrs. Gloria Biglow, Rec. Sec, 
2118 Alpha Way, Antioch 94509. 

Cerrito de Oro No. 306, El Cerrito — Meets 
1st and 3rd Wednesday, 6712 Portola Drive, El 
Cerrito; Mrs. Jennie Agresta, Rec Sec, 431 
Everett St., El Cerrito 94530. 

Carquinez No. 310, Crockett — Meets 3rd Tues- 
day, 464 Alhambra Ave., Crockett; Mrs. Mary 
Cerelli, Rec. Sec, 4214 Nevin Ave., Crockett 
94805. 

Las Amigas No. 311, Walnut Creek— Meets 
2nd and 4th Wednesday. Women's Club. Lin- 
coln Ave.; Mrs. Aretta Hughes. Rec Sec, 3570 
O'Conner Drive. Lafayette 94549. 

Concord No. 323, Concord— Meets 1st and 3rd 
Thursday. Mt. Diablo Women's Club, 2619 Port 
Chicago Hwy; Mrs. Edith F. Ferriera, Rec. Sec, 
1497 Amador Ave., Concord 94520. 

EL DORADO COUNTY 

Marguerite No. 12, Placerville — Meets Third 
Wednesday, Eagles Hall, 215 Coloma St.; Mrs. 
Mary L. Lyons. Rec. Sec, 2876 Pleasant St., 
Placerville 95667. 

El Dorado No. 186, Georgetown — Meets 2nd 
Saturday afternoon, I.O.O.F. Hall. Mrs. Elsie 
M. Ford. Rec. Sec, Cool, California 95614. 

FRESNO COUNTY 

Fresno No. 187, Fresno— Meets 1st and 3rd 

Wednesday, Knights of Pythias Hall, 4867 

E. Fillmore Ave.; Mrs. Lois Smith Traber, Rec. 

Sec. 620 E. Peralta, Fresno 93704. 



Coalinga No. 270, Coalinga— Meets 2nd am 
4th Monday, Eagle Hall, 156 W Durian; Mrs 
Dora C. Phelps, Rec Sec, 225 Pleasant St 
Coalinga 93210. 

Wawona No. 271, Fresno — Meets 1st and 3n 
Friday, Knights of Columbus Hall, 2540 Flor I 
Dora St.. Fresno; Mrs. Muriel Wells, Rec. Seci 
163 S. Woodrow Ave.. Fresno 93702. 

Selma No. 313, Selma — Meets 2nd Wednesl 
day, I.O.O.F. Hall, 1710 Tucker St.; Mrs. Altai 
Clapham, Rec. Sec, 1427 Pine St., Selma 93662 j 

GLENN COUNTY 
Berryessa No. 192, Willows — Meets 1st am, 
3rd Monday, I.O.O.F. Hall, 213-A N. Tehanv 
St.; Mrs. Elaine Barceloux, Rec. Sec, 639 Sit 
Merrill Ave., Willows 95988. 

HUMBOLDT COUNTY 

Occident No. 28, Eureka — Meets 1st and 3r 
Wednesday, N.S.G.W. Hall, 623 - 3rd St.; Mrs. 
Marion Jurrens, Rec. Sec, 1461 Summer St I 
Eureka. 95501. 

Oneonta No. 71, Ferndale — Meets 2nd an | 
4th Thursdays, Danish Hall, Ocean Avenue 
Miss Margaret M. Smith, Rec. Sec, P. O. Bo I 
635, Ferndale 95536. 

Reichling No. 97, Fortuna — Meets 2nd am 
4th Tuesday, Rohner Grange Hall, Main St . 
Mrs. Frances S. Lentz, Rec. Sec, 237 Newe< 
Dr., Fortuna 95540. 

Areata No. 325. Areata — Meets 1st and 3ri 
Wednesday, Eagles Hall, 1005 11th St.; Mrs, 
Mary K. Foresti, Rec. Sec, 3446 Ribeiro Laneil 
Areata 95521. 

KERN COUNTY 

Miocene No. 228, Taft— Meets 1st and 3r I' 
Monday, Veterans Memorial Bldg., Cedar ami 
Taylor Streets; Mrs. Arden Reyes, Rec. Sect 
P.O. Box 613, Taft 93268. 

El Tejon No. 239, Bakersfield— Meets 2nd am 1 
4th Tuesday, Druids Hall, 501 Sumner St.; Mrs) 
Grace Acheson, Rec. Sec, 1307 Baldwin Roadl 
Bakersfield 93304. 

Alila No. 321, Delano — Meets 2nd and 4th 
Monday. V.F.W. Hall, 4th & Lexington; Mrsl 
Louise Whitten, Rec. Sec, 1635 - 7th PI.1 
Delano 93215. 

KINGS COUNTY 

Las Flores No. 262, Avenal — Meets 2nd ami] 
4th Thursday, Redman Hall, Tulare St.: MrsH 
Jessie M. Measell, Rec. Sec, 101 W. Stanisfl 
laus St., Avenal 93204. 

Ramona No. 283, Hanford — Meets 1st and 3r| 
Tuesday, McCarthy Hall. 1000 N. Harris; Mrs 
Glenda Velasquez, Rec. Sec. P.O. Box 158tl| 
Visalia 93277. 

LAKE COUNTY 

Clear Lake No. 135, Middletown— Meets 2ni ) 

and 4th Tuesday, Gibson Library. Mrs. Dor'l 

othy Baldwin, Rec. Sec, P.O. Box 566, Middle] 

town 95461. 

LASSEN COUNTY 

Na.aqua No. 152, Standish — Meets 3rd Weoji 
nesday, Standish Hall; Mrs. Lynda Fhearsor|| 
Rec. Sec, 125 Small St., Susanville 96130. I 

Mount Lassen No. 215, Bieber — Meets lsl 
and 3rd Thursday, Legion Hall; Mrs. Marie 
Walsh, Rec. Sec, Bieber 96009. 

Susanville No. 243, Susanville — Meets 3pi 
Tuesday, IOOF Hall; Miss Jennie Borghi, Reel 
Sec, Box 331, 454 Richmond Rd., SusanvilhB 
96130. 

LOS ANGELES COUNTY 

Los Angeles No. 124, Los Angeles — Meeutj 
1st and 3rd Wednesday, I.O.O.F. Temple, 182:' 
S. Oak St.; Mrs. Pauline Brasher, Rec. Sec.,'. 
2346 Portland St., Los Angeles 90007. 

Long Beach No. 154, Long Beach— Meets lsll 
and 3rd Thursday, Y.W.C.A., 550 Pacific Ave.J 
Mrs. Leola Temby, Rec. Sec, 1155 E. 20th St;' 
Long Beach 90806. 

Rudecinda No. 230, San Pedro — Meets lsll 
and 3rd Wednesday, Womans' Club, 11th ancfl 
Gaffey Sts.; Mrs. Rowena Wheeler, Rec Secfl 
1137 McDonald Ave.. Wilmington 90744. 

Verdugo No. 240, Glendale — Meets 1st anc 
3rd Tuesday, I.O.O.F. Hall, 520 Glen Oaks Blvd.i, 
Mrs. Geraldine Leonetti, Rec. Sec, 726 Winiil 
St.. Glendale 91205. 

Californiana No. 247, Los Angeles — Meets 2m(| 
Tuesday, Assistance League, 1370 N. St. Amj 
drews PI.; Mrs. Blanch Oechsel, Rec. Sec. 
4261i 2 Cahuenga, North Hollywood 91602. 

Compton No. 258. Compton — Meets 1st anej 
4th Tuesday, South Gate Civic Auditoriumlj 
4900 Southern Ave.. South Gate; Mrs. Marioi 
Kelly, Rec. Sec, 8442 Gainford, Downey 902400 

Poppy Trail No. 266, Montebello — Meets lsl 
and 3rd Tuesday, I.O.O.F. Hall, 125 N. 5th St[l 
Miss Viola Salgado, Rec. Sec, 751 S. Mcii 
Donnell Ave., Los Angeles 90022. 

Placerita No. 277, Van Nuys— Meets 2nd ancU 
4th Wednesday, Encino Women's Club, Encino 
Mrs. Ellen Hermann. Rec. Sec, 8103 Green'] 
bush Ave., Van Nuys 91402. 

CALIFORNIA HERALlJ 



Wilmington No. 27a, Wilmington— Meets 2nd 

-id 4th Tuesday, Woman's Club, Lakme and 
lenni Streets; Mrs. Agnes Seja, Rec. Sec, 

)50 Avalon Blvd., Wilmington 90744. 

Tolu.:a No. 279, Burbanx — Meets 2nd and 

h Tuesday, Campo de Cahuenga; Mrs. Don- 

ibel Roher. Rec. Sec, 3520 Rosemary, Glen- 

lie 912C8. 

i San Fernando Mission No. 280, San Fernando 

•Meets 1st and 3rd Wednesday, San Fer- 
ando Womens Club, 552 N. Maclay Ave.; Mrs. 
race Trimble, Rec. Sec, Box 311, Newhall 

321. 

San Gabriel Valley No. 281, San Gabriel — 
leets 1st and 3rd Thursday, Vigari Adobe, 
(6 Ramona; Mrs. June T. Goldie, Rec. Sec, 
!0 Rosemont Blvd., San Gabriel 91775. 

La Tijera No. 282, Inglewood — Meets 1st and 

d Tuesday, 820 Java St., Inglewood; Mrs. 

arriett Coleman, Rec. Sec, 10612 4th Ave., 
iglewood 90305. 

Rio Hondo No. 284. Huntington Park — Meets 
it and 3rd Wednesday, Ebell Clubhouse, 2502 
5a'end->-i; Mrs. Valda Vauphn. Rec Sec, 8958 

unt Ave.. South Gate 90280. 
Ijos'-i" Tr»e No. 288. Lancaster — Meets 1st 
nd 3rd Thursday, IOOF Hall; Mrs. Sunny L. 
bnes Rec, Sec, 44620 N. Stanridge, Lan- 
as'er <"5«. 

'Beverlv Hills No. 289. Beverly Hillls— Meets 
L ,t Wednesday, 9461 Wilshire Blvd.; Mrs. Olive 
[ Burke. Rec. Sec, 10507 Bradbury Rd., Los 
nceles 90064. 

i Pasadena No. 290, Pasadena— Meets 2nd and 
Ih Thursdays. E. Pasadena American Legion 
[•III Mrs. Lilly Westover, Rec. Sec, 1012 W. 

uar'e Rd.. Apt. 17, Arcadia 91006. 

Whittier No. 298, Whittier— Meets 1st and 
rd Wednesday Greenleaf Masonic Temole. 
6001 W. Bever'y Blvd.; Mailing Address Whit- 
fer Parlor No. 298, P.O. Box 15, Whittier 
rsi8. 

Tierra del Rey No. 300, Hermosa Beach — 
leets 1st and 3rd Monday, Neptunia Club, 920 
(ighland Ave., Manhattan Beach; Barbara Car- 
er. Rec. Sec. 1038 Elkgrove Ave., Apt .1, 
enice 90291. 

' Cien Anos No. 303, Norwalk — Meets 2nd and 
r>h Wednesday. V.F.W. Hall 12634 Pioneer 
llvd.; Mrs. Shirlev Elofson, Rec. Sec, 12020 

ebe Ave.. Norwa'k 90650. 

Rancho San Jose, No. 307, Pomona — Meets 
nd and 4th Tuesday, Assistance League, 693 
). Palomares; Mrs. Senaida Baiz, Rec Sec, 
'14 Marywood Ave., Claremont 91711. 
I El Camino Real No. 324, Granada Hills — 
leets 2nd and 4th Wednesday, Granada Hills 
'/omens Club. 10666 Whiteoak; Mrs. Marie 
[arrington, Rec. Sec, 11039 Memory Park Ave., 
Hission Hills 91340. 

MADERA COUNTY 
. Madera No. 244, Madera — Meets 2nd and 4th 
Thursday. Women's Improvement Clubhouse; 
>1rs. Frances Higuera, Rec. Sec, 321 South 
B" St., Apt. 3, Madera 93637. 

M0RIN COUNTY 

Sea point No 196, Sausalito— Meets 1st and 
rd Tuesday, Perry's Hall, 44A Caladonia St.; 
''s H''da c ur'es, Rec Sec, 66 Shell Rd., 
<lill Valley 94941. 

' Marinita No. 198, San Rafael — Meets 2nd and 
th Monday. Portuguese American Hall, 822 
t St.. San Rafael; Mrs. Lee Brice, Rec. Sec, 
".O. Box 41, San Quentin 94902. 

Fairfax No. 225. Fairfax — Meets 1st and 3rd 
Vednesday, American Legion Hall. San An- 
lelmo; Mrs. Doris J. Crocker, Rec. Sec, 25 
Meernaa Ave., Fairfax 94930. 

Tamelpa No. 231, Mill Valley— Meets 1st and 
rd Monday. I.O.O.F. Hall; Mrs. Elvira E. Bru- 
,ati. Rec Sec, 104 Mission Ave., San Rafael 
,4901. 



MARIPOSA COUNTY 
Mariposa No. 63, Mariposa— Meets 1st Tues- 
day, Odd Fellows Hall; Rita Cavagnaro, Rec. 
See, Star Route, Mariposa 95338. 

MENDOCINO COUNTY 

Fort Bragg No. 210. Fort Bragg— Meets 2nd 
rhursday. I.O.O.F. Hall, Main St.; Mrs. Glenise 
/allory. Rec. Sec, 180 Lyta Way, Fort Bragg 
15437. 

Ukiah No. 263, Ukiah— Meets 1st Monday 
Saturday Afternoon Club, Church and Oak, 
Ird Monday in Members Homes; Mrs. Dorothy 
3uchanan, Rec. Sec, P.O. Box 87, Talmage 
J5481. 

MERCED COUNTY 

Veritas No. 75, Merced— Meets 1st and 3rd 
Tuesday, IOOF Hall; Miss Edith Dougherty, 
Rec. Sec, 1198 E. Bel Air Drive, Merced 95340. 

Lomitas No. 255, Los Banos— Meets 1st and 
3rd Wednesday. D.E.S. Hall, "I" St.; Miss Mary 
Louise Cotta, Rec. Sec, 13780 S. Volta Rd., 
Los Banos 93635. 

Golden California No. 291, Gustine — Meets 
Ird Tuesday. I.O.O.F. Hall, 471 - 4th Ave.; Mrs. 
£velyn Nunes, Rec. Sec, 29431 W. Sullivan 
M., Gustine 95322. 

APRIL, 1969 



MODOC COUNTY 

Alturas No. 159, Alluras— Meets 1st Thurs- 
day IOOF Hall, Main St.; Mrs. Evelyn Cop 
pedge, Rec. Sec, P.O. Box 746 Alturas 96101. 
MONTEREY COUNTY 

Aleli No. 102, Salinas— Meets 2nd and 4th 
Thursday, I.O.O.F. Hall; Miss Rose Rhyner, 
Rec. Sec, 420 Soledad St., Salinas 93901. 

Jumpcro No. 141, Monterey— Meets 1st and 
3rd Tuesday, House of Four Winds, Calle 
Principal; Mrs. Mae Layton, Rec. Sec, 344 
Clay St., Monterey 93940. 

Mission Bell No. 316, Soledad— Meets 2nd 
and 4th Monday. Forester's Hall; Mrs. Kath- 
erine Hambey, Rec. Sec, Box 457, Soledad 
93960. 

NAPA COUNTY 

Eshcol No. 16, Napa— Meets 2nd and 4th 
Monday, N.S. Hall, 1st and Coombs; Mrs. Ruth 
Stofer, Rec. Sec, 1300 Thompson, Napa 94558. 

Calis oga No 145, Calls. oga— Meets 2nd and 
4th Monday. St. Lukes Hall. Myrtle St.; Mrs. 
Ella Light, Rec Sec, 1465 - 1st St., Calistoga 
94515. 

La Junta No 203, St. Helena— Meets 1st and 
3rd Tuesday, N.S.G.W. Hall, Spring St.; Mrs. 
Amelia Greenhow, Rec. Sec, 1522 Hudson 
Ave., St. Helena 94574. 

George C. Yount No. 322, Yountville — Meets 
1st and 3rd Wednesday. Grant Hall, Recrea- 
tion Bldg., Veterans Home; Mrs. Verona Mas- 
on, Rec Sec, P.O. Box 144, Veterans Home 
Stalion, Yountville 94599. 

NEVADA COUNTY 

Laurel No. 6, Nevada City — Meets 1st and 
3rd Wednesday, Veterans Memorial Building, 
N. Pine and Cottage; Mrs Marine Hopkins, 
Rec Sec, Rt. 1, Box B-290, Nevada City 95959. 

Manzanita No. 29, Grass Valley — Meets 1st 
and 3rd Tuesday, Auditorium Hall, Mill St.; 
Mrs. Elsie Peard, Rec. Sec, 120 High St.. 
Grass Valley 95945. 

Columbia No. 70, French Corral — Meets 1st 
Friday afternoon. Farrelley Hall; Mrs. Fannie 
M. Moulton, Rec. Sec, French Corral, Star 
Route, P.O., Smartsville 95977. 

ORANGE COUNTY 

Santa Ana No. 235, Santa Ana — Meets 2nd 
and 4th Monday, 6th & Baker; Mrs. Virginia 
Cillev, Rec. Sec, 815 S. Philadelphia, Anaheim 
92805. 

Grace No. 242, Fullerton — Meets 1st and 3rd 
Thursday, I.O.O.F. Hall, Lemon and Amerige; 
Mrs. Betty Bennett, Rec. Sec, 2127 Kathryn 
Way, Placentia 92670. 

Silver Sands No. 286, Huntington Beach- 
Meets 1st Tuesday, Lake Park Club House; 
Virginia Segelson, Rec. Sec, 303 13th St., 
Huntington Beach 92646. 

PLACER COUNTY 

Placer No. 138, Lincoln — Meets 2nd Wednes- 
day, The Womans Club, 499 E Street; Mrs. 
Margaret Schmidt, Rec. Sec, P.O. Box 171, 
Lincoln 95648. 

Auburn No. 233, Auburn — Meets 3rd Monday, 
Veterans Memorial; Mrs. Anna E. Brown, Rec. 
Sec, 112 Aeolia Drive, Auburn 95603. 

Sierra Pines No. 275, Colfax — Meets 1st and 
3rd Thursday, Knights of Pythias Hall, Main 
St.; Mrs. Isabelle Eddy, Rec. Sec, P.O. Box 55, 
Colfax 95713. 

PLUMAS COUNTY 

Plumas Pioneer No. 219, Quincy— Meets 
1st and 3rd Monday. I.O.O.F. Hall, Main St.; 
Mrs. Lola O. Viera, Rec. Sec, R.F.D. Box 689, 
Quincy 95971. 

RIVERSIDE COUNTY 

Jurupa No. 296, Riverside — Meets 1st and 3rd 
Wednesday, I.O.O.F. Lodge, 3942 Jurupa Ave.; 
Mrs. Roberta Nolze, Rec. Sec, 13838 Nolze 
Place, Riverside 92508. 

SACRAMENTO COUNTY 

Califia No. 22, Sacramento — Meets 2nd and 
4th Tuesday, N.S.G.W. Hall, 11th and "J" Sts.; 
Mrs. Lillian Blackwell, Rec. Sec, 3908 - 2nd 
Avenue. Sacramento 95817. 

La Bandera No. 110, Sacramento — Meets 1st 
and 3rd Thursday, NSGW Hall, 11th and Jay 
Sts., Sacramento; Mrs. Rae L. Rominger. Rec. 
Sec, 2841 - 69th Ave., Sacramento 95822. 

Sutter No. 111, Sacramento — Meets 1st and 
3rd Tuesday, N.S.G.W. Hall. 11th and J Streets; 
Mrs. Wilma Gutenberger, Rec. Sec. 615 27th 
St.. Sacramento 95816. 

Fern No. 123, Folsom— Meets 1st and 3rd 
Tuesday, Community Club House; Mrs. Rose 
Marie Trammell. Rec. Sec, 9424 Golden Dr., 
Orangevale. Send mail to P.O. Box 326, 
Folsom 95630. 

Chabolla No. 171, Gait— Meets 3rd Thursday. 
Women's Club House. 5th & D St.; Mrs. Jea- 
nette Preston, Rec. Sec, 12911 E. Comstock, 
Stockton 95205. 

Liberty No. 213, Elk Grove — Meets 2nd and 
4th Friday, I.O.O.F. Hall, Elk Grove; Mrs. Ger- 
trude E. Hogaboom, Rec. Sec, P.O. Box 72, 
Elk Grove 95624. 

Rio Rito No. 253, Sacramento — Meets 2nd 
and 4th Thursday, Y.L.I. Club House, 1400 27th 
St.; Mrs. Catherine Bennett, Rec Sec, 1299 
8th Ave., Sacramento 95818. 



San Juan No. 315, Carmicnaei— Meets 2nd 
and 4th Thursday, Veteran's Memorial Hall, 
Carmichael Park; Mrs. Lillian Gunderson, Rec 
Sec, 3441 Arden Creek Road, Sacramento 
95825. 

SAN BENITO COUNTY 

Copa de Oro No. 105, Hollister — Meets 1st 
and 3rd Wednesday, I.O.O.F. Hall, 362 Fourth 
St.; Mrs. Evelyn Pivetti, Rec. Sec, 1258 West 
St., Hollister 95023. 

San Juan Bautista No. 179, San Juan Bau- 
tista— Meets 1st Wednesday, N.D.G.W. Adobe, 
4th St.; Miss Sharon Johnston, Rec. Sec. 99 
Lang St., San Juan Bautista 95045. 

SAN BERNARDINO COUNTY 
Lugonia No. 241, San Bernardino — Meets 2nd 

and 4th Thursday, N.S.G.W. Hall; Winnifred A. 

Kerr, Rec. Sec, P.O. Box 58, San Bernardino 

92402. 
Ontario No. 251, Ontario — Meets 1st and 3rd 

Tuesday, Ontario Women's Club, 738 N. Euclid; 

Mrs. Betty Clement, Rec. Sec, 976 East "H" 

St., Ontario 91762. 

SAN DIEGO COUNTY 

San Diego No. 208, San Diego — Meets 2nd 
and 4th Monday, House of Hospitaltiy, Balboa 
Park; Mrs. Sarah Miller, Rec. Sec, 4117 
Georgia St., San Diego 92103. 

Las Flores Del Mar No. 301, Oceanside — 
Meets 2nd and 4th Tuesday, Community Center 
Bldg.; Mrs. Frances Van Wey, 325 Blue Springs 
Lane, Oceanside 92054. 

Ilia M. Knox No. 320, El Cajon— Meets 1st 
and 3rd Tuesday, Veterans Hall, 136 Chambers 
St.; Mrs. Letha M. Miller, Rec. Sec, 1547 E. 
Washington Ave., Apt. 2, El Cajon 92020. 

SAN FRANCISCO COUNTY 

Minerva No. 2, San Francisco — Meets 2nd 
and 4th Wednesday, N.S.G.W. Hall, 414 Mason 
St.; Mrs. Mary Oertwig, Rec. Sec, 40 Pine- 
hurst Way, San Francisco 94127 

Alta No. 3, San Francisco— Meets 2nd and 
4th Tuesday afternoon N.S.G.W. Bldg, 414 
Mason St.; Mrs. Lucille Kimbark, Rec. Sec, 
2271 - 32nd Ave.. San Francisco 94116. 

Orinda No. 56, San Francisco — Meets 2nd 
and 4th Friday, St. Marks Square Urban Cen- 
ter, 1101 O'Farrell St.; Mrs. Irmgard Wala- 
schek, Rec. Sec, 447 Carl St., San Francisco 
94117. 

Buena Vista No. 68, San Francisco — Meets 
3rd Thursday, N.D.G.W. Home, 555 Baker St.; 
Mrs. Lillian Dowling, Rec. Sec, 278 Silver Ave., 
San Francisco 94112. 

Las Lomas No. 72, San Francisco — Meets lit 
and 3rd Tuesday, N.D.G.W. Home, 555 Baker 
St.; Mrs. Emily E. Ryan, Rec. Sec, 1371 - 48th 
Ave., Apt. 201, San Francisco 94122. 

Darina No. 114, San Francisco — Meets 3rd 
Monday, Druids Hall. 44 Page St.; Mrs. Thelma 
Wilson. Rec. Sec, 21 Wabash Terrace, San 
Francisco 94124. 

El Vespero No. 118, San Francisco — Meets 
2nd and 4th Tuesday, N.S.G.W. Bldg., 414 
Mason St.; Miss Ruth McAdam, Rec. Sec, 120 
Romney Drive, South San Francisco 94080. 

Genevieve No. 132, San Francisco — Meets 1st 
and 3rd Thursday, NSGW Hall 414 Mason St.; 
Miss Elizabeth Brennan, Rec. Sec, 2066 Grove 
St.. San Francisco 94117. 

Guadalupe No. 153, San Francisco— Meets 
2nd and 4th Monday, Dovre Hall, 3543 18th St.; 
Ruth A. Stone, Rec. Sec, 270 Ellsworth St., 
San Francisco 94110. 

Golden Gate No. 158, San Francisco— Meets 
2nd and 4th Monday, N.S.G.W. Bldg., 414 
Mason St.; Mrs. Anne Plescia, Rec. Sec, 1378 
- 26th Ave., San Francisco 94122. 

Dolores No. 169, San Francisco — Meets 2nd 
and 4th Wednesday, NDGW Home, 555 Baker 
St.; Mrs. Evelyn I. Carlson. Rec. Sec, 1308 
Hoover St.. Apt. 1, Menlo Park 94025. 

Portola No. 172, San Francisco— Meets 1st 
and 3rd Tuesday, N.S.G.W. Bldg., 414 Mason 
St.; Mrs. Dorothy Vitalie, Rec. Sec, 162 Cayuga 
Ave.. San Francisco 94112 

Twin Peaks No. 185, San Francisco — Meets 
2nd and 4th Tuesday. Dovre Hall. 3543 18th 
St.; Mrs. Irene Cashman, Rec. Sec. 125 Rus- 
sia Ave.. Apt. 2, San Francisco 94112. 

James Lick No. 220, San Francisco— Meets 
2nd Wednesday afternoon, Druids Temple. 44 
Page St.; Mrs. Jaredna Johnson, Rec. Sec. 
423 So. Van Ness, San Francisco 94103. 

Miss ; on No. 227, San Francisco — Meets 2nd 
and 4th Friday. N.S.G.W. Building. 414 Mason 
St.; Mrs. Bernice Short, Rec. Sec, 330 Foote 
Ave.. San Francisco 94112. 

Utopia No. 252, San Francisco— Meets 2nd 
Tuesday. Dovre Hall. 3543 - 18th St.; Mrs. Helen 
C. Scannell. Rec. Sec, 4064 - 18th St., San 
Francisco 94114. 

San Francisco No. 261, San Francisco — 
Meets 1st and 3rd Wednesday, N.S.G.W. Bldg., 
414 Mason St.; Mrs. Irene Bondanza. Rec. Sec, 
2328 Union St., San Francisco 94123. 

Yerba Buena No. 273, San Francisco — Meets 
1st Thursday afternoon. N.S.G.W. Bldg., 414 
Mason St.. Mrs. Julia Bode. Rec. Sec. 2535 
Taraval St., San Francisco 94116. 

PAGE 9 



SAN JOAQUIN COUNTY 

loaquin No. S. Stockton Meets 2nd end 
4th Tuesday. NSGW Hall. 809 N. Hunter; 
Ini J. Williamson. Rec. Sec, 510 E. 
Mendocino Ave.. Stockton 95204. 

El Pt»cid»ro No. 82, Tracy— Meets 1st end 
3rd Wednesday, Muncy Hall. 214 E. 10th St.; 
i.sher, Roc. Sec, 2800 Cabrillo 
Way, Tracy 95376 

Cahx de Oro No. 206. Stockton— Meets 1st 
and 3rd Tuesday. Pythian Castle Hall. 134 W. 
Park St ; Mrs Edith I Foster. Rec. Sec, 657 
tockton 95204. 

Phoebe A. Hearst No. 214, Manter.' 
2nd and 4th Wednesday, MR PS. Hall, N. 
Grant SI ; Mrs. Norma Hodson, Rec. Sec, 139 
N. Sherman. Manteca 95336. 

Stockton No. 256. Stockton -Meets 1st and 
3rd Thursday. NSGW. Hall. 809 N. Hunter; 
Mrs Elizabeth Baker. Rec. Sec. 1702 S. 
American. Stockton 95206 

SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY 
San Miguel No. 94. San Miguel— Meets 2nd 

and 4th Wednesday. I.O.O.F. Hall, San Miguel; 

Mrs. Hortense Wright, Rec. Sec, P.O. Box 96, 

San Miguel 93451. 
San Luisita No. 108, San Luis Obispo — Meets 

1st and 3rd Tuesday, I.O.O.F. Hall, 520 Dana 

St.; Juanita L. Kiger, Rec. Sec, 2141 Broad 

St.. San Luis Obispo 93401. 
El Pmal No. 163, Cambria— Meets 2nd and 

4th Tuesday, Masonic Temple; Mrs. Katie G. 

Jewett. Rec. Sec, P.O. Box 685, Cambria 

93428. 

SAN MATEO COUNTY 

Bonita No. 10. Redwood City— Meets 2nd 
and 4th Thursday. Veterans Memorial Building, 
1455 Madison Ave.; Mrs. Louise Gibsen. Rec. 
Sec. 1558 Lago Street, San Mateo 94403. 

Vista del Mar No. 15S, Half Moon Bay- 
Meets 3rd Tuesday, I.D.E S. Hall. Main St.; 
Mrs. Marion Miramontes. Rec. Sec, P. O. Box 
115. Hall Moon Bay 94019. 

Ano Nuevo No. 180, Pescadero — Meets 3rd 
Wednesday. N.S.G.W. and N.D.G.W. Hall; Mrs. 
Alice Mattei. Rec. Sec, Willowside Farm, Pes- 
cadero 94060. 

El Carmelo No. 181, Daly City— Meets 1st 
and 3rd Wednesday, 22 Hillcrest Dr.; Mrs. 
Christine E. Hulme, Rec. Sec, 305 Hillcrest 
Blvd.. Millbrae 94030. 

Menlo No. 211, Menlo Park— Meets 1st and 
3rd Tuesday. Recreation Bldg., Civic Center; 
Mrs. Lillian King, Rec. Sec, 1303 Fernside St., 
Redwood City 94061. 

San Bruno No. 246, San Bruno — Meets 2nd 
and 4th Thursday, Fireman's Hall, 618 San 
Mateo Ave., San Bruno; Mrs. Rena LoReaux. 
Rec. Sec. 838 Easton Ave., San Bruno 94066. 

La Paz No. 326, Pacifica — Meets 1st and 3rd 
Monday. Nick's Restaurant, 100 Rockaway 
Beach Ave.; Mrs. Rosamond Lagomarsino, Rec. 
Sec, 1034 Yosemite Ave., Pacifica 94044. 

SANTA BARBARA COUNTY 

Reina del Mar No. 126, Santa Barbara — 
Meets 1st and 3rd Tuesday, K. C. Hall, 925 
De La Vina St.; Mrs. Mamie Miller, Rec. Sec, 
3131 Calle Mariposa, Santa Barbara 93105. 

Santa Maria No. 276, Santa Maria — Meets 
1st and 3rd Tuesday, D.E.S. Club, 615 W. 
Chapel; Mrs. Blanche F. Powell, Rec Sec, 
508 So. Lincoln St., Santa Maria 93454. 

Tierra de Oro No. 304, Santa Barbara — Meets 
1st and 3rd Thursday, Eagles Hall, 923 Bath 
St.; Mrs. Frances Ames, Rec. Sec, 3521 Ma- 
drone Drive. Santa Barbara 93105. 

La Purisima No. 327, Lompoc— Meets 2nd 
and 4th Tuesday, Recreation Hall, 105 South 
C St.; Mrs. Mary Rule, Rec. Sec, 1401 East 
Maple. Lompoc 93436. 

SANTA CLARA COUNTY 

San Jose No. 81, San Jose — Meets 1st and 
3rd Thursday, Eagles' Hall, 148 N. 3rd St.; Mrs. 
Marie C. Landini, Rec. Sec, 860 Warren Way, 
Palo Alto 94303. 

Vendome No. 100, San Jose — Meets 1st and 
3rd Tuesday. I.O.O.F. Hall, 122 Race St.; Mrs. 
Susie T. Engfer, Rec. Sec, 1301 Glen Eyrie, 
San Jose 95125. 

El Monte No. 205, Mountain View — Meets 
2nd and 4th Friday, Masonic Temple, Church 
and Franklin; Mrs. Henrietta Marcotte, Rec. 
Sec, 22415 Starling Dr., Los Altos 94022. 

Palo Alto No. 229. Palo Alto — Meets 1st and 
3rd Wednesday. Palo Alto Savings, 300 Ham- 
ilton Ave.; Mrs. Wealthy Falk. Rec. Sec, 
4240 Bain Ave., Santa Cruz 95060. 

Gilroy No. 312, Gilroy — Meets 1st and 3rd 
Thursday, Salinas Valley Community Room, 
Monterey St.; Miss Kathleen Holzhauer, Rec. 
Sec. P.O. Box 71, Gilroy 95020. 

Los Gatos No. 317, Los Gatos — Meets 4th 
Wednesday, 1st National Bank Bldg.; Mrs. Eola 
Howe, 2325 Winchester Blvd., Campbell 95008. 

SANTA CRUZ COUNTY 
Santa Cruz No. 26, Santa Cruz — Meets 2nd 
and 4th Monday, B.P.W.C. Clubhouse, 240 Ply- 
mouth Ave.; Mrs. Rosaline C. Oliveria, Rec 
Sec, 446 May Ave., Santa Cruz 95060. 

PAGE 10 



El Pajaro No. 35, Watsonville — Meets 2nd and 
4th Tuesday, K. C. Hall; Mrs. Bernadine Lynch, 
Rec Sec. 105 Hill Ave , Watsonville 95076. 

SHASTA COUNTY 

Camellia No. 41, Anderson— Meets 1st Tues- 
day, Masonic Hall, Center and Howard; Mrs. 
Rosemary McCabe, Rec. Sec, P. O. Box 104, 
Cottonwood 96022. 

Lassen View No. 98, Shasta— Meets 2nd Fri- 
day, Masonic Hall; Jeanette Hall, Rec. Sec, 
P.O. Box 400, Redding 96001. 

Hiawatha No. 140, Redding— Meets 1st and 
3rd Wednesday, N.D.G.W. Hall 2322 California 
St.; Mrs. Flora E. Jordan, Rec. Sec, 1604 Verda 
St., Redding 96001. 

SIERRA COUNTY 

Naomi No. 36, Downieville — Meets 2nd and 
4th Wednesday, N.D.G.W. Hall, Commercial St.; 
Mrs. Margaret Elaine Lambert, Rec. Sec, Box 
224, Downieville 95936 

Imogen No. 134, Sierraville— Meets 2nd and 
4th Wednesday, Coorens Hall; Mrs. Jennie 
Copren, Rec. Sec, Box 126, Sierraville 96126. 

SISKIYOU COUNTY 

Eschscholtzia No. 112, Etna— Meets 1st and 

3rd Tuesday. Masonic Hall, Main St.: Mrs. Kate 

Berthelsen, Rec. Sec, Star Route, Etna 96027. 

SOLANO COUNTY 

Vallejo No. 195, Vallejo— Meets 1st and 3rd 
Wednesday, Veterans Bldg., 444 Alabama St.; 
Mrs. Elvena B. Woodard, Rec. Sec, 302 Illinois 
St.. Apt. A, Vallejo 94590. 

Mary E. Bell No. 224, Dixon — Meets 2nd and 
4th Thursday, I.O.O.F. Hall; Miss Floris Trip- 
lett, Rec. Sec, P.O. Box 233, Dixon 95620. 

Vacaville No. 293, Vacaville— Meets 1st and 
3rd Tuesday, Saturday Club House; Mrs. Mar- 
tha Fisher, Rec. Sec, Rt. 2, Box 3195. Vaca- 
ville 95688. 

SONOMA COUNTY 

Sonoma No. 209, Sonoma — Meets 2nd and 
4th Monday. I.O.O.F. Hall, Broadway St.; Mrs. 
Clare Geisner, Rec. Sec, 575 Studley St., 
Sonoma 95476. 

Santa Rosa No. 217, Santa Rosa — Meets 1st 
and 3rd Wednesday, N.S.G.W. Hall, 404 Men- 
docino Ave.; Mrs. Ruth Smith, Rec Sec, 3243 
Magowan Dr., Santa Rosa 95405. 

Petaluma No. 222, Petaluma — Meets 2nd and 
4th Tuesday, Herman Sons Hall, 860 Western 
Ave.; Mrs. Olga Lavio, Rec. Sec, 4990 D St., 
Petaluma 94952. 

Sebastopol No. 265, Sebastopol — Meets 2nd 
and 4th Friday. I.O.O.F. Hall. McKinley Street; 
Mrs. Ilah Thorp. Rec. Sec, 436 Parquet St., 
Sebastopol 95472. 

Cotati No. 299, Cotati— Meets 2nd and 4th 
Thursday, Women's Club Hall; Mrs. Marie 
Baranzini, Rec. Sec, 8107 El Rancho Dr., 
Cotati 94928. 

STANISLAUS COUNTY 

Oakdale No. 125, Oakdale — Meets 1st and 
3rd Monday, Grange Hall, F and Lambuth; 
Mrs. Daisv Ulrich, Rec. Sec, 414 West G St., 
Oakdale 95361. 

Morada No. 199, Modesto — Meets 2nd and 
4th Wednesday, Senior Citizens Center, 211 
Bodem St.; Mrs. Mary E. Clay, Rec Sec, 225 
Sunset Blvd., Modesto 95351. 

Eldora No. 248, Turlock — Meets 1st and 3rd 
Thursday, American Legion Hall; Mrs. Lillian 
Stammerjohan, Rec Sec, 5201 N. Tully Rd., 
Turlock, 95380. 

SUTTER COUNTY 

South Butte No. 226, Sutter— Meets 1st and 
3rd Monday, N.D.G.W. Hall; Mrs. Necia Correll, 
Rec. Sec, 418 Page Avenue, Yuba City 95991. 

Oak Leaf No. 285, Live Oak— Meets 2nd and 
4th Tuesday, Women's Clubhouse, "P" St.; Mrs. 
Maxine Dodge, Rec. Sec, 8991 S. Larkin Road, 
Live Oak 95953. 

TEHAMA COUNTY 

Berendos No. 23, Red Bluff — Meets 1st and 
3rd Thursday, N.D.G.W. Hall, 1439 Lincoln St.; 
Mrs. Verona DeWitt, Rec. Sec, 90 Gurnsey 
Ave.. Red Bluff 96080. 

Olivia No. 309, Corning— Meets 2nd and 4th 
Wednesday, I.O.O.F. Hall, Solano St.; Mrs. 
Reta Fees, Rec. Sec, 810 Almond St., Corning 
96021. 

TRINITY COUNTY 
Eltapome No. 55, Weaverville— Meets 2nd 
and 4th Thursday, N.S.G.W. Hall; Mrs. Mar- 
garet J. Brown. Rec. Sec, P.O. Box 224, 

Weaverville 96093. 

TULARE COUNTY 

Charter Oak No 292, Visalia— Meets 2nd and 
4th Wednesday, Visalia Women's Civic Club 
House, Johnson and Center; Mrs Lois Edwards 
Rec. Sec, 2840 Canary, Visalia 93277. 



Tule Vista No. 305, Portervi Me— Meets 2ni|! 
and 4th Thursday, Porterville Women's Clue i 
513 North "E" St.; Mrs. Ruth Olsen, Rec. Sec. 
681 W. Belleview, Porterville 93257. 

TUOLUMNE COUNTY 
Oardanelle No. 66, Sonora — Meets 1st Tues 

day, I.O.O.F. Hall, Sonora; Mrs. Martha Mar! 

shall. Rec. Sec, 227 E. Lyons Street, Sonor. 

95370 

Golden Era No. 99, Columbia — Meets 1st ami 

3rd Thursday, N.S.G.W. Hall; Miss Irene Ponce 

Rec. Sec, Rt. 3, Box 644, Sonora 95370. 
Anona No. 164, Jamestown— Meets 2nd ami 

4th Tuesday, Rebekah Hall; Mrs. Celia Carl 

boni, Rec Sec, Box 123, Jamestown 95327. , 

VENTURA COUNTY 

El Aliso No. 314, Santa Paula— Meets Is 
Monday, Moose Lodge Hall, 700 E. Santa Bar! 
bara St., 3rd Monday, members homes; Mrs 1 1 
Dorothv Douglas, Rec. Sec, 7294 Kodiak, Ven 
tura 93003. 

Poinsettia No. 318, Ventura — Meets 2nd ami 
4th Tuesday I.O.O.F. Hall, 516 E. Main St., 
Mrs. Rita Preston, Rec. Sec, 5336 Queen. ii 
St., Ventura 93003. 

YOLO COUNTY 

Woodland No. 90, Woodland — Meets 2nd an. 
4th Tuesday, 547 First Street; Mrs. Elizabeth E IS 
Elston, Rec. Sec, 920 Cross SI., Woodlamll 
95695. 

YUBA COUNTY 

Marysville No. 162, Marysville — Meets 2m N 
and 4th Wednesday, Jewish Center, 10th ancH 
Rameriz St.; Mrs. Evelyn D. Eden, Rec. Sec. '( 
669 Chestnut St., Yuba City 95991. 

Camp Far West No. 218, Wheatland— Meet" I 
3rd Tuesday, Masonic Temple, 4th & Front 1 
Mrs. Shirley Ross, Rec. Sec, Rt. 1, Box 50 l: 
Wheatland 95692. 




JUNIOR NATIVE DAUGHTERS 
State Officers — 1968-1969 

President: Kathy Slater, Sequoia Unit No. 27, ,, 

1216 Windsor Way, Redwood City 94061. I 
Past President: Marsha Metzger, Estrellas del 

Oro Unit No. 37, 13128 Liggett St., Norwalkl 

90650. 
Vice President: Leealyn Baker, Fruitvale Unitr 

No. 22, 3530 66th Ave., Oakland 94605. 
Secretary: Jean Tulius, Argonaut Unit No. 3 I 

2478 47th Ave., San Francisco 94116. 
Treasurer: Beverly Beckemeyer, Las Amigu- 

itas Unit No. 33, 242 Elaine Dr., Pleasanton 

Hill 94523. 
Marshal: Linda Cane, Menlo Unit No. 10, 3814. 

Jefferson Ave., Redwood City 94061. 
Trustees: Paula Ferguson, Argonaut Unit No.: 

3, 471 Neilson St., Berkeley 94707. Sharon 

Douglas, Fruitvale Unit No. 22, 970 Castle 

St., San Leandro 94578. Robin Gilbert; 1 

Menlo Unit No. 10, 116 Nina Ct, Los Gatos|i 

95030. 
Sentinel: Jamey Maynard, Escholita Unit No.'| 

26, 142 Kerns Ct., Napa 94558. 
Organist: Kathy Koch, Sequoia Unit No. 27;J 

1223 Dewey, Redwood City 94061. 

JUNIOR NATIVE DAUGHTER UNITS 

Argonaut Unit No. 3, Oakland — Advisor: Mrs.' 
Helen Tullius, 2478 47th Ave., San Franciscol 
94116. 

Menlo Unit No. 10, Menlo Park — Advisor: 
Mrs. Evelyn I. Carlson, PGP 1308 Hoover St.J 
St., Apt. 1, Menlo Park 94025. 

Camellia Unit No. 15, Anderson — Advisor: 
Mrs. Berness Medford, 2430 Hospital Lane,4 
Redding 96001. 

Fruitvale Unit No. 22, Oakland — Advisor: Mrs. 1 
Esther Ragon, 3479 Davis St., Oakland 94601.1 

Escholita Unit No. 26, Napa — Advisor: Mrs. 
Gail Martin. 1433 Perkins St., Napa 94558. I 

Sequoia Unit No. 27, Redwood City — Ad- 
visor: Mrs. Lillian Stetson, 1217 Connecticut. 
Dr., Redwood City 94061. 

Las Amiguitas Unit No. 33, Walnut Creek— I 
Advisor: Mrs. Marge Woodward, 2464 Casa Way.l 
Walnut Creek 94596. 

Estrellas de Oro Unit No. 37, Norwalk — Ad-i 
visor: Mrs. Mary Manges, 14514 Graystone, Nor- 1 
walk 90650. 

Golden Poppy Unit No. 38, San Francisco — ] 
Advisor: Mrs. Dorothy Bayless, 254 Eureka St., | 
San Francisco 94114. 

CALIFORNIA HERALD i 




U£O v 




X>x». Ijoo J". Fi>ils 





The California Constitution of 1849 pro- 
ided: "Neither slavery, nor involuntary servi- 
ude, unless for the punishment of crimes, shall 
ver be tolerated in this State." This provision 
/as placed in the 1879 Constitution.' 

About June 1, 1852, Robert Perkins, Carter 
'erkins and Sandy Jones, three slaves from Mis- 
issippi, were seized and brought before B. D. 
; ry, a justice of the peace of Sacramento. Their 
rrest was instigated by Harden Scoles, agent for 
heir master, C. S. Perkins, who requested Judge 
pry to issue a certificate ordering the removal of 
he men from California to Mississippi. The jus- 
ice granted the certificate. These men had been 
irought to California by their master prior to 
fie time California was admitted to the Union. 

This proceeding was authorized by an act 
)f the California Legislature, approved April 15, 
852, the first three paragraphs of which copied 
he Federal Fugitive Slave Act. The fourth sec- 
ion of the act provided for the apprehension and 
eturn of slaves brought to California prior to 
?alifornia's admission to statehood. The men 
ought their freedom under a writ of habeas cor- 
>us. Speaking for the California Supreme Court, 
rhief Justice Murray ruled the state fugitive slave 
aw to be constitutional, dismissed the writ and 
lirected the slaves remanded to the sheriff and 
>y him to be "delivered to the master or his 
igent, without delay or cost." 2 

The next slave case arising in California had 
o do with Archy, a slave of Charles A. Stovall, 
i citizen of Mississippi. Stovall claimed that he 
lad come to California for his health, bringing 
^rchy with him. He contended that he intended 
o remain not over 18 months and then to re- 



turn to Mississippi. After being in Sacramento 
two months Stovall put Archy on a river steamer 
bound for San Francisco to be sent back to 
Mississippi. Archy escaped from the ship and was 
arrested by a policeman, under a warrant issued 
by a justice of the peace. The chief of police re- 
fused to release Archy to Stovall. Stovall peti- 
tioned the California Supreme Court for a writ 
of habeas corpus to obtain Archy from the chief. 

Justice Burnett readily admitted that a cit- 
izen of another state passing through California 
had "the right to transit" with slaves like any other 
baggage. However, he had grave doubts as to 
whether Stovall was in fact either a traveler or a 
visitor. Nevertheless he said, "This is the first 
case; and under these circumstances we are not 
disposed to rigidly enforce the rule for the first 
time. But, in reference to all future cases, it is 
our purpose to enforce the rules laid down strictly, 
according to their true intent and spirit." 

The Supreme Cort forthwith directed Archy 
to be released from the custody of the chief of 
police and handed over to Stovall. Justice Bur- 
nett's philosophy in this opinion (if he had any) 
may be explained by this callous remark appear- 
ing in his opinion: "It is not so much the rights 
of the parties immedately concerned in this par- 
ticular case, as the bearing of the decision upon 
our future relations with our sister States, that 
gives to the subject its greatest importance' 



■California Constitution of 1849, Article 1, Sec. 13; 
California Constitution of 1879, Article 1, Section 18. The 
only difference in ihe two provisions is that the word 
"crimes" in the 1849 Constitution was changed to 'crime" 
in the later document. 

'In re Perkins, (1852) 2 Cal. 424. 

'In re Archy (1858) 9 Cal. 147. 



PAGE 11 



I I DDK UDO 

Georgia Gardner, ol El Douulo 
s,. 186, is history and landmarks 
chairman Plans are nearing comple- 
tion for placing .1 marker at the site 
ol tin.- mining communitj of Georgia 
sink- situated two miles north of 
Georgetown. this will be dedicated 
when Grand Presidenl makes her 
official \isit i" II Dorado ou Mas 6. 
OOk will be placed in the 
Georgetown Public Library in mem- 
ory of Nellie Schlein who was an act- 
ive Name Daughter for main years. 




Luncheon was served by Catherine 
Farnham and Leah Hurley at tables 
decorated in the St. Patrick motif. 



JUNIOR NEWS . . . 
'Continued from Page 2) 

Under "Good of the Order," Jr. 

Secretary Lynne Nordheim read the 
Unit's Activities Report and present- 
ed it to Mrs. McCarthy, together 
with checks for the Childrens' Foun- 
dation, Native Daughters' Home 
"Rug Fund." and the Junior Scholar- 
ship Aid Fund. Mrs. McCarthy was 
also presented with a "birthday gift" 
from the unit and responded with an 
inspiring talk on membership, the 
Junior Scholarship and other inter- 
esting facts regarding the Junior Or- 
der. The meeting was very well at- 
tended by members of the Senior Or- 
der of the Native Daughters includ- 
ing Fruitvale, Piedmont, Orinda, 
Utopia, Berkeley and Las Amit-as 
Parlors as well as many parents of 
the Junior members. 

Following the close of the meeting, 
members of the Junior Unit present- 
ed a lively satire on the life of one 
of their Advisors, whose anonymity 
was preserved by referring to her 
only as "Maria." The beautifully dec- 
orated birthday cake was cut and 
served to the guests along with ice- 
cream, punch and coffee. Even the 
weather man co-operated by giving 
the first sparkling clear, dry evening 
in months to make this a most en- 
joyable affair. 

Members of Las Amiguitas Jr. 
Unit culminated a most busy week by 
attending Sequoia Unit's Official 
Visit on the following Friday even- 



Parlor Neu/s 



ing, the Institution of the First Ju- 
nior Native Son Parlor on Saturday 
evening March 8, the Contra Costa 
County Breakfast at the Home on 
Sunday morning, and ended up with 
Sunday's afternoon's matinee of the 
presentation of "Oklahoma" at the 
Walnut Creek Civic Art Theater. 



SEQUOIA UNIT 

St. Patrick's Day was the theme of 
the evening when Cathy Carpenter 
and her corps of officers welcomed 
Mrs. Helen C. McCarthy, Grand 
Trustee and State Chairman of the 
Jr. Native Daughters to Sequoia Unit 
for her official visit, Friday night 
March 7. 



H 



Carrying paper shamrocks, the es- 
cort team of Lori Lind, Rene Nash, 
Margaret Deto, Audrey Flores and 
Sandy Prescott, formed an arch 
through which Marshal Kathy Koch 
escorted Mrs. McCarthy to her seat 
of honor. Kathy Slater, Jr. State Pres- 
ident, unable to attend due to illness, 
asked Leealyn Baker, Jr. State Vice 
President from Fruitvale Unit to pre- 
sent Mrs. McCarthy with a corsage 
of green carnations. 

Mrs. McCarthy brought greetings 
from Grand President, Mrs. Hazel 
T. Mallette. Mrs. McCarthy remind- 
ed the girls about the Jr. State Con- 
ference which is to be held at the 
Villa Hotel in October with Sequoia 
unit as the hostess unit. 

Holly Baker, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Donald Baker was initiated in- 
to the unit. Entertainment for the 
evening was a community sing of 
Irish songs led by the O'Connor 
girls. 

The next function of Sequoia will 
be the public installation of Debbie 
Smith as unit president on May 2. 
Advisors to the unit are Mrs. Lillian 
Stetson, Mrs. Juanita Doyle, Mrs. 
Celeste Carpenter, Mrs. Barbara 
Slater and Mrs. Barbara Koch. 



HAYWARD 

President Maxine Luce and hci 
corps of officers have kept the merrl 
bers busy these past few months. Fc' 
the second consecutive year we haji 
a prize-winning car in the Admissioj 
Day parade. At Christmas time, 4I 
members gathered for a delicioi 
catered dinner at the Veterans Builo 
ing in Hayward. Honored guests h ' 
eluded DGP Kathleen Madsen, chail 
ter member Lena Harder, Presiden 
Luce and SDDGP Dolores Feren;| 
Recording Secretary Doris Pert, 
gave a brief description of each men 
ber's membership record. 

During February we celebrated 01 , 
parlor's 68th birthday with a dinne^ 
We were pleased to have our Chartt' 
member Lena Harder with us. DG ! 
Madsen and SDDGP Ferenz were a' 
so on hand for the festivities. Ou>| 
President was ill but each membc 
wrote her a note to be presented as )■ 
remembrance. 

On March 2, 30 members ar I 
husbands attended the 12th Annut| 
Children's Foundation Breakfast zi 
the Claremont Hotel in Eerkeley; 
This affair is sponsored by the Super, 
vising District Deputy Grand Presili 
dent and Deputies of District No. 2Cj 
Dolores Ferenz is SDDGP this tern| 
and Minnie Silva and Irma Machad<l! 
are deputies. 

On April 8, Grand President Haze, 
T. Mallette made her official visit t<| 
a joint meeting of Hayward No. 122] 
El Cereso No. 207 and Vallecito No J 
308. All joined the Grand Presidenl 1 
for a journey along the "Pionee 
Trail." 

May 13 will feature a fashioil 
show. Plans are now being made. 



EL TEJON 

Under the chairmanship of Mrs': 
Dorothy Rother, El Tejon No. 239| 
entertained with a party for the bene; 
fit of the Childrens Foundation. 
Keeping in mind that love and con<| 
sideration for less fortunate childrerj 
are of paramount importance, all 
members of her committee worked 
diligently to make the party a suc^ 
cess. 

Mrs. Peter Hansen served as co-l 
chairman and Miss Muriel West wasl 
in charge of decorations. Tables ar| 
ranged for cards and bingo were arl 
ranged by Mrs. John Hanning anci 
Mrs. Max Walker. Mrs. Frank Ache-| 
son was in charge of the many prize;] 

CALIFORNIA HERALtJ 



warded throughout the evening ;is 
(aw prizes and also those for the 
|rd ;md bingo tables. 

Serving as chairman of refresh- 
ments of home made cakes, pies and 
iiffce was Mrs. Clinton Sheela. Mrs. 
gnes Smith was ticket chairman, 
ireeting the guests were the hostes- 
;'s for the evening Mmes. Frank 
:;ibert, Errol Knight and Mark 
pwen. 
i Although the evening was very 

iny and stormy, there was a good 
fowd, a successful evening, and a 
ice contribution to the Childrens 
.iundation. 



IE MEMBKIAM 



11 




m 









U>t lost to those that love them, 
Not dead, just gone before; 

hey still live in our memory, 
And they will forever more. 



Elizabeth F. Johnson. Occident No. 28, 

February 4. 
mily D. Morrison, Golden Gate No. 158, 
February 6. 

larriett F. Garner, Copa de Oro No. 105, 
February 5. 

Jazel O. Leal, Ramona No. 283, January 
18. 

lazel S. Lund, Los Gatos No. 317. Feb- 
ruary 4. 

Ja N. Wyman, Cerrito do Oro No. 306. 

February 4. 
ettie Lewis, Eschscholtzia No. 112, Feb- 
ruary 18. 

Use Mary Doyie, Bear Flag No. 151, 
February 13. 

Jorothy H. McGlothlin, Fairfax No. 225. 
February 15. 

?eraldine H. Grand, Reina del Mar No. 
1 26, February. 

Minnie Joughin, Californiana No. 247, 
February 11. 

Slellie B. Schlein. El Dorado No. 186. 
February 13. 

"auline B. Parmisano, El Carmelo No. 
181, February 13. 

•ffie L. Elizondo, Marysville No. 162, 
February 23. 

Uary T. Hatch, Woodland No. 90. Feb- 
ruary 21. 

vlary M. Smithers, El Pinal No. 163. Feb- 
ruary 20. 

UPRIL, 1969 



THE LEGEND OF THE DOGWOOD 

At the time of the Crucifixion, 

the dog wood was the size of the oak 
and other forest trees. So firm and 
strong was the tree that it was select- 
ed as the timber for the cross. 

To be used for such a purpose, 
caused the tree great distress and 
grief. Jesus observed this and in His 
gentle pity for all sorrow and suffer- 
ing, made the tree this promise, 

"Never again shall the dogwood 
grow large enough to be used as a 
cross. Henceforth, it shall be slender, 
bent and twisted. Its blossoms shall 
be in the form of a cross with the 
print of the nails in each petal. In 
the center of the flower will be the 
crown of thorns, and all who see it 
will remember that it was upon a 
dogwood tree I was crucified. There- 
fore this tree shall not be destroyed, 
but cherished as a reminder of my 
death upon the cross." 



ASSOCIATION NO. 14 

Members of Hiawatha Parlor ser- 
ved dinner to the Past Presidents 
Association No. 14 at the Native 
Daughter Hall in Redding. During 
the business session, delegates and 
alternates were nominated to attend 
the State Assembly in Sonora in 
April. 

The 1969 officers were installed 
by Past State President, Virginia Ban- 
igan, assisted by State Director, Ella 
Brownfield serving as marshal. Min- 
nie Mulford of Redding, was seated 
as president of the association for 
the coming year. Katie Huney of 
Cottonwood is the retiring president. 



EL CAMINO REAL 

El C amino Real No. 324, honored 
DGP Florence Parsons, Toluca No. 
279, and SDDGP Ruth Etz, Joshua 
Tree No. 288. 

Courtesy officers for the evening 
came from Verdugo No. 240; El Al- 
iso No. 314; Placerita No. 277; To- 
luca No. 279; San Fernardino Mis- 
sion No. 280; and Joshua Tree No. 
288. The meeting was both opened 
and closed by courtesy president Bev- 
erly Swaner, San Fernando Mission 
Parlor. This was also the first visit of 
the new supervisor, Ruth Etz, to El 
Catrdno Real. The Parlor's new mar- 
shal, Ella Entin, was installed into 
office by Deputy Florence Parsons. 



Following the meeting a hilarious 
Lolly Walk was enjoyed with home- 
made cakes, etc. as prizes. 



Hostesses Wilda O'Hanlon and 
Helen Trammcll carried out refresh- 
ments with a beautifully decorated 
cake as piece dc resistance. All offi- 
cers and courtesy officers appeared 
i:i cocktail dress adding to the color 
and beauty of the evening. 



Aleli No. 102, welcomed Grand 
President Hazel T. Mallette on the 
occasion of her official visit. She was 
escorted to her seat of honor by the 
escort team in white formals, carry- 
ing fans of oli\e green and gold feath- 
ers. Participating in the escort were 
Mmes. Rasmussen, Lovelady, Mattei. 
Litde, Anderson, and Waidtlow. PGP 
Elmarie Dyke, SDDGP Vivian Med- 
eiros, and DGP Helen Lyons were 
also escorted. 

Coramae Luck, Adeline Parker, 
Louise Westphal, Olivia Vaughan, 
Marilyn Nail, and Linda Nail were 
initated. Marilyn and Linda Nail's 
mother and grandmother are also 
members of Aleli Parlor — making 
three generations. 

The Grand President presented 50- 
year pins to Lillian Brindero and 
Adela Bettencourt. They were given 
a rising ovation. Twenty-five year 
pins were presented to Lorraine Fos- 
ter and Eva Fiese. Adela Betten- 
court's sister, Etta Schmidt, a mem- 
ber since 1912, was introduced. The 
Parlor's report was given by Rose 
Rhyner. 

Dressed as an Indian maid and 
accompanied by the escort team, 
Carmen Nardone presented a feather 
fan to the Grand President. To it 
were attached checks for the Univer- 
sity fund, and a monetary gift for the 
Grand President. The Grand Presi- 
dent reviewed the projects of the Or- 
der, stressing the importance of all 
of them. Others who spoke were PGP 
Elmarie Dyke, SDDGP Vivian Med- 
erios, and DGP Helen Lyons. Adela 
Case, a member of Terra del Rey No. 
300, who lives at the Native Daughter 
home, was introduced. The evening's 
coin march was donated to the gen- 
eral scholarship fund. 

A dinner at the Italian Villa pre- 
ceded the meeting. Credit for the 
(Continued on page 14) 



ALELI . . . 

(Continued from /»</v<' 13) 

outstanding decorations goes to I ve- 
lyn Mi.'tK. Edna Gipe and their 
committee Green and gold leaves, 
oranges, bright papei flowers, and 
large candles were used, rhe hall 
dons featured local historj and 
landmarks, including a large framed 
picture oi John Steinbeck, author, 
.1 native ol Salinas, and a picture of 
the Spreckels Sugar factory, located 
tour mites south of Salinas. It was 
built in is i >< b) Claus Spreckels, the 

sugar kini:. and at that time was the 
largest beet sugar factory in the 
world. I he hall decorations by Mar- 
jorie Burden and Lorraine McBridge 
included green and gold leaves. Olive 
green table cloths and coal oil lamps 
were on the tables where refresh- 
ments were served alter the meeting. 
I ois Koue and lla Anderson were 
co-chairmen of the refreshment com- 
mittee. 

Erna Bird, president, presided and 
Claudina Clark was the musician. 
Parlors represented were Santa Cruz, 
( 'opa </c Oro, Junipero, Mission Bell, 
Gold of Ophir, Lomitas, and Tierra 
del Rev. 



DOG RACES . . . 
(Continued from page 3) 

by Ruth Drury 
ada City. Sue, a fifteen year old stu- 
dent at Nevada Union High School, 
completed the race in 22.8. Second 
place in the Class 'C events was tak- 
en in a time of 24.5 1 by another 
fifteen year old girl, Sheryl Walling of 
Truckee, who came in four places 
ahead of her mother, Joan Walling. 

"First place in the Class 'B' race — 
a five-dog team event — was captured 
by Liz Henderson of Jacksonville, 
Oregon, in a total time of 1 :3.47, for 
the 1 1 miles. The first five miles 
were run on Saturday, with the sec- 
ond leg of the race taking place Sun- 
day. Daphne Levorsen of Belvedere, 
California, took second in the Class 
"B' in a time of 1:4.23. 

"The 'Open' race — open to all 
breeds, sizes and numbers of dogs- — 
scheduled to be a distance of 15 miles 
each day, was shortened to 10 miles 
on Saturday and 1 1 miles on Sunday 
because of the blowing snow and low 
visibility. Art Christenson of Jeffer- 
son, Oregon, took first place in a 
total time of 2:23.40. 



"An expensive sneeze caused one 
racer to become disqualified in the 
Class B' event. Dean Jennings of 
Vacaville, was suffering from a cold 
when he entered the race, and found 
it accessary to halt the team when he 
felt a sneeze coming on. When he 
sneezed, he lost his grip on the sled 
and the dogs bolted for home, leav- 
ing Jennings to trudge back to the 
finish line — shanks mare". 

"In spite of the bad weather, the 
snowman contest had participation. 
A group of girls who live in San Fran- 
cisco and work at Sierra County 
camp during the summer, won a 
trophy for a snow sculpture of a 
dog team with sled and driver." 



BONITA 

Bonita Parlor observed Arbor Day 
on March 9. A tree was planted at 
the entrance to the city parking lot 
at Middlefield Rd. and Jefferson 
Ave., honoring Sidney D. Herkner, 
an outstanding citizen and one time 
Mayor of Redwood City. Presenta- 
tion of colors by Bonita's Color 
Guard: Marie Amaya, Florence 
Boelsems, Patricia Coronado, and 
Anne Isaacs was followed by pledge 
of allegiance led by Gloria Rene 
Marshal of Bonita. 

Native Daughters present were in- 
troduced by Bonita's president Lor- 
etta Mosley. City officials were intro- 
duced by John Rosselli; County Of- 
ficials by Marvin Church. John Cas- 
sell president of Redwood Parlor No. 
66 introduced Native Sons present. 

Those working on Arbor Day com- 
mittee were Nora Nesper chairman, 
assisted by Mmes. Panto, Kneip, 
Rene, Falk, Amaya, Isaacs, Rodri- 
guez, Coronado, Boelsems, Locatelli, 
O'Conner and Bozzo. Refreshments 
were served at the conclusion of the 
ceremonies. 



EL MONTE 

Officers of five parlors in Dis- 
trict No. 26 (Santa Clara County) 
were honored by El Monte No. 205, 
in Mountain View, at the Masonic 
Temple Hall. El Monte officers in- 
troduced their guests and presented 
each with a gift. Irene Hatch, Presi- 
dent of El Monte Parlor, welcomed 
the officers, grand officers and mem- 
bers present. Dignitaries included 
GT Marie C. Landini PGP Evelyn 
I Carlson, SDDGP Phyllis D. Tin- 
dall and DGP Irene Lial. The dec- 



orations were by Louise Cotta at, 
Mary Hawley. Refreshments we 
served by Chairman Henrietta Mi 
cotte and her committee. 

El Monte's sewing group, "Tl 
Golden Thimbles" are busy gettii 
prepared for their bazaar in tl 
Spring. El Monte Parlor's Admissk 
Day Chairman, Mary Ausano aut 
two members, Frances Conklin at I 
Hilda Cambell, also Elizabeth Brinl 
mann, San Jose No. 81, and Isabel; 
Stevenson, Vendome No. 100 a 
working on the rummage sale 
Campbell for the benefit of the San] 
Clara County Native Sons and Nati i 
Daughters Admission Day Para< 
Committee. 



REMEMBRANCE TEA 

"A Cup Of Remembrance Teal 
for the Leslye Hicks Home Heal i 
Fund was held at the Native Daugi 
ters Home, March 1, with Margarj 
Skelly State Chairman in charge J 
the affair. The table was decorate | 
with a very pretty centerpiece <| 
fresh fruits and flowers, trays (I 
dainty homemade cookies, sanij 
wiches, mints and silver service sefl 
on each end of the table. Preset 1 
were Grand President Hazel T. Maf 
lette, GVP Nancy Cohens, GM Ireri 
Bondanza, GS Mary C. Mahone;! 
GTs Marie C. Landini, Betty Rea, 
Curilich and Marian E. McGuire, anf 
PGPs Evelyn I. Carlson, Orinda (] 
Giannini, Clarice Lindsey, Emily If 
Ryan, Jewel McSweeney, Alice l| 
Shea and Fern Adams. Each gue! 
was given a cup and saucer as J 
remembrance of the Day. 

Margaret Skelly addressed the a: 
sembly of Native Daughters an. 
friends. Grand President Hazel ll 
Mallette extended her thanks to aj 
who attended and for her gift. Jewtl 
McSweeney spoke of Leslye Hick, 
love for the Native Daughters Homoi 

Frances Simas, Sue Cole and M; ( 
Harrison entertained. SDDGP Myr' 
le E. Ritterbush a member of the Lea 
lye Hicks Home Health Fund waj 
called upon also. All past State Chair] 
men of this committee present wer 
introduced and so was the Horn 
Committee. Wealthy Faulk a mem 
ber of Leslye A. Hicks Home Healtj 
Fund was unable to attend due fc 
illness. 

An enjoyable day was had by 
large attendance. 

CALIFORNIA HERAtX 



bGW— NSGW 

! Miss Connie Uphoff and Frank 
J Vierra, Jr., both of Los Banos, 
ere elevated to the highest positions 
i a subordinate parlor of the Native 
daughters and Native Sons of the 
plden West, in joint installation 
tremonies held at the D. E. S. Hall, 
i Los Banos. Margaret Peterson of 

eritas No. 75, and Joe Ranuio of 
remont Parlor, were the installing 
dicers, and presented the gavels to 
(je new Presidents. Relinquishing 
teir gavels as presidents were Mrs. 
I:te Yriarte and A. V. Bettencourt. 
ho -erved as Presidents of the local 
Jrlors for the 1968 term. 
! Others installed for Lomitas Par- 
|r were Mmes. Cardoza, McDonald, 
hinter. Gomes, Wattenbarger, Do- 
ptto, Moore, Wheeler and Swan- 
;n and the Misses Chettero, Faria. 
l(iropreso, and Cotta. 

Native Sons included Messrs. Joe 

f. Cardoza, Farrell, Miranda, Frei- 

k, Joe C. Cardoza, Amaral, Ciri- 

e, Nunes, Marciochi, Gonsalves, 

srtao, Vierra and Brazil. 

111 

DON'T QUIT 
hen things go wrong, as they some- 
times will, 

jhen the road you're trudging seems 

i all up hill, 

jhen the funds are low and the 

j debts are high, 

ind you want to smile, but you have 

i to sigh, 

[hen care is pressing you down a 

ibit, 

jest, if you must — but don't you 
quit! 

life is queer with its twists and turns, 

js everyone of us sometimes learns, 

nd many a failure turns about 

jhen he might have won had he 

\ stuck it out; 

pn't give up though the pace seems 

! slow, 

pu might succeed with another 

, blow. 

jiccess is failure inside out, 

fie silver tint of the clouds doubt, 

nd you never can tell how close you 
are — 
may be near when it seems afar; 

) stick to the fight when you're hard- 
est hit, 

fs when things seem worst that you 
mustn't quit! 

— Author Unknown 

this poem was sent in by Gloria 

arrison. With floods in California 

id tax time almost here, she thought 
quite apropos.] 



OFFICIAL VISIT . . . 
(Continued from Page 6) 

Purisima, San Gabriel Valley, Pasa- 
dena, Poppy I rail, Ursula, l:l ( a 
mino Real, San Fernando Mission, 
La Tijera, Poinseilia and El Aliso. 1 1 
was noted that Ursula No. I, our 
oldest Parlor and La Purisima No 
327, our newest Parlor, were repre- 
sented. 

Two new members were initiated 
into the Order. Pamela Thayer and 
Charlotte Torres became members of 
Reina del Mar. The gifts of the Par- 
lors were presented to the Grand 
President by Mamie Milller, past 
president of Reina del Mar. An orig- 
inal sketch of Padre Serra, drawn by 
Marianna Schmitter, past president 
of Reina del Mar, formed the cover 
of the Parlors' reports and was pre- 
sented to our Grand President by 
Barbara Allen, third vice president 
of Tierra de Oro The sketch was re 
produced on the covers of the pro- 
grams. 

Hostesses were Jeanne Fredrick. 
Audrey McKinney and Barbara Up- 
ton, past president of Tierra de Oro 
and Ambert Phillips and Mamie Mil- 
ler, past presidents of Reina del Mar. 

Refreshments were served by Clau- 
dine Wullbrandt, inside sentinel of 
Tierra de Oro, and her committee on 
beautifully decorated tables bearing 
replicas of San Diego Mission — Cal- 
ifornia's first and the Santa Barbara 
Mission, Queen of the Missions, in 
keeping with the theme of the even- 
ing. 

Others responsible for the lovely 
evening included general chairman, 
Amelia Acres, past president of 
Reina del Mar; hall decorations and 
flower committee, Bernice Hogg. 
Anita Joyal of Reina del Mar anrl 
Eileen Dismuke, Gertrude Reed, 
Henrietta Cordona, Laura Minetli 
and Norma Grimm of Tierra de Oro; 
and publicity, Jeanne Fredrick of 
Tierra de Oro. 



EXTENSION OF THE ORDER 

The joint installation of the San 
Francisco County Extension of the 
Order Committees, NSGW and 
NDGW was held at the Grizzly Bear 
Clubroom in San Francisco. Chair- 
man of the evening was Flora Cam- 
pisi with her committee, who pre- 
pared and served a delightful repast 
following the ceremonies. 

(To be continued next month) 



PGP MAXIKNK I'liiniK 

PGP Maxiene Porter who now 
lives in Alexandria, Virginia is Stale 
Treasurer of the Virginia Federation 
of Republic Women. She worked on 
the inaugural committee and attended 
the inaugural events of President 
Richard E. Nixon. Mrs. Porter is a 
member of La Tijera Parlor. NDGW. 



HIAWATHA 

Each year, in observing Arbor 
Day, Hiawatha No. 140, has planted 
shrubs and trees in public grounds 
throughout the city of Redding. These 
have been planted as memorials to 
deceased members although none 
have been marked except the tulip 
tree planted in the County Court 
House grounds for Ruth Presleigh, 
who served as County Clerk for 
many years. 

This year, Viola Lowden, Conser- 
vation Chairman, arranged to have 
a tree planted in the Redding Cem- 
etery at the grave of Isabel Doll, who 
had served as president of the parlor 
in 1961. The tree selected was a tu- 
lip tree, one of Mrs. Doll's favorites. 

Dedication ceremonies were held 
at ll:00 A.M. Friday, March 7. 
Mrs. Lowden read an original poem 
written by her granddaughter, Pattie 
Gribble. Other readings were given 
by members of the parlor. Tribute 
was paid to Mrs. Doll for her years 
of devotion and service to the order. 

Others in attendance at the ser- 
vices were members of the many 
other organizations with which Mrs. 
Doll had been affiliated. 



MY FRIEND 

As my friend stands its silent vigil 

Out in the snow laden yard; 

I stand by my friend. 

Admiring its patience, 

Dark falls. 

I retire 

Leaving my friend alone. 

I awaken in spring 

To find my friend again; 

Or is it my friend? 

Everything is different now. 

So bright and green. 

Yes, that is my friend. 

And some day soon, 

Some spring, 

I'll be just like my friend: 

A colorful giant. 

Yes, someday I will be 

A great tulip tree. 

—Pattie Gribble 



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SPECIAL COLLECTIONS 




Official Publication of 
THE NATIVE DAUGHTERS of the GOLDEN WEST 




MAY, 1969 * 40<t 




<.oi i>i n pom 

Golden Poppy Junior I ail N 
s.in Francisco will have an official 

visit Horn Mrs Helen (' \1c C'arthy. 

Grand State Chairman of Juniors and 
Grand ["rustet mh.w rhe girls are 
very excited and looking eagerl) for- 
ward to the date of the visit. M;i\ 10. 



California Herald 



■PRESERVING THE PAST FOR THE FUTURE' 



Vol i mi XVI 



May. 1969 



CONTENTS THIS MONTH 



Number <l 




si-OI OIA JUNIORS 

Cathy Carpenter is president of 
Sequoia Unit No. 27 Junior NDGW. 
At a recent meeting of the Unit. 
( atln read an interesting poem as 
part of the program. These girls are 
active in the work of their unit and 
their programs are outstanding. 



II MOK I Ml INSTJTITION 

Grand President Hazel T. Mallette. 
assisted bj Grand Trustee Helen C. 
McCarthy. State Chairman Junior 
Native Daughters, and Grand Officers 
will institute a Junior Unit in Red- 
ding. Friday afternoon May 30. The 
Mother Parlor of this new unit is 
Hiawatha No. 140, and the name of 
the Unit will be Shasta Daisy Unit 
No. 39. Junior State President Kathy 
Slater, assisted by the Junior State 
Officers and Junior members will ini- 
tiate the new Unit's members and in- 
stall the officers. 



Junior Unit News 

The Mission Bell Markers, by Rev. Francis J. Weber 

Fremont Puts History to Work, by Dolores M. Ferenz ' 

The Grand President's Corner ( 

Parlor News 

In Memoriam 1! 



PHOTO CREDITS — Official visit to Ukiah. Santa Rosa and Sebastopol Parlors: Ukiaf 
Daily Journal, photo by Guy. 



Before you make 

d- 1 1 lv/ V W' be sure to see a Medallion Electric 
Home. After all, the trend is to 
electric living. A Medallion Home can mean: Flameless, 
electric heating with room-by-room temperature controls. 
An all-electric kitchen that stays clean and cool. Cool, re- 
freshing air conditioning throughout the house. Medallion 
Homes are available now in all price ranges. It will pay 
you to look for this emblem before you make a move. 




Southern California Edison 



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dOLHOOidEVnOLDS 



GHHDING(jTfl)CDNTRHCTDR 

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J. J. FRIIS 
Publisher 



LEO J. FRIIS 
Editor 



JANE FRIIS 

Public Relation 



„ ... Published Monthly by J. J. Friis and Leo J. Friis, owners and publishers, Anaheim. 
California All Rights Reserved. EDITORIAL AND GENERAL OFFICES: Anaheim, California. 
Mailing Address: P.O. Drawer 4243, Anaheim, California 92803. ADVERTISING OFFICE: 301 
N. Parton St., Santa Ana, Calif. 92701. CHANGE OF ADDRESS AND SUBSCRIPTIONS: Maill 
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= ^ an SncT W n a r C l.^ e l ses n «iI!F. luding zip code - NDGW MEMBERS: please send Parlor Number 
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to California Herald, P.O. Drawer 4243, Anaheim, California 92803. SUBSCRIPTION RATES:! 
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printed without specific permission. 



CALIFORNIA HERALC 



(^Mission 2k// cAiavkers 




by ^%ev. frauds J. HVeber 




El Camino Real Bell 



Old Plaza Church in Los Angeles 



2* hortly after the turn of the 
^3 century, a group of history-con- 
cious Californians expressed the de- 
ire to honor the state's tradition by 
>tablishing a series of meaningful 
lonuments. At the suggestion of Mrs. 
^.S.C. Forbes, it was decided that 
eplicas of the old mission bells plac- 
d along the 700 mile route of El Ca- 
linn Real would be a "distinctive, 
mblematic and appropriate guide- 
OBt" to remind the Golden State's 
iisidents of their noble historical her- 
age. 

The first bell, situated outside the 
vsistencia de Nuestra Senora de Los 
vngcles. was dedicated on August 
5. 1906, in connection with the an- 
ual patronal observation of the old 
'laza church. Each of the one hun- 
red pound cast-iron bells was sus- 
ended on a standard resembling in 
hape the shepherd's crook. The 
uidepost was fashioned in a plain. 
:vere design to represent the simple 
nd austere life of the early mission- 
lies. A marker was attached to each 
-•plica giving explicit directions to the 



traveler and information regarding 
the missions along the way. 

Initial interest in marking the 
meandering road connecting the 
missions was widespread and numer- 
ous organizations cooperated in rais- 
ing funds to erect the bell standards. 
By 1913, there were 450 markers 
stretching along El Camino Real 
from the Mexican border to So- 
noma. When funds to sustain and 
replace the bells were depleted in the 
years prior to 1921, the Automobile 
Club assumed the task of maintaining 
the symbolic standards. 

After 1933, the work of caring for 
the bells was superivsed by the Cal- 
ifornia Division of Highways. Gra- 
dually, however, the bells began dis- 
appearing. Some were lost when state 
roads were widened or relocated; van- 
dals and souvenir hunters despoiled 
others, and, by 1959, there were only 
seventeen of the replicas remaining 
in Los Angeles County. When the 
California State Legislature approved, 
in 1959. a proposal authorizing the 
Division of Highways to re-erect the 



bells, more than thirty were reco\er- 
ed from various private parties. In 
addition, a Los Ange'es firm agreed 
to produce new facsimiles for the ori- 
ginal price of $25. 

Soon mission bells reappeared a- 
long California's El Camino Real and. 
in 1963, Chief Justice Earl Warren 
headed a delegation of notable fig- 
ures who journeyed to Fray Junipero 
Sena's birthplace on Mallorca with a 
mission bell to commemorate the 
250th anniversary of the Franciscan's 
birth. 

Travelers driving through the state 
today might find it historically rel- 
evant to recall the words written in 
1903. by the originator of the bell 
markers: 

They are the voice of the past. 
Of an age that is fading fast, 
Of a power austere and grand. 
When the flag of Spain unfurled 
Its fold o'er the Western world 
And the priest was lord of the 
land. 



& 



tetnon 



i /Oat 



bu Z&o&otes yf(j. ^y-eten!t 



is mm is not dead in the 
ci t > of Fremont 1 his boom- 
ing community ol 96,000 people 
nestled against Mission Peak in 
southern Alameda County has set 
out to final!) preserve some of its 
historical landmarks before the bull- 
dozers flatten everything in sight. 

Just thirteen years ago the city 
of Fremont was formed by incor- 
porating five small communities — 
Warm Springs. Mission San Jose. 
Irvington, Centerville and Niles. 
These little towns had slept silently 
since hey-daj when the Ohlone In- 
dians of Mission San Jose de Guada- 
lupe numbering in the thousands 
raised cattle and carried on a lively 
barter with the early settlers of San 
Francisco and the Argonauts on their 
way. to the Mother Lode through 
Mission Pass. 

Centerville and Irvington were 
agricultural lands with carefully cul- 
tivated fields and row upon row of 
orchards standing like soldiers guard- 
ing the homesteads. The adobe flour 
mills built by Seiior Vallejo along 
side the banks of Alameda Creek 
formed the nucleus for the Niles 
area. Niles also enjoyed prominence 
during the period when cowboys 
from Essanay Studios performed the 
great train robberies throughout Niles 
Canyon and Charlie Chaplin delight- 
ed millions with his antics before the 
studio cameras at Essanay during the 
"silent" movie days. A resort with 
its warm mineral springs brought 
many vacationers in the early years 
to the Warm Springs Community. A 
disastrous earthquake in 1868 de- 
stroyed many of the resort's build- 
ings. The property was sold and a 
hotel constructed which later became 
the workers' quarters on the famed 
Josiah Stanford estate. The Stanford 
vineyards were acquired many years 
ago by the Weibel family. Weibel's 



* mm 


\x A 


fci^TiFifi! 




t, i*„»] 





Old Hotel on Weibel Winery, Warm 
Springs 

label is known far and wide for ex- 
cellent champagne and varietal wines. 
The hotel and other grounds are still 
enjoyed by those seeking a restful 
place for a weekend picnic. Each of 
these five hamlets had thriving econ- 
omic results but there was little pop- 
ulation change from the 1880's un- 
til 1950. 

The large metropolitan areas of 
the bay region were suffering from 
lack of room to expand and suddenly 
the spotlight focused on the vast lands 
in the south county. The residents 
of the area felt caught in the squeez- 
ing jaws of an enormous vice rapidly 
closing. San Jose was sprawling up 
from the South and the city of Hay- 
ward was reaching down from the 
North. What could be done before 
they would be swallowed up in this 
mass urbanization? In early 1955 
groups of residents gathered to dis- 
cuss the situation. Talk of incorpor- 
ation was sparked and boundaries for 
the new city were agreed upon. The 
Centerville Chamber of Commerce 
sponsored a "naming" contest. Scores 
of names were submitted but selec- 
tion was difficult. When it appeared 
no progress was being made, it was 
mentioned that General John C. Fre- 
mont had visited these plains and 



was particularly impressed with th 
area during his early visit to Cal, 
ifornia. The deadlock was broke: 1 
and "Fremont" had its name. On 
January 23, 1956 a new city wa 
born. 

Little has been published regard| 
ing the early history of the five conn 
munitiss. Most of the information 
is recollections passed through fam 
ilies or records of early fraternal 
societies. One report exists tha| 
"there was particular grace or styli 
in the homes of the early settlers oi 
the area. Most shelters consisted ol 
wood frames to which blue denim o 
canvas was attached. Later redwood 




John C. Fremont 

shakes were manufactured and the) 
walls became sturdier." 

"Some homes had a little more 1 
class than the general run. Steven] 
son and Rix. early settlers having 
prospered since their arrival on the 1 
bay plain, ordered prefabricatec! 
houses from the East. Wall sections j 
roof, floor and beams were num-l 
bered and cut to a specific size. Alt 
Stevenson and Rix needed to builc; 

CALIFORNIA HERALD 



^yf^ytsiot 



i 



& 



f/Jotk 



heir homes were a hammer, nails 
ind an instruction booklet." 

Although these reports may be 
rue, a visitor may still find hidden 
>ehind lofty shrubbery and palm- 
ined drives some examples of lovely 
;racious old homes. On the Califor- 
lia Nursery Company property in the 
Jiles district sits Vallejo's charming 
idobe which still attracts visitors 
rom afar. 




Adobe, Miles District 



The early boom of the new city 
f Fremont attracted the lusty specu- 
ltor and soon the sounds of bulldoz- 
rs were heard and wrecking crews 
apidly leveled many of this area's 
istorical landmarks. When cries 
'ere heard from the localites, the 
ity fathers realized Fremont soon 
■ould be an area of sprawling sub- 
ivisions and beautiful sparkling shop- 
ing centers. However, the color of 
s history would be blotted out for- 
ver rather than blend into the new. 
irst attempts to preserve the past 
'ere accomplished when it was a- 
reed to move the old carriage house 
"om the Chadbourne estate several 
undred feet to border on the main 
treet. A modern shopping center 
as already being constructed on the 
lain property but arrangements 




Chadbourne Carriage House 

were made. Many individuals have 
helped in the restoration effort and 
local Girl Scout troops have planted 
a memorial rose garden around the 
structure. A tax-burdened citizenry 
feared the Carriage House, situated 
in the middle of the shopping center 
parking lot. would serve no purpose 
but be a heavy tax drain for upkeep. 
Plans are now underway to utilize 
this structure to house an office of 
the Fremont Chamber of Commerce. 




Miss Olive Hyde, a resident of 
Mission San Jose district, owned val- 
uable property near the old Mission. 
She wanted to deed this property to 
the City but only if arrangements 
could be made to use it for cultural 
purposes. The buildings needed little 
renovation and soon was established 
the "Olive Hyde Art Center" where 
lessons in art, ceramics, ballet and 
lively discussion groups are held. 

St. Joseph's Church, built to re- 
place the Mission Chapel which had 
been destroyed by earthquakes, owns 
one of Fremont's showplaces. Suf- 
fering from lack of space due to 
rapid population increases in recent 
years, the Church wanted to expand. 
A furor arose. On one side of the 




Olive Hyde Community Center, Mis- 
sion San Jose 



UauegOS mansion. Mission San Jose 



old Church stands the restored wing 
of Mission San Jose de Guadalupe 
and on the other the tiny cemetery 
sheltering the remains of many of 
Fremont's early settlers including 
Robert Livermore. for which the 
neighboring city was named. The 
only solution was to purchase ad- 
ditional property and move the site 
of the church. An agreement was 
reached with the Gallegos family to 
purchase their lovely old home but 
(Continued on Page 15) 



The Grand 
President's Corner 



GR \M> PR1 SID1 Nl 

i Mallette (Mrs. Fveral A.) 
45 Dunstone Drive 
Oroville, ( alifornia 95965 




HAZEL T. MALLETTE 



GRAND SECRETARY 

Mary C. Mahoney (Mrs. Herbert J.) 

Office: 703 Market Street, Room 612 

San Francisco 94103 Dial 362-4127 
Res: 4125 Lincoln Way 

San Francisco 94122 



President Richard Miliums Nixon 
is a new subscriber to the California 

Herald. Grace Parlor No. 242 has 
sent a gift subscription to the Presi- 
dent and Mrs. Nixon. 

Hie VIPs of the Native Daughters 
of the Golden West are Grand Presi- 
dent Hazel T. Mallette and her corps 
of officers. Everyone is a subscriber 
to the official magazine. 



Kl K\ v MM \ 

The theme "With a song in my 
heart'" and the colors pink and silver 
predominating, amid fresh graden li- 
lacs, apple blossoms and gladioli, 
Buena 1 'ista No. 68 welcomed ninety- 
six guests to a reception at the 
NDGW Home, honoring its member 
SDDGP Myrtle Ritterbush. It was 
Sunday afternoon, April 20, just four 
days after the Parlor's 77th birthday. 
Rose Leithner and Lillian Dowling 
co-chairmen, were assisted by host- 
esses Mmes. Facciano, Goodman, 
Blackburn, Filer, Guesing, McKit- 
trick and Daley. Honorary marshals 
were Blanche Elliott and Anglina 
Stover. Past SDDGP Georgia Nel- 
son was in charge of the guest book. 
Mrs. Nelson was deputy grand pres- 
ident when Myrtle was president of 
the Parlor in 1938 and in 1940 Myr- 
tle was one of Mrs. Nelson's deputies 
under the regime of PGP Hazel Han- 
sen. 

Winifred Davis, president of Buena 
Vista Parlor extended greetings and 
PGP Orinda Giannini was guest 
speaker giving a brief resume of the 
Parlor's six past grand presidents and 
Myrtle's activities and services to the 
Order. Guests included: GT Helen 
McCarthv. PGPs Edna Williams. 



ITINERARY 1969 



MAY 



1 \,ui Miguel No. 94, San Lubita No. 108, 

// Pinal No. 163 San Miguel* 

2 Annie K. Bidwell No. 168 Chico* 

3 Marguerite No. 12, El Dorado No. 186 Georgetown* 

9-10-11 Gold Spike Ceremonies Promontory, Utah 

13 Wilmington No. 278 — 25th Anniversary Wilmington" 

14 Santa Maria No. 276, La Purisima No. 327 Lompoc* 

15 Rudecinda No. 230, Tierra Del Rev No. 300, 

Long Beach No. 154 Long Beach* 

17 Sacramento County District Luncheon 

19 El Tejon No. 239, Alila No. 321, Tule Vista No. 305, 

Miocene No. 228 Taft* 

20-21-22 NSGW Grand Parlor River.-ide 

24 District No. 20, Deputy Grand Presidents Luncheon 

25 Alameda County Memorial Services 

26 Marinita No. 198, Fairfax No. 225 San Rafael* j 

27 Fruitvale No. 177, Bahia Vista No. 167, Aloha No. 106 Oakland* ] 

28 Las Lomas No. 72, Buena Vista No. 68, 

Dolores No. 169 San Francisco*! 

30 Memorial Day 

31 Gold of Ophir No. 190 — Homecoming Oroville* i 

i 
JUNE 

3 Portola No. 172 — 60th Anniversary San Francisco* I 

7 San Francisco County District Luncheon 

8 Grove of Memory San Francisco j 

15-19 Grand Parlor Los Banos | 

Asterisks mark Official Visits 



laney, State Chairman of Printing and 
Supplies. 

The musical program was under 
the direction of PGO Frances Simas, 




PGP Orinda Giannini 



Alice Shea, Evelyn I. Carlson, and 
Emily Ryan; and DGPs Edith O'Con- 
nor, Bernadette Sullivan, Elizabeth 
Brennan, Doris Stidhem, Marilyn 
Driscoll. Theresa Galvin, Romelda 
Ralph, Gladys Knight and Zelma 
Buckholz; SDDGP Mary Souza of 
San Mateo County and Alma Mul- 




PGO Frances Simas 

Sue Cole, violinist, and Brenda Wells 
was the soloist. Refreshments were 
served in the dining room to the many 
guests. 

CALIFORNIA HERALD 



OKI KKACG 

Celebrating its fifty-third birthdaj 
as Fort Bragg No. 210 when the 
lembers met in March with acting 
I ni Betty (arr presiding. Char- 
■r members were honored. Ida Mel- 
illc. Josie Stoddard, Nellie Thome 
ihI Ha/el Thurman were escorted 
\ marshal Ila Allenby to the altar 
nd presented with corsages. Acting 
re ident Betty Carr also remember- 
d the other four charter members 
ho could not be pressent — Ruth 
uller, Clara Methlan. Olga Nolan 
nd Rose Tallman. 



I lie official visit by Grand Presi- 
ent Hazel T. Mallette in April was 
njoyed. Committee chairmen were 
pminded to get their annual reports 
uide and sent in to their State Chair- 
men. A donation was made to the 
iaster Seal drive. The proceeds from 
ic bingo was turned in to benefit the 
art Bragg Parlor's High School 
cholarship Fund. 

After the meeting, refreshments of 
ssorted sandwiches, coffee and tea 
ere served from tables decorated 
1 the Easter theme by Edith Cimo- 
ao and her committee. The birth- 
ay cake was presented to the parlor 
y charter member Hazel Thurman. 
he prize package was won by Eva 
loretti. Nora Tamagno and Bertha 
lordeen won the two place settings 
f Melmac. The money from the raf- 
e of the Melmac wil also go to the 
cholarship fund. 



A busy evening was held by El 
inal No. 163 on April 8 when Lydia 
ewis Kelly was initiated into the 
rder. The initiation ceremony was 
receded by a delicious steak dinner 
t the Brambles Cafe. All officers of 
/ Pinal Parlor were present. During 
litiation the Hymn to California was 
ing by Roberta Sutherland. 

Plans were made for attendance 
id participation at the joint official 
isit of GP Hazel T. Mallette on May 

with San Miguel No. 94 as hostess 
arlor. Also participating is 5a/ 1 Luis- 
a No. 108 of San Luis Obispo. Re- 
lation for the dinner were made 
ith Ann Olivero, Cambria. 



Parlor News 




PGP JEWETT 

El Pinal is also planning its semi- 
annual enchilada dinner. This will be 
held in the Cambria Veteran's Hall. 
Katie G. Jewett, PGP and Ann Oli- 
vero are co-chairmen for this fund 
raising event. 

After the meeting delicious refresh- 
ments were served by Alice Vanoni 
and Sylvia Silva to the 27 members 
present. 



COMING EVENTS 

Jack B. Curran of University Par- 
lor No. 272 NSGW and Special 
Events Chairman for the Inter-par- 
lor Committee of the Native Sons 
and Daughters of the Golden West, 
announced the following events: Sat- 
urday, May 24, "A Day with the 
Dodgers." The St. Louis Cardinals 
vs. the Los Angeles Dodgers. This is 
a 1:00 p.m. game at Dodger Sta- 



dium; Thursday, August 14, "A 
Night at Pabst Brewery" with dinner 
at 7:30 p.m. (This is not a NS-ND 
sponsored event); Friday, September 
5, "A Day at Del Mar." The Del Mar 
Turf Club will play hosts to the Na- 
tive Sons and Daughters of the Gold- 
West, and will name the fifth race 
"The Native Sons and Daughters of 
the Golden West Handicap"; and a 
"Night with the Angels" is planned 



for a late September evening at Ana- 
heim Stadium. 

Contact Mr. ( urran at 5201 Wil- 
ghire Boulevard, I oi Angeles, 90036 
or call W I . 7-4444 or WE, 6-6766 
(res) for reservations and further in- 
formation. Arrangements are being 
made for air conditioned buses that 

will leave from the north east corner 
of 3rd and Detroit and from Verne 
Tucker's office at 950 Washington 
Boulevard for all these events. 



OFFICIAL VISIT 

Darina No. 144 and James Lick 

No. 220, calling themselves "Spring 
Flowers Parlor" greeted Grand Pre- 
sident Hazel T. Mallette on April 9 
at a 12:15 luncheon with a meeting 
following. 




President Mallette gave a most in- 
spiring talk. Both Parlors presented 
gifts. Secretary Jaredna Johnson of 
James Lick Parlor presented the 
Grand President with an heirloom 
piece of cut glass which had been 
presented to donor Jaredna in 1917 
by her aunt, Nellie 1. Parrish, a mem- 
ber of Donner Parlor. 



WILMINGTON 

Wilmington No. 278 will hold an 
open reception on May 13 at which 
time Grand President Hazel T. Mal- 
lette will make her official visit to 
the parlor. The meeting will be held 
at the Women's Club House, Denni 
and Lakme Streets. 

A dinner honoring Mrs. Mallette 
will also be held at 6:30 pm.. May 
13, at the Jumping Jack Restaurant 
2880 Pacific Coast Highway, Tor- 
rance. Make reservations with Cath- 
erine Erven, 1602 Lakme, Wilming- 
ton 90744 not later than May 1, — 
Price: $5.25. 




4*± 



FULL COVERAGE 



Suite 114 / 



A. P.M. BROWN, INC. 

"A Full House of Insurance" 

Fire — Auto — Theft — Casua Ity 
Compensation — Bonds 

Phone (714) 635-7871 

280 N. Wilshire Ave. / Anaheim, California 92801 



\NM» K Hll>" I I I 

I wo l Hi. Memberships were a- 
warded during the annual member- 
ihip dinner of Annie k Bid* 
hico. 

iving the awards were Helen 
. Hi- I indgren. Mrs. 
.1 ii.iii\c ol Chico and was. .in 
.1 young member, among those in- 
struiiK-ni.il in choosing the name An- 
nie k Bidwell tor the Parlor, in hon- 
or of the wife ol General John Bid- 
well, the founder of Chico and who, 
with his wife, did so much for the 
community. Mrs. Gage's family were 
friends of the BidweUs and she re- 
members visiting often in the stately 
Bidwell Mansion. It is now an his- 
tories! landmark. Mrs. Lindgren is 
a native of San Diego and a more re- 
eent member ol the Parlor. 

Given recognition as oldest mem- 
bers present were Clara Lucas who 
admitted to being born in IS78 and 



Matie Opdyke proudly said she was 
93 years young Lorena Barnes was 
next m line at 89. Carolyn Reed and 
Bessie Shults were over 80 years 
young, 

Myrtle Mess was general chairman 
of the meeting which Lee Logan 
conducted as president. Each mem- 
ber had an opportunity to introduce 
herself and say when she joined the 
Parlor and to reveal her age. which 
some did Some said they were "old 
as the hills" and some gave the mag- 
ical "39" as their age. 

Seventy-five members and guests 
enjoyed a family style turkey dinner 
at tables decorated in the I aster mo- 
tif with Easter baskets, camellias and 
candy eggs. On the head table was 
an arrangement of stock and spring 
I lowers, with tiny Easter bonnets 
and Easter eggs. There were also dark 
pink candles in white containers sur- 
rounded by spring flowers. The dec- 



orations were done by Mmes. Ralph 
Girdler and Florence Handley. Oth- 
ers on committees were Mrs. Boon | 
Baker, telephoning; Mrs. Walter 
Bammann reservations; Mmes. Has- 
kell Hargrove, Charles Risher, Mur-j 
iel Schroeder, Girdler, Doris Picchi, 
Bertha Cooley and Miss Genevieve I 
Jezler taking care of transportation. 

Guests included SDDGP Clara 
Staehli of Olivia No. 309, Corning. 
PGP Fern Adams, and DGP Helen 
Kessler, the latter two from Berrvessa 
No. 192. Joyce Barkley, Social Edi- 1 
tor of the Chico Enterprise Record i 
was also an invited guest. 

The speaker for the evening was J 
Enrico Turconi of Como, Italy, an 
American Field Service high school I 
exchange student. He outlined as- 
pects of his country and expressed 
how grateful he is for the opportunity I 
of spending a year in this country. I 
He concluded with the slogan of the J 




m*h 



il^t 



hooker Oak in Bidwell Park, Chico 



CALIFORNIA HERALD 



PIEDMONT Parlor No. 87 


M 


N. D G. W. 
Oakland 

proudly presents 
NANCY J. 
CONENS 


'w 


for election 
to the office of 


^^ 


Grand 
President 


1969 Grand Parlor Los Banos 



merican Field Service, "Walk to- 
,-thcr. talk together all ye peoples 
f the earth for then and only then 
Kill ye have peace." 
The program ended with a bou- 
uet of old-fashioned sentimental 
>ngs by the Wil Le Bob Trio of 
aradise. Singing were Barb Nelson, 
ee Bush and Wilda De Tro, ac- 
jmpanied by Irene Donahue. 



IONEER TEA 

Rancho San Jose No. 307 will 
old its annual Pioneer Silver Tea at 
asa Alvarado, 1459 Old Settler's 
ane. Pomona on Sunday, May 25 
om 2:30 to 5:30 p.m. The tea is 
pen to the public. Donation is $1.50. 
heme this year, is "Mission Bells," 
hich the parlor has chosen to high- 
ght all activities during the bi-cen- 
innial year. 

Descendants of families whose an- 
estors came to California during the 
lission period will be especially 



honored. Entertainment will be bj 
Gabriel Ruiz and his group and Al- 
phonsc B. Fagcs. Early California 

dances and songs will be presented. 

Casa Alvarado is the home of Mr. 
and Mrs. Alphonse B. ( Isabel ) 
Fages. It was built between 1837 and 
1840 and housed religious services 
for forty-five years as well as iiist 
public school sessions in Pomona. 
Many heirlooms will be on display 
for the event. The historical art con- 
test sponsored by the parlor will be 
exhibited. During the month of June 
the art will be shown in the Pomona 
Public Library. 

Old Settler's Lane is located near 
the intersection of Park and Prcciado 
streets just north of the San Bernar- 
dino Freeway. Sign there will direct 
you. 



A PIONEER 

Recently Emma McKinley, a 
member of Miocene Parlor lost her 
mother and the State of California 
lost another pioneer. Felipa Yorba 
DeFarias passed away shortly be- 
fore her birthday. She would have 
been 97 on December 24 — having 
been born in 1872 in Yorba, Califor- 
nia. 

Mother DeFarias comes from the 
family of Yorbas. Her father was 
Vincente Yorba and her mother's 
maiden name was Anita Peralta. She 
had a brother, Vincente G. Yorba. 
Mother DeFarias was raised where 
she was born in the old Yorba home 




SAN FRANCISCO Parlor No. 261 

N. D. G. W. 
San Francisco 

proudly presents 

IRENE 

B0NDANZA 

for election 
to the office of 

Grand 
Vice-President 

1969 Grand Parlor Los Banos 




and attended school in the old Prado 
School in Santa Ana Cans on. When 
she was 2 1 she married Emma Mc- 
kinley's father who took her to his 
hacienda located in LaBallona Palms 
(which is now Culver City). The only 
way they had to travel was by train 
to Mesmer City where a coach met 
the bride and groom, taking them to 
the hacienda where the Fiesta was 
held. The men following the coach 
had already been celebrating and 
Mother DeFarias would tell her chil- 
dren of the shooting and celebrating. 
They celebrated for three days, kill- 
ing steer for the feast and drinking 
the wine for which California is 
known. 

Mother DeFarias spent the rest of 
her life at Culver City. She seldom 
left the hacienda since she had eleven 
children and could not take the whole 
family in one coach. She was a beauti- 
ful lady and always happy. If she 
knew of someone sick, she was the 
first to go to take care of them and 
be sure that there was food cooked 
for the family. The priest said that 
everyone should look to her life as 
an example of Christian living. She 
will long be remembered for her good 
deeds! She was never sick and never 
was in a hospital. 

She is survived by three sons — 
Edward, John, and Joseph and five 
daughters. Vera Farias, Marion Ma- 
terna, Stella Price, Phoebe Scott and 
Emma McKinley — 9 grandchildren. 
25 great-grandchildren and one great- 
great-grandchild. 



^asa Alvarado, adobe landmark home of Alfonso and Isabel Faxes, built in 

'840. This was the site of the first school sessions in Pomona and for 45 

years, religious services were held here. 

1AY, 1969 




LA BANDERA Parlor No. 110 

N. D 
Sacramento 

proudly presents 

RAE L. 
ROMINGER 

for election 
to the office of 

Grand Marshal 

1969 Grand Parlor Los Banos 




III UK \ DEI ki ^ 

rhrough the California's Depart- 
ment i>i Veteran's Affairs, Tierra del 
Re) Parlor No, 300, Hermosa Beach, 
Native Daughters of the Golden West 
has -.cut a California Bear Rag to a 
serviceman in Vietnam. 




RAE ROMINGER HONORED 

La Bandera No. 111). Sacramento 
recentlj sponsored a tea and recep- 
tion in honor of its recording sec- 
retary Rae L. Rominger. a past pres- 
ident of the Parlor and Chairman of 
the Board of Grand Trustees of the 
Native Daughters of the Golden West. 
She has taken an active interest 
in the affairs and the projects of the 
Order, including six school dedica- 
tions and the dedication of the Fr. 
Junipero Serra Monument in Capitol 
Park in Sacramento. 

Mrs. Genevieve Didion, Financial 
Secretary of La Bandera was general 
chairman of the affair with Mrs. Lil- 
lian Simpson and Miss Sandra Fair- 
child assisting as co-chairmen. This 
social activity was held in the Youne 



Women's Christian Association Hall. 

I 7th and I Streets, Sacramento. In 

the receiving line were: Mmes. Jessie 

1 1. men. Didion, Simpson, and the 
Misses Fairchild, Judy Phillips and 
Suzanne lillett. 

\ program of early California 
ound music was under the 
direction of Miss Marie Stebbins, 
member of the Parlor. A replica of 
! State Capitol with an array of 
colorful spring flowers were used as 
table decorations. Among the many 
County. Citj and Governmental of- 
ficials was the Mayor of Sacramento 
Richard Marriott and his wife. Repre- 
senting the Grand Parlor of the Na- 
me Daughters of the Golden West 
was Grand President Hazel T. Mal- 
lette. Gold of Ophir Parlor, Oroville. 
Numerous Grand Officers of both 
Orders were in attendance. 



OFFICIAL VISIT 

When Grand President Hazel T. 
Mallette paid her official visit to 
Ukiah No. 263. Santa Rosa No. 217 
and Sebastopol No. 265, a dinner was 
arranged honoring her at the Palace 
Hotel in the 1891 room. President 




From left, front row: PGP Ethel Beg- 
ley, Regina W . Reeves and GP Hazel 
T. Mallette. Back row, from left: 
PGP Lee Rice, Theresa Mirate, GT 
Betty Read Curilich and Gladys 
Wing. 



A N A H E I M 

SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION 



Dorothy Y. Ulvestad. President 

construction loans 

(Main Office) 

ANAHEIM 

187 W. Lincoln Avenue 

PRopect 2-1532 



J. Bernard Soto, Exec. Vice-Pres 

refinancing i collections 



HUNTINGTON BEACH 

411 Main Street 
LEhigh 6-6591 



BREA 

770 South Brea Blvd. 
Ph. 529-4971 



MORADA Parlor No. 199 




N. D. G. W. 


AH,' 


Modesto 


JFv 


proudly presents 


wl'-m 


VIRGILIA 


!£ " 


McCOMBS 


\ 


for election 




to the office of 


Grand Marshal 


1969 Grand Parlor Los Banos 



Theresa Mirata of Ukiah had charge 
of the opening ceremonies. SDDGP 
Gladys Wing was chairman. The es- 
cort team was made up of members i 
of Santa Rosa and Sebastopol par- ' 
lors. Organist was Ruth Roberts. Thej 
escort team wore colorful formals ! 
and carried green stove pipe hatsl 
trimmed with leprechauns, Irish pipes 1 
and gold letters bearing the message, 
Welcome. Hazel." A picture que! 
drill was performed. 

Visiting parlors included Gold oj\ 
Ophir. Auburn, Ursula, MarinitaA 
Seapoint, Fairfax, Santa Rosa, Seb-l 
astopol and Fort Bragg. Among the | 
distinguished guests were: GT Betty I 
Read" Curilich, PGPs Ethel Begley 
and Lee Brice, SDDGP Gladys Wingj 
and DGP Jean Reeves. 

The Grand President gave a very ; 
informative talk stressing history and 
landmarks preservation and the Chil- 
dren^ Foundation project. 



With the hope to replenish the 
stock in the "cash register," Orinda 
No. 56, had two money-making pro- 
jects during the past two months. 

Madeline Janowski, and her com- 
mittee. Jeanette Sullivan and Dorothy 
Sandry, arranged a Tupperware Party 
to which approximately 25 members 
attended. Interestingly enough, the 
lovely granddaughter of Orinda Par- 
lor's Vivian Hall, Diane Riedel, pre- 
siding over the evening and demon- 
strated the myriad types and uses of 
Tupperware products. To add to the 
enjoyment of the evening, the mem- 
bers participated in several games 
and each gained a small and useful 
gift. The evening was so monetarily 
successful, that Orinda Parlor's treas- 
ury is now $15.00 richer. 

The second event occurred on the 
20th of March when Charlotte Lude- 



CALIFORNIA HERALD 



WHITTIER Parlor No. 298 




proudly presents 

GERTRUDE L 

DOSS 

for re-election 
■ to the office of 

/-• Grand Trustee 
1969 Grand Parlor Los Banos 



lann hosted a sewing meeting at her 
ome. Fleven Orinda members gath- 
ired for an afternoon of sewing, chat- 
ng, embroidering, preparing dish 
>wels for hemming. During the latter 
;ssion, plans were discussed for fu- 
lire fund-raising projects. Charlotte 
;rved the snack dishes and dessert, 
' hile the gue.ts munched on their 
wn sandwiches. Happily and sur- 
risingly. much was accomplished 
hd Orinda looks forward to an ac- 
ve dish towel selling campaign 
iroughout the year and to many 
usy e\ents planned for the subse- 
uent months. 



SSTALLATION 




istalUition of Orinda officers. From 
■ft: Mines. Jones, Begovich, Galli, 
'alph. Hall, Bloom, Janowski, King, 
tohaupt, Friede, Wischer, Parks, 
Walaschek and Weaver. 



Portola No. 172 is planning a for- 
jrmal reception for its 60th anni- 
ersary honoring Grand President 
lazel T. Mallette on June 3, 1969, 
t Michaels 30th Ave. and Irving St. 
an Francisco. This will be the last 
isit of the Grand President in San 
rancisco before Grand Parlor. 



Charier members Delia Ulan. I thel 

Cook, Catherine Dolly. Ellen l.eary. 
Kathleen O'Brien and Mars Wn 

son will also be honored, Twenty- 
five year pins will be presented to 
Victorine Me Devitt and Kathleen 

Uniacke. 



OFFICIAL VISIT 

Three parlors of District 35 honor- 
ed Grand President Hazel T. Mallette 
in the Elks Lodge, Pomona. Hostess 
parlors were Ranclio San Jose, No. 
307; Wluttier No. 298 and Poppy 
Trail No. 266. 

Chosen as theme for the evening 
was "Mission Bells," in observance of 
California's bi-centennial year and 
keynoting the grand president's pri- 
mary interest: California History 
and Landmarks. Tiny replicas of 
mission bells made under under the 
original El Camino Real souvenir 
bell mold patented by Mrs. A. S. C. 
Forbes in 1929 were mounted in 
mission arches. These were used as 
table decorations. Reproductions of 
El Camino Real sign posts also were 
used. In the hall variegated tissue 
paper flowers adorned the stations 
and a mission bell replica tolled as 
the grand president was escorted to 
the altar, flanked by six members of 
the three parlors wearing Spanish 
shawls. 

Rancho San Jose Parlor president, 
Edna Greenwald conducted the open- 
ing ceremonies. Initiation was con- 
ducted by Wluttier Parlor, Carlotta 
Funk, president. Laura Sanders sang 
Hymn to California and presented 
the parlor reports. Closing ceremonies 
were conducted by Poppy Trail par- 
lor, Irma Archer, president. 

Grand officers present were GTs 
Gertrude Doss, Marie C. Landini, 
Lila Hummel and GOS Laura Blos- 
dale. PGPs June T. Goldie, Mary 
Barden and Anna T. Schiebush, also 
SDDGP Mildred McGee and DGPs 
Evelyn Sherman, Vera Walsh and 
Lilla Lucas were in attendance. 

The monetary gift of the partici- 
pating parlors was inclosed in an arch 
containing three bells. Vida Wells of 
Poppy Trail Parlor made the presen- 
tation. 

At the Hammond organ for the 
grand president's escort and entry of 
officers was Ethel Ebcrhart of Ran- 
cho San Jose parlor playing "Sere- 
nade of the Bells" and "Vaya con 
Dios." Grand Trustee, Gertrude Doss 



SAN JOSE Parlor No. 81 


mnnnBrvBiiB 


N. D. G. W. 


£ r> 4 


San Jose 


^^^^m* 


proudly presents 


^Lt ^m 


MARIE C. 


▼ "'* J 


LANDINI 


^\^J 


for re-election 


■E: *IV 


to the office of 


jfcjMM. 


Grand Trustee 


1969 Grand Parlor Los Banos 



played for the remainder of the cere- 
monies. 

Eighty members were in attend- 
ance including many from visiting 
parlors. Six new members were in- 
itated for Ranch San Jose Parlor. 
They included: Grace Watson, Jose- 
phine Green, Raquel Barraza, Peggy 
Davis, Nellie Conrad and Dorothy 
Hensley. 

The Grand President made a plea 
for greater participation in the pre- 
servation of history and landmarks 
and emphasis on Americanism. She 
stressed also importance of parental 
guidance in the home. 

An invitation is extended by the 
Parlors to women born in California 
to join the Native Daughters organ- 
ization. 



EL DORADO 

El Dorado No. 186 and Mar- 
guerite No. 12 co-hosted the official 
visit of Grand President Hazel T. 
Mallette on Saturday afternoon. May 
3. at the V.F.W. Hall, Georgetown. 

At 12:30 p.m., members and 
guests enjoyed a smorgasbord lun- 
cheon of turkey, ham and all the 
trimmings. The meeting was called 
to order at 1 : 30 and at 3:30 was re- 
cessed for the dedication and the 
placing of the marker for Georgia 
Slides Mines. The history and land- 
marks committee was headed by 
Georgia Gardner. Later the Parlors 
reassembled at the hall for closing 
ceremonies. 

At 7:30 p.m., a swiss steak din- 
ner, at the historic Georgetown Hotel 
was served in the Victorian dining 
room for members and guests of 
both Parlors. Organ music and a 
fashion show were enjoyed. Mem- 
bers wore old-fashioned dress. 



BERKELEY Parlor No. 150 

N. 0. G. W. 

Bartn 

proudly presents 

MARIAN E. 
McGUIRE 

for re-election 
to the office of 

(Grand Trustee 
1969 Grand Parlor Los Banos 




I OS |l WON 

Grand President Hazel I. Mallette, 
o! Oroville, was a guest al a recent 

meeting held at the Pancake House 
in 1 os Banos, bj the Grand Parlor 
for 1969 Session Committee, of 
which June Painter, oi Lomitas No. 
255. I. os Banos, is State Chairman. 
Connie Uphoff and Evelyn Holm, al- 
so ol / omitas Parlor are co-chair- 
men with Mrs. Painter. The local 
parlor will host the 1969 Grand Par- 
lor sessions, with all the parlors of 
District 25. which includes Maripo- 
sa. Merced and Stanislaus Counties, 
assisting. 

The Grand Parlor Sessions will be 
held at the Los Banos Fairgrounds, 
with the Floral Building, serving as 




From left: Evelyn Holm, Grand Pres- 
cient Hazel T. Mallette and June 
Painter. Mrs Painter is State Cliair- 
man of the 1969 Grand Parlor Ses- 
sions Committee; Co-chairmen are 
Mrs. Holm and Miss Connie Uphoff. 

the headquarters. Registration is 
scheduled for Sunday, June 15, 1969, 
which will begin the convention. The 
Grand President's reception is sched- 
uled for Sunday evening, and the 
actual business sessions will begin 
on Monday, June 16th. Monday 
evening, the City of Los Banos will 
officially welcome the delegates and 



PLACERITA Parlor No. 277 




N. D. G. W. 


j^ 


Van Nuys 


Js^Vk 


proudly presents 


V P^w 


PEGGY L 




BRANDENBURG 


-^^ 


for re-election 


L^B^LVi^Lfc 


to the office of 


IBEI 


Grand Organist 


1969 Grand Parlor Los Banos 



THE BASLER HOME 



CONVALESCENT & ELDERLY 

24-Hour Nursing Service 

Excellent Meals - Tray Service 

LARGE CHEERFUL ROOMS 
ADJOINING BATHS & SUNDECKS 

Life Membership or Monthly Rates 

542-3514 

1015 N. Broadway Santa fi 



535-3289 




RITZ 




CLEANERS and 


DYERS 


307 E. Lincoln 


Anaheim 



Patronize Our Advertisers 

and tell them you saw their ad 

in the California Herald 



4^\ 3cimcr Sheet L Metal, P„c. 
■■Since 1870" 

771-11(1.1 

INDUSTRIAL SHEET METAL WORK 
210 Chestnut Anaheim 



2 


BACKS 
KAULBARS 




MORTUARY 


CK 


1617 W. La Palma at Euclid 
Anaheim 
772-1617 




UTOPIA Parlor No. 252 

N. D. G. W. 
San Francisco 

proudly presents 
HELEN C. 

McCarthy 

for re-election 
to the office of 

Grand Trustee 

1969 Grand Parlor Los Banos 




visitors at a reception which will als* 
be held at the Fairgrounds. Wedne? 
day is the banquet for all visitor 
delegates and guests. The conventio 
will close with the Installation cei 
emonies on Thursday evening, Jut 
19. 

/ 1 1 
SAN FRANCISCO DEPUTIES 

Plans for the annual deputies luu 
cheon were made by SDDGP Myrtl' 
Ritterbach and her committee. Th 
place chosen by Doris Stidhem' 
committee will be the Elks Club oi 
Post Street, San Francisco. All mem 
bers and friends are invited. 

Reservations for the bus trip 
Oroville for the Grand President': 
Homecoming can be made witl 
Chairman Anita Gillick. 

1 1 1 
RICHMOND PARLOR 




Diamonds — Silverware 

132 W. Lincoln / Anaheim / 533-3107 



Members of Richmond Parlor weari 
ing their prize winning hats. 



SAN DIEGO 

San Diego No. 208 started the New) 
Year off with a Bunco party fon 
members, families and friends. Sincd 
this is San Diego's 200th Anniver- 
sary year, decoration using the yellow! 
gold and orange colors expressed this] 
theme. The cake served was especial- 
ly lovely decorated in this manner i 
Barbara Dunn was chairman of the 
evening with Myrtle Otto as co-chair-i 

CALIFORNIA HERALD 



LA TIJERA Parlor No. 282 

N. D. G. W. 
Inglewood 

proudly presents 

LI LA S. 
HUMMEL 

for re-election 
to the office of 

Grand Trustee 

L969 Grand Parlor Los Banos 




ian. Catherine Higdon was in charge 
:' refre hments. 

i Courtesy night was indeed a mem- 
able evening. Margaret Helton was 
•airmail aid carried out a Valen- 
ke motif in decorations and refresh- 
c n t ^ . The cake was centered with 
red heart which proclaimed "I Love 
ou. Califor.ua." 

Marlene Thompson was chairman 
the Hobo held in March. Members 
ime through with their be:t stews. 
eatballs and pies for a delicious 
ipper. Everyone dressed as hobos 
ith Evelyn Wurzell, Grace Sporl and 
largie PattLon taking prizes for the 
jst. Games were played and a won- 
:rful time was had by all. 

The Parlor's 54th anniversary was 
slebrated on April 14 by honoring 
GP Frances Saner, SDDGP Alice 
ell) and all Parlor Past Presidents. 
ew members Margie Pattison and 
meline McKosky were initiated dur- 
g the meeting. Entertainment for 
lis event was presented by Mack 
igg who showed color slides of Old 
to Diego, Presidio Park and Mis- 
on San Diego de Alcala and narrat- 
1 with a brief history of San Diego, 
fterwards, delicious refreshments 
ere served by chairman Catherine 
igdon and her committee. 

On April 20, San Diego Parlor 
ined with all other San Diego Coun- 
Native Daughters and Native Sons 
the Golden West and, in conjunc- 
sn with the San Diego 200th An- 
versary Committee, held a tea in 
)nor of pioneer San Diego families 
id their descendants. The Native 
aughters and Native Sons combined 
>r this salute to San Diego's 200th 
nniversary which was held in Casa 
i Pico, Old Town. Evelyn Wurzell 
as chairman of the event which 
as attended by civic dignitaries, 
arlor members and pioneer families. 

AY, 1969 



VISTA DEL MONTE 

Vista del Monte, one of three re- 
tirement residences established by 
CTA-SS, primarily for teachers of 
Southern California, numbers among 
its 119 residents at 3775 Modoc 
Road, Santa Barbara, fifteen native 
Californians. Observance of Calif- 
ornia's birthday was observed here 
for the first time since the opening 
in 1964, when a resident (also an 
NDGW, Joshua Tree No. 288) form- 
ed a committee, which worked out 
a short program for the dinner hour, 
followed next day by an exhibit of 
Californiana in the lounge, hostessed 
by the "Natives." 




Three views of Vista del Monte in 

Santa Barbara, the "Riviera of the 

Pacific." 

California flags were conspicuous 
in the dining-room. A framed copy 
of the Great Seal of California was 
presented for display in the office, 
as was a California Flag with stan- 
dard and pole. Each native spoke 
briefly, telling what brought her fam- 
ily to California and in what field of 
endeavor each engaged after arrival 
here. One resident provided beauti- 
ful Jonathan "apples for teachers," 



URSULA Parlor No. 1 

N. D. G. W. 
Jackson 

proudly presents 

BETTY READ 

CURILICH 
for re-election 
to the office of 

Grand Trustee 

1969 Grand Parlor Los Banos 



handsomely polished by herself, for 
each diner. The apples were the 
product of the part of the State in 
which she had lived. "1 Love You, 
California" was sung by Geo. N. An- 
derson, himself a Native. California 
flags were presented to his three chil- 
dren, also natives and to those din- 
ing-room employees who are natives. 
The poem, "Just California" by John 
Steven McGroarty, Poet Laureate of 
California, 1933-1944, was read. 

Exhibited were cherished books, 
relating to California's natural won- 
ders and beauty as well as to her his- 
tory, personal keepsakes, jewelry, 
china, utensils, pottery, paintings, etc. 

Participating were Mmes. Bernice 
Curren, Winifred Hodgins, Alice 
Kranz, Pearl Brown, May K. Siddell, 
Mary Hough, Gladys Young, Vesta 
Davy, Misses Mable Nelson, Mildred 
Moffett, Anne Shepard, Julia Mel- 
ton. Hazel Nelson, and Messrs. John 
Ehlen and Arthur Cherrie. 



REINA DEL MAR 

The parlor's dance group known 
as "Las Fiesteras" performed for the 
Knights of Pythias who were having 
their national convention in town at 
the Miramar Convention Hall. Mem- 
bers of the dance group participating 
for this event were: Mariana Schmit- 
ter. Mary Louise Days, Nancy Fluk- 
er, Karen Stupak, Priscilla Kyte, Sa- 
rah Diaz, Liselotte MacFarlane, Pa- 
tricia Joyal and Vera Smith. The 
group performed their very popular 
"Shawl Dance" and the "Varsouvi- 
anna." Both dances were favorably 
received by a very large and appre- 
ciative audience. 

Members travelling to the Chil- 
dren's Foundation Bruncheon at the 
Beverly Hilton Hotel were Elizabeth 
Miller, Mamie Miller, Mariana 
(Continued on page 14) 



BEVERLY HILLS Parlor No. 289 





N V 
Bevcii. 

proudly presents 

LAURA 
BLOSDALE 


% 


for election 

to the office of 

Grand Inside 

Sentinel 


1969 Grand Parlor Los Banos 



REINA DEL MAR . . . 

niifil from page 13) 

Schmitter, Sarah Diaz and Ambert 
Phillips. 

I he parlor recent!) sponsored ;i 
very successful baked goods sale at 
the Recreation Center, ["he proceeds 
ha\e been ear-marked For history and 
landmark projects of the parlor 
Mamie Miller. was chairman of the 
event. Members assisting at the sale 
were Mmes. Miller. Ruiz, Hogg, Gra- 
ham, linker. Sevegney and Miss 
Mar) Ionise Days. 




Las Fiesteras dance group of Reina 

del Mar during I96S old Spanish 

days. 



A few months ago, a very old his- 
toric tree was removed from Santa 
Barbara much to the dismay of the 
members of the parlor. In checking 
the city ordinance it was found that 
there was nothing to prevent such a 
reoccurrence. Therefore. Reina del 
Mar called this to the attention of the 
city council in December of 1968 and 
specifically requested that a specimen 
tree ordinance be adopted. We are 
happy to report that on March 25, 
1969. an ordinance was adopted re- 
lating to the preservation of speci- 



men and historic trees on private 
propertj in Santa Barbara. 



(II I l( I VI \ ISM 

I he official wsit Of GP Ha/el T. 
Mallette to San Juan Bautista and 

Copa tie Oro Parlors at San Juan 
Bautista was a highlight More than 
100 members attended the meeting at 
San Juan Bautista Parlor's historic- 
Adobe. Ninety members attended the 
dinner at Cadcmartori's preceding the 
meeting. I he tables wre decorated 
with camellias. 

Gay caballeros greeted Mrs. Mal- 
lette when she arrived at the .Adobe 
and escorted her to the door while 
San Juan members tossed roses in 
her path. The Adobe was decorated 
with Spanish shawls, large red flowers 
and bright posters of bull fighters and 
Spanish dancers. The officers car- 
ried red and yellow poppies. 

After the officers entered. Copa de 
Oro's president Rosalee Pfal/graf in- 
troduced the guests: Grand Presi- 
dent Mallette and GTs Betty Cur- 
ilich and Marie Landini. Other guests 
were SDDGP Vivian Mederios and 
DGP Ella Fahev. 

San Juan Bautista then initiated 
five new members. Grand President 
Mallette was presented with a mone- 
tary gift and pictures of the mission 
and other historical buildings of San 
Juan Bautista by Sharon Johnson. 
Eleanor Taglio presented Mrs. Mal- 
lette with a monetary gift and a pic- 
ture painted by Mrs. Pfalzgraf depict- 
ing the busy queen bee and California 
poppies in which she used the NDGW 
colors of red, white and gold. 

Evelyn Pivetti of Hollister then pre- 
sented the Grand President with a 
large check as Copa de Oro's con- 
tribution to the Children's Founda- 
tion. Mrs. Mallette gave an inspiring 
and informative talk. 

Light refreshments were served at 
a beautifully appointed table center- 
ed with a large arrangement of daf- 
fodils and daphne. Edith McDonald 
and Rosalee Pfalzgraf served. 




HAYWARD Parlor No. 122 

N. D. G. W. 
Hayward 

proudly presents I 

DOLORES 

FERENZ 

for election 

to the office of I 

Grand Outside I 

Sentinel 

Los Banos l 




1969 Grand Parlor 



EXTENSION OF THE ORDER . . . 
(Continued from April) 

The installing officers were Johp 
J. Lewis, National No. 1, NSGW 
and Clarisse C. Meyer, San FranciM 
No. 261. NDGW with their assist- 
ants who included: Hazel Adams. 
Gertrude La Fortune, William Keane 
and Paul Curien. Clarisse had to take* 
over on a moment's notice as Bertha 
Miller who was the installing officer 
for the NDGW became ill upon ar- 
rival at the hall. 

Tho:e installed were: William EJ 
Young, Pacific No. 10, NSGW and 1 
Norma Schick, San Francisco No.l 
261, NDGW as chairman with their' 
corps which included: Vice Chair-;' 
men: Clarisse C. Meyer and Fred! 
Linns; Recording Secretary: Flora* 
Campisi and Roger Vincent; Treas-il 
urers: Mae Waring and Paul Gordon;! 
Guards: Anne Williams and Gabriel! 
Molin and Past Chairmen: Eleanorl 
Keneally and Roger Vincent. 

Both pre-idents have planned aj 
busy year in 1969 and request the 
delegates of San Francisco County 
to please attend the meetings which 
are held: NDGW each 2nd Friday 
and NSGW /NDGW (Joint Meet-J 
ings) Each 4th Friday at 8 P.M., at[ 
the Grizzly Bear Clubrooms. 

Honorees at the dinner held on 
April 30, 1969 at the Montclairj 
Restaurant, San Francisco were the! 
retiring Chairmen: Eleanor Ker.eally,l 
Minerva No. 2 and Roger Vincent.! 
Twin Peaks No. 214. 



EL CAMFNO REAL 

Attired in Spanish-California cos-| 
tumes and in a setting of spring! 
flowers, the members of El Cainino 
Real Parlor honored Hazel T. Mal-| 
lette at their Grand President's Tea| 
at San Fernando Mission recently. 
This is an annual affair sponsored'! 

CALIFORNIA HERALD! 



v the History and Landmark com- 

iltce of the Parlor. 

Grand officers accompanying the 

and president included VP Nancy 
uncus; GM Irene Bondanza; GTs 
ae Rominger, Marie C. Landini, 
etty Read Curilich, Lila S. Hum- 
iell. Helen C. McCarthy, Marian E 
IcGuire and GOS Laura Blosdale. 
pecial guests included Msgr. Carl 
erken. administrator of the Mis- 
on, GP Andrew Stodel, NSGW 
bnaida Sullivan, Madrina of Los 
Ingeles, and PGPs Fern Adams, Ka- 
B Jewett and Ethel C. Enos. 

Presiding at the tea table were 
GP Florence Parsons, Toluca Par- 
»r and former DGP Ellen Guthrie, 
/ Aitso Parlor and past presidents 
) El Camino Real. In charge of the 
a was history and landmark chair - 
an Marie Harrington and her com- 
ittee members Ida Grossi, Lyn Len- 
>x, Barbara Herman, Audrey Hasel- 
ish. Esther Wilkinson, Bess Con- 
ir. Helen Trammell, Gloria Mei- 
n, Sherri Grosesiand Carmen Mil- 
r. Teen-age daughters of members, 
athy and Teri Trammell and Jeri 
ellon were junior hostesses adding 
larming color to the afternoon's 
stivities. 




ssie H. Socker, Sebastopol No. 265, 

March 7. 
yih H. Carpenter, Berendos No. 23, 

March 7. 
bv I. Lohsen. El Cereso No. 207, March 

6. 
Ima C. Bennett. Alturas No. 159, March 

6. 
aline G. Deal, Piedmont No. 87, March 

8. 
">ina T. Dailey. San Francisco No. 261. 

March 5. 
a H. Cameron. Phoebe A. Hearst No. 

214. March 8. 
adys M. Smith, El Vespero No. 118. 

February 27. 
cille H. Jackson. Manzanita No. 29. 

March 1 1. 
landa T. Dusthimer, Madera No. 244. 

January 15. 
ncess C. Hammar. Californiana No. 

24". March II. 

Y, 1969 



Lempi A. Penttila, Tule Vista No KM 

i ebi uary 28. 
Eva I. Tellu, Tule Vista No. »05, i eb 

ruary 24 
Abbie ci. Crowley, Tule Viata No. M)s 

March 14. 
Esther. S. Taylor. Woodland No. 90 

March 13. 
Rose Mary (.. Haulm. Aloha No. 106 

February 27. 

Caroline K Coe, Kancho San Jose No 

307. March 13. 
Isabel P, Dutra, Mary E, Bell No. 224 

January 16. 
Hattie Durant. El Tejon No. 239. March 

11. 
Orr V. Sadowski. Gold of Ophir No. 190, 

February 3. 



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Esther B. Whitecotton. Naomi No. 36, 

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FREMONT . . . 
(Continued from Page 5) 

the family retained possession until 
death of the last member who still 
resides there. Soon this lovely home 
may be lost to the wrecker's axe. Un- 
fortunately the dilemma defiies sol- 
ution but we may still enjoy its 
beauty while the hands of the clock 
tick off the precious moments of 
time. 

One subdivider in the Centerville 
district purchased a large tract of 
land. The orchards were uprooted 
to build homes but the main house 
was carefully preserved. Much care 
was taken to keep the circular drive 
and garden intact. Here now is hous- 
ed another Community Center. Meet- 
ings are already being held in the old 
home with the gardens used as a 
small park. 

Homes are sprouting like weeds 
in a field, freeways border to the 
East and West, Bay Area Rapid 
Transit lines are slowly creeping 
toward this booming little city. The 
needs of a growing community rise 
like a balloon filling with air. but 
Fremont realizes the need for pre- 
serving its history before it's too 
late. It is attempting to awaken in 
its youth a realization of the legac) 
left by those pioneer residents w ho 
carved their path through these plains 
before man ever dreamed of tower- 
ing aluminum, glass and shiny steel 
symbols Of the latest chapter of our 
history. 



— ADDRESS CORRECTION REQUESTED 
CALIFORNIA HERALD 
P. 0. Drawer 4243 
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Life and events in Anaheim from October 1870 to 1871. Barter was a 
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FECIAL COLLFCTIONS 



Official Publication of 
THE NATIVE DAUGHTERS of the GOLDEN WEST 




JUME. 1969 * 40<t 



DQ 1 



S JR. UNIT NEWS 



California Herald 



■PRESERVING THE PAST FOR THE FUTURE' 



Ml M O S\ MORS 

Helen McCarthy, State chairman 
ol Juniors paid her official visit to 
the Metric- I nit. ("he Menlo Recre- 
ation c enter «.iv decorated in white 
and green, which are Mrs. McCar- 
thy's favorite colors. She was pre- 
sented with a daint) leathered cor- 
sage. 

State Officers present included 
kathv Slater. Jean lulluis. lieverlv 
Beckemayer, 1 inda Cane. Rubin Gil- 
ben. Sharon Douglas and kathv 
Koch. Other dignitaries included CIS 
Marj Mahoney, (il Marie Landini, 
SDDGP's Marj Sousa and Dolores 
Keren/. PGP Evelyn 1. Carlson and 
seven of Menlo Unit's advisors and 
Frances Mahonej charter member of 
Menlo No. 211. Delegates from Fruit- 
vale. Sequoia. San Francisco. Argon- 
aut. Las Amiguitas were present. 
Denise Lonergjne and Mary Mc- 
Laughlin were initiated by Jr. Presi- 
dent Linda Ucovich and her officers. 

Gifts were ceramic planters by Al- 
ma Mulcaney of Yerba Bucna Parlor 
and corsages to State Chairmen and 
Menlo officers by Lois Cook. Presi- 
dent of Menlo Parlor. Two beautiful- 
ly decorated cakes were made by 
Mrs. Frances Harris, mother of one 
of Menlo Unit's Juniors. 

Installation of Robin Gilbert and 
her staff of officers was held May 
16. The final event of the year will be 
the Father-Daughter Dinner on June 

27. 




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Vol i \n \\ I Juni:. 1969 Numblr 1 

CONTENTS THIS MONTH 

Junior Unit News 

Wild Life Refuge 

Los Banos 

The Grand President's Corner 

Did You Know'.', by Alzada Eaton 

Parlor News 

Grand Parlor Program 

Amapola. by Hazel Marre 1 

In Memoriam 1 



PHOTO CREDITS — Picture on the cover. Los Banos Creek Reservoir, and Sai 
Luis Camp Adobe: U.S. Bureau of Reclamation: Waterfowl scene on Teal Lake: photo] 
by Leon Snyder. Bureau of Sport Fisheries & Wildlife: Millerton Courthouse: Marie 
Davis: Aerial view of Los Banos: Los Banos Chamber of Commerce. 



Before you make 

d- 1 1 IUVv be sure to see a Medallion Electric 
Home. After all, the trend is to 
electric living. A Medallion Home can mean: Flameless, 
electric heating with room-by-room temperature controls. 
An all-electric kitchen that stays clean and cool. Cool, re- 
freshing air conditioning throughout the house. Medallion 
Homes are available now in all price ranges. It will pay 
you to look for this emblem before you make a move. 




Southern California Edison 



J. J. FRIIS 

Publisher 



LEO J. FRDS 
Editor 



JANE FRIIS 
Public Relations' 1 



_ ... Published M 0n thly by J. J. Friis and Leo J. Friis, owners and publishers, Anaheim,! 
California All Rights Reserved. EDITORIAL AND GENERAL OFFICES: Anaheim, California. 1 
Mailing Address: P O. Drawer 4243, Anaheim, California 92803. ADVERTISING OFFICE; 301 1 
N. Parton St., Santa Ana, Calif. 92701. CHANGE OF ADDRESS AND SUBSCRIPTIONS: Mail 
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cant. 92803. When ordering change of address, please allow six we«ks; please fumitlM 
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printed without specific permission. 



CALIFORNIA HERALD 




Hmid JLife Ttefuge 



•J n the very early days the skies 
Jj£ were darkened by vast numbers 
■ waterfowl which hovered over 
their home in the extensive marshes 
af the San Luis Gonzaga grant in 
the San Joaquin Valley. Great herds 
af cattle ranged over this land and 
after the rancho period, farming and 
ndustry came. 

In 1%7, in order to preserve these 
marshes and lakes for wildlife, the 
San Luis National Wildlife Refuge 
was established. Approximately one- 
third of the refuge consists of marsh 
and ponds. It is an ideal habitat for 



birds as well as animals and fish. The 
streams have black and white bass, 
catfish, crappies, sunfish and carp. 
Many kinds of wild life call this re- 
fuge their home. 

Thousands of waterfowl are here 
during the fall and winter seasons. 
Mallards, pintails, cinnamon teal, 
shovelers. gadwalls and ruddy duck 
nest in the refuge. 

Among the migrants are avocets, 
black-neck stilts, sandpipers and cur- 
lews. Such shorebirds as herons, 
egrets and bitterns nest at San Luis. 
Even great flocks of sandhill cranes 



pay these marshes a visit in the fall 
or winter. The white-faced ibis comes 
for a Christmas holiday. Thousands 
of mourning doves migrate through 
the refuge and large numbers like it 
so well, they remain the "year- 
round." 

This refuge is a rewarding place 
both for the wild life and the bird 
watchers. Its establishment is an im- 
portant step in the preservation of 
birds and animals which are being 
crowded out of existence bj man's 
effort to use more land for agricul- 
ture and industry. 




Aerial view of Los Banos 



Xn the early days, the San Joa- 
quin Valley was a vast open 
grazing range. Settlements were 
sparse. Land grants were great ran- 
ches, later broken up into smaller 
units. The great cattle herds of the 
past gradually gave way to agricul- 
ture, industries, towns and cities. 

In this lovely San Joaquin Valley 
lies the city of Los Banos where the 
1969 session of the Grand Parlor of 
the Native Daughters will convene. 



The Los Banos area has an inter- 
esting historical background. Around 
1858 two German butchers in San 
Francisco formed a partnership that 
developed into the firm of Miller & 
Lux. The name of Henry Miller is so 
well known that it may be astounding 
to learn that the man who bore it 
was originally Heinrich Alfred Krei- 
ser. He had come to New York where 
he worked as a butcher at the time of 
the California gold rush. 



A shoe salesman of German de- 
scent, named Henry Miller, had pur- 
chased a ticket for California. He 
decided not to go west and sold his 
passage to young Kreiser at a dis- 
count. As the ticket bore the name 
of Henry Miller and was not trans- 
ferable, Kreiser took the name of 
Miller and retained it ever afterward. 

Miller purchased an 8,835 acre 
ranch from Henry Hildreth for $1.15 
per acre. The purchase included the 

CALIFORNIA HERALD 



£ 



ll^lttrS 




mm 




San Luis Camp adobe built on land owned by Henry Miller 



famous Double H brand, which Mil- 
ler and Lux were to make nationally 
known. Henry Miller and Charles 
Lux operated under the principle to 
buy good land and never sell it. They 
ultimately acquired 14,538,880 acres 
of land embracing 22,717 square 
miles. Their holdings were stocked 
with 100,000 sheep and 150,000 
cattle. 

In the Los Banos district, where 
Miller & Lux maintained their head- 
quarters, they created a new type of 
beef cattle by crossing the big-boned 
Shorthorn with the Hereford, a breed 
peculiarly resistant to tuberculosis. 

Charley Lux once stated that his 
firm could round up cattle near the 
Arizona border and drive them to 
Oregon, via the San Joaquin Valley, 
being able to bed them down every 
night on lands either owned or leased 



by it. When Lux died in 1887 the 
partnership owned an area twice as 
large as Belgium. Miller inherited 
most of Lux's interest and when he 
died in 1916, Miller left an estate of 
the value of $50,000,000. 

Miller and Lux bore an excellent 
reputation for honest dealing, a char- 
acteristic which added to their pros- 
perity. There are many interesting 
stories about Miller. When some of 
his foremen suggested that deer 
should be shot while feeding on com- 
pany lands, Miller ruled in favor of 
the wild creatures, maintaining that 
they had as much right to eat as the 
cattle. 

Miller and his partner deemed it 
wise to feed any person who showed 
up on one of their ranches during 
meal time. They felt that a "hungry 
man could be dangerous" and that 



to feed him might prevent vandalism. 
Hoboes soon learned of this policy 
and were frequent visitors. They 
trudged from one ranch to the next 
and their trail became known as the 
"Dirty Plate Route" because the dis- 
gusted Chinese cooks frequently serv- 
ed the tramps on unwashed dishes 
from which regular employees had 
eaten. 

Henry Miller was generous to those 
in need. A family in want could al- 
ways borrow a cow for fresh milk. 
Hard pressed settlers could get seed 
from a Miller & Lux warehouse. 

Los Banos is famous for its May 
Day celebrations, inaugurated by Mil- 
ler as a mean of meeting "his people." 
They have gained state-wide fame. 
May Day perpetuates the memory of 
a great pioneer 

PAGE 5 



The Grand 
President's Corner 



GR \mi I'Ki sini m 

i Mallette (Mrs, l ■ 
\l Dunstone Drive 
Oroville, i alifornia 95963 



GRAND SFCRF.TARY 

Mary C. Mahoney (Mrs. Herbert J.) 

Office: 703 Market Street. Room 612 

San Francisco 94103 Dial 362-4127 
Res: 4125 Lincoln Way 

San Francisco 94122 




With the month of June, comes 

Grand Parlor and the clove of mj 

serving son as Grand Presi- 

den of the Native Daughters of the 

Golden West 

Tins has been one of the most 
interesting and rewarding years oi 
m\ life. 

it has given to me, the honor of 

representing our order at many I unc- 
tions, some of them state-wide and 
one nation-wide. I had the honor of 
representing the Order of the Native 
Daughters of the Golden West in the 
presentation of a Hear Flag, in co- 
operation with the Native Sons of the 
Golden West, to President Richard 
Nixon, a native Californian, the first 
to serve in the highest office of the 
United States. 

To the Native Daughters, through- 
out the State. 1 wish to express my 
pleasure in serving you. and my 
sincere appreciation and thanks to 
all my Sisters for the honors and 
courtesies extended to one as their 
Grand President. 

I am looking forward to Grand 
Parlor and to meeting the delegates. 
I sincerely hope that the program 
planned for you will be enjoyed by 
all. There will be work to do and this 
we will consumate with dispatch in 
order that grand officers, present and 
past, delegates and visitors may meet 
in fellowship. 

Again my heartfelt thanks to each 
and everyone of you, my sisters. 



CLIFF ELLIOTT 

\WtiuiPS) 

123 535-3541 
1025 W. Lincoln Anaheim 



ITINERARY 1969 



JUNE 

3 Portola No. 172 — 60th Anniversary San Francisco I 

7 San Francisco County District Luncheon 

8 Grove of Memory San Francisco 

15-14 Grand Parlor Los Banos' 

Asterisks mark Official Visits 



Did You Know? 

By Alzada Eaton 

Menlo Park is to lose its oldest 
habitable structure to the bulldozer. 
The house is almost 100 years old 
and was built by Darius Edgar Mills, 
brother of Ogden Mills who founded 
the California National Bank in Sac- 
ramento. 



The first drug store in California 
was opened in 1849 in San Jose. 
The medicines and nostrums were dis- 
pensed in glass bottles sealed with 
cork or sealing wax. Otto Schoenheit, 



a German who had come to the gold 
fields, worked in this drug store ana 
in 1856 became the owner. 



LEO J. FRHS HONORED 

Leo J. Friis, editor of the Califor- 
nia Herald, was recently presented 
with the Regional History Award at 
the annual dinner of the Friends ot 
the Library of the University of Cal- 
ifornia, Irvine. The plaque received] 
by him specifically mentions his 
"When Anaheim Was 21," although] 
President Lee Cooley, professional! 
writer, stated that the judges also] 
considered Friis's "Orange County] 
Through Four Centuries", "George 
W. Barter, Pioneer Editor," and "The 
Charles W. Bowers Memorial Mu-J 
seum and its Treasures." 




4** 



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CALIFORNIA HERALD 



PIEDMONT Parlor No. 87 

N. D G. W. 
Oakland 

proudly presents 

NANCY J. 

CONENS 

for election 

to the office of 

Grand 

President 

1969 Grand Parlor Los Banos 




►FFICIAL V1SIT 

El Dorado No. 186 together with 
Marguerite No. 12, Placerville, met 
n a special session Saturday after- 
loon. May 3, at the VFW Hall, 
Qeorgetown, to greet Grand Presi- 
dent Hazel Mallette, on her official 
/isit. There were some 85 Native 
Daughters present. 

Parlors from the following places 
a ere represented: Nevada City, Elk 
tfcove, Sutter, San Jose, San Fran- 
:isco, Berkeley, Oakland, Corning, 
lackson, San Andreas, Sacramento, 
jrass Valley, Live Oak, Oroville, 
?olusa and Wheatland. 

All present enjoyed a smorgasbord 
uncheon. The tables were beautiful 
vith covers of white and large center- 
sieces of rose buds, lilacs and tree 
monies. 

PGP Florence D. Boyle, Chairman 
)f History and Landmarks gave an 
nteresting talk. The speaker of the 
.lay was Grand President Hazel Mal- 
ette. 

The highlight of the afternoon was 
he unveiling the the plaque. Char- 
er members Louise Schmeder and 
Elizabeth Murdock, of El Dorado 
Mo. 186 were given that honor. 




PGP BROWN 



The meeting opened with the escort 
vork by Ann Larson and Tamie 
toskela. The first to be presented at 
he altar and introduced was Grand 
Resident Hazel Mallette, then three 
'GPs Florence Boyle, 1937, Doris 
Daley, 1948, and Audrey Brown, 



Parlor News 

1957. Various other Grand Officers, 

both present and past, were intro- 
duced. 

Charter members Louise Schmeder 
and Elizabeth Murdock were escort- 
ed to the altar and given special 
honor. There were three members 
present wearing 50 year pins — 
Kathleen Flynn, Alice Pugh and Ir- 
ma Lawyer. 

Ethel Breedlove was escorted to 
the altar where she was presented 
with a 50 year pin by the Grand Pre- 
sident. 

Ethel Van Vleck, who has been a 
member of Marguerite No. 12 over 
60 years, was escorted by Marshal 
Tamie Koskela, the newest member 
of the Parlor, and both were intro- 
duced. 

The Grand President was present- 
ed with a monetary gift, also with a 
replica (ceramic) of a small Califor- 
nia bear, the fine work of Lorraine 
Ross. 

After the meeting the dedication of 
the Marker pertaining to the mining 
community of Georgia Slide situated 
two and one-half miles north of 
Georgetown took place. Owing to 
the inaccessibility to the actual site it 
was deemed best to locate the mar- 
ker here in town near the corner of 
upper Main and School streets, near 
the home of Miss Kathleen Flynn, 
who, until recently, held ownership in 
the mines there. 

The ceremony opened by Helen 
Francisco, president of El Dorado 
Parlor, was very impressive. Father 
McKnight gave the invocation. The 
Cub Scout Troop 149 presented the 
flag and led the pledge of allegiance. 

The activities closed with a prayer 
by PGP Florence Boyle. 

A fashion show was presented 
through the courtesy of Irene's Dress 
Shop, Georgetown. The fashions 
modeled were from 1902 to the pre- 
sent time. Katherine Farnham wore a 
dress of some 80 years old. 



JANE FRIIS IN HOSPITAL 

Jane Friis, Public Relations Re- 
presentative of the California Herald. 
has been in the Anaheim Memorial 
Hospital for a month, recovering 
from a heart attack which occurred 
following an automobile accident. 



SAN FRANCISCO Parlor No. 261 

N. D. G. W. 
San Francisco 

Droudly presents 

IRENE 

B0NDANZA 

for election 
to the office of 

Grand 
Vice-President 

1969 Grand Parlor Los Banos 




BONITA 

Bonita's 82nd birthday was observ- 
ed at Hillsdale Inn, San Mateo. Bou- 
quets of red and white carnations 
decorated the tables. All honored 
guests were presented with a red and 
white corsage. Tiny glass slippers 
and goblets trimmed in red and gold 
filled with white mints were favors. 
Six members of Bonita were present- 
ed with 25 year service emblems. 
Those receiving this honor were Dol- 
ores Bozzo, Adeline Rodrigues, Eva 
Rose, Azel Bullivant. Anna Ferra, 
and Ann Westberg. The presentations 
were made by GP Hazel T. Mallette. 
A group of Bonita's young members 
in polk-a-dot blouses and floor 
length skirts in harmonizing colors, 
carrying lace parasols sang several 
of the old time favorites and stepped 
to the tune of each selection. Secret 
Pals were revealed and new ones 
chosen. OS Shirley Cloutier and her 
committee are to be complimented 
on making this an evening to be long 
remembered. 



EL CAMINO REAL PARLOR 

El Camino Real No. 324 chose 
early California for the theme of its 
10th annual fashion show held at 
Sportsmen's Lodge on May 17. 
"Fashions With the Belles of El Cam- 
ino Real" carried out mission bell 
decorations in the colorful affair in 
keeping with California's bi-centen- 
nial year. John Robert Power models 
showed women's fashions while 
Michael Steele modeled men's clothes. 
Dee Downs, parlor president, pre- 
sented Ida Grossi, show chairman, 
who opened the afternoon festivities. 
The Parlor colors of red and yellow 
were carried out in the beautiful table 
decorations done by Marie Huener- 
gardt. Nellie Miller of Verdugo No. 
240 was guest pianist. Committee 
(Continued on page 13) 




p- 



toatam 

££un<2 16-1Q, 1Q6g 

HEADQUARTERS - Youth Building, Los Banos Fairgrounds 
BUSINESS SESSION - Fairgrounds Auditorium 



SUNDAY, JUNE 15 

1:00 to 

5:00 p.m. Registration, Youth Building 

8:00 p.m. Formal Reception Honoring Grand President Hazel T. Mallette, 

Fairgrounds Auditorium 
Program, A Pageant, "From the Pools of Padre Arroyo to the 

Invasion," by the Native Daughters of the Golden West 



MONDAY, JUNE 16 

8:00 to 

9:00 a.m. Registration, Youth Building 
9:30 a.m. Formal Opening of Grand Parlor 
11:30 a.m. Memorial Services 
6:30 p.m. Welcome, City of Los Banos Reception 



WEDNESDAY, JUNE 18 

3:00 p.m. Visitation of Grand Officers of Native Sons of the Golden West, 

and Junior Native Daughters 
4:30 p.m. Dedication 

7:00 p.m. Wild Western Days — Barbeque, Fairgrounds 
9:00 p.m. Old Time Talent Show, Come in Western Dress, if you wish. 



THURSDAY, JUNE 19 

8:30 p.m. Installation of Grand Officers, Auditorium 



CALIFORNIA HERALD 



LA BANDERA Parlor No. 110 

BN. D. G. W. 
Sacramento 
proudly presents 
RAE L 
ROMINGER 
for election 
to the office of 
Grand Marshal 
1969 Grand Parlor Los Banos 



Kudos to Althea Demetrak, chair- 
ian; Genevieve Parks, co-chairman 
ml their super committee for the 
irofitable luncheon-bingo at the Ur- 
>an Center in San Francisco on a 
loriously sunny and bright May day. 
t was a "first" for Orinda Parlor 
nd more successful than imagined 
•r anticipated. 

An idea proposed by Althea cul- 
linated in having 90 people at the 
iinch and three-fourths remaining 
or bingo. When Althea discussed 
ier plans, Orinda decided to give 
lis party and the wheels began to 
urn. A flyer was dispatched to many 
if the NDGW parlors in San Fran- 
isco and vicinity announcing the 
ime. date and event. Faye Curtis, 
/ith her inimitable telephone voice, 
ailed restaurants and stores for do- 
ations. Most graciously, the parlor 
eceived free dinner chits, boxes of 
andy. merchandise orders and some 
ilverware. These, together with gifts 
nd money donated by Orinda mem- 
icrs were given as prizes for a raffle 
eld in the early afternoon. Table 
lecorations, made by Alma Klahn, 
/ere small manzanita trees ending 
1 small pastel-colored buds. 

The luncheon was served by the 
)rinda members in an assembly line 
iroduction to be envied by the 
irgest corporation. Everyone work- 
d. Piping hot chicken turnovers, top- 
ied by a delicious and tempting 
auce, were served together with a 
oil, and a delicious lime, cottage 
heese and pineapple gelatin salad 
~he latter was made by Charlotte 
.udemann, Marion Bragg and Althea 
)emetrak. Ice cream and cookies 
iked by Haroldene VanWinkle, fol- 
jwed. Coffee was served during and 
fter the meal. 

Immediately after a leisurely lunch. 
he raffle was held and one by one 
he handsome gifts disappeared as 
he holders of the winning tickets 



claimed their treasures, Genevieve 
Parks conducted the bingo puses 
with Althea checking the winning 
cards. Money was given to the lucky 

bingo winners. I Ins was a coopera- 
tive affair, From its inception, the 

girls began to work. I his was notice- 
able in the efficient ami flawless man- 
ner in which the afternoon's proceed- 
ings were conducted. Charlotte Lude- 
niaii'i. not only helped to serve, but 
she aided Faye Curtis by writing 
letters requesting the donations and 
again bj sending the "thank you" 
replies. Ida Jones collected the tick- 
ets from the "waitresses"; Madeline 
King was in charge of the "ticket 
concession" and collecting the money 
and was assisted by Madeline Jan- 
owski. Alice M o h a u p t, Alyce 
Crouere, Irma Walaschek, Nancy 
Selsnick, Vivian Hall, Genevieve 
Parks, Marion Bragg, Madeline Jan- 
owski . . . and the list goes on and 
on . . . all helped to serve the lunch 
and on the clean-up detail after- 
wards. Enthusiasm and eagerness 
were apparent. The members were 
determined to make this afternoon 
an outstanding success. It proved to 
be one of the most fanastic afternoons 
in the history of Orinda Parlor. 



NOTE: If your news items and stories 
arrived after our deadline for this month, 
look in the next issue (July). 

— Thank You 




MORADA Parlor No. 199 

N. D. G. W. 
Modesto 

proudly presents 

VIRGILIA 
McCOMBS 

for election 
to the office of 

Grand Marshal 

1969 Grand Parlor Los Banos 




Los Banos Creek Reservoir. People 

enjoying themselves fishing a n d 

swimming. 



ART TALEN1 CONTES1 

Winners of the Historical Land- 
mark art talent contest sponsored by 
/:'/ final Parlor were announced by 
the Veterans Memorial building in 
Cambria. 

Winning entries were submitted b\ 
Lynn Selkirk and Spencer Whiting, 
both students of Mrs. Ethyl Winter's 
art class at Coast Union High School. 

Judging the entries were Jan Rider. 
Malcolm Titus and Scott McLean. 
local artists. 

Winners of this competition will re- 
ceive $100, $75 or $25 cash prizes 
and their winning entries will be dis- 
played at Grand Parlor at Los Banos. 

Helen Walters decorated the foyer 
of the Veterans Hall with the Califor- 
nia poppy and blue iris where the 
paintings were on display through- 
out the evening. 

Chairman of the contest. Helen 
Bordegaray and El Pinal parlor wish 
to thank the judges and students for 
their efforts in making this contest 
possible. This was the first of which 
El Pinal hopes to make a yearly 
event. 



FORT BRAGG 

Mission bells and Spanish theme, 
an integral part of California history, 
were the decorations used to host 
Grand President Hazel T. Mallette 
during her official visit to Fori Bragg 
No. 210. After being escorted to the 
altar. Grand President Mallette was 
introduced to local members and 
then escorted to her seat of honor. 
Also introduced and escorted were 
GT Betty Read Curilich SDDGP and 
DGP Edith Coble of Fort Brain; Par- 
lor. Charter members present were 
Nellie Thome. Josie Stoddard and 
Ha/el Thurman. 

During the ceremonies of initiation 

Grace Bennett became a member of 

(Continued on pane 10) 



WHITTIER Parlor No. 298 

/■*•' %% Whl ' 

^^^^^ ' udly presents 
B* ^ GERTRUDE L. 
DOSS 

A 4Pr f° r re-election 
/ ^ to the office of 

| Grand Trustee 

1969 Grand Parlor Los Banos 




AhtfZ 



tfi 



:s 



Mower' J>Kop 
1213 W. Lincoln, Anaheim 535-4997 



the 



SQR 



store 



lincoln at lemon 
anaheim 



RAY 0. LINK 

Telephone 535-7221 

INSURANCE — SURETY BONDS 

M. E. BEEBE & CO. 

132 North Anaheim Boulevard 

Anaheim, California 



mmm. 



Faithful . Courteous. Service 
120 E. Broadway. Anaheim 

PHONE KE 5—4105 



Fine Cosmetics 

DRUG CENTER 



PRESCRIPVONS fcv? 



. . . Our Spmciotty 

KE 5-1115 

201 West Lincoln 

Anaheim, California 

S & H Green Stamps 



FORT BRAGG . . . 

/( ontinued from page 9 ) 

the Parlor, I he drill team under the 
direction of Da AJlenby, carried gold- 
en mission hells and wore black man- 
tillas with yellow roses A poem com- 
posed bj Marie Richards, was read 

in i va Moretti, who made the pres- 
entation of a monetary gift to the 
Grand President, "South of the Bord- 
er," played bj Marie Richards, was 

the soul; used lor the drill. Also pres- 
ented was a picture of Russian Gulch 
State Park to add to the Grand Pres- 
ident's collection. 

rwo 25 year members, Gertrude 
Brink and Marguerite Heitmeyer and 
two 50 year members, Ida Baily and 
Loria Johnson were escorted to the 
altar and had the honor of being 
presented pins by Grand President 
Ha/el T. Mallctte. 

Before the meeting a dinner was 
held with 39 members present. Mis- 
sion bells and a centerpiece of a 
ceramic mission with pades were 
on the tables. All were made by 
Leona Peterson. 

After the meeting, Olivia Fraga 
and her committee served cookies, 
punch, tea and coffee from a buffet 
decorated with camellias under a 
huge Mission Bell. Everyone enjoy- 
ed the meeting. 



MISSION PARLOR 

At the recent 47th annual assembly 
of the General Association of Past 
Presidents held in Sonora, Constance 
Warshaw was installed as vice-presi- 
dent of the organization. Mrs. War- 
shaw will preside as President of the 
Assembly in 1971. Members from 
Mission Parlor who were able to at- 
tend portions of the Assembly, din- 
ner and the installation of Connie in- 
to her new office, were Inga and Lu- 
cille Meyer and Zelma Buckholz. 

On Sunday morning following, the 
breakfast was held in the historic 
town of Columbia, where members 
and friends were able to view the 
many artifacts of early California 
history and visit the Native Son's 
museum. 



PGP CARLSON 

The deputies of San Mateo County 
Parlors surprised PGP Evelyn 1. Carl- 
son with the presentation to her of 
a beautifully framed scroll of honor- 
ary membership in the San Mateo 



DAROANELLE Parlor No. 66 

N. D. G. W. 
Sonora 

proudly presents 

MEREDYTH 
BURNETTE 

for election 
to the office of 

GRAND TRUSTEE 

1969 Grand Parlor Los Bano: 



County Parlors. The scroll express» 
appreciation of the 37 years of se 
vice given to the San Mateo Parlo 
by Mrs. Carlson. A standing ovatio 
by the 160 guests followed. Mrs. Cai 
son graciously and emotionally o 
pressed her heartfelt thanks ai 
pledged her continued support. 



TIERRA DE ORO 

The pioneers of Carpinteria Valk 
and members of their families wei 
honored at a reception in the Ve 
erans Memorial Building in Carph 
teria, from 2 to 5 o'clock; whe 
Tierra de Oro No. 304 membeii 
were hostesses. It was the fourteent 
annual reception honoring peop) 
who have lived in Carpinteria Valle 
fifty years or longer and was undf 
the chairmanship of Claudine WuL 
brandt and co-chairman Patsy Ran 
gel. PGP Eileen Dismuke, presider 



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PGP 


Eileen Dismuke 




CALIFORNIA HERALC 



SAN JOSE Parlor No. 81 

N. D. G. W. 
San Jose 

proudly presents 
MARIE C. 
LANDINI 

for re-election 
to the office of 

Grand Trustee 

1959 Grand Parlor Los Banos 




Tierra de Oro Parlor was mis- 
e-s of ceremonies. A keepsake re- 
embcrance was awarded to Mrs. 
Iar\ si.ee 1 of Santa Maria and to 
aro'd Cadwe'l of Carpinteria, the 
de t Carpinteria pioneer lady and 
•nt'eman in attendance. 




During the program, President 
ismuke introduced the Mayor of 
ity of Carpinteria, Allan Coates 
id Mrs. Coates; members of Reina 
?l Mar No. 126 including President 
erniee Hogg; of Poinsetlia No. 318 
eluding President Carmelita Flores; 
id PP Ellen Guthrie of El Aliso 
o. 314. Special tribute was paid 
i PP Elizabeth Birss, of Tierra de 
ro, and to her husband, Bill, who 
stituted the pioneer receptions and 
id been chairman throughout the 
:ars. Elizabeth was unable to attend 
le to recent illness. 

Guest speaker was Mrs. John J. 
odrigues, Carpinteria historian and 
riter of a column "Las Memorias 
: Tina" in the Carpinteria Herald 
eekly newspaper. She spoke of her 
irly memories of Carpinteria Valley. 

"Fashions of Yesteryears" under 
(airmanship of PP Florence Nagel 
splayed a treasured collection of 
othing worn over fifty years ago. 
lodels representing the Parlor in- 
uded Jane Gray and daughters 
irah, Julia and Violet; Gertrude 
eed, Shauna McKinney, Norma 
rimm. Patsy Rangel, Claudine Wull- 
andt and granddaughter Terri Wull- 




brandt. Hortensia Cuellar, organist 
for Tierra de Oro offered piano sel- 
ections during the fashion show. A 
musical program of vocal and guitar 
.'elections by Ramona Martinez and 
harp selections by Sarah and Julia 
Gray completed the program. 

Others assisting as hostesses were 
Mary Wegener, Edith Webster and 
Mary Weatherbee; refreshment com- 
cittee, Frances Olivera and Con- 
stance Rivero; and publicity. Jeanne 
Fredrick. 



VOUNG MOTHER OF THE YEAR 

Mrs. Mike (Camelia) Robles was 
nominated by Poppy Trail No. 266 
as Young Mother of the Year. Her 
application and essay on "Today's 
Need — A Responsible Mother," 




Mrs. Mike Robles and her children 
Michael and Christina. 

took her through the preliminaries 
and made her Montebello and Pico- 
Rivera "Young Mother of the Year." 
Mrs. Robles. a second generation 
native Californian, is the daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Sam Baquera, Pico- 



UTOPIA Parlor No. 252 

N. O. G. W. 
San Francisco 

proudly presents 
HELEN C. 

McCarthy 

for re-election 
to the office of 

Grand Trustee 

1959 Grand Parlor Los Banos 




Rivera. A 1962 graduate of Sacred 
Heart of Mary High School, she has 
lived in Pico-Rivera nine \ears. Her 
husband is an acoustic carpenter. 
Mrs. Robles has been a member of 
Poppy I rail Parlor for seven vears 
and will become president in July. 
1970. Her mother, a member lor 25 
years, is a past president of the par- 
lor. 

Camelia is the mother of two child- 
ren, Michael, age 5, and Christina, 
age 3. Due to Rubella (German 
measles) during pregnancy, the lat- 
ter was born with brain damage, heart 
defect, blindness and partial deafness. 
Because of Christina's condition. 
Camelia is very active in The John 
Tracy Clinic, the Casa Colina Re- 
habilitation Center in Pomona: and 
is the co-founder and secretary of 
the Rubella Parent Association of 
California, which aids parents to help 
their multihandicapped children, es- 
pecially victims of Rubella. 

The awards program of The Mo- 
ther of the Year is sponsored bv the 
American Mothers Committee, Inc., 
official sponsor of the National Moth- 
er's Day. Honorary president is Mrs. 
Dwight D. Eisenhower. 

This is the first year that California 
has had a Young Mothers Council 
and made a statewide search for a 
"California Young Mother of the 
Year." 

Mrs. Robles is an exceptonal mo- 
-rtier and is dedicated to her little 
daughter. In the State contest she 
was first runner-up and was present- 
ed with a beautifully engraved silver 
water pitcher. The California Herald 
and Native Daughters are very proud 
of Camelia Robels, a wonderful 
mother, wife, daughter and citizen. 



"You haven't many buildings in this 
new town of yours." 

"I know." responded the en(husias(ic 
realtor, "but look a( (he parking space." 



Atnapola 

by Hazel Marre 

Mothei Nature's Flowers were .ill 
in bloom along the Mother I ode to 
help Amapola No. 80 ol Suttei < reek 
celebrate us 75th anniversar) 

I he da) started with a luncheon 
.a Bellotti's Inn, presided over bj 
Presidenl Virgina I pton, who along 
wiih si\ othei members were hostes- 
ses dressed in i i >o<> era costumes. 
One Hundred and four attended this 
luncheon, which was followed In an 
enjoyable fashion show ol dress from 
I9O0 i" date. I en 50 year pin mem- 
bers were honored guests as well as 
Grand Presidenl Hazel I . Mallette 
"i Oroville. Also present were Grand 
Marshal, five Grand I rustees, Grand 
Outside Sentinel, eight Past Grand 



Presidents, Amador County's Super- 
vising District Deputy and Amapola's 
Deputy Grand President. Grand 
President Hazel I. Mallette presented 
Past Grand President 1 Imarie M, 
Dvke wiih her 50 year pin, fwenty 
pallors were represented at tins func- 
tion. 




Betty Read Curilich 

Alter luncheon the Grand Officers 
dedicated a bronze plaque at the 



Brignole Building, which was hu. 
in 1858. Grand Trustee Betty Cut 
lich was mistress of ceremonies. A dj 
lightful tea was served at 4 o'clock I 
NSGVV Hall which was decora] 
with tamarack, calla lilies, red bid 
lilac and California poppies. Regalil 
and banners hand-made by origin! 
charter members 75 years ago we 
displayed. 

, , , 

JOINT EXTENSION DINNER 

A Past Chairman's Dinner honol 
ing Eleanor Keneally and Roger Vi 
cent, the past chairmen for 1 96(1 
was held at the Montclair Restaur! 
in San Francisco. There was a larj' 
attendance and all had a most ei 
lovable evening partaking of goal 
food, companionship and making tf 
evening a huge success for the n 
tirees. 




Port of Stockton, California's first inland seaport 



CALIFORNIA HERALD 



LA TIJERA Parlor No. 282 

N. D G. W. 
Inglewood 

proudly presents 

LILA S. 
HUMMEL 

for re-election 
to the office of 

Grand Trustee 

959 Grand Parlor Los Banos 




EL CAMINO REAL . . . 
(( ontinued from page 7) 

chairme i included fashion commenta- 
tor Helen rrammell; tickets. Faye 
Macl arlane and l rammell; pro- 
grams, Ella I ntin: lallllcs. Jinnj Mac- 
Loud; hostesses, Lyn Lynnox and 
Gloria Mellon: door and table prizes, 
Delia Hodnett and .lean Bensfield 
and publicity, Marie Harrington. 

Junior hostesses, teen-age daugh- 
ters Of Parlor members appeared in 



BERKELEY Parlor No. 150 

N. D. G. W . 
Berkeley 

proudly presents 

MARIAN E. 
McGUIRE 

for re-election 
to the office of 

(Grand Trustee 

1959 Grand Parlor Los Banos 





i ABOVE: Looking east on Weber 
venue — Stockton's main street — 
front of the present Courthouse 
site on July 4, 1876. 



early California costumes and in- 
cluded Jeri Mellon, Teri I rammell. 
I'errie VanVvl and Sue Dottl. Among 
the guests were members from To- 
luca, San Fernando Mission, Placer- 
ita, Californiana, Verdugo and other 
Parlors. 



'Today, more than two-thirds of ever) 
tax dollar goes to Washington and less 
than a third sla\s home. Not long ago 
the proportion was exactlj the opposite. 
I his presents an economic enigma . . . 
one to which a solution must he found" 
I Hornsby Wasson, National Cham- 
ber vice-president and chairman of the 
Pacific Telephone and Telegraph Com- 
pany. 



An old man hobbled into an MD's of- 
fice and complained of rheumatism in his 
right leg. 

"That no rheumatism: it's just old age." 
said the MD. 

"Well, the left leg doesn't bother me. 
and it is just as old as the right one." 
came the quick answer. 



T RIGHT: Main Street about^ 
190, looking west from center of 
ock between California and Ameri- 
\n. Look closely and see the wood 
awnings and sidewalks. 




BEVERLY HILLS Parlor No. 289 


f\ 


N. D. G. W. 
Beverly Hills 

proudly presents 


*' 


LAURA 
BLOSDALE 


\^ 


for election 
to the office of 


Jn 


Grand Inside 
Sentinel 


1969 Grand Parlor Los Banos 



sw MATEO « «)i vn Di i'i in IS 

rhe annual San Mateo Count) 
Deputies' luncheon i:i honor of 
Grand Presideni Mallette was held at 
the Lobster rrap Restaurant at Fos- 
ter dt\ with 155 present. Chairman 
Mai * Sousa ol Bonita No. 10 was 
assisted In DGP's Frances Harris. 
Christine Hulme, Rena 1 o Reux, 
Gertrude Bettencourt and also Nora 
Nesper and Dolores Bozzo. The 
theme was nautical in keeping with 
the lagoons in the Foster Citj area. 
lo\ sail boats, shells and •"treasure 
chests" which were filled with cos- 
tume jewelry formed the tea table 
decorations. Plastic ■■goodie" bags 
were given each guest. 

Chairman Mary Sousa introdued 
the civic officials who responded with 
short talks. Native Daughter digni- 



taries introduced included GP Ha/el 
i Mallette, GVP Nancj Conens, 
p< ip s l velyn I. Carlson, family E. 
Ryan, and lima M Caton. Former 
Grand rrustee Virgilia McCoombs 

was also present. Mrs. Carlson was 

presented with a beauufullj framed 
certificate, making her a member of 
all the San Mateo County Parlors. 

PGP Carlson repsonded graciously. 
A check of $25 donated by Mary 
Sousa was awarded to l.oretta Mosley 
for bringing the most members to 
Bonita Parlor during the past year. 
A beautiful afghan donated by Ger- 
trude Bettencourt of I 'ista del Mar 
No. 156 was won by Evelyn Bemis. 
Sequoia and Menlo Juniors made 
monetary presentations to the Grand 
President. The Juniors also gave a 
comic fashion show which caused 
much merriment. 

Various raffles were held; the pro- 
ceeds from the ticket sales were de- 
vided between the N.D. Home rug 
fund aid the Historical Room. 

Chairman Sousa gave a big "thank 
you" to all who helped make the af- 
fair such a success. 



"Whenever we pass by a church 
Let's stop and pay a visit. 
Then when at last we're carried in 
Our Lord won't say, "Who is it?" 



PLACERITA Parlor No. 277 | 

N. O. G. W. 
Van Nuys 

proudly present: 

PEGGY L 
BRANDENBURG 

for re-election 
to the office of 
Grand Organist 

1969 Grand Parlor Los Banos 




THE BASLER HOME 



CONVALESCENT & ELDERLY 

24-Hour Nursing Service 

Excellent Meals - Tray Service 

LARGE CHEERFUL ROOMS 
ADJOINING BATHS & SUNDECKS 

Life Membership or Monthly Rates 

542-3514 

1015 N. Broadway Santa f 



535-3289 

RITZ 

CLEANERS and DYERS 

307 E. Lincoln Anal 



Patronize Our Advertisers 

and tell them you saw their ad 

in the California Herald 



4£$\ '3enner Sheet cMelat, $>tc. 
"Since 1870" 

774-1843 

INDUSTRIAL SHEET METAL WORK 
210 Chestnut Anaheim 



2 


BACKS 
KAULBARS 

MORTUARY 

1617 W. La Palma at Euclid 
Anaheim 
772-1617 




Courthouse at site of Millerton, first comity seat of Fresno County 

PAGE 14 



Diamonds — Silverware 

132 W. Lincoln / Anaheim / 533-3107 
CALIFORNIA HERALC 




\ ; ot lost to those that love them. 
Not deud, just gone before; 

'hey still live in our memory, 
And they will forever more. 



VERDUGO 

A copy of the stale song. "I I ove 
You California," and a Bear Flag 
were given to three elementary 
schools in La Cresenta. Verdugo No 

240 has now presented every school 

in the Glendale school system with 
a Bear Rag tor the fourth grade 
rooms. Making the presentations this 
year was Mmes. Jackie [*homas, 
Chairman and Olive Parker. A short 
hi tor\ was given on "I Love Ybu 
California" to familiarize the chil- 
dren with the state song. 

I erdugo Parlor also presented the 
City of Glendale with three Bird of 



HAYWARD Parlor No. 122 






N. D G. W. 


1 


ktffi 


Hayward 

W proudly presents 




fa* "1 


DOLORES 


W 


FERENZ 




for election 


^ 


^^ U 


1 to the office of 


s 


" '{' 


m Grand Outside 


\ 


V 


Sentinel 


1969 Grand Parlor Los Banos 



Paradise plants for Arbor Da\ \1i 
Nellie Henry was chairman. 



Uverta M. Ferguson, Joaquin No. 5. 

April 7. 
)ra R. Stubendorff. Santa Cruz No. 26. 

April 4. 
lelia S. Griess. Petaluma No. 222. March 

21. 
ODora H. Bailey, Nataqua, No. 152. 

March 5. 
vnnie T. Bailey, Nataqua No. 152. March 

31. 
ifargaret M. Kerrigan. Genevieve No. 132. 

February I 7. 
ncille C. Dunn, Genevieve No. 132, 

March 19. 
osephine Bushong South Butte No. 226, 

April 8. 
eBk C. Stevenol, Dardanelle No. 66, 

April 13. 
.lildred M, Jenkins, Yerba Buena No. 273, 

April 15. 
iloria H. Withers, Yerba Buena No. 273. 

October 7. 1968. 
■velvn W. Butler, Guadalupe No. 153, 

October 10. 1968. 
tegina L. Capps, Woodland No. 90, April 

10. 
.ola C. Stephens, Auburn No. 233, April 

18. 
ilizabelh A. Armstrong. Ursula No. 1. 

April 19. 
{ose R. Nolan. Anona No. 164, April 

rfarianna Blomquist, Ano Nuevo No. 180. 

April 28. 
lelene R. Azevedo. Lomitas No. 255. 

April 23. 

23. 
essic M. Bliss. Angelita No. 32, March 

9. 
Jertha D. Kellogg. Pasadena No. 290, 

April 29. 
jertrude K. Lyons, La Bandera No. 110. 

April 14. 
Mice H. Ellingham. Mariposa No. 63. 

April 25. 
luby W. Waller. Mariposa No. 63. March 

31. 
•Jora H. Gray. Marguerite No. 12, Mav 

7. 
-inda L. Walker, San Jose No. 81, May 2. 
iarah N. Reader, Columbia No. 70. May 3. 




AT RIGHT: Stockton 
(about 1923) looking 
towards t o w n from 
Deep Water Channel. 
One of the old river 
boats (stern paddler) 
can be seen on channel. 
River runs right into 
downtown. 





Holt Caterpiller Tractor 



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SPtCIAL OULLLLHUNS 




Official Publication of 
THE NATIVE DAUGHTERS of the GOLDEN WEST 




JULY, 1969 + 40<t 



H 

OLD BALE MILL AT ST. HELENA 



JR. UNIT NEWS 



mi-m t> ii NKMtS 

Kohm Gilbert and ha corps ol 
officers ol Menlo Juniors Unit were 
installed b> Ji PP I ileen Mc Laugh- 
lm Robin was gowned in an aqua 
blue formal and the decorations were 
■qua with green accent 

In front ol each station was a 

replica ol an II (amino Real bell. 
Six Junior State Officers were pres- 
ent Miss Gilbert as Jr. State Trustee 

and Miss i inda Cane, State Mar- 
shall are the representatives of the 

Menlo Juniors in the State organi- 
zation. 

/ / f 

SHAS1 v l)\|s> I Ml 

Shasta Daisy Unit No. 34 Junior 
Name Daughters of the Golden 
West was instituted at the Native 
Daughters Hall in Redding. Hiawatha 
No 140 is the sponsoring parlor. 
GP Hazel T. Mallette eonducted for- 
mal Institutional Ceremonies. She 
was assisted by GS Mary C. Mahoney 
and GTs Lila Hummel, Marian Mc- 
Guire and Helen C. McCarthy, who 
is also State Chairman of Junior Na- 
tive Daughters. 

Kathy Slater of Redwood City. 
State Junior President, assisted by 
her corps of State Junior Officers, 
initated thirty-three charter members 
and installed the first officers of Shas- 
ta Daisy Unit: Past President, Susan 
Briley; President. Linda Porterfield; 
Vice-President. Susan Roach; Secre- 
tary. Susan Lapp; Treasurer, Susan 
Gersbach; Marshal, Tata Twomey; 
Sentinel, Sandra Ganin; Organist, 
Renee Caporusso; Trustees. Kathy 
Solie, Glenda Manprin, and Donna 
Rutherford. 

Mrs. Eda Mazzini was given recog- 
nition as organizer of the Unit, and 
Mrs. Catherine Porterfield will serve 
as Junior Advisor, with several mem- 
bers of Hiawatha Parlor assisting. 

The new Unit was the recipient of 
many gifts. Each charter member 
was presented with a Junior Native 
Daughter pin. a gift from Hiawatha 
Parlor. Three charter members, un- 
able to attend the ceremonies will be 
initiated at the first meeting of the 
Unit on June 2. 

Representatives from Native 

Daughter Parlors throughout the state 

(Continued on Page 10) 



California Herald 

"PRESERVING THE PAST FOR THE FUTURE" 

Vol i mi XVI July. 1969 Number I 

CONTENTS THIS MONTH 

Junior Unit News 3 

California's Bicentennial, by Rev. Francis J. Weber ; 

Casa de Ramirez, by Nancy Fluker 4 

The Grand President's Corner 6 

Parlor News 

Grand Parlor and New NDGW Officers 

That Two Might Walk, by Helena R. Keefe 9 

In Memoriam L 

PHOTO CREDIT — Padre Serra Medal: Courtesy of Serra Cause. 

Before you make 

%\ 1 1 M\J V ^^ be sure to see a Medallion Electric 
Home. After all, the trend is to 
electric living. A Medallion Home can mean: Flameless, 
electric heating with room-by'room temperature controls. 
An all-electric kitchen that stays clean and cool. Cool, re- 
freshing air conditioning throughout the house. Medallion 
Homes are available now in all price ranges. It will pay 
you to look for this emblem before you make a move. 




•MM 

Southern California Edison 



J. J. FRns 
Publisher 



LEO J. FRIIS 

Editor 



JANE FRIIS 

Public Relations 



Published Monthly by J. J. Friis and Leo J. Friis, owners and publishers, Anaheim, 
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CALIFORNIA HERALD 



Calif ornia s bicentennial 




Padre Junipero Serra Medal struck by United States Mint 



5fSJ)o californians, 1969 is an his- 
JJ> torically significant year, mark- 
ing as it does the bi-centennial an- 
niversary of Hispanic penetration in- 
to an era previously known only 
from crudely drawn nautical charts 
and maps. 

Official recognition of this im- 
portant milestone is being manifested 
in many concrete ways. The United 
States Post Office, for example, plans 
to issue a special stamp to commem- 

JULY, 1969 



orate the occasion this month. The 
highest representatives of the Spanish 
government have journeyed west to 
participate in public observance. 
Books and learned articles have been 
published, symposia conducted and 
pilgrimages organized — all to honor 
a feat unparalleled in New World 
expansion. 

History, to be relevant, must be 
defined in terms of men, their origin 
life and destiny. In this regard, one 



TZev. Francis J. TVeber 



man, above all others, epitomizes that 
spirit which motivated California's 
colonizers to their noble accomplish- 
ments. He was, of course, Junipero 
Serra, the gray-robed friar to whom. 
according to Hiram Johnson. "Cal 
ifornia owes an everlasting tribute." 

From the silver strand of San 
Diego to the Golden Gate on San 
Francisco Bay, this "torch bearer of 
civilization" inaugurated a program 
whereby the natives of the forest 
and plains might turn their faces 
from the darkness of heathenism 
toward the celestial light of Christi- 
anity and immortality. 

The heroism and triumph associat- 
ed with today's El C amino Real were 
unknown quantities to Junipero Ser- 
ra who forged the initial links of that 
tortuous highway through unknown 
terrain during years when tragedy 
and despair plagued his every for- 
ward step. As to the permanency of 
Serra's contributions and those of his 
pioneering collaborators, the distin- 
guished non-Catholic historian, Rob- 
ert Glass Cleland, had this to say: 

Consider the Missions of California. 
How shall we view them? As interesting 
examples of architectural adaptation? As 
monuments to the members of an adven- 
turous, heroic Order? As Outposts of 
Christianity and civilization upon a bar- 
barous frontier? They are all of these, 
surely, and something more. Break oft ;i 
piece from one of their century-old adobe 
w;ills. Crumble it to dust between your 
thoughtless fingers. Then place this dust 
in the open palm of you hand and hold 
it so that the wind from the sea will 
blow it away forever. Only from the 
dust of a crumbling adobe brick from 
a crumbling Mission wall, you say with 
an idle shrug. Yes, but a trifle more. The 
dust you held so carelessly in your open 
hand was the dust of an empire, if you 
had only understood — the glory of an 
ancient, heroic race. And the wind which 
blew it so utterly away? Ah, that was the 
wind which men call time. 

The esteem for Junipero Serra's 
name, now a household word in 
California, has grown progressive!} 



(Continued on Page 13) 



z 



as a 



/e 



amit&!c 



by yVancLf r _y kuk* 



Of^t in \ik)iu . known as the 
JL "Casa de Ramirez" located 

m I l Pueblo \ iejo protectee! area, 
Santa Barbara, is an excellent ex- 
ample of the California house of the 
Spanish period having been erected 
in about 1825 bj Don Rafael Gon- 
zales for his young bride. Don Rafael. 
.1 descendant of the family to which 
the Kmy ol Spam granted large acre- 
age, was a man of considerable prom- 
inence in Santa Barbara and became 
alcalde in 1829. On April 24. 1865. 
his daughter. Salome Krancisca Ven- 
tura Gonzales, married Cristobal A. 
Ramirez. The house was deeded to 




Front entrance of Ramirez adobe 
which originally was hack of house. 

her on March 17. 1866. and be- 
came known as the Ramirez adobe. 
Senora Ramirez lived in this house 
until a few months before her death 
in 1922. at the age of 83. when it was 
sold to Mrs. A. L. Murphy Vhay, 
who was its occupant until her death 
a few years ago. The house was pur- 
chased from the Vhay family in April 
1966 by Mr. and Mrs. Hastings 
Harcourt. the present owners. 

Rafael built this adobe facing the 
beloved presidio where both he and 
his father had spent so many years 
as soldiers; thus, the adobe faced 
the sunset, the back toward Laguna 
street and the mountains. He left 




Back ol Ramirez adobe which origi- 
nally was front of Itottse. 



the back windowless, not because the 
tame Indians of the vicinity were 
dangerous, but because they were 
such a nuisance due to ther curios- 
ity and inquisitiveness. 

The house was built in the form 
of a short-stemmed H, with small 
projecting wings at each end. between 
which are long verandas. Like most 
of the early adobes, the veranda was 
roofed with split shingles instead of 
tile. Part of this roof on the garden 
side has now been removed to allow 
more light into the house. The studio 
wing was added by Mrs. Vhay. 

The walls of the house are of ado- 
be two feet thick on three sides and 
four feet thick on the southeast end 
which is exposed to heavy winter 
rains. The other walls are sheltered 
by either verandas or wide eaves. 
Over the adobe bricks was a coat 
of adobe plaster, inside and outside, 
finished with several coats of white- 
wash mixed with cactus juice. This 
same mixture was used by Mrs Vhay 
during the restoration and later addi- 
tions made by her. The floor which 
boasts a handmade tile surface, now 
impossible to obtain, originally was 
packed earth, swept and swept and 
watered and watered until it was hard 
as granite. Before the tile floor of 



1924, Cristobal Rameriz laid on 
wooden floor of wide planks. 

The roof is still covered by the 
original heavy tile made by the In- 
dians under the direction of the Mis- 
sion fathers. These tiles were laic 
without mortar, the exposed end fac- 
ing away from the prevailing winds. 
Under the tile was a ceiling of long 
tough reed, and rafters of pine logs. 
When the house was about 50 years 
old. a flat beamed ceiling was added 
in the main room but, during re- 
pairs after the 1925 earthquake, this 
was removed. At that time also, the 
reed weakened with age was replaced 
with bamboo and the old pine rafters 
with eucalyptus. The bamboo, was 
later removed. 

Mrs. Vhay added the windows 
you see today, cutting into the thick 
adobe walls and in the style of the 
period, lining the windows with wood 
casements. The wiggly uneven glass 
of the period is found in the windows, 
making it authentic. There were few 
windows in the houses of this period, 
one explanation being that curious 
Indians were apt to peer in which 
frightened the women of the house- 
hold and also the darkness acted as 
a repellant to flies. 




Inside shot of the adobe living room 

of the Ramirez adobe looking into 

the kitchen. 



CALIFORNIA HERALD 



I he fireplaces, one in each room, 
i. ere added by Mrs. Vhay, as were 
he plumbing, light and gas installa- 
ions. Until 1923, candles were used 
or lighting and there was no pro- 
isions for heating except by char- 
oal "braseros." 

In the earliest years the kitchen 
vas the room at the southwest end 
>f the house where a small cooking 
ire was built on the earth floor and 
he smoke found a way out through 
he loosely laid roof. (An oven was 
Undoubtedly built in the yard.) La- 
er, this room was used as a bedroom 
nd the kitchen was moved to its 
'resent location. Convenient equip- 
nent has been added without destroy- 
hg the charm and character of the 
•Id structure. 



I lie portion which was the rear 
of the house is now the front en- 
trance, for when the house was built. 
Laguna Street did not exist. One 
feature of the old back yard was a 
pear tree, the first of its kind in this 
area, which furnished slips for other 
trees in the city and county. Near 
it was a well used by the family be- 
fore Santa Barbara had a city water 
system. 

The Adobe was one of six houses 
selected in 1937 by the historic 
American Building Survey as typify- 
ing early California architecture. 
Complete measured drawings of the 
house were made at that time and 
are on file in the Public Library. Two 
members of Reina del Mar Parlor, 
Mrs. Ambert Phillips and Mrs Edna 



Cannon (a 50 vr member) are de- 
scendants of Don Rafael don/ales 
In commemoration ol ( alilornia's 
Bi-Centennial year (1769-1969) 
Rcina del Mar No. 1 26, placed a 
bronze marker at the (ion/ales Ka 
nine/ adobe located at 835 Laguna 
Street, Santa Barbara, on April 27. 
1969. SDDGP Mary Rule ol Dis- 
trict 32 was an honored guest at the 
marking. Dedication ceremonies for 
the bronze marker were conducted b\ 
Miss Mary Louise Days, past presi- 
dent; Mrs. Bernice Hogg, president, 
and Mrs. Nancy Flukcr, third vice- 
president. Miss Days was chairman ot 
the marking, assisted by: publicity 
and program, Nancy Flukcr, invi- 
tations and hostessing, Karen Stupak; 
(Continued on Page 13) 




Veranda of the Ramirez adobe 



The Grand 
President's Corner 



t,K \M) I'RI SIDEN1 

\.,ik\ i i oneni (Mrs.) 
-t3i i Allendale Avenue 
Oakland, California 94619 



GRAND SECRETARY 

Office: 703 Market Street, Room 612 
San Francisco 94103 Dial 362-4127 




NANCY J. CONENS 



r/onigrU marks the culmination of 
thirty-three years of affiliation with 

the Native Daughters of the Golden 
West I was but a small child when 
my sister became a member of our or- 
der and so main of tin earliest mem- 
ories are centered around activities ot 
the Native Daughters. It was a verj 
happj day. when twenty years ago. 
m\ mother and 1 stood side by side 
and were obligated as members in the 
Native Daughters. Tonight — what 
jo) is in ms heart as we stood side 
Dj side again and she escorted me to 
this high position. 

With the immediate presence of 
our esteemed college of past grand 
presidents. I feel verj humble indeed. 
1 am aware of their watchfulness as 
well as their friendliness. Each of the 
eighty-three grand presidents who 
have preceded me has given the ulti- 
mate in service and guidance. To 
those who are here. I openly pledge 
m\ wholehearted promise to try to 
do them proud. To those who have 
gone beyond, so many of whom were 
m\ dear friends. I privately utter a 
prayer for their assistance. 

V I assume the mantle of the 
office of Grand President. I do so 
with a deep realization of the re- 
sponsibility, as well as the honor, 
that is mine. 1 pledge myself and 
each day of the term to complete 
dedication to the Native Daughters 
of the Golden West and all of its 
principles. 1 promise to uphold the 
constitution and laws of the order 
and will be ever hopeful that my ex- 
ample will be worth) of exemplifi- 
cation. To accomplish all this. I ask 
help and guidance from God and 
support and understanding from each 
of you. 



Main months ago when it was 
time to select the theme for this 
evening and the term. I was un- 
decided for some time. Then one 
da) I heard the "Star Spangled Ban- 
ner" sung in folk style; another night 
I watched a news program which 
covered a demonstration where the 
American Flag was torn from the 
Mag pole and burned. Well, I cried — 
and then gradually the tears turned 
\o anger and the anger turned to in- 
spiration and the inspiration turned 
to determination. 1 have chosen 
Americanism as my theme because 
I am determined to inspire each of 
you with a renewed Love, Respect 
and Appreciation for our American 
Flag and everything for which it 
stands! I hope this inspiration be- 
comes the greatest epidemic of all 
time and spreads so rapidly, no vac- 
cine will ever be found to bring it 
under control. I hope that in this 
term each Native Daughter will be- 
come a better Californian and each 
Californian will become a better 
American. 

Every time you recite the Pledge 
of Allegiance, do so with honor and 
pride. Look at this great American 
Flag, repeat each word of the pledge 
with heartfelt meaning and renewed 
faith. When you sing the "Star 
Spangled Banner" be mindful of the 
message you are imparting and let 
the luster of love for country enrich 
your voice. 

Oh my friends — so much needs 
to be done — there is so much rest- 
lessness and "Anti" everything! We 
need to analyze the cause of the 
unrest and do our part to rectify 
the actions. In my opinion, one very 
important word is missing from the 
nation, the church, the home, the 
school, the order and indeed from 
every aspect of life. That word is 
Respect! The dictionary defines the 
word as "To hold in esteem or honor; 
to show regard or consideration." 
I am asking that you implant that 
word deep in your mind and heart 
and that you practice that meaning 
in your every thought and action. 
In this age of moon orbits and jet 
speeds — I would like to catch my 
breath for a minute — we are travel- 



ing too fast into tomorrow and we a 
forgetting to live Today! Look 
round you. Native Daughters, th! 
really is a pretty good world riglj 
here and now and with a little effol 
on Your part and the practice < I 
"Respect" the world will look evtij 
better. 

A great organization founded ;J 
a means of rededicating our sou! I 
to pride in and understanding of trll 
American Heritage, and of stinul 
lating adults to reaffirm and perpe I 
uate their belief in the American wal 
of life, is observing its twentietl 
anniversary this year. In tribute t 
the purpose and outstanding achieve 
ments of freedoms foundation at Val 
ley Forge, I am contributing thi 
Grand President's special award i 
recognition of their continual pro 
gram to preserve "The America; 
Way of Life." 

During this year, each of our pro 
jects will receive my attention ant 
support. However along with Ameri 
canism and civic participation, twi 
others will be stressed as my specia 
interests: scholarships and extensioi 
of the order. The whole world t 
looking to the youth of each nation 
They are our hope and our promise 
but they need our help to sustain the 
burden we are placing before them 
The Native Daughters can be justl; 
proud of their scholarship program 
but there is always need for improve* 
ment I am hopeful that each parlor 
or district will plan an activity foi 
the benefit of this most worthwhile 
program. 

Of course it is my desire to show 
an increase in membership this term 
I have three colors in my term theme 
— red, white and blue — and I arc 
asking each parlor to give the order 
at least three new members above 
and beyond any losses caused by 
death, resignation or suspension. Lei 
us have our "Actions speak louder 
than words." In checking the pro- 
ceedings I found this to be the motto 
of PGP Emily Ryan who is celebrat- 
ing her twenty-fifth anniversary this 
year. With her permission and in hei 
honor, this will be the motto for this 

(Continued on Page 12] 

CALIFORNIA HERALC 



Parlor Neu/s 



IOV01 IN 

Joaquin No. 5, Stockton is proud 
of its year under President Mrs. 
Reno Chiarello. The activities were 
profitable both to the community 
tind the Parlor. 

1 A tea was held to raise funds for 
Childrens Foundation. PGP Jewel 
McSweeney. State Chairman of Chil- 
drens Foundation was the speaker. 
Present also was DGP Maude Hen- 
sen, of Stockton Parlor. 

Under the chairmanship of Mrs. 
Charles Kelley three televisions were 
bought and donated by the Parlor 
( to Letterman Hospital, San Fran- 
risco for the hospitalized returnees 
from Vietnam. A flag requested by 
'a Stockton boy who is serving in 
Vietnam, was sent. 

Donations were given to assist 
with the further development of Pixie 
[Woods, the Heart Fund and March 
of Dimes. Needy families were aided 
with Mrs Emma Morotti, Home Wel- 
fare Chairman. Two scholarships 
were given with Mrs. Frank Luc- 
chesi. Chairman. 

Finance chairman was Mrs. Frank 
Portale. A fashion show, a rummage 
sale and sale of greeting cards were 
fund raising activities. 

Members participated in two par- 
ades under the leadership of Mrs. 
Dan Looper. A Hawaiian luau pot 
luck also Halloween, Christmas, and 
Mexican fiesta parties were given for 
the members by the president at her 
home. Fifty year members were hon- 
ored at an anniversary party. A pic- 
nic for members and their families 
will end the year. 



TWIN PEAKS 

Twin Peaks Parlor activities start- 
ed in February with an enjoyable 
trip to "Snow Country" with 38 
members and friends going to Carson 
City. In April an annual breakfast 
was served to a group of 63. PGP 
Emily Ryan was the guest speaker 
with an interesting and worth while 
talk. Dignitaries included PGP Hazel 

JULY, 1969 



Hansen. Chairman ol the Home com 
mittee, PGP Orinda Giannini, Lorel 

ta Cameron. GM Irene Boiulan/a, 
Irene Crowlcv of (he Historical 
Room and Will Young DGP Ha/el 




PGP Emily E. Ryan, guest speaker 



Adams played while the guests were 
seated and also helped with the de- 
coration, Anita Gullick was chair- 
man; Ada Hoerner, co-chairman. 

In March a bingo luncheon was 
a success with 127 attending. Chair- 
man Claudine Silvera was assisted 
by Mildred Von Post and Mary Bec- 
cria. In May, a banquet was held at 
Castle Lanes with Ada Hoerner in- 
troducing the guests. The last social 
event in May was a handkerchief 
shower for PGP Emily Ryan who 
is foster mother of Twin Peaks Par- 
lor. 



Twenty Past Grand Presidents at- 
tended the annual dinner at Carl's. 
Los Banos, June 16. The occasion 
was the tradition of honoring the 
PGP observing her 25th anniversary 
as Grand President. The honoree this 
year was PGP Mary Barden. 

The tables were decorated with 
silver trees and numerals "25." PGP 
Eileen Dismuke presided as chair- 
man, assisted by other PGPs from 
the South. A gift was presented to 
PGP Barden who graciously express- 
ed her appreciation and recounted 
high lights of her year 1943-1944. 

At the business meeting PGP 
Hazel B. Hansen was elected presi- 



dent. PGP ( larice Gilchrist, vice 

president and POP Evelyn I Carlson, 

secretary-treasurer. PGP Orinda 
Giannini expressed greetings. At the 
dinner next year PGP Emily I R\an 
will be honored. 

At the Talent Show on Wednes- 
day evening at Grand Parlor the 

PGPs attired in gowns of yesteryears 
were awarded first prize — a beau- 
tiful trophy. 



I I N< HKON 

Chairman Anita Gillich and co- 
chairmen Lucile Ashbaugh and Lu- 
cille Kimbark were in charge of the 
Deputies Luncheon at Canal Farms 
Inn, Los Banos. A capacity crowd 
attended. 

Past SDDGP Vera Thompson and 
her 1948-1949 deputies met at the 
Iron Horse Restaurant, San Fran- 
cisco renewing their friendship of 20 
years. Each brought a greeting note 
for PGP Margaret Farnsworth, grand 
president in 1948-1949 who now lives 
in San Jose. GM Irene Bondanza 
who was one of this group gave an 
interesting talk on the duties of a 
deputy. Those of this group of dep- 
uties, Mmes. Kimbark, Brennan and 
Johnson who were deputies 20 years 
ago are also deputies 1968-1969. 




From left: Jr. PGP Hazel T. Mallette 
and PGP Margaret Farnsworth 



The deputies who were present 
voted to meet each year on the Sat- 
urday noon before Mothers Day. 
All agreed the get-to-gether was a 
wonderful idea and an afternoon ot 
happy memories. 



Grand Parlor and New NDGW Officers 



GRAND 
PRESIDENT 




JR PAST GRAND 
PRESIDENT 



GRAND VICE- 
PRESIDENT 






CHM. BD. GRANI 
TRUSTEES 




NANCY J CONENS 



HAZEL T. MALLETTE 



IRENE BONDANZA 



VIRGILIA McCOMBS 



GERTRUDE L. DOS] 




MARIE C. LANDINI 



3ETTY READ 
CURLICH 



LILA S. HUMMEL 



MARIAN E. 
McGUIRE 



GRAND 
TRUSTEE 



(Not 

Pictured) 



MEREDYTH 
BURNETTE 



GRAND INSIDE 
SENTINEL 



GRAND OUTSIDE 
SENTINEL 



GRAND 
ORGANIST 




LAURA BLOSDALE 





DOLORES FERENZ 



PEGGY 

BRANDENBURG 



Grand officers of the Native 
Daughters of the Golden West for the 
year 1969-1970 are: Jr. Past Grand 
President. Hazel Mallette, Gold of 
Ophir No. 190; Grand President. 
Nancy Conens. Piedmont No. 187; 
Grand Vice President. Irene Bondan- 
za. San Francisco No. 261; Grand 
Marshal, Virgilia McCombs. Morada 
No. 195; Chairman of the Board of 
Trustees, Gertrude Doss, Whittier 
No. 298; Grand Trustees: Marie C. 
Landini, San Jose No. 81; Betty 
Read Curlich, Ursula No. 1; Lila S. 
Hummel, La Tijera No. 282; Helen 
C. McCarthy, Utopia No. 252; Mari- 



an E. McGuire, Berkeley No. 150; 
and Meredyth Burnette, Dardanelle 
No. 66; Grand Inside Sentinel, Laura 
Blosdale, Beverly Hills No. 289; 
Grand Outside Sentinel, Dolores 
Ferenz, Hay ward No. 122 and Grand 
Organist, Peggy Brandenburg, Place- 
nta No. 277. PGP June Goldie serv- 
ed as installation officer. 

Grand Parlor was held in Los 
Banos June 15-19, and was reported- 
ly one of the largest Grand Parlors 
ever held. Approximately 500 dele- 
gates attended. 

The opening ceremony was con- 
ducted by PGP Ethel C. Enos who 




served as honorary chairman of thd 
convention. A program was present-i 
ed by Lomitas Parlor. June Painter 
served as state chairman of the Grand, 
Parlor with Connie Uphoff and Mrs. 
Lee Holm, co-chairmen. On Mon- 
day evening the city of Los Banos 
staged a formal reception and buffet, 
welcoming the Native Daughters. 

The Native Sons and the state 
officers of the Junior Units paid a 
visit to Grand Parlor and were wel-i 
corned. One of the highlights was 
the dedication of State Historical 
Marker No. 829 recognizing Pacheco 
Pass as a historical landmark. The 
dedication took place at Romero 
Overlook on the east side of San 
Luis Dam. The plaque was unveiled 
by Grand President, Hazel T. Mal- 
lette. 

CALIFORNIA HERALD 



THAT TWO MIGHT WALK 

by Helena R. Keefe 



(The Stale Children's foundation of 
ic N;iti\o Daughters donated two wheel 
lairs to the Ventura County Cerebral 
als\ School, through El Aliso Parlor No. 
14, Santa Paula. Miss Ethelwyne Fraish 
i, state secretary for the Children's Ruin- 
ation, believes that these are the first 
\cr donated to a school in the state and 
erhaps the first to an> individual, by the 
(Btive Daughters. Mrs. Helena R Keefe 
I Aliso Pallor's Children's Foundation 
hairman herein expresses to the Native 
laughters the appreciation of those who 
ill benefit by this splendid gift.) 



01 GAVE FROM within the 
depths of your heart that two 
,-hom you never knew might "walk" 
mong us. These past few weeks a 
Iream came to full term for two lone- 
y children, crippled from birth: one, 

girl, appealing in her shyness, the 
ither, a husky voiced boy who loves 
ports. Neither of these two has ever 
now n the smell of the redwoods, or 
he crash of the surf tossing about its 
lungent seaweed perfume. Those of 
is who walk and can explore nature 
o its fullness often count these things 
s just a way of life. 

How many of us has spent the 
irst five years of life on our bed? 
-low many of us have been too weak 
o look out a window, or how many 
it age 10 have been in and out of 
i hospital year in and year out, 
[more often in than out), waking 
o the sweet smells of the anesthetic 
ind the soft swish and pad of the 
turses's walk? 



minute. Someone in charge had to 
keep that scraggly line of children 
from going as fast as they would 
like to so you wouldn't be embar- 
rassed by the old faithful chair. You 
hated being so large you had to use 
an adult chair at age ten, but faith 
in friends is bound to take root and 
flourish. 

Now is the magic time of Spring. 
The promises of a good God have 
shone through in the kindness of 
many, many people you will never 



Would we have a ready shy smile 
)n pale lips for a watchful driver 
jvho must lift us carefully into a 
attle yellow chugging bus? Think of 
i daily ride of an hour or more each 
ways to the only outing that counts — 
school. Here at the special school 
marvelous and wonderful things hap- 
pen. Other children are here, some 
In wheelchairs and many in full or 
Partial braces who can hop and run. 
There are many things to see and 
eel. Eyes and ears and heart are 
ipened by music, art, books and films 
ind above all by understanding 
eachers and attendants. 

On nature walks, imagine your- 
elf a heavy boy who was pushed. 
Iways, it seemed in the squeaky 
vheelchair with big wheels that stuck 
ind little front wheels that protested 
and threatened to crumble at any 



.'■' 




m 


WJlmm^m 



From left, back: Mines. Helena Keeje, 
teacher; Doris Lauffler, occupational 
therapist and Shirley Carter, Past 
President of El Aliso No. 314. Chil- 
dren are Ronald Herrera and Am para 
Holquin. 



know. Your teacher called them the 
Native Daughters of the Golden West. 
All you can remember as you pat 
the arm of your new charger is the 
"Golden Ladies." For surely and 
forever they have turned a helpless 
person into one who can truly, "walk 
with others by himself." 

We can all feel his prayers at 
night and those of the almost em- 
barrassingly grateful little girl who 
said, "They must love children an 
awful lot to help so much. Did they 
really and truly give chairs that work? 
Can you tell them all, the Golden 
Ladies, how much I love them?" So 
we all, at the Cerebral Palsy School 
in Santa Paula, thank you too with 
all our hearts that you are one within 
a rare group. Your hearts are held 
always in your hands, ready to stretch 



out tO help our least brethren (mil 
bless you all and "\ .isa < Oil Dio«" 
all your life. 



OFFICIAL MM I 

GP Ha/el I. Mallette made hci 
last visit in San Francisco to Parlors 

Buena Vista, Las Lomas and Dolores 
I he theme depicted the lovely ranch 
and home of Mrs. Mallette in Oro- 
ville. Olive green and orange form- 
ed the table colors. 

Soloist Brenda Wells was accom- 
panied by former Grand Organist 
Frances Simas. The meeting was eon- 
ducted by Betty Marlin of Dolores. 
Donations were made to the His- 
torical Room, ND Home and scholar- 
ships and a personal gift to the Grand 
President. Mrs Mallette talked on 
the projects of the Order. GT Ger- 
trude Doss spoke for the Grand 
Officers and PGP Fern Adams for 
the Past Grand Presidents. 

SDDGP Myrtle Rittcnbush was 
responsible for the theme. PGPs 
Evelyn Carlson and Emily Ryafl 
were co-chairman. 



TIERRA DEI. REY 

Tierra del Rev No. 300, Hermosa 
Beach celebrated its 20th birthday. 
The Parlor was organized and insti- 
tuded April 21, 1949 by PGP Max- 
iene Porter of La Tijera Parlor. 



The Parlor honored SDDGP Val- 
da Vaughn and DGP Dolly Kerr. 
Courtesy night was held with Long 
Beach No. 154, Rudecinda No. 230, 
Verdugo No. 240. Compton No. 258, 
Wilmington No. 278, La Tijera No. 
282, Rib Hondo No. 284, Beverly 
Hills No. 289 and Cien Ahos No. 
303 being represented. 

GOS Laura Blosdale was intro- 
duced at the altar. Charter president 
Mary Ella Wolfrom and past presi- 
dents Mildred Hollisler, Alma Com- 
pton, Elizabeth Tyack, May Smith. 
Alice Arenslein, Ruth Austin. Vera 
Mcintosh and Helen Loved were 
honored. Charter members present 
include Mmes. Carter. Watt, Wol- 
fran. Compton, Hollister. Mcintosh 
and life member Ann Mclntvre. Fol- 
lowing the meeting, the birthdaj cake 
was cut by PP Helen Lovett. 

PAGE 9 




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Grace No. 242 installed officers 
for the new year on July 17. at the 
Odd Fellows Hall, Fullerton. Wilm;i 
Dm kin will be the new president. 
On her staff arc Vera Popov, Ethelyn 
Furman, Helen Renard, Sandra D*- 
Angelo, Ida Mac Siiili. Betrj Ben- 
nett, Eva Wood. (Catherine Baxter, 
April lemons. Dora Fruits, Geor- 
gia Stone, Mae Lemke. Grace Hurst 
and Cecelia Gerola. Installing officer 
was SDDGP Jo Elliott. Santa Ana 
No. 235. Virginia Scgelson, of Sil- 
K7 Sands No. 286 is the incoming 
deputy. 

The theme chosen for the year is 
"Friendship" and the colors are pink 
and green. Following the meeting, 
delicious refreshments of coffee, 
punch, cookies and sandwiches were 
served. 



ELMER ROELLING PASSES 

Elmer Roelling husband of PGP 
Rhoda Roelling passed away June 15, 
1969. He had been ill for the past six 
years. He was a member of Antioch 
Parlor No. 32, NSGW. 

In appreciation of the many kind- 
nesses extended to Mr. and Mrs. 
Roelling, Mrs. Roelling sends this 
note: 

"I wish to take this opportunity of 
thanking our many Parlors and mem- 
bers for their expressions of sympathy 
on the loss of my dear husband 
Elmer. He was so proud of our Or- 
ders and their aims to preserve our 
State and assistance to children." 



JUNIOR UNIT NEWS . . . 
(Continued from Page 2) 

were in attendance. Parents, relatives 
and guests of the juniors witnessed 
the impressive ceremonies. Among 
the dignitaries present were PGP 
Orinda G. Giannini of San Francisco 
and GOS Dolores Ferenz, of Fre- 
mont, a member of the Junior Native 
Daughter Committee. 

Following the ceremonies, refresh- 
ments were served by Mrs. Virginia 
Banigan and her committee. At the 
buffet table Mrs. Alice Kirkpatrick 
and Mrs. Jeanette Hall served coffee 
and tea. Mrs. Freda VanNoy presid- 
ed at the punch bowl. The hall and 
buffet were decorated by the juniors, 
under the direction of Aurelia Shuf- 




PGP Orinda G. Gian 



fleton, using Shasta Daisies in unique 
and elaborate arrangements. 



MENLO JUNIORS 

Jr. State Marshal Linda Cane anc 
Jr. State Trustee Robin Gilbert along 
with other Jr. State officers attendee 
Grand Parlor at Los Banos. 

Robin Gilbert who is president oi 
the Menlo Unit presided at thai 
Father-Daughter dinner June 27 atl 
Menlo Park Recreation Center. M 
was a spaghetti dinner with all of the! 
trimmings. The tables were spread! 
with white cloths, red and whites' 
checked napkins and centered with! 
a candle at the base of which was| 
a cluster of grapes. A beach and bar-* 
becue party is planned in August at 
Santa Cruz. 

The Juniors will escort Mrs. Mariei 
Rogers incoming president of Menldj 
Parlor No. 211 and Junior Advisor.! 

A presentation gift will be made atj 
that time. 



OFFICIAL VISIT 

Grand President Hazel T. Mallettel 
was honored at Taft with four Par-| 
lors participating: Miocene No. 288,{ 
Alila No. 321, Tide Vista No. 305* 
and El Tejon No. 239, Gladys Roch- 
on of Miocene was chairman. The 
hall was beautifully decorated. Four i 
large rose-entwined candelabra were 
lighted by the Tide Vista Parlor drill 
team who then formed an honor | 
guard while Grand President Hazel 
T. Mallette was escorted by Marshal i 
Bessie Davis of Miocene to her seat 
of honor. PGP Fern Adams of I 
Berryessa No. 192 and GM Irene ll 
Bondanza of San Francisco No. 262, j 
were in attendance. The officers of'i 
all four parlors were presented at the 
altar and introduced, with Irene Felizl 
of Miocene presiding. DGPs Ardeni 
Reyes of Miocene, Lucy Spuhler of I 
Tide Vista and Doris West of El Te- 1 



CALIFORNIA HERALD 



tn were also introduced. El Tejon 
trior conducted the initiation ol two 

j ml i dates, one for Alila and the 
ther for Tide Vista. The "Hymn to 
alilornia" was sung by Alta Sells 
I / / Tejon. 
GP Hazel T. Mallette presented 
5 sear emblems to Alice Walters. 
7 Tejon, Constance Feliz Miocene 
ntl a past president's emblem to 
lena Hansen. Miocene. GP Mallette 
poke on projects of the Order and 
ave an interesting account of the 
Joldcn Spike ceremony of Promon- 
jry, Utah. The four parlors prescnt- 
d gifts to the Grand President. Pres- 
lent Mallette complimented the par- 
irs and DGPs Reyes, Spuhler and 
Ve t added a few words of praise. 



uNNIK K. B1DWELL 

Grand President Hazel T. Mallette 
lade her official visit to Annie K. 
fidwell No. 168. A formal dinner 
eld at the Catholic Youth Center, 
ireceded the meeting. The tables 
^ere decorated in olive green and 
old, the colors of the Grand Presi- 
lent. There was a large flower ar- 
angement at the head table. Cen- 
ers of the tables were decorated with 
:reen and gold net pompoms in 
irown vases, also smilax for green- 
ry. Green napkins were used. The 
California Poppy" nut cups were 
nade by Mrs. Boon Baker. During 
he dinner the members were enter- 
ained with love songs by Mrs Mar- 
on Prestesater. The meeting was 
leld in Native Daughters Hall with 
«/Irs. Ethel Estes as opening chair- 
nan. Mrs. Lee Logan conducted the 
neeting. The Grand President was 
escorted to the altar, introduced and 
•scorted to her seat of honor. Also 




GT MARIAN E. 



Uroduced were GTs Rae Rominger 

Ind Marian E. McGuire, PGPs Flor- 

Ince Boyle and Fern Adams. SDDGP 

lara Staheli and DGP Helen Kes- 




PGP FLORENCE D. 
BOYLE 



PGP FERN E. 
ADAMS 



sler. Life members Mary Belle Lind- 
gren, Ethel Estes and Bessie Shults 
were introduced. Members were pre- 
sent from Oroville, Redding, Sacra- 
mento. Willows, Corning, Berkeley, 
Vallcjo, Wheatland and Chico. 

Twenty-five year emblems were 
presented to Helen Brusie, Tess Rish- 
er and Fern Gearhart by the Grand 
President. Initiated into membership 
was LaBerta King, a former member 
of La Junta No. 203. 

During a recess the Drill Team 
performed and sang in honor of Mrs. 
Mallette. At the conclusion of the 
drill each member of the team placed 
a little white daisy in a handled wick- 
er basket. The stems of the flowers 
were wrapped in "green" monetary 
gifts for the Grand President. Drill 
team members included Mmes. Beers, 
Wade, Girdler, Logan, Cross, Schroe- 
der, Bearse, LaBreacht, C o o 1 e y, 
Prendergast, Kidwell and Sterns. 
They were dressed in pastel formals 
and carried white daisy nosegays, 
lilene Gottman was the musician. 



Above the President's station was 

a large green banner with 'Welcome 
Ha/el" spelled out in white daisies 
At other stations were small wishing 
wells anil at the lust \ ice -president's 
Station, a miniature water wheel 
pumping real water. 

Mrs. Mallette gave a comprehen- 
sive report on the many programs 
of the Native Daughters. (Catherine 
LaBreacht read a short history of 
the seal ol the Parlor, which depicts 
the Hooker Oak, the (alilornia pop- 
py and the Sierra Nevada Mountains. 
Mrs. Mallette has collected the his- 
tory of each Parlor's seal as one ol 
her interests. 

After the meeting, members were 
served coconut cake, ice cream, cof- 
fee and tea. at tables covered with 
white cloths and decorated with green 
candles surrounded by white daisies 
and small pots of daisies throughout. 

General chairman for the event 
was Mrs. Thomas Beers. Mrs. Claude 
Sterns made the dinner arrangements 
and took reservations. Among those 
helping were Mmes. Girdler, Cooley, 
Post, Arnes, Baker, Wade, and 
Bearse. Mrs. Walter Bammann had 
charge of the publicity. 



Some people are no good at counting 
calories, and they have the figures to prove 



A dog's life isn't too bad: someone else 
pa\s his taxes. 




Suite 114 



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Dorothy Y. Ulvestad. President 

construction loans 1 

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ANAHEIM 

187 w. Lincoln Avenue 

PRopect 2-1532 



J. Bernard Soto, Exec. Vice-Pres. 

refinancing 1 collections 



HUNTINGTON BEACH 

411 Main Street 
LEhigh 6-8591 



BREA 

770 South Brea Blvd. 
Ph. 529-4971 



GRAND PRESIDIO 1 

age *> 

term \ tion Net Words." 

I .mi verj proud to be .1 membei ol 
m Parloi No. n 7 and I often 
s.i\ u is the best parloi I suppose 
each one of us thinks ihis of her own 
parloi and right!) so. 

Piedmont Parlor is 73 years old 
and has given the ordei one oilier 
(ir.md President, the late Addie I 
Mosher who served in 1918-1919 
I Ins parlor lias always been active 
and strong; .1 leader in the commun- 
itj and .1 producer of man) Bne, out- 
standing and dedicated Native Daugh- 
ters I feel humble indeed that the) 
have placed their confidence in me 
to adequate!) represent 1 li e m 
throughout the State. Will all the 
members ol Piedmont Parlor please 
st. mil for recognition? "Thank You" 
seems like such a small expression 
0l the gratitude and love in my heart 
for mv members and especially the 
drill team I know you realize that 
man) long hours of practice were 
necessar) to produce the outstand- 
ing performance presented tonight. 
Each production needs a director and 
it is m\ good fortune to have such a 
fine one right in the Parlor. She and I 
have been life long friends and I 
know she truly shares the joy that is 
mine tonight. I am happy to intro- 
duce mv parlor installation chair- 
man and drill captain: Mrs. Bettv 
Maffei. 

To everyone who had a share in 
tonight's installation. I say thank you. 
1 am so proud and so grateful for 
all your efforts. The members in the 
white formats that formed the hon 
orarv escort are from the Parlors in 
Alameda and part Contra Costa 
County. Will they please stand for 
recognition'.' I pay tribute to my 
dear friends and ardent supporters 
who have gone to the Grand Parlor 
on high: Emily Lawson, Patricia 
Reardon and Erna Jenkins. I know 
how much they wanted to be here 
tonight and I sense their presence. 

Music is such a part of my life 
and I am thankful my good friends of 
the Franciscan Trio, Frances Simas. 
Gladys and Sue Cole, were able to 
be here to share their talents with us. 
Carol King, the organist from Pied- 
mont Parlor, was my first accompa- 
nist when I began singing for the 
Native Daughters. Paul Walti and 
I met when we presented a program 



1 1 hank you Paul for being 
here 

In closing mv message to you 
tonight. I do so b) asking that you 
go forth with renewed enthusiasm, 

with burning love for country, with 
respect for everyone ami everything 

and that your action will truly speak 
louder than words. 



POPP1 IRAII. 

PoppyTrail's courtesy night was 
a real success. I he Hawaiian theme 
was used and with the colorful Ha- 
waiian attire of the guests, the room 
was a picture of beauty. Pamela 
Woolman. grand daughter of mem- 




ber Pauline Pappas entertained with 
fahitian dances. GT Gertrude Doss 
was organist for the evening. SDDGP 
Mildred McGee and DGP Evelyn 
Sherman were presented with jewel- 
ed gifts. 




The refreshments were delicious. 
The raffle of Cameo Necklace Set 
donated by Leola Butler was won 
by Adele Fournier. The ways and 
means netted $22.60 on the raffle. 



FLAG PRESENTED 

Grand Presidents Hazel T. Mallette 
NDGW, Richard Ritchison NSGW 
and PGP Andrew Stodel NSGW on 
behalf of the Orders presented a 
California Bear Flag to President 
Richard M. Nixon at the executive 




From left: GP Richard Ritchison, 

NSGW; GP Hazel T. Mallette, 1 

NDGW and PGP Andrew Stodel. 

NSGW 

mansion. The flag will be on display I 
in the President's executive office. 

The official presentation was ar-il 
ranged by Senaida Sullivan, State 
chairman of Americanism and Civic 1 
Participation. PGP Maxiene Porter, 
who resides in Alexandria, Virginia, 
met the group at the Dulles airport. 




PGT Senaida Sullivan 



PGP Maxiene Porter 



Washington D.C. Others who attend- 
ed the flag presentation were GT 
Betty Read Curilich, Anne Ritchison, 
Senators George Murphy and Allen 
Cranston. President Nixon is a long 
time member of Ramona Parlor. 

A California Bear mounted for 
use on her desk was presented to Mrs. 
Nixon by GP Hazel T. Mallette on 
behalf of the Native Daughters for 
the graciousness and dignity she has 
broueht the White House. 



REINA DEL MAR 

Reina del Mar Parlor appeared on 
the program of the Daughters of ' 
Charity of St. Vincent de Paul, in I 
Santa Barbara, dedication of the New 
Classroom Facility. His Eminence 
James Francis Cardinal Mclntyre 
officiated. George V. Castagnola, 
member and past President of Santa 
Barbara No. 116, NSGW acted as 
M.C. (Continued on Page 15) 

CALIFORNIA HERALD 



ICENTENNIAL . . . 
ontinncd from Page 3) 

nee his demise. I lie tide of mental 
ilightenment and spiritual uplift that 
as followed in his wake has no- 
herc been more aptly stated than 
i an address delivered a lifetime 
m In Dr. Warren D. More, pastor 
i Santa Barbara's First Presbyterian 
hureh: 

Other slates may point to a great event 
B .meat name, or even to a succession 
peal names and events, but the names 
I i Junipero Serra brings before us 
I epoch, stirring and eventful, a civi- 
'ation. unique, different, a bit of the 
desi world mingling fascinatingly with 
e newest world, a faith, self-sacrificing. 
:roic. unconquerable before difficulties. 
:t ultimately yielding to the inevitable 
tanging order of things, a man with the 
ith and zeal of the saints, with the 
lUrage and fortitude of the soldier, with 
e v ision and dreams of the prophet, 
ith the sacrifice and gladness of the 
artyr, and yet all — epoch, civilization, 
ith. man, losing themselves as in the 
ssolving picture, and in their stead there 
ipeais the radiant, glorious, enduring 
ime California. 



w< 


* ^fl 


™-+i*ym 




£#; 



atne of Fr. Serra in Capitol Park, 
Sacramento 



111 



ASA DE RAMIREZ . . . 

Continued from Page 5) 

freshments, Mariana Schmitter, 
tamie Miller, Sarah Diaz, Ambert 
iiillips and Anita Joyal; hostesses, 
orraine Aceves, Patricia Joyal and 
ieborah Lopez; guest book, Mar- 
ftret Graham. 

Special guests of the parlor were: 
Its. Francis V. Lloyd, president of 



the Santa Barbara I rust lor Historic 
Preservation; Mrs. Courtney Mon- 
sc-n oi old Spanish Days; Miss Pearl 

Chase, chairman of the Plans and 
Planting Committee; Lynn Spear and 
Jeremy Hass of the Volunteers ol the 
Presidio restoration; Walter Tomp- 



kins, historian. PGP I ileen Disntuke; 
Arthur Lowe, and Kenneth Bell, ol 
Parlor No. I I ft NSCYv 




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Unveiling the marker are from left: 
Mary Louise Days, Nancy linker. 
1 irgitea Daw Beverly Sorenson and 
Bernice Hogg of Reina del Mar No. 

26. 

Special guest speaker for the oc- 
casion was Gail B. Matthews. As- 
sistant Trust Officer for Crocker- 
C iti/ens National Bank in San Fran- 
cisco. Mr. Matthews was formerly a 
resident of Santa Barbara and lived 
in the Gonzales-Ramirez adobe dur- 
ing this time in the city. He gave a 
very delightful and enlightening talk 
on the history of the adobe along with 
highlights of his stay at this old land- 
mark. 

111 
DEPUTIES 

The Deputies of 1956-57 held their 
annual "get-together" at the Old Col- 
ony Restaurant. PGP Audrey Brown 
and Past SDDGP Constance War- 
shaw greeted the deputies. Each re- 
ceived a little gift from Connie. A 
pleasant evening was enjoyed. Next 
year the meeting will be held in Mrs. 
Warshaw's home. 

111 
EL DORADO 

Due to a misunderstanding in re- 
gard to a key (a case of "let George- 
do it") El Dorado No. 1 86 failed to 
gain entrance to the VFW Hall, the 
official meeting place of the order. 
However, Miss Kathleen Flynn gra- 
ciously offered the use of her spacious 
home for the regular meeting June 
14 

First vice president Georgia Gar- 
dner presided as president Helen 
Francisco was in attendance at Grand 
Parlor. Officers were elected and 
will be installed July 12. 

A luncheon was served by Elsie 
Ford. 



IN MKMORIAM 




Not lost to those that love them, 

dead, just gone before 

They ttUl live in our memory. 

And they will forever more. 

1 m \l Hum. I airfax No 225, May 5. 
Elizabeth A Telesmonic, Portola No. 172, 
Ma) 18 

i.ith. Guadalupe Ni 

April 17. 

Emelie N. Wilson, Darina No. 1 14, March 
30. 

I illi.in R Hickman. Aloha No. 106. April 

28 
Violet An/ar. Ano Nuevo No. 180, Maj 

16. 
Helena M. Stitt, Woodland No. 90. Mav 

16 

Estella A. Nichley, Amapola No. so. Ma) 

• 
Theresa R. Eberwine, La Bandera No. 

110, Ma) is. 
Charlotte D. Heritage, Entinal No. 156. 

Ma) 20. 
Minnie R. Hansen. Morada No. 199, May 

17. 
Gertrude Sillico. Fruitvale No. 177. Mav 

21. 
Mars Ellen Green. Minerva No. 2. Mav 

24. 
Beatrice N. Turner. Minerva No. 2. Mav 

17. 
Barbara S. Dallas. Vendome No. 100. 

May 19. 
Mayme k Brown. Brooklyn No. 1 57. Mav 

24. 
Ann L. Weber. Fruitvale No. 177. May 

Viola E. Smith. Fresno No. 187. Mav 24. 
Mary B. Taix. San Juan Bautista No. 179. 

Max 22. 
Glad\s E. Noce. Amapola No. 80. May 

25. 
Gertrude S. McGuire. Golden State No 

158, May 23. 
Maryarethe S. Carter. Los Angeles No. 

124. Ma) 21. 
Barbara M. Alves, Woodland No. 90, Mav 

28. 
Virginia H Wilson, Tamelpa No. 213. 

June 6. 



ORINDA — NDGW SAN FRANCISCO 

No Hawaiian luau setting could 
surpass the colorful scene at Orinda 
Parlor's Hawaiian night. Charlotte 
Ludemann and Jean Galli transform- 
ed the Urban Center to an island 
atmosphere to conjure up swaying 
palm trees and the touch of the soft 
trade winds. Members were attired 



in mini inuiis of all styles and colors. 
Needless to say. the colorful dresses 
provided a light mk\ gaj touch to the 
evening. Alycc Crouere, wearing a 
long, red mini rauu, with a red lei 

circling her dark tresses, «a\ chosen 

"queen." Charlotte presented Miss 
Hawaiian Queen with a lei and a kiss. 
"Hilo Haiti." in the person of Alice 
l ange. gave a demonstration of the 
footsteps and hand gestures of the 
Hawaiian Hula \ erena Fricdc play- 
ed the soft island tunes on the piano. 
Soon everyone was swaying to "Love- 
h Hula Hands." 

The evening culminated with a 
treat of fruit salad, topped with lime 
sherbert, crackers, chocolate and 
straw hem frosted cupcakes. Pine- 
apples, coconuts, bananas and limes 
served as table decorations comple- 
mented by brightly colored leis. One 
of Orinda*s newest members and 
granddaughter of Past President Jean 
Galli. lovel) Kathy Ringer, energeti- 
cally assisted Charlotte and Jean 
throughout the evening. 
111 
LA TIJERA 

La Tijera presented a California 
Bear Flag to Fairfax High School 
in Hollywood. President Bea Scully 
made the presentation. The R.O.T.C. 
raised the flag. An interesting pro- 
gram was given. 




The Parlor celebrated its birth- 
da\ with a luau party. A seven o'- 
clock dinner was served. An interest- 
ing program was enjoyed. GT Lila 
Hummel. DGP Thelma Eisen and 
SDDGP Ruth Payne were honored. 



DISTRICT DEPUTIES 

Jr. PGP Hazel T. Mallette joined 
her former SDDGP Dolores Ferenz 
of Hayward No. 122 and 16 of the 
1968-69 DGPs of Alameda and part 
Contra Costa Counties for an end-of- 
the-year celebration dinner. Also pre- 
sent for the festivities were Grand 
President Nancy J. Conens. GT 
Marian McGuire and PGPs Irma 
Caton and Edna Williams. DGPs 
Rose Sairanen, Minnie Silva and 
Lena Lemos were in charge or ar- 
rangements. 




PGP Irma Caton 




Following dinner a short busines] 
session was held at which the Depj 
uties and their Grand President Haze 
unanimously selected the "Haze 
Nuts" to designate this particulal 
group. A date was set for their 1 970 
renunion. A novel gilt frame wai 
presented by the deputies to Hazel 
which featured "greens" and dangU 
ing nuts. Former SDDGP Dolorej 
was given a tray featuring candleJ 
wrapped in "greens" to be used it 
the purchase of silver candlesticks aJ 
a memento of her term. Each guesi 
was the recipient of a napkin holdeJ 
formed from resin in the outline o\ 
the State of California and imbedded 
with green and orange feathers carryl 
ing forth the theme of the past year! 
Jr. PGP Hazel T. Mallette thankee 
her Supervisor and Deputy Grand 
Presidents for their service and ex| 
tended congratulations and best wisM 
es to Dolores for recently having beer] 
elected Grand Outside Sentinel. Tra| 
ditionally in District No. 20, thq 
newly appointed SDDGP is a guesil 
and Betty J. Maffei of Piedmont 
No. 87 was appropriately presented 
with her regalia. Pictures were takem 
of all those present and will be suit-j 

CALIFORNIA HERALl 



hl\ placed in an album as a personal 
ill from Dolores Ferenz to Mrs. 
toilette. 



• \\ FRANCISCO DEPUTIES 

The lovely dining room of the Flks 
lub in down town San Francisco 
.as chosen by SDDGP Myrtle Rit- 
erback and DGP Doris Stedhim for 
he annual luncheon meeting of this 
Bin's deputies. DGP Bernadette Sul- 
ivan was in charge of the table door 
irizes. DGP Marie Feil acted as 
lOStess with the deputies directing 
he guests to the tables. DGP Jaredna 
ohnson led the flag salute and 
"ledge. The invocation was given 
>y DGP Elizabeth Brennan. Chair- 
lan Stedhim introduced SDDGP 
Myrtle Ritterback and GP Hazel T. 
fallette and presented each with a 
ook on California history. Mrs. Wil- 
am Hatch, guest speaker, spoke on 
he founding of San Francisco. Mrs. 
fallette discussed the principles of 
he NDGW. GP Richard Ritcheson 
ivited all to be at Santa Cruz on 
admission Day. Among those pre- 
;nt were 25 grand and past grand 
fficers. 



son, Orinda Ci. Giannini, Emilj I 
Ryan, Ethd Enos, Jewel McSweeney, 
1,1,1:1 ML Caton, Edna ( Williams 
and Alice l) Shea. The committees 
prepared an eventful evening and re- 
freshments. All enjoyed it. 




PGO Frances Simas 

Each deputy was presented with a 
>ld pin with a cultured pearl in the 
nter of a circle with two leaves. 
jO Frances Simas and her Fran- 
scan Trio presented the music with 
enda Wells as soloist. 
On June 26, Mrs. Ritterbush and 
r deputies met to conclude the 
isiness of the term. 



SIT 

San Francisco, El Vespero and 
>lden State Parlors were hostesses 
• GP Hazel T. Mallette's official 
it. Dignitaries attending included 
/P Nancy Conens; GM Irene Bon- 
nza; GS Mary Mahoney; Chairman 
Board Rae Rominger; GTs Helen 
:Carthy and Marian McGuire GOS 
ura Blosdale; PGPs Evelyn 1 Carl- 



DEDH Alios oi FOUNTAIN 

Grand Officers of the Native Sons 
Of the Golden West and Native 
Daughters of the Ciolden West were 
present, when El Pajaro No. 35, 
NDGW, and Watsonville Parlor No' 
65, dedicated a fountain and plaque 
for the enjoyment of all who will 
come to Pinto Lake. 

President Joseph Silva, Watson- 
ville Parlor No. 65, opened the cere- 
mony. The salute to the flag was led 
by Mary Nemanich, Marshal of El 
Pajaro, followed by the introduction 
of GP Andrew M. Stodel, NSGW, 
who led the dedication ceremony 
Other NSGW Grand Officers intro- 
duced were: PGP Wayne Millington, 
GS Fred Dissmeyer, GT Joe Regallo, 
and PGP Joseph Oeschger. Maurine 
Sherriff, President of El Pajaro No. 
35, then introduced GVP Nancy 
Conens, representing GP Hazel T. 
Mallette who was unable to attend; 
PGPs Edna Williams and Alice Shea, 
DGP Roseline Oliveria, and Allis 
Hussey, Chairman of History and 
Landmarks for District No. 27. 

President Maurine Sherriff then 
said, "On behalf of Watsonville No. 
65, NSGW and El Pajaro No. 35, 
NDGW, we welcome Santa Cruz 
County Officials, City Officials of 
Watsonville, Native Sons and Native 
Daughters of the Golden West, and 
guests. It is a pleasure to welcome 
you here today on this special occas- 
ion, the dedication of the water foun- 
tain and plaque commemorating the 
Portola Expedition through our beau- 
tiful Pajaro Valley in 1769. It is 
believed Don Gaspar de Portola, 
while making his famous overland 
trek from the Mexican border to 
San Francisco in 1769, camped here 
at Pinto Lake where the white man 
first saw a California Redwood tree. 
We take this opportunity to thank 
all of you who have made it possible 
for us to mark this historical site 
at Pinto Lake today." 

Arrangements for this marking 
with a plaque, and the designing of 
the fountain built with granite rock 
from the local Granite Rock Com- 
pany, were under the direction of 



Committee members Joseph SiK.i. 

(■us Enos and Charles Leonard of 
Watsonville Parlor nsgw /./ Pajaro 

Parlor committee members \sere 
Mines Sylvia Davis, (Lira Leonard 

and Bernadine Lynch. At the con- 
clusion of the ceremony, some fortj 

persons attended a reception |,„ 
visiting Grand Officers and uuests 
hosted by Mr. and Mrs. I-. }.. Davis 
at their home overlooking Pinto Lake. 
Presidents Maurine Sherriff and 
Joseph Silva presented the gilt to the 
Citj of Watsonville. when the Park 
was officially dedicated. 



PIONEER RECEPTION 




Fourteenth annual Carpinteria Pio- 
neer Reception sponsored by Tierra 
tie Oro No. 304 in the Veterans 
Memorial Building. From left: PGP 
Eileen Dismuke, M.C.; Marx Weg- 
ener Past President of Tierra de On,; 
Claudine Wullbrandt, General Chair- 
man of Carpenteria Pioneer Recep- 
tion, 1969; Gertrude Reed, Past 
President of Tierra de Oro Parlor. 



ST. VINCENT DE PAUL . . . 
(Continued from Pa^e 12) 

Mrs. James Hogg, president of 
Reina del Mar, presented the Bear 
Flag on behalf of the Parlor, as well 
as the American Flag which was given 
to the Parlor by Mrs. Francis Mel- 
endez in memory of her departed son 
Frank, who was in the Navy. It was 
her desire to have this flag presented 
to St. Vincent School. Assisting Mrs. 
Hogg in the presentation was Si. 
Vincent Cadette Troop No. 454. 
Members attending were Rena Cas- 
tagnola. Edna Cannon. Emma Da- 
vies, Anita Joyal. Lotte MacFarlane. 
Betty Miller, Mamie Miller, and Nan- 
ncttc Sevegney. and Beverly Soren- 
son, 



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$2.00 (plus 40^ tax and mailing). 

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Life and events in Anaheim from October 1870 to 1871. Barter was an 
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Excellent narrative verse depicting 
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DEMETRIOS DISCOVERED 
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Biography of Demetrios Stylianou who 
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California Herald 



•PRESERVING THE PAST FOR THE FUTURE' 



i ki iin vi i ji stoma 

I Ik- l ruitvale Juniors Unil No. 

22 u.is hostess t»r State Chairman. 

! leu ( McCarthy. "Fiesta" 
was the theme oi the afternoon. An 
enchilada luncheon was enjoyed be- 
fore the meeting. 

I ntertainment was provided by the 
Ragonettes. Mis McCarthj was es- 
corted b) the Juniors, who were 
dressed in colorful costumes to add 
to the Fiesta theme A good time 
uas had by everyone. 

Fruitvale plans to hold a number 

of bingo parties. The first was held 
on Jul\ 1 2. 



VKI CONT1 51 

Rt'iini del Mar No. I 26 and Tierra 
</<• Oro No. 304, co-sponsored an 

historical art talent contest for high 
school stduents of southern Santa 
Barbara County. The judging and 
awards ceremony was held in the 
beautiful County Courthouse. Co- 
chairmen for the event were Mary 
Louise Days, past president of Reina 
del Mar and Lua Safwenberg of 
Tierra de Oro. 

First prize was won by John Wull- 
brandt. a junior at Carpinteria High 
School. John is the son of City 
Councilman and Mrs. Ernest Wull- 
brandt and the grandson of Claudine 
Wullbrandt. an officer of Tierra de 
Oro parlor. His entry was a large 
oil painting of San Diego Mission. 
John's grandmother accepted the a- 
ward for him, since he could not be 
excused from work. Second prize was 
won b\ Merrillee Ford, a senior at 
Santa Barbara High School. Her en- 
try was a water color and ink por- 
trayal of the "Treasure Tree" at 
3689 State Street. Santa Barbara, a 
very old sycamore tree reputed to 
have buried treasure near it. The 
third prize was won by a pencil draw- 
ing of the famed Moreton Bay Fig 
Tree by Scott Hain. a junior at La 
Cuesta High School. Santa Barbara. 

Judges for the contest were Doro- 

th\ Russell, an art teacher. Russell 

A. Ruiz, artist-historian, and Don 

Paulson, an artist. Members of the 

(Continued on page 13) 



VoiiMi XVI August, 1969 Numhir 

CONTENTS THIS MONTH 

Junior Unit News 

Post Office from Utopia, by Lois M. Scarboro 

Angel's Flight, by Laura Blosdale 

Paradise, by Lida M. Stearns 

The Grand President's Corner 

Amador County, by Alzada Eaton 

Admission Day, by Doris Perez 

Bowling Tournament, by Lola Bredehoft 

Parlor News 

In Memoriam 

Anaheim Landing, by Ed Pugh 

Adobes, by J. J. Friis 



Before you make 



amove 



be sure to see a Medallion Electric 
Home. After all, the trend is to 
electric living. A Medallion Home can mean: Flameless, 
electric heating with room-by-room temperature controls. 
An all-electric kitchen that stays clean and cool. Cool, re- 
freshing air conditioning throughout the house. Medallion 
Homes are available now in all price ranges. It will pay 
you to look for this emblem before you make a move. 




Southern California Edison 



i. J. FRIIS 
Publisher 



LEO J. FRIIS 

Editor 



JANE FRUSi 

Public Relation 



Published Monthly by J. J. Friis and Leo J. Friis, owners and publishers, Anaheirt 
California. All Rights Reserved. EDITORIAL AND GENERAL OFFICES: Anaheim, Californit 
Mailing Address: P.O. Drawer 4243, Anaheim, California 92803. ADVERTISING OFFICE: 3C 
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printed without specific permission. 

CALIFORNIA HERALI 



POST OFFICE FROM UTOPIA 



BY LOIS M. SCARBORO 




Kaweah Post Ofjice ha ill in 1910 



M an you imagine a more delight- 
Jj ful place in which to pick up 
mr mail? This tiny, rustic, and his- 
iric Post Office is one of the three 
nallest in the United States, and 
pie of its patrons are descendants 
I members of an early California 
topian experiment. 

The unique 10x12 structure lies 
it only in a scenic wonderland, 
at among friendly, chatty people. 
n amiable postmistress knows the 
w hundred near-by residents and 
is a personal greeting for each of 
em when they arrive, almost simul- 
neously, at noon-time to pick up 
eir mail. They exchange local news 
ibits on the porch and trade light- 
Brted banter as they gather around 
le buiiding and on the leaf strewn 
iad. 

The Post Office, built in 1910 
: rough lumber sits quite sturdily 
ithout a foundation. It is situated 
l the North Fork Road of the 
awcah River, just off the highway- 
id across the bridge, about two 
iles north of Three Rivers. Cal- 
irnia. Visitors can get to the area 
/ State Highway 198, which takes 
em also into Sequoia National 



Park, home of the giant California 
redwoods, among the oldest living 
things on earth. 

The Kaweah River, rising in the 
Sierra Nevada range, has three prin- 
cipal branches — the North, Middle, 
and South Forks. These branches 
unite to form one immense river 
which emerges from the foothills in- 
to the plains of the valley of the San 
Joaquin. It creates an extensive and 
lush growth of magnificent oaks, wil- 
lows and wild vines, and in the 
spring, beautiful purple mountains 
lilacs burst forth. 

The Post Office was originally lo- 
cated seven miles up the river at a 
camp of the Kaweah Co-operative 
Colony. When the colony was dis- 
banded, it was hoisted upon a truck 
and moved to its present spot. 

The Kaweahs were an Indian 
tribe — really Ga'wias — that had lived 
in the early years along the banks 
of the river. The settlers spelled the 
name as it sounded, Kaweah, and 
chose it for the name of their wilder- 
ness project. The Kaweah dwellers 
of to-day seem aware and quite im- 
pressed, by the interesting hack 
ground of their region. 



I he short-lived project was the 
dream of a San Francisco lawyer, 
Burnette Haskell, a brilliant and er- 
ratic genius, who became attracted to 
the cause of the workingman. It was 
to be a socialistic experiment design- 
ed to establish ultimately a profitable 
industry, with equal wages and equal 
rights for all its members. In 1885 
Mr. Haskell, with sixty-eight work- 
ingmen, began the experiment on 
the banks of the swift-flowing 
Kaweah. 

The location was ideal: mild cli- 
mate, fertile farmland in a small val- 
ley protected by the mountains from 
cold storms and sweeping winds, and 
in the adjacent high mountains, fine 
stands of fir, pine, and spruce. Lum- 
bering could be the economic base of 
the colony and the vast central Cal- 
ifornia valley could be a potential 
market for the lumber. 

From the first day disputes arose 
with the government over land claims. 
The government had become sus- 
picious about predatory claimants of 
the national timberlands. Discord in 
the camp over organization of the 
project weakened the experiment. Mr. 
Haskell remembered later that argu- 
ments went on for days at a time 
while the necessary work in the camp 
remained undone. Bickering over tri- 
vialities caused hard feelings and jeal- 
ousy among the members. And 
"equal rights for all" proved tough 
to apply. 

In 1890, after four years of hard 
work, constant lawsuits over land 
claims, and endless suspicions on 
both sides. Congress formed the Se- 
quoia National Park. Its boundaries 
included the trees the colonists had 
hoped to use and the 18 mile hand- 
built road that led to them. 

The colony, which had peaked at 
about 400 members, began slowly to 
disintegrate alter the creation of 
the park. Since no alternative plans 
had been made in case the land 
claims did not materialize, there was 
no economy to fall back on. A small 
number of the colonists remained for 

(Continued on Page 12) 

PAGE 3 







« s-^ 




r^auia 



febosbak 



\f^'***k 



Angel's Flight built 68 years ago. 



m ngel's flight, one of the 
*&£, world's shortest railroads and 
the last remaining cable railway in 
Los Angeles is no longer in use. 
Angel's Flight was the brain child 
of Colonel J. W. Eddy, a native of 
Java, New York, who came to Los 
Angeles in 1895. In 1901 he peti- 
tioned the Los Angeles City Coun- 
cil for a franchise to construct a funi- 
cular railway up Bunker Hill. In 
order that they might not be crit- 
icized for giving him a monopoly the 
conscientious city fathers insisted 
that Eddy build steps up the hill on 
the north side of Third Street. When 
this was accomplished a thirty-year 
franchise was granted on May 30. 
1901. 

Construction was completed in 
December, 1901 and on the grand 
opening day, December 3 1 . all pas- 



sengers rode free and punch was 
served by the ladies who resided 
nearby on Olive Heights (the old 
name of Bunker Hill). The Hill 
Street entry arch was added in 1908. 
The price of tickets was 50 Three 
tickets could be purchased for a dime, 
ten for a quarter, and 100 for a dol- 
lar. Two cars, holding 32 passen- 
gers each were named Olivet and 
Sinai. Originally they were painted 
white, but later orange and black. 
A one way trip took 50 seconds. 

Colonel Eddy soon found him- 
self in financial difficulties. It cost 
him a cent for each passenger carried 
and he hoped to make his profit on 
sales of fares to transients and tour- 
ists at the five cent rate. To encour- 
age this traffic he had erected a 
steel observation tower on Bunker 
Hill which he called "Angel's Rest" 



and which proved an attraction 
people desiring to get a good view 
the city. However it was later orde 
ed removed by the Board of Pu 
lie Works due to the continued sin 
ing of the pillars holding it, apparer 
ly caused by the building of the Thi 
Street tunnel. It was not actual 
removed until 1938, twenty-fo' 
years later. 

Colonel Eddy sold Angel's Flig 
in May, 1912, to the Funding Con 
pany of California. Damage to 
cable in 1913 which caused an at 
cident responsible for one fatali' 
provoked lawsuits which broke 
new company. Although safety di 
vices were installed to prevent 
recurrence of the accident, the rai 
way was sold to Continental Secur 
ties Co. in 1914. A threat to te 
minate the franchise in 1935 occur 
ed when the City Council announo 
plans to widen 3rd Street. A band 
1200 residents and property ownei 
protested so vigorously that Ange 
Flight was issued a new ten yea 
franchise. 

When Continental Securities de 
cided to sell, Robert Moore pul 
chased the railway as his own vec 
ture. When Moore retired in 1952, h 
sold Angel's Flight to Lester 
Moreland and Byron E. Linvilk 
knowing that Moreland had an inter 
est in the preservation of the rail 
road and was capable of operating 
it. In March, 1953, the MorelaH 
family purchased the interest of Lin 
ville and became the sole owners. 

On November 18, 1952 Beverlj 
Hills Parlor No. 289, NDGW pre 
sented and dedicated a bronze plaqu> 
mounted on an especially designei 
drinking fountain. The plaque wa 
unveiled and presented by Mrs 
Senaida Sullivan, History and Land 
marks chairman of the Parlor, Mayo 

CALIFORNIA HERALC 




Dedication by Beverly Hills Parlor of plaque at Angel's Flight. From left: 

he late Sheriff Eugene V . Biscailuz, Mrs. Senaida Sullivan and former Mayor 

Fletcher Bowron. 



3owron and Sheriff Biscailuz. It was 
tccepted by the owners Lester B 
vloreland and Byron E. Linville. 

An Historic American Building 
Survey report was prepared in 1963 
)y the Historic Building Committee, 
Southern California Chapter of the 
\merican Institute of Architects in 
vhich Angel's Flight was listed as 
in historic structure in the Library 
)f Congress, Washington, DC. The 
Culture Heritage Board of the City 
)f Los Angeles declared Angel's 
-light in historic-cultural monument 
n August 1962. In October 1962, 
he Los Angeles City Council approv- 
:d allocation of $35,000 for acqui- 
ition of Angel's Flight. 

On the last day of Angel's Flight, 
nembers of Beverly Hills Parlor No. 
189 were guests of honor at the 
:losing event. Mrs. Helen Moreland 
)f Beverly Hills Parlor was the last 
>wner of this historic railway. Other 
MDGW Beverly Hills Parlor mem- 
bers present were Grand Outside 
Sentinel Laura Blosdale, Past Presi- 
lents Erlinda Eastman and Senaida 
Sullivan. Mrs. Sullivan and Edith 
Vaughn are also past presidents of 
he Cultural Heritage Board. Ida 
3elle Griffin of San Fernando Parlor 
vas also introduced. 

AUGUST, 1969 



The hill-top residential communi- 
ty and the little railway flourished to- 
gether around the turn of the cen- 
tury and grew old together. But while 
Angel's Flight continued to meet the 
needs of the people of Los Angeles, 
the neighborhood at the top of the 
hill became an area which was no 
longer able to provide decent hous- 
ing or adequate services for its resi- 
dents. 

In 1959 the City Council approv- 
ed a redevelopment plan for Bunker 
Hill, improving and selling the pro- 
perty for development. 

When completed, within the next 
decade, Bunker Hill will be the vital 
center of downtown Los Angeles. 
A 600-million dollar planned devel- 
opment of office buildings, shops, 
hotels and residential towers all in 
a pleasant setting for people to en- 
joy: plazas, open spaces, terraces, 
and pedestrian walkways. 

Angel's Flight has an important 
role to play, too, in the future. The 
little cable railway will be carefully 
taken down and stored for about 
two years, and while the top of Bun- 
ker Hill is being graded and im- 
proved for the new buildings. Angel's 
Flight will be refurbished and worn 
parts will be replaced. 



i hen when the siie and the rail 
waj are ready, Angel's Flight will be 
nbled in us present location, 
I he two l:h s v>ill again cat i 
dents and tourists up and down be- 
tween Hill ami ()li\L . . . and Angel's 
Flight will eer\e as a link between the 
bustling pre e it and a gracious by- 
gone era in the proud history ol 
l os Angeles. 



PARADISE 

BY LIDA M. STEARNS 



During i iii Civil w ar when the 
South cut off the resin and 
pitch supply from the North, the 
area surrounding the new well-known 
city of Paradise became active in the 
production of these necessary items. 
Turpentine was taken from the pine 
trees. Some of the patriarchs of these 
pines still bear the scars from the old 
gashes from which the resinous oil 
was drawn. 

In its heyday the life of the com- 
munity centered around "Four Cor- 
ners" as Paradise was first called. 
One of the first establishments in 
1862 was Paradise Mills, also known 
as Leonard's Mills. It was William 
Leonard, owner of the Mills, who 
on a hot summer day, sat out under 
the pine trees growing around his 
mill. He enjoyed the coolness and 
exclaimed. This is Paradise." Thus 
the town was named. 

By 1872, the town boasted of 
several stores, a saloon, a blacksmith 
shop, a pool hall, and the old Adams 
Hotel. Mail was first brought in by 
stage coach but by March 19, 1879, 
the official post office was established 
and John H. Strong was appointed 
postmaster. 

The first school was said to have 
been established near the present 
cemetery but was later moved to a 
location on what is now known as 
Copeland Road. The first church 
was the Congregational Church fol- 
lowed by the Methodist. 

In the early days, around 1870. 
the Sons of Temperance organization 
was very active. The original Com- 
munity Hall was built by the Good 
Templars. 

When the Butte County Railroad 

was laid from Chico to Paradise. 

(Continued on Page 10) 



The Grand 
President's Corner 




NANCY J. CONENS 



GR VND I'KI SIDENT 

Nancy i i onens (Mn 
•4 511 Mlendale Avenue 
Oakland. California 94619 



GRAND SECRETARY 

office: 703 Market Street, Room 612 
San Francisco 94103 Dial 362-4127 



Stripes over the Custom House. The 
event «as climaxed with a 21 gun 

salute from the (.leeks of the U.S.S. 

England. 

I he principal activities for the 
months of Julj and August will he 
the eight Schools of Instructions 
which will he held throughout the 



State for Supervising District Depul' 
Grand Presidents and Deputy Oran| 
Presidents. It is my hope that muc 
practical and beneficial information 
will be gained from these meeting: 

As we approach the month 
September, I am hopeful that mam 
of you are now making plans 



Greetings to all my fraternal sis- 
ters' Another year has begun and 

your Grand President has already 
been active m the performance of 
her official duties. On July 4 in the 
Citj ol Monterey, high on a hilltop 
overlooking the Pacific Ocean — a 
very impressive ceremonj was held 
commemorating the 123rd Anniver- 
sarj of Commodore John D. Sloat's 
landing and raising of the Stars and 





Above: Shoreline of early Monierey with Custom House where Conunodor 
John Sloat raised the Stars and Stripes; other early buildings also shown 
At Left: Satire Daughters participating in ceremony of laying wreath on 
monument commorating the landing of Commodore John Drake Sloat. 



participate in the Admission Day 
Celebration in Santa Cruz. Your 
State Chairmen have outlined the de- 
tails elsewhere in this issue. 

Each month I shall remind youi 
of our urgent need to increase our. 
membership. Please keep this up- 
permost in your ambitions and bel 
alert to gaining new members. Dis-j 
trict Chairmen have been appointed] 
for the Extension of the Order Com- 
mittee. Please contact them for as- 
sistance or needed information. Any-' 
one knowing of an area where a new. 
Parlor might be instituted is asked ! 
to contact Past Grand President 
Katie Jewett, Extension of the Order 
Chairman. I am confident that with 



(Continued on Page 13) 



CALIFORNIA HERALD 



AMADOR COUNTY 

bq Alzada Eaton 

VOLCANO SCHOOL-HOUSE 

Volcano School-house was built 
n 1855 for the miners' children. 
School was held there until approx- 
imately 1957 or 1958. There is no 
school in Volcano now. The chil- 
.Ircn from grades one to three attend 
school in Pine Grove which is three 
biles away and those from grades 
our to eight attend school in Pioneer, 
line miles distance. 

The building is now being used as 
i residence, and it is very well kept 
.ip on the outside. 




lop. from left: Volcano Schoolhouse; 

Pine Grove School. Bottom from left: 

Butte Store: another old building in 

Sutter Creek. 



PINE GROVE SCHOOL 

Pine Grove School was built in 
1889 and school was held there un- 
til 1964. A new building was needed 
md the old building was moved a- 
bout 1000 feet, to its present site, 
to make room for the new building. 
I"he old school is now being used 
I an attractive gift shop. 



BUTTE STORE 

Butte Store walls are all that re- 
main of an old mining town called 
Butte City. It is in Amador Counts 
ocated between Jackson and Moke- 
umme Hill. 



si i IKK CREEK 

Sutter Creek, in Amador County, 
was founded in 1X46 by John A. 
Sutter. It has many old buildings on 
the main street. It is interesting to 
notice how well kept up the old 
homes are. Some of them were prob- 
ably built during the mining days. 
The yards are beautiful and color- 
ful with many varities of flowers. 



ADMISSION DAY 
b t "y Doc is Pewez 

In just a few weeks we will be 
celebrating our State's birthday in the 
city of Santa Cruz. A program of 
events has been planned starting 
with the statewide bowling tourna- 
ment on Saturday September 6, a 
civic banquet on Monday evening 
and the parade on Tuesday morning 
at 10:00 a.m. Prize winning awards 
will be presented at the outdoor band 
stand on the board-walk at 4:00 p.m. 

The theme of the parade is "Cal- 
ifornia — Bi-Centennial." Every 
member of the Native Daughters of 
the Golden West should make an ef- 
fort to take part. We have to im- 
press upon the people of our great 
state the significance of Admission 
Day and what it means to us. Let 
them know how much we cherish 
the priceless heritage which is ours — 
that of having California as the land 
of our birth. Information regarding 
the program of events and housing 



will be sent to each parlor from the 
general committee. 

Should >our parlor find it im- 
possible to be represented in the 
Admission Day parade in Santa (ru/ 
a special program or allair should 
be arranged in your parlor or com- 
munity. 

I shall look forward to joining 
with you in Santa ( ru/ to celebrate 
our State's birthday. 



BOWLING TOURNAMENT 
bij Lola Bredehoft 

It will soon be time to bowl again 
in the September 9, Admission Day 
Bowling Tournament. This year it 
will be at the Surf Bowl in Santa 
Cruz, on September 6 and 7. 

The committee is hoping that more 
bowlers who have not before enter- 
ed do so this year; the more the bet- 
ter. The only requirements are that 
you are a member in good standing 
of your parlor, and that you have a 
book average from 1965 or later. If 
you do not have full teams or only 
one or two who want to bowl, con- 
tact parlors in your immediate area, 
or contact the committee and they 
will do their best to place you on a 
team or find you a double partner. 
This is a good activity for all ages 
and an opportunity to meet mem- 
bers from other parlors. 

Information is in the mail to all 

the secretaries, contact them for en- 

(Contimted on Page 13) 




\UGUST. 1969 



Kl IN \ 1)1 I M \K 

Reina del War's 1968 69 term, un- 
dei the presidency ol Bcmict 
concluded on Jul) I, 1969. (Tie Fol- 
lowing events mark the continued 
service rendered to the Order and 
the community. 




Las Fiesteras dance group of Reina 
,,, Vtai during 1968 old Spanish 

dens. 



On May 8, the Parlor's dance 
group. Las Fiesteras. danced for the 
Retired I eachers Association at Vis- 
ta del Monte. Members dancing were 
Mines. MacFarlane. Fluker. Stupak. 
Diaz, Schmitter and Miss Patricia 
Joyal, also, the daughters of mem- 
ber I sther De Vito. Laurentine and 
Christine De Vito, talented dancers. 

Memorial services were held by 
the officers of the Parlor in white 
formal attire, under the chairman- 
ship of Janelle Bell, inside sentinel. 
at the regular meeting on May 20, 
president Bernice Hogg presiding. 




On May 23 and 24. the annual 
Poppy Sale sponsored by the Ameri- 
can Legion Auxiliary, had the sup- 
port of members of Reina del Mar, 
under the chairmanship Betty Mil- 
ler, treasurer and Civic Participation 
chairman. Assisting her were the fol- 
lowing Mmes. Steele, Joyal, Miller 
and Sevegney. 

On May 25. Reina del Mar Par- 
lor assisted the group of volunteers 
for the Santa Barbara Trust for His- 



Parlor Neu/s 



torit Preservation stage a community 

barbecue, the proceeds benefiting the 
restoration of the Fl Presidio de San- 
la Barbara. Lynn Spear, a member 
i»l the Volunteer Group, as chairman 
and Liselotte MacFarlane. past presi- 
den of Reina del Mar, as co-chair- 
man. The Santa Barbara Trust for 
Historic Preservation purchased the 
site ol II Presidio Chapel at 125 
East Canon Perdido Street, in 1966. 
During 1967-68, a group of volun- 
teers, led by Lynn Spear and directed 
bj Pete Aguilar. an adobe brick ex- 
pert, built the adobe wall surround- 
ing the chapel site. It is the hope of 
this civic-minded group to rebuild 
the chapel in the near future and to 
eventually see a completely recon- 
structed the El Presidio de Santa Bar- 
bara. 

Official delegates to Grand Parlor 
at Los Banos were Liselotte Mac- 
Farlane, past president and Beverly 
Sorenson, first vice president. 

On June 17, Bernice Hogg, presi- 
dent presiding, and assisted by Karen 
Stupak, marshal, and members of her 
corps of officers, initiated Constance 
Lynch a native of Long Beach and 
member of the local chapter of the 
Sierra Club; Margaret Shanholtzer, a 
native of Ontario, third generation 
Californian and a member of the 
Volunteers for the Santa Barbara 
Trust for Historic Preservation; and 
Mildred Winger, a native of Santa 
Barbara and a seventh generation 
Californian. Mrs. Klinger is a direct 
descendant of Don Jose Francisco 
Ortega, the first Commandante and 
founding organizer of the Royal Pre- 
sido of Santa Barbara. Gutierrez 
Street was named after one of her 
equally well-known ancestors, Oc- 
taviano Gutierrez, who arrived in 
California in 1816. Anita Joyal, past 
president, and Patricia Joyal were in 
charge of decoration and refresh- 
ments for the social hour following 
the business meeting and initiation 
ceremonies. 

On June 28, members of Reina 
del Mar actively participated in the 
fund raising benefit programs for the 
Santa Barbara Trust for Historic 
Preservation, of the historic picture 
Trader Horn, which was obtained 
through the courtesy of Duncan Re- 
naldo, a member of the cast, com- 
menting. Beverly Sorenson, first vice 



president, and a member of lies 
Auxiliary, devoted considerable a 
sistance in formulating plans for tl 
showing of the picture, on behalf i 
the Volunteers Group. 



POPPY TRAIL 

Poppy Trail No. 266 had an inte:[j 
esting booth at the Thieves Markt 
at Atlantic Square, Monterey Pari 




Poppy Trail Parlor No. 266 Bootrl 
at Thieves Market at Atlantic Square* 
Monterey Park. From left: Mmesl 
Hertzog, Leola Butler and Rati 
Galvin. 

The Ways and Means committee werei 
happy with the proceeds of $127. 



FORT BRAGG 

The Hawaiian theme was well car-l 
ried out at the meeting when Ha Al- 
lenby was elected President for 1969-1 
70. Ua and her corps of officers wereJ 
installed at an open installation oni 
July. 

The scholarship committee inform- 
ed the Parlor that Toni McFarland 
was awarded the Parlor's $100 dol- 
lar High School Scholarship. A re- 
port was made by President Rae Ash 
on the Mooring Basin Dedication on 
May 17, at which time Fort Bragg, 
No. 210 donated the California Bear 




Flag that will fly over the Mooring 
Basin. President Rae attended the 
Camp Fire Girl's Ceremonial, where 



CALIFORNIA HERALD 



le represented all sixth grade spon 
irs. Fort Bragg Parlor sponsors one 
I' me sixth grade groups. 




After closing the meeting all mem- 
ers. wearing Mu Mus or bright 
lothing, went downstairs to a well 
ecorated Hawaiian table. Elaine 
lenderson and her committee did 
luch to make it a delightful evening 
Did many prizes were awarded; some 
1 the form of pineapples and coco- 
uts from the table decorations. 
luch fun was had by all. 

CALIFORNIA HERALD time 
gain and members are reminded to 
enew their subscriptions now. 



OS ANGELES BREAKFAST CLUB 

The Los Angeles Breakfast Club, 
onors the 188th Birthday of the 

ity of Los Angeles — (1781- 
969). California's Bicentennial and 

19th Admission Day. 

For the 26th consecutive year. 
J ATI YE SONS & DAUGHTERS 
)F THE GOLDEN WEST and 

riends are especially invited to share 
hese important anniversaries. 

Time & Place: NO HOST FAM- 
XJS "HAM 'N EGGS" — $2.00 

Pay at door) — 7:30 a.m., Wed- 
lesd'av. September 3, 1969. LOS 
UMGELES BREAKFAST CLUB. 
i201 Riverside Drive, (Between Hy- 
•erion & South of Los Feliz Blvd.. 
>n the East side of Riverside Drive, 

,os Angeles 90027. 

Rsvp before September 2, 1969. 
>hone: 662-1191 or 275-7607. 

Miss Margaret Ann Kerr, Chair- 
nan ( American & Civic Affairs, Cal- 
fomiana No. 247) 8750 Burton 
lay, Los Angeles 90048. (Co- 
>rdinator NS-NDGW 26th year). 

VUGUST, 1969 



II < \\il\o RE M 

Banners outlining the coming 
\ear\ activities in turquoise and 
parrot green accompanied by clever 

sketches of the events, highlighted 
the I Oth annual installation oi offi 
cers of II Camino Real No. 324 at 
the Granada Hills Woman Club 
House on July *■> 

Ida Grossi was seated as presi- 
dent. Also installed at the open cere- 
mony were l.vn Lennox, Gloria Mel- 
lon. Edie Bartlett, Marie Harrington. 
tola Acker, Faye MacFarlane, Ella 
Entin, Sherri Grossi, Harriet Me- 
Govem, Mildred De Martin. Delia 
Hodnett, Ann Bennett, Bess Conner 
and Dee Downs 

Carmen Miller was chairman of 
the evening assisted by decorations 
chairmen Gloria Mellon and Helen 
Trammell; invitations, Iola Acker; 
programs, Lyn Lennox; refreshments, 
past presidents of the Parlor, Audrey 
Haselbush and Marie Harrington co- 
chairmen; junior hostesses, Teri 
Trammell, Jeri Mellon and Sue 
Dottl. 




PGP GOLDIE 

June Goldie, PGP. San Gabriel 
Valley Parlor was installing past 
grand Marshal and Peggy Branden- 
burg, GO, Placenta Parlor was guest 
organist. Laura Blosdale. GOS was 
at her station. 




GO BRANDENBURG 



GOS BLOSDALE 



Flag bearers were Girl Scout 
Troop 2150. and Lance Morgan. 



nephew of the new president, was 

Bible bearer "I el's Build Memories" 
is the new term's theme An inter- 
esting note is that Ida Grossi is the 
third president ot El ( amino Real 
ill whose term a daughter has been 

also an officer. Mis Grossi's daugh- 
ter is Sherri Grossi. 



II l)OK\l><> 

President Helen Francisco oi El 

Dorado No. I 86 was unable to pre- 
side at the meeting due to the illness 

of her sister PGP Hazel I Mallette. 

Five members of Marguerite No. 12 
were visitors. DGP Mildred Lelcuc 
assisted by DCiP Marshal Helen 
Neercamp. DGP Myrtle Marks and 
Musician Ethel Breedlove installed 
the new officers which included Pres- 
ident Georgia Gardner and her staff 
of Mines. Hurley, Griffith. Ford. Lar- 
son, Murdock, Hover, Jaeger, Breed- 
kne and Miss Flynn. 

The Parlor presented gifts of cos- 
tume jewelry to DGP Mildred Le- 
fevre and Marshal Helen Neercamp. 
Elizabeth Murdock was honored as 
a charter member. Charter members 
Louise Schmeder and Mary Relvas 
were unable to be present. Kathleen 
Flynn and Ethel Breedlove were 
honored as 50 year members. Miss 
Flynn, as financial secretary and Mrs. 
Breedlove as musician have held 
office continuously for 50 years. — 
certainly an outstanding record! 

A delicious luncheon preceded the 
meeting. 



POPPY TRAIL 

Miss Loretta Roach was installed 
as president of Poppy Trail No. 266, 
on July 1, at the I.O.O.F. hall, Mon- 
tebello. Her corps of officers for 
the ensuing year include Mmes. Irma 
Archer, Camelia Roblcs. Madeline 
Kallcr, Viola Salgado, Dorothy Hu- 
baud. Rae Galvin, Philomena Woos- 
ter. Rose Lowery, Pauline Pappas. 
Mary Cravea, Elsie Franco, Kae Pot- 
ter, Lucia Baqueria and Leola But- 
ler. The new president's theme for 
the year is perseverance; her colors 
are green and gold, symbolic of Cal- 
ifornia's wheat fields and forest. 

Her Bible carrier was Valorie 

Hass, great grand daughter of Mrs. 

Pappas. DGP Evelyn Sherman of 

(Continued on Page 10) 



POPPY TRAIL 
ntinued from Rn 

Whim, i u.is m ch 

the installation l"wo grand officers 
present were PGP Marj Barden, who 
marshaled foi the evening, and G1 
Oertude Doss who was the organist 
lor the occasion 




Newly appointed deputies are DGP 
Margaret Heath ol M Umington No. 
278 and SDDGP Geraldine Mead 
ol Rio Hondo No. 284. Miss Roach's 
family in attendance were her sister 
Miriam Roach, sister Cecilia and hus- 
band Thomas J. McDonough and her 
nieces and nephews Susan and 
George Fodrea, Patrick. Sue, Sherian 
and James McDonough. 

I he hall was beautifully decorat- 
ed in green and gold flowers. De- 
licious refreshments were served. 



PARADISE . . . 
(Continued from Page 5) 

"Old Paradise"' declined and a new 
center of business began to develop. 
On June 15, 1 S» 1 1 a post office was 
opened in the new section and the 
"Old Paradise" post office was dis- 
continued. 

In order that posterity should 
remember the early days of Paradise. 
Centennial Parlor No. 295. NDGW 
established and dedicated an histori- 
cal marker. The marker, designed 
and made bj Otto McCorkle of Par- 
adise, was created of native stone 
with a bronze plaque centered in the 
masonry. It established the area 
known in the early days as "Four 
Corners" and later as "Old Para- 
dise." Lorraine Hubh. chairman of 
the marker committee gave the wel- 
come. Mrs. Carol Swartzlow. local 
historian, was mistress of ceremonies. 




From left: Jr. PGP Hazel 7. Mallctte, 

Lorraine flulh and Mrs. (lien Wilson, 

president of Centennial Parlor. 



Junior Past President Hazel T. Mal- 
lctte and PGP Audrey Brown offici- 
ated in the unveiling and dedicating 
the marker. GT Betty Read Curlich, 
GT Marian E. McGuire and GT 
Mcredyth Burnette were present. 

The inscription on the plaque 
reads: "Old Paradise" — On these 
four corners was the old town of 
Paradise, known in the 1860's as 
Leonard's Mill, hotel and stage stop; 
to the northeast was a turpentine in- 
dustry. The Paradise post office was 
established here and a Sunday School 
organized in 1877. Church was held 
in the Good Templars Hall on the 
southwest corner in 1882, next to a 
grocery store and a doctor's office. 
The first church was built, to the 
southeast in 1889. Here was a black- 
smith and wagon shop and saloon. 
Old Town waned after it was by- 
passed by the Railroad in 1902. 
Dedicated by Centennial Parlor 295, 
Native Daughters of the Golden 
West. 1969." 



LOS ANGELES 

On the night of July 16th, mem- 
bers of Los Angeles No. 124, gave a 
dinner at Michael's Los Feliz Rest- 
aurant, in lieu of installation. All 
officers are resuming their offices as 
held in the previous term. Honored 
were DGP Dolores Zetwo of La 
Tijera and incoming DGP Rose 
Rumsay of Placenta. Also honored 
was the new SDDGP Nellie Miller 
of Verdugo and retiring SDDGP 
Ruth Payne of La Tijera. 

There were 57 members and 
guests in attendance, which includ- 
ed GIS Laura Blosdale, PGPs Mary 
Barden and Anna T. Schiebusch. 



President Beverly Slobogan was 
charge of the festivities of the evt 
ing. All agreed that it was a delig 
ful evening. 




Diamonds — Silverware 

132 W. Lincoln / Anaheim / 533-310 



Fine Cosmetics 

DRUG CENTER 



PRESCRIPTIONS 



. . . Our Specialty 

KE 5-1115 

201 West Lincoln 

Anaheim, California 

S & H Green Stamps 



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rloweV Jjhap 
1215 W. Lincoln. Anaheim 535-495 



BRIDGES - HIGHWAYS • DAMS • RAILROADS 



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505 S. Sunkist Ave. Anaheim 






MEMORIAL PARK • MAUSOLEUM 

CREMATORIUM • COLUMBARIUM 

Orangewood Street at Santa Ana Freeway 

538-3583 



CALIFORNIA HERAL 



IAOMI 

Members of Naomi No. 36, Dow- 
ieville enjoyed a dinner meeting at 
IC home of the president, Rose 
.mies at Bee Ranch on the banks 
I the North Yuba River. It was 
Iterating to learn the Eames I'am- 
v feed the various wild animals in 
le vicinity. The members watched 
ime coons feeding that evening. An 
utdoor meeting was planned but 
iclement weather forced the meeting 
i be held in the spacious home of 
>e hostess 




ew members of Naomi No. 36, 
NDGW, Downieville 



Mary Beverly reported that the 
ate had approved the place for the 
ative Daughters' Bassett's State 
laque. The annual rummage sale 
as held August 2 and 3 at the meet- 
g hall. A dinner was held especially 
>r new members: Donna Nelson, 
osemary Hill, Maryles Bush, Jean- 
te Olsen, Pattie Epps. Joyce White, 
aniaris Harbert, Barbara Williams. 
hose not attending: Carrol Neu- 
lrth. Connie Blue, and Elinor 
utishauser. At the same time the 
trior's oldest active member, Teresa 
edell (April S, 1925) was surprised 
ith a special corsage and gift of 
:rfume. As Extension of the Order 
hairman, Mrs. Bedall has added 
even new members to the Parlor's 
ster. 



the 



SQR 



store 



lincoln at lemon 
anaheim 




Nor lost to those that love them. 
Not dead, just gone before; 

They still live in our memory, 
And they will forever more. 

Irene ( .'. Kite. Hiawatha No. 140. June 

6. 
Irene A. Harris, Bahia Vista No. 167. 

June 5. 
Isabel S. Sncdigar. Bahia Vista No. 167, 

June 2. 
Peggy P. West. Berkeley No. 150. Mav 31. 
Anna V. Coale. Sutter No. 111. June 9. 

Henrietta B. Ward, Golden date No. 158. 
June 6. 

Mary G. Denend. Forrest No. 86. June 9. 

Pearl C. Lewis. La Bandera No. 110. 
June 17. 

Eleanor P. Carlson, Annie K. Bidwell No. 
168, June 20. 

Margaret P. Lanini. Copa de Oro No. 105, 
June 19. 

Emma C. Rutan, San Jose No. 81. June 
15. 

Elizabeth A. Hayes. Vendome No. 100. 
June 26. 

Hazel G. Sparling, Copa de Oro No. 105. 
June 28. 

Flora S. Miles. Tierra de Oro No. 304. 
June 20. 

Emil) Schbabiague, La Junta No. 203. 
May 14. 

Amy M. Anglade. Mt. Lassen No. 215, 
June 29. 

Anna Lena McCarthy, Columbia No. 70. 
July 2. 

Lena A. Randall. Santa Cruz No. 26. 
June 22. 

Lina C. Manley. Anona No. 164. June 30. 

Laura H. Gerdes. Stockton No. 256. July 



Emma Fraser. Twin Peaks No. 185, Jul> 5. 

Minnie A. Peck. Guadalupe No. 153. June 
11. 

Julia Peveri. Guadalupe No 153, March 
26. 

Therese Daisy Block. San Diego No. 209, 
Juh 5. 

Helen C. Rodriquez. Santa Cruz No. 26. 
May 14. 

Grace D. Gasper, Petaluma No. 222. 
June 7. 

Patricia L. Mann. Camellia No. 4 1. Juh 
6. 



ORINDA 

Orinda No. 56, San Francisco, had 

an eventful month of June. I he last 
meeting of the month was one of the 
most colorful ones; in keeping with 
the gorgeous colors ot our flag, < ,, m 
memorating I lag Day, Orinda mem- 
bers wore the Old Glory colors and 
carried out the theme during the en- 
tire evening. In charge ot the refresh- 
ments anil festivities were Althca 
Demetrak and Marion Bragg. Red 
jello with white marshmallows was 
served as well as a beautiful decorat- 
ed cake with small American flags 
protruding out of the white frosting. 
The red, white and blue napkins 
blended with the spirit of patriotism. 

Betty Crocker Coupon Club in 
Minneapolis, Minnesota, deemed the 
entry submitted from Orinda Parlor 
to be the third prize winner in the 
"Share Your Idea Contest No. 2." 
A handsome check and a letter of 
congratulations were sent to Orinda 
Parlor. 

Holding the paragraph under 100 
words, the third-prize-vvinning idea 
was as follows: "The most effective 
way our group has found to collect 
Betty Crocker Coupons is ... to 
ask a Coupon when a member of our 
organization forgets to say "Please" 
or "Thank You." This serves two 
purposes — of great importance is 
our attempt to win a prize in "Share 
Your Idea Contest No. 2" and sec- 
ondly, of equal importance, is to 
remind us all to be respectful and 
polite at all times to our associates 
and to extend courtesies we all like 
to receive." 



ILGENFEL 

. MORTUARY , 

Faithful . Courteous, Service 
120 E. Broadway. Anaheim 

PHONE KE 5-4105 



535-3289 




RITZ 




CLEANERS and 


DYERS 


307 E. Lincoln 


Anaheim 



3 


BACKS 
KAULBARS 




MORTUARY 


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1617 W. La Palme at Euclid 
Anaheim 
772-1617 



by I d Pugll 

musts • en, 

in t. ii and smoke, 
hats ol steam blowing to West, 
pink fingers railing in tx 
cows pushing .1 fog, 
flags courting .1 chimnej top, 
salute ol pigeons singing a gale, 
whiskers in lime painted with teeth. 
.-I sand planted to rockweed. 
line folded around sugarboat, 

Map ol love kissed bj the sc.i 



Kl IN V 1)1 I M\K 

In observation of Conservation 
Week. Reina del Mar No. 126, pre- 
sented a Monterey cypress tree to 
the Citj of Santa Barbara. Vera 
Smith, conservation chairman, was in 
charge of all the arrangements tor the 
planting of the tree on the bluff side 
of Shoreline Park on the Mesa. 

I he parlor celebrated its 68th 
birthday having been founded on 
April 20. 1901. A luncheon and 
parts was held at Harry's Plaza Cafe 
where, appropriately, the decor fea- 
tures photographs of Old Santa Bar- 
bara. The party was a big success. 
The highlight of the afternoon, was 
the presentation of a life member- 
ship to Velma Tackaberry. It was a 
well guarded secret and Velma was 
so overwhelmed she was momentari- 
ly speechless and finally responded 
with "But there are others who are 
more deserving." Velma surely is a 
shining example of a true Native 
Daughter. 

Twenty-five year memberships pins 
were awarded by Recording Secretary 
Mamie Miller to Rena Castagonla, 
Gertrude Thorpe, Aileen Allen and 
Sylvia Ferrario. Margaret Graham 
was to have also been ■"pinned" but 
was not able to make the luncheon. 
Not only were the 25-year members 
given special recognition, but also 
all past presidents who were able to 
attend, as well as members who have 
portrayed St. Barbara in the local 
fiesta parade each year. Members 
and guests visited two local land- 



^A^^mm^y, 




»i& 



Drawing of Monterey Cypress by Ed Pug/i 



marks. Stow House and Hope House. 
On Santa Barbara's birthday, the 
founding of the Santa Barbara Pres- 
idio, special commemorative cere- 
monies were held at the steps of the 
County Court House. Miss Diana 
Russell, the parlor's St. Barbara for 
the current term, represented the 
Parlor. School children from one of 
the elementary schools sang to St. 
Barbara and presented her with 
flowers. In attendance were Elizabeth 
Miller, Nancy Fluker, and Mary 
Louise Days. 



KAWEAH POST OFFICE . . . 

(Continued from page 3) 

a few years on the acres that were 
left after the Congressional actions 
of 1890. Eventually they bought 
farm lands in the valley and stayed 
on. 

But back to the rustic Post Office 
with its distinctive appeal to visitors. 
In 1894 the original Kaweah Post 



Office was constructed at the site j 
the main settlement, where the har 
built road started its way into t 
mountains. Sixteen years later it w 
rebuilt and moved, its name 1< 
unchanged. 

Now the tiny Post Office is on o 
of the original boundaries of the c«; 
ony in a pleasant valley about fi 
or six miles long and a mile wide, 
remains the only tangible eviden 
of a defunct Utopia experiment. Tl 
river bottom lands are covered wi 
beautiful old oak, the hillsides wi 
smaller oaks, tangled bushes, ai 
vines. Its patrons are the neighbc 
ing farmers — a few new arrivals, ai 
some of the descendants of the oi 
ginal, historic and ill-fated Kawei 
Co-operative Colony. 



SUBSCRIPTIONS 

Time for subscriptions. Send No' 

CALIFORNIA HERAI 



RT CONTEST . . . 
ontimied from Page 2 1 

int parlor committee were PGP Ei- 
en Dismuke, District 32 chairman 
r the art talent contest and presi- 
:nt of Tierra de Oro, Bernice Hogg. 
esident of Reina del Mar Parlor, 
irginia Days, Betty Miller, Karen 
upak, Mamie Miller, Eileen Gray, 
crtrudc Reed, Henrietta Cardona 
id Edith Webster. 




The Native Daughters of the Gold- 
1 West of Santa Barbara and Ven- 
ra Counties held a district fun 
ght in Eagles Hall in Santa Bar- 
ira. After a shared dinner, enter- 
inment was provided by each of 
e parlors. General chairman of the 
'ent was SDDGP Mary Rule-, and 
ist president of La Purisima No. 
11. Assisting Mrs. Rule were DGPs 
melia Acres, Mamie Miller and 
mbert Phillips of Reina del Mar; 
harity Righetti of Santa Maria; El- 
n Guthrie of El Aliso and Jeanne 
redrick of Tierra de Oro. 
Committee members were Nancy 
uker. publicity for Reina de Mar 
id Gertrude Reed, entertainment 
id table set-up; Jeanne Fredrick, 
ill arrangements and publicity for 
err a de Oro. 



DWLING TOURNAMENT . . . 

"ontimied from Page 7) 

f forms and rules or contact Lola 
■edehoft, chairman, 1332 Carlotta 
ve.. Berkeley 94703 for any infor- 
ation you may need. Deadline for 
tries is August 18. See you at San- 
Cm/. 



?AND PRESIDENT . . . 

ontimied from Page 6) 

ittle EXTRA EFFORT on the part 
each one of you, we can have a 
:mbership gain. 

Remember our motto for the term 
• "Action Not Words." LET ME 
•E SOME! 



APOLLO 

WHEREAS, APOLLO 8 encircled 
the Moon in outer space last Decem- 
ber: and 

WHEREAS, earth-bound man- 
kind through the miracle of radio 
heard the clear, resonant, unforget- 
able voices of ASTRONAUTS BOR- 
MAN, LOVELL AND ANDERS so 
fittingly quoting the WORD OF THE 
LIVING GOD, from outer space: 
and 

WHEREAS, the distance this in- 
spiring message may have been heard 
in limitless space, even beyond the 
horizons of the Moon, is to us in- 
known, and which may still be echo- 
ingaeons away: 

THEREFORE. IT IS HEREBY 
RESOLVED, that CALIFORNI- 
ANA PARLOR No. 247, NATIVE 
DAUGHTERS OF THE GOLDEN 
WEST, in regular meeting assembled 
this 10th day of June, 1969, at the 
Assistance League Clubhouse in Hol- 
lywood, California transmit our con- 
gratulations to these American As- 
tronauts, not only for their great 
courage and ability, but also extend 
our commendation for their rever- 
ance, faithfulness and due recogni- 
tion to Almighty God, Creator of the 
Universe, vouluntarily given in this 
thrilling momentous milestone in his- 
tory: and 

It is FURTHER RESOLVED, 
that this resolution be presented to 
the forth coming Grand Parlor of the 
NATIVE DAUGHTERS OF THE 
GOLDEN WEST, convening at Los 
Banos, California, June 16th, 1969 



and copies be transmitted to the 
N \\ IONA] \l ROSPAl l M> 
MINISTRATION al Huston 

as, to Radio Station KFSO at San 
Francisco, and to the California 

Herald. 

Margaret Ann Kerr 
Americanism Chairman 
Californiana Parlor 
Helen M. Williams 
President 

Californiana Parlor 
Blanch Oechsel 
Recording Secretary 
Californiana Parlor 



<j4dobes 

by 7. 7. JriU 

II these old adobes could talk, what 
an interesting story each would tell. 
Some of these adobes have been pre- 
served. Others are gone. 




Distrii 1 




Suite 114 



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"A Full House of Insurance" 

Fire — Auto — Theft — Casua Ity 
Compensation — Bonds 

Phone (714) 635-7871 

280 N. Wilshire Ave. / Anaheim, California 92801 



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up to 
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INTEREST ON INSURED SAVINGS 
Payable Quarterly on Full Paid Accounts 

FULLERTON 

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ASSOCIATION 



TRojan 1-4244 



ADOBES . . . 
^Continued from Page 13) 




Juan </<■ la Guerra adobe in Santa Barbara 



CLIFF ELLIOTT 

(PNIUIPS) 

JEX3I 535-3541 
1025 W. Lincoln Anaheim 



At right: I wo 

Views <>i re- 
stored 2 story 

Rocha adobe 
in Los Ange- 
les. Home oj 
Senaida Sul- 
livan. Madri- 
na oi Olvera 
Street. 





THE BASLER HOME 



CONVALESCENT & ELDERLY 

24-Hour Nursing Service 

Excellent Meals - Tray Service 

LARGE CHEERFUL ROOMS 
ADJOINING BATHS & SUNDECKS 

Life Membership or Monthly Rates 



542-3514 



1015 N. Broadway 



Patronize Our Advertisers 

and tell them jou saw their ad 

in the California Herald 



^'3^ '3enner Sheet c^etat, Jnc. 
■■Since 1870" 

774-1843 

INDUSTRIAL SHEET METAL WORK 
210 Chestnut Anaheim 



RAY 0. LINK 

Telephone 535-7221 

INSURANCE — SURETY BONDS 

M. E. BEEBE & CO. 

132 North Anaheim Boulevard 

Anaheim, California 



Below: Looking southerly toward the Ide Adobe showing part of the corn 
in foreground. 




CALIFORNIA HERALI 



/ right: Louis Robidoux's adobe on 
the Jurupa Ranclio. 





At left: Richardson adobe with cen- 
tury old locust trees, the wed of 
which came from Baltimore. Mary- 
land and was planted by William 
B runner Richardson. Adobe is on 
Los Coches Ranclto. 



ower right: Leonis adobe 
in Calabasas. 




— ADDRESS CORRECTION REQUESTED 
CALIFORNIA HERALD 
P. 0. Drawer 4243 
Anaheim, California 92803 







Four Books bu, Southern California's Leading Historian 
Dr. Leo J. Friis 



ORANGE COUNTY THROUGH FOUR CENTURIES 

From 1542 to present day. Written in easy to read, yet 
concise style; Illustrated, Annotated and a complete Index. 
57.50 (plus 80c tax and mailing). 

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Using the anecdotal approach with sparkles of humor, the author de- 
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ditches and wineries. Illustrated, Annotated, Index. No. 2 of Orange 
County Pioneer Series. (This is Pioneer Press' newest book). 
$7.50 (plus 800 tax and mailing). 

THE CHARLES \V. BOWERS MEMORIAL MUSEUM AND ITS TREASURES 

Indian treasures, animal traps, sea shells, statues and portraits are just a few 
of the interesting items found in the fabulous book on the fine museum in 
Santa Ana, California. Illustrated; Index. 
$2.00 (plus 40c tax and mailing). 

GEORGE WASHINGTON BARTER, PIONEER EDITOR 

Life and events in Anaheim from October 1870 to 1871. Barter was an 
early newspaper man. This is No. 1 of the Orange County Pioneer Series. 
$3.75 (plus 65c tax and mailing). 



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by Leroy Doig 

Continuation of growth of Garden 
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ection of pictures; index. Cloth bound 
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THE CRY OF THE BITTERN 

by Virginia Petty Tidball 

Excellent narrative verse depicting] 
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AMERICA 

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SPECIAL COLLECTION 




Official Publication of 
THE NATIVE DAUGHTERS of the GOLDEN WEST 




SEPTEMBER 19C9 + ice 



MUIR REDWOODS 



J oanhtna oj\ Ine K^/th&t 




Lilly (). Reichling, Founder, Satire Daughters oj the Golden West 



ON SEPTEMBER 25. the Native 
Daughters of the Golden West 
will celebrate Founders Day, recall- 
ing with pride the founding of the 
Order eighty-three years ago. on Sep- 
tember 25. 1886, by Miss Lilly O. 
Reichling in the historic mining city 
of Jackson, Amador County, Cali- 
fornia. 

It was appropriate that on the an- 
niversary of this historic day that 
Grand President Nancy. J. Conens 
will make her official visit to L'rsuki 



No. 1 at Jackson, not only to com- 
memorate the founding of the Order, 
but also to pay tribute to the energe- 
tic, far-seeing Lilly Reichling. 

Miss Reichling had personal 
knowledge of the newly organized 
Native Sons of the Golden West and 
felt her sisters in the State should 
also form such an organization. Dis- 
couraged by the Native Sons, she did 
nothing about it until after a visit to 
the Admission Day celebration in 
Sacramento, September 9, 1886. 



^, L*o g. ^ 



Upon returning home, she mailed] 
twenty-four invitations to friends ini 
Jackson, inviting them to Pioneer 
Hall on September 11. The notes: 
were ambiguous, and perhaps it was 
more curiosity than anything else 
that brought twenty of those invited 
to the first meeting. 

Miss Reichling's enthusiasm pre- 
vailed and temporary officers were' 
elected and the organization meet- 
ing set for September 25th. Chosen 
for the first Parlor of the Order was- 
the distinctive name of Ursula — 
meaning the Bear — suggestive of 
courage and strength. This Parlor 
today is Parlor No. 1 — very active 
in the town of its birth — Jackson. I 

There were seventeen parlors or-} 
ganized within the first four months, 
and the first Grand Parlor convened ji 
in San Francisco in 1887. Tina L. i 
Kane, first president of the Mother! 
Parlor, was elected the Grand Presi-j 
dent. Later the special title of J 
Founder of the Order was conferred J 
on Lilly O. Reichling, later Lilly O. I 
Reichling Dyer. 

The founding principles, which | 
are still proudly upheld by the Order, I 
were Love of Home, Devotion of the j; 
Flag of Our Country, Veneration of; 
the Pioneers of California, and an , 
Abiding Faith in the Existence of' 
God. The flag of the United States 
and the Bear Flag are honored by |] 
each Parlor. 

During the years, the Order of , 
the Native Daughters of the Golden 
West has grown and prospered. It 
also sponsors the Junior Native 
Daughters of the Golden West. 

(Continued on Page 10) 

CALIFORNIA HERALD 




SOLEDAD 
FIESTA 



BY 



MARY SILVA 



Restored chapel and cloister of Mision Nuestra Senora de la Soledad 

■r 



4?J) oledad mission Fiesta and the 
^jj Pioneer Tea will commemorate 
the California Bicentennial on Sep- 
tember 27 and 28. Mission Hell Par- 
lor will hostess the ninth annual 
Pioneer Tea, Saturday. September 
27 from 2 to 4 p.m. in La Sala, the 
Sallie R. Thaler Memorial Room. 
Mission Nuestra Senora de la Sole- 
dad. The Memorial Fountain and the 
restored pews will be dedicated. 
Guests are invited to tour the chapel, 
museum rooms and garden. 

The schedule also includes such in- 
teresting events as wine tasting, cor- 
onation ball (Queen candidate Lynn 
Rianda is sponsored by Mission Bell 
Parlor) on Saturday and Mass, par- 
ade, barbecue and prizes on Sunday. 
Participation by Native Daughters, 
their families and friends is urged. 
Both Catholics and Protestants have 
joined forces to achieve the goal 
of preserving our California heritage 
by restoring the Mission to its orig- 
nal prominence. All proceeds de- 
rived will go to the maintenance and 
continuance of the restoration pro- 
ject. 

For further information write or 
phone Mary Silva. 312 Coplev Ave., 
King City"— (408) 385-3161 or 
phone Katherine Hambv (408) 
672-2642. 



SEPTEMBER, 1969 




Wooden statue o) Nuestra Senora de la Soledad, hand- 
carved by Henry J. Downie. The altar in the chapel 
measuring 25 indies wide by 70 inches in length was also 
carved and assembled hv Mr. Downie. 



The Grand 
President's Corner 



GRAND I'Ri siniM 

\..nc\ i i onens I Mrs I 
■I? I I Mlendale Avenue 
Oakland, I alifornia l M6i9 



(,K\NI) SECRETARY 

Office: 703 Market Street. Room 612 
San Francisco 94103 Dial 362-4127 




NANCY J. CONENS 



HAPP> BIRTHDAY TO I HI 
\ \ I l\ 1 DAUGHTERS OF THE 
GOLDEN WEST! 

rhese words of joy will be ring- 
ing throughout the State and our 
Order during the month of Septem- 
ber How fitting it is that in the same 
month, just sixteen days apart, we 
commemorate two events of such 
importance. In 1 S50 when California 
was admitted to the Union, instantly 
it became one of the foremost 
States, increasing and growing until 
today when it is recognized as THE 
foremost State. On September 9th 
we will gather in Santa Cruz to cele- 
brate the 1 19th birthday of our great 
State. 1 hope many of you will be 
there to join in this tribute to the 
past, salute to the present and prom- 
ise for the future. 

The little mining town of Jackson 
was the location of the founding of 
our Order on September 25, 1886. 
Throughout the years, it too has ex- 
celled in the purpose for which it 
was formed and ranks today among 
the outstanding recognized organiza- 
tions. How proud we should 
be of our many accomplishments in 
the past; how grateful we should be 
for the opportunities of the present; 
how determined we should be for 
the challenges of the future. On Sep- 
tember 25, 1969 the Mother Parlor, 
Ursula No. 1 in conjunction with 
the other Parlors in the District, will 
hostess their Official Visit in Jack- 
son at the special request of your 
Grand President. I am grateful they 
have accepted this day in order that 
we may be in the area on the actual 
date of our founding. Perhaps you 
can plan to be there too! 



Summer vacations will soon be 
over and the children will be re- 
turning back to school. This means 
a return to routine and a renewal 
of our efforts on behalf of our Par- 
lors. The new officers have much 
enthusiasm and with help from all 
the members, this enthusiasm will 
be rewarded with results. Don't for- 
get — at Least three new members! 
Hope to see you along the line or 
at least in "The Corner" next month. 
Remember the "Action"! 

Sisters — the time is here for 



renewal of your subscription to thei 
California Herald. 1 ask each Parlor 
President to appoint an Official Pub- 
lications Chairman not only to con- 
tact the current subscribers but also 
to encourage the other members and 
promote interest in the magazine. 
This is your news media! By vote 
of the Delegates at Grand Parlor, 
YOU adopted the California Herald 
as YOUR Official Publication! Now, 
I ask that YOU give it YOUR sup- 
port! 



ITINRARY 1969 

SEPTEMBER 

5 Alameda County Pre-Admission Day Dinner 

6-7 Admission Day Bowling Tournament Santa Cruz 

8 Admission Day Dinner Dance Santa Cruz 

9 Admission Day Parade Santa Cruz 

12 Orinda No. 56, San Francisco* 

15 Auburn No. 233, Placer No. 138, 

Marguerite No. 12, Auburn* 

16 Fern No. 123 Folsom* 

17 Albany No. 260, Richmond No. 147 Albany* 

19 Dinner — Tournament of Roses, Japanese Deer Park Buena Park 

20 El Pescadero No. 82 — 75th Anniversary Tracy* 

23 Anona No. 164, Dardanelle No. 66, 

Golden Era No. 99 Jamestown* 

24 Ruby No. 46, San Andreas No. 113 Murphys* 

25 Founders Day 

25 Ursula No. 1, Chispa No. 40, Forrest No. 86, 

Amapola No. 80 Jackson* 

27 Mission Soledad Tea 

28 Mission Soledad Fiesta 

30 Columbia No. 70 French Corral* 

OCTOBER 

1 Laurel No. 6, Manzanita No. 29, Sierra Pines No. 275 .... Nevada City* 
4 Sacramento Children's Foundation Luncheon Sacramento 

6 Plumas Pioneer No. 219 Quincy* 

7 Imogen No. 134 Sierraville* 

8 Naomi No. 36 Downieville* 

11-12 Junior Native Daughters Conference San Mateo 

13 Santa Cruz No. 26 Santa Cruz* 

15 Stirling No. 146, Donner No. 195 Pittsburg* 

16 Gilroy No. 312 Gilroy* 

18 Districts 28 & 31 Children's Foundation Luncheon Lompoc 

20 Tierra del Rey No. 300, Wilmington No. 278 Hermosa Beach* 

21 Toluca No. 279 — 25th Anniversary Burbank* 

23 Madera No. 244, Fresno No. 187 Madera* 

24 San Francisco Deputy Grand Presidents' Reception 
25-26 Grand Officers' Meeting 

* Official visits are marked with asterisks 

CALIFORNIA HERALD 



SEQUOIA 

With Winifred McKee and Mar- 
garet Almeida as chairmen, Sequoia 
'2 enjoyed a cocktail hour din- 
ner in a special banquet room of the 
Hotel Mcrritt in Oakland. The large 
room overlooked beautiful Lake Mer- 
ritt with its many sail boats. The 
tables were decorated with greens 
and flowers. Gay nut cups were at 
each place. 




from left: PGP Edna C. Williams, 

organizer of Sequoia Parlor; DGP 

Dorothy Lynn; Mary Scott, president 

of Sequoia parlor. 



Special guests seated at the head 
table included, PGP Edna C. Wil- 
liams, organizer of the Parlor in May 
1939; Mary Scott, the president and 
her husband, Alex Scott; Dorothy 
Lynn, of Bear Flag No. 151, deputy 
to Sequoia Parlor and Mrs. McKee 
with her husband, Charles McKee. 
Corsages were presented to Mrs. Wil- 
liams, Mrs. Lynn and Mrs. Scott. 

Mrs. McKee acted as mistress of 
ceremonies and introduced the hon- 
ored guests, the remaining charter 
members, members and their guests. 
Mrs. Williams gave a word of greet- 
ing and Mrs. Scott welcomed all 
those attending. Mrs. Lynn spoke of 
her work with the Parlor. Following 
the evening's activities, a large birth- 
day cake was cut by Mrs. Williams, 
assisted by Mrs. Lynn and Mrs. Scott. 
A brief reception was held at the 
close of the affair. 

SEPTEMBER, 1969 



Parlor Neu/s 



VENDOME 

Officers of Vendome Parlor No. 
100, San Jose, lor the new Year were 
installed at the Odd Fellows Hall, by 
DGP Betty C 'ardo/a and her corps 
Of officers of El Monte No. 205, 
Mountain View. GP Richard L, 
Ritchison, NSGW, presented the new 
president, Elsie Figonc, with a beauti- 
ful bouquet of yellow roses. She was 
also the recipient of many lovely gifts 
from fellow officers and non-offi- 
cers. On her staff are Past President 
Marion Howard; First Vice President 
Betty Yakobovich; Second Vice Pres- 
ident Louise Bartscher; Third Vice 
President Jennie Catania; Organist 
Katherine Cooper; Recording Secre- 
tary Susie Engfer; Financial Secretary 
Margaret Morgan; Treasurer Jean 
Postier; Marshal Violet Misakian; In- 
side Sentinel, Grace Fox; Outside Sen- 
tinel Adeline Schmidt; Board of Trus- 
tees Sue Mattei, Stella Garino and 
Ida Bonito. Leola Howe, Los Gatos 
No. 317, is the new Worthy Deputy 
Grand President, and Betty Cardoza, 
El Monte No. 205, is the new Wor- 
thy Supervising Deputy Grand Presi- 
dent. One of the surprises and high- 
lights of the evening was the ren- 
dition of two songs by Elsie's brother, 
Frank Sabattei, accompanied at the 
piano by Betty Yakobovich. The 
theme for the year is Unity, Mem- 
bership and Achievement. Outgoing 
President Marion Howard presented 
each of her officers with a lovely cer- 
amic teapot with delicious homemade 
cookies. 

Following the installation delicious 
refreshments of coffee, punch, salad, 
finger sandwiches and cup cakes were 
served at tables decorated in the col- 
or scheme of blue and white to the 
seventy-two officers and visiting 
guests in attendance. 

In an attempt to increase member- 
ship attendance at meetings, a new 
policj is being instituted by having 
the usual second business meeting of 
the month (3rd Tuesday) strictly a 
social affair. 



ORINDA 

Another eventful social meeting 
occurred when Orinda No. 56. San 
Francisco, celebrated "International 



Night" In order ol the events, the 
new Deputy Grand President to Or- 
inda Parlor. Lucille Kimbark, Alia, 
No. 3, was welcomed. DGP Gladyi 
Knight is the retiring deputy. An in- 
itiation was held early in the meeting 
Iim the newest member Miss Cath- 
erine Kelly. 

Orinda members wore costumes 
of European origin, as well as early 
American. Verena I riede. the par- 
lor's organist, prepared her famous 
and appetizing stuffed rolls, which, 
when heated, arc pure delight. Cup- 
cakes with vanilla and chocolate 
frosting were served with coffee and 
tea. During refreshments, 35mm 
slides of past functions of Orinda 
Parlor . . . parades, dinners and in- 
stallations were viewed. It was an 
exciting evening. 



£ee&£ 



MILK 



Tastes so fresh because if IQ 



^'3^ tenner Sheet (.Metat, "Jnc. 
■'Since 1870" 

774-1S43 

INDUSTRIAL SHEET METAL WORK 
210 Chestnut Anaheim 



THE BASLER HOME. 



CONVALESCENT & ELDERLY 

24-Hour Nursing Service 

Excellent Meals - Tray Service 

LARGE CHEERFUL ROOMS 
ADJOINING BATHS & SUNDECKS 

Life Membership or Monthly Rates 

542-3514 

1015 N. Broadway Santa A 



Patronize Our Advertisers 

and tell them you saw their ad 

in the California Herald 



535-3289 




RITZ 




CLEANERS and 


DYERS 


307 E. Lincoln 


Anaheim 



I i Hayward, 

01 .1 surprise tcs 
dmoniul dinner foi Matilda < Hiveira 
l nos, .1 charter member of Bets) 
3 >me one hundred 
and twent) guests attended the din- 
ner to p.iv their respects to this pil- 
lar ol the community. 




From left: Mrs. Harry Burton, pres- 
ident o\ Betsy Ross Parlor; Gene 
Rhodes, vice mayor oi Fremont; 
Matilda Enos, honoree and charter 
member oi Betsy Ross; Grand Pres- 
ident Nancy Conens. 



Dignitaries who attended the din- 
ner and who spoke of the many 
accomplishments and the generosity 
oi Mrs. Enos included the newly in- 
stalled Grand President of the Native 
Daughters of the Golden West, Mrs. 
Nancj Conens. GOS Dolores Ferenz, 
PGP Edna Williams, DGP Lucille 
Stuart, Gene Rhodes, the Vice May- 
or of the City of Fremont and long 
time friend of Mrs. Enos; Assistant 
Superintendent of Schools of the 
Fremont Unified School District, 
Tom Maloney; former Superinten- 
dent of Schools of Washington Town- 
ship, J. V. "Pop" Goold; Grand 
Parlor representative of the Native 
Sons. DGP Ray Butler; Alameda 
County Planning Commission mem- 
ber, Edward Enos; and many rela- 
tives and friends and former em- 
ployees of Mrs. Enos. Unable to 
attend but sending greetings were 
Mayor and Mrs. Hugh Block of the 
City of Fremont. 

A white carnation corsage was 
presented by chairman, Barbara Ca- 
minada, on behalf of herself and her 
husband Rudolph who had been 
neighbors of Mrs. Enos for many 
years. Presentation of a floral center- 
piece was made to the guest of honor 
on behalf of the Parlor by the presi- 
dent, Helen Button. Many gifts from 



friends were also presented to her, 
including a beautiful floral arrange 
men! From GOS Dolores Ferenz. 

Chairman of the evening was Bar- 
bara Caminada, recording secretary 
ol the Parlor, who expressed the 

sentiments of all the members that 

Mrs. I nos was an example of the 

type el members that the Native 
Daughters of the Golden West ire — 

generous, charitable and law-abiding. 

Mrs. Enos just recently assured 
the Parlor of a five year program 
for its Scholarship Committee, funds 
being donated in memory of her late 
mother. Mrs. Rita Olveira. who 
was also a member of Betsy Ross 
Parlor. 

Entertainment was furnished by 
Carolyn Caminada. A surprise of the 
evening was a song sung by the 
Grand President Nancy Conens to 
the honoree. 



JAMES LICK 

James Lick Parlor complimented 
at the party its returning deputy 
Elizabeth Brennan, delegate Mabel 
Walker and the Parlor president 
Georgia Robinson and welcomed 
Doris Stidhem the new deputy. PGP 
Emily E. Ryan was a special guest. 




PGP Emily E. Ryan 

Official visit to the Grand Presi- 
den will be November 12 to James 
Lick and Darina. Committees met 
September 10, to complete plans. 



El Pinal No. 163 has increased 
its membership by three new mem- 
bers: Rose Elaine Buddie, Harriett 



B. Rich and Arlene Briggs, who were f: 
initiated into the Parlor. The meeting [| 
was preceded by a delicious dinner I 
held at the Brambles honoring these (j 
new members. The tables were tic- f | 
corated in a patriotic theme of red, I 
white and blue. Baskets of Mowers); 
from the gardens of Ann Olivero and! 
Lesta Buffington were used to decor] , 
ate the hall. 

Fall Parlor events include instal- I 
lation of officers, participation in I 
Pinedorado Parade and the October I 
enchilada dinner, a fund raising U 
event. 

Delicious refreshments were sen- U 
ed after the meeting by Fvaline Curl I 
and Amelia Tognazzini. 




Not lost to those that love them, 
Not dead, just gone before; 

They still live in our memory, 
And they will forever more. 



Selma S. McMullen. Dolores No. 169, 

May 25. 
Edna S. Gutenberger. Sutter No. 111. July 

16. 
Mary E. Maher. El Cereso No. 207. July 

18. 
Alma N. Wemple. Nataqua No. 152, July 

10. 
Olive MacDonald, James Lick No. 220, 

July 18. 
Alberta Bales, Encinal No. 156, July 17. 
Rose C. Tallman. Fort Bragg No. 210. 

July 24. 
Florence J. Parry, Dolores No. 169, Julv 

24. 
Helen V. Harris, Aloha No. 106, May 15. 
Alice W. Jones, Aloha No. 106, May 21. 
Helen W. Shedd. Manzanita No. 29, July 

18. 
Wanda V. Morris, Copa de Oro No. 105, 

July 26. 
Emma M. Gerger, Minerva No. 2, July 

25. 
Adeline Lima. Santa Cruz No. 26, Julv 

29. 
Ellen A. McElligott, Mariposa No. 63, 

June 17. 
Emma Sutton, Antioch No. 223, May 27. 
Agnes Brown, Las Lomas No. 72, July 7. 
Belva L. Skeel, Tierra de Oro No. 304, 

July 23. 

CALIFORNIA HERALD 



I II UK \ Dl ORO 

rhe California Bicentennial was 
he chosen theme of President Eileen 
)ismuke, PGP, when installed for 
ier third term as president of Tierra 
,,■ Oro No. 304. Others installed to 
ierve with President Dismukc were: 
tfarj Wegner, Mary Weatherbee, 
Barbara Allen. Lua Safwenberg, Hor- 
ensia Cuellar, Jeanne Fredrick, Hel- 
ta Coffey, Edith Webster. Gertrude 
Iced, Claudine Wullbrandt, Sophie 
ordeio. Norma Grimm. Jennie 
Aollen and Henrietta Cardona. 




°GP Eileen Dismuke, President of 
Tierra de Oro Parlor 

Halt decorations under the chair- 
nanship of Gertrude Reed, featured 
eplicas of the San Diego Mission, 
ralifornia's first mission established 
500 years ago and the Santa Bar- 
>ara Mission, founded in 1786. The 
tations were decorated with color- 
ul shawls. El Camino Real Bell min- 
atures and fresh flowers. Betty Clark 
ashioned the California Poppy cor- 
ages and Claudine Wullbrandt was 
:hairman of the refreshment com- 
nittee. 

PP Mary Wegener was chairman 
»f the evening and introduced DGP 
Bnelia Acres of Reina del Mar No. 
126 who conducted the Open In- 
tallation of Officers. DGP Acres 
vas assisted by members of the Par- 
or who served as acting Grand Of- 
icers: Mamie Miller, Virginia Days, 
Jernice Hogg, Ambert Phillips, Bet- 
y Miller, Lottie MacFarlane, Sarah 
)iaz, Nancy Fluker and Patricia Joy- 

iEPTEMBER, 1969 








Decorations included El Camino Real Bells and fresh flowers. California 
popies were fashioned into corsages. 



al. Dorothy Dye of Placerita No. 277 
was grand organist and Mildred 
Klinger of Reina del Mar No. 126, 
soloist. Also assisting in the cere- 
monies was PP Barbara Upton of 
Tierra de Oro Parlor as acting mar- 
shal. 




DGP Marx Louise Daxs 



Mary Louise Days, Past President 
of Reina del Mar was introduced as 
the new Deputy Grand President. 
Also present to extend their con- 
gratulations to the new Board of 
Officers was SDDGP Margery 
Abern, of Poinsettia No. 318. Abe 
Martinez, President of Santa Barbara 
Parlor No. 1 1 6, NSGW and visiting 
members of Santa Maria No. 276. 
El Aliso No. 314, Poinsettia No. 
318, and La Purisima No. 327. 



CHILDRENS FOUNDATION 

The NDGW Childrens Foundation 
will benefit from a luncheon being 
planned for October 18, 1969. Sat- 
urday afternoon, in Lompoc by the 
Parlors in San Luis Obispo, Santa 
Barbara and Ventura Counties. The 
work of the Childrens Foundation 
Committee will be told by guest 
speaker, PGP Jewel McSweeney. 

Mary Rule of Lompoc is the gen- 
eral chairman for the tri-counties 
committee. She is being assisted by 
area-chairmen: Katie G. Jewett PGP 
in San Luis Obispo County: Charity 
Righetti in Santa Maria: Ambert 
Phillips in Santa Barbara and Ellen 
(Continued on Page 10) 



CHILDRENS FOUNDATION . . . 
•/;■/<•</ from page 9) 

Guthrie in Ventura Count) Partici 
pating Parlors are v<;// Miguel No. 

01 / uisita No. 108, II Final 
No 163, Reina del Mat No. 126, 
Santa Maria No 276, Tierra >/<■ <v<> 

14, /« Purisima No. ; ! ! 
.-<//*i» No. 314 and Poinsettia No. 

Further details maj be obtained 
in contacting any of the Parlors or 
write to Jeanne Fredrick, Secretary - 
rreasurer, at IM las Olas Ave- 
nue. Santa Barbara. Calif. 93105. 



LaVerne Hambleton was installed 

lor another term as president of 
Ramona No. 2<S3. when the group 
met to seat the new corps of officers. 
Audra Hendricks. Las Flores No. 
2d 2. and her corps of Acting Grand 
Officers were the installing team. 
Members of the local Parlor formed 
an official escort for president-elect 
I \ erne Hambleton and flowers 
were presented to her by her grand- 
daughter, 4-year old Angic Steven- 
son. 

Other officers installed with Mrs. 
Hambleton include: Mmes Virginia 
Ferguson, Pat Pimental, Dona Fer- 
reira. Glenda Valasquez, Connie 
Rocha, Helen Edwards, Virginia Cas- 
tro. Natalie Garcia. Carmen Lopez, 
Nadine Rose, and Miss Carrie Fac- 
chini. 

Mrs. Hambleton announced plans 
for a family picnic in honor of DGP 
Audra Hendricks. Mrs. Castro was 
as general chairman. 

Among the guests at the installa- 
tion were SDDGP Gerry Freeman, 
Coalinga No. 270, who introduced 
the new SDDGP Mary C. Newton 
of Charter Oak No. 292. 

Mrs. Hambleton's husband, sev- 
eral other family members, members 
from Fresno and Visalia parlors were 
present as guests. 

Mrs. Ferguson presented Mrs. 
Hendricks with a gift from the Par- 
lor, Mrs. Bessie Uselton presenting 
a gift to Mrs. Freeman from the 
Parlor, and Mrs. Velasquez (daugh- 
ter of Mrs. Hambleton) presented 
Mrs. Hambleton with an engraved 
gavel from the Parlor. 

Mrs. Garcia was general chairman 
of the installation, and Miss Fac- 
chini was refreshment chairman. 



R] IN \ Ml M \\t 

Installation ceremonies were con- 
ducted at the Knights of Columbus 
Hall, for the officers elect of Reina 
del Mar Parlor. DGP Ellen Guthrie. 
El Aliso No. 314 as installing of- 
ficer was assisted by members of her 
parlor as acting grand officers and 
Past Grand President Eileen Dis- 
muke. of Tierra de Oro No. 304. 




Virginia Days, President of Reina del 
Mar Parlor. 



Installed were Mrs. Anthony Days, 
president. Her corps of officers in- 
cluded Mmes. Walter R. Fluker, John 
E. Stupak, Arnold Diaz, H. Dale 
Thayer, Raymond D. Smith, Peter 
A. Graham, Roy V. Miller, Paul J. 
Miller and Armand W. Schmitter. 
Also installed was Mrs. James T. 
Hogg, past president, and trustees 
Mmes. Ambert Phillips, William 
MacFarlane and Kenneth L. Bell. 

Dorothy Dye, of Placerita No. 277, 
was the organist and the accompanist 
for the soloist Mildred Klinker, of 
Reina del Mar during the ceremonies. 

President Days introduced mem- 
bers of her family and announced 
her committee chairmen. 

Attending the occasion were of- 
ficers and members of Santa Maria 
No. 276; Tierra de Oro No. 304; 
El Aliso No. 314; Poinsettia No. 3is' 

During the opening ceremonies, 
SDDGP Margey Abern of District 
32 was introduced and escorted 
to her seat of honor; and during the 



closing ceremonies the new D(l 
Gertrude Reed of Tierra de Oro v [ 
introduced and escorted to her sij 
of honor. 



GENEVIEVE 

An inspirational installation of J 
ficers was held by Genevieve 1^1 
132. GT Helen McCarthy of UtoA 
Parlor escorted each officer to r 
station. 

PGPs Evelyn I. Carlson and Em , 
Ryan spoke on the interesting h 
tory of Genevieve Parlor. Beau 
fully wrapped gifts from the Pari 
and individual members were pr 
sented to outgoing president Dos' 
Stidhem. DGP Edith O'Conner ail 
incoming president Virginia Bigara 
by Irene Crowley, chairman of tW 
evening. A lovely bouquet of red arl 
white carnations with a blue bo 
donated by Native Son Louie Wit 
ant was presented to the presides 
by her son William. A red, white ar 
blue corsage was the gift of her hud 
band, Harry. 

Old Glory's color scheme was use) 
in the table and hall decoration: 
Chairman Crowley, co-chairmaj 
Josephine Moran assisted by Mmej 
Shores, Kastellic and Buckley serve] 
delicious refreshments. 



FOUNDING OF NDGW . . . 
(Continued from Page 4) 

The work of the Order is we) 
known throughout the State. Th 
Parlors have been most active in th 
restoration and preservation of thl 
Franciscan Missions of the State. 

The marking of historic buildings 
preservation of historic sites an» 
relics, the history of the pioneers anc 
heritage of California are dear tc 
the Parlors and the work constantly 
in this field. The Childrens Founda 
tion Agency is the Order's child wel' 
fare work. The Order maintain* 
many scholarships for the youth oi 
California, sponsors a junior collegd 
public speaking contest and has ai 
active veterans welfare program 
There are projects to interest womer 
of California, regardless of age. anc 
it is this wide range program that 
answers the need of women "to do 
something for someone" and makes 
the Order a vital force in each com 
munity. 

CALIFORNIA HERALC 







Meeting place of first NDGW Parlor 
at Jackson. 



Ursula No. I 



Friendship and fun are not for- 
otten, and the Native Daughters 
're well-known for their hospitality, 
b their 83 years, the Native Daugh- 
.-rs of the Golden West have given 
huch to the State and to their mem- 
prs, and each Native Daughter is 
jroud of her membership in this 
rarth while and friendly organization. 
1 It is with true appreciation and 
he desire to ever strengthen the 
Seals of the Founder that the Order 
alutes Lilly O. Reichling Dyer, 
['hose vision brought into being the 
lativc Daughters of the Golden 
Vest. 



|T. PATRICK'S CHURCH . . . 
Continued from Page 3) 

o cement stairs and stained glass 
findows have been added. Many 
jf these changes were due to the 
-tive work of Father Patrick Guer- 
}i, who became pastor of the church 
i 1889. A new lighting system and a 
Spe organ were also installed. At 
ie present time Father Stephen 
^ack, who came in 1953, is the 
astor. 

Research concerning the history 
(f the Chuhch was made by the late 
eonard J. Rehm, Barbara Eastman, 
istorian of Columbia; and Ruth 
»nn Newport, historian of Tuolumne 
'ounty. Mrs. Newport possesses an 
Ktensive collection of rare pictures 
f the Church and of other Tuolumne 
ounty historical buildings. 

On May 25, 1969, the Native 
•aughters of the Golden West, Dis- 
ict 24, Tuolumne County, corn- 
rising Anona No. 164, Dardanelle 

EPTEMBER, 1969 



No. 66 and Golden Era No. 99, de- 
dicated a historic plaque to the 
Church. Mrs. Ed Carboni of James- 
town, district chairman of Native 
Daughters History and Landmark.*. 
Committee, was mistress of cere- 
monies. The plaque lists the January 
4, 1863, date of the first Mass and 
the dedication date, January 25, 
1863. 




Plaque marking St Patrick's Church. 
From left: Rev. Father Stephen Stack: 
Mrs. Ed Carboni; and Irene John- 
son, president of Anona Parlor. 

Native Daughters dignitaries at- 
tending included GIS Meredyth Bur- 
nette, PGP Norma Hodson, SDDGP 
Lucile Turnamn, DGPs Sue Quilla 
and Lucy Valerdi and Junior State 
Past President Roberta Griffiths of 
the Past Presidents' Association. At 
the plaque dedication ceremonies 
brochures were distributed giving an 
interesting history of the Church and 
an 1873 picture of the church edifice. 



i II si \ WEEK 

Grand President Nancy J. ConetU 
spent the entire week of liesta in 
Santa Barbara attending the various 
functions in connection with this an- 
nual event. Accompanying her was 
SDDGP Ann Shaw, lor Golden Gate 
Parlor in San Francisco I he visitors 
arrived in time to attend the annual 
(lower Girl Party held at historic 
Covamibias Adobe, sponsored an- 
nually for the past fourteen years by 
Tierra de Oro No. 304. honoring the 
150 Fiesta Flower Girls of 1969. 
and the Fiesta Usherettes, also spon- 
sored by the Parlor. Flower girls arc- 
ages 12 to 16, and usherettes 16 to 
21. The Fiesta Flower Girls are the 
official junior hostesses of the annual 
Fiesta in Santa Barbara. They meet 
the trains, buses and planes as they 
bring thousands of visitors to Santa 
Barbara for the week's festivities, 
visit hospitals and rest homes to 
spread their fiesta spirit with their 
gay baskets of flowers, sell fiesta 
badges to assist the Old Spanish 
Days Board of Directors in the finan- 
cing of the annual event, and serve 
as young hostesses at many private 
functions. The party given on Sun- 
day, August 3, honored the young 
participants and their mothers, who 
make the gay costumes which their 
daughters wear during Fiesta Week. 

Grand President Conens then was 
a guest at the El Presidente's cocktail 
party, also held at the Covamibias 
Adobe, following the flower girl par- 
ty. She was the houseguest of Past 
Grand President Eileen Dismuke. and 
her husband, Ben, and attended the 
Fiesta Pequena and the Misa del 
Presidente at Old Mission Santa Bar- 
bara on Wednesday evening and 
Thursday morning of Fiesta as a 
guest of the Franciscan Fathers. On 
Thursday she also was a guest of the 
City of Santa Barbara and Mayor 
Gerald S. Firestone in the Mayor's 
box at the Historical Parade and at 
the Cocktail Party held at Earl War- 
ren Park following the parade. 

She was entertained at luncheon 
at El Paseo by a group of members 
of Reina del Mar Parlor, and as a 
guest at the Cafe del Sol of Mrs. 
of Mrs. Fred Acres, Sr.. long-time 
member of Reina del Mar No. 126. 
Grand President Conens had the 
pleasure of seeing the floats spon- 
sored by Reina del Mar and Tierra 
de Oro Parlors in the historical par- 

( Continued on Page 12) 



FIFSfA WEEK . 
it ontUut 



I 

membei ol th< 

,i Barbara during 
i nd i" ride on the beau- 

loal in the histor- 
many 
red th< I .1 Ramara Floal 
in the parade, but three years ago 
the Greal Seal ol the State 
ol California .is its Boat in the par- 
ade in recognition ol the fact that 
Santa Barbara became an incorpor- 
ated cit) a few weeks before Califor- 
nia w;is admitted into the union of 
in 1850. I he Parlor chooses 
.1 membei of the Parlor, or the daugh- 
ter o\ a member to represent Minerva 

00 the Boat, which was designed and 
executed DJ a parlor member and the 
daughter of Past Grand President 
Eileen Dismuke, Eileen Jane (Mrs 
Wesley 1 Gray, who. like her mother. 
is a native-born Santa Barbaran. 

Other events enjoyed by the Grand 
President and her companion during 
jsta Week were the dedication 
of a plaque at the site of the More- 
ton Bay Fig Tree in commemoration 
of the camp site of Gasper de Por- 
lola in his treek with Padre Junipero 
Serra two hundred \ears ago to Santa 
Barbara. The plaque was dedicated 
by the Society of Colonial Wars. 
Another historic event witnessed by 
the Grand President and other vis- 
itors was the Landing of Cabrillo 
on the same afternoon at the water- 
front. She attended the bowl show as 
a guest of the Dismukes in their box 
on Thursday ol Fiesta, and the San- 
ta Barbara Woman's Club Annual 
Merienda Tea on Friday afternoon, 
where Mrs Dismuke served as a 
member of the committee and a 
hostess. Friday evening the Grand 
President and other visiting Native 
Daughters attended the Noches de 




\isitmg members of the History u 
Landmarks Committee of III (ami 
Real Parlor. 



^ 



Grand President Nancy J. Conens 

Ronda evening program in the sunk- 
en garden of the Santa Barbara 
County Court House, where they 
were guests of Reina del Mar Par- 
lor members, co-sponsors of this 
beautiful outdoors free musical pro- 
gram presented nightly Thursday 
through Saturday evening of Fiesta 
Week. 

The Grand President left Santa 
Barbara on the Saturday morning 
of Fiesta for Sacramento where she 
was scheduled to attend the Sacra- 
mento Birthday celebration on Sat- 
urday evening, vowing to again re- 
turn to Fiesta in Santa Barbara, as 
have all of her predecessors who have 
attended this outstanding civic cele- 
bration. 

Past Grand President Eileen Dis- 
muke and Mr. Dismuke entertained 
at dinner and at luncheon on Thurs- 
day for visiting Native Daughters. 
including GIS Laura Blosdale and 
her traveling companion, who also 
were houseguests, PGP Edna C. Wil- 
liams and her husband Don, GP 
Richard L. Richison, NSGW and 
Mrs Richison. Andrew M. Stodel, 
Jr. PGP, NSGW and a number of 





A 


N 


A H E 


1 M 




SAVINGS 


AND 


LOAN 


ASSOCIATION 


Dorothy Y. Ulvestad, President 






J. Bernard 


Soto, Exec. Vice-Pres. 


construction loans 


i 


escrow y 


refinancing 


i collections 


(Main Office) 












ANAHEIM 




HUNTINGTON BEACH 


BREA 


187 W. Lincoln Avenue 




411 Main Street 


770 


South Brea Blvd. 


PRopect 2-1S32 






LEhigh 6-6591 




Ph. 529-4971 



N\\ FRANCISCO DEPUTIES 

A dinner and fun night was hi] 
at the Iron Horse Restaurant wl 
Lucille Kimbark in charge. All 1961 
1969 deputies were present wl 
SDDGP Myrtle Ritterbush headil 
the group. Mrs. Ritterbush present! 
hand made gifts to each deputy, 
get-well card was signed by all a 
sent to Jr. PGP Hazel T. Mallet 
I he surprise of the evening cai 
when Lucille Kimbark presented 
Past Supervisor's charm to SDD( 
Ritterbush for her charm bracelet. 



SCHOLARSHIP 

Marilyn Ann Baker is the prot 
recipient of the scholarship from t 
Native Daughters of the Gold 
West. She was sponsored by h 
unit's mother parlor, Fruitvale >l 
177. Marilyn graduated last JunJ 




Marlyn Ann Baker 

from Holy Names High School I 
Oakland with awards for scholastl 
and citizenship excellents. She w! 
attend the University of Californj 
Berkeley, this fall, majoring in po"J 
tical science. 

Marilyn is a member of Fruitva 
Junior Unit No. 22, Past Preside 
and currently holding office of Tre 
surer. She is also a member of Fru« 
vale Jr. Unit choral group the "Ra.| 
onettes." 

CALIFORNIA HERAll 



R. CONFERENCE . . . 
'ontinued from Page 2) 

ibits, shows, and special attractions 
rained playful dolphins, perform- 
ig sea lions, water-ski and boat show 
airing a water-skiing elephant, a 
Rirnev to the depths of Nautilus 
eef tor a walk along the floor of 
ie sea are but a tew of the man) 
(citing and unusual attractions. 
iuided tours will start at 10:30 a.m., 
ith lunch break continuing on tour 
mil approximately 3:00 p.m. when 
lis wonderful Junior Conference 
eekend will climax another success 
il year for the Junior Native Daugh- 
rs. 




GT Helen C. McCarthy, 
Stale Chairman, Junior NDGW 



The State Committee, Sequoia 
nit (Junior Hostesses) and their 
jvisors, and the Mother Parlor, Be- 
ta No. 10 of Menlo Park cordially 
sites you to attend this most out- 
anding event of the Junior Year. 

In addition to the enjoyment that 
ill be yours by your attendance at 
ie Conference where you will wit- 
sss and be amazed and proud of 
ie efficiency and knowledge of the 
.iuth of our Order and participate 
i the social events planned, you will 
tost certainly enjoy your stay at the 
ilia Hotel. The exciting 200 room 
ilia Hotel in the unique and beauti- 
il resort-like setting is located 12 
linutes from San Francisco Inter- 
ational Airport (24 hours courtesy 
mousine between airport and hotel) 

30 minute drive from San Fran- 
isco, also adjacent to Greyhound 
us Lines and Southern Pacific Rail- 
ed transportation. It is a "Full Ser- 
ice Hotel" featuring shops, 24 hour 
:rvice, 24 hour Coffee House, color- 
d TV in rooms, and all the luxuries 
laintained for your pleasure. 

The committee is working diligent- 
I to make this Conference a most 
njoyable and outstanding event and 

EPTEMBER, 1969 



lhe\ hope that you will attend ami 
the weekend with the Junior 
Native Daughters of the Golden 
West. 



\n\ .n nior t Ml 

I he Junior Native Daughters arc- 
increasing their ranks. I he Institution 
of Princesa del Mar Unit No. 40 
in Santa Barbara will take place on 
Saturday evening. September 13. Ilk- 
new Unit is sponsored by Reina del 
Mar Parlor. The orgajii/er is member 
Nancy Fluker. 

Grand President Nancy J. (onens. 
assisted by the State Chairman of 
Junior Native Daughters, GT Helen 
Mc Carthy, and Grand Officers will 
conduct the institution ceremonies. 
Junior State President Kathy Slater 
and Junior State Officers will conduct 
the initiation and installation cere- 
monies. 

Plans are being made by the Moth- 
er Parlor for a festive and gala even- 
ing to welcome these young ladies 
into the Order and a large attendance 
is anticipated. 



The will of the people is very import- 
ant in any election. So is the WONT of 

the people. 



By the time some people can afford 
one of those sporty little foreign cars, 
they can't fit into them. 



A Texan was dictating his will: "To 
my son I leave three million dollars — and 
he's lucky I didn't cut him off entirely." 



Accident statistics prove that the yen 
eral run of pedestrians is too slow. 



The kindly, gray-haired boss was in the 
process of firing a young office worker 
when he halfway relented. "In a way I 
hate to lose you," the boss said. "You've 
been like a son to me — insolent, surly 
and unappreciative." 



BRIDGES • HIGHWAYS - DAMS - RAILROADS 



dOLflnDldEVnOLOS 

GRADING ■fhflj CONTRACTOR 



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Hauling For Rent 

535-4233 

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VAL M. BRAY 256-0747 



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1215 W. Lincoln. Anaheim 535-4997 



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BACKS 
KAULBARS 

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Anaheim 
772-1617 




Diamonds — Silverware 

132 W. Lincoln / Anaheim / 533-3107 




Suite 114 



A. P.M. BROWN, INC. 

"A Full House of Insurance" 

Fire — Auto — Theft — Casualty 
Compensation — Bonds 

Phone (714) 635-7871 

280 N. Wilshire Ave. / Anaheim, California 92801 



;& 3 M 1 M M I 






by 

JJ. Friiii 




The ship, "Oregon" entered t\ 
Golden (late and brought t\ 
good news that "California is] 
Stale." The news was then s\ 
naled to the people of San FW 
cisco from Telegraph Hill. 



s 



i i>! i MBER Ninth marks the 
I l^th anniversarj of California's ad- 
mission into the Union. Native Sons 
and Native Daughters of the Golden 
West celebrate at Santa Cruz from 
September 6 through September 9. 
The theme this year is "California — 
Bicentennial." 




Colton Hall in Monterey where delegates had met to frame a 
stitution for California. 

PAGE 14 



SYMBOLISM OF BEAR FLAG 

The red star (left hand corne 
shows Sovereignty; the Grizzly Be 
(middle) shows Strength and tl 
Red Bar (across the bottom) sho« 
Courage 



CALIFORNIA HERAL 



flag Presented to President Nixon 




From left at President Nixon's executive office in Washington. 
DC: Mrs. Richard L. Ritchison (wife of Grand President Rich- 
ard L. Ritchison, NSGW), Jr. PGP Hazel T. Mallette; President 
Richard M. Nixon; Senaida Sullivan, Madrina of Olvera Street 
and State Chairman of Americanism and Civic Participation. 
NDGW; GT Betty Read Curilich and PGP Maxiene Porter. 



EINA DEL MAR 



California heritage came alive 
Rockwood in the form of song, 
ince and folklore when members 
id guests of Reina del Mar, gath- 
ed for their annual pre -fiesta tea. 
he event is annually held to honor 
e directors of Old Spanish Days 
id descendants of early California 
milies. Mrs. James T. Hogg, presi- 
:nt of Reina del Mar welcomed the 
lests and introduced Miss Mary 
auise Days, past president and 
lairman of the pre-Fiesta tea. Heir- 
om shawls on display provided the 
tting for the "Shawl Dance" pre- 
nted by Las Fiesteras, the parlor's 
ince group. 

Arnold Diaz and his orchestra 
ayed a variety of songs, and the 
e Vito sisters offered Spanish dan- 
s. Patricio Perex, with Flamenco 
litar, and the singing of Lucille 
lalek, in both English and Spanish, 

EPTEMBER, 1969 




From left: Mrs. James T. Hogg, pres- 
ident Reina del Mar, PGP Andrew 

M. Stodel, NSGW; Miss Mary Louise 
Days, Chairman Annual Fiesta Tea. 



completed a worthy tribute to Old 
Spanish Days. 

Dr. Jay Monahan, library consult- 
ant at UCSB and author of 13 books, 
was guest speaker. He presented 
numerous and varied accounts of 



the days of the California gold rush. 

Pouring for die tea were ' 
Goulet Abbott, Wilson Forbes, W. 
R. Alien. ( . ii Cannon, I rnest H. 
Menzies, and w l< Allen and the 
Misses Catherine Lataillade and 

Dorothy Dye. 

\mong the invited guests were: 
Mayor and viis. Gerald S. Firestone, 
El Presidente and Mrs. William Rus- 
sell, PGP Eileen Dismuke, DGP I I 
len Guthrie ol Fillmore, Councilwo- 
man Gladys Carr, Mr. and Mrs. 
Abraham Martinez, president ol San- 
ta Barbara Parlor I In. NSGW, 
Courtney Monsen of Old Spanish 
Days, Mr. and Mrs. Lynn Spear ol 
the Volunteers for the Santa Barbara 

Trust for Historic Preservation, and 

the Reverend Mavnard Geiger, 
O.F.M. 



ilie. 



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THE NATIVE DAUGHTERS of the GOLDEN WEST 




cct( in. i9( ) + \(c 



SCENIC VIEW AT NATURAL BEACH BRIDGES STATE PARK. SANTA CRUZ 



3BI IB I ) t3E^i| 



JR. UNIT NEWS 

! , , , , 



Ml \sl \ I) MSN II NIORS 

l leven members of Shasta Daisj 
i mi \,. 39 lunioi Native Daughters 
attended the State Conference in San 
Mateo on October 10, 1 1 and 12. 
1 mil. i Porterfield, president of Shasta 
Dais) t mi was installed as Junior 
State rrustee when the newly elected 
state officers were installed on Sat 
urdaj evening. I he ceremonj was 
held in the Pacifica Room of the 

Villa Hotel at Marine World in Red- 
wood City. Delegates and members 
attending from Redding were Misses. 
Briley, Porterfield, Roach, Iwomev 
Rutherford, M a npr i n. Brothwell, 
Gersbach, Eieinan, Solie, and Hayncs. 
The group was accompanied \)\ 
advisors of the unit — Mines. Porter- 
field. Ma//ini and Griffin. 



California Herald 



■PRESERVING THE PAST FOR THE FUTURE' 



Volumi wii October, 1969 Numbkr 

CONTENTS THIS MONTH 

Junior Unit News 

Church of the Lighted Window, by Idabelle Griffin 

Hope Adobe in Santa Barbara 

The Grand President's Corner 

Parlor News i 

Official Directory of NDGW Parlors 

Diamond Jubilee, by Gladys Wegener I 

In Memoriam 1 

Admission Day, by Doris Perez, State Chairman l< 



Ml \l () II MORS 

Menlo Junior Unit No. 10 was 
awarded second prize of $10 for its 
year bunk. Five advisors and eleven 
Juniors attended. Rene Cook was 
elected Jr. State Secretary and Robin 
Gilbert. State Chairman of Welfare. 
Linda Cane. State Marshal conduct- 
ed her duties during the Conference. 
Yicki Nichols was an initiate. 



M \\ II MOR I Ml 




Institution oj Princesa del Mar Unit 

No. 40. From left — Mrs. Nancy 
Flucker, Organizer a n d Chairman 
Advisor; Ellen Decker, President oj 
new Unit; GP Sancy Conens; C,T 
Helen McCarthy, State Chairman of 
Junior NDGW. 

(Continued on Page 11) 



Before you make 

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electric heating with room-by-room temperature controls. 
An all-electric kitchen that stays clean and cool. Cool, re- 
freshing air conditioning throughout the house. Medallion 
Homes are available now in all price ranges. It will pay 
you to look for this emblem before you make a move. 




Southern California Edison 



3. J. FRIIS 
Publisher 



LEO J. FRIIS 
Editor 



JANE FRIIS 

Public Relations 



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CALIFORNIA HERALD 




C sttutctt on ilt 



& 



lOinh 



ow 



bif 'rzJhabrAbe G^tikjiin. 



m FTER ! 
i'\ tori 



fter seeing La Canada's his- 
c Congregational Chur- 
;h. California's Poet Laureate, John 
v McGroarty exclaimed, "This win- 
low bears a beautiful picture of the 
Wanderer of Galilee. . . his tender 
lands knocking at a closed door. . . 
i lighted window that shines out upon 
:he lonely night." 

1 his church, has become known 
ill over California as "The Church 
)f the Lighted Window." 

Back in 1774, Governor Pedro 
-ages granted the Rancho La Can- 
da. composed of over 6,000 acres, 
:xtending from Arroyo Seco to the 
Jan Fernando grant line, unto Don 
wtf Verdugo as a reward for his 
aithful military service to the King 
)f Spain. A century later, land in the 
alley was purchased by Dr. J. L. 
fcnterman and Col. A. W. Williams, 
it was divided and sold, but portions 
vere retained by the heirs. 

By 1883 informal religious services 
vere being conducted at "Home- 
vood", residence of Dr. J. L. Lanter- 
nan. by itinerant preachers or valley 
esidents. In 1897 fifteen persons 
net at the Lanterman home to draw 
ip the Statement of Faith and form- 
illy found the La Canada Congrega- 
ional Church. 

From the Lanterman family came 
he lot itself, and from a Roman 

OCTOBER, 1969 



Catholic neighbor of the Lantermans 
the gift of a corner stone. Building 
materials, furnishings, and the skilled 
labor of a variety of La Canadans 
s a w the building completed and 
dedicated April 19, 1898. At that 
time there were approximately 120 
persons in the entire area. This was 
the only church in this vicinity for 
fifty years. The first minister. Rev. 
Franklin James Culver, was paid a 
salary of $10 per month . . . "And 
something more if it can be done". 

Because of growth, plans were 
begun in 1919 to build a large, more 
adequate church. The present sanctu- 
ary was dedicated on December 14, 

1924. On the following April 9, 

1925, the Tiffany stained glass mem- 
orial window, which was given by the 
Lanterman f a m i 1 y in memory of 
Jacob and Ammoretta Lanterman. 
was installed, which actualh created 
the identity of the Church of the 
Lighted Window as we know it 
today. 

Through the years, donors have 
beautified the church by giving 
memorial windows. On the south side 
of the sanctuary are stained glass 
windows, the first was given by the 
workmen in 1925. Five others depict- 
ing bible scenes have been donated 
by various members 1929-1956. 
These were made by Judson Brothers 



of Highland Park and Los Angeles. 
On the north side of the sanctuary 
are the newer Chipped Glass Win- 
dows made by Gabriel Loire, world 
famous artist of Chartres. France. 
1955-1957. 

There is a Children's Memorial 
Window in the Worship Room ol 
the Education Building. 

Memorial Windows "Abraham 
Lincoln" and "The Pilgrim" are in 
the church narthex. 

The original stained glass window 
which was in the first church, de- 
picting Easter Lilies, is now in the 
Youth Hall. 

Inside the front entry to the 
Church of the Lighted Window, 
about floor level is the church corner 
stone. This corner stone of the orig- 
inal edifice erected in 1897, was 
made a part of the present building. 
It was cut and lettered by George 
Kane. The inscription reads. "1 .a 
Canada Congregational Church 1897, 
rebuilt 1924." 

The church has closely paralleled 
the history of the town of La Canada 
and nows finds itself busj surviving 
one more major change in the face 
of the valley it has served for nearly 
three-quarters of a century. Massive 
earth moving machines are tunnelling 
under the intersection for the upcom- 

(Continued on Page 14) 

PAGE 3 




Thomas Hope House built in 1875 

and designed by the lamed architect 

Peter Barber 



in 
s&cmta Barbara 



5JBJ) his historic ranch home was 
Ji, built in 1875 by Thomas Hope 
at the cost of SI 0,000. It was de- 
signed by tamed architect Peter 
Barber — the first professional archi- 
tect to work in Santa Barbara. 

In 1843. the Mexican Governor 
Micheltorena made a grant of La 
Calera (lime kiln) Rancho to Narcise 
Fabregat, an officer at the Santa 
Barbara Presidio, and in 1846 
Governor Pico granted the adjoining 
Las Positas (little springs) rancho to 
Thomas Robbins. Thomas Hope pur- 
chased the land from Encarnacion 
Carrillo de Robbins in 1861. A cow- 
boy and sheepherdcr in Texas, he 
came through Santa Barbara on his 
way to San Francisco. He returned 
here in 1849 because Santa Barbara 
reminded him of his native Ireland. 
He was appointed Indian Agent and 
with his wife, Delia, sympathetically 
dealt with the large encampment of 
Indians who since prehistoric times 
had lived around the nearby Ciene- 
guitas Creek. At one time Hope's 
holding extended from Valerio Street 




Plaque marking Hope Adobe as 
historical landmark by Native Dau- 
ghter Pallors Reina del Mar and 
Tierra de Oro. 



to Mescalitan Island (near UCSB) 
in Goleta. Hope made a fortune from 
his sheep when the price of wool 
skyrocketed during the Civil War. 

Although Hope died in 1876, his 
widow and six children lived here 
for 12 years The children inherited 
the eastern portion of t h e ranch, 
while Mrs. Hope was willed the 
western portion which she sold in 
1887 for S250,000 (demanding pay- 
ment in gold coin) to the Pacific 



Improvement Co., a holding com-l 
pany organized by the Southern Pac-I 
ific Railroad Co. There are no known! 
descendants. 

Maurice Heckscher was the next! 
owner who sold the property in 1924P 
to a company organized by Harold! 
Chase. Recent owners have been! 
Howard Vesey and C. W. Berry. 

Vacant and severely vandalized,! 
the old landmark was scheduled to! 
be razed. Restoration was began! 
March, 1968. 

Through the generosity of many! 
friends, the carpets, curtains, andi] 
antique furniture were gathered fori 
the 12 rooms. One parlor became aj 
museum. There is a central staircase 
with two parlors on each side and 
four bedrooms upstairs. Four rooms 
on the first floor were added later 
in the rear. 

The large trees are 64 years old, 
having been planted in 1904. The 
arborvitae is said to be the largest 
in the county. 

Hope House was marked as an 
historical landmark by Native Dau- 
ghters of Reina del Mar and Tierra 
de Oro Parlors. 

CALIFORNIA HERALD 



The Grand 
President's Corner 



GRAND PRESIDENT 

Nancj I, Conens i MrsO 
4311 Allendale Avenue 
Oakland, ( alifornia 94619 




NANCY J. CONENS 



(,K \M) si ( RETARY 

Lucille I. Kimhaik (Mis ( I I 

2271 -32nd Avenue 

s:m Pranciico, California V4i if> 

office: 70.1 Market Street, Room 612 

San l rancisco 94103 Dial 362-4127 



The month of September has been 
a busy one and I told you of some 
.if the activities in our last visit. 
However, I would now like to men- 
tion two more events of special note. 
1 On September 13th, it was my 
pleasure to institute Princesa d e 1 
Alar Unit No. 40, Junior Native 
[Daughters of the Golden West, in 
Santa Barbara. Many Grand Offi- 
cers and Past Grand Presidents were 
present to witness this outstanding 
je v e n t and welcome thirty young 
ladies into the Junior Order. Con- 
gratulations to the Organizer, Nancy 
Flucker from Reina del Mar No. 
126. for a job well done. 

On September 27th at the Annual 
Fiesta Tea at Mission Soledad, a 
fountain was dedicated in memory 
of all Native Daughters. I do hope 
that whenever you are in the area of 
this Mission you will take the time 
to visit and see all that has been 
accomplished by the Order in this 
restoration work. 

In the month of October there will 
be many official visits plus two Chil- 
drens Foundation luncheons, the 
Junior Conference and the San 
Francisco Deputies Reception. I look 
forward to meeting many of you on 
these different occasions and I do 
hope you will make an effort to 
attend the events in your area. The 
more active you are, the more your 
membership will mean to you. 

When events are open to the 
public, bring along prospective 
members so they may learn of our 
objectives. Be aware of every op- 
portunity to obtain a new member. 

OCTOBER. 1969 



How are you doing on our goal? Do 
you have your three members yet7 



Keep up lite A( I ION and you will 
be successful. See you next time. 



Jtinerary 1969 

OCTOBER 

1 Laurel No. 6, Manzanita No. 29, Sierra Pines No. 275 ... Nevada City" 

4 Sacramento Children's Foundation Luncheon Sacramento 

6 Plumas Pioneer No. 219 Quincy* 

7 Imogen No. 134 Sierravillc* 

8 Naomi No. 36 Downieville* 

11-12 Junior Native Daughters Conference San Mateo 

13 Santa Cruz No. 26 Santa Cruz* 

15 Stirling No. 146, Donner No. 195 Pittsburg* 

16 Gilroy No. 312 Gilroy* 

18 Districts 28 & 31 Children's Foundation Luncheon Lompoc 

20 Tierra del Rey No. 300, Wilmington No. 278 Hermosa Beach* 

21 Toluca No. 279 — 25th Anniversary Burbank* 

23 Madera No. 244, Fresno No. 187 Madera* 

24 San Francisco Deputy Grand Presidents' Reception 
25-26 Grand Officers' Meeting 



NOVEMBER 

Northern Counties' Childrens Foundation Breakfast Corning 

Mt. Lassen No. 215 — 50th Anniversary Bieber* 

Alturas No. 159 Alturas* 

Nataqua No. 152, Susanville No. 243 Standish* 

La Bandera No. 110, Sutter No. Ill, Califia No. 22 Sacramento* 

Berkeley No. 150 Berkeley* 

Mariposa No. 63 Mariposa* 

Veterans' Day, Woodland No. 90 Woodland* 

James Lick No. 220, Darina No. 114, (afternoon) San Francisco 

Oneonta No. 71, Areata No. 325, Occident No. 28, 

Reichling No. 95 Ferndale :: 

Miocene No. 228, El Tejon No. 239, Alila No. 321 Taft* 

Santa Maria No. 276, La Purissima No. 327 Santa Maria* 

El Pinal No. 163, San Miguel No. 94. San Luisita No. 198 .... Cambria* 

Tierra de Oro No. 304, Reina del Mar No. 126 Santa Bargara 

Argonaut No. 166, Aloha No. 106, Brooklyn No. 157 Emeryville* 
Thanksgiving Day 



2 

2 

3 

5 

6 

8 

9 

11 

12 

13 

17 
18 
19 
20 

25 
27 



* Official visits are marked with asterisks 



LATE NEWS 

An accident in the printing plant caused the linotype galleys with the type of 
the October issue to be ruined. It necessitated doing the magazine all over ag 
regret that this made the October magazine late. However, the Novcm:' 
be out this month. 



i \s FIESTI kvs 

One of the traditional attractions 
«'i old Spanish Days in Santa Bar- 
bara is the portrayal of Old Califor- 
nia dances bj I as I iesteras dance 

eroup i>l Reina J, I Ma 

I .1- l iesteras was begun bj Miss 
Maria de i os Angeles Ruiz in 1962 
when the dancers took part in the 
tirst Fiesta courthouse shows pre- 
sented in the Poole-Verhelle familj 

group. Mis William RuSSeD, wile of 

our 1969 presidente, the former Oor- 
.iilr> Poole, learned the dances from 



Parlor Neu/s 



I Ins year the I iesteras were wear- 
ing new formal gowns, modeled on 
those worn by California senoras and 
senoritas The gowns were hand- 
made In Anita Joyal. chairman of 
the group and a fourth generation 
Calif orni an. The long blue gown 
worn by members of the group long 
have been a welcome sight to the 
audiences of the Noches de Ronda 




From left — Mrs. John Stitpak, Mrs. Wm. MacFarlane Miss 

Patncia Joyal. Miss Mary Louise Days, Mrs. Armand Schmitter 

Mrs. Manuel DeVito, Mrs. Raymond Smith, Mrs. Sarah Dias and 

Mrs. W. R. F I ticker. 



of the Golden West, as well as I 
the state convention of the Pythiali 
Sisters at the Miramar Hotel I 
spring. They are featured perform! 
crs at Reina del Mar Parlor's pre! 
Fiesta tea each July. Every year durl 
ing Santa Barbara's Old Spanisl 
Days Fiesta, Las Fiesteras have danc] 
ed at Fiesta Pequena at the Old Mis'- 
sion. 

Current members of the group arJ 
Mmes. Armand Schmitter, Sara Diaz] 
Willam MacFarlane, John E. Stupaljj 
Jr.. Waiter R. Fluker, RaymorJ 
Smith and Manuel De Vito; also uV 
Misses Mary Louise Days and Patri 9 
cia Joyal, the 1969 Saint Barbara! 
Past Saint Barbaras who are memJ 
bers of the dance group are Mrs! 
Stupak, Mrs. Schmitter and MisJ 
Days. 

1 * < 
LOS ANGELES 

Los Angeles No. 124 is starting thcl 
holiday season with a Fall Festival! 
dinner party. Thelma Meek, ways' 
and means chairman, and her com-l 
mittee are planning a deicious chick-| 
en dinner catered by a well known! 
caterer. Home made trimmings will I 
be served. 

The date is November 19, 1969.1 
Place: Odd Fellows Temple, 1823 1 
South Oak Street, Los Angeles. Price: 1 
Three dollars. Time: 6:30 P.M. 

Reservations are absolutely nec-M 
essary. Send your check to Mrs.! 
Noma Stretch, 118 E. Avenue 33,1 
Los Angeles, California, 90031. 

All Native Daughters and S o n s I 
are invited as well as their families! 
and friends. An enjoyable evening! 
will be spent with games, visiting! 
with friends and a good dinner. I 
Come and have fun. 



her parents. The beloved Teresa Jans- 
sens Lane, a disciple of Miss Ruiz, 
taught Las Fiesteras the graceful dan- 
ces of the California dons. The group 
continues to preserve these dances 
and many of its members are descen- 
dants of pioneer families. 

No other dance group performs 
such historic Fiesta dances as the 
contra danza, shawl dance, la jota, 
and varsouvienne. The shawl dance 
was created by Mrs. Lane especially 
for Las Fiesteras, but the others are 
performed as they were danced in 
early Santa Barbara. 



courthouse performances, which 
Reina del Mar co-sponsors. 

The Las Fiesteras have danced 
at many events throughout Califor- 
nia over the years. They have per- 
formed at the Mission Soledad and 
La Purisima Mission fiesta, and won 
a prize in the 1967 NDGW-NSGW 
Admission Day parade in Hayward. 

The group has danced for a num- 
ber of local organizations, including 
the Catholic Daughters of America, 
Young Ladies' Institute, California 
Teachers Assn. and the Native Sons 



ALOHA 

At the official visit of Aloha No. 
106, a 25-year pin was presented to 
Martha Decker and a 50-year pin to 
Gladys J. Farley, both past presidents 
of Aloha. A 50-year pin will also 
be given to PP Hazel Andrews who 
lives in Ukiah and a 25-year pin 
to Elaine Van Buren. 

Officers were installed by DGP 
Ethel Murphy, with Alma Lilienthal 
as president. Refreshments were 
served by Chairman Gladys Farley 
and Mmes., Ferreira, Nelson, Vio- 
lich, Muha and Peterson. 

CALIFORNIA HERALD 



N.D.G.W. Dt RECTO Ry 



GRAND OFFICERS — 1969-1970 
Grand President 

ancy J. Conens (Mrs.) Piedmont No. 87, 4311 
Allendale Ave., Oakland 94619. 

Junior Past Grand President 
azel T. Mallette (Mrs. Everal A.) Gold of 
Ophir No. 190, 45 Dunstone Drive, Oroville 
95965. 

Grand Vice President 
»ne Bondanza (Mrs. Joseph) San Francisco 
No. 261, 2328 Union St.. San Francisco 
94123. 

Grand Marshal 

rgilia McCombs (Mrs. C. F.) Morada No. 199, 

1241 Normandy Drive, Modesto 95351 

Grand Secretary 
jcille F. Kimbark (Mrs. C. F.) Alta No. 3, 
2271-32nd Ave., San Francisco 94116. Office, 
703 Market St., Rm. 612, San Francisco 
94103. Telephone: (415) 362-4127. 
Chairman, Board of Grand Trustees 
ertrude L. Doss (Mrs. Curtis E.) Whittier No. 
298, 308 South Valencia, La Habra 90631. 

Grand Trustees 

arie C. Landini (Mrs. Anthony) San Jose No. 

81, 860 Warren Way, Palo Alto 94303. 
etty Read Curilich (Mrs.) Ursula No. 1, 41 

Curilich Lane, Jackson 95642. 
la S. Hummel (Mrs. Leonard) La Tijera No. 
I 282, 836 E. Grand Ave.. El Segundo 90245. 
ielen C. McCarthy (Mrs. James P.) Utopia No. 
I 252, 4064 - 18th St., San Francisco 94114. 
iarian E. McGuire (Mrs. Paul B.) Berkeley No. 

150, 652 Wildcat Road. Berkeley 94708. 
leredyth Burnett (Mrs. Paul B.) Dardanelle 

No. 66 P.O. Box 1124. Sonora 95370 

Grand Inside Sentinel 

aura Blosdale (Mrs. Frank) Beverly Hills No. 
289, 1563 Brockton Ave., Los Angeles 90025. 

Grand Outside Sentinel 

lolores M. Ferenz (Mrs. James) Hayward No. 
122, 33 Alton Ct, Fremont 94536 

Grand Organist 

eggy Brandenburg (Mrs.) Placerita No. 277, 
4800 Brandenburg PL, Tarzana 91356. 



PAST GRAND PRESIDENTS N.D.G.W. 

931— Estelle M. Evans (Mrs. Ellis) Antioch 

No. 223, 314 West 5th Street, Antioch 

94509. 
932— Evelyn I. Carlson (Mrs.) Dolores No. 169. 

1308 Hoover Street, Apt. 1, Menlo Park 

94025 
934— Irma W. Laird (Mrs. Ralph) Alturas No. 

159, Alturas 96101 
935— Gladys E. Noce (Mrs. John) Amapola No. 

80, Box 281, Sutter Creek 95685 
937— Florence D. Boyle (Mrs.) Gold of Ophir 

Parlor No. 190, P.O. Box 1743, Oroville 

95965 
1938— Ethel Begley (Mrs.) Marinita No. 198 

233 Prospect Ave., San Francisco 94110 
1940— Orinda G. Giannini (Mrs. Raymond) Orin- 

da No. 56, 2822 35th Avenue, San Fran- 
cisco 94116 
|941— Hazel B. Hansen (Mrs. Louis) Verdugo 

No. 240, 535 N. Howard Street, Glendale 

91206 
1942— Clarice E. Gilchrist (Mrs.) Caliz de Oro 

No. 206, 25 Seaview Ave., Piedmont 

94611. 
1943— Claire Lindsey (Mrs.) Golden Gate No. 

158, 624 Cordelia Drive, Santa Rosa 95405 
1944— Mary B. Barden (Mrs. Harold) Californ- 

iana No. 247, 320 22nd St., Santa Monica 

90402 
1945— Emily E. Ryan (Mrs.) Las Lomas No. 72, 

1371 - 48th Ave., Apt. 201, San Francisco 

94122 
1946— Ethel C. Enos (Mrs.) Morada No. 199, 

Box 174, Modesto 95353 
1947— Loretta M. Cameron (Mrs.) Twin Peaks 

No. 185, 39 Chenery Street, San Fran- 
cisco 94131 
1948— Doris Treat Daley (Mrs.) San Andreas 

No. 113, 316 West Magnolia St. Stockton. 

95203. 
1949— Margaret M. Farnsworth (Mrs.) Vendome 

No. 100, Beverly Manor Convalescent 

Hospital, 2225 Dela Vina St., Santa Bar- 
bara 93101. 
1950— Henrietta Toothaker (Miss) Woodland No. 

90, 723 Gibson Road, Woodland 95695 
1951 — Anna T. Schiebusch (Miss) Los Angeles 

No. 124, 320 W. Chestnut Avenue, San 

Gabriel 91776 
1952— Jewel McSweeney (Miss) El Vespero No. 

118, 2845 Van Ness Avenue, San Fran- 
cisco 94109 
1953— Elmarie H. Dyke (Mrs.) Junipero No. 

141, Box 300, Pacific Grove 93950 

OCTOBER, 1969 



1955— Doris M. Gerrish (Miss) Liberty No. 213, 

2709 7th Avenue, Sacramento 95818 
1956— Norma Hodson (Mrs. Theron) Phoebe A. 

Hearst No. 214, 139 N. Sherman Street, 

Manteca 95336 
1957— Audrey D. Brown (Mrs.) Sutter No. HI, 

5608 Caleb, Sacramento 95819 
1958— Irma M. Caton (Mrs.) Argonaut No. 166, 

1166 Pawell Street. Oakland 94608 
1959 — Eileen Dismuke (Mrs. Benjamin) Tierra 

de Oro No. 304, 1021 Dela Vina, Santa 

Barbara 93101 
1960— Maxiene H. Porter (Mrs. Dale) La Tiiera 

No. 282, 6436 Elmdale Rd., Alexandria, 

Virginia 22312 
1961— Edna C. Williams (Mrs. Don) Seauoia 

No. 272, 941 Norvell, El Cerrito 94530 
1962 — Alice D. Shea (Mrs.) Minerva No. 2, 

1850 Woodhaven Way, Oakland 94611 
1963— Rhoda Roelling (Mrs. Elmer C.) Stirling 

No. 146, 2017 Chickie St., Antioch 94509 
1964— Lee Brice (Mrs. W. Max) Marinita No. 

198, Res. 31, Box 41, San Quentin 94964 
1965— Fern E. Adams (Mrs. Emmett C.) Berry- 

essa No. 192, P.O. Box 387, Willows 95988 
1966— Katie G. Jewett (Mrs. A. L.) El Pinal No. 

163. P.O. Box 685, Cambria 93428 
1967— Annette Caiocca (Mrs. Julius Jr.) La 

Junta No. 203. 1624 Main St., St. Helena 

94574. 
1968— June T. Goldie (Mrs. Wm. L.) San Gabriel 

Valley No. 281, 320 Rosemont Blvd., San 

Gabriel 91775. 



PAST GRAND SECRETARY 

Irma S. Murray (Mrs. Arthur) Aloha No. 106. 
2128 Central Ave.. Apt. A, Alameda 94501. 

SUPERVISING D.D.G.P.S 1969-1970 
Appointed by Grand President Nancy J. Conens 

District 

1— Humboldt County; Mrs. Gwendolyn Foster. 

Occident No. 28, 1720 Gates St., Eureka 

95501. 
2_ Mendocino County; Mrs. Elaine Hender- 
son. Fort Bragg No. 210, 464 So. Harrison 

St., Fort Bragg 95437. 
3_Siskiyou County; Mrs. Eleanor Hendricks, 

Eschscholtzia No. 112, Etna 96027. 
4 — Trinity, Shasta and part Tehama Counties; 

Miss Maybell Diestelhorst, Hiawatha No. 

140. Box 1044, Redding 96001. 
5— Modoc and part Lassen Counties; Mrs. 

Irma W. Laird P.G.P. Alturas No. 159, Box 

970, Alturas 96101. 
6 — Part Lassen County; Miss Jennie Borghi, 

Susanville No 243. 454 Richmond Rd.. 

Susanville, 96130. 
7 — Butte, Glenn and Part Tehama Counties; 

Mrs. Wanda E. Haas, Gold of Ophir No. 

190, 371 Mt. Ida Rd.. Oroville 95965. 
8 — Yuba, Colusa and Sutter Counties; Mrs. 

Maxine Dodge, Oak Leaf No. 285 8991 

So. Larkin Rd., Live Oak 95953 
9— Plumas and Part Sierra Counties; Mrs. 

Beatrice Hunt, Plumas Pioneer No. 219, 

P.O. Box 773, Quincy 95971. 
10 — Part Sierra County; Mrs. Abbie B. Borne, 

Naomi No. 36, P.O. Box 124, Sierra City 

96125. 
11 — Sonoma and Part Mendocino Counties; 

Mrs. Clare Geisner, Sonoma No. 209, 575 

Studley St.. Sonoma 95476. 
12— Napa. Lake and Part Solano Counties; 

Mrs. Barbara I. Dulinsky. George C. Yount 

No. 322. 2030 Monroe St., P.O. Box 2008, 

Yountville 94599. 
13 — Marin County; Mrs. Dolores Kikke, Minerva 

No. 2, 169 Willow Ave., Fairfax 94930. 
14 — Nevada and Part Placer Counties; Mrs. 

Elsie Peard, Manzanita No. 29, 120 High 

St., Grass Valley 95945. 
15 — El Dorado and part Placer Counties; Mrs. 

Mildred E. LeFevre, Marguerite No. 12, P.O. 

Box 545, Placerville 95667. 
16 — Sacramento. Yolo and Part Solano Count- 
ies; Mrs. Mary M. Ehlers. Rio Rito No. 

253, 1359 Palomar Circle, Sacramento 95831 
17— Amador County; Mrs. Dolores L. Questo, 

Chispa No. 40, P.O. Box 31. lone 95640. 
18 — Calaveras County; Mrs. Dorothy Wistos. 

Princess No. 84. P.O. Box 787, Angels 

Camp 95222. 
19— Part Contra Costa County; Mrs. Mildred 

Higgins, Las Amigas No. 311, 1360 Rud- 

gear Rd., Walnut Creek 94596. 
20 — Alameda, and part Contra Costa Counties; 

Mrs. Betty J. Maffei. Piedmont No. 87, 

1070 Bristol Ct., Walnut Creek 94598. 
21 — San Francisco County; Miss Ann M. Shaw, 

Golden Gate No. 158, 833 Judah St., San 

Francisco 94122. 
22— San Mateo County; Mrs. Mildred M. 

Yancy. La Paz No. 326, 1108 Banyan Way, 

Pacifica 94044. 
23 — San Joaquin County; Mrs. Jane Lapachet. 

Stockton No. 256. 8/23 Davis Rd.. Stock- 
ton 95207. 



24 — Tuolumne County; Mrs. Sue M. Quilla 
Golden Era No. 99, P.O. Box 587. Columbia 
95310. 

25 — Merced, Stanislaus and Mariposa Counties; 
Mrs. Margaret Peterson, Veritas No. 75, 
1520 W. 22nd St., Merced 95340. 

26— Santa Clara County; Mrs. Betty J. Cor- 
doza, El Monte No. 205, 1328 Brookdale 
Ave, Mountain View 94040. 

27— Monterey, San Benito and Santa Cruz 
Counties; Mrs. Louise Little. Aleli No. 102., 
52 Talbot St. Salinas 93901. 

28 — San Luis Obispo County; Mrs. Vida M. 
Basham. San Miguel No. 94, Box 67. 
Bradley 93426. 

29 — Madera and part Fresno Counties; Mrs. 
Mary C. Newton. Charter Oak No. 292, 206 
S. Crenshaw. Visalia 93277. 

30— Kern County; Mrs. Elma Whitten, Alila No. 
321, 1821 Inyo St., Delano 93215. 

31 — Santa Barbara and Ventura Counties; Mrs. 
Margery H. Aberm. Poinsettia No. 318, 
1002 llena St.. Oxnard 93030. 

32— Part Los Angeles County; Mrs. Nellie 
Miller, Verdugo No. 240, 730 Patterson 
Ave.. Glendale 91202 

33— Part Los Angeles County; Mrs. Geraldine 
H. Mead. Rio Hondo No. 284, 10511 Gar- 
field Ave., South Gate 90280 

34— Part Los Angeles, Riverside and San Bern- 
ardino Counties; Miss Hilda Garcia. Bev- 
erly Hills No. 289, 237 East "O" St.. 
Colton 92324 

35— Orange County; Mrs. Jo W. Elliott Santa 
Ana No. 235. 13631 Yorba St.. Santa Ana 
92705. 

36— San Diego County; Miss Marie Otto. San 
Diego No. 208, 3855 Avenida San Miguel, 
Bonita 92002. 



STATE CHAIRMEN— 1969-1970 

Admission Day (to serve Oct. 1, 1969 to Oct. 
1. 1970); Mrs Kathleen I. Dombrink. Pied- 
mont No. 87, 1122-4th Ave., Oakland 94606. 

Sub-Committee on Bowling: Mrs. Evelyn 
Rodes, Argonaut No. 166, 1146 Essex St.. 
Livermore 94550. 

Americanism and Civic Participation: Mrs. 
Elmarie H. Dyke, P.G.P.. Junipero No. 141. 
Box 300, Pacific Grove 93950. 

Appeal, Grievances and Petitions: Mrs. Alice 
D. Shea. P.G.P.. Minerva No. 2, 1850 
Woodhaven Way, Oakland 94611. 

Board of Control: Mrs. Nancy J. Conens, GP. 
Piedmont No. 87, 4311 Allendale Ave., 
Oakland 94619. 

California History and Landmarks: Mrs. Norma 
Hodson, PGP, Phoebe A. Hearst No. 214, 
139 N. Sherman St., Manteca 95336. 

Sub-Committee — California History and Land- 
mark, Art Talent Contest: Mrs. Olivia 
Vaughn. Aleli No. 102, 663 N. Madeira. 
Salinas 93901. 

Sub-Committee on Brochure-State Historical 
Sites: Mrs. Loretta G. Trathen. Orinda 
No. 56. 140 Stacey Lane, Grass Valley 
95945. 

Sub-Committee on N.D.G.W. Historical Room: 
Mrs. Evelyn I. Carlson, PGP, Dolores No. 
169, 1308 Hoover St., Apt. 1, Menlo Park 
94025. 

Conservation and Safety: Mrs. Virgilia Mc- 
Combs, GM, Morada No. 199. 1241 Norm- 
andy Dr. Modesto 95351. 

Credentials: Mrs. Josephine Lauricella. Arg- 
onaut No. 166. 841 Santa Ray Ave.. Oak- 
land 94610. 

Education and Scholarships: Mrs. Nellie Miller, 
Verdugo No. 240, 730 Patterson, Glendale 
91202. 

Extension of the Order: Mrs. Katie G. Jewett, 
PGP, El Pinal No. 163, P.O. Box 685. 
Cambria 93428. 

Finance: Mrs. Edna B. Heartt. Pasadena No. 
290, 800 Arcadia Ave. t E. Arcadia 
91006. 

Grand Parlor Sessions: Mrs. Edna C. Williams. 
PGP, Sequoia No. 272, 941 Norvel St.. El 
Cerrito 94530. 

Historian of the Order: Mrs. Orinda G. Gian- 
nnini. PGP, Orinda No. 56. 2822-35th Ave.. 
San Francisco 94116. 

Insurance: Mrs. Irma M. Caton. PGP, Arg- 
onaut No. 166. 1166 Powell St., Oakland 
94608. 

Junior Native Daughters: (Eff. Oct. 12) Mrs. 
Dolores M. Ferenz. Hayward No. 122, 
3306 Alton Ct.. Fremont 94536. 

Laws and Supervision: Mrs. Irene Bondanza. 
GVP, San Francisco No. 261. 2328 Union, 
San Francisco 94123. 

Legislation: Mrs. Ella Fahey, Aleli No. 102. 
83 Clark St., Salinas 93901. 

Legislative Measures: Mrs. Genevieve H. Did- 
ion. La Bandera No. 110, 200022nd St., 
Sacramento 95818. 

Leslye A. Hicks Home Health Fund: Mrs. 
Wealthy M. Falk, Palo Alto No. 229. 20658 
Kirwin Lane. Cupertino 95014. 

Mission Restoration: Mrs. Gertrude Doss, GT. 
Whittier No. 298. 308 So. Valencia. La 
Habra 90631. 

PAGE 7 



Mm. on Soirrud Rtttoralion: Mrs. Mary Silva, 
it,. 312 Copley Ave., 

-va No. 

ncisco 94116. 

nogw Childrtnt Foundation: Mrs. Audrey 

Suiter No. 111. 5608 Ca eb. 

■ •■819. Secretary: Miss Etne- 

m Fernando Mission 

BO, 216 Alexander St., San Fernando 

Horn*! 555 Baker St., San Francisco 

94117 Chm Mrs Hazel B. Hansen PGP. 

Ve-dugo No. 240. 535 N Howard St 

Glendale 91206 Secretary: Mrs Chnstine 

u,me, El Carmelo No. 181. 305 Hill- 

Hlvd. Millbrae. 94030. 

NSCW NDGW Adoption Agency: Mr. Bernard 

<T Hiss 456 So Spr.ng St., Los Angeles 

0Hic?a| U Publication: Miss Doris Jacobsen 
Grace No. 242. 225 So. Bradford, Placentia 

Pion'wVster: Mrs. Betty R. CurilichGT 
Ursula No. 1. 41 Cunhch Lane. Jackson 

Phn'!ng 2 and Supplies: Mrs. Katherine Young. 

Golden Gate No. 158. 3745 Lawton St., 

San Francisco 94122. 
Public Relations: Mrs. Laura Blosdale, Gib. 

Beverly Hills No. 289. 1563 Brockton Ave.. 

Los Angeles 90025. 
Ritual and Manual of Instruction: Miss. Dons 

M Gerr.sh, PGP. Liberty No. 213. 2709-7th 

Ave.. Sacramento 95818. 
Roll of Honor: Mrs. Emily E .Ryan, PGP, Las 

Lomas No. 72. 137148th Ave., Apt 201, 

San Francisco 94122. 
State of the Order: Mrs. Ethel I C Enos, PGP. 

Morada No. 199. Box 174. Modesto 95353 
Tournament of Roses Float: Mrs. June T. 

Goldie. PGP, San Gabriel Valley No. 281, 

320 Rosemont, San Gabriel 91775. 
Transporation: Miss Margaret Locatelh, Bonita 

No. 10, 1261 lefferson Ave., Redwood City 

94061. .. „ 

Veteran's Welfare: Miss Jewel McSweeney. 

PGP. El Vespero No. 118, 2845 Van Ness 

Ave ! San Francisco 94109. 
Welfare: Mrs. Lucille F. Kimbark, Alta No. 3. 

2271-32nd Ave., San Francisco 94116. 
Year Books: Mrs. Blanche Oechsel, Cahforn- 

iana No. 247, 426^2 N. Cahuenga Blvd., 

North Hollywood 91602. 
Young Women's Activities: Mrs. Lucile Ash- 

baugh, Dolores No. 169, 248633rd Ave., 

San Francisco 94116. 
Father Junipero Serra Statue: Mrs. Rae L. 

Rominger, La Bandera No. 110, 2841-69th 

Ave.. Sacramento 95822. 



ALAMEDA COUNTY 

Angelita No. 32, Livermore — Meets 2nd Fri- 
day, Carnegie Bldg.. 2155 Third St.; Mrs. An- 
gie Marsh, Rec. Sec, 1587 - 2nd St., Liver- 
more 94550. 

Piedmont No. 87, Oakland— Meets 1st and 
3rd Thursday, Veterans Bldg., 200 Grand Ave., 
Oakland; Mrs. Elza Paul, Rec. Sec, 6017 Mon- 
roe Ave.. Oakland 94618. 

Aloha No. 106, Oakland— Meets 2nd and 4th 
Tuesday. Montclair Women's Club, Mrs. 
Gladys I. Farley. Rec. Sec. 4623 Benevides 
Ave.. Oakland 94602. 

Hayward No. 122, Hayward— Meets 2nd and 
4th Tuesday, Veterans' Memorial Bldg., 22737 
Main St., Hayward; Mrs. Doris Perez, Rec. 
Sec. 21672 Knoll Way, Hayward 94546. 

Berkeley No. 150, Berkeley — Meets 2nd Mon- 
day. Berkeley City Club, 2315 Durant; Mrs. 
Loretta Reynolds. Rec Sec, 507 Cornell Ave. 
Albany 94706. 

Bear Flag No. 151, Albany — Meets 1st and 3rd 
Tuesday. Masonic Temple, Bancroft and Shat- 
tuck; Mrs. Rhea Campbell. Rec. Sec. 2110 
Byron St.. Berkeley 94706. 

Encinal No. 156, Alameda — Meets 2nd and 
4th Monday, Improvement Club, 1407 - 9th St., 
Alameda; Mrs. Ruth Schmidt, Rec. Sec, 623 
Taylor Ave.. Alameda 94501. 

Brooklyn No. 157, Oakland — Meets 1st and 
3rd Thursday, Danish Hall, 164 - 11th St.; Mrs. 
Daveda Windfelt. Rec. Sec, 634 - 15th St., 
Oakland 94612. 

Argonaut No. 166, Emeryville — Meets 2nd 
and 4th Tueday. 4321 Salem St.; Mrs. Jose- 
phine Lauricella. Rec. Sec, 841 Santa Ray 
Avenue, Oakland 94610. 

Bahia Vista No. 167, Oakland — Meets 1st and 
3rd Thursday, 410 11th Street Building; Mrs. 
Dorothy Jordan, Rec. Sec, 1614 101st Ave., 
Oakland 94603. 

Fruitvale No. 177. Oakland — Meets 2nd and 
4th Fridays. Foothill Blvd. Women's Club Hall, 
2535 Mason St., Oakland; Mrs. Gertrude Bor- 
man. Rec. Sec, 1915-108th Ave.. Oakland 
94603. 

El Cereso No. 207, San Leandro — Meets 2nd 
and 4th Wednesdays, Elks Hall, 350 Davis St., 
San Leandro; Mrs. Florence Smith, Rec. Sec, 
280 Best Ave., San Leandro 94577. 



Betsy Rots No. 238, Newark— Meets 2nd and 
4th Wednesday, Newark Pavilion, 6420 Thorn- 
ion Ave ; Mrs. Barbara Caminada. Rec. Sec, 
38536 Logan Dr., Fremont 94536. 

Albany No. 260. Albany— Meets 1st and 3rd 
Wednesday. Alban/ Temple, 533 San Pablo- 
Mrs. Delia Madding, Rec. Sec, P.O. Box 6i02, 
Albany 94706. 

Sequoia No. 272, Berkeley— Meets 2nd and 
4th Thursday, Finnish Brotherhood Hall, 1970 
Chestnut St.. Berkeley: Mrs. Dorothy Coats. 
Rec Sec. 5709 Sierra, Richmond 94805. 

Vallecito No. 308, Castro Valley — Meets 2nd 
and 4th Tuesday, 1109 "C" St.. Haywdrd; Mrs 
losephine Cappa, Rec. Sec, 3171 Carleen 
Dr., Castro Valley 94546. 

AMADOR COUNTY 

Ursula No. 1, Jackson— Meets 2nd and 4th 
Tuesday, Native Sons Hall, Court St. Mrs. 
Evelyn Garbarini, Rec Sec, P.O. Box 253, Jack- 
son 95642. 

Chispa No. 40, lone — Meets 1st and 3rd 
Tuesday, N.S.G.W. Hall; Mrs. Cynthia A. 
Phillips. Rec. Sec, P.O. Box 293, lone 95640. 

Amapola No. 80, Sutter Creek— Meets 2nd 
Thursday, N.S.G.W. Hall, Main St. Mrs. Hazel 
Marre. Rec. Sec, 15 Gopher Flat Road, Sutter 
Creek 95685 

Forrest No. 86, Plymouth— Meets 2nd and 
4th Tuesday, N.S.G.W. Hall; Miss Melba M. 
Withrow, Rec. Sec, RFD Box 24, Plymouth 
95669. 

BUTTE COUNTY 

Annie K. Bidwell No. 168, Chico— Meets 2nd 
and 4th Thursday, N.D. Hall, 316 W. 2nd St.; 
Mrs. Katherine LaBreacht, Rec. Sec. 383 East 
Sixth Ave.. Chico 95926. 

Gold of Ophir No. 190, Oroville— Meets 1st 
and 3rd Wednesday, Monday Club, 2385 Mont- 
gomery St.; Mrs. Zada Harkcom, P.O. Box 252, 
Oroville 95965. 

Centennial No. 295, Paradise — Meets 2nd 
and 4th Tuesday, Cherokee I.O.O.F. Hall; 
Mrs. Rama Harris, Rec. Sec. 6723 Pamela 
Drive, Paradise 95969 

CALAVERAS COUNTY 

Ruby No. 46, Murphys — Meets 1st Friday, 
N.S.G.W. Hall; Mrs. Annie J. Voitich, Rec. 
Sec, P.O. Box 152, Murphys 95247. 

Princess No. 84, Angels Camp — Meets 2nd 
Wednesday. I.O.O.F. Hall; Mrs. Celia Beltramo, 
Rec. Sec. Box 302, Angels Camp 95222. 

San Andreas No. 113, San Andreas — Meets 
3rd Friday, Fraternal Hall; Mrs. Mabel Lively, 
Rec. Sec, Box 26, San Andreas 95249. 

COLUSA COUNTY 

Colus No. 194, Colusa — Meets 1st and 3rd 

Monday, N.D.G.W. - N.S.G.W. Hall; Mrs. Hazel 

Nordyke, Rec. Sec, 609 D Street, Colusa 95932. 

CONTRA COSTA COUNTY 

Stirling No. 146, Pittsburg— Meets 1st and 
3rd Wednesday. The Cellar (upstairs). 916 Cum- 
berland St., P.ttsburg; Mrs. Eleanor Hogan, 
Rec Sec, 1337 Columbia St., Pittsburg 94565. 

Richmond No. 147, Richmond — Meets 1st 
and 3rd Tuesday, Women's City Club, 1125 
Nevin Ave.; Mrs. Maud E. Alexander, Rec. 
Sec, 219 Nicholl Ave., Richmond 94801. 

Donner No. 193, Byron — Meets 1st and 3rd 
Wednesday. I.O.O.F. Hall; Mrs. Catharine Arm- 
strong, Rec. Sec, P. O. Box 63, Byron 94514. 

Las Juntas No. 221, Martinez — Meets 1st 
and 3rd Wednesday, Kiwanis Youth Center, 
750 Allen St.; Mrs. Clarine Brusatory, Rec. 
Sec, 3510 Estudillo St., Martinez 94553. 

Antioch No. 223, Antioch— Meets 3rd Mon- 
day. IOOF Hall; Mrs. Gloria Biglow, Rec. Sec, 
2118 Alpha Way, Antioch 94509. 

Cerrito de Oro No. 306, El Cerrito — Meets 
1st and 3rd Wednesday, 6712 Portola Drive, El 
Cerrito; Mrs. Jennie Agresta, Rec. Sec, 431 
Everett St., El Cerrito 94530. 

Las Amigas No. 311, Walnut Creek— Meets 
2nd and 4th Wednesday, Women's Club, Lin- 
coln Ave.; Mrs. Aretta Hughes, Rec. Sec, 3570 
O'Conner Drive, Lafayette 94549. 

Concord No. 323, Concord — Meets 1st and 3rd 
Thursday, Mt. Diablo Women's Club, 2619 Port 
Chicago Hwy; Mrs. Edith F. Ferriera, Rec. Sec, 
1497 Amador Ave., Concord 94520. 

EL DORADO COUNTY 

Marguerite No. 12. Placerville — Meets Third 
Wednesday, Eagles Hall, 2810 Coloma St.; 
Mrs. Mary L. Lyons. Rec. Sec, 2876 Pleasant 
St., Placerville 95667. 

El Dorado No. 186, Georgetown — Meets 2nd 
Saturday afternoon, VFW Hall. Main St.; Mrs. 
Elsie M. Ford. Rec. Sec; Cool 95614. 

FRESNO COUNTY 

Fresno No. 187, Fresno— Meets 1st and 3rd 

Wednesday, Knights of Pythias Hall, 4867 E. 

Fillmore; Mrs. Molly Baker, Rec. Sec, 4568 

E. Iowa, Fresno 93702. 






Coalinga No. 270, Coalinga — Meets 2nd ar 
4th Monday, Eagle Hall, 156 W Durian; Mr 
Dora C. Phelps, Rec. Sec, 225' Pleasant Si 
Coalinga 93210. 

Wawona No. 271, Fresno — Meets 1st and 3i| ■: 
Friday, Knights of Columbus Hall, 2540 Floi 1 
Dora St.. Fresno; Mrs. Muriel Wells, Rec. See 
163 S. Woodrow Ave., Fresno 93702. 

Selma No. 313, Selma— Meets 2nd Wednell 
day, I.O.O.F. Hall, 1710 Tucker St.; Mrs. Alici. 
Clapham, Rec. Sec, 1427 Pine St., Selma 936611 

GLENN COUNTY 
Berryessa No. 192, Willows — Meets 1st anlt 
3rd Monday, I.O.O.F. Hall, 213-A N. Teharr I 
St.; Mrs. Elaine Barceloux, Rec. Sec, 639 :| • 
Merrill Ave., Willows 95988. 



HUMBOLDT COUNTY 

Occident No. 28, Eureka — Meets 1st and 3r I 
Wednesday, N.S.G.W. Hall, 623 -3rd St.; Mrr I 
Marion Jurrens, Rec. Sec, 1461 Summer Stt 
Eureka. 95501. 

Oneonta No. 71, Ferndale — Meets 2nd an 
4th Thursdays, Danish Hall, Ocean Avenui • 
Miss Margaret M. Smith, Rec. Sec, P. O. Boil 
635. Ferndale 95536. 

Reichling No. 97, Fortuna — Meets 2nd an I 
4th Tuesday. Rohner Grange Hall. Main St i 
Mrs. Frances S. Lentz, Rec. Sec, 237 Newel 
Dr., Fortuna 95540. 

Areata No. 325, Areata — Meets 1st and 3r I 
Wednesday, Eagles Hall, 1005 11th St.; Mrr| 
Mary K. Foresti, Rec Sec. 3446 Ribeiro Lanc|| 
Areata 95521. 



KERN COUNTY 

Miocene No. 228, Taft — Meets 1st and 3rc| 
Monday, Veterans Memorial Bldg., Cedar am 
Taylor Streets; Mrs. Bessie Davis, Rec. Sec. 
200V2 Pierce St., Taft 93268. 

El Tejon No. 239 Bakersfield — Meets 2nt 
and 4th Tuesday. Druids Hall. 501 Sumner 
Mrs. Grace Acheson. Rec. Sec, 1307 Baldwit 
Rd. Bakersfield 93304. 

AM la No. 321, Delano— Meets 2nd and 4th 
Monday, V.F.W. Hall, 4th & Lexington; Mrs 
Louise Whitten, Rec. Sec, 1635 - 7th PI. 1 
Delano 93215. 



KINGS COUNTY 

Las Flores No. 262, Avenal— Meets 2nd ano( 
4th Thursday, Redman Hall. Tulare St.; Mrs.* 
Jessie M. Measell, Rec. Sec, 101 W. Stanis- 
laus St., Avenal 93204. 

Ramona No. 283, Hanford — Meets 1st and 3roJ 
Thurs., Hanford Frat. Hall. 1015M 10th Ave, 

f 1 ,_ ti.i r» ,? — o r\ Drtu ieoc.1 



I 



LAKE COUNTY 

Clear Lake No. 135, Middletown — Meets 2nd! 
and 4th Tuesday, Gibson Library, Mrs. Dorlfl 
othy Baldwin, Rec. Sec, P.O. Box 566, Middle-1 
town 95461. 



LASSEN COUNTY 

Nataqua No. 152, Standish— Meets 3rd Wed-B 
nesday, Standish Hall; Mrs. Lynda Phearson,]! 
Rec. Sec, 320 N. Sacramento, Susanvillell 
96130. 

Mount Lassen No. 215, Bieber — Meets 1st 
and 3rd Thursday, Legion Hall; Mrs. MarieH 
Walsh, Rec. Sec, Bieber 96009. 

Susanville No. 243, Susanville — Meets 3rd[l 
Tuesday, IOOF Hall; Miss Jennie Borghi, Recij 
Sec, Box 331, 454 Richmond Rd., Susanvilleij 
96130. 

LOS ANGELES COUNTY 

Los Angeles No. 124, Los Angeles — Meet" I 
1st and 3rd Wednesday, I.O.O.F. Temple, 1828fl 
S. Oak St.; Mrs. Pauline Brasher, Rec. Sec, 1 
2346 Portland St., Los Angeles 90007. 

Long Beach No. 154, Long Beach — Meets lstl 
and 3rd Thursday, Y.W.C.A., 550 Pacific Ave.; ] 
Mrs. Leola Temby, Rec Sec, 1155 E. 20th St., I 
Long Beach 90806. 

Verdugo No. 240, Glendale — Meets 1st and ■ 
3rd Tuesday, I.O.O.F. Hall, 520 E. Glenoaks |i 
Blvd.; Mrs. Phyllis V. Hirst, Rec. Sec, 1244 I! 
N. Columbus Ave., Apt. 8„ Glendale 91202. |, 

Californiana No. 247, Los Angeles — Meets 2nd 
Tuesday, Assistance League, 1370 N. St. An-fl 
drews PI.; Mrs. Blanch Oechsel, Rec. Sec, li 
426H2 Cahuenga, North Hollywood 91602. . I 

Compton No. 258, South Gate — Meets 1st 
and 4th Tuesday, South Gate Park and Rec- y 
creation, South Gate Park; Mrs. Marian Kelley, I 
Rec. Sec, 8442 Gainford. Downey 90240. 

Poppy Trail No. 266, Montebello — Meets 1st 1 
and 3rd Tuesday. I.O.O.F. Hall, 124 N. 5th I 
St.; Mrs. Dorothy Huband, Rec. Sec, 549 S. I 
Chicago St., Los Angeles 90033. 

Placerita No. 277, Van Nuys — Meets 2nd I 
and 4th Wednesday, 4924 Paso Robles. Encino; I 



PAGE 8 



CALIFORNIA HERALD 



irs Barbara Terry, Rec. Sec, 8446 Penfield 
►e., Canoga Park 91306. 
Wilmington No. 278, Wilmington— Meets 2nd 
id 4th Tuesday, Woman's Club, Lakme and 
enni Streets: Mrs. Agnes Seja, Rec. Sec, 
ISO Avalon Blvd., Wilmington 90744. 
Toluca No. 279, Burbank — Meets 2nd and 
h Tuesday. Campo de Cahuenga; Mrs. Alice 
ooney, Rec. Sec, 1549 Broadview, Glendale 
208. 

San Fernando Mission No. 260, San Fern- 
'ldo— Meets 1st and 3rd Wednesday, Wo- 
ens Club, 552 N. Maclay Ave.; Mrs. Carolyn 
ggs, Rec. Sec. 1303 Glenoaks Blvd., San 
ernando 91340. 

San Gabriel Valley No. 281, San Gabriel— 
eets 1st and 3rd Thursday, Vigari Adobe, 
6 Ramona; Mrs. June T. Goldie, Rec. Sec, 
•0 Rosemont Blvd., San Gabriel 91775. 
La Tijera No. 282, Inglewood— Meets 1st and 
d Tuesday, 820 Java St., Inglewood; Mrs. 
arriett Coleman, Rec. Sec, 10612 4th Ave., 
iglewood 90305. 

Rio Hondo No. 284. South Gate— Meets 1st 
id 3rd Wednesday, 10301 California Ave., 
puth Gate; Mrs. Margaret Wilkey. Rec. Sec, 
M9 Home Ave.. Bell 90201. 
Joshue Tree No. 288, Lancaster — Meets 1st 
nd 3rd Thursday, Fraternal Hall, Date and 
Idfield; Mrs. Betty Ladd, Rec. Sec, P.O. Box 
06, Lake Hughes 93532. 

j Beverly Hills No. 289, Beverly Hillls— Meets 
,5t Wednesday, 9461 Wilshire Blvd.; Mrs. Olive 
•. Burke. Rec. Sec, 10507 Bradbury Rd., Los 
neeles 90064. 

' Pasadena No. 290, Pasadena — Meets 2nd and 
th Thursdays, E. Pasadena American Legion 
all; Mrs. Lilly Westover, Rec. Sec, 1012 W. 
iuarte Rd.. Apt. 17, Arcadia 91006. 
Whittier No. 298, Whittier— Meets 1st and 
rd Wednesday. Greenleaf Masonic Temple 
2001 W. Beverly Blvd.; Mrs. Maxine South, 
ec Sec, 8441 So. California Ave., Whittier 
0605. 

; Tierra del Rey No. 300. Hermosa Beach — 
lid and 4th Monday. Womens Club House, 
DO S. Broadway. Redondo Beach; Mrs. Alma 
lompton, Rec. Sec, 226 N. Catalina, Redondo 
leach 90277. 

, Cien Anos No. 303, Norwalk — Meets 2nd and 
,th Wednesday, V.F.W. Hall 12634 Pioneer 
ilvd.; Mrs. Shirley Elofson, Rec. Sec, 12020 
lebe Ave.. Norwalk 90650. 
Rancho San Jose, No. 307, Pomona — Meets 
nd and 4th Tuesday, Assistance League, 693 
■I. Palomares; Mrs. Senaida Baiz, Rec Sec, 
>14 Marywood Ave., Claremont 91711. 

El Camino Real No. 324, Granada Hills — 
rteets 2nd and 4th Wednesday, Granada Hills 
Vomens Club, 10666 Whiteoak; Mrs. Marie 
Harrington. Rec. Sec, 11039 Memory Park Ave., 
Mission Hills 91340. 

MADERA COUNTY 

Madera No. 244, Madera — Meets 2nd and 

th Thursday, Womens Improvement Club- 

louse; Mrs. Lydia Gilliland, Rec. Sec. 12828 

Rd. 26, Madera 93637. 

MARIN COUNTY 

Sea Point No. 196, Sausalito — Meets 1st and 
ird Tuesday, Portuguese American Hall. 822 
i St., San Rafael; Mrs Hilda Surles, Rec. Sec, 
.6 Shell Rd., Mill Valley 94941. 

Marinita No. 198, San Rafael — Meets 2nd and 
Ith Monday, Portuguese American Hall, 822 
3 St.. San Rafael; Mrs. Lee Brice, Rec. Sec, 
3 .0. Box 41, San Quentin 94902. 

Fairfax No. 225, Fairfax — Meets 1st and 3rd 
Wednesday. American Legion Hall, San An- 
>elmo; Mrs. Doris J. Crocker, Rec. Sec, 25 
VJeernaa Ave., Fairfax 94930. 

Tamelpa No. 231, Mill Valley— Meets 1st and 
Ird Monday, I.O. O.F. Hall; Mrs. Mary C. 
3'Connor, Rec. Sec, 29 Paloma Dr. Corte 
Madera 94925. 

MARIPOSA COUNTY 
Mariposa No. 63, Mariposa — Meets 1st Tues- 
day, Odd Fellows Hall; Rita Cavagnaro, Rec. 
Sec, Star Route, Mariposa 95338. 

MENOOCINO COUNTY 

Fort Bragg No. 210, Fort Bragg — Meets 2nd 
rhursday, I.O.O.F. Hall, Main St.; Mrs. Glenise 
vlallory, Rec. Sec, 180 Lyta Way, Fort Bragg 
)5437. 

Ukiah No. 263, Ukiah— Meets 1st Monday 
Saturday Afternoon Club, Church and Oak, 
)rd Monday in Members Homes; Mrs. Dorothy 
Buchanan, Rec. Sec, P.O. Box 87, Talmage 
95481. 

MERCED COUNTY 

Veritas No. 75, Merced— Meets 1st and 3rd 
Tuesday, IOOF Hall; Miss Edith Dougherty, 
Rec. Sec, 1198 E. Bel Air Drive, Merced 95340. 

Lomitas No. 255, Los Banos— Meets 1st and 
3rd Wednesday, D.E.S. Hall, "I" St.; Miss Mary 
Louise Cotta, Rec. Sec, 13780 S. Volta Rd., 
Los Banos 93635. 

Golden California No. 291, Gustine— Meets 
3rd Tuesday, I.O.O.F. Hall, 471 -4th Ave.; Mrs. 

OCTOBER, 1969 



MODOC COUNTY 
Alturas No. 159, Alturas— Meets 1st Thurs- 
day IOOF Hall, Main St.; Mrs. Evelyn Cop- 
pedge, Rec Sec, P.O. Box 746 Alturas 96101. 

MONTEREY COUNTY 

Aleli No. 102, Salinas— Meets 2nd and 4th 
Thursday, I.O.O.F. Hall; Mrs. Ella Fahey, Rec. 
Sec, 83 Clark St., Salinas 93901. 

Junipero No. 141, Monterey — Meets 1st and 
3rd Tuesday, House of Four Winds, Calle 
Principal; Mrs. Mae Layton, Rec. Sec, 344 
Clay St., Monterey 93940. 

Mission Bell No. 316, Soledad— Meets 2nd 
and 4th Monday. Forester Hall, Front St.; 
Miss Linda Romo. Rec. Sec, P.O. Box 248, 
Soledad 93960. 

NAPA COUNTY 

Eshcol No. 16, Napa— Meets 2nd and 4th 
Monday, Native Sons Bldg., Coombs St.; Mrs. 
Dorothy Ambrose, Rec. Sec, 1768 Milton Rd., 
Napa 94558. 

Cal s:oga No 14S, Calis'oga— Meets 2nd and 
4th Monday. St. Lukes Hall, Myrtle St.; Mrs. 
Ella Light, Rec Sec, 1465 - 1st St., Calistoga 
94515. 

La Junta No. 203, St. Helena— Meets 1st 
and 3rd Tuesday, N.S.G.W. Hall, Spring St.; 
Mrs. Emma Parnisari, Rec. Sec, P.O. Box 
345. St. Helena 94574. 

George C. Yount No. 322, Yountville — Meets 
2nd and 4th Wednesday, Yountville City Hall. 
Yount St.; Mrs Verona Mason, Rec. Sec, P.O. 
Box 144. Veterans Home Sta., Yountville 94599. 

NEVADA COUNTY 

Laurel No. 6, Nevada City— Meets 1st and 
3rd Wednesday, Veterans Memorial Building, 
N. Pine and Cottage; Mrs Marille Hopkins. 
Rec. Sec, Rt. 1, Box B-290, Nevada City 95959. 

Manzanita No. 29, Grass Valley— Meets 1st 
and 3rd Tuesday, St. Patricks Hall; Mrs. Elsie 
Peard, Rec. Sec, 120 High St., Grass Valley 
95945. 

Columbia No. 70, French Corral — Meets 1st 
Friday afternoon. Farrelley Hall; Mrs. Fannie 
M. Moulton, Rec. Sec, French Corral, Star 
Route, P.O.. Smartsville 95977. 

ORANGE COUNTY 

Santa Ana No. 235, Santa Ana— Meets 2nd 
and 4th Monday, 6th and Baker; Mrs. Marie 
Brewer, Rec. Sec, 2767 W. 1st Street, Sp. 31, 
Santa Ana 92703. 

Grace No. 242, Fullerton— Meets 1st and 3rd 
Thursday, I.O.O.F. Hall, Lemon and Amerige; 
Mrs. Betty Bennett, Rec. Sec, 2127 Kathryn 
Way. Placentia 92670. 

Silver Sands No. 286, Huntington Beach- 
Meets 1st Tuesday, Lake Park Club House; 
Virginia Segelson, Rec. Sec, 303 13th St., 
Huntington Beach 92646. 

PLACER COUNTY 

Placer No. 138, Lincoln— Meets 2nd Wednes- 
day, The Womans Club, 499 E Street; Mrs. 
Margaret Schmidt, Rec Sec, P.O. Box 171, 
Lincoln 95648. 

Auburn No. 233, Auburn— Meets 3rd Monday, 
Veterans Memorial; Mrs. Anna E. Brown, Rec. 
Sec, 112 Aeolia Drive, Auburn 95603. 

Sierra Pines No. 275, Colfax— Meets 1st and 
3rd Thursday, Knights of Pythias Hall, Main 
St.; Mrs. Isabelle Eddy, Rec. Sec, P.O. Box 55, 
Colfax 95713. 

PLUMAS COUNTY 

Plumas Pioneer No. 219, Quincy — Meets 

1st and 3rd Monday, I.O.O.F. Hall. Main St.; 

Mrs. Lola O. Viera, Rec. Sec, R.F.D. Box 689, 

Quincy 95971. 

RIVERSIDE COUNTY 

Jurupa No. 296, Riverside— Meets 1st and 3rd 

Wednesday, I.O.O.F. Lodge, 3942 Jurupa Ave.; 

Mrs. Roberta Nolze, Rec. Sec, 13838 Nolze 

Place, Riverside 92508. 

SACRAMENTO COUNTY 

Califia No. 22, Sacramento — Meets 2nd and 
4th Tuesday, N.S.G.W. Hall, 11th and "J" Sts.; 
Mrs. Lillian Blackwell, Rec. Sec, 3908 - 2nd 
Avenue, Sacramento 95817. 

La Bandera No. 110, Sacramento — Meets 1st 
and 3rd Thursday, N.S.G.W. Hall, 11th and 
J Sts.; Mrs. Fern Werner, Rec. Sec. 244439th 
Ave., Sacramento 95822. 

Sutter No. 111, Sacramento — Meets 1st and 
3rd Tuesday, N.S.G.W. Hall. 11th and J Streeti; 
Mrs. Wilma Gutenberger, Rec. Sec, 615 27th 
St.. Sacramento 95816. 

Fern No. 123, Folsom— Meets 1st and 3rd 
Tuesday, Community Club House; Mrs. Rose 
Marie Trammell, Rec. Sec, 9424 Golden Dr., 
Orangevale. Send mail to P.O. Box 326, 
Folsom 95630. 

Chabolla No. 171, Gait— Meets 3rd Thursday, 
Women's Club House, 5th & D St.; Mrs. Jea- 
nette Preston, Rec. Sec, 12911 E. Comstock, 
Stockton 95205. 



Liberty No. 213, Elk Grove— Meets 2nd and 
4th Friday, I.O.O.F. Hall, Elk Grove; Mrs. Ger- 
trude E. Hogaboom, Rec. Sec, P.O. Box 72, 
Elk Grove 95624. 

Rio Rito No. 253, Sacramento— Meets 2nd 
and 4th Thursday, Y.L.I. Club House, 1400 27th 
St.; Mrs. Catherine Bennett, Rec. Sec, 1299 
8th Ave., Sacramento 95818. 

San Juan No. 315, Carmichael— Meets 2nd 
and 4th Thursday, Veteran's Memorial Hall, 
Carmichael Park; Mrs. Lillian Gunderson, Rec. 
Sec, 3441 Arden Creek Road. Sacramento 
95825. 

SAN BENITO COUNTY 

Copa de Oro No. 105, Hollister— Meets 1st 
and 3rd Wednesday, I.O.O.F. Hall, 362 Fourth 
St.; Mrs. Evelyn Pivetti, Rec. Sec, 1258 West 
St., Hollister 95023. 

San Juan Bautisia No. 179, San Juan Bau- 
tista— Meets 1st Wednesday, NDGW Adobe, 
4th St., Mrs. Anna Baccala, Rec. Sec, P.O. 
Box 33, San Juan Bautista 95045. 

SAN BERNARDINO COUNTY 
Lugonia No. 241, San Bernardino— Meets 
2nd and 4th Thursday, N.S.G.W. Hall; Mrs, 
Sylvia Gregory, Rec, Sec, P.O. Box 58, 
Downtown Station, San Bernardino 92401. 

Ontario No. 251, Ontario — Meets 1st and 3rd 
Tuesday, Ontario Women's Club, 738 N. Euclid; 
Mrs. Betty Clement, Rec. Sec, 976 East "H" 
St., Ontario 91762. 

SAN DIEGO COUNTY 

San Diego No. 208, San Diego — Meets 2nd 
and 4th Monday, House of Hospitaltiy, Balboa 
Park; Mrs. Sarah Miller, Rec. Sec, 4117 
Georgia St., San Diego 92103. 

Las Flores Del Mar No. 301, Oceanside — 
Meets 2nd and 4th Tuesday, Community Center 
Bldg.; Mrs. Frances Van Wey, 325 Blue Springs 
Lane, Oceanside 92054. 

Ilia M. Knox NO. 320. El Cajon— Meets 1st 
and 3rd Tuesday, Veterans Hall, 136 Chambers 
St.. Mrs. Letha M. Miller. Rec, Sec. 9222 
Wister Dr., La Mesa 92041. 

SAN FRANCISCO COUNTY 

Minerva No. 2, San Francisco — Meets 2nd 
and 4th Wednesday, N.S.G.W. Hall. 414 Mason 
St.; Mrs. Mary Oertwig, Rec. Sec, 40 Pine- 
hurst Way, San Francisco 94127 

Alta No. 3, San Francisco — Meets 2nd and 
4th Tuesday afternoon, N.S.G.W. Bldg. 414 
Mason St.; Mrs. Lucille Kimbark, Rec. Sec, 
2271 - 32nd Ave.. San Francisco 94116. 

Orinda No. 56, San Francisco— Meets 2nd 
and 4th Friday, St. Marks Square Urban Cen- 
ter, 1101 O'Farrell St.; Mrs. Irmgard Wala- 
schek, Rec. Sec, 447 Carl St., San Francisco 
94117. 

Buena Vista No. 68, San Francisco — Meets 
3rd Thursday, N.D.G.W. Home. 555 Baker St.; 
Mrs. Lillian Dowling. Rec. Sec, 278 Silver Ave.. 
San Francisco 94112. 

Las Lomas No. 72, San Francisco— Meets 1st 
and 3rd Tuesday, N.D.G.W. Home, 555 Baker 
St.; Mrs. Emily E. Ryan, Rec Sec, 1371 - 48th 
Ave., Apt. 201. San Francisco 94122. 

Oarina No. 114, San Francisco — Meets 3rd 
Monday, Druids Hall. 44 Page St.; Mrs. Thelma 
Wilson, Rec. Sec, 21 Wabash Terrace, San 
Francisco 94124. 

El Vespero No. 118, San Francisco — Meets 
2nd and 4th Tuesday, N.S.G.W. Bldg., 414 
Mason St.; Miss Ruth McAdam, Rec. Sec, 120 
Romney Drive, South San Francisco 94080. 

Genevieve No. 132, San Francisco — Meets 1st 
and 3rd Thursday, NSGW Hall 414 Mason St.; 
Miss Elizabeth Brennan, Rec. Sec, 2066 Grove 
St., San Francisco 94117. 

Guadalupe No. 153, San Francisco— Meets 
2nd and 4th Monday, Dovre Hall, 3543 18th St.; 
Ruth A. Stone, Rec. Sec, 270 Ellsworth St., 
San Francisco 94110. 

Golden Gate No. 158, San Francisco — Meets 
2nd and 4th Monday, N.S.G.W. Bldg., 414 
Mason St.; Mrs. Anne Plescia. Rec. Sec. 1378 
• 26th Ave., San Francisco 94122. 

Dolores No. 169, San Francisco — Meets 2nd 
and 4th Wednesday, NDGW Home, 555 Baker 
St.; Mrs. Evelyn I. Carlson, Rec. Sec. 1308 
Hoover St., Apt. 1, Menlo Park 94025. 

Portola No. 172, San Francisco — Meets 1st 
and 3rd Tuesday, N.S.G.W. Bldg.. 414 Mason 
St.; Mrs. Dorothy Vitalie, Rec. Sec, 162 Cayuga 
Ave., San Francisco 94112. 

Twin Peaks No. 185, San Francisco — Meets 
2nd and 4th Tuesday, Dovre Hall, 3543 18th 
St.; Mrs. Irene Cashman, Rec. Sec, 125 Rus- 
sia Ave.. Apt. 2, San Francisco 94112. 

James Lick No. 220, San Francisco— Meets 
2nd Wednesday afternoon, Druids Temple. 44 
Page St.; Mrs. Jaredna Johnson. Rec. Sec. 
423 So. Van Ness. San Francisco 94103. 

Mission No. 227, San Francisco — Meets 2nd 
and 4th Friday. N.S.G.W. Building. 414 Mason 
St.; Mrs. Bernice Short, Rec. Sec, 330 Foote 
Ave., San Francisco 94112. 

Utopia No. 252, San Francisco — Meets 2nd 
Tuesday, Dovre Hall. 3543 - 18th St.; Mrs. Helen 
C. Scannell. Rec. Sec, 4064 - 18th St., San 
Francisco 94114. 

PAGE 9 



San Funci\co No 261. San Fran 

Bldg., 414 
Mason 
1010 U2J 

Yt'ba Burm No. 27), San Francnco — Meets 
1st Thuriday afternoon. N S.G.W. Bldg.. 414 
Mason St Mrs. Julia Bode. Rec. Sec. 1535 
Taraval St . San Francisco 94116. 

SAN JOAQUIN COUNTY 

laaquin No. S. Stockton -Meets 2nd and 
4th Tuesday. N S G W Hall. 809 N. Hunter; 
Mrs Edna J. Williamson, Rec. Sec. 510 E. 
Mendocino Ave.. Stockton 95204. 

El Pttcadero No. 82. Tracy— Meets 1st and 
3rd Wednesday. Muncy Hall. 234 E. 10th St.; 
Mrs Florence Tisher. Rec. Sec. 2800 Cabnllo 
Way. Tracy 95376. 

Caht da Oro No 206. Stockton— Meets 1st 
and 3rd Tuesday. Pythian Castle Hall. 134 W 
Park St : Mrs Edith L. Foster. Rec. Sec, 657 
Lexington Ave , Stockton 95204. 

Photbe A. Hearst No. 214. Manteca- Meets 
2nd and 4th Wednesday. M.R.P.S. Hall, N. 
Grant St.: Mrs. Norma Hodson, Rec. Sec, 139 
N. Sherman. Manteca 95336. 

Stockton No. 256, Stockton— Meets 1st and 
3rd Thursday. N. S.G.W. Hall. 809 N. Hunter; 
Mrs Eva Bisagno. Rec. Sec. 927 Acacia. 
Stockton 95206. 

SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY 
San Miguel No. 94, San Miguel— Meets 2nd 

and 4th Wednesday. I.O.O.F. Hall, San Miguel; 

Mrs. Hortense Wright, Rec. Sec, P.O. Box 96, 

San Miguel 93451. 
San Luisita No. 108, San Luis Obispo— Meets 

1st and 3rd Tuesday. I.O.O.F. Hall. 520 Dana 

St.: Juanita L. Kiger. Rec. Sec, 2141 Broad 

St.. San Luis Obispo 93401. 

El Pinal No. 163. Cambria— Meets 2nd and 

4th Tuesday. Masonic Temple; Mrs. Katie G. 

Jewett Rec Sec, P.O. Box 685, Cambria 

93428. 

SAN MATEO COUNTY 

Bonita No. 10, Redwood City— Meets 2nd 
and 4th Thursday. Veterans Memorial Building, 
1455 Madison Ave.: Mrs. Louise Gibsen. Rec 
Sec, 1558 Lago Street. San Mateo 94403. 

Vista del Mar No. 155, Half Moon Bay- 
Meets 3rd Tuesday. I.D.E.S. Hall. Main St.. 
Mrs. Marion Miramontes. Rec. Sec, P.O Box 
4% Half Moon Bay 94019. 

Ano Nuevo No. 180, Pescadero— Meets 3rd 
Wednesday. N. S.G.W. and N.D.G.W. Hall; Mrs. 
Alice Mattei. Rec. Sec. Willowside Farm, Pes- 
cadero 94060. 

El Carmelo No. 181, San Mateo— Meets 1st 
and 3rd Wedneday. House of Parties. 17 Hill- 
crest Dr.. Daly City; Mrs. Christine E. Hulme. 
Rec. Sec. 305 Hillcrest Blvd.. Milbrae 94030 

Menlo No. 211, Menlo Park— Meets 1st and 
3rd Tuesday. Recreation Bldg.. Civic Center; 
Mrs. Lillian King. Rec. Sec. 1303 Fernside St., 
Redwood City 94061. 

San Bruno No. 246, San Bruno — Meets 2nd 
and 4th Thursday, Fireman's Hall, 618 San 
Mateo Ave.. San Bruno; Mrs. Rena LoReaux 
Rec Sec. 838 Easton Ave.. San Bruno 94066' 

La Paz No. 326, Pacifica— Meets 1st and 3rd 
Monday. Nick's Restaurant, 100 Rockaway 
Beach Ave.; Mrs. Rosamond Lagomarsino, Rec 
Sec. 1034 Yosemite Ave., Pacifica 94044. 

SANTA BARBARA COUNTY 

Reina del Mar No. 126, Santa Barbara- 
Meets 1st and 3rd Tuesday, K. C. Hall, 925 
?, e „~ Vma st ' ; Mrs - Mamie Miller, Rec. Sec. 
3131 Calle Mariposa. Santa Barbara 93105. 

Santa Marta No. 276, Santa Maria— Meets 
1st and 3rd Tuesday, D.E.S. Club, 615 W 
?I1??? ,: Mrs ' Blan = h e F. Powell, Rec. Sec ' 
508 So. Lincoln St.. Santa Maria 93454 

Tierra de Oro No. 304. Santa Barbara- 
Meets 1st and 3rd Thursday. Eagles Hall 923 
Bath St., Miss Edith Webster, Rec. Sec, 185 
San Ysidro Rd., Santa Barbara 93103 

La Puris.ma No. 327, Lompoc— Meets 2nd 
and 4th Wednesday. Alpha Clubhouse. Corner 
B and Ocean Ave.; Mrs. Mary Rule. Rec Sec 
1401 E. Maple Ave., Lompoc 93436. 

SANTA CLARA COUNTY 
San Jose No. 81, San Jose— Meets 1st and 
3rd Thursday, Eagles' Hall, 148 N. 3rd St; Mrs 
Mane C. Landmi, Rec. Sec, 860 Warren Way, 
Palo Alto 94303. " 

Vendome No. 100, San Jose— Meets 1st and 
3rd Tuesday, I.O.O.F. Hall. 122 Race St.; Mrs 

la U n' e joIe Isils.'' "^ S6C " U ° l G ' 6n Eyrie ' 
El Monte No. 205, Mountain View— Meets 
2nd and 4th Friday, Masonic Temple. Church 
and Franklin; Mrs. Henrietta Marcotte, Rec 
Sec. 22415 Starling Dr., Los Altos 94022 

Palo Alto No. 229. Palo Alto— Meets 1st and 
3rd Wednesday, Palo Alto Savings, 300 Hamil- 
ton Ave.; Mrs. Wealthy Falk. Rec Sec, '0658 
Kirwm Lane, Cupertino 95014 

Gilroy No. 312, Gilroy— Meets 1st and 3rd 
Thursday, Salinas Valley Community Room 
Monterey St.; Miss Kathleen Holzhauer. Rec' 
Sec, P.O. Box 71, Gilroy 95020. 

PAGE 10 



Lo Gatos No. 317, Los Gatos— Meets 4th 
Wednesday, 1st National Bank Bldg.; Mrs. Eola 
Howe. Rec. Sec. 2325 Winchester Blvd., 
Campbell 95008. 

SANTA CRUZ COUNTY 

Santa Cruz No. 26, Santa Cruz— Meets 2nd 
and 4th Monday. B.P.W.C. Clubhouse, 240 Ply- 
mouth Ave ; Mrs. Rosaline C. Oliveria, Rec. 
Sec, 446 May Ave.. Santa Cruz 95060. 

El Pajaro No. 35. Watsonville — Meets 2nd 
and 4th Tuesday. I.O.O.F. Hall, 17A E. Third 
St.; Mrs. Bernadene Lynch, Rec. Sec. 105 Hill 
Ave . Watsonville 95076. 

SHASTA COUNTY 

Camellia No. 41, Anderson— Meets 1st Tues- 
day. Masonic Hall. Center and Howard; Mrs. 
Rosemary McCabe, Rec Sec, P. O. Box 104, 
Cottonwood 96022. 

Lassen View No. 98, Shasta — Meets 2nd Fri- 
day, Masonic Hall; Jeanette Hall, Rec. Sec, 
P.O. Box 400, Redding 96001. 

Hiawatha No. 140, Redding— Meets 1st and 
3rd Wednesday. N.D.G.W. Hall 2322 California 
St.; Mrs. Flora E. Jordan, Rec. Sec, 1604 Verda 
St.. Redding 96001. 

SIERRA COUNTY 

Naomi No. 36, Downieville — Meets 2nd and 
4th Wednesday, N.D.G.W. Hall, Commercial St.; 
Mrs. Margaret Elaine Lambert, Rec. Sec, Box 
224. Downieville 95936 

Imogen No. 134, Sierraville— Meets 2nd and 
4th Wednesday. Coprens Hall: Mrs. Jennie 
Copren. Rec. Sec. Box 126, Sierraville 96126. 

SISKIYOU COUNTY 

Eschscholtzia No. 112, Etna — Meets 1st and 

3rd Tuesday. Masonic Hall, Main St.; Mrs. Kate 

Berthelsen, Rec. Sec, Star Route, Etna 96027. 

SOLANO COUNTY 

Vallejo No. 195, Vallejo— Meets 1st and 3rd 
Wednesday, Veterans Bldg., 444 Alabama St.; 
Mrs. Elvena B. Woodard, Rec. Sec, 302 Illinois 
St., Apt. A. Vallejo 94590. 

Mary E. Bell No. 224, Dixon — Meets 2nd and 
4th Thursday, I.O.O.F. Hall; Mrs. Floris Trip- 
lett. Rec. Sec. P.O. Box 233. Dixon 95620. 

Vacaville No. 293, Vacaville— Meets 1st and 
3rd Tuesday, Saturday Club House; Mrs. Mar- 
tha Fisher. Rec. Sec. Rt. 2, Box 3195. Vaca- 
ville 95688. 

SONOMA COUNTY 

Sonoma No. 209, Sonoma — Meets 2nd and 
4th Monday. I.O.O.F. Hall, Broadway St.; Mrs. 
Clare Geisner, Rec. Sec, 575 Studley St., 
Sonoma 95476. 

Santa Rosa No. 217, Santa Rosa— Meets 1st 
and 3rd Wednesday. N. S.G.W. Hall, 404 Men- 
doc ; no Ave.; Mrs. Gladys Wing. Rec. Sec, 
1204 Stewart St.. Santa Rosa 95404. 

Petaluma No. 222. Petaluma — Meets 2nd and 
4th Tuesday, Herman Sons Hall. 860 Western 
Ave.; Mrs. Olea Lavio. Rec. Sec. 4990 D St., 
Petaluma 94952. 

Sebastopol No. 265. Sebastopol — Meets 2nd 
and 4th Friday. I.O.O.F. Hall, McKinley Street; 
Mrs. Ilah Thorp. Rec. Sec, 436 Parquet St., 
Sebastopol 95-72. 

Cotati No. 299, Cotati— Meets 2nd and 4th 
Thursday. Women's Club Hall; Mrs. Marie 
Baranzini, Rec. Sec, 8107 El Rancho Dr., 
Cotati 94928. 

STANISLAUS COUNTY 

Oakdale No. 125, Oakdale— Meets 1st and 
3rd Monday. Grange Hall, F and Lambuth; 
Mrs. Daisy Ulrich. Rec. Sec, 414 West G St., 
Oakdale 95361. 

Morada No. 199, Modesto — Meets 2nd and 
4th Wednesday, Senior Citizens Center. 211 
Bodem St.; Mrs. Mary E. Clay, Rec. Sec. 225 
Sunset Blvd., Modesto 95351. 

Eldora No. 248, Turlock— Meets 1st and 3rd 
Thursday. American Legion Hall; Mrs. Lillian 
Stammerjohan, Rec. Sec. 5201 N. Tully Rd.. 
Turlock. 95380. 

SUTTER COUNTY 

South Butte No. 226, Sutter— Meets 1st and 
3rd Monday, N.D.G.W. Hall; Mrs. Carolyn 
Childers, Sec. Pro. Tern. 1650 Villa Ave.. 
Yuba City 95991. 

Oak Leaf No. 285, Live Oak— Meets 2nd and 
4th Tuesday. Women's Clubhouse, "P" St.; Mrs 
Maxme Dodge, Rec. Sec, 8991 S. Larkin Road. 
Live Oak 95953. 

TEHAMA COUNTY 

Berendos No. 23, Red Bluff— Meets 1st and 
3rd Thursday, N.D.G.W. Hall, 1439 Lincoln St • 
Mrs. Verona DeWitt. Rec. Sec, 90 Gurnsey 
Ave.. Red Bluff 96080. 

Olivia No. 309, Corning— Meets 2nd and 4th 
Wednesday, I.O.O.F. Hall, Solano St; Mrs 
Catherine Richardson, Rec. Sec. Rt 1 Box 
58D Corning 96021. 

TRINITY COUNTY 
Eltapome No. 55, Weaverville— Meets 2nd 
and 4th Thursday. N. S.G.W. Hall; Mrs. Mar- 
garet J. Brown. Rec Sec, P.O. Box 224 
Weaverville 96093. 



TULARE COUNTY 

Charter Oak No 292, Visalia— Meets 2nd <| 
4th Wednesday, Visalia Women's Civic cF 
House, Johnson and Center; Mrs Lois Edwai 
Rec. Sec, 2840 Canary, Visalia 93277. 

Tule Vista No. 305, Portervi lie— Meets :l 

and 4th Thursday, Porterville Women's el 

265 North "E" St.; Mrs. Ruth Olsen, Rec. SiH 

681 W. Belleview. Porterville 93257. 

TUOLUMNE COUNTY 

Dardanelle No. 66, Sonora— Meets 1st Tu 
day. I.O.O.F. Hall. Sonora; Mrs. Martha r/ 1 
shall. Rec. Sec, 227 E. Lyons Street. Son.U 
95370 

Golden Era No. 99, Columbia— Meets 1st I I 
3rd Thursday, N. S.G.W. Hall; Miss Irene Pon I 
Rec.Sec. Rt. 3. Box 644, Sonora 95370. 

Anona No. 164, Jamestown — Meets 2nd a 

4th Tuesday. Rebekah Hall; Mrs. Celia C I 

boni, Rec. Sec. Box 123, Jamestown 95327§ 

VENTURA COUNTY 

El Aliso No. 314, Santa Paula— Meets 
Monday, Moose Lodge Hall, 700 E. Santa B 
bara St., 3rd Monday, members homes; M 
Dorothy Douglas, Rec. Sec, 7294 Kodiak, Vi 
tura 93003. 

Poinsettia No. 318, Ventura — Meets 2nd a 
4th Tuesday I.O.O.F. Hall, 516 E. Main 
Mrs Rita Preston, Rec. Sec, 5336 Que* 
St.. Ventura 93003. 

YOLO COUNTY 

Woodland No. 90, Woodland — Meets 2nd a 
4th Tuesday, 547 First Street; Mrs. Elizabeth 
Elston, Rec. Sec, 920 Cross St., Woodla 
95695. 

YUBA COUNTY 

Marysville No. 162, Marysville — Meets 
and 4th Wednesday, Jewish Center, 10th a 
Rameriz St.; Mrs. Evelyn D. Eden. Rec. 
669 Chestnut St., Yuba City 95991. 

Camp Far West No. 218, Wheatland— I 
3rd Tuesday, Masonic Temple, 4th & Fro> 
Mrs. Shirley Ross, Rec. Sec, Rt. 1, Box 
Wheatland 95692. 



JUNIOR NATIVE DAUGHTERS 
State Officers — 1969-1970 
President: Leealyn Baker, Fruitvale Unit t» 

22, 3530 - 66th Ave., Oakland 94605. 
Past President: Kathy Slater, Sequoia Ui 

No. 27, 1216 Windsor Way. Redwood C 

94061. 
Vice President: Kathy Koch, Sequoia Ut 

No. 27, 1223 Dewey St., Redwood Ci 

94061. 
Secretary; Renee Cook, Menio Unit No. I 

116 Beverly Drive, San Carlos 94070. 
Marshal: Laura Carey, Las Amiguitas Ur 

No. 33, 3326 Johnson Road, Lefayet 

94549. 
Treasurer: Sharon Douglas, Fruitvale Ur 

No. 22, 970 Castle St.. San Leandro 9457 
Trustees: Sue Hartmann, Argonaut Unit N 

No. 3, 626 - 26th Ave., San Mateo 9440 

Linda Porterfield, Shasta Daisy Unit N 

39, 1438 Oregon St., Redding 96001. Deb 

Wilson, Estrellas de Oro Unit No. 3 

14520 Graystone, Norwalk 90650. 
Sentinel: Cindy Earl, Golden Poppy Unit Ni 

38, 717 Castro St., San Francisco 9411 
Organist: Diane Rolla, Sequoia Unit No. 2 

150 Summerhill Lane, Woodside 94062. 

JUNIOR NATIVE DAUGHTER UNITS 

Argonaut Unit No. 3, Oakland — Advisor: Mr 
Helen Tullius, 2478 - 47th Ave., San Francis 
94116. 

Menlo Unit No. 10, Menlo Park — Adviso 
Mrs. Evelyn I. Carlson, PGP, 1308 Hoover S1 
Menlo Park 94025. 

Camellia Unit No. IS, Anderson — Adviso 
Mrs. Bernese Medford. 2430 Hospital Lan 
Redding 96001. 

Fruitvale Unit No. 22, Oakland — Adviso 
Mrs. Esther Ragon, 3479 Davis St., Oaklan 
94601. 

Eshcolita Unit No. 26, Napa — Adviso 
Mrs. Barbara Bentley, 2715 Sescol Ave., Nap 
94558. 

Sequoia Unit No. 27, Redwood City — Adviso 
Mrs. Lillian Stetson, 1217 Connecticut DriV' 
Redwood City 94601. 

Las Amiguitas Unit No. 33, Walnut Creek- 
Advisor: Mrs. Marge Woodward, 2464 Cas 
Way, Walnut Creek 94596. 

Estrellas de Oro Unit No. 37, Norwalk— At 
visor: Mrs. Danella Hawkins, 13128 Li; 
St., Norwalk 90650. 

Golden Poppy Unit No. 38, San Francisco- 
Advisor: Mrs. Dorothy Bayless, 254 Eurek 
St., San Francisco 94114. 

Shasta Daisy Unit No. 39, Redding— Adv 
sor: Mrs. Catherine T. Porterfield, 1438 Orego 
St.. Redding 96001. 

Princesa del Mar Unit No. 40, Santa Bai 
bara— Advisor: Mrs. Nancy Flucker, 182 
San Pascual St.. Santa Barbara 93101. 



EW JR. UNIT. . . 
lontinued from Page 2 ) 

[incesa del Mar Unit No. 40 was 
ktituted on September 13. It is 
onsored by R c i n a del Mar No. 
16, NDGW in Santa Barbara. 
itiation and installation ceremon- 
I were conducted by Junior State 
esident Kathy Slater and her corps 
officers. 




fficers of the n e w I y instituted 
•incesa del Mar Unit No. 40 



iN DIEGO 

San Diego No. 208 started this 
ar with a busy schedule. Installa- 
>n of officers was held in the West 
oom of the Atlantis Restaurant with 
beautiful view of Mission Bay to 
: seen through the glass doors and 
indows. Carrying out our Grand 
esident's wishes, decor was in a 
itriotic theme with a floral center- 
ece of red, white and blue on the 
:ad table at dinner; corsages of 
hite carnations with red, white and 
ue ribbon looked quite elegant on 
e officer's formals. DGP Frances 
iner and her corps of Deputy 
rand Officers from Ilia M. Knox 
trior had charge of the installation. 

New officers include Barbara 
unn, president and Mmes. Mason, 
igdon. Stone, Redfearn, Miller, 
heney. Stanton, Cross, Haubert, 
eane. Muslain, Pattison, McKos- 
:y, Thompson, Martinez and Otto. 

"Ways and Means" events were: 
l ice cream social in the spacious 
itio of Marie and Myrtle Otto and 
bus trip to the Laguna Art Festival. 

A party for those having birthdays 

:TOBER, 1969 



during July, August and September 

was enjoyed alter the second meeting 
in August. A Hawaiian theme pre- 
vailed as Emetine McKoskey had 
just returned from the Islands with 

orchids for all (and a hula skirt for 
Gwen Hanlon who "performed" in 
her own inimitable style). 

Admission Day was observed the 
first meeting in September with a 
d i m e-a-dip dinner with Margaret 
Helton in charge. Proceeds from this 
dinner are to go to the Children's 
Foundation Fund. These Native 
Daughters are really good cooks — 
as everyone knows. One of the 
newer members, Viola Miles, had the 
tables decorated with prints of the 
missions and other historical sites 
set on little plastic easels. Games 
were played during the evening. 

Several members of San Diego 
Parlor joined in the fun planned by 
Inter Parlor to see the sights in "Old 
Town" celebrating the City's 200th 
anniversary. Those who participated 
enjoyed a Mexican dinner prior to 
the visit to Old Town, the birthplace 
of San Diego and California. 



H 



SHAMROCKS 

A number of San Francisco 
Native Daughters have formed a fun 
loving group called the "Shamrocks" 
They recently met at the home of 
Doris Stidham and elected as presi- 
dent, Helen McCarthy; vice presi- 
dent, Anita Gillick; secretary, Doris 
Stidham; treasurer, Edith O'Connor 
and sergeant at arms, Jane Green. 
The group will meet quarterly. The 
next meeting will be December 30. 



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// Peseadero No. 82, 1 rac> cele- 
brated its "Diamond Jubilee" Sept- 
ember 20. 1969. rhe parlor was 
instituted on August 10, I s i >4 by 
PGP Dr. Mariana Bertola l he cele- 
bration also honored GP Nancy 
Conens on her official visit. 

Dinner was served to 160 in the 
Gold Room of I i a c y Inn. Lois 
Goodpaster, president greeted mem- 
bers and guests. Msgr. Eugene J. 
Shea gave the invocation; Mayor 
Richard Hastie, the welcome. The 
decor was silver and white with silver 
glittered "75s". white candles and a 
beautiful silver and white fresh 
floral arrangement. 




From left — Ma y o r Richard O. 
Hastie signing a proclamation mak- 
ptember 13-20 NDGW week 
in Tracy: Lois Goodpaster, President 
and Mrs. A. I ierra. 



An open meeting was held with 
Mrs. A. Ekenberg, chairman. The 
theme was "Americanism" The off- 
icers wearing long, white formals and 
carrying American flags marched into 
the hall. 

Grand President Nancy Conens 
was escorted to her station. Escorted 
also were GTs Betty Read Curilich. 
Lila Hummel. Marian McGuire; 
GIS Meredvth Burnett; PGPs Ev- 
elyn I. Carlson, Ethel E. Enos. lima 
M. Caton, Edna C. Williams, Alice 
D. Shea, Fern E. Adams and Katie G. 




Jewett; SDDGP Jane Lapachet and 
DGP Eva Bisagno. There were 32 

parlors represented by 94 visiting 
members and 23 members were pre- 
sent from Tracy. Local organizations 
represented included: American Le- 
ion Post. Garden Club, St. Bernards' 
Altar Society. Knights of Columbus, 
Odd Fellows. Republican Women 
and Native Sons No. 186. PGP 
Joseph Perez NSGW spoke briefly. 
President Ray Murphy NSGW, pre- 
sented GP Conens with red roses. 

Rene Fagrendcs, Loraine Arnando 
and the Four Specs provided the 
entertainment. President Lois Good- 
paster read the "History of El 
Peseadero Parlor." The Grand Presi- 
dent presented Mrs. Anna Brand- 
eman's 50-year pin to her daughter 
May Brandeman and a 25-year pin 
to Mrs. T. Vierra. 

A reception followed. The table 
featured white floral arrangements, 
beautiful silver services and a large 
sheet cake with the NDGW emblem 
in color. Two hundred guests and 
members signed the guest book. 
Greeting cards and monetary gifts 
were received. 



VENDOME 

Hawaii came to Vendome No. 100 
when President Elsie Figone and her 
corps of officers entertained their 
members and guests of the other five 
Native Daughter Parlors of Santa 
Clara County at a festive luau. Spec- 
ial guests were the officers of the 
visiting parlors who were each pre- 




sented with a gift. Many other guetl 
received beautiful leis and fresl 
pineapple. The hall was appropriate! 
decorated in the traditional thetl 
and soft Hawaiian music was enjol 
ed throughout the evening. Entertail 
ment was provided by the Pan Hicl 
Hawaiian Dancers, and deliciol 
refreshments were enjoyed by al 
Betty Yakobovich and Jeanne Posl 
ier were in charge of the evening! 
activities assisted by other VendorA 
members. 

President Elsie Figone and Maj 
Schmidt, served sandwiches, cookie! 
fruit and punch to servicemen droj 
ping in at the USO. Vendome pa] 
lor furnishes refreshments to the USl 
every third Sunday of the mont 
Irene Lial sponsored a purity stoJ 
luncheon at the Eagles' Hall, til 
proceeds of which were donated ] 
the sewing club to purchase sewiil 
supplies for the annual bazaar. TB 
parlor is fortunate in having such ;| 
active member as Irene as chairmil 
of its sewing club. 

DGPs Irene Lial and Amalia Velll 
assisted by a corps of officers frol 
Vendome No. 100, installed the nel 
officers at EI Monte No. 205 an| 
Gilroy No. 312. 

The parlor held its annual baza.l 
October 23 at Letterman's Club, Sfl 
Jose. In addition to the sale of va| 
ious handiwork items, there was 
raffle of two grocery baskets and ; 
afghan hand crocheted by S u 
Mattei. 



JUtoey 



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CALIFORNIA HERAL 



bcol 

Eshcol No. 16 celebrated its 82nd 
njversary with Anita Land, who 
s president 29 years ago, conduct- 
i the meeting. The parlor w a s 
med by the late Judge Henry C. 
sford, a state legislator and past 
SSldent of Napa Parlor. NSGW. 
e name means "land of the vine" 
e parlor was instituted on July 
1887 with 69 charter members. 



In honor of the anniversary, a 
lUtiful cake, decorated with blue 
j gold lettering which read "Happy 
rthday, Sisters." was surrounded by 
1, white and yellow streamers, the 
ors of the NDGW. 



JLLECITO 

Officers for Vallecito No. 308 are 
iTtha MacDonald, president and 
nes. McLennan, Youse, Smith, 
gg. Harter, Tenney, Van de Graaf, 
jart. Cappa, Manning, Costa, 
u i g 1 c y. Limbeck and Ornellas. 
iev were jointly installed with 
istro Valley No. 319 NSGW. 




Bordanaro and Zarcone Photographers 

fficers of Vallecito Parlor. From 
H — Marie S. Legg, Myrtle Orne- 
\s, Laura Limbeck, Adeline Costa. 
ending: Edna Youse; Beth Van 
e Graff; Myrtha MacDonald. Presi- 
■nt; Betty Harter and Lena Lemos. 

The Parlor has already enjoyed 
swim party and a spaghetti feed 
id have scheduled a luncheon, 
h i t e elephant sale, a Halloween 
irty and a Christmas potluck. 



A portion of the funds support 
the monthly socials for service men 

at Oak Knoll Naval Hospital. Oak 
land. PP Catherine Manning has 
devoted time to this project for the 
past 111 teen years. 



IN MEMORIAM 




Not lost to those that love them. 

Not (lend, just gone before; 
They still live in our memory, 

And they will forever more. 



Matilda A. Grindell, Hayward No. 122. 
August 6. 

Mabel P. Bryant. Oneonta No. 71. July 
18. 

Thelma McNeil, Eschscholtzia No. 112 
August 13. 

Mary Barnard, Betsy Ross No. 238 Aug- 
ust 10. 

M arie M. Dondero, Stockton No. 256 
August 14. 

Emma Jess O'Meara, Dolores No. 169 
August 17. 

Eva C. Fowler, Marguerite No. 12 
August 18. 

Charlette Hoffman, Bahia Vista No. 167 
August 14. 

Maude Hannah, Susanville No. 243 Jan- 
uary 10. 

Mabel H. Fraser, Stockton No. 256 
August 18. 

Ruth Adams. Reichling No. 97 August 
20. 

Mary J. Silva. Vista Del Mar No. 155 
August 20. 

Gertrude C. Hill, Aloha No. 106 August 
18. 

Mamie R. Luiz. Richmond No. 147 Aug- 
ust 26. 

Ann Evans Eddy, Sierra Pines No. 275 
August 31. 

Catherine V. Nomellini. Joaquin No. 5 
August 28. 



< hriatina s Md rea, Rcina del M 

I2'i August 27. 
Isabell ( Ashluii. ( hjlpt No. 40 August 

30. 
( ecilia m Hamrol, < ioldi 

158, September 2. 
I tva J Mann. San Miguel No. 94, August 

29, 
Maude <i < >»'t < alifia No. 22, August 

31. 
I ileen I ompa, < opa de Oro No. 105 

September I. 
Rose Callahan McGinety, Phoebe A. 

Ileal si No. 214. July 25. 
I ouite J. Wheelhousc. Ursula No. 1. Sept- 
ember 3. 
( lara Strohmeier, Oolden date No. 158, 

September 4. 
Blanche Aubuchon. (harter Oak No. 292, 

July 21. 



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. H 

I lie president's theme "American- 
as carried oul in the decor- 
tothill Freewaj I his makes 
nol onlj a m.iioi change in the town 
ol 1 .1 Canada, bul heralds the begin- 
ning ol a new phase of life in the 
( hurch of the Lighted Window, 

Architectural plans lor major re- 
building of the church facilities on 
us present three and one-half acre 

site are in final stages of completion. 
Church plans eall lor an investment 
"I approximate!) a half million dol- 
lars for site alteration, new buildings 
and major remodeling. The church 
now serves more than l.ooo mem- 
bers. 




From leu — PGP June T. Goldie. 

Chairman Isabelle Griffin and PGP 

Hazel Hansen. 

On June 7, 1969, the State of 
California officially declared the 
Church of the Lighted Window an 
historical landmark in ceremonies at 
the church. San Fernando Mission 
No. 280 and 1 ' e r d u g o No. 240 
NDGYV presented a bronze land- 
mark plaque, thus commemorating 
the contribution made by the found- 
ers and the church to the community. 
Native Daughters participating in- 
cluded PGP Hazel B. Hansen, 
I erdugo Parlor. June Goldie, San 
Gabriel Valley Parlor, and Idabelle 
F. Griffin, San Fernando Mission 
Parlor, History and Landmarks 
chairman. First Vice President Dor- 
othy Golden, Verdngo, and President 
Beverly Swaner, S a n Fernando 



Mission, unveiled the plaque, it was 
received In Rev. Myron E. Meckel, 

Church of the Lighted Window, 

United Church of Christ. 
I he plaque reads: 
Ml I I INC, IN THE HOME OF DR. 
AND MRS. J. L LANTERMAN. 
si \i i mini Ol FAITH WAS DRAWN 
AND SIGNED. Ill II IN CHARTER 
Ml MIU kS HFCAME THE FIRST OR- 
GANIZ1 D c HURCH IN LA CANADA 
MAX 23, IS<>7. MINISTER WAS REV. 
FRANKLIN CULVER 1897 - 1898. 
CHURCH WAS REBUILT IN 1924. 
MARKED BY: VERDUGO PARLOR 
240 AND SAN FERNANDO MISSION 
PARI OR 280 NATIVE DAUGHTERS 
OF THE GOLDEN WEST. JUNE 7, 
1969. ( \l OORNIA REGISTERED 
LANDMARK NO. LAn007. 



VALLEJO 

Layol Welter will serve as presi- 
dent of Vallejo No. 195 for the sec- 
ond consecutive term. Her corps of 
officers this year includes Mmes. E. 
Smith. MacFarland, Curry, Faven, 
Woodard, M. Smith, Miller, Low, 
Barenchi, Azevedo, Heath, Curtis, 
Bliss and Miss Tessie O'Neill. DGP 
Verona Mason was installing officer 
assisted by Mmes. Dulinsky, Kemp- 
ster. Tonascia, Mathison and Fag- 
undas, all members of George C. 
Yount No. 322. 




From left — Barbara Dulinsky, Ver- 
ona Mason, Layol Welter and I 'erda 
Kempster. 

Honored guests were newly ap- 
pointed DGP Verda Kempster and 
SDDGP Barbara Dulinsky. Mrs. 
Welter also introduced her mother, 
Mrs. Nellie Hein and her daughter 
Layol Miller. Presentations included 
a Parlor gift to Verona Mason, past 
president's pin to Teresa Jones, gifts 
to officers from the president and 
a monetary gift to Mrs. Welter from 
her officers. 



ations with a large 13-star fll 
fashioned of red, white and b|< 
p a p e r rosettes at the presideip 
station, and miniature trees trimnto 
with paper rosettes at the otH 
stations. 

Mmes., Faven and Curry assisl 
Mrs. Welter in decorating the hi 
A large sheet cake decorated <m 
American flags centered the bull 
table where refreshments were servl 



ADMISSION m 

by DORIS PEREZ 
State Chairman 

Native Sons and Daughters eel 
brated California's 119th birthday I 
Santa Cruz in four days of everl 
Bowling a n d softball tournamel 
were held on September 6-7. A g 
tournament was staged on the eiglij 
followed by a civic dinner-dance I 
tended by Grand Officers. P'J 
Grand Officers, members of bcl 
Orders and public officials. 

Grand Marshals V ir g i 1 i a M 
Combs and James Hubbard head! 
the colorful parade in which (I 
Nancy Conens, NDGW, and m 
Richard L. Ritchison, NSGW, pad 
cipated. 

Parade awards to Native DaujM 
ters presented by the two grand pre! 
dents were: Largest Number in Lijj 
of March: Piedmont No. 87, hi 
Golden Gate No. 158, 2nd; Ge\ 
vieve No. 132, 3rd. 

Best Appearing: Piedmont No. it 
1st; Genevieve No. 132, 2nd; BueM 
Vista No. 68, 3rd. 

Best Decorated Auto: Fn//ml 
No. 177, 1st; Joaquin No. 5, 2rl 

Best Appearing Junior Unit: Frim 
vale Junior Unit No. 23. Drul 
Corps: Mission No. 227. 

Drill Team (Junior) : Las Ami 
uitas Junior Unit No. 33. Awards 
combined Native Sons and Daughte 
units were: Largest Number in LL 
of March: Guadalupe No. 15 
NDGW and Guadalupe No. 23 
NSGW, 1st; Portola No. 17 
NDGW, and Pacific No. 10, NSG\ 
2nd. 



CALIFORNIA HERAL 



Best Appearing: Guadalupe No. 

3, NDGW, and Guadalupe No. 
|l, NSGW, 1st.; Hayward No. 122. 
>n,\V and Eden No. 113, NSGW, 

Y 

Mixed Native Daughters and Nat- 
h Sons Drum Corps: Guadalupe 
>>. 153, NDGW. and Guadalupe No. 
jl, NSGW, 

Best Majorette: Kim Larson. 
Sweepstakes Award — Native Dau- 
ters and Native Sons: Guadalupe 
j, 153, NDGW, and Guadalupe 
». 231, NSGW. 

Sineere appreciation and gratitude 
expressed to every member who 
rticipated and the committee 
rnestly hopes that each parlor will 
irt now to make plans to take an 
tive part in the 1970 celebration 
be held in the twin cities of Fair- 
ld-Suisun in Solano County. 



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OFFICIAL MSI I 

Berendos No. 23, < amellia No. 41, 

Lassen View No, 98, and Hiawatha 
No. 140, met at the Native Daughters 
Hall, Red mull, tor the official visit 
of Grand President, Nancy J. Conens, 
Presidents Ma/ie Winters of Hiawa- 
tha, Lois Islev of Camellia. kathyn 
Kueny of Berendos and first Vice 
president Bobbi Wilson ol /.mwii 
View presided over various portions 
of the ritualistic work. 




From left — Verona DeWitt. GP 
Nancy Conens and Lucille Douglas 
at Kelly-Griggs House Museum. 

GP Nancy J. Conens, DGPs Helen 
Hoy of Berendos, Jeanette Hall, Las- 
sen View and Betty Toms and Marg- 
urite Cross both of Camellia were 



e s e o r t e il and introduced. Lucille 

Douglas of Piedmont, Regina Swarts 

Of Hiawatha and (lata Stalieh ol 

Olivia visiting deputies who introd- 
uced themselves, Sheri I son was 

intiated into Berendos Parlor. A total 

of 84 members attended the informal 

meeting. Money from the coin march 
was designated by the Grand Presi- 
dent to be shared by Camellia and 
Shasta Daisj Junior I 'nit. 

Aurelia Shuffleton dressed as a 
drummer boy presented an inspiring 
patriotic leading and the group 
joined in singing an original song 
set to the music of " I he Battle Hymn 
of the Republic". The reading will 
he entered in competition at Free- 
dom Foundation. 

Prior to the meeting the Grand 
President and her sister, Lucille 
Douglas, were taken on a tour of 
the Victorian homes in Red Bluff 
followed by a visit to the Ide Adobe 
and the Kelly-Griggs House Museum. 
Accompanying the Grand President 
on her visit to the northern part of 
the State were her mother. Mis. 
Lillian Stearns and a friend. Mis 
Bernicc Moore. 



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Looking southerly toward the Ide Adobe showing part of the corral . 

ground. 



:TOBER, 1969 



RETURN POSTAGE GUARANTEED 
CALIFORNIA HERALD 
P. 0. Drawer 4243 
Anaheim, California 92803 




run^iL LiiOHAHl _26 

CIVIC CENTER 

SAN FRfl j :i S ' , CALIF. 94102 
AT. PERIODICAL DEPi . 



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$2.50 (plus 720 tax and mailing) 



•PECIAL COLLttmWH 




Official Publication of 
THE NATIVE DAUGHTERS of the GOLDEN WEST 




NOVEMBER. 1969 + 40<t 



STATE CAPITOL AT SACRAMENTO 



Veterans Annual 
Christmas Party 

by Evelyn Henry 

I he Native Sons and Daughters 
ol the Golden Wes( will sponsor the 
44th annual Christmas Party for the 
Vetenuu ol the Sawtelle Hospital 
on Sunday, December 7. 1^69 at 
the Domiciliarj rheatre Veterans 
Center at 1:15 p.m, rhe Christmas 
Part) is sponsored bj "" of the 
Southern California Native Sons and 

Daughters. Please he as generous as 

possible as the need is great. Parlors 
ami friends should send their checks, 
made out to l\ I I KI'ARLOR. to: 
Mrs. Jaek Henry 13622 Leadwell 
Street Van Nuys, California 91405. 



We are asking our members and 
friends to collect playing cards, pap- 
er-back hooks, games, puzzles. Sports 
and Detective magazines. We have 
over 1.000 men at these parties, so 
we need lots of the above items. The 
afternoon starts with a short program, 
then the Bingo games with cash pri- 
zes, and ends with light refresh- 
ments. For further information, call 
Evelyn Henry, ST 5-4974; Jim Lech- 
litner. ST 6-6744; or Hazel Steckel, 
DU 4-0809. Thank you for being 
so generous in the past. And a Happy 
Holiday Season to you all. 



As usual. Vendome's a n nu a 1 
"Holiday Lane" bazaar of October 
23 under chairman Velma Gordan 
and co-chairman Irene Lial was a 
success. A superb luncheon of corn- 
ish game hens, accompanied by other 
goodies, was prepared and served 
under the direction of chairman Sue 
Engfer and co-chairman Jeanne Pos- 
tier. The parlor is indeed grateful to 
(Continued on page 8) 



California Herald 

"PRESERVING THE PAST FOR THE FUTURE" 

Vol i mi Wll November, 1969 Numhkr 

CONTENTS THIS MONTH 

Veterans 1 Christmas Party, by Evelyn Henry 

Atwood Adobe, by Martha Jean Johnson 

Stow House 

Parlor News 

The Grand President's Corner 

1969 Junior NDGW Conference, by Dolores Ferenz, State Chairman 

California Bi-Centennial. by Margaret Ann Kerr 1 

In Memoriam 1 



Before you make 

tt 1 1 Ivr V^ be sure to see a Medallion Electric 
Home. After all, the trend is to 
electric living. A Medallion Home can mean: Flameless, 
electric heating with room-by-room temperature controls. 
An all-electric kitchen that stays clean and cool. Cool, re- 
freshing air conditioning throughout the house. Medallion 
Homes are available now in all price ranges. It will pay 
you to look for this emblem before you make a move. 




ICai«> 

Southern California Edison 



J. J. FRIIS 
Publisher 



LEO J. FRIIS 
Editor 



JANE FRIIS I 
Public Relations! 



Published Monthly by J. J. Friis and Leo J. Friis, owners and publishers, Anaheim, 
California. All Rights Reserved. EDITORIAL AND GENERAL OFFICES: Anaheim, California. I 
Mailing Address: P.O. Drawer 4243, Anaheim, California 92803. ADVERTISING OFFICE: 3011 
N. Parton St., Santa Ana, Calif. 92701. CHANGE OF ADDRESS AND SUBSCRIPTIONS: Mail 
correspondence to CALIFORNIA HERALD, Circulation Department, P.O. Drawer 4243, Anaheim,! 
Calif. 92803. When ordering change of address please allow six weeks; please furnish i 
old and new addresses including zip code. NDGW MEMBERS: please send Parlor Number also., 
POST OFFICE: RETURN POSTAGE GUARANTEED. Please send magazine with address change' 
to California Herald, P.O. Drawer 4243, Anaheim, California 92803. SUBSCRIPTION RATES: 
in U.S.A. (50 states), 40c a copy, $3.50 a year; $6.50 for two years; $9.00 for three years. I 
Other countries: Please apply for rates. Entered as second-class matter at the Post Office at 
Anaheim, California, under the Act of March 3, 1879. No part of this magazine may be re- 
printed without specific permission. 

CALIFORNIA HERALD I 



\^/JiwGoh K^AJboh 



by Martha Jean Johnson 



This adobe was built one hundred and fifteen years ago as a one- 
tory adobe. The second story was added at a later date. 



MjMMf ARKING THE AtWOOd Adobe 

JLTjIL in the city of San Bernar- 
lino, a bronze plaque reads: 
Atwood Adobe 
"One of city's oldest Adobe hous- 
s built by Andrew Lytle in 1854. 
Vithstood 1862 flood. Subsequent 
twners — B. Coopwood, A. Wolbe, 
. Kelting, J. M. James. 1888 George 
Arnold Atwood. Later added second 
tory. Still owned by Atwood and 
Vebster families. Dedicated by Lu- 
■onia Parlor No. 24 1 , Native Daught- 
ers of the Golden West. June 7, 
969." 




Worn left — Mrs. Thomas Webster. 
Mrs. Leon A twood, Mr. Thomas 
Webster. Mr. Stafford Atwood. Mrs. 
Frances A twood. 

This historical plaque has qualified 
or County Registration and is the 

NOVEMBER, 1969 



first such registered marking in the 
County of San Bernardino. The ado- 
be is located at 234 Fourth Street 
and is thought to be the oldest con- 
tinuously lived in residence in San 
Bernardino. 

The lower story of the Adobe is 
built of adobe with thick walls, keep- 
ing it so cool in the summer that 
heat often has to be turned on. So 
few people realized the history of 
the Adobe, that Lugonia Parlor be- 
came interested in placing a plaque, 
with the hope that future generations 
might know something of the his- 
tory of this old house. A tube will 
be placed inside the wall, containing 
information on the history and the 
ceremonies. 

When Lugonia Parlor No. 241 
NDGW dedicated the site more than 
150 persons attended the ceremonies. 
Mrs. Ralph Carr, chairman of the 
Parlor's History and Landmark Com- 
mittee welcomed the guests and in- 
troduced President of the Parlor, 
Mrs. Manuel Cisneros. Mrs. Everett 
Kerr gave the invocation; Mrs. C. M. 
Noland led the pledge of allegiance; 
Mrs. C. Bounds and Mrs. Ora Riley 
acted as color guards. 

Among those in attendance were 
Captain Andrew Lytle's grand-daugh- 
ter, Mrs. Alexander Hamilton Mar- 
shall, great grand-son. Jack Marshall, 
great grand-son and daughter of 
Judge Retting. Dr. Clarence Lamb. 
Mrs. Mildred Nick, Mr. and Mrs. 
Keir Brooks, Mrs. Leon Atwood, 



Stafford Atwood, Mrs. Alice Van 
Bowne, State President Elfrieda Rob- 
inson, Past Presidents association 




Atwood Adobe as it now stands. 
Orginally the adobe built in 1854 by- 
Andrew Lytle was a one-storied 
adobe dwelling. 



NDGW. SDDGP Helen Mc Daniels, 
and Mrs. James Meadows, State 
Chairman of History and Landmarks. 
District 37. Mrs. Carr introduced the 
three owners of the Adobe. Mrs. 
Cisneros unveiled the plaque and 
presented it and the adobe wall to 
the Atwood and Webster families. 
Mrs. Atwood accepted the gift. 

PAGE 3 




Residence <>! Sherman Patterson Stow, Goleta. Home was built in 1872. 



STOW HOUSE 

B<i iff id GofetsL, Saofa Bar 6am GeaniV 



Om OF THE OLDEST American 
built landmarks in the Goleta 
Valley i> the Slow House, which was 
built in 1872 by Sherman Patterson 
Stow, son of William Whitney Stow, 
former speaker of the Assembly of 
the California State Legislature. 

The elder Stow came to Goleta 
Valley in 1871 and purchased 1,043 
acres of the La Patera (duck pond) 
tract from German Senter. Sherman 
Stow built his house on the knoll 
west of the original La Patera. The 
pond was called Stow Pond for 
nearly a century. It is now known 
as Lake Cameros. 



The first irrigation in the Goleta 
Valley was on the Stow Rancho. In 
1874, on this ranch, was planted 
the first lemon grove in the valley. 
When Sherman Patterson Stow died 
in 1915, various sons and finally a 
nephew managed the ranch which 
had been incorporated in S. H. Stow's 
name. The nephew, Garrett Van 
Home, deeded the historic house to 
the County of Santa Barbara as a 
gift in 1967. 

Stow House now serves as head- 
quarters for the Goleta Valley His- 
torical Society and is used as a 



museum. The house is lavishly dej 
corated in the gingerbread style oJ 
a century ago. In the rear is a coacll 
house where pioneer vehicles arJ 
displayed. There is a two-story buni| 
house which houses the Santa Barb<| 
ara Archeological Society offices ana 
the Museum of Early Man. There lifl 
also a blacksmith shop and a carel 
taker's house. Some of the raresj 
flora in California may be found orn 
the premises. 

Stow House was marked as a his-i 
torical landmark of Santa Barbara 
County by Reina del Mar and T/er«| 
de Oro Parlors. 

CALIFORNIA HERALcJ 



1 (AMINO REAL 

El Camino Real No. 324 celebrat- 
d the 10th anniversary of its instit- 
noii with a candlelight ceremony, 

huge decorated birthday cake and 
iany reminiscences from the many 
lembers and guests assembled. 



A special guest was the Parlor 
rganizer and charter president. Mil- 
red Kubler. now residing in Oregon, 
ho was here for the event. Other 
pecial guests were Lila Hummel, 
iT; Laura Blosdale, GIS; Mary 
taiden, PGP and Dolores Zetwo of 
a Tijera Parlor who, during the 
ummer of 1959 accompanied Grand 
'resident Maxiene Porter to the 
iany meetings prior to the new Par- 
k's installation. 



Parlor News 




IT Lila Hummel and GIS Laura 
Blosdale. 

The Candlelight Ceremony, ar- 
unged by Marie Harrington, who 
as charter third vice-president, was 
tarted off by Audrey Haselbusch, 
hartcr past president who passed the 
iper to Mildred Kubler who lighted 
le first candle and told of the high- 
ghts of her year. She was accomp- 
nied by her deputy, Phyllis Hirst, 
'erdugo Parlor and supervisor, 
iathryn Smith, Placenta Parlor. The 
jper then passed to Marie Harring- 
jh who related the Parlor's second 
nd third years, accompanied by 
dice Mooney, Tallica Parlor who 
'as supervisor during the second year 
nd deputy the year following. The 
iper then passed on to past presi- 
ents Carmen Miller, Helen Tram- 
lel, Dee Downs and Ida Grossi. Red 
ases were placed at the stations of 

IOVEMBER, 1969 





Ralph Samuels Valley Photo, Van Nuys 



F r o m left — PP Beverly Swaner; 
President Irma McKibhen; retiring 
DGP Rose Rumsey; SDDGP Nellie 
Miller. 



Edna Vetter and her deputy, Helen 
Dusenberry Gould, both of whom 
have passed away. Deputies and 
supervisors present included Carolyn 
Riggs, San Fernando Mission Parlor; 
Margaret Heath, Wilmington Parlor, 
Ellen Guthrie, El Aliso and Dorothy 
Pedroza, Toluca Parlor. 

Baskets of blue and green flowers, 
the president's colors, decorated the 
hall and the beautiful refreshment 
table was in charge of vice president 
Lyn Lennox, Gloria Mellon and 
Edie Bartlett. They were assisted by 
Wilda O'Hanlon and Helen Tram- 
mell. 

At the meeting, Mildred Kubler 
presented the Parlor with the first 
book for the library, a copy of the 
California Missions. An interesting 
note is that material from Marie Har- 
rington's book, "The Mission Bells of 
California" was used for the San 
Gabriel Mission part of the book. 
This book was a prize for El Camino 
Real as having taken in the largest 
number of new members in District 
32 in the past season during the first 
part of Milly's term as supervisor. 



EL MONTE 

Members of El Monte No. 205 
Mountain View, presented the Moun- 
tain View Public Library with the 
California Bear Flag. President Irene 



Hatch g a v e ;i brief history of (he 
Bear Flag which \sas first raised at 
Sonoma on June 14, 1846. She 
added that it was most appropriate 
that the Native Daughters made the 
presentation since they were the first 
woman's patriotic organization in the 
State and this year are joining in the 
ceremonies of celebrating the 200th 
anniversary of the founding of Calif- 
ornia. 

Henrietta Marcotte, President, and 
her corps of officers, Mmes. Hatch, 
H o b b s, Morton, Alonza, Ausano, 
Smith, Campbell, Cordoza, Cotta, 
Lannessus, Hawley, Conklin, and 
Endreson, were installed by D G P 
Irene Lial, Vendome No. 100. The 
Masonic Temple was decorated with 
beautiful white flowers and green 
leaves. Marie Smith was chairman of 
the evening with co-chairman, Mary 
Ausano and Louise Cotta as chair- 
men of decorations. 

Past President Irene Hatch was 
appointed as chairman of Children's 
Foundation and Mary Ausano, Re- 
cording Secretary, as chairman of the 
California Herald. Lena Alameda 
was presented a 50 year pin by DGP 
Irene Lial. Newly appointed DPG 
Mary Bennett of Palo Alto No. 229, 
was introduced. After the installation 
delicious refreshments were served by 
the committee. 



EL PINAL 

At the Masonic Temple in Cam- 
bria, officers of El Pinal Parlor were 
installed by DGP Ruth Von Dollen 
and her corps of officers from San 
Miguel No. 94. Visitors from Sa.i 
Luisita No. 108 were also present. 
The hall was beautifully decorated by 
Mary Warren and Althea Soto. Re- 
freshments were served by Mmes. 
Sutherland, Paolini, Buddell, Briggs 
and Curti. Earlier Lesta Buffington 
entertained all retiring officers with 
a delicious buffet dinner at her home. 

(Continued on Page 7) 

PAGE 5 



The Grand 
President's Corner 



GR \Mi I'KI SIDF.NT 

Nancj i ( onens (Mil 
431 1 Allendale Avenue 
Oakland. ( alifomia ''4619 



GRAND SECRETARY 

I ucille P. Kimbark (Mrs. C. F.) 

227 1 -32nd Avenue 

San I rancisco, California 94116 

Office: 703 Market Street. Room 612 

San r- rancisco 94103 Dial 362-4127 




NANCY J CONENS 



It hardly seems possible that time 
could pass so quickly, and that we 
are now m the eleventh month of the 
year. In the past few weeks 1 have 
made quite a few Official Visits, 

travelling from as far north as Susan- 
ville to Burbahk in the South. Each 
visit is different and unique and look- 
ed forward to with great anticipation. 
What a pleasure to welcome so 
many new members! It is gratifying 
to learn that so many Parlors are 
stri\ tag for at least three members. If 
you have not ahead) set this as your 
goal, won't you promise today to do 

SO 

On November 1 1 we shall once 
again pause a moment in tribute to 
our Veterans for the many sufferings 
they have endured. It is because of 
their sacrifices that we enjoy the love 
of our homes under the protection 
of our glorious flag. 

As you gather with your family 
and friends on this Thanksgiving 
Day of 1969. may you be mindful 
of the Pilgrims — those valiant men 
and courageous women who endured 
hardships and want to enjoy the 
foundation of the freedom that was 
their legacy for generations to come. 
My dear Sisters — we have so much 
for which we should be thankful! 
Think about it — each in your own 
words: each in your own way — 
say "thank you". 

"THANKSGIVING" 
by M. Kathleen Haley 
"I'm thankful for each separate day. 
For every moment in it — 
The chance to work, to learn, to 

play. 
To set a eoal and win it. 



I'm thankful lor the common things 
We often take lor granted; 
The sun. the rain, the birds, the trees. 
Each flower that's planted. 

I'm thankful for the winter-time. 
Spring, summer, and the fall; 
And lor a wise and generous God 
Who watches over all. 



And for this land, America, 
Wherein free men are living. 
With right to worship as they pleas 
I render my thanksgiving." 

HAPPY THANKSGIVING! 

Remember our goal — three! Ri 
member our motto — action! See yc 
next month. 



Jtinerary 1969 

NOVEMBER 

2 Northern Counties' Childrens Foundation Breakfast Cornin 

2 Mt. Lassen No. 215 — 50th Anniversary Bieber 

3 Alturas No. 159 Alturas 

5 Nataqua No. 152, Susanville No. 243 Standish 

6 La Bandera No. 110, Sutter No. Ill, Calif ia No. 22 Sacramento 

8 Berkeley No. 150 Berkeley 

9 Mariposa No. 63 Mariposa 

11 Veterans' Day, Woodland No. 90 Woodland 

12 James Lick No. 220, Darina No. 114, (afternoon) San Francisco 

13 Oneonta No. 71, Areata No. 325, Occident No. 28, 

Rekhling No. 95 Ferndale ; 

17 Miocene No. 228, El Tejon No. 239, Alila No. 321 Tafr 

18 Santa Maria No. 276, La Purissima No. 327 Santa Maria 1 

19 El Pinal No. 163, San Miguel No. 94, San Luisita No. 198 ... Cambria' 

20 Tierra de Oro No. 304, Reina del Mar No. 126 Santa Bargara' 

25 Argonaut No. 166, Aloha No. 106, Brooklyn No. 157 .... Emeryville' 

27 Thanksgiving Day 



DECEMBER 

1 La Paz No. 326, San Bruno No. 246 Pacifica* 

2 Vendome No. 100, Los Gatos No. 317 San Jose* 

3 Fairfax No. 225, Tamelpa No. 231 Fairfax' 

7 San Francisco Childrens Foundation Breakfast 

8 Sonoma No. 209, Petaluma No. 222 Sonoma' 

9 Aha No. 3. (afternoon) San Francisco' 

10 Phoebe A. Hearst No. 214 Manteca* 

12 Fruitvale No. 177, Encinal No. 156, Bahia Vista No. 167 .... Oakland* 

14 Italian Women's Dinner Los Anse^ 

25 Christmas Day 



* Official visits are marked with asterisks 



CALIFORNIA HERALC 



1 PINAL . . . 
Continued from Page 5) 

i.l Pinal No. 163 also enjoyed a 
elicious pot-luck dinner honoring 

or more year members. Mmes. L. 
OtO, \l Soto and B. Williams were 

1 charge of arrangements for this 
iccasion. President Margaret Soto 
resented life membership certificate - 
3 her mother, Aggie Soto and to 
'OP Katie Jevvett, Marcella Porte- 
nd Maude Thorndyke. Unable to be 
resent because of illness were three 
thcr 50 year members, Mmes. Stei- 
,er, Miller and Montano. 

On October 4 a fund raising 
nchilada dinner was held. The offi- 
ial visit will be on November 19. 



IFFICIAL VISIT 

Members of Sierra Pines No. 275, 
olfax; Laurel No. 6, Nevada City; 
md Manzanita No. 29, Grass Valley 
net in the Veterans Hall in Nevada 
' i t y to welcome Grand President 
<Iancy J. Conens. Chairman of the 
vening, Gladys Blanchard, welcom- 
d those assembled and introduced 
(residents of those parlors. 




Union Photo, Grass Valley 



7 rom left — Mary D or n e y, Fair 
Amager Malcolm H a m m i 1 1 and 
Zlsie Peard, chairman of the project. 

During the meeting Laurel Parlor 
)fficers exemplified the ritualistic 
:eremony. Highlights of the evening, 
vhich was preceded by a fine dinner 
erved by a church group, was the 
>resentation of a 50-year emblem 
o Loraine Keast of Manzanita Parlor 
vhere she had served for over 25 
years as secretary and was a past 
resident. Grand President Conens 
also presented 25-year emblems to 

NOVEMBER, 1969 




Union Photo, Grass Valley 

From left — Rutli Sinneck, President 
of Sierra Pines No. 275; Jane Elliott, 
President of Laurel No. 6/ G r a n d 
President N a n c y Conens; Mar y 
Domex. President of Mazanitn No. 
29. 



Brita Rozynski and Marie McGuire 
of Manzanita. There were in attend- 
ance ten other 50 year members and 
one of 60 years. 

Decor, of course, was red, white 
and blue and all enjoyed light re- 
freshments before journeying home. 



CENTENNIAL 

Native Sons and Daughters from 
southern area parlors m e t in the 
patio of Pico House to celebrate its 
centennial. The chairman was Mark 
Russek; in charge of decorations was 
Blanch Oechsel. Gay serapes hung 
from the balcony. Also used as dec- 
oration were Spanish fans made by 
Carolyn Riggs. Spanish costumes of 
the members added color. Beautiful 
Spanish dances were presented by 
Mark Russek's daughter, Carolyn, 
with music by Carolyn's husband. 




Dignitaries attending included Bill 
Probert of El Pueblo de Los Angeles 
association, PGP Andrew Stodel, 



NSGW, and Mr. and Mrs. James 
I eehlitner. Mr. I.echlitner is presi- 
dent oi Inter-Parlor, 



3 


BACKS 
KAULBARS 

MORTUARY 

1617 W. La Palma at Euclid 
Anaheim 
772-1617 




Diamonds — Silverware 

132 W. Lincoln / Anaheim / 533-3107 



OhJ^i 



tf' 



1215 W. Lincoln. Anaheim 




Tastes bo fresh because ifl§ 



BRID6ES • HIGHWAYS • DAMS - RAILROADS 



nomnDiREvnoLDS 

GRHDING Qhfl) CONTRHCTDR 

• Heavy •Equipment 

Hauling For Rent 

535-4233 
505 S. Sunkist Ave. Anaheim 



San Jose No. 81 Celebrates Diamond 
Anniversary and GP Official Visit 



San y.'M- No 81, celebrated its 
"sih anniversary and the first official 
MMt ol Qrand President Nancj J. 
Conens. ["he event was celebrated 
with a dinner al the St. Claire Motel 
followed by B meeting and program 
at the Jaj McCabe Auditorium. 

Approximately 250 guests were in 
attendance including Grand Officers. 
Past Grand Presidents and members 
of both orders. State Senator Alfred 
Alquist extended greetings to all 
assembled at the dinner. Greetings 
were extended by GP Richard L. 
Ritehison N S G W. Congratulatory 
messages were received from the 
President of the United States Rich- 
ard Nixon. Governor Ronald Reagan, 
Senator Alan Cranston, State Senator 
Clark L. Bradley, City Manager A. 
P. Hamann and Supervisor Sid San- 
chez. 



Greetings received 
from several 
dignitaries including 
Richard Nixon 
President of the 
United States of 
America. 



The officers of the Parlor served 
as an escort team, dressed in identical 
gowns of blue crepe trimmed with 
rhinestones, carrying nosegays trim- 
med with blue tulle and silver net. 
The decor at the dinner and meeting 
were boughs of magnolia sprayed 
silver, blue roses and silver candles. 



G.P. Nancj I. Conens, was escort- 
ed to the altar and presented with a 
nosegaj of blue tulle and silver net 
entwined with green paper money 
by GT Marie C. Landini. Among 
other dignitaries escorted were GVP 
Irene Bondanza, GM Virgilia Mc- 
Combs, GT's Marie C. Landini, 
Betty Read Curilich, Lila Hummel, 
Marion McGuire, Helen McCarthy, 
Meredyth Burnette and GOS Dolores 
Ferenz. Escorted also were PGPs 
Evelyn 1. Carlson, Emily E. Ryan, 
Ethel C. Enos, Jewel McSweeney, 
Irma M. Caton, Edna C. Williams, 
Alice D. Shea and Katie G. Jewett. 
Other dignitaries escorted were 
SDDGP Betty Cordoza, DGP Eola 
Howe; GP Richard L. Ritehison, 
GM James Hubbard and John J. 
Nelson, President of San Jose No. 
22, NSGW; Jr. State VP Leealyn 
Baker, Jr. State Trustees Sharon 
Douglas and Robin Gilbert. Former 
GS Mary C. Mahoney and former 
GT Rae Rominger were introduced. 

Chairman of the event GT Marie 
C. Landini, presented a brief history 
of the 75 years of the Parlor's exist- 
ence, 1894-1969, followed by a pro- 
gram of dances and songs of the 
period. 

Another highlight of the evening 
were the presentations of 50 year 
pins to Kathryn Nelson, Edna Oertly, 
May Hoover and Elise Fisher. Re- 
ceiving their 25 year pins were Mil- 
dred Nelson, Edna Jenecke, Ella 
Mathewson and Birdie Munson. 

Many presentations were made to 
the Grand President and to San Jose 
No. 81 on its 75th birthday. 

In addition to Marie Landini, the 
members serving on the committee 
were Mmes. Knox, Chessani, Turner, 
Bringmann, Berryessa, Carricol, Del- 
gado, Healy, Hogan, La Metre, Lob- 
ner, Rowland, Knox, Sholes, Nelson 
and Wyman. Refreshments of cake 
and punch were served following 
the meeting. 



I never knew how hard it was to drive 
a bargain until I bought a second hand car. 



VENDOME . . . 

I 
(Continued from Page 2) 

all those who worked so diligent 
throughout the year, during the lui> 
cheon and bazaar, to make the] 
"Something to be talked about" li 
those in attendance. 

For relaxation after the bazaaii 
Irene Lial, arranged for a buslot 
of members to leave on October 2' 
for an overnight stay at Lake Taho 
where the "night life" and "one ani 
bandits" were enjoyed. 

President Elsie Figone, accom|i 
anied by some of her officers an 
members, attended the official visi 
of GP Nancy J. Conens to Gilrc 
Parlor No. 312, October 16. The visi 
was preceded by a dinner at GrangJ 
Hall, and delicious refreshment! 
were served after the meeting. 

Isabel Stevenson is the new woij 
thy DGP to San Jose parlor No. 8M 
As chairman, the NDGW children;!! 
foundation will benefit from a salal 
bar luncheon being planned by he 
for February 3, 1970, Tuesday noorfl 
in lOOF Hall, 122 Race Street, SaJ 
Jose. Mark your calendar for thill 
date and attend this worthwhile fund' 
raising event. 



CALIFORNIANA 

Following a special steak luncheoij 
in the attractive Riviera Room al 
Michael's Los Feliz Restaurant, Hel| 
en Williams was again installed aj 
President of Californiana No. 24'j 
along with her corps of officers. SDj 
DGP Nellie Miller gave the invocaj; 
tion. DGP Nooma Stretch with Lo\ 
Angeles No. 124 again performed thd 
ceremony. Sally Bucklin was guest 
pianist. Parlor delegations were weH 
corned from Beverly Hills, Placental 
Poinsettia, Ventura. Poppy Trail, Sat\ 
Fernando Mission. San Gabriel Val\ 
ley and Verdugo. 



"Do you play golf?" he asked of the*] 
simple but gushing maiden. 

"Dear me, no," she bashfully replied. "lU 
don't believe I should even know how tel 
hold the caddie." 



1969 g-uni* J\)^>.G,.lAJ. 



\<2t<2nce 



otf J^cUotes ^J 



eienk. 



Grand Outside Sentinel and 
State Chairman, Jr. N.D.Q.W 




DOLORES FERENZ 



X 



he Seventeenth Annual 
Conference of Junior Native 
Daughters of the Golden West was 
held at the Villa Hotel in San Mateo 
an October 10, 11 and 12. 

Friday evening the Junior State Of- 
ficers and Grand Officers enjoyed a 
delicious dinner informally presided 
over by Kathy Slater, Junior State 
President and Grand Trustee Helen 
VlcCarthy, State Chairman of Junior 
Native Daughters. Following dinner a 
fun-filled evening included a hilarious 
imateur talent show with participants 
from various Units and finale perfor- 
mance of the Junior State Officers 
singing "I Love You' California." 

On Saturday morning the 1969 
Conference was called to order and 
the escort team of the hostess unit. Se- 
quoia No. 27, dressed in gingham 
iresses with white pinafores entered. 
Senior members of the sponsoring 
parlor, Bonita No. 10. were colorful- 
y attired in blue and gold dresses. 

Productive business sessions were 
:apably handled by Junior State Pre- 
sident Kathy Slater of Sequoia Unit 
No. 27, assisted by her corps of Jun- 
ior State Officers. Initiation ceremon- 
es added twelve new Junior members 
to the Order. 

NOVEMBER, 196? 



Two new units, Shasta Daisy of 
Redding and Princesa del Mar of 
Santa Barbara were welcomed to their 
first conference. Civic dignitaries ex- 
tended greetings. GVP Raymond 
Johnson and PGP Joseph Oeschger, 




Officers of newly instituted Princesa 
del Mar Unit. 

NSGW congratulated the Juniors and 
wished them a very successful confer- 
ence. The President of Redwood Par- 
lor No. 66, NSGW presented a beau- 
tiful set of flags to Sequoia Unit which 
were used throughout the conference. 
During the afternoon session prizes 
were awarded. The awards presented 
were as follows: 



Year Book — Sequoia Unit No. 27, 
1st Place; Membership — Golden 
Poppy Unit No. 38; Essay — Audrey 
Florez, Sequoia Unit No. 27, 1st 
Place; Sharon Douglas, Fruitvale 
Unit No. 22, 2nd Place; Debbie 
Smith, Sequoia Unit No. 27, 3rd 
Place: Junior Scholarship — Marilyn 
Baker. Fruitvale Unit No. 22. 

Visiting our Junior Conference for 
the first time were a group of Junior 
Native Sons from Seal Rock Unit No 
3, San Francisco. President Don Per- 
razzo presented plaques to Jr. State 
President Kathy Slater and incoming 
State President Leealyn Baker. A for- 
mal banquet officially ended the term 
of State President Kathy Slater and 
her officers. 

Highlighting Saturday evening was 
the installation of the Junior State Of- 
ficers for 1969-1970. State Chairman 
Mrs. McCarthy installed Leealyn Ba- 
ker of Fruitvale Unit No. 22 as Junior 
State President. The Bible was pre- 
sented at the altar by Marilyn Baker, 
accompanied by two members of her 
Unit carrying lighted candles. An es- 
cort team from Fruitvale Unit gowned 
in formals of yellow rose print formed 

(Continued on Page 10) 

PAGE 9 



- 



JR. CONFERENCE . . . 

n n. ir, I from pagt 

.mi arch ol yellow roses as I eealyn 
was escorted to hei station by her 
fathei I he Ragonette choral group 
serenaded her 

Othei Junioi State Oficers installed 
were Past President Kathj Slater, Se- 
quoia inn. Vice President, Kathj 
Koch. Sequoia l nit; Secertary, Renee 
Cook, Menlo Unit; treasurer, Sharon 
Douglas, Fruitvale Unit; Marshal. 

I aura ( ,nn . I as Amiguitas I nil; 
I rusiLL-, Sue Hartman of Argonaut 
I nit. I inda Porterfield ol Shasta Dai- 
sj l nit and Debbie Wilson of Estrel- 
las de Oro Unit; Sentinel, Cindj l arl, 
Golden Poppy Unit; Organist. Diane 
Rola. Sequoia Unit 

1 he newlj installed State President 
presented her plans for the term. 
She stressed "Unity Through Partici- 
pation" as her theme and encouraged 
each Junior to interest her Unit in the 
Junior activities. She appointed the 
following Junior State Chairmen: 
Membership, Kathy Koch. State Vice 
President; Welfare, Robin Gilbert; 
Publicity, Beverly Beckmeyer. 

Those dignitaries escorted and pre- 
sented were Grand President Nancy 
Conens, GVP Irene Bondanza, Chm. 
Bd. GT Gertrude Doss, GT Marie 
Landini, GT Betty Curilich, GT Lila 
Hummel, a member of the State 
Committee of Junior NDGW. GT 
Marian McGuire, PGPs Evelyn 1. 
Carlson and Irma Caton. The Past 





Las Fiestera dance group of Reina 
del Mar parlor No. 126 who enter- 
tained. 



Marilyn Baker, Junior Scholarship 
winner. 

Junior State Presidents present were 
Marilyn Gushe 1962-63; Charyl Pat- 
terson, 1966-67 and Marsha Metzger, 
1967-68. Mrs. Lillian Stetson of Bon 
ita No. 10 was introduced as the new- 
est appointee to the State Committee 
of Junior Native Daughters. Enter- 
tainment was provided by the Ragon- 
ette choral group and the Las Fies- 
teras dance group of Reina del Mar 
Parlor. 

Grand Outside Sentinel Mrs. Do- 
lores M. Ferenz of Hayward No. 122 
was installed as State Chairman of 
Junior Native Daughters of the Gold- 
en West. She congratulated the State 
Officers and spoke to all the Juniors 
reminding them of their challenge 
to live up to the ideals of the Junior 
Native Daughters of the Golden 
West. While she would like them 
to continue to increase their mem- 
bership, she asked them to carry out 
the Junior State President's desire by 
actively participating in all phases of 
the Junior program — membership. 
Admission Day activities, Publicity, 
Welafre, Essay and Year Book con- 
tests, and the Junior Scholarship fund. 
Because she is a former Junior Native 
Daughter she looks forward with 
great pride to working with all the 
units. 

On Sunday morning, the Juniors 
and their advisors visited Marine 
World in Redwood City for play day 
activities. 



II tYWARD 

Rising eleven stories above thfl 
city of Hayward like a giant scntinil 
watching over the lowlands is thl 
new six million dollar City Centel] 
Building. This beautiful new buildin 
was officially dedicated by the cit'.l 
officials assisted by the Native Son! 
and Daughters of the Golden Wes. 
First phase of a total 64 million do, 
lar civic center complex, the sit t 
chosen for this development was th 
former location of old Hayward Higi 
School. Fond memories were relive t 
and nostalgia overcame many mermj 
bers of Hayward No. 122 attending 
the ceremonies. 




Hayward Parlor No. 122 proudlj 
presented the California Bear Flan 
to be used in the new City Counci i 
Chambers. Presenting the flag on be-i 
half of her Parlor, GOS Dolores FerJ 
enz related the story of the first Beaijl 
Flag in Sonoma and extended con-J 
gratulations to Mayor John Smith]; 
and the Council for their keen fore4l 
sight in bringing this modern facility! 
to a recesty. GP Richard Ritchisonl 
and the Grand Officers of the { 
N. S. G. W. presented a plaque tcfl 
the City. PGP Joe Perez N. S. G. wJ 
presented the American Flag for the! 
Council Chambers, a gift from his: J 
parlor. Mrs. Minnie Silva of Hay\[ 
ward Parlor made the arrangements : 
with the Dedication Committee forjl 
the presentations. 



The kindergarden teacher was trying to| 
teach her class to count money. 

Placing a half dollar on her desk, she! 
asked: 

"What is that?" 

Said a small voice from the back row:] 
"TAILS" 

CALIFORNIA HERALD J 




C^l i. Pueblo Nuestra Sei'iora La 
eina de Los Angeles del Rio Porci- 
tcula (now known as the City of 
>s Angeles) was honored by the Los 
ngeles Breakfast Club on the eve of 
, 188th birthday at its spacious club 
Wise north of the old Plaza on 
« west bank of the Los Angeles 
iver which still supplies water for 
e downtown area, although hardly 
sible except at floodcrest. 
Salute to California's Bi-Centennial 
id its I 19th Anniversary opened the 
-lam 'n Eggs" breakfast (with de- 
nous hot cakes! ) with the presenta- 
m of colors — the five Flags under 
hich California and Los Angeles 
id grown. 

Chairman E. Llewellyn Overholt, 
irmer professor of law at USC, pre- 
nted officers of the Native Sons and 
aughters of the Golden West, Dr. 
arl Dentzel, President and members 
the Los Angeles City Cultural 
oard, Mr. J. William Orozoco, Pre- 
dent of the Board of Trustees, Los 
ngeles Community Colleges, Senora 
I Bonza and other guests. 
Hon. Samuel W. Yorty, Mayor of 
os Angeles, reviewed the progress 
id development of the City of Los 
ngeles from 1781 to date. He has 
stored pictures of all former mayors 
i his office, but has not located that 
I the first American mayor, A. P. 
odges. (If anyone has a picture of 
lis pioneer, please loan it to us.) His 
ne talk, and that of Mr. Miccichc, 
ere actually historical documents 
orthy of preservation in the official 
inals of this Bi-Centennial year, 
though both speakers admitted they 
ere only "getting warmed up" in 

iVEMBER, 1969 



California's 
Bi-Centennial 

bif Margaret Ann Kerr 



the brief radio time limitations. This 
is the 2,303rd weeklj broadcast of 
the Club. 

Delegations from the Native Sons 
included: SDDGP Albert Sandoval, 
PGP Andrew Stodel, PGM Jack Hen- 
ry; Inter-Parlor President James R. 
Lechlitner; PG, NSPP Assn., of 
Southern California Verne K. Tucker; 
PP Harold Barden, Santa Monica 
Bay; DDGP James J. Friis. Santa 
Ana and publisher of the California 
Herald; President Donavan R. Hare, 
M.D. and PP David V. Hamm of 
Long Beach; Marcus I. Russek and 
Val Bray of Inter-Parlor; PP Jack 
B. Curran and PP E. W. Black of 
University No. 292. Sheriff Emeritus 
Eugene V. Biscailuz, deceased, was 
greatly missed. 

Delegations from the Native 
Daughters were: GTs Gertrude L. 
Doss and Lila S. Hummel, GIS Laura 
Blosdale, PGPs June T. Goldie, Anna 
T. Schiebusch and Mary Barden; and 
from the Parlors: Beverly Hills No. 
289, PGT Senaida Sullivan, Lucille 
Gilligan: Californiana No. 247, Presi- 
dent Helen Williams, VP Flora D. 
Merrilees, VP Inez Hobbs, PP Blanch 
Oeschsel, PP Hazel Steckel, Minna 
Baxter; Los Angeles No. 124, Norma 
Stretch, Beverly Slobojan, Martha 
Gristock, Sophie Cubison, Vivien 
Morse, Sophia Stewart. Vera Walsh; 
San Fernando Mission No. 280, PP 
Carolyn Riggs; San Gabriel Valley 
No. 281, President Irene Reitcnbach. 
Lee Dollen. Jo Helmuth, Juanita Pal- 
omares, Marcella Palethorpe and 
Whittier No. 298, Evelyn Sherman. 
Thanks is given to Wilda BrandrifT. 
secretary of the Breakfast Club. Miss 
Margaret Ann Kerr was in charge of 
NS-NDGW arrangements of the 26th 
consecutive year. 



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» Mil DKINS MM NDVIION 
I I \< IIION 

I he annual District luncheon >>i the 
Native Daughters ol the Golden Weal 
Children! Foundation was held in 
Sacramento, October 4 at the rues- 
da) i lulv A delicious luncheon was 
served to 170 interested members ol 
the < tadei and friends at tables gaylj 
decorated with baskets of colorful 
artificial i.ill flowers, 




Sacramento Union 



From left — I'CJP Audrey D. Brown, 
Siciw Chairman, Childrens Founda- 
tion Committee and Rae Rominger, 
Committee member. 

In attendance were GP Nancy J. 
Conens; GM Virgilia McCombs, who 
led the pledge of allegiance to the 
Flag; GT Betty R. Curlich; GVP 
Irene Bondanza; PGPs Doris M. Ger- 
rish. who gave the invocation, Hen- 
rietta Toothaker. Hazel Hansen 
( a member of the State Committee 
for the Foundation. ) accompanied by 
her husband Louis Hansen; Hazel 
Mallette; Ethel Enos; Irma Caton; 
Fern Adams; also Lois Smith Traber 
and Kathryn Smith, members of the 
State Committee. 



PGP leu el McSweenej was the 

speaker ol the da\ and her remarks 

were timely as well as memorable. 

Jewel was State Chairman of the 
Foundation Committee for several 
years and is now serving as Public 
Relations Director of the Foundation. 

GP Nane\ Conens expressed appre- 
ciation for the privilege of being the 
guest of the committee. 

The committee was comprised of 
members of Parlors in Sacramento 
and Yolo Counties and part of Sol- 
ano County: Waltha Bidstrup, Chair- 
man, and Lillian Gunderson, Gracie 
Scott, Ruth Carr, Betty Rhodes, PGP 
Henrietta Toothaker, Kay Mysznski, 
Rae Rominger, Judy Phillips, Muriel 
Blodgctt, Dorothy Buscher, Virginia 
Lee, PGP Audrey D. Brown, Bea 
Norris and Frances Quirling. 

Donations for this most worthy 
project were made by the Parlors, in- 
dividual members and friends in the 
amount of $800. Some of the monies 
were given as memorials in memory 
of deceased family members, friends 
and Parlor members. 



DOLORES 

A costume Halloween party was 
enjoyed by members of Dolores No. 
169 and some of the ladies living 
in the NDGW Home. Prizes were 
awarded to Mmes. Jackson and Cully 
in 1890 gowns. President Melissa 
Hall in skeleton outfit; DGP Wilson 
in Hawaiian dress and PGP Carlson 
in "hippie costume complete". 




From left — GP Nancy J. Conens; Waltha Bid- 
strup, chairman of the committee and PGP Jewel 
McSweeney, speaker of the day. 



The Parlor has scheduled Januarl 
20. 1970 as the celebration of in 
61st birthday. Guests will includ. 
charter member Claire Marguire an*! 
DGP Bernadette Sullivan. 



ORIMDA'S BIRIHDAY 

Orinda Parlor's 79th birthday wal» 
celebrated with a delightful old-fashl 
ioned party reminiscent of childhooil 
days. 

After the meeting a social houJ 
was enjoyed. Wearing large bows iil 
their hair, the members played "pin | 
the-tail on the donkey". Est he I 
Bloom put the tail closest to when i 
"it ought to be" while Alice Mo- < 
haupt put it — well, she won t h cl 
booby award. With three tries o'j 
dropping clothes pins into a milk) 
bottle, there was a tie. A playofl! 
was held and the winner, Champion-I 
Clothes-Pin-Dropper Kay Kelly, re-j 
ceived stationery in lovely pastels 
shades, as did the Donkey-Tail-i 
Putter winner. 

When the gorgeous birthday cake 
was brought in, all the lights were 
turned off and the members holding! 
lighted birthday candles, sang Happy 
Birthday to Orinda Parlor. Thanks 
for this evening go to Irma Wala- 
schek and Betty Weaver. 



JAMES LICK - DARINA 

A luncheon at noon with the joint 
meeting of James Lick and Darina 
parlors following took place Novem- 
ber 12. It was the official visit of 
Grand President Nancy Conens. 
Darina also celebrated its anniver- 
sary. 



EL CAMINO REAL 

El Camino Real recently won its 
first trophy when sixteen members in 
sunbonnets and pioneer dresses mar- 
ched in the Frazier Park second an- 
nual Pioneer Daze Parade and car- 
ied off second place prize in the I 
marching division. The fun day in 
Kern County's picturesque mountain 
area was planned by the history and 
landmarks committee of the Parlor 
and entire families enjoyed the bar- ! 

CALIFORNIA HERALD : 



•cue following the parade and a 
,\ of fun in the tree-shaded park. 

I he busy committee also cele- 
ated its second annual Tardeada 
[exicana (a Mexican supper) at the 
lission Hills adobe of Dr. Mark 
id Marie Harrington. Eighty-one 
iests gathered in the candlelit patio 
. enjoy tamales. enchiladas, frijoles 
,1'ritos. Spanish rice and ensalada 
ade by committee members Mmes 
aselbusch, I. S. Grossi, Trammell, 
lellon and Harrington. Among the 
iests at the many tables were Rev. 
arl Gerken. administrator of San 
ernando Mission, GT Laura 
losdale, GO Peggy Brandenburg, 
GPs Mary Barden, and Eileen Dis- 
mke. SDDGP Nellie Miller and 
>GP Dorothy Pedroza. Parlors re- 
resented included Placerita, Tallica, 



S a n Fernando Mission, Californiana, 

/-.'/ Aliso, Beverly Hills and Verdugo. 

Led by President Ida (irossi and 
Chairman of History and Landmarks 

Marie Harrington, fifty guests took 

a tour of the l.os Angeles Harbor as 

guests of Mayor Samuel Yoity and 




El Camino Real's "S u n b o n n e I 
Babies" 



the Board of Harbor Commissioners. 

I bJa is the first >>t the tours planned 

lui I I < ammo Real's new season 
Costumed members also took part 
in the Valley Folklorico held at S.m 
Fernando Mission anil Brand Park 

when the) w e t e official Mission 

guides during the two day festivities. 
They also took part in the Los 
Angeles Cits Birthday celebration at 

the Old Plaza and the Hollywood 
Bowl. 

Monthly lunches of t h e Parlors 
have been resumed with the Sept 
ember lunch and swimming party 
having been at Edie Barlett's home. 
The October lunch was held at the 
Sylmar home of Wilda O'Hanlon. An 
Art Show and wine tasting parts at 
Brook side Wine Tasting Rooms, Van 
Nuys, was held in November. Plans 
are also underway for welfare pro- 
jects during the holiday season. 




Vallev Folklorico held at San Fernando Mission 



NOVEMBER, 1969 



ATWOOD ADOBE 

i( KiumueJ from Pagi 

Mrs c .in thanked Stephen \i 
( ase, the incoming President ol Ar- 
rowhead Parloi No. 1 10, nsgw for 
building the Adobe Wall ami donat- 
ing his tune and work, so thai the 
bronze plaque could be placetl. Mr. 
1 uther I air gave I short talk on 
what the Native Daughters of the 
Golden West have accomplished In 

being interested in ever) phase ol 

communit) life 

Keir Brooks researched informa- 
tion on the \twood Adobe. His 
grandparents Aha Jr. and Maryetta 

were married in the Adobe in 1869. 
He discussed Andrew Lytle's arrival 
in San Bernardino in March of 1851 
with a wagon train and sketched 
the part Captain Lytic played in the 
earl) histor) of the town. He was 
the second Mayor of San Bernardino. 
Following the marking, a no- 
host luncheon was served at the Cal- 
ifornia Hotel. 



m mm&Qm&m 




Not lost to those that love them. 
Not dead, just gone before; 

They still live in our memory, 
And they will forever more. 



Hazel I. Andrews. Aloha No. 106. Sep- 
tember 30. 

Viola Dugan Penter. Forrest No. 86. Oct- 
ober 9. 



I dttfa Mac Jones Dow, Morada No. IW 

Octobei \2 

Alice Maude \Uialcv. Lassen View No 

■is. Octobei i: 

Mar) BeCCBlia, Twin Peaks No. 185 
October 12. 

Ella Borden Ware, long Beach No. 154 

October 14. 
I ucille Mcycrink. Rcina del Mar No. 126 

October 14. 
Lorain B. Williams. Sutter No. Ill, Oct 

ober 16. 
Dorothea Anderson. Morada No. 199 

October 16. 
Marion Jackson. Golden Gate No. 158 

October 1 1. 
Isabella Telmont, HI Monle No. 205 

October 10. 
Kosc Vieira Oliver, Anona No. 164, Oct 

ober 19. 
Ilka Cole. Portola No. 172. October 20 
Neeia Correll. South Butte No. 226. Oct 

ober IS 
Ruth L. Baldwin. Gold of Ophir No. 190 

October 22 
Ellen Balthazar. Golden California No 

291. September 14. 
Geneviere Gull Ross, La Tijera No. 282 

October 1969. 
Beryl Mallory Johnson, Fort Bragg No 

'210, October 25. 
Sabra Greenhalgh, Amapola No. 80. Oct- 
ober 15. 
Lillian Sked. Stockton No. 256, Novem- 
ber 3. 
Jennie Ludwig Taylor. Hiawatha No. 140 

November 4. 



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ORINDA 

Orindu No. 56 was honored to I 
the first NDGW Parlor in San F ral 
cisco to host an official visit by GrEjl 
President Nancy J. Conens. For tfl 
occasion, to mark the celebration §1 
first", Orinda became "Silver Mcf^ 
Parlor, 1969". 



L 



Grand President Nancy was esco 
ed to the altar and as soon as a silw 
half moon was placed over her he) 
by the Escort Team, Brenda Wells 
young singer, serenaded with "Sw* 
Lady in the Moon", the lyrics writti 
by Alma Klahn. Nancy was giveni 
small silver moon and an America 
flag by Marshal Genevieve Parks ai 
told to place the flag on the surfao 

After Nancy was escorted to h 
seat -of honor, President E s t h t 
Bloom introduced the NDGW digrj 
taries, present Grand Oficers as w« 
as Past Grand Officers. Brenda WeU 
accompanied by PGO Frances Sim 
on the piano, presented "By the Lig. 
of the Silvery Moon" at which tin 
the lights were turned off and a spo 
liht placed on a silver moon at tl 
rear of the room. 

Orinda Parlor initiated four ne 
members: Valerie Riner, sister 




Charlotte Ludemann, 50-year mem-\ 
her. 



CALIFORNIA HERALD 



athy Riner as well as granddaughter 
PP Jean Galli; Edythe B. Sinclair, 
other of new member Juanita Pate- 
Bid; Dorothy L. Dixon and Marie 
udemann. daughter of Charlotte 
lldemann and niece of PGP Orinda 
iannini. 

The 25-year pin was presented to 
el en Brokaw by GP Nancy. In 
idition, a 50-year pin of member- 
lip was awarded to Charlotte Lude- 
ann. GP Con ens congratulated 
harlotte and asked that PGP Orinda 
iannini present the pin to her sister. 




PGP Orinda G. Giannini 



The Grand President was present- 
J with her personal gift as well as 
fts aimed for Mission Soledad, Gen- 
•al Scholarship Fund and the Native 
•aughters Home. Prior to GP Nancy 
:ceiving the President's report, a dis- 
rtation on the similarities of the 
toon and earth was given in a ton- 
ue-in-cheek manner. The President's 
:port was contained in a white cover 
hich held two large white daisies, 
ith silver "moon-dust" sprinkled 
enerously on the top. Nnacy gave 
er message to the capacity-filled 
all at Urban Center and spoke of 
er love of the Native Daughters 
rid the pride with which she serves, 
ler spirit of patriotism and her de- 
otion to America and all it stands 
>r were brought out in her message. 
►GP Lucille Kimbark, also, present- 
i a message, as did GVP Irene Bon- 

OVEMBER, 1969 



nadza, PGP Evelyn ( 'arlson a n d 
SDDGP Ann Shaw 

PGP Orinda Giannini. chairman, 

co-chairman. Alma Klahn, and the 
many others who carefully planned 
and prepared this "solo first" per- 
formed a "labor of love." Home- 
made sandwiches, of many varieties, 
and cookies, punch, coffee and tea 
were served alter the meeting. It was 
an evening to be long remembered by 
"Silver Moon, 1969." 



SAN FRANCISCO 

In mid-October, San Francisco No. 
261 celebrated its birthday at Gino's. 
GVP Irene Bondanza, chairman and 
her committee planned a most en- 
joyable evening. DGP Mary Barron 
of Minerva No. 2 was a guest. PGP 
Jewel McSweeney, "adopted mother" 
of the Parlor was also in attendance. 
Until her death, PGP Anne C. 
Thucsen was the "Mother" of the 
parlor. 

DGP Clarisse C. Meyer was chair- 
man of the evening for the deputies 
reception in San Francisco county 
held late in October when Nancy J. 
Conens, Grand President and her 
officers were welcomed. The theme 
was "Americanism". The deputies 
wore red formals and had carrying 
pieces of blue and white. Members 
of San Francisco No. 261 and Gol- 
den Gale No. 158 did "KP duty" 
that evening. 

A third event was the recent trip 
to Carson City and Reno by Parlor 
members under the direction of 
Marie L. Feil. There were two bus 
loads. 

1 i 1 
FORT BRAGG 

Ha Allcnby is the new president 
of Fort Bragg Parlor. At the country 
Fair on October 1 1 a new Singer 
Sewing machine, as first prize, a 



S20 gift certificate for 2nd prize 
and $5 for 3rd prize were given. 
Ljndfl Valley was chairman. Bertha 
Nordeen is visiting chairman this 
year. A congratulatory card was sent 
to Neva Cannon on her retirement 
alter 30 yean in education. 

P.P. Rae Ash presented a much 
desired camera as a gift to the par- 
lor tO record all events. I he parlor 
congratulated Floise I klund who 
received the NDGW Veterans and 
Welfare Scholarship for the third 
year. 

"Grub Night" (Modern version ol 
"Hobo") was enjoyed and prizes 
given for the best costumes. Parlor 
members also participated in "Paul 
Bunyan Days' 

After the parlor meeting, Lily 
Morley and her committee served 
jello salads, assorted crackers, t e a 
and coffee. The tables were decor- 
ated with gloriosa daisies. 

1 1 i 
POPPY TRAIL 

Poppy Trail No. 266 celebrated 
its 31st birthday at the IOOF Hall in 
Montebello. Dignitaries present were 
GT Gertrude Doss, SDDGP Gerald- 
inc Mead and DGP Margaret Heath. 
Parlors represented were San Gabriel 
Valley, Rio Hondo, Wilmington. I i- 
errci del Rey Grace and Whittier. 

The highlight of the evening was 
the presentation of 25-ycar pins to 
Frances Vena and Dorothy Motlo bv 
GT Gertrude Doss. 

A beautiful birthday cake decorat- 
ed with yellow poppies, red script and 
a border of white icing on the base of 
the cake carried out the colors of the 
Order. Sandwiches and date bread, 
potato chips and coffee were served. 
President Loretta Roach felt everyone 
had a wonderful time. 



Everything comes to him who hustles 
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Santa Ana, California. Illustrated; Index. 
52.00 (plus 400 tax and mailing). 

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THE VILLAGE OF 
GARDEN GROVE 

by Leroy Doig 

Early Beginnings of Garden Grove. 
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THE TOWN OF 
GARDEN GROVE 

by Leroy Doig 

Continuation of growth of Garden 
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earthquakes, flood, churches, news- 
papers and other businesses. Fine sel- 
ection of pictures; index. Cloth bound. 
$7.50 (plus 80? tax and mailing). 



THE CRY OF THE BITTERN 

by Virginia Petty Tidball 

Excellent narrative verse depicting 
the life of John the Baptist and events 
of the time. Exciting and penetrating! 
$2.00 (plus 60)2 tax and mailing.) 



DEMETRIOS DISCOVERED 
AMERICA 

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Biography of Demetrios Stylianou who 
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HOW TO BE A 
SUCCESSFUL PERSON 

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Valuable psychological guide to ef- 
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$2.50 (plus 720 tax and mailing) 



*>-tuAi coincrioNs 




Official Publication of 
THE NATIVE DAUGHTERS of the GOLDEN WEST 




DECEMBER. 1969 + 40* 



yf | — |" r m i mi I BE 

JR. UNIT NEWS 

I 



■ •KIM I <»V ■ > t ■ M\K 

iuni.il Native Daughters of Prin- 
cesa de Mai Unit No 40 have been 
verj active since their institution, 
rhree members: VP Barbara Kaiser, 
Marsha] Debbie I opea and Sentinel 
I is. i MacFarlane attended the Child- 
ren's Foundation I uncheon at Lorn- 
\\k and made a monetary donation 
on behalf oi the unit. 

I he car wash was a successful pro- 
ject I he proceeds went into the Con- 
ference Fund. 



ORI\l>\ I'VKI OH No. 56 




From left — PGP Orinda Giannini, 
Alma Klahn, Letitia Sunte:, Gene- 
vieve Parks. Ida Jones, Vivian Hall 
and President Esther Bloom. Jean 
Galli kneeling. Costumes depict 
foreign countries. 




c?eajon s oteetinai 



California Herald 

"PRESERVING THE PAST FOR THE FUTURE" 
Volumi XVII December, 1969 Numbfr 4 

CONTENTS THIS MONTH 

Junior Unil News 2 

Christmas at Mission San Luis Rey, by Dr. Leo J. Friis 3 

Tournament of Roses Parade, by Laura Blosdale 4 

The Grand President's Corner 6 

Parlor News 

In Memoriam 8 

Christmas Plants, by J.J. Friis 13 

Remember When?, bv J.J. Friis ... 15 



Before you make 



amove 



be sure to see a Medallion Electric 
Home. After all, the trend is to 
electric living. A Medallion Home can mean: Flameless, 
electric heating with room-by-room temperature controls. 
An all-electric kitchen that stays clean and cool. Cool, re- 
freshing air conditioning throughout the house. Medallion 
Homes are available now in all price ranges. It will pay 
you to look for this emblem before you make a move. 




#OMIKN 

Southern California Edison 



i. J. FRIIS 
Publisher 



LEO J. FRIIS 
Editor 



JANE FRIIS 

Public Relations 



Published Monthly by J. J. Friis and Leo J. Friis, owners and publishers, Anaheim, 
California. All Rights Reserved. EDITORIAL AND GENERAL OFFICES: Anaheim, California. 
Mailing Address: P.O. Drawer 4243, Anaheim, California 92803. ADVERTISING OFFICE: 301 
N. Parton St., Santa Ana, Calif. 92701. CHANGE OF ADDRESS AND SUBSCRIPTIONS: Mail 
correspondence to CALIFORNIA HERALD, Circulation Department, P.O. Drawer 4243, Anaheim, 
Calif. 92803. When ordering change of address please allow six weeks; please furnish 
old and new addresses including zip code. NDGW MEMBERS: please send Parlor Number also. 
POST OFFICE: RETURN POSTAGE GUARANTEED. Please send magazine with address change 
to California Herald, P.O. Drawer 4243, Anaheim, California 92803. SUBSCRIPTION RATES: 
in U.S.A. (50 states), 40c a copy, $3.50 a year; $6.50 for two years; $9.00 for three years. 
Other countries: Please apply for rates. Entered as second-class matter at the Post Office at 
Anaheim, California, under the Act of March 3, 1879. No part of this magazine may be re- 
printed without specific permission. 

CALIFORNIA HERALD 




Christmas 

at 
cAiission 



an 
JLuis 
TZetf 

JZ>r. JLeo J. Jriis 



v rt i,n ^*>v-. 



J£jj Christmas festival of ancient 
'rigin is enacted each year at Old 
lission San Luis Rey, near Ocean- 
ide. California. The pageant Las 
'osadas has its roots in early 16th 
entury Spain and was introduced 
ito the New World by the Francis- 
an padres when they came to Christ- 
inize the Indians. 

The colorful ceremony tells the 
tory of Mary and Joseph's search for 
helter for the birth of Christ at Beth- 
:hem on the first Christmas. It was 
irst celebrated in the New World at 
he church of Alcoman in Mexico in 
587. and later at the California Mis- 
ions. In time, Posadas became so 
lopular that they spread not only 
(Continued on Page 12) 

DECEMBER, 1969 




Mision San Luis Rev 



T 1 1 U 



- a'A a\ 



A> A 



t ' y R OSES P A II A D I 



"California is a Holiday" is the 
title of this year's float entrj of the 
Native Daughters and Native Suns in 
the Pasadena rournament of Roses 
parade H olid a j s A r o u a d the 
World" is the theme of the parade 
and the entry bj both Orders in con- 
junction with the Los Angeles El 
Pueblo Commission is a beautiful and 
gracefully executed Boat featuring in 
the center a revolving platform on 
which is depicted in cameo " I he Pico 
House" on one side and on the Other 
side an "Earlj California Bandstand." 
I here will be live young people at- 
tired in costumes of the period 

According to Junior Past Grand 
President June T. Goldie. State Chair- 



by Laura Blosdale 



man of the Tournament of Roses 
Float Committee of the Native Dau- 
ghters for this year, "The 1970 
float is the most beautiful we have 
ever entered and is worthy of the 
Governor's Trophy. "The Governor's 
trophy is awarded to the float which 
most authentically depicts the history 
and beauty of California. 

As the float is decorated by mem- 
bers of both Orders, many hands will 
be needed to decorate it. Members 
of both Orders are invited to assist 
the Float Committee and to later 
enjoy the happiness and thrill of see- 
ing the float in all its beauty go down 
Colorado Avenue. 

The float decorating will be at the 



Rose Palace, 835 South Ray mom 
Ave., Pasadena, commencing on Do 
ember 26th. Working hours arc froi 
10 A.M. to 10 P.M. 



OPPOSITE PAGE, TOP — 77i 
1966 entry which emphasized cor 
serration through fire prevention wo 
the Grand Marshall's Trophy. Th 
late Walt Disney was Marshal tha 
year. BOTTOM — The 1959 entr. 
"Forest Adventures." This float woi 
the Governor's Trophy. Perhaps thi 
year will he another trophy winner. 




NSGW — NDGW Tournament of Roses Float entry for 1970. 



CALIFORNIA HERALD 



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3 



The Grand 
President's Corner 



GR \M> PRESIDBNT 

Nanc) J ( onens (Mrs.) 
4311 Allendale Avenue 
Oakland, ( alifornia Wftl 1 ; 




GRAND SECRETARY 

Lucille F. Kimbark (Mrs. C. F.) 

227 1 -32nd Avenue 

San Francisco, California 94116 

Office: 703 Market Street, Room 612 

San Francisco 94103 Dial 362-4127 



NANCY J. CONENS 



B) the time you receive this issue. 
1 will have returned from Freedoms 
Foundation at Vallej Forge and will 
undoubted!) have many experiences 
to relate to you. I am looking forward 
to tins trip with great anticipation 
and anxiety for the challenge that 
is mine and for the recognition that 
is accorded our Order. 

The first six months of my term 
,ire almost ended and it is unbeliev- 
able that time can pass so quickly. By 
December 3 1st I will have completed 
forty two of the one hundred and five 
Official Visits I h a v e scheduled. 
Each visit is different and special to 
me and the memories 1 am gathering 
will be cherished a lifetime. From 
the golden dressed sisters of Mt. 
Lassen Parlor in the far north to the 
silver dresses of the members of 
Toluca Parlor in the south and all 
those in between. — what a joy it 
has been to meet each of you! A day 
does not pass that I am not mindful 
of the heartfelt gratitude that I have 
for each of you that have accorded 
me this great privilege of serving the 
Order of the Native Daughters of 
the Golden West as Grand President. 

Once again we are preparing to 
commemorate the birthday of t h e 
Christ Child. Christmas is such a 
joyous time of year, especially if you 
find it in your heart to create the 
proper spirit of the Season. Give 
more than presents, give love — 
understanding — charity — friend- 
liness — kindness — helpfulness — 
respect! Open your mind and heart 
to giving and what you receive in 
return will enrich your life with un- 



measurable happiness. May the 
Greatest Giver of all. abide with you 
and yours on Christmas Day and 
throughout each day of the New 
> ear. 

Another decade has been written 
into the pages of history. In the 
sixties we have reached unbelievable 
heights as well as the deepest lows. 
Three Presidents have attempted to 
guide us through one of the greatest 
turmoil decades in our history. The 
assassination of one of these men 
was the greatest shock of all followed 
by the further brutal deaths of Martin 
Luther King and Robert F. Kennedy. 
How can this happen in this day and 
age when we live in a land of the 



free and have attained unbelievable | 
advancements in science, medicine, I 
education and space! The late Presi 
dent John F. Kennedy's declaration 
of hope on May 25, 1961 became a 
heretofore unrealized reality on Jul 
20. 1969 when Neil Armstrong took 1 
"One giant step for mankind" on the 
moon. 

Each one of us must do our share 
as citizens of this great nation to 
help keep it great! Let us take one 
giant step into the seventies with 
hope in our heart and a prayer on i 
our lips. 

MERRY CHRISTMAS AND 
HAPPY NEW YEAR! 



Jtinerary 1969 

DECEMBER 

San Francisco Childrens Foundation Breakfast 

Sonoma No. 209, Petaluma No. 222 Sonoma* 

Aha No. 3, (afternoon) San Francisco* 

Phoebe A. Hearst No. 214 Manteca* 

Fruitvale No. 177, Encinal No. 156, Bahia Vista No. 167 .... Oakland* 

Italian Women's Dinner Los Angeles 

Christmas Day 



9 

10 
12 
14 
25 



1 

5 
6 
8 
9 
12 

14 
15 

20 
21 
22 
24 
26 
28 



3tinerary 1970 

JANUARY 

Tournament of Roses Parade Pasadena 

La Paz No. 326, San Bruno No. 246 Pacifica* 

Junipero No. 141, El Pajaro No. 35 Monterey* 

Fort Bragg No. 210 Fort Bragg* 

Sebastopol No. 265, Cotati No. 299 Sebastopol* 

Golden Gate No. 158, Genevieve No. 132, 

Mission No. 227 San Francisco* 

Marysville No. 162, Camp Far West No. 218 Marysville* 

Annie K. Bidwell No. 168, Gold of Opliir No. 190. 

Centennial No. 295 Chico* 

Veritas No. 75, Golden California No. 291 Merced* 

Vallejo No. 195 Vallejo* 

Aleii No. 102 Salinas* 

Gold Discovery Banquet San Francisco 

Marinita No. 198, Seapoint No. 196 San Rafael* 

El Cereso No. 207, Vallecito No. 308 San Leandro* 

* Official visits are marked with asterisks 

CALIFORNIA HERALD 



.IINKRVA 

DGP Marilyn Driscoll installed 
'rcsitlcnt Rose Sarouhan and her 
porps of oficers of Minerva No. 2. 
'hairman Florence Conklin carried 
he rose theme throughout the cere- 
nonj except for the new president 




.vho was presented with a white or- 
hid. 

Hazel Adams sang "You're our 
Sweetheart" accompanied by P G O 
-ranees Simas. Officers installed with 
'he president were Mmes. Ross, Shea, 
foker, Orchard, Oertwig, Conklin, 
Miller, Keneally, Spiller, Rausch, 
Trousdale, Tait and Adams. The offi- 
cers were obligated by PGP Emily 
Ryan. 

I Presented were GVP Irene Bon- 
danza, PGPs Emily Ryan and Alice 
Shea, and DGP Marilyn Driscoll. 
The new DGP to Minerva is Verna 
Cummings. PP Mary O'Keefe was 
praised for her excellent work done 
.luring the past term. 



RE REN DOS 

I Berendos No. 23, and the Red 
Bluff Women's Club in a joint effort 
to restore the golden beauty of what 
was once fields of California poppies 
and in observance of California's bi- 
centennial designated November 7 as 
California Poppy Day. 




Poppy seed, sold by a leading seed 
company for $3.50 a pound was 
planted along the freeway approaches 
leading into Red Bluff. Mrs. Helen 
Stolp was chairman of the committee. 
The California Division of Highways 
did the actual planting. 

At one time Red Bluff was noted 
for its great abundance of poppies: 

DECEMBER, 1969 



Parlor Neu/s 

however, with the ever-growing tree- 
way and highway systems and the cul- 
tivation of great areas of land the 
plants can no longer reseeel them- 
selves naturally. Each year there are 
fewer and fewer poppies. 

Organizations, individuals a n d 
community merchants have been in- 
vited to become a part of "Poppy 
Planting Day" by contributing money 
to help buy poppy seeds. Contribut- 
ions can be sent to Berendos Parlor. 
N.D.G.W., 1600 Walbridge St.. or 
Red Bluff Women's Club, P.O. Box 
929 Red Bluff. 

/ / / 
DEPUTIES 

SDDGP Marge Skelly entertained 
her 1963-64 deputies at her home at 
a one o'clock luncheon. The piece de 
resistance was ham accompanied by 
delicious variety of "goodies". 

Those present regretted that PGP 
Rhoda Roelling and all the deputies 
were not able to be present. A pleas- 
ant afternoon was enjoyed. The host- 
ess presented gifts to her deputies. 



Inga Meyer was appointed Chair- 
man for the upcoming Official Visit, 
which is scheduled for January 12, 
1970 for Mission No. 227 Golden 
Gate No. 158 and Genevieve No. 
132. 

Two members from El Tejon No 
239, Bakersfield, v i s it e d in San 
Francisco, staying at the ND Home, 
and also visiting Lucile K a u 1 1 of 
Mission, who formerly was a member 
of El Tejon, before transferring to 
Mission. 



The December 12th meeting, 
M i s si o n Parlor held a Christma> 
Party, with an exchange of gifts. Inga 
Meyer was the social chairman for 
the evening. By-law changes were 
presented to change meetings to once 
a month only — the 2nd Friday of 
each month. 

The Parlor's "Reno trip" is sch- 
eduled for week-end of January 31, 
February 1. 



( 01 1 MBIA 

( olumbia No. 70, entertained 
(irand President Nancy J. (uncus on 
her Official mm! A salad-bar lunch- 

Bon was enjoyed before the members 

and visitors went upstairs to the little 
lodge hall, where Hilda Sandow . ot 
Manzanita No. 2". opened the ses- 
sion. President Ruth Skoverski pre- 
sided, and welcomed a host of visit- 
ors: from Piedmont No. 87; Marys- 
villc No. 162; Oak Leaf No. 286. 
Camp lor West No. 218; Manzanita 
No. 29; Laurel No. 6; and George 
C. Yount No. 322. 

Introduced at the altar were Grand 
President Nancy J. Conens of Pied- 
mont No. 87 and DGP Marie Mc- 
Quire of Manzanita No. 29. In- 
troduced at their seats were SDDGP 
Betty Maffci of District 21 and Max- 
ine Dodge of District 8; also DGPs 
Gladys Blanchard, Mae Norton, 
Marie Van Winkle, Florence Elliott. 
Esther Fortna, and Alberta Sargent. 

Grand President Conens was pre- 
sented with an assortment of home- 
made jellies and a silver spoon with 
Native Daughters emblem. Receipts 
from the coin march was donated to 
the Scholarship Fund. Grand Presi- 
dent Conens gave an address in which 
she emphasized the many projects in 
which the Native Daughters of the 
Golden West are active. She espec- 
ially asked that each parlor initiate 
three new members during the year 
in which she is serving as Grand 
President. 



UILGENFELn 

O MORTUARY U 

Faithful . Courteous. Service 
120 E.Broadway. Anaheim 

PHONE KE 5-4105 



the 



SOR 



store 



lincoln at lemon 
anaheim 



IN MKMOKIAM 




Not tost to those that love them, 

lead, just gone ■'•■ 
The) still live in <>nr memory. 
And they will forever more. 



loyce lohnson, Km Hondo No. 2s 
embei 

Mabel c hristensen, Angelita No. ?2. Nov- 
ember 10. 

Helen Segoria, Vallejo No. 195. Novem- 
ber 11. 

I >m- No SI. Novem- 
ber 16. 

Stella Schlink, Golden Gate No. 158. Nov- 
ember 14. 

Fleecie domes. Betsy Ross No. 238. Nov- 
en\ber 14. 

Ivj Cull, Beis\ Ross No. 238, November 
17. 

S Kennedy, Piedmont No. 87, Nov- 
ember 7. 

Carolyn Martin, Yendome No. 100, Nov- 
ember IS. 

Belle Elwell, II Uiso No. 314, November 
7. 

M.ible Fisher, James I ick No. 220. Nov- 
ember 16. 

Sta i kej . I as Funtas No. 221. Nov- 
ember 19. 

Lillie B. Hill. Gold of Ophir No. 190. 
Ma) 2o. 

I ouise McDougall, Bahia Vista No. 167. 
November 19. 

Edith \hern. San Juan Bautista No. 179. 
October 16. 

Mar) 0;i> Taylor, Eltapome No. 55. Nov- 
ember 25. 

Ollie V. McBrian, Caliz de Oro No. 206. 
November 2" 

Josephine Senner. \liner\a No. 2. October 
14. 

Myrtle Passalacqua. Genevieve No. 132. 
May 27. 

Velma Manier, fule Vista No. 305. Dee- 
ember I. 

Gervina Diethelm. Antioch No. 223, Nov- 
ember 14. 

Maud Arnold. Richmond No. 147, Dec- 
ember 2. 

Rose Sweeney, El ( armelo No. 181. Dec- 
ember 2. 

Grace Haver McNeil. Beverly Hills No. 
289. November 5. 



ill uk \ Di i RBI 

"Autumn Harvest" was the theme 
for the official visil ol ( irand Presi- 
denl Nancj Conens to Wiltmington 

" and Tierra del Key No J00. 

lei Rev \\;is m charge ol the 
i pening and closing ceremonies and 
Wilmington was in charge of the in- 
i nation ceremonies. Lydia Gonzales 
became a member of Tierra del Key. 
Dignitaries attending were PGP June 
Goldie, G I Gertrude Doss, Chair- 
man of the board of Trustees and 
(il Lila Hummel. Introduced also 
were SDDGP Geraldene Mead and 
DGPs Marge Barrett and Helen 
Lovett. State chairmen attending were 

Miller. State Chairman of Ed- 
ucation a n d Scholarships: Doris 
lacobsen, State Chairman of the of- 
ficial publication. California Herald 
June Goldie, State Chairman of the 
Tournament of Roses Float. 

111 
HISTORIC BEAR FLAG 

When Maiizanita No. 29, was 25 
years old a Bear Flag was presented 
to the parlor by Quartz Parlor No. 
58, N.S.G.VV. This historical old 
flag, handpainted silk, has now been 
framed and placed on permanent 
display at the Nevada County Fair- 
grounds, in a building where many- 
public meetings are held. 




2 
CK 


BACKS 
KAULBARS 

MORTUARY 

1617 W. La Palma at Euclid 
Anaheim 
772-1617 



Union Photo, Grass Valley 

From left — Mary Dorney, Fair 
Manager Malcolm H a in m i 1 1 and 
Elsie Peard, chairman of the project. 

Further plans call for the preser- 
vation of the American flag which 
boasts 45 stars and was earned by 
the parlor in a contest in 1905. 



SAN FERNANDO MISSION 

Irene McKibben was installed as 
the "Silver Anniversary President" 
Of San Fernando Mission No. 280 



at the Golden Valley Auditorium iti 
\ .in Nuys. DGP Rose Rumscy ancj 
No. 277 officiated at the ceremony. 1 

Officers yvho were seated with Mrs 'I 
McKibben in the ritual which follow-1 
ed a blue and silver motif, are: MmesI 
Swaner, Nicolson, McLennan. John-J 
son. Hutchings, Riggs. Husbands! 
Hook Calderon, Hayes. Molitz, Ho il 
well, Garcia, and Butler. Digniiar | 
ies taking part in the "Silver Circk 1 
of Friendship" included PGP Maryl 
N. Harden. G.T. Lila Hummel. Gfl 
Laura Blosdale and GO Peggy Bran-] 
denburg. Ethelwynne Fraisher nfl 
named Chidrens Foundation Chair- 1 
man. 

The guest book was in charge o) 
V'innie Swaner; Bible bearer. Martha! 
Caldwell; corsages. Beverly Swanerl 
and Miriam McPhee: decorations., 
Evelyn Hayes and Mar} Hayes: re-| 
treshments, Grace Trimble and past] 
presidents. The Yankee Dood'ettes 
of America entertained. 
111 

EDITOR HONORED 

For his historical advisory assist-! 
ance to the Orange County Planning i 
Commission, the Board of Supenis-I 
ors presented Leo J. Friis with al 
Resolution of Commendation togeth-j 
er with a gold card denominating] 
him "Orange County's Honored Cit-1 
izen." At its annual meeting the 
Orange County Historical Society! 
awarded him a plaque for "the best 
researched regional history of the i 
year." 

111 
GOLDEN GATE 

Golden Gate No. 1 58 installed its 
officers at St. Francis Hall. DGP 
Marie Feil installed Wanda White 
as president. Other officers installed 
were Mmes. Meyer, Morsh, Sullivan, I 
Plescia, V. Perazza. Plasmier. Bagna- 
tori, Schallenbaum. Dethlefsen, Lew- j 
is. Shayv. Koenig and F. Perazza. 

In attendance were GVP Irene! 
Bondanza, GM Virgilia McCombs, 
GT Helen McCarthy. SDDGP Anna 
Marie Shaw. Also present were PGPs 
Claire Lindsey, Ethel Enos. Jewel 
McSweeney and PGS Mary Mahoney. 

After the installation refreshments 
yvere served in the Grizzly Bear Club 
room. 



CALIFORNIA HERALD 



RACE I'ARI.OR HOLDS ( fill l> 
l-V.s FOUNDATION CARD PART'S' 
M> PRESENTS AMERICAN FLAGS 

American flags have been present 
H h\ Grace I'm lor to Girl Scouts 
id Brownie Troops. Presented were 
tptember 30, to Girl Scout Troop 
o, 1095 ot Placentia; October 2. to 
newl) formed Brownie Troop; Oct 
ker 9, to Girl Scout Troup No. I 170 
SO of Placentia. and on October 23 
id 30 two flags were presented in 
ullerton. 




j On November 20, Grace Parlor 
eld a card party with the proceeds 
oing toward the eight gift subscrip- 
ts of the California Herald pre- 
dated by the Parlor. 



\N( HO SAN JOSE 

A California Bear flag which had 
own over the state capitol was pre- 
:nted to the City of Pomona and the 
ounty of Los Angeles by Rancho 
an Jose No. 307. President Edna 
(reenwald made the presentation to 
upervisor Frank Bonelli and Mayor 
benjamin Lawing in the new civic 
lazza in front of the recently dedi- 
ated county courts building. 

Introductions and a brief history 
if California's bi-centennial were 
lade by Isabel Fages, history and 
indmarks chairman. History of the 




Bear flag was recalled In Miss I [jza 
heth /illes. Miss Rose Palomarcs and 
Mrs. Greenwald. Other members of 
the parlor who appeared in costumes 

portraying the various periods of 
California's history were Mrs Fran- 
ces Ybarra McCain, M t s. W. F. 

kellev and Miss I mclia Palomares 

Plans for the presentation of Calif- 
ornia flays for the year includes ( asa 
Colima, rehabilitation center and 
Holv Name of Mary Catholic school 
in la Verne. 

Four Rancho San Jose members 
serve on the Historical Societj board, 
I 'hey are Mrs. Fages, Miss Rose 
Palomares; Mrs. Senaida Bai/ and 
Mrs. Peggy Davis. 



ESt list HOETZIA 

GP Nancy Conens paid an official 
visit to Eschscholtzia No. 112 at 

Etna. Lietta Ahlgren. president, pre- 
sided. Frances Smith, marshal, escort- 
ed the Grand President to the altar 
where she was introduced. SDDGP 
Eleanor Hendricks and DGP Doris 
Young were also welcomed. 

The charter was draped in memory 
of Thelma McNeil, deceased. Mrs. 
Conens gave a very interesting talk 
on projects of the Order. She was 
presented with a bouquet of flowers 
containing a monetary gift by DGP 
Doris Young. 

A turkey dinner preceded the 
meeting and refreshments were later 
served. The tables were decorated 
with bowls of flowers and candles 
prepared by Anita Luiken. 
/ / «■ 

SANTA MARIA 

"Togetherness" is the theme of 
Bethal McCallistcr, new president of 
Santa Maria No. 276. Her colors are 
yellow and white, yellow for the sun- 
light in the Golden State, and white 



lor the puritj that emphasizes the 

characteristics of the true children 
ol ( alifornia 

M i B Met alhster w as installed 
bj DGP Jeanne 1 redncks and her 
corps oi officers from Tierra ./< Oro 
No. 304. PP I lise Hayes was open- 
ing chairman. Sails lidd. acting mar- 
shal, Blanche Powell, soloist, a n d 
Irene Rodriguez, ipanist. 

President-elect McCallister n a s 
escorted to the altar by her son. Jeff, 
Jr. The escort team carried long 
stemmed yellow roses with which 
they formed an arch as she approach- 
ed her station. Installed with her were 
Mmes. Anderson. Howard. Azevedo, 

Powell. Carr, Spears, Cave, Murray, 
Kortner, Del Porto. Bailey. Wilk- 
anoski and the Misses Mehschau, and 
Rodriguez. 

Introduced were PGP Eileen Dis 
muke. DGP Mary Rule of La I'nri- 
sima No. 327 and SDDGP Margery 
Abern of Poinsettia No. 318. 

A beautiful silver tea service be- 
longing to PP Amanda Krelle was 
used on the refreshment table. The 
hall was decorated in white and vel- 
1 o w flowers. Artistically designed 
flowers received the appropriate 
name of Moon Drops. Refreshment 
chairmen were Mabel Lopez and 
Rose Pimental. The corsages were 
made by PP Florence Green. 



Two little boys were walking home from 
Sunday School after having had a lesson 
in which the Devil was discussed. One 
boy asked the other, "What do von think 
about all that Devil business?" 

The other hoy replied. "You know how 
Santa C laus turned out. It's probably 
just \oiir dad." 



\ six-year-old girl prayed every night 
for a baby brother. When twin brothers 
arrived, that night the girl said in her pars- 
ers. "Dear God. thank you for sending 
me a baby brother, but I thought you 
ought to know that when he got here he 
was in two pieces." 



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NOVEMBER, 1969 



SAINT BARBARA 

• mi Bar- 
Roman Empire 
he third centurj and was the 
■ us. .1 pagan noble- 
fusal i" renounce Chris- 
lionity, the rtorj continues, bo en- 
iili father that he beheaded 
hei with his sword and was instantly 
struck ilc.ul b) lightning. I lie tower 
common to painting of the saint re- 
presents the one in which her lather 

imprisoned her prior to her death. 

I he ship of Sebastian Viscamo. 
an explorer, is said to have been de- 
livered from a storm off the Califor- 
nia (oast because his sailors prayed 
to the saint. Hie Santa Barbara 
Channel was named in 1602 by a 
priest visiting there with Viscaino 
December 4. her feast day. Saint 
Barbara is the patronness of artillery- 
men and architects, as well as sea- 
farers. 




Patricia Ann Joyed 

Miss Patricia Ann Joyal, selected 
to portray Saint Barbara during Old 
Spanish Days 1969, was presented 
at the pre-Fiesta Tea given by Reina 
del Mar Parlor. Complement- 
ing the costume which she wore in 
El Disfile Historico and other Fiesta 
activities are the traditional chalice 
and palm frond. In addition to the 
nightly presentations were the court- 
house show, Noches de Ronda. She 
also performed with the parlor's 
dance group. Las Fiesteras. 

An active member of Reina del 
Mar for the past five years, Miss 



Joyal has been a participant in vari- 
ous committees, particularly as a 
member of 1 as Fiesteras, She also 
works on projects oi the Volunteers 

for the Santa Barbara Trust for His- 
toric Preservation and Santa Barbara 
Historical Society. As a member of 
Our Lady of Sorrows parish, she 
assists with the Confraternity of 
Christian Doctrine program. Born in 
Santa Barbara, this year's Saint Bar- 
bara is a fifth generation Californian 
and a descendant of the Loren/ana- 
l.eyva. family, which came to the 
state with Padre Junipero Serra. 
Locally employed, she is the daughter 
of Mrs. Crawford Joyal, a past pres- 
ident of the parlor and a member 
for over 25 years. 



ALELI 

Aleli No. 102 was the hostess for 
the "Fun Night" held by the Parlors 
of District No. 27. SDDGP Louise 
Little chose "Thanksgiving" as the 
theme for the program. 

Helen Lyons of San Juan Baitlista, 
No. 179. spoke of Mission San Juan 
Bautista and gave two Thanksgiving 
Day readings. Mae Layton, of Juni- 
pero. No. 141, contributed an ap- 
propriate reading. 

Mission Bell No. 316 depicted an 
an original version of the first 
Thanksgiving. It was written by Mar- 
garet Olson, who was also respon- 
sible for the art work — the ship, the 
log cabin, the tall corn, the turkeys, 
and other Thanksgiving fare. Marie 
Bengard and Mary Silva, State Chair- 
man of Mission Soledad Restoration, 
were the Indians, and Sadie Sorensen 
and Edna Smith were the Pilgrims. 

Aleli's entry came as a surprise to 
Rose Rhyner, who had served the 
Parlor for many years as its recording 
secretary. Written by Bernice Grigsby 
and entitled "The Record," it was 
narrated by Ella Fahey, State Chair- 
man of Legislation. Elsie Mattei was 
in the role of secretary, with Rena 
Thurman as marshal. Evelyn Alioto, 
with a dolly loaded to the top, wheel- 
ed in the records of the secretary's 
years, and finally brought in a pillow, 
which symbolized the passing of time 
and advancing years. Genevieve Pat- 
terson advertised the California Her- 
ald. 

Lee Vaughan, Aleli's president and 



State Chairman of Art Talent Col 
test, presented Rose Rhyner withJ 
Life Membership and a guest boil 
which contained the names of ;l 
members in attendance. 

The members of Copa de Oro Ne 
105 sang "Memories" and "My Wii 
Irish Rose," which was followed II 
an inspiring talk by Mary Grunnagl 
DGP to Aleli No. 102, and in beh; : 
of her Parlor presented the honor' 
with two dozen red roses. Musiciil. 
for the evening was Claudina Clarl 
Refreshments were served by Mai 
jorie Burden, Agnes Punneo, Else 
Dill, and Marian Massera. Fall flo» 
ers for the hall and banquet roo>| 
were provided by Louise Little, Vil 
ginia Frassetto, Bernice Grigsb' 
Ella Fahey, Marjorie Burden, anj 
Adelina Olivieri. 




Members of Orinda Parlor in th 
Admission Dax Parade. 



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SILVER SIMJI AD 

Want the perfect gift for Christmas? 
>OW\ TO EYGPT" by Virginia Petty 
dball. 5 illustrated, narrative poems, 
loth bound. Send $4.40 (includes tax 
id mailing) per book to CHRISTMAS 
DOK, Dept. CH.. P.O. Box 4243, Ana- 
lim, California 92803. 



At I <• i i — Restored t >r o 
story Rocha Adobe, home 

of Scintilla Sullivan, former 

GT, Native Daughters o\ 
the Golden West, 



BEVERLY HILLS 

On Sunday, November 16, Past 
Grand Trustee Scnaida Sullivan 
opened her historical Rocha Adob". 
to greet prospective members of 
Beverly Hills Parlor to a membership 
tea. 



itbout the Moat entry <>i the Native 

Daughter! and Native Sons in the 

roumamenl oi Roaei Parade. Many 
prospective members and their 
daughters volunteered to assist in 
decorating the float 



BI-CENTENIAL I III Ml 




Another view of historic Rocha 
Adobe in Los Angeles. 



Parlor President Erlinda Eastman 
and Mrs. Sullivan welcomed t h c 
guests. Past President Lillian Strat- 
ton spoke on the "Aims and Object- 
ives" of the Order of the Native 
Daughters. She also gave a resume of 
the historical markings made and the 
many American and Bear Flags given 
by Beverly Hills Parlor since its in- 
stitution in 1947. 

Membership Chairman Iron e 
Cooper was assisted by Lillian Strat- 
ton, Erlinda Eastman, Senaida Sul- 
livan and GIS Laura Blosdale, who 
also welcomed the guests and spoke 




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From left — Philomena Wooster, Mr. 
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May the Blessings of the 

Season fill yon with joy 
through the coming year. 



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ECEMBER, 1969 




ILLUSTRATION BY TED PUGH 



Celebration in which the pinata is broken. 
Illustration shows boys trying to smash gallo 
{chicken) pinata. This year the burro 1 
being used. 



CHRISTMAS AT MISSION SAN LUIS REY 

{Continued trom page 3) 

throughout the churches of Mexico 
and neighboring countries, but also 
came to be celebrated by people in 
their homes. 

This year on December 14. t ! ^e 
children in the San Luis Rey area 
again enacted the ancient pageant. 
At the conclusion the children sing 
"Aye Que Linda" (How lovely, how 
gracious this child). A mission padre 
blesses the outdoor nativity crib and 
imparts a special blessing on the chil- 
dren present. 




Following this ceremony comes a 
time of lively celebration. The tradi- 
tional pinata, in this case a fantastic 
gaily decorated papier mache burro 
filled with candies and other sweets, 
it suspended in the air. It keeps 
swinging away from blindfolded boys 
and girls who take turns trying to 
smash it. Since an agile man is hold- 
ing the other end of the rope and can 
raise and lower the pinata, their aim 
is not always good. At last, someone 
succeeds; the crowd shouts; the pinata 
bursts open; and the children 
scramble for the scattered sweets. 

Each year the Franciscan commun- 
ity at the Old Mission invites the 
public to come and take part in this 
colorful festival. Many California 
families look forward to the pageant 
each year as part of their famih 
Christmas celebration. 



CALIFORNIA HERALD 



When a Sunilav School pupil applied 
I word I at lo Pilate, she was asked wh\ 
er answer: "Because his name was I'aun 
ly Pilate." 



The optimisl is wrong as often as the 

■ssinnsi is; hut he has a lot more fun. 



In mosl yuls men are not a problem 

it a solution. 



Thinking is like loving and dying. Each 
t us must do it for himself. 



"I am a woman of few words." an- 
ounced the haughty mistress to the new 
■ aid. "If I beckon with my finger, that 
leans. Come.' " 

"Suit me. mum," replied the girl cheer- 
'illy. "I'm a woman of few words, too. 

I shake me head, that means 'I ain't 
|>min.' " 



When opportunity knocks at the door, 
ime people are out in the yard looking 
)r a four-leaf clovers. 



"Hey. Lulu." came the voice on the 
tone, "how about a date tonight?" 
"Sure, Jim, come on over." 
"But I'm not Jim." 
"And I'm not Lulu. Come anyway." 



The way some folks go out of their 
3 look for trouble, you'd think trading 
amps came with it. 



The modern line of least resistance is 
ie dotted one at the bottom of the in- 
:allment contract. 




Toyon, also known as California Hollx. 



JEWELERS 




Diamonds — Silverware 

132 W. Lincoln / Anaheim / 533-3107 




AhMV 



if 



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Flower' 5^°P 
215 W. Lincoln. Anaheim 535-4997 

JECEMBER, 1969 



CHRISTMAS PLANTS 

Tfc>y «X- J. Fx>iis 



This evergreen shrub or small tree 
of the Rosacega family hears large 
panicles of creamy flowers which 
produce red (sometimes yellow) ber- 
ries. Often they are found in the 
coast region from Mendocino county 
southward into Lower California. 

Common names included tollon, 
toyon, toyen, Christmas berry, and 
Christmas holly. The early California 
and Mexican name is tollon. 

The variety macrocarpa Mun/. is 
a native of Santa Calalina and San 
Clemente Islands and is preferred for 
cultivation. 

Dr. Archibald Menzies, Scottish 
naturalist and surgeon on C a p t. 
George Vancouver's Discovery col- 
lected seeds and specimens of the 



toyon when the ship was anchored 
off California in 1792-94. He intro- 
duced the plant to Europe. 
111 

The poinse'tia has become a sym- 
bol of the Yuletide season. Below the 
Rio Grande it is appropriately called 
the Flor <le Noche Buena (the flower 
of Christmas Eve. ) 







Joel Roberts Poinsett, brought to 
the United States from Mexico, this 
beautiful flower w h i c h bears his 

name. 



Pioneer Press presents Imogene Klatt's book 
CHRISTMAS PRESENT" 




^fyesesvt 



lui f)momn. *9£latt 



- 



Lovely collection of 14 Christmas poems including "The Cross-shaped Star", "Follow The Star". 
"Call of the Child", "For All Children". "The Radiant Gift", "Only Mary Knew", "Abacus", "Christmas 
Present" and six more. Deluxe paper edition with deckle edge. Cover illustration by Harriett Noel. $2.50 
plus 59 cents tax and mailing per book. Supply is limited. Order you copy today. 



CALIFORNIA HERALD 





REMEMBER 
WHEN? 

BY J. J. FRIIS 

A man in the I880's, whether for 
physical fitness or just to enjoy him- 
self, might go for a ride on this 2- 
wheel Bicycle. 



p» i Ml miser when milady looked 
yr^ forward for Santa to bring her 
stylish gown as the one pictured 
here. With the 
sunny Califor- 
nia Christmas 
day she could 
get all gussied 
up in her finery 
and stroll down 
to the band- 
stand in the 
park or watch 
children rolling 
hoops. 





Remember the large agates, some 
almost the size of a tennis ball — 
others smaller — all with a design or 
small animal in the center. Children 
used to play with these by the hour. 



At left A scene from "Pepeto's 
Posada." 



PH ii ki (in nil ( o\ i i< 
(hand Officers, Installation Picture. 
/•' r a in left — Peggy Brandenburg, 
(•(>: Dolores Ferenz, COS, Laura 
Blosdale, a I s. Meredyth Burnett, 
GT; Marie ( . Landini, GT; Gertrude 

I.. DOSS, GT; llarel / Mallear, Jr. 
PGP, \<uh \ J. Conens, (hand I'resi- 
dent; Irene Bondania, G\ I': Virgilia 
McCombs, (IM; Betty Head Curilich, 
(i I . l.ila S. Hummel, GT; Marian I. 
Mi (hare. GT; Helen McCarthy, (•! 



SAN1 \ MARIA 

A holiday potluck for members 
and their families was held in keeping 
with a tradition of Santa Maria Par- 
lor. The annual Christmas exchange 
with members bringing their favorite 
holiday goodies for refreshments is 
another tradition started in the last 
tew sears. 




Something new starting this month 
is a monthly birthday party to try 
to promote interest for members to 
come. For those not able to attend, 
a birthday card will be signed b) all 
present. This card will be in addition 
to the one sent to the member b\ the 
card chairman. 

DGP Mary Rule of La Parisian/ 
was a guest to help receive Santa 
Claus at the parlor. 




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CALIFORNIA HERALD 
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Anaheim, California 92803 



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SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 94102 

AT. PERIODICAL DtFi . 




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^£2^ a book from Pioneer Tress is 

the perfect gift. 



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Four Books bu, Southern California's Leading Historian 
Dr. Leo J. Friis 



ORANGE COUNTY THROUGH FOUR CENTURIES 

From 1542 to present day. Written in easy to read, yet 
concise style; Illustrated, Annotated and a complete Index. 
57.50 (plus 800 tax and mailing). 

WHEN ANAHEIM WAS 21 

Using the anecdotal approach with sparkles of humor, the author de- 
scribes Anaheim as it appeared in 1878 with its Chinese quarter, irrigation 
ditches and wineries. Illustrated, Annotated, Index. No. 2 of Orange 
County Pioneer Series. (This is Pioneer Press' newest book). 
$7.50 (plus 800 tax and mailing). 

THE CHARLES VV. BOWERS MEMORIAL MUSEUM AND ITS TREASURES 

Indian treasures, animal traps, sea shells, statues and portraits are just a few 
of the interesting items found in the fabulous book on the fine museum in 
Santa Ana, California. Illustrated; Index. 
$2.00 (plus 400 tax and mailing). 

GEORGE WASHINGTON BARTER, PIONEER EDITOR 

Life and events in Anaheim from October 1870 to 1871. Barter was an 
early newspaper man. This is No. 1 of the Orange County Pioneer Series. 
53.75 (plus 650 tax and mailing). 



Make checks payable to PIONEER PRESS and send check and order to 301 N. Parton 
Street, Santa Ana, California 92701. 



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THE VILLAGE OF 
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by Leroy Doig 

Early Beginnings of Garden Grove 
Fine pictures, maps, index. Cloth bound 
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THE TOWN OF 
GARDEN GROVE 

by Leroy Doig 

Continuation of growth of Garden 
Grove. The beginnings of the town 
earthquakes, flood, churches, news- 
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THE CRY OF THE BITTERN 

by Virginia Petty Tidball 

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DEMETRIOS DISCOVERED 
AMERICA 

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Biography of Demetrios Stylianou who 
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HOW TO BE A 
SUCCESSFUL PERSON 

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Official Publication of 
THE NATIVE DAUGHTERS of the GOLDEN WEST 




JAMUAI V I97( + 4C<t 



SAN LUIS CAMP ADOBE 







PROSPERO A N O 
NUEVO 

ITus New Year Resolution was 
written in 1855 by the Reverend 

Sydney Smith. 

It is a recipe for making everyday 
of the year a happy day not only for 
someone else but for yourself as well. 

The advice dates back over one 
hundred years but it is just as ap- 
propos in this year of 1970. 

A Resolution 

When you rise in the morning, 
form a resolution to make the day a 
happy one to a fellow-creature. It 
is easily done; a left-off garment to 
the man who needs it, a kind word to 
the sorrowful, an encouraging expres- 
sion to the striving; trifles in them- 
selves light as air will do it, at least 
for the twenty-four hours; and, if you 
are young depend upon it, it will tell 
when you are old; and if you are 
old, rest assured it will send you 
gently and happily down the stream 
of human time to eternity. By the 
most simple arithmetical sum, look 
at the result: you send one person, 
only one, happily through the day; 
that is three hundred and sixty-five 
in the course of the year and suppos- 
ing you live forty years only after 
you commence that course of medi- 
cine, you have made 14,600 human 
beings happy, at all events for a time. 

PAGE 2 



California Herald 

"PRESERVING THE PAST FOR THE FUTURE" 
Volumi XVII January, 1970 Number | 

CONTENTS THIS MONTH 

Fog; enemy of the Mariner, by Dr. Leo J. Friis 

Leo's Dictionary, by Dr. Leo J. Friis 4 

My Heritage — My Nation's Flag, by Audrey Flores | 

The Grand President's Corner 6 

Parlor News 

California Landmarks, by J.J. Friis 



PICTURE ON THE COVER— San Luis Camp Adobe in Merced County \ 
which was built in 1848 b\ Francisco Perez Pacheco and his son. 



Before you make 

%\ 1 1 lUVv be sure to see a Medallion Electric 
Home. After all, the trend is to 
electric living. A Medallion Home can mean: Flameless, 
electric heating with room-by-room temperature controls. 
An all-electric kitchen that stays clean and cool. Cool, re- 
freshing air conditioning throughout the house. Medallion 
Homes are available now in all price ranges. It will pay 
you to look for this emblem before you make a move. 




Southern California Edison 



J. J. FRIIS 
Publisher 



LEO J. FRIIS 

Editor 



JANE FRIIS 
Public Relations 



Published Monthly by J. J. Friis and Leo J. Friis, owners and publishers, Anaheim, 
California. All Rights Reserved. EDITORIAL AND GENERAL OFFICES: Anaheim, California. 
Mailing Address: P.O. Drawer 4243, Anaheim, California 92803. ADVERTISING OFFICE: 301 
N. Parton St., Santa Ana, Calif. 92701. CHANGE OF ADDRESS AND SUBSCRIPTIONS: Mail 
correspondence to CALIFORNIA HERALD, Circulation Department, P.O. Drawer 4243, Anaheim, 
Calif. 92803. When ordering change of address please allow six weeks; please furnish 
old and new addresses including zip code. NDGW MEMBERS: please send Parlor Number also. 
POST OFFICE: RETURN POSTAGE GUARANTEED. Please send magazine with address change 
to California Herald, P.O. Drawer 4243, Anaheim, California 92803. SUBSCRIPTION RATES: 
in U.S.A. (50 states), 40c a copy, $3.50 a year; $6.50 for two years; $9.00 for three years. 
Other countries: Please apply for rates. Entered as second-class matter at the Post Office at 
Anaheim, California, under the Act of March 3, 1879. No part of this magazine may be re- 
printed without specific permission. 

CALIFORNIA HERALD 




^og; enemy of tly 
tMavinev 



JZ>t. JLeo 7- Jriis 



Old engraving of San Francisco Hay. 



His is the time of year that 
California is cursed by fog. The 
driver of a car and the man who 
walks both fear that all enveloping 
cloud of mist. 

Fog has always been a dangerous 
enemy of the mariner along the rocky 
shores of California and many types 
of warning apparatus have been con- 
trived throughout the years. 

The first device ever used in the 
State was a cannon obtained from 
the Benicia Arsenal. In September. 
JB55, this gun, a twenty-four pound- 
er, was placed on the grounds of the 
Bonita Point light station just outside 
of the Golden Gate. 

Pat Maloney, a former army ser- 
geant was hired to man the cannon. 
He was instructed, "To fire the gun 
every half-hour during the fogs at 
the entrance of the Bay, whether they 
occur at night or in the day — the 
firing being made at the hours and 
half-hours of San Francisco mean 
time." 

Maloney found the job to be too 
formidable. In the following month 
he reported, "I cannot find any per- 
son here to relieve me not five min- 
utes; I have been up three days and 
nights, and had only two hours rest 
. . . I was nearly used up. All 
the rest I would require in the 24 
hours is two if I only could get it." 

JANUARY, '1970 




Ships were helped with various types of fog warnings. 



The cannon was used at Bonita 
Point until 1857 when it was dis- 
carded as being "too expensive and 
not effective." In the last year of 
operation it used up nearly $2,000 
worth of gunpowder in firing 1582 
times. Charges of powder weighing 
from three to five pounds were used, 
depending on the thickness of the 
fog. The sound of the cannonading 
could be heard from four to seven 
miles away. Several years ago the 
old cannon was taken to the Coast 
Guard Base at Alameda in San Fran- 
cisco Bay. 

It is interesting to note that cannon 
fire is an old method of fog warning 
and was first used in 171° on the At- 
lantic Coast at Boston Light. 

In 1856 a manually operated fog- 



bell was installed at Bonita Point 
which was improved with a clock 
driven mechanism in the following 
year. In 1858 a bell-boat was an- 
chored off the entrance to the Bay. 
This boat, which was crewless, was 
equipped with a half-ton bell struck 
by four clappers that moved with the 
motion of the waves. 

Today Bonita Point is provided 
with a diaphone which is adjusted 
for station identification. This is the 
most common form of fog warning 
signal now used upon the nation's 
coasts and is, of course, a great im- 
provement over the old cannon. 

However, as an old Indian once 
said. "The horn him blow and blow, 
but the fog him no care: him come 
in anyway." 

PAGE 3 



;i:*;,L> v ij ajaijtfa<DWAja 



V 



( n m «. \ is.. .11 ih-gah) 

I i. .m tin- Spanish word, ciinaga, 
meaning .1 marsh 01 mirj place. 

I he is-mi h.is .1 special geological 
significance in California. " I hat 
country [southern California], and 
in I a c t all ol California, is inter- 
spersed with places which the Span- 
ish call cienegas, where in the rainj 

season of ordinal) years, and all 

the year round in some o( them dur- 
ing \eais of heavj rainfall, the sur- 
face of the ground has the appear- 
ance of a swamp, rhese are in reality 

ancient lakes which in the course of 
ages have been filled with sand, soil, 
gravel and boulders that have been 



earned into them by the mountain 
torrents or perhaps in some cases 
by glacial action. The loose material 
,.| winch the} are composed is usual- 
ly of great depth and is saturated with 
water. They are natural reservoirs of 
water. I he surface streams flow over 
deep beds of similar material, per- 
meated with water from the bottom 
to the level of the surface of the 
Stream and this body of underground 
water, in such cases, supports the 
stream and is necessary to its exist- 
ence. From these sources it was poss- 
ible to obtain a large addition to the 
supply of water." 

Lucien Shaw, Chief Justice of the Calif- 
ornia Supreme Court, The Development of 
the Law /if Waters in the West, an address 



By Dr. Leo J. Frii;j. 

delivered at a joint session of ihc AmcricaiB 
Bar Association and the California Ball 
Association at San Francisco on August 91) 
I '122 and recorded in the California Supremi 
Court Reports, Vol. 1 sy, page 779 at 79?. 

ORANGERY 

An early term for an orange grove 

"Matthew Keller of Los Angeles 
h a s a vineyard of forty thousafl 
bearing vines and a young orangen 
of three hundred trees, besides ar 
orchard of apple, pear, and other 
fruits, all doing well." 

Transactions of State Agricultural Societ) 
of California for 1869, Sacramento, 1X60, 73 

PINACATE BUG 

Not a bug, but one of the Dark- ' 

ling Beetles of the genus Eleodes of I 

(Continued on Page 15)\ 




&&?&£■ ~\ 



ranges in an orangery in Garden Grove in 1907. 



CALIFORNIA HERALD 




4aG 




C^.ubtetf -^/-Uotes 



gwj) Ht great "Stars and Stripes" 
■£ did not always fly over the 
United States. In 1775, the flag used 
was the Grand Union flag. This flag 
had thirteen red and white stripes 
and a union of crosses of England 
and Scotland. When the Declara- 
tion of Independence was signed in 
July 1776, the Grand Union flag 
became inappropriate. The union was 
English and Scottish, which our 
country was no longer a part of. 

In October 1776, William Rich- 
ards, a Navy quarterman, complained 
of the flag's inappropriateness. It 
wasn't until June 14, 1777 that the 
Continental Congress adopted a nat- 
ional flag design, It stated, "The flag 
of the United States shall be thirteen 
stripes, alternate red and white, with 
a union of thirteen stars of white on 
a field of blue, representing a new 
constellation." The only difference 
between the two flags was this: a 
union of stars would replace the 
British-Scottish union. There was no 
set rule of how the stars were to be 
placed. Usually there were thirteen 
stars in a circle. Sometimes there 
were twelve stars in the circle with 
one in the middle, or three horizontal 
rows of four, five and four stars. 

The first "Stars and Stripes" ever 
flown in battle by land forces was the 

JANUARY, 1970 



"76" flag. It was flown in the battle 
of Bennington on August 16, 1777. 
It is still preserved for us to see in 
North Bennington, Vermont in a 
museum. 

The first time the story of Betsy 
Ross was made known was in a his- 
torical society paper article in Penn- 
sylvania on March 14, 1870. The 
article was written by William J. 
Canby, a grandson of Betsy Ross. In 
1857 his aunt, a daughter of Betsy 
Ross, asked him to write a story from 
a dictation of the story Betsy told her 
daughter many times. It went like 
this: In June of 1776, before the Dec- 
laration of Independence was adopt- 
ed. General Washington, Robert 
Morris and George Ross came to 
the place where Betsy worked, which 
w a s in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
The men showed Betsy a rough draft 
of the flag and asked her if she could 
make it. After she made the flag, she 
brought it to the statehouse while 
Congress was in session. They adopt- 
ed the flag design. 

This story was long regarded 
authentic. However, investigations 
were made to see if the story was true. 
It was found that there is no record 
of a committee to design a Hag. Fur- 
ther investigations showed that there 



was no record of a flag adoption until 
June 1777. A receipt was found 
which stated a flagmaker. BetS) Ross, 
made some flags tor the Navy of Pen- 
nsylvania. 

In January 1794 the first change 
was made on the flag. Two stars were 
added. By July 1836, there were 
twenty-five stars on the flag and by 
July I960, there was a total of fiftj 
stars on the flag. 

On Flag Day, 1923. the American 
Legion held a conference to adopt 
a universal flag code. This universal 
flag code was written to show citizens 
why and how to use and display the 
flag, storage and respect of the flag, 
and how to carry it. 

My nation's flag means so much 
to me. it is almost impossible to ex- 
press my love for it. It symbolizes 
the most important period of history 
in the forming of our country. It will 
always be remembered in the minds 
Of Americans. It had been 150 years 
since the Pilgrims first landed at Ply- 
mouth Rock in 1620 in search of 
freedom from the mother country, 
England. Ideas had evolved for years 
in the minds of men. Now at last, 
after many battles and deaths. 
Thomas Jefferson wrote the Declara- 

(Continued on Page 10) 

PAGE 5 



The Grand 
President's Corner 



GRAND I'KI SIDENT 

n.iik \ i i onens i Mrs. i 
431 i Allendale Avenue 
Oakland, I alifornia 94619 




NANCY J. CONENS 



GRAND SECRETARY 

Lucille F. Kimbark (Mrs. C. F.) 

2271-32nd Avenue 

San Francisco, California 94116 

Office: 703 Market Street. Room 612 

San Francisco 94103 Dial 362-4127 



I Ik- scar 1970 is now well under 
wag and among many resolutions you 
made. 1 hope each of you promised 
to do your part to help the Parlor 
increase in membership and activit- 
ies. I lie Parlors need the assistance 
ol ML the members. It is so easy 
to acquire the attitude of "letting 
someone else" do the work! By work- 
ing together so much more can be 
accomplished. 

My trip to Valley Forge was a most 
memorable experience. Freedoms 
Foundation at Valley Forge is a 
nonprofit, nonpolitical and nonsec- 
tarian educational institution founded 
in 1949 for the purpose of promoting 
the American Way of Life. One phase 
in their program is the annual pre- 
sentation of awards in various cate- 
gories in recognition of the promot- 
ion of their principles. This year there 
were thirty one members on the 
Awards Jury — ten State Supreme 
Court Judges and twenty one heads 
of sen ice and patriotic organizations. 
Each judge was assigned at least four 
categories and was responsible for 
reading, viewing, inspecting, or listen- 
ing to the material submitted. My 
categories were Television and Films, 
Governmental Unit Activities, Econ- 
mic Education. Schoolmen and 
School Editorials. What an inspirat- 
ion — to see so much "Americana" 
assembled in one area! The results 
of the Awards Program will be 
announced on February 22, 1970. 
As the only State organization to 
have been invited to participate, I 
feel we should be justly honored and 



renew our patriotic efforts in order 
to be worthy of receiving this recog- 
nition. 

Now, let us all net busy and renew 



our efforts for the projects of the 
Order and increase our membership. 
Let us really see some ACTION! 



1 

5 
6 
8 
9 
12 

14 
15 

20 
21 
22 
24 
26 
28 



3 

4 

5 

8 

10 

12 

13 

16 

23 

25 

26 

28 



Jti'nerary 1970 



JANUARY 

Tournament of Roses Parade Pasadena 

La Paz No. 326, San Bruno No. 246 Pacifica* 

Junipero No. 141, El Pajaro No. 35 Monterey* 

Fort Bragg No. 210 Fort Bragg* 

Sebastopol No. 265, Coiati No. 299 Sebastopol* 

Golden Gate No. 158, Genevieve No. 132, 

Mission No. 227 San Francisco* 

Marysville No. 162, Camp Far West No. 218 Marysville* 

Annie K. Bidwell No. 168, Gold of Ophir No. 190. 

Centennial No. 295 Chico* 

Veritas No. 75, Golden California No. 291 Merced* 

Vallejo No. 195 Vallejo* 

Aleli No. 102 Salinas* 

Gold Discovery Banquet San Francisco 

Marinita No. 198, Seapoint No. 196 San Rafael* 

El Cereso No. 207, Vallecito No. 308 San Leandro* 

FEBRUARY 

Berrycssa No. 192, Olivia No. 309 Willows* 

Bonita No 10, Menlo No. 211 Redwood City* 

El Carmelo No. 181 Daly City* 

Yerba Buena No. 273, (afternoon) San Francisco* 

San Francisco Deputies' Breakfast 

Utopia No. 252, Guadalupe No. 153 San Francisco* 

San Juan No. 315, 15th Anniversary Carmichael* 

El Monte No. 205, Palo Alto No. 229 Mountain View* 

Antioch No. 223, Las Amigas No. 311 Antioch* 

Mission Bell No. 316 Soledad* 

George C. Yount No. 322 Yountville* 

Sequoia No. 272, Cerrito de Oro No. 306, 

Bear Flag No. 151 Berkeley* 

District 19 Contra Costa Country Luncheon 

MARCH 

District 20 Alameda and part Contra Costa Country Childrens' 
Foundation Breakfast 

Ukiah No. 263 Ukiah* 

Vendome No. 100, Los Gatos No. 317 San Jose* 

Copa de Oro No. 105, San Juan Bautista No. 179 Hollister* 

(Continued on Page 7) 
* Official visits are marked with asterisks 

CALIFORNIA HERALD 



M 



ARCH ITINERARY . . . 
Continued from Page 6) 

5 Eldora No. 248, Oakdale No. 125 lurlock* 

8 Southern California Children's Foundation Bruncheon 

M Calistoga No. 145, Clear Lake No. 135 Calistoga 

11 Minerva No. 2, E7 Vespero No. I 18 San Francisco 

14-15 Grand Officers Meeting 

16 Whittier No. 298, R/'o //<»/</<> No. 284, /'<w.v //</// No. 266 VVhittier* 
IS San Fernando Mission No. 2X0 — 25th Anniversary San Fernando* 
B /.<>«£ Bear/? No. 154, Campion No. 258, 

Cien Anos No. 303 Long Beach* 

20 Wawona No. 271, Selma No. 313 Frensno* 

21 Leslye A. Hicks Home Health Fund Tea, N.D.G.W. 

Home San Francisco 

25 Betsy Ross No. 238, Hayward No. 122, Angelita No. 32 Newark* 

29 Easter 



Official visits are marked with astericks 



Parlor New/s 



UILGENFEm 

II MORTUARY U 

Faithful . Courteous. Service 
120 E. Broadway. Anaheim 

PHONE KE 5-4105 



RAY 0. LINK 

Telephone 535-7221 

INSURANCE — SURETY HONDS 

\t. I HI 1 111 t CO 

132 Norlh Anaheim Boulevard 

Anaheim, California 



wmmm 


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^fp ■*■ 


IHll 


■'iSil 




/*•«- V 



Diamonds — Silverware 

132 W. Lincoln / Anaheim / 533-3107 



OFFICIAL VISIT 

In keeping with the Grand Presi- 
dent's theme Americanism, a beauti- 
ful arrangement in red, white and 
blue with a plate of the California 
Missions on it in the background 
greeted our guests in the entry at 
the D.E.S. Club when Santa Maria 
No. 276 and La Purisima No. 327 
honored Grand President Nancy J. 
Conens at a delicious home cooked 
turkey dinner. The tables were beauti- 
fully decorated in keeping with the 
theme of the evening, "Thankful for 
Our Heritage." 

The meeting hall was decorated 
with dry flower arrangements. Chair- 
man for opening ceremonies, Sally 
Tidd, introduced President Bethal 
McCallister and her corps of officers 
of Santa Maria, who had opening 
and closing ceremonies. President 
Christine Hogan and her corps of 
officers of La Purisima did the 
Initiation work. The Flag Bearers 
and Escort Team of Santa Maria 
presented the flags of our country 
and state. When the Worthy Grand 
President was escorted to the altar, 
the Escort Team formed an arch of 
American flags. 

JANUARY, 1970 



Other guests of the evening were 
PGPs Eileen Dismuke and Katie G. 
Jewett, SDDGP Marjorie Aberm 
and DGPs Mary Rule and Mamie 
Kortner. 




PGP JEWETT 



PGP DISMUKE 



Karen Lea to Santa Maria and 
Marian Schuyler to La Purisima were 
initiated. Grand President Nancy gave 
a very inspiring message. The coin 
march was designated for the General 
Scholarship Fund. A 25 year pin 
to Eva Crump of Santa Maria was 
presented. Special thanks went to 
the committee chairman Mary Jane 
Bailey and co-chairman Florence 
Green and chairman Bernice Hcnning 
and co-chairman Germaine Kern and 
their committees for making the 
evening a huge success. 



BRIDGES • HIGHWAYS - DAMS - RAILROADS 



HoinnDlREvnoiDs 

GRADING (RjS) CDKTRHCTDH 

. Heavy .Equipment 

Hauling For Rent 

535-4233 
505 S. Sunkist Ave. Anaheim 




lastes so fresh because If tQ 



the 



SOR 



store 



lincoln at lemon 
anaheim 





A ABOVE: ( ourtyard o) restored 
Pmomares Adobe in Pomona. This 
was the home o] ) enacio Palomares. 



A I RIGHT: The Del Voile home^ 
with brick fountain at right and old 
chapel at left. 



a 



H 



&\ 





^AT LEFT: Stagecoach Inn at 
Newbury Park which was erected in 
1876 on James Hammell. 



CALIFORNIA HERALD 



n 



hmcitRS 



ills 




A ABOVE: French Hotel where 
writer Robert Louis Stevenson Moved. 




^ A / LEFT: Casa de Juan Ban- 
ditti in the pueblo de San Diego (ola 

town). 



(Continued on page 10) 



HISTORIC IDE ADOBE, built ^ 
may near Sacramento River which 
can be seen in background. William 
B. Ide is sometimes called t h e 
Father of the California Republic". 




JANUARY, 1970 




CALIFORNIA LANDMARKS 
< Continued from Page 9) 






<4% I / left — Old winery at the 
Camulos Ranch. 



Below — Pioneer Moth e r Colony 
House which was originally the home 
of George Hansen, on north Anaheim 
Boulevard. It is now located on North 
West street in Anaheim. 




■■■ n i! S!i? s ".i 

||] 

' Milium 

-j. 



MY HERITAGE— MY NATION'S FLAG 
{Continued from Page 5) 



tion of Independence. We were the 
United States of America, no longer 
subject to England's rule; and were 
a b 1 e to exercise free enterprise, 
choice, market, speech, press, relig- 
ion and private property. It com- 
pletely changed a man's life. He was 
no longer bound to a certain religion, 
or to work at a particular job. Our 
nation was in great need of a symbol 
of their fight for freedom; of some- 
thing they could fly proudly in the 
breeze, and be proud to say. "This 
is my nation's flag". 

Written in a song entitled. "This 



Is My Country", is a line which so 
well describes the feelings of any 
patriotic, proud American, proud of 
his flag. It is: "I only know I swell 
inside and deep within my breast, I 
thrill to see "Old Glory" paint the 
breeze." 

I am proud of my flag, my herit- 
age, and the history behind the flag. 
When our flag is raised high into the 
blue, I am proud to see the blue field 
and stripes catch the sunlight as it 
ripples in the breeze. But I am just 
as proud to say, "This is MY flag, 
symbol of my nation's heritage." 




(This was the essay which 
first prize at the Junior Nat 
Daughters Conference, 1969.) 



won 
i ve 



CALIFORNIA HERALD 



[official visit 

Participation in the program hon- 
lrinu. Grand President Nancy Conens 
,\as alternated with Reina del Mar 
m charge of the opening and closing 
seremonies and Tierra de Oro Parlor 
in charge of the initiatory ceremonies. 




Virginia Days, President of Reina del 
Mar No. 126. 

Past President Ellen Hayward 
Merrow of Reina del Mar was chair- 
man for the Opening March, others 
participating in the program were: 
Hortensia Cuellar, Organist, Tierra 




de Oro; President Virginia Days, 
Reina del War, Opening and Closing 
Ceremonies; Escort I cam of Princesa 

del Mar Junior Unit No. 40 members 
Nanci A 1 V a. Rosemary Baragan, 
Connie (astro. Kim Cornell. I lien 
Decker. Denise Erway, Rhonda I s- 

pinosa. Barbara Kaiser, Debbie 
I. open. Marjorie Luther, Lisa Mac- 




Eileen Dismuke, President of Tierra 
del Oro No. 304. 

JANUARY, 1970 



DGP Mary Louise Days. 

Farlane and Jeanne Roulet; Initiat- 
ion Ceremonies, Eileen Dismuke 
PGP, President Tierra de Oro; Soloist 
"Hymn to California" Mildred Kling- 
er, Reina del Mar; Accompanist, 
Dorothy Dye, Placerita Parlor; Pre- 
sentations, Gifts: Edith Webster, 
Tierra de Oro; Reports - Carmen Jay, 
Reina del Mar. 

District No. 31 SDDGP Margery 
Abern. Poinsettia No. 3 1 8, DGPs 
Gertrude Reed and Mary Louise 
Days were present. 

Committees of the evening - Reina 
del Mar Parlor Chairman Liselotte 
MacFarlane; assisted by Mrs. Mar- 
garet Shanholtzer; Anita C. Joyal; 
Lorraine Aceves; Nancy Fluker; Mar- 
iana Schmitter Clara Ruiz; Esther De 
Vito; Sylvia Ferrarnio, Nannette Sev- 
egney and Amelia Acres. 

Tierra de Oro Parlor chairman 
was Eileen Dismuke PGP assisted by 
Betty Clark. Gertrude Reed, Norma 
Grimm, Claudine Wullbrandt and 
Henrietta Cardona: Gertrude Reed, 



\lar> Weathcrive. Eileen Jam 
Jeanne Fredrick; l dith Webster; 
Mar J Wegenei and Andres Mc- 
Kinney. 




Ellen Hayward Merrow when she was 
Saint Barbara. 



Refreshments were served follow- 
ing the closing ceremonies. Grand 
President Nancy J. Conens presented 
a 25-year pin to Past President Ellen 
Hayward Merrow. 



VENDOME 

Members gathered at Vahl's Res- 
taurant, Alviso, on December 1 1 . 
for their annual Christmas Dinner. 
The Christmas party was held Dec- 
ember 16 at the IOOF meeting hall 
with member's children and grand- 
children as guests. Members ex- 
changed gifts and old St. Nick, the 
gift-giver, greeted the children. One 
of the newer members, Janice Baker, 
performed the duties of Santa Claus 
in the new suit she made for the Par- 
lor's use at Christmas time. 

Monetary donations were made for 
the purchase of Christmas gifts for 
"Shut-ins", indigent patients at the 
Veterans Administration Hospital. 
Palto Alto, and members residing 
in the Native Daughters' Home San 
Francisco. 

The first sewing Club meeting for 

1970 was held at Liz Hagaman's on 

(Continued on page 14) 



SECOND GENERATION NATIVE DAUGHTER 
RECEIVES 50 YEAR EMBLEM 



Mrs Charlotte I u d e m .1 n was 
awarded a 50 yeai pin; a unique 
honor, Bttained only b) I n g and 
faithful membership in Orim 

( harlotte is a second-generatioa 
Native Daughter, foi hei mother, 
( harlotte Gunther, w ^ also a 50- 
yeai member ol Orinda Parlor. In 
addition to an aunt, I ouise kom|is. 
receiving hei 50-yeai pin, c harlotte's 
sister, Orinda Giannini, not onlj is 
.1 50-year member, but is ;i l' ;i s 1 
Grand President as well. 




Charlotte Ludenwn recipient of a 
50-year award. 

Charlotte joined Orinda Parlor in 
1919. at which time the meetings 
were conducted at the B'nai Brith 
Building in San Francisco. She held 
office soon after joining and was 
Orinda Parlor's president in 1928. 
In addition, she has served as sec- 
retary of the Home Committee for 
over 15 years, and at present, is the 
treasurer. 

Due to taking up residence in San 
Jose and Fresno, she was not able 
to participate in the various functions 
of Orinda Parlor for a number of 
years, but resumed her interests upon 
movine back to San Francisco. 



She is triil > a wonderful person, 
Her regal stature, warmth and sin 
cerity, hei interest in people and her 
never-ending desire to help, have 
made her one of the most popular 
Native Daughters. 

In addition to her participation in 

the Native Daughters, site is e\- 
tremels active in the Senior Citizens 
Group at the St. Marks Lutheran 
(enter in San Francisco, and can be 
found ever) Friday donating her 
time. She and Iter husband. Carl, are 
garden enthusiasts and share an 
enjoyment in travel. Daughter Marie, 
who was initiated into the Native 
Daughters the night of the official 
visit, is a schoolteacher in San Jose, 
while another daughter, Betty and 
her husband, John are now residing 
in Santa Ana, after a seven-year re- 
sidence in Europe. 

Grand President Nancy Conens 
congratulated Charlotte and thanked 
her for such long and faithful service 
to the Native Daughters. Nancy then 
asked PGP Orinda Giannini to pre- 
sent the pin to Charlotte. 

Congratulations for this wonderful 

honor, Charlotte. It is well deserved. 

It would not have been the same 

without you. All Native Daughters 

wish you another happy 50 ... . 

111 
BONITA 

Santa was on hand at Bonita's 
December 1 1 meeting to greet mem- 
bers and guests. A play was given 
by the young members of the parlor. 
There was a gift for everyone present. 
Secret Pals also exchanged gifts. De- 
licious refreshments were served by 
chairman Gloria Rene and commit- 
tee. Distinguished guests were PGP 
Evelyn I. Carlson and DGP Anne 
Biggio. 

Members are now planning for 
the Official Visit of GP Nancy 
Conens on February 3. This will be 
a joint meeting with Menlo Parlor. 



535 


3289 

RITZ 






CLEANERS and 


DYERS 


307 


E. Lincoln 


Anaheim 



TO V.BSEN1 MEMBERS 

"Roses ate red, Violets are blue . ,, 
Someone is missing . . . Could it 
be you? 

We had the Ritual and lots of 
Chatter . . . 

We counted heads and found 
something the matter. 

Oh, now I know, it's coming 

through . . . 

Your smiling face followed by uuill 

It takes lots o'links to make us 

strong . . . 
And we miss you LOTS . . .it 
seems so long. 

Try to make the meeting on Parlor 
Night . . . 

To have you with us would be 
sheer delight." 

Long Beach Parlor No. 154 re-i 
centlv sent this message to absent! 
members. 



ilie 



MEMORIAL PARK • MAUSOLEUM 

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| Orangewood Street at Santa Ana Freeway 

538-3583 



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Anaheim 
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24-Hour Nursing Service 

Excellent Meals - Tray Service 

LARGE CHEERFUL ROOMS 
ADJOINING BATHS & SUNDECKS 

Life Membership or Monthly Rates 

542-3514 

1015 N. Broadway Santa Ana 



CALIFORNIA HERALD 




Ihe honoree I'd!' Anther D. Brown. 



SAN FRANCISCO 

On December 13, GVP Irene 
Bondanza. Clarisse C. Meyer and 
several others attended a reception 
for PGP Audrey D. Brown in the 
Governor's mansion, Sacramento. 
PGP Brown was celebrating her 50th 
anniversary as a member of the 
Order. The evening was highlighted 
by the presentation of her emblem 
by Grand President Nancy Conens, 
who also sang, "How much is that 
doggie in the Window?" 

The Christmas party of San Franc- 
mo was held in December with Edna 
Garaventa as chairman. Santa came 
wtih exchange gifts for all. Cecilia 
O'Brien won first prize in the raffle, 
Edna Garaventa, 2nd prize and 
Annie Avedano, 3rd 

Verna D. Cummings President of 
San Francisco No. 261, Clarisse C. 
Meyer and others visited the sister 
Parlors of Genevieve, Golden Gate 
and Mission when the Grand Presi- 
dent made her official visit on Janu- 
ary 12. 

JANUARY, 1970 



MM - \\\ |)| |'l Ills 

Florentine Gardens was the setting 
selected far the annual dinner and 
Christmas party ol the Deputies and 
their Supervisors, Ann s h a « and 
Lucile Ashbaugh. The twin daughters 
of Jean McNabb and Grand Daugh 
icis of Josephine Sullivan who were 
born during Ann's term were special 
guests, PGP Maxiene Porter who now 



lives in Virginia sent greetingi PGP 

I iln. i Williams was ton ill to attend 
and sent her regrets anil good wishes. 
The two leaders and Lucfll 
each Deputy a small L'llt A donation 
trom the Deputies was presented to 
the Children's Foundation in memory 

ol l mm, i O'Meara Next years dinner 

chairmen will be Helen Clifton and 
(ieorgia Robinson. 




Governor's mansion at Sacramento where PGP Audrey D. Brown's reception 
was held. She is shown here in front oj the mansion when it was marked 
as a Historical Landmark. Standing from left are Ray D. Hunter. Deputy 
Director of California Department of Parks and Recreation; PGP Audrey 
D. Brown; Henry J. Lynch, past president of F.Ik Grove No. 41 . NSGH 



VENDOME . . . 
(Continued from Page 11) 

January N I 1/ prepared and 

.1 sumptuous luncheon in her lovelj 

home n< .ill ihose in attendance. 




Sue Mattel shown with her family. 
She h fourth from left in the front 
row. 

Sue Mattci. who was 92 years 
young on November 16, was the 

proud recipient of Birthday greetings 
from President and Mrs. Richard M. 
Nixon. She has been an active mem- 
ber of the order for nearly sixty 
years, joining A no Nnevo Parlor on 
February 25. 1910 and transferring 
to I anionic' Parlor on January 18, 
1928. Thirteen members of her fam- 
ily, ranging from daughters, grand- 
daughters, nieces and grandnieces, 
are members of the parlor. 

1 i 1 

LONG BEACH 

Long Beach No. 154 held the 
Parlor Christmas party on December 
18 at Mottell's Garden Room. Made- 
line Boyd was chairman. All enjoyed 
an exchange of gifts, door prizes and 
delicious Christmas goodies. 

1 1 i 

MENLO I'NIT 

A public and formal installation 
of Menlo Unit was held in December. 
Miss Susan Scott became Junior 
President of the Unit. The hall at 
the Recreation Center was beautifully 
decorated in keeping with the Yule 
Tide season. As the Jr. President was 
at the altar, she was presented with a 
cascade of poinsettias. 

State Officers present were the 
Misses Kathy Koch, Kathy Slater, 




(hand trustees Marie l.andini and 
and I.ila Hummel 

Diane Roles. Renee Cook and Sue 
Hartman. NDGW dignitaries includ- 
ed GTs Marie Landini and Lila 
Hummel, GOS Dolores Ferenz, PGP 
Evelyn I. Carlson and SDDGP Mil- 
dred Yancy. Representatives from 
Sequoia. Argonaut and Golden Pop- 
py Units were present. 




^ K. 



— v 

Grand Oustide Sentinel Dolores 
Ferenz. 



Ceremonies were conducted by 
Linda Ucovich assisted by Linda 
Cane and Lynn Hardin. Miss Ucovich 
was presented with a Junior Past 
President's pin by Mrs. Carlson. Rob- 
in Gilbert, for the second time was 
awarded the merit gift for attend- 
ance and service by Mrs. Cook, an 
advisor. 

On December 20, the Unit en- 
joyed a Christmas party and luncheon 
provided by the advisors. 

Robin Gilbert was appointed Jr. 
State Chairman of Welfare by Junior 
State President Leealyn Baker. 



6 



JrWH 



VAL M. BRAY 



The Lamplighter 

"Let there be Light" 

at the 
Thieves Market 

40 W. Holly St. 
Old Town, Pasadena 



PGP PORTER HONORED 

The n a m e of PGP Maxiene H| 
Porter is in the 1969 edition of Who'\ 
Who of American Women. Mki 
Porter was Grand President of th> 



' 




PGP Maxiene H. Porter 

Native Daughters of the Golden Wesn 
in 1960-1961. This is a great honoi i 
and the Native Daughters are proucH 
of her. 

1 i 1 
JAMES LICK 

At holiday time as in the past 48 
years the members of James Lick hadM 
a Christmas party. The day began 
with a turkey dinner served at noon 
with the exchange of gifts following.} 
Cards were signed for member Alice] 
Stahl and DGP Doris Stidhem whol 
were ill. 

PGP Emily E. Ryan and Elizabeth) 
Brennan were special guests. In the! 
remarks made by President Georgia! 
Robinson and charter member Mabel] 
Walker both mentioned that James\ 
Lick is a small parlor, but a veryj 
happy one and happiness it what 
counts. 

1 i 1 

LA TIJERA 

The "fun group" of La Tiejera No. | 
282, enjoyed a Christmas party at the 
home of Ruth Payne and Margaret | 
Strouse on December 27. They taxed j 
their ingenuity by bringing a Christ- 
mas exchange gift which cost no more 
than twenty five cents. Everyone 
present had fun. 

i 1 1 

SDDGP GREETINGS FROM PAST 
SUPERVISORS! 

The following Past Supervisors 

and their Deputies of San Francisco 

extend the seasons greetings to all — 

Vera Thompson, Mildred Ehlert 

Frances Simas, Ann Shaw, Lucile 

Ashbaugh, Eleanor Bianchi, Marie 

Feil and Myrtle Ritterbush. 



CALIFORNIA HERALD 



7 rand President Greeted 

by J a red n a Johnson 

Calling themselves U.S.A. Parlor 
1969, Darina and James Lick Parlors 
mil as their guest Grand President 
N'ancv .1. Conens. Many friends greet- 
ed Grand President Conens. The 
ifternoon began with a luncheon and 
he regular meeting followed. 

Patricia Jacobs, president of Darina 
Parlor conducted the introductions 
md Georgia Robinson, president of 
fames Lick, conducted the business 
meeting. These two parlors are both 
;mall but do take part in all the af- 
fairs of the Order. 

• James Lick has only once in the 
Parlor's 48 years, been unable to send 
B delegate to Grand Parlor. Last year 
Darina also had a delegate go to Los 
Banos The members of both parlors 
and others present from other parlors, 
some also small, were surprised when 
JGP Nancy Conens p u t so much 
stress on small parlors consolidating 
with some other parlor. 
; Grand Vice President Irene Bond- 
anza spoke for the Grand Officers 
and thanked the Parlors for her lunch, 
the gift of the afternoon and for do- 
ing so well. 

PGP Loretta Cameron spoke for 
the Past Grands. She said that on 
her way up the long ladder to become 
Grand President, she began by being 
deputy three times to James Lick and 
was very pleased to see the Parlor 
members still carrying on, no matter 
how small they are now. James Lick 
Parlor was once one of San Francis- 
co's large Parlors and PGP Cameron 
thinks it is wonderful that the Parlor 
wants to carry on for a few more 
years at least. In a couple of years 
the Parlor will celebrate its 50th 
birthday. 

1 i i 

LEO'S DICTIONARY . . . 
{Continued from Page 4) 

which several species are abundant 
on the Pacific Coast. When disturbed 
it elevates the hinder part of its body 
and discharges a disagreeable smell- 
ing black liquid. It is frequently called 
a stink bug. 

Donald J. Borror and Dwight M. DeLong, 
An Introduction to till Study of Insects. 

JANUARY, 1970 




NS-NI1GW FLOAT WINS 

"California is a Holiday" was the 
title of this year\s NSGW-NDGW 
Tournament of Roses float entry. 
This was one of the most beautiful 
floats ever entered hy the NS-NDGW. 
The float depicted in cameo "The 
Pico House" on one side, complete 
with street lamps and an "Early 
California Bandstand" on the other 
side. Members of both Orders spent 
countless hours decorating this beau- 
tiful float. It truly was a joy to see 
it go down Colorado Boulevard in 
Pasadena. 

The float won first place in the 
Fraternal Division. 



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Dr. Leo J. Friis 



ORANGE COUNTY THROUGH FOUR CENTURIES 

From 1542 to present day. Written in easy to read, yet 
concise style; Illustrated, Annotated and a complete Index. 
S7.50 (plus 80c tax and mailing). 

Will N AN \HEI\I WAS 21 

Using the anecdotal approach with sparkles of humor, the author de- 
scribes Anaheim as it appeared in 1878 with its Chinese quarter, irrigation 
ditches and wineries. Illustrated, Annotated, Index. No. 2 of Orange 
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S7.50 (plus 800 tax and mailing). 

THE CHARLES W. BOWERS MEMORIAL MUSEUM AND ITS TREASURES 

Indian treasures, animal traps, sea shells, statues and portraits are just a few 
of the interesting items found in the fabulous book on the fine museum in 
Santa Ana, California. Illustrated; Index. 
$2.00 (plus 40c tax and mailing). 

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Life and events in Anaheim from October 1870 to 1871. Barter was an 
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Early Beginnings of Garden Grove. 
Fine pictures, maps, index. Cloth bound. 
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by Leroy Doig 

Continuation of growth of Garden 
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Official Publication of 
THE NATIVE DAUGHTERS of the GOLDEN WEST 




FEBRUARY, 197C * 40* 



THE OAKLAND BAY BRIDGE 



I lOMf TOWN 

by Ion 

Ram drenched streets reflected 

light 
and San Francisco sparkled with an 

air 

ol Md sell confidence, knowing that 

the light 
held magic which made her fair. 

Standing bj the bay, I saw diamonds 

strung 
in fabulous array, 

for streets lar and dwindling in the 
distance. 

No cat) holds more allure, 
has a stench si' sweet. 

Ihis. San Francisco's spell will ever 

endure, 
no matter what strange roads beckon 

m\ feet 



by 
Vcrna Pabst smith 

As long as I remember. 
I've loved her from the start, 
The enchanting blue Pacific. 
Siren without a heart. 

She lures me with her loveliness 
On rainy days or fair, 
When she rushes up to greet me 
With seaweed in her hair. 

On clear, cold days she beckons me, 
It's then 1 love her best, 
So charming and beguiling 
With white caps on her breast. 

I love her everchanging moods, 
And on a stormy night, 
She vents her restless fury 
On everything in sight. 

When her tantrum has subsided, 
She's peaceful and calm for a spell, 
The enchanting blue Pacific 
That I know and love so well. 



California Herald i 

•PRESERVING THE PAST FOR THE FUTURE" 
VOLUMl XVII February, 1970 Number (I 

CONTENTS THIS MONTH 

Home Town, by Tom Conroy 3 

Sea Siren, by Verna Pabst Smith I 

Camarillo's Glass Paperweights, by Rev. Francis J. Weber ;J 

Eggs, by Dr. Leo J. Friis <l 

The Grand President's Corner cl 

Parlor News '/| 

Adobes, by J. J. Friis it 

Official Visit Itinerary to Jr. Units by State Chm. Ferenz 11 

Jr. Unit News 11 

Leslye A. Hicks Home Health Fund, by Wealthy M. Falk II 

In Memoriam ll! 



The trend? 

It's to Medallion Electric Homes. 

Back in 1958 only 5.9£ of all 
new homes and apartments 
built in the area we serve were 
Medallion Electric Homes. 

But last year nearly 53^ were 
Medallion Electric Homes with 
all-electric kitchens — cleaner, 
cooler, because they're flameless. 

Wouldn't a Medallion Electric Home or Apartment be 
your best investment? It isn't out-of-date today. It won't 
be obsolete tomorrow in the all-electric future. For the 
good clean life, live electrically 

Southern California Edison i 




J. J. FRIIS 
Publisher 



LEO J. FRIIS 
Editor 



JANE FRUS 

Public Relations 



Published Monthly by J. J. Friis and Leo J. Friis, owners and publishers, Anaheim 
California. All Rights Reserved. EDITORIAL AND GENERAL OFFICES: Anaheim, California. 
Mailing Address: P.O. Drawer 4243, Anaheim, California 92803. ADVERTISING OFFICE: 301 
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Other countries: Please apply for rates. Entered as second-class matter at the Post Office at 
Anaheim, California, under the Act of March 3, 1879. No part of this magazine may be re. I 
printed without specific permission. 

CALIFORNIA HERALD j 



^ctrncitmlG s 



M 



Gfa, p 



ei'p&twGi&mis 



by r^ZsVu. «y lands C^- . iAJ^bf. 




The glass paperweights, part of the Carrie Estelle Doheny collection are 
displayed here in the Edward Laurence Doheny Memorial Library at St. 
John's Seminary in Camarillo. 



3*pni-: production of antique 
£5 paperweights combines the 
genius of glassmaker and artist in 
such a way to allow emerald, ame- 
thyst, ruby, sapphire, mossy agate, 
jold and silver to sparkle forth in 
1 rich myriad of attractive designs. 

One of the world's most colorful 
ind extensive concentrations of these 
'manmade jewels" is on permanent 

: EBRUARY, 1970 



display among the treasures of the 
Estelle Doheny Collection of Rare 
Books, Manuscripts and W oiks of 
Art on the campus of Saint John's 
Seminary, Camarillo, California. 

The 228 superb specimens in this 
fascinating, yet little-known collect- 
ion of glass paperweights are dis 
played on lucite mounts in four spec- 
ially constructed walnut cases in the 



oval foyer of the Edward Laurence 

Doheny Memorial Library. Most of 
the weights are individually lighted 
through a special small orifice, con- 
denser control system which enhances 
their widely divergent color schemes 

While no catalogue of its holdings 
in this area has yet been issued, 
the Camarillo collection is known for 
its artistic originality which incor- 
porates French, British and American 
examples from almost every period 
during which the art flourished. 

Glass, with its components of two- 
parts lead or lime and five-parts pure 
sand, is an excellent medium for 
preserving artistic expression. It 
loses none of its original substance 
and weight when heat is applied and 
its versatility allows for utilizing de- 
signs of great diversity and beauty. 

Venetian glass makers produced 
the first paperweights in the early 
19th century, but in the I S40's the;, 
were rapidly outstripped by French 
artisans at Saint Louis. Clichy and 
Baccarat. The exceptional quality, 
workmanship and beauty evident in 
the superlative specimens of French 
origin represent the ultimate expres- 
sion of the art. 

In the actual production of paper- 
weights, the first step was to take a 
thick piece of crystal or colored glass 
and decorate it as desired. It was 
essential that all the component ele- 
ments be brought to a uniform tem- 

(Continued or. page 14) 

PAGE 3 








tQQS 

Dr. Leo J. Frifs 



How "Doc x " Robinson solved the San Francisco egg shortage m 1849. 



wpg ggs WERE a mighty scarce com- 
^Fj modify in San Francisco in 
1849 until "Doc" Robinson decided 
to do something about it. "Doc" had 
come to California with the intention 
of opening a theatre in San Fran- 
cisco. Much to his disappointment he 
found no building available and he 
was forced to seek some other source 
of income to protect his fast dwind- 
ling supply of cash. 

"Doc" did a bit of practical phil- 
osophizing. He reasoned that if he 
could find some item to sell for which 
there was a great demand that he 
could make a handsome profit. A 
perfectly logical deduction, but just 
what was that item? 

He consulted his brother-in-law, 
Orrin Dorman. 

"Orrin," he asked, "what thing is 
most in demand in San Francisco?" 

"What do you mean, Doc?" 



"Let me put it this way. If you 
had your choice of anything you 
wanted right now, what would you 
choose?" 

Orrin looked thoughtfully. 

"Well, if I could have what I 
wanted most, I would say a couple 
of fried eggs." 

"Doc" snorted. 

"Fried eggs! Man. I'll bet there 
aren't a dozen hens in San Fran- 
cisco." 

"Well," replied Orrin plaintively, 
"you just asked me what I wanted 
most. I'd settle for duck eggs, goose 
eggs or any other kind of eggs." 

"Doc's" eyes sparkled. 

"Orrin, do you remember way 
back when we used to rob bird nests 
when we were kids?" 

His brother-in-law nodded. 

"And do you remember how we 
used to take the bird eggs home and 



fry them when Ma wasn't looking?' 

"Yes, why?" 

"I've got an idea. Just before wi 
came into San Francisco Bay w| 
saw some little islands that wen 
simply alive with birds. I'll bet ther<| 
are a million eggs out there. Wha 
do you say we go out and get some?'! 

"Gosh, I'm no sailor." 

"Makes no difference. We'll gej 
somebody who is." 

A few days later Robinson ana 
Dorman chartered a whale-boat am| 
sailed for the Farallon Islands whid; 
lie about thirty miles west of tV 
Golden Gate. Anchoring their crafi 
in a small cove of the southermoS| 
and largest island, they appraised th«l 
situation. 

Although it was a pleasant dayl 
the sea about them was exceeding!] 
rough. Waves crashed against th«j 
rocks casting up plumes of spray! 

CALIFORNIA HERALMI 



larking sea-lions crawled about the 
asc of the island. The precipitous 
litis swarmed with penguin-like 
irds called murres. 
Lifting his voice above the roar 
f the sea "Doc" yelled, "All right; 
:t \ get our sacks and get to work." 
Each selected a cloth bag, jumped 
ut of the boat and climbed up the 
lippery rocks. Clouds of birds took 
light but many remained to defend 
heir nests. Through the centuries 
ie\ had fought off predatory sea 
alls with their sharp beaks. Now 
icy fiercely attacked a new enemy. 
Vith dogged persistence the men 
truggled along the cliff, fighting off 
lie birds and filling their sacks. By 
fternoon they had collected a boat- 
>ad of eggs and started on their 
ough trip back to San Francisco. 
A squall sprang up and the over- 
lden boat commenced to ship water. 
tfibinson and Dorman looked at 
acli other. There was nothing to do 
>ut to lighten the load. Sorrowfully 
he\ jettisoned half of their cargo. 
\fter much difficulty they reached 
he Long Wharf in Yerba Buena 
"ovc. 

i Transporting their merchandise 
p the city, they set up business. In 
■ short time they had disposed of 
heir entire stock for over three thou- 
and dollars, good eggs selling for a 
lollar apiece and cracked ones at 
ifty cents each. 

"Doc" never repeated his venture. 

»ut he had numerous successors. In 

jhe following year the Farallon Egg 

Dompany was organized to collect 

jnd ship murre eggs to San Fran- 

jisco. In 1885 the Federal govern- 

lent gave this firm the exclusive egg 

icking rights upon the islands. This 

icrative franchise was granted be- 

ause of the ruthless manner in 

"EBRUARY, 1970 



which other groups had despoiled 
eggs and birds. 

It is estimated that by 1856 three 
or four million eggs had been 
shipped to the mainland. Thereafter 
about three hundred thousand eggs 
were collected annually until 1S73. 
Then the harvest commenced to de- 
cline. 

The outfit of a professional 
"egger" consisted of a blouse-like 
shirt which was drawn tightly 
around the waist and had a capacity 
of about eighteen dozen eggs. Egg- 
ing shoes had soles of braided rope 
with canvas tops. Like an alpinist 
the picker carried a coil of rope to 
assist him in climbing steep places. 

Although the bird egg business is 
now prohibited by law, the industry 
was destined to die anyway. After 
all, murre eggs never tasted as good 



as the hen product. Neither were 
the) as appetizing in appearance. 

Their yolks were a golden red and 
their whites retained a gelatinous 
transparency despite thorough cook- 
ing. 

Memories of the bird egg trade 
have been preserved in the writings 
of the early California authors. Pren- 
tice Mulford, Bret Harte and Charles 
Warren Stoddard. Of these three. 
Mulford had the most experience in 
the business. Upon first coming to 
California he made a living as an 
egg-sorter, 

The California bird egg industry 
was an important one in its day. 
"Doc" Robinson had found a theatre 
but it might not have started if 
in which to commence show busi- 




THE SOUTH FARALLONE ISLAND, FROM THE BIC ROOKERY, LOOKING SOUTH. 
(Six tana cock island.. Twenty fi« miles doe west r the Golden Cue in tie Pnciic Oce»n.) 



PAGE 5 



The Grand 
President's Corner 



GRAND PR! SIDBNT 

Nancj i < oneni (Mrs.) 
4.' 1 1 Allendale Avenue 
Oakland, California 94619 




(iRAND SECRETARY 

Lucille F. Kimbark (Mrs. C. F.) 

227 1-3 2nd Avenue 

San Francisco. California 94116 

Office: 703 Market Street. Room 612 

San Francisco 94103 Dial 362-4127 



NANCY J. CONENS 



It was truly a great pleasure to 
K.- a small part of the Tournament 
A Roses Parade on New Years Day. 
Native Daughters from all over the 
state should make a point of attend- 
ing this event and in particular assist- 
ing in the preparation of our float. 
When 1 arrived at the Rose Palace in 
Pasadena on December 29 and wit- 
nessed the bustling activities in that 
huge area where twelve floats were 
being constructed I was overwhelmed 
by the size of the undertaking. Our 
float was 17 feet high, 20 feet wide 
and 55 feet long! That my friends, 
means a great many flowers and 
main more helping hands to apply 
them. Our members came every day 
and willingly worked long hours in 
this very cold area (which must be so 
because of the flowers). These mem- 
bers certainly need to be commended 
for their service and I am happy to 
do so. There were many young boys 
and girls working also and upon in- 
quiring I learned they volunteer their 
services and are most willing to help 
in any way and as long as they can, 
without any remuneration of a n y 
type. When "kids" do something 
wrong it always makes the front 
page, but when they do something 
right, no mention is made! I salute 
the young people of the Pasadena 
area, thank them for their service 
and their promise of a better tomor- 
dow as long as there are people of 
their caliber to carry on. 

February is the month in which 
we commemorate the birthdays of 
two great Presidents, Washington and 



I ineoln. As the first and sixteenth 
Presidents they laid the plans that 
marked the paths for the future of 
our Nation. Each in their own way 
and in their own time, took "one 
step for mankind". They endured 
many hardships, knew unhappiness 
and loneliness and m a n y of their 



achievements went unrealized whil 
they lived. While at Valley Forge, I 
visited the home where Washingto 
resided and also saw the meage' 
tent in which he first lived until h 
was assured his men had adequatl 
accommodations. Native Daughter 
(Continued on Page 7| 



Stinerary, 1970 



2 
3 
4 
5 
8 

10 
12 
13 
16 
23 
25 
26 

28 



FEBRUARY 

BerryessaNo. 192, Olivw No. 309 Willows i 

Bonita No. 10, Menlo No. 211 Redwood City j 

El Carmelo No. 181 Daly City 

Yerba Buena No. 273, (afternoon) San Francisco, 

San Francisco Deputies' Breakfast 

Utopia No. 252, Guadalupe No. 153 San Franciscoi 

San Juan No. 315, 15th Anniversary Carmichaell 

El Monte No. 205, Palo Alto No. 229 Mountain View] 

Antioch No. 223, Las Amigas No. 311 Antiochl 

Mission Bell No. 316 Soledad ; 

George C. Yount No. 322 Yountville 

Sequoia No. 272, Cerrito de Oo No. 306, 

Bear Flag No. 151 Berkeley 

District 19 Contra Costa Country Luncheon 



MARCH 

1 District 20 Alameda and part Contra Costa Country Childrens' 
Foundation Breakfast 

2 Ukiah No. 263 Ukiahl 

3 Vendome No. 100, Los Gatos No. 317 San Jose I 

4 Copa de Oro No. 105, San Juan Bautista No. 179 Hollisterl 

5 Eldora No. 248, Oakdale No. 125 Turlockl 

8 Southern California Children's Foundation Bruncheon 

9 Calistoga No. 145, Clear Lake No. 135 Calistoga ; | 

11 Minerva No. 2, El Vespero No. 118 San Francisco^ 

14-15 Grand Officers Meeting 

16 Whittier No. 298, Rio Hondo No. 284, Poppy Trail No. 266 .. Whittierl 

18 San Fernando Mission No. 280- — 25th Anniversary .... San Fernando] 

19 Long Beach No. 154, Compton No. 258, 

Cien Anos No. 303 Long Beach| 

20 Wawona No. 271, Selma No. 313 Frensno| 

21 Leslye A. Hicks Home Health Fund Tea, N.D.G.W. 

Home San FranciscJ 

25 Betsy Ross No. 238, Hayward No. 122, Angelita No. 32 Newark : i 

29 Easter 

(Continued on Page 15) 

* Official visits are marked with asterisks 

CALIFORNIA HERALCii 



PRESIDENTS' MESSAGE . . . 
(Continued from Page 6) 

throughout the state — pay honor to 
these two great leaders — fly your 
flag on their day! 

The news of our membership con- 
test should have reached all of you 
In now and I hope each Parlor will 
attempt to be a winner. If each mem- 
ber just tries "a little harder" I 
knou we will be successful in our 
desire for an increase in membership. 
Won't you do your part? 

As 1 continue my travels through- 
out our Golden State. I am reminded 
.main times of the beauties and pri- 
vileges that are ours to enjoy. It is 
so interesting to observe the areas 
is they change with the various sea- 
jsons of the year. Each season is 
unique unto itself. I hope to see YOU 
along the way and in the meantime. 
let's see some ACTION. 



Ql ACKERY EXPOSE 

Calijorniana No. 247 convened 
January 13, in regular monthly ses- 
sion at The Assistance League, 
Hollywood. Mrs. Clifford (Helen) 
Williams, President, presided and 
following luncheon presented a help- 
ful, informative program concerning 
"Quackery" in so-called cancer 
"cures" and its tragic consequences. 
Following a color film, "Journey into 
Darkness", Mrs. Lewis Bullock told 
of the vast research, increasing solu- 
tions, services, equipment, therapy 
available to those who are ill, through 
the Amercan Cancer Society, which 
maintains District Branch offices 
throughout the State. Harley Eitel 
was the projectionist. Other speakers 
and programs are also available 
which present exhibits of the quack- 
ery instead of the film. 



Parlor New/s 



OFFICIAL MSI i 

Grand President Nancy .1. Conens 
made her official visit on January 6 
to Juniper a No. 141 and El Pajero 
No. 35, in joint meeting, in the House 
of the Four Winds, in Monterev I he 
meeting room of the old adobe was 
decorated in the National colors, in 
keeping with the worthy Grand Presi- 
dent's emphasis on Americanism dur- 
ing her term of office. Mrs. Anthony 




Hi 

GT Landini and GOS Ferenz 



Landini, Grand Trustee, and Mrs. 
James Ferenz, Grand Outside Sen- 
tinel, were among the distinguished 
guests at the meeting. Preceding the 
meeting, a dinner honoring the 
worthy Grand President was hosted 
by Mrs. LeRoy Henry, president of 
Junipero Parlor. 

The officers of El Pajero Parlor 
opened and closed the formal meet- 
ing. Juniper's officers conducted the 
ceremonies initiating four members 
into the Order as members of Juni- 
pero Parlor. The Worthy Grand 
President thanked both parlors for 
the courtesies extended to her and 
asked that the proceeds of the coin 
march go into the General Scholar- 
ship Fund. She gave an inspiring 
account of her recent visit to Vallev 



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FargC where she was one of the 

judges of the Freedoms Foundation 

Awards Contest She also told ol 

watching, In Pasadena, the decoration 

of the floats for the Tournament ol 
Roses parade. It could not be ac- 
complished, she said, without the 
help of many enthusiastic and dedi- 
cated young volunteers who gave long 
hours of their vacation time to the 
tedious task of securing the flowers, 
often petal by petal, to the float. 



SAN FRANCISCO DEPUTIES 

Grand President Nancy J. Conens 
was honored guest at the San Fran- 
cisco County Deputies" Party held at 
the Florentine Gardens Restaurant in 
San Francisco. SDDGP Ann Shaw 
presented each deputy with an Amer- 
ican flag pin as a gift. Chairman for 
the event was Deputy Edith O'Con- 
nor. The tables were beautifully 
decorated by her. 

The next event for the year was 
the annual breakfast held February 
8, 1970 at the Native Daughter 
Home in San Francisco. 



LONG BEACH 

Long Beach No. 154 members 
were invited to meet with Low; 
Beach Parlor No. 278 NSGW on 
January 15. Dr. Donovan Hare, 
president of the Native Sons secured 
Dr. Alonzo L. Baker, noted expert 
on international affairs as guest 
speaker. His subject was 'Decades 
Ahead"! Dr. Baker is a professor of 
International Relations at Loma 
Vista College. 



the 



SGR 



store 



lincoln at lemon 
anaheim 



FEBRUARY, 1970 



vr-j p-j^M p-l r^ frgj R^ 
23 ti-:-J Li:J fcj^ k;-.^ E2is 



by 

J. J. Fmis 




I eranda of Ramirez adobe in Santa Barbara 



CALIFORNIA HERALD 




■Ml MM BaM i 





ABOVE- — Ruins of San Luis Rev Mission 




BELOW — Palomares Adobe in Pomona before it was re- 
stored in J 939. 



TOP — Old hotel on Weibel Winery 
in Warm Springs. MIDDLE — Old 
adobe in San Luis Obispo built in 
about J 840. It was restored in 1935. 
LOWER — A t wood adobe as it 
looks today. When this adobe was 
first built in 1854 by Andrew Lytle, 
it was a one-storied adobe dwelling. 

FEBRUARY, 1970 




Dr. Fr/is Lectures at 

University 

I eo i I riis, prominent Orange 
( ounrj historian, will lecture ;it the 
i niversit} ol i alifornia, Irvine, on 
February 25 Di Friu's book, Orange 
County Through lour Centuries is 
being used as a textbook at the Uni- 
versit) 

When Anaheim was 21, another 
ol I riis's hunks won three history 
awards in l l ">" 



RUN V 1)1 I M \K 

Members of Reina del Mar attend- 
ed the Open House party at the 
home of member Mrs. Sarah Gray 
on December 1 7th to celebrate her 

90th birthday. Many friends and 
members of both Reina del Mar and 
Fieri a </<• Oro Parlors attended and 
presented her with a room full of 
gifts and flowers. Mrs. Gray's four 
daughters and a daughter-in-law are 
members of the Order: Alice Harris 
is a member of Reina del Mar, and 
Margaret Lewis, Barbara Upton and 
Florence N a g e 1 are members of 
Tierra de Oro Parlor, also Eileen 
Jane Gray, daughter of PGP Eileen 
Dismuke who is married to Wesley 
Gray, son of Mrs. Gray. 

December activities for Reina del 
Mar Parlor followed long established 
traditions, keeping in mind the 
principles which the Order re- 
presents. Thus, supporting the mat- 
erial needs by contributation of 
food and toys; and providing a 
social highlight for the members 
and their families with the annual 
Party. Honored were past members 
chosen as St. Barbara for Old Span- 
ish Days celebration. Special guests 
were members of Princesa del Mar 
No. 40 Junior Native Daughters of 
the Golden West, who under the 
direction of First Vice President 
Beverly Sorenson graciously enter- 
tained after the dinner hour. 

For this occasion, President Vir- 
ginia Days was general chairman and 
was assisted by the following mem- 
bers: Karen Stupak, Anita Joyal, 
who cooked the turkeys for the din- 



ner other serving and assisting the 
committee were: Sylvia Ferrario. 
Janelle Bell, Sarah Diaz, Nannette 
Savegney, Lorraine Acevcs. Yvonne 
Robles, Margaret Graham and Eliza- 
beth Coen; also three husbands. John 
Stupak a n d Kenneth Bell, doing 
chores during the preparations, and 
Arthur Sorenson who distributed 
gifts in the young children in attend- 
ance. 



SAN DIEGO 

San Diego No. 208 was as busy 
this quarter as at the beginning of 
the fiscal year. Five new members 
have been initiated and three transfer- 
ees obligated since the Grand Presi- 
dent's installation in June. 

When Rose Laehr was initiated 
recently, she became one of a three- 
generation team in San Diego Parlor! 
Her daughter, Ellen Stone, is 2nd 
Vice-President and granddaughter. 
Geraldine Martinez, is Junior Past 
President — both having been mem- 
bers for several years. Others ac- 
cepted into the Parlor include .Mmes. 
Switters, Miles, LeBarron, Haynes, 
Aschmann, McGee and Lottermoser. 

Founder's Day was observed with 
a history of the Order being given 




£Jh ^ 



s 



by Emily Welch. Each year Si 
Diego Parlor participates with a coi 
guard in the Massing of the Cole 
and this year was no exception wh 
San Diego No. 208 appeared in t 
line-up in the huge San Diego stac 
um, bearing the Stars and Strip 
and Native Daughters' banner. Ell 
Stone was in charge of this activii 
A Waffle Bruncheon was held ear 
er that same day as a ways ai 
means project, in the patio of Pa 
President Dorothy Mason (an 
hubby "Sister Louie"), and a ni« 
sum was added to the treasur 
Chairman of the affair was Catherii 
Higdon. 

The birthday party for the la 
three months of the year was he) 
with Dorothy Ritter and her con 
mittee preparing the goodies. ChaL 
man Catherine Higdon and co-chaii 
man Dorothy Ritter had charge of th 
dime-a-dip dinner and bazaar. 

Marie Myrtle Otto planned tl 
Christmas party which followed th 
December meeting, at which tim 
sort of musical chairs idea was cat 
ried out to determine who woul 
get which gift — and 'twas fun 
Margaret Helton had Cathedral can 
dies for sale, profits from which wil 
go into the Children's Foundatioi 
Fund. Decorations chairman. Viol 





LEFT. Sarah Gray's 90th birthday. She is shown here with her daughters. 
From left: Alice Harris, Margaret Lewis, Barbara Upton, Mrs. Gray and\ 
Florence Nagel. RIGHT. Three generations of San Diego Parlor members. 
Rose Laehr (center) initiated in September, 1969; Granddaughter Geraldine 
Martinez (left), junior past president and Daughter Ellen Stone (right), 
second vice president. 



CALIFORNIA HERALD 



eslye A. Hicks Home 
lealth fund 

y Wealthy M. FalK, 
fate Chairman 

\\ is my privilege and pleasure to 
;r\e as Chairman of the Committee 
jr the Leslye A. Hicks Home Health 
und. Committee members are 
iyrtlc Ritterbush of Buena Vista 
Jo. 68 and Elenore Bianchi of £7 
'espcro No. 1 18, both in San Franc- 
en. 

The Fund was established in 
lemory of our Grand President, 
.eslye A. Hicks, who passed away 
hile in office, in 1954. At the time 
here was a dire need for a fund to 
upplement the medical needs ol 
lembers residing in the Native 
)aughters of the Golden West Home. 
Each committee member is appointed 
3 serve for three years, becoming 
hairman in her third year. 
; On March 21, 1970 the committee 
i planning to have a tea at the home 
or the benefit of this fund. There 
tol be a program in addition to 
efreshments. All members of our 
)rder are invited to attend. 



committee announced the American 

Field Service student lmm.ii Billkh 
from Germany will speak before the 
parlor at the next meeting Visiting 

Committee made donations in mem 

ory of two charter members, Ruth 
Fuller and Josie Stoddard. 

The drill team, performing under 
the direction of Edith Goblc carried 
red, white and blue flowers and were 
wearing banners of red. white and 
blue to carry out the Grand Presi- 
dent's theme of Americanism. Before 
making the presentation of a mon- 
etary gift and tablecloth to the Grand 
President Eva Moretti read a poem 
written by Marie Richards, especially 
honoring Grand President Nancy J. 
Conens. The tablecloth was made by 
President Ila Allenby. It had won 
three awards in competition at differ- 
ent Fairs. The Grand President in- 
troduced her traveling companion, 
her mother, Lillian Stern of Piedmont 
No. 87, Oakland. 

Before the meeting a dinner was 
enjoyed with 56 members present. 
The Grand President did the honor 
of presenting t w o 25-year pins to 
members Dorothy Galletti and Helen 
Cummings. After the meeting refresh- 
ments of cookies, punch, tea and 
coffee were served at a table decorat- 
ed in red, white and blue. 



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SHASTA DAISY I Ml 

Shasta Daisy Unit No. 39, Redding 
initiated two new members: Brandi 
Jo Borges and Edyth Kohn on Jan- 
uary 19. This brings the membership 
up to 35 members. 

In November, the members had 
a booth at the Hiawatha Parlor 
bazaar. In December a Mother- 
daughter dinner and Christmas party 
was enjoyed. 

February 12 has been set for a 
public card party. "Miss Shasta 
Daisy", a doll with a complete 
wardrobe will be given away to some 
lucky ticket holder. 



OFFICIAL VISIT ITINERARY 

State Chairman Dolores M. Ferenz, G.O.S. to 

Junior Units — Native Daughters of the Golden West 



OK I BRAGG 

Stormy weather didn't dampen the 
pirit or enjoyment of members 
'hen Grand President Nancy J. 
'onens visited Fort Bragg No. 210, 
n January 8, 1970, on her official 
isit. She was introduced at the altar 
nd escorted to her seat of honor. 
'he Supervising District Deputy 
irand President and DGP Elaine 
[enderson of Fort Bragg Parlor were 
Iso introduced and escorted to seats 
f honor. During the ceremonies of 
litiation fourteen new members be- 
ame sisters of Fort Bragg Parlor. 

The Welfare report was made that 
tree baskets were delivered to needy 
imilies at Christmas. Entertainment 

iBRUARY, 1970 



Monday, January 19 — 8:00 p.m., Las Amiguitas No. 33 Buena Vista 

School, Walnut Creek 

Tuesday, February 3 — 7:30 p.m., Eshcolita No. 26 Native Sons Hall, 

Napa 
Saturday, February 14 — Afternoon, Fruitvale No. 22 ... 3246 E. 14th Street, 

Oakland 

Saturday, February 28 — 2:00 p.m.. Argonaut No. 3 Veterans Memorial 

(30th Anniversary) Bldg.. Berkelev 

Saturday, March 7 — Afternoon, Princesa del Mar No. 40 Eagles Hall. 

Santa Barbara 

Monday, March 9 — 7:30 p.m.. Estrellas de Oro No. 37 Cora Hargitt 

School, Norwalk 
Tuesday, March 17 — 7:30 p.m.. Camellia No. 15 Masonic Hall. 

Anderson 

Friday, March 20 — Evening, Sequoia No. 27 Redwood Cit\ 

Saturday, April 4 — Afternoon, Golden Poppy No. 38 San Francisco 

Monday, April 6 — 7:30 p.m., Shasta Daisy No, 39 N.D.G.W. Hall. 

Redding 
Friday, April 10 — Evening, Menio No. 10 Menlo Recreation Center. 

Menlo Park 



IN MEMOKIAM 




Not lost to those that love them, 
Sot dead, just gone before; 
still live in our memory. 
Aiul they will iorever more. 

Haskell Cuddy, Caliz de Oro No. 
206, December 10. 

I ucinda Elarrell, Forrest No. 86, Dec- 
ember 6. 

l\.i Babeock, Fresno No. 1S7. November 
:4. 

Bertha Plasmier. Golden Gate No. 158. 
December 9. 

Bessie Wilson, Hiawatha No. 140. Dec- 
ember 14. 

knih Willis Fuller. Fort Bragg No. 210. 

December 12. 
Bildena Swingle. Plumas Pioneer No. 219, 

November 12. 

I lorence Bodeman, Twin Peaks No. 185, 

December 14. 
Henrielta Quevillon. Caliz de Oro No. 206, 

December 17. 
Edna Spielbauer, Copa de Oro No. 105, 

December 15. 
Lillian Young. Laurel No. 6, December 1. 
Elida Wells. Berendos No. 23. December 

19. 

Bessie Hutchison. Laurel No. 6. Decem- 
ber 18. 

Mae Jackson. Dolores No. 169. Decem- 
ber 20. 

Ruby Brown Maston, Tule Vista No. 305. 
December 17. 

Ma\ M. Stanton. Manzanita No. 29, Dec- 
ember 19. 

Lottie Patterson, Sutter No. Ill, Decem- 
ber 23. 

Josie Stoddard. Fort Bragg No. 210, Dec- 
ember 21. 

Dorothy Spencer. Verdueo No. 240, Dec- 
ember 28. 

Mary Jane Berger, Ursula No. 1, Decem- 
ber 30. 

Pearl Sellman. Colus No. 194, December 
12. 

Mary L. Carter, Las Flores del Mar No 
301, January 2, 1970. 

Winifred M. Hefner, Gold of Ophir No 
190, January 3, 1970. 

Charlotte McComb, Cerrito de Oro No 
306, December 18. 

Olivetta Block. Angelita No. 32. January 
7. 1970. 

Juanita Avery Pettis, El Tejon No. 239, 
December 24. 



01 I l< I vi \ i.Mi 

Approximately 100 members were 
present to g r e e I Grand President 
Nancj i Conens when she made her 
first Official visit in iy7() in San 
Francisco < OUnty, to Mission No. 
227, Genevieve No. 132 and Golden 
Cute No. 158, January 12. 

Fifteen of the San Francisco 
Count) Deputies were on hand to 
act as an escort for Nancy as she 
was brought to the podium. The 
opening ceremony was presented by 
Genevieve Parlor. The following 




GVP Bondanza and C,T McCarthy 

dignitaries were introduced: GVP 
Irene Bondanza, GM Virgilia Mc- 
Combs, GS Lucille Kimbark, GOS 
Dolores Ferenz; Grand Trustees 
Marie Landini and Helen McCarthy: 
PGPs Evelyn Carlson, Emily Ryan. 
Orinda Giannini, Ethel Enos. Jewel 
McSvveeney, and SDDGP Ann 
Shaw. 




PGP Evelyn I. Carlson 

The initiatory work was put on by 
Golden Gate Parlor. The two cand- 
idates were Marie Doyle for Mission 
and Margaret Creighton for Gene- 
vieve. Closing ceremony was pre- 
sented by Mission, acting president 
being Inga Meyer. 




PGP Emily Ryan 

The theme for the affair vvi 
"Scholarship", t h e meeting bein 
presented as "Scholarship Parlor. 




PGP Jewel McSweenex 




PGP Orinda G. Giannini 

CALIFORNIA HERALCl 



ack board and hooks were scattei 
I at the various stations to depict 
c idea. Donations from the involved 
triors were presented for "Scholai 
i ip Fund." 
The Grand President spoke on her 
cent trip to Valley Forge and stated 
Bt the NDGW is the only state 
ganization invited to participate, 
le also told about helping to de- 
bate NDGW/NSGW float at the 
Ke Parade in Pasadena. 
Fifty year and twenty five year 
ablems were presented to members 
Golden Gate parlor by the Grand 
resident. Lucille Kaull of Mission 
as the organist for the meeting. 



VST GRAND PRESIDENT 
UDREY D. BROWN 

On Saturday evening, December 
1, over 200 guests joined with Past 
rand President Audrey D. Brown 
celebrating her fifty years o f 
embership in Sutter Parlor No. 111. 
| a champagne reception in the 
storic Governor's Mansion in 
icramento. Invitations had been ex- 
nded to all Grand Officers, Past 
rand Presidents, members of Sutter 
irlor and other close friends of Mrs. 
rown and their husbands. As Mrs. 
rown told one guest her one regret 
as that she could not include all of 
:r friends but because of regulations 
(verning the number of persons per- 
itted in the Mansion at one time, 
at was not possible. 
The Mansion was beautiful with 
I gala holiday trimmings, a sixteen 
ot silver-tip Christmas tree was 
aced in the large bay window in 
e main Parlor — this tree was 
:corated in the manner used at 
e turn of the century. Popcorn and 
anberries strung in long streamers. 
Jored balls, etc. Potted poinsettias 
inked the sides of each fireplace 

the rooms on the ground floor; 
mquets of red roses and golden 
irysanthemums were on the various 
i b 1 e s and chests and the buffet 
ble was centered with a white milk 
iss punch bowl filled with an 
rangement of flowers in the colors 

the Order. White gladiolas, chrys- 
ithemums and stocks, red carna- 

BRUARY, 1970 



tions. and yellow daisies and button 
chrysanthemums. 

Background music was furnished 

DJI Rosalie Brand (who has been 

soloist at the California Exposition 

for a number of years) at the piano 
and Margaret Heilbron on the violin. 
Personnel from the Department of 
Parks and Recreation escorted those 
guests who were interested in a 
guided tour of the upper floor. 

Mrs. Brown's three daughters and 
their husbands assisted in receiving 
her guests. Mrs. B. D. Arnold is a 
member of Mary /-.'. Bell Parlor in 
Dixon, while Mrs. George Fit/morns 
and Mrs. Fredrick J. Mulligan Jr., 
arc members of Sutler Parlor. Mrs. 
lit/morris has retained her member- 
ship in Sutter Parlor although she 
resides in Taft. Kern County. Mrs. 
Thomas Oliver Muller (her grand- 
daughter) and her husband also 
assisted with hostess duties. Mrs. 
Brown's three young granddaughters 
Cathy and Nancy Mulligan and Joyce 
Fitzmorris were present. 

Mrs. Brown received her guests 
wearing a coin gold and white sari 
and her corsage was white butter- 
fly orchids. Grand President Nancy 
J. Conens presented her with a 50 
year emblem and complimented her 
for her years of service to the Order 
and then at Mrs. Brown's request 
sang "Little Doggie in the Window". 
This song had been very popular 
during the time she was Grand 
President and Mrs. Conens had sung 
it at many functions. 

Among those present were Mrs. 
Conens and her mother; Junior Past 
Grand President Hazel Mallette and 
her husband Everal; Grand Vice 
President Irene Bondanza and her 
husband Joseph; Grand Marshal 
Virgilia McCombs, Grand Trustees 
Marie Landini, Betty Read Curlich. 
Marian E. McGuire and her husband 
Paul, Mrs. Meredyth Burnett and 
Grand Outside Sentinel Dolores 
Ferenz and her husband James. Past 
Grand Presidents Evelyn I. Carlson. 
Jewel McSweeney, Doris M. Gerrish. 
Norma Hodson and her husband 
"Hod", Irma M. Caton, Edna C. 
Williams, Alice D. Shea, Fern E. 
Adams and her husband Emmett. 
Also present from the Native Sons 



ot the Golden Weil were Grand 2nd 
Vice President Dave Mason III and 

his wile Diane; Past Grand President 
Philip ( Wilkins and his wife Sue 
(Mr. Wilkins had just been appointed 
United States District Judge for the 
eastern district of California In 
President Richard M. Nixnin. 
Grand Historian Prank Christy and 
his wile Mildred; Deputy Grand 
President to Sutter Parlor Marge 

Edmonds of Woodland Parlor and 

her husband Kenneth. 



ihe. 
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ORINDA 

Oriiulu Parlor's Party held at 
Urban Center. San Francisco, had 
approximately 32 in attendance. The 
three vice-presidents. Vivian Hall. 
Eleanor Begovich and L ore 1 1 a 
Wischer, were in charge and pre- 
pared a very splendid celebration. A 
catered dinner was served and the 
menu included hot rolls and butter. 
a vegetable salad. Hawaiian Chicken, 
with herb rice and dessert and coffee. 

A^ the guests arrived, they gave 
their gifts, then chose a balloon which 
had a name of a tune of a song 
written on it. When the gifts were 
given out, the names of the tunes 
were called and if the name matched 
the balloon, the member received that 
particular gift. The tables were de- 
corated in a festive spirit. 

Verena Friede, organist, played the 
piano, while the members sang. The 
"chef" also entertained with a lovely 
song. PGP Orinda Giannini passed 
around a lovely box of chocolates, 
while Esther Bloom presented each 
person with a gaily-decorated cir- 
cular tube containing wrapped 
candies. Everyone had a marvelous 
evening and a good start for the year. 



Ki< HMOND 

Richmond No. 147 celebrated 
Us annual "H a t Party" at a 
dinnei at a restaurant in S a n 
Pablo. I he Grand Prize winner 
was Gladys Figueiredo. the most 
glamorius prize winner was 
i h e President, Mary Zehrung. 
Georgia Barber won the prize for 
the hum original hat. Attending 
dinner was Pauline Madera of 
Brooklyn No. 157. deputy to 
Richmond Parlor. 

The Parlor initiated two mem- 
bers recently. Aileen Johnson 
and Marion Jessee, both of 
Richmond. The Parlor hostessed 
the Grand Parlor Sessions Com- 
mittee at the January meeting. 
Those serving on this committee 
were: Mary Zehrung, Maud 
Alexander. Louise Perry, and 
Henrietta Freitas. 







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PAPERWEIGHTS . . . 
{Continued from Page 7) 

peratnre to avoid cracking on t 
inside of the weight around the pi 
tern. As soon as the glass becai 
pliable, tongs, shears, spatula ai 
blow pipe were used to apply cliffc 
ent shades to the existing depressid 
and erections. 

At this point, the artist would se 
himself in a cradle with its set 
metal arms across which rested t 
pontil rod. The craftsman moved t 
rod quickly back and forth with 1 
left hand while a spatula, held in 1 
right hand, shaped the molten mass 
its desired size and form. 

Though it was virtually impc 
sible to exactly duplicate a desig 
glassmakers generally avoided evi 
related productions. Each was 
masterpiece in itself, with a uniq 
decorative singularity incorporatii 
such chromatic subjects as flowei 
fruits, snakes anl lizards. 

Glass weights were never made ft 
commercial purposes, a fact whii 
partially accounts for their preser 
day paucity. In addition, relative 
few artisans possessed the skill ai 
technical knowledge essential to tl 
fabrication of fine paperweights 

A rather sizeable number of vai 
ations can be found in the Dohe: 
Collection, some fashioned into base 
for vases, penholders and bottle}) 
others moulded into decorative mat I 
tel ornaments. Over a dozen minia| 
ture weights are included, one cjl 
which is attributed to the Sandwicl 
Glass Works. The exquisite glai' 
door-knobs were probably fashionei 
by Apsley Pellatt. 

The fascinating collection of gla:l 
paperweights assembled by the lafl 
Carrie Estelle Doheny, outstandinl 
for their lustrous softness and excel! 
ent craftsmanship, is highly regardel 
for the fine artistic sense clearly evid 
ent in the diverse nature of its card 
fully selected specimens. Truly thei 
are mille flore poems in glass! 



Middle Class- Those who manage t 

live in public as the rich do, by living i 

private as the poor do. — Wall Stitt 

Joumi 

■r i i 

Some persons cause happiness whereve 

they go: others whenever they go. 

CALIFORNIA HERAL 



OLORKS 

The sixty-first birthday dinner of 
olores No. 169 was observed on 
muarv 20 at the Florestine Gardens 
ith 35 members in attendance. I ta- 
bles were attractive with English 
illy. Notebooks and pens were given 
each guest. President Melissa Hall 
ked each member to introduce her- 
lf and state the number of years as 
member of Dolores Parlor. 
Guests included DGP Bcrnadetle 
illivan and PGP Evelyn I. Carlson, 
he three deputies apppointed by 
rand President Nancy J. Conens 
Dm Dolores Parlor were also in 
tendance: Claire Brake. Leora Wil- 
n and Rosy Cully. 



ITINERARY. . . 

I Continued from Page 8) 




CHSCHOLTZIA 

Eschscholtzia No. 1 1 2 held in- 
lllation of officers on January 20. 
stalling officers was DGP Dorice 
>ung assisted by Mmes. Evans, 
illoway, Smith, Farrington, Barnes 
d Purdy. The new officers are 
etta Ahlgren, president and her 
rps of officers which includes 
icile Webster, Eleanor Hendricks, 
ay Aker, Barbara Duffy, Kate 
:rthelsen, Jessie Burcell, Barbara 
oss, Dorice Young, Ellen Skiller, 
irley Gilmore, Bernice Smith, 
lita Tucker and Dorothy Hayden. 
>lleen McCallister was the soloist. 
After the ceremonies the members 
:nt to the home of Dorice Young 
iere she and Bernice Smith served 
licious refreshments. A social hour 
is enjoyed. 

At a recent meeting Bernice Smith 
is presented her fifty-year pin by 
3P Dorice Young. 

■f -f y 

HITHER 

Whit tier Parlor No. 298 meets 
i 1st and 3rd Wednesdays at the 
instance League, 6339 S. Green- 
if Ave, Whittier. The mailing 
dress is Whittier Parlor No. 298, 
DGW. P. O. Box 15, Whittier, 
ilifornia. 



MRU 



Fairfax No. 225. lainel/xi No. 231 | ;,irfax* 

Concord No. 323, Las Juntas No. 221 (uncord* 

Californiana No. 247, Los Angeles No. 124 |.,,s Angeles* 

Meet Your Neighbor Breakfast. Marin County 
Portola No. 172, San Francisco So. 261 San Francisco* 

8 Morada No. 199 Modesto* 

9 Mary E. Bell No. 224, Vacaville No. 293 

1 1 Sacramento District Luncheon 

12 Children's Foundation Bruncheon Fresno 

13 Eshcol No 16, La Junta No. 203 Napa 

14 Twin Peaks No. 185 — 60th Anniversary San Francisco 

15 AnoNuevoNo. 180, Vista del Mar No. 155 Pescadero* 
18 Santa Clara County District Luncheon 

20 Colus No. 194, South Butte No 226, Oak Leaf No. 285 Colusa* 

22 Charter Oak No. 292, Tule Vista No. 305 \ isalia* 

23 Las Flores No. 262, Coalinga No. 270 Avenal* 

24-25 Past Presidents' Assembly Upland 

27 Santa Ana No. 235, Grace No. 242, Silver Sands No. 286 .... Santa Ana* 

28 Las Flores del Mar No. 301 Oceanside* 

30 San Gabriel Valley No. 281 —25th Anniversary San Gabriel* 

* Official visits are marked with astericks 



WHEN? 




BY J. J. FRIIS 

Do you remember on those Sunday 
afternoons when you invited your 
friends over for a musical potpourri? 
Oftentimes top musicians would plav 
for friends before opening at the 
San Francisco Opera House or make 
their debut in New York. 



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BRUARY, 1970 



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THE TOWN OF 
GARDEN GROVE 

by Leroy Doig 

Continuation of growth of Garden 
Grove. The beginnings of the town, 
earthquakes, flood, churches, news- 
papers and other businesses. Fine sel- 
ection of pictures; index. Cloth bound. 
$7.50 (plus 80? tax and mailing). 



THE CRY OF THE BITTERN 

by Virginia Petty Tidball 

Excellent narrative verse depicting! 
the life of John the Baptist and events' 
of the time. Exciting and penetrating!) 
$2.00 (plus 600 tax and mailing.) 



DEMETRIOS DISCOVERED 
AMERICA 

by Bernard J. Oliver, Ph. D. 

Biography of Demetrios Stylianou who i 
has dedicated his life to help the men- 
tally handicapped find a place in soci- 
ety. $3.75 (plus 65? tax and mailing). I 



HOW TO BE A 
SUCCESSFUL PERSON 

by Bernard J. Oliver, Ph. D. 

Valuable psychological guide to ef- 
fective living. 
$2.50 (plus 720 tax and mailing) 



SPECIAL COLLECTIONS 




Official Publication of 
THE NATIVE DAUGHTERS of the GOLDEN WEST 




MAPCI . 197C * 4C* 



SAN FERNANDO MISSION 




California Herald 



•PRESERVING THE PAST FOR THE FUTURE" 



Vol t mi W II 



March, 1970 



Number I 



^^ utilise ~-Z>otuicG 

4/tq ixTY-oNi 11 m< s ago the tirst out- 
•)Q) door Baster sunrise service was 
held in the United States. On April 
II. 1909, Frank A Miller founder 
nt the Riverside Mission Inn, led a 
group o\' about one hundred persons 
to the foot of the Serra Cross on Mt. 
Rubidoux. It was dark and chilly as 
the pilgrims commenced their ascent 
to the tiny, boulder-strewn peak. 

\s the first rays of the morning 
sun pierced the eastern horizon the 
clear tones of a trumpet called the 
assemblage to worship. Joyous Eas- 
ter hymns were sung to the accom- 
paniment of a portable organ. A 
prayer was uttered and the service 
ended. 

The worshipers left Mt. Rubi- 
doux with a sense of spiritual exhil- 
aration. Probably none of them real- 
ized that they had participated in 
an event that would become a great 
annual affair and would serve as the 
inspiration for similar services 
throughout the nation. 



I HAT EASTER DAY 

That Easter Da\ with joy was bright. 
The sun shone out with fairer light. 
When to their longing eyes restored. 
The apostles saw their risen Lord. 

O Lord of all, with us abide 
In this our joyful Eastertide; 
From every weapon death can wield 
Thine own redeemed forever shield. 

All praise. O risen Lord, we give 
To thee, who, dead, again dost live; 
To God the Father equal praise. 
And God the Holy Ghost, we raise. 



CONTENTS THIS MONTH 






First Easter Sunrise Service [I 

Drop-Outs, by Alice T. Smith .,1 

I 

The Oak of the Golden Dream, by Dr. Leo J. Friis 'I 

MisicSn San Fernando fl 

The Grand President's Corner (1 

Parlor News "' 

In Memoriam 9 j 

Junior Unit News lcj 

Silver Anniversary, by Carolyn R. Riggs 15' 




SOME CHEFS ARE PAID 
TO COOK OVER HOT 
FLAMES. YOU'RE NOT. 
YOU CAN LIVE BETTER 
ELECTRICALLY. WITH- 
OUT FLAMES. WITH- 
OUT EXCESSIVE KITCHEN HEAT. WITHOUT BY- 
PRODUCTS OF COMBUSTION. MAKE YOUR NEXT 
HOME TRULY MODERN. MAKE IT A MEDALLION 
HOME OR APARTMENT. AVAILABLE IN ALL PRICE 
RANGES. 

Southern California Edison 



J. J. FRIIS 

Publisher 



LEO J. FRIIS 
Editor 



JANE FRIIS 

Public Relations 



„ ,. x Published Monthly by J. J. Friis and Leo J. Friis, owners and publishers, Anaheim, 
California. All Rights Reserved. EDITORIAL AND GENERAL OFFICES: Anaheim, California. 
Mailing Address: P.O. Drawer 4243, Anaheim, California 92803. ADVERTISING OFFICE: 301 
N. Parton St., Santa Ana, Calif. 92701. CHANGE OF ADDRESS AND SUBSCRIPTIONS: Mail 
correspondence to CALIFORNIA HERALD, Circulation Department, P.O. Drawer 4243, Anaheim, 
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POST OFFICE: RETURN POSTAGE GUARANTEED. Please send magazine with address change 
to California Herald, P.O. Drawer 4243, Anaheim, California 92803. SUBSCRIPTION RATES: 
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other countries: Please apply for rates. Entered as second-class matter at the Post Office at 
Anaheim, California, under the Act of March 3, 1879. No part of this magazine may be re- 
printed without specific permission. 



CALIFORNIA HERALD 



BMP-OUTS 

BTJULI€I f. BHITO 



M N EARLY SCENE OF A halt 

gQ century ago shows a rag-man 
i(so called) trudging up and down 
he street on foot, a bulging gunny- 
^ack slung over his shoulder, his 
back bent by its weight. In a cracked 
yoice he chants, "Old rags, old 
bottles." The procedure is then for 
the lady of the house to gather up 
[ill the accumulation of rags and 
bottles which has collected since this 
peddler's last visit, and give it to 
trim. This will include old bitters, 
bottles, patent medicine containers, 
and fruit jars which are damaged, 
poubtless a most precarious living 
was achieved by the sale of this 
rubbish, but there was no welfare in 
those days. 

Today it is unwise to discard a 
really old bottle, no matter what it 
once contained, until you check its 
value. If you like to learn interesting 
facts about this bit of Americana, 
you would have enjoyed the first 
annual show given by the Orange 
County Antique Bottle Club Febru- 
ary 28th to March 1st, at the Retail 
Clerks' Union Hall in Buena Park. 

If you are looking for a hobby, 
here is a chance to become a part of 
the fastest growing ('tis said) hobby 
in the nation. Bottle collectors, by 
their own admission, frequently are 
down in the dumps, but only because 
there they find buried treasure. Gold? 
No, but who needs gold when you 
may turn up an old bottle worth 
$500 or maybe as much as $2000 
discarded by you or me, who never 
dreamed of its value. Unbelievable? 
— well, seeing is believing, as a rule. 



(Continued on Page 10) courtesy. Lewis C. Spencer Family 
FEBRUARY, 1970 




TKM SVITH PHOTO 
PAGE 3 





u 


MM? ' 




*^»^"w.s« 




TKM SMITH PHOTOI 



l^k<2 \_Jak on iltz 

by Z±z)i. Keo £/. ^J tiis 



•t was on March 9, 1842, that 
Q Francisco Lopez y Arballo and a 
servant named Julio were searching 
for stray horses in the San Fernando 
Hills. At noon the men sat down for 
a siesta beneath an oak tree over- 
shadowing a small stream in San 
Feliciano Canon, now called Placenta 
Canyon. Legend has it that Lopez 



fell asleep and dreamed that he had 
found gold. For this reason the oak 
under which he rested is called the 
"Oak of the Golden Dream." 

Whether Lopez slept or dreamed 
cannot be proved nor disproved, but 
one thing is certain, he found gold 
and his discovery was through an 
accident. While sitting by the stream 



Lopez espied some wild onions which 
he dug up with his sheath knife. He . 
observed tiny particles of a glittering 
yellow metal in the earth attached to | 
the onions roots. Excitedly he called I 
to Julio. What was this gold? 

Collecting some of the soil the men 
returned to San Fernando Mission 

(Continued on Page 14) 

CALIFORNIA HERALD 



tMisiovi— .San ^emando 



N SEPTEMBER 8 1797 Mision 
San Fernando, Rcy dc 
Espana, the seventeenth in the chain 
of California Missions, was founded 
by Padre Fermin Francisco de 
Lasucn in the Encino Valley. The 
Mission was dedicated to Ferdinand 
111. King of Spain. Father Lasuen 
came down from San Miguel to Santa 
Barbara, especially for the founda- 
tion, and from thence with Sergeant 
Olivera and a military escort. These, 
with Padre Francisco Dumetz, the 
priest chosen to have charge and his 
assistant, Francisco Favier Uria. 



composed, with a large group of 

Indians, the witnesses of the solemn 
ceremonial. 

From the baptismal register it was 
seen that ten children were baptized 
the first day, and thirteen adults 
were received early in October. By 
the end of 1797 there were 55 
neophytes. Three y ears after its 
founding there were 310 Indians with 
the Mission. Its year's crop was 1000 
bushels of grain. 

In December 1806. an adobe 
church with a tile roof was con- 
secrated, which on December 2 1 



IK 1 2 was severely injuried by an 

earthquake Now beams were needed 
to support the walls In IK IS. a new 
chapel was built. Storehouses, a 
tannery, carpenter s h p. tallow 
works, blacksmith shop, mills, grains, 
and livestock were added year h\ 
year to the mission's holdings. 

After t h e secularization of the 
mission in 1834, several thousand 
acres, including the lands of Mision 
San Fernando were leased in Dec- 
ember. 1845 to Andres Pico, brother 
Of Governor Pio Pico. In order to 

(Continued on l'at>e 12) 







Mision San Fernando 



MARCH, 19/0 



The Grand 
President's Corner 



GR \M> PR1 SUM M 

Nancj i < onena (Mn I 
i I 1 1 Allendale Avenue 
Oakland, < alifornia 94619 




GRAND SF.CRETARY 

1 ucillc F. Kimbark (Mrs. C. F.) 
2271-32nd Avenue 

ACisco, California 941 16 
Office: 703 Market Street, Room 612 
s.m Francisco 94103 Dial 362-4127 



NANCY J. CONENS 



Since I las! wrote to you, the days 
have been filled with many miles of 
travel and meeting main nev, sisters 
throughout the State. It is gratifying 

to realize hov. devotedly our sisters 
are working to promote the projects 

Of the Order It seems in each area 
a particular project is of special 
interest and all efforts go into its 
behalf. Main Parlors have under- 
taken the presentation of American 
or Bear Rags to Schools. Girl Boj 
Scouts, B r o w n i e Troops, Public 
Buildings, etc. and I am very pleased 
to know this is a prime object this