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Full text of "Catalogue of the officers and students of the Law School of the Cincinnati College"

1881/82.- 
1886/87 




CATALOGUE 



Officers and Students 



LAW SCHOOL 



CINCINNATI COLLEGE, 



FORTY-NINTH ACADEMICAL YEAR, 1881-82, 



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WITH A STATEMENT OF THE COURSE OF INSTRUCTION. 

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C INCI N N A T I 
1882. 




CATALOGUE 



Officers and Students 



LAW SCHOOL 



CINCINNATI COLLEGE, 



FORTY-NINTH ACADEMICAL YEAR, 1881-82, 



WITH A STATEMENT OF THE COURSE OF INSTRUCTION. 



CINCINNATI: 
1882. 



CORPORATION. 

Trustees of the Cincinnati College. 

— ..<>.- «3"£>-.<>...— 

WILLIAM HOWARD NEFF,* 

President. 

ALEX. H. McGUFFEY, 

Sec'y and Treas. 

SAMUEL P. BISHOP. 

SAMUEL J. BROADWELL. 

JULIUS DEXTER. 

JOHN DAVIS, M. D. 

GEORGE HOADLY. 

WILLIAM HOOPER. 

MARCELLUS B. HAGANS. 

Rev. Z. M. HUMPHREY, D. D.f 

Rt. Rev. THOS. A. JAGGAR, D. D. 

RUFUS KING. 

EDM. W. KITTREDGE. 

JOSEPH LONGWORTH. 

SAMUEL LOWRY. 

STANLEY MATTHEWS. * 

EDWARD SARGENT. 

ELKANAH WILLIAMS, M. D. 



* Elected President December 29, 1881. 

t Elected President April 9, 1881 ; Died November 13, 



FACULTY. 



JACOB D. COX, LL. D., Dean, 

PROFESSOR OF THE LAW OF CIVIL PROCEDURE, EVIDENCE, AND 
ELEMENTARY LAW. 



RUFUS KING, LL. D., 

PROFESSOR OF CONSTITUTIONAL LAW AND THE LAW OF REAL PROPERTY. 



GEORGE HOADLY, LL. D., 

PROFESSOR OF THE LAW OF APPELLATE JURISDICTION AND PRACTICE IN THE 

FEDERAL COURTS. 



HENRY A. MORRILL, M. A., 

PROFESSOR OF THE LAW OF CONTRACTS AND TORTS. 

MANNING F. FORCE, M. A., LL. B., 

PROFESSOR OF EQUITY JURISPRUDENCE AND CRIMINAL LAW. 

JOHN W. STEVENSON, M. A., of Kentucky, 

PROFESSOR OF COMMERCIAL LAW AND CONTRACTS. 



SENIOR CLASS. 



Dwight Archibald, B. a., 
Centre College, 

Albert Irving Ashburn, . 

Richard L. Ayer, B. s., 

Nat. Nor. School ; ll.b., Iowa State Univ 
Attorney at Law, 

John Noble Bailey, 

John Alexander Bingham, . 

Thomas Vance Brodnix, \ 
Attorney at Law, ) 

Simon Don Cameron, b. ph., ) 
Mt. Union College, j 

John R. Carter, .... 

William Matthew Carter,* . 

John Chester Chaney, 
Attorney at Law, 

Alfred Shepherd Coffeen, b. a., ) 

L T rbana University, j 

Charles Cassilly Cook, 
George Doddridge Copeland, . 
Leonard Jacob Crawford, 
Abel Seymour Cunningham, 

Robert W. Ellison Davis, b. a., 

Denison University, 

James Anthony Divine, 

Lewis John Dolle, ll. B.,f 
Cincinnati College, 

Frank Doty, 

Joseph Clifford Douglas, 

John Milton Downey, 



,1 



. Danville, Ky. 
Batavia. 

. Sweetwine. 

Spencerville. 
. Shobonier, 111. 

Paulding. 

. Salem. 

Cincinnati. 
Cincinnati. 

Sullivan, Ind. 

. Wyoming. 

Clifton. 
. Marion. 

Newport, Ky. 
. Covington, Ky. 

Cincinnati. 

. Monterey. 

Cincinnati. 

Middletown. 
Chillicothe. 
. Jackson. 



Not a candidate for degree. t Post graduate. 



8 



LAW SCHOOL, 



Edmond S. Dye, 

Frank Ford, .... 

George William Funk, [ 
Attorney at Law, ) 

George Blackburn Goodhart, b. a., 
Lafayette College, 

Richard Keith Gurman,* 

John M. Hamilton, 

Clarence Hart, 

Daniel Vantreese Herider, Jr., . 

Richard Hingson, . 

Thomas Hamer Hogsett, . 

Charles Brooks Holmes, 

Arnold Alexander Ingram, 

George G. Jennings, 

Raymond Allston Johnson, 

Arthur Dwight Knapp, . 

Charles Henry Kyle, b. a., ] 
Wooster University, j 

George Washington Lindeman, ll. 
Cincinnati College, 

John Morton LaTourrette, 

James Robert MackJ Jr., 

Moritz Macks, .... 

W. S. Magly, . . . * . 

John Henry Martin, . 

David Meade Massie, b. a., j 
College of New Jersey, j 

Joseph West Molyneaux, . 

James Joseph McCarten, 

Mark Antony McCarty, b. ph., 
Mt. Union College, 



B.,t 



Eaton. 
Washington C. H. 

Logansport, Ind. 

Harrison. 

Covington, Ky. 

Bellefontaine. 

Greenville. 

Cincinnati. 

Cincinnati. 

Hillsboro. 

Cumberland. 

Wooster. 

Caldwell. 

Leesburg. 

Ravenna. 

Cedarville. 

Cincinnati. 

Middletown. 
Columbia. 
Cincinnati. 
Cincinnati. 
Mt. Auburn. 

Chillicothe. 

Oxford. 
Cincinnati. 

Middletown. 



* Not a candidate for degree, t Post graduate. 



CINCINNATI COLLEGE. 



Elmer Ellsworth McKeever, . 
William Edwin Owens, | 

Attorney at I aw , j 

Emmett Newton Parker, 

Marshall Fleming Parrish, m. a., \ 
Ohio University, j 

Buchanan Perin, ..... 

David Pierce, . . ... 

Richard Butler Powell, ) 

Attorney at Law, ) 

Charles Edward Prior, 

Ernest Charles Sebastian Rehm, b. a., ) 
Marietta College, j 

William Frederick Ring, b. a., ) 
Urbana University, j 

Abel C. Risinger, b. s., \ 
Buchtel College, j 

John Robbins, ..... 

John Thomas Schoonover, 

Howard Elder Sears, .... 

George Washington Sieber, 

Rufus Scofield Simmons, . 

Samuel Watson Smith, Jr., b. a., ) 
Brown University, j 

John Wesley Spindler, b. a., j 
Ohio Wesleyan University, ) 

Frank Overton Suire, b. a., j 
Harvard College, j 

James Pryor Tarvin, ) 
Attorney at Law, j 

Samuel Wolfstein, ..... 

Thomas Stokely Wood, b. a., ) 
Kenyon College, j 

Arthur Kimball Woodbury, . 

William Elwood Wynne,- 



Barnesville. 
. Somerset, Ky. 

Cincinnati. 

. New Lexington. 

Cincinnati. 
Camden. 

Carrollton, Ky. 

Cincinnati. 

Pomeroy. 

. Urbana. 

Eaton. 

. Jackson. 

Wapakoneta. 

Randolph. 

Akron. 
. Covington, Ky. 

Walnut Hills. 

. Circleville. 

Cincinnati. 

. Covington, Ky. 

Cincinnati. 

Steubenville. 

Walnut Hills. 
. Avondale. 



10 



LAW SCHOOL, 



JUNIOR CLASS. 



Erastus Bainbridge, . 

Samuel Logan Baker, 

William Henry Beavis, 

George Cribbs Berlin, 

Herbert Denman Blakemore, 

Leon Block, .... 

LaFayette Bloom, 

Francis William Brown, 

Charles Henry Carey, b. ph., ) 
Denison University, j> 

Harry Quinton Cleneay, b. a., ) 
Yale College, j 

Nathan Cohn, b. l., j 
University of Cincinnati, j 

Frederick James Converse, 

Delano Cordell, 

William Love Crawford, 

George Strong Daniels, 

Henry Danziger, . 

Edward Dienst, 

Patrick Joseph Donohue, 

Charles Henry Evans, 

Charles Drake Fisher, . 

John Galvin, . . . . 

Quincy Alanson Gillmore, b. 
Ohio Wesleyan University, 

Henry Gumble, . 

William Montague Hall, b. a., > 
Yale College, ) 

Warren Neander Hauck, 



i 



Owenton, Ky. 
Greensburg, Ind. 
Cleveland. 
Ironton. 
Cincinnati. 
Cincinnati. 
Cincinnati. 
Seymour, Ind. 

Cincinnati. 
Avondale. 

Cincinnati. 

Harrison. 

Cincinnati. 

Glendale. 

New York City. 

Cincinnati. 

Cincinnati. 

Cincinnati. 

Cincinnati. 

Cincinnati. 

Covington, Ky. 

Lorain. 

Columbus. 

Ashneld, Mass. 

Lawrenceburg, Ind. 



CINCINNATI COLLEGE 



11 



Edward Neblett Hidden, 

John Hubig, . 

Linn Walker Hull, 

Elias Jacoby, b. a., ) 

Ohio Wesleyan University, \ 

James Monroe Jones, 

Lanson B. C. Kirkendall, b. a., | 

Ohio University, \ 

John Charles Knapp, 

William Smith Little, 

Howard Benjamin Magruder, 

John Philip Maloney, 

James B. Matson, . 

Thomas Henry McConica, b. a., 
Ohio Wesleyan University, 

Horace Adelbert Merrill, 

Edward Wallace Pelton, b. a., | 
Dartmouth College, j 

Otto Pflueger, 

Napoleon Bonaparte Porter, b. s., 
Dartmouth College, 

Robert Camp Price, 

Christian Frederick Rapp, 

Albert Michael Reinhart, b. a., j 
St. Xavier's College, j 

John Van Buren Scarborrough, b. 
Amherst College, 

John Baptist Scheidemantle, . 

Henry Secrist, .... 

Warner Spencer Shultz, 

Arnold J. H. Speiser, 

William John Tobin, b. a., ) 

St. Xavier's College, j 

Dudley Palmer Wayne, b. s., ) 
Urbana University, j 



Madisonville. 

Cincinnati. 

Sandusky. 

Marion. 

College Hill. 

Dawkin's Mills. 

Cincinnati. 
Cincinnati. 
Port Clinton. 
Delaware. 
North Bend. 

Marengo. 

Ai. 

Cincinnati. 

Cincinnati. 

London. 

Avondale. 
Cincinnati. 

Cincinnati. 

Walnut Hills. 

Cincinnati. 
Cincinnati. 
Cincinnati. 
Cincinnati. 

Cincinnati. 
Avondale. 



12 LAW SCHOOL. 

Joseph William Weber, ..... Cincinnati. 

John Wentzel, ....... Riverside. 

John Thomas Williamson, .... Greenville. 

John Rogers Wright, ...... Riverside. 

Fred Murlin Youmans, ...... Cincinnati. 



Senior Class, . . . . . . . . 71 

Junior Class, ........ 56 

Total, .. . . . . . . .127 



LAW SCHOOL 



Cincinnati College 



This School was founded in May, 1833, by lawyers who had 
received their instruction in the Law School of Reeve & Gould, at 
Litchfield, or in the Dane Law School at Cambridge, and who sought 
to introduce the advantages of that method of the study of law into 
the West. It is understood to be the first Law School established 
west of the Alleghany Mountains. The first term began on the 7th 
of October, 1833. 

In the year 1835 the Law School was incorporated with the Cin- 
cinnati College, a literary and academic institution founded in the 
year 18 19 ; and from that time it has been conducted under the 
name of the " Law School of the Cincinnati College." As such it 
became permanently located in the College Buildings, on Walnut 
Street, in Cincinnati, and has been liberally endowed from the College 
funds for the establishment of professorships, and for the formation 
of a law library adequate to the purposes of the school. 



14 LAW SCHOOL, 



SESSIONS AND VACATIONS. 



The regular Course of Study occupies a period of nineteen 
months ; two terms of seven months each, and a recess of five months 
between the terms. There are two sessions in each term : one before, 
and one after the Christmas holidays. The first session commences 
on the Thursday next after the second Tuesday* in October, and 
closes with the Christmas holidays. The second session commences 
on the 2d of January, and closes on the last Wednesday in May. 
The Christmas vacation includes both Christmas and New-year's 
days, and is the only interruption in the continuity of the two sessions. 



ADMISSION. 



Applicants for admission may register their names and pay their 
tuition fees to the Dean of the Faculty, at the Library of the School, 
on the three days next before the commencement of the first session 
of each term. 

Applicants are admitted to the Junior Class upon satisfactory 
evidence of such advancement in ordinary academic education as will 
fit them to profit by the studies in the Law School ; but no formal 
examination is required. 

Applicants are admitted to the Senior Class upon a satisfactory 
examination in the course prescribed for the Junior Year. In addi- 
tion to such examination, and as a necessary condition of entering 
the Senior Class, the applicant must have completed the full Course 
of Study for the Junior Class at this School, or must present the 



* Election day in Indiana and Ohio, 

i 



CINCINNATI COLLEGE. 15 

diploma of another Law School, or a certificate of attendance for one 
year at such School ; or the certificate of an attorney at law, in good 
standing, showing that the applicant has diligently studied law, under 
his direction, for one year previous. 

The regular examination for admission to the Senior Class occurs 
on the first three days of the first session of the term. 

Applicants for a degree must register their names for the Senior 
Class with the Dean before the first day of November, and be in daily 
attendance thereafter. Students may enter the Senior Class subse- 
quently, but will not be graduated. 

Special students, not candidates for a degree, will be admitted to 
any of the exercises of the School without examination. 



COURSE OF STUDY. 



The School is divided into two classes, Junior and Senior, for 
each of which a special Course of Study is provided. 

The daily exercises consist of lectures and recitations from stand- 
ard text-books. Leading cases and collateral authorities, on the sub- 
ject under consideration, are frequently referred to rjy the Professor ; 
and, at the succeeding recitation, the class will be examined upon the 
cases and authorities thus cited, as well as upon the subject matter 
of the lesson. At each exercise hypothetical cases are put to the 
student as a means of developing the faculty of making a practical 
application of legal principles. Students are encouraged to put ques- 
tions freely to the instructor at all recitations. 

At the close of the second session a course of study to be pursued 
during the Summer recess will be prescribed for the Junior Class. 

Those who desire to take a special course can do so, and the 
tuition fees will vary in proportion to the amount of instruction given. 



16 LAW SCHOOL, 

The regular course of instruction is as follows : 

Junior Year. — Elementary Law, Gov. Cox; Contracts, Prof. 
Morrill ; Real Property, Gov. Cox 

The text-books are Blackstone's Commentaries and Kent's Com- 
mentaries. 

Senior Year. — Pleading and Civil Procedure, Gov. Cox ; Appel- 
late Jurisdiction and Practice in the Federal Courts,* jfudge Hoadly ; 
Torts, Prof. Morrill ; Real Property, Prof. King; Equity Jurispru- 
dence, jfudge Force; Mercantile Law and Contracts, Gov. Stevenson: 
Evidence, Gov. Cox ; Constitutional Law,* Prof. King; Criminal Law, 
jfudge Force. 

The text-books are Stephen on Pleading, Bliss on Code Pleading, 
Bigelow on Torts, Williams on Real Property, Bispham's Principles 
of Equity, Parsons on Contracts, Greenleaf on Evidence, Stephen on 
Evidence, and Harris' Criminal Law. 

Special instruction in the Constitution of the State of Ohio will 
be given to such of the Seniors as may desire it. 

By the rules of the University of Cincinnati, students in this 
School may take special studies in the University, free of charge, if 
found, on examination, qualified to enter such classes. 



POST GRADUATE COURSE. 



An advance course of study will be added whenever a class of 
sufficient number can be organized. It will be open to Graduates of 
this or other Law Schools, and junior members of the Bar, and will 
comprehend a course in the higher branches of the Law Merchant, 
Equity Jurisprudence, Admiralty Law, the Law of Corporations, Con- 
flict of Laws, and International Law. 

During the current session a course of lectures, in partial execution 
of the purpose stated, has been delivered. 



* The text-book has not yet been selected. 



CINCINNATI COLLEGE. 17 

DEGREES. 

The degree of Bachelor of Laws will be conferred by the Cor- 
poration upon all students who have been regularly admitted to the 
Senior Class, and have attended the full Course of Senior Lectures, 
and shall have satisfactorily passed the examination required for grad- 
uation. This examination is both oral and written, and is conducted 
by the Committee appointed by the Supreme Court of Ohio for the 
examination of candidates for the Bar. No student will be admitted 
to such examination, the number of whose unexcused absences is 
twenty per cent of the whole number of lectures during the Senior 
Year, or whose conduct shall have been otherwise exceptionable. 

The degrees are conferred on the last day of the term, and gradu- 
ates must attend in person to receive them. 

Graduates having the necessary qualifications of age and citizen- 
ship will be admitted to the Bar of Ohio without further examination. 



MOOT COURTS. 



Moot Courts are held each week during the year, commencing 
with the first Thursday in November. These are presided over by 
the Professors in turn, and members of the Senior Class are appointed 
to act as counsel. 

At each of the Moot Courts short but carefully prepared essays, 
on topics previously assigned, are required to be read.. , 

Those Courts over which the Dean presides are devoted exclu- 
sively to Exercises in Pleading. 

Attendance is compulsory upon the Seniors, but is optional with 
the Juniors. 

Moot clubs, limited in membership, are also formed among the 
students for voluntary exercises in Pleading, Practice, and Argument. 



18 LAW SCHOOL, 



LIBRARIES. 



The School has a Library of over two thousand volumes, com- 
prising the works of the best writers on law and jurisprudence, and 
the more important reports. It has been selected with special refer- 
ence to the wants of the School, and is devoted to its exclusive use. 
Large additions are annually made, a yearly appropriation of $1,500 
for that purpose being provided by the Corporation. The Library is 
open to the students daily, from 9 o'clock, A. M., to 10 o'clock, P. M., 
and is under the control of the Librarian and his Assistant. 

Students of the Senior Class will also have access, on very liberal 
terms, to the Law Library of the Cincinnati Bar. This Library, which 
is one of the largest and best in the country, having been selected 
with a view to the actual demands of practice, is particularly well 
adapted to the wants of advanced students about to come to the Bar. 
It contains all the American, English, Irish, Canadian, and Nova 
Scotian Reports, and a large collection of American and English 
Statutes, besides the standard text-books. Considerable additions are 
annually made to it as new works are published. 

Students who are non-residents have, by the courtesy of the Di- 
rectors of the Public Library of Cincinnati, the use of the Library, 
and are admitted to the Reading Rooms, without charge. 

Very valuable advantages are thus open to those who have time 
for pursuing any branch of literary or scientific culture in connection 
with the study of the law. 



CINCINNATI COLLMGE. 19 



PRIZES. 



ESTABUSHED IN 1877. 

Julius Dexter, Esq., one of the Trustees of the College, pro- 
vided funds, in 1877, amounting to $250 per annum, for the following 
prizes, to be awarded to the Graduating Class at the close of the year: 

Two prizes of seventy-five dollars each for the best two oral 
examinations; a prize of seventy-five dollars for the best essay, on 
a subject to be designated; and a prize of twenty-five dollars to be 
awarded at the discretion of the Committee. 

The annual provision for these prizes was continued by Mr. 
Dexter till 188 1, when the temporary arrangement made by him was 
assumed by the Board of Trustees of the Cincinnati College, who now 
make the appropriation for the purpose. 

The awards are made by the Examining Committee of the Bar, 
appointed by the Supreme Court. 

Since the establishment of these prizes the following awards have 
been made by the different Examining Committees: 

CEASS OK 1876-7. 

Essay, — Subject: Charitable Trusts, or the Doctrine of Cy Pres. 

* William M. White, . . . Alexandria, Ky. 

One Hundred Dollars. 

Oral Examination, — 

Willis Miller Kemper, m. a., ) ^. . 

TT . . „. r ' > Cincinnati. 

University of Wooster. J 

Seventy-five Dollars. 

Theodore Horstmann, . . . Cincinnati. 

Seventy five Dollars, 



* Deceased. 



20 LAW SCHOOL, 



CLASS OK 18778. 

Essay, — Subject : The Relation of Law and Equity, and the Province 
of Each. 

Francis Marion Coppock M. a j cincinnatk 

Miami Univ. ; Ph. D., Heidelberg, Germany, ) 
Seventy-five Dollars. 

Oral Examination, — 

Rufus Biggs Smith, b. a., ) ^. . 

__ . ° & ,, • . • Cincinnati. 

Yale College, ) 

Seventy-five Dollars. 

William O'Brien, .... Cincinnati. 

Seventy-five Dollars. 

John Benzing, Jr., ..... Cincinnati. 
Twenty-five Dollars. 

CLASS OK 1878-9. 

Essay, — Subject : The Doctrine of Ultra Vires. 

Jacob Chandler Harper, x . . . Cincinnati. 

One Hundred Dollars. 

Oral Examination, — 

Edward John Dempsey, .... Cincinnati. 
Seventy-five Dollars. 

Simeon Harris, ..... Cincinnati. 

Seventy-five Dollars. 



CINCINNATI COLLKCK. 



21 



CLASS OK 1879-80. 

Essay, — Subject : The Common Law in the United States. 

Cincinnati. 
Seventy-five Dollars. 



Sylvester Genin Williams, b. s., } 
Ohio Wcsleyan Univ., j 



Percival Werner Steinbrecher, b. s., 
Cincinnati University, 



Twenty-five Dollars. 



Oral Examination, 



William Howard Taft, b. a.. 
Yale College, 

Seventy -five Dollars. 

Alfred Barnum Benedict, b. a., 
iversity, 

Seventy-five Dollars. 



Cincinnati. 



Cincinnati. 



Cincinnati. 



CLASS OK 1880-81. 

Essay, — Subject: The Relations to Each Other of the United States, 
the States, and the People, under the Constitution. 

Harry Singleton Taylor, . . Crawfordsville, Ind. 

Seventy-five Dollars. 

Oral Examination, — 

James Homan, .... Springfield. 

Seventy-five Dollars. 



Alfred Ashwell Frazier, b. a. 
University of Wooster, 



, +s. j.*., 



Fraziersburg. 



Seventy-five Dollars. 



22 LAW SCHOOL, 



EXPENSES. 



Tuition Fees are as follows : 

For the first year, whether Junior or Senior, . . $60 00 
" " second year, ..... 30 00 

Special courses may be taken at proportional rates. 

All tuition fees are to be paid in advance. 
Graduation Fee, $5 00 

The text-books, in Cincinnati, cost, for the Junior year, about 

Twenty-five Dollars ; for the Senior year, about Forty Dollars. The 

other expenses vary according to the mode of life and habits of each 

student. Below is an approximate statement. The lower figures 

afford comfort, but not luxury, and can readily be obtained by those 

who take rooms together. The time is thirty weeks, exclusive of the 

holiday vacation. 

Rent and care of room, $1 00 to $3 50 per week, $30 00 $105 00 
Board, '. . . 3 00 to 6 00 " " 90 00 180 00 

Fuel and light, . . . . . . . 8 00 1 5 00 



$128 00 $300 00 



AD V ISORY 



As a general answer to numerous inquiries, the Faculty would 
make the following suggestions : 

They earnestly advise and recommend the pursuing of academic 
studies as far as possible, before beginning a professional course. 
They believe that the time occupied in a college course of study, if 
diligently used, will in the end be saved by the more rapid advance- 
ment of the young lawyer in his profession. Apart, therefore, from the 



CINCINNATI COLLEGE. 23 

motives to be drawn from the general benefits of a liberal education, 
they give their full influence in favor of the most thorough preparation 
for professional study. 

But, as all can not command the means and time for this, no rule 
is established in regard to the amount of education required for enter- 
ing the Junior year, beyond what is generally understood by the ele- 
ments of a good English education. 

The chief advantages of attending a law school, instead of reading 
in a practicing lawyer's office, are found in the regular recitations in 
class, where the presence of numerous fellow-students stimulates the 
desire to be well prepared for the daily examinations ; in the regular 
and full development and illustration of the topic in hand by the lec- 
tures of the professors ; in the practical application of what is learned 
by the exercises of the moot courts ; and in the comparison of one's 
powers with others in a way which shows where improvement is most 
necessary, or gives reasonable confidence in the student's ability to * 
cope with those he must meet in the arena of professional labor. 

Very few lawyers in active practice can afford the time or labor 
necessary for the thorough instruction or examination of a student in 
the office, and experience shows that all that is commonly done is to 
give advice as to text-books, some general supervision of study, with 
occasional brief examinations, and the opportunity to the student to 
become familiar with the ordinary current of business. 

If a part of such experience could be supplemented by the full 
course of lectures of the Law School, the best results would no doubt 
be attained ; and as the course of study in this school is framed with 
a view to unity and proper relation of parts, we cannot too strongly 
urge the advisability of attending the Junior as well as the Senior 
lecture terms. 

The Supreme Court of Ohio, under recent legislation, is enforcing 
rules which must have the good effect of raising the standard of qual- 
ification for the Bar in this State ; and a similar tendency throughout 



24 LAW SCHOOL. 

the country is making the necessity for careful and systematic training 
more and more evident. The value of the diploma and degree granted 
by a reputable school is, therefore, becoming more apparent, as evi- 
dence of the sound preliminary education which is the best commend- 
ation to the public, as well as to the members of the profession. 



Communications concerning the Law School should be ad- 
dressed to Jacob D. Cox, Dean, Cincinnati, Ohio 

The Lecture Room and Library are in the Cincinnati College 
Building, Walnut Street, between Fourth and Fifth Streets. 



ADVERTISEMENT. 



The next term of the Law School of the Cincinnati College will 
begin on Thursday, the 12th day of October, 1882. Applications for 
admission can be made then, or on the three days preceding, between 
the hours of 10 A. M. and 4 P. M., at the Library. 

Students will assemble at the Lecture Room on Thursday, at 
12 M., to receive instructions from the Dean, and to hear the 
announcement of the Schedule of Lectures and Recitations. 



\V1 



ADVERTISEMENT. 

The next term of the Law School of the Cincinnati College 
begin on Thursday, the 12th day of October, 1882. Appli- 
cations for admission can be made then, or on the three days 
preceding, betwfeen the hours of 10 A. M. and 4 P. M., at 
the Library. 

Students will assemble at the Lecture Room on Thursday, 
at 12 M., to receive instructions from the Dean, and to hear the 
announcement of the Schedule of Lectures and Recitations. 



** 



n 



•-.., =53 



.TALOUU E 



OFFICERS AND STUDENTS 



LAW SCHOOL 



CINCINNATI COLLEGE, 



Fiftieth Academical Year, 1882-83, 

umEHsm 



0F UJ.WH 



WITH A STATEMENT OF THE COURSE OF INSTRUCTION 



APR-- \f~ 



CINC I N N ATI 
1883 



fl«4»J 



^ 
^ 



v_ 



CATALOG I E 



OFFICERS A N I) STU DENTS 



LAW SCHOOL 



CINCINNATI COLLEGE, 



Fiftieth Academical Year, 1882-83, 



WITH A STATEMENT OF THE COURSE OF INSTRUCTION 



•«=^-*"^- 



CINCINN All 

i 8 S 3 



CORPORATION 



Trustees of the Cincinnati College, 



WILLIAM HOWARD NEFF,* 

President. 

ALEX. H. McGUFFEY, 

Secretary and Treasurer. 

SAMUEL P. BISHOP, 
SAM TEL J. BROADWELL, 
JULIUS DEXTER. 
JOHN DAVIS, M. D., 
Rev. JAMES EELLS, D. I).. 

george hoadly, 
william hooper, 
marcellus b. hagans, 

Rt. Rev. THOS. A. JAGGAR, D. I).. 

RUFUS KING, 

EDM. W. KITTREDGE, 

JOSEPH LONGWORTH, 

SAMUEL LOWRY, 

SI. AN LEV MATTHEWS. 

EDWARD SARGENT, 

ELKANAH WILLIAMS, M. D. 

:; Elected President December 29, 18S1. 



* 



FACULTY. 



JACOB D. COX, LL. D., Dean, 

'ROFESSOK OK THE LAW OF CIVIL PROCEDURE, EVIDENCE AM' 
ELEMENTARY LAW. 



RUFUS KING, LL. D., 
PROFESSOR OF CONSTITUTIONAL LAW VND THE LAW OF REAL PROPERTY 



GEORGE HOADLY, LL. D. 



PROFESSOR OF THE LAW OF APPELLATE JURISDICTION AND PRACTICE IN THE 

FEDERAL COURTS. 

HENRY A. MORRILL, M. A., 

PROFESSOR OF THE LAW OF CONTRACTS AND TORTS. 

MANNING F. FORCE, M. A., LL. B., 
PROFESSOR <>] EQUITY JURISPRUDENCE AND CRIMINAL LAW. 

JOHN W. STEVENSON, M. A., of Kentucky, 
PROFESSOR OF COMMERCIAL LAW AND CONTRACTS. 



* During the current year Judue Hoadly's place has been temporarily supplied by 

GUSTAVC8 H. Wai.i>. 1".m,.. as lecturer. 



SENIOR CLASS. 



Americus Vespucius Andrews, 
I [orace Andrews, 

Samuel Logan Baker, . 

George Charles Basch, 

William Henry Beavis, 

Henry Willard Benton, a. b., ! 
Ohio Wesleyan College, | 

George Cribbs Berlin, 

Charles Oscar Blake, 

Herbert Denman Blakemore, 

La Fayette Bloom, 

Forest Hosford Bowlby, 

Edward Thomson Brandebury, 
Ohio Wesleyan University, 

Henry Harrison Brock, 

CMiarles Edgar Brown, ll. b., I 
Columbian Law School, \ 

Francis William Brown, 

Charles Bunn, 

Charles Henry Carey, ph. i;., ) 
Denison University, \ 

Harry Quinton Cleneay, a. b., 

Vale College, 
Nathan Colin, b. l., I 

University of Cincinnati, j 

Wilber Colvin, b. s., i 

Ohio University, \ 
Fred James Converse, . 



a. b. 3 



Medina. 
Medina. 

Greensburg, Ind. 
Bolivar, N. Y. 
Cleveland. 

Kenton. 

Cincinnati. 
Gallipolis. 

Cincinnati. 
Cincinnati. 
Galion. 

Delaware. 

Hillsboro. 

Cincinnati. 

Seymour, Ind. 
Jackson. 

Cincinnati. 

Cincinnati. 

Cincinnati. 

Springfield. 
( 'incinnati. 



8 



LAW SCHOOL, 



Delano Warren Cordell, 

William Love Crawford, 

Charles Whitely Dale, 

Marion Everett Danford, 

George Strong Daniels, 

Henry Danziger, 

Walter Voorhees Denton,* 

Edward Dienst, 

Silas Marion Douglass, a. b. , 
Heidelburg College. 

Alfred C. Dyer, a. b., ) 

Kenyon College. \ 

Charles Henry Evans, 

Patrick Dean Finnegan, a. b 
Cornell University. 

Charles Drake Fisher, 

Charles Smith Furber, . 

John Galvin, . 

Martin Kissinger Gantz, 

Quincy Alanson Gillmore, a. 
Ohio Wesleyan University. 

Henry Gumble, . 

W T arren Neander Hauck, . ' 

Charles John Howard, . 

John Harrison Howe, ) 
Attorney at Law. j 

John Hubig, 

Linn Walker Hull, . 

Carl Ellsworth Koons, . 

Lanson B. C. Kirkendall, a. 

Ohio University. 

Elias jacoby, a. b., | 

Ohio Wesleyan University. ) 

James Dolpheas Johnson, . 



B., I 



Cincinnati. 

Glendale. 

Dayton. 

Trimble. 

New York City. 

Cincinnati. 

Aurora, Ind. 

Cincinnati. 

Mansfield. 

Columbus. 
Cincinnati. 
Cincinnati. 

Cincinnati. 
Covington, Ky. 
Covington, Ky. 
Troy. 

Lorain. 

Columbus. 
Lawrenceburg, Ind. 
Barnesville. 

Martinsville, Ind. 

Cincinnati. 

Sandusky. 

Eaton. 

Dawkin's Mills. 

Marion. 
Celina. 



Partial course 



CINCINNATI COLLEGE 



William Smith Little, . 

Theodore Murdoch I ,i\ esa) . \. b., I 
Kenyon College. \ 

Howard Benjamin Magruder, 

John Philip Maloney, 

James B. Matson, 

Horace Adelbert .Merrill, . 

Bohen Hill Montgomery, 

Thomas Henry McConica, a. b., ) 
Ohio Wesleyan University. \ 

George Campbell McKee, a. b., ) 
Franklin College. ) 

James Oswell Ohler, 

Grier Melancthon Orr, a. b., ) 
Heidelburg College. | 

Otto Pflueger, . 

Napoleon Bonaparte Porter, b. s., ) 
Dartmouth College. j 

Robert Camp Price, . . , 

Harry Hoover Prugh, . 

Albert Martin Reinhart, a. b., ) 
St. Xavier College. \ 

George Reiter, .... 

William Armstrong Rogers, a. b., | 
Harvard College. j 

Wilson J. Romans, a. b., ) 
Valparaiso College. j 

Eugene Mason Salin, 

William Henry Sanford. 

John V. B. Scarborough, b. s., ] 
Ambers i College. J 

John Baptist Scheidemantle, . 

Henry Secrist, \i. D., ) 

Miami Medical ( College. } 

Arnold J. H. Speiser, 

William Hamilton Spence, ) 
Attorney at Law. j 



( lincinnati. 

( 'olumbiis. 

Port Clinton. 
Delaware. 
North Bend. 
Ai. 

( 'olumbus. 

Marengo. 

Bridgeport. 

Kenton. 

Miamisburg. 

Cincinnati. 

London. 

Avondale. 

Dayton. 

Cincinnati. 
Pleasant Ridge, 
Cincinnati. 

Cardington. 

( hventon, Ky. 
Akron. 

Cincinnati. 

Cincinnati. 

Cincinnati. 
Cincinnati. 
New Lisbon. 



IO 



LAW SCHOOL, 



William C. Sprague, a. b. 
Denison University. 

Albert B. Tinker, b. s., ) 
Buchtel College. j 

William Lawrence Tobey, 

William John Tobin, a. b 
St. Xavier College. 

Arthur T. Van Sickle, . 

John Wentzel, . 

Horatio Trace Willson 
Buchtel College. 

Henry Gaylord Wilshire, 

John Wesley Wright, * . 

Rogers Wright, 

John Thomas Williamson 

Fred Murlin Youmans, 



A. 



B.,1 



McConnellsville. 

Akron. 

Winchester. 

Cincinnati. 

Delaware. 
. Delhi. 

Akron. 

Cincinnati. 
Frankfort, Ky. 
Cincinnati. 
Greenville. 
Cincinnati. 



Partial course. 



CINCINNATI COLLEGE. 



I I 



JUNIOR CLASS. 



Alfred Marston Allen, ,\. i;., j 

Harvard College. \ 

George S. Baily, 

Elmer Ellsworth Black, 

William Edward Byers, 

Harry Morian Cake, a. b., ") 
Oberlin College. ) 

Joseph Taylor Doan, . 

George Doniphan, a. u., ) 
Rochester University. j 

William Seward Encell, 

Alfred Harris Evans, 

John Wesley Hargo, 

James William Harsha, 

James Cleland Hume, a. r>., ") 
Hanover College. ) 

Myron C. Jenkins, ?.. s., ) 

Lebanon National Normal Institute, j 

William Francis Kean, ph. b., ) 
Wooster University. ) 

Charles Theodore Kellam, 

Melancthon AVade Luckett. . 

s.,1 



Emery Francis Lynn, b 
Heidelburg College. 

Nelson Marston Mayer, 

Rueben Broaddus Miller, a 

Kenyon ( College. 
Lawrence Martin Mongan, 



'! 



Glendale. 

Maynesville. 
Salineville. 
Kirkwood, 111. 

Fostoria. 

Wil lining ton. 
Augusta, Ky. 

Warsaw, Ind. 
Cincinnati. 
Greenfield. 
Circleville. 

Hanover, Ind. 
Newpoint, Ind. 

Wooster. 

Mt. Vernon. 
East Columbia. 

Youngstown. 

Miamisburg. 

Covington, Ky. 

Cincinnati. 



LAW SCHOOL, 



Orlando Coffin Moore, b. s., | 

Lebanon National Normal Institute. \ 

Henry Nelson Morris, a. b., ) 
Adelbert College. j 

John George O'Connell, . 

Joseph William O'Hara, 

Elliot Hunt Pendleton, Jr., a. b\, ) 
Harvard College. j 

William Walter Prather, r>. s., ) 
Valparaiso College. j 

Philip Renner, 

Alfred Lewis Rollwagen, 

John Armstrong Shackleford, a. i;., 
Kentueky State College. 

Charles Lincoln Shambaugh, 

William McDonald Shaw, a. b. , ) 
Princeton College. ) 

Adiel Sherwood, .... 

John William Strehli, 

George Twachtmann, . 

Gustav Robert Werner, 

Archibald Douglas Wilkin, . 

John Minor Yankie, 

James Lee Zimmerman, 



Morrow. 

Cincinnati. 

Cincinnati. 
Cincinnati. 

Cincinnati. 

Chilo. 

Cincinnati. 
Cincinnati. 

Lexington, Ky. 

Wilmington. 

Newport, Ky. 

St. Louis, Mo. 

Cincinnati. 

Cincinnati. 

Cincinnati. 

Newcomerstown. 

Clifton, Arizona. 

Washington C. H. 



Senior Class, 
Junior Class, 



86 
• 38 



Total. 



124 



CINCINNATI COLLEGE. 13 



LAW SC HOOL 

OF THE 

Cincinnati College 



This School was founded in May, 1833, by lawyers who had 
received their instruction in the Law School of Reeve & Gould, at 
Litchfield, or in the Dane Law School, at Cambridge, and who sought 
to introduce the advantages of that method of the study of law into 
the West. It is understood to be the first Law School established 
west of the Alleghany Mountains. The first term began on the 7th 
of October, 1833. 

In the year 1835 the Law School was incorporated with the Cin- 
cinnati College, a literary and academic institution founded in the 
year 18 19 ; and from that time it has been conducted under the 
name of -the "Law School of the Cincinnati College." As such it 
became permanently located in the College Buildings, on Walnut 
Street, in Cincinnati, and has been liberally endowed from the College 
funds for the establishment of professorships, and for the formation 
of a law library adequate to the purposes of the school. 



14 LAW SCHOOL, 



SESSIONS AND VACATIONS. 

The regular Course of Study occupies a period of nineteen 
months : two terms of seven months each, and a recess of five months 
between the terms. There are two sessions in each term : one before, 
and one after the Christmas holidays. The first session commences 
on the Thursday next after the second Tuesday* in October, and 
closes with the Christmas holidays. The second session commences 
on the 2d of January and closes on the last Wednesday in May. 
The Christmas vacation includes both Christmas and New-year's 
days, and is the only interruption in the continuity of the two sessions. 



ADMISSION. 

Applicants for admission may register their names and pay their 
tuition fees to the Dean of the Faculty, at the Library of the School, 
on the three days next before the commencement of the first session 
of each term. 

Applicants are admitted to the Junior Class upon satisfactory 
evidence of such advancement in ordinary academic education as will 
fit them to profit by the studies in the Law School ; but no formal 
examination is required. 

Applicants are admitted to the Senior Class upon a satisfactory 
examination in the course prescribed for the Junior Year. In addi- 
tion to such examination, and as a necessary condition of entering 
the Senior Class, the applicant must have completed the full Course 
of Study for the Junior Class at this School, or must present the 



-Election day in Indiana and Ohio. 



CINCINNATI COLLEGE. 1 5 



diploma of another Law School, or a certificate of attendance for one 
year at such School, or the certificate of an attorney at law in good 
standing, showing that the applicant has diligently studied law, under 
his direction, for one year previous. 

The regular examination for admission to the Senior Class occurs 
on the first three days of the first session of the term. 

Applicants for a degree must register their names for the Senior 
Class with the Dean before the first day of November, and be in daily 
attendance thereafter. Students may enter the Senior Class subse- 
quently, but will not be graduated. 

Special students, not candidates for a degree, will be admitted to 
any of the exercises of the School without examination. 



COURSE OF STUDY. 

The School is divided into two classes, Junior and Senior, for 
each of which a special Course of Study is provided. 

The daily exercises consist of lectures and recitations from stand- 
ard text-books. Leading cases and collateral authorities, on the sub- 
ject under consideration, are frequently referred to by the Professor ; 
and, at the succeeding recitation, the class will be examined upon the 
cases and authorities thus cited, as well as upon the subject matter 
of the lesson. At each exercise, hypothetical cases are put to the 
student as a means of developing the faculty of making a practical 
application of legal principles. Students are encouraged to put ques- 
tions freely to the instructor at all recitations. 

At the close of the second session, a course of study to be pursued 
during the Summer recess will be prescribed for the Junior Class. 

Those who desire to take a special course can do so, and the 
tuition fees will vary in proportion to the amount of instruction given. 

The regular course of instruction is as follows : 

Junior Year. — Elementary Law, Gov. Cox; Contracts, Prof 
Morrill; Real Property, Gov. Cox. 



]6 i \\\ SCHOOL, 

The text-books are Blackstone's Commentaries and Kent's Com- 
mentaries. 

Senior Year.- — Pleading and Civil Procedure, Gov. Cox ; Appel- 
late Jurisdiction and Practice in Federal Courts, * Judge Hoadly ; 
Torts, Prof. Morrill; Real Property, Prof. King: Equity Jurispru- 
dence, Judge Force ; Mercantile Law and Contracts, Gov. Stevenson ; 
Evidence, Gov. Cox : Constitutional Law, Prof. King : Criminal Law, 
Judge Force. 

The text-books are Stephen on Pleading, Bliss on Code Pleading, 
Bigelow on Torts, Williams on Real Property, Bispham's Principles 
of Equity, Parsons on Contracts, Greenleaf on Evidence, Stephen on 
Evidence, Cooley's Principles of Constitutional Law. and Harris' 
Criminal Law. 

Special instruction in the Constitution of the State of Ohio will 
be given to such of the Seniors as may desire it. 

By the rules of the University of Cincinnati, students in this 
School may take special studies in the University, free of charge, if 
found, on examination, qualified to enter such classes. 



POST GRADUATE COURSE. 

An advance course of study will be added whenever a class of 
sufficient number can be organized. It will be open to Graduates of 
this or other Law Schools, and junior members of the Bar, and will 
comprehend a course in the higher branches of the Law Merchant, 
Equity Jurisprudence, Admiralty Law, the Law of Corporations, Con- 
flict of Laws, and International Law. 



-The text-book has not vet been selected. 



CINCINNATI COLLEGE. I 7 



DEGREES. 

TpE degree of Bachelor of Laws will be conferred by the Cor- 
poration upon all students who have been regularly admitted to the 
Senior Class, and have attended the full Course of Senior Lectures, 
and shall have satisfactorily passed the examination required for grad- 
uation. r l "his examination is both oral and written, and is conducted 
by the Committee appointed by the Supreme Court of Ohio for the 
examination of candidates for the Bar. No student will be admitted 
to such examination, the number of whose unexcused absences is 
twenty per cent, of the whole number of lectures during the Senior 
year, or whose conduct shall have been otherwise exceptionable. 

The degrees are conferred on the last day of the term, and gradu- 
ates must attend in person to receive them. 

Graduates having the necessary qualifications of age and citizen- 
ship will be admitted to the Bar of Ohio without further examination. 



MOOT COURTS. 

Moor Courts are held each week during the year, commencing 
with the first Thursday in November. These are presided over by 
the Professors in turn, and members of the Senior Class are appointed 
to act as counsel. 

At each of the Moot Courts, short, but carefully prepared, essays, 
on topics previously assigned, are required to be read. 

Those Courts over which the Dean presides are devoted exclu- 
sively to Exercises in Pleading. 

Attendance is compulsory upon the Seniors, but is optional with 
the Juniors. 

Moot clubs, limited in membership, are also formed among the 
students for voluntary exercises in Pleading, Practice, and Argument. 



i8 



LAW SCHOOL, 



LIBRARIES. 



The School has a Library of nearly three thousand volumes, com- 
prising the works of the best writers on law and jurisprudence, and 
the more important reports. It has been selected with special refer- 
ence to the wants of the School, and is devoted to its exclusive use. 
Large additions are annually made, a yearly appropriation of $1,500 
for that purpose being provided by the Corporation. The Library is 
open to the students daily, from 9 o'clock, A. M., to 10 o'clock, P. M., 
and is under the control of the Librarian and his Assistant. 

Students of the Senior Class will also have access, on very liberal 
terms, to the Law Library of the Cincinnati Bar. This Library which 
is one of the largest and best in the country, having been selected 
with a view to the actual demands of practice, is particularly well 
adapted to the wants of advanced students about to come to the Bar. 
It contains all the American, English, Irish, Canadian, and Nova 
Scotian Reports, and a large collection of American and English 
Statutes, besides the standard text-books. Considerable additions are 
annually made to it as new works are published. 

Students who are non-residents have, by the courtesy of the Di- 
rectors of the Public Library of Cincinnati, the use of the Library, 
and are admitted to the Reading Rooms, without charge. 

Very valuable advantages are thus open to those who have time 
for pursuing any branch of literary or scientific culture in connection 
with the study of the law. 



CINCINNATI COLLEGE. 10 



PRIZES. 



ESTABLISHED IN 1877. 



Julius Dexter, Esq., one of the Trustees of the College, pro- 
vided funds, in 1877, amounting to $2 507V/' annum, for prizes, to be 
awarded to the Graduating (lass at the close of the year. 

The annual provision for these prizes was continued by Mr. 
Dexter till 1881, when the temporary arrangement made by him was 
assumed by the Board of Trustees of the Cincinnati College, who now 
make the appropriation for the purpose. 

The awards are made by the Examining Committee of the Bar, 
appointed by the Supreme Court. 

A prize of seventy-five dollars is awarded for the best oral exami- 
nation : a prize of seventy-five dollars for the best essay, on a subject 
to be designated ; a prize of fifty dollars for the second best oral exami- 
nation, and a prize of fifty dollars for the best performance in a public 
forensic discussion. 

Since the establishment of these prizes, the following awards have 
been made by the different Examining Committees : 

CLASS OF 1876-77. 

Essay, William M. White, .... Alexandria, Ivy. 

Examination ( i), Willis Miller Kemper, m. a., Cincinnati. 

Examination (2), Theodore Horstmann, . Cincinnati. 

CLASS OF 1877-78. 

Essay, Francis Marion Coppock, \i. a., . . Cincinnati. 

Examination I e), Rufus Biggs Smith, b. a., . Cincinnati. 

Examination (2), William O'Brien, . . Cincinnati. 
Examination (3), John Bending, Jr., . . Cincinnati. 



20 



LAW SCHOOL, 



CLASS OF 1878-79. 

Essay, Jacob Chandler Harper, . . . Cincinnati. 

Examination (i), Edward John Dempsey, . Cincinnati. 

Examination (2), Simeon Harris, . . . Cincinnati. 

CLASS OF 1879-80. 

Essay ( i), Sylvester Genin Williams, n. s. , . Cincinnati. 

Essay (2), Percival Werner Steinbrecher. . . Cincinnati. 

Examination (i), William Howard Taft, is. a., Cincinnati. 

Examination (2), Alfred Barnum Benedict, b. a., Cincinnati. 

CLASS OF 1880-81. 

Essay, Harry Singleton Taylor, . ■ . Crawfurdsville,lnd. 

Examination (i), James Homan, . . Springfield. 

Examination (2), Alfred Ashwell Frazier, b. a., Fraziersburg. 



CLASS OF 1881-82. 

Essay, George Washington Sieber, . . . Akron. 

Examination (1), Frank Overton Suire, is. a., Cincinnati. 
Examination (2), Ernest C. S. Rehm, b. a., Pomeroy. 

Examination (3), David Meade Massie, b. a., Chillicothe. 

Forensic Discussion, Abel C. Cunningham, Covington, Ky. 



CINCINNATI COLLEGE. 21 



EXPENSES. 



I'i [TION FEES arc as follows : 
For the first year, whether Junior or Senior, . . $60 00 



;o 00 



" " second year, ..... 

Special courses may be taken at proportional rates. 
All tuition fees are to be paid in advance. 

Graduation Fee, . . . . . . . $5 00 

The text-books, in Cincinnati, cost for the Junior year, about 
Twenty-five Dollars; for the Senior year, about Forty Dollars. The 
other expenses vary according to the mode of life and habits of each 
student. Below is an approximate statement. The loAver figures 
afford comfort, but not luxury, and can readily be obtained by those 
who take rooms together. The time is thirty weeks, exclusive of the 
holiday vacation. 

Kent and care of room, $1 00 to $3 50 per week, #30 00 #105 00 
Board, . . . 3 00 to 6 00 " " 90 00 1S0 00 

Fuel and light, X 00 15 00 



Si 28 00 #300 00 



22 LAW SCHOOL, 



ADVISORY. 



As a general answer to numerous inquiries, the Faculty would 
make the following suggestion : 

Thev earnestly advise and recommend the pursuing of academic 
studies as far as possible, before beginning a professional course. 
They believe that the time occupied in a college course of study, if 
diligently used, will in the end be saved by the more rapid advance- 
ment of the young lawyer in his profession. Apart, therefore, from 
the motives to be drawn from the general benefits of a liberal education, 
they give their full influence in favor of the most thorough preparation 
for professional study. 

But, as all can not command the means and time for this, no rule 
is established in regard to the amount of education required for *enter- 
ing the Junior year, beyond what is generally understood by the 
elements of a good English education. 

The chief advantages of attending a law school, instead- of reading 
in a practicing lawyer's office, are found in the regular recitations in 
class, where the presence of numerous fellow-students stimulates the 
desire to be well prepared for the daily examinations ; in the regular 
and full development and illustration of the topic in hand by the lec- 
tures of the professors; in the practical application of what is learned 
by the exercises of the moot courts: and in the comparison of one's 
powers with others in a way which shows wirere improvement is most 
necessary, or gives reasonable confidence in the student's ability to 
cope with those he must meet in the arena of professional labor. 

Very few lawyers in active practice can afford the time or labor 
necessary for the thorough instruction or examination of a student in 



( INI i\NA II COLLEGI 2$ 



the office, and experience shows that all that is commonly done is to 
give advice as to text-books, some general supervision of study, with 
occasional brief examinations, and the opportunity to the student to 
become familiar with the ordinary current of business. 

If a part of such experience could be supplemented by the full 
course of lectures of the Law School, the best results would no doubt 
be attained ; and as the course of study in this School is framed with 
a view to unity and proper relation of parts, we can not too strongly 
urge the advisability of attending the Junior as well as the Senior 
lecture terms. 

The Supreme Court of Ohio, under recent legislation, is enforcing 
rules which must have the good effect of raising the standard of qual- 
ification for the Bar in this State ; and a similar tendency throughout 
the country is making the necessity for careful and systematic training- 
more and more evident. The value of the diploma and degree granted 
by a reputable school is, therefore, becoming more apparent, as evi- 
dence of the sound preliminary education, which is the best commend- 
ation to the public, as well as to the members of the profession. 



:■■ Communications concerning the Law School should be ad- 
dressed to Jacob D. Cox, Dean, College Building, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

The Lecture Room and Library are in the Cincinnati College 
Building, Walnut Street, between Fourth and Fifth Streets. 



24 Law school. 



ADVERTISEMENT 



The next term of the Law School of the Cincinnati College will 
begin on Thursday, nth day of ^October, 1883. Applications for 
admission may be made then, or on the three days preceding, between 
the hours of 10 A. M. and 4 P. M., at the Library. 

Students will assemble at the Lecture Room on Thursday, at 
12 M., receive instructions from the Dean, and to hear the 
announcement of the Schedule of Lectures and Recitations. 



ADVERTISEMENT. 



The next term of the Law School of the Cincinnati College 
will begin on Thursday, the nth day of October, 1883. Appli- 
cations for admission can be made then, or on the three days 
preceding, between the hours of 10 A. M. and 4 P. M., at 
the Library. 

Students will assemble at the Lecture Room on Thursday, 
at 12 M., to receive instructions from the Dean, and to hear the 
announcement of the Schedule of Lectures and Recitations. 






CATALOGUE 



OF THE 



OFFICERS AND STUDENTS 



LAW SCHOOL 



CINCINNATI COLLEGE, 

Fifty-First Academical Year, 1883-84, 



WITH A STATEMENT OF THE COURSE OF INSTRUCTION. 



-*3~-*--«*~ 



CINCINNATI 

i 884 






: = 



CATALOGUE 



OFFICERS AND STUDENTS 



OF THE 



LAW SCHOOL 



OF THE 



CINCINNATI COLLEGE, 



FOR THE 



Fifty-First Academical Year, 1883-84, 



WITH A STATEMENT OF THE COURSE OF INSTRUCTION 



-*- -^-*~^ 



CINCINNATI 

i 884 



CORPORATIO N 



Trustees of the Cincinnati College, 



WILLIAM HOWARD NEFF,* 
President. 

ALEX. H. McGUFFEY, 

Secretary and Treasurer. 

SAMUEL P. BISHOP, 

SAMUEL J. BROADWELL, 

JULIUS DEXTER, 

JOHN DAVIS, M. D. 

Rev. JAMES EELLS, D. D. 

GEORGE HOADLY, 

WILLIAM HOOPER, 

MARCELLUS B. HAGANS, 

Rt. Rev. THOMAS A. JAGGAR, D. D. 

RUFUS KING. 

E. W. KITTREDGE, 

JOSEPH LONGWORTH, 

SAMUEL LOWRY, 

STANLEY MATTHEWS, 

EDWARD SARGENT, 

GEORGE R. SAGE, 

ELKANAH WILLIAMS, M. D., 

OBED J. WILSON. 



Elected President December 29, 1881. 



FACU LTY 



JACOB D. COX, LL.D., Dean, 

PROFESSOR OF THE LAW OF CIVIL PROCEDURE, EVIDENCE AND 
ELEMENTARY LAW. 



RUFUS KING, LL.D., 

PROFESSOR OF CONSTITUTIONAL LAW AND THE LAW OF REAL PROPERTY 



GEORGE HOADLY, LL.D., 

PROFESSOR OF THE LAW OF APPELLATE JURISDICTION AND PRACTICE IN THE 

FEDERAL COURTS. 

t 



HENRY A. MORRILL, M. A., 

PROFESSOR OF THE LAW OF CONTRACTS AND TORTS. 

MANNING F. FORCE, M. A., LL.B., 
PROFESSOR OF EQUITY JURISPRUDENCE AND CRIMINAL LAW. 

JOHN W. STEVENSON, M. A., of Kentucky, 
PROFESSOR OF COMMERCIAL LAW and CONTRACTS, 



SENIOR CLASS 



Alfred Marston Allen, a. b., | 
Harvard College. j 

Joseph Erastus Andrews, a. is., ) 
Denison University. ) 

Charles H. Apt, b. s. , ) 

North Western Ohio N. S. J 

George Charles Basch, 

George S. Baily, 

Chambers Baird, Jr., a. b., ) 
Harvard College. j 

Elmer Ellsworth Black, 

La Fayette Bloom, . 

Jacob Henry Bromwell, ll. b., 

Law School of the Cincinnati College. 

William Edward Byers, 

Louis Henry Chalmers, 

Reuben Dillen Culver, 

Thomas Edwin Dempsey, 

Joseph Taylor Doan, 

George Doniphan, a. b., | 
Rochester University. ) 

Patrick Joseph Donohue, 

Augustus Drahmann, . 

Alfred Harris Evans, 

John Cornwall Geyer, a. b, 
Ohio Wesleyan University. 

Frank M. Gorman, b. s., ) 

National Normal University, ) 



Glendale. 
Linwood. 

Columbus. 

Sandusky. 
Cincinnati. 

Ripley. 

Salineville. 
Cincinnati. 

Wyoming. 

Kirkwood, 111. 
Washington C. H, 
Logan. 
Urbana. 
Wilmington. 

Augusta, Ky. 

Cincinnati. 
Cincinnati. 
Cincinnati. 

Piqua. 
Cincinnati. 



8 



LAW SCHOOL, 



Benjamin Franklin Graziani, 

John Wesley Hargo, 

Charles Oscar Hastings, 

Warren Neander Hauck, 

Eugene Heim, ..... 

Benjamin Franklin Hershey, 

David A. Holliday, a. b.,\ 
Franklin College. j 

John Hubig, ..... 

Edward N. Huggins, .... 

James Cleland Hume, a. b., ) 
Hanover College. j 

Melancthon Thompson Huston, a. m., ) 
Muskingum College. j 

Myron Crocker Jenkins, b. s., *) 

Lebanon National Normal Institute, j 

Alexander Hamilton Johnson, 

George Washington Julien, 

Robert Grant Kinkead, a. b 

Marietta College. 
William Littleford, . 

Emery Francis Lynn, b. s. 
Heidelberg College. 

John Philip Maloney, 

Thomas William Marchant, b. s., 
Ohio Wesleyan University. 

Nelson Marston Mayer, . 

Lawrence Martin Mongan, . 

Henry Nelson Morris, a. b., ) 
Adelbert College. ) 

Justus Fobes Munsell, . 

John George O'Connell, . 

Joseph William O'Hara, 

George Francis Ormsby, 1 
U. S. Naval Academy. j 

Edward Wallace Pelton, 






Dartmouth Colleg 



Q, A. B. , I 



Covington, Ky. 

Greenfield. 

Cincinnati. . 

Cincinnati. 

Cincinnati. 

Dayton. 

Cadiz. 

Cincinnati. 
Hillsboro. 

Asbury Park, N. J. 
Mt. Perry. 

Newpoint, Ind. 

Germano. 
Delphi, Ind. 

Marietta. 

Newport, Ky. 

Youngstown. 

Delaware. 

Washington C. H. 

Miamisburg. 
Cincinnati. 

Cincinnati. 

Ashtabula. 
Cincinnati. 
Cincinnati. 

Xenia. 
Cincinnati. 



CINCINNATI COLLEGE. 



"•! 



/ 



Elliot Hunt Pendleton, Jr., \. B. 

Harvard College. 

William Walter Prather, B. s., | 
Valparaiso College. j 

Philip Renner, 

John William Rogers, . 

Alfred Lewis Rolhvagen, 

John Armstrong Shackleford, a. 
Kentucky State College. 

Charles Lincoln Shambaugh, 

William McDonald Shaw, a. b. 
Princeton College. 

Adiel Sherwood, 

*Orlo Dudley Skinner, a 
Lafayette College. 

Richard Elihu Sloan, a. b., "j 
Monmouth Collega. j 

Charles Robert Smith, a. b., ) 
Yale College. j 

John William Strehli, 

Charles H. D. Summers, 

Benjamin Vincent Tyler, a. b., 
Centre College. 

Louis Wagner, 
Harry Elmer Walk, . 
Gustav Robert Werner, 
Henry Miller Wisler, 
Charles Alto Wood, 
John Edwin West, . 
Cornelius Clark Young, a. b., ) 
Wittenberg College. ) 

John - Lee Zimmerman, 
1^1. U.*.' 



B., ) 

) 

,1 



Cincinnati. 

Chilo. 

Cincinnati. 

Malta. 

Cincinnati. 

Lexington, Ky. 
New Burlington. 

Newport, Ky. 
Springfield, Mo. 
Fostoria. 

Hamilton. 

Greenspring." 

Cincinnati. 
Gallipolis. 

Lexington, Ky. 

Tiffin. 

Bethany. 

Cincinnati. 

Napoleon. 

Mechanicsburg. 

Bellefontaine. 

Springfield. 
Washington C. H, 



Died December 30, 1883. 



10 



LAW SCHOOL, 



JUNIOR CLASS 



Frank Abraham, . 

Henry Ferdinand Busch, . 

Scott Bonham, a. b. , j 

Ohio Wesleyan University, j 

Edgar Meloy Braddock, . 

August William Bruck, . 

Henry Moore Caldwell, . 

Charles Eugene Clark, . 

Charles Louis Faber, Jr., . 

William Irwin Grubb, a. b., 
Yaie College. 

Victor Emanuel Helleberg, a 
Yale College. 

Silas Everett Hurin, a. b., | 
Princeton College. j 

Frank Herbert Jones, a. b., j 
Adelbert College. \ 

Arthur Elmer Kerns, . 

Henry Graham Lewis, 

Eugene Dorsey Lindsay, 

George Henry Anderson Lyford, 
Yale College. 

Herman Marckworth, Jr., 

William Wesley Masterson, 

Harry Wolfred McMillen, . 

David Symmes Oliver, b. s., | 
University of Cincinnati. j 



.{ 



) ' 



A. B. 



Crawfordsville,Ind. 
Cincinnati. 

Sedalia. 

New Lexington. 
Cincinnati. 
Cincinnati. 
Covington, Ky. 
Cincinnati. 

Cincinnati. 
Cincinnati. 
Wyoming. 

Bellevue. 

Piqua. 
Cincinnati. 
Covington, Ky. 

Cincinnati. 

Cincinnati. 
New Castle, Ky. 
Homer. 

Cincinnati. 



CINCINNATI CO I I EG! . 



» I 



Charles Pleasants, a. ii. , | 

Buchtel College. j ' 

William Tice Pursell, 

George Benjamin Ranshaw, . 

Edward W. Rector, 

John Wilmore Schrage, 

Michael Clarence Simon, . 

Cassius Marble Ski 11 man, 

Lewis Alphonso Springer, 

William Joseph Walsh, 

Robert Lee Webb, . 

Richard E. Werner, 

Lewis Conner Yager, 



Vevay, Ind. 

Cincinnati. 

Covington, Ky. 

Cincinnati. 

Cincinnati. 

Cincinnati. 

Lockland. 

Fultonham. 

Cincinnati. 

Williamstown, Ky. 

Cincinnati. 

Florence, Ky. 



Senior Class, 
Junior Class, 



70 
3 2 



Total, 



12 LAW SCHOOL, 



LAW SCHOOL 



Cincinnati College 



This School was founded in May, 1833, by lawyers who had 
received their instruction in the Law School of Reeve & Gould, at 
Litchfield, or in the Dane Law School, at Cambridge, and who sought 
to introduce the advantages of that method of the study of law into 
the West. It is understood to be the first Law School established 
west of the Alleghany mountains. The first term began on the 7th 
of October, 1833. 

In the year 1835 the Law School was incorporated with the Cin- 
cinnati College, a literary and academic institution founded in the 
year 1819; and from that time it has been conducted under the 
name of the " Law School of the Cincinnati College." As such it 
became permanently located in the College Buildings, on Walnut 
street, in Cincinnati, and has been liberally endowed from the College 
funds for the establishment of professorships, and for the formation 
of a law library adequate to the purposes of the School. 



CINCINNATI CO! LEGE. 13 



SESSIONS. AND VACATIONS.' 

The regular Course of Study occupies a period of nineteen 
months : two terms of seven months each, and a recess of five months 
between the terms. There are two sessions in each term : one before, 
and one after the Christmas Holidays. The first session commences 
on the Thursday next after the second Tuesday* in October, and 
closes with the Christmas holidays. The second session commences 
on the 2d of January and closes on the last Wednesday in May. 
The Christmas vacation includes both Christmas and New Year's days, 
and is the only interruption in the continuity of the two sessions. 



ADMISSION. 

Applicants for admission may register their names and pay their 
tuition fees to the Dean of the Faculty, at the Library of the School, 
on the three days next before the commencement of the first session 
of each term. 

Applicants are admitted to the Junior Class upon satisfactory 
evidence of such advancement in ordinary academic education as will 
fit them to profit by the studies in the Law School ; but no formal 
examination is required. 

Applicants are admitted to the Senior Class upon a satisfactory 
examination in the course prescribed for the Junior Year. In addi- 
tion to such examination, and as a necessary condition of entering 
the Senior Class, the applicant must have completed the full Course 
of Study for the Junior Class at this School, or must present the 

Election dav in Indiana and Ohio. 



14 LAW SCHOOL, 



diploma of another Law School, or a certificate of attendance for one 
year at such School, or the certificate of an attorney ,at law in good 
standing, showing that the applicant has diligently studied law under 
his direction for one year previous. 

The regular examination for admission to the Senior Class occurs 
on the first three days of the first session of the term. 

Applicants for a degree must register their names for the Senior 
Class with the Dean before the first day of November, and be in daily 
attendance thereafter. Students may enter the Senior Class subse- 
quently, but will not be graduated. 

Special students, not candidates for a degree, will be admitted to 
any of the exercises of the School without examination. 



COURSE OF STUDY. 

The School is divided into two classes, Junior and Senior, for 
each of which a special Course of Study is provided. 

The daily exercises consist of lectures and recitations from stand- 
ard text-books. Leading cases and collateral authorities, on the sub- 
ject under consideration, are frequently referred to by the Professor ; 
and, at the succeeding recitation, the class will be examined upon the 
cases and authorities thus cited, as well as upon the subject-matter 
of the lesson. At each exercise, hypothetical cases are put to the 
student as a means of developing the faculty of making a practical 
application of legal principles. Students are encouraged to put ques- 
tions freely to the instructor at all recitations. 

At the close of the second session, a course of study to be pursued 
during the summer recess will be prescribed for the Junior Class. 

Those who desire to take a special course can do so, and the 
tuition fees will vary in proportion to the amount of instruction given. 

The regular course of instruction is as follows : 

Junior Year. — Elementary Law, Gov. Cox; Contracts, Frof. 
Morrill ; Real Property, Gov. Cox. 



CIN< i\n \ I i COLLEGE. . 15 



The text-books are Blackstone's Commentaries, Kent's Commen- 
taries, Parsons on Contracts, and Bliss on Code Pleading. 

Senior Yi \r — Pleading and Civil Procedure, Gov. Cox; Appel- 
late Jurisdiction and Practice in Federal Courts, Judge Hoadly ; Torts, 
Pro f Morrill ; Real Property, Prof. King; Equity Jurisprudence, 
Judge Force ; Mercantile Law and Contracts, Gov. Stevenson and Prof. 
Morrill; Evidence, Gov. Cox; Constitutional Law, Prof. King; 
Criminal Law, Judge Force. 

The text-books are Stephen on Pleading, Bliss on Code Pleading, 
Bigelow on Torts, Williams on Real Property, Bispham's Principles 
of Equity, Parsons on Contracts, Greenleaf on Evidence, Stephen on 
Evidence, Cooley's Principles of Constitutional Law, and Harris' 
Criminal Law. 

Special instruction in the Constitution of the State of Ohio will 
be given to such of the Seniors as may desire it. 

By the rules of the University of Cincinnati, students in this 
School may take special studies in the University, free of charge, if 
found, on examination, qualified to enter such classes. 



POST GRADUATE COURSE. 

An advance course of study will be added whenever a class of 
sufficient number can be organized. It will be open to Graduates of 
this or other Law Schools, and Junior members of the Bar, and will 
comprehend a course in the higher branches of the Law Merchant, 
Equity Jurisprudence, Admiralty Law, the Law of Corporations, Con- 
flict of Laws, and International Law. 



1 6 LAW SCHOOL, 



DEGREES. 

The degree of Bachelor of Laws will be conferred by the Cor- 
poration upon all students who have been regularly admitted to the 
Senior Class, have attended the full Course of Senior Lectures, and 
shall have satisfactorily passed the examination required for grad- 
uation. This examination is both oral and written, and is conducted 
by the Committee appointed by the Supreme Court of Ohio for the 
examination of candidates for the Bar. No student will be admitted 
to such examination^ the number of whose unexcused absences is 
twenty per cent, of the whole number of lectures during the Senior 
year, or whose conduct shall have been otherwise exceptionable. 

The degrees are conferred on the last day of the term, and gradu- 
ates must attend in person to receive them. 

Graduates having the necessary qualifications of age and citizen- 
ship will be admitted to the Bar of Ohio without further examination. 



MOOT COURTS. 

Moot Courts are held each week during the year, commencing 
with the first Thursday in November. These are presided over by 
the Professors in turn, and members of the Senior Class are appointed 
to act as counsel. 

At each of the Moot Courts, short but carefully prepared essays, 
on topics previously assigned, are required to be read. 

Those Courts over which the Dean presides are devoted exclu- 
sively to Exercises in Pleading. 

Attendance is compulsory upon the Seniors, but is optional with 
the Juniors. 

Moot clubs, limited in membership, are also formed among the 
students for voluntary exercises in Pleading, Practice, and Argument 



CINCINNATI COLLEGE. I 7 



LIBRARIES. 



The School has a Library of nearly three thousand volumes, com- 
prising the works of the best writers on law and jurisprudence, and 
the more important reports. It has been selected with special refer- 
ence to the wants of the School, and is devoted to its exclusive use. 
Large additions are annually made, a yearly appropriation of $1,500 
for that purpose being provided by the Corporation. The Library is 
open to the students daily, from 9 o'clock A. M. to 10 o'clock P. M., 
and is under the control of the Librarian and his x\ssistant. 

Students of the Senior Class will also have access, on very liberal 
term?, to the Law Library of the Cincinnati Bar. This Library, which 
is one of the largest and best in the country, having been selected 
with a view to the actual demands of practice, is particularly well 
adapted to the wants of advanced students about to come to the Bar. 
It contains all the American, English, Irish, Canadian, and Nova 
Scotian Reports, and a large collection of American and English 
Statutes, besides the standard text-books. Considerable additions are 
annually made to it as new works are published. 

Students who are non-residents have, by the courtesy of the 
Directors of the Public Library of Cincinnati, the use of the Library, 
and are admitted to the Reading Rooms, without charge. 

Very valuable advantages are thus open to those who have time 
for pursuing any branch of literary or scientific culture in connection 
with the study of the law. 



iS 



LAW SCHOOL, 



PRIZES. 



ESTABLISHED IN 1877. 



Julius Dexter, Esq., one of the Trustees of the College, pro- 
vided funds, in 1877, amounting to $250 per annum, for prizes to be 
awarded to the Graduating Class at the close of the year. 

The annual provision for these prizes was continued by Mr. 
Dexter till 1881, when the temporary arrangement made by him was 
assumed by the Board of Trustees of the Cincinnati College, who now 
make the appropriation for the purpose. 

The awards are made by the Examining Committee of the Bar 
appointed by the Supreme Court. 

A prize of seventy-five dollars is awarded for the best oral exami- 
nation ; a prize of seventy-five dollars for the best essay, on a subject 
to be designated; a prize of fifty dollars for the second best oral exami- 
nation, and a prize of fifty dollars for the best performance in a public 
forensic discussion. 

Since the establishment of these prizes, the following awards have 
been made by the different Examining Committees : 

CLASS OF 1876-77. 

Essay, William M. White, .... Alexandria, Ky. 

Examination (i), Willis Miller Kemper, m. a., Cincinnati. 

Examination (2), Theodore Horstmann, . Cincinnati. 

CLASS OF 1877-78. 

Essay, Francis Marion Coppock, m. a,. . . Cincinnati. 
Examination (i), Rufus Biggs Smith, b. a., Cincinnati. 

Examination (2); William O'Brien, . . Cincinnati. 

Examination (3), John Benzing, Jr. , . Cincinnati. 



CINCINN \ ll COLLEGE, 



19 



CLASS OF 1878-79. 

Essay, Jacob Chandler Harper, . . . Cincinnati. 

Examination (i), Edward John Dempsey, . Cincinnati. 

Examination (2), Simeon Harris, . . . Cincinnati. 

CLASS OF 1879-80. 

Essay (i), Sylvester Genin Williams, b. s. , . Cincinnati. 

Essay (2), Percival Werner Steinbrecher, . . Cincinnati. 

Examination (i), William Howard Taft, b. a., Cincinnati. 
Examination (2), Alfred Barnum Benedict, B. a., Cincinnati. 

CLASS OF 1880-81. 

Essay, Harry Singleton Taylor, . . ■ Crawfordsville,Ind, 

Examination (i), James Homan, . . Springfield. 

Examination (2), Alfred Ashwell Frazier, b. a., Fraziersburg. 

CLASS OF 1881-82. 

Essay, George Washington Sieber, . . . Akron. 

Examination (i), Frank Overton Suire, b. a., Cincinnati. 

Examination (2), Ernest C. S. Rehm, b. a., Pomeroy. 

Examination (3), David Meade Massie, b. a., ChiJlicothe. 

Forexsic Discussion, Abel C. Cunningham, Covington, Ky, 



CLASS OF 1882-83. 

Essay, Herbert Denman Blakemore, . . Cincinnati. 

Examination (i), Herbert Denman Blakemore, Cincinnati. 

Examination (2), Edward Dienst, . . . Cincinnati. 

Forensic Discussion, Elias Jacoby, b. a., . Marion. 



20 LAW SCHOOL, 



EXPENSES. 



Tuition Fees are as follows : 

For the first year, whether Junior or Senior, . . $60 00 

" " second year, ...... 30 00 

Special courses may be taken at proportional rates. 
All tuition fees are to be paid in advance. 

Graduation Fee, . . . . ... $5 00 

The text-books, in Cincinnati, cost for the Junior year about 
Twenty-five Dollars ; for the Senior year, about Forty Dollars. The 
other expenses vary according to the mode of life and habits of each 
student. Below is an approximate statement. The lower figures 
afford comfort, but not luxury, and can readily be obtained by those 
who take rooms together. The time is thirty weeks, exclusive of the 
holiday vacation. 

Rent and care of room, $1 00 to $3 50 per week, $30 00 $105 00 
Board, . . . 3 00 to 6 00 " " 90 00 180 00 

Fuel and light, , . 8 00 15 00 



$128 00 $300 00 



CINCINNATI COLI.KCK. 2 1 



ADVISORY. 



As a general answer to numerous inquries, the Faculty would 
make the following suggestions : 

They earnestly advise and recommend the pursuing of academic 
studies as far as possible, before beginning a professional course. 

They believe that the time occupied in a college course of study, if 
diligently used, will in the end be saved by the more rapid advance- 
ment of the young lawyer in his profession. Apart, therefore, from 
the motives to be drawn from the general benefits of a liberal education, 
they give their full influence in favor of the most thorough preparation 
for professional study. 

But, as all can not command the means and time for this, no rule 
is established in regard to the amount of education required for enter- 
ing the Junior year, beyond what is generally understood by the 
elements of a good English education. 

The chief advantages of attending a law school, instead of reading 
in a practicing lawyer's office, are found in the regular recitations in 
class, where the presence of numerous fellow-students stimulates the 
desire to be well prepared for the daily examinations ; in the regular 
and full development and illustration of the topic in hand by the lec- 
tures of the professors ; in the practical application of what is learned 
by the exercises of the moot courts; and in the comparison of one's 
powers with others in a way which shows where improvement is most 
necessary, or gives reasonable confidence in the student's ability to 
cope with those he must meet in the arena of professional labor. 

Very few lawyers in active practice can afford the time or labor 
necessary for the thorough instruction or examination of a student in 



22 LAW SCHOOL, 



the office, and experience shows that all that is commonly done is to 
give advice as to text-books, some general supervision of study, with 
occasional brief examinations, and the opportunity to the student to 
become familiar, with the ordinary current of business. 

If a part of such experience could be supplemented by the full 
course of lectures of the Law School, the best results would no doubt 
be attained ; and as the course of study in this School is framed with 
a view to unity and proper relation of parts, we cannot too strongly 
urge the advisability of attending the Junior as well as the Senior 
lecture terms. 

The Supreme Court of Ohio, under recent legislation is enforcing 
rules which must have the good effect of raising the standard of quali- 
fication for the Bar in this State; and a similar tendency throughout 
the country is making the necessity for careful and systematic training 
more and more evident. The value of the diploma and degree granted 
by a reputable school is, therefore, becoming more apparent, as evi- 
dence of the sound preliminary education, which is the best commenda- 
tion to the public as well as to the members of the profession. 



fi^"CoMMUNiCATiONS concerning the Law School should be 
addressed to Jacob D. Cox, Dean, College Building, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

The Lecture Room and Library are in the Cincinnati College 
Building, Walnut street, between Fourth and Fifth streets. 



( i\i l\\ \ I I OU.I.KCK. $.% 



ADVERTISEMENT. 



The next term of the Law School of the Cincinnati College will 
begin on Thursday, 16th day of October, 1884. Applications for 
admission may be made then, or on the three days preceding, between 
the hours of 10 A. M. and 4 P. M., at the Library. 

Students will assemble at the lecture room on Thursday, at 12 M., 
to receive instructions from the Dean, and to hear the announcement 
of the Schedule of Lectures and Recitations. 



* ADVE RTI S E M E NT.^ 



The next term of the Law School of the Cincinnati College 
will begin on Thursday, the 16th day of October, 1884. Appli- 
cations for admission can be made then, or on the three days 
preceding, between the hours of 10 A. M. and 4 P. M., at 
the Library. 

Students will assemble at the Lecture Room on Thursday, 
at 12 M., to receive instructions from the Dean, and to hear the 
announcement of the Schedule of Lectures and Recitations. 






«*><*4<>44*4<4<K><<><><>44<4<4+4-$<<<&^ ) 






\ 



CATALOGUE 



OFFICERS AND STUDENTS 



LAW SCHOOL 



CINCINNATI COLLEGE 



Fifty-Third Academical Year, 1885-< 



STATEMENT OF THE COURSE OF INSTRUCTION 



■•-!•-*-! 



CINCINNATI 
1886. 









APR 1 2191Z 




CATALOGUE 



OFFICERS AND STUDENTS 



LAW SCHOOL 



CINCINNATI COLLEGE 



Fifty -Third Academical Year, 188b- 



STATEMENT OF THE COURSE OF INSTRUCTION. 



-*—• -&-h 



CINCINNATI 

1886. 



CO RPORATION. 



Trustees of the Cincinnati College. 



WILLIAM HOWARD NEFF,* 
President. 

ALEX. II. McGUFFEY, 

Secretary and Treasurer. 

SAMUEL P. BISHOP, 

SAMUEL J. PRO AD WELL, 

JOHN DAVIS. M.D., 

Rev. JAMES EELLS, D.D., 

GEORGE HOADLY, 

WILLIAM HOOPER, 

MARCELLUS B. HAGANS, 

Rt. Rev. THOMAS A. JAGGAR, D.D., 

RUFUS KING. 

F. W. KITTREDGE, 

JOSEPH LONG WORTH, 

SAMUEL LOWRY, 

STANLEY MATTHEWS, 

EDWARD SARGENT, 

GEORGE R. SAGE, 

ELKANAH WILLIAMS, M.D., 

OBED J. WILSON, 

JACOB D, COX. 



'Elected President December 29. 1881. 



FACULTY. 



JACOB D. COX, LL.D., Dean, 

PROFESSOR OF THE LAW OF CIVIL PROCEDURE, EVIDENCE AND 
ELEMENTARY. LAW. 



RUFUS KING, LL.D., 
PROFESSOR OF CONSTITUTIONAL LAW AND THE LAW OF REAL PROPERTY 



GEORGE HOADLY, LL.D., 



ROFESSOR OF THE LAW OF APPELLATE JURISDICTION AND PRACTICE IN Til] 

FEDERAL COURTS. 



HENRY A. MORRILL, M.A., 
PROFESSOR OF THE LAW OF CONTRACTS AND TORTS. 

MANNING F. FORCE, LL.D., 
PROFESSOR OF EQUITY JURISPRUDENCE AND CRIMINAL LAW 

JOHN W. STEVENSON, LL.D., of Kentucky. 

PROFESSOR OF COMMERCIAL LAW AND CONTRACTS. 



SENIOR CLASS. 



Clifton Arnsparger, b. s. ,) ., Tr 

' ,, }■ Georgetown, Ky. 

Georgetown l ollege. ) 

Hunter Sherman Armstrong Woodsfield. 

Edward Spencer Aston Cincinnati. 

lames Hartley Beal, h. s., ) __ . ... 

. „ „ r Urichsville. 

Scio College. ) 

Harry Lincoln Beatty. Ravenna. 

William Wallace Bellew Lockland. 

Albert Theodore Brown Chillicothe. 

George Buckland Fremont. 

Joseph Hartwell Cabell, a. b , ) _,. . 

TT . TT . r Cincinnati. 

Urbana University. ) 

William Marion Cake Cincinnati. 

Robert I )e ValCourt Carroll Riverside. 

Albert Aubrey Castle, a. b. , 



..Alexandria. 
Princeton College. ) 

Edward Young Chapin Petersburg, Ky. 

Frederick Willes Clark, a. b. 



...Potsdam, N. Y. 
\\ esleyan University. ) 

Joel Cave Clore, b. s., ") 

w*. u r- 11 i Hebron, Ky. 

\\ lttenberg College. ) ' J 

Michael Thomas Corcoran, a. b., 

c . v n „ x Cincinnati. 

St. Xavier College. 



Earl Montgomery Cranston, a. b. 



Denver, Col. 



Denver University. \ 

William Creed Cincinnati. 

Daniel Richard Crissinger, a. b., \ . 

Buchtel College. ) 

William Joseph Davidson Covington, Ky. 

Charles Gates Dawes, a. b., ) . r . 

AT . x Marietta. 

Marietta College. ) 

Thomas Cleland Dawson Enterprise, Fla. 

Clayton William De Lamatre, a. b,) „.. _ • 

^, . ,. TT . x Kimball. 

Ohio State University. ) 

Edgar Henry DeWolfe Vincennes, Ind. 



LAW SCHOOL, 



William Wade Dyar, ph. b. i ,, . 

A/r • .. r ,. ' * Marietta. 

Marietta College. \ 

Jacob Lewis Eichelberger Cincinnati. 

Charles Edward Everett, a. m., ) 

*n , r- 11 ( Glendale. 

Allegheny College. j 

Charles Louis Faber Cincinnati. 

Stanley Ferguson Cincinnati. 

William Francis Fox, b. s., 

Cincinnati. 



i 



St. Xavier College. 

Michael Francis Galvin Cincinnati. 

John' Crittenden Gaskins, m. d., 



...Amelia. 
xLcJectic Medical Institute. 



1 

William John (jeer Tobasco. 

Bailey Walker Gilfillan, b. s. , ) _,. . 

rvU . .., , .... Y Sidney. 

Ohio Wesleyan University. j J 

Charles Irwin Goard Hayesville. 

William Broussais Grubbs Cincinnati. 

Marcellus Hawthorne Poe Hagans Cincinnati. 

John Durrell Hammel, B. s., 



...Carthage. 
JNational JNormal University j ° 

Lee McClellan Hammel Circleville. 

Robert Palmer Hargitt Hamilton. 

Edward Neblett Hidden, a. b. , ) ,, n . 

, r . „ ., \ Madisonville. 

Yale College. ) 

Louis Gottlob Hummel Cincinnati. 

Chaur.cey Hugh Humphrey Cincinnati. 

Hale Hunter Urbana. 

William Clay Huston DeGrafT. 

Charles James Inott Cincinnati. 

Francis Bacon James Cincinnati. 

Ferdinand Jelke, Jr., a. b. , ) „. . 

„. nu r Cincinnati. 

Princeton College. ) 

Byron Bancroft Johnson A vondale. 

Hollis C. Johnston Gallipolis. 

John Erwen Johnston Antrim. 

John William Jones Dayton., Ky. 



CINCINNATI COLLEGE. 



Willis Jordan New 1 asbon. 

Frederick William Keam Cincinnati. 

Albert Wilson Kennon, a. b., 



t Wilson Kennon, a. b., j en 

Washington and J efterson College j 



irsvillc. 



Benjamin F. Kerr Mentor. 

Walter Scott Kessler West Milton. 

Jacob Krummel Cincinnati. 

Edward Sherman Leavitt, a. b., 



Princeton College. J " ...Cincinnati. 

Henry Graham Lewis Cincinnati. 

Eugene Dorsey Lindsay Covington, Ky. 

William Herman Lueders Cincinnati. 

John Quincy Lyne Hooksburgh. 

Alfred Floyd McCormick Buena Vista. 

Frank Lincoln McCoy, a. b., ) 

Indiana University. \ Greensburg, Ind 

Harry Woolfred McMillen Newark. 

Theodore Mack ., , .Cincinnati. 

John Clifford Martin Dayton. 

Joseph Frederick Maxwell, a. b., ) 

Marietta College. [ Leadville, Col. 

Milo Melchers Toledo. 

Hugh Llewellyn Nichols , Batavia. 

Samuel Nesbitt Wheeling, W. Va. 

James Leander Orr, a. b. , j 

Wooster University. J Wooster. 

*George W. Ozias, a. b., ) ... . 

°. „ T , ' . . Cincinnati. 

Ohio Wesleyan University. \ 

Reuben Wilson Pickering Woolerstown . 

Atlee Pomerene, a. b., ) n v 

'„ - Berlin. 

Princeton College. ) 

William Reed Pomerene Coshocton. 

Wesley H. Preston Columbus. 

Robert Ramsey, a. b., ) .,. . . 

„..„. / ', , Cincinnati. 

\\ uliams College. j 



: Not candidate for degree. 



IO LAW SCHOOL. 



Charles Clement Richardson, a. b. , ) .„. . . 

w . n . n „ 1 Glendale. 

Williams College. ) 

James Ellsworth Robinson Amelia. 

Charles Jacob Scroggs, a. m , ) _ 

,.. ,. TT . °° t Bucyrus. 

Michigan University. ) J 

Charles Seemann, a. b., ) , *•,*■. 

u . , ,, ~ „ i Mineral Point. 

Heidelberg College. j 

Julius Silverman Gallipolis. 

Harry Lewis Simmons Cincinnati. 

William Smith Small Cincinnati. 

Irwin McDowell Smith, a. b., ) 

», . .. n „ i Hillsboro. 

Marietta College. ) 

Thomas Ewing Steele, a. b., \ 

^a TT . c Lancaster. 

Notre Dame University. J 

George Emanuel deSteiguer, a. b., ) 

, Athens. 



Ohio University. 



I 



Albert Stephan, b. s., ) . 

University of Cincinnati. J : Cincinnati. 

Horace Dutton Taft, a. b , ] . . 

Yale College. ( Cincinnati. 

Walter Roe Talbott ..Barnesville. 

John Ro-e Thompson Cincinnati. 

Charles Allen Tinley, b. s., ) . 

t ,a TT . . ( Covington, Ky. 

Notre Dame University. ) ° J 

William Pitt Trimble Covington, Ky. 

George Andrews Turrill Cincinnati. 

George Wells Tyler Oberhn. 

George Sidney Tylor, a. b. 



...Avondale. 

Harvard College. ) 

Robert Marion VanHorne Cincinnati. 

Edmund Von Martels Cincinnati. 

George Hoadly Von Seggern Cincinnati. 

William Vernon Walton Woodsfield. 

Charles Wardlow, ph. b., 



..Middletown. 

Kenyon College. 

William Emerson White, b. s., , 

Cincinnati. 



Purdue University. 



! 



JUNIOR CLASS. 



Francis Marion Baughman Miami. 

William {ones Berne, a. b., ) _ _ 

-...' , v , TT . .. f Daytona, Fla. 

Ohio \\ esleyan University. i) ' 

Tacob E. Bloom, ) „ . 

tt o A/r-v * i " Cincinnati. 

U. S. Military Academy. \ 

Daniel Rose Broh, b. s., ) __ _, _. __ 

n , 1TT . '., \ Mt. Sterling, Ky. 

Central University. ) 

William Beckett Brown Hamilton. 

Henry Work Crawford Cincinnati. 

John Burkley Cunningham, a. b. ,) 

Franklin College. \ L 

Frank John Doerger Cincinnati. 

Henry William Friedhoff Cincinnati. 

Ernest Leslie Frisbee, a. b., ) TT . . • 

an v r> 11 r Union City, Pa. 

Allegheny College. ) J 

Robert Wentworth Gates Cincinnati. 

fohn Samuel Geisler, a. b , ) ^ T 

c . v • n ,, \ Newport, Ky. 

St. Xavier College. j r ' J 

Jerry Lincoln Grumbine Cincinnati. 

David Preston Guthrie Belpre. 

Robert James Harlan Cincinnati. 

William Simpson Hartley Cincinnati. 

Henry White Herrman Dayton. 

Owen Milton Mill Cincinnati. 

John Tibbatts Hodge Newport, Ky. 

William Houk Osborn. 

George Clarence Hollowav, a. b., ") 

\ nu \ Avondale. 

Kenyon College. ) 

Edward Bulwer Hunt Covington, Ky. 

Clark Jamison, a. b. , / ^ ,. 

J ' - Cadiz. 

Franklin College. ) 



12 LAW SCHOOL, 



Thomas Tones, a. b., ) «. , ., 

n , J r '„ \ Richville, N. Y. 

Oberhn College. ) 

Frederick John Kleimeyer Cincinnati. 

Oscar William Kuhn Cincinnati. 

Allen Martin Lambright, a. b., ) XT . , 

Oberlin College. } Unchsville. 

Thomas Langdon Lee, a. b., ) . 

n ,. , y , rT . .. r Cincinnati. 

Ohio Wesleyan University. ) 

Thomas Charles Mahon Dunkirk. 

Mart Armstrong Mayo Lima. 

Albert Harrington Meads, a. b.,| _ XT __ 

c TT . r Syracuse, N. Y. 

Syracuse University. ) J 

Casper William Miles Cincinnati. 

Frank Howard Morrill, a. 
Shurtleff College. 

William Beatty Rochester, Jr Washington, D. C. 

John Jacob Roush Cincinnati. 

John Edward Ruffin Brownsville, Ind. 

Herman Schrader Cincinnati. 

Benjamin Franklin Thomas Maysville, Ky. 

Louis Kirtley Torbet Cincinnati. 

Walter Clifford Turner Newport, Ky. 

Arthur Hanson Walkey Circle ville. 

Charles Frederick Windisch Cincinnati. 

Daniel Thew Wright, Jr Cincinnati. 



B *' | Virden, 111. 



Senior Class 105 

Junior Class 43 

Total 148 



CINCINNATI COLLEGE. 13 



LAW SCHOOL 



OF THE 



CINCINNATI COLLEGE, 



This School was founded in May, 1833, by lawyers who had 
received their instruction in the Law School of Reeve & Gould, at 
Litchfield, or in the Dane Law School, at Cambridge, and who sought 
to introduce the advantages of that method of the study of law into 
the West. It is understood to be the first Law School established 
west of the Alleghany Mountains. The first term began on the 7th 
of October, 1833. 

In the year 1835 the Law School was incorporated with the 
Cincinnati College, a literary and academic institution founded in the 
year 181 9; and from that time it has been conducted under the 
name of the "Law School of the Cincinnati College." As such it 
became permanently located in the College Buildings, on Walnut 
Street, in Cincinnati, and has been liberally endowed from the College 
funds for the establishment of professorships, and for the formation 
of a law library adequate to the purposes of the School. 



14 



SESSIONS AND VACATIONS. 

The regular Course of Study occupies a period of nineteen 
months : two terms of seven months each, and a recess of five months 
between the terms. There are two sessions in each term : one before, 
and one after the Christmas holidays. The first session commences 
on the Thursday next after the second Tuesday in October, and 
closes with the Christmas holidays. The second session commences 
on the 2d of January, and closes on the last Wednesday in May. 
The Christmas vacation includes both Christmas and New Year's days, 
and is the only interruption in the continuity of the two sessions. 



ADMISSION. 

Applicants for admission may register their names and pay their 
tuition fees to the Dean of the Faculty, at the Library of the School, 
on the three days next before the commencement of the first session 
of each term. 

Applicants are admitted to the Junior Class upon satisfactory 
evidence of such advancement in ordinary academic education as will 
fit them to profit by the studies in the Law School ; but no formal 
examination is required. 

Applicants are admitted to the Senior Class upon a satisfactory 
examination in the course prescribed for the Junior Year. In addi- 
tion to such examination, and as a necessary condition of entering 
the Senior Class, the applicant must have completed the full Course 



CINCINNATI COLLEGE. I 5 



of Study for the Junior Class at this School, or must present the 
diploma of another Law School, or a certificate of attendance for one 
year at such School, or the certificate of an attorney at law in good 
standing showing that the applicant has diligently studied law under 
his direction for one year previous. 

The regular examination for admission to the Senior Class occurs 
on the first three days of the first session of the term. 

Applicants for a degree must register their names for the Senior 
Class with the Djfn before the first day of November, and be in daily 
attendance thereafter. Students may enter the Senior Class subse- 
quently, but will not be graduated. 

Special students, not candidates for a degree, will be admitted to 
any of the exercises of the School without examination. 



COURSE OF STUDY. 

The School is divided into two classes, Junior and Senior, for 
each of which a special Course of Study is provided. 

The daily exercises consist of lectures and recitations from stand- 
ard text-books. Leading cases and collateral authorities, on the sub- 
ject under cDnsideration, are frequently referred to by the Professor ; 
and, at the succeeding recitation, the class will be examined upon the 
cases and authorities thus cited, as well as upon the subject-matter 
of the lesson. At each exercise, hypothetical cases are put to the 
student as a m^ans of developing the faculty of making a practical 
application of legal principles. Students are encouraged to put 
questions freely to the instructor at all recitations. 

At the close of the second session, a course of study to be pursued 
during the summer recess will be prescribed for the Junior Class. 

Those who desire to take a special course can do so, and the 
tuition fees will vary in proportion to the amount of instruction given. 



i6 



The regular course of instruction is as follows : 

Junior Year. — Elementary Law, Gov. Cox; Contracts, Prof. 
Morrill ; Real Property, Gov Cox. 

The text-books are Blackstone's Commentaries, Kent's Commen- 
taries, Anson on Contracts, and Bliss on Code Pleading. 

Senior Year. — Pleading and Civil Procedure, Gov. Cox ; Torts, 
Prof. Mowill ; Real Property, Prof. King; Equity Jurisprudence, 
Judge Force ; Mercantile Law and Contracts, Gov. Stevenson; Evidence, 
Gov. Cox; Constitutional Law, Prof. King; Criminal Law, Judge 
Force. 

The text-books are Stephen on Pleading, Bliss on Code Pleading, 
Bigelow on Torts, Williams on Real Property, Bispham's Principles 
of Equity, Parsons on Contracts, Greenleaf on Evidence, Stephen on 
Evidence, Cooley's Principles of Constitutional Law, and Harris' 
Criminal Law. 

Special instruction in the Constitution of the State of Ohio will 
be given to such of the Seniors as may desire it. 

By the rules of the University of Cincinnati, students in this 
School may take special studies in the University, free of charge, if 
found, on examination, qualified to enter such classes. 



POST-GRADUATE COURSE. . 

An advance course of study will be added whenever a class of 
sufficient number can be organized. It will be open to Graduates of 
this or other Law Schools, and Junior Members of the Bar, and will 
comprehend a course in the higher branches of the Law Merchant, 
Equity Jurisprudence, Admiralty Law, the Law of Corporations, Con- 
flict of Laws, and International Law. 



CINCINNATI COLLEGE. I 7 



DEGREES. 

The degree of Bachelor of Laws will be conferred by the Corpo- 
ration upon all students who have been regularly admitted to the 
Senior Class, have attended the full course of Senior Lectures, and 
shall have satisfactorily passed the examination required for gradua- 
tion. This examination is both oral and written, and is conducted by 
the Committee appointed by the Supreme Court of Ohio for the exam- 
ination of candidates for the Bar. No student will be admitted to 
such examination, the number of whose unexcused absences is twenty 
per cent, of the whole number of lectures during the Senior year, or 
whose conduct shall have been otherwise exceptionable. 

The degrees are conferred on the last day of the term, and gradu- 
ates must attend in person to receive them. 

Graduates having the necessary qualifications of age and citizen- 
ship will be admitted to the Bar of Ohio without further examination. 



MOOT COURTS. 

Moot Courts are held each week during the year, commencing 
with the first Thursday in November. These are presided over by 
the Professors in turn, and members of the Senior Class are appointed 
to act as counsel. 

At each of the Moot Courts, short but carefully prepared essays, 
on topics previously assigned, are required to be read. 

Those Courts over which the Dean presides are devoted exclu- 
sively to Exercises in Pleading. 

Attendance is compulsory upon the Seniors, but is optional with 
the Juniors. 

Moot clubs, limited in membership, are also formed among the 
.students for voluntary exercises in Pleading, Practice, and Argument. 



LAW SCHOOL, 



LI BRARY. 



The School has a Library of nearly four thousand volumes, com- 
prising the works of the best writers on law and jurisprudence, and 
the more important reports. It has been selected with special refer- 
ence to the wants of the School, and is devoted to its exclusive use. 
Large additions are annually made, a yearly appropriation of $1,500 
for that purpose being provided by the Corporation. The Library is 
open to the students daily, from 9 o'clock A. M. to 10 o'clock P. M.. 
and is under the control of the Librarian and his Assistant. 

Students who are non-residents have, by the courtesy of the 
Directors of the Public Library of Cincinnati, the use of the Library, 
and are admitted to the Reading Rooms without charge. 

Very valuable advantages are thus open to those who have time 
for pursuing any branch of literary or scientific culture in connection 
with the study of the Law. 



CINCINNATI COLLEGE. I 



PRIZES. 

ESTABLISHED IN 1877. 



Julius Dexter, Esq., one of the Trustees of the College, pro- 
vided funds, in 1877, amounting to $2$o per annum, for prizes to be 
awarded to the Graduating (lass at the close of the year. 

The annual provision for these prizes was continued by Mr. 
Dexter till 1881, when the temporary arrangement made by him was 
assumed by the Board of Trustees of the Cincinnati College, who now 
make the appropriation for the purpose. 

The awards are made by the Examining Committee of the Bar 
appointed by the Supreme Court. 

A prize of seventy-five dollars is awarded for the best examina- 
tion ; a prize of seventy-five dollars for the best essay on a subject 
to be designated ; a prize of fifty dollars for the second best examina- 
tion ; and a prize of fifty dollars for the best performance in a public 
forensic discussion. 

Since the establishment of these prizes, the following awards have 
been made by the different Examining Committees : 

CLASS OF I876-77. 

Essay, William M. White Alexandria, Ky. 

Examination (i), Willis Miller Kemper, m. a Cincinnati. 

Examination (2), Theodore Horstmann Cincinnati. 

CLASS" OF 1877-78. 

Essay, Francis Marion Coppock, m. a Cincinnati. 

Examination (i), Rufus Biggs Smith, b. a Cincinnati. 

Examination (2), William O'Brien Cincinnati. 

Examination (3), John Benzing, Jr Cincinnati. 

CLASS OF 1878-79. 

Essay, Jacob Chandler Harper Cincinnati. 

Examination (i), "Edward John Dempsey Cincinnati. 

Examination (2), Simeon Harris Cincinnati. 



20 . LAW SCHOOL, 



CLASS OF 1879-80. 

Essay (i), Sylvester Genin Williams, b. s Cincinnati. 

Essay (2), Percival Werner Steinbrecher Cincinnati. 

Examination (i), William Howard Taft, b. a Cincinnati. 

Examination (2), Alfred Barnum Benedict, b. a.. Cincinnati. 

CLASS OF I83o-8i. 

Essay, Harry Singleton Taylor Crawfordsville,Ind. 

Examination (i), James Homan Springfield. 

Examination (2), Alfred Ashwell Frazier, b. A....Fraziersburg. 

CLASS OF 1-881-82. 

Essay, George Washington Sieber Akron. 

Examination (i), Frank Overton Suirc, b. a Cincinnati. 

Examination (2), Ernest C. S. Rehm, b. a Pomeroy. 

Examination (3), David Meade Massie, b. a Chillicothe. 

Forensic Discussion, Abel C. Cunningham Covington, K\. 

CLASS OF 1882-83. 

Essay, Herbert Denman Blakemore Cincinnati. 

Examination (i), Herbert Denman Blakemore.... Cincinnati. 

Examination (2), Edward Dienst Cincinnati. 

Forensic Discussion, Elias Jacoby, b. a Marion. 

CLASS OF 1883-84. 

Essay, James Cleland Hume, a. b Ashbury Park, N.J. 

Examination (i), Cornelius Clark Young, A. b. ... Springfield. 

Examination (2), William Littleford Newport, Ky. 

Forensic Discussion, W. McDonald- Shaw, a. b.. Newport, Ky. 

CLASS OF 1884-85. 

Examination (i), Robert Bonner Bowler Cincinnati. 

Examination (2), Frank Herbert Jones, a. b Bellevue. 

Examination (2), Edward W. Rector ..Cincinnati. 

Forensic Discussion, David DeMott Woodmansee, 

b. s Delaware. 



CINCINNATI COLLEGE. 



EXPENSES. 



Tuition Fees are as follows: 

For the first year, whether Junior or Senior $60 00 

" " second year 30 00 

Special courses may be taken at proportional rates. 

All tuition fees are to be paid in advance. No deduction or 
return is made if the student does not, for any reason, continue 
through the term. 

Graduation Fee $ 5 00 

The text-books, in Cincinnati, cost for the Junior year about 
Forty Dollars ; for the Senior year, about Thirty Dollars. The other 
expenses vary according to the mode of life and habits of each stu- 
dent. Below is an approximate statement. The lower figures afford 
comfort, bnt not luxury, and can readily be obtained by those who 
take rooms together. The time is thirty weeks, exclusive of the 
holiday vacation. 

Rent a*nd care of room, $1 00 to $3 50 per week, $ 30 00 $105 00 
Board, . . . 3 00 to 6 00 " " 90 00 180 00 

Fuel and light, 8 00 15 00 

$128 00 $300 00 



22 LAW SCHOOL, 



ADVISORY 



As a general answer to numerous inquiries, the Faculty would 
make the following suggestions : 

They earnestly advise and recommend the pursuing of academic 
studies as far as possible, before beginning a professional course. 

They believe that the time occupied in a college course of study, 
if diligently used, will in the end be saved by the more rapid advance- 
ment of the young lawyer in his profession. Apart, therefore, from 
the motives to be drawn from the general benefits of a liberal educa- 
tion, they giv^ their full influence in favor of the most thorough 
preparation for professional study. 

But, as all can not command the means and time for this, no rule 
is established in regard to the amount of education required for enter- 
ing the Junior year, beyond what is generally understood by the 
elements of a good English education. 

The chief advantages of attending a law school, instead of read- 
ing in a practicing lawyer's office, are found in the regular recitations 
in class, where the presence of numerous fellow-students stimulates the 
desire to be well prepared for the daily examinations ; in the regular 
and full development and illustration of the topic in hand by the lec- 
tures of the professors; in the practical application of what is learned 
by the exercises of the moot courts ; and in the comparison of one's 
powers with others in a way which shows where improvement is most 
necessary, or gives reasonable confidence in the student's ability to' 
cope with those he must meet in the arena of professional labor. 

Very few lawyers in active practice can afford the time or labor 
necessary for the thorough instruction or examination of a student in 



CINCINNATI COLLEGE. 23 



the office, and experience shows that all that is commonly done is to 
give advice as to text hooks, sonic general supervision of study, with 
occasional briel examinations, and the opportunity to the student to 
become familiar with the ordinary current of business. 

If a part of such experience could be supplemented by the full 
course of lectures of the Law School, the best results would no doubt 
be attained ; and as the course of study in this School is framed with 
a view to unity and proper relation of parts, we can not too strongly 
urge the advisability of attending the Junior as w r ell as the Senior 
lecture terms. 

The Supreme Court of Ohio, under recent legislation, is enforcing 
rules which must have the good effect of raising the standard of quali- 
fication for the Bar in this State ; and a similar tendency throughout 
the country is making the necessity for careful and systematic training 
more and more evident. The value of the diploma and degree grant- 
ed by a reputable school is, therefore, becoming more apparent, as 
evidence of the sound preliminary education, which is the best com- 
mendation to the public as well as to the members of the profession. 



Communications concerning the Law School should be ad- 
dressed to Jacob D. Cox, Dean, College Building, Cincinnati, Ohio. 
The Lecture-room and Library are in the Cincinnati College 
Building, Walnut Street, between Fourth and Fifth Streets. 



24 LAW SCHOOL. 



ADVERTISEMENT. 



The next term of the Law School of the Cincinnati College will 
begin on Thursday, 14th day of October, 1886. Applications for 
admission may be made then, or on the three days preceding, between 
the hours of ro A. M. and 4 P. M., at the Library. 

Students will assemble at the Lecture-room on Thursday, at 12 
M., to receive instructions frcm the Dean, and to hear the announce- 
ment of the Schedule of Lectures and Recitations. 



ADVERTISEMENT. 



The next term of the Law School of the Cincinnati College will 
begin on Thursday, 14th day of October, 1886 Applications for 
admission may be made then, or on the three days preceding, between 
the hours of ro A. M. and 4 P. M., at the Library. 

Students will assemble at the Lecture-room on Thursday, at 12 M., 
to receive instructions from the Dean, and to hear the announcement 
of the Schedule of Lectures and Recitations. 






04^ 



u.251 



\ft8t8l 







CATALOGU E 



OFFICERS AND STUDENTS 



LAW SCHOOL 



CINCINNATI COLLEGE, 



if 



Fifty-Fourth Academical Year, iS86-8y, 



HE COURSEVm*y/»JSTRUCTION. 



SE OF 

AfHHr2WT 



•i 



s 



CINCINNATI 

1887. 



CATALOGU E 



OFFICERS AND STUDENTS 



LAW SCHOOL 



CINCINNATI COLLEGE, 



FOR THE 



Fifty- Fourth Academical Year, 1 886-8 '7, 



STATEMENT OF THE COURSE OF INSTRUCTION 



CINCINNATI 

1887. 



CORPORATION. 



Trustees of the Cincinnati College. 



WILLIAM HOWARD NEFF,* 
President. 

ALEX. H. MoGUFFEY, 

Secretary and Treasurer. 

SAMUEL P. BISHOP, 

SAMUEL J. BROA DWELL, 

JACOB BURNET, 

JACOB D. COX, 

JOHN DAVJS, M.D., 

Rev. LLEWELLYN J. EVANS, D.D., 

MARCELLUS B. HAGANS, 

GEORGE HOADLY, 

WILLIAM HOOPER, 

Rt. Rev. THOMAS A. JAGGAR, D.D., 

RUFUS KING, 

E. W. KITTRIDGE, 

SAMUEL LOWRY, 

STANLEY MATTHEWS, 

GEORGE R. SAGE, 

EDWARD SARGENT, 

ELKANAH WILLIAMS, M.J)., 

OBED J. WILSON, 

"Elected President December 29, 1881, 



FACULTY 



JACOB D. COX, LL.D., Dean, 

PROFESSOR OF THE LAW OF CIVIL PROCEDURE, EVIDENCE AND 
ELEMENTARY LAW. 



KTJFUS KING, LL.D., 

PROFESSOR OF CONSTITUTIONAL LAW AND THE LAW OF REAL PROPERTY. 



GEORGE HOADLY, LL.D., 

EMERITUS PROFESSOR OF THE LAW OF APPELLATE JURISDICTION AND PRACTICE 
IN THE FEDERAL COURTS. 



HENRY A. MORRILL, M.A., 
PROFESSOR OF THE LAW OF CONTRACTS AND TORTS. 

MANNING F. FORCE, LL.D., 
PROFESSOR OF EQUITY JURISPRUDENCE AND CRIMINAL LAW. 

GEORGE R. SAGE, LL.D., 

PROFESSOR OF COMMERCIAL LAW A.ND CONTRACTS. 



SENIOR CLASS. 



IC11S. 



Samuel Pressly Armstrong, ph. b., ) » ,, 

Ohio University. j 

Columbus. 



Jacob L. Bach man, b. s., 

National Normal University 

George Gottlieb Bambach Ripley. 

Francis Marion Baughman. . . ♦ .... Cincinnati. 

.lames Ellsworth Benham, A.B., ) T , 

„. .. IW , TT • ' r Lebanon. 

National Normal University. ) 

Jacob E. Bloom, ) «. . ,. 

TT a ,,.,., . , Cincinnati. 

U.S. .Military Academ}'. \ 

Daniel Rose Broh, b. s. ,1 n . . 

,, i tt • •« r Cincinnati. 

Central University. j 

John Brackett Childe, ph. b. ) T1T 

r» • tt •* r Wyoming. 

Denison University. ) J & 

Clinton Collins, A. b., ) ~. . . 

tt . ■ Cincinnati. 

Harvard. ) 

William Creed Cincinnati. 

George Strode Cunningham, ph. b. , } 
Ohio State University. \ 

John Barckley Cunningham, a. b., ) 



George Strode Cunningham, ph. b., ) T 

Xl- t( * ri • ■* i Lancaster. 

Ohio State University. \ 



Franklin College. ' \ Cadiz. 

Frank John Dorger Cincinnati. 

Henry Charles Fink Jasper, Ind. 

Samuel Forsythe, b. s., ) , y , XT . T , 

De Pauw University, j Grand VieW ' Ind ' 

William McClellan Fridman, b. s., ) ri , .,, 

Ohio Wesleyan University. [ Clermontville. 

John Samuel Geisler, A. b. , ) _, Tr 

St. Xavier College. j Newport, Ky. 

Henry Aaron Glick Cincinnati. 

J erry Lincoln Grumbine Cincinnati. 

David Preston Guthrie Belpre. 



LAW SCHOOL. 



James Wood Half hill, b. s., ) ,, 

Ohio Normal University. j Mercer. 

James Henry Hamilton, b. s., ) ~ . T _ 

Hanover College. j Greensburg, Ind. 

William Wallace Hammond, a. b., ) , xr .. ... 

„. tt . n „ } Wellsville. 

Mt. Union College. ) 

Robert James Harlan Cincinnati. 

Heaton Willis Harris, a. b. , ) . ... 

Ar , TT . ~ „ Y Alliance. 

Mt. union College. j 

James William Harsha Circleville. 

William Simpson Hartley Cincinnati. 

Owen Milton Hill m Cincinnati. 

John Tibbatts Hodge Newport, Ky. 

George Clarence Hollo way, a. b., ) . . , 

-,? n ,, J > Avondale. 

Kenyon College. \ 

Peter Boyd Holly, b. s., ) M111l , 

XT 4 . i xt itt ■ •* r Middletown. 

National Normal University. ) 

Samuel Holmes Mt, Olivet, Ky. 

William Honk Cincinnati. 

Edward Bulwer Thomas Hunt Covington, Ky. 

John Clark Jamison, A. b. , ) ^ ,. 

-c, .,. n ,, > Cadiz. 

Franklin College. ) 

George Alexander Jobes Greenville. 

John William Jones Cincinnati. 

Thomas Jones, a. B., ) Ty . , .„ AT xr 

txv v n ,', \ Richville, N. Y. 

Oberhn College. j 

Charles Krichbaum, A. b., ) ~ 

w . TT . .. \ Canton. 

Wooster University. ) 

Jacob Krummel Cincinnati. 

Oscar William Kuhn, a. b., ) n- - \- 

TT . ., e „. . .. \ ..Cincinnati. 

University of Cincinnati, j 

Clarence Brunner Laird Rockport, Ind. 

Allen Martin Lam bright, a. b., \ TT ' h "11 

Oberlin College. j 

George Newton Lea Sure Delphos. 

Edward Sherman Leavitt, A. b., ) n . . 

-o . Y Cincinnati. 

Princeton. \ 



CINCINNATI COLLEGE. 



rhoraas Langdoti Lee, a. b., ) n . . .. 

, f _ . ' • Cincinnati. 

Ohio \\ esleyan I niversity. j 

*George Washington Lighty, b. b., ) p t 

National Normal University, j 

J ulius L. Maas Hamilton . 

Thomas Charles Mahon Dunkirk. 

Samuel Willard Margerum Middletown. 

William Ktt Mayer a. m.,1 Cincinnati. 

German \v a 11 ace I oilege. \ 

Mart Armstrong Mayo Lima. 

Robert Western McCammon Woodfield. 

Albert Harrington Meads, a. b,, ) Syracuse, N. Y. 

Syracuse, University. ) 

Caspar William Miles Cincinnati. 

Henry Albert Miller Celina. 

Frank Howard Morrill, A. B., ) .Cincinnati. 

Shurtleff College. j 

Arthur Bradley Murphy, b. a., ) Coudit 

Ohio Wesleyan University. ) 

Samuel Nesbitt Wheeling, W. Va. 

Joseph Addison Okey, a. b., ( ...Caldwell. 

Ohio Wesleyan University. j 

Robert Henry Olmsted, a. b. , } rn ., 

Hanover College. \ 

Richard Butterfield Pullan, Jr Cummiusville. 

Victor Emanuel Rhodes, b. s., ) n ., ■** 

. __ . r • ' . ' Carthage, Mo. 

Ohio Wesleyan University. \ 

John Simpson Roebuck Newport, Ky. 

John Jacob Roush Cincinnati. 

John Edward Ruffin Brownsville, Ind. 

William Smith Small Cincinnati. 

Herman Schrader Cincinnati. 

Curtis Pendleton Smith, a. M., ) A7 . T , 

_ _, TT . . ' ' Vmcennes, Ind. 

De Pauw University. , j 

William Heaten Snider Salem. 



* Not candidate for degree. 



10 L/VW SCHOOL. 



John Stout Snook Antwerp. 

Alonzo Mitchell Snyder, a. b., ) n -,. 

Jven\ T (Hi College. ) 

James Forbes Stephenson Leesville. 

Stanley William Swabey New Philadelphia. 

Benjamin Franklin Thomas , Maysville, Ky. 

Gilbert Pearson Thorpe, b. s., ) a , . 

„ . ™ . tt • ( oabina. 

Ohio Wesleyan University. ) 

Louis Kirtley Torbet Cincinnati. 

William Pitt Trimble Covington, Ky. 

Williams Pennock Vaughan... Mt. Gilead. 

George Hoadly Von Seggern Cincinnati. 

Lewis Welty New Philadelphia. 

Daniel Thew Wright, Jr Cincinnati 



JUNIOR CLASS. 



Joseph Lincoln Adler, a. b., ) n . . ,. 

{. , ' V Cincinnati. 

\ ale. ) 

Albert Jacob Alexander, a. b., } p. . ,. 

University of Cincinnati. ) 

Henry Ferdinand Busch Cincinnati. 

James Lee Breeding Highland, Kas. 

Ephraim Taylor Brown Mt. Airy. 

Frank Ward Bursovne, A. B., } n . . ,. 

TT . to : ; ' y Cincinnati. 

\\ coster University. ) 

Alfred Alexander Creps, b. s., ) w ^ • * 

IT ., „ _ .. r > Westminster. 

Heidelberg College. ) 

Heman Lewis Day, A. B., | Deerfield 

Mt. Union College. j ueerneia. 

David Eichberg Cincinnati. 

Robert McMains Fishback Indianapolis, Ind. 

Franklin Franks Cincinnati. 

John Kinsj Griffith, a. b., ) ^ ,, . T ^ 

Yllle s j Cynthiana, Ky. 

Oliver Porter Grimes Piedmont, Kas. 

Frank Gibson Haddock Cincinnati. 

Norbert Herman Heinsheimer Cincinnati, 

Abraham Harris Huston Pleasant Run. 

Charles Henrv Jeffras, A. b., ) ~,. . ,. 

^. . J ' > Cincinnati. 

1 ale. \ 

Charles Henry Kirshner, A. b., } Ft' 

Oberlin College. ) 

Frank Olds Loveland, A. b., ) __ . . _ 

T . . .. r* ,, > JNorwich, Vt. 

Dartmouth College. j 

Frederick Engelbert Mackentepe, a. b.. ) ri . . 

Q . v . Z ,, r ' ' Cincinnati. 

St. Xavier College. \ 

Wade MacMillan Ham ilton . 



12 LAW SCHOOL. 



Ed ward Everett McCombs Martin's Ferry. 

Sherman Tecumseh McPherson Casstown. 



■i Thomas Mooney, b. s., ) gt M 

o Normal University. \ J 



Williai 

Ohio Normal University. j 

George Merrill Norris, A. b.,) ,«- ,-, ,«- 

J 5 . . ,. .. ' > Monmouth, Me. 

Isowaom College. j 

Martin George Pauly Wooster. 

Thomas Armstead Peter Cincinnati. 

Moses Rogowskie Cincinnati. 

Richard Wilson Puffin Brownsville, Ind. 

Gustavus Adolphus Schrage Cincinnati. 

Robert Campbell Simmons Covington, Ky. 

Edward Thomas Snediker Dayton. 

William Richard Stewart Youugstown. 

Bruce Stevens Weeks Cincinnati. 



Senior Class 82 

Junior Class 34 

Total 116 



CINCINNATI COLLEGE. 13 



LAW SCHOOL 



OF THE 



CINCINNATI COLLEGE 



This school was founded in May, 1833, by lawyers who had 
received their instruction in the Law School of Reeve & Gould, at 
Litchfield, or in the Dane Law School, at Cambridge, and who sought 
to introduce the advantages of that method of the study of law into 
the West. It is understood to be the first Law School established 
west of the Allegheny Mountains. The first term began on the 7th 
of October, 1833. 

In the year 1835 the Law School was incorporated with the 
Cincinnati College, a literary and academic institution fouuded in the 
year 1819; and from that time it has been conducted under the 
name of the "Law School of the Cincinnati College." As such it 
became permanently located in the College Buildings, on Walnut 
Street, in Cincinnati, and has been liberally endowed from the College 
funds for the establishment of professorships, and for the formation 
of a law library adequate to the purposes of the School. 



14 LAW SCHOOL. 



SESSIONS AND VACATIONS. 

The regular Course of Study occupies a period of nineteen 
mouths; two terms of seven months each, and a recess of five months 
between the terms. There are two sessions in each term : one before, 
and one after the Christmas holidays. The first session commences 
ou the Thursday next after the second Tuesday in October, and 
closes with the Christmas holidays. The second session commences 
on the 2d of January, and closes on the last Wednesday in May. 
The Christmas vacation includes both Christmas and New Year's days, 
and is the only interruption in the continuity of the two sessions. 



ADMISSION. 

Applicants for admission may register their names and pay their 
tuition fees to the Dean of the Faculty, at the Library of the School, 
on the three days next before the commencement of the first session 
of each term. 

Applicants are admitted to the Junior Class upon satisfactory 
evidence of such advancement in ordinary academic education as will 
fit them to profit by the studies in the Law School ; but no formal 
examination is required. 

Applicants are admitted to the Senior Class upon a satisfactory 
examination in the course prescribed for the Junior Year. In addi- 
tion to such examination, and as a necessary condition of entering 
the Senior Class, the applicant must have completed the full Course 



CINCINNATI COLLEGE. 15 



of Study for the Junior Class at this School, or must present the 
diploma of another Law School, or a certificate of attendance for one 
year at such School, or the certificate of an attorney at law in good 
standing, showing that the applicant has diligently studied law under 
his direction for one year previous. 

The regular examination for admission to the Senior Class occurs 
on the first three days of the first session of the term. 

Applicants for a degree must register their names for the Senior 
Class with the Dean before the first day of November, and be in daily 
attendance thereafter. Students may enter the Senior Class subse- 
quently, but will not be graduated. 

Special students, not candidates for a degree, will be admitted to 
any of the exercises of the School without examination. 



COURSE OF STUDY. 

The School is divided into two classes, Junior and Senior, for 
each of which a special Course of Study is provided. 

The daily exercises consist of lectures and recitations from stand- 
ard text-books. Leading cases and collateral authorities, on the sub- 
ject under consideration, are frequently referred to by the Professor ; 
and, at the succeeding recitation, the class will be examined upon the 
cases and authorities thus cited, as well as upon the subject-matter 
of the lesson. At each exercise, hypothetical cases are put to the 
student as a means of developing the faculty of making a practical 
application of legal principles. Students are encouraged to put 
questions freely to the instructor at all recitations. 

At the close of the second session, a course of study to be pursued 
during the summer recess will be prescribed for the Junior Class. 

Those who desire to take a special course can do so, and the 
tuition fees will vary in proportion to the amount of instruction given. 



lfi LAW SCHOOL. 



The regular course of instruction is as follows : 

Junior Year. — Elementary Law, Gov. Cox; Contracts, Prof. 
Morrill ; Real Property, Gov. Cox. 

The text books are Blackstone's Commentaries, Kent's Commen- 
taries, Anson on Contracts, and Bliss on Code Pleading. 

Senior Year. — Pleading and Civil Procedure, Gov. Cox ; Torts, • 
Prof, Morrill; Real Property, Prof. King; Equity Jurisprudence, 
Judge Force; Mercantile Law and Contracts, Judge Sage; Evidence, 
Gov. Cox; Constitutional Law, Prof. King; Criminal Law 7 , Judge 
Force. 

The text-books are Stephen on Pleading, Bliss on Code Pleading, 
Bigelow on Torts, Williams on Real Property, Bispham's Principles of 
Equity, Parsons on Contracts, Greenleaf on Evidence, Stephen on 
Evidence, Cooley's Principles of Constitutional Law, and Harris' 
Criminal Law. 

Special instruction in the Constitution of the State of Ohio will 
be given to such cf the Seniors as may desire it. 



DEGREES. 



The Degree of Bachelor of Laws will be conferred by the Corpo- 
ration upon all students who have been regularly admitted to the Senior 
Class, have attended the full course of Senior Lectures, and shall have 
satisfactorily passed the examination required for graduation. This ex- 
amination is both oral and written, and is conducted by the Committee 
appointed by the Supreme Court of Ohio for the examination of can- 
didates for the Bar. No student will be admitted to such examination 
the number of whose unexcused absences is twenty per cent of the 
whole number of lectures during the Senior year, or whose conduct shall 
have been otherwise exceptionable. 



CINCINNATI COLLEGE. 17 



The degrees arc conferred on the last day of the term, and gradu- 
ates must attend in person to receive them. 

Graduates having the necessary qualifications of age and citizen- 
ship will he admitted to the Bar of Ohio without further examination. 



MOOT COURTS. 

Moot Courts are held each week during the year, commencing 
with the first Thursday in November. These are presided over by the 
Professors in turn, and members of the Senior Class are appointed to 
act as counsel. 

At each of the Moot Courts, short but carefully prepared essays, 
on topics previously assigned, are required to be read. 

Those Courts over which the Dean presides are devoted exclusively 
to Exercises in Pleading. 

Attendance is compulsory upon the Seniors, but is optional with 
the Juniors. 

Moot clubs, limited in membership, are also formed among the 
students for voluntary exercises in Pleading, Practice, and Argument. 



LIBRARY. 

The School has a Library of nearly four thousand volumes, com- 
prising the works of the best writers on law and jurisprudence, and the 
more important reports. It has been selected with special reference to 
the wants of the School, and is devoted to its exclusive use. Large 
additions are annually made, a yearly appropriation of $1,500 for that 



18 LAW SCHOOL. 



purpose being provided by the Corporation. The Library is open to 
the students daily from 9 o'clock A. m. to 10 o'clock p. M., and is 
under the control of the Librarian and his Assistant. 

Students who are non-residents have, by the courtesy of the Direc- 
tors of the Public Library of Cincinnati, the use of the Library, and 
are admitted to the Heading Rooms without charge/ 

Very valuable advantages are thus open to those who have time 
for pursuing any branch of literary or scientific culture in connection 
with the study of the Law. 



PRIZES. 



ESTABLISHED IK 1877. 



Julius Dexter, Esq., one of the Trustees of the College, pro- 
vided funds, in 1877, amountiug to $250 per annum, for prizes to be 
awarded to the Graduating Class at the close of the year. 

The annual provision for these prizes was continued by Mr. Dex- 
ter till 1881, when the temporary arrangement made by him was as- 
sumed by the Board of Trustees of the Cincinnati College, who now 
make the appropriation for the purpose. 

The awards to the Senior Class are made by the Examining Com- 
mittee of the Bar aj^pointed by the Supreme Court. 

To the Senior Class: A prize of seventy-five dollars is awarded 
for the best examination ; a prize of seventy-five dollars for the best essay 
on a subject to be designated ; a prize of fifty dollars for the second 
best examination ; and a prize of fifty dollars for the best performance 
in a public forensic discussion. 

To the Junior Class : A prize of seventy -five dollars for the best 
examination ; a prize of fifty dollars for the second best examination. 



CINCINNATI COLLEGE. 19 

'The prizes tire offered to regular under-graduate students. Post- 
graduates and admitted attorneys do not compete for them. 

Since the establishment of these prizes, the following awards have 
been made by the different Examining Committees: 

Class of 1876-77. 

Essay, William M. White Alexandria, Ky. 

Examination (1), Willis Miller Kemper, m. a Cincinnati. 

Examination (2), Theodore Horstmann Cincinnati. 

■ 

Class of 1877-78. 

Essay, Francis Marion Coppock, m. a Cincinnati. 

Examination (1), Kufus Biggs Smith, b. a Cincinnati. 

Examination (2), William O'Brien Cincinnati. 

Examination (3), John Benzing, Jr ....Cincinnati. 

Class of 1878-79. 

Essay, Jacob Chandler Harper Cincinnati. 

Examination (1), Edward John Dempsey Cincinnati. 

Examination (2), Simeon Harris Cincinnati. 

Class of 1879-80. 

Essay (1), Sylvester Genin Williams, b. s Cincinnati. 

Essay (2), Percival Werner Steinbrecher Cincinnati. 

Examination (1) William Howard Taft, b. a Cincinnati. 

Examination (2), Alfred Barnum Benedict, b. a.. Cincinnati. 

Class, of 1880-81. 

Essay, Harry Singleton Taylor Crawfordsville,Ind. 

Examination (1), James Human Springfield. 

Examination (2), Alfred Ashwell Frazier, b. A...Fraziersbnrg. 

Class of 1881-82. 

Essay, George Washington Sieber Akron. 

Examination (1), Frank Overton Suire, b. a Cincinnati. 



20 LAW SCHOOL. 



Examination (2), Ernest C. S. Rehm, b. a Pomeroy. 

Examination (3), David Meade Massie, b. a Chillicothe. 

Forensic Dischssion, Abel C. Cunningham Covington, Ky. 

Class of 1882-83. 

Essay, Herbert Den man Blakemore Cincinnati. 

Examination (1), Herbert Denman Blakemore. ...Cincinnati. 

Examination (2), Edward Dienst Cincinnati. 

Forensic Discussion, Elias Jacoby, b. a Marion. 

Class of 1883-84. 

Essay, James Cleland Hume, a. b AshburyPark,N.J. 

Examination (1), Cornelius Clark Young, a. b... Springfield. 

Examination (2), William Little ford Newport, Ky. 

Forensic Discussion, W. McDonald Shaw, a. b.. Newport, Ky. 

Class of 1884-85. 

Examination (1), Robert Bonuer Bowler...... Cincinnati. 

Examination (2), Frank Herbert Jones, a. B......Bellevue. 

Examination (2), Edward W. Rector Cincinnati. 

Forensic Discussion, David DeMott Woodmansee, 

b. s Delaware. 

Class of 1885-86. 

Essay, Thomas Cleland Dawson Enterprise, Fla. 

Examination (1), Francis Bacon James Cincinnati. 

Examination (2), Joseph Hartwell Cabell, a. b... Cincinnati. 
Forensic Discussion, Atlee Pomerene, a. b......... Berlin. 



CINCINNATI COLLEGE. 21 



EXPENSES. 

Tuition Fees are as follows : 

For each year, whether Junior or Senior, . . $75 00 

Special courses may be taken at proportionate rates. 

All tuition fees are to be paid in advance. No deduction or re- 
turn is made if the student does not, for any reason, continue through 
the term. 

Graduation Fee, . '. . . ■ $5 00 

The text-books, in Cincinnati, cost for the Junior year, about 
Forty Dollars ; for the Senior year, about Thirty Dollars. The other 
expenses vary according to the mode of life and habits of each stu- 
dent. Below is an approximate statement. The lower figures afford 
comfort, but not luxury, and cau readily be obtained by those who 
take rooms together. The time is thirty weeks, exclusive of the holi- 
day vacation. 

Rent and care of rooms, including fuel and lic;M. 

SI 00 to $3 00 per week, . . . . . . $30 00 $90 00 

Board, $2 50 to $5 00 per week, 75 00 150 00 



$105 00 $240 00 



22 LAW SCHOOL. 



ADVISORY. 

As a general answer to numerous inquiries, the Faculty would 
make the following suggestions : 

They earnestly advise and recommend the pursuing of academic 
studies as far as possible, before beginning a professional course. 

They believe that the time occupied in a college course of study, 
if diligently used, will in the end be saved by the more rapid advance- 
ment of the young lawyer in his profession. Apart, therefore, from 
the motives to be drawn from the general benefits of a liberal educa- 
tion, they give their full influence in favor of the most thorough prep- 
aration for professional study. 

But, as all can not command the means and time for this, no rule 
is established in regard to the amount of education required for enter- 
ing the Junior year, beyond what is generally understood by the 
elements of a good English education. 

The chief advantages of attending a law school, instead of read- 
ing in a practicing lawyer's office, are found in the regular recitations 
in class, where the presence of numerous fellow-students stimulates the 
desire to be well prepared for the daily examinations; in the regular 
and full development and illustration of the topic in hand by the lec- 
tures of the professors; in the practical application of what is learned 
by the exercises of the moot courts; and in the comparison of one's 
powers with others in a way which shows where improvement is most 
necessary, or gives reasonable confidence in the student's ability to 
cope with those he must meet in the arena of professional labor. 

Very few lawyers in active practice can afford the time or labor 
necessary for the thorough instruction or examination of a student in 



LAW SCHOOL. 23 



the office, and experience shows that all that is commonly done is to 
give advice as to text-books, some general supervision of study, with 
occasional brief examinations, and the opportunity to the student to 
become familiar with the ordinary current of business. 

If a part of such experience could be supplemented by the full 

course of lectures of the Law School, the best results would no doubt 

< 

be attained ; and as the course of study in this school is framed with 
a view to unity and proper relation of parts, we can not too strongly 
urge the advisability of attending the Junior as well as the Senior lec- 
ture terms. 

The Supreme Court of Ohio, under recent legislation, is enforcing 
rules which must have the good effect of raising the standard of qual- 
ification for the Bar in this State ; and a similar tendency throughout 
the country is making the necessity for careful and systematic training 
more and more evident. The value of the diploma and degree granted 
by a reputable school is, therefore, becoming more apparent, as evi- 
dence of the sound preliminary education, which is the best commenda- 
tion to the public as well as to the members of the profession. 



Communications concerning the Law School should be ad- 
dressed to Jacob D. Cox, Dean, College Building, Cincinnati, Ohio. 
The Lecture-room and Library are in the Cincinnati College 
Building, Walnut Street, between Fourth and Fifth Streets. 



24 LAW SCHOOL. 



ADVERTISEMENT. 

The next term of the Law School of the Cincinnati College will 
begin on Thursday, loth day of October, 1887. Application for 
admission may be made then, or on the three days preceding, between 
the hours of 10 a. m. and 4 P. M. , at the Library. 

Students will assemble at the Lecture-room on Thursday, at 12 m., 
to receive instructions from the Dean, and to hear the announcement 
of the Schedule of Lectures and Recitations. 





ADVERTISEMENT. 




The next term of the Law School of the Cincinnati College will 
begin on Thursday, 13th clay of October, 1887. Applications for ad- 
mission may be made then, or on the three days preceding, between 
the hours of 10 A. M. and 4 P. M., at the Library. 

Students will assemble at the Lecture-room on Thursday, at 
12 M., to receive instructions from the Dean, and to hear the auounce- 
ment of the Schedule of Lectures and Recitations. 




UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS-URBANA 




3 0112 111482367