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Full text of "A manual for the genealogist, topographer, antiquary, and legal professor, consising of descriptions of public records; parochial & other registers; wills; county and family histories; heraldic collections in public libraries, etc., etc."

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Manual for the genealogist, topographer. 



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A MANUAL 



FOR THE 



Genealogist, Copograpler, ^ntiquarp, 



AND 



ILegal professor, 



CONSISTING OF 

DESCRIPTIONS OF PUBLIC RECORDS ; PAROCHIAL &> 

OTHER REGISTERS; WILLS; COUNTY & FAMILY 

HISTORIES; HERALDIC COLLECTIONS IN 

PUBLIC LIBRARIES, ETC., ETC., 



BY 

RICHARD SIMS, 

(Of the British Museum.) 
NEW AND IMPROVED EDITION, 

WITH A 

GLOSSARY OF PHRASES AND TERMS 

OCCURRING IN PUBLIC RECORDS, 



portion : 

ED HARD AVER\\ 
Greek Street, Soho, 

mdccclxxxviii. 

9 



PUBLISHER'S PREFACE. 



' I "HE Study of Heraldry and Genealogy is beset 
-*- with difficulties sufficiently great to deter all but 
the most enthusiastic, from the pursuit of an employment 
to all appearances so dry and unprofitable. 

Nevertheless, the number of students in this useful 
department of history is undoubtedly on the increase ; 
hundreds of persons derive pleasure from this mode of 
passing their leisure hours. 

The materials existing for the successful prosecution 
of such pursuits are numerous and scattered; some 
jealously guarded and rendered nearly unapproachable 
by the heavy fees demanded for their production, whilst 
others, and — we rejoice to say — by far the greater por- 
tion, are readily accessible to every inquirer, who knows 
where and how to seek for them. 

The references to Manuscripts, scattered throughout 
the volume, have been carefully selected from the pub- 



publisher's preface. 

lished and unpublished Catalogues of the libraries to 
which they refer. 

No notice has been taken of Collections in the 
possession of private persons, chiefly from the absence 
of suitable catalogues of their contents, although their 
transitory nature, and the great difficulty of public ac- 
cess thereto, in most cases, tended greatly to a decision 
against their introduction. 

Since the first appearance of this work, the study 
of this branch of literature has considerably advanced, 
thus causing an increased demand for works bearing 
on this subject. Under these circumstances the pub- 
lisher submits this new and improved edition to the 
Student and Public in general, in the hope that the 
knowledge of what has already been done for Genea- 
logy and Heraldry may be more generally diffused. 



London, January^ 1888. 



INTRODUCTION, 



^T^HE value of Records deposited in Public Libraries and else- 
where, as evidence in our Courts of Law, has been so often a 
matter of dispute, that a few words respecting them will form an 
appropriate Introduction to the present work. 

The term "Record" is derived from the Latin record-art, to 
remember, and signifies an authentic testimony in writing preserved 
in Courts of Record. Many ancient writers make it necessary that 
records should be on parchment; but this remark cannot be correct, 
as many of the Exchequer Records are on paper. 

An act committed to writing in any of the Queen's Courts is, 
during the term wherein it is written, alterable — being no record; 
but that term ended, and the act duly enrolled, it is a record ; and, 
in our common law, no witness can prevail against it. This being 
the definition of the word Record, it follows that the term is most 
incorrectly used when applied to parchment deeds, registers, and 
miscellaneous manuscripts. 

Records in general will be found to consist of — 

I. ^Enrolments, which are intended to be official and authentic 
records of lawful acts made by the proper officer of any 
Court upon rolls, or, in some cases, in official entry-books 
of the same Court. 
II. Memoranda of acts or instruments brought into the proper 
office of any Court by parties interested therein (or by their 
agents), either in the form of rolls or otherwise, and pre- 
served in bundles or on files. 
III. Books of entries, containing memoranda of acts, etc., entered 
by officers of the Court. 



x INTRODUCTION. 

IV. State Papers. These originally sprung from the Privy Council 
and Chancery, and now from various branches; the cor- 
respondence and other records of the Privy Council, Secre- 
taries of State, and all other public departments. 

The Public Records Act (1 and 2 Vict. c. 94), after vesting in the 
Master of the Rolls the public records deposited in the several 
places or offices therein particularly named, and enabling her 
Majesty in Council to order records deposited in any other office, 
court, place, or custody, to be transferred to the charge and super- 
intendence of the Master of the Rolls, provides that the word 
Records shall be taken to mean all rolls, records, writs, books, pro- 
ceedings, decrees, bills, warrants, accounts, papers, and documents 
whatsoever, of a public nature, belonging to her Majesty, or 
then deposited in any of the offices or places of custody before 
mentioned. 

Although many of the Public Libraries of this country contain 
undoubted national records, charters, and registers — even Magna 
Charta itself, — they are not allowed as evidence in our Courts of 
Justice ; having been separated from their proper custody, they are 
rejected and disowned, however valuable. The duplicate Pipe Rolls, 
deposited in the British Museum, are, perhaps, the only records 
which have not lost their right of being received as evidence by 
their removal. 

However valuable, then, and however genuine a document may 
be, it will not now be received as evidence, unless it be in the pos- 
session of some person connected with the estate or property to 
which it refers, or who can satisfactorily account for its possession. 
Upon a trial at the Stafford assizes in 1810, the Marquis of Stafford 
offered in evidence an old grant to the Priory of Stone, brought 
from the Cottonian Manuscripts in the British Museum, and Mr. 
Justice Lawrence rejected it on the authority of a case in the 
Exchequer, where a grant to the Abbey of Glastonbury, contained 
in a curious manuscript book entitled the " Secretum Abbatis," 
preserved in the Bodleian Library at Oxford, was rejected as not 
coming from a proper custody. 



INTRODUCTION. xi 

An old grant of common, made by John de Trussell, in 1342, to 
the Priory of Stone, given by a friend of the plaintiff, not connected 
with the estate, to the plaintiff, a3 a curiosity, was rejected for the 
like reason — the possession of it not being sufficiently accounted 
for, nor connected with any one who had an interest in the pro- 
perty it contained. (Swinnerton v. Marquis of Stafford.) In the 
case of Potts v. Durant, ancient instruments offered in evidence 
were likewise rejected, as coming out of private hands unconnected 
with the matter in dispute -, and one of the first questions in our 
Courts, at the present day, to a witness producing an old grant or 
document, is, " Where did you obtain it?" 

Although this is the strict rule of legal evidence, there are many 
cases in which ancient grants and documents, not in satisfactory 
custody, have been received as good and sufficient proof. In the 
Mayor of Leicester v. Ruding, extracts from two monastic rentals 
and registers, in the Bodleian Library , Oxford, were produced by 
John Caley, Esq., and received as evidence. The defendant's 
counsel objected to them, as not being the originals; but Mr. Caley 
explaining that the originals could not be produced, on account of 
the express direction of the donor that the books should never be 
taken from the library, the extracts were received as evidence ; and 
such ancient documents have also often been received as evidence 
before Commissioners, and before the Attorney or Solicitor General, 
in investigation of peerages. 

In regard to Public Records, it is not necessary, excepting before 
the House of Lords, to produce the originals ; but copies made by 
the clerks in the offices, and signed by them, are received as 
evidence, on some competent witness proving that he had examined 
such copies with the originals. It is not absolutely necessary that 
the copies should have the signatures of the record-keepers ; but 
the Courts have occasionally, in particular cases, expressed their 
opinion that it would have been better to have done so. In pro- 
ducing Latin records or copies, it is the duty of the witness to 
produce a translation for the judge ; and he should also be prepared 
with a Latin transcript of the original record, as parties sometimes 
differ about the meaning of a word or a passage. The charges 



xii INTRODUCTION. 

made at the different public offices for such transcripts will be found 
in the Appendix to the present work, No. II. 

The industry of Lord Harley, Sir Thomas Bodley, Sir Robert 
Cotton, and other antiquaries, obtained a multitude of valuable 
records from private individuals, to whose estates they related, of 
which circumstance no memoranda exist, and they are, consequently, 
not evidence. These documents form collections worthy the boast 
of this country; but some slight regret is unavoidable in the 
examination of these valuable instruments, on being compelled to 
conclude that they ceased to be legal evidence at the moment when 
some patriot made them national property. 

Of their genealogical utility, however (whether legal evidence or 
otherwise), there can be no doubt; and our genealogical writers 
have been much indebted to them for their contents. The valuable 
collection of charters, etc., at the British Museum is continually 
increasing ; and we would suggest that the early deeds often en- 
cumbering the offices of solicitors, after the transfer of old family 
estates, and too frequently consigned to the hammer of the gold* 
beater or the size-pot of the gilder, should be forwarded thither. 

The most ancient record which we have in this kingdom is the 
Domesday Survey, the compilation of which was completed in the 
year 1086. The date of the next public record is 1130, being the 
Great Roll of the Exchequer for the thirty-first year of Henry I. ; 
and, with the exception of a short period immediately subsequent 
to this date, the records called Pipe Rolls have been continued in 
regular succession to the present day. 

Our next records are of the reign of Henry II. ; and of this 
period we have a celebrated record of knights' fees, called the Black 
Book of the Exchequer; and another record, being rolls of the 
widows and children of the King's tenants, showing their ages 
lands, and possessions. By means of these documents, and these 
alone, we can trace the connection from one great man to another 
from the Conquest till the year 1189. 

In the reign of Richard I. we find the commencement of the 
proceedings of our Courts of Justice ; and we are in possession of 



INTRODUCTION. xiii 

Placita of the Curia Regis, and of Assize, and of fines levied in his 
reign, as also the records called the Scotch Rolls; but from the 
next King's reign (that of John) we may consider we have an 
unbroken series of records of the principal events and persons in 
the kingdom. We have rolls of charters; rolls of offerings or gifts, 
called oblata rolls; rolls of letters patent; rolls of liberate; also 
close rolls, on the backs of which are the writs of summons to Par- 
liament, fine rolls, Norman and other rolls. 

It is possible that the next reigns, of Henry III. and of his son 
Edward I., will include the commencement of all the important 
remaining records of the kingdom ; for from the first year of this 
King's reign we have a series of Inquisitions Post Mortem ; and 
from the reign of the last of these Kings we have an uninterrupted 
series of records of our present Courts of Queen's Bench, Common 
Pleas, Exchequer, Parliament, and others, to the present time. 

An account of the Public Record Offices, existing or abolished, 
and of the Public Libraries and other places of deposit mentioned 
in this volume, will be found in the Appendix No. I. 

The Abbreviations used in ancient records vary with the dif- 
ferent styles of writing, and present formidable obstructions to the 
progress of the uninitiated student. To those who are desirous of 
making themselves acquainted with these characters we would 
recommend the perusal of the following works •} — 

Lexicon Diplomaticum, J. L. Waltherus. Gottlng. 1745. Eolio. 
Nouveau Traite de Diplomatique. 6 vols. Par, 1750 — 1765, 
Court-hand Restored, by A. "Wright. Lord. 1776— 2nd ed. 1778.— 3rd ed. 

1815. 4to.— New ed. 1848. 
Elements de Paleographie, par N. deWailly. 2 vola. Par. 1838. 4to. 
Dictionnaire des Abbreviations, par L. A. Chasaant. Iforeux, 1846. 8vo. 
Paleographie des Chartes, par L. A. Chassant. Par. 1847. 8vo. 

Explanations of Ancient Terms continually to be met with in 
Records may be found in the following works : — 

1 The compiler of the present work has been for some years engaged in collecting 
materials for a "Manual of Palaeography? which he hopes to he enabled shortly to 
prepare for the press. 



xiv INTRODUCTION. 

Glossarium Archaiologicum, autore Henrico Spelmanno. Lord. 1626 — 1664 

—1687. Folio. 
The Interpreter, or Book containing the Signification of Words, &c, by John 

Cowell. Camb. 1607. 4to.— Other editions in 1609, 1638, 1658, and 

1672 ; continued by Manley to 1684. Lond. 1701. Folio— Improved 

and augmented, 1708. Folio. — Last edition, Lond. 1737. 4to. 
GlGssarium mediae et infimae Latinitatis, par C. Du Fresne, Seign. Du Cange. 

6 vols. Par. 1733—1766. Folio.— Supplements, 1766. 4 vols.— 

Abridged, Halle, 1722—1784. 6 vols. 8vo.— Enlarged by G. A. L. 

Henschel. Par. 1840—1845. 6 vols. 4to. 
New Law Dictionary, by Giles Jacobs. Lond. 1797. Folio, 11th ed.— New 

ed. by Tomlins. 2 vols. Lond. 1820. 4to. 
Glossaire de la Langue Eomaine, par J. B. B. Koquefort. 2 vols. Par* 1808,. 

8vo. — Supplement, one vol. 1820. 
A Glossary of Words, Phrases, Names, and Allusions to Customs, Proverbs, 

etc., by Eobert Nares. Lond. 1822. 4to. 
Archaic Dictionary, by J. O. Halliwell. 2 vols. Lond. 1846. 8vo. — 2nded. f 

1849.— New ed. 1852. 

A valuable Glossary of the terms used in Domesday Book will be 
found in Sir Henry Ellis's " Introduction !> to that Record, and in 
Kelhanr's " Domesday Book Illustrated. 39 

The Forms of Ancient Charters are given in Madox's " Formulare 
Anglicanum" Lond. 1702. Folio. 

With respect to the modes of dating ancient records, the student 
will find all the information he may require in Nicolas's te Chro- 
nology of History" a useful and portable work, of which the last 
edition appeared in 1852. Other works containing like informa- 
tion, but in a more bulky form, are — that splendid monument of 
learning and labour, entitled " UArt de verifier les Dates" Par. 
1783—1831, 9 vols, folio ; and Wailly's "Elements de Paleographie/ 3 
Par. 1138, 2 vols. 4to. 

From these works, brief tables of the regnal years of the Kings 
of England, and of the dates most frequently met with in con- 
sulting charters and other documents, have been compiled for 
the student's use, and ibrm Nos. III., IV., V., and VI., of the 
Appendix to this work. 



INTRODUCTION. xv 

Specimens of many of the more important Public Records, 
together with proofs of their genealogical utility, are given in 
Mr. Grimaldi's "Origines Genealogies" Lond. 1828, 4to. ; and in a 
little work entitled "A Description of the Contents, fyc, of the various 
Works printed by authority of the Record Commission" Lond. 1831, 
8vo. 

Facsimiles of the Records, engraved by Basire, with explanations, 
will be found in the valuable publications of the Record Commis- 
sioners. The plates were collected into one volume, folio, in 1819, 
and form the "Appendix" to the Report for that year. This useful 
volume can be purchased for about 15s. 1 

1 This, and other Record Publications, as well as moat of the printed works men- 
tioned in this volume, may be obtained from Mr. John Russell Smith, bookseller, 36, 
Soho Square. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



Domesday Books : *aod 

Domesday Book ,....,.< 1 

The Exon Domesday 5 

The Inquisitio Eliensis ib. 

The Winton Domesday 

The Boldon Book ib. 

Monastic Kecobds: 

The Chartulary 10 

The Leiger Book 12 

The Kegister ib. 

The Necrology, or Obituary ib. 

The Calendar ib. 

The Chronicle ib. 

Lists of Chartularies 14 

Car™ Antique 30 

Title Deeds 33 

Inrolments in Chancery ib, 

in the Court of Queen's Bench ....... 34 

i = Court of Common Plea3 ib. 

■ Court of Exchequer 35 

■ with Clerks of the Peace ib. 

City and Corporation Inrolments 36 

Fen [Registers ib. 

York and Middlesex County [Registers ib. 

Knights' Fees 88 

Black Book of the Exchequer , 39 

Bed Book of the Exchequer „ 4 9 

Testa de Nevil 42 

Scutage Bolls 43 

Marshal's Rolls 44 

Coustable's llolls 45 

Aid and Subsidy Bolls ib. 

Nonarum Inquisitiones 40 

Lists of Tenants in Capita, &c 48 

b 



xiiii TABLE OF CONTENTS. 

Placita 52 

of the Curia Regis ^8 

of Assize • &^ 

of the Forests , • 5 ? 

Placita Coronse * * 58 

of Parliament 59 

De Quo Warranto #• 

Court of Augmentation 61 

of Chancery 62 

of Chivalry 65 

of Common Pleas 67 

Ecclesiastical Courts 68 

Court of Exchequer 69 

of King's Bench 70 

Marshal's Court 73 

Court of Requests 74 

of Star Chamber 75 

of Survey 76 

of Wards and Liveries i5, 

Eotuli 79 

Charter Kolls #, 

Close Eolls 80 

Copyhold Court Eolls, Ancient Demesne Eolls 85 

Coronation Eolls 87 

Coroner's Eolls 95 

Escheat Eolls 96 

Fine Eolls 98 

French Eolls 99 

Gascon Eolls 100 

Norman Eolls 102 

Hundred Eolls 104 

Liberate Eolls 106 

Memoranda Eolls 107 

Oblata Eolls . „ 110 

Originalia . „ Ill 

Patent Eolls . - , 114 

Pipe Eolls • . c 119 

Eedisseisin Eolls 122 

Inquisitiones Post Mobtem 123 

Inquisitiones ad Quod Damnum 13\ 

Fines and Recoveries . , 13$ 

Sign Manuals and Signet Bills .... 131 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. xix 

PAGB 

Privy Seals 136 

Extracta Donation dm: ..,.,139 

Records of Attainders 140 

Forfeitures 141 

Pardons 143 

Parliamentary Records 148 

Rolls of Parliament 149 

Writs of Summons and Returns to Parliament 152 

Journals of Parliament 157 

Heraldic Collections 159 

Heralds' Visitations ib. 

Pedigrees of Nobility 177 

Baronets 190 

Knights 192 

Gentry 196 

County Histories 229 

Family Histories 242 

Funeral Certificates 279,284 

Monumental Inscriptions, Sec 280, 286 

Coats of Arms 294,300 

Seals 297 

American Genealogies 309 

Miscellanea Geenalooica 318 

Nomina Villarum ib. 

Crown Surveys, Ministers' Accounts ib. 

Year Books 322 

Entries in Bibles ib. 

Poll-Books, Sheriffs' Books 323 

Lists of Gentry 325 

Magazines, Directories, &c 340 

Wills 343 

Parochial Registers 351 

Non-Parochial Begisters 365 

Foreign Protestant Churches in England 367 

Presbyterian, Independent, and Baptist 368 

Wesleyan and others 370 

Quakers 371 

At the Heralds' College #. 

Bunhill Fields 372 

Cemeteries . . ~ #■ 

-- 



xx TABLE OP CONTENTS, 

1 PAGE 

Non-Parochial Eegtstebs (continued): 

East India Company's Servants 372 

English Ambassadors and Consuls 373 

Private Chapels in or near London 376 

Fleet Marriage Registers 378 

King's Bench Prison and Mint . . . . 380 

May-Fair Chapel . ib, 

Eoman Catholics 381 

At Dr. Williams's Library 384 

Guilds, Fraternities, and Corporations 385 

Churchwardens' Accounts 388 

Soldiers ib. 

University Eegistees 390 

Public School Eegistees 398 

Counties Palatine Eecoeds 401 

Scotch Eecoeds 404 

Ieish Eecoeds 410 

Welsh Eecoeds 413 

Miscellaneous Eecoeds 416 

Eecords of Clergymen ib. 

Jews 427 

Lawyers 428 

Members of the Medical Profession 432 

Soldiers 433 

Sailors 439 

Appendix. 

I. Notices of the Eecord repositories 443 

II. Eules and Eegulations 469 

III. Eoman and Church Calendar 472 

IV. "Regnal Years of English Sovereigns 484 

V. Dates and Terms met with in Eecords 49 S 

VI. Calendar of Saints' Days, &c. . » % % 504 

[XDEX , 513 



THE 

GENEALOGIST'S MANUAL. 



Bames&ap loofes. 



rpHE records bearing the title of The Domesday Books are five 
-*- in number, and are the most valuable in this kingdom. They 
are : — 

The Domesday Book, 

The Exon Domesday, 

The Inqtjisitio Eliensis, 

The Winton Domesday, and 

The Boldon Book. 

The Domesday Book. — This venerable volume, which is the 
most ancient and one of the most important records in the king- 
dom, affords highly valuable antiquarian and historical information. 
It contains a survey of all the lands in England, with few exceptions, 
made by the order of William the Conqueror ; and was the register 
from which judgment was to be given upon the value, tenure, and 
service of the lands described therein. 

The survey was probably commenced about 1085, and completed 
about 1086. For this survey certain commissioners were appointed ; 
and some notion of the contents of the book may be formed from 
the following statement : — The inquisitors were to inquire into the 
name of every place; who held it in the time of King Edward the 
Confessor ; who was the present possessor ; how many hides in the 
manor; how many carucates in demesne; how many homagers; 
how many villeins ; how many cotarii ; how many servi ; what 
free men ; how many tenants in socage ; what quantity of wood ; 
how much meadow and pasture; what mills and fishponds; how 
much added or taken away; what the gross value was in King 
Edward's time ; what was the present value ; how much each free- 
man or soch-man had or has. All this was to be triply estimated. 

1 



2 DOMESDAY BOOKS. 

First, as the estate was held in the time of the Confessor \ then as 
it was bestowed by King William ; thirdly, as its value stood at the 
formation of the survey ; and to state whether any advance could 
be made in the value. 

The inquisitions having been taken, were sent to Winchester, and 
were there methodized and entered in a register, such as we now 
see it. 

Northumberland, Cumberland, Westmoreland, and Durham, are 
not described in the survey, nor Lancashire under its proper name ; 
but Furness, and the northern part of the county, as well as the 
south of Westmoreland, with part of Cumberland, are included 
within the West Riding of Yorkshire. That part of Lancashire 
which lies between the rivers Ribble and Mersey, and which at the 
time of the survey comprehended 6 hundreds and 188 manors, is 
subjoined to Cheshire ; and part of Rutlandshire is described in the 
counties of Northampton and Lincoln, &c. 

The authority of this book is never permitted to be called in 
question — there is no appeal from it; hence some suppose its 
name ; others from its place of preservation, the Chapter House of 
the church (Domus Dei) at Westminster. In questions relative 
to tenure, the Conqueror himself often submitted to it ; and for a 
long time after, none was permitted to make claim or title to lands 
beyond the Conquest. 

Domesday Book consists of two volumes, written in Latin, on 
parchment, and is now in excellent preservation in the Chapter 
House at Westminster, where it was deposited in 1696. An abridg- 
ment, in one volume — a very beautiful manuscript, apparently 
compiled early in the reign of $dward I. — is in the same custody. 

The original returns of the commissioners, from which these 
books were compiled, have not been discovered ; but there exist in 
the British Museum transcripts of part of them, with lists of the 
jurors before whom some of the inquisitions were taken. 1 

Domesday Book was published in 1783, in two volumes. In 
1811, a third volume, containing the " Indices," and a very valuable 
Introduction, was printed by the Record Commission. The 
" Indices" consist — First, of an Index Locorum, according to the 
order in which the counties occur in the original; secondly, a 
general Index Locorum, with the nature of the land, the county, 
the hundred or wapentake, and the name of the possessor; thirdly, 
an Index Nominum of tenants in capite ; and lastly, a general Index 

1 See Cotton. MS. Tiberius A. vi. f. 38. 



DOMESDAY LOOKS. 3 

Rerum Pracipuarum ; but unfortunately there is no general Index 
Nominum. In the same year, a fourth or supplementary volume 
was published under the same authority, containing — 1. The Exon 
Domesday; 2. The Inquisitio Eliensis ; 3. The Winton Domesday; 
and 4. The Boldon Book. 

A General Introduction to Domesday Book, by Sir Henry Ellis, 
was published in 1833, in two volumes, royal 8vo ; the first volume 
of which contains a valuable Glossary of the terms used in the 
record. The price of this work was £1. Is. It is now out of print. 

The present price of the four volumes above mentioned is 
£10. 10*. 

Translations of the surveys of many of the counties have been 
made by private individuals, and published at various periods; 
and copies of, or extracts from, the surveys of nearly every county 
may be seen in the respective County Histories. 

The separate publications are : — 

Domesday; or an Actual Survey of South Britain by the Commissioners 
of William the Conqueror. By Samuel Henshall and John Wilkinson. 
Lord. 1799. 4to. [Comprehending Kent, Sussex, and Surrey.] 

Hampshire; extracted from Domesday Book. Lond.ll$4i. 4to. 

A Translation of Domesday, so far as relates to the Counties of Middlesex, 
Hertford, Buckingham, Oxford, and Gloucestershire. By 
W. Bawdwen. Boncaster, 1812. 4to. 

Domesday Book for the County of Warwick. Translated by William Header. 
Coventry, 1835. 4to. 

Wiltshire ; extracted from Domesday Book ; with an English Translation 
by H. P. Wyndham. Salisbury, 1788. 8vo. 

A Translation of Domesday, so far as relates to the County of York ; 
including also Amounderness, Lonsdale, and Furness, in Lancashire, 
and such parts of Westmoreland and Cumberland as are included 
in the Survey. Also, the Counties of Derby, Nottingham, Rutland, 
and Lincoln. By W. Bawdwen. Doncaster, 1809. 4to. 

These translations are works of great utility, as the contractions 
and unusual words, found in the survey, render it at first no less 
difficult to be perused by the scholar than by the miscellaneous 
reader. A very valuable Glossary of these terms will be found in 
vol. i. of Sir Henry Ellis's Introduction before mentioned, and in 
Domesday Book Illustrated, published by Kelham in 1788. 



4 DOMESDAY BOOKS. 

Transcripts from Domesday may be found in all the principal 
public libraries of the kingdom. 

The following are some of the more important manuscripts 
relating to this survey : — 

An Abstract of Domesday, omitting the villeins, borderers, and stock; 
Carlton Ride. 

Epitome libri Censualis, vulgo Doomsday Book; Brit. Mus. Cotton. MS. 
Julius, C. i. p. 3. 

Exemplar libri Censualis, vulgo Domesday ; Brit. Mus. Cotton. MS. Faus- 
tina, C. xi. 

Original Returns of the Domesday Commissioners ; Brit. Mus. Cotton. MS. 
Tiberius, A. vi. f. 38. 

The following manuscripts contain extracts from, and copies of, 
Domesday Book for various Counties : — 

Bedfordshire: Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 6016, f. 80, 

Berkshire: Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 6016, f. 22. 

Buckinghamshire: Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 6016, f. 52. 

Cambridgeshire : Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 6016, f. 75. 

Cheshire: Brit. Mus. Earl. MSS. 139, f. 126; 1178, f. 130 5.; 1424, 

f. 5 ; 6428. 
Cornwall: Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 6015, f. 16; 6016, f. 45; Exeter Cath. 

Lib. MS. No. 39. 
Derbyshire: Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 207 D. f. 235. 
Devonshire: Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 601 5, f. 9;; 6016, f. 41; Exeter Cath. 

Lib. MS. No. 39. 
Dorsetshire : Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 6015, f. 45 ; 6016, f. 32. 
Essex: Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 5167. 
Gloucestershire: Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 1903; 6016, f. 60; Lincoln's 

Inn Lib. Sale MS. 115. 
Hampshire : Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 1904 ; 6016, f. 15. 
Herefordshire: Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 6856; Balliol Coll. Oxp. MSS. 

No. ccclxii, ccclxiii ; Lincoln's Inn Lib. Eale MS. 115. 
Hertfordshire: Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 6016, f. 49. 
Huntingdonshire: Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 6016, f. 78. 
Kent : Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 1905 ; 6015, f. 18 ; 6016, f. 1. 
Leicestershire: Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 6016, f. 89. 
Lincolnshire: Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 207 D. f. 25; Earl. MS. 6016, 

f. 116. 
Middlesex: Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 6016, f. 47. 

Norfolk: Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 1906 ; 5167 ; Lansd. MS. 207 D. f. 153. 
Northamptonshire : Coll. of Arms, Vincent MS. 83. 



DOMESDAY BOOKS. 5 

Nottinghamshire: Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 207 D. f. 189. 

Oxfordshire: Brit. Mus. Karl. MS. 6016, f. 56. 

Rutlandshire: Coll. of Arms, Vincent MS. 83. 

Shropshire: Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 6016, f. 97. 

Somersetshire: Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 6015, f. 1; 6016, f. 37 ; Exeter 

Cath. Lib. MS. No. 39. 
Staffordshire: Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 1985, f. 208 b. 
Suffolk: Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 88, f. 149; 5167. 
Surrey: Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 6015, f. 37 ; 6016, f. 12; 6025, f. 239. 
Sussex : Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 1907 ; 6015, f. 29 ; 6016, f. 9. 
Warwickshire: Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 6016, f. 92. 
Wiltshire: Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 6015, f. 40; 6016, f. 27. 
Worcestershire: Brit. Mus. Earl. MS, 1908 ; 6016, f. 67. 
Yorkshire: Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 1415, f. 2; 4953; 6016, f. 113. 

The charge made for consulting this valuable manuscript is the 
same with other records, as given in the " Scale of Eees" in the 
Appendix to this volume. If consulted for strictly literary purposes, 
no fee is taken. Persons prompted by mere curiosity can only be 
allowed to see it through an order from the Master of the Rolls. 

The Exon Domesday. — This volume comprises the counties of 
Wilts, Dorset, Somerset, Devon, and Cornwall, and is supposed, so 
far as it extends, to contain an exact transcript of the original roils 
or returns made by the Conqueror's commissioners, from which the 
Great Domesday was compiled. It is preserved in Exeter Cathe- 
dral. Many variations occur between this record and the Exchequer 
Domesday. ' The names of tenants in King Edward's time are far 
more numerously preserved in the Exon Domesday. In the sys- 
tematic arrangement of the subject matter, the Exchequer Domesday 
bears unquestionably a decided preference over the Exon Domesday. 
It is printed, with Indices Locorum et Nominum, in the fourth or 
supplementary volume of the Record Commissioners' publication 
above referred to. Extracts are given in Lansd. M8. 320, in the 
British Museum. 

The Inqitisitio Eliensis. — This is a document of the same kind 
as the preceding volume, and relates to lands and property in 
Cambridgeshire, Hertfordshire, Essex, Norfolk, Suffolk, and Hunt- 
ingdonshire, belonging to the monastery of Ely, recorded after- 
wards in the two volumes of the Domesday Survey. It has the 
names of the jurors in the different hundreds in Cambridge and 
Hertfordshire. 



6 DOMESDAY BOOKS. 

It is preserved in a register of the monastery remaining amongst 
the Cottonian Manuscripts in the British Museum [Tiberius A. vi], 
and is, at least, as old as the twelfth century. Another copy of 
this Inquisition is contained in the chartulary of Ely monastery, 
preserved at Trinity College, Cambridge. It has been printed by 
the Record Commissioners, in the fourth or supplemental volume 
of the Domesday Survey, with good Indices Locorum et Nominum. 

The Winton Domesday. — This is a survey of the lands belong- 
ing to Edward the Confessor in Winchester, made on the oath of 
eighty-six burgesses in the time of Henry I. It consists of two 
distinct parts or records, both written upon vellum. The first is 
entitled, " A Book of the King's Lands in Winchester, rendering 
Land-gable as they were used to render in the time of King 
Edward/' The second record begins at fol. 13 b: — "This is the 
Inquisition of the Lands of Winchester, taken by command of 
Bishop Henry, in the year of our Lord 1148." The most remark- 
able circumstance in this book is the quantity of sirnames among 
the tenants of King Edward the Confessor. 

This MS. was formerly the property of James West, Esq., and is 
now in the possession of the Society of Antiquaries of London. 

The contents, with Indices Locorum et Nominzwi, are printed in 
the fourth or supplementary volume of the Domesday Survey, 
published by the Record Commissioners. Extracts are given in 
Lansd. MS. 321, in the British Museum. 

The Boldon Book. — This is a survey of the county palatine of 
Durham, made by order of Hugh Pudsey, nephew of King Stephen, 
in the year 1183 ; so called (it is presumed) from Boldon, in Durham, 
where it was compiled. The original manuscript is lost, but three 
different copies of it, possessing different degrees of perfection, 
remain: one in the Bishop's Office, Durham; another in the 
Dean and Chapter's Library there ; and a third in the Bodleian 
Library at Oxford. 

It is a particularly valuable supplement to Domesday, as that has 
not any notice of this county. It is moreover of great importance 
to the see and palatinate of Durham, as it is frequently appealed to, 
and has been admitted as evidence in trials at law, on the part of 
succeeding bishops, to ascertain their property and seignorial rights. 

This survey has also been printed by the Record Commissioners, 
and will be found in the fourth or supplementary volume of the 



DOMESDAY BOOKS. 7 

Domesday Survey. Good Indices Locorum et Nominum, are given 
at the end of the volume. 

Copper-plate facsimile engravings of these records will be found 
in portions of the Record publications above referred to, and in many 
County Histories, more especially in that of Surrey, 1 where thirteen 
folio engravings are given — each sheet being of the same size, and 
containing the same quantity, as the corresponding page in the 
original record. 

There is another record preserved in the Chapter House, West- 
minster, called Kirby's or Kirkby's Quest or Inquest, which is said 
to be of the nature of Domesday. In 35 Edward I, Adam Kirkeby 
or Kirby, then Treasurer, and his fellows, made inquiry, according 
to the ancient custom, by inquests or verdicts of juries, concerning 
the tenures in capite throughout several of the shires of England; 
and the result of these verdicts, or inquests, was a scheme which in 
some respects is analogous to Domesday, inasmuch as it com- 
prehends all the immediate military tenants of the crown. This, 
and numerous other documents of the same class and description, 
furnish the materials for a connected history of the land, and also 
of the occupiers of the land in their several classes, from the 
Conquest to the abolition of the feudal tenures; and, although 
specially relating to England, they nevertheless greatly elucidate 
the general history of the progress of society. 

The first portion of the Record of Caernarvon, or Esotentm Wallice, 
printed by the Record Commissioners in 1838, from the Harleian 
MS. 696, contains a collection of extents of manors, taken chiefly 
26 Edward III, in the counties of Caernarvon and Anglesey, 
seemingly in imitation of the Great Survey by the Conqueror. A 
second portion contains other extents of commots and manors, 
including the lands of the bishopric of Bangor. A third portion 
contains records under the title, " Leges et Consuetudines Wallise. " 
A fourth portion is a collection of inquisitions and pleadings in quo 
warranto, before the justices itinerant in North Wales, petitions, 
&c. The next portion contains particulars of the taxation of the 
spiritual and temporal possessions of the clergy of the diocese of 
Bangor, followed by an extent of the temporalities of the see, 
22 Richard II. After which follows a collection of smaller records. 
The publication bears for its title : — " Registrum vulgariter nun- 
cupatum, f The Record of Caernarvon/ e codice MS. Harleiano 696, 

1 Manning and Bray's, 1814. 



8 DOMESDAY BOOKS. 

descriptum." 1 vol. fol. 1838. The present price of this volume 
us £1. lis. 6d. 

William the Conqueror divided such parts of England as did not 
belong to the church, and were not reserved for himself, into 700 
baronies or great fiefs, which he bestowed on his particular friends, 
and those who had signalized themselves in his service; these 
baronies were subdivided into 60,215 knights' fees. No Englishman 
had any of the first, and few only were fortunate enough to obtain 
any of the latter. Sir Matthew Hale states, that several generations 
elapsed after the Conquest, before one family of Saxon pedigree was 
raised to any considerable honours, or could so much as obtain the 
rank of a baron of the realm. At present there are few English 
families who pretend to higher antiquity than the Norman invasion ; 
and it is probable that not many of these can authenticate their 
pretensions. On making an abstract of the English printed peerage, 
it appears that out of 249 noblemen, the number of thirty-five laid 
claim to having traced their descent beyond the Conquest; forty-nine, 
prior to the year 1100; twenty-nine, prior to the year 1200; thirty- 
two, prior to the year 1300; twenty- six, prior to the year 1400; 
seventeen, prior to the year 1500; twenty-six, prior to the year 
1600 ; and thirty, but little prior to the year 1700. The number of 
peers entered in that peerage is 294, exclusive of the Royal Family ; 
but of that list no satisfactory conclusion could be drawn as to the 
commencement of the pedigrees of forty-five noblemen. 

Among all the noble Scotch families, the house of Marre seems 
to be that which can at once carry its nobility to the remotest 
period, and authenticate it by the best evidence. 

The only case (if any) at the present day, in which legal proof 
of a genealogy, for 700 years and upwards, can by possibility be 
necessary, is in the instance of some claimant to a barony or 
earldom by tenure — the very existence of which species of title is 
now generally denied. To the descent of property, however, Domes- 
day is more valuable. The proof of ancient demesne still rests 
with Domesday Survey; its evidence is also appealed to, in our 
courts of law, in proving the antiquity of mills, and in setting up 
prescriptions in non decimando; and it is frequently the only evidence 
which can be adduced of the discharge of abbey lands from tithes, 
and places from toll. 

But though the legal utility of Domesday, as confined to pedi- 
grees, is small, the antiquary, as well as the family or national 
historian, will find much assistance and gratification in consulting a 



DOMESDAY BOOKS. 9 

record containing the name and title of every person of importance 
in this kingdom nearly eight centuries back ; the situation, nature, 
and extent of all their estates, and in some instances the names of 
their fathers, wives, and children. Almost every page of Dugdale's 
Baronage may be referred to as evidence of the importance of this 
census to the genealogist. 

In cases where the evidence of Domesday is required, a copy is 
usually made from the printed volumes, which are remarkably 
accurate. This copy is then examined with the original, and 
should be certified by the keeper of the record as correct ; and the 
party examining it is sufficient witness of the contents of the 
original volume ; for wherever such original is of a public nature, 
though not a record, an authenticated copy is good evidence. An 
exception exists in the House of Lords, who allow none but original 
documents and records to be produced to them, provided such 
documents be in England. 



10 



JHonastic EecorUau 



THERE are no records in the kingdom of more antient data 
than those which belonged to the religious houses ; for it is 
quite evident that the inhabitants of these institutions were never 
so absorbed in spiritual matters as to neglect any opportunity of 
preserving their secular estates. In what proportion (with re- 
ference to the number of religious houses) these their records exist, 
cannot well be ascertained ; but two centuries ago this lament was 
made on the destruction of some of them : — cc Polydore Virgil, an 
Italian, did our nation that deplorable injurie in the time of 
K. Henrie the Eight; for that his own historie might passe for 
currant, he burned and embezzled the best and most antient 
records and monuments of our abbeies, priories, and cathedrall 
churches, under colour (having a large commission under the great 
seale) of making search for all monuments, manuscripts, records, 
legier-bookes, &c, as might make for his purpose ; yet, for all this, 
he hathe the ill lucke to write nothing wel, save the life of Henrie 
the Seventh." 

John Bale, writing in 1549, says, "The library books of monas- 
teries were reserved by the purchasers of those houses, to serve 
their jakes, to scour their candlesticks, and to rub their boots; 
some were sold to grocers, sopesellers, and some sent over the sea 
to the bookbinders ; not in small numbers, but at times whole ships 
full. A merchant bought two noble libraries for forty shillings." 
Fuller says, that " the owners of the monastic libraries burnt and 
threw them away, reserving however the leiger-books and terriers, 
to find such straggling acres belonging unto them." 

It is worthy of remark, that, whereas examples are daily occur- 
ring of the wanton mutilation of noble manuscripts by the earlier 
bookbinders, for the binding and fly-leaves of books, few if any 
records, properly so called, appear to have been used for that purpose. 

Monastic records may be divided into the following heads: — 
Chartularies • — Leiger-Books — Registers — Obituaries — Ne- 
crologies — Calendars — and Chronicles. 

The Chartulary. — The Chartulary is a parchment or vellum 
book, containing copies of all charters relating to the property of 



MONASTIC RECORDS. 11 

the religious house, entered therein, at the various periods when the 
charters themselves were executed. Most religious houses in the 
kingdom, in possession of lands, had a Chartulary ; and some few 
of such records are still in existence, which formerly belonged to 
individuals of large possessions. 1 The charters are of gift, exchange, 
lease, and other descriptions. Many of the chartularies now exist- 
ing contain entries (in Saxon) for several centuries prior to the 
Norman Conquest. The Evesham Chartulary commences with a 
deed of gift of Ethelred, a.d. 701 (in Saxon). This record very 
generally commences with a history of the foundation, and an 
account of the founder's family ; after which follow, in order of 
time, copies of the charters granted by them and the other patrons 
of the house, and the Archbishop's confirmation of them; of the 
Pope's bulls, and their definitive sentences, concerning the disputes 
arising about their lands and tithes. 

These valuable records are scattered amongst the public and 
some of the private libraries of the kingdom; but the British 
Museum is in possession of the greatest number, which are chiefly 
to be found in the Harleian and Cottonian Collections. The 
libraries of Oxford and Cambridge are also rich in these docu- 
ments, and several volumes will be found at Carlton Ride, and 
in the Augmentation Office, 3 the most appropriate repository for 
them, that establishment having been formed for the custody 
of the records concerning property belonging to the monks at 
the Dissolution of Monasteries. Of the monastic Chartularies 
in private collections, those in the valuable library formed by 
Sir Thomas Phillipps, Bart., of Middle Hill, more particularly 
deserve notice. 

Several Lists of these records have been printed ; the earliest, 
and most copious, by the gentleman above named, in 1839. 
Having been printed for private circulation, its existence is not so 
well known as it deserves to be; a copy will be found in the 
Library of the British Museum, and entered in the Catalogue 
under the head of " Phillipps." Other lists are given in Nichols's 
Collectanea Topographica et Genealogica, vol. i, pp.74, 197, 399, 102; 
and in Sims's Handbook to the Library of the British Museum. 

A List of Chartularies deposited in public Libraries only, is given 
at the end of the present Chapter. 

1 A list of some of these is given at the end of the present Section. 

2 A calendar of part of these is printed in the Deputy Keeper's Eighth Report, 
Appx. ii, pp. 135-166. 



12 MONASTIC RECORDS. 

The Leiger Book. — The Leiger-Book is nearly if not exactly the 
same as the Chartulary, excepting that it seems to have been for 
more familiar use, and to have been, in the first instance, compiled 
at one time, by one person. 

The Register. — The Register is a vellum or parchment book, 
containing a variety of entries relating to the religious house in 
which it was preserved ; such as its members, revenues, possessions, 
patrons, their genealogies, and other subjects. Sometimes it has 
the names of persons buried in the precincts of the religious house, 
and of others who have been married there ; some have portraits 
of their patrons, but doubtless ideal ; and some have the names of 
natives or inhabitants of property under their jurisdiction. 

The Necrology, or Obituary. — This is a parchment or vellum 
record of the time of the death of benefactors, kings, archbishops, 
bishops, abbots, priests, monks, benefactors, and others, inter- 
spersed at times with biographical notices* 

The Calendar is what its name at this day imports, an Almanac, 
containing an additional column, in which was inserted, against 
certain days, the names of those benefactors or great persons, 
whose births, deaths, or benefactions, were, on those days, to be 
commemorated. 

The Chronicle. — This record was kept by some (but not by all) 
heads of monasteries and priories, relating principally to historical 
events, which, though commencing " ab initio mundi," " ab orbe 
condito," and other equally unsatisfactory periods, contains, never- 
theless, much important matter relative to English families of note, 
and worthy of credit, when the chronicler is narrating the events 
of his day; thus, the chronicles of the monastery of Tewkesbury, 
contain the names of the noblemen and other worshipful slain at 
that battle, and of others who were taken and beheaded. 

Another class of records, often found amongst the documents 
belonging to the dissolved religious houses, are rolls of names of 
illustrious men, kings, nobles, warriors, and others, who were 
present at some religious, joyous, or warlike ceremony, or as in 
some other way entitled to be remembered. Of these the most 
notorious and curious is the Battle Abbey Roll, in which were 
recorded the names of the principal soldiers who attended William 
the Conqueror at the battle of Hastings. Genealogists have been 



MONASTIC RECORDS. 13 

accustomed to refer to this roll in proof of the Norman descent of 
a family ; but it became so falsified in the course of years, by the 
insertions and forgeries of the monks, that its authority is of little 
value, — an assertion first made by Camden above two centuries 
ago, who said, that "whosoever considereth it well, shall find it 
always to be forged, and those names to be inserted which the time 
in every age favoured, and were never mentioned in the notable 
Eecord of Domesday." The publication of Domesday Books 
diminishes, however, the regret which would otherwise have been 
felt at the want of truth in the Battle Abbey Boll. 1 

Two ancient manuscript copies of this roll are in the British 
Museum, viz., in Lansdowne MSS. 255, fol. 117 ; 446, fol. 15 ; and 
in 882. Printed copies may be seen at the end of Duchesne's 
Normannici Scriptores, in Leland's Collectanea, in Grafton's 
Chronicle, in Holinshed's and Stowe's Chronicles, in Fuller's Church 
History, in Banks's Dormant Peeraye, and in the Censura Lite- 
raria, vol. i, pp. 4-42. The Boll of Battle Abbey, annotated by 
Sir J. B. Burke, was published in 1848. 

There are several other rolls of the Conqueror's companions, 
besides those bearing the names of Battle Abbey. The oldest of 
them is a list in Wace's Chronicle of the Dukes of Normandy, in 
the British Museum {Roy. MS. 4, C. xi, f. 246). There is another 
roll of William's followers in the same Collection, written in 1436 
(Roy. MS. 14, B. i), and a third in the Harleian Collection, 
No. 293. Another of these lists is to be found amongst the Norfolk 
MSS. (No. ix.) in the College of Arms. 

Another roll of great notoriety is the Tournament Boll, pre- 
served in the College of Arms, representing the tournament of 
Henry VIII., with portraits of himself, his family, and court, in 
number very considerable. Another may be mentioned, formerly 
the property of the Derings, now in the possession of Stacey 
Grimaldi, Esq., being a Crusade Boll of the time of Henry III., 
containing the Christian and sirname, or Christian name and title, 
with highly emblazoned shields of nearly two hundred eminent 
persons then flourishing, who undertook the last Crusade. 

The rolls of arms of the knights at the tournaments held at 
Stepney and Dunstable, in the reigns of Edward II. and III., are 
printed in Nichols's Collectanea Topographica et Genealogica, vol. iv, 
pp. 61, 389. 

1 See a critical examination of the (so called) Roll of Battle Abbey, by the Rev. 
Joseph Hunter, in vol. vi. of The Sussex Archaeological Collections. 



14 



MONASTIC RECORDS. 



LIST OF ENGLISH CMARTULAEIES. 



County. 
Berks. 



Monastery. 
Abingdon {Saxon) 



Heref. 
Salop. 
Line. 

Herts. 

Line. 

Camb. 

Som. 

Sussex 



Southt. 

Nott. 
Sussex 

Line. 

Essex 

Surrey 
York 



Norfolk 

Buck. 

Nott. 

Wore. 

Line. 

Sussex 

North . 



— " Chronicon " 
Acornbury 1 . . . 
Alberbury . (carta) 
Alvinffham . . . 



Ashridge . (2 volumes) 



Bardney . 
Barlings . 
Barnwell . 



Bath, "Holloway" . 
— "St. Peter's" 



Battle 



»2 



— . . . . [tale 

— " Consuetud. etRen- 

— . (fragment) 
Beaulieu .... 



Beauvale, or Greseley 
Beigham .... 

— . (transcript) 
Belvoir . (excerpta) 

— . . (carta) . 
Berking .... 

— . (excerpta) 
Bermondsey " Annates' 
Beverley 



Binham 
Bittlesden 
Blyth, or Blida 
Bordesley (cartes 
Boston Gilda 
Boxgrave . 
Brackley . 



orig.) 



Where Deposited. 

! Brit. Mus. Cott. MS. Claud. B. vi. 
■ — — — C.ix. 

— — Jul. A. ix. 

I Corp. Chr. Coll. Camb. No. cxi. 
j Christ's Hospital. 

PublicLib.Camb. Park.MS.ccxxx.vii. 

Augmentation Office. 

All Souls' Coll. Oxford. 

Bodl. Lib. No. 1156. 

College of Arms. 

Ashridge Library. 

Brit. Mus. Cott. MS. Vesp. E. xx. 

— — Faust. B.i. 

— Earl MS. 3601. 
Bodl. Lib. Gough MS. 
Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 3970. 
Corp. Chr. Coll. Camb. No. cxi. 
Lincoln's Inn Lib. No.xliv. 
Brit. Mus. Cott. MS. Dora. A ii. 

— Add. MS. 6348. 
Lincoln's Inn Lib. Male MS. 87. 
Augmentation Office. 

Brit. Mus. Marl. MS. 3586. 

— Cott. MS. Nero A. xii. 

— Marl. MS. 6603. 
Augmentation Office. 
Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 6060. 

— Cott. MS. Otho A. ii. 

— Add. MS. 6037, 2. 

ASHMOLEAN LlB. Wood MS. 

Brit. Mus. Cott. MS. Faust, lxxxii. 

— — Yesp. B. xv. 

— Marl. MS. 231. 

— _ 4292. 

Dean and Chapter, York. 
University Coll. Oxf., No. lxxxii. 
Brit. Mus. Cott. MS. Claud. D. xiii. 

— Marl MS. 4714. 

— — 3759. 
Augmentation Office. 
Brit. Mus. Marl. Jtf& 4795. 

— Cott. MS. Claud. A. vi. 
Magdalen Coll. Oxford. 



1 A calendar of this chartulary is printed in the Dep. Keeper's 8th Rep. App. ii, p. 135. 

2 Ibid. p. 139. 



MONASTIC RECOEDS. 



15 



English Chaktulaeies. 
County. | Monastery. 



Wilts. 
York. 

Wore. 
Glouc. 

Norfolk 

Oxford 

Norfolk 

Lane. 

Leic. 

Suffolk 



York 



Camb. 
Devon 
Kent 



Brandenstoke . 

Bretton . . . 
— . {transcript) 



Bridon . 
Bris+ol 



(cartes) 



Bromholm 

Bruerne . . . ■ . 
Buckenham . {survey) . 
Burscough .... 
Burton-Lazar's Hospital 
Bury St. Edmund, "Aston 
— . "Cellararii" 



— . " Cratfield " 

— . "Croftis" . 

— ." Consuetudinar. 5 

— . . " Curteys " 

— . "DomusDei" 

— . " Extenta terrarum ' 

— . " Ickworth " 

— . "Kempe" 

— . "Lakynhethe" 
—"Lease^'temptf. VIII. 

— . " Liber Albus" 

— . "Liber Niger" 

— . " Liber Rubeus ' 

— . "Pyncebeck" 

— . " Rentale " 

— . "Sacristse" 

— . " Thomas Abbatis' 

— . . "Vestiarii" 

— . . "Werketone" 



Byland 



{cartes) 



Cambridge "St John'sHosp.' 
Canon's Legh .... 
Canterbury, "St. Augustine ' 



: Christ Church ' 



Where Deposited. 

Brit. Mus. (hit. MS. Vitell. A. xi. 

— Lansd. MS. 405. 
College of Arms. 

Brit. Mus. Co^. MS. Nero E. i, f. 387. 
Dean and Chapter op Bristol. 
Public Lib. Camb. Mm. ii. 20. 

Brazennose Coll. Oxford. 
Augmentation Office. 
Duchy of Lancaster Office. 
Brit. Mus. Cott. MS. Nero C. xii. 

— — Claud. A. xii. 
Public Lib. Camb. Gg. iv. 4 (Pars i. 

to letter C.) 
Duchy of Lancaster Office. 
Brit. Mus. Cott MS. Tib. B. ix. 

— Earl. MS. 21. 

— — 3977. 

— Add. MS. 7096. 

— — 14,848. 

— Arund. MS. 1. 

— Add. MS. 14,849. 

— Lansd. MS. 416. 

— Earl. MS. 645. 

— — 743. 

— — 308. 

— — 1005. 

— Add. MS. 14,847. 
Public Lib. Camb. Mm. iv. 19. 

— .gf.ii.29; j3f.iv.35. 

— Be. iii. 60. 
Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 14,850. 

— Earl. MS. 58. 
Public Lib. Camb. Ff. ii. 23. 
Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 230. 
Public Lib. Camb. Ee. iii. 60. 
Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 638. 

— Add. MS. 18.38S. 
St. Mary's Tower, York. 
Brtt. Wis. Add. MS. 18,388. 

St. John's Coll. Cambridge. 

— Earl. MS. 3660. 

— Cott. MS. Jul. D. ii. 

— — Tib. A. ix. 

— Arund. MS. 310. 
Trin. Hall, Camb. 

Queen's Remembrancer's Office. 
Brit. Mus. Cott. MS. Claud. A. iii. 

— — Galba E. iv. 



16 



MONASTIC RECORDS. 



English Chabtulabies. 



County. 
Kent 



Monastery. 
Canterbury/'ChristChurch " 



(abstract) . 



Southt. 
Norfolk 

Dorset 
North 11 . 

Camb. 
Surrey 



Chesh. 



Sussex 
Southt. 
Glouc. 

Suffolk 



Midd. 

Essex 
Oxon. 

Essex 



Carisbrooke 
Castle Acre 



Cerne . 
Chacombe 



Chateriz 
Chertsey 



Rentale" . . 
Molash" . . 
St. Gregory" . 
St. Saviour" . 
St. Sepulchre " 
Holy Trinity". 
Liber Niger" . 



— {fragment) 
Liber Eubeus ". 



(part transcr.) 



(excerpta) . 



Terrarium ' 



— "Rutherwick" . 
Chester, " Irrotulatorium " . 

— " Litterse et Brevia" 

— " Prisca Sanctorum " 

— "St.Werburgh" . 
Chichester Cathedral . . 
Christ Church, Twinham . 
Cirencester 

— "St. Mary's Chapel" 
Clare (Stoke) 

— . . (abstract) . 

— "St. Austin" , . 

— . — (transcript) . 
Clerkenwell 

Colchester, « St. John's " . 

Cold Norton 

Colne 



Wliere Deposited. 

Beit. Mus. Arund. MS. 68. 

— Add. MS. 6159. 
Dean and Chapter, Canterbury. 
Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 6037. 

— — 5506. 
Public Library Camb. Ee. v. 31. 
Corp. Christi Coll. Oxf. No. cclvi. 
Lambeth Palace, TenisonMS. 814. 
Bodl. Lib. Tanner MS. 165. 
Public Library Camb..Z2. ii. 15. 
Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 1006. 

— Add. MS. 5516. 
Gresham College, Norfolk MS. 67. 
Brit. Mus. Cott. MS. Faust. A. i. 

— Arund. MS. 300. 
Queen's Remembrancer'sOff. D. 
Brit. Mus. Sari. MS. 337. 

— Cott. MS. Claud. D. x. 

— — Otho B. xv. 

— — Vitell. A. ii. 

— — — D. x. 
Brit. Mus. Sari. MS. 2110. 

Queen's Remembrancer's Office. 
Public Lib. Camb. LI. i. 3. 
Coll. of Arms, Arund. MS. No. xlix. 
Augmentation Office. 
Brit. Mus. Cott. MS. Jul. A. i. 

— — Vitell. A. xiii. 

— Zoned. MS. 434. 
Queen's Remembrancer's Office 
Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 435. 

— Sari MS. 1965. 

— — 2148. 

— - 2062. 
Dean and Chapter, Chester. 

— Chichester. 

Brit. Mus. Cott. MS. Tib. D. vi. 
Bodl. Lib. Rawlinson MS. 
Ashmolean Lib. Dugdale MS. 42. 
Brit. Mus. Cott. MS. Vitell. D. xiii. 

— — Append, xxi. 

— Add. MS. 8190. 

— Earl. MS. 4835. 

— Add. MS. 8189. 

— Cott. MS. Faust. B. ii. 
Bodl. Lib. No. 3844. 

Brit. Mus. Arund. MS. 145. 
Brazen-nose College, Oxford. 
Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 5857. 



MONASTIC RECORDS. 



17 



English Chaetuiabies. 



County. 
Warw. 

Chesh. 
Warw. 



Norfolk 



Derb. 
Line. 



Derb. 



Kent 
North 11 . 

Line. 
Kent 



Essex 
Bedf. 



Sussex 
Durh. 



Wilts 
Camb. 



Monastery. 



Bucks. 
Wore. 



Combe 



Combermere 
Coventry . 



(imperfect) 

— "Rentale" . . 

Crabhouse, or Wigenhall 

Creyk South, Burnham . 

(transcript) 

(fragment) 



Crich . 
Croyland 



{transcript) 



Dale, al. de Parco Stanley 
Darley, al. Little Darby. 
— — (transcript) 



Dartford 
Daventry 



Deeping 
Dover, " 



St. 
'St 

''St 



Dunmow 
Dunstable 



Dureford 
Durham 



Bdingdon 

Ely . 



Bartholomew' 
Martin" . 
Radegund " 



(excerpta) . 



. (2 vols.) 
. (2 vols.) 
(fragment) 
Historia" . . 
Eton College . . . - 

Evesham 

— . . (transcript) 



Where Deposited. 

Brit. Mus. Cott. MS. Vitell. A. i. 

— — — D.xvii. 

— — Faust. B. viii. 
Queen's Remembrancer's Office. 
Augmentation Office. 
Archives of Coventry. 

Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 400. 

— Add. MS. 4733. 
Corp. Christ. Coll. Camb. 
Bodl. Lib. Tanner MS. 
Public Lib. Camb. 

Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 3669. 
All Souls 1 Coll. Oxf. No. xxxii. 
Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 5842. 

— Cott. MS. Vesp. E. xxvi. 

— — Titus C. ix. 

— Add. MS. 5819. 
Bodl. Lib. Gough MS. 
Brit. Mus. Arund. MS. 61. 

— Cott. MS. Claud. D. xii. 
Duchy of Lancaster Office. 
Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 3658. 
Bodl. Lib. Rawlinson MS. B. 335. 
Lambeth Pal. No. 241. 

Bodl. Lib. Rawlinson MS. B. 236. 
Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 662. 

— Cott. MS. Tib. A. x. 

— Earl. MS. 1885. 
Cathedral Lib. Durham. 
Lambeth Pal. No. 277. 

Brit. Mus. Cott. MS. Yesp. E. xxiii. 
Dean and Chapter, Durham. 
Durham Palace, London. 

Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 442. 

— Cott. MS. Tib. A. vi. 

— _ Claud. C. xi. 

— — Vesp. A. vi. 

— — Titus A. i. 

— — Domit. xv. 

— Add. MS. 9822. 
Caius Coll. Camb. 

Public Lib. Camb. Moore MS. 170. 
Dean and Chapter, Ely. 
Ashmolean Lib. No. 801. 
Jesus Coll. Oxford, No. lxxvi. 
Eton College Library. 
Brit. Mus. Cott. MS. Vesp. B. xxiv. 

— Lansd. MS. 411. 



18 



MONASTIC RECORDS. 



English Chaetulabibs. 



County. 


Monastery. 


Where Deposited. 


Wore. 


Evesham, " Bremesgrave " . 


Brit. Mus. Cott. MS. Titus, C. ix. 
— Harl. MS. 3763. 


Devon, x 


Exeter, " St. John's " . . 


Dean and Chapter, Exeter. 







Corporation Archives, Exeter. 


Suffolk 


Eye, " Danoun " (transcript) 


Brit. Mus. Add. MS. BUS. 







— Arund. MS. 921. 


Oxon. 


Eynsham ... (2 vols.) 


Christ Ch. Coll. Oxf. Nos. 26, 27- 


York 


Fountains, v. i. (lett. A — C) 


Brit. Mus. Cott, MS. Tib. C xii. 




— . .... 


— Add. MS. 18,276. 







Dean and Chapter, York. 




— 


Tower op St. Mary's, York. 
BoDL.LiB.Oxp.itaZwwo?aJf#.B.447. 







University Coll. Oxf. clxvii; clxx. 


Lane. 


Furness ... (2 vols.) 


Duchy op Lancaster Office. 


Leic. 




Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 415. 


York 




— Cott. MS. Cleop. D. ii. 


Som. 


Glastonbury, " Chronicle " . 


Bodl. Lib. No. 2613. 




— " Moniton " . . 


Brit. Mus. Arund. MS. 2. 




— "Rentale" . . 


— Add.MS.ll^hO; 17,451. 




— " Secretum Abbatis " 


Bodl. Lib. Wood MS. 1. 




— ... (abst?'act) . 


— Tanner MS. 


Glouc. 


Gloucester Abbey . . . 


Queen's Coll. Oxf. ccclxvii. 




— "Frocester" . . 


Dean and Chapter, Gloucester. 




— "Historia" . . . 


Brit. Mus. Cott. MS. Dom. viii. 




— " Malvern "... 


Dean and Chapter, Gloucester. 




—"Cathedral" (fundatio) 


Brit. Mus. Cott. MS. Appendix, ix. 


Southt. 




— Harl. MS. 6603. 


Oxford 




Queen's Rememb. Office, No. 11. 




— . . (in EnglisK) . 


Bodl. Lib. Eawlinson MS. B. 408. 




— . . (abstract) . . 


QuEEN'sCoLL.OxF.No.lxxxviii.f.261. 


Monm. 


Goldcliff, " Carta:" . . . 
Greseley, v. Beauvale . . 


Eton College. 






Coll. of Arms, Vincent MS.S\ 3 y.\lZ. 


Salop. 


Haghmon . . (excerptd) . 


Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 2188. 




— ■ • (fragmenta) . 


— — 446. 


Bedf. 


Harewood . (abridgment) . 


— Lansd. MS. 391. 


Glouc. 




Queen's Remembrancer's Office. 




— 


Brit. Mus. Royal MS. 12, E. xiv. 




— . "Chronicle". . 


— Harl. MS. 3725. 


York 


Helagh Park, "Lieudayl" . 


— Cott. MS. Vesp. A iv. 


Norfolk 


Heropton, " Accompts " 


— Add. MS. 10,621. 


Kent 


Herbaldoun Hospital . . 


Master and Wardens. 




— — ... 


Lambeth Library. 


Heref. 


Hereford Cathedral . . . 


Pub. Lib. Camb. More MS.~No. 141. 




— — ■ 


Bodl. Lib. Jlawlinson MS. B. o29. 




— (fragment) 


Bodl. Lib. Jones MS. 21. 




— "St.Guthlac" . 


Ballidl Coll. Oxf. MS. eclxxi. 



MONASTIC RECORDS. 



19 



English Chartulabies. 
County. Monastery. 



Northl* 
Cumb. 



Norfolk 

Kent 

Norfolk 



Hunt. 

Southt. 



York 

Warw. 

York 



Line. 
Warw. 

"Wilts. 



Lane. 

Kent 

Norfolk 

Cornw. 

Kent 

Leic. 

Suffolk 

Northl d 
Heref. 

Sussex 



Staff. 



Holm, juarta Alnwick 

— Cultram . . . 

— — {excerpta) 

— — (transcript) 



Horsham (extenta terrarum). 
Horton . . {fragment) . 
Hulme, " St. Bennet" . . 

— (rotulus cartarum) 
Huntingdon, " St. Mary " . 
Hyde," St. Peter " (lib. aur.) 



Keling, alias Nunkeling 
Kenilworth .... 
Kirkby Hill Hospital . 
Kirkham 

— "LeigerBook" 

Kirkstall 

Kirksted 

Knoll . . {transcript) 
Kyngton 3 " Obituarium " 

— . . (transcript) , 



Lacock .... 
Lancaster .... 
— " Duchy " . 
Langdon (West) . . 
Langley . , . . 



Launceston .... 
Ledes . (carta et rentale) 
Leicester, " Charite " . 



Leiston 

— . . {transcript) 

Lenton 

Leominster {cartes plures) 
Lewes . . (fragment) 



— ... (rentale) . 
Lichfield Cathedral {pt. i.) 

•—.... (pt. iil) 

— ' "Liber Albus" ! 

— — {carta) . 



Where Deposited. 

Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 3897. 

— — 3911. 

— — 294. 

— — 1881. 
Carlisle Cath. No. 2. 
Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 6164. 

— — 5516. 

— Cott. MS. Galba E. ii. 
Dean and Chapter, Norwich. 
Brit. Mus. Cott. Rolls xvi. 51-53. 

— Cott MS. Faust. C. i. 

— — Vesp. A. viii. 

— — Dom. xiv. 

— Harl. MS. 1761, 
Archives of Winchester Cath. 

Brit. Mus. Cott. MS. Otho C. viii. 

— Harl. MS. 3650. 
Master and Wardens. 

St. Mary's Tower, York. 

Bodl. Lib. No. 3887. 

Duchy of Lancaster Off. No. 7. 

Brit. Mus. Cott MS. Vesp. E. xviii. 

AsHM.LiB.OxFJ%&.af&No.l2,F.2. 

Pub. Lib. Camb. Bd. viii. 2, art. 4. 

Bodl. Lib. Tanner MS. 

Queen's Remembrancer's Office. 
Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 3764. 

— Cott. MS. Cleop. D. vi. 
Queen's Remembrancer's Office, 
Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 5948. 

Bodl. Lib. No. 242. 

— Tanner MS. 196. 
Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 19,772. 

— Cott. MS. Vitell. F. xvii. 
Bodl. Lib. Laud MS. H. 72. 
Brit. Mus. Cott. MS. Vesp. E. xiv. 

— Add. MS. 8171. 

— Cott. MS. Otho B. xiv. 

— — Domit. iii. 

— — Vesp. E. ii. 

— — — F. xv. 
Chapter House, Westminster. 
Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 8930. 

— Harl. MS. 4799. 

— — 3683. 
Ashmolean Lib. No. 1527. 

— — 827. 

— — 864. 



20 



MONASTIC RECORDS. 



English Chaetulaeies. 
County. Monastery. 



Staff. 

Salop. 

Line. 

Midd. 



Salop. 
North* 1 , 

Wilts. 



York 

Lane. 

York 

Warw. 

York 



Surrey- 
Dorset. 
Bucks. 



Lichfield Cathedral . . . 
Liileshull . . (excerpta) . 
Lincoln Cathedral . . . 



London, " Christ Church " . 

— " Halliwell" (excerpta) 

— "St.Barthmw,Smthfd. 

— " St. Giles "... 
— "St.Martin's le Grand" 

— « St. Paul's " \ \ '. 



— "St. Thomas D' Aeon" 

Ludlow, " S*. JohnBapt." . 
Luffield 



Malmsbury 1 . . (Saxon) 
— ... (transcript). 



— ... (excerpta) 

— "Leiger Book" 

Malton ; 

Manchester .... 
Marham . . (excerpta) 

Maxtoke 

Melsa, al. Meaux . . 



— . . (abbreviatio) 

— . . {transcript) 

— . " Annates" . 
Merton 



— "Eentale" . 
Middleton .... 



Missenden, " Abbey " 



Where Deposited. 

Dean and Chapter, Lichfield. 
Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 2060. 

— Cott. MS. Vesp. E. xvi. 
Bugden Palace Library. 
Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 448. 
Chapter House, Westminster. 
Bodl. Lib. Bodesworth MS. vol. cii. 
Brit. Mus. Cott. MS. Vesp. B. ix. 
Bodl. Lib. Rawlinson MS. 356. 
Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 4015. 

_ — 4080. 

Dean and Chapter, Westminster. 
Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 4345. 
Ashmolean Lib. No. 801, p. 50. 
Dean and Chapter, St. Paul's. 
Pub. Lib. Camb. MS. Ee. v. 21. 
Brit. Mus. Cott. MS. Tib. C. v. 
Mercer's Hall. 
Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 6276. 
Dean and Chapter, Westminster. 

Bodl. Lib. Wood MS. No. 5. 
Queen's Bemembrancer's Office. 
Brit. Mus. Cott. MS. Faust. B. viii. 

— Lansd. MS. 417. 

— Add. MS. 15,667. 
Bodl. Lib. No. 3860. 

— James MS. No. 8. 

— Wood MS. No. 5. 
Brit. Mus. Cott MS. Claud. D. xi. 
Dean and Chapter, Manchester. 
Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 294. 
Trinity Coll. Oxford, MS. lxxxiv. 
Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 424. 

— Earl. MS. 6974. 
Dean and Chapter, York. 
St. Mary's Tower, York. 
Brit. Mus. Cott. MS. Vitell. C. vi. 

— Lansd. MS. 207. 
Bodl. Lib. Bodesworth MS. vol. lxix. 
Brit. Mus. Eg. MS. 1141. 

— Cott. MS. Cleop. C. vii. 
Bodl. Lib. Laud MS. E. 34. 
Coll. of Arms, Norfolk MS. xxviii. 
Queen's Remembrancer's Office. 
Bodl. Lib. No. 3860. 

Brit. }ivs. Shane MS. 747. 



1 " Cartularium Saxonicum Malmesburiense," Medio- Montanis. 1829. folio* Pri- 
vately printed by Sir T. Phillippe, Bart. 



MONASTIC RECORDS. 

English Chaktulabies. 



21 



County. 

Bucks. 
Soutbt. 

York 
Bedf. 
Devon. 
Glouc. 

Bucks. 



Essex 
Notts. 

North 11 . 



Norfolk 



York 

Bucks. 

York 

Warw. 



Oxford 



Leic. 
Oxford 



Missenden, " Welwes " 
Mottisfont .... 



Newburgh . 
Newenham 

Newent 



NewentonLongueville(2u0&) 

Newplace 1 

Newport Pagnel (excerpta) . 
Newport Pond .... 
New stead 

— "LeigerBook" . 
Northampton," St. Andrew" 

— " St. James " . . 

— . . . "Rentale". 

— ... (excerpta) . 

Norwich,« < HolyTrin."(7w&) 

— "St. Giles" . . 

— "Analecta" . . 
Nostell 

— . . (excerpta) 
Notley . . (inrotulo) . 
Nun Appleton (transcriptd) . 
Nuneaton . (in rotulo) . 
Nunkeling, u. Keling . . 

Oseney 

— . . (fragment) . 

— . . (in English) . 

— "Rentale" . . 
Osulveston, " Rentale " . . 
Oxford, "AU Souls" . . 

— "Balliol" . . . 

— " Brazen-nose ' J . . 

— "ChristChurch,"or 

St. Frideswide . 

— — "Rentale" 

— " Corpus Christi" . 

— "Exeter" . . . 

— "Lincoln" . . . 

— "Magdalen" . . 



— "Merton" 



Where Deposited. 

Beit. Mus. Earl. MS. 3688. 
Queen's Remembrancer's Office. 



St. Mary's Tower, York. 
Brit. Mus. Sari. MS. 3956. 

— Arund. MS. 17. 

— Add. MS. lb 3 QQS. 
_ _ 18,461. 

New College, Oxford. 
Coll. of Arms. Norfolk MS. No. lx. 
Brit. Mus. Marl. MS. 2188. 
Dean and Chapter, Westminster. 
Queen's Remembrancer's Office. 
Coll. of Arms, Norfolk MS. 54, 60. 
Brit. Mus. Cott. MS. Vesp. E. xvii. 
__ _ Tib. E. v. 

— Add. Chart. 6117. 
Coll. of Arms, No. 218. 
Brit. Mus. Royal MS. 2, B. ix. 
Dean and Chapter, Norwich. 
Archives of the City of Norwich. 
Bodl. Lib. Tanner MS. 

Brit. Mus. Cott. MS. Vesp. E. xix. 
BoDL.LiB.IWetfworMf&vol.lxxxviii. 
Christ Church Coll. Oxford. 
BoDL.LiB.I)0^m$'.vols.8,9,49,89. 
Dean and Chapter, Lichfield. 



Brtt. Mus. Cott. MS. Vitell. E. xv. 
Christ Church Coll. Oxford. 
Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 4783. 
Queen's Remembrancer's Office. 
Bodl. Lib. Wood MSS. 10, 15. 
Public Lib. Camb. Bd. iii. 87. 
All Souls' College. 
Balliol College. 
Brazen-nose College. 

Corpus Christi College, No. clx. 
Chapter House, Westminster. 
Corpus Christi College. 
Exeter College. 
Lincoln College. 
Magdalen College. 
Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 4240. 
Merton College. 



1 " Registrum Cartarum Prioratus de Novo Loco," privately printed by Sir Charles 
Young, Garter. This tract gives the titles of the instruments contained in Norfolk 
MS. 60, at the College of Aems. 



22 


MONASTIC 


records: 


English Chaetttlaeies. 




County. 


Monastery. 


Where Deposited. 


Oxford 


Oxford, "Oriel". . . . 


Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 380, 




— " Queen's "... 


Queen's College. 




— "St. John's" . . 


Public Lib. Cams. 




— " St. Frideswide v. 






Christ Church . 




Staff. 




Archiepiscopal Archives,Dublin 


Wore. 




Augmentation Office. 


North 11 . 


Peterborough 


Brit. Mus. Cott. MS. Otho A. xvii. 






— — Cleop. C. i. ii. 




— .,... [2 vols. 


— — Faust. B.iii. 




— " Consuetudinarium " 


Lambeth Library. 




— "Liber Niger" . . 


Soc.of Antiquaries, 38,60,126,131 




— "Maldone" . . . 


Brit. Mus. Cott. MS. Vesp. E. xxi. 




— "Mare" .... 


_ — — E.xxii. 




— . — .... 


Dean and Chapter, Peterborough 




— "Rentale" . . . 


Brit. Mus. Cott. MS. Nero, C. vii. 






— — Jul. A. i. 






— -- Calig. A. xii. 






- — — — A. xiii. 




— 


— — Otho B. xiv. 




— ... (fragment) . 


Soc. of Antiquaries, No. 33. 


Hunt. 


Ramsay ...'.. 


Brit. Mus. Cott. MS. Otho B. xiy. 






— Marl MS. 445. 




— 


— — 5071. 




— 


Bodl. Lib. Rawlinson MS. B. 333. 




— " Dodeford " . . 


Brtt. Mus. Cott. MS. Vesp. E.ii. 




— . . (Feodarium) . 


— — Galba, E. x. 




— ... — . . 


Queen's Remembrancer's Office. 


Berks. 




Brit. Mus. Cott. MS. Vesp. E. v. 






— — — E. xxv. 




— 


— — Domit. iii. 




— 


— Marl. MS. 1708. 




— " Quaplode " (fragmf) 


— — 82. 




— ... {abstract) . 


Bodl. Lib. Tanner MS. 


York 




Brit. Mus. Cott. MS. Jul. D. i. 






Dean and Chapter, York. 


Kent 


Rochester 


Brit. Mus. Cott. MS. Vesp. A. xxii. 




i 


— — Domit. x. 

— — Eaust. B. v. 
_ __ — C. v. 

Dean and Chapter, Rochester, 




— "TextusRoffensis". 




— . — (transcript) 


Brit. Mus. Marl. MS. 6523. 




— . — .... 


Soc. of Antiquaries, No. 177. 


Staff. 


Rounton 


Brit. Mus. Cott. MS. Vesp. C. xv. 


Nott. 


Rufford. . . (transcript) 


— Marl. MS. 1063. 


Hertf. 


St. Alban's . . (Saxon,) . 


Brit. Mus. Cott. MS. Nero, D. i. 






— — Jul. D. iii. 



MONASTIC RECORDS. 



23 



English Ciiahtulabies. 
Monastery. 



County. 
Hertf. 



St. Alban's 



Cumb. 

Cornw. 

Southt. 
Midd. 



Hunt. 
Warw. 
Wore. 



Wilts. 

York 

Hunt. 

Oxford 

York 



Sussex 
Line. 
Dorset 
Surrey 

Kent 
Dorset 



— " Cat.Benefactorum " 

— " Almoner " . . . 

— " Moot " . . . . 

— "Whethamstede/W.i. 

— . — . (vol. ii.) 

— . — . (vol. iii.) 

— "WintersQulle" . . 



— " Hosp. St. Julian " . 
St. Bees 

— ... (in rotulo) 

St. Berian 

St. Denis 

St. John of Jerusalem . . 



— . (transcript of part) 

— "Botiller" . . . 

St. Neots 

St. Sepulchre (carta orig.) 
St. Wolstan . (excerpta) . 



— ... (carta orig.) 

Salisbury Cathedral . . . 

— . . (abridgmenf) . 

Salley 

Saltrey . . . (carta) . 
Santlford 

— . "Rentale" . . 

Selborne 

Selby 

— . "Historia" . . 

Sele 

Serapringham . . (carta) . 

Shaftesbury 

Shene . "Eentale" . . 

— . (index cartarum) 
Shepy " Galendarium " . 
Sherburn . . . . . 

— . (in rotulo) . 



Where Deposited. 

Beit. Mus. Cott. MS. Tib. E. v?„ 

— — Claud. E. iv. 

— — Otho D. iii. 
Public Lib. Camb. He. iv. 20. 
Brit. Mus. Cott. MS. NeroD. vii. 

— Lansd. MS. 375. 

— Harl. MS. 602. 

— Cott. MS. Claud. D. i. 
Coll. of Arms, Norfolk MS. 3. 
Brit. Mus. Arund. MS. 34. 
Public Lib. Camb. More MS. 59. 
Bodl. Lib. Rawlinson MS. B. 332. 
Furnival's Inn, GwyuneMS. 
Brit. Mus. Cott. MS. Claud. D. i. 

— Harl. MS. 434. 

— Cott. Chart, xiii. 21. 
Public Lib. Camb. More MS. 267. 
Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 15,314. 

— Cott. MS. Claud. E. vi. 

— — Nero C. ix. 

— Lansd. MS. 200. 
Bodl. Lib. Rawlinson MS. 
Ashmolean Lib. Dugdale MS. 39. 
Brit. Mus. Cott. MS. Nero E. vi. 

— — Faust. A. iv. 
Ashmolean Lib. Dugdale MS. F. 2. 
Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 1087. 

— — 3648. 
_ „ 5804. 

Ashmolean Lib. Wood MS. 127. 
Christ Church Coll. Oxford. 
Inner Temple Lib. No. 511. v. 18. 
Lambeth Library. 
Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 112. 
Harleian Charters. 
Bodl. Lib. Wood MS. 8598. 
Corp. Christi Coll. Oxf. MS. ccexx. 
Magdalen Coll. Oxford. 
Brit. Mus. Cott. MS. Vitell. E. xvi. 
_ _ Cleop. D. iii. 6. 

Duchy of Lancaster Office, No. 8, 
Printed in L Abbe's Bill. Nova Manu- 
Magdalen Coll. Oxf. [scriptorum. 
Bodl. Lib. Laud MS. (In xegistro Abb. 
BmTMvs.Harl.MS.fil. [Alvingham. 

— Cott. MS. Jul. C. ii. 

— — Otho, B. xiv. 

— — Faust. B. vi. 
Brit. Mus. Cott. MS. Faust. A. ii. 
Augmentation Office. 



24 



MONASTIC RECORDS. 



English Chabtttlakies. 
County. Monastery. 



Salop. 

Suffolk 



Surrey 

Nott. 
Southt. 

Line. 



Essex 
Chesh. 

Wilts. 

Staff. 

Warw. 

Essex 

Kent 

Berks. 

Gamb. 



Gloue. 



Oxford 



Warw. 

Norfolk 

Camb. 

Line. 

Nott. 

Southt. 

Bucks. 

Northl d 

Monm. 

Essex 
Devon. 

Kent 

Kent 



Shrewsbury,"S.Pet." (carte) 
Sibton 

— . . (transcript) . 

Southwark 

— . . (fragment) . 
Southwell, " Liber Albus ;; . 
Southwick . (fragment) . 
Spalding . (partes iv. v.) 



— . . (transcript) . 
Stanesgate . (carta orig.) . 
Stanlaw or~Whslley(e$cerpta) 

— — . (transcript) 

Stanley 

Stone 

Stoneleigh . (excerpta) . 

Strafford 

Strode . . . (carta) . 
Sunning, " Custumale " 
Swaffham . . (excerpta) . 

— " Liber Niger " 
Swavesey . . (carta orig.) 

— . . {transcripta) 

Tewkesbury 



— " Cat. Eundatorum " 
Thame . . . (excerpta) . 

— . . (fragmenta) . 
Thelesford,"S. Trin."(wrcp/.) 
Thetford . . (carta) . 
Thorney 

— "LiberRuber" (exce?*pt.) 
Thornton, "Historia" . . 

Thurgarton 

Tichfield . . (abstract) . 
Tickford . (carta orig.) . 
Tinmouth . . (excerpta) . 
Tintern 

— ... (excerpta) . 
Tiptree . (carta orig.) . 
Torre 

— ... (excerpta) . 

Trewleigh 

Trim, v. Westbury . . . 
Tunbridge . (carta orig.) . 



Where Deposited. 

Public Library Camb. Dd. ix. 62. 
Brit. Mus. Arund. MS. 221. 

— Add. MS. 8172. 
Bodl. Lib. Rawlimon MS. B. 419. 
Brit. Mus. Cott. MS. Faust. A. iii. 

— Add. MS. 6040. 
College Chapter Library. 
Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 317. 

— — 1742. 
Caius Coll. Camb. MS. C. 18. 
Public Lib. Camb. More MS. D. 117, 
Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 5846. 
Ashmolean Lib. Wood MS. 

Brit. Mus. Harl. MSS. 2060, 2061, 
Bodl. Lib. Dodeswortk 3 MSS. clix.clxi. 
Trinity College, Dublin. 
Brit. Mus. Cott. MS. Yesp. E. xxiv. 
Ashmolean Lib. Dugdale MS. F. 2. 
Trinity College, Dublin. 
Dean and Chapter, Rochester. 
University Coll. Oxford. 
Brit. Mus. Sari. MS. 5019. 
Public Lib. Camb. More MS. 445. 
Inter Munimenta Epi. Eliensis. 
Bodl. Lib. Tanner MS. 

Brit. Mus. Cott. MS. Cleop. A. vii. 

College of Arms. 

Brit. Mus. Cott. MS. Otho, D. 1. 

— — Jul. C. vii. 
Bodl. Lib. BodeswortJt MS. vol. cxli. 
Christ Church Coll. Oxford. 
St. Mary's, Warwick, No. 30. 
Ashmolean Lib. Wood MS. 121. 
Brit. Mus. Cott. MS. Vitell. D. v. 

— Lansd. MSS. 964, 994. 
Bodl. Lib. Tanner MS. No. 166. 
Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 972. 

— — 1602, 1603. 
Ashmolean Lib. Wood MS. 127. 
Brit. Mus. Cott. MS. Vitell. E. v. 

— Arund. MS. 19. 

— Earl.MSS.1081 ; 3648; 5804. 
Ashmolean Lib. Wood MS. 127. 
Queen's Remembrancer's Office. 
Trinity College, Dublin. 
Public Library, St. Omer. 

Ashmolean Lib. Wood MS. 127. 



MONASTIC RECORDS. 

English Chaetitlabies. 



25 



County. 

Staff. 






Chesh. 
Line. 

Essex 



Berks. 

Staff. 

Norfolk 
Essex. 



Suffolk 

Bedf. 

York 

Warw. 

North". 

Nott. 

Som. 

Glouc. 

Midd. 



Wore. 
Cumb. 
Lane. 

Hamp. 
York 

Camb. 



Monastery. 



Tutbury* 



Vale Eoyal . 
Vaudry • . 



. (transcript) 

.(transcript) 
, (carta) 



Walden 

— "Historia" . . 

— " Pentelowe " 
Wallingford College (carta). 

— Priory . . . 

Walshall 

Walsingham 

Waltham 



— "Fuller" . . . 
Walton . . (excerpta) . 
Wardon . . (imperfect) . 
Wartre, " Lieger Book " 
Warwick, " St. Mary " . . 
Wedon Bee. . . (carta) . 
Welbeck 

— . . (excerpta) . 

Wells 

Westbury, or Trim . . . 
Westminster, « St. Peter's ". 



Westwood 

Wetherell 
Whalley 



" Liber Pilosus " . 
"St. Stephen's". 



. (transcript) 
. (transcript) 



— v. Stanlaw 
Wherwell . . (excerpta) . 

Whitby 

Wigenhall, v. Crabhouse 
Wigraore, " Liber Niger " . 
Wiflingham 



Where Deposited. 



Coll.of A.mis,Norf.MS.Tso. lix.[xli.?] 
Trinity Coll. Camb. 
Duchy of Lancaster Office, No. 4. 
Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 6714. 

— Harl. MS. 2064. 

— Harleian Charters, 

— Arund. MS. 29. 

— Cott. MS. Vesp. E. vi. 

— Harl. MS. 3697. 
Corp. Archives, Bicester, Oxon. 
Ashmolean Lib. Wood MS. 127. 
Brit. Mus. Cott. MS. Nero, C. xii. 

— _ _ E. vii. 

— — Tib. C. ix. 

— Harl. MS.S91. 

— — 4809. 

— — 3739. 
Bo-DL.LiB.DodeswortkMS. v. cii.f.134. 
Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 4765. 
Bodl. Library, No. 3889. 
Queen's Remembrancer's Office. 
Eton College. 

Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 3640. 

— Lansd. MS. 207. 
Episcopal Palace, Wells. 
Brit. Mus. Cott. MS. Nero E. i. 

— — Faust. A. iii. 

— — Claud. A. viii. 
Dean and Chapter, Westminster. 
Pub. Lib. C amb. More MSS. 214, 223. 
Brit. Mus. Cott. MS. Faust. B. viii. 

— — Vesp. E. ix.. , 

— Lansd. MS.U1. 

— Harl. MS. 1881. 
Carlisle Cath. No. 1. 
Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 973. 

— Add. MS. 10,374. 

Bodl. Lib. Gough MS. 
Brit. Mus. James MS. No. 8, 

— Add.MS.mZ. 

— Harl. MS. 1240. 

— Cotton. MS. Nero, C. ix. 



1 " Begistrum Cartarum Prioratus Tuttebuviensis," Royal 8vo. Privately printed 
by Sir Charles Young, Gorier. This tract gives the titles of the instruments 
contained in Norfolk MS. 49, in the College of Abms 



ae 



MONASTIC RECORDS. 



.English Chaetulaeies. 



County. 

Wilts. 
Souttit. 



Berks. 
Wore. 

Heref. 

Warw. 
Norfolk 

Southt. 

Norfolk 
York 



Monastery. 

Wilton 1 . . .(Saxon). 
Winchester College . . . 

— "St. Cross" . . . 

— "St.Swithin"(&aw) 

— "Historia" . . . 

— "Chronicon" 

Windsor College .... 

— .... (exceipta) 
Worcester 3 <'Hemii)g''(fe.) 

— " Liber Albus" . . 

— (transcripta cartarurn) 

— ... (excerpta) . 

— ... (fragmenta). 
Wormesley 

Wotton Waven (carta orig.) 
Wymondham 

Wynteney, " Calendarium ". 

Yarmouth Hospital . . . 
York, "Archiepiscop." . . 

— " Consuetudinarium". 

— — (fragmenta) 

—"Corpus Christi Guild" 

— "Grenefeld" . . 

— -"St.Leonard'sHosp." 



— " Registrum Album " 

— « St. Mary's " . . 

— — (transcript). 

— "St. Peter's" '. ! 



"Warwick" 



Where Deposited. 

Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 436. 

Custos et Socii. 

Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 1616. 

— Add. MS. 15,350. 
Dean and Chapter, Winchester. 
All Souls' Coll. Oxf. MS. cxiv. 
Bodl. Lib. MS. N. E. A.. 3, 19. 
Corp.Chr.Coll.Camb. FarkerMS.cs.. 
Dean and Chapter, Windsor. 
Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 939. 

— 'Cott. MS. Tib. A. xiii. 
Dean and Chapter, Worcester. 
Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 460. 

— Cott. MS. Vitell. C. ix. 

— — Nero, E. i. 

— Harl. MS. 3586. 
Lambeth Palace. 
King's Coll. Cambridge. 
Brit. Mus. Cott. MS. Tit. C. viii. 

— — Otho, B. iv. 

— — Claud. D. iii. 

Corporation Archives,Yarmouth. 
Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 492. 
St. John's Coll. Camb. MS. D. 127. 
St. Mary's Tower, York. 
Bodl. Lib. Ration MS. 

— Dodeswortk MS. vol. lxxvi. 
Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 403. 

— Jrund. MS. 11. 
Dean and Chapter, York. 
Brit. Mus. Cott. MS. Nero, D. iii. 
Bodl. Lib. Rawlinson MS. B. 455. 
St. Mary's Tower, York. 
Dean and Chapter, York. 
Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 236. 
Bodl. Lib. JlfS. 5018, f. 55. 
Dean and Chapter, York. 
Brit. Mus. Cott. MS. Claud. B. iii. 

— — Galba, E. x. 

— — Vitell. A. ii. 
Bodl. Lib. MS. N.E.A. 3, 20. 



1 "Registrum Wiltunense Saxonicum et Latinum, in Museo Britannico asser- 
vatum ; Lond. 1827. fol. Sumptibus R. C. Hoare." Only 100 copies printed. 

* '* Hemingi Chartularium Ecclesiffi Wigorniensis, ed. Thos. Hearnius." Oxon. 1723. 
2 toIs. 8vo. 



MONASTIC RECORDS. 



27 



LIST OF WELSH CHARTULARIES. 



County, 

Caern. 
Carm. 
Caern. 



Hint. 
Carm. 

Caern. 

Merion. 
Glam. 



Card. 

Glam. 

Hint. 
Pemb. 



Card. 

Montg 1 

Glam. 



Monastery. 

Aberconway 

Alba Landa(ftKce^. cartar.) 
Bangor . . . {cartes) . 

Bardsey 

Basingwerk {excerpt, car tar) 
Carmarthen," St. John " . . 

— — {collectanea). 
ClynnockVaur .{confirmat.). 
Kymmer . . . {carta) . 
Llandaff, " Chronicon " . . 

— "Annales" . . 

— " Kegistra " . . 

— (cartarumtranscripta) 
■ — ... {excerpta). 

Llandewi Brewi . {carta) . 
Llangenith . . . {carta) . 
Llanrust 
Margam 



St. Asaph . 
St David's 



St. Dogmaels 
Strata Florida 
Stratmarcell 
Swansea 



collectanea) 
. {carta) . 
{excerpta). 



transcripta) , 
. {carta) . 



{carta) 
{carta) 



Where Deposited. 

Beit. Mus. Harl. MS. 3725. 

— — 2101. 
Dean and Chapter. 

Pat. 8, E. iv. p. 3. m. 10. 
Pat. 9, B. ii. et 8, E. ii. 
BMT,Mus.mrUf&2060;2079;2099. 
Pat. 14, H. vi. p. 1. m. 14. 
Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 1549 

— — 696 

— — 696. 

— Cott. MS. Tit. D. xxii. 

— Harl. MS. 838. 
Dean and Chapter, Llandaff. 
Corp. Chr. Coll.Camb.110 and 101. 

— Oxf. vol. iii. n. 9. 
Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 1249. 

All Souls' Coll. Oxford. 
Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 67. 

— Harleian Charters. 

— Harl. MS. 2273. 
Ashmolean Lib. No. 844. 
Dean and Chapter, St, Asaph. 
Jesus College, Oxford. 
Brit. Mds. Harl. MS. 1294. 
Dean and Chapter, St. David's. 
Pat. 20, R. ii. 

Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 6068. 

Pat. 28, H. vi. 

Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 1249. 



LIST OF IRISH CHARTULARIES. 



| Monastery. 

'St. John of Jerusalem , . 
Dublin, " St. Mary's" . . 

— « St. Thomas " . . 

— " St.Trinity" {excerpt.) 

Tristernagh . {transcripta) 



Where Deposited. 
Bodl. Lib. Rawlinson MS. 

Brit. Mus. Cott. MS. Tib. A. xi. 
Bodl. Lib. Rawlinson MS. 



28 



MONASTIC RECORDS. 



LIST OF SCOTTISH CHART UL ARIES} 



Monastery. 



Abroath 

Balmerino 

Cambuskeneth . . . 
Coldingham .... 

Crail 

Dryburgh 

Dunblane 

Dunfermline 2 . . . . 
Edinburgh, 3 " St. Cross " 

Elgin 

Kelso 2 

Kynlos, 2 "Historia" . 
Lanercost, 3 " Chronicon " 

Lindores 

Melrose 2 

Moray 2 

Newbottle 

Paisley 3 

St. Andrew 2 . . . . 
St. Anthony .... 

Scone 3 

Soltre 

Stirling Chapel Royal . 



Where Deposited. 
Advocates' Library, Edinburgh. 



Dean and Chapter, Durham. 
Advocates 1 Library, Edinburgh. 



Lambeth Library. 

Advocates' Library, Edinburgh. 



Advocates' Library, Edinburgh. 
British Museum, Harl. MS. 3960. 
Advocates' Library, Edinburgh. 



LIST OF FAMILY CHARTULARIES, FTC. 

Arundell : Rentale terrarum Ricardi comitis Arundelise, temp. Ric. II. * 

Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 10,013. 
Babington : Rental of lands of Mr. Babington of Dethick, 1565 ; Brit. 

Mus. Add. MS. 17,449. 
Beauchamp : Feodarium Eamilise de Bello Campo de Hacche ; Augm. Off. 
Berkley : Chartulary of the Family of Berkley of Wymondham, co. Norf. ; 

Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 265. 
Bohun : Registrum Cartarum de terris Edmundi Bohun de Trefyngfelde in 

com. Suff., 22 Edw. IV.; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 2201. 
Bourstall : Leiger Book of the Lords of Bourstall, co. Bucks. ; Coll. of 

Arms, Vincent MS. 85. 
Boyne : Cartularium ad Baroniam de Boyne spectans, Sec. xvi. ; Univ. 

Coll. Oxford, MS. cviii. 
Bray : Register of Henry de Bray, of Harleston, co. Northampton, a.d. 1322 ; 

Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 761. 
Braybrooke : Cartularium sive transcripta Cartarum Roberti de Braibroc, 

Sec. xiv. ; Brit. Mus. Shane MS. 986. 

1 Tor a further account of the Scottish ChartularieB, see Turnbull's Fragmenta 
Scoto-Montistica. Edinb. 1842, 8vo. 
- Printed by the Bannatyue Club. 3 Printed by the Maitland Club, 1832. 



MONASTIC RECORDS. 29 

Family Chabotlames. 
Castlemaine, Earl of. See Palmer. 
Cheddre : Chartulary of the Family of Cheddre^ of Chedder, co. Somerset ; 

Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 316. 
Darcy : Eentale terrarum Thomae Darcy mil., 20 Hen. VIII. ; Chapter 

House, Westminster. 
Fitz-Gerald : TheEental of Gerald Fitz-Gerald, Earl of Kildare, 1518; 

Brit. Mus. Sari. MS. 3756. 
Foun : Chartulary of the Family of Foun of Holinton, co. Derby; Eecord 

Office, Carlton Eide. 
Gaynesford: Chartulary of theFam. of Gaynesford; BRiT.Mus.iforZ.i/&392. 
Goldtngham : Chartulary of the Family of Goldingham ; Brit. Mrs. Lansd. 

MS. 860. 
Hill: Chartulary of the Family of Hill of Spaxton, co. Somerset; Augm. Off. 
"Kildare, Earl of. See Fitz-Gerald. 
Langley : Cartas de terris per Familiam de Langley occupatis ; Brit. Mus. 

Earl. MS. 1. 
Lennox : " Cartularium com. de Levenax, ad ann. 1498 ;" Edinb. 1833, 4to. 

(Printed by the Maitland Club, from the MS. in the Advocates' Library, 

Edinburgh.) 
Lovell : Eental-Book of the Estates of Sir Thomas Lovell, K.G., 15 Hen. 

VIII. ; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 12,463. 
March, Earl of. See Mortimer. 
Montague : Transcripta Cartarum, etc. domui de Monte-acuto pertinentium : 

Trin. Coll. Oxf. MS. lxxxv. 
Mortimer : " Liber Niger de Wigmore," containing transcripts of deeds 

and evidences relating to the estate of the Earls of March; Brit. Mus. 

Marl. MS. 1240. 
Eegister of muniments of Edmund Mortimer, Earl of March ; 

Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 6041. 
Okeover ; Cartularium Familiae de Okeover, in com. StafFordiae ; Bodl. 

Lib. Oxf. Wood MS. No. 6. 
Ormonde : Eental of Thomas, afterwards Earl of Ormonde, 1473 to 1523 ; 

Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 15,761. 
Palmer : Accounts of the debts, rental, etc. of Eoger Palmer, Earl of 

Castlemaine, Aug. 1666; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 12,516. 
Pedewardyn : Transcripts of the Chartulary of the Family of Pedewardyn ; 

Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 207, C. 
Percy: Extracts from a Chartulary of the Family of Percy; Bodl. Lib. 

Jftf. 5016; {Bodesworth MS. lxxiv.) 
Verb : Chartulary of the Family of Vere ; Bodl. Lib. Ratclinson MS. 248. 
Warwick, Earl of : Schedule of Eecords relating to the Estates of the 

Earl of Warwick, &c. a.d. 1662 ; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 3959. 
Woodford : Chartulary of the Family of Woodford, of Ashby Folville, 

co. Leicester; Brit. Mus. Cotton. MS, Claudius, A. xiii. (Printed in 

Nichols's Leicester sliwe.) 



30 



Cartae Snttquat* 

^T> H E term " Cartse Antiquae," or " Charter," is usually applied 
-*- to all ancient deeds and writings, from the Saxon period down 
to the reign of Henry VIII. In many of the public libraries this 
term is applied to these documents, to the period of the Revolution 
of 1649. They are very numerous, and their nature and contents 
are so thoroughly and universally known, that any lengthened 
description of them is needless. They consist chiefly of founda- 
tion charters of abbeys ; endowments of religious houses ; grants 
to secular establishments, and to individuals; appropriations of 
churches; deeds of bargains and sale; compositions, feoffments, 
exchanges, and all manner of contracts; releases and quit claims; 
letters of attorney and proxy ; grants and manumissions of villeins, 
&c. &c, of all dates. 

The value of charters and deeds is very great, as they may be 
classed among the surest proofs of a genealogy, either from the 
description of the party making the charter — some recital relating 
to his father, mother, wife, children, or other branches of his 
family — from his seal of arms, or the names mentioned as witnesses. 

A reference to the pedigree of the Percys, one of the most full 
and complete genealogies in the kingdom, or a reference to the 
descent of any ancient family, as printed in Dugdale's Baronage, 
will show the great assistance to be derived from the "Cartse 
Antiquse." It may almost be doubted if some of the most ancient 
families could prove their pedigrees without having recourse to 
them. 

The "Cartse Antiquse" are the most ancient of the public 
records at the Tower. They consist of forty-one rolls, containing 
transcripts made apparently in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, 
for the purpose of obtaining confirmations, of a miscellaneous col- 
lection of charters granted by various sovereigns, from Ethelbert, 
King of Kent, at the close of the sixth century, to Henry III. 
inclusive. There is a manuscript calendar to these rolls in the 
office, with Indices Nominum et Locorum. Its references, being 
sometimes merely numerical, render it occasionally obscure, but 
none of the instruments appear to be unnoticed. It was printed 



CAMME ANTIQUE. 31 

by Sir Joseph Ayloffe in 1 774, under the title of, A Calendar of 
Antient Charters, and of the Scotch and Welsh Rolls, now in the 
Tower of London, fyc. 4to. 
Abstracts of these records are to be found as follows : — 

Apographs Cartarum A.ntiquarum in Arch. Arcis Lond. conservatarum, 

A— Z; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 84. 

__ AA— KB,; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 85. 

Transcripta Cartarum Antiquarum ; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 311, f. 14 b. 
Extracts of Charters out of the Records of the Tower ; Brit. Mus. Earl. 

MS. 6748. 
Abstracts of the Cartse Antiquae remaining in the Tower; Brit. Mus. Lansd. 

MS. 319. 
" Miscellanea e palea Cartarum Thomae Kymer, vol. it/' containing Historical 

Tracts, xviith Cent.; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 18,911. 
Cartas Antiquae, tempp. Hen. I — Hen. Ill; Bodl. Lib. MS. 4167 (Dod&w. 

MS. vol. 25). 
Transcripts from the Carta? Antiquae in the Tower, from Eic. I — Hen. Ill ; 

Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 6711. 
Extracts of the Cartas Antiquae, tempp. John and Hen. Ill ; Coll. of Arms, 

MS. B. 4. 

At the Augmentation Office is a great quantity of "Cartae 
Antiquae/' of a very miscellaneous kind, consisting of appropria- 
tions to religious houses; endowments and ordinations of vicar- 
ages, &c. ; inrolments of grants of bailiwicks; bonds and other 
writings obligatory; some few chartularies of monasteries; royal 
and private deeds of exchange and purchase; feoffments of all 
sorts ; many deeds of frankalmoigne, or free alms to monasteries 
and other religious houses, &c. &c. Although most of the lands 
taken from religious houses were granted away as soon as seized, 
yet the charters or title-deeds, and other records of such houses 
and lands, do not generally appear to have accompanied the grants ; 
and there remain in this office a great variety of important and 
valuable deeds, some nearly as ancient as the Conquest. Occa- 
sionally some of these private title-deeds have been, by virtue of a 
warrant from the Crown, delivered to the owners of the lands they 
concern. 

At the Duchy of Lancaster Office are ninety-six boxes of 
ancient and original charters, deeds, and grants, by and from the 
kings and queens of England, and divers great personages, as well 
a« private individuals, with confirmations and exchanges, affecting 
manors, lands, and estates, liberties, privileges, rights, and emolu- 



32 CARTM ANTIQUE. 

ments of various descriptions. The earliest record amongst them 
is a deed of confirmation by William Rufus, and the latest in the 
collection is in the reign of Queen Elizabeth. 

At Carlton Ride is a large collection of ancient charters and 
confirmations of charters of foundation, and of privileges granted to 
monasteries and priories from the Saxon kings downwards ; and a 
variety of ancient charters and deeds relating to private property, and 
made between private persons, from the reign of Henry I. downwards. 1 

The collections of " Cartse Antiquas," both originals and tran- 
scripts, in the public libraries of the kingdom, are very numerous 
and valuable. 

The present number of these records at the British Museum 
amounts to no less than 25,771 separate instruments. They are 
divided into eleven collections, chiefly named after the original 
collector. Of these the Harleian Collection alone numbers 13,285 
charters and 948 rolls. They consist of royal charters of the 
kings of England from Cornwulf, king of Mercia, down to the reign 
of Charles I. ; numerous ecclesiastical charters, and private deeds 
almost without number. These collections will be found more 
fully described in Sims's Handbook to the Library of the British 
Museum, pp. 145-156. 

In the Bodleian Library at Oxford are also most ancient 
royal charters and grants, as well as private deeds and charters, 
beginning in the Saxon times, and many relating to the numerous 
possessions of the Knights Templars and of St. John of Jerusalem. 

In the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth are thirteen 
folio volumes of curious documents, called "Cartse Antiquse," 
containing church grants of offices and lands, leases, dispensations, 
elections, licenses, ordinations, appropriations, wills, taxations, 
visitations, inquisitions post mortem, inquisitions of lands, bonds, 
lists of recusants, miscellaneous charters, awards, sales, exchanges, 
letters, sentences of the Prerogative Court, surveys, valuations, 
papal indulgences, lists of clergy, terriers, rentals, &c. &c. 

The Public Library at Cambridge is also possessed of ancient 
books of charters. 

In the Library op All Souls* College, Oxford, is a MS. con- 
taining a collection of charters, copied from different sources, from 
the time of Edward I. to that of Henry VI. (No. ccxxvii). 

In private families, long possessed of landed property, the " Cartse 
Antiquse" are sometimes numerous beyond calculation. It is 
1 See forward, p. 35. 



CARTLE ANTIQUE. 33 

known that the Howard, Percy, Cavendish, Temple, Scudamore, 
and other noble repositories, contain thousands of these documents. 

Title Deeds. — The exact division of time when these records 
ceased to be called "Cartse Antiquae," and assumed the more 
modern term of " Title Deeds," is not only optional but unimportant. 
Mr. Grimaldi, in his Origines Genealogicce, p. 18, fixes the date 
in the year 1535, and gives as his reason for so doing, that " there 
is, perhaps, no title to lands which, at the present day, can have 
occasion to be traced further back than to the dissolution of the 
monasteries; and that there are many of such titles which must 
commence with a grant of the dissolved monastery's lands from 
Henry VIII. or his immediate successor." 

What has been already said with respect to the (( Cartse 
Antiquse " relates so materially to the modern Title Deeds, that it 
will only be necessary to point out the repositories where the deeds 
or transcripts of them, should be searched for. 

Inrolments in Chancery. — Inrolment of deeds is, in most cases, „ 
by statute. Deeds between private individuals were inrolled in 
Chancery as early as the reign of Edward II., and are still extant 
upon the various rolls of that court, preserved at the Tower of 
London, and at the Rolls. It is probable that the multitude of 
deeds required to be inrolled, and the irregularity of the clerks in 
Chancery, who inrolled the deeds on rolls of different descriptions, 
gave rise to the establishment of the Inrolment Office of the 
Court of Chancery. This office was constituted by letters patent, 
16 Eliz., for inrolment of recognizances, deeds, &c. in Chancery. 
The following are the records therein preserved : — 

1. Close Rolls subsequent to those at the Public Record Office. — 
There are indexes to the Close Rolls, from the establishment of 
the office to the present time, remaining in the Inrolment Office. 
They do not pass on the indexes with the records to the Public 
Record Office. 

The following are entered on the Close Rolls : — 

Bargains and sales of lands, pursuant to stat. 27 Hen. VIII. and 16 Eliz. 

by Commissioners of Forfeited Estates, 4 Geo. 1. 

by Trustees of South Sea Directors, 7 Geo. I. 

Conveyances and wills of Papists. 
Conveyances of bankrupts' estates, &c. 
Conveyances to charitable uses, 9 Geo. II. 



34 CART.E ANTIQUE. 

Deeds of exchange of lands, &c. for charitable purposes, 1 and 2 Geo. IV, c. 92. 
Deeds under 10 Anne, for building churches. 

43 Geo. III. churches. 

1 Geo. I. augmentation of livings (called Queen Anne's Bounty). 

the Act relating to fines and recoveries, 3 and 4 Will. IV, c. 74. 

From 1574 to 1784, these Close Rolls are at the Rolls Chapel; 
cancelled deeds will also be found among the miscellaneous records 
in the same repository. From 1784 to the present time, the Close 
Rolls are deposited at the Inrolment Office. 

2. Memorials of Deeds and other Securities for Annuities. — They 
were entered on the Close Rolls by authority of 17 Geo. III., which 
was repealed by 53 Geo. III., by which latter statute they are 
ntered or inrolled in books kept at this office. The memorials 
from 53 Geo. III. (from which the entries are made in books in 
the Inrolment Office) are passed on with the Close Rolls to the 
Public Record Office. Thus, as many years of the Close Rolls as 
are retained at the Inrolment Office, so many years also of the 
memorials remain with them ; the books in which they are entered 
or inrolled are always kept at the Inrolment Office. 

Inrolments in the Court of Queen's Bench. — The rolls of the 
Court of Queen's Bench commence in 1422 (1 Hen. VI), and 
contain, in addition to the judgments and proceedings of the court, 
such instruments, deeds, and writings, as the court orders to be 
inrolled of record. 

The rolls are preserved in the Record Office, Carlton Ride. 

Those, prior to 1422, are at the Chapter House, Westminster, 
an account of which will be found under the head of " Placita," 
in the present work. 

The indexes commence in 1656, and are kept at the Clerk of the 
Dockets, in the Queen's Bench Office. Some imperfect earlier 
calendars remain ; but it is supposed the greater part were destroyed 
at the fire of London in 1666. 

Inrolments in the Court of Common Pleas. — The records of 
the court commence in 1272; 1 and the books of entry of inrolments, 
formerly kept by the Clerk of the Warrants, inrolments, and extracts 
(commencing in 1554), are kept at the Master's Office, in Mitre- 

COURT-BUILDINGS. 

1 See under the head of " Placita." 



CARTJE ANTIQUE. 35 

For a printed Inventory of these books; see 3d Rep. of Dep. 
Keeper of Records, App. ii, p. 130. 

Such deeds as the court orders to be inrolled are at the Record 
Office, Carlton Ride. 

Deeds are inrolled on the " Placita Terrae/' which are fastened up 
with the Common Rolls till 25 Eliz., when they form distinct rolls. 

There are various separate deeds which were indexed by Mr. 
Hewlett, and will be found in the (i Appendix to Report of the 
Commissioners on Records, 1837," pp. 142-145. 

Pursuant to statute 3 & 4 Will. IV. c. 74, "An Act for the 
Abolition of Fines and Recoveries, and for the Substitution of more 
simple Modes of Assurance," an officer of the Common Pleas, 
under the name of Registrar, has been appointed, who has the 
custody of the certificates of the acknowledgments of deeds by 
married women, taken before the commissioners appointed under 
the said statute. The office is at 9, Serjeants 5 Inn, Fleet Street. 

Inrolments in the Court of Exchequer. — The Memoranda 
Rolls, or Remembrances, which commence in 1220, contain inrol- 
ments of deeds and conveyances of estates by private persons. 
Therein are also entered deeds and instruments acknowledged 
before one of the barons of the Exchequer, or a commissioner for 
taking acknowledgments of deeds in the country. 1 These docu- 
ments are now at Carlton Ride. 

In the same repository are preserved : — 

Deeds of exchange and purchase. 

Deeds of surrenders of monasteries and other religious foundations, temp. 

Hen. VIII. and Edw. VI. (There is an Inventory of these printed in 

the Dep. Keeper's 8th Rep., App. ii, p. 1.) 
Deeds inrolled on Judgment Rolls. 
Deeds of sales of lands, gifts, purchase, and exchange, from Edward I. 

The ancient Rolls have been transferred from Westminster to 
the Rolls House. 

Inrolments with Clerks of the Peace. — By virtue of various 
Acts of Parliament, some title-deeds are inrolled with Clerks of the 
Peace. They generally relate to newly inclosed lands, to canals, to 
deeds of annuity granted subsequently to the act of 3 George III. ; 
or to the wills and conveyances of Roman Catholics, under the 
Act 3 George I. c. 18. By statute 27 Henry VIII. c. 16, bargains 

See the " Memoranda Roils." 



:i(> CART^E ANTIQUE. 

and sales of lands are to be inrolled in one of the courts of West- 
minster ; or else within the county where the lands lie, before the 
custos rotulorum, and two justices of the peace, and the clerk of 
the peace, of the same county or counties. It is believed there are 
no records with the majority of clerks of the peace of more ancient 
date than the commencement of the eighteenth century, though it 
is evident deeds were anciently inrolled with them ; but the county 
records for the clerk of the peace of Middlesex, which are the 
earliest in existence, commence in 1547. 

City and Corporation Inrolments. — From a very early period, 
the head officers of certain cities and corporate towns, have had power 
to inrol deeds relating to lands, or to persons, within their juris- 
diction, and which inrolment is necessary to their validity. By 
statute 34 and 35 Henry VIII. c. 22, it was enacted, that all 
recoveries, deeds inrolled, and releases acknowledged, and taken 
before the mayors, aldermen, recorders, chamberlaius, or other head 
officers of London, or any other city, borough, or town corporate, 
having authority to take and receive the same according to the 
laudable ways and customs of the said cities, boroughs, and towns, 
shall stand and remain in like force as tt*ey were before the statute 
of 32 Henry VIII. c. 28. 

The Fen Registers. — The fen lands lie in the counties of 
Northampton, Norfolk, Suffolk, Lincoln, Cambridge, and Hunt- 
ingdon, and the Isle of Ely. In the year 1663 (15 Chas. II.) an 
act was passed " for settling the drainage of the Great Level of the 
Fens, called Bedford Level ;" and as this great work of drainage 
was undertaken by Francis, Earl of Bedford, at his private costs, he 
had a grant of 95,000 acres, and the earl and his participants were 
made a corporation. It was enacted, that no lease, grant, or 
conveyance, or charge out of or upon the said 95,000 acres (except 
leases for seven years or under, in possession), should be of force, 
but from the time it should be entered with the registers, in a book 
to be provided for that purpose. 

The Decrees or Awards of the commissioners for settling and 
draining are at the Petty Bag Office. 

York and Middlesex County Registers. — There are two 
register counties in England, containing in the whole four registries, 
all of which have been created by Acts of Parliament :— 



CART.E ANTIQUE. 37 

1. For the West Riding of Yorkshire, commencing in 1704. 

2. For the East Riding and Hull, commencing in 1708. 

3. For Middlesex, which commenced in 1709. 

4. For the North Riding of Yorkshire, which commenced in 1736. 

These offices were established for registering memorials of all 
deeds and conveyances, wills, and devises in writing, concerning 
and whereby any honours, manors, lands, tenements, or heredita- 
ments, in their respective counties or districts, may be any way 
affected in law or equity; and any deed or conveyance, not so 
registered after the passing of the act, to be adjudged fraudulent 
and void against any subsequent purchaser or mortgagee for valuable 
consideration. 

As the registration of deeds is thus necessary to their validity, it 
is presumed that very few in these counties remain unregistered. 

The Register Office for the West Riding of Yorkshire is at 
Wakefield; for the East Riding, at Beverley; for the North 
Riding, at Northallerton; and for Middlesex, in Bell-Yard, 
Temple-Bar. 

Without viewing these offices in the light for which they have 
been instituted, viz., that of preventing frauds and preserving titles, 
it will easily be perceived that such repositories are very valuable 
to the genealogist, for the information which such records as settle- 
ments and family deeds must afford him in his searches after those 
iamilies, who have at any period within the last century possessed 
estates in register counties. 



38 



' ffim. 



TTTHEN the lands of the conquered English were divided 
* * amongst the vassals of the Norman Invader, he imposed 
upon them the obligation of supplying the crown with a certain 
number of Knights, specified in the infeoffment. These knights 
had allotments of land from the king's immediate tenants, and held 
of their several lords by homage, fealty, and so forth. Their lands 
were called fees, and composed the barony of the king's vassals. 

The number of Knights' Fees throughout the kingdom was 60,21 5; 
and of these the clergy had 28,015. In erecting and laying forth 
the knights' fees, the Normans ordinarily assigned two carucates 
(about 100 acres) of land to each Knight's fee, the value of which 
m Selden's time was five pounds, but in the reign of William Ill- 
it was raised by statute to fifty pounds per annum. 

As in time it became often doubtful whether lands were held by 
knight's service, or by some other tenure, or (if held by knight's 
service) whether immediately of the king, or of some other lord, or 
by how many knights' fees, and the like, it became necessary to 
take account from time to time, as well by inquisition as otherwise, 
concerning them. 

Inquisitions were accordingly held, and the barons returned to 
the king accounts of what they held. These accounts are of great 
value to the genealogist ; they commence earlier than the generality 
of our national records, and relate to all the great men of the times 
in which they were compiled, showing their estates, and often how 
they became possessed of them, such as by what ancestor, or from 
what king ; and from a series of these documents may be traced the 
succession of the families who have owned the estates burdened 
with the knights' service. Their authenticity is not their least 
value. 

The documents containing information of this description are, — 
The Black Book of the Exchequer — The Bed Book of the 
Exchequer — The Testa de Nevil — The Scutage Bolls — The 
Marshals' Rolls — The Constable's Boll — The Aid and Sub- 
sidy Rolls — Lists of Tenants in capite, &c. &c. 



KNIGHTS' FEES. 39 

The Black Book, or Liber Niger, 1 of the Exchequer, is the 
most ancient of these records. It contains a list of knights' fees of 
the time of Henry II., being copies of the returns of many of the 
immediate tenants of the crown to the king's writs, certified to the 
king in consequence of a survey ordered by the monarch preparatory 
to his levying an aid for the marriage of his eldest daughter, such 
being one of the only three cases m which the king might require 
aid of his subjects, without the public consent of the kingdom. 
These aids could only be levied of knights' fees, and of such as held 
their lands by that tenure ; and the uttermost that could be required 
was forty shillings upon each knight's fee. The returns show that a 
very large proportion of the landed property in the country was in 
the hands of the sub-tenants of the immediate tenants of the crown, 
who must have formed an important part of the population of the 
kingdom. The tenants-in-chief appear to have been required to 
certify how many knights' fees they respectively had of old feoffment 
of the time of Henry I. ; how many of new feoffment after the time 
of that king ; and how many upon their respective demesne lands. 
Almost all the prelates had great numbers of knights' fees holden of 
their respective churches, generally to the amount, at least, of the 
knights' fees, for which they owed service to the crown ; and many 
of the lay proprietors, immediate tenants of the crown, had also 
knights' fees holden of them respectively to the number, or nearly 
to the number, for which they respectively owed service to the crown, 
and some a greater number. The number of sub-tenants holding 
by knight's service of the tenants-in-chief of the crown was probably 
nearly equal to the number of knights' fees in the kingdom. When 
a tenancy-in-chief was forfeited or escheated to the crown, the 
immediate sub-tenant became tenant-in-chief of the crown, as of the 
forfeited honour, and their interests were specially provided for by 
the Charter of John, that they should hold of the crown as they held 
of their former lord. If the crown afterwards granted the escheat, 
the grant sometimes extended only to the demesnes, and the 

1 There is a great inconvenience in this mode of designating manuscripts. There 
are two books in the Exchequer, both known by the name of Liber Niger — the one, 
which contains the Dialogus, preserved at the Chapter House, under the care of the 
"Keeper of the Records there ; and the other, which contains the Constitutio, preserved 
onder the care of the Queen's Remembrancer. These two books are sometimes con- 
founded. And there is even a third Liber Niger of the Exchequer, also under the care 
of the Queen's Remembrancer — the Liber Niger Feodorum. Other archives, as those 
of the Irish Exchequer, the Admiralty, the Cinque Ports, the Chapter of Peterborough, 
and other public bodies at home and abroad, have each their Liber Niger. 



40 KNIGHTS' FEES. 

superiority of the fees was reserved to the crown ; and at length it 
was provided by law, that upon the grant of an escheat by the 
crown, the fees should not pass without special words for that 
purpose. 

The sub-tenants of the tenants-in-chief must have generally 
been the principal knights resident in every county, and the prin- 
cipal men summoned on inquests. In the reign of Edward I. sub- 
infeudations were prohibited, and all alienations were required to 
be made to hold not of the alienor, but of the chief lord of the 
fee; and every alienation of every part, however small, of lands 
holden in chief of the crown, must have created a new tenancy- 
in-chief of the crown, and thus greatly increased the number of 
tenants-in-chief, besides the subdivisions produced by various other 
means. 

The Liber Niger parvus Scaccarii was edited by Hearne, and 
printed at Oxford in 1728, in two volumes 8vo; a second edition, 
also in two volumes, and printed at London, appeared in 1771. 

In many of the returns appear family names and particulars of 
the parents, children, wives, and occupiers of the land, as well as of 
the tenants in capite. 

A manuscript copy of this record is in the British Museum 
(Harl. MS. 95) ; another is at Cambridge, with Archbishop Parker's 
manuscripts; and a third in the Ashmolean Library at Oxford. 

The Red Book, or Liber Rubeus, 1 of the Exchequer, was com- 
piled by Alexander de Swereford, Archdeacon of Shrewsbury, who 
died 14th November, 1246 (31 Henry III). It contains, among 
many miscellaneous entries respecting the court and kingdom at 
lai*ge, serjeanties, knights' fees, and prima scutagia, of the reigns of 
Henry II., Richard I., John, and Henry III. In substance it is much 
the same with the Black Book, already mentioned, and with the 
Testa de Nevil ; although, on comparison with the printed copy of 
the Testa, it appears that this manuscript would be found to supply 
some valuable readings. 

It is to be regretted that Hearne, who edited the Liber Niger, 
had not access to either of these originals, but printed from three 
copies — one in his own possession, and the other two in the Ashmolean 
and Harleian Libraries. His text is an eclectic text made out of 
the three; but it varies in some important particulars from the 

1 This book derives its name from the colour of its binding, which was originally of 
red, or rather pink, leather. 



KNIGHTS' FEES. 41 

text of this manuscript, which must be regarded as one of high 
authority. 

As the IAber Rubew has not yet been published, a short abstract 
of its contents may not be unacceptable to the student. 

I. De Libertate Ecclesise et tocius Anglise observand& Leges Henrici primi filii 

Conquestoris ; pp. 16-30. (This begins with the charter of Henry I.) 

II. Constitutio Domus Regis ; p. 30. (This is an account of the royal 

household, temp. Henry IT. or one of his sons. It is also in the Black 
Book.) 

III. The Dialogus de "Scaccario;" pp. 31-46. (This is a treatise on the 
ancient constitution and practice of the Exchequer. It is printed by 
Madox.) 

IV. A large Collection from the Pipe Rolls, of Scutages levied between 
2d Henry II. and 13th of John. 

V. Certificationes facta3 de Feodis Militum, tempore Regis Henrici Secundi 

per Prelatos et Barones pretextu mandati Regis ejusdem annotati aiibi 
in hoc libro, fol. xlvii. precedente. (This reference is to the collections 
respecting the aid ad maritandam of 13 or 14 Henry II. pp. 83-122. 
There is another copy in the Black Book.) 

VI. A Collection of the Serjeanties in the different Counties; pp. 123-129. 
(Most of this is in the Testa de Nevil.) 

VII. Inquisitiones factse tempore Regis Johannis per totam Angliam, anno 
scilicet regni sui 12 et 13, in quolibet comitatu : de servitiis militum 
et aliorum qui de eo tenent in capite secundum rotulos liberatos 
Thesaurario per manus vice-comitum Anglise, tempore predicto; 
pp. 132-149. 

VIII. Inquisitiones de honoribus exchaetis aliquo tempore factae anno 
13 Regis Johannis de servitiis M. eorundem; pp. 150-159. (Much of 
this is in the Testa de Nevil.) 

IX. Normannia. Infeudationes militum qui debent servicia militaria Duci 
Normannise, et in quot militibus quilibet tenetur ei servire; pp. 
160-162. (This document is printed by Du Chesne, JScriptores rerum 
Normannicarum, p. 1045 ; also by Ducarel, Anglo-Norman Antiquities 
Appendix, No. ii.) 

The nine portions thus described lie consecutively and in con- 
tinuity, and are all that can be said to have been completed by the 
original compiler of the volume, by whom nothing has been entered 
later than a.d. 1230. The volume was not then half filled; but 
many curious matters relating to the constitution, privileges, or 
practice of the Court of Exchequer, have been superinduced, to 
the end of the reign of Edward I., after which period but few 
entries have been made. 



42 KNIGHTS' FEES. 

An abstract of this record is in the Library of Lincoln's Inn, 
another in the College of Arms, and a third is in the British 
Museum (Harl. MS. 7022). 

The Testa de Nevil. — This name has been given to two ancient 
volumes formerly in the Queen's Remembrancer's Office, which 
appear to have been compiled towards the close of the reign of 
Edward II., or the commencement of that of Edward III., partly 
of inquests taken on the presentments of jurors of hundreds before 
the justices itinerant, and partly from inquisitions upon writs 
awarded to the sheriffs for collecting of scutages, aids, &c. 

From what circumstance they have obtained the name of Testa 
de Nevil is not ascertained: there are, however, two persons, to 
either of whom they may be assignable, viz. Ralph de Nevill, an 
accountant in the Exchequer, and collector of aids in the reign of 
Henry III., whose name occurs in the book, p. 39 ; and Jollan de 
Nevill, a justice itinerant of the same reign, who, as Dugdale 
supposes, may have been the author. 

The entries, which are specifically entitled Testa de Nevil, are 
evidently quotations, and form comparatively a very small part of 
the whole ; they have, in all probability, been copied from a roll 
bearing that name, a part of which is still extant in the Chapter 
House, at Westminster, consisting of five small membranes, con- 
taining ten counties : the roll appears to be of the age of Edward L, 
and agrees verbatim with the entries in these books. 

These books contain principally an account : — 

I. Of Fees holden either immediately of the king, or of others who held of 
the king in capite ; and if alienated, whether the owners were enfeoffed 
ah antiquo, or de novo ; as also fees holden in frank-almoigne, with the 
values thereof respectively. 
II. Of Serjeanties holden of the king, distinguishing such as were rented or 
alienated, with the values of the same. 

III. Of widows and heiresses of tenants in cwpite y whose marriages were in 
the gift of the king, with the values of their lands. 

IV. Of Churches in the gift of the king, and in whose hands they were. 

V. Of Escheats, as well of the lands of the Normans as of others, in whose 

hands the same were, and by services holden. 
VI. Of the amount of sums paid for scutage and aid, &c. by each tenant. 

These records were printed by order of the House of Commons 
in the year 1807, under the title of Testa de Nevil, sive Liber 
Feodorum in Curia Scaccarii, temp. Henry III. et Edw. L 1 vol. fol. 



KNIGHTS' FEES. 43 

The original price was £1. 16s., but it is now sold for 155. 

The chief use of the work is to ascertain the principal landholders 
throughout the kingdom in those reigns, and the tenures by which 
they held their estates. 

In the British Museum are : — 

A transcript on vellum of the " Testa de Nevil," made about the time of 

James I. (Lamd. MS. 257.) 
Extracts from the " Testa de Nevil," relating to Cambridgeshire and 

Huntingdonshire. {Lansd. MS. 325, f. 9.) 
Extracts from the same, relating to Northumberland. (Lansd. MS. 326.) 

The Scutage Rolls. — When the personal attendance of knights 
under the feudal system became troublesome, they found means of 
compounding for it — by first sending others in their stead, and in 
process of time making a pecuniary satisfaction to the lords in lieu 
of it. This pecuniary satisfaction at last came to be levied by assess- 
ments, at so much for every knight's fee, and therefore this kind 
of tenure was called scutagium, or servitium scuti (service of the 
shield) ; in like manner it was called in Norman-French, escuage, 
from ecu, a shield. The first levy, amounting to about two marks on 
every knight's fee, appears to have been made by Henry II. in the 
fifth year of his reign, on account of his expedition to Toulouse. 
It soon afterwards became so universal, that personal attendance 
fell into disuse. The assessment in the reign of Henry II. having 
been made in an arbitrary manner, seems to have occasioned a 
national clamour, so that King John consented, in Magna Carta, 
that no scutage should be imposed without consent of Parliament. 
This was omitted in Henry III/s charter, where it is only provided 
the scutages should be taken as in the time of Henry II.; and 
afterwards, by statute 25 Edw. I., c. 5 and 6, and many subsequent 
statutes, it was enacted that the king should take no aids or tasks, 
but by the common assent of the realm. Hence it is held in our 
old books, that escuage or scutage could not be levied but by consent 
of Parliament ; such scutages being indeed the ground-work of all 
succeeding subsidies, and the land-tax of later times. 

The Scutage Rolls contain transcripts of writs from the king to 
his sheriffs, directing them to give acquittances to certain tenants 
in capite named in them, for their escuage. 

The Rolls are preserved at the Tower. The earliest of them is of 
the 5th Edw. I. ; the second commences in the 10th and ends in the 



44 KNIGHTS' FEES. 

18th of the same reign; the third and last is of the 31st Edw. I. 
Matters relating to scutage are entered in the Close Rolls. 

In the Red Book of the Exchequer, ff. 47-81, is a large collection 
from the Pipe Rolls, of Scutages levied between the 2d Henry II. 
and the 13th of John, as follows : — 

Henbici n. 
A° 2. Pro exercitu Walliae, on the prelates only, 20*. on each knight's fse. 

5. Pro eodem exercitu, on each knight's fee, 2 marks. 

7. Pro exercitu Tholosae, on each fee, 2 marks. 

8. Pro eodem exercitu, on each fee, 1 mark. 

14. Ad maritandam filiam Regis, on each fee, 1 mark. (This was an 

auxiUitm.) 
18. Pro exercitu Hiberniae, on each fee, 20*. 
33. Pro exercitu Galweise, on each fee, 20*. 

Ricardi Regis. 
A° 2. Scutagium Wallige, on each fee, 10*. 

6. Ad redemptionem Regis illustris, on each fee, 20*. 
8. Pro exercitu Normanniae, on each fee, 20*. 

Johannis Regis. 
A 1. Primum scutagium post coronationem Regis, on each fee, 2 marks. 
3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. Six asssesments of 2 marks each, pro exercitn Xor- 
mannia?. 

12. Pro passagio Regis in Hibernia, on each fee, 2 marks. 

13. Pro exercitu "Walliae, on each fee, 2 marks. 
Eodem, Pro exercitu Scotia?, on each fee, 2 marks. 

Transcripts of the rolls, from the 9th to the 34th of Edw. I., are 
in the British Museum. (Lansd. MS. 316, ff. 25, 47, 103.) 

An Inventory of scutages, aids, &c. is printed in the Deputy 
Keeper's Second Report, Appendix ii. pp. 132-189, and continued 
in Appendix ii. of the Third, Fourth, and Fifth Reports. 

The Marshal's Rolls. — These appear to have been records 
made by the Earl Marshal of England, containing an account of 
the military service due from the great tenants in capite to the king, 
taken on the occasion of the king's assembling his army prepara- 
tory to a war. They contain, in the course of their entries, many 
marriages and descents of the barons and great men of the time in 
which they were compiled. It was part of the duty of the Earl 
Marshal and High Constable of England to see that the King was 
properly attended, and his army furnished or supplied by those 
tenants in capite whose tenure so bound them. 



KNIGHTS' FEES. 45 

Some few of these Rolls are preserved in the Tower ; they are of 
the 10th Edw. I. and 8th Edw. II. 

Transcripts of them are in the British Museum. [Lansd. MS. 
316, ff. 1. 121.) 

The Constable's Roll. — This may be considered as a companion 
to the Marshal's Rolls. There is one solitary roll in the Tower, 
with this name, of the date of 50 Henry III., containing an account 
of the services due or rendered by some of the tenants in capiie. 

The Aid and Subsidy Rolls. — These records contain the supplies 
to the King from his tenants in capite, generally given gratuitously 
to aid him in his wars and emergencies. In the year 1288, Pope 
Nicholas granted the tenths to Edward I. for six years, towards 
defraying an expedition to the Holy Land, and in 1340 a subsidy 
of the Nones or ninths of all goods and chattels, was granted by Par- 
liament to Edward III. These inquisitions are more fully described 
at p. 46. Like the preceding records, they contain much informa- 
tion of service to the genealogist seeking after ancient families. 

The Subsidy Rolls are preserved at the Tower and Exchequer. 
Many lists of assessments and subsidies may be found in other 
public offices and libraries, as follows : — 

Rolls of subsidies, tenths, fifteenths, twentieths, &c, from 19 to 35 Edw. I. ; 

Eolls House. 
Subsidy Eolls of tenths, in many reigns and years subsequent to 20 Edw. I. ; 

Queen's Eemembrancer's Office. 
Account of subsidies granted to Edw. III.; Brit. Mus. Harl. MSS. 370 ; 6700. 
Eoll of a fifteenth of the 16 Edw. III. ; Land Eevenue Department. 
Fragment of a Taxation Eoll of 22 Edw. III. ; Land Eevenue Depart. 
Accounts of tenths or subsidies, tempp. Edw. III. and Hen. IV. ; Augmenta- 
tion Office. 
Subsidy Eolls for divers counties, during the reigns of Edw. III., 11 Hen. VI., 

Hen. VIII., and 18 Eliz.; Tower of London. 
A book of tenths and fifteenths of the laity in several counties, 3 Hen. "v.; 

Queen's Remembrancer's Office. 
Subsidies and knights' fees in several counties, taken by inquisition, leaip. 

Hen. VI. ; Queen's Eemembrancer's Office. 
Various taxations, temp. Eliz. ; Land Eevenue Department. 
Orders and Eates concerning subsidies, temp. Eliz. ; Brit. Mus. Harl. MSS, 

309, art. 37, 53; 366, art. 9, 37-34; 2219, art 1. 
Valor subsidii Archidiaconatus Richmondie, 1525; Chapter House, 

Westminster. 



46 KNIGHTS 5 PEES. 

Assessment of the nobility for payment of the first subsidy, 4th Feb. 1589 ; 

Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 63, art. 10. 
Account of subsidies and aids, temp. James I. ; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 250, 

art 2; 298, art. 3; 354, art. 4, 15, 35; 366, art. 36, 37, 38. 
Original Mize-book of the assessment laid upon Cheshire,cw*c. 10 Hen.VIII. ; 

Brit. Mus. Harl MS. 2098. 
List of Contributors to the payment of the subsidy in Essex 29 Eliz., 

Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 52, art. 59. 
Reliefs for co. Hunts, Edw. I. to Ric. II. ; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 5837, f. 177. 
A perfect book of all the Taxation for the countie of Lancaster, 1650; 

Chetham Library, Manchester, No. 8042. 
Auxilia in com. Leicestrt^;, ad regem Edw. III. concessa, a.d. 1347 ; 

Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 6700. 
Two books of Subsidies paid in London, temp. Henry VIII. ; Chapter 

House, Westminster. 
Subsidy Roll of the Wapentake of Staincross, co. Tore, in 1663 ; See the 

Collectanea Topographica et Genealogica, vol. iii. p. 333. 

Nonarum Inqtjisitiones. — In the 14th year of Edward III,, in 
the Parliament holden at Westminster, it was enacted, that, " in con- 
sideration of the grants, releases, and pardons, of the chattels ofrfelons 
and fugitives, and many other things underwritten, which the king 
had granted to the prelates, earls, barons, and all the commons of 
his realm, for the ease of them perpetually to endure, the said pre- 
lates, &c., willingly of one assent, and good will, having regard to 
the will that the king their liege lord hath toward them, and to 
the great travailes that he hath made and sustained, as well in his 
wars of Scotland as against the parts of France, &c. &c, have 
granted to him the ninth lamb, the ninth fleece, and the ninth 
sheaf, to be taken by two years then next to come. And of cities 
and boroughs the very ninth part of all their goods and chattels, to 
be taken and levied by lawful and reasonable tax by the same two 
years ; and in right of merchants foreign, which dwell not in the 
cities nor boroughs, and also of other people that dwell in forests 
and wastes, and all other that live not of their gain nor store, by the 
good advice of them which shall be deputed taxers, shall be set law- 
fully at the value of the fifteen, without being unreasonably charged." 

By statute 2 of the same year, the king granted that the above 
grant should not be had in example, nor fall to the prejudice of the 
nobles and commons, &c. in time to come, &c. Assessors and 
venditors were thereupon appointed for every county in England, 
to assess and sell the ninth and fifteenth ,** and three commissions 



KNIGHTS' FEES. 47 

were issued, directed to the assessors and venditors named under 
the Great Seal. 

The execution of the first commission was confined to a few 
parishes only within a county, and within the assessment and sale 
the ninth of the religious was included. 

The second commission was also imperfectly executed, but it was 
done in a way very different from the first, by assessing and selling 
the ninth of the articles, to be levied according to the tax or 
valuation of churches completed in 1292 (20 Edw. I.), called " Pope 
Nicholas's Taxation." 1 By which proceeding it seems that the 
assessors and venditors were to consider the ninth of corn, wool, 
and lambs, in 1340, worth as much in a parish as the tenth of 
corn, wool, and lambs, and all other tytheable commodities, and 
the glebe lands, were, when the valuation was made of them in 
1292, and within the assessment and sale, by virtue of the second 
commission, the ninth of the religious was included. 

The clergy, notwithstanding they granted in 14 Edw. III. a 
tenth for two years (besides the former triennial and annual 
grants) of all their property, were assessed and taxed to the ninth ; 
and both were collected, which produced a remonstrance on the 
part of the Archbishop of Canterbury ; and the King afterwards 
(whenever the grievance was stated) issued a writ to the treasurer 
and barons, commanding redress to be given. From various writs 
of this kind, it is evident that from the laity only the grants of the 
ninth and fifteenth were considered to proceed, except the religious 
who held by barony, and were summoned to Parliament when the 
grant of the ninth was made ; and except upon possessions acquired 
by the religious after 20 Edward I., which otherwise would have 
escaped taxation, not being included in Pope Nicholas's Valor, 
which then, and until the reign of Henry VIII., was used as the 
guide for taxing the clergy, and was constantly resorted to by the 
treasurer and barons to correct the accounts of collectors of a 
tenth, and to determine the liability of persons and property, and 
to what amount. 

A third commission was afterwards issued, and directed to the 
assessors and venditors, on 26th Jan., 15 Edw. III., whereby they 
were instructed to levy the ninth of corn, wool, and lambs in every 
parish, according to the value upon which churches were taxed 

1 Printed by the Record Commissioners, under the title of " Taxatio Ecclesiastic* 
Angliae et Walliee, auct. P. Nicholai iv., circa 1291." 1 vol. fol. 1802. The present 
price of the volume is 16s. 6d. 



48 KNIGHTS' FEES. 

(i. e., Pope Nicholas' Valor), if the value of the ninth amounted to 
as much as the tax, and to levy more where the true value of the 
ninth should be found to exceed the tax ; but should the value of 
the ninth be less than the tax, they were directed to levy only the 
true value of the ninth, and to disregard the tax; and, to gain 
correct information of those facts, they were directed to take 
inquisitions upon the oath of the parishioners in every parish. 

In these records it appears that the parishioners of every parish 
found upon their oath the true value (sometimes separately) of the 
ninth of corn, wool, and lambs ; then the amount of the ancient 
tax of the church was stated, and afterwards the causes of the 
ninth not amounting to the tax or value of the church were 
assigned; and when the ninths did not exceed the tax, it was 
assigned for cause thereof, that within the valuation or tax of the 
church there were other articles included besides corn, wool, and 
lambs, such as the dos or glebe of the church, tithe of hay, and 
other tithes ; and if any abbey, priory, or religious corporation had 
property within any parish, the ninth arising from such property 
was found and returned. 

The principal utility of these Rolls is in tithe cases ; and, as the 
assessment was made on the places and not on the persons, much 
of their genealogical utility is lost. They abound however with 
the names of persons who appeared either as jurors, commis- 
sioners, landowners, or in other capacities, and therefore cannot 
be overlooked. 

The Nonarum Inquisitiones have been printed by the Record 
Commission, in one volume folio, with the title — Inquisitiones 
Nonarum, temp. Edw. III., 1807. l 

The names of the assessors and venditors are prefixed to the 
volume. They usually consist of an abbot or prior, and three or 
four lay persons of the best families in each county. 

The original price of the volume was £2. 2s., but it is now 
reduced to 18*. 

Miscellaneous Lists op Tenants in capite, &c. — Independently 
of the sources before enumerated, the industry of many antiquaries 
has extracted from inquisitions, rolls, and other records, lists of 

1 Since these records were printed in 1807, the Nonse Rolls for the county of 
Northumberland have been found amongst the unarranged records, and also the rolls 
of the county of Warwick and part of Hertford. The county of Warwick had been 
before printed from a copy in the Bodleian Library, and published. 



KNIGHTS' FEES. 49 

tenants in capite^ and others, for various reigns and counties, 
which lists are deposited in our public libraries. So numerous 
and scattered are these collections, that our limited space does not 
admit of more than a bare mention of some of the more im- 
portant : — 

Nomina eorum qui de rege tenent per servicium militare, etc. ; Bodl. Lib. 

MS. 4153. (Dodesworth MS. vol. xi.) 
List of Knights' fees in England; Brit. Mus. Cotton. MS. Tiberius, D. xx. 

f. 893. 
Feoda ntilitum in diversis comitatibus; Brit. Mus. Harh MS. 313. 
Tenentes in capite, et feoda militum, temp. Hen. II. ; Brit. Mus. Harh MS. 

971, f. 127. 
Certificationes de feodis militum, temp. Hen. II. ; Brit. Mus. Harh MS. 

5173, f. 12. 
Eeturn of the Knights' fees held of the King in capite, temp. Hen. II., 

throughout England (excepting the counties of Cumberland, Westmore- 
land, Durham, and Cheshire) ; Society of Antiquaries, MS. No. 136, 

art. 4. 
Certificationes factae de feodis militum per totam Angliam, 12 Hen. II. ; 

Bodl. Lib. MS. 4189, f. 1. 
Nomina tenentium in capite et feodorum militum in diversis comitatibus, 

12 Hen. II. ; Bodl. Lib. MS. 5030. (Dodesworth MS. vol. lxxxix.) 
Inquisitiones per totam Angliam factae de servitiis militum, et aliorum qui de 

rege tenent in capite, 12, 13 Joh. ; Bodl. Lib. MS. 4] 89, ff. 143-166. 

(Dodesworth MS. vol. xlvii.) 
Collectanea Inquisitionum de servitiis tenentium in capite, fact. 12 et 13 

E. Joh.; Brit. Mus. Harh MS. 301, f. 210. 
Inquisitio temp. Hen. III. facta, de tenementis et feodis quae tenentur in 

capite, quae sunt alienata a capitali servitio regis ; Brit. Mus. Harh 

MS. 5172. 
Knights' fees for estates, from the reign of Hen. III. to that of Charles I. ; 

Exchequer. 
Nomina eorum . qui de rege tenuerunt in capite per servitium militare, 

1 Hen. III. ad Edw. IV.; Brit. Mus. Cotton. MS. Claud. C. x. ; 

Harh MS. 708; Lansd. MS. 277; College of Arms, MS. A. 25; 

Trinity Coll. Oxford, MSS. lxi. lxii. 
Feoda militum in diversis comitatibus, temp. Edw. I. ; Bodl. Lib. MS. 5053. 

[Dodesworth MS. vol. cxii.] ; Queen's Coll. Oxford, MS. lxxxviii. 
Nomina eorum qui tenent de rege in variis comitatibus, tempp. Edw. I. et II. 

Brit. Mus. Harh MS. 1192. 
Abstractum releviorum diversor. tenentium in capite, tempp. Edw. I. ad Edw. 

iv ; Brit. Mus. Cotton. MS. Vitellius, C. ii. ; Harh MS. 34 ; Coll. 

o^ Arms, F ; wvent MS. No. 3. 

if 



50 KNIGHTS' FEES. 

Eeoda militum, 18 Edw. II. et 35 Edw. Ill ; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 6082, 

f. 1. 
Numerus feodorum militum in Anglia, temp. Edw. III. ; Brit. Mus. Harl. 

MS. 945, f. 2. 
Nomina eorum qui de rege Edw. III. tenuerunt in capite, etc. ; Brit. Mus. 

Harl. MS. 821, f. 1. 
Liber de tenuris, tempp. Bich. III., Hen. VII., et VIII. ; Brit. Mus. Harl. 

MS. 5174. 
Nomina eorum qui de rege tenent per servicium militare, magnam serjantiam, 

etc., 1 Hen. IV. ad 15 Edw. IV.; Bodl. Lib. MSS. 4153; 4179. 
Feoda militum, Eschaetas, Fines, tempp. Hen. V., VI., et VIII.; Brit. 

Mus. Harl. MS. 6082. 
Lists of tenants in capite, tempp. Edw. VI., Elizabeth, and James L; 

Lincoln's Inn Library. 

Berkshire : Knights' fees in Berkshire, annexed to the Duchy of Lancaster, 

1638 ; Pub. Lib. Camb. MS. Be. ii. 24. 
Buckinghamshire : Tenures in co. Backs, collected out of Inquisitions at 

the Tower; Pub. Lib. Camb. MS. Be. ii. 7. 
Cheshire : A Calendar of Knights' fees and military tenures in the co. of 

Chester, from Edw. III. to Hen. VII.; Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 271. 
Eeodary of Cheshire, tempp. Edw. III. to Hen. VIII.; Brit. 

Mus. Add. MS. 18,110. 
Transcript of a Cheshire feodary, temp. Edw. VI. ; Brit. Mus. 

Add. MS. 11,337. 
Liber feodorum militum in Com. Pal. Cestrise et Flynt, in scaccario 

Cestrise remanens, etc. 15 June, 1557 ; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 699. 
Cumberland: Eeoda Ducis Suffolcie, in Bromfelde, Yale, et Chirkeland, 

16 Hen. VIII. ; Brit. Mus. Royal MS. 7 C. xvi. art. 8. 
Devonshire: Fees holden in capite in co. Devon, 1584; Lambeth Palace 

Lib. MS. 283. 
Dorsetshire : Knights' fees in Dorsetshire, annexed to the Duchy of Lan- 
caster, 1638; Pub. Lib. Camb. MS. Be. ii. 24. 
Tenures in co. Dorset, collected out of the Inquisitions in the 

Tower; Pub. Lib. Camb. MS. Be. ii. 7. 
Hampshire : Knights' fees in Hampshire, annexed to the Duchy of Lancaster, 

1638; Pub. Lib. Camb. MS. Be. ii. 24. 
Herefordshire : Evidencise extractse de libro feodorum militum in com. Here- 
ford. &c; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 6765. 
Nomina et tenurae omnium dominorum, maneriorum, et ter- 

rarum, in comitatu Hereford., per Thorn. Havard, anno primo Elizabethan 

collecta; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 762. 
Kent: Nomina eorum qui tenent feoda militum in com. Cantise; Brit. 

Mus. Cotton. MS. Julius, C. ii. p. 1 ; Coll. of Arms, Pkilipot MS. 53; 

Pb. art. 5. 



KNIGHTS 5 FEES. 51 

Kent : Liber feodorum militum com. Kancise, temp. Edw. I. ; Society of 

Antiquaries, MS. 130. 
Liber feodorum militum, etc., infra com. Kancise. Compiled about 

the end of the reign of Elizabeth ; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 15,666. 
List of tenures in the county of Kent, 1662; Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 

309. 
Lancashire: Feodary of the Duchy of Lancaster; Bodl. Lib. MS. 5072. 

(Dodesworth MS. vol. cxxxi.) 
Leicestershire: Knights' fees within the county of Leicester, 20 Edw. III. ; 

See Nichols' History of Leicestershire, vol. i. pt. 1, p. ciii. 
Lincolnshire : Catalogus tenentium terras per singulas hundredas, in com. 

Lincolniensi, temp. Hen. L; Brtt. Mus. Cotton. MS. Claudius, C. v. 
Nomina liberorum tenentium infra com. Lincolnise, temp. 

Hen. III.; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 6289. 
Norfolk : Feodary for co. Norfolk, tempp. Hen. III. and 9 Edw. II. ; Brit. 

Mus. Add. MS. 5522, ff. 171, 248. 
Shropshire : Tenants in capite in Shropshire, temp. Edw. I. See the Coir 

lectanea Topographica et Genealogica, vol. i. p. 111. 
Somersetshire : Knights' fees in Somersetshire, annexed to the Duchy of 

Lancaster; Pub. Lib. Camb. MS. Be. ii. 24. 
Staffordshire : Feodary of the county of Stafford, compiled 10 Car. I. ; Brit. 

Mus. Add. MS. U MS. 
Suffolk : Liberi tenentes in Monewden, Soham, Framgdeu, et Cretingham, in 

com. Suffolcise ; St. John's Coll. Camb. MS. S. 40. 
Surrey : Liber feodorum militum com. Surrise, temp. Edw. I. ; Society of 

Antiquaries, MS. 130. 
Nomina illorum qui tenent viginti libratas terrse, etc. in com. Surrise, 

6 Edw. I. ; Jesus Coll. Oxford, MS. cxxvi. 

The Customary Tenants of the Manor of Redereth, in Surrey ; Brit. 



Mus. Earl. MS. 6708. 
Sussex : Liber feodorum militum com. Sussexise, temp. Edw. I. ; Society 

of Antiquaries, MS. 130. 
Nomina illorum qui tenent viginti libratas terra?, etc. in com. 

Sussexiae, 6 Edw. I. ; Jesus Coll. Oxford, MS. cxxvi. 
Wiltshire : Knights' fees in Wiltshire, annexed to the Duchy of Lancaster, 

1638 ; Pub. Lib. Camb. MS. Be. ii. 24. 
Flintshire : Liber feodorum militum in com. Pal. Cestrise et Flynt, in scac* 

cario Cestriae remanens, 15 June, 1557 ; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 699. 



52 



IHacfta* 



HP HE pleadings in our several courts, and the judgments thereon, 
-*- have been preserved for many centuries, and are entered on 
Rolls, the greater part of which are called Placita Rolls. They 
give the most important information upon every subject respecting 
which men wage legal war with each other; and among these 
subjects are most especially to be enumerated, the claims to lands, 
honours, and baronies. 

Until of late years, great part of the Placita was useless, being 
known to few besides their keepers. The exertions of the Com- 
missioners of Public Records, however, at length brought them to 
light ; and by the noble publications which they have given to the 
world of part of them, and the admirable indexes of persons and 
places, have fully justified the assertion in their preface, of their 
having been made, amongst other advantages, " serviceable to the 
genealogist and historian, for the proofs they contain of heirs, 
their ages, and pedigrees." 

Although the nature of the suits or actions in our respective 
courts is essentially different, yet, as far as the Genealogist is con- 
cerned, the records of them alike contribute to his information; 
and it would, perhaps, be difficult to name a family, possessing 
hereditary property, which has passed a century without requiring 
the assistance of some court or courts of law or equity during that 
period. 

Many of the Courts are no longer in existence ; and in our courts 
of common law the modern Rolls of pleadings are not so regular 
with respect to their entries, or so valuable with respect to the con- 
tents of those entries, as the ancient Rolls. 

On the latter were entered the pleadings of every cause, or of 
every important cause, and in general the judgments thereon ; and 
it was the practice in cases of difficulty, civil or criminal, to set 
down the reasons of the judgment in the record; a practice which, 
as Lord Coke informs us, was continued till the reign of Edward III.; 
but that practice having been disused, the Rolls now contain the 
pleadings alone; and the pleadings only in such actions as the 



PLACITA. 53 

att orneys employed therein find it necessary to enter or inrol, for 
Mhe sake of proceedings to be taken subsequently to the judgment ; 
and this in general is only requisite in the most insignificant actions. 

To avoid repetition, it may be as well to take a slight view, in 
this place, of the advantages to be derived from the records of the 
pleadings in an equity court. 

A great part of the proceedings in the equity court relate to 
affairs solely of a private family nature, as a dispute on a will, or 
the want of a will ; protection for infants, lunatics, marriage settle- 
ments of wards of the court, and the like. In all these cases (and 
of them our report-books are full) we have the lineal succession of 
families, the particulars of the estates, with dates, names, localities, 
and identities, clearly set out, corroborated by affidavits, inter- 
rogatories, depositions, answers filed of record and sworn to by 
all the parties answering, and accompanied with ulterior proceed- 
ings in the Master's Office, and not unfrequently attended with 
deposits of documents and title-deeds. 

Thus the archives of equity courts are often found to contain 
records and particulars of families which are not now to be dis- 
covered in any other depository in the kingdom. 

Placita of the Curia Regis. — This court took its name from 
the place where it was held — the Aula, or Curia Regis, or Hall or 
Court of the king's palace, and appears to have been of Norman origin. 

Itinerant Justices were appointed in aid of the king's court in 
the reign of Henry I., and were finally established 22 Henry II. 

A division of the Curia Regis is said to have taken place at the 
latter end of the reign of Richard I. Plaints of a fiscal kind were 
transferred to the Exchequer, and for the Court of Chancery were 
reserved all matters unappropriated to other courts. The Curia 
Regis retained pleas touching the crown, together with common 
pleas of a civil and criminal nature. 

The Common Pleas was separated from this court by Magna 
Carta, 17 John. 

After this separation, the Curia Regis continued to be the superior 
court of law for all criminal matters, and the judges were the 
supreme conservators of the peace and coroners of the land, &c. 

In the return made by the keeper of the records in the Treasury 
of the receipt of the Exchequer (Chapter House), pursuant to the 
order of the Committee of the House of Commons in 1800, it 
is stated that there exist rolls of Curia Regis for the reigns of 



54 PLACITA. 

Richard I., John, and Henry III.; that it would be very difficult 
to give any distinct definition of them ; but that the proceedings 
recorded in them do not vary very 'much in their nature ; that they 
respect civil suits between individuals, as the early proceedings in 
Parliament chiefly did, except in the petitions, and in some in- 
stances, criminal cases. 

The titles of these rolls are, in most instances, " Placita coram 
Domino Rege et Consilio suo." 

In these rolls of the Curia Regis will be found matter interesting 
to the law, the history, and the customs of the country. 

The proceedings in these rolls were in many instances before the 
king himself in his council, wherever he happened to be ; and in 
one instance (37 Henry III.), the proceedings were before the 
queen and the king's council. 

The precise period at which this court took the title of the 
Curia Regis, and the Court of King's Bench and Common Pleas 
first sat as distinct and separate courts, does not appear. In the 
old calendars the rolls are called of the Curia Regis, to the end 
of Henry III., and from 1 Edward I., of the King's Bench and 
Common Pleas; but this division is perhaps not accurate, as in 
King John's reign mixed titles are found on the rolls. 

A few rolls of the reign of Henry III. are said to be in the Tower. 

A calendar of these rolls has been printed, and forms the first 
part of the volume containing the Index to the King's Bench 
Records, as mentioned in the ensuing pages. 

They are also printed from 6 Richard I. to 1 John, under the 
title, Rotuli Cwrim Regis, 2 vols. 8vo, 1835, by Sir Francis Palgrave, 
acting under the authority of the Record Commissioners. The 
present price of the work is £1. 85. 

Placita of Assize. — The earliest Itinerant or Justices Errant 
were the Justices in Eyre; probably so called from the old French 
word erre, or the verb errer — to wander or rove, and they held 
criminal and common pleas, and also pleas of the forest ; but these 
afterwards gave place to the Commissioners of Assize, or Circuit 
Judges. The Justices in Eyre then became only Justices of the 
Forest. 

The Justices Itinerant were vested with great power and authority. 
They determined pleas of the crown and common pleas, in like 
manner as did the justices of the Curia Regis. 

They assessed taillages and aids, and admitted men. to make con- 



PLACITA. 55 

ventions, fines, and oblations, iu their several iters ; and the Assize 
Kolls will be found to contain this description of information. 

The rolls commence in the 6th of Richard I., and conclude with 
the reign of Edward IV. 

The records found in the Treasury of the receipt of the Ex- 
chequer (Chapter House) , pertaining to the assizes, and taken 
possession of by the Master of the Rolls, under statute 1 and 2 Vic, 
c. 94, are as follows : — 

Placita de Juratis et Assisis, Hen. III. — Hen. VI."] In counties, including 
Placita Gorone, John — Edw. IV. I London, and Mid- 

Deliberationes Gaole, Hen. III. — Edw. IV. f dlesex, Guernsey, 

Hotuli Coronatoris, Edw. I. — Hen. VI. J Jersey, &c. 

An Inventory of the above is printed in the Record Report of 
1837, p. 22, et seqq. 

Records of Assizes will also be found in other repositories, as 
follows : — 

Collectanea Placitorum Justiciariorum, temp. Eic. L; Brit. Mvs.HarLMS. 

301, f. 9. 
Abbreviationes Placitorum de Banco Kegis, et Assisarum, tempp. Kic. I., 

Hen. Ill, Edw. I. et III., Hen. IV. et VIII., etc. ; Beit. Mus. Earl. 

MS. 4286. 
Liber Placitorum, tempp. E. Job., Edw. I. — III., Eic. II., Hen. IV., et 

Edw. V.; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 7163. 
Placita de Juratis et Assisis comm. Angliaa, temp. Edw. I. ; Inner Temple 

Lib. MS. 515, vol. i. ; Lincoln's Inn Lib. 

tempp. Edw. I. — Hen. VI. ; Chapter House, Westminster. 

Placita de Assisis, temp. Edw. II. ; Bodleian Library. 

The Book of Assizes held in the reign of Edw. III. ; Brit. Mus. Harl. MSS. 

5280 ; 5281 ; Pub. Lib. Camb. MS. Ee f vi. 21. 
Proceedings of Assizes held in the Western Circuit, 7 to 42 Edw. III. ; 

Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 6691. 
Placita Assisae, 20 to 45 Edw. III. ; Lincoln's Inn Library. 
Assisse de anno 8 Hen. IV. et 5 Hen. V. ; Exeter Coll. Oxford ; MS. 

cxxxiv. ; Lincoln's Inn Library. 

Cheshire : Placita tent, apud Cestriam coram Justiciariis, 4 et 10 Edw. II., 
27 Edw. III., 5 Hen. V. ; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 258, f. 131. 

Excerpta varia ex rott. Placitorum com. Cestrensis, tempp. Edw. 

III., Eic. II., Hen. V., Edw. IV., et Hen. VII. ; Brit. Mus. HarL 
MS. 139. 



56 PLACITA. 

Cornwall: Placita in itinera apud Launceston, com. Cornub., 30 Edw. T. ; 

Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 5928, f. 95. 
Derbyshire : Adnotationes ex itineribus de Derbye, et de Notyngham, temp. 

Edw. III. tent. ; Beit. Mus. Karl. MS. 741, f. 251. 
Placita itineris in com. Derbise, 3 Edw. III.; Beit. Mus. Add. MS. 

5926, f. 10. 
Durham : Placita itineris apud Dunelm, 33 Edw. I. ; Beit. Mus. Lansd. 

MS. 603. 
Essex: Placita itineris in com. Essexise, 39 Hen. III. ; Beit. Mus. Lansd. 

MS. 636, 
Gloucestershire : Recorda Assisse Gloucestriae, temp. Elizabeth. ; Brit. Mus. 

Earl. MS. 4,131, art. 3. 
Kent : Placita de itinere coram Justic. in com. Kancise, 5, 6, 11, et 12 Hen. 

III.; Beit. Mus. Add. MS. 12,269. 
Eeport of Proceedings in a circuit in Kent, temp. Edw. I. ; Beit. 

Mus. Sari MS. 6692. 

Iter CanciaB, anno 6 Edw. II. ; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 1062, f. 12. 

Placita itinerum Kancise, 6 et 14 Edw. III. ; Beit. Mus. Earl. 



MS. 453. 
Leicestershire: Placita de itinere in com. Leicestrise, 5, 6, 11, et 12 Hen. 

III.; Beit. Mus. Add. MS. 12,269. 
London : Placita itinerum, Kanciae et London., 6 et 14 Edw. III. ; Beit. 

Mus. Earl. MS. 453. 

Iter London, anno 14 Edw. II. ; Beit. Mus. Earl. MS. 1062, f. 1. 

pi ac it a a p U d Westmonasterium, 2 — 24 Hen. III.; Beit. Mus. 

Add. MS. 12,269. 
10— 46 Edw. III. ; Brit. Mus. 



Lansd. MS. 603. 

, 8 Will. ni. ; Brit. Mus. Add. 



MS. 6727, f. 155. 
Norfolk: Placita de itinere in com. Norfolcias, 5, 6, 11, et 12 Hen. III.; 

Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 12,269. 
Northamptonshire : Placita de itinere in com. Northampton. 3 Edw. III. ; 

Beit. Mus. Add. MS. 5924, f. 1. 
Nottinghamshire : Placita de itinere in com. Nottinghamias, 3 Edw. IH. ; 

Beit. Mus. Add. MS. 5926, f. 1. 
Oxfordshire : Placita de itinere in com. Oxoniae, 42 Hen. III. et 14 Edw. I. ; 

Beit. Mus, Earl. MS. 362, ff. 52, 76, 78. 
Staffordshire : Placita de itinere in com. Staffordiae, 5, 6, 11 et 12 Hen. IH. ; 

Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 12,269. 
Suffolk: Placita de itinere in com. Suffolciae, 5, 6, 11, et 12 Henry III.; 

Beit. Mus. Add. MS. 12,269. 
Placita de itinere 42 Hen. III. et 14 Edw. I.; Brit. Mus- Earl. 

if& 362, ff. 52, 76, 78. 



PLACITA. 57 

Wiltshire : Placita de itinere in com. Wiltonise, temp. Ric. I. ; Beit. Mus. 

Lanad. MS. 633. 
Yorkshire : Placita de itinere in com. Eboraci, 5, 6, 11, et 12 Hen. III. ; 

Bkit. Mus. Add. MS. 12,269. 
Trials in the county of York, from 4 to 45 Edw. III. ; Bodl. Lib. 

Oxford, MS. 4143. (JDodestoorth MS. vol. i.) 



Placita of the Forests. — The Justices in Eyre were the Iti- 
nerant or Justices Errant, and held criminal or common pleas, 
and also Pleas of the Forest. They gave place afterwards to the 
Commissioners of Assize, or Circuit Judges, and became simply 
Justices of the Forest, retaining their ancient title of " Justices 
in Eyre." The last Court of Justice-seat was held in the time of 
Charles II. 

The Forest claims before the Justices in Eyre, in the time of 
Charles I., show the particular liberties, privileges, and immunities 
of each claimant ; to which a general Index, Virorum et Locorum, 
has been made. 

Seventeen Reports, relative to the state of the Woods and 
Forests, were made to the House of Commons between 1787 and 
1793, under authority of statute 26 Geo. III. c. 87. 

A number of the ancient perambulations and inquisitions have 
been printed. 

Copies of these printed reports, bound in two large folio volumes, 
are preserved in the Public Record Office. 

Perambulations and proceedings relating to the Forests are 
generally entered upon the Patent Rolls, and occasionally upon 
the Claus Rolls. 

Copies will be found in several public repositories, as follows : — 

Perambulations and proceedings relating to the Forests, from 10 John [1208] 

to the end of Edw. III. [1377] ; Chapter House, Westminster. 
Bolls of perambulations of Forests in the reigns of Edw. I. and Hen. III. ; 

Tower of London. With a complete Index. 
Perambulations, presentments, etc. in the counties of Southampton, Stafford, 

Surrey, Sussex, Worcester, and Wilts, from Edw. I. to Charles II. ; 

Chapter House, Westminster. 
Placita de Foresta apud Stratford, temp. Edw. II. ; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 

5937, f. 113. 
Iter Forestae Henrici com. Lancastrian, 8 Edw. III.; Lincoln's Inn Lib.; 

Maynard MS. xii. 



58 PLACITA. 

Placita Forestse de Shirewode, 8 Edw. III.— Hen. VI. ; Brit. Mus. Earl. 
MS. 4954. 

Assists de Poresta; Brit. Mus. Rati. MS. 858, ff. 67-69 5; 867, f. 44 5; 
1011, ff. 7, 39 ; 1033, ff. 165, 18, 19 ; 1690, f. 41. 

Assisse de Poresta factae apud Woodstock, temp. Hen. II. ; Brit. Mus. Add. 
MS. 5761, f. 130 5. 

Consuetudines Forestas; Brit. Mus. Earl. MSS. 1690, f. 41 ; 869, f. 4. 

Black Book of the Forests, temp. Hen. VIII. ; Chapter House, West- 
minster. 

Claims of Liberties in the Boyal Forests, before the Justices in Eyre, temp. 
Charles I. ; Tower of London. 

A bundle of Perambulations, 17 Charles I. ; Petty Bag Office. 

Claims, Perambulations, and Proceedings, before the Chief Justices in Eyre, 
on this side Trent, at Justice Seats held in New Forest, Hants, and 
Waltham Forest, in Essex, temp. Chas. II. ; Chapt. House, Westm. 

A Perambulation of the Forests of Derbyshire, entered in a book with other 
matters ; Queen's Remembrancer's Department. 

Returns of Writs for electing Verderers and Eegarders; Petty Bag Office. 

Other surveys of forests and chases may be found in the Queen's 
Remembrancer's Department/ and in the Land Revenue De- 
partment. 

An Inventory of the records in the Chapter House will be found 
in the Record Report, 1837, pp. 25-65 ; and of those in the Tower, 
in the 5th Report of the Deputy Keeper of Records, App. ii., 
pp. 46-59. 

Placita Corona. — The Pleas of the Crown date from the 
10 Henry III. to the end of Edward III. ; since which period, 
Lord Chief Justice Hale states, pleadings and judgments upon 
franchises and liberties have not been before justices itinerant, but 
in the King's Bench or Exchequer; and are respectively entered 
upon the King's Bench Rolls, or Memoranda of the Exchequer. 

These records are deposited at the Chapter House, West- 
minster. 

Transcripts of Placita may be found in many public libraries, as 
follows : — 



La comence le Pie de la Couronne; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 
Placita Coronse ; Brit. Mus, Earl. MSS. 667, f. 227 ; 1120, f. 151 ; 1208, 
f. 187 5; 1690, f. 665. 

32 Edw. I.— 6 Edw. II. ; Brit. Mus. Eargrave MS. 375. 

Edw. I — Hen. VI. ; Chapter House, Westminster. 



PLACITA. 59 

Placita Coronae, Edw. III. ; Pur, Lib. Camb. MS. He. vi. 21 ; Lincoln's 

Inn Library. 

30 — 44 Edw. III. ; Exeter Coll. Oxf. MS. cxxxiv. 

38—43 Edw. Ill; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 5088. 

4—19 Hen. VI.; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 5088. 

in com. Lancastrian, 20 Edw. I. ; Brit. Mjjs. Lansd. MS. 604. 

in coram, Surrise et Somersetsise, temp. Edw. I. ; Brit. Mus. 

Lansd. MS. 635. 

Placita of Parliament. — The rolls called " Placita Parlia- 
nientaria " contain the early pleadings in Parliament. 

The practice of entering the Placita on separate rolls was dis- 
continued in 1321 , from which period they were recorded with, 
and formed a portion of, the Rotuli Parliamentariorum, 1 and were 
printed in 1765, by order of the House of Lords. Ryley, a clerk 
in the Record Office, had, however, previously printed them in the 
year 1661, in one vol. folio, under the title of "Placita Parlia- 
mentarian taken from an ancient MS. among the Tower Records, 
called the Vetus Codex, and to which he added an Appendix of 
Illustrative Records. 

The original rolls are at the Chapter House, Westminster. 

The following transcripts of the Placita Parliamentaria are in the 
British Museum : — 

Placita et Petitionee 8, 9, 14, 35 Edw. I. {Lansd. MS. 530.) 
18 — 35 Edw. I. [Lansd. MS. 526 — duplicate volume, 

No. 527.) 

5, 8, 19 Edw. II. (Lansd. MS. 530.) 

1 — 29 Edw. III. (Lansd. MS. 528 — duplicate volume, 

No. 529.) 

Placita de Quo Warranto. — It is stated, in the notice of the 
Hundred Rolls, that on Edward the First's return from the 
Holy Land he found that the revenues of the crown had been con- 
siderably diminished by tenants in capite alienating without license ; 
by persons withholding from the crown its just rights, claiming the 
privileges of holding courts, and oppressing the people, by pre- 
tending rights of free warren, free chase, &c. ; and that the measures 
adopted by the king to remedy these abuses gave rise to the 
inquiries which form the " Hundred Rolls." 

These Rolls were returned into his majesty's Exchequer, and from 
them the crown was furnished with evidence, upon the oath of a 
1 See Pabxiamenxaet Recokds. 



60 PLACITA. 

jury selected from each hundred and town in every county, Df 
(inter alia) all the crown lands, the tenants holding the same, how 
alienated ; and also of all wardships, marriages, escheats, suits, and 
services, withholden from the king. 

In consequence of these returns, the Statute of Gloucester 
(6 Edw. I.) is presumed to have been enacted, and the parties 
were summoned to answer, " Quo Warranto, 3 such a thing was 
done ? left undone ? property held ? &c. 

The Rolls of the Pleadings in answer to these summonses, and of 
the judgments thereon, are called the " Placita de Quo Warranto." 
They are of the reigns of Edward I., II., and III., and of great 
value and utility, especially to the genealogist, as including, among 
other information, the various families or various members of the 
same family, through whom manors, advowsons, and property, from 
the earliest period, has descended. They contain the boundaries of 
many free chases, free warrens, and fisheries, and the allowance in 
eyre of various franchises and liberties : in them are also many 
royal charters, both to ecclesiastical and ]ay corporations, not to be 
elsewhere found on record; many obscure passages and obsolete 
words in charters are explained, and much learning illustrative of 
the laws and customs of the country, both useful and interesting to 
the lawyer and antiquary, will be found dispersed throughout the 
work. They are frequently referred to in our courts of law. 

Since 10 Edward III., Lord Chief Justice Hale observes, plead- 
ings and judgments upon franchises and liberties have not been 
before the justices itinerant, but in the King's Bench or Exchequer, 
and are respectively entered either upon the King's Bench Rolls or 
Memoranda of the Exchequer. 

The rolls are preserved at the Chapter Hottse, Westminster. 

They are arranged under counties ; and Cardigan in Wales, as 
well as the islands of Guernsey and Jersey, is included ; but nothing 
occurs relative to the palatinate of Durham. 

Parliament, some years since, ordered the publication of those in 
the Chapter House; and one folio volume has been printed, under 
the title of " Placita de Quo Warranto temporibus Edw. /., II. 3 III. y 
in Curia Recepta Scaccarii Westm. asservata" 1818. 

A facsimile of the manuscript is prefixed, and copious Indices 
Nominum et Locorum are appended to the volume. 

The original price of this work was £2. 12s. 6d. ; it can now be 
purchased for 18s. 



PLACITA. 61 

Board of Green Cloth. — This Board had the power of trying 
treasons within the limits of the court. Here likewise (and not in 
Chancery) were inrolled all letters and writings concerning such 
matters of state as were not fit to be made public. The records 
preserved at this board, which is in St. James's Palace, commence 
in the reign of Henry VIII., and consist of orders for the govern- 
ment of the king's establishments and their expenditures, warrants 
and certificates of the household, and proceedings in the Court of 
Verge, from 1676 to the present reign. 

Court op Augmentation. — This court was established 27 Henry 
VIII. [1535], under the title of the Court of the Augmentation 
of the Revenues of the Crown, for the purpose (inter alia) of 
determining disputes respecting lands and possessions belonging to 
the crown, by reason of the dissolution of religious houses. It was 
moreover formed for the custody of the records concerning property 
belonging to the monks at the dissolution of monasteries ; and of 
these monastic records an abundance is still preserved here of great 
value, and no less interest. 

The Court was dissolved and re-established by letters patent of 
38 Henry VIII.; confirmed by statute 7'Edw. VI. c. 2; abolished 
by the statute 1 Mary, sess. 2, c. 10 ; and annexed to the Exchequer 
by letters patent, 1 Mary, 23rd' and 24th January, 1553-4. 

Since this time, the office has been denominated the Augmenta- 
tion Office. The records are very numerous and valuable, com- 
prising bills, answers, replications, rejoinders, grants from the 
crown, leases, fee-farm rents, escheat rolls, surveys of manors, 
taxation rolls, and many of the original deeds, charters, evidences, 
and records belonging, to the dissolved religious institutions. 

Here also have been from time to time deposited for security, 
a quantity of valuable records and accounts, some of which are 
peculiarly connected with genealogical researches. 

Many books of the decrees and leases of this court are in the 
depository at Carlton Ride. 

In the British Museum will be found : — 

A Declaration of the Manours, Lands, etc., that fell to Hen. VIII. through 
exchange or otherwise, before the Court of Augmentation was erected. 
(Lamd. MS. 16, art. 55.) 

Calendar of Orders and Decrees of the Court of Augmentation, 28 Hen. VHL 
to 7 Edw. VI. (Add. MSS. 9781 ; 9782.) 



62 PLACITA. 

Declaratio omnium Eeodorum collectorum, cum annuitatibus, pensionibus, 
divisarum personarum, per sig. Curiae Augmentationum, etc. pro termino 
vitse et annorum concessorum, anno 36 Hen. VIII. {Marl. MS. 600, 
f. 20.) 

Surveys and Possessions of Gilds and Chantrys, granted to Edw. VI. 
(Marl. MS. 605.) 

Account of all Lands leased by Q. Mary. (Marl MS. 239.) 

Proceedings of Commissioners in the Sale of Royal Possessions, 3 and 4, 
4 and 5 Philip and Mary. {Marl. MSS. 606 to 608.) 

In the Lambeth Library is an Index to ancient Deeds, Charters, 
and other instruments remaining in the Augmentation Office. 



Court op Chancery. — The nature and jurisdiction of the Court 
of Chancery are so generally known, that it cannot be necessary to 
say more of it, even for the most unacquainted, than that the pro- 
ceedings are by bill of complaint filed, by answers (the truth of 
which is sworn to), also filed, and that the evidence is by affidavits, 
likewise filed, overt testimony not being admissible. 

The earliest records of this court, at present known to exist, 
commence with the 17th year of Eichard II., at which period it 
appears that the chief business of the court did not arise from the 
introduction of uses of land, according to the opinion of most early 
writers on the subject; very few instances of applications to the 
Chancellor on such grounds, occurring among the proceedings of 
the Chancery during the former five first reigns, after the equitable 
jurisdiction of the court seems to have been fully established. 
Most of the ancient petitions appear to have been presented in 
consequence of assaults and trespasses, and a variety of outrages 
which were cognizable at common law; but for which the party 
complaining was unable to obtain redress, in consequence of the 
maintenance or protection afforded to his adversary by some power- 
ful barons, or by the sheriff or other officer of the county in which 
they occurred. The petitions in the reign of Eichard II. are very 
numerous. During the active reign of Henry IV. no bills or 
petitions addressed to the Chancellor have yet been found; and 
comparatively few appear to have been filed during that of his son 
and successor, Henry V. From the commencement of the reign 
of Henry VI. the bills or petitions, and other proceedings in the 
Court of Chancery, appear to have been preserved with greater 
regularity; and in his time the use of the English language, which 



PLACITA. 63 

had been partially introduced in the time of his predecessor, became 
generally adopted. But few decrees in these early periods have 
been discovered, and these are generally found endorsed on the 
Bill, a practice' which continued from the time of Henry VI. down 
to that of Henry VIII., if not to a later period. It is stated by 
Nicholson, Maitland, and other writers, that most of the Chancery 
Eecords were in an outrageous manner burned and destroyed by 
rebels under Wat Tyler, in Richard the Second's time. 

With respect to their genealogical utility, it was held by Lord 
Chief Justice Kenyon, in 1796, that a bill in Chancery could never 
be admitted in evidence, further than to show that such a bill did 
exist, and that certain facts were in issue between the parties, in 
order to let in the answer or depositions of witnesses; 1 and in 
1799, his lordship held the same doctrine, though with this material 
exception, if not contradiction, that a bill in Chancery by an 
ancestor, was evidence to prove a family pedigree stated therein, in 
the same manner as a Bible. 3 In the claims to the Bunbury Peerage, 
heard before the House of Lords in 1809, counsel having offered 
certain depositions taken upon a bill filed in the Court of Chancery 
in 1640, the opinions of the judges were required upon various 
points, when they answered to the House (inter alia), that neither 
the bill in equity, nor the depositions, would be received in evidence 
in the courts below, on the trial of ejectment then in question; and 
that, generally speaking, a bill in Chancery could not be received 
as evidence in a court of law to prove any fact either alleged or 
denied in such bill as filed; but whether there might be put a 
case which would form an exception to such rule, they could not 
undertake to say. Notwithstanding these opinions, the Placita of 
the Court of Chancery, as well as of other courts, can never fail of 
being valued for the very important genealogical evidence they 
afford, whether legal or not : and the instances are not few where 
the Placita Eecords have been successfully referred to, and given 
as evidence in genealogical cases. 

The bills, answers, depositions, and other proceedings in Chancery, 
from Richard II. to 1758, are among the records at the Tower, 
except the Town Depositions, which were not sent to the Tower for 
a later period than 1724, after which they are at the Examiner's 
Office, Rolls Yard, Chancery Lane. 

The bills, answers, country depositions, and other proceedings 

1 Doe dem. Bo-wenuan v. Syboura, 7 T. R. 

2 Temple v. Cole, 1 T. R. 



64 PLACITA. 

in Chancery, subsequent to those sent to the Tower, are at the 
Records and Writs' Clerks 3 Office (formerly the Six Clerks' 
Office), Chancery Lane. 

The Judgment or Decree Rolls, as well as the dockets from 
which the inrolments are made, from about the 25th Henry VIII., 
are from time to time brought from the Records and Writs' Clerks' 
Office to the Public Record Office. 

Entry books of decrees, from Henry VIII. to the present time, 
are at the Report Office, report side. Minute books in the office 
of the Registrars. 

Reports of Masters in Chancery, from 1590, are at the Report 
Office, report side. 

The Affidavit Office has preserved the affidavits from 1632 to 
the present time: there are Indices from 1632 to 1770 (1770 to 
1780 are lost), and from 1780 to the present time are perfect. 

In the British Museum is a volume of cases in this court. 
(Lansd. MS. 568.) 

Affidavits are arranged in terms at the Register Office for 
Affidavits, 10, Symond's Inn, Chancery Lane. 

Calendars of the Chancery proceedings in the reign of Queen 
Elizabeth, which are in the Tower, have been printed and pub- 
lished, in three volumes folio. 1827-1832. 

They contain, in separate columns, the plaintiffs' and defendants' 
names, the object of the suit, the particulars of the property in 
dispute, and the county in which it is situated, with a slight 
account of the nature of the claims in the proceedings of the 
Court of Chancery during the reign of Queen Elizabeth, 1558 to 
1603, alphabetically arranged under the name? of the plaintiffs. 
Prefixed are many curious examples of earlier proceedings in that 
court, from Richard II. to Elizabeth. 

This calendar is useful to topographical writers ; it affords much 
genealogical information; and is of considerable value for legal 
purposes. Judging from the specimens given of various bills and 
answers from the reign of Richard II. to that of Elizabeth, these 
records are not exceeded by any that have been given to the public 
in valuable illustrations of the state of society at the periods to 
which they respectively refer ; and they are likewise redundant in 
inform itinv relative to the descent of property, and in materials for 
family history. 

Each volume was published at £2. 2$., which is also the present 
price of the work. 



PLACITA. 65 

Court op Chivalry. — This court is called Curia Militaris in Rot. 
Pat. 12 Henry IV.; the Marshal's Court in Rot. Pari. 2 Henry VI. 
n. 9; and the Court of the Constable and Marshal in stat. 13 
Ric. II., stat. 1, c. 2. 

The Court of Chivalry, established by Edward I,, was a military 
court and court of honour ; and the proceedings therein appear to 
have been formerly held before the Lord High Constable and the 
Earl Marshal of England. The duties of these two officers were 
executed partly abroad in the king's army in time of war, and 
partly in the king's court in time of peace. They had their 
respective deputies in the Court of Exchequer. 

The above court, held before the Earl Marshal only, was a military 
court, or court of honour; but when held before the Lord High 
Constable, jointly with the Earl Marshal, was also a criminal court. 

Coke states that the proceedings in this court were by petitions 
in a summary way; and the trial not by a jury of twelve men, but 
by witnesses, or by Combat. But if the roll in the Chapter House, 
mentioned below, be a part of the proceedings in the Court of 
Chivalry, it is clear that in criminal cases there was certainly a 
jury; for these expressions occur therein: — "Ideo fiat inde Jur' 
tarn de Curi& Domini Regis quam de exercitu," &c. "Et Jura- 
tores dicunt super sacramentum/' &c. Sir Matthew Hale makes 
no mention of a jury in his account of the military court held 
before the Constable and Marshal. 

There is only one roll of the court, which is preserved among the 
records of the Chapter House, Westminster, called Placita 
Exercitus Regis, 24 Edw. I., and is particularly pointed out by 
Prynne, in his Animadversions on the 4th Inst. p. 337, as 
belonging to the Court of Chivalry. 

It contains the pleadings which began at Werke, in Northumber- 
land, and continued as the army of Edward I. proceeded through 
Scotland, by Roxburgh, to Edinburgh, thence to Aberdeen, and 
back to Berwick, where they end. 

There certainly were more records of this sort, from the following 
passage on the Patent Roll [15 Edw. III. part iii. m. 12 a.] : — 

" Et habita super premissis deliberatione per eosdem de concilio 
concordatum est quod iterum scrutentur Liber de feodis, Rotuli, et 
alia Vetera Memoranda hujus Scaccarii hujusmodi Amerciamenta 
tangentia, nee non Rotuli Marescalciae tarn de exercitibus Regis 
mine, quam Progenitorum suorum." The existence of these 
records is, however, now unknown. 

5 



66 PLACITA. 

By the statute 8 Richard II. it is enacted, that all pleas and suits 
touching the common law, and which ought to be examined and 
discussed at the common law, shall not thereafter be drawn or 
holden by any means before the Constable and Marshal ; but that 
the Court of the Constable and Marshal shall have that which 
belongeth to the same court, as in the time of King Edward. 

Since the extinction of the office of Lord High Constable by the 
attainder of the Duke of Buckingham, temp. Henry VIII., the 
court has usually been held before the Earl Marshal only with 
respect to civil matters. 

Probably the last proceedings in this court are those in the year 
1631 (7 Charles L), when a duel was ordered to take place between 
Lord Rea and Mr. Ramsay ; but that order was afterwards counter- 
manded. The proceedings are in the Bodleian Library. 

The form and manner of proceeding in this court, touching the 
use and bearing of arms, will be found in the second volume of a 
collection of curious discourses by eminent antiquaries, generally 
known as Hearne's " Curious Discourses/' 2d edit., 2 vols. 8vo, 
1773, p. 243. 

Records of the Court of Chivalry, called the Earl Marshal's 
Book, will be found in the College of Arms. 

They contain entries of some few proceedings in the Earl Mar- 
shal's Court, from the time of Queen Elizabeth to that of Charles II. 
inclusive. Such of the original documents and records as still exist, 
relating to suits and proceedings in the Court of Chivalry, between 
the years 1630 and 1707, are in this repository. 

There are matters in the State Paper Office illustrative of the 
functions of this court. 

Matters pertaining to the Court of Chivalry will be found entered 
on the Close and Patent Rolls. 

There are among the Tower Records what are called the Scrope 
and Grosvenor Rolls, which, with abstract of the proceedings from 
a manuscript in the Harleian Library, have been partly printed by 
Sir Harris Nicolas, under the title, " De Controversies in Curia 
Militari inter Ricardum le Scrope et Robertum Grosvenor, milites, 
Rege Ricardo Secundo. 1385-1390." There are also other rolls of 
a similar description among the miscellaneous Records there. See 
Deputy Keeper of Record's 3rd Rep. App. ii., pp. 192, 193. 

In other public repositories are : — 



PLACITA. 67 

A volume of Collections relating to the Court of Chivalry ; Lincoln's Inn 

Lib. Hale MS. xi. 
Papers relating to the Office of Earl Marshal of England ; Brit. Mus. Cott. 

MS. Titus, C. i. ; Karl. MS. 4176 ; Add. MS. 5937, f. 45 ; 6297, pp. 

194, 197, 205, 214, 375 to 384 ; 9023 ; Ashm. Lib. MS. 7355. 
Proceedings in the Earl Marshal's Court, temp. Charles I. ; Beit. Mus. 

Lansd. MS. 641. 
Acts and Official Proceedings in the Earl Marshal's Court and Heralds' 

Office, brought down to the end of the Seventeenth Century ; Brit. 

Mus. Lansd. MSS. 867; 868. 
Earl Marshal's Warrants from 1683 to 1707 ; Coll. of Arms, MS. M. 17 (2). 
Catalogues and Descents of the Marshals of England, from Hen. I. to 1638 ; 

Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 6168 ; Lansd. MS. 195. See also Dallaway's 

Heraldic Miscellanies, p. 49, and Noble's College of Arms. 



Court of Common Pleas. — The establishment of the Court of 
Common Pleas, as distinct from the Curia Regis, was by one 
of the articles granted by King John in Magna Carta; and it 
now forms the eleventh chapter of the charter, as confirmed by 
25 Edward L, viz. " Common Pleas shall not follow our courV but 
shall " be holden in some place certain." 

This " certain place " was established at Westminster Hall, where 
the Aula Regis originally sat, when the king resided there. 

The Rolls containing the early pleadings of this court are with 
those of the Curia Regi3 ; and, as has already been remarked (p. 54 
ante), it is difficult to say when the courts became separate. 

The greater part of the Records are at Carlton Ride; the 
remainder are deposited in the Stone Tower, Westminster Hall. 

Docket-rolls — containing the nature of the pleadings, descriptions 
of actions, counties in which the venues were laid, names of the 
parties and their attorneys, from 1 Henry VIII., 3 Edward VI., 
and 2 Elizabeth, respectively, to the present time — were formerly in 
the possession of the three prothonotaries of the court. The number 
of these rolls, down to the year 1770, is about 23,000. 

The prothonotaries had also books of common judgments, from 
3 Charles I.; of special judgments and of nisiprius records, from 
14 Charles II.; and of entries on the rolls, from 12 Anne; all of 
which, though not considered as records, are of great moment in 
cases where the entries on the rolls carried into the Treasury are 
not completed. 

The office of Prothonotary was abolished by statute 1 Vict. c. 30 ; 



68 PLACITA. 

and the Records removed from Serjeants' Inn to Carlton Ride, 
by warrant dated 10th July, 1840, and by subsequent warrants. 

At the Master's Office are parchment books, wherein are entered 
in alphabetical order, by the defendants 5 surname, pursuant to the 
statute 4th and 5th William and Mary, a docket of all the final 
judgments entered in the Court of Common Pleas. 

In the absence of Indices to the Judgment Rolls, the Essoin 
Rolls are useful as references to the number of the roll containing 
the proceedings in any given case ; inasmuch as it is much easier to 
run down a list of little else 'than the names of parties than to 
search through a series of long rolls. 

The Essoin Rolls contain excuses for such as do not appear in 
court according to the summons of the writ. They exist at the 
Tower, from the 3d Henry III. to the end of Edward III. ; and 
at Carlton Ride, from 1 Henry IV. to 13 William III. 

Collections from the Plea Rolls may be found as follows : — 

Collectanea ex rott. Placitorum Communium, temp. E. Joh. ; Brit. Mus. 

Earl MS. 301, f. 182. 

1 — 7 John; Coll. of Arms, Vincent MS. 104. 

4 et 25 Hen. III. ; Brit. Mus. Harl.MS. 248, f. 34. 

temp. Edw. I. ; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 294, f. 148 b ; 298, f. 56, 

et seqq. 

1—13 Edw. I. ; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 1609, art. 2. 

1—25 Edw. I. ; Coll. of Arms, Vincent MS. 102. 

18—23, 28, 35 Edw. I. ; Exeter Coll. Oxf. MS. cxlvii. 

25— 27 Edw I.; Coll. of Arms, Vincent MS. 104. 

Edw. I.— Edw. III. ; Inner Temple Lib. MS. 515 (v. 1 to 6). 



Reports of Common Pleas, temp. Elizabeth; Pub. Library, Camb. MS. 

Be. iii. 45. 
A Register of Causes tried in the Court of Common Pleas, 26 to 32 Elizabeth ; 

Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 4779. 
Reports of Cases in Common Pleas, 43 Elizabeth to 9 Jac. I. ; Brit. Mus. 

Add. MS. 9844. 

22 Jac. I. ; Brit. Mus. Earl MS. 363. 

__ 4 — 7 Car. I. ; Pub. Lib. Camb. MS. Dd. iii. 46. 

Ecclesiastical Courts. — The ecclesiastical authorities of this 
country have many courts under their dominion, which are dis- 
persed in the several dioceses of England. 1 

1 See "An Account of the State of the Ecclesiastical Courts of Record," by 
W, D. Bruce. Lond. 1854. 



PLACITA. 69 

The jurisdiction conceded to them extends properly over wills/ 
matrimonial disputes of all kinds, even to limited divorces, ques- 
tions of church-rates and churchwardens; brawling in churches, 
defamation, maritime causes, certain immoral offences, and the 
dereliction of clergymen from church discipline. The decision upon 
questions arising out of these multifarious subjects is governed, not 
by the English law, but by the popish canon law and the civil law, 
which the Norman barons of old unanimously rejected. The con- 
duct of the business is intrusted to judges ; to advocates licensed 
to practise by the archbishops and bishops ; and to proctors, who 
become such by virtue of seven years' service, under articles to one 
of the senior proctors. 

The earliest judicial proceedings preserved in any Consistory 
Court are of the year 1450, in the Courts of York, and of Lichfield 
and Coventry. The records of these courts are generally, if not 
invariably, at the registry for the diocese, either in the cathedrals, 
the episcopal palaces, or in their immediate vicinity. The records 
of the Court of Arches, of the Archbishop of Canterbury, and of 
the Court of Delegates, commence in 1663 and 1666, and are con- 
tinued, with some few exceptions, down to the present time. These 
are preserved at Doctors 5 Commons. 

Court of Exchequer. — The ancient Court of the Exchequer 
was introduced into England by William the Conqueror, and was 
not finally abolished until the reign of Queen Victoria. (Statute 
5 & 6 Vic. c. 86.) 

On the ancient Memoranda Rolls at Carlton Ride are entries 
of a great variety of pleadings relating to the revenues and estates 
of the nobility and gentry, with the judgments of the court thereon* 

Bills, Informations, Pleas, Depositions, Orders, and Decrees o. 
the Court of Exchequer, from the 1st of Elizabeth to the present 
time, are in the same repository. 

The Clerk of the Pleas of the Court of Exchequer had under 
his custody, Rolls containing Pleadings between Parties, and the 
Judgments of the Court thereon, Judgments on Warrants of 
Attorney, Books of the execution of Writs of Inquiry, Files of 
Writs, Bills, or Declarations, Bail Pieces, Affidavits of Debts, and 
Books of Appearances of the Defendants ; some of them (including 
the most material) commencing as early as the reign of Edward I. 

1 See under the head of " Wilis." 



70 PLACITA. 

In the Inner Temple Library is an Index of the Orders, 
Decrees, and Inrolments of the Court, from the reign of Edward 1 
to that of George III. 

In Mr. Madox's valuable collections in the British Museum 
{Add. MSS. 4500; 4508; 4534-4541) are Bills and Answers, from the 
time of Edward I. to 28 Henry VIII. ; and in the same repository 
is an Index to the Exchequer Decrees and Orders, from 1 to 8 
James I., in the Queen's Remembrancer s Office. (Add. MS. 9780.) 

An Index to various Repertories, Books of Orders, Decrees, and 
other Records, preserved in the Court of Exchequer, from the reign 
of Edward I., compiled by the late Adam Martin, Esq., was pub- 
lished by the Society of the Inner Temple, in 1819. 



Court of King's Bench. — The precise period at which the court 
known as the " Caria Regis " lost its title and merged into that of 
the King's Bench, does not precisely appear; it is, however, clear 
from the statute, that in the 52d year of the reign of Henry III. 
it was called the King's Court, and in the 3d year of the reign of 
Edward I. it was called the Court of the King's Bench. And in 
the old calendars we find that the records are called Curia Regis 
Rolls to the end of Henry III., and from that time they are called 
King's Bench Rolls 

The Placita of the Curia Regis, then, having been fixed as 
extending no later than the end of the reign of Henry III. [1272], 
we must consequently date the commencement of the Rolls of the 
King's Bench from that period. 

These records have been continued, and are in preservation, from 
the 1st Edward I. to the present day. 

The Calendars and Indexes to the Records of the Court of King's 
Bench have been printed by order of the House of Commons, 
down to the end of the reign of Edward II., with indexes Rerum, 
Nominum, et Locorum. 

The Index, which was printed in 1811, commences with the reign 
of Richard I. ; and in this respect the orders of the House of Com- 
mons, to commence with the reign of Edward I., have been more 
than fully attended to. 

As it was found difficult to decide when the proceedings in the 
Curia Regis finished, and the component branches of that court 
became distinct and permanently severed, the whole work was 
printed under the title of " Placitorum in Domo Capttulari West- 



PLACITA. 



71 



monasteriensi asservatorum Abbreviatio, Temp. Regura Ricardi L, 
Johann., Hen. III., Edw. L, Edw. II." 

In variety and importance the contents of this volume are 
superior to those of most of the works published by the Record 
Commissioners, and it well merits a place in every historical, legal, 
and antiquarian library. It consists of pleadings before the Just ces 
of the King's Bench, before the King and his Council, pleadings 
remitted from the King's Bench to Parliament, together with some 
petitions to that assembly ; and, besides throwing light on the early 
constitution of Parliament and the Concilium Regis, these Records 
abound in curious matter illustrative of the general history of the 
country, of the descent of landed property, and of the manners and 
state of society in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries. 

Among the points on which information may be found are the 
following : — 



Appeals of Murder and other Felonies, 

Assisa. 

Attaint. 

Bridges and Sewers. 

Charters and Grants to Corporations. 

Concords and Fines in real Actions. 

Enrolments of Deeds. 

Damages and Costs. 

Dictum de Kenilworth. 1 

Error. 

Fines. 

Gavelkind. 

Heirs and the Proofs of their Age and 
Pedigrees. 

Historical Facts relative to the Rebel- 
lion and Insurrection under Simou 
de Moutfort, and others. 

Honours and Baronies. 

Judgment. 

Jurisdiction. 



Juries. 

Liberties and Privileges to Corpus- 
rations. 

Towns and Tillages. 

London — Customs of, and Historical 
Facts relative to. 

Measures of Land. 

Obsolete Words. 

Practice of the Courts. 

Prerogative. 

Privilege of Courts. 

Punishment for Contempt. 

Quo Warranto. 

Records of the Kingdom. 

Statutes and Ordinances, 

Trial by Domesday. 

by the Roll of Winton. 

by Duel, and by Ordeal. 

Writs of Right, &c. 



The price of the volume, which also contains three fac- simile 
engravings of the records, was originally £1, 16s., but is now 18s. 



1 The award made by commissioners appointed by Hen. III. after the battle of 
Evesham, for the good estate of the realm, and for the provision of certain disinterested 
persona . 



72 PLACITA. 

The Records are to be found at the Chapter House, Westmin- 
ster, down to the reign of Henry VI. 

For all successive reigns they are preserved at Carlton Ride, 
and at the Stone Tower, adjoining Westminster Hall. 

Copies of the Placita for the several reigns will be found as 
under : — 

John ; Brit. Mtjs. Earl. MS. 294, art. 100 ; Lincoln's Inn Lib. ; Middle 

Temple Lib. 
Hen. III. ; Brit. Mtjs. Earl. MSS. 94, art. 10; 294, art. 93. 
Edw. I. ; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 673; Lansd.MS. 602.; Lincoln's Inn Lib.; 

Lib. or Middle and Inner Temple. 
Edw. II. ; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 88, art. 1 ; Inner Temp. Lib. 
Edw. III. ; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 294, art. 45; Lansd.MS. 602; Lincoln's 

Inn Lib. ; Library of Middle and Inner Temple. 

10—17; Inner Temple Lib. MS. 510. 

Eich. II. ; Lincoln's Inn Lib. 

Hen. IV. ; Lincoln's Inn Lib. 

Hen. VI. 7 and 8 ; Pub. Lib. Camb. Dd. vi. 59. 

Hen. VIII. ; Pub. Lib. Camb. Dd. xiii. 24. 

Mary ; Bodleian Library. 

Elizabeth; Brit. Mus. Earl. MSS. 363; 4779; 6682; 6683; Bodl.Lib.; 

Pub. Lib. Camb. Dd. xiii. 24 ; xiv. 18 ; If. v. 26. 

28—30 Pub. Lib. Camb. Dd. xi. 64. 

33 ; Pub. Lib. Camb. If v. 20, 26. 

34—39 ; Pub. Lib. Camb. Dd. x. 51 ; Ee. iii. 2. 

36—40; Pub. Lib. Camb. Ee. vi. 17. 

39—42; Pub. Lib. Camb. Dd. viii. 48; If. ii. 14. 

42 ; Exeter Coll. Oxf. MS. cix. 

JamesL; Brit. Mus. Earl. MSS. 363 ; 4779; 6682; 6683. 

1 — 14 ; Pub. Lib. Camb. Dd. r. 51. 

4 and 5 ; Exeter Coll. Oxf. MS. cix. ; Pub. Lib. Camb. 

Ee. v. 17. 

9 and 10; Pub. Lib. Camb. Ee. iii. 54. 

15, 16, 20.; Pub. Lib. Camb. Dd. ii. 42.; vi. 57, 58. 

20—22; Pub. Lib. Camb. Ee. vi. 2. 



Chas. I. 2—7; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 1330, f. 26.; Pub. Lib. Camb. 

Dd. xii. 48, 49; Ee.v. 17. 

— 8— IS ; Pub. Lib. Camb. Dd. vi. 61. 

Charles II. ; All Souls' Coll. Oxf. MS. cxlv. 

James II. ; All Souls' Coll. Oxf. MS. cxlv. 

"William III. ; Brit. Mus. Lamd. MS. 568 ; All Souls' Coll. Oxf. MS. cxlv. 

William and Mary, and Anne ; Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 6722 to 6726, f. 104-; 

6727, f. 103. 
George II. 14—27 ; Inner Temple Lib. MS. 509. 



PLACITA. 73 

Marshal's Court (Curia AuLiE Regis). — This court, which was 
obliged to follow the king, was instituted to administer justice 
between the king's domestic servants, that they might not be drawn 
into other courts. Its jurisdiction, which was limited to twelve miles 
round the king's lodgings, was formerly held in, though not part of, 
the Aula Regis; and when that was subdivided, remained a distinct 
jurisdiction, holding pleas of trespasses committed within the verge 
of the court. 

The records of this court are now at the Chapter House, West- 
minster. They contain the proceedings in the Marshalsea Court, 
in which the Lord Steward and the Earl Marshal presided. 

The bag contains rolls of 12 Edward I., 10 and 11 Edward II., 
and from 15 to 32 Edward III. 

The roll 10 Edward II. is entitled, " Placita Aulge Domini Eegis 
apud Ebor J , coram Domino Wilhelmo de Monte-acuto Senescallo 
Hospitii Domini Regis et Domino Johanne de Weston, Locum 
tenente Thorn, de Brotherton Comitis Norff.' et Suff.' MarescaF 
Anglise, Die Mercurii prox' post festum Sancti dementis Papse A°. 
Regni Regis Ed 1 , filii Regis Ed 1 , decimo." 

In the same roll are " Placita apud Sitoby, Blid, Clipston, Not- 
tingham, Lotterworth, Daventr/ Brakeley, Oxon, London, Sar/ 
Andover, Westm', Wyndesore, Staines, Sanct' Dunstanum infra 
Barram Novi Templi London, Tame, et Woodstock." 

In this court the Marshal had various duties to perform ; and it 
is plain, by the title to the roll, that he was one of the judges who 
presided. 

A number of valuable documents relating to the office of Marshal 
will be found amongst the Cottonian MSS. in the British Museum, 
as also an original Placita Roll of one cause in 1347. (Titus, C. i.) 

Papers relating to the Jurisdiction of this court will be found in 
Hargrave MS. 307, in the same library. 

In the Bodleian Library are some " Proceedings of the Court 
of Verge, belonging to the Palace of Saint James originally." 

Doubts having arisen as to the extent of the jurisdiction of the 
Marshalsea Court, King Charles I., in the sixth year of his reign, 
by letters patent, erected a new Court of Record, called the Curia 
Palatii, or Palace Court, to be held before the Steward of the 
Household, and Knight Marshal, and the Steward of the Court or 
his deputy; with jurisdiction to hold pleas of all manner of personal 
actions between parties within twelve miles of the Palace at White- 
hall, not extending into the city of London. 

This latter court, together with the ancient Court of Marshalsea, 



H PLACITA. 

was afterwards held in King Street, in the borough of South wark; 
from thence they were removed to Great Scotland Yard, West- 
minster, where the court was held every Friday, until its abolition. 
Upon the establishment of the Palace Court, the Marshalsea 
Court gradually fell into disuse. Both courts were abolished by 
12 and 13 Vict. c. 101, after 31st Dec. 1849. The Records were 
directed to be placed under the custody of the Master of the Rolls. 

Court of Requests. — This Court is sometimes called the Court 
of Whitehall, because the court was held in or adjoining to the 
chamber in Westminster Hall called the White Hall. It was some- 
times also called the Court of Conscience, 

The Court of Requests was established in the 9th year of the reign 
of Henry VII., and sat at first wherever the Privy Council happened 
to be ; but in latter times it sat more generally at Westminster. 

The Lord Privy Seal presided, assisted by Masters of Requests, 
who were the ordinary judges. 

It was originally an Equity Court for poor men's suits, which 
were made to the king by supplication, and upon which they were 
entitled to have right without payment of money. 

An order was made in Chancery, 30th Nov. 1588, referring all 
poor persons seeking relief in that court to the Court of Requests. 

Immediately before its dissolution, however, almost all suits that 
by colour of equity, or supplication made to the Prince, might be 
brought before him, became cognisable by this court. 

Its jurisdiction, as a Court of Equity, was contested in the 40th 
Elizabeth; and it was adjudged that it was no court that had power 
of judicature. 

The court was virtually abolished by stat. 16 Car. I. c. 10. 

The office of Master of Requests continued probably the whole of 
the reign of Charles II., when it ceased, as it had become of no value. 

The Records, which are very useful for family and local history, 
pedigrees, &c, are deposited in the Chapter House, at West- 
minster. They are as follows : — 



Affidavit Books. 

Appearance Books. 

Bills and Answers (if found). 

Returns of Commissions. 

Decrees. 

Docket Books. 

Notice Books. 



Order Books, and Order and Decree 

Books. 
Process Books. 
Replication Books. 
Returns of Commissions. 
Witness Books. 



PLACITA. 75 

An Inventory of the Records will be found printed in the Deputy 
"Keeper of the Records' 8th Report, App. ii. p. 167. 

There are proceedings in this court among the Miscellaneous 
Records of the Land Revenue Department. 

Two books of judicial proceedings, from 1639 to 1640, were 
formerly in the Office of Privy Seal. 

In the British Museum are — 

Cause3 in the Court of Requests, from 1580 to 1604. {Lansd. MS. 161.) 
Register of Requests from 1660 to 1669. {Add. MS. 5759.) 
Names of Counsellors that heard Causes in the Court of Requests, from 
Hen. VII. to 12 Elizabeth. {Lansd. MS. 12, art. 57.) 

In the Chapter House are 36 volumes of Proceedings in ihis 
Court. 

Court of Star Chamber. — This was a very ancient court, held 
before the king and council. It consisted of divers lords, being 
privy councillors, together with two judges of the courts of common 
law, without (as it has been said) the intervention of a jury. Their 
jurisdiction extended legally over riots, perjury, misbehaviour of 
sheriffs, and other notorious misdemeanors, contrary to the law of 
the land. 

Such as remain of the bills, answers, depositions, and other 
proceedings in this court, from the 3d Henry VII., when it was 
established, to the 16th Charles I., when it was finally abolished, 
are at the Chapter House, Westminster 

The original decrees are lost; the last notice of them was in 
1719, when they were in a house in St. Bartholomew Close. 

Those at the Chapter House are of the reigns of Henry VII., 
VIII., Edward VI., and Elizabeth : the latter are the most perfect. 
Indexes have been made to these, as there is much useful matter 
respecting property in the depositions. 

Some of the bills and answers are to be found amongst the 
Miscellaneous Records at the Tower. (See 3d Report of Deputy 
Keeper of Records, App. ii. p. 196.) 

In the British Museum and at Cambridge are : — 

Causes in the Star Chamber, temp. Hen. VII. % Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 

6811, f. 2. 
Proceedings in the Court of Star Chamber, 1 tt«n. TIL to 37 Hen. VI. r > ; 

Beit. Mus. Add. MSAWl. 



76 PLACITA. 

Decrees of the Court of Star Chamber, from Edw. VI. to 8 Jac. I. , Pepysian 

Lib. Magdalen Coll. Camb. 
Orders in the Court of Star Chamber, temp. Elizabeth; Pub. Lib. Camb. 

Dd. xi. 81. 
Decisions in the Star Chamber, 1582-3; Beit. Mus. JSarl MS. 6265, 

if. 371 to 376. 
Reports of Trials in the Star Chamber, from 40 Elizabeth to 13 James I. ; 

Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 1330, f. 1. 
Abstract of Trials in the High Court of Star Chamber to the reign of James I. ; 

Brit. Mus. Karl. MS. 2143, f. 1. 
Two volumes of Cases in the Star Chamber, temp. Car. I. ; Bodl. Lib. 
" Account of Causes tryed in the Starr Chamber, 1631 ; 3 ' Brit. Mus. Harl. 

MS. 4130. 
Cases in the Court of Star Chamber, 10 Chas. I. ; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 4022. 

There are also proceedings, reports, and collections, relative to 
the Star Chamber, in the Land Revenue Department, in the 
Inner Temple, and in the State Paper Office. Some few 
judgments and other proceedings, removed by certiorari, are in the 
Rolls Chapel. 

In Rushworth's Collections, vol. ii., are the proceedings and de- 
crees in one case, and in the Appendix to vol. iii. are several decrees. 

Court of Survey. — This court was established by statute 33 
Henry VIII. c. 39, suppressed by letters patent 38 Henry VIII., 
and incorporated in the New Court of Augmentation, erected by 
the said letters patent, which latter court was annexed to the 
Court of Exchequer by letters patent 1 Mary. 

The Bills and Answers of the Court are now at the Record 
Office, Carlton Ride. Here also is deposited a book called "Liber 
Curiae Generalis Supervisoris Terrarum Domini Regis." 

Court of Wards and Liveries. — Under the head of Inquisitions 
post mortem, it has been stated that they were consequent upon the 
feudal system ; and, although they had so remote an origin, they 
were made an engine of the greatest oppression by Henry VII., 
whose creatures Empson and Dudley compelled many persons to 
sue out livery from the crown who were by no means tenants 
thereto. To remedy this grievance, the Court of Wards and 
Liveries was instituted by statute 32 Henry VIII. c. 46, and lasted 
until the troubles in 1645. 

The court consisted of a master, an attorney, a receiver-general. 



PLACITA. 77 

and two auditors, whose duty it was to superintend and regulate 
inquiries upon the death of the king's tenants; what lands they 
died seized of, who was the heir, and of what age, in order to 
entitle the king to his marriage wardship, relief, primer seisin, or 
other advantages. 

This court was virtually abolished during the Commonwealth, 
and finally by the statute 12 Car. II. c. 24. 

The proceedings of the court were by bill and answer; its 
records contain also the inquisitions post mortem occurring during 
its existence. 

The records afford such important proof of descents and alliances, 
and of various rights of property, that an endeavour was made by 
Dethick, York herald, in 1584, to establish an office in the Court 
of Wards and Liveries, for inrolling and registering the descent of 
the wards. 

In 1709, a Committee of the House of Lords found the records in 
a neglected and perishing condition in a fishmonger's house, in a 
fish-yard near Westminster Hall ; the room where they were kept 
seemed to the committee to be the place where the records were 
kept when the court was existing. 

It is stated in Strachey's Index to the Records, printed in 1739, 
that eleven bags of the Feodaries' certificates, and also calendars 
and indexes, were in the hands of the executors of Mr. Charles 
Grimes, of Gray's Inn. And it appears from the Lords' Journals, 
1709, 20th April, that Mr. Grimes had the key of the room where 
the records were, and produced four books of alphabetical Indexes 
to the Inquisitions which his father had made. These deeds are 
now in the Chapter House. 

Calendars of the names of all the wards, and the situations of 
their estates, have been made, from which it appears that the deeds 
of 5000 wards and estates remain unclaimed. 

An Index to the Deeds is printed in the 6th Report of the Deputy 
Keeper of the Pub. Records, App. ii. No. 1. 

A list of these records is given in Thomas's " Hand Booh to the 
Public Records," pp. 312—316. 

The decrees of the judges are preserved at the same office, and 
amongst them are a great number of title-deeds brought into the 
court while the proprietors of the estates to which they relate were 
in wardship. From these deeds also, the most unimpeachable 
evidence of descent may be obtained ; and it was stated by the 
Commissioners appointed to inquire into the public records of the 



78 PLACITA. 

kingdom, in their report to the Parliament in 1800, that if the 
owners of these estates could now be ascertained, it might perhaps 
be desirable to return to each such deeds as related to his property. 

Some of the proceedings are among the Miscellaneous Records at 
the Tower. (See Deputy Keeper of Records' 3d Rep. App. ii. 
p. 197.) 

In other repositories are : — 

"Avesque Cases hors Curiae Wardorum;" Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 1588, 

art 2. 
Abstracta Inquisitionum, in Curia Wardorum conservatorum manu Thomse 

Cole; Brit. Mus. Harl. MSS. 756—760; 410; 411. 
A Collection of Precedents of Forms, Judgments, &c, belonging to the Court 

of Wards, by Thomas Cole ; Brit. Mus. Lansd. MSS. 608 ; 647 ; 648. 
Book of Wards' Estates, 21—23 Hen. VII., 19—21 Hen. VIII.; Chapter 

House, Westminster. 
■" Collection de touts tiels Decrees fait in Court de Gards," beginning Trinity 

Term, 7 Edw. VI. ; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 1727. 
An Abstract of the Decrees in the Court of Wards, from 7 Edw. VI. [1553] 

to 23 Elizabeth [1581] inclusive; Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 606. 
The Decrees in the Court of Wards, and in the other courts, during the reigns 

of Edw. VI., Mary, Elizabeth, James I., and Charles I. ; Brit. Mus. 

Lansd. MS. 607. 
Instructions of King James I. for the Master of his Wardes and Lyveryes ; 

Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 736. 
Cases in the Court of Wards and Liveries, 7 Edw. VI. to 10 James I. ; Brit. 

Mus. Add. MS. 5760, f. 26. 
Eeport of Cases in the Court of Wards, temp. Jac. I. ; Pub. Lib. Camb 

Dd. xiii. 28. 
Surveys of the Court of Wards and Liveries for Sussex, 5 — 30 Hen. VIII. ; 

Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 5700, f. 31. 



79 



&0tUlU 



/"CHARTER ROLLS. — In their more important features, the 
^ Charter Rolls differ little from the Inrolments of the King's 
Letters Patent. They consist of grants of privileges to religions 
houses, to cities, towns, bodies corporate, and private trading 
companies, belonging to those cities and towns ; grants of markets, 
fairs, and iree warrens ; grants of creations of nobility, from the 
11th Edward II. to the end of the reign of Edward IV. ; charters, 
creations of honour, and other grants of the crown, which conclude 
with the words, " Hiis Testibus/' &c. 

Charters, like Letters Patent, passed under the Great Seal; and 
the principal distinction between a Charter and a Patent is, that 
the former was witnessed by such persons as were present when it 
was executed, and that the latter was executed by the king himself. 
Charters are sometimes confirmed by Letters Patent. 

The Rolls commence 1 John (1199), and end with the reign of 
Edward IV. (1483.) After the accession of Richard II. few 
entries, comparatively speaking, occur on the Charter Rolls ; and ten 
pages only of the Calendar contain a notice of all which were granted 
in the reigns of Henry IV., V., and VI., and Edward IV. The 
Charter Rolls cease in the 12th James I. ; and after that period, 
grants from the crown were made in the form of Letters Patent, and 
entered on the Patent Rolls. The names of barons and great men, 
mentioned as witnesses to these charters, are so numerous that of 
themselves they form a very valuable body of evidence. 

The Committee of the House of Lords, appointed to search into 
documents touching the dignity of a peer of the realm, have stated 
in their Report, that they had reason to doubt, in some cases, the 
fidelity of transcripts of charters on the Charter Rolls by Inspeximus. 

Fines for passing and renewal of charters are entered on the 
Patent Rolls. 

The Rolls from 1199 to 1483, the end of the reign of Edward IV., 
are kept at the Tower. 

The remainder, to 12 James I., are at the Rolls Chapel. 



80 ROTULI. 

Extracts from the early half are in the Inner Temple Library. 
In other libraries are : — 

Collectanea ex rott. Cartarum; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 298, ff. 37, 76. 
temp. Johannis et Hen. III. ; College of 

Arms, MS. B. 4. 
Transcripta ex rott. Cartarum, ad com. Warwici prsecipue pertinent. 1 Joh. — 

23 Edw. IV.; Ashmolean Lib Dvgdale MS. 4, B. 2, p. 1. 
Transcripts from the Charter Eolls in the Tower, 1 — 31 Hen. III.; Brit. 

Mus. Add. MS. 6712. 
Extract of Charter Eolls, from 3 Edw. L — 12 Edw. IV. ; College of Arms, 

MSB. 5. 
A Calendar of Charter Eolls, temp. Edw. L; Brit. Mus. Lamd. MS. 

860 (A.) f. 55. 
Calendar of such Charter Eolls as are extant since 1 Eic. III.; Brit. Mus. 

Lamd. MS. 221. 

A Calendar of the Charter Rolls was printed in 1803, from three 
manuscript volumes in the Tower, apparently compiled in the time 
of James I. The work is entitled, " Calendarium Rotulorum Char- 
tarum, et Inquisitionum ad quod damnum" 1 vol. folio. 

The first part of the volume contains a Calendar to the Charter 
Eolls, 1 John to the end of the reign of Edward IV. The second 
part is a Calendar of the Inquisitions ad quod damnum, commencing 
1 Edward II., and ending 38 Henry VI. 

Although the exact purport of the different charters cannot 
always be gleaned from the printed calendar, it nevertheless affords 
much information with respect to lands and individuals ; and, not- 
withstanding that it was only intended as a reference to the records 
themselves, the purport of the instruments may sometimes be 
learned from the calendar. In using this volume it must be remem- 
bered, that the lands, liberties, or franchises, mentioned under 
each name, were then granted by the king to the respective parties. 

The original price of this volume was £2, now reduced to 18s. 

The Rolls themselves of the reign of King John were published 
also by the Record Commissioners under this title, " Rotuli Char- 
tarum in Turri Lond. asserv., 1199-1216," 1 vol. folio. 1837. 

The present price of this volume is £1. 10s. 

The Close or Clatjs Rolls. — The Close Rolls are so called from 
the custom of inrolling Brevia Clausa upon them. 

The difference between documents entered on the Close Roils, 



ROTULI. 81 

and those on the Patent Rolls, is, that the king's Letters Patent 
were delivered open, having the Great Seal attached to the bottom ; 
and are presumed to be of a public nature, addressed to all the 
king's subjects. The Close Rolls are records of such instruments 
as were despatched closed or sealed up } and were of a more private 
nature, being addressed to one or two individuals only. 

Many of the original instruments, of which entries are on the 
Close Rolls, will be found among the bundles known under the 
term Brevia, among the Tower Records. 

. The Close Rolls contain important documents relating to the 
prerogatives of the crown, the privileges of the nobles and com- 
mons, the different branches of judicature, civil, ecclesiastical, 
naval, and military ; regulations for the coin of the kingdom, the 
measures used for manning and fitting out our fleets and armies, 
orders for the observance of truces or treaties, for the raising of 
subsidies, aids, tallages, and imposts, for restitution of possessions, 
for suppressing riots and tumults, and for the preservation of the 
peace of the kingdom, assignments of dower, acceptances of 
homage, for fortifying, repairing, and provisioning castles, with a 
great variety of writs and mandates for regulating every branch of 
the affairs of the royal household, the payment of salaries and 
stipends, commitments, pardons, and deliveries of state prisoners, 
&c. On the backs of these rolls are those important documents, 
the writs of summons to parliament, there are also writs for the 
prorogation of parliament, for the expenses of knights, citizens, 
and burgesses, proclamations, letters of protection, inrolments of 
deeds between party and party, liveries and seizins of lands, entries 
respecting the birth, marriages, and deaths of royal and noble 
families, writs of summons for the performance of military and 
naval services, copies of letters to foreign princes and states, pro- 
clamations, prohibitions, orders for providing ships, raising and 
carrying forces, furnishing provisions, and a variety of other instru- 
ments : indeed they contain a fund of information, the diversity and 
importance of which render them some of the most important ot 
national records. 

Since the reign of Henry VIII. they contain mostly the inrol- 
ments of deeds of bargain and sale, settlements, wills of Roman 
Catholics, conveyances of bankrupts 5 estates, recognizances, speci- 
fications of new inventions, and other instruments, either acknow- 
ledged by the parties thereto, or sworn to by a subscribing witness, 
for the purpose of inrolment, or inrolled for safe custody only by 

6 



82 



ROTULL 



warrant from the Lord Chancellor or Master of the Rolls, and also 
memorials of deeds, and other securities for annuities, bargains 
and sales, made by Cromwell's Commissioners, of manors, lands, &c. 
belonging to the crown, and to pretended delinquents, whose estates 
had been sequestered, as also to the clergy. 

The ancient Close Rolls contain some inrolments of wills ; and the 
following heads ought to be particularly noticed by the genealogist : — 



Admiralty. 


Fisheries. 


Adultery. 


Fleets. 


Advowsons. 


Forests. 


Aids. 


Forfeitures. 


Alien Priories. 


Gascony. 


Alimony. 


Gavelkind. 


Ambassadors. 


Grain. 


Armies. 


Great Seal. 


Arts. 


Habeas Corpus. 


Attainders. 


Heralds. 


Auditors. 


Heretics. 


Aurum Reginae. 


Homage. 


Banishment. 


Household, Royal. 


Bridges. 


Idiots. 


Chancery. 


Imposts. 


Chivalry. 


Inquisitions, 


Cinque Ports. 


Invasions. 


Coinage. 


Ireland. 


Coronations. 


Jewels, Crown. 


Coroners. 


Jews. 


Costume. 


King's Bench. 


Credentials. 


Knights Hospitallers— Templars 


Crusades. 


Knight Service. 


Customs. 


Laws. 


Custos Regni. 


Letters, Royal. 


Demesnes. 


Livery of Lands. 


Deodands. 


London. 


Divorces, Royal. 


Lunatics. 


Dowers. 


Marriage, Royal. 


J)ueTs. 


Marshal. 


Ecclesiastical Affairs. 


Military. 


Error. 


Mortmain. 


Escheats. 


Navy. 


Exchequer. 


Nobility. 


Exemptions, 


Oaths. 


Fines. 


Ordinances. 



ROTULL 


Ordnance. 


Scutage. 


Outlawries. 


Serjeants at Law. 


Pardons. 


Stannaries. 


Parliament. 


State Letters. 


Peace, Justices of. 


Subsidies. 


Piracy. 


Tallage. 


Plague. 


Tallies. 


Poll-Tax. 


Taxes. 


Poor. 


Tournaments. 


Popes' Bulls. 


Treasure Trove. 


Pre-emption. 


Treaties. 


Prerogative of the Crown. 


Truces. 


Privy Council. 


Tumults. 


Privy Seal. 


Tythes. 


Proclamations. 


Verderers. 


Prohibitions. 


Universities. 


Protection. 


Wales. 


Purveyance. 


Wardships. 


Reprisals. 


Warrens. 


Bevenue. 


Wills. 


Riots. 


Writs ne exeant regno 


Scotland. 


Writs of Habeas, &c. 



83 



The modern Close Rolls consist partly of documents inrolled 
according to the course of Chancery, such as recognizances and 
deeds inrolled for safe custody; and partly of deeds and instruments 
inrolled pursuant to statute, such as — bargains and sales, specifi- 
cations of patent inventions, conveyances for charitable uses, dis- 
positions of tenants in tail, dispositions by Commissioners of 
Bankruptcy, and other bankruptcy proceedings, conveyances under 
Queen Anne's Bounty, the Mortmain Act, many purposes con- 
nected with church endowments, consents under private bills, 
registration of partners of joint-stock companies, and other analo- 
gous documents; and are inrolled according to the counties to 
which they respectively belong. 

Indexes are made at the Inrolment Office, but are not passed on 
to the Public Record Office with the rolls. These Indexes, from 
Elizabeth to the present time, remain, therefore, at the Inrolment 
Office, and are frequently searched for reference to the rolls at the 
Public Eecord Office. 

Sir William Dugdale, Collins, and all other writers who have 
taken the trouble of compiling genealogies from original sources, 



84 ROTULL 

have made great use of the contents of the Claus or Close Rolls. 
As the writs of summons of peers to sit in the House of Parliament 
are indorsed on them, it follows that they must be generally pro- 
duced in cases of claims to peerage. 

The Rolls, from 1205 to 1485, are deposited at the Tower. 

A description of them has been privately printed by T. D. Hardy, 
Esq., in 1833. 

From the year 1485 to 1784, they are preserved at the Rolls 
Chapel. 

The subsequent Rolls to the present time are in the custody of 
the Clerk of the Inrolments in Chancery. 

Copies of, and extracts from, these Rolls are distributed as follows: — 

Breve abstractum, ex rott. Clausarum, eorum, quae ad Stemmatum Familia- 

rumque Auglicarum aeries enucleandas spectant, selectum; Brit. Mus. 

Karl. MS. 294. 
Index rotulorum Clausarum, a temp. K. Johannis, ad temp. Hen. VI., quae in 

Turri Lond. custodiuntur ; Brit. Mus. Cotton. MS. Julius, E. iii. 
Index rerum in rott. Clausis, etc. a 31 Hen. III. ad Edw. IV. ; Exeter 

Coll. Oxford, MS. xci. 
Collectanea varia ex rott. Clausarum; Brtt. Mus. Harl. MSS. 298, f. 76; 

971, ff. 108, 136. 
Collectanea et transcripta, temp. Johannis; Bodl. Lib. MS. 5044.; Brit. 

Mus. Earl MS. 86, f. 49 ; Exeter Coll. Oxford, MS. xciv. 

Joh. ad Edw. IV. ; Inner Temple Lib. 

6 Joh. ad Edw. III. ; Lincoln's Inn Lib. 

6 Joh. ad 22 Edw. IV. ; Bodl. Lib. MSS. 4178 ; 



5044; 5050; 7376. 



MS. 581. 



10 Joh. ad 6 Edw. III.; Caius Coll. Camb. 



temp. Hen. III. ; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 86, 

f. 171; Bodl. Lib. MSS. 5044- 5050; 5052; Coll. of Arms, 
MSS.B. 6; 7. 

1 — 30 Hen. III.; Exeter Coll. Oxford, 



MS. cxxxi. 



1—31 Hen. III.; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 6712. 
7—50 Hen. III. ; Caius Coll. Camb. MS. 582. 
13 Hen. III. ad 21 Ric. II. ; Lincoln's Inn Lib. 
31 Hen. III. ad Edw. IV. ; Exeter Coll. Oxf. 



MS. xci. 



34—36 Hen. III.; Ashmolean Lib. MS. 1144, 

dp. 1-68, 73—223. 
, temp.Kdw. I.; Coll. of Arms, MSS. B 6; 7; 

Bodl. Lib. MS. 5052. 



ROTULI. 85 

Collectanea et transcripta, 1 Edw. I. ad 10 Hen. V. ; Caius Coll. Camb. 

MS. 583. 
1 Edw. I. ad Hen. VI. ; All Souls' Coll. Oxf. ; 

MS. ccxxvii. 

Edw. I. ad Jac. I. ; Brit. Mus. Hargrave MS. 296. 

— — ■ 20 Edw. I. ad 11 Edw. III. ; Exeteb Coll. Oxf. 

MS. cxxii. 

Edw. II. et HI. ; Ashmolean Library. 

tempp. Edw. II. et III., Hen. IV.— VI. ; Coll. 

of Arms, MSS. B. 6 ; 7. 

temp. Edw. III. 1 ; Ashm. Lib. Oxf. MS. 7376, 

f. 285. 

tempp. Edw. III., Bic. II., Hen. IV., et Edw. IV. ; 



Bodl. Lib. MS. 4178. 
1—53 Edw. m.; Brit. Mus. Karl. MSS. 



1175; 1176. 



MS. cxxiii. 



2d. ii. 40. 



MS. 296. 



12, 23, 24 Edw. III.; Exeter Coll. Oxf. 

14 Edw. IH. ; Coll. of Arms, Vincent MS. 9 L. 

temp. Eic. II. ; Bodl. Lib. MS. 5052. 

temp. Hen. VII.; Public Lib. Camb. MS. 

Hen. VIII. ad Jac. I. ; Brit. Mus. Hargrave 



The Close Rolls are printed by the Record Commissioners, from 
6 John to 11 Henry III., with the following title : — " Rotuli 
Litterarum Clausarum in Turri Londinensi asservati" 2 vols, folio. 
1833-1844. The first volume from a.d. 1204 to 1224; the second 
volume, 1224-1227. The present price of these volumes is £4. 

An Index to the Claus Rolls is in the Library, Lincoln's Inn. 

Copyhold Court Rolls, Ancient Demesne Rolls. — Few title- 
deeds are of such antiquity as the Rolls of Courts of Copyhold and 
Ancient Demesne. In the transfer of property from poor to rich, 
which is, and has been, continually taking place ; lawyers, to obviate 
difficulties, generally show no more title than is absolutely necessary: 
a period of about sixty years, and all older deeds are, in the course 
of time, destroyed or lost. This, however, is not the case on the 
transfer of manors, the Court Rolls of which being public docu- 

1 An Index to the Close Rolls for Wiltshire, 3 Edw. III.— 36 Henry VI. has been 
printed for private circulation, by Sir Thomas Phillipps, Bart, of Middle Hill. 



86 ROTULL 

ments, and in the nature of public property, are generally preserved 
with care, and duly handed over to each successor or purchaser of 
the manor. It is not uncommon to find these rolls commencing in 
the reign of our earliest Edward. 

Manors, though in substance perhaps as ancient as the Saxon 
constitution, are considered by the best writers on English an- 
tiquities as of Norman introduction. Dugdale says, the reign of 
Edward the Confessor is the first in which they are mentioned. 

Every lord of a manor, holding immediately of the crown, was, 
during the first century after the Conquest, deemed a baron, and 
his manor a barony. 

To every manor was appendant a jurisdiction, and a court called 
the Court Baron. 

The persons employed in servitude within a manor, were called 
Villani, or Villeins. They originally belonged, with their children 
and effects, to the lord of the soil, like the rest of the cattle or 
stock upon it. 

Villeins and their children having been permitted to enjoy their 
possessions without interruption in a regular course of descent, the 
common law gave them title to prescribe against their lords, and, 
on performance of the same services, to hold their lands in spite of 
any determination of the lord's will. For though, in general, they 
are still said to hold their estates at the will of the lord, yet it 
is such a will as is agreeable to the custom of the manor, which 
customs are preserved and evidenced by the Rolls of the several 
Courts Baron in which they are entered, or kept on foot by the 
constant immemorial usage of the several manors in which the 
lands lie. As such tenants had nothing to show for their estates 
but these customs, and admissions in pursuance of them, entered 
on these rolls, or the copies of such entries witnessed by the steward, 
they now began to be called tenants by copy of court roll, and 
their tenure itself a copyhold. 

These manors which, by Domesday Book, appear to have belonged 
to the crown at that period, are called Ancient Demesne; they 
amount to 1422. 

The number of other manors mentioned in Domesday is very 
great. Earl Moretaine held 793 ; Alan, Earl of Bretagne, 442 ; 
Odo, Bishop of Baieux, 439 ; the Bishop of Coutance, 280 ; Roger 
de Bassi, 174; Ilbert de Laci, 164: William Peverel, 162; Eobert 
de Stadford, 150; Roger de Laci, 116; forming a total of 2720 
manors, given to nine persons. 



ROTULL 87 

Copyhold Court Rolls may be of the greatest utility to the 
genealogist. They contain the names, residences, and descriptions 
of the tenants; the lands they hold of the manor, how they 
acquired them, whether on the death of relations as heirs, or by 
devise, or by purchase. They contain the dates of the tenants' 
deaths, their wills (if any), their marriages, the deaths or survivor- 
ships of their wives, and their heirs, if they died without wills. 

Nothing can be more complete than such information ; and when 
we consider how seldom families in the country expatriate them- 
selves from the parish or district where their fathers and forefathers 
resided, and that the very same families are still often found in the 
modern, as in the most ancient, rolls of manors, we shall perceive 
that such tenants would probably be able, with very little trouble, 
to trace their ancestors, and obtain particulars of their families, for 
three or four centuries past. 

It is agreed by all men (says Lambarde), that there were never 
any bondmen or villaines in Kent, neither were they there so much 
bounden to the gentrie by copyhold or customary tenures as the 
inhabitants of the western countries; for copyhold tenure is rare 
in Kent. 

The Court Rolls of the Honours and Manors formerly belonging 
to the crown, from 1 Edward I. to the reign of Charles I., are 
deposited at Carlton Ride. 

Those from the reign of Henry VIII. to the present time are 
preserved at the Land Revenue Office. 

In Chancery are Court Rolls from 17 Edward I. to 1687. 

The Court Rolls of Manors formerly in possession of the crown, 
by attainder, escheat, exchange, forfeiture, purchase, or other causes, 
chiefly from Edward I. to Henry VIII., are in the Chapter House. 

A great variety of these records will be found at the British 
Museum, and in the libraries of Oxford and Cambridge. 



Coronation Rolls. — Many of our ancient families have titles, 
honours, or profits arising from services to be performed at the 
coronations of our kings and queens, originating in grants made 
to, or privileges conferred upon, the ancestors of such families, by 
sovereigns of the earliest dynasties. Of such instances it will be 
sufficient to name the office of King's Champion, an honour which 
has been held by the family of Dymoke (conveyed occasionally 
through females) for many generations previous to the Conquest. 



88 BOTULI. 

On the intended coronation of the king, a commission is directed 
to certain great officers, directing them to inquire into, and allow 
or disallow, all claims of services or honours to be performed, as 
well as of allowances to be made, on the solemn day; and these 
proceedings have been preserved from very early times, and occa- 
sionally published. 

The most regular documents of this description are the <€ Coro- 
nation Rolls," preserved at the Rolls Chapel, which begin in the 
reign of King James I., and are continued regularly, including that 
of George IV., except that the Coronation Rolls of Charles I. and 
George III. are wanting. These rolls contain the commission and 
the proceedings of the commissioners appointed to hear and de- 
termine claims of service to be performed at coronations, and the 
oath taken and declaration made and signed by the king or queen 
when crowned. The roll is made up by the Clerk of the Crown, 
and delivered in open court by the two Qhief Justices to the Lord 
Chancellor, and by him to the Master of the Rolls, in order to be 
inrolled. 

There are no indexes to the Coronation Rolls ; but, as the whole 
proceedings at each coronation are contained in one roll, the claims, 
&c. recorded therein can be easily referred to. 

The earliest inrolment of a coronation is that of Aleanor, Queen 
of Henry III., in the Red Book of the Exchequer. The earliest 
printed account appears to be that of the coronation of Edward VI., 
which occurs at page 54 of Milles* ce Catalogue of Honor. 33 Land. 
1610. 

Amongst the printed accounts may be mentioned — 

"An Account of the Ceremonies observed in the Coronations of English 

Sovereigns." London, 1727. 4to. 
" Account of the Ceremonies observed in the Coronations of the Kings 

and Queens of England." (Jas. II.— Geo. II.) Lond. 1761. 4to. 
" Collections relative to Claims at Coronations, beginning with Rich. 11." 

Lond. 1838. 8vo. 

Manuscript Collections relating to Coronations will be found in 
various public repositories, as follows : — 

Miscellaneous. 

Ashmolean LibeabY : Quaedam de Coronationibus ; No. 863. 

Bkitish Museum : Be modo Coronationis ; Cotton. MSS. Claud. A. iii. ff. 7 b. 

17 ; Claud. E. viii. f. 10 5; Cleop. D. vii. f. 2 ; Nero, C. ix. f. 165 ; 

Tib. B. viii. ff. 33, 79 ; Tib. E. viii. ff. 43, 75, 84, 93; Vesp. C. xiv. 



EOTULI. S9 

CORONATIONS. 

f. 125 ; Yitell. C. xii. f. 232.— Lansd. MSS. 253, p. 166 ; 260, art. 4. ; 

21$.—Eargrave MS. Wl.—Add. MSS. 6307; 6308. 
British Museum : Qusedam de Coronationibus ; Add. MSS. 6032. f. 128 ; 

6113, f. 9 ; 6297, pp. 52, 53 ; 6338 ; 8167, f . 1 b ; 10,106 ; 14,294. 
Officers attending Coronations; Cotton. MSS. Tib. E. viii. ff. 33, 

75, 193 0; Yesp. A. v. ff. 1, 9, 12; Tib. C. xiv. ff. 113,118,119,133. 
Collections out of the " Liber Regalis " touching Coronations of 

Kings and Queens ; Earl. MS. 310, f. 43. 

Extracts from printed Works relating to the Coronations of Kings 



of England, from Will. I. to Edw. I. ; Add. MS. 6307, ff. 1—15. 

Collections relating to the Coronations of the Kings of England, 



from Hen. VIII. to Eliz. ; Add. MS. 6113. 
Coronation Claims; Margrave MS. 496. 



College op Akms : Many Papers relating to Coronations ; amongst others, 

Vincent MS. No. 25, and I. 18. 
Dean and Chapter op Westminster's Archives : Many papers and 

proceedings relating to Coronations, from Hen. VIII. to Geo. IV. 

The Liber Regalis, containing an exact Ordinal of the Service and 

Ceremonies used at the Coronation of the Kings and Queen's Consort. 
Probably prepared for the instruction of the prelates and nobles who 
assisted at the Coronation of King Eichard II. (1377.) A valuable and 
important manuscript. 1 

Inner Temple Library : Manner and Form of Coronations ; No. 531. 

Touching Coronations, &c. ; No. 512, AA. BB. 

Lambeth Palace: Ceremonies at Coronations, from Edw. VI. to Geo. III. 
(part printed) ; Misc. MSS. 1075 (A)— 1083 (C). 

William the Conqueror. 
Coronation of William I. ; Inner Temple Lib. No. 533 (vol. xxxvii.) 

Stephen. 
Coronation of King Stephen; Inner Temple Lib. No. 533 (vol. xxxvii.) 

Henry I. 

Coronation of Henry I. ; Inner Temple Lib. No. 533 (vol. xxxvii.) 

Henry II. 

Coronation of Henry II. ; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 1065, f. 50 ; Inner Temp. 
Lib. No. 533 (vol. xxxvii.) 

1 The manuscript copy of the Latin Gospels, upon which, it is said, the Saxon Kings 
of England took the Coronation Oath, is preserved in the British Museum. (Cotton. 
MS. Tib. A. ii.) It was much injured by the fire at Ashburnham House in 1731, but 
has been beautifully restored by Mr. Henry Gough, sen. A full description of the 
volume is given in Westwood's Pal&ographia Sacra. 



90 ROTULI. 

COEONATIONS. 

Manner, Form, and Usage of Gilbert de Strigulle, Marshal of England, at the 
Coronation of Henry II. ; Brit. Mus. Cotton. MS. Vesp. A. v. f. 9 ; 
Earl. MSS. 1065; 4176. 

ElCHARD I. 

Account of the Coronation; Brit. Mus. Cotton. MSS. Claud. C. iv. f. 236 ; 
Tib. E. viii. f. 160 5; Vesp. C. xiv. ff. 127, 130; Harl. MS. 293, 
f. 239.— Caius Coll. Cams. No. 665, f. 341.— Inner Temp. Lib. 
No. 533 (vol. xxxvii.) 

Order of the Coronation ; Brit. Mus. Harl. MSS. 158, f. 1 b ; 3504, f. 238. 

Hoveden's Account of the Coronation; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 310. 

Note of the Coronation; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 6032, f. 128 b. 

Henry III. 

Account of the Coronation ; Brit. Mus. Cotton. MS. Vesp. C. xiv. ff. 1 32, 141. 

Queen Eleanor. 
Account of her Coronation ; Brit. Mus. Cotton. MS. Vesp. C. xiv. f. 141. 
Officers and Services ; Brit. Mus. Cotton. MS. Claud. C. iv. f. 234 ; Harl. 

MSS. 293 ; 310, f. 30 5. 
Account of her Coronation, with Claims ; Exchequer {Red Book). 

Edward II. 
The Coronation; Brit. Mus. Cotton. MSS. Vitell. C. xii. f. 231 ; Vesp. C. 

xiv. ff. 116, 122; Harl. MS. 5019, f. 203.— Ashm. Lib. MS. 7354.— 

Pub. Lib. Camb. Mm. v. xii. — Tower of London. 
Extracts from Public Eecords relating to the Coronation ; Brit. Mus. Harl. 

MS. 310, f. 35. 
Copy of Coronation Boll; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 714, f. 1; Lansd. MS. 

317, f. 16. 
Form of the Coronation; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 3504, f. 238. 

Edward III. 
Account of the Coronation; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 5019. 

Richard II. 

The Coronation; Ashmolean Lib. No. 7354, pp.1, 89.— Brit. Mus. Cott. 
MSS. Domit. xviii. ff. 2, 12 ; Nero, D. vi. f. 70 ; Tib. E. viii. ff. 26, 
39 b, 160 b ; Vesp. B. xv. f. 2 ; Vit. C. xii. ; Lansd. MS. 317, f. 16.— 
Coll. of Arms, Vincent MS. 25.— Pub. Lib. Camb. Mm. iii. 29. 

Claims and Allowances ; Brit. Mus. Cotton. MSS. Domit. xviii. ; Tib. D. vi. ; 
Vit.C.iv. ; Harl. MSS.U9 } f. 61 ; 714, f. 11 ; 1309. ; Lansd. MS. 279. — 
Lincoln's Inn Lib. — Tower of London. 

Extracts from Claus Boll; Brit. Mus. Harl MS. 592, f. 13. 



ROTULI. 91 

COEONATIONS. 

Henry IV. 

Koll of Services performed; Bbit. Mus. Cotton. MS, Vesp. C. xiv. f. 133 ; 

Lansd.MSS. 280; 317, f. 28. 
Claims and Allowances; Brit. Mus. Sari. MS. 1385, f. 17 ; Lansd. MS. 

279. — Tower op London. 
Dinner at Coronation, &c. ; Brit. Mus. Sari. MS. 279, ff. 46, 47. 
Copy of Coronation Roll; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 714. 

Henry V. 

Claims and Allowances; Brit. Mus. Cotton. MS. Tib. E. viii. f. 75; Earl. 

MSS. 592, f. 24; 310; Lansd. MS. 279.— Tower or London. 
Sergeanties, &c. ; Ashm. Lib. MS. 7354, p. 42. 

Queen Katherine. 
Coronation; Brit. Mus. Sari. MS. 169, f. 43.— Ashm. Lib. MS. 7354, 
d. 129. 

Henry VI. 

Coronation ; Brit. Mus. Cotton. MSS. Nero, C. ix. f. 172 ; Tib. E. viii. ff. 83, 
85 ; Lansd. MS. 285; Add. MS. 6113, ff. 45, 49.— Ashm. Lib. MS. 
7354, p. 135. 

Edward IV. 

Coronation; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 6113, f. 102 b.— Queen's Coll. Oxf. 
MS. li. 
Richard III. 

Proceedings at the Coronation of the King and Queen Anne; Brit. Mus. 

Sari. MSS. 1386, f. 16 (a.b.); 2115, f. 152 (a.b.); Add. MSS. 6307, 

f. 16 ; 6113, f. 9.— Ashm. Lie. MS. 8495, f. 41. 
Claims and Allowances; State Paper Office. 

Henry VII. 

Coronation of the King and Queen; Brit. Mus. Cotton. MS. Jul. B. xii. 

p. 28; Sari. MS. 5111, art. 7; Eg. MS. 985.— Ashm. Lib. MS. 

7354, pp. 145, 165. 
Largess given to Heralds ; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 6297, p. 52. 
Claims and Allowances ; State Paper Office. 

Henry VIII. 

Coronation of the King ; Brit. Mus. Cotton. MS. Tib. E. viii. f. 100* ; Add. 

MS. 6297, p. 344.— Coll, of Arms, Vincent MS. 25. 
Claims and Allowances ; State Pa.per Office. 
Coronation of Queen Anne Boleyn ; Brit. Mus. Cotton. MS. Vesp. C. xiv 

f. 124; Earl. m?.41,ff.2, 13, 15; 543, f. 119; Eg. MS. 985, f. 48; 
1 With Notes in the King's handwriting. 



92 EOTULL 

COEONATIONS. 

Add. MSS. 6113, ff. 22,32; 6284; 6285.— Trin.Coll. Dublin; 1.68, 
art 2. 
Names of Nobles who did Homage ; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 6113, f. 71. 

Edward VI. 
Coronation; Brit. Mus. Harl. MSS. 169, f. 45 £; 353, f. 3; 2308; 8504, 

f. 238 ; Add. MSS. 6307, f. 18 ; 9069.— Caius Coll. Camb.No. 665, 

f. 344.— Lambeth Palace; MS. 1075 (A).— Soc. op Ant. MS. 123. 
Claims ; Brit. Mus. Cotton. MS. Vesp. A. v. f.l ; Earl. MS. 51 76, art. 25.— 

State Paper Office. 

A printed account of the Coronation of this king, will be found in 

" The Catalogue of Honor, by T. Milles." Lond. 1610,/ota>, p. 54. 

Maby. 
Manner of the Coronation; Brit. Mus. Cotton. MS. App. xxviii. f. 91. 
Order of Procession ; Society of Antiquaries, MS. 123. 
Claims and Allowances; State Paper Office. 

Elizabeth. 

Coronation Boll; Ashm. Lib. MS. 7354. — Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 6297, 

p. 356. 
Claims and Allowances ; State Paper Office. 
Ceremonies at the Coronation; Ashmolean Library, MS. 863. 

James I. 

Coronation of the King and Queen Anne: Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 293, 
f. 212 b; Add. MSS. 4712; 6284, f. 40.— Lambeth Lib. MS. 1075 (B). 

Claims and Allowances ; State Paper Office. 

A printed account of the Coronation will be found in a book entitled, 
"England's Caesar; His Majestie's most royall Coronation, &c. by 
H. Petowe " Lond. 1603. 4to. 

Charles I. 
Form of the Coronation of Charles I. and his Queen ; Brit. Mus. Harl. MSS. 

4707; 5222; Add. MS. 6297, ff. 279, 330, 362.— College of 

Arms {Orig. MS.) — Duchy of Cornwall Office. — Lambeth Lib. 

MS. 1076.— Queen's Coll. Oxf. MS. cxxii. f. 23.— St. John's 

Coll. Camb. MS. L. 12. 
Claims and Allowances ; State Paper Office. 

There are several printed accounts of the Coronation, viz. " The Forme 

and Order of the Coronation of Charles II." &c. Aberdeen, 1651. 4to. : 

reprinted in 1660, 4to. — "The Entertainment of His Majestie Chas. LT. 

in his Passage to his Coronation, &c. by J. Ogilby." Lond. 1662, folio. 

— " A Circumstantial Account of the Coronation, &c. &c. by Sir 

Edward Walker, Garter." Lond. 1820. 8vo. 



ROTULI. 93 

COEONATIONS. 

Charles II. 

Ceremonies at the Coronation; Ashmolean Lib. MS. 819. — Beit. Mus. 

Sari. MS. 4129; Add. MSS. 6338, p. 1 ; 15,170, f. 135.— Lamb, 

Lib. MS. 1083(C). 
Processus ad Coronationem ; Brit. Mus. Sari. MSS. 4238 ; 6025, ff. 1—236. 
Proceedings at the Coronation; Beit. Mus. Sari. MS. 6815. 
Names of Nobility to attend the Coronation; Beit. Mus. Add. MS. 6303, 

f. 40 b. 
Claims and Allowances ; State Papee Office. 

A printed account of the Coronation will be found in a work entitled 

" The entire Ceremonies of the Coronation of King Charles II." &c. 

Lond. 1761, 4to. 

James II. 

Ceremonies observed at the Coronation; Beit. Mus. Sari. MS. 6815 ; Add. 
MSS. 6286 ; 6307, ff. 22, 25, 27 ; 6338, pp. 61, 103.— Coll. of Arms, 
L. 19.— Lambeth Library, MS. 1083 (C). 

Processus et Clamea ; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 3964 ; Lansd. MS. 281, f. 1.— 
Bodl. Lib. Douce MS. cxcvii. 

Expenses of Coronation ; Board of Green Cloth. 

The printed accounts are : "An Account of the Ceremonial at the 
Coronation of James II. and his Queen." Lond. 1685, folio. — "The 
History of the Coronation, &c. by Fr. Sandford, Lancaster Eerald" 
Lond. 1687, folio. — " An Account of the Ceremonies observed at Coro- 
nations," &c. Lond. 1761, 4to. 

William and Mary. 

Ceremonial of the Coronation; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 6307, p. 28. — Coll. 
of Arms, L. 19. 

Papers relating to the Coronation; Brit. Mus. Sari. MS. 6815, f. 152, 
et seq. 

Processus ad Coronationem; Brit. Mus. Lamd. MSS. 281, f. 51; 282. 

Formulary of the Coronation ; Lambeth Lib. MS. 1077. 

There are several printed accounts, viz. — " The Proceeding to the 
Coronation of their Majesties King William and Queen Mary." Lond. 
(a print).^-" An Account of the Ceremonial at the Coronation," &c. 
1689, folio. (Drawn up by Greg. King). — "An Account of the Cere- 
monies observed at Coronations," &c. Lond. 1761, 4to. 

Anne. 

Processus ad Coronationem; Bodl. Lib. Douce Mb. cecxvi. — Coll. of 
Arms, L. 19. 



94 EOTULL 

CORONATIONS. 

Formulary of the Coronation; Beit. Mus. Earl. MS. 6118. — Lamb. Lib. 
MS. 1078. 

A printed account of the Coronation will be found in a work entitled 
"An Account of the Ceremonies observed at Coronations," &c. Lond. 
1761, 4to. 

George I. 
Processus factus ad Coronationem ; Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 283. — Coll. op 

Arms, L. 19. — Inner Temple Lib, MS. 503. 
Formulary for the Coronation; Brit. Mus. Earl MSS. 6116 ; 6117 ; Add. 

MS. 6281. 
Claims; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 6282. 

& printed account of the Coronation is given in a work entitled, "An 

Account of the Ceremonies observed at Coronations," &c. Zww?.1761,4to. 

George II. 

Processus factus ad Coronationem Kegis et Reginae ; Brit. Mus. Lansd. MSS. 
284; 1190; Add. MS. 6307, f. 33; Bodl. Lib. Douce MS. cccl.— 
Coll. of Arms, L. 19. — Inner Temple Lib. MS. 503. 

Forms to be observed; Lambeth Lib. MSS. 1079 (A.B.) 1080—1082. 

Proceedings of Court of Claims ; Crown Office. 

The printed accounts are : " The Solemnities a* ihe Coronation of 
Geo. II. 1727." 8vo.— "Form of the Proceeding to the Koyal Corona- 
tion," kc.folio. — " An Account of the Coronation." Lond. 1760, 4to. — 
" An Account of the Ceremonies observed at Coronations," &c. Lond. 
1761, 4to. 

George III. 
Coronation of the King and Queen; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 6307, f. 35. — 

Coll. of Arms, L. 19. — Lambeth Library, MS. 1083 (A — C). 
Claims and Allowances ; Crown Office. 
Expenses of Coronation ; Great Wardrobe Office. 

There are several printed accounts of the Coronation, viz. "The Form 

and Order of the Service, and Ceremonies to be observed, &c." Lond. 

1761, 4to. — " The Forms of proceeding to the Coronation of Geo. III." 

Lond. 1761, folio. — "An Account of the Ceremonies observed at the 

Coronation," &c. Lond. 1761, 4to. 

George IV. 
Proceedings of Court of Claims ; Crown Office. 

William IV. 
Proceedings of Court of Claims ; Crown Office. 

Victoria. 

Proceedings and Claims ; Crown Office. 



ROTULL 95 

Coroner's Rolls. — The duties of the modern Coroner differ 
greatly from those expected from this official in ancient times. 
In the 4th year of Edward I. it was decreed, that a coroner's duty 
was to go to the places where any be slain, or suddenly dead or 
wounded, or where houses were broken, or where treasure was said 
to be found, and inquiry was to be made of persons culpable, and 
the inquisition thereon "was to be written in Rolls; 33 and the 
coroner was to make further inquiry what goods the culpable had, 
what corn he had in his graunge ; if a freeman, how much land he 
had, and what it was worth yearly, and what corn he had upon the 
ground. His duty was also to attach parties on appeal of rape, on 
appeal of wounds. The particulars of " all which things are to be 
inrolled in the Roll of the Coroners 33 

Such were the duties anciently expected from a coroner; but 
now, unless by custom, as in Northumberland and elsewhere, no 
coroner can take an inquisition but on death. 

There are particular coroners for every county of England ; some- 
times two, four, or six. There are also special coroners for divers 
liberties, as the Coroner of the Verge of the King's Court, of the 
city of London, the borough of Southwark, of both the Universities, 
and for cities which are counties in themselves. 

The Coroner's Rolls were anciently returned to the Crown Office, 
and filed along with the indictments and informations ; but the prac- 
tice of returning them to that court has been for many years dis- 
continued; and many have been consequently either lost after a few 
years, or now remain in the hands of private individuals having no 
right to them, no knowledge of their contents, and no wish even to 
preserve them. 

Modern Coroner's Inquisitions, such at least as exist, must be 
searched for at the respective Coroners' Offices. 

Inquisitions on which proceedings have subsequently taken place, 
as where the jurors have found verdicts of murder, manslaughter, 
and the like, should be searched for at the Office of the Clerk of 
Assize, or Clerk, of the Court, where the further investigation 
occurred. 

Coroner's Rolls or Inquisitions in the reigns of Edward I., II., 
III., Richard II., and Henry IV., will be found at the Chapter 
House. 

Matters concerning Coroners are entered on the Close Rolls, at 
the Tower. 



96 ROTULI. 

Returns of Writs for electing Coroners will be found at the Petty 
Bag Office. 

Inquisitions taken on view of the bodies of Prisoners who have 
died in the Queen's Bench Prisons, from the year 1771, are at the 
Crown Office. 

No instance has yet been met with of these rolls having been 
used as evidence for genealogical purposes. 

Escheat Rolls. — The Escheat Rolls, although bearing a name 
often given to Inquisitions Post Mortem, are of a different nature, 
and have different contents. They contain the escheators* accounts 
of lands and property escheated to the crown from various causes, 
and the profits of the same. 

The Rolls begin with the reign of Henry III. ; but it is stated 
in Madox's History of the Exchequer, folio, p. 205, that escheats 
were holden in the time of Henry II., Richard I., and John, by the 
sheriffs of the county where they lay, who answered for them in the 
Great Rolls (Pipe Rolls), under the title of Be Propresturis et 
Escaetis. About the end of the reign of Henry II. they began to 
form an Escheatry ; for at that time the escheats lying in several 
counties were placed together, and particular rolls made for them ; 
and in the reign of Richard I. the smaller escheats in the several 
counties were committed to one or more persons, who answered for 
the profits, and the rolls of their accounts are called Rotuli de 
Escaetis. In subsequent times the Escheatry was managed by 
officers called at first Custodes Escaetarum, or Escaetrie, and after- 
wards Escheators. 

From the continued oppression of the nobility by our kings in 
early times, and the destruction of noble families by the civil wars 
in the reigns of the Henrys and Edwards, it may be presumed 
that the Escheat Rolls relate to about one-third of the whole 
ancient peerage, and to a great proportion of the best families of 
the kingdom. 

Escheat Rolls, containing the escheators' accounts of lands, &c. 
escheated to the crown from 47 Henry III., are deposited at 
Carlton Ride. 

There are Escheat Rolls among the Pipe Miscellaneous Records, 
from about 33 Edward I. to about 7 Elizabeth. Escheats are also 
entered on the Pipe Rolls. 

The Escheat Rolls, particularly one large roll, temp. Henry IV., 



ROTULL 97 

containing most of the counties, formerly at the Augmentation 
Office, are also at Caklton Ride. 

In the Testa de Nevil are entries of escheats, as well of the 
lands of the Normans as others. Upon the separation of Normandy 
from England, the King of France seized the lands which the 
English held in Normandy, and the King of England in like manner 
seized the lands which the Normans held in England. By this 
means the lands in England holden by Normans became vested in 
the King of England as escheats, under the name of Terra Norman- 
norum, which were granted out as the king thought fit. 

Extracts from the Escheat Rolls will be found in other public 
repositories, as follows : — 

An Index of the Heirs of Noble Families, extracted from the Escheats and 
other Kecords in the Tower, from Edw. I. to the end of the reign of 
Henry VIII. ; Brit. Mus. Cotton. MS. Claud. C. viii. 1 

Calendar of the " Kotuli Escaetarum," from Edw. I. to Edw. IV. ; Beit. Mus. 
Lansd. MS. 804, f. 1. 

Excerpts from the Escheat Rolls, from Hen. III. to Philip and Mary ; Brit. 
Mus. Earl. MS. 640. 

34 Hen. Ill— Mary; Bodl. Lib. MSS. 4186; 4190; 5002; 

5006. 

_ i_25 Edw. I. ; Coll. of Arms, MS. B. 34. 

o. Edw. II., and from 1 to 21 Hen. IV. ; Coll. op Arms, 



MSS.B. 30; 31. 
16—20 Edw. II., et 1 Edw. III., Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 362, 

ff. 18, 20. 

5—25 Edw. III.; Bodl. Lib. MS. 5002. (flodesw. MS. vol. lx.) 

Edw. III.— Hen. V. ; Coll. of Arms, Philvpot MS. 41, Pb. 

1 Bic. II.— 4 Edw. IV.; Bodl. Lib. MS. 4190. (Dodesw. MS. 

vol. xlviii.) 
temp. Elizabeth; Brit. Mus. Earl. MSS. 639, f. 145; 7567, 

art. 14. 

relating to Kent : Brit. Mus. AM. MS. 5483. 

■ relating to Yorkshire : Coll. of Arms, Vincent MS. 416. 

A Calendar formed of the Escheators* Accounts and Inquisitions, 
from 1 Henry VII., is printed in the Deputy Keeper of Records' 
10th Rep. App. ii. pp. 1-222. 

No instance has yet been met of these records having been given, 
ju evidence for genealogical purposes. 

1 A very necessary addition to Cole's Escheats. {Vide ante, p. 78.) 

7 



98 ROTULI. 

The Fine Rolls. — The Fine Rolls contain accounts of fines paid 
to the king for licenses to alienate lands, for freedom from knight 
service, or being knighted (pro exonerations militum), for passing 
and renewal of charters and grants for livery of lands, pro licentia 
concordandi, for wardships, for safe conduct, for pardons; patents 
to escheators, customers, comptrollers, searchers, and other officers 
in the gift of the Lord Treasurer ; writs de diem clausit extremum, 
which issued before the taking away of the Court of Wards and 
Liveries, and the abolition of tenures in capite ; writs of inquiry on 
amortising lands, writs ad quod damnum, &c. 

The Fine Rolls prior to the reign of Edward V. are preserved at 
the Tower. 

The subsequent records are at the Rolls Chapel, and are called 
Fine, or Lord Treasurer's Rolls. 

There is a roll in the Tower, of the 20th Edward III., having no 
other contents than the fines pro exoneratione militum. 

There are collections from the Fine Rolls in other repositories, 
as follows : — 

Breve abstractum e rott. Finium, eorum, quae ad Stemmatum Familiarumque 
Anglicarum, series enucleandaa spectant. selectum: Brit. Mrs. Harl. 
MS. 294. 

Collectanea rott. Finium, temp. Ric. I.; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 301, f. 14. 

temp. Johannis ; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 86, f. 100. 

temp. Hen. III. ; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 86, f. 256.— Bodl. Lib. 

MS. 4198. 

1—30 Hen. III.; Exeter Coll. Oxf. MS. cxxxi. 

1 Hen. III.— 11 Edw. IV.; Bodl. Lib. MSS. 4194; 4198; 



5025. 
Sumraa rott. Finium, a 20 Edw. I. ad 11 Edw. III. ; Exeter Coll. Oxf 

MS. cxxii. 
Abbreviations rott. Finium, temp. Edw. III. ; Bodl. Lib. MSS. 4194 t 

5025. 

20 Edw. III. ; Caius Coll. Camb. MS. 581. 

- . 45 Edw. III.— 11 Edw. IV. ; Bodl. Lib. MS. 4198. 

. tempp. Ric. II., Hen. IV.— Edw. IV.; Bodl. Lib. MS. 4194. 

The Fine Rolls of King John, and extracts from those of 
Henry III., were printed by the Record Commissioners, under the 
following titles : — " Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus in Turri Londinensi 
asservati, tempore Regis Johannis." 1 vol. 8vo. 1835. 

These are oblations or fines paid to the king for the enjoyment 
of honours, offices, lands, liberties, and privileges. 



ROTULI. 



9'J 



t( Excerpta e Rotulis Finium in Turri Londinensi asservatis, 
temp. Henr. III., 1216-1272." 2 vols. 8vo. 1835-1836. 

These are selections from the Fine Rolls, for the purposes of 
genealogy. 

The present price of the first work is 18$., that of the last £1 . 1 2s. 

The French Rolls. — The records bearing the title of the French 
Rolls relate to transactions occurring in, or relating to, France, 
whilst the English held possession of part of that country ; and the 
charters and writs entered on the rolls were transmitted to the 
Chancery at Westminster for inrolment, because the Exchequer of 
Westminster had the superintendence over all the countries de- 
pendent on the Crown of England; several charters also, having 
been tested at London, Westminster, or other places in England, 
were retained here, and copies only forwarded to the dependent 
provinces. The contents of these rolls are similar to those of their 
sister records, the Norman and Gascon Rolls. 

The French Rolls have long been consulted by genealogists ; and 
the pages of Dugdale and Collins abound in references to them in 
support of their compilations. They have, however, been used by 
those authors who have published genealogical works, more to 
assist them in the biography of the barons and great men of 
ancient days, and in illustration of their actions, than as records to 
prove the dates of births, marriages, and deaths, particulars which 
are not the primary objects of these rolls, and which are chiefly in 
the Post Mortem Inquisitions, and in some other records. 

The Rolls, about 150 in number, range from the reign of 
Henry III. to the 22d year of Edward IV., and are thus dis 
tributed : — 



Reign. 


No. of Rolls. 


18 and 48 Hen. III. 


2 


1 — 4 Edw. II. . 


4 


14 — 51 Edw. III. . . 


39 nearly one roll annually 


1—23 Rich. II. . 


22 Ditto. 


1 — 14 Hen. IV. . 


12 Ditto. 


1 — 10 Hen. V. . . 


. 10 Ditto. 


1 — 39 Hen. VI. . 


40 Ditto. 


1—22 Edw. IV. . 


22 Ditto. 



They are deposited among the records at the Towlbl. 



100 ROTULL 

In the Ashmolean Library are : — 

Extractaerott. Eranciffi, temp. Edw. III. ; MSS. 7376; 7377; 7378. 

In the British Museum are similar extracts, as follows : — 

14—30 Edw. III., 1—6, 19, 20 Eic. II {Harl. MS. 2197.) 

1 Ric. IT.— Edw. IV. (Harl. MS. 92,ff.76, 51, 63,145,193 5.) 

1—5 Hen. IV. (Earl. MS. 4195, if. 7, 10 5, 13.) 

A Catalogue of the French Rolls was printed by Thomas Carte, 
Esq. in 1743. This work contains catalogues of the Norman and 
Gascon Rolls, as well as the French, and has the following title : — 
" Catalogue des Rolles Gascons, Normans, et Francois, conserves 
dans les Archives de la Tour de Londres, tire d'apres celui du 
Garde des dites Archives," &c. Sec. a Londres, 1743. 2 vols, folio. 

The Gascon Rolls. — The Vascon or Gascon Rolls, as they are 
termed, relate to transactions occurring in, or relating to, Gascony, 
whilst that province was under the dominion of the English kings. 
The charters and writs entered on the rolls were transmitted to the 
Chancery at Westminster for inrolment, for the reasons stated in 
the preceding page. 

The Rolls contain Grants of lands, of fairs, of rent charges, of 
liberties to individuals and boroughs, of markets, of the goods and 
chattels of deceased tenants in capite. 

Licenses, to receive seizin of lands, to inclose forest lands, to 
contract marriage, to have safe conduct, to erect mills, fortresses, 
fortified mansions, for widows to receive dower, to seize possessions, 
to have duels, to have trials, to make compositions, to give seizin to 
sons of their fathers' possessions, to alienate, to remain at home on 
account of illness. 

Orders, for payment of money, to prepare for the king's service, 
to reduce fines due from the king's tenants, to complete buildings, 
to inquire as to lands in mortmain, to do justice, to inquire the 
extent, boundaries, and value of lands of tenants in capite, con- 
cerning the coinage, to commit to prison, for the execution of wills, 
to annul sales of lands, concerning soldiers. 

Appointments to places, oaths of kings and subjects, oaths of 
fealty, treaties of peace, confirmations of charters, contracts of mar- 
riage, letters credential, pardons to noblemen and others, releases 
of dower. 



ROTULL 101 

The rolls are about 131 in number, viz. : — 

Reiyn, JVb. of Rolls. I Reign. No. of Roll*. 

Hen. Ill 5 Hen. IV 7 

Edw. 1 16 Hen. V 5 

Edw. II 7 Hen. VI 24 

Edw. Ill 51 Edw. IV 

Rich. II ]6 ' 

and are thus divided : — 

Charters and Patents, 26 Hen. III. 

Contra brevia, ) 

Fines, > 27 Hen. III. 

Liberate, ) 

Vascon generally, 39 Hen. III.— 22 Edw. I. 

Protections, 22 Edw. I. 

Vascon generally, 23 Edw. I.— 7 Edw. IV. 

These records are preserved at the Towek. 
Numerous volumes of extracts from these rolls will be found in 
Public Libraries, as follows : — 

Abstracts of the Foreign .Rolls, or Rotuli Vasconice. etc., tempp. Hen. III., 

Edw. I.— III., Kich. II., Hen. IV.— VI. ; Coll. op Arms, MS. B. 15. 
Collectio Cartarum, etc. de rebus ad Vasconiam, et Ducatum Aquitaniae 

spectantibus, tempp. Hen. III., et Edw. I. et II. ; Brit. Mus. Cotton. 

MS. Julius, E. i. 
Collectanea e rott. Patentium de Vasconia, tempp. Hen. III. — Edw. II. ; 

Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 320. 

26 Hen. Ill— 7 Edw. I.; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 93. art. 2. 

temp. Edw. III. ; Ashm. Lib. MSS. 7377 ; 7378. 

A transcript from the Eotulus Vasconice, 1 Edw. III. ; Brit. Mus. Lansd. 

MS. 315, f. 167. 
Excerpta e rott. Vasconise, 14—28 Edw. III., 21 et 22 Ric. II. ; Brit. 

Mus. Earl. MS. 2197. 
tempp. "Ric. II., Hen. IV., Hen. V., et Hen. VI. ; Brit. Mus. 

Earl. MSS. 92, ff. 1, 45 b, 64 b, 145 ; 4195, ff. 19, 40 b t 42. 

A Catalogue of the Gascon Rolls was published in 1743, by- 
Thomas Carte, the author of a History of England, under the 
following title : — " Catalogue des Rolles Gascons, Normans, et 
Francois, conserves dans les Archives de la Tour de Londres, tire 
d } apres celui du Garde des dites Archives/' &c. &c. a Londres, 1743, 
2 vols, folio. It is said that Carte's Catalogue is not free from errors 
and omissions ; the value of such a work is nevertheless undoubted. 



102 ROTULL 

The Norman Rolls. — It is said in Normandy that their ancient 
archives were destroyed by the policy of Richelieu. 

These Rolls derive their name from their relating to the affairs of 
Normandy, or to indifferent transactions which took place there. 
They contain 3uch letters and grants of the kings of England as 
almost exclusively relate to the Norman provinces, over which, 
whilst annexed to the English crown, our monarchs exercised the 
same authority as in this kingdom. Owing probably to the negli- 
gence of the Chancery clerks, entries, having no relation to either of 
the above-named circumstances, will be often found therein. Those 
which remain among the Tower Records contain, not only the instru- 
ments relating to Normandy which passed the Great Seal, but also 
the chirographs and concords which were effected before the 
Exchequer at Rouen. 

The Rolls are divided into classes for the different subjects they 
contain. They extend over a period of 256 years, commencing in 
the 2d of King John; but, that prince having lost the Norman 
dominion, they were discontinued from his time till the recovery of 
it by Henry V. 

The Rolls are distributed into the following heads : — 

Date. 

2 John, Charter. 

— Contra brevia. 1 

Oblata. 

4 Contra brevia. 

5 Close. 

6 De valore terrarum. 

46, 47 Henry HL 3 Liberate. 

20 Edw. III., Patent and Charter. 
5—10 Hen. V., Patent. 

The contents of these Records are important to the genealogist, as 
they relate to a great proportion of the men of consequence of 
ancient days, most of whom were of Norman origin, and possessed 
property in that duchy. The events to which they relate are so 
various and numerous, that a few only can be here enumerated. 
In them we find letters of safe conduct and protection, confirmations 
of every description, grants of all sorts, pardons, attornments, royal 
licenses to individuals, for innumerable permissions, restitutions, 
writs for doing justice, for trials, for taking into custody, for pre- 

1 These contain orders for payment of money, seisin of lands, and other matters 
relating to ^ormanriv. 



ROTULL 103 

venting duels, for legitimatizing, for marriage between private 
individuals, grants of wardship, exemplification of charters, fines, 
authorities for levying taxes, examination of witnesses, and licenses 
to import, to catch wild beasts, to trade, and to travel. In them 
will also be found a curious account of the lands in England, held 
by the Normans in the 6th of John. 

The Rolls are preserved at the Tower. 

The earliest of the originals has this commencement : — " Hie est 
rotulus Cartarum et Cyrografarum Normannise factus tempore 
Guarini de Glapion tunc Senescalli Normannise anno secundo 
Regni Regis Johannis,Assistentibus ad Scaccarium Sansone Abbate, 
Cadomi et Radulfo Labe, Petro de Lions clerico Domini Regis." 

In the British Museum are excerpts from these records, temp. 
John (HarL MS, 88, ff. 18, 192) ; and 5—10 Henry V. {HarL MS. 
92, f. 77 A.) 

In the same library is a collection of eight hundred and eighteen 
original documents, consisting of muster rolls, warrants, acquit- 
tances, indentures, payments, charters, etc., illustrative of the history 
of France during its occupation by the English, or having reference 
to English affairs, from the year 1231 to the end of the sixteenth 
century. {Add. Ch. 3294-4123.) 

In the Ashmolean Library is a volume of Excerpts for the reign 
of Edward III. (Ashm. MS. 7376, pp. 73, 151.) 

A Catalogue of the Norman, Gascon, and French Rolls, was 
published at the private expense of Thomas Carte, the author of a 
History of England, bearing the following title : — ci Catalogue des 
Rolles Gascons, Normans, et Francois, conserves dans les Archives 
de la Tour de Londres tired'apres celui du Garde des dites Archives" 
&c. &c. a Londres, 1743, 2 vols, folio. 

This catalogue contains the title, date, and matters of about 
20,000 charters, but is said to be not free from errors or omissions. 
The value of such a work to the public is nevertheless undoubted. 

The Rolls for the reign of John, and for the 5 Henry V., have 
been printed under the direction of the late Record Commissioners. 
The work has for title : — " Rotuli Normannm in Turri Londinensi 
asservati, a.d. 1200—1205, et 1417—1418." 1 vol. 8vo. 1835. 

The present price of this volume is 12s. 6d. 

In the year 1840, the Antiquarian Society published the Great 
Rolls of the Exchequer of Normandy, under the following title . — 
" Magni Rotuli Scaccarii Normannia, sub regibus Anglic, euro, 
Stapleton" 2 vols. 



104 EOTULL 

The Hundred Rolls. — One of the first acts of Edward I., on lis 
return to England after the death of his father, was to inquire into 
the state of the demesnes, and of the right and revenues of the 
crown; what lands were holden of the crown by knight service 
and other tenures, and whether immediately of the crown or of 
mesne lords, in order that the crown might be informed how to 
collect, and the subject how to pay, escuage for one species of tenure, 
and hidage or tallage for the other. Inquiry was also to be made 
into the conduct of the sheriffs and other officers and ministers, who 
had defrauded the king, and oppressed the people. 

A speedy remedy to the crown and the subject being necessary, 
and the circuit of the justices itinerant, who went it generally but 
once in seven years, not returning until the seventh year of this 
king's reign, he appointed special commissioners on the 11th of 
October to inquire into these matters. The "Hundred Rolls" 
contain inquisitions taken in pursuance of this commission. 

The Commissioners were commanded to survey, by the oath of 
knights and other lawful men, all cities, boroughs, and market 
towns ; to inquire of all demesnes, fees, honors, escheats, liberties, 
and things touching fees and tenements belonging to the king or to 
others; that is, to distinguish tenants holding in demesne or as 
villeins, bondmen, cottagers, and freeholders, and such as hold 
woods, parks, chases, warrens, waters, rivers, liberties, fairs, markets, 
and other tenures, how and of whom, and out of what fees escuage 
was wont and ought to be paid, with the amount of fees of all 
honors, who held them, and by what means, so that every town, 
hamlet, and other tenure, by whatsoever name distinguished, might 
be distinctly assessed and closely entered on rolls, and no man to be 
favoured. 

The Commissioners having, in the third year, returned their 
Rolls of Inquisitions, in obedience to the commission of 2 Edw. I., 
it was necessary for the Court of Exchequer to have, in one view, 
such parts of the returns as affected the rights of the crown and the 
abuses of its officers. Certain rolls were accordingly drawn up, 
containing a selection, under the denomination of Extracts, w hich 
supply the deficiency of the lost original Inquisitions, as, for a few 
counties, no Hundred Rolls have been yet discovered. 

These Extracts are entered on rolls in a handwriting coeval 
with the Inquisitions, and are preserved at the Chapter House. 

It appears that the original Hundred Rolls of 2 Edw. I. (see 
Close Rolls, 7 Edw. I. m. 8 d.) were delivered to the Justices in 



ROTULI. 105 

Eyre on their departure for their circuit, for the purpose of holding 
pleas ; and the verdict in Eyre, where there was one, and in like 
manner the judgment of the justices, or at least the effect thereof, 
were generally entered on the Hundred Rolls. The entries thereof 
were numerous in the counties of Gloucester and Lincoln, and afford 
evidence of the connection between the Hundred Rolls and the Quo 
Warranto Rolls, the latter being the proceedings had in respect of 
the Hundred Rolls, &c. It is also worthy of observation, that 
many of the same jurors who were upon the inquest, under the 
special commission, anno 2 Edward I., formed a part of the inquest 
on the inquiry upon the proceedings in Quo Warranto. 

It appears from the Patent Rolls, that thirty-five articles of 
inquiry were given to the commissioners. Twelve other articles, 
not discoverable on the Patent Rolls, are to be found among the 
returns, making in all forty-seven articles. The latter were adapted 
to the circumstances of the place ; and some of these are applicable 
to maritime counties only. After the 6 Edward I. these articles of 
inquiry formed a part of the " Capitula Corone et Itineris," under 
the title of " Nova Capitula," and were always given in charge 
by the justices on their circuits, on the crown side, to the Hun- 
dredors. 

The Hundred Rolls of 2 Edward I. afford evidence, upon the oath 
of a jury of each hundred and town in every county, 

I. Of all the demesne lands of the crown, whether ancient or newly acquired 

by escheat or purchase. 
II. Manors, &c. formerly in the hands of the crown, the persons holding 
the same, the authority, and how alienated. 

III. Tenants in capite, and tenants in ancient demesne. 

IV. The losses sustained by the crown in military services, and otherwise, 

by sub-infeudations made by such tenants. 
V. Alienations to the church under pretext of gifts in frankalmoigne. 
VI. Wardships, marriages, escheats, suits and services witholden and sub- 
tracted. 
VII. Fee-farms of the crown, hundreds, wapentakes, and tythings. 
VIII. Coasts, wreck of the sea, free chase, free warren, fisheries, and other 
jura regalia. 
IX. Oppressions of the nobility, clergy, &c. claiming to have such rights. 
X. Exactions by excessive and illegal tolls in fairs, for murage, pontage, &c, 
XI. Exactions of sheriffs, escheators, &c. 
XII. Unlawful exportations of wool, &c. 



106 BOTULL 

The original Inquisitions for Lincolnshire are in the Tower. 

Those for several other counties are in the Chapter House, 
Westminster. 

There are also Hundred Rolls taken hy virtue of a special com- 
mission, dated 12th March, 7 Edward I., but only those for Bedford, 
Buckingham, Cambridge, Huntingdon, and Oxford, are known to 
be extant. They differ from those of 2 Edward I., heing in the 
nature of a general survey. 

In the Tower is also a bundle of Inquisitions concerning Hun- 
dreds, taken in the 10 Edward II,, by virtue of writs directed to 
the sheriffs of the different counties. 

The whole of the Hundred Bolls and Extracts have been printed 
by order of the Becord Commissioners, under the following title : — 
u Rotuli Hundredorum, temp. Hen. III. et Edw. I. in Turri Lond. 
et in Curia Receptee Scaccarii Westm. asservati." 2 vols, folio, 
1812-1818. 

The other Hundred Bolls above mentioned are appended to the 
second volume. Indices Nominum et Locorum occur at the end of 
each volume. 

The genealogist may estimate the assistance these volumes are 
capable of affording, when it is mentioned that the Indices of Names 
contain references to about 70,000 persons. 

The price at which the Hundred Bolls were published was, 
£2. 2s. for vol. i., and £2. 12s. 6d. for vol. ii. The present price of 
the whole is £2. 2s. 

Liberate Bolls. — These are Bolls of precepts to the Treasurer 
and other great officers of the Exchequer, directing the payment of 
sums of money, such as pensions, salaries, stipends, and various 
other expenses of the state and royal household ; orders to ministers 
of the crown for the delivery of lands, castles, &c. ; writs to 
sheriffs, &c, to deliver possession of lands or goods which had 
been extended. 

The earliest of these, particularly those of Henry the Third's 
reign, like the Close Bolls of the same period, form a most inte- 
resting species of record. After the reign of Edward I. the instru- 
ments become of a less general nature, though to the genealogist, 
perhaps, equally useful. From Edward III. they contain compa- 
ratively little besides orders for the payment of salaries, to the 
judges and the law-officers of the crown. 

The quantity of important matter in these records may be esti- 



ROTULI. 107 

mated by the number of the rolls, which appears from Holmes' 
Calendar of Tower Records to be 147. 

Sir William Dugdale, and after him, William Collins, Esq., are 
the only authors known to have made use of the Liberate Rolls ; so 
remarkable indeed was the industry of the former, that few of our 
national records escaped his personal examination and transcribing 
hand. 

The records from 2 John to 14 Edward IV. are deposited in the 
Tower. 

Collections from the Liberate Bolls, temp. John, are in the 
British Museum. (Harl. MS. 86, f. 95.) 

Liberate Rolls, tempp. Henry III. and Edward I. are at the 
Rolls Chapel. 

An Index to the Liberate Rolls from 31 Hen. III. to Edw. IV. 
is at Exeter College, Oxford. (MS. xci.) 

Copies of those for 5 Edward II., and for 18, 21, 24, and 35 of 
Edward III., are in the Ashmolean Library. [MS. 7376.) 

The Rolls of 2, 3, and 5 John, were printed by the Record Com- 
mission, together with the Mists Roll of 11 John, also a Roll de 
Prestita of the 12th of John, with the following title : — " Rotuli 
de Liberate ac de Misis et Prcestitis, regnante Johanne" 1 vol. 8vo., 
1844. 

The Liberate Rolls contain writs issued out of Chancery, directed 
to the Treasurer and Chamberlain of the Exchequer, ordering 
them to deliver or pay money out of the Treasury. 

The Mists Roll contains an account of the daily expenses of the 
Court of King John. 

The Prtestita Roll contains the entry of sums of money which 
issued out of any of the royal treasuries by way of imprest, advance, 
or accommodation. 

The present price of this volume is 6s. 



The Memoranda Rolls. — The valuable records called Memo- 
randa contain inrolments of all the business of weight transacted 
in the Queen's Remembrancer's Office; viz., of writs of scire 
facias and proceedings thereon for recovery of debts due to the 
crown, writs of extents and proceedings thereon, special com- 
missions which have been issued for particular purposes, commis- 



108 BOTULL 

sions of inquiry, and proceedings thereon, whereby the estates of 
debtors and accountants to the crown, and estates forfeited to, or 
belonging to the crown, are seized into the king's hands, and com- 
missions and inquisitions thereupon returned or certified into the 
Court of Exchequer on attainder or forfeiture for treason or felony, 
and other special matters; informations on seizures made in the 
several ports of England of goods forfeited for nonpayment of 
customs or unlawful importation, and proceedings thereon, for- 
feitures arising to the -crown, and sometimes to the crown and 
informer, from offences committed against penal laws, transcripts 
of outlawries certified into the Court of Exchequer, and proceedings 
thereon, whereby seizures are made of lands and goods into the 
king's hands ; all recognizances taken in the office, proffers, being 
the particular sums of money payable half-yearly into the Exchequer 
by the sheriffs of the several counties, cities, and towns in England, 
and bailiffs of particular liberties; grants and patents under the 
Great and Privy Seals for several purposes, and warrants and con- 
stitutions under the sign manual, deeds and conveyances of estates 
made by private persons, affidavits for goods for which customs 
have been paid, and which have either been lost at sea or taken by 
enemies, also many orders, decrees, and proceedings in equity on 
English informations and bills. 

The earliest Memoranda Roll is that of 2 Henry III. The first 
Repertory Roll commences 1 Edward II., and the rolls continue to 
32 Charles II. In 25 Henry VIII. a different form of entering 
the heads of the Memoranda was adopted in books called Agenda 
books. 

The Memoranda of the Lord Treasurer's Remembrancer consist 
of the inrolments of a variety of pleadings in suits commenced and 
prosecuted in the Lord Treasurer's Remembrancer's Office, accord- 
ing to the course of the common law, with the judgments of the 
court thereon, particularly upon the writs during the existence of 
the military tenures of Quo titulo clamat, and of Quare maneria, §*c. 
in manibus regis seisiri non debent ; of pleadings on petitions of 
right grounded on records in the office, pleadings and judgments 
upon claims of franchises and privileges within cities, boroughs, 
towns, and liberties, pleadings respecting fines, issues, and amer- 
ciaments contained in the estreats delivered into the office from the 
several courts of Westminster and other jurisdictions, a few com- 
missions heretofore issued to survey lands and woods belonging to 



ROTULI. 109 

the crown, with the returns thereof, proceedings of the Court of 
Exchequer concerning the accounts of sheriffs, escheators, and 
bailiffs, and of a variety of matters concerning the charge and 
discharge of the king's debtors and accountants; states and views 
of accounts of the greater and lesser accountants of the kingdom, 
orders of the Court of Exchequer on the Remembrancer's side 
concerning the land and casual revenue of the crown, entries of 
presentations and admissions of several of the officers of the Court 
of Exchequer, and other officers, and of inrolments of deeds and 
instruments acknowledged before one of the barons of the Ex- 
chequer, or a commissioner for taking acknowledgments of deeds 
in the country. 

The above records commence from the beginning of Henry III. 

The Brevia Regia, which are indorsed on the Memoranda Rolls, 
are the most ancient writs of that description in the kingdom, and 
in their natures as various as the wishes of the sovereigns : in early 
times they are often in the shape of letters. 

Those titles, or bundles at the Tower bearing the above title, 
consist of writs to sheriffs of all counties to cause inquisitions to 
be made for taking extents of manors, with the returns annexed ; 
inquisitions of lands, and pleas of assize, &c. They extend from 
about the time of John to Charles II. An Inventory of them is 
printed in the Third Report of the Deputy Keeper of Records, 
App. ii., pp. 113-130. 

Those files bearing the same title at the Petty Bag Office, 
consist of writs ad quod damnum, dedimuses to swear masters extra- 
ordinary in Chancery, justices of the peace, and sheriffs, certiorari 
to remove records, writs for calling serjeants-at-law, and returns of 
writs for electing coroners and verderers and regarders of forests. 
They extend from the 9th Charles I. to the present time. 

It is impossible to give general heads sufficiently descriptive of 
the nature of the Memoranda Rolls, as they contain such a vast 
variety of things relating to secular aud religious matters. 

The pleadings of Quo titulo, as well as claims of franchises and 
other proceedings, throw great light upon the descent of property, 
and refer to where the original grants are to be found recorded. 

The Memoranda Rolls are deposited at the Record Office, 
Carlton Ride. 

Two volumes of Indices were printed by Mr. Edward Jones 



110 ROTULI. 

in 1793, entitled "Index to Records called the Originalia and 
Memoranda of the Lord Treasurer's Remembrancer's Side of the 
Exchequer" &c. &c. 2 vols, folio. The second volume of this work 
is an Index to the Memoranda, and is arranged alphabetically 
under Manors and other lands noticed in these records, between 
1509 and 1714. 

A valuable Index Locorum et Return to the Memoranda of 
the Exchequer, from the reign of Henry III. to 1831, excepting 
the Bills, Answers, and Depositions, is preserved in the Inner 
Temple Library, and has been published by the Benchers of that 
Society. 



Oblata Rolls. — These Bolls contain accounts of the offerings 
and free gifts to the king, from every great man of the period who 
wished his protection or favour. Amongst them will be seen gifts ; 
for having a barony, for having places, some great man's youngest 
daughter in marriage, his eldest daughter, any one of his daughters, 
for having a manor to farm, a city to farm, for leave to stay at 
home instead of going abroad with the king, not to be asked to 
marry, that the sheriff and a jury may inquire of a heirship, and 
which heirship is therein set out \ for leave to make up a quarrel, 
for a writ of summons against an adversary, for justice against an 
adversary, that an adversary may not compel the donor to plead 
to his action, gifts for heirships, for wardships, for reliefs, for 
scutage, for license to transfer estates, for a jury's inquisition to 
inquire of particular facts, to marry a widow, to have a trial, that 
debts due to a Jew may not be paid, for having acquittance of 
accounts with the king, for grants of property, for confirmation of 
former grants, for having seisin of lands, for having judgment in 
the King's Court, and for having the custody of the king's vine- 
yard. It would, perhaps, be now difficult to ascertain the justice 
with which most of these fines were received. 

In the 2d year of King John, the widow of Ralph Cornhill gave 
the king 200 marks, three palfreys, &c. not to marry Godfrey de 
Louvaine, and he at the same time sent the king 400 marks that 
she might be compelled to have him. 

Many of the entries relate entirely to matters of pedigree ; most 
of them may be made useful to the genealogist ; all of them are full 
of interest to the historian and the antiquary. 

It has not yet been ascertained that these Rolls have been used 



BOTTTLI. Ill 

for genealogical purposes, other than in Sir William Dugdale's 
Baronage, and Collins's Peerage. 

These records are only for the 1st, 2d, 3d, and 9th John, the 
3d and 9th Edward II., and from the 1st to the 29th Edward III. 
inclusive; the number of rolls is 31. 

They are preserved among the records at the Tower. 

Selections from the Oblata Bolls will be found in the British 
Museum (Harl. MSS. 86, f. 77; 3875, f. 325) ■ in the Ashmoleax 
Library {Dugdale MS. 3, B. 1, p. 311) ; and at Caius College, 
Cambridge (MS. 584). 

The rolls from the reign of King John have been printed by the 
Becord Commissioners, under the following title: — " Rotuli de 
Oblatis et Finibus in Turri Londinensi asservati tempore Regis 
Johannis." 1 vol. 8vo. 1835. 

The present price of the volume is 18s. 



The Originalia. — The Exchequer, 1 being the grand conservatory 
of the king's revenues, had of charge the land and casual revenues 
of the crown ; and all matters, deeds, charters, or instruments, in 
any manner affecting those revenues, must therefore be of record, 
to answer the record of charge : thus, all lands being the property 
of the crown, whilst in the crown, were accounted for in the 
Exchequer ; and when granted out, it was necessary that the grant 
should be of record, to warrant the discharge of the original issues, 
and to charge the grantee, by the process of the court, with the 
rent and services reserved. 

With respect to the casual revenues arising from fines, issues, 
and forfeitures, when any charter is granted to a city, borough, or 
town, forming it into a body politic or corporate, it generally gives 
some immunities arising from the casual revenue within that city, 
borough, or town, or it grants fairs or markets, the profits of which 
had, until then, been accounted for ; and it generally contains some 
dues, rents, or services reserved to the crown, or from courts of 
justice created therein, the casual revenues arising in which were 
formerly returned to the Court of Exchequer, to be then dealt with 
according to the course of the court, and also the commissions of 
the peace, the patents of creations, the licenses of disafforestation, 
of alienation, to impark, to dispark, patents of inventions, consti- 

1 The ancient- Court of Exchequer was introduced into England by William the 
Conqueror, and was not finally abolished until the reign of Queen Victoria. 



112 ROTULL 

tutions, or patents of the officers of the crown, and various other 
matters, under the Great Seal, by reason of their connection with 
the Exchequer, were transmitted there from the Petty Bag Office 
in Chancery, and bear the name of Originalia^ or Originals. 

Also fines and forfeitures set or imposed, as well in the said 
Court of Chancery, as in the Courts of King's Bench, Common 
Pleas, Courts of Sessions of the Peace for counties, cities, boroughs, 
towns, &c, and before the commissioners of sewers, were likewise 
turned into this court. There are entered on the rolls, creations of 
peers, and grants of titles, honours, and places. 

From these rolls, therefore, may be obtained : 

I. The names of all Sheriffs, Escheators, Customers, Comptrollers, 

Searchers, and Fermors j as may be called unto accompt. 
II. All liveries sued out of the king's hands, that process may be had 
against the king's tenants for doing of their homage, and answering 
of their reliefs. 

III. All manner of patents granted to any person by the king, wherein is 

reserved or contained any homage or fealty, or else any yearly rent, 
or whereby a fee is granted. 

IV. All manner of commissions to any justices of the peace, justices of 

sewers, or of other kinds ; that process may be made against them 
for delivering of recognizances, issues, fines, and amerciaments, taken 
before them. 
V. All manner of commissions directed to any person or persons, to in- 
quire of any lands or tenements, of such as have been offenders to 
the king. In which commissions, the commissioners have authority 
to seize the said lands or tenements to the king's use, that process 
may be had against the said commissioners for the profits thereof. 
"VI. All names of collectors of Subsidies, Fifteenths, Tenths, and Taxes, to 
call them to accompt. 
VII. All pardons of course, granted of grace for manslaughter, by which, 
though the life be pardoned, yet the goods of the party so pardoned 
are forfeited, so that process may go forth to inquire, what goods or 
chattels he had at the time of the doing of the offence. 
VIII. Also, under the title diem clautit extremum, are the names of such per- 
sons as the escheator hath found to be possessed of any office or 
title for the king by knights' service, on the days of their deaths. 
And in how many shires the said office was found, and before what 
escheator ; that in case one office make no mention of any tenure for 
the king, whereby he should have a right, yet then they may 
examine all the other shires, whether there be any tenure for the 
king in them. Also there are, or should be, all recognizances 
forfeited to the king in Chancery, and charters of denization. 



EOTULI. 113 

And these be the contents of the Original for the most part, 
which, though it were disused in the Lord Chancellor Cromwell's 
days, yet it was restored to its former use afterwards. 

The value of these rolls is also augmented by the circumstance 
of their containing entries of, and extracts from, other early rolls, 
not now in existence. 

Numerous notices of an historical and antiquarian nature occur 
in the " Originalia," which throw much light on the genealogies of 
families, on the descent of lands, and occasionally on manners and 
customs, as well as on the general state of society in the thirteenth 
and fourteenth centuries. 

The records named Estreats or Originalia, were removed in the 
year 1843, from the Lord Treasurer's Remembrancer's Office to 
the Record Office at Carlton Ride, where they still remain. 

Since the abolition of the first-named office, the " Originalia " are 
transmitted from Chancery to the Queen's Remembrancer. 

In the year 1793, Mr. Edward Jones published an Index to these 
records, with the following title: — "Index to the Originalia and 
Memoranda of the Lord Treasurer's Remembrancer's Side of the 
Exchequer" &c. 2 vols, folio. Much useful information may be 
found in them respecting the Office of the Exchequer, as well 
as on the value of records (particularly the Originalia) in elucida- 
tion of history. 

The first volume, which relates to the "Originalia" only, is 
arranged under the different reigns, the names of the parties being 
placed in alphabetical order ; and at the end of each reign is an 
Index to the Manors and other lands mentioned. 

The second volume is an Index to the Memoranda of the 
Exchequer, and is arranged alphabetically under the Manors and 
other lands noticed in those records between 1509 and 1714. A 
copious Index Nominum affords every facility for reference. It has 
been said that these volumes are " very useful, but ve,ry imperfect." 

Abstracts of the " Originalia" have been printed by the Record 
Commissioners, in two volumes, folio, with this title : — " Rotulorum 
Originalium in Curia Scaccarii abbreviatio, 20 Hen. Ill — 
Edw. III." Folio, 1805-1810. Indices Rerum, Locorum, et No- 
minum, are subjoined to each volume. 

The present price of this work is £3. 135. 

Similar "Abstracts" of the "Originalia," from the 1st Richard II. 
to the end of the reign of James L, were also made, with a view 
to publication; but they have not been printed, and the MSS. 



114. ROTULI. 

were deposited in the British Museum, by order of the Con 
missioners on Public Records. They are numbered Add. MS£ 
6363-6387. 

Another volume of abstracts, from Henry III. to Henry VI. 
is in the same repository. (Lansd. MS. 270, f. 141.) 



The Patent Rolls. — These Rolls commence with the third year 
of the reign of King John, and extend to the present time. On 
them are entered all grants of offices, honours, lands, annuities, 
and particular privileges, either to individuals or bodies corporate ; 
restitutions of temporalities to bishops, abbots, and other eccle- 
siastics ; occasional notices of deliveries of the Great Seal, confirma- 
tions of grants as well to corporations, both civil and ecclesiastical, 
as to individuals ; special liveries, creations of peers, licenses of all 
descriptions which pass the Great Seal, grants of pardon, &c. On 
the back of the rolls are commissions to justices of gaol delivery, 
of the peace, of sewers, and, in fact, all other commissions which 
pass the Great Seal are there recorded. On some of the early 
Patent Rolls, treaties with foreign sovereigns, and other diplomatic 
instruments, were frequently entered ; but they rarely appear after 
the reign of Edward the Third. 

Such, in general terms, is a description of the entries on the 
Patent Rolls ; but there is scarcely a subject connected with the 
history or government of this country, or with the most distin- 
guished personages of the thirteenth, fourteenth, and fifteenth 
centuries, which is not illustrated by them ; and they yield oidy to 
the Claus or Close Rolls in the variety and importance of their 
contents. 

"What may be termed the Originals of the Patent Rolls, or the 
documents from whence the entries on the same are made, and 
which sometimes supply the defects of the Patent Rolls, are con- 
tained in what are termed the Privy Seal Bundles, which consist of 
writs of Privy Seal, signed bills, immediate warrants, and pro- 
clamations. 

Patents surrendered are amongst the Miscellaneous of the Rolls 
Chapel Records. 

The Rolls were formerly made up by the Six Clerks of Chancery ; 
but since they were abolished, they have been made up yearly by 
the Clerks of Records and Writs, at their office in Chancery Lane, 
from Privy Seal writs, warrants, and bills, under the royal sign 



ROTULI. 115 

manual, proclamations, fee., which have been obtained from the 
different offices where the originals have been made out to pass 
under the Great Seal. The above offices retain the rolls, as well as 
the original instruments from which they were formed, for the last 
four or five years ; all above that period are passed into the Petty 
Bag Office, and from thence to the Public Record Office, to which 
latter office, however, they are not transmitted immediately, the 
Petty Bag Office retaining eight years in hand. 

The difference between documents entered on the Patent Rolls, 
and those on the Close Rolls, is, that the King's Letters Patent 
were delivered open, having the Great Seal attached to the bottom. 
They are presumed to be of a public nature, addressed to all the 
king's subjects, whilst the Close Rolls are records of such instru- 
ments as were despatched closed or sealed up, and were of a more 
private nature. 

The Patent Rolls, preserved at the Tower, close with the reign of 
Edward IV. (April, 1483.) The subsequent inrolments of Letters 
Patent being deposited in the Rolls Chapel. 

Some few for the reigns of John, Edward II., and Henry VI., 
are at the Chapter House. 

Extracts from these records will be found in various public 
repositories, as follows : — 

Extracts out of the Patent Rolls by Vincent; Coll. of Arms, Vincent 

MS. 60. 
" Grauntes of her Ma tiea Offices," extracted from the Calendar of the Patent 

Rolls; Asum. Lib. MS. 1805. 
Breve Abstraction, e rott. Patentium eorum, quae ad Stemmatum Familia- 

rumque Anglicarum series enucleandas spectant, selectum ; Brit. Mus. 

Earl. MS 294. 
Calendarium rott. Patentium de temp. Kegis Johannis, in Turri Londinensi 

existentium; Beit. Mus. Add. MS. 9783. 
Calendar of the Patent Bolls in the Tower, from John to Edw. II. ; Brit. Mus. 

Lansd. MS. 302. 
Collectanea e rott. Patentium temp. R. Johannis ; Brit. Mus. Harl. MSS. 

86, f. 1; 362, f. 25. 
Rotulorum Patentium, temp. Johannis, abbreviatio, s. xvii. ; Exeter Coll. 

Oxf. MS. xciv. 
Collectanea e rott. Patentium, terapp. Joh., Hen. III., et Edw. I. ; Brit. 

Mus. Harl. MS. 88. 
Selection of Patent Rolls, 3—18 John ; Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS, 287. 



116 EOTULL 

Index Rotulorum Patentium qui in Turn Lond. reponuntur, a 3 Joh. ad 5 '. 

Edw. III. ; Brit. Mus. Cotton. MS. Titus, C. ii. 
An Abstract of all the Patent Rolls, from the 3d John to the end of Edw. IV. 

Brit. Mvs. Add. MS. 4554. 
Excerpta e rott. Patentium, 5 — 15 R. Johannis; Beit. Mus. Sari. MS 

298, f. 42. 
" Litterae Patentes," etc., mostly respecting Wales, 10 John — 6 Edw. III. 

Caius Coll. Cams. MS. 581. 
Collection of Letters Patent, from 16 John to 50 Hen. III. ; Oaius Coll 

Camb. MS. 582. 
An Abridgment of the Patent Rolls in the Tower, tempp. John, Hen. III. 

Edw. I., and Edw. II., by Mr. Bowyer, Keeper of the Records; Brit 
Mus. Add. MS. 5511. 
Index Literarum Patentium R. Johannis, Hen. III., Edw. I, — III., et Ric 

IL; Brit. Mus. Harl. MSS. 5160—5165. 
Index rott. Clausarum et Patentium, a temp. R. Johannis, ad temp. Hen. VI. 

qui in Turri Lond. custodiuntur ; Brit. Mus. Cotton. MS. Jul. E 

iii. f. 1. 
A Calendar of the Patent Rolls in the Tower of London, from John to Edw 

IV. 4 vols.; Brit. Mus. Eg. MSS. 634—637; Lamd. MS. 1168.— 

Inner Temple Lib. 
Collectanea e rott. Patentium selecta, temp. Hen. III.; Brit. Mus. Harl 

MS. 86, f. 122.— Lincoln's Inn Lib. 

1—19 Hen. III. ; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 6712. 

1—57 Hen. III. ; Brit. Mus. Lamd. MS. 288. 

16 Hen. III.— 35 Edw. III.; Brit. Mus. Lamd. MS. 941. 

Literse Patentes, tempp. Heri. III., Edw. I., II., III., et Ric. II. ; Brit, 

Mus. Sari. MS. 3875, ff. 335, 355. 
Index rerum in rott. Patentibus, etc., a 31 Hen. III. ad Edw. IV. ; Exeteb 

Coll. Oxf. MS. xci. 
Extracts from Patent Rolls, from 37 Hen. III. to 34 Hen. VI. ; Brit. Mus. 

Lansd.MS. 973, f. 116. 
Selection of Patent Rolls, 1 — 23 Edw. I. ; Brtt. Mus. Lamd. MS. 289. 
9 — 35 Edw. I., et temp. Edw. III.; Coll. oi 

Arms, Vincent MS. 9, L. 
Charters copied from the Patent and other Rolls, from Edw. I. — Hen. VI. : 

All Souls' Coll. Oxf. MS, ccxxvii. 
Excerpts from Patent Rolls, from Edw. I. to 9 Jas. I. ; Brit. Mus. Sargravt 

MS. 296. 
Selection of Patent Rolls, 1—20 Edw. II. ; Brit. Mus. Lamd. MS. 290. 
Calendar of the Patent Rolls in the Tower, temp. Edw. III. ; Brit. Mus, 

Lamd. MS. 303. 
Collectanea e rott. Patentium, tamp. Edw. III. ; Brit. Mus. Sari. MS. 90. 



ROTULL 117 

Extracta e rott. Patentium fact, in partibus transmarinis, temp. Edw. III. ; 

Ashm. Lib. Oxf. MS. 7376, p. 164. 
Selection of Patent Rolls, 1—51 Edw. 111.; Brit. Mus. Lamd. MSS. 

291—293. 

1 Edw. III.— 23 Ric. II.; Coll. of Arms, MS. B. 11. 

36 Edw. III.— 22 Ric. II. ; Brit. Mus. Lamd. MS. 942. 

Contenta in rott. Patentium de regno R. Ric. II. ; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 91. 
Selection of Patent Rolls, 1—23 Ric. II.; Brit. Mus. Lamd. MSS. 

294; 295. 
Calendar of the Patent Rolls in the Tower, from Ric. II. to Hen. V. ; Brit. 

Mus. Lamd. MS. 304. 
Index rotulorum Patentium qui reponuntur in Turri Lond., a 1 Ric. II. ad 

23 Edw. IV. ; Brit. Mus. Cotton. MS. Tit. C. iii. 
Collectanea e rott. Patentium, 1—14 Hen. IV. ; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 

4195, ft 6, 16, 17, 24, 27, 41; Lamd. MS. 296. 
Excerpta e rotulis Patentium in Turri Lond., 1 Hen. IV. — 39 Hen. VI. ; 

Brit. Mus. Lamd. MS. 943. 
Abstract of Patent Rolls, from Hen. IV. to 22 Edw. IV.; College op 

Arms, MS. B. 2. 
Selections of Patent Rolls, 1—10 Hen. V. ; Brit. Mus. Lamd. MS. 297. 

1—39 Hen. VI.; Brit. Mds. Lamd. MSS. 298; 299. 

Calendar of the Patent Rolls in the Tower, from Hen. VI. to Edw. IV. ; 

Brit. Mus. Lamd. MS. 305. 
Selection of Patent Rolls, 1—22 Edw. IV.; Brit. Mus. Lamd. MSS. 300; 

301. 
Calendar of the Patent Rolls of Hen. VII.; Brit. Mus. Lamd. MS. 254 

f. 88. 
Extracts from the Patent Rolls, and from the Inquisitions of the time of 

Hen. VII. ; Pub. Lib. Camb. MS. Dd. ii. 40. 
Caleudarium Concessionum in rott. Patentium inrotulatarum, 12 — 38 Hen. 

VIII. ; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 140. 
A Calendar of the Patent Rolls, from 1 Edw. VI. to Mary; Brit. Mus. 

Lamd. MS. 221 ; Hargrave MS. 376. 

temp. Jac. I. ; Brit. Mus. Hargrave MS. 377. 

List of Patents granted by Jas. I. to the year 1619; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 

7188,^.5. 
Royal Grants passed by Letters Patent, 1 and 2 Jas. I.; Ashm. Lib. 

MS. 1162. 
Dockets of Patents granted 10—16 Chas. I.; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 1012, 
An Abstract from the Patent Rolls from Charles II. to Queen Anne; Brit. 

Mus. Add. MS. 4555, p. 65. 

In the Tower there are also some Rolls of Patents, independently 
of those Rolls commonly called the Patent Rolls, which have h en 



118 ROTULI. 

described above. That these extra Patent Rolls may not be over- 
looked, a list of them is subjoined : — 

Date. No. of Rolls. 

14 Hen. III. Patent, in Britannia 1 

14 Edw. I. Patent, fact, in partibus transmarinis 1 

1 9 Patent, de Dominibus Judseorum post eorum exitium, &c. 1 

26 Patent, de obligat. per regem mercatoribus .... 1 

12 Edw. III. Patent, apud Antwerpiam 1 

13 Patent, pro mercatoribus 1 

— — Patent, concess. hominibus Angl s et Vascon 1 

■ — Patent, inter Eegem et diversos magnat. Germ. ... 1 

14 Patent, et Cart. fact, ultra mare 1 

15 Patent, pro mercatoribus 1 

19 Same 1 

20 Patent, fact, in Francia 1 

21 Patent, fact, apud Cales 1 

A Calendar of a selection from those in the Tower, not later 
than 23d Edward IV., was printed by order of the Record Commis- 
sioners, in 1802, tinder the following title: — te Calendarium Rotu- 
lorum Patentium in Turri Londinensi asservat." 1 vol. folio. 

In using this Calendar, it is particularly necessary to bear in 
mind the following observation, which is prefixed to it ; namely, 
that "it is only a Selection, and that various entries appear 
on the Patent Rolls which are not here described ; and therefore, 
although the work will be found to afford abundant information, no 
one is to be deterred from an examination of any record referred to 
elsewhere, as being on the Patent Roll, because it is not to be dis- 
covered here." 

The cause of this fact may be thus explained. No perfect 
Calendar to the Patent Rolls has yet been compiled, and the 
printed volume was taken from a copy which was procured in the 
year 1775 by Mr. Astle, late Keeper of the Records in the Tower, 
for public use, but collated with two manuscripts in the Cottonian 
Library (Tit. C. ii. and iii.), which is supposed to have been com- 
piled in the reign of James I. from the records, by some clerk, who 
has selected from them what appeared to him most useful and 
interesting. 

The volume contains copious Indices, and will be found to com- 
prise much information, as well for legal as for biographical, 
antiquarian, and historical purposes. The Index Nominum affords 



EOTULI. 119 

evidence of the utility of these Records to the genealogist, as it 
contains references to about 7000 eminent families. 

The original price of the volume was £1. 16s. , now reduced to 15s. 

The Rolls have been printed, under the auspices of the same 
Commission, from the 3d to the 18th John, in one vol. folio, 1835, 
with this title : — " Rotuli Litterarum Patentium in Turri Londinensi 
asservati, a.d. 1201 — 1216." 

The present price of this volume is £1. Us. 6d. 

The Introduction to the work has, for convenience, been pub- 
lished separately in 8vo. under the title of " A Description of the 
Patent Rolls in the Tower of London, to which is added an Itinerary 
of King John, by T. D. Hardy;' 1835, royal 8vo. 



Pipe Rolls. — The Great Roll of the Exchequer, otherwise called 
the " Pipe Roll," formerly contained the accounts of the whole reve ■ 
nues of the crown, digested under the heads of the several counties, 
and annually written out, in order to the charging and discharging 
of the sheriffs and other accountants. The ancient revenues were 
either certain or casual; the certain revenues consisted of farms, 
fee farms, castle-guard rents, and other rents of various kinds ; the 
casual part was composed of fines, issues, amerciaments, recog- 
nizances, profits of lands and tenements, goods and chattels seized 
into the hands of the crown on process of extents, outlawry, diem 
clausit extremum, and other writs and process, wards, marriages, 
reliefs, suits, seignories, felons' goods, deodands, and other profits 
casually arising to the crown by virtue of its prerogative. The 
Great Roll also contains the accounts of lords of liberties granted 
from the crown, of the greenwax within their respective liberties, 
and many debts of different natures due to the crown, and put in 
process for levying the same for the benefit of the public. All 
these accounts and other matters are contained in the Great Roll, 
and the respective sheriffs now account for so much of the said 
revenue as yet remains, and take their quietus out of the office of 
the Clerk of the Pipe, yearly. 

The series of the Great Rolls of the Exchequer takes its begin- 
ning from the second year of the reign of King Henry the Second. 
From that remote period to the present time, the series is complete, 
with the exception of the rolls of two years only. Not long ago, 
thirteen rolls in the series were supposed to be lost, and it was not 
until the late Commission on Public Records entered on their 



120 ROTULI. 

labours that any of these were recovered to the public. Eleven of 
the lost rolls have been found, and restored to their places in the 
presses of the Exchequer. The two which still remain to be dis- 
covered belong to the first year of Henry III., and the seventh year 
of Henry IV. The antigraphy or roll made by the Chancellor's 
scribe, of the latter of these, exists, and is made to supply the place 
of the corresponding Treasurer's Roll till that roll shall itself appear. 
Besides the series, there is one roll more, which was long regarded 
as the roll of the first year of Henry II. The antiquaries of the 
seventeenth century determined it to belong to the fifth year of 
King Stephen. Doubts, however, have been entertained of the 
soundness of this conclusion ; and it is thought that Mr. Hunter, 
in the preface to the publication of this roll, has completely 
established the fact, that it is the roll of the 31st year of Henry I., 
the earliest national document of any extent now existing after 
Domesday Book. 

The "PipeRolls" are of great interest and utility, more particularly 
in regard to the transactions of early times, as the names of most 
men, or families of property, appear upon them, and nearly every 
ancient pedigree is indebted to them for assistance ; since the sources 
from which the crown revenues were formerly obtained, inde- 
pendently of the crown lands, were so numerous, that it would 
perhaps be impossible to produce from history a name of note 
which is not recorded on them. It is of course evident that 
the most perfect list of Sheriffs of Counties is to be obtained 
from them. 

The Comptroller's or Chancellor's Rolls, being duplicates of the 
Great Roll of the Pipe, and regarded as .of inferior dignity and 
authority to the Great Rolls themselves, containing moreover 
matter of great importance to historical inquirers, who could not 
have easy access to them while under the custody of officers of the 
Exchequer, were removed to the British Museum by order of the 
Commissioners of the Public Records, in the years 1833-4, where 
they may be consulted like the other manuscripts, records, and 
charters in that repository. This series is far from being so com- 
plete as that of the Great Rolls themselves. There are 310 rolls 
in all, the earliest roll being that of the 11th Henry II., and the 
latest that of the 17th James I. Owing to the little care bestowed 
upon them when in other depositories, the following Rolls are now 
missing : — 



ROTULI. 



121 



Hen. II. 12, 15—18, 28, 30—35. 

Eic. I. 1—10. 

John 1—3, 5—9, 11—16, 18. 

Hen. III. 1-12, 36, 57. 

Edw. II. 10, 20. 

Edw. III. 15, 42. 

Eic. II. 20, 23. 

Hen. IV. 7 1 , 14. 

Hen. VI. 39. 



Edw. IV. 23. 

Hen. VII. 1—6, 15—24. 

Hen. VIII. 1—19, 31, 35, 37. 

Edw. VI. 1—7. 

Mary, 1 and 2. 

Philip and Mary, 1 & 2, 3 & 4—5 & 6. 

Elizabeth, 1, 2, 6—28, 32, 33, 36, 

37, 39—45. 
James I. 1—4, 6—9, 11, 14. 



The Pipe IJoll in the Museum for the 21st Henry II. is of much 
importance. On the fifth membrane is an account of the Sheriff of 
Shropshire, the whole of which is wanting on the Pipe Roll for the 
same year at Carlton Ride. 

The Pipe Office was abolished by statute 3 & 4 Will. IV. c. 99, 
and the records removed to Carlton Ride in May, 1843. 

The Chancellor's Records, from the time of Richard I. to 1767, 
as well as the records from 1768 inclusive to the present time, the 
States of Account from 1789, and the Folio books from 1685 to the 
present period, are also deposited at Carlton Ride. 

At the same repository is a large collection of excerpts out of the 
Rotuli Annales, or Pipe Rolls, formerly at the Office of the Queen's 
Remembrancer. These are in a hand of the reign of Edward I. 
They are from rolls of Henry II. and Richard I., and are remark- 
able for containing large portions, if not nearly the whole, of the 
roll of 1st Henry II., of which the original is not known to exist. 

In the Tower are two Pipe Rolls, one of 6 Richard I., the other 
of 7 John, being duplicates of those at Carlton Ride. 

In the Britjsh Museum are several volumes of transcripts, as 
follows : — 

Collectanea e mag. rott. Pipaein Scaccario. {Harl. MS. 971, f. 40.) 
Transcripta e rott. Pipae, annis 1 et 2 Hen. II. {Cotton. MS. Vitell. E. v.) 
Titles and Extracts from a great number of records on various subjects, 

taken from the Great Rolls of the Pipe, &c. tempp. Hen. II., Ric. I., 

John, and Hen. III. {Add. MSS. 4567 ; 4568.) 
Transcripta e rott. de Scaccario, de temp. Hen. III. {Harl. MS. 30.) 
Collectanea e rott. Scaccarii, 4—6 Hen III. {Harl. MS, 312, f. 83.) 
Extracts from the Pipe Rolls relating to Wales. {Lansd. MS. 219.) 
Four Indexes, alphabetically disposed, of the most material things contained 

in the Great Roll of the Pipe. {Add. MS. 4560 ) 
Alphabetical List of the Pipe Rolls. {Lansd. MS. 322.) 

1 This roll was retained by ths Commissioners to supply the chasm occasioned by the 
loss of the Great Roll of that year. 



in ROTULI. 

In theBoDLEUNLiBRARY are collections from the Pipe Rolls, made 
by Dodesworth, which occur in vols. xii. — xvii. of his Collections : — 

Vol. xii. contains the 5th of Stephen. 

— xiii. 1—10 Kic. I. 

— xiv. 1 — 17 John. 

— xv. 2— 52, 56, Hen. III. 

— xvi. 1—30 Edw. I. 

_ xvii. 12—18 Edw. II., and 13, 14, Edw. III. 

Sometranscripts of thePipe Rolls are in theLiNcoLN'slNN Library. 

In the years 1833 and 1844 the following publications were 
issued by the Record Commissioners : — 

" Rotulus Cancellarii vel Antigraphum Magni Rotuli Pipes, de 
tertio anno regni regis Johannis" 1 vol. 8vo. 1833. 

" Magnus Rotuhis Scaccarii vel Magnus Rotulus Pipee, 31 Hen. I" 
1 vol. 8vo. 1833. 

" The Great Roll of the Pipe of the 2d, 3d, and 4th years of 
King Henry IL, 1155—1158." 1 vol. 8vo. 1844. 

<( The Great Roll of the Pipe for the 1st year of the reign of 
King Richard L, 1189, 1190." 1 vol. 8vo. 1844. 

The present prices of these volumes are respectively, £1. 5*.; 18s.; 
4s. 6d. ; and 6*. 

So early as in the time of the Plantagenets, the Roll of the 
Exchequer was referred to for evidence connected with descent, 
although not for the express purpose of proving a pedigree. 

Dugdale, Collins, and other genealogical writers, have made great 
use of these records, as a reference to any of the pedigrees traced 
by them and published will prove. 

The Redisseisin Rolls. — The Redisseisin Rolls begin 14 
Edward I. and end 39 Henry VI. They contain writs to, and 
proceedings of, sheriffs, for restoring those to the possession of 
lands or tenements of which they had been unlawfully dispos- 
sessed. These were directed to be inrolled, and transcripts sent 
into the Exchequer, by statute 13 Edward I., sec. 8. They are 
in the " Originalia," at the Tower. 

Extracts of these are printed from Edward I. to the end of 
Edward III., under the title of '• Rotulorum Originalium abbre- 
viation which may be used as Indices or Calendars of these rolls. 1 

It is not known if these rolls have ever been produced in any 
court as evidence to support a genealogy. 

1 See ante, p. 113. 



123 



Xnqutstttones $ost jftortem* 

TOURING the prevalence of the feudal system, the greater part 
-*-^ of the lands of England was held either mediately or imme- 
diately of the crown. On the death of each tenant in capite 3 a tax, 
called a "relief," was due to the king; and before the heir could 
take possession, he was not only bound to pay it, but also to perform 
homage, after which ceremony, livery of his inheritance was given 
him. In the cases, however, where the heir was a minor, or the 
last tenant had been attainted of treason or felony, the lands in the 
former case escheated to the crown, until the heir attained his 
majority, made proof of his age, and performed homage; but, in 
the latter contingency, absolutely and for ever. 

In each county an officer was appointed, called the " escheator," 
whose duty it was to seize into the king's hands all lands held inr 
capite of the crown ; on receiving a writ, entitled a writ " De diem 
clausit extremum" commanding him to assemble a jury to inquire, 

I. Of what lands the party died seized. 
II. By what rents or services the same were held. 
III. Who was his next heir, and of what age the said heir then was. 

The inquest was taken on oath, and the verdict returned under 
the seals of the jury, and upon that report the crown acted. 

It is thus evident that Inquisitions Post Mortem, or, as they 
are sometimes incorrectly termed, "Escheats," 1 contain valuable 
information connected with the descent of lands and families, and 
are of the first importance to topographical writers, and for genea- 
logical evidence. 

The return of the jury summoned to inquire into these facts, 
having been engrossed on parchment, was returned, with a writ or 
commission authorising the inquiry, into the King's Chancery, 
whence a transcript was sent into the Exchequer (which transcripts 
are still, from the reign of Edward I. to that of Charles I., in exist- 
ence), to enable the king's officers to collect the duties, services, 
Sec. payable to the king. 

1 So called from the writs being directed to the escbeattir of the county. 



124 INQUISITIONES POST MOlu^u. 

These "Returns," "Inquisitions," or "Escheats/' commence 
with the third year of the reign of Henry III. 

The returns of some escheators contain such full particulars of 
the extent of the tenant in capite's manors and lauds, that a pre- 
sumption has arisen of those surveys having been taken in conse- 
quence of the statute of Edward I., called Extenta Maneini, but they 
are in reality no more than extended Inquisitions post mortem. 

The abuse of compelling persons who were not tenants of the 
crown to sue out their livery, gave rise to the act of Henry VIII., 
establishing the Court of Wards and Liveries. 

The Inquisitions come down to 20th Charles I., when there was an 
intermission of the business of this Court, and with it most of the 
appendages of feudal tenure were abolished ; but with regard to 
others, the Inquisitions post mortem still remain in force, and are 
now daily taken by the coroner in cases of felo-de-se, murder, man- 
slaughter, and the like. 

The " Retours of Special Service " are the Scotch Inquisitions 
for finding the heir on the death of an ancestor, and are in use at 
this day in Scotland. In the case of the Annandale Peerage, in 
1825, the production of a "Retour" for the year 1823, by the claim- 
ant, was objected to by the Attorney-General, on behalf of the 
crown, when the Lord Chancellor (Lord Eldon) remarked : — " That 
it might be received as prima facie evidence, but that better ought 
to be given; old Retours, or Inquisitions post mortem, could not 
generally be substantiated, but modern facts required better proof." 
(See Scotch Records.) 

The Irish Inquisitions post mortem do not commence before the 
reign of Elizabeth. (See Irish Records.) 

The writs of diem clausit eostremum, which authorise the Inquisi- 
tions, have been found genealogically useful. 

The Rolls of Inquisitions are thus distributed : — 

From the 3d Henry III. to the end of Richard III., the records 
are deposited at the Tower, excepting some few in the County 
Bags, at the Chapter House. 

From the 1st Henry VII. to 20th Charles T. (when they were 
discontinued), they are at the Rolls Chapel. 

A collection of no less than 3569 records, relating to lands and 
tenements in all counties, from 1st Henry V. to 18th Charles L, is at 
the Duchy op Lancaster Office. 

In the record repository at Carlton Ride arc duplicates or 



INQUISITIONES POST MORTEM. 1:23 

transcripts of all Inquisitions from Edward I. to 1636, a few years 
prior to the abolition of the Court of Wards and Liveries. 

Similar Inquisitions, which were taken by escheators, virtute 
officii, without writ or commission, are in the same repository. 

Powell says, "divers Inquisitions are not to be found in the 
Chancery, by means of some omissions, yet are in the Exchequer, 
by reason of the correspondence between those courts." 

The Inquisitions for the county palatine of Durham are in the 
custody of the Clerk of the Crown in the city of Durham. Those 
for the county palatine of Lancaster will be noticed hereafter. 
(See, Counties Palatine Records.) 

Extracts from the Escheats, and abstracts of Inauisitions, are 
preserved in our public libraries, as follows : — 

Collectanea e bundellis Inquisitionum intra Turrim Lond. existentium ; Ashm. 

Lib. Bugdale MS. i. A.. 1. 
Extracts from tbe Escheats, taken from the registry of the Court of Wards, 

by Thomas Cole, with indexes of Names and Places ; Brit. Mus. Sari. 

MSS. 756—760; 410,411. 

* # * This valuable collection commences about the 32d Henry VIII., 

and is of singular importance to the topographer and genealogist. 
Extracta Escaetarum de tempp. regum diversorum; Brit. Mus. Sari. MS. 

971, ff. 27, 147. 
Copies of Escheats in the Tower, of several old families ; Coll. of Arms, 

Vincent MS. 43. 
Kepertorium Inquisitionum in Turri Lond. asservatarum ; Trinity Coll. 

Dublin, MS. D. 4. 
Inquisitiones de honoribus Escaetis factae 13 Joh. et de servitiis militum 

eorundem, incomm. diversis; Bodl. Lib. MS. 4189. 
Inquisitiones in comm. variis, tempp. Joh., Hen. III., et Edw. I. — III. ; 

Bodl. Lib. MSS. 5001 ; 5003; 5006; 5009; 5010; 5012; 5014; 

5016; 5021; 5027; 5030; 5064; 5094; 5095. 
Escaeta nonnulla, temp. Hen. III. ; Bodl. Lib. MS. 4193. 
Aliquot Escaeta, ann. 39 Hen. III. et 11 Edw. I.; Coll. of Arms, Vin- 
cent MS. L. 9. 
Excerpta nonnulla ex Escaetis, tempp. Hen. III., Edw. I., Edw. III., et 

Kic. II. ; Brit. Mus. Sari. MS. 88, f. 194. 
Compendium omnium Escaetarum, a temp. Hen. III. usque ad annum 

21 Eic. II. ; Brit. Mus. Sari. MS. 708. 
Abstract of Inquisitions post mortem, &c. concerning heirs, during the reigns 

of Hen. III., Edw. L— III., Uich. II., Hen. IV.— VI., and Edw. TV. ; 

Coll. of Arms, MSS. B. S ; F. 11. 



126 INQUISITIONES POST MORTEM. 

Escaeta varia, tempp. Hen. III. et Hen. IV. ; Bodl. Lib. MSS. 4185 ; 4186. 
Escaeta in diversis comitatibus, 28, 29 Hen. III., 5 Edw. II., et 1, 2 Hen. VI. ; 

Coll. or Arms, Vincent MS. L. 9. 
Kegistra Inquisitionum et Escaetarum a temp. Hen. III. ad temp. Eic. III. ; 

Brit. Mus. Cotton. MS. Claud. C. xii. 
Collectanea e recordis vulgo Escaetriae nuncupatis, a temp. Hen. III. ad 

exitum regnorum Ph. et Mar. ; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 640. 
Escaeta nonnulla, temp. Edw. I. ; Bodl. Lib. MSS. 4186 ; 4193. 
Sylloge Inquisitionum captarum temp. Edwardi I., in plerisque comitatibus ; 

Brit. Mus. Cotton. MSS. Jul. C. i. p. 107 b ; Jul. C. vii. p. 1. 
Escaeta de annis 3—10 Edw. L, 8—10, 18—20 Edw. II., et 1 Edw. III. ; 

Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 821, ff. 12, 26, 42. 
Index of the Inquisitions post mortem remaining in the Tower, from Edw. I. 

to Hen. VI. inclusive ; Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 270. 
Escheats from 1 Edw. I. to 17 Hen. VI., showing the heirs, alphabetically 

arranged, xixth cent. ; Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 19,704—19,708. 
Alphabetical Index of the heirs of the noble families of England, from the 

reign of Edw. I. to that of Elizabeth; Brit. Mus. Cotton. MS. Claud. 

C. viii. 
Escaeta nonnulla, temp. Edw. II. ; Bodl. Lib. MSS. 4159 ; 4190 ; 4193. 
Copies of Inquisitions, temp. Edw. III., etc. ; Bodl. Lib. MSS. 4190 ; 5002 ; 

5077, f. 1. 
The genealogical matter in the Escheats, from 1 Edw. III. to 10 Hen. V., 

chronologically arranged; Brit. Mus. Cotton. MS. Eaustina, C. x. 
Abstracts of Escheats, tempp. Edw. III., Ric. II., Hen. IV. and V. ; Coll. 

op Arms, MSS. B. 9, 10 ; Vincent MSS. 27 ; 28. 
Inquisitiones varise, tempp. Edw. III. — Edw. VI. ; Brit. Mus. Cotton. MS. 

Julius, B. xii. pp. 258 5—300 b. 

temp. Hen. IV. ; Bodl. Lib. MS. 5023, f. 78. 

Escaeta, taken from Inquisitions post mortem, beginning 4 Hen. IV. and con- 
cluding in anno 38 Eliz. ; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 2085, f. 443 b. 
Escaeta varia, temp. Hen. V. ; Bodl. Lib. MS. 4193. 
Collection of Escheats and Inquisitions, temp. Edw. IV. ; Coll. of Arms, 

Vincent MS. 72.— Bodl. Lib. MS. 4193. 

temp. Hen. VII. ; Bodl. Lib. MS. 4193. 

Kepertorium Inquisitionum, in Scacc. Hibernise remanentium, 3 Ph. et Mar. ; 

Trin. Coll. Dublin, MS. D. 14. 
Transcripts of Inquisitions post mortem, which are preserved in the chancery 

of the see of Durham, from Elizabeth to 3 Chas. I. ; Durham Cath. 

Hunter MS. 28, 1. 
Calendar of the Inquisitions post mortem preserved in the Eolls Office, Dublin, 

from Elizabeth to William III. ; Brit. Mus. Eg. MS. 205. 

Berkshire : Escaeta in com. Berks, 1 — 27 Hen. III. ; Bodl. Lib. MS. 5006. 



INQUISITIONES POST MORTEM. 127 

Cambridgeshire : Escheats in the county of Cambridge, 8 Edw. T. — Chas. I. ; 

Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 5837; 5838. 
Excerpta de exitibus Escaetriae in com. Cantab., 29 Nov. 

17 Edw. II. ; Brit. Mus. Sari. MS. 88, f. 166. 

Inquisitions held at Wisbeach, co. Camb. temp. Car. I. ; Pub. 



Lib. Camb. MS. Bd. viii. 29. 

Inquisitions found at Cambridge by the Escheator in 1616, 



1637, 1638, and 1639, and of Sir W. Hilton, of Abingdon, in 1644 ; 
Pub. Lib. Camb. MS. Bd. viii. 32. 
Cheshire: Various Cheshire Inquisitions; Brit. Mus. Sari. MS. 2115. 

Copies of Inquisitions held in Cheshire, xvth and xvith 

cent.; Brit. Mus. Sari. MS. 1991. 

Derbyshire : Escaeta a 33 Hen. III. ad 1 Ric. III. in com. Derbise ; Bodl. 

Lib. MS. 4199. 
Abstracts of Inquisitions post mortem, in Derbyshire, from 

2 Hen. VII. to 44 Eliz. ; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 6710. 
Devonshire : Inquisitiones post mortem in comit. Devoniae, anno 28 Hen. 

III. et tempp. Edw. I., II., et III. ; Brit. Mus. Sari. MS. 6126. 
Dorsetshire : Abridgments of the Inquisitions post mortem in Dorsetshire, 

from Hen. III. to Ric. III., together with abstracts of records and 

other evidences; Brit. Mus. Sari. MS. 4120. 
Inquisitions post mortem in Somerset and Dorset, tempp. 

Hen. II. et III.; see Collectanea Topog. et Genealog. v. ii. pp.48, 168. 
Essex : Escheats and Inquisitions in the co. of Essex, from John to Hen. VI. ; 

Coll. of Arms, Vincent MS. 71. 

Collectanea ex Escaetis, de an. 28 Hen. HI. ad Reg. Mariam, tan- 

gentia com. Essex., maxima ex parte; Bodl. Lib. MS. 4193. 

Excerpta de exitibus Escaetriae in com. Essex., 29 Nov. 17 Edw. II. ; 

Brit. Mus. Sari. MS. 88, f. 166. 
Hertfordshire : Excerpta de exitibus Escaetriae, in com. Hertford., 29 Nov. 

17 Edw. II. ; Brit. Mus. Sari. MS. 88, f. 166. 
Huntingdonshire : Escheats for the co. of Huntingdon, 8 Edw. I. — Chas. I, ; 

Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 5837 ; 5838. 
Excerpta de exitibus Escaetriae in com. Hunt., 29 Nov. 

17 Edw. II. ; BRrT. Mus. Sari. MS. 88, f. 166. 
Inquisitions found at Huntingdon by the escheator in 

1616, 1637, 1638, and 1639, and of Sir W. Hilton, of Abingdon, ut 

1644 ; Pub. Lib. Camb. MS. Bd. viii. 32. 
Kent : Copies of Inquisitions relating to property and descents in Kent ; 

Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 5487. 
Calendarium Inquisitionum post mortem in com. Kane, tempp. Edw. I. 

—Ric. III. j Soc. or Ant. MS. 168, art. 31. 
Lancashire: Inquisitiones com. Lancastriae, temp. Joh. et Edw. IV.; Bodl. 

Lib. MS. 5028, ff. 7, 105. 



128 INQUISITIONES POST MORTEM. 

Lancashire : Escaeta, taken from the Inquisitions post mortem, co. Lane. 

from 4 Hen. IY. to 38 Eliz. ; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 2085, f. 448 b. 
Inquisition post mortem lands in the Duchy of Lancaster, 

from 1 Hen. VII. to 1 Elizabeth; Coll. of Arms, Vincent MS. 503. 
Lincolnshire : Escheats and Inquisitions in the county of Lincoln, from John 

to Hen. VI. ; Coll. of Arms, Vincent MS. 70. 
Middlesex : Inquisitiones de com. Midd. temp. Edw. III. ; Bodl. Lib. MS. 

5034, f. 47. 
Norfolk : Excerpta de exitibus Escaetriae in com. Norff., 29 Nov. 17 Edw. II. ; 

Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 88, f. 166. 
Nottinghamshire : Inquisitiones captse 7 Bic. IT. in com. Nottingham. ; Bodl. 

Lib. MS. 5017, f. 92. 
Somersetshire : Abridgment of the Inquisitions post mortem in Somersetshire, 

from Hen. III. to Kic. III., together with abstracts of records and 

other evidences; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 4120. 
Inquisitions post mortem in Somerset and Dorset, tempp. 

Hen. II. et III.: see Collect. Topog. et Genealog. v. ii. pp. 48, 168. 
Suffolk : Collectanea e libris Escaetriarum, ad com. Suff. pertinentia ; Brit. 

Mus. Earl. MS. 1232. 
Inquisitiones et Escaeta, de com. Suff. 4 Edw. II. &c. ; Bodl. Lib. 

MS. 5017, f. 121. 
Excerpta de exitibus Escaetriae in com. Suff., 29 Nov. 17 Edw. II. ; 

Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 88, f. 166. 
Surrey : Abstracts of Inquisitions post mortem in the county of Surrey, tempp. 

Edw. II. and III.; Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 6168 ; 6169. 
Abstract of Escheats in co. Surrey, 1 — 51 Edw. III.; Brit. Mus. 

Add. MS. 6169. 
York : Inquisitions taken in Yorkshire, tempp. HeD. VII. and VIII. ; Bodl. 

Lib. MSS, 5039; 5042. 
t eM p t Elizabeth; Bodl. Lib. MS. 4176. 

There is in the British Museum [Harl. MS. 624) a copy of 
some Rolls belonging to a period thirty-three years prior to the 
earliest Inquisition post mortem, and affording similar information. 
These Rolls relate to twelve counties, and contain abstracts of 
inquisitions taken in the year 1185 (31 Henry II.), for the purpose 
of ascertaining the wardships, reliefs, and other profits due to the 
king from widows and orphans of his tenants in capite, minutely 
describing their ages and heirship, their lands, the value of them, 
the beasts upon them, &c. This document has been published 
by Mr. Stacey Grimaldi, under the following title : — " Rotuli de 
Dominabus et Pueris et Puellis de Donatione Regis in xli Comi- 
tatihiiSj fyc" 



INQUISITIONES POST MORTEM. 129 

Ample Calendars and Indices, of such of these records as are 
preserved at the Tower, have been printed by the Record Com- 
missioners, under the title of " Calendarium Inquisitionum post 
Mortem sive Escaetarum. Henry III. — Richard III" 4 vols, folio. 
1806-1828. 

Vol. I. contains the Inquisitions from the reign of Hen. III. to the end of 

the reign of Edw. II. 
Yol. II. contains the Inquisitions in the reign of Edward III. 
Vol. III. contains the Inquisitions in the reigns of Rich. II. and Hen. IV. 
Vpl. IV. contains a list of the Inquisitions in the reigns of Hen. V., VI., 
Edw. IV., and Eich. III., and an Appendix, with a list of a large portion 
of the Inquisitions which are noted in the preceding volumes as lost ; 
as well as of upwards of 3000 other Inquisitions post mortem, in the 
several reigns from Hen. III. to Jas. I. inclusive, which have been 
recently discovered. 

'j> 
To each volume copious Indices Locorum et Nominum are ap- 
pended ; but, in using the Calendar, some caution is necessary, and 
the following hints may prevent mistakes. 

In many instances, and most commonly with respect to the 
" second numbers," notices occur of Inquisitions which were not 
Inquisitions post mortem, but proceedings connected with alienation, 
or enfeoffment of lands to trustees, often for religious or charitable 
uses. It does not always follow that the lands mentioned were the 
property of the person to whom the inquisition relates, though it 
is certain that they are mentioned therein ; for they may be lord- 
ships, of which he held only a trifling tenement, or to which he 
was bound to pay a customary rent. 

The original price of vols. I., II., and III. was five guineas, and 
of vol. IV. £2, being, for the set, £7. 5s. The present price is — for 
vols. I., II., and III., £3, and for vol. IV. £1. 10s.; vols. II. and 
III. may be purchased separately. 

Calendars of the Inquisitions for the Duchy of Lancaster have 
also been printed by order of the same Commission. They are 
intitled, " Ducatus Lancastriee Calendarium Inquisitionum Po& 
Mortem^ 9 &c. 3 vols, folio. 1823-1834. 

Yl j ( Part I. Calendar to the Inquisitions, Edw. I. — Car. I. 

\ Part II. Calendar to the Pleadings, etc. Hen. VII. — Ph. and Mary. 

Vol. II. Part III. 1—13 Elizabeth. 

Vol. III. Part IV. 14—45 Elizabeth. 

9 



130 INQUISITIONES POST MORTEM. 

The Pleadings, forming the second, third, and fourth parts, con- 
sist of hills, answers, depositions, and surveys, in suits exhibited in 
the Duchy Court of Lancaster. 

The present price of this work is £1. Is. 

Stow and Powell refer occasionally to "The Book of Heirs of 
Henry III.;" they are merely the MS. indices or calendars of the 
Inquisitions at the Tower. 



131 



Ihtquisitumes ati quoU Bamnum* 

n^HE Inquisitio ad quod damnum is a judicial inquiry which still 
-*- occasionally takes place, arising from the necessity of protecting 
the rights, property, or revenue of the crown and of the subject from 
injury or encroachment. This process occurred when any grant of 
a market, fair, or license to alienate lands in mortmain was solicited, 
or to possess any other peculiar privilege, in case a doubt existed 
whether the favour sought would not be to the detriment of the crown 
or some of its subjects. For example : by the alienation in mortmain 
of lands for which service was due to the crown, and thereby depriving 
it of that service ; by the grant of a market or fair, or of a mill too 
near to a place where one already existed, so that its tolls might be 
affected; or by the concession of any other new privilege which 
might interfere with vested rights, whether of a public or private 
nature. They also contain a variety of information, such as Inqui- 
sitions on murder, theft, felonies, fugitives, of the king's lands, &c. 
In all such cases a writ was addressed to the escheator of the county 
where the place was situated, by whom a jury was assembled to 
ascertain by their verdict whether it would be to the damage of the 
king or of others, if the privilege sought were granted : thence 
called Inquisitions " ad quod damnum." 

Those taken before the time of Edward II. are among the Inqui- 
sitions post mortem. 

A Calendar of these records has been published by the Record 
Commissioners, under the title of " Calendarium Inquisitionum ad 
quod Damnum," and forms the second part of the " Calendarium 
Rotulorum Patentium" folio. 1803. 1 

The Inquisitions, to which this volume is a Calendar, are amongst 
the records at the Tower, and extend from 1st Edward II. to 38th 
Henry VI. Though the result of the inquiry is not to be gathered 
from this Calendar, for which the original record must be consulted, 
it is nevertheless of much utility ; for it generally proves that the 
parties mentioned were seized of the lands alluded to, and occa- 
sionally presents genealogical facts and curious antiquarian and 
historical information. The original price of this volume was £%^ 
now reduced to 15*. 

The Writs ad quod damnum, from 9th Charles I. to the present 
time, are at the Petty Bag Office. 

1 See page 118. 



132 



ffinm anti ifocobmes* 

HP HE antiquity of Fines is greater than the date of the Norma 
-*- Conquest, and the records of them are regularly preserve 
from the reign of Richard I. Some few are in existence of the reig 
of Henry II. 

The House of Commons Committee on Public Records, in speal 
ing of fines, states, "The utility of these records to all persor 
desirous of traciug property and pedigree, is unquestionable." 

The use of Recoveries did not openly take place until tl 
12th Edward IV., from which period, or shortly afterwards, tt 
records of them are preserved. 

These — to genealogists — well-known records, contain the pre 
ceedings which have been adopted to convey estates, and to frc 
them from their entailment to issue, and from the dower of wives. 

The information to be obtained from both Fines and Recoverie: 
is the name of the freeholder levying the fine — if married, that ( 
his wife, and occasionally the name of his eldest child, or otht 
members of his family — the situation and quantity of his estate, an 
in fines of ancient date, ancestors are not unfrequently mentioned 

The value of these records will be readily acknowledged, whe 
it is considered that they prove marriages, and the issue of thes 
marriages, at a time when there were no parochial registers, an 
that even now they can supply the place of lost or defective parisl 
books. 

No documents have been so continued, and preserved in sue 
uninterrupted succession, and from so early a date, as the " Pedi 
Finium," or "Feet of Fines." 

These records, from the reign of Richard I. to that of George II 
as also the original record of all Fines from the reign of Henry VIII 
are at the Chapter House. 

In the Record Office at Carlton Ride are copies of the Writs < 
Covenants and the Fines paid thereon, from 1576 to the presei 
day. Here also are entries of Recoveries, from the year 1507 1 
the present time. 

At the Warrant of Attorney's Office are entries of all Fini 
levied from about 1507; as likewise a Warrant of Attorney < 



FINES AND RECOVERIES. 133 

every Recovery suffered by dedimus, being the only part of tbe 
process where the signature of the party interested appears. 

Entries of Fines, and some of the proceedings therein, from 1688, 
are at the Master's Office. 

At the Prothonotaries* Office are Recovery Remembrance 
Rolls, from the 36th Henry VIII., containing, among other legal 
forms, the names of the demandants, tenants, and vouchers, with 
the description and particulars of the land to be passed. 

In the same office, the Clerk of the Returns has the writs of 
covenant, entry, summons, and seisin, the returns thereto, and 
the attorneys 3 names, from 1687 to 1824. He has also, from 
14th George III., affidavits on parchment of the due acknowledg- 
ment of all recoveries suffered by dedimus potest at em. 

The Fines, from the 7th Richard I. to the 16th John, have been 
printed by the Record Commissioners, under the following title : — 
" Fines, sive Pedes Finium, sive Finales Concordia in Curia Domini 
Regis, 7 Ric. I.— 16 John/ 3 2 vols. 8vo. 1835—1844 (in counties). 
The present price of these volumes is Us. 

At the British Museum are several Calendars of Fines, as 
follows : — 

Calendar of Fines passed during the reign of Edw. in. (Lansd. MS. 306.) 
Calendar of Fines passed during the reigns of Rich. II., Hen. IV., and 

Hen. V. (Lansd. MSS. 307 ; 308.) 
Calendar of Fines levied in Kent, from 2 Hen. III. to 35 Edw. I. (Lansd. 

MSS. 267; 268.) 
Fines capti in comm. Somerset, Dorset, Wilts, et Southampton, pro 

favoribus, etc. Petro Warbec, &c. factis. (Boy. Moll, 14, B. vii.) 

The Wiltshire Fines, from 1 Edward III. to Richard III., ex- 
tracted from the Lansdowne MSS. 306 — 308 ; together with those 
for Worcestershire, temp. Car. I., have been printed for private 
circulation by Sir Thomas Phillipps, Bart. 



134 



Mtft JHanuals an* fttfliwt Mis* 

TTTARRANTS signed by the Queen, and countersigned by a 
* * Secretary of State, or by the Lords of the Treasury, are 
called Sign Manuals, 

These warrants, in general, are directed to the Attorney or 
Solicitor-General, requiring them to " prepare a bill for our royal 
signature, containing our grant unto," &c, or otherwise, as the 
case may require ; and when this bill is prepared and signed by the 
law officer, the Secretary of State procures the Queen's signature, 
to it, and this is called a Signet Bill. It is then taken to the 
Signet Office, 1 where it remains on record. The subsequent pro- 
ceedings are mentioned under the title of Privy Seals, in the next 
chapter. 

Warrants respecting the peerage are directed to the Attorney- 
Genelra. 

Grants of charters are addressed to the Solicitor-General. 

Warrants for miscellaneous grants are directed to the Attorney 
and Solicitor-General, or one of them. 

Warrants for grants of ordinary preferments in the church, 
when signed by the Queen, were formerly directed to the Clerk of 
the Signet attending to "prepare a bill granting," &c, and the 
Attorney and Solicitor- General had no concern therein. 

Warrants of the Lords of the Admiralty, the Earl Marshal, and 
the Lord Chamberlain, are issued to the Attorney or Solicitor 
General for preparing bills for those grants of offices under their 
patronage. 

Although the grants to which these documents refer should be 
found inrolled on the Patent, Close, Charter, or Confirmation Rolls, 
yet it is to be remembered, that the Sign Manual or Signet Bills 
occasionally contain recitals omitted in the Patent, and there are 
some grants which were never inrolled. 

The Confirmation Rolls commence in 1483, and end in 1615 ; 
they are at the Rolls Chapel, and contain confirmations of 
charters to cities, boroughs, and other bodies corporate or politic, 

1 The offices of the Clerks of the Signet were abolished by stat. 14 and 15 Tic. c. 82, 
and the duties were directed to be performed in the officeB of the Secretary of State for 
the Home Department. In the year 1852, such records as were not required for 
current business, were ordered to be transferred to the Public Recokd Office. 



SIGN MANUALS AND SIGNET BILLS. 135 

and also to private persons; correct indexes have been made of 
their contents. All Confirmations since 1615 have been inrolled 
promiscuously with other patents on the Patent Rolls. 

These records are distributed amongst the Public Record and 
other repositories, as follows : — 

Signet Bills from the reign of Rich. II. to that of Chas. I. ; the Tower. 
Signed Bill bundles from the reign of Hen. VII. to the present time ; Rolls 

Chapel. 
Sign Manuals of the reigns of Hen. "VII., Hen. VIII., Mary, and Elizabeth ; 

Chapter House. 
Several bundles of Sign Manuals, Grants, etc. of the reign of Hen. VIII. ; 

State Paper Office. 
Grants from Hen. VIII. to divers private persons, anno 36; Brit. Mus. 

Earl. MS. 6822, f. 22. 
Note of all Bills signed by the King and Council, 4—7 Edw. VI. ; Brit. 

Mus. Roy. MS. 18, C. xxiv. 
A Collection of Sign Manuals, from 1523 to 1684 ; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 

7583. 
Billae Signatae et Privata Sigilla, 1—25 Elizabethan reg. ; Brit. Mus. Sloane 

MS. 1567. 
Books containing abstracts of former grantSj from 1584 to 1597 ; Public 

Record Office. 
Nine volumes of Indexes, from the year 1584 to 1803 inclusive, with some 

chasms ; Privy Signet Office. 
Above 2000 original Sign Manuals for grants of offices, lands, and pardons, 

many are of the reigns of Jas. I. and Chas. I. ; State Paper Office. 
Abstracts of former grants, from 1603 to 1605, and from 1645 to 1660 ; 

Public Record Office. 
Docquets of grants which have passed the Signet Office, from Dec. 17, 1628, 

to June 30, 1630; Pub. Lib. Camb. MS. Bd. ii. 12. 
Docquets of grants passing the Eoyal Signet, from June to Nov. 1660; 

Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 1884. 
Original records of the Seal Grants, and Appointments passing through the 

Signet Office, from 1660 to 1852 ; Public Eecord Office. 
Bills signed by several sovereigns of England, for various Grants, Appoint- 
ments, etc., from 1661 to 1789. Also various Eoyal Warrants, from 

the year 1672,3 to 1800 inclusive; Public Eecord Office. 
Docquets of Grants passing the Eoyal Signet, temp. William ancl Mary * 

Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 7639, art 1. 

temp. Anne; Brit. Mus. Earl. MSS. 2262—2264. 

Entries of Patents, royal Sign Manuals, and other Warrants and Appoint- 
ments, from 5th July, 1785 ; Audit Office. 



136 



$rfo£ ftiafo 



TXTHEN the Signet Bill with the Queen's signature has 

* * arrived at the Signet Office, 1 an attested transcript, under the 
hand of the clerk or deputy, and addressed to the Lord Privy Seal, 
is made, and handed over to the Privy Seal Office. To this instru- 
ment the Queen's Signet (being one of the seals in the hands of 
the Secretary of State) is affixed. This is the warrant to the Lord 
Privy Seal, and remains in his hands. A similar transcript, and 
addressed to the Lord Chancellor, to cause Letters Patent to be 
passed conformably thereto, has the Privy Seal affixed to it. 

This last transcript, called the Privy Seal, is lodged at the Crown 
Office, or Clerk of the Letters Patent, in Chancery, where it is 
opened. The Privy Seal is taken off, and an engrossment made of 
it. The whole are then left at the Lord Chancellor's ; and, if he 
should see no objection, he writes his name in the margin of the 
parchment, and the Great Seal is affixed to the engrossment, which 
completes the grant. The instrument called the Privy Seal being 
returned to the office which engrossed the Letters Patent for the 
Great Seal, is, after a certain time, removed to the Petty Bag 
Office, and thence to the Roils, where it remains on record. 

The Privy Seal bills forwarded to the Clerk of the Patents relate 
to grants of land, money, pardons, and offices, and those for deni- 
zation of foreigners are usually sent to him. 2 The early entries of 
denizations in the docket-books are very unsatisfactory, one solitary 
name often appearing with these words following, "and many 
others;" they are, however, entered on the Patent Rolls. The 
Crown Office claims and receives all Privy Seal bills authorising 
Letters Patent for the grant of dignities. 

A search in the books of the Clerk of the Patents and of the 
Crown Office, is a necessary part of the evidence to prove that 
letters patent have not been granted. In the Office of the Clerk 
of the Patents is a complete series of official docket-books from 
1 603, the date (it is presumed) of the institution of the office. 

1 See the preceding article. 

2 In the Privy Signet department are fourteen boxes, each containing a Patent of 
Denization, with the Great Seal attached. 



PRIVY SEALS. 137 

Sometimes the Privy Seal contains a preamble or recital omitted 
in the patent, and therefore becomes a valuable document. 

As the Privy Seals are the original documents of the entries on 
the Patent Rolls, where their contents are generally, and ought 
invariably to be entered, there is not often occasion to make 
searches for them ; there are, however, not wanting instances of 
omissions of their inrolment, arising from civil wars, neglect, or 
other circumstances. 

These records will be found in the following repositories : — 

Grants under the Great and Privy Seals, are entered on the Memoranda 

Rolls at Carlton Ride. 
Privy Seal Warrants, from Edw. I. to Rich. III. ; the Tower. 
Calendar of the Rolls and Privy Seals in the Pell Office, from 1 Edw. I. to 

43 Elizabeth; Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 254. 
Register of Grants which passed the Privy Seal, Signet or Sign Manual, 

tempp. Edw. V. and Rich. III.; Brit. Mus. Mark MS. 433. 
Original Letters of Privy Seal, from Hen. VII. to Will. IV., partly filed 

among the Brevia of the Receipt of the Exchequer, partly arranged by 

reigns in bundles ; Rolls Chapel. 
Memoranda from Privy Seals, temp. Hen. VIII.; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 

5485, f. 37. 
Privy Seals are entered in Inrolment Books from the time of Hen. VIII., at 

the Land Revenue Department. 
Extracts from the register of the Great Seal of England, 1533, 1534, 1536, 

1542—1545 ; Brit. Mus. Cotton. MS. Calig. B. vii. f. 208. 
Privy Seal Warrants, 32 — 34 Hen. VIII. ; Chapter House. 
Register of Grants, etc. under the Great Seal, from 1551 to 1553; Brit. 

Mus. Cotton. MS. Julius, B. ix. 
Note of all the Bills signed by the King and Council, 4 — 7 Edw. VI. ; Brit. 

Mus. Roy. MS. 18, C. xxiv. 
Inrolment Books of Writs or Letters of Privy Seal, for the payment of 

moneys at the receipt of the Exchequer, 1570 — 1834; Rolls Chapel. 
An inventory of them is printed in the Deputy Keeper's 2d Rep. 

App. ii. pp. 211—219, and in the 5th Rep. App. ii. pp. 291, 292. 

Some of these books were transferred to the Treasury, upon the 

abolition of the ancient Exchequer, 1834. 
Privy Seals granted, 1 — 25 Elizabeth; Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 276. 
Entries of Privy Seals, 10— 12 Elizabeth; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 146. 
Docket Books, containing abstracts of all the Grants and Appointments 

passed from the 13 Elizabeth to the reign of Geo. IV.; Privy Seal 

OiTrcE. There is a chasm from 1580 to 1600, and during the Civil 

Wars. (These are the only books of entry kept at this office.) 



138 PKIVY SEALS. 

Dormant Privy Seals, or such as were not satisfied by a simple payment, but 

operated upon from time to time by the warrants of the Treasurer, etc. 

1597—1628; Rolls Chapel. 
An inventory is printed in the Deputy Keeper's 4th Eep. App. ii. 

pp. 168—175. 
Privy Seals entered in Bolls and Inrolment Books, being Inrolments of 

Letters of Privy Seal, etc. for payment of money out of the Exchequer, 

recorded in the Pells Books, 1597—1834 ; Bolls Chapel. 

An inventory is printed in the Deputy Keeper's 4th Bep. App. ii. 

pp. 201—308. 
Inrolment Books of Patents and Privy Seals, containing Crown Leases, 

Grants by Patent, Letters of Privy Seal, and other documents, 1599 — 

1696; Bolls Chapel. 

An inventory is printed in the Deputy Keeper's 2d Bep. App. iL 

pp. 209—211. 
Privy Seal Bolls, 1603—1620; Bolls Chapel. 

An inventory is printed in the Deputy Keeper's 4th Beport App. ii. 

pp. 210—212. 
Begister of Writs of Privy Seal, Warrants under the Signet, etc., 1609 — 1611 ;- 

Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 9045. 
Privy Seal Warrants, from the reign of James I., and part of that of Chas. I. ; 

Chapter House. 
Index of Grants of all Offices, Commissions, Licenses, etc., made by James I. ; 

Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 222. 
Calendar of Grants recorded in the Exchequer, from 1 Jas. I. to 3 Chas. I. ;. 

Brit. Mus. lansd. MS. 220. 
The Privy Seals during the expedition of Charles, Prince of Wales, into 

Spain, are at the Duchy of Cornwall Office. 
Patent and Privy Seal Books for Tallies, or Books of Inrolment of Letters- 

Patent, Privy Seals, Warrants, etc., relative to the Pell of Beceipt, and 

the striking of Tallies, 1620—1701 ; Bolls Chapel. 

An inventory is printed in the Deputy Keeper's 5th Bep. App. ii. 

pp. 278—280. 
Books of Inrolments, or entry of Letters of Privy Seal for the allowance of 
v moneys at the Beceipt of the Exchequer, or for the discharge of 

accountants and others, interspersed with sundry other documents, as 

assignments, letters of attorney, wills, administrations, etc. 1620 — 

1734; Bolls Chapel. 

An inventory of them is printed in the Deputy Keeper's 2d Beport, 

App.ii. pp 219—221. 
Warrants of Privy Seal, from 9 Chas. I. to 11 Anne; Brit. Mus. Karl. 

MSB. 7344—7351. 
A Calendar of the Privy Seals, temp. Commonwealth, is printed in the Deputy 

Keeper's 5th Bep. App. ii. pp. 246 — 277. 



EXTRACTA DONATIONUM. 139 

Copies of Warrants under the Privy Seal, from 1653 to 1656 ; Brit. Mus. 

Shane MS. 4184. 
Warrants of Privy Seal, tempp. Chas. L, II., and Anne ; Brit. Mus. Marl. MSS. 

7344—7351. 
Dockets of Grants under the Privy Seal, temp. Chas. II. ; Brit. Mus. Marl. 

MS. 1884. 
A Calendar of the Privy Seals of 1672 and 1673 is printed in the Deputy 

Keeper's 4th Eep. App. ii. pp. 208, 209. 
Dockets of all Grants of any part of their Majesties' Kevenue, either of lands, 

woods, money, or any other profits passed the Privy Seal, from 4 Jas. II. 

to 4 William and Mary ; Brit. Mus. Marl. MS. 7639, A. B. 
Register of the dockets of the Privy Seals, between the 28th June 1701, and 

the 29th Nov. 1716; Brit. Mus. Eg. MS. 743. 
Privy Seals from 4 and 5 Anne; Brit. Mus. Marl. MS. 6840, art. 11. 
Dockets and Letters of Privy Seal, from 8 to 10 Anne; Brit. Mus. Marl. 

MSS. 2262—2264. 

These belonged to John Holies, Duke of Newcastle, as Lord Privy 

Seal to the Queen. 
Account of Patents that have passed the office of Privy Seal, from 1st April 

1709, to 31st March 1710; Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 849, f. 265. 
Privy Seals from Geo. IV. to the present time, are at the Petty Bag, and Six 

Clerks' Office. 



^tracta Bonattomtm* 

HHHESE records contain abstracts from the Charter, Patent, 
-*- and other rolls, of grants from the crown, chiefly of lands 
and rents for term of life, and the custody of property during the 
minority of infants : much information relating to heirship is con- 
tained in them, but there is no calendar of their contents. 

It would appear, from the copies of writs (entered upon them) 
directed to the king's escheators, that the Extracta Donationum 
were compiled, for the purpose of furnishing the escheators with 
schedules of lands and profits no longer in the king's hands, or 
having the reversion in the king on the death of the tenant, or 
having any rent or service due thereout. 

There are twenty-seven rolls of the Extracta, all preserved at the 
Tower. They commence with the 45th year of Henry III., and 
end with the 6th of Richard II. 

There is no instance on record of their having been used for 
genealogical purposes. 



140 



foetortis of gttaintrers, dfcrfefturcs, 
anti bartons, 

ATTAINDERS. — The term attainted is particularly used for 
such as are found guilty of some crime, and especially of 
treason or felony. Acts of attainder of criminals have been passed 
in several reigns, on the discovery of plots and rebellions, from the 
reign of Charles I. to the present time. 

It is said, that in this country a family can have little claim to 
antiquity, if it cannot prove an attainder in some sovereign's reign. 

The early baronial feuds, the wars between the houses of York 
and Lancaster, the cruel caprice and religious persecutions of the 
Tudor race, together with the Stuart and Cromwell wars, have, at 
some period or another, involved nearly every great family in ruin 
or distress ; the shame of an attainder has therefore been lost in its 
universality and frequent injustice. 

"We may, therefore, without reproach, search the Attainder 
Records for assistance in tracing honourable descent. 

An act of Parliament is necessary to remove corruption of blood, 
where the party has been attainted of high treason by act of Par- 
liament, or by judgment on an indictment for high treason, petty 
treason, or felony. 

In the Tower are Rolls of Attainders and "Forfeitures, from 
Edward II. to 1st Henry IV. Also a volume containing a collection 
out of all the Parliament Rolls of attainders, restitutions, and 
resumptions, from 29th Edward III. to the end of Edward IV. 

In the same repository are three rolls of Grants and Restora- 
tions, two of which are indorsed, "Clause de terris forisfactis 
liberand 5 , " and the other, " Carte de t'ris forisf cis dat' div*s aliis 
psonis." They relate to the years 1321, 13(22, and 1323, and are 
as important for the periods to which they refer, as the Patent or 
any other rolls containing grants. Two out of the three records 
relate to the restoration of the forfeited lands to the offending 
parties ; and, as these rolls often recite the pardons which had been 
granted to the same persons, the records might be useful in proving 
such facts; their contents, which are considerable, have not yet 
had the benefit of a calendar. 



FORFEITURES, AND PARDONS. 141 

Although the earliest of these rolls bears date 15th Edward II., 
yet it has retrospect to forfeitures under Edward I. 

No instance of their having been used for genealogical purposes 
has yet been known 

Here likewise are deposited, records for the Court of Commission 
on Forfeited Estates after the rebellions of 1715 and 1745; con- 
sisting of upwards of 100 volumes, and a great number of bundles 
of deeds. 

In the Chapter House are surveys, inventories, and accounts of 
the forfeited estates of attainted persons in the reigns of Henry VII. 
and VIII., and records of their attainder. There are also accounts 
relating to the insurrections in Yorkshire, Lincolnshire, and the 
Duke of Richmond's matters in the reign of Henry VIII. Here 
also are deposited some interesting rolls, with the names and 
residences of, and fines imposed upon, many thousand " rebels," 
who sided with Lord Audley, Perkin Warbeck, and others, in the 
reign of Henry VII. 

In the Record Office at Carlton Ride are commissions on 
attainders, surveys of forfeited lands for treason, &c, and accounts 
relating thereto, especially during the period of 1660. Here also 
are king's ministers' accounts of the possessions of persons attainted 
in the reigns of Henry VI., VII., VIII., and Edward VI. 

In the Baga de Secretis of the Court of Queen's Bench are 
records of attainder, convictions, and others, chiefly relating to 
the crown's title to lands. A calendar of this mysterious repository 
is printed in the 3d, 4th, and 5th Reports of the Deputy Keeper of 
Records. 

In the Petty Bag Office are special commissions to inquire of 
estates forfeited to the crown, with the inquisitions and traverses 
thereon, from James I. to the present time. 

The " Parliament" and " Close Rolls " also often contain attaind- 
ers and pardons. 

Forfeitures. — Forfeitures to the crown, and sometimes to the 
crown and informer, for offences committed against penal laws, are 
entered on the "Memoranda Rolls," at Carlton Ride. 

The papers relating to the estates of those families whose lands 
were sequestered, or encumbered with a fine, by Cromwell, in 
consequence of their adherence to their sovereign, are preserved at 
the State Paper Office, They embrace a period of twelve years, 
from 1649 tol660. There are two sets of documents : one relating 



142 RECORDS OF ATTAINDERS, 

to about 5000 persons whose estates were sequestered ; the other 
relating to about 3000 persons who compounded for their lands. 

These documents contain the particulars of the estates seques- 
tered or compounded for ; the latter having a petition to the Par- 
liament, signed by the owner, a survey of his lands, &c., particu- 
larizing them most fully, then an order of the Parliament thereon ; 
and generally will be found in them an account of the petitioner's 
family, and of the entailment or inheritance of his property. 

An alphabetical catalogue of the Lords, Knights, and Gentlemen 
who compounded for their estates, apparently compiled by Thomas 
Dringe, has been published, and may serve as a calendar to the 
original documents in the State Paper Office. The first edition 
was printed in 1655 ; the second at Chester in 1733. 

By statute 1st George I., c. 50, the estates of the rebels in 1715 
were forfeited and vested in the king for the use of the public ; and 
and in 4th George I. another act was passed, which appointed 
commissioners as trustees for the sale of the estates. 

The papers and parchments relating to these estates, containing 
surveys, particulars, claims, appeals, and much matter of family 
pedigree, are known by the name of the " Proceedings of the Com- 
missioners on Forfeited Estates," and are preserved at the Tower. 

A copious list of these documents, with an alphabetical table of 
the persons to whom they relate, will be found in Thomas's Hand- 
book to the Public Records, 1854, pp. 382 — 391. An inventory, or 
alphabetical index of the books, papers, and proceedings, is printed 
in the 5th Report of the Deputy Keeper of Records, App. i. pp. 97 — 
130. There are about 7471 vols, and bundles, including the 
decrees. 

In the Rolls Office is a Warrant Book, containing warrants, 
decrees, and debentures, for claims payable out of the estates of 
certain traitors, sold for the use of the public, 1719 — 1724. The 
decrees are those of the commissioners to whom all cases were 
referred, relative to the interests of any individuals or bodies cor- 
porate in those estates, and are after the form of the courts of 
equity. The warrants are by the Lords of the Treasury. 

The proceedings of the commissioners in Scotland are in 
Scotland, and also those of the Rebellion of 1745. 

Some of the original proceedings against the traitors will be found 
in the Baga de Secretis, noticed in the preceding page. 

Several certificates, rentals, and reports, relating to forfeited 
estates in Scotland, are deposited at the Treasury. 



FORFEITURES, AND PARDONS. 143 

Another class of forfeitures were those of Romish recusants, 
against part of whose property escheats were issued for their 
contumacy. 

Accounts of the lands and rents of sequestered estates of 
recusants, temp. Commonwealth, are deposited at Carlton Ride. 

Among them may be noticed — 

I. A roll of persons called rescusants, temp. Elizabeth, for contumacy, 

whereupon extents issued against part of their property. 
II. Particulars of several counterparts, leases, and contracts of sequestered 
estates in Beers, 1654. 

III. Particulars and surveys of all lands under sequestration in Berks, 1654. 

IV. A book containing a brief view of all farmers, tenants, and occupiers 

of the estates of delinquents, and two-thirds of the estates of Popish 
recusants, in the county of Lancaster, remaining under seques- 
tration, 1656 and 1658. 
V. Alphabetical particulars of all the estates in the county of Lancaster 
under sequestration, cause of sequestration, to whom let, and for what 
term, rents, &e. 
VI. A book containing a list of such Papists and delinquents whose estates 
were under sequestration, in the county of Worcester, and the 
rental of the same. 

In the State Paper Office is a great body of papers relating to 
the composition and purchase of estates of delinquents during the 
interregnum, called Composition Papers. 

In the Petty Bag Office are certificates of Popish convicts, and 
of persons concealed, from Anne to the present time. 

Bargains and sales of sequestrations, temp. Commonwealth, are 
entered on the Close Rolls, at the Tower. 

There are Recusant Rolls among the miscellaneous of the Pipe 
and Lord Treasurer's Remembrancer's Records, as may be seen by 
referring to the miscellaneous matter printed in the 5th Report of 
the Deputy Keeper of Records, App. i., p. 19. It is not there 
distinguished to which department they belong. 

Pardons. — These documents have a twofold use : the one, as 
an assistance in a mere genealogical point of view ; the other, in 
removing the impediment of attainder, with which obstruction the 
most perfect pedigree can, for some purposes, avail nothing. 

At the Tower are Pardon Rolls from the 22d Edward I. to 
2d James I., both inclusive, containing general and particular par- 
dons to individuals. 



144 RECORDS OP ATTAINDERS, 

Pardons will be found entered on the Close Rolls. 

Pardons of alienation, and special and general pardons, on the 
Patent Rolls. 

Fines for pardons are entered on the Fine Rolls, 

In the Rolls Chapel are divers Rolls of Pardons, containing 
Bails upon Special Pardons, &c. 

Pardons are entered on the Controlment Rolls, at Carlton Ride, 
where are also deposited the Entry Books of Licenses and Pardons, 
from 1571. 

In the State Paper Office are a great many original Sign 
Manuals for Grants of Pardon, in the reigns of James I. and 
Charles I. 

The Privy Seal Warrants, and Signet Bills, abound with Grants 
of Pardon. 

A list of Manuscripts in public libraries, relating to these records, 
is here subjoined : — 

Papers respecting Popish Recusants, and proceedings against them ; Brit. 

Mus. Cotton. MS. Titus, B. in. pp. 56 6—75; Earl. MSS. 286; 360; 

7042; Lansd. MSS. 19 (art. 21, 29); 23 (art. 52, 59); 28; 51; 58; 153. 
Names of Popish Recusants convict, and Papists, who have registered their 

estates, etc, as returned by the Clerks of the Peace for the several 

counties ; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 15,629. 
Papers respecting concealed Lands; Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 47. 
A list of Patents and Pardons granted; Brit. Mus. HarL MS. 3796. — 

Inner Temple Lib. MS. 536. v. i. 
Warrants for apprehending suspected persons, &c. ; Brit. Mus. HarL MS. 

6998. 
Notes concerning Eecusants, xviith cent. ; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 17,022. 
Eeturns of Traitors' Estates in various counties, xviith cent. ; Brit. Mus. 

Add. MS. 19,678. 
"Extract from a term rowl of such as were attaynted, temp. Hen. III., for 

rysing in armes at the battayle of Evsham;" Brit. Mus. Shane MS. 

1301, art. 138. 
Inquisitiones de Rebellis, anno 49 Hen. 111. ; Bodl. Lib. MS. 4182, f. 189. 

(Bodesw. MS. v. 40.) 
Analecta e rotulis donationum de terris forisfactis, 15, 16, Edw. IT. ; Ashm. 

Lib. MS. 6494, p. 156. 
Names of persons attainted in the reigns of Edw. III. and IV. ; Brit. Mus. 

Lansd. MS. 870, f. 8. 
Names of those who were attainted of treason with the Marquis of Exeter, 

1540; Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 2, art. 3. 
Book of Concealments, temp. Elizabeth; Brit. Mvs.Lansd.MS. 59, art. 35, 39. 



FORFEITURES, AND PARDONS. 145 

Names of such as are certified to be Fugitives, contrary to the statute 

23 Eliz. ; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 6839, f. 325, 
Names of such as are certified to be fugitives over the sea, temp. Elizabeth ; 

Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 412, f. 25. 
List of persons attainted, anno 13 Elizabeth (1570); Brtt. Mus. Cotton. 

MS. Titus, C. vii. f. 9 b; Harl. MS. 309, f. 201 b. 
An account of concealed lands, found 15 Elizabeth (1572); Brit. Mus. 

Lansd. MS. 16, art. 56. 
Catalogue of Papists confined in different prisons of England, 1579 ; Brit. 

Mus. Lansd. MS. 29, art. 97. 
Rents and revenues of Eecusants in England, 1587; Brit. Mus. Lansd. 

MS. 53, art. 69. 
Names of Papists and Eecusants in England, 1587 ; Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 

55, art. 58. 
Eeturns of Popish Fugitives, 1593; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 7042, f. 315. 
Note of lands forfeited to the Queen by the attainder of the D. of Norfolk 

Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 58, art. 24. 
Catalogue of persons outlawed in the reign of Jas. I. ; Cath. Lib. Westm. 

MS. 214. 
Papers relating to the Sequestrations throughout England, 1642 — 1652 

Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 5478 ; 5501; 5508; 5291; 5494; 5497. 
Abstract of the accounts of the Committees for Sequestration, anno 1644 

Pub. Lib. Camb. MS. JDd. iii. 67. 
Orders and Grants touching Sequestered Estates, 1645 — 1647 ; Brit. Mus. 

Add. MS. 16,178. 
Papers relating to Sequestrated Livings, from 1649 to 1662 ; Lamb. Lib. 

MS. 1027. 
Catalogue of the Lords, Knights, and Gentlemen, that have compounded for 

their estates; Lond. 1655, 8vo — reprinted, with additions, at Chester, 

1733. 
Eeturn of Papists and Dissenters in England and Wales, circ. 1660 ; All 

Sgvls 5 Coll. Oxf. MS. ccv. ff. 42, 42 b. 
Names of Eecusants convicted in the Exchequer, 1671 ; Brit. Mus. AM> 

MS. 20,739. 
Proceedings against, and names of, Eebels in 1685; Brit. Mus. iZaW..&r& 4689. 
Names of such as were required to be delivered up, or at least banished out 

of the States Generals dominions, 1685; Brit. Mus. Shane MS. 

2723, art. 1. 
Names of Popish Eecusants convict, and Papists, &c, as returned pursuant t<? 

the act of 1716 ; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 15,629. 
The names of the Eoman Catholics, non-jurors and others, who refused to 

take the oaths to his late majesty King George; Lond. 1745, 8vo. 
Original Papers relating to the Vaudois and French Eefugees, from May 

1669 to April 1703 ; Lambeth Lib. MS. 1028. 

10 



146 RECORDS OF ATTAINDERS, 

Livre des Anglois a Geneve, by J. S. Bum. Lond. 1831. 8vo. 

A copy of the Register of the Church at Geneva, containing the 
names of English Protestants who took refuge there in the reign of 
Q. Mary. 

Bedfordshire — Buckinghamshire : History of the Sequestrations, with copies 

of letters, etc. in the counties of Bedford, Berks, and Buckingham; 

Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 5491. 
Cambridgeshire: List of Sequestrators for Cambridgeshire, 1643: Bbit. 

Mus. Add. MS. 5823, f. 95 b. 
Cheshire: Sequestrators' Accompts within the county palatine of Chester; 

Brit. Mus. Earl. MSS. 1999; 2018; 2126; 2128; 2130; 2136; 

2137; 2144; 2174. 
List of Cheshire gentlemen who compounded for their estates, 

temp. Chas. I.; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 2043, ff. 118, 128. 

Accompts of moneys paid to the Sequestrators, in the parish of 



Church-Lawton, co. Chester, 1642—1646; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 
1943. 

Original accompts of the delinquents within the hundred of 

Edesbury, co. Chester, 1645, 1646; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 2175. 

The Sequestration book of delinquents' estates in Namptwich 



hundred, 1644—1646; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 2166. 
Derbyshire: List of Recusants in West Derby; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 

2128, f. 175. 
Devonshire: Proceedings against the Rebels in 1685, in the county of 

Devon; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 4689. 
Dorsetshire : Register of Sequestrations in Dorsetshire, 1645 — 1647 ; Brit. 

Mus. Add. MS. 8845. 
Proceedings against the Rebels in 1685, in the county of Dorset ; 

Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 4689. 
Durham: Minute Book of Sequestrators within the co. of Durham, 1644; 

Durham Cath. Eunter MS. 22, art. 36. 
Essex: Account of Sequestered lands in Essex; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 

5505. 
Hampshire: Proceedings against the Eebels in 1685, in the county of 

Southampton; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 4689. 
Kent : A brief sum of all the Recusants certified within the dioceses of the 

provinces of Canterbury and York ; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 280, f. 157. 
Leicestershire : List of Leicestershire gentlemen who compounded for their 

estates, temp. Chas. I. ; Brit. Mus. Earl, MS. 2043, f. 38 b. 
Lincolnshire: Utlagaria com. Lincolnise, 22 Edw. IV.; Chapter House. 
London : Names of Priests and Recusants committed to prisons in and about 

London, 1586 and 1588; Brit. Mus. Lansd. MSS, 51, art. 67; 58, 

art. 13. 



FORFEITURES, AND PARDONS. 147 

Norfolk: Papers relating to Popish Recusants in co. Norfolk, 1578, 1591, 

1627—1665; Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 5847, p. 313; 5848> p. 286. 
Letters and accounts of the Committee of Sequestrations in co. 

Norfolk, 1644, 1645; Brit. Mvs.Add.MSS. 5508, ff. 12—39; 5497, 

f. 127. 
Northamptonshire : Papers relating to Sequestrations in CO. Northampton 

1648, 1649; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 5508, f. 75. 
Northumberland : Account of holders of concealed lands in Northumberland, 

1587 ; Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 51, art. 82. 
Somersetshire: Proceedings against the Rebels in 1685, in the county of 

Somerset; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 4689. 
Wiltshire : Papers of the Committee for Sequestrations in Wiltshire, 1648 ; 

Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 5508, ff. 141, 145 b } 156 5. 
Proceedings against the Rebels in 1685, in the county of Wilts ; 

Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 4689. 

Scotland : Records of the Court of Commissioners on Forfeited Estates, 
after the Rebellions of 1715 and 1745 ; Tower op London. 

Account of all the Attainted Scottish Noblemen, 1715 — 45 ; see 

Buchan's Account of the Family of Keith. 

Lists of Persons concerned in the Rebellion, 1745 ; Brit. Mus. 

Add. MS. 19,796. 

Ireland : " Licenses, pardons, writts of entree and acquytances entered in 
the Fyne Office of Robert, Earl of Leicester, from Trin. Term anno 22 to 
Easter Term anno 25 Elizabeth;" Society of Antiquaries, MS. 97. 

List of persons indicted for High Treason in Ireland, from 

Hilary Term 1641 to Easter Term 1642 ; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 
4772. 

List of Converts and Protestant Settlers in Ireland, from Chas. II. 

to 1772 ; Brit. Mus. Eg. MS. 77. 

Sale of Forfeited Estates in Ireland, 1702-3; Brit. Mus. Add. 



MS. 15,973. 
Report of the Trustees of Forfeited Estates in Ireland, Nov. 1703 ; 

Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 17,774. 
Survey of Forfeited Estates in Cork; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 

17,508. 
Surveys of Forfeited Land in Donnegal; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 

14,406. 
Sale of Forfeited Lands, co. Dublin, 1702-3 ; Brit. Mus. Add. 

MS. 18,718. 
Surveys of Forfeited Lands in Leitrim, Mayo, and Sligo; 

Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 14,405. 



148 



Parliamentary Eecortis. 



HPHE Statute Rolls and Inrolments. — The Statute Rolls are 
-*- records of Chancery, drawn up in form, for the purpose of 
being proclaimed and published, being framed upon original 
petitions and answers, or entries thereof on the Parliament Rolls. 
The earliest statutes contained in any collections are those of 
Henry III. No record of parliament is now known to be extant 
prior to the Statute of Gloucester, 6th Edward I., from which 
period they are continued to 8th Edward IV., with an interruption 
from 8th to 23d Henry VI. 

After 8th Edward IV. the Statute Roll is not preserved, though 
there is evidence of its existence as late as 4th Henry VII., after 
which (as supposed) it ceased to be made up, and ultimately it was 
succeeded, for all practical purposes, by the Inrolments of the Acts of 
Parliament certified into Chancery, commencing 1st Richard III. to 
the present time (except during the Usurpation) . They are brought 
in annually by the Clerk of the Parliament. 

Before Henry VIII., these Statute Rolls are sometimes in Latin 
and sometimes in French; but after Henry VIII. they are uni- 
formly in English. 

The Inrolments of Acts of Parliament, certified into Chancery, 
commence 1st Richard III., and come down to the present time. 
Down to the 3d Charles I., they comprehend several other pro- 
ceedings of parliament, besides the acts inrolled ; sometimes, for 
instance, the Commissions for giving Royal Assents to Bills are 
entered, thus partaking of the qualities of Rolls of Parliament, and 
including nearly the same contents, until, the miscellaneous 
matters disappearing by degrees, the acts inrolled only occur. To 
25th Henry VIII. they contain all acts, public and private, passed 
in every session, each with an introductory and concluding form of 
their being presented and assented to. From 25th Henry VIII. to 
35th Elizabeth, several of the private acts, and afterwards to 3d 
Charles I., all the private acts are omitted, their titles only being 
noticed. From 16th Charles I. to 31st George II., the inrolments 
contain nothing but the public acts, and the titles of the private acts, 



PARLIAMENTARY RECORDS. 149 

with the several forms of assent, without any other parliamentary 
matter; and from 32d George II. their contents are the same, 
with the omissions of the titles of the private acts. 

In February 1849, the ingrossments and inrolments ceased, and 
acts printed on vellum were substituted, pursuant to the recom- 
mendation of a Select Committee of the House of Commons 
in 1848. 

It is to the Private Statutes that the genealogist will be most 
indebted. They contain the settlements of family estates, long 
recitals of family pedigrees, the naturalization of foreigners, the 
attainders of parties, and the reversals of such attainders, licenses 
to change names and arms, the dissolution of marriages, the legiti- 
mation and illegitimation of issue, authority for individuals to 
re-marry, and other objects of a private description. 

There are many valuable manuscript copies of collections of 
Statutes preserved in public and private libraries; but the greatest 
number in any one place is in the British Museum. 

The Statutes of the Realm were printed (1810—1828) by the 
Record Commissioners, down to the end of Queen Anne, in eleven 
volumes, large folio, including two volumes of Indices. 

The following have also been printed : — 

Public Acts, from 2 Will, and Mary to 15 and 16 Victoria. 

Private Acts, from 1705 to 1852. 

Local, Personal, and Private Acts, from 38 Geo. III. to 15 and 16 Victoria, 

folio. 
Index to the Statutes at Large, by D. Pickering. Camb. 1769, 8vo. 
Index to the Statutes, from John to Geo. III., by O. Ruffhead. Lond. 1772, 

8vo. 
A table of Private Statutes, by G. Bramwell. Lond. 1813, 8vo. 
Index to the Statutes, by J. Raithby. 1814, 2 vols. 8vo. 

by B. Spiller. Lond. 1822, 4to. 

■ Index to Public and Private Acts, 1801 — 1844. Lond. 1845, folio, 2 parts. 
Chronological list of Statutes, by A. "N. Oulton. Lond. 1837, roy. 8vo. 
Index to the Statutes, 1810—48, by A. N. Oulton. Lond. 1846—9, roy. 8vo. 

(Comprising annual supplements.) 

Rolls of Parliament. — These important and highly interesting 
records commence with the 6th Edward I., and extend to the reign 
of Henry VIII.; but the Rolls, subsequent to the 19th Henry VII V 
will be found in the first volume of the Journals of the House of 
Lords. The Rolls of Parliament are very defective, the proceedings 
of various Parliaments being, it is feared, irretrievably lost. The 



150 PARLIAMENTARY RECORDS. 

value of these records can only be adequately appreciated by those 
who have been in the habit of consulting them ; for there is scarcely 
a subject connected with the parliamentary, legal, or general history 
of this country, on which information may not be derived from 
these records. A9 the Journals of the House of Lords do not 
commence until the 1st Henry VIII., it is from the Rolls of Par- 
liament alone that proofs can be found of peers having sat in 
Parliament previous to that period, which proofs are requisite in 
claims to an ancient barony by writ. 

The Petitions to Parliament frequently contain very curious 
matter, abounding in biographical materials, in illustrations of the 
state of society, and in notices of the descent of lands. 

The Rolls of Parliament contain entries of the several transactions 
in Parliament. When complete, they include the adjournments, 
and all other common and daily occurrences and proceedings, from 
the opening to the close of each Parliament, with the several 
petitions or bills, and the answers given thereto, not only on public 
matters on which the statutes were afterwards framed, but also on 
private concerns. In some few instances the statutes, drawn up in 
form, are entered, but in general the petitions and answers only are 
found entered \ and in such case, the entry of itself furnishes no 
certain evidence that the petition and answer were at any time put 
into the form of a statute. 

In the Parliament Rolls, it is much to be regretted that the 
names of those noblemen only who were appointed Triers of 
petitions', or who acted in some particular capacity, are to be found 
noticed as being present. In the Journals which commence with 
the reign of Henry VIII., the daily attendance of noblemen is 
noted ; and, as there were earlier Journals, it cannot be doubted 
that the Parliamentary Rolls were never intended to supply that 
evidence of sittings, which is now, in many cases, to be drawn from 
them alone. 

As has been already stated, the earliest Roll now extant is of 
the 6th Edward I. ; and the only other Rolls now preserved of that 
reign are of the 18th, 19th, 20th, 21st, 22d, 23d, 26th, 28th, 29th, 
30th, 33d, and 35th. 

Of the reign of Edward II. there are only five Rolls extant, — 
for the 8th, 9th, 12th, and 14th; the two Rolls of the 12th are not 
printed in the six volumes published by the House of Lords in 
1765, but they have lately been printed among other miscellaneous 
records in the Exchequer, by authority of the Government, under 



PARLIAMENTARY RECORDS. 151 

the title of " Documents Illustrative of English History," &c., under 
the editorship of Mr. Henry Cole. 

In the reign of Edward III., the Rolls for the 1st, 4th, 5th, 6th, 
13th, 14th, 15th, 18th, 21st, 22d, 25th, 29th, 36th, 37th, 38th, 
40th, 42d, 43d, 45th, 46th, 47th, 50th, and 51st years of his reign 
only have been preserved, and in the subsequent reigns there are 
many chasms. 

Many of the lost rolls belong to those Parliaments, which are of 
the greatest importance to the history of the constitution ; and it 
may be doubted whether their loss is wholly owing to accident. 
Richard II. was accused of defacing and cancelling records relating 
to the state and government of the kingdom, to the great prejudice 
of the people. And there are some reasons for supposing, that the 
Parliamentary Records relating to the deposition of Edward II. 
were amongst those which were thus destroyed. 

The Rotuli Placitorum Parliament ariorum form a portion of the 
Rotuli Parliament ariorum, and were printed entire in 1765, from 
6th Edward I. to 19th Henry VII., by order of the House of Lords, 
in six volumes folio. Ryley had, however, previously printed them 
in the year 1661, under the title of Placita Parliament aria, taken 
from an ancient MS. among the Tower Records, called the " Vetus 
Codex," and to which he added an Appendix of illustrative records. 
Ryley was not aware that the originals of most of the Parliament 
Rolls in the " Codex " were extant in the Chapter House ; but his 
volume, as far as it extends, has considerable value. An elaborate 
Index to the six volumes above mentioned was published in 1832. 

Down to the end of the reign of Edward IV. these documents 
are preserved in the Tower. After that period they are at the 
Rolls Chapel. 

Transcripts of the Rolls of Parliament will be found in other 
public repositories, as follows : — 

Petitions in Parliament, from 18 to 23 Edw. I. ; Pub. Lib. Camb. MS. Ee. 

v. %1. 
Bolls of Parliament, from 4 Edw. II. to Hen. VII.; Brit. Mus. Harl. MSS. 

7057—7086. 
Transcripts of Rolls of Parliament, 5, 8, 9 Edw. II. ; Brit. Mus. Hargrave 

MS. 487.— Pub. Lib. Camb. MS. fid. ii. 24. 
5 Edw. II. — 19 Hen. VII. ; Magd. Coll. Camb. Pepysian 

Lib. 1. 
5 Edw. II.— 6 Hen. VIIL, in 33 volumes; Inn. Temp. 

Lib. MS. 534. 



152 PARLIAMENTARY RECORDS. 

Abridgment of the Records of Parliament in the Tower, from 1 Edw. III. to 

22 Edw. IV. ; Beit. Mus. Cotton. MS. Tit. E. i. 
Transcripts of the Rolls of Parliament, from Edw. III. to Rich. III. inclusive, 

in 65 volumes; Brit. Mus. Jdd. MSS. 4631— 4695. 1 

1_3 Ri cn . II. . Brit. Mus. Eargrave MS. 106. 

1—11 Rich. II. ; Brit. Mus. Cotton. MS. Tit. E. ii. 

11 Rich. II.— 43 Eliz. ; Brit. Mus. Cotton. MSS. Tit. E. iii. ; 

Tit. F. ii. 
< ■ 21 Ric. II. ; Brit. Mus. Hargrave MS. 488. 



Writs of Summons, and Returns to Parliament. — The Writs 
of Summons and Returns to the Lower House of Parliament, from 
the time of Edward I. down to 17th Edward IV., are preserved at 
the Tower. There likewise are deposited a considerable number 
of returns to the three Parliaments during the Usurpation. These 
latter instruments are often crowded with the electors' signatures 
in their proper handwriting. 

Down to the 8th Henry IV., the returns are indorsed on 
the writs, or made on schedules annexed to them, being only the 
names of the members returned, with their manucaptors ; after that 
time there are indentures between the sheriffs and freeholders of 
the county, and the returning officers and electors of each city or 
borough. 

A writ of summons, followed by a sitting, confers the dignity of 
a baron descendible to all lineal issue, both male and female ; this 
proof of a sitting must be by the Records of Parliament, and can 
only be found on the Rolls or Journals of Parliament, unless the 
letter from the Barons to the Pope, in 29th Edward L, be considered 
genuine. 

The Returns of Members, from 33d Henry VIII., to the 
Parliament next before the Restoration of Charles II., are among 
the Rolls Chapel records. 

From 12th Charles II. to the present time (except the last two 
Parliaments) the writs of summons and returns are at the Petty 
Bag Office. The last two Parliaments are always kept at the 
Crown Office. As soon as the third Parliament is called, the 
indentures or returns of the first are delivered to the Petty Bag 
Office. 

As these returns point out the estates qualifying representatives, 

1 The original transcripts, from which the Rolls were printed by order of the 
House of Lords in 1765 (v. preceding page). 



PARLIAMENTARY RECORDS. 153 

genealogical evidence may be obtained through, them by a reference 
to the title-deeds of such estates, or the local rate or parish books. 

The Parliament Pawns are abstracts of all writs of summons 
and writs of election issued on calling a new Parliament. When 
the Parliament meets, the Parliament Pawn is completed; and after 
that period, all writs of summons are issued from the Crown Office 
in Chancery. 

It became the practice about the time of Henry VIII., when a 
Parliament was to be called, for the Clerks of the Petty Bag 
Office in Chancery to prepare these abstracts and schedules ; when 
fairly engrossed on parchment, they were lodged in the Petty Bag 
Office, under the name of Parliamentary Pawns, where they are 
still preserved, from the 21st Henry VIII. to the present time. 

The following are at the Crown Office, besides the writs of 
summons and returns for the last two Parliaments, viz., 18 lists of 
names of members of Parliament, Mary to Charles I, ; — a book 
containing the names of the Convention Parliament 1688; — a book 
containing the names of members returned to Parliament, 1682 to 
the present time. 

Lists of Writs of Summons are printed in Appendix i. to the 
Report on the Dignity of a Peer of the Realm. 

Literal copies of the Writs to Parliament have been printed by 
authority of Parliament, under the title of " Parliamentary Writs 
and Writs of Military Summons, together with the Records and 
Muniments relating to the Suit and Service due and performed to the 
King's High Court of Parliament and the Councils of the Realm 3 
%c. Edward L, IIP 2 vols, in 4 parts, folio. 1827—1834. 

Vol. I. embraces the reign of Edward L, and contains a Calendar of Writs 
of Elections and Returns, p. 1, xcvi ; Parliamentary Writs, being literal 
copies of original documents, pp. 1 — 192. 

Vol. II. embraces the reign of Edward II. (1307—1327), and is divided 
into two volumes, each of which is called a Division. Division I. 
contains a Calendar of Writs of Election and Returns, pp. i — cclxxxiv. 
Division II. — Writs, Records, and Muniments, relating to the Suit and 
Service due and performed to the King's High Court of Parliament, and 
the other Councils of the Realm, or affording evidence of attendance 
given at Parliaments and Councils during the reign of Edward II., 
pp. 1—366. 

The price of the first volume was £4. 4s., now reduced to £2. 2s. 



154 PARLIAMENTARY RECORDS. 

The second volume was published at £5. 5$., but is now reduced to 
£2. 2s. 

The Writs of Election are exhibited in a series which, though by 
no means complete, does not offer any very important chasms ; and 
the comparison between the number of returns there printed for 
the first time at full length, and the number catalogued by Prynne, 
will show how many have been recovered since the age of that 
laborious writer. 

Copious lists of Members of Parliament have been printed. 
Notices of a few of these, and of Manuscripts containing lists of 
Summonses, and of Members returned, are here subjoined. 1 

Returns of Members of Parliament in different reigns ; Brit. Mus. Lansd. 

MS. 1191. 
Returns of Representatives in Parliament, made by Borroughs in divers 

counties; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 161, p. 238. 
Noblemen in all kings' reigns, and when summoned ; College of Arms, 

MS. L. 7. 
List of Peers as they sat in Parliament at various periods ; Coll. of Arms, 

Dublin. 
An account of all the Parliaments holden in each reign, from 49 Hen. III. 

to the end of Edw. IV. ; v. Prynne's Brevia Parliammtaria rediviva. 

1660, 4 vols. 4to. 
A perfect copy of all Summons to Parliament, from the 49 Hen. III. to this 

present, by Sir Will. Dugdale; Lond. 1685, fol. 2d ed. about 1794. 
Summonses to Parliament, temp. Hen. III.; Inner Temple Lib. MS* 534. 

(vol. xxxiii.) 

Hen. III.— Edw. L; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 298, art 45. 

49 Hen. III.— 22 Edw. III. ; Coll. of Arms, Vincent MS.ZS. 

49 Hen. III.— 50 Edw. III. ; Caius Coll. Cams. MS. 501. 

49 Hen. III.— 2 Hen. VIII.; Brit. Mus. Cotton. MS. Titus, 

C. v. f. 44 b. 

49 Hen. III.— 6 Hen. VIII. ; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 158, f. 3. 

- 49 Hen. IH.— 21 Hen. VIII. ; Brit. Mus. Harl. MSS. 778; 2 

6204, p. 8, etseqq. 

49 Hen. III.— 13 Car. II. ; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 3323. 

23 Edw. I.; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 7555, art. 1. 



1 See Lists ot Gentby (Poll Books). In order to preserve a strictly chronological 
arrangement, it has been found undesirable, in this and other lists, to separate the 
notices of printed worts from those of the manuscripts. 

2 Number 778 is described as being in some places more extensive and correct than 
Dugdale's printed lists, though in others that work is more correct than this. 



PARLIAMENTARY RECORDS. 155 

Summonses to Parliament, Edw. I., II, III.; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 1300, 
ff. 57, 60, 72—83 5. — Inner Temple Lib. MS. B34. (vol. xxxiii.) 

24 Edw. I.— 21 Kich. II.; Brit. Mus. Cotton. MS. Faustina, 

Cxi. 

24 Edw. I. — 27 Hen. VI. ; Queen's Coll. Oxf. MS. clxxiii. 

Edw. II. — Bich. II. ; v. Cotton's Abridgment of Records at 



the Tower; Lond. 1689 ; ed. by Prynne. 

Edw. III. — Rich. II. ; Exeter Coll. Oxf. MS. cxxiv. 

48 Edw. III.— 22 Edw. IV. ; Coll. of Arms, MS. B. 3. 

1—23 Eich. II. ; Inner Temp. Lib. MS. 534. (vol. xxxiii.) 

1 Bach. II.— 22 and 23 Edw. IV.; Caius Coll. Camb. MS. 



502. 

1 — 14 Hen. IV. ; Inn. Temple Lib. MS. 534. (vol. xxxiii.) 

. 1 — 9 Hen. V. ; same manuscript. 

1 — 39 Hen. VI. ; same manuscript. 

. — , 2—4 Hen. VI; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 723, ff. 127, 388, 534. 

5—9 Hen. VI.; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 724, ff. 1—197. 

Names of the Lordes of the Parliament, 31, 32 Hen. VI. ; Brit. Mus. 

Harl. MS. 158, ff. 108, 116, 119. 
Summonses to Parliament, 38 Hen. VI.; Brit. Mjjs. Harl MS. 727, f. 333. 
1—23 Edw. IV.; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 729, art. 2.— 

Inner Temple Lib. MS. 534. (vol. xxxiii.) 
Names of the Lordes of the Parliament, 5 Hen. VIII. ; Brit. Mus. Harl. 

MS. 158, f. 109. 
List of Members of Parliament, from 1541 to 1660; v. Willis's Notitia 

Parliamentaria. 1750, 8vo. 

tempp. Mary and Elizabeth ; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 158, f. 125. 

Writs for electing Members in the reigns of Elizabeth, Jas. I., and Chas. I. ; 

Bodleian Library. 
Names of Lords and Commoners in the Scottish Parliament, Aug. 1560; 

Brit. Mus. Cotton. MS. Calig. B. ix. f. 144. 
The Names of the Lords of the Parliament holden at Dublin, 25 th April, 

1585 ; Brit. Mus. Cotton. MS. Titus, B. xiii. f. 381. 
List of Lords of Parliament and their eldest sons, 1588; Brit. Mus. 

Lansd. MS. 104, art. 23. 
List of Knights and Burgesses returned to Parliament, anno 35 Eliz. ; Brit. 

Mus. Lansd. MS. 255, f. 180. 
Summonses to Parliament, 1603 ; Brit. Mvs.'HarL MS. 158, ff. 165, 167. 

1620; Brit. Mus. Hargrave MS. 311, f. 459. 

A Catalogue of the names of such who were summoned to any Parliament, 

from the year 1640 to 1661 ; Lond. 1661, 8vo. 
The names of the Members of Parliament called to take upon them the trust 

of the government of this Commonwealth, etc., 1653. Lond. 1654, 4to. 
A list of the names of the Long Parliament, likewise of the Parliament held 

at Oxford, and those of 1653, 4, 6, and 9 ; Lond. 1659, 8vo. 



156 PARLIAMENTARY RECORDS. 

Lists of the twenty-four Parliaments, from 1660 to 1741, with a list of the 

House of Lords, etc. ; 1741. 12mo. 
Names of the Representatives in Parliament, 1677 ; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 

7170, art. 1. 
List of Knights, Citizens, and Burgesses of Parliament, 6th Peb. 1701; 

Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 1789, 1791, art. 1. 
Abstract of the Returns to Parliament for all the counties, cities, and 

boroughs of England, between 1702 and 1710; taken from the original 

records in the Rolls Chapel; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 15,661. 

Cambridgeshire : Members of Parliament for co. Cambridge, temp. Chas. II. ; 

Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 5813, f. 246; See also Carter's Eutory of 

Cambridge. 
Derbyshire: List of Knights and Burgesses of the co. of Derby, 1640; 

Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 2043, f. 22. 
Durham : List of the Knights and Burgesses who have represented the co. of 

Durham in Parliament, Durham, 1826, 4to. Privately printed. A second 

edition, consisting of 100 copies, was printed at Durham in 1831, 4to. 
Essex : List of the Members of Parliament for the borough of Colchester, 

co. Essex, from 23 Edw. I. to 1789; v. Eutory of Colchester, 1789, 

8vo. (Fenno), p. 122. 
Lincoln : List of Members of Parliament for the city of Lincoln ; v. 

Eutory of Lincoln, 1810, p. 21. 
Tables of the Burgesses in Parliament for the co. of Lincoln, to 

the year J 779 ; Lond. 1779, 4to. {White.) 
London: Members of Parliament for London, 1640, 1654, 1656, 1659; 

Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 5840, p. 417. 
List of Members returned for the city of London, from 1660 to 

1768; v. London Magazine, 1771, p. 408. 
Diary of the Parliaments held at Westminster, 1st, 3d, and 8th 

Henry VIII. ; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 2235, f. 34. 

Names of Members of Parliament for Westminster, in 1640, 1654, 



1656, 1659; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 5840, p. 417. 
Lists or Returns of Members from 1700 to 1705; Brit. Mus. 

Earl. MSS. 1789, art. 1 ; 1791, art. 1; 7361, art. 1. 
— List of Members for Westminster, from the Restoration to 1770 ; 

London Magazine, 1772, p. 483. 
Nottinghamshire : List of the Knights of the Shire and Burgesses for 

Nottingham ; v. Thoroton's Eut. of NottingJiam, 2d ed. v. ii. ; also 

Deering's Eutory of Nottingham, 
Oxfordshire : Historical Collections : or a brief account of the two Parlia- 
ments held at Westminster and Oxford, with exact lists of the Members 

of each Parliament. Lond. 1685, 8vo. 
Rutlandshire: Knights of the Shire for the co. of Rutland to ] 780 ; v, 

Wright's Eutory of Rutland, ed. by Harrod. 1788. 



PARLIAMENTARY RECORDS. 157 

Staffordshire : Members of Parliament for the co. of Stafford ; v. Shaw's 

History of Staffordshire, p. xiii. 
Warwickshire : List of Members of Parliament for Warwick ; v. Dugdale's 

History of Warwick, v. ii. p. 1145. 
Wiltshire : Members of Parliament, High Sheriffs, Gentry, &c. of Wiltshire ; 

v. Hoare's Eepertorium Wiltonense. Bath, 1821. Polio. Privately 

printed. 

For other Lists of Members, see — 

Carter's Honor redivivus. Lond. 1673, 3d ed. 

Willis's Notitia Parliamentaria. Lond. 1750. 8vo. 

Chamberlayne's State of Great Britain. The 1st edition appeared in 1663, 
and the 38th in 1755. 

The Parliamentary History. Lond. 1762. 23 vols. 8vo. and Index. Con- 
taining biographies of members. 

Beatson's Chronological Register of the Houses of Parliament, 3 vols. 
1807, 8vo. 

Oldfield's History of the House of Commons, etc. Lond. 1816, 6 vols. 

Adam's Parliamentary Hand-Book, ed. by E. Morton; Lond. 1851, 8vo, 
3d edit. 

Dodd's Parliamentary Companion; Lond. 1855, 12mo. 23d edit. 

Journals of Parliament, — It is not known when Journals were 
first used ; those in existence of the Upper House commence in the 
1st Henry VIII., and of the Lower House in the 1st Edward VI. 
From an original letter, prefixed to the journal book of Hen. VIII., 
it appears that several journal books were taken away and sup- 
pressed by Cardinal Wolsey. 

The Journals contain entries of the daily and ordinary occur- 
rences and proceedings, from the opening to the closing of each 
session, with the several petitions or bills, and the answers given 
thereto, not only on public matters, on which statutes have been 
afterwards framed, but also on private concerns, affecting a con- 
siderable portion of the families of the nobility and gentry of this 
kingdom. The names of the several members of the House of 
Peers daily present are entered on the Journals of that House, and 
they are consequently often the necessary evidence of sittings 
under writs of summons. It would require no less than a volume 
to specify the different descriptions of transactions noticed in these 
records, and a very imperfect idea of their value would even then be 
formed, without inspecting them. 

The Journals of both Houses have been printed from 1st 
Henry VIII. to the present day, with Calendars, and Indexes to 



158 PARLIAMENTARY RECORDS 

1848. A general Index by Vardon and May, from 1547 to 1714, 
was published in 1852. 

The original Journals are preserved at the Parliament Office. 

The Votes of the House of Commons were first printed in 1681, 
those of the House of Lords in 1825. 

Copies of the Journals and Proceedings in Parliament will be 
found as follows : — 

Proceedings in Parliament, tempp. Edw. III. and Rich. n. ; Ashm. Lib. 

MS. 822, p. 202. 
Lords' and Commons' Journals of Parliament, from 1 Hen. VHL to 31 

Chas. II., in 46 volumes; Inner Temple Lib. MS. 537, &c. 
Lords' Journals from 1 Hen. VHL to 1740; Brit. Mus. Sari. MSS. 

7087—7155. 
from 6 Nov. 1640, to 2 Peb. 1648, 25 volumes ; Beit. Mus. 

Shane MSS. 4660—4695. 
Calendar to the Journals of the House of Lords, from Hen. VHL to 1723 ; 

Beit. Mus. Eargrave MSS. 176—178. 
from 1509 to 1642, and from 1660 to 1735 ; Brit. Mus. Add. 

MSS. 5120—5122. 
Proceedings in Parliament, from 1602 to 1610, or 1611; St. John's Coll. 

Camb. MS. H. 17. 
Journals of the House of Commons, from I Edw. VI. to 1701 ; Brit. Mus. 

Earl. MSS. 7201—7309. 
from Jas. I. to Anne, in 83 volumes; Inner Temp. Lib. 

MS. 502, &c. 
Reports of debates in the House of Commons, from 10 May 1768, to 13 

June 1774, in 48 volumes; Brit. Mus. Eg. MSS. 215—262. 
Index to Appeals, or Parliamentary Cases, 1701 — 1728; Inner Temple 

Lib. MS. 525. 



159 



igeraliM €olltitiom. 

'T^HE documents falling under this head are very numerous, and 
J- may be found in nearly all the public and private libraries 
throughout the kingdom. They may be classed under the following 
heads: — Heralds 5 Visitations — Pedigrees of Nobility, Knights, 
and Baronets — Pedigrees of Gentry — Funeral Certificates 
and Monuments — Armorial Bearings — etc. etc. 



Heralds 5 Visitations. — These records are of the highest import- 
ance to genealogists. The Heralds were first incorporated in the 
reign of Richard III., and their province appears to have at that 
time extended no further than the preventing more than one family 
from using the same escutcheon. It was evident, however, that 
the advantages to be derived from their institution, were such as 
resulted from the confidence with which the public resorted to their 
archives, and were determined by their reports. That their in- 
vestigations, therefore, might be as general as possible, a Visitation 
of each county was decreed by the Earl Marshal, and confirmed by 
warrant under the Privy Seal. The most ancient visitation on 
record is asserted to have been made in the reign of Henry IV., 
from the existence of the following memorandum in Harleian MS. 
1196 — "Visitacio facta per Marischallum de Norroy ult. ann. 
R. Henrici 4ti. 1412" — a period of seventy years before the incor- 
poration of that body. The MS. in question is a folio, consisting of 
loose pedigrees and miscellaneous heraldic scraps, some written as 
late as 1620 and 1627, pasted on the leaves of a printed book. The 
memorandum quoted occurs amongst others on folio 76 b 3 and 
affords the sole authority for the above assertion. 

The first commission proceeding from royal authority was issued 
to Thomas Benolte, Clarenceux King of Arms, in the 20th of 
Henry VIII. (1528-9), empowering him to visit the counties of 
Gloucester, Worcester, Oxford, Wilts, Berks, and Stafford. From 
this time until the close of the seventeenth century, visits were 
regularly made every twenty-five or thirty years. The last, which 



160 HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 

was that of the county of Southampton, was made by Sir Henry 
St. George, Clar. t in the year 1686. 

The register books kept by the Heralds and their assistants, 
during these visitations, contain the pedigrees and arms of the 
nobility and gentry, signed by the heads of their respective 
families, and are of the highest value to genealogists. Unfortu- 
nately, many of these books are now lost, and those which remain 
are scattered amongst the public and private libraries of the king- 
dom. In the library of Queen's College, Oxford, are forty volumes, 
and in that of Caius College, Cambridge, fifty-four ; the Bodleian 
and Ashmolean Libraries are likewise very rich in these records ; 
but by far the greatest collections are in the archives of the College 
of Arms, and at the British Museum. 

Those in private hands are very numerous. The valuable collec- 
tion formerly in the library of the Duke of Buckingham, at Stowe, 
is now in the possession of Lord Ashburnham. The library of Sir 
Thomas Phillipps, Bart., of Middle Hill, Worcestershire — probably 
the finest private library in the kingdom — is exceedingly rich in 
Heralds' Visitations and other genealogical collections. 

Notices of the Visitations in the first-mentioned library will be 
found in Moule's Bibliotheca Heraldica, pp. 560 — 612. Catalogues 
of the latter library are periodically printed by the owner, for 
private distribution only. Copies are deposited in the British 
Museum. A brief list of the Visitations, &c, will be found in the 
Nouvelle Encyclopedie Theologique, Par, 1853. 

A useful catalogue of the collection at the British Museum, was 
printed by Sir N. H. Nicolas in 1825 ; x and a copious <c Index" to 
the Pedigrees and Arms contained in about 250 of the principal 
manuscripts mentioned therein — compiled by the author of the 
present work — -was published in 1849. 3 

A list of these records deposited in Public Libraries is here 
subjoined. 

1 " Catalogue of the Heralds' Visitations, etc. etc., in the British Museum." Lond. 
1825, 8vo. 

2 " Index to the Pedigrees and Arms, contained in the Heralds' Visitations, in the 
British Museum." By K. Sims. Lond. 1849. 8vo. Price 15*. 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 
LIST OF HERALDS 3 VISITATIONS. 



161 



%* References to the Pedigrees and Arms, contained in the Manuscripts 
bearing this (+) mark, will be found in Sims's "Index" referred 

to in the preceding page. 



BEDFORDSHIRE. 



Date. 
1566 



1582 



1586 
1634 



By whom made. 
Harvey 



Cooke 



(with additions) 



Cooke (by Glover) . . . 

St. George & Burrough (by 

Owen) 



"Where deposited. 

Brit. Kvs.Harl. MS. |1531. 
_ _ +4600. 

— +5867,^.2. 
Coll. op Arms, MS. H. 15 ; PMlipot 

MS. P. 49. 
Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. +5186. 

— — +2109. 

— — 3968. 
Queen's Coll. Oxf. MS. cxiv. 

Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. +4108. 
Coll. of Arms, MS. C. 31. 



1531 
1566 



1597 
1623 



1664 



Benolte . 
Harvey l 



BERKSHIRE. 
(Original) 



Lee . 



Camden 1 (by Chitting and 
Philipot) 



Bysshe 1 






Brit. Mus. Add. MS. +12,479, 
Coll. of Arms, MS. H. 20. 
Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. +1139. 

— — +1532. 

— — 5867. 
_ _ +1081. 

— Add. MS. +14,283.' 
Coll. of Arms, MSS. G. 5 ; H. 9 ; 

Philipot MS. 49, P. 
Bodleian Lib. GoughMS. 
Caius Coll.C amb .MS. 5 3 1 .— Queen "s 

Coll. Oxf. MS. lxxxii. 

Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. +1532. 

— — +4108. 

— Add. MS. +4961. 
_ _ +14,283. 

Coll. of Arms, MS. C. 18. 
Ashmolean Lib. MS. 852. 
Brit. Mus. Harl. ^#.+1530. 
_ _ +1483. 

— Add. MS. +14,284. 
Coll. of Arms, MS. C. 12. 
AshmoleAn Lib. MS. 861. 



1 The Visitation for this year has been privately printed by Sir Thomas Phillipps, 
Bart.„ in folio. 

11 



162 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 



BUCKINGHAMSHIRE. 



Hebaxds' Visitations. 



Bate. 


By whom made. 










1566 


Harvey 


_ 


— . (with additions) . 


1574 


— (in Glover's handwriting) 
Cooke (by Lee) .... 


— 


— . . (Original) . 


1634 


St. George and Burrough (by 
Philipot and Ryley) . 


—— 


— ... (imperfect) . 


— 


— . (with additions) . 


— 


— 



Where deposited. 

Bodleian Lib. Gough MS. 
Coll. o^ks^s .Philipot MSS A^P.; 6,P. 
Beit. Mus. Harl. MS. +5181. 
_ _ 3968. 

— — +1429, ff. 68— 84. 

— — 5867. 
College of Arms, MSS. H. 9 ; 15 ; 

Philipot MS. 49, P. 

— Vincent MS. 138. 
Beit. Mus. Harl MS. +1139. 

— — +1533. 
CoLL.oFARMs^afS&F.l; G.3; E.D.N. 

No. 11. 

Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. +1533. 

— — +1102. 

— — +1151. 

— — +1193. 

— — +1234. 

— — +1136. 

— — +1391, f. 12. 
Coll. op Aems, MS. C. 26 (1. 2.) 

— Philipot MS., 49, P. 
Caius Coll. Cams. MS. 534. 
Queen's Coll. Oxf. MS. cxxv. 



CAMBRIDGESHIRE. 



1575 

1590 
1619 



Cooke 



(Original) . 



Camden 1 (by St. George) 
with additions . 



Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. +1534. 
Coll. of Arms, MSS. G. 10 ; 14 ; 18. 
Beit. Mus. Add. MS. 16,940. 

— Harl. MS. +1534. 

— — +1043, f. 53. 

— — +1401. 

— — +6769,+6770. 

— Add. MS. +4962. 
Coll. of Arms, MS. C. 11. 

— Vincent MS. 181. 
Caius Coll. Camb. MS. 542. 
Queen's Coll. Oxf. MS. xciii. 
Bodleian Library. 



1 The Visitation for Cambridgeshire for this year was privately printed by Sir 
Thomas Phillipps, Bart., in 1S40, in folio. 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 



163 



CHESHIRE. 



Heralds' Visitations. 



Bate. 

1533 
1566 

1569 
1580 



1591 
1612 
1663 



By whom made. 

Benolte 

Flower (by Cooke) . 



Flower (by^Glover) 



— (Glover's transcript) . 

Chaloner (frag. (^Original 

Visitation) .... 

St. George 



Dugdale 



Where deposited. 



Brit. Mvs.Harl MS. +2076, f. 11. 
Coll. op Arms, MS. D. 3; E.D.N. 17. 
Queen's Coll. Oxp. MS. lxxx. 
Coll. of Arms, MS. D. 3. 
Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. j-1605. 

— — +1424, f. 125. 

— — f5182. 
Coll. op Arms, MS. E. D. N. No.17. 

— MS. D. 14 (1). 
Chetham Lib. MS. 6694, f. 133. 
Brit. Mus. Harl. MSS. 2161, f. 263 ; 

+2163, f. 71. 

— Harl. MS. 11535, f. 35. 
Coll. of Arms, MS. C 6. 

— MS. C. 38. 



CORNWALL. 



S. D. 

1530 



1573 



1620 



Benolte 



Cooke 



. . (Original) 



(Original) , 



Camden (by St. George and 
Lennard) . . . . 

— (part of Original) . 

— (remaining part) . . 



— . (with additions) . 



• ■» * 



College of Arms. 

Brit. Mus. Add. MS. +14, 315. 

Coll. of Arms, MS. H. 18. 

— MS. G. 2 (1). 
Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. +1079. 
Coll. of Arms, MS. E. 15. 

— JfS&G.6(l);H.16. 
Caius Coll. Camb. MS. 553. 

Brit. Mus. Harl MS. +1079. 

— — +1162. 

— — +1164. 

— — +1142. 

— — +1149. 
Coll. of Arms, MS. C. 1. 

— MS. E.D.N. No. 2. 
Caius Coll. Camb. MS. 532. 
Bodl. Lib. MS. 5054, f. 59. 



CUMBERLAND. 



1615 
1665 



St. George 

— . (with additions) 
Dugdale 



Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. +1374, f. 12. 

— — +1536. 

Coll. of Arms, MS. C 39. 



164 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 



DERBYSHIRE. 



Heralds' Visitations. 
Date. By whom made. 



1569 



1611 



1634 
1662 



Flower . . 



(with additions) 



St. George . 



Chitting 
Dugdale 



Where deposited. 



Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. +886. 

— — 12134, f. h'O. 

— — +6592. 

— — +2113, f. 34 
-_ _ -fl484, f. 23. 

Coll. of Arms, Vincent MS. 146. 
Ashmolean Lib. MS. 798. 
Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. J 1093. 

— — +1153, f. 93. 

— — +1486, f. 23. 

— — +1537. 

— Eg. MS. +996. 

CoLL.OFARMS,lf&C.4;^cUf&14i6. 

Queen's Coll. Oxf. MS. xci. 
Caius Coll. Camb. MS. 529. 
Coll. of Arms, MS. C. 33. 
Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. +6104. 
Coll. of Arms. MS. C. 34. 



DEVONSHIRE. 



1531 



1564 



1572 

1620 



Benolte 

— . . (Original) . 

Harvey 

Cooke 

Camden (by St. George and 
Lennard) 

— (part of Original V.) 

— (remaining parf) . . 



Brit. Mus. Add. MS. +14,315. 
Coll. of Arms, MS. G. 2 (1). 

— MS. H. 18. 
Ashm. Lib. MS. 763. 
Bodl. Lib. Gough MS. 

Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. +3288, f. 25. 

— — -j-5185. 

— — +1567. 

— — +1399. 

— — +5840. 

— — +5871. 

— — +1091. 

— — +1080, f. 364, 

— Add. MS. +14,288. 
Coll. of Arms, MSS. D. 7 ; G. 19 ; 

2, H. 7; H.15. 
All Souls' Coll. Oxf. Grafton's 

Pedigrees, No. 58. 
Caius Coll. Camb. MS. 537. 
Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. +1080, ff. 1— 

368 6. 

— — +1163. 

— — +1164. 
Coll. of Arms, MS. C. 1. 
Caius Coll. Camb. MS. 530. 
Bodl. Lib. MS. 5054, f. 59. 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 



165 



DORSETSHTP 

Heealds' Visitations. 
Date, j By w,hom made. 

1530 iBenolte. . (Original) 
1565 Harvey 



1623 



{with additions) . 
■ • (fragmenf) . 



Camden (by St. George and 
Lennard). 
— . . (Original) . 



Where deposited. 

Coll. of Arms, MS. H. 18. 
Brit. Mus. Earl. MB. +888, f. 37. 

— — +1153, f. 69. 

— — +2186. 
_ _ +1092. 

— — +1046,f.A.126,181. 

— — +1451. 

— +1539. 
Coll. of Arms, MS. G. 8. 
Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. +1451. 

— — +1166. 

— — , +1539. 
Coll. of Arms, MSS. C. 22; E.D.N. 

No. 16. 
Caius Coll. Camb. MS. 544. 



DUREAM. 



1575 Flower 1 



1615 



1666 



St. George 3 . 



Dugdale 



{with additions) 



Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. +1171, f. 65. 

— — +1540. 
Coll. of Arms, PHlipot MS. 11, P. 
Queen's Coll. Oxf. No. cxxvi. 
Durham Cath. MS. Allan, 3. 
Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. +L153, f. 48 b. 

— — +1397, f. 201. 

— — +1168. 

— — +1540. 
Coll. of Arms, MS. C. 41. 3 

— MS C. 32; Vincent MS. 118. 
Caius Coll. Camb. MS. 541, art. 4. 
Queen's Coll. Oxf. MS. cxxviii. 



1 This "Visitation was printed at Newcastle-upon-Tyne >, a.d. 1820, from a copy in 
the possession of Nicholas John Philipson, Esq., F.S.A., of that place. Collated with 
another in the collection of Sir Cuthbert Sharp. Only 140 copies printed. 

9 Printed at Simderland, in 1820, folio. 

5 A very yaluable manuscript. 



166 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 



Heeai^s* Visitations. 



ESSEX. 



Date. 



S. B. 
1552 

1558 

1570 



1612 



6134 



1664 



By whom made. 



Hawley . 
Harvey . 

Cooke . 



(with additions). 
. (Original) . 



Camden (by Haven) . . . 
St. George (by Owen & Lilly) 



Bysshe 



Where deposited. 

College op Arms. 

Beit. Mus. Add. MS. 7098. 

— Earl. MS. 11484, f. 52. 
__ — +1137, f. 11. 

Coll. of Arms, MS. H. 10. 

— MS. D. 11. 
Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 16,940. 

— Earl. MS. +6065. 
Queen's Coll. Oxf. MS. xcv. 
Coll. of Arms, MS. C. 15. 
Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. |1083. 

— — 7017 (art. 40). 

— _ +1542. 
Coll. of Arms, MS. C. 21 ; Philipot 

MS. 13, P. 

— MS. D. 21. 



GLOUCESTERSHIRE. 









1530 


Benolte . 


. (Original) . 


1569 


Cooke . 




1583 


— 


...... 


— 


— 


(with additions . 


— 


— . 


. . [Philipot) . 


1623 


Camden 


(by Chitting and 


— 


— 


(with additions) . 


— 


— 





Caius Coll. Camb. MS. 553, art. 6. 
Coll. of Arms, MS. H. 20. 

— MSS.V.U; G.9,f.74. 
Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. fl041, f. 18. 

— — +1543. 
Coll. of Arms, Vincent MS. 115. 
Brit. Mus. Earl MS. fl041, f. 775. 

— — +1543. 
Coll. of Arms, MS. C. 17. 



1530 



Benolte l 



EAMPSEIRE. 
(Original) 



Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. +1544. 
Coll. of Arms, MSS. H. 7 (1) ; H. 18. 

— MS. D. 13. 
Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 7098, f. 80. 

— Earl. MS. +1544. 

— — +1139. 

— — 1186. 

— — 1483, f. 167. 

— — 3968. 

— Add. MS. 16,940. 

— — 17,065. 
Coll. of Arms, MSS. G. 16; 17. 

— MS. H. 5. 
Caius Coll. Cams. MS. 536. 
Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. +1544. [130. 
CoLL.OFARMS,i/&C.19; VincentMS. 

1 The Obi&inaii Visitation of the Isle of Wight, by Benolte, is in the Collqj* si 
Arms, MS. H. 7 (1). 



1552 
1575 


Hawley . 
Cooke , 


• 


— 


— . 


• 




■ i 


* ■ ■ * • 
. (Original) • 


_ 
1622 


■ 

Camden 


(by Philipot) . . 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 



1G7 



HEREFORDSHIRE. 



Hekalds' Visitations. 
Date. By whom made. 

1569 Cooke 



1586 



1634 



.(with additions). 



St. George. 



Where deposited. 

Coll. of Arms, MS. D. 12. 

Caius Coll. Camb. MS. 553, art. 7. 

Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. fll59. 

— — 1442. 

— — +1545. 

— Add. MS. 19,815. 
Coll. of Arms, Vincent MS. No. 115; 

Fhilipot MSS. 20, C.; 21, P. 

— MSS. C. 25; C 28. 



HERTFORDSHIRE. l 



1572 



Cooke 



— 


— . (with additions) . 

— . . (Original) . 


1615 
1634 


Camden 

St. George and Burrough 
(by Henry St. George) . 


— 





Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. +1546. 

— — +6147. 

— — +1433. 

— — +1504. 
Coll. of Arms, MSS. G. 16; 17, 

— MS. G. 9, f. 39. 

— Fhilipot MS. SI, L. 
Chetham Lib. MS. 7995. 
Queen's Coll. Oxf. MS. xcvi. 

Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. +1504, f. 130. 

— — +1547. 

— — +1234, f. 112. 
Caius Coll. Camb. MS. 549, art. 5. 
Chetham Lib. MS. 7995. 



HUNTINGDONSHIRE. 



S. D. 

1564 
1566 
1613 


Harvey (by Cotgrave) . . 
Camden (by Charles) . . 


~7 


— . . (Original) 3 . 

— . (with additions) . 




..-_. 



I College of Arms. 
Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. +890, f. 99. 
Coll. of Arms, MS. H. 15. 
Brit. Mvs.Harl MS. +1179. 

— — +1075. 

— Cott. MS. Julius, P. viii. 
Coll. of Aras,Jf5&C.3; E.D.N. 7; 3. 

— Vincent MS. No. 125. 

— Fhilipot MS. 22, P. 
Caius Coll. Camb. MS. 524. 
Queen's Coll. Oxf. MS. xciv. 



1 A Visitation of Hertfordshire was privately printed by Sir Thomas Phillipps, Bart., 
in his "Topographer" for March 1821. 

2 The Original Visitation of Huntingdon was edited by Sir H. Ellis, and printed by 
the Camden Society, in 1848. 



168 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 



KENT. 



Heralds' Visitations. 



Date. 


By whom made. 


1530 
1574 


Cooke 


— 


— . {with additions) . 


[592 


— (continued to 1640) . 
— (fragm. of Original) . 


1619 


— . (with additions) . 
Camden (by Philipot) . . 


— 


— . (with additions) . 


— 


— . (fine copy) . . 


— 


— (in Camden's hand- 
writing, with additions). 


1623 
1663 


Segar 


— 


— 



Where deposited. 

College op Arms. 

— D. 13; Vincent MS. 1 16. 
Brit. Mus: Earl. MS. +1484, f. 60. 

— Add. MS. 16,279. 

— — +5532. 
Coll. of Arms, MS. H. 2. 

Caius Coll. Camb. MS. 536, f. 31. 
Queen's Coll. Oxf. MS. ci. 
Chetham Lib. J!/#. 6694, ff. 74— 108. 
Society of Antiquaries, MS. 164. 
Coll. of Arms, MS. G. 12. 
Brit. Mus. Harl.MS. +1196,004— 
109, and f. 112. 

— — +2198, f. 86. 
_ _ +1106. 

— -— -j-1432. 
_ __ +154S. 

— Add. MS. +5507- 

— — +5526. 

— — 16,279. 
Coll. of Arms, MS. C. 16. 

— Philipot MS. 23 P. 
Caius Coll. Camb. MS. 550. 
Queen's Coll. Oxf. MS. xcix. 
Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 8932. 

— — 8931. 
Coll. of Arms, MS. D. 18. 
Society of Antiquaries, MS. 163. 



1533 

1567 



1613 
1664 



LANCASHIRE} 

Benolte (by Fellows) Ori- I 

ginal Visitation . . 'Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. +2076, f. 11. 



Flower 



— . (with additions) . 



St. George . 
Dugdale 



+2086. 
+891, f. 59. 

— — +1468, f. 12. 

— — +1549. 

— — +6159. 
Coll. of Arms. MSS. D. 3; E.D.N. 9. 
Caius Coll. Camb. MSS. 523; 527. 
Queen's Coll. Oxf. MS. c. 
Chetham Lib. MS. 6715. 

Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. +1437. 
Coll. of Arms, MS. C 5. 

— MS. C 37. 



1 The Visitations of Lancashire, under the editorship of Mr. Hibberd, are preparing 
for publication by the Chetham Society. 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 

LEICESTERSHIRE. 



369 



Heralds' Visitations. 




Date. 


By whom made. 


Where deposited. 


1*63 


Harvey (by Cooke) . . . 


Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 17,065, f. 125. 


— 


— 


Coll. of Arms,.3/S&F.7; G.ll; H.12. 


1619 


Camdeu (by Lennard and 






Vincent) 


Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. +6125. 


— 




— — +6183. 


— 




— — +1431. 


— 




— — +1187, f. 97. 


— 




— — +1189. 




— . {with additions) . 


— — +11:50. 





— {some Ri G mkLpapers) 


— — 1195, f. 72. 


— 




Coll. of Arms, MS. C. 8. 


— 


— 


Vincent MS. No. 127. 


— 


— 


Caius Coll. Camb. MS. 519. 


— 


— 


New Coll. Oxf. MS. cccxxx. 


— 


— 


Queen's Coll. Oxf. MS. lxxxix. 




LINCOLN. 


S. D. 





College of Arms. 


1562 


Harvey (by Cooke) . . . 


— if& E.D.N. 10. 


— 


— 


— MS. J). 8. 








Caius Coll. Camb. MS. 545. 


— 


— 


Queen's Coll. Oxf. MS. xcii. 


1564 


— 


Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. +1190. 


— 


— 


— — +1550. 


— 


— . {with additions) -_ 


_ _ +1484, f. 3. 


1592 


Cooke (by Lee) .... 


__ _ +1550. 


— 


— 


— Add. MS. 16,940. 


— 


— 


Coll. of Arms, MSS. G. 4; H. 11. 


1634 


St. George (by Chitting) . 
LON 


— MS. C. 23. 
DON. 


1568 


Cooke (Original) . . . 


Coll. of Arms, MS. F. 1. 


— 


— 


— MS. G. 10 (1). 


v 


— . {with additions) . 


Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. +1463. 


— 


— 


Queen's Coll. Oxf. MS. lxxii. 


1634 


St. George 


Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. +1476. 


. — 


. 


Coll. of Arms, MS. C 24 ; K. 9. 


~_ 




— Philipot MS. 32. L. 


1664 


MIDD 


— MS. D. 19. 
LESEX. 


1572 


Cooke (Original) . . . 


Coll. of Arms, MSS. G. 16 ; 17. 


1634 




— MS. C 28. 


1663 


Bysshe (by Ryley and De- 






thicke) 1 


— MS. D. 17. 


— 


— 


Brit. M.tjs. Earl. MS. +1468, f. 112. 



1 This Visitation has been privately printed by Sir Thomas Phillipps, Bart., Salisb. 
1820, fol. 



170 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 



Heealdb' Visitations. 
Date. By whom made. 

8. D. 
1563 



NORFOLK, 



1589 

1613 

1664") 
1668) 

1564 



Harvey . . 



— 




— 


. . (fragments) . 


— 


(with additions) . 


Cooke 
Camden 


. (Original) . . 
(by Raven) . . . 


Bysshe 





Where deposited. 



College of Arms. 

Brit. Mvs. Harl. MS. |4755. 

— — {5189. 

— — fll77, f. 98. 
_ — {6093. 

— — J1552. 

— Add. Jf&19,816. [&153. 

— Harl. MS. iUl^KllG, 

— — {6166, art. 2. 
Coll. of Arms, MSS. G. 1 ; H. 3. 

— Vincent MS. 133. 
Caius Coll. Camb. MS. 555. 
Queen's Coll. Oxf. MS. cxv. 
Bodl. Lib. Rawlinson MS. 
Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. |1552. 
Coll. of Arms, MS. H. 17. 
Queen's Coll. Oxf. MS. xc. 
BRiT.Mu3.^W.J^.f5823.[64— 705. 

— — |1154,ff.43— 61, 
Coll. of Arms, MS. C. 15. 



MS. D. 20. 



NORTHAMPTONSHIRE. 



1617 
1618 



Harvey (by Cotgrave) . 



Camden (by Segar) . 
Camden (by Vincent) 



(with additions) 

(a valuable copy) 

(fragment) 

(part only) 



Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. f890. 

_ _ -f-1171, f. 19. 

_ _ -j-1138. 

_ _ |1553. 

Coll. of Arms, MSS. H. 4; 15; Vin- 
cent MS. No. 44. 

Queen's Coll. Oxf. MS. cxii. 

Caius Coll. CambJ£&541, arts. 6, 7. 

Queen's Coll. Oxf. MS. cviii. 

Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. |1553. 

— — {ll84. 
_ _ -j-1094. 

— — tU87, f. 

— _ {1084, f. 15 

— — {1188. 
Coll. op Arms, MS. C. 14. 



10. 



NORTHUMBERLAND. 



1575 
1615 

1666 



Flower 



St. George. 



(with additions) 

(imperfect) . 

(Original) 



Dugdale 



Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. fl554. 
Queen's Coll. Oxf. MS. cxxvi. 
Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. fl448. 

— — {l554. 

— — {1153, f. 50. 
Coll. of Arms, Vincent MS. 149. 
Caius Coll. Camb. MS. 541, art. 3, 
Coll. of Arms, MS. C 41. 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 



171 



NOTTINGHAMSHIRE. 



Hebalds' Visitations. 



Date. 

1530 
1569 



1575 

1614 



1662 



By whom made. 

Tonge 

Flower 

— . (with additions) , 

— . (with additions) . 
St. George 

- — . (with additions) , 



Dugdale 



Where deposited. 

Brit. Mus. Had. MS. |1499, f. 41. 

— — -j-1555. 

— — f886, f. 52. 
Coll. of Arms, Vincent MS. No. 117. 
Caius Coll. Camb. MS. 541, art. 1. 
Queen's Coll. Oxf. MS. cxvii. 
Coll. of A.HKs s Fincent MS. No. 117. 
Brit. Mus. Sari. MS. fl082, f. 64. 

— — j-1555. 

— — J1400. 
Coll. of Arms, MS. C. 9. 

— MS. C. 34. 



OXFORDSHIRE? 



1530 
1566 



1574 



Benolte . 
Harvey . 



(Original) . 



1634 



Cooke (by Lee) 2 



(with additions) 
. (Original) 



St. George and Burrough (by 
Philipot and Kyley) . 



Coll. of Arms, MS. H. 20. 
Brit. Mus. Sari MS. |1097. 

— — 5867. 

— — 3966. 
Coll. of Arms, MSS. G. 5 ; H. 9. 

— Philipot MS. 49, P 
Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. f880. 

— Sari MS.-\h\W. 

— — f808. 

— — |6166, f. 138. 

— — -j-1412,^.29. 

— — 3968. 

— — |1556. 

— — -j-1095. 
Coll. of Arms, MS. F. 1. 

— — MSS. G. 3 ; G. 14 ; 

E. D. N. 11. 

— — Vincent MS. 128. 
Queen's Coll. Oxf. MS. cxxxii. 
Caius Coll. Camb. MS. 538, art. 3. 

Brit. Mus. Sari MS. fl480. 

— — tl&57. 
Coll. of Arms, MS. C. 29. 

Caius Coll. Camb. MS. 538, art. 1. 
Queen's Coll. Oxf. MS. cxxix. 



1 A Visitation of the University of Oxford is in the Ashmolean Museum, Wood MS. 
852, art. 60. 

3 This Visitation was privately printed by Sir Thomas Phillipps, Bart., in his 
w Topographer" for March. 1821. 8vo. 



172 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 



RUTLANDSHIRE. 



Heralds' Visitations. 



Date. 

1618 



By whom made. 

Camden (by Vincent) with 
additions 



— . {with additions) 



Where deposited. 

Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. +1558. 

— — +1094, f. 230. 
Coll. of Arms, MS. C. 14. 

— Vincent MS. No. 132. 



SHROPSHIRE. 



S. D. 

1569 

1584 



1623 



Cooke 



— (by Lee) . . . . 

— . {with additions) . 

— . . (Original) . 

— „ {with additions) . 
Camden (by Treswell and 

Vincent) with additions . 

— ... {imperfect) . 



1663 |Bysshe(by Dugdale) 



College of Arms. 

MS. G. 9, f. 104. 
Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. +1241. 

— — +6172. 

— Add. MS. 14,314. 
College of Arms, MS. D. 10. 

— Vincent MS. No. 115. 

Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. +1396. 

— — +1983. 

— — +1472. 
Coll. of Arms, MS. C. 20. 

— Vincent MS. No. 134. 
Caius Coll. Camb. MS. 533, f. 43. 
School Lib. Shrewsbury. 

Coll. of Arms, MS. C. 35. 



SOMERSETSHIRE. 



1531 


Benolte 




(Original) . 


Coll. of Arms, MS. D. 13; H. 18. 
Ashmolean Library. 


— 


— 












. 


Brit. Mus. Add. MS. +14,315. 


1573 


Cooke 












• 


— Harl. MS. +1385. 

— +1559. 


— 


— 












. 


— Add. MS. 17,065. 


— 


— 














Coll. of Arms, MSS.^.l; E.D.N. 


— 


__ 














— Vincent MSS. 141; 147. 


1591 


— (by Brooke) 






Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. +1559. 


— . 


— . . (Original) . 


Coll. of Arms, MS. G. 19. 


1623 


Camden (by St. George and 






Lennard) Original 1 . 


Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. +1141. 


— 




— — +1445. 


«.- 


— . (with additions) . 


— — +1559. 






Coll. of Arms, MS. C 22. 


— 


— 














Caius Coll. Camb. MS. 540. 



1 The Visitation of Somersetshire for 1623 has been privately printed by Sir Thomas 
Pbillippa, Bart. ; Zond. 1831-3, folio. 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 



173 



STAFFORDSHIRE. 



Heralds' Visitations. 



Date. 
15— 

1563 
l5Vi 



1614 



1663 



By whom made. 

Part of an early Visitation, 
apparently Original . 

"Flower 

— ■ (by Glover) . . . 



(with additions) 
(with additions) 
. (Original) 



St. George . 



Dugdale 



{imperfect) . 



Where deposited. 

Brit. Mus. Harl.MS. +2113, art. 14. 

„ _ +886, f. 65. 

_ _ +1570. 

_ _ +1415, f.105. 

— — +6128. 

— — +1173. 
_ — +1077. 

— Lansd. MS. 843, f. 98. 
Coll. op Arms, MS. E.D.N. 13. 

— Vincent MS. 133. 
Queen's Coll. Oxf. MS. cxi. 

— — MS. cvi. 
Bodl. Lib. Gough MS. 

— Dodesworth MS. 5037, f. 8. 
Brit. Mus. Hart. MS. +1439. 

— — +1173, f. 112. 
Coll. of Arms, MS, C. 10. 

Caius Coll. Camb. MS. 528. 
Coll. of Arms, Bugdale MS. 

— MS. 0. 36. 
Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. +6104. 



SUFFOLK. 



S.B. 

1561 



1577 
1611 



Harvey . 



(with additions) 



College of Arms. 

Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. +155. 

— — +1177. 

— — +1560. 

— — +1103. 

— — +1449. 
Coll. of Arms, MSS. G. 14; H. 14. 

— ........ — Vincent MS. No. 144. 

— . (with additions) . iCaius Coll. Camb. MS. 554. 

— 'Queen's Coll. Oxf. MS. clxiv. 

— Bodleian Lib. Gongh MS. 

Cooke ! Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. +891. 

. . (Original) . [Coll. of Arms, MS. G. 7. 

— MSS. H. 13; 14. 
Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. +1560. 

— — +1820, f. 11. 



Camden (by Kaven) . 



" Copie of a Booke of the 
Vicytation of Suffolke." 1 . 



— — +1484, f. 41. 

Coll. of Arms, MS. C. 15. 



1 The Pedigrees are dated in 1581. 



174 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 



SURREY. 



Hebalds' Visitations. 



Date. 
1530 



1552 
1572 



1623 



By whom made. 



Benolte . 



Hawley , 
Cooke . 



(Original) 



1662 



Camden (by Thompson and 

Vincent) .... 

— . (with additions) 



— . (with church notes) 

— (valuable additions) 



Bysshe 



Where deposited. 



Beit. Mus. Earl MS. +1561. 
Coll. of Arms, MS. 1. H. 7. 

— MS. D. 13. 
Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 7098. 

— Earl. MS. +1561. 

— — +1433, f. 25 b. 

— — 1483, f. 167. 

— AM. MS. 17,065. 
Caius Coll. Camb. MS. 536, a;^. 44. 

[22, 189. 
Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. +1046, ff. U— 

— — +1561. 

— — 5830. 

— — +1433, f. 1. 

— — +1147. 

— — +1430. 

— — +1397, f. 383. 

— Add. MS. +4963. 

— — +12,478. 

— — +14,311. 
Coll. op Arms, MS. C 2. 

— Vincent MS. No. 129. 
Caius Coll. Camb. MS. 535. 
Queen's Coll. Oxf. MS. cxvi. 
Coll. of Arms, MS. D. IB. 

Brit. Mus. Add. MS. +5533. 



SUSSEX. 



1530 


Benolte 


1574 


Cooke 


1633 


St. George and Burrough (by 


— 


Philipot and Owen) . 


— 


— . (with additions) . 


— 


— . (fine copy, on veil.) 


— 


— . (Original notes) 


1662 





College of Arms. 
Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. +1562. 
Coll. of Arms, MS. D. 13. 
Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 17,065. 

— Earl. MS. +1484, f. 60 b. 
Coll. of Arms, MS. D. 11. 

Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. +1562. 

— — +1084, f. 22. 

— — +1135. 

— — +1406. 

— — +4109. 

— — +1076. 
— +1194. 

— — +6164. 
Coll. of Arms, MS. C 29. 

— MS. E.D.N. 15. 
Bodleian Lib. Gough MS. 
Coll. of Arms, MS. D. 16. 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 



175 



WARWICKSHIRE* 



Hebalds' Visitations. 



Date. 
1563 

1619 



By whom made. 



Cooke 



Camden (by Lennard and 
Vinceut) 



— . (some Original 
papers) 



Where deposited. 

Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. +1563. 
Coll. of Arms, MSS. F. 7 ; G. 11 ; 
H. 12. 

Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. +1563. 

— — +1167. 
__ _ jnoo. 

— — 1196, f. 101. 
Coll. of Arms, MS. C 7. 

Caius Coll. Camb. MS. 548. 
I Queen's Coll. Oxf. MS. clx. 



WESTMORELAND. 



1615 
1664 



St. George 3 
Dugdale . 



Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. +1435. 
Coll. of Arms, MS. C 39. 



WILTSEIRE. 



1530 
1565 



1623 



Benolte . 
Harvey . 



(Original) 



. (with additions) 



Camden (by St. George and 
Lennard) Original 3 . 



Coll. of Arms, MS. H. 20. 
Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. +888. 

— — +1111, f. 28. 

— — +5184. 

— — +1181. 

— — +1565. 
Coll. of Arms, MS. G. 8. 

— Vincent MS. No. 147. 
Caius Coll. Camb. MS. 543, art. 2. 
Queen's Coll. Oxf. MS. lxxix. 

Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. +1165. 
_ _ +1443. 

Coll. of Arms^^.E.D.N.16; C.22. 
Caius Coll. Camb. MS. 543. 



1 An Index to the Warwickshire Visitations in the Harleian Library has been 
privately printed by Sir Thomas Phillipps, Bart., of Middle Hill. 

2 The Visitation of Westmoreland in 1615 was printed in a narrative form, by 
J. Or. Bell, in 1853. 8vo. 

3 This Visitation was privately printed by Sir Thomas Phillipps, Bart., in 1828, 
folio. 



176 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 



WORCESTERSHIRE. 



HEEAiiDS' Visitations. 



Date. 

1530 
1569 



1634 



By whom made. 
Benolte . . (Original) 



Cooke 



(with additions) 



(with additions) . 



St. George andBurrougb (by 
Owen and Lilly) . . 



Where deposited. 

Coll. of Arms, MS. H. 20. 
Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. fl043, f. 13. 

— — fl352. 

_ ' _ |1486. 

__ _ |1566. 

Coll. of Arms, MSS.VA2; G.9,f.: 
Vincent MS.No. Hi 
Caius Coll. Oamb. MS. 533, art. i 
Queen's Coll. Oxf. MS. clxiii. 

Coll. of Arms, MS. C. 30. 

Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 19,816, art. \ 



YORKSHIRE. 



1530 



1552 
1563 

1574 

1584 



Tonge 



(Original) , 
. (wvperfecf) 



Harvey , 



Flower . 

Elower (by Glover) 



(Original) 



1612 
1665 



. (part only) 
(with additions) 



St. George , 



— . (with additions) . 
Dugdale 

— (Original entry-booh) 



Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. fl499, f. 41. 

— — t!487. [H.2: 
Coll. of Arms, MSS. D.4; D.9; E.( 

— MS. E.D.N. No. 4. 

— Vincent MS. No. 16; 

— MSS. D. 9; E. 6. 

— MSS.D.2;J).5(l). 

— MS. H. 19. 

Brit. Mus. Harl MS. fll71, ff. : 

39 5, 46 5, 51, 52. 
Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. fl487. 

— — J1394. 

— — -j-1415. 
_ _ -j-6070. 

— Lansd. MS. 900, f. 81. 

— Add. MS. 17,065. 

— — 18,011. 

— Harl. MS. fl415,f.48. 

— — {1420. 

— — 1571. 
Coll. of Arms, MS. D. 5 (2). 

— Dugdale MS. 

— PhilipotMS. 51,1 

— Vincent MSS.110; 11 
Caius Coll. Camb. MS. 575. 
Queen's Coll. Oxf. MS. lxxxvi. 
Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. |1487. 
Coll. of Arms, MS. C. 13. 

— Vincent MS. 111. 
Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 826, f. 100 

— Add. MS. 12,482. 
Coll. of Arms, MS. C. 40. 
Durham Cath. Allan MS. 5. 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 177 

WALES. 



Heralds* Visitations. 
Date. 

1530 



By whom made. 

Fellows . . (Original) . 



Where deposited. 

Coll. of Arms, MS. H. 8. 

— Vincent MS. 148. 



Heraldic Visitations of Wales and part of the Marches, between 15"86 and 
1613, by Lewys Dwnn, ed. by Sir Samuel R. Meyrick; 2 vols. 4to. 
Printed by the Welsh MSS. Society. 



Pedigrees of Nobility. — By a standing order of the House of 
Lords, made on the 1 1th May 1 767, it was ordered " that Garter King 
at Arms do officially attend this House, upon the day and at the time 
of the first admission of every peer, whether by creation or descent ; 
and that he do then and there deliver in at the table, a pedigree of 
the family of such peer, fairly described on vellum, etc. etc. ; and 
such pedigree so delivered in shall be referred to the Committee of 
Privileges, who shall examine and report the same as it shall appear 
to them verified with the proofs ; which report being agreed to by 
the House, such pedigrees, signed and certified by every such peer 
to be true to the best of his knowledge, information, or belief, upon 
his honour, shall be filed by the clerk, and kept (together with the 
proofs) amongst the records of the House, and an authentic copy 
thereof registered in the Office of Arms." These pedigrees were duly 
taken, and, after having been proved at the bar of the House of' 
Lords, were beautifully recorded and illuminated with the armorial 
bearings by the heralds, until the year 1802, when the late Lord 
Thurlow procured the rescinding of this useful order, with the 
intention of proposing a new one, which was never accomplished. 
The last entry which appears in these noble registers is a blazon 
of the arms of Lord Redesdale, who was created a peer in 1802. 
There is now no record of the families of the English nobles but iu 
the fleeting peerages and publications of the day, except in a few 
instances, where some peers, impressed with a due sense of the 
importance of preserving their family descents, have recorded their 
pedigrees, in which cases they are entered in books at the College 
of Arms appropriated to the " Peers." 

Copies of all Patents or Charters of Creation of Peers, from the 
earliest on record to the end of the reign of Edward the Fourth, 
have been lately printed by command of the House of Lords, and 

12 



178 HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 

form the Appendix to the Fifth Report of the Lords' Committees 
on the Dignity of a Peer of the Realm. 

The Printed Peerages are very numerous. 1 The first was Milles' 
tc Catalogue of Honor" published in folio in 1610; although Camden's 
" Britannia/' of which the first edition was published in 1586, and the 
fourth in 1594, contained many noblemen's genealogies. The best 
peerages of the present day are those by Sir Bernard Burke, K.H., 
and Edmund Lodge, Esq. Many peers can show no pedigrees but 
what they find recorded in them. 

A list of these, and other printed works and manuscripts bearing 
upon the genealogical history of the nobility of the United King- 
dom, is here subjoined. 

Prefixed is a short list of works, containing Genealogies of the 
Royal Family of England, &c. 



ROYAL GENEALOGIES. 
England. 

Catalogue and Succession of the Kings, Princes, Dukes, &c. of England, by 

R. Brooke, York Herald. Lond. 1619. folio.— 2d ed. enlarged. 1623. 
Regum Pariumque Magnse Britannise Historia Genealogica, studio J. W. 

Imhoff. Norimb. 1690. folio. 
A Genealogical History of the Kings of England, from the Conquest to the 

year 1677, by Fr. Sandford, Esq., Lane. Her. Lond. 1677. folio.— 

2d ed. (enlarged by Stebbing, Somerset Herald) 1707. 
The History of the Royal Family of England, from the Conquest. Lond. 

1713. 8vo. An abridgment of the preceding work continued to this 

time. 
Royal Genealogies, by J. Anderson. 2 vols. Lond. 1732. folio. — 2d ed. 1736. 
Genealogies of the Royal Family of England to 1790, by J. Bentley. Lond. 

1790. folio. 
Genealogical Tables of the Sovereigns of the world, by the Rev. W. Betham. 

Lond. 1795. folio. 
A Genealogical History of the English Sovereigns, from Will. I. to Geo. III., 

by W. Toplis. Lond. 1814. 4to. 
Stemmata lllustria praecipue regia, by Sir E. Brydges. Par. 1825. 4to. 
Sechzig Genealogische, &c. Tabellen, zu Furstentafel und Fiirstenbuch der 

Europaischen Staatengeschichte, von J. F. Damberger. Regensburg. 

1831. fol. 

1 For a more complete list of these works than that given in the succeeding pages, 
see " A Catalogue of Works on the Peerage and Baronetage of England, Scotland, and 
Ireland, &c." Lond. 1827. 8vo. Printed at the expense of Sir C. <x. Young, Garter. 
Also > Moule , s"BibliothecaHeraldica." Lond. 1822. 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 179 

Kotal Genealogies. 
Royal Descents : a list of persons entitled to quarter the Arms of the Royal 

Houses of England, by C. E. Long, M.A. ; Lond. 1845. 4to. 
The Royal Families of England, Scotland, and Wales, with their Descendants, 

Sovereigns, and Subjects, by J. and J. B. Burke. 2 vols. Lond. 

1847-51. 8vo. 
Genealogical Chart of the Royal and Sovereign Houses of Europe, by F. D. 

Hartland. Lond. ]853. Large folio. An Index in a separate volume. 

A costly work, profusely embellished with coats of arms, national 

colours, &c. 
Royal Descents, and Pedigrees of Founders' Kin, by Sir J. B. Burke. Lond. 

1855. Parti. 
Pedigrees of the Sovereigns and Nobility of England, by William Berry. 

Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 15,450. 
Genealogical Tables, beautifully emblazoned, executed about 1570, con- 
taining the Descent of Queen Elizabeth, from Robert Duke of Normandy ; 

Brit. Mus. King's MS. 396. 

Scotland. 

The Genealogies of the Kings of Scotland, and the whole Nobility of Scotland. 

Edinb. 4to. n. d. (circ. 1604). 
Royal Genealogies, by J. Anderson. 2 vols. Lond. 1732. folio. — 2d ed. 

1736. 
A short Genealogical Account of the Royal Family of Scotland, by D. Stewart. 

Edinb. 1739. 4to. 
Tables of the Succession of the Kings of Scotland, by Sir D. Dalrymple. 

Edinb. 1776. 4to. 
Genealogical Tables of the Sovereigns of the World, by the Rev. W. Betham. 

1795. folio. 
Au Historical and Genealogical Tree of the Royal Family of Scotland, to the 

year 1811, by J. Brown. Lond. 1811. 2d ed. 
Table of the Reigns of the Kings of Scotland ; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 6091. 
Pedigrees of the Kings of Scotland, from Robert Bruce to Queen Mary ; 

Brit. Mus. Cotton. MS. Caligula, B. iv., f. 224. 
Pedigrees of the Twelve Competitors for the Crown of Scotland, temp. Edw. I.,* 

Coll. of Arms, Vincent MS. 52. 
Account of the Kings, Nobility, and Gentry of Scotland, 1585 ; Brit. Mus. 

Lansd. MS. 877. 
The Names, Matches, and Arms of the Kings, Queens, and Nobility of 

Scotland, &c, anno 1588; Ashm. Lib. Wood MS. No. 8549. 
Genealogies of the Royal Family of Scotland to the time of the Stewarts, 

inclusive; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 15,620. 



J 80 HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 

Royal Genealogies. 

Wales. 
An Account of the Princes of Wales, from the first institution till Prince 

Henry, by E. Connak. 8vo. 1751. 
The Royal Tribes of Wales, by P. Torke. Wrexham, 1799. 4to. 
The Descents of the British Kings and Princes, to a.d. 1233; Beit. Mus. 

Earl. MS. 1949. 
Genealogies of the British Kings, fifteenth century ; Beit. Mus. Add. MS. 

18,268, a. b. 



PEDIGREES OF NOBILITY, §c. 

England. 

peinted works. 

A Catalogue and Succession of Kings, Princes, Dukes, Marquesses, Earles, 
and Viscounts to the year 1619, by R. Brooke, York Herald. Lond. 
1619, fol.— 2d ed. enlarged. 1622. 
A Discoverie of Errours in Brooke's Catalogue of Nobility, by A. Vincent, 

Rouge-Croix. Lond. 1622, foL 
A Catalogue of the Dukes, Marquesses, Earls, &c. of England, Scotland, and 
Ireland, by T. Walkley. Lond. 1632. 8vo.— Other editions in 1642, 
1652, and 1658. 
The Union of Honour, by J. Torke. Lond. 1640. fol. 
The Baronage of England, by William Dugdale. 3 vols. Lond. 1675-6. folio. 
The manuscript collections for Dugdale's Baronage and Monasticon are 
deposited in theAshmolean Library, at Oxford (Nos. 6491 — 6536). In 
the Bodleian Library is a copy of the printed work, with manuscript 
notes and additions by the author, and another with notes by Le Neve. 
A very splendid copy, with the arms blazoned, is preserved in the library 
of Caius College, Cambridge. Wood's additions and corrections of 
the Baronage is in the Bodleian Library, (No. 8588). In the British 
Museum is " A Transcript of the Additions and Emendations of Dugdale's 
Baronage of England, by Anthony Wood," written by Moses Williams, of 
University College, Oxford (Sari. MS. 1056). 
An exact Catalogue of the Nobility of England, by R.Dale. Lond. 1697. 8vo. 
Memoirs (British and Eoreign) of the Lives and Families of the most illus- 
trious Persons who dy'd in the year 1711. Lond. 1712-13. 8vo. This 
is strictly a genealogical work, and well written. 
A Peerage of England, &c., by A. Collins. Lond. 1709. 8vo. — 2d ed. 1710. 
—3d ed. 1714.— Reprinted in 1715 and 1717.— New ed. Lond. 1735, 
in 3 vols. 8vo. — 2d ed. 1741. 4 vols. — Supplement, 2 vols, in 1750. — 
3d«d. 1756. 5 vols.— 4th ed. 1768, in 7 vols.— 5th ed. 1779, 8 vols, 
(ed. by Longmate), with Supplement in 1784. — New ed. 1812, 9 vols 
8vo (ed. by Sir E. Brydges). 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 181 

Pedigrees or Nobility — (England). 
The British Compendium. Land. 1718. 12mo. — 2d and 3d ed. 1719. — 

Other editions in 1721, 1723, 1726, 1731, 1738, 1751.— Afterwards 

called the " English Compendium." 
The English Compendium, containing the Genealogies of all the Nobility of 

England, etc. 3 vols. Lond. 1753. 12mo. 10th ed. — Other editions in 

1760, 1766, and 1769. 
An Account of Peers and Peeresses created or advanced by King George I. 

Lond. 1724. 12mo. 
The English Baronage, by Arthur Collins. Lond. 1727. 4to. vol. i. (all pub- 
lished). 
Proceedings, Precedents, and Arguments concerning Baronies by Writ, Sec., 

by Arthur Collins. Lond. 1734. folio. 
An History of Land-Honours and Baronies, and of Tenure in ccvpite, by 

T. Madox. Lond. 1741. folio. 
A short View of the Families of the present English, Scottish, and Irish 

Nobility, by — Salmon. Lond. 1751. 8vo.— 2d ed. 1758-9. 8vo.— 

3d ed. 1761. 8vo. 
A Complete History of English Peerage, by W. Guthrie. Lond. 1763. 4to. 

Only one volume published. 
" Baronagium Genealogicum," or Pedigrees of English Peers, by Joseph 

Edmondson. Lond. 1764. 5 vols, folio. A supplemental volume in 

1784. A copy in the British Museum has many valuable manuscript 

additions by the late Erancis Hargrave, Esq. 
A List of the English, Scots, and Irish Nobility, etc., with dates of creation, 

by C. Whitworth. Lond. 1765. 8vo. 
The Peerage of England, by E. Kimber. Lond. 1766. 12mo.— 2d ed. 1769. 
A Complete English Peerage, by the Rev. A.Jacob, 3 vols. Lond. 1766. fol. 
The Pocket Herald, or a Complete View of the Peerage of England, 

Scotland, and Ireland (printed for J. Almon), 2 vols. Lond. 1769. 12mo. 
The Extinct Peerage of England (printed for J. Almon). Lond. 1769. 12mo. 

by S. Bolton. Lond. 1769. 8vo. 

The New Peerage, or the Present State of the Nobility of England, Scotland, 

and Ireland. Lond. 1769. 8vo.— 2d ed. 1778.— 3d ed. 1784.— 4th ed. 

1790. 
A Genealogical Peerage of the British Empire, by J. Sharpe. 3 vols. n. d. 8vo. 
The Compleat English Peerage, by E. Barlow. 2 vols. Lond. 1772. 8vo. — 

2d ed. 1775. 
A Companion to the Peerage of Great Britain and Ireland, by J. Edmondson. 

Lond. 1776. 8vo. 
The Pocket Peerage of Great Britain and Ireland. 1778. 8vo. 
The Peerage of the Nobility of England, Scotland, and Ireland, by H. Clark 

andT. Wormull. 1779. 12mo. 
The Peerage of England (printed for T. Booker). 2 vols. 1779. 8vo. 



182 HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 



Pedigeees op Nobilitx — ( 
The Present Peerage, by J. Edmondson. Lond. 1785. 8vo. 
The Pocket Peerage of England, Scotland, and Ireland, by B. Longmate. 

2vola. 1790. 12mo.— 2d ed, 1793.— 3d ed. 1812.— Supplement, 1813. 
The English Peerage, by C. Catton. 3 vols. 1790. folio. 
The Peerage of Great Britain and Ireland, including the extinct, by E. 

Pollard. 1793. 4to. Only one volume published. 
Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, and Ireland, by G. Kearsley. 2 vols. 

Lond. 1796. 12mo.— 2d ed. 1799.— 3d ed. 1802.— 4th ed. 1804. 
The Peerage of England, Scotland, and Ireland, by J. Debrett. 2 vols. Lond. 

1802. 12mo. Fifteen editions appeared between this date and 1823, 

which was the last edited by Debrett. A new (22d) edition, edited by 

Courthope, was published in 1838, and another by Collen in 1849. 
Memoirs of the Peers of England to Jas. I.,bySirS.E.Brydges. Zo»^.1802.8vo, 
Lists of British Peers and Peeresses, from 1066 to 1806. See Beatson's 

"Political Index" vol. i. 
The Dormant and Extinct Baronage of England, by Sir T. C. Banks. 3 vols. 

Lond. 1807—1837. 4to.— Supplement. Lond. 1826. 
The Manual of Nobility, by Sir T. C. Banks. Lond. 1807. 8vo. 
A Biographical Peerage of Great Britain, by Sir S. E. Brydges. 4 vols. 

[Lond. 1808. 12mo. England, vols. i. and ii. — Scotland, vol. iii. 

— Ieeland, vol. iv.] 
British Family Antiquity, by W. Playfair. 9 vols. Lond. 1809, 1810. 4to. 

[Peerage of England, vols. i. and ii. — Scotland, vol. iii. — Ieeland, 

vols. iv. and v.J 
Stockdale's Peerage of England, Scotland, and Ireland, by B. Longmate, 

2 vols. 1810. 8vo. 
A Genealogical History of the Dormant and Extinct Peerage of England, by 

Sir T. C. Banks. Lond. 1812. This work was intended to have formed 

six volumes, but only one was published. 
Stemmata Anglicana, by Sir T. C. Banks. Lond. 1825. 4-to. 
A Compendium of the British Peerage, by C. White. Lond. 1825. 8vo. 
A Synopsis of the Peerage of England, by N. H. Nicolas, Esq. 2 vols. Lond. 

(1825). 12mo. 
Tableaux Genealogiques de TEmpire Britannique, par E. Baron de Reden. 

Eanov. 1830. folio. 
The Genealogy of the Existing British Peerage, with brief Sketches of the 

Family Histories of the Nobility, by Edm. Lodge. Lond. 1832-33. 8vo. 

— Newed. 1838. 
Baronia Anglica Concentrata, by Sir T. C. Banks. 2 vols. Lond-, 1844 — 1849. 
Histories of Noble British Families, by H. Drummond. Lond. 1844 — 1849. 

Imp. folio. Only eight parts published. A magnificent work, published 

by the late Mr. Pickering, after the plan of Litta's " Famiglie celebri 

Italiane." Milan. 1832—1838. Imp. folio. 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 183 

Pedigeees op Nobility — (England). 
A Genealogical Dictionary of the Peerage of England, Ireland, and Scotland, 

Extinct, Dormant, and in Abeyance, by J. and J. B. Burke. Lond. 1831. 

—3d ed. Lond. 1846. 8vo. 
A Dictionary of the Peerage and Baronetage of the British Empire, by J. and 

J.B.Burke. 2 vols. Lond. 1832. 8vo. This work has passed through 

several editions ; the 17th was published in the present year (1855). 
A Genealogical Peerage of Great Britain, by W. Berry. Lond. (about 1840). 

Parts i. to iv. royal 4to. 
The Peerage of England and of Great Britain, to 1851. See Haydn's " Book 

of Dignities" part vi. 
The Peerage, Baronetage, and Knightage, of Great Britain and Ireland, by 

C. R. Dod. Lond. 1841. 12mo.— 2d ed. 1842. Other editions have 

appeared annually up to the present time (1855). 
The Genealogy of the existing British Peerage, by Edm. Lodge. Lond. 

1849. 8vo. 
The Peerage of the British Empire, to which is added a View of the Baronetage 

of the three Kingdoms, by Edm. Lodge. Lond. 1832. 8vo. A new 

edition has appeared annually ; that for the present year is the 24th, and 

is edited by A. E. and M. Innes. 
Anecdotes of the Aristocracy, by Sir J. B. Burke. 1st series, 2 vols. Lond. 

1849. 8vo.— 2d series, 2 vols. Lond. 1850. 8vo. 
A Yisitation of the Seats and Arms of the Noblemen and Gentlemen of Great 

Britain and Ireland, by Sir J. B. Burke, K.H. — 1st series. Lond. 1852. 

8vo. — 2d series. Lond. 1854. 8vo. — Concluding volume. 1855. 
Family Romance, or Episodes in the Domestic Annals of the Aristocracy, by 

Sir J. B. Burke. 2 vols. Lond. 1853. 8vo. 

MANUSCRIPTS. 

Pedigrees of English Nobility; Bodl. Lib. MS. 5022. — Ashm. Lib. 

MS. 831. 
Pedigrees of the Noble Families of England, by Robert Glover ; Ashm. Lib. 

MS. 799.— Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 205, art. 3. 
Collectanea de Insignibus Gentilitiis Nobilium Familiarum Gentis Anglorum, 

etc. ; Brit. Mus. Cotton. MS. Tiberius, E. ix. 
Collectanea, prsecipue de Familiis Nobilibus Anglias ; Brit. Mus. Cotton. MSS. 

Titus, A. v.; vi. 
A Collection of Patents of Nobility ; Brit. Mus. Karl. MS. 3319. 
lllorum Magnatum Stemmata quorum hsereditas, deficientibus masculis, ad 

fceminas devoluta est ; Coll. or Arms, Vincent MS. 2. 
Antiquity Revived, setting forth the Originals and Descents of the Nobility, 

Barony, and Gentry of the Realme, by R. Butcher, Gent. ; St. John's 

Coll. Cams. MSS. H. 3; 4. 
Collection of Peerage Cases, with Anstis's notes ; Brit. Mus. Add.MS. 19,818. 



184 HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 

Pedigbeeb op Nobjiity— (England). 
Pedigrees of Nobility, collected by W. Berry ; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 15,450. 
Pedigrees of English Barons; Bodl. Lib. MSS. 4144 — 4148. 
Pedigrees of all that ever were Barons of this Kingdom; Coll. of Abms, 

MS.U. D. N. 18. 
Pedigrees of old Barons by tenure ; Coll. of Abms, MS. F. 2. 
Precedents of Baronyes by Wrytte, descending with the landes to the heirs 

males, and not to the heirs females; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 566. 
Baronies by Writ; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 5019. A valuable MS. 
Catalogue of Old English Barons, with dates of Summons; Coll. of 

Arms, Vincent MS. No. 12. 
Baronies descending to heirs general ; Coll. of Arms, Vincent MSS. 99 ; 100. 
Baronagium Anglise; Coll. of Arms, Fhilvpot MSS. 5, Pe; 10, Pe; 11, Pe; 

12, Pe. 
Portion of a Baronage, from the Conquest to Hen. III., sixteenth century; 

Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 15,934. 
The Baronage of England, from the Conquest to 1572, by Robert Cooke, 

Clar.; Brit. Mus. Harl. MSS. 1183; 7382.—^^. MS. 5504. 
Another copy, amended by Glover, and augmented with Knights of the 

Garter, by Lant, 1589 ; Brit. Mus. Roy. MS. 18, C. xvii. 
Other copies to 1584 and 1597; Caius Coll. Camb. MS. 578; — Coll. of 

Arms, Norf. MS. xxxiv.; Vincent MS. 93; — Queen's Coll. Oxf. 

MSS. lxxiii.; cxxxiii.; cxxxvi.; — Lambeth Lib. MS. 278. 
A copy of Cooke's Baronage, said to have been drawn by him for the Earl 

of Leicester; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 4958. 
Baronagium Anglise, or Vincent's Great Baronage; Coll. of Arms, Vincent 

MSS. 20; 447. 
List of Nobles from Edward the Confessor to Elizabeth ; Brit. Mus. 

Add. MS. 6113, ff. 185—194. 
Notitise et Insignia Illustrium Familiarum Angliae, a temp. Edw. Conf. ad 

Jac. I. ; Magd. Coll. Camb. Pepysim MS. 13. 
Lists of Nobles who came over with the Conqueror from Normandy ; Brit. 

Mus. Harl. MSS. 293, art. 9, 11, 14; 542, art. 3; 1619, art. 4; 

1808, art. 7. 
An Account of the English Nobility since the Conquest, commonly ascribed 

to Robert Cooke, Clarenceux ; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 1183. 
A Genealogical History of English Nobility, from the Conquest, by John 

Vincent; Ashm. Lib. Wood MS. 8467. 
Creations of Nobility, from the Conquest to the year 1586 ; Bodl. Lib. MS. 

4161. 
Arms and Descents of the Nobility from the Conquest to 1586 ; Brit. Mus. 

Add. MS. 5525. 
Creations of Nobility, from the Conquest to a.d. 1592; Ashm. Lib. MS. 

763, p. 113. — Queen's Coll. Oxf. MS. cxiii. 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 185 

Pedigrees of Nobility — (England). 
History of the Creation of the Nobility of England, from the Conquest to 

Elizabeth ; Corp. Chr. Coll. Oxf. MS. cccxxiii. 
Catalogue of English Nobility, from the Conquest to Queen Elizabeth; 

St. John's Coll. Camb. MS. I. 14. 
The Nobility of England displayed, from the earliest times to the reign of 

Queen Elizabeth; Ashm. Lib. MS. 797. 
A Catalogue of the Nobility of England, from the Conquest to the year 

1605, &c.; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 12,448.— Pub. Lib. Camb. MS. 

Dd. i. 25. 
Creationes Nobilium Angliae, a Matilde usque ad annum 17 Caroli I. ; Ashm. 

Lib. MS. 6522. 
Catalogue of Nobility, from the Conquest to Chas. L, with their Anns; 

Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 865, f. 17. 
Nomina Baronum et Militum, collecta ex rott. de feodis militum solutis 

E. Eic. L; Brit. Mus. Cotton. MS. Claud. C. ii. f. Sb. 
Catalogues and Descents of the Marshals of England, from Hen. I. to 1638 ; 

Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 6168; Lansd. MS. 195. See also Dallaway's 

" Heraldic Miscellanies" p. 49, and Noble's " College of Arms." 
Creations of Nobility, from Hen. II. to James I. ; Coll. of Arms, Vincent 

MS. 217. 
Creations of Peers, by successive Kings of England, from King Stephen to 

Hen. VIII. ; Ashmolean Library. 
List of Barons, temp. Edw. L; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 5482, f. 23 5. 
Names of the Barons summoned to Parliament, 4 Edw. II. — 22 Edw. III.; 

Coll. of Arms, MS. M. 1. 
An Index of the Heirs of Noble Families, alphabetically arranged, extracted 

from the Escheats and other Eecords at the Tower, from the reign of 

Edw. L to the end of the reign of Hen. VIII. ; Brit. Mus. Cotton. MS. 

Claud. C. viii. An extremely useful manuscript, forming a very necessary 

addition to Cole's Escheats. (See page 125, ante.) 
Names and Arms of the Ancient Nobility and Knights of England and Wales, 

temp. Hen. III. See the "Antiquarian Repertory" vol. i. 
Catalogue of Peers and Peeresses of England, from 1294 to 1716; Brit. 

Mus. Add. MS. 6287, p. 1. 
Creations of Peers, 9 and 21 Eic. II. ; Brit. Mus. Cotton. MS. Julius, B. i. 

p. 97 d. 
List of English Nobility, temp. Eic. II.; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 293, f. 39. 
Lists of Peers, tempp. Hen. VI., Hen. VIIL, and Elizabeth; Brit. Mus. 

AM. MS. 5758, ff. 1, 14, et seqq. 
Nomina illorum qui ad honoris titulos, a temp. Eic. III. ad Elizabeth., 

promoti erant; Brit. Mus. Cotton. MS. Cleop. C. iii., ff. 374, 395. 
Pedigrees of Noble Families related to the Blood Eoyal, temp. Hen. VII. 

See Nichols's M Collectanea Topographica et Genealogica" vol. i. p. 296. 



186 HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 

Pedigeees of Nobility — (England). 
Armes and Matches of the Nobilitie of England, from Hen. VIII. to a.d. 

1602; Ashm. Lib. MS. 805, p. 181. 
The Names of Persons Created, and the Dates of their Patents, from the 

19 Hen. VIII. [1528] to the present time, may be found in the 

"Partition Books" at the College op Arms. 
Creations of Peers, by King Edward VI., Mary, Elizabeth, James I., and 

Charles L; Ashm. Lib. MS. 832. 
Creations of Peers, Baronets, and Knights, from the reign of Elizabeth ; 

Coll. op Arms, Dublin. 
Pedigrees of Peers living in 1587; Brit. Mus. Earl, MS. 806. A very 

valuable manuscript. 
The Baronage of England, sixteenth century ; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 18,643. 
The Baronage of England to James I.; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 18,594. 
Privileges of the Baronage of England, seventeenth century; Brit. Mus. 

Add. MS. 18,645. 
Pedigrees of English Nobility, compiled in 1600 ; Brit. Mus. Eg. MS. 987. 
Peers created at Hampton Court, and at the Tower, anno 1603, 1604; 

Ashm. Lib. MS. 763, p. 88. 
Pedigrees of the Nobility of England, temp. James L; Jesus Coll. Oxp. 

MS. lxxxi. 
Catalogue of Nobilitie, etc., temp. Jac. L; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 17,685. 
A Catalogue of the Nobility of England, collected in 1626; Brit. Mus. 

Add. MS. 14,285. 
Catalogues of the Nobility of England, to the year 1632 ; Brit. Mus. Add. 

MS. 12,512. 
Catalogue of English Nobility, a.d. 1642; Corpus Christi Coll. Oxf. 

MS. cxcix. 
Creations of Peers, temp. Charles II. ; Ashm. Lib. MS. 838. 
A Genealogical History of the Creation and Succession of all our Princes, 

Dukes, Earls, Viscounts, and Barons, continued to the reign of Chas. II., 

by John Vincent; Ashm. Lib. Wood MS. 8467. 
Catalogue of the English Nobility for the Sessions in Parliament, anno 

1677-8 ; College of Arms. 
Patents of Nobility granted by William and Mary, etc. ; Brit. Mus. Eg. 

MS. 743. 
Collections for Pedigrees of the British Nobility in 1707, by Peter Le Neve, 

vol. iL; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 6180. 
The Descents and Pedigrees of the English Nobility, by Peter Le Neve ; Brit. 

Mus. Earl. MS. 5808. A curious and valuable collection. 
A Catalogue of Peers and Peeresses of England, ranked according to their 

first creations, a.d. 1716; Brit. Mus. Lamd. MS. 499. 
Pedigrees of English Peers to the year 1780 ; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 14,835. 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 187 

Pedigebes op Nobility — (Scotland). 
Index of the Noble Families in England, whose Pedigrees are to be found in 
the books of the Heralds* Office in London; Beit. Mus. Cotton. MS. 
Julius, B. xi. 

SCOTLAND. 1 

PRINTED WORKS. 

The Peerage of Scotland, by G. Crawfurd ; Edinb. 1716. folio. 

The British Compendium [Scotland]. Lond. 1719. 12mo.— 2d ed. 1725, 

called vol. ii. — 3d ed. 1729,called vol. iL — 4th ed. 1741, called vol. iii. 

— Afterwards known as the " Scot's Compendium." 
The Scot's Compendium. Lond. 1752. 5th ed. Other editions in 1756 and 

1764. 
The Peerage of Scotland, by Sir R. Douglas. Edinb. 1764. folio.— 2d ed. 

(enlarged by Wood) 2 vols. 1813. folio. 
The Peerage of Scotland (printed for J. Almon). Lond. 1767. 8vo. 
The Peerage of Scotland, by E. Kimber. Lond. 1767. 12mo. 
The New Peerage, or Present State of the Nobility. 3 vols. Lond. 1769. 

8vo. — [Scotland, vol. ii. — Ireland, vol. iii.] 
The Nature and Descent of Ancient Peerages of Scotland, by G. Wallace. 

Edinb. 1785. 8vo. 2d ed. 
Proceedings relating to the Peerage of Scotland, from Jan. 19, 1707, to 

April 29, 1788, by W. Eobertson. 1790. 4to. 
The Baronage of Scotland, by Sir E. Douglas. Edinb. 1796. fojio. 
Lists of Peers of Scotland to 1806. See Beatson's " Political Index,' 

vol. iii. 
The Peerage of Scotland. 1809. See Playfair's " British Family Antiquity. " 

vol. iii. 
The Pocket Peerage of Scotland. 2 vols. Edinb. 1826. 12mo. 

MANUSCRIPTS. 

Historical Account of the Ancient Families of Scotland ; Advocates' Lib. 
Edinb. MS. in folio. 

List of the Nobility of Scotland, their Marriages and Issue; Brit. Mus. 
Cotton. MS. Calig. B. iv. f. 240. 

A List of Earls and Lords in Scotland ; Brit. Mus. Cotton. MS. Caligula, 
B.v.f. 156. 

Short Eemarks concerning many of the Scotch Nobility, by Secretary Davi- 
son; Brit. Mus. Earl. MSS. 290, f. 255; 291, ff. 66, 77, 78, 80. 

Genealogies of several noble Scotch Houses ; Brit. Mus. Karl. MS. 4837, 
f. xvii. 

1 See pages 180 and 181, ants. 



188 HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 

Pedigrees of Nobility — (Ireland). 

A short Account of the Nobility of Scotland; Beit. Mus. Sari. MS. 6119, 
f. 57. 

List of the Nobility of Scotland, with their Arms ; Beit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 
865, f. 46. 

Pedigrees of Scotch Nobility; Coll. of Aems, Vincent MS. 84. 

Genealogical Papers relating to the Scottish Nobility, sec. xvi., xvii. ; Lam- 
beth Lib. MSS. 316; 320. 

The Names of the Nobility of Scotland, etc. a.d. 1582 ; Beit. Mus. Harl. 
MS. 291, ff. 61, 65. 

An Account of the Kings, Nobility, and principal Gentry of Scotland, a.d. 
1585 ; Beit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 877. 

List of Noblemen of Scotland, a.d. 1588 ; Queen's Coll. Oxf. MS, l. 

Arms of the Nobility of Scotland, a.d. 1602, with some account of their 
births, etc.; Beit. Mus. Earl. MS. 1482, f. 1. 

Arms and Pedigrees of Scottish Nobility, 1606 ; Beit. Mua. Earl. MS. 1423. 

Ireland. 1 

feinted "works. 

The Irish Compendium, 1722. 12mo.— 2d ed. 1727.— Other editions in 

1735, 1745, and 1756. 
The Peerage of Ireland, by A. Crossley. Dublin. 1725. folio. 
The Peerage of Ireland, by John Lodge. 4 vols. Land, 1754. 8vo. — 2d ed. 

3 vols. Lond. 1838. 8vo. 
The Peerage of Ireland, by E. Kimber. Lond. 1768. 12mo. 
The Peerage of Ireland. 1810. See Playfair's " British Famih/ Antiquity" 

Vols. iv. and v. 
The Ancient Baronage of Ireland, by E. Lord Athenry. Lond. 1833. 8vo. 
A Visitation of the Seats and Arms of the Noblemen and Gentlemen of Great 

Britain and Ireland, by Sir J. B. Burke, K.H. — 1st series. Lond. 1852. 

8vo. — 2d series. Lond. 1854. — Concluding volume. 1855. 

manuscripts. 

The Names and Arms of the Earls, Viscounts, and Barons of Ireland; 
Beit. Mus. Earl. MS. 1482, f. 13 5. 

An Alphabet of the Names and Arms of certain Nobility and Gentry of 
Ireland ; Beit. Mus. Earl. MS. 5866. 

A Brief of sundry Records concerning Ireland, remaining in the Tower of 
London, with copies of the Creations of divers Noblemen of that King- 
dom ; Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 323. 

A List of the Nobility of Ireland ; Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 865, f. 49. 

List of the ancient Nobility of Ireland that are extinct ; Brit. Mus. Jdd. 
MS. 4788, art. 8. 

1 See pages 180 and 181, ante. 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 189 

Pediqrees op Nobility — {Wales). 
Anns and Descents of many of the Nobility and Gentry of Ireland ; Beit. 

Mus. Add. MS. 4814. 
Aaron Crossley 's Collections for aPeerage of Ireland; Brit.Mus.^^. MS AS 1 5 . 
Miscellaneous Pedigrees and Arms of the Nobility and Gentry of Ireland, in 

14 vols. ; Coll. op Arms, Dublin. 
Pedigrees and Arms of the Peers of Ireland, called " Lords* Entries," in 

4 vols. ; Coll. of Arms, Dublin. 
Stemmata Nobilium Antiquorum Hiberniae ; Coll. or Arms, Vincent MSS. 

26; 27. 
Copies of the Creations of divers Noblemen of the Kingdom of Ireland, from 

1 John [1199] to 18 Hen. VI. [1439]; Brit. Mus.U^.J/&4784,f.343. 
Nomina Magnatum Hiberniae, 5 Hen. III. [1221] ; Brit. Mus. Cotton. MS. 

Titus, B. xi., f. 31. 
Pour Visitation-Books, containing the Pedigrees and Arms of the Nobility 

and Gentry of several counties in Ireland, from 1568 to 1620 ; Office 

of Arms, Dublin. 
Note of the Nobility and Gentry in Munster, 1579 ; Lambeth Lib. Carew 

MS. 597. 
Names of the Nobility, Archbishops, Bishops, &c, of Ireland, 1611; Lam- 
beth Lib. Carew MS. 629. 
Pedigrees of the Nobility of Ireland, 1615 and 1617 ; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 

1425. 
The Nobility of Ireland, rated to the subsidy, by Arthur Chichester, 8th July, 

1615 ; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 4792, f. 175. 
Creations of the Nobility of Ireland to 1629, with Arms to 1627; Brit. 

Mus. Earl. MS. 1951, f. 52. 
An Account of the Irish Earls, Viscounts, and Barons, their Creations and 

Arms, circ. 1640; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 1373. 
Pedigrees and Arms of the Peers of Ireland, 1789; Coll. of Arms, Dublin. 
Pedigrees of Irish Peers, taken from Lodge's Peerage, ed. 1789 ; with a few 

additions, 2 vols.; Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 14,838 ; 14,839. 

Wales. 1 

Names and Arms of the Ancient Nobility and Knights of England and 
Wales, temp. Hen. III. See the "Antiquarian Repertory" vol. i. 

Descents of many of the Nobility and Gentry of Wales ; Brit. Mus. Earl. 
MS. 1975. 

Thomas's Collections for a "Genealogical History of the Ancient Nobility and 
Gentry of Wales ;" Brit. Mus. Earl. MSS. 6823; 6831; 6870. 

The Originals and Descents of the Nobility, Barony, and Gentry, in the 
Eealme of England and Principality of Wales, by Richard Butcher, 
Gent. ; fol. pap. ; St. John's Coll. Camb. MSS. H. 3 ; 4. 
1 See page 177, ante. 



190 HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 

Baronetage. — A Baronetcy is a dignity or degree of honour, 
which hath precedency before all knights, as Knights of the Bath, 
Knights Bachelors, &c. except Bannerets. This order was insti- 
tuted by King James L, in the year 1611, upon the following 
occasion. — Sir Oliver Lambart having reduced the province of 
Ulster in Ireland, the king, in order to preserve it in subjection, 
and encourage a plantation therein by the English, instituted the 
hereditary dignity of baronet. They engaged singly to maintain 30 
foot- soldiers in Ireland for three years, and to pay the first year's 
wages into the Exchequer, upon passing their patents, which, with 
the fees of honour, amounted to ,£1200. Their number was at 
first but two hundred, but now they are without limitation. Some 
creations of baronets are entered on the Patent Rolls, and there is 
a bundle of original creations among the records at the Tower. 
Since December 1783, all the patents of Baronets have, under the 
direction of a royal warrant, been transmitted from the Crown 
Office to the Register of the College op Arms, to be recorded in 
books kept for that purpose, before delivery to the grantees ; and 
the pedigrees of the Baronets are, by the same warrant, ordered to 
be recorded before the passing of the patent — an order which, 
though in many cases observed, has in many been neglected. 

PRINTED WORKS. 1 

A List of Baronets till the 18th year of James I., 1620. A single printed 

sheet, with arms of 127 Baronets. 
A Catalogue of Baronets from the first creation until 1681 ; Lond. 1681, 12mo. 
A Catalogue of Baronets, from Jas. I. to 1721. See Guillim's "Display of 

Herald?y,"L p. 183. 
Genealogical Account of the Families of English Baronets, by T. "Wotton. 

3 vols. Lond. 1727. 12mo.— 2d ed. 1741, 5 vols. 8vo. 
A Genealogical Account of Baronets, by A. Collins. 2 vols. Lond. 1720. 8vo. 

— 2ded. 1742. 
A New Baronetage of England (printed for J. Almon), 3 vols. Lond. 1769. 

12mo. 
The Baronetage of England, by E. Kimber, 3 vols. Lond. 1771- 8vo. 
The New Baronetage of England, 2 vols. Lond. 1804. 12mo. 
The Baronetage of England, by the Eev. W. Betham. 5 -vols. Ipswich. 

1801— 1805. 4to. 
The Baronetage of England (printed for J. Stockdale). Lond. 1806. 12mo. 
Lists of Baronets of Great Britain, from their creation to 1806. See 

Beatson's "Political Index" vol. i. 

1 See note, page 178, ante. 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 191 

Pedigrees of Baronets. 
List of the Baronets of Ireland, from their Creation to 1806. See Beatson's 

" Political Index" vol. iii. 
List of the Baronets of Nova Scotia to the year 1807. See Beatson's 

" Political Index" vol. iii. 
The Baronetage of England, by J. Debrett. 2 vols. Lond. 1808. 12mo. 

1st ed. This work has passed through many editions : a new edition 

by Courthope appeared in 1835, and others by Collen in 1840 and 1849. 
British Family Antiquity, by W. Playfair. 9 vols. Lond. 1809—1811. 4to. 

[Baronetage of England, vols. vi. and vii. — Scotland, vol. viii. — 

Ireland, vol. ix.] 
A Genealogical and Heraldic Dictionary of the Peerage aud Baronetage of 

the British Empire, by J. and J. B. Burke. Lond. 1822. 8vo. This 

work has passed through several editions; the 18th was published at 

the commencement of the present year (1856). 
The Peerage of the British Empire, to which is added the Baronetage, by 

Edm. Lodge. Lond. 1832. 8vo. A new edition has been published 

annually; that for the present year (1856) is the 25th, and is edited by 

A. E. and M. Innes. 
A Synopsis of the Extinct Baronetage of England, by William Courthope. 

Lond. 1835. 8vo. 
Case of the Baronets of Scotland and Nova Scotia. Lond. 1836. 8vo. 
A Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Extinct and Dormant Baronetcies 

of England, by J. and J. B. Burke. Lond. 1838 and 1844. 8vo. 
The Peerage, Baronetage, and Knightage of Great Britain and Ireland, by 

C. E. Dod. Lond. 1841. 12mo. A new edition has been printed 

annually up to the present time (1856). 
The Baronetage for 1843, by Sir Eichard Broun. Lond. . 8vo. 

MANUSCRIPTS. 

Arms and Crests of English Baronets; Brit. Mus. Earl. MSS. 1381; 

1477. 
The Arms and Pedigrees of 216 Baronets of England; Jesus Coll. Oxf. 

MS. lxxx. 
Creations of Baronets, from the Eeign of Elizabeth; College of Arms, 

Dublin. 
A Book of Baronets, beginning with Sir Nicholas Bacon, and ending with 

Sir Hugh Stukeley; Coll. op Arms, Philipot MS. Pe. 7. 
A Booke of Baronetts to the 16th Jas. I. ; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 3320. 
Liber Baronettorum, tempp. Jac. I. et Car. I. creatorum; Brit. Mus. Earl, 

MS. 5188. 
Catalogue of English Baronets, from 9 Jas. I. to 16 Chas. L, with Arms; 

Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 865, f. 140. 
Liber Baronettorum ad an. 1629 ; Cail-s Coll. Cams. MS. 520. 



192 HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 

Peihgeees of Bayonets. 
Baronets in order of Creation, from 1611 to 1631; Queen's Coll. Oxf. 

MS. cxix. 
Names and Arms of Baronets, from their Creation to 1641 ; Coll. op Arms, 

MS. 12. 
Baronets created by Patent since Jan. 4th, ] 641, to 1646, with Arms ; Brit. 

Mus. Lansd. MS. 865, f. 150. 
Baronets made since the Restoration of King Charles ; Ashm. Lib. Wood 

MS. 8587, f. 79. 
Pedigrees of Baronets created by Charles II., James II., William and Mary, 

William III., and Queen Anne, by Peter Le Neve, Rouge Croix ; Coll. 

of Arms. 

Kent : List of Baronets in Kent. See " The Kentish Chronologht" 1707. 
Nottinghamshire : Notes concerning the Baronets of Nottinghamshire, and 

their behaviour to Charles I. ; Brit. Mus. Hark MS. 2043, f. 184. 
Sussex : Catalogue and Arms of Sussex Baronets ; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 

6344, col. 31. 
Yorkshire : A Catalogue of Knights, Baronets, Esquires, and Gentlemen of 

Yorkshire, by K. G-ascoigne ; Coll. op Arms. 

Ireland : Baronets in Ireland ; Lamb. Lib. Carew MS. 635, f. 140. 
The Names of the Baronets of Ireland to the year 1630 ; Brit. Mus. Earl. 
MS. 1441, f. 39 b. 

Pedigrees of Knights. — Of all the orders of British Knight- 
hood, that of the Knights Bachelors is the lowest, yet the most 
ancient among us. The order of the Knights of the Garter is the 
most noble, and was founded by Edward III. in 1350. That of 
Knights of the Bath was introduced by King Henry IV., and 
revived in the reign of King George I. Other orders are — Knights 
of St. Andrew, called also Knights of the Thistle ; Knights of St. 
Patrick; Knights of the Carpet; Knights of the Chamber; 
Knights Bannerets, &c. 

The most perfect lists of Knights will be found in the collections 
at the British Museum, and at the College of Arms. Before 
the reign of James I., Knights do not appear to have been recorded 
on any rolls. In that reign a proclamation was made by the king, 
and the Heralds had the charge of registering them, which registers 
are still preserved in their custody. At present and for some 
period past, Knights have been regularly gazetted ; but there exist 
no other records for those of ancient date than the usual catalogues 
made by Heralds or other antiquaries. Eines for exoneration from 
Knigrhthood are entered on the Fine Rolls. 



HEKALDIC COLLECTIONS. 193 

Pedigrees of Knights. 

PRINTED BOOKS. 

A History of Knighthood, by Hugh Clark. 2 vols. Zond. 1784. — [Garter, 

p. 17.— Bath, p. 77. — Thistle, p. 123. — St. Patrick, p. 139. 
A History of the Orders of Knighthood of the British Empire, by Sir N. H. 

Nicolas. 4 vols. Zond. 1842. folio. — [Garter, vols. i. and ii. — 

Thistle, vol. iii. p. 84. — Bath, ib. p. 276. — St. Patrick, vol. iv. 

p. 92. — St. Michael and St. George, ib. p. 100. — Guelphs, ib. 

p. 28. 
The Begister of the Most Noble Order of the Garter, by J. Anstis. 2 vols. 

Zond. 1724. folio. 
The Institution of the Order of the Garter, by E. Ashmole. Zond. 1772. folio. 

The original MSS. are at the Ashmolean Library at Oxford, Nos. 

1097—1135. 
Collections relating to the History of the Order of the Garter ; Brit. Mus. 

AM. MSS. 6321—6323. 
Knights of the Garter from the Foundation of their Order ; LichfieldCath. 

MS. No. 6. 
Collections relating to the History of the Order of the Bath ; Brit. Mus. 

^tarns'. 6324— 6328. 
Beatson's " Political Index " vol. iii. contains Lists of Knights of the Garter, 

the Bath, the Thistle, and of St. Patrick, to 1806. 
Haydn's "Book of Dignities" contains Lists of Knights to 1851 — [Garter, 

part iv. — Bath, part iv. — Thistle, part v. — St. Patrick, part vi.] 
A Catalogue of all Knights Bachelaurs made by King James since his coming 

to the Crown of England, by J. Philipot. Zond. 1660. 8vo. 
A Catalogue of Knights made by Charles I., 1624—1646. 12mo.— 2d ed. in 

folio. Privately printed by Sir Thomas Phillipps, Bart, in 1853. 
A Catalogue of Knights, from 1650 to 1750. 8vo. Privately printed by Sir 

Thomas Phillipps, Bart. 
A Catalogue of Knights, from 1660 to 1760, by F. Townsend, Esq. Zond. 

1833. 
A Calendar of Knights ; being the Names of Persons Knighted from 1760 to 

1828, by F. Townsend, Esq. Zond. 1828. 8vo. 
Knightage of Great Britain and Ireland, by J. and J. B. Burke. Zond. 

1841. 18mo. 
Peerage, Baronetage, and Knightage of Great Britain and Ireland, by 

C. R. Dod. Zond. 1841. 12mo.— 2d ed. 1842.— Other editions have 

appeared annually up to the present year (1856). 
Names and Arms of the Ancient Nobility and Knights of England and Wales, 
temp. Hen. III. See " Jntiq. Repert." vol. i. 



13 



194 HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 

Pedigbees op Knights. 

manuscripts. 
Knights made at various times ; Beit. Mus. Earl. MS. 293 ; Add. MS. 5482. 
The Names of Knights in most of the Counties of England; Brit. Mus. 

Lansd.MS. 855. 
Knights of different Counties; Caius Coll. Camb. MS. 571, art. 4. 
Pedigrees of Knights, by Cooke; Coll. of Arms, Vincent MS. 46. 
A List of Knights in every Shire in England, tempp. Edw. I. and II. ; Brit. 

Mus. Earl. MS. 5803. 
Les Noms et les Armes a Banerez de Engleterre, au temps du E. Edw. I. ; 

Brit. Mus. Cotton. MS. Calig. A. xviii. f. 1. 
The Names and Arms of the Bauneretts and Knights, temp. Edw. II. ; Ashm. 

Lib. Wood MS. 8495, f. 1. 
Nomina Bannaratorum, temp. Edw. III.; Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 804, f. 92. 
" Equites Anglicani ;" or a Catalogue of the several Degrees of Knighthood in 

England, from Edw. III. to the end of the Keign of Charles I. ; Ashm. 

Lib. Wood MS. 8480. 
Lists of Knights created in England, from Eic. II. to Eliz.; Brit. Mus. Add. 

MS. 5482, ff. 6 5—9 5, 13—18. 
Lists of Knights made in the several Eeigns, from Hen. VII. to Elizabeth, 

seventeenth century; Queen's Coll. Oxf. MS. lxxxvii. 
The Names and Arms of Knights created in the Eeigns of Hen. VII., 

Hen. VIII., Edw. VI., Mary, and Elizabeth; and the Names of such as 

were Knighted by King James I.; Brit. Mus. Cotton. MS. Claud. C. iii. 
List of Knights made in the Eeign of Henry VIII., sixteenth century; 

Queen's Coll. Oxf. MS. cxxiii. 
Knights made from the Eeign of Hen. VIII. to that of Charles II. inclusive ; 

Ashm. Lib. Bugdale MS. 25, E. p. 156. 
Bannerets made 5 Hen. VIII.; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 5482. f. 9 b. 
Bannerets of England, their Names and Arms ; Brit. Mus. Cotton. MS. 

Calig. A. xviii. f. 1. 
Knights made temp. Elizabeth ; Ashm. Lib. Wood MS. 8495. f. 54. 
Creations of Peers, Baronets, and Knights, from the Eeign of Elizabeth; 

Coll. of Arms, Dublin. 
A Catalogue of Knights made in the Eeigns of Elizabeth and James I.; 

Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 678. 
A Catalogue of Knights, tempp. Elizabeth, James L, and Charles I. ; Ashm. 

Lib. Wood MS. 8580. 
Alphabet of Knights Batchelors, from Elizabeth to GeoTgeL; Coll. of 

Arms, MS. M. 18 (2). 
List of Knights Batchelors made by James I., and continued to the present 

time (1789); Coll. of Arms, MS. M. 5. 
List of Knights made between 1603 and 1624; Queers Coll. Oxf. MS. 

cvii. 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 195 

Pedigeees op Knights. 
Knights made by King James and King Charles, from 1603 to 1636; Brit. 

Mus. Earl. MS. 6063. 
Knights made by Charles I. during the first six years of his reign ; Ashm. 

Lib. Wood MS. 8580. 
Knights made by Charles I. and II., and James II., to 1686 ; Brit. Mus. 

Lansd. MS. 870, f. 62. 
Pedigrees of Knights created by Charles II., James II., William and Mary, 

William III., and Queen Anne, by Peter Le Neve, Rouge Croix. 2 vols. 

folio; Brit. Mus. Harl. MSS. 5801, 5802. 
Knights made at the Tower of London, before the Coronation of Queen Anne; 

Trin. Coll. Dublin, MS. ¥. 73, art. 3. 

Cheshire : Names of Knights, Esquires, Gentlemen, and Freeholders in co. 

Chester, 1579, 1580; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 1424, f. 7. 
Essex, etc. . Nomina Banerettorum, militum, armigerorum, et hominum ad 

arma, in comin. Essex., Hertf., Warw., Cantab., et Hunt., temp. Edw. I. ; 

Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 1192, ff. 34, 37, 38, 42, 43. 
Gloucestershire: Knights in the co. of Gloucester, temp. Edw. L; Caius 

Coll. Camb. MS. 553, art. 2. 
Norfolk : Knights made by Queen Elizabeth and James I., in their Pro- 
gresses through Norfolk, Suffolk, &c; Coll. of Arms, Vincent MS. 442. 
Oxfordshire : List of Names and Arms of the ancient Knights of the co. of 

Oxford. See " Antiq. Repert" vol. i. p. 101. 
Shropshire : Names and Arms of Knights, Esquires, and Gentlemen, who 

appeared at the Visitation of Shropshire in 1620 ; Brit. Mus. Earl. 

MS. 1112. 
Suffolk : Lists of the Knights of Suffolk who accompanied Edw. III. to his 

Foreign Wars; Brit. Mus. Shane MS. 1301, f. 86. (See above.) 
Surrey: List of Surrey Knights; Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 5705, p. 53; 

6167, f. 3 5. 
Sussex: Lists of Knights in co. Sussex; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 5705, pp. 

53, 280. 
Yorkshire : A Catalogue of Knights, Baronets, Esquires, and Gentlemen of 

Yorkshire, by R. Gascoigne; College of Arms. 

Ireland: Knights made by the Earl of Essex in Ireland; Brit. Mus. 

Earl. MS. 304. 
A List of Persons who received the Honor of Knighthood or other Dignities 

in Ireland, from 1599 to 1639; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 4784. p. 202. 
Knights made in Ireland, from 1666 to 1678, and those made by Sir William 

Drury just before his death; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 4763. ff. 12, 13. 



196 HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 

Pedigrees of Gentry. 1 — Independently of the Heralds' Visita- 
tions, many valuable collections, relating to the families of the 
nobility and gentry, exist in the College of Arms, the British 
Museum, and other public repositories. These generally contain 
abstracts of charters, deeds, family settlements, the Inquisitions 
w$£ mortem, &c, drawings of seals, coats of arms, painted glass 
windows, monuments, &c. &c : many of them in the handwriting of 
the most distinguished Heralds, such as Glover, Camden, Philipot, 
Dugdale, Le Neve, and others. For others we are indebted to the 
laborious application of private individuals, at the head of whom 
stand Ashmole, Burrell, Cole, Davy, D'Ewes, Dodesworth, Holme, 
Jermyn, Lysons, Wolley, and Wood. 

A copious list of these manuscripts has been compiled for the 
assistance of Genealogists. 

PRINTED BOOKS. 

The Worthies of England, by T. Fuller. Lond. 1663. Folio.— Ibid. 1811. 

2 vols. 4to.— With additions by Nuttall. 3 vols. Lond. 1840. 8vo. 
Portraits of Illustrious Personages of Great Britain, with Biographical 

Memoirs, by Edm. Lodge. 4 vols. Lond. 1821 — 34. folio. — 12 vols. 

1829, &c. Imp. 8vo. — 8 vols, (cabinet edition). 1846. small 8vo. — 

Ke-issued in Bonn's " Illustrated Library'' 1849, &c. (in progress.) 
Collection of the Nobility and Gentry of this Kingdom, whose Honours and 

Estates have by some of their Ancestors been acquired by the practice of 

the Law, etc., by H. P. Gent. Lond. 1685. 12mo. 
Collectanea Topographica et Genealogica, ed. by J. G. Nichols. Lond. 

1834—1843. 8 vols. 8vo. 
The Topographer and Genealogist, ed. by J. G. Nichols. 17 parts issued. 

Lond. 1846 to March 1855. 8vo. This publication forms a sequel to 

the preceding work. 
A Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Landed Gentry, or Commoners of 

Great Britain and Ireland, by J. Burke. 4 vols. Lond. 1833 — 38. 8vo. 

— Ibid, 1843 and 1847. 8vo.— Ibid. 1850. 2 vols. 8vo. 
Heraldic Illustrations, consisting of the Armorial Bearings of the principal 

Families of the Empire, with Pedigrees, by J. and J. B. Burke. Lond. 

1845. — Illuminated Supplement. 1851. 8vo. 
Koyal Descents, a Genealogical List of Persons entitled to quarter the Arms 

of the Eoyal Houses of England, by H. L. Long. Lond. 1845. 
Histories of British Families, by H. Drummond. Lond. 1842. Parts i.— viii. 

Folio. (Pickering.) 
A Visitation of the Seats and Anns of the Noblemen and Gentlemen of Great 
Britain and Ireland, by Sir J. B. Burke. 1st series s Lond. 1852. — 2d 
series, Lond. 1854. 8vo. 

1 See Lists of G-ejttrt. 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 197 

Pedigeees op Gentbt. 
A Genealogical andHeraldic Dictionary of the whole of the Untitled Aristocracy 

of England, Ireland, and Scotland, by Sir J. B. Burke. Lord. 1855. 

(In course of publication.) 
Pedigrees from the Plea Rolls. See Nichols's " Collectanea Topogrwphka et 

Genealogical 'vol. i. pp. 128, 254. 

MANUSCRIPTS. 

Breve abstraction, ex rott. Patentium, Clausarum, et Finium, eorum, quae ad 

Stemmatum Familiarumque Anglicarum series enucleandas, spectant, 

selectum; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 294. 
A Book of Pedigrees of several of the Gentry of England; Ashm. Lib. 

Wood MS. 8465. 
Collections of Genealogies, for the most part of Bishops and Authors; 

Ashm. Lib. Wood MS, 8469. 
Entries of the Royal Licences for the changes of Name, Arms, etc. ; Coll. of 

Arms, Dublin. 
Biographia Adversaria, alphabetically arranged by Sir William Musgrave; 

Brit. Mus. AM. MSS. 5718— 5722.— Not arranged, Add. MSS. 

5723; 5724. 
The Genealogies of many Ancient Families in England ; Trin. Coll. Dubl. 

MS. I. 104. 
Treatise of all the Families which came to England with the Conqueror, and 

the Nobility since ; Coll. of Arms, Vincent MS. 91. 
Nomina militum et aliorum hominum in Comitatibus variis, tempp. Hen. III., 

Edw. I., et II. ; Brit. Mus. Cotton. MS. Claud. C. ii. 
The Names of the Lords of every Manor throughout the Counties of England, 

from a.d. 1316 to 1559 ; Brit. Mus. Sari. MS. 6281. A Transcript 

of the Book called "Nomina Villarum" kept in the Office of the Treasurer 

Remembrancer in the Exchequer. 
Descents of English Families, by Camden; Bodl. Lib. MS. 4162. 
Pedigrees of various Families, by Bob. Glover, sixteenth cent.; Queen's 

Coll. Oxf. MS. cl. 
Pedigrees and Arms, relating to numerous Ancient Families, in the Autograph 

of Robert Glover, Somerset Serald; Brit. Mus. Sari. MS. 807. 

This MS. presents a body of genealogical information which cannot be 

too highly appreciated. 
Liber Miscellaneorum Roberti Glover, Somersetsii Seraldii transcriptus per 

W. Smith, Rouge Dragon, a.d. 1600; Brit. Mus. Sari. MS. 245. 

A valuable MS. ; a copy of two volumes now in the College of Arms. 

It is well indexed. 
Pedigrees of English Families, compiled about 1587 ; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 

12,471. 



198 HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 

Pedigbees of Gentry. 
Extracts from Registers of Abbeys, and other Records, concerning Pedigrees, 

with Drawings of Seals, in 1598, 1611, and 1691, by Ralph Brooke, 

York Herald; Brit. Mus. HarL MS. 4757. A duplicate of a MS. in 

the College of Arms. 
Extracts from Records relating to Property of various Families, seventeenth 

cent. ; Queen's Coll. Oxf. MS. clix. 
Pedigrees of English Families, seventeenth cent. ; Queen's Coll. Oxf. MS. 

lxxiv. 
Pedigrees of English Families of various Counties, seventeenth cent. ; Brit. 

Mus. Eg. MS. 1075 ; Add. MS. 12,474. 
Pedigrees of English Families, in the handwriting of Nicholas Charles ; 

Queen's Coll. Oxf. MS. lxxi. 
A large Collection of Pedigrees of English Families, by Thomas Lloyd, 

eighteenth and nineteenth cent.; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 14,409. 
Miscellaneous Pedigrees, collected by Edmondson, eighteenth cent. ; Brit. 

Mus. Add. MS. 19,819. 
Miscellaneous Pedigrees and Arms, collected by the Rev. D. T. Powell, 

eighteenth and nineteenth cent.; Brit.Mus. Add.MSS. 17,454; 18,917. 

Bedfordshire. 

Pedigrees of Bedfordshire Families; Coll. of Arms, PMlipot MSS. 1, 

P.; 2, P; Vincent MS. 139. 
Small Collection of Pedigrees of Bedfordshire Families ; Brit. Mus. Lansd. 

MS. 864. 
Arms and Descents of Bedfordshire Families, dated 1582 and 1583, with 

continuations ; Brit. Mus. HarL MS. 1390. 
Pedigrees and Arms, registered at the Visitation of 1583; Brit. Mus. HarL 

MS. 1097, f. 11. 
Pedigrees of Bedfordshire Families, by St. George, to about 1621; Caius 

Coll. Camb. MS. 541, art. 13. 
Arms and Crests in Harvey's Visitation of 1566 ; Coll. of Arms, Vincent 

MS. 184. 
Arms of Bedfordshire Families, by Bysshe, 1669 ; Coll. of Arms, MS. D. 24. 
Collections for a Parochial History of Bedfordshire, by the Rev. S. Lysons ; 

Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 9437. 
Lysons' Bedfordshire Correspondence; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 9408. 
The Miscellaneous Heraldical Collections of John Pomfret, with Notes relating 

to Bedfordshire Families; Brit. Mus. Lamd. MS. 854. 
Powell's Topographical Collections for Bedfordshire ; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 

17,456. 
Thynne's Collection of Arms/ etc. in several Churches in Bedfordshire, etc. ; 

Brit. Mus. Cotton. MS. Cleop. C. iii. ff. Id, 55, 67, 94, 95, 103, 156, 

1985, 204, 215. 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 199 

Pedig-bees of Gentry. 

Warburton and Pomfret's Genealogical Collections towards a History of Bed- 
fordshire; Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 887. 

Another volume of Warburton's collections for Bedfordshire ; Beit. Mus. 
Lansd. MS. 888. 

Berkshire. 

Pedigrees of Berkshire Families; Ashm. Lib. MS. 852. — Coll. op Arms, 

Philipot MS. 3, P. 
Pedigrees of Families in Berkshire, etc., without index ; Brit. Mus. Harl. 

MS. 5819. 
Pedigrees of Berkshire Families, in alphabetical order; Beit. Mus. Marl 

MS. 5822. 
Pedigrees of several of the most noted Families in Berkshire, extracted from a 

Genealogical MS. written about 1601. See Appendix to Ashmole's 

"Antiquities of Beik&hire" 
Pedigrees and Arms of Berkshire Families, taken at the Visitation of 1623 ; 

Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 6173.— Coll. of Arms, MS. E. D. N. 1. 
Pedigrees of Berkshire Families, by W. Berry. Lond. 1837. Folio. The 

original MS. is in the British Museum, Add. MS. 15,445. 
Arms and Crests in Harvey's "Visitation of 1566; Coll. of Arms, Vincent 

MS. 184. 
Ashmole's Collection of Arms, etc. in Churches in Berkshire, 1666; Ashm. 

Lib. MS. 571. 
Collections for the Parochial History of Berkshire, by the ftev. S. Lysons; 

Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 9438. 
Lysons' Berkshire Correspondence; Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 9409 ; 9410. 
Powell's Topographical Colleptions for Berkshire; Brit.Mus. Add. MS. 17,457. 
Suckling's Collections for Berkshire, 1821—1839; Brit. Mus. AM. MSS. 

18,489; 18,490. (Index, Add. MS. 18,491.) 

Buckinghamshire. 
Pedigrees of Buckinghamshire Families ; Coll. of Arms, Philipot MS. 

35, Pb. ,W. 
Extracts and Pedigrees from the Begister of Nutley Abbey, co. Bucks, 1591 ; 

Coll. of Arms, MS. G.. 5 (2). 
Pedigrees of Buckinghamshire Families, by W. Berry. Lond. 1837. Folio. 

The original MS. is in the British Museum, Add. MS. 15,445. 
Arms aud Crests in Harvey's Visitation of 1566; Coll. of Arms, Vincent 

MS 184. 
Arms of Buckinghamshire Families, by Bysshe, 1669 ; Coll. of Arms, MS. 

D. 25. 
Collections for a Parochial History of Buckinghamshire, by the Bev. S. Lysons; 

Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 9439. 



200 HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 

Pedigrees of G-entey. 
Lysons' Buckinghamshire Correspondence; Bkit. Mus. Add. MS. 9411. 
Powell's Topographical Collections for Buckinghamshire; Beit. Mus. Add. 

MS. 17,456. 
Suckling's Collections for Buckinghamshire, 1821 — 1839 ; Beit. Mus. Add. 

MS. 18,490. (Index, Add. MS. 18,491.) 
" Parochial Histories, by J. Theobald." The collections chiefly relate to the 

counties of Buckingham, Somerset, and Wilts, folio, paper; Society 

of Antiquaeies, MS. 115. 
Hare's MSS. in the College of Aems, contain a very extensive collection 

for Buckinghamshire, perhaps the most valuable collection of materials 

for a history of that county which is extant. 

Cambridgeshire. 

Pedigrees and Arms of Cambridgeshire Families; Beit. Mus. Sari. MSS. 

6774; 6775; 6830.— Coll. of Aems, Philipot MSS. 6, P.; 7, P. 
Two volumes of Heraldry and Pedigrees ; Beit. Mus. Add. MS. 5798. a. 6. 
Arms and Descents from the Visitation of 1619; Beit. Mus. Sari. MSS. 

2198, f. 1 ; 2230, f. 10. 
Memoranda of Deeds relating to Cambridgeshire ; Beit. Mus. Add. MS. 

6397. 
Arms of the Justices of Peace, co. Camb., a.d. 1601, 1619 ; Queen's Coll. 

Oxf. MS. xciii. 
Sixty volumes of Collections by the Rev. William Cole, chiefly relating to the 

history and antiquities of Cambridge and Cambridgeshire ; Beit. Mus. 

Add. MSS. 5802—5861. 
General Index to the first forty-six volumes of the preceding Collections ; 

Add. MS. 5801. 
Other Indexes to the same Collections; Add. MSS. 5799; 5800. These 

volumes of Indexes are placed in the "Beading Room." 
Collections for a Parochial History of Cambridgeshire, by the Rev. J. Lysons ; 

Beit. Mus. Add. MS. 9440. 
Lysons' Cambridgeshire Correspondence ; Beit. Mus. Add. MSS. 9412 ; 

9413. 
Powell's Topographical Collections for Cambridgeshire j Beit. Mus. Add, 

MS. 17,458. 
Suckling's Collections for Cambridgeshire, 1821 — 1839; Beit. Mus. Add. 

MSS. 18,476; 18,478; 18,481; 18,482. (Index, Add. MS. 18,491.) 
Description of parts of Cambridgeshire, copied from Mr. Layer's MS., 1639 ; 

Beit. Mus. Sari. MS. 6768. 
Very valuable Collections relative to the University of Cambridge; Beit. 

Mus. Sari. MSS. 7027—7050. 
A large Collection of Documents relating to the University and Town of 

Cambridge, written a.d. 1594; Pub. Lib. Camb. MS. Ff. iii. — 33. 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 201 

"Pbdigbees op G-entby. 
Cheshire. 
Pedigrees of the Nobility and Gentry of Cheshire since the Conquest ; Bodl. 

Lib. Qough MS. 
Pedigrees of Cheshire Families; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 11,836.— Coll. op 

Arms, Philipot MSS. 9, C ; 10, L. 
Cheshire Pedigrees, taken from Pedigrees by Glover; Brit. Mus. EarLMS. 

774, ff. 14 5 — 315. 
Pedigrees taken from Visitations and other sources ; Brit. Mus. Harl. MSS. 

2119; 2142. 
Pedigrees of Cheshire and Lancashire Families ; Caius Coll. Camb. MSS, 

533; 547. 
Collection of Cheshire Pedigrees; Coll. of Arms, Vincent MS. 120. 
List of Cheshire Gentlemen, 24 Hen. VIII. ; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 1920;, 

f. 38. 
Pedigrees, apparently taken from the Visitations of 1566, 1580, and 1613 ; 

Brit. Mus. Sari. MS. 1170. 
Pedigrees from the Visitation of 1580 ; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 1045, ff. 116 

—132; 1070. 
Pedigrees from the Visitations of 1580 and 1612; Brit. Mus. Estrl. MS+ 

2187. 
Parts of the original Papers of Arms and Pedigrees of Cheshire Gentry, from 

the Visitation of 1613 ; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 1070, ff. 68—147. 
Pedigrees of Families in the County Palatine of Chester, 1630 ; Brst* Mus 

Add. MS. 5529. 
Arms, Monuments, etc. of Cheshire Families, collected by Ashmole; Ashm- 

Lib. MS. 7260. 
Arms of Cheshire Families; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 2230, f. 18. — Chetham 

Lib. MS. 8019. 
Arms from the Visitation of 1580 ; Chetham Lib. MS. 6694. 
Ordinaries of Cheshire Arms; Brit. Mus. Earl. MSS. 246; 521 ; 893; 

1382; 1457; 2055; 2088; 2157; and 2167. 
Crests of Cheshire Families ; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 1963. 
A Treatise on the History and Antiquities of Cheshire, in 1588 ; Brit. Mus. 

Add. Earl. MS. 1046, ff. 122—175. 
Miscellaneous Papers relating to Cheshire, eighteenth cent. ; Brit. Mus. 

MS. 19,055. 
Accounts of Lands, Descents, Coat Armours, and other passages, both legal 

and historical, of the County of Chester, collected by Laur. Bostocke ; 

Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 139. 
Observations of Chester and some parts of Wales, with divers Epitaphes, 

Coats Armour, &c, apparently by Sampson Erdeswicke, in 1574; 

Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 473.— The Index to this collection will be 

found in Earl. MS. 471. 



202 HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 

Pedioeees op Gentry. 
Erdeswick's Collections for Cheshire, with additions ; Brit. Mus. Harl. 

MS. 506. 
Collections for the History of Cheshire, by Foote Gower, M.D. ; Brit. Mus. 

Add. MSS. 11,334 ; 11,338. 
Kandal Holme's Collections for Cheshire, in about 270 volumes; Brit. Mus. 

Harl MSS. 1920—2187; 7568; 7569. 
King's Description of Cheshire; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 5175. 
Collections for a Parochial History of Cheshire, by the Rev. S. Lysons ; 

Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 9441—9443. 
Lysons* Cheshire Correspondence; Brtt. Mus. Add. MS. 9414; 9415. 
Miscellanea Palatina, consisting of Genealogical Essays illustrative of Cheshire 

and Lancashire Families, by Geo. Ormerod. 1851. 8vo. Privately printed. 
Warburton's Collections for Cheshire; Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 644. 
Collections towards a History of Cheshire, by John Woodnoth ; Brit. Mus. 

Add. J/&6032. 
"Antiquitie of the Cittie of Chester," compiled about the year 1725; Brit. 

Mvs. Add. MS. 11,335. 
Transcripts of Evidences concerning Families and Lands in Cheshire; Coll. 

op Arms, Vincent MS. 96. 
Extracts from the Registers of the City of Chester, 14 Edw. II. to 1701 ; 

Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 16,179. 

Cornwall. 

A considerable number of Cornish Pedigrees, very extensive and valuable ; 

Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 4031, ff. 76—90. 
Pedigrees of Families in Cornwall, eighteenth cent.; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 

18,448. 
Arms of the Gentry of Cornwall; Brit. Mus. Harl. MSS. 891, ff. 1—6; 

1956, and 4632, f. 23. 
Blazon of Arms of Cornish Families ; Exeter Cath. Lib. MS. 33. 
An Alphabet of Arms of Cornwall, 1717-18 ; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 14,833 ; 

Coll. of Arms, E. D. N. 52. 
Arms of the Cornish Families from the Visitation of 1620 ; Brit. Mus. 

Harl. MS. 1482, f. 5. 
A Discourse of Devonshire and Cornwall, with Blazon of the Arms, &c; Brit. 

Mus. Harl. MS. 5827. 
Collections for a Parochial History of Cornwall, by the Rev. S. Lysons ; 

Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 9444 ; 9445. 
Lysons' Cornwall Correspondence; Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 9416 — 9420. 
Norden's Topographical and Historical Description of Cornwall ; Brtt. Mus. 

Harl. MS. 6252. 
Extracts of Documents relating to the County and Duchy of Cornwall, in the 

Augmentation Office anno 1836 ; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 12,493. 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 203 

Pedigrees op Gentry. 
Cumberland. 
Arms of Cumberland Families; Caius Coll. Camb. MS. 576. 
Arms of the Nobility and Gentry of Cumberland and Derbyshire, 1818. 4to. 

Printed separately from Lysons* History. 
"The Antiquitys of Cumberland, by Mr. Denton of Cardew;" Soc. OP Ant. 

MS. 91. 
Collections for a Parochial History of Cumberland, by the Eev. S. Lysons ; 

Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 9446 ; 9447. 
Lysons' Cumberland Correspondence; Brit. Mus. Add.MSS. 9421; 9422. 
Collections for a History of Cumberland, by Hugh Todd, D.D., seventeenth 

cent. ; Queen's Coll. Oxf. MS. cclxxxii. 

Derbyshire. 
Extracts from Dugdale's Visitation, in 1662 ; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 1082, 

f. 81. 
Pedigrees of Derbyshire Families ; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 5809. — Coll. op 

Arms, Philipot MSS. 48, P.; BO, P.— Vincent MS. 399, V.— Queen's 

Coll. Oxp. MS. xcvii. 
Arms of the Nobility and Gentry of Cumberland and Derbyshire. — . 1818. 

4to. Printed separately from Lysons' History. 
Arms of Derbyshire Families ; Ashm. Lib. MS. 854. 
Arms of Derbyshire Families, sixteenth cent.; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 9827. 
Arms of Derbyshire Families, from the Visitations of 1569 and 1611 ; Brit. 

Mus. AM. MS. 14,317. 
Collections for the Parochial History of Derbyshire, by the Kev. S. Lysons ; 

Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 9449 ; 9450. 
Lysons' Derbyshire Correspondence; Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 9423 — 9425. 
Dr. Pegge's very valuable Collections for Derbyshire are in the Coll. of Arms. 
Suckling's Collections for Derbyshire, 1821—1839; Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 

18,478; 18,479 (Index, Add. MS. 18,491). 
Valuable Collections for the History of Derbyshire, by Adam Wolley, Esq., 

in 53 vols. ; Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 6666—6718. 

Devonshire. 

An Account of some Noble Families in Devonshire, by Sam. Somast. 

[Somaster?] Sept. 1694; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 6861. 
An Account of the Chief Families of Devonshire ; Exeter Cathedral Lib. 

MS. 32. 
Genealogies of the most Noble Families in Devonshire ; Queen's Coll. Oxf. 

MS. No. ccl. 
Pedigrees of Devonshire Families; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 2121, f. 45. — 

Coll. op Arms, PJiilipot MS. 48, P. 
Descents of several Devonshire Families ; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 1408, f. 41. 



204 HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 

P.EDIGEEES OP GteNTBY. 

Cotgrave's Collections of Devonshire Pedigrees ; Brit. Mus. Hart. MS. 

2189, ff. IB, 22. 
Pedigrees by Hugh Cotgrave, with additions by Ealph Brooke ; Brit. Mtjs. 

Harl. MS. 3967. 
A Collection of Devonshire Pedigrees, by Mr. Thomas Westcote ; Brit. Mus. 

Harl.MS. 2297. 
Arms and Pedigrees from the Visitation of 1564; Brit. Mus. Harl. MSS. 

889; 2230, ff. 54—59, 65. 
Pedigrees, apparently fragments of a Copy of the Visitation of 1564; Brit. 

Mus. Earl. MS. 1169, f. 125. 
Pedigrees taken from the Visitations of 1564 and 1620. Some are continued 

to 1637 ; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 1538. 
Pedigrees of Devonshire Families from the Visitation of 1564 ; Brit. Mus. 

Add. MS. 14,288. 
Pedigrees of Devonshire Families, eighteenth cent.; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 

18,448. 
The Worthies of Devon, &c, by John Prince; Exeter. 1701. Folio. — 

2ded. Lond. 1810. 4to. 
Register of divers Persons who have given Tenements, &c, towards the Belief 

of the Poor in the County of Devon, by R. Izacke. Lond. 1736. 8vo. 
Names and Arms of Gentlemen in Devonshire and Cornwall; Brit. Mus. 

Cotton. MS. Faustina, E. iii. 
Arms of Gentry of Devonshire ; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 4632, f. 23. 
Arms borne by Noblemen and Gentlemen of Devonshire, 1584 ; Bodl. Lib. 

Gough MS. 
Arms from the Visitation of 1620; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 1482, f. 10. 
Arms and Crests from Harvey's Visitation of 1566 ; Coll. of Arms, 

Vincent MS. 184. 
Blazon of Arms of Devonshire Families; Exeter Cath. Lib. M3. 33. 
Arms of the Gentry of Devonshire ; See Risdon's " Survey of Devon." 1714. 
A Discourse of Devonshire and Cornwall, with Blazon of the Arms, &c. ; 

Brit. Mus. Harl MS. 5827. 
Collections for a Parochial History of Devonshire, by the Rev. S. Lysons ; 

Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 9449 ; 9450. 
Lysons' Devonshire Correspondence; Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 9426 — 9430. 
Powell's Topographical Collections for Devonshire; Brit. Mds. Add. MS. 

17,459. 
Upcott's Topographical Collections for Devonshire; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 

15,921. 
The History and Antiquities of Devonshire, by Mr. Thomas Westcote, temp. 

Jac. I. et Car. I.; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 2307. 
A View of Devonshire in 1630, with a Pedigree of most of its Gentry, by 

Thomas Westcote, ed. by Oliver and Jones. Exeter. 1845. 4to. 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 205 

Pedigrees op Gentry. 
Dorsetshire. 

Pedigrees of Dorsetshire Families; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 6888. 

Pedigrees from the Visitation of 1565, with additions; Brit. Mus. Harl. 
MS. 1150. 

Arms and Crests, from Harvey's Visitation of 1566; Coll. op Arms, Vin- 
cent MS. 184. 

Arms from the Visitation of 1623 ; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 1482, f. 10. 

Arms from Bysshe's Visitation of 1677 ; Coll. of Arms, MS. D. 28. 

Collections for Dorsetshire, by the Eev. S. Lysons; Brit. Mus. AM. Jlf&9458. 

Powell's Topographical Collections for Dorsetshire ; Brit. Mus. AM. MS. 
17,459. 

Upcott's Topographical Collections for Dorsetshire ; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 
15,921. 

Durham, 

Pedigrees of Families residing in the Bishoprick of Durham ; Brit. Mus. 

Harl. MS. 2118, f. 355. 
Pedigrees of Durham Families ; Queen's Coll. Oxf. MS. xcvii. 
Pedigrees from the Visitation of Durham in 1575 ; Brtt. Mus. Add. MS. 

12,477. 
Arms from the Visitation of Durham, 1575; Caius Coll. Cams. MS. 

541, art. 5. 
A valuable Collection of MSS. relating to the County of Durham ; Durham 

Cath. Lib. Allan MSS. 
Some Historical Account of the Nobility and Gentry of the Counties of 

Lincoln and Durham; Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 865, f. 163. 
Collections for Durham, by the Rev. S. Lysons ; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 9458. 

Essex. 

Arms and Pedigrees of Essex Families ; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 4944 ; 

AM. MS. 14,290.— Coll. of Arms, Vincent MS. 124. 
Pedigrees and Arms registered at the Visitations of 1558, 1583, and 1612 ; 

Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 1146, f. 10. 
A large Collection of Pedigrees from the Visitations of 1583, 1612, and 1634, 

with some additions; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 1541. 
Pedigrees from the Visitation of 1612; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 1398, f. 4. 
Arms and some Descents from the Visitation of 1634; Brit. Mus. Harl. 

MS. 2198, ff. 12-48-50. 
Pedigrees and Arms, some dated as low as 1657; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 

1432. 
Pedigrees of Essex Families, by W. Berry. Lond. . Folio. The original 

MS. is in the British Museum {Add. MS. 15,446). 



206 HEEALDIC COLLECTIONS. 

Pedigrees op (3-entby. 
Names of Noblemen in the County of Essex; Beit. Mus. Hart. MS. 2240, 

f. lb. 
List of Contributors to the Payment of the Subsidy in Essex, 29 Eliz. ; 

Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 52, art. 59. 
List of Nobility and Gentry of the County of Essex, who have subscribed to 

a new Map of the County, by John Warburton. Land. 1722. 4to. 
Arms of Essex Families, seventeenth cent.; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 11,609. 
Arms of Essex Families by Bysshe ; Coll. of Arms, MS. D. 21. 
Arms of the Nobility and Gentry of Essex, from the Visitation of 1612; 

Brit. Mus. Earl. Jf& 887. 
JekylTs Collections for the History of the County of Essex ; Brit. Mus. 

Harl. MSS. 3960; 4723; 5185; 5186; 5190; 5192 ; 5195 ; 6677 ; 

6678; 6684; 6685; 6832; 7017.— Add.MSS. 19,985— 19.989. 1 
Collections for a Parochial History of Essex, by the Rev. S. Lysons ; Brit. 

Mus. Add. MS. 9456; 9458. 
Lysons' Essex Correspondence; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 9434. 
Powell's Topographical Collections for Essex; Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 

17,460; 17,461. 
Suckling's Collections for Essex, 1821—1839; Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 

18,476; 18,479; 18,482 ; 18,486 ; 18,488 (Index, Add.MS. 18,491). 
Upcott's Topographical Collections for Essex ; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 15,921. 

Gloucestershire. 

Pedigrees of many ancient Gloucestershire Families; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 

2121, f. 72. 
Pedigrees and A.rms of Gloucestershire Families; Brit. Mus. Harl. MSS. 

1191; 6174; 6185. 
Pedigrees of Gloucestershire Families ; Coll. of Arms, JPhilipot MSS. 16,L ; 

37, L; 14, P; 15, P. 
Pedigrees copied from the Visitations of Worcestershire, Herefordshire, and 

Gloucestershire, taken 1569 ; Ashm. Lib. 831. 
Arms with some Descents from the Visitation of 1569 ; Brit. Mus. Harl. 

MS. 2230, f. 92. 
Pedigrees from the Visitation of 1569 ; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 615, f. 173. 
Arms and Pedigrees from the Visitation of 1583; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 

1041, f. 18. 
Pedigrees of Gloucestershire Families to 1619 ; Caius Coll. Camb. MS. 

553, f. 184. 
Arms and Pedigrees of Gloucestershire Families, circa 1634; Brit. Mus. 

Harl. MS. 6139. 

1 See a valuable notice of JekylTs MS. Collections, by Sir Frederic Madden, in the 
number of " Notes and Queries " for Dec. 8, 1855. 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 207 

Pedigrees op Gentry. 
Arms of the Nobility and Gentry of Gloucestershire ; Brit. Mus. Haiti, MS. 

1042, f. 79. 
Arms of Gloucestershire Families ; Queen's Coll. Oxf. MS. xcviii. 
Arms borne by the Nobility and Gentry of the County of Gloucester. Gloucest. 

1786. 4to. 
Coats of Arms borne by the Nobility and Gentry of the County of Gloucester. 

Lond. 1792. 4to. 
Collections for Gloucestershire, by the Kev. S. Lysons; Brit. Mus. Add. 

MS. 9458. 

Hampshire. 
Pedigrees of Hampshire Families ; Coll. op Arms, Philipot MSS. 17 3 C; 

29, L; 18, P; 19, P. 
Pedigrees of Hampshire Families, sixteenth century ; Queen's Coll. Oxf. 

£xxxi. 
Pedigrees of Hampshire Families, by W. Berry. Lond. 1833. Folio. The 

original MS. is in the British Museum (Add. MS. 15,447). 
Genealogical Anecdotes of Eminent Families in Hampshire. See " Gent. Mag" 

voLlvii. pp. 680, 1056, 1152. 
List of Names of the Hampshire Nobles, temp. Hen. VIII. See Nichols 1 

" Topographer,' 1 vol. i. p. 459. 
Arms and Crests from Harvey's Visitation of 1564; Coll. op Arms, Vincent 

MS. 184. 
Arms from the Visitation of 1575 ; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 1054, f. 13. 
Various Heraldic Memoranda relating to Hampshire ; Brit. Mus. Add, 

MS. 8156. 
Miscellaneous Papers relating to Hampshire, eighteenth century; Brit. 

Mus. ^d&JfA 19,056. 
Topographical and other Notes relating to the Isle of Wight and Hampshire, 

1719; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 14,296. (v. MS. James, 9, Bodl. Lib.) 
Collections for Hampshire, by the Bev. S. Lysons; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 

9458. 
Suckling's Collections for Hampshire, 1821—1839; Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 

18,478 ; 18,479 ; 18,482 ; 18,488—18,490 (Index. Add, MS. 18,491). 
Upcott's Topographical Collections for Hampshire; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 

15,921. 
Miscellaneous Collections for a History of Portsmouth, by Lake Allen, Esq. ; 

Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 8153 ; 8154. 

Herefordshire. 
Pedigrees and Arms of Herefordshire Families, with notes ; Brit. Mus. 

Harl. MSS. 1140; 2121; 5799; 6596. 
Pedigrees of several Herefordshire Families; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS, 2141. 



208 HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 

Pediobees of G-sntry. 
Pedigrees from the Visitation of 1569 ; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 615, f. 20. 
Pedigrees copied from the Visitations of Worcestershire, Herefordshire, and 

Gloucestershire, taken 1569; Ashm. Lib. MS. 831. 
Pedigrees, supposed to have been copied from the Visitation of 1619 ; Brit. 

Mus. Harl. MS. 1434. 
Arms and Pedigrees of Herefordshire Families, circa 1634; Brit. Mus. 

HarL MS. 6139. 
Arms and Descents, apparently from the Visitation of 1634; Brit. Mus. 

Harl.MS. 2230, f. 110. 
Arms of Families in Herefordshire; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 4056. 
Arms and Crests from Cooke's Visitation of Hereford; Coll. of Arms, 

Vincent MS. 184. 
Heraldry of Herefordshire, by G. Strong. Lond. 1848. Eoyal 4to. 
A small volume relating to Herefordshire ; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 4174. 
Topographical Collections for Herefordshire ; Brit. Mus. Harl. MSS. 6726 ; 



Papers relating to Herefordshire, eighteenth cent. ; Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 

17,331; 17,332. 
Dr. Matthew Hutton's Collections relating to Herefordshire ; Brit. Mus. 

Harl. MS. 7519. 
Collections for Herefordshire, by the Kev. S. Lysons ; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 

9458. 
Powell's Topographical Collections for Herefordshire ; Brit. N.va.Add. MS. 

17,458. 
Part of Taylor's History of Herefordshire, with the Valuation of the Estates ; 

Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 6766. 
Upcott's Topographical Collections for Herefordshire; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 

15,922. 
History of the City of Hereford ; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 4046. 
Collections on the Antiquities of Hereford; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 7366. 

Hertfordshire. 

" Excerpta ex libro M ri Grafton de Visitatione com. Hertfordise" ; Brit. 

Mus. Harl. MS. 7022, art. 15. 
Pedigrees and Arms of Hertfordshire Families ; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 

1429, f. 7.— Coll. of Arms, Vincent MS. 122. 
Pedigrees of Hertfordshire Families, 1579—1619; Caius Coll. Camb. 

MS. 549, art. 4. 
Pedigrees of Nobility and Gentry of Hertfordshire, by Will. Berry. Lond. 

1843. folio. The original MS. is in the British Museum [Add. MS. 

15,446). 
List of Nobility and Gentry of Hertford, &c. who have subscribed to a new 

Map of the County, by John Warburton. Lond. 1722. 4to. 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 209 

Pedigrees oe Gentry. 
Arms of Hertfordshire Families; Bodleian Lib. Oough MS. 
Arms and Crests from Cooke's Visitation of Hertford ; Coll. of Arms, 

Vincent MS. 184. 
Arms from Bysshe's Visitation in 1669 ; Coll. of Arms, MS. D. 24. 
Chauncey's History of Hertfordshire, with MS. additions by Thos. Basker- 

field, Esq. 3 vols.; Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 9062— 9064. 
Collections for a Parochial History of Hertfordshire, by the Kev. S. Lysons ; 

Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 9456 ; 9458. 
Lysons' Hertfordshire Correspondence; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 9434. 
The Description of Hertfordshire, by John Norden,, in 1597 ; Lambeth 

Lib. MS. 521. 
Powell's Topographical Collections for Hertfordshire; Brit. Mus. Add. 

MS. 17,458. 
Topographical Collections for Hertfordshire, by W. Upcott; Brit. Mus. 

Add. MS. 15,922. 

Huntingdonshire. 

Pedigrees and Arms of Huntingdonshire Families; Brit. Mus. Sari. MSS. 

5825, 6774. 
Arms from the Visitation of 1613 ; Brit. Mus. Sari. MS. 1054, f. 19. 
Heraldical and Topographical Collections for the County of Huntingdon, by 

Sir Bob. Cotton; Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 921. 
Collections for Huntingdonshire, by the Rev. S. Lysons; Brit. Mus. Add. 

MS. 9458. 
Suckling's Collections for Huntingdonshire, 1821 — -1839 ; Brit. Mus. Add. 

MS. 18,479 (Index, Add. MS 18,491). 

Kent. 

Pedigrees and Arms of Kentish Families; Brit. Mus. Sari. MSS. 5862; 

6175. Add. MSS. 5480; 5509; 5520; 5528.— Coll. of Arms, 

Vincent MS. 145.— Lambeth Lib. MS. 312. 
Arms, Pedigrees, and Monuments, of Kentish Families; Brit. Mus. Add. 

MS. 5486. 
Genealogical Notes of Kent ; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 5538. 
Pedigrees of Kentish Gentlemen ; Coll. of Arms, PMlipot MSS. 24, C ; 

25, P; 12, Pc; 26, 27, L. 
A very large Collection of Kentish Pedigrees ; Society of Antiquaries, 

MS. 173. 
Glover's Genealogies of Kentish Gentry, 1571; Coll. of Arms, PMlipot 

MS. 33, W. 
Pedigrees from the Visitation of 1574; Brit. Mus. Sari. MS. 1824. 
Pedigrees, with Continuations from the Visitation of 1619; Brit. Mus. 

Sari. MS. 6138. 

14 



210 HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 

Pedigrees op G-entbt. 
Pedigrees of Kentish Families, from the Visitation of 1623, with additions; 

Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 14,311. 
Authenticated Pedigrees of Kentish Families, continued to 1760 ; Brit. 

Mus. Add. MS. 5534. 
Pedigrees of Kentish Families, by W. Berry. Lond. 1830. folio. The ori- 
ginal MS. is deposited in the British Museum {Add. MS. 15,448). 
Index of Proprietors of Lands in Kent; Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 5517 — 

5519. 
Gentry of Kent, with their Lands, from 12 Hen. II. to Edw. VI.; Coll. of 

Arms, PMlipot MS. 4, Pb. 
Arms of the Nobility and Gentry of Kent ; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 5480. 
Arms of Lords, Knights, and Gentlemen, in the County of Kent, 1593; 

Lambeth Lib. MS. 300. 
Arms of Baronets, Knights, Esquires, and Gentry of Kent; Brit. Mus. 

Harl. MS.^m. 
"Armes of Ancient Kentish Families;" Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 6587, f. 43. 
Arms of Families of Kent; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 5843. — Soc. op Ant. 

MSS.UQ; 158—162. 
Arms and Monumental Inscriptions in Churches in Kent ; Brit. Mus. Marl. 

MS. 3917. 
A Collection of Kentish Arms, sixteenth and seventeenth cent. ; Brit. Mus. 

Add. MSS. 14,306; 14,307. 
Arms, etc. of Kentish Families, 1624 ; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 18,594, f. 106. 
Notes of Arms, &c. in Churches in Kent, 1603 — 1624; Brit. Mus. Add. 

MS. 5479. 
Arms of Kentish Families to Chas. II, ; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 12,226. 
A valuable Collection of Extracts relating to Kent ; Coll. of Arms, PMlipot 

MS. 53, Pb. 
Miscellaneous Collections relating to Kent; Lamb. Lib. MS. 1127. 
Collections for a History of Kent, by Will. Alexander, 3 vols. ; Brit. Mus. 

Add. MSS. 8836—8838. 
Valuable Collections for a History of Kent, by Edw. Hasted; Brit. Mus. 

Add. MSS. 5478—5539; 16,631. 
Collections for a Parochial History of Kent, by the Rev. S. Lysons; Brit. 

Mus. Add. MSS. 9456; 9458. 
Lysons' Correspondence for Kent; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 9435. 
Philipot's Collections for the County of Kent; Brit. Mus. Lamd. MSS. 

267; 268; 269; 276. 
Powell's Topographical Collections for Kent ; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 17,733. 
Collections towards a History of Kent, by — Somner ; Canterbury Cath. 

Somner MSS. 
Suckling's Collections for Kent, 1821— 1839 \ Brit. Mus. Add, MSS. 
18,484; 18,485; 18,490 (Index, Add. MS. 18,491). 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 211 

Pedigkees oe G-entby. 
Thorpe's valuable Collections relating to Kent; Soc. of Ant. MSS. 156 — 

201; 204. 
Biographical Dictionary of Kent, 1819, 5 vols.; Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 

18,470—18,474. 

Lancashire. 

Pedigrees of Lancashire Families; Ashm. Lib. MS. 834, art. v. p. 16. — 

Coll. op Arms, Philipot MS. 50, P. 
Pedigrees of Cheshire and Lancashire Families ; Caius Coll. Camb. MS. 

533. 
Pedigrees from the Visitation of Lancashire, in 1567 ; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 

12,477. 
Pedigrees, supposed to be from the Visitation of 1567 ; Brit. Mus. Harl. 

MS. 1152. 
Pedigrees, apparently from the Visitation of 1567; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 

1158. 
Lancashire Pedigrees, supposed to be from the Visitation of 1567, with 

continuations by the last two Handle Holmes, so low as the year 1704 ; 

Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 1987. 
Descents registered at the Visitation of 1613 ; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 1549, 

f. 108. 
Lancashire Pedigrees, collected by Thomas Barritt in 1782 ; Chetham Lib. 

MS. 8017. 
Arms of Lancashire Families ; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 893. — Chetham Lib. 

MS. 8019. 
Ordinaries of Lancashire Arms; Brit. Mus. Harl. MSS. 893; 1234; 

1367; 1382; 1452; 1457; 1940; 2017; and 2053. 
Collections, Historical, Heraldical, and Juridical, principally relating to 

Lancashire; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 7386. 
Valuable Collections for Lancashire, by Handle Holmes; Brit. Mus. Harl. 

MSS. 2042 ; 2112. 
Genealogical Collections for a History of Lancashire, by Dr. E. Keurden ; 

Chetham Lib. MS. 6702. — Some volumes by the same collector are 

in the College op Arms. 
Lysons' Collections for Lancashire; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 9458. 
Miscellanea Palatina ; consisting of Genealogical Essays illustrative of Cheshire 

and Lancashire Families, by Geo. Ormerod, Esq. 1851. 8vo. Privately 

printed. 
Suckling's Collections for Lancashire, 1821—1839 ; Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 

18,478; 18,479. 
IJpcott's Topographical Collections for Lancashire ; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 
5,922. 



212 HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 

Pedigrees op G-entry. 
Warburton's Collections relating to Lancaster; Coll. of Arms, MS. E.D.N. 

No. 63. 
An interesting Collection of Antiquarian Memoranda, principally relating to 

Manchester and its vicinity, by Thomas Barritt ; Chetham Lib. 

MS. 8026. 

Leicestershire. 
Pedigrees of Leicestershire "Families ; Brit. Mus. Sari. MS. 6590. — Coll. 

op Arms, MS. E. 1. Philipot MSS. 28, P; 29, L.~ Queen's Coll. 

Oxf. MS. cxxxi. 
Pedigrees and Arms, apparently by Nicholas Charles; Brit. Mus. Sari. 

MS. 1113. 
Pedigrees and Arms from the Visitation of 1564; Brit. Mus. Sari. MS. 

810, ff. 1—21. 
Burton's Description of Leicestershire, with MS. Notes by Edw. Yernon, D.D.; 

Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 10,126. 
Burton's History of Leicestershire, with large additions to the Pedigrees, by 

R. Gascoigne, Esq. ; Jesus College, Camb. 
Collections for Leicestershire, by the Eev. S. Lysons; Brit. Mus. Add* 

MS. 9458. 
Powell's Topographical Collections for Leicestershire ; Brit. Mus. Add. 

MS. 17,462. 
Suckling's Collections for Leicestershire, 1821 — 1839; Brit. Mus. Add. 

MS. 18,481 (Index, Add. MS. 18,491). 
Topographical Collections for Leicestershire, by W. Upcott ; Brit. Mus. 

Add. MS. 15,922. 

Lincolnshire. 
Pedigrees and Arms of Lincolnshire Families; Brit. Mus. Sari. MS. 5874. 

—Coll. of Arms, MS. E. 1. Philipot MSS. 30, P; 31, P; Vincent 

MS. 150. 
Collections relating to Lincolnshire Families, eighteenth cent.; Queen's 

Coll. Oxf. MS. lxxxv. 
Some Historical Account of the Nobility and Gentry of the Counties of 

Lincoln and Durham; Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 865, f. 163. 
Pedigrees and Arms registered at the Visitation of 1562 ; Brit. Mus. Sari. 

MS. 1097, f. 40. 
Pedigrees collected from the "Visitations of 1562 and 1592; Brit. Mus. 

Sari. MS. 2145, ff. 1—99. 
Descents registered at the Visitations of 1562 and 1592, with some additions 

Brit. Mus. Sari. MS. 1436. 
Pedigrees of Lincolnshire Families, 1617 ; Queen's Coll. Oxf. MS. lxxxv. 
Ancient Baronies in the County of Lincoln, with the Descents of their owners, 

continued to a.d. 1646 ; Brit. Mrs. Add. MS. 5531. 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 213 

Pedigrees of Gtentby. 
Antiquities of the County of Lincoln, chiefly Monumental Inscriptions and 

Arms; Brit. Mus. ITarl. MS. 6839. 
Arms of Lincolnshire Families; Brit. Mus. Karl, MS. 5845. 
Arms and Crests from Harvey's Visitation of 1564; College op Arms, 

Vincent MS, 184. 
Arms of Lincolnshire Families from Bysshe's Visitation of 1666; Coll. op 

Arms, MS. D. 23. 
An Alphabet of Arms of Lincolnshire, 1717-18; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 

14,833. 
The Names and Arms of the Lincolnshire Gentry are arranged at the end of 

Yorke's " Union of Honour." 
Kecords connected with the County of Lincoln, temp. Hen. III. ; Brit. Mus. 

Karl. MS. 6289. 
Topographical Notes relative to the Town and Churches of Lincoln, &c. ; 

Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 8938. 
The valuable Collections of Gervase Holies, Esq. for the County of Lincoln ; 

Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 207, A— F. Add. MS. 6118. 
Collections for Lincolnshire, by the Rev. S. Lysons; Brit. Mvs. Add. MS, 

9458. 
Powell's Topographical Collections for Lincolnshire; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 

17,462. 
Suckling's Collections for Lincolnshire, 1821—1839 ; Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 

18,478; 18,479 (Index, Add. MS. 18,491). 
Upcott's Topographical Collections for Lincolnshire ; Brit. Mus. Add. MS, 

15,922. 

London. 

Arms and Genealogies of the Nobility and Gentry of London; Brit. Mus. 

Add. MS. 5533. 
Arms and Pedigrees of London Families; Brit. Mus. Karl. MSS. 5810 ; 

2134, f. 1915. 
Pedigrees of London and Middlesex; Coll. of Arms, Vincent MS. 119. 
Pedigrees copied from the Visitation of 1634 ; Brit. Mus. Karl. MS. 1444. 
Arms and some Descents, apparently from the Visitation of 1634 ; Brit. 

Mus. Karl. MS. 2230, f. 146. 
Pedigrees, apparently from the Visitations of 1634 and 1664; Brit. Mus. 

Karl. MS. 1096, ff. 13, 118, 133, 144. 
Pedigrees, some continued to A..D. 1640 ; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 5533. 
Names of Persons dead, or removed from London since the last Assessment 

for the Subsidy; Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 63, art. 9. 
Names of the Persons of the several Companies of London; Brit. Mus. 

Karl. MS. 4778. 



214 HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 

Pedigeees op Gentby. 
List of People put to Death in the Civil Wars, in and about London, from 

1641 to 1662 ; Beit. Mus. Sari. MS. 4716, art. 2. 
Arms and Crests of London Families ; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 5869. 
Arms and Crests of Families of London, from the Visitation of 1634 ; Brit. 

Mus. Earl. MS. 1358. 
Arms of the Citizens of London, being Gentlemen, a.d. 1664, 1665, by Sir 

Edw. Bysshe; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 1086. 
Arms of the Families of the City of London, in 1668 ; Brit. Mus. Earl. 

MS. 6076. 
Arms of the Mayors, Sheriffs, Aldermen, &c. of London ; Brit. Mus. Earl. 

MSS. 1349, ff. 55—95 ; 6860.— Coll. op Arms, Philipot MS. 22, Pb. 
Arms of the Lord Mayors of London, from the first Mayor to the year 

1618 ; Brit. Mus. Earl. MSS. 1349, f. 3 ; 2097, ff. 2, 78. 
Arms and Devices of the Commanders and Colonels of the Trained Bands, 

1647; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 14,308. 
Arms of the Companies of London; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 6860. — Coll. 

op A.rms, MS. C. 24 (2). 
A Collection of the Armes, Crests, and Supporters of all the Companies in 

London. Lond. 1673. 
The Arms, Crests, Supporters, etc. of London Companies and Societies, 

engraved by Bic. Wallis. Lond. 1677. folio. 
The Names, Eesidence, Genealogy, and Coat-Armour of the Nobility and 

other Eminent Families of London and Middlesex, by J. Warburton. 

Lond. 1749. 8vo. 
Arms and Inscriptions upon Funeral Monuments and Gravestones in London, 

Westminster, &c; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 6835. 
Collections of Arms and Epitaphs in many of the Churches in London and 

other parts of England; Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 874. 
Part of a Visitation of several Churches in London, made 27th March, 

24 Hen. VIII. [1533], by Clarenceux ; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 544, 

f.lll. 
Collection of Pennons and Hatchments, in Churches in and about London, 

A..D. 1665, by Thos. Holfourd, Portcullis; College op Arms. 
Collections relating to the City of London ; Brit. Mus. Eargrave MSS. 

135; 139; 142; 153; 154; 179. 
Upcott's Topographical Collections for London; Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 

15,923; 15,924. 

Middlesex. 

Pedigrees of London and Middlesex; Coll. op Arms, Vincent MS. 119. 
Pedigrees registered at the Visitations of 1634, and of such Families as were 
living in 1593 ; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 1551 ; Add. MS. 4964. 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 215 

Pedig-bees of G-entey. 
Lists of Nobility and Gentry of the County of Middlesex, who have subscribed 

to a new Map of the County, by John Warburton. Lond. 1722. 4to. 
Arms and Crests from Cooke's Visitation of Middlesex; Coll. of Aems, 

Vincent MS. 184. 
Arms of Middlesex Families, circa 1664; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 1096. 
Accounts of Estates in Middlesex, 1692—1699; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 

19,043. 
Collections for the Parochial History of Middlesex, by the Rev. S. Lysons ; 

Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 9451—9455 ; 9459. 
Lysons' Correspondence for Middlesex ; Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 9431 — 9433. 
Upcott's Topographical Collections for Middlesex ; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 

15,923. 

Norfolk. 

Notes of Arms, Pedigrees, Monuments, &c. mostly of Norfolk; Brit. Mus. 

Add. MS. 5522. 
Pedigrees of Norfolk Families ; Coll. of Arms, Philipot MSS. 33, P ; 

34, P; 35, P. 
Pedigrees from the Visitation of 1563 ; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 1154, ff. 98 

—149. Add. MS. 14,309, f. 93 b. 
Pedigrees of Families circa 1612 ; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 4756. 
Arms of Norfolk Families; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 1101. 
Arms of Norfolk Families, by Bysshe; Coll. of Arms, MS. D. 21. 
Arms and Crests from Harvey's Visitation of 1563 ; Coll. of Arms, Vincent 

MS. 184. 
Arms and Crests of Norfolk Families, eighteenth cent. 2 vols. ; Brit. Mus. 

Add. MSS. 14,298; 14,299. 
Arms taken in the Churches of Norfolk and Suffolk, seventeenth cent. ; Brit. 

Mus. Add. MS. 4969. 
Alphabet of Arms of Families in Norfolk; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 12,481. 
Collectanea Thomee Gibbonsii, Arm., Historiam Familiarum tarn Norfolcien- 

sium quam Suffolciensium illustrantia ; Brit. Mus. Earl. MSS. 970 — 

972. 
Kempe's Heraldical and Historical Collections, relating to Norfolk ; Brit. 

Mus. Earl. MS. 901. 
Collections for a History of Norfolk, by Peter Le Neve, and others. 5 vols. ; 

Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 8839—8843. 
Collections for Norfolk, by the Rev. S. Lysons ; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 

9459. 
Journals of Tours, by Craven Ord, in the Counties of Norfolk and Suffolk, 

1781—1797; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 14,823. 
Collections for a History of Norfolk, probably by the Rev. Charles Parkin ; 

Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 8844. 



216 HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 

Pedigbees op Gentey. 
Powell's Topographical Collections for Norfolk ; Beit. Mus. Add. MS. 

17,462. 
Suckling's Collections for Norfolk, 1821—1839; Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 

18,476; 18,477 ; 18,479—18,482 (Index, Add. MS. 18,491). 
Upcott's Topographical Collections for Norfolk; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 

15,925. 

Northampton shire. 

Pedigrees of Northamptonshire Families, by Vincent ; Coll. ofArms, Vincent 

MSS. 112; 113; 114. 
Pedigrees of Northamptonshire Families ; Queen's College, Oxf. MS. 

lxxiv. art. 2. 

Pedigrees from the Visitation of ; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 6066. 

Pedigrees and Arms, supposed from the Visitation of 1618; Brit. Mus. 

Harl. MS. 1467, f. 11. 
Stemmata Chicheliana : A Genealogical Account of some of the Families 

derived from Thomas Chichele, of Higham-Ferrers, co. Northampton, all 

whose descendants were held to be entitled to Fellowships in All Souls' 

College, Oxford [by Dr. Buckler]. Oxf 1765. 4to.— Supplement. Oxf. 

1775. 4to. There is a copy with valuable additions in the College Library. 
Arms of Northamptonshire Gentry ; Brit. Mus. Earl. MSS. 1045, f. 150 ; 

1353, f. 61. 
Arms and Crests from Harvey's Visitation of 1566 ; Coll. of Arms, Vincent 

MS. 184. 
Copies of Records in the Tower, &c. relating to Manors and Families in 

Northamptonshire; Coll. of Arms, Vincent MSS. 36 — 38. 
Collections for Northamptonshire, by the Rev. S. Lysons; Brit. Mus. Add. 

MS, 9459. 
Suckling's Collections for Northamptonshire, 1821 — 1839; Brit. Mus. 

AM, MS. 18,481. 
Upcott's Topographical Collections for Northamptonshire; Brit. Mus. 

Add. MS. 15,925. 

Northumberland. 
Pedigrees of Northumberland Families ; Queen's Coll. Oxf. MS. xcvii. 
Certain Pedigrees of Northumberland Families, as registered at the Visitation 

of 1575; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 1171, ff. 13,15,46,47 5, 49, 64, 815, 

82 5, 84 5. 
Pedigrees from the Visitation of Northumberland in 1575; Brit. Mus. 

Add. MS. 12,477. 
Some Account of the Ancient Families of Northumberland. See Greig's 

" Survey of Newcastle-tupon-Tyne" sm. 4to. 
Arms of Northumberland Gentry, by J. Barber. Lond. 1743. 
Arms of Northumberland Families; Caius Coll. Camb. MS. 576, 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 217 

Pedigeees of Gentey. 
Arms from the Visitation of Northumberland in 1614 ; Caitjs Coll. Camb. 

MS. 541, art. 2. 
Arms from the Visitation of 1615 ; Brit. Mits. Earl. MS. 1429, f. 45. 
Collections for Northumberland, by the Eev. S. Lysons; Brit. Mus. Add. 

MS. 9459. 
Topographical Collections for Northumberland, by W. Upcott ; Brit. Mtjs. 

Add. MS. 15,925. 

Nottinghamshire. 
Pedigrees of Nottinghamshire Families; Coll. of Arms, Vincent MS. 399, 

— Queen's Coll. Oxp. MS. xcvii. 
Pedigrees of Families of Nottinghamshire, with Extracts from Deeds, Monu- 
mental Inscriptions, &c. ; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 6593. 
Pedigrees and Evidences of Nottinghamshire Families, collected by Sir Eich. 

St. George ; Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 871. 
Genealogical Notes relating to Nottinghamshire ; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 

1171. 
A Collection of Arms and Monuments in Nottinghamshire ; Ashm. Lib. 

MS. 854. 
Arms of Nottinghamshire Families ; Brit. Mrs. Earl. MS. 1457. 
Arms of Families in Annesley, Titheby, and Whatton; Brit. Mus. Earl. 

MS. 1393. 
Arms from the Visitation of 1614 ; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 5870. 
Arms of Nottinghamshire Families, sixteenth cent.; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 

9827. 
Alphabet of Arms of Nottinghamshire Gentry ; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 1057. 
Kaye's Notes relating to Nottinghamshire, eighteenth cent. ; Brit. Mus. 

Add. MSS. 18,551—18,553, a. b. 
Collections for Nottinghamshire, by the Rev. S. Lysons; Brit. Mus. Add. 

MS. 9459. 
Powell's Topographical Collections for Nottinghamshire; Brit. Mus. Add. 

MS. 19,915. 
Topographical Collections for Nottinghamshire, by W. Upcott; Brit. Mus. 

Add. MS. 15,925. 

Oxfordshire. 
Pedigrees and Arms of Oxfordshire Families ; Brit. Mus . Earl. MSS. 5812; 

5828.— Coll. of Arms, PhUipot MSS. 15, P ; 36, P. 
Pedigrees, chiefly from the Visitation of Oxfordshire, 1573 ; Pub. Library, 

Camb. MS. Bd. xi. 69. 
Pedigrees of Oxfordshire Families, being a copy of C. 29 (the Visitation of 

1634), in the College of Arms. Also, part of another Book of Arms 

and Pedigrees of Families of the said county ; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 

3966, f. 91. 



218 HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 

Pedigrees op Gentry. 
Epitaphs and Arms in the Churches in Oxfordshire; Bodl. Lib. Wood MS. 

8505. 
Arms and Crests from Harvey's Visitation of 1566; Coll. of Arms, Vin- 
cent MS. 184. 
Arms of Oxfordshire Families, by Bysshe, 1669; Coll. of Arjis, MS. 

D. 25. 
Collections for Oxfordshire, by the Rev. S. Lysons ; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 

9459. 
Anthony a Wood's Collections, chiefly relating to Oxfordshire; Ashm. Lib. 

MSS. 8463—8588. 
Topographical Collections for Oxfordshire, by W.Upcott; Brit. Mus. Add. 

MS. 15,925. 
Collections for a History of Oxfordshire, by W. Upcott, 2 vols. ; Brit. Mus. 

Add. MSS. 15,930; 15,931. 

RUTLANDSHIRE. 

Collections for Rutlandshire, by the Rev. S. Lysons; Brit. Mus. AM. MS. 

9459. 
Topographical Collections for Rutlandshire, by W. Upcott ; Brit. Mus. 

Add. MS. 15,926. 
Forty-nine Rolls illustrative of the History of Rutlandshire, being chiefly 

Rolls of the Assizes held at Oakham, from 5 Will, and Mary to 1761; 

Brit. Mus. Add. Ch. 873. 

Shropshire. 

Genealogical Collections for the County of Shropshire; Brit. Mus. Hart. 

.MSS. 1984, f. 189 6; 5178; 5179; 5848; 7510. 
Pedigrees of Shropshire Families, chiefly of Welsh Descent ; Brit. Mus. 

Earl. MS. 1157. 
Pedigrees of Families of Wales and Shropshire ; Brit. Mus. Marl. MS. 

6153. 
Challoner's Collections of Shropshire Pedigrees ; Brit. Mus. Karl. MS. 

2163, f. 19 5. 
Pedigrees of Shropshire Families; Coll. of Arms, Pkilipot MSS. 37, P; 

48, P; 50, P. 
Pedigrees, taken in 1569; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 615, f. 235. 
Part of the Pedigrees registered at the Visitation of 1584; Brit. Mus. 

Earl. MS. 1161. 
Pedigrees and Arms of Shropshire Families, from the Visitations of 1584 

and 1623, with additions; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 14,314. 
Pedigrees from the Visitation of 1623, with many important additions; 

Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 1983. 
Genealogical Collections for Shropshire, 1662 and 1668; Ashm. Lib. MS, 

854. 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 219 

Pedigrees op Gentey. 
Collections from the Visitation of Shropshire, sixteenth cent.; Queen's 

Coll. Qxf.MS. cxvii. f. 80. 
Collections for Shropshire; Society of Antiquaries, MS. 139. 
Valuable Collections for a History of Shropshire, by T. F. Dukes and 

D. Parkes; Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 21,011—21,025. 
Collections for Shropshire, by the Eev. S. Lysons; Bb.it. Mus. Add. MS, 

9459. 
Topographical Collections for Shropshire, by W. Upcott ; Beit. Mus. Add. 

MS. 15,926. 

Somersetshire. 

Pedigrees of Somersetshire Families; Queen's Coll. Oxf. MS. cxxxi. — 

Coll. of Arms, PhilipotMSS. 37, L; 38, P; 4,8, P ; 50, P. 
Pedigrees from the Visitation of Somersetshire in 1573; Brit. Mus. Add. 

MS. 12,477. 
A Book used at the Visitation of 1623 ; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 1145. 
Arms from the Visitation of 1623 ; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 1482, f. 10. 
Arms of Somersetshire Families, by Bysshe, 1672 ; Coll. of Arms, MS. 

D. 27. 
Papers relating to Somersetshire, from 19 Hen. VIII. to 1783 ; Brit. Mus. 

Add. MS. 18,616. 
Collections for Somersetshire, by the Kev. S. Lysons; Brit. Mus. Add. 

MS. 9459. 
Powell's Topographical Collections for Somersetshire ; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 

17,463. 
"Parochial Histories, by J. Theobald." The collections chiefly relate to the 

counties of Buckingham, Somerset, and Wilts; Soc. of Antiquaries, 

MS 115. 
Topographical Collections for Somersetshire, by W. Upcott ; Brit. Mus. 

Add. MS. 15,926. 

Staffordshire. 

Pedigrees of Staffordshire Families; Ashm. Lib. MS. 834, art. v. — Brit. 
Mus. Harl. MS. 2043, f. 186 5.— Coll. of Arms, PMlipot MSS. 39, 
L; 47, L. 

Some Pedigrees of Staffordshire Families, taken temp. Elizabeth, with con- 
tinuations; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 1995. 

Pedigrees from the Visitation of 1563; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 2145, f. 99. 

Descents copied from the Visitation of 1663 ; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 1429 
ff. 285, 33,34 5, 37 5, 38 5,39 5,42 5,45 5,48 5,49 5—52 5. 

Arms of Staffordshire Families. See Plot's " Natural History of Stafford- 
shire:' 1686. folio. Also, Shaw's " History of Staffordshire:* 

Arms of Staffordshire Families ; Ashm. Lib. MS. 853. 



220 HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 

Pedigsees of G-entey. 
Arms aud Seals from the Visitation of 1583 ; Beit. Mus. Earl. MS. 2203. 
Arms taken in the Visitations of 1663 and 1664, in Dugdale's hand ; Beit. 

Mus. Lansd. MS. 857. 
Divers Matters relating to Staffordshire, Pedigrees of Families, &c. ; Soc. or 

Ant. MSS. 99; 139. 
Early Becords relating to Staffordshire; Beit. Mus. Earl. MS. 1985, ff. 

199 5—213. 
Ashmole's Collections for a History of Staffordshire; Ashm. Lib. MSS. 

859; 864. 
Erdeswicke's Collections for Cheshire, which contain several articles relating 

to Staffordshire; Beit. Mus. Earl. MSS. 506; 818. 
Erdeswicke's View of Staffordshire, a.d. 1603 ; Beit. Mus. Earl. MS. 1990. 
Collections for Staffordshire, by the Rev. S. Lysons; Beit. Mus. Add. MS. 

9459. 
Topographical Collections for Staffordshire, by W. Upcott ; Beit. Mus. 

AM. MS. 15,926. 

Suffolk. 

Pedigrees and Arms of the Gentry of Suffolk ; Bodl. Lib. Gougk MS. 

—Beit. Mus. Earl. MS. 5842. Add. MSS. 5523 ; 5524; 12,471.— 

Coll. of Aems, Philipot MSS. 33, P ; 40—42, P. 
A large Collection of the Pedigrees of Suffolk Families ; Beit, Mus. Earl. 

MS. 1169, f. 5 5. 
Pedigrees of Suffolk Families, by H. Jermyn, Esq., alphabetically arranged; 

Beit. Mus. Add. MSS. 8200—8217; 17,097. Indexes, Add. MS. 

17.099. 
Arms and Pedigrees of Suffolk Families, temp. Elizabeth, collected by William 

Harvey, Clarenceux ; Brit. Mus. Lamd. MS. 876. 
Pedigrees and Arms from the Visitation of 1561; Beit. Mus. Earl. MS. 

1136, ff. 17—68. 
Pedigrees of Suffolk Families, from the Visitation of 1 5 63 ; Brit. Mus. Add. 

MS. 14,309, f. 93 5. 
Pedigrees of Suffolk Families, collected by D. E. Davy, alphabetically 

arranged, in 43 vols. ; Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 19,114—19,156. 
Alphabetical List of Suffolk Surnames, 1843 ; Beit. Mus. Add. MS. 19,160. 
Synopsis of the Lords of the several Manors in the County of Suffolk, col- 
lected by D. E. Davy, 1835 ; Beit. Mus. Add. MSS. 19,161—19,164. 
Arms of Suffolk Families; Beit. Mus. Add. MS. 19,159. 
Arms of Suffolk Families, by Bysshe; Coll. of Arms, MSS. D. 21 ; 22. 
Arms of the Nobility and Gentry of Suffolk; Beit. Mls. Earl. MS. 772. 
Arms taken in the Churches of Norfolk and Suffolk, seventeenth cent. ; Brit. 

Mus. Add. MS. 4969. 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 221 

Pedigeees op Gentey. 
Arms and Crests from Harvey's Visitation of 1561; Coll. of Arms, Vin- 
cent MB. 184. 
Arms and Crests of Suffolk Families, seventeenth cent. 2 vols. ; Brit, Mus. 

Add.MSS. 14,298; 14,299. 
Alphabet of Arms of Suffolk Families; Bkit. Mus. Add. MS. 12,481. 
The Armoury of Suffolk, by D. E. Davy, 1848; Bkit. Mus. Add. MS. 

19,158. 
Breviary of Suffolk : — Alphabet of Arms ; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 19 7 157. 
" A Breviary of Suffolk ; or, a Plain and Familiar Description of the County," 

&c. a.d. 1618; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 3873. A recent transcript is 
. in Add. MS, 8200, f. 171, and extracts are given in Add. MS. 5829, 

f. 180. 
Evidences relating to the Hundred of Thingoe, Co. of Suffolk; Brit. Mus. 

Add. MS. 7097. 
An Essay towards recovering some Account of the Ancient Families in the 

County of Suffolk; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 20,695. 
Valuable Collections for the History of Suffolk, collected by D. E. Davy, Esq. 

of Ufford, in 130 volumes, are deposited in the British Museum. In 

addition to those already mentioned, are : — 

Collections for the History of Suffolk, arranged in Hundreds. In 37 

vols.; Add. MSS. 19,077—19,113. 
" Athense-Suffolcienses ;" or, a Catalogue of Suffolk Authors, 1847-8 

Add. MSS. 19,165—19,168. 
Lists of Suffolk Authors, with their Works; Add. MSS. 19,169 

19,170. 
General History of the County of Suffolk; Add. MSS. 19,171 

19,172. 
Collections of Drawings and Sketches, illustrative of the History of 

the County of Suffolk, arranged in Hundreds, 6 vols. ; Add. MSS. 

19,176—19,181. 
General Index-Book to the Parochial Collections for the History of 

Suffolk; Add. MS. 19,184. 
Miscellaneous Papers and Documents relating to the County of 

Suffolk; Add. MSS. 19,185—19,198. 
Original Letters, chiefly addressed to Eleazar Davy, Esq., and to 

D. E. Davy, Esq., 1758—1851, in 29 vols. ; Add. MSS. 19,213 

—19,219; 19,241. 

D'Ewes' Collections for Suffolk, chiefly consisting of Abstracts of Charters, 

&c. ; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 639. 
Collectanea Thomae Gibbonsii, Arm., Historiam Familiarum tarn. Norfolcien- 

sium quam Suffolciensium illustrantia ; Brit. Mus. Harl. MSS. 970 — 

972. 



222 HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 

Pedigbees of Gentey. 
Collections for a General History of Suffolk, by Hen. Jermyn, Esq., in 51 
volumes, folio; Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 8168—8218. The volumes 
are thus arranged : — 

Collections, arranged in Hundreds; Add. MSS. 8168 — 8196. 

General History; Add. MS. 8191. 

Landholders, from "Domesday " Add. MS. 8198. 

Biographical Collections; Add. MS. 8199. 

Collections of Pedigrees, alphabetically arranged ; Add. MSS. 8200 

— ^8217. 
Arms of Suffolk Families; Add. MS. 8218. 

Kemp's Collections for the County of Suffolk; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 901. 
Miscellaneous Notes for a History of Suffolk, collected by Craven Ord, Esq., 

2 vols. ; Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 7101 ; 7102. 
Collections, illustrative of the Topographical History of Suffolk, by Craven 

Ord, Esq., 2 vols. ; Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 8986; 8987. 
Journals of Tours by Craven Ord, Esq. in the Counties of Norfolk and Suffolk, 

1781—1797 ; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 14,823. 
Suckling's Collections for Suffolk, 1821—1839; Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 

18,476— 18,478; 18,480—18,482. (Index, Add. MS. 18,491.) 
Topographical Collections for Suffolk, by W. Upcott ; Brit. Mus. Add. 

MS. 15,926. 
There is a valuable volume of Notes and Collections for Suffolk in the Library 

of the College of Arms. 

Surrey. 
Pedigrees of Surrey Families; Brit. Mus. Karl. .M&5830. — Coll. of Arms, 

PMlipot MSS. 13, P; 43, P; 44, P.— Queen's Coll. Oxf. MS. 

cxxxi. 
Pedigrees of Families in Surrey, from the Visitation of 1623, with additions ; 

Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 14,311. 
Pedigrees of Surrey Families, by W. Berry. Lord. 1837. folio. The original 

MS. is deposited in the British Museum. (Add. MS. 15,446.) 
Arms from the Visitations of Surrey, in 1623, with additions; Coll. of 

Arms, MS. E.D.N. 14. 
Promiscuous Collections for Surrey; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 6409. 
Collections relating to Surrey, 1641—1798 ; Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 11,571 

—11,573. 
Transcripts of Surveys, Extracts from Parish Registers, Court Rolls, &c. re- 
lating to the Manors of East and West Mulsey, co. Surrey ; Brit. Mus. 

Earl. MS. 779. 
Collections for a Parochial History of Surrey, by the Eev. S. Lysons ; Brit. 

Mus. Add. MSS. 9457; 9459. 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 223 

Pedigkrees op Gentey. 
Lysons* Correspondence for Surrey ; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 9436. 
Suckling's Collections for Surrey, 1821—1839; Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 

18,476; 18,485 ; 18,490 (Index, Add. MS. 18,491). 
Symmes's Collections for the History of the County of Surrey, 1670 — 1680 ; 

Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 6167. 
Topographical Collections for Surrey, by W. Upcott; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 

15,926. 

Sussex. 
Pedigrees of Sussex Families; Brit. Mus. Lamd. MS. 873. Add. MSS, 

6346 j 6347; 6350.— Coll. op Arms, Vincent MS. 121.— Queen's 

Coll. Oxf. MS. cxxxi. 
Pedigrees taken from an old Visitation; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 892. 
Pedigrees of Sussex Families, by W. Berry. Lond. 1830. folio. The original 

manuscript is in the British Museum {Add. MS. 15,449). 
Pedigrees of Sussex Families from the Visitation of 1623, with additions; 

Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 14,311. 
Arms of Sussex Families; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 906. 
A fine Collection relating to the History and Antiquities of Sussex, by Sir 

W, Burrell, Bart., in 41 volumes; Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 5670 — 

5711. The volumes are thus arranged : — 

CoUections, divided into Eapes; Add. MSS. 5679—5690. 
Pedigrees, alphabetically arranged; Add. MSS. 5691 — 5696. 
Monuments and Inscriptions; Add. MSS. 5697 — 5699. 
Miscellaneous CoUections; Add. MSS. 5700—5706. 
Pedigrees, continued below the year 1750; Add. MS. 5711. 

Hayley ? s Collections for a History of Sussex; Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 

6343 — 6361. They form an excellent Supplement to Sir William Bur- 

rell's Collections for the same county. 
Collections for Sussex, by the Eev. S. Lysons; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 9459. 
Topographical Collections for Sussex, by W. Upcott; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 

15,926. 
Warburton's Collections for a History of Sussex; Brit. Mus. Lamd. MSS. 

886; 918. 

Warwickshire. 
Arms and Pedigrees of Warwickshire Families ; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 

6060.— Coll. of Arms, MS.~E>.1. PMlipot MSS. 29,1, ; 45,P. Vincent 

MS. 126. 
Arms of the Gentry of Warwickshire ; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 1353. 
Dugdale's Warwickshire Collections; Ashm. Lib. MSS. 6491—6513. 
Ashmole's Collections for a History of Lichfield; Ashm. Lib. MSS. 855; 

1521. 



224 HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 

Pedi&bees op Gentby. 
Annals of the City of Coventiy for the year 1703; Beit. Mus. Add. MS. 

11,364. 
Collections for Warwickshire by the Kev. S. Lysons; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 

9459. 
Topographical Collections for Warwickshire, by W. Upcott; Beit. Mus. 

Add. MS. 15,927. 

Westmoreland. 

Descents of Families residing in the Barony of Kendal, 1638 ; Beit. Mus. 

Earl. MS. 1564. 
Topographical, Collections for Westmoreland, by W. Upcott; Brit. Mus. 

AM. MS. 15,927. 

Wiltshire. 

Pedigrees of Wiltshire Families ; College op Aems, PMlipot MSS. 16, L ; 

46, P. 
Original Note Book of William Harvey, Clar., during his Visitation in 

L565; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 1111, ff. 7—22. 
Arms and Crests from Harvey's Visitation of 1565 ; Coll. op Arms, Vin- 
cent MS. 184. 
Arms of the Gentry of Wiltshire from the Visitation of 1623 ; Beit. Mus. 

Earl. MSS. 1054, f. 13 ; 1482, f. 1. 
Anns of Wiltshire Families, by Bysshe, 1677 ; Coll. of Arms, MS. D. 28. 
Collections for Wiltshire, by the Rev. S. Lysons; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 

9459. 
" Parochial Histories, by J. Theobald." The collections chiefly relate to the 

counties of Buckingham, Somerset, and Wilts; Soc. op Ant. MS. 115. 
Topographical Collections for Wiltshire, by W. Upcott ; Beit. Mus. Add. 

MS. 15,927. 
The Heralds' Visitations of Wiltshire, and Notes of Pedigrees of Wilts 

Families, by F. A. Carrington; TPllU. Archmolog. Mag. Dec. 1855. 

Worcestershire. 

Genealogical Descent of Worcestershire Families; Soc. op Ant. MS. 145, 
art. 4. 

Pedigrees and Arms of Worcestershire Families, Monumental Inscriptions, 
&c. ; Brit, Mus. Earl. MS. 5814. 

Genealogies of Families of Worcester, taken at the Visitation in 1569; 
Beit. Mus. Earl. MS. 615, f. 97.— Ashm. Lib. MS. 831, p. 197 b. 

Pedigrees and Arms, apparently from the Visitation of 1569, with continua- 
tions; Brit. Mus. Earl. MSS. 1133; 5841. 

Pedigrees of Worcestershire Families, some to 1620; Caius Coll. Camb. 
MS. 553, f. 34. 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 225 

Pedigrees of G-entey. 
Arms and Pedigrees of Worcestershire Families, circ. 1634 ; Brit. Mus. 

Harl. MS. 6139. 
Arms of Worcestershire Families, 1574; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 19,816. 
Habington's Collections for a History of Worcestershire ; Jesus Coll. Oxf. 

MSS. Ixxxiv — lxxxvi. 
Parochial Antiquities of Worcestershire, by WiUiam Habingtou, of Hindlip, 

in three vols. ; Soc. op Ant. MSS. 139 — 152. 
Collections for Worcestershire, by the Bev. S. Lysons; Brit. Mus. Add. 

MS. 9459. 

Yorkshire. 
A Collection of Yorkshire Pedigrees ; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 2118, ff. 1, 48. 

Lansd. MS. 900, f. 81.— Asm. Lib. MS. 834, art. iii.— Queen's 

Coll. Oxf. MS. cxxxi. 
Arms and Descents of Yorkshire Families ; Brit. Mus. Harl. MSS. 4198 ; 

(Index at f. 169) 6070. 
Arms and Pedigrees of the Gentry of the West Hiding of Yorkshire ; Brit. 

Mus. Harl. MS. 4630, art. 11. A very useful addition to Harl. MS. 

1487. 
Pedigrees of Staffordshire and Yorkshire, temp. Elizabeth, with some con- 
tinuations; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 1995. 
Descents of Yorkshire Families, taken chiefly from Flower's Visitation, a.d. 

1563; Ashm. Lib. MS. 834. 
Most of the Pedigrees registered at the Visitation of 1584, with additions; 

Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 1182. 
Pedigrees of the Visitation of Yorkshire, taken 1584, with continuations to 

1656 ; Caius Coll. Camb. MS. 522. 
Descents and Arms, extracted from the Visitation of 1664; Brit. Mus. 

Harl. MS. 1420, f. 228. 
Arms of Yorkshire Families; Caius Coll. Camb. MS. 575. 
Arms in Flower's Visitation of Yorkshire, 1563 ; Coll. op Arms,J/& 2. H. 8. 
Arms of the Sheriffs of Yorkshire to 1652 ; Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 865, 

f. 129 5. 
Miscellaneous Collections relating to Yorkshire; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 

4792, f. 184. 
The valuable unpublished Collections for this County, by John Charles 

Brooke, Esq., Somerset Herald^ in many folio volumes, are in the Library 

of the College of Arms. 
Dodesworth's valuable Collections for Yorkshire; Bodl. Lib. MSS. 4143 — 

5101. These Manuscripts are described in Bernard's " Catalogi libb. 
Manuscriptorum Anglics et Hibernia" pp. 187 — 233. 
Collections for a History of several Towns, &c. in Yorkshire, extracted from 
the Dodesworth MSS. ; Brit. Mus. Harl. MSS. 793—805. 

15 



226 HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 

Pedigrees ov Gentry. 

Collections for Yorkshire, by the Kev. S. Lysons ; Beit. Mus. Add. MS. 

9459. 
Suckling's Collections for Yorkshire, 1821—1839 ; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 

18,478. 
Topographical Collections for Yorkshire, by W. Upcott ; Brit. Mus. Add. 

MS. 15,927- 
Warburton's Collections for Yorkshire; Brit. Mus. Lansd. MSS. 889 — 

901; 908—919. 
History and Antiquities of the Town of Kingston upon Hull to the year 

1688 ; Brit. Mus. Lansd. MSS. 890; 891. Add. MS. 8936. 
A Collection of Muniments relating to the Honor of Eichmond ; Brit. Mus. 

Add. MS. 5466. 

Scotland. 

Pedigrees of Scotch Families; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 2218. 

A few Pedigrees of Scotch and Irish Families ; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 6151. 

Pont's Collections of the Names and Arms of the second degree of Gentry 
in Scotland ; Brit. Mus. Sloane MS. 940. 

A. Collection of the most Remarkable Accounts that relate to the Families of 
Scotland, drawn up by Sir Geo. Mackenzie ; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 
3740. Add. MS. 12,464. 

An Account of the principal Gentry of Scotland, a.d. 1585 ; Brit. Mus. 
Lansd. MS. 877- 

Pedigrees of Scotch Families, to the year 1798. 2 vols.; Brit. Mus. Add. 
MSS. 14,836; 1.4,837. 

A Genealogical Account of the principal Families in Ayrshire, by George 
Eobertson. 3 vols. Irvine. 1823—1825. 8vo. 

History of the County of Ayr, with Genealogical Account of Ayrshire Fami- 
lies, by James Paterson. Ayr. 1847-8. 8vo. 

A Genealogical and Heraldic Dictionary of the whole of the Untitled Aristo- 
cracy of England, Scotland, and Ireland, by Sir J. B. Burke. Lond. 
1855. In course of publication. 

Ireland. 
Genealogies of Irish Families ; Brit. Mus. Cotton. MS. Tit. C. x. f. 4C b. 
The Name3 of the chief Families in the Kingdom of Ireland ; Brit. Mus. 

Harl. MS. 1441, f. 39. 
Various Pedigrees of Irish Families ; Brit. Mus. Harl. MSS. 2094 ; 2218. 
A few Pedigrees of Scotch and Irish Families; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 6151. 
An Alphabet of the Names and Arms of certain Nobility and Gentry of 

Ireland; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 5866. 
Pedigrees of Irish Families ; Brit. Mus. Eg. MSS. 133 ; 135 ; 139. 
Arms and Descents of many of the Nobility and Gentry of Ireland ; Brit. 

Mus. Add. MS. 4814. 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 227 

Pedigrees op Q-entey. 
Miscellaneous Collections relating to the History of Ireland, with an Account 

of some of the Families of Ireland; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 4821. 
Miscellaneous Pedigrees of the Gentry of Ireland, in 14 volumes; Coll. op 

Arms, Dublin. 
Four Visitation Books, containing the Pedigrees and Arms of the Gentry of 

Ireland, from 1568 to 1620 ; Coll. of Arms, Dublin. 
Genealogies of Irish Families ; Lambeth Lib. MS. 257. 
The Descent of Irish Families to the time of Henry II ; Lambeth Lib. 

CarewMS. 599. 
Descents, either of the mere Irish, or of the English Families in Ireland ; 

Lambeth Lib. Carew MS. 626. 
Genealogies of all the Ancient Families of Ireland; Trinity College, 

Dublin, MS. D. 18. 
Tabulae Genealogicae et Nomina Yirorum in Hiberni&; Trinity College, 

Dublin, MS. I. 103. 
Note of the Nobility and Gentry of Munster, 1579 ; Lambeth Lib. Carew 

MS. 597. 
Heraldic Calendar: a List of the Nobility and Gentry whose Arms are 

registered, and Pedigrees recorded, in the Heralds 3 Office in Ireland. 

Dublin. 1846. 8vo. 

Wales. 

A Tour in quest of Genealogy, through several parts of Wales, &c, by a 

Barrister. Lond. 1811. 8vo. 
Descents of Welsh Families ; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 1412, f. 54 b. 
Collection of Welsh Pedigrees in Welsh; Brit. M^s. Earl. MS. 1935. 
Welsh Pedigrees, amongst which are those of each of the Fifteen Tribes, 

excepting one; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 1969. 
Extensive Collections of Welsh Pedigrees, chiefly of North Wales ; Brit. 

Mus. Earl MSS. 1970—3 979. 
Pedigrees of several Families of Wales, chiefly by Eandle Holme ; Brit. 

Mus. Earl. MS. 2094. 
Pedigrees of several Welsh Families ; Brit. Mrs. Earl. MSS. 1936 ; 1995 ; 

1997; 2218; 2288; 2291; 4031, ff. 58— 71. 
A large Collection of Welsh Descents, principally in Welsh ; Brit. Mus. 

Earl. MSS. 2299 ; 2414. 
Welsh Pedigrees in detail; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 3538. 
Pedigrees of several Families in Wales; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 6068, f. 56. 
Pedigrees and other matter, chiefly Historical, relating to Wales; Brit. Mus. 

Earl. MS. 4181. 
Genealogies of Welsh Families; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 5053. 
Arms and Descents of one hundred and ninety-seven Welsh Families ; Brit. 

Mus. Earl. MS. 6102. 



228 HERALDIC COLLECTION 

Pedigbees op G-entby. 
Pedigrees of Families of Shropshire and Wales ; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 6153. 
Hugh Thomas's Collections for a " Genealogical History of the Nobility and 

Gentry of Wales;" Brit. Mus. Earl. MSS. 6823 ; 6831 ; 6870. 
Short Collections for a Feudal History of Wales; Be . Mus. Add. MS. 

4232. 
Numerous Pedigrees of Welsh Families, sixteenth to ighteenth century; 

Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 6915, f. 445 ; 9864—9867 ; 14,915—14,919; 

14,942; 15,041. 
Genealogies of the principal Families of Wales, in two vols. ; Beit. Mus. 

Add. MSS. 15,017; 15,018. 
A Collection of Welsh Pedigrees; Caius Coll. Cams. MS. 537, f. 211. 
Pedigrees of Welsh Families; Coll. op Arms, Vincent MSS. 135 — 137. 
Ancient Descents of Gentlemen in Wales ; Coll. of Arms, Vincent MS. 180. 
A short History of Wales, from a.d. 688 to a.d. 936, with some Genealogies 

and Epitaphs; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 3325. 
Arms and Descents of Welsh Families, temp. Hen. VII. ; Ashm. Lib. MS. 32. 
Copies of some Pedigrees in Fellows' Visitation of Wales in 1530 ; Coll. 

op Arms, MS. F. 9. 
Pedigrees from the Visitations of Wales, by Lewys Dwnn, edited by Sir 

Samuel K. Meyrick. 2 vols. 4to. Printed by the Welsh MSS. Society. 
Pedigrees of a few Welsh Families, compiled about 1587 ; Brit. Mus. Add. 

MS. 12,471. 
A Collection of Welsh Pedigrees, compiled circ. 1590; Brit. Mus. Add. 

MS. 18,114. 
Welsh and Anglo-Saxon Genealogies in Welsh, seventeenth cent. ; Beit. 

Mus. Add. MS. 19,761. 
Descent of divers Noble Houses springing from Wales, eighteenth cent. ; 

Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 14,914. 
List of Esquires in England and Wales; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 6804, 

art. 104. 
Willis's Collections for a History of Bangor ; Jesus Coll. Oxf MSS. cxv. ; 

cxvi. 
Collection of Welsh Pedigrees, chiefly of Families of Brecknockshire ; Brit. 

Mus. Earl. MS. 2289. 
Pedigrees of Families of Carnarvonshire ; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 2300. 
History of Glamorganshire, by Kice Merrick, 1578; Queen's Coll. Oxf. 

MS. cclxxxviii. Privately printed by Sir Thomas Phillipps, Bart. 
A full Description of the County of Pembroke, containing some curious 

matter; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 6250. 
Descents and Arms of Pembrokeshire Families ; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 6824. 
A Visitation of Pembrokeshire in 1671 ; Chetham Lib. MS. 6715. 
Observations on the Snowdon Mountains, with a Genealogical Account of 

the Penrhyn Families, by W. Williams. Lond. 1802. 8vo. 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 229 

County Histories ; Family Histories, etc. — Other sources of 
genealogical information are those laborious undertakings known as 
County Histories, of which many splendid specimens have been 
produced during the last and present centuries; and Family 
Histories, for the most part printed for private distribution by some 
member of the family interested therein. In submitting a list of 
these for the student's use, it may be proper to observe, that refer- 
ences to many local histories are given, on account of their con- 
taining much genealogical information, and that we have been 
induced to include in our list of Family Histories, references to 
many manuscript collections, and separate pedigrees, which have 
occurred to us in the course of reading. 

A brief notice of American Families will also be found towards 
the close of the present section. 

A very valuable collection of Records relating to the English 
Counties are in the "County Bags," at the Chapter House, 
Westminster. They will be found described in the Record Report 
for the year 1837, pp. 25—67. 



LIST OF THE PRINCIPAL COUNTY HISTORIES. 

Bedfordshire. 

Collections towards the History of Bedfordshire. See Nichols' " Bill, Top, 

Brit" Lond. 1783. 4to. Vol. iv. Nos. viii., xxix., xliv. 
Magna Britannia, by the Rev. D. Lysons, M.A. Lond. 1813. 4to. Vol. i. 
part i. contains Bedfordshire. The original MSS. are in the British 
Museum {Add. MSS. 9408; 9437; 9460). 

Pomfret and Warburton's MS. Collections for Bedfordshire are in the 
British Museum. (See Pedigrees or Gentry.) 

Berkshire. 

The Antiquities of Berkshire, by Elias Ashmole, Esq. 3 vols. Lond, 1723. 

8vo. — 2d ed. Reading, 1736. sm. folio, with a large Appendix. The 

original MS. is in the Ashmolean Library. 
Magna Britannia, by the Kev. D. Lysons, M.A. Lond. 1813. 4to. Vol. i. 

part ii., contains Berkshire. The original MSS. are in the British 

Museum (AM. MSS. 9409; 9410; 9438; 9460). 
History of the Hundred of Wanting, by W. Clarke. Oxford. 1824. 4to. 
Antiquities in Berkshire. See Nichols' "Bib!. Top. Brit." Lond. 1783. 4to. 

vol. iv. 



230 HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 

List of County Histoeies. 
Buckinghamshire. 
The History and Antiquities of Buckinghamshire, principally the Town of 

Buckingham, by Browne Willis, Esq. LL.D. Lond. 1755. 4to. 
Magna Britannia, by the Rev. D. Lysons, M.A. Lond. 1813. 4to. Vol. i. 
part ii., contains Buckinghamshire. The original MSS. are in the 
British Museum {Add. MSS. 9411; 9439; 9460). 
The History and Antiquities of Buckinghamshire, by Geo. Lipscombe. 4 vols. 

Lond. 1847. 4to. 
The History of the Hundred of Desborough and Deanery of Wycombe, by 
Thomas Langley, MA. Lond. 1797. 4to. 

Hare's valuable MS. Collections for this county are at the College 
of Arms. 

Cambridgeshire. 
The History of the County of Cambridge, by Edmund Carter. Comb. 1753. 

8vo. — New ed. by Upcott. Lond. 1819. 8vo. 
Magna Britannia, by the Bev. D. Lysons, M.A. Lond. 1808. 4to. Vol. ii. 
part i., contains Cambridgeshire. The original MSS. are in the Bri- 
tish Museum (Add. MSS. UU ; 9413; 9440; 9461). 
The History of the University of Cambridge. 2 parts. Lond. 1721. 8vo. 
Collectanea Cantabrigiensia, or Collections relating to the University, Town, 

and County, by Francis Blomefield. Norwich, 1750. 4to. 
The History of the University of Cambridge, by Edmund Carter. Lond. 

1753. 8vo. 
Memorabilia Cantabrigise, by Joseph Wilson, Esq. Lond. 1803. sm. 8vo. 
The History of the University and Colleges of Cambridge, by G. Dyer, B.A. 
2 vols. Lond. 1814. 8vo. and 4to. 

Cole's extensive MS. Collections for this county are in the British 

Museum. (See Pedigrees of Gentry.) 
Baker's Collections for the University of Cambridge, in 42 folio 
volumes, are deposited in the Library of St. John's Coll. Cam- 
bridge, and at the British Museum. An Index was printed 
by the Cambridge Antiquarian Society, in the year 1848, in 8vo. 

Cheshire. 
The Vale-Royall of England, or the County Palatine of Chester, illustrated 

by W. Smith and W. Webb. (Pub. byD. King.) Lond. 1656. sm. folio. 
Historical Antiquities, in Two Books, &c. ; the second containing particular 

remarks concerning Cheshire, by Sir Peter Leycester, Bart. Lond. 1673. 

folio. 
The History of Cheshire, containing King's " Vale-Eoyall," with considerable 

additions. Chester. 1778. 8vo. 
A Topographical Survey of the County of Chester, by William Tunuicliff. 

Nantwich. 1787. 8vo. 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 231 

List of County Histories. 
Magna Britannia, by the Rev. D. Lysons, M.A. Lond. 1810. 4to. Vol. ii. 
part ii., contains the County Palatine of Chester. The original MSS. 
are in the British Museum (Add. MSS. 9414 ; 9415 ; 9441—9443 ; 
9461). 
The History of Cheshire, by J. H. Hanshall. Chester, 1817- 4to. 
The History of the County Palatine and City of Chester, by George Ormerod. 

3 vols. Lond. 1819. Polio. 
The History of the Hundred of Wirrall, by W.W. Mortimer. Chester, 1847. 4to. 
A History of Chester, by J. Hemingway. 2 vols. Chester, 183]. 8vo. 
Miscellanea Palatina, consisting of Genealogical Essays, illustrative of Cheshire 
and Lancashire Families, by George Ormerod. 1851. 8vo. Privately 
printed. 
King's Vale-Royal of England, abridged by Thomas Hughes. 1852. 8vo. 
Cheshire and Lancashire Historical Collector, ed. by T. W. Barlow. 2 vols. 
1853-5. 8vo. 

A fund of valuable information relative to this county, will be found 
in Randle Holme's Collections in the British Museum, where 
also are deposited Foote Gower's Collections for the same county. 
(See Pedigrees of Gentry.) 

Cornwall. 

The Survey of Cornwall, by Richard Carew, Esq. Lond. 1602. 4to. 

A Topographical and Historical Description of Cornwall, by John Norden. 

Lond. 1728. 4to. 
Observations on the Antiquities of Cornwall, by William Borlase, M.A. 

Oxford, 1754. Folio.— 2d. ed. Lond. 1769. Polio. 
Carew's Survey of Cornwall, with Notes, first published from the original 

manuscripts, by Francis, Lord de Dunstanville. Lond. 1811. 4to. 
Magna Britannia, by the Bev. D. Lysons, M.A. Lond. 1814. 4to. Yol. iii. 

contains Cornwall. The original MSS. are in the British Museum 

(Add. MSS. 9416— 9420 ; 9444; 9445; 9462). 
The History of Cornwall, by the Bev. B. Polwhele. 7 vols. Lond. 1816. 4to. 
The Parochial History of Cornwall, by Davies Gilbert. 4 vols. Lond. 1817. 8vo. 
The Complete History of Cornwall. Part ii., being the Parochial History, 

by William Hals. Folio. Part i. was never printed. 
A Historical, Topographical, and Heraldical Survey of Cornwall, by 

C. S. Gilbert. 3 vols. Plymouth, 1817—20. 4to. 
A History of Cornwall, by F. Hitchins, ed. by S. Drew. 2 vols. Eelston, 

1824. 4to. 

Cumberland. 

The History of the Counties of Cumberland and Westmoreland, by Joseph 
Nicolson and Kich. Burn. 2 vols. Lond. 1777. 4to. 



232 HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 

List op Cottnty Histories. 
The History of Cumberland, by William Hutchinson, F.S.A. 2 vols. Carlisle, 

1794. 4to. 
Magna Britannia, by the Rev. D. Lysons, M.A. Loud. 1S16. 4to. Vol. iv. 

contains Cumberland. The original MSS. are in the British Museum 

{Add, MSS. 9421 ; 9422; 9446; 9447; 9462). 

Derbyshire. 
View of the Present State of Derbyshire, by James Pilkington. 2 vols. 

Derby, 1789. 8vo. 
The History of Derby, by W. Hutton, F.S.A. Lond. 1791. 8vo. 
A new Historical View of Derbyshire, by the Rev. D. P. Davies. Betyer, 

1811. 8vo. 
Magna Britannia, by the Rev. D. Lysons, M.A. Lond. 1816. 4to. Vol. v. 

contains Derbyshire. The original MSS. are in the British Museum 

{Add. MSS. 9423—9425 ; 9448 ; 9463). 
The Peak Guide, with Pedigrees, by S. Glover. Derby, 1830. 8vo. 
The History of the County of Derby, by S. Glover (ed. by T. Noble). 2 vols. 

Derby, 1831. 8vo and 4to. 
The History and Topography of the Hundreds of High Peak and Scarsdale, 

in the County of Derby, by Sam. Mitchell, Esq., of Sheffield. In pre- 
paration. 

Dr. Pegge's very valuable Collections for Derbyshire are in the Col- 
lege of Arms. A valuable Collection of Materials for a History 
of this County, by Adam Wolley, Esq., in 53 volumes, is deposited 
in the British Museum. (See Pedigrees of Gentry.) 
Devonshire. 
The Chorographical Survey of the County of Devon, by Tristram Bisdon, 

Gent. Lond. 1714. 8vo.— 2d. ed. Lond. 1811. 8vo. 
A Review of part of Risdon's Survey, by Will. Chappie. Exeter, 1785. 4to. 
Collections towards a Description of Devonshire, by Sir William Pole, Knt. 

Lond. 1791. 4to. 
The History of Devonshire, by the Rev. R. Polwhele. 3 vols. Exeter, 1797. 

Folio. 
Magna Britannia, by the Rev. D. Lysons, M.A. Lond. 1818. 4to. Vol. vi., 

2 parts, contains Devonshire. The original MSS. are in the British 

Mvsevu (Add. MSS. 9426— 9430; 9449; 9450; 9464). 
Westcote's Views of Devonshire in 1630, with a Pedigree of most of its 

Gentry, ed. by Oliver and Jones. Exeter, 1845. 4io. 

Dorsetshire. 
A Survey of Dorsetshire, with a Genealogical Account of three hundred of 

the principal Families, by the Rev. Mr. Coker. Lond. 1732. Folio. 
The History and Antiquities of Dorset, by John Hutchins, M.A. 2 vols. 

Lond. 1774. folio.— 2d. ed. 4 vols. Lond. 1796.— 1815. Folio. 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 233 

List of Counts Histobies. 
Durham. 
The History and Antiquities of Durham, by Will. Hutchinson, F.S.A. 3 vols. 

Newcastle, 1785. 4to. 
The History and Antiquities of Durham, by Robert Surtees. 4 vols. Lond. 

1816—1840. Polio. 
View of the County of Northumberland, and of those parts of the County of 
Durham north of the River Tyne, by E. Mackenzie. 2 vols. Newcast. 
1825. 4to.— 2d. ed. 
The History and Antiquities of North Durham, by the Rev. James Raine, M.A. 
2 parts. Lond. 1830-52. Polio. 
A valuable Collection of Papers relating to this county is deposited 
amongst the Allan MSS. at Durham Cathedral. 

Essex. 

The History of Essex, by N. Tindal. Lond, 4to. 

The History and Antiquities of Essex, by N. Salmon. Lond. 1740. Polio. 
The History and Antiquities of Essex, by Philip Morant, M.A. 2 vols. 

Lond. 1768. Folio. 
A New History of Essex, by a Gentleman (under the patronage of Peter 

Muilman, Esq.). 6 vols. Chelmsford, 1769. 8vo. 
The History of Essex, by Elizabeth Ogborne. Lond. 1814. 4to. 
The Environs of London, by the Rev. D. Lysons, M.A. Lond. 1796. Vol. iv. 

contains Essex. 
The History and Topography of the County of Essex, by T. Wright. 2 vols. 
1835. 4to. 
The MS. Collections of Jekyll, Powell, and Suckling, for this county, 
are in the library of the British Museum. (See Pedigrees op 
Gentry.) 

Gloucestershire. 
The Ancient and Present State of Gloucestershire, by Sir Robert Atkyns. 

Lond. 1712. Folio.— 2d. ed. Lond. 1768. Folio. 
A New History of Gloucestershire (by Rudder). Cirencester, 1779. Folio. 
The History and Antiquities of Gloucester Cirencester, 1781. 8vo. 
Historical, Monumental, and Genealogical Collections relative to the County 

of Gloucester, by Ralph Bigland, Esq. 2 vols. Lond. 1791. Folio. 
The History of the County of Gloucester, brought down to the year 1803, by 

the Rev. Thomas Rudge. 2 vols. Glouc. 1803. 8vo. 
Abstracts of Records and Manuscripts respecting the County of Gloucester, 

by T. D. Fosbrooke, F.A.S. 2 vols. Glouc. 1807. 4to. 

Hampshire. 
Collections for the History of Hampshire, by Richard Warner. 6 vols. Lond. 
[1795.] 4to. 



234 HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 

List of Cottnty Histobies. 
A History of Hampshire, by E. Mudie. 3 vols. Winchester, 1838. Koyal 8vo. 
The History of the Isle of Wight, by Sir Richard Worsley, Bart. Lond. 1781. 

4to. 
A new History of the Isle of Wight, with Genealogical Notices of the 
Inhabitants, is about to be published by Mr. George Hillier. Part i. 
has already appeared. 

Suckling's MS. Collections for Hampshire are in the British 
Museum. (See Pedigrees of Gentry.) 

Herefordshire. 
Collections concerning the Manor of Marden, by the Earl of Coningsby. 

1722—27. Folio. Privately printed. 
Introductory Sketches towards a History of the County of Hereford, by the 

Eev. J. Lodge, B.A. Kington, 1793. 8vo. 
Collections towards the History and Antiquities of the County of Hereford, 

by John Duncumb, M.A. 2 vols. Eeref. 1804. 4to. 
The Heraldry of Herefordshire, by G. Strong. Lond. 1848. Eoyal 4to. 

Hertfordshire. 

The Historical Antiquities of Hertfordshire, by Sir Henry Chauncy, Knt. 
Lond. 1700. Folio.— 2d ed. 2 vols. Bishops Stortford, 1836. 8vo. A 
copy of this work, with numerous MS. additions by Thomas Basker- 
field, Esq., is in the library of the British Museum {Add. MSS. 9062 
—9064). 

The History of Hertfordshire, by N. Salmon. Lond. 1728. Folio. 

The History and Antiquities of the County of Hertford, by Eobert Clutter- 
buck, Esq. 3 vols. Lond. 1815—1827. Folio. 

The Environs of London, by the Eev. D. Lysons, M.A. Lond. 1796. Vol. iv. 
contains Hertfordshire. 

Huntingdonshire. 
There has been no general History of this County printed. 

Kent. 
The History of Kent, by John Harris. Lond. 1719. Folio. 
Kent Surveyed and Illustrated, by Thomas Philipot. Lond. 1659. Folio.— 

2d edit, with index. Lynn, 1776. Folio. 
The History and Topographical Survey of Kent, by Edward Hasted, Esq. 

4 vols. Cant. 1778. Folio.— 2d ed. 12 vols. Cant. 1797. 8vo. 
The Environs of London, by the Eev. D, Lysons, MA. Lond. 1796. Vol.iv. 

contains Kent. 
Antiquities in the County of Kent. See Nichols' " Bibl. Top. Brit." vol. i. 
A New History of Kent, by A. J. Dunkin, of Dartford, is in course of 

publication. 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 235 

List of County Histories. 

Hasted's MS. Collections for Kent, in 62 vols, are in the Biutish 
Museum ; as also a small collection, by William Alexander, Esq., 
in 3 vols, folio. Philipot's Collections are amongst the Lansdowne 
MSS. in the same repository. (See Pedigrees of Gentry.*) 
Collections by W. Somner, are in the Cathedral Library at 
Canterbury. Dr. John Thorpe's valuable Collections are in the 
library of the Society op Antiquaries. 

Lancashire. 
A Topographical Survey of the County of Lancaster, by William Tunnicliff. 

Nantwich, 1787. 8vo. 
A Portfolio of Fragments relative to the History of the County of Lancaster, 

by M. Gregson. Liverpool, 1817 . Folio. 
The History of Liverpool, by W. Enfield. Lond. 1774. Folio. 
Liverpool from 1775 to 1800, by E. Brooke. Liverpool, 1853. Boy. 8vo. 
The History of Lancashire, by J. Corry. 2 vols. Lond. 1825. 4to. 
The History of the County Palatine and Duchy of Lancaster, by Edw. Baines. 

4 vols. Lond. 1836. 4to. 
Miscellanea Palatina, consisting of Genealogical Essays illustrative of Cheshire 
and Lancashire Families, by George Ormerod. 1851. 8vo. Privately 
printed. 
The History of the Parish of Whalley, in the County of Lancaster, by 

T. D. Whitaker. Lond. 1806. royal 4to.— 2d ed. Lond. 1818. 4to. 
Eemains, Historical and Literary, connected with the Counties of Lancaster 
and Chester, published by the Chetham Society, 4to, vols. i. — xxxvi. 
Dr. Cuerden's Lancashire Collections are partly deposited in the 
Chetham Library at Manchester, and partly in the College of 
Arms. A valuable collection for Cheshire and Lancashire, by 
Eandle Holme, forms part of the Harleian Library at the British 
Museum. (See Pedigrees of Gentry.) 

Leicestershire. 
The Description of Leicestershire, by Will. Burton, Esq. Lond. 1622. Folio. 

— 2d ed. Lynn, 1777. Folio. A copy of this work, with large additions 

to the pedigrees, by E. Gascoigne, is in the Library of Jesus College, 

Cambridge. Another copy, with additional notes, by Edw.Yernon,D.D., 

is in the British Museum (Add. MS. 10,126.) 
The Memoirs of the Town and County of Leicester, by John Throsby. 6 vols. 

Leic. 1777. 12mo. 
Select Views of Leicestershire, accompanied by Historical Eelations, by 

J. Throsby. 2 vols. Leic. 1789. 4to. 
Collections towards the History of Leicestershire, by John Nichols. Lond. 

1790. 4to. See Nichols' " Bibl. Top. Brit" vols. vii. andviii., Nos. 50 

and 51. 



236 HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 

List of Cot/kty Histobies. 
The History and Antiquities of the County of Leicester, by John Nichols. 

4 vols, in 8. Lond. 1795. Folio. 
The History and Antiquities of Aston Flamville, etc., with Genealogical 

Notices of the County at large. See Nichols* "Bibl. Top. Brit." vol. vii. 

No. 43. 

Lincolnshire. 
Antiquarian Annals of Stamford, by the Rev. Francis Peck. Lond. 1727. Fol. 
Antiquities in Lincolnshire. See Nichols* " Bill. Top. Brit." vol. iii. 
The History of the County of Lincoln, by T. Allen. 2 vols. Lond. and Line, 

1834. 4to. 
The History and Topography of the Isle of Axholme, by the Rev. W. B. 
Stonehouse. Lond. 1839. 4to. 

Some valuable collections for this county, by Gervase Holies, Esq., 
are deposited with the Lansdowne MSS. in the British Museum. 
(See Pedigrees op Gentry.) 

London. 

A Survey of London and Westminster, and the Borough of Southwark, by 
John Stow, edited by Strype. Lond. 1754. Folio. 6th ed. 

The History of London, from its foundation to the present time, by Will. 
Maitland, F.E.S. 2 vols. Lond. 1772. Folio. 

The History of London, by T. Pennant. Lond. 1793. 4to. A copious Index, 
by Thos. Downes. Lond. 1814. 4to. A fine copy, in 14 vols, folio, 
profusely illustrated by J. C. Crowle, Esq., is in the Print Room of the 
British Museum. There is an excellent index to the collection. 

The Environs of London, by the Rev. Daniel Lysons, M.A. 4 vols. Lond. 
1796. 4to.— Supplement. Lond. 1811. 4to.— 2d ed. Lond. 1811. 4to. 
4 parts. The original MSS. are in the British Museum {Add. MSS. 
9451—9455). 

Londinium Redivivum; or, a Modern Description of London, by J. P. Mal- 
colm. 4 vols. Lond. 1803. 4to. 

Middlesex. 

The Antiquities of Middlesex, being a Collection of several Church Monu- 
ments in that County (by Sir John Bowack). Lond. 1705. Folio. 

Antiquities in Middlesex and Surrey. See Nichols' "BM. Top. Brit." vol. ii. 

The Environs of London, by the Rev. D. Lysons, M.A. Lond. 1795. Vols. ii. 
and iii. contain Middlesex. 

An Account of those Parishes in the County of Middlesex not described in 
the " Environs of London" by the Rev. D. Lysons, M.A. Lond. 1800. 
4to. The original MSS. are in the British Museum {Add. MSS. 
9451—9455; 9459. (Correspondence, 9431— 9433). 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 237 

List of County Histories. 
Monmouthshire. 
The History of Monmouthshire, by David Williams. Lond. 1796. 4to. 
Historical Tour in Monmouthshire, by William Coxe, M.A. 2 parts. Lond. 
1801. 4to. 

Norfolk. 

Topographical History of the County of Norfolk, by Francis Blomefield. 5 

vols. Fersf. 1739. Folio.— 2d. ed. 11 vols. Lond. 1805. Royal 8vo. 
History and Antiquities of the County of Norfolk. 10 vols. Norwich, 1781. 
8vo. 

The Manuscript Collections of Gibbons, Le Neve, Craven Ord, and 
Suckling, for this County, are in the British Museum. (See 
Pedigrees of Gentry.) 

Northamptonshire. 

The History and Antiquities of Northamptonshire, by the Rev. Peter Whalley. 

2 vols. Oxford, 1791. Polio. 
The History of the County of Northampton, by George Baker. 2 vols. Lond. 

1822—1841. Folio. 

Northumberland . 

A Yiew of Northumberland, by W. Hutchinson. 2 vols. Newcast. 1778. 4to. 
The History of the Town and County of the Town of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, 

by John Brand, M.A. 2 vols. Lond. 1789. 4to. 
A Historical View of the County of Northumberland. 2 vols. Newcast. 1811. 

8vo. 
A History of Northumberland, by J. Hodgson. 6 vols. Newcast. 1820 — 

1840. 4to. Not yet completed. 
Yiew of the County of Northumberland, and of those parts of the County of 

Durham north of the River Tyne, by E. Mackenzie. Newcast. 1825. 

4to.— 2d. ed. 
A Historical Account of the Town and County of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, 

including the Borough of Gateshead, by E.Mackenzie. 2 vols. Newcast. 

1827. 4to. 

Nottinghamshire. 

The Antiquities of Nottinghamshire, by Robert Thoroton. Lond. 1677. Folio. 
Historical Account of the Town of Nottingham, by C. Deering. Nottingham, 

1751. 4to. 
Thoroton's History of Nottinghamshire, republished by John Throsby. 3 

vols. Lond. 1790. 4to. 
Antiquities, Historical and Itinerary, in Nottinghamshire and the adjacent 

Counties, by William Dickinson, Esq. 3 parts. Newark, 1801. 4to. 



238 HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 

List of Countx Histobies. 
oxfordshire. 
The Natural History of Oxfordshire, by Robert Plot. Oxford, 1677. Folio. 

—2d. ed. enlarged. Oxford, 1705. Folio. 
Parochial Antiquities attempted in the History of Ambrosden, Burcester, and 
other Parts of the Counties of Oxford and Bucks, by White Kennet. 
Oxford, 1695. 4to. — new ed. with additions, by the Kev. B. Bandinel, 
D.D. 2 vols. Oxford, 1818. 4to. 
The Ancient and Present State of the City of Oxford, by Anthony a Wood. 

ed. by Sir J. Peshall. Lond. 1773. 4to. 
The History and Antiquities of the University of.Oxford, by Anthony a Wood, 
edited by Gutch. Oxf. 1786.— Appendix. Oxf. 1790.— New ed. 2 vols. 
Oxf 1792—1796. 4to. 
The History and Antiquities of the Hundreds of Bullington and Ploughley, 

by J. Dunkin. 2 vols. Lond. 1823. 4to. 
Parochial Collections for the County of Oxford. Uvesham, 1825. Folio. 
Privately printed by Sir Thomas Phillipps, Bart. 

Anthony a Wood's very valuable Collections for Oxfordshire are 
preserved in the Ashmolean Library. A Catalogue of these 
collections was printed by William Huddesford, M.A., at Oxford, 
in 1761. 

Rutlandshire. 

The History of the County of Rutland, by James Wright. Lond. 1684. 

Folio. — Additions. Lond. 1687. — Further additions (8 pages). Lond. 

1714. — New ed. by W. Harrod. Only 2 parts printed. 
The History of the County of Rutland, by Thomas Blore, F.S.A. Stamford, 

1811. Royal folio. Part ii. All printed. 

Shropshire. 

Antiquities of Shropshire, by the Rev. R. W. Eyton. Vols. i. — iii. Lond. 

1853 — 56. Royal 8vo. In progress. 
Documents connected with the History of Ludlow and the Lords Marchers of 

the Welsh Borders, by the Hon. R. H. Clive. Lond. 1841. Imp. 8vo. 
The History of Ludlow and its Neighbourhood, by T. Wright. Lond. 1843. 

8vo. 
The History of Shrewsbury, by Archdeacon Owen and the Rev. J. B. Blakeway. 

2 vols. Lond. 1825. 4to. 
The Sheriffs of Shropshire, with their Armorial Bearings, and Notices, Genea- 
logical and Topographical, by the Rev. J. B. Blakeway. Shrewsbury, 

1831. Folio. 
Antiquities of Shropshire, by E. Lloyd, revised and enlarged by T. F. Dukes. 

Shrewsbury, 1 844. 4to. 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS 239 

List of County Histoeies. 
Somersetshire. 
A compleat History of Somersetshire. Sherborne, 1742. Folio. 
The History and Antiquities of the County of Somerset, by the Eev. John 

Collinson. 3 vols. Bath, 1791. 4to. 
Delineations of the North-Western Division of Somersetshire, by T. Kutter. 

Lond. 1829. 8vo. 
A History of Somersetshire, by the Eev. W. Phelps. Lond. 1839. 4to. Parts i. 

to viii. 
Memoirs of Bristol, by the Kev. S. Seyer. 2 vols. Bristol, 1821. 4to. 
The History of the Hundred of Cariiampton, by W. Savage. Bristol, 1830. 

8vo. 
A History of Glastonbury, by the Eev. E. Warner. Bath, 1826. 4to. 

Staffordshire. 

The Natural History of Staffordshire, by Eobert Plot. Lond. 1686. Polio. 
A Survey of Staffordshire, by Sampson Erdeswicke, Esq. Lond. 1717. 

8vo. — New ed., by the Eev. T. Harwood. Lond. 1844. Eoyal 8vo. 
A Topographical Survey of the County of Stafford, by William Tunnicliff. 

Nantwich, 1787- 8vo. 
The History and Antiquities of Staffordshire, by the Eev. Stebbing Shaw, 

B.D. 2 vols. Lond. 1798. Folio. 
The History and Antiquities of Lichfield, by the Eev. T. Harwood. Glou- 
cester, 1806. 4to. 
The History of Shenstone, in the County of Stafford, with the Pedigrees of 

all the Families in that Parish. See Nichols' "Bibl. Top. Brit," vol. ix. 

No. 4. 
A Topographical and Historical Description of the Parish of Tixall, in the 

County of Stafford, by Sir Thomas Clifford, Bart. Paris, 1817. 4to. 

Privately printed. 

Suffolk. 

A History of Hawsted and Hardwick, by Sir John Cullum. Lond. 1813. 4to. 

The History of Hengrave, in Suffolk, by J. Gage. Lond. 1822. 4to. 

The History of Suffolk (Thingoe Hundred), by J. Gage. Lond. 1838. 

Eoyal 4to. 
A History of the County of Suffolk, by the Eev. A. Suckling. 2 vols. Lond. 
1846. Folio. 

Very valuable manuscript collections for this county, by D. E. Davy, 
Esq., and H. Jermyn, Esq., are deposited amongst the Additional 
MSS. in the British Museum. Minor collections by Craven Ord, 
Gibbons, and Suckling, are in the same library. (See Pedigrees 
of Gentry.) 



240 HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 

List op County Histobies. 
Surrey. 
The History of the County of Surrey, by John Aubrey. 5 vols. Lond. 

1719. 8vo. 
The History of the County of Surrey, by the B>ev. Owen Manning, continued 

by William Bray, Esq. 3 vols. Lond. 1804. Folio. 
A Topographical History of Surrey, by W. Brayley and J. Britton. 5 vols. 

Lond. 1841—1846. 4to. and 8vo. 
Antiquities of Surrey and Middlesex. See Nichols' "Bill. Top. Brit." 

vol. ii. 
The Environs of London, by the Rev. D. Lysons, M.A. Lond. 1792. Vol. i. 
contains Surrey. The original MSS. are in the British Museum 
(Add. MSS. 9436 ; 9457 ; 9459). 

In the same Library are deposited small collections for this county, 
by Suckling and Symmes. (See Pedigrees of Gentry.) 

Sussex. 
A History of the Western Division of the County of Sussex, by James Dal- 
laway, B.M. Vols. i. and ii., part i. Lond. 1815. — 1819. 4to. — Con- 
tinued by Ed. Cartwright. Vol. ii. part ii. Lond. 1830. 
The History, Antiquities, and Topography of the County of Sussex, by 

T. W. Horsfield. 2 vols. Lewes, 1835. 4to. 
Sussex Archaeological Collections, illustrating the History and Antiquities of 
the County. Published by the Sussex Archaeological Society. Vols. i. 
— viii. Lond. 1848—56. 
The History of Lewes, by the Kev. T. W. Horsfield. Lewes, 1824. 4to. 
History of the Town and Port of Eye, by W.Holloway. 2vols. Lond. 1847. 8vo. 
The History of Winchelsea, by W. J). Cooper. Lond. 1850. 8vo. 

Sir William BurrelTs fine Collections for Sussex are in the British 
Museum. Hayley's Manuscripts in the same Library, form an 
excellent supplement to the preceding collection. (See Pedigrees 
op Gentry.) 

Warwickshire. 

The Antiquities of Warwickshire, by William Dugdale. Lond. 1656. Folio. — 
2d ed. {Thomas). 2 vols. Lond. 1730. Folio.— 3d ed. Coventry, 1765, 
Folio. 

Westmoreland. 

The History of the Counties of Westmoreland and Cumberland, by Joseph 
Nicolson, Esq., and Richard Burn, LL.D. 2 vols. Lond. 1777. 4to. 

Wiltshire. 

A Tour in quest of Genealogy through several parts of Wales, Somersetshire, 
and Wiltshire, by a Barrister. Lond. 1811. 8vo. 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 241 

List of County Histories. 
History of Modern Wiltshire, by Sir Eichard Colt Hoare, and others. 6 vols. 

Lond. 1822—1826. Folio. 
History of Castle Combe, Co. Wilts, by G. P. Scrope. , 1852. 4to. 

Privately printed. 
Aubrey's Collections for Wiltshire. 2 vols. Salisb. 1819— 1838. 4to. Privately 

printed by Sir Thomas PhilKpps, Bart. This volume contains a collection 

of inscriptions from monuments, &c, in the churches of Wiltshire. 
History of the Town of Marlborough, and more generally of the entire Hun- 
dred of Selkley, by James Waylen. Lond. 1854. 8vo. 
Worcestershire. 
Collections for a History of Worcestershire, by the Eev. Tread way Nash, D.D. 

2 vols. Lond. 1781. Folio. 
History and Antiquities of Worcester, by V. Green. 2 vols. Worcester, 

1796. 4to. 
History of Evesham, by W. Tindal. Evesham, 1794. 4to. 

Habington's manuscript collections for this county are deposited in the 
library of the Society of Antiquaries, and in that of Jesus 
College, Oxford. (See Pedigrees of Gentry.) 
Yorkshire. 
History of the County of York, by John Allen. 6 vols. Lond. 1832. 8vo. — 

Also in 3 vols. 4to. 
The History and Antiquities of Beverley, by Geo. Oliver. Beverley, 1829. 4to. 
Beverlac ; or the Antiquities and History of Beverley, by George Poulson. 

2 vols. Lond. 1829. 
The History of Cleveland, Co. York, with the Origin and Genealogy of the 

principal Families within the district, by the Kev. John Graves. Carlisle, 

1808. 4to. 
The History and Antiquities of Cleveland, Co. York, by J. W. Ord. Lond. 

1846. 4to. 
The History of the Deanerv of Craven, Co. York, by the Eev. T. D. Whitaker. 

Lond. 1812. Eoyal 4to. 2d ed. 
The History and Topography of the Deanery of Doncaster, Co. York, by tht 

Eev. J. Hunter. 2 vols. Lond. 1828. Folio. 
History of Halifax, by the Eev. John Watson. Lond. 1775. 4to. 
History and Antiquities of Hallamshire, by the Eev. J. Hunter. Lond. 1819. 

Folio. 
The History and Antiquities of Holderness, Co. York, by Geo. Poulson. 

2 vols. Hull, 1840. 4to. 
History of Kingston-upon-Hull, by the Eev. John Tickell. Hull, 1796. 4to. 
The Topography of the Town and Parish of Leedes, with Pedigrees of the 

Nobility and Gentry, by Ealph Thoresby. Lond. 1715. Folio.— 2d ed. 

enlarged, with Loidis and Elmete, embracing Aredale, Wharfdale, and 

theVale of Calder, by the Efiv.T.D. Whitaker. 2 vols. Leeds, 1816. Folia 

16 



242 HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 

List op County Histoeies. 
Registrum Honoris de Richmond, cura Eogeri Gale. Lond. 1722. Folio. 
History of Kichmond, by Chr. Clarkson. Richmond, 1821. 4to. 
A History of Richmondshire in the Co. of York, by the Rev. T. D. Whitaker. 

2 vols. Lond. 1823. Folio. 
Richmondshire, its ancient Lords and Edifices, with short Notices of memo- 
rable Men, by W. H. Longstaffe. London and Richmond, 1852. 8vo. 
History of the Wapentake of Strafford and Tickhill, by John Wainwright. 

Sheffield, 1%%%. 4to. 
History of the Parish of Whalley and Honor of Clitheroe, by the Rev. T. D. 

Whitaker. Lond. 1806. Royal 4to.— 2d ed. Lond. 1818. Royal 4to. 
The History of Whitby, with the Original and Antiquity of many particular 

Families in Yorkshire, by Lionel Charlton. Fork, 1779. 4to. 
Eboracum ; or the History of the City of York, by the Rev. F. Drake. Lond. 

1736. Folio. 



LIST OF FAMILY HISTORIES, PEERAGE CLAIMS, 

ETC. ETC. 

Note, — As numerous references to Manuscript Pedigrees will be found in the follow- 
ing List, it may be as well to observe, that such Pedigrees are not mere out- 
lines, occupying only a few pages, but separate volumes or rolls, in many cases 
drawn up with very great care, and as such deemed worthy of notice here. 
Other references to Printed Works, not coming strictly under the head of 
Family Histories, are given on account of the important genealogical informa- 
tion to be found therein. 

In the references to Peerage Claims, the figures placed at the end of the Titles 
in parentheses, refer to the number at the bottom of each Pill, Paper, or ^Report. 

Abergavenny, Barony of, see Neville. 

Aboyne — Claim of George, Earl of Aboyne, to the title of Marquess of 

Huntly, &c. See Sess. Papers (197 of 1838). 
Adkin — Pedigree of Adkin, sixteenth cent.; Brit. Mtjs. Add. MS. 16,596. 
Ailsa, Marquess of, see Kennedy. 
Airlie, Peerage of see Ogilvy. 
Airth — Airth Papers. Lond. 1839. Privately printed by H. Gurney, Esq., 

in reference to the claim of Robert B. Allardice, of Urie, Esq., to the 

Earldom of Airth and Monteith. 

see Allardice ; Strathern. 

Aldborough, Earl of see Stratford. 

Alexander — Claim of William Alexander to the Earldom of Stirling. See 

Sess. Papers (May, 1760— Mar. 1762). 
Allan — Parentalia Memoranda : Lineage of the Allans of Staffordshire, 

Hyltons of Westmoreland, Clervaux and Chator Families of Croft in 

Richmondshire, by W. Hylton Longstaffe, Esq. Newcastle-upon-Tyne , 

1852. Royal 8vo. Privately printed. 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 243 

List of Family Histories. 

Allan (continued). Wills of several members of the Family of Allan of Dar- 
lington. Privately printed at the Darlington Press, in 4to. 

Allardice — Claim of Kobert B. Allardice, Esq., to be the Earl of Airth. 
See Sess. Papers (162 of 1839). 

Alno, or De Alneto — Succinct Genealogies of the Ancient Houses of Alno, 
or, De Alneto, Broe of Shephale, Latimer of Duntish, Drayton of Dray- 
ton, Mauduit of Werminster, Greene of Drayton, Vere of Addington, 
Fitz-Lewes of West Hornedon, Howard of Effingham, and Mordaunt of 
Turvey, by Rob. Halstead. Lond. 1685. Folio. Privately printed. 1 

Anderson — Descent of the Family of Anderson of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, 
a.d. 1592. veil. roll. Society of Antiquaries, MS. 5. 

ANGLESEA,^ar^Omo/,seeANNESLEY;MoUNTNORRIS;MULGRAVE;VALENTIA. 

Angus, House of, see Douglas ; Hamilton. 

Annandale, Peerage of, see Hopetoun; Johnstone. 

Annesley — -Claim of James Annesley, Esq., to the Earldom of Anglesea, 

before the Irish Court of Exchequer, 1743. Newcastle-on-Tyne, 1744. 

Folio. 
Claim of William Richard, Earl of Annesley, to vote at Elections 

of Irish Peers. See Sess. Papers (K. of 1855). 
Anson — Pedigree of the Eight Hon. Thomas Anson, Viscount Anson, of 

Shugborough, in Co. Staff. Lond. 1806. Folio. Three folded tables, 

privately printed. 
Genealogical Tables of the Family of the Eight Hon. Viscount 

Anson, Baron Soberton. n.d. Folio. Privately engraved. 
Anstrutheb — Claim of Dame Ann Paterson Anstruther to the title of 

Baroness Polewart or Polwarth. See Sess. Papers (101 of 1818). 
Arden — Pedigree of the Noble Family of Arden. See Drummond's " History 

of Noble British Families," parts i. and ii. 
Argyle — The Life of John Duke of Argyle and Greenwich ; containing a 

Genealogical Account of His Grace's Family and Ancestors, by Eob. 

Campbell, Esq. Lond. 1745. 8to. 
Papers relating, to the Argyle Family, edited byMaidment. 1834. 

4to. Only 50 copies printed. 
Armin, Family of, see St. Medakd. 
Arundel — Notices of the Family of Arundel of Aynho. See Nichols' "Top. 

and Gen" vol. ii., pp. 312—339; vol. iii., p. 240. 

Earl of, see Howard. 

Ashburnham — Pedigree of the Noble Family of Ashburnham. See Drum- 
mond's "History of Noble British Families" parts i. and ii. 
Ashtown, Baron, see Trench. 

1 The real author of this very rare work, of which, it is said, there were but twenty- 
four copies printed, was the second Earl of Peterborough, with the aid of his chaplain, 
the Rev. Mr. Rous. 



244 HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 

List op Family Histories, etc. 

Astley — Claims of Sir Jacob Astley, Bart., and of Henry le Strange Style- 
man le Strange, Esq., to be coheirs to the title of Baron Hastings. See 
Sess. Tapers (211 of 1840 ; 55 of 1841). 

Athenry, Peerage of, see Birmingham ; Sewell. 

Atholl — The Case of the Duke of Atholl, claiming the Barony of Strange. 
[1736.] Folio. With a Pedigree. 

• Claim of the Duke of Atholl to the Barony of Strange. See Sess. 

Papers (Feb. Mar. 1726). 

See Murray. 



Babington — Pedigree of the Family of Babington. See Nichols's "Collect. 

Top. et Gen." vol. viii. p. 313. 
Badlesmere — Memoirs of the Family of Badlesmere. See Scrope's "History 

of Castle Cornier 1852. 4to. 
Bagot— Memorials of the Bagot Family. Bbythfield, 1824. 4to. Privately 

printed. 
Balcarres, House of, see Crawfurd. 
Balguy — A Pedigree of the Family of Balguy, and their alliances ; Brit. 

Mtjs. Add. MS. 21,185. 
Balmerino, Lord, see Kilmarnock. 
Bamfield — Excerpta e cartis, et stemma Familiae de Bamfield. Privately 

printed by Sir Thomas Phillipps, Bart., in his " Topographer" No. 1, 

for March, 1821. 8vo. 
Banbury — Proceedings relating to the case of the Earl of Banbury. See 

Sess. Papers (July 1660— Feb. 1697). 

—The true Countess of Banbury's case. Lond. 1696. Folio. 

The Arguments in the controverted point of Peerage in the case 

of Charles Knowles, otherwise Earl of Banbury. Lond. 1716. Folio. 

-Claim of the Earls of Banbury to that Earldom. See Sess. Papers 



(14,48, 87, 126, of 1808; 20 of 1809; 64 of 1810; 11, 33, of 1811; 
111 of 1812). 

-Law of Adulterine Bastardy, with Report of the Claim of the 



Earldom of Banbury, by Sir N. H. Nicolas. Lond. 1836. 8vo. 
Bantry — Claim of the Right Hon. Richard, Earl of Bantry, and Viscount 

Blarhaven, to vote at Elections of Irish Peers. See Sess. Papers (216 of 

1851). 
Barclay — A Genealogical Account of the Barclays of Urie, formerly of 

Mather, by R. Barclay. Aberdeen, 1740. 8vo. Privately printed. 

Genealogical Account of the Barclays of Urie. 1812. 8vo. 

Barnard — Genealogical Account of the Barnard Family. 1816. Privately 

printed. 
Barnewall — Claim of Matthew Barnewall, Esq., to be Yiscount Barnewall 

of Kingsland and Baron of Turvey. See Sess. Papers (44 of 1812; 

27 of 1812-13; 61 of 1813-14). 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 245 

List op Family Histories, etc. 

Barry — Claim of James R. Barry to vote at Elections of Irish Peers as Vi?ct. 
Buttevant. See Sess. Papers (215 of 1825). 

Basset — Historical Descent of the Family of Basset of Welledone ; Brit. 
Mus. Sari. MS. 6152. 

Beatson — Genealogical History of the Family of Beatson, by Alex. John 
Beatson, Esq. Edinb. 1854. Privately printed. 

Beatjchamp — History of the Earls of Warwick, with their Arms embla- 
zoned, and Portraits of them neatly painted in water colours, ascribed to 
John Rouse; Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 882. 

. — Notes relating to the Beauchamp Family, from the Conquest 

to Hen. VIII. ; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 4451. 

-Rouse's " History of the Earls of Warwick," beautifully copied 



by Dugdale; Ashm. Lib. MS. 839, art. 1. 
Beaumont, Barony of see Stapleton. 
Bedford, Duke of, see Russell. 
Bedingfield — Claim of Sir Henry P. Bedingfield of Oxborough, Co. Norf., 

Bart., to the Barony of Grundison. See to*. Papers (82 of 1854 ; B. of 

1855). 
Belhaven, Lord, see Hamilton. 
Berkeley — Claim of N. Berkeley, Esq., to the Barony of Botetourt. See 

Sess. Papers (Dec. 1763— Apr. 1764). 
■ — Claim of William Fitzhardinge Berkeley to be Earl of Berkeley. 

See Sess. Papers (May, 1799— June, 1802; 14, 16, of 1811; 115 of 

1829). 

-Evidence respecting the Claim to the Berkeley Peerage. Lond. 



1811. 8vo. 
Address to the Peers of the United Kingdom, by Mary, Countess 

of Berkeley. Lond. 1811. 8vo. 
The B******y Family, a Narrative, by Mary Tudor, Sister-in- 
law to the Countess. Lond. . 8vo. 

. ,_^ Abstracts of Smith's "Lives of the Berkeley s" by T. D. Fosbrooke. 

Lond. 1821. 4to. 
Pedigree of the Berkeleys of Camden ; Coll. oe Arms, PMUpot 

MS. 9, Pd. 
Berners, Barony of see Bokenham ; Wilson. 
Bertie — Memoir of Peregrine, 11th Lord Willoughby D'Eresby. Lond. 

1828. 8vo. 
Five Generations of a Loyal House. Part i., containing the Lives 

of Richard Bertie and his Son Peregrine, Lord Willoughby ; by Lady 

Georgina Bertie. Lond. 1845. sm. 4to. 
Birmingham — Claim of John Birmingham, of Dalgin, Esq., to the Barons 

of Athenry. See Sess. Papers (17, 269, of 1836). 



246 HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 

List op Family Histories, etc. 
Birnie — Account of the Families of Birnie and Hamilton of Bromhill, 

edited by W. B. D. D. Turnbull. Edinburgh, 1838. Only 60 copies 

printed. 
Bisshopp — Minutes of Evidence relative to the Claims of Sir Cecil Bisshopp, 

Bart., of Parham Park, to the title of Baron Zouche. See Sess. Papers, 

vol. viii., 259. 
Blackett — Memoirs of the Life of Sir Walter Blackett, Bart., with Pedigree 

of the Calverleys of Calverley in Yorkshire, and the Blacketts of New- 
castle-upon-Tyne and Northumberland. Newcastle, 1819. 12mo. 
Obsequies of certain of the Family of Blackett of Newcastle. 

Newcastle, 1846. 12mo. 
Blackwood — Claim of the Et. Hon. Frederick Temple Blackwood, Baron 

Dufferin and Claneboye, to vote at Elections of Irish Peers. See Sess. 

Papers (245 of 1848). 
Bland — Collections for a History of the Ancient Family of Bland, by N. 

Carlisle. Lond. 1826. 4to. Privately printed. 
Blodwell, or Bladwell — The Genealogy of the Family of Blodwell, or 

BladweU, a.d. 1754; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 14,393. 
Bloomfield, Baron, see Douglas. 
Blount — Collections for a History of the Ancient Family of Blount. Lond. 

1826. 4to. Privately printed. 
Bode — The Pedigree of John Bode of Rayley, Co. Essex, to 1617; Brit. 

Mus. Add. MS. 15,565. 
Bohun — Descent of the Family of Bohun of Fressingfield, &c. See "The 

Diary of Edm. Bohun/ 9 edited by S. W. Eix. Beccles, 1853. 4to. Pri- 
vately printed. 
Bokenham— Abstract of Eecords, &c, to prove the Claims and Title of 

Katherine, wife of Richard Bokenham of Weston-Mercate, Co. Suffolk, 

to the Barony of Berners. 1717. Folio, pp. 55. 
■ Claim of Mrs. Bokenham to the Barony of Berners. See Seas. 

Papers (March— June, 1720). 
Bolle — Anecdotes of the Family of Bolle. See Ulingworth's "Account of 

Scampton" 1810. 4to. 
Borthwick — Claim of Henry Borthwick to the title of Lord Borthwick. 

See Sess. Papers (Jan. — Apr. 1762). 
Claim of John Borthwick, Esq., to the title of Lord Borthwick, 

See Sess. Papers (Feb. 1774— Nov. 1776). 

-Claim of Archibald Borthwick, Esq., to the title of Lord Borth- 



wick. See Sess. Papers (83 of 1812; 26 of 1812-13; 77 of 1813-14; 
49 of 1814— 15). 
Bosville — Genealogical Tables of the Bosville Family. See Baverstock's 
" Account of Maidstone' 3 1832. 8vo. 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 247 

List of Family Histories, etc. 
Botetourt, Barony of, see Berkeley. 
Botfield — Stemmata Botevilleiana : Memorials of the Family of Botfield. 

Norton Hall, 1843. 8vo. Privately printed. 
Bowes — Claim of the Et. Hon. Thomas Bowes to be Earl of Strathmore. 

See Sess. Papers (39 of 1821). 
Boyle — Memorials of the Illustrious Family of Boyle, particularly of Charles, 

Earl of Orrery, by E. Budgell. 1732. 8vo. 
Papers relating to the Family of Boyle, 1598 — 1640; Bkit.Mus. 

Add. MS. 19,832. 
Boyne — Claim of Gustavus Frederic, Viscount Boyne, to vote at Elections 

of Irish Peers. See Sess. Papers (0. of 1855). 
Boys — A Pedigree of the Family of Boys, by W. Boys and W. Boteler. 

Printed on a large sheet for private distribution. 
Brabazon — Genealogical History of the Family of Brabazon, edited by H. 

Sharpe. Paris, 1825. 4to. Privately printed. 
Brandon — Copies of various Papers, &c, relating to the Peerages of 

Brandon and Dover, n.d. {cite. 1769.) 4to. pp. 30. Privately printed 

at the expense of the Duke of Hamilton. 
Braose — The Families of Braose of Chesworth; and Hoo, by W. D. Cooper. 

Lond. 1856. 8vo. Reprinted from the "Sussex Arch. Coll." vol. viii. 
Braye, Peerage of, see Cave. 
Bridges — Claim of Sir Brook W. Bridges, Bart., to be Baron Fitzwalter. 

See Sess. Papers (159 of 1842 ; 104 of 1843 ; 51 of 1844). 
Bridgewater, Earl of see Egerton. 
Broc, Family of, see Alno. 
Brodrick — Claim of the Et. Hon. Charles Brodrick, Viscount Middleton, 

to vote at Elections of Irish Peers. See Sess. Papers (161 of 1854). 
Brooke, Barony of see Verney. 
Browne — Statement of the claim of Henry Browne, Esq., to the dignity of 

Viscount Montague, by H. Prater, Esq. Lond. 1849. 8vo. 
Bruce — Pedigree of the Family of Bruce. See Drummond's " History 

Noble British Families, 11 parts iii. and iv. 

Descent of the Family of Bruce ; Ashm. Lib. Wood MS. 8539. 

An Historical Account of the Family of Brus, or Bruce, of Skelton 

and Danby Castle, in Yorkshire ; as also of the Boyal Family of Bruce 

in Scotland; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 3879. 
Bryan — Claim of George Bryan, Esq., of Jenkinstown, to be Lord Baron of 

Slane. See Sess. Papers (157 of 1830; 64 of 1830-31; 41, 75, of 

1831). 
Brydges — The Case of Edward Tymewell Brydges, claiming the Barony of 

Chandos of Sudeley, with Appendices, pp. 24. Folio. See also Sess. 

Papers (1790 of 1802-3). 



248 HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 

List ov Family Histories, etc. 
Brydges {continued). General Pedigree of the Rev. Edward Tymewell 
Brydges, Polio. Single sheet. 

Claim of E. T. Brydges, Clerk, to the Barony of Chandos. 1790. 

Folio. 

-Pedigree of the Descendants of John Bridges of Harbledown. 



Folio. Single sheet. 

-Proofs of the Pedigree of John Brydges of Harbledown. Folio. 



Single sheet. 

-Atavise Regise, by Sir E. Brydges. Florence, 18%0. 4to. Contains 



Genealogical Tables of the Families connected with that of Brydges. 
Privately printed. 

-Stemmata Illustria prsecipue Regia, auctore Sir Egerton de 



Bruges, Bart . Paris, 1825. Royal folio. 

Buchan — Sir Colin Mackenzie's Claim to the Title and Dignity of Earl of 
Buchan and Lord Auchterhouse. n r d. (pirc. 1840.) Folio. Privately 
printed. 

Buchanan — A Genealogical Essay upon ue Family of Buchanan, by W. 
Buchanan. Glasgow, 1723. 4to. 

History of the Ancient Surname of Buchanan, &c, by W. Bu- 
chanan. Glasgow, 1793. 8vo. 

-Inquiry into the Genealogy. &c.j of Highland Clans and Families 



of Buchanan, by W. Buchanan, Esq. Edlnb. 1755. 8vo. — Reprinted. 

Glasgow, 1820. 12mo. 
Buckingham, Duke of, see Villiers. 
Burlington — Claim of the Earl of Burlington to the Barony of Clifford. 

See Sess. Papers (May, 1737). 
Burnes — Notes on his Name and Family, by James Burnes, K.H. Edinb. 

1851. sm. 8vo. Privately printed. 
Burnet — Letters and papers relating to the Burnet Family, 1693 — 1803; 

Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 11,403 ; 11,404. 
Butler — Some Account of the Family of the Butlers, particularly of the late 

Duke of Ormond. Lond. 1716. 8vo. 
Buttevant, Viscount, see Barry. 
Byam — Memoir of the Reverend Henry, John, and Edward Byam, together 

with their Lineage, by Edw. S. Byam, Esq. Ryde (1854). 12mo. 
Caernarvon, Earl of, see Dormer. 
GffiSAR — Life of Sir Julius Caesar, Knt., with Memoirs of his Family and 

Descendants, by Edm. Lodge, Esq. Lond. 1827. 4to. 
Caithness, Earldom of, see Sinclair. 
Calverley, Family of, see Blackett. 
Camelford, Lord, see Pitt. 
Camoys, Peerage of, see Stonor. 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 219 

List op Family Histories, etc. 
Campbell — A Letter to Mr. Campbell of Barbreck, containing an Account 

of the Campbells of Barbreck, by F. W. Campbell. IpmicJi, 1830. 4to. 

Privately printed. 
Canynge — Memorials of the Canynges Family, by Geo. Pryce. Bristol, 

1854. 8vo. 
Carbery, Earl of, see Vaughan. 

Cakew — The History and Pedigree of Carew, by Sir Will. Poole of Devon- 
shire; Ashm. Lib. fFood MS. 8547. 
Papers relative to the Family of Carew ; Coll. of Arms, Vincent 

MS. 420, P. 
Pedigree of Carew, called Montgomery, from the Conquest to 

1573 ; Brit. Mus. Harl. Roll, P. 9. 
Carey — Papers relating to the Claim of Wm. Ferdinand Carey, Esq., to the 

Dignity of Baron of Hunsdon, with Pedigrees ; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 

6694. 
Claim of W. F. Carey, Esq., to the Barony of Hunsdon. See Sess. 

Papers (Feb.— Mar. 1707). 
Carlisle — Collections for a History of the Family of Carlisle. Lond. 1822. 

4to. Privately printed. 
Carlos — Pedigree of the Carlos Family of Broomhall, Co. Staff., drawn up 

after 1784; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 14,844, e. 
Carnegie — Claim of Sir James Carnegie of Southesk, Bart., to be Earl of 

Southesk,&c. See Sess. Papers (2$S of 1848 ; 164 of 1854; A. of 1855). 
Carrington — Pedigree of the Family of Carrington, alias Smith, to about 

1764 ; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 14,844, c. 
Carteret — A History of the Noble Family of Carteret, by Arthur Collins. 

1756. 8vo. Privately printed. 
Cassillis — Claims preferred to the House of Lords, in the Case of the 

Cassillis Peerage, by Jas. Maidment, Esq. Edinb. 1840. Only 60 copies 

printed. 

See Kennedy ; Ruglen. 

Castle-Stewart — Claim of Lord Castle-Stewart to the title of Lord 

Ochiltree. See Sess. Papers (April, 1790— June, 1793). 
Cave — Claim of Sarah Otway Cave, of Stamford Hall, to be Baroness Braye. 

See Sess. Papers (40 of 1836 ; 91 of 1838 ; 171 of 1839). 
Cavendish— Memoir of the Family of Cavendish, by W. Kennett. Lond. 

1708. 8vo. 
Historical Collections of the Noble Families of Cavendish, 

Holies, Vere, Harley, and Ogle; by A. Collins. Lond. 1752. Folio. 

-The Lives of the Dukes of Devonshire, descended from Sir 



Will. Cavendish, by Joseph Grove. Lond. 1764. 8vo. 



250 HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 

List of Family Histoeies, etc. 

Cecil — Pedigree of the Family of Cecil. See Drummond's "History of 
Noble British Families" parts i. and ii. 

The Life of Cecil, Lord Burleigh, with Memoirs of the Family of 

Cecil, by A. Collins, Esq. Lord. 1732. 8vo. 

Chambres — Account of the Family of Chambres of the Hawes, in West- 
moreland, a.d. 1700 ; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 11,323. 

Chandos — Papers on the Chandos Peerage. n.d. Polio. Privately printed ; 
very rare. 

Review of the Chandos Peerage Case, by G. F. Beltz, Esq. Lond. 

1834. 8vo. 

see Brydges. 



Charleville — Claim of the Et. Hon. Charles William George, Earl of 
Charleville in Ireland, to vote at Elections of Irish Peers. See Sess, 
Papers (198 of 1852-3). 

Chator, Family of, see Allan. 

Chaworth — Pedigrees of the Family of Chaworth, and of sundry ancient 
Families from whom they were descended ; Coll. op Arms, Vincent 
MS. 24. 

Chester, Earldom of — A Defence of Amicia, daughter of Hugh Cyvelock, 
Earl of Chester, against Sir Peter Leycester's declaration of her ille- 
gitimacy, by Sir Thos. Mainwaring, Bart. Loud. 1673. ]2mo. 

An Answer to Sir Thomas Mainwaring's "Defence" by Sir 

Peter Leycester, Bart. 1673. 12mo. 

A Reply to an Answer of the Defence of Amicia, &c. &c, by Sir 

Thos. Mainwaring, Bart. Lond. 1673. 12mo. 

-Addenda ; or some Things to be added to Sir T. Mainwaring's 



Book. Nov. 1673. 12mo. 

-An Answer to Sir P. Leycester's "Addenda" by Sir T. Main- 



waring. Lond. 1673-4. 12mo. 

Two Books, &c. &c, by Sir P. Leycester. Anno Domini 1674. 

-An Answer to Two Books, &c, by Sir T. Mainwaring. Lond. 



1675. 12mo. 

A Reply to Sir T. Mainwaring's "Answer" by Sir P. Leycester. 

A.D. 1675. 12mo. 

The Second Reply, &c. Lond. 1676. [By Sir P. Leycester.] 

" Peroratio ad Lectorem," by Sir P. Leycester. 17th Dec. 1675. 

" An Advertisement to the Reader," by Sir P. Leycester. Un- 
answered, n. d. 

An Admonition to the Reader, by Sir T. Mainwaring. 1676. 12mo. 

-An Answer to Sir T. Mainwaring's "Admonition" by Sir P. 



Leycester. Lond. 1677. 12mo. 

The Legitimacy of Amicia, &c, clearly proved, by Sir T. 

Mainwaring, Bart. Lond. 1679. 12mo. 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 251 

List of Family Histoeies, etc. 
Chester {Earldom of, continued) — A Reply to Sir P. Leycester's "Answer" 

to Sir T. Mainwaring's "* Admonition." Manchester, 1854. lZmo. 1 
Cheyney — Church Notes relating to the Family of Cheyney; Beit. Mus. 

Add. MS. 8979. 
Chichele — Stemmata Chicheleana : a Genealogical Account of some of the 
Families derived from Thomas Chichele of Higham Ferrers, Co. North- 
ampt., all whose Descendants are held to be entitled to Fellowships in 
All Souls' College ; by Dr. Buckler. Oxford, 1765. 4to. 

A Supplement to the " Stemmata Chicheleana," with large 

additions to the Tables of Descents. Oxford, 1775. 2 
Cholmley — Memoir of Sir Hugh Cholmley, Knt., with some Account of his 

Family. 1787. 4to. Only 100 copies printed. 
Clanronald — Vindication of the Clanronald of Glengary, with Eemarks as 
to the Descent of the Family who style themselves of Clanronald. Edinb. 
1821. 8vo. 
Clarence — Claim of William Henry, Duke of Clarence, to vote at Elections 

of Irish Peers. See Sess. Papers (1805). 
Clermont, Baron, see Fortescue. 
Clervaux, Family of see Allan. 

Clifford — Collectanea Cliffordiana; containing Genealogical Notices of 
the Clifford Family, by A. Clifford, Esq. 3 parts. Paris, 1817. 8vo. 
Privately printed. 

Cliffordiana : An Account of the Cliffords of Chudleigh, edited 

by the Bev. G. Oliver. Exeter, 1827. 12mo. 

Claim of the Countess Dowager of Dorset, and the Earl of 

Thanet, to the Barony of Clifford. See Sess. Papers (May, 1663— Nov. 
1694). 

Collections relating to the Family of Clifford of Skipton in 



Craven, s. xvii. ; Queen's Coll. Oxford, MS. cv. 

Titles of Honour and Pedigrees, especially touching Clifford ; 



Lincoln's Inn Lib. Sale MS. xcvii [civj. 

Evidences of the Cliffords ; of great interest and value ; Bodl. 



Lib. Bodesworth MSS. 70 ; 74 ; 83. 
Barony of see Burlington. 



Clinton, Barony of, see Trefusis. 

Cloncurry — Claim of the Kt. Hon. Edward, Baron Cloncurry, to vote at 

Elections of Irish Peers. See Sess. Papers (160 of 1854). 
Clopton — Papers relating to the Family of Clopton of Kentwell ; Brit. Mus. 

Earl. MS. 127. 

1 Now first printed by J. Or. Bell, from the original in the Bodleian Library. 

2 An interleaved copy of this work, enriched with considerable additions, by the 
Rev. Charles Annesley, formerly Fellow of All Souls' College, is deposited in the 

Library there. 



252 HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 

List of Family Histobies, etc. 

Cobham — Memorials of the Family of Cobhara. See Nichols' " Collect. 
Top. et Gen." vol. vii. p. 320. 

see Brooke. 

Colepeper — Original Papers and Letters relative to the Family of Cole- 
peper, 1649—1749 ; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 11,324. 

■ Leases and Documents relating to the Family of Culpeper, 

1639— 1687; Brit. Mus. Add. Chart. 1774—1781. 

Colville — Claim of Charles John Colville, Baron Colville of Culross, to vote 
at Elections of Scotch Peers. See Sess. Papers (36 of 1850). 

Comberforde — Pedigree of the Family of Comberforde, 1594 ; Brit. Mus. 
Add. MS. 17,326. 

Compton — Pedigree of the Family of Compton. See Drummond's " His- 
tory of Noble British Families" parts i. and ii. 

Conyers, Barony of, see Osborn. 

Courcy — Claim of John de Courcy to be Baron Kiogsale and Baron 
Courcy of Ringrone. See Sess. Papers (144 of 1831-32). 

Courtenay — Discours sur la Genealogie et Maison de Courtenay. Paris, 
1603. 8vo. Privately printed. 

, D e Stirpe et Origine Domus de Courtenay. Paris, 1607. 

8vo. Privately printed. 

A Genealogical History of the Noble Eamily of Courtenay, 



by Ezra Cleaveland, B.D. JExon. 1735. Folio. 

■ Case of William, Viscount Courtenay, on his Claim to the 



title of Earl of Devon. 1830. Folio. 
Minutes of Evidence taken before the Committee for Privi- 



leges on the Petition of William Visct. Courtenay. 1831. Folio. See 
Sess. Papers (27 of 1830-31). 

Histoire Genealogique de la Maison de Courtenay, par Jean 



du Bouchet. 1761. Folio. 
Letter to Lord Brougham on the late decision of the Earldom 



of Devon, by T. C. Banks. Lord. 1831. 

-Eeport of Proceedings on the Claim to the Earldom of 



Devon, by Sir N. H. Nicolas. Lond. 1832. 8vo. 

Genealogy of the Family of Courtenay, Earls of Devon. See 



1 Journ. Archtzolog. Inst." vol. x- p. 52. 
See Tracy. 



Coventry — Account of Croome D'Abuot, with Biographical Notices of the 

Coventry Family. Worcester, 1824. 8vo. 
Cratvfusd — Claim of Mr. John Lindsay Crawfurd to the Title and Estates 

of Crawfurd and Kilbirny. Paisley, 1819. 4to. Privately printed. 
The Crawfurd Peerage; with Genealogical Particulars relating 

to the Illustrious Houses of Crawfurd and Kilbirnie, by Dr. A. M. Adams. 

Edinb. 1829. 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 253 

List of Family Histoeies, etc. 
Crawfurd {continued) — An Examination of the Claim of J. L. Crawford, 
by J. Dobie. Edinb. 1831. 4to. 

Sketch of the Case of John Lindsay Crawford, by Dr. A. M, 

Adams. Edinb. 1834. 4to< 

Case of John Lindsay Crawford. Folio, pp. 50 — Appendix, 

pp. 44. Reprinted, with Additions, in 3 vols. 8vo. 1849. 

Lives of the Lindsays, or a Memoir of the Houses of Crawford 



and Balcarres, by Lord Lindsay. 4 vols. Wigan, 1840. Eoyal 8vo. 
Privately printed. 

— Claim of James, Earl of Balcarres, to be Earl ol Crawford and 

Lord Lindsay; and Petition of Robert Lindsay Crawford, Esq., claim- 
ing the same title. See Sess. Papers (206 of 1845 ; 47 of 1846'; 231 of 
1847; 135 of 1848; 347 of 1852-3). 

Report of the Speeches of Counsel, etc, upon the Claim of 



James, Earl of Crawford and Balcarres, to the original .Dukedom of 

Montrose, by Lord Lindsay. Lond. 1856. Folio. 1 
Croke — A Genealogical History of the Croke Family, originally named 

Le Blount, by Sir A. Croke. 2 vols. Oxford, 1823. 4to. 
Cromartie, Lord, see Kilmarnock. 
Cromwell — Anecdotes and Observations relating to Oliver Cromwell and 

his Family, by J . Burrow. Lond. 1763. 4to. Privately printed. 
_ Memoirs of the Protectoral House of Cromwell, by M. Noble. 

2 vols. Birmingham, 1787. 8vo. 3d ed. 
X Review of Noble's " Memoirs of the Protectoral Souse of 

Cromwell" by W. Richards. Lynn, 1788. 8vo. 
The Genealogical Line, or Paternal Descent of Oliver Cromwell. 



See Prestwick's " Respublica." 

Genealogical View of the Family of Oliver Cromwell. See 



Nichols' " Bibl. Top. Brit.," vol. vi. part iii. 

Danvers — Claim of George John Danvers Butler Danvers, Earl of Lanes- 
borough, to vote at Elections of Peers. See Seas. Papers (96 of 1848). 

Pedigrees of Danvers, deduced from John Danvers of Cotherop, 

sixteenth cent. ; Brit. Mus. Harl. Rolls, P. 5; 10. 

Darnley, Earl of, see Stuart. 

Davenport — The History and Genealogy of the Davenport Family, from 
1086 to 1850, by A. B. Davenport. New York, 1851. 8vo. 

De Alneto, Family of, see Alno. 

De Courcy — Pedigree of the Family of De Courcy. See Drummond's 
"Hist, of Noble British Families" part viii. 

Dee — Genealogical Account of some of the Families derived from Bedo Dee. 
Lond. 1815. 

1 A Bibliographical Catalogue of the Cases and Papers printed is given at p. ix. of 
the Introduction. 



254 HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 

List of Family Histories, etc. 
D$E(continued) — Pedigree of Dr. Dee, deduced from various Welsh Families ; 

Autogr. Brit. Mus. Cotton. Chart, xiii. 38 ; xiv. 1. 
Deering — Deeds and Charters relating to the Deering Faanily ; Brit. Mus. 

Add. MS. 5481. 
De Gorram, Family of, see Gorham. 
De Insula, Family of, see Lisle. 
Delvin, Barony of see Nugent. 
De Marisco, Family of see Montmorency. 
Denzell — Densellorum, sive de Denzell, prosapia, ex archiv. suis ; Brit. 

Mus. Earl. MS. 3367. 
D'Este— The History of the House of Este. Lond. 1681. 8vo. 
Papers elucidating the Claim of Sir Augustus D'Este, K.C.H., 

by J. T. Dillon. Lond. 1831. 8vo. Privately printed. 
Case of the Children of H.R.H. the Duke of Sussex, elucidated 



by J. T. Dillon. 2 vols. 1832. 4to. 

■ Claim of Augustus Frederick D'Este to be Duke of Sussex. See 



Sess. Papers (142 of 1844 ; 177 of 1844). 
De Vallibus, Family of see Vaux. 
De Vesci — Genealogy of the Constables De Vescy ; Brit. Mus. Cotton. 

Chart, xiv. 9. 
Devonshire — Lives of the Earls and Dukes of Devonshire, with Genealogies 

of eminent Men their Contemporaries, by Jos. Grove. Lond. 1764. 8vo. 

see Cavendish ; Courtenay. 

D'Ewes — Pedigree of the Family of Ewes or D'Ewes ; Brit. Mus. Sari. 

Rolls,!). 25; O. 8; 9. 
D'Eyncourt — Genealogical History of the Family of Tennyson D'Eyncourt, 

by John B. Burke, Esq. Lond. 1846. 12mo. 
Dillon — Epitome of the Case on the Claim of the Dillon Family of Proud- 

ston, by Sir J. J. Dillon, Kt. Lond. (really Paris) 1829. 4to. Privately 

printed. This Claim was originally printed in folio, without date, some 

years before 1829. 
Disney — Claim of Molineux Disney, Esq., to the Barony of Hussey, with 

Eemarks by W. B. D. D. Turnbull, Esq. Edinb. 1836. 8vo. Privately 

printed. 
Remarks on the Hussey Peerage, with Pedigrees, by W. B.D. D. 

Turnbull. Edinb. 1842. Intended as a supplement to the preceding 

work. Only 40 copies printed. 
Doneraile, Viscount, see Hayes. 
Donoughmore, Earl of see Hely. 
Dore — Account of the Family of Dore of Compton Beauchamp, Co. Wilts, 

&c. 4to. Privately printed. 
Account of the Family of Dore of Longcot, &c, Co. Berks. 4to. 

Privately printed. 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 255 

List op Family Histoeies. etc. 
Dore (continued) — Account of the Family of Dore of Longleat, Co. Wilts. 

4to. Privately printed. 
Dormer — Genealogie de la Maison des Lords Dormers, Comptes de Caer- 
narvon, etc., par M. D****. [Antwerp,] 1771. Folio. See also an 

account of the Dormers in the " Nobiliare de Brabant" vol. iv. p. 79. 

Pedigree of the Dormer Family of Buckinghamshire to about 

1765 ; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 14,844 5. 
D orset, Earl of see Sackville. 
Douglas — The History of the Houses of Douglas and Angus, by D. Hume. 

Edinb. 1644. Folio.— 2d ed. 2 vols. 1743. 8vo.— 4th ed. 2 vols. 

1748. 8vo. 
A Synopsis of the Genealogy of the Noble Family of Brigantes, 

or Douglas, by P. Pineda. 1754. 8vo. 
Speeches and Judgments of the Lords in the Douglas Cause, by 

William Anderson. Edinb. 1768. 8V0. 1 
Abstract of the Evidence taken in the service of the Right Hon. 

Sylvester Douglass, Lord Glenbervie, &c, with a Genealogical Table. 

Edinb. 1815. 4to. Privately printed. 

Claim of John Arthur Douglas, Baron Bloomfield, to vote at 



Elections of Scotch Peers. See Sess. Papers (109 of 1849). 
Dover, Earldom of, see Brandon. 
Doyle — Claim of the Bt. Hon. Lady Susan Doyle to the Barony of North. 

See Sess. Papers (72 of 1837). 
D'Oyly— History of the House of D'Oyly, by W. D'Oyly Bayley. 2 parts. 

Loud. 1845. 8vo. 
Drake — Life of Sir Francis Drake, with the Historical and Genealogical 

Account of his Family, &c. ; containing also an Account of the Rich- 
mond Family. Lond. 1828. Imp. 8vo. 
Genealogical and Biographical Account of the Family of Drake in 

America, with some Notices of the same Family name in England. 

1845. 8vo. 
Drayton, Family of, see Alno. 
Drtjce — Genealogical Account of the Family of Druce of Goreing, Co. Oxon. 

Lond. 1735. 4to. — Reprinted, 1853. Only 50 copies printed. 
Drummond — A Genealogical Memoir of the Noble House of Drummond. 

Edinb. 1808. 12mo. 
Genealogy of the Most Noble House of Drummond, collected 

by the Hon. W. Drummond, ed. by D. Laing. Edinb. 1831. 4to. 

• Claim of George Drummond, Duke of Melfort, to the Earldom 



of Perth. See Sess. Papers (233 of 1846 ; 107 of 1847 ; 326 of 1848 ; 
432 of 1852-3). 

1 A Bibliography of this celebrated Cause will be found in Lowndes' "Bibliographers' 
Manual" art. Douglas. See also " Censiwa Liter aria" vols, v., vi., and viii., edit. 1805-9. 



256 HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 

List op Family Histobies, etc. 
Drummond (continued) — Pedigree of the Family of Drummond. Sea 
Drummond's "History of Noble British Families" part vii. 

The Genealogy of the Most Noble House of Drummond; Bbit. 

Mus. Earl. MS. 4238. 
see Innes. 



Dufferin, Baron, see Blackwood. 

Dugdale — Pedigree of the Dugdale Family. See Hamper's "Life of Dugdale" 

Dunallt, Lord, see Prittie. 

Dunbar — Pedigree of the Family of Dunbar. See Drummond's " Hist* of 

Noble British Families" part vi. 
Dundas — Pedigree of the Family of Dundas. See Drummond's " Hist, of 

Noble British Families" part vi. 
Dunraven, Earl of see Wyndham. 
Dunsandle, Baron, see St. George. 
Dunsany — Claim of the Et. Hon. Edward, Baron Dunsany, to vote at 

Elections of Irish Peers. See Sess. Papers (49 of 1823 ; 158 of 1854). 
Dunstanville— Memoirs of the Family of Dunstanville. See Scrope's 

" History of Castle Combe." 1852. 4to. Privately printed. 
Dunteith, House of see Ednem. 
Dymoke — Claim of Lewis Dymoke, Esq., to the Barony of Marmyon. See 

Sess. Papers (47 of 1818; 48 of 1819). 
Echyngham; — Notices of the Family of Echyngham of Echyngham, by 

Spencer Hall, Esq. Lond. 1850. 8vo. Privately printed. 
Ednem — The Genealogy of the Lairds of Ednem and Dunteith, from 1063 

to 1699. Glasgow, 1699.— Reprinted, Edinb. 1824. 18mo. 
Egerton — The Pedigree of Francis Henry Egerton, afterwards Earl of 

Bridgewater, 12th Feb. 1S06; Brit. Mus. Eg. MS. 66. 
Ellis — Claim of C. A. Ellis to be Lord Howard of Walden. See Sess. Papers 

(3 of 1806-7). 
Elphinstone — A Genealogical Tree of the Noble House of Elphinstone, by 

J. Brown. 1808. A folio sheet. 
Erdeswike— Stemmata antiquae Familise de Erdeswike, de Sondon in Com. 

Stafford.; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 5410. 
Este, House of see D'Este. 
Estofte — Genealogy of the Family of Estofte, Co. York, a.d. 1660 ; Brit. 

Mus. Add. MS. 15,569. 
Fairfax— Account of the Family of Fairfax; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 6862. 
Papers relating to the Family of Fairfax, 1635—1790; Brit. 

Mus. Add. MSS. 11 S 325—J1,327. 

Charters and Documents relating to the Family of Fairfax of 



Denton, Co. York, 1430—1758 ; Brit. Mus. Add. Chart. 1782—1811. 

Falstaff — Memoirs of the Family of Falstaff. See Scrope's "History of 

Castle Combe" 1852. 4to. — and D. Turner's "History of Caisier 

Castle" Lond, 1842. 8vo. 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 257 

List op Family Histoeies, etc. 
Fanshawe — Account of the Family of Fanshawe. See "Memoirs of Lady F." 

Lond. 1829. 8vo. 
Fauconberge — Account of Henry Fauconberge, LL.D., of Beccles, with 

Pedigree of that Family, and of Eevett of Brandeston, by S. W. Eix. 

Ipswich^ 1849. 4to. 
Ferrers, Earl, see Shirley. 
Fiennes — Miscellanea, concerning the Names and Families of Fiennes ; 

Brit. Mus. Sari. MSS. 1834 ; 1835. 
Fitz-Gerald — Claim of the Et. Hon. Lady Henry Fitzgerald, and Sir H. 

Hunloke, Bart., to the Barony of Eoos. See Sess, Papers (1 5 of 1803-4; 

32 of 1805). 
Fitz-Lewes, Family of, see Alno. 
Fttz-Simon, Family of see Fraser. 
Fitz-W alter, Peerage of see Bridges. 
Fleming — Claim of Charles E. Fleming to be Earl of Wigtoun. See Seas. 

Papers (Jan. Mar. 1762). 
Historical and Genealogical Memoir of the Family of Fleming, 

of Slane, in the County Pal. of Meath, by Sir W. Betham. Dublin, 1829. 

Folio. Privately printed. 
Foljambe — Notices of the Family of Foljambe. See Nichols' " Coll. Top. 

et Gen." vol L p. 91. 
Forbes — The Genealogy of the House of Forbes, by M. Lumsden. Inverness, 

1819. 8vo. 
Fortescue — Claim of the Et. Hon. Thomas Fortescue, Baron Clermont in 

Ireland, to vote at Elections of Irish Peers. See Sess. Papers (330 of 

1852-3). 
Notitiae and Pedigrees concerning the Family of the Fortescues, 

eighteenth cent.; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 15,629, f. 63. 
Fraser — Annals of the Family of Fraser, Frysell, Simson, or Fitz-Simon, 

ed. by Col. A. Fraser. Edinb. 1795.— Eeprinted. Edinb. 1805. 8vo. 
Historical Account of the Family of Frisel, or Fraser, by John 

Anderson, Edinb. 1825. 4to. 

■ The true Genealogie of the Frasers, by Jas. Fraser, 1666 ; Advo- 



cates' Lib. Edinburgh, MS. 4to. 
Frazer — Claim of Thomas A. Frazer, of Lovat, Esq., to the Barony of 

Lovat. See Sess. Papers (93, 178 of 1826-27; G. of 1855). 
Frecheville — Pedigrees of the Families of Frecheville and Musard, of Crich 

and Staveley, Co. Derby. See Nichols' "Coll. Top. et Gen." vol. iv. part i. 
Freke — A Pedigree or Genealogye of the Family of the Frekes, by E. 

and J. Freke. 1825. Oblong folio. Privately printed by Sir Thomas 

Phillipps, Bart. 
French — Memoir of the Family of French, by John D'Alton, Esq. Lublin, 

1847. 8vo. 

17 



258 HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 

List op Family Histobies, etc. 
Fuenival — Collections relating to the Family of Furnival, eighteenth cent. ; 

Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 18,446. 
Galloway, Earl of, see Stuart. 
Gardner — Report of the Proceedings of the House of Lords on the Claims 

to the Barony of Gardner, by D. Le Marchant. Lond. 1828. 8vo. 
Claim of A. L. Gardner, an Infant, to the Barony of Gardner. 

See Sess. Papers (175 of 1825 ; 32 of 1826). 
Gilbert — Genealogical Memoir of the Gilbert Family in both Old and New 

England, by J. W. Thornton. (Boston) 1850. 8vo. Privately printed. 
Giustiniani — Plowden's Disquisition concerning the Law of Alienage, illus- 
trated in an elaborate Opinion of Counsel upon the Claim of Prince 

Giustiniani to the Earldom of Newburgh. Paris, 1818. 8vo. 
Glenbervie, Lord, see Douglas. 
Glencairn — Claims preferred to the House of Lords in the Case of the 

Glencairn Peerage, by J. Maidment, Esq. Edinb. 1840. Only 60 

copies printed. 
Glendour — The History of the Island of Anglesey, with a Genealogical 

Account of Owen Glendour. 1775. 4to. 
Goddard — Pedigree of Goddard of Swindon, Clive, Pipard, and Purton. 

Folio sheets. Privately printed by Sir Thomas Phillipps, Bart. 
Gordon — The History of the Ancient Family of Gordon. 2 vols. Edinb. 

1726. 8vo. 
Claim of Sir Charles Gordon to the Earldom of Sutherland. See 

Sess. Papers (Dec. 1767— Jan. 1768). 
A History of the Ancient House of Gordon, by C. A. Gordon. 

Aberdeen, 1754. 12mo. Privately printed. 
Gorham — General Account of the Families of De Gorram, by the Rev. G. 

C. Gorham, B.D. 8vo. First printed in Nichols' " Collect. Top. et 

Gen.;" vol. v. p. 182. 
Gournay, House of, see Gurney. 
Grace — A Survey of Tullaroan, &c, being a Genealogical History of the 

Family of Grace. Ihiblin, 1819. 8vo. Only 50 copies printed. 
Memoirs of the Family of Grace, by Sheffield Grace. 2 vols. 

1823. 4to. Privately printed. 

Pedigree of the Family of Grace. See Nichols' " Bibl. Top. 



Brit." vol. vii. part ii. p. 360. 
Graham — A Genealogical Tree of the Illustrious Family of Graham, by J. 

Brown. A folio sheet. 
Grandison, Barony of, see Bedingfield. 

Viscount, see Jersey. 

Grant — Memoires Historiques, Geuealogiques, etc. de la Maison de Grant. 

1796. 8vo. (By Charles Grant, Visct. de Vaux.) 
Greaves — Collections relating to the Family of Greaves ; Brit. Mus. Add. 

MS. 4243. 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 259 

List op Family Histobies, etc. 
Green — Memoir of Thomas Green, Esq., of Ipswich, and an Account of his 

Family, &c. Ipswich, 1825. 4to. Privately printed. 

see Alno. 

Greville — A Genealogical Account of the Noble Family of Greville, by J. 

Edmondson. Lord. 1766. 8vo. 
Griffin — Claim of Sir John Griffin Griffin to the Barony of Howard de 

Walden. See Sess. Papers (3 of 1806-7 ; 9 of 1806-7). 
Grosvenor— Account of the Descent of William de Grosvenor. 1776. 8vo. 

Privately printed. 

see Scrope. 

Grove — Pedigree of Thomas Grove of Feme House, Co. Wilts. Evesham, 

1819. Drawn up by Sir Thomas Phillipps, Bart. 
Gunning — Documents of the Gunning Family of Hoo, in Kent, by Lieut. 

George Gunning. Cheltenham, 1834. 8vo. Privately printed. 
Gurnet — The Record of the House of Gournay, by Dan. Gurney, F.S.A. 

1848. 4to. Privately printed. 
Gwydir — The History of the Gwydir Family, by Sir J. Wynne. Land. 

1770. 8vo.— Newed. Ruthin, 1827. 4to. 
Haliburton — Memorials of the Haliburtons, edited by Sir Walter Scott. 

Edinb. 1820. 4to.— Reprinted. 1842. 4to. Privately printed. 
Hamilton — Memoirs of the Life and Family of James, late Duke of Hamil- 
ton. 1717. 8vo. 
Claim of the Duke of Hamilton and Brandon to the Earldom of 

Angus. See Sess. Papers (Jan. — Mar. 1762). 

Claim of William Hamilton, Esq., to the Barony of Belhaven 



and Sturton. See Sess. Papers (Jan. 1795 — Apr. 1799). 

State of the Evidence produced for proving the Claim of Wil- 



liam Hamilton, of Wishaw, to be lawful Heir Male of James, last Lord 
Belhaven. 1796. 4to. Privately printed. 

Genealogical Memoirs of the House of Hamilton, by John 



Anderson. Edinb. 1825. 4to. 

An Inquiry into the Pedigree, Descent, &c, of the Chiefs of the 



Hamilton Family, by Will. Aiton. Glasgow, 1827. 8vo. 

Memoirs of the House of Hamilton, corrected by Dr. F. H. 



Buchanan. Edinb. 1828. 4to. 

Reply to the preceding, by J. Riddell, Esq. Edinb. 1828. 4to. 

see Birnie. 



Hardinge — Memoirs of George Hardinge, Esq., with Anecdotes of the 
Hardinge Family, by John Nichols, F.S.A. Lond. 1818. 8vo. 

Harley. — Pedigree of the Family of Harley. See Drummond's " History of 
Noble British Families," parts i. and ii. 

. Memoirs of the Harley Family; Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 885, 

f. 8. See Cavendish. 



260 HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 

List op Family Histories, etc. 
Harrington — The Genealogy of the Family of Harrington ; Bkit. Mus. 

Earl. MS. 4041. 
Pedigree of Harrington of Exton, Co. Rutland, a.d. 1670; 

Queen's Coll. Oxf. MS. cii. 
Account of the Descendants of Sir James Harrington of 



Exton ; Pub. Lib. Camb. Dd. vii. — 23. 
Hastings — Genealogical History of the House of Hastings. See Bell's 

" Huntingdon Peerage." 1820. 4to.— 2d ed. 1821. 
Transcripts of Charters, "Records, &c, relating to the Family of 

Hastings; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 3881. 

History of the Hastings Family, a.d. 1583; Brit. Mus. Earl. 



MS. 4774. 

■ A Collection of Papers and Records relating to the Family of 



Hastings ; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 4849. 

Barony of, see Astley; Longevile. 



Hatton — Pedigree of the Family of Hatton, circ. 1630 ; Brit. Mus. Add. 

MS. 19,646. 
Hayes — Genealogie of the Hayes of Tweeddale, by Father Hay. 1835. 4to. 

Edited by J. Maidment, Esq. Only 108 copies printed. 
Claim of the Rt. Hon. Henry Hayes, Yisct. Doneraile of Ireland, 

to vote at Elections of Irish Peers. See Sess. Papers (163 of 1854). 
Hely — Claim of the Rt. Hon. Richard John Hely, Earl of Donoughmore of 

Ireland, to vote at Elections of Irish Peers. See Sess. Papers (195 of 

1852-3; 178 of 1854). 
Heneage — Notes from Records and Evidences of the Heneages of Kent, 

with an Historical Account of the Family; Coll. of Arms, Pldlipot 

MS. IS, Pd. 
Henry — The Descendants of Philip Henry, M.A., Incumbent of Worthen- 

bury, in Co. Flint, by Sarah Lawrence. Lond. 1844. 8vo. 
Heron — Genealogical Tables of the Family of Heron of Newark. — 1797- 

Folio. Privately printed by Sir R. Heron. 
The Genealogical Tables of the Herons of Newark, with a Map of 

Northumberland, n.d. Folio. 
Herries, Peerage of, see Maxwell. 
Hoare — Pedigrees and Memoirs of the Families of Hoare, by Sir R. C. 

Hoare, Bart.; Bath, 1819. 4to. Privately printed. 
Hochpied — Documents relating to the De Hochepied Family. Antwerp % 

1827. 8vo. Privately printed. 
Hodilow — Account of the Family of Hodilow. See Nichols' " Topographer" 

vol. ii. p. 28. 
Holles, Family of, see Cavendish. 
Holte — A History of the Holtes of Aston, by A. Davidson. Birm. 1854. 

4to. 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 261 

List op Family Histories, etc. 
Home — Genealogical Account of the Family of Home of Wedderburne. 

4to. Privately printed. 
Claim of Alexander Home, Esq., to the title of Earl of Marchmont. 

See Sess. Papers (40 of 1822). 
Claim of Francis Home, Esq., to the title of Earl of Marchmont. 

See Sess. Papers (US of 1838; 141 of 1839; 67 of 1840; 33 of 1842; 

103 of 1843). 
Honeywood — Evidences of the Family of Honeywood, Co. Essex, seven- 
teenth cent.; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 16,604. See also Nichols' 

" Topographer," vol. L p. 568; vol. ii. pp. 169, 256, 312, 433.— See 

Knatchbull. 
Hoo, Family of, see Braose. 
Hopetoun — Claim of James, Earl of Hopetoun, to the title of Marquis of 

Annandale. See Sess. Papers (Apr. May, 1794; Dec. 1795). 
Horn, Family of s see Mantell. 
Howard — The Antiquities of Arundel, with an Abstract of the Lives of the 

Earls of Arundel, by C. Carraccioli. Lond. 1766. 8vo. 
Historical Anecdotes of the Howard Family, by the Hon. Chas. 

Howard. Lond. 1769. 8vo. Reprinted 1817. 
An Analysis of the Genealogical History of the Family of Howard, 

by Sir T. C. Banks. Lond. 1812. 8vo. 

The Mysterious Heir — being the Case of Mr. Walter Howard 



claiming the Dukedom of Norfolk, &c. Lond. 1816. 8vo. 3d edit. 

Genealogical History of the Noble House of Howard. Lond. 

1830. 8vo. 

History and Antiquities of the Castle and Town of Arundel, in- 
cluding the Biography of its Earls, by the Eev. M. A. Tierney. 2 vols. 
Lond. 18a4. Royal 8vo. 

Indication of Memorials, &c, of the Howard Family, by H. 

Howard. Corby Castle, 1834. Privately printed. The copy in Mr. 
Grenville's library (Brit. Mus.) is illustrated with numerous additional 
drawings of seals, &c. 

The Genealogy of the Family of Howard ; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 



4041, art. 2. 
The Descent of the Family of Howard, 1615 ; Brit. Mus. Harl. 

MS. 4221. 

The Arms of the Howards and their Descendants, beautifully 

painted; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 4259. 

Historia Comitum Arundelise; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 4840. 

Arundeliorum Familise Genealogia ; Brit. Mus. Royal Roll, 14, 

B. xlii. 

A Discourse of the Earls of Arundel, from the Conquest ; Coll* 

of Arms, Vincent MS. 3. — See Alno; Ellis; GRitFKN. 



262 HERALDIC . COLLECTIONS. 

List op Family Histobies, etc. 
Hume — Davidis Humii de Familia Humia Wedderburnensi Liber. Edinb. 

1839. 4to. Edited by Dr. John Miller. Printed by the Abbotsford 

Club. 
Pedigree of the Family of Hume. See Drummond's "History of 

Noble British Families" part vi. 
Hungerford — Hungerfordiana ; or, Memoirs of the Family of Hungerford, 

collected by Sir E, C. Hoare, Bart. Shaftesbury, 1823. 8vo. Only 100 

copies printed. 
Hunloke, Claim of Peerage, see Fitzgerald. 
Hunsdon, Baron, see Carey. 
Huntingdon — The Huntingdon Peerage, by H. N. Bell. Lond.l$%0. 4to. — 

2ded. 1821. 
Huntly, Peerage of, see Aboyne. 
Hussey, Barony of, see Disney. 
Hutton — Life of William Hutton, F.R.S., and the History of his Family, 

written by himself. Bond. 1817. 8vo. 3d ed. 
Hylton, Family of, see Allan. 
Innes — Claims of Sir James Norcliffe Lines, Bart., Walter Ker, Esq., of 

Littledean, and the Et. Hon. William Drummond, to the Titles of Duke 

and Earl of Eoxburghe. See Seas. Papers (124 of 1808 ; 15 of 1809 ; 

land 66 of 1810; 39 of 1812). 
Account of the Origin of the Family of Innes. Edinb. 1820. Large 

4to. Two hundred copies printed, at the expense of the Duke of 

Eoxburghe. 
Isaacson — Notices of the Isaacson Family ; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 17,732. 
Ivery, i. e. Perctval — A Genealogical History of the House of Ivery, or 

Yvery, by J. Anderson. 2 vols. Bond. 1742. Eoy. 8vo. 
Jerningham — Claim of Sir William Jerningham, Bart., to the Barony of 

Stafford. See Sess. Papers (80 of 1808; 107 of 1809; 18 of 1812; 

129 of 1825). 
Jersey, Earl of— Claim of George, Earl of Jersey, to vote at Elections of 

Irish Peers as Visct. Grandison. See Sess. Papers (102 of 1829). 
Johnson — Claim of Martha, wife of Sir Henry Johnson, Knt., to the Barony 

of Wentworth. See Sess. Papers (Mar. Apr. 1702). 
Johnston — Genealogical Account of the Family of Johnston of that Ilk, by 

Alex. Johnston. Edinb. 1832. 4to. 
Johnstone — Claim of Sir John Lowther Johnstone, Bart., to the title of 

Marquis of Annandale. See Sess. Papers (June, 1805). 
— — Claim of J. J. H. Johnstone, of Annandale, Esq., to the Earl- 
dom of Annandale. See Sess. Papers (128 of 1825; 34 of 1S26; 

66 of 1834; 100, 101 of 1844). 
Keith — Account of the Noble Family of Keith, Ear-Is Marichal of Scotland, 

by P. Buchan. Peterhead, 1820. 12mo. 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS, 263 

List of Family Histories, etc. 
Kellie, Peerage of, see Miller. 
Kennedy — Claim of Sir Thomas Kennedy to be Earl of Cassilia. See Sess. 

Papers (Mar. 1760— Jan. 1762). 
Genealogical Account of the principal "Families of the name of 

Kennedy, by R. Pitcairn. Edinb. 1830. 4to. 

Anecdotes of the noble Family of Kennedy, Marquess of Ailsa, 

c, by D. Cowan, Esq. Edinb. 1849. 4to. Privately printed. 
Ker, Claim of Peerage, see Innes. 
Kilbirnie or Kilbirny, House of see Crawfurd. 
Kildare — Papers relating to the Family of Kildare ; Trinity College, 

Dublin, MS. B. 58. 
Killeen, Barony of see O'Connor. 
Killmorey — Claim of Robert, Visct. Killmorey, to vote at Elections of Irish 

Peers. See Seas. Papers (187 of 1812 ; 84 of 1812-13). 
Kilmarnock — Memoirs of the Lives of the Lords Kilmarnock, Cromartie, 

and Balmerino. Lond. 1746. 8vo. 
Kingsale, Barony of see Courcy. 
Kirkcudbright, Lord, see M'Clellan. 
Knatchbull — Memoirs of the Family of Sir Edw. Knatchbull, and Filmer 

Honeywood, Esq., by R. Pocock. Gravesend, 1802. 8vo. Privately 

printed. 
Kyn aston — Claim of John Kynaston to the Barony of Powys. See Sess. 

Papers (Feb. 1731— May 1732). 
Lancaster, Duke of — A Genealogical Account of the Descendants of John 

of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster. Lond. 1855. Roy. 4to. Privately printed. 
, Family of— Pedigree of the Family of Lancaster, sixteenth cent.; 

Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 16,596. 
Lanesborough, Earl of see Danvers. 

Langley — Genealogy of the Family of Langley of Gloucestershire and Shrop- 
shire, to 1664; Brit. Mus. Shane MS. 3975. 
Latimer, Family of see Alno. 
Lauderdale, Earl of see Maitland. 
Le Blount, Family of see Croke. 
Legge, or Wolleye — Some Account of the Family of Legge, or Wolleye, 

Co. Hereford ; Brit. Mus. Shane MS. 855. 
Leigh — The Leigh Peerage. 2 vols. Lond. 1832. 8vo. — 2d. ed. 
Case of Geo. Leigh, Esq., claiming the Peerage Dignity of Baron 

Leigh of Stoneley. Lond. 1826. Folio. 

Petition to the House of Lords. Lond. 1827. 8vo. 

Minutes of Evidence taken before the Committee of Privileges. 



1328— 1829. Folio.— See also Sess. Papers (117 of 1828; 59 of 1829). 

A relation of Facts relating to the Stoneleigh Case, by Charles 

Griffin, attorney. 1850. 18mo. 



264 HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 

List op Family Histories, etc. 

Leigh (continued) — Pedigrees of the Family of Leigh. See "Stoneltigh Abbey" 
byF.L. Colville. Warwick,l$50. 8vo. Privately printed. Mso"The Cis- 
tercian Abbey of Stoneley, and its Occupants" by the Rev. J. M. Gresley. 
Ashby -de-la- Zouch. 1854. Only 71 copies printed. 

Leighton Bromswold, Barony of, see O'Brian. 

Lennox — History of the Partition of the Earldom of Lennox, with a Vindi- 
cation of the Antiquities of Merchiston and Thirlestane, by Mark Napier. 
Edinb. 1835. 8vo. 

Additional Eemarks upon the Question of the Lennox or Rusky 

Representation, by John Riddell. 8vo. 1835. 

Lesley — Laura Lesleiana explicata, sive enumeratio Personarum utriusque 
sexus cognomine Leslie. Grcecii, 1692. Folio. 

Le Strange, Claim of Peerage, see Hastings. 

Lifford — Claim of the Rt. Hon. James Viscount Lifford to vote at Elections 
of Irish Peers. See Sess. Papers (P. of 1855). 

Lincoln — Pedigrees of the Earls of Lincoln and Chester; Coll. of Arms, 
PhilipotMS. 28, Pd. 

A Genealogical Account of the Earls of Lincoln. See Feme's 

" Blazon of Gentrie" Lond. 1586. 

Lind — Genealogy of the Family of Lind, by Douglas. 1795. 8vo. Pri- 
vately printed. 

Lindsay — Claim of the Earl of Lindsay to be Earl of Oxford. See Sess. 
Papers (May— Dec. 1660). 

see Crawfurd. 

Lisle — Case of the Barony of Lisle. 1790. Polio. Privately printed. 

Report of Proceedings on the Claim to the Barony of L'Isle, by N, 

H. Nicolas. Lond. 1829. 8vo. 

Pedigree of de Insula or Lisle, of Wodyton, Isle of Wight ; Coll. of 

Arms, Philipot MS. 29, Pd. 

see Sidney. 



Locke— A Genealogical Record of the Descendants of William Locke of 

Woburn, &c, by J. G. Locke. Boston and Camb. 1853. Royal 8vo. 
Londonderry— Claim of the Rt. Hon. Frederick William Robert, Marquess 

of Londonderry, to vote at Elections of Irish Peers. See Sess. Papers 

(316 of 1854). 
Longe — Papers and Letters relating to the Family of Longe of Whaddon, 

Co. Wilts; Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 11,757 ; 15,559—15,561. 
Longevile — Claim of Longevile to the Barony of Hastings and 

Ruthin. See Sess. Papers (Nov. 1640 and Feb. 1640-1). 
liOVAT — Paper on the Lovat Peerage Case. 1727. 4to. 

Barony of see Frazer. 

. ovetot— Collections relating to the Family of Lovetot, eighteenth cent.; 

Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 18,446. 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 265 

List of Family Histories, etc. 

Luttrell — Genealogical Account of the Family of Lutrell, Lotterel, or 
Luttrell. Milborne Port, 1774. 4to. Privately printed. 

Lyttelton — Genealogical Account of the Family of Lyttelton ; S' ic. op 
Ant. MS. 151. 

Macdonald — Letters to the Editor of the Inverness Journal; chiefly re- 
lating to the Title of Macranald, and the " Chief of the Clan Macdonald, 
Lord of the Isles," 1817-18. Edinb. 1818. 8vo. 

Historical and Genealogical Account of the Family of Mac- 
donald, in two Parts. Edinb. 1819. Royal 8vo. Privately printed. 

Extracts from the Inverness Courier, relative to the Ancient 



Kingdom of the Isles and Ronaldson Controversy. 1822. 8vo. 
Mackay — History of the House of Mackay, and of other Scotch Families, 

by R. Mackay. Edinb. 1829. 4to. 
Mackenzie — The Genealogie of the Mackenzies. Edinb. 1829. 4to. Only 

50 copies printed [by J. W. Mackenzie]. 
The Genealogy of the Mackenzies, preceding the year 1661. 

1843. 8vo. 
Maclean — Historical and Genealogical Account of the Clan of Maclean. 

Lond. 1838. 8vo. 
M'Clellan — The Case of Lieutenant John M'Clellan, claiming the title of 

Lord Kirkcudbright, with additional Appendix. 1769. Folio, pp. 11. 

See Bess. Papers (Dec. 176 —Apr. 1769). 
Maitland — Genealogy of the Family of Maitland, Earl of Lauderdale, by 

A. Dalzel. Edinb. 1785. 4to. Privately printed. 
Makgill — Abstract of the proof which makes out the case of James Makgill, 

claiming the title of Viscount Oxford, n.d. Folio, with a Pedigree. 
Maltravers — Proofs of the Mautravers Pedigree. See Nichols' " Coll. 

Top. et Gen." vol. vi. p. 334. 
Mansell — An Historical and Genealogical Account of the Family of 

Maunsell, Mansell, or Mansel, by W. W. Mansell. 4to. Privately printed. 
Mantell — Proof and Pedigrees of Mantell and Horn, in Kent; Brit.Mus. 

Add. MS. 5521. 
Marchmont, Earldom of, see Home. 
Markham — A History of the Markham Family, by Rev. D. F. Markham. 

Lond. 1854. 8vo. Privately printed. 
Marmion — History of the Noble Family of Marmyun, by Sir T. C. Banks. 

Lond. 1817. 8vo. 
Pedigree of the Marmion Family, from the Conquest to 1327 ; 

Brit. Mus. Cotton. Chart xiii. 32. 
■ Barony of, see Dymoke. 



Mauduit, Family of, see Alno. 
Maxwell — Royal Descents of Henry Maxwell, K. P., seventh Lord Farn* 
ham, &c. 2 vols. 8vo. Privately printed. 



266 HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 

List of Family Histories, etc. 
Maxwell (continued)— Claim of William C.Maxwell, of Nithsdale, Esq., to 

the dignity of Lord Hemes, of Terregles. See Sees. Papers (108 of 1849; 

154 of 1852-3; 172 of 1854 ; L. of 1855). 
Mayo— Claim of the Et. Hon. Robert, Earl of Mayo, to vote at Elections of 

Peers. See Sess. Papers (294 of 1849). 
Middleton — Genealogy of the Family of Middleton of Middleton, Co. 

Salop ; Brit. Mus. Shane MS. 3977. 
Midleton, Viscount, see Brodrick. 
Mildmay— Pedigrees of the Families of Mildmay, of Moulsham Hall, Essex, 

and of St. John, of Farley, Hampshire. Lond. 1803. 4to. Privately 

printed. 
Miller— Claim of John F. Miller, Earl of Mar, &c. 3 to the title of Earl of 

Kellie, Yisct. Fenton, &c. See Sess. Papers (133 of 1831-2; 212 of 

1834; 206 of 1835). 
Molesworth, Viscount, see Pigot. 
Molyneux— The Pedigree of the Family of Molyneux, by Sir Thomas 

Phillipps, Bart. 1819. A single sheet, privately printed. 
Account of the Family and Descendants of Sir Tho. Molyneux, 

Kt. Evesliam, 1820. 4to. Privately printed by Sir Thos. Phillipps, Bart. 
A History of the Family of Molyneux. 1821. 12mo. Pri- 



vately printed by Sir Thomas Phillipps, Bart. 
Monck, Viscount, see Stanley. 
Monk — The Pedigree and Descent of His Excellency Gen. George Monk, 

&c. Lond. 1659. 4to. 
Montague, Viscount, see Browne. 
Monteith, Earl of, see Airth ; Strathern. 
Montgomery — Genealogy of the Montgomeries of Smithton, by — Douglas. 

1795. 8vo. 
The Montgomery Manuscripts ; containing Memoirs of the 

first, second, and third Viscounts Montgomery, &c, by W. Montgomery. 

Belfast, 1830. 12mo. 
See Carew. 



Montmorency — Histoire Genealogique de la Maison de Montmorency, par 

Andre du Chesne. Paris, 1624. Folio. 
- — . A Genealogical Memoir of the Family of Montmorency, 

styled De Marisco, or Morres, by Henry de Montmorency-Morres. 

Paris, 1817. 4to. Privately printed. 

Les Montmorency de France et les Montmorency d'Irlande, 



Precis Historique. Paris, 1828. 4to. Privately printed. 
Montrose, Dukedom of, see Crawfurd. 
Mordaunt — Genealogy and Arms of the Noble House of Mordaunt ; Brit. 

Mus. Earl. MS. 6767. 
See Alno. 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. ZW 

List of Family Histories, etc. 
Morres, Family of see Montmorency. 

Mountgarret — Claim of the E.t. Hon. Henry Edmund, Visct. Mountgarrett, 

and of Pierre Somerset, Visct. Mountgarret, to vote at Elections of Peers. 

See Sess. Papers (159 of 1854 ; Q. of 1855). 

Mountnorris — Claim of George, Earl of Mountnorris in Ireland, to the 

Titles of Earl of Anglesey and Baron Annesley of Newport PagnelL 

See Sess. Papers (65 of 1819). 
Mulgrave — Claim of Constantine, Lord Mulgrave, to the Earldom of 

Anglesea. See Sess. Papers (Feb. L770— Apr. 1772). 
Munro — Genealogy of Munro of Fowlis. See Doddridge's "Life of Col. 

Gardiner" 1792. 12mo. 
Murray — Claim of John Murray to the Dukedom of Atholl. See Sess. Papers 

(Feb. 1764). 
Musard, Family of see Frecheville. 
Napier — Memoirs of John Napier of Merchiston, his lineage, life, and 

times. Edinb. and Lond. 1834. 8vo. 
Naunton — Pedigree of the Family of Naunton; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 

17,098. 
Nelson — The Royal Descent of Nelson and Wellington, from Edw. I., by 

G. R. French. Lond. 1853. 8vo. 
Netterville — Claim of James Netterville, Esq., to the title of Viscount 

Netterville, in Ireland. See Seas. Papers (206 of 1830 ; 35 of 1833 ; 

141 of 1834). 
Neville — Claim of Henry Neville to the Barony of Abergavenny. See -Sess. 

Papers (Apr. 1605— June 1610). 
A treatise, whether the Barony of Abergavenny be descended unto 

the daughter and heire of the Hon. Henry Nevill, the late Baron, &c. 

Lond. 1642. 12mo. 

■ A Genealogical Account of the Noble Family of Neville, by D. 



Rowland, Esq. Lond. 1830. Folio. Privately printed. 

A Sketch of the Stock of Nevill, Earls of Northumberland, and of 

its Descendants the Earls of Westmoreland, by W. E. Surtees. Newcast. 
1843. 8vo. 

■ Pedigree of the Family of Neville. See Drummond's " History of 



Noble British Families" part viii. 

Pedigree of the Family of Nevill, Earl of Northumberland ; Brit. 

Mus. Add. MS. 4712. 

Pedigree of the Nevill's, Lords of Raby and Earls of Westmore- 



land; Ashm. Lib. Wood MS. 8486. 
Topographical, Historical, and Genealogical Collections relating to 

the Family of Nevil; Brit. Mus. Sari. MS. 3882. 
Boll of the Family of Neville; College of Arms, Philipot MS, 

2, Pd. 



268 HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 

List op Familt Histories, etc. 
Neville (continued) — Pedigrees of several branches of the Nevills ; Coll. 

op Arms, Pkilipot MSS. Pb. 2 ; 3. 
Newburgh, Earldom of, see Giustiniani. 
Newton — Account of the Family of Sir I. Newton, by Dr. T. Keid. See 

"Edinb. Phil. Journ." vol. in. p. 293. 
Nicholas— Pedigree of Nicholas of Ryndway, Co. Wilts, 1679; Brit. 

Mus. Add. MS. 17,869, a. b. 
North, Barony of, see Doyle. 
Northampton — Descent of the Family of the Earl of Northampton, with 

Portraits in pen and ink; Brit. Mus. Lansd. Roll, 9. 
Northumberland — Extracts of the History and Genealogy of the Noble 

Families of the Earl and Countess of Northumberland. Dublin, 1764. 

8vo. Privately printed. 

see Neville ; Percy. 

Nowell — Genealogical Collections relating to the Family of Nowell, or 

Noel; Ashm. Lib. MSS. 1750, ff. 1—10, and 1750, B (a roll) ; 1763, 

f. 26 b. 
Nugent — Claim of Governor Nugent, and Andrew Nugent, Esq., to be 

Coheirs of the Barony of Delvin. See Sess. Papers (144 of 1831-32). 
Claim of William Thomas Nugent to be Baron Nugent of Rivers- 
ton, in Ireland. See Sess. Papers (208 of 1839). 
O'Brian — Claim of Lady O'Brian to the Barony of Leighton Bromswold. 

See Sess. Papers (Jan— Feb. 1673). 
An Account of the O'Brian Family; Pub. Lib. Camb. MS. Bd. 

iii. 83, art. 8. 

Copies of the Pedigrees of the various branches of the O'Brien 



Family; Brit. Mus. Eg. MS. 101. 
Ochiltree, Peerage of, see Castle-Stewart. 
O'Connor — Claim of Maurice O'Connor, of Mount Pleasant, in King's Co., 

Esq., claiming to be Baron of Killeen. See Sess. Papers (144 of 1831-32). 
O'Conor — Memoirs of Charles O'Conor of Belanagare, with a Historical 

Account of the Family of O'Conor, by the Rev. C. O'Conor. Dublin, 

1796. 8vo. 
Ogilvy — Claim of Walter Ogilvy, Esq., to the title of Earl of Airlie, and 

Lord Ogilvy. See Sess. Papers (67 of 1812-13; 60 of 1813-14). 
Ogle — An Account of the Family of Ogle. Edinb. 1812. 8vo. Privately 

printed. 
Baronum Ogleorum Northumbriensis Familiae Perantiquas, Descensus; 

Bodl. Lib. MS. 4160. 
see Cavendish. 



Oldis — Memoirs of the Family of Oldis ; Brit. Mds. Add. MS. 4240. 
Ormond — Claim of the Earl of Ormonde and Ossory to vote at Elections 
of Irish Peers. See Sess. Papers (104 of 1821). 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 269 

List op Family Hibtoeies, etc. 
Ormond (continued) — Pedigree of Thomas, late Earl of Ormond and Ossory, 

1616 ; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 4792, f. 30.— See Butler. 
Osborn — Claim of G. W. F. Osborn, called Marquis of Carmarthen, to the 

Barony of Conyers. See Sess. Papers (Apr. 1797 — June 1798). 
Ossory, Earl of see Ormond. 
Oxford, Earl of see Lindsey ; Makgill; Verb. 
Pakenham — An Ancient Book relating to the Pakenham Family, temp. 

Edw. II. ; Brit. Mus. Campbell Chart, xvii. 
Parker — Pedigree of the Family of Parker. See Parker's " Description of 

Browsholme." Lond. 1815. 4to. 
Paston — Account of the Family of Paston, by F. Worship, Esq. Reprinted 

from the "Journal of the Norfolk Archaeological Society" 8vo. 
Pauncefote — Collections relating to the Family of Pauncefote, Co. Glouc; 

Lamb. Lib. MS. 1221. 
Pepys — Genealogical Pedigrees of the Family of Pepys, and of the Impington 

Branch thereof. 1844. 4to. 
Percival — Pedigree of the Family of Percival. See Drummond's " History 

of Noble British Families" part v. 

See Ivery. 

Percy — The Case of James Percy, claymant to the Earldom of Northumber- 
land. Lond. 1685. Folio. 
Short Account of the Proceedings of James Percy, late of Ireland, 

in pursuance of his right to the Earldom of Northumberland, n. d. 

Folio broadside. 
A Sketch of the Descendants of Josceline de Louvaine, the second 



House of Percy, Earls of Northumberland, &c., by W.E. Surtees. New- 
castle-upon-Tyne, 1844. 4to. Only 22 copies printed. 
Chronicle of the Family of Percy. Newcast. 1845. 4to. A metri- 
cal pedigree, edited by D. Bisley, Yicar of Long Burton. Only 30 
copies printed. 

■ Evidentise Antiquorum Dominorum de Percy; Bodl. Library, 



MS. 5016, f. 1. 

Genealogy of the Percy Family, from 890 to Edw. III.; Brit. 



Mus. Add. MS. 4276. 

Pedigree of the Percy Family ; Coll. of Arms, MS. D. 1. 



Perry — The Case of Elizabeth Perry, of Penshurst-Place, Kent, respectirg 
her Claim to the Barony of Sydney of Penshurst. Lond. 1782. Folio. 

Perth, Earldom of see Drummond. 

Pigot — Claim of the Rt. Hon. Richard Pigot, Visct. Molesworth, to vote at 
Elections of Irish Peers. See Sess. Papers (76 of 1821). 

Pitt — Narrative of Thomas Pitt, Lord Camelford, and Proofs of his Claims 
to the Peerage. 1785. 4to. 

Polewart, Barony of see Anstruther; Scott. 



270 HERALDIC COLLECTIONS, 

List of Family Histoeies, etc. 

Powys, Barony of, see Kynaston. 

Prittie— Claim of the Rt. Hon. Henry Prittie, Lord Dunally, to vote at Elec- 
tions of Peers. See Sess. Papers (N. of 1855). 

Radclyffe — Genealogy of the Family of RadclyfFe, by James Ellis. New- 
castle-upon-Tyne, 1850. 8vo. 

Rayner — Memoranda of the Family of Eayner ; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 6256. 

Revett, Family of, see Fauconberge. 

Richmond, Family of, see Drake. 

Riddell — Pedigree of Sir James Riddell, Bart., of Ardnamurchan. [EdinL 
1794?] 4to. 

A Genealogical Sketch of the Riddell Family, by W. P. 

Riddell. New Orleans, 1852. 8vo. 

Rivers, Earl, see Savage. 

Eobertson — The History of the Robertsons of Strowan. Edinb.n.d. 12mo. 

Roche — Original Papers and Deeds relating to the Family of Roche of 
Cork, 1543—1740; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 19,868. 

Rokeby — Claim of the Rt. Hon. Matthew, Baron Rokeby, to vote at Elec- 
tions of Irish Peers. See Sess. Papers (153 of 1830). 

Rookewood — Vetustissima Prosapia Rookewodorum de Stanningefilde, in 
Com. Suff. See Nichols' " Coll. Top. et Gen.," vol. ii. p. 120. 

Roos, Barony of, see Fitzgerald. 

Roscommon — Claim of the Earl of Roscommon to vote at Elections of 
Irish Peers. See Sess. Papers (122 of 1823 ; 62 of 1824 ; 46 of 1825 ; 
116 of 1826; 40 of 1826-7; 138 of 1828). 

The Roscommon Claim of Peerage explained, by J. S. Taylor. 

1829. 8vo. 

Rose — History of the Family of Rose of Kilravock, edited by Cosmo Innes, 
Esq. 184*. 4to. Printed by the Spalding Club. 

Ross — "Ane Breve Cronicle of theEarlis of Ross," including Notices of the 
Family of Ross, of Balnagown. Edinb. 1850. Small 4to. Privately printed. 

Row — Memoirs of the Family of Row, by James Maidment. Edinb. 1828. 
Small 4to. Privately printed. 

Rowallan — Historie and Descent of the House of Rowallane, by Sir W. 
Mure, Knt. Glasgow, 1825. 12mo. 

Roxburghe, Dukedom of, see Innes. 

Ruglen — Claim of William, Earl of Ruglen, to be Earl of Cassilis. See 
Sess. Papers (Mar. 1760— Feb. 1761). 

Russell — Anecdotes of the House of Bedford, from the Norman Conquest. 
Lond.n.d. (arc. 1800). 8vo. 

An Historical Account of the Original and Rise of the Russells, 

Earls of Bedford: Lond. 1684. 12mo. 

Historical Memoirs of the House of Russell, by J. H. Wiffen. 



2 vols. Lond. 1833. Roy. 8vo. 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 271 

List op Family Histories, etc. 

Rutherford — Claim of Alexander Rutherford to the title of Lord Ruther* 
ford. See Sess. Papers (Dec. 1761— Mar. 1762). 

Ruthin, Barony of, see Longevile. 

Sackville — Memoirs of the Noble Family of Sackville, by A. Collins. 
Lond. 1741. 8vo. 

A Topographical Sketch of Knole, Co. Kent, with a Brief Ge- 
nealogy of the Sackville Family, by J. Bridgman. Lond. 1797. 8vo. 
Several later editions, the last in 1817. 

Pedigree of the Family of Sackville, Earls of Dorset, to 1622 ; 

Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 14,844, a. 

Grants and Patents to the House of Sackvile, with other Evi- 



dences to prove their Pedigree; Coll. of Arms, PJiilipot MS. 9, Pc. 
Saintclaire — Genealogie of the Saintclaires of Rosslyn, by Father R. A. 

Hay. Edinb. 1835. Small 4to. Only 108 copies printed. 
St. George — Claim of the Right Hon. Denis St. George, Baron Dunsandle 

and Clanconal, to vote at Elections of Peers. See Sess. Papers (211 of 

1849). 
St. John — Notitia St. Johanniana : Genealogical Memoirs of the Family of 

St. John. 1713. 8vo. 

see Mildmay. 

St. Medard — Genealogia Famiiiarum de Sancto Medardo, et de Armin, 

Dominorum de Osgodby, in Com. Line. ; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 4783. 
St. Nicholas — Collectanea qusedam de Antiquitate et Prosapia Sti. Nicholai, 

in Com. Cane. ; Coll. of Arms, Philipot MS. 20, Pd. 
Salisbury — Genealogical Account of the Ancient Earldom of Salisbury, by 

T. C. Banks. Lond. 1832. 8vo. 
Salusbury — Testimonial to the Descent of Foulke Salusbury, and his Claim 

to be entitled a Gentleman. See 5th Annual Report of the Oxford 

Heraldic Society. 1839. 8vo. 
Savage — Pedigree of John Savage, Earl Rivers, 1582; Brit. Mus. Lansd. 

Poll, 7. 
Pedigree of the Family of Savage, from John the Savage, Lord of 

Stansby, 4 Edw. II. ; Brit. Mus. Lansd. Roll, 8. 
Saye and Sele, Barony of, see Twistleton. 
Scott — The History of several Families of the name of Scott, by Capt. 

Walt. Scott. Edinb. 1688. 4to.— 2d. ed. 1776.— 3rd. ed. 1786. 
Claim of Hugh Scott, Esq., to be Baron of Polewart. See Sess. Papers 

(45 of 1831). 
Pedigree of Scott of Stokoe, compiled by William Scott. Newcast. 

1783. 8vo. Privately printed. — Reprinted in 1852. Lond. 8vo. 
Scrase — History of the Family of Scrase, by M. A. Lower. Lond. 1856. 

8vo. Printed separately from the "Sussex Collections" vol. viii. 



272 HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 

List op Family Histoeies, etc. 
Scrope — The Scrope and Grosvenor Roll, edited by Sir N. H. Nicolas. 

2 vols. Lord. 1832. Imp. 8vo. Privately printed. 
Memoirs of the Family of Scrope. See Scrope's "History of Castle 

Combe." 1852. 4to. Privately printed. 
Scudamore — Some Memoirs of the Ancient Family of Scudamore. See 

Gibson's "History of Boor and Home Lacy." Land. 1727. 4to. 
Letters and Papers relating to the Family of Scudamore 

of Horn-Lacy, in Herefordshire; Beit. Mtjs. Add. MSS. 11,041-— 

11,059; 11,689; 11,816. 

■ Sixty-three Charters and Deeds relating to the Property of 



the Family of Scudamore, from the reign of Henry III. to the year 
1674; Brit. Mus. Add. Chart. 1308—1349; 1351—1357; 1359— 
1371. 

Charters and Deeds relating chiefly to the Estates of the 



Family of Scudamore of Horn-Lacy and Ballingham, Co. Heref., 1400 — 

1698; Brit. Mus. Add. Chart. 1813—1973. 
Selby — Selbyana : An Attempt to elucidate the Origin and History of the 

Family of Selby of Wavendon. Carlisle, 1825. 8vo. 
Seton, House of see Seytoun. 
Sewell — Claim of T. B. D. H. Sewell, Esq., to the Barony of Athenry. 

See Sess. Papers (144 of 1831-32 ; 203 of 1836). 
Seymour — The Attorney-General's Report of Sir E. Seymour's Title to the 

Dukedom of Somerset. 1750. Folio. 
Seytoun — History of the House of Seytoun, by Sir E. Maitland, continued 

by Alexander Viscount Kingston. Glasgow, 1829. 4to. Printed by 

Sir R. Maitland for the Bannatyne Club. 
Genealogy of the House and Surname of Setoun, by Sir E. 

Maitland, edited by C. K. Sharpe. Bdinb. 1830. 4to. 

An Historical Genealogie of the Ancient and Noble House of 



Seton, to the year 1687 ; Advocates' Lib. Edinb. 

The History of the House of Seton ; Brit. Mus. Hath MS. 



6091. 
Sharnburn — Vetusta Historia Familise de Sharnburn; Ashm. Lib. MS. 

1141, art. 5. Published by Bishop Gibson, in the "Beliquia Spelman- 

niance" Oxford, 1698. Folio. 
Sheffield — A Character of John Sheffield, late Duke of Buckinghamshire, 

with an Account of the Pedigree of the Sheffield Family. Lond. 1729. 

12mo. 
Sheraton, or Shoroveton — Genealogy of the Family of Shoroveton or 

Sheraton, nineteenth cent. ; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 21,183. 
Shirley {Earl Ferrers) — Stemmata Shirleiana ; or, Annals of the Shirley 

Family. Lond. 1841. 4to. Privately printed. 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 273 

List os Family Histories, etc. 
Shirlei (continued) — Historical Memoirs of the Sherley Brothers, by E. P. 
Shirley. 1848. 4to. Printed for the Roxburghe Club. 

Genealogica Historia Donnls de Shirley; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 

4023. 

Shirleorum Warwicensis et Darbiensis Familise Prosapia ; Brit. 



Mus. Earl. MS. 4028. 

• Pedigree and Arms of the Family of Shirley, of Eatington ; Brit. 



Mus. Earl. MSS. 4928; 6832, art. 61. 

Pedigree of the Family of Sherley, from the Conquest, signed by 

Cooke and Glover; Brit. Mus. Earl. Roll, 0. 17. 

Shrewsbury — Claim of the Rt. Hon. Bertram Arthur, Earl of Shrewsbury 

to vote at Elections of Irish Peers. See Sess. Papers (162 of 1854). 
Sidney — Claim of Sir John S. Sidney, Bart., to the Barony of De Lisle. 

See Sess. Papers (140 of 1824 ; 177 of 1825 ; 59 of 1826). 
Simson, Family of see Fraser. 
Sinclair — Claim of William Sinclair, Esq., to the title of Earl of Caithness. 

See Sess. Papers (Feb. 1771— Feb. 1790). 
Siptoft — Memoirs of the Family of Siptoft, See Scrope's "Eistory of Castle 

Combe" 1852. 4to. Privately printed. 
Slane, Barony of see Bryan. 
Sloane — Account of the Family of Sir Hans Sloane ; Brit. Mus. Shane 

MS. 3984. 
Smith — Collections relating to Henry Smith, Esq., sometime Alderman of 

London, &c. Lond. 1800. 8vo. 

Notices relating to Thomas Smith of Campden, and to Henry Smith, 

Alderman of London, by the late Rev. C. P. Gwilt, B.A. Lond. 1836. 
Royal 8vo. 

Pedigree of the Family of Smith of Queensborough, Co. Leicester, 

to about 1764 ; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 14,844, d. 

Arms of the Families of Smith in England and Germany ; Brit. 

Mus. Earl. MS. 578. 

Collection of Arms by the name of Smith, 2 vols, ; Coll. of Arms, 

MS. E.D.N. 24. 

see Carrington. 



Somers — Papers relating to the Somers Family; Public Lib. Camb. MS. 

Dd. xiv. 25. 
Somerset, Dukedom of see Seymour. 
Somerville — Memorie of the Somervilles, by James, Lord Somerville, 

2 vols. Edinb. 1815. 8vo. Edited by Sir Walter Scott. 
Southampton, Earl of see Wriothesley. 
Southesk, Earldom of see Carnegie. 
Spencer— Genealogy of the Noble Family of Le de Spencers, and Spencers; 

Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 6] 35. 

18 



274 HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 

List op Family Histobies, etc. 

Spynie — Claims preferred to the House of Lords in the case of the Spynie 
Peerage, by J. Maidment, Esq. Edinb. 1840. Only 60 copies printed. 

Stafford— Papers relating to the two Baronies of Stafford, claimed by Sir 
W. Jerningham, Bart. 1807. 4to. Privately printed. 

The Stafford Peerage, by J. Campbell. Lond. 1818. 4to. 

Collections for a History of the Family of Stafford Brit. Mus. 

Add. MS. 14,409, f. 266. 

Stair — Claim of James Dalrymple to the Earldom of Stair. See Sets. 
Papers (Mar. 1747— May 1748). 

Stanhope — Notices of the Stanhopes as Esquires and Knights, and until 
their first Peerages in 1605 and 1616. Lond. 1855. 8vo. Unpub- 
lished (by Visct. Mahon, now Earl Stanhope, P. S. A.). 

Stanley — A Genealogical Account of the House of Stanley, to 1735, by 
J. Seacome. Liverpool, 1741. 4to. — Reprinted, Manchester, 1783. 4to. 
Again at Preston, 1793. 8vo. 

Claim of the Rt. Hon. Charles Stanley, Visct. Monck, to vote at 

Elections of Peers. See Sess. Papers (121 of 1849). 

-Pedigrees of the Family of Stanley; Brit. Mus. Marl. Bolls, P. 2; 6. 



Stapleton — Claim of Thomas Stapleton, of Carlton, Esq., to the Barony of 
Beaumont. See Sess. Papers (Apr. May, 1791— May, 1798 ; 64 of 1840). 

Staunton — Memoir of the Life and Family of the late Sir G. L. Staunton, 
Bart. Movant Press, 1823. 8vo. Privately printed. 

Steward — Collections relating to the Family of Steward, of Swaffham, Co. 
Norfolk; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 15,644. 

Stewart, see Stuart. 

Stirling — Claim of William Alexander to the Earldom of Stirling. See Sess. 
Papers (May, 1760— Mar. 1762). 

An Analytical Statement of the Case of Alexander, Earl of Stir- 
ling and Doran, by Sir T. C. Banks. Lond. 1832. 8vo. 

Case of the Eight Hon. Alexander, Earl of Stirling, by J. I. Burn. 

Lond. 1833. 8vo. 

— Narrative of the Proceedings to overpower the Earl of Stirling, 

&c. ; also a Genealogical Account of the Family of Alexander, Earl of 
Stirling, &c., by E.Lockhart, Esq. Edinb. 1836. 4to. Privately printed. 
-The Stirling Peerage : Trial of Alex. Humphreys, or Alexander, 



styling himself Earl of Stirling, for Forgery, ed. by W. B. D. D. Turn- 
bull, Esq. Edinb. 1839. 8vo. 

Report of the Trial, by Archibald Swinton, Esq. Edinb. 1839. 8vo. 

Earldom of, see Alexander. 



Stonor — Claim of Thomas Stonor, Esq., to the Barony of Camojs. See 

Sess. Papers (118 of 1838 ; 167 of 1839). 
Stoughton — Collections relating to the Family of Stoughton, of Stoke, near 

Guildford; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 6174. 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 275 

List op Family Histobies, etc. 
Strange, Barony of see Atholl. 
Stratford — Claim of the "Rt. Hon. Benjamin O'Neale Stratford, Earl of 

Aldborough, to vote at Elections of Irish Peers. See Sess. Papers (155 

of 1854). 
Strathern — History of the Earldoms of Strathern, Monteith, and Airth, by 

Sir N. H. Nicolas. Lond. 1842. 8vo. 
Strathmore, Earldom of, see Bowes. 

Stuart — Memoires of the Family of the Stuarts. Lond. 1683. 8vo. 
La Race et la Naissance, la Vie et la Mort, de Marie Stuart. 

Amst. 1695. 18mo. 

A Chronological, Genealogical, and Historical Dissertation of the 



Royal Family of the Stuarts, by Matth. Kennedy. Paris, 1705. 8vo. 

A Genealogical History of the Royal Family of the Stewarts, from 

1034 to 1710, by G. Crawfurd. Edinb. 1710. Folio. Privately printed. 
— Reprinted for sale in 1782. 4to. 

A Genealogical Account of the Most Illustrious Name of Stuart, 



by D. Symson, M.A. 1713. 4to. 

■ Essay on the Origin of the Royal Family of the Stewarts, by R. 



Hay. Edinb. 1722 and 1793. 4to. 
An Historical Genealogy of the Royal House of Stuart, by M. 

Noble. Lond. 1795. 4to. 
Genealogical History of the Stuarts, by A. Stuart. Lond. 1798. 



4to. — Supplement, Lond. 1799. 4to. 

The Genealogical History of the Stewarts refuted. Edinb.1799. 8vo. 

Genealogical Account of the Royal House of Stuart, by Thomas 

Waterhouse. Grantham, 1816. 8vo. 

The Salt Foot Controversy, involving the Descent of the Family 



of Stewart of Allanton, by J. Riddell. Edinb. 1818. 8vo. 

Coltness Collections, comprising Memorials of the Stewarts of 



Allanton, Coltness, &c, by Mrs. Calderwood. 1842. 4to. Privately 
printed by the Maitland Club. 

Stewartiana ; containing the Case of Robert II. and Elizabeth 



Mure, &c, by J. Riddell. Edinb. 1843. 8vo. 

-View of the Evidence for proving that the Paternal Ancestor of the 



present Earl of Galloway was the second Son of Sir Alex. Stewart of 
Darnley, &c. 1801. 4to. Privately printed. 

Claim of the Rt. Hon. John Stuart, Earl of Darnley, to vote at 

Elections of Peers. See Sess. Papers (293 of 1849)* 

Genealogical Sketch of the Stuarts of Castle Stuart, in Ireland, by 



the Rev. A. G. Stuart. Edinb. 1854. 4to. 
Sturton, Barony of see Hamilton. 
Stuteville— Notices of the Stuteville Family; Brit. Mus. Add. MS, 

jrj no.o 



276 HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 

List op Family Histoeies, etc. 
Surrey, Earl of see Warren. 
Sussex, Duke of see D'Este. 

Sutherland — The Case of Elizabeth, claiming the Title and Dignity ot 
Countess of Sutherland, by D. Dalrymple. 1770. 4to. 
i The additional Case of Elizabeth, Countess of Sutherland, 

by D. Dalrymple. 1770. 4to. 

■ A Genealogical History of the Earldom of Sutherland, by Sir 



E. Gordon. Edinb. 1813. Folio. 

Claims preferred to the House of Lords in the Case of the 



Sutherland Peerage, by James Maidment, Esq. Edinb. 1840. Only 60 
copies printed. 

■ Earldom of see Gordon. 



Sutton — The Pedigree of Sutton. See Churton's "Life of Sir Eichard Sutton" 

p. 533 * 
Sydney — An Account of the Sydney Family. 1816. 8vo. Printed at the 

Lee Priory Press, Kent. 

Barony of see Perry. 

Sylvester — Gens Sylvestrina ; Memorials of some of my good and religious 

Ancestors, and eleven generations of a Puritan Family, by Joseph 

Hunter, F.S.A. 1846. 12mo. For private distribution only. 
Talbot — Memoirs of the Noble Eamily of Talbot. 1737. 8vo. Privately 

printed. 
Genealogical Memoir of the Ancient and Noble Family of Talbot 

of Malahide, Co. Dublin. Dublin, 1829. Folio. 
Claim of the Kt. Hon. James, Baron Talbot of Malahide, to vote 



at Elections of Peers. See Sess. Papers (106 of 1851). 

Collections relating to the Family of Talbot, eighteenth cent.; 



Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 18,446. 

A Kalendar chiefly of the Talbots and their Alliances ; Coll. of 



Arms, MS. K. B. 29. 

Pedigree of the Family of Talbot, with Extracts from Ancient 

Deeds, &c. ; Durham Cathedral, Allan MS. 2. 4 

Propagines et Stemmata antiquse Familise Talbotorum, ad ann. 



1596; Brit. Mus. Cotton. Chart, xiii. 37. 
Tattershall — Notices of the Family of Tattershall. See " Topographical 

Account of Tattershall." fforncastle, ISIS. 8vo. 
De dominis de Tateshale post Conquestum per Successionem ; 

Brit. Mus. Cotton. MS. Tib. C. viii. f. 4. 
Thanet, Earl of see Tufton. 
Townshend — Claim of certain Persons to be Children of the Marquess 

Townshend. See Sess. Papers (116 of 1842 ; 46, 97 of 1843). 
Tracy — Memoirs illustrating the Ncble Families of Tracy and Courtenay. 

Cant. 1796. 8vo. 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 277 

List of Family Histobies, etc. 
Tracy {continued) — Claim of James Tracy, Esq., to be Visct. and Bar. Tracy, 

of Rathcoole. See Sess. Papers (46 of 1841; 59 of 1843 ; 162 of 1847; 

156 of 1848; 107 of 1849; R. of 1855). 
Trefusis— Claim of R. G. W. Trefusis, Esq., to the Barony of Clinton. See 

Sess. Papers (June 1793— Mar. 1794). 
Trench — Claim of Frederic Mason Trench, Baron Ashtovvn, to vote at 

Elections of Peers. See Sess. Papers (M. of 1855). 
Tresham — The Ruins of Liveden, with Historical Notices of the Family of 

Tresham, by T. Bell. Lond. 1847. 4to. 
Tufton — Memorials of the Family of Tufton, Earls of Thanet, by R. 

Pocock. Gravesend, 1800. 8vo. 
Turing — The Lay of -the Turings, a Sketch of the Family History. 4to. 

Privately printed. 
Turvey, Baronage of, see Barnewall. 
Twistleton — The Case of John Twistleton of Broughton, in the Co. of 

Oxon, Esq. n. d. Folio. 
Claim of John Twistleton, Esq., to the Barony of Saye and Sele. See 

Sess. Papers (Mar. 1733). 

Claim of the Rev. Frederic Benjamin Twistleton, to be Baron of Saye 



and Sele. See Sess. Papers (316 of 1847 ; 101 of 1848). 
Tyndale — Genealogy of the Family of Tyndale, by B. W. Greenfield. Lond. 

1843. Folio. Privately printed. 
Tynte — Claim of Charles K. K. Tynte of Halswell, Co. Som., to the Barony 

of Wharton. See Sess. Papers (66 of 1844 ; 202 of 1845). 
Un ton — The Untonlnventories, with Genealogical Notices of theUnton Family, 

by J. G. Nichols. Lond. 1 841. 4to. (for the Berkshire Ashmolean Society). 
Urquhart — Promptuary of Time, with the Pedigree of the Urquharts of 

Cromartie. Lond. 1652. 8vo. — Reprinted in the 8vo ed. of Sir Thomas 

Urquhart's Tracts. Edinb.lllk. 
Valentia — Several Claims to the title of Visct.Valentia, &c. Dublin,lll$. Fol. 
Claim of Arthur, Visct. Valentia, to the Earldom of Anglesea. 

See Sess. Papers (Feb. 1770— Apr. 1772. 
Vaughan — British Antiquity Revived, touching the Soveraignty of the three 
. Princes of Wales, with Pedigree of the Earl of Carbery, &c., by Robert 

Vaughan; also the Pedigree of the Author, continued to 1834. Bala, 

1834. 4to. 
Vaux — Sketch of a Genealogical Account of the Family of Vaux, Vaus, or 

De Vallibus. Pembroke, 1800. 4to. Privately printed from Nisbet's 

"Heraldry." 8vo. 
Speeches delivered upon the Claims to the Barony of Vaux of Har- 

rowden. Lond. 1836. 8vo. Privately printed. 
Pedigrees of the Lords Vaux of Harrowden, Co. Northampton ; 



Coll. of Arms, Vincent MS. 49. 



278 HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 

List op Family Histories, etc. 
Vere — Collections relating to the Family of Vere ; Brit. Mus. Earl. MSS. 
6134; 6776. 

Amies, Honours, and Matches, of the illustrious Family of Veere ; 

Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 4189 ; Eargrave MS. 494. 

History of Vere, Earl of Oxford ; Coll. of Arms, Vincent MS. 445. 

seeALNO; Cavendish. 



Verney — Claim of Sir Eichard Verney to the Barony of Brooke. See Sess. 
Papers (Dec. 1694— Feb. 1695). 

Vernon — Historical Memoir of the House of Vernon (by Thos. Stapleton). 
n. d. 4to. Unfinished — no title. Only 100 copies printed. 

Collections relating to the Family of Vernon, eighteenth cent. ; 

Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 18,446. 

Villiers — The Case of George Villiers, claiming the Title of Earl of Buck- 
ingham, n. d. Folio. 

Claim of John Villiers to be Earl of Buckingham. See Sess. Papers 

(Apr. 1709). 

The Genealogy of the Family of Villiers ; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 



4041, art. 2. 

Account of the Family of Villiers, Duke of Buckingham; Brit. 



Mus. Earl. MS. 6862. 

Genealogy and Pedigree of the Most Noble Family of Villiers ; 

Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 7178. 

Wake — A brief Enquiry into the Antiquity of the Family of Wake, by 
W. Wake, D.D. Warminster, 1833. 8vo. Only 100 copies printed. 

Walpole — A brief History of Sir Robert Walpole and Family, by W. Mus- 
grave, Esq. Land. 1732. 8vo.— 1738. 8vo.— 1745. 8vo. 

Warburton —Memoir of the Family of Warburton of Garryhinch, King's 
Co., Ireland. Dublin, 1848. 8vo. Privately printed. 

Ward— Memoranda of the Family of Ward ; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 6256. 

Warren — The History of the Ancient Earls of Warren and Surrey, with the 
Descent of the Warrens of Poynton, Co. Chester, and Stapleford, Co. 
Notts., by the Rev. J. Watson. Warrington, 1776. 4to. Privately 
printed. Afterwards published in 1782. 2 vols. 4to. 

Genealogy of the Family of Warren of Poynton ; Lambeth Lib. 

MS. 1281. 

Warwick, Earl of, see Beauchamp. 

Welby — Notices of the Family of Welby. Grantham, 1842. 8vo. Privately 

printed. 
Wellesley — Pedigree of the Family of Wellesley, to about the year 1770 ; 

Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 13,914, a. 
Wellington — The Koyal Descent of Nelson and Wellington from Edw. I., 

by G. R. French. Zand. 1853. 8vo. 
Wentworth, Barony of, see Johnson. 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 279 

List op Family Histobies, etc. 
Westmoreland, Earl of see Neville. 
Weston — Westonorum Families antiquissimse ex agro Stafford. Geneaiogia, 

1632 ; Bkit. Mus. Add. MS. 18,667. 
Wharton, Barmy of see Tynte. 
Wheeler — Description of Otterden Place, Co. Kent, with Genealogical 

Memoirs of the Family of Wheeler, by the Rev.T. Rackett, M.A. Loud. 

1832. 8vo. Privately printed. 
Wickham — Descent of the Family of Wickham of Swalcliffe, Co. Oxon, by 

C. E. Long. See Nichols' " Coll Top. et Gen.," vol. ii. pp. 225, 368 ; 

vol. iii. pp. 178, 345. 
Wigtoun, Earldom of, see Fleming. 
Willoughby — Claim of Henry Willoughby to the Barony of Willoughby of 

Parham. See Sess. Papers (Feb. 1733— Feb. Mar. 1767). 
Pedigree and Deeds of the Family of Willoughby of Bisley, 

Co. Derb. ; Coll. of Arms, Vincent MS. 31, pp. 235—272. 
see Bertie. 



"Wilson — Claim of Eobert Wilson, Esq., to the Barony of Berners. See Sess. 

Papers (IS of 1831-32). 
Windsor — A Genealogical Account of the Family of Windsor, by A. 

Collins. Lond. 1754. 4to. 
Familia Antiqua Windesoriensium, a Conquestu Anglian; Brit. 

Mus. Karl. Roll, P. 8. 
Wolleye, Family of, see Legge. 
Wren — Memoirs of the Family of the Wrens, by Steph. Wren. Lond. 1750. 

Folio. 
Wriothesley — Genealogie du Seign. Hen. Wrothesley, Comte de Sou- 
thampton, jusqu'a Tan 1590; Brit. Mus. Earl. Roll, 0. 12. 
Pedigree of the Family of Wriothesley, from the Barons de 

Dunstanville, sixteenth cent. ; Brit. Mus. Earl. Roll, P. 4. 
Wykeham — Tabula Genealogica exhibens cognatos et affines W mi . de 

Wykeham, he. See Lowth's "Life of Wykeham" 
Wyndham— Claim of the lit. Hon. Edwin Richard Wyndham, Earl of 

Dunraven, to vote at Elections of Peers. See Sess. Papers (107 of 

1851). 
Yvery, Eouse of see Ivery. 
Zouche, Peerage of see Bisshopp. 

Funeral Certificates. — Funeral Certificates were taken by 
virtue of an order of the Earl Marshal, issued in the 10th Elizabeth, 
1567, wherein it was enjoined, that every King of Arms, Herald, or 
Pursuivant, who should serve at any funeral, should bring into the 
Library or Office of Arms, a true and certain certificate, under the 
hands of executors and mourners, or mourner, present at the funeral; 



280 HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 

and it has been stated, 1 that the want of such signatures to any 
ancient funeral certificate renders it inadmissible as evidence. They 
contain attested accounts of the time of death, place of burial, and 
of the marriages, issue, and frequently the collateral branches of 
the several persons whose funerals were attended by the officers at 
arms or their deputies, illustrated with the armorial bearings of the 
deceased. When heraldic influence began to decline in conse- 
quence of the Revolution of 1688, these funeral entries were also 
neglected, though the certificates of some are recorded as late as 
1710, 1713, 1717. The College of Arms possesses — in addition — 
many books containing accounts of Proceedings at Royal and other 
Funerals, and some important Manuscripts relating to them may 
be found in Public Libraries, as hereafter noted. 2 

Monumental Inscriptions ; Epitaphs; Coffin-Plate Inscrip- 
tions. — Although often erroneous in dates, and sometimes even 
in names, the inscriptions engraved upon monuments, and tomb or 
grave stones, are well worthy the notice of the genealogical inquirer. 
Sir Henry Chauncy, in his History of Hertfordshire, says, " These 
being memorials of our once flourishing ancestors, designed to 
perpetuate their remembrance to future ages, are of no despi- 
cable use to heralds in tracing pedigrees, or lawyers in making out 
titles to estates." Many instances are on record of the incor- 
rectness of Inscriptions, which arises from various causes : executors 
are not always well informed on the subject ; frequently all trans- 
actions relating to funerals and monuments (of eminent men 
especially) are under the direction of an undertaker, a man seldom 
very careful or very learned ; he again hands over half of his orders 
to the stonemason, a man probably of less learning ; and, if we often 
see the most absurd orthography in epitaphs, there is less reason to 
impute infallibility to the same chisel when carving dates. Another 
great cause of errors in monumental dates is the imbecility of 
mind of many, especially aged persons, who disguise their ages 
when living, foolishly adding to or diminishing from the truth. 
From all these reasons, it behoves the genealogist to be careful 
against placing implicit confidence, in important cases, upon monu- 
mental inscriptions. 

From Coffin-Plate Inscriptions we may collect authentic genea- 
logical evidence. An application was made in 1822, to the Lord 
Chancellor, by a claimant of the Scudamore Estates, at Home Lacy, 

1 Banbury Peerage Case. 3 See page 285. 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 281 

in Herefordshire, for permission to inspect the coffins in the Home 
Lacy vaults, such license having been refused to him by those to 
■whom possession of the estates had already been decreed by the 
Court. The application was granted ; but, some doubts having 
existed as to the jurisdiction of the court in such a case, the parties 
who obtained this order applied to the Bishop's Court for a further 
license to open the graves. Meeting with no assistance, they 
went to Home Lacy, hired a competent number of men with proper 
tools, and in the presence of the village clergyman, who protested 
against their conduct, peaceably and decently broke open the vaults 
and graves, no one presuming to oppose the order of the Court of 
Chancery, whatever he might think of its jurisdiction. 

As burial in graves has been the usual mode of interment in 
England, and from the rapid destruction of coffins so deposited, 
this source of genealogical information cannot be made generally 
available. Yet to families of rank, of of long residence on manorial 
or large estates, whose remains are generally deposited in vaults, it 
is peculiarly applicable. A very full and authentic pedigree of the 
family of Brydges (Dukes of Chandos), even to the collateral 
branches, for more than one hundred years, might be compiled 
from the family sepulchre at Whitchurch alone. The "Memorials 
of the Tufton Family 33 seem to have been collected principally from 
coffin-plates found on an inspection of the Earl of Thanet's family 
vaults at Rainham, in Kent. 

The first inscribed funeral monuments are those bearing the 
names of Romanized Britons, which have been found in various 
parts of England. In St. Alban's, Westminster, Winchester, and 
other cathedrals, inscriptions of eight centuries' standing may still 
be seen. That so few ancient monumental inscriptions remain, may 
be chiefly attributed (after Time) to our Reformers : those of the 
reign of Henry VIII. doing as much mischief to them, in their 
destruction of monasteries, as their followers did to them in the 
reign of Charles I., under colour of an Act passed in 1643, ordering 
all monuments of superstition or idolatry to be demolished. 

Collections of Proceedings at Funerals, Funeral Certificates, 
Monumental Inscriptions, &c, both printed and in manuscript, are 
very numerous. Lists of the principal works are given at the end 
of the present section. 

We are generally driven to accidental figures for determining the 
date of monuments. The practised antiquary knows well that the 
date of many an object of antiquity is determined rather by the 



232 HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 

general character and composition of the design, and by resem- 
blances to conventional peculiarities of a particular period, than by 
any particular feature -which can be pointed out to an experienced 
eye. When inscriptions engraven upon monuments are partly or 
wholly obliterated, the form or fashion of the stone itself will often 
enable the genealogist to assign a date to it. To guide him in his 
researches we have subjoined a few 

DIRECTIONS FOR ASCERTAINING THE DATES OE 
MONUMENTS. 

Coffin Stones. — Coffins. — Tenth and eleventh centuries : the coffin 
lid was in the form of a prism. Twelfth century : the coffin lids, 
improved or distinguished with crosses, at first plain, then fieury, in 
bos relief. Thirteenth century : coffin stones, with heads or bodies 
emerging from them, and placed in walls, with arches turned over 
them. 

Stone coffins went out of fashion about the end of the fifteenth 
century. 

Mr. Cutts observes : 1 — " The shape or size of a gravestone is no 
safe guide to its date ; it has been thought that the early ones were 
highly coped, the later ones less so ; but this is not the case, for 
many early ones are quite flat, while late ones are highly coped. 
Also, in both coffin stones and incised stones, the eight-sided and 
coffin-shaped ones are to be found of all dates. 

ct To determine the dates then, we have to guide us only the form 
of the cross, and the ornamental accessories. A symbol — as a 
mitre, pastoral staff, chalice, shield, swords, &c, introduced upon 
the stone, will often determine its date approximately." 

Crosses. — The shape of the cross is not of so much service in 
ascertaining the date as might have been expected. Round and 
pear-shaped forms are late Norman. 

Crosses with vine-leaves, and with accompanying heads and half- 
length effigies, are generally of the fourteenth century. 

Crosses with lilies as terminations to the limbs are very common 
in the fifteenth century, though we do find them of an earlier 
date. 

The crosses formed by single broad lines are probably of the 
fifteenth century. 

The calvary moulded like the base of a pier belongs generally to 
the fifteenth century. 

1 "Manual for the Study of Sepulchral Slabs and Crosses?* 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 283 

Pastoral Staves. — The early form of the pastoral staff, previous 
to the thirteenth century, was that of a crutch, and sometimes a 
curved head. This extended to the beginning of the thirteenth 
century, when we frequently find the curve of the head terminating 
in a trefoil. In the fourteenth century the forms are more elabo- 
rate, the curved head is crocketed, and its section very generally 
hexagonal or octagonal. 

Mitres. — The early mitres were low, and the sides straight, 
About the middle of the twelfth century we find them simple in 
detail, and the apex forming a right angle ; afterwards the height 
increased ; and in the fifteenth century the sides are lofty, and 
often convex, and the details elaborate. 

Chalices. — Early chalices were very simple in shape ; those of the 
fifteenth and sixteenth centuries generally had an octagonal base. 

Armour. — In the tenth, eleventh, and twelfth centuries, the 
rustred, ringed, trellised, tegulated, mascled, and edge-ringed, 
obtained use. Twelfth century : chain-mail was introduced by the 
Crusaders of Henry III. Cylindrical helmets, instead of descending 
only as far as the ears, rested on the shoulders. The apertures for 
sight and breathing were commonly in the form of a cross. The 
camail, or piece of mail hanging over the shoulders, was introduced 
in the reign of Edward I. Suits of mixed chain and plate were 
introduced in the reign of Edward II., the plate being worn on the 
arms and legs. Ailettes — little plates of steel — were also fixed to the 
shoulders, and emblazoned with the arms of the knight. Complete 
armour, ox plate, came into partial use in the reign of Henry IV., 
and in the succeeding one of Henry V. became general. 

Shields. — The early Norman shields were kite-shaped ; afterwards 
the heater-shaped, with a straight top. Through the thirteenth 
and fourteenth centuries they became shorter. At the end of the 
fourteenth and beginning of the fifteenth centuries, the upper part 
of the sides is straight, and the shape almost square. About the 
end of the fifteenth and beginning of the sixteenth, very fanciful 
shapes were given to them. 

Ornamental Work, when introduced interlaced, is generally Saxon 
or very early Norman. Rude figures of men and animals are gene- 
rally of Norman work — fioreated, of the thirteenth centurv — vine- 
leaves and oak-leaves, of the fourteenth century. 

Effigies. — The custom of affixing to slabs of marble or stcne, 
portraitures of the deceased, engraven on plates of metal, appears 
to have been adopted about the beginning of the thirteenth century. 



284 HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 

Brass&t. — The earliest record of a brass in England is that of 
Simon de Beauchamp, Earl of Bedford, who died 1208. It is 
curious that no sepulchral brass has hitherto been noticed as 
existing in Scotland, and in Ireland two examples only are on 
record, which are memorials of a late date. 

Shields of Arms do not occur prior to the twelfth century. The 
earliest known in England are those of Geffrey Magnaville, Earl of 
Essex, buried in the Temple Church, 1165. Coats of arms were 
not quartered by subjects until the fourteenth century: John 
Hastings, Earl of Pembroke, was the first. 

Inscriptions. — Until a comparatively late period, inscriptions were 
as brief as possible. From 1100 to 1360, the inscription, though 
often in Latin, was more frequently in Norman-French, and gene- 
rally in rhyme. From circ. a.d. 1400 downwards, Latin became 
the common language for inscriptions, though English ones are not 
uncommon after circ. a.d. 1500. "Orate pro anima" was discon- 
tinued on monuments at the Reformation. Roman Catholics only 
have used it since. The Runic character was not used after 1000. 
From that date to 1360 a kind of Roman character, called Lorn- 
bardic , was commonly used. The character called black letter seems 
to have been introduced circ. 1360, and was in common use until 
the reign of Elizabeth. In the fourteenth century the inscriptions 
were engraven on brass, and the words abbreviated. About 1530 
a debased kind of Lombardic became fashionable, and gradually 
changed until about the middle of the sixteenth century, when it 
became the common Roman character. 

When the stone has an inscription without date, the shape of the 
letters will frequently enable us to approximate very nearly to the 
date. Stone slabs of the middle of the fourteenth century have 
merely an inscription round the border, without any symbol. 

The first table monument was that of King John, who died in 
1216; and the fashion lasted until the reign of James I. Altar 
monuments were introduced at the beginning of the sixteenth cen- 
tury; monuments against the wall, chiefly since the Reformation. 
The oldest instance of a skeleton monument is in 1241. 

List of Proceedings at Funerals ; Funeral Certificates, etc 

Proceedings at Funerals of Royal and Noble Families of England, sixteenth 

and seventeenth centuries ; Ashm. Lib. MS. 818. 
Proceedings at Royal and other Funerals; Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 6284, 

ff. 2— 17; 6292; 6303, ff. 15 5, 46 ; 6309; 6310. 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 285 

Fttneeal Certificates, etc. 
Several Papers relating to Eoyal and other Funerals, collected by Sir W. 

Dethick; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 10,110. 
Funerals of Eoyal and Eminent Persons, from Jas. I. to anno 1800 ; Coll. 

of Arms, MS. I. 4. 
Accounts and Warrants relating to Koyal Funerals, temp. Jac. I. — Will. III. 

and Geo. III.; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 5751, ff. 45—55. 
Collection of the Burials of several of the English Nobility ; Ashm. Lib. 

Wood MS. 8578. 
Orders at various Funerals of Nobility and Gentry; BKiT.Mvs.Harl.MS.2129. 
The Booke of Buryals of Nobilite, small folio ; Coll. of Arms, Norfolk MS. 

XXXV. 

Parentalia, or Euneral Rites, &c, performed to worthy persons deceased, &c; 

Coll. of Arms, Vincent MS. 87. 
Proceedings at Funerals of English Nobility and Gentry, sixteenth and 

seventeenth centuries; Ashm. Lib. MS. 836. 
Certificates of Funerals, &c., from 1566 to 1800 ; Coll. of Arms, MSS. I. 

5; 6; 8; 10; 11; 12; 13; 14; 15; 16; 19; 22; 23; 24; 30; 31. 
Funerals, by Dethick, 1586 ; Coll. of Arms, MS. A. 31. 
Charges for several Funerals about 1594; Coll. of Arms, Vincent MS. 188. 
Funeral Inscriptions and Arms in Churches, collected by Vincent; Coll. of 

Arms, Vincent MSS. 175 ; 177. 
Proceedings at Funerals of English Nobility and Gentry, seventeenth cent. ; 

Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 14,417. 
A Collection of Funerals, made by Sir John Gwyllym, Rouge Croix, s. xvii. ; 

Jesus Coll. Oxf. MS. xxxi. 
Funeral Escutcheons of Nobility and Gentry, from 1651 to 1663 ; Coll. of 

Arms, E.D.N. 30. 

Cheshire : Book of Funerals in Cheshire, &c, begun a.d. 1600 ; Brit. Mus. 

Lamd. MS. 879. 

FuneralCertificatesforCheshire,1606;BRiT.Mus.iTaW.^S'. 2041. 

Lancashire : Book of Funerals in Lancashire, &c, begun a.d. 1600 ; Brit. 

Mus. Lamd. MS. 879. 
Funeral Certificates of the County of Lancashire, begun 28th 

May, 1606 ; Brit. Mus. Earl. M& 2041. 
Norfolk : Entry Book, with Funeral Escutcheons of Families in Norfolk, 

1st Nov. 1686— 4th Aug. 1719 ; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 12,223. 
Shropshire : Book of Funerals in Salop, &c., begun A.D. 1600 ; Brit. Mus. 

Earl. MS. 2041; Lamd. MS. 879. 

Wand : Entries of the Funeral Certificates of the Nobility and Gentry of 
Ireland, from 1595 to 1698, in 14 vols.; Office of Arms, Dublin. 

— ^ Extracts from a Funeral Book, 1597, 1621; Brit. Mus. Add. 

jtf^.4793, f. 128. 



286 HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 

Funebai Certificates, etc. 
Ireland (continued) : Funeral Certificates of many of the Nobility and Gentry 
of Ireland, from 1634 to 1729 ; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 4820. 

Wales : Book of Funerals in North Wales, &c, a.d. 1600 and 1606 ; Bkit. 
Mus. Earl. MS. 2041 ; Lansd. MS. 879. 

LIST OF MONUMENTAL INSCRIPTIONS, ETC. 

PRINTED WORKS. 

Ancient Funerall Monuments within the United Monarchic of Great 
Britaine, Ireland, and the Islands adjacent, &c, by John Weever. Lond. 
1631. Folio.— 2d. ed. 1661.— 3d. ed. with additions. 1767. 4to. 
The original MS. is in the library of the Society of Antiquaries 
(Nos.127; 128). An Alphabetical Index, in manuscript, is in the British 
Museum (Add. MS. 11,824). 

Monumenta Anglicana ; being Inscriptions on the Monuments of several 
Eminent Persons deceased in or since the year 1600, to the end of the 
year 1718, by John Le Neve, Gent. 5 vols. Lond. 1717-18-19. 8vo. 
The original MSS., with many additions, are in the British Museum 
{Earl. MSS. 3605—3616 ; 5321 ; 6408 ; 6418). 

Sepulchrorum Inscriptions ; or a curious Collection of above 900 of the 
most remarkable Epitaphs, Ancient and Modern, Serious and Merry, in 
the Kingdoms of Great Britain, Ireland, &c., collected by James Jones, 
Gent. Westrn. 1727. 8vo. (100 pages only of vol. ii. were printed.) 

A Collection of Epitaphs, by W. Toldervy. 2 vols. Lond. 1755. 12mo. 

Select and B-emarkable Epitaphs, by JohnHackett. 2 vols. Lond.1757. 12mo. 

A new select Collection of Epitaphs, including the most remarkable Inscrip- 
tions in the Collections of Hacket, Jones, and Toldervy, together with 
one thousand Epitaphs never before published, by T. Webb. 2 vols. 
Lond. 1775. 8vo. 

Ulustrium virorum Elogia Sepulchralia, edidit Edvardus Popham, Coll. Oriel. 
Oxon. 1778. 8vo. 

Sepulchral Monuments in Great Britain applied to illustrate the History of 
Families, Manners, Habits, and Arts at the different periods, from the 
Norman Conquest to the seventeenth century, by Eichard Gough, Esq. 
3 vols. Lond. 1786—1796. Folio. 

Collection of Epitaphs and Monumental Inscriptions, with an Essay by 
Dr. Johnson. 2 vols. Lond. 1806. 8V0. 1 

Sepulchral Memorials of the English at Bruges. See Nichols' "Topographer 
and Genealogist" vol. ii. p. 468. 

Monumental Effigies of trreat Britain, &c, from the Norman Conquest to the 
Iteign of King Hen. VIII. by C. A. Stothard. Lond. 1817—1820. 4to. 

1 Numerous other smaller Collections of Epitaphs have been published, but of little 
use for our purpose. 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 287 

Monumental Inscriptions, etc. 
Monumental Remains of Noble and Eminent Persons, by Edw. Blore. Lend. 

1825. 8vo. 
The Monumental Effigies of Great Britain, by I. and G. Hollis. 1840. 4to. 
A Series of Monumental Brasses, from Edward I. to Elizabeth, by J. G. and 

L. A. B. Waller. Lond. 3 840—1844. Polio. 
Cambridge Camden Society's Illustrations of Monumental Brasses. (tomb. 

1846. 4to. 
Monumental Brasses and Slabs of the Middle Ages, by the Rev. C. Boutell. 

Lond. 1847. 8vo. 
Monumental Brasses of.England, by the Bev. C. Boutell. Lond. 1849. 8vo. 
Manual for the Study of Monumental Brasses. Lond. 1848. 8vo. 
A Manual for the Study of the Sepulchral Slabs and Crosses of the Middle 

Ages, by the Rev. E. L. Cutts, B.A. Lond. 1849. 8vo. 

MANUSCRIPTS. 

An Obituary, with an account of several persons in England, by John Le 

Neve; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 3625. 
LeNeve's Obituary, from 1658 to 1680; Brit. Mvs.HarLMSS. 6404—6418. 
An Obituary alphabetically arranged, by Sir William Musgrave; Brit. Mus. 

Add. MSS. 5727— 5740.— Supplement; Add. MSS. 5741— 5749. 
Miscellaneous Collection of Epitaphs; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 5832, f. 165 b. 

et seqq. 
Collection of Epitaphs and Inscriptions from English Cathedrals ; Corp. 

Christ. Coll. Oxf. MS. cccix. f. 97. 
A large Collection of Epitaphs, made between the years 1764 and 1778, by 

Thomas Hayward of Hungerford, in 34 vols., with 7 vols, of Indexes ; 

Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 13,916—13,953. 
Church-notes taken by Randle Holme in various Counties ; Brit. Mus. 

Harl. MS. 2129. 
Epitaphs collected in various parts of England, in the handwriting of Dr. 

Hutton ; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 5329. 
Epitaphs arranged under heads, by the Bev. Sir Richard Kaye, Bart., seven- 
teenth cent.; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 18,562. 
Monumental Inscriptions, from a.d. 1400 to 1716, collected from various 

Churches in England, by John Le Neve; Brit. Mus. Harl. MSS. 

3605—3616. 
Another volume, beginning with the year 1600, and ending with 1649 ; 

Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 6321. Partly printed in Le Neve's li Monu- 

menta Anglicana." 
Monumental Inscriptions upon Archbishops and Bishops of England and 

Wales, collected by John Le Neve; Brit. Mus. Harl. MSS. 6407; 

6414; 6416. 
Index to Le Neve's Monumental Inscriptions, 1501 — 1529; Brit. Mus. 

Harl. MS. 6408. 



*^83 HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 

Mosttmental Inscriptions, etc. 
The same from 1650 to 1679 ; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 6418. 
Epitaphs in several Churches in England, collected by R. Sheldon; khuu. 

Lib. Wood MSS. 8550; 8551. 
Epitaphia, sive Monumenta Sepulchrorum, ab Erancisco Thynne, in sua 

Angliae peregrinatione collecta, etc. ; Brit. Mus. Shane MS. 3836. 
Epitaphs in various Counties, collected by Ant. a Wood ; Ashm. Lib. Wood 

MS. 8505. 
Monumental Inscriptions in different Churches and Churchyards ; Beit. Mus. 

Earl. MS. 6894. 
Armorial Ensigns and Monumental Inscriptions in various Churches in 

England; Bbtt. Mus. Lansd. MS. 919. 

Bedfordshire. 
Thynne's Monumental Inscriptions in Churches in Bedfordshire, &c. ; Brit. 

Mus. Cotton. MS. Cleop. C. iii. ff. \b, 55, 67, 94, 95, 103, 156, 198 6, 

204, 215 5. 
Church Notes in Bedfordshire, collected by the Rev. S. Lysons ; Brit. Mus. 

Add. MS. 9460. 

Berkshire. 
Monumental Inscriptions in Berkshire, &c., collected in 1660 ; Brit. Mus. 

Earl.MSS. 4170; 6365. 
Church Notes in Berkshire, collected by the Rev. S. Lysons; Brit. Mus. 

Add. MS. 9460. 
Ashmole's Collection of Arms, Epitaphs, &c, in Churches in Berkshire, 

1666; Ashm. Lib. MSS. 850; 1137. 

Buckinghamshire. 
Church Notes in Buckinghamshire, collected by the Rev. S. Lysons; Brit. 

Mus. Add. MS. 9460. 
Monumental Inscriptions in Buckinghamshire, collected in 1660 ; Brit. 

Mus. Earl. MSS. 4170; 6821.— Lansd. MS. 712. 

Cambridgeshire. 
Church Notes, &c., in Cambridgeshire, collected by the Rev. S. Lysons; 

Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 9461 ; 9465. 
Epitaphs in Cambridgeshire, a.d. 1713 ; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 11,425. 
Monumental Inscriptions in divers Churches and Chapels in Cambridge; 

Brit. Mus. Earl. MSS. 2129; 6121; 6821. 
Monumental Inscriptions in Cambridgeshire. See Blomefield's "Collectanea 

Cantabrigienma'' 1750. 4to. Privately printed. 

Cheshire. 
Monuments and Arms of Cheshire Families, collected by £. Ashmoie; 
Ashm. Lib. MS. 7260. 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 289 

MONUMENTAL InSOBIPTIONB, ETC. 

An extensive Collection of Monumental Inscriptions, by the third Randle 

Holme; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 2151. 
Miscellaneous Collection of Church Notes; Brit. Mus. Harl. MSS. 2071; 

2103. 
Church Notes in Cheshire, collected by the Rev. S. Lysons ; Brit. Mus. 

Add. MSS. 9461; 9466. 

Cornwall. — Cumberland. 
Church Notes in Cornwall and Cumberland, collected by the Rev. S. Lysons; 
Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 9462. 

Derbyshire. 
Derbyshire Church Notes; Brit. Mus. Earl. MSS. 1026; 1486.—^. MS. 

6701. 
(Staveley and Crich). See Nichols* " Coll. Top. 

et Gen." vol. i. p. 34. 
Ashmole's Church Notes in Derbyshire; Ashm. Lib. MS. 854. 
Sketches and Church Notes in Derbyshire, by the Rev. S. Lysons ; Brit, 

Mus. Add. MSS. 9448; 9463. 

Devonshire. 
Sketches and Church Notes in Devonshire, by the Rev. S. Lysons; Brit. 

Mus. Add. MSS. 9464 ; 9467—9469. 
Epitaphs and Inscriptions in Exeter Cathedral. See Hewett's Monumenta- 
rium of Exeter Cathedral, in vol. iii. of the "Exeter Diocesan Architectural 
Society 8 transactions." 1848. 4to. 
Essex. 
Monumental Inscriptions in Churches in Essex ; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 

6762. 
Epitaphs in the County of Essex, a.d. 1713 ; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 11,425. 

Hampshire. 
Church Notes for Hampshire. See Nichols' " Coll. Top. et Gen." vol. vii. 

p. 211 ; vol. viii. pp. 43, 132, 210, 369. 
Epitaphs and Inscriptions in Winchester Cathedral. See Gale's "History of 
Winchester Cathedral." Lond. 1715. 8vo. Reprinted in Cassan's 
"Lives of the Bishops of Salisbury." 2 vols. Lond. 1827. 
Hereford. 
Epitaphs and Inscriptions in Hereford Cathedral. See "History of the Cit\ 
and Cathedral of Hereford" Lond. 1717. 8vo. 
Hertfordshire. 
Ashmole's Church Notes in Hertfordshire; Ashm. Lib. MS. 1137. 

Kent. 
Monumental Inscriptions in Churches in Kent; Brit. Mus. Harl. MSS. 5805; 
3917. 

19 



290 HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 

Monumental Inscriptions, etc. 
Monumental Inscriptions in Churches in the Diocese of Rochester; Brit. 

Mus. Earl. MS. 6587. 
Notes of Monuments in several Parish Churches in Kent ; Brit. Mus. Add. 

MS. 11,259. 
Notes of Arms, Monuments, &c, in Churches in Kent, drawn up by Peter 

Le Neve, 1603—1624 ; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 5479. 
Monuments and Painted Glass in upwards of one hundred Churches in Kent, 

by Ph. Parsons. Cant. 11 U. 4fco. 
Tour through the Isle of Thanet, including a particular description of the 

Churches, and copies of the Monumental Inscriptions (by Z. Cozens). 

Lond. 1793. 4to. 
Epitaphs and Inscriptions in Canterbury Cathedral. See Dart's "History of 

Canterbury Cathedral." Lond. 1726. Polio. — "Historical Description of 

Canterbury Cathedral." Canterbury, 1772 and 1778. 8vo. — Woolnoth's 

"Canterbury Cathedral" Lond. 1816. 4to. 
Epitaphs and Inscriptions in Rochester Cathedral. See "History of the Cathe- 
dral Church of Rochester" (byDr.Rawlinson). Lond. 171$ &1723. 8vo. 

Huntingdonshire. 
Church Notes for Huntingdonshire; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 1179. 

Leicestershire. 
Church Notes in Leicestershire; Coll. of Arms, Vincent MS. 197. 

Lincolnshire. 
€hurch Notes in Lincolnshire, 1592—1634 ; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 17,506. 
Monumental Antiquities of Great Grimsby, by George Oliver. .EM, 1825. 8vo. 

London. 
Collection of Inscriptions on Monuments and Gravestones in London ; Brit. 

Mus. Shane MS. 516. 
Monumental Inscriptions in several of the Churches in London ; Brit.Mus. 

Harl. MSS. 1096, ff. 110—117 h 6072. 
Epitaphs in and about London ; Brit. Mus. Harl. MSS. 835 ; 5348. 
Inscriptions and Arms upon Puneral Monuments and Gravestones in London, 

Westminster, &c. ; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 6835. 
Collection of Epitaphs in many of the Churches in London, and other parts 

of England ; Brit. Mus. Lansd. MSS. 874.; 878. 
Interments in the several Churches in London ; Coll. of Arms, MS. P. 9. 
Persons of consequence buried in several Churches in London, to the 27th of 

March, 1533; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 544. 
Hotfourd s Collection of Pennons, Gravestones, and Hatchments in Churches 

in and about London in 1665 ; College of Arms. 
Catalogue of Tombes, Gravestones, &a, in the Churches of London, by P. 

Fisher. Lond. 1668. 4to. 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 2»1 

MoNUfiiENTAX Inscriptions, etc. 
A Catalogue of Tombes in the Churches of London, from St. Katheriue's 

Deyontl the Tower, to Temple-Barre, by P. Fisher. Lond. 1668. 4to. 

Supposed to be an unfinished work. 
Kegister of Sepulchral Inscriptions existing temp. Hen. VIII. in Grey Friars' 

Church, London. See Nichols' "Coll. Top. et Gen.," vol. v. pp. 274, 385. 
Eegistrum eorum qui sepeliuntur in Ecclesia et Capellis fratrum minor. 

London.; Brit. Mus. Cotton. MS. Vitellius, F. xiL f. 273. 
Church Notes of St. Dunstan's in the West, London. See Nichols* " Coll. 

Top. et Gen." vol. iv. p. 96. 
Inscriptions on the Mural Monuments and Tablets, Gravestones, and Tomb- 
stones, in the Church and Churchyards of the Parish of St. Michael, 

Crooked Lane, in the City of London. 1831. 8vo. [Removed for the 

London Bridge improvements.] 
The Tombs and Sepulchral Inscriptions in St. Paul's Cathedral, by P. F. 

[Payne Fisher], Lond. . 4to. 

Monumenta Sepulchralia Sancti Pauli, by H. H. [Hugh Holland]. Lond. 

1614. 4to.— 2d. ed. Lond. 1633. 4to. 
Epitaphs, Inscriptions, &c, in St. Paul's Cathedral. See Dugdale's "History 

of St. Paul's, London." Enlarged by Maynard 1716, and by Sir H. 

Ellis in 1818. All in folio. Also the latter portion of Arithmsei "Man- 

solea." (See " Westminster Abbey.") 
Names of such as have been buried in the Temple Church, from 1623 to 

1652 ; Ashm. Lib. Wood MS. 8576. 
Notes of Monumental Inscriptions in Westminster Abbey, &c. ; Bkit. Mus. 

Cotton. MS. Cleop. C. iii. ff. 1 5, 55, 67, 94, 95, 103, 156, 198 5, 204, 

215 5. 
Epitaphs, Inscriptions, and Arms in Westminster Abbey. See Camden's 

"Reges, Reginee, Nobiles et alii in Ecclesia, Westmonasterii sepulti." Lond. 

1600. 4to. — Arithmsei, "Mausolea Regum, Reginarum, Dynastarum, No- 

bilium, Londini Anglorum in occidsntali urbis angulo structa." Francf. 

1618. 12mo. — Keepe's "Monumenta Westmonasteriensia." Lond. 1688. 

8vo. Also, Crull's "Antiquities of St. Peter's, Westminster." 2 vols. 

Lond.114%, 8vo.— Dart's "Hist.ofWestm. Abbey " 2 vols. Lond.Yi%%. 

Folio. — And Neale and Brayley's "Hist, of Westminster Abbey ." % vols. 

Lond. 1818. 4to. 
Middlesex. 
Church Notes in Middlesex; Coll. of Arms, Philipot MS. 19, Pd. 
A Collection of Church Monuments in Co. Middlesex, by John Bowack. 

Lond. 1705. Folio. 
Epitaphs in the County of Middlesex, a.d. 1713; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 

11,425. 
Church Notes in Middlesex, collected by the Rev. S. Lysons ; Beit. Mrs. 

Add. MSS. 9470—9471. 



292 HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 

MOKTMENTAI INSCBIPTIONS, ETC. 

Inscriptions upon the Tombs and Gravestones, &c, in the Dissenters' 
Burial-place near Bunhill Fields. Lond. 1717. 8vo. See also Earl. MS. 
6212, in the Brit. Mtjs. 

Church Notes taken at Highgate ; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 7943. 

Norfolk. 
Epitaphs from Churches in Norfolk; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 6762. 
Church Notes taken in sixty-two Churches in Norfolk, 1743 — 1745 ; Brit. 

Mus. Add. MS. 12,526. 
Sepulchral Brasses in Norfolk, by J. S. Cotman. [Yarmouth], 1819. Folio. 
Monumental Inscriptions in the Parish Churches of Norwich, 1723 ; Brit. 

Mus. Add. MS. 12,525. 
Tombs and Monuments in Norwich Cathedral. See "Records of Norwich." 

Lond. 1736—1738. 12mo. Also, Sir Thomas Browne's "Posthumous 

Works." Lond. 1712, 1721. 8vo. 
Sepulchral Reminiscences from St. Nicholas' Church, Great Yarmouth, edited, 

with Pedigrees, by Dawson Turner. Gt. Yarmouth, 1848. 8vo. 

Northamptonshire. 
Ashmole's Church Notes in Northamptonshire ; Ashm. Lib. MS. 1137. 
Monumental Inscriptions in Churches in Northamptonshire; Brit. Mus. 

Earl. MSS. 6365 ; 6763 ; Lansd. MS. 1042. 
Church Notes in Northamptonshire ; Coll. of Arms, Vincent MS. 197. 
Epitaphs in the County of Northampton, a.d. 1713 ; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 
11,425. 
Northumberland. 
Church Notes in Northumberland; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 6763. 

Nottinghamshire. 
A Collection of Monuments in Nottinghamshire ; Ashm. Lib. MS. 8b4. 
Tombstone Inscriptions in Nottinghamshire; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 6121, 

p. 223. 
Oxfordshire. 
An Account of the Nobility and Gentry buried in and about Oxford ; Ashm. 

Lib. Wood MS. 8466. 
Collection of Epitaphs and Arms in most of the Churches of Oxfordshire ; 

Ashm. Lib. Wood MS. 8505. 
Coats of Arms in Churches and Gentlemen's Seats in Oxfordshire, by G. Lee, 

Clar.; Ashm. Lib. Wood MS. 8548. 
Monumental Inscriptions in Oxfordshire; Ashm. Lib. Wood MS. 8586. 
Oxfordshire Church Notes, transcribed from the papers of Ant. a Wood, by 

the Rev. John Gutch ; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 6033. 
Church Notes in Oxfordshire ; Coll. of Arms, Vincent MS. 192, W. 
Oxfordshire Monumental Inscriptions. Evesham, 1825. Polio. Privately 

printed by Sir Thomas Phillipps, Bart. 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 293 

Monumental Inscbiptions* etc. 
Monumental Inscriptions in Oxfordshire, anno 1660 ; Brit. Mus. Harl. 

MS. 4170. 
Account of Nobility and Gentry buried in and about Oxford, since 1648 ; 

Ashm. Lib. Wood MS. 8466. 
Notes of Epitaphs, Arms, &c, in various Churches and Colleges at Oxford, 

1656—1661; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 11,610. 
Monumental Inscriptions in Oxford. See Wood's "History of Oxford* 7 

1773. 4to. 
Rutlandshire. 
Church Notes in Rutlandshire ; Coll. of Arms, Vincent MS. 197, C. 

Shropshire. 
Church Notes in Shropshire, taken 1584; Coll. of Arms, Vincent MS. 195, P. 
Collections from Churches in Shropshire, 1794 — 1832; Brit. Mus. Add. 

MSS. 21,011— 21,015 ; 21,180; 21,181. 
Monuments and Arms in Churches in Shropshire; Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 

21,236; 21,237. 

Staffordshire. 
Sepulchral Inscriptions, &c, of Staffordshire ; Ashm. Lib. MS. 853. 
Church Notes in Staffordshire; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 21,011. — Coll. of 

Arms, Vincent MS. 197, C. 
Epitaphs in Staffordshire, a.d. 1713; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 11,425. 
Account of Persons buried in Lichfield Cathedral, and in the Churches of 

Lichfield. See Abingdon's "Antiquities of Worcester Cathedral" p. i. 

Lond. 1717. 8vo. 
Suffolk. 
Monumental Inscriptions in divers Churches in Suffolk ; Brit. Mus. Harl. 

MSS. 6724; 6762. 
A valuable series of Church Notes in Suffolk, taken in the years 1655-6; 

Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 15,520. 
Church Notes in Suffolk, by Sir W. Betham; Brit. Mus.^^. MS. 21,032. 
Sepulchral Brasses in Norfolk and Suffolk, by J. S. Cotman. \Yarmouth~\ y 

1816. Folio. 
Surrey. 
Church Notes in Surrey; Ashm. Lib. MS. 1137. — Brit. Mvs.Add.MS. 6409. 

Sussex. 
Monumental Inscriptions, collected by Sir William Burrell ; Brit. Mus. 

Add. MSS. 5697—5629. 
Monumental Inscriptions in Chichester and Lichfield Cathedrals. See 

Abingdon's " Antiquities of Worcester Cathedral." Lond. 1717. 8vo. 

Warwickshire. 
Church Notes in Warwickshire ; Brit. Mus. Harl. MSS. 2009; 7022.— 
Add. MS. 21.012.— Coll, n* Arms, Vincent MS. 197, C. 



294 HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 

Monumental Inscriptions, etc. 
Wiltshire. 

CoDections for Wiltshire, 1819, by Sir Tho. Phillipps, Bart. Salish. 1819. 
8vo. Privately printed. This volume contains a collection of In- 
scriptions from Monuments, Sec, in the Churches of Wiltshire. 

Epitaphs and Inscriptions in Salisbury Cathedral. See "History of the Cathe- 
dral of Salisbury and the Abbey Church of Bath" Lond. 1719, 23, or 28. 
8vo.— "Description of the Cath.CImrch of Salisbury" Salisb.1787. 4to. 

Copies of the Epitaphs in Salisbury Cathedral, Cloisters, and Cemetery, by 
J. Harris. Salisb. 1825. 8vo. 

Worcestershire . 
Monumental Inscriptions in Worcestershire; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 5814. 
ChurchNotes of the Cathedral; Brit. Mus.^. MSS. 5811, f. 129; 6728, 
f. 47; 6742, f. 13 5. 

Yorkshire. 
Arms and Inscriptions in Yorkshire Churches; Bodl. Lib. MS. 5078. 
Church Notes in Yorkshire; Coll. of Arms, Vincent MS. 197, C— (in 

1584). — Queen's Coll. Oxf. MS. lxxxvi. 
Monumental Inscriptions in Churches in York. See " The History of Fork" 

3 vols. 1785. 12mo.— And Torr's "Antiquities of Fork " 1719. 8vo. 

Scotland. 
Theatre of Mortality, or a Collection of Funeral Inscriptions over Scotland. 

Edinb. 1704—13. 8vo. 
Collection of Epitaphs and Monumental Inscriptions in Scotland. 1834. 8vo. 

Coats of Arms. — Coats of Arms — whether impressed on seals of 
deeds, wills, and the like, or found on walls or windows of castles, 
palaces, churches, private houses, and on shields, banners, plate, 
tapestry, pictures, and other miscellaneous ornaments — have been 
found, in genealogical matters, to be of signal service. In English 
families, many persons of the same name can only now be classed 
with their proper families by an inspection of the arms they bore 
on their seals, shields, and the like ; whilst Welsh families are more 
known by their arms than by their names. 

According to Dugdale, Edward the Confessor was the first in 
England who put his seal to a charter ; this however seems, by the 
subsequent discoveries of the matrices of old Anglo-Saxon seals, 
especially that of Ethelwald, Bishop of Dunwich {circa 850), to be 
incorrect. 

Specimens of hereditary armorial bearings appeared on the shield 
in the time of Henry I. ; but it was probably on the return of 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 295 

Richard I. from the Holy Land, that coats of arms became gene- 
rally used on seals and elsewhere. 

In the history of Battel Abbey, Richard Lucy, Chief Justice 
temp. Henry II., is reported to have blamed a mean subject for 
using a private seal, when that pertained, as he said, to the King 
and nobility only. At that early period they used to engrave on 
their seals their own pictures, and counterfeits, covered with a long 
coat over their armours. After this, gentlemen of the better sort 
took up the fashion, and, because they were not all warriors, they 
made seals of their general coats of arms. 

In the time of Edward L, seals of some sort were so general, that 
the statute of Exon ordains the coroners jury to certify with their 
respective seals. 

At length, about the time of Edward II., seals became very 
common, so that not only such as bore arms used to seal, but others 
fashioned signets, taking the letters of their own names, flowers, 
knots, flourishes, birds, beasts, &c. 

An essential utility in old seals is, that the shield of arms or 
devices are frequently, if not generally, encircled by a label or 
garter, on which is inscribed the name and title of the knight, or 
other party, sealing the deed, sometimes also adding the name of 
the father or husband. 

Ancient charters and evidences were only sealed, not signed. The 
custom of sealing without subscription continued in Scotland till 
the year 1540, when James V. ordered that all evidences should be 
subscribed as well as sealed. 

It was enacted by statute, 1 that every freeholder should have his 
proper seal of arms ; and he was either to appear at the head court 
of the shire, or send his attorney with the said seal ; and they who 
wanted such seals were to be amerced or fined. Every gentleman 
used then to send his seal to the clerk of the court in lead, in order 
to compare with other sealings, for fear of counterfeits ; and so par- 
ticularly careful were people of seals in those days, that in case one 
was lost, no means were wanting, by proclamation or otherwise, to 
have it restored. 

The forms of seals are as varied as their colours, and present all 
the modifications of figures known. The round form appears to 
have been adopted by kings, princes, and knights, whilst the oval 
specially belonged to prelates, abbies, clergy, and even women. 

The shape of seals used by secular persons during the eleventh 

1 Nesbitt'e "Heraldry;" it is not known what statute (if English) is here alluded to. 



296 HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 

and twelfth centuries was generally circular. Triangular seals are 
chiefly of the twelfth and thirteenth centuries. 

During the thirteenth century the shape of seals was generally 
oval, more or less acute. So ordinary was this form, that any one 
having to arrange a mass of unsorted deeds might easily pick out 
most of those anterior to the year 1300 by merely observing the 
contours of the seals. There are many circular and heater-shaped 
shields of this date, but the ovoid will be found to predominate. 

The earliest example of a secretum or privy seal, on the back, is 
of the close of the twelfth century. It is of ordinary occurrence on 
baronial and knightly seals after that period. 

The devices of personal seals of the eleventh and twelfth centuries 
are entirely arbitrary and literal in character. Barons and persons 
of knightly degree used seals representing a horseman armed at all 
points, or riding, falcon on wrist, to the chase. Others bore effigies 
of birds, eagles or falcons, animals, commonly lions, varieties of the 
draconine type, a conventional flower^ewr-tfe-Zwe in character, stars 
and crescents, diversely arranged, agmis dei, etc. 

In the thirteenth century, seals became more numerous : rebuses 
on the christian and surname were adopted ; symbols of occupation 
or handicraft were used. At the commencement of the fourteenth 
century we find examples of grotesques on personal seals in great 
variety. 

It was during the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries that me- 
dieval seals attained their highest artistic excellence, and continued 
to present features of considerable beauty from that time until the 
year 1400. 

After 1400, personal seals, which are not of armorial character, 
gradually decline in importance, both as to size, style of design, and 
execution. Thenceforth many represent chiefly merchants' marks 
rudely executed, monograms, or a letter surmounted by a coronet, 
&c. Merchants' marks became very common during the fifteenth 
and early part of the sixteenth century, both on seals and signet 
rings. They are composed of a private cipher combined with the 
initials of the owner's name. It may be observed that such marks 
belonged chiefly to woolfactors, or merchants of the staple. 

From 1400 to 1500, we find the former types repeated throughout 
the century, marked by inferior execution. 

The seals of females, single or married, bore their effigies attired 
in a costume generally indicating that of their time ; some few are 
depicted on horseback bearing a falcon upon the wrist. 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 297 

Antique intaglios were frequently used on personal seals during 
the middle ages, from the twelfth to the fifteenth century. These 
gems are easily recognised by the peculiarity of the impression they 
leave, arising from the convex surface which the ancients usually gave 
to precious stones intended for signets. 

The wax used during the eleventh and twelfth centuries was gene- 
rally white; there are a few examples of red, but the colour appears 
to have been applied superficially. Towards the end of the twelfth 
century, green wax became very common. It may be remarked, that 
seals of the latter colour are in all instances better preserved than 
those of white or red. From this period downwards, red appears to 
have been more generally in use than any other colour. 

The following list of works on Seals will probably be found useful 
by the genealogist : — 

Aspilogia, by Henry Spelman. Lond. 1654. Polio. 

Display of Heraldry, by J. Guillim. Lond. 1660. Folio. 5th. ed. 

An Essay on the Use of Armories, by A. Nesbitt. Edinb. 1702. 8vo. 

De Yeteribus Germanarum aliarumque Nationum Sigillis, cura J. M. Heinec- 

cii. Franc, et Lips. 1709. Folio. 
De Re Diplomatica, par J. Mabillon. Paris, 1681. Folio. — Supplement. 

Paris, 1704. Folio.— New ed. Paris, 1709. Folio.— Naples, 1739. 

2 vols, folio. 3rd. ed. 
A Dissertation on the Use of Seals, by J. Lewis. Lond. 1740. 4to. 
Nouveau Traite de Diplomatique. 6 vols. Paris, 1750 — 1765. 4to. 
Observations on Parochial Registers, by R. Bigland. Lond. 1764. 4to. 
Observations on Seals, by Sir Henry Ellis. Printed in the " Archeeologia," 

vol. xviii. p. 12. 
Recueil de Documents et de Memoires relatifs a TEtude speciale des Sceaux. 

Paris. Published by the " Societe de Sphragistiques." Complete to 

No. 10 of vol. iii. 
Sphragistische Aphorismen, by Prof. Lipsius. In the "Transactions of the 

Thuringo- Saxon Antiquarians." Halle, 1842-3. 
Sigilla Antiqua: Engravings of Ancient Seals attached to Deeds and Charters 

in the Muniment Room of Sir Thomas Hare, Bart. 1847. Folio. Pri- 
vately printed. 
Dactyliotheca, sive " Annulorum Sigillarium usus," cura A. Gorlsei. Lugd. Bat. 

1604. 4to. 
Dactyliotheca, by the Hon. R. C. Neville. Privately printed. 
Observations on Personal Seals, by Hudson Turner. See "Archaol. Journal," 

vol. v. p. 7. 
A Paper on the General Arrangement of Seals. See " Archaol. Journal" 

vol. viii. p. 74. 



■298 HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 

Notices of Mediaeval Seals. See "Archaol. Journal" vol. x. pp. 141, 526; 

vol. xi. pp. 61, 73, 84, 261, 366. 
List of Seals in the British Museum. See Sims's "Hand-Book" pp. 78, 

274, 276. 
List of Seals added to the British Museum since 1851. See " AtcTmboI, 

Journ." vol. x. p. 11. 

England. 

Sandford's Genealogical History of England. Lond. 1707. Folio. 

Rymer's Fcedera. 7 vols. Lond. 1816—1830. 

Tresor de Numismatique et de Glyptique, Sceaux d'Angleterre et de France. 
Paris, 1835. Folio. 

'The Great Seals of England, from the Time of Edward the Confessor to 
William IV. 1837. Folio. Engraved by Collas' process. See also 
Wailly's "Mmens de Paleographie." Paris, 1838 [vol. ii. p, 369]. 

Sigilla Antiqua Norfolciensia. (Ives), 1772. 12mo. Privately printed. 

Remarks on the Discovery of the Ancient Seal of the Archdeaconry of North- 
ampton, with Remarks on the subject of Ecclesiastical Seals in general, 
by the Rev. A. W. Brown. Head before the Architectural Society of 
Northampton, and published separately in 1845. 

Sigilla Antiqua Suffolciensia ; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 21,056. 

A Paper on the Seals of Winchester, by J. G. Nichols. See the Winchester 
volume xlix of " Arch Institute" pp. 103 and 111. 

Scotland. 

•Selectus Diplomatum Scotise, etc., by Jas. Anderson. Edhib. 1739. Folio. 

Account of the Seals of the Kings, Royal Boroughs, and Magnates of Scot- 
land, by Thomas Astle, Esq. 1792. Folio. Separately printed, 

but forms a part of the third volume of the " Vetusta Monumenta." 

Descriptive Catalogue of Impressions from Ancient Scottish Seals, by D.Laing, 
Esq. Mini. 1850. Printed by the Bannatyne Club. 

Draughts of Seals belonging to the Nobility of Scotland; Brit. Mus. Rati. 
MS.G1Q1. 

Ireland. 

Sigilla Ecclesiae Hibernicae illustrata, by R. Caulfield. Lond. Two parts are 
published. 

Foreign Seals. 

Recueil de Sceaux Normands et Anglo-Normands, par A. L. D'Anisy. Caen, 
1834. Oblong 4to. An atlas of engraved seals, arranged by centuries, 
accompanying a work entitled "Extrait des Chartes Normands ou Anglo- 
NormandSy etc." by the same author. 

Sigilla Comitum Flandriee, Olivarii Vredii. Bruges, 1639. Folio. 

Monumenta Rerum Germanicarum, E. J. de Westphalen. 4 vols. Lipsia, 
1739. Folio (very full of plates). 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 299 

History of Seals in Germany, by Dr. Melly of Vienna. 

Vossberg on the Seals of Prussia and the Cities of Northern Europe. Berlin. 

Die Siegel der Stadt Frankfurt-am-Main, by Dr. Komer-Biichner. Frank/. 

8vo. 
SigillaImperatorum f Episcoporum, etc, ex Archiv. Civitatis Egrae in Bohemia; 

Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 19,998. 

The Rawlinson Collection of Seals at Oxford is very large. The 
late Mr. Caley made a collection of casts from English and foreign 
seals, above 2000 in number. Most of them are now in the pos- 
session of Sir Thomas Phillipps, Bart. 

The late Mr. Doubleday, of Little Russell Street, Bloomsbury, 
possessed the largest collection of casts of seals in England, pro- 
bably in the world. We are sorry to hear that his valuable collec- 
tions are likely to be dispersed. 

Casts of seals may be obtained from Mr. H. Laing, Elder Street, 
Edinburgh, and from Mr. Redhead, of Cambridge. 

Many excellent papers on seals, accompanied by fine engravings, 
may be found in the journals of the various Archaeological Societies, 
in Nichols's "Topographer and Genealogist "and in the "Collectanea 
Topographica et Genealogical The County and Local Histories 
abound in engravings of seals. 

Arms appear to have been first quartered on shields by John 
Hastings, Earl of Pembroke, in the reign of Edward III. 

In the reign of Elizabeth, the fashion of quartering arms was so 
much in use, that Wyrley observes, " except it be to be made in a 
pedigree or descent, to lock up in an evidence chest, thereby to 
show men's titles to their lands, or the alliances and kindreds of 
their houses, otherwise, as I say, I see not to any use in the world 
they serve, especially so many together, to be made upon a man's 
vesture, target, or banner." 

Connected with arms on seals are those ancient marks of family 
honours, the arms, crests, supporters, mottoes, and badges of emi- 
nent families and individuals, so frequently found sculptured on 
walls, or emblazoned in churches and private houses. Although 
these cannot be supposed to exist in such abundance as to assist 
the multitude who may seek to prove or authenticate their genea- 
logies, yet, in the pedigrees of noble, eminent, or wealthy families, 
they form a material and very interesting portion. That they have 
long been considered as affording good evidence respecting families, 
is ascertained from Wyrley's observations, as above given. 



300 HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 

Burton, the author of the "History of Leicestershire" was so 
sensible of the value of these ancient memorials, coats of arms, that, 
in order to make them still more useful to posterity, he collected 
copies of them from stained-glass windows, monuments, and the 
like ; for the avowed purpose that they might rectify armories and 
genealogies, and give such testimony and proof as might put an end 
to many differences. 

It is impossible to name the variety of ways in which coats of 
arms have been used, and in which they continually serve as 
material proofs of marriages and descents. Two or three centuries 
past, much more consideration was given to the subject than at the 
present day, and herald-painters were obliged to obtain license from 
the Heralds to pursue their occupations, and were punishable and 
punished for acting without such authority. 

Printed works and manuscripts containing Coats of Arms are so 
numerous, that a bare recital of them would fill a volume. Under 
these circumstances, any notice of them in this place must be 
necessarily a superficial one. The subjoined list has reference 
principally to collections of Arms only, and does not include those 
to be found in Peerages, Baronetages, Heralds' Visitations, County 
Histories, Societies' Publications, etc., lists of which works may be 
found in another part of the present volume. 

LIST OF COATS OF ARMS, 

England. 

The Academy of Armory, by E. Holme. Chester, 1688. Folio. The original 

MSS. are deposited in the British Museum {Marl. MSS. 2026—2035). 
A Dictionary of Arms, by Samuel Kent. Lond. 1717. 4to. 
A System of Heraldry, by Alex. Nesbitt. Edinb. 1722. Polio. 
A Display of Heraldry, by J. Guillim. Lond. 1724. Folio. 6th ed. 
The Banner Display'd, or an Abridgement of Guillim, by S. Kent. 2 vols. 

Lond. 1726. 8vo.— 2d ed. 1755. 8vo. 
A Complete Body of Heraldry, by Joseph Edmondson. 2 vols. Lond. 1780. 

Folio. 
The principal Historical and Allusive Arms borne by Families, collected by 

an Antiquary [Col. De la Motte?] Lond. 1803. 4to. 
Encyclopaedia Heraldica ; or Complete Dictionary of Heraldry, by W. Berry, 

4 vols, (including 1 vol. of plates, and 1 vol. Supplement). Lond. — 4to. 
The British Herald, by Thomas Robson. 3 vols. Sunderland ',1830. 4to. Two 

copies in the British Museum, each with copious manuscript additions. 
General Armoury of Great Britain, by J. and J. B. Burke. Lond. 1843. 

[Royal 8vo.— 3d ed. 1844.— New ed. 1847. 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 301 

List op Coats op Arms. 
Heraldic Illustrations, consisting of the Armorial Bearings of the principal 
Families of the Empire, &c, by J. and J. B. Burke. Lond. 1845. 8vo. 
Index to Pedigrees and Arms in the Heralds' Visitations and other MSS. in 

the British Museum, by E. Sims. Lond. 1849. 8yo. 
The Armorial Insignia of the Kings and Queens of England, by T. 

Willementl Lond. 1821. 4to. 
Arms and Quarterings, etc., of English Sovereigns, by the Kev. D. T. Powell ; 

Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 17,441. 
Arms of English Kings and Nobility; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 1073. 
The Arms of the most Eminent Families in Great Britain and Ireland, by A, 

Johnston. 2 vols. Lond. 1742. 8vo. 
Anns of the English Nobility, and Tables of Dates to Family Honours, by 

JohnMillan. Lond. 1749. 8vo. — Eeprinted. 1752. 
The Arms of the Nobility of England, Scotland, and Ireland, by H. Clark. 

Lond. 1778. 12mo. 
A Visitation of the Seats and Anns of the Noblemen and Gentlemen of 
Great Britain and Ireland, by Sir J. B. Burke. 1st series. Lond. 1852. 
8vo. — 2d series, Lond. 1854. 8vo. — Concluding volume. 1855. 
Collectanea de Insignibus Gentilitiis Nobilium Familiarum Gentis Anglorum ; 

Brit. Mus. Cotton. MS. Tib. E. ix. 
Arms of the Nobility and Gentry of most of the Counties of England ; Brit. 

Mus. Sari. MS. 1457. 
Arms of the Bastard Nobility and Gentry ; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 6298, f. 259. 
Arms, Crests, and Supporters of English, Irish, and Scotch Nobility ; Coll. 

op Arms, Norfolk MS. 33.— Vincent MS. 172. 
Notitiae et Insignia Illustrium Familiarum Angliae, a temp. Edw. Conf. ad 

Jac. I.; Magd. Coll. Camb. Pepys MS. 13. 
Roll of Arms of English Nobility, Knights, &c., fifteenth cent. ; Soc. of 

Antiquaries, MS. 17. 
The Names and Arms of all the Nobility of England, from the Conquest to 

1580 ; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 896. 
Arms of the Nobility, from 1066 to 1586 ; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 5525. 
A Collection of the Armorial Bearings of the Nobility and great Families of 
England, from the earliest times to the reign of Queen Elizabeth; 
Soc. of Antiquaries, MS. 136, art. 9. 
Bolls of Arms of Hen. III. and Edw. III., by Sir N. H. Nicolas. 1829. 8vo. 
The Boll of Arms, known as the Roll of KiDg Henry III., emblazoned by 

A. P. Harrison. [1846?] 4to. 
Names and Arms of the Ancient Nobility and Knights of England and 

Wales, temp. Hen. III. See "Ant. Repertory" vol. i. 
Nomina et Insignia Gentilitia Nobilium Equitumque sub Edvardo primo tege 

militautium, ed. E. R. Mores. Oxon. 1748. 4to. 
The Siege of Carlaverock, 28 Edw. I., with the Arms of the Earls, Barons, 
and Knights present, by Sir N. H. Nicolas. Lond. 1828. 4to- 



302 HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 

List op Coats op Aems. 
The Boll of Karlaverock, emblazoned by A. P. Harrison. 1 846. 4to. 
Karnes and Arms of Barons and Knights, temp. Edw. I. ; Coll. op Arms, 

MS. M. 16. 
Names and Arms of the Earls of England, temp. Edw. I. ; Queen's Coll. 

Oxf. MS. cxx. 
Arms of Noblemen, temp. Edw. I. and II.; Caius Coll. Camb. MS. 570. 
Roll of Arms in the Reign of Edw. II., by Sir N. H. Nicolas. 1828. 8vo. 
Arms of English Nobility, temp. Edw. HI.; Ashm. Lib. MSS. 15 (A.), art. 2; 

804, p. 56. The latter a beautiful and extremely curious manuscript. 
An Antient Book, containing 672 Shields of Arms of King Edward III. 

and Princes of the Blood Royal, Noblemen, and Knights, 1345 — 1351 ; 

Ashm. Lib. MS. 804. 
Roll of Arms of the reign of Edward IU. in the possession of Stacey 

Grimaldi, Esq., F.S.A. See Nichols' "Coll. Top. et Gen." vol. ii. 

Printed separately in 1835. 
Roll of Arms of the reign of Rich. II. , by Thos. Willement. Lond. 1834. 4to. 
The Roll of Arms of King Rich. II., containing the Arms of Barons, &c, 

anno 1377, by A. P. Harrison. [1848.] 4to. 
Roll of Arms of Peers, temp. Hen. VIIL, by Thos. Willement. Lond. 1829. 

Oblong folio. 
ArmsoftheNobiKtyofEngland,^m^.Hen.VIIL — Jas.L; Ashm. Lib. MS. 805. 
Collection of Arms of English Nobility and Gentry, sixteenth cent. ; Brit. 

Mus. Add. MS. 18,215. 
Arms and Quarterings of the Nobility of England, temp. Jac. I. ; Brit. Mus. 

Add. MS. 14,305. 
The Names, Arms, Crests, Mottoes, and Supporters, of the Nobility of Eng- 
land to the year 1629 ; Brit. Mus. Sari. MS. 1114. 
Funeral Escutcheons of Nobility and Gentry, from 1651 to 1663 ; Coll. op 

Arms, MS. E.D.N. 30. 
Arms and Notices of Peers of England in 1664; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 14,321. 
Insignia of the Orders of British Knighthood, by John Hunter. Lond. 

Folio. 

Arms, Supporters, Badges, &c. of the Sovereigns, with the Arms of the 

Knights of the Garter, from the creation of the Order to the year 1780, 

begun by Sir W. Segar, and continued by J. Edmondson ; Brit. Mus. 

King's MSS. 398—416. 21 vols. 
Arms of the Knights of the Garter ; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 6162. 
Arms, Quarterings, and Crests, of the Knights of the Garter, by John Hol- 
land, 1588 ; Coll. of Arms, Pkilipot MS. 9, Pe. 
Arms of the Knights of the Garter to the reign of Chas. I. ; Brit. Mus. 

Earl MS. 5831. 
.ah Armoiries de tous les Chevaliers de la Jarretiere, &c jusqu'a l ; an 1752; 

Brit. Mus. Add. MS 6278. 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 303 

List op Coats op Arms. 
Les Armes des Chevaliers de POrdre du Bain. n.d. Polio. 
Les Armes des Chevalliers de POrdre du Bain. [Sympson.] 1721. 4to. — 

1725. Folio. 
Arms of Crusaders. See "The English Crusaders" by J. C. Dansey. Lond. 

1849. 4to. 
Arms of Knights, Noblemen, and Gentlemen, of England and Ireland ; Trin. 

Coll. Dublin, MSS. I. 71, 88, 98 ; 113, art. 1 ; F. 125. 
Arms of Knights; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 5855, p. 197. 
Arms of Knights created in the reigns of Hen. VII., Hen. VIII., Edw. VI., 

Mary, and Elizabeth ; Brit. Mus. Cotton. MS. Claud. C. iii. 
Arms of Knights, temp. Edw. I. ; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 5848, p. 107. 
Koll of the Arms of the Knights at the Tournament at Stepney, 2 Edw. II. ; 

See Nichols' "Collect. Top. et Gen." vol. iv. p. 61. 
Arms of Knights, temp. Edw. II. ; Ashm. Lib. MS. 831, p. 100. 
Les Armes de noble Chivalers, que furent al tornement faict a Donstaple, 

7 Hen. III.; Brit. Mus. Shane MS. 1301, art. 82.— See also Nichols' 

"Collect. Top. et Gen." vol. iv. p. 389. 
Copy of a Roll of Arms, temp. Edw. III. See Nichols* " Collect. Top. et 

Gen." vol. ii. p. 320. 
Arms of Knights before 1583 ; Caius Coll. Camb. MS. 565. 
Arms of the Knights Baronets; Pub. Lib. Camb. MS. Dd. ix. 58. 
Pictures and Arms of Knights Bannerets, sixteenth cent. ; Brit. Mus. Karl. 

MS. 4205. 
Arms of the Baronets of England and Nova Scotia, &c., by John Millan. 

Lond. 1753. 8vo. 
The Arms of the English Baronets, and the Knights of the Bath, with the 

dates of creation. Lond. 1779. 12mo. 
Arms and Quarterings of Baronets; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 9372. 
Arms of Baronets, and other Gentlemen; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 12,446. 
Tricks of Arms of Baronets, from 1611 to 1641 ; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 

14,281. 
Arms of Baronets, a.d. 1611—1643 ; Caius Coll. Camb. MS. 517. 
The Arms of the most eminent Families in Great Britain and Ireland, by 

A. Johnston. 2 vols. Lond. 1742. 8vo. 
Arms of English Families in various Counties; Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 

12,442; 12,444; 12,445. 
A Collection of Arms, by A. Bedford; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 18,581. 
Arms of the principal Families in England, temp. Edw. I. ; Brit. Mus. Add, 

MS. 5848, p. 100. 
Arms of the Gentry of England, according to Counties, by J. Holland, 1584 ; 

College of Arms, Philipot MS. 18, W. 
Coats of Arms, chiefly of English Families, temp. Jas. I. ; Brit. Mus. Add. 

MS. 12,441. 



304 HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 

List ox Coats op Arms. 

Coats of Arms of the principal Families in England, 1607 ; Beit. Mus. Add. 
MS. 14,262. 

Arms of English Gentry, seventeenth cent.; Bbit. Mus. Add. MS. 15,972. 

Collection of English Coats of Arms, seventeenth cent. ; Beit. Mus. Add. 
MS. 19,814. 

Arms of English Families tricked, seventeenth cent. ; Brit. Mus, Add. MS. 
12,472.— Queen's Coll. Oxf. MS. xli. 

A valuable Collection of the Names and Anns of English Families, seventeenth 
cent. ; Pub. Lib. Camb. MS. Ee. ii. 21. 

Arms of English Families, eighteenth cent. ; Bbit. Mus. Add. MS. 14,322. 

Miscellaneous Collection of Anns of English Families, eighteenth cent.; 
Bbit. Mus. Add. MSS. 14,833 ; 14,834. 

Anns of English Commoners, a.d. 1730 ; Bbit. Mus. Add. MS. 14,832. 

Anns and Crests of different Families, with the date of Grant and Confirma- 
tion. 2 vols. 1748 ; Bbit. Mus. Add. MSS. 14,830; 14,831. 

Scotland. 

Note of the Arms of the Nobility of Scotland; Advocates' Lib. Edinbubgh, 

MS. 4to. The most ancient volume of Becords of Scottish Arms 

known to exist is in this library. 
Arms of the Nobility of Scotland; Bbit. Mus. Cotton. MS. Vesp. E. viii. 

f. 2$.— Harl. MSS. 1384, f. 79; 2120, ff. Z—l.—Add. MSS. 5523, 

f. 114 ; 17,537.— Thin. Coll. Dublin, MS. I. 72. 
Arms and Effigies of some of the Scottish Kings, with Arms of many of the 

Scottish Nobility ; Bbit. Mus. Harl. MS. 115. 
The Arms of the Kings and Nobility of England and Scotland ; Bbit. Mus. 

Harl. MS. 4030. 
The Names, Arms, and Matches of the Kings and Nobility of Scotland to 

1588; Ashm. Lib. Wood MS. 8549. 
Arms, Crests, and Mottoes of Scottish Nobility ; Bbit. Mus. Add. MS. 6298, 

ff. 145—152. 
Arms, Crests, and Supporters of Scottish Nobility ; Coll. of Abms, Norfolk 

MS. 33.— -Vincent MS. 172. 
Ordinary of Arms of Scotch Families, by Sir George Mackenzie ; Bbit. Mus. 

Harl. MS. 3740. 
An Ordinary of Arms of Scotland ; Beit. Mus. Harl. MS. 4732. 
Arms of certain Scotch Families ; Beit. Mus. Harl. MSS. 1042, ff. 54—57 ; 

5392. — Coll. of Abms, MSS. 1 — 5. 
Facsimile of an ancient Heraldic MS., emblazoned by Sir David Lyndsay, 

Lyon King of Ames, 1542. Edinb. 1822. Folio. 
Arms of the Sovereigns and Nobility of Scotland, 1585; Bbit. Mus. Harl. 

MS. 6101. 
An Alphabet of Arms of the Nobility and Gentry of Scotland, 1624, by 

James Pont; Advocates' Lib. Edinbubgh. 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 305 

List op Coats op Arms. 
Register of Arms, by Sir James Balfour, Lyon King of Arms, temp. Chas. I. ; 

Advocates' Lib. Edinb. MS. 
The Record Book of the Armorial Bearings of the Kings of Scotland and 

Great Britain, and of the Archbishops, Bishops, Nobility, and Gentry 

of Scotland, commencing in 1678 ; Lyon Office, Edinb. MS. 
A few Arms of Scottish Families, seventeenth cent. ; Brit. Mtjs. Add. MS. 

15,096. 
Arms of the Nobility and Gentry of Scotland, registered in the Lyon Office 

of Arms, 1721 ; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 20,701. 
The Arms of the Nobility of England, Scotland, and Ireland, by H. Clark. 

Lond. 1778. 12mo. 

Ireland. 

Arms of Irish Nobility and Gentry ; Brit. Mus. Sari. MSS. 1351, f. 148 ; 

1384, art. 4; 1425, f. 195; 4024; 4623, f. 18; 6866.-^0. MSS. 

4814; 4821; 5523, f. 114.— Caius Coll. Camb. MS. 1248, 
Alphabet of Arms of the Irish Gentry; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 1441, f. 40. 
Arms of Irish Families, by W. Terry; Brit. Mus. Earl. MSS. 4039; 4040. 

— Coll. of Arms, MSS. 6 — 11. 
Copies of Grants of Arms by the Office of Arms in Ireland ; Brit. Mus. 

Add. MS. 4815. 
Arms of Knights, Noblemen, and Gentlemen of Ireland ; Trin. Coll. Dubl. 

MSS. I. 71 ; 88; 98 ; 113, art. 1 ; E. 125. 
A true coppye of an auncient Booke of Armes of the Irishe Nobility and 

Gentry, collected by Mr. Thomas Poyninges, with additions by Mr. 

Chaloner, the second Randle Holme, &c. ; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 2120, 

f. 40. 
Arms, Crests, and Supporters of Irish Nobility; Coll. of Arms, Norfolk 

MS. 33.— -Vincent MS. 172. 
A Booke of the Arms of several Noblemen and Gentlemen of Ireland ; Lamb. 

Lib. Carew MS. 625. 
Irish Arms, collected by John Holland, 1585 ; Coll. of Arms, PhilipotMS. 

15, Pe. 
Arms of Knights created by Sir William Russell, Lord Deputye of Ireland, 

1st Sept. 1594; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 1386, f. 100. 
The Arms of Knights dubbed in Ireland; Trin. Coll. Dublin, MS. C. 25. 
Arms of all the Nobility and Gentry of Ireland, a.d. 1603 ; Brit. Mus. 

Earl. MS. 6096. 
The Arms, Crests, and Supporters, with the several Quarterings of all the 

Nobility of Ireland, collected by John Withie, a.d. 1613 and 1630 ; 

Brit. Mus. Earl. MSS. 1071; 1403. 
Arms of Irish Nobility, including Creations, to 1627 ; Caius Coll. Camb. 

MS. 560. 

20 



306 HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 

List op Coats op Abms. 

Arms and Creations of the Nobility of Ireland, 1629; Brit. Mus. Earl. 
MS. 1362. 

Anns of most of the Irish Nobility, temp. Chas. II. ; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 
1412, f. 33. 

Arms, chiefly of Irish Families, alphabetically arranged to letter D, seven- 
teenth cent.; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 14,318. 

A few Arms of Irish Families, seventeenth cent. ; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 
15,096. 

The Arms of the most eminent Families in Great Britain and Ireland, bv 
A. Johnston. 2 vols. Lond. 1742. 8vo. 

"Wales. 
A Display of Coat Armours now in use in the Six Counties of North Wales, 

by J. Davies. Salop, 1716. 12mo. 
Arms of the Princes, Noblemen, and Gentlemen of Wales ; Brit. Mus. Add. 

MS. 15,018, f. 307. 
Arms of the Founders of Welsh Families; Brit. Mus. Earl.MSS. 1143; 

1370; 1386; 1946. 
Arms of Welsh Families, sixteenth cent. ; Ashm. Lib. MS. 32. — Brit. Mus. 

Earl. MSS. 1441, ff. 14—39; 1933; 4291; 6122. 
Arms of divers old Welsh Families, a.d. 1580 ; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 1 961. 
Arms of Flintshire Families, by Chaloner, 1670 ; Coll. of Arms, MS. D. 26. 

Grants of Arms. 

Grants of Arms, sixteenth and eighteenth cent. ; Ashm. Lib. MS. 858. 
Miscellaneous Grants of Arms; Brit. Mus. Earl. MSS. 1172; 1441. 
Grants of Arms by divers Heralds; Brit. Mus. Earl. MSS. 1115; 1359; 

1438. — Queen's Coll. Oxf. MS. cxlvi. 
Grants of Arms by divers Kings, beautifully tricked by John Gough ; Brit. 

Mus. Earl MS. 1422. 
Grants of Arms, from Edw. I. to Elizabeth; Queen's Coll. Oxf. MS. cxl. 
Grants of Arms, from Edw. III. to Chas. I. ; Queen's Coll. Oxf. MS. cxxxix. 
Book of [Registration of all Grants of Arms, from the reign of Edw. VI. ; 

Coll. of Arms, Dublin. 
Grants of Arms, from Edw. VI. to 33 Elizabeth; Queen's Coll. Oxf. MS. 

cxxxviii. 
Grants of Arms by various Heralds, from the reign of Elizabeth to a.d. 1686 ; 

Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 14,293 ; 14,295. 
Grants of Arms, principally temp. Elizabeth ; Queen's Coll. Oxf. MS. cxlv. 
Patents of Arms, 1557—1564; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 16,940. 
Names of Persons who obtained Grants of Arms, from 10 Eli* *<* the year 

1600 ; Brit. Mus. Cotton. MS. Faustina, E. ii. f. 223. 
Arms and Crests granted to divers Persons, 1574 — 1597 ; Bk.x: Mus. Add. 

MS, 14,297. 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 307 

List op Coats op Abms. 
Grants of Arras, from 33 Elizabeth to 8 Chas. L; Queen's Coll. Oxf. 
MS. cxxxvii. 

by Baker; Coll. of Arms, MSS. E.D.N. 55 — 58. 

by Barker; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 5846. 

by Benolt ; Coll. of Arms, MS. G. 4 (2). 

by Camden; Brit. Mus. Harl.MS. 6095. — Coll. of Arms, 

MSS. E.D.N. 55—58. 

by Cooke; Coll. of Arms, MSS. F. 13; H. 10 (2); 

MSS. E.D.N. 55— 58.— Vincent MS. 198.— Ashm. Lib. Oxf. MS. 834. 

by Dalton; Coll. of Arms, MS. H. 6 (2). 

by Dethick; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. b$4,.—Add. MSS. 



12,454; 18,582.— Coll. of Arms, Vincent MSS. 1M; 163.— Queen's 
Coll. Oxf. MS. cxlv. 

by Elower; Ashm. Lib. Oxf. MS. 834. — Coll. of Arms, 



MS.B. 11(2). 

by Glover; Ashm. Lib. MSS. 834, p. 1; 844, art. ii. 

by Harvey; Coll. of Arms, MSS. 2, H. 5 ; H. 10 (2).— 



Vincent MS. 169. 

by Hawley; Brit. Mus. MS. H. 5 (2). 

by Segar; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. QUO.— Add. MS. 

12,225.— Coll. of Arms, MSS. E.D.N. 55—58; M. 2. 

by Walker; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 14,294. 

Alphabets of Arms. 

Alphabets of Arms; Brit. Mus. Earl. MSS. 1051; 1089; 1134.— Coll. 

of Arms, MSS. E.D.N. 29; 35—54. 
An Alphabet of Arms, arranged in Counties ; Brit. Mus. Earl. MSS. 1057 ; 

1108. 
The Greate Alphabet of Armes ; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 1414. 
Collection of Arms alphabetically arranged; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 18,594. 
Alphabetical Index to the Arms in Holmes' " Academie of Armory;" Brit. 

Mus. Add. MS. 8861. 
Transcripts of Alphabets of Arms, &c, from MSS. in Queen's College, Oxford^ 

Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 8933. 
Alphabets of Arms, containing upwards of 50,000 Coats. See Edmond- 

son's "Eeraldry " Berry's "Eeraldry" and Burke's "Armoury," 
Dictionary of Arms, sixteenth cent., 2 vols. ; Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 18,013 ; 

18,014. 
Alphabet of Arms of Families in various Counties, from A. to I., sixteenth 

cent.; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 5820.— -rfdtf. MS. 14,319. 
Alphabet of Arms, seventeenth cent.; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 20,024. 
Grafton's Alphabet of Arms; Coll. of Arms, Vincent MSS. 159; 160. 



»08 HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 

Ijist op Coats of Aems. 
An Alphabet of Arms, by Kandle Holmes; Brit. Mtjs. Earl. MS. 2108. 
Vincent's Alphabet of Arms ; Brit. Mus. Vincent MS. 179, P. 

Ordinaries of Arms. 1 

Ordinaries of Arms; Brit. Mus. Earl. MSS. 1078; 1387 (iwperf.); 1404; 

1458; 2021; 4036. 
Ordinaries of Arms of Families of various Counties, seventeenth cent.; Ashm. 

Lib. Wood MS. 8468.— Brit. Mus. Earl MS. &$50.—Add. MSS. 

14,320; 19,521; 19,522.— Coll. of Arms, MSS. E.D.N. 21; 22; 23. 
Chaloner's Ordinary of Arms; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 1465. 
An Ordinary of Arms, supposed by Dethick; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 5849. 
Copies of Glover's Ordinary of Arms; Brit. Mus. Cotton. MS. Tit. D. %.; 

Earl. MSS. 1392; 1459. 
Ordinary of Arms, by Gervase Holies ; Coll. of Arms, MS. E.D.N. 21. 
An Ordinary of Arms, by Eoger Kemyss, anno 1609 ; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 

5803. 
Ordinaries of Arms, by Smith and Philipot; Brit. Mus. MS. E.D.N. 22. 
Vincent's Ordinary of Arms; Brit. Mus. Vincent MS. 178. 
An Ordinary of Arms, by W. Berry, See his "Encyclopedia Eeraldica" vol. i. 

Crests and Mottos. 

A correct Collection of Arms, Crests, &c, by Philip Bryan. Lond. n.d. Polio. 
A Collection of Crests of the Nobility and Gentry, drawn by W. Sharp. 

Lond. 1778. 4to. 
Book of Ornamented Crests, by J. Lockington. Lond. 1791. 4to. 
Two thousand five hundred different Crests, selected from Heraldic Works, 

by J. P. Elven. Lond. 1815. 12mo. 
British Crests, by A. Deuchar. Mini. 1817. 8vo. 2 vols. 
The Book of Family Crests and Mottos. 2 vols. Lond. 1838.— 2d ed. 1845. 
An Ordinary of Crests; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 1475. 
Badges, Crests, and Standards, temp. Hen. VIII. See "Collect. Topog. et 

Genealog." vol. iii. p. 49. 
Crests of several Families; Coll. of Arms, MS. M. 12; Vincent MS. 168. 
Mottos of the Nobility and Baronets of Great Britain and Ireland. Lond. 

1736. 12mo. 
Arms of the Nobility, with Supporters, Crests, and Mottos, by J. Millan. 

Lond. Eeprinted, 1752. 
Other Lists of Mottos. See Edmondson's " Body of Eeraldry." — Berry's 

" Acyclopcedia Eeraldica" vol. i. — " Symbola Eeroica." Lond. 1736. 

12mo. — Kobson's "British Eerald" (Supplement). 

1 An Alphabetical Dictionary of Coats of ArmB, being an Ordinary of British 
Armorials, upon an entirely new and elaborate plan, by J. W. Papwortb, Esq., of 
14a, Great Marlborough Street, London, is nearly ready for the press. 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 309 

List of Coats op Aems. 
Miscellaneous Coats. 

Arms of Patriarchs, Princes, Abbots, &c; Coll. of Arms, Vincent MS. 153. 
Arms, &c, of the Archbishops of Canterbury, from Lanfranc to John Moore; 

Lamb. Lib. MS. 555. 
Arms of English Sees, impaled, with the Coats borne by those Archbishops 

and Bishops that sat in the House of Lords in 1735 ; Brit. Mus. Add. 

MS. 14,829. 
Arms of the Archbishops, Bishops, Chancellors, Masters of the Bolls, 

Treasurers, Constables, Chief Justices, Chief Barons, and Admirals of 

England, and of the Viceroys of Ireland, from the Conquest to the year 

1636; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 12,443. 
Grants of Arms to Bishops and certain Clergymen; A.SHM. Lib. Wood MS. 

8569. 
Arms of Bishops and their Sees, Abbies, Priories, &c; Coll. op Arms, MSS. 

L. 8; 10; M. 5. 
The Blazon of Episcopacy, being a Catalogue of Coats of Arms borne by or 

ascribed to the Bishops of England and Wales, by the Rev, W. K. 

Eiland Bedford, MA. Preparing for press. 
Arms of Irish Sees; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 6331, f. 51. 
Arms of Abbies, Monasteries, and Religious Houses, Sees in England and 

Ireland, Universities, Schools, Public Hospitals, Inns of Court, Counties, 

Cities, Boroughs, Societies, Trades, &c. &c. See Edmondson's " Body 

of Heraldry." — Dugdale's "Monasticon." — Tanner's "Notitia." 
Arms of Sees, Colleges, Towns, &c. ; Coll. of Arms, MS. M. 5. 
The Arms and Common Seals of all y e Cities and Borough Towns in England 

and Wales, by W. Jackson. Lond. 1714. Folio. — See also Lewis's 

"Topographical Dictionary." 
Arms of Cities, Bishops, &c. ; Trin. Coll. Dubl. MS. I. 17. 
Arms of Cities and Corporations, in trick; Brit. Mus. Eg. MS. 1073, f. 8. 
Arms of Towns, Cities, Religious Houses, etc.; Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 

5819, f. 211 ; 9372 ; 6331, ff. 1, 51. 
Arms and Names of Erles Marschalls of England, from the Conqueat to 1590; 

Caius Coll. Camb. MS. 670, ff. 203, 217. 
Arms of Lords Keepers, Justices, Law Officers, fifteenth to seventeenth cent.;. 

Caius Coll. Camb. MS. 598. 
Engravings of the Arms of many of the Heralds are given in Moule's "Biblio- 

theca Heraldica." 

American Genealogies. 1 — The increasing interest displayed by 
our brethren across the Atlantic in whatever relates to family his- 
tory and their connection with the old country, and the praise- 

4 Fifteen rolls of Reports of Commissioners on the Claims of American Loyalists, 
between 1784 and 1788, are now in the Rolls House. 



310 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 



worthy zeal displayed by them for the preservation of the already 
decaying early records of their remarkable country, as instanced in 
the numerous publications daily issuing from the American press, 
render it necessary that we should devote some small space in the 
present work to a notice of their labours in the cause of History 
and Genealogy. 

Numerous Societies for the encouragement of the study of the 
history of America have been established in that country, the chief 
of which is the "New England Historical and Genealogical Society." 
The Journal of this Body contains curious and valuable biogra- 
phical and antiquarian information, and is particularly valuable to 
the genealogist. It is printed at Boston, under the title of the 
"New England Historical and Genealogical Register" in royal 8vo, 
and has already entered upon its tenth volume. The following 
Index to the genealogical collections contained in the work, as 
far as it is at present published, cannot fail of being useful to the 
student on this side the water : — 



Abbe, vii. 325. 

Abbott, vi. 200. 

Adams, vii. 30, 351 ; viii. 41. 

Addington, vii. 117. 

Allerton, viii. 270. 

Appleton, v. 144. 

Ashley, ii. 394. 

Bailey, viii. 91. 

Baker, v. 190. 

Ballantine, vi. 371. 

Bangs, viii. 368, 369. 

Bates, v. 101. 

Bean, v. 202— 205. 

Beede, v. 214, 216. 

Billings, vii. 272. 

Blake, vi. 372. 

Boltwood, v. 101. 

Bonner, v. 174. 

Bowdoin, viii. 247. 

Boylston, vii. 145, 351. 

Bradford, iv. 39, 233. 

Bradstreet, viii. 312. 

Breck, ii. 225; iii. 104; v. 396, 397. 

Bridges, viii. 252. 



Bright, vi. 272. 

Bronfield, v. 100. 

Brooks, v. 355. 

Browne, vi. 232, 272, 278; vii. 312. 

Bulkley, vii. 269. 

Butler, i. 167; ii. 355 ; iii. 73—76, 

353—358. 
Carpenter, ix. 52. 
Carr, v. 200, 201. 
Chase, i. 68. 
Checkley, ii. 349. 
Chesley, v. 205, 454, 455. 
Chipman, vi. 272. 
Clap, vii. 163, 270, 325 j vi. 373. 
Clement, v. 473. 
Coffin, ii. 337. 

Cogswell, v. 206—208; vi. 102. 
Collins, v. 473. 
Colton, v. 167. 

Cotton, i. 164 ; iv. 92 ; vii. 305. 
Cox, v. 102. 
Cradock, viii. 27. 

Dane, viii. 148. 
Banforth, vii. 315—321. 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 



311 



Amebic an Genjealog ies. 
Davenport, iv. Ill, 351. 
Davis, vi. 35, 
Deane, iii. 375—337; vi. 103; ix. 

93. 
Dearborn, ii. 81, 297; vi. 60, 
Denison, v. 139, 140. 
Dexter, viii. 24S. 
Dodge, v. 328, 329. 
Doolittle, vi. 293. 
Drew, vi. 36. 
Dudley, i. 71; vi, 280. 

Eliot, vi. 277; viii. 45, 259: 
Emerson, vi. 37. 
Endicott, i. 335.. 

Foster, i. 352. 
Eoxcroft, viii. 171, 260. 
Erost, v. 165—170. 
Erye, viii. 226, 227. 

Gay, vi. 373. 

Gerrist, vi. 258. 

Gilbert, iv. 223, 329. 

Gilman, v. 210, 2 LI, 345; vi 376. 

Goddard, vi. 25& 

Gookin, i. 345; iv. 183. 

Greene, iv. 75. 

Hall, vi. 259; vii. 271. 
Ham, vi. 329. 
Hanson, v. 213; vi. 329. 
Harris, ii. 218; viii. 172. 
Hayes, vi. 333. 
Heard, v. 179,187; vii. 47. 
Hilton, vii. 50,155. 
Hinkley, vii. 170. 
Hirst, viii. 260. 
Hodges, v. 414, 415. 
Hopkins, vi. 43. 
Home, vii. 156. 

Hubbard, v. 142, 143, 316, 317. 
Humphrey, viii. 250. 
Huntingdon, i. 343; v. 163; viii. 
186. 



Hussey, vii. 157. 

Ingalls, v. 474. 

Jennison, vii. 71. 
Johnson, viii. 232, 359, 
Johonnot, vii. 141. 
Jones, vi. 200, 273. 
Josselyn, ii. 306. 

Kitchell, vii. 267. 

Knight, v. 474. 

Leighton, v. 166 ; vii. 255. 
Leonard, v. 101, 102, 403, 404; vii. 

71. 
Leverett, iv. 121. 
Levermore, vi. 272. 
Lewis, viii. 47. 
Lindall, vii. 15. 
Lord, vii. 71. 
Loring, vi. 374, 375 ; vii. 163, 326. 

Mack, vii. 307. 

Matter, vi. 20, 21. 

Matthews, vii. 257. 

Meader, vii. 257. 

Meigs, iv. 91. 

Metcalf, vi. 171 ; vii. 168, 328.. 

Minot, i. 171, 256. 

Moseley, vii. 329. 

Niles, viii. 261. 
Nock, vii. 258. 
Noyes, ii. 44, 231. 
Nute, vii. 258. 
Nutter, 259. 

Oates, vi. 150* 
Odlin, vi. 272. 
Otis, ii. 281; iv. 143; v.177— 223. 

Palmer, vii. 330. 
Parker, vi. 375. 
Parsons, i. 2G3. 
Payne, v. 331, 332. 



312 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 



American Geneaxogies. 
Peabody, ii. 153, 361; iii. 359— 

373. 
Pearce, vi. 276. 
Pease, iii. 27—31, 169—175,233— 

238, 390—398; vii. 12. 
Perkins, viii. 100. 
Peters, ii. 58. 
Phillips, vi. 273. 
Pinkham, v. 198, 450; vii, 353. 
Pitman, vii. 355. 
Plumer, v. 267, 268. 
Porter, ix. 54. 

Prentice, vi. 273—276; vii. 71. . 
Prescott, vi. 274. 
Prince, v. 375—384; vi. 234. 
Purington, v. 215. 

Eawson, iii. 297—330. 

Richardson, v. 475 ; ix. 68. 

Eicker, v. 308—310, 464. 

Roberts, vii. 356; viii. 63. 

Robins, viii. 64, 173, 251. 

Robinson, v. 464. 

Rockwell, vii. 164. 

Rogers, v. 105, 224, 311. 

Rolfe, iii. 149—152. 

Rollins, v. 168, 169; viii.253— 258, 

Russell, vi. 274. 

Sartle, vi. 274. 

Scannon, viii. 65. 

Shannon, v. 245. 

Shapleigh, v. 345. 

Sherman, vii. 308. 

Smith, vii. 132 ; viii. 65. 

Spofford, viii. 335; ix. 61. 

Starbuck, viii. 68, 129. 

Stebbins, v. 71, 351. 

Stoddard, v. 21—23. 

Storer, vi. 275. 

Stoughton, v. 350. 

Strong, vii. 100; viii. 180—183. 

Sumner, viii. 128 d. 

Swett, vi. 49. 



Taylor, ii. 398. 

Tibbets, viii. 130—132. 

Townsend, viii. 184. 

Tozer, viii. 264. 

Tully, iii. 157—163. 

Turner, v. 466 ; vii. 185 

Tuttle, v.188, 198, 216; viii 132— 

134. 
Twombley, viii. 263. 

Varney, v. 197, 198. 
Varnum, v. 79, 250. 
Yaughan, v. 245. 
Vinton, vii. 164. 

Waldron, v. 182, 205, 206; viii. 78. 
Wales, v. 411, 412. 
Wallingford, v. 206, 207. 
Walter, vii. 166; viii. 209. 
Ware, vi. 145. 
Washington, vi. 384. 
Waterman, vii. 308. 
Watson, v. 216, 217. 
Webster, vii. 102. 
Weeks, v. 467. 

Weld, vii. 309 ; viii. 207; ix. 42. 
Wentworth, iv. 321; v. 103, 104, 
205, 206, 269, 418 8 ; vi. 213, 
291; vii. 265, 304; viii.48,246. 
West, vi. 282. 
Whitman, vi. 376. 

Whittingham, v. 149—152. 

Willard, iv. 305. 

Williams, ii. 116 ; y. 414 5. 

Willis, v. 476. 

Winslow, iv. 297. 

Wiswall, v. 468. 

Wolcott, i. 251. 

Wood, ii. 259, 260. 

Woodbridge, vi. 273, 281; vii. 75. 

Woodward, vi. 214. 

Wormeley, v. 268, 269. 

Wright, iv. 355. 

Wyman, iii. 33—38. 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 313 

A catalogue of the Local Histories of America was printed by 
Mr. George Ludwig, in 1846. 

The following is a list of such Histories as contain genealogical 
memoranda, accompanied by a table of Family Histories, partly 
compiled from an anonymous article on " American Genealogies," 
which appeared in the April number of the "North American 
Review 33 for the year 1856 : — 

LOCAL HISTORIES. 

Journals of the Rev. Thomas Smith and the Rev. Samuel Dearie, with .Notes 
and Biographical Notices, by W.Willis. Portland, 1849. The Notes 
in this work abound in pedigrees. 

American Genealogy, being a History of some of the Early Settlers of North 
America, by J. B. Holgate. New York, 1851. 4to. — The families 
named are, Rapalje; Johnson; Yan Rensselaer; Gardiner; Beekman; 
Bleecker; DeGraaf; Hoffman; Kip; DeLancey; Barclay; Roosevelt; 
Van Schaick ; Livingston ; Lawrence ; Osgood ; and Jay. 

Table of Births, Marriages, and Deaths in Bellerica, from 1654 to 1704, by 
John Farmer. "Mass. Hist. Coll." xii. pp. 162. 

Memorials of the Dead in Boston, with copious Notices of many of the Early 
Settlers of the Metropolis of New England, by T. Bridgman. Boston, 
1853. 12mo. 

Genealogy of the Families who have settled in the North Parish, in Bridge- 
water, Mass., &c. by Moses Cary. Boston, 1824. 8vo. 

History of the early Settlement of Bridgewater, in Ply mouth, Co. Mass. including 
an extensive Eamily Register, by Nahum Mitchell. Boston, 1840. 8vo. 

Epitaphs from the Old Burying-Ground in Cambridge (New England), with 
Notes, by W.T. Harris. Cambridge, N.E., 1845. 8vo. 

A Catalogue of the Names of the first Puritan Settlers of the Colony of Con- 
necticut, collected by R. R.Hinman (1846-7). Hartford, 1852. 8vo. 

A Collection of Epitaphs from Connecticut Valley, Copps Hill, and King's 
Chapel Burial Grounds, Boston, by Bridgman. 

A History of the Town of Duxbury, Massachussetts, with Genealogical Regis- 
ters, by Justin Winsor. Boston, 1849. 8vo. 

A short Genealogical Account of a few of the Families of the Early Settlers 
in Eliot, and of a branch of the Moody Family, by William Fogg. Saco, 
1851. 16mo. 

History of Gardiner, Pittston, and West Gardiner, with Genealogical Sketches 
of many Families, by J. W. Hanson. Gardiner, 1852. 12mo. 

History of the Town of Groton, including Pepperell and Shirley [Massachus- 
setts], with Appendices, containing Family Registers, &c, by C. Butler. 
Boston, 1848. 8vo. 

A Historical Sketch of the Town of Hanover, Massachussetts, with Family 
Genealogies, by J. S. Barry. Boston, 1853. 8vo. 



314 HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 

American Genealogies. 

Extracts from the first Book of Church Eecords in Hopkintoa. See "Jtow 
and Moore's Collection" ii. pp. ] 71, 172. 

The History of Long Island, with Genealogies of the principal Families, by 
B.F.Thompson. N Fork, 1843. 2 vols. 8vo. 2d. ed. 

History of the Episcopal Church in Narragansett, Ehode Island, with Genea- 
logical and Biographical Accounts of distinguished Men, Families, &c, 
by W.Updike. New York, 1847. 8vo. 

A Genealogical Agister of the First Settlers of New England, &c, by John 
Farmer. Lane. Mass., 1829. 8vo. A new edition of this valuable work, 
by the Hon. James Savage, is likely to appear shortly. 

List of Counsellors of New Hampshire, from 1650 to 1837. " N. Eamp. 
Hist. Coll.," v. pp. 231—237. 

A History of New Ipswich, New Hampshire, by F. Kidder and A. Gould. 
Boston, 1851. 8vo. With Genealogical Sketches. 

A History of the Early Settlement of Newton, Co. of Middlesex, Mass., from 
1639 to 1800, by Fr. Jackson. Boston, 1854. 12mo. 

The Annals of Newtown, in Queen's County, New York ; also a particular 
Account of numerous Long Island Families, by J. Eicker. New Fork, 
1852. 8vo. 

The Ancient Historical Eecords of Norwalk, Conn., by Edwin Hall. Norwalk, 
1847. 12mo. — The "Genealogical Register," which occupies about 106 
pages of small type, contains a list of Early Settlers and their Families. 

Letters and Papers relating chiefly to the Provincial History of Pennsylvania 
[ed. by Thomas Balch]. Phil. 1835. 8vo. Privately printed. Prefixed is 
much interesting genealogical memoranda relating to American families. 

The History of Eoxbury Town [Massachussetts], by C. M. Ellis. Boston, 
1847. 8vo. — Forty-five pages in this work are devoted to Genealogical 
History. 

A History of Eutland, Worcester County, Mass., with a Biography of its first 
Settlers, by Jonas Eeed. Wore. 1836. 12mo. 

Inscriptions from the Burying Grounds in Salem, Mass. Boston, 1838. 8vo. 

History of the Town of Shrewsbury, Massachussetts, by A. H. Ward. Boston, 
1847. 8vo. — It contains an account of 266 Families of different Sur- 
names, and 1080 Families in the whole. 

Names of the first Settlers of Somersworth, N. H., between 1650 and 1700. 
See "New Eamp. Mist. Coll." iii. pp. 39. 

A History of the Town of Union, in the Co. of Lincoln, Me., with a Family 
Eegister of the Settlers and their Descendants, by J. L. Sibley. Boston, 
]85L 12mo. 

Genealogies of the Families and Descendants of the Early Settlers of Water- 
town, Mass., including Waltham and Weston, to which is appended the 
early History of the Town, with Illustrations, Maps, and Notes, by 
Henry Bond, M.D. 1855. 8vo. 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 



315 



American Genealogies. 

A History of the County of West-Chester, by Robert Bolton, Jun. New York, 
1848. 2 vols. 8vo. — Great attention has been paid by the author to 
the genealogical portion of the work. 

History of Ancient Woodbury, Connecticut, from 1659 to 1854, by W. 
Cothren. Water&ury, 1854. 8vo. — "Much attention has been paid to 
the genealogical portion of the work, which must be sought for in 
years to come, by all of those whose ancestors belonged to 'Ancient 
Woodbury.' " 

FAMILY HISTORIES. 



Family Name. 


Author. 


Where published. 


Date. 


Adam . . 
Adams and (J 

Appleton 
Bellows 
Brown . 
Chapman 
Clark . 
Cushman 

Davenport 
Day . . 


»uinoy 




• 


Boston . . . 
Albany . . . 
Havana . . 
Easton . . . 
Boston . . . 
New York . . 
Providence 
Hartford . . 
Bennington . 
Boston . . . 
Boston . . . 
New York . . 

Northampton •! 

Boston . . • 


1847. 
1848. 


H. W. Bellows . . 
— Beckwith . . . 
Kev. F. W. Chapman 
Miss S. Bobinson 
H. W. Cushman . , 


. 


1851. 
1850. 
1855. 
1851. 

1854. 
1837. 
1855. 
1854. 
1851. 
1840, 1st ed. 


DODD 


• • 


W "R Deane . . 
S. Dodd . . 


• 


1848, 2d ed. 

1849. 

1839. 


Drake . 
Farrar . 


S. G. Drake . . 
D. Dudley . . . 
W 8 Porter . . 


* 


Boston . . . 
Boston . . . 
New Haven . 
Boston . . . 
Hartford . . 
Philadelphia (?) 
Boston . . . 


1845. 
1848. 
1854. 
1850. 








- • 


1849. 
1853. 


Gilbert 

Goodhue 


. . . 




* • 


1850. 
1845. 


Greenleap 


J. Greenleaf . . 
W. H. Whitmore 


• ■ 


New York . . 
Boston . . . 

Boston . . j 

Bangor . . 
Cincinnati . . 
Boston . . . 
New York . . 
Hartford . . 
Boston (?) . . 
Albany . . . 


1854. 
1855. 

1844, 1st ed. 


Herrick 
Houghton 




■{ 


1849, 2d ed. 
1846. 

1837, lsted. 
1854, 2d ed. 
1848. 


KiLBOURN 

Laurence 
Lawrence 


■ • • 


P. K. Kilboum . 
J. Laurence . . 
F. S. Pease . . 


• • 


1845. 

1847. 
1848. 



316 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 



Ameeicaw Genealogies. 



Family Name. 



Lawrence 
Leavitt. 
Lee . . 
Leland . 



Leveeitt 

Locke . 
Marvin . 
Mather. 
Moody . 



Morse . 
Mygatt . 
Nash . 
Olcott . 
Piper . 
Prentice or 
Prenties 
Quincy, see Adams. 
Eawson . 
Eedfield 



Eice . 



Eiddell 
eobinson 
Safford 
Sears . 

Sharpies 

Shattuck 

Shippen 
Smith . 



Spofford 
Sprague 



Stetson . 
Stoddard 
Sumner . 
Swett . 
Taintor. 
Temple . 
Thayer . 
Thomas . 
Tucker . 



Author. 



J. Lawrence 
J. Torrey . 
W. H. Hill 

S. Leland . 



J. G. Locke . 
T. E. Marvin . 
J. M. Mather . 
C. P. Moody . 
W. Pogg . . 
Eev. Abner Morse 
P. T. Mygatt . 
Eev. S. Nash, A.M 
N. Goodwin . 



C. J. P. Binney 



S. S. Eawson . 
J. S. Eedfield . 



W. P. Eiddell 

Miss S. Eobinson 
Miss Eobinson 



J. Sharpie 



T. Balch 



N. H. Keene 
J. Spofford 
Henry Sprague 
E. Soule, jun 
J. S. Barry 



W. H. Sumner 
J. W. Thornton 
C. M. Taintor 
W. H. Whitmore 
E. Thayer . . 



Where published, 



Albany. 
Lewiston 
Albany. 
Boston . 



Boston . 

Boston . 

Hartford 

Boston . 

Saco 

Boston . 

Brooklyn 

Hartford 

Hartford 

Boston 

Boston 



Boston 
New York 



New Orleans 

Bennington 

Bennington 

Cambridge 

Philadelphia 



Philadelphi; 
Utica . 



Haverhill 

Hingham 

Boston 

Boston 

Boston 

Boston 

Eoxbury 

Greenfield 

Boston 

Hingham 



New York. . 1851 



Date. 



1853. 

1853. 

1851. 

1850. 

In an advanced 
stage of pre- 
paration. 

1853. 

1848. 

1848. 

1847. 

1851. 

1850. 

1853. 

1853. 

1845. 

1849. 

1852. 



1849. 

1839. 

Inanadvanced 
stage of pre- 
paration. 

1852. 

1837. 

1837. 

1855. 

1816. 

Now passing 
through the 
press. 

1855. 

1849. 

1852. 

1851. 

1828, 1st ed. 

1847, 2ded. 

1847. 

1849. 

1854. 

1851. 

1847. 

1856. 

1835. 



HERALDIC COLLECTIONS. 



317 



Ambbican Genealogies. 



Family Name. 



Turner 
Upham 

Usher 



Ward . . . 

"Warren . . 

Webster . . 

Wells . . . 

Wentworth . 

Whitman . . 

Whitmore . . 

(England) 

Whittlesey . 

Wight . . . 

Williams . . 

Winsor . . . 

Woodman . . 

Yale. . . . 



Author. 



J. Turner . . 
A. G. Upham . 



A. H. Ward, A.M. 
J. C. Warren . . 
N. Webster . . 
A. Wells . . . 



E. Whitman . . 
W. H. Whitmore 
W. H. Whitmore 



D. P. Wight, M.D. . 
S. W. Williams, M.D. 
O. Winsor .... 



Where published. 



Boston 

Concord 



E.Yale. 



Boston . . 

Boston . . 
New Haven (?) 

New York . . 

Boston . . 

Portland . . 

Boston . . 



New Haven (?) 
Boston . . 
Greenfield . . 
Providence 
Newbury Port 
New Haven . 



Date. 



1852. 

1845. 

In an advanced 
stage of pre- 
paration. 

[1851]. 

1854. 

1836. 

1848. 

1850. 

1832. 

1855. 

1856. 

1855. 

1848. 

1847. 

1847. 

1855. 

1850. 



318 



JHiSttllanea dknealosua* 

"jt/TANY a chasm may be filled up, and many a link wanting in 
-L*J- a pedigree may be formed, by reference to works, which, 
although not immediately bearing upon genealogical matters, are 
nevertheless of too much service in cases connected with the descent 
of land, to be omitted. Such are the documents known as the 
f c Nomina Villarum "; Crown Surveys; Ministers' Accounts ; Year- 
Books; Entries in Bibles; Poll-Books; Sheriffs' Lists; Lists of 
Gentry, of Officers of State ; Corporation Dignitaries ; Justices of 
the Peace, etc. ; Magazines ; Directories, etc. etc. 

References to the principal printed works and manuscripts, 
affording information under these heads, are given in the succeed- 
ing pages. Lists of Church Dignitaries ; Members of Parliament ; 
Lawyers ; Medical Men ; and of the Army and Navy, may be found 
under their respective heads in other parts of this work. 

Nomina Villarum. — The most ancient of the documents above 
mentioned are the Nomina Villarum, being two books belonging to 
the Exchequer of Accounts, and now at Carlton Ride — the one of 
the time of Henry III. and Edward I. ; the other of the time of 
Edward II. In the same repository are several original rolls, bear- 
ing the same title, containing the sheriffs' returns of the names of 
all the villages in England, and the possessors thereof, in 1316. 

A transcript of the MS. at Carlton Ride, extending from 1316 to 
1559, is in the British Museum {Harl. MS. 6281). In the same 
library is a MS. bearing the title "Nomina Villarum, maneriorum, 
etc. infra Com. Lincoln." (HarL MS. 6289.) Other copies are in 
the Bodleian Library, MSS. 5046 and 3550. At Carlton Ride 
is a book, formerly in the Foreign Opposer's Office, called Nomina 
Villarum, containing claims of Lords of Liberties allowed by the Court 
of Exchequer, in pursuance of ancient charters, from the year 1672. 

Crown Surveys ; Ministers' Accounts, etc. — The Surveys of 
the lands and possessions of the Crown contain the names of the 
tenants, their sub-tenants, the rents and services payable in respect 
of such lands, the nature of the holding, and the title of such tenants 



MISCELLANEA GENEALOGICA. 319 

to the tenancy, whereby it often becomes necessary to show two or 
three descents of a pedigree. 

In the " Ministers' Accounts " of estates which belonged to the 
Crown previously to the dissolution of monasteries, will be found the 
names of former owners and present tenants of the estates, as well 
as incidental particulars relating to them. 

It is often found necessary to examine these latter documents, for 
the purpose of ascertaining the period at which grants of Crown 
Lands were made to private individuals ; for it is frequently impos- 
sible to discover, by the existing indexes of some of the records, the 
grants required, especially where the date is unknown ; so it becomes 
advisable to search when the Ministers of the Crown discontinued 
entering the rents and profits of the land in question in their 
accounts, for the purpose of ascertaining the period of the transfer, 
as well as the parties to whom transferred. 

A list of these important documents, with their present places of 
deposit, is here subjoined : — 

CROWN LANDS, ETC. 

Inquisitions containing Surveys of manors, the antient demesne of the 
Crown ; also of lordships, manors, lands, and other possessions, which 
the Crown acquired by forfeiture upon attainders, purchase, and the 
like. Also, Surveys of forests and chases ; Surveys in consequence of 
disputes respecting the boundary of particular manors, parks, &c. &c. 
Surveys of manors, rectories, lands, and tithes, concealed from the 
Crown. Inquisitions respecting land gained by dereliction of the sea. 
These Surveys are very numerous, and chiefly from and including the 
teign of Elizabeth to Charles II. inclusive; Chapter House, West- 
minster, and Augmentation Office. 

Surveys of Crown demesne Lands, and of Lands belonging to attainted Per- 
sons and others ; Carlton Ride. 

Accounts of Crown Lands, and their Tenants, throughout England, for many 
centuries; Pub. Lib. Camb. 

Papers relating to Crown Lands; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 5755, f. 127. 

A Book of Manors, &c. held of the Crown, from Hen. III. to Edw. IV., with 
the Surnames of Tenants in capite; Brit. Mus. Karl. MS. 3874. 

Ministers' Accounts of Manors and Lands, the demesne of the Crown, as well 
purchased and exchanged, as procured by attaint, &c. from Hen. III. to 
Charles I. ; Exchequer of Accounts. 

Bundles of Leases, from Hen. III. to Charles II. ; State Paper Office. 

Accounts of Grants from the Crown in fee-tail, from 1 Edward I. to 26 
Elizabeth ; and of Grants to Families for long terms of years ; Land 
Eevenue Office. 



320 MISCELLANEA GENEALOGICA. 

CEOWW IjAKDSj eto. 

Surveys, Leases, and particulars of Land, now or heretofore belonging to the 
Crown, from 1 Edw. I. to the present time; Office op Land Re- 
venue. 

Survey of the Lands of Edward Prince of Wales, 19 Edw. III.; Pub. Lib. 
Camb. MS.Bd. ix. 36. 

Abstracts of ^Enrolments of Grants from the Crown, on the Patent and other 
Bolls, in the Rolls Office, and Bermingham Tower, Dublin, from temp. 
Edw. II. to Elizabeth; Beit. Mus. Eg. MS. 75. 

Ministers' Accounts of Crown Lands from the reign of Edward II. to the 
present time; Duchy of Lancaster Office. 

Ministers' Accounts of Estates which belonged to the Crown previous to the 
Dissolution of Monasteries, in particular Counties, from Richard II. to 
Hen. VIII. ; Augmentation Office. 

Conventual Leases of the reigns of Edw. IV. and Rich. III., but chiefly of 
those of Hen. VII. and VIII. ; Augmentation Office. 

Receivers' Accounts, Surveys, Sec. of Crown Lands, 7 — 14 Hen. VIII.; Coll. 
of Arms, Norf. MS. xxxiii. 

Rentale variarum terrarum regis, 10 Hen. VIII. ; Brit. Mus. Roy. Moll, 
14, B. xxxviii. 

Grants of Crown Lands on Eiants not inrolled, tempp. Henry VIII. and 
Elizabeth ; Brit. Mus. Eg. MS. 75. 

Accounts of the Rents, Profits, and Revenues arising from the Honors, 
Manors, Rectories, &c. which came to the Crown on the dissolution of 
Religious Houses, as also by attainder, escheat, or other forfeiture, chiefly 
of the reigns of Hen. VIII., Edw. VI., Philip and Mary, and Etizabeth ; 
Augmentation Office. 

Leases granted by the Court of Augmentations, inrolled in books, from 27 
Hen. VIII. to the dissolution of the Court, 1 Mary ; Leases of Crown 
Lands, tempp. Elizabeth and James I. ; Augmentation Office. 

Inrollments of Deeds relating to Lands formerly granted by the Crown, from 
Henry VIII. to George IV. ; Auditor General's Office. These 
books contain a complete chain of evidence of the descent of property, 
whether by heirship or otherwise, from antient times to the present day. 

Bailiffs' Accounts of Manors belonging to the Crown, temp. Edw. VI.; 
Brit. Mus., Margrave MS. 159. 

Register of Sales and Donations of Crown Lands, Pensions, &c. during the 
reign of Edw. VI. ; Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 1216. 

Dimissiones Terrarum ad Coronam Anglise pert, ab ann. 29 Eliz. ad ann. 
5 Jac. I. ; Pub. Lib. Camb. MS. Dd. ix. 48. 

An Account of all the Leases granted by Queen Mary during her reign ; 
Brit. Mus. Sari. MS. 239. 

Index of Leases of Manors and Lands in England, granted since the Re- 
formation. 1832. Folio. Printed by Sir Thomas Phillipps, Bart. 



MISCELLANEA GENEALOGICA. 321 

Crown Lands, etc. 
Register of Sales and Donations of Crown Lands, Pensions, &c. 1 & 2 Jas. I.; 

Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 1217. 
An Index of Crown Lands granted by James L; Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 222. 
Surveys of Crown Lands, tempp. James I., Charles I., the Commonwealth, 

and Charles II. ; Surveyor-General of Crown Lands. 
Eecords of Leases of Crown Lands, from the reign of James I. to the present 

time; Clerk of the Pipe. 
A Particular of Crown Lands sold from March 1 649 to December 1655, with 

Names of the Purchasers ; Pub. Lib. Camb. MS. Dd. xiii. 20. 
Counter-parts of Leases of Church Lands, made by Trustees, from 1662 to 

1658, by authority of Parliament ; Lambeth Library. 
A Survey of Crown Lands in several Counties, taken anno 1650 ; Brit. Mus. 

Earl. MS. 5013. 
Particulars relative to the Demised Estates of the Crown, from the Restora- 

tion to the present time, in ninety-one volumes. Two volumes exist of 

the time of Charles I.; Surveyor-General of Land Revenue. 

Cambridgeshire : Notes relating to Crown Lands in Co. Cambridge ; Brit. 

Mus. Add. MS. 5838, ff. 96 5, 120 5, 156 J, 1675, 1895. 
Cheshire: Concessiones terrarum, relaxationes, etc., in Com. Cestrise; Brit. 

Mus. Cotton. MS. Cleop. D. vi. 
Hampshire: Survey of King's Lands in Winchester. See the "Winton 

Domesday Book." 
Herefordshire : Rental of the King's Lands in Herefordshire and Gloucester- 
shire 30 Henry VIII.; Brit. Mus. Karl. MS. 4131, art 2. 
Patents and Grants of Lands in the County of Hereford, tempp. 

Ric. III., Henry VIIL, and Elizabeth ; Brit. Mus. Marl. MS. 6695. 
Kent : Survey of the King's Manor of East Greenwich, Kent, 7 William III.; 

Petty Bag Office. 
Lancashire : Concessiones terrarum, relaxationes, etc., in Com. Lancastria ; 

Brit. Mus., Cotton MS. Cleop. D. vi. 
Leicestershire — Oxfordshire : Abstracts of Crown Grants of Lands in Co. 

Leicester, Lincoln, Northampton, Nottingham, and Oxford, 36 Henry 

VIIL; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 6059. 
— Rentals of Lands and Inquisitions, particularly as to the 

Pens in Nottingham and Derby, temp. Edw. III.; Chapter House. 
Somersetshire : Rental of King's Lands in the Co. of Somerset, 1606 ; Pub. 

Lib. Camb. MS. He. ii. 13. 
Staffordshire — Surrey : Crown Grants of Land in StaiFordshire and Surrey, 

36 Hen. VIIL; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 6059. 
Sussex : Surveys of Manors held of the Crown in Co. Sussex, temp. James I. ; 

Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 784. 
Worcestershire: Crown Grants of Lands in Worcestershire, 36 Hen. VIIL; 

Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 6059. 

21 



322 MISCELLANEA GENEALOGICA. 

Cbowk Lands, etc. 

Yorkshire: Crown Grants of Lands in Yorkshire, 36 Hen. VIII.; Burr. 
Mus. Add. MS. 6059. 

Names of Possessors of Crown Lands in Yorkshire, temp. Eliza- 
beth; Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 896, f. 204. 

Ireland. 

Accounts of Eeceipts of Crown Eents in Ireland, 1667—1722 ; Brit. Mus. 

Add. MSS. 4768; 4772—4776. 
A Terrier of the Crown Lands in Ireland ; with the Names of the Tenants, 

Quantity, Rent, &c, circa a.d. 1680; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 4755. 

Year-Books. — The Year-Books, which contain Keports of law 
cases, commence in 1220 ; and the Reports have been continued — 
with some intermissions — to the present day, amounting to nearly 
a thousand volumes. Heirship is, perhaps, as frequently a cause of 
dispute as any one subject which can be named. The names of all 
the books of Reports, their dates, and an account of a portion of 
them, may be seen in WorralPs "Bibliotheca Legum Anglta" 1788, 
and in the "Law Catalogue" 1823. 

The Year-Books were first printed, and for the most part in sepa- 
rate years and terms, by Machlinia, Pynson, and others. The whole 
series, with the exception of the reign of Edward II., was reprinted 
about 1600. In 1679, another edition in eleven volumes, including 
the reign of Edward II., was published by Serjeant Maynard. 

The labours of the official reporters employed in the compilation 
of the Year-Books were discontinued after the 27th Henry VIIL, 
or probably earlier. After that time a considerable period elapsed 
before the appearance of any new Reports. The regular periodical 
publication of Reports did not take place till the latter part of the 
last century. 

The Lincoln's Inn Library, and the Public Library at Cam- 
bridge, are very rich in manuscript Year-Books. There are also 
a few at the British Museum. 

Entries in Bibles. — Most valuable assistance is frequently 
afforded the genealogist from Family Bibles, Letters, and the innu- 
merable miscellaneous manuscripts and documents which are fre- 
quently treasured up in families. Cases are almost daily occurring 
in which a simple entry in a Family Bible affords the connecting 
link in a pedigree, which has in vain been sought for in parochial 
registers and other authentic sources of information. 



MISCELLANEA GENEALOGICA. 32 S 

Entries in Family Bibles, prayer or other books, when known to 
have been made by the parent, head of a family, or other competent 
person, of births, marriages, deaths, and circumstances happening 
within his own knowledge, is good evidence of such transactions, 
and have been used and received as evidence at all periods. Too 
much pains, therefore, cannot be used in searching for books Oi 
this nature, and for family manuscripts ; for innumerable are the 
instances of individuals not registered in the parochial books of 
baptisms, either from poverty, carelessness, or some other cause. In 
such cases, unless the Bibles or private manuscripts of such parties 
contain entries of their families, there may, perhaps, not be a single 
proof in existence by which their descents can be traced. 

Entries of births, deaths, and marriages, frequently occur in the 
calendars prefixed to missals and books of hours, as early as the 
middle of the fifteenth century ; it cannot however be expected that 
many families are in possession of documents relating to their 
ancestors of this remote period. 

Familiar Letters will rarely be found earlier than the fifteenth 
century. Prior to the reign of Henry V., specimens of English cor- 
respondence are rare ; letters previously to that time were usually 
written in French or Latin, and were the productions chiefly of the 
great or the learned. The material upon which letters were written 
up to the same period was usually vellum ; very few instances, indeed, 
occurring of more ancient date, of letters written upon paper. 

Poll-Books; Sheriffs 5 Books. — Although there is utility to a 
genealogist in being able to prove the existence, residence, and 
respectability of an ancestor at a certain period and place, yet, were 
it necessary, still greater utility might often be derived from these 
County Records. From them may be obtained the names, resi- 
dences, and descriptions of persons having freehold property; 
whilst, as they point out the estates formerly held by a predecessor, 
a clue is given to a source of information (that of Title-Deeds) 
which, if permitted by the existing owners to be made available, 
might at once furnish all the evidence which an inquirer stood in 
need of. 

The Sheriffs 3 Lists are books formerly compiled annually by the 
under-sheriff, containing the names and residences of every male 
freeholder in his county, for the purpose of enabling his deputies to 
summon juries. By the act 6 Vict. cap. 18, the clerk of the pea:* 
for every county, and the town clerk for every city and borough, are 



324 MISCELLANEA GENEALOGICA. 

now required once a year to print and keep for sale an alphabetical 
list or book of all persons qualified to vote for members of Parlia- 
ment for such county, city, or borough. 

In the Poll-Books the sheriff enters the names, descriptions, re- 
sidences, properties, and tenants of the voters at an election for a 
member of the county. By the 93rd section of the same statute, 
the sheriff or other returning officer is required, as soon as possible 
after every election, to deliver the Poll-Books to the Clerk of the 
Crown in the Court of Chancery, who keeps possession of the same. 

In cases of contested elections, Poll-Books are not unfrequently 
printed, and will doubtless be in existence when the original records 
have perished. 

The Poll-Books may not, and most probably do not, contain the 
whole of the freeholders of the county : they are lists only of those 
who voted, though, in cases of contested elections, the candidates 
take care not to suffer many defaulters. As to the number of 
persons entitled to vote, the register for each county or city, now 
kept, is numbered ; but many of the electors are inserted twice or 
more, by reason of their having qualifications in more than one 
parish in the county or city ; and as to cities and boroughs, many 
are registered both as freemen and as inhabitant householders. 

Few counties have any books of ancient date — Northampton, 
which has preserved them from 1669, being the only shire which 
has records of that century. Shropshire has them from 1713. Few 
others are of a more remote period than 1760. 

The Poll and Jury Books are in the custody of the Clerks of 
the Peace for the respective counties. 

As connected with the Freeholders of England, may be placed the 
Land-tax Assessments, which are in the Land Revenue Auditors' 
Office, from 1689 to the present time. By statute 18 George II., 
duplicates of these are to be preserved at the Clerk of the Peace's, 
and further copies, formerly at the Queen's Remembrancer's Office, 
are now at Carlton Ride. 

Some few lists of Freeholders are among the manuscripts in the 
British Museum, as here given : — 

Lists of Freeholders in the Counties of Bedford, Hertford, Lincoln, Oxford, 
Suffolk, and York, a.d. 1561; Brit.Mus. Lansd.MS. 5. 

Raines of Freeholders in Cheshire, 1579, 1580; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 
1424, f. 7. 

-^_ temp. Car. II. ; Bkit. Mus. Earl. MS. 

1920, ff. 46, 66, 69. 



MISCELLANEA GENEAL0G10A. 325 

Names of Freeholders in Essex; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 2240, f. 6; Lansd. 

MS. 5. 
Lists of Persons objected to as Voters for the Co. of Hereford, eighteenth 

cent.; Bhit. Mus. Add. Roll, 1372. 
Lists of Freeholders in Lancashire, a.d. 1 600; Brit. Mus. Earl. MSS. 2042, 

ff.185; 2077; 2085; 2112. 
Freeholders' Book for the Co. of Leicester, a.d. 1630 ; see Nichols* "Eistory 

of Leicestershire ," vol. i. pt. i. p. xcii. 
Table of the High Sheriffs, Knights of the Shire, Citizens, and Burgesses, of 

the County of Lincoln, from the earliest times; Lond. 1779. 4to. 
List of London Electors, A. D. 1723-4 ; Brit. Mus. Eargrave MS. 139, 

pp. 369—417. 
Proceedings on the Scrutiny of Pollers at the Westminster Election, a.d. 1749; 

Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 509 (a. b.). 
List of Freeholders in Middlesex, 1684 ; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 3790, f. 152. 
List of Freeholders in Northumberland, a.d. 1639 ; Durham Cath. Lib. 

Eunter MS. 23, p,297. 
Poll-Books at the Election of Knights of the Shire for Northumberland, 

anno 1747; Brit. Mus. Lansd. MSS. 523 ; 524. 
List of Freeholders in Nottinghamshire, a. d. 1561 and 1698 ; Brit. Mus. 

Earl. MSS. 6846, f. 306 ; 7020, art. 1 ; Lansd. MS. 5. 
Lists of the Poll at Brecknock, 25 July 1698 ; Earl. MS. 6846, f. 304. 

Lists of Gentry. — We have already noticed, under the head of 
"Heraldic Collections/' the principal records containing the 
Pedigrees and Arms of the Gentry of England, a class which might 
justly require a volume in itself. In this place it is proposed to 
direct the student's notice to documents containing lists of names 
only, and more especially to the records known by the name of 
" Lists of Gentlemen of England." The earliest of such lists is 
a roll of the reign of Edward II., 1307 — 1327, preserved in the 
Tower, containing the names of those who possessed land to the 
value of <£20, in the counties of Somerset, Dorset, Notts, and 
Derby. The next and most important document of this descrip- 
tion is, a Catalogue of the Gentry of England, made in the twelfth 
year of Henry VI. [1433], and returned by the Commissioners into 
Chancery. The outward object was to enable the King's party to 
administer an oath to the gentry, for the better keeping of the 
peace and observing the laws, though the principal reason was to 
detect and suppress such as favoured the title of York, then begin- 
ning to show itself. These returns are very unequal : some, as in 
Oxfordshire and Cambridgeshire, descending to persons of mean 



826 MISCELLANEA GENEALOGICA. 

quaHy * and some, as in Shropshire, Yorkshire, and Northumber- 
land "wkose returns do not answer to the extent of those counties. 
The returns of the counties of Chester, Cornwall, Durham, Herts, 
Lancaster, Northampton, Somerset, Suffolk, Westmoreland, and 
"Worcester, do not appear on the roll. Copies of the names of all 
the gentry are given in Fuller's "Worthies." 

Although this census of gentry does not appear to have been con- 
tinued by succeeding kings, yet our public libraries are not deficient 
in lists of this class of society for many generations past. These 
lists, references to which are given below, include also officers filling 
appointments in her Majesty's court, household, and public offices; 
justices of peace, corporation dignitaries, and others. 

LISTS OF GENTRY. 

The Names of the Lords of every Manor throughout the Counties of England, 

from a.d. 1316 to 1559; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 6281. 
Names of Families contained in Domesday ; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 78, f. 25. 
Names of Landholders mentioned in Domesday ; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS r 369, 

f. 98. 
Lists of the Gentry of England; Bodl. Lib. MS. 6512; Ashm. Lib. 

Wood MS. 8495. 
Lists of Persons of Note in different Counties ; Brit. Mus. Cotton. MS. 

Titus, B.i, p. 124. 
Names of the Gentry of England, at various periods ; Brit. Mus. Harl. MSS. 

293; 7020. 
Names of the Nobility and Gentry who contributed to the defence of this 

country in 1588; Lond. 1798. 4to. 
A List of Esquires in England and Wales; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 6804, 

art. 104. 
Names of Persons in England fit to be appointed Escheators, 1592; Brit. 

Mus. Lansd. MS. 71, art. 62. 
Names and Arms of the Gentry in the respective Shires of England ; Trin. 

Coll. Dublin, MS. I. 67. 

Berkshire: A Catalogue of the Principal Gentry living in 1665; Ashm. 

Lib. MS. 7235. 
Camoridgeshire : The Names, Habitations, and Arms of all the Gentlemen 

m Cambridgeshire ; Bodl. Lib. Gougli MS. 
- Names of Persons in Cambridgeshire and the Isle of Ely, 

axed for the Loan, 1590; Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 63, art. 13. 

A Terrier of Lands in the Counties of Cambridge, Oxford, 



Salop, part of Somerset, Surrey, and Sussex, with the Names of the 
Possessors, etc., to the time of Elizabeth, in 6 volumes ; Brit. Mus. 
Add. MSS. 4700—4705. 



MISCELLANEA GENEALOGIOA. 327 

List of Gentey, etc. 
Cheshire: List of Cheshire Gentlemen, 24 Hen. VIII.; Brit. Mus. Earl. 

MS. 1920, f. 38. 
Names of Gentlemen of Worship in Co. Chester, 1575 ; Brit. 

Mus. Lansd. MS. 20, art. 39. 
Names of Gentlemen and Freeholders in Co. Chester, 1579, 1580 ; 



Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 1424, f. 7. 

■ The Names of all the Inhabitants within the County of Chester, 



a.d. 1641 ; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 2107. 
Cornwall: Names and Arms of Gentlemen in Cornwall ; Brit. Mus. Cotton. 

MS., Faustina, E. iii. 
■ Names of the Gently of Cornwall, anno 1728, may be found in 

Norden's " Speculi Britannia Pars" 
Cumberland: Names of Cumberland Gentlemen; Brit. Mus. Cotton. MS. 

Caligula, B. iii., f. 192. 
Lists of Persons in public and private stations in Cumberland. 

See Jollie's " Cumberland Guide." Carlisle, 1811. 8vo. 
Derbyshire : Names of Knights and Gentlemen resident in Derbyshire, 

12 Hen. VI. ; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 2043, f. 32. 
Devonshire : A Catalogue of all those which usurped the Names and Titles 

of Gentlemen without authority, and were disclaimed, in Exeter, and 

many other Towns Corporate within the various Counties of England, 

1620. Polio. Privately printed by Sir Thomas Phillipps, Bart. 
Register of divers Persons who have given Tenements, &c, towards 

the Relief of the Poor in Devonshire, by R. Izacke. Lond. 1736. 8vo. 
Essex : Names of Noblemen in the County of Essex; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 

2240, f. 1 b. 
List of Contributors to the Payment of the Subsidy in Essex, 

29 Eliz.; Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 52, art. 59. 

List of Nobility and Gentry of the County of Essex, who have sub- 



scribed to a new Map of theCounty, by JohnWarburton. Lond. 1722. 4to. 
Herefordshire: List of the principal Gentlemen in Herefordshire, 1645; 

Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 911, f. 78 b. 
— Lists of Persons objected to as Voters for the County of 

Hereford, eighteenth century; Brit. Mus. Add. Boll, 1372. 
Kent : Names of the Gentlemen of Kent in the reign of Hen. VII. ; Brit. 

Mus. Cotton. MS., Faustina, E. ii., f. 216. 

Index of Proprietors of Lands in Kent ; Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 5517 

—5519. 

Gentry of Kent, with their Lands, from 12 Hen. II. to Edward VI. ; 

Coll. of Arms, Philipot MS. 4, Pb. 

London : Names of Gentlemen of Account residing in London and its Suburbs, 
Nov. 1595 ; Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 78, art. 67. Privately printed by 
Sir C. G. Young, Garter, in 1832. 



328 MISCELLANEA GENEALOGICA. 

List op Gentry, etc. 
London (continued) : Names of Strangers resident in London, 28 Nov. 1595. 

See Nichols 1 "Collect Top. et Gen.'' vol. viii. p. 205. 
Names of Persons dead, or removed from London, since the last 

Assessment for the Subsidy ; Brit. Mus. Lamd. MS. 63, art. 9. 
A Catalogue of Inhabitants of the several Parishes in London, 

a.d. 1638; Lamb. Pal. Lib. MB. 272. 
Names of the Parishioners, Inhabitants, and Occupiers of Land, in the 

Parish of St. James's, Clerkenwell, 1677 ; Brit. Mus. Shane MS. 3928. 
Account of Inmates within the City of Westminster, and its Liber- 
ties, 1582 ; Brit. Mds. Lamd. MS. 35, art. 32. 
Middlesex : List of Nobility and Gentry of the County of Middlesex who 

have subscribed to a new Map of the County, by John Warburton. 

Lond. 1722. 4to. 
Northumberland : List of Gentlemen of Property in Northumberland, 1522 ; 

Brit. Mus. Cotton. MS. Calig. B. vi. f. 432. 

Some Account of the Ancient Families of Northumberland. 

See Greg's "Survey of Newcastle." 

Nottinghamshire : List of the Gentlemen and Freeholders in Nottingham- 
shire; Brit. Mus. Harl.MS. 7020, art. 1. 

Oxfordshire : Names of Gentry in Oxfordshire summoned to compound for 
not being made Knights, a.d. 1630; Ashm.Lib. WoodMS. 8495, f. 58. 

Staffordshire : Names of Knights, Esquires, and Gentlemen within the County 
of Stafford, a.d. 1614 ; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 1439, f. 2. 

— Names of the Inhabitants of Litchfield, temp. Anne ; Brit. 

Mus. Karl. MS. 7022. 

Suffolk Landowners; Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 8198; 19,161—19,164. 

Surrey : Names of the Gentry of Surrey, 12 Hen. VI. ; Brit. Mus. Add. 
MS. 6171, f. 22. 

Warwickshire : List of Warwickshire Noblemen and Gentlemen, in the year 
1733; Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 846, f. 249. 

Catalogue of Besidents in Co. Warwick, temp. Elizabeth. See 

Nichols' "Collect. Top. et Gen. 3 " vol. viii. p. 298.— In 1733 and 1742, 
ibid., vol. viii. p. 361. 

Westmoreland: Names of Gentlemen in Westmoreland ; Brit. Mus. Cotton. 

MS. Calig. B.iii. f.192. 
Collections for Westmoreland, by the Eev. S. Lysons ; Brit. 

Mus. Add. MS. 9459. 
Wiltshire : List of Nobles and Gentry of Wiltshire, temp. Hen. VII. See 

Nichols' " Topographer" vol. ii. p. 96. 
Lists of Wiltshire Gentry. See the " Eepertorium Wlltonense" by 

Sir B. C. Hoare, Bart. Bath, 1821. Folio. 
Yorkshire : A Catalogue of Esquires and Gentlemen of Yorkshire, by R. 

Gascoigne; Coll. of Arms. 



MISCELLANEA GENEALOGICA. 329 

List of Gentry, etc. 
Yorkshire (continued) : Catalogue of Gentry iu the Northern Parts, with their 

Arms, temp. Eliz. and Chas.L; Brit.Mus. Lansd.MS. 865, ff.68— 1105. 
Glamorganshire : List of the principal Gentlemen in Glamorganshire, 1645 ; 

Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 911, f. 78 b. 
Ireland : The Names of certeine of the Chiefe of the English Families in 

Ireland, mentioned in the Records in Bermingham's Tower ; Brit. Mus. 

Add. MS. 4787, f. 56. 
A Note of the Gentlemen's Names within the several Counties of 

Ireland; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 4767, art. 29. 

Names of English Families who came into Ireland in the reigns of 



Henry II., Richard I., and John; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 4814, art. 1. 
Names of the Gentlemen of the several Counties of England ordered 



to provide Men for the Defence of Ireland, temp. Elizabeth; Brit. Mus. 
Add. MS. 4757, f. 145. 

Lists of Public Officers. 
Origines Juridiciales, by W.Dugdale. Lond. 1666. Fol.— 2d ed. 1671.— 3d 

ed. 1680. — Abridged and continued, 1st, in 1685, 2d, in 1739, under 

the title of "Chronica Juridicialia." 
The Court Register, containing a Series of all the Great Officers, Prime 

Ministers, &c, from Chas. II. to 1733, by Will. Siiford. 1733. 8vo.— 

2d. ed. 1782. 
" Anglise Notitia," or the Present State of England, by Edw. Chamberlayne. 

Lond. 1755. 12mo. 38th edit. The first edition appeared in 1669. 
A Help to English History, by Peter Heylyn. [Wright.] Lond. 1773. 8vo. 
The Political Index to the Histories of Great Britain and Ireland, by Rob. 

Beatsoo. Lond. 1806. 3 vols. 8vo. 3d edit. 
A Manual of Dignities, including Lists of Great Public Functionaries, from 

the Revolution to the present time, by C. R. Dodd. Lond. 1842. 12mo. 
The Book of Dignities, by Joseph Haydn. Lond. 1851. Roy. 8vo. 

Officers of the Household, etc. 

Great Officers of England, with Forms of their Patents ; Coll. of Arms, 

MS. B. 24. 
Miscellaneous Documents relating to the Officers of the Royal Household in 

Ancient Times ; State Paper Office. 
List of Chamber Officers of Hen. VIII. ; Brit. Mus, Royal MS. 7, E. xiv. 

f. 17. 
List of the Officers of State, &c, in the reign of Queen Elizabeth, s. xvij. ; 

Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 168, art. 85.— Pub. Lib. Gamb. MS. Ee. v. 29. 
Names of Officers and Clerks of the Queen's Household ; Brit. Mus. Lansd. 

MS. 86, art. 50.— Earl. MS. 1848, art. 1; 2078, arts. 7—9; 4133, 

art. 1. 



330 MISCELLANEA GENEALOGICA. 

List op G-entby, etc. 
Officers and Ladies of the Queen's Privy Chamber, 1558 ; Brit. Mus. Lansd. 

J£*j. t, arts, &o, 55. 
Names of the Lords and Officers lodged within the Court and Friery, 1573 ; 

Beit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 18, art. 37. 
Names of Great Officers of the Queen, from 1558 to 1588; Brit. Mus. 

±ia.7isa.M&. 104, art. 24. 
Names of her .Majesties Commissioners, and Lists of the Nobility and all the 

Fubtic Officers, in 1585 ; Brit. Mus. Sloane MS. 3194. 
Names of the Ladies and Gentlemen of the Bed and Privy Chambers, 1589 ; 

Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 59, art. 22. 
Names of Officers of the Green-Cloth and Household, 1590; Brit. Mus. 

Lansd. MS. 62, art. 55. 
List of Officers of the Household and their Servants, 35 Eliz. [1592] ; Brit. 

Mus. Lansd. MS. 69, art. 68. 
A Catalogue of the Officers of the Crown, anno 1618; Brit. Mus. Sloane 

MS. 3299, art. 92.— Harl. MSS. 4257; 6381, art. 1. 
List of the Officers of the Household, temp. Charles I.; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 

4706, art. 24. 
Warrants and Certificates of the Appointments of the Officers and Servants of 

the Household, from 1626 to the present time; Board of Green 

Cloth. 
List of King's Servants appointed to attend his Majesty to Scotland, a.d. 

1633; Ashm. Lib. Wood MS. 8495, f. 69. 
Officers of the Household, temp. Charles II. ; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 6836, 

art. 32. 
Names of the Servants that attended the Prince [Charles II.] and the rest of 

the Eoyal Children, 1641; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 3791, f. 105. 
Lists of Officers of State and Judges, temp. Will. III.; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 

7512, arts. 1, 2, 3. 
Lists of Officers of the Household and of State, to the year IS 06. See 

Beatson's " Polit. Index" vol. i. — to the year 1851, see Haydn's 

"Book of Dignities" pt. ii. 
List of Officers of State of Scotland to 1806. See Beatson's "Political 

Index" vol. iii. — to 1851, see Haydn's "Book of Dignities" pt. v. 
List of Officers of State for Ireland to 1806. See Beatson's "Political Index" 

vol. iii. — to 1851, see Haydn's "Book of Dignities " pt. vi. 

Chancellors, Masters of the Kolls, etc. 

List of the Chancellors of England; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 542, f. 14, 
Names of the Chancellors and Keepers of the Great Seal, with Dates of Patents, 

&c. ; Coll. of Arms, Vincent MS. 214. 
List of the Chancellors of England, from the Conquest to Nicholas Heath 

[1555] ; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 1153, f. 15. 



MISCELLANEA GENEALOGICA. 331 

List of Gentry, etc. 
Names of Chancellors and Keepers of the Great Seal, from 7 Hen. VIII. to 

Q. Elizabeth, 1558; Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 3, art. 79. 
Catalogue of the Chancellors of England, from Athelstan to 1593; Brit. Mus, 

HarlMS. 6778, f. 33. 
Names of the Masters of the Rolls, from 50 Hen. III. to 12 Jas. I.; Beit. 

Mrs. Lansd. MS. 163, f. 310. 
Nomina Magistrorum Rotulorum in Cancellaria, ab ann. 25 Edw. I. ad ann. 

1 Car. I.; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 4029, f. 10.— See also Dugdale's 

"Origines Juridieiales." 
Custodes Rotulorum Cancellarise Anglise, ab. ann. 1294 ad ann. 1621; Bodl. 

Lib. 5063, f. 28. 
Nomina Caucellariorum Angliae, ab ann. 718 ad ann. 1625 ; Brit. Mus. Harl. 

MS. 4029, f. 11. 
Catalogue of Chancellors, Lord Keepers, Lord Treasurers, of England, Masters 

of the Rolls, &c., by J.Philipot. Lond. 1636. 4to. 
Catalogue of Lord Chancellors and Keepers of the Great Seal, from the Con- 
quest to a.d. 1646 ; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 1357. 
A Catalogue of the Lord Chancellors and Keepers of the Great Seal, from 

the Conquest to 1671. See "Selden's "Discourse; 11 also Dugdale's 

"Origines Juridieiales." 
The Chancellors from theConquest to 1806. Lond.lSOQ. 4to. Privately printed. 
A Catalogue of the Lord Chancellors, Keepers of the Great Seal, Masters of 

the Rolls, &c., by T.D. Hardy. Lond. 1843. Roy. 8vo. 
List of the Chancellors of Scotland. See Crawfurd's "Lives of the Officers 

of Scotland;" also Chalmers' "Caledonia" 

Privy Councillors. 
List of Privy Counsellors, from 1536.to 1545 ; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 6989, 

f. 80. 
Names of Noblemen, Knights, &c. of the Privy-Council, dead, from anno 1 of 

Edw. VI. to 1575 ; Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 104, art. 14. 
The Names of Privy Counsellors, 37, 38, Hen. VIII., and 4—7 Edw. VI. ; 

Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 160, f. 286. 
Names of Privy Councilors, in Mary's Days; Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 160, 

f. 277. 
Names of Privy Councilors since 1 Eliz.; Brit. Mus. Lansd.MS. 160, f. 281. 
List of Privy Councellors appointed by Jas. II., in 1684 ; Brit. Mus. Lansd. 

MS. 1163. 
The Lords and others of the Privy Council, temp. Will. III.; Brit. Mus. 

Harl. MS. 7512, art. 2. 

Other Officers. 
Officers of the Exchequer and of England; Brit. Mus. Harl. MSS. 5169 ; 
5170 



332 MISCELLANEA GENEALOGICA. 

List aw Gentry, etc. 
Officers of the Court of Eevenue, the Exchequer, &c. ; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 

7020, art. 10. 
Nomina Thesaurariorum Angliae et Scaccarii, ab anno 946 ad ann. 1635; 

Beit. Mus. Earl. MS. 4029, f. 17. 
Names of the Chancellors of the Exchequer, from 48 Hen. III. to 12 Jac. I.; 

Beit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 163, f. 312. 
List of Administrations in England, from the reign of Hen. VIII. to that of 

Victoria. See Haydn's "Book of Dignities" pt.ii. 
List of Ambassadors and Ministers employed in Foreign Affairs during the 

reign of Elizabeth; Beit. Mus. Shane MS. 4164, art. 76. 
List of Ambassadors to and from England, from 1664 to 1680 ; Beit. Mus. 

Earl. MS. 6273, art. 4. 
List of Ambassadors, &c. from Great Britain to Foreign States, to the year 

1851. See Haydn's "Book of Dignities" pt. ii. 
Names of the Erles Marschalls of England from the Conquest to 1590; 

Caius Coll. Camb. MS. 670, ff. 203, 217. 
Catalogue and Descents of the Marshals of England, from Hen. I. to 1638 ; 

Beit. Mus. Earl. MS. QWS.—Zansd. MS. 195. See also Dallaway's 

"Eeraldic Miscellanies" p. 49, and Noble's "College of Arms" 
Lists of Governors of the Colonies to 1851. See Haydn's "Book of Dignities" 

pt. iii. 
Lists of Officers of the Customs, Excise, Stamps and Taxes, to 1851. See 

Haydn's "Book of Dignities" pt. vi. 
Lord Deputies, Lieutenants, and Justices of Ireland, from the Conquest thereof 

to 1670. See Leycester's "Eistorical Antiquities" pp. 76 — 83. 
Series Custodum, Justiciariorum, Deputatorum, et Locumtenentium Hibernise, 

ab adventu Hen. II.; Beit. Mus. Add. MS. 4796, f. 63. 
Names of the Lords Presidents of the Counsell established in the Marches of 

Wales, from 18 Edw. IV.; Beit. Mus. Earl. MS. 368, f. 181. 
A List of the Deputy-Lieutenants and Commission Officers of England and 

Wales, 1680; All Souls' Coll. Oxf. MS. ccxxiii. 

Justices of the Peace. 
Lists of Justices of the Peace throughout England; Beit. Mus. Earl.MS. 474. 
A Book of all the Justices of the Peace in England and Wales ; Beit. Mus. 

Earl.MS. 7512, ar*. 3. 
List of the Chief Justices in Eyre, North and South of Trent, from 2 Hen. HI. 

to 37 Hen. VIII.; Beit. Mus. Cotton. MS. Vesp. F. iv. f. 64. 
Names of the Justices of the Benches, from Edw. I. to 1556 ; Beit. Mus. 

Tansd. MS. 3, arts. 47, 48. 
Liber Pacis, or Lists of the Nobility and Gentry, anno 1 Eliz. ; Beit. Mrs. 

lansd. MS. 1218, f. 1. 



MISCELLANEA GENEALOGICA. 333 

List op G-entby, etc. 
Names of Justices of Assize, Counsellors of the North, Counsellors of the 

Marches of Wales, Sheriffs, &c, a.d. 1562; Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 

1218, f. 64. 
Names of all the Justices of the Peace in England, anno 1579 ; Butt. Mus. 

Roy. MS. 18, D.iii. 
Names of Gentlemen in Commission for the Peace in England and Wales, 

1582 ; Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 35, art. 40. 
Liber Pacis, or a List of Nobility and Gentry in England and Wales, qualified 

to act as Justices of Peace, circ. 1584; Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 737, 

f. 149. 
Names of Northern Justices, 1587; Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 53, art. 86. 
Names of Justices of the Peace in every County, 1587 ; Brit. Mus. Lansd. 

MS. 53, art. 91. 
Lists of Nobility and Gentry in the Commission of Peace, 34 Eliz. [1592] ; 

Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 1218, f. 154. 
List of the Justices of the Peace, a.d. 1625 ; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 1622. 
Lists of Justices of Peace for each County, anno 1653; Pub. Lib. Camb. 

MS. Bd. viii. 1. 
Lists of Justices of Peace in England and Wales, circ. 1680; All Souls' 

Coll. Oxf. MS. ccxxiii. 

Cambridgeshire : Names of Gentlemen in the Commission of the Peace within 

the Town of Cambridge, 1597 ; Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 84, art 99. 
Names and Arms of Justices of Peace, Co. Camb., a.d. 1601, 

1619; Queen's Coll. Oxf., MS. xciii.; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 

5808. 
Cheshire : Catalogue of the Justices of Chester ; Bodl. Lib. MS. 5095, f. 89. 
Essex: Names of Justices of the Peace in Co. Essex, 1633; Brit. Mus. 

Earl. MS. 2240, f. 2.— to 1640; Brit. Mus. Earl MS. 5190, art. 7. 
Gloucestershire : Nomina Justiciarior. ad Pacem in Com. Glouc, 1 Eic. III., 

1 Edw. VI., et 22 Car. II. ; Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 231, ff. 44, 51. 
Lists of the Justices of the Peace for Gloucestershire, in 1601 

and 1620 ; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 1041, f. 18. 
Northampton : Names of Justices of the Peace in Co. Northampton and 

Butland, 1587 ; Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 54, art. 75. 
Rutland : Rolls of Justices of the Peace, Coroners, &c, for the Co. of Rutland, 

tempp. Will. III.— Geo. II. ; Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 54, art. 75 ; Add. 

Chart. 873. 
Staffordshire : Names of the Justices of Peace in the County of Stafford ; 

Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 7020, art. 3. 

a.d. 1614; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 1439, f. 1. 

Surrey : Justices of Peace of the County of Surrey ; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 

6850, f. 251. 



334 MISCELLANEA GENEALOGICA 

List of G-entby, etc. 
Sussex : List of Justices for Co. Sussex, 1781 ; Brit. Ms& JM. M? *a*i 
f. 200. 

Mayors, Sheriffs, etc. 
Catalogue of the Sheriffs of England to the last year of Queea Elizabeth ; 

Coll. of Arms, Philipot MS. 10, Pb. 
List of Sheriffs in England, from temp. Henry II. to Elizabeth incksve, 

s. xvii. ; Queen's Coll. Oxf. MS. clxv. 
Nomina Vicecomitum in diversis Comitatibus, tempp. Hen. II., John.Edw. HI., 

Hen. VIII., Eliz., Jac. I. s Car. I. ; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 259. 
Catalogue of the High Sheriffs of England, from Hen. II. to Jas. I. ; Coll. 

of Arms, Vincent MS. 47. 
High Sheriffs of divers Counties, from the reign of Hen. II. to Chas. I.; Brit. 

Mus. Harl. MS. 2122. 
A Catalogue of Sheriffs of England and Wales, from Henry II. to George I. ; 

Sion Coll. Lib. 
Names of the Lieutenants and Deputies in England, temp. Elizabeth ; Brit. 

Mus. Roy. MS. 18, C. xxi, p. 38. 
Names of Sheriffs, &c, a.d. 1562; Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 1218, f. 64. 
The Names of Sheriffs throughout England and Wales, 1582; Brit. Mus. 

Lansd. MS. 35, art. 41. 
Names of High Sheriffs of England to 1585 ; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 474, 

f. 2. 
Lists of Sheriffs to 1662. See Fuller's "Worthies "—to 1748 ; Brit. Mus. 

Lansd. MS. 1218, f. 113 5. 
The Names of Bailiffs, Receivers, Auditors, Sheriffs, Justices of the Peace, 

and other Civil Officers, are given in the "Valor Ecclesiasticus" 

Berkshire : List of Sheriffs of Co. Berks, 1647—1653; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 

5832, f. 181. 
Buckinghamshire : Names of the High Sheriffs of Buckinghamshire. See 

Willis's "History of Bucks" 
Cambridgeshire: Lists of Sheriffs of Cambridgeshire; Brit. Mus. Add.MSS. 

5810, p. iv.; 5832, f. 181 ; 5866, f. 206. See also Carter's "History 

of Cambridgeshire." 
List of Sheriffs of Cambridgeshire, from Hen. II. to 17 Jas. I.; 

Queen's Coll. Oxf. MS. xciii. f. 6. 

Lists of Mayors and Bailiffs of Cambridge, 1263 — 1500 j 



Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 5813, f. 1313; 5833, f. 123. 

List of the Mayors of Cambridge. See Blomefleld's "Ce£- 



lectanea Gantabrigiensia" 1750. 4to. Privately printed. 
Cheshire: List of Cheshire Officers; Brit. Mus. Harl. MSS. 280, f. 506; 
1920. 



MISCELLANEA GENEALOGICA. 335 

List of G-entby, etc. 
Cheshire {continued)-. List of Sheriffs of Cheshire from the reign of Edw. III. 

to 1699; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 1920, f. 15. 
Names of the Corporation of Chester, 1601 ; Beit. Mus. Earl. 

US. 2003, f. 665. 
Cornwall: List of High Sheriffs of Cornwall, 1647— 1653; Brit. Mus. Add. 

MS. 5832, f. 181. 
Derbyshire: Lists of Sheriffs for Co. Derby, from 1140 to 1825; Brit. Mus. 

Add. MSS 5832, f. 181 ; 6675, f. 153 ; 6700, p. 133 ; 6705, f. 41. 
Catalogue of Bailiffs of Derby, from 5 lien. VIII. to 13 Chas. I., 

and Mayors from 13 Chas. I. to 1698; Brit. Mvs.Jdd.MS. 6705, f. 925. 
Account of the High Sheriffs of Derbyshire to Chas. I. ; Brit, 



Mus. Earl. MS. 2043, f. 145. 
Devonshire : Catalogue of the Sheriffs of Devon, with their Coat Armory. 

See Izacke's "Antiq. of Exeter." — Also Risdon's "Survey of Devon " 

1811. pp. 9—16. 
List of High Sheriffs, 1647—1653; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 

5832, f. 181. 
Dorsetshire : List of Sheriffs of Co. Dorset, 1644 — 1756 ; Brit. Mus. Add. 

MS. 5832, f. 179. 
List of the Mayors of Poole, Co. Dorset, from 1490 to 1788. 

See the "Eistory of Poole." [Moore] 1788. 8vo. 

Mayors of Shaftesbury, Co. Dorset. See Adams's " Eistory of 



Shaftesbury." 
Essex: List of High Sheriffs in Co. Essex, 1647—1653 ; Brit. Mus. Add. 

MS. 5832, f. 181. 
Gloucestershire : Lists of Sheriffs of Gloucestershire, from Hen. II. to 43 

Eliz. [1601] ; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 1041, f. 18. 
Hampshire : Sheriffs of Hampshire, tempp. Hen. III. and Edw. I. ; Brit. 

Mus. Lansd. MS. 310, f. 125— from 1647 to 1653; Add. MS. 5832, 

f. 181. 
■ Les Noms des Maires de la Ville de Southampton depuis Tan du 

Seigneur 1498 jusqu'a 1671, with Biographical Notes; Brit. Mus. 

Eg. MS. 868. 
Herefordshire : Names of the Mayors of the City of Hereford, from 7 Ric. II. 

to 2 Chas. I.; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 2141. 
List of the Sheriffs of Herefordshire, to the year 1659; Brit. 

Mus. Earl. MS. 6726 ; Add. MS. 5832, f. 181 b. 
Huntingdonshire : List of Sheriffs of Huntingdonshire; Brit. Mus.Add.MS. 

5810, p. iv. 
List of Sheriffs in Huntingdonshire from Hen. H. to 

17 Jas. I.; Queen's Coll. Oxf. MS. xciii. f. 6. 
Kent : The Kentish Chronologer and Index, comprising a List of the Nobility. 

Lord Lieutenants, Baronets, High Sheriffs, &c, 1807. 



336 MISCELLANEA GENEALOGICA. 

List op Gbntey, etc. 
Kent {continued) : Catalogue of High Sheriffs of Kent. See Philipot's "Fillare 
Cantianum." Lond. 1659. p. 12. 

Constables and Lieutenants of Dover and Kochester Castles ; Coll. 

or Arms, Philipot MS. 34. ' 

Catalogue of Lord Wardens of the Cinque Ports. See Somner's 

"Roman Ports in Kent" 

Lancashire : Vicecomites Lancastriae ab anno 1 Hen. II. ; Bodl. Lib. MS. 

5088, f. 1. 
Leicestershire: List of High Sheriffs, Co. Leicester, 1647 — 1653; Brit. 

Mus. Add. MS. 5832, f. 181. 
List of the Sheriffs of Leicestershire to a.d. 1622. See 

Burton's "History of Leicester " p. 323. 
Lincolnshire : Lists of Sheriffs of Lincolnshire; Brit. Mus. AM. MSS. 5832, 

f. 181; 6118, p. 405. 

Tables of the High Sheriffs of Lincolnshire, and of the Knights 

of the Shire, Citizens, and Burgesses in Parliament, from the earliest 
account to the present time. Lond. 1779. 4to. \White^\ 

List of Mayors, Bailiffs, and Sheriffs of Lincoln. See the 

" History of Lincoln" 1810. 12mo. {Stark). — Another edition. 1816. 
8vo. 

London : Arms and Names of the Sheriffs of London ; Bkit. Mus.Harl. MS. 
1349, f. 55, etseqq. 

Catalogue of Mayors and Sheriffs of London; Coll. op Arms, 

Norfolk MS. 

Names of the Bailiffs, Mayors, and Sheriffs of London, from 1 Kic. L 

to 7 Hen. VI.; Brit. Mus. Cotton. MS. Yit. F. ix. 

1 Kic. I. to 3 Mary; Brit. Mus. Cotton. MS. 



Yit. P. xii. f. 337. 

List of the Mayors and Sheriffs of London, from 1 Bic. I. to 10 

Hen. YI. inclusive, s. xv. ; St. John's Coll. Oxf. MS. lvii. f. 138. 

Names of the Wardens, Mayors, and Sheriffs of London, from 1 Bic. L 

to 21 Hen. YI. ; Brit. Mus. Hart. MS. 565, f. 10. 
Names of the Bailiffs, Mayors, and Sheriffs of London, fromlEicT. 

to 23 Edw. IY.; Brit. Mus. Cotton. MSS. Julius, B. i. f. 2; Julius, 

B. ii. p. 2. 

Names of the Mayors from 1 to 23 Hen. VIII.; Brit. Mus. Cotton. 

MS. Julius, B. i. f. 92 b. 

Series of Mayors and Sheriffs of London, from 1 Eic. I. to a.d. 1629, 

with some Arms and Historical Notes; Brit. Mus. Harl.MS. 1049, f. 
21. 

Names of the Maires and Sheriffs of London, sene Kynge Kichardis 

Days to the Mayoralty of William Purches ; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 541, 
f. 215. 



MISCELLANEA GENEALOGICA. 337 

List op Gentry, etc. 
London (continued) : Names of Mayors and Sheriffs of London, from 1419 to 
1444; Butt. Mus. Cotton. MS. Cleop. C. iv. f. 31. 

Catalogue of Mayors and Sheriffs of London to the year 1475; 

Coll. of Aems, MS. H.D.N. 19. 

List of the Lord Mayors of London from 1214 to 1605 ; Beit. 

Mus. Lansd. MS. 719. 

The Lord Mayors and Sheriffs of London, with their Arms, to the 

11 Jas. I. ; Coll. op Arms, Philipot MS. 22, Pb. 

— Names and Arms of the Mayors of London to a.d. 1618; Brit. 

Mus. HarL MS. 1349, f. 3. 

Lists of Mayors, Sheriffs, Aldermen, and Members of Parliament, of 

London, to 1772 [by Will. Chancellor] . Lond. 1772. 8vo. AlsoDouce's 
"Customs of London" pp. xix. — lii. 

Lists of Mayors, Eecorders, Common Serjeants, &c., of London, to 

1851. See Haydn's "Booh of Dignities" pt. iii. 

Arms of all the Lord Mayors of London. See " Heylyn's Help to 



Eng. Hist.," by Wright. 8vo. Lond. 1773. 
Norfolk: List of Sheriffs in Co. Norfolk, 1643—1663; Beit. Mus. Add. 

MS. 6398, f. 65 b. 
Chronological List of the Mayors of Lynne, &c, from 1517 to 

1673; Beit. Mus. Add. MS. 8937. 
— Chronological Table of the Mayors of Lynn-Eegis, from 1268 

to 1772. See Parkins's "Topography of Freebridge Hundred." 

List of the Mayors and Sheriffs of Norwich. See "A Compleat 

History of Norwich." [Knapton] 1728. Also Eldridge's "History of 
Norwich." 

Norfolk : Lists, from the Reformation, of Lord Lieutenants, Sheriffs, Mem- 
bers of Parliament, etc., by W. C. Ewing. Norwich. 1837. 12mo. 

Yicecomites Norfolciae ; or Lists of the Sherriffs of Norfolk, a.d. 

1154 to 1841, chronologically and alphabetically arranged, with their 
Armorial Bearings. Stow Bardolph, Norfolk, 1843. 4to. 

Northampton : Names of the Mayors and Bailiffs of Northampton, from 
1 Eic. II. to 1 Edw. IV. ; Trin. Coll. Dubl. MS. G. 84, art. 4. 

List of Sheriffs in Northamptonshire, 1646 — 1669; Beit. 

Mus. Add. MS. 6398, f. 66. 

Northumberland: List of High Sheriffs, Co. Northumberland, 1647—1653; 

Beit. Mus. Add. MS. 5832, f. 181. 
Nottinghamshire: List of High Sheriffs in Nottinghamshire, 1647 — 1653; 

Beit. Mus. Add. MS. 5832, f. 181. 
List of Sheriffs of Nottinghamshire, from 1745 — 1795. 

See Thoroton's "History of Nottingham" 2d edit. vol. ii. 
Oxfordshire: List of Sheriffs for Oxfordshire, 1647—1653; Beit. Md& 

Add. MS. 5832, f. 181. 

22 



338 MISCELLANEA GENEALOGICA. 

List op Gentry, etc. 
Oxfordshire (continued) : Catalogue of Mayors and Bailiffs of Oxford till 

2 Charles L; Ashm. Lib. Wood MS. 8502— till 1695; ibid. MS. 

8523. 
Eutlandshire : List of High Sheriffs for Co. Kutland, 1647—1653; Beit. 

Mus. Add. MS. 5832, f. 181. 

Sheriffs of Kutland to 1788. See Wright's " History of 

Rutland" (ed. by Harrod). 

Shropshire ; List of High Sheriffs for Shropshire, 1647—1 653 ; Beit. Mus. 
Add. MS. 5832, f. 181. 

The Sheriffs of Shropshire, with Genealogical Notices of their 

Families, by Rev. J. B. Blakeway, M.A. Shrewsbury, 1831. Folio. 

Catalogue of the Bailiffs of Shrewsbury, from 1372 to 1614; 



Pub. Lib. Camb. MS. Bd. iv. 38. 
Somersetshire : List of the Sheriffs of Somersetshire, tempp. Eliz. and Jas. I.; 

Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 1385, f. 1. 
List of High Sheriffs for Somersetshire, 1647—1653 ; Brit. 

Mus. Add. MS. 5832, f. 181. 

Corporation Dignitaries of Bristol. See Hooke's " Memoirs 



of Bristol" 1748. 8vo. 
Staffordshire: List of High Sheriffs for Staffordshire, 1647—1653; Brit. 

Mus. Add. MS. 5832, f. 181. 
List of Sheriffs for Staffordshire. See Shaw's "History of 

Staffordshire" p. xiii. 
Surrey — Sussex : List of Sheriffs for Surrey and Sussex, from 1 Hen. II. to 

1789 ; Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 5705, pp. 54, 60 ; 5832, f. 181 ; 6171, 

f. 19; 6344, coll. 
Warwickshire : List of Sheriffs of Warwickshire. See Burton's "History of 

Leicestershire" p. 323. Also Dugdale's "History of Warwickshire" 

vol. ii. p. 1149. 
— List of the Mayors of Coventry, from 1348 to 1688 ; Brit. 

Mus. Harl. MS. 6388. 
Wiltshire: List of High Sheriffs in Wiltshire, from 1647 to 1653; Brit, 

Mus. Add. MS. 5832, f. 181. 
Correct List of the Mayors of Salisbury, from 1227. Salisb. 1798. 

12mo. 
Worcestershire: List of Sheriffs of Worcestershire, 1647 — 1653; Brit. 

Mus. Add. MS. 5832, f. 181. 
Yorkshire-. Sheriffs of Yorkshire, from 1155 tol652, with theirArms; Brit. 

Mus. Lansd. MS. 865, f. 129 b. 
Names of the Bailiffs of Liberties, Constables of Wapentakes, 

Coroners, and Bailiffs within the Co. of York. See "Nomina Fillarum 

ffioracensium." [Fork, 1768]. 8vo.— 2d. ed. Fork, 1792. ObL 8vo 

Also Langdale's "Top. Diet. ofForkshire" [1809.] 



MISCELLANEA GENEALOGICA. 339 

List op Gentby, etc. 
Yorkshire (continued) : Mayors, Bailiffs, and Sheriffs of York; Bodl. Lib., 
MS. 5062, f. 144. 

Catalogue of Mayors, Sheriffs, and Bailiffs of York, to 1664. Fork % 

1664. 4to. — Beprinted HIS. 4to. 

A List of the Mayors and Bailiffs, Lord Mayors and Sheriffs of 



York, from Edw. I. to a.d. 1677 ; Bkit. Mus. Earl. MS. 6115. Partly 



List of the Mayors, Bailiffs, and Sheriffs of York, from Edw. I. to 

1719. See Torr's " Antiquities of York" Also Gent's "History of 
Fork" Also " The History of Fork" [Fork, 1785.] Vol. iii. 

■ A List of the Mayors of Doncaster, from 1493 to 1641; Bbit. 



Mus. Harl. MS. 6387. 

List of the Mayors, Sheriffs, and Chamberlains of Kingston-upon- 

Hull. See Gent's "Annates Regioduni Hullini." 

Ireland. 

Names of Governors, Lieutenants, Deputies, and Justices of Ireland, from its 

Conquest to 1552 ; Tein. Coll. Dublin, MS. I. 78, art. 1. 
The Names and Arms of the Governors, Lieutenants, Lord Justices, and 

Deputies of Ireland, since the Conquest thereof; Beit. Mus. Harl.MSS. 

2120, f. 10 ; 5866. Cotton. MS. Yitellius, C. xvii. f. 318. 
A Catalogue of the Governors, Lieutenants, and Deputies of Ireland, from its 

Conquest to a.d. 1662, with their Arms ; Beit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 865, 

f. 53. 
Lord Deputies, Lieutenants, and Justices of Ireland, from the Conquest 

thereof to 1670. See Leycester's "Historical Antiquities" pp. 76 — 83. 
Series Custodum, Justiciariorum, Deputatorum, et Locumtenentium Hiberniae, 

ab adventu Hen. II. ; Beit. Mus. Add. MS. 4796, f. 63. 
List of the Lords Lieutenant of Ireland, from 1540 ; Dueham Cath. Allan 

MS. 7, p. 140. 
Catalogus Majorum Hiberniae, ab ann. 1309 ad ann. 50 Edw. III.; Beit, 

Mvs.Add. MS. 4797. p. 47. 
Catalogue of the Mayors, Sheriffs, and Bailiffs of Dublin, from 1406 to 1566 ; 

Tein. Coll. Dublin, MSS. B. 58, art. 1 ; C. 59. 
Catalogus Majorum, Prsepositorum, et Balivorum, civit. Dublin, ab ann. 1229 

ad ann. 1302 ; Beit. Mus. Add. MS. 4793, p. 67. 
The Kegister of the Mayors of Dublin, from 1406 to 1622; Beit. Mus. 

Add. MS. 4791. 

Wales. 

List of Lords Presidents of the Marches of Wales; Beit. Mua. HarL Jf*X 
368, f. 181 ; Add. MS. 5485, f. 210. 



340 MISCELLANEA GENEALOGICA. 

List op Gentbt, etc. 
List of Deputy Lieutenants and Commission Officers in England and Wales, 

as they were brought into the House of Peers, in Nov. 1680; All 

Souls' Coll. Oxf. MS. ccxxiii. f. 1. 
Lists of Chamberlains and Justiciaries of North Wales ; Brit. Mus. Lansd. 

MS. 1318, f. 64; Add. MS. 5485, f. 204. 
Justices of Peace for Wales; Brit. Mus. Zansd. MS8. 35, art. 40; 737, 

f. 149— .HarZ. MS. 1933. 
List of Sheriffs of Brecknockshire, 1539—1717; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 

2289, f. 340. 
List of Bayliffs, Recorders, and Aldermen of Brecknock, 1556 — 1715 ; Brit. 

Mus. Harl. MS. 2289, f. 344. 
Names of Justices of the Peace in Co. Cardigan, Carmarthen, and Pembroke, 

1587 ; Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 53, art. 87. 
Names of the Sheriffs of Denbigh, from 1541 to 1682; Brit. Mus. Harl. 

MS. 2122, art. 32. 
List of High Sheriffs of Monmouth, 1647—1653; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 

5832, f. 181. 

Miscellaneous. 
Annuities and Pensions paid to sundry Persons in the Counties of Essex, 

Hertford, Middlesex, and London, tempp. Edw. IV. and Mary ; Coll. 

of Arms, MS. R.B. 33. 
Lists of Persons receiving Annuities and Fees from the Crown, seventeenth 

century; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 14,313. 
A Brief of the Yearly Pensions paid by Prince Henry; Brit. Mus. Harl. 

MS. 7009, art. 1. 
List of Pensioners in the Long Parliament, a.d. 1640; Durham Cath. 

Allan MS. 7, p. 160. 
List of Pensioners and Placemen in the House of Commons, temp. Chas. II. ; 

Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 7020, art. 9. 
Original Orders for Payment of Pensions, etc., from June 1655 to June 1660, 

2 vols.; Brit. Mus. Sloane MSS. 4196 ; 4197. 
List of Nominees created in the years 1745, 1746, 1757, 1764 ; Lond. 1764. 

sm. fol. 
List of the Nominees in the Life Annuities of 1775. 4to. 1777. 

Magazines, Directories, etc. — As the genealogist will be 
much indebted to Magazines and the like for a variety of in- 
formation, a brief enumeration of those most likely to aid him in 
his researches may not be unacceptable. The " London Gazette" 
which commenced in 1665, contains many genealogical particulars. 
Chamberlayne's "Angiitis Notitia, or the Present State of Great 



MISCELLANEA GENEALOGICA. 341 

Britain" was nearly an annual work from 1663 to 1755. From a 
small and widely printed duodecimo, the work was soon extended 
to a thick and closely printed octavo, containing excellent lists of 
soldiers, sailors, physicians, lawyers, divines, public officers, and 
royal households, with the title of the " Court Kalendar" Its 
successful rival, the modern " Red Book" was first published in 
1739. In 1714 the "Historical Register" was published, with births, 
marriages, and deaths, and a volume was issued annually until 
1738. In 1731 the "Gentleman's Magazine" appeared, and has 
from that period continued a monthly publication to the present 
day. In 1732 the "London Magazine" was published, and conti- 
nued for fifty-four years, when it ceased. The " European Maga- 
zine" succeeded the "London" 

The names of modern residents in the metropolis, and in nearly 
all the important cities of England, may be known by the "Direc- 
tories" a class of books which must at some future period be of 
great interest to the antiquary, as well as of utility to the genea- 
logist, should they have the fate to survive the destruction which at 
present generally attends them when the year brings a new edition. 
For the Metropolis, we have Pigof s "Royal National Directory of 
London" Kobson's "London Directory" and the "Post Office Direc- 
tory" For the Provinces, are Slater's "Royal, National, and Commer- 
cial Directory" for the Eastern and Midland Counties of England ; 
Pigot's "Royal National Directory for the Counties of Bedford, Cam- 
bridge, Essex, Herts, Huntingdon, Kent, Middlesex, Norfolk, Suffolk, 
Surrey, and Sussex;" White's "Historical Gazetteer and Directory" 
for various counties; Slater's "Commercial Directory for the County 
of Lancaster ;" Whellan's "Classified Directory of Manchester and 
its Neighbourhood, 1853;" Kelly's "Post Office Directory of English 
Counties ;" "An Historical Gazetteer and Directory of the County 
of Oxford" published at Peterborough in 1852; whilst for Ireland 
there is Thoms's "Irish Almanac" 

Lastly, Newspapers, with their multitudinous advertisements 
for Next of Kin, etc., will frequently be found to render important 
assistance to the genealogical inquirer, and, as such, deserve a 
passing notice here. 

The Collection of Newspapers at the British Museum is probably 
the largest in the world, consisting not only of the principal English 
Metropolitan and Provincial Papers, but also of many of the leading 
Journals of the Continent. The Series commences about the year 
1670; but the earlier numbers are very incomplete. The Papers 



342 MISCELLANEA GENEALOGICA. 

of the present day are retained at the Stamp Office for two years 
after their publication, so that the National Collection i3 always 
deficient in them during that period. Manuscript Catalogues of 
the Papers are kept on the shelves of the " Reading Room." A 
valuable Series of Irish Papers, from the year 1818, was presented 
to the Library in the autumn of last year. 

The City of London Library, at Guildhall, contains the next 
most complete Collection of Newspapers known. 

References to advertisements for Next of Kin, derived from 
Newspapers and Gazetteers, both town and country, for the last 
hundred years, can be obtained, for a small fee, from Mr. William 
Turner, 16, Thornhill Place, Pentonville. 



343 



mm*. 

WILLS AND ADMINISTRATIONS.— The documents so 
■well known as Wills and Administrations, are of the greatest 
importance to the genealogist. 

1. They are the principal and often the only records by which 
families in the middling classes of life can trace any descent prior 
to the introduction of Parochial Records ; for the Inquisitions post 
mortem were only taken on the tenants in capite, or on persons 
supposed to be such. 

2. The quantity of genealogical information in wills is also of 
great value; the testaments of men of property almost invariably 
name two and frequently three or four clear descents of pedigree, 
whilst the limitations of estates, and bequests of legacies, bring to 
light kindred who could not otherwise have been traced. 

3. The sanctity belonging to wills in the minds of the testators, 
and the useless wickedness, as far as they can be concerned, of any 
deception, render them instruments of great authority. 

Lastly. The description of estates appearing by ancient wills to 
have belonged to a family, and the wardships of children frequently 
directed by testators before the abolition of the Court of Wards 
and Liveries, may lead to other documents containing information 
not to be found in the wills themselves. 

The date of probate of a will, or date of grant of letters of 
administration, generally points out the period of the deceased's 
death; and the legacy books at the Stamp Office afford evidence 
not only of the degree of relationship of a legatee, but also of the 
common ancestor through whom such relationship exists. 

From the Roman Catholic priests the right of granting probate 
of wills and letters of administration has descended to the Pro- 
testant clergy. 

Each bishop has a separate court, extending (except as here 
stated) over his diocese ; and each archbishop has a court, exer- 
cising jurisdiction not only over his own diocese, but that of his 
suffragan bishops. 

The province of York includes the dioceses of York, Durham, 
Carlisle, Chester, and Sodor and Man; the remaining twenty-two 
bishoprics are subject to Canterbury. 



344 WILLS. 

The jurisdiction conceded to these courts extends properly over 
wills ; matrimonial disputes of all kinds, even to limited divorces ; 
questions of church-rates and churchwardens; brawling in churches; 
defamation ; maritime causes ; certain immoral offences ; and the 
dereliction of clergymen from church discipline. 

In former times, when the property of the country consisted 
chiefly in land, the importance of their jurisdiction was not so great 
as it is at the present time, when so large a proportion of that pro- 
perty consists of money and other personalty. 

Besides these courts there are the Record Offices, 1 which are 
attached to the old cathedrals throughout Great Britain, subject 
to the care of the diocesan registrar. In these offices are placed 
the original wills; the duplicate parish registers; the administrations; 
the copies of marriage licenses ; and other documents, such docu- 
ments forming deeds affecting thousands of landed proprietors ; 
but to the great mass of the middle and all the lower classes, they 
form the title-deeds to which they can appeal, and on the accuracy 
of which they can rely. Unfortunately, the greatness of the fees 
in some offices, independent of other circumstances, renders these 
documents nearly inaccessible. 

The most important of these offices is that of Doctors 3 Commons, 
in which are deposited all the wills proved in that large, rich, and 
populous district included within the archiepiscopal jurisdiction of 
Canterbury. The original wills in this office commence with the 
year 1484, 2 and the transcripts with 1383. The original wills are 
complete from December 1660 to the present time : the earliest 
will at Lambeth is dated 1312. 

The office is open every day, from nine until four, from the 1st 
of February to the 1st of October, and from nine until three, for 
the remainder of the year. 

The next office in importance is that of York. The jurisdiction 
of this court extends over the large and populous counties of York, 
Chester, Lancashire, Westmoreland, Cumberland, Durham, North- 
umberland, and Flintshire ; and the national records relating to this 
district contain a great quantity of valuable information relating to 
our ecclesiastical history. In this office the date of the earliest 
will is 1590, that of the transcripts is 1389. 

1 Lists of the Contents of these Offices may be seen in the "Report on the Public 
Becords," 1837, pp. 257—281. 
1 Witt Tyler and his rebels are said to have destroyed those of earlier date. 



WILLS. 345 

The charge for searching for a will in this registry is 1$. : each 
will or administration-bond inspected is charged 1$. 

The charge for official copies is regulated by the length of the 
document, &c. 

Applicants are not allowed to copy for themselves except in very 
rare cases, where the matter is required for some historical or 
purely literary purpose. The hours of attendance are from nine 
to five. 

Next in magnitude to the two archiepiscopal courts of Canterbury 
and York is Chester, in the province of York, extending over the 
whole counties of Chester and Lancaster, with parts of York, West- 
moreland, Cumberland, and Flint. The ancient wills here contain 
a wonderful mass of information illustrative of biography and his- 
tory. The present Registry Office is open from nine till six ; the 
fee for searching the index is now altered from 2$. 6d. to Is. 

All modern wills are now copied at length into large well-bound 
books, in a round hand, so distinct and plain, that the illiterate 
might read them. The originals can be examined on giving a satis- 
factory reason to the registrar, who is always anxious to facilitate re- 
searches for public or literary objects. When any person applies to 
search on his own responsibility, for either of the above objects, he is 
allowed to see wills, and make his own extracts, at Is. each. Wills 
which are received from Manchester and other places, are indexed the 
same day : a practice very different from that at York, where wills 
are sometimes not indexed for six or eight months. The first index 
of wills commences about 1553 ; the diocese was not founded till 
the reign of Henry VIII., and the testamentary records before that 
period are to be found at York and Lichfield. There is no index 
from 1601 to 1605, and the index from 1605 is imperfect, only 
commencing with the letter M. In the Parliamentary Returns the 
date of the earliest will is given as 1590. 

The diocese of Lincoln extends over seven counties, viz., Lincoln, 
Leicester, Bedford, Huntingdon, Buckingham, and parts of Hereford 
and Derbyshire. Mr. Bruce's account of the state in which he 
found the records here, is anything but satisfactory. The date of 
the earliest registered will in this office is 1515. From 1526 to 
1560 there are no regular records; but from the latter year the 
regular series of registered wills may be dated, extending to the 
present time. The Administration- Bonds commence with the year 
1558. Inventories relating to the personal estates of both testators 
and intestates are filed from the year 1520 to the present time. 



346 



WILLS. 



Access can be had to the indexes to wills, on the payment of Is.; 
and copies are made on payment of the usual fee of lOd. per folio. 
The office hours are from nine to eight. 

The jurisdiction of the Court of Lichfield and Coventry ex- 
tends over the whole counties of Stafford and Derby, and the greater 
part of Warwick and Salop. The office for searching is incon- 
veniently small. The charge is 6s. Sd. per year for parish register 
returns, and 2s. 6d. for each will. The date of the earliest will is 
1526. No extracts are allowed to be made by the inquirer in 
these offices — a circumstance much complained of by those who 
have paid their fee to consult these records. 

The following list of the Registers of Wills in the other offices is 
principally collected from the official returns to Parliament : — 

Diocese. from a.d. 
London 1373 

Transcripts 1368 

Norwich 1521 

Oxford 1579 

Transcripts 1528 

Rochester 1508 

Transcripts 1440 

St. Asaph 1660 

Transcripts 1565 

"Winchester 1660 



Diocese. pbom a.d. 

Bangor 1635 

Bath and Wells . . . .1660 

Bristol 1682 

Chichester 1600 

Transcripts 1518 

Ely 1478 

Exeter 1592 

Gloucester 1541 

Hereford 1517 



Although it has been stated in the returns to the House of 
Commons, that the original wills preserved in the registries of 
most of the dioceses commence between the years 1500 and 1600, 
this statement must, it is presumed, be understood with great allow- 
ances, and rather that there are some few original wills of that period, 
than that they have been thenceforward regularly preserved. 

The prerogative of the Archbishop of York does not extend to 
the province of Canterbury ; if, therefore, a deceased person should 
have bona notabilia 1 in each province, there must be separate admi- 
nistrations ; neither will a Canterbury or York prerogative probate 
cover effects in Ireland. 

The contents of the majority of the episcopal, and of some few 
other registries, may be seen in the Report on Public Records, for 
the yearl837; and the whole were, together with additional informa- 

1 Bona notabilia aro such goods and debts as require administration, and are there- 
fore termed notabile. The value of them is fixed by the 93rd Canon at £5, except in 
London, where it is £10. 



WILLS. 347 

tion, arranged in alphabetical order of the dioceses, and published 
in a volume, entitled "Notitia Historical by Sir Harris Nicolas, in 
1824. A list and short account of the Archiepiscopal Courts of 
Probate within the Counties of York and Nottingham, &c., were 
published in 1825, by Mr. Lawton, of York. 

Within many of the dioceses there are various peculiar and 
exempt jurisdictions. There are several sorts of peculiars, viz., 
royal peculiars, which are under the immediate jurisdiction of the 
Crown ; peculiars under the jurisdiction of deans and chapters, 
archdeacons, prebendaries, and other dignitaries ; and there are 
also peculiars which formerly belonged to monasteries, but are now 
in lay hands. In some seignories or lordships, the probation and 
approbation of the testaments of the tenants there dwelling, does 
by prescription appertain to the principal lord; and, in some manors, 
wills are by prescription to be proved before the steward, though no 
lands thereby pass. By custom also, the probates of wills of bur- 
gesses belong to the mayors of some boroughs ; yet, as to personal 
property, the will must be proved before the ordinary. 

The number of courts throughout the country to which the 
public may resort for the purpose of proving wills and obtaining 
administrations is no less than 372. 

The existence of these courts of peculiars is much to be regretted ; 
their number and insignificance are so great, that parties whose 
wills are preserved in some of them, are often presumed to have 
died intestate ; the genealogist, therefore, cannot too well bear them 
in mind. A list of the various courts of peculiars in the province 
of Canterbury was published, by order of the Record Commissioners, 
in the " Valor Ecclesiasticus" or survey of ecclesiastical property, 
temp. Henry VIII. A list of courts and peculiars throughout all 
England, will also be found in Gwynne's "Law relating to the 
Duties on Probates," &c. Lond. 1836. 8vo. p. 201. 

The Sessional Paper of the House of Commons, 1845, No. 249, 
exhibits the extraordinary number of jurisdictions where wills are 
to be found : showing that they are deposited in parish churches, 
private houses of registrars, with lords of manors, &c. Sessional 
Paper, 1830, No. 205, is a very extensive and valuable return. 

In 1653, by an ordinance of the Commonwealth Parliament, 
judges: were appointed for the probate of wills and granting admi- 
nistrations in every county and city of England and Wales. This 
law, which was to endure for six months only, was continued by 
subsequent ordinances until the Restoration. Although the probate 



348 WILLS. 

of many wills might have been granted in various parts of England, 
/et it is presumed they could only be registered in London. 

Many probates of wills, however, were granted during these 
periods, of which no registration is to be found, even in the Prero- 
gative Office; and these probates are frequently found amongst 
ancient family evidences, 

Royal wills l or transcripts are in existence from the reign of 
Henry II., a copy of whose will is entered in the Black Book of 
the Exchequer, Copies have been printed in Rymer's "Fcedera" in 
Nichols* "Royal Wills" London, 1780; and in a work, entitled 
' Testamenta Vetusta, or Abstracts of Wills of the Royal Family, 
Nobility, and Gentry, from the reign of Henry II. to the Accession 
of Elizabeth," by Sir N. H. Nicolas. 2 vols. 8vo. 

It is possible that original wills and transcripts may be found 
with the deeds and evidences of the wards of the Court of Wards 
and Liveries, at the Chapter House. 

Very early testaments are entered on the Close Rolls, and in the 
Inquisitiones post mortem. 

The earliest consecutive collection of wills is that entered in the 
various Archbishops' registers, which are kept at Lambeth Palace, 
of which a Calendar was made by Dr. Ducarel. The first entry 
therein is in the year 1312, the last is in 1636. In number they are 
under 1600. 

Tbs wills enrolled in the Court of Hustings, commencing with 
the rf ign of Henry III., to their discontinuance in that of James I., 
have been fully and carefully indexed by W. T. Alchin, Esq., the 
com teous keeper of the Guildhall Library. The Calendar is alpha- 
betical, and every will is accessible at a moment's notice. 

Wills and probates are also entered in the Inrolment Books of 
Patents, &c, formerly belonging to the Auditors of the Land 
Revenue. 

In the Assignment Books formerly at the Exchequer of Receipt, 
now at the Rolls Chapel, among other matters, are entered letters 
of administration and probates of wills, &c., from 1622. Previous to 
that date the above were entered among the Patents and Privy 
Seals, and in the Pell Office they are to be found in the Warrant 
Books, but a great proportion was never recorded by the Clerk of 
the Pells. 

1 The wills of Henry V., Henry VII., and Henry VIII., are preserved at the 
Chapter House. 



WILLS. 349 

In thelnrolment orEntry Books of Letters of PrivySeals there are, 
among other matters, letters of attorney, wills, administrations, &c. 

The wills of Roman Catholics are entered on the Close Rolls at 
the Tower. 

Muniment books, containing probates of wills, &c., of seamen, 
from 1660, are preserved among the records of the Admiralty 
Court. 

Extracts of wills from every register from the different counties, 
divisions, &c, are now — under stat. 42 Geo. III. c. 99 [1802] — 
sent to the Legacy Duty Office. 

Abstracts of wills in various registries, both in manuscript and 
printed, will be found in our public libraries, as follows : — 

WILLS. 

Papers relating to Wills, Probates, Executors, &c. ; Brit. Mus. Earl. MSS. 
1225; 3793. 

Extracts from the Wills of English Nobility and Gentry, — fourteenth and 
sixteenth centuries; Ashm. Lib. MS. 1115. 

Papers relating to Probates of Wills during the Protectorate; Brit. Mus. 
HargraveMS. 289. 

Cambridge : Abstracts of Wills proved in the Registry of the Bishop of Ely, 
at Cambridge, from 1478—1551 ; Beit. Mus. Earl. MS. 7043, ff. 153 
—177, 265. 

Extracts from the Register of Wills in the Diocese of Ely, re- 
lating to Cambridgeshire, 1515—1561; Brit. Mus. Add.MS. 5861, p. 3. 
Abstract of Wills recorded in the Registry of the University of 



Cambridge, from 1500 to 1590 ; Beit. Mus. Earl MSS. 7030, f. 307 ; 
7033, f. 200. 

Cheshire: Copies of Cheshire Wills; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 1991. 

Wills copied from the " Great Register Booke," in the Will Office 

within the Abbey Court of the City of Chester. They commence about 
1520, and extend to 1660 ; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 2067. 

Durham : Sanctuarium Dunelmense et Sanctuarium Beverlacense ; or, Regis- 
ters of the Sanctuaries of Durham and Beverley; 1837. Printed by 
the Surtees Society. 

London : Collectanea quaedam ex Registris Testamentorum in Curia Prserog. 
Lond., anno 1651 ; Bodl. Lib. MS. 4164. 

Collections out of the Wills in the Prerogative Office ; Ashm. Lib. 

Wood MS. 8584. 

- Abstract of various Wills from the Registry in Doctors* Commons ; 



Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 938. 

■ Extracta ex Testamentis in Praerogat. Officio ; Brit. Mus. Earl. 



MS. 972, p. 110. 



350 WILLS. 

Wills. 
London (continued): Notes out of Wills in the Prerogative Office; Beit. 

Mus. Earl. MS. 6148, ff. 12, 17, 63, 100, 123, 138, 144. 
Wills out of the Prerogative Office; Coll. of Asms, Vincent MS. 

31, p. 139. 
Oxfordshire : Some Collections out of the Will Office in Oxford, by Antony 

a Wood; Ashm. Lib. Wood MS. 8562, f. 223. 
Suffolk : Abstracts of Wills from the Eegistry of the Archdeacon of Sudbury, 

between 1354 and 1560 ; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 294, ff. 156 b— 162. 
Collectanea ex KegistrisTestamentorum, in Cur. Archid. Sudburiensis, 

anno 1633, remanentibus ; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 639, f. 121. 

■ Wills and Inventories from Registers of the Commissary of Bury 



St. Edmunds and the Archdeacon of Sudbury, 1850 ; ed. by S. Tymms. 
Printed by the Camden Society. The first will is dated 1370, and the 
last 1649. 

Yorkshire : Wills and Inventories, illustrative of the History, &c. of the 
Northern Counties of England, 1835. Printed by the Surtees Society. 

Abstract of Wills from the Registry of the Archdeaconry of Rich- 
mond in Yorkshire, from 1522; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 7029. 

Testamenta Eboracensia, or Wills registered at York, illustrative 



of the History of the Province of York, from 1300 downwards; New- 
cattle, 1836. Printed by the Surtees Society. 
Ireland: Registrum Testamentorum Diaeces. Dublin, temp. Jo. Archiep. Dublin. 
1472 ; Trin. Coll. Dub. MS. B. 52. 

By Stat. 7 Anne, c. 20, memorials of wills affecting lands, tene- 
ments, or hereditaments, co. Middlesex, were ordered to be regis- 
tered in an office directed to be established by the said Act; in 
which also were to be registered, deeds, conveyances, Sec., in the 
said counties. 

A similar Act for the West Riding of Yorkshire was passed 2 and 3 
Anne, c. 4j and for the East Riding and Hull, 6 Anne, c. 62; and 
another for the North Riding, 8 Geo. II. c. 6. 



351 



$arocf)ial anti otfytx Registers* 

T>AROCHIAL REGISTERS.— The evidence afforded by Pare 
-*- chial Registers is of the first class, and there is scarcely a claim 
of peerage or case of heirship on record, which has not been proved 
in part by them. 

At the dissolution of the monasteries, in the year 1535, the dis- 
persion of the monks, who were, tip to that period, the principal 
register-keepers, gave rise probably to a mandate, issued in 1538, 
by Thomas Crumwell, afterwards Earl of Essex, the Vicar-General, 
for the keeping of registers of baptisms, marriages, and burials, in 
each parish. Afterwards, in the reign of Elizabeth, it was ordered 
that every minister, at his institution, should subscribe to this 
protestation, "I shall keepe the register booke according to the 
Queene's Majesties injunction." 

The registers not being so regularly entered and preserved as was 
necessary, it was ordained, by a constitution made by the arch- 
bishops and clergy of Canterbury, 25th of October, 1597, that 
parchment register books should be purchased at the expense of 
each parish, and that there should be transcribed, at the same 
parish cost, from the paper books then in use, into the parchment 
registers, not only the names of those who had been baptized, 
married, or buried, during the reign of the then Queen (which 
commenced 1558, a period of thirty-nine years prior to the man- 
date), but also the names of those who thenceforth should be bap- 
tized, married, or buried. Such transcripts to be examined, and 
their correctness certified at the bottom of each page, by the clergy- 
man and churchwardens. Copies of the registers were to be 
forwarded annually, within one month of Easter, by the respective 
churchwardens, to the registrar of the diocese, that they might be 
faithfully preserved in the episcopal archives. The constitution 
was approved by the Queen, under the Great Seal of England, and 
ordered to be observed in both provinces of Canterbury and York. 

These regulations were confirmed by the 70th Ecclesiastical 
Canon of 1603, one of the earliest disobediences of which was the 



352 PAROCHIAL AND OTHER REGISTERS. 

non-delivery of the duplicates to the registrar of the diocese : a 
subject of regret, but not of astonishment, when we consider that 
the registry, transmission, and custody of it, occasioned unprofit- 
able labour to uninterested parties. 

The next interruption to the proper keeping of registers arose 
from the civil wars, and most parishes are deficient in registers, or 
at least in registers of any regularity, during the Usurpation ; not 
that all registration ceased during that period, as will be seen from 
what follows, but, that the duty of registrars was taken out of the 
hands of the clergy, and given over to some village tradesman, whose 
chief recommendation for the office was probably the zeal he had 
shown in the destruction of the ancient registers. 

In the year 1644 an ordinance was passed, that " the Book of 
Common Prayer" should not be thenceforth used, but the "Di- 
rectory for Public Worship," in which was a clause in these words, 
" And it is further ordained, by the authority aforesaid, that there 
shall be provided, at the charge of every parish or chappelry in this 
realm of England and dominion of Wales, a fair register-book of 
velim, to be kept by the minister and other officers of the church ; 
and that the names of all children baptized, and of their parents, 
and of the time of their birth and baptizing, shall be written and 
set down by the ministers therein ; and also the names of all per- 
sons married there, and the time of their marriage ; and also the 
names of all persons buried in that parish, and the time of their 
death and burial ; and that the said book shall be showed, by such 
as keep the same, to all persons reasonably desiring to search for 
the birth, baptizing, marriage, or burial of any person therein re- 
gistered, and to take a copy or procure a certificate thereof." 

And again, " a register is to be carefully kept, wherein the names 
of the parties so married, with the time of their marriage, are 
forthwith to be fairly recorded in a book provided for that purpose, 
for the perusal of all whom it may concern." 

In the year 1653, another ordinance respecting registers was 
passed, whereby it was enacted, "that a true and just account might 
always be kept, of all marriages, and also of the births of children, 
and deaths of all sorts of persons within the commonwealth;" it 
was further enacted, "that a book of good velim or parchment should 
be provided by every parish, for the registering of such ; for the 
safe keeping of which, the inhabitants and householders of every 
parish chargeable to the relief of the poor, should, before the 22d 
September 1653, make choice of some able and honest person 



PAROCHIAL AND OTHER REGISTERS. 353 

(such as should be sworn and approved by one justice of the peace, 
and so signified under his hand in the said register-book), to have 
the keeping of the said book, who should therein fairly enter in 
writing all such publications, marriages, births of children, and 
burials of all sorts of persons, and the names of every of them, and 
the days of the month and year of publication, marriages, births, 
and burials, and the parents', guardians 5 , and overseers' names; 
and that the register of such parish should attend the said justice 
of peace, to subscribe the entry of such marriage ; and the party 
so elected should be called the parish register, and should continue 
three years in the said place of register, and longer, until some 
other should be chosen," &c. 

The ordinances contain no particular directions for the preserva- 
tion of the registers, and as they were retained in private hands, 
and the registrars were continually changed, most of the records 
have been lost ; in some parishes the entries are found in the old 
parish book of registers. 

With the Restoration this irregular system of registers ceased, 
and from 1660 the parochial registers have in most cases been well 
kept. 

The next legal notice of registers arose out of a tax upon mar- 
riages, births, and burials, &c, for the levying of which it was, by 
statute 6 and 7 Will. III. [1694], c. 6, enacted, that every clergy- 
man should keep a register of all persons married, buried, christened, 
or born, in his parish, under the penalty of £100. 

In the following year a further enactment was made, to restrain 
marriages without licenses or bans, and for better registering 
marriages, births, and burials. Distinct registers were to be kept 
of children born in the parish and not christened, and all parents 
were, within five days, to give notice of the birth of a child. 

In 1711 (10 Anne), in consequence of the "inconvenience which 
daily grew " from solemnizing clandestine marriages, an Act was 
passed, imposing certain penalties on clergymen offending. Amongst 
other clauses, it was directed that the churchwardens and chapel- 
wardens of every parish or chapelry should provide books of vellum 
or good paper, in which all marriages and bans of marriage 
should be registered; that the pages should be numbered, and 
ruled with lines at proper and equal distances, and that the bans 
and marriages should be registered, and signed by the clergyman ; 
and that the books should be carefully kept for public use ; and 

23 



354 PAROCHIAL AND OTHER REGISTERS. 

that the marriages should be in the presence of two witnesses, and 
that all parties should sign their names to a register thereof. 

The Act of 1 754 having rendered it necessary to the legality of a 
marriage, that it should be solemnized in some church or chapel 
where bans had been theretofore usually published, the Court of 
King's Bench was compelled, in 1781, to declare a marriage void 
which had been duly solemnized in a consecrated chapel erected in 
1765. An Act of Parliament was, therefore, immediately passed, 
declaring that all marriages solemnized before the 1st of August, 
1781, in any church or public chapel, erected and consecrated 
since the 26th Geo. II., should be good and valid in law, and that 
the registers of such marriages, or copies thereof, should be received 
in all courts as evidence; and that the registers of all marriages 
solemnized in any such chapels should, within twenty days, be 
removed to the parish church of the parish in which such chapel 
should be situated, to be kept with the marriage register of such 
parish. 

The last legal interference respecting registers, was the Act of 
52 Geo. III., c. 146, which, after reciting that the amending the 
manner and form of keeping and preserving registers of baptisms, 
marriages, and burials of his Majesty's subjects, in the several 
parishes and places of England, would greatly facilitate the proof 
of pedigrees of persons claiming to be entitled to real or personal 
estates, enacts that new books of registers, with new forms, should 
be used by all parishes after the 31st December, 1812. The bap- 
tisms, marriages, and burials were to be registered in separate 
books, the registers of each parish were to be preserved in an iron 
chest, and annual copies were to be sent to the bishop's registrar 
of the diocese, who was likewise to be furnished with lists of extant 
register books. 

Thus far the Legislature appears to have well provided for the 
careful keeping and safe custody of these important documents. 
Many circumstances have however arisen to counteract its good 
intentions : fires, robberies, neglect, and other accidents, have each 
contributed to their destruction, and this more especially in small 
country parishes, where these books are not often referred to. 

It may not be out of place here to remind those in whose custody 
so many of these mutilated registers remain, that, although no 
remedy has yet been found to cure the ravages of damp, yet, that 
vellum documents injured by fire can be restored to use, at, com- 
paratively speaking, small expense, when the value of these records 



PAEOCHIAL AND OTHER REGISTERS. 355 

is taken into consideration. As an instance of this, we need only 
refer to the beautiful restorations of the burnt MSS. in the Cot- 
tonian Library, at the British Museum, effected with great skill, by 
Mr. Henry Gough, sen. 

Many parishes have no early registers 

The registers of London parishes will most generally be found to 
commence in the year 1558 (1 Elizabeth), and to have been thence 
regularly continued (the Usurpation excepted) to the present day. 
The registers of the twenty years intervening between their intro- 
duction in 1538 and the year 1558, are not frequently met with. 

All parish registers have more entries of burials than of christen- 
ings. Half-baptisms are not recorded, though some clergymen 
make memoranda of them. 

Many registers contain further information than the baptisms, 
marriages, or deaths, which is always interesting, if not useful. 

Ancient registers sometimes record marriages which did not take 
place in the parish. 

It should be remembered that many parishes exist no longer, or 
have become united to others. No less than thirty-five of the 
churches destroyed by the fire of London in 1666, have never been 
rebuilt. The ancient registers of these parishes, or some of them, 
may often with diligence be discovered; at times they are to be 
found in the chest of the nearest, or of a neighbouring parish 
church. 

Some Hospitals have the privilege of baptism and burial accord- 
ing to the forms, and by clergymen of the Established Church. 

Some persons have their decease registered in two places; such 
is the case with many members of Lincoln's Inn, who are buried 
in their chapel, and have their obits nevertheless entered in the 
register of the parish of St. Andrew, Holborn ; and the decease 
of Catholics is recorded in the registers of Catholic chapels, whilst 
their burials appear entered in the Protestant registers of the places 
of their sepulture. 

It should be remembered that it was common in the age of 
Elizabeth to give the same Christian name to two children succes- 
sively ; and that every unmarried lady was called Mistress till the 
time of George I. 

The negligent way in which all parochial registers have, at some 
period or other, been kept, precludes the possibility of substan- 
tiating a pedigree traced through a period of two centuries; for, 
independently of the casualties to the registers themselves, the 



356 



PAEOCHIAL AND OTHER REGISTERS. 



very books constantly bear evidence that baptisms, marriages, and 
burials, have been wholly omitted to be entered; and entries of 
births, marriages, and burials, are very common with the names 
omitted. 

It has been already stated (p. 354) that the churchwardens of 
each parish were directed to forward copies of the registers annually 
to the registrar of the diocese, that they might be preserved in the 
episcopal archives. This injunction, probably from the unprofitable 
duties which it entailed, was so frequently neglected, that at the 
present time the duplicate registers are not perfect in any one 
'diocese in the kingdom. The accompanying schedule, taken from 
the Returns to Parliament, will serve, in some slight degree, as a 
guide, showing the assistance an inquirer may be likely to obtain, 
on application for registers at the diocesan registries. 

Transcripts of Parochial Registers in the Archives of the 
several Bishops. 



Bath and Wells .... 
Bedford Archdeaconry . . 

Bristol 

Carlisle 

Chester 

Chichester Archdeaconry . . 

Durham 

Ely 

Exeter 

Gloucester 

Hereford 

Huntingdon Archdeaconry, ") 

in Huntingdonshire . . ) 
Huntingdon Archdeaconry, ) 

in Hertford . . . . ) 
Leicester Archdeaconry . . 

Lewes 

Lichfield and Coventry . . 
Lincoln Gounty 



Date of 

Earliest 
Transcript. 



1731 

1650* 



1600 

1571 
1660 



London 



Norwich 



1660 

1587 



Parishes 

in 
Diocese. 



480 
120 
204 
101 
262 
129 
195 
156 



323 

92 

77 

231 
142 



Number of Parishes 

transmitting 
Duplicates in 1800. 



50 

nearly perfect. 

perfect. 

101 

perfect. 

perfect. 

147 

nearly perfect. 

nearly perfect. 
323 

85 

74 

nearly complete. 

perfect. 

nearly perfect. 

ditto. 



(■None. It has never been the custom for 
< the Clergy in this Diocese to transmit 
(■ duplicates. 

The .Returns are 



1227 



to four 
Archdeaconries. 



PAROCHIAL AND OTHER REGISTERS. 



357 





Date of 


Parishes 


Number of Parishes 




Earliest 
Transcript. 


in 
Diocese. 


transmitting 
Duplicates in 1800. 






314 


160 


Richmond Archdeaconry . . 





330 

77 
95 


225 

74 
7 






434 
324 

353 


9 in 10 

nearly perfect. 

181 


York, Dean and Chapter . . 


1660 


90 


perfect. 



From this account it will be seen that many thousand registers 
are wanting, nor have recent inquiries tended to show that much 
greater care has been latterly bestowed upon them. 

Dr. Thelwall, of Newcastle, writes, in the " Gentleman's Maga- 
zine" for 1819, page 490: — "The most shameful negligence is 
attributed to the person (the Deputy Registrar at York) in whose 
keeping the records have been placed. Indeed I have some reason 
to suppose this, as I lately saw, in the possession of a friend, a great 
number of extracts from the registrar of a certain parish in this 
neighbourhood, and on questioning him as to the way in which he 
became possessed of them, I was informed that they were given to 
him by his cheesemonger, and that copies were forwarded by the 
clergyman of the parish to the proper officer in a bordering diocese, 
and had been allowed, through the negligence of their keeper, 
to obtain the distinguished honour of wrapping up cheese and 
bacon." 

In the evidence of Sir William Betham, Ulster King at Arms, 
before the Committee in 1832, we find that he had occasion to 
search at York Cathedral, and went for the express purpose of 
searching duplicates of Parish Registers. He found them ' { lying 
unarranged and unconsultable " in the office. Upon asking the 
reason, he was answered that the Act of Parliament which ordered 
this class of records to be sent to the Bishop's Registry, gave no. 
directions about fees. 

Mr. Downing Bruce states, in a very able pamphlet, published 
in 1854, 1 that the Parish Register of Kirkby Malzeard, in Yorkshire, 
for 1653, which was reported by the curate as lost or stolen, was 

1 "An Account of the present deplorable State of the Ecclesiastical Courts of Record, 
with Proposals for their Reformation," by W. D. Bruce, Esq. Lond. 1854. 8vo. 



358 PAROCHIAL AND OTHER REGISTERS. 

discovered by him (Mr. Bruce), tattered and torn, behind some 
old drawers in the curate's back kitchen. 

At Chester, the Parish Register returns are substantially bound, 
in separate parishes, and kept in one large room ; they have been 
much referred to since their arrangement, about four years ago ; a 
fee of three shillings and fourpence is demanded for each parish 
examined. At York the charge for inspecting the transcripts of 
Parish Registers is one shilling for each year and each parish exa- 
mined; the charge for searching the marriage license file is one 
shilling per year. 

At Lincoln the duplicate Parish Registers are tied up in the 
parcels in which they were sent, bundled into boxes, and those 
which had been written on parchment were regularly cut up for 
binding modern wills. 

At Lichfield, Mr. Bruce found the records exposed to the rain, 
through the dilapidated state of the building in which they were kept; 
and in such order, that the clerks acknowledged it would take at 
least eight or ten months to find any wills required before 1526. 

The charge for searching the Parish Register Returns at Lich- 
field is six shillings and eightpence for each year. 

By an Act recently passed, the charge for searching in Parochial 
Registers has been fixed at one shilling for each year, and at three 
shillings and sixpence for each certified extract. 

Applicants at the various Registries are not allowed to copy for 
themselves, except in very rare cases, where the matter is required 
for some historical or purely literary purpose. 

Much valuable information for a genealogist may be obtained 
from Bigland's " Observations on Parochial Registers/' Lond. 1764, 
4to. ; and from Burn's "History of Parish Registers in England" 
Lond. 1829, 8vo. Many Extracts from Parochial Registers are 
printed in County Histories, and other topographical and genealo- 
gical works, others exist in manuscript, in several of our public 
Libraries ; a list of some of these is given below : — 

PAROCHIAL REGISTERS. 

Memoranda of Births, Marriages, Deaths, and Burials of Persons, from 1720 

to 1729; Coll. of Asms, Norfolk MS. 61. 
Registry of Births before Christmas 1747, and since; College of Arms, 

Norfolk MS. A. 1. 
Registry of Births for the Colonies, from the year 1750 ; Coll, of Arms, 

Norfolk MS. 



PAROCHIAL AND OTHER REGISTERS. 359 

Parochial Registers. 
Parish Registers and Chapelry Registers extant in 1831, alphabetically 

arranged under the Hundreds, in 6 vols. ; Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 9355 

—9350. 
Bedfordshire : Extracts from the Parish Registers of Campton, Co. Bedford. 

See Nichols 5 "Collectanea TopograpMea et Genealogical vol. iii. p. 121. 

of Cople, Co. Bedford. vol. v. p. 362. 

of Hawnes, Co. Bedford, vol. iii. p. &5. 

Berkshire : Extracts from the Parish Registers of Welford, Co. Berks. See 

Nichols* * Collect. Topog. et Genealqg." vol. v. p. 359. 
ofSteventon [Co. Berks ?] ; BrhvMus. 

Earl. MS.2Z95. 
Buckinghamshire : Extracts from the Parish Registers of Burnbam, in Buck- 
inghamshire. See Nichols' "Collect. Topog. et Genealog." vol. iv. p. 286. 

of Iver, same County, vol. iii. p. 279. 

Cheshire : Extracts from the Parish Registers of Backford, in Cheshire. See 

Nichols' " Cillect. Topog. et Genealog." vol. iv. p. 232. 
' Copy of the Register of the Parish of St. Bridget, in Chester, from 

1560 to 163* ; Beit. Mus. Earl. MS. 2177. 

of St. Mary-on-the-Hill, in Chester, from 



1547— 1553 j Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 2177, f. 113. 
of St. Olave, in Chester ; Brit. Mus. 



Earl. MS. 2V7 s f.Ul. 

of Trinity Church, in Chester, from 1598 

to 1653; Bsir, Mus. Earl. MS. 2177, f. 55. 

Extracts from the Parish Registers of Earndon, in Cheshire, com- 



mencing 1601. See Nichols' "Collect. Topog. et Genealog." vol. iv. p. 233. 
Dorsetshire: Extracts from the Parish Registers of Sutton Waldron, Co. 

Dorset. See lichols' "Topographer" vol. iii. p. 411. 
Essex : Extracts from the Parish Registers of Stanway, Co. Essex. See 

Nichols' "Golhctanea Topographica et Genealogica" vol. iv. p. 305. 

of Theydon Mount, from 1564. vol. viii. p. 406. 

Gloucestershire : Extracts from the Parish Registers of Aston-sub-Edge, Co. 

Gloucester. &e Nichols' " Collect. Topog. et Genealog." vol. vii. p. 279. 
Herefordshire : Colbctions out of a Register of the Church of Hereford, from 

a.d. 1393 ; Beit. Mus. Earl. MS. 6203. 
Kent: Extracts fron the Parish Registers in Kent; Soc. of Ant. MSS. 180; 

183. 
Abstract of tie Parish Register of Bromley, in Kent, from 1651 to 1698; 

Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 3391. 
, of Down, same County. See Nichols' 

"Topographer" vol. ii. pp. 280, 532. 
Lincolnshire : Account of the Baptisms and Burials within the Hundred of 

Boothby-Grafor, in Lincolnshire, from 1688. See " Gent. Mag." 1782* 

p. 75. 



360 PAROCHIAL AND OTHER REGISTERS. 

Parochial Registers. ' 
London; Burials and Christenings in London, from 8th to 15th April, 1618; 
Beit. Mus. Royal MS. 7, C. xvi. art. 16. 

■ Registry of Births for London, from Christmas 1747, snd. since ; 

Coll. of Arms, Norfolk MSS. A. 1; B. 1. 

Burials in the Charter-House, London. See Nichols' "Ctllect. Topog. 

et Genealog." vol.iv. p. 308. 
at St. Dunstan's-in-the-West, London. toL iv. p. 116. 



— Extracts from the Parish Registers of St. Dunstaa-in-the-West, 
London. See Nichols' "Topographer" vol. v. pp. 202, 355. 

— Extracts from the Parish Registers of St. James, Westminster. See 
Nichols' "Topographer" vol. iii. p. 491. 

of St. Olave, Hart Street, London. See 



Nichols' "Collect. Topog. et Genealog." vol. ii. p. 311. 

Baptisms in Somerset House Chapel, from 1732— 7775 ; Marriages 

in the same, from 1714 — 1758 ; and Burials in the Tault there, from 
1720—1770. All privately printed by Sir Thomas Biillipps, Bart., in 
1831. 8vo. 

Register of Baptisms, Marriages, and Burials in Westminster Abbey ; 

from 1607 to 1705. See Nichols' " Collect. Topog. et Genealog." vol. vii. 
pp. 162, 243, 355 ; vol. viii. p. 1. 

Burials in the Chapter House, Westminster, temp Hen. VIII. See 



Nichols' "Collect. Topog. et Genealog." vol. i. p. 21. 
Middlesex : Extracts from the Parish Registers of Hamiiersmith, Co. Mid- 
dlesex. See Nichols' "Collect. Topographica et Chnealogica" vol. iii. 

p. 316. 
Northamptonshire : Extracts from the Parish Registers o:" Great Billing, Co. 

Northampton. See Nichols' " Collect. Topog. et Genealog." vol. viii. 

p. 189. 
Oxfordshire : Collections out of the Registers of all the Parishes in Oxford, 

by Ant. a Wood, from about 1538 till 1677 ; Asm. Lib. Wood MS. 

8524. 
■ Chipping-Norton Register, Co. Oxford, (.560—1686; folio. 

Privately printed by Sir Thomas Phillipps, Bart. 
Surrey : Extracts from the Parish Registers of Addingtm, Co. Surrey. See 

Nichols' "Collect. Topog. et Genealog." vol. vii. p. 186. 
of Croydon, Co. Surtey. In addition to 

those published in Steinman's "History of Croydon" 8vo. 1834, see 

Nichols' "Collect. Topog. et Genealog." vol. ii. p. 2S2; vol. iii. p. 807 ; 

vol. iv. p. 91 ; vol. v. p. 42. 

— ■ of Camberwell, in sime County. See 

Nichols* "Collectanea Topographica et Genealogici?' vol. iii. p. 142. 

— ■ of Streatham, in sameCo. vol. iii. p. 309. 

Sussex : Extracts from Parish Registers of Sussex, &c. by Bx William Burrell ; 

Brit. Mtjs. Add. MSS. 5697—5699. 



PAROCHIAL AND OTHER REGISTERS. 361 

Pakochial Reghstebs. 
Wiltshire : Extracts from Wiltshire Parish Kegisters, 8vo. Privately printed 
by Sir Thomas Phillipps, Bart. 

Extracts from the Parish Register of Bedwyn Magna, Co. Wilts. 

See Nichols* " Collectanea Topographica et Genealogical vol. v. p. 28. 
of Bedwyn Parva. vol. v. p. 359. 



Parish Register of Durneford, Wiltshire, to a.d. 1650 ; Salisb. 

1828. 8vo. Privately printed by Sir Thomas Phillipps, Bart. 

Extracts from the Parish Registers of Aldbourn, Co. Wilts. See 



Nichols' "Collectanea Topographica et Genealogical vol. vi. p. 385. 
of Chute, same County, vol. viii.p.190. 
of Collingbourne Ducis, Collingbourne 



Kingston, Burbage, and Tidcombe, Co. Wilts. See Nichols' "Col- 
lectanea Topographica et Genealogical vol. vii. pp. 72, 175. 

of Easton. vol. v. p. 39. 

of Proxfield. vol. v. p. 36. 

of Hungerford. vol. v. p. 359. 

of Malmesbury. vol. vi. p. 237. 

of Market Lavington. vol. viii. p. 201. 

of St. Peter and St. Paul the Apostles, and 

St. Mary the Virgin, Marlborough. vol. v. p. 260. 

of Milton Lislebon. See Nichols' "Topo- 

grapher" vol. iii. p. 347. 
of Preshute, Mildenhall, Ogbourn Saint 



Andrew, and Ogbourn Saint George. See Nichols' " Collectanea Topo- 
graphica et Genealogical vol. v. p. 346. 
of Stratton Saint Margaret, and South 



Marston, in Wiltshire; Middle Hill, 182 — . 8vo. Privately printed 

by Sir Thomas Phillipps, Bart. 
Worcestershire: Marriages at Bretforton, Co. Worcester, 1538 to 1752, 

Lond. 1831. 8vo. Privately printed by Sir Thomas Phillipps, Bart. 
Yorkshire : Extracts from the Parish Registers of Hornby, Co. York. See 

Nichols' "Collectanea Topographica et Genealogical vol. iii. p. 325. 

of Tong. vol. viii. p. 364. 

of Wath, near Ripon. vol. iii. p. 414. 

Monmouth : Extracts of Marriages from the Register of Tintern Abbey, Co. 

Monmouth; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 6148, f. 16. 
Ireland : Extracts from the Parish Registers of St. Nicholas, Dublin. See 

Nichols' "Topographer ," vol.ii. p. 520. 

Marriage Dispensations, or Licenses. — Much important in- 
formation relative to the dissolution and contraction of marriages, 
is to be obtained from the bulk or briefs of Dispensations. In 



362 PAROCHIAL AND OTHER REGISTERS. 

former times, applications from great men to the Pope or other 
ecclesiastical authorities, that parties, prohibited by certain impe- 
diments, might intermarry, were very frequent. By the change of 
religion in the time of Henry VIII., the dispensing power was 
transferred to the Protestant clergy, and papal bulls or dispensa- 
tions found successors in the marriage licenses of the present day. 

By the Act of 25th Henry VIII. it was enacted, that all dispensa- 
tions, licenses, and confirmations, obtained from the See of Rome 
before the 12th day of March 1533, should be valid; but that after 
that time the Archbishop of Canterbury and other spiritual persons 
should alone grant licenses of things wont to be licensed. 

Nevertheless great irregularities about marriage continued to 
exist, which called forth another Act of the 28th Henry VIII., 
wherein it was declared that all faculties and dispensations what- 
ever, issuing from the See of Rome, should be void and of no value. 

The Parliament also, in 1533, in one of their Acts, caused to be 
published a table of degrees, wherein it was prohibited by God's 
law to marry. But the Act did not cure these irregularities, for 
many thought to bear out themselves in their illegal contracts, by 
getting dispensations from the Archbishop, which created him much 
trouble by his denying to grant them. 

For genealogical particulars and identity of parties, no parochial 
registers can be compared with the Protestant licenses of marriage ; 
documents which like these contain, under the sanction of an oath, 
the names, residences, and descriptions of husbands and wives, 
their ages, whether they have been previously married, their hand- 
writing, and if under age, the names, particulars, and handwriting 
of parents or guardians, must in all cases be ranked as of the most 
valuable description of evidence. 

The most important repository of Dispensations prior to the 
Reformation is doubtless in the Vatican. 

In the year 1788, Andrew Stuart, Esq., M.P., having a wish to 
inspect the marriage dispensations in this repository, to aid him in 
the compilation of a Genealogical History of the Stewarts, obtained 
an introduction to Monsieur de Marini, the keeper of the Secret 
Archives. Mr. Stuart's research was for Scotch families ; and after 
much labour, no less than sixty dispensations to Scotsmen alone 
were furnished by M. Marini, and verbatim copies of thirty-eight 
having been obtained, were afterwards printed by Mr. Stuart, to- 
gether with the dates and names of the parties to the remaining 
twenty-two dispensations. . M. Marines search extended from 1317 



PAROCHIAL AND OTHER REGISTERS. 363 

to 1452, not only in the Vatican and Castle of S* Angelo, but at the 
Office of the Dataria ; and he found dispensations during the whole 
course of this period, with little intermission. 

The next most important archives for ancient marriage dis- 
pensations are the Registers of the Archbishops and Bishops of this 
kingdom, in which are not only transcripts of, but (it is believed) 
original marriage dispensations, 

They are to be found of as early a date as the year 1300, in the 
library at Lambeth ; and some as early as the twelfth century are 
in the British Museum. 

Ancient applications to Popes for marriage dispensations are to be 
found entered on the rolls called "Roman Rolls/ 3 preserved at the 
Tower of London. These records commence 34 Edw. I, [1305], 
and conclude 23 Edw. IV. [1483] . 

The records of modern marriage dispensations, or marriage 
licenses as they are now termed, will be found in the registries of 
the several Bishops and Archbishops ; and the documents preserved 
in such archives are the affidavits made by parties applying for 
licenses, and the bonds entered into by them at the same time. 

In London there are three distinct offices where marriage 
licenses can be obtained ; and, as each is independent of the others, 
distinct registries are kept in each. 

1. The Bishop of London's Office, in his Consistory Court, as 
head of the diocese. This registry has license records from about 
the Fire of London. 

2. The Vicar-General, who has authority over the whole see of 
Canterbury. This registry has them from the 8th August, 1666, 
twenty-five days prior to the fire (all earlier records having been 
then burnt). 

3. The Faculty Office, or Office of the Primate, which has juris- 
diction over the see of York as well as that of Canterbury. Books 
of licenses exist in this office from about 163. 

Of the Marriage Allegation Papers, or Affidavits, formerly at 
York, Mr. Bruce thus writes i 1 — " I was not prepared to find that 
the whole of another and most important class of records, up to a 
comparatively late date, were not forthcoming ; namely, Marriage 
Allegation Papers, or Affidavits. On inquiry elsewhere it was dis- 
covered that these documents, or at least the greater part of them, 
were the private property of one of the clerks, a genealogist by pro- 

1 See note, page 357. 



364 PAROCHIAL AND OTHER REGISTERS. 

fession, who kept them in his own house. c A County Magistrate/ 1 
in a letter to the ' York Herald,' dated 23rd Oct. 1850, in answer to 
a statement made by Mr. E. V. Harcourt, the Registrar, respecting 
these documents, states : — * I have in my possession a number of 
papers containing notifications of marriage, extracted, as I under- 
stand, from the private documents of the gentleman who, I presume, 
is alluded to, which were furnished by him about six months ago ; 
and each of these notices of marriage has a regular printed formula 
attached to it, specifying a graduated scale of charges for the informa- 
tion so furnished, amounting altogether to a large sum of money. 
I will minutely describe them. Each paper, after giving informa- 
tion required in manuscript, has printed at the foot of it these 
words : — "" The above is a correct copy of an entry in my manuscript, 
entitled NoteB of Weddings by License." Then comes the written 
signature of a gentleman who is, it is presumed, the clerk in ques- 
tion, and the date, u York, February, 1850." Then comes, under a 
line, the following notification in print : — " The manuscript above 
mentioned, which relates principally, but not wholly, to the seven- 
teenth century, and contains many important particulars as to 
residence, age, rank, and not to be found in any other collections, has 
been compiled probably from original marriage licenses, as it con- 
tains facts which in several instances are not recorded in the license 
affidavits preserved in the Registry at York. Fees for a general search 
for any surname, including a list of all, whether male or female, 
with year, according to the following plan : — " Dawson, Gent, and 
Lister," £1. 0s. Od. ; a copy of each note of marriage, where the 
party is described as merchant, gentleman, or of higher rank, 
£1. 0s. Od.; a copy of each note of marriage, where the party is 
not described as above, or is undescribed in the list, £0. 5s. Od. 
®° Personal applications cannot be attended to. 5 " The signature 
to this document is " William Pover." 

At Chester the Marriage Allegation Books from 1606 have a few 
chasms. The first book commences in 1606 and ends 1616. The 
marriage affidavits and bonds are very imperfect prior to the year 
1700, and there is no index to them. 

Other dispensations, having, however, no relation to marriage, 
must be noticed. They are entered on the Dispensation Rolls, and 
contain enrolments of commendams, degrees, dispensations, and 
faculties, which have passed under the Great Seal. They are pre- 

1 G-eo. P. Dawson, Esq., of Osgodby Hall, magistrate for the East and West 
Riding of Yorkshire. 



PAROCHIAL AND OTHER REGISTERS. 365 

served at the Rolls Chapel, and extend (but not regularly) from 
the 37th Elizabeth (1594) to the 20th Geo. II. 

Register books, in which these documents are entered, are kept 
by the Secretary of Presentations, from 1692 to the present time. 

The fiat of the Archbishop of Canterbury to grant a com- 
mendam is addressed to the Master of the Faculties (Faculty 
Office, Doctors' Commons), which fiat is all that is required at 
the Faculty Office to proceed with the instrument and forward it to 
the Dispensation Office in Chancery, where it is confirmed and sealed. 

In the State Paper Office are Dispensations from the year 
1532 to 1698. 

NON-PAROCHIAL REGISTERS. 

In the 7th year of King William IV. (1836) a Commission was 
issued under the Great Seal, authorising certain Commissioners to 
inquire into the state, custody, and authenticity of any such Regis- 
ters or Records of Births or Baptisms, Deaths or Burials, and Mar- 
riages lawfully solemnised, as had been theretofore or were then 
kept in England and Wales, other than the Parochial Registers, and 
the copies thereof deposited with the Diocesan Registrars ; and to in- 
quire whether any and what measures could be beneficially adopted 
for collecting and arranging all or any of such Registers or Records, 
and for depositing the same, or copies thereof, in the Office of the 
Registrar -General of Births, Deaths, and Marriages, or for other- 
wise preserving the same ; and also to consider and advise the proper 
measures to be adopted for giving full force and effect, as evidence 
in all courts of justice, to all such Registers as might be found 
accurate and faithful. 

Public notice was given of the existence of this Commission, 
and circular letters were addressed to the ministers of all the Dis- 
senting congregations in England and Wales, and to other persons 
having custody of such Registers, calling upon them to surrender 
the Registers to the custody of the Commissioners, or to afford 
information on various points connected with the objects of the 
Commission. The circulars were forwarded to the ministers of the 
following religious communities : — 



The Foreign Protestant Churches in 

England, 
The Presbyterians, 
The Baptists, 
The Wesleyan Methodists, in their 

several branches, 



The Independents, 
The Moravians, 

The Countess of Huntingdon's Con- 
nection, 
The Calvinistic Methodists, and 
The Swedenborgians. 



366 PAROCHIAL AND OTHER REGISTERS. 

Communications to a similar effect were also addressed to 



The Prelates of the Roman Catholic 

Church, 
The Quakers, 
The Jews, 

The Heralds' College, 
The Corporation of London, as having 

The result was the transmission of about 7000 Registers from 
3630 religious congregations, viz. : — 



the custody of the BunhinVFieldfl 

Burial Register, 
The East India House, and 
The Registrar of the Consistory Court 

of the Diocese of London. 



The Foreign Protestant Churches 37 

The Presbyterians, Independents, and Baptists .... 2264 

The Wesleyan Methodists, in their several branches . . 818 

The Moravians 10 

The Lady Huntingdon's Connection 44 

The Calvinistic Methodists 436 

The Swedenborgians 21 



Total . . 3630 

Each of these registers was authenticated by a certificate under 
tbe signature of tbe minister, or of some officer of the Church or 
Denomination from whom it was received. In many instances the 
book containing the register comprised also entries relating to 
religious tenets and discipline, which the congregations were un- 
willing to give up. To meet this difficulty, the Commissioners 
detached and returned the irrelevant matter to the several congre- 
gations, and affixed a certificate to the register, explaining the cause 
of the mutilation of the book. 

On the subject of the admissibility of these registers as evidence 
in courts of justice, it appeared to the Commissioners essential to 
consider how they stood as contrasted with parochial registers, 
and the principle upon which the broad distinction which has 
hitherto obtained between these two classes of documents is 
founded. Parish registers are invariably received in all our courts 
of justice as evidence of baptisms, marriages, and burials, while 
the non-parochial registers were not admissible. The grounds of' 
this distinction were these : — Parish registers, framed originally in 
pursuance of injunctions issuing from the sovereign power in the 
state, and subsequently recognised by repeated acts of the Legis- 
lature, had been kept for general use in the custody of public 
functionaries ; whereas the non-parochial registers not having been 
so made, and having been kept in the custody of private individuals 



PAROCHIAL AND OTHER REGISTERS. 367 

— however carefully and strictly preserved, however formally and 
regularly made — had never been admissible in evidence as registers 
in courts of justice. 

To afford, therefore, every facility and advantage for establishing 
the registers of the Dissenters, so far as might be compatible with the 
due administration of justice, the Commissioners recommended — 

1. That the several registers transmitted to them, together with the 
certificates and returns annexed thereto, shall be kept together in some 
secure place of deposit, under the care of the Registrar-General. 

2. That all registers so deposited shall be deemed to be in legal 
custody, and shall be receivable in evidence in all courts of jus- 
tice, subject to certain conditions. 

3. That the officer having custody of the registers shall, on sub- 
poena or order of a competent court, produce any original register 
deposited with him. 

4. That in all criminal proceedings the proof shall be by the pro- 
duction of the original. 

5. That in all other cases, copies or extracts, duly certified, shall 
be receivable in evidence, subject to certain regulations. 

The office of the Registrar-General at Somerset House is open 
every day. The charge for search is Is., and for a copy, 2s. 6d. 

To this " Report " we are chiefly indebted for the contents of the 
following pages. 

The Foreign Protestant Churches in England. — The first 
registers in point of antiquity are those of the Walloon and French 
Churches. 1 They commence in the year 1567, and are the Registers 
of Baptisms, Marriages, and Burials of Foreigners, who, flying from 
religious persecution in their own countries, have, from time to 
time, been received with hospitality in England, and have met with 
protection from the sovereigns of this country, who liberally pro- 
vided for the maintenance of their schools and ministers. Their 
churches were established in London, Canterbury, Norwich, South- 
ampton, and other towns. 

The first considerable influx of these foreigners appears to have 
been from Flanders, in the reign of Edward VI., and during the 
civil wars which prevailed in the Low Countries. Their numbers 
were greatly augmented in the reign of Queen Elizabeth, after the 
massacre of Paris in 1572, and, in later times, after the revocation 

1 A "Sistorrt of the French, Walloon, Dutch, and other Foreign Protestant Refugees 
settled m England from the Reign of Hen, VIII. to the Edict of Nantes? by J.S.Buru, 

was printed in 1846. 



368 PAROCHIAL AND OTHER REGISTERS. 

of the Edict of Nantes; but they have undergone considerable 
diminution in the last century, the descendants of the original 
emigrants having, by degrees, become intermixed and incorporated 
with the English population. 

There appear at one time to have been as many as sixty-four 
congregations ; but at the present period, only five or six of these 
churches are in actual existence. Many of the registers of the 
chapels, which have from time to time ceased to exist, including 
the French Chapel Royal (which was dissolved in 1830), have been 
carefully preserved \ and nearly the whole of them, together with 
almost all those of the churches which remain, are now deposited in 
the Office of the Registrar-General of Births, Deaths, and Marriages 
in England. They are all written in the French language, and appear 
to have been kept throughout with scrupulous accuracy and care. 

The registers belonging to the German Chapel Royal, and the 
German Chapel in Trinity Lane^ in the city of London, have been 
deposited in the same custody. 

A list of these records will be found in the "Appendix" to the 
"Report of the Commissioners on the State of Registers of Births, 
$e./'p.l. 

Presbyterian, Independent, and Baptist Registers. — In point 
of antiquity, Registers of the Presbyterian, the Independent, and 
the Baptist denominations, rank next to those of the Foreign Pro- 
testant Churches in England ; in point of numbers and importance 
they far exceed them. 

These three bodies, although differing materially from each other 
in tenets and discipline, and having distinct boards for the manage- 
ment of their separate affairs, and for the advancement of the 
interests of their several religious communities, have nevertheless 
now, for upwards of a century and a half, been characterized under 
the general description of " The Three Denominations." 

Some of the earlier registers of the Independents and Baptists 
had their origin during the troubles which occurred in the reign of 
Charles the First : but the registers of this early date are rare. 
After the passing of the Act of Uniformity, on the Restoration of 
Charles the Second, when the great body of the Presbyterian 
clergy, and with them many of the other clergy, who had em- 
braced the tenets of the Independents and Baptists, seceded from 
the Established Church, and became the officiating ministers of 
large congregations, the registers of " The Three Denominations " 
increased in number, and acquired importance from the rank and 



PAROCHIAL AND OTHER REGISTERS. 369 

wealth of some of the Nonconformist families. These registers 
were greatly multiplied after the Revolution of 1688, when the 
Toleration Act gave a legal sanction to the worship of the Pro- 
testant Dissenters, and for the first time, by a legal enactment, 
recognised them as separate religious communities in the State. 

The Registers of the Presbyterians and Independents are Regis- 
ters of Births and Baptisms, and, in some instances, of Deaths and 
Burials. The entries of Births and Baptisms are made up by the 
minister who officiated at the baptism, and are generally attested 
by his signature. In most of the registers in which the signature 
is omitted in the separate entry, there is a title or heading to the 
book, in the handwriting of the minister, with his name affixed to 
it, indicating that the baptisms therein recorded were performed by 
him. These registers seem, for the most part, to have been accu- 
rately and faithfully kept. 

The Registers of the Baptists are of a different character. From 
their peculiar tenets, such Registers are Records, not of Baptisms, 
but merely of Births, for with them Baptism is administered to 
those only who, having arrived at an age of understanding, are 
desirous of being admitted to church fellowship and communion. 
As regards the Registers of Births, the general usage is, that, 
shortly after the birth of a child, the minister of the congregation 
to which the parents belong, dedicates the child with prayer, and 
thereupon, if a register is kept in the congregation, he enters 
therein the name of the child and the date of the birth, as then 
reported to him, adding, in some instances, the date of registration. 
In other cases, the entry is signed by the parents, or one of them, 
or by witnesses who were present at the birth. 

These books were retained by the Commissioners appointed to 
inquire into the state of Registers of Births, &c. in 1838, and are 
now deposited with the Registrar at Somerset House. 

Other Registers have been kept on quite a different principle, 
which are mere certificates, not entered contemporaneously with 
the dedication of the child, not attested by the signature of either 
of the parents, nor of any of the witnesses present at the birth, 
and not bearing any date when the entry was made : these were 
rejected by the Commissioners, under the conviction that, being 
devoid of any evidence, internal or otherwise, to show by what 
authority or under what circumstances the entries had been made, 
the keeping of them would answer no useful purpose, and they were 
therefore returned to the custody from which they came. 

24 



370 PAROCHIAL AND OTHER REGISTERS. 

A list of the Registers, arranged in counties, will be found in 
the Appendix to the "Report" of the said Commissioners to Par- 
liament, pp. 3 — 84. 

The Wesleyan, and other Registers. 

from a.d. 

Bible Christians 1817 

Calvinists 1762 

Lady Huntingdon's Connection 1752 

•Inghamites 1753 

Moravians ..;.... 1742 

New Connection Methodists 1779 

•Primitive Methodists ..1813 

Swedenborgians 1787 

Wesleyans 1772 

The Registers of the Wesleyan and of the Calvinistic Methodists, 
of the Countess of Huntingdon's Connection, of the Moravians, 
and of the Swedenborgians, are, like those of the Presbyterians and 
Independents, Registers of Births and Baptisms, with some records 
of Deaths and Burials; and they may be included in the same 
general observations as to the mode of entry, and the attestation of 
the Registrar, the books being, in almost all cases, kept by the 
officiating minister, and authenticated by his signature, either ap- 
pended to the several entries, or written on the title or heading of 
the register. The Registers of the Methodists differ from the 
others in this respect, that most of them have been kept and the 
entries made by a Church officer, appointed and duly authorised 
for the purpose by the recognised heads or directors of those reli- 
gious communities. The Registers differ as to their value and 
importance : many of them have been very carefully, many very 
carelessly kept ; some are of a superior, others of an inferior cha- 
' racter. Indeed, it will readily be understood, that documents derived 
from such different sources, namely, from religious congregations 
scattered throughout England and Wales, as well in agricultural 
and sequestered districts as in populous and flourishing towns, 
should present various shades of difference. 

The Wesleyan Methodists, independently of their Congregational 
Registers, instituted, in 1818, a Metropolitan Office, in Paternoster 
Row, for the Registration of the Births and Baptisms occurring 
amongst their different religious communities. The registers in 
this office, together with certificates on parchment, signed by the 
parents and by witnesses who may have been present at the birth, 



PAROCHIAL AND OTHER REGISTERS. 371 

as well as by the minister, appear to have been regularly kept; 
they contained, in 1838, the Births and Baptisms of 10,291 
children. 

These Registers, or transcripts of them, are deposited with the 
Registrar- General at Somerset House. 

Lists of the Registers, arranged in counties, will be found in the 
Appendix to the " Report" before quoted, pp. 80 — 145, 150, 151. 

The Quakers* Registers. — The Commissioners appointed by 
her present Majesty, in the year 1838, to inquire into the State of 
the Registers of Births, &c., in England and Wales, having called 
upon the Society of Friends to deliver up their Registers, with a 
view to some arrangement for depositing them with the Board; 
the several Registers, from the origin of the Society down to the 
establishment of the system of civil registration, under the Act of 
6 and 7 Will. IV., were brought to London for their inspection. 
The Commissioners state, in their Report, " We have visited then 
place of deposit, and saw enough of their state and condition to 
testify- that they exhibit an admirable specimen of the state to 
which order and precision may be carried in the classification and 
arrangement of records of this description : they amount to 1432 
volumes. 

" The Society has urged upon our consideration, that these Re- 
gisters are constantly referred to, and have been treated as possess- 
ing, for practical purposes, a very considerable degree of authority ; 
that their local custody, in the different districts to which they 
belong, is consequently attended with great advantage, not only to 
the members of the Society of Friends, but to the public at large. 
They state also, that the permanent transfer of these documents to 
a Metropolitan Office would be attended with serious inconvenience, 
unless it were accompanied with some measure for providing an 
adequate local substitute, in the respective neighbourhoods from 
which they are brought." 

Under these circumstances they did not consent to surrender 
their registers into the custody of the Commissioners, or to pledge 
themselves to transfer them to any place of general deposit. 

These Records have since been deposited with the Registrar- 
General, at Somerset House. 

Registers at the Heralds' College. — Registers of Births and 
Deaths have been kept at the College of Arms from the year 1747 



372 PAROCHIAL AND OTHER REGISTERS. 

to the year 1783. They are comprised in three books. The Chapter 
of the College informed the Commissioners above mentioned, that 
they are the records of a public body, taken in the due exercise of 
official duty, and that they should not feel justified in parting with 
them. They represented them to be very limited as to the number 
of entries, and unimportant as public documents. 

Bunhill Fields Register. 1 — The burial-ground atBunhill Fields 
was first used in the year 1665 * afterwards it became the principal 
burial-place of the Dissenters. The registers commence on the 1st 
of April, 1713; from which time, however, to the year 1788, they 
were but negligently kept ; but from that year to the present 
time they appear to have been preserved with considerable care. 
The registers consist of twenty-seven books, containing about 
100,000 entries. This burial-ground is the property of the city of 
London ; and, an application being made to the Committee for the 
letting of the City lands, by the Commissioners appointed to inquire 
into the State of the Registers of Births, etc., in 1838, for the 
transmission of these records for their inspection, they replied that 
" they did not feel that they could with propriety part with them, 
constant reference thereto being required by the public." 

Cemeteries. — In addition to the registers of burials received from 
various burial-grounds attached to Protestant Dissenting chapels, 
there have been deposited with the Registrar-General at Somer- 
set House the registers of burials from cemeteries at Liverpool, 
Leeds, Eccleshall, and Walworth : that at Liverpool contained, in 
1838, the record of 13,416 burials. These registers appear to have 
been correctly kept by registrars appointed by the proprietors of the 
several burial-grounds. A schedule of them will be found in the 
Appendix to the " Report on the State of the Registers of Births" 
$c, Lond. 1838, p. 152. 

Registers of the East India Company's Servants. — The 
registers of baptisms, marriages, and burials, solemnised in the 
territories belonging to the East India Company, according to the 
forms of the English Established Church, are transmitted in dupli- 
cates from our several East India settlements to the East India 
House in London, where they are preserved in the Secretary's 
Office. 

1 See ante, p. 292. 



PAROCHIAL AND OTHER REGISTERS. 373 

The books deposited there contain the records of baptisms, mar- 
riages, and burials in India, viz. : — 





From a.d. 




From a.d 


In Bengal . . 


. . 1713 


At Madras . . 


. . 1698 


In Bombay 


. . 1709 


At St. Helena 


. . 1767 



Each part of the registers so transmitted may be considered as 
an original document, since each is signed by the clergyman trans- 
mitting them. 

The Court of Directors stated, in answer to the application of the 
Commissioners appointed to inquire into the State of the Registers 
of Births, etc., in the year 1838, for the registers to be deposited 
with them, that they thought the public interest and convenience 
would be best consulted by allowing these records to remain in 
their present place of deposit, inasmuch as they were then easily 
accessible to all persons who seek for information connected with 
the East Indies ; and they added, that as these books were at present 
received as evidence in courts of law and equity, when produced by 
the proper officer from the East India House, they (the Directors) 
were unwilling to lisk the disturbance of a system then generally 
understood and found convenient. 

Lists of the Madras and Bengal Civil Servants, 1780 — 1839, com- 
piled by Dodwell and Miles, were published in the latter year. 

Registers or English Ambassadors and Consuls. 1 — Clergymen 
attached to the English Embassies and Consulates, as also clergy- 

1 A correspondent of the "Times" writing from Berlin, in October, 1855, observes, 
with respect to these registers, — "All that there iB of church ministration in Germany 
is, to say the least of it, irregular. There is no registration of births, marriages, or 
deaths ; for, although marriages are required to be solemnised at British missions, on 
the legal fiction that they are British ground, the missions hare no power to register. 
What important interests are thus jeopardised, in the case of subsequent litigation, by 
the difficulty of proving the legality of a marriage, and consequently the legitimacy of 
a child, it is unnecessary to point out. The missionaries of the Jews, who have all 
been ordained by the Bishop of London to enable them to administer the sacraments, 
remit to his Lordship, on occasion of every marriage solemnised, an English sovereign 
as a fee — it is to be supposed for the trouble his Lordship has in getting it entered at 
the liegistrar's office, for his own office in G-odliman Street no longer takes cognizance 
of marriages solemnised abroad. Baptisms and burials are still registered at the 
Bishop's offices, and notice of them must be sent through the embassy or mission to 
the Foreign Office. Complaints, however, are rife in Godhman Street, Doctors' Com- 
mons, that notices of these first and last ceremonies in the human career are supplied 
to the Bishop's registrars very irregularly and precariously by the various ConBiils, 
Ministers resident, and Ambassadors abroad." 



374 PAROCHIAL AND OTHER REGISTERS. 

men of various English congregations settled at factories, trading 
towns, and other places in foreign countries not under the dominion 
of the English, perform the offices of baptism, marriage, and burial 
at the several stations where they are resident. These registers 
may be divided into three classes : — 

1. Certificates of baptisms and marriages bearing the signatures 
of the parties and witnesses (which, with very few exceptions, is the 
case), and authenticated by the British Envoy or Minister as having 
been performed in his house, and which have from time to time 
been sent through the Foreign Office to the Registry of the Bishop 
of London. 

2. Transcripts from original registers, certified by the ministers 
of the different places, in the same manner as the transcripts 
under the Act of the 52 George III. c. 146, for the regulation 
of the transcripts deposited with the registrars of the several 
dioceses. 

3. A book of registers transmitted from Cronstadt, which appear 
to have been transcribed, but they are not certified as such. 

No general rule exists as to the preservation of these registers ; 
and whilst some remain in the hands of the clergyman for the time 
being of the congregation, others have been transmitted to England 
to the Secretary of State, or to the Bishop of London. Such as 
have been received are deposited at the Registry Office of the Bishop 
of London in Doctors' Commons. 

The Bishop has, in addition to the foregoing, a general register 
book, in which parties who have been born or married abroad, and 
the surviving friends of those who have died there, may register 
their births, marriages, and friends 3 deaths. This volume was com- 
menced in 1816, though it probably contains entries of an earlier 
date. 

The Lisbon registers are deposited at the Vicar- General's Office, 
Doctors' Commons. The following list contains the particulars of 
all now presumed to be in existence : — 

Registers at the Consistorial Court, London. 
I. 

Oporto Port Factory . 1716—1797 (Original) Births. 

1788—1807 (Original) Marriages ; 1 vol., no index. 

1814—1839 (Copies) Burials. 
Cape of Good Hope . 1796 — 1S03 (Original) Baptisms, marriages, and 

burials. 



PAROCHIAL AND OTHER REGISTERS. 



375 



Gibraltar 
Geneva 1 . 



Antwerp 



Archangel . . . 

Avranches . . . 

Bahia,. Brazils . . 

Boulogne . . . 

British Embassy . 

Brussels . . . 

Cronstadt . . » 





II. 


1819 
1821 


(Copies) 
(Copies) 



1833&1834 (Copies) 
1835 (Copies) 

1820—1828 (Copies) 
1821—1822 (Copies) 
1815—1853 (Copies) 
1834 & 1835 (Copies) 
1816—1855 (Copies) 
1818 & 1826 (Copies) 

1831 



1807' — 1812 (Original) Baptisms and marriages. 
181 7 — 1 829 (Original) Births, marriages, and burials. 



Baptisms and burials. 
Baptisms, marriages, and 

burials. 
Births, marriages, and burials. 
Births and burials. 
Baptisms. 

Burials and baptisms. 
Baptisms and burials. 
Births, marriages, and burials. 
Baptisms and marriages. 
Baptisms, marriages, and 

burials. 
British seamen who died in 

the Government hospital 

of cholera. 
Burials and baptisms. 
Births, marriages, and burials. 
Baptisms, marriages, and 

burials. 
Marriages. 

Births, marriages, and burials. 
Baptisms, marriages, and 

burials. 
Births, marriages, and burials. 
Births, marriages, and burials. 

Births, marriages, and burials* 
Births, marriages, and burials. 
Baptisms and burials, 
Baptisms, marriages, and 

burials. 
Marriages. 

Baptisms and burials. 
Baptisms, marriages, and 

burials. 
Marriages, baptisms, and 

burials. 



Dieppe 1835—1828 (Copies) 

Elsinore, Denmark . 1833—1835 (Copies) 

France (Paris and its 1816—1828 (Copies) 
Environs). 

1816—1835 (Copies) 

Genoa (Sardinia) . . 1824—1831 (Copies) 

Hamburg .... 182Q<&1821 (Copies) 

1834 (Copies) 

Leghorn and vicinity 1832 (Copies) 

Macao (China) : — 

British Chapel . . 1834 (Copies) 

Naples 1831 (Copies) 

Ponta de la Gada . 1830—1833 (Copies) 
1833 & 1834 (Copies) 

Rennes, Bretagne . . 1826 (Copies) 

Rome . . Nov. 1825 to Apr. 1826 (Copies) 
Rotterdam. . . . 1815 & 1816 (Copies) 

Russia, British Fae- 1716—1834 (Copies) 
tory. 

1 " Livre des Anglois a Gen&oe" by J. S. Burn. Land. 1831. 8vo. A copy of 
the Register of the Church at Geneva, containing the names of English Protestants 
vho took refuge there in the reign of Queen Mary. 



376 PAROCHIAL AND OTHER REGISTERS. 

St. Servan, Ille et 1824 — 1826 (Copies) Baptisms and burials. 
Vilaine, 

St.Maloe's 1824 — 1826 (Copies) Baptisms and burials. 

Smyrna 1789 — 1829 (Copies) Baptisms, marriages, and 

burials. 
"^Fhampoa, near Can- 1820 — 1835 (Copies) Baptisms, marriages, and 
ton ; and British burials 

Chapel at Macao, 
China. 

III. 
Cronstadt .... 1807 — 1824 (Copies) Baptisms, marriages, and 

burials. 

Registers of Private Chapels in or near London. — Prior to 
to the Marriage Act in 1753, it was not necessary to the validity of 
a marriage that it should be accompanied by any religious cere- 
mony, or be solemnised in a church. The consequence was, that 
nearly every chapel in and about London, whether belonging to 
the Established Church or to the Dissenters, was in the habit 
of marrying persons, and sometimes of keeping Registers of the 
marriages. 

The Marriage Act of 1753, however, rendered it necessary to the 
validity of a marriage that it should be solemnised in some "parish 
church or public chapel where bans of matrimony had been usually 
published." A stop was thus put to the marriages at chapels, for 
bans were scarcely ever published but in parish churches. 

The discontinuance of marriages at chapels, and the passing of 
the ownership of the chapels themselves from one to another, 
together with the lapse of time and accidental circumstances, have 
occasioned the loss of many of the registers kept at these places of 
worship; a brief enumeration, therefore, of those which are now 
known to exist may prove serviceable to the genealogist. 

Duke Street Chapel. — This chapel is situate at the south end of 
Duke Street, in the parish of St. Margaret, Westminster. It was 
founded by a Mr. Higgins, and finished by private subscription, in 
1709. It is now the property of Lewis Wolfe, Esq., the lessee of 
the Crown. 

The only existing register of this chapel consists of several sheets 
of foolscap paper, containing twelve entries of marriage, which are 
given in Nichols' "Collectanea Topograpkica et Genealogical 
vol. iii. p. 382. 



PAROCHIAL AND OTHER REGISTERS. 377 

Gray's Inn Chapel. — The Chapel of Gray's Inn is of ancient 
foundation. Marriages were performed in this chapel for many- 
years prior to the commencement of the present register, as will 
appear by the "Matrimonial Allegations" 1 in the Bishop of London's 
Registry. The register of Gray's Inn is a small folio book, bound 
in rough calf, containing both marriages and baptisms. The mar- 
riages commence on the 7th of May, 1695, and the baptisms in 
1707. A List of Contents may be found in Nichols' "Collectanea" 
vol. iv. p. 157. 

Knightsbridge Chapel, — On the north side of the road at 
Knightsbridge stands this chapel, dedicated to the Holy Trinity, 
which belonged formerly to an ancient lazar-house held under the 
church of Westminster. The chapel was rebuilt in 1629; and 
again in 1699, at the charge of Nicholas Birkhead, citizen and 
goldsmith, of London. 

There is no register to be found ; but, by the "Matrimonial Alle- 
gations" in the Bishop of London's Registry, it appears that many 
were married at this chapel in the years 1667, 1668, and 1669. 

Extracts are given in Nichols' " Collectanea" vol. iv. p. 162. 

The Rolls Chapel Register. — The Register of this chapel is 
preserved, with the other Records of the Master of the Rolls, at this 
chapel. It is a short folio, commencing in 1736, but contains only 
entries of twenty marriages. For contents, see Nichols' f { Col- 
lectanea/ 3 vol. iii. p. 384. 

St. John's Chapel, Bedford Row. — This chapel was built about 
1720, and consecrated in September 1723. Inquiries have been 
made of the Trustees, but no register has been found. A list of 
matches, taken from the "Matrimonial Allegations," is given in 
Nichols' " Collectanea/' vol. iii. p. 387. 

Wheeler Chapel Register, Spitalfields. — This chapel was 
built by Sir George "Wheeler, prior to the year 1714, and was used 
by the inhabitants of Spitalfields before their present church, Christ 
Church, was built. It is situated near to Wheeler Street, on the 
east side of Bishopsgate Street. The register is a small quarto, in 
the possession of one of the Trustees of the chapel. It contains, 

1 The affidavit made by one of the parties on obtaining the marriage license, is called, 
in the Ecclesiastical Courts, a " Matrimonial Allegation." 



378 PAROCHIAL AND OTHER REGISTERS. 

at one end, entries of 197 baptisms, from the 24th of March 1734 
to 1824; and, at the other end, entries of 23 marriages. The latter 
are given in Nichols* " Collectanea" vol. iii. p. 388. 

Fleet Marriage Registers. — The marriages denominated "Fleet 
Marriages " were so called from their being solemnized by regularly 
ordained clergymen of low character, residing within the Fleet 
Prison, or its rules, and generally confined for debt. 

It will scarcely be credited by future generations that such a 
notorious abuse as these clandestine marriages, could have been 
allowed to exist in London in the eighteenth century. The follow- 
ing is an extract from the ct Gentleman's Magazine " for February 
1735, copied by that work from the " Grub Street Journal' 3 : — 

ff A female correspondent, who signs * Virtuous,' complains of 
the many ruinous marriages that are every year practised in the 
Fleet, by a set of drunken, swearing parsons, with their myrmidons, 
that wear black coats, and pretend to be clerks and registers to the 
Fleet, plying about Ludgate Hill, pulling and forcing people to 
some pedling alehouse or brandy-shop, to be married; even on 
Sunday, stopping them as they go to the church. Not long since, 
a young lady was deluded and forced from her friends, and, by the 
assistance of a very wicked swearing parson, married to an atheistical 
wretch, whose life is a continual practice of all manner of vice and 
debauchery. Another young lady was decoyed to a house in the 
confines of the Fleet, by a pretended clergyman : Dr. Wryneck im- 
mediately appeared, and swore she should be married, or, if she 
would not, he would have his fee, and register the marriage from 
that night; the lady, to recover her liberty, left her ring, as a 
pledge that she would meet him the morrow night." 

These abuses existed until the year 1754, when Lord Hardwicke 
introduced his Marriage Act, but not until many noble families 
had suffered under the inconveniences of a Fleet marriage. Strange 
to say, this bill could not have been popular, as it was deemed expe- 
dient to print a single sheet of paper (copies, of which are now very 
scarce), explaining the reasons for passing the bill. This paper sets 
forth, that, — 

" Multitudes of honourable and reputable families have been 
greatly injured, and many of them utterly ruined, by clandestine 
marriages, solemnized in taverns, brandy-shops, alehouses, and other 
houses, within the liberties of the prisons of the Fleet and King's 
Bench, and in the Mint, and other pretended privileged places. 



PAROCHIAL AND OTPIER REGISTERS. 379 

" By which abuse, the religious establishment of marriage is en- 
tirely subverted, and the legal evidence thereof rendered precarious 
and uncertain. 

" Instances of the families ruined by such marriages are too 
many to be here inserted. The number of these clandestine mar- 
riages is almost incredible. 

"On a trial at Guildhall, London, 14th February, 1716, before 
the then Lord Chief Justice Parker, in an action brought against 
John Mottram, a clergyman, living within the rules of the Fleet 
Prison, it was proved that ten register-books for marriages were 
kept in several houses about that prison, and that one of those 
registers contained above 2000 clandestine marriages solemnized 
within one year, and the other nine almost as many. Certificates 
were given of such marriages with the City arms printed on them, 
and ignorant people were imposed on, in being made to believe that 
was the king's stamp. The stamp duties on every marriage license 
are five shillings ; on every affidavit made to obtain a license, one 
shilling; on every bond executed on grant of each license, one shil- 
ling and sixpence ; and on every marriage certificate, five shillings : 
total, twelve shillings and sixpence. 

" The loss of the stamp duties by these clandestine marriages 
amounts to £4000 or £5000 per annum." * 

The Registers were, in some instances, in the keeping of the 
ministers who performed the ceremony, and they were also often 
kept by the proprietors of the houses or taverns in which the mar- 
riages happened to have taken place. After the door was closed 
against marriages of this description, by the operation of the 
Marriage Act, it appears that a clerk of one of the Fleet ministers 
collected a number of them together, and opened an office, where 
reference might be had to them. Another office, for the deposit of 
these registers, was opened in another part of the town ; but, in 
1813, the great bulk of them came into the hands of a private in- 
dividual, of the name of Cox, from whom the Government purchased 
them in 1821, and by the direction of the then Secretary of State 
for the Home Department, they were deposited in the Registry of 
the Consistorial Court of London. By far the greater number of 
the registers of the marriages celebrated within the precincts of 
these several places, are comprised in this collection. There are, 
however, exceptions; for two of the Fleet registers are known to 
be in the possession of a professional gentleman in Doctors' Com- 

1 An original is in the possession of Sir Charles Young, Garter King at Arms. 



380 PAROCHIAL AND OTHER REGISTERS. 

mons, and a third has found its way into the Bodleian Library at 
Oxford. 

The registers are contained in two hundred and twenty-three 
volumes, fifty-one of which have indexes. There are also twenty- 
four bundles, 1 containing nearly one thousand small pamphlets or 
pocket-books, having in them entries of baptisms as well as mar- 
riages celebrated in or near the Fleet Prison. They commence in 
the year 1682, and end in 1754. The books are in good preserva- 
tion, and seldom filled, each clergyman having had a separate 
register, so that there are perhaps twelve registers for every year. 

The books of the Fleet, however corroborated by other circum- 
stances, are not in any case received as evidence of a marriage : not 
because a marriage celebrated there was not good, for such it clearly 
was before the Marriage Act ; but because the manner in which 
those marriages were celebrated, and the conduct of the persons 
who, without any legal authority, assumed the power of registering 
them, have thrown such an odium on those books as to take from 
them even the authority of a private memorandum. 

King's Bench Prison and Mint Registers. — Our remarks 
upon the "Fleet Marriages" apply to those which took place in the 
King's Bench Prison, and the Mint in Southwark. 

The registers commence in the year 1718, and end in 1736. 

They are contained in four volumes, and form a part of what are 
called the " Fleet Registers "; they contain entries of marriages, as 
well in the King's Bench Prison, and in the Mint in Southwark, as 
in the Fleet. There is also one bundle of pamphlets or pocket- 
books, containing entries of these marriages. 

They are deposited with the Fleet Registers. Many of them 
abound in interpolations and erasures ; in several, entries occur in a 
long series, evidently written in one and the same hand, and at the 
same time ; there is a general want of authentication by witnesses, 
or by the signatures of the parties between whom the marriage 
ceremony purports to have been solemnized; and, like the Fleet 
Registers, whenever they have become the subject of judicial exa- 
mination, they have been considered as bearing a very questionable 
character. 

Registers of May-Fair Chapel. 1 — The marriages celebrated at 

1 Extracts from these registers may be found in " The Fleet Registers, with some 
Account of May Fair, Mint, and Savoy Chapels" by J. S. Burn. Lond. 1833. 8v9. 



PAROCHIAL AND OTHER REGISTERS. 381 

this chapel bear the same character, and were as notorious as those 
of the Fleet and King's Bench Prisons. The site of this chapel 
is now occupied (it is believed) by Curzon Chapel. 

The registers commence with the year 1728, and end with 1754. 

They are contained in twelve volumes, comprising marriages and 
a few baptisms. Nine of these volumes are now with the Fleet 
Registers, at the Consistobial Court of London, and the remaining 
three are with the Parish Registers in the Church of St. George, 
Hanover Square ; those at the latter place are marked (A), (B), 
and (C). 

(A) Contains 1020 marriages, commencing 21st Feb. 1735, and 
ending 27th July 1744; baptisms from 26th March 1740 to 7th 
April 1753. 

(B) Contains about 5000 marriages, commencing 28th July 1744, 
and ending 30th September 1749. 

(C) Commencing 30th September 1749, and ending 25th March 
1754; from October 1753 to March 1754, are 1136 marriages. 

Lord Hardwicke's Act was hastened in consequence of the mis- 
chief done at this chapel, where it is said 6000 marriages took place 
in one year; and that in one day, 173 couple were married. On the 
24th of March 1754 (the last day), before eleven o' clock, forty-five 
couple were married; and at the close of the day, nearly one 
hundred pair had been joined together, two men being constantly 
and closely employed in filling up licenses for that purpose. 1 

It is affirmed, that these documents are not received as evidence 
of a valid marriage, no license for the chapel having been disco- 
vered to have been ever granted. 

Registers of Roman Catholics. — Roman Catholics were not 
accustomed to keep registers of baptisms, marriages, and burials, 
prior to the restoration of Charles II. 

By the Act 3 James I., in consequence of the secret marriages 
and christenings of the Roman Catholics, it was enacted, " that all 
persons married otherwise than in some open church or chapel, and 
otherwise than according to the orders of the Church of England, 
by a minister lawfully authorised, should be disabled to have any 
freehold, dower, thirds," &c. &c. ; and further, "that every Popish 
recusant should, within one month after the birth of any child of 
his, baptize the same in the open parish church, under a penalty of 

1 " Gentleman's Magazfoie" 1^53. 



382 PAROCHIAL AND OTHER REGISTERS. 

one hundred pounds ; and that if any Popish recusant should be 
buried other than in the church or churchyard, or not according to 
the ecclesiastical laws of the realm, the executors should forfeit 
twenty pounds." 

With the return of Charles II., himself a Catholic, came a reli- 
gious toleration : ambassadors from Roman Catholic sovereigns had 
mass publicly performed in their respective chapels, attended by 
regular congregations, and baptisms and marriages were openly 
celebrated in them. 

By the Act of 11 and 12 William III.., Popish priests cele- 
brating mass, &c, except in the houses of ambassadors, were 
liable to perpetual imprisonment. This law was in force till the 
31 George III. ; it would appear, therefore, that there can be no 
Catholic registers for any part of England, except London, from 
1698 to 1790. 

There are now 697 Roman Catholic churches, chapels, and stations 
in England, and 141 in Scotland ; of these, 296 have been regis- 
tered for marriages, under the Act of 6 and 7 Will. IV. cap. 85. 
They are particularised in the "Catholic Directory and Ecclesiastical 
Register" for the present year. 

Catholics have now no burial-grounds in the metropolis or su- 
burbs, excepting the Cemetery in Sloane Street, Chelsea. 

As the marriages of Catholics are invalid in England unless they 
take place according to the Protestant forms, by Protestant clergy- 
men, they are not commonly entered in the Catholic registers, 
though the ceremony is usually performed at the Catholic chapel, 
in addition. The names of the sponsors are inserted in the Catholic 
record of baptism : a custom not known to the English Church, but 
it is very desirable, as it might occasionallv prove identity. 

The ensuing is a list of all the Catholic chapels at present in 
London, which have been registered for marriages, together with 
some particulars relating to their registers. 

Bavarian Ambassador's Ch apel, Warwick Street, Golden Square. 
— The registers commence with the year 1748; all the previous 
ones were lost in the riots in 1780. 

French Ambassador's Chapel, Little George Street, Portman 
Square. — The registers commence in 1793, in which year the chapel 
was built. The marriages and baptisms are of French families 
chiefly. The entries of marriages contain the places of birth of the 
parties, and their parents' names. 



PAROCHIAL AND OTHER REGISTERS. 383 

Sardinian Ambassador's Chapel, Lincoln's Inn Fields. — All 
registers prior to 1761 were destroyed by a fire in 1760; but there 
are at the commencement of the present books, about six pages of 
registers, from the year 1732 to 1760, being some copies from a 
book saved out of the flames. 

Spanish Ambassador's Chapel, Spanish Place, Manchester 
Square. — The registers commence in 1732, are attentively kept, and 
the number of baptisms in 1823 was 236. 

St. Mary's, Moorfields. — This chapel contains the registers of the 
chapel formerly existing in Whitecross Street. The rioters of 1780 
destroyed all records prior to those of 1763. 

St. Patrick's, Soho Square. — The records begin 1792, the year 
of the erection of the chapel. 

The remaining registered churches and chapels in London and 
its suburbs have been so recently erected, that their registers are 
scarcely worthy of notice. A list of them may not be unaccept- 
able to the reader : — 

German Chapel, Bow Lane, Cheapside. 

Our Immaculate Lady of Victories, Clapham. (1852.) 

Our Lady's Church, St. John's Wood, Grove Road. (1833-86.) 

St. Aloysius's, Clarendon Square, Somers Town. (1808,) 

St. Ann's, Spicer Street, Spitalfields. 

St. Edmund's, Mill Wall, Isle of Bogs. (1846.) 

St. Francis de Sale's, Chapel Place, Tottenham. (1826-27.) 

St. George's Cathedral, St, George's Fields, SoutJiwark. (1841*48.) 

St. John the Baptist's, Hackney. (1847-48.) 

St. John the Evangelist's, Duncan Terrace, Islington. (1841-43.) 

St. Mary's, Cadogan Terrace, Sloane Street. 1 (1812.) 

St. Mary's, Holland Street, Kensington. 

St. Mary's, Holly Place, Hampstead. (1816.) 

St. Mary's, Wade Street, Poplar. (1818.) 

St. Mary and St. Michael's, Virginia Street, Ratcliff Highway. 

The Roman Catholic clergy in Ireland have not been accustomed 
to keep registers until very lately. 

The deaths of Catholics in England are generally registered in 
the Catholic Chapels, notwithstanding the burial is entered in the 
register of the parish where they are buried. 

When, in 1838, the Commissioners appointed by her present 
Majesty to inquire into the state of the Registers of Births, &c, 

1 A apacioua cemetery adjoins this church. 



384 PAROCHIAL AND OTHEE REGISTERS. 

applied to the Roman Catholic prelates to deliver up any registers 
in their possession, they declined to do so, or to authorise the in- 
ferior clergy of their persuasion to do so, partly on account of the 
omissions and defects incident to records, made and preserved for 
so many years, with so much danger and difficulty under the severe 
pressure of the penal laws, and partly on account of the practical 
inconvenience that would result from depriving the Roman Catholic 
clergy of the custody of records, to which frequent reference is 
made, for purposes purely religious and canonical. 

There is another source from which information respecting 
Catholics may be obtained. By Stat. 2 Geo. I. c. 5 (1715), it was 
enacted, " thac all Papists having any estate or interest in lands, 
tenements, or hereditaments, should take the oaths therein required, 
in the Court of Chancery, King's Bench, Common Pleas, or Exche- 
quer, or at the General Quarter Sessions of the Peace, or, in default 
thereof, register their names, properties, the occupiers and the 
leases thereof, with the clerks of the peace for their respective 
counties;" and by the 3 Geo. I. c. 18 (1716), it was enacted, "that 
after the 29th day of September 1717, no interest in any heredita- 
ments belonging to Catholics should pass by deed or will, except 
such deed or will were inrolled in one of the King's Courts at West- 
minster, or with the clerk of the peace of the county." These pro- 
visions lasted until the 31 Geo. III. (1791), when they were re- 
pealed. For a notice of other records relating to Catholics, see the 
heading, "Forfeited Estates." x 

The Register kept at Dr. Williams's Library, Redcross 
Street. — Dr. Daniel Williams, a Presbyterian minister, who was 
born at Wrexham, in Denbighshire, in 1644, and who died in 1716, 
founded a library in Redcross Street, Cripplegate, London, for the 
use of Dissenters. In the year 1742 a Register of Births was 
established here, by the London Society of Lay Deputies, of the 
Congregations of the Protestant Dissenters of the "Three Denomi- 
nations " in London and within twelve miles of London, and con- 
tinued till the last day of December 1837, under the direction and 
supervision of the deputies, the librarian always acting as registrar. 

The books of registry are large folio volumes, having each page 
divided into compartments, with printed headings for the informa- 
tion to be registered, and which information is vouched for in a 
certificate, signed by the parents and friends of the parties. AL 

1 See ante, p. 141. 



PAROCHIAL AND OTHER REGISTERS. 385 

these certificates (being 30,417 in number) are, with the trifling 
exception of about 13, preserved most carefully, and regularly 
arranged in boxes, containing 1 000 each, so that any one of them 
can, from the earliest commencement of the series, be referred to 
without the slightest difficulty. The certificates may be divided 
into two classes, the earlier series being signed by persons who were 
witnesses of the birth, the latter by the parents as well as such 
witnesses. 

Besides the registers so kept at Dr. Williams's Library, there are 
also seventeen registers of births, baptisms, and burials, which have 
been deposited there from time to time by the representatives of 
deceased ministers, or which, in pursuance of a recommendation of 
the deputies of the congregations of the Protestant Dissenters, have 
been sent to the Registry in question for safe custody. In some 
years there may have been about 1000 births registered at Redcross 
Street. Since the commencement of the new system of registration, 
in the year 1826, up to the period when the Registry was closed, 
there had been recorded 18,558 births. 

Lists of the registers will be found in the "Appendix" to the "Re- 
port on the State of Registers of Births, §c." Lond.lSSSj pp. 146-48. 

Registers of Guilds, Fraternities, and Corporations. — 
Guilds or Fraternities were societies or associations of persons in 
the same town, profession, or class, confederated together for the 
common cause of trade, or charity, or religion. They were bodies 
corporate, licensed by the Crown ; had power to purchase lands, to 
build chapels, to erect altars, to maintain chaplains and priests, to 
hold frequent and private meetings, to make annual public pro- 
cessions, and to administer oaths upon the admission of their 
members. Some of the richer fraternities had companies of min- 
strels, and occasionally amused the public with pageants, and with 
plays taken from the Old and New Testaments. Their charities 
were extensive and voluntary. In some respects they resembled 
the benefit societies of modern times; but they were more numerous. 
Almost every parish contained one guild, and sometimes several 
guilds, which had each a patron saint, and a chapel or altar, at 
times in the parochial church, and at other times in a distinct 
building annexed to the guildhall. 

Richard I. is said to have introduced societies or companies into 
London; but the period at which the greatest number of guilds 
was founded was from the fifteenth to the sixteenth century. 

25 



386 PAROCHIAL AND OTHER REGISTERS. 

In 1436 an Act of Parliament was passed against unlawful orders 
made by guilds, fraternities, and other companies incorporate; they 
were, doubtless, frequently political assemblies. 

The contents of the Registers of Guilds or Fraternities offer no 
small aid to the genealogist, relating often to individuals of rank, 
and setting forth the names and parentage of wives, and whole 
families of children. 

Persons desirous of trading within the jurisdiction of cities or 
boroughs must first obtain the freedom of such city or borough, or 
of London, whose privilege extends to all places throughout Eng- 
land. This freedom may be obtained in four ways : — 

1. By servitude; that is, apprenticeship to a freeman. 

2. By patrimony; that is, being the child of a freeman, born 
after the parent's admission to his freedom. 

3. By purchase from the city or borough. 

4. By gift of the city or borough. 

The first two are the most frequent ; and in both instances the 
entry in the registers of the Corporation of London states the 
names of the parent of the child being bound apprentice, or claim- 
ing freedom by patrimony : in the former case the boy's minority, 
if not exact age, will appear; and in the latter, there will be a 
reference to the entry of the parent's freedom, where similar par- 
ticulars of such parent will appear. 

The books of the company of which the person sought was a 
member will show the residence and trade or profession ; and some- 
times the whole of the evidence afforded by the Corporation regis- 
ters may be confirmed by the company's books. 

There is a small annual payment, termed quarterage, due from 
freemen to their respective companies ; and, therefore, their time of 
death can generally be ascertained. 

These observations are not confined to the Companies and Cor- 
poration of the City of London ; the Guilds of every trading town 
fford the same advantages to the genealogist. 

Although many registers of ancient guilds or fraternities are in 
the public libraries throughout the kingdom, yet the total number 
is, perhaps, inconsiderable in comparison with the number of such 
establishments; but of existing companies the records will, in 
general, be found perfect for the last two or three centuries ; and 
by their means an important number of families, from the rank of 
duke downwards, may have good evidence of their descent. 



PAROCHIAL AND OTHER REGISTERS. 387 

In the British Museum are — 
Memoranda respecting Guilds {Add. MSS. 5846, p. 1; 5861, p. 434; 5869, 

f. 134 5; 5870, f. 118 5). 
Registrum Gilde Corporis Christi de Boston, incepte a.d. 1335 {Harl. MS. 

4795, art. 1). 
Register Book of Wardens' Accompts of the Pinners' and Wire-sellers' Comps. 

fifteenth century {Eg. 1142). 
Accompts of the Masters of the Company of Vintners of the City of London, 

from 23 Hen. VII. to 14 Hen. VIII. {Eg. 1143). 
Papers relating to the Companies of Chester and London will be found in the 

Harleian and Lamdotone Collections. 
Register of the Gild of St. George [in Norwich?], in the reigns of Hen. VI., 

Edw. IV., and Hen. VII. {Eargrave MS. 300). 
The "Black-Book" of the Corporation of the City of Winchester, tempp. 

Hen. IVth, Vth, and Vlth {Add. MS. 6036). 
Town Records of the Town of Yarmouth, in the Isle of Wight, from 1600 to 

1766 {Add. MS. 5669). 
Transcript of the Proceedings of the Corporation of Limerick, 1672 — 1682 

{Add. MS. 19,859). 
Court-Book of the Town of Conway, 1592—1632 {Add. MS. 19,714). 

In the Ashmolean Library — 
Liber Eratrum Gildae et Eraternitatis in villa de Lichfield, A 1444 ; MS. 
1521. 

The Corporation Register Books of the City of London were, 
unfortunately, destroyed by fire in 1786; but the greater part of 
the files of the original documents -were saved. They commence in 
1681, are in good preservation, and of easy access, wanting only 
indexes — a deficiency in a measure supplied by the books of the 
respective City Companies. 

A multitude of petitions from Guilds and Corporations to King 
William III., upon the subject of the Protestant religion, with the 
signatures of most of the members of such corporate bodies, is pre- 
served at the Tower of London. 

At the Land Revenue Office are Certificates and Answers from 
Ministers and Churchwardens of parishes in England and Wales aa 
to Foundations and Endowments of Chantries, Hospitals, Colleges, 
Fraternities, Guilds, and the value of the lands, possessions, and 
effects thereto belonging ; also, like Certificates and Returns from 
the Wardens, Keepers, and Commonalty of the different Crafts or 
Companies in the City of London, taken in the reigns of Henry 
VII L, Edward VI., and Philip and Mary. 



388 PAROCHIAL AND OTHER REGISTERS. 

Churchwardens 5 Accounts. — The Accounts of Rates, Receipts, 
and Payments by Churchwardens may be found of considerable 
utility, in connection with Parochial Registers, as collateral evi- 
dence, proving the identity of parties named in the registers, their 
residences, estates, and establishments. They may also prove the 
descent of estates from ancestors to heirs for many generations, by 
the rates made upon their owners; and by other miscellaneous 
entries often afford evidence of births, marriages, and deaths. 

These records are, in some parishes, of earlier commencement 
than the regular registers. 

By the 17th Geo. II. c. 38, s. 14, it is enacted that true copies 
of all rates and assessments made for the relief of the poor shall be 
entered in a book by the Churchwardens and Overseers, and attested 
by them, and carefully preserved; and the Statute 46 Geo. III. 
c. 46, compels the Overseers of the Poor to keep a book, with the 
name of every parish apprentice, his age, his parents, and other 
particulars. 

In the British Museum are — 
Churchwardens' Accounts for Berkhampstead, Co. Herts, from 1584 to 1748 

Book of Accounts and Memoranda of the Overseers and Churchwardens of 
Bansted, Co. Surrey, 1690—1717 {Add. MS. 12,492). 

Churchwardens' Accompts of the Parish of Horley, Co. Surrey, 1507 — 1702 
{Add. MS. 6173). 

In the Library of Corpus Christi College, Oxford, is, 
An Account Book of the Churchwardens of Oldestoke, Co. Hants, from 1541 
to 1656 {MS. ccclxxvi). 

At the Society of Antiquaries — 
Churchwardens' Accounts for the Parish of St. Clement Danes, Co. Middlesex, 
from 26th April 1616, until the 22nd April 1617 {MS. 67). 

Registers of Soldiers. — In the year 1816 a General Order was 
issued to the Commander-in-Chief of the Forces, that " with a view 
of ascertaining the marriage of soldiers, and the age and baptism of 
their legitimate children," a book of registry should be kept in every 
regiment and battalion, in which "the marriage of every non- 
commissioned officer and private, and the baptism and age of every 
legitimate child born of parents belonging to such regiment or 
battalion, shall be recorded, and the said registry shall be certified 
by the signature of the Adjutant." 



PAROCHIAL AND OTHER REGISTERS. 389 

After directions respecting the attention to local and other laws 
necessary to be observed by parties marrying, whether in England 
or abroad, the order thus concludes : — 

The regimental register of marriages is to contain the following particu- 
lars, viz. : — 

1. The rank, Christian and surname of the soldier, specifying whether 

bachelor or widower. 

2. The Christian and surname of the woman, specifying whether spinster 

or widow. 

3. The place of marriage, specifying parish, county, 8cc. &c. 

4. The date of marriage. 

5. The signature of the parties married. 

6. The signature of two witnesses present at the eeremony. 

7. The signature of the chaplain or officiating clergyman by whom the 

marriage was solemnised. 

8. The certificate of the Adjutant that the registry is correct. 

In all cases of the baptism of children of non-commissioned officers and 
soldiers, the parties are commanded to bring without delay to the Adjutants 
of their respective corps, for the purpose of being registered, an account, 
containing — 

1. The date of the child's birth. 

2. The place and date of its baptism. 

3. The Christian name of the child. 

4. The Christian and surnames of the parents. 

5. The rank of the father. 

6. The name of the chaplain or other clergyman by whom the ceremony 
was performed. 

In many cases, civil as well as military, the regimental register may prove 
the only record in existence ; instances have occurred in which property to a 
large amount has descended to the children of private soldiers, and of which 
they have been unable to obtain possession, from the want of satisfactory 
evidence of their parents' marriage, which the regimental register is calcu- 
lated to afford. 

It may be observed that this is entirely a regimental document, 
and the commanding officer (not the Secretary at War) should be 
be addressed for any extracts therefrom. 

The arrangement is so excellent, and the information in the 
books so valuable, that it is to be hoped they will at stated periods 
>e transmitted to the War Office for more safe custody and more 
easy reference. 

For other information respecting Soldiers, see the heading "Mis- 
cellaneous Records." 



390 



mnttoitp Eefiisters, anti Eegfeters of 
3$\iUit locate* 

npHE information afforded to the genealogist from the principal 
-*- Records preserved at our Universities and Public Schools 
must not be overlooked. The birth, parentage, and education of 
Clergymen may be principally traced from their pages ; but it must 
be borne in mind that many members of the Legal and Medical 
Professions, as well as those of the Army and Navy, have passed 
their early years at one or both of these institutions. 

At the Universities the most important records are — the Admis- 
sion Books, the Matriculation Books, and the Graduate Books. 

There are other less important books, called the Buttery or Battle 
Books; but these contain the dates of their entrance at college only. 

The Admission Books are preserved at their respective colleges, 
and contain entries of the several students attached to them. In 
them will be found the Christian and surname of the student, his 
birthplace, the school where, and the master under whom, he was 
educated ; the date of his admission into college, his age, and his 
rank in the University. In addition, the Christian and surname of 
his father, his station in life, and occasionally his residence ; with, 
sometimes — as in Magdalen College, Cambridge— his mother's 
maiden name. 

In case of a student changing his rank, a new entry is made ; and 
a certificate of baptism is generally, if not invariably, required at 
Oxford, as proof of the age, place of birth, and parentage. 

The Admission Books of the several Colleges vary in date of 
commencement ; but it is believed the majority of them begin during 
the fifteenth century. 

The Matriculation Books. — The period and form of matricu- 
lation varies at the two Universities. At Oxford every person is 
matriculated within a day, or two at most, of the time when he is 
entered of any college or hall. At Cambridge the oaths may be 
taken before the expiration of the first term. At Oxford, immediately 
after the entry in the college books, the new member is conducted 



UNIVERSITY REGISTERS, ETC. 391 

by one of the Tutors, or Deans, to the private residence of the 
Vice- Chancellor, who writes the student's name and address in the 
matriculation books, and gives him his matriculation paper upon 
his taking the customary oaths. At Cambridge, the member who 
is to be matriculated appears before the Proctors and Registrar at 
the Senate House, and the entry in the books is made by himself. 

Not only does the form of entry vary at each University ; but 
some entries afford considerably more information than others; and 
those at Cambridge contain fewer particulars than those at Oxford. 

The Matriculation Books of Cambridge commence in 1544, and 
have been continued to the present day with uninterrupted regu- 
larity. They are of paper, in five volumes, folio, and are preserved 
in the Registry Office. 

The Oxford Matriculation Registers are very imperfect. About 
1574 — and, in some few cases, as early as 1571 — the scribe began 
to insert the age of the person matriculated, his county, and the 
condition in life of his father; which plan continued to be acted 
upon till Michaelmas Term, 1621, when the registers became much 
more valuable. To the information already stated they thenceforth 
added the Christian name of the father, and the place of birth, of 
every person entered on the books of the University. This plan 
was pursued till, in the time of Charles I., the University became 
a prey to a set of Puritans. From 1647 to 1660 the registers are 
little better than the account books of the beadles, irregularly kept, 
and extremely defective in information. From 1660 to the present 
time the registers are regular and invaluable, containing the same 
information that is found in the registers from 1621 to 1647. 

The Graduate Books. — At both Universities these registers con- 
tain the names of members who have taken degrees, and commence 
in or about the year 1500. They are not of equal value with the 
matriculation books, as they do not comprise the numerous par- 
ticulars found in them ; but, from the circumstance of their earlier 
commencement by nearly half a century, and from their connection 
with the previously described records, they may occasionally afford 
desirable information. 

College Chapel Registers. — Another source of information is 
the registers or obituaries in the chapels appendant to the several 
colleges; which are, perhaps, the most ancient in the kingdom. An 
old "Liber Obitatis" of Queen's College has entries of the reign of 
Edward III. 



392 UNIVERSITY REGISTERS, 

Founders' Kin Pedigrees.— As the kindred of many founders 
of, or benefactors to, colleges, are entitled to fellowships or other 
advantages, which render the knowledge and proof of such kindred 
important, a few words, in this place, respecting them, may not be 
unacceptable. 

The pedigrees of those persons who have at any time successfully 
claimed such benefits are preserved amongst the records of the re- 
spective colleges ; but, as the heads of colleges are not very desirous 
of publishing the ramifications of their founders' or benefactors' 
kindred, they rarely allow copies of these documents to be 
taken. 

At the Heralds' College are several volumes [marked L. 2 
(1. 2.)] of pedigrees passed under the Common Seal, certifying the 
descents of individuals from certain founders of colleges, or fellow- 
ships in colleges, in the different Universities. These volumes also 
contain the descents of persons from the blood royal of England, 
who, by virtue of such descent, have taken or were entitled to 
honorary degrees at Cambridge. They do not commence before 
1620 (18 James I.). The practice of proving descents for the 
satisfaction of heads of colleges in the early years after these 
foundations, was not by the evidence at present required, because 
the relationship was then matter of notoriety, or vouched for by 
living parties; and the custom of recording notices of descents 
commenced only with the Visitations. 

Manuscript pedigrees of founders' kin are in Lambeth Library. 

Extensive collections, showing the kindred of Wykeham and of 
Sir Thomas "White (the founders of New College and St. John's 
College, Oxford) are in the possession of Sir Charles Young, Garter 
King at Arms. 

The pedigrees of families of kin to Archbishop Chichele, the 
founder of All Souls' College, Oxford, and, as such, entitled to 
fellowships in that college, were published in quarto in 1765, with a 
Supplement in 1775. Additional MS. collections are in the library 
of that college. 1 

Genealogical information is likewise contained in Churton's 
"Founders of Brazen Nose College, Oxford?' 1800; and in Warton's 
"Life of Sir Thomas Pope/' 1780. 

Many lists of members of each University have been printed, and 
others exist in manuscript, as shown in the following Lists : — 

1 See ante, p. 216. 



AND REGISTERS OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 393 

LISTS OF COLLEGIANS, ETC. 

University of Oxford. 

The University of Oxford Calendar. This calendar was commenced in 1810, 

and has been continued annually to the present time. 
Athense Oxonienses, by Anthony a Wood. 2 vols. Lond. 1721. 2nd edit.- — 

New edition by Dr. Bliss. 4 vols. Lond. 1813 — 1820. 4to. — A new 

edition by the same editor has been for some time in preparation. 

Wood's own copy, with manuscript notes, is in the Ashmolean 

Library, WoodMSS. 8500; 8501. 
The History and Antiquities of the University of Oxford, by Anthony a Wood, 

edited by Gutch. Oxf. 1786.— Appendix, Oxf. 1790.— New edition. 

2 vols. Oxf. 1792—1796. 4to. 
Lists of the Chief Officers in the University of Oxford. See Le Neve's 

" Fasti" new edit., by T.D. Hardy. 3 vols. Oxf. 1854. 
List of the Chancellors of Oxford; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 5833, f. 90, 
Lists of the Chancellors, High Stewards, Burgesses, Vice-Chancellors, Proc- 
tors, &c, of the University of Oxford, 1749. See Pointer's "Oxoniensis 

Academia." 
List of Chancellors of Oxford, from 1505 to 1641 ; Univ. Coll. Oxf. MS. 

cxxviii. fP. 5, 6. 
List of the Heads of Colleges in Oxford, from the earliest times to 1810. 

See Chalmers' "History of the University of Oxford" p. 475. 
Names of all the Doctors and Masters of Arts in every College in Oxford, 

1616 ; Ashm. Lib. Wood MS. 8587, f. 111. 
List of Doctors, Masters, Proctors, &c, from 1563 to 1628; Univ. Coll. 

Oxf. MS. cxxviii. f. 21. 
Catalogue of Doctors and Masters that went out, in Oxford, from 1565 to 

1616; Bodl. Lib. MS. 3486, art. 2. 
Admissions to Degrees at Oxford, from 1505 to 1690; Ashm. Lib. Wood 

MSS. 8506—8511. 
Nomina Baccalaureorum determinantium Oxon., ab ann. 151| ad ann. 16£f; 

Ashm. Lib. Wood MS. 8476. 
List of Bachelors of Divinity, from 1563 to 1628; Univ. Coll. Oxf. MS. 

cxxviii. ff. 9—20. 
Collections out of the Matriculation Books from 1564 till 1647, with the 

Names of all the Fellows, Scholars, and Commoners of every College or 

Hall in Oxford, 1552; Ashm. Lib. Wood MS. 8511. 
Similar Collections, from 1540 till 1690; Ashm. Lib. Wood MS. 8512. 
Admissiones ad informandum in Grammatica et Rhetorica, 1508 — 1567; 

Ashm. Lib. Wood MS. 8511. 
Custodes Cistarum, Bedelli, Eegistrarii, in Acad. Oxon., ab ann. 1508 ad 

ann. 1659; Ashm. Lib. Wood MS. 8511. 



394 UNIVERSITY REGISTERS, 

Lists of Collegians, etc. 
Nomina omnium inceptorum in quavis facilitate, quae in Comitiis Oxon. 

steterunt, ab ann. 1502 ad ann. 1680 ; Ashm. Lib. .Wood MS. 8475. 
Admissiones opponentium in Theologia, ab ann. 1505 ad ann. 1539. — Bac- 

calaureorum et Doctorum SS. Theologise, ab ann. 1505 ad ann. 1690; 

Ashm. Lib. Wood MS. 8510. 

Baliol College: Catalogue of the Fellows and Masters of Arts of Baliol 

College, Oxford, from 1502 till 1642 ; Ashm. Lib. Wood MS. 8490, f. 53. 
Brazen-Nose College : Names of Fellows of Brazen-Nose College, from 1538 

till 1555 ; Ashm. Lib. Wood MS. 8490, ff. 162, 165. 
Christ Church College : Registrum eorum qui Electi sunt et Admissi sunt 

in hanc Ecclesiam, ab ann. 1547 ad ann. 1581 ; Ashm. Lib. Wood MS. 

8490, f. 172. 
Catalogi Decanorum, Prsebendariorum, Canonicorum, 

Alumnorum, etc., iEdis Christi Oxon., ab ann. 1547 ad ann. 1619; 

Ashm. Lib. Wood MSS. 8541; 8542. 
— Electiones Discipulorum Westmonasteriensium ad 

utramque Academiam, viz., ad iEdem Christi Oxon., et Coll. S. Trinitatis 

Cantab., ab ann. 1561 ad ann. 1689; Ashm. Lib. Wood MS. 8490, 

f. 170. 
■ Students called Qanoniers, being put in by the Deans 

and Canons of Christ Church, Oxford, from 1661 to 1735 ; Brit. Mus. 

Harl.MS. 7025, f. 120. 
Lincoln College : Catalogue of the Fellows of Lincoln College, Oxford, from 

1436 till 1681 ; Ashm. Lib. Wood MS. 8490, f. 133. 
Oriel College : Catalogus Prsepositorum et Sociorum Coll. Oriel Oxon., ad 

ann. 1665 ; Ashm. Lib. Wood MS. 8490, f. 63. 
Pembroke College : Names of Persons of Pembroke College, Oxford, who were 

Officers in the Army of Charles I. ; Ashm. Lib. Wood MS. 8490, f. 242. 
Queen's College : Catalogue of Fellows of Queen's College, Oxford, for forty 

years after the Foundation; Ashm. Lib. Wood MS. 8490, f. 96. 
St. Edmund Hall: Names of the Scholars of St. Edmund Hall, from 1573 

till 1693 ; Ashm. Lib. Wood MS. 8490, f. 267. 
St. John's College: Catalogue of Fellows of St. John's College till 1617; 

Ashm. Lib. Wood MS. 8490, f. 204. 
St. Mary Magdalen College : A Register of the Presidents, Fellows, Deans, 

Chaplains, Clerks, Choristers, and other Members of St. Mary Magdalen 

College, Oxford, from the Foundation to the present time, by John 

Rouse Bloxam, D.D. Oxf. 1854, vol. i. Volume ii. is in preparation. 
Trinity College: Catalogus Alumnorum a Tempore Fundationis, ad ann. 

1600; Ashm. Lib. Wood MS. 8490, f. 172. 
University College : Nomina Magistrorum, Sociorum, et Alumnorum Coll. 

Univ. Oxon., ab ann. 1381 ad ann. 1654 ; Ashm. Lib. Wood MS. 8490. 



AND REGISTERS OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 395 

Lists op Collegians, etc. 
Wailham College : Catalogus Custodum, Sociorum, Scholarium, etc., ab ann. 
1631 ad ann. 1713; Ashm. Lib. Wood MS. 8490, f. 240. 

Names of Commoners, from 1615 till 1670; Asim. Lib. 

Wood MS. 8490, f. 225. 

University of Cambridge. 

The Cambridge University Calendar. This calendar commenced about the 

year 1799, and has-been continued annually to the present day. 
History of the University of Cambridge, 2 parts. Lond, 1721. 8vo. 

by Edm. Carter. Lond, 1753. 8vo. 

Memorabilia Cantabrigise ; or, An Account of the Colleges in Cambridge, 

by Joseph Wilson. Lond. 1803. 8vo. 
History of the University of Cambridge, by G. Dyer. 2 vols. Lond. 1814. 

8vo. and 4to. 
Lists of the Chief Officers of the University of Cambridge. See Le Neve's 

"Fasti," new edit., by T.D. Hardy. 3" vols. Oxford, 1854. 
Collections for an "Athense Cantabrigienses," by the Rev. William Cole, 

alphabetically arranged; Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 5862 — 5884. 
Similar Collections, made about 1732; Pub. Lib. Cams. MS. Ff. iii. 32. 
Athenae Cantabrigienses, or Companion to Anthony a Wood's great Work, is 

in preparation by Mr. C. H. Cooper, F.S.A., the author of "The Annals 

of the University and Town of Cambridge" and his eldest son, Mr. 

Thompson Cooper. 
Lives of Illustrious Men educated at Cambridge, from the Foundation to the 

year 1715; Brit. Mus. Earl.MSS. 7176; 7177, and 6114, pp.12, 13. 
A Catalogue of the Founders and Benefactors of the University of Cambridge, 

with the Names of the Masters, Fellows, etc., a.d. 1621 ; Brit. Mus. 

Add. MS. 11,720. 
Catalogus Cancellariorum, Pro-Cancellariorum, Procuratorum,. et eorum qui 

in Acad. Cantab, ad Gradum Doctoris aspirant; et numerus omnium 

Graduatorum, etc., ab ann. 1500 ad ann. 1571, per Matth. Parkerum, 

Arch. Cant.; Ashm. Lib. Wood MS. 8567. 
List of Cambridge Officers, 1708—1782; Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 5813, 

f. 200 5; 5960, f. 27. 
List of High Stewards ; Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 5821, p. 89 ; 5834, p. 440. 
Catalogus Cancellariorum Cantab.; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 5845, p. 404. 
List of Vice-Chancellors, Proctors, and Graduates of Cambridge, 1454 — 

1589; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 5845, p. 413. 
List of Registrars ; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 5813, f. 160 5. 
Lists of Professors; Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 5813, f. 162 5.; 5822, f. 49 5.; 

5834, pp. 264, 274, 466; 5846, p. 362. 
Registrum Gratiarum, Graduum, etc., a veteri libro procuratorum, 1488 — 

1544 ; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 6399, A. p. 1. 



396 UNIVERSITY REGISTERS, 

Lists op Collegians, etc. 
List of Cambridge Graduates, 1500—1775; Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 5851, 

p. 224; 5884, p. 33. 
Graduati Cantabrigienses, ab anno 1600 ad ann. 1784; Caius Coll. Camb. 

MS. ion. 
Graduati Cantabrigienses, 1823, with MS. additions by D. E. Davy, Esq. ; 

Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 19,209 ; 19,210. 
List of Bachelors of Arts of Cambridge, 1500 — 1775; Brit. Mus. Add. 

MSS. 5585; 5851, p. 309; 5885, p. 1. 
The Names of London Scholars, Members of certain Colleges in Cambridge, 

1575 ; Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 20, art. 82. 

Christ's College : Extracts from the Eecords of Christ's College, Cambridge, 

Brit. Mus. Earl. MS: 6981. 
Biographical List of the Masters, with their Arms, to 1 7 8 ; 

Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 5821, p. 45 b. 
List of Fellows, temp. Edw. VI.; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 



5846, p. 456. 

Corpus Christi College : Biographical List of the Masters of Corpus Christi, 
or Benet College, with their Arms ; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 5807, f. 27 b. 

- p An Alphabetical Series of Masters, together with 

their Counties, times of Admission, and Degrees, from the Foundation 
to 1351; of all Fellows from 1440; and of all other Students from 
1544. See Masters' "History of Benet College, Camb." A prior list of 
members had been published in 1749. 

Emmanuel College : Lists of the Masters, Fellows, etc., of Emmanuel Col- 
lege; Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 5851, p. 3; 5857, p. 356; 5868, f. 63 5. 

Jesus College : List of Fellows of Jesus College, 1499 — 1745 ; Brit. Mus. 
Add. MS. 5820, f. 150. 

Admissions from 1618 to 1719; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 

5820, f. 157. 

King's College: Account of King's Coll. Camb., by H. Maiden. GmS.1769.8vo. 

Biographical Notices of all the Provosts, Fellows, and 

Scholars of King's College, from the Foundation ; Brit. Mus. Add. 
MSS. 5814— 5817; 5802, ff. 116— 168 ; 5955; 5960, f. 1. 

Catalogue of Provosts, Fellows, and Scholars; Caius Coll. 



Camb. MS. 173, f. 119. 

— Catalogue of Provosts, Fello ws, and Scholars elected into King's 



College, Cambridge, from 1441 to 1703 ; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 6114. 
Alumni Utonienses, or a Catalogue of the Provosts and Fel- 



lows of Eton College, and King's College, Cambridge, from the Founda- 
tion in 1443 to the year 1797, with an Account of their Lives and 
Preferments, by T. Harwood. Birm. 1797. 4to. 
Account of the Fellows, 1478—1620; Brit. Mus. Add. 



MS 5954, f. 1. 



AND UEGISTEES OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 397 

Lists op Collegians, etc. 
King's College (continued) : Registrum Regale, sive Catalogus PrBepositorum, 

Sociorum et Alumnorum, e Collegio Etonensi in Coll. Reg. Cantab. 

cooptatorum, 1443 — 1774 ; ffiona (Pote), 1774. 4to. 
King's Hall : List of Masters and Fellows of King's Hall ; Brit. Mus. Add. 

MS. 5846, pp. 223,457. 
Magdalen College: Catalogue of the Fellows of Magdalen College, 1575 — 

1735 ; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 5851, p. 99. 
Pembroke Hall : Biographical List of Masters of Pembroke Hall, with their 

Arms, 1555 ; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 5820, ff. 132 b, 172. 

List of Masters, 1747 ; Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 5853, p. 170; 

6402, f. 131. 

List of Fellows, from the fourteenth century to 1710 ; Brit. 

Mus. Add. MS. 5851, p. 199. 

List of Masters and Fellows to 1798. See Loder's "Hist. 



of FramlingKam." 4to. 
Peter House College: List of Fellows of Peter House College; Brit. Mus. 

Add. MS. 5843, f. 131. 
Queen's College: List of Masters, Fellows, &c, of Queen's College; Brit. 

Mus. Add. MSS. 5808, p. 124; 5848, p. 325. 
St. Catharine's Hall: List of the Masters, Fellows, Scholars, &c, of St. 

Catharine's Hall; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 5851, f. 149. 
St. John's College : List of Masters and Fellows of Saint John's College, to 

1775, with their Arms; Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 5850, pp. 42,449; 

5858, p. 362. 
Sidney Sussex College : Biographical List of Masters of Sidney Sussex Col- 
lege; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 5821, f. 101 b. 
Trinity College : List of Masters, Fellows, Scholars, &c, of Trinity College 

Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 5846, pp. 223, 459. 

Masters of Trinity College, Cambridge, from 1546 to 1699 

Brit. Mus. H fl rl. MS. 7025, f. 130. 

List of the Persons in Commons, and of the Fellows, 1578 



Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 5845, p. 349. 
Trinity Hall : Biographical List of Masters of Trinity Hall, with their Arms 
Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 5807, f. 95. 

Trinity College Dublin. — The Matriculation Books at this 
College commence with the year 1625, and are carried on — with 
one hiatus of about forty years in the beginning of the eighteenth 
century — to the present time. They are kept on the same plan as 
those of Oxford and Cambridge, giving the name, father's name 
age, place of birth, and schoolmaster's name of every student 
matriculated. 



398 UNIVERSITY REGISTERS, 



PUBLIC SCHOOL REGISTERS. 

At most, if not all, of the Public Schools, registers (more or less 
particular) are kept of the students, their ages, residences, birth- 
places, and parents. 

Particulars of all the Endowed Grammar Schools in England and 
Wales were published by Nicholas Carlisle, Esq., in 1818. 

Charter House. — The registers of the Charter House contain a 
pretty accurate account of the scholars of the foundation since the 
Restoration. The parentage of the scholars is recorded. Since the 
appointment of Dr. Russell, which took place in 1811, more accu- 
rate lists haye been kept of the whole of the boys in the school ; 
and soon after that year, a list was printed, called the "Blue Book," 
which has been continued annually, but these lists give no clue to 
parentage. 

Christ's Hospital. — The registers of this institution have been 
preserved in an unbroken series from 1563, and the form of entry 
in the earlier registers is very similar to that used at the present 
time. It is not perhaps unlikely that the entries of 1563 may in- 
clude children who had been some time in the hospital, and whose 
names were then collected into a book or register, the hospital 
having been occupied in 1552, and its letters patent of foundation 
dated in 1553. Some of the children admitted in the first years of 
the hospital's establishment (and during a century afterwards) were 
foundlings, or destitute children, to whose parentage there was little 
or no clue. In cases where the parent was known, it was the prac- 
tice, at the earliest period to which the registers extend, to record 
the father's name, and his trade or company. The children, for 
many years (leaving out of view foundlings, &c), were almost ex- 
clusively children of freemen of London, which circumstance would 
connect them with the City companies, and in some cases might 
afford a clue to their families and origin. 

The entries in the hospital's registers are mostly very explicit, and 
comprise the admission and discharge, or apprenticing out or decease 
of each child, allowing for some few irregularities or omissions in 
the earlier books. 

In 1677, rules were made requiring that children should be seven 
years of age before admission, and should not be foundlings or 



AND REGISTERS OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 399 

parish children. These points were vouched for by the minister, 
churchwarden, and several inhabitants of the parish. For nearly 
two hundred years a certificate of baptism has been required with 
each child, and for the last sixty-four years a certificate of marriage 
has also been furnished, besides (since the year 1677) the certificate 
as to legitimacy, &c. &c, signed by the minister and others, being 
given. 

At the present time, certificates of birth, baptism, and marriage 
are required; and for a very long period (probably since 1677) a 
statement has been required of the parent (if living) of his circum- 
stances, number of family, &c. 

In the Rev. W. Trollope's History of the Hospital, there is a 
list of the hospital scholars at the Universities from 1591 to 1833, 
with notes, and some account of the more distinguished. The names 
of the boys educated on King Charles the Second's Mathematical 
Foundation, and put out to sea service, from its establishment in 
1672-73, were printed in 1769. 

Eton College. — Catalogues of the Eton scholars from 1443 to 
1774, with short biographies, have been printed, under the title of 
{ ' Registrum Regale, sive Catalogus Proepositorum, Sociorum et 
Alumnorum in Coll. Etonensi, in Coll. Reg. Cantab. Cooptatorum, 
1443—1774;" Etonm [Pote], 1774. 4to. 

A Catalogue of the Provosts and Fellows of Eton College, and 
King's College, Cambridge, from the Foundation in 1443 to the 
year 1797, with an Account of their Lives and Preferments, by 
Thorn. Harwood, was published at Birmingham in 1797. 4to. 

In the Ashmolean Library, at Oxford, ia a manuscript, entitled 
u Catalogus Prsepositorum et Sociorum Coll. Etonensis, in Com. 
Bucks." {Wood MS. 8583, f. 120.) 

Annual lists of the scholars are also published. 

Harrow School. — The only published register of this school is 
that compiled by the late Dean of Peterborough, commencing 1770 
to 1826. The "Harrow Calendar/' containing lists of the boys, 
without any description, from 1845 to 1852, can be had of Mr. 
Winkley, Bookseller, Harrow. 

King's College. — A calendar of students at this college is pub- 
lished annually. The first was printed about 1831. 



400 UNIVERSITY REGISTERS, ETC 

London University. — A calendar is annually printed of the 
students there. The first was published in 1844. 

Merchant Tailors* School. — There are registers of the boys of 
this School, from the year 1607 to the present time, in which their 
birth, entrance on and continuance in the School, are set down, but 
there is no account of their parentage in these registers. A list of 
the principal scholars is given in Wilson's History of the School. 
Lond. 1814. 4to. 

Rugby School. — A regular register is kept of the names and 
ages of boys admitted to Rugby School, together with the names 
and addresses of their parents. The register is published at inter- 
vals, under the name of the " Rugby Register" by Messrs. Crossley 
and Billington, Rugby. 

St. Paul's School. — For lists of the masters and scholars of 
St. Paul's School, see Knight's "Life of Bean Colet." Lond. 1724. 
8vo. p. 327. 

St. Peter's College, Westminster. — Several lists of the boys 
admitted at this school are in existence. 
A List of Scholars, as elected to Christ Church College, Oxford, and Trinity 

College, Cambridge, was published by Jos. Welch, London, 1788. 4to. 

This work embraces also a List of Masters. 
A new Edition, entitled " List of the Queen's Scholars of St. Peter's College, 

Westminster" was published by Ginger, of Great College Street, West- 

minsteryin 1852. 

In the British Museum are : — 
Lists of Westminster Scholars, from 1561 to 1738, with some other lists, and 

another copy, extending only to 1717 {Hark MS. 7025, f. 152). 
A similar List, from 1683 to 1738 (Add. MS. 8872). 

Lists of Head Masters of Westminster School, from 1561 to 1733 (Karl. 
MS. 7025, f. 133). 
A MS. list of boys admitted since 1803 is in the custody of the 
head master. 

Winchester College. — Registers exist in this college of all the 
scholars who have ever been admitted into it. Their names are en- 
tered, with the date and place of their birth, and the date of their 
admission ; also, in most instances, the time of their leaving the 
college ; and if anything remarkable has befallen them in after life, 
it is generally noticed. No list of names has ever been printed. 



401 



Counties palatine itoor&s* 

r l"^HE Counties Palatine of Durham, Lancaster, and Chester 
-*~ had formerly separate Courts for the hearing of civil, criminal, 
and ecclesiastical matters ; but these were abolished by Statute 6 
Will. IV. c. 19, and the records have for the most part been removed 
to London. The Records of these Courts are so similar to the 
documents enumerated elsewhere, that they require no particular 
description or explanation. They consist chiefly of criminal pro- 
ceedings ; writs in real and personal actions ; files of warrants to 
prosecute and defend ; bail pieces ; writs of error ; affidavits of debt, 
&c. ; rolls of judgments; record, or the feet of fines levied; plea 
rolls; recoveries; remembrance rolls; enrolments of licenses of 
alienation; pardons of alienation; commissions; patents; awards 
and decrees ; deeds relating to private property ; copyhold books, 
containing an account of the different surrenders, admittances, &c., 
made at the halmot courts of the different bishops; inquisitions 
post mortem ; mandates and returns of writs for the election of 
members to serve in Parliament, etc. etc. 

These records were originally deposited in the custody of the 
Clerk of the Crown, Prothonotary, and Cursitor for the several 
jurisdictions; but have, with the exception of those at Durham, 
been removed and placed under the charge of the Master of the 
Rolls, pursuant to the Statute 1 and 2 Vict. c. 94. 

The proceedings of the County Palatine Courts of Durham have 
been removed to a building recently erected for them by the 
Warden, Masters, and Scholars of the University of Durham in the 
Exchequer Building there, and can be consulted daily, between the 
hours of nine and one and three and five, upon payment of the usual 
fees. The question as to their removal to London is still pending. 
A brief calendar of them is given in Thomas's " Handbook to the 
Records/ 3 pp. 334, 335 ; another, more in detail, will be found in 
Mr. Hardy's " Report/ 3 which is appended to the Report of the 
Deputy- Keeper, made to Parliament in 1855. 

Hunter's Collection of Manuscripts relating to the County Pala- 
tine of Durham is deposited in the Library of the Dean and Chaptei 
of Durham. 

26 



402 COUNTIES PALATINE RECORDS. 

The Lancaster Records were transferred to the Office of the 
Duchy Court of Lancaster in London, where they still remain. 
This office is also the repository of numerous valuable documents 
relating to other counties, such as charters, deeds, and grants by and 
from the Kings and Queens of England and divers great personages, 
as well as private individuals, commencing in 1135; enrolments of 
charters and grants in fee-farm, from 51 Edw. III. [1377] to Anne; 
Court Rolls of honours, lordships, and manors in England and 
Wales, chiefly within and parcel of the Duchy, from the reign of 
Edw. I. to the present time; ministers' and receivers' accompts, 
from the reign of Edw. II. to the same period. Inquisitions post 
mortem, &c, commencing 1 Hen. V. and ending the 18 Charles L; 
in all about 3569 records. Pleadings and surveys, from the reign 
of Henry VII. to the present day. Decrees and decretal orders, 
commencing with Henry VII. and ending with the present day. 
Leases and patents of offices, and presentations to livings, from 
1 Hen. VIII. [1510] to the present time. Privy seals and bills, from 
1 Jas. I. Grants of quit-rents, from 1780, and awards on inclosures, 
from 1754. 

Indexes and calendars have been compiled to these records, suf- 
ficient for all practical purposes. For an account of the office hours 
and fees, see the heading "Duchy of Lancaster Office" in the 
"Appendix " to this work. 

Among the volumes of Public Records published by order of the 
House of Commons are Calendars of the Inquisitions post mortem 
of the Duchy of Lancaster, under this title : " Ducatus Lancastriee, 
Calendarium Inquisitionum Post Mortem" &c. 3 vols, folio. 1823 — 
1834. 
v , T (Part I. Calendar to the Inquisitions, Edw. I. — Car. I. 

'(.Part II. Calendar to the Pleadings, etc. Hen. VII. — PL and Mary. 

Vol. II. Part III. 1—13 Elizabeth. 

Vol. III. ' Part IV. ■ 14 — 45 Elizabeth. 

The Calendars present the names of the Plaintiffs and Defendants, 
a slight notice of the subjects, and of the situation of the lands or 
other property in dispute. It is material to observe, that the lands 
litigated were as frequently in other counties as in Lancashire; 
hence the utility of the calendar is not confined to that county, but 
extends to all lands which formed part of the Duchy of Lancaster. 
Indices, Nominum et Locorum, are appended to each volume. 

The first two volumes were published at £3. 55.; the third at 
£1. 10s. The present price is £1. Is. for the three. 



COUNTIES PALATINE RECORDS. 403 

The Chester Records have been deposited in the new repository 
of the Rolls House, Chancery Lane. A brief calendar of them 
will be found in Thomas's " Handbook to the Records" pp. 323 — 
327. 

At the Lambeth Library are returns of the possessions attached 
to the see, and to the Dean and Chapter of Chester. 

In the County Bag at the Chapter House are records relating 
to the County of Chester. 

At the Rolls Office are Rolls containing the accounts of the 
bailiffs and farmers of lordships, townships, manors, &c, in Cheshire, 
and the accounts of the sheriff and escheator. Also the Macclesfield 
Rolls, which contain the accounts of the bailiffs of the hundred, 
distinct from the rest of Cheshire ; and also of the catchpolls and 
bailiffs of the borough, and of the bailiffs of the forest of Maccles- 
field, &c. 

Most extensive collections relating to families of this Duchy, the 
chief part of which were collected by the three Randal Holmes, are 
at the British Museum (Harl. MSS. 1920— 2187 ; 7568; 7569). 

Chester City was taken out of the County Palatine and made a 
county of itself by Letters Patent, 6 April, 21 Hen. VII. 



404 



&tott\) SteorDs* 



'T^HE Collections of Records illustrative of the History of Scot- 
-*- land are very numerous, and their places of deposit are nearly 
as varied as the collections. 

Notwithstanding the connection which subsisted between this 
country and Scotland from a very early period, and the disputes 
and wars carried on between them, no authentic record relative 
thereto is of earlier date than the reign of Richard I., from which 
time there is a series of treaties and documents, down to the treaty 
between Elizabeth and Mary, in 1586. 

Records called the Scotch Rolls (Rotuli Scotise), commencing 
19 Edw. I., and ending 22 Edw. IV., are deposited in the Towek, 
and at the Rolls Chapel, with the exception of those of the 13 
and 34 Edw. III., which are at the Chapter House. 

They consist of negotiations and treaties of peace; truces; pre- 
cepts to the Lords Marchers respecting the keeping of the marches ; 
precepts for levying men; orders concerning pay and provisions, 
and for garrisoning, fortifying, and victualling castles ; impressment 
of seamen; notices of soldiers employed; proceedings relating to 
prisoners of war ; ransoms; safe conducts to the families of prisoners ; 
rewards to partisans ; grants of estates to those who had rendered 
essential aid to the Kings of England in their claims to the Crown 
of Scotland; attainders of persons for having acted against Edward I. 
or his successors ; orders for raising money; licenses to trade; grants 
of benefices, &c. &c. 

For early biography, these records present highly valuable ma- 
terials. In the middle ages almost every person of the rank of a 
gentleman served in the field ; and it is from documents connected 
with political and military affairs that the lives of eminent in- 
dividuals must be mainly composed. Of many of the most distin- 
guished characters of the fourteenth century not a word is said by 
any contemporary historian ; and the little which can be collected 



SCOTCH RECORDS. 405 

respecting them must be wholly gleaned from records. Between 
Scotland and this country there was always a constant connection, 
either of a warlike or pacific nature ; and it must be at once obvious 
that the Scotch Rolls are of the utmost utility to persons who are 
interested in the history of either kingdom. 

The particulars of some of the families who accompanied the 
King in his Scotch wars, especially of the northern families, are so 
extensive, that they serve almost as a diary. 

A Calendar of all the Scotch Rolls and Records here noticed was 
printed, with Indexes, in 1774, at the expense of Sir Joseph Ayloffe, 
Baronet; and the Rolls themselves were, in 1814, printed verbatim, 
and published in two folio volumes, by the Commissioners on Public 
Records. They are entitled, " Rotuli Scotice in Turri Londinensi, 
et in Domo Capitulari Westm. asservati/' 19 Edw. I. — 8 Hen. VIII., 
folio, 1814—1818. 

The original price of these volumes was £5. 10s.; the present 
price is £2. 2s. 

No instance is yet known where these records have been produced 
in open court for the verification of a pedigree. Dugdale quotes 
them so constantly in his "Baronage/ 3 that he, doubtless, had copies 
of them; and transcripts were possessed by Elias Ashmole, and are 
still preserved with his MSS. in the Ashmolean Museum. 

At the College of Arms is an Abstract of the Scotch Rolls for 
the reigns of Edw. I,, II., III.; Ric. II.; Hen. IV., V., and VI. 
IMS. B.15.] 

Collections from these Rolls, from the reign of Edward I. to 
that of Edward IV., may also be found in the British Museum 
(Harl. MSS. 320; 92, ff. 36, 616, 66b, 1846, 205; Lansd. MS. 
314) 

Another important class of Scotch Records was the Scottish 
Inquisitions, which originate in the fi Brieve Mortancestry," or 
" Brieve of Succession." This is a writ issuing from Chancery in 
the King's name, the purport of which is to establish a claim by 
inheritance, or to be " served nearest lawful heir " to those lands 
of a feudal nature, in which the alleged ancestor of the claimant was 
vested at the time of his death. 

According to the law of Scotland, the complete and effective 
right to such property does not pass immediately and spontaneously 
from the ancestor to the heir, but is said to remain "in hereditate 
jacente" of the deceased owner, until the claim of the heir has been 



406 SCOTCH RECORDS. 

formally recognised and established by the procedure under a writ 
of succession. 

By that writ the Judge to whom it is addressed is authorised and 
required to ascertain, by the verdict of a jury — 1. In what lands and 
annual rents, within the limits of his jurisdiction, the alleged 
ancestor of the claimant died vested and seised as of fee, at the faith 
and peace of the King. — 2, If the claimant be the nearest lawful 
heir of the deceased in these lands. — 3. If he be then of lawful age. 
4. What is the annual value of the lands, according to certain 
valuations, usually called the old and the new extent. — 5. Of whom, 
as feudal superior, the lands are held. — 6. By what feudal service 
or species of tenure. — 7. In whose possession the lands now are, 
and on what account, and how long they have been so possessed. 

The proceedings so held are denominated a " Service." The 
verdict of the jury is transmitted to Chancery, where it is entered 
on record by the Director, and an extract of the record is given to 
the claimant; and in this completed state it is commonly termed the 
" Retour of the Service." 

An Abridgment of these Inquisitions has been printed by the 
Record Commissioners, in four volumes folio, of which the last is a 
supplement. The work is entitled, " Inquisitionum ad Capellam 
Domini Regis retornatarum, quae in Publicis Archivis Scotia adhuc 
asservantur, abbreviation fol. 1811 — 1816. 

Of the original Inquisitions retoured to Chancery, the present 
series begins in the year 1547 ; and no original retours of prior 
date have been found, but such as have been preserved in the 
custody of individuals, and afterwards deposited and recorded in the 
office. The imperfections in the series, subsequently even to the 
period above mentioned, are very great. 

Of the present series of Inquisitions retoured to Chancery, com- 
mencing in the minority of Queen Mary, no record appears to have 
been made until about the year 1630, when they were recorded in 
a series of books; and from that period the practice of recording 
Inquisitions has been regularly continued. The whole of the series, 
ending in March, 1811, consists of one hundred and two volumes, 
in folio. The fifth volume, relating to the years 1611 — 1614, is 
lost; and many original Retours have been discovered which are 
not contained in any of the existing volumes of the Record. 

The importance of the record of Retours, independently of its 
primary purposes, is too well known to require illustration. "With 
certain limitations, it may be considered as exhibiting an authentic 



SCOTCH RECORDS. 407 

history of the transmission, by inheritance, of the far greater part 
of the landed property in Scotland, as well as that of the descent of 
the greater number of its considerable families during the course of 
the last two centuries. 

The work above noticed has been brought down to the end of the 
seventeenth century. It embraces the contents of about forty-nine 
volumes of the Record, as also those more ancient Retours which 
have been deposited in Chancery at a later period, and an abridg- 
ment of those original Retours, of which the existing books contain 
no record. 

The three volumes were published at £7. 17 s. 6d, ; but the present 
price is £3. 13s. 6d. 

A record called the Ragman Roll was printed by the Bannatyne 
Club in 1834, with this title, " Instrument a Publica, sive Processus 
super Fidelitatibus et Homagiis Scotorum, Domino Regi Anglia 
factiSj a.d. 1291 — 1296." It contains a chronological detail of the 
proceedings in the competition of the Crown of Scotland, from the 
conference at Norham, in May 1291, down to the final award in 
favour of Balliol, in November 1292 ; and, besides a recital of all 
that related to the adjudication of the question of right among the 
competitors, it carefully sets forth every circumstance relative to 
the claim of Edward, as lord paramount of the kingdom; and 
registers at full length all instruments of homage and fealty 
executed under the seals of the competitors, and of the nobles, 
barons, and clergy of Scotland, as well as of other persons of inferior 
rank, who made their submission to the English Monarch during 
the period above mentioned. Two copies of this record have been 
preserved in the Chapter House, Westminster; and it has been 
printed by Rymer, though in a rather disjointed form, under the 
title of {C Magnus Rotulus Scotia" (Fcedera ii. 542). Another 
record of the same transactions, framed by a different notary, and 
probably at a later period, has been deposited in the Tower. 

The term Ragman, in diplomatic language, properly imports an 
indenture or other legal deed, executed under the seals of the 
parties; and, consequently, its application to the Rolls here in 
question implies that they are the record of the separate ragmans } 
or sealed instruments of homage and fealty, executed by the people 
of Scotland. The editors of the documents above noticed give 
numerous examples, in the preface to the work, of the early use of 
this term; but in conclusion they remark, that "it must be con- 



408 SCOTCH RECORDS. 

fessed, after all, that the origin of Ragman still remains a problem 
for future lexicographers." l 

Numerous other documents relating to Scotland -will be found 
entered on the Close Rolls, and amongst the Tower and Chapter 
House records. 

Of these the records found in the Chapter House have been 
printed, under the authority of the Record Commissioners, in a 
volume bearing the title, " Documents and Records illustrating the 
History of Scotland, preserved in the Treasury of the Exchequer, 
by Sir F. Palgrave." Vol. i. 1837. Royal 8vo. 

A very valuable collection of State Papers relating to transactions 
between England and Scotland is preserved in the Cottonian Library 
at the British Museum. 3 

At Sion College are Records of the Church and Kirk of Scot- 
land, from the beginning of the Reformation to the year 1638, in 
three volumes, folio. 

A work entitled " Fragmenta Scoto-Monastica, or Materials for 
the Formation of a Scottish Monasticon" was published at Edin- 
burgh in 1842, by that zealous antiquary, Mr. Turnbull. This 
gentleman has also announced the preparation of a "Monasticon 
Scoticanum" 

References to Pedigrees, &c, of Scotch Families will be found 
under the head of " Heraldic Collections" in the present work. 

1 In a note appended by Mr. Thomas Wright to a short poem, termed the "Ragman 
Boll," in his volume of "Anecdota IAteraria" Land. 1844, that gentleman observes : — 
" It would appear from the title that the name of the game was Ragman : the title of 
the French copy is c Bagman the Good.' It is well known that the charter by which 
the Scots acknowledged their dependence on the English Crown under Edward I. waa 
popularly called a ragman roll; and the name was afterwards applied to other rolls. 
The origin of the name has been a subject of much doubt. In the ' Chronicle of 
lionercost 1 [ed. Stevenson, p. 261], we are told that the Scottish deed just mentioned 
•was called ragman on account of the number of Beals of the Scottish nobility which 
hung from it. It appears by the beginning of the following poem that, in the game of 
Ragman, the person seeking his character drew a string, which indicated the stanza 
that was to be applied to him. If we suppose (which appears to me very probable) 
that the stanzas were written one after another on a roll of parchment, that to each 
Btanza a string was attached at the side, with a seal or piece of metal or wood at the 
end, and that, when used, the parchment was rolled up, with all the strings and their 
seals hanging together, so that the drawer had no reason for choosing one more than 
another, but drew one of the strings by mere chance, on which the roll was opened to 
see on what stanza he had fallen. If such were the form of the game, we can very easily 
imagine why the name was popularly applied to a charter with an unusual number of 
seals attached to it, which when rolled up would present exactly the same appearance." 

2 See Hooper's " Catalogue of the. Cottonian Library" Lond. 1777, p. 29. 



SCOTCH RECORDS. 409 

The following are the works relating to Scotland, published tinder 
the orders of the Record Commissioners, in addition to those already 
mentioned : — 

Registrum Magni Sigilli Regum Scotorum in Archivis Publicis asservatum, 
a.d. 1306—1424. 1 vol. fol. 1814. The above is a collection of Royal 
Charters of Scotland. The present price is 15*. 

The Acts of the Parliament of Scotland. 11 vols, folio. 1814—1845. The 
first volume of these acts was not published till 1846. 

The Acts of the Lords Auditors of Causes and Complaints ; or, Acta Domi- 
norum Auditorum, a.d. 1466 — 1494. 1 vol. fol. 1839. This volume 
contains the judicial acts and proceedings of the Committees of the three 
Estates of Scotland, chosen for hearing causes and complaints during 
the reigns of James III. and IV. of Scotland. 

The Acts of the Lords of the Council in Civil Causes ; or, Acta Dominorum 
Concilii, a.d.1478 — 1495. 1 vol. fol. 1839. These are intimately con- 
nected with the above contemporaneous and analogous proceedings of 
" The Acts of the Lords Auditors of Causes and Complaints." 



410 IRISH RECORDS. 



Mtfy Eecortis, 



T IKE the Scotch Records just mentioned, the Records of Ire- 
-" land have suffered from the vicissitudes of war, neglect, and 
the gradual ravages of time. Nevertheless, our public offices and 
libraries contain much that is valuable to the Historian and 
Genealogist with relation to this country, and several important 
works have lately been printed by the Irish Record Commissioners, 
The Patent and Close Rolls of the Chancery of Ireland are pre- 
served in the Rolls Office, Dublin. Upon these rolls are found 
grants of lands in fee or otherwise ; creations of honours ; charters 
of incorporation ; grants of offices ; presentations ; denizations ; 
wardships; pardons; ancient statutes; Kings' letters, and other 
State documents ; with several inquisitions, and many deeds, con- 
veyances, letters of attorney, and Chancery proceedings. 

A Calendar of these Records has been printed by the Commis- 
sioners above referred to, under the title of " Rotulorum Patentium 
et Clausorum Cancellarice Hibernue Calendarium, Hen. II. — 
Hen. VIL" Vol. i. part i. fol. 1828. 

In the Rolls Office of the Court of Chancery of Ireland are 
preserved the Inquisitions Post Mortem and Inquisitions on Attainder. 
These are divided, according to the four provinces and the several 
counties of Ireland, into reigns, and generally commence in the 
time of Queen Elizabeth, a few being prior to that period. 

The Inquisitions Post Mortem are the best evidences of the 
descent of families, and of the transfer and possession of property 
during the period they embrace. They cease soon after the restora- 
tion of Charles II., when the feudal tenures were abolished. 

The Inquisitions on Attainder show whether any person was 
attainted, in which case his lands and other property were seized 
into the King's hands. They extend to the reign of William the 
Third. 

These, records have also been printed by the Irish Record Com- 
missioners, with this title : " Inquisitionum in Officio Rotulorum 
Cancellarim Hibernue asservatarum, repertorium" Vols. i. ii. folio. 
1826—1829. 



IRISH RECORDS. 411 

In the Tower of London are records called the Irish Rolls, 
of the 1, and 47 to 50 Edward III. On them will be found grants of 
lands and other possessions; letters of protection and safe conduct; 
inquisitions of various sorts ; appointments of constables and 
governors of castles; grants of freedom; committals to prison; 
grants of wardship, etc., as found on the Scotch and Welsh Rolls, 
described elsewhere. 

At Carlton Ride are — Accounts of the Chamberlain of the 
Exchequer in Dublin, and of the Treasurer in Ireland, Edward I. 
and subsequent reigns. 

At the Rolls House are Rolls of the Irish Establishments, 
temp. Jac. I. 

At the Treasury are — Irish Books from 1669; Books, etc., of 
the late Exchequer of Ireland ; original Certificates of Receipts and 
Payments ; Books of the Pells, etc. etc. 

At the Chapter House are Transcripts of all Letters Patent of 
Grants by the Lords Lieutenants, &c, of Ireland, from Hen. V. to 
12 Hen.VI. These have been printed by the Record Commissioners 
in a volume of miscellaneous records, entitled, " Rotuli Selecti ad 
res Anglicas et Hibernicas spectantes, ex archiv. in Domo Cap. 
Westmon. deprompti." 1 vol. 8vo. 1834. 

At the Office of the Land Revenue Department are — Accounts 
of Lords Deputies ; of Treasurers at War ; Victualling and Imprests, 
from Philip and Mary to the Commonwealth. 

The Library of the British Museum contains some very im- 
portant and valuable collections relative to Irish History. The 
volumes known as the Clarendon Manuscripts are very valuable to 
the historian and genealogist. They are described in Ayscough's 
"Catalogue of Additional Manuscripts/' vol. i. pp.309 — 340. A 
few volumes of the same collection are at the Bodleian Library. 
The Egerton Library, also at the Museum, contains a very im- 
portant collection relating to the early history and literature of the 
country, with some few records interesting to the genealogist. The 
dispersion of the Library of the late Sir William Betham, Ulster, 
afforded an opportunity to the Trustees of securing several valuable 
manuscripts, which are described in the " Hand-List of Additional 
Manuscripts/ 3 at Nos. 19,829—19,865. 

In respect to the History of Ireland, the Carew Collection at the 
Lambeth Library presents an inestimable mass of the most im- 
portant evidence. The Carew Manuscripts formerly belonged to 
George, Lord Carew, Earl of Totness, and were purchased by 



412 IRISH RECORDS. 

Archbishop Tenison. They consist of forty-two volumes of 
valuable papers, principally relating to Irish History during the 
reign of Elizabeth, but contain some circumstances of earlier 
times, particularly of the conquest of Ireland. They are numbered 
596—638. 

A valuable work, affording abundant information concerning 
the Official History of Ireland, has been printed by the Irish 
Record Commissioners, with this title, "Liber Munerum Pub- 
licorum Hibernia, 1152 — 1827; or, The Establishments of Ireland " 
1 vol., in 2 parts, folio. 1852. The present price of this work is 
£2. 2s. 

The Irish Ecclesiastical documents, exclusive of Pope Nicholas' 
Taxation, are of considerable importance. Surveys, commencing 
with the 28 Henry VIII., are to be found in the Chief Remem- 
brancer's and First Fruits Offices. The most useful of these 
documents are the " Valor Beneficiorum" and the "Inquisitions" 
upon which such valuation was founded. 

The student will find some notices of the ancient Irish Records 
in Nicholson's "Irish Historical Library" chapter vii., and in 
Sir William Betham's "Dignities, Feudal and Parliamentary" 
chapters x. — xiii. 

Reference to Pedigrees, &c, of Irish families will be found in the 
present work, under the head of " Heraldic Collections." 



413 



Welsf) Scorns* 



f T^HE most important of the Records relating to Wales are the 
-■- "Welsh Rolls," which commence with the 5th and extend to 
the 23rd year of Edward I. 

In the fourth year of Edward I., Lewellin ap Gruffydh, Prince of 
North Wales, having offended the King by marrying Eleanor de 
Bohnn, the Earl of Leicester's daughter ; by the depredations he 
had committed in the marches; and by refusing to do homage 
at the King's coronation, was pronounced guilty of contumacy, 
and a great army was levied to proceed against him as a rebel. 
The Prince having been brought to submission, a treaty of peace 
was concluded between the belligerent parties about Martinmas, 
1277. 

At this period the Welsh Rolls begin, and continued to the time 
that Wales became thoroughly subdued, the rebellion raised by 
Rees ap Meredith entirely quashed by his execution, and the ordi- 
nances for the settlement of the country and incorporating it with 
England were established. 

The Rolls contain all the different instruments which passed the 
Great Seal touching the affairs of the Principality and its Marches, 
as also relating to the several persons who were either employed or 
interested in those parts. Therein will be found grants of castles, 
lands, and other possessions ; letters of protection and safe conduct ; 
appointments of justices; inquisitions of various sorts; presentations 
to churches ; appointments of constables and governors of castles ; 
grants of freedom ; committals to prison ; grants of wardship ; writs 
to receive money ; grants of fairs ; liberty to trade free from toll ; 
releases from debts ; removals from appointments ; confirmations of 
former charters ; exchanges of lands ; feoffments ; arrests ; orders for 
dower, for support of children, for homage ; appointments to military 
rank, and other entries too numerous to detail. 

The Rolls are preserved amongst the records at the Tower. 

Although termed the " Welsh Rolls," and relating to the affairs 



414 WELSH RECORDS. 

cf Wales, it is necessary to mention that notices of many English 
families appear upon them. 

Extracts from these rolls will be found in the Harleian MS. 320, 
f. 42, at the British Museum. 

A Calendar of the ancient Charters, and of the Welsh and Scotch 
Rolls, was published by Sir Joseph Ayloffe, in one volume 4to., in 
1774 ; but, as relates to the Welsh Rolls, it is very defective. 

Many matters relating to Wales are entered on the Close Rolls. 
There is also, among the Chapter House records, a roll of ex- 
tracts from these rolls touching Wales. Here, likewise, are docu- 
ments relating to the transactions with the Welsh Princes, tempp. 
Henry III. and Edward L; Letters concerning the war against the 
Welsh, etc. 

The Revenue Rolls of the Prince of Wales (47—49 Edw. III.) 
are among the Tower records. 

At Carlton Ride are ministers' accounts, and accounts of the 
revenues of Wales ; some as early as Edward III. down to Philip 
and Mary. 

The British Museum possesses a fine collection of manuscripts 
illustrative of the Literature of Wales; and several volumes of 
Genealogical Collections, with Pedigrees of Welsh Families, col- 
lected by Randal Holme. A descriptive Catalogue of all the Welsh 
manuscripts and documents relating to the Principality of Wales 
preserved in this Library, formed by James Logan, F.S.A., in 1833 
and 1834, will be found in Additional MS. 15,088. In the year 
1844, two very fine collections of Welsh Manuscripts, amounting in 
all to 224 volumes, were presented to the Trustees by the Governors 
of the Welsh School, and by the Royal Cymmrodorion Society. 
Descriptions are given in the " Lists of Additions " for the year 
1844, pp. 16—85 ; and 1845, p. 25. 

A long list of Welsh Records will be found in Thomas's " Hand- 
Book to the Public Records,' 9 pp. 321—333. 

The document known as the " Record of Caernarvon " has been 
printed by the Record Commissioners, with this title, " Registrum 
vulgariter nuncupatum c The Record of Caernarvon, 9 £ codice MS. 
Harleiano 696 descriptumP 1 vol. folio. 1838. 

The first portion of the above record contains a collection of 
extents of manors, taken chiefly in 26 Edward III., in the counties 
of Caernarvon and Anglesey. A second portion contains other 
extents of commots and manors, including the lands of the bishopric 
of Bangor. A third portion contains records under the title, "Leges 



WELSH RECORDS. 415 

et Consuetudines Wallice." A fourth portion is a collection of inqui- 
sitions and pleadings in quo warranto before the Justices Itinerant 
in North Wales, petitions, &c. The next portion contains particulars 
for the taxation of the spiritual and temporal possessions of the 
clergy of the diocese of Bangor, followed by an extent of the tem- 
poralities of the see, 22 Richard II. ; after which follow a collection 
of smaller records. 

The present price of this work is £1. lis, 6d. 

References to Pedigrees, &c, of Welsh families will be found in 
the present work, under the head of " Heraldic Collections." 



416 



JHtscellanwus ftecort& 



RECORDS OF CLERGYMEN. 

r I^HE birth, education, life, and death, of a clergyman, may be 
-*- traced with great facility. The Registers of Public Schools 
and Universities supply the earliest information, and the Eccle- 
siastical Records supply the residue. The former documents have 
been already described; 1 the latter are very numerous, the principal 
being the Bishops' Registers and the Registers of the First 
Fruits and Tenths. 

A very valuable collection of these records are preserved at the 
Lambeth Library. They contain the surveys of the possessions of 
Bishops, Deans, and Chapters, and of other benefices, made in 
pursuance of various ordinances of the Commonwealth ; also pre- 
sentations to livings during that period, and the augmentation of 
benefices by salaries or pensions for the maintenance of preaching 
ministers, &c. References to these and other records will be found 
in the accompanying lists. 

The British Museum and Sion College are very rich in his- 
tories and matters relating to the clergy; and the libraries of Oxford 
and Cambridge contain many records worthy the attention of the 
genealogist. 

The Bishops' Registers will be found to contain the names of 
the incumbents of the several benefices throughout England from 
the earliest times, the date of their inductions, the names of the 
patrons or patronesses ; and, should the advowsons have been family 
possessions, a series of such patrons' ancestors, with many par- 
ticulars of them, their deaths, their heirs, and devisees. 

The dates of these registers, though varying in each diocese, are 
all of great antiquity; those in the Consistory Court of London 
commence in 1306. 

At Durham are registers of several Bishops between 1311 and 

1 See ante, page 390. 



MISCELLANEOUS RECORDS. 417 

1660, containing entries of visitations, consecrations, grants, ordi- 
nations, etc., perfect, and in good order. 

There are manuscripts in the British Museum and other Libraries 
from which lists of the dignitaries of the Church have been com- 
piled (with little interruption) from the time of the introduction of 
Christianity into the island ; and even the parochial clergy may in 
- general be found registered from a few reigns after the Conquest. 

First Fruits and Tenths. — The First Fruits are the profits, 
after a voidance, of every spiritual living for the first year. The 
Tenths are the tenth part of the annual value of every spiritual 
benefice. At the Reformation, Henry VIII., by Act of Parliament, 
put himself in the situation of Pope over the clergy, and these taxes 
were thenceforward ordered to be paid to the King. To receive 
these, a Court of First Fruits was erected — 32 Hen. VIII. c. 45 — 
wherein were filed certificates from the Bishops of the patronages 
and institutions to all ecclesiastical benefices, and consequent entries 
were made in the books of this office. By Statute 27 Henry the 
Eighth, the two Universities are exempted from First Fruits and 
Tenths. By an Act of Queen Anne, certain poor livings were like- 
wise discharged on account of the smallness of their incomes ; and 
those spiritual benefices called Donations, or Curacies, were exempt ; 
of these no information will be found amongst the records of First 
Fruits and Tenths. 

The court was dissolved by letters patent 23rd January, 1 Mary, 
and united to the Court of Exchequer. First Fruits were abolished 
by Statute 2 and 3 Philip and Mary, c. 4, and revived by Statute 
1 Elizabeth, c. 4, and put under the survey of the Exchequer. 

The office finally was abolished by Statute 1 Victoria, c. 20, and 
the collection of the revenue placed under the management of the 
Governors and Treasurer of Queen Anne's Bounty; and the records 
were placed under the care of the Treasurer; but subsequently, by 
Statute 1 and 2 Victoria, c. 94, the records were removed to the 
custody of the Master of the Rolls. 

The records were deposited at Carlton Ride, 29th Dec.. 1842. 
The more important are : l — 

I. Remembrancer's, Comptroller's, and Receiver's Account Books. 
II. Libri Compositionum. Entries of the Compositions for First Fruits to 
be paid by Incumbents on induction. 

1 See a more complete account in Thomas's " Hand-book to the Public Records" 
p. 196. 

27 



418 MISCELLANEOUS RECORDS. 

III. Certificates of Bishops. These are the certificates of the Bishops, 

addressed to the Barons of the Exchequer, certifying the induction 
of Clerks to livings, made up according to dioceses, in half-years, 
from about 1586. 

IV. Libri Institutionum. Abstracts of the certificates of Bishops, giving 

the same information in columnar arrangement, and serving as an 
index to the same. 
V. Liber Decimarum. An account of the yearly Tenths charged on all 
benefices ; also the value of all ecclesiastical livings, not exceeding 
the value of £50, returned into the First Fruits by virtue of Statute 
6 Anne, discharged from First Fruits and Tenths. 
VI. King's Books. Liber Kegis, or Valor Ecclesiasticus ; containing the 
annual value of benefices and their tithes, being surveys of all 
ecclesiastical benefices, taken by virtue of certain commissions, 
26 Hen. VIII., known as the "Liber Regis." 
VII. Liber Valorum. A compilation from the above, made for the use of 
the Office of First Fruits, and from whence the deficiencies of 
many of the originals of the above (which have been lost) are 
supplied. 
VIII. Bolls of Pleas and Proceedings in the Court of First Fruits in the 
Exchequer, from 1 Mary to 3 George I. 

A list of a few important Ecclesiastical Records in Public 
Libraries; notices of Printed Works useful to the Genealogist; 
Lists of Church Dignitaries, Cathedral Histories, etc., are here 
subjoined : — 

LISTS OF CHURCH DIGNITARIES, ETC 

A Catalogue of Ministers ejected out of their Livings for Conscience' Sake. 

Lond. 1663. 
Chronological Lists of Dignitaries to 1715 ; Beit. Mrs. Harl. MS. 6417. 
List of all the Dignitaries in England and Wales, 1715 ; Brit Mus. Harl. 

MS. 6410, art. %. 
A Series of Abbots of the principal Monasteries in England, from 1101 to 

1550 ; Bsit. Mus. Harl. MS. 7520, art 1. 
Names of Priors, Abbots, etc., temp. Henry VIII., may be found in the 

" Valor EcclesiasticuSy" and in Dugdale's " Monasticon." 
Catalogue of Priors, Deans, Archdeacons, Canons, and other Ecclesiastical 

Dignitaries of England; Ashm. Lib. Wood MS. 8567. 
Fasti Ecclesiae Anglicanae; or, a Calendar of the principal Ecclesiastical 

Dignitaries in England and Wales, and of the Chief Officers in the 

Universities of Oxford and Cambridge, compiled by John Le Neve, 

continued to the present time by T. D. Hardy. 3 vols. Oxford, 1854* 



MISCELLANEOUS RECORDS. 419 

Lists op Chttrch Dignitaries, etc. 

Koyal 8vo. Le Neve's Collections for his "Fasti Ecclesia AngMcana " 
are in the British Museum (Earl MSS. 6404—6418). This collec- 
tion contains an Obituary, from 1658 to 1680. 
Collections for a Continuation of Le Neve's "Fasti" by the Rev. John 
Denne, D.D., brought down to about the year 1797 ; Brit. Mrs. Add. 
MS. 11,823. 

Collections for a similar work, by the Rev. Thomas Stone ; Brit. Mus. Add. 

MSS. 18,767—18,770 
Lives of the Archbishops and Bishops of England to 1670 ; Brit. Mus. Add. 

MS. 21,089. 
Account of English Bishops to 1600; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 4900. 
The Lives, Characters, Deaths, Burials, and Epitaphs, of all the Protestant 

Bishops of England, by John Le Neve, Gent. Lond. 1720. 8vo. 
A Catalogue of Bishops, by Fras. Godwyn. Cant. 1743. 4th ed. with additions. 
Succession of Archbishops and Bishops to 1825. See Nicolas' " Synopsis of 

the Peerage" vol. ii. p. 817. 
Lists of Chancellors and Vicars- General, to about 1756; Brit. Mus. Add, 

MS. 11,821. 
Lists of Divines between 1663 and 1755 may be found in Chamberlayne's 

"Anglim Notiiia" or "Present State of Great Britain*' published 

annually down to that period. 
Lists of Patrons to Churches in England and Wales. See "The Clergyman's 

Intelligencer." Lond. 1745. 8vo. — Also Browne Willis' "Thesaurus 

Rerum Ecclesiasticarum. 3 ' Lond.ll&S. 4to. — -New edit, by the Kev. T. 

Lloyd. Lond. 1788. 8vo. 
The Ecclesiastical Guide ; containing Names of all Incumbents and Patrons. 

2nd edit. Lond. 1822. 
Other Lists of Church Dignitaries, to the year 1806, may be found in Beat- 
son's " Political Index, 3 ' vol. i. — and to the year 1851, in Haydn's 

"Bookof Dignities?' partiv. Also in Gilbert's "Clerical Guide " 4i \o\s. 

Lond. 1817 — 1836; and in the "Clergy Lists" which are continued 

annually. 

Bath and Wells : Lives of the Bishops of Bath and Wells, from the earliest 

times, by the Eev. S. H. Cassan. Lond. 1829. 8vo. 
Bristol: Lists of Dignitaries of the Diocese of Bristol. See Boswell's 

" Ecclesiastical Division of the Diocese of Bristol" 
Canterbury : Account of the Deans, Priors, and Archdeacons of Canterbury. 

See Dart's "History of Canterbury" pp. 94 — 190. — Also, Somner's 

"Antiquities of Canterbury" 1640. — 2nded. [Batteley], 2 parts. Lond. 

1703. Folio. — "A Description of the Cathedrals of Canterbury and Fork." 

Jyond. 1755. Folio.— Woolnoth's "Illustration of the Cathedral Church 

of Canterbury. 3 ' Lond. 1816. 4to. 



420 MISCELLANEOUS RECORDS. 

Lists of Chtteoh Dignitaries, etc. 
Carlisle : Account of Religious Houses within the Diocese of Carlisle, with 

the Names of the Chancellors, Archdeacons, Rectors, &c. ; Carlisle 

Cath. MS. 4. 
Chester : Catalogue and Lives of the Bishops of Chester, &c. ; Beit. Mus. 

Add. MB. 11,836. 
Chichester : Lists of the Incumbents and Dignitaries of Chichester, by the 

Rev. John Denne, D.D. ; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 11,822. See also 

Abingdon's "Antiquities of the Cathedral Church of Chichester." Land. 

1717. 4to. 
Durham : Church Dignitaries of Durham. See Sanderson's "Antiquities of 

the Cathedral Church of Durham.*' Newcastle, 1767. 12mo. 
Ely : Lists of the Ecclesiastical Dignitaries of Ely. See Bentham's "History 

of Ely Cathedral." Camb. 1771. 4to.— 2nd ed. Norwich, 1812. 4to.— 

Supplement by W. Stevenson. Norm. 1817. — Also Miller's "History of 

Ely Cathedral" Lond. 1807. Royal 8vo. 
Gloucester : Ecclesiastical Dignitaries of Gloucester. See " The History of 

Gloucester" Cirencester, 1781. 8vo. 
Hereford : List of the Dignitaries of Hereford Cathedral. See Rawlinson's 

"History of the Cathedral Church of Hereford." Lond. 1717. 8vo. 
History of the Bishops of Hereford to 1602 ; Brit. Mus. Harl. 

MS. 4056. 
Lichfield : Church Dignitaries of Lichfield. See Abingdon's "Antiquities of 

the Cathedral Church of Lichfield." Lond. 1717. 4to. — Harwood's 

"History of the Church of Lichfield" Glouc. 1806. 4to. 
London : List of Clergy in the Diocese of London. See Newcourt's " Re~ 

pe?'torium Ecclesiasticum." Lond. 1708. 
Dignitaries of St. Paul's Cathedral. See Dugdale's " History of 

St.PauVs" Xow^.1658. Folio— 2nd edit, Lond.llW. Folio.— New edit. 

by Sir Henry Ellis in 1818. 

■ Dignitaries of Westminster Abbey. See Dart's " History of the 



Abbey Church of St. Peter's, Westminster." 2 vols. Lond. 1732. — Another 
Account. 2 vols. Lond. 1812. 4to. — Also Neale and Brayley's "History 
of Westminster Abbey" 2 vols. Lond. 1818. 

Deans of Westminster, from 1549 to 1731 ; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 

7025, f. 132. 

Deans and Prebendaries of Westminster, from 1560 to 1620; 



Brit. Mus. Cotton. MS. Claud. A. viii. f. I 

Norwich: The History of the Cathedral Church of Norwich, with Bio- 
graphical Anecdotes of the Bishops, etc., by John Britton. Lond. 1816. 
4to. 

. Catalogue of the Priors, Deans, Chancellors, &c, of Norwich, to 

1712. See "Posthumous Works of Sir T. Brown" Appendix. — Also 
Blomefield's "Hist, of Norfolk." 



MISCELLANEOUS RECORDS. 421 

LiBTS op Ohtjeoh Dignitabies, etc. 
Rochester: "History of Rochester Cathedral" Lond.llll. 8vo. — Eeprinted 
1723. 

Custumale RofFense, with Memorials of the Cathedral Church, &c, 

by J. Thorpe. Lond. 1788. Folio. 

Repertory of Incumbents and Dignitaries within the Diocese of 



Rochester, by the Rev. John Denne, D.D., brought down to about 1795 ; 
Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 11,819 ; 11,820. 
Salisbury: Deans, Precentors, Chancellors, &c, of Salisbury. See "History 
of Salisbury " Lond. 1719, p. 269.—" Description of the Cathedral 
Church of Salisbury" Salisb. 1787. 4to.— Britton's "History of the 
Cathedral Church of Salisbury ." Lond. 1814. 4to. — Dodesworth's "Ac- 
count of the Cathedral Church of Salisbury " Salisb. 1814. Royal 4to. 

Lives of the Bishops of Sherborne and Salisbury, from 705 to 

1824, by the Rev. S. H. Cassan. Salisb. 1824. 8vo. 

Wiltshire: Archdeacons of Wiltshire, Derbyshire, and Dorsetshire. See 

"History of Salisbury'' [Lond. 1719], p. 269. 
Winchester : Gale's History of the Cathedral Church of Winchester. Lond. 

1715. 8vo. 
■ Milner's Ecclesiastical History of Winchester. 2 vols. Winchester, 

1798. 4to.— 2nd edit. ibid. 1809. 2 vols. 
Worcester : Catalogues of Deans and Prebendaries of Worcester ; Ashm. Lib. 

WoodMS. 8587, f. 1. See also Abingdon's "Antiquities of the Cathedral 

Church of Worcester ." Lond.llll. 4to. — and Thomas's "Survey of the 

Cathedral Church of Worcester." Lond. 1736. 4to. 
York: Catalogues of Ecclesiastical Dignitaries of Yorkshire; Ashm. Lib. 

WoodMS. 8567. See also Burton's " Monasticon Eboracense" and 

"A Description of York Cathedral." [York, 1768.] 12mo. 

Scotland: List of Scottish Bishops to 1688. See Beatson's "Political 
Index" vol. iii. — to 1851, Haydn's "Booh of Dignities" pt. v. 

Keith's Catalogue of Scottish Bishops, by Russell, 1824. 8vo. 

See a copy with MS. additions in the Beitish Museum, Add. MSS. 
8143; 8144. 

Ireland: Fasti Ecclesise Hibernicse, by H. Cotton. Lond. 1848. 8vo. 

Archbishops, Bishops, and other Dignitaries of Ireland, from 1660 

to 1726; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 6850, f. 252.—^. MS. 21,126. 

. Names of the Irish Bishops ; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 4799, p. 17. 

Lists of Irish Bishops to the year 1806. See Beatson's "Political 

Index" vol. iii. — to the year 1851, Haydn's "Book of Dignities" pt. vi. 



422 MISCELLANEOUS RECORDS. 



ECCLESIASTICAL RECORDS. 

A History of Mitred Abbies, &c, by Browne Willis. 2 vols. Lond. 1718-19. 

8vo. 
A Survey of English Cathedrals, by Browne Willis. 3 vols. LondAlW— 

1730.— 2nd ed. 1742. 4to. 
Notitia Monastica, by Dr. T. Tanner. 1744. Folio. — New edition, by James 

Nasmith. Camb.llSI. Folio. 
Monasticon Anglicanum, per Rog. Dodesworth et Guliel. Dugdale. 3 vols. 

folio. Lond. 1655, 1661, 1673.— Abridged by John Wright. Lond. 

1693. Folio. — New edit. Lond. 1718. Folio. — Additions by John Stevens. 

2 vols, folio. 1722, 1723.— Fine edition, by Cayley, Ellis, and Bandinel. 

6 vols. Lond. 1817—1830. Folio. 
A Collection out of the Records of the Tower, showing the Foundation and 

Endowment of all Religious Houses, and also of all the Colleges in the 

Universities of Oxford and Cambridge ; — the Incorporating of all Cities 

and Borough Towns, with the Companies in them ; — of all Fraternities 

and Guilds, with their several Liberties and Privileges ; — the Custody 

of Honors, Castles, Manors, Parks, and Forests, granted, &c; with 

Indexes of Towns, Places, and Persons ; Brit. Mus. Marl. MS. 744. 
A similar Collection; Coll. of Arms, Vincent MS. 17. 
Transcripts from Monastic Records in the Exchequer ; Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 

6164—6166. 
Liber Beneficiorum omnium Ecclesiasticorum tarn in Anglia quam in Wallia ; 

All Souls' Coll. Oxf. MS. xliii. — Pub. Lib. Camb. MS. Dd. i. 3. 
Valuation of the Bishoprics, Deaneries, &c., of England; Brit. Mus. Marl. 

MS. 6839, f. 321. 
Thesaurus ; or, Valuation of Ecclesiastical Benefices, by John Ecton [ed. by 

Willis]. Lond. 1754. 2nd ed. 
Records relating to the Clergy; Bkit. Mus. Marl. MSS. 6839; 7023 ; 7028. 
Collections for a minute account of all the Livings in the Kingdom, arranged 

under the Rural Deaneries; Brit. Mus. Marl. MS. 6826. 
Papers relating to Tenths; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 5755, f.112. 
Charters relating to various Churches in England, s. xvii. ; Queen's Coll. 

Oxf. MS. ccclxviii. 
Transcripts of Foundation Charters of various Religious Houses ; Brit. Mus. 

Lansd. MS. 447. 
Collection of Records relating to the Clergy and Religious Houses, tempp. 

Hen. III.— Edw. VI.; Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 4525—4527. 
Taxatio Ecclesiastica Angliae et Walliae, auct. P. Nicholai IV., circa 1291. 

Folio. 1802. Printed by the Record Commission. 1 See a copy in the 

British Museum {Cotton. MS. Tib. C. x.). 

1 The present price of this volume is 16*. 6d. 



MISCELLANEOUS RECORDS. 423 

Ecclesiastical E-ecobds. 

Royal Grants to Religious Houses, to the reign of Edward III. ; Bodl. Lib. 
MSS. 4166; 4167. 

Valor Ecclesiasticus, temp. Hen. VIII., auetoritate Regia institutus. 6 vols. 
1811 — 1834. Folio. Printed by the Becord Commission. 1 An "In- 
troduction," by the Rev. Joseph Hunter, was printed in 1834,in royal 8vo. 

Valor omnium Terrarum et Possessionum, tarn Temporalium quam Spiri- 
tualium, inComm. Norf. et Suff., Cantab., Hunt., Essex., Hertf., Midd., 
et Civ. Lond. jacentium, in manu R. Hen. VIII., anno regni sui 36, 
remanentium ; Be.it. Mus. Harl. MS. 701. 

A very valuable Collection of Papers relative to the Ecclesiastical Affairs of 
England, from the reign of Henry VIII. to that of Charles II. inclusive, 
subdivided into the following heads, viz. — 1st, Correspondence; 2nd, 
Papists and Recusants ; 3rd, Visitations by Bishops and Commissioners ; 
and, 4th, Universities, Schools, and Hospitals ; in 46 vols, folio. State 
Paper Office. 

Account of Pees, Corrodies, Pensions, etc., paid to members of the sup- 
pressed monasteries, 2 and 3 Phil, and Mary; Beit. Mus. Add. MS. 
8102. 

Register of Crown Presentations to Ecclesiastical Preferments, temp. Elizabeth; 
Brit. Mus. Lansd. MSS. 443 ; 444. 

Register of Presentations to Livings by the Lord Chancellor, 1587 — 1591 
inclusive; Soc. of Ant. MS. 42. 

Compositions of Persons for their First Pruits, temp. Car. I. ; Coll. of Arms, 
PhilipotMS. 25, Pb. 

Register of the Acts of the Court of the Ecclesiastical Commissioners, from 
1631 to 1633; Pub. Lib. Camb. MS. Dd. ii. 21. 

Register Book of Proceedings for the relief of godly and well-affected 
Ministers, from 30 Jan. 164f to 5 Oct. 1646, and from 1 May to 
30 Oct. 1647 ; Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 15,669—15,671. 

Account of the Sale of Bishops' Lands, between 1647 and 1651. See 
Nichols' "Collect. Top. et Gen.," vol. i. pp. 1, 222, 284 [horn Add. MS 
9049]. There is a copy in the Bodleian Library; Raiolinson MS 
B. 236. 

Surveys of the Possessions of Bishops, Deans and Chapters^ and other 
Benefices, made by order of Parliament during the Commonwealth; 
Lamb. Lib. MSS. 902 — 922. There is an Index to the whole, in 1 vol. 
folio. All admitted as original records by a decree of the Court of 
Exchequer. 

Record Books of the Commissioners appointed to settle the Augmentations of 
Rectories and Vicarages, &c, in the time of the Commonwealth ; Lamb. 
Lib. MSS. 966—1021. 

1 The present price of this work is £6. 14*. 



424 MISCELLANEOUS RECORDS. 

Ecclesiastical Records. 
Presentations to Benefices in various Dioceses, from 1652 to 1659; Lambeth 

Lib. MSS. 944—947. 
Counterparts of Leases of Church Lands, made by authority of Parliament, 

from 1652 to 1658; Lamb. Lib. MSS. 948—950. 
The Book of Lambeth Leases, containing the Augmentations made by the 

Archbishops, from 12 Charles II., to Vicarages and Curacies, on letting 

the Impropriations ; Lamb. Lib. MS. 
Notitia Parochialis; containing an account of the state of 1579 Parish 

Churches in 1705; most of them written and signed by the then 

Incumbents; Lamb. Lib. MSS. 960—965. 
The Numbers and Sufferings of the Clergy during the Rebellion, by John 

Walker. Lond. 1714. Polio. 

Cambridgeshire : Evidence against Scandalous Ministers in the County of 
Cambridge, from 19 Mar. 164f to 10 July 1644, &c. ; Brit. Mus. AM. 
MS. 15,672. 

Estimatio Ecclesiarum Episcopatus Eliensis; Beit. Mus. 

Cotton. MS. Tib. B. ii. f. 232. 

Survey of Lands and Property in Cambridgeshire, Hert- 



fordshire, Essex, Norfolk, Suffolk, and Huntingdonshire, belonging to 
the Monastery of Ely. See the " Inquisitio Eliensis" 

Liber de Inquisitionibus Maneriorum Episcopatus Eliensis, 



anno 1221 (?); Brit. Mus. Cotton. MS. Tib. B. ii. f. 

Inquisitiones Maneriorum Episcopatus, Eliensis, temp. 



Hen. VIII.; Caius Coll. Camb. MS. 489, f. 19. 

Cumberland : Account of Religious Houses within the Diocese of Carlisle, 
Co. Cumberland; Carlisle Cath. MS. 4. 

Devonshire : A Complete History of all the Religious Houses of Devon and 
Cornwall, by the Eev. William Jones. Lond. 1779. 12mo. 

— . Thesaurus Ecclesiasticus Provincialis ; or a Survey of the Dio- 
cese of Exeter, &c. Exeter, 1782. 4to. 

Monasticon Dioecesis Exoniensis, by George Oliver, D.D. 



jEk*ter,1846. Polio. 
Durham : Boldon Book : Sive Inquisitio de Consuetudinibus et Redditibus 

Episcopat. Dunelmensis, a.d. 1180; Bodl. Lib. Laud MS. 1392, 52. 

Printed by the Surtees Society, 1852. Edited by the Rev. William 

Greenwell. 
Values of Livings and Names of Incumbents in Durham and 

Northumberland, 1630 or 1636; Brit. Mus. Sari. MS. 7567, art. 19. 
Collections relating to the See of Durham, by the Rev. Thomas 

Randall; Durham Cath. 
Hampshire : Ecclesiastical Visitation of Hampshire and the Isle of Wight, 

held in March and April, 1543 ; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 12,483. 



MISCELLANEOUS RECORDS. 425 

Ecclesiastical Records. 
Hereford: Acta in Domo Capitulari Herefordensi, ab ami. 1622 ad 1636 ; 

Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 4833. 
A Survey of the Ministry of Herefordshire, 1640 ; Corp. Christi 

Coll. Oxp. MS. ccvi. 
Kent : Charters and Instruments relative to the See of Canterbury, and others 

within that Province, chiefly of the time of Hen. VIII., in 13 vols, folio ; 

Lamb. Lib. MSS. 889 — 901. See a full table of contents of each 

volume in Todd's " Catalogue of the Lamb. Lib." p. 267. 

Registers of the Archbishops of Canterbury, from Abp. Peckham [1278] 

to Abp. Potter [1747], 68 vols; Lambeth Library. The continuations 
from the last Archbishop are kept in the Vicar- General's Office in Doc- 
tors' Commons. 

Abstract of the Lambeth Registers, from the time of Abp. Peckham 

[1278] to that of Abp. Herring [1756] ; Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 6062 
—6109. 

Registrum Roffense, by John Thorpe. Lond. 1769. Folio. 

Custumale Roffense, by John Thorpe. Lond. 1788. Folio. 

Important Collections relating to the Diocese of Rochester, Co. Kent ; 

Soc. of Ant. ^^.167— 200; 210. 

Lincoln : Extracts from the Registers of the Diocese of Lincoln, by Dr. M. 
Hutton; Brit. Mus. Sari. MSS. 6950—6954. 

Taxatio Parochiarum in Comitatu Lincoln. ; Brit. Mus. Cotton. MS. 

Vesp. D. xxvii. 

Inquisitiones de redditibus, etc., ad Ep. Lincoln, spectantibus, 

Sec. xiv. ; Queen's Coll. Oxf. MS. ccclxvi. 

London : Extracts from the Registers of the Bishop of London, by Dr. M. 
Hutton; Brit. Mus. Earl. MSS. 6955 ; 6956. 

The Domesday of St. Paul's ; a Description of the Manors belonging 

to St. Paul's in the year 1222, by the Ven. Archdeacon Hale. Printed 
by the Camden Society, 1855. 

Repertorium Ecclesiasticum Londinense ; or the Parochial History 

and the Incumbents and Patrons of the whole Diocese of London, by 
Richard Newcourt. 2 vols. Lond. 1708— 1710. 1 Polio. 

The Present Ecclesiastical State of London, by James Paterson. 

Lond. 1714. 12mo. 

Liber Curiarum a Seneschallo Abbat. S. Petri Westm. tent, anno 1 



— 3 Ric. III. in div. maneriis eidem monast. spect. ; Coll. of Arms, 
Norf. MS. xxxvi. 
Norfolk : Account of the Bailiffs of the Bishopric of Norwich, from Mich. 
1690 to Mich. 1691 ; Pub. Lib. Camb. MS. Dd. viii. 37. 

1 See manuscript additions to this work, by the Rev. W. Cole, in Add. MS. 5833, at 
the Bbitish Museum. 



126 MISCELLANEOUS RECORDS. 

Ecclesiastical Records. 
Norfolk (continued) : Collections out of a Leiger Book and Chapter Book 
belonging to the Church of Norwich ; Ashm. Lib. Wood MS. 8687, f. 17. 
Collectiones ex Kegistris Ecclesise Norwicensis; Brit. Mus. Harl. 



Compotus omnium Ballivorum, etc., Episcoporum Norwicensium, 

19 et 26 Hen. VIII.; et 2 Car. L; Pub. Lib. Camb. MSB. Dd. iii. 61 ; 62. 

Tables of Livings, &c, in Co. Norfolk ; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 5522, 

f. 44. 

Index Monasticus of the Diocese of Norwich, by E. Taylor. Lond. 

1821. Polio. 

Northumberland : Values of Livings and Names of Incumbents in Durham 

andNorthumberland,1630orl636; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 7567, arU9. 
Oxfordshire : Visitation of the University of Oxford ; Ashm. Lib. Wood 

MS. 8522. All Souls' Coll. Oxf. Jehyll MS. 51. 
Liber Visitationis Archidiaconi Oxoniensis, ann. 1585 - 3 Queen's 

Coll. Oxf., MS. cclii. 
Somersetshire : The Ecclesiastical Division of the Diocese of Bristol, with 

Lists of the Dignitaries, &c, by Edw. Boswell. Lond. 1829. 8vo. 
Fines Terrarum et Tenementorum Decani et Capituli Eccl. 

Cath. S. Andreas Wellensis, in Com. Somerset., ab ann. 1508, usque ad 

ann. 1533 ; Ashm. Lib. MS. 1154, f. 2. 
Suffolk : Taxatio Beneficiorum in Archidiac. Suffolcise et Sudburiae ad solu- 

tionem decimse regi ; Pub. Lib. Camb. MS. Dd. x. 34. 
Surrey : Nomina Hominum Ecclesiasticorum Seculariumque, infra Comitatum 

de Surreia; sec. xv. ; Jesus Coll. Oxf. MS. cxxix. 
Sussex : Monaslicon Sussexianum, ex Monastici Anglicani voluminibus ex- 

scriptum; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 6353. 
Wiltshire : Extracts from the Kegisters of the Bishops of Salisbury, 1297 — 

1458. Privately printed by Sir Thomas Phillipps, Bart. 

Institutiones Clericorum in Comitatu Wiltonise, ab ann. 1297 ad 

ann. 1810. 2 vols, folio. 1825. Privately printed by Sir Thos. Phillipps, 
Bart. 

Eentale Maneriorum, etc., ad Ecclesiam Sarisburiensem perti- 

nentium ; sec. xiv. ; Unit. Coll. Oxf. MS. clxvi. 

Yorkshire : Monasticon Eboracense ; and the Ecclesiastical History of York- 
shire, by John Burton, M.D. -York. 1758. Folio. 

Monasticon Boreale, continens instrumenta varia super Funda- 

tionibus Domorum Eeligiosorum, etc., ultra Trentam ; Bodl. Lib. MSS. 
4149—4153. 

Eegistrum Archiepiscoporum Eboracensium, abbreviatum per R, 

Dodesworth; Bodl. Lib. MS. 4170. 

A Eental of Chantries and College Lands annexed to the Duchy 



of Lane, in Yorkshire; Bodl. Lib. MS. 5058, f. 105. 



MISCELLANEOUS RECORDS. 427 

Ecclesiastical Records. 
Yorkshire (continued) : An Itinerant Survey of the Churches in Yorkshire ; 
Bodl. Lib. MS. 5101. 

Collections out of the Registers of the Archbishop and Church of 

York, from 1317 to 1687; Ashm. Lib. Wood MS. 8567, ff. 31, 55, 83. 
Rental Book of Estates belonging to the Archbishopric of York, 



1580 — 1637, alphabetically arranged; Bett. Mus. Eg. MS. 925. 

Collections relating to the Archdeaconryof York, Lists of Churches, 



Incumbents, &c, from 1660 to the end of the eighteenth century; Brit. 
Mus. Add. MSS. 11,396—11,400. 

Scotland: Register of Ministers and their Stipends, 1567. Printed by the 

Maitland Club. 
Registrum Episcopatus Glasguensis. 2 vols. Printed by the same 

Club, 1843. 

■ The Chartulary of the Episcopal See of Aberdeen. 2 vols. Printed 



by the same Club. 

Registrum Episcopatus Aberdonensis. Vol. i. et ii. Edited by 

Cosmo Innes, Esq. Printed by the Spalding Club, 1845. 

Ireland : Monasticon Hibernicum, or the Monastical History of Ireland, by 

John Stevens. Lond. 1722. 8vo. 
. • Monasticon Hibernicum ; or, an History of the Abbies, Priories, and 

other Religious Houses in Ireland, by M. Archdall. Lond. 1786. 4to. 

Account of several Visitations in Ireland, and the Value of Livings ; 

Tein. Coll. Dublin, MS.B. 40. 

Inquisitions touching the Church Lands in Ireland, anno 1609 ; 

Trin. Coll. Dublin, MS. B. 44. 

Liber Regalis Visitationis in tribus Provinciis Hibernise, 1615, fol.; 



Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 19,836. 

Wales: Survey of the Cathedral Church of Bangor; Jesus Coll. Oxf. MS. 

cxvi. 
. Surveys of the Cathedral Churches of Bangor, Llandaff, St. Asaph, 

and St. David's, by Browne Willis, were printed at London in the years 

1721, 1718, 1720, and 1717, in 8vo. 

RECORDS OF JEWS. 

The Jews were expelled the kingdom in the year 1290 (12 Edw. I.), 
and were not allowed to return until the time of Cromwell ; there 
are, consequently, no records of them during this long interval ; nor 
is it probable that any early notices of them can ever be required 
for genealogical purposes. It is said (but, perhaps, incorrectly) 
that Cromwell's policy paved the way for the restoration of the 



428 MISCELLANEOUS RECORDS. 

Jews ; and, although their residence in England was not legalised, 
some few must have settled by connivance, as, in 1663, their register 
of births contains twelve names ; and during the whole reign of 
Charles II., who introduced the sale of denizations, their numbers 
were increased. 

The numbers and powers of the Jews have, of late years, much 
increased. Our Peerage and Baronetage now contain Jewish 
families; and Jews may purchase and inherit land, though a con- 
trary and erroneous opinion has much prevailed. 

Early notices of them will be found in the Tower, where matters 
concerning them are entered on the Close, Patent, and Fine Rolls. 
There, also, is a Roll of Taxation concerning their houses or pro- 
perty, 19 Edw. I. 

In the Record Office at Carlton Ride are Memoranda Rolls of 
the Exchequer of the Jews, on which are inrolled, "Essonia, Placita, 
et Starra." 1 Also Jews' Rolls, tempp. Hen. III. and Edw. I. 

At the Rolls House are Pleadings before the Justices of the 
Jews; perquisites; amerciaments; and receipts of tallages on their 
goods, etc., 17, 44, and 56 Hen. III., and 2—6, 9, 13—16, 18, 19, 
21—23 Edw. I. 

From the year 1663 the registers of births, marriages, and deaths 
of the Jews have been correctly made, and carefully preserved : the 
birth is entered at their ceremonial of naming on the eighth day ; 
and all the entries are more minute than those of the Christian 
Church. 

The Committees of the Great Synagogues in Bevis Marks, and 
Duke's Place, Aldgate, when applied to by the Commissioners 
appointed to inquire into the State of Registers of Births, &c, in 
1838, declined to part with their registers, which are kept in the 
Hebrew language, on the ground that they are continually required 
for civil as well as religious purposes. 

RECORDS OF LAWYERS. 

The appointments of the Lord Chancellors, of the Judges of the 
Courts at Westminster, and of the inferior Judges in Equity, are 
entered on the Patent and Claus Rolls ; and their several names, as 
well as those of the ancient justices of assize, and of all other judges 
of dissolved courts, appear on the records of the courts themselves. 

1 Several of the Records called "Starra' 1 will be found among the Harleian Charter* 
at the Bbixibh Museum (43 A. 54 -43 A. 69). 



MISCELLANEOUS RECORDS. 429 

Lists of the Chancellors 1 are in existence from the reign of 
William the Conqueror, and Catalogues of the Judges from the reign 
of Henry III. Dugdale 3 published a Catalogue of the Chancellors 
and Chief Justices, with the dates of their appointments, and of the 
appointments of the Attorneys and Solicitors General : the list has 
been continued to 1810 in Banks 1 new edition. The Justices of 
Assize and Barons of the Exchequer appear in Madox's "History 
of the Exchequer" The "Lives of all the Chancellors 33 were pub- 
lished in 1708, in 2 vols. 8vo. "Catalogues of Lord Chancellors, 
Masters of the Rolls, etc-" by T. D. Hardy, Esq., were published in 
1843. In the year 1845 appeared, " The Lives of the Lord Chan- 
cellors and Keepers of the Great Seal to the Reign of George IV.," 
by Sir John, afterwards Lord Campbell, in 7 vols. 8vo. The "Lives 
of the Chief Justices of England, from the Conquest to the Death of 
Lord Mansfield, edited by John, Baron Campbell, 33 in 2 vols, royal 
8vo., appeared in 1849. We are indebted to the laborious applica- 
tion of Mr. Edward Foss for " The Judges of England, with Sketches 
of their Lives, etc.," the sixth volume of which, embracing the period 
of the Stuarts, has just been issued. Lastly, a "List of the Judges of 
England" to 1851, may be found in Haydn's "Book of Dignities, 33 
part iii. 

In the College op Arms are : — 

Names of the Chief Justices of the King's Bench and Common Pleas, with 
Dates of their Patents, and some Arms (Vincent MSS. 203 ; 213 ; 223). 

And in the British Museum : — 
Lists of Judges, with their Arms (Lamd. MS. 865, f. 123). 
Names of the Judges and Councell of the Courts in Westminster and Wales, 
temp. Will. III. (Sari. MS. 7512, art. 1). 

The appointments of her Majesty's Serjeants at Law and Counsel 
are inrolled in Chancery, as are also the appointments of officers of 
the Court of Chancery : those from the 40 Elizabeth to the present 
day are at the Petty Bag Office, prior to which period they are on 
the Patent or Claus Bolls. 

Lists of these officers have been printed from 1671, in Chamber- 
layne's "Anglice Notitia," the Bed Books, and the modern Law 
List. A Treatise, entitled "The Grandeur of the Law," enumerating 
the most illustrious families of England who had been raised to 

1 See ante, page 330. s " Origw.es Juridiciales." 



430 MISCELLANEOUS RECORDS. 

honour and wealth by the law, with the names of the Chief Justices 
and Barons, was published in 1 vol. 8vo. in 1685. 1 A new edition, 
by Edward Foss, Esq., appeared in 1843, 12mo. 

There are four Inns of Court, viz., the Inner Temple, the Middle 
Temple, Lincoln's Inn, and Gray's Inn. There are also several 
inferior Inns, called Inns of Chancery, which were formerly under 
the control of the Inns of Court with respect to legal education, 
and students were required to pass some time here previous to 
admission into the Inns of Court. They are seven in number, 
and three of them, viz., Clifford's Inn, Clement's Inn, and Lyon's 
Inn, belong to the Inner Temple ; New Inn, to the Middle Temple ; 
Eurnival's Inn, to Lincoln's Inn; and Staple's Inn and Barnard's 
Inn, to Gray's Inn. Thavies' Inn, which formerly belonged to the 
Society of Lincoln's Inn, was sold, in 1769, to Mr. Middleton. 

There are three ranks, or degrees, among the members of the 
Inns of Court : — Benchers, Barristers, and Students. 

The names, together with other particulars, of all Barristers, 
appear in the Registers of the several Inns, 

The entries in the registers of the Inns generally contain the 
Christian and surname of each member thereof, the town and county 
he comes from ; his father's name, description, and residence ; and 
whether such member be the eldest son. The Registers commence 
at various periods: the Society of Lincoln's Inn has them from 
1423 (2 Hen.VL), but with little regularity prior to 1656, from 
which year they have been kept with great exactness. 

Lists of Benchers of the Inns of Court will be found in the 
"History of the Four Inns of Court, Lond. 1780," 8vo., after- 
wards incorporated with the "Historical Memorials of the English 
Laws" The student may also consult "Antiquities of the Inns 
of Court, by W. Herbert," Lond. 1804, 8vo.; and the "History of 
the Inns of Court, by R. R. Pearce," Lond. 1847, 8vo. 

At the British Museum are : — 

The Number and Names of Students in the Inns of Court and Chancery, 

1585 (Lamd. MS. 47, arts. 34, 35). 
Lists of Persons admitted at Gray's Inn, 1531—1677 (Earl MS. 1912). 
Names of Benchers, Associates, &c, of the Innek Temple, and of the 

several Inns of Court, temp. Elizabeth {Lamd. MS. 106, arts. 15 — 17). 

1 See ante, page 196. 



MISCELLANEOUS RECORDS. 431 

The Christian and surnames, with the date of admission, of all 
Solicitors and Attorneys, are preserved on the rolls of their respec- 
tive courts. 

Those for the Court of Chancery commence in 1730, and are 
preserved at the Petty Bag Office ; those for the Queen's Bench 
commence in 1729, and are kept by the Master of the Court; those 
for the Common Pleas commence in 1730, and are preserved by the 
Clerk of the Warrants ; and in their respective custodies are like- 
wise registered all articles of clerkship from the years 1749, 1753, 
and 1780, whereby the name, residence, and description of the 
parents of the intended attorney may be ascertained. From these 
documents, also, the age of the attorney may be estimated. From 
the certificates annually taken out of the Stamp Office by all attor- 
neys, solicitors, and conveyancers, the contents of which are entered 
at the Stamp Office, and (as to attorneys) at the Queen's Bench 
Office, may be obtained the residence of the party; and the period 
of his death may, perhaps, be ascertained from the discontinuance 
of the certificate. 

In 1798 a Law List, with the names and residences of all the 
members of the profession, was published, and has been continued 
annually. 

Lists of Attorneys-General, Solicitors- General, Serjeants-at-Law, 
etc., with Lists of Law Officers of Scotland and Ireland, to the year 
1851, may be found in Haydn's " Book of Dignities" 

The Advocates and Procurators belonging to the Ecclesiastical 
Court were formerly appointed by the Primate. The individuals of 
the profession did not form a distinct society till the beginning of 
the reign of Henry the Eighth, when a plan of association was 
formed, under the denomination of " The College of Doctors and 
Advocates of the Court of Arches." In 1568 this voluntary corpo- 
ration obtained Montjoy House, and other buildings in the parish 
of Saint Benet, Paul's Wharf, for the use of the advocates. Their 
courts have been thenceforth held there, and the whole thus received 
the appellation of Doctors' Commons. 

In 1768 this body became incorporated by letters patent, under 
the title of (C The College of Doctors of Law exercent in the Eccle- 
siastical and Admiralty Courts;" and it was therein declared that 
no person should be admitted into the Society without having 
regularly taken the degree of Doctor of the Civil Law, either at 
Cambridge or Oxford. 

In the register of the Society two lists appear — one containing 



432 MISCELLANEOUS RECORDS. 

the names of mere commensales and honorary members, as well 
as of pleaders and surrogates ; the other comprehending only pro- 
fessed advocates. The first date which occurs in the second list 
is the 22nd February 1511-12; but, as the formation of the Society 
was not later than November 1511, the list is evidently imperfect. 
A still more correct Catalogue was printed in a sheet in 1800, and 
another partial catalogue was printed in 1804, and afterwards sup- 
pressed. 

The records of the admissions of Proctors are kept at Doctors* 
Commons, by the Registers of the Arches of the Court of Canterbury, 
in paper books, called ce Assignation Books." 

Lists of the Advocates and Proctors, from 1671 to 1755, appear in 
the annual publication entitled Chamberlayne's "Anglim Notitia, or 
Present State of Great Britain." Other Lists, to the year 1851, 
will be found in Haydn's " Book of Dignities," part iii. 

Lists of Civilians, from 1511 to 1800, were published in the latter 
year. A work entitled " Sketches of the Lives of English Civilians" 
was printed in 1804. 8vo. 



RECORDS OF MEMBERS OF THE MEDICAL 
PROFESSION. 

The records of Surgeons, Physicians, and Apothecaries, must be 
searched for in the corporation registers of their respective com- 
panies. 

Surgeons. — The barbers took up the practice of surgery at a 
very early period, and were incorporated in 1461 (1 Edw. IV.), from 
which period no one was to exercise surgery unless approved of by 
the masters and governors. As this was not sufficient restraint 
against intruders, the barbers obtained an Act of Parliament, in the 
3rd Henry VIII. , preventing all other persons from practising sur- 
gery within London and seven miles of the same. But the prac- 
tising surgeons of London, having more skill than the barbers, 
separated themselves into a distinct society (though not incorpo- 
rated), and by Statute 32 Henry VIII. were incorporated by the 
name of "The Barbers and Surgeons of London ; w and no barbers 
within the city of London, the suburbs, or one mile compass, were 
thenceforth to occupy any surgery, letting of blood, or other things 
belonging to surgery, except drawing of teeth. 

By letters patent of 5 Charles I. no person was to practise surgery 



MISCELLANEOUS RECORDS. 433 

within seven miles of London without letters testimonial from the 
masters or governors of that company. 

By Statute 18 George II. the partnership between the barbers 
and surgeons was dissolved, and the surgeons were incorporated 
separately. 

Physicians. — There was no restraint by law for the practice of 
physic till the 3rd Henry VIII., when the Bishop of London or 
Dean of St. Paul's, and four doctors of physic, were to license people 
to practise in London, or seven miles thereof. They were incor- 
porated 10 Henry VIII., and were to examine all persons, and 
authorise their practising within seven miles of London. An 
University degree of Doctor of Medicine was necessary to enable a 
practitioner to practise out of London. 

Apothecaries. — These practitioners were first incorporated with 
the grocers in 1606, and separately in 1617. Though a trading 
company, and having many members unconnected with the pro- 
fession, yet many apothecaries will be found on their records. 

Lists have been printed of a portion of the members of these pro- 
fessions, from the reign of Elizabeth. Chamberlayne published 
annual lists of them, from 1671, in his "Anglice Notitia." The 
"Red Books" have the names to the present year. Other publica- 
tions of the present day are "The British Medical Directory for 
England, Wales, and Scotland/' royal 8vo. ; and " The London and 
Provincial Medical Directory," in 8vo. In the Lambeth Library 
are " Returns of the Physicians for the Diocese of St. Asaph, Exeter, 
St. David's, Norwich, and Bristol, for the year 1666." (MS. 639.) 

Arms of the members of the College of Physicians, a.d. 1666, are 
given in Sloane MS. 4000, in the British Museum 



RECORDS OF SOLDIERS. 1 

The earliest list of Soldiers extant is to be gathered from "Domes- 
day Book" the published index to which affords an excellent cata- 
logue of Norman warriors. 

A roll of the gentry and warriors who came over with William 
the Conqueror was anciently hung up in Battle Abbey, Sussex, and 
thence called the " Battle Abbey Roll ; ; ' but no true copy of it is 

1 Sec mnte, page 388. 

28 



434 MISCELLANEOUS RECORDS. 

in existence. Several lists, unworthy of credit, are to be found in 
various chronicles, as already noticed at page 12 of this work. 

In the reign of Henry III., certain Commissioners were appointed 
in each county, who were directed to return an account of all the 
" gentry," and ultimately of all " men," who had used or were able 
to use arms, and were of able body, between the ages of sixteen and 
sixty years. From this reign, then, we are supplied with a quantity 
of muster-rolls, or books, of very considerable interest, though with 
very great deficiencies. These returns of inquisitions were not 
inrolled, and it is by accident they have been preserved : they can 
only be discovered by a perusal of the catalogues of the various 
public libraries. In them will be found the Christian and surname 
and rank of each individual, his armour, sometimes his age, the 
value of his lands, his wages, the time of his service, his dwelling, 
and occasionally other particulars. 

The Writs of Military Summons tempp. Edward I. and II., were 
printed by the Record Commissioners, together with the Parlia- 
mentary Writs, in the years 1827 and 1830, in 2 vols, folio. The 
former occur in vol. i. pp. 193 — 380, and in vol. ii. div. ii. pp. 367 
— 763. The portion of the text relating to Military Service will 
be found to include, in addition to the Writs of Summons, &c, all 
the Scutage Writs which the Rolls in the Tower can supply, and a 
complete series of all the Commissions of Array. 

In addition to the muster -books, the Earl Marshal, the Heralds, 
and other officers, were accustomed to compile rolls of the men-at- 
arms for various purposes connected with their respective offices, 
and some of these rolls have been likewise by accident preserved, 
and are to be found in the public libraries of the kingdom. There 
is no particular form in which the returns or inquisitions commonly 
called muster-rolls were kept, and they contain more or less par- 
ticulars, as circumstances or accidents dictated. 

At the Rolls House are the indentures of such persons as have 
contracted to serve the Kings of England in their wars. 

Musters and other papers relating to military affairs, from the 
time of Henry VIII. to that of Charles II., in about forty volumes, 
are deposited at the State Paper Office. 

At the Chapter House are thirty-four volumes of musters taken 
in the reign of Henry VIII. in the counties of Bedford, Dorset, 
Gloucester, Southampton, Hereford, Lincoln, Northampton, Nor- 
folk, Nottingham, Oxon, Salop, Stafford, Surrey, Sussex, Wilts, 
Worcester, York, Anglesey, Denbigh, Merioneth, Monmouth, and 



MISCELLANEOUS RECOKDS. 435 

North and South Wales. An Inventory of these may be found in 
Thomas's "Hand-Book to the Records," pp. 287—297. 

Modern Muster-Rolls. — It is the duty of the Adjutant of each 
regiment to prepare a monthly list, containing the names of every 
man in his regiment (whether officer, non-commissioned officer, 
private, drummer, or trumpeter), in alphabetical order, by troops or 
companies, which lists are called muster-rolls, or adjutant's rolls ; 
and a copy of this monthly list is duly transmitted to the Secretary 
at War. 1 The original, or another copy, is understood to be kept at 
regimental head-quarters. In this return, notice is made of all 
casualties which have occurred since the last return ; and there are 
very few instances- where the date of the casualty does not appear. 
These muster-rolls are now in paper books; formerly they were 
occasionally on parchment. 

Connected with these documents is a similar one called the Pay 
List, being an account made out by the Paymaster of the pay and 
allowances of the regiment, and showing the dates to which officers 
and men who die shall have been paid by him. This list is periodi- 
cally returned to the Secretary at War; and from December 1797 
the regimental pay-lists may be considered as duplicate authority, 
they being deemed to have the full credit and authority of muster- 
rolls. 

The earliest returns in the War Office are dated 1700, about 
which period the corrected manuscript Army Lists were formed, 
which gave the promotions and deaths of commissioned officers, but 
did not then show, and have not since shown, any reference to non- 
commissioned officers, drummers, trumpeters, or privates. 

There are no muster-rolls in the War Office of an earlier date 
than 1760; if any exist they will possibly be with the head- quarters 
of the regiment, or with the regimental agent. 

Up to December 1809, the muster-rolls of regiments serving in 
Ireland are kept in that country, and inquiries relative to them 
should be made to the Chief or Under Secretary of the Lord Lieu- 
tenant, Dublin Castle. From that period they have been transmitted 
monthly to the War Office, London. 

In 1735 his Majesty, by circular, directed the muster-rolls to be 

1 The whole of the War Office Papers, consisting of 40,104 bound volumes and 
bundles, have been recently transferred to the New Eecokd Repositoby, Chancery 
Lane. 



436 MISCELLANEOUS RECORDS. 

taken half-yearly, not by troops or companies, but regimentally, on 
one sheet of large paper, showing officers and privates. 

The muster-rolls of the Royal Regiment of Artillery are sent to 
the Paymasters of the corps, who transmit them to the Surveyor- 
General of the Ordnance, Tower, with whom they are deposited. A 
monthly muster-roll is sent to the head-quarters, Woolwich, and 
the others are disposed of as above. The same remarks apply to the 
Engineers, 

The first printed Army List appeared in the year 1754; partial 
lists of the army were, however, published in Chamberlayne's 
"Anglia Notitia" as early as 1708. The " New Annual Army List " 
by Major H. G-. Hart, is the best work of the present day. 

The first publication in the "London Gazette" of promotions, &c, 
of officers in the army was on the 13th of January, 1767. 

Army Lists give the services and deaths of 'commissioned officers 
only ; Muster Rolls and Pay Lists give that information, and also 
all further particulars regarding warrant officers, non-commissioned 
officers, drummers, trumpeters, and privates. 

The muster-books of the Royal Marines are kept by the Adjutants 
of the respective divisions, and a monthly return is transmitted to 
the Admiralty, a copy being kept at the head-quarters of each 
division. Similar returns of this body are transmitted from all 
vessels of war, and from all foreign stations, as often as opportunity 
serves. 

The muster-rolls for the Militia commenced with the revolu- 
tionary war in 1792. 

The Clerk of the Peace for each county has inrolments of the 
Militia Officers, entered on rolls called the Qualification Rolls. 

The East India Company are also in possession of muster-rolls 
and army lists of their armies, from which the same information 
may be obtained as from the documents at the War Office ; and 
most persons proceeding to India in the service of the Company are 
obliged to prove their age by certificates of baptism, which are pre- 
served at the East India House. 

East India Registers, containing much of the information supplied 
by the above documents, have been published annually from 1795. 

An Alphabetical List of the Medical Officers of the Indian Army, 
from 1764 to 1838, was published by Dodswell and Miles in 1839, 
royal 8vo. 

References to Muster-Books, Lists of Officers, &c, deposited in 
public libraries, are given in the following pages : — 



MISCELLANEOUS KECORDS. 437 



LISTS OF MUSTERS, ARMY LISTS, ETC. 

Army Lists, and other Papers; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 9755—9762. 

List of the Followers of Hen. III. to Palestine ; Bbit. Mus. Harl. MS. 6033, 

art. 3. 
Commissions of Musters and Returns, tempp. Edw. I., Edw. II., and Ric. III. ; 

Brit. Mus. Harl. MSS. 433; 1192. 
The Siege of Carlaverock, 28 Edw. I., with the Names and Arms of the Earls, 

Barons, and Knights present, by Sir N. H. Nicolas. Lond. 1828. 4to. 
The Roll of Karlaverock, emblazoned by A. P. Harrison. 1846. 4to. 
Catalogue of the Names and Arms of the principal Captains, as well Noble- 
men as Knights, which were with King Edward III. at the Siege of 

Calais; Ashm. Lib. Wood MS. 8547. 
List of the Slain at the Battle of Poictiers ; Brit. M.V9. Harl. MS. 200, art. 3; 

and of Prisoners taken there ; tM, art. 4. 
Names of Persons serving in the Wars, from Edw. III. to Hen. VII. inclusive ; 

Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 804, f. 51. 
Extracts relative to Officers appointed to Military and Naval Commands, 

tempp. Edw. III., Hen. VI., and Hen. VIII. ; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 

5485, f. 52. 
Muster RoEs and Documents chiefly relating to the Wars of the English in 

Prance, between 1385 and 1682; Brit. Mus. Add. Chart. 232—505; 

1061—1246; 1397—1516; 3294—4125. 
Account of Men-at-Arms, and others, engaged to serve in sundry National 

Expeditions, from the reign of Rich. II. to temp. Hen. VI. ; Coll. of 

Arms, Vincent MS. 29. 
Roll of the Men-at-Arms in the English Army at the Battle of Agincourt. 

See Nicolas's " History of the Battle of Agincourt" Lond. 1^21. — 2nd 

ed. 1832. — Also Hunter's "Agincourt; a contribution towards an authen- 
tic List of the Commanders of the English Hosts in Henry V. 9 s Expedition 

to France." Lond. 1850. 
Names and Arms of those who were with Hen. IV. at the Siege of Rouen, 

anno 1418 ; Coll. of Arms, Vincent MS. 50. 
Names of Noble-men slain at Tewkesbury; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 692, 

f. 264 5.— Trin. Coll. Dubl. MS. H. 48, f. 200. 
Musters taken temp. Hen. VIII. to Chas. II. See ante, page 434. 
List of Officers of the Ordnance, 14 Hen. VIII.— 1634 ; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 

6176, f. 29. 
Papers relating to Musters of the Army, temp. Elizabeth ; Brit. Mus. Harl. 

MSS. 168; 253, arts. 38—44; 366, art. 1; 2219, arts. 15, 19; 4228, 

arts. 10, 13 ; 4943, art. 1 ; 6671 ; 6849, art. 2. 
Officers' Names and Governors of Places; Brit. Mus. Harl. MS. 293, 

f. 223.— Add. MS. 4796, f. 63. 



438 MISCELLANEOUS RECORDS. 

Lists ov Mttsteeb, etc. 
Lists of sundry Invalid Officers, temp. Elizabeth; Brit. Mus. Lamd. MS. 

1218, f. 125. 
Names of the Officers of the Army at Tilbury, 1588 ; Brit. Mus. Roy. MS. 

18, C. xxi. p. 43. 
Names of the Principal Officers of the Queen's Forces, 1595 ; Brit. Mus. 

Lansd. MS. 78, art. 56. 
Officers of the Ordnance, temp. Jas. I.; Brit. Mus. Roy. MS. 17, A. xxxi. 

art. 3. 
King James Second's Army List, 1689, by John D'Alton. Dublin, 1855. 
Lists of Officers in the Army of Charles I. ; Brit. Mus. Sari. MS. 6804. 
List of Colonels, temp. Charles I. ; Brit. Mus. Sari. MS. 38, art. 22. 
Royalists' Composition Papers during the Commonwealth, alphabetically 

arranged ; State Paper Office. 
Lists of the Lords, Knights, Commoners, and Gentlemen slain in the late 

Wars, 1660; Brit. Mus. Sari. MS. 2155, art. 34.— See also Prest- 

wick's " Respublica," p. 131. 
List of the Officers of the Army, 1687 ; Brit. Mus. Sari. MS. 4847. 
List of King James's Army in Ireland, 1689 ; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 9763. 
Army and Navy List, etc., from 1689 to 1701; 6 vols. 4to; All Souls' 

Coll. Oxf. MS. clii. 
Lists of the principal Officers in the Army of James II. ; Brit. Mus. Lansd. 

MS. 1163. 
List of Officers of the Regiments, etc., disbanded since 10th September 1697; 

All Souls' Coll. Oxf. MS. cliv. 
Army Lists, and Debentures signed by Lord Ranelagh, 1699 — 1710 ; Brit. 

Mus. Add. MSS. 9755—9762. 
Lists of Officers from 1705 to 1755 may be found in Chamberlayne's "Anglia 

Notitia, or Present State of Great Britain" published annually during 

this period. 
Succession of Colonels to the several Troops and Regiments, 1733; Brit. 

Mus. Add. MS. 11,286. 
List of Indian Officers to 185 1. See Haydn's " Book of Dignities" pt. iii. 
Lists of Governors of Forts, Castles, Hospitals, Islands, etc., to the year 

1806. See Beatson's "Political Index" vol. ii. 
Lists of Commanders-in-Chief, Pield-Marshals, Generals, &c, in the British 

Army, to the year 1806. See Beatson's " Political Index ," vol. ii. — 

The same to the year 1851. See Haydn's "Boal of Dignities ," part iii. 
Lists of Ordnance Officers to 1806. See Beatson's "Political Index" vol. ii. 

Cambridgeshire : Warrants for raising Men and Horses in Cambridgeshire, 

a.d. 1595, &c; Brit. Mus. Sari. MS. 6599. 
Orders about the Militia in Cambridgeshire, from 1626 to 

1640; Brit. Mus. Sari. MS. 4014. 



MISCELLANEOUS RECORDS. 439 

Lists op Mttstehs, etc. 
Cambridgeshire (contintced) : Musters for Cambridgeshire, the Isle of Ely, 

and Norfolk, 1591 ; Bkit. Mus. Add. MS. 5848, p. 284. 
Dorsetshire : Musters in the County of Dorset ; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 3324, 

arts. 3—7. 
Herefordshire : The Muster-Book of the Foure Fotte Companies of trayned 
Souldiers, in the Hundreds of Caishoe and Dacorum, Co. Hereford, a.d. 
1040; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 2285. 
Lancashire : Accounts of Musters in Lancashire ; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 

1926, art 1. 
Norfolk : Papers relating to Musters in the County of Norfolk, 1578, 1594, 
1627—1665; Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 5847, p. 313; 5848, pp. 284, 
286. 
Shropshire : A List of Indigent Officers certified out of the County of Salop, 
temp. Charles L. See Nichols' " Collectanea Topographica et Genealogica" 
vol. vii. p. 315. 
Suffolk : Names of Bowmen in the County of Suffolk, temp. Elizabeth ; Brit. 
Mus. Earl. MS. 366, ff. 40—52. 

Names of Pikemen, Bowe-men, and Bill-men, &c, in the County of 

Suffolk, 1579 ; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 309, ff. 186, 187. 

Surrey : Account of Musters in Surrey ; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 703, art. 27. 
Sussex: Eeturn of Persons summoned for Military Service in Sussex, 25 
Edtv. I.; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 5705, p. 320.* 

Muster Roll for the Rape of Hastings, 13 Edw. III. See Nichols' 

(t Collectanea Topographica et Genealogica" vol. vii. pp. 118. 

Wiltshire: North Wiltshire Musters, 30 Hen. VIII.. From the original in 
the Chapter House, Westminster. Privately printed by Sir Thomas 
PhiUipps, Bart. 1834. Folio. 

Ireland : List of the Army under the Command of the Earl of Essex. Lond. 
1642. 8vo. 

The Muster Rolls of the Province of Ulster ; Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 

4770; 18,735. 

Lists of Governors of Forts, Castles, Hospitals, &c, to the year 1806. 

See Beatson's "Political Index" vol.iii. 

RECORDS OF SAILORS. 

At the Ticket Office of the Nayy Office are preserved Lists of 
the Sailors in the Royal Navy, as well officers as otherwise, con- 
taining the ages of all the men (not officers), as stated by themselves 
at the time of their entering the service, and their birthplace. 
There are, also, regular returns to the Navy Office of the time and 
place of death of all sailors, both officers and men. 



440 MISCELLANEOUS RECORDS. 

Although the ages of the commissioned officers do not appear hy 
the navy records, yet, as the times of their entrance into the navy, 
and the dates of their commissions, are registered, the times of their 
birth may be ascertained ■without great inaccuracy. 

In 1749 the commissioned officers were about 1000 in number, 
and 10,000 in 1820. 

Steele's printed " Navy List" was first published in 1772, and 
was succeeded, in 1814, by the "Navy List" in its present form. A 
"New Navy List" by Joseph Allen, is published annually. 

The Library of the British Museum is very rich in manuscript 
collections relating to the Navy, the principal of which will be found 
among the Harleian and Additional Manuscripts. 

The records of the High Court of Admiralty, from 1542 to 1793, 
are at the Tower of London. 

References to Lists of Officers in the Navy will be found below : — 

Papers Relating to the Navy; Brit. Mus. Cotton. MS. Otho E. ix.; — Add. 

MSS. 9289—9339. 
List of the Admirals of England; Brit. Mus. Shane MS. 1301, art. 6. 
A List of the Admirals of England, from 8 Hen. III. to 16 James I., is given 

in Spelman's " Glossarium Archeeologicum" ed. 1626, p. 16. 
Names of the Vice- Admirals of England; Brit. Mus. Hart. MS. 474, f. 97. 
List of English Admirals, from 34 Edw. I. to 27 Elizabeth; Brit. Mus. 

Add. MS. 12,471. 
Admiralli Angliae, a temp. Edw. II., ad ann. 1590 ; Brit. Mus. Hart. MSS. 

6082,^.22; 6843, f. 151; 6848, art. 30. 
Extracts relative to Officers appointed to Military and Naval Commands, 

tempp. Edw. III., Hen. VI., and Hen. VIII. ; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 

5485, f. 52. 
List of the Eoyal Navy of England, anno 1546 ; Trin. Coll. Camb., Pepys 

MS. 99. 
Names of the Officers of the Navy, temp. Elizabeth; Brit. Mus. Boy. MS. 

18, C. xxi. pp. 4, 9. 
Ships and Captains serving against the Spaniards, 1588; Brit. Mus. Boy. 

MS. 14, B. xiii. 
List of English Captains now in England, 1597; Brit. Mus. Lansd. MS. 

84, art. 6. 
List of Men and Ships appointed for Sir Francis Drake's Journey ; Brit. 

Mvs.HarLMS. 366, f. 146. 
List of Officers of the Navy, temp. Car. I. ; Brit. Mus. Harh MS. 7504, art. 1. 
List of the Ships, Commanders, etc., at the Eight against the Hollanders, 

2nd and 3rd June 1653 ; All Souls' Coll. Oxf. MS. cxL 



MISCELLANEOUS RECORDS. 441 

Navy Lists, etc. 
Register of Admissions and Promotions of Officers employed in the English 

Navy between 1660 and 1688 ; Tkin. Coll. Camb. Pepys MS. 128. 
Lists of the Navy, from 1660 to 1691 ; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 7464. 
List of Officers of the Navy, from 1660 to 1750; Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 

11,603. 
List of Officers from 1705 to 1755 may be found in Chamberlayne's "Anglia 

Notitia, or Present State of Great Britain" published annually during 

this period. 
List of Officers of the Navy from 1672 to 1684 ; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 7504. 
A List of Commanders and Lieutenants surviving, that have served in the 

Dutch Wars, taken 1680 ; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 6277, f. 143. 
List of Flag Officers in the Royal Fleet of England, from 1688 to 1715; 

Brit. Mus. Add. MS. 11,604. 
List of Officers of the Navy made by the Admiralty Commissioners, to the 

year 1691; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 6003, f. 251. 
List of Officers in the Navy, 1691 ; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 7472. 
Lists of the Royal Navy, 1692—1694 ; Brit. Mus. Eg. MS. 863 ;— Add. MS. 

14,418. 
Characters of Great Men and Officers of the Navy in the reign of Queen 

Anne; Brit. Mus. Earl. MS. 6760. 
Biographia Navalis; or Memoirs of the Officers of the Navy from 1600, by 

John Charnock. 4