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Full text of "Duquesne University Bulletin 1952-1953"


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Office of the Registrar 

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Office of the Eegistrar 
Duquesne "n-versity 
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The 
DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 

BULLETIN 



<© 



Announcement of the 

GRADUATE SCHOOL 



1952-1953 




DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 

PITTSBURGH 19, PENNA. 



The 

DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 

BULLETIN 

VOLUME XL JANUARY 1952 NUMBER 1 



Announcement of the 

GRADUATE SCHOOL 

For the Session p ^1 4 * 1 

1952-1953 




GRADUATE SCHOOL OFFICE 
DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 
PITTSBURGH 19, PENNSYLVANIA 



VOLUME XL JANUARY 1952 NUMBER 1 



CALENDAR 

1952-1953 

SUMMER SESSION 

June 12, 13, 14 y Thursday, Friday from 9:00-4:00; Saturday until Noon 

Registration, Eight Weeks Session, Day and Evening 

June 16, Monday Eight Weeks Session begins 

June 26, 27, 28, Thursday, Friday from 9:00-4:00; Saturday until Noon 

Registration, Six Weeks Day Session 

June 30, Monday Six Weeks Session begins 

July 3, Thursday Latest date to apply for degrees: August Candidates 

July 3, Thursday Latest date for submitting completed theses 

to faculty readers: August Candidates 

July 4, Friday Holiday 

July 11, Friday Modern Language Examination 

July 12, Saturday Class Day 

July 14, Monday Comprehensive Examination 

July 18, Friday Latest date for filing approved theses 

in the Graduate Office: August Candidates 
August 8, Friday Summer Sessions end: Commencement 

1952-1953 
FIRST SEMESTER 

September 12, 13, Friday, Saturday until Noon Registration 

September 15, Monday First Semester begins 

September 27, Saturday Latest date for change of schedule, etc. 

October 25, Saturday Latest date for removal of E, I, X grades 

October 25, Saturday Latest date to apply for degrees: January Candidates 

October 25, Saturday Latest date for filing an outline of thesis: 

January Candidates 

November 1, Saturday Holiday 

November 21, Friday Modern Language Examination 

November 26, Wednesday {after last class) Thanksgiving Vacation begins 

December 1, Monday Classes resumed 

December 8, Monday . . Holiday 

December 20, Saturday Latest date for submitting completed theses 

to faculty readers: January Candidates 

December 20, Saturday {after last class) Christmas Vacation begins 

January 5, Monday Classes resumed 

January 7, Wednesday Latest date for filing approved theses 

in the Graduate Office: January Candidates 

January 8, Thursday Comprehensive Examination 

January 15, Thursday Final Examinations begin 

January 24, Saturday Final Examinations: Saturday Classes 

1952-1953 
SECOND SEMESTER 

February 6, 7, Friday, Saturday until Noon Registration 

February 9, Monday Second Semester begins 

February 21, Tuesday Latest date for change of schedule, etc. 

February 21, Tuesday Latest date to apply for degrees: June Candidates 

March 16, Friday Modern Language Examination 

March 17, Saturday Latest date for filing an outline of thesis: 

June Candidates 

March 21, Wednesday Latest date for removal of E, I, X grades 

April 1, Wednesday {after last class) Easter Vacation begins 

April 7, Tuesday Classes resumed 

April 20, Monday Comprehensive Examination 

April 25, Saturday Latest date for submitting completed theses 

to faculty readers: June Candidates 

May 14, Thursday Holiday 

May 16, Saturday Latest date for filing approved theses 

in the Graduate Office: June Candidates 

May 30, Saturday .•••;• Holiday 

June 1, Monday Final Examinations begin 

June 6, Saturday Final Examinations: Saturday Classes 

June 7, Sunday Baccalaureate Services and Commencement Exercises 

Registration is conducted during the days listed in the above calendar. 
Only by rare exception, by consent of the Dean, and on payment of a penalty, 
will late registration be permitted. 






CONTENTS 

Page 

Calendar ii 

Personnel: 

Officers of Administration 5 

Graduate Council 5 

Advisory Board 6 

Committee on Admissions 7 

Committee on Modern Languages 7 

Faculty 8 

General Statement: 

Historical Statement 18 

Location 18 

Philosophy and Objectives 18 

Purpose of the Graduate School 19 

Accreditation and Membership 19 

Degrees 20 

Candidacy 20 

Admission : 

Application 20 

Official Transcripts 21 

Acceptance 21 

Conditional Status 21 

Unclassified Status 21 

Campus Courtesy 21 

Auditors 22 

Registration : 

Graduate Program 22 

Where to Register 22 

General Requirements: 

Hours in Course 22 

Restriction on Time 22 

Residence 23 

Transferred Graduate Credit 23 

Pro-Seminar 23 

Language Requirement 23 

Comprehensive Examination 23 

Outline of Thesis 24 

Thesis 24 



Page 

Grading 25 

Tuition and Fees 25 

Summary of Requirements 28 

Campus Facilities: 

Chapel 29 

Laboratories 29 

Residence 29 

Library 30 

Guidance Bureau 30 

Assistantships and Scholarships 31 

Departments and Courses of Instruction 32 

Biological Sciences 33 

Business Administration 36 

Chemistry 42 

Classics 44 

Economics 46 

Education 48 

English 54 

History 56 

Modern Languages 58 

Music 62 

Pharmacy 65 

Philosophy 67 

Political Science 69 

Social Science 71 

Student Enrollment 74 

Graduate Degrees Granted 82 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 



PERSONNEL 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Vert Reverend Vernon F. Gallagher, CS.Sp., Ph.D. 
President of the University 

Reverend J. Gerald Walsh, CS.Sp., Ph.D. 
Dean of the Graduate School 

Reverend Sebastian J. Schiffgens, CS.Sp., B.A. 
Treasurer of the University 

Maurice J. Murphy, D.Ed. 
Registrar of the University 

Margaret Eleanor McCann, B.S. (Library Science) 
Librarian of the University 



GRADUATE COUNCIL 

Reverend J. Gerald Walsh, CS.Sp., Ph.D. 
Chairman 

Reverend Joseph R. Kletzel, CS.Sp., M.A. 
Dean of the College 

Reverend William R. Hurney, CS.Sp., B.A. 
Dean of the School of Music 

Reverend George A. Harcar, CS.Sp., D.Ed. 
Dean of the School of Education 

Hugh C Muldoon, Ph.G., B.S., D.Sc. 
Dean of the School of Pharmacy 

Albert B. Wright, M.A., D.CS. 
Dean of the School of Business Administration 

Maurice J. Murphy, D.Ed. 
Registrar of the University 



Page Five 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



ADVISORY BOARD 



Joseph H. Bialas 
Lou R. Cbandall 
Walter J. Curley 
Edward J. Hanley 
R. B. Heppenstall 
John J. Kane 
J. P. Lalley 
David L. Lawrence 
Charles McKenna Lynch 
William J. McIlvane 
John P. Monteverde 
Dominic Navarro 



Edward J. O'Brien 

John A. Robertshaw 

John P. Robin 

John P. Roche 

W. F. Rockwell, Sr. 

J. T. Ryan, Jr. 

William A. Seifert, Sr. 

J. V. Smith 

William J. Strassburger 

Samuel A. Weiss 

Irwin D. Wolf 



Page Six 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 



COMMITTEE ON ADMISSIONS 

Reverend Hilary J. Kline, C.S.Sp., M.S. 
Biology 

Albert B. Wright, M.A., D.C.S. 

Business Administration 

Tobias H. Dunkelberger, Ph.D. 
Chemistry 

Reverend Raymond M. Cadwallader, Ph.D. 
Classics 

Cyril Zebot, Ph.D. 
Economics 

Regis J. Leonard, Ph.D. 
Education 

James M. Purcell, Ph JD. 
English 

Reverend Salvator J. Federici, C.S.Sp., Ph.D. 
History 

Edmund M. Goehring, M.S. 
Music 

Hugh C. Muldoon, D.Sc. 
Pharmacy 

Reverend J. Gerald Walsh, C.S.Sp., Ph.D. 
Philosophy 

Paul Anderson, Ph.D. 
Political Science 

Reverend Francis R. Duffy, CS.Sp., M.A. 
Social Science 

COMMITTEE ON MODERN LANGUAGES 

Primitivo Colombo, Ph.D. 
Chairman 

Pauline M. Reinkraut, Ph.D. 
Kenneth Duffy, Ph.D. 



Graduate School Office, 37 Canevin Hall, is open daily, 
9:00 to 5:00; Sat., 9:00 to 12:00; Phone: Grant 1-4635 



Page Seven 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



FACULTY 

John N. Albauoh Instructor in Management 

B.S. Duquesne University, 1949 
M.S. Duquesne University, 1951 

Neish Ave., R.D. 2, Aliquippa, Pa. Aliquippa 880-N 

Charles G. Algier Assistant Professor of Classics 

B.A. Loyola University, Chicago, 1941 
M.A. Loyola University, Chicago, 1942 

1519 McFarland Road, Pittsburgh 16, Pa. LOcust 1-5639 

Henry Anderson Assistant Professor of Business Economics 

B.A. University of London, 1939 
M.B.A. Columbia University, 1948 

1425 McFarland Road, Pittsburgh 16, Pa. 

Paul H. Anderson Associate Professor of Political Science 

B.A. University of Notre Dame, 1938 
M.A. University of Notre Dame, 1939 
Ph.D. University of Notre Dame, 1942 

7126 Mt. Vernon St., Pittsburgh 8, Pa. FRemont 1-5395 

George P. Basttr Assistant Professor of Economics 

B.A. Gettysburg College, 1947 
MXitt. University of Pittsburgh, 1949 

3871 Brighton Road, Pittsburgh 12, Pa. 

Gerard Bessette Instructor in Modern Languages 

B.A. University of Montreal, 1941 

M.A. University of Montreal, 1946 

Licence es Lettres, University of Montreal, 1946 

DXitt. University of Montreal, 1950 

348 South Highland Ave., Pittsburgh 6, Pa. EMerson 1-9518 

Eva Betschart Lecturer in Elementary Education 

B.S. Pennsylvania State College, 1925 

603 Olympia Road, Pittsburgh 11, Pa. EVerglade 1-1381 

Eleanora A. Bevil Lecturer in Elementary Education 

B.S. University of Pittsburgh, 1935 
M.Ed. University of Pittsburgh, 1942 
730 Kelly St., Wilkinsburg, Pa. 

Martin I. Blake Assistant Professor of Pharmacy 

B.S. Brooklyn College of Pharmacy, 1947 
M.S. Rutgers University, 1950 
Ph.D. Ohio State University, 1951 

5320 Keeport Drive, Pittsburgh 27, Pa. 

Sydney M. Brown Professor of History 

B.A. Bowdoin College, 1916 
M.A. Oxford University, 1927 
Ph.D. Oxford University, 1937 

1214 West Point Ave., Pittsburgh 12, Pa. Linden 1-6279-J 



Page Eight 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 



Beenard A. Brunner Instructor in English 

B.A. Hendrix College, 1947 
M.A. University of Chicago, 1948 
Ph.D. University of Chicago, 1951 

301 Roup St., Pittsburgh 32, Pa. EMerson 1-9867 

Rev. Raymond M. Cadwallader Associate Professor of Classics 

Ph.D. University of Montreal, 1947 

1102 Vickroy St., Pittsburgh 19, Pa. GRant 1-3184 

William V. Campbell. Lecturer in Secondary Education 

B.S. Duquesne University, 1934 
M.Ed. Duquesne University, 1938 

315 East 11th Ave., Homestead, Pa. HOmestead 1-3586 

Reyes Carbonell Assistant Professor of Modern Languages 

B.A. Instituto Luis Vives, Valencia, Spain, 1931 
M.A. University of Valencia, Spain, 1940 
Ph.D. University of Madrid, Spain, 1948 

5524 Fair Oak, Pittsburgh 17, Pa. JAckson 1-6998 

Arthur A. Clay Assistant Professor of Accounting 

B.C.S. New York University 
C.P.A. New York, New Jersey, Ohio 
M.S. Duquesne University, 1950 

Y.M.C.A., Wood St., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Primitivo Colombo Professor of Modern Languages 

B.A. University of Pittsburgh, 1927 
M.A. University of Pittsburgh, 1928 
Ph.D. University of Pittsburgh, 1934 

R.D. No. 4, Box 202, Greensburg, Pa. 

John Fremont Cox Lecturer in Sociology 

B.A. University of Pittsburgh, 1927 
M.A. University of Pittsburgh, 1930 
L L.B. University of Pittsburgh, 1933 
Ph.D. University of Pittsburgh, 1950 

Orphan's Court, Judges Chamber, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Lois R. Cribbins Assistant Professor of Biology 

B.S.Ed. Pennsylvania State College, 1940 
Ph.D. University of Pittsburgh, 1948 
Oakdale, Pa. 

Jack H. Curtis Instructor in Sociology 

B.S. St. Louis University, 1949 
M.A. University of New Mexico, 1950 

927 Vickroy St., Pittsburgh 19, Pa. COurt 1-3446 

Rev. Francis R. Duffy, C.S.Sp Associate Professor of Sociology 

B.A. St. Mary's Seminary, 1938 
B.D. St. Mary's Seminary, 1942 
M.A. Catholic University, 1943 

801 Bluff St., Pittsburgh 19, Pa. GRant 1-4635 

Kenneth Duffy Associate Professor of Modern Languages 

Ed.B. Duquesne University, 1936 
Litt.M. Duquesne University, 1939 
Ph.D. University of Pittsburgh, 1940 

923 Wallace Ave., Pittsburgh 21, Pa. 



Page Nine 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



Tobias H. Dtjnkelberger Professor of Chemistry 

B.S. Dickinson College, 1930 

Ph.D. University of Pittsburgh, 1937 

7227 Kelly St., Pittsburgh 8, Pa. CHurchill 1-3964 

Percy O. Eitel Lecturer in Finance 

242 Arabella St., Pittsburgh 10, Pa. EVerglade 1-4880 

Rev. Michael J. Faidel Assistant Professor of Political Science 

B.A. St. Vincent's College, 1913 
M.A. St. Vincent's Seminary, 1915 
S.T.B. St. Vincent's Seminary, 1917 
LL.B. Duquesne University, 1939 

301 Saline St., Pittsburgh 7, Pa. HAzel 1-2766 

Harold Falkofp Assistant Professor of Commerce 

B.S. Temple University, 1948 
M.B.A. New York University, 1949 

319 Denniston St., Pittsburgh 6, Pa. 

Rev. Salvator J. Federici, C.S.Sp Professor of History 

B.A. Duquesne University, 1934 

S.T.B. University of Fribourg (Switzerland), 1938 

Ph.D. Georgetown University, 1945 

801 Bluff St., Pittsburgh 19, Pa. GRant 1-4635 

Oscar Gawron Associate Professor of Chemistry 

B.S. Brooklyn College, 1934 

Ph.D. Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn, 1945 

1104 North St. Clair St., Pittsburgh 6, Pa. MOntrose 1-6915 

Edmund M. Goehring Associate Professor of Public School Music 

B.S. Duquesne University, 1930 
M.S. Duquesne University, 1935 

1220 Strahley Place, Pittsburgh, Pa. WAlnut 1-3344 

A. John Goetz Professor of Education 

B.A. University of Dayton, 1914 

S.T.B. University of Fribourg (Switzerland), 1923 

Ph.D. University of Fribourg (Switzerland), 1925 

968 Athalia Ave., Monessen, Pa. Monessen 1108 

Vito Grieco Assistant Professor of Accounting 

Ed.B. University of Buffalo, 1939 
Ed.M. University of Buffalo, 1947 
M.S. Duquesne University, 1950 

734 Hill Ave., Wilkinsburg, Pa. FRemont 1-5526 

Lawrence A. Griffin Assistant Professor of Education 

B.S.Ed. Duquesne University, 1934 
M.Ed. University of Pittsburgh, 1940 

2005 East Carson St., Pittsburgh 3, Pa. HUbbard 1-0264 

Geza Grosschmid Assistant Professor of Economics 

Ph.D. University of Budapest, 1943 

6811 Thomas Blvd., Pittsburgh 6, Pa. MOntrose 1-0263 



Page Ten 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 



Rev. Stephen C. Gulovich Lecturer in Philosophy 

B.A. Angelicum, Rome, 1929 
M.A. Angelicum, Rome, 1930 
Ph.D. Angelicum, Rome, 1931 
S.T.D. Propaganda, Rome, 1935 

4027 Beechwood Blvd., Pittsburgh 17, Pa. GRant 1-4635 

Rev. George A. Harcar, C.S.Sp Associate Professor of Education 

B.A. Duquesne University, 1935 
B.D. St. Mary's Seminary, 1937 
M.A. Duquesne University, 1941 
D.Ed. St. Francis College, 1945 

801 Bluff St., Pittsburgh 19, Pa. GRant 1-4635 

Hugh F. Harnsberger Associate Professor of Chemistry 

B.S. William and Mary College, 1944 
M.S. University of California, 1947 
Ph.D. University of California, 1950 

1677 Skyline Drive, Pittsburgh 27, Pa. Plantation 1-2653-M 

Bruno J. Hartung Instructor in Economics 

B.A. St. Vincent College, 1939 
M.A. Catholic University, 1948 

3725 Brighton Road, Pittsburgh 12, Pa. Linden 1-2392 

Raymond O. Heckerman Instructor in Biology 

B.S. Geneva College, 1939 
Graduate Work, University of Pittsburgh 
934 Atlantic Avenue, Monaca, Pa. 

Frank J. Heintz Instructor in Political Science 

B.A. Catholic University, 1947 
M.A. Catholic University, 1949 

3516 Shadeland Ave., Pittsburgh 12, Pa. 

Rev. William J. Holt, C.S.Sp Associate Professor of Educational Psychology 

B.A. Duquesne University, 1928 
B.D. St. Mary's Seminary, 1931 

801 Bluff St., Pittsburgh 19, Pa. GRant 1-4635 

Harry Houtz Lecturer in Education 

B.Ed. Slippery Rock College, 1929 
M.A. University of Pittsburgh, 1937 
M.Ed. University of Pittsburgh, 1947 

1539 Vance Ave., Coraopolis, Pa. Coraopolis 4-5656 

James Hunter Assistant Professor of Music Theory 

B.A. Carnegie Institute of Technology, 1943 
M.A. Duquesne University, 1946 

527 S. Braddock Ave., Pittsburgh, Pa. PEnhurst 1-1153 

Daniel L. Jones Assistant Professor of Biology 

B.A. Utah State College, 1938 
M.A. Pennsylvania State College, 1940 
Ph.D. University of Pittsburgh, 1950 
25 Bon Vue St., Pittsburgh 14, Pa. 

Chester A. Jurczak Instructor in Sociology 

B.A. St. Mary's College, 1940 
M.A. Fordham University, 1948 

5740 Darlington Road, Pittsburgh 17, Pa. 



Page Eleven 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



Rev. Joseph R. Kletzel, C.S.Sp Assistant Professor of English 

B.A. Duquesne University, 1935 
B.D. St. Mary's Seminary, 1936 
M.A. University of Detroit, 1949 

801 Bluff St., Pittsburgh 19, Pa. GRant 1-4635 

Francis X. Kleyle Professor of Elementary Education 

B.A. Carnegie Institute of Technology, 1924 
M.S. Duquesne University, 1933 
Ph.D. University of Pittsburgh, 1950 

421 Oneida St., Pittsburgh 11, Pa. EVerglade 1-2398 

Helen M. Kleyle Instructor in Secondary Education 

B.A. Duquesne University, 1933 
M.Ed. Duquesne University, 1949 

421 Oneida St., Pittsburgh 11, Pa. EVerglade 1-2398 

Ralph A. Klinefelter Associate Professor of English 

B.A. LaSalle College, 1937 

M.A. University of Pennsylvania, 1941 

Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania, 1951 

1304 Macon Ave., Pittsburgh 18, Pa. FRemont 1-9073 

Rev. Gordon F. Knight, C.S.Sp Associate Professor of Religion 

B.A. St. Mary's Seminary, 1927 

S.T.D. Gregorian University, Rome, 1930 

801 Bluff St., Pittsburgh 19, Pa. GRant 1-4635 

Rev. Henry Koren, C.S.Sp Assistant Professor of Philosophy 

S.T.L. Gregorian University, Rome, 1939 
S.T.D. Catholic University, 1942 

801 Bluff St., Pittsburgh 19, Pa. GRant 1-4635 

Vincent F. Lackner Assistant Professor of Philosophy 

B.S. St. Vincent College, 1945 
M.A. University of Toronto, 1948 

3163 Ashlyn St., Pittsburgh 4, Pa. 

Rev. Henry Lemmens, C.S.Sp Assistant Professor of Modern Languages 

M.A. University of Pittsburgh, 1950 
Ph.D. University of Cincinnati, 1951 

801 Bluff St., Pittsburgh 19, Pa. GRant 1-4635 

Regis Leonard Professor of Secondary Education 

B.Ed. Duquesne University, 1936 
M.Ed. University of Pittsburgh, 1938 
Ph.D. University of Pittsburgh, 1949 

5218 Holmes St., Pittsburgh, Pa. STerling 1-2921 

Thomas J. Lowery Instructor in Biology 

B.S. St. Francis College, 1946 
M.S. Fordham University, 1949 

1620 Skyline Drive, Pittsburgh 27, Pa. 

Hugh MacDonald Associate Professor of Piano, Organ 

Ecole Normalle, Paris, 1931 

Student of Piano and Composition under Sigismund Stojowski, Salim 
Palmgren, Pierre Mayer, and Alfred Cortot. Student of Organ 
under Marcel Dupre. 

1105 Bluff St., Pittsburgh 19, Pa. 



Page Twelve 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 



Phillip McDonough Instructor in Finance 

B.S. Duquesne University, 1947 
M.S. Duquesne University, 1949 

436 Library St., Braddock, Pa. ELectric 1-1271 

George McFadden Instructor in English 

B.A. St. Francis College, 1938 
M.A. Brooklyn College, 1948 

811 S. Negley Ave., Pittsburgh, Pa. Hlland 1-7535 

Howard F. McGinn Assistant Professor of Secondary Education 

B.A. Saint Vincent College, 1934 

B.S. Drexel Institute of Technology, 1934 

M.A. Saint Vincent College, 1939 

1709 Harpster St., Pittsburgh, Pa. CEdar 1-8740 

Henry C. McGinnis Instructor in Christian Social Philosophy 

M.A. Duquesne University, 1949 

932 Vickroy St., Pittsburgh 19, Pa. GRant 1-0372 

Helena A. Miller Associate Professor of Biology 

B.S. Ohio State University, 1935 
M.S. Ohio State University, 1938 
Ph.D. Radcliffe College, 1945 

532 Highview Road, Pittsburgh 16, Pa. Fleldbrook 1-1969 

Robert N. Miller Associate Professor of Accounting 

B.C.S. Duquesne University, 1918 
C.P.A. Pennsylvania, 1920 

Orchard Ave., Library, Pa. SChenley 1-1778 

Francis L. Milton Instructor in Finance 

B.S. Duquesne University, 1948 

4915 Brownsville Road/ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Robert E. Mitchell Assistant Professor of English 

A.B. Miami University, 1934 
M.A. Duke University, 1940 
M.A. Harvard University, 1947 
Ph.D. Harvard University, 1951 

218 S. Graham St., Pittsburgh 6, Pa. MOntrose 1-5755 

Richard H. Mohler Associate Professor of Accounting 

C.P.A. Pennsylvania, 1921 
C.P.A. Ohio, 1923 

304 S. Negley Ave., Pittsburgh, Pa. EMerson 1-9191 

John T. Morris Professor of Commerce 

B.A. Washington & Jefferson College, 1900 
M.A. Columbia University, 1926 
Ph.D. Columbia University, 1929 

R.D.No.2, Allison Park, Pa. Glenshaw 956-M 

Hugh C. Muldoon Professor of Chemistry 

Ph.G. Union University, 1912 
B.S. Valparaiso University, 1920 
D.Sc. Valparaiso University, 1925 

William Penn Hotel, Pittsburgh, Pa. ATlantic 1-7100 



Page Thirteen 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



James P. Niland Associate Professor of Management 

B.S. Duquesne University, 1942 
M.Litt. University of Pittsburgh, 1948 

25 Moody St., Braddock, Pa. BRandywine 1-S793 

Patrick M. O'Donnell Assistant Professor of Political Science 

B.A. Duquesne University, 1947 
M.Litt. University of Pittsburgh, 1948 
LL.B. University of Pittsburgh, 1950 

112 W. Steuben Ave., Pittsburgh 5, Pa. 

Anthony T. Oltva Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.A. Long Island University, 1937 
M.A. Teachers College, Columbia U., 1940 
D.Ed. Columbia University, 1949 

814 Sandusky St., Pittsburgh 12, Pa. FAirfax 1-1259 

Kazys Pakstas Professor of Economic Geography 

Ph.D. University of Fribourg (Switzerland), 1923 
4114 Murray Ave., Pittsburgh 17, Pa. 

Robert Pearce Lecturer in Accounting 

B.S. Indiana University, 1938 

140 Academy Ave., Pittsburgh 28, Pa. ATlantic 1-5100 

Nathaniel Pigman Assistant Professor of Management 

B.A. University of Virginia, 1942 
M.A. University of Pennsylvania, 1947 
380 McKee Place, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Adrian W. Poitras Assistant Professor of Biology 

B.S. University of Illinois, 1940 
M.S. University of Illinois, 1947 
Ph.D. University of Illinois, 1950 

147 Roberta Drive, Pittsburgh 21, Pa. 

James M. Purcell Professor of English 

B.A. Montana State University, 1919 
M.A. Ohio State University, 1925 
Ph.D. New York University, 1934 

8526 Beechwood Blvd., Pittsburgh 17, Pa. HAzel 1-1799 

Rev. Thomas J. Quigley Lecturer in Educational Administration 

B.A. Duquesne University, 1927 
M.A. Catholic University, 1938 
Ph.D. University of Pittsburgh, 1945 

125 N. Craig St., Pittsburgh 13, Pa. MAyflower 1-6968 

Pauline M. Reinkraut Assistant Professor of Modern Languages 

B.A. University of Vienna, Austria, 1921 
Ph.D. University of Vienna, Austria, 1927 
M.A. University of Pittsburgh, 1944 

6330 Glenview Place, Pittsburgh 6, Pa. 

James L. Rich Lecturer in Economics 

B.S. Haverford College, 1938 

M.B.A. Harvard Business School, 1940 

6911 Church Ave., Ben Avon, Pittsburgh 2, Pa. Linden 1-4655-M 



Page Fourteen 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 



Wilfred D. Rush Lecturer in Accounting 

B.S.C. Duquesne University, 1918 
C.P.A. Pennsylvania, 1921 

1601 Jancey St., Pittsburgh, Pa. HUand 1-3565 

Severino Russo Assistant Professor of History 

B.A. Duquesne University, 1943 
M.A. Duquesne University, 1948 

2304 Woodstock Ave., Pittsburgh 18, Pa. BRandywine 1-4023 

Frank Sanford Lecturer in Management 

B.S. Carnegie Institute of Technology, 1936 
M.B.A. University of Pittsburgh, 1939 

Wildwood Road, R. D. No. 2, Allison Park, Pa. STerling 1-0740 

Rev. John R. Schlicht, C.S.Sp Assistant Professor of History 

B.A. St. Mary's Seminary, 1939 
B.D. St. Mary's Seminary, 1943 
M.A. Duquesne University, 1944 

801 Bluff St., Pittsburgh 19, Pa. GRant 1-4635 

Kurt C. Schreiber Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

B.S. City College of New York, 1944 
A.M. Columbia University, 1947 
Ph.D. Columbia University, 1949 

4114 Murray Ave., Pittsburgh 17, Pa. JAckson 1-1647 

Maurice Schulte Assistant Professor of Sociology 

B.A. St. John's University, 1935 
M.A. University of Wisconsin, 1937 

210 Parker Drive, Pittsburgh 16, Pa. 

Earl J. Schuur Assistant Professor of Elementary Education 

B.A. Catholic University, 1933 
M.A. Wayne University, 1941 
Ed.D. Indiana University, 1951 

R.F.D. 3, 628 Logan Road, Bethel Borough, Pa. Colonial 3-6492 

Vartkes H. Simonian Associate Professor of Pharmacy 

Ph.C. Beirut, Lebanon, 1936 

M.Sc. Massachusetts College of Pharmacy, 1947 

Ph.D. University of London, 1948 

1801 Termon Ave., Pittsburgh 12, Pa. Linden 1-7888-J 

Paul Sladek Assistant Professor of Composition, Violin 

Student of Violin under Gottfried Feist and Leopold Auer. Author of 
numerous compositions for violin. 

5108 Bayard St., Pittsburgh, Pa. MAyflower 1-0608 

Casmer Smith Assistant Professor of Management 

B.A. Bowling Green University, 1940 
M.B.A. City College of New York, 1949 
187 Pennsylvania Ave., Emsworth, Pa. 

Robert E. Smith Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B.A. Iowa State University, 1934 
M.A. University of Pittsburgh, 1940 
Ph.D. University of Pittsburgh, 1951 
939 Sedolia Ave., Pittsburgh 2, Pa. 



Page Fifteen 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



Aaron M. Snyder Professor of Educational Psychology 

B.A. Franklin Marshall College, 1903 
Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania, 1910 

96 Sampson St., Pittsburgh, Pa. WAlnut 1-3873 

David Staudt . . Instructor in Management 

B.S. University of Pittsburgh 
M.A. University of Pittsburgh 

P.O. Box 216, Hickory, Pa. Hickory 108 

Henry Stevenson Instructor in Piano 

B.Mus. Duquesne University, 1948 
M.A. Duquesne University, 1950 

100 Wilson Ave., Washington, Pa. Washington 4092 

Elsa Stockmann Professor of Piano t Music Literature 

Graduate, Royal Academy of Music, Berlin, 1915 

Student of Piano with Leopold Godowsky and Ernst von Dohnanyi 

B.S. in Music, Duquesne University, 1929 

M.A. in Music, Duquesne University, 1939 

Iroquois Apartments, Pittsburgh, Pa. SChenley 1-3506 

Harry H. Szmant Professor of Chemistry 

B.S. Ohio State University, 1940 
Ph.D. Purdue University, 1944 

624 Hastings St., Pittsburgh 17, Pa. EMerson 1-2462 

George V. Tchirkow Associate Professor of Commerce 

M.A. College of Oriental Languages at Moscow, 1901 

M.Int.L. Moscow, 1902 

D.Int.L. Consular Academy of the Foreign Office of Russia, 1905 

363 Anawanda Ave., Pittsburgh 16, Pa. LEhigh 1-4371 

John A. Timko Instructor in Commerce 

B.S. Duquesne University, 1949 
M.S. Duquesne University, 1951 

117 W. 16th Ave., Homestead, Pa. HOmestead 1-7739 

Frederick I. Tsuji Assistant Professor of Biochemistry 

B.A. Cornell University, 1946 
M.N.S. Cornell University, 1948 
Ph.D. Cornell University, 1950 

517 Maple Lane, Edgeworth, Sewickley, Pa. 

Rev. J. Gerald Walsh, C.S.Sp Assistant Professor of Philosophy 

B.A. St. Mary's Seminary, 1937 
University of Louvain, Belgium, 1937-1939 
Ph.D. University of Montreal, 1946 

801 Bluff St., Pittsburgh 19, Pa. GRant 1-4635 

James Warden Lecturer in Finance 

B.S. Washington and Jefferson, 1928 
LL.B. Duquesne University, 1931 

6561 Darlington Road, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Catherine C. Weaver Instructor in English 

B.A. University of Michigan, 1946 
M.A. University of Michigan, 1947 
Ph.D. University of Michigan, 1951 
5217 Baum Blvd., Pittsburgh, Pa. 



Page Sixteen 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 



Robert S. Weidman Assistant Professor of Management 

B.B.A. City College of New York, 1947 

M.B.A. City College of New York, 1948 

826 Ohio Blvd., Sewickley, Pa. 

George B. Welsh Instructor in Educational Psychology 

B.A. Mount Saint Mary's College, 1933 
M.Ed. Duquesne University, 1947 
R. D. No. 1, Library, Pa. 

Albert Bayard Wright Professor of Business Administration 

B.S. Illinois Wesleyan University, 1907 
M.A. Illinois Wesleyan University, 1910 
M.A University of Illinois, 1914 
D.C.S. Duquesne University, 1927 

5643 Woodmont St., Pittsburgh, Pa. HAzel 1-8390 

Joseph A. Zapotocky Associate Professor of Pharmacy 

B.S. (Phar.) Ohio State University, 1940 
Ph.D. Ohio State University, 1948 

1818 Plainview Ave., Brookline, Pa. LEhigh 1-8988 

Cyril Zebot Associate Professor of Economics 

M.A. University of Ljubljana, 1936 
Ph.D. University of Ljubljana, 1938 

5800 Ellsworth Ave., Pittsburgh, Pa. EMerson 1-8478 

Gerald L. Zimmerman Associate Professor of Finance 

B.S. in Econ. University of Pennsylvania, 1927 
M.A. University of Pennsylvania, 1931 

R. D. No. 7, Pittsburgh 29, Pa. Perrysville 1-2975-W 



Page Seventeen 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



GENERAL STATEMENT 

HISTORICAL STATEMENT 

Duquesne University is an educational institution conducted 
and controlled by members of the Congregation of the Holy 
Ghost. Instituted as a college of arts and letters in 1878, it was 
incorporated in 1881 under the title of the Pittsburgh Catholic 
College. Upon obtaining a university charter in 1911 Pittsburgh 
Catholic College became Duquesne University with authority to 
grant degrees in the arts and sciences, law, medicine, dentistry, 
and pharmacy. In 1930 the charter was broadened to authorize 
degrees in education and music. It was further extended in 1937 
to include nursing. 

The present schools of the University, all offering courses 
leading to degrees, are the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, 
the School of Law, the School of Business Administration, the 
School of Pharmacy, the School of Music, the School of Educa- 
tion, the School of Nursing, and the Graduate School. 

The student body, comprising men and women since 1915, 
annually averages about 4,000 students. Daily classes of the 
regular school year meet for the most part upon campus. Sum- 
mer sessions, evening and Saturday courses are held both on 
campus and in the Fitzsimons Building in downtown Pittsburgh. 

LOCATION 

The University, an urban institution serving the needs of an 
industrial city and the surrounding communities in western 
Pennsylvania, is situated upon an eminence overlooking the 
Golden Triangle in downtown Pittsburgh. Both the campus and 
the downtown school are convenient to several railway stations 
and within easy access of various rapid transit lines. 

PHILOSOPHY AND OBJECTIVES 

Duquesne University is a Catholic institution of higher 
learning. It believes that education is concerned with man in 
his entirety, body and soul. It believes that education consists 
in the preservation, transmission and improvement of the 
material and temporal order through its elevation, regulation 
and perfection, in accordance with the example and teaching of 
Christ and His Church. It believes that the product of education 
is the man of true character, who thinks, judges and acts con- 
stantly and consistently in accordance with right reason with a 
view to his ultimate end. 



Page Eighteen 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 



The University has as its responsibility the conservation, 
interpretation and transmission of knowledge and ideas and 
values, the quest of truth through scholarly research, and the 
preparation for vocational and avocational fields by intelligent 
and thorough training in the principles underlying these fields. 
The general aim is to facilitate through the media of instruction 
and related collegiate activities the development of purposeful 
character, intellectual accomplishment, emotional and social 
maturity and professional efficiency. 

The University attains this aim in the Colleges (Schools) by 
guiding the student through a cultural core program, through a 
concentrated study of a major field of interest, through an 
organized program of co-curricular and extra-curricular activities, 
and through established personnel services. 

The University aims specifically to assist the student in: 

1. The development of a sound philosophy of life through 
an understanding of spiritual and physical, intellectual 
and moral, social and aesthetic aims and values. 

2. The development of a well-balanced personality. 

3. The development of a broader understanding of our 
culture. 

4. The development of scholarship and continuous pro- 
fessional growth. 

5. The development of a constant evaluation of himself 
as an individual and as a member of the community. 

6. The development of a genuine American attitude. 

PURPOSE OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

The Graduate School of Duquesne University is an institution 
primarily devoted to providing properly qualified students with 
an opportunity to pursue advanced work. 

The scope of the Graduate School is such as to include 
several fields of intellectual and cultural content which have a 
legitimate place in an institution of higher learning, and in which 
speculative investigation can be carried on without regard for 
the merely practical and vocational standpoint. 

ACCREDITATION AND MEMBERSHIP 

The University is accredited by the State Council on Educa- 
tion of the Pennsylvania Department of Public Instruction, and 
by the Middle States Association of Colleges and Secondary 
Schools. 



Page NintUin 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



It is also a member of the American Council on Education, 
the Association of American Colleges, the National Catholic 
Educational Association, the Catholic Educational Association 
of Pennsylvania, the National Educational Association, the 
Pennsylvania Educational Association, the American Association 
of Collegiate Registrars, the Pennsylvania State Education 
Association, the Eastern States Association of Professional Schools 
for Teachers, the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy, 
the Association of Collegiate Schools of Nursing, and the National 
Organization for Public Health Nursing. 

The University is affiliated with the Catholic University of 
America. 

DEGREES 

Through the facilities of the several major departments in 
the University, the Graduate School offers advanced studies 
leading to a degree of Master of Arts or Master of Science or 
Master in Education. Candidates confine their work in course 
to one of the following fields: Biology, Business Administration, 
Chemistry, Classics, Economics, Education, English, History, 
Modern Languages, Music, Pharmacy, Philosophy, Political 
Science, Social Sciences. 

CANDIDACY 

Graduates with the degree of bachelor from an accredited 
college or university and ordained priests and ministers who 
have completed a four-year course of study in a recognized 
seminary will be considered for admission to the Graduate School. 

Applicants shall have, in scope of study, a sufficient prepara- 
tion in their proposed field of graduate work, and shall show 
that they maintained a superior grade in quality of academic 
record. Deficiencies will be supplied for without graduate credit. 

ADMISSION 

Application: Each student applying for admission, either as 
an applicant for a degree or as a non-degree applicant, must file 
with the Graduate School an application for admission and such 
other documents as may be required. An application form will 
be supplied by the Graduate School upon request. Such appli- 
cation should be made not later than one month before the 
beginning of the term in which the entrant anticipates com- 
mencing or continuing graduate work. 



Page Twenty 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 



Official Transcripts: A student applying for admission as a 
degree candidate must assume the responsibility of having the 
registrar of each institution previously attended mail an official 
transcript of record directly to the Graduate School. A trans- 
cript must be received from each institution attended, including 
any attended during summer sessions, regardless of whether or 
not the transcript of the last institution attended lists the record 
at the other institutions and regardless of whether or not credit 
was received. 

Transcripts and other documents which are accepted toward 
admission become the property of the University. 

Acceptance: Reasonably after particular transcripts and the 
Application for Admission have been favorably reviewed, the 
Graduate School Office mails to the prospective entrant official 
notification of admission to graduate study. Students whose 
records have been unfavorably reviewed for admission will 
receive notice to that effect. 

Conditional Status: Transcripts and applications should be 
forwarded well in advance of registration. Entrants who fail to 
attend to this necessary detail a month in advance of registra- 
tion must, should they wish to register, incur the risks involved 
in conditional admission. No entrant registering in such fashion 
may continue so beyond one semester; nor will credit obtained in 
such circumstance be certified to by the Registrar, until official 
transcripts have been presented to and approved by the Com- 
mittee on Admissions. 

Unclassified Status: A properly qualified person who does 
not wish to become a candidate for a further degree may pursue 
graduate courses in an unclassified status. He is not held to the 
specific requirements of any particular graduate program. In lieu, 
however, of official transcripts unclassified students shall present 
a letter from their undergraduate Registrar certifying to the date 
of their Baccalaureate. In the event an entrant should later 
prefer to become a candidate for a further degree, the fact that 
credit has been acquired in unclassified status is no guarantee 
that it will be honored for advancement until all regular require- 
ments, such as submission of official transcripts of undergraduate 
records, have been met. 

Campus Courtesy: Registered students in the undergraduate 
schools of Duquesne University, who require not more than 
twelve semester hours for the completion of their Baccalaureate 
studies, may begin graduate study with the approval of their 
Dean, provided, having met all other conditions, they have 



Pagt Ttvinty-ons 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



completed a minimum of eighteen undergraduate credits in the 
subject they wish to pursue. To such students only courses 
numbered 500-599 can be offered. The maximum amount of 
credit thus earned shall not exceed six hours. 

Auditors: With the permission of the Dean of the Graduate 
School, auditors may attend certain courses, provided they pay 
regular rates per semester hour. Under no circumstance will 
credit be allowed for such attendance. 



REGISTRATION 

Graduate Program: After a student has been admitted to 
Graduate School, he should consult the Head of the Department 
in which he intends to do his major work for advisement as to 
the exact program he should pursue. The written approval of 
the Head of the Department or his delegate is required in advance 
of each registration for any course creditable toward a graduate 
degree. Approval of program may be obtained during the days 
of registration prior to the beginning of each session. 

Where to Register: Upon approval of program the student 
should present himself at the Graduate School Office, room 37, 
Canevin Hall, for final endorsement and instructions on how to 
complete registration. Students are obliged to register before 
each term during which they propose to attend courses. The 
hours of registration are from 9:00 A.M. until 4:00 P.M. on 
the days noted in the annual calendar. 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS 

Hours in Course: Candidates for a degree of Master, other 
than in Education, shall complete a minimum of twenty-four 
semester hours in course upon one major subject. Occasionally 
one minor in a kindred field is allowed, provided maximum 
credit does not exceed six semester hours. 

Restriction on Time: One who is devoting full time to graduate 
study without other occupation may be permitted to complete 
a program in one calendar year. Candidates engaged in activity 
other than graduate work will accordingly be limited in the 
number of semester hours they may take during any particular 
session. Ordinarily graduate assistants will be restricted to four 
semester hours a term. No part-time student can anticipate 
completing the minimum requirements in course within less than 
two years. All work acceptable toward the advanced degree 
shall be completed within a period of six years. 



Page Twenty-two 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 



Residence: Course requirements are met in residence. No 
graduate credit is allowable for work done by correspondence or 
in extension courses. 

Transferred Graduate Credit: With the approval of the Head 
of Department graduate work done at other accredited institu- 
tions may be offered in partial fulfillment of course requisites. 
Immediately after matriculation such students should arrange to 
have submitted an official transcript of record of such graduate 
work to: Graduate Office, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh 19, 
Pennsylvania. After a reasonable time has elapsed to observe the 
student's work in course, a maximum of six credits may be 
accepted. 

Pro-Seminar: Due to the nature of graduate study, proper 
orientation is necessary. As the Pro-Seminar course is for this 
purpose, every candidate should aim to take this course in his 
major field as soon as possible so as to be acquainted with 
methods in research. To this end all students should provide 
themselves with Preparing the Research Paper by R. M. Schmitz, 
a study procurable at the campus book store. 

Language Requirements: Save in the fields of Business Admini- 
stration and Education, graduate students applying for the degree 
of either Master of Arts or Master of Science must, through a 
prescribed examination, demonstrate their ability to use a 
modern language as an instrument of study. The particular 
language will be determined in each case by the Head of the 
Department in which the student is doing his major study. 
Language examinations occur in July, November and March, 
their precise dates being noted in the annual calendar. Candi- 
dates should meet this requirement about an academic year 
before the degree is to be conferred. Since the Dean is to be 
notified as to the result, a card to that effect, to be attested to 
by the examiner, should be procured at the Graduate Office 
about two weeks in advance of the examination. As a substitute 
for modern language, candidates in Business Administration and 
Education pursue course work in statistics. 

Comprehensive Examination: All Heads of Department re- 
quire a comprehensive examination. As this examination tests 
the student's mastery of the field, a candidate may not apply 
for this trial until course and language requirements have been 



Page Twenty-three 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



successfully met. Dependent upon the custom of the Depart- 
ment, these examinations may be oral or written or both. They 
occur in July, January, and April, precise dates being annually 
noted in the calendar. About two weeks prior to examination, 
candidates, upon the written approval of the Head of Depart- 
ment, should procure an application from the Graduate Office. 
A record of the result signed by the Head of Department should 
be deposited with the Dean. Should a student fail, the Head of 
Department may recommend a second trial, not earlier than the 
following semester. Should this prove unsatisfactory, there will 
be no further attempt. 

Outline of Thesis-. Where applicable, an outline of thesis 
together with a bibliography should be submitted by candidates 
to their Major Department for approval by their Major Advisor 
and the Head of Department. A student who aims to graduate 
at the end of a particular session should see to it that his approved 
outline is on file in the Graduate Office by the date noted in the 
annual calendar. 

Thesis: All candidates, save those pursuing a program of 
Master of Education, shall present a thesis. Since a thesis is 
the equivalent of six semester hours of graduate work, registra- 
tion for it is to be made according to the usual procedure, and 
this registration is to be renewed each semester during which 
thesis work continues. Students engaged in thesis writing should 
be careful to note in the annual calendar the last day for submit- 
ting theses to the Graduate Office. Approved theses shall follow 
Form Book for Thesis Writing by W. G. Campbell, a work pro- 
curable at the campus book store. Three copies of the thesis are 
to be presented: an original and two copies on bonded paper 
procurable at the campus book store. 

The Dean by and with the advice and consent of the Graduate 
Council approves or disapproves theses, following the separate 
reports of a committee of readers appointed from the faculty of 
the Graduate School. Immediately after the candidate has been 
notified of approval, he must deposit three typed copies in the 
University Library. These copies become the permanent pro- 
perty of the University and may not be wholly or partially 
published elsewhere without the consent of the University. The 
Librarian arranges to have them bound at a cost of ten dollars 
per set of three. 



Page Twenty-four 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 



GRADING 

The following grading system, adopted February 21, 1929, 
and amended September 19, 1938, is the only method of rating 
recognized by the University. The system is as follows: 

A — Excellent 
B— Good 
C — Average 

D — Below Average: lowest passing grade 
E — Conditioned : eligible for re-examination 
F — Failure: course must be repeated 

I — Incomplete: grade is deferred because of incomplete work 
X — Absent from final examination 
W — Official Withdrawal 
P — Pass: used in certain courses without quality points 

All incomplete grades must be removed within one calendar 
year. 

Credit obtained with D grade will not be counted towards 
the total number required for a Master's degree. 

Graduate students are expected to maintain an average not 
lower than B; those failing to meet this standard will be subject 
to faculty action. 

TUITION AND FEES 

Tuition, per Semester Hour Credit $12.00 

The total tuition for the semester is payable at 
the time of registration, unless other arrangements 
are made through the Deferred Tuition Office. 

Activities Fee, per Semester $10.00 

This fee gives access to intercollegiate and intra- 
mural sports activities, concerts, dramatic presen- 
tations and other events throughout the scholastic 
year. It entitles the student to copies of the 
weekly newspaper, and the monthly magazine. 
This fee is payable by all students carrying eight 
or more credits in the regular semesters. 

Library Fee, Full-time Students $ 5.00 

This fee gives library privileges, and is payable 
each semester by all full-time students. 



Page Twenty-fivt 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



Library Fee, Part-time Students $ 2.00 

This fee is payable by all students carrying less than 
eight credits in any semester or summer session. 

Registration Fee $ 1.00 

This fee is required of every student at each 
registration period. 

Student Health Fee, per Semester $ 1.00 

This fee includes advice and emergency treatment 
at the University dispensary. 

Late Registration Fee $ 5.00 

This fee is charged to all students registering later 
than the last day of the regular registration period. 

Condition Examination Fee $ 5.00 

This fee is charged for each condition and special 
examination for removal of E and X grades. It is 
payable in advance. 

Change of Course Fee $ 1.00 

Student Publication Fee, per Semester $ 1.00 

Payable by all part-time students in the regular 
sessions. The fee entitles them to a copy of each 
issue of the student newspaper and of the monthly 
magazine. 

Auditor's Fees, per Semester Hour $12.00 

N.B. — The fees for auditors are the same as those 
for regularly matriculated students. 

Special Examination $10.00 

Payable by students granted a special examination 
to satisfy either general or special requirements at 
times other than those regularly prescribed. 

Thesis Binding Fee $10.00 

This fee is charged to cover the cost of binding 
three copies of thesis. 

Graduation Fee — Master's Degree $25.00 



Page Twenty-six 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 



School of Music Fees: 

For courses in the Department of Music Conserva- 
tory 601-608: Advanced Study of Instrument, a 
fee of $50.00 per semester for one hour of private 
instruction per week is paid by all full-time stu- 
dents. The fee for part-time students taking one 
hour of instruction per week per semester is $60.00. 
Students taking one-half hour of private instruction 
per week per semester are charged $37.50. 

The fee for private instruction in Courses 620, 621, 
622, 623, 631, 632, 637, 638 and 701 is $5.00 per 
hour. 

Laboratory Fees: 

Students enrolled in the following courses will pay 
laboratory fees, not subject to refund, as follows: 

Biological Sciences $12.50 

Botany: 511, 512, 522, 525, 631, 632, 634, 635, 636, 
639, 641, 642, 651, 652. 

Bacteriology: 561, 562, 661, 662. 

Zoology: 511, 512, 601, 602, 603, 604, 606, 608, 
609, 610, 611, 612, 651, 652. 

Chemistry $17.50 

501, 502, 521, 522, 525, 526, 541, 543. 

Pharmacy $12.50 

603, 604, 611, 612, 613, 614, 615, 633, 634. 

Management $ 2.50 

507, 508. 

Graduate Students who are required to take undergraduate 
courses are subject to the laboratory fees as listed in the under- 
graduate catalogues. 

Tuition and Fee Changes: At the discretion of the Executive 
Committee of the University, tuition and fees are subject to 
change at any time. 

REFUNDS FOR WITHDRAWALS 

Students who withdraw from the university for a satisfactory 
reason within eight weeks after the opening of the semester are 
entitled to a proportionate refund of tuition provided that they 
notify their dean at the time of the withdrawal. Fees are not 
refundable. 



Page Twenty-seven 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



Refunds are made in accordance with the following schedule. 

Withdrawal Refund 

1st Week 90% 

2nd Week 70% 

3rd Week 60% 

4th Week 50% 

5th Week 30% 

6th Week 20% 

7th Week 10% 

8th Week 5% 

No refund will be made in the case of students who are 
requested to withdraw as a result of faculty action. 

SUMMARY OF REQUIREMENTS FOR THE 
DEGREE OF MASTER 

1. Degree of bachelor from an accredited school, showing 
sufficient quantitative and qualitative undergraduate prepara- 
tion for the proposed field of graduate study. 

2. Official transcripts of academic record. 

3. Official application form on file in the Graduate Office. 

4. A program of graduate work approved by the Head of 
Department. 

5. A minimum of thirty semester hours work. 

6. The Modern Language requirement will be met approx- 
imately a year before graduation. Students in Business Admin- 
istration and Education will substitute course work in statistics. 

7. An outline of thesis should be on file in the Graduate Office 
approximately six months before graduation. Students pursuing 
the Master in Education program are exempt from this re- 
quirement. 

8. After all requirements in course have been successfully 
completed, candidates are subject to a comprehensive examina- 
tion covering the major field. 

9. A thesis submitted for approval no later than the date 
set in the annual calendar, should the candidate wish to graduate 
at the end of that session. Students pursuing the Master in 
Education program are exempt from this requirement. They 
must, instead, successfully complete a minimum of thirty-two 
semester hours in course. 



Page Twenty-eight 






GRADUATE SCHOOL 



10. An original copy and two carbons of the approved thesis 
must be given to the Librarian for binding. Students pursuing the 
Master in Education program are exempt from this requirement. 

11. The candidate must make complete settlement of his 
financial account with the University. 

12. All work leading toward a graduate degree shall be 
completed within a maximum of six years. 

13. The candidate must have made formal application for 
the degree at the Office of the Registrar prior to the date listed 
in the University Calendar, and must be present at the Bacca- 
laureate and Commencement Exercises. 

The University reserves the right to change any provision or 
requirement during the term of residence of any student; and 
to compel the withdrawal of any student whose conduct at any 
time is not satisfactory to the University, even though no 
specific charge is made against the student. 



CAMPUS FACILITIES 
CHAPEL 

The University Chapel, located on the Campus, provides 
the opportunity for fulfilling the religious obligations for Catholic 
students. Morning Masses are said daily and a Mass at the noon 
hour is said every school day during the year. There are regular 
hours for hearing confessions, and special devotions are held on 
feastdays. The University Chaplain is available at all times. 

LABORATORIES 

Laboratory space is reasonably ample and well equipped. 
There are five residences on campus exclusively devoted to 
Biology and Chemistry. Two are used solely for the administra- 
tive offices and laboratories in Biology and three similarly occu- 
pied alone by administrative offices and laboratories in Chemis- 
try. One of these is entirely devoted to Graduate Chemistry. 
Pharmaceutical laboratories and a model pharmacy are located 
in Canevin hall. 

RESIDENCE 

The Campus Cafeteria, situated on the ground floor of 
Canevin Hall, is at the service of the student body from 7:30 
A.M. until 6:00 P.M., Monday through Saturday and on Sunday 



Page Twenty-nint 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



at 7:30 A.M. to 9:00 A.M. and at 11:30 A.M. to 1:00 P.M. and 
at 5:00 P.M. to 6:00 P.M. 

As living accommodations are limited, graduate students 
should procure quarters off campus. Information on this matter 
can be had by writing to the Dean of Men or the Dean of Women, 
Duquesne University, Pittsburgh 19, Pennsylvania. 



LIBRARY 

The University Library with its reading rooms occupies a 
separate building upon campus. It is supplemented by an addi- 
tion in the downtown school. Added facilities are to be found in 
the fortunate location of the University. Resources available in 
the public, institutional, commercial, and industrial libraries of 
the city total more than a million volumes. 

Students have use of such public collections as the Carnegie 
Library of Pittsburgh with its various branches and its valuable 
technology collection, also the Carnegie Free Library of Alle- 
gheny. By arrangement with the University Librarian free access 
may be had to special and institutional libraries of the district, 
such as, the Historical Society of Western Pennsylvania Library, 
the Carnegie Museum Library, the Pittsburgh Academy of 
Medicine Library, the Library of the Pittsburgh Board of 
Education, and the Library of the Mellon Institute, together 
with the libraries of various commercial and industrial organ- 
izations. 

The University Library is open during Fall and Spring 
Sessions from 8:30 A.M. until 9:00 P.M., Monday through 
Friday, and on Saturday from 8:30 A.M. until 5:00 P.M. During 
Summer Sessions, the library is open from 8:00 A.M. until 5:00 
P.M., Monday through Saturday. On certain ecclesiastical and 
legal holidays listed at the main desk, the library is closed. 



THE GUIDANCE BUREAU 

The Guidance Bureau contains the offices of the Director of 
Student Welfare, the Dean of Men, the Dean of Women, the 
University Chaplain, the University Physician, the University 
Dispensary, the Director of Testing, the Department of Psy- 
chology, the Speech Clinic. The Bureau makes available to 
students in all Schools of the University spiritual, physical and 
vocational guidance. 



Page Thirty 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 



ASSISTANTSHIPS AND SCHOLARSHIPS 

In the departments of Biology, Business Administration, 
Chemistry, English, History, and Philosophy, there are a number 
of graduate assistantships available yearly to students who have 
completed their undergraduate work with distinction. Occasion- 
ally other departments call for such aid, as the need arises. 
Appointments are for a period of one year. Reappointments are 
made upon a basis of proved competence. 

Graduate assistants are engaged either to teach the more 
elementary undergraduate courses in the department of their 
graduate choice of study, or to assist in the direction of the 
laboratory work of undergraduate students. The assistant is 
granted compensation in addition to exemption from fees and 
tuition. As he is engaged in four to six semester hours of gradu- 
ate work, the maximum amount of his service in class or labora- 
tory is restricted accordingly. 

The University also grants a limited number of scholarships 
based essentially upon the applicant's academic record, need, and 
character. Such awards yield tuition and fees but no cash stipend. 

Students who intend to devote full time to graduate study 
are preferred. For unsatisfactory work, or for violation of the 
terms of the award the Dean can terminate any scholarship. 

Application blanks for assistantships and scholarships are 
procurable from the Graduate Office, Duquesne University, 
Pittsburgh 19, Pennsylvania. Applicants must include a com- 
plete transcript of undergraduate record and must submit their 
request no later than the first of March. Applications beyond 
that date will not be considered. 



Page Thirty-one 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



DEPARTMENTS AND COURSES 
OF INSTRUCTION 

The programs listed in the following pages are 
those offered by the several departments of the 
Graduate School. 

Herein will be found, for each department, three 
distinct items : the specific requirements of the parti- 
cular department; the program, or sum total of 
courses offered in any department; and a description 
of all the courses in each of the various departments. 

These programs and courses are subject to change 
if the enrollment does not warrant their being given 
as listed. 



Pate Thirty-two 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 



BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 

Coordinator: Hilary J. Kline, C.S.Sp., M.S. 

REQUIREMENTS IN BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 

Candidates shall have completed a minimum of thirty-two 
semester hours of undergraduate work in the biological sciences, 
together with ample course work in organic and inorganic 
chemistry, physics, and German or French. Deficiencies shall 
be supplied for without graduate credit. Course work covering 
a minimum of twenty-four semester hours, together with a 
thesis, is prerequisite for the degree of Master in the biological 
sciences. Candidates shall follow a major field of concentration, 
devoting sixteen course credits to either botany or zoology. 



PROGRAM IN BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 

The following list indicates the course offerings in this 
Department. They are generally covered within a period of 
two years. 



BO 



Botany 



511 




Paleobotany 4cr. 


512 




Plant Physiology 4cr. 


522 




Plant Cytology 4cr. 


525 




Plant Microtechnique 4cr. 


631 




Mycology 4cr. 


632 




Phycology 4cr. 


634 




Bryology 4cr. 


635, 


636 


Systematic Morphology 8cr. 


638 




Plant Ecology 4cr. 


639 




Plant Anatomy 4cr. 


641, 


642 


Experiments in Plant Growth 8cr 


651, 


652 


Biological Research 8cr. 


700 




Thesis 6cr. 



BA Bacteriology 

561, 562 Serology and Immunology 8cr. 
661, 662 Physiology of Bacteria 8cr. 



zo 


Zoology 


511 


Animal Physiology 4cr. 


512 


Animal Genetics 4cr. 


601 


Invertebrate Zoology 4cr. 


602 


Parasitology 4cr. 


603, 604 


Vertebrate Zoology 8cr. 


605 


Biology of Marine Animals 2cr. 


606 


Biology of Freshwater Animate 4cr. 


607 


Animal Geography 2cr. 


608 


Palaeontology 4cr. 


609 


Animal Micrology 4cr. 


610 


Embryology 4cr. 


611 


Experimental Embryology 4cr. 


612 


Experimental Invertebrate 




Zoology 4cr. 


651, 652 


Biological Research 8cr. 


700 


Thesis 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 
BOTANY 

511. Paleobotany. A survey of the geologic history of the earth with 
emphasis upon extinct forms of vegetation. Two four-hour periods of lecture 
and laboratory weekly. Credit, Four hours. MILLER. 

512. Plant Physiology. A course in the dynamic activity of plants 
through a study of individual processes. Two four-hour periods of lecture and 
laboratory weekly. Credit, Four hours. MILLER. 



Page Thirty-three 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



522. Plant Cytology. A study of the living plant cell as an organized 
protoplasmic unit of structure and function. Two four-hour periods of lecture 
and laboratory weekly. Credit, Four hours. STAFF. 

525. Plant Microtechnique. A course designed to acquaint the 
student with the principles and techniques of preparing plant materials for 
study. Two four-hour periods of lecture and laboratory weekly. Credit, Four 
hours. STAFF. 

631. Mycology. A study of the morphology, taxonomy and physiology 
of fungi including the pathogenic and non-pathogenic genera. Two four-hour 
periods of lecture and laboratory. Credit, Four hours. POITRAS. 

632. Phycology. A study of the taxonomy and anatomical develop- 
ment of the algae with special consideration given to freshwater algae. Two 
four-hour periods of lecture and laboratory. Credit, Four hours. POITRAS. 

634. Bryology. A study of the taxonomy and anatomical develop- 
ment of mosses and liverworts. Two four-hour periods of lecture and labora- 
tory weekly. Credit, Two hours. POITRAS. 

635, 636. Systematic Morphology. A study of the ontogeny and 
phylogeny of plants and ferns to composites. Two four-hour periods of 
lecture and laboratory weekly. Credit, Four hours each semester. MILLER. 

638. Plant Ecology. A study of plants in relation to their environment. 
Credit, Four hours. STAFF. 

639. Plant Anatomy. A study of the internal structure of gymno- 
sperms and angiosperms. Two four-hour periods of lecture and laboratory 
weekly. Credit, Four hours. MILLER. 

641, 642. Experiments in Plant Growth. The use of tissue culture 
methods in studying the growth and development of plants. Individually 
assigned problems, literature and research. Laboratory open daily. Credit, 
Four hours each semester. MILLER. 

651, 652. Biological Research. Individual research problems involv- 
ing both library work and laboratory experimentation. Credit, Four hours 
each semester. 

BACTERIOLOGY 

561, 562. Serology and Immunology. Fundamental principles of 
immunology and various orders of antigen and antibody reactions. A detailed 
study of normal haematology and routine clinical tests. Two four-hour 
periods of lecture and laboratory weekly. Credit, Four hours each semester. 

661, 662. Physiology of Bacteria. The fundamental principles of 
bacterial metabolism. A course devoted to detailed studies of the enzyme 
together with individual physiological problems. Two four-hour periods of 
lecture and laboratory weekly. Credit, Four hours each semester. 



Page Thirty-jour 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 



ZOOLOGY 

511. Animal Physiology. The comparative study of physiological 
problems as applied to animals. Two four-hour periods of lecture and lab- 
oratory weekly. Credit, Four hours. 

512. Animal Genetics. A study of heredity and variation with 
emphasis upon problems relative to animal and man. Laboratory includes 
breeding experiments and practice in biometrical methods. Two four-hour 
periods of lecture and laboratory weekly. Credit, Four hours. 

601. Invertebrate Zoology. An intensive study of the morphology, 
development, classification and biology of the invertebrates. Two four-hour 
periods of lecture and laboratory weekly. Credit, Four hours. 

602. Parasitology. A taxonomic study of invertebrate parasites with 
emphasis on those forms which are of economic and medical importance. 
Two four-hour periods of lecture and laboratory weekly. Credit, Four hours. 

603. 604. Vertebrate Zoology. An intensive study of the morphology, 
development, classification, and biology of the vertebrates. Two four-hour 
periods of lecture and laboratory weekly. Credit, Four hours each semester. 

605. Biology of Marine Animals. The elements of oceanography 
with major emphasis upon life in the sea. Credit, Two hours. 

606. Biology of Fresh Water Animals. The elements of limnology 
with major emphasis upon animal life in lakes and rivers. Two four-hour 
periods of laboratory and lecture weekly. Credit, Four hours. 

607. Animal Geography. Geographic distribution of and variations 
in animals with particular emphasis upon terrestrial animals. Credit, Two 
hours. 

608. Palaeontology. _ The elements of historic geology with major 
emphasis upon animal fossils. Two four-hour periods of lecture, laboratory 
and museum work weekly. Credit, Four hours. 

609. Animal Micrology. Practice in the principal microtechnical 
and histological methods. Two four-hour periods of lecture and laboratory 
weekly. Credit, Four hours. 

610. Embryology. A comparative study of animal development. 
Two four-hour periods of lecture and laboratory weekly. Credit, Four hours. 

611. Experimental Embryology. Individual laboratory problems. 
Two four-hour periods of lecture and laboratory weekly. Credit, Four hours. 

612. Experimental Invertebrate Zoology. Individual laboratory 
problems. Two four-hour periods of lecture and laboratory weekly. Credit, 
Four hours. 

651, 652. Biological Research. Individual research problems involv- 
ing both library work and laboratory experimentation. Credit, Four hours 
each semester. 



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DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Coordinator: Albert B. Wright, D.C.S. 

REQUIREMENTS IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Candidates must have completed a minimum of twenty-four 
semester hours in Business Administration of which a minimum 
of eighteen semester hours was had in the field of the candidate's 
major. Work covering a minimum of twenty-four semester hours 
in course, together with a thesis, is required for a degree of 
Master. All candidates will include in their studies, B.E. 505, 
506, Government Control of Business. 

PROGRAM IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

The following list indicates the courses offered in this Depart- 
ment. The programs in Accounting, Finance, and Management 
will be offered annually. Those in Business Economics and 
Commerce will occur either annually or in alternate years. 



AC 



Accounting 



Governmental Accounting 4cr. 
Miscellaneous Federal and State 

Taxes 4cr. 
507, 508 Analysis of Financial Statements 

4cr. 
Advanced Cost Accounting 4cr. 
Life Insurance Accounting 4cr. 



501, 502 
503, 504 



517, 518 
523, 524 



601, 602 Public Utility Accounting 4cr. 

603, 604 C.P.A. Problems 4cr. 

605, 606 Advanced Problems in Federal 

Income Taxes 4cr. 
651, 652 Seminar in Accounting 4cr. 
700 Thesis 6cr. 



BE 

505, 506 

507, 508 

511, 512 
541, 542 
601, 602 

CO 

501, 502 

503, 504 

511, 512 
601, 602 



Business Economics 



Government Control of Business 

4cr. 
Economic Effects of Advertising 

4cr. 
The Business Cycle 4cr. 
Post-War Economic Problems 4cr. 
Theory of Price 4cr. 



603, 604 Economic Problems of Inter- 
national Trade 4cr. 

605, 606 The Regulation of Public Utilities 
4cr. 

651, 652 Seminar in Business Economics 4cr. 

700 Thesis 6cr. 



Commerce 



Economic Geography of North 

America 4cr. 
Economic Geography of Latin 

America 4cr. 
Market Analysis 4cr. 
Economic Geography of Europe 

4cr. 



603, 604 Economic Geography of Africa 4cr. 
605, 606 Economic Geography of Soviet 
Eurasia 4cr. 

651, 652 Seminar in Commerce 4cr. 
700 Thesis 6cr. 



Page Thirty-six 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 



FI 



Finance 



503, 504 


Problems in Credit Management 


523, 524 




4cr. 


601, 602 


505, 506 


Current Banking Problems 4cr. 




509, 510 


Commodity and Security Markets 


603, 604 




4cr. 


605, 606 


521, 522 


Public and Private Retirement 


651, 652 




Plans 4cr. 


700 



MG Management 

507, 508 Advanced Business Statistics 4cr. 540 

509 Principles of Industrial Purchasing 

2cr. 551, 552 

510 Industrial Psychology 2cr. 601, 602 
511, 512 Principles of Industrial Engineering 

4cr. 603 

531, 532 Principles of Public Administration 

4cr. 651, 652 

537,538 Job Evaluation 4cr. 700 

539 Safety Engineering 3cr. 



Life Insurance Accounting 4cr. 
Problems in Corporation Finance 

4cr. 
International Finance 4cr. 
Central Banking 4cr. 
Seminar in Finance 4cr. 
Thesis 6cr. 



Materials, Handling and Plant 

Layout 3cr. 
Management Research 4cr. 
Advanced Personnel Management 

4cr. 
Product Design and Development 

3cr. 
Seminar in Management 4cr. 
Thesis 6cr. 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

ACCOUNTING 

Acting Head of Department: Albert B. Wright, D.C.S. 

501, 502. Governmental Accounting. A study of the accounting 
classifications and methods of local, state and federal governmental bodies. 
Credit, Two hours each semester. PEARCE. 

503, 504. Miscellaneous Federal and State Taxes. A preparation of 
reports, accounting problems, and procedure arising from Pennsylvania 
Capital Stock and Loans, Mercantile, County and State Personal Property, 
Inheritance, Estate, Documentary Stamp, Unemployment Insurance, and 
Local Taxes; also Federal Capital Stock, Excess Profits, Undivided Profits, 
Estate, Gifts, Excise, Unemployment Insurance and Old Age Benefits. Credit, 
Two hours each semester. RUSH. 

507, 508. Analysis of Financial Statements. This course applies 
accounting and auditing principles to the analysis and criticism of the financial 
statements of corporations. It will include a study of the content and valuation 
of the individual items of a balance sheet; comparisons of statements of past 
periods considered in connection with the current statement to disclose 
favorable or unfavorable trends, and an attempt to forecast probable future 
conditions from this information. Credit, Two hours each semester. R. N. 
MILLER. 

517, 518. Advanced Cost Accounting. A study of the application of 
cost accounting principles to various kinds of business enterprise. Analysis of 
standard and job costs in manufacturing, merchandising, and public service 
industries. Credit, Two hours each semester. 

523, 524. Life Insurance Accounting. A study of the underlying 
principles and arrangements of the accounting systems in life insurance 
companies, with special reference to the conventional annual statements. 
Credit, Four hours. MILTON. 



Page Thirty-stvtn 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



601, 602. Public Utility Accounting. A study of the accounts of the 
various public utilities reporting to the Interstate Commerce Commission or 
to the Public Service Commission of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. 
Crediiy Two hours each semester. MILLER. 

603, 604. C.P.A. Problems. A study of representative problems given 
in various State C.P.A. examinations. Emphasis is placed on the analysis of 
complex problems and the preparation of the working papers and statements 
required for their solution. Credit, Two hours each semester. CLAY. 

605, 606. Advanced Problems in Federal Income Taxes. This is a 
practical course in solving by the use of tax return forms numerous current 
problems in federal taxes on income, including personal income as well as that 
of partnerships, trusts and corporations. All problems are worked out under 
the guidance of a Certified Public Accountant who is enrolled to practice 
before the Tax Court. Credit, Two hours each semester. CLAY. 

651, 652. Seminar in Accounting. Research in special problems of 
accounting theory and practice. Credit, Two hours each semester. Members 
of Department. 

BUSINESS ECONOMICS 

Head of Department: Albert B. Wright, D.C.S. 

505, 506. Government Control of Business. This course will concern 
itself with such widely differing matters as price regulation, restriction and 
stimulus given to selected business activities, the government-sponsored cor- 
poration, taxation and government plans for post-war full employment. 
Credit, Two hours each semester. WRIGHT. 

507, 508. Economic Effects of Advertising. A study of the develop- 
ment of modern advertising and its influence upon the nature, quality, and 
extent of the market. The business and economic problems caused by adver- 
tising will be analyzed. Credit, Two hours each semester. WRIGHT. 

511, 512. The Business Cycle. Analysis of the periodic fluctuations of 
prices, production, employment and consumption. Credit, Two hours each 
semester. ANDERSON. * 

541, 542. Post War Economic Problems. This course will present an 
analysis of the problems of the postwar period as a consequence of war tax- 
ation, increased public indebtedness, conversion of industry to wartime 
production and mobilization of manpower for the armed services. Among the 
problems given special treatment are: plans for postwar full employment, 
methods of handling the national debt, international monetary relations and 
the re-establishment of normal international trade. Credit, Two hours each 
semester. WRIGHT. 

601, 602. The Theory of Price. A study of the theory of price-making 
in an economy founded on free markets. Credit, Two hours each semester. 
WRIGHT. 

603, 604. Economic Problems of International Trade. An examina- 
tion of the difficulties facing international trade arising from the late war and 
the development of conflicting political and economic ideologies. Credit, Two 
hours each semester. ANDERSON. 



Page Thirty-eight 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 



605, 606. The Regulation of Public Utilities. A study of the effects 
of the policy of regulating public utility businesses by means of administrative 
governmental commissions. Credit, Two hours each semester. WRIGHT. 

651, 652. Seminar in Business Economics. Research in special 
problems in the theory and practice of business economics. Credit, Two hours 
each semester. 

COMMERCE 

Head of Department: John T. Morris, Ph.D. 

501, 502. Economic Geography of North America. A study of the 
present agricultural, commercial and industrial development of the North 
American continent with emphasis upon the regional geography of the United 
States and Canada. Credit, Two hours each semester. PAKSTAS. 

503, 504. Economic Geography of Latin America. An interpretation 
of industries, trade, governments and peoples south of the Rio Grande as 
affected by topography, resources, climate, and location. Attention will be 
given to critical economic problems such as labor, transportation and organi- 
zation. Some emphasis is given the domestic and international problems of 
the southern republics of the New World as well as their relationship to the 
United States since the World War. Credit, Two hours each semester. 
PAKSTAS. 

511, 512. Market Analysis. A seminar course, in which the student, 
acting as marketing executive, develops, through sound analysis, the working 
plans for the effective marketing of specific merchandise. Plans ordinarily 
require numerous analyses of markets, products, marketing practices, adver- 
tising methods, etc. Sources of information may include published research 
reports, company records, and original data, collected by questionnaire, 
interview, or observation, and prepared in accordance with statistical methods. 
Within practical limits, plans are developed primarily for the Pittsburgh area. 
Course must be taken for full academic year for credit. Credit, Two hours 
each semester. FALKOFF. 

601, 602. Economic Geography of Europe. A study of the economic 
development, governments and peoples of the countries of Europe in relation 
to the environmental background and resources of the continent. The course 
emphasizes the relationship of political institutions in each of the countries 
to trade and economic development, and also analyzes the potential trade 
possibilities of each market. Attention is directed to the influence of geographic, 
economic, and social factors upon the post war adjustments. Readings, dis- 
cussions, lectures and reports. Credit, Two hours each semester. PAKSTAS. 

603, 604. Economic Geography of Africa. A study of the present and 
potential agricultural, commercial and industrial development of the African 
continent with emphasis upon the influence of European colonial administra- 
tion. Credit, Two hours each semester. PAKSTAS. 

605, 606. Economic Geography of Soviet Eurasia. This is a regional 
study of natural resources, agriculture, distribution of industries and popula- 
tion of Soviet Russia and the newly sovietized countries in Europe and Asia. 
A study of trade, government, national traditions and aspirations of the 
Soviet Union and its colonial possessions and dependencies in Europe and 
Asia. Credit, Two hours each semester. PAKSTAS. 



Page Thirty-nine 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



651, 652. Seminar in Commerce. The study of special phases or 
problems of marketing, foreign trade or transportation. Credit, Two hours 
each semester. MORRIS, TCHIRKOW. 

FINANCE 

Head of Department: Gerald L. Zimmerman, M.A. 

503, 504. Problems in Credit Management. This course deals with 
the problems in the operation of the Credit and Collection Departments of 
manufacturing, service and mercantile establishments. It includes the practi- 
cal application of the fundamentals of business law, credit interpretation of 
financial statements, ratio analysis of both balance sheet and operating 
statements with purification for credit purposes; a study of insurance and 
bonding proceedings in the sale of merchandise, a study of interpretation of 
economic forecasts and administrative problems of the credit man. Credit, 
Two hours each semester. EITEL. 

505, 506. Current Banking Problems. An advanced study of the 
principles of money, credit and banking making an analytical survey of recent 
changes and tendencies in this field. A substantial portion of the work is 
concerned with an examination of the doctrines of the modern schools of 
thought and the development of simplified research projects. Credit, Two 
hours each semester. WARDEN, ZIMMERMAN. 

509, 510. Commodity and Security Markets. Consisting of an 
analysis of the various commodity exchanges and markets; followed by an 
intensive study of the securities market, with particular emphasis on the 
New York Stock Exchange and the financial adjuncts which have grown up 
in association with it. Credit, Two hours each semester. ZIMMERMAN. 

521, 522. Public and Private Retirement Plans. The development 
of retirement plans, public and private including social security. Particular 
stress is laid on modern pension trusts and their relation to current tax laws 
and regulations. Credit, Two hours each semester. MILTON. 

523, 524. Life Insurance Accounting. A study of the underlying 
principles and arrangements of the accounting systems in life insurance 
companies, with special reference to the conventional annual statements. 
Credit, Two hours each semester. MILTON. 

601, 602. Problems in Corporation Finance. A study of the financial 
principles, policies and practices evolved in the growth of industrial com- 
bination in the corporate form. Credit, Two hours each semester. ZIMMER- 
MAN. 

603, 604. International Finance. A course in the international 
movements of money, including the theory and practice of foreign exchange, 
under gold and paper standards; intercountry capital movements, balances 
of trade, and comparative banking systems. Credit, Two hours each semester. 
ZIMMERMAN. 

605, 606. Central Banking. An extensive study of the development 
and present position of central banking at home and abroad; an intensive 
studv of our own Federal Reserve System. Credit, Two hours each semester. 
ZIMMERMAN. 

651, 652. Seminar in Finance. The study of special and timely 
problems affecting financial stability and security. Credit, Two hours each 
semester. 



Page Forty 



GRADUATE S CHOOL 



MANAGEMENT 

Acting Head of Department: James P. Niland, M.Litt. 

507, 508. Advanced Business Statistics. A seminar course, in which 
the student develops and presents for general discussion timely and practical 
studies, requiring understanding and employment of relatively advanced 
statistical procedures. The student is responsible for all phases of the study, 
from its definition to preparation of final reports for publication. These studies 
ordinarily require research into particular fields of business activity and 
supervision of field and clerical personnel. Credit, Two hours each semester. 

509. Principles of Industrial Purchasing. This course deals with 
the nature of the purchasing function, the organization of the purchasing 
department, purchasing procedures and the principles governing the exercise 
of the purchasing function. Credit, Two hours. 

510. Industrial Psychology. An examination of the psychological 
approach to industrial problems from the management point of view. Empha- 
sis will be placed on the problems of morale, attitude and motivation. Credit, 
Two hours. NILAND. 

511. 512. Principles of Industrial Engineering. This course is based 
upon the premise that industrial engineering is essentially a cost reduction 
program, and special attention is given to the tools of accounting and engi- 
neering that lead to this end. In order to give the student the proper back- 
ground, a preliminary study is made of the evolution of mass production and 
the development of standards. This is followed by a study of the application 
of present-day methods to the problem of cost reduction. The following 
general topics will be treated: development of mass production; development 
of standards; wage incentives; time and motion study; work simplification; 
personnel relations; material control; material standards; waste recovery; 
plant layout; process development; material handling; yield improvement; 
machine development; quality improvement; sales service; problems in 
initiating and operating cost reduction work. Credit, Two hours each semester. 

531, 532. Principles of Public Administration. This course will 
present the principles, methods and procedures by which public business is 
transacted in government administrative offices, bureaus, agencies and 
government corporations. Comparison will be made with the practice of 
private business and voluntary associations and agencies. Credit, Two hours 
each semester. WRIGHT. 

537, 538. Job Evaluation. A study in detail of the four types or 
methods of job evaluation together with forms and illustrations of successful 
applications now used in the Greater Pittsburgh area and other industrial 
centers. Attention will also be given to evaluation methods and experience 
in public administration. Credit, Two hours each semester. NILAND. 

539. Safety Engineering. A study of industrial safety stressing personal 
training and the design of equipment to prevent and control accidents and 
hazards. Consideration is given to the organization and supervision of a safety 
program with emphasis on cost factors, safety inspection, protective equip- 
ment, machine guards and preventative measures. Credit, Three hours. 
WEIDMAN. 

540. Materials, Handling and Plant Layout. A practical analysis 
and appraisal of the development, design and layout of effective industrial 
plants. The applications of materials handling and their integration with 
the production process. Discussion of equipment and methods of handling. 
Credit, Three hours. WEIDMAN. 



Page Forty-one 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



551, 552. Management Research. Individual research in specific 

problems in personal contact with business enterprises in the Greater Pitts- 

)urgh district. Prerequisite: completion of a minimum of sixteen semester 

lours in advanced management courses and consent of instructor of the 

course. Credit, Two hours each semester. NILAND, C. SMITH, WEIDMAN. 

601, 602. Advanced Personnel Management. In this course textbook 
study and discussion will be combined with individual research, individual 
and group practice and case study. Special consideration of interviewing 
techniques, selection and induction procedures, employee and supervisory 
training, wage and salary administration including job evaluation, job analysis 
and specifications, personnel records and statistics, employee testing and 
personnel research. Also to be considered are special problems such as pension 
plans, the employee magazine, communications, audit, morale, safety and 
recreation. Credit, Two hours each semester. C. SMITH. 

603. Product Design and Development. Industrial design is studied 
from the management viewpoint. The course covers all industries with 
emphasis placed upon metal fabrication and glass manufacturing. Consider- 
ation of many types of manufacturing processes such as molding, extrusion, 
stamping, smelting, and annealing. The course will include a discussion of 
industrial research, patent law and the economics of manufacturing. Credit, 
Three hours. WEIDMAN. 

651, 652. Seminar in Management. Forward analysis of business 
concepts and management principles. Credit, Two hours each semester. 



CHEMISTRY 

Head of Department: T. H. Dunkelberger, Ph.D. 

REQUIREMENTS IN CHEMISTRY 

Candidates must have completed a minimum of thirty-two 
semester hours in undergraduate chemistry, together with at 
least one course in physics, mathematics through calculus, and 
are expected to have a reading knowledge of German. A mini- 
mum of twenty-four semester hours in course and a thesis based 
on experimental work are required for the Master's degree. 

Three programs are available, emphasizing organic chemistry, 
or biochemistry, or physical and inorganic chemistry. In general, 
a candidate should not expect to complete a program in less 
than two years. 

Candidates in organic chemistry should include: 509-510, 
511-512, 551-552, 631-632, or 501-502, 521-522, 651-652. Candi- 
dates in biochemistry should take: 501-502, 503-504, 509-510, 
521-522, 631-632, 651-652. Candidates in physical and organic 
chemistry should pursue work in: 501-502, 509-510, 521-522, 
551-552, 609-610, 631-632, 651-652. 



Page Forty-two 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 



PROGRAM IN CHEMISTRY 

The following list indicates the courses offered in this Depart- 
ment. They are covered within a two-year period. 
CH 

501, 502 Biochemistry and Physiological 525, 526 Organic Preparations 2cr. 

Chemistry 8cr 541 Qualitative Organic Analysis 4cr. 

503, 504 Advanced Biochemistry 6cr. 543 Quantitative Organic Analysis lcr. 

509, 510 Advanced Organic Chemistry I 551, 552 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 6cr. 

6cr. 609,610 The Structure of Matter 6cr. 

511, 512 Advanced Organic Chemistry II 631, 632 Advanced Physical Chemistry 6cr. 

6cr. 651,652 Seminar 2cr. 

521, 522 Research Technics 2cr. 700 Chemical Research (Thesis) 6cr. 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

501, 502. Biochemistry and Physiological Chemistry. This course 
covers the fundamental chemistry and metabolism of biological materials. 
Pertinent aspects of physiological chemistry are included. Prerequisite: Or- 
ganic Chemistry 301-302, or equivalent; prerequisite or corequisite: Physical 
Chemistry or equivalent. Class, Three hours; Laboratory, Four hours. 
Credit, Four hours each semester. GAWRON. 

503, 504. Advanced Biochemistry. An advanced discussion of the 
chemistry and metabolism of proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates and fats. 
The anabolic as well as catabolic aspects of metabolism are included. Vitamin 
and hormonal influences on metabolism, genetic control of biochemical re- 
actions, energy relationships, and antimetabolite effects are introduced at 
appropriate points in the discussion. Prerequisite: Biochemistry 501-502. 
Class, Three hours. Credit, Three hours each semester. GAWRON. 

509, 510. Advanced Organic Chemistry I. A survey of the theoretical 
aspects of organic chemistry, including reaction mechanisms and the structural 
interpretation of the physical and chemical behavior of various bond types. 
Class, Three hours. Credit, Three hours each semester. SCHREIBER. 

511,512. Advanced Organic Chemistry II. Important special topics 
are considered: Heterocyclics, Natural Products, High Polymers, etc. Ad- 
vanced Organic Chemistry I will normally, but not necessarily, precede this 
course. Class, Three hours. Credit, Three hours each semester. SZMANT. 

521, 522. Research Techniques. Practice is given in the use of instru- 
ments and methods that are widely utilized in chemical research. The exact 
choice of experiments is determined by the past experience and anticipated 
future needs of the individual student. Molecular distillation, spectrophoto- 
metry, chromatography, polarography, thermometry, microscopy, glass- 
blowing, vaporphase reactions, are included. Laboratory work and informal 
discussion. Credit, a total of two hours in one or two semesters. SCHREIBER 
and STAFF. 

525, 526. Organic Preparations. A survey intended to prepare the 
student for independent work in synthetic organic chemistry. A search of the 
literature is required to find appropriate methods of preparation for the 
assigned compounds. Laboratory work and informal discussion. Credit, One 
hour each semester. SZMANT. 



Page Forty-thru 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



541. Qualitative Organic Analysis. The systematic identification of 
organic compounds is considered both theoretically and practically. Class, 
One hour; Laboratory, Eight hours minimum. Credit, Four hours. SZMANT. 

543. Quantitative Organic Analysis. Analyses are carried out, 
usually by micro methods, for nitrogen, halogens, carbon, hydrogen, and 
several functional groups in organic compounds. Laboratory and informal 
discussion. Credit, One hour. DUNKELBERGER. 

551, 552. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. This course is intended to 
broaden the student's chemical background by a more penetrating discussion 
of certain topics touched on in undergraduate courses. Periodic properties of 
the elements, crystal structure, intermetallic compounds, metallo-organic 
compounds, stereochemistry, and similar topics are included. Class, Three 
hours. Credit, Three hours each semester. HARNSBERGER. 

609, 610. The Structure of Matter. Atomic and molecular theory is 
developed on the basis of quantum mechanics and the theory of spectra. 
Methods of determining the sizes and shapes of molecules are discussed, with 
particular emphasis on organic compounds. Experimental methods of deter- 
mining structures are described. Class, Three hours. Credit, Three hours 
each semester. DUNKELBERGER. 

631, 632. Advanced Physical Chemistry. The emphasis is on thermo- 
dynamics and chemical kinetics, with such other information as is necessary 
to integrate these subjects with the general chemical background. Class, 
Three hours. Credit, Three hours each semester. HARNSBERGER. 

651, 652. Seminar. Various assigned topics are discussed by students 
registered for the course, after adequate literature search and study. All 
graduate students are required to attend. In addition to the main prepared 
discussion, members of the group are selected by lot to present extemporane- 
ously brief discussions on subjects of their own choosing. Credit, One hour 
per semester, for a maximum of two credits. GAWRON and STAFF. 

700. Chemical Research (Thesis). Each student selects a subject 
for experimental investigation and a faculty adviser to direct the work. The 
results are incorporated into the thesis and, usually, into a paper for publica- 
tion in a chemical journal. Credit, Six hours. STAFF. 



CLASSICS 

Head of Department: Rev. Raymond Cadwallader, Ph.D. 

REQUIREMENTS IN CLASSICS 

Candidates must have completed a minimum of twenty-four 
hours in classical languages. Work covering a minimum of 
twenty-four semester hours, term papers, a comprehensive 
examination and a thesis are required for a degree of Master. 
All candidates will include courses 501, 502 or 506, 508; 522 or 
523; and 651, 652. A reading knowledge of a modern language 
is also required. 

Page Forty-four 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 



501, 502 Latin Prose Composition 4cr. 


522 


503 


Mediaeval Latin 2cr. 


523 


504 


Vulgate Latin 2cr. 


524 


506 


Roman Literature 2cr. 


528 


510 


Roman Religion 2cr. 


529 


511 


Roman Private Life 2cr. 


644 


513 


Roman Satire 2cr. 


648 


514 


Patristic Latin 2cr. 


650 


515 


St. Augustine, De Civitate Dei 2cr. 


651 


516 


St. Augustine, Confessiones 2cr. 


652 


517 


St. Thomas, Contra Gentiles 2cr. 


700 


521 


Roman Psalter 2cr. 





PROGRAM IN CLASSICS 

The following list indicates the courses offered in this Depart- 
ment. They are covered within a two-year period. 
CL 

Greek Vocabulary Structure 2cr. 
Latin Vocabulary Structure 2cr. 
Latin Conversation 2cr. 
The Teaching of Greek 2cr. 
The Teaching of Latin 2cr. 
Roman Education 2cr. 
Roman Art 2cr. 
Roman Occupations 2cr. 
Master's Bibliography 2cr. 
Classical Antiquities 2cr. 
Thesis 6cr. 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

501, 502. Latin Prose Composition. Rendition of texts of English 
literature into continuous Latin prose composition; comparison of idiom and 
style. Credity Two hours each semester. CADWALLADER. 

503. Mediaeval Latin. Translation in the field of the second nocturn 
in the Breviarium Romanum. Credit, Two hours. ALGIER. 

504. Vulgate Latin. Translation in the field of the first nocturn in the 
Breviarium Romanum. Credit, Two hours. ALGIER. 

506. Roman Literature. A course covering the republican, golden 
and silver ages. Credit, Two hours. 

510. Roman Religion. Numina, Lares, Immortality, Emperor-worship, 
Religion and the State. Credit, Two hours. CADWALLADER. 

511. Roman Private Life. Home, furniture, household, matrimony, 
childhood, clothing, amusements, and burial. Credit, Two hours. CAD- 
WALLADER. 

513. Roman Satire. Origin and development of Satire. Dramatic and 
Literary Satire, Lucilius. Selected readings and translations from Horace, 
Juvenal, Persius, Martial. Periodic reports and term paper. Credit, Two 
hours. ALGIER. 

514. Patristic Latin. Translation of excerpts, particularly from 
Jerome, Ambrose and Augustine. Credit, Two hours. CADWALLADER. 

515. St. Augustine, De Civitate Dei. A portrayal of the intellect of 
St. Augustine, with studies in style and structure as exemplified in this great 
work. Reports on Latin writing from the close of the classical age to the 
fifth century. Credit, Two hours. CADWALLADER. 

516. St. Augustine, Confessiones. A portrayal of the soul of St. 
Augustine, with studies in style and structure. Reports on Latin writing 
from the fifth century to the twelfth. Credit, Two hours. CADWALLADER. 



Page Forty-five 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



517. St. Thomas, Contra Gentiles. A study in mediaeval Latin style, 
structure and philology. Reports on Latin writings of the twelfth and thir- 
teenth centuries. Credity Two hours. ALGIER. 

521. Roman Psalter. Translation of the psalms from the Breviarium 
Romanum. Credity Two hours. ALGIER. 

522. Greek Vocabulary Structure. Practical exercises in building 
vocabularies for and from the texts of Greek authors. Credity Two hours. 
ALGIER. 

523. Latin Vocabulary Structure. Practical exercises in building 
vocabularies for and from the texts of Latin authors. Credity Two hours. 
ALGIER. 

524. Latin Conversation. A view in question and answer form of 
classical inflection and syntax. Credity Two hours. 

528. The Teaching of Greek. Classroom methods for the practical 
presentation of Greek grammar and authors, and for the stimulation of 
interest through projects, plays and contests. Credity Two hours. CAD- 
WALLADER. 

529. The Teaching of Latin. Classroom methods for the presentation 
of Latin syntax and authors, together with methods for creating interest 
through projects, plays and emulation. Credity Two hours. CADWALLADER. 

644. Roman Education. Historical development, curriculum of 
studies, method in grammatical and rhetorical schools. Credity Two hours. 

648. Roman Art. Painting, gems and metal work, architecture, build- 
ing construction, mosaics and pavements. Credity Two hours. CADWAL- 
LADER. 

650. Roman Occupations. Professions, agriculture, industries, trade 
and commerce, public entertainers and guilds. Credity Two hours. CAD- 
WALLADER. 

651. Master's Bibliography. A pro-seminar of introduction to the 
reading list employed throughout the program in classics. Credity Two hours. 

652. Classical Antiquities. A seminar with individual library assign- 
ments in the several fields of classical civilization. Weekly oral reports. 
Credity Two hours. CADWALLADER. 



ECONOMICS 

Head of Department: Cyril Zebot, Ph.D. 

REQUIREMENTS IN ECONOMICS 

Candidates must have an undergraduate preparation which 
is judged adequate by the department. Graduate work covering 
a minimum of thirty semester hours in the major field, including 
a thesis, is required for the degree of Master of Arts in Econ- 
omics. All candidates must include in their studies 517, 518, 
527, 528 and 651. 



Page Forty-six 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 



PROGRAM IN ECONOMICS 

517, 518 The Theory of Demand, Production 633 Economic Fluctuations 2cr. 

and Prices 4cr. 635 International Economic Relations 
527, 528 The Theory of National Income, 2cr. 

Output and Employment 4cr. 637 Economics of Socialism and 
547, 548 Industrial Studies and Inter- Communism 2cr. 

Industry Relations 4cr. 639, 640 Contemporary Economic Trends 
549, 550 The Economics of the Steel 4cr. 

Industry 4cr. 647 Economic Statistics, Charts and 
615 Public Finance and Fiscal Policy Graphs 2cr. 

2cr. 651 Pro-Seminar 2cr. 

630 Economics of Labor-Management 652 Seminar 2cr. 

Relations 2cr. 700 Thesis 6cr. 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

517, 518. The Theory of Demand, Production and Prices. A course 
in micro-economics; i.e. a study of basic economic units, their decisions and 
actions as to demand and production, and of price and income determination, 
under different institutional conditions of modern economy. Credit, Two 
hours each semester. GROSSCHMID. 

527, 528. The Theory of National Income, Output and Employ- 
ment. A course in macro-economics; i.e. a study of the working of a modern 
economy as a whole in its aspects of total income, spending and saving, of 
total output and employment, and their components, in the framework of 
national economic accounting as a tool of macro-economic analysis and 
synthesis. The relationship between micro- and macro-economics will be 
explored. Economic Reports of the Council of Economic Advisers will be 
examined. Credit, Two hours each semester. ZEBOT. 

547, 548. Industrial Studies and Inter- Industry Relations. The 

course will explore the mutual dependence of different industries both during 
their growth and development as well as in the more stabilized course of their 
operation. Special attention will be given to such basic industries as steel, 
automobiles, railroads, electricity and petroleum, among others. Credit, Two 
hours each semester. 

549, 550. The Economics of the Steel Industry. The course will 
deal with the economic aspects of the steel industry from the raw materials 
stage through the finished products. Use of raw materials, basic production 
methods, productivity, distribution of steel, its markets and end uses, as well 
as the internal organization of the industry, will be studied and analyzed. 
Credit, Two hours each semester. 

615. Public Finance and Fiscal Policy. An analysis of the financial 
operations of government and their possibilities as a means of influencing the 
nation's economy. Credit, Two hours. BASTYR. 

630. Economics of Labor-Management Relations. An analysis of 
labor-management relations in their effects on output, employment and 
income distribution. Stress on contemporary problems in the field. Credit, 
Two hours. HARTUNG. 

633. Economic Fluctuations. A study and analysis of economic 
processes in view of locating the causes of disturbances in dynamic stability 
conditions. Credit, Two hours. 



Page Forty-seven 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



635. International Economic Relations. Analysis of selected prob- 
lems in international economics according to changing patterns and trends in 
national economic policies and in international arrangements. The theories 
of international economic specialization and development, rate of exchange, 
balance of payments, and practices of institutions such as I.M.F., the Inter- 
national Bank, the Marshall Plan, the Inter-European Payment Union, the 
Schuman Plan, Point four, etc., will be examined. Credit, Two hours. ZEBOT. 

637. Economics of Socialism and Communism. An analysis of the 
economic aspects of socialism and communism with particular reference to 
economic practices in Great Britain and the Scandinavian countries, and to 
the economy of the Soviet Union and other communist-dominated countries. 
Credit, Two hours. GROSSCHMID. 

639, 640. Contemporary Economic Trends. A survey and analysis 
of major trends in contemporary economic thought and political action. 
Proposals and measures for integrating the goals of economic freedom, op- 
portunity, security, equity and efficiency. Social security schemes. Industrial 
councils. Changes in the forms of interprises. Economics of defense pre- 
paredness. Credit, Two hours each semester. ZEBOT. 

647. Economic Statistics, Charts and Graphs. A study of methods 
of quantitative economic analysis and laboratory work in respective tech- 
niques, with special regard to the material presented in the Survey of Current 
Business, the Federal Reserve Bulletin and the Economic Reports and 
Reviews of the Council of Economic Advisers. Credit, Two hours. 

651. Pro-Seminar. A study of the methodology of social sciences in 
general and economics in particular. An introduction to graduate research 
work. Credit, Two hours. ZEBOT. 

652. Seminar. Selected readings from classic and contemporary 
economic literature; research work. Credit, Two hours. 



EDUCATION 

Head of Department: Regis J. Leonard, Ph.D. 

REQUIREMENTS IN EDUCATION 

Candidates must have completed an adequate undergraduate 
preparation in Education, including courses in General Psych- 
ology, Educational Psychology, Statistics and Measurements, 
Mental Hygiene. For the degree of Master of Science in Educa- 
tion, a minimum of twenty-six semester hours in course and a 
thesis are required. For the degree of Master of Education, a 
minimum of thirty-two semester hours in course is required. 
Master of Education programs leading toward additional certi- 
fication must include an applied research project. All candidates 
will include in their studies 553, 619, 620, 651. 



Page Forty-eight 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 



PROGRAM IN EDUCATION 



The following list indicates the courses offered in this Depart- 
ment. They are covered within a two-year period. 



GE 

528 
603 
609 
610 
611, 612 



PS 

511 
514 

521 
527, 528 

553 

555, 556 
561 

563 



General Education 



Principles of Guidance 2cr. 619, 620 

Supervision of Instruction 2cr. 641 

Public School Administration 2cr. 651 

Public School Management 2cr. 700 
Parochial School Administration 
4cr. 



Philosophy of Education 4cr. 
Essentials in School Law 2cr. 
Education Seminar 2cr. 
Thesis 6cr. 



Educational Psychology and Speech Correction 



Psychology of Speech 3cr. 

Psychology of the Pre-School Child 
2cr. 

Advanced Speech Problems 3cr. 

Clinical Practice in Speech Correc- 
tion 4cr. 

Statistics 2cr. 

Psychological Testing 4cr. 

Psychology of the Atypical Child 
2cr. 

Diagnostic Testing and Remedial 
Teaching 2cr. 



622 Advanced Educational Psychology 
2cr. 

623, 624 Clinical Psychology 4cr. 

625, 626 Psychometric Techniques 4cr. 

629 Introduction to Projective Tech- 
niques 3cr. 

651 Methods of Research in Educa- 
tional Psychology 2cr. 

653, 654 Speech Pathology 4cr. 

700 Thesis 6cr. 



EE 

503 
504 
506 
508 
509 

513 
514 
530 

590 



SE 

501 

505 

515 
516 
529 

604 
607 
608 
615 



Elementary Education 



Nursery Education 2cr. 
Problems in Elementary Education 2cr. 
Nursery School Administration 2cr. 
Reading Disabilities 2cr. 
Integrating the Elementary Program 
2cr. 

Elementary School Curriculum 2cr. 
Psychology of the Pre-School Child 2cr. 
Problems in Elementary Pupil Person- 
nel 2cr. 

Curriculum Construction: Parochial 
Elementary School 2cr. 



605 Child Development and the Curriculum 

2cr. 

606 Advanced Techniques in Elemen- 

tary Education 2cr. 

613 Administration of the Elementary 

School 2cr. 

614 Supervision-Improvement of Teaching 

in the Elementary School 2cr. 
618 Practices in Elementary School 

Administration 2cr. 
700 Thesis 6cr. 



Secondary Education 



Principles of Business Education 
2cr. 

Practices in Personnel Administra- 
tion 2cr. 

Journalism Education 3cr. 

Radio Education 3cr. 

Problems in Secondary Pupil Person- 
nel 2cr. 

Problems in Secondary Education 2cr. 

Problems in Business Education 2cr. 

Curricula in Business Education 2cr. 

Supervision-Improvement of Teaching 
in the Secondary School 2cr. 



616 

617 

627 

628 

630 
631 
637 
638 
639 
700 



Administration of the Secondary School 

2cr. 
Administrative Practices in the Junior 

High School 2cr. 
Organization of Extra-Curricular 

Activities 2cr. 
Guidance Techniques in the Secondary 

School 2cr. 
School Guidance Program 2cr. 
Secondary School Curriculum 2cr. 
Occupational Study 2cr. 
Occupational Application 2cr. 
Practicum in Counseling Ocr. 
Thesis 6cr. 



Page Forty-nine 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



NOTE: the following are the fields in graduate work. 

Educational Psychology Secondary Education (Principal, Public 
Speech Correction School) (State Certification) 

Elementary Education (Teachers) Secondary Education (Principal, Non-Public 
Elementary Education (Principal, Non-Public School) (State Certification) 

School) (State Certification) Guidance Counseling. 
Secondary Education (Teachers) 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

GENERAL EDUCATION 

528. Principles of Guidance. This course presents the history of the 
guidance movement, the fundamental principles involved in guidance work, 
whether educational or vocational, and a survey of the types of guidance 
material available with a study of the techniques needed to use the same. 
Credit, Two hours. LEONARD. 

603. Supervision of Instruction. General problems in the supervision 
and evaluation of instruction; methods and techniques of supervision; in- 
service training and professional growth of teachers. Credit, Two hours. 
QUIGLEY. 

609. Public School Administration. An introduction to general 
school administration; the place of education in a democratic society; edu- 
cational organization; the administration of staff personnel; the administration 
of instruction. Credit, Two hours. GRIFFIN. 

610. Public School Management. An introduction to the business 
administration of public education; school finance; accounting and budgeting; 
service of supplies; school plan construction, maintenance and operation; 
techniques of appraisal. Credit, Two hours. GRIFFIN. 

611. 612. Catholic School Administration. Initial phases of general 
school administration; educational organization; the administration of staff 
personnel; the administration of instruction; school finance, accounting and 
budgeting; service of supplies; school plan construction, maintenance and 
operation; techniques of appraisal. Credit, Two hours each semester. 
QUIGLEY. 

619, 620. Philosophy of Education. A view of the norms to be applied 
in education. Special attention is given to the nature of the child and to the 
philosophical basis for religious and moral training, physical and health 
rearing, intellectual and aesthetic culture, curriculum and method. A study 
of the chief philosophies of today: Pragmatism, Nationalism, Socialism, and 
Scholasticism, in their educational implications and applications. Credit, 
Two hours each semester. GOETZ. 

641. Essentials in School Law. Principal provisions in school law 
affecting teachers, principals and superintendents in the administration and 
supervision of the public school; constitutional, statutory, ruling case and 
common law bases for public education interpretation; legal procedures. 
Particular emphasis on Pennsylvania School Law. Credit, Two hours. 
GRIFFIN. 

651. Education Seminar. Methods and materials of research with a 
problem analysis in the definite field of the student's program. Credit, Two 
hours. 



Page Fifty 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 



EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY AND SPEECH CORRECTION 

511. Psychology of Speech. Psychological processes basic to speech 
with emphasis upon developmental changes from infancy to maturity. Credit, 
Three hours. OLIVA. 

521. Advanced Speech Problems. A study of advanced speech 
problems. Specialization and research. Credit, Three hours. WELSH. 

527, 528. Clinical Practice in Speech Correction. An advanced 
study of the rehabilitation of speech. Diagnostic testing in the Speech Clinic. 
Credit, Two hours each semester. WELSH. 

553. Statistics. A course in Statistics for the understanding and 
application of numerical phenomena to educational and psychological data. 
Credit, Two hours. WELSH, SMITH. 

555, 556. Psychological Testing. An analysis of the standardized 
aptitude, intelligence, vocational and personality tests now in use, with 
practical experience in the administration of the individual and group types 
of tests. Credit, Two hours each semester. LEONARD. 

561. Psychology of the Atypical Child. An introduction to the study 
of handicapped children in light of their psychological, physiological, and 
social status. Case studies supplement theoretical development. Credit, Two 
hours. OLIVA. 

563. Diagnostic Testing and Remedial Teaching. Diagnostic and 
remedial procedure with reference to instructional problems. Credit, Two 
hours. McGINN. 

622. Advanced Educational Psychology. A study of the experimental 
evidence concerning the genetic approach to mental development — the laws 
of learning, memory and retroactive inhibition, transfer and motivation. 
Credit, Two hours. HOLT, McGINN. 

623, 624. Clinical Psychology. A psycho-dynamic approach to the 
study of the aberrant personality; clinical orientation; techniques of analysis 
and therapy. Credit, Two hours each semester. OLIVA. 

625, 626. Psychometric Techniques. A practical study of the develop- 
ment, standardization and specific instruction in the administration and 
interpretation of the Stanford Revision of the Binet Intelligence tests. Credit, 
Two hours each semester. WELSH. 

629. Introduction to Projective Techniques. Projective methods in 
the study of personality. Word association, visual stimulus techniques, 
expressive movement, play and psychodrama. Credit, Three hours. OLIVA. 

651. Methods of Research in Educational Psychology. Classification 
of research methods; normative survey, experimental and historical method; 
statistical analysis and interpretation of data; formulation of conclusions and 
generalizations. Credit, Two hours. SMITH. 

653, 654. Speech Pathology. A detailed study of complicated speech 
disorders, such as aphasia, cleft palate speech, and spastic speech resulting 
from pathologies that affect the vocal mechanism. Credit, Two hours each 
semester. 



Page Fifty-one 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

503. Nursery Education. Theory, function, and purpose of the nursery 
school. Credit, Two hours. 

504. Problems in Elementary Education. Appraisal of methods and 
objectives in modern elementary education; the characteristics of children, 
individual differences and grouping; particular supervisory problems. Credit, 
Two hours. 

506. Nursery School Administration. Organization and administra- 
tion of the nursery school. Credit, Two hours. 

508. Reading Disabilities. Significance of reading disabilities; causes; 
analysis; a program of correction. Credit, Two hours. BETSCHART. 

509. Integrating the Elementary Program. Integration as major 
aim of the modern school; relationships between learning and doing; coordina- 
tion of subject matter, materials, experiences, and activities. Credit, Two 
hours. KLEYLE. 

513. Elementary School Curriculum. Principles of curriculum con- 
struction on the elementary level; a study of curriculum improvement; 
organization and content of elementary school subjects. Credit, Two hours. 
KLEYLE. 

514. Psychology of the Pre-School Child. A detailed study of the 
child from two to six years. Physical, mental, emotional and social growth 
and development. Credit, Two hours. KLEYLE. 

530. Problems in Elementary Pupil Personnel. Problems in the 
management and progress of the elementary pupil; administration of pupil 
personnel services; child accounting; recording and reporting; promotion; 
discipline; articulation; home and community relationships. Credit, Two 
hours. GRIFFIN. 

590. Curriculum Construction: Parochial Elementary School. 

Curriculum principles and construction procedures applicable to Catholic 
elementary schools; organization and content of elementary school subjects. 
Credit, Two hours. 

605. Child Development and the Curriculum. A survey of children's 
growth as it contributes to the understanding of subject matter and methods 
of elementary education. Credit, Two hours. KLEYLE. 

606. Advanced Techniques in Elementary Education. Study and 
research in techniques relative to the instructional improvement in the ele- 
mentary school. Credit, Two hours. 

613. Administration of the Elementary School. Organization and 
administration of the elementary school; particular personnel management; 
curricular and extra-curricular programs peculiar to the elementary school; 
home and community services. Credit, Two hours. SCHUUR. 

614. Supervision-Improvement of Teaching in the Elementary 
School. Methods particular to elementary supervision; diagnosis and evalu- 
ation of teaching and learning procedure; improvement of instruction in 
terms of modern methods and objectives; stimulation of faculty cooperation. 
Credit, Two hours. SCHUUR. 

618. Practices in Elementary School Administration. Practices 
and trends in modern elementary school administration as evidenced by 
current educational literature and research. Credit, Two hours. 



Page Fifty-two 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 



SECONDARY EDUCATION 

501. Principles of Business Education. Objectives of business edu- 
cation, current educational views and attitudes, business consumer education, 
available tests in business education. Credit, Two hours. SCHUUR. 

505. Practices in Personnel Administration. Current practices in 
personnel administration in business and industry with special reference to 
industrial relations. Credit, Two hours. WELSH. 

515. Journalism Education. School publications: newspaper, year- 
book, magazine. Editorial content, staff organization, editing, typography, 
make-up and business management. Credit, Three hours. 

516. Radio Education. Radio script writing theory and practice; 
studio laboratory work. Supervision of student scripts, dramatic script selec- 
tion, casting, rehearsals and production. Credit, Three hours. 

529. Problems in Secondary Pupil Personnel. Problems in the 
management and progress of the secondary pupil; administration of pupil 
personnel services; pupil accounting; recording and reporting; promotion; 
discipline; articulation; home and community relationships. Credit, Two 
hours. GRIFFIN. 

604. Problems in Secondary Education. Appraisal and analysis of 
the objectives, issues, functions, and procedures in secondary education as 
found in current literature and research. Credit, Two hours. GOETZ, SMITH. 

607. Problems in Business Education. Trends in business education, 
guidance program, occupational foundations, current problems in business 
education. Credit, Two hours. 

608. Curricula in Business Education. Survey of curricula in busi- 
ness. Evaluation of these curricula. Credit, Two hours. SCHUUR. 

615. Supervision Improvement of Teaching in the Secondary 
School. Methods and techniques in the supervision of the secondary school; 
problems of instruction peculiar to the secondary level; improvement of 
teaching and learning in terms of modern methods and objectives. Credit, 
Two hours. GOETZ. 

616. Administration of the Secondary School. Organization and 
administration in relation to objectives and problems of secondary education; 
administration of the secondary curriculum and evaluation of procedures. 
Credit, Two hours. CAMPBELL. 

617. Administrative Problems in the Junior High School. The 

psychological factors of adolescence which make the Junior High School an 
essential education unit; an evaluation of course materials and techniques of 
instruction. Credit, Two hours. CAMPBELL. 

627. Organization of Extra-Curricular Activities. Objectives and 
problems of building programs in the extra-curricular field of student activities 
in secondary schools. Credit, Two hours. McGINN. 

628. Guidance Techniques in the Secondary School. Practical 
application of fundamental principles, techniques, and materials of guidance 
to the secondary school. Actual laboratory case studies. Credit, Two hours. 
LEONARD. 



Page Fifty-three 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



630. School Guidance Program. Administration and development of 
the guidance program on the secondary level. Credit, Two hours. McGINN. 

631. Secondary School Curriculum. Basic principles and procedures 
in secondary curriculum construction with reference to objectives of modern 
secondary education and the needs of adolescents; a critical survey of subject 
fields. Credit, Two hours. GOETZ. 

637. Occupational Study. Study of fields of work with requirements; 
job analysis in vocational guidance. Credit, Two hours. WELSH. 

638. Occupational Application. Case work; techniques in vocational 
guidance. Credit, Two hours. WELSH. 

639. Practicum in Counseling. An applied research project involving 
guidance and counseling with a homeroom group. Registration with consent 
of Department. No credit. 

ENGLISH 

Head of Department: James M. Purcell, Ph.D. 

REQUIREMENTS IN ENGLISH 

Candidates must have completed a minimum of twenty-four 
semester hours in English Literature. Work covering a minimum 
of twenty-four semester hours in course, together with a thesis, 
is required for a degree of Master. All candidates will include in 
their studies courses 611, 651. 



PROGRAM IN ENGLISH 



EN 



Studies in Shakespeare 2cr. 
Seventeenth Century Literature 2cr. 
Elizabethan Non-Dramatic Literature 

2cr. 
Elizabethan Drama 2cr. 
English Fiction, 1740-1800 2cr. 
English Fiction, 1800-1890 2cr. 
Literary Criticism 2cr. 
American Romantic Literature 2cr. 
English Fiction since 1890 2cr. 
Pro-Seminar 2cr. 
Thesis 6cr 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

501. Neo-Classicism. A study of the historical trends of Augustan 
Literature. The meaning and source of Neo-Classicism; the rise of middle- 
class literature. Credit, Two hours. McFADDEN. 

502. Romantic Poetry. A consideration of the lives and works of the 
great Romantics: Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, Keats; and of the 
minor poets, in relation to the philosophical, social, and political milieu of 
the early 19th century. Credit, Two hours. BRUNNER. 



501 


Neo-Classicism 2cr. 


605 


502 


Romantic Poetry 2cr. 


606 


503 


Nineteenth Century Prose 2cr. 


607 


504 


Victorian Poets 2cr. 




505 


English Literature since 1890 2cr. 


608 


506 


Restoration Literature 2cr. 


609 


507 


The Pre-Romantics 2cr. 


610 


510 


Modern American Fiction 2cr. 


611 


601 


Old English Literature 2cr. 


612 


602 


English Literature from the Conquest 


613 




to Chaucer 2cr. 


651 


603 


Chaucer and the Later Middle Ages 
2cr. 


700 






Page Fifty-four 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 



503. Nineteenth Century Prose. A study of the rise of literary reviews 
and of the continuing development of the formal and familiar essay from 
Lamb to Stevenson. Credit, Two hours. 

504. Victorian Poets. Tennyson, Browning, Arnold, the PreRaphae- 
lites, Swinburne, and Thompson viewed as representative types of various 
expressions of the Victorian Compromise. Credit, Two hours. WEAVER. 

505. English Literature since 1890. An endeavor to place contem- 
porary experimental literature into its historical perspective and to diagnose 
its trends. Credity Two hours. 

506. Restoration Literature. A study of the literary trends in Rest- 
oration England. The drama and the works of Dryden form the basis of the 
course. Credity Two hours. 

507. The Pre-Romantics. This course studies the reaction to Neo- 
Classicism and the advent of Liberalism as exemplified in the writings of the 
harbingers of the New Romanticism. Credit, Two hours. 

510. Modern American Fiction. An intensive study of selected 
writings of a major American Novelist. The course at present is devoted to 
the development of the art of Henry James. Credit, Two hours. MITCHELL. 

601. Old English Literature. A survey of the literature of England 
from the coming of the Saxons to the Norman Conquest. Though of a literary 
rather than philological nature, this course gives some attention to the reading 
of Old English. Credit, Two hours. KLINEFELTER. 

602. English Literature from the Conquest to Chaucer. Traces 
literary and linguistic developments in England from the Conquest to the 
fusion of Saxon and Norman elements. Reading is done in Early Middle 
English. Credit, Two hours. 

603. Chaucer and the Later Middle Ages. Studies the field of later 
Middle English Literature, Emphasis is placed on outstanding works and 
figures of the period, and on significant developments in the writings of the 
15th century. Credit, Two hours. KLINEFELTER. 

605. Studies in Shakespeare. Shakespeare, the man, the dramatist, 
the poet. A discussion of the plays from the following viewpoints: philoso- 
phical, social, historical and literary content, dates, dramatic devices, poetic 
progress, sources. Reading and interpretation of the major dramas. Credit, 
Two hours. PURCELL. 

606. Seventeenth Century Literature. Considers poetic and prose 
works from Donne to Butler. An analysis of the various influences at work 
in the seventeenth century; wide collateral reading. Credit, Two hours. 

607. Elizabethan Non-Dramatic Literature. Classical and con- 
temporary foreign influences of the Renaissance. Developments in the sonnet 
sequence, pastoral, historical poem, and the prose of the Elizabethan Age. 
Credit, Two hours. PURCELL. 

608. Elizabethan Drama. A presentation of the rise, development, 
and decline of English drama from its beginnings in the liturgy of the Church 
to its sudden end with the closing of the theatres in 1642. The main emphasis 
is on the best and most significant plays of the period. Credit, Two hours. 



Page Fifty-five 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



609. English Fiction, 1740-1800. The beginnings of fiction in world 
and earlier English literature; Richardson, Fielding, Smollett, Sterne, and 
their imitators; the Gothic romance and the novel of sentiment. Credit, Two 
hours. 

610. English Fiction, 1800-1890. Jane Austen, Scott, Collins, Dickens, 
Thackeray, Eliot, Meredith, Hardy, and Stevenson. Credit, Two hours. 
BRUNNER. 

611. Literary Criticism. Analyzes critical documents of major import- 
ance from Aristotle to the present. Aims at enabling the student to formulate 
for himself a solid critical system. Credit, Two hours. McFADDEN. 

612. American Romantic Literature. The growth of romantic 
literature in America. Includes a thorough study of Transcendentalism as it 
finds expression in American Literature, particularly in the writings of 
Emerson. Credit, Two hours. MITCHELL. 

613. English Fiction Since 1890. Close reading of the works of three 
outstanding modern English novelists is supplemented by consideration of 
literary and historical contexts. Credit, Two hours. 

651. Pro-Seminar. An introduction to the methods and materials of 
research. Enables the graduate student to pursue original research projects 
satisfactorily and to present the results of his work in fully documented 
fashion. Credit, Two hours. 



HISTORY 

Head of Department: Salvator J. Federici, C.S.Sp., Ph.D. 

REQUIREMENTS IN HISTORY 

Candidates must have completed a minimum of twenty-four 
semester hours in history. Work covering a minimum of twenty- 
four semester hours in course, together with a thesis, is required 
for a degree of Master. All candidates will include in their 
studies courses 511, 525, 527, 544, 545, 651. 



PROGRAM IN HISTORY 



The following list indicates the courses offered in this Depart- 
ment. They are covered within a two-year period. 



HI 

511 Social and Economic Structure of the 591 

Middle Ages 2cr. 611 

525 The Thirteenth Century 2cr. 621 

527 Renaissance and Reformation 2cr. 625 
537 United States Diplomatic History 2cr. 

531 Latin American Foreign Relations 2cr. 629 

544 Rise of Nationalism 2cr. 639 

545 Development of Internationalism 2cr. 651 
571 Diplomatic History of Europe since 700 

1815 2cr. 



European Colonial Expansion 2cr. 

The Crusades 2cr. 

The British Revolutions 2cr. 

The French Revolution and Napoleon 

2cr. 
American Constitutional History 2cr. 
Civil War and Reconstruction 2cr. 
Science and Methods of History 2cr. 
Thesis 6cr. 



Page Fifty-six 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

511. Social and Economic Structure of the Middle Ages. An 

investigation of the social and economic aspects of Feudalism. Credit, Two 
hours. BROWN. 

525. The Thirteenth Century. Intellectual, Political, and Cultural 
developments of this century. Credit, Two hours. FEDERICI. 

527. Renaissance and Reformation. Intellectual transition prepara- 
tory to the religious upheaval of the sixteenth century. Credit, Two hours. 
RUSSO. 

531. Latin American Foreign Relations. Infiltration of foreign 
influences into South America. Credit, Two hours. 

537. United States Diplomatic History. A study in United States 
Foreign Policy, from the Monroe Doctrine to the present, with emphasis upon 
the period after World War I. Credit, Two hours. HEINTZ. 

544. Rise of Nationalism. Break-up of the Middle Ages and the 
formation of the National States. Credit, Two hours. FEDERICI. 

545. Development of Internationalism. The growth, consequent to 
1870, of International Alliances and Rivalries with attempts at international 
cooperation for peace, following the two World Wars. Credit, Two hours. 
HEINTZ. 

571. Diplomatic History of Europe since 1815. The Congress of 
Vienna, the Holy Alliance, the Quadruple Alliance, methods employed by 
the big powers to keep the peace of Europe, the unification of Italy and 
Germany up to the Franco-Prussian War. Credit, Two hours. 

591. European Colonial Expansion. Beginning with Portuguese and 
Spanish explorations to the demands of the present powers for colonial equality. 
Credit, Two hours. FEDERICI. 

611. The Crusades. The political and economic aspects of these 
religious wars and their effect upon both East and West. Credit, Two hours. 
FEDERICI. 

621. The British Revolutions. Rise of Constitutional Governments. 
The Social and Industrial Revolutions. Credit, Two hours. BROWN. 

625. The French Revolution and Napoleon. The abuses of the Old 
Regime leading to the violent outburst of anarchy — the cause of the Revolu- 
tion and the rise of Napoleon. Credit, Two hours. BROWN. 

629. American Constitutional History. Development of the Con- 
stitution and reasons for the amendments. Credit, Two hours. FEDERICI. 

639. Civil War and Reconstruction. The War between the States. 
States Rights, Tariff and Slavery as causes of the war, and the effects upon 
the nation. Credit, Two hours. SCHLICHT. 

651. Science and Methods of History. Nature of History. Short 
history of history writing. Description of source material and its use. Credit, 
Two hours. BROWN. 



Page Fifty-seven 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



MODERN LANGUAGES 

Head of Department: Primitivo Colombo, Ph.D. 

REQUIREMENTS IN MODERN LANGUAGES 

Candidates must have completed a minimum of twenty-four 
hours in their major field of study (French, German or Spanish). 
Work covering a minimum of twenty-four semester hours in 
course, not more than six semester hours of which may be taken 
from the 500 group, together with a thesis, is required for a 
degree of Master. 



PROGRAM IN MODERN LANGUAGES 

The following list indicates the courses offered in this Depart- 
ment. They are covered within a two-year period. 



FRE 

501, 502 

504 

505, 506 
611 
612 
621 

625 
626 



French 

General Survey of French Culture 631 



and History 6cr. 

Phonetics 2cr. 

Advanced French Composition 4cr. 

Introduction to Old French 2cr. 

Chansons de Geste 2cr. 

Sixteenth Century French 
Literature 2cr. 

The Classical Tragedy 2cr. 

The Classical Comedy 2cr. 



632 

635 

641, 642 

645, 646 

651 
700 



GER German 

501, 502 General Survey of German Culture 621, 622 

and History 6cr. 
504 Phonetics 2cr. 

505, 506 Advanced German Composition 

4cr. 

610 Introduction to the History of the 

German Language 2cr. 

611 History of German Literature from 

the beginnings to the Reforma- 
tion 2cr. 
615 German Literature of the Reforma- 

tion and Baroque 2cr. 



625 
631 
635 
640 
645 

651 
700 



Eighteenth Century French 

Theater 2cr. 
Eighteenth Century Prose 

Writers 2cr. 
Nineteenth Century French 

Theater 2cr. 
Nineteenth Century French Novel 

4cr. 
Twentieth Century French 

Literature 4cr. 
Pro-Seminar 2cr. 
Thesis 6cr. 



German Literature in the Eight- 
eenth Century 4cr. 

Period of Classicism 2cr. 

German Romanticism 2cr. 

Comparative Literature 2cr. 

Symbolism and Impressionism -2cr. 

German Prose Fiction after Goethe 
2cr. 

Pro-Seminar 2cr. 

Thesis 6cr. 



SPAN 



Spanish 



501, 502 General Survey of Spanish Culture 

and History 6cr. 
504 Phonetics 2cr. 

505, 506 Advanced Spanish Composition 4cr. 
601, 602 Spanish Classics 4cr. 
611 The Picaresque Novel 2cr. 

615 Spanish Drama of the Golden Age 

2cr. 



621, 622 The Spanish Novel 4cr. 
625 Latin-American Trends in Litera- 
ture 2cr. 
631 Romanticism in Spain 2cr. 

641 Modern Spanish Drama 2cr. 
651 Pro-Seminar 2cr. 

700 Thesis 6cr. 



Page Fifty-eight 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 
FRENCH 

501, 502. General Survey of French Culture and History. Study of 
the principal events of French History from the Celts to the present. France's 
contributions to the arts and sciences. This course is intended to serve as a 
background for later courses in French literature. Credit, Three hours each 
semester. 

504. Phonetics. A study of the sounds of French, individually and in 
combination. Both oral and visual aids used to perfect speech habits. Credit, 
Two hours. 

505, 506. Advanced French Composition. Free composition, assigned 
topics, reports on outside readings. This course is designed to develop fluency 
and accuracy in writing French. Credit, Two hours each semester. 

611. Introduction to Old French. Credit, Two hours. 

612. Chansons de Geste. The origin, development and decay of the 
mediaeval French epics. A special study will be made of the Chanson de 
Roland. Credit, Two hours. 

621. Sixteenth Century French Literature. French literature at 
the beginning of the sixteenth century. Influence of Italian art and literature. 
Sources and development of the work of Rabelais. Thought and method of 
Montaigne. Evolution of French poetry from Marot to the Pleiade. The 
drama. Credit, Two hours. 

625. The Classical Tragedy. Development of the French Tragedy. 
The quarrel of the Cid. The work of Corneille and Racine. Decay of the 
tragedy after Racine. Credit, Two hours. 

626. The Classical Comedy. Sources of the French Comedy. Italian 
and Spanish influences. Study and evaluation of Moliere's work. Credit, 
Two hours. 

631. The Eighteenth Century French Theatre. Decline of the 
tragedy in the eighteenth century. Voltaire's contributions to tragedy. 
Introduction of Shakespeare to the French theatre. The evolution of comedy 
in the writings of Lesage, Marivaux, and Beaumarchais. The drama in the 
works of Diderot and Sedaine. Credit, Two hours. 

632. Eighteenth Century Prose Writers. The influence of the English 
moralists and philosophers on France. Study of the intellectual and moral 
atmosphere of the period. New tendencies and viewpoints. Montesquieu, 
Voltaire, J. J. Rousseau. Credit, Two hours. 

635. Nineteenth Century French Theater. Romantic drama. The 
revolt against classicism. Hugo, Vigny, Dumas pere, Musset. Realism. 
The comedy of Dumas fils, and Augier. Credit, Two hours. 

641, 642. Nineteenth Century French Novel. Romanticism, Realism 
and Naturalism in the French novel. The reaction against Naturalism. A 
consideration of the works of Hugo, Stendhal, Balzac, Flaubert, A. Daudet, 
Zola, and de Maupassant. The psychological novel of France, Bourget, 
Barres and Bazin. The impressionistic novel. The exotism of Loti. Credit, 
Two hours each semester. 



Page Fifty-nine 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



645, 646. Twentieth Century French Literature. A general con- 
sideration of contemporary French literature: Mauriac, Giono, Hemon, 
Bernanos, LaVarende and Giradoux. An analysis of French family and social 
life in the writings of Proust and Duhamel. Treatment of the characteristics 
and formulas of the period. Credit, Two hours each semester. 

651. Pro-Seminar. An introduction to the methods and materials of 
research. Credit, Two hours. 

GERMAN 

501, 502. General Survey of German Culture and History. In this 
survey two facts will be emphasized: 1) Germany as against the western 
European countries never outgrew Feudalism, becoming "petrified," so to 
say, "in the German Particularism" of the sixteenth to the nineteenth cen- 
turies; 2) Germany's very great contribution to the science and research of 
the nineteenth century. Credit, Three hours each semester. 

504. Phonetics. A study of the sounds of German, individually and 
in combination. Both oral and visual aids used to perfect speech habits. 
Credit, Two hours. 

505, 506. Advanced German Composition. Practice in writing and 
speaking the living language. Topics from both current and literary sources 
to gain fluency in colloquial as well as literary German. Credit, Two hours 
each semester. 

610. Introduction to the History of the German Language. 

Credit, Two hours. 

611. History of German Literature from the Beginnings to the 
Reformation. A discussion of the historic background of early German 
literature Readings from the more important works and writers of this 
period. Credit, Two hours. 

615. German Literature of the Reformation and Baroque. After 
promising beginnings during the Reformation, the literary effort bogs down 
under the impact of the Thirty Years' War. Credit, Two hours. 

621, 622. German Literature in the Eighteenth Century. Two 

semesters. First semester: Period of Enlightenment: an introduction to 
this period with special emphasis on the works of Wieland and Lessing. 
Second semester: Klopstock and Herder. "Storm and Stress." Literary 
standards established by Lessing threatened by an excess of feeling. Credit, 
Two hours each semester. 

625. Period of Classicism. Goethe and Schiller. Reading and inter- 
pretation of their important works. Their relation to the humanistic ideals 
in Germany. Credit, Two hours. 

631. German Romanticism. Opposition to the overestimation of 
Antiquity and its rationalistic approach to the problems of life. Credit, Two 
hours. 

635. Comparative Literature. German Realism and Naturalism with 
reference to French, North European and East European influences. Friedrich 
Hebbel's works and Gerhart Hauptmann's early writings will be discussed. 
Credit, Two hours. 

640. Symbolism and Impressionism. Discussion of the later works 
of Gerhart Hauptmann and of the poetry of Stefan George, Rainer Maria 
Rilke and Hugo von Hofmannsthal. Credit, Two hours. 



Page Sixty 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 



645. German Prose Fiction after Goethe. In the nineteenth century 
German literature produced no Dickens or Thackeray, but it excelled in the 
field of the short story. Credit, Two hours. 

651. Pro-Seminar. An introduction to the methods and materials of 
research. Credit, Two hours. 

SPANISH 

501, 502. General Survey of Spanish Culture and History. A 

chronological study from the earliest recorded events to the present. Develop- 
ment of the Spanish language and literature and the latter' s contribution to 
world thought. Reports, oral and written, and discussion. Credit, Three 
hours each semester. 

504. Phonetics. Study of the sounds of Spanish, individually and in 
combination. Both oral and visual aids used to perfect speech habits. Credit, 
Two hours. 

505, 506. Advanced Spanish Composition. Practice in writing and 
speaking the living language. Topics from both current and literary sources 
to gain fluency in colloquial as well as literary Spanish. Credit, Two hours 
each semester. 

601, 602. Spanish Classics. Brief discussion of the development of 
literary forms in Castillian, and reading of outstanding works: el Cid, el 
Conde Lucanor, Libro de Buen Amor, la Celestina, el Corbacho, Lazarillo 
de Tormes, Santa Teresa de Avila, Fray Luis de Leon, Quevedo, Don Quijote, 
etc. Credit, Two hours each semester. 

611. The Picaresque Novel. A study of the Picaresque novel and its 
influence on modern world literature. Emphasis on Lazarillo de Tormes, 
Gil Bias de Santillana. Credit, Two hours. 

615. Spanish Drama of the Golden Age. Representative works of 
the highest point in Spanish dramatic achievement, with emphasis on the 
four masters: Lope de Vega, Calderon de la Barca, Tirso de Molina and 
Alarcon. Influence on world drama. Credit, Two hours. 

621, 622. The Spanish Novel. Study of the novel in Spain from 
mediaeval times to the present. Second semester begins with nineteenth 
century. Credit, Two hours each semester. 

625. Latin- American Trends in Literature. Survey of the develop- 
ment of poetry and prose in Latin-America, and study of future potentialities. 
Readings from representative authors. Credit, Two hours. 

631. Romanticism in Spain. Representative works from Spanish 
romantic poetry and drama of the nineteenth century; el Trovador, los 
Amantes de Teruel, la Fuerza del Sino, Becquer, Espronceda, Nunez de Arce, 
Campoamor. Credit, Two hours. 

641. Modern Spanish Drama. Representative works from the nine- 
teenth and twentieth century Spanish dramatists: Benevente, Marquina, 
Martinez Sierra, Galdos, Echegaray, etc. Credit, Two hours. 

651. Pro-Seminar. An introduction to the methods and materials of 
research. Credit, Two hours. 



Page Sixty-one 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



MUSIC 

Head of Department: William R. Hurney, C.S.Sp. 

MUSIC CONSERVATORY 

Advisor: James Hunter, M.A. 

REQUIREMENTS IN MUSIC CONSERVATORY 

Candidates for admission must have completed a minimum of 
twenty-four semester hours in Music. They must give evidence 
of competence in theory, ear-training, sight reading and major 
instrument. Work covering a minimum of twenty-four hours 
in course, together with an original composition, or a thesis, 
is required for the Master's degree. Six hours' credit may be 
taken in the study of the major instrument. 

PROGRAM IN MUSIC CONSERVATORY 

Courses 633, 634, 635 and 636 are offered as class instruction 
in succeeding sessions. Advanced study of instrument (601 to 
608) is offered every session. All other courses are offered by 
private instruction only. 



601 to 608 Advanced Study of Instrument 


635 


Advanced Studies in Music 


2cr. each semester 




History III 2cr. 


620, 621 Advanced Technique of 


636 


Advanced Studies in Music 


Composition 4cr. 




History IV 2cr. 


622, 623 Advanced Harmonic and Score 


637 


Double Counterpoint and Canon 


Reading 4cr. 




2cr. 


633 Advanced Studies in Music 


638 


Fugue 2cr. 


History 1 2cr. 


700 


Thesis 6cr. 


634 Advanced Studies in Music 


701 


Original Composition 6cr. 


History II 2cr. 







DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

620, 621. Advanced Technique of Composition. This course is 
carried out on the creative plane entirely. Each step in the compositional 
process is studied and the student is required to produce a number of com- 
positions in various forms. Credit, Two hours each semester. STEVENSON. 

622, 623. Advanced Harmonic and Formal Analysis. The examin- 
ation in close detail of the harmonic functions and tonal architecture of 
representative musical works. Special attention is given to the stylistic 
earmarks of construction in the music of different periods. Credit, Two hours 
each semester. HUNTER. 

631, 632. Advanced Conducting and Score Reading. The prepa- 
ration of ensemble works for performance. The fluent reading of scores at 
the piano and the analysis, technical and aesthetic, of their contents is empha- 
sized. Credit, Two hours each semester. HUNTER. 



Page Sixty-two 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 



633. Advanced Studies in Music History I. The Baroque Period. 

The entire semester is devoted to a study of the style, forms, and kinship 
among the art forms in the period leading up to and including Bach and 
Handel. Credit, Two hours. HUNTER. 

634. Advanced Studies in Music History II. The Classical Period. 

The semester's work examines the trend of musical art from the disintegrating 
Baroque or Rococo period through Haydn, Mozart, and finally Beethoven. 
Credit, Two hours. HUNTER. 

635. Advanced Studies in Music History III. The Romantic 
Period. An analysis of the complex musical expressions of the nineteenth 
century, from Weber to Wagner. Credit, Two hours. HUNTER. 

636. Advanced Studies in Music History IV. Contemporary 
Trends. The many styles of our own day are examined in this semester's 
work, and an attempt is made to discern the aims and accomplishments of 
twentieth century composers. Credit, Two hours. HUNTER. 

637. Double Counterpoint and Canon. By emphasizing the tech- 
nique of invertible counterpoint at the various intervals and of canonic 
imitation, a groundwork is laid for the writing of fugue. Two and three part 
inventions are written as exercises in employing the techniques discussed. 
Credit, Two hours. HUNTER. 

638. Fugue. The fugal form is analyzed with special reference to the 
work of Bach and the student is required to produce several fugues of his 
own, involving two, three and four voices. Credit, Two hours. HUNTER. 



PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC 

Advisor: Edmund M. Goehring, M.A. 

REQUIREMENTS IN PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC 

Candidates for admission must have completed a minimum 
of twenty-four semester hours in music. In addition, they must 
give evidence of sufficient acquaintance with primary and 
secondary methods of teaching music. Work covering a minimum 
of twenty-four hours in course is required for the Master's 
degree. All candidates must take four hours of course work in 
theory. (See "Music Conservatory' , ). Qualified students may 
elect six hour's credit in the study of the major instrument. 
A thesis is required of all candidates for the degree. 

Page Sixty-three 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



PROGRAM IN PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC 

The following list indicates the courses offered. They are 
arranged on a cycle of five sessions, with three courses offered 
each session. 



ME 

501 Thesis Seminar 2cr. 
551, 552 Problems in Public School Music 
4cr. 

553 Public School Instrumental and 

Vocal Instruction 2cr. 

554 Advanced Conducting and Score 

Reading 2cr. 
555, 556 Advanced Methods of Elementary 
and High School Instrumentation 
4cr. 



601, 602 Methods and Materials of Public 
School Music 4cr. 

603, 604 Psychology of Public School Music 
4cr. 

605,606 Teaching High School and Con- 
servatory Harmony 4cr. 

607 Recent Trends in Elementary and 
High School Music Education 2cr. 

700 Thesis 6cr. 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

501. Thesis Seminar. A course in research bibliography and prepara- 
tion of materials for writing a thesis. Credit, Two hours. GOEHRING. 

551, 552. Problems in Public School Music. An examination of the 
problems involved in the preparation of musical performances, and in the 
general supervision of the music program, together with the presentation of 
practical solutions. Credit, Two hours each semester. GOEHRING. 

553. Public School Instrumental and Vocal Instruction. A resume 
of the techniques used in instrumental and vocal music in the public schools. 
A study of the methods employed in teaching beginning and advanced groups 
in chorus, orchestra, and band. Credit, Two hours. GOEHRING. 

554. Advanced Conducting and Score Reading. A review of the 
principles of conducting as applied to Public School and Community Music, 
with particular attention to varying demands of Choral and Instrumental 
Conducting. The technique of conducting with or without a baton; score 
reading; methods of reducing full scores to two, three, or four lines. Credit, 
Two hours. GOEHRING. 

555. 556. Advanced Methods of Elementary and High School 
Instrumentation. This course is designed to give teachers an acquaintance 
with various types of unbalanced combinations of instruments, and to develop 
a creative approach toward the solution of problems peculiar to the individual 
school band and orchestra. Credit, Two hours each semester. GOEHRING. 

601, 602. Methods and Materials of Public School Music. A course 
designed to acquaint teachers with the progress made in methods of music 
instruction, and to furnish a guide to the best selection of materials for vocal 
and instrumental teaching. Credit, Two hours each semester. GOEHRING. 

603, 604. Psychology of Public School Music. Herein are treated 
the psychological phases of music instruction, along with methods of awaken- 
ing and sustaining interests in the study. Credit, Two hours each semester. 
GOEHRING. 



Page Sixty-four 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 



605, 606. Teaching High School and Conservatory Harmony. A 

resume of the traditional type of harmony taught in the High Schools and 
the present-day study of modern harmony taught in conservatories and 
colleges. Exercises will be given in the use of greater freedom on the old lines, 
modal influences, the twelve note and whole tone scales, new methods of 
chord structure, impressionistic methods, modern melody, rhythm, form. 
Credit, Two hours each semester. GOEHRING. 

607. Recent Trends in Elementary and High School Music Edu- 
cation. A critical analysis and evaluation of current developments, innova- 
tions and trends which challenge traditional practices in music education. 
Credit, Two hours. GOEHRING. 



PHARMACY 

Head of Department: Hugh C. Muldoon, D.Sc. 

REQUIREMENTS IN PHARMACY 

Candidates must be graduates of approved colleges of phar- 
macy, and must have completed a minimum of twenty-four 
semester hours of undergraduate work in pharmacy, or in 
chemistry, or in the biological sciences, depending upon the 
proposed field of major concentration. Any deficiencies in under- 
graduate courses must be made up without graduate credit. A 
reading knowledge of French or German is required for gradu- 
ation; German is recommended. Work covering a minimum of 
twenty-four semester hours in course, together with a thesis 
based on experimental work, is required for the degree of Master 
of Science. All the courses may be in a single field, or eighteen 
hours may be offered as a major with six additional hours in a 
related and approved minor field. The thesis must be in the 
field of major concentration. 

Three programs are available, with majors in pharmacy, 
pharmacognosy, and pharmaceutical chemistry. 

PROGRAM IN PHARMACY 

The following list indicates the courses offered in this depart- 
ment. They are covered within a two-year period. 

PM Pharmacy 

605,606 Special Projects (Cr. to be arranged) 633,634 Advanced Pharmaceutical Chem- 

609, 610 Methods of Pharmaceutical Con- istry 8cr. 

trol (Cr. to be arranged) 651, 652 Seminar 2cr. 

615 Advanced Theoretical Pharmacy 700 Thesis 6cr. 

3cr. 000 Additional Courses from the 

616 Chemistry of Galenical Prepara- Departments of Biology or 

tions 3cr. Chemistry. 



Page Sixty-five 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



pp 


Pharmacognosy 


603, 604 


Microscopic Pharmacognosy 6cr. 613, 614 Advanced Pharmacognosy 6cr. 


605, 606 


Special Projects (Cr. to be 651, 652 Seminar 2cr. 




arranged) 700 Thesis 6cr. 


609 


Immunology 3cr. 000 Additional Courses from the 


610 


Endocrinology and Metabolism 3cr. Departments of Biology or 


611, 612 


Technical Microscopy 8cr. Chemistry. 


PC 


Pharmaceutical Chemistry 


605, 606 


Special Projects (Cr. to be 633, 634 Advanced Pharmaceutical 




arranged) Chemistry 8cr. 


609, 610 


Methods of Pharmaceutical Control 651, 652 Seminar 2cr. 




(Cr. to be arranged) 700 Thesis 6cr. 


615 


Advanced Biochemistry 3cr. 000 Additional Courses from the 


616 


Chemistry of Galenical Prepara- Departments of Biology or 




tions 3cr. Chemistry. 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 
PHARMACY 

605, 606. Special Projects. Open to graduate students in pharmacy, 
and to majors in pharmaceutical chemistry and pharmacognosy, on consul- 
tation Credit, To be arranged. 

609, 610. Methods of Pharmaceutical Control. Techniques involved 
in the analysis of pharmaceuticals. An extension of undergraduate course 306: 
Drug Assay. Credit, To be arranged. ZAPOTOCKY. 

615. Advanced Theoretical Pharmacy. A consideration of various 
theoretical principles involved in pharmacy. Class, Two hours; Laboratory, 
Three hours. Credit, Three hours. ZAPOTOCKY. 

616. Chemistry of Galenical Preparations. A consideration of the 
chemistry of galenicals with emphasis on formulation and stability. Class, 
Three hours. Credit, Three hours. ZAPOTOCKY. 

633, 634. Advanced Pharmaceutical Chemistry. Synthesis and 
therapeutic uses of the newer pharmaceuticals. The relationship of chemical 
structure to biological activity is studied. Class, Two hours; Laboratory, 
Six hours. Credit, Four hours each semester. ZAPOTOCKY. 

651, 652. Seminar. Required of graduate students in pharmaceutical 
chemistry, pharmacy and pharmacognosy. Credit, One hour each semester. 

PHARMACOGNOSY 

603, 604. Microscopic Pharmacognosy. The structure and micro- 
chemical reactions of plant drugs and certain foods. Class, One hour; Lab- 
oratory, Six hours. Credit, Three hours each semester. SIMONIAN. 

605, 606. Special Projects. Open to graduate students in pharma- 
cognosy and to majors in related fields, on consultation. Credit, To be arranged. 

609. Immunology. A study of antigen body reactions. Vaccines and 
serums are studied in connection with diagnosis and immunity. Credit, 
Three hours. 

610. Endocrinology and Metabolism. A study of digestion, excretion, 
metabolism, endocrinology and reproduction. Credit, Three hours. TSUJI. 



Page Sixty-six 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 



611, 612. Technical Microscopy. The microscopy of foods, commercial 
starches, and animal, plant and mineral fibers. Micrometry. Class, Two 
hours; Laboratory, Four hours. Cred.it> Four hours each semester. SIMON- 
IAN. 

613, 614. Advanced Pharmacognosy. The examination of a variety 
of plant and animal drugs, and methods of determining their identity, purity 
and quality. The detection of adulterants and substitutes. Class, Two hours; 
Laboratory, Three hours. Credit, Three hours each semester. SIMONIAN. 

651, 652. Seminar. Required of graduate students in pharmacognosy, 
pharmacy and pharmaceutical chemistry. Credit, One hour each semester. 

PHARMACEUTICAL CHEMISTRY 

605, 606. Special Projects. Open to graduate students in pharmaceu- 
tical chemistry and to majors in pharmacy and pharmacognosy, on consul- 
tation. Credit, To be arranged. 

609, 610. Methods of Pharmaceutical Control. Techniques involved 
in the analysis of pharmaceuticals. An extension of undergraduate course 
306: Drug Assay. Credit, To be arranged. ZAPOTOCKY. 

615. Advanced Biochemistry. A consideration of vitamins, hormones, 
and enzymes; digestion and absorption; metabolism of proteins, purine 
derivatives, carbohydrates and lipids; biological oxidations. Credit, Three 
hours. TSUJI. 

616. Chemistry of Galenical Preparations. A consideration of the 
chemistry of galenicals with emphasis on formulation and stability. Class, 
Three hours. Credit, Three hours. ZAPOTOCKY. 

633, 634. Advanced Pharmaceutical Chemistry. Synthesis and 
therapeutic uses of the newer pharmaceuticals. The relationship of chemical 
structure to biological activity is studied. Class, Two hours; Laboratory, 
Six hours. Credit, Four hours each semester. ZAPOTOCKY. 

651, 652. Seminar. Required of graduate students in pharmaceutical 
chemistry, pharmacy and pharmacognosy. Credit, One hour each semester. 



PHILOSOPHY 

Acting Head of Department: J. Gerald Walsh, C.S.Sp., Ph.D. 

REQUIREMENTS IN PHILOSOPHY 

Candidates must have completed a minimum of twenty-four 
semester hours in undergraduate Philosophy. This preparation 
shall have included an adequate formation in Logic, fundamental 
problems and History of Philosophy. Work covering a minimum 
of twenty-four semester hours in course, together with a thesis, 
is required for the degree of Master. All candidates will include 
in their studies courses 509, 511, 512, 521, 522, 651. A reading 
knowledge of either French or German is required of each 
student. A reading knowledge of Latin is highly recommended. 

Page Sixty-seven 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



PROGRAM IN PHILOSOPHY 



PH 

509, 510 Readings in Aristotle 4cr. 

511, 512 Advanced Study of Ancient 
Philosophers 4cr. 

518 Augustinian Theory of Gnosis 2cr. 

521, 522 Fundamental Problems of Phil- 
osophy of St. Thomas 4cr. 

531 Philosophy of Science 2cr. 

534 Philosophical Presuppositions of 

Natural Science 2cr. 

535 Philosophy and the Atomic Theory 

2cr. 



538 Philosophical Consequences of 

Contemporary Physics 2cr. 

611, 612 Origins of Modern Philosophy 4cr. 

615, 616 Kantian and Post-Kantian Phil- 
osophy 4cr. 

619 English Empiricism and French 

Positivism 2cr. 

622 American Pragmatism 2cr. 

626 Contemporary French Philosophers 

2cr. 

651 Pro-Seminar 2cr. 

700 Thesis 6cr. 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

509, 510. Readings in Aristotle. A study with the purpose of drawing 
from the text some of the fundamental themes. Aristotle's criticism of their 
treatment by his predecessors and his own contribution to their develop- 
ment. Credity Two hours each semester. 

511, 512. Advanced Study of Ancient Philosophers. An analysis of 
the work of the non-Aristotelians of the ancient period, with special attention 
to Plato, Philo and Plotinus. Credity Two hours each semester. 

518. Augustinian Theory of Gnosis. An outline of Augustinian 
theory of cognition, and a tracing of its influence during the early mediaeval 
period. Credity Two hours. 

521, 522. Fundamental Problems of the Philosophy of Saint 
Thomas. The mind of the Angelic Doctor on the classic questions of phil- 
osophy as drawn from extensive study of his principal writings. Credity Two 
hours each semester. 

531. Philosophy of Science. The nature of physical science. The 
distinction of the sciences. Credity Two hours. 

534. Philosophical Presuppositions of Natural Science. The 

postulates about the nature of human knowledge and the structure of the 
cosmos which are implicitly presupposed by the inductive and deductive 
methods of science. Credity Two hours. 

535. Philosophy and the Atomic Theory. Philosophical and physical 
atomic theories; the philosophical implications of the twentieth century 
atomic theory; Scholastic philosophy of nature and the modern atomic theory. 
Credity Two hours. 

538. Philosophical Consequences of Contemporary Physics. The 

relations between philosophy and science, especially in respect to modern 
problems. Causality, determinism, free will, etc. Credit, Two hours. 

611, 612. Origins of Modern Philosophy. Beginning with their 
sources in the breakdown of Scholasticism, stressing the Platonism and Neo- 
Platonism of Nicholas of Cusa and the Nominalism of Occam, the spirit of 
the new sciences as propounded by Copernicus, Kepler, Galileo and others, 
concluding with Descartes and the Cartesians of the seventeenth century. 
Credit, Two hours each semester. 



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GRADUATE SCHOOL 



615, 616. Kantian and Post-Kantian Philosophy. A consideration 
of the philosophy of Kant, particularly the critique of pure reason. Stress 
will be laid upon Leibniz, Christian Wolff and Hume as contributing influences, 
and upon such post-Kantians as Fichte, Schelling, Hegel and Schopenhauer. 
Credit, Two hours each semester. 

619. English Empiricism and French Positivism. A discussion of 
the Empiricist influence of Locke, Berkeley, Hume, J. S. Mill and Spencer, 
and of the Positivist influence of Comte, Littre, etc., upon the development 
of contemporary culture. Credit, Two hours. 

622. American Pragmatism. The influence of the utilitarian phil- 
osophy of Peirce, William James, John Dewey and their followers upon the 
contemporary American mind. Credit, Two hours. 

626. Contemporary French Philosophers. Bergson, the Existential- 
ists and some of the recent revivals of ideas from the great philosophical 
tradition. Credit, Two hours. 

651. Pro-Seminar. An introduction to the methods and materials of 
research in the field of philosophy. Credit, Two hours. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Coordinator: Paul H. Anderson, Ph.D. 

REQUIREMENTS IN POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Candidates must have completed a minimum of twenty-four 
semester hours in Political Science. Graduate work covering a 
minimum of thirty semester hours in the major field, including 
a thesis, is required for the degree of Master of Arts in Political 
Science. All candidates will include in their studies course 651. 



PROGRAM IN POLITICAL SCIENCE 



501 

503 
504 

509 
511 

512 

523 

537 
603 



Foreign Relations of the United States 
2cr. 

Pennsylvania State Government 2cr. 

Legislation and Legislative Procedure 
2cr. 

Introduction to International Law 2cr. 

Comparative Government I: Canada 
2cr. 

Comparative Government II: Conti- 
nental European 2cr. 

International Organization and 
Administration 2cr. 

United States Diplomatic History 2cr. 

Current Domestic Problems of Govern- 
ment 2cr. 



604 Constitutional Law 2cr. 

610 Municipal Administration 2cr. 

611 State Administration 2cr. 

612 Public Administration 2cr. 

613 Judicial Administration 2cr. 

614 Administrative Law 2cr. 

618 Public Opinion and Political Processes 

2cr. 

620 American Political Thought 2cr. 

623 Modern Political Thought 2cr. 

651 Pro-Seminar in Law and Government 

2cr. 

700 Thesis 6cr. 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

501. Foreign Relations of the United States. Historical approach 
to foreign relations of the United States; the basis of its foreign policy, and 
a critique of its general and regional policies. Credit, Two hours. 



Page Sixty-nine 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



503. Pennsylvania State Government. Attention will be focused on 
selected problems confronting the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. Credit, 
Two hours. FAIDEL, ANDERSON. 

504. Legislation and Legislative Procedure. The electoral process 
and legislative organization; management of legislative business; party 
responsibility; legislative committees in policy-making and legislative pro- 
cedure. Credit, Two hours. ANDERSON. 

509. Introduction to International Law. The present bilateral 
system of adjudicating rights and remedies among nations; public and private 
claims and remedies; the need for a unilateral coercive system. Maritime 
laws; Law Merchant. Credit, Two hours. FAIDEL. 

511. Comparative Government I: Canada. An analysis of differ- 
ences and similarities between Canada and neighboring United States. Credit, 
Two hours. FAIDEL. 

512. Comparative Government II: Continental European. Special 
emphasis on the governments of Switzerland, France and Germany. Credit, 
Two hours. ANDERSON. 

523. International Organization and Administration. Develop- 
ment of international organization since the Treaty of Westphalia, with 
consideration of the League of Nations, the Permanent Court of International 
Justice and International Organization. Problems and prospects of the 
United Nations. Credit, Two hours FAIDEL. 

537. United States Diplomatic History. A study of the United 
States Foreign Policy, from the Monroe Doctrine to the present, particularly 
during the period following the First World War. Credit, Two hours. HEINTZ. 

603. Current Domestic Problems of Government. Problems of 
government relative to industry, labor and public finance. Politics and 
policies in legislation; issues involved in national reconstruction. Credit, Two 
hours. O'DONNELL. 

604. Constitutional Law. An investigation of the principles and 
applications of constitutional law, with detailed study of the American con- 
stitutional system and its equivalent in England. Credit, Two hours. FAIDEL. 

610. Municipal Administration. Survey of overhead administration, 
stressing such topics as administrative organization, personnel, contracting. 
Credit, Two hours. ANDERSON. 

611. State Administration. Selected problems confronting the several 
state governments in the execution of proper administrative functions. Credit, 
Two hours. FAIDEL. 

612. Public Administration. An intensive investigation into admini- 
strative organization, fiscal management, personnel and dynamics of manage- 
ment. Credit, Two hours. O'DONNELL. 

613. Judicial Administration. Discussion of the judicial structure; 
theory of American adjudication; judicial procedure. Credit, Two hours. 
O'DONNELL, FAIDEL 

614. Administrative Law. Survey of administrative powers; consti- 
tutional provisions; Administrative Procedure Act of 1946; judicial review 
and the problem of the rule of law versus the administrative process. Credit, 
Two hours. O'DONNELL. 



Page Seventy 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 



618. Public Opinion and Political Processes. The organization of 
controversy and the production of consent in the formation of public policy. 
Political institutions as agencies of education and propaganda. Public and 
private controls over mass communications. Credit, Two hours. FAIDEL, 
ANDERSON. 

620. American Political Thought. A study of the writings of American 
political theorists and philosophers who contributed ideas to the development 
of government in the United States. Credit, Two hours. FAIDEL, ANDERSON. 

623. Modern Political Thought. A study of the leading schools of 
political thought from the time of the French Revolution, with special em- 
phasis on contemporary developments: Socialism, Pluralism, Syndicalism, 
Distributism, Fabianism, Fascism, Communism, Nazism. Credit, Two hours. 
ANDERSON. 

651. Pro- Seminar in Law and Government. Methods and fields of 
various schools of political scientists; general bibliography and procedure. 
Credit, Two hours. ANDERSON. 



SOCIAL SCIENCE 

Head of Department: Francis R. Duffy, C.S.Sp., M.A. 

REQUIREMENTS IN SOCIAL SCIENCE 

Candidates must have an undergraduate preparation which 
is judged adequate by the department. Graduate work covering 
a minimum of eighteen semester hours in the major field, together 
with a minor in a cognate field and a thesis, is required for the 
degree of Master of Arts in Sociology or in Christian Social 
Philosophy. All candidates will include in their studies course 
651. 

PROGRAM IN SOCIAL SCIENCE 

The following list indicates the courses offered in this depart- 
ment. They are covered within a two year period. 

SO Sociology 



520 


Social Theories 2cr. 


651 Pro-Seminar 2cr. 


521 


Juvenile Delinquency 2cr. 


652 Seminar 2cr. 


527 


Community Organization 2cr. 


660 Family 2cr. 


550 


The Social Encyclicals 2cr. 


661 Social Structure and Mobility 2cr. 


628 


Contemporary Social Movements 2cr. 


700 Thesis 6cr. 


642 


Industrial Sociology 2cr. 






Christian Social Philosophy 


501 


The Natural Law 2cr. 


608 Cooperative Living 2cr. 


504 


The State in Catholic Thought 2cr. 


619 Philosophy of Education 2cr. 


507 


Contemporary Social Pronouncements 


651 Pro-Seminar 2cr. 




2cr. 


652 Seminar 2cr. 


550 


The Social Encyclicals I 2cr. 


660 The Family 2cr. 


551 


The Social Encyclicals II 2cr. 


700 Thesis 6cr. 


607 


Decentralization Problems 2cr. 








Page Seventy-one 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

SOCIOLOGY 

Advisor: Rev. Joseph R. Kletzel, C.S.Sp., M.A. 

520. Social Theories. A study of the contributions of selected pioneer 
sociologists, with an analysis and evaluation of their efforts to establish 
sociological theory and scientific sociology. Credit, Two hours. DUFFY, 
CURTIS. 

521. Juvenile Delinquency. A review of the latest juvenile delin- 
quency reports; a review of the new methods of research in regard to the 
genesis, backgrounds, detection, apprehension and treatment of juvenile 
delinquency. Probation, parole and prevention as community-conscious 
participation. Credit, Two hours. 

527. Community Organization. The role of national and local com- 
munity organization. Planning an ideal community by scientific method. 
Contribution of various cultural elements to an integrated pattern of American 
life. Credit, Two hours. 

550. The Social Encyclicals. The basic dicta of Catholic social idealism 
drawn from pontifical statements regarding poverty, property, capital and 
labor, education, family life, socialism, communism, and the State. Credit, 
Two hours. McGINNIS. 

628. Contemporary Social Movements. Indications of the problems 
of modern society and the structures which have arisen to meet them. Pro- 
cesses involved in social movements; success and failure. Credit, Two hours. 
SCHULTE. 

642. Industrial Sociology. The employer, the worker and the State 
as functionaries in society; issues giving rise to conflict, and the resulting 
influences on economic, political and social life. Background of typical 
solutions; the future. Credit, Two hours. JURCZAK. 

651. Pro-Seminar. An analysis of the various schools and methods of 
sociological research, and evaluation of these methods in the light of their 
approach, purpose and limitations; the nature of sociological materials; the 
results achieved. Credit, Two hours. 

652. Seminar. Research work in selected topics. Credit, Two hours. 

660. The Family. Application of the principles of sociology to an 
empirical view of the family. Analysis of the complexities of family Jife, 
derived from and based on philosophy, psychology, family counseling prac- 
tice. An investigation of family needs; normal and extraordinary methods of 
meeting family problems. Credit, Two hours. DUFFY, JURCZAK. 

661. Social Structure and Mobility. A study of the organization of 
society and cultural dynamics. Credit, Two hours. SCHULTE. 

CHRISTIAN SOCIAL PHILOSOPHY 

Advisor: Henry C. McGinnis, M.A. 

501. The Natural Law. A study of the philosophy of the natural law 
and the position accorded it in the Age of Individualism and Rationalism. 
Particular attention is paid to its relation to positive law and the sciences. 
Its current relation to Positivism. Credit, Two hours. 



Page Seventy-two 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 



504. The State in Catholic Thought. A presentation of the various 
principles of political philosophy which are independent of changing historical 
conditions, and of other principles which must be evaluated in the light of 
changing conditions. A socio-philosophical analysis of the origin and nature 
of the State, the basis and limitations of authority in its relationship to the 
citizen, the family, the church, and other states. Credit, Two hours. GULO- 
VICH. 

507. Contemporary Social Pronouncements. A survey and evalu- 
ation of the significance of contemporary pronouncements such as the Malvern 
Manifesto, the Delaware Conference, the Princeton Conference, and the 
Roman Catholic Bishops' Declaration. The contributions made to current 
social philosophies by German Social Democracy, Reactionary Socialism, 
French Syndicalism, Ricardian Socialists, the Fabian Society, England's 
Christian Socialists, Bishop von Ketteler's Christian Worker groups, and 
other nineteenth and twentieth century social ideologies. Credit, Two hours. 
McGINNIS. 

550. The Social Encyclicals I. The basic dicta of Catholic social 
idealism drawn from pontifical statements regarding poverty, property, 
education, familv life, socialism, communism and the State. Credit, Two 
hours. McGINNIS. 

551. The Social Encyclicals II. A study of the Economic Encyclicals: 
Rerum Novarum and Quadragesimo Anno. The philosophy behind these 
papal utterances and its application to the current American scene. Credit, 
Two hours. McGINNIS. 

607. Decentralization Problems. A critical study of the problems 
evoked by the historical trend toward mass concentration of population and 
the effects of such on social and spiritual elements in the popular character. 
Solutions presented and examined for advantages and disadvantages of 
decentralization. Credit, Two hours. McGINNIS. 

608. Cooperative Living. A study of various forms of cooperative 
enterprise. A survey of the Catholic Rural Life Movement and the "One- 
Foot-on-the-Land" Movement. Credit, Two hours. 

619. Philosophy of Education. A study of the philosophical aspects 
of Catholic education at its various levels. Education viewed as a natural 
method of thinking and as a vehicle for the supernatural system of thought 
and way of life. Credit, Two hours. GOETZ. 

651. Pro-Seminar. Methods and materials of research in the various 
fields of study which contribute to an understanding of the Christian social 
pattern. Relevant materials for study as found in mediaeval history and 
philosophy, the swing to modern political and economic ideologies; the social 
message of the Gospel and its vindication by Christian social Philosophers to 
the present time. Credit, Two hours. 

652. Seminar. Assignment of topics designed to correlate the studies 
undertaken in this field for the purpose of furthering situational analysis and 
the presentation of comprehensive solutions. Credit, Two hours. 

660. The Family. Application of the principles of sociology to an 
empirical view of the family. Analysis of the complexities of family life, 
derived from and based on philosophy, psychology, family counseling practice. 
An investigation of family needs; ordinary and extraordinary methods of 
meeting family problems. Credit, Two hours. 



Page Seventy-three 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



STUDENT ENROLLMENT 

1951-1952 

Abplanalp, Sister Cosmas, Baden, Pa., B.S. in Ed. '47, Mount Mercy College, Pa. 
Ackerman, Sister M. Leonore, Allison Park, Pa., B.Ed/45, Duquesne Univ., Pa. 
Adamiec, Merle J., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.S. in Bus. Adm. '51, Duquesne Univ., Pa. 
Aiken, George M., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.S. in Math. '47, Waynesburg College, Pa. 
Albrecht, Sr. M. Frederick, Allison Park, Pa., B.Ed. '37, Duquesne Univer., Pa. 
Allen, George A., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.A. '38, Bucknell University, Pa. 
Allen, Kenneth C, Pittsburgh, Pa., B.S. in Bus. Adm. '39, Univ. of Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Allias, Joseph F., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.Ed. '51, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Arnold, Rudolph J., Manhasset, N. Y., B.S. in Chem. '51, Long Island Univ., N. Y. 
Artac, Eugene, Springdale, Pa., M.S. in P.S.M. '51, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Aucremanne, Sr. Marie Camille, Parkersburg,W.Va.,A.B.'42, St. Mary of the 

Springs College, Ohio 
Avampato, James H., McDonald, Pa., B.S. in Mus. Ed. '50, Indiana STC, Pa. 
Baker, Dwight B., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.A. in P.S.M. '43, Carnegie Tech, Pa. 
Baldauf, Sr. M. Victoria, Allison Park, Pa., B.Ed. '39, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Ball, Arthur L., Coal Center, Pa., B.S. '51, Washington and Jefferson College, Pa. 
Bambeck, Sr. M. Anastasia, Allison Park, Pa., B.Ed. '51, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Bannister, Philip F., Pittsburgh, Pa., M.Ed. '47, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Barie, Walter P., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.S. in Chem. '50, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Barney, Katherine E., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.Ed. '51, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Barron, Mitchell A., Ligonier, Pa., B.Ed. '39, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Barry, James P., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.S. in Bus. Adm. '50, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Belt, Roger F., Springfield, Ohio, B.S. in Chem. '50, Ohio State University, Ohio 
Bench, Stephen K., McKees Rocks, Pa., B.S. in P.S.M. '49, Duquesne Univ., Pa. 
Benyak, Leonard, West Mifflin, Pa., B.Ed. '50, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Berdar, Sister M. Martha, Elizabeth, Pa., B.Ed. '50, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Berry, Sis er Vincent Mary, Baden, Pa., B.Ed. '46, Mount Mercy College, Pa. 
Beyerl, Sister Francis G., Allison Park, Pa., B.Ed. '50, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Bird, Sister M. Clarencia, Pittsburgh, Pa., B.A. '42, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Biter, Sister Mercia, Baden, Pa., A.B. '34, University of Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Blinn, Morton B., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.S. in Chem. '50, University of Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Bosley, Charles B., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.S. in P.S.M. '50, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Boylan, Edward G., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.S. in Bus. Adm. '50, Duquesne Univ., Pa. 
Boyle, Sister M. Irene, Pittsburgh, Pa., B.A. '43, Mount Mercy College, Pa. 
Braukus, Sister M. Raymond, Pittsburgh, Pa., B.Ed. '49, Duquesne Univ., Pa. 
Bressi, James A., Rankin, Pa., B.S. in Ed. '50, Slippery Rock STC, Pa. 
Breza, Pauline M., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.S. in Nur. Ed. '51, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Brogan, Dolores P., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.S. in Bus. Adm. '51, Duquesne Univ., Pa. 
Brozeski, Carl S., Oil City, Pa., B.S. in Mus. Ed. '50, Indiana STC, Pa. 
Burns, John J., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.S. in Bus. Adm. '41, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Burns, John M., Merrittstown, Pa., B.S. in Ed. '35, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Burns, Sister M. Catherine, Baden, Pa., B.S. in Ed. '51, Mount Mercy College, Pa. 
Bushinski, Rev. Edward A., Ringtown, Pa., B.A. '47, St. Mary's Seminary, Conn. 
Butler, James H., Glenshaw, Pa., M.Ed. '48, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Byers, Sister M. Thaddeus, Baden, Pa., B.S. in Ed. '51, Mount Mercy College, Pa. 
Cairns, Arthur T., Roscoe, Pa., B.S. in Ed. '36, California STC, Pa. 
Callaghan, Sr. Regina Mary, Millvale, Pa., B.S. in P.S.M/42, Duquesne Univ., Pa. 
Canaga, Louise A., McKees Rocks, Pa., B.Ed. '51, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Cantelmi, Anthony F., Beaver Falls, Pa., B.Ed. '51, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Capone, Robert E., Braddock, Pa., B.Ed. '50, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Carlson, Burnell E., Elizabeth, Pa., B.S. in M.Ed. '49, State Teachers College, Pa. 
Carnegie, Jean T., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.S. in Bus. Adm. '51, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Caslin, Sister M. Adele, Pittsburgh, Pa., B.A. '45, Mount Mercy College, Pa. 



Page Seventy-jour 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 



STUDENT ENROLLMENT— Continued 

Caveglia, James M., Leechburg, Pa., B.S. in Bus. Adm. '28, Univ. of Pittsburgh,Pa. 
Caye, Edward J., Pittsburgh, Pa., M.A. '25, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Cecho, James P., Erie, Pa., B.S. in P.S.M. '51, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Ceh, Stephen M., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.S. in P.S.M. '50, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Cercone, Bertha M., McKees Rocks, Pa., B.Ed. '51, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Chapel, Robert J., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.S. in Bus. Adm. '34, Univ. of Chicago, 111. 
Chilenska, Sister M. Celine, Coraopolis, Pa., B.S. in Ed.'48, Duquesne Univ., Pa. 
Chonko, Anfrances, Duquesne, Pa., B.S. in Ed. '49, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Chow, John B., Rio De Janeiro, Brazil, B.S. in Chem.'49, St. John's Univ., Minn. 
Chrysler, Louise D., Elmhurst, 111., B.Ed. '51, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Cibula, Margaret V., Tarentum, Pa., B.Ed. '48, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Claney, Sister M. Peter, Pittsburgh, Pa., B.A. '47, Mount Mercy College, Pa. 
Clark, Donald L., Sutersville, Pa., B.S. in Bus. Adm. '48, Penn State, Pa. 
Clark, John P., Donora, Pa., B.S. in Ed. '31, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Clark, Sister M. Berenice, Baden, Pa., B.A. '39, Mount Mercy College, Pa. 
Cole, Andrew M., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.S. in Bus. Adm. '41, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Collopy, John D., Carnegie, Pa., B.S. in Bus. Adm. '50, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Conlon, James E., McKeesport, Pa., B.S. in Bus. Adm. '49, Duquesne Univ., Pa. 
Conner, Herbert J., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.S. in P.S.M. '41, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Corbett, Sr. M. Jamesina, Pittsburgh, Pa., B.S. in Ed.'49, Mt. Mercy College, Pa. 
Corriols, Joseph G., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.A. '37, Pennsylvania State College, Pa. 
Cotroneo, Anthony, Indiana, Pa., B.S. in Mus. Ed. '48, Indiana STC, Pa. 
Coulson, John R., Saltsburg, Pa., B.S. in Ed. '47, Waynesburg College, Pa. 
Crowley, Sister M. Daniel, Pittsburgh, Pa., B.A. '45, Mercyhurst College, Pa. 
Crowley, Rev. William F., Norwalk, Conn., B.A.'46, St. Mary's Seminary, Conn. 
Cunniff, Patricia L., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.Ed. '50, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Dacko, John III, Monessen, Pa., B.S. in Bus. Adm. '49, Waynesburg College, Pa. 
Davis, Edith Mae, Cleveland, Ohio, B.S. in Nur. Ed. '48, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Day, Frances S., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.S. in Nur. Ed.'49, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Delemater, Dorothy, Carnegie, Pa., B.S. in Nur. Ed. '48, St. Louis University, Mo. 
DiBacco, Sr. M. Francesca, Wheeling, W. Va., B.Ed.'44, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Dickey, Anna M., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.S. in Nur. Ed.'48, University of Pittsburgh,Pa! 
Dickson, Rev. John J., Dayton, Ohio, M.A. '47, University of Dayton, Ohio 
DiLucente, Nina Mary Ann, Rankin, Pa., B.S. in P.S.M.'46, Duquesne Univ., Pa. 
Dirling, Leo F., Larimer, Pa., B.Ed. '50, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Dolcich, John H., Noblestown, Pa., B.Ed. '50, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Donnelly, Sister M. Alfreda, Pittsburgh, Pa., B.A. '42, Mount Mercy College, Pa. 
Donovan, Alice M. Aliquippa, Pa., B.Ed. '51, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Donovan, Sister M. Dennis, Baden, Pa., M.Ed. '51, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Doran, Sister M. Demetrius, Baden, Pa., B.A. '41, Mount Mercy College, Pa. 
Dougherty, Charles A., New Kensington, Pa., B.S. in Bus. Adm. '50, Duq. U., Pa. 
Dowdy, Richard S., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.A. '49, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Draus, Frank J., Dupont, Pa., B.S. in Chem. '51, Alliance College, Pa. 
Drum, Leslie E., W. Elizabeth, Pa., B.A. '39, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Dudek, Walter J., McKeesport, Pa., B.Ed. '50, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Dysert, David C, Johnstown, Pa., B.S. in Mus. Ed. '50, Indiana STC, Pa. 
Earley, Sister M. Joques, Scranton, Pa., B.A. '46, Marywood College, Pa. 
Eisley, Sister M. Evangelist, Pittsburgh, Pa., B.A. '42, Mount Mercy College, Pa. 
Elia, Raymond J., Farrell, Pa., B.S. in Chem. '50, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Ellis, Geraldine L., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.S. in Nur. Ed. '48, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Elster, Ethel P., McKeesport, Pa., B.A. '36, Thiel College, Pa. 
Emmel, Thomas P., Munhall, Pa., B.S. in P.S.M. '50, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Evans, Paul C, Beaver, Pa., B. Mus. Ed. '49, Westminster College, Pa. 
Fedorka, Andrew, Clairton, Pa., B.S. in P.S.M. '50, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Fenner, William P., Homestead, Pa., B.Ed. '50, Duquesne University, Pa. 



Page Seventy-five 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



STUDENT ENROLLMENT— Continued 

Fernandez, Jose, Havana, Cuba, B.S. '50, University of Havana, Cuba 
Figulski, Gertrude M., Turtle Creek, Pa., B.S. in Nur. Ed. '47, Duquesne Univ., Pa. 
Fiorill, Albert, Monessen, Pa., B.Ed. '49, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Fitch, Frank J., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.S. in Bus. Adm. '47, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Fitz, Donald A., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.S. in Bus. Adm. '50, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Flanagan, Rev. Francis P., Loretto, Pa., B.A. '41, Catholic Univ., Washington,!). C. 
Fleck, Sister M. Florita, Carnegie, Pa., B.Ed. '47, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Flocco, Albert M., Pittsburgh, Pa., M.Ed. '49, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Fortun, Raymond, Pittsburgh, Pa., B.Ed. '48, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Franciuk, Mercia J., W. Homestead, Pa., B.A. '51, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Friel, Sr. M. Amadeus, Pittsburgh, Pa., B.S. in Nur. Ed. '41, Duquesne Univ., Pa. 
Furrie, Henry J., North Braddock, Pa., B.S. in Ed. '47, Waynesburg College, Pa. 
Fusan, Regina E., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.S. in Nur. '43, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Gabany, Suzanne A., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.A. '51, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Gallagher, Grace C, Carnegie, Pa., B.A. '25, Geneva College, Pa. 
Gallagher, James G., Vandergrift, Pa., B.S. in Ind. Eng. '47, Northeastern Univ., 

Mass. 
Gallenz, Sr. M. Dolorita, Allison Park, Pa., B.Ed. '37, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Garbin, Mario S., Pittsburgh, Pa., M.Ed. '49, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Gatz, Sr. M. Charlotte, Allison Park, Pa., B.Ed. '48, Duquesne University, Pa. 
George, Rita T., Pitcairn, Pa., B.A. '49, Seton Hill College, Pa. 
Gerber, Sister Rosealma, Millvale, Pa., B.Ed. '41, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Giaccardo, Louis A., Export, Pa., B.S. in Bus. Adm. '51, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Giannangelo, Joseph P., Carnegie, Pa., B.S. in Ed. '40, Kansas STC, Kansas 
Gilmer, Gene E., Coraopolis, Pa., A.B. '49, West Liberty State College, W. Va. 
Ging, Sister M. Edward, Baden, Pa., B.A. '51, Mount Mercy College, Pa. 
Glackin, Francis B., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.Ed. '51, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Glasheen, William F., Albany, N. Y., B.S. in Biol. '47, St. Bonaventure Col., N. Y. 
Glotnis, Adam, Arnold, Pa., B.A. '50, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Gmitter, Thomas E., Connellsville, Pa., B.S. in Biol. '50, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Goggin, Dorothy K., Donora, Pa., A.B. '31, Trinity College, Washington, D. C. 
Graff, Stephen P., New Brighton, Pa., B.S. in P.S.M. '38, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Grefenstette, Charles G., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.S. in Bus. Adm. '50, Duquesne U., Pa. 
Grelecki, Chester J., Plains, Pa., B.S. in Chem. '50, King's College, Pa. 
Gusty, David J., McKeesport, Pa., B.S. in Bus. Adm. '50, Duquesne Univ., Pa. 
Halapy, Sister M. Paul, Duquesne, Pa., B.Ed. '40, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Halechko, Andrew, New Eagle, Pa., B.S. in Ed. '35, University of Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Haley, Sister M. Georgine, Pittsburgh, Pa., B.A. '42, Mount Mercy College, Pa. 
Hane, Lillian A., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.S. in P.S.M. '48, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Hannan, Mary Jane, Pittsburgh, Pa., B.Ed. '51, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Harmuth, Charles M., Bridgeville, Pa., B.S. in Chem. '49, Duquesne Univ., *Pa. 
Harris, James J., Fredericktown, Pa., B.S. in Ed. '39, California STC, Pa. 
Hartz, Joseph A., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.S. in Bus. Adm. '48, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Hauber, Sister M. Genevieve, Pittsburgh, Pa., B.A. '43, Mount Mercy College, Pa. 
Healy, Sister Sara M., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.S. in Ed. '43, Mount Mercy College, Pa. 
Helinski, Joseph A., Pittock, Pa., B.S. in P.S.M. '51, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Henley, William O., Brooklyn, N. Y., B.S. in Chem. '49, Hofstra College, N. Y. 
Herrington, Newton J., McKeesport, Pa., B.S. in Bus. Adm.'48, Duquesne U., Pa. 
Herubin, Sr. M. Ambrose, Pittsburgh, Pa., B.Ed. '47, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Hetterscheidt, Sr. M. Bertille, Baden, Pa., B.A. '46, Mount Mercy College, Pa. 
Hickey, Sister M. Paul, Pittsburgh, Pa., B.A. '51, Mount Mercy College, Pa. 
Hillis, Sister M. Harriet, Pittsburgh, Pa., B.A. '19, Marywood College, Pa. 
Hirsch, John E., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.S. in Bus. Adm. '42, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Hirsch, Sister Margaret C., Baden, Pa., B.Ed. '42, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Hoar, Sister M. Roseanne, Pittsburgh, Pa., B.A. '42, Mount Mercy College, Pa. 



Page Seventy-six 



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STUDENT ENROLLMENT— Continued 

Hoban, Mary E., Carnegie, Pa., B.A. '36, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Hogan, Rev. Edward W., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.A. '47, St. Mary's Seminary, Conn. 
Hogan, Thomas J., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.A. '30, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Homick, Richard B., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.S. in Bus. Adm. '51, Duquesne Univ., Pa. 
Huckestein, Harold W., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.Ed. '49, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Hurd, Sister Grace M., Altoona, Pa., B.Ed. '43, Lock Haven STC, Pa. 
Hutchison, Edward K., McKeesport, Pa., B.A. '40, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Hyland, Donald D., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.S. in Bus. Adm. '38, Duquesne Univ., Pa. 
Jacob, Mary Alice, Pittsburgh, Pa., B.S. '51, Saint Mary's College, Ind. 
Jacobs, Louis J., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.S. in Ed. '49, Indiana STC, Pa. 
Jaeger, Rev. Valerian J., Pittsburgh, Pa., A.B.'47, St. Procopius College, 111. 
Jagmin, Sr. M. De Sales, Pittsburgh, Pa., B. of Mus. '45, Aquinas College, Mich. 
Jayson, Vitolda, Pittsburgh, Pa., B.S. in Bus. Adm. '50, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Jenkins, Frances B., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.Ed. '50, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Jenkins, John M., Homestead, Pa., B.Ed. '50, Duquesne University, Pa. 
John, John L., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.S. in Bus. Adm.'51, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Johnston, Mary Louise, Pittsburgh, Pa., B.A. '51, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Jones, Violet M., McKeesport, Pa., B.Ed. '41, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Joyce, Sister Celestia, Baden, Pa., B.A. '36, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Juick, Norma L., Farrell, Pa., B.Ed. '48, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Kaczmarek, Sister M. Alphonsus, Coraopolis, Pa., M.A., Poland 
Kadyszewski, Sr. M. Amandine, Coraopolis, Pa., B.A.'50, Catholic University,D.C. 
Kanda, Rev. John R., Trenton, N. J., B.Ph.'38, University of Louvain, Belgium 
Kane, Mortimer F., Lynbrook, N. Y., B.S. in Chem.'50, Georgetown University, 

Washington, D. C. 
Kealy, Thomas J., New York, N. Y., B.S. in Chem. '50, Manhattan College, N. Y. 
Keefe, Mary C, McKees Rocks, Pa., B.Ed. '50, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Keener, Teresa L., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.Ed. '48, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Kelly, Sr. M. de Chantal, San Francisco, Cal., B.A.'38, San Francisco College, Cal. 
Kelly, Peter B., Baltimore, Md., B.S. in Chem. '49, Loyola College, Md. 
Kerekes, Sr. M. Paul, Pontiac, Mich., B.A. '46, Siena Heights College, Mich. 
Kerr, John W., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.S. in Bus. Adm.'50, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Kirsch, William M., Homestead, Pa., M.Ed. '49, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Kistler, Edward A., Ligonier, Pa., B.S. in Mus. Ed. '49, Indiana STC, Pa. 
Klein, Henry J., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.Ed. '49, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Kleinman, Sister M. Oliver, Baden, Pa., B.A. '45, Mount Mercy College, Pa. 
Klimchak, Joseph J., Aliquippa, Pa., B.A. '42, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Kline, Mary Dolores, Nicktown, Pa., B.A. '34, College Misericordia, Pa. 
Knott, Harry, McKeesport, Pa., M.S. in Bus. Adm. '51, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Kocon, Joseph L., Natrona, Pa., B.Ed. '51, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Konchak. Sr. M. Sophia, Coraopolis, Pa., B.Ed. '49, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Kondas, Andrew R., Munhall, Pa., B.Ed. '49, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Koziel, Frank T., Marion Center, Pa., B.S. in Mus. Ed. '49, Indiana STC, Pa. 
Kram, Sister Rose Edward, Baden, Pa., B.A. '49, Mount Mercy College, Pa. 
Krouse, Sister M. Tarcisius, Baden, Pa., B.A. '41, Mount Mercy College, Pa. 
Krumenaker, Michael D., Lilly, Pa., B.A. '50, Saint Francis College, Pa. 
Kundick, John R., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.A. '51, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Kvamme, Sigmund M., Volda, Norway, B.S. in Mus. '46, Mus. Conserv., Norway 
LaCava, Joseph S., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.S. in Bus. Adm. '49, Duquesne Univ., Pa. 
Laird, Margaretta J., Clinton, Pa., B.Ed. '49, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Lakomy, Sister M. Fabian, Coraopolis, Pa., B.Ed. '49, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Lamanna, Louis A., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.Ed. '50, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Langley, Hubert P., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.S. in Comm.'48, Univ. of W. Va., W. Va. 
LaPietra, Jack S., Rankin, Pa., B.S. in Econ. '34, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Lapinski, Ronald L., Wilkes-Barre, Pa., B.A. in Chem. '50, King's College, Pa. 



Page Seventy-seven 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



STUDENT ENROLLMENT— Continued 

Laus, Anthony J., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.S. in Ed. '48, California STC, Pa. 
Lavin, Sr. Ann Florence, Baden, Pa., B.S. in Ed.'48, Mount Mercy College, Pa. 
Lavin, Sr. M. Philippa, Pittsburgh, Pa., B.A. '43, Mount Mercy College, Pa. 
Lee, George W., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.S. in Eng. '48, Bluefield State College, W. Va. 
Legnard, Beatrice H., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.Ed. '37, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Legutko, Sr. M. Carmella, Pittsburgh, Pa., B.Ed.'51, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Lennon, Sr. M. St. Hugh, New Bern, N. C, B.S. '45, Marywood College, Pa. 
Lentz, Charles L., Tarentum, Pa., B.S. in Bus. Adm. '51, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Lentz, William H., Springdale, Pa., M.Ed. '48, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Leskowat, Walter, Arnold, Pa., B.S. '50, University of Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Levitt, George, Newburgh, N. Y., B.S. in Chem. '50, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Liguori, Nicholas L., McKees Rocks, Pa., B.Ed. '51, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Likovich, John S., Rankin, Pa., B.S. in Econ. '31, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Lilly, Robert F., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.S. in Comm. '50, Spring Hill College, Ala. 
Lioon, Samuel L., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.S. in Bus. Adm.'51, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Loll, Charles J., Beaver, Pa., B.S. in Bus. Adm. '50, Geneva College, Pa. 
Lonchar, Andrew, Bakerstown, Pa., B.S. in Bus. Adm.'51, Duquesne University.Pa. 
Loria, Sister M. Justin, Baden, Pa., B.S. in Ed. '51, Mount Mercy College, Pa. 
Lovrich, Sister Magdalene, Pittsburgh, Pa., B.A. '45, Mount Mercy College, Pa. 
Lucas, Joseph F., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.S. in Comm. '39, Grove City College, Pa. 
Luncher, Edward T., Forest Hills, Pa., B.S. in P.S.M. '47, Duquesne University,Pa. 
Lyons, Arline T., Munhall, Pa., B.Ed. '51, Duquesne University, Pa. 
McCaa, Louise, Pittsburgh, Pa., B.S. in Nur. '51, Duquesne University, Pa. 
McCague, Sr. M. Stanislaus, Pittsburgh, Pa., B.A. '47, Mount Mercy College, Pa. 
McCloskey, Sister M. Hosina, Pittsburgh, Pa., A.B. '49, Marywood College, Pa. 
McClure, Frederick L., Watertown, Mass., B.A. '51, Duquesne University, Pa. 
McConnell, James L. Jr., Lilly, Pa., B.S. '50, Saint Francis College, Pa. 
McCormick, Howard J., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.Ed. '48, Duquesne University, Pa. 
McDermott, Sister M. Donatus, Baden, Pa., B.A. '39, Seton Hill College, Pa. 
McDonagh, John P., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.A. '50, Duquesne University, Pa. 
McDonough, Phillip T., Braddock, Pa., M.S. in Bus. Adm.'49, Duquesne Univ., Pa. 
McDunn, Thomas B., Donora, Pa., B.S. in Ed. '30, Indiana STC, Pa. 
McGrath, Sister Marian, Pittsburgh, Pa., B.A. '39, Mount Mercy College, Pa. 
McKenna, Ruth M., S. Norwalk, Conn., B.A. '50, Duquesne University, Pa. 
McMurray, Florence J., Coraopolis, Pa., B.S. in Ed. '49, Slippery Rock STC, Pa. 
McNamee, Sister M. Geralda, Pittsburgh, Pa., B.A. '48, Marywood College, Pa. 
McQuillan, Peggy A., Louisville, Pa., B.A. '49, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Maloney, James R., McKees Rocks, Pa., B.S. in Bus. Adm. '50, Duquesne U., Pa. 
Mancinskas, Sr. Margaret M., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.Ed. '37, Duquesne Univ., Pa. 
Mangan, Sister M. Sylvanus, Pittsburgh, Pa., B.A. '41, Mount Mercy College, Pa. 
Mangery, Peter W., Irwin, Pa., B.S. in Ed. '32, Saint Vincent College, Pa. 
Mannarino, Joseph S., Erie, Pa., B.S. in Biol. '49, Gannon College, Pa. 
Manning, Charles E. Jr., Dravosburg, Pa., B.A. '51, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Manning, John M., Homestead, Pa., B.Ed. '51, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Marcolini, Samuel F., Denbo, Pa., B.A. '49, Washington and Jefferson College, Pa. 
Markley, Frank, Pittsburgh, Pa., M.Ed. '47, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Marracino, William G., Pittock, Pa., B.S. in P.S.M. '50, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Martell, James E., Clairton, Pa., B.S. '37, University of Chattanooga, Tenn. 
Martin, Job C, Perryopolis, Pa., A.B. '51, Sacramento State College, Cal. 
Matczak, Sister M. Rita, Coraopolis, Pa., B.Ed. '49, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Mauroni, Leroy E., Arnold, Pa., B.S. in P.S.M. '50, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Meier, Philip J., Baden, Pa., B.A. '42, Mount Angel College, Oregon 
Meindl, Sr. M. Concessa, McKees Rocks, Pa., B.S. in Ed.'43, St. Mary's, Ohio 
Meindl, Sr. M. Louis, Columbus, Ohio, B.S. in Ed. '42, St. Mary's, Ohio 
Meisner, Sr. M. Michael, Coraopolis, Pa., B.Ed. '50, Duquesne University, Pa. 



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STUDENT ENROLLMENT— Continued 

Menard, Raymond O., McKeesport, Pa., B.S. in Chem.'49, Loyola C, U. of Mont., 

Oregon 
Merges, George, Aliquippa, Pa., B.S. in Art Ed. '85, Edinboro STC, Pa. 
Mihalich, Joseph C, Baden, Pa., M.A. '51, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Milcic, Edward A., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.S. in Bus. Adm.'49, Duquesne Univ., Pa. 
Milton, Francis L., Broughton, Pa., B.S. in Bus. Adm. '42, Duquesne Univ., Pa. 
Miskovitz, Sr. M. Bertrand, Perrysville, Pa., B.S. in P.S.M.'47, Duquesne U., Pa. 
Mitchell, George E., Homestead, Pa., B.S. in Bus. Adm.'49, Duquesne Univ., Pa. 
Monahan, Daniel J., McKeesport, Pa., B.S. '49, Salem College, W. Va. 
Moore, Daniel E., Bridgeville, Pa., B.Ed. '49, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Moore, Donald W., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.S. in Ed. '34, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Morgan, James F., Aspinwall, Pa., B.A. '31, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Morgan, Kathryn R., Cheswick, Pa., M.Ed. '50, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Moroney, Rev. Joseph P., Brooklyn, N. Y., B.D. '40, St. Mary's Seminary, Conn. 
Mucha, Bette F., Oakdale, Pa., B.Ed. '51, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Mulgrave, Norman W., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.Ed. '49, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Mullen, Sr. M. Innocentia, Parkersburg, W. Va. B.Ed. '43, Duquesne Univ., Pa. 
Mulpeters, Sr. Patricia M., San Francisco, Cal., B.A. '45, Univ. of California, Cal. 
Mulvehill, Sr. M. Crescentia, Baden, Pa., B.A. '49, Mount Mercy College, Pa. 
Mulvihill, Dennis E., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.A. '49, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Murphy, Sr. M. Coleman, Pittsburgh, Pa., B.A. '50, Mount Mercy College, Pa. 
Navaroli, August D., McKeesport, Pa., B.A. '29, Ohio Northern University, Ohio 
Nedlik, August J., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.S. in Bus. Adm. '49, Duquesne Univ., Pa. 
Nemeth, Stephen J., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.S. in Bus. Adm.'47, Duquesne Univ., Pa. 
Nesbitt, Clarence E., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.Ed. '50, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Niederst, Elma C, Pittsburgh, Pa., B.S. in Nur. Ed. '50, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Niland, James P., Braddock, Pa., Litt.M. '48, University of Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Nuttall, Sister M. Rachel, Pittsburgh, Pa., B.A. '45, Mount Mercy College, Pa. 
Nychey, John, Pittsburgh, Pa., B.S. in P.S.M. '49, Duquesne University, Pa. 
O'Boyle, Margaret P., Donora, Pa., B.Ed. '50, Duquesne University, Pa. 
O'Brien, Anne L., Masontown, Pa., B.A. '41, Seton Hill College, Pa. 
Obringer, Sr. M. Dominic, Allison Park, Pa., B.Ed. '46, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Oeler, Sr. M. Bertran, Allison Park, Pa., B.Ed. '40, Duquesne University, Pa. 
O'Neill, Sr. Ann G., Baden, Pa., B.S. in Ed. '46, Mount Mercy College, Pa. 
O'Rourke, John W., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.Ed. '49, Duquesne University, Pa. 
O'Toole, Michael J., Pittsburgh, Pa., M.Ed. '50, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Owens, Paul E., Parkersburg, W. Va., B.S. '49, West Virginia University, W. Va. 
Parkin, Dorothy N., Louisville, Col., B.S. in Phar. '51, Univ. of Colorado, Col. 
Paskevich, Sr. M. Virginia, Pittsburgh, Pa., B.Ed. '46, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Pasquarelli, Victor R., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.S. in P.S.M. '42, Duquesne Univ., Pa. 
Passoja, Paul J., Monessen, Pa., A.B. '39, West Virginia Wesleyan, W. Va. 
Pateras, George, Pittsburgh, Pa., B.Ed. '51, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Pease, Lillian M., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.Ed. '50, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Pepe, Arthur, Oliphant Furnace, Pa., B.S. in P.S.M.'49, Miami University, Ohio 
Pessolano, Arsenio A., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.S. in Chem. '49, Duquesne Univ., Pa. 
Petillo, Sr. M. Nicoletta, New Castle, Pa., B.S. in Ed.'50, St. Louis University, Mo. 
Petruska, Bernard P., Pittsburgh, Pa., M.Ed. '48, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Phelan, Sr. M. Carolyn, Baden, Pa., B.S. in Ed. '49, Mount Mercy College, Pa. 
Phillips, John H., McKeesport, Pa., B.S. in Bus. Adm. '48, Duquesne Univ., Pa. 
Piekarski, Rev. Stanley C, Tarentum, Pa., B.A. '35, St. Vincent's Seminary, Pa. 
Pietrzak, Norbert K., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.S. '51, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Piroli, Orlando A., Aliquippa, Pa., B.A. '50, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Planinsek, Henry J., Forest City, Pa., B.S. in Chem. '50, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Pleva, August P. Jr., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.S. in Bus. Adm. '51, Duquesne Univ., Pa. 
Pokrywka, Sr. M. Ignatius, Coraopolis, Pa., B.A. '32, Cath. Univ. of America, D.C. 
Popovich, Rev. Josaphat, Pittsburgh, Pa., B.A. '47, St. Procopius College, 111. 



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STUDENT ENROLLMENT— Continued 

Powers, William H., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.Ed. '46, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Prady, Joseph J., Mars, Pa., B.A. '49, Waynesburg College, Pa. 
Puccetti, Peter M., Pittsburgh, Pa., M.Ed. '50, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Puzniak, Sr. M. Aurelia, Coraopolis, Pa., B.Ed. '43, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Ranalli, Frank A., Glenshaw, Pa., B.S. '51, Saint Francis College, Pa. 
Reed, Catherine M., Coraopolis, Pa., B.Ed. '44, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Regan, Thomas M., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.S. in Chem. '49, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Regotti, John J., Coraopolis, Pa., B.S. in Bus. Adm.'51, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Reichenfeld, Eugene, Pittsburgh, Pa., B.S. in P.S.M. '50, Duquesne Univ., Pa. 
Reilly, William L., Bayonne, N. J., B.S. in Chem.'50, W. Va. Wesleyan Coll.,W.Va. 
Reuss, Sr. M. Eusebia, Allison Park, Pa., B.S. in Ed. '34, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Reznick, Aron, Pittsburgh, Pa., B.S. in Bus. Adm. '50, University of Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Rice, Bruce D., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.A. '51, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Ridge, Joseph H., Pittsburgh, Pa., L.L.B. '51, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Rittleman, Sister M. Colette, Baden, Pa., B.A. '45, Mount Mercy College, Pa. 
Roache, Sr. M. Boniface, Pittsburgh, Pa., B.S. in Nur. Ed. '33, Duq. Univ., Pa. 
Roberts, Sister M. Celine, Wheeling, W. Va., B.A. '42, Marymount College, Kan. 
Rocco, Valentine, Ellwood City, Pa., B.S. in P.S.M. '50, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Rocereto, Louis V., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.S. in P.S.M. '47, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Rodgers, Sr. M. Gertrude, Pittsburgh, Pa., B.Ed. '36, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Rodio, Joseph, Ambridge, Pa., B.S. in Bus. Adm. '43, Kent State University, Ohio 
Rothbein, Julius, Pittsburgh, Pa., B.Ed. '39, Jewish Teachers' College, 

Wurzburg, Germany 
Rothberg, Ira D., Baldwin, N. Y., B.A. '51, Hofstra College, N. Y. 
Ruggiero, Vincent L., Pittsburgh, Pa., Ph.B. '49, Mount Carmel College, Ont. 
Ryan, Sister Sebastian, Pittsburgh, Pa., B.S. in Ed. '34, Bloomsburg STC, Pa. 
Sabol, John A., Whitaker, Pa., B.Ed. '51, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Sachon, Arthur E., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.A. '50, St. Vincent College, Pa. 
Santucci, Eleanor G., Steubenville, Ohio, B.S. in Nur. Ed. '51, Duquesne Univ., Pa. 
Sardo, Rev. Leonard P., Steubenville, Ohio, B.A. '35, St. Francis College, Pa. 
Sarti, Victor J., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.A. '50, St. Vincent College, Pa. 
Savage, Carmelita A., McKeesport, Pa., B.S. in Ed. '42, Mercyhurst College, Pa. 
Savulak, Agnes K., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.Ed. '50, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Schad, Sr. M. John Baptist, Pittsburgh, Pa., B.A. '45, Mount Mercy College, Pa. 
Schoeneweis, Robert G., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.A. '43, Carnegie Tech, Pa. 
Schor, Edward C, Pittsburgh, Pa., B.S. in P.S.M. '50, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Schrader, Lois M., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.S. in Biol. '47, University of Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Sciarra, John J., Brooklyn, N. Y., B.S. in Phar. '51, St. John's University, N. Y. 
Scurci, Daniel J., Jeannette, Pa., B.S. in Bus. Adm. '49, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Segedi, Michael J., Clairton, Pa., B.S. '51, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Sepesy, Louise J., Braddock, Pa., B.Ed. '51, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Serdy, George, Pittsburgh, Pa., B.S. in Bus. Adm. '48, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Severin, Sr. M. Mildred, Wheeling, W. Va., B.A.'40, Cath. Univ. of America, D. C. 
Shalley, Regis V., Homestead, Pa., B.S. in P.S.M. '49, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Shapkauskas, Sr. M. Louise, Pittsburgh, Pa., B.Ed. '49, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Shrift, Donald C, Pittsburgh, Pa., B.S. in P.S.M. '49, Mansfield STC, Pa. 
Sibilia, Genevieve J., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.Ed. '51, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Sieber, Sr. M. Georgine, Allison Park, Pa., B.S. in Ed.'49, Duquesne Univ., Pa. 
Siegel, Harry G., Curtisville, Pa., B.Ed. '49, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Sieger, Sister M. Norma, Pittsburgh, Pa., B.Ed. '40, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Simoni, Henry R., Aliquippa, Pa., B.A. '50, Fairmount State College, W. Va. 
Simons, Sister M. Pauline, Pittsburgh, Pa., B.Ed. '50, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Sirak, Albert, McKeesport, Pa., B.S. in Bus. Adm. '50, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Skirtich, Joseph P., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.S. in Ed. '50, California STC, Pa. 
Slater, Sr. Frances DeChantal, Pittsburgh, Pa., B.A.'40, Seton Hill College, Pa. 
Slotnik, John J., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.S. in P.S.M. '49, Duquesne University, Pa. 



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STUDENT ENROLLMENT— Continued 

Smith, Bernard C, E. Hartford, Conn., B.S. in Chem.'SO, St. Michael's Coll., Vt. 
Smoger, Sr. M. Chrysostom, Coraopolis, Pa., B.Ed.'50, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Sninsky, George R., Munhall, Pa., B.S. in Bus. Adm.'49, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Sohl, Sister Paul Marie, Allison Park, Pa., B.Ed. '43, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Sotak, Andrew, Pittsburgh, Pa., B.S. in Bus. Adm. '49, Duquesne University, Pa. 
South, Mary, Pittsburgh, Pa., B.Ed. '51, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Steckel, Thomas J., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.S. in Bus. Adm. '50, Duquesne Univ., Pa. 
Stevenson, Robert A., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.S. in Ed. '47, Slippery Rock STC, Pa. 
Strano, Alfonso J., Ambridge, Pa., B.S. '50, Hiram College, Ohio 
Streily, Raymond, Pittsburgh, Pa., B.S. in Bus. Adm. '49, Duquesne Univer., Pa. 
Sullivan, Sr. Jean Marie, Pittsburgh, Pa., M.A. '42, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Sullivan, Lawrence E., Homestead, Pa., M.Ed. '48, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Sullivan, Sr. M. Marcella, Pittsburgh, Pa., B.A. '33, Mercyhurst College, Pa. 
Sullivan, Sylvia M., Connellsville, Pa., B.Ed. '50, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Sweeney, Virginia L., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.A. '41, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Swisher, Oren J., Homestead, Pa., B.S. in P.S.M. '38, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Szabo, Sister M. Beatrice, Elizabeth, Pa., B.Ed. '50, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Szczygiel, Rev. Daniel J., Pittsburgh, Pa., A.B. '44, St. Vincent College, Pa. 
Szilacyi, Eugene, Kennywood, Pa., B.S. in P.S.M. '49, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Tamburri, David H., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.S. in P.S.M. '51, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Tassone, Tony Jr., Republic, Pa., B.A. '41, West Virginia Wesleyan, W. Va. 
Tesla, Thomas, Pittsburgh, Pa., B.S. in Bus. Adm. '50, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Testa, Robert F., Clairton, Pa., B.A. in Mus. Ed. '48, Carnegie Tech, Pa. 
Tomkiewicz, Sr. M. Mechtilde, Coraopolis, Pa., B.Ed. '48, Duquesne Univ., Pa. 
Trageser, Joseph G., Pittock, Pa., B.A. '33, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Trainor, William C, Pittsburgh, Pa., B.S. in Bus. Adm. '51, Duquesne Univ., Pa. 
Unger, Joseph A., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.S. in P.S.M. '50, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Usmiani, Rev. Mirko, Pittsburgh, Pa., B.A. '41, University of Zagreb, Youg. 
Vancheri, Frank J., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.S. in Chem. '51, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Vargo, Michael, Canonsburg, Pa., B.A. '49, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Venckus, Sister M. Ursula, Pittsburgh, Pa., M.A. '43, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Village, Paul A., Duquesne, Pa., M.S. '50, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Vitkauskas, Sr. M. Liguoria, Pittsburgh, Pa., B.Ed.'46, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Vucic, Steve J., Rankin, Pa., B.S. '42, St. Vincent College, Pa. 
Walls, Sister M. Alverna, Pittsburgh, Pa., B.Ed. '51, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Walls, Sr. M. Francesca, Pittsburgh, Pa., B.S. in P.S.M. '50, Duquesne Univ., Pa. 
Walsh, Vincent, Dunmore, Pa., B.A. '35, Susquehanna University, Pa. 
Wauro, Helen O., Aliquippa, Pa., B.A. '45, Geneva College, Pa. 
Weaver, James J., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.S. in Ed. '47, Slippery Rock STC, Pa. 
Weber, A. Vincent, Pittsburgh, Pa., B.S. '50, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Whalen, Sister Anne P., Wheeling, W. Va., B.Ed. '51, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Will, Sister M. Gregory, Pittsburgh, Pa., B.A. '45, Mount Mercy College, Pa. 
Wilson, Sister Caroline J., Pittsburgh, Pa., B.Ed. '44, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Wishoski, Dorothy, Pittsburgh, Pa., B.S. in Bus. Adm. '51, Duquesne Univ., Pa. 
Wisniewski, Sr. M. Jermiah, Coraopolis, Pa., B.A/48, Seton Hill College, Pa. 
Worrell, Louis P., Clairton, Pa., B.Ed. '51, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Woteska, Virginia, Pittsburgh, Pa., B.Ed. '51, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Woytko, Sr. M. Gabrielle, Pontiac, Mich., B.A.'43, Siena Heights College, Mich. 
Wysocka, Sr. M. Dominic, Pittsburgh, Pa., B.Ed. '45, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Yash, Sr. M. Celestine, Perrysville, Pa., B.Ed. '41, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Yoncoskie, Robert A., Shamokin, Pa., B.S. '51, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Yuhasz, Albert, Pittsburgh, Pa., B.S. in Ed. '33, Slippery Rock STC, Pa. 
Zakrzewska, Sr. M. Theophane, Pittsburgh, Pa., B.Ed. '49, Duquesne Univ., Pa. 
Zeph, Mary Frances, Mt. Lebanon, Pa., B.Ed. '51, Duquesne University, Pa. 
Zielinski, Leonard, Pittsburgh, Pa., B.S. in Bus. Adm. '49, Duquesne Univ., Pa. 
Zimmerman, Gerald L., Pittsburgh, Pa., M.A. '31, University of Pennsylvania, Pa. 
Zukauskas, Sr. M. Evelyn, Pittsburgh, Pa., B.A. '50, Duquesne University, Pa. 



Page Eighty-one 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



GRADUATE DEGREES GRANTED 

MASTER OF ARTS 

August 11, 1950 

Francis C. Lehner, B.A., Duquesne University, 1948. 
Major: English. 

Thesis: Analysis of Style in Doctor Faustus Relevant to the Problem of 
Marlowe's Authorship. 

Sister M. Rosalia Ondrak, B.S. in Ed., Duquesne University, 1941. 
Major: English. 

Thesis: Study of the Qualities of Wit Inherent in the Comic Dialogue of 
Philip Barry's Plays. 

Sister M. Editha Springer, S.C., B. of Ed., Duquesne University, 1940. 
Major: History 

Thesis: The Financial Policies of Albert Gallatin Regarding the National 
Debt. 

Phyllis Anne Taylor, B.S. in Ed., Ohio University, 1947. 
Major: History. 
Thesis: Causes of the Whiskey Rebellion, 1791-1794. 

Sister M. Victorine Verosky, D.P., B.S. in Ed., Duquesne University, 1945. 
Major: English. 

Thesis: Study of the Dramatic Use of the Elizabethan Underworld in the 
Plays of Shakespeare. 

June 3, 1951 

Michael William Hnath, B. of Ed., Duquesne University, 1949. 
Major: Mathematics. 

Mary Ann Huston, B.A., Duquesne University, 1949. 
Major: Mathematics. 

Sister M. Bona venture Melichar, B.A., Mount Mercy College, 1948. 
Major: History. 

Thesis: Emperor Charles IV of Bohemia, Patron of Literature and Art 
(1316 to 1378). 

MASTER OF SCIENCE 

August 11, 1950 

Bernard Anderson, B.S., Southern University, 1948. 
Major: Botany. 

Thesis: Study of the Vegetative and Floral Apices of Cucurbita Maxima 
Duchesne. 

Leonard Paul Bieranowski, B.S., Duquesne University, 1949. 
Major: Botany. 
Thesis: Study in the Development of Linum Perenne L. 

Thomas J. Butler, B.S., Duquesne University, 1948. 
Major: Chemistry. 

Thesis: Study of the Nature of the Reaction Mechanism of the Wolff- 
Kishner Reduction. 



Page Eighty-two 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 



Ruth Theresa Connelly, B.S., Duquesne University, 1949. 
Major: Biology. 

Thesis: Reaction of the Eosinophilic Leukocyte toward previously stained 
Fat in the Cat. 

Andrew J. Glaid, III, B.S., Duquesne University, 1949. 
Major: Chemistry. 
i Thesis: Synthesis and Testing of Anti-Blood Clotting Compounds. 

Hilary Joseph Kline, C.S.Sp., B.A., St. Mary's Seminary, 1937. 
Major: Botany. 

Thesis: Study in the Development of Auxiliary Buds and Branch Roots of 
Chenopodium Ambrosioides I. 

Francis John Krahe, B.S., Duquesne University, 1949. 
Major: Chemistry. 
Thesis: An Investigation of the Oxidation of Phenyl Sulfoxide. 

Philip W. Krey, B.S., St. Francis College, 1948. 
Major: Chemistry. 
Thesis: Study of Some Cobalt Chelates. 

John Aloysius Lieb, B. of Ed., Duquesne University, 1948. 
Major: Chemistry. 
Thesis: Attempted Synthesis of Open Chain Models of Penicillin. 



June 8, 1951 

Gene Anthony Brost, B.S. in Chemistry, Loyola College, 1949. 
Major: Chemistry. 
Thesis: Cryscopic Studies in Sulfuric Acid. 

Edward Leo Cochran, B.S. in Chemistry, Loyola College, 1949. 
Major: Chemistry. 
Thesis: Basicities of Various Hydrazones. 

Marjorie Duqgan, B.A., Alfred University, 1948. 
Major: Chemistry. 

Thesis: The Effect of Substituents in the Benzene Ring on the Wheat Germ 
Lipase Catalyzed Hydrolysis of Phenyl Acetates. 

John Joseph McIntosh, B.S. in Chemistry, Duquesne University, 1949. 
Major: Chemistry. 

Thesis: An Investigation of Some Phenyl Sulfides, Sulfoxides, and Sulfones 
Containing Nitro and Amino Groups. 

John Alexander Wagner, B.S. in Biology, Southern University, 1948. 
Major: Zoology. 

Thesis: A Monograph of the Land Crabs (Gecarcinidae) in the Virgin 
Islands. 



Page Eighty-three 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



MASTER OF SCIENCE IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

August 11, 1950 

Robert C. Adams, B.A., La Salle College, 1943. 
Major: Business Economics. 
Thesis: The Railroad Industry as a Market for Steel Products. 

Harvey Reginald Alexander, B.S. in Management, University of Illinois, 1947. 
Major: Management. 

Thesis: Investigation of the Advisability of a Universal Form for Reporting 
Financial Information. 

Edward Paul Battle, B.S. in B.A., Duquesne University, 1948. 
Major: Accounting. 

Thesis: An Investigation of the Difficulty and Trend of Financial Reporting 
to the Public. 

Arthur Augustus Clay, B.C.S., New York University, 1931. 
Major: Accounting. 

Thesis: Profitable Uses of Profit and Loss Data Through More Effective 
Presentation, Interpretation and Utilization. 

Michael Danko, Jr., B.S. in B.A., Duquesne University, 1948. 
Major: Accounting. 

Thesis: Analysis and Interpretation of Business Financial Statements and 
Other Data to Determine the Need for Business Insurance to 
Prevent Forced Liquidation. 

Hugh John DePaul, B.S. in B.A., Duquesne University, 1941. 
Major: Management. 

Thesis: Causes of Failures in a Small Retail Business and the Remedies 
Needed to Correct Those Failures. 

Ralph Gordon Dippel, B.S. in B.A., Duquesne University, 1942. 
Major: Finance. 

Thesis: Case Study in the Application of the "Death Sentence Clause" of 
the Public Utility Holding Company Act: Niagara Hudson Power 
Corporation. 

William Joseph Foley, Jr., B.S. in B.A., Duquesne University, 1948. 
Major: Business Economics. 

Thesis: Analysis of the Economic Effects of the Aggressive Selling by the 
Automobile Industry. 

Vito Anthony Grieco, M.S. in Ed., University of Buffalo, 1947. 
Major: Accounting. 
Thesis: Depreciation Policy During Periods of High Costs. 

Hans Christian Jensen, B.S., The Tulane University of Louisiana, 1947. 
Major: Commerce. 

Thesis: A Study of the Marketing of Petroleum Products in Brazil by 
American Interests. 

Ben Bernard Kalser, B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1949. 
Major: Management. 

Thesis: Study of Personnel Practices in a Cross-Section of the Fabricating 
Industries in the Tri-State Area. 



Page Eighty-four 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 



Glenn Eugene Moore, B.S. in B.A., Duquesne University, 1948. 
Major: Management. 

Thesis: Investigation into the Recent Trend of Company Financed Pension 
Programs and the Overall Added Costs Involved. 

i 
William J. O'Brien, B.S. in B.A., Duquesne University, 1940. 
Major: Management. 

Thesis: Investigative Analysis of the History and Section 8 (a) of the Labor 
Management Relations Act of 1947. 

Anthony Joseph Paolino, B.S. in B.A., Duquesne University, 1947. 
Major: Management. 
Thesis: Budgets and Budgetary Controls as a Phase of Management. 

William B. Slish, B.S. in B.A., Duquesne University, 1949. 
Major: Management. 

Thesis: Historical Study of the Development of Collective Bargaining in 
England and in the United States. 

June 3, 1951 

John N. Albaugh, Jr., B.S. in B.A., Duquesne University, 1949. 
Major: Business Economics. 

Thesis: An Investigation of Areas Available for Economic Practices in the 
General Electric Company. 

Philip Joseph Angello, B.S. in B.A., Duquesne University, 1947. 
Major: Management. 
Thesis: Profit Sharing. 

James Torrence Duncan, B.S. in Mgt. Eng., Carnegie Institute of Technology, 
1939. 
Major: Management. 
Thesis: Production Control in the Job Shop. 

Harry Knott, B.S. in B.A., Salem College, 1950. 
Major: Commerce. 
Thesis: Oil and Gas Transmission Lines in the United States. 

Paul J. Maloskey, B.A., St. Francis College, 1948. 
Major: Commerce. 
Thesis: A Survey of Bituminous Coal Production in the United States. 

Aileen S. Morgan, B.S. in Bus. Adm., Duquesne University, 1946. 
Major: Commerce. 
Thesis: A Study of the History and Operation of the Chicago Board of Trade. 

John A. Timko, B.S. in Bus. Adm., Duquesne University, 1949. 
Major: Commerce. 

Thesis: A Study and Analysis of Brazil's Commercial Importance to the 
United States. 

William James Welker, B.S. in B.A., St. Francis College, 1950. 
Major: Accounting. 

Thesis: An Analysis of the Reserves and Their Effect Upon the Financial 
Statements. 



Page Eighty-five 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



MASTER OF SCIENCE IN PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC 

August 11, 1950 

Gut Kenneth Corno, B.S. in P.S.M., Mansfield State Teachers College, 1934. 
Major: Music Education. 

Thesis: Relationship between the Degree of Intelligence and Performance 
on a Test of Musical Aptitude. 

Julius R. D'Alfonso, B.S. in P.S.M., Duquesne University, 1945. 
Major: Music Education. 
Thesis: Study of the Techniques of Violin Class Instruction. 

Paul A. Gehm, B.S. in P.S.M., Duquesne University, 1942. 
Major: Music Education. 

Thesis: Investigation of the Principles in the Production of Tone Quality 
in High School Vocal Music. 

Sister M. Kevin Kerwin, S.S.J., B.S. in P.S.M., Duquesne University, 1940. 
Major: Music Education. 

Thesis: The Spiritual, Moral, and Aesthetic Values of Chant in the Catholic 
School Program. 

Christine W. Mueller, B.A., Cumberland University, 1938. 
Major: Music Education. 
Thesis: An Evaluation of the Percussion Orchestra. 

Ernest Domenic Rotili, B.S., The Pennsylvania State College, 1948. 
Major: Music Education. 
Thesis: A Study of the Public School String Problems. 

Dominic Edward Scacchitti, B.S. in P.S.M., Duquesne University, 1947. 
Major: Music Education. 

Thesis: Study of the Correlation of Music Education with the Techniques 
Used in High School Marching Bands. 

Lucy Carolyn Sheffey, B. of Music, Wilberforce University, 1931. 
Major: Music Education. 
Thesis: Integration of the Elementary School Music Program as Applied 

to Cities with a Population of Fifty Thousand or More, in the 

State of North Carolina. 

June 3, 1951 

Gloria Marie Rocereto, B.S. in Music Ed., Indiana State Teachers College, 1946. 
Major: Music. 

Thesis: An Evaluation of Audio- Visual Aids Used in Teaching the String 
Instruments of the Orchestra to Junior High School Music Ap- 
preciation Classes. 



MASTER OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 

June 3, 1951 

Lillian Lang Meyers, B.A., University of Georgia, 1948. 
Major: Education. 

Thesis: A Study of Twenty-five Male Juvenile Delinquents on the Basis of 
the Wechsler-Bellevue Intelligence Scale and the Rorschach Ink 
Blot Test. 



Page Eighty-six 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 



MASTER OF EDUCATION 

August 11, 1950 

Edith Agnes Black, B. of Ed., Duquesne University, 1946. 

Cornelius P. Campbell, B.S. in H. Ed., Slippery Rock College, 1931. 

Sister Mary Isabel Concannon, S.S.J., B. of Ed., Duquesne University, 1943. 

Sister Mary Agnes Hannan, S.S.J., B.A., Mount Mercy College, 1945. 

Robert William Harper, B. of Ed., Duquesne University, 1946. 

Robert Joseph Jacisin, B.A., Duquesne University, 1949. 

George N. Kambisios, B.A., Duquesne University, 1949. 

Sister Mary Juliana Kellerman, B. of Ed., Duquesne University, 1943. 

Esther E. Kustra, B. of Ed., Duquesne University, 1947. 

Robert Corbly McCune, B. of Ed., Duquesne University, 1940. 

Howard Francis Noble, Jr., B.A., Duquesne University, 1949. 

Ralph M. A. Papa, B.A., Duquesne University, 1949. 

Mildred Anne Petty, B. of Ed., Duquesne University, 1944. 

Sister Jane Frances Riley, B. of Ed., Duquesne University, 1943. 

Gloria A. Saunders, B. of Ed., Duquesne University, 1946. 

Angeline Narcisi Schuster, B. of Ed., Duquesne University, 1947. 

Maurice J. Silverstein, B.S. in Ed., Duquesne University, 1931. 

Samuel J. Sullivan, B.S. in Economics, Duquesne University, 1933. 

Sister Mary Florita Waters, B.A., Marywood College, 1942. 

June 3, 1951 

David Harold Abrams, B.S. in Ed., Slippery Rock State Teachers College, 1939. 

Emily Bennett, B.S. in N. Ed., Duquesne University, 1945. 

Marvin Buncher, B. of Ed., Duquesne University, 1949. 

Sister M. Frederick Burkett, R.S.M., B.A., Mt. Mercy College, 1941. 

Cordellia Margaret Campbell, B. of Ed., Duquesne University, 1949. 

Rita Catherine Cattley, B. of Ed., Duquesne University, 1941. 

Dorothy M. Doran, B.S. in Ed., University of Pittsburgh, 1933. 

Sister St. Bede Downey, S.S.J., B.A., Mount Mercy College, 1944. 

Francis James Eureka, B. of Ed., Duquesne University, 1940. 

Dorothea B. Ferguson, B. of Ed., Duquesne University, 1948. 

Mary Sowa Fleckenstein, B.S. in Ed., California State Teachers College, 1949. 

Paul E. Franks, B.S. in Ed., University of Pittsburgh, 1949. 

Steve David Gyory, B.S. in Ed., Rider College, 1941. 

Leonard J. Heimbuecher, B.A., Duquesne University, 1949. 

Sister M. Celestia Joyce, S.S.J., B.A., Duquesne University, 1936. 

Gertrude Ida Kearns, B. of Ed., Duquesne University, 1947. 

Rev. Daniel M. Kirwin, B.A., St. Mary's University, 1938. 

Alice L. Locke, B. of Ed., Duquesne University, 1949. 

Anthony Fred Mafrica, B. of Ed., Duquesne University, 1949. 

James Edward Martell, B.S., University of Chattanooga, 1937. 

Frances Masal, B. of Ed., Duquesne University, 1946. 

Joseph Edward McGrath, B.A., St. Mary's Seminary, 1943. 

Frances King Mellett, B. of Ed., Duquesne University, 1948. 

Louis Lawrence Melocchi, B.S. in Ed., Waynesburg College, 1947. 

Emma Marie Stultz Nozling, B. of Ed., Duquesne University, 1948. 

John Petchel, B. of Ed., Duquesne University, 1942. 

Loretta Helene Rogers, B. of Ed., Duquesne University, 1948. 

Frank David Rovilea, Jr., B.A., Washington and Jefferson College, 1933. 

Josephine Patricia Ruzzini, B.A., Mount Mercy College, 1945. 

Frances Dorothy Spanbauer, B. of Ed., Duquesne University, 1948. 

Ray G. Stowitzky, B. of Ed., Duquesne University, 1949. 

Verona S. Tatala, B. of Ed., Duquesne University, 1947. 

Sister Joseph Marie Taylor, CD .P., B. of Ed., Duquesne University, 1945. 

Catherine Crawford Wilhelm, B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1927. 



Page Eighty-seven 



Duouesne University 



College of Liberal Arts and Sciences 

School op Law 

School of Business Administration 

School of Pharmacy 

School of Music 

School of Education 

School of Nursing 

Graduate School 



Bulletins of the above schools are published separately 
and may be obtained on request from the 

DIRECTOR OF ADMISSIONS 

Duouesne University 

PITTSBURGH 19, PA. GRant 1-4635 



1 






The 
DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 

BULLETIN 



<© 



Announcement of the 

SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

1952-1953 




DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 

PITTSBURGH 19, PENNA. 



The 

DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 

BULLETIN 



VOLUME XL 



FEBRUARY 1952 



NUMBER 2 



Announcement of the 

SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

For the Session 

1952-1953 




SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 
PITTSBURGH 19, PENNSYLVANIA 



VOLUME XL 



FEBRUARY 1952 



NUMBER 2 



CALENDAR 

1952-1953 

SUMMER SESSION 

June 12, 13, 14, Thursday, Friday from 9:00-4:00; Saturday until Noon 

Registration, Eight Weeks Session, Day and Evening 

June 16, Monday Eight Weeks Session begins 

June 26, 27, 28, Thursday, Friday from 9:00-4:00', Saturday until Noon 

Registration, Six Weeks Day Session 

June 30, Monday ! Six Weeks Session begins 

July 3, Thursday Latest date to apply for degrees: August Candidates 

July 4, Friday Holiday 

July 12, Saturday Class Day 

August 8, Friday Summer Sessions end: Commencement 

1952-1953 

FIRST SEMESTER 

September 8, 9, Monday, Tuesday from 1:00-4:00 Registration 

September 8, 9, Monday, Tuesday from 4:30-7:30 Registration: Evening School 
September 10, 11, 12, 13, Wednesday to Friday from 9:00-4:00; 

Saturday until Noon Registration 

September 15, Monday First Semester begins 

September 27, Saturday Latest date for change of schedule, etc. 

October 25, Saturday Latest date for removal of E, I, X grades 

October 25, Saturday Latest date to apply for degrees: January Candidates 

November 1, Saturday .•••:• Holiday 

November 5, Wednesday Mid-Semester Examinations begin 

November 26, Wednesday {after last class) Thanksgiving Vacation begins 

December 1, Monday Classes resumed 

December 8, Monday Holiday 

December 20, Saturday {after last class) Christmas Vacation begins 

January 5, Monday Classes resumed 

January 15, Thursday Final Examinations begin 

January 24, Saturday Final Examinations: Saturday Classes 

1952-1953 

SECOND SEMESTER 

February 2, 3, Monday, Tuesday from 1:00-4:00 Registration 

February 2, 3, Monday, Tuesday from 4:30-7:30 Registration: Evening School 
February 4, 5, 6, 7, Wednesday to Friday from 9:00-4:00; 

Saturday until Noon Registration 

February 9, Monday Second Semester begins 

February 21, Saturday Latest date for change of schedule, etc. 

February 21, Saturday Latest date to apply for degrees: June Candidates 

March 21, Saturday Latest date for removal of E, I, X grades 

April 1, Wednesday {after last class) Easter Vacation begins 

April 7, Tuesday Classes resumed 

April 8, Wednesday Mid-Semester Examinations begin 

May 14, Thursday Holiday 

May 30, Saturday Holiday 

June 1, Monday Final Examinations begin 

June 6, Saturday Final Examinations: Saturday Classes 

June 7, Sunday Baccalaureate Services and Commencement Exercises 

Registration is conducted during the days listed in the above calendar. 
Only by rare exception, by consent of the Dean, and on payment of a penalty, 
will late registration be permitted. 



CONTENTS 

Page 
Calendar rear of title page 

The University Personnel 4 

Faculty 5 

General Statement 6 

The School of Pharmacy 7 

Information on Admission 9 

Academic Regulations 14 

Organizations 17 

Tuition and Fees 20 

B.S. (Phar.) Curriculum 24 

Description of Courses 26 

List of Students, 1951-1952 34 






DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



THE UNIVERSITY PERSONNEL 

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 



Most Reverend John Francis Dearden, D.D. 
Chancellor 

Very Reverend Vernon F. Gallagher, C.S.Sp., Ph.D. 

President 

Reverend J. Gerald Walsh, C.S.Sp., Ph.D. 
Vice-President 

Reverend Joseph R. Kletzel, C.S.Sp., M.A. 
Secretary 

Reverend Sebastian J. Schiffgens, C.S.Sp., B.A. 
Treasurer 

Maurice J. Murphy, D.Ed. 
Registrar 

Reverend William J. Holt, C.S.Sp., B.A. 
Director of Student Welfare 

Reverend James F. McNamara, C.S.Sp., B.A. 
Dean of Men 

Elizabeth K. Wingerter, M.A. 
Dean of Women 

Margaret Eleanor McCann, B.S. (Library Science) 

Librarian 

Reverend Salvator J. Federici, C.S.Sp., Ph.D. 
Director of Admissions 

Reverend Joseph F. Rengers, C.S.Sp., B.A. 
University Chaplain 

Colonel Russell W. Schmelz, U.S.A. 
Coordinator of Military and Air Science and Tactics 

Robert B. Challinor, M.D. 
Director of Student Health 



Four 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

FACULTY 

1952-1953 

ADMINISTRATION 

Very Reverend Vernon F. Gallagher, C.S.Sp.,Ph.D. President of the University 

Reverend J. Gerald Walsh, C.S.Sp., Ph.D Vice-President 

Hugh C. Muldoon, Ph.G., B.S., D.Sc Dean of the School of Pharmacy 

Maurice Wilhere, B.A Secretary to the Dean 

TEACHING STAFF 

Tobias H. Dunkelberger, B.S., Ph.D Professor of Chemistry 

Hugh C. Muldoon, Ph.G., B.S., D.Sc Professor of Chemistry 

Morris Ostrofsky, B.A., Ph.D Professor of Mathematics 

Andrew J. Kozora, B.S., M.S Associate Professor of Physics 

Helena A. Miller, B.S., M.S., Ph.D Associate Professor of Biology 

Vartkes H. Simonian, Ph.C, M.S., Ph.D.. .Associate Professor of Pharmacognosy 

Joseph A. Zapotocky, B.S., Ph.D. Associate Professor of Pharmacy and Chemistry; 

Head, Department of Pharmacy 

Martin I. Blake, B.S., M.S., Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry 

Rev. Raymond M. Cadwallader, Ph.D Assistant Professor of Philosophy 

Daniel L. Jones, B.A., M.A., Ph.D Assistant Professor of Biology 

Frederick I. Tsuji, B.A., M.N.S., Ph.D Assistant Professor of Biochemistry 

Joan V. Atkinson, B.S. (Phar.) Instructor in Pharmacy 

Bernard Brunner, B.A., M.A., Ph.D Instructor in English 

William H. Cadugan, B.S. (Bus. Adm.), M.Ed Instructor in Business Practice 

Joseph R. DePhilip, Ph.G Instructor in Pharmaceutical Administration 

Sister M. Gonzales Duffy, B.A., B.S. (Phar.), M.S Hospital Instructor in 

Pharmacy 

Olga S. Manasterski, B.Phar., B.S. (Phar.) Instructor in Pharmacy 

Margaret A. Rauskauskas, B.A., M.A Instructor in Zoology 

Bernard L. Schmitzer Instructor in Commercial Display 

Marjorie L. Green, B.S. (Phys. Ed.) Lecturer in First Aid 

William C. O'Toole, B.A Lecturer in Law 

John Farbarik, B.S. (Phar.) Assistant in Pharmacology 

Dorothy N. Parkin, B.S. (Phar.) Assistant in Pharmacy 

John J. Sciarra, B.S. (Phar.) Assistant in Pharmacy 

Additional teachers are assigned from the College of Arts and Sciences. 



Fivt 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



GENERAL STATEMENT 

Duquesne University is an educational institution conducted 
and controlled by members of the Congregation of the Holy 
Ghost. Instituted as a college of arts and letters in 1878, it was 
incorporated in 1881 under the title of the Pittsburgh Catholic 
College. Upon obtaining a university charter in 1911 Pittsburgh 
Catholic College became Duquesne University with authority to 
grant degrees in the arts and sciences, law, medicine, dentistry, 
and pharmacy. In 1930 the charter was broadened to authorize 
degrees in education and music. It was further extended in 1937 
to include nursing. 

The University, an urban institution serving the needs of an 
industrial city and the surrounding communities in western 
Pennsylvania, is situated upon an eminence overlooking the 
Golden Triangle in downtown Pittsburgh. Both the campus and 
a downtown school in the heart of the financial district are 
convenient to the several railway stations and within easy access 
of the various rapid transit lines. 

The student body, comprising men and women since 1915, 
annually averages about 3,500 students. Daily classes of the 
regular school year meet for the most part upon campus. 
Summer sessions, evening and Saturday courses are held both 
on campus and downtown. 

The University is affiliated with the Catholic University of 
America and is also a member of the following educational 
associations: the Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools 
of the Middle States and Maryland, American Council on 
Education, National Catholic Educational Association, Catholic 
Educational Association of Pennsylvania, Pennsylvania State 
Education Association, Eastern States Association of Profes- 
sional Schools for Teachers, American Association of Colleges of 
Pharmacy, American Association of Collegiate Registrars, 
Association of Collegiate Schools of Nursing, and the National 
Organization for Public Health Nursing. 

As presently constituted the University consists of six 
undergraduate and two graduate units. The former comprise a 
college of Liberal Arts and Sciences, and schools of Business 
Administration, Education, Music, Nursing, and Pharmacy. 
The latter include a School of Law and a Graduate School. Each 
unit is under the administration of a separate dean who annually 
edits the bulletin of announcements for the respective schools. 



Six 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

Plans for establishing a School of Pharmacy were instituted 
in 1911 when the charter of the University was amended and 
authority obtained to grant degrees in Pharmacy. On April 20, 
1925, the final work of organizing the school was begun. The 
first class was received September 21, 1925. 



PURPOSE 

The chief purpose of the School of Pharmacy is to train 
pharmacists; to give men and women such schooling in pharmacy 
and its allied sciences as will enable them to meet the present 
and future demands of their chosen profession in an able and 
intelligent manner. Both the professional and commercial aspects 
of pharmacy are given consideration. Students are taught to be 
good business men as well as good pharmacists; but graduates of 
the course in pharmacy are not restricted to retail pharmacy 
alone. They may become hospital pharmacists, pharmacists in 
the Army, Navy, or Public Health Service, analytical chemists, 
pharmacognosists, bacteriologists, food chemists, food and drug 
experts in government laboratories, medical technologists or 
teachers in high schools or colleges of pharmacy. Additional 
study is required for some of these positions. Graduates may 
find employment as agents for the enforcement of anti-narcotic 
acts. They may become manufacturers, or salesmen and detail 
men for medicinal products. They may enter the wholesale drug 
business, or do general chemical and pharmaceutical manufac- 
turing and control work. A few pharmacists continue their study 
and become physicians. In the Graduate School of Duquesne 
University work leading to the Master of Science degree is offered 
in the fields of pharmacy, pharmaceutical chemistry and pharma- 
cognosy. 



STANDARDS AND RECOGNITION 

The standards of the American Council on Pharmaceutical 
Education and the requirements of the American Association 
of Colleges of Pharmacy are maintained. The legal requirements 
of Pennsylvania, New York, New Jersey, Ohio, West Virginia, 
and of all other states are met. 

The Duquesne University School of Pharmacy was registered 
as a recognized school of pharmacy by the Pennsylvania State 
Board of Pharmacy, March 10, 1926. The school holds member- 



Seven 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



ship in the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy. This 
association numbers among its members the most progressive 
colleges of pharmacy in the United States as determined by their 
standards for entrance, instruction and graduation. 

The Duquesne University School of Pharmacy is accredited 
by the American Council on Pharmaceutical Education as a 
Class A college. The Council is the only national accrediting 
agency in pharmaceutical education. Graduates of this school 
are admitted to licensing examinations in all states. 



ADVANTAGES 

Because the School of Pharmacy is an integral part of the 
University, its students may participate in all University activi- 
ties, social, athletic, literary, fraternal and educational. Students 
in the School of Pharmacy are eligible for positions on the varsity 
athletic teams. The School of Pharmacy takes an active part in 
all intramural sports. 

The courses of study in the School of Pharmacy, aside from 
those of strictly pharmaceutical character, are coordinated with 
those of the other departments of the University. This arrange- 
ment gives the students in the School of Pharmacy the valuable 
advantage of the broadening influence resulting from close con- 
tact with the students and teachers of the several schools. 

A well-planned curriculum, including business as well as 
professional training, an unusually large amount of laboratory 
work, careful supervision by experienced teachers, and the pro- 
gressive policies of the university insure to the student more than 
adequate training for his life-work. The opportunity to work in 
the George A. Kelly, Sr., Memorial Pharmacy and the affiliation 
of the school with Mercy Hospital offer great advantages in 
prescription practice. 

The location of the school affords all the many advantages to 
be found in a big city. There are opportunities to work in drug 
stores or in other establishments for those who find it necessary 
to earn a portion of their expenses. Concerts, lectures, libraries, 
museums, theatres, and the other educational advantages of a 
great commercial and educational center are available to the 
student. 



Eight 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



STATE LICENSING OF PHARMACISTS 

A candidate for registration as pharmacist must meet the 
following requirements before he (or she) may be admitted to the 
licensing examinations which are conducted in Pittsburgh by the 
Pennsylvania State Board of Pharmacy at Duquesne University 
and at the University of Pittsburgh. 



Requirements for registration as Pharmacist 

1. Age. Character. The candidate must not be less than 21 years of 
age, and of good moral character. 

2. Professional Training. The candidate must be a graduate of a 
reputable and properly chartered college of pharmacy, so recognized 
by the State Board of Pharmacy. 

3. High School Preparation. The candidate must have a State Pre- 
liminary Certificate certifying to not less than four years of high school 
work, or the equivalent, in approved subjects. The certificate must 
bear a date not later than November 1st of the year of matriculation. 

4. Practical Experience and Apprenticeship. Students who enter a 
college of pharmacy in September, 1952, and in later years, will obtain 
on entrance to the college a Pennsylvania Apprenticeship Certificate 
from the Pennsylvania State Board of Pharmacy. This requirement 
applies to out-of-state students as well as to residents of Pennsylvania. 

Before the graduate of the college will be permitted to take the 
practical part of the state licensing examination, he must have passed 
the theoretical part of the examination and he must present satis- 
factory evidence of having had subsequent to his entering the college 
of pharmacy at least one year of practical experience in retailing, 
compounding and dispensing practice, gained under the personal 
supervision of a registered pharmacist. 

The year of practical experience shall total 2080 hours (52 weeks of 
40 hours per week). Credit will not be given for experience gained on 
evenings, week ends, holidays or vacations during the college year. 
A maximum of 13 weeks of 40 hours per week may be allowed for 
each of three summer vacations. 



INFORMATION ON ADMISSION 

CATEGORIES OF STUDENTS 

Students at Duquesne University are classified as matricu- 
lated and non-matriculated. A matriculated student is one who 
has satisfied all of the requirements for admission to the degree 
program of his choice and is pursuing courses in which he is 
qualified to earn credit for the degree. Registrants who are so 



Nine 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



classified may be full-time or part-time students in either the 
day or evening division of the university. Non-matriculated 
students are mature persons who are not interested in pursuing 
courses for a degree and who have not met the requirements 
for matriculation. 

A student who is enrolled as a non-matriculated, or special 
student, must have the approval of the dean who is responsible 
for the courses to be pursued. In such case the entrance require- 
ments may be waived, but the courses will not carry credit 
toward a degree at Duquesne until such time as the student has 
met fully the requirements of matriculation. Only in an excep- 
tional case is a non-matriculated student permitted to attend 
regular day-school classes. 

Students carrying less than twelve hours credit per semester 
are part-time students. 

Students carrying a schedule of courses each semester which 
will enable them to qualify for a degree in the regular time are 
full-time students. 

ENTRANCE CREDITS 

Entrance credits are stated in high school units. A high 
school unit represents a year's study in an approved standard 
secondary school, so planned as to constitute approximately one- 
fourth of a full year of work for a pupil of normal ability. To 
count as a unit, the recitation period shall aggregate approxi- 
mately not less than 120 sixty-minute hours. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

Admission of Regular students: A candidate for admission 
must be of good moral character. 

The candidate must be a graduate of an approved high 
school, in the upper three-fifths of his class. Those who place in 
the lower two-fifths are automatically subject to an entrance 
examination. 

The candidate should present twelve units from the following 
fields: English, Social Studies, Language, Mathematics, and 
Science, and four units in electives for which the high school offers 
credit toward graduation, or the genuine equivalent. 

The candidate's application must be approved by the 
University Committee on Admissions. 



Ten 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



The committee must be satisfied that the applicant is 
equipped to pursue his college studies with profit. In arriving at 
a decision the committee considers the applicant's character and 
general ability and examines the quality of previous achievement 
shown by the high school record. A personal interview may be 
requested. 

Should the committee decide that the quality of the appli- 
cant's high school work makes success in college doubtful, a 
special entrance examination may be given by the University 
Faculties. This examination will include the scholastic aptitude 
and achievement tests of the American Council on Education. 

Admission of Transfer Students: Students of approved colleges 
and universities may be admitted to advanced standing if their 
credentials so warrant. They must be in good standing and 
eligible to continue their studies at the institution previously 
attended. They must have been granted an honorable dismissal. 
A general average equivalent to the grade C at Duquesne is 
required of transfer students. Advance credit may be allowed for 
those courses which are the equivalent of the courses in the 
chosen Duquesne curriculum. No credit will be allowed in any 
subject in which a grade lower than C was obtained. 

Advanced standing is conditional until the student completes 
a minimum of one semester's work (15 semester hours). If his 
work proves unsatisfactory, the student will be requested to 
withdraw. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION TO THE 
SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

The requirements for admission to the School of Pharmacy 
are the same as for the other undergraduate schools of the 
university, except for the following: 

The candidate's high school record must be approved by the 
State. 

As evidence of State approval the candidate must present 
before November 1st of the year in which college work in Phar- 
macy is begun, a Pennsylvania State Preliminary Certificate 
issued by the Pennsylvania Department of Public Instruction 
at Harrisburg. Such Certificates are granted, upon payment to 
the State of a 32.00 fee, to candidates who have completed an 
approved four-year high school course. 

An approved four-year high school course must comprise two years 
of social science including American history or problems of democracy, one 
year of mathematics (algebra or geometry), one year of science (chemistry, 



Eleven 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



physics, or biology), four years of English, and additional work to make a 
total of at least 72 counts or 16 units. Not more than 2 units may be allowed 
in commercial subjects. Additional preparation in mathematics and science 
and practical experience in a retail or hospital pharmacy are desirable. Appli- 
cants who cannot satisfy the requirements by furnishing certified records from 
accredited schools may make up the deficiency by passing the examinations 
given for this purpose by the Pre-Professional Credentials Bureau of Pennsyl- 
vania. These examinations are held during January, May and August in 
Pittsburgh, Philadelphia, Harrisburg, Reading, Scranton, Hollidaysburg and 
Erie. Eighteen counts earned by examination are accepted as equivalent to 
one year's high school work. 

Further information regarding these examinations, the 
method of securing admission, fees, dates, etc., may be obtained 
by writing to the rre-Professional Credentials Bureau at Harris- 
burg. 

The School of Pharmacy accepts both men and women 
students. 

New students are admitted to the regular pharmaceutical 
courses only at the opening of the First Semester. Except in 
unusual cases students will not be registered after instruction 
has begun. In no case are new students permitted to register 
later than October 10th. 

Special students, not candidates for degrees, and those 
admitted with advanced standing from other schools of phar- 
macy, may enter at the beginning of any semester. 

Students are not admitted to the regular courses subject to 
the removal of entrance conditions. 



ROUTINE OF MATRICULATION 
Regular Students 

1. Applicants should address the Director of Admissions to 
obtain the necessary application blanks. 

2. The applicant will complete the personal application and 
return it to the Director of Admissions, 801 Bluff St., Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania. He will have his high school complete the creden- 
tials form which must be mailed directly to the Director of 
Admissions. 

3. Upon receipt of these application papers an evaluation 
will be made by the Committee on Admissions; the applicant 
will then be notified of his admission status and provided with 



Twelve 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



information on registration. A deposit of twenty dollars is 
required within two weeks of notification of acceptance, in order 
to assure the applicant of the reservation of a place in class. 
For further information see Tuition and Fees. 

Transfer Students 

1. Applicant should address the Director of Admissions to 
obtain the necessary form. 

2. The applicant will complete the form and return it to the 
Director of Admissions, 801 Bluff St., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 

3. The applicant must notify all colleges or universities pre- 
viously attended to mail directly to the Director of Admissions, 
Duquesne University, official transcripts of record. 

4. Upon receipt of all credentials an evaluation will be made; 
the applicant will then be notified of his admission status and 
provided with information concerning registration. A deposit of 
twenty dollars is required within two weeks of notification of 
acceptance, in order to assure the applicant of the reservation 
of a place in class. For further information see Tuition and Fees. 

REGISTRATION INFORMATION 

A registration period precedes each semester and summer 
session. (See University Calendar.) All schools register students 
during this period. Late registration, permitted for the first two 
weeks of a semester carries a penalty of 25.00. General regulations 
concerning registration are: 

1. Registration for all day students is held on the campus. 

2. The student's schedule is prepared in conference with his 
dean or adviser. 

3. Tuition and fees for the semester are payable at regis- 
tration time. 

4. Admission to any class is allowed only to those who have 
officially registered for that class. 

Students are not permitted to change their schedules of 
courses without the permission of their dean. A student who 
withdraws from a course without proper authorization receives a 
grade of F for the course. Change of schedule is permitted, without 
fee, only during the registration period. For a serious reason, 
change of schedule may be permitted during the same period 
that late registrations are accepted. 



Thirteen 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 

The following regulations govern all undergraduate students 
of the University. The University reserves the right to change 
any provision or requirement during the term of residence of 
any student; and to compel the withdrawal of any student whose 
conduct at any time is not satisfactory to the University. 

1. Class Attendance: Students are not permitted to absent them- 

selves without good reason. 

2. Examinations: 

a. Entrance examinations are given at the beginning of each 
semester for those applicants for admission who were not 
graduated in the upper three-fifths of their high school class. 

b. Mid-Semester examinations are given or omitted according 
to the regulations of the individual schools of the university. 

c. Final examinations are given at the end of each semester 
and summer session. No student is excused from taking 
final examinations. 

d. Condition examinations, the date for which is announced 
in the university calendar, are given toward the end of 
the first month of each semester, in order to give students 
who have received the marks of E or X for courses taken 
during the preceding semester the opportunity to remove 
these deficiencies. For information on the fee for this exam- 
ination, see the section of this bulletin headed "Tuition 
and Fees." 

e. Comprehensive examinations, covering the entire field of 
major study, must be passed successfully by every can- 
didate before he may be recommended for a degree. 

3. Grading: The university grading system adopted February 21, 
1929, and amended September 19, 1938, is the only method of 
rating recognized by the university. The system is as follows: 

A — Excellent 

B— Good 

C — Average 

D — Below Average — lowest passing grade 

E — Conditioned: eligible for re-examination 

F — Failure: course must be repeated 

I — Incomplete: grade is deferred because of incomplete 

work 
X — Absent from final examination 
W— Official Withdrawal 
P — Pass — used in certain courses without quality points. 



Fourteen 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



The temporary marks, I, X, and E, if not removed within 
the first thirty school days of the next succeeding semester, 
become permanent marks, and the courses must be repeated 
for credit. It is the student's responsibility to make arrange- 
ments with his dean for the removal of these temporary marks. 
An E grade can be changed by re-examination to only D or F. 

4. Unit of Credit: The unit of credit is the semester hour. One 
semester hour of credit is granted for the successful completion 
of one hour per week of lecture or recitation, or at least two 
hours per week of laboratory work for one semester. Inasmuch 
as the minimum number of weeks in a semester is sixteen, 
an equivalent definition of the semester hour is sixteen hours 
of class or the equivalent in laboratory work. 

5. Quality Points: Among the requirements for graduation is a 
quality point average of at least 1.0. The quality point system 
operates as follows: 

(a) For the credits of work carried, quality points are awarded 
according to the grade received: for a grade of A, the 
number of credits are multiplied by 3; for a grade of B, 
by 2; for a grade of C, by 1; for a grade of D, by 0; and 
for a grade of F, by minus 1, until the F has been removed 
by repeating the course successfully. The marks E, I, and 
X, being temporary indications rather than grades, and 
W and P are independent of the quality point system. 

(b) A student's quality point average can be calculated at 
the end of an academic period by dividing his total 
number of quality points by the total number of semester 
hours of credit he has obtained. 

The only exception to this rule is for credits earned in the 
course in Physical Education. 

6. Scholastic Standing: 

(a) Dismissal: A student, to be permitted to continue a 
course of study, must pass in two-thirds of the hours of 
credit carried in each semester, and must maintain a 
quality point average of at least 0.67. Failure to satisfy 
this minimum scholastic requirement will result in the 
dismissal of the student for low scholarship. 



Fifteen 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



(b) Probation: A student who fails in one third or less of the 
hours of credit carried in each semester, or whose quality 
point average falls below 1.0, is placed on probation for 
the next semester. Students on probation may be required 
to carry a reduced schedule. 

7. Classifications of Students: Students will be ranked in the 
several classes as follows: 

Freshmen: Those having completed less than 30 semester 
hours. 

Sophomores: Those having completed 31 to 60 semester 
hours. 

Juniors: Those having completed 61 to 90 semester 

hours. 

Seniors: Those having completed 91 semester hours. 



GRADUATION 

1. General Requirements: The candidate for a degree must be of 
good moral character; must have paid all indebtedness to the 
University; must have made formal application for the degree 
at the Office of the Registrar prior to the date listed in the 
University Calendar; must be present at the Baccalaureate 
and Commencement Exercises. 

2. Scholastic Requirements: The candidate for a degree must have 
satisfied all entrance requirements; must have completed suc- 
cessfully all the required courses of his degree program; must 
have no grade lower than D; must have completed the last 
year's work (a minimum of thirty semester hours of credit) 
in residence; must have passed the comprehensive examin- 
ation in his major field or have fulfilled the thesis requirement. 

3. Quality Point Requirements: The candidate for a degree must 
have a minimum total number of quality points equivalent 
to the number of semester hours credit required for the 
Bachelor's degree; or a minimum quality point average of 1.0. 

4. Degrees Awarded With Honor: Degrees are awarded with special 
mention cum laude or magna cum laude to students who have 
completed the regular course with unusual distinction. Upon 
recommendation of the faculty, this mention may be raised 
to summa cum laude. 



Sixteen 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



THE SCHOOL YEAR 

The school year, which occupies 32 weeks exclusive of 
vacations, is divided into a First Semester and a Second Semester 
of 16 weeks each. 

CLASSES AND SESSIONS 

Regular Classes: Classes are in session five days a week during 
the school year. 

COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATIONS IN THE 
SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

Comprehensive examinations, covering the work of four 
years in the departments of pharmacy, chemistry, and pharma- 
cology-pharmacognosy must be passed in the second semester 
of the senior year by all candidates for the degree of Bachelor of 
Science in Pharmacy. These examinations are administered in a 
number of sessions totaling in all twelve hours. The number of 
sessions, and the time of each session will be announced. 

EMPLOYMENT IN PHARMACIES 

Some students find it necessary or advisable to work in 
pharmacies during the school year. Such employment is approved 
when the college work does not suffer thereby. The university is 
sometimes able to aid students in securing positions. When 
employers request aid in obtaining assistants, students are noti- 
fied so that they may make personal application. 

ORGANIZATIONS 

The Student Branch of the American Pharmaceutical Asso- 
ciation, whose membership includes all students registered in the 
School of Pharmacy, aims to promote their interests, scholastic, 
social and professional. Under its auspices many worth-while 
events are arranged during the school year. Its annual member- 
ship fee of three dollars includes one year's student membership 
in the American Pharmaceutical Association and a year's sub- 
scription to its Journal (Practical Edition). 

The Alpha Beta Chapter of Rho Chi, national honorary 
pharmaceutical society, organized to promote the advancement 
of the pharmaceutical sciences, is located at Duquesne Univer- 
sity. Elections to the society are held annually. Students who 
have completed two and one-half years of work with high schol- 
astic standing are eligible to membership. 



Sevtntteu 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



Tau Chapter of Lambda Kappa Sigma was established at 
DuTquesne University in 1932. This important national phar- 
maceutical sorority maintains chapters at eighteen colleges of 
pharmacy throughout the country. 

The Pharmacy Research Club is a voluntary organization of 
upper-class students of high academic standing who are interested 
in research. Biweekly meetings help to establish a research 
attitude. Simple problems may be undertaken to familiarize 
the student with research techniques. 

PRIZES 

The following prizes are offered: 

Lehn and Fink Prize. In order to stimulate interest and re- 
search in pharmacy, Lehn and Fink Products Co., New York 
City, furnishes annually a gold medal to be awarded to the mem- 
ber of the graduating class who in the judgment of the faculty 
has attained the highest general average or who has accomplished 
some special work in pharmacy that is worthy of such recognition. 

Pharmaceutical Association Prize. A prize of five dollars is 
awarded annually to the student who presents before the Phar- 
maceutical Association the most interesting and instructive 
original paper on a subject of interest to pharmacists. 

Merck Awards. Each year Merck & Co., Rahway, N. J., 
offers a set of valuable reference books to the senior student who 
attains the highest standing in pharmaceutical chemistry. A 
second set of books is given to the senior student who has the 
highest standing in dispensing pharmacy. 

Canter Prize. Each year Mr. A. R. Canter of the Canter 
Pharmacy, Pittsburgh, offers a prize of twenty-five dollars to the 
member of the graduating class who has achieved the highest 
standing in the department of pharmacy during the four-year 
course. 

Galen Society Prizes. The Galen Society of Pittsburgh offers 
annually two prizes of twenty-five dollars each to the members of 
the graduating class who have achieved the highest standings in 
the departments of chemistry and pharmacology-pharmocognosy 
during the four-year course. 

Rho Chi Prize. Alpha Beta Chapter of Rho Chi offers 
annually a prize often dollars to the freshman student earning the 
highest general average in all subjects of the freshman year. A full 



Eighteen 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



program must be carried. The recipient is chosen by the faculty, 
and the prize is awarded at the first Fall meeting of the Pharma- 
ceutical Association. 

Bristol Award. A copy of a standard reference book is 
awarded annually by the Bristol Laboratories, Inc., New York 
City, to the graduating senior who has in the opinion of the 
faculty attained unusual distinction in the work in pharma- 
ceutical administration. 



SCHOLARSHIPS 

The university offers a definite number of competitive exam- 
ination scholarships. Eligible for the examinations, which are 
held annually in April, are students who will be, according to 
certification by their principal, graduated in the upper third of 
their high school class. All scholarships are awarded for two 
years, but are potentially four-year awards, provided that the 
requirements for continuance of the award are fulfilled. Informa- 
tion concerning them may be had by addressing the Committee 
on Scholarships. 

The American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education 
has established a number of fellowships for well qualified students 
seeking graduate degrees. Each fellow receives a stipend to 
cover the year of his appointment, with an additional allowance 
for tuition and other expenses. At Duquesne work may be done 
leading to the Master of Science degree in the departments of 
pharmacy, pharmacognosy and pharmaceutical chemistry. The 
Dean will inform interested candidates of the procedure to be 
followed in applying for a fellowship. 

The University Alumni Association makes available annually 
a $100.00 scholarship to a competent and deserving student in 
the School of Pharmacy. The award, which is based upon 
student need and promise of success, is restricted to sophomores, 
juniors and seniors. Application for the scholarship must be 
made to the Dean of the School of Pharmacy. 

STUDENT EMPLOYMENT 

The University makes available limited student employment 
for students who are in need of financial assistance and who, at 
the same time, maintain a satisfactory scholastic average and 
give evidence of good character. Opportunities for employment 
exist on and about the campus. Information may be had by 
addressing the Committee on Student Welfare. 



Ninttttn 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



STUDENT LOAN 

The University has available a limited sum of money in 
various student loan funds, which each year is loaned to under- 
graduate students who have completed at least thirty semester 
hours credit at the University, and who meet the requirements 
of good scholarship, need of financial assistance and good char- 
acter. These loans are granted only for the purpose of the pay- 
ment of tuition. They are made available through the University 
Student Loan Fund. Information may be had by addressing the 
Committee on Student Welfare. 

The Fred Schiller Loan Fund was established in 1952 by 
Mr. Fred Schiller, Pittsburgh pharmacist, in memory of the late 
Emmanuel Spector. A revolving fund, it makes available to 
worthy junior and senior students, [in the School of Pharmacy 
only, tuition loans of varying amounts depending upon the appli- 
cant's need and general ability. Applications for loans are to be 
made to the Dean of the' School of Pharmacy. 

STUDENT PUBLICATION 

The Duquesne Pharmacist is a quarterly journal published 
by the students of the School of Pharmacy in the interests of the 
School and its Alumni. It is financed by the Student Branch 
of the American Pharmaceutical Association. Subscription, $1.00 
per year. 

SUMMER COURSES 

No pharmaceutical courses for which credit is given are 
offered normally during the summer or in the evening. Summer 
courses in the basic and cultural subjects are accepted for credit 
if the courses are approved by the College of Liberal Arts and 
Sciences. 

TUITION AND FEES 

The University reserves the right to change the fees herein stated at any 
time without notice. Whenever a change is made it will become effective at 
the beginning of the succeeding academic year. 

Matriculation Deposit $20.00 

The matriculation deposit of twenty dollars is pay- 
able by entering students within two weeks from 
the date of notification of acceptance to the Uni- 
versity. The purpose of this fee is to assure the 
student of a reservation of a place in class. This 
deposit will be credited against the student's tuition 



Twenty 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



and fees at the time of registration for the semester 
in which the student's application has been ap- 
proved. This deposit is not refundable. 

Tuition, per Semester Hour Credit $12.00 

The total tuition for the semester is payable at 
the time of registration, unless other arrangements 
are made through the Deferred Tuition Office. 

Activities Fee per Semester $10.00 

This fee gives access to intercollegiate and intra- 
mural sports activities, concerts, drarnatic presen- 
tations and other events through the scholastic 
year. It entitles the student to copies of the weekly 
newspaper. This fee is payable by all students 
carrying twelve or more credits in the regular 
semesters. 

Library Fee per Semester $5.00 

This fee gives library privileges, and is payable 
each semester by all fulltime students of the 
university, and by those taking 12 or more credits 
in the summer sessions. 

Registration Fee $ 1.00 

A registration fee of ?1.00 is required of every 
student at each registration period. 

Student Health Fee, per Semester $ 1.00 

This fee includes physical examination at entrance, 
and advice and emergency treatment at the 
university dispensary. 

Late Registration Fee $ 5.00 

This fee is charged to all students registering later 
than the last day of the regular registration period. 

Condition Examination Fee $ 5.00 

This fee is charged for each condition and special 
examination for removal of E and X grades. It is 
payable in advance. 

Change of Course Fee $ 1.00 

Graduation Fees — Bachelor's Degree $15.00 

Laboratory Fees: Students enrolled in the following courses 
will pay laboratory fees, not subject to refund, as indicated: 



Tu>tnty-ont 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



Laboratory Fees $ 7.50 

Physics 201, 202. 

Laboratory Fees $12.50 

Biology 101, 102, 304, 311. 

Pharmacy 201, 202, 305, 322, 427, 428. 

Pharmacology-Pharmacognosy 302, 405. 

Laboratory Fees $17.50 

Chemistry 101, 102, 104, 201, 202, 
305,306,431,432. 

All Graduate Laboratory Courses. 

Key Deposit $ .50 

This fee is collected for each locker key furnished to 
the student. The deposit is refunded when the key 
is returned at the end of the course. 

Pharmaceutical Association Membership Fee $ 3.00 

This annual fee is required of all students in the 
School of Pharmacy. It includes one year's student 
membership in the American Pharmaceutical As- 
sociation and one year's subscription to the Journal 
of the American Pharmaceutical Association* Prac- 
tical Edition. This fee is not subject to refund. It 
is paid to the Association at registration time. 

REFUNDS FOR WITHDRAWALS 

Students who withdraw from the University for a satisfactory 
reason within eight weeks after the opening of the semester are 
entitled to a proportionate refund provided that they notify 
their dean at the time of the withdrawal. 

Refunds are made in accordance with the following schedule: 

Withdrawal Refund 

1st Week 90% 

2ndWeek 70% 

3rd Week 60% 

4th Week 50% 

5th Week 30% 

6th Week 20% 

7th Week 10% 

8th Week 5% 

No refund will be made in the case of students who are 
registered on probation or who are requested to withdraw as a 
result of faculty action. 



Ttoenty-two 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



AVERAGE ANNUAL COST 

The total annual cost to the students in the School of 
Pharmacy ranges between $495 and $520. This includes tuition 
and all laboratory and other fees and deposits, but not books or 
living expenses. 



HOW EXPENSES MAY BE PAID 

All expenses are due and payable on the day of registration. 
Upon application, however, at the Office of Deferred Tuition, 
a student may arrange to pay part of his expenses down and the 
remainder, which is subject to a service charge, in regular 
monthly instalments during the semester. 



Twenly-lhret 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



Ch. 


101 


Math. 


101 


Eng. 


101 


Pha. 


115 


Bio. 


101 



B.S. (Phar.) CURRICULUM 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

First Semester 

Hours per Week Sem. 

Courses Class Lab. Hours 

Inorganic Chemistry. 4 3 5 

Advanced Algebra 3 .. 3 

English Composition 3 . . 3 

Pharmaceutical Latin 2 .. 2 

Botany 3 3 4 



Ch. 


102 


Math. 


102 


Eng. 


102 


Phil. 


101 


Bio. 


102 



Second Semester 

Inorganic Chemistry 4-6 

Trigonometry 3 

English Composition 3 

Logic 3 

General Zoology 3 

31-33 



3-6 



12-15 



5 
3 
3 
3 
4 

35 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 

First Semester 

Hours per Week Sem. 

Courses Class Lab. Hours 

Phy. 201 Physics 4 3 4 

Ch. 201 Organic Chemistry 4 3 4 

Pha. 201 Theory of Pharmacy 13 2 

Eng. 201 English Literature 3 . . 3 

Pha. 203 Pharmaceutical Mathematics. .. . 2 .. 2 



Phy. 


202 


Ch. 


202 


Pha. 


202 


Eng. 


202 


Phil. 


202 



Second Semester 

Physics 4 

Organic Chemistry 4 

Galenical Pharmacy 2 

English Literature 3 

Ethics 3 

~30~ 



3 
3 
6 



21 



4 

4 
3 
3 
3 

17 



Twenty-four 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



Ch 


305 


Bio. 


311 


Ph. Ad. 


301 


Pha. 


305 


Pha. 


321 


Bio. 


325 



JUNIOR YEAR 

First Semester 

Hours per Week Sent. 

Courses Class Lab. Hours 

Quantitative Analysis 2 8 4 

Physiology 3 3 4 

Law 3 .. 3 

Operative Pharmacy 2 4 3 

Pharmaceutical Ethics and History 1 . . 1 

First Aid 1 .. 1 



Ch. 


306 


Pgy. 


302 


Ph. Ad. 


304 


Bio. 


304 


Pha. 


322 



Second Semester 

Drug Assay 2 

Pharmacology 3 

Business Practice 3 

Bacteriology 2 

Prescription Practice 2 



24 



4 

3 

4 
4 



30 



3 
4 

3 
4 
3 



33 



Ch. 


431 


Pgy. 


405 


Ph. Ad. 


407 


Pha. 


427 


Pha. 


431 



SENIOR YEAR 

First Semester 

Hours per Week Sent. 

Courses Class Lab. Hours 

Biochemistry 3 3 3 

Pharmacognosy 3 2 4 

Pharmaceutical Administration . . 3 . . 3 

Dispensing 3 6 4 

Inorganic Pharmacy 3 .. 3 



Second Semester 

Ch. 432 Pharmaceutical Chemistry 3 

Pgy. 406 Pharmacognosy 4 

Ph. Ad. 408 Pharmaceutical Administration . . 3 

Pha. 428 Dispensing 3 

Pha. 432 Organic Pharmacy 3 



31 



3 

i • 

6 



20 



3 
4 

3 
4 
3 



34 



(Students who are not preparing for retail pharmacy may, with the 
permission of the Dean, substitute approved elective subjects for the following 
courses of the Senior year: Ph. Ad. 407, 408.) 



Twenty-five 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

The courses of instruction are numbered in accordance with 
a plan uniform throughout the university. Odd numbers indicate 
courses given in the first semester, from September to February; 
even numbers indicate those given in the second semester from 
February to June. Courses designated in pairs, viz. "101, 102," 
"307, 308," run through the school year. 



Courses numbered 100 are Freshman courses; 200, Sopho- 
more courses; 300, Junior courses; 400, Senior courses. Courses 
numbered 500 are primarily graduate courses, but Seniors may, 
with permission of the Dean, be admitted. Courses numbered 
600 and above are strictly graduate courses and only qualified 
students may take them for credit. 



CHEMISTRY 

101, 102. Inorganic Chemistry. A general college course dealing with 
the fundamental laws and theories of inorganic chemistry. Non- 
metallic elements and their compounds; metals and their com- 
pounds; industrial processes; modern chemical theories. The 
laboratory work of the second semester is concerned with the 
reactions of the common anions and cations. Additional lectures 
are given on the theory of qualitative analysis. Class, 4 hours; 
Laboratory, 3-6 hours. Credit, Five hours each semester. Muldoon, 
Staff. 

104. Qualitative Analysis. An introductory course dealing with the 
properties and reactions of the common elements and the common 
organic and inorganic acids. For pharmacy students who have 
completed courses in inorganic chemistry in which qualitative 
analysis was not included. Class, 2 hours; Laboratory, 6 hours. 
Credit, Two hours. Moroney. 

201, 202. Organic Chemistry. A course in general organic chemis- 
try dealing with fundamental theories and with the aliphatic 
hydrocarbons and their derivatives. Compounds representing the 
important types are prepared in the laboratory. The aromatic 
hydrocarbons and their derivatives, terpenes, alkaloids, proteins, 
and many compounds of medical importance are studied. Pre- 
requisite: Ch. 102. Class, 4 hours; Laboratory, 3 hours. Credit, 
Four hours each semester. Blake, Staff. 



Twenty-six 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



305. Quantitative Analysis. A course in gravimetric and volu- 
metric processes. The use of the analytic balance; stoichiometry; 
common gravimetric determinations; the preparation and stand- 
ardization of volumetric solutions; assays involving neutraliza- 
tion, precipitation, oxidation and reduction. Prerequisite: 
Chemistry 102. Class, 2 hours; Laboratory, 8 hours. Credit, Four 
hours, Zapotocky, Staff. 

306. Drug Assay. A course devoted to the determination of the 
relative amounts in which the active or valuable constituents of 
medicinal substances are present. Volumetric, gravimetric, and 
gasometric assays of official substances are made. Work is done 
in the detection, identification, and determination of alkaloids. 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 301. Class, 2 hours; Laboratory, 4 hours. 
Credit, Three hours. Zapotocky, Staff. 

431. Biochemistry. The chemistry of digestion, metabolism, and 
excretion. Theory and practice in those studies which aid the 
physician in making a correct diagnosis. Urine analysis, blood 
counts, gastric analysis, etc. This course is designed to meet the 
needs of pharmacists. Prerequisite: Chemistry 202, 306. Class, 
3 hours; Laboratory, 3 hours. Credit, Three hours. Tsuji, Staff. 

432. Pharmaceutical Chemistry. A course devoted to the occur- 
rence, preparation, purification, properties, and identification of 
official inorganic and organic chemicals. Practice is given in the 
use of the polarimeter and refractometer. Prerequisite: Chemistry 
104, 202, 306. Class, 3 hours; Laboratory, 3 hours. Credit, Three 
hours. Tsuji, Staff. 

605-606. Special Projects. Open to graduate students majoring in 
pharmaceutical chemistry or pharmacy, on consultation. Credit, 
To be arranged. Blake, Staff. 

609-610. Methods of Pharmaceutical Control. Techniques involved 
in the analysis of pharmaceuticals. An extension of undergradu- 
ate course Ch. 306. Credit, To be arranged. Zapotocky. 

615. Advanced Biochemistry. A consideration of vitamins, hor- 
mones and enzymes; digestion and absorption; metabolism of 
proteins, purine derivatives, carbohydrates and lipids; biological 
oxidations. Credit, Three hours. Tsuji. 

616. Chemistry of Galenical Preparations. A consideration of the 
chemistry of galenicals with emphasis on formulation and sta- 
bility. Class, Three hours. Credit, Three hours. Zapotocky. 



Twenty-seven 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



633-634. Advanced Pharmaceutical Chemistry. Synthesis and thera- 
peutic uses of the newer pharmaceuticals. The relationship of 
chemical structure to biological activity is studied. Class, Two 
hours; Laboratory, Six hours. Credit, Four hours each semester. 
Zapotocky, Blake. 

651-652. Seminar. Required of graduate students in pharmaceu- 
tical chemistry, pharmacy and pharmacognosy. Credit, One hour 
each semester. Staff. 



700. Thesis. Credit, Six hours. 



PHARMACY 

115. Pharmaceutical Latin. An elementary course dealing with the 
morphology and syntax of the Latin used in prescriptions and 
in chemical, botanical, and pharmaceutical nomenclature. No 
previous knowledge of Latin is assumed. Class, 2 hours. Credit, 
Two hours. Muldoon. 

201. Theory of Pharmacy. An introduction to the study of phar- 
macy. Legal standards, metrology, specific gravity, heat and its 
applications, pharmaceutical apparatus and general processes, 
such as comminution, solution, extraction, and distillation, are 
studied. Class, One hour. Laboratory, Three hours, Credit, Two 
hours. Manasterski, Atkinson. 

202. Galenical Pharmacy. A course dealing with the galenical 
preparations of the United States Pharmacopoeia and the 
National Formulary. Representative examples of medicated 
waters, spirits, solutions, syrups, elixirs, tinctures and fluid- 
extracts are prepared in the laboratory. Prerequisite: Pha. 201. 
Class, Two hours; Laboratory, Six hours. Credit, Three hours. 
Manasterski, Atkinson. 

203. Pharmaceutical Mathematics. The mathematical problems 
and calculations encountered in pharmaceutical practice are 
considered. Class, Two hours. Credit, Two hours. Manasterski. 

305. Operative Pharmacy. The study and manufacture of certain 
classes of official preparations. Representative examples of 
extracts, lotions, liniments, magmas, ointments, pastes, emul- 
sions, isotonic solutions and related types of preparations are 
prepared. Prerequisite: Pha. 202. Class, Two hours; Laboratory, 
Four hours. Credit, Three hours. Simonian, Atkinson. 



Twenty-eight 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



321. Pharmaceutical Ethics and History. A lecture course devoted 
to the study of general moral principles as they affect pharma- 
ceutical and medical practice. The course emphasizes the special 
responsibilities of the pharmacist. A brief survey of the history 
of pharmacy is included. Class, One hour. Credit, One hour, 
Muldoon. 

322. Prescription Practice. A course devoted to the methods of 
compounding powders, capsules, pills, tablets, suppositories, 
effervescent salts and buffered solutions. Representative pre- 
scriptions for these are filled in the laboratory. Prerequisite: 
Pha. 305. Class, Two hours; Laboratory, Four hours. Credit, 
Three hours. Simonian, Atkinson. 

427-428. Dispensing. Practical work in compounding prescrip- 
tions, including unusual and difficult ones selected from actual 
medical practice. Methods of overcoming incompatabilities and 
dispensing difficulties are studied. Homeopathic pharmacy is 
considered. Dispensing practice is given in the pharmacy and 
dispensary of a hospital which treats 30,000 patients a year. 
Prerequisite: Pha. 322. Class, Two hours; Laboratory, Six hours. 
Credit, Four hours each semester. Zapotocky, Atkinson, Sister 
Gonzales. 

431. Inorganic Pharmacy. A systematic study of the inorganic 
substances of the United States Pharmacopoeia, National Form- 
ulary, and New and Non-Official Remedies, together with 
a discussion of the official pharmaceutical preparations into 
which they enter. Class, Three hours. Credit, Three hours. 
Blake. 

432. Organic Pharmacy. A systematic study of the organic chemi- 
cals of the United States Pharmacopoeia, National Formulary, 
and New and Non-Official Remedies, together with a discussion 
of the official pharmaceutical preparations into which they enter. 
Class, Three hours. Credit, Three hours. Blake. 

605-606. Special Projects. Open to graduate students in pharmacy, 
and to majors in pharmaceutical chemistry and pharmacognosy, 
on consultation. Credit, To be arranged. Blake, Staff. 

609-610. Methods of Pharmaceutical Control. Techniques involved 
in the analysis of pharmaceuticals. An extension of under- 
graduate course Ch. 306. Credit, To he arranged. Zapotocky. 

615. Advanced Theoretical Pharmacy. A consideration of theoreti- 
cal principles involved in pharmacy. Class, Two hours; Labora- 
tory, Three hours. Credit, Three hours. Zapotocky. 



Twtnty-niiu 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



616. Chemistry of Galenical Preparations. A consideration of the 
chemistry of galenicals with emphasis on formulation and 
stability. Class; Three hours. Credit, Three hours. Zapotocky. 

633-634. Advanced Pharmaceutical Chemistry. Synthesis and thera- 
peutic uses of the newer pharmaceuticals. The relationship of 
chemical structures to biological activity is studied. Class, Two 
hours; Laboratory, Six hours. Credit, Four hours each semester. 
Zapotocky, Blake. 

651-652. Seminar. Required of graduate students in pharmacy, 
pharmacognosy and pharmaceutical chemistry. Credit, One hour 
each semester. Staff. 

700. Thesis. Credit, Six hours. 

PHARMACEUTICAL ADMINISTRATION 

301. Law. A study of the fundamental principles of the law 
governing business transactions. Attention is given to sales of 
personal property, negotiable instruments, partnerships, cor- 
porations, real property, insurance, banking and bankruptcy. 
Consideration is given to the laws directly affecting the phar- 
macist in the conduct of his business. Class, Three hours. Credit, 
Three hours. O'Toole. 

304. Business Practice. An elementary course in the fundamentals 
of accounting, especially adapted to the needs of the pharmacist. 
The student is taught to open a set of books, to journalize and 
post business transactions, to close the ledger, to keep a cash 
book, to draw a trial balance, and to prepare an income tax 
report. Class, Three hours. Credit, Three hours. Cadugan. 

407. Pharmaceutical Administration. A practical course giving con- 
sideration to the business side of drug-store operation. Lectures 
and discussions on the subjects of establishing and financing a 
business; buying, selling, and advertising methods; store man- 
agement. A study is made of the manufacture, uses and sale of 
important drug-store merchandise. Laboratory work in the 
fundamentals of window decoration and merchandise display. 
Class, Three hours. Credit, Three hours. DePhilip, Schmitzer. 

408. Pharmaceutical Administration. A continuation of Pharma- 
ceutical Administration 407. Class, Three hours. Credit, Three 
hours. Muldoon, DePhilip. 

BIOLOGY 

101. Botany. A general survey of the plant kingdom. The general 
morphology and physiology of the higher plants are taken up, 



Thirty 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



followed by a study of the life cycles and evolution of represen- 
tative plants from the various groups. Class, Three hours; 
Laboratory, Three hours. Credit, Four hours. Miller. 

102. General Zoology. The characteristics common to animals with 
respect to morphology, physiology, reproduction, development, 
and biology. Laboratory study of a series of representative 
animals. Class, Three hours; Laboratory, Three hours. Credit, 
Four hours. Raskauskas. 

304. Bacteriology. This course presents the fundamentals of 
general bacteriology. Training is given in the preparation of 
culture media, and in the isolation, staining and characteristics 
of representative pathogenic and non-pathogenic micro-organ- 
isms. Principles of sterilization, disinfection and aseptic technique 
are emphasized. Immunology and the elementary principles of 
serology receive attention. Prerequisite: Chemistry 102; Biology 
101. Class, Two hours; Laboratory, Four hours. Credit, Four 
hours. Jones. 

311. Physiology. An elementary course in physiology. Prerequisite: 
Chemistry 102 and 202. Class, Three hours; Laboratory, Three 
hours. Credit, Four hours. Tsuji, Farbarik. 

325. First Aid. A series of lectures and demonstrations teaching 
methods of bandaging; treatment of hemorrhage, collapse, and 
fractures; and the general care of wounds. This course teaches 
how to render intelligent aid in cases of accident, while awaiting 
the arrival of a physician. Class, One hour. Credit, One hour. 
Green. 

PHARMACOLOGY— PHARMACOGNOSY 

302. Pharmacology. The pharmacology, use, posology, and tox- 
icology of medicinal substances. Emphasis is placed on inorganic 
and synthetic drugs. The action of drugs on animal tissues. Pre- 
requisite: Chemistry 102 and 202, Bio. 311. Class, Three hours; 
Laboratory, Three hours. Credit, Four hours. Tsuji, Farbarik. 

405. Pharmacognosy. The following factors are considered for 
important drugs of vegetable and animal origin: official titles, 
synonyms, sources, habitat, part or product used, assay, con- 
stituents, action, dose and identification. Class, Three hours; 
Laboratory, Two hours. Credit, Four hours. Simonian. 

406. Pharmacognosy. A continuation of Pharmacognosy 405. 
Class, Four hours. Credit, Four hours. Simonian. 

603-604. Microscopic Pharmacognosy. The structure and micro- 
chemical reactions of plant drugs and certain foods. Class, One 
hour; Laboratory, Six hours. Credit, Three hours each semester. 
Simonian. 



Thirly-otu 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



605-606. Special Projects. Open to graduate students in pharma- 
cognosy, and to majors in related fields, on consultation. Credit, 
To be arranged. Staff. 

609. Immunology. A study of antigen body reactions. Vaccines 
and serums are studied in connection with diagnosis and im- 
munity. Credit, Three hours. Staff. 

610. Endocrinology and Metabolism. A study of digestion, excre- 
tion, metabolism, endocrinology, and reproduction. Credit, 
Three hours. Tsuji. 

611-612. Technical Microscopy. The microscopy of foods, com- 
mercial starches, and animal, plant and mineral fibers. Micro- 
metry. Class, Two hours; Laboratory, Four hours. Credit, 

Four hours each semester. Simonian. 

613-614. Advanced Pharmacognosy. The examination of a variety 
of plant and animal drugs, and methods of determining their 
identity, purity, and quality. The detection of adulterants and 
substitutes. Class, Two hours; Laboratory, Three hours. Credit, 
Three hours each semester. Simonian. 

651-652. Seminar. Required of graduate students in pharmacog- 
nosy, pharmacy and pharmaceutical chemistry. Credit, One hour 
each semester. Staff. 

700. Thesis. Credit, Six hours. 

MATHEMATICS 

101. Advanced Algebra. Quadratics, progressions, inequalities, log- 
arithms, binomial theorem, ratio, proportion, variation, con- 
vergence of series. Partial fractions, determinants. Permutations 
and combinations. Theory of equations. Credit, Three hours. 
The Department. 

102. Trigonometry. Definitions of trigonometric functions; their 
geometric basis; their relations. Solution of right triangles. 
Fundamental identities. Radian measure; inverse functions; 
trigonometric equations. Solution of oblique triangles. Credit, 
Three hours. The Department. 

PHYSICS 

201-202. General Physics. A general course designed to give the 
student a basic knowledge of the mechanics and properties of 
matter, heat, wave motion, sound, magnetism, electricity and 
light. Class* Four hours; Laboratory, Three hours. Credit, Four 

hours each semester. Kozora. 



Thirty-tu/o 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



ENGLISH 

101, 102. English Composition. Major emphasis is placed on actual 
practice in writing. A rapid review of English grammar and 
rhetoric will be provided. Credit, Three hours each semester. The 
Department. 

201-202. English Literature. A course designed to provide the 
student with a general knowledge of English literature, to 
familiarize him with the writers of prose and poetry, and to place 
their works against the historical, social, and philosophical back- 
ground of their times. The continuity of the periods is established 
by a study of Romanticism and Classicism, and of Christian and 
non-Christian modes of thought. Credit, Three hours each semester. 
The Department. 

PHILOSOPHY 

101. Logic. This course is required of all students throughout the 
University. It offers fundamental training in dialectics, exclud- 
ing epistemology. Credit, Three hours. The Department. 

202. Ethics. This course is required of all students throughout the 
University. It proposes a consideration of the nature and 
principles of morality as determined by the norm of right reason. 
Credit, Three hours. The Department. 

RELIGION 

In the first and second years, courses in Religion must be 
taken by all Catholic students. Non-Catholic students may, but 
are not obliged, to attend. 

101-102. Fundamental Theology. This course prepares the students 
for the study of Theology. It includes an investigation of the 
nature of Religion and the demonstration of the objective 
existence of such a branch of knowledge. It further includes a 
demonstration of the fact that Christ is God and that the true 
version of religion is still being unanimously taught by His 
Church exactly as Christ Himself taught it. Credit, One hour 
each semester. The Department. 

201-202. Nature of God. This is a course in Rational Theology 
designed especially to arm the layman against the atheism and 
agnosticism of our times. Emphasis is placed on the student's 
coming to see for himself that what the Church teaches about 
the nature of God is not merely a matter of belief but sheerly a 
matter of fact. Credit, One hour each semester. The Department. 



Thirty-three 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



LIST OF STUDENTS, 1951-52 

FOURTH YEAR STUDENTS 

Ball, Wilma J Canton, Ohio 

Becsi, John Leechburg 

Bendzsuk, Cecilia Pittsburgh 

Blaha, Leo Pittsburgh 

Blettner, Janet Hanover 

Boniface, Dolores J Pittsburgh 

Calligan, Richard Natrona 

Cappelli, Michael Bridgeville 

Checcone, Gene Midland 

Connor, Donald Library 

Cozza, Albert New Castle 

Davis, Herbert Clairton 

DeEulio, Henry New Castle 

Delp, Malene Pittsburgh 

Ebig, Earl Sarver 

Evanovich, Victor Clairton 

Evans, Robert Pittsburgh 

Fife, Sr. M. Anthanasia, B.S. in Nurs Mishawaka, Ind. 

Frankman, Marie A Fairmont, W. Va. 

Gallagher, William D Duquesne 

Gerazounis, James Ambridge 

Groner, Thomas Oil City 

Grove, James Pittsburgh 

Hvozdovich, Kathleen Homestead 

Indovina, Thomas A Steubenville, Ohio 

Kilkeary, Edward M Pittsburgh 

McGonigle, Charles T Tarentum 

Myers, James Washington 

Nickel, Robert Pittsburgh 

Novak, Evelyn Fairbank 

Nutz, Michael Midland 

O'Malley, William E McKeesport 

Pollice, Philip Coraopolis 

Regney, John '. Monaca 

Riley, G. Alden Washington 

Santilli, Anthony J Ambridge 

Serpento, Joseph Fairchance 

Sevy, Keith Pittsburgh 

Skibicki, Richard J Pittsburgh 

Smerigan, Dolores South Heights * 

Smith, Charles Pittsburgh 

Stablow, Francis Rochester 

Steighner, John Butler 

Sweet, Walter Abington, Mass. 

Swigart, Herman Butler 

Walker, Hugh J., B.S Williamsport 

Werner, Bernard Pittsburgh 

Wherry, Paul A Vandergrift 

Winters, Louis Pittsburgh 

THIRD YEAR STUDENTS 

Abood, Abdou Scranton 

Amadio, Anthony J., M.Litt McKees Rocks 



Thirty-four 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



Anderson, Jean Pittsburgh 

Ashton, William P Oakdale 

Barr, Frank A McKees Rocks 

Barr, James L McKees Rocks 

Baughman, Arthur J Scottdale 

Bedas, John J Dickson 

Cashell, Joseph W New Kensington 

Catney, Sr. M. Constantia Pittsburgh 

Cucchiara, Michael Swissvale 

DeLeon, Clara Mary Pittsburgh 

Delli-Gatti, Robert E Fairmont, W. Va. 

DeMaria, Florine Beaver Falls 

Deutsch, Rudolph Allentown 

Douglas, Hildah V Turtle Creek 

Drolet, Mary W Niles, Michigan 

Eno, Denise Mary Corinth, New York 

Evanick, Irene Clairton 

Fogal, Benedict J Chambersburg 

Geisler, Thomas Pittsburgh 

Gerlach, Albert J Etna 

Ingram, James A Conway 

Knapic, William S , Twin Rocks 

Kukura, Raymond J Campbell, Ohio 

Loughran, Edward Greensburg 

Maietta, Michael F Vandergrift 

McCann, Agnes Pittsburgh 

McCormick, John P Youngstown, Ohio 

McKee, Gary Vernon Pittsburgh 

Meier, Norman R Etna 

Meyer, William A Pittsburgh 

Nardone, Joseph C, B.S Koppel 

Nobers, John R Midland 

Pandrok, Michael T Donora 

Pruszko, Stanley J Glassport 

Ranalli, Dominic Rochester, N. Y. 

Saltsburg, Louis P Pittsburgh 

Sance, Melina D Charleroi 

Schneier, Edward L Pittsburgh 

Schuler, Edward J Cleveland, Ohio 

Sheer, Robert J., B.S Pittsburgh 

Siegal, Sanford S., B.S Pittsburgh 

Sinclair, William R Pittsburgh 

Slavoski, John J Sugar Notch 

Stablow, John G Rochester 

Sullivan, William J Indiana 

Terek, Francis W McKeesport 

Thomas, Donald Knott Youngstown, Ohio 

Wardrop, Terrance E. McKeesport 

Wargo, Alexander Glassport 

Whalen, Paul Anthony Pittsburgh 

Wisniewski, Leo Z Nanticoke 

Yanniello, John P Ellwood City 

Zidanavich, Sr. M. Aquina Pittsburgh 

Zucker, Edward L., B.S Cleveland, Ohio 

SECOND YEAR STUDENTS 

Albrecht, Lois M Cleveland, Ohio 

Alexander, Victoria M Reading 



Thirty-five 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



Antonelli, Rita Steubenville, Ohio 

Bartolich, Rudolph J Pittsburgh 

Basti, Edmund R Pittsburgh 

Bernas, Albert E Latrobe 

Biskup, Michael G Wyoming 

Byers, William, B.S Pittsburgh 

Calla, Vincenzo Pittsburgh 

Checcone, Albert G Midland 

Chiodo, Frank R Warren 

Combs, Robert M Pittsburgh 

Cronin, Norbert S Monaca 

David, Thomas, B.S Pittsburgh 

Deli, Frank J '. Pittsburgh 

Delich, Michael Harmarville 

Diggs, John P Pittsburgh 

Duncan, Edgar N Monessen 

Dwyer, Edward J Rahway, N. J. 

Farber, Stanton Monessen 

Friedlander, Murray I Donora 

Gibbon, Joel, B.S Pittsburgh 

Haller, John J Erie 

Heidenreich, Raymond B Pittsburgh 

Hepps, Richard N Pittsburgh 

Holleran, James G Pittsburgh 

Hudock, Richard E Hazleton 

Jenkins, Robert Suitland, Md. 

Jurick, Andrew J Clarksburg, W. Va. 

Kealy, Jefferson Jeannette 

Keane, Anne K Pittsburgh 

Keiser, George F Pittsburgh 

Kenna, Francis R Pittsburgh 

Klisavage, Bernard A Pittsburgh 

Kowalski, Robert G Haddonfield, N. J. 

Lance, James J Bradford 

Lanza, Russel Pittsburgh 

Laux, William R Pittsburgh 

Manf resca, Charles Steubenville, Ohio 

McClain, Mary C Duncansville 

McCoy, Ellsworth C Oakdale 

McHugh, Rosemary Larimer 

Migliore, John J Midland 

Mintz, Gerald H Butler 

Mitchell, James Braddock 

Mosso, Joseph Latrobe 

Nierman, Robert F Cincinnati, Ohio 

Papincak, John J Duquesne 

Passeri, Anthony R W. Aliquippa 

Perrone, Anne J Swissvale 

Rose, David T Pittsburgh 

Rowand, Edwin R Bradford 

Roward, Thomas F Erie 

Sbrocco, Jane Campbell, Ohio 

Scarinzi, Hugo Lenox, Mass. 

Shivell, John P Hudson 

Shorr, David Pittsburgh 

Skacan, William New Brighton 

Smerkanich, Paul Kelayres 



Thirty~six 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



Smith, Kathleen A Decatur, Ind. 

Smith, Stewart E Turtle Creek 

Starinieri, Anthony. . . . t Steubenville, Ohio 

Tarloski, Rose Mary Perth Amboy, N. J. 

Vottero, Louis D Trevorton 

Weiss, Charles R Pittsburgh 

Woodward, Dorsey Columbus, Ohio 

Worhatch, Maximilian Gibsonia 

FIRST YEAR STUDENTS 

Banchieri, Cesare Pittsburgh 

Borrelli, Eugene Pittsburgh 

Butler, Lou Cinda Carmichaels 

Chambers, John Pittsburgh 

Colabrese, Ann P Pittsburgh 

Fitzgerald, Helen Pittsburgh 

Fordenbacher, Raymond Pittsburgh 

Foster, Irwin Pittsburgh 

Fowler, Thomas Pittsburgh 

Freifeld, Jerrold New York, N. Y. 

Garczewski, Joseph New Castle 

Hall, Roy Pittsburgh 

Halle, Ernest Pittsburgh 

Haver, Joseph Fredericktown 

Hirsh, Howard Pittsburgh 

Kalyn, Walter McKees Rocks 

Kellehar, Richard Rankin 

Kendall, Mervin Pittsburgh 

Kisla, Bernadette Argo, Illinois 

Kotheimer, John Youngstown, Ohio 

Krupp, Ralph Lorain, Ohio 

Laman, Clyde Aliquippa 

Maier, Ann Marie Canton, Ohio 

Manzione, Geraldine Pittsburgh 

Margerum, David Pittsburgh 

McCaslin, Charles McKeesport 

McMurray, John T Mannington, W. Va. 

Melotti, Dominic Portage 

Morozowich, Walter Irwin 

Mullen, Joseph Meadville 

Munns, Thomas Pittsburgh 

Muscante, Elayne McKeesport 

Myers, Charles Pittsburgh 

Myers, Richard Washington 

Pallone, Leslie Sewickley 

Pappada, Nicholas Pittsburgh 

Partridge, Ronald Pittsburgh 

Petraglia, Francis Pittsburgh 

Pupi, Louis J Monaca 

Pusateri, Frances Pittsburgh 

Salonus, Edward Aliquippa 

Schiavoni, James Connellsville 

Slavonic, Rose Marie Pittsburgh 

Stonis, Ronald New Kensington 

Strawberry, Pearl Uniontown 

Traeger, Charles McKeesport 

White, Ruth M., B.S. in Ed Pittsburgh 



Thirty-seven 



FORM OF BEQUEST 

Because of my interest in the educational work being 
done by Duquesne University, and in consideration 
of others subscribing, I hereby subscribe and promise 
to pay to Duquesne University, a corporation existing 
under the laws of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, 

the sum of dollars. 



Date 



Signed, 



Witness 



Duouesne University 



College of Liberal Arts and Sciences 

School of Law 

School of Business Administration 

School of Pharmacy 

School of Music 

School of Education 

School of Nursing 

Graduate School 



Bulletins of the above schools are published separately 
and may be obtained on request from the 

DIRECTOR OF ADMISSIONS 

Duouesne University 

PITTSBURGH 19, PA. GRant 1-4635 




am 



The 
DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 

BULLETIN 



(5> 



Announcement of the 

SCHOOL OF 
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

1952-1953 




DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 
PITTSBURGH 19, PENNA. 



The 

DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 

BULLETIN 

VOLUME XL MARCH 1952 NUMBER 3 

Announcement of the 

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

For the Session 

1952-1953 




SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 
DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 
PITTSBURGH 19, PENNSYLVANIA 

VOLUME XL MARCH 1952 NUMBER 3 



CALENDAR 

1952-1953 

SUMMER SESSION 

June 12, 13, 14, Thursday, Friday from 9:00-4:00; Saturday untilNoon 

Registration, Eight Weeks Session, Day and Evening 

Jung 16, Monday Eight Weeks Session begins 

June 26, 27, 28, Thursday, Friday from 9:00-4:00; Saturday untilNoon 

Registration, Six Weeks Day Session 

June 30, Monday Six Weeks Session begins 

July 3, Thursday Latest date to apply for degrees: August Candidates 

July 4, Friday Holiday 

July 12, Saturday Class Day 

August 8, Friday Summer Sessions end: Commencement 

1952-1953 

FIRST SEMESTER 

September 8, 9, Monday, Tuesday from 1:00-4:00 Registration 

September 8, 9, Monday, Tuesday from 4:30-7:30 Registration: Evening School 
September 10, 11, 12, 13, Wednesday to Friday from 9:00-4:00; 

Saturday until Noon Registration 

September 15, Monday First Semester begins 

September 27, Saturday Latest date for change of schedule, etc. 

October 25, Saturday Latest date for removal of E, I, X grades 

October 25, Saturday Latest date to apply for degrees: January Candidates 

November 1, Saturday .•••:• Holiday 

November 5, Wednesday Mid-Semester Examinations begin 

November 26, Wednesday {after last class) Thanksgiving Vacation begins 

December 1, Monday Classes resumed 

December 8, Monday Holiday 

December 20, Saturday (after last class) Christmas Vacation begins 

January 5, Monday Classes resumed 

January 15, Thursday Final Examinations begin 

January 24, Saturday Final Examinations: Saturday Classes 

1952-1953 

SECOND SEMESTER 

February 2, 3, Monday, Tuesday from 1:00-4:00 . ....... .^ Registration 

February 2, 3, Monday, Tuesday from 4:30-7:30 Registration : v .Evening School 
February 4, 5, 6, 7, Wednesday to Friday from 9:00-4:00; 

Saturday until Noon Registration 

February 9, Monday Second Semester begins 

February 21, Saturday Latest date for change of schedule, etc. 

February 21, Saturday Latest date to apply for degrees: June Candidates 

March 21, Saturday Latest date for removal of E, 1,^ X grades 

April 1, Wednesday (after last class) Easter Vacation begins 

April 7, Tuesday Classes resumed 

April 8, Wednesday Mid-Semester Examinations begin 

May 14, Thursday Holiday 

May 30, Saturday ^ Holiday 

June 1, Monday % .Final Examinations begin 

June 6, Saturday Final Examinations: Saturday Classes 

June 7, Sunday Baccalaureate Services and Commencement Exercises 

Registration is conducted during the days listed in the above calendar. 
Only by rare exception, by consent ofthe Dean, and on payment of a penalty, 
will late registration be permitted. 



CONTENTS 

Page 

Calendar rear of title page 

The University Personnel 4 

Faculty ' 6 

General Statement 10 

History and Purpose of School 14 

Location and Equipment 16 

Degree Granted 16 

Comprehensive Examinations 16 

Information on Admission 17 

Registration Information 20 

Academic Regulations 20 

Graduation 23 

The School Year 24 

Tuition and Fees 25 

Information on Total Expense 28 

Scholarships, Student Aid 29 

Curriculum 30 

Required Reading Program 36 

Courses of Instruction 37 

Departments of Military and Air Science and Tactics 

(R.O.T.C.) 49 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



THE UNIVERSITY PERSONNEL 
OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 



Most Reverend John Francis Dearden, D.D. 
Chancellor 

Very Reverend Vernon F. Gallagher, C.S.Sp., Ph.D. 

President 

Reverend J. Gerald Walsh, C.S.Sp., Ph.D. 
Vice-President 

Reverend Joseph R. Kletzel, C.S.Sp., M.A. 
Secretary 

Reverend Sebastian J. Schiffgens, C.S.Sp., B.A. 
Treasurer 

Maurice J. Murphy, D.Ed. 
Registrar 

Reverend William J. Holt, C.S.Sp., B.A. 
Director of Student Welfare 

Reverend James F. McNamara, C.S.Sp., B.A. 
Dean of Men 

Elizabeth K. Wingerter, M.A. 
Dean of Women 

Margaret Eleanor McCann, B.S. (Library Science) 

Librarian 

Reverend Salvator J. Federici, C.S.Sp., Ph.D. 
Director of Admissions 

Reverend Joseph F. Rengers, C.S.Sp., B.A. 
University Chaplain 

Colonel Russell W. Schmelz, U.S.A. 
Coordinator of Military and Air Science and Tactics 

Robert B. Challinor, M.D. 
Director of Student Health 



Four 



SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



COMMITTEES 

UNIVERSITY COUNCIL 

Rev. J. Gerald Walsh, C.S.Sp Chairman 

C. Gerald Bropht Rev. George A. Harcar, CS.Sp. 

Albert B. Wright Ruth D. Johnson 

Rev. Joseph R. Kletzel, C.S.Sp. Colonel Russell W. Schmelz 

Hugh C. Muldoon Maurice J. Murphy 

Rev. William R. Hurney, C.S.Sp. Margaret Eleanor McCann 



COMMITTEE ON ADMISSIONS AND STUDENT STANDING 

Maurice J. Murphy Chairman 

Rev. Salvator J. Federici, C.S.Sp. Gerald L. Zimmerman 
Rev. James A. Phalen, C.S.Sp. Rev. William R. Hurney, C.S.Sp. 
Joseph A. Zapotocky Helen M. Kleylb 

Alice C. Feehan 



COMMITTEE ON SCHOLARSHIPS 

Rev. Salvator J. Federici, C.S.Sp Chairman 

Maurice J. Murphy Vincent P. Viscomi 

Rev. John P. Gallagher, C.S.Sp. Vito Grieco 
Vartkes H. Simonian Victor Plushkat 

Michael V. Ference Regina Fusan 



COMMITTEE ON EXAMINATIONS 

University 

College of Arts and Sciences Tobias D. Dunkelberger, Chairman 

School of Business Administration John T. Morris 

School of Pharmacy Joseph A. Zapotocky 

School of Music Brunhilde Dorsch 

School of Education Aaron M. Snyder 

School of Nursing Alice C. Feehan 



COMMITTEE ON STUDENT WELFARE 

Rev. William J. Holt, C.S.Sp Chairman 

Rev. Joseph F. Rengers, C.S.Sp. Elizabeth K. Wingerter 

Rev. James F. McNamara, C.S.Sp. Robert B. Challinor, M.D. 



Fiu 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



THE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

1952-1953 

FACULTY 

ADMINISTRATION 



Albert Bayard Wright, M.A., D.S.C Dean 

Rev. Joseph P. Lucey, C.S.Sp Assistant Dean 

B.S. in Ec. Duquesne University, 1934 
B.D. St. Mary's Seminary, 1937 
D.B.A. Xavier University, 1950 

Beatrice Haley Albaugh, B.Ed Executive Secretary 

TEACHING STAFF 

Beatrice Haley Albaugh Lecturer in Secretarial Studies 

B.Ed. Duquesne University 

John N. Albaugh, Jr Instructor in Management 

B.S. Business Administration 
Duquesne University, 1949 
M.B.A. Duquesne University, 1951 

John J. Burns Instructor in Accounting 

B.S. Business Administration 
Duquesne University, 1941 

William H. Cadugan Assistant Professor of Accounting 

B.S. Business Administration 
Duquesne University, 1938 
M.B.A. Duquesne University, 1949 

Arthur A. Clay Assistant Professor of Accounting 

B.C.S. New York University 
C.P.A. New York 
New Jersey 
Ohio 
M.B.A. Duquesne University, 1950 

W. John Davis Instructor in Business Law 

B.A. St. Francis College, 1927 
LL.B. Duquesne University, 1930 
M.Ed. Duquesne University, 1941 

John W. Devine Lecturer in Management 

B.S. Business Administration 
University of Pittsburgh, 1936 

R. Gordon Dippel Instructor in Finance 

B.S. Business Administration 
Duquesne University, 1942 
M.B.A. Duquesne University, 1950 
(On leave of absence) 



Page Six 



SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



Frank T. Ebberts Professor of Business Law 

B.S. in Ec. Duquesne University, 1925 
LL.B. Ibidem, 1927 

Percy O. Eitel Lecturer in Finance 

Howard Eulenstein Lecturer in Business Law 

LL.B. Duquesne University, 1933 

Harold Falkoff Assistant Professor of Commerce 

B.S. Temple University, 1948 
M.B.A. New York University, 1949 

Merle Gilliand Lecturer in Accounting 

B.S. Duquesne University, 1948 
C.P.A. Pennsylvania, 1951 

Vito Grieco Assistant Professor of Accounting 

Ed.B. University of Buffalo, 1939 
Ed.M. University of Buffalo, 1947 
M.B.A. Duquesne University, 1950 

Francis Haas Lecturer in Traffic Management 

C. E. Hilborn Assistant Professor of Business Administration 

A.B. Allegheny College, 1914 

M.A. University of West Virginia, 1917 

Thomas Hogan Instructor in Business Statistics 

B.A. Duquesne University, 1930 

Robert C. Jones Lecturer in Commerce 

B.S. in Econ. Duquesne University, 1933 
M.Ed. University of Pittsburgh, 1947 

A. A. Logan Assistant Professor of Accounting 

B.S. in Econ. Duquesne University, 1935 
LL.B. Ibidem, 1939 
C.P.A. Pennsylvania, 1934 

Joseph F. Lucas Instructor in Accounting 

B.S. in Commerce 
Grove City College, 1939 

Edward Milcic Instructor in Accounting 

B.S. Business Administration 
Duquesne University, 1949 
M.B.A. Duquesne University, 1951 

Robert N. Miller Associate Professor of Accounting 

B.C.S. Duquesne University, 1918 
C.P.A. Pennsylvania, 1920 

Francis L. Milton Instructor in Insurance 

B.S. Business Administration 
Duquesne University, 1942 

John T. Morris Professor of Commerce 

B.A. Washington & Jefferson College, 1900 
M.A. Columbia University, 1926 
Ph.D. Ibidem, 1929 



Page Seven 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



Phillip T. McDonough Instructor in Finance 

B.S. Business Administration 
Duquesne University, 1947 
M.B.A. Ibidem, 1949 

James P. Niland Associate Professor of Management 

B.S. Duquesne University, 1942 
M.Litt. University of Pittsburgh, 1948 

William J. O'Brien Assistant Professor of Management 

B.S. Business Administration 
Duquesne University, 1940 
M.B.A. Duquesne University, 1950 

Kazys Pakstas Professor of Economic Geography 

Ph.D. University of Fribourg, 1923 

Robert Pearce Lecturer in Accounting 

B.S. Indiana University, 1988 

Albert I. Raizman Lecturer in Accounting 

B.S. University of Pittsburgh, 1939 

Joseph Ridge Instructor in Commerce 

B.S. Business Administration 
Duquesne University, 1947 
LL.B. Duquesne University, 1951 

W. D. Rush Professor of Accounting 

B.C.S. Duquesne University, 1918 
C.P.A. Pennsylvania, 1921 

Frank Sanford Lecturer in Management 

B.S. Engineering, Carnegie Institute of Technology, 1936 

M.B.A. Vocational Education and Psychology, University of Pittsburgh, 1939 

William K. Schusler Assistant Professor of Commerce 

B.S. Business Administration 
Duquesne University, 1942 
M.B.A. Ibidem, 1949 

William Slish Instructor in Management 

B.S. Business Administration 
Duquesne University, 1949 
M.B.A. Duquesne University, 1950 

Casmer Smith Assistant Professor of Management 

B.A. Bowling Green University, 1940 
M.B.A. City College of New York, 1949 

David Staudt Instructor in Management 

B.S. Business Administration 
University of Pittsburgh, 1949 
M.A. University of Pittsburgh, 1951 

Stephen A. Sutton Lecturer in Finance 

B.A. Harvard University, 1929 

Graduate School, Rutgers University, 1932 

G. V. Tchirkow Professor of Commerce 

M.A. College of Oriental Languages at Moscow, 1901 

M.Int.L. Moscow, 1902 

D.Int.L. Consular Academy of the Foreign Office of Russia, 1905 



Pagt Eight 



SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



John Ttmko Instructor in Commerce 

B.S. Business Administration 
Duquesne University, 1949 
M.B.A. Duquesne University, 1951 

Vincent P. Viscomi Lecturer in Accounting 

B.S. Business Administration 
Duquesne University, 1940 
M.B.A. Ibidem, 1949 

Robert Weidman Assistant Professor of Management 

B.B.A. City College of New York, 1941 
M.B.A. Ibidem, 1948 

Louis Werbaneth Lecturer in Accounting 

B.S. Business Administration 
Duquesne University, 1948 
C.P.A. Pennsylvania, 1951 

R. J. Worley. . ; . .^ Assistant Professor of Commerce 

Southern Illinois State Teachers College, 1917 
B.A. Colorado State Teachers College, 1921 
M.Ed. Harvard University, 1929 
Ph.D. Duquesne University, 19S1 

Albert Bayard Wright Dean, School of Business Administration 

Professor of Business Administration 
B.S. Illinois Wesleyan University, 1907 
M.A. Ibidem, 1910 
M.A. University of Illinois, 1914 
D.S.C. Duquesne University, 1927 

Frank Wright Assistant Professor of Accounting 

B.S. Business Administration 
Duquesne University, 1947 
M.B.A. University of Pennsylvania 

Robert Yinger Lecturer in Accounting 

C.P.A. Pennsylvania 

Gerald L. Zimmerman Associate Professor of Finance 

B.S. in Econ. University of Pennsylvania, 1927 
M.A. Ibidem, 1931 



Page Nine 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 

PITTSBURGH 19, PA. 

GENERAL STATEMENT 
LOCATION 

The University, an urban institution serving the needs of an 
industrial city and surrounding communities in Western Penn- 
sylvania, is situated upon an eminence overlooking Pittsburgh's 
Golden Triangle. The campus on which most of the University 
buildings are located surrounds the Administration Building at 
Bluff and Colbert Streets in downtown Pittsburgh. The School 
of Law and the School of Business Administration are off-campus 
in the Fitzsimons Building at 331 Fourth Avenue, in the heart 
of the financial district. 

The University is easily reached by any of the railroad, bus, 
or trolley lines leading into downtown Pittsburgh. 

HISTORICAL STATEMENT 

In 1878 the Fathers of the Congregation of the Holy Ghost 
and the Immaculate Heart of Mary established a College of Arts 
and Letters which was incorporated in 1881 as the Pittsburgh 
Catholic College of the Holy Ghost. 

In 1911 a university charter was obtained and the Pittsburgh 
Catholic College became Duquesne University, with authority 
to grant degrees in the Arts and Sciences, Law, Medicine, 
Dentistry, and Pharmacy. This charter was further extended in 
1930 to include degrees in Education and Music, and in 1937 to 
include degrees in Nursing. 

The present schools of the University, all offering courses 
leading to degrees, are the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, 
the School of Law, the School of Business Administration, the 
School of Pharmacy, the School of Music, the School of Educa- 
tion, the School of Nursing, and the Graduate School. 

The student body now numbers over 4,000 each year. 

Women students are admitted to all departments of the 
University. 

EDUCATIONAL PURPOSE, POLICY, AND AIM 

Duquesne University has a distinctive function among the 
several major educational institutions of Western Pennsylvania: 
the education of young men and women in the ideals and practice 
of Catholic philosophy and Christian ethics. The general aim of 



Page Ten 



SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



the administrative officers and faculty, as a body of educators, 
is to secure the combined development of both mind and heart 
in the formation of character, for the man and citizen. They 
recognize moral training as an essential element of true education, 
and, while offering every facility in the acquisition of the highest 
and broadest mental culture, they spare no effort to form in the 
student habits of virtue and moral integrity. It is their ultimate 
ambition to form men of deep thought, of solid principles, and 
of sound character. In keeping with this aim and in fulfillment 
of the University's distinctive function, their first wish is to 
prepare students as Duquesne men and Duquesne women. The 
definition of what makes a Duquesne man and a Duquesne 
woman is to be found in certain courses common to all curricula 
in the undergraduate schools. These Core Courses are the Uni- 
versity's articles of educational belief — articles which may be 
summarized as follows: 

Duquesne University believes that, while it is not her pre- 
rogative to see that her students do what is right (for this is 
limited to the sphere of every man's and woman's own conscience), 
it is nevertheless her duty to see to it that they know what is 
right and what is wrong morally. Accordingly, she prescribes a 
course in both the principles and the problems of Ethics. She 
believes that her students should have a true concept of the role 
of the individual in society. In consonance with this belief, she 
prescribes a course in the History of American Democracy 
especially designed to give both an appreciation of the freedom 
and an understanding of the responsibilities of the citizen in a 
republic founded on sound democratic principles. 

She believes that her students, in order that their knowledge 
may be fruitful to others, should have facility in clear and effect- 
ive expression. To supply this need, and also to develop in the 
student a sound, discriminating artistic taste, she prescribes a 
course in English Composition and a course in English Literature. 
She believes that her students, to be truly educated, must be 
able to give to themselves and to others a reasonable argument 
for the knowledge that is in them. Consequently, she prescribes 
a course in Logic. Finally, she believes in "a sound mind in a 
sound body." Accordingly, she prescribes either Physical Educa- 
tion, or Military Science, or Eurhythmies. 

Duquesne University, therefore, places the prime emphasis 
on the pursuits which lead to the formation of Duquesne men 
and women; but the professional subjects, which will ultimately 
be the source of livelihood for the graduate, are by no means 
neglected. 



Page Eleven, 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



CAMPUS FACILITIES 

CHAPEL 

The University Chapel, located on the Campus, provides the 
opportunity for fulfilling the religious obligations for Catholic 
students. Morning Masses are said daily and a Mass at the noon 
hour is said every school day during the year. There are regular 
hours for hearing confessions, and special devotions are held for 
feastdays. The University Chaplain is available at all times. 

THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES 

The Main Library is housed in its own building on the campus, 
at the corner of Locust and Colbert Streets. The hours are from 
8:30 A.M. to 9:00 P.M. Monday through Friday, and from 8:30 
A.M. to 5:00 P.M. on Saturday. The book collection contains 
more than 45,000 volumes. 

There is a downtown library reading room in the Fitzsimons 
Building, where its facilities are available to all students. The 
hours here are from 9:00 A.M. to 9:00 P.M. Monday through 
Friday. The books in this collection are supplied from the Main 
Library. 

The John E. Laughlin Memorial Library, the library of the 
School of Law, is located in the Fitzsimons Building. The book 
collection here numbers over 10,000 volumes. This library is 
open every hour of the day and night throughout the year, and 
is for the exclusive use of students in the School of Law. 

BOOKSTORE 

The University Bookstore is located in the rear of the 
Administration Building facing the campus. 

DORMITORIES AND CAFETERIA 

Limited dormitory facilities are provided on the campus for 
out-of-town students. The University operates a cafeteria for 
the convenience of all students. OfF-campus rooms in private 
homes are under the supervision of the Dean of Men. 

Page Twelve 



SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



ATHLETICS 

The University is represented in intercollegiate athletic com- 
petition in basketball, golf, tennis and baseball. 

The instructors in physical education supervise intramural 
programs in various competitive sports. All physically able 
students participate in these programs 



Page Thirteen 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

HISTORY 

Courses in Business Administration were established by the 
University in 19 J 3 under the name, School of Accounts, Finance, 
and Commerce. The rapid growth of the school necessitated a 
constant broadening of the curriculum until it covered all the 
business subjects of fundamental importance. In 1931, the school 
assumed its present name and with this change became definitely 
a professional school of business administration offering the same 
curriculum in full in both day and evening divisions leading to 
the degree, Bachelor of Science in Business Administration. 

PHILOSOPHY AND OBJECTIVES 

In accord with the educational philosophy and objectives of 
the University, the School of Business Administration aims to 
assist the student in his development of the natural and super- 
natural virtues. The general aim is to provide through the 
media of instruction and related collegiate activity the facili- 
tation of purposeful character, intellectual accomplishment, 
emotional and social maturity, and professional efficiency. 

The School of Business Administration in the University 
provides the basic preparation for careers devoted to the pre- 
servation, effectiveness and expansion of our free enterprise 
system, whether through private business or through public 
business. It has the professional responsibility of developing in 
the student such knowledge of business principles, procedures 
and problems as will enable him to become a self-sustaining 
member of the business community, aware of his social and 
public responsibilities and dedicated to the enrichment of the 
resources for worthy living. It attains this objective by guiding 
the student through a cultural core program, through a pre- 
scribed program of basic business subjects, through a concen- 
tration group of advanced business subjects elected on the basis 
of vocational interest, through a program of required extra- 
curricular readings, through coordination of extra-curricular 
activities with the curricular program and through established 
personnel services. 

The objectives of the School of Business Administration are: 

1. The development of spiritual and religious aims and values 
for the betterment of the individual's own life and for the 
advancement of these spiritual and religious aims and values 
in others. 

2. The development of a wholesome personality for the enrich- 
ment of the student's own life and for the guidance of others 
toward wholesome personalities. 



Page Fourteen 



SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



3. The development of a broader understanding of our culture in 
order to advance this understanding in others. 

4. The development of a competent understanding of the process 
of living, growth and learning, and of the fitness to act upon 
this understanding in practical situations. 

5 The development of an understanding of and practice in the 
democratic process in all areas of living. 

6. The development of a social foundation in a special area of 
business knowledge. 

7. The development of the desire for continuous professional 
growth. 

8. The development of scholarship through a constant willingness 
to use the resources and methods of critical inquiry in the fields 
of human knowledge relevant to the student's responsibility 
as a professional worker and as an individual. 

9. The development of a persistent and continuous practice of 
studying and analyzing the economic order for the improve- 
ment of business and human welfare. 

10. The development of mastery of the art and science of manage- 
ment with the objective of creating better human relations. 

11. The development of a constant evaluation of himself as an 
individual. 

12. The development of a sound philosophy of life consonant with 
man's material and spiritual destiny. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

Several organizations, limited to students in the School of 
Business Administration, exist for the promotion of the scholarly 
and professional interests of members. The Beta Alpha Phi 
fraternity is the honorary scholarship society of the School. 
Epsilon Eta Phi, a national professional commerce sorority, 
maintains two chapters, one in the day division and one in the 
evening division. The Duquesne University Student Chapter of 
the Society for the Advancement of Management offers a varied 
program of importance to students majoring in Management. 
Annually the Chapter conducts a Management Conference, 
featuring as speakers specialists of national reputation. 

The Duquesne University Bureau of Marketing Research 
provides an ambitious program for student marketing majors 
who are interested in market research. The Student Accounting 
Association provides for the interests of those who intend to 
become accountants. The Insurance Club is an organization of 
students who plan insurance as a life work. The Salesmanship 
Club is open to students who are interested in becoming sales- 
men. A selected group of seniors majoring in salesmanship is 
permitted, under faculty supervision, to participate in the 



Pag e Fifteen 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



meetings of the Sales Executives Club of Pittsburgh. A selected 
group of seniors majoring in Marketing participate, under faculty 
supervision, as junior members in the meetings of the Pittsburgh 
Chapter of the American Marketing Association. 

LOCATION AND EQUIPMENT 

The offices of the School are in the Fitzsimons Building, 
where classes also are conducted. The quarters occupied have 
been especially designed for the work of the school. The lighting, 
ventilation, seating arrangement, and interior decoration have 
all been planned for maximum school efficiency. Complete ac- 
counting, advertising, and statistical laboratories are special 
features of the school's equipment. 

DEGREE GRANTED 

The School of Business Administration grants one degree 
only, that of Bachelor of Science in Business Administration. 
This degree may be awarded to those who satisfy the entrance 
requirements and complete successfully the degree program of 
the school. As a preliminary requirement candidates must com- 
plete satisfactorily the curriculum requirements as outlined here- 
in. The final and determining requirement is that the candidate 
must pass successfully a comprehensive examination in business 
administration at the end of the senior year. Recommendation 
by the dean and faculty for the award of the degree is based on 
the result of the comprehensive examination, not upon the 
completion of course requirements. 

COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATIONS IN THE SCHOOL OF 
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Comprehensive examinations covering both the basic business 
courses and the concentration group selected by the student 
must be passed successfully by each candidate before he may.be 
recommended for the degree of the school. The comprehensive 
examination requires the student to demonstrate that he has a 
grasp not only of the factual content of his business courses but 
that he has developed as well the ability both to correlate his 
knowledge with allied fields and to be directed by his knowledge 
in solving specimen problems of a kind that arise in actual busi- 
ness life. 

The examination is given in two sessions of three and one- 
half hours each, and is held in January, May and August. Notifi- 
cation of the time and place of the examination will be posted on 
the bulletin board of the School of Business Administration. 



Page Sixtiin 



SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



INFORMATION ON ADMISSION 

CATEGORIES AND STUDENTS 

Students at Duquesne University are classified as matricu- 
lated and non-matriculated. A matriculated student is one who 
has satisfied all of the requirements for admission to the degree 
program of his choice and is pursuing courses in which he is 
qualified to earn credit for the degree. Registrants who are so 
classified may be full-time or part-time students in either the 
day or evening division of the University. Non-matriculated 
students are mature persons who are not interested in pursuing 
courses for a degree and who have not met the requirements 
for matriculation. 

A student who is enrolled as a non-matriculated or special 
student, must have the approval of the dean who is responsible 
for the courses to be pursued. In such case the entrance require- 
ments may be waived, but the courses will not carry credit 
toward a degree. Only in an exceptional case is a non-matric- 
ulated student permitted to attend regular day school classes. 

Students carrying less than twelve hours credit per semester 
are part-time students. 

Students carrying a schedule of courses each semester which 
will enable them to qualify for a degree in the regular time are 
full-time students. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

Admission of Regular students: A candidate for admission 
must be of good moral character. He should submit at least one 
recommendation of character signed by a person of established 
reputation. 

The candidate must be a graduate of an approved high school, 
in the upper three-fifths of his class. Those who place in the 
lower two-fifths are automatically subject to an entrance ex- 
amination. 

The candidate should present twelve units from the following 
fields: English (four units); Social Studies; Language; Mathe- 
matics (including at least one unit of Algebra); Science; and 
remaining units in electives for which the high school offers credit 
toward graduation, or the genuine equivalent. 

The candidate's application must be approved by the Univer- 
sity Committee on Admissions. 



Page Seventeen 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



The committee must be satisfied that the applicant is equipped 
to pursue his college studies with profit. In arriving at a decision 
the committee considers the applicant's character and general 
ability and examines the quality of previous achievement shown 
by the high school record. A personal interview and a special 
examination may be required. 

Should the committee decide that the quality of the appli- 
cant's high school work makes success in college doubtful, a 
special entrance examination may be given by the University 
Faculties. This examination will include the scholastic aptitude 
and achievement tests of the American Council on Education. 

Admission of Transfer Students'. Students of approved colleges 
and universities will be admitted to advanced standing if their 
credentials so warrant. They must be in good standing and 
eligible to continue their studies at the institution previously 
attended. They must have been granted an honorable dismissal. 
A general average equivalent to the grade C at Duquesne is 
required of an applicant wishing to transfer. Advanced credit may 
be allowed for those courses which are the equivalent of the 
courses in the chosen Duquesne curriculum. No credit will be 
allowed in any subject with a grade lower than C. 

Advanced standing is conditional until the student completes 
a minimum of one semester's work (15 semester hours). If his 
work proves unsatisfactory, the student will be requested to 
withdraw. 



SUGGESTED HIGH SCHOOL COURSE OF STUDY 
IN PREPARATION FOR ADMISSION 

Duquesne University does not require an applicant to present 
a fixed pattern of high school units for admission. The student, 
however, who desires to prepare for admission to this university, 
must, whatever course of study he pursues in high school, pursue 
it with the utmost interest and to the best of his ability. 

For the student who desires to know what course in high 
school will best prepare him for Duquesne University, he is 
urged to follow the college preparatory course, i.e., English — 
4 units; foreign language (Latin, Spanish, French, German, etc.) 
— 2 units of one language; history, (including United States 
history) — 2 units; mathematics (algebra and plane geometry) — 
2 units; science (including at least 1 unit in a laboratory science) 
— 2 units; and elective subjects — 2 units. 



Page Eighteen 



SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



FRESHMEN DAYS AND PLACEMENT TESTS 

All entering Freshmen are required to be present for Fresh- 
man Days Activities which take place the week preceding the 
beginning of the first semester. These activities consist in general 
orientation conferences and in the completion of a group of 
placement tests. Failure to take the placement tests at the 
regular time will incur a penalty of $5.00 for individual tests. 
Registration for the first semester courses must be completed 
in this week. 

ROUTINE OF MATRICULATION 
Regular Students 

1. Applicants should address the Director of Admissions to 
obtain the necessary application blanks. 

2. The applicant will complete the personal application and 
return it to the Director of Admissions, 801 BlufFSt., Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania. He will have his high school complete the creden- 
tials form which must be mailed directly to the Director of 
Admissions. 

3. Upon receipt of these application papers an evaluation 
will be made by the Committee on Admissions; the applicant 
will then be notified of his admission status and provided with 
information on registration. A deposit of twenty dollars is re- 
quired within two weeks of notification of acceptance, in order 
to assure the applicant of the reservation of a place in class. 
For further information see Tuition and Fees. 

Transfer Students 

1. Applicant should address the Director of Admissions to 
obtain the necessary form. 

2. The applicant will complete the form and return it to the 
Director of Admissions, 801 BlufF St., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 

3. The applicant must notify all colleges or universities pre- 
viously attended to mail directly to the Director of Admissions, 
Duquesne University, official transcripts of record. 

4. Upon receipt of all credentials an evaluation will be made; 
the applicant will then be notified of his admission status and 
provided with information concerning registration. A deposit of 
twenty dollars is required within two weeks of notification of 
acceptance, in order to assure the applicant of the reservation 
of a place in class. For further information see Tuition and Fees. 



Page Nineteen 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



REGISTRATION INFORMATION 

A registration period, as indicated in the University Calendar, 
precedes each semester and summer session. All schools register 
students during this period. Only by rare exception, by consent 
of the Dean, and on payment of a penalty of $5.00, will late 
registration be permitted. General regulations concerning 
registration are: 

1. Registration for all students is held on the campus. 

2. The student's schedule is prepared in conference with the 
dean. 

3. Tuition and fees for the semester are payable at regis- 
tration time. 

4. Admission to any class is allowed only to those who have 
officially registered for that class. 

Students are not permitted to change their schedules of 
courses without the permission of their dean. A student who 
withdraws from a course without proper authorization receives a 
grade of F for the course. Change of schedule is permitted, without 
fee, only during the registration period. For a serious reason, 
change of schedule may be permitted during the same period 
that late registrations are accepted. 

ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 

The following regulations govern all undergraduate students 
of the University. The University reserves the right to change 
any provision or requirement during the term of residence of 
any student; and to compel the withdrawal of any student whose 
conduct at any time is not satisfactory to the University. 

1. Class Attendance: In order to secure credit in any course in 
which he is registered, a student must attend classroom and 
laboratory exercises regularly and promptly. A student who 
absents himself from class excessively or is habitually tardy 
will be dropped from the class and given a failing grade. 

2. Examinations: 

a. Entrance examinations are given at the beginning of each 
semester for those applicants for admission who were not 
graduated in the upper three-fifths of their high school 
class. 

b. Mid-Semester examinations are given during the eighth week 
of each semester. 



Page Twenty 



SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



c. Final examinations are given at the end of each semester 
and summer session. No student is excused from taking 
final examinations. 

d. Condition examinations, the date for which is announced 
in the university calendar, are given toward the end of 
the first month of each semester, in order to give students 
who have received the marks of E or X for courses taken 
during the preceding semester the opportunity to remove 
these deficiencies. An E grade can be changed by re- 
examination to only D or F. The fee for such examinations 
is S5.00. 

e. Comprehensive examinations, covering the entire field of 
major study, must be passed successfully by every can- 
didate before he may be recommended for a degree. The 
requirements governing types of comprehensive examina- 
tions for the various fields are established by the Committee 
on Comprehensive Examinations. This committee also 
determines in what fields a Thesis may take the place of 
the comprehensive examination. For details of the require- 
ments in each of the various fields, consult the school 
which has jurisdiction over that field. 

3. Grading: The university grading system, adopted February 
21, 1929, and amended September 19, 1938, is the only 
method of rating recognized by the university. The system 
is as follows: 

A — Excellent 

B — Good 

C — Average 

D — Below Average — lowest passing grade 

E — Conditioned: eligible for re-examination 

F — Failure: course must be repeated 

I — Incomplete: grade is deferred because of incomplete 

work 
X — Absent from final examination 
W— Official Withdrawal 
P — Pass — used in certain courses without quality points. 

The temporary grades E, I, and X must be removed within 
the first thirty school days of the next succeeding semester. 
It is the student's responsibility to make arrangements with 
his dean for the removal of these temporary marks. An E 



Page Twenty'ont 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



grade can be changed by re-examination to only D or F. 
Failure to remove E and X grades within the specified time 
will result in an F grade for the course. 

4. Unit of Credit: The unit of credit is the semester hour. One 
semester hour of credit is granted for the successful completion 
of one hour per week of lecture or recitation, or at least two 
hours per week of laboratory work for one semester. Inasmuch 
as the minimum number of weeks in a semester is sixteen, 
an equivalent definition of the semester hour is sixteen hours 
of class or the equivalent in laboratory work. 

5. Quality Points: Among the requirements for graduation is a 
quality point average of at least 1.0. The quality point system 
operates as follows: 

(a) For the credits of work carried, quality points are awarded 
according to the grade received: for a grade of A, the 
number of credits are multiplied by 3; for a grade of B, 
by 2; for a grade of C, by 1; for a grade of D, by 0; and 
for a grade of F, by minus 1, until the F has been removed 
by repeating the course successfully. The marks E, I, and 
X, being temporary indications rather than grades, and 
W and P are independent of the quality point system. 

(b) A student's quality point average can be calculated at 
the end of an academic period by dividing his total 
number of quality points by the total number of semester 
hours of credit he has obtained. 

The only exception to this rule is for credits earned in the 
course in Physical Education. 



6. Scholastic Standing: 

(a) Dismissal: A student, to be permitted to continue a 
course of study, must pass in two-thirds of the hours of 
credit carried in each semester, and must maintain a 
quality point average of at least 0.67. Failure to satisfy 
this minimum scholastic requirement will result in the 
dismissal of the student for low scholarship. 



Page Twenty-two 



SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



(b) Probation: A student who fails in one third or less of the 
hours of credit carried in each semester, or whose quality 
point average falls below 1.0, is placed on probation for 
the next semester. Students on probation may be required 
to carry a reduced schedule. 

7. Classification of Students: Students will be ranked in the several 
classes as follows: 

Freshmen: Those having completed less than 30 semester 
hours. 

Sophomores: Those having completed 31 to 60 semester hours. 
Juniors: Those having completed 61 to 90 semester hours. 
Seniors: Those having completed 91 semester hours. 



GRADUATION 

1. General Requirements: The candidate for a degree must be of 
good moral character; must have paid all indebtedness to the 
University; must have made formal application for the degree 
at the Office of the Registrar prior to the date listed in the 
University Calendar; must be present at the Baccalaureate 
and Commencement Exercises. 

2. Scholastic Requirements: The candidate for a degree must have 
satisfied all entrance requirements; must have completed 
successfully all the required courses of his degree program; 
must have no grade lower than D; must have completed the 
last year's work (a minimum of thirty semester hours of credit) 
in residence; must have passed the qualifying and compre- 
hensive examinations as required in his program; must have 
completed a minimum of 128 semester hours of work. 

3. Quality Point Requirement: The candidate for a degree must 
have a minimum total number of quality points equivalent 
to the number of semester hours credit required for the 
Bachelor's degree; or a minimum quality point average of 1.0. 

4. Degrees awarded with honor: Degrees are awarded with special 
mention cum laude or magna cum laude to students who have 
completed the regular course with unusual distinction. Upon 
recommendation of the faculty, this mention may be raised 
to summa cum laude. 



Page Twenty-three 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



THE SCHOOL YEAR 

The school year, which occupies 32 weeks exclusive of vaca- 
tions, is divided into a First Semester and a Second Semester 
of 16 weeks each. 

GLASSES AND SESSIONS 

Regular Classes: Classes are in session five days a week during 
the school year. 

The Summer Sessions: Three distinct summer sessions are held: 

1. The Six Weeks Session, in which courses are offered by the 
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, the School of Education, 
the School of Music, the School of Nursing, and the Graduate 
School. The classes of the six weeks session meet daily except 
Saturday. 

2. The Eight Weeks Session, in which courses in Liberal Arts and 
Business Administration are offered to School of Business 
Administration students. The classes of the eight week session 
meet five days a week, except when it is the desire of the 
students registered to attend class six days a week for seven 
weeks. 

3. The Eight Weeks Evening Session, in which courses are offered 
by the School of Business Administration. Each evening 
course meets three hours Monday and Wednesday; one and 
one-half hours Friday; three hours Tuesday and Thursday; 
one and one-half hours Friday. 

Saturday Classes are offered by the College of Liberal Arts and 
Sciences, the Graduate School, the School of Music, the School 
of Education, and the School of Nursing. 

Other Special Classes: Late afternoon and evening courses are 
offered by the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, the Graduate 
School, the School of Business Administration, the School of 
Music, the School of Education, and the School of Nursing. 

Requirements for admission to the special classes of the 
university as a candidate for a degree are the same as those for 
admission to regular classes. Mature students, however, not 
candidates for degrees, may be admitted to those special courses, 
which, in the judgment of the dean, they are equipped to pursue 



Page Twenty-four 



SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



with profit. In such cases the entrance requirements may be 
waived, but the courses pursued carry no credit. 

The courses offered in the late afternoon and evening and on 
Saturday are selected from the curricula of the university and 
are taught by regular faculty members. These special courses 
may carry reduced credit if the time schedule does not permit 
the full course to be given. 

The purpose of the special courses is to afford teachers and 
others who cannot avail themselves of the time of the regular 
course in the university an opportunity to pursue work toward 
a degree. 

TUITION AND FEES 

The University reserves the right to change the fees herein 
stated at any time without notice. Whenever a change is made 
it will become effective at the beginning of the succeeding 
academic year. 

Matriculation Deposit $20.00 

The matriculation deposit of twenty dollars is pay- 
able by entering students within two weeks from 
the date of notification of acceptance to the Uni- 
versity. The purpose of this fee is to assure the 
student of a reservation of a place in class. This 
deposit will be credited against the student's tuition 
and fees at the time of registration for the semester 
in which the student's application has been ap- 
proved. This deposit is not refundable. 

Tuition, per Semester Hour Credit $12.00 

The total tuition for the semester is payable at 
the time of registration, unless other arrangements 
are made through the Deferred Tuition Office. 

Activities Fee, per Semester $10.00 

This fee gives access to intercollegiate and intra- 
mural sports activities, concerts, dramatic presen- 
tations and other events throughout the scholastic 
year. It entitles the student to copies of the weekly 
newspaper, and the monthly magazine. This fee is 
payable by all students carrying twelve or more 
credits in the regular semesters. 



Page Twenty-fivi 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



Library Fee per Semester $5.00 

This fee gives library privileges, and is payable each 
semester by all full time students of the university, 
and by those taking 12 or more credits in the 
Summer Sessions. 

Library Fee, Part-time Students $ 2.00 

This fee is payable by all students carrying less than 
twelve credits in any semester or summer session. 

Registration Fee $ 1.00 

A fee of $1.00 is required of every student at each 
registration period. 

Student Health Fee, per Semester $ 1.00 

This fee includes a physical examination at entrance, 
and advice and emergency treatment at the univer- 
sity dispensary. 

Late Registration Fee $ 5.00 

This fee is charged to all students registering later 
than the last day of the regular registration period. 

Condition Examination Fee $ 5.00 

This fee is charged for each condition and special 
examination for removal of E and X grades. It is 
payable in advance. 

Change of Course Fee $ 1.00 

Laboratory Fees: Students enrolled in the following courses 
will pay laboratory fees, not subject to refund, as indicated: 

Laboratory Fees $ 5.00 

Commerce 317, 318, 419, 420. 

Laboratory Fees $ 2.50 

Management 351, 352, 507, 508, 533, 534. 

Student Publication Fee, per year $ 1.00 

Payable by all part-time students in the regular 
sessions. The fee entitles them to a copy of each 
issue of the student newspaper and of the monthly 
magazine. 



Pag* Twenty-six 



SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



G.P.A. and American Institute Preparation $100.00 

Graduation Fees — Bachelor's Degree $ 15.00 

Note: Auditors pay the same tuition and fees as do students 
taking courses for credit. 

REFUNDS FOR WITHDRAWALS 

Students who withdraw from the university for a satisfactory 
reason within eight weeks after the opening of the semester are 
entitled to a proportionate refund of tuition provided that they 
notify their dean at the time of the withdrawal. Fees are not 
refundable. 

Refunds are made in accordance with the following schedule. 

Withdrawal Refund 
1st Week 90% 

2nd Week 70% 

3rd Week 60% 

4th Week 50% 

5th Week 30% 

6th Week 20% 

7th Week 10% 

8th Week 5% 

No refund will be made in the case of students who are 
registered on probation or who are requested to withdraw as a 
result of faculty action. 

The Refund Schedule for Summer Sessions (six or eight weeks 
session) is as follows: 

Withdrawal Refund 

1st Week 60% 

2nd Week 20% 

There are no refunds after the second week of a Summer 
Session. Fees are not refundable. 

Page Twenty's even 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



INFORMATION ON TOTAL EXPENSE 

AVERAGE ANNUAL TUITION 

Undergraduate tuition is charged at the rate of 312.00 per 
semester hour credit. There must also be added the fixed fees 
chargeable to all students in the university, such as the Activities 
Fee, the Medical Fee, Registration Fee, and any fees attached 
to given courses. The student who carries the normal semester 
load of 16 credits must anticipate a tuition-and-fees charge of 
about 3200.00 for the semester (that is, for one-half of the school 
year). An additional expense of approximately 320.00 will be 
realized for books and supplies. 

RESIDENCE 

A limited number of residences are maintained by the 
University on campus for the convenience of out-of-town stu- 
dents. Reservations for room space are made on a semester basis 
through the Dean of Men or the Dean of Women. A deposit 
of 310.00, payable to Duquesne University, must accompany 
each room application. 

The deposit will be held as a breakage deposit until the 
satisfactory termination of the student's lease. Deductible from 
the deposit are any damages to room contents or buildings and 
a pro rata general breakage. 

A student who is prevented, for any reason, from occupying 
the room reserved will be released and the deposit refunded if 
the Dean of Men or the Dean of Women is notified in writing 
at least two weeks prior to the date of registration. 

Room rent is payable in advance. Rooms may be assigned 
upon receipt of the room deposit but possession is not given 
until the rent is paid in full. 

Non-commuting students are not permitted to live oflF- 
campus without permission of the Dean of Men or the Dean of 
Women. 

HOW EXPENSES MAY BE PAID 

All expenses are due and payable on the day of registration. 
Upon application, however, at the Office of Deferred Tuition, 
a student may arrange to pay part of his expenses down and the 
remainder, which is subject to a service charge, in regular 
monthly installments during the semester. 



Page Twenty-eight 



SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



STUDENT AID 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

The University offers a definite number of competitive exam- 
ination scholarships. Eligible for the examinations, which are 
held annually in April, are students who will be, according to 
certification by their principal, graduated in the upper third of 
their high school class. All scholarships are awarded for two 
years, but are potentially four-year awards, provided that the 
requirements for continuance of the award are fulfilled. Informa- 
tion concerning them may be had by addressing the Committee 
on Scholarships. 

The University Alumni Association makes available annually 
a ?100.00 Scholarship to a competent and deserving student in 
the School of Business Administration. Application for this 
scholarship is made to the Dean of the School of Business 
Administration. 

STUDENT EMPLOYMENT 

The University makes available limited student employment 
for students who are in need of financial assistance and who, at 
the same time, maintain a satisfactory scholastic average and 
give evidence of good character. Opportunities for employment 
exist on and about the campus. Information may be had by 
addressing the Committee on Student Welfare. 



STUDENT LOAN 

The University has available a limited sum of money in 
various student loan funds, which each year is loaned to under- 
graduate students who have completed at least thirty semester 
hours credit at the University, and who meet the requirements 
of good scholarship, need of financial assistance, and good 
character. These loans, are granted only for the purpose of the 
payment of tuition. They are made available through the Univer- 
sity Student Loan Fund. Information may be had by addressing 
the Committee on Student Welfare. 



Page TuMnty-nine 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



Course 


Number 


Phil. 


101 


Eng. 


101 


Hist. 


103 


Eom. 


101 


Mgt. 


115 


Rel. 


101 


Mil. Sci 


. 101 



CURRICULUM FOR ALL MAJOR FIELDS WITH THE 
EXCEPTION OF ACCOUNTING 

Leading to the Degree 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Freshman Year 

First Semester 

Sem. Hrs. 
Title Credit 

Logic 3 

English Composition 3 

History of American Democracy 2 

Economic Geography 3 

Business Mathematics 2 

Fundamental Theology 1 

Military Science and Tactics 2 

or 

Phys. Ed Physical Education 1 

Second Semester 

Sem. Hrs. 
Title Credit 

Epistemology — or 3 

General Psychology 3 

English Composition 3 

History of American Democracy 2 

Economic Geography 3 

Business Mathematics 2 

Fundamental Theology 1 

Military Science and Tactics 2 

or 

Phys. Ed. Physical Education 1 

Sophomore Year 

First Semester 

Sem. Hrs. 

Course Number Title Credit 

Phil. 201 Ontology 3 

Eng. 201 English Literature 3 

Econ. 211 Principles of Economics 3 

Soc. 101 Principles of Sociology 2 

Acct. 101 Introductory Accounting 3 

Rel. 201 Nature of God 1 

Mil. Sci. 201 Military Science and Tactics 2 

or 

Phys. Ed. Physical Education 1 



Course 


Number 


Phil. 


102 




220 


Eng. 


102 


Hist. 


104 


Com. 


102 


Mgt. 


116 


Rel. 


102 


Mil. Sci 


. 102 



Page Thirty 



SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



Course Number 



Phil. 


202 


Eng. 


202 


Econ. 


212 


Soc. 


102 


Acct. 


102 


Rel. 


202 


Mil. Sci. 


202 


or 




Phys. Ed 


• 



Second Semester 

Sem. Hrs. 

Title Credit 

Ethics . . 3 

English Literature 3 

Principles of Economics 3 

Principles of Sociology 2 

Introductory Accounting 3 

Nature of God . 1 

Military Science and Tactics 2 

Physical Education 1 



Course 


Number 


Acct. 


201 


B.Law 


301 


Com. 


303 


Fin. 


311 


Mgt. 


351 


Mgt. 


301 


Rel. 


301 



Junior Year 

First Semester 

Sem. Hrs. 

Title Credit 

Intermediate Accounting 3 

Introductory Business Law 3 

Principles of Marketing 2 

Principles of Money and Banking 3 

Business Statistics 2 

Business Organization and Management 3 

Nature of Man 1 



Course 


Number 


Acct. 


202 


B.Law 


302 


Com. 


304 


Fin. 


314 


Mgt. 


352 


Com. 


324 


Rel. 


302 



Second Semester 

Sem. Hrs. 

Title Credit 

Intermediate Accounting 3 

Introductory Business Law 3 

Principles of Marketing 2 

Corporation Finance 3 

Business Statistics 2 

Business Communication 3 

Nature of Man 1 



Senior Year 

First Semester 

Sem. Hrs 

Course Number Title Credit 

Mgt. 451 Business Policy 2 

Rel. 401 The Eucharist 1 

**Electives in concentration group 11 

Second Semester 

Sem. Hrs. 

Course Number Title Credit 

Mgt. 452 Business Policy 2 

Rel. 402 Marriage 1 

Electives in concentration group 11 



Page Thirty-one 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



Course 


Number 


Phil. 


101 


Eng. 


101 


Hist. 


103 


Mgt. 


115 


Acct. 


101 


Rel. 


101 


Mil. Sci 


. 101 


or 




Phys. Ed. 



CURRICULUM FOR ACCOUNTING 

Leading to the Degree 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Freshman Year 

First Semester 

Sem. Hrs. 

Title Credit 

Logic 3 

English Composition 3 

History of American Democracy 2 

Business Mathematics 2 

Introductory Accounting 3 

Fundamental Theology 1 

Military Science and Tactics 2 

Physical Education 1 

Second Semester 

Sem. Hrs. 

Course Number Title Credit 

General Psychology 3 

English Composition 3 

History of American Democracy 2 

Business Mathematics 2 

Introductory Accounting 3 

Fundamental Theology 1 

Military Science and Tactics 2 

Phys. Ed. Physical Education , 1 

Sophomore Year 

First Semester 

Sem. Hrs. 

Course Number Title Credit 

Phil. 201 Ontology 3 

Eng. 201 English Literature. 3 

Econ. 211 Principles of Economics 3 

Soc. 101 Principles of Sociology 2 

Acct. 201 Intermediate Accounting 3 

Rel. 201 Nature of God 1 

Mil. Sci. 201 Military Science and Tactics 2 

Phys. Ed. Physical Education 1 



Phil. 


220 


Eng. 


102 


Hist. 


104 


Mgt. 


116 


Acct. 


102 


Rel. 


102 


Mil. Sci. 


102 


or 





Page Thirty-two 



SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



Course Number 



Phil. 


202 


Eng. 


202 


Econ. 


212 


Soc. 


101 


Acct. 


202 


Rel. 


202 


Mil. Sci. 


202 


Phys. Ed 


• 



Course 


Number 


Acct. 


305 


Acct. 


309 


B. Law 


301 


Fin. 


311 


Mgt. 


301 


Mgt. 


351 


Rel. 


301 



Course Number 



Second Semester 

Sem. Hrs. 
Title Credit 

Ethics . . 3 

English Literature. . .^ 3 

Principles of Economics 3 

Principles of Sociology 2 

Intermediate Accounting 3 

Nature of God 1 

Military Science and Tactics 2 

Physical Education 1 

Junior Year 

First Semester 

Sem. Hrs. 
Title Credit 

Advanced Accounting 2 

Cost Accounting. ^ 2 

Introductory Business Law 3 

Principles of Money and Banking 3 

Business Organization and Management 3 

Business Statistics 2 

Nature of Man 1 

Second Semester 

Sem. Hrs. 
Title Credit 

Advanced Accounting 2 

Cost Accounting. ^ 2 

Introductory Business Law 3 

Corporation Finance. 3 

Business Communication 3 

Business Statistics 2 

Nature of Man 1 

Senior Year 

First Semester 

Sem, Hrs. 
Course Number Title Credit 

Mgt. 451 Business Policy 2 

Com. 303 Principles of Marketing 2 

Rel. 401 The Eucharist 1 

**Electives in concentration group 12 

Second Semester 

Sem. Hrs. 
Course Number Title Credit 

Mgt. 452 Business Policy . . . . ; 2 

Com. 304 Principles of Marketing 2 

Rel. 402 Marriage. 1 

Electives in concentration group 12 

The courses in Religion, 101, 102, 201, 202, 301, 302, 401 and 402 are 
required for all Catholic Students. Non-Catholic students, if they do not 
elect to take the Religion courses, may select in substitution cultural courses 



Acct. 


306 


Acct. 


310 


B. Law 


302 


Fin. 


314 


Com. 


324 


Mgt. 


352 


Rel. 


302 



Page Thirty-thru 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



offered by the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences equivalent in credit as 
approved by the faculty. 

♦Seniors will choose their electives in one of several concentration groups 
available. The choice of courses for each concentration group is flexible, 
depending partly upon the student's choice of a future career and partly upon 
individual preferences as to subjects for study and investigation. Concentra- 
tion groups are offered forSeniors in the following fields: Accounting, Cost 
Accounting, Finance, Foreign Trade, Insurance, Commercial Management, 
Industrial Management, Marketing Management, Personnel Management, 
Public Business Management, Salesmanship, and Secretarial Work. 

The selection of the Senior concentration group must be made not later 
than the second semester of the Sophomore year. In all cases a minimum of 
128 semester hour credits will be required for the degree. The faculty reserves 
the right to prescribe as many credits beyond the minimum of 128 as may 
be required in the individual case. In all cases the candidate for the degree 
must pass satisfactorily the comprehensive examinations covering the field of 
major study as required by the faculty at the end of the senior year. 

Students electing the insurance concentration group may defer Manage- 
ment 351, 352 to the senior year. 

Courses in Advanced Military Science are available for inclusion in 
senior concentration groups with the consent of the department concerned. 
Authorization must be secured by the student from the appropriate depart- 
ment head as to the number of credits in Advanced Military Science courses 
which may be applied toward his concentration group. 

Departments are responsible for concentration groups as follows: 
Accounting department: Accounting, Cost Accounting; Commerce depart- 
ment: Foreign Trade, Commercial Management, Marketing Management, 
Salesmanship; Finance department: Finance, Insurance; Management 
department: Industrial Management, Personnel Management, Public Busi- 
ness Management, Secretarial Work. 

Courses available for senior electives for the various concentration groups 
are as follows: 

Accounting 

Aeet. 407,408 Accounting Systems Acct. 503,504 Misc. Fed. & State Taxes 

Acct. 411, 412 Auditing Acct. 507, 508 Analysis of Fin. Statem't 

Aeet. 451, 452 Income Tax Acct. B.Law 403, 404 Adv. Business Law 

Aeet 501,502 Governmental Acct. 

Cost Accounting 

Acct. 517, 518 Adv. Cost Accounting Mgt. 511, 512 Prin. of Industrial Eng. 

Mgt. 407,408 Production Management Mgt. 533,534 Motion & Time Study 
Mgt. 509 Prin. Industrial Purch. Mgt. 505, 506 Personnel Management 



Finance 



Pin. 415, 416 Credit Management 

Fin. 417, 418 Investment Analysis 

Fin. 419, 420 Personal & Con. Finance 

Fin. 425, 426 Math, of Finance 

Fin. 505,506 Current Banking Prob. 

Fin. 507,508 Prob. in Corp. Fin. 



Fin. 509, 510 
B.Law 403,404 
B.Econ. 505, 506 
Mgt. 507, 508 
Acct. 411, 412 



Com. & Security Markets 
Adv. Business Law 
Govt. Control of Busi. 
Adv. Business Statistics 
Auditing 



Pag* Thirty-four 






SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 







Foreign Trade 


i 




Com. 
Com. 
Com. 


405, 406 
411, 412 
415, 416 


Foreign Trade 
Transportation 
Marketing Problems 


Com. 
Com. 
Fin. 


501, 502 
503, 504 
517, 518 


Ec. Geog. of N. America 
Ec. Geog. of Lat. America 
International Finance 






Insurance 






Acct. 

Fin. 

Fin. 

Fin. 

Fin. 


523, 524 
315, 316 
417, 418 
421, 422 
423, 424 


Life Insurance Accounting 
General Insurance 
Investment Analysis 
Life Insurance 
Casualty Insurance 


Fin. 
Fin. 

Mgt. 


425, 426 
521, 522 

409 


Mathematics of Finance 
Public and Private 
Retirement Plans 
Office Management 






M anagemen t — Commercial 




Acct. 

B.Law 

Com. 

Com. 

Com. 

Com. 


415, 416 
403, 404 
317, 318 
421, 422 
425, 426 
427, 428 


Managerial Acct. 
Adv. Business Law 
Advertising Essentials 
Prin. of Salesmanship 
Retail Store Mgt. 
Sales Management 


Com. 

Fin. 

Mgt. 

Mgt. 

Mgt. 


511, 512 
415, 416 
409 

411, 412 
461, 462 


Market Analysis 
Credit Management 
Office Management 
Personnel Mgt. 
Mgt. of Small Enterprise 






Management 


: — Industrial 




Acct. 
Acct. 
Mgt. 
Mgt. 
Mgt. 
Mgt. 
Mgt. 
Mgt. 
Mgt. 


309, 310 
415, 416 
407, 408 
411, 412 
413, 414 
415, 416 
471, 472 
507, 508 
509 


Cost Accounting 
Managerial Acct. 
Production Mgt. 
Personnel Mgt. 
Industrial Relations 
Motion and Time Study 
Statistical Quality Control 
Adv. Bus. Statistics 
Prin. Industrial Purchas. 


Mgt. 

Mgt. 
Mgt. 
Mgt. 
Mgt. 

Mgt. 


509 

510 
511, 512 
539 

540 

551, 552 


Prin. Industrial 
Purchasing 
Industrial Psychology 
Prin. of Industrial Eng. 
Safety Engineering 
Materials Handling and 
Plant Layout 
Management Research 






Management 


— Marketing 




Com. 
Com. 
Com. 
Com. 
Com. 


317, 318 
415, 416 
419, 420 
421, 422 
427, 428 


Advertising Essentials 
Marketing Problems 
Advertising Procedures 
Prin. of Salesmanship 
Sales Management 


Com. 
Com. 
Mgt. 
Mgt. 
Fin. 


461, 462 
511, 512 
505, 506 
507, 508 
415, 416 


Business Psychology 
Market Analysis 
Personnel Management 
Adv. Business Statistics 
Credit Management 






Management — Personnel 




Com. 

Mgt. 
Mgt. 
Mgt. 
Mgt. 


461, 462 
407, 408 
409 

411, 412 
413, 414 


Business Psychology 
Production Management 
Office Management 
Personnel Management 
Industrial Relations 


Mgt. 
Mgt. 
Mgt. 
Mgt. 


415, 416 

507, 508 

510 

537, 538 


Motion and Time Study 
Adv. Bus. Statistics 
Industrial Psychology 
Job Evaluation 






Public Business Management 


Mgt. 
Mgt. 
Mgt. 
Acct. 
Acct. 


411, 412 
509 

531, 532 
501, 502 
505, 506 


Personnel Management 
Prin. Industrial Purch. 
Prin. Pub. Adm. 
Government Acct. 
Public Utility Acct. 


Econ. 319, 320 
Pol.Sci. 301 
Pol.Sci. 302 
PoLSci. 401 
Bus.Ec. 505, 506 


Public Finance 
State & Local Govt. 
Municipal Government 
Comparative Govt. 
Govt. Control of Bus. 



Page Tkirty-fipt 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



Com. 

Com. 
Com. 
Com. 



421,422 
427,428 
429, 430 
415, 416 



Bas.Ec. 401, 402 



Salesmanship 



Prin. of Salesmanship 
Sales Management 
The Sales Presentation 
Marketing Problems 
Business Economics 



Com. 
Com. 
Com. 

Mgt. 



317, 318 
461, 462 
511, 512 
409 



Bus.Ec. 511, 512 



Prin. of Advertising 
Business Psychology 
Market Analysis 
Office Management 
The Business Cycle 



Secretarial Work 



Mgt. 301 Secretarial Procedure 

B.Law 403, 404 Adv. Business Law 
Com. 421,422 Principles of Sales 
Com. 461,462 Business Psychology 
Fin. 419, 420 Personal and Consumer 
Finance 



Mgt. 410 
Bus.Ed. 201, 202 
Bus.Ed. 203, 204 
Bus.Ed. 308 
Mgt. 411, 412 



Office Mgt. 

Adv. Shorthand Theory 
Adv. Typing Theory 
Secretarial Office Prac. 

Personnel Mgt. 



Approval of Content of Concentration Group Must Be Secured 
from the Head of the Responsible Department 

Students who, on admission as Freshmen, indicate either Management or 
Cost Accounting as the desired field of major study, may, on application to 
the Dean, have appropriate Mathematics and Science courses included in the 
degree program. Similarly those who indicate the choice of Foreign Trade as 
field of Major study may on application to the Dean, be authorized to include 
a Modern Language in the degree program. In such cases study of the language 
selected must continue for three years or more. 



REQUIRED READING PROGRAM 

Entering students are advised that they will be required to 
develop an individual program of purposive reading apart and 
distinct from the reading assignments prescribed in the various 
courses taken by the student. The reading program will be in 
three parts. For the first of these the student will select the 
industry or kind of business of most interest to him and will by 
progressive reading and notes develop a comprehensive knowl- 
edge of the subject chosen. Notes will be submitted at periodic 
intervals for appraisal by a faculty advisor. The second portion 
of the program will consist of reading selected works from an 
approved list of authoritative contributions to the solution of 
some of the existing economic, political and social problems. 
The third portion of the program will consist of reading selected 
works from an approved list of the great books of literature 
which are regarded as a part of our cultural heritage. It is 
expected that the vacation periods will be used for the satisfac- 
tion of the second and third portions of the reading program and 
that advisers will test the student's progress at the end of such 
periods. A final test of the student's performance will be embodied 
in the comprehensive examination at the end of the Senior year. 



Page Thirty-six 



SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

The courses listed below are numbered and carry designations 
according to a system which is standard in all divisions and 
departments of the university except the School of Law. Courses 
numbered from 100 to 299 are lower division courses, intended 
primarily for freshmen and sophomores; courses numbered from 
300 to 499 are upper division courses, intended primarily for 
juniors and seniors; courses numbered from 500 to 599 are open 
to students in the upper division of the undergraduate schools, 
but also carry graduate credit, in view of additional work, for 
students in the Graduate School; courses numbered from 600 
upwards are open only to graduate students. Courses carrying 
an odd number are normally given during the first semester, 
while courses carrying an even number are normally given 
during the second semester. 



ACCOUNTING 

A. B. Wright, Acting Head of Department; Associate Professor: R. N. 
Miller; Assistant Professors: W. Cadugan, A. A. Clay, V. A. Grieco, A. A. 
Logan, F. Wright; Instructors: J. Burns, J. F. Lucas, E. A. Milcic; Lecturers: 
M. Gilliand, R. Pearce, A. Raizman, V. Viscomi, L. Werbaneth, R. Yinger. 

101, 102. Introductory Accounting. This course is devoted to the 
fundamental problems of accounting, building up along the lines and methods 
of modern accounting practice. The subject matter embraces: theories of 
debit and credit; classification of accounts; underlying principles of accounting 
records; business papers used as the basis for first entry; simple problems of 
balance sheet and income statement; controlling accounts; handling sales 
and purchases; safeguarding the cash; consignments; basic interrelations 
between accounting and business management. Practice material will be 
provided. Credit, Three hours each semester. MILCIC, WRIGHT, VIS- 
COMI, WERBANETH. 

201, 202. Principles of Accounting. The aim of the course is to present 
a thorough study of the corporation and its related problems. Some of the 
topics covered are: records and accounts peculiar to a corporation; elements 
of manufacturing accounts; perpetual inventory, voucher system and payroll 
methods; theories of the balance sheet, its make-up, form, and arrangement; 
valuation of assets in the balance sheet; depreciation; showing of liabilities; 
valuation of capital stock; profits; dividends; reserves and surplus; sinking 
and other funds; income summary; liquidation of a corporation; consolidations 
and mergers; branch house accounting; fire loss adjustments; hypothecation 
of accounts receivable; fiduciary accounts. Practice work in corporation 
accounts and related problems. Prerequisite: Acct. 101, 102. Credit* Three 
hours each semester. BURNS, CADUGAN, LUCAS, RAIZMAN, WRIGHT, 
LOGAN. 

305, 306. Advanced Accounting. This course continues the study of 
accounting theory and supports it by practical problems covering the work 
sheet, adjustments, etc. Main topics treated are: construction and technique 
of the balance sheet; profit and loss statements; surplus and reserve accounts; 



Page Thirty~seven 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



statement of funds and their application; comparative balance sheets and 
consolidated balance sheets; sinking funds; statements of realization and 
liquidation. Numerous problems are provided as practice work. Prerequisite: 
Acct. 201, 202. Credit, Two hours each semester. BURNS, GRIECO, 
LOGAN, WERBANETH. 

309, 310. Cost Accounting. This course explains the relation of cost 
systems to general books and systems. Emphasis is placed throughout upon 
scientific and efficient methods of management. Subjects studied include 
perpetual inventory and all other elements relating to material costs, labor 
costs, power costs, distribution of expense, depreciation, fixed charges, and 
other elements of overhead costs; also various standard cost systems and plans, 
the installation of cost systems and of departmental cost keeping. Prerequisite: 
Acct. 201, 202. Credity Two hours each semester. CLAY, LUCAS. 

407, 408. Accounting Systems. This course is designed primarily for 
those who wish to enter the public accounting profession. It deals with the 
peculiarities encountered in the various types of business and the necessary 
accounting systems to record the data correctly where it differs from that of 
other businesses. The following types of business will be covered: Federal 
Reserve Banks, National Banks, State Banks, Savings Banks, Trust Com- 
panies, Building and Loan Associations, Insurance Companies, Professional 
firms, Decedents' estates, Bankruptcy estates, Iron and Steel Companies, 
Department Stores, Building and Contracting firms, Installment nouses, 
Hotel Companies, Brokerage concerns, Clubs, Associations, and many others. 
Prerequisite: Acct. 201, 202. Credit, Two hours each semester. CADUGAN, 
GRIECO, LOGAN. 

411, 412. Auditing. This course covers the theory and practice of 
auditing. The relationship of the accountant with the client, the working 
papers, the audit procedure, the accounting principles involved, the prepara- 
tion of reports, and the ethics of the accounting profession are treated in 
detail. The chief topics developed are: purpose and classes of audits; detailed 
procedure in the verification of original records, special consideration in the 
audit of cash; accounts receivable; inventories; plant; liabilities; capital stock 
and surplus; analysis of accounts and preparation of working papers; certified 
statements and reports. Prerequisite: Acct. 201, 202. Credit, Two hours each 
semester. GRIECO. 

415, 416. Managerial Accounting. A study of the technique involved 
in the gathering, recording, and interpretation of accounting and statistical 
data used in the solution of internal problems of management. Some of the 
topics covered are: construction, analysis and interpretation of reports, 
establishment of operating and financial standards; measurement of man- 
agerial performance; use of budgets in managerial control; use of cost data 
and interpretation of cost reports; use of quantitative data in the formulation 
of policies. Prerequisites: Acct. 201, 202, Mgt. 201, 202. Credit, Two hours 
each semester. R. N. MILLER. 

451, 452. Income Tax Accounting. A special class for executives, 
auditors, accountants, and others who are qualified by training and experience 
to make a detailed study of the present Federal and State Income Tax 
requirements; in connection with this, practical application in the preparation 
of reports. Prerequisite; Acct. 411, 412. Credit. Two hours each semester. 
CLAY, MILLER, RUSH, YINGER. 

501, 502. Governmental Accounting. A study of the accounting classi- 
fications and methods of local, state and federal governmental bodies. Pre* 
requisite: Acct. 411, 412. Credit, Two hours each semester. PEARCE. 



Page Thirty-eight 



SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



e503, 504. Miscellaneous Federal and State Taxes. A preparation of 
reports, accounting problems, and procedure arising from Pennsylvania 
Capital Stock and Loans, Mercantile, County and State Personal Property, 
Inheritance, Estate, Documentary Stamp, Unemployment Insurance, and 
Local Taxes; also Federal Capital Stock, Excess Profits, Undivided Profits, 
Estate, Gifts, Excise, Unemployment Insurance and Old Age Benefits. 
Prerequisite: Acct. 201, 202. Credit, Two hours each semester. RUSH. 

507, 508. Analysis of Financial Statements. This course applies ac- 
counting and auditing principles to the analysis and criticism of the financial 
statements of corporations. It will include a study of the content and valuation 
of the individual items of a balance sheet; comparisons of statements of past 
periods considered in connection with the current statement to disclose 
favorable or unfavorable trends, and an attempt to forecast probable future 
conditions from this information. Prerequisite: Acct. 411, 412. Credit, Two 
hours each semester. R. N. MILLER. 

e517, 518. Advanced Cost Accounting. A study of the application of 
cost accounting principles to various kinds of business enterprise. Analysis of 
standard and job costs in manufacturing, merchandising, and public service 
industries. Prerequisite: Acct. 309, 310. Credit, Two hours each semester. 
PEARCE. 

523, 524. Life Insurance Accounting. A study of the underlying 
principles and arrangements of the accounting systems in life insurance 
companies, with special reference to the conventional annual statements. 
Credit, Two hours each semester. MILTON. 



BUSINESS ECONOMICS 

A. B. Wright, Professor, Head of Department. 

401, 402. Business Economics. This course will consider the place, 
function and conditions of survival of the privately owned and operated 
business organization in our economic order from the viewpoint of the business 
manager. Specific situations will be examined through cost analysis. Pre- 
requisite: Econ. 211, 212. Credit, Two hours each semester. WRIGHT. 

505, 506. Government Control of Business. This course will concern 
itself with such widely differing matters as price regulation, restriction and 
stimulus given to selected business activities, the government-sponsored cor- 
poration, taxation and government plans for post-war full employment. 
Prerequisite: Bus. Ec. 401, 402. Credit, Two hours each semester. WRIGHT. 

507, 508. Economic Effects of Advertising. A study of the develop- 
ment of modern advertising and its influence upon the nature, quality, and 
extent of the market. The business and economic problems caused by adver- 
tising will be analyzed. Prerequisite: Econ. 211, 212; Com. 317, 318. Credit, 
Two hours each semester. WRIGHT. 

511, 512. The Business Cycle. Analysis of the periodic fluctuations of 
prices, production, employment and consumption. Prerequisite: Econ. 211,212 
or Bus. Ec. 401, 402. Credit, Two hours each semester. WRIGHT. 



Page Thirty-nine 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



541, 542. Post War Economic Problems. This course will present an 
analysis of the problems of the postwar period as a consequence of war 
taxation, increased public indebtedness, conversion of industry to wartime 
production and mobilization of manpower for the armed services. Among the 
problems given special treatment are: plans for postwar full employment, 
methods of handling the national debt, international monetary relations and 
the re-establishment of normal international trade. Prerequisite: Econ. 211, 
212. Credit^ Two hours each semester. WRIGHT. 

BUSINESS LAW 

F. T. Ebberts, Professor, Head of Department; Lecturers: H. Eulenstein, 
A. Mazer, W. J. Davis. 

301, 302. Introductory Business Law. The aim of the course is to give 
the student such a knowledge of legal procedure as will enable him intelligently 
to study the law from the decided cases, and to acquaint him with the funda- 
mental legal doctrines in the basic fields of the law: contracts, agency, em- 
ployer and employee, partnerships and corporations. Credit, Three hours each 
semester. EBBERTS, MAZER, DAVIS. 

e301, 302. Introductory Business Law. The aim of the course is to 
give the student such a knowledge of legal procedure as will enable him in- 
telligently to study the law from the decided cases, and to acquaint him with 
the fundamental legal doctrines in the basic fields of the law: contracts, 
agency, employer and employee, suretyship, bailments, and insurance. Credit, 
Two hours each semester. EBBERTS, EULENSTEIN, MAZER. 

403, 404. Advanced Business Law. A study of Pennsylvania business 
law by text and case method. The subjects covered are: suretyship, negotiable 
instruments, sales, bailments, and insurance. Prerequisite: B. L. 301, 302. 
Credit, Two hours each semester. EBBERTS, EULENSTEIN, MAZER, 
DAVIS. 

e403, 404. Advanced Business Law. A study of the law of negotiable 
instruments, sales, partnership, and corporations, by the text and case method. 
Prerequisite: B. L. e301, 302. Credit, Two hours each semester. EBBERTS. 

e405, 406. Real Estate Law. This course is intended to give the student 
a practical knowledge of Pennsylvania law and practices pertaining to real 
estate. It includes a thorough discussion of estates, liens, agreements of sale, 
deeds, mortgages, landlord and tenant, and a general discussion of easements, 
restrictions, fixtures, and agency. Prerequisite: B. L. 301, 302. Credit, Two 
hours each semester. EBBERTS. 

COMMERCE 

John T. Morris, Professor, Head of Department; Professors: K. Pakstas, 
G. V. Tchirkow; Assistant Professors: H. Falkoff, W. Schusler, R. J. Worley; 
Instructors: J. Ridge, J. Timko; Lecturers: F. Haas, R. Jones. 

101, 102. Economic Geography. A course in regional economic geog- 
raphy, giving a survey of man's utilization of the earth in making a living. 
The foundation of the course is the study of the world's major geographic 
regions and of their present and potential production of food and raw materials 
for manufacture. Emphasis is placed on the relation of the different factors 
of the physical environment to man's economic activities. Required of Fresh- 
men in Business Administration. Credit, Three hours each semester. RIDGE, 
SCHUSLER, PAKSTAS. 



Page Forty 



SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



303, 304. Principles of Marketing. This course is designed to present 
the fundamental principles and methods of marketing raw materials, agri- 
cultural, and manufactured products. It includes a discussion of consumer 
buying habits and motives; market functions; analysis of the important 
market institutions; marketing policies in finance; price; speculation; com- 
petition, and advertising. Prerequisite: Com. 101, 102. Credit, Two hours 
each semester. FALKOFF, MORRIS, SCHUSLER, WORLEY. 

317, 318. Advertising Essentials. This course stresses those funda- 
mental principles of advertising a knowledge of which is important to all 
students aspiring to future executive positions, whether in accounting, sales, 
or other departments. Advertising as a factor in our national economy, as 
well as a tool in the hands of the individual producer and seller of goods or 
services, for the acceleration of distribution and sales, will be considered. 
A study will be made of advertising in the industrial, national, and retail 
fields; and of various media such as general magazines, business publications, 
newspapers, outdoor display, direct mail, radio, and television. The import- 
ance of product analysis, market research, and evaluation of different media 
for the attainment of given objectives will be stressed. Current advertising 
will be critically ^ examined and students will be given assignments in the 
planning and writing of complete advertisements. Credit, Two hours each 
semester. WORLEY. 

324. Business Communication. This course covers the entire field of 
business correspondence. The principles of modern business writing are 
explained, illustrated, and applied. Certain types of correspondence such 
as applications, inquiries, adjustments, credit letters, and sales letters receive 
particular attention. Abundant practice work is provided. Prerequisite: Eng. 
101, 102. Credit, Two hours each semester. TIMKO, B. ALBAUGH. 

t 405, 406. Foreign Trade. A survey of the nature, scope, and significance 
of international trade. Basic historical, geographic, and economic factors 
influencing the development of international commerce including: ocean 
transportation and shipping practices; customs procedure and importing; 
trade correspondence and advertising; commercial regulations and tariffs; 
foreign exchange, credits and collections; market surveys, and marine in- 
surance. Emphasis is given to analysis of foreign markets, trade channels, and 
methods of developing foreign markets. Study of recent changes in the various 
phases of foreign trade relations. Prerequisite: Com. 303, 304. Credit, Four 
hours each semester. TCHIRKOW, SCHUSLER. 

411, 412. Transportation. The development, operation and control of 
transportation by railroads, motor, water, and air. Much emphasis will be 
given to the American, German, British, and French railway systems, espec- 
ially from the economic and public aspects; analysis of the Interstate Com- 
merce Law and its amendments; interpretation of proposals for more adequate 
coordination and regulation of American transportation agencies. Prerequi- 
site: Econ. 211, 212. Credit, Four hours each semester. TCHIRKOW, 
SCHUSLER. 

413, 414. Traffic Management. This course deals with the organization 
and functioning of traffic departments of industrial concerns. Topics treated 
are: organization of shipping departments, car records for the control of 
private car lines; claims, routing, service and rating departments, regulations 
governing packing, shipping and sales; shippers' relations with carriers; 
freight and express tariffs; delays in transit; receipt and delivery of property. 
Intensive work in the race structures of the United States will be an important 
item. Prerequisite: Econ. 211, 212. Credit, Two hours each semester. HAAS. 



Page Forty-one 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



415, 416. Marketing Problems. A case study illustrative of typical 
merchandising and marketing problems encountered by manufacturers, raw 
material producers, wholesalers, retailers, and other distributors. Among the 
topics considered are the following: sales promotion and advertising; control 
of sales organization; selection of channels of wholesale and retail distribu- 
tion; types of retail enterprise; trade marks; price maintenance; produce 
exchanges, cooperative marketing, and the distribution of industrial goods. 
Readings, lectures, reports. Prerequisite: Com. 303, 304. Credit, Three hours 
each semester. MORRIS, SCHUSLER. 

419, 420. Advertising Procedures. Students whose work in Advertising 
Essentials has shown special aptitude in the skills required in the advertising 
profession will be admitted to this course, at the discretion of the teacher. 
Research as a frequently necessary preliminary to successful advertising will 
be stressed. Available sources of information on markets, population, circu- 
lation of media, and other data will be reviewed and practical fact-finding 
methods will be studied. The case method will be generally employed and 
problems presented will so far as possible simulate those encountered in 
actual practice. Complete campaigns will be planned in detail for both 
industrial and consumer goods. Emphasis will be placed on copywriting, 
but on copywriting as a function thoroughly integrated in the overall picture 
with product analysis, sales appeals, marketing methods, media employed, 
and other factors. Prerequisite: Com. 317, 318. Credit, Two hours each 
semester. HILBORN, WORLEY. 

421, 422. Principles of Salesmanship. A course in the principles of 
salesmanship covering fundamentals of selling, analyzing the product, organ- 
ization of selling background, psychology of sales appeal, buying motives, 
reserve arguments and development of the salesman's personality. Special 
attention is given to such topics as merchandising, promotion, creation of 
consumer demand, dealer contracts, good taste in buying and selling, business 
ethics, and market analysis. Credit, Two hours each semester. TIMKO, 
JONES. 

425, 426. Retail Store Management. A survey of the fundamentals of 
retail buying and merchandising with emphasis on the practical methods 
employed in successful retail organization; merchandise departmentalization 
and classification. Basic market trends. Merchandise resources, consumers 
demands, trends, and methods of estimating. Buying policies and methods. 
Practical effects of various methods of buying. The work of the buyer; buyer's 
records and reports; the merchandise manager's functions; merchandise plan- 
ning and control. Budgeting determination of standards of mark-up turnover, 
expense, model stocks, price lines, open-to-buy and capital requirements. 
Stock control. Stock shortages. Method of merchandising, slow selling goods. 
Resident buying offices and cooperation or group buying. Prerequisite: Com. 
303, 304. Credit, Two hours each semester. WORLEY. 

427, 428. Sales Management. A course dealing with the problems of 
wholesale and retail sales management, covering characteristics of a successful 
sales manager, relation of sales manager to sales and other departments. 
Marketing policies, selecting and training salesman, assigning territory, 
routing salesmen, methods of compensation, stimulating sales, planning sales 
literature, salesmen's reports. Prerequisite: Com. 421, 422. Credit, Two hours 
each semester. TIMKO. 

429, 430. The Sales Presentation. An examination of all types of sales 
presentation by analysis and comparison including oral presentation, visual 
presentation and oral presentation supplemented by visual and auditory 



Page Forty-two 



SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



aides. The student will be required to solve a series of problems which com- 
bine variously considerations of economics, ethics, logic, English, psychology 
and product knowledge. The use of action words and the semantic problems 
connected therewith will receive special consideration. Prerequisite: Com. 
421, 422. Credit, Two hours each semester. TIMKO. 

461. Business Psychology. This course deals with the principles of 
applied psychology as dependable guides toward more effective business 
relations. The same material is studied in 461, 462, but in a more compre- 
hensive fashion. Credit, Two hours. SCHUSLER. 

461, 462e. Business Psychology. This course deals with the principles 
of applied psychology as dependable guides toward more effective business 
relations, particularly in such matters as advertising, selling, procurement 
and executive relations. Prerequisite: Mgt. 201, 202. Credit, Two hours each 
semester. WORLEY. 

501, 502. Economic Geography of North America. A study of the 
present agricultural, commercial and industrial development of the North 
American continent with emphasis upon the regional geography of the United 
States and Canada. Prerequisite: Com. 303, 304. Credit, Two hours each 
semester. PAKSTAS. 

503, 504. Economic Geography of Latin America. An interpretation 
of industries, trade, governments and peoples south of the Rio Grande as 
affected by topography, resources, climate, and location. Attention will be 
given to critical economic problems such as labor, transportation and organi- 
zation. Some emphasis is given the domestic and international problems of 
the southern republics of the New World as well as their relationship to the 
United States since the World War. Prerequisite: Com. 303, 304. Credit, Two 
hours each semester. PAKSTAS. 

511, 512. Market Analysis. An evaluation is made of the utility of 
marketing research and of such of its techniques as internal analysis, question- 
naire design, sampling, and information collection. Application is made to 
practical problems of packaging, advertising, distribution and sales analysis. 
Prerequisite: Com. 303, 304 and Mgt. 351, 352 or consent of the instructor. 
Credit, Two hours each semester. FALKOFF. 



FINANCE 

Gerald L. Zimmerman, Associate Professor, Head of Department; 
Instructors: F. Milton, P. McDonough; Lecturers: P. O. Eitel, S. Sutton, 
J. B. Warden. 

311. Principles of Money and Banking. A study of the development 
and theory of money, credit and banking. This course deals with monetary 
standards, a history of currency, principles of note issue, an introductory 
study of the money markets, gold movements, foreign exchange, the structure 
and operation of commercial banks and contemporary business credit prac- 
tices. It also treats of central banking, the Federal Reserve system, transfer 
and collection of credit items, Federal fiscal policies, banking supervision and 
regulation, and the control of credit. Credit, Three hours. Required of Juniors 
in the School of Business Administration. ZIMMERMAN, McDONOUGH. 



Page Forty-three 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



e311, 312. Principles of Money and Banking. A course similar to 
Finance 311 but requiring a more detailed treatment of banking problems. 
Prerequisite: Econ. 211, 212. Credit, Two hours each semester. SUTTON. 

314. Corporation Finance. An examination of the principles and 
policies of corporate financial practice. The phases of promotion and organiza- 
tion; financial plans; types of securities and their limitations; underwriting, 
syndicating and selling of securities; credit, dividend, investment and main- 
tenance policies; budgets; expansion, combination and holding companies; 
investment trusts; failure, insolvency and reconstruction are studied. Particu- 
lar attention is paid to recent trends and the problems of social control. 
Problems dealing with each topic are used to supplement the discussion. 
Prerequisite: Acct. 101, 102. Credit, Three hours. ZIMMERMAN, Mc- 
DONOUGH. 

e313, 314. Corporation Finance. A course similar to Finance 314 but 
requiring attention to a greater number of problems of corporate financing. 
Prerequisite: Acct. 101, 102. Credit, Two hours each semester. ZIMMERMAN. 

315, 316. General Insurance. A study of risk-bearing as handled 
through the institution of insurance. Survey will be made of life insurance 
and the various forms of casualty insurance. Prerequisite: Econ. 211, 212. 
Credit, Three hours each semester. MILTON. 

e415, 416. Credit Management. This course deals with the organization 
and operation of the credit and collection departments of manufacturing, 
service and mercantile establishments. It includes a study of terms of sale; 
sources of credit information; analysis of risks; methods of protecting receiva- 
bles, internal administration and policies; legal and/or practical debtor- 
creditor positions; and cooperative practices. Prerequisite: Fin. e311, 312. 
Credit, Two hours each semester. EITEL. 

417, 418. Investment Analysis. The aim of this course is to develop a 
methodology and technique of dealing with diversified investment problems. 
The fundamental principles and practices involved in the proper use and care 
of savings and capital accumulations are covered by a study of such topics 
as: types of investors and their needs; protection; professional management 
of funds; classes of investments and their limitations; portfolio structure and 
revision; practical tests of investment theories; taxation; available informa- 
tion; financial customs. Prerequisites: Fin. 311, Fin. 314. Credit, Two hours 
each semester. ZIMMERMAN. 

419, 420. Personal and Consumer Finance. An analysis of in- 
dividual financial problems, bank accounts, installment buying, borrowing, 
savings, life insurance purchases, home^ ownership, trust funds, wills; with a 
discerning analysis of financial institutions catering primarily to individuals 
personal finance companies, savings and loan associations, credit unions, etc. 
Prerequisite: Fin. 311, 314. Credit, Two hours each semester. ZIMMERMAN. 

421, 422. Life Insurance. This course deals with the principles of in- 
surance, the need for life insurance; kinds of risks, types of contracts, analysis 
and use of provisions; the scientific basis of life insurance, the mortality 
table; calculation of premiums and reserves; insurance carriers; the law of 
life insurance; state regulation. Prerequisite: Econ. 211, 212. Credit, Two 
hours each semester. McDONOUGH, MILTON. 

423, 424. Casualty Insurance. A study of the structure of casualty 
insurance with intensive examination of its most important fields. Prerequi- 
site: Econ. 211, 212. Credit, Two hours each semester. MILTON. 



Pag t Forty-four 



SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



425, 426. Mathematics of Finance. A study of the mathematical 
theory of finance and the analysis and solution of practical problems. Special 
attention will be given to problems in the fields of investment, life insurance 
and life annuities. Prerequisite: Mgt. 115, 116. Credit, Two hours each 
semester. HILBORN. 

e503, 504. Problems in Credit Management. This course deals with 
the problems in the operation of the Credit and Collection Departments of 
manufacturing, service and mercantile establishments. It includes the practi- 
cal application of the fundamentals of business law, credit interpretation of 
financial statements, ratio analysis of both balance sheet and operating 
statements with purification for credit purposes; a study of insurance and 
bonding proceedings in the sale of merchandise, a study of interpretation of 
economic forecasts and administrative problems of the credit man. Prerequi- 
site: Fin. e415, 416, and permission of the instructor. Credit, Two hours each 
semester. EITEL. 

505, 506. Current Banking Problems. An advanced study of the prin- 
ciples of money, credit and banking making an analytical survey of recent 
changes and tendencies in this field. A substantial portion of the work is 
concerned with an examination of the doctrines of the modern schools of 
thought and the development of simplified research projects. Prerequisite: 
Fin. 311. Credit, Two hours each semester. WARDEN, ZIMMERMAN. 

509, 510. Commodity and Security Markets. Consisting of an 
analysis of the various commodity exchanges and markets; followed by an 
intensive study of the securities market, with particular emphasis on the 
New York Stock Exchange and the financial adjuncts which have grown up 
in association with it. Prerequisite: Fin. 311, 314. Credit, Two hours each 
semester. ZIMMERMAN. 

521, 522. Public and Private Retirement Plans. The development 
of retirement plans, public and private, including social security. Particular 
stress is laid on modern pension trusts and their relation to current tax laws 
and regulations. Credit, Two hours each semester. MILTON. 

MANAGEMENT 

J. P. Niland, Acting Head of Department; Assistant Professors: C. E. 
Hilborn, W. O'Brien, N. Pigman, C. Smith, R. Weidman; Instructors: J. N. 
Albaugh, T. Hogan, W. Slish, D. Staudt; Lecturers: B. Haley Albaugh, 
J. Devine, F. Sanford. 

115, 116. Business Mathematics. This course familiarizes the student 
with the background of, and reasons for, the different types of mathematical 
procedure in use in business, together with a study of the actual processes, 
particularly in Accounting, Finance, and Statistics. Topics include: calcula- 
tion and use of percentages, kinds of interest, such as simple, compound, and 
discount, types and significances of averages, analytical ratios, annuities, 
elementary tabular and graphic methods, etc. Required of Freshmen in 
Business Administration. Credit, Two hours each semester. ALBAUGH, 
HILBORN, HOGAN, SLISH. 

201. Business Organization and Management. This course deals 
with the fundamental principles of organization and management and their 
application in business enterprise. Lectures, cases, and problems are correlated 
to bring out clearly the functions of the several departments and their respect- 
ive positions in a well-arranged business. Throughout, emphasis is placed 



Page Forty-five 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



upon recent trends in management. The problems of adapting business to 
changing physical, social, and economic environment are developed by showing 
the functions of planning, organizing, and controlling. Credit. Three hours. 
ALBAUGH, SLISH. 

e201, 202. Business Organization and Management. A course 
similar to Mgt. 201 but more extensive in scope. Credit, Two hours each 
semester. SLISH. 

301. Secretarial Procedure. The course presents the fundamentals of 
secretarial duties, including: secretarial and stenographic duties; meeting 
office callers, appointments; telephoning; preparation of outgoing and in- 
coming mail; office reference books; filing. The technical equipment needed 
by a secretary is reviewed from the management point of view. Credit, Two 
hours. B. ALBAUGH. 

351, 352. Business Statistics. This course presents the elementary 
principles and methods of statistics as applied in making practical analysis 
of business problems. The case method of instruction predominates in the 
presentation of such topics as collection and tabulation of data, graphic 
presentation, analysis of time series, uses of index numbers, principles of 
sampling, correlation, etc. Required of Juniors in Business Administration. 
Credit, Two hours each semester. HOGAN, PIGMAN. 

407, 408. Production Management. This course presents the principles 
and methods of factory organization, operation and control. The topics treated 
include: means of production; functional organization; tools and workers; 
time and motion studies; master schedules; store management; inspection; 
maintenance; manufacturing standards and records; routing and layout. 
Prerequisite: Mgt. 201. Credit, Two hours each semester. ALBAUGH. 

e409. Office Management. An application of the principles of organiza- 
tion and management to office problems, functional organization, including 
the development of stenographic, clerical, filing, ordering, mailing, purchasing, 
advertising, and other departments; office planning and layout; materials, 
equipment, and appliances; selection, training, and promotion of personnel; 
standardization of procedure and routine work. Prerequisite: Mgt. 201. Credit, 
Two hours. B. ALBAUGH. 

411, 412. Personnel Management. This course provides and evaluates 
current practices in personnel administration, founded upon a understanding 
of the historical development of the problems and a sound study and discussion 
of current factors which confront the personnel manager in modern enter- 
prises. Special emphasis is placed upon employer-employee relationships as 
affected by political and sociological developments since 1920. Prerequisite: 
Mgt. 201. Credit, Two hours each semester. C. SMITH. 

413, 414. Industrial Relations. A course dealing with the problems 
encountered by top management in collective bargaining, labor disputes, 
government controls and public relations. Analysis will be developed to reveal 
both the internal and external influences of specific policies adopted by 
various business organizations. Prerequisite: Mgt. 505, 506. Credit, Two hours 
each semester. NILAND, ALBAUGH. 

415, 416. Motion and Time Study. The principles and practice of time 
analysis and micromotion analysis of work for the purpose of setting standards 
of performance and of improving methods of production. Emphasis will be 

E laced on applications to job evaluation. Prerequisite: Mgt. 201. Credit, Two 
ours each semester. WEIDMAN, SANFORD. 



Page Forty-six 



SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



451, 452. Business Policy. This course is designed to clarify and organize 
the student's understanding of executive responsibility in business decisions, 
and to investigate intensively current technological, political, and social 
developments that affect policy formation. Coordination between specialized 
fields of Business Administration is expounded as a basic principle of system- 
atic management. Prerequisite: Mgt. 201. Required of Seniors in Business 
Administration. Credit, Two hours each semester. O'BRIEN, STAUDT. 

e461, 462. The Management of Small Enterprise. This course deals 
with the place and function of the small business enterprise in our economic 
system. Consideration is given to the conditions essential for starting a small 
business, the selection of the type of business, the procedure of organization 
and the principles of management and finance applicable to the small enter- 

Krise ; Some of the topics treated are: location; buying; receiving and ware- 
ousing; prices and pricing problems; selling, advertising and sales promotion; 
office organization; records and record keeping; credits and collections; risk 
and riskbearing; employer-employee relations; forecasting and research. 
Prerequisite: Mgt. 201. Credity Two hours each semester. DEVINE. 

471, 472. Statistical Quality Control. The fundamentals of statistics 
are here applied to control techniques. The student is taught how to design 
and install control systems and charts and to train personnel in their use. 
Topics included are: construction of Shewart charts; Dodge, Romig and 
Army Ordnance tables for acceptance sampling; quality assurance for sampl- 
ing by measurement; introduction to sequential analysis; methods of correla- 
tion; elementary analysis of variances. The primary objective of the course 
is to meet the needs of persons responsible for the designing of methods of 
control or appraisal of manufactured products or processes. Prerequisite: 
Mgt. 201 or 351, 352, or approved equivalent. Credity Two hours each semester. 
SANFORD. 

507, 508. Advanced Business Statistics. A seminar course, in which the 
student develops and presents for general discussion timely and practical 
studies, requiring understanding and employment of relatively advanced 
statistical procedures. The student is responsible for all phases of the study, 
from its definition to preparation of final reports for publication. These studies 
ordinarily require research into particular fields of business activity and super- 
vision of field and clerical personnel. Prerequisite: Mgt. 351, 352. Credit, 
Two hours each semester. T. HOGAN. 

509. Principles of Industrial Purchasing. This course deals with the 
nature of the purchasing function, the organization of the purchasing de- 
partment, purchasing procedures and the principles governing the exercise of 
the purchasing function. Prerequisite: Mgt. 201. Credity Two hours. STAUDT. 

510. Industrial Psychology. An examination of the psychological 
approach to industrial problems from the management point of view. Empha- 
sis will be placed on the problems of morale, attitude and motivation. Pre- 
requisite: Psych. 220; Mgt. 201. Credit, Two hours. NILAND. 

e511, 512. Principles of Industrial Engineering. This course is based 
upon the premise that industrial engineering is essentially a cost reduction 
program, and special attention is given to the tools of accounting and engi- 
neering that lead to this end. In order to give the student the proper back- 
ground, a preliminary study is made of the evolution of mass production and 
the development of standards. This is followed by a study of the application 
of present-day methods to the problem of cost reduction. The following general 
topics will be treated: development of mass production; development of 



Page Forty-seven 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



standards; wage incentives; time and motion study; work simplification; 
personnel relations; material control; material standards; waste recovery; 
plant layout; process development; material handling; yield improvement; 
machine development; quality improvement; sales service; problems in 
initiating and operating cost reduction work. Prerequisite: Acct. 101, 102, 201, 
202. Credit, Two hours each semester. DEVINE. 

531, 532. Principles of Public Administration. This course will 
present the principles, methods and procedures by which public business is 
transacted in government administrative offices, bureaus, agencies and 
government corporations. Comparison will be made with the practice of pri- 
vate business and voluntary associations and agencies. Prerequisites: Pol.Sci. 
201, 202; Mgt. 201. Credit, Two hours each semester. PIGMAN. 

537, 538. Job Evaluation. A study in detail of the four types or methods 
of job evaluation together with forms and illustrations of successful applica- 
tions now used in the Greater Pittsburgh area and other industrial centers. 
Attention will also be given to evaluation methods and experience in public 
administration. Prerequisite: Mgt. 411, 412. Credit, Two hours each semester. 
NILAND. 

539. Safety Engineering. A study of industrial safety stressing personal 
training and the design of equipment to prevent and control accidents and 
hazards; consideration is given to the organization and supervision of a safety 
program with emphasis on cost factors, safety inspection, protective equip- 
ment, machine guards and preventative measures. Prerequisite: Mgt. 407, 
408. Credit, Three semester hours, WEIDMAN. 

540. Materials, Handling and Plant Layout. A practical analysis 
and appraisal of the development, design and layout of effective industrial 
plants. The applications of materials handling and their integration with 
the production process. Discussion of equipment and methods of handling. 
Prerequisite: Mgt. 407, 408. Credit, Three semester hours. WEIDMAN. 

551, 552. Management Research. Individual research in specific 
problems in personal contact with business enterprises in the Greater Pitts- 
burgh district. Prerequisite: completion of a minimum of sixteen semester 
hours in advanced management courses and consent of instructor of the 
course. Credit, Two semester hours each semester. NILAND, C. SMITH, 
WEIDMAN. 



Page Forty-eight 



SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



MILITARY DIVISION 

RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS, DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 

Pittsburgh 19, Pennsylvania 

Colonel Russell W. Schmelz, ARTY, RA Coordinator 

FACULTY 

Department of Military Science and Tactics 

Colonel Russell W. Schmelz, ARTY, RA Head of Department, Professor 

B.S. in E.E. Iowa State College 1926. Adv. O.C. FAS 1947. 

5 Campaigns Europe. Federal and Reserve Service 26 years. 

Lieutenant Colonel Charles F. Moore, ARTY, USAR Assistant Professor 

B.S. in Educ. Purdue University 1926. M.S. in Econ. Purdue University 1936. 
Adv. O.C. FAS, 1947. Abn. Tng. TIS, 1948. 

6 Campaigns EAME, Japan Occupation, 3 Campaigns Korea. Federal 
and Reserve Service 26 years. 

Major Alfred C. Bieri, ARTY, RA Assistant Professor 

B.S. Colorado State A&M College. Adv. O.C. FAS 1949. 
5 Campaigns Europe. Federal Service 11 years. 

Captain William C. French, ARTY, USAR Assistant Professor 

B.S. University of Pittsburgh. OCS FAS 1942. 

8 Campaigns Europe-Africa. Federal and Reserve Service 9 years. 

WOJG James T. Doherty, USA Instructor 

LL.B. University of Balitmore 1938. TIS 1944. AAAS 1946. 
Middle East 2*^ years. Federal Service 12 years. 

WOJG Robert A. Simpson, ARTY, RA Instructor 

FAI & S 1940. SNCOC-FAS 1946. 
Federal Service 28 years. 

Master Sergeant Harold F. Showalter, ORD, RA Instructor 

MSFAS 1940. SNCOC-FAS 1946. FTVC 1946. 
4 Campaigns Europe. Federal Service 22 years. 

Master Sergeant Leslie J. Walker, Jr., ARTY, RA Instructor 

TI&E School, Carlisle Bks. 1947. 

Korean Occupation, 8 Campaigns Korea. Federal Service 7 years. 

Sergeant First Class ICenneth B. Campbell, QM, RA Instructor 

83 months Asiatic-Pacific. Federal Service 8 years. 

Sergeant First Class Walter Leskowat, AG, RA Instructor 

B.S. University of Pittsburgh 1950. 

1 Campaign Asiatic-Pacific. Federal and Reserve Service 9 years. 

Sergeant First Class George T. Tyberg, ARTY, RA Instructor 

O.C.S. 1942. 

3 Campaigns Europe. Federal Service 8 years. 

Sergeant Donald G. Freeman, ARTY, RA Instructor 

Darmstadt QMS 1948. Ord. Sch. 1946. 
Federal Service 7 years. 



Page Forty-nine 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



Department of Air Science and Tactics 

Lt. Colonel Sam R. Oglesby, Jr., USAF Head of Department, Professor 

Air Force Flying School 1941. Spartanburg Junior College 1939. 
6 Campaigns Europe. Federal Service 12 years. 

Ma job Richard M. Colegrove, USAF Assistant Professor 

B.S. in Econ. Duquesne University 1933. LL.B. Duquesne University 1937. 
Air Service Command School 1942. Air University 1951. 
6 Campaigns Europe. Federal Service 10 years. 

Major Milton P. Cook, USAF Assistant Professor 

A.B. University of Michigan 1940. LL.B. University of Virginia 1949. 
Air University 1951. 
3 Campaigns Asiatic-Pacific. Federal Service 11 years. 

Captain Ralph H. Durham, USAF Assistant Professor 

Air Force Flying School 1944. B.S. Texas A & M 1948. 

2 Campaigns Asiatic-Pacific. Federal Service 9 years. 

Captain Jack H. Hague, USAF Assistant Professor 

Air Force Flying School 1942. B.S. in Ed. Ohio University 1947. 
M.S. Ohio University 1950. Air University 1951. 

3 Campaigns Europe. Federal Service 10 years. 

Captain William P. Thompson, USAF Assistant Professor 

Air Force Flying School 1943. Air University 1946. 
Univ. of Alabama AF ROTC 1948. 

2 Campaigns Southwest Pacific. Federal Service 11 years. 

Master Sergeant George D'Aloiso, USAF Instructor 

Administrative School 1950. Air University 1951 

1 Campaign Asiatic-Pacific. European Theater 3 years. 
Federal Service 8 years. 

Master Sergeant Marion A. Miller, USAF Instructor 

Air Force Flying School 1940. Classification School 1948. 
Asiatic-Pacific 2 years. Federal Service 16 years. 

Technical Sergeant James G. Acey, USAF Instructor 

AF Engineering & Operations School 1940. 

North Atlantic Theater 3 years. Federal Service 10 years. 

Technical Sergeant Joseph Knoneberg, USAF Instructor 

European Intelligence School 1948. Air University 1951. 

Asiatic-Pacific 6 months. Europe 3 years. Federal Service 10 years. 

Technical Sergeant Thomas S. Ireland, USAF Instructor 

Newfoundland Base Command 2 years. Federal Service 11 years. 



Page Fifty 



SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

The military service maintains Departments of Military Science and Air 
Science and Tactics of the Reserve ^ Officers Training Corps at Duquesne 
University for Field Artillery and Air Force Administration and Logistics 
or Flight Operations. Duquesne University's ROTC Field Artillery unit is 
unique inasmuch as it is the only Field Artillery unit in Pennsylvania and the 
only unit in the Pittsburgh area leading to a commission in a combat arm of 
the Armed Services. 

The Mission of the Departments. The Reserve Officers Training 
Corps has two missions. The first is to produce junior officers who have the 
qualities and attributes essential to their progressive and continued develop- 
ment as officers in the United States Army and Air Force. The second is to lay 
the foundations of intelligent citizenship within the student and to give him 
such basic military training as will be of benefit to himself and to the military 
service if he becomes a member thereof. Special emphasis is placed upon 
"Leadership" to assist Duquesne men in meeting any situation in life with 
success and honor. The development of physical fitness, good posture and 
military bearing is stressed. 

Organization. The Staff and Faculty of the Departments are detailed 
from the Army and the Air Force. The Federal Government furnishes the 
equipment and supplies used in the Departments, including uniforms and text 
books. Courses are prescribed and methods of instruction followed which will 
give the student the breadth of vision desired in the officers of the Armed 
Forces and will give him practical knowledge in the performance of military 
duties. Students enrolled in the Reserve Officers Training Corps are designated 
ROTC Cadets. Cadets are not members of the military service and are not 
subject to military law or the Articles of War but are subject to the reg- 
ulations prescribed by the University. 

Basic and Advanced Course. There are two courses in each Depart- 
ment, each consisting of two years. The Basic Course corresponds to the 
Freshman and Sophomore years. These^ two years in one of the Departments 
are required of all non-veteran students in the courses of the College of Liberal 
Arts and Sciences, School of Business Administration, School of Education 
and School of Music. Veteran students are given credit for one or two years 
of the Basic Course for honorably terminated active service as determined 
by the Professor of Military or Air Science and Tactics. 

The Advanced Course corresponds to the Junior and Senior years. This 
course is elective by the student and selective by the Professors of Military 
and Air Science and Tactics. Students who enroll in a course are expected 
to complete the two years. The Army or Air Force authorities may in certain 
cases on recommendation of the President authorize a student to drop the 
course. 

Commission. Graduates of the Advanced Course are awarded commis- 
sions in the Reserve^ Corps of the^ United States Army or United States Air 
Force. An opportunity for commission in the Regular Army or Air Forceis 
open to those students whose records entitle them to be designated as Dis- 
tinguished Military Students. Regular commissions are also > awarded to 
officers of the Reserve Forces who are successful in a competitive tour of 
active duty following graduation in the U. S. Army, or by direct appointment 
while on active duty in the U. S. Air Force. 



Page Fifty-ont 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



Academic Credit. _ Credit toward graduation of two hours per semester 
is awarded for the Basic Course. The academic credit for the Advanced 
Course is three hours per semester. This counts as elective credit in the 
requirements for the degree in most courses of each school in which the Basic 
Course is required. 

Eligibility. For the Basic Course a student must be a citizen of the 
United States, able to pass a physical examination and between fourteen (14) 
and twenty three (23) years of age. For the Advanced Course satisfactory 
completion of the Basic Course, approval of the President of the University 
and recommendation of the Professor of Military Science and Tactics or of 
the Professor of Air Science and Tactics, are required. The number of students 
who may be accepted^ for the Advanced Course is established by a quota 
allotted to the University by the services. Qualified veterans may be accepted 
into the Advanced Course directly. Credit toward advanced standing is 
allowed for work completed at other Senior ROTC units and under prescribed 
regulations for that completed at Junior ROTC units. Students who are 
conscientious objectors, present or former members of subversive organiza- 
tions or who have been convicted of serious offenses by a court are not eligible. 

Uniform and Allowances. The complete uniform of the same pattern 
and material as^ the # Army or Air Force Officer's uniform, depending upon the 
branch of service in which enrolled, including the overcoat and shoes, is 
furnished l>y the Government for all basic students. The University draws 
commutation for and furnishes Advanced Course students with a tailored 
uniform including trench coat. The uniform is given to the student by the 
University upon being commissioned. 

A monetary allowance of ninety cents (90jf) per day up to 595 days, 
totalling $553.50, is paid in monthly payments to students while pursuing 
the Advanced Course. 

Summer Camp. Each Advanced Course student attends one summer 
camp. This camp is of six weeks duration. It is usually attended > between 
the first and second years of the Advanced Course. Under exceptional cir- 
cumstances authority may be obtained to permit attendance after completing 
the Basic Course or after completing the second year of the Advanced Course. 
The camp affords application of the subjects studied during the previous 
school years, including qualification in arms. A comprehensive athletic 
program utilizing the golf and tennis courts, ball diamonds, swimming pools 
and other facilities of the post is conducted. Evening social and recreational 
activities are conducted on the post. Rail transportation to and from camp, 
all living expenses and any necessary medical care is furnished by the Govern- 
ment. Students are paid the regular service pay of the first grade while at 
camp. 

Rifle Team. A University Rifle Team is sponsored by the Departments 
of Military and Air Science. All ROTC Cadets are eligible to compete for 
places on the team. The rifle team is recognized as a minor sport and its 
members are eligible for the award of the University letter. The team competes 
in matches with other colleges. Duquesne ROTC teams have achieved na- 
tional recognition. 

Honor Societies. The Departments sponsor the Pershing Rifles (a 
National Honor Military Society), the Scabbard and Blade (National Hono- 
rary Military Fraternity), and the William J. McKee Squadron of the Arnold 
Air Society (National Honorary Air Force Society). 



Page Fifty-two 



SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



CURRICULA 
Department of Military Science and Tactics 

Basic Course 

101, 102. Military Science. Leadership to include drill and exercise 
of command. Basic military subjects including Military Organization; Maps 
and Aerial Photographs; Individual Weapons and Marksmanship; First Aid 
and Hygiene; Military Problems of the United States; Military Policy of the 
United States; Evolution of Warfare. Three hours per week, 2 credits per 
semester. 

201, 202. Military Science. Artillery. Continuation of leadership, 
stressing development of poise and confidence in command positions and 
small unit combat exercises; sixty hours of elementary tactics and technique 
of Field Artillery. Three hours per week, 2 credits per semester. 

Advanced Course 

301, 302. Military Science. Artillery. Continuation of leadership 
with warrants in the cadet corps and including command of units. More 
advanced Field Artillery Tactics and Technique including Battery Executive; 
Tactics; Gunnery; Surveying; Communications; Weapons and Marksman- 
ship including rifle firing on range. Five hours per week, 3 credits per semester. 

401, 402. Military Science. Artillery. Continuation of leadership with 
commissions in the cadet corps and assignment to command and staff positions 
with cadet batteries and assignments in instructing in classes and at drills. 
More advanced general military subjects including Military Law; Military 
Administration; Military Teaching Methods and Psychological Warfare; 
Foundations of National Power; Advanced Tactics and Technique of Field 
Artillery including the Military team; Gunnery; Surveying; Fire Direction 
Center; Supply and Evacuation; Command and Staff; Military Intelligence 
and new developments. Five hours per week, 3 credits per semester. 

Completion of this course will fit the student to assume duties of a battery 
officer in a field artillery unit. 



Department of Air Science and Tactics 

Basic Course 

101, 102. Air Science. Leadership to include drill and exercise of 
command. Sixty hours of World Political Geography, a study of the areas 
and resources of the various states organized as political units, together with 
a study of the people who live in these areas. Three hours per week, 2 credits 
per semester. 

201, 202. Air Science. Continuation of leadership, drill and exercise of 
command. Organization for the Defense of the United States; Maps, Aerial 
Photographs and Aerial Navigation; Aerodynamics and Propulsion; Meteor- 
ology and Navigation; Applied Air Power; and Personal Maintenance. Three 
hours per week, 2 credits per semester. 



Page Fifty-thrte 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



Advanced Course 

301, 302. Air Science. Continuation of Leadership with warrants in 
the cadet corps and supervision of units. Global problems as illustrated in 
World War II; Logistics; Air Operations; ninety hours in Air Administration 
and Logistics or Flight Operations .Five hours per week, 3 credits per semester. 

Summer Camp. Air Force. Tentatively scheduled at Langley Air 
Force Base, Virginia. 

401, 402. Air Science. Continuation of leadership with commissions in 
the cadet corps and assignments of instructing classes. Applied Fields of 
Officer Orientation, USAF Inspector General's Department, Military Law 
and Boards; Military Teaching Methods, and Air Force Management. Fifty 
hours of Air Administration and Logistics or Flight Operations. Five hours 
per week, 3 credits per semester. 

Completion of this course will qualify the student to assume adminis- 
trative or logistical assignments as a 2nd Lieutenant at a USAF Base or 
Tactical Organization. 



Page Fifty-four 



FORM OF BEQUEST 

Because of my interest in the educational work being 
done by Duquesne University, and in consideration 
of others subscribing, I hereby subscribe and promise 
to pay to Duquesne University, a corporation existing 
under the laws of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, 

the sum of dollars. 

Date Signed 

Witness 



Duquesne University 



College of Liberal Arts and Sciences 

School of Law 

School of Business Administration 

School of Pharmacy 

School of Music 

School of Education 

School of Nursing 

Graduate School 



Bulletins of the above schools are published separately 
and may be obtained on request from the 

DIRECTOR OF ADMISSIONS 

Duquesne University 

PITTSBURGH 19, PA. GRant 1-4635 



The 
DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 

BULLETIN 



© 



Announcement of the 

COLLEGE OF 
LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 

1952-1953 




DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 
PITTSBURGH 19, PENNA. 



The 
DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY ^ * * 
BULLETIN **"^ 

VOLUME XL JUNE 1952 NUMBER 4 

Announcement of the 

COLLEGE OF 
LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 

For the Session 

1952-1953 




THE COLLEGE OFFICE 
DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 
PITTSBURGH 19, PENNSYLVANIA 



VOLUME XL JUNE 1952 NUMBER 4 



CALENDAR 

1952-1953 

SUMMER SESSION 

June 12, 13, 14, Thursday, Friday from 9:00-4:00; Saturday until Noon 

Registration, Eight Weeks Session, Day and Evening 

June 16, Monday Eight Weeks Session begins 

June 26, 27, 28, Thursday, Friday from 9:00-4:00; Saturday until Noon 

Registration, Six Weeks Day Session 

June 30, Monday Six Weeks Session begins 

July 3, Thursday Latest date to apply for degrees: August Candidates 

July 4, Friday Holiday 

July 12, Saturday Class Day 

August 8, Friday Summer Sessions end: Commencement 

1952-1953 

FIRST SEMESTER 

September 8, 9, Monday, Tuesday from 1:00-4:00 Registration 

September 8, 9, Monday, Tuesday from 4:30-7:30 Registration: Evening School 
September 10, 11, 12, 13, Wednesday to Friday from 9:00-4:00; 

Saturday until Noon Registration 

September 15, Monday First Semester begins 

September 27, Saturday Latest date for change of schedule, etc. 

October 25, Saturday Latest date for removal of E, I, X grades 

October 25, Saturday Latest date to apply for degrees: January Candidates 

November 1, Saturday Holiday 

November 5, Wednesday Mid-Semester Examinations begin 

November 26, Wednesday {after last class) Thanksgiving Vacation begins 

December 1, Monday Classes resumed 

December 8, Monday . Holiday 

December 20, Saturday {after last class) Christmas Vacation begins 

January 5, Monday Classes resumed 

January 15, Thursday Final Examinations begin 

January 24, Saturday Final Examinations: Saturday Classes 

1952-1953 

SECOND SEMESTER 

February 2, 3, Monday, Tuesday from 1:00-4:00. ....... .^ Registration 

February 2, 3, Monday, Tuesday from 4:30-7:30 Registration: Evening School 
February 4, 5, 6, 7, Wednesday to Friday from 9:00-4:00; 

Saturday until Noon Registration 

February 9, Monday Second Semester begins 

February 21, Tuesday Latest date for change of schedule, etc. 

February 21, Tuesday Latest date to apply for degrees: June Candidates 

March 21, Wednesday. Latest date for removal of E, I, X grades 

April 1, Wednesday {after last class) Easter Vacation begins 

April 7, Tuesday Classes resumed 

April 8, Wednesday Mid-Semester Examinations begin 

May 14, Thursday Holiday 

May 30, Saturday Holiday 

June 1, Monday Final Examinations begin 

June 6, Saturday Final Examinations: Saturday Classes 

June 7, Sunday Baccalaureate Services and Commencement Exercises 

Registration is conducted during the days listed in the above calendar. 
Only by rare exception, by consent of the Dean, and on payment of a penalty, 
will late registration be permitted. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Calendar Rear of Title Page 

Administration 4 

Committees 5 

General Statement of the University 7 

College Faculty 11 

Curricular Information 21 

Academic Regulations 24 

Graduation 27 

The School Year 29 

Tuition and Fees 30 

Student Aid 33 

Extra-Curricular Academic Organizations 34 

Courses of Instruction : 

Department of Biology 36 

Department of Chemistry 38 

Department of Classical Languages 40 

Department of Economics 41 

Department of English 43 

Department of History 45 

Department of Journalism 46 

Department of Mathematics 51 

Department of Modern Languages 52 

Department of Philosophy and Religion 54 

Department of Physics 56 

Department of Psychology 57 

Department of Social Sciences 59 

Departments of Military and Air Science and Tactics . . 63 

List of Students 1951-1952 69 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



THE UNIVERSITY PERSONNEL 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Most Reverend John Francis Dearden, D.D. 
Chancellor 

Vert Reverend Vernon F. Gallagher, C.S.Sp., Ph.D. 

President 

Reverend J. Gerald Walsh, C.S.Sp., Ph.D. 
Vice-President 

Reverend Joseph R. Kletzel, C.S.Sp., M.A. 
Secretary 

Reverend Sebastian J. Schiffgens, C.S.Sp., B.A. 
Treasurer 

Maurice J. Murpht, D.Ed. 
Registrar 

Reverend William J. Holt, C.S.Sp., B.A. 
Director of Student Welfare 

Reverend James F. McNamara, C.S.Sp., B.A. 
Dean of Men 

Elizabeth K. Wingerter, M.A. 
Dean of Women 

Margaret Eleanor McCann, B.S. (Library Science) 

Librarian 

Reverend Salvator J. Federici, C.S.Sp.» Ph.D, 
Director of Admissions 

Reverend Joseph F. Rengers, C.S.Sp., B.A. 
University Chaplain 

Colonel Russell W. Schmelz, U.S.A. 
Coordinator of Military and Air Science and Tactics 

James Conlet, M.D. 
Director of Student Health 



Four 






COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 



COMMITTEES 

UNIVERSITY COUNCIL 

Rev. J. Gerald Walsh, C.S.Sp Chairman 

C. Gerald Bropht Rev. George A. Harcar, C.S.Sp. 

Albert B. Wright Ruth D. Johnson 

Rev. Joseph R. Kletzel, C.S.Sp. Colonel Russell W. Schmelz 

Hugh C. Muldoon Maurice J. Murphy 

Rev. William R. Hurney, C.S.Sp. Margaret Eleanor McCann 



COMMITTEE ON ADMISSIONS AND STUDENT STANDING 

Maurice J. Murphy Chairman 

Rev. Salvator J. Federici, C.S.Sp. Gerald L. Zimmerman 
Rev. James A. Phalen, C.S.Sp. Rev. William R. Hurney, C.S.Sp. 
Joseph A. Zapotocky Helen M. Kleylb 

Alice C. Feehan 



COMMITTEE ON SCHOLARSHIPS 

Rev. George A. Harcar, CS.Sp Chairman 

Rev. William F. Hogan, C.S.Sp. Andrew J. Kozora 
Primitivo Colombo Regis J. Leonard 



COMMITTEE ON EXAMINATIONS 

University 

College of Arts and Sciences Tobias D. Duneelberger, Chairman 

School of Business Administration John T. Morris 

School of Pharmacy Joseph A. Zapotocky 

School of Music Brunhilde Dorsch 

School of Education Aaron M. Snyder 

School of Nursing Alice C. Feehan 



COMMITTEE ON STUDENT WELFARE 

Rev. William J. Holt, C.S.Sp Chairman 

Rev. Joseph F. Rengers, C.S.Sp. Elizabeth K. Wingerter 

Rev. James F. McNamara, C.S.Sp. James Conley, M.D. 



Five 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



ADVISORY BOARD 



Joseph H. Bialas 
Lou R. Cbandall 
Walter J. Curley 
Edward J. Hanley 
R. B. Heppenstall 
John J. Kane 
J. P. Lalley 
David L. Lawrence 
Charles McKenna Lynch 
William J. McIlvane 
John P. Monteverde 
Dominic Navarro 



Edward J. O'Brien 

John A. Robertshaw 

John P. Robin 

John P. Roche 

W. F. Rockwell, Sr. 

J. T. Ryan, Jr. 

William A. Seifert, Sr. 

J. V. Smith 

William J. Strassbubgeb 

Samuel A. Weiss 

Irwin D. Wolf 



Six 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 

DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 

PITTSBURGH 19, PA. 

GENERAL STATEMENT 

LOCATION 

The University, an urban institution serving the needs of an 
industrial city and surrounding communities in Western Penn- 
sylvania, is situated upon an eminence overlooking Pittsburgh's 
Golden Triangle. The campus on which most of the University 
buildings are located surrounds the Administration Building at 
Bluff and Colbert Streets in downtown Pittsburgh. The School 
of Law and the School of Business Administration are off-campus 
in the Fitzsimons Building at 331 Fourth Avenue, in the heart 
of the financial district. 

The University is easily reached by any of the railroad, bus, 
or trolley lines leading into downtown Pittsburgh. 

HISTORICAL STATEMENT 

In 1878 the Fathers of the Congregation of the Holy Ghost 
and the Immaculate Heart of Mary established a College of Arts 
and Letters which was incorporated in 1881 as the Pittsburgh 
Catholic College of the Holy Ghost. 

In 1911 a university charter was obtained and the Pittsburgh 
Catholic College became Duquesne University, with authority 
to grant degrees in the Arts and Sciences, Law, Medicine, 
Dentistry, and Pharmacy. This charter was further extended in 
1930 to include degrees in Education and Music, and in 1937 
to include degrees in Nursing. 

The present schools of the University, all offering courses 
leading to degrees, are the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, 
the School of Law, the School of Business Administration, the 
School of Pharmacy, the School of Music, the School of Educa- 
tion, the School of Nursing, and the Graduate School. 

The student body now numbers over 4,000 each year. 

Women students are admitted to all departments of the 
University. 

PHILOSOPHY AND OBJECTIVES 

Duquesne University is a Catholic institution of higher 
learning. It believes that education is concerned with man in 
his entirety, body and soul. It believes that education consists 



Seven 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



in the preservation, transmission and improvement of the 
material and temporal order through its elevation, regulation 
and perfection, in accordance with the example and teaching of 
Christ and His Church. It believes that the product of education 
is the man of true character, who thinks, judges and acts con- 
stantly and consistently in accordance with right reason with a 
view to his ultimate end. 

The University has as its responsibility the conservation, 
interpretation and transmission of knowledge and ideas and 
values, the quest of truth through scholarly research, and the 
preparation for vocational and avocational fields by intelligent 
and thorough training in the principles underlying these fields. 
The general aim is to facilitate through the media of instruction 
and related collegiate activities the development of purposeful 
character, intellectual accomplishment, emotional and social 
maturity and professional efficiency. 

The University attains this aim in the Colleges (Schools) by 
guiding the student through a cultural core program, through a 
concentrated study of a major field of interest, through an 
organized program of co-curricular and extra-curricular activities, 
and through established personnel services. 

The University aims specifically to assist the student in : 

1. The development of a sound philosophy of life through 
an understanding of spiritual and physical, intellectual 
and moral, social and aesthetic aims and values. 

2. The development of a well-balanced personality. 

3. The development of a broader understanding of our 
culture. 

4. The development of scholarship and continuous pro- 
fessional growth. 

5. The development of a constant evaluation of himself as 
an individual and as a member of the community. 

6. The development of a genuine American attitude. 



ACCREDITATION — MEMBERSHIP 

The University is accredited by the State Council on Educa- 
tion of the Pennsylvania Department of Public Instruction, and 
by the Middle States Association of Colleges and Secondary 
Schools. 



Eight 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 



It is a member of the American Council on Education, the 
Association of American Colleges, the American Association of 
Urban Universities, the National Catholic Educational Associa- 
tion, the Catholic Educational Association of Pennsylvania, the 
National Education Association, the Pennsylvania State Edu- 
cation Association, and the American Association of Collegiate 
Registrars. 

The University is affiliated with the Catholic University of 
America. 

The Colleges (Schools) of the University hold memberships 
in numerous educational societies and associations. 



CAMPUS FACILITIES 

CHAPEL 

The University Chapel, located on the Campus, provides the 
opportunity for fulfilling the religious obligations for Catholic 
students. Morning Masses are said daily and a Mass at the noon 
hour is said every school day during the year. There are regular 
hours for hearing confessions, and special devotions are held for 
feastdays. The University Chaplain is available at all times. 

THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES 

The Main Library is housed in its own building on the campus, 
at the corner of Locust and Colbert Streets. The hours are from 
8:30 A.M. to 9:00 P.M. Monday through Friday, and from 8:30 
A.M. to 5:00 P.M. on Saturday. The book collection contains 
more than 45,000 volumes. 

There is a downtown library reading room in the Fitzsimons 
Building, where its facilities are available to all students. The 
hours here are from 9:00 A.M. to 9:00 P.M. Monday through 
Friday. The books in this collection are supplied from the Main 
Library. 

The John E. Laughlin Memorial Library, the library of the 
School of Law, is located in the Fitzsimons Building. The book 
collection here numbers over 10,000 volumes. This library is 
open every hour of the day and night throughout the year, and 
is for the exclusive use of students in the School of Law. 

BOOKSTORE 

The University Bookstore is located in the rear of the 
Administration Building facing the campus. 



Nine 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



DORMITORIES AND CAFETERIA 

Limited dormitory facilities are provided on the campus for 
out-of-town students. The University operates a cafeteria for 
the convenience of all students. Off-campus rooms in private 
homes are under the supervision of the Dean of Men. 



ATHLETICS 

The University is represented in intercollegiate athletic com- 
petition in basketball, golf, tennis and baseball. 

The instructors in physical education supervise intramural 
programs in various competitive sports. All physically able 
students participate in these programs. 

THE GUIDANCE BUREAU 

The Guidance Bureau contains the offices of the Director of 
Student Welfare, the Dean of Men, the Dean of Women, the 
University Chaplain, the University Physician, the University 
Dispensary, the Director of Testing, the Department of Psy- 
chology, the Speech Clinic. The Bureau makes available to 
students in all Schools of the University spiritual, physical and 
vocational guidance. 



Ten 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 

THE COLLEGE OF 
LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 

FACULTY 
1952-1953 



ADMINISTRATION 

Rev. Joseph R. Kletzel, C.S.Sp., M.A Dean 

Rev. James A. Phalen, C.S.Sp., M.Ed Assistant Dean 

Marguerite S. Puhl Secretary 

TEACHING STAFF 

Charles G. Algier Assistant Professor of Classics 

B.A. Loyola University, Chicago, 1941 
M.A. Loyola University, Chicago, 1942 

Paul H. Anderson Associate Professor of Political Science 

B.A. University of Notre Dame, 1938 
M.A. University of Notre Dame, 1939 
Ph.D. University of Notre Dame, 1942 

Stephen J. Angelo Lecturer in Physics 

B.S. University of Pennsylvania, 1939 
M.S. University of Pennsylvania, 1940 
Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania, 1942 

Phillip Bannister Instructor in Philosophy 

B.A. St. Mary's Seminary, 1942 
M.Ed. Duquesne University, 1948 

George P. Bastyr Assistant Professor of Economics 

B.A. Gettysburg College, 1947 
M.Litt. University of Pittsburgh, 1949 
Graduate Work, University of Pittsburgh 

Gerard Bessette . Instructor in Modern Languages 

B.A. Externat Classique Ste-Croix, Montreal, 1941 
M.A. University of Montreal, 1946 
Licence es Lettres, University of Montreal, 1946 
D.Litt. University of Montreal, 1950 

Vincent P. Bodell Lecturer in Economics 

B.A. Duquesne University, 1948 

Sydney M. Brown Professor of History 

B.A. Bowdoin College, 1916 
M.A. Oxford University, 1927 
Ph.D. Oxford University, 1931 



Eleven 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



Bernard A. Brunner Instructor in English 

B.A. Hendrix College, 1947 
M.A. University of Chicago, 1948 
Ph.D. University of Chicago, 1951 

James H. Butler Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.A. St. Vincent College, 1945 
M.Ed. Duquesne University, 1948 
Graduate Work, University of Pittsburgh 

Rev. Raymond M. Cadwallader Associate Professor of Classics 

B.A. Loyola College, Montreal, 1930 
M.A. University of Montreal, 1945 
Ph.D. University of Montreal, 1947 

Reyes Carbonell Assistant Professor of Modern Languages 

B.A. Institute Luis Vives, Valencia, Spain, 1931 
M.A. University of Valencia, Spain, 1940 • 
Ph.D. University of Madrid, Spain, 1948 

Robert B. Carver Lecturer in Sociology 

B.A. University of Notre Dame, 1942 
M.A. University of Pittsburgh, 1947 

Edward M. Case Instructor in Philosophy 

B.A Mount St. Mary's College, 1948 

M.A. University of Ottawa, 1949 

Graduate Work, Catholic University of America 

Frances Colecchia Instructor in Modern Languages 

B.A. Duquesne University, 1947 
M.Litt. University of Pittsburgh, 1949 
Graduate Work, University of Pittsburgh 
Graduate Work, National University of Mexico 

Primthvo Colombo Professor of Modern Languages 

B.A. University of Pittsburgh, 1927 
M.A. University of Pittsburgh, 1928 
Ph.D. University of Pittsburgh, 1934 

Joseph G. Corriols Lecturer in Modern Languages 

B.A. Pennsylvania State College, 1937 
Graduate Work, Pennsylvania State College 

John Fremont Cox Lecturer in Sociology 

B.A. University of Pittsburgh, 1927 
M.A. University of Pittsburgh, 1930 
L.L.B. University of Pittsburgh, 1933 
Ph.D. University of Pittsburgh, 1950 

Rev. Paul R. Coyle Lecturer in Philosophy 

B.A. Duquesne University, 1933 
J.C.D. Catholic University, 1944 

B. Kendall Crane Lecturer in Journalism 

Creighton University 

St. Mary's College, Kansas 

Marquette University of Journalism 



Twelve 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 



William J. Craven Instructor in English 

B.A. Xavier University, 1947 
M.A. Xavier University, 1951 

Lois Rankin Crebbins Assistant Professor of Biology 

B.S.Ed. Pennsylvania State College, 1940 
Ph.D. University of Pittsburgh, 1948 

Rev. William F. Crowley, C.S.Sp Instructor in English 

B.A. St. Mary's Seminary, 1946 
B.D. St. Mary's Seminary, 1950 
Graduate Work, Duquesne University 

Jack H. Curtis Instructor in Sociology 

B.S. St. Louis University, 1949 
M.A. University of New Mexico, 1950 
Graduate Work, Stanford University 

Rev. Vincent DeP. Deer, C.S.Sp Instructor in Philosophy 

B.A. Duquesne University, 1930 
B.D. St. Mary's Seminary, 1931 

Frederick DeFeis Instructor in English 

B.A. Brooklyn College, 1946 
M.F.A. Fordham University, 1949 

Magda DeSpub Instructor in Modern Languages 

B.A. Veress Paine, Budapest, 1919 
M.A. Teacher's Diploma, Budapest, 1920 
Ph.D. University of Budapest, 1923 

Marie Diehl Instructor in English 

B.A. Asbury College, 1943 

M.A. University of Pittsburgh, 1950 

Rev. Francis R. Duffy, C.S.Sp Associate Professor of Sociology 

B.A. St. Mary's Seminary, 1938 
B.D. St. Mary's Seminary, 1942 
M.A. Catholic University, 1943 
Graduate Work, University of Pittsburgh 
(On leave of absence: Chaplain, U. S. Army) 

Kenneth J. Duffy Associate Professor of Modern Languages 

B.A. Duquesne University, 1936 
M.A. University of Pittsburgh, 1989 
Ph.D. University of Pittsburgh, 1940 

Esther Dunkelberger Lecturer in Mathematics 

A.B. University of Pittsburgh, 1935 
M.Litt. University of Pittsburgh, 1941 

Tobias H. Dunkelberger Professor of Chemistry 

B.A. Dickinson College, 1930 
Ph.D. University of Pittsburgh, 1937 

Francis Fallon Evans Instructor in English 

B.A. University of Notre Dame, 1950 
M.A. University of Chicago, 1951 



Thirteen 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



Rev. Michael J. Faidel Assistant Professor of Political Science 

B.A. St. Vincent College, 1913 
M.A. St. Vincent Seminary, 1915 
S.T.B. St. Vincent Seminary, 1917 
LL.B. Duquesne University, 1939 
Graduate Work, Pennsylvania State College 

Rev. Salvator J. Federici, C.S.Sp Professor of History 

B.A. Duquesne University, 1934 

S.T.B. University of Fribourg (Switzerland), 1938 

Ph.D. Georgetown University, 1945 

Rev. John P. Gallagher, C.S.Sp Instructor in Mathematics 

B.A. St. Mary's Seminary, 1937 

University of Fribourg (Switzerland), 1938-1940 

B.S. in L.S. Catholic University, 1942 

Rev. Vernon F. Gallagher, C.S.Sp Associate Professor of English 

B.A. St. Mary's Seminary, 1936 
B.D. St. Mary's Seminary, 1940 
M.A. University of Pennsylvania, 1942 
Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania, 1952 

Oscar Gawron Associate Professor of Chemistry 

B.S. Brooklyn College, 1934 

M.S. Columbia University, 1939 

Ph.D. Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn, 1945 

Ruth Eileen Goodman Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B.A. Ball State Teachers College, 1936 

M.A. Indiana University, 1937 

Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania, 1944 

Geza Grosschmid Assistant Professor of Economics 

LL.B. University Pazmany Peter, Budapest, 1943 
J.U.D. University Pazmany Peter, Budapest, 1943 

Rev. Stephen C. Gulovich Lecturer in Philosophy 

B.A. Angelicum, Rome, 1929 
M.A. Angelicum, Rome, 1930 
Ph.D. Angelicum, Rome, 1931 
S.T.D. Propaganda, Rome, 1935 

Hugh F. Harnsberger Associate Professor of Chemistry 

B.S. William and Mary College, 1944 
M.S. University of California, 1947 
Ph.D. University of California, 1950 

Bruno J. Hartung Assistant Professor of Economics 

B.A. St. Vincent College, 1939 

M.A. Catholic University of America, 1948 

Ph.D. Catholic University of America, 1952 

Raymond O. Heckerman Instructor in Biology 

B.S. Geneva College, 1947 

M.S. University of Pittsburgh, 1949 

Graduate Work, University of Pittsburgh 



Fourteen 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 



Frank J. Heintz Instructor in Political Science 

B.A. Catholic University of America, 1947 
M.A. Catholic University of America, 1949 
Graduate Work, Catholic University of America 

Rev. Eugene Hornyak Instructor in Classics 

Ph.B. Pontifical Athenaeum de Propaganda Fide, Rome, 1941 
S.T.B. Pontifical Athenaeum de Propaganda Fide, Rome, 1943 
S.T.L. Pontifical Athenaeum de Propaganda Fide, Rome, 1945 
S.T.D. Pontifical Athenaeum de Propaganda Fide, Rome, 1947 
J.C.B. Pontifical University Gregoriana, Rome, 1947 

Dominic Iannotta Lecturer in History 

B.A. Duquesne University, 1942 
M.Litt. University of Pittsburgh, 1948 

Dale S. Jackson Lecturer in Journalism 

Head of Continuity Department 
Radio Station KDKA, Pittsburgh 

Daniel L. Jones Assistant Professor of Biology 

B.A. Utah State College, 1938 

M.A. Pennsylvania State College, 1940 

Ph.D. University of Pittsburgh, 1950 

Rev. Alfred A. Juliano, C.S.Sp Instructor in Philosophy 

B.A. St. Mary's Seminary, 1943 

Jean Kernan Instructor in English 

B.A. Seton Hill College, 1950 
M.A. Yale University, 1951 

Rev. Joseph R. Kletzel, C.S.Sp Assistant Professor of English 

B.A. Duquesne University, 1935 
B.D. St. Mary's Seminary, 1936 
M.A. University of Detroit, 1949 

Rev. Hilary J. Kline, C.S.Sp Assistant Professor of Biology 

B.A. St. Mary's Seminary, 1937 
B.D. St. Mary's Seminary, 1942 
M.S. Duquesne University, 1950 
Graduate Work, University of Pittsburgh 

Ralph A. Klinefelter Associate Professor of English 

B.A. LaSalle College, 1937 

M.A. University of Pennsylvania, 1941 

Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania, 1951 

Rev. Gordon F. Knight, C.S.Sp Associate Professor of Philosophy 

B.A. St. Mary's Seminary, 1927 

S.T.D. Gregorian University, Rome, 1930 

Rev. Henry Koren, C.S.Sp Assistant Professor of Philosophy 

S.T.L. Gregorian University, Rome, 1939 
S.T.D. Catholic University of America, 1942 

Andrew J. Kozora Associate Professor of Physics 

B.S. Duquesne University, 1932 
M.S. Duquesne University, 1940 
Graduate Work, University of Pittsburgh 



Fifteen 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



Richard Kress Lecturer in Journalism 

Vincent F. Lackner Assistant Professor of Philosophy 

B.A. St. Vincent College, 1944 

M.A. University of Toronto, Pontifical Institute of Medieval Studies, 1948 

Rev. Henry Lemmens, C.S.Sp Assistant Professor of Modern Languages 

Knechsteden, Germany, 1929-1935 
M.A. University of Pittsburgh, 1950 
Ph.D. University of Cincinnati, 1951 

James T. C. Liu Lecturer in History 

B.A. China University, 1943 

Ph.D. University of Pittsburgh, 1950 

Thomas J. Lowert Instructor in Biology 

B.S. St. Francis College, 1946 
M.S. Fordham University, 1949 
Graduate Work, Fordham University 

Cornelius S. McCarthy Associate Professor of Journalism 

B.S. in Journalism Boston University, 1940 
M.E. Boston University, 1941 

George McFadden Instructor in English 

B.A. St. Francis College, Brooklyn, 1938 
M.A. Brooklyn College, 1948 

Henry C. McGinnis Instructor in Christian Social Philosophy 

M.A. Duquesne University, 1949 

J. William McGowan Professor of Sociology 

B.S. McGill University, 1923 

B.A. University of Notre Dame, 1925 

M.A. University of Notre Dame, 1926 

John J. McKee Lecturer in Journalism 

Rev. James F. McNamara, C.S.Sp Instructor in Philosophy 

B.A. St. Mary's Seminary, 1939 
B.D. St. Mary's Seminary, 1943 

James Maloney Lecturer in Political Science 

B.A. Duquesne University, 1949 

John P. Mazzola Lecturer in History 

B.A. Grove City College, 1928 
M.A. University of Pittsburgh, 1929 
Ph.D. University of Pittsburgh, 1939 

John Mertz Instructor in English 

B.A. Hamilton College, 1949 
M.A. Syracuse University, 1951 

Helena A. Miller Associate Professor of Biology 

B.S. Ohio State University, 1935 
M.S. Ohio State University, 1938 
Ph.D. Radcliffe College, 1945 



Sixteen 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 



Robert E. Mitchell Assistant Professor of English 

A.B. Miami University, Ohio, 1934 
M.A. Duke University, 1940 
M.A. Harvard University, 1947 
Ph.D. Harvard University, 1951 

Thomas J. Moban Lecturer in Journalism 

B.S. in Ed. Bucknell University, 1949 

M.S. in Journalism Columbia University, 1951 

Joseph R. Morice Instructor in History 

B.A. La Salle College, 1947 
M.A. Fordham University, 1951 
Graduate Work, University of Pittsburgh 

Rev. Joseph P. Mobonet, C.S.Sp Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

B.A. St. Mary's Seminary, 1936 

S.T.B. University of Fribourg (Switzerland), 1938 

M.S. Duquesne University, 1951 

Norman Mulgbave Instructor in Christian Social Philosophy 

B.Ed. Duquesne University, 1949 

Dennis Mulvihill Lecturer in Political Science 

B.A. Duquesne University, 1949 

Rev. Edwabd L. Mubbay .'.... Lecturer in Philosophy 

B.A. St. Vincent College, 1941 
M.A. St. Vincent College, 1945 

John P. O'Cabboll Professor of Chemistry 

B.A. National University of Ireland, 1920 
M.A. Duquesne University, 1924 
Graduate Work, Columbia University 

Patrick M. O'Donnell, IH Assistant Professor of Political Science 

B.A. Duquesne University, 1947 

M. Litt. University of Pittsburgh, 1948 

L.L.B. University of Pittsburgh, 1950 

Anthony T. Oliva Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.S. Long Island University, 1937 

M.A. Teachers College, ColumbiafU., 1940 

Ed.D. Columbia University, 1949 

Mobbis Ostbofsky Professor of Mathematics 

B.A. University of Pittsburgh, 1928 
Ph.D. University of Wisconsin, 1937 

John Patteeson Lecturer in Journalism 

B.A. Notre Dame University, 1941 

Rev. Basil Pekab Instructor in Philosophy 

Ph.B. Pontifical Athenaeum de Propaganda Fide, Rome, 1942 
S.T.B. Pontifical Athenaeum de Propaganda Fide, Rome, 1944 
S.T.L. Pontifical Athenaeum de Propaganda Fide, Rome, 1946 
S.T.D. Pontifical Athenaeum de Propaganda Fide, Rome, 1947 

Bebnaed P. Petbuska Lecturer in History 

B.A. Duquesne University, 1935 
M.Ed. Duquesne University, 1947 



Seventeen 






DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



Rev. James A. Phalen, C.S.Sp Instructor in Classics 

B.A. St. Mary's Seminary, 1944 
M.Ed. Duquesne University, 1949 
Graduate Work, Fordham University 

Adrian W. Poitras Assistant Professor of Biology 

B.S. University of Illinois, 1940 
M.S. University of Illinois, 1947 
Ph.D. University of Illinois, 1950 

Peter Puccetti Instructor in Philosophy 

B.A. Duquesne University, 1948 
M.Ed. Duquesne University, 1950 

James M. Purcell Professor of English 

B.A. Montana State University, 1919 
M.A. Ohio State University, 1925 
Ph.D. New York University, 1934 

Margaret A. Raskauskas Instructor in Biology 

B.A. Seton Hill College, 1947 

M.A. Catholic University of America, 1949 

Pauline M. Reinkraut Assistant Professor of Modern Languages 

B.A. University of Vienna, 1921 
Ph.D. University of Vienna, 1927 

Rev. Joseph F. Rengers, C.S.Sp Instructor in Philosophy 

University of Fribourg (Switzerland), 1938-1940 
B.A. St. Mary's Seminary, 1941 

Jacob E. Rosenberg Lecturer in Physics 

B.A. University of Michigan, 1920 
M.S. University of Michigan, 1921 
Ph.D. University of Pittsburgh, 1925 

Severino A. Russo Assistant Professor of History 

B.A. Duquesne University, 1943 
M.A. Duquesne University, 1948 
Graduate Work, University of Pennsylvania 

Rev. Louis N. Schenning, C.S.Sp Instructor in Philosophy 

B.A. St. Mary's Seminary, 1935 

S.T.B. Gregorian University, Rome, 1937 

S.T.L. Catholic University of America, 1942 

Rev. John R. Schlicht, C.S.Sp Assistant Professor of History 

B.A. St. Mary's Seminary, 1940 

B.D. St. Mary's Seminary, 1943 

M.A. Duquesne University, 1944 

Graduate Work, Western Reserve University 

Kurt C. Schreiber Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

B.S. City College of New York, 1944 
A.M. Columbia University, 1947 
Ph.D. Columbia University, 1949 

Maurice P. Schulte Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.A. St. John's University, 1935 
M.A. University of Wisconsin, 1937 
Graduate Work, University of Pittsburgh 



Eighteen 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 



Benjamin 1 L. Schwartz Instructor in Mathematics 

B.S. Carnegie Institute of Technology, 1946 
M.S. Carnegie Institute of Technology, 1947 

Rev. Basil Shereghy Instructor in Modern Languages 

Ph.B. University Pazmany Peter, Budapest, Hungary, 1939 
S.T.B. University Pazmany Peter, Budapest, Hungary, 1940 
S.T.L. University Pazmany Peter, Budapest, Hungary, 1941 
S.T.D. University Pazmany Peter, Budapest, Hungary, 1942 

Rev. Louis T. Sismis Lecturer in Modern Languages 

S.T.D. Gregorian University, Rome, 1939 

Robert E. Smith Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B.A. Iowa State University, 1934 
M.A. University of Pittsburgh, 1940 
Ph.D. University of Pittsburgh, 1951 

Rev. Basil Smochko Instructor in Philosophy 

Ph.B. Pontifical Athenaeum de Propaganda Fide, Rome, 1942 
S.T.B. Pontifical Athenaeum de Propaganda Fide, Rome, 1944 
S.T.L. Pontifical Athenaeum de Propaganda Fide, Rome, 1946 
S.T.D. Pontifical Athenaeum de Propaganda Fide, Rome, 1948 

Michael Strasser . Instructor in Philosophy 

B.A. St. Louis University, 1947 
M.A. University of Toronto, 1949 
Graduate Work, University of Toronto 

Harrt H. Szmant Professor of Chemistry 

B.S. Ohio State University, 1940 
Ph.D. Purdue University, 1944 

Sister Bernadette Trance, O.S.U Lecturer in Religion 

B.A. Seton Hill College, 1950 

Rev. J. Gerald Walsh, C.S.Sp Assistant Professor of Philosophy 

B.A. St. Mary's Seminary, 1937 
University of Louvain, Belgium, 1937-1939 
Ph.D. University of Montreal, 1946 

Catharine C. Weaver Instructor in English 

B. A. University of Michigan, 1946 
M.A. University of Michigan, 1947 
Ph.D. University of Michigan, 1951 

Cyril F. Zebot Associate Professor of Economics 

Ph.D. University of Ljubliana, 1937 



Nineteen 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



THE COLLEGE OF 
LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 

PHILOSOPHY AND OBJECTIVES 

In accordance with the educational philosophy of the Uni- 
versity, the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences believes that 
the product of education is the man of true character who thinks, 
judges and acts constantly and consistently in accordance with 
right reason with a view to his ultimate end. It aims to facilitate 
through the media of instruction and related collegiate activities 
the development of purposeful character, intellectual accomplish- 
ment, emotional and social maturity, and professional efficiency. 

The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences in the University 
provides the basic preparation for further professional growth 
in the various fields of the liberal arts and sciences. It has as its 
responsibility the general aim of developing in students a truly 
cultural personality and, in addition, the special aim of intro- 
ducing students to diverse areas of intellectual and vocational 
specialization. It attains this objective by guiding the student 
through a cultural core program, through a concentrated study 
of a major and minor field of specialization, through an organized 
program of co-curricular and extra-curricular activities, and 
through established personnel services. 

The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences aims specifically to 
assist the student in: 

1. The development of a sound philosophy of life through an 
understanding of truly spiritual and religious aims and values 
for the betterment of his own life and for the advancement of 
these aims and values in others. 

2. The development of a wholesome personality for the en- 
richment of his own life and for the guidance of others toward 
wholesome personalities. 

3. The development of a broader understanding of our 
culture in order to advance this understanding in others. 

4. The development of an expert understanding of the process 
of living, growth and learning, and of competency in acting upon 
this understanding in practical situations. 

5. The development of an understanding of and practice in 
the democratic process in all areas of living. 



Twenty 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 

6. The development of a good foundation in a special area 
of knowledge and the desire for continuous professional growth. 

7. The development of scholarship through a constant will- 
ingness to use the resources and methods of critical inquiry in 
the fields of human knowledge relevant to his responsibility as 
a professional worker and as an individual. 

8. The development of a constant evaluation of himself as 
an individual, and as a member of the community. 

9. The development of an appreciation of all things beautiful. 

CURRICULAR INFORMATION 

CATEGORIES OF STUDENTS 

Matriculated Students. Those who have satisfied all require- 
ments for admission to the degree program of their choice and 
are pursuing courses leading toward that degree are classified as 
matriculated students. 

Non-Matriculated Students. These are mature persons who 
are not interested in pursuing courses toward a degree and who 
have not met the requirements for matriculation. Such students 
must have the approval of the dean who is responsible for the 
courses to be pursued. Work done by non-matriculated students 
will not carry credit toward a degree, even though the matricu- 
lation requirements may subsequently be met. Only in rare 
exceptions will non-matriculated students be permitted to attend 
classes in the regular day-session. 

Full-Time Students. The normal credit-load for fulltime stu- 
dents is sixteen semester hours in academic subjects. In the case 
of students whose ability is truly exceptional, the dean may 
grant permission to carry additional work. 

Part-Time Students. Anyone who carries less than twelve 
semester hours of credit is regarded as a part-time student. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

Admission of Regular Students. The candidate must be a 
graduate of an approved high school. If he is not in the upper 
three-fifths of his high school class, he is automatically subject 
to an entrance examination. It should be noted, however, that 
the Committee on Admissions reserves to itself the right to 
demand an entrance examination and to pass upon the quali- 
fications of any candidate seeking admission. 



Twenty-one 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



Candidates should present twelve units from the following 
fields of study: English, Social Studies, Language, Mathematics, 
Science. The four remaining units may be taken in electivesfor 
which the high school offers credit toward graduation. The 
genuine equivalent of these requirements may be accepted. 

Admission of Transfer Students. Students of approved colleges 
and universities will be admitted to advanced standing if their 
credentials so warrant. They must be in good standing and 
eligible to continue their studies at the institution previously 
attended. They must have been granted an honorable dismissal. 
A general average equivalent to the grade C at Duquesne is 
required of an applicant wishing to transfer. Advanced credit 
may be allowed for those courses which are the equivalent of 
the courses in the chosen Duquesne curriculum. No credit will 
be allowed in any subject with a grade lower than C. 

Advanced standing is conditional until the student completes 
a minimum of one semester's work (16 semester hours). If his 
work proves unsatisfactory, the student will be requested to 
withdraw. 

GUIDANCE 

FRESHMEN DAYS AND PLACEMENT TESTS 

All entering Freshmen are required to be present for Fresh- 
man Days Activities which take place the week preceding the 
beginning of the first semester. These activities consist in general 
orientation conferences and in the completion of a group of 
placement tests. Failure to take the placement tests at the 
regular time will incur a penalty of $5.00 for individual tests. 
Registration for the first semester courses must be completed 
in this week. 

FACULTY ADVISEMENT 

Each student must choose a Faculty Advisor to whom he 
can go for guidance in his program of study. These Faculty 
Advisors will be available to their advisees at a definite place 
and hour each week, and it is strongly urged that conferences be 
had on a minimum basis of once a month. The name of the 
Faculty Advisor must be submitted to the Dean's Office and 
filed in the student's folder. 



Twenty-two 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 
INFORMATION ON ADMISSION 

PROCEDURE FOR ADMISSION 

1. Procure application blank from Director of Admissions. 

2. Fill out blank and return to Director of Admissions. 

3. Obtain and submit letter of recommendation. 

4. Request high school principal to submit record of aca- 
demic work to Director of Admissions on form provided. 

5. Upon receipt of all credentials an evaluation will be made; 
the applicant will then be notified of his admission status 
and provided with information concerning registration. 
A deposit of twenty dollars is required within two weeks 
of notification of acceptance, in order to assure the 
applicant of the reservation of a place in class. For further 
information see Tuition and Fees. 

6. Contact Dean of Men or Dean of Women for residence 
facilities if desired. 

7. Report for physical examination, placement tests, and 
registration on days assigned. 

8. The transfer student must, in addition to following the 
procedure outlined above, notify all colleges or universities 
previously attended to mail directly to the Admissions 
Office of Duquesne University official transcripts of his 
academic records. After an evaluation is made, the appli- 
cant will be notified of the action of the Committee in his 
regard. 

REGISTRATION INFORMATION 

A registration period, as indicated in the University Calendar, 
precedes each semester and summer session. All schools register 
students during this period. Only by rare exception, by consent 
of the Dean, and on payment of a penalty of $5.00, will late 
registration be permitted. General regulations concerning 
registration are: 

1. Registration for all students is held on the campus. 

2. The student's schedule is prepared in conference with his 
dean or adviser. 

3. Tuition and fees for the semester are payable at regis- 
tration time. 

4. Admission to any class is allowed only to those who have 
officially registered for that class. 



Twenty-three 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



Students are not permitted to change their schedules of 
courses without the permission of their dean. A student who 
withdraws from a course without proper authorization receives 
a grade of F for the course. Change of schedule is permitted 
without fee, only during the registration period. For a serious 
reason, change of schedule may be permitted during the same 
period that late registrations are accepted. 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 

The following regulations govern all undergraduate students 
of the University. The University reserves the right to change 
any provision or requirement during the term of residence of 
any student; and to compel the withdrawal of any student whose 
conduct at any time is not satisfactory to the University. 

1. Class Attendance: In order to secure credit in any course in 
which he is registered, a student must attend classroom and 
laboratory exercises regularly and promptly. A student who 
absents himself from class excessively or is habitually tardy 
will be dropped from the class and given a failing grade. 

2. Examinations: 

a. Entrance examinations are given at the beginning of each 
semester for those applicants of whom they are required. 

b. Mid-Semester examinations are held on the dates assigned. 

c. Final examinations are given at the end of each semester 
and summer session. No student is excused from taking 
final examinations. 

d. Condition examinations, the date for which is announced 
in the University Calendar, must be taken toward the end 
of the first month of each semester, in order to give students 
who have received the marks of E or X for courses taken 
during the preceding semester the opportunity to remove 
these deficiencies. For information on the fee for this 
examination, see the section of this bulletin headed 
"Tuition and Fees." 

e. General Education Test. All students in the College who 
have completed forty-five credit hours of work are required 
to take the General Education Test in order to test their 
ability and determine their achievement in the various 
fields of instruction. The results of this examination will 
be used for guidance purposes. 



Twenty~four 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 



f. Graduate Record Examination. In the last semester of their 
senior year, all students are required to take the Graduate 
Record Examination. At this session they must also take 
the Advanced Comprehensive Test in their major field of 
study. 

When the Graduate Record Office does not offer an 
Advanced Test in a specific field, the students majoring in 
that subject will be required to submit a senior essay indica- 
tive of high scholastic attainment. The paper should set 
forth a chosen topic in a logical, independent and effectively 
expressed argument which will run to approximately six 
thousand words. In consultation with a faculty adviser 
appointed by the dean, he will choose his topic at the 
beginning of the second semester of his junior year. From 
then until the beginning of his last semester in the College 
he will develop that topic under the direction of his adviser. 

The completed thesis must be submitted for approval in 
the first week of November for February graduates and 
the first week of March for June graduates. 

3. Grading: The university grading system, adopted February 
21, 1929, and amended September 19, 1938, is the only 
method of rating recognized by the university. The system 
is as follows: 

A — Excellent 

B— Good 

C— Fair 

D — Poor — lowest passing grade 

E — Conditioned : eligible for re-examination 

F — Failure: course must be repeated 

I — Incomplete: grade is deferred because of incomplete 

work 
X — Absent from final examination 
W — Official Withdrawal 

P — Pass — used in certain courses without quality points. 

The temporary grades E, I, and X must be removed within 
the first thirty school days of the next succeeding semester. 
It is the student's responsibility to make arrangements with 
his dean for the removal of these temporary marks. An E 

frade can be changed by re-examination to only D or F. 
ailure to remove E and X grades within the specified time 
will result in an F grade for the course. 



Ttventy-fivt 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



4. Unit of Credit: The unit of credit is the semester hour. One 
semester hour of credit is granted for the successful completion 
of one hour per week of lecture or recitation, or at least two 
hours per week of laboratory work for one semester. Inasmuch 
as the minimum number of weeks in a semester is sixteen, 
an equivalent definition of the semester hour is sixteen hours 
of class or the equivalent in laboratory work. 

5. Quality Points: Among the requirements for graduation is a 
quality point average of at least 1.0. The quality point 
systejn operates as follows: 

a. For the credits of work carried, quality points are awarded 
according to the grade received: for a grade of A, the 
number of credits is multiplied by 3; for a grade of B, by 2; 
for a grade of C, by 1; for a grade of D, by 0; and for a 
grade of F, by minus 1, until the F has been removed by 
repeating the course successfully. The marks E, I, and X, 
being temporary indications rather than grades, and W 
and P, are independent of the quality point system. 

6. Scholastic Standing: 

a. Dismissal. A student, to be permitted to continue in 
course of study, must pass in two-thirds of the hours of 
credit carried in each semester, and must maintain a 
quality point average of at least 0.67. Failure to satisfy 
this minimum scholastic requirement will result in the 
dismissal of the student for low scholarship. 

b. Probation. A student who fails in one third or more of the 
hours of credit carried in each semester, or whose quality 
point average falls below 1.0, is placed on probation for 
the next semester. Students on probation must carry a 
reduced schedule. 

7. Classification of Students: 

Freshmen: Those having completed less than 30 semester 
hours. 

Sophomores: Those having completed 31 to 60 semester 
hours. 

Juniors: Those having completed 61 to 90 semester 

hours. 

Seniors: Those having completed 91 semester hours. 

Twenty-six 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 



GRADUATION 

1. General Requirements'. The candidate for a degree must be of 
good moral character; must have paid all indebtedness to the 
University; must have made formal application for the degree 
at the Office of the Registrar prior to the date listed in the 
University Calendar; must be present at the Baccalaureate 
and Commencement Exercises. 

2. Scholastic Requirements. The candidate for a degree must have 
satisfied all entrance requirements; must have completed 
successfully all the required courses of his degree program; 
must have no grade lower than D; must have completed the 
last year's work (a minimum of thirty semester hours of 
credit) in residence; must have passed the Graduate Record 
Advanced Test or have fulfilled the thesis requirement; must 
complete a minimum of 128 semester hours of work. 

3. Quality Point Requirements: The candidate for a degree must 
have a minimum quality point average of 1.0. 

4. Degrees awarded with honor: Degrees are awarded with special 
mention cum laude or magna cum laude to students who have 
completed the regular course with unusual distinction. Upon 
recommendation of the faculty, this mention may be raised 
to summa cum laude. 

In addition to the graduation honors, there are four per- 
manent undergraduate awards open to students in the college. 
They are given at Honors Day for distinction in studies. 

Gold Medal for General Excellence. This medal is awarded to 
the student who has throughout his four years consistently 
achieved scholastic distinction in all fields of study for which his 
curriculum calls. 

Gold Medal for Excellence in English. This medal is awarded 
to that student, usually an English Major, whose scholastic re- 
cord, literary background, and evidence of writing skill through 
publications in the under-graduate journals show high promise. 

Gold Medal in the Sciences. A gold medal is awarded annually 
to the senior candidate for the Bachelor of Science degree who 
makes the best record for the four year program, as determined 
by the Faculty of the College. 

Gold Medal for Oratory. All students in the University are 
eligible for this award. This medal is awarded to the winner of 
the Annual Oratorical Contest. 



Twenty-seven 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



DEGREES 

The College offers courses leading to the degrees of Bachelor 
of Arts and Bachelor of Science. If a student elects to major in 
English literature, history, journalism, advertising, classical 
languages, German, French, Spanish, mathematics, scholastic 
philosophy, psychology, sociology, economics, political science, 
christian social philosophy, or speech, he will receive the degree 
of Bachelor of Arts upon successful completion of the course. 

Students majoring in botany, bacteriology, zoology, chem- 
istry, or physics will graduate with the degree of Bachelor of 
Science. 

Pre-legal students should take courses leading to a B.A. 
degree. The major may be taken in any field of study within the 
scope of Bar Association recommendations. The Pennsylvania 
Bar Association recommends "a program to develop the 'inquir- 
ing mind/ To teach students to read critically, to think straight, 
to find and evaluate fact and opinion, to sense when the human 
element in the case requires a departure from the dictates of 
strict logic, and to express all this in honest English prose: 
these are the objectives of pre-legal education. They are not 
different from the aims of a general Arts education." 

Pre-medical students will take courses leading to a Bachelor 
of Science degree. They will choose either Chemistry or Biology 
as their major field of study and will complete those courses 
recommended by their adviser. 

Pre-dental students will follow courses recommended by the 
Dental Schools which they wish to attend. 

Candidates for the Seminary will follow courses leading to 
the B.A. degree with a major in Philosophy and a minor in the 
Classics. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

1. A minimum total of 128 hours of credit. 

2. A major of 24 hours of credit in one specific field of the arts 
or 32 hours of credit in one specific field of the sciences. 

3. A minor of 18 hours of credit in one specific field of the arts 
or 20-24 hours of credit in one specific field of the sciences. 

4. Two years of English (101, 102, 201, 202). 

5. Two years of Modern Language. 

6. Two years of Philosophy (101, 102, 201, 202). 

7. Two years of R.O.T.C., physical education or eurhythmies. 



Twenty-eight 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 

8. One year of American History (103, 104). 

9. Two years of science (for B.A. candidates), including one 
year of Biology. 

10. Political Science 101, 102 and Sociology 101, 102 for Economics 
majors. 

11. Economics 211, 212, and Sociology 101, 102 for Political 
Science majors. 

12. Economics 211, 212, and Political Science 101, 102 for 
Sociology majors. 

13. Economics 211, 212, and Political Science 101, 102 for 
Christian Social Philosophy majors. 

14. Mathematics through trigonometry for biology majors, 
through calculus for chemistry and physics majors. 

15. At least one year of biology and physics for chemistry majors. 

16. At least one year of chemistry for physics majors. 

17. At least one year of physics and the completion of organic 
chemistry for biology majors. 

18. Sociology 101, 102 for Psychology majors. 

19. Physics 211, 212, 303 for mathematics majors. 

20. General Education Test in the sophomore year. 

21. The Graduate Record Examination in the senior year. 

22. A minimum quality point average of 1.0. 

23. Application for degree (see Calendar for latest date). 

24. Payment of all indebtedness to the University. 

25. Catholic students must take one course in Religion during 
each regular semester. 

THE SCHOOL YEAR 

The school year, which occupies 32 weeks exclusive of vaca- 
tions, is divided into two semesters of 16 weeks each. 

The Summer sessions. For classes during the months of June, 
July, and August, see the special summer roster of classes. 

Late Afternoon, evening, and Saturday Classes are offered 
for those who are pursuing their degree work on a part-time 
basis. These courses are selected from the curricula of the 
College and are taught by regular faculty members. 



Twenty-nine 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



TUITION AND FEES 

The University reserves the right to change the fees herein stated at any 
time without notice. Whenever a change is made it will become effective at 
the beginning of the succeeding academic year. 

Matriculation Deposit $ 20.00 

The matriculation deposit of twenty dollars is pay- 
able by entering students within two weeks from the 
date of notification of acceptance to the University. 
The purpose of this fee is to assure the student of a 
reservation of a place in class. This deposit will be 
credited against the student's tuition and fees at 
the time of registration for the semester in which 
the student's application has been approved. This 
deposit is not refundable. 

Tuition, per Semester Hour Credit $12.00 

The total tuition for the semester is payable at 
the time of registration, unless other arrangements 
are made through the Deferred Tuition office. 

Activities Fee, per Semester $ 10.00 

This fee gives access to intercollegiate and intra- 
mural sports activities, concerts, dramatic presen- 
tations and other events throughout the scholastic 
year. It entitles the student to copies of the weekly 
newspaper, and the monthly magazine. This fee is 
payable by all students carrying twelve or more 
credits in the regular semesters. 

Library Fee, Full-time Students $ 5.00 

This fee affords library privileges to all students 
carrying twelve or more credits in any semester or 
summer session. 

Library Fee, Part-time Students $ 2.00 

This fee is payable by all students carrying less than 
twelve credits in any semester or summer session. 

Registration Fee $ 1.00 

A fee of ?1.00 is required of every student at each 
registration period. 

Student Health Fee, per Semester $ 1.00 

This fee includes a physical examination at en- 
trance, and advice and emergency treatment at 
the university dispensary. 



Thirty 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 



Late Registration Fee $ 5.00 

This fee is charged to all students registering later 
than the last day of the regular registration period. 

Condition Examination Fee $ 5.00 

This fee is charged for each condition and special 
examination for removal of E and X grades. It is 
payable in advance. 

Late Examination Fee $ 5.00 . 

This fee is charged to all students taking an 
examination at any other than the regularly 
scheduled time. 

Change of Course Fee $ 1.00 

Student Publication Fee, per Semester $ 1.00 

Payable by all part-time students in the regular 
sessions. The fee entitles them to a copy of each 
issue of the student newspaper and of the monthly 
magazine. 

Auditor's Fees, per Semester Hour $12.00 

N.B. — The fees for auditors are the same as those for regularly 
matriculated students. 

Graduate Record Fee $ 3.00 

For a private administration of this examination the regular 
fee of $15.00 is charged. 

General Education Examination Fee $ 3.00 

Graduation Fees — Bachelor's Degree $15.00 

Laboratory Fees: Students enrolled in the following courses 
will pay laboratory fees, not subject to refund, as indicated: 

Laboratory Fees $ 5.00 

Journalism 105, 209, 301, 302, 305, 306, 307, 308, 311, 312, 
315, 316, 401, 402, Advertising 406, 407, 422, 423, News- 
Editorial Sequence 406 and 407. 
Psychology 401. 

Laboratory Fees $ 7.50 

Physics 201, 202, 211, 212, 302, 403, 404. 

Laboratory Fees $12.50 

Biology 101, 102, 151, 201, 202, 211, 212, 301, 302, 308, 310, 
311, 312, 351, 352, 401, 402, 411, 412, 451, 452. 

Laboratory Fees $17.50 

Chemistry 111, 112, 205, 206, 207, 208, 211, 212, 301, 302, 
413, 414, 501, 502, 521, 522, 525, 526, 541, 543. 



Thiriy-one 



DUJQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



REFUNDS FOR WITHDRAWALS 

Students who withdraw from the University for a satisfactory 
reason within eight weeks after the opening of the semester are 
entitled to a proportionate refund of tuition provided that they 
notify their dean at the time of the withdrawal. Fees are not 
refundable. 

Refunds are made in accordance with the following schedule. 

Withdrawal Refund 

1st Week 90% 

2nd Week 70% 

3 rd Week 60% 

4th Week 50% 

5th Week 30% 

6th Week 20% 

7th Week 10% 

8th Week 5% 

No refund will be made in the case of students who are 
registered on probation or who are requested to withdraw as a 
result of faculty action. 

The Refund Schedule for Summer Sessions (six or eight weeks 
session) is as follows: 

Withdrawal Refund 

1st Week 60% 

2nd Week 20% 

There are no refunds after the second week of a Summer 
Session. Fees are not refundable. 

BOARD AND ROOM 

Rooms for students are available at the rate of 365.00 per 
semester per person with two students occupying the room; and 
at the rate of 355.00 per semester per person, with more than 
two students in the room. Reservations for room space are made 
on a semester basis through the Dean of Men or the Dean of 
Women. A deposit of 310.00, payable to Duquesne University, 
must accompany each room application. 

The deposit will be held as a breakage deposit until the 
satisfactory termination of the student's lease. Deductible from 
the deposit are any damages to room contents or buildings and 
a pro rata general breakage. 



Thirty-two 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 

A student who is prevented, for any reason, from occupying 
the room reserved will be released and the deposit refunded if 
the Dean of Men or the Dean of Women is notified in writing 
at least two weeks prior to the date of registration. 

Room rent is payable in advance. Rooms may be assigned 
upon receipt of the room deposit but possession is not given 
until the rent is paid in full. 

Non-commuting students are not permitted to live off-campus 
without permission of the Dean of Men or the Dean of Women. 

The Board cost per semester approximates 2175.00. 

STUDENT AID 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

The University offers a definite number of competitive exam- 
ination scholarships. Eligible for the examinations, which are 
held annually in April, are students who will be, according to 
certification by their principal, graduated in the upper third of 
their high school class. All scholarships are awarded for two 
years, but are potentially four-year awards, provided that the 
requirements for continuance of the award are fulfilled. Other 
awards and scholarships are listed by several schools in their 
proper sections of the catalogue. 

The University Alumni Association makes available annually 
a $100.00 Scholarship to a competent and deserving student in 
the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Application for this 
Scholarship is made to the Dean of the College. 

STUDENT EMPLOYMENT 

The University makes available limited student employment 
for students who are in need of financial assistance and who, 
at the same time, maintain a satisfactory scholastic average and 
give evidence of good character. Opportunities for employment 
exist on and about the campus. Information may be had by 
addressing the Committee on Student Welfare. 

STUDENT LOAN 

The University has available a limited sum of money in 
various student loan funds, which each year is loaned to under- 
graduate students who have completed at least thirty semester 
hours credit at the University, and who meet the requirements 
of good scholarship, good character, and need of financial 



Thirty-three 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



assistance. These loans are granted only for the purpose of the 
payment of tuition. They are made available through the 
University Student Loan Fund. Information may be had by 
addressing the Committee on Scholarship and Student Aid. 



EXTRA-CURRICULAR ACADEMIC ORGANIZATIONS 

The following are the Academic Organizations open to 
students in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Information 
concerning membership may be obtained from the Heads of 
Departments. 

American Chemical Society : Student affiliate of the American 
Chemical Society — National. 

Sigma Tau Delta: National English Honor Society. 

History Club. 

Journalism Association. 

Spanish Club. 

German Club. 

Intercollegiate Conference on Government'. Organization of 
students of Pennsylvania Colleges and Universities interested in 
practical politics. 

Aquinas Club: An organization of University students 
interested in Philosophy. 

Mu Omega Cast : Duquesne University chapter of the national 
dramatic honor society, Alpha Psi Omega. 

Psi Chi: National Psychology Honor Society. 



Thirty-four 






COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 



DEPARTMENTS AND 
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

In this section are listed the personnel of the 
various departments, the specific requirements 
for major and minor fields of study and a 
description of all courses offered in each de- 
partment. 



Thifty~five 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 

Rev. Hilary J. Kline, C.S.Sp., Coordinator of Department; Associate Professor 
Helena A. Miller; Assistant Professors: Adrian W. Poitras, Daniel Jones, 
Lois R. Cribbins; Instructors Margaret Raskauskas, Raymond Hecker- 
man, Thomas J. Lowery. 

REQUIREMENTS 

Major: A minimum of 32 semester hours. 

All majors in Biology must take 101, 102 plus twenty-four additional 
hours, only sixteen of which should be in a major field of concentra- 
tion. The sequence of courses must be approved by the student's 
major adviser. 

Minor: A minimum of 20 semester hours. 



COURSES 

101. General Botany. The characteristics common to plants with 
respect to morphology, physiology, reproduction and development. Lecture, 
Four hours. Laboratory, Four hours. Credit, Four hours. MILLER, POI- 
TRAS. 



102. General Zoology. The characteristics common to animals with 
respect to morphology, physiology, reproduction and development. Labora- 
tory study of a series of representative animals. Lecture, Four hours. Lab- 
oratory, Four hours. Credit, Four hours 

107, 108. Principles of Biology. A brief survey of all the biological 
sciences with emphasis on those aspects about which an educated person 
ought to be informed. Lecture, Three hours. Credit, Three hours each 
semester. 

151. Bacteriology. A one-semester course in the fundamentals of 
Bacteriology for non-majors. Lecture, Two hours. Laboratory, Four hours. 
Credit, Four hours. JONES. 

201. Comparative Anatomy. A comparative study of the anatomy, 
development and classification of the vertebrates. Two four-hour periods of 
lecture and laboratory. Credit, Four hours. LOWERY, RASKAUSKAS. 

202. Vertebrate Zoology. This course deals with the anatomy and 
phylogeny of the principal vertebrate groups, with emphasis on the cat. 
Two four-hour periods of lecture and laboratory. Credit, Four hours. LOWERY. 

211. Plant Physiology. A course in the dynamic activity of plants 
through a study of individual processes. Two four-hour periods of lecture 
and laboratory. Credit, Four hours. MILLER. 

212. Local Flora. Two four-hour periods of lecture and laboratory. 
Field trips. Credit, Four hours. KLINE. 

301. Invertebrate Zoology. A survey of the principal lower animals. 
Two four-hour periods of lecture and laboratory. Credit, Four hours. LOWERY. 

302. Entomology. A survey of insects. Two four-hour periods of 
lecture and laboratory. Credit, Four hours. CRIBBINS. 



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COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 



307. Genetics. A study of the principles and laws of heredity as applied 
to both plants and animals. Lecture, Three hours. Credit, Three hours. 
HECKERMAN. 

308. Elementary Physiology. This course is primarily intended for 
non-Biology students. It cannot be applied toward a major or minor in the 
Department of Biological Sciences. Lecture, Three hours. Laboratory, Four 
hours. Credit, Four hours. 

310. Animal Histology. A study of the microscopic structure of animals, 
together with practice in methods of preserving materials and making slides. 
Two four-hour periods of lecture and laboratory. Credit, Four hours. 
HECKERMAN. 

311. Non-Vascular Plants. A general survey of the morphology, de- 
velopment, reproduction, activities and importance of the various groups of 
lower plants. Two four-hour periods of lecture and laboratory. Credit, Four 
hours. POITRAS. 

312. Vascular Plants. A general survey of the morphology, develop- 
ment, anatomy, reproduction, distribution and importance of the various 
groups of higher plants. Two four-hour periods of lecture and laboratory. 
Credit, Four hours. MILLER. 

351. General Bacteriology. The fundamental principles of bacteriology 
including an introduction to yeasts and molds. Two three-hour periods of 
lecture and laboratory. Credit, Four hours. JONES. 

352. Applied Bacteriology. A general study of the role of bacteria in 
industry and in public health. Practice in the standard procedures for the 
identification of unknown micro-organisms. Two three-hour periods of 
lecture and laboratory. Credit, Four hours. JONES. 

401. Embryology. A comparative study of animal development with 
emphasis on the experimental approach. Two four-hour periods of lecture 
and laboratory. Credit, Four hours. HECKERMAN. 

402. Animal Physiology. A comparative study of physiological prob- 
lems as applied to all types of animals. Two four-hour periods of lecture and 
laboratory. Credit, Four hours. HECKERMAN. 

411. Plant Anatomy. A study of the external and internal organization 
of higher plants with emphasis on their development. Two four-hour periods 
of lecture and laboratory. Credit, Four hours. MILLER. 

412. Advanced Plant Physiology. A study of plant processes using 
more precise experimental methods than those introduced in 312: Vascular 
Plants. Stress is placed on those processes related to growth. Two four-hour 
periods of lecture and laboratory. Credit, Four hours. 

451. Water, Food and Dairy Bacteriology. The lectures consider the 
bacteria of importance to industry, agriculture, and public health. Labora- 
tory work provides training in the standard methods of analysis employed 
in these fields. Two three-hour periods of lecture and laboratory. Credit, 
Four hours. JONES. 

452. A Study of Pathogenic Bacteria. The lectures deal with disease- 
producing organisms, while the laboratory provides training in the techniques 
for isolation of pathogenic forms and in the identification of these organisms 
in non-virulent forms. Two three-hour periods of lecture and laboratory. 
Credit, Four hours. JONES. 



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DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY 

TobiasfH. Dunkelberger, Chairman; Professor Emeritus John P. O'Carroll; 
Professor Harry H. Szmant; Associate Professors Oscar Gawron, Hugh 
F. Harnsberger; Assistant Professors Rev. Joseph P. Moroney, C.S.Sp., 
Kurt C. Schreiber. 

REQUIREMENTS 

Major: 32 semester hours are required for a major in Chemistry. All students 
must take 111, 112, 211, 212, 301, 302, 411, 412, 413, 414. 

To meet the requirements for certification by the American Chemical 
Society a student must elect an additional course in the 500 group. 

Minor: At least 20 semester hours in the following courses are required for 
a minor in Chemistry, 111, 112, 211, 212, (301-302) or (205-206). 

*Courses 205, 206, 207, 208 will not be counted toward a major in 
Chemistry. 

Courses 207, 208 will not be counted toward a minor in Chemistry. 

COURSES 

111, 112. General Chemistry. The fundamental theories and facts of 
chemistry are presented from the standpoint of the structure of matter and 
the way in which structure determines behavior. Lecture, Four hours. Labora- 
tory, Four hours. Credit, Four hours each semester. 

205, 206. Organic Chemistry. An introduction to the compounds of 
carbon, intended for students who plan to take only two courses in chemistry. 
Chemistry majors must take Chemistry 301-302. Lecture, Four hours. Labora- 
tory, Four hours. Credit, Four hours each semester. GAWRON. 

207, 208. Principles of Chemistry. A cultural course designed to give 
the college student a general acquaintance with the subject as a whole. Reci- 
tation with lectures, demonstrations and laboratory. This course does not 
carry credit toward a chemistry major. Lecture, Three hours. Laboratory, 
Two hours. Credit, Three hours each semester. MORONEY. 

211. Quantitative Analysis. Rigorous training in stoichiometric rela- 
tionship and in the^ application of equilibrium principles, with laboratory 
experience in the principal methods of gravimetric and volumetric analysis. 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 111, 112. Lecture, Three hours. Laboratory, Eight 
hours. Credit, Four hours. DUNKELBERGER. 

212. Qualitative Analysis. Theoretical and practical study of the 
methods of separating and identifying the more common anions and cations. 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 211. Lecture, Three hours. Laboratory, Eight hours. 
Credit, Four hours. DUNKELBERGER. 

301, 302. Organic Chemistry. The theoretical background is developed 
from the standpoint of the electronic structure of molecules and the accom- 
panying energy considerations. The preparation, properties, and uses of 
representative organic compounds are then discussed in considerable detail. 
Perequisite: Chemistry 211, 212. Lecture, Four hours. Laboratory, Six hours. 
Credit, Four hours each semester. SZMANT. 

411, 412. PhysicalJChemistry. A study of the structure and properties 
of the various states of matter; thermodynamics and thermochemistry. 
Prerequisites: Physics 212, Chemistry 212, Mathematics 207. Lecture, Four 
hours. Credit, Three hours each semester. HARNSBERGER. 



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COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 



413, 414. Physical Chemistry. Laboratory portion of Chemistry 411, 
412. Laboratory, Four hours. Credit, One hour each semester. HARNS- 
BERGER. 

501, 502. Biochemistry. This course covers the fundamental chemistry 
and metabolism of biological materials. Pertinent aspects of physiological 
chemistry are included. Prerequisite: Organic Chemistry 301-302, or equiva- 
lent; prerequisite or corequisite: Physical Chemistry or equivalent. Lecture, 
Three hours; Laboratory, Four hours. Credit, Three hours each semester. 
GAWRON. 

503, 504. Advanced Biochemistry. An advanced discussion of the 
chemistry and metabolism of proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates and fats. 
The anabolic as well as catabolic aspects of metabolism are included. Vitamin 
and hormonal influences on metabolism, genetic control of biochemical re- 
actions, energy relationships, and antimetabolite effects are introduced at 
appropriate points in the discussion. Prerequisite: Biochemistry 501-502. 
Lecture, Three hours. Credit, Three hours each semester. GAWRON. 

509, 510. Advanced Organic Chemistry I. A survey of the theoretical 
aspects of organic chemistry, including reaction mechanisms and the structural 
interpretation of the physical and chemical behavior of various bond types. 
Lecture, Three hours. Credit, Three hours each semester. 

511, 512. Advanced Organic Chemistry II. Important special topics 
are considered: Heterocyclics, Natural Products, High Polymers, etc. Ad- 
vanced Organic Chemistry I will normally, but not necessarily, precede this 
course. Lecture, Three hours. Credit, Three hours each semester. SZMANT. 

521, 522. Research Techniques. Practice is given in the use of instru- 
ments and methods that are widely utilized in chemical research. The exact 
choice of experiments is determined by the past experience and anticipated 
future needs of the individual student. Molecular distillation, spectrophoto- 
metry, chromatography, polarography, thermometry, microscopy, glass- 
blowing, vaporphase reactions, are included. Laboratory work and informal 
discussion. Credit, a total of two hours in one or two semesters. STAFF. 

525, 526. Organic Preparations. A survey intended to prepare the 
student for independent work in synthetic organic chemistry. A search of the 
literature is required to find appropriate methods of preparation for the 
assigned compounds. Laboratory work and informal discussion. Credit, One 
hour each semester. SZMANT. 

541. Qualitative Organic Analysis. The systematic identification of 
organic compounds is considered both theoretically and practically. Lecture, 
One hour. Laboratory, Eight hours minimum. Credit, Four hours. SZMANT. 

543. Quantitative Organic Analysis. Analyses are carried out, 
usually by micro methods, for nitrogen, halogens, carbon, hydrogen, and 
several functional groups in organic compounds. Laboratory and informal 
discussion. Credit, One hour. DUNKELBERGER. 

551, 552. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. This course is intended to 
broaden the student's chemical background by a more penetrating discussion 
of certain topics touched on in undergraduate courses. Periodic properties of 
the elements, crystal structure, intermetallic compounds, metallo-organic 
compounds, stereochemistry, and similar topics are included. Lecture, Three 
hours. Credit, Three hours each semester. HARNSBERGER. 



Thirty-nine 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



DEPARTMENT OF CLASSICAL LANGUAGES 

Rev. Raymond Cadwallader, Chairman; Assistant Professor Charles G. Algier; 
Instructor Rev. James A. Phalen, C.S.Sp. 

REQUIREMENTS 

Major: Two units of high-school Latin or courses 101, 102 Elementary Latin 
are prerequisite to majoring in this Department. No credit toward 
the major is given for 101, 102. Twenty-four hours constitute the 
major. Six credits in Greek may be substituted for six of the twenty- 
four in Latin. 

Minor: Eighteen semester hours of Latin constitute a minor. 

COURSES 

LATIN 

101, 102. Elementary Latin. Essentials of grammar, declensions, con- 
jugations, syntax of cases and moods. Exercising in reading and composition. 
This course does not carry credit towards a major in Latin. Credit, Three 
hours each semester. 

201. Introduction to Latin Prose. Selections from Caesar and Cicero, 
including the latter's Pro Archia. Latin composition, further syntax of moods, 
complex and compound sentences. Credity Three hours. 

202. Latin Poetry. Selections from the poetry of Vergil, Horace, 
Catullus, Tibullus, Propertius and Ovid. Historical and biographical back- 
ground. Development of verse forms. Credity Three hours. 

301. Survey of Classical Roman Literature I. First three periods, 
from Livy to Catullus. Historical and biographical studies. Latin com- 
position and term papers. Credit, Three hours. 

302. Survey of Classical Roman Literature II. Second three periods, 
from Crispus to Gaius. Historical and biographical studies. Latin composition 
and term papers. Credit, Three hours. 

401. Tacitus. Study of the Germania and Agricola. Tactius as a stylist 
and historian. Collateral reading, reports, term paper. Credit, Three hours. 

402. Horace. Selected Odes and Epodes. The development of lyric 
poetry, literary analysis, the influence of the Odes. Collateral reading, reports, 
term paper. Credit, Three hours. 

403. Cicero. Pro Milone. This work is read in its entirety with careful 
attention to the application of the classic principles of rhetoric. Collateral 
reading, reports, term paper. Credit, Three hours. 

404. Cicero. De Senectute, De Amicitia. Study of essay forms as 
differing from historical studies and oratory. Philosophical background of 
the times and the author. Collateral reading, reports, term paper. Credit, 
Three hours. 

411. Livy. A study of the syntax and style of Livy and of his role as 
historian and eulogist of Rome. Collateral reading, reports, term paper. 
Credit, Three hours. 



Forty 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 



412. Vergil. Selections from the Aeneid, Eclogues and Georgics. Epic 
and pastoral poetry. Roman poets and their patrons. Collateral reading, 
reports, term paper. Credit, Three hours. 

413. Roman Drama. Selections from Plautus and Terence. The place 
of the drama in Roman life; its sources and development. Collateral reading, 
reports, term paper. Credit, Three hours. 

414. Pliny. Selected Letters. Comparison with letters of Cicero and 
Seneca. Contemporary Roman life. Collateral reading, reports, term paper 
Credit, Three hours. 

GREEK 

101. Greek Grammar. Grounding in the common forms and elements 
of syntax necessary for translation. Credit, Three hours. 

102. Greek Composition. Grounding in the irregular forms and 
elements with exercises in composition. Credit, Three hours. 

201. Xenophon. Selections from the Anabasis and the Hellenica. 
Historical and biographical background. Collateral reading, reports, term 
paper. Credit, Three hours. 

202. New Testament Greek. Study of style, idioms and forms used 
by New Testament authors. Application of both style and forms to frequent 
exercise in composition. Collateral reading, reports, term paper. Credit, 
Three hours. 

DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS 

Cyril F. Zebot, Chairman; Assistant Professors Geza Grosschmid, George P. 
Bastyr, Bruno Hartung; Lecturer Vincent P. Bodell. 

REQUIREMENTS 

Major: A minimum of thirty credit hours is required for a major in Econo- 
omics. These credits must include 211, 212, 221, 222, 405, 406, 418. 
All Economics Majors must complete* Sociology 101, 102 and 
Political Science 101, 102. 

Minor: A minimum of twenty credit hours is required for a minor in Econ- 
omics. All Economics Minors must complete Sociology 101, 102, 
and Political Science 101, 102. 

COURSES 

101, 102. Economic Geography. A course in regional economic geo- 
graphy giving a survey of man's utilization of the earth in making a living. 
The foundation of the course is the study of the world's major geographic 
regions and of their present and potential production of food and raw materials 
for manufacture. Emphasis is placed on the relation of the different factors of 
the physical environment to man's economic activities. Business Administra- 
tion Faculty. Credit, Three hours each semester. 

211, 212. Principles of Economics. A study of the fundamental con- 
cepts, institutions, and principles of economics as they appear in the pro- 
duction, consumption, and distribution of wealth. Credit, Three hours each 
semester. 



Forty-one 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



221, 222. Economic Measurements. The statistics of production and 
of its effects on both unit and aggregate levels of economic activity. Credit, 
Three hours each semester. BASTYR, GROSSCHMID. 

311. Principles of Money and Banking. A study of the development 
and theory of money, credit and banking. This course deals with monetary 
standards, a history of currency, principles of note issue, and introductory 
study of the money markets, gold movements, foreign exchange, the structure 
and operation of commercial banks and contemporary business credit practices. 
It also # treats of central banking, the Federal Reserve System, transfer and 
collection of credit items, federal fiscal policies, banking supervision and 
regulation, and the control of credit. Credit, Three hours. FACULTY OF 
THE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION. 

312. Public Finance. The management of government revenues and 
expenditures; emphasis is on American practices and policies. Credit, Three 
hours. BASTYR. 

t 317, 318. Labor Economics. A study of the workers as human person- 
alities, of social unrest, employment, its stabilization, wages, working condi- 
tions, living standards, social insurance, and the modern labor movement, 
and its objectives. Prerequisite: Economics 211, 212. Credit, Two hours each 
semester. HARTUNG. 

321. Trends and Goals of Economic Development. A historical 
treatment of aims and achievements in American economic development; 
free production and consumption; government policies. Credit, Three hours. 
GROSSCHMID. 

405, 406. History of Economic Thought. Chronologically traces the 
development of economic thought and considers allied topics. Prerequisite: 
Economics 211, 212. Credit, Four hours. ZEBOT. 

417. International Economics. A study of the policies and practices 
of the various government in their international dealings; the effect of these 
on individual national economies. Credit, Three hours. ZEBOT. 

418. Applied Economics. A more detailed study of the economic 
problems met in Economics 211, 212, together with an evaluation of possible 
solutions. Credit, Three hours. ZEBOT. 

517, 518. The Theory of Demand, Production and Prices. A course 
in micro-economics; i.e. a study of basic economic units, their decisions and 
actions as to demand and production, and of price and income determination, 
under different institutional conditions of modern economy. Credit, Two 
hours each semester. GROSSCHMID. 

547, 548. Industrial Studies and Inter- Industry Relations. The 

course will explore the mutual dependence of different industries both during 
their growth and development as well as in the more stabilized course of their 
operation. Special attention will be given to such basic industries as steel, 
automobiles, railroads, electricity and petroleum, among others. Credit, Two 
hours each semester. ADAMS. 



Forty-two 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 



DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH 

James M. Purcell, Chairman', Associate Professors Rev. Vernon F. Gallagher, 
C.S.Sp., Ralph A. Klinefelter; Assistant Professors Rev. Joseph R. 
Kletzel, C.S.Sp., Robert E. Mitchell; Instructors Rev. William F. 
Crowley, C.S.Sp., Frederjc DeFeis, Marie Diehl, George McFadden, 
Bernard A. Brunner, William J. Craven, F. Fallon Evans, John Mertz, 
Catharine C. Weaver. Jean Kernan. 



REQUIREMENTS 

ENGLISH LITERATURE 

Major: Twenty-four semester hours are required for a major in English 
Literature. The following courses are required: 201, 202, 307 or 308, 
406, and two courses from 364, 402, 403. 

English majors must also take History 251, 252. Students who 
anticipate going into graduate study should choose French or 
German as a foreign language. 

Minor: Eighteen semester hours are required for a minor in English Litera- 
ture.^ 

*Engljsh 101, 102 will not be counted toward a major or a minor in 
English Literature. 



PUBLIC SPEAKING 

Major: Twenty-four semester hours are required for a major in Public 
Speaking. These must be taken in the following courses: Public 
Speaking 205, 206, 305, 306, 307, 308, 405, 406. 

Minor: Eighteen semester hours are required for a minor in Public Speaking. 
Public Speaking 205, 206, plus twelve credits in the higher courses 
in Public Speaking. 



COURSES 

COMPOSITION AND LITERATURE 

000. Remedial English. Required of all freshmen who in placement 
and theme tests exhibit serious deficiencies in their ability to use the English 
language. This course does not carry credit toward graduation. The fee, 
however, is the same as for a three-credit course. 

101, 102. English Composition. Major emphasis placed on actual 
practice in writing. A rapid review of English grammar and rhetoric will be 
provided. Credit, Three hours each semester. 

201, 202. English Literature. A course designed to provide the student 
with a practical knowledge of English Literature, to familiarize him with the 
writers of prose and poetry, and to place their works against the historical, 
social and philosophical background of their times. The continuity of the 
periods is established by a study of Romanticism and Classicism, and of 
Christian and non-Christian modes of thought. Credit, Three hours each 
semester. 



Forty-three^ 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



204. Creative Writing. The course begins with a study of the basic 
elements in fiction writing, from which point the student is urged to try his 
pen at all types of creative writing. Credit, Two hours. 

307, 308. History of the English Language. The first semester is 
devoted to a study of the chronological development of the English language, 
and the second semester to the kinds of changes and standards of usage that 
prevail in language. Credit, Two hours each semester. PURCELL. 

313. Playwriting. Building the play from the first idea, through plot, 
characterization and dialogue. Credit, Two hours. Open to all students. 
DE FEIS. 

319. Major English Poets. A critical reading and description of the 
major English poets. A study in the appreciation of poetry. Credit, Two hours. 
PURCELL. 

320. The Development of the Essay. The course presents the develop- 
ment of the Essay as a form of literature. Separate essayists, and successive 
periods in English and American literature will be considered both for histori- 
cal importance and for intrinsic literary value. Credit,Two hours. McFADDEN. 

363. The Drama in England. A survey of the drama in England from 
the liturgical play to the modern theatre. While this course is primarily a 
survey, attention is given to the elements of dramatic art. Credit, Two hours. 
KLINEFELTER. 

364. American Drama. A study of the Theatre in America from the 
Colonial Drama to the Modern Stage. Credit, Two hours. KLETZEL. 

401. The English Novel. A study of the historical development of the 
novel and the influences which affected the novel form, together with the 
reading and analysis of characteristic works. Credit, Two hours. 
KLINEFELTER. 

402. American Fiction. The borrowed and native background for 
American Fiction; Mysticism and the Personal narrative of religious America; 
the Puritan influences; Hawthorne and Melville; Social influence on American 
Fiction; Romanticism and the westward movement; Realism. Credit, Two 
hours. KLETZEL. 

403. American Poets. A critical reading in the major American Poets, 
and a study of the national influences on the poems of these authors. Credit, 
Two hours. KLETZEL. 

406. Chaucer. Several of the tales in the Canterbury Tales will be read 
with special attention to the language. Credit, Two hours. KLINEFELTER. 

407. Readings in Shakespeare. A course designed to familiarize the 
student with the dramas of Shakespeare. Credit, Two hours. PURCELL. 

PUBLIC SPEAKING 

205. Voice and its Use. Presents the theory^ of voice production from 
the scientific standpoint. The student is drilled in all that will make for 
satisfactory volume, resonance and pitch. Credit, Three hours. 

206. Principles of Public Speaking. Continues the application of vocal 
theory and more directly integrates it with public speaking. Enunciation, 
pacing and fundamentals of speech construction are stressed. Credit, Three 
hours. 



Forty-four 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 



305, 306. Argumentation and Debate. Trains the student in parlia- 
mentary procedure and gives him practice in the oral presentation of well- 
ordered thought. Impromptu speaking and the more spontaneous aspects of 
public speech are treated in conjunction with the theory of debate. Credit, 
Three hours each semester. MERTZ. 

307, 308. Public Address. Introduces the more formal types of public 
address and sets forth their various characteristics. Stress is laid on platform 
manners and audience analysis. Credit, Three hours each semester. DE FEIS. 

405. Oral Interpretation. A course in advanced reading which empha- 
sizes the technical aspects underlying artistic interpretation. Selected items, 
especially those of a dramatic or lyric nature, provide material for practice. 
Credit, Three hours. DE FEIS. 

406. Radio Speech. Introduces the student to "microphone technique , ' 
by means of a consideration of the advantages and limitations of electrical 
amplification. Practice with the microphone forms a major part of this course. 
Credit, Three hours. 



DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY 

Rev. Salvator J. Federici, C.S.Sp., Chairman; Professor Sydney M. Brown, 
Assistant Professors Rev. John R. Schlicht, C.S.Sp., Severino Russo, 
Instructor Joseph R. Morice; Lecturers Dominic Iannotta, John Mazzola, 
Bernard Petruska, James T. C. Liu. 

REQUIREMENTS 

Major: Twentv-four semester hours are required for a major in History. 
Sequence A: History 105, 106, 201, 202, 205, 206, 8 elective credits. 
Sequence B: History 201, 202, 205, 206, 305, 306, 6 elective credits. 

Minor: Eighteen semester hours are required for a minor in History. 

101, 102, 103, 104, 412, 413, 414 will not be counted toward the 
major or minor. 

103, 104 must be taken by all students but will not be counted toward 
a major or a minor in history. 101, 102 is a survey course for those 
who do not intend to take any advanced work in history. 

COURSES 

101, 102. History of Civilization. A general survey of the History of 
Western Nations, emphasizing the development of the main elements in the 
make-up of Western Civilization. Credit, Three hours each semester. 

103, 104. History of American Democracy. The historical development 
of American institutions and ideals from the time of the early settlements to 
the present. Credit, Two hours each semester. 

105. Greek History. The Classical Heritage of Greece portraying its 
intellectual and political contributions as the link between the ancient world 
of the East and the new world of the West. Credit, Two hours. BROWN. 

106. Roman History. A survey of political and social history of Rome. 
The Monarchy, the Republic, and the Early Empires. Credit, Two hours. 
BROWN. 



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DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



201, 202. Medieval History. A survey of the 1000 years, 500-1500. 
Emergence of Feudalism — its operation; Empire and the Papacy, and factors 
preceding Modern Times. Credit, Three hours each semester. BROWN. 

205, 206. European History 1500-1815. Reformation to the Congress 
of Vienna. Foundation of National Monarchies. Rise of Absolutism and its 
decline. Credit, Three hours each semester. RUSSO. 

251, 252. English History. Deals mainly with the social and economic 
life of England as a special background for students of English Literature. 
The first semester covers the period from the Anglo-Saxon invasion to the 
Tudor period. The second semester covers the Stuart period to World War II. 
Credit, Three hours each semester. BROWN. 

301. Russian History. Origin of Kiev State to present time with 
emphasis on 19th and 20th Century. Credit, Three hours. STAFF. 

303. Near Eastern History. A survey of the history of Turkey, the 
Balkan States, Syria and Egypt, with emphasis on the policies of the great 
powers and on the ambitions of the minor states in southeastern Europe in 
the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Credit, Three hours. STAFF. 

304. Far Eastern History. Background of Chinese and Japanese differ- 
ences with the Western World. Credit, Two hours. STAFF. 

305. 306. European History, 1815 to Present. Growth of Capitalism 
and international rivalries with political and social repercussions. Credit, 
Three hours each semester. SCHLICHT. 

401, 402. Social and Economic History of the United States. 

Exclusive investigation of the social and economic factors in the development 
of our country from Colonial Times to the Present. Credit, Three hours each 
semester. SCHLICHT. 

403, 404. Latin American History. Colonial development of South 
America. Successful revolt and subsequent development of each republic. 
Credit, Two hours each semester. SCHLICHT. 

412. History of Pennsylvania. A comprehensive course in Pennsylvania 
history, with special attention to the economic resources of the commonwealth. 
Credit, Two hours. BARR. 

413, 414. History of the Arts. Lectures and demonstrations surveying 
the development of music, painting, sculpture and architecture. Credit, Two 
hours each semester. DE SPUR. 



DEPARTMENT OF JOURNALISM 

Cornelius S. McCarthy, Coordinator of Department; Instructors Rev. Vincent 
DeP. Deer, C.S.Sp.; Lecturers Dale S. Jackson, B. Kendall Crane, 
John Patterson, Richard Kress, John J. McKee, Thomas J. Moran. 

REQUIREMENTS 

Major: All students take the following courses in the freshman year: 103, 
104, 105. These courses take the place of 101, 102 English Com- 
position, and may not be counted toward the major. In the sopho- 
more year students choose one of the following sequences: 



Forty-six 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 



Advertising: 207, 208, 209, 301*, 302*, 303*, 304*, 305, 306, 307*, 
308*, 351*, 301*, 402*, 403*, 406, 407, 409, 410, 
414*, 422, 423. 

News-Editorial: 207, 208, 209, 210, 301*, 302*, 305*, 306*, 307, 
308, 401*, 402*, 403*, 404*, 405*, 406, 407, 409, 
410, 411. 

Radio Journalism: 205*, 206*, 212, 213, 305, 306, 309, 311, 312, 
315, 316, 409, 410, 414, 417, 418. 

* Co-requirement courses. 

Minor: Minors in Journalism will take the following courses: 207, 208, 209, 
212, 213, 307, 311, 409, 410. 

COURSES 

103. Survey of Journalism. The basic principles of such fields of com- 
munication as the newspaper, magazine, radio, advertising, public relations, 
and the specialized press. By the end of the semester each student must be 
able to type at a minimum rate of twenty words per minute. This course is 
required of all Journalism majors in their freshman year. Credit, Three hours. 

104. Rhetoric. Review of sentence and paragraph structure; use of 
direct quotations; vocabulary building; preparing and writing the research 
paper. Credit, One hour. 

105. News Reporting. Study and practice in gathering news. Training 
in coverage of campus news events. Intensive study of news leads; technique 
and structure of news stories; news values and news sources. Credit, Three 
hours. 

ADVERTISING SEQUENCE 

207, 208. History of Journalism. The first semester of this course is 
concerned with the origin and growth of journalism in England and in the 
American colonies up to the end of the Civil War. Emphasis in the second 
semester is on the major social influences affecting the pattern of the American 
press from that time down to the present day. The effects of the industrial 
revolution, population growth, technology and urbanization are analyzed. 
Credit, Two hours each semester. 

209. News Writing. Advanced writing and reporting with stress on the 
gathering and writing of all types of news reports. Telephone interviewing; 
human-interest stories; news analysis. Ethical aspects of reporting and news 
presentation. Credit, Three hours. 

301, 302. Press Photography. Fundamentals of photography, dark- 
room practice and use of press camera. Credit, Two hours each semester. 

303, 304. Principles of Marketing. Offered by the School of Business 
Administration. Credit, Two hours each semester. 

305, 306. Principles of Advertising. Major topics of this introductory 
course are retail advertising, industrial advertising, national or general adver- 
tising, each being treated from the viewpoints of newspaper, direct-mail, 
outdoor, magazine and radio advertising. The student writes copy, devises 
advertising layouts, designs covers and develops original ideas for the selling 
of merchandise. Credit, Two hours each semester. 



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307, 308. Copy-reading and Editing. Newspaper desk work; revising 
and rewriting of faulty news stories; editing of copy; building of headlines. 
News values; style; use of reference materials. Second semester course is a 
laboratory course in editing the complete newspaper under city-room practice 
in the news room of the University's weekly All-American newspaper. Empha- 
sis is placed on make-up and news display. The student has practice in using 
press association and syndicate service copy; wires of the United Press and 
of the International News Service are available for this purpose in the Depart- 
ment. Credit, Three hours each semester. 

351. Business Statistics. Offered by the School of Business Administra- 
tion. Credit, Two hours. 

401, 402. Advanced Press Photography. Professionally supervised 
study-practice of techniques followed by press photographers. Credit, Two 
hours each semester. 

403, 404. Picture Editing. Editing, cropping and layout of photographs 
and illustrations in newspapers and magazines; organization of photography 
and engraving departments. Credit, Two hours each semester. 

406, 407. Newspaper Advertising Practice. An advanced field course 
for senior news-editorial and advertising majors. The student works on an 
assigned newspaper and is expected to produce editorial advertising copy 
each week. Credit is given only when student's editor and faculty supervisor 
agree that student's work is of professional quality. Credit, Three hours each 
semester. 

409, 410. Public Relations. Nature and development of public opinion 
and propaganda; public relations progress; standards; plans; programs; 
opinion research; publicity and the use of media. Credit, Two hours each 
semester. 

414. Radio Advertising. Radio as an advertising medium. Practice in 
preparing scripts and various types of commercial programs. Problems in 
program selection, time buying and program ratings. Radio advertising 
ethics; listener-response; sponsors; transcription companies; talent. Credit, 
Two hours. 

422. Advertising Copy Writing. Principles and practices in techniques 
of writing advertising copy for newspapers, magazines and direct mail. Copy 
relationship to headline, illustration and message. Readership and market 
surveys; study of advertising media and advertising appeal. Credit, Three 
hours. 

423. Advanced Advertising. Application of principles and techniques 
of copy-writing to preparation of advertising campaigns. Choice of media; 
sales promotion; consumer research studies; problems of layout; pre-testing 
copy and layout. Credit, Three hours. 

NEWS-EDITORIAL SEQUENCE 

207, 208. History of Journalism. The first semester of this course is 
concerned with the origin and growth of journalism in England and in the 
American colonies up to the end of the Civil War. Emphasis in the second 
semester is on the major social influences affecting the pattern of the American 
press from that time down to the present day. The effects of the industrial 
revolution, population growth, technology and urbanization are analyzed. 
Credit, Two hours each semester. 



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209. News Writing. Advanced writing and reporting with stress on 
the gathering and writing of all types of news reports. Telephone interview- 
ing; human-interest stories; news analysis. Ethical aspects of reporting and 
news presentation. Credit Three hours. 

210. Feature Story Writing. Advanced study in writing and marketing 
of factual articles for newspapers. University publications. Newspaper 
feature stories and development of individual style. Instruction in subject 
research and preparation of manuscript. Techniques of marketing. Credit, 
Two hours. 

301, 302. Press Photography. Fundamentals of photography, dark- 
room practice and use of press camera. Credit, Two hours each semester. 

305, 306. Principles of Advertising. Major topics of this introductory 
course are retail advertising, industrial advertising, national or general 
advertising, each being treated from the viewpoints of newspaper, direct-mail, 
outdoor, magazine and radio advertising. The student writes copy, devises 
advertising layouts, designs covers and develops original ideas for the selling 
of merchandise. Credit, Two hours each semester. 

307, 308. Copy-reading and Editing. Newspaper desk work; revising 
and rewriting of faulty news stories; editing of copy; building of headlines. 
News values; style; use of reference materials. Second semester course is a 
laboratory course in editing the complete newspaper under city-room practice 
in the news room of the University's weekly Ail-American newspaper. Empha- 
sis is placed on make-up and news display. The student has practice in using 
press association and syndicate service copy; wires of the United Press and 
of the International News Service are available for this purpose in the Depart- 
ment. Credit, Three hours each semester. 

401, 402. Advanced Press Photography. Professionally supervised 
study-practice of techniques followed by press photographers. Credit, Two 
hours each semester. 

403, 404. Picture Editing. Editing, cropping and layout of photographs 
and illustrations in newspapers and magazines; organization of photography 
and engraving departments. Credit, Two hours each semester. 

405. Industrial Journalism. Writing and editing the trade and business 
publication. Internal and external publications of industry. Factual articles 
for trade journals. Credit, Two hours. 

406, 407. Newspaper Editorial Practice. An advanced field course for 
senior news-editorial and advertising majors. The student works on an 
assigned newspaper and is expected to produce editorial advertising copy 
each week. Credit is given only when student's editor and faculty supervisor 
agree that student's work is of professional quality. Credit, Three hours each 
semester. 

409, 410. Public Relations. Nature and development of public opinion 
and propaganda; progress and standards; plans and programs; opinion re- 
search; publicity and the use of media. Credit, Two hours each semester. 

411. Reporting of Public Affairs. The student covers news and features 
at the City-County Building, Court House, Police Headquarters, Federal 
Building and other municipal and political offices in the city. Topics studied 
in detail are fair comment and criticism, privileged matter, contempt of court, 
right of privacy, and the Law of Libel. Credit, Three hours. 



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RADIO JOURNALISM SEQUENCE 

205. Voice and Its Use. Offered by the English Department. Credit, 
Three hours. 

206. Principles of Public Speaking. Offered by the English Depart- 
ment. Credit, Three hours. 

212. Introduction to Radio Broadcasting. A survey course in which 
the various aspects of radio are covered. Radio as a mass-communication 
medium, its influence and responsibilities. The role of the FCC and FTC in 
American broadcasting. Television and facsimile transmission. Credit, Two 
hours. 

213. Radio Continuity Writing I. Primary techniques in concentrated 
writing of all program types, including interviews, talks, forums, round-tables 
and documentary scripts. Credit, Two hours. 

305, 306. Principles of Advertising. Major topics of this introductory 
course are retail advertising, industrial advertising, national or general adver- 
tising, each being treated from the viewpoints of newspaper, direct-mail, 
outdoor, magazine and radio advertising. The student writes copy, devises 
advertising layouts, designs covers and develops original ideas for the selling 
of merchandise. Credit, Two hours each semester. 

309. Radio Continuity Writing II. Further techniques in concentrated 
writing of all program types, including interviews, talks, forums, round-tables 
and documentary scripts. Credit, Two hours. 

311. Radio Production. Organization and presentation of programs. 
Microphone technique. Sound effects. Studio terminology and signals. 
Balancing of radio fare. Credit, Two hours. 

312. Radio News Writing. Processing, writing and editing of straight 
news broadcasts. News commentaries and interviews. Use of the United 
Press and International News Service wires in the Department. Practice in 
broadcasting over the University's FM radio station WDUQ. Credit, Two 
hours. 

315, 316. Radio Announcing. Problems and techniques of effective 
radio speaking. Extemporizing. Practice in broadcasting over the University's 
FM radio station WDUQ. Credit, Two hours each semester. 

409, 410. Public Relations. Nature and development of public opinion 
and propaganda; public relations progress; standards; plans; programs; 
opinion research; publicity and the use of media. Credit, Two hours each 
semester. 

414. Radio Advertising. Radio as an advertising medium. Practice in 
preparing scripts and various types of commercial programs. Problems in 
program selection, time buying and program ratings. Radio advertising ethics; 
listener-response; sponsors, transcription companies; talent. Credit, Two hours. 

417, 418. Radio Dramatic Writing. Techniques of writing for the unit, 
serial and episodic drama, and for the narrative and documentary program. 
Credit, Two hours each semester. 



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DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS 

Morris Ostrofsky, Chairman; Associate Professors Ruth Eileen Goodman, 
Robert E. Smith; Instructors Benjamin Schwartz, Rev. John P. Gallagher, 
C.S.Sp.; Lecturer Esther Dunkelberger. 

REQUIREMENTS 

Major: Thirty-two semester hours are required for a major in mathematics 
in the following courses: 105, 106, 207, 208, 451, 452, 461, 462. 
Mathematics majors must also take Physics 211, 212, 303. 

Minor: A minimum of 18 semester hours are required in the following courses 
for a minor in mathematics: 105, 106, 207, 208. 

COURSES 

101. College Algebra. A course intended for students who are not 
prepared to take Math. 105. Credit, Three hours. 

102. Trigonometry. The definitions; their geometric basis; their rela- 
tions. Solutions of right triangles; addition and subtraction of formulas. 
Extension of definitions. Trigonometric equations. Inverse functions. Solution 
of oblique triangles. Credit, Three hours. 

103. Algebra and Trigonometry. This intensified course combines the 
material of Mathematics 101 with an introduction to trigonometry. Credit, 
Four hours. 

104. Trigonometry and Analytic Geometry. A continuation of 
Mathematics 103. Completes the study of plane and spherical trigonometry 
and enters the field of geometry to study conic sections, systems of coordinates, 
general equation of the second degree and the point, line and plane in space. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 103. Credit, Four hours. 

105. Freshman Mathematics. Algebra, trigonometry, and analytic 
geometry. Linear and quadratic equations, logarithms, progressions, trig- 
onometric functions and identities, laws of sines and cosines, solution of 
triangles, Cartesian and polar coordinates, elements of solid analytic geom- 
etry. Credit, Four hours. 

106. Calculus I. Differential and integral calculus. Limits and limiting 
processes, the definite integral, the derivative, application to problems in 
physics, chemistry, and geometry; maxima and minima, rates, approximation 
of errors. Functions of more than one variable, partial derivatives, multiple 
integrals with applications to finding volumes, centroids, moments of inertia, 
fluid pressure and work. Sequences, infinite series and methods of approxima- 
tion, hyperbolic functions. Prerequisite: 105. Credit, Four hours. 

207. Calculus II. Continuation of Calculus 106. Prerequisite: 106 
Calculus. Credit, Four hours. 

208. Elementary Differential Equations. Linear differential equations 
of the first degree; solutions by special methods of those types of ordinary 
differential equations which possess a solution in closed form, with applica- 
tions to problems in the physical sciences; solution by operator methods. 
Systems of equations, series solutions, approximate solutions. Prerequisite: 
207. Credit, Four hours. 



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407. Higher Algebra. Selected topics in algebra. Determinants. Com- 
plex numbers. Theory of equations. Credit, Three hours. 

408. Advanced Euclidean Geometry. This course is especially designed 
to give those students who expect to teach geometry a broader background 
in the subject. Such topics as homothetic figures, anharmonic division, symme- 
dians of a triangle, and the nine-point circle will be considered. Credit, Three 
hours. GOODMAN. 

451, 452. Differential Equations. A study of the more common types 
of ordinary and partial differential equations, with applications to geometry 
and the physical sciences. Prerequisite: 208. Credit, Three hours each semester, 
OSTROFSKY. 

461, 462. Advanced Calculus I and II. First course in modern math- 
ematical rigor. Topics include limits, sequences, infinite series, theorem of 
the mean in differential calculus, theorem of the mean for integrals, functions 
of several variables, implicit functions, the definite integral, the fundamental 
theorem of calculus, improper integrals, functions defined by definite integ- 
rals, Fourier Series. Prerequisite: 208. Credit, Four hours each semester. 

471. Vector Analysis. Scalars and vectors, scalar and vector products, 
vector fields, gradient, divergence, curl, Stokes' theorem, curvilinear co- 
ordinates, applications to physical sciences. Credit, Three hours. OSTROFSKY. 



DEPARTMENT OF MODERN LANGUAGES 

Primitivo Colombo, Chairman; Associate Professor Kenneth J. DufFy; 
Assistant Professors Pauline Reinkraut, Rev. Henry J. Lemmens, C.S.Sp., 
Reyes Carbonell; Instructors Frances Colecchia, Gerard Bessette, Magda 
DeSpur; Lecturers Joseph Corriols, Jr., Rev. Louis T. Sismis. 

REQUIREMENTS 

Major: Twenty-four semester hours in any one language are required for a 
major. Courses to be taken are: 

French 201, 202, 301, 302, 401, 402, 501, 502. 
German 201, 202, 301, 302, 401, 402, 501, 502. 
Spanish 201, 202, 301, 302, 401, 402, 501, 502. 

Minor: Eighteen semester hours in any one language are required for a 
minor. Courses to be taken are: 

French 201, 202, 301, 302, 401, 402. 

German 201, 202, 301, 302, 401, 402. 

Spanish 201, 202, 301, 302, 401, 402. 

Twelve credits are offered in Russian: 101, 102, 201, 202. 

COURSES 

FRENCH 

101, 102. Elementary French. Pronunciation, reading, dictation, 
grammar, exercises and translation. This course does not carry credit toward 
a major or minor. Credit, Three hours each semester. 



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201, 202. Intermediate French. An intensified continuation of the 
work of French 101, 102. Translation, written and oral, easy composition, 
practice in understanding the spoken language. Prerequisite: French 102 or 
equivalent. Credit, Three hours each semester. 

301, 302. Advanced French Conversation. Systematic and intensive 
drill in French oral practice. Written and oral composition. Readings and 
subjects for discussion are assigned. Prerequisite: French 202 or equivalent. 
Credit, Three hours each semester. 

401, 402. Survey of French Literature. General survey of French 
literature from its beginnings to the present. Given in French. Prerequisite: 
French 302 or equivalent. Credit, Three hours each semester. 

501, 502. General Survey of French Culture and History. Study of 
the principal events of French history from the Celts to the present. France's 
contributions to the arts and sciences. This course is intended to serve as a 
background for later courses in French Literature. Given in French. Pre- 
requisite: French 302 or equivalent. Credit, Three hours each semester. 

504. Phonetics. A study of the sounds of French, individually and in 
combination. Both audio and visual aids are used to perfect speech habits. 
Credit, Two hours. 

505, 506. Advanced French Composition. Free composition, assigned 
topics, reports on outside readings. This course is designed to develop fluency 
and accuracy in writing French. Given in French. Prerequisite: French 302 
or equivalent. Credit, Two hours each semester. 



GERMAN 

101, 102. Elementary German. Pronunciation, reading, dictation, 
grammar, exercises and translation. Credit, Three hours each semester. 

201, 202. Intermediate German. An intensified continuation of the 
work of German 101, 102. Translation, written and oral, easy composition, 
practice in understanding the spoken language. Prerequisite: German 102 or 
equivalent. Credit, Three hours each semester. 

301, 302. Advanced German Conversation. Systematic and intensive 
drill in German oral practice. Written and oral composition. Readings and 
subjects for discussion are assigned. Prerequisite: German 202 or equivalent. 
Credit, Three hours each semester. 

401, 402. Survey of German Literature. General survey of German 
literature from its beginnings to the present. Given in German. Prerequisite: 
German 302 or equivalent. Credit, Three hours each semester. 

501, 502. CJeneral Survey of German Culture and History. Two 

facts are emphasized: 1) Germany's failure to outgrow Feudalism, with the 
resulting petrification in the German Particularism of the sixteenth to the 
nineteenth century; 2) Germany's very great contributions to the science 
and research of the nineteenth century. Given in German. Prerequisite: 
German 302 or equivalent. Credit, Three hours each semester. 

504. Phonetics. A study of the sounds of German, individually and in 
combination. Both audio and visual aids are used to perfect speech habits. 
Prerequisite: German 302 or equivalent. Credit, Two hours. 



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505, 506. Advanced German Composition. Practice in writing and 
speaking the living language. Topics from both current and literary sources 
to gain fluency in colloquial as well as literary German. Given in German. 
Prerequisite: German 302 or equivalent. Credit, Two hours each semester. 

SPANISH 

101, 102. Elementary Spanish. Pronunciation, reading, dictation, gram- 
mar, exercises and translation. Credit, Three hours each semester. 

201, 202. Intermediate Spanish. An intensified continuation of the 
work of Spanish 101, 102. Translation, written and oral, easy composition, 
practice in understanding the spoken language. Prerequisite: Spanish 102 or 
equivalent. Credit, Three hours each semester. 

301, 302. Advanced Spanish Conversation. Systematic and intensive 
drill in Spanish oral practice. Written and oral composition. Readings and 
subjects for discussion are assigned. Prerequisite: Spanish 202 or equivalent. 
Credit, Three hours each semester. 

401, 402. Survey of Spanish Literature. General survey of Spanish 
literature from its beginnings to the present. Given in Spanish. Prerequisite: 
Spanish 302 or equivalent. Credit, Three hours each semester. 

501, 502. General Survey of Spanish Culture and History. A chrono- 
logical study from the earliest recorded events to the present. Development 
of the Spanish language and literature and the latter' s contribution to world 
thought. Reports, oral and written, and discussion. Given in Spanish. Pre- 
requisite: Spanish 302 or equivalent. Credit, Three hours each semester. 

504. Phonetics. Study of the sounds of Spanish, individually and in 
combination. Both audio and visual aids are used to perfect speech habits. 
Prerequisite: Spanish 302 or equivalent. Credit, Two hours. 

505, 506. Advanced Spanish Composition. Practice in writing and 
speaking the living language. Topics from both current and literary sources 
to gain fluency in colloquial as well as literary Spanish. (Siven in Spanish. 
Prerequisite: Spanish 302 or equivalent. Credit, Two hours each semester. 

RUSSIAN 

101, 102. Elementary Russian. Elementary drill in pronunciation, 
reading, grammar and exercises. Credit, Three hours each semester. SISMIS. 

201, 202. Intermediate Russian. Advanced grammar, composition 
and translation, with some emphasis on technical Russian. Credit, Three 
hours each semester. SISMIS. 

DEPARTMENT OF PHILOSOPHY AND 
RELIGION 

Rev. J. Gerald Walsh, C.S.Sp., Acting Chairman-, Associate Professor Rev 
Gordon F. Knight, C.S.Sp.; Assistant Professors Vincent F. Lackner, 
Rev. Henry Koren, C.S.Sp.; Instructors Phillip F. Bannister, Rev. 
Vincent DeP. Deer, C.S.Sp., Rev. Alfred A. Juliano, C.S.Sp., Rev. James 
F. McNamara, C.S.Sp., Peter Puccetti, Rev. Louis N. Schenning, C.S.Sp., 
Edward M. Case, Rev. Joseph Rengers, C.S.Sp., Michael Strasser; 
Lecturers Rev. Paul R. Coyle, Rev. Stephen C. Gulovich, Rev. Edward 
L. Murray, Sr. M. Bernadette Trance, O.S.U. 



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COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 

REQUIREMENTS 
Major: Twenty-six semester hours are required for a major in philosophy. 
Minor: Eighteen semester hours are required for a minor in philosophy. 

COURSES 
PHILOSOPHY 

101. Logic. Required of all first year students throughout the University. 
A fundamental course in dialectics. Credit, Three hours. 

102. Epistemology. The nature of truth; examination of the motives 
of certitude; the validity of sense perceptions. Credit, Three hours. 

201. Ontology. The study of being and its categories. Causality. First 
principles of metaphysics. Credit, Three hours. 

202. Ethics. Required of all second year students throughout the 
University. The course proposes a consideration of the nature and principles 
of morality as determined by the norm of right reason. Credit, Three hours. 

303, 304. Survey of Philosophy. A general history of philosophy that 
aims to point out and evaluate the major figures and trends in the field from 
the Eleatics to St. Augustine and from St. Augustine to the present time. 
Prerequisite: 201 Ontology. Credit, Three hours each semester. 

401. Cosmology The origin, nature and laws of the material universe 
A general application of metaphysics to the material world. Prerequisite: 
201 Ontology. Credit, Three hours. 

402. Rational Psychology. Discusses the origin of life, the nature and 
destiny of the human soul, its powers and activities. Prerequisite: 201 Ont- 
ology. Credit, Three hours. 

403. Theodicy. Analyzes and evaluates the rational proofs for the 
existence of God. Discusses the divine attributes. Credit, Two hours. 

RELIGION 

101, 102. Fundamental Theology. This course investigates the nature 
of Religion and demonstrates the objective existence of such a branch of 
knowledge. It includes a demonstration of the fact that Christ is God and 
that the true version of religion is still being unanimously taught by His 
Church exactly as Christ Himself taught it. Credit, One hour each semester. 

201, 202. Nature of God. This is a course in Rational Theology designed 
especially to arm the layman against the atheism and agnosticism of our times. 
Emphasis is placed on the student's coming to see for himself that what the 
Church teaches about the nature of God is not merely a matter of belief but 
sheerly a matter of fact. Credit, One hour each semester. 

301, 302. Nature of Man. This is a course in Rational Theology 
designed especially to arm the layman against the errors of our time concern- 
ing the nature, dignity and origin of man. It analyzes the teaching of the 
Church on the human soul, original and personal sin, and the fate of man 
after death. Credit, One hour each semester. 



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401. The Eucharist. This course proceeds from a general discussion of 
the teaching of the Church on Grace and the Sacraments to a detailed study 
of the Sacrament of the Eucharist in particular, the nature of Transubstan- 
tiation and the Sacrifice of the Mass. Credit, One hour. 

402. Marriage. This course continues the study of the Sacraments, 
devoting the major portion of the semester to the teaching of the Church on 
the nature and purposes of marriage. Credit, One hour. 



DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS 

Andrew J. Kozora, Acting Chairman; Lecturers Stephen Angelo, Jacob 
Rosenberg. 

REQUIREMENTS 

Major: Thirty-two hours in the following courses are required for a major 
in Physics: 211, 212, 301, 302, 303, 305, 306, 307, 308, 401, 402, 403, 
404. Majors in Physics must complete Chemistry 111, 112 and 
Mathematics 208. 

Minor: Twenty semester hours in the following courses are required for a 
minor in Physics: 211, 212, 301, 302, 303. Minors in Physics must 
complete Chemistry 111, 112 and Mathematics 208. 

COURSES 

201, 202. General Physics. A course designed to give the student a 
basic knowledge of the mechanics and properties of matter, heat, wave motion, 
sound, magnetism, electricity and light Prerequisite: Mathematics 101, 102 
or the equivalent. Lecture, Four hours. Laboratory, Three hours. Credit, 
Four hours each semester. KOZORA. 

207, 208. Principles of Physics. A cultural course suited to the needs 
of the college student who seeks familiarity with the laws of the physical 
world. Lectures and demonstrations. This is an introductory survey not 
intended for science majors. Credit, Three hours each semester. KOZORA. 

211, 212. General Analytical Physics. A course for Physics, Chemistry 
and Mathematics majors designed to provide a rigorous introduction to the 
study of Mechanics, Heat, Electricity, Sound and Light. Prerequisite: 
Mathematics 105, 106. Lecture, Four hours. Laboratory, Three hours, 
Credit, Four hours each semester. 

301. Heat. Thermometry and Calorimetry, thermic expansion, change 
of state, kinetic theory of gases, thermodynamics, theory of specific heats, 
heat propagation. Prerequisite: Physics 212, Mathematics 208. Lecture, 
Four hours. Credit, Four hours. 

302. Light. Lenses, mirrors, optical instruments, photometry, propa- 
gation of light waves, phenomena of interference and diffraction. Spectro- 
scopy; the Michelson experiment. Absorption, scattering, dispersion and 
polarization of light. Prerequisite: Physics 212, Mathematics 208. Lecture, 
Three hours. Laboratory, Three hours. Credit, Four hours. 

303. Mechanics. Statics, Kinematics and Dynamics of a particle and 
of rigid bodies in the plane and in space. Lagrange's equations. Introduction 
to the special theory of relativity. Prerequisite: Physics 212, Mathematics 
208. Lecture, Four hours. Credit, Four hours. 



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305, 306, 307, 308. Seminar. Credit, One hour each semester. 

401. Electricity and Magnetism. Electrostatic fields in a vacuum and 
in dielectric media. Analysis of D-C and A-C circuits. Electromagnetic 
effects of currents. Magnetic properties of matter. Magnetic circuits. Pre- 
requisite: Physics 212, Mathematics 208. Lecture, Three hours. Credit, 
Three hours. 

402. Electronics. Electron conduction and electron tubes. Rectifiers, 
amplifiers, oscillators. Vacuum tube circuits. Ultra-high-frequency and 
microwave tubes and circuits. Prerequisite: Physics 401. Lecture, Three 
hours. Credit, Three hours. 

403. 404. Electrical Measurements. A laboratory course intended to 
acquaint the student with the techniques of measurement in Electricity and 
Magnetism and in Electronics. Laboratory, Three hours. Credit, One hour 
each semester. 

405, 406. Introduction to Theoretical Physics. Advanced work in 
mechanics, dynamics, hydrodynamics, thermodynamics, electrostatics, electro- 
magnetics, optics, statistical mechanics and quantum theory. Prerequisite: 
Mathematics 208 and two years of college physics. Credit, Four hours each 
semester. 

407. Introduction to Modern Physics. Intended to familiarize the 
student with the basic elements of atomic and nuclear physics. Prerequisite: 
Physics 211, 212, Mathematics 207. Credit, Two hours. 



DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY 

Anthony T. Oliva, Acting Chairman; Associate Professor Rev. William J. 
Holt, C.S.Sp.; Assistant Professors Maurice P. Schulte, James H. Butler. 

REQUIREMENTS 

Major: Thirty hours in the following courses are required for a major in 
Psychology: 101, 102, 320, 340, 350, 351, 401, 402, 464. 
Majors in Psychology must complete 102 Zoology, 307 Genetics, 
207, 208 Physics, 101, 102 Sociology. 

Minor: Twenty-four hours in the following courses are required for a minor 
in Psychology: 101, 102, 320, 340, 350, 351, 402, 464. 
Minors in Psychology must complete 102 Zoology, 307 Genetics, 
207, 208 Physics, 101, 102 Sociology. 

COURSES 

101, 102. Principles of Psychology. A survey of the essential laws 
and principles of human behavior. The experimental basis of general psy- 
chology. Experimental demonstrations will be undertaken in class. Credit, 
Three hours each semester. 

220. General Psychology. The essential laws and principles of human 
behavior. Fundamental native reaction, emotional life, mental life, including 
memory and imagination, thinking, concepts and judgment, sensations, 
perceptions, adjustments; and personality. This course is for students in the 
professional schools. Credit, Three hours. 



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310. Educational Psychology. The genetic approach to mental develop- 
ment; ability, and its growth; intelligence, and its significance; the law of 
learning; the principles for the effective use of memory; motivation; transfer; 
personality development. Prerequisite: Psychology 101, 102, or 220. Credit, 
Three hours. HOLT. 

320. Child Psychology. The physical, emotional, social, intellectual, 
and moral development of the child. Maturation and learning. Characteristics 
dominant at different ages. Personality development; the maladjusted child. 
Prerequisite: Psychology 101, 102, or 220. Credit, Three hours. OLIVA. 

330. Adolescent Psychology. The mental, moral, emotional, and social 
development of the adolescent; adolescent needs and interests, various adjust- 
ive problems. Prerequisite: Psychology 101, 102, or Psychology 220. Credit, 
Three hours. OLIVA. 

340. Social Psychology. Foundations of social behavior; mechanism of 
social adjustment; public opinion and propaganda; the psychology of social 
movements. Prerequisite: Psychology 101, 102, or 220, 351. Sociology 101, 
102. Credit, Three hours. SCHULTE. 

350. Abnormal Psychology. Exaggerated and faulty psychological 
processes; impaired cognitional processes; pathological reactions with special 
reference to emotion and volition. Prerequisite: Psychology 101, 102, or 
220, Psychology 351 and any one additional course in psychology. Credit, 
Three hours. SCHULTE. 

351. Statistics. An introduction to statistics in Psychology. Credit, 
Three hours. SMITH. 

401. Experimental Psychology. The laboratory study of basic psycho- 
logical processes; sensation, perception, imagination, memory, thought, 
emotion, and volition. Measurements: cognitional, emotional, and volitional. 
Experimental examination of personality. Prerequisites: Psychology 340, 350. 
Credit, Three hours. SCHULTE. 

402. Rational Psychology. The origin of life, the nature and destiny of 
the human soul, its powers and activities. Prerequisite: 201 Ontology. Credit, 
Three hours. 

» 

464. Mental Hygiene. Mental disease, its psychological cause, proper 
measures for prevention. Mental health; elements of the wholesome person- 
ality; hygienic adjustment to the conflicts of life. Prerequisite: Open to all 
juniors and seniors who have had a first course in psychology. Credit, Three 
hours. HOLT. 

470. Contemporary Schools of Psychology. An examination of current 
trends in psychological theory and methodology in the light of their historical 
development. Prerequisite: All preceding courses. Credit, Three hours. OLIVA. 

485. Introduction to Psychological Testing. The history of psycho- 
logical testing; the rationale of test construction and administration; types of 
tests. Credit, Three hours. OLIVA. 



Fifty-eight 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 



DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL SCIENCES 

Christian Social Philosophy 

Political Science 

Sociology 

Rev. Francis R. Duffy, C.S.Sp., Chairman; Professor J. William McGowan; 
Associate Professor Paul H. Anderson; Assistant Professors Rev. Michael 
J. Faidel, Patrick O'Donnell; Instructors Frank J. Heintz, Jack H. Curtis, 
Chester A. Jurczak, Henry C. McGinnis, Norman Mulgrave; Lecturers 
James Maloney, Dennis Mulvihill, John Fremont Cox, Robert B. Cox. 

REQUIREMENTS 

CHRISTIAN SOCIAL PHILOSOPHY 

Major: Twenty-four semester hours are required for a major in Christian 
Social Philosophy. These credits must include Sociology 101-102 
and at least twenty credits in upper division Christian Social Phil- 
osophy. All Majors in this field must complete Political Science 
101-102 and Economics 211-212. 

Minor: Eighteen semester hours are required for a minor in Christian Social 
Philosophy. These credits must include Sociology 101-102 and at 
least fourteen credits in upper division Christian Social Philosophy. 
All Minors in this field must complete Political Science 101-102 
and Economics 211-212. 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Major: Twenty-four semester hours are required for a major in Political 
Science. These credits must include Political Science 101, 102, 201, 
202, 401, 405, 406. All Majors in Political Science must complete 
Sociology 101, 102 and Economics 211, 212. 



SOCIOLOGY 

Major: Twenty- four semester hours are required for a major in Sociology. 
These credits must include Sociology 101, 102 and at least twenty 
credits in upper division Sociology. All Majors in Sociology must 
complete Political Science 101, 102 and Economics 211, 212. 

Minor: Eighteen semester hours are required for a minor in Sociology. 
These credits must include Sociology 101, 102 and at least fourteen 
credits in upper division Sociology. All Minors in Sociology must 
complete Political Science 101, 102 and Economics 211, 212. 

COURSES 
CHRISTIAN SOCIAL PHILOSOPHY 

205, 206. Christian Concept of Society. A philosophical and scientific 
approach to the concept and background of the organic nature of society, 
state and government in a Christian framework. A study of structural and 
operational patterns of moral government. Credit, Three hours each semester. 



Fifty-nine 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



310, 311. Christian Social Thought. An evaluation of current problems 
in economic-social life in the light of the Catholic pattern for the proper 
direction of industrial relations. Emphasis on education and the Christian 
family as necessary conditions for a just society, according to the plans of 
Leo XIII and Pius XI. Credity Two hours each semester. 

351. The Christian State. A study of the Christian type state advocated 
by Christian Social Philosophy, with particular emphasis laid upon operational 
patterns. Contrasts between the Christian state and contractual forms of 
state are established. Prerequisite: 205, 206. Credity Three hours. 

352. General Welfare Patterns. A presentation of desirable operational 
patterns for the promotion of the general welfare, with particular attention 
paid to the means of activating the proposals set forth in Rerum Novarum 
and Quadragesimo Anno. Prerequisite: 351. Credity Three hours. 

411, 412. Christian Democracy. A new social-economic movement 
inspired by traditional Christian principles. New fields for a thoughtful attack 
on low economic standards of living; a positive approach to social welfare as 
an antidote to Totalitarianism, Communism and Socialist Collectivism. 
Credity Two hours each semester. 

413, 414. Evolution of Society. An evaluation of social progress, begin- 
ning with the social culture of Babylon and other ancient civilizations, through 
Biblical times, and continuing to the present day. Detailed attention is paid 
to the culture of the Middle Ages and to the social lags later produced by 
industrialism. Emphasis is laid upon the many contributions to proper social 
progress made by Catholic social thought. Credity Two hours each semester. 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 

101, 102. Introduction to Political Science. An investigation of the 
nature, scope, and methods of political science; its relationship to and depend- 
ence on other social sciences; divisions of the field; basic concepts such as 
state, government, law, sovereignty, constitution, representation, electorate 
and political parties. Credity Four hours. 

201, 202. American Federal Government. Colonial and Revolutionary 
sources; Federal Constitution, origin of parties, party organization, election, 
actual working of the Federal and State governments, with special considera- 
tion of the Inter-State Commerce Commission, Federal Reserve Board. 
Lectures, Library reading, and Recitations. Credit, Six hours. 

301. State and Local Government. Embraces a study of the position 
of the State in the Federal Union; popular control in state and local govern- 
ment; state and local politics; the state legislature, the state judiciary, the 
governor, and local rural government. Credit, Two hours. FAIDEL, ANDER- 
SON. 

302. Municipal Government. The different methods of city govern- 
ment, including the commission and city manager systems and problems 
incident to city administration in America and Europe. Lectures, recitations 
and collateral reading. Credit, Two hours. FAIDEL, ANDERSON. 

401. Comparative Government. A study of the various governments 
of the nations of the world, showing their similarities and differences. Lectures, 
recitations and collateral reading. Prerequisite: Pol. Sci. 201, 202. Credity 
Three hours. ANDERSON. 



Sixty 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 



402. Political Parties and Public Opinion. An analytical study of the 
nature and functions of various political parties. Party membership, organ- 
ization, and activities discussed with particular regard to creative factors. 
The factors determining the attitude, the formation and expression of public 
opinion, the influencing of public opinion by propaganda as used by pressure 
groups. Credit, Three hours. 

403, 404. Public Administration and Management. Deals with 
principles of administration; the organization of administrative agencies; the 
relations of staff, auxiliary, and line functions; the financing of administrative 
agencies; the place of personnel management;the interrelations of national, 
state and local agencies — conflict and cooperation; the problems of investiga- 
tion, inspection, and audit; the establishment of administrative standards 
and the control of administrative agencies in the public interest. Credit, Three 
hours each semester. O'DONNELL. 

405, 406. History of Political Thought. Ancient theories since Socrates 
and Plato; medieval and modern theories; impact upon American Revolution 
and Federal Constitution; impact upon modern class legislation. Credit, Two 
hours each semester. FAIDEL. 

407, 408. Philosophy of Law. History and development of Roman and 
English Common law, modern legal systems, and their philosophical back- 
grounds. Constitutional, public and private law discussed in the light of 
Christian philosophy. Credit, Two hours each semester. FAIDEL. 

409. International Relations. General survey of the forces operating 
beneath international relations during war and peace; contemporary policies 
of world powers; historical, political and economic aspects. Credit, Three hours. 
HEINTZ. 

410. Development of International Organization. The development 
of international organization since the Treaty of Westphalia, means of peace- 
ful settlement of international disputes; the Hague Conference of 1899 and 
1907; the Permanent Court of Arbitration; the Central American Court; the 
League of Nations; the Permanent Court of International Justice; the United 
Nations and comparisons with the League system. Credit, Three hours. 
HEINTZ. 

SOCIOLOGY 

101, 102. Principles of Sociology. An introduction to the basic socio- 
logical concepts with concentration on the principles underlying the pheno- 
mena in the fields of Family, Housing, Population, Education, Health, Race 
Relations and Crime. Credit, Two hours each semester. 

201. Social Problems. An investigation of the difficulties which underlie 
the ills of modern society. Credit, Two hours. McGOWAN. 

202. Social Pathology. Studies the various approaches toward a solution 
of the problems encountered in Sociology 201. Credit, Two hours. McGOWAN. 

203. Introduction to Anthropology. Elementary examinations of the 
findings of scientists in the fields of Anthropology and Archaeology with 
accent on their applicability to sociological research into primitive races and 
social groups; culture diffusion, domestication of animals, cultural acquisitions 
and progress. Credit, Two hours. DUFFY. 



Sixty-one 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



204. Rural and Urban Society. A study of scientific analysis of the 
farming and non-farming rural areas, the neighborhood, the community, the 
suburb, the city and the metropolitan area. The meaning and value and 
limitations of the ecological approach to the understanding of sociological 

generalizations. Credit, Two hours. CURTIS. 

305. Society and Government. A detailed explanation of the meaning, 
genesis and development of influential concepts in Sociology and Political 
Science. Derivation and historical synthesis of familiar expressions, authority, 
liberty, law, common welfare, political liberty, coercion, majority, democracy 
and equality, with emphasis on the contributions of Aristotle, Augustine, 
Mannegold, Gregory, Saint Thomas, Luther, Calvin. Implications evidenced 
in Communism, Facism, Nazism and Democracy. Credit, Three hours. 
DUFFY, JURCZAK. 

306. The Family. The history of marriage and the family; various 
concrete forms of marriage and family; functions and organization of the 
family; disorganization and reconstruction; marital adjustment and counsel- 
ing. Credit, Three hours. DUFFY, JURCZAK. 

340. Social Psychology. Foundations of social behaviour; mechanisms 
of social adjustment; application of psychological principles to practical 
social problems. Prerequisite: Psychology 101, 102 or 220; Psychology 351; 
Sociology 101, 102. Credit, Three hours. SCHULTE. 

351. Statistics. An introduction to statistics in Psychology. Credit, 
Three hours. SMITH. 

401. Population Problems. Population theories, expansive, restrictive; 
contribution of Malthus; adjustment of people to social institutions. Pre- 
requisite: 101, 102. Credit, Three hours. CURTIS. 

402. Criminology. Crime as a social phenomenon; criminals and environ- 
ment; responsibility; retribution; protections. Credit, Three hours. McGOWAN. 

407, 408. History of Social Thought. Contributions of ancient and 
medieval cultures to the field of social, economic, political and religious 
thinking; their influences on later thought. Modern Social and political con- 
cepts; the development and consequent contributions of scientific sociology. 
Credit, Two hours each semester. CURTIS. 



Sixty-two 






COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 
MILITARY DIVISION 

RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS, DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 

Pittsburgh 19, Pennsylvania 

Colonel Russell W. Schmelz, ARTY, RA Coordinator 

FACULTY 

Department of Military Science and Tactics 

Colonel Russell W. Schmelz, ARTY, RA Head of Department, Professor 

B.S. in E.E. Iowa State College 1926. Adv. O.C. FAS 1947. 

5 Campaigns Europe. Federal and Reserve Service 26 years. 

Lieutenant Colonel Charles F. Moore, ARTY, USAR Assistant Professor 

B.S. in Educ. Purdue University 1926. M.S. in Econ. Purdue University 1936. 
Adv. O.C. FAS, 1947. Abn. Tng. TIS, 1948. 

6 Campaigns EAME, Japan Occupation, 3 Campaigns Korea. Federal 
and Reserve Service 26 years. 

Major Alfred C. Bieri, ARTY, RA Assistant Professor 

B.S. Colorado State A&M College. Adv. O.C. FAS 1949. 
5 Campaigns Europe. Federal Service 11 years. 

Captain William C. French, ARTY, USAR Assistant Professor 

B.S. University of Pittsburgh. OCS FAS 1942. 

3 Campaigns Europe-Africa. Federal and Reserve Service 9 years. 

WOJG James T. Doherty, USA Instructor 

LL.B. University of Balitmore 1938. TIS 1944. AAAS 1946. 
Middle East 23^ years. Federal Service 12 years. 

WOJG Robert A. Simpson, ARTY, RA Instructor 

FAI & S 1940. SNCOC-FAS 1946. 
Federal Service 23 years. 

Master Sergeant Harold F. Showalter, ORD, RA Instructor 

MSFAS 1940. SNCOC-FAS 1946. FTVC 1946. 

4 Campaigns Europe. Federal Service 22 years. 

Master Sergeant Leslie J. Walker, Jr., ARTY, RA Instructor 

TI&E School, Carlisle Bks. 1947. 

Korean Occupation, 3 Campaigns Korea. Federal Service 7 years. 

Sergeant First Class Kenneth B. Campbell, QM, RA Instructor 

33 months Asiatic-Pacific. Federal Service 8 years. 

Sergeant First Class Walter Leskowat, AG, RA Instructor 

B.S. University of Pittsburgh 1950. 

1 Campaign Asiatic-Pacific. Federal and Reserve Service 9 years. 

Sergeant First Class George T. Tyberg, ARTY, RA Instructor 

O.C.S. 1942. 

3 Campaigns Europe. Federal Service 8 years. 

Sergeant Donald G. Freeman, ARTY, RA Instructor 

Darmstadt QMS 1948. Ord. Sch. 1946. 
Federal Service 7 years. 



Sixty-three 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



Department of Air Science and Tactics 

Lt. Colonel Sam R. Oglesby, Jr., USAF Head of Department, Professor 

Air Force Flying School 1941. Spartanburg Junior College 1939. 
6 Campaigns Europe. Federal Service 12 years. 

Major Richard M. Colegrove, USAF Assistant Professor 

B.S. in Econ. Duquesne University 1933. LL.B. Duquesne University 1937. 
Air Service Command School 1942. Air University 1951. 
6 Campaigns Europe. Federal Service 10 years. 

Major Milton P. Cook, USAF Assistant Professor 

A.B. University of Michigan 1940. LL.B. University of Virginia 1949. 
Air University 1951. 
3 Campaigns Asiatic-Pacific. Federal Service 11 years. 

Captain Ralph H. Durham, USAF Assistant Professor 

Air Force Flying School 1944. B.S. Texas A & M 1948. 

2 Campaigns Asiatic-Pacific. Federal Service 9 years. 

Captain Jack H. Hague, USAF Assistant Professor 

Air Force Flying School 1942. B.S. in Ed. Ohio University 1947. 
M.S. Ohio University 1950. Air University 1951. 

3 Campaigns Europe. Federal Service 10 years. 

Captain William P. Thompson, USAF Assistant Professor 

Air Force Flying School 1943. Air University 1946. 
Univ. of Alabama AF ROTC 1948. 
2 Campaigns Southwest Pacific. Federal Service 11 years. 

Master Sergeant George D'Aloiso, USAF Instructor 

Administrative School 1950. Air University 1951 

1 Campaign Asiatic-Pacific. European Theater 3 years. 
Federal Service 8 years. 

Master Sergeant Marion A. Miller, USAF Instructor 

Air Force Flying School 1940. Classification School 1948. 
Asiatic-Pacific 2 years. Federal Service 16 years. 

Technical Sergeant James G. Acey, USAF Instructor 

AF Engineering & Operations School 1940. 

North Atlantic Theater 3 years. Federal Service 10 years. 

Technical Sergeant Joseph Knoneberg, USAF Instructor 

European Intelligence School 1948. Air University 1951. 

Asiatic-Pacific 6 months. Europe 3 years. Federal Service 10 years. 

Technical Sergeant Thomas S. Ireland, USAF Instructor 

Newfoundland Base Command 2 years. Federal Service 11 years. 



Sixty-four 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

The military service maintains Departments of Military Science and Air 
Science and Tactics of the Reserve Officers Training Corps at Duquesne 
University for Field Artillery and Air Force Administration and Logistics 
or Flight Operations. Duquesne University's ROTC Field Artillery unit is 
unique inasmuch as it is the only Field Artillery unit in Pennsylvania and the 
only unit in the Pittsburgh area leading to a commission in a combat arm of 
the Armed Services. 

The Mission of the Departments. The Reserve Officers Training 
Corps has two missions. The first is to produce junior officers who have the 
qualities and attributes essential to their progressive and continued develop- 
ment as officers in the United States Army and Air Force. The second is to lay 
the foundations of intelligent citizenship within the student and to give him 
such basic military training as will be of benefit to himself and to the military 
service if he becomes a member thereof. Special emphasis is placed upon 
"Leadership" to assist Duquesne men in meeting any situation in life with 
success and honor. The development of physical fitness, good posture and 
military bearing is stressed. 

Organization. The Staff and Faculty of the Departments are detailed 
from the Army and the Air Force. The Federal Government furnishes the 
equipment and supplies used in the Departments, including uniforms and text 
books. Courses are prescribed and methods of instruction followed which will 
give the student the breadth of vision desired in the officers of the Armed 
Forces and will give him practical knowledge in the performance of military 
duties. Students enrolled in the Reserve Officers Training Corps are designated 
ROTC Cadets. Cadets are not members of the military service and are not 
subject to military law or the Articles of War but are subject to the reg- 
ulations prescribed by the University. 

Basic and Advanced Course. There are two courses in each Depart- 
ment, each consisting of two years. The Basic Course corresponds to the 
Freshman and Sophomore years. These two years in one of the Departments 
are required of all non-veteran students in the courses of the College of Liberal 
Arts and Sciences, School of Business Administration, School of Education 
and School of Music. Veteran students are given credit for one or two years 
of the Basic Course for honorably terminated active service as determined 
by the Professor of Military or Air Science and Tactics. 

The Advanced Course corresponds to the Junior and Senior years. This 
course is elective by the student and selective by the Professors of Military 
and Air Science and Tactics. Students who enroll in a course are expected 
to complete the two years. The Army or Air Force authorities may in certain 
cases on recommendation of the President authorize a student to drop the 
course. 

Commission. Graduates of the Advanced Course are awarded commis- 
sions in the Reserve Corps of the United States Army or United States Air 
Force. An opportunity for commission in the Regular Armyor Air Force is 
open to those students whose records entitle them to be designated as Dis- 
tinguished Military Students. Regular commissions are also awarded to 
officers of the Reserve Forces who are successful in a competitive tour of 
active duty following graduation in the U. S. Army, or by direct appointment 
while on active duty in the U. S. Air Force. 



Sixty-fivr 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



Academic Credit. _ Credit toward graduation of two hours per semester 
is awarded for the Basic Course. The academic credit for the Advanced 
Course is three hours per semester. This counts as elective credit in the 
requirements for the degree in most courses of each school in which the Basic 
Course is required. 

Eligibility. For the Basic Course a student must be a citizen of the 
United States, able to pass a physical examination and between fourteen (14) 
and twenty three (23) years of age. For the Advanced Course satisfactory 
completion of the Basic Course, approval of the President of the University 
and recommendation of the Professor of Military Science and Tactics or of 
the Professor of Air Science and Tactics, are required. The number of students 
who may be accepted for the Advanced Course is established by a quota 
allotted to the University by the services. Qualified veterans may be accepted 
into the Advanced Course directly. Credit toward advanced standing is 
allowed for work completed at other Senior ROTC units and under prescribed 
regulations for that completed at Junior ROTC units. Students who are 
conscientious objectors, present or former members of subversive organiza- 
tions or who have been convicted of serious offenses by a court are not eligible. 

Uniform and Allowances. The complete uniform of the same pattern 
and material as the Army or Air Force Officer's uniform, depending upon the 
branch of service in which enrolled, including the overcoat and shoes, is 
furnished by the Government for all basic students. The University draws 
commutation for and furnishes Advanced Course students with a tailored 
uniform including trench coat. The uniform is given to the student by the 
University upon being commissioned. 

A monetary allowance of ninety cents (90j0 per day up to 595 days, 
totalling $553.50, is paid in monthly payments to students while pursuing 
the Advanced Course. 

Summer Camp. Each Advanced Course student attends one summer 
camp. This camp is of six weeks duration. It is usually attended ^ between 
the first and second years of the Advanced Course. Under exceptional cir- 
cumstances authority may be obtained to permit attendance after completing 
the Basic Course or after completing the second year of the Advanced Course. 
The camp affords application of the subjects studied during the previous 
school years, including qualification in arms. A comprehensive athletic 
program utilizing the golf and tennis courts, ball diamonds, swimming pools 
and other facilities of the post is conducted. Evening social and recreational 
activities are conducted on the post. Rail transportation to and from camp, 
all living expenses and any necessary medical care is furnished by the Govern- 
ment. Students are paid the regular service pay of the first grade while at 
camp. 

Rifle Team. A University Rifle Team is sponsored by the Departments 
of Military and Air Science. All ROTC Cadets are eligible to compete for 
places on the team. The rifle team is recognized as a minor sport and its 
members are eligible for the award of the University letter. The team competes 
in matches with other colleges. Duquesne ROTC teams have achieved na- 
tional recognition. 

Honor Societies. The Departments sponsor the Pershing Rifles (a 
National Honor Military Society), the Scabbard and Blade (National Hono- 
rary Military Fraternity), and the William J. McKee Squadron of the Arnold 
Air Society (National Honorary Air Force Society). 



Sixty-six 






COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 

CURRICULA 

Department of Military Science and Tactics 

Basic Course 

101, 102. Military Science. Leadership to include drill and exercise 
of command. Basic military subjects including Military Organization; Maps 
and Aerial Photographs; Individual Weapons and Marksmanship; First Aid 
and Hygiene; Military Problems of the United States; Military Policy of the 
United States; Evolution of Warfare. Three hours per week, 2 credits per 
semester. 

201, 202. Military Science. Artillery. Continuation of leadership, 
stressing development of poise and confidence in command positions and 
small unit combat exercises; sixty hours of elementary tactics and technique 
of Field Artillery. Three hours per week, 2 credits per semester. 

Advanced Course 

301, 302. Military Science. Artillery. Continuation of leadership 
with warrants in the cadet corps and including command of units. More 
advanced Field Artillery Tactics and Technique including Battery Executive; 
Tactics; Gunnery; Surveying; Communications; Weapons and Marksman- 
ship including rifle firing on range. Five hours per week, 3 credits per semester. 

401,402. Military Science. Artillery. Continuation of leadership with 
commissions in the cadet corps and assignment to command and staff positions 
with cadet batteries and assignments in instructing in classes and at drills. 
More advanced general military subjects including Military Law; Military 
Administration; Military Teaching Methods and Psychological Warfare; 
Foundations of National Power; Advanced Tactics and Technique of Field 
Artillery including the Military team; Gunnery; Surveying; Fire Direction 
Center; Supply and Evacuation; Command and Staff; Military Intelligence 
and new developments. Five hours per week, 3 credits per semester. 

Completion of this course will fit the student to assume duties of a battery 
officer in a field artillery unit. 

Department of Air Science and Tactics 

Basic Course 

101, 102. Air Science. Leadership to include drill and exercise of 
command. Sixty hours of World Political Geography, a study of the areas 
and resources of the various states organized as political units, together with 
a study of the people who live in these areas. Three hours per week, 2 credits 
per semester. 

201, 202. Air Science. Continuation of leadership, drill and exercise of 
command. Organization for the Defense of the United States; Maps, Aerial 
Photographs and Aerial Navigation; Aerodynamics and Propulsion; Meteor- 
ology and Navigation; Applied Air Power; and Personal Maintenance. Three 
hours per week, 2 credits per semester. 



Sixty'Stven 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



Advanced Course 

301, 302. Air Science. Continuation of Leadership with warrants in 
the cadet corps and supervision of units. Global problems as illustrated in 
World War II; Logistics; Air Operations; ninety hours in Air Administration 
and Logistics or Flight Operations .Five hours per week, 3 credits per semester. 

Summer Camp. Air Force. Tentatively scheduled at Langley Air 
Force Base, Virginia. 

401, 402. Air Science. Continuation of leadership with commissions in 
the cadet corps and assignments of instructing classes. Applied Fields of 
Officer Orientation, USAF Inspector General's Department, Military Law 
and Boards; Military Teaching Methods, and Air Force Management. Fifty 
hours of Air Administration and Logistics or Flight Operations. Five hours 
per week, 3 credits per semester. 

Completion of this course will qualify the student to assume adminis- 
trative or logistical assignments as a 2nd Lieutenant at a USAF Base or 
Tactical Organization. 



Sixty-eight 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 



LIST OF STUDENTS 

SENIORS 

1951-1952 

Aland, David Seville Pittsburgh 

Baney, Robert Emmet Pittsburgh 

Becko, Jack Paul. Pittsburgh 

Behers, Paul Louis Pittsburgh 

Bell, Derrick A Pittsburgh 

Beltz, John Emmett Pittsburgh 

Beres, George William Pittsburgh 

Brochetti, Joseph Paul Pittsburgh 

Brockett, Richard Donald Pittsburgh 

Burns, Mary Jane Pittsburgh 

Byrne, Robert John Pittsburgh 

Carr, James G Pittsburgh 

Carroll, Maryellen Charleroi 

Casper, Edward Michael Pittsburgh 

Catalano, James A Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Cendrosky, Francis T McKeesport 

Childs, Robert L Pleasant Hills 

Chlystek, Stanley Joseph McKees Rocks 

Cibulas, Edward M. . Noruelt 

Cipolla, Joseph Camillo Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Cole, Charles Edward Wexford 

Conlin, Richard Thomas Pittsburgh 

Conroy, Joseph G. Pittsburgh 

Conte, Anita Marie Pittsburgh 

Cortese, Anthony Joseph Pittsburgh 

Creehan, James Edward Pittsburgh 

Curcio, John Pittsburgh 

DeCasper, Anthony James Mechanicsville, N. Y. 

Degenhardt, Sally Pittsburgh 

Del Frate, Frank Pittsburgh 

Delpizzo, Berardino Joseph Pittsburgh 

DeNardo, Joseph William Martins Ferry, Ohio 

Di Donna, Edward Dante Pittsburgh 

DiMeo, Raymond Regis Pittsburgh 

Dippel, Robert G Pittsburgh 

Donatelli, Nicholas J Pittsburgh 

Duffy, James John Philadelphia 

Dukovich, Edward J Etna 

Dunne, Robert Joseph Braddock 

Echard, Jerry Mitchell Pittsburgh 

Edwards, Mary Audrey Pittsburgh 

Edwards, Samuel Pittsburgh 

Forrester, Carl Bedell Clairton 

Fury, Daniel G Aspinwall 

Gannon, Edward John Pittsburgh 

Georgelis, James John Martins Ferry, Ohio 

Gerber, Joan V Beloit, Ohio 

Getsie, Cyril J Braddock 

Giuliano, Fred Anthony Sharpsburg 

Grogan, Thomas Francis Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Guerro, Francis J Pittsburgh 

Hallaman, Alfred Ambridge 



Sixty-nine 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



Haller, Frank Joseph Pittsburgh 

Harmon, Joseph Richard East Brady 

Hesko, Genevieve Elaine Farrell 

Heuler, Stanley Charles Pittsburgh 

Hoffman, H. John Gibsonia 

Holowecky, Mike Paul Pittsburgh 

Huber, Donald Joseph. . .^ Bellevue 

Hughes, John Joseph Homestead 

Hullihan, John Raymond Pittsburgh 

Irwin, Donald Andrew McKeesport 

Isaac, Cornelius Wesley N. Vandergrift 

Jacobs, Paul N Pittsburgh 

Johns, William Anthony Washington 

Jordan, James William Donora 

Jurovaty, Carl Richard Homestead 

Kalnas, Andrew Joseph Pittsburgh 

Kelly, Charles Carroll Uniontown 

Kissane, Joseph Michael Pittsburgh 

Koresko, Richard Lawrence Pittsburgh 

Kotlensky, William Donora 

Kunstel, Marie Frances Cleveland, Ohio 

Laitta, Richard Paul Pittsburgh 

Levenson, Fred H , Pittsburgh 

Ley, Walter Thomas Pittsburgh 

Lopresti, Joseph M Pittsburgh 

Lowstuter, Don Ellsworth Meyersdale 

Lynch, John Paul Pittsburgh 

McAllister, John Thomas Pittsburgh 

McDonagh, Jack Thomas Edgeworth 

McGonigle, James Joseph Pittsburgh 

McKenna, John Bernard McKeesport 

McNamara, Martin Donald Pittsburgh 

Manion, James Joseph Turtle Creek 

Matthews, James Augustine Philadelphia 

Meyer, John A Duquesne 

Miller, Charles Michael Jeannette 

Millis, Francis Joseph Clairton 

Milnes, Edward Russell . Aliquippa 

Minken, Albert H Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Mullen, Martin Edward Pittsburgh 

Murphy, William Martin Pittsburgh 

Muscante, Anthony J McKeesport 

Nagy, Zoltan J Homestead 

Navaroli, Elmo John McKeesport 

Nealon, Joan Cramer Pittsburgh 

Neil, Aramus Collart Belle Vernon 

Notarian, James J Punxsutawney 

O'Donnell, John Joseph Bridgeville 

O'Neil, John J Pittsburgh 

Paolone, Joseph Donald New Castle 

Pavlic, George John Pittsburgh 

Petrie, James L Pittsburgh 

Petrisko, John David Aliquippa 

Porter, Joseph Pittsburgh 

Ray, Harry Eugene Rockland, Mass. 

Reed, Daniel Kenneth Gallitzin 

Regan, Donald Pittsburgh 



Seventy 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 



Rodgers, John J Uniontown 

Rodkey, Richard Carlysle Verona 

Romanik, Carl John Pittsburgh 

Ruppel, Thomas Conrad Pittsburgh 

Ruszkowski, Irene Marie Pittsburgh 

Rutkowski, Gertrude Ann Natrona 

Savage, Paul James McKeesport 

Schlegel, John Emil Pittsburgh 

Scholle, Robert Anthony Pittsburgh 

Senge, Edward A Pittsburgh 

Simile, Nicholas Anthony Pittsburgh 

Skleder, John Matt. Pittsburgh 

Smetakna, George Richard Pittsburgh 

Spychala, Thaddeus Joseph Pittsburgh 

Staub, Richard Andrew Aspinwall 

Stephin, John Evans City 

Stich, Marion Clairton 

Styslinger, William Pittsburgh 

Sullivan, William Thomas Pittsburgh 

Szmyt, Joseph Walter Pittsburgh 

Szott, Stanley Pittsburgh 

Tamilia, Patrick Ronald Pittsburgh 

Terzopoulos, Nick Shamokin 

Thomas, James R W. Homestead 

Trainor, Edward Alphonsus Braddock 

Treher, James Earl Pittsburgh 

Valeri, John Anthony Leominster, Mass. 

Vlha, John Regis Pittsburgh 

Wachs, Hirsh Pittsburgh 

Walsh, John H Pittsburgh 

Weger, Edward Julius Pittsburgh 

Weisgerber, John Homer Sewickley 

Weismann, Theodore James Pittsburgh 

Weiss, Oliver F Carnegie 

Wertz, John Wallace. Pittsburgh 

Whetzel, Howard William Pittsburgh 

Wholey, William Pittsburgh 

Williams, Gene Ira East Pittsburgh 

Wilson, James Albert Pittsburgh 

Wuslich, George C E. McKeesport 

Zarkoski, John A Kulpmont 

Zinkand, Catherine Anne Pittsburgh 

Zurchin, Joseph James McKees Rocks 

JUNIORS 

1951-1952 

Aiello, Anthony Joseph Pittsburgh 

Anania, Frank T Pittsburgh 

Antinucci, Bruno A , McKees Rocks 

Bahadur, John J Burlington, N. C. 

Barber, Mary Lou West Bridgewater 

Benedict, Alfred D. McKeesport 

Benz, Norman Ferdinand Pittsburgh 

Bober, Bernard Stanley New Castle 

Bobnis, Regis Darrow Pittsburgh 



Seventy-ont 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



Boyle^ Rose Marie Pittsburgh 

Brannick, Allen P Greensburg 

Brown, Robert Sanford Torrington, Conn. 

Brust, John William Pittsburgh 

Bucsek, William J Pittsburgh 

Burkhart, Lawrence Edward Sharpsburg 

Casey, Francis Joseph North Braddock 

Caterinicchio, Peter Vincent Elizabeth, N. J. 

Certo, John Peter Pittsburgh 

Clarke, Wilfred Joseph Pittsburgh 

Colabrece, Frederick James Pittsburgh 

Colecchia, Arnold R Pittsburgh 

Conboy, Kathleen Ann Pittsburgh 

Crehan, M. Carole Pittsburgh 

Cronan, Thomas Leo Hamden, Conn. 

Crown, Paul Vincent Bellevue 

D'Alessio, Albert Joseph Pittsburgh 

Daley, James Paul Donora 

DiCiero, Salvatore Anthony Pittsburgh 

Ditolla, Lucille K. Pittsburgh 

Dixon, James Martin Bellevue 

Dolby, Arnold Earl. . Clarion 

Doyle, William Patrick Pittsburgh 

Ennis, John Alexander Waverly, N. Y. 

Evancic, Anthony H Lloydeli 

Fallon, John Patrick. . . Pittsburgh 

Farabaugh, John Martin Pittsburgh 

Farino, Salvatore Louis Pittsburgh 

Feeney, Thomas Joseph Philadelphia 

Fischer, Joan Ernestine . Pittsburgh 

Flaherty, John P Pittsburgh 

Flanagan, Norman Patrick Pittsburgh 

Flannery, Edmund Francis Pittsburgh 

Franklin, Charles William North Braddock 

Franks, Lee Robert Pittsburgh 

French, Richard George Pittsburgh 

Fulton, Samuel M McKeesport 

Gast, William George McKees Rocks 

Geiss, Robert Charles Pittsburgh 

Gemma, Geraldine Ann Pittsburgh 

Gershuny, William A Pittsburgh 

Giglio, James Joseph Pittsburgh 

Giovannitti, Francis Alfred Pittsburgh 

Gittelman, Neil Jordan Bay Shore, N. Y.' 

Gray, James O Springdale 

Greco, Mariano Pittsburgh 

Gribben, Daniel Brian Wilkinsburg 

Harvey, John Bernard Pittsburgh 

Hepp, Donald Andrew Pittsburgh 

Hohmann, Rosemary Pittsburgh 

Hotz, Gertrude. N. Plainfield, N. J. 

Hughes, James Vincent Pittsburgh 

Hughes, William Edward Pittsburgh 

Kachik, Robert Henry Coraopolis 

Kachur, Thomas John Cortland, Ohio 

Kasarda, Paul Rankin 

Katarinic, Joseph A Pittsburgh 



Seventy-two 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 



Kelley, Elizabeth C Clearfield 

Kiwala, Raymond Andrew Ambridge 

Kogel, Beatrice Lou Coraopolis 

Kopka, Joseph Pittsburgh 

Kostkas, Andrew D McKeesport 

Kotlensky, William Donora 

Kress, Jerome John Pittsburgh 

Krut, Mildred Jane Pittsburgh 

Kucharsky, David Eugene. Pittsburgh 

LaPeccerella, Patricia Louise Pittsburgh 

Leasure, Marilyn F Pittsburgh 

Lee, Robert Emmanuel New York, N. Y. 

Leonard, George Russell Greensburg 

Lesnock, Edward Eugene , Washington 

Lewis, Ashton Francis Pittsburgh 

McConnell, Regina Marie New York, N. Y. 

McCrory, Henry Philip Pittsburgh 

McHugh, James Paul Pittsburgh 

Malinowski, Joan Mary Mahanoy City 

Mandle, Leo Steven . . .^ Ambridge 

Manion, Thomas Francis Turtle Creek 

Marchione, Joseph Louis Washington 

Martin, Joseph James Middletown, N. Y. 

Martino, John Louis Rochester, N. Y. 

Menz, Rita Carolyn Sewickley 

Miglioretti, Val Ermes Valencia 

Morgan, Charles Carngeie 

Newberry, Horace Duquesne 

Nigro, John Sam Meadville 

Novotnak, Lawrence Victor Duquesne 

O'Black, Charles Thomas Pittsburgh 

Ogorchock, Paul Thomas Brookville 

Ombres, Dolores Madeline Ambridge 

O'Neil, Theresa Ann Pittsburgh 

O'Neill, Paul F Pittsburgh 

Ortmann, William Henry Beaver Falls 

Pacini, Jeanne Marie Pittsburgh 

Palmer, M. David Pittsburgh 

Papieski, Jean Ellen Pittsburgh 

Parrish, JamesEdward Pittsburgh 

Pasewicz, Stanislaus Pittsburgh 

Pelino, John C Monaca 

Pradetto, Thomas Anthony , Pittsburgh 

Rainer, Howard Lopez Sewickley 

Rascati, Ernest Pittsburgh 

Renzi, Ottayio George Glassport 

Rocereto, Richard Clement Pittsburgh 

Rodgers, James Patrick Pittsburgh 

Rossi, ErnestEzio Ambridge 

Roy, John Oliver Pittsburgh 

Roxas, Savina A. . . Pittsburgh 

Sadecky, William Michael Tarentum 

Sander, David Lott Clairton 

Sands, Clarence James Pittsburgh 

Saunders, Betty Ann Pittsburgh 

Sherman, Wayne Joseph Pittsburgh 

Shrader, Marianne Edna Norwalk, Conn. 



Seventy-thrtt 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



Simoni, Peter Paul Aliquippa 

Skowron, Anthony L Pittsburgh 

Smerigan, Jacqueline Frances South Heights 

Smith, Janice Joan Pittsburgh 

Smyrnes, James V McKeesport 

Sninsky, Edward Raymond Munhall 

Spano, Helen Maria Pittsburgh 

Stock, John Robert Clairton 

Stukus, Peter Paul Pittsburgh 

Sutty, Donald Ervin Harwick 

Sweeny, John Joseph Pittsburgh 

Tarantini, Domenic Turtle Creek 

Tepe, James Connolly Pittsburgh 

Testa, Gilbert A Clairton 

Tick, Robert George McKeesport 

Toocheck, Edward Andrew Trafford 

Torisky, Daniel Andrew Pittsburgh 

Ubinger, Fred C Pittsburgh 

Varga, Frank Stephen Monessen 

Vecchiola, Rita Marie Pittsburgh 

Vinski, Lillian Grace Etna 

Wadowsky, Andrew Pittsburgh 

Ward, Lawrence Raymond Pittsburgh 

Watson, Thomas Harris Whitaker 

White, Walter Jay McKeesport 

Wilhere, George Arthur Pittsburgh 

Williston, Frank Samuel Fayetteville, N. C. 

Wilson, Donald Lloyd Pittsburgh 

Zawadzki, Edward Andrew Pittsburgh 

Ziznewski, Steve Perth Amboy, N. Y. 

SOPHOMORES 

1951-1952 

Acker, Robert W Enon Valley 

Adams, John Edward Pittsburgh 

Barretta, JoAnne Pittsburgh 

Basa, Walter Anthony Wilmerding 

Beyer, Henry Anthony Pittsburgh 

Bollens, William Joseph Pittsburgh 

Borrelli, Mary Rose Glassport 

Bove, Anthony Pittsburgh 

Breitenback, Paul George Millvale 

Bresnahan, Nancy Anne Pittsburgh 

Brunner, John L Langeloth 

Brushmiller, John George Pittsburgh 

Burns, Kathleen Ann Pittsburgh 

Caputo, Joseph V «« Pittsburgh 

Caruso, Gene Albert Cleveland, Ohio 

Cataldo, Urban Anthony Jeannette 

Cerminara, Donald Eugene Pittsburgh 

Chlystek, Martin Thomas McKees Rocks 

Clements, John Armand Pittsburgh 

Colwell, John Conrad Pittsburgh 

Curtin, Eleanor Mae Pittsburgh 

DeFedericis, Alfonso Anthony. Ambridge 



Seventy-four 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 



Deffner, John Fred Pittsburgh 

Deglmann, James Charles Pittsburgh 

Dobies, Richard John Braddock 

Domitrovic, Rudolph William Pittsburgh 

Dougherty, Daniel V Pittsburgh 

Duffy, James R Braddock 

Ebner, John Gerard Pittsburgh 

Einloth, Leo Christopher Crafton 

Faison, Margaret Anne Jeannette 

Fearon, Joseph Paul Pittsburgh 

Feeney, Thomas Joseph Pittsburgh 

Ferons, Daniel Davies Pittsburgh 

Fine, Arnold Bennett Irwin 

Fisher, Michael E Pittsburgh 

Galletta, Louis Ambridge 

Gault, James Edward Sharon 

Gentile, Robert C Pittsburgh 

Gidus, Francis J. Duquesne 

Gorski, Eugene Edwin Pittsburgh 

Gregurich, John T Library 

Hermesmann, William Joseph McKeesport 

Heverling, Joanne Marie Pittsburgh 

Hoebler, William Ralph Pittsburgh 

Hoffmann, Joseph H Pittsburgh 

Izzo, Carl Peter. Pittsburgh 

Jasiota, Charles Patrick Oil City 

Joyce, John Joseph Pittsburgh 

Joyce, Pearse J Irwin 

Kamenar, Edward Joseph Pittsburgh 

Kenney, Raymond Patrick Pittsburgh 

Klepser, Patricia Ann Coraopolis 

Koessler, Carol Anne Pittsburgh 

LaLama, Anthony Joseph West Aliquippa 

Lawrence, Merle William Greensburg 

Lindner, Charles E Pittsburgh 

McCabe, Edward Gerard Pittsburgh 

McGrath, Ann G Turtle Creek 

McGrath, James Lislie Pittsburgh 

McLaughlin, Francis George Homestead 

McNeilly, Leo Vincent Crafton 

Madden, Jerome A Pittsburgh 

Malaga mba, Donald Hogan Pittsburgh 

Mallon, Martha Ann Bellevue 

Maloney, Collette Margaret Pittsburgh 

Martin, William Robert Pittsburgh 

Massaro, Joseph John Pittsburgh 

Mattei, David Samuel Old Forge 

Meyer, Vincent David McKees Rocks 

Miller, James Renshaw Pittsburgh 

Mitchell, Red Thamon, Jr New Castle 

Monath, John Robert Newell 

Moran, James William Pittsburgh 

Mueller, Margaret C Pittsburgh 

Myers, James Emil Pittsburgh 

Nee, John Joseph Pittsburgh 

Nicholas, Mary Ann Wheeling, W. Va. 

Notaro, John Aliquippa 



Seventy-five 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



Nowakowski, Marie M Pittsburgh 

Oddis, Nilandino Anthony Muse 

O'Donnell, Leo Vincent Swissvale 

Ofiesh, Raymond L. . . . New Kensington 

Ombres, Dolores Madeline Ambridge 

Pacini, Paul James Lewistown 

Petrich, Louis Paul Pittsburgh 

Portnoy, Harold A Pittsburgh 

Power, William John Pittsburgh 

Prince, Jeffrey William Pittsburgh 

Rideout, Stanley Kendall Pittsburgh 

Rosa, Anthony Francis Pittsburgh 

Sarandria, Carl Donald Coraopolis 

Sarti, Richard Pittsburgh 

Scanlon, John Anthony Pittsburgh 

Schellhammer, Edward Johnstown 

Scherer, Kenneth Allen Pittsburgh 

Schmalzried, Robert Jerome Pittsburgh 

Schmitt, Thomas Joseph Donora 

Sebastian, Donald P Pittsburgh 

Seminatore, Charles Joseph Pittsburgh 

Smolinski, Frank Thomas Pittsburgh 

Stephen, William George Pittsburgh 

Stimpert, Howard Paul McKees Rocks 

Strehl, Charles B Glenshaw 

Sullivan, Daniel Joseph Pittsburgh 

Tomana, Richard Joseph Ambridge 

Tominey, John Joseph Niles, Ohio 

Veltri, Raymond George New Kensington 

Wagner, Ronald Arthur Bellevue 

Will, Rodger Philip Bridgeville 

Wolfe, James Ronald Pittsburgh 

Wolosyn, William Eugene Arnold 

Yaggi, Norbert Frederick McKees Rocks 

FRESHMEN 

1951-1952 

Allen, Wendall James Pittsburgh 

Ambrose, Daniel Michael Pittsburgh 

Anderson, George Walter Arnold 

Ayoob, Thomas John Pittsburgh 

Bautz, Albert Joseph New Eagle 

Benich, Barbara Anne Export 

Bernard, Jack Arnold 

Bope, John Michael Bellevue 

Braun, Norbert Francis Pittsburgh 

Brennan, Joseph Aloysius Pittsburgh 

Brown, George Grayson ; Pittsburgh 

Byers, Ronald Gerard Pittsburgh 

Cannon, Max Ernest Pittsburgh 

Carey, Charles George Pittsburgh 

Carmack, Robert Edward Pittsburgh 

Casper, Walter Anthony Pittsburgh 

Catanzariti, Dominick Frank Ambridge 

Chasko, Lila Frances Pittsburgh 



Seventy-six 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 



Cheetham, Frank Howard Ayalon 

Cipa, John George Pittsburgh 

Cochran, Constance C Pittsburgh 

Connolly, Gerald Patrick Emsworth 

Consilio, Ronald Pittsburgh 

Cornelius, Frederick Joseph Pittsburgh 

Corrieri, Fred Dominick New York, N. Y. 

Costanzo, Anthony Pittsburgh 

Courville, Frederick Pittsburgh 

Crum, Richard G St. Paul, Minn. 

Curran, John Thomas McKees Rocks 

Dailey, John R Pittsburgh 

Danner, George James Pittsburgh 

Daquila, Thomas Phillip Beaver Falls 

Dawson, William Allen Pittsburgh 

DeLuca, John E Pittsburgh 

Devine, Richard Frank Pittsburgh 

DiBernardo, Rusty James Pittsburgh 

DiCola, Dina Hilda Pittsburgh 

Didion, Phillip Joseph Library 

DiLucente, Anthony Joseph Rankin 

Diluiso, Gloria Marie Pittsburgh 

DiPerna, Robert Anthony Pittsburgh 

Dishart, Paul Warren Pittsburgh 

Ditmore, Martin Anthony Pittsburgh 

Ditz, Theresa Ellen Ambridge 

Dixon, Edward Raymond McKeesport 

Dixon, Robert Edward Pittsburgh 

Dobrushin, Saul. Pittsburgh 

Dolan, Richard Edwin McKeesport 

Donovan, Edward V Pittsburgh 

Donovan, Robert James Pittsburgh 

Dottle, James Charles New Castle 

Driscoll, Francis Vincent Pittsburgh 

Duffy, Mary Ann Pittsburgh 

Eisenschmid, William J Pittsburgh 

Entress, Maureen Judith Pittsburgh 

Epstein, Joseph . Pittsburgh 

Ermel, Fred William. Pittsburgh 

Evangelisti, Amerigo Michael Rochester 

Fales, William John McKees Rocks 

Fallon, William Lawrence Pittsburgh 

Ferraro, Mary Ann Pittsburgh 

Fitzgerald, David Cal Pittsburgh 

Fleckenstein, Robert E Perrysville 

Frey, Thomas Lawrence Pittsburgh 

Gabriel, Charles Anthony Pittsburgh 

Gallucci, Donald Lewis Johnstown 

Giumtoli, Ronald Marino Pittsburgh 

Gleinn, Arnold George Brackenridge 

Golasinska, Dorothy L Pittsburgh 

Grenesko, Henry Edward Pittsburgh 

Haas, Donald Anthony Pittsburgh 

Haffner, Julia Elizabeth Canton, Ohio 

Hagerty, John Joseph Pittsburgh 

Halligan, Thomas Gill Pittsburgh 

Hanrahan, Francis Patrick Mahanoy City 



Seventy-seven 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



Hay ward, George Gerard Pittsburgh 

Hecmanczuk, Paul A Arcadia 

Heidenreich, Charles Edward Pittsburgh 

Henderson, Frederick Mark Pittsburgh 

Henney, Francis James Pittsburgh 

Hodgess, Edwin Earl Brackenridge 

Iezzi, Louis Anthony Pottstown 

Iocca, Edward T Ambridge 

Jarrell, Jay Kyle Pittsburgh 

Joyce, Walter Leo Pittsburgh 

Kaelin, Daniel Alfred Pittsburgh 

Kampo, John Monessen 

Keehan, James F Pittsburgh 

Kelly, A. Roger Pittsburgh 

Kelly, Lucyanne McKeesport 

Kennedy, Alfred Richard McKees Rocks 

Kerr, Marcius C Pittsburgh 

Khorey, Fred Munhall 

Kirk, George Joseph Pittsburgh 

Kirk, John Joseph Pittsburgh 

Kline, Alfred Burton Montoursville 

Knauss, Joseph Anthony Pittsburgh 

Kobert, Janice A Pittsburgh 

Kondis, Thomas John Munhall 

Koton, Charles Library 

Krebs, Giles Ralph Butler 

Kustron, Joseph John Pittsburgh 

Lacava, Frank Pittsburgh 

Lagattuta, Anthony Joseph Pittsburgh 

LaMarca, Frederick F Pittsburgh 

Lanagan, Agnes Jo Pittsburgh 

Lankford, Willard Paul Pittsburgh 

Lankford, Wilma Jean Pittsburgh 

Leap, Rosemary Frances Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 

Lenze, Hilary Joseph St. Marys 

Lepera, Joseph Pittsburgh 

Lewis, Marvin Pittsburgh 

Little, Laura Jane Braddock 

LoNigro, Paul Joseph Grapeville 

Loughlin, Donald Joseph Philadelphia 

Lucas, Sylvan Walter Pittsburgh 

Lucia, Emmanuel A Ambridge 

Ludwig, Joseph M Carnegie 

McCarthy, Daniel Leo Pittsburgh 

McCarthy, Lawrence Pittsburgh 

McCormick, Arthur Harry Canonsburg 

McKee, Patrick Thomas Sharon 

McLaughlin, Robert Edward Turtle Creek 

McLaughlin, Robert Gary Pittsburgh 

McQuillan, Patricia Mae West Alexander 

Manion, Arthur A Turtle Creek 

Manley, James Frederick Pittsburgh 

Markle, Ronald Deman Pittsburgh 

Maruca, Francis Joseph Edgeworth 

Mazzei, Rodger M Derry 

Megeath, Susan Catherine Library 

Meyer, Philip Charles Presto 



Seventy-eight 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 



Mihm, Martin Charles Pittsburgh 

Miller, Gerald William Pittsburgh 

Miller, Martha Elizabeth Pittsburgh 

Millis, Edward Daniel Clairton 

Mitzen, Paul Stanley Pittsburgh 

Morse, Robert William Pittsburgh 

Mount, Margaret Ellen Alexandria, La. 

Mulholland, John Robert Pittsburgh 

Murphy, James Patrick Pittsburgh 

Murphy, John Paul Pittsburgh 

Murphy, Joseph Anthony Pittsburgh 

Nemeth, Magda Maria Wilkinsburg 

Nickel, Leo William Pittsburgh 

Notaro, Angela M Aliquippa 

O'Connor, Paul Robert Braddock 

O'Donnell, Edward Timothy Altoona 

O'Neil, Rita Kathryn Swissvale 

O'Neill, Hilda M Pittsburgh 

Palmieri, John A . Aliquippa 

Pellegrini, William Mario Pittsburgh 

Posch, John Robert McKees Rocks 

Price, Samuel Henry Braddock 

Pufko, George Ernest. Pittsburgh 

Quinlan, Francis William Pittsburgh 

Rehak, Charles R Harmarville 

Reynolds, Nancy Ann Pittsburgh 

Rezzetano, Frank Anthony Wexford 

Riber, George R Braddock 

Ritter, David G Elizabeth 

Riva, Franette Jo Washington 

Rossen, Jane Frances Pittsburgh 

Samay, Frank George Tarentum 

Scardamelia, Dolores Ann Pittsburgh 

Schano, Eleanor Martha Pittsburgh 

Schweitzer, Gerald William McKeesport 

Sedon, Michael Pittsburgh 

Seidel, Joachim Munich, Germany 

Seifert, Fred Thomas Pittsburgh 

Sharo, Kenneth A Duquesne 

Shelton, Marie Georgetta Pittsburgh 

Sherbon, George Pittsburgh 

Sheriff, Patricia Aileen Pittsburgh 

Sherman, Arthur B Pittsburgh 

Short, Charles Harry Pittsburgh 

Simon, John Frank Ellwood City 

Slaby, Lorraine Louise N. Braddock 

Smialek, Stanley Joseph Pittsburgh 

Smith, Beatrice Pittsburgh 

Smith, Edward John Pittsburgh 

Smith, Georgia Theresa Bronx, N. Y. 

Snyder, Robert Anthony Snydersburg 

Solack, Frances Mary Pittsburgh 

Solomon, Max II Pittsburgh 

Sparkman, Joseph Clark McKeesport 

Spingola, Dennis Anthony Clearfield 

Staley, James Thomas Pittsburgh 

Stevenson, Joseph William Pittsburgh 



Seventy-nine 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



Styslinger, John Michel . Pittsburgh 

Sudol, Eugenia Lucy Wallington, N. J. 

Suschak, Paul John Glassmere 

Sweeney, Clayton Anthony Pittsburgh 

Trambley, John Thomas Johnsonburg 

Tucker, James D Paris, Ky. 

Uber, Paul E Scottdale 

Vale, A. Barbara Pittsburgh 

VanDine, Alan Charles Kittanning 

Vergot, William Dennis Trafford 

Very, Donald Leroy Pittsburgh 

Vetter, Mark George Bellevue 

Vidosh, John Jerome Bridgeville 

Wagner, Keith Anthony. , Cecil 

Washington, Lee Bush Pittsburgh 

Wassick, James Anthony Pittsburgh 

Webster, Joseph M Detroit, Mich. 

Weitz, Charles Anthony Pittsburgh 

Wetzel, Gloria Lee Pittsburgh 

White, Chester Isaac Coraopolis 

Wilson, Theodore P Pittsburgh 

Woodson, Lolita Alice Tarentum 

Zagorski, Irene Helen Franklin 

Zapp, John Andrew Hutchinson 

Zappala, Stephen Andrew Pittsburgh 

Zelezaik, Richard G Pittsburgh 

EVENING SCHOOL STUDENTS 

1951-1952 

Alcott, John C. . . Monongahela 

Allen, Eleanor Julie Pittsburgh 

Bailey, Lois Ann . Pittsburgh 

Barcaskey, Jean Marie Coraopolis 

Barie, Michael John Pittsburgh 

Barsh, George Nicklas Etna 

Basl, Carl V Pittsburgh 

Bechtold, Walter Joseph Pittsburgh 

Bonino, John Julian Freeport 

Bradley, Nellie Desales Pittsburgh 

Bronchain, Gertrude Leona Pittsburgh 

Brown, Mary Lou Pittsburgh 

Busch, Rita Mae Pittsburgh 

Carney, Francis Joseph Arnold 

Cervi, Arthur William Pittsburgh 

Chmiel, Stanley Richard Canonsburg 

Clarke, James Richard Allison Park 

Costello, Anastasia Loretta Pittsburgh 

Coyne, James Pittsburgh 

DeCaro, John Cecil Greensburg 

Deley, Mary Agnes Pittsburgh 

DeSantis, Vincent Joseph McKees Rocks 

Dilanni, Emma Pittsburgh 

Dowling, Kathryn Marie Pittsburgh 

Erdelyi, Sylvester Donora 

Evans, Alan Carl Pittsburgh 



Eighty 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 



Faison, Robert Lynwood Greensburg 

Fiedler, Albert Joseph Pittsburgh 

Fiedler, Howard William Pittsburgh 

Forsythe, Forrest Evans Pittsburgh 

Fox, Alan Joseph Beaver Falls 

Fox, Donald William Pittsburgh 

Fox, Walter Richard Pittsburgh 

Froehlich, Helen Anne Pittsburgh 

Funfar, Joseph Turtle Creek 

Gallagher, William James Pittsburgh 

Gallup, Malcolm Pittsburgh 

Garner, James Bernard Pittsburgh 

Gilberti, Jack Aliquippa 

Gray, Regina Gail Pittsburgh 

Gustine, Floyd Louis Broughton 

Haines, Robert F Pittsburgh 

Hannan, David Gerard Pittsburgh 

Harrigan, John Fabian Pittsburgh 

Huber, Joan R Ebensburg 

Hudak, Joseph Edward Rankin 

Hunnell, Patricia Ann Pittsburgh 

Imgrund, Alfred T Pittsburgh 

Junker, Patricia Mary Pittsburgh 

Kennedy, Joseph B Pittsburgh 

Kerna, Paul , Cecil 

Kilkeary, John Thomas Pittsburgh 

Kram, Mary Agnes Pittsburgh 

Kramer, Dorothy Pittsburgh 

Kress, Kathleen Pittsburgh 

Kuder, Mary Joanne Pittsburgh 

Lacny, Francis Homestead Park 

Laeng, Edward Regis Aspinwall 

Lee, John L Elliott 

Lee, Thomas Howard Pittsburgh 

Lehew, Edwin Clell Pittsburgh 

Lerro, Anthony J Pittsburgh 

Long, Florence B Pittsburgh 

McDonough, Edward Braddock 

McFarlane, Edward J Pittsburgh 

McGill, William Joseph Bridgeville 

McHugh, Margaret D.. Pittsburgh 

Malinowski, Rose Mary Mahanoy City 

Maloney, Edward Bernard Pittsburgh 

Mayer, Robert Eugene Wexford 

Meyer, Dorothy Elizabeth Pittsburgh 

Muth, Sylvia Jean Pittsburgh 

Nastico, Faye A Pittsburgh 

Notsch, John Pittsburgh 

O'Brien, John James Pittsburgh 

Orr, Garrett David Pittsburgh 

Osborne, Ruth Ann Pittsburgh 

O'Toole, Mary Catherine Pittsburgh 

Patrina, Donald Pittsburgh 

Paul, Caroline D McKees Rocks 

Powers, William Pittsburgh 

Price, Rita Mary Pittsburgh 

Richards, William Robert Pittsburgh 



Eighty-ont 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



Rossetti, Dorothy May Pittsburgh 

Russ, Frank Joseph Pittsburgh 

Ryan, Veronica B McKeesport 

Schmitt, Mary Jo Sharpsburg 

Schneider, Ralph Herman Bridgeville 

Schultz, Mary Jane Pittsburgh 

Seljak, Carl Frank Pittsburgh 

Sieminski, Esther Doris Pittsburgh 

Singer, Lois Mary Pittsburgh 

Snyder, Eleanor Ann Pittsburgh 

Stack, Thomas Patrick Pittsburgh 

Staples, John Taylor. McKeesport 

Steppling, John Francis Library 

Sturges, Marcus Robert Pittsburgh 

Tambellini, Anita Louise Pittsburgh 

Vranic, John Michael Pittsburgh 

Walko, Emil A Ambridge 

Walsh, Robert E Pittsburgh 

Witt, Mary Jane Pittsburgh 

Yeo, Thomas Edward Pittsburgh 

Young, Edwin Allen McKees Rocks 

Young, George Albert Pittsburgh 



SPECIAL STUDENTS 

1951-1952 

Baker, John L. . . McKees Rocks 

Becker, Henry Timothy Pittsburgh 

Connolly, William Irwin 

Diroll, Sr. M. Claudia. Baden 

Dougherty, Matthew Cyril Perrysville 

Giltinan, Edward J Johnstown 

Griffith, Millicent Philadelphia 

Knight, Joseph R Braddock 

Kushner, George McKeesport 

Levy, Leonard E Pittsburgh 

Lopez, Avelino Victor Pittsburgh 

McGinnis, Edith B Pittsburgh 

Miller, Sr. M. Geraldine Pittsburgh 

Pavlich, Mary Joan New Castle 

Perfetto, Robert A Pittsburgh 

Philbin, John Patrick Pittsburgh 

Purcell, Jennie M Pittsburgh 

Quinlan, John Pittsburgh 

Reese, William David McKeesport 

Roney, Gertrude Mary Pittsburgh 

Sagan, Cyril E Springdale 

Smith, Sr. Maura Pittsburgh 

Snick, Bernard C. Venitia 

Sturges, John Louis Butler 

Szymanski, Loretta M Pittsburgh 

Thomson, Richard John Pittsburgh 

Vitori, Eugene F Clairton 

Williams, Edward Pittsburgh 



Eighty-two 



Duouesne University 






College of Liberal Arts and Sciences 

School of Law 

School of Business Administration 

School of Pharmacy 

School of Music 

School of Education 

School of Nursing 

Graduate School 



Bulletins of the above schools are published separately 
and may be obtained on request from the 

DIRECTOR OF ADMISSIONS 

Duouesne University 

PITTSBURGH 19, PA. GRant 1-4635 



The 
DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 

BULLETIN 



<© 



Announcement of the 

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 

1952-1953 





JeAaaJs? C&J&V 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 
PITTSBURGH 19, PENNA. 



The 

DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 

BULLETIN 

VOLUME XL APRIL 1952 NUMBER S 

Announcement of the 

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 

For the Session 

1952-1953 




SCHOOL OF EDUCATION OFFICE 

DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 
PITTSBURGH 19, PENNSYLVANIA 

VOLUME XL APRIL 1952 NUMBER 5 



CALENDAR 

1952-1953 

SUMMER SESSION 

June 12, 13, 14, Thursday, Friday from 9:00-4:00; Saturday until Noon 

Registration, Eight Weeks Session, Day and Evening 

June 16, Monday Eight Weeks Session begins 

June 26, 27, 28, Thursday, Friday from 9:00-4:00; Saturday until Noon 

Registration, Six Weeks Day Session 

June 30, Monday Six Weeks Session begins 

July 3, Thursday Latest date to apply for degrees: August Candidates 

July 4, Friday Holiday 

July 12, Saturday Class Day 

August 8, Friday Summer Sessions end: Commencement 

1952-1953 

FIRST SEMESTER 

September 8, 9, Monday, Tuesday from 1:00-4:00 Registration 

September 8, 9, Monday, Tuesday from 4:30-7:30 Registration: Evening School 
September 10, 11, 12, 13, Wednesday to Friday from 9:00-4:00; 

Saturday until Noon Registration 

September 15, Monday First Semester begins 

September 27, Saturday Latest date for change of schedule, etc. 

October 25, Saturday Latest date for removal of E, I, X grades 

October 25, Saturday. . . .Latest date to apply for degrees: January Candidates 

November 1, Saturday Holiday 

November 5, Wednesday Mid-Semester Examinations begin 

November 26, Wednesday {after last class) Thanksgiving Vacation begins 

December 1, Monday Classes resumed 

December 8, Monday Holiday 

December 20, Saturday {after last class) Christmas Vacation begins 

January 5, Monday Classes resumed 

January 15, Thursday Final Examinations begin 

January 24, Saturday Final Examinations: Saturday Classes 

1952-1953 

SECOND SEMESTER 

February 2, 3, Monday, Tuesday from 1:00-4:00 . Registration 

February 2, 3, Monday, Tuesday from 4:30-7:30 Registration: Evening School 
February 4, 5, 6, 7, Wednesday to Friday from 9:00-4:00; 

Saturday until Noon Registration 

February 9, Monday Second Semester begins 

February 21, Saturday Latest date for change of schedule, etc. 

February 21, Saturday Latest date to apply for degrees: June Candidates 

March 21, Saturday Latest date for removal of E, I, X grades 

April 1, Wednesday {after last class) Easter Vacation begins 

April 7, Tuesday Classes resumed 

April 8, Wednesday Mid-Semester Examinations begin 

May 14, Thursday Holiday 

May 30, Saturday .•••:• Holiday 

June 1, Monday Final Examinations begin 

June 6, Saturday Final Examinations: Saturday Classes 

June 7, Sunday Baccalaureate Services and Commencement Exercises 

Registration is conducted during the days listed in the above calendar. 
Only by rare exception, by consent of the Dean, and on payment of a penalty, 
will late registration be permitted. 






TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

The University Calendar 2 

The University 

Officers of Administration 5 

Location 8 

History , 8 

Philosophy and Objectives 9 

Accreditation-Membership 10 

The Library 10 

The University Chapel 10 

The School of Education 

Officers of Administration 11 

Officers of Instruction 11 

Location 17 

History 17 

Philosophy and Objectives 18 

Accreditation-Membership 19 

Plant and Facilities 19 

Academic Information 

Admission 20 

Entrance Examination 21 

Application . . . . 21 

Classified Status of Students 22 

Registration 23 

Freshman Days 23 

The School Year 23 

Academic Regulations 24 

Graduation 26 

Financial Information 

Tuition and Fees 28 

Room and Board 31 

Scholarships 31 

Student Employment 32 

Student Loan 32 

Student Service and Activity 

Residence and Recreation 32 

Health Service 33 

Book Store 33 

Cafeteria 33 

Theatre 33 

Publication 33 

Athletic Activities 33 

Student Organizations 34 

The Guidance Bureau 35 



Page 
The School of Education Program 

Orientation and Guidance 35 

Selection 36 

General and Professional Education 36 

Departments — Programs 37 

Elementary Education 38 

Secondary Education 39 

Observation and Student Teaching 40 

Degree 40 

Certification 41 

Teacher Placement 42 

Follow-Up of Graduates 43 

In-Service Education 43 

Graduate Education 43 

Courses of Instruction 

General Education 44 

Educational Psychology 44 

Elementary Education 45 

Secondary Education 47 

Business Education 48 

Library Science Education 49 

Arts Education 50 

Classics 50 

English 51 

Modern Languages 52 

Philosophy 54 

History and Social Studies 55 

Science Education 60 

Biology • 60 

Chemistry 61 

Physics 62 

Mathematics 62 

Physical Education 63 

Military and Air Science and Tactics 64 

List of Graduates 1951-1952 70 

List of Students 1951-1952 74 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 



THE UNIVERSITY PERSONNEL 
OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 



Most Reverend John Francis Dearden, D.D. 
Chancellor 

Very Reverend Vernon F. Gallagher, C.S.Sp., Ph.D. 

President 

Reverend J. Gerald Walsh, C.S.Sp., Ph.D. 
Vice-President 

Reverend Joseph R. Kletzel, C.S.Sp., M.A. 
Secretary 

Reverend Sebastian J. Schiffgens, C.S.Sp., B.A. 
Treasurer 

Maurice J. Murphy, D.Ed. 
Registrar 

Reverend William J. Holt, C.S.Sp., B.A. 
Director of Student Welfare 

Reverend James F. McNamara, C.S.Sp., B.A. 
Dean of Men 

Elizabeth K. Wingerter, M.A. 
Dean of Women 

Margaret Eleanor McCann, B.S. (Library Science) 

Librarian 

Reverend Salvator J. Federici, C.S.Sp., Ph.D. 
Director of Admissions 

Reverend Joseph F. Rengers, C.S.Sp., B.A. 
University Chaplain 

Colonel Russell W. Schmelz, U.S.A. 
Coordinator of Military and Air Science and Tactics 

Robert B. Challinor, M.D. 
Director of Student Health 



^^•^^r^mmmmm^^ 



Five 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



ADVISORY BOARD 



Joseph H. Bialas 
Lou R. Crandall 
Walter J. Curley 
Edward J. Hanley 
R. B. Heppenstall 
John J. Kane 
J. P. Lalley 
David L. Lawrence 
Charles McKenna Lynch 
William J. McIlvane 
John P. Monteverde 
Dominic Navarro 



Edward J. O'Brien 

John A. Robertshaw 

John P. Robin 

John P. Roche 

W. F. Rockwell, Sr. 

J. T. Ryan, Jr. 

William A. Seifert, Sr. 

J. V. Smith 

William J. Strassburger 

Samuel A. Weiss 

Irwin D. Wolf 



Six 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 



COMMITTEES 
UNIVERSITY COUNCIL 

Rev. J. Gerald Walsh, C.S.Sp Chairman 

C. Gerald Brophy Rev. George A. Harcar, C.S.Sp. 

Albert B. Wright Ruth D. Johnson 

Rev. Joseph R. Kletzel, C.S.Sp. Colonel Russell W. Schmelz 

Hugh C. Muldoon Maurice J. Murphy 

Rev. William R. Hurney, C.S.Sp. Margaret Eleanor McCann 



COMMITTEE ON ADMISSIONS AND STUDENT STANDING 

Maurice J. Murphy Chairman 

Rev. Salvator J. Federici, C.S.Sp. Gerald L. Zimmerman 
Rev. James A. Phalen, C.S.Sp. Rev. William R. Hurney, C.S.Sp. 
Joseph A. Zapotocky Helen M. Kleylb 

Alice C. Feehan 



COMMITTEE ON SCHOLARSHIPS 

Rev. Salvator J. Federici, C.S.Sp Chairman 

Maurice J. Murphy Vincent P. Viscomi 

Rev. John P. Gallagher, C.S.Sp. Vito Grieco 
Vartkes H. Simonlan Victor Plushkat 

Michael V. Ference Regina Fusan 



COMMITTEE ON EXAMINATIONS 

University 

College of Arts and Sciences Tobias D. Dunkelberger, Chairman 

School of Business Administration John T. Morris 

School of Pharmacy Joseph A. Zapotocky 

School of Music Brunhilde Dorsch 

School of Education Aaron M. Snyder 

School of Nursing Alice C. Feehan 



COMMITTEE ON STUDENT WELFARE 

Rev. William J. Holt, C.S.Sp Chairman 

Rev. Joseph F. Rengers, C.S.Sp. Elizabeth K. Wingerter 

Rev. James F. McNamara, C.S.Sp. Robert B. Challinor, M.D. 



Seven 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 

PITTSBURGH 19, PA. 

GENERAL STATEMENT 
LOCATION 

The University, an urban institution serving the needs of an 
industrial city and surrounding communities in Western Penn- 
sylvania, is situated upon an eminence overlooking Pittsburgh's 
Golden Triangle. The campus on which most of the University 
buildings are located surrounds the Administration Building at 
Bluff and Colbert Streets in downtown Pittsburgh. The School 
of Law and the School of Business Administration are off-campus 
in the Fitzsimons Building at 331 Fourth Avenue, in the heart 
of the financial district. 

The University is easily reached by any of the railroad, bus, 
or trolley lines leading into downtown Pittsburgh. 

HISTORICAL NOTE— INCORPORATION 

In 1878 the Fathers of the Congregation of the Holy Ghost 
and the Immaculate Heart of Mary established a College of 
Arts and Letters which was incorporated in 1881 as the Pitts- 
burgh Catholic College of the Holy Ghost with authority to 
grant degrees in arts and sciences. 

In 1911 the College and University Council of the Common- 
wealth of Pennsylvania approved an amendment in favor of the 
corporate title "Duquesne University" and the extension of the 
Charter to University status, with authority to grant degrees 
in arts and sciences, law, medicine, dentistry and pharmacy. 
This charter was further extended in 1930 to include programs 
and degrees in Music and Education, and in 1937 to include 
programs and degrees in Nursing. 

The present Schools of the University, all offering courses 
leading to degrees, are the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, 
the School of Law, the School of Business Administration, the 
School of Pharmacy, the School of Music, the School of Educa- 
tion, the School of Nursing and the Graduate School. 

The University is a coeducational institution and admits 
women to all divisions. 

The student body numbers approximately 4,000 each year. 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 



PHILOSOPHY AND OBJECTIVES 

Duquesne University is a Catholic institution of higher 
learning. It believes that education is concerned with man in 
his entirety, body and soul. It believes that education consists 
in the preservation, transmission and improvement of the 
material and temporal order through its elevation, regulation 
and perfection, in accordance with the example and teaching of 
Christ and His Church. It believes that the product of education 
is the man of true character, who thinks, judges and acts con- 
stantly and consistently in accordance with right reason with a 
view to his ultimate end. 

The University has as its responsibility the conservation, 
interpretation and transmission of knowledge and ideas and 
values, the quest of truth through scholarly research, and the 
preparation for vocational and avocational fields by intelligent 
and thorough training in the principles underlying these fields. 
The general aim is to facilitate through the media of instruction 
and related collegiate activities the development of purposeful 
character, intellectual accomplishment, emotional and social 
maturity and professional efficiency. 

The University attains this aim in the Colleges (Schools) by 
guiding the student through a cultural core program, through a 
concentrated study of a major field of interest, through an 
organized program of co-curricular and extra-curricular activities, 
and through established personnel services. 

The University aims specifically to assist the student in: 

1. The development of a sound philosophy of life through 
an understanding of spiritual and physical, intellectual 
and moral, social and aesthetic aims and values. 

2. The development of a well-balanced personality. 

3. The development of a broader understanding of our 
culture. 

4. The development of scholarship and continuous pro- 
fessional growth. 

5. The development of a constant evaluation of himself 
as an individual and as a member of the community. 

6. The development of a genuine American attitude. 



Nine 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



ACCREDITATION— MEMBERSHIP 

The University is accredited by the State Council on Educa- 
tion of the Pennsylvania Department of Public Instruction, and 
by the Middle States Association of Colleges and Secondary 
Schools. 

It is a member of the American Council on Education, the 
Association of American Colleges, the American Association of 
Urban Universities, the National Catholic Educational Associa- 
tion, the Catholic Educational Association of Pennsylvania, the 
National Education Association, the Pennsylvania State Edu- 
cation Association, and the American Association of Collegiate 
Registrars. 

The University is affiliated with the Catholic University of 
America. 

The Colleges (Schools) of the University hold memberships 
in numerous educational societies and associations. 



THE LIBRARY 

The Duquesne University Library contains about fifty- 
thousand volumes, besides numerous classified but uncataloged 
pamphlets. Under the supervision of librarians, the students 
have access to the shelves and are permitted to withdraw from 
the library any volume except those reserved for special reasons. 
The Library receives from various sources gifts and bequests. 

The Downtown Library in the Fitzsimons Building is sup- 
plied from the main University Library. 

The John E. Laughlin Memorial Library of the School of 
Law, located in the Fitzsimons Building, numbers over ten 
thousand volumes. 

» 

The University Library is open, with some exceptions, from 
8:30 a.m. to 9:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, and from 8:30 
a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Saturday. 

THE UNIVERSITY CHAPEL 

The University Chapel adjoins the Administration Building. 
Masses are said at appointed hours throughout the week. Several 
Masses are offered on Sunday for the convenience of the students 
residing on the campus. Special devotions are conducted on 
feast days. 



Ttn 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 
1952-1953 

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Rev. George A. Harcar, C.S.Sp., M.A., D.Ed Dean 

Helen M. Kleyle, B.A., M.Ed Director of the Freshman Program 

Francis X. Kleyle, M.Ed., Ph.D. Chairman, Department of Elementary Education 

Regis J. Leonard, M.Ed., Ph.D.. .Chairman, Department of Secondary Education 

Lawrence A. Griffin, B.A., M.Ed Director of Student Teaching and Teacher 

Placement, Supervisor of Secondary Student Teaching 

Anne M. Barr, B.Ed., M.A Supervisor of Elementary Student Teaching 

Thomas J. F. McHale Secretary to the Dean 

OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

Anne M. Barr Assistant Professor of Elementary Education 

B.A. Duquesne University, 1938 
M.A. Duquesne University, 1940 

408 Lawn Street, Pittsburgh 13, Pa. MUseum 1-2267 

Michael V. Ference Assistant Professor of Elementary Education 

B.A. Edinboro State Teachers College, 1932 
M.Ed. Duquesne University, 1935 

303 Union Avenue, Bellevue, Pittsburgh 2, Pa. Linden 1-6195 

A. John Goetz Professor of Education 

A.B. University of Dayton, 1916 
S.T.B. University of Fribourg, Switzerland, 1923 
S.T.L. University of Fribourg, Switzerland, 1924 
Ph.D. University of Fribourg, Switzerland, 1925 

968 Athalia Avenue, Monessen, Pa. Monessen 1108 

Marjorie Green Instructor in Physical Education 

B.S. in Ed. Slippery Rock State Teachers College, 1939 

109 Puritan Road, Roslyn Farms, Carnegie, Pa. Carnegie 123-R 

Lawrence A. Griffin Assistant Professor of Secondary Education 

B.A. Duquesne University, 1934 
M.Ed. University of Pittsburgh, 1940 
Graduate study at the University of Pittsburgh 

2005 Carson Street, Pittsburgh, Pa. HUbbard 1-0264 

Rev. George A. Harcar, C.S.Sp Associate Professor of Education 

B.A. Duquesne University, 1935 
B.D. St. Mary Seminary, 1937 
M.A. Duquesne University, 1941 
D.Ed. St. Francis College, 1945 

• 801 Bluff Street, Pittsburgh 19, Pa. GRant 1-4635 

Wilverda Hodel Professor of Business Education 

B.S. in B.A. University of Pittsburgh, 1924 
M.Ed. Duquesne University, 1935 

Hotel Lincoln, East Palestine, Ohio 



Eleven 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



Rev. William J. Holt, C.S.Sp Associate Professor of Educational Psychology 

B.A. Duquesne University, 1928 

Graduate study at Duquesne University and New York University 

801 Bluff Street, Pittsburgh 19, Pa. GRant 1-4635 

Francis X. Kletle Professor of Elementary Education 

B.A. Carnegie Institute of Technology, 1921 
M.Ed. Duquesne University, 1933 
Ph.D. University of Pittsburgh, 1950 

421 Oneida Street, Pittsburgh 11, Pa. EVerglade 1-2398 

Helen M. Kleyle Assistant Professor of Secondary Education 

B.A. Duquesne University, 1933 
M.Ed. Duquesne University, 1949 

421 Oneida Street, Pittsburgh 11, Pa. EVerglade 1-2398 

Regis J. Leonabd Professor of Secondary Education 

B.Ed. Duquesne University, 1936 
M.Ed. University of Pittsburgh, 1938 
Ph.D. University of Pittsburgh, 1949 

5218 Holmes Street, Pittsburgh 1, Pa. STerling 1-2921 

Eleanor McCann Instructor in Library Science Education 

B.S. (Library Science), Carnegie Institute of Technology, 1927 

Cathedral Mansions, Pittsburgh 13, Pa. MAynower 1-8100 

Howard F. McGinn Assistant Professor of Secondary Education 

B.A. St. Vincent College, 1934 

B.S. Drexel Institute of Technology, 1938 

M.A. St. Vincent College, 1940 

Graduate study at the University of Pittsburgh CEdar 1-8740 

Earl J. Schuur Assistant Professor of Business Education 

B.A. Catholic University of America, 1933 
M.Ed. Wayne University, 1941 
Ed.D. Indiana University, 1951 

R.F.D. #3, Library, Pa. Colonial 3-6492 

Louis Skender Instructor in Physical Education 

B.S. in Econ. Duquesne University, 1930 
LL.B. Duquesne University, 1935 

Macmillan Road, Bridgeville, Pa. Bridgeville 1057 

Aaron M. Snyder Professor of Educational Psychology 

B.A. Franklin and Marshall College, 1903 
Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania, 1910 

96 Sampson Street, Pittsburgh 5, Pa. WAlnut 1-3873 

Raymond Stowitzky Instructor in Educational Psychology 

B.Ed. Duquesne University, 1949 
M.Ed. Duquesne University, 1951 

5522 Hayes Street, Pittsburgh 6, Pa. EMerson 1-7950 

John T. Stratton Instructor in Educational Psychology 

B.Ed. Duquesne University, 1948 

M.Ed. Duquesne University, 1949 

Graduate study at the University of Pittsburgh 

229 Grandview Avenue, Pittsburgh 11, Pa. HUbbard 1-3331 



Twelve 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 



George B. Welsh Instructor in Educational Psychology 

B.A. Mt. St. Mary College, 1933 
M.Ed. Duquesne University, 1947 
Graduate study at the University of Pittsburgh 
92 Bradford Avenue, Crafton, Pa. 

Elizabeth Wingerter Instructor in Elementary Education 

B.A. West Liberty State Teachers College, 1932 

M.A. University of Pittsburgh, 1933 

Graduate study at Carnegie Institute of Technology, Columbia University, 

and Northwestern University 

837 Farragut Street, Pittsburgh 6, Pa. Hlland 1-8344 



COOPERATING FACULTY OF THE 
SCHOOLS OF THE UNIVERSITY 

Rev. Gordon F. Knight, C.S.Sp., S.T.D.. Religion and Philosophy 

James M. Purcell, Ph.D English 

Catherine C. Weaver, Ph.D English 

Ralph Klinefelter, Ph.D English 

Rev. Salvator J. Federici, C.S.Sp., Ph.D History 

Sydney M. Brown, Ph.D History 

Cyril F. Zebot, Ph.D Social Science 

Paul H. Anderson, Ph.D Social Science 

Kenneth Duffy, B.Ed., Ph.D Spanish 

Primitivo Colombo, Ph.D French 

Pauline Reinkraut, Ph.D German 

Andrew J. Kozora, B.S., M.S Physics 

Oscar Gawron, Ph.D Chemistry 

Kurt C. Schreiber, Ph.D Chemistry 

Harry H. Szmant, Ph.D Chemistry 

Adrian Poitras, Ph.D Biology 

Robert C. Smith, Ph.D Mathematics 

Morris Ostrosfky, Ph.D Mathematics 

Rev. Raymond M. Cadwallader, Ph.D Classics 

Anthony T. Oliva, B.A., M.A., Ed.D Psychology 

Brunhilde Dorsch, M.S. in Ed Music 

Ebba L. Houggy, B.Ed Music 

Howard Eulenstein, LL.B Business Law 

George V. Tchirkow, D.Int.L Economic Geography 

William H. Cadugan, M.Ed Accounting 

) ' -. . *^"^p—— — — — ■ "h i I, ~ 

Thirteen 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



LECTURERS 

Catherine McDevitt, M.Ed Elementary Education 

Eva Betschart, B.S Elementary Education 

Eleanora Bevil, M.Ed Elementary Education 

Dorothy Thomas, M.Ed Elementary Education 

Helen Brennan, M.Ed Elementary Education 

Ralph Scott, Ed.D Secondary Education 

James Shannon, M.Ed Secondary Education 

Rot T. Mattern, M.Ed Secondary Education 

Rev. Thomas J. Quiglet, Ph.D Education 

Rev. John McDowell, Ph.D Education 

Brother E. Anthony, Ed.D Education 

F. W. Hershelman, B.Accts Business Education 

Sister M. Hieronyme, R.S.M., M. A Library Science Education 

Sister Marie Helene, S.C., M.A Library Science Education 

Helen Lutton, M.Ed Library Science Education 

Rev. Vincent Negherbon, T.O.R., B.S. in L.S Library Science Education 

Sister M. Henrica, P.C.J., M.A English 

Sister Francis Teresa, P.C.J., M.A History 

Sister M. Rosalia, V.S.C., M.A Education 

Mother M. Gregory, V.S.C., M.Ed History 

Sister M. Gabriella, O.S.F., M.S Education 

Sister M. Joseph, O.S.F., M.A Education 

Mother M. Aloysia, O.S.F., M.A English 

Mother M. David, O.S.F., M.A Music 

Mother M. Perpetua, S.S.J., M.A Education 

Sister M. Alice, S.S.J., M.Ed Education 

Sister M. Bernarda, O.S.B., M.A English 

Mother M. Lucina, O.S.F., M.A Philosophy 

Sister M. Viola, O.S.F., M.A Education 

Sister M. Kenneth, C.D.P., M.A Education 

Sister M. Florence, C.D.P., M.S Music 

Sister M. Clarita, CD .P., M.A English 



STUDENT TEACHING 

Lawrence A. Griffin, M.Ed., Director of Student Teaching and Teacher Placement, 

Supervisor of Secondary Student Teaching 

Anne M. Barr, M.A Supervisor of Elementary Student Teaching 

Dorothy B. Thomas, M.Ed Principal, Forbes Elementary School 

Helen Brennan, M.Ed Principal, Whittier Elementary School 

Ralph Scott, Ed.D Principal, Fifth Avenue Junior-Senior High School 

James Shannon, M.Ed Principal, South Junior-Senior High School 

Roy T. Mattern, M.Ed Principal, Allegheny Senior High School 



Fourteen 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 



Critic Teachers Public Schools 

Forbes Elementary School 

Rebecca Cooper Kindergarten Crescentia Daschbach 



Eleanora Bevtl First Grade 

Willa T. Wynn First Grade 

Wilda Bach Second Grade 

Margaret Derby Third Grade 

Mildred Gergich Fourth Grade 

Robert Oberlin Fifth Grade 



Sixth Grade 

Leo Dirling Social Studies 

Bertha B. Kalson Library 

Hazel Carey Art 

Helen McElree Music 

Margaret Troup Expression 

Carolyn Feller. . .Physical Education 



Whittier Elementary School 

Annette Deloche Fourth Grade Harrington Truby Second Grade 

Zilpah Rodenbaugh First Grade Ethel Rode Fifth Grade 

Mary Walsh Third Grade Marion Milligan Sixth Grade 

Fifth Avenue Junior- Senior High School 



Ruth Nirella English 

John Kennedy English 

Gladys Demmel English 

Stella Espy — , English 

John Dickson English 

John Fetter Latin 

Anne Leifer Social Studies 

Paul Driebelbis Social Studies 

Agnes McKaln Social Studies 

Sara Walker Mathematics 



Inez O'Donnell Mathematics 

Blanche Schultz Mathematics 

Lawrence Norris Physical Science 

Helen Kiester Social Studies 

Opalrae Johnson. .Business Education 
Mildred Hinderer. .Biological Science 
Russell Bobbitt . . Business Education 

Mary Unikel Business Education 

Frieda Yetter. . . .Business Education 



Cyrus Weckerle English 

Jane Heberling History 

Charles Hettinger English 

C. E. Worley English 

Margaret Kline English 

Grace Miller History 

Gerritt Thorne History 

Roumayne Worrell. . .Bus. Education 



Allegheny Senior High School 

Dorothy Marick Social Studies 

Ella Messer Social Studies 

Mary Caldwell Spanish 

Frederick Kunze Mathematics 

Louis Hole Physical Science 

Myrtle Wylie .... Business Education 
Claude Diehl Business Education 



South Junior-Senior High School 



Marie Thomas English 

Felix Castaldo Spanish 

R. C. Burghardt Social Studies 

Beatrice De Matty. . . .Social Studies 

Pearl Wagner Social Studies 

Harry Black Mathematics 



Ella Cohen Mathematics 

Donald Crowe Biological Science 

John Wolsko Business Education 

James Kroh Physical Science 

Signe Hagelin .... Business Education 
Harry Friedlander. . .Bus. Education 



Fifteen 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



Critic Teachers 



Catholic Schools 



ELEMENTARY 



Sister M. 
Sister M. 
Sister M. 
Sister M. 
Sister M. 
Sister M. 
Sister M. 
Sister M. 
Sister M. 
Sister M. 
Sister M. 
Sister M. 
Sister M. 



Teresa Clare, S.C. 
Victoria, C.D.P. 
Isabel, S.S.J. 
Norma, O.S.F. 
Victoria, V.S.C. 
Louis, R.S.M. 
Alphonsus, Fel. 
Loyola, H.F.N. 
Ewaldine, H. G. 
Elizabeth, O.S.F. 
Clara, O.S.F. 
BoGUMiLLA, Bern. 
Agnetta, S.N.N.D. 



Sister M. Theresa Marie, R.S.M. 
Sister M.^Innocentia, O.S.F. 
Sister M. Alexis, M.Fr.I.C 
Sister M. Florence, M.Z.S.H. 
Sister M. Damian, O.S.B.M. 
Sister M. Sebastian, R.S.M. 
Sister M. Barbara, Pr.Bl. 
Sister M. Thomas Aquinas, O.S.A. 
Sister M. Cyprian, C.M.P. 
Sister M. Immac. Conception, G.S. 
Sister M. Evangelista, O.S.B.M. 
Sister M. Martha, D.Red. 
Sister Esther Del Luca 



SECONDARY 



Sister M. Agnes Geraldine, S.C. 
Sister M. Kenneth, CD .P. 
Sister M. Teresa, S.S.J. 
Sister M. Viola, O.S.F. 
Sister M. Rose of Lima, V.S.C. 
Sister M. Michael, R.S.M. 
Sister M. Gabriella, O.S.F. 
Brother Austin, F.S.C. 
Brother Leonard Mann, S.M. 



Sister M. Bernarda, O.S.B. 
Sister M. Enmilda, H.F.N. 
Sister M. Rebecca, I.H.M. 
Sister M. Jean, O.P. 
Sister M. Mary DeChantel, O.S.U. 
Sister M. Mildred, O.S.F. 
Brother E. Anthony, F.S.C. 
Brother Joseph Panzer, S.M. 



Sixteen 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 



THE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 

LOCATION 

The School of Education is located in Canevin Hall. The 
departmental rooms are on the second floor. Business Education 
classrooms are located in the Fitzsimons Building. 



HISTORY 

Prior to 1929, the Department of Education was maintained 
in the College of Arts and Sciences. In February of that year, 
the first classes were enrolled in the newly-organized School of 
Education, the designated teacher-training division of the Uni- 
versity. The senior class of 1929 received the first degrees offered 
by the School of Education. 

The first courses in the School were in Secondary Education 
with majors and minors in the Arts and Science fields. 

From this beginning, there developed in the School a variety 
of specialized curricula. A curriculum in Music Education was 
prepared and received State approval in February 1930. In April 
1932, the Business Education program became an official major 
in the School. 

Late in 1934, a program of graduate courses in Education 
was prepared and in April, 1935, the State Department auth- 
orized the conferring of the Master degree upon graduates of the 
appropriate curriculum. Further, in May 1936, graduate pro- 
grams for certification received the approval of the State. 

The Elementary Education program was approved in April 
1937. 

In June 1944, the State Department placed its approval on 
the special Library Science Education curriculum. 

The School of Education offers programs in Elementary 
Education, including Nursery School Education, Kindergarten- 
Primary Education and Elementary Education; in Secondary 
Education including majors in the Arts and Sciences, Business 
Education and Library Science Education. 

Graduate programs are offered by the Graduate Education 
Department in the Graduate School. 



Seventeen 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



PHILOSOPHY AND OBJECTIVES 

In accordance with the educational philosophy of the Uni- 
versity, the School of Education believes that the product of 
education is the man of true character, who thinks, judges and 
acts constantly and consistently in accordance with right reason 
with a view to his ultimate end. It aims to facilitate through the 
media of instruction and related collegiate activities the develop- 
ment of purposeful character, intellectual accomplishment, 
emotional and social maturity and professional efficiency. 

The School of Education is the Teacher-Training School in 
the University. It has as its responsibility the general and pro- 
fessional training of teachers for the elementary and secondary 
schools. It attains this aim by guiding the student through the 
cultural core program, through a concentrated study of a teaching 
field, through a scientific study of the facts and principles of 
education, through a thorough study of the learning process, 
through an intensive study of teaching methods, techniques and 
materials, through planned observation of experienced teachers 
in classroom situations, and through student teaching based 
upon recognized modern procedures. 

The School of Education aims specifically to assist the 
student in: 

1. The development of a sound philosophy of life and education through 
the understanding of truly spiritual and religious aims and values for 
the betterment of his own life and for the advancement of these aims 
and values in others. 

2. The development of a wholesome personality for the enrichment of his 
own life and for the guidance of others toward wholesome personalities. 

3. The development of a broader understanding of our culture in order to 
advance this understanding in others. 

4. The development of an expert understanding of the process of living, 
growing and learning, and of competency in acting upon this under- 
standing in teaching situations. 

5. The development of an understanding of and practice in the democfatic 
process in all areas of living and of competency in guiding young people 
to utilize such democratic process in their own living. 

6. The development of an expertness in utilizing his enriched experience 
in guiding the process of living, growing and learning of young people. 

7. The development of the desire for continuous professional growth. 

8. The development of scholarship through a constant willingness to use 
the resources and methods of critical inquiry in the fields of human 
knowledge relevant to his responsibilities as an individual and as a 
professional worker in teaching and guiding students to use similar 
resources and methods in facing their own problems of living. 

9. The development of a constant evaluation of himself as an individual, 
as a teacher, and as a member of the community. 



Eighteen 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 



ACCREDITATION— MEMBERSHIP 

The School of Education is accredited by the Pennsylvania 
Department of Public Instruction. The State Bureau of Teacher 
Education and Certification issues college provisional certificates 
for the programs completed in the School. 

The School holds membership in the Eastern States Associa- 
tion of Professional Schools for Teachers, the Eastern Arts 
Association, the National Association of Business Teacher- 
Training Institutions, the National Association for Student 
Teaching, the National Vocational Guidance Association, the 
National Institutional Teacher Placement Association, the 
Pennsylvania Institutional Teacher Placement Association. 

The Faculty holds membership in various departments of 
the National Education Association, the Pennsylvania State 
Education Association and in other educational societies and 
associations. 

PLANT AND FACILITIES 

The buildings and other facilities of the University are at the 
disposal of the student. 

Courses in the general education program conducted in co- 
operation with the Faculty of the College of Arts and Sciences, 
are held in assigned rooms throughout the various buildings of 
the University. The future teachers intermingle with the students 
of the several Schools in all "Core Courses" required by the 
University. 

The departmental rooms on the second floor of Canevin Hall 
contain materials for the sole use of the School of Education 
students. Business Education students use the special depart- 
mental rooms in the Fitzsimons Building. Special textbook 
collections are distributed through these departmental rooms. 

Secondary Education students majoring in Arts and Science 
subjects use the materials and laboratories employed by the 
students of the College. 

The University Library contains a representative collection 
in the field of Education. This Main Library is used by the 
students of the School of Education. 

Student teaching is completed at the Forbes Elementary 
School, the Whittier Elementary School, the Fifth Avenue 
Junior-Senior High School, the Allegheny Senior High School 
and the South Junior-Senior High School. 



Nineteen 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



ACADEMIC INFORMATION 

INFORMATION ON ADMISSION 
Requirements for Admission to the Undergraduate Schools 

Admission of Regular Students: A candidate for admission 
must be of good moral character. He should submit at least one 
recommendation of character signed by a person of established 
reputation. 

The candidate must be a graduate of an approved secondary 
school, in the upper three-fifths of his or her class. Those who 
place in the lower two-fifths are automatically subject to an 
entrance examination. 

The candidate should present twelve units from the following 
fields: English, Social Studies, Language, Mathematics and 
Science, and four units in electives for which the secondary 
school offers credit toward graduation or the genuine equivalent. 

A Secondary School Unit represents a year's 
study in an approved standard secondary school, 
so planned as to constitute approximately one- 
fourth of a full year of work for a pupil of normal 
ability. To count as a unit, the recitation period 
shall aggregate approximately not less than 120 
sixty-minute hours. 

The candidate must satisfactorily pass the medical examina- 
tion administered by the University Director of Student Health. 

The candidate's application must be approved by the 
University Committee on Admission and Student Standing. The 
Committee may recommend the completion of an examination 
before matriculation. This examination will include scholastic 
aptitude and achievement tests. 

Admission of Transfer Students: Students of approved Colleges 
and Universities will be admitted to advanced standing if their 
credentials so warrant. They must be in good standing and 
eligible to continue their studies at the institution previously 
attended. They must have been granted an honorable dismissal. 
A general average equivalent to the grade C at Duquesne is 
required of an applicant wishing to transfer. Advanced credit 
may be allowed for those courses which are the equivalent of 
the courses in the chosen Duquesne curriculum. No credit will 
be allowed in any subject with a grade lower than C. 



Twenty 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 



Advanced standing is conditional until the student completes 
a minimum of one semester's work (15 semester hours). If his 
or her work proves unsatisfactory, the student will be requested 
to withdraw. 

Temporary transfer students will be admitted to sessions if 
they present the written approval of their institution to take 
courses at Duquesne. 

ENTRANCE EXAMINATION 

Candidates for admission to the undergraduate Schools of 
the University who rank in the lower two-fifths of their second- 
ary school class must take the University Entrance Examina- 
tion. 

Candidates for admission may take the College Entrance 
Examination Board Tests. The College Entrance Examination 
Board will forward the scores directly to the Office of Admissions. 
These tests should be taken in the senior year in secondary 
school. 

Application for these tests is made to the College Entrance 
Examination Board, Post Office Box 592, Princeton, New Jersey. 



APPLICATION 

Application of Regular Students: 

Applicants for admission should address the Office of Admis- 
sions to obtain the necessary application blanks. 

The applicant will complete the personal application and 
return it to the Office of Admissions, Duquesne University, 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. He or she will have the secondary 
school complete the credentials form which must be mailed 
directly to the Office of Admissions. 

Upon receipt of these application papers, an evaluation will 
be made by the Committee on Admission and Student Standing. 
The applicant will then be notified of his or her status and if 
admitted will be provided with information on registration. A 
deposit of twenty dollars is required within two weeks of noti- 
fication of acceptance, in order to assure the applicant of the 
reservation of a place in class. For further information see 
Tuition and Fees. 



Twtnty-ont 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



Application of Transfer Students: 

Applicants for admission should address the Office of Admis- 
sions to obtain the necessary application blanks. 

The applicant will complete the personal application and 
return it to the Office of Admissions, Duquesne University, 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. He or she must notify all colleges or 
universities previously attended to mail directly to the Office of 
Admissions official transcripts of record. 

Upon receipt of all credentials an evaluation will be made. 
The applicant will then be notified of his or her status, and if 
admitted will be provided with information on registration. A 
deposit of twenty dollars is required within two weeks of noti- 
fication of acceptance, in order to assure the applicant of the 
reservation of a place in class. For further information see 
Tuition and Fees. 



CLASSIFIED STATUS OF STUDENTS 

Students at Duquesne University are classified as matriculated 
and non-matriculated. A matriculated student is one who has 
satisfied all of the requirements for admission to the degree 
program of his choice and is pursuing courses in which he is 
qualified to earn credit for the degree. Registrants who are so 
classified may be full-time or part-time students in either the 
day or evening division of the University. Non-matriculated 
students are mature persons who are not interested in pursuing 
courses for a degree and who have not met the requirements for 
matriculation. 

A student who is enrolled as a non-matriculated or special 
student, must have the approval of the Dean who is responsible 
for the courses to be taken. In such case the entrance require- 
ments may be waived, but the courses will not carry credit 
toward a degree. Only in an exceptional case is a non-matricu- 
lated student permitted to attend regular day classes. 

Students carrying a schedule of courses each semester which 
will enable them to qualify for a degree in the regular time are 
full-time students. 



Twenty-two 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 



REGISTRATION 

A registration period precedes each semester and summer 
session. (See University Calendar.) All Schools register students 
during this period. Late registration, permitted for the first two 
weeks of a semester, carries a penalty of 35.00. 

General regulations concerning registration are: 

Registration for all students is held on the Campus. 

The student's schedule is prepared in conference with the 
Dean or Adviser. 

Tuition and fees for the semester are payable at registration 
time. 

Admission to any class is allowed only to those who have 
officially registered for that class. 

Students are not permitted to change their schedules 
of courses without the permission of their Dean. A 
student who withdraws from a course without proper 
authorization receives a grade of F for the course. Change 
of schedule is permitted without fee only during the 
registration period. For a serious reason, change of 
schedule may be permitted during the same period in 
which late registrations are accepted. 

FRESHMAN DAYS 

All entering Freshmen are required to be present for Fresh- 
man Days Activities which take place the week preceding the 
beginning of the first semester. These activities consist in general 
orientation conferences and in the completion of a group of 
placement tests. Failure to take the placement tests at the 
regular time will incur a penalty of $5.00 for individual tests. 
Registration for the first semester courses must be completed 
in this week. 

THE SCHOOL YEAR 

REGULAR SCHOOL YEAR 

The School Year is divided into the First Semester and the 
Second Semester. Each semester occupies sixteen weeks of 
instruction exclusive of vacation periods. 

During a regular semester, classes are in session five days 
a week. 



Twenty-thut 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



Evening and Saturday classes are offered throughout both 
semesters. 

SUMMER SESSION 

A Summer Session is conducted annually. In addition to the 
regular Six Weeks Session, special sessions may be conducted. 
Courses in the Sciences and in Business Administration are 
offered in the Eight Weeks Session. 

The School of Education offers summer courses in the regular 
Six Weeks Session. 

Summer Session courses are taught by the regularly ap- 
pointed members of the Faculty. Some classes are held by 
visiting instructors. 

The schedule of summer classes meets the needs of a) students 
who wish to remove deficiencies in courses, b) graduates and 
undergraduates who are fulfilling requirements for degrees by 
part-time study, c) teachers who are working for certification. 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 

The following regulations govern all undergraduate students 
of the University. The University reserves the right to change 
any provision or requirement during the term of residence of 
any student; and to compel the withdrawal of any student whose 
conduct at any time is not satisfactory to the University. 

1. Class Attendance: Students are not permitted to absent them- 
selves from class without good reason. Accumulated absences 
may bring exclusion from class. 

2. Examinations: 

a. Mid-Semester examinations are given during the eighth 
week of each semester. 

b. Final examinations are given at the end of each semester 
and summer session. No student is excused from taking 
final examinations. 

c. Condition examinations are given toward the end of the 
first month of each semester in order to give students who 
have received marks of E or X for courses in the preceding 
semester the opportunity to remove these deficiencies. An 
E grade can be changed by re-examination to D or F. The 
fee for such examinations is 35.00. 



Twenty-four 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 



d. The National Teachers Examination. All degree candidates 
in the School of Education are required to take the National 
Teachers Examination in the Senior year. 

The date of registration for the Examination will be 
announced. For the fee attached to the Examination 
consult "Tuition and Fees". 

3. Grading: The University grading system, adopted February 
21, 1929 and amended September 19, 1938, is the only method 
of rating recognized by the University. The system is as 
follows: 

A — Excellent 

B— Good 

C — Average 

D — Below Average: lowest passing grade 

E — Conditioned : eligible for re-examination 

F — Failure: course must be repeated 

I — Incomplete: grade is deferred because of incomplete 
work 

X— Absent from final examination 

W— Official Withdrawal 

P — Pass: used in certain courses without quality points. 

The temporary grades E, I, and X must be removed within 
the first thirty school days of the next succeeding semester. 
It is the student's responsibility to make arrangements with 
his dean for the removal of these temporary marks. An E 
grade can be changed by re-examination to only D or F. 
Failure to remove E and X grades within the specified time 
will result in an F grade for the course. 

4. Unit of Credit: The unit of credit is the semester hour. One 
semester hour of credit is granted for the successful completion 
of one hour per week of lecture or recitation, or at least two 
hours per week of laboratory work for one semester. Inasmuch 
as the minimum number of weeks in a semester is sixteen, 
an equivalent definition of the semester hour is sixteen hours 
of class or the equivalent in laboratory work. 

5. Quality Points: Among the requirements for graduation is a 
quality point average of at least 1.0. The quality point system 
operates as follows: 



Twenty-five 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



(a) For the credits of work carried, quality points are awarded 
according to the grade received: for a grade of A, the 
number of credits are multiplied by 3; for a grade of B, 
by 2; for a grade of C, by 1; for a grade of D, by 0; and 
for a grade of F, by minus 1, until the F has been removed 
by repeating the course successfully. The marks E, I, and 
X, being temporary indications rather than grades, and 
W and P are independent of the quality point system. 

(b) A student's quality point average can be calculated at 
the end of an academic period by dividing his total 
number of quality points by the total number of semester 
hours of credit he has obtained. 

6. Scholastic Standings: 

(a) Dismissal: A student, to be permitted to continue a 
course of study, must pass in two-thirds of the hours of 
credit carried in each semester, and must maintain a 
quality point average of at least 0.67. Failure to satisfy 
this minimum scholastic requirement will result in the 
dismissal of the student for low scholarship. 

(b) Probation: A student who fails in one third or less of the 
hours of credit carried in each semester, or whose quality 
point average falls below 1.0, is placed on probation for 
the next semester. Students on probation may be required 
to carry a reduced schedule. 

7. Classification of Students: Students will be ranked in the several 
classes as follows: 

Freshmen: Those having completed less than 30 semester 
hours. 

Sophomores: Those having completed 31 to 60 semester hours. 

Juniors: Those having completed 61 to 90 semester hours. 

Seniors: Those having completed 91 semester hours. 

GRADUATION 

1. General Requirements: The candidate for a degree must be of 
good moral character; must have paid all indebtedness to the 
University; must have made formal application for the degree 
at the Office of the Registrar prior to the date listed in the 
University Calendar; must be present at the Baccalaureate 
and Commencement Exercises. 



Twenty-six 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 



2. Scholastic Requirements: The candidate for a degree must have 
satisfied all entrance requirements; must have completed 
successfully all the required courses of his degree program; 
must have no grade lower than D; must have completed the 
last year's work (a minimum of thirty semester hours of credit) 
in residence; must have passed the qualifying and compre- 
hensive examinations as required in his program. 

3. Quality Point Requirement: The candidate for a degree must 
have a minimum total number of quality points equivalent 
to the number of semester hours credit required for the 
Bachelor's degree; or a minimum quality point average of 1.0. 

4. Degrees Awarded With Honor: Degrees are awarded with special 
mention cum laude or magna cum laude to students who have 
completed the regular course with unusual distinction. Upon 
recommendation of the Faculty, this mention may be raised 
to summa cum laude. 

In addition to graduation honors there are several awards 
given to senior students for outstanding academic ability and 
participation in extra-curricular activities: 

Association for Childhood Education Medal. This medal is 
awarded to a student in the Department of Elementary Edu- 
cation. 

The Secondary Education Association Medal. This medal is 
awarded to a student in the Department of Secondary Education. 

FINANCIAL INFORMATION 

AVERAGE ANNUAL EXPENSE 

The total annual cost to the full-time student in the School 
of Education approximates $450.00. This includes tuition, general 
fees, and books, but not laboratory fees or deposits, or living 
expenses. 

HOW EXPENSES MAY BE PAID 

All expenses are due and payable on the day of registration. 
Upon application, however, at the Office of Deferred Tuition, a 
student may arrange to pay part of his expenses down and the 
remainder, which is subject to a service charge, in regular 
monthly installments during the semester. 



Twenty-seven 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



TUITION AND FEES 

The University reserves the right to change the fees herein 
stated at any time without notice. Whenever a change is made 
it will become effective at the beginning of the succeeding 
academic year. 

Matriculation Deposit $ 20.00 

The matriculation deposit of twenty dollars is pay- 
able by entering students within two weeks from the 
date of notification of acceptance to the University. 
The purpose of this fee is to assure the student of a 
reservation of a place in class. This deposit will be 
credited against the student's tuition and fees at 
the time of registration for the semester in which 
the student's application has been approved. This 
deposit is not refundable. 

Tuition, per Semester Hour Credit $ 12.00 

The total tuition for the semester is payable at 
the time of registration, unless other arrangements 
are made through the Deferred Tuition Office. 

Activities Fee, per Semester $ 10.00 

This fee gives access to intercollegiate and intra- 
mural sports activities, concerts, dramatic presen- 
tations and other events throughout the scholastic 
year. It entitles the student to copies of the weekly 
newspaper. This fee is payable by all students 
carrying twelve or more credits in the regular 
semesters. 

Library Fee, Full-time Students $ ,5.00 

This fee affords library privileges to all students 
carrying twelve or more credits in any semester or 
summer session. 

Library Fee, Part-time Students $ 2.00 

This fee is payable by all students carrying less than 
twelve credits in any semester or summer session. 

Registration Fee $ 1.00 

A fee of $1.00 is required of every student at each 
registration period. 



Twenty-eight 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 



Student Health Fee, per Semester $ 1.00 

This fee includes a physical examination at entrance, 
and advice and emergency treatment at the univer- 
sity dispensary. 

Late Registration Fee $ 5.00 

This fee is charged to all students registering later 
than the last day of the regular registration period. 

Condition Examination Fee $ 5.00 

This fee is charged for each condition and special 
examination for removal of E and X grades. It is 
payable in advance. 

Change of Course Fee $ 1.00 

Student Publication Fee, per year $ 1.00 

Payable by all part-time students in the regular 
sessions. The fee entitles them to a copy of each 
issue of the student newspaper. 

Auditor Fee, per Semester Hour , . . . $12.00 

This fee is the same as the regular credit hour fee. 



SCIENCE FEES 

Laboratory Fees 

Biology 101, 102, 201, 202, 212, 351, 401, 402 $12.50 

Physics 201, 202, 301, 302, 401, 402, 501, 502 7.50 

Chemistry 111, 112, 211, 212, 301, 302, 401, 402 17.50 

Fees for any additional Science courses taken are 
as listed in the Bulletin of the College of Liberal 
Arts and Sciences. 

Key Deposit $ .50 

This fee is collected for each locker key furnished 
to the student. The deposit is refunded when the 
key is returned at the end of the course. 



EDUCATION FEES 

Laboratory Fees $ 2.00 

Business Education 103, 104, 203, 204. 
Audio- Visual Education 401. 

Future Teachers of America Association Fee $ 2.00 

Twtnty-nint 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



Association for Childhood Education Fee $ 1.25 

Students in the Department of Elementary Educa- 
tion should hold membership in this Association. 

Secondary Education Association Fee $ 1.00 

Students in the Department of Secondary Educa- 
tion should hold membership in this Association. 

Student Teaching Fee $25.00 

The National Teachers Examination Fee $ 6.00 

Graduation Fee (Bachelor of Education Degree) $15.00 

REFUNDS FOR WITHDRAWALS 

Students who withdraw from the university for a satisfactory 
reason within eight weeks after the opening of the semester are 
entitled to a proportionate refund of tuition provided that they 
notify their dean at the time of the withdrawal. Fees are not 
refundable. 

Refunds are made in accordance with the following schedule. 

Withdrawal Refund 

1st Week 90% 

2nd Week 70% 

3rd Week 60% 

4th Week 50% 

5th Week 30% 

6th Week 20% 

7th Week 10% 

8th Week 5% 

No refund will be made in the case of students who' are 
registered on probation or who are requested to withdraw as a 
result of faculty action. 

The Refund Schedule for Summer Sessions (six or eight weeks 
session) is as follows: 

Withdrawal Refund 

1st Week 60% 

2nd Week 20% 

There are no refunds after the second week of a Summer 
Session. Fees are not refundable. 



Thirty 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 



BOARD AND ROOM 

A limited number of residences are maintained by the 
University on campus for the convenience of out-of-town 
students. Reservations for room space are made on a semester 
basis through the Dean of Men or the Dean of Women. A 
deposit of 310.00, payable to Duquesne University, must accom- 
pany each room application. 

The deposit will be held as a breakage deposit until the 
satisfactory termination of the student's lease. Deductible from 
the deposit are any damages to room contents or buildings and 
a pro rata general breakage. 

A student who is prevented, for any reason, from occupying 
the room reserved will be released and the deposit refunded if 
the Dean of Men or the Dean of Women is notified in writing 
at least two weeks prior to the date of registration. 

Room rent is payable in advance. Rooms may be assigned 
upon receipt of the room deposit but possession is not given 
until the rent is paid in full. 

Non-commuting students are not permitted to live ofF-campus 
without permission of the Dean of Men or the Dean of Women. 

The Board cost per semester approximates 2175.00. 



STUDENT AID 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

The University offers a definite number of competitive exam- 
ination scholarships. Eligible for the examinations, which are 
held annually in April, are students who will be, according to 
certification by their principal, graduated in the upper third of 
their high school class. All scholarships are awarded for two 
years, but are potentially four-year awards, provided that the 
requirements for continuance of the award are fulfilled. Informa- 
tion concerning them may be had by addressing the Committee 
on Scholarships. 

The University Alumni Association makes available annually 
a $100.00 scholarship to a competent and deserving student in 
the School of Education. The award is based upon student need 
and promise of success. Application for the scholarship must be 
made to the Dean of the School of Education. 



Thirty-ont 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



STUDENT EMPLOYMENT 

The University makes available limited student employment 
for students who are in need of financial assistance and who, at 
the same time, maintain a satisfactory scholastic average and 
give evidence of good character. Opportunities for employment 
exist on and about the campus. Information may be had by 
addressing the Committee on Student Welfare. 

STUDENT LOAN 

The University has available a limited sum of money in 
various student loan funds, which each year is loaned to under- 
graduate students who have completed at least thirty semester 
hours credit at the University, and who meet the requirements 
of good scholarship, need of financial assistance and good char- 
acter. These loans are granted only for the purpose of the pay- 
ment of tuition. They are made available through the University 
Student Loan Fund. Information may be had by addressing the 
Committee on Student Welfare. 



STUDENT SERVICE AND ACTIVITY 

RESIDENCE 

On the University campus or in the immediate vicinity are 
located several residence halls for men and several for women. 
Each hall is under the supervision of a proctor or of a house 
mother. Reservations for rooms for men are made through the 
Dean of Men; those for women are made through the Dean of 
Women. Non-commuting students are not permitted to live 
off-campus without permission of the Dean of Men or of the 
Dean of Women. 

RECREATION 

The Student Lounge Building, located near the Administra- 
tion Building, houses a lounge and various rooms used for student 
gatherings and meetings. 

The University Gymnasium and the athletic field are available 
for recreational use. 

Because the University is located in the central area of the 
city of Pittsburgh, many opportunities for wholesome recreation 
exist. The campus is convenient to legitimate theatres, concert 
halls, and museums. 



Thirty-two 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 



HEALTH SERVICE 

The Office of the University Physician and the University 
Dispensary are located on the second floor of the Guidance 
Building. 

A medical examination is administered by the University 
Physician to all students on matriculation at the University. 

Daily medical service is available through the Physician and 
two full-time Nurses in the Dispensary. 

Serious emergency treatment is available at Mercy Hospital 
which adjoins the University campus. 

BOOKSTORE 

The University Bookstore is located on the lower floor of 
the Administration Building. Students may obtain textbooks 
and supplies at this store. 

CAFETERIA 

The University Cafeteria is located on the lower floor of 
Canevin Hall, where students may avail themselves of its 
facilities and services. Cafeteria space is also available to stu- 
dents for special activities. 

THEATRE 

The Campus Theatre, with a seating capacity of 350, is 
available for student-sponsored programs. Such student events 
as concerts and dramatic presentations are held in this theatre. 
University and School Assemblies are also conducted here. 

STUDENT PUBLICATION 

The Duquesne Duke is the official weekly student newspaper. 
Though edited and published by students in the Department of 
Journalism, it includes articles and news items submitted by 
students and student organizations throughout the University. 

ATHLETIC ACTIVITIES 

The instructors in physical education supervise intra-mural 
programs in various athletic activities. All physically able 
students participate in these programs. 



Thirty-three 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



The University is represented in intercollegiate athletic 
competition in basketball, golf, tennis and baseball. A member 
of the National Collegiate Athletic Association, the University 
abides by the stipulated policies of this organization. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

The University fosters group life of students in societies, 
clubs, fraternities, sororities and organizations. All such organi- 
zations are conducted on the student government plan under 
the supervision of the Committee on Student Welfare. 

The Student Council, the chief student organization, co- 
operates with the Committee on Student Welfare in all matters 
pertaining to student government and activity. 

Societies, Associations, Clubs'. American Chemical Society, 
American Pharmaceutical Association, Bureau of Market Re- 
search, Debate Society, Journalism Society, Society for the 
Advancement of Management, Arnold Air Society, History 
Club, International Relations Club, Bridge Club, Monogram 
Club, Evening Duke and Duchesses, Intrafraternity Council, 
Pan-Hellenic Council, Women's Residence Council, National 
Federation of Catholic College Students, Men's Holy Name 
Society, Women's Sodality, Pershing Rifles, Scabbard and Blade, 
Social Science Council, Red Masquers, Women's Athletic 
Association. 

Fraternities and Sororities: Alpha Epsilon, Alpha Phi Alpha, 
Alpha Phi Delta, Alpha Phi Omicron, Alpha Tau Delta, Beta 
Alpha Phi, Delta Mu Delta, Delta Phi Sigma, Delta Sigma 
Theta, Epsilon Eta Phi, Gamma Sigma, Gamma Phi, Kappa 
Sigma Phi, Lambda Kappa Sigma, Phi Alpha, Rho Chi, Psi Chi, 
Sigma Alpha Kappa, Sigma Lambda Phi, Sigma Tau Delta, 
Sigma Phi Delta. 

School of Education Organizations 

The Future Teachers of America Association: a junior branch 
of the National Education Association and the Pennsylvania 
State Education Association. 

The Association for Childhood Education International: a 
chapter of the national group for the students in the Department 
of Elementary Education. 

The Secondary Education Association: a campus professional 
organization for students in the Department of Secondary 
Education. 



Thirty-four 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 



Pi Omega Pi: the Business Education honorary society in 
the School of Education. 

GUIDANCE BUREAU 

The Guidance Bureau is located in the Guidance Building on 
the University campus. This building houses the offices of the 
Director of Student Welfare, the Dean of Men, the Dean of 
Women, the Chaplain, the University Physician, the Dispensary, 
the Director of Testing, the Department of Psychology, and the 
Speech Clinic. 

The Guidance Bureau is responsible for the extended advise- 
ment services for students in the University. This student 
service includes personal, religious, moral, educational, voca- 
tional, social and medical services as well as special corrective 
and remedial services. Administrative personnel and faculty 
advisors refer students to the Bureau for supplementary advise- 
ment. 

THE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION PROGRAM 

ORIENTATION AND GUIDANCE 

The first year student shall participate in the activities of 
Freshman Days which include orientation conferences on the 
general regulations of the University, the placement tests and 
registration for the semester's study. At this registration the 
student shall report to the Director of the Freshman Program. 

In the first semester of college study, the student shall parti- 
cipate in special orientation conferences pertaining to college 
study with added stress on the serious preparation for the 
teaching profession. 

At the beginning of the second year, the student is assigned 
a Faculty Advisor by the Chairman of the Department (Ele- 
mentary or Secondary) to which the student has been admitted. 
This advisor is the student's guide during the remaining years 
of preparation. 

At least once each semester while in course, the student shall 
report to the Dean for a personal interview. Although im- 
mediate advisement is effected through the Faculty Advisor, the 
student may approach the Dean whenever necessary. 

The University Guidance Bureau makes available extended 
advisement to students in the School of Education. Included in 
this supplementary advisement service is the Testing Service to 



Thirty-five 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



which the students shall present themselves for tests required 
by the School and also for any tests which should be taken on 
the recommendation of Faculty Advisors. 

The Teacher Education Programs in the School demand 
requirements which are solely for the guidance of the Future 
Teacher in his preparation for the teaching profession. 

SELECTION 

The School of Education maintains in its enrollment only 
those students who evidence definite teacher possibilities. There- 
fore, students, mindful of their goal, shall exhibit a serious 
attitude, commendable scholarship and a wholesome relation- 
ship with others. Selection of worthy candidates is governed by 
the following: 

1. The fulfillment of all admission requirements. 

2. Seriousness of purpose in the pursuance of a program. 

3. Cooperation with advisement and guidance in every way. 

4. Satisfactory completion of all tests and examinations. 

5. Commendable work in English and Psychology. 

6. Study habits above the average. 

7. A wholesome personality in social and professional 
relations. 

8. Fulfillment of all University, School and State require- 
ments for graduation and certification. 

GENERAL AND PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION 

The University Core Program and the School of Education 
Core Courses introduce students to a cultural background. 

The University Core Program includes four credits in Religion 
for Catholic students, nine credits in Philosophy, twelve credits 
in English, four credits in American History and four credits in 
Physical Education. Physically able men pursue the R.O.T.C. 
program. 

The School of Education in most programs extends this 
Core Program to include Public Speaking, Psychology, Social 
Science, Mathematics and Science. 

The Professional Education program introduces students to 
the teaching profession through a thorough study of the principles 
of education, the learning process, teaching techniques and 
methods, laboratory experiences, community and classroom 
observation, student teaching and participation in professional 
groups. 



Thirty -six 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 



DEPARTMENTS — PROGRAMS 

The Department of Elementary Education in accord with 
the philosophy and objectives of the School offers students 
opportunity — 

1. To qualify for the Provisional College Certificate to teach 
in the Elementary public and non-public schools of 
Pennsylvania for a period of three years. Four-year 
programs lead to certification in Kindergarten-Primary 
Education, and General Elementary Education. Nursery 
School Education is studied partly on the undergraduate 
and partly on the graduate levels. 

2. To qualify for the Pennsylvania Permanent College 
Certificate. 

3. To qualify for temporary and permanent teaching certi- 
fication in other States with few exceptions. 

4. To qualify for admission to graduate programs in Educa- 
tion. (In some instances, also Psycho-Education and 
Psychology). 

The Department of Secondary Education in accord with the 
philosophy and objectives of the School offers students oppor- 
tunity — 

1. To qualify for the Provisional College Certificate to teach 
certain subjects in the Secondary public and non-public 
schools of Pennsylvania for a period of three years. 
Four-year programs lead to certification in at least two 
branches: English, Mathematics, Latin, French, Spanish, 
German, History, Social Studies, Biological Science, 
Physical Science, Business Education and Library Science 
Education. 

2. To qualify for the Pennsylvania Permanent College 
Certificate. 

3. To qualify for temporary and permanent teaching certifi- 
cation in other States with few exceptions. 

4. To qualify for admission to graduate programs in Arts 
and Sciences corresponding to certification branches and 
in Education. (In some instances, Psycho-Education and 
Psychology). 

The programs of study in the School require the completion 
of the General and Professional courses and the completion of 
study in a definite field of concentration in a Department. 



Thirty -seven 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



DEPARTMENT OF ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

(Consult "Courses of Instruction" for the nature and hours of the 
courses listed below by number). 

General Education 

101 Logic (3) 201,202 Nature of God (1,1) 

101, 102 English Composition (3,3) 202 Ethics (3) 

101, 102 History of Civilization (3,3) 201, 202 English Literature (3,3) 

101, 102 Intro, to Political Science (2,2) 205 Public Speaking (3) 

103, 104 History of American Democracy 211 Principles of Economics (3) 

(2,2) 220 General Psychology (3) 

107 Biological Science (3) 320 Child Psychology (3) 

108 Physical Science (3) 412 History of Pennsylvania (2) 

101, 102 Fundamental Theology (1,1) 464 Mental Hygiene (3) 

Professional Education 

120 Introduction to Teaching (3) 351 Statistics-Measurements (3) 

210 History of Education (3) 410 Audio-Visual Aids (2) 

310 Educational Psychology (3) 490 Student Teaching (6) 



FIELDS OF CONCENTRATION 

A. Kindergarten-Primary Education 

Elementary Education: 101, 102, 109, 121, 122, 141, 212, 306, 307, 315, 319, 325, 342, 345, 

408, 415, 473. 

B. Intermediate Education 

Elementary Education: 101, 102, 110, 121, 122, 141, 212, 307, 319, 321, 325, 342, 346, 401, 

408, 417, 455, 475, 479. 

C. General Elementary Education 

Elementary Education: 101, 102, 111, 121, 122, 141, 212, 307, 319, 321, 325, 347, 401,* 408, 
418, 455, 476, 480. 

D. Nursery School Education 

The required work for this program is studied partly on the undergraduate level and partly 
on the graduate level. 

A certificate of standard grade valid for teaching kindergarten-primary in the elementary 
curriculum or home economics may be extended to include teaching in the nursery school 
upon the completion of State Department requirements. 

Four semester hours (minimum) must be earned in Military Science and Tactics. 
Women may substitute Physical Education for Eurhythmies. 



Thirty-eight 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 



DEPARTMENT OF SECONDARY EDUCATION 

(Consult "Courses of Instruction" for the nature and hours of the 
courses listed below by numbers). 

101 Logic (3) 220 General Psychology (3) 

101, 102 English Composition (3,3) 201, 202 English Literature (3,3) 

103,104 Hist, of American Democracy (2,2) 202 Ethics (3) 

101,102 Modern Language (3,3)** 205 Public Speaking (3) 

107 Biological Science (3)* 330 Adolescent Psychology (3) 

108 Physical Science (3)* 412 History of Pennsylvania (2) 

101, 102 Fundamental Theology (1,1) 464 Mental Hygiene (3) 

201, 202 Nature of God (1,1) 

*Except majors or minors in Biological or Physical Science. 
**Except majors in Business Education. 

Professional Education—Secondary Education 

120 Introduction to Teaching (3) 340 Principles of Secondary 

210 History of Education (3) Education (3) 

310 Educational Psychology (3) 351 Statistics-Measurements (3) 

330 Secondary School Methods (3) 410 Audio-Visual Aids (2) 

490 Student Teaching (6) 

FIELDS OF CONCENTRATION 
A. Arts (Major— 24 credits, Minor— 18 credits) 

Classics (Latin): 201, 202, 401, 402, 403, 404, German: 201, 202, 301, 302, 401, 402, 501, 

411, 412. 502. 

English: 201, 202, 207, 208, 319, 320, 363, s °cjal Studies: 

364, 401, 402, 403, 406, 407. Hist. 201, 202, 205, 206, 305, 306. 

History: 201, 202, 205, 206, 305, 306, 401, E°U Sc <h }°l\ l 02 ' 20L 

402 ' 403 ' 404 ' Soc ioi 102 201. 

French: 201, 202, 301, 302, 401, 402, 501, Spanish: 201, 202, 301, 302, 401, 402, 501, 
502. 502. 

B. Sciences (Major— 32 credits, Minor— 18 or 20 credits) 

Mathematics: 103, 104, 106, 207, 208, 407, Physics: 201, 202, 301, 302, 303, 401, 402, 

408, 451, 452. 501, 502. 

Chemistry: 111, 112, 211, 212, 301, 302, Biology: 101, 102, 201, 202, 212, 351, 401, 

401, 402. 402. 

C. Business 

Shorthand: 101, 102, 201, 202. Office Practice: 308. 

Typewriting: 103, 104, 203, 204. Business Law: 401, 402. 

Business Mathematics: 206. Junior Business Training: 405. 

Commercial Geography: 301, 302. Salesmanship: 421. 

Accounting: 303, 304, 403, 404. Business English: 305. 

D. Library Science 
301, 302, 304, 305, 306, 307, 308, 401, 403, 405, 406, 407, 408, 409, 410. 

Four semester hours (minimum) must be earned in Physical Education or Military Science 
and Tactics. 



*mnn^ 



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DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



MUSIC EDUCATION 

The program of Music Education is offered by the School of 
Music. This program prepares teachers and supervisors of Public 
School Music. The Bachelor of Science in Public School Music is 
conferred at graduation. On application to the Teacher Educa- 
tion and Certification Bureau, Department of Public Instruction, 
Harrisburg, the Provisional College Certificate is issued to the 
applicant. The Curriculum in Music Education is published in 
the catalogue of the School of Music. 

OBSERVATION AND STUDENT TEACHING 

The future teacher is introduced to his chosen profession by 
completing laboratory experiences at the observation and partici- 
pation levels. Public and non-public schools must be visited 
and reports on these observations and experiences are controlled 
by the Supervisor of Student Teaching. This program is ex- 
tended to include social agencies, places of community interest 
and the workshops of labor and industry, in accordance with 
the needs and interests of the individual. 

Beginning with the first semester of the Sophomore year and 
continuing each succeeding semester until the last semester of 
the senior year, a laboratory experience schedule must be 
followed. 

In the last semester of the senior year, the required student 
teaching is completed under the direct supervision of a critic 
teacher. This is further complemented by regular visits of the 
Supervisor of Student Teaching and his staff, and by individual 
follow-up conferences. Further, a group conference of student 
teachers and the Supervisors is held at least once a week. 

GRADUATION AND DEGREE 

A student in the School of Education must complete a min- 
imum of 128 semester hours of work before he is eligible for 
graduation. All University and School of Education requirements 
must be completed before the degree can be conferred. 

At the completion of these requirements and upon formal 
application for the degree at the Office of the Registrar and on 
attendance at the Baccalaureate and Commencement Exercises, 
the degree of Bachelor of Education is conferred upon students 
who have pursued the approved programs of the School of Edu- 
cation. The degree Bachelor of Science in Public School Music is 
conferred upon the student who has completed the Music 
Education program. 



Forty 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 



CERTIFICATION 

PROVISIONAL COLLEGE CERTIFICATE 

Citizens of the United States who have completed any of the 
four-year curricula offered by the School of Education and 
who have complied with the other regulations for graduation 
will be granted the Bachelor Degree. 

At graduation the graduate shall obtain the Form for the 
Application for the Provisional College Certificate from the 
Office of the School of Education. This Form must be completed 
and returned to the Office of the School of Education for the 
Dean's signature. The completed Form with the transcript of 
college work shall be forwarded to the State Bureau of Teacher 
Education and Certification in Harrisburg. The Bureau will issue 
to the applicant the Provisional College Certificate which is a 
license to teach in Pennsylvania. This certificate is provisional 
since it is valid for only three years of teaching. 



PERMANENT COLLEGE CERTIFICATE 

The Certificate may be made permanent after three years of 
teaching in the appropriate fields in the public schools of this 
Commonwealth with a rating of "satisfactory" by the super- 
intendent under whose direction the teaching has been done. 
Within this period, the holder of the certificate must have com- 
pleted six semester hours of approved courses in the appropriate 
fields. These courses must be taken after graduation. A course 
in visual education and "a basic course in the history of the 
United States and Pennsylvania" must have been completed 
either as undergraduate or as graduate work. 



EXTENSION OF COLLEGE CERTIFICATE 

a. To Include the Secondary Field 

College certificates valid in the elementary or special fields 
may be validated for the secondary field by completing twelve 
semester hours of professional work in that field, six of which 
must be student teaching, and eighteen semester hours of appro- 
priate courses in the subject for which certification is desired. 

Forty-one 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



b. To Include the Elementary Field 

College certificates valid in the secondary or special fields 
may be validated for the elementary field by completing "thirty 
semester hours of approved courses in the field of elementary 
education including six semester hours of elementary student 
teaching." 



c. To Include the Special Fields 

The extension of a valid teacher's certificate to include the 
field of art, or music, or health, or business education, or indus- 
trial arts, or library science, will require the satisfactory com- 
pletion of not fewer than thirty semester hours of approved 
courses in the field for which certification is desired. 



TEACHER PLACEMENT 

The School of Education conducts a Teacher Placement 
Bureau. Though a division of the University Bureau of Recom- 
mendations, the Teacher Placement Bureau through the Director 
of Teacher Placement is responsible for all teacher placement. 

The Teacher Placement Bureau makes every effort it can to 
place the graduate in the school where he or she can best serve 
and be of the greatest use to the community in which he or she 
is going to teach and to his professional development. 

All graduates of the School of Education must register with 
the Bureau before graduation. They must comply with the 
following regulations: 

1. They shall complete the Bureau Application (Registration) 

Form. 

» 

2. They shall supply the Bureau with testimonials from the 
Supervisor of student teaching, the critic teacher, instructor 
in major field, and a home-community reference. 

3. They shall furnish the Bureau with five first-class, professional 
photos, size 2J^ x 23^2. 

4. Applicants must agree to accept telegrams and telephone calls 
which may be sent collect when recommendation is made by 
the Bureau. 

5. When placed, applicants shall notify the Bureau. 

Forty-two 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 



FOLLOW-UP OF GRADUATES 

The Placement Bureau makes several contacts a year with 
the Superintendent of Schools or the Principal of the School in 
which applicants may be teaching. In this way, confidential 
reports on the teaching of the applicants are obtained. Such 
records are kept on file by the Bureau. 



IN-SERVICE EDUCATION AND GUIDANCE 

Teachers in service who are in course for the Bachelor degree 
and who desire the College Provisional Certificate complete their 
course work in the undergraduate field. 

The in-service teachers who already possess the College 
Provisional Certificate may complete the necessary semester 
hours of work for the Permanent College Certificate, either by 
taking undergraduate courses which they might not have had, 
or by enrolling for graduate work for appropriate study in their 
field if they are qualified. 

In-service teachers who desire to extend their certificates to 
include an additional field or subject must abide by the State 
requirements for the extension of the certificate. 

All members of the Faculty are available for in-service 
guidance of teachers and administrators. Individual conferences 
for consultation may be arranged at the convenience of in-service 
teachers and administrators. 



GRADUATE EDUCATION 

The Department of Education in the Graduate School of 
the University offers several programs leading to the degrees of 
Master of Education and Master of Science in Education. The 
following are the fields in graduate work — Educational Psych- 
ology, Speech Correction, Elementary Education (Teachers), 
Elementary Education (Principal, Public School), Elementary 
Education (Principal, Non-Public School), Secondary Education 
(Teachers), Secondary Education (Principal, Public School), 
Secondary Education (Principal, Non-Public School), Secondary 
Education (Guidance Counselling), and Supervising Principal 
and Administrative Officers. Information about graduate study 
in Education can be had by addressing the Department of 
Education, the Graduate School, Duquesne University, Pitts- 
burgh 19, Pennsylvania. 



Forty-three 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

GENERAL EDUCATION 

107. Biological Science. Major concepts of Botany, Zoology and 
Physiology. Credit, Three hours. 

108. Physical Science. Major concepts of Physics and Chemistry. 
Credit, Three hours. 

120. Introduction to Teaching. An orientation course presenting the 
requirements, advantages, and opportunities, along with the responsibilities 
of those in the teaching profession. Required for all types of state certification. 
Credit, Three hours. H. KLEYLE, GOETZ. 

210. History of Education. A critical review of the history and philoso- 
phy of education from the pre-Christian era to the present day. Presented as 
a background course for all professional courses in education. Credit, Three 
hours. McGINN. 

410. Audio-Visual Aids. An evaluation of numerous forms of audio- 
visual aids. Each student is required to compile a source book of sensory 
aids for his teaching field. Credit, Two hours. FERENCE. 

420. Educational Sociology. An introductory course in the study of 
agencies, social institutions, and organizations, and their effect upon the 
functioning of the school. Credit, Two hours. GOETZ. 

EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY 

220. General Psychology. The essential laws and principles of human 
behavior. Methods of psychology; fundamental native reactions; emotional 
life; mental life, including imagination, thinking, reasoning, concepts and 
judgments; sensations; perceptions; adjustment; and personality. This course 
is the foundation for other courses in psychology. Credit, Three hours. HOLT. 

310. Educational Psychology. The genetic approach to mental devel- 
opment; ability, and its growth; intelligence, and its significance; the laws of 
learning; the principles for the effective use of the memory; motivation; 
transfer; personality development. Credit, Three hours. HOLT. 

320. Child Psychology. The child's mind, its nature and endowment; 
characteristics dominant at different ages; development of mental traits and 
abilities, of moral nature, and of various child activities. Prerequisite: Psych. 
220. Credit, Three hours. F. KLEYLE. 

330. Adolescent Psychology. Mental, moral, emotional, and social 
development of the adolescent; various problems of adolescent behavior; the 
adolescent's interests, environments, hygiene. Prerequisite: Psych. 220. Credit, 
Three hours. McGINN. 

351. Statistics-Measurements. Basic principles of educational and 
psychological statistics. Aims and objectives of measurement; the construc- 
tion and use of tests; evaluation of standardized tests in the elementary and 
secondary fields. Credit, Three hours. WELSH, STRATTON. 

464. Mental Hygiene. Mental disease; its psychological cause; proper 
measures for prevention. Mental health; elements of the wholesome person- 
ality; practical steps for development; hygienic adjustment to the conflicts 
of life. Credit, Three hours. HOLT. 



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ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

101, 102. Art Fundamentals. Methods of drawing from memory, 
developing the power of self expression and art objectives on the elementary 
level. Credit, Two hours each semester. FERENCE. 

109. Speech Training in the Primary Grades. Speech activities for 
primary grades. Common speech problems. Dramatization. Credit, Two hours. 
WINGERTER. 

110. Speech Training in the Intermediate Grades. Speech activities 
forthe intermediate grades. Common speech problems. Dramatic and audi- 
torium activities. Credit, Two hours. 

111. Speech Training in the Elementary Grades. Speech activities 
for the elementary grades. Phonetics, articulation, and common speech 
defects. Dramatic, choric speech, and auditorium activities. Credit, Two hours. 
WINGERTER. 

121, 122. Eurhythmies. The study of musical rhythm by means of 
physical movement. Credit, One hour each semester. DORSCH. 

141. Sight Singing. Instruction in simple theory, sight singing, and 
ear training to meet the needs of teachers of all grades. Credit, Two hours. 
HOUGGY. 

212. Health and Safety Education. This course deals primarily with 
methods and procedures of carrying out an adequate program of health and 
safety. Emphasis is placed on new trends, techniques, and ways of meeting 
actual classroom problems. Credit, Two hours. BARR. 

225, 226. Handicrafts in the Elementary School. Practical applica- 
tion of handicrafts for all elementary grades. Credit, Two hours each semester. 
FERENCE. 

306. Kindergarten-Primary Theory. Aims, techniques, organizations 
and fundamentals of the Kindergarten, and Primary grades. Credit, Two 
hours. F. KLEYLE. 

307. Children's Literature and Story Telling. A study of types of 
children's literature with purpose of selection and adaptation. Skill in the art 
of story telling is developed by actual practice. Credit, Three hours. 
WINGERTER. 

315. Teaching Language Arts in the Primary Grades. Principles, 
methods, and practices underlying the basic skills in language and reading in 
the Primary grades. Correct habits and treatment of remedial cases. Credit, 
Two hours. 

319. Nature Study. Study of living things. Practical application and 
approach to Nature Study in the classroom. Field trips. Credit, Two hours. 
F. KLEYLE. 

321. Elementary Science. The place of Science in Elementary Educa- 
tion. Trends and types of activities. Planning of instruction in Science. Credit, 
Two hours. F. KLEYLE. 



Forty-five 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



325. Rote Songs. Study of song materials suitable for use in all elemen- 
tary grades. Credit, Two hours. HOUGGY. 

342. Games and Play Activities. Material and methods. Games and 
play activities suitable for the classroom, recreation period, and auditorium. 
Credit, Two hours. WINGERTER. 

345. Art Methods for Primary Grades. Theory and practice in the 
presentation of art subjects on the primary level. Credit, Two hours. 
FERENCE. 

346. Art Methods for Intermediate Grades. Theory and practice in 
the presentation of art subjects on the intermediate level. Credit, Two hours. 
FERENCE. 

347. Art Methods for Elementary Grades. Theory and practice in the 
presentation of art subjects on the elementary level. Credit, Two hours. 
FERENCE. 

401. Speech Correction. Speech defects; function of the speech mechan- 
ism; diagnosis and treatment of the more common speech defects. Credit,Two 
hours. WINGERTER. 

408. Reading Diagnosis. Diagnosis of oral reading; diagnosis of silent 
reading; remedial reading materials and instruction based on diagnosis. Credit, 
Two hours. 

415. Teaching Arithmetic in the Primary Grades. Subject matter 
and its presentation; acquaintance with methods, materials, and principles 
of instruction; observation of actual pupil-teacher situations in the primary 
grades. Credit, Two hours. F. KLEYLE. 

417. Teaching Arithmetic in the Intermediate Grades. Methods, 
materials, and principles of instruction. Practical ways of meeting classroom 
problems through observation of actual pupil-teacher situations in the inter- 
mediate grades. Credit, Two hours. 

418. Teaching Arithmetic in the Elementary Grades. Methods, 
materials, and principles of instruction. Unit learning, problems in the class- 
room, in the school; observation of actual teaching situations on the elementary 
level. Credit, Two hours. BARR. 

455. Teaching Geography. Selection of units of experience, content, 
and criteria for judging the outcome of teaching practice. New materials of 
instruction, how to use these. Observation of actual pupil-teacher work. Credit, 
Two hours. BARR. 

463. Child Guidance. Understanding of the guidance functions in 
elementary education; physical, social, and emotional problems involved in a 
child's life. Credit, Two hours. F. KLEYLE. 

471, 472. Art Appreciation. Appreciation of art, schools of art, and 
modern ideas of art. Credit, Two hours each semester. FERENCE. 

473. Teaching Social Studies in the Primary Grades. Methods, 
materials, and principles of instruction. Practical ways of meeting classroom 
problems through observation in the primary grades. Credit, Two hours. 



Forty-six 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 



475. Teaching Social Studies in the Intermediate Grades. Principles 
and practices used in the development of pupil behavior, understanding, and 
appreciation. Unit learning; observation in the intermediate grades. Credit, 
Two hours. 

476. Teaching Social Studies in the Elementary Grades. Principles 
and practices. Development of Social Living Program providing such exper- 
ience for the pupil to improve his own background and to appreciate social 
practices. Unit learning; observation in the elementary grades. Credit, Two 
hours. BARR. 

479. Teaching Language Arts in the Intermediate Grades. Princi- 
ples, methods, and trends in the teaching of communication skills. Laws of 
child growth applied to reading, written expression, and handwriting. Credit, 
Two hours. 

480. Teaching Language Arts in the Elementary Grades. Principles, 
methods, and trends in the teaching of communication skills. Application of 
the laws of child growth to reading, written expression, and handwriting. 
Observation in the elementary grades. Credit, Two hours. BARR. 

485. Principles of Elementary Education. An intensive treatment of 
the underlying concepts and bases of elementary education. Credit, Two hours. 

487. Religion Methods. A basic methods course for teaching of religion 
in the elementary school; materials, techniques, supplementary aids, assign- 
ments and evaluation. Credit, Two hours. 

489. Elementary School Practices. Survey of accepted school prac- 
tices. Trends in modern elementary procedures and classroom techniques. 
Credit, Two hours. 

490. Elementary Student Teaching. Actual student teaching in an 
approved elementary school under the direct supervision of a critic teacher. 
Credit, Six hours. 

SECONDARY EDUCATION 

330. Secondary School Methods. A Junior-Senior secondary methods 
course treating of assignments, questioning, reviews, supervised study, unit 
and daily lesson plans and types of teaching from the Socratic to Socialized 
recitation. Special methods laboratory. Credit, Three hours. LEONARD, 
KLEYLE, GRIFFIN. 

340. Principles of Secondary Education. Aims, function and organi- 
zation of the secondary school, its articulation with other units. Basic prin- 
ciples of administration, guidance and curriculum. Credit, Three hours. 
LEONARD, KLEYLE, GRIFFIN. 

440. Secondary School Practices. Survey of accepted school practices. 
Trends in modern secondary procedures and classroom techniques. Credit, 
Two hours. GOETZ. 

487. Religion Methods. A basic methods course for teaching of religion 
in the secondary school; materials, techniques, supplementary aids, assign- 
ments and evaluation. Credit, Two hours. 

490. Secondary Student Teaching. Actual student teaching in an 
approved secondary school under the direct supervision of a critic teacher. 
Credit, Six hours. 



Forty-seven 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



BUSINESS EDUCATION 

101, 102. Beginning Shorthand Theory. A first course in the theory, 
principles, and methodology of Gregg Shorthand. Credit, Three hours each 
semester. HODEL. 

103, 104. Beginning Typewriting Theory. After mastery of machine 
operations, keyboard reaches and control, emphasis is given to accuracy and 
speed. Credit, Two hours each semester. HODEL. 

201, 202. Advanced Shorthand Theory. Speed is developed here, but 
emphasis is upon combination of dictation and transcription. Prerequisite: 
Bus. Ed. 101, 102. Credit, Three hours each semester. HODEL. 

203, 204. Advanced Typewriting Theory. Increased speed is stressed, 
but emphasis is upon styles of letter writing and other office forms. Prere- 
quisite: Bus. Ed. 103, 104. Credit, Two hours each semester. HODEL. 

206. Business Mathematics. A skill course in mathematical operations 
for office work with fundamental treatment of algebraic, trigonometric, and 
logarithmic functions. Credit, Three hours. SCHUUR. 

301, 302. Commercial Geography. A study of the world's major 
geographic regions and their contribution of raw materials for marketing 
and manufacture. Credit, Three hours each semester. TCHIRKOW. 

303, 304. Introductory Accounting. Fundamental problems and 
principles of accounting. Credit, Three hours each semester. SCHUUR. 

305. Business English. An intensive course in the application of the 
best English usage to business practice. Prerequisite: Eng. 101, 102. Credit, 
Two hours. 

307. Dictation and Transcription. An intensive course in timed 
dictation and machine transcription, with speed building based upon its 
major factors. Prerequisites: Bus. Ed. 201, 202; 203, 204. Credit, Three hours 
HODEL. 

308. Office Practice. A finishing course in shorthand and typing with 
detailed instructions in filing, indexing, telephone communications, and other 
office duties. Prerequisites: Bus. Ed. 201, 202; 203, 204. Credit, Three hours. 
HODEL. 

401, 402. Business Law. A fundamental course in business law based 
upon decided cases covering contracts, agency, negotiable instruments, 
partnerships, corporations, etc. Credit, Three hours each semester. 
EULENSTEIN. 

403, 404. Principles of Accounting. A thorough study of the corpor- 
ation and its problems, including inventories, voucher systems, the balance 
sheet, capital, liabilities, dividends, etc. Prerequisite: Bus. Ed. 303, 304. Credit, 
Three hours each semester. CADUGAN. 

405. Junior Business Training. Principles and practice of business 
management with emphasis on consumer problems. Credit, Three hours. 

421. Salesmanship. Fundamentals of selling, psychology of sales appeal, 
the salesman's personality, creation of consumer demand, market analysis, 
and business ethics. Credit, Three hours. SCHUUR. 



Forty-eight 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 



LIBRARY SCIENCE EDUCATION 

301. Organization and Administration — School Libraries I. A 

study of the general principles of library services, followed by their application 
to the Library in the School. Credit, Two hours. DAVIES. 

303. Classification and Cataloguing I. An introduction to the prin- 
ciples of cataloguing and classification, the dictionary catalogue, and the use 
of the unit card system. Credit, Two hours. McCANN. 

304. Classification and Cataloguing II. Continuation of 303. Brief 
study of the Classified Catalogue. Ordering and use of Library of Congress 
cards. Credit, Two hours. McCANN. 

305. Reference and Bibliography I. Principles of evaluation, selection 
and use of reference books. Study of the various types of reference books: 
encyclopedias, dictionaries, year books and annuals, periodical indexes, 
reference tools for special subjects. Credit, Two hours. Sr. M. HIERONYME. 

306. Reference and Bibliography II. Continuation of 305. Reference 
work in specialized fields. Government documents. Credit, Two hours. 
Sr. M. HIERONYME. 

307. Reading Guidance and Book Selection I. General principles 
and aids for the selection of books. Sources and uses of book reviews. Practice 
in writing critical annotations, presenting book reviews, and compiling book 
lists. Credit, Two hours. DAVIES. 

308. Reading Guidance and Book Selection II. The selection of 
books and periodicals for the school library. Credit, Two hours. DAVIES. 

401. Organization and Administration — School Libraries II. The 

function of the library in the modern school. Cooperation with public libraries. 
Special administrative problems. Credit, Two hours. McCANN. 

403. Classification and Cataloguing III. Actual cataloguing; Library 
of Congress system; teaching use of catalogue; documents. Credit, Two hours. 

405. Reference and Bibliography III. The organization and admini- 
stration of reference service in the school library. Credit, Two hours. Sr. M. 
HIERONYME 

406. Reference and Bibliography IV. Bibliographic form and methods. 
Compilation of bibliographies. Credit, Two hours. Sr. M. HIERONYME. 

407. Reading Guidance and Book Selection III. Special types of 
books for young people. Credit, Two hours. DAVIES. 

408. Reading Guidance and Book Selection IV. Methods of fostering 
interest in books and good reading habits Credit, Two hours. DAVIES. 

409. Teaching the Use of Books and Libraries. Methods of guiding 
students to an understanding and appreciation of the library and its resources. 
Credit, Two hours. 

410. Observation of School Libraries. Correlation between classroom 
instruction and practical applications is secured by experience in the University 
Library under faculty supervision. Visits to local libraries. Credit, Two hours. 



Forty-nine 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



CLASSICS 

REQUIREMENTS 

Major: Two units of high-school Latin or courses 101, 102 Elementary Latin 
are prerequisite to majoring in this Department. No credit toward 
the major is given for 101, 102. Twenty-four hours constitute the 
major. Six credits in Greek may be substituted for six of the twenty- 
four in Latin. 

Minor: Eighteen semester hours of Latin constitute a minor. 

COURSES 

LATIN 

101, 102. Elementary Latin. Essentials of grammar, declensions, con- 
jugations, syntax of cases and moods. Exercising in reading and composition. 
This course does not carry credit towards a major in Latin. Credit, Three 
hours each semester. 

201. Introduction to Latin Prose. Selections from Caesar and Cicero, 
including the latter's Pro Archia. Latin composition, further syntax of moods, 
complex and compound sentences. Credit, Three hours. 

202. Latin Poetry. Selections from the poetry of Vergil, Horace, 
Catullus, Tibullus, Propertius and Ovid. Historical and biographical back- 
ground. Development of verse forms. Credit, Three hours. 

401. Tacitus. Study of the Germania and Agricola. Tacitus as a stylist 
and historian. Collateral reading, reports, term paper. Credit, Three hours. 

402. Horace. Selected Odes and Epodes. The development of lyric 
poetry, literary analysis, the influence of the Odes. Collateral reading, reports, 
term paper. Credit, Three hours. 

403. Cicero. Pro Milone. This work is read in its entirety with careful 
attention to the application of the classic principles of rhetoric. Collateral 
reading, reports, term paper. Credit, Three hours. 

404. Cicero. De Senectute, De Amicitia. Study of essay forms as 
differing from historical studies and oratory. Philosophical background of 
the times and the author. Collateral reading, reports, term paper. Credit, 
Three hours. 

411. Livy. A study of the syntax and style of Livy and of his role as 
historian and eulogist of Rome. Collateral reading, reports, term paper. 
Credit, Three hours. 

412. Vergil. Selections from the Aeneid, Eclogues and Georgics. Epic 
and pastoral poetry. Roman poets and their patrons. Collateral reading, 
reports, term paper. Credit, Three hours. 

413. Roman Drama. Selections from Plautus and Terence. The place 
of the drama in Roman life; its sources and development. Collateral reading, 
reports, term paper. Credit, Three hours. 

414. Pliny. Selected Letters. Comparison with letters of Cicero and 
Seneca. Contemporary Roman life. Collateral reading, reports, term paper. 
Credit, Three hours. 



Fifty 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 



ENGLISH 

REQUIREMENTS 

Major: Twenty-four semester hours are required for a major in English. 
In addition to 201, 202, courses 207, 208 are required. The remaining 
work must be taken from the following courses: 319, 320, 363, 364, 
401, 402, 403, 406, 407. 

Minor: Eighteen semester hours are required for a minor in English. Courses 
207, 208 are required. 

101, 102. English Composition. Major emphasis placed on actual 
practice in writing. A rapid review of English grammar and rhetoric will be 
provided. Credit, Six hours. 

201, 202. English Literature. A course designed to provide the student 
with a general knowledge of English literature, to familiarize him with the 
writers of prose and poetry, and to place their works against the historical, 
social, and philosophical background of their rimes. The continuity of the 
periods is established by a study of Romanticism and Classicism, and of 
Christian and non-Christian modes of thought. Credit, Six hours. 

207, 208. Advanced English Composition. Practice in the four forms 
of discourse with special attention to the individual talents of the student. 
Credit, Two hours each semester. 

319. Major English Poets. A critical reading and description of the 
major English Poets. A study in the appreciation of poetry. Credit, Two hours. 

320. The Development of the Essay. The course presents the develop- 
ment of the Essay as a form of literature. Separate essayists, and successive 
periods in English and American literature will be considered both for historical 
importance and for intrinsic literary value. Credit, Two hours. 

363. The Drama in England. A survey of the drama in England from 
the liturgical play to the modern theatre. While this course is primarily a 
survey, attention is given to the elements of dramatic art. Credit, Two hours. 

364. American Drama. A study of the Theatre in America from the 
Colonial Drama to the Modern Stage. Credit, Two hours. 

401. The English Novel. A study of the historical development of the 
novel and the influences which affected the novel form, together with the 
reading and analysis of characteristic works. Credit, Two hours. 

402. American Fiction. The borrowed and native background for 
American Fiction; Mysticism and the Personal narrative of religious America; 
the Puritan influences; Hawthorne and Melville; Social influence on American 
Fiction; Romanticism and the westward movement; Realism. Credit, Two 
hours. 

403. American Poets. A critical reading in the major American Poets, 
and a study of the national influences on the poems of these authors. Credit, 
Two hours. 

406. Chaucer. Several of the tales in the Canterbury Tales will be read 
with special attention to the language. Credit, Two hours. 

407. Readings in Shakespeare. A course designed to familiarize the 
student with the dramas of Shakespeare. Credit, Two hours. 



Fifty-ont 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



PUBLIC SPEAKING 

205. Voice and its Use. Presents the theory of voice production from 
the scientific standpoint. The student is drilled in all that will make for 
satisfactory volume, resonance and pitch. Credit, Three hours. 

206. Principles of Public Speaking. Continues the application of vocal 
theory and more directly integrates it with public speaking. Enunciation, 
pacing and fundamentals of speech construction are stressed. Credit, Three 
hours. 

MODERN LANGUAGES 

REQUIREMENTS 

Major: Twenty-four semester hours in any one language are required for a 
major. Courses to be taken are: 

French 201, 202, 301, 302, 401, 402, 501, 502. 
German 201, 202, 301, 302, 401, 402, 501, 502. 
Spanish 201, 202, 301, 302, 401, 402, 501, 502. 

Minor: Eighteen semester hours in any one language are required for a 
minor. Courses to be taken are: 

French 201, 202, 301, 302, 401, 402. 
German 201, 202, 301, 302, 401, 402. 
Spanish 201, 202, 301, 302, 401, 402. 

COURSES 

FRENCH 

101, 102. Elementary French. Pronunciation, reading, dictation, 
grammar, exercises and translation. This course does not carry credit toward 
a major or minor. Credit, Three hours each semester. 

201, 202. Intermediate French. An intensified continuation of the 
work of French 101, 102. Translation, written and oral, easy composition, 
practice in understanding the spoken language. Prerequisite: French 102 or 
equivalent. Credit, Three hours each semester. 

301, 302. Advanced French Conversation. Systematic and intensive 

drill in French oral practice. Written and oral composition. Readings and 
subjects for discussion are assigned. Prerequisite: French 202 or equivalent. 
Credit, Three hours each semester. 

401, 402. Survey of French Literature. General survey of French 
literature from its beginnings to the present. Given in French. Prerequisite: 
French 302 or equivalent. Credit, Three hours each semester. 

501, 502. General Survey of French Culture and History. Study of 
the principal events of French history from the Celts to the present. France's 
contributions to the arts and sciences. This course is intended to serve as a 
background for later courses in French Literature. Given in French. Pre- 
requisite: French 302 or equivalent. Credit, Three hours each semester. 

504. Phonetics. A study of the sounds of French, individually and in 
combination. Both audio and visual aids are used to perfect speech habits. 
Credit, Two hours. 



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505, 506. Advanced French Composition. Free composition, assigned 
topics, reports on outside readings. This course is designed to develop fluency 
and accuracy in writing French. Given in French. Prerequisite: French 302 
or equivalent. Credit, Two hours each semester. 

GERMAN 

101, 102. Elementary German. Pronunciation, reading, dictation, 
grammar, exercises and translation. Credit, Three hours each semester. 

201, 202. Intermediate German. An intensified continuation of the 
work of German 101, 102. Translation, written and oral, easy composition, 
practice in understanding the spoken language. Prerequisite: German 102 or 
equivalent. Credit, Three hours each semester. 

301, 302. Advanced German Conversation. Systematic and intensive 
drill in German oral practice. Written and oral composition. Readings and 
subjects for discussion are assigned. Prerequisite: German 202 or equivalent. 
Credit, Three hours each semester. 

401, 402. Survey of German Literature. General survey of German 
literature from its beginnings to the present. Given in German. Prerequisite: 
German 302 or equivalent. Credit, Three hours each semester. 

501, 502. General Survey of German Culture and History. Two 

facts are emphasized: 1) Germany's failure to outgrow Feudalism, with the 
resulting petrification in the German Particularism of the sixteenth to the 
nineteenth century; 2) Germany's very great contributions to the science 
and research of the nineteenth century. Given in German. Prerequisite: 
German 302 or equivalent. Credit, Three hours each semester. 

504. Phonetics. A study of the sounds of German, individually and in 
combination. Both audio and visual aids are used to perfect speech habits. 
Prerequisite: German 302 or equivalent. Credit, Two hours. 

505, 506. Advanced German Composition. Practice in writing and 
speaking the living language. Topics from both current and literary sources 
to gain fluency in colloquial as well as literary German. Given in German. 
Prerequisite: German 302 or equivalent. Credit, Two hours each semester. 



SPANISH 

101, 102. Elementary Spanish. Pronunciation, reading, dictation, 
grammar, exercises and translation. Credit, Three hours each semester. 

201, 202. Intermediate Spanish. An intensified continuation of the 
work of Spanish 101, 102. Translation, written and oral, easy composition, 
practice in understanding the spoken language. Prerequisite: Spanish 102 or 
equivalent. Credit, Three hours each semester. 

301, 302. Advanced Spanish Conversation. Systematic and intensive 
drill in Spanish oral practice. Written and oral composition. Readings and 
subjects for discussion are assigned. Prerequisite: Spanish 202 or equivalent. 
Credit, Three hours each semester. 

401, 402. Survey of Spanish Literature. General survey of Spanish 
literature from its beginnings to the present. Given in Spanish. Prerequisite: 
Spanish 302 or equivalent. Credit, Three hours each semester. 



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501,502. General Survey of Spanish Culture and History. A chrono- 
logical study from the earliest recorded events to the present. Development 
of the Spanish language and literature and the latter's contribution to world 
thought. Reports, oral and written, and discussion. Given in Spanish. Pre- 
requisite: Spanish 302 or equivalent. Credit, Three hours each semester. 

504. Phonetics. Study of the sounds of Spanish, individually and in 
combination. Both audio and visual aids are used to perfect speech habits. 
Prerequisite: Spanish 302 or equivalent. Credit, Two hours. 

505, 506. Advanced Spanish Composition. Practice in writing and 
speaking the living language. Topics from both current and literary sources 
to gain fluency in colloquial as well as literary Spanish. Given in Spanish. 
Prerequisite: Spanish 302 or equivalent. Credit, Two hours each semester. 

PHILOSOPHY 

101. Logic. Required of all first year students throughout the university. 
A fundamental course in dialectics, excluding epistemology. Credit, Three 
hours. 

102. Epistemology. The nature of truth; examination of the motives 
of certitude; the validity of sense perceptions. Credit, Three hours. 

201. Ontology. The study of being and its categories. Causality. First 
principles of metaphysics. Credit, Three hours. 

202. Ethics. Required of all second year students throughout the 
university. The course proposes a consideration of the nature and principles 
of morality as determined by the norm of right reason. Credit, Three hours. 

303, 304. Survey of Philosophy. A general history of philosophy that 
aims to point out and evaluate the major figures and trends in the field from 
the Eleatics to St. Augustine, and from St. Augustine to the present time. 
Prerequisite: Phil. 201, Ontology. Credit, Three hours each semester. 

401. Cosmology. The origin, nature, and laws of the material universe. 
A general application of metaphysics to the material world. Prerequisite: 
Phil. 201, Ontology. Credit, Three hours. 

402. Rational Psychology. Discusses the origin of life, the nature and 
destiny of the human soul, its powers and activities. Prerequisite: Phil. 201, 
Ontology. Credit, Three hours. 

403. Theodicy. Analyzes and evaluates the rational proofs for the 
existence of God. Discusses the divine attributes. Credit, Two hours. . 

RELIGION 

101, 102. Fundamental Theology. This course investigates the nature 
of Religion and demonstrates the objective existence of such a branch of 
knowledge. It includes a demonstration of the fact that Christ is God and 
that the true version of religion is still being unanimously taught by His 
Church exactly as Christ Himself taught it. Credit, One hour each semester. 

201, 202. Nature of God. This is a course in Rational Theology designed 
especially to arm the layman against the atheism and agnosticism of our times. 
Emphasis is placed on the student's coming to see for himself that what the 
Church teaches about the nature of God is not merely a matter of belief but 
sheerly a matter of fact. Credit, One hour each semester. 



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301, 302. Nature of Man. This is a course in Rational Theology 
designed especially to arm the layman against the errors of our time concern- 
ing the nature, dignity and origin of man. It analyzes the teaching of the 
Church on the human soul, original and personal sin, and the fate of man 
after death. Credit, One hour each semester. 

401. The Eucharist. This course proceeds from a general discussion of 
the teaching of the Church on Grace and the Sacraments to a detailed study 
of the Sacrament of the Eucharist in particular, the nature of Transubstan- 
tiation and the Sacrifice of the Mass. Credit, One hour. 

402. Marriage. This course continues the study of the Sacraments, 
devoting the major portion of the semester to the teaching of the Church on 
the nature and purposes of marriage. Credit, One hour. 

403. New Testament. Introduction to Sacred Scripture with stress on 
the Gospels. Credit, Two hours. 

404. The Church. Institution, constitution, properties of the Church. 
Background of history, tradition, and the Bible. Credit, Two hours. 



PSYCHOLOGY 

(Additional courses are listed under Educational Psychology) 

340. Social Psychology. Foundations of social behavior; mechanisms 
of social adjustment; application of psychological principles to practical social 
problems. Credit, Three hours. 

350. Abnormal Psychology. Exaggerated and faulty psychological 
processes; impaired cognitional processes; pathological reactions with special 
reference to emotion and volition. Credit, Three hours. 

HISTORY AND SOCIAL STUDIES 

HISTORY 

REQUIREMENTS 

Major: Twenty-four semester hours are required for a major in History. 
*101, 102, 103, 104 will not be counted toward the major. 

Minor: Eighteen semester hours are required for a minor in History. *101, 
102, 103, 104 will not be counted toward the minor. 

*103, 104 must be taken by all students but will not be counted toward 
a major or a minor in history. 101, 102 is a survey course intended 
for those who do not intend to take any advanced work in history. 

101, 102. History of Civilization. A general survey of World History 
emphazing the development of the main elements in the make-up of Western 
Civilization. Credit, Six hours. 

103, 104. History of American Democracy. A political history of the 
United States describing the steps in the formation of our democracy during 
the Colonial Period through the formation of the Constitution and its practical 
development to the New Deal. Credit, Four hours. 



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105. Greek History. The Classical Heritage of Greece portraying its 
intellectual and political contributions as the link between the ancient world 
of the East and the new world of the West. Credit, Two hours. 

106. Roman History. A survey of political and social history of Rome. 
The Monarchy, the Republic and the Early Empires. Credit, Two hours. 

201, 202. Medieval History. A survey of the 1000 years, 500-1500. 
Emergence of Feudalism — its operation; Empire and the Papacy, and factors 
preceding Modern Times. Credit, Six hours. 

205, 206. European History 1500-1815. Reformation to the Congress of 
Vienna. Foundation of National Monarchies. Rise of Absolutism and its 
decline. Credit, Six hours. 

301. Russian History. Origin of Kiev State to present time with 
emphasis on 19th and 20th century. Credit, Three hours. 

303. Near Eastern History. Eastern Roman Empire; Mohammedan- 
ism; Turkish Empire. Credit, Two hours. 

304. Far Eastern History. Background of Chinese and Japanese differ- 
ences with the Western World. Credit, Two hours. 

305. 306. European History, 1815 to present. Growth of Capitalism 
and international rivalries with political and social repercussions. Credit, 
Six hours. 

401, 402. Social and Economic History of the United States. 

Exclusive investigation of the social and economic factors in the development 
of our country from Colonial Times to the Present. Credit, Six hours. 

403, 404. Latin American History. Colonial development of South 
America. Successful revolt and subsequent development of each republic. 
Credit, Four hours. 

412. History of Pennsylvania. A comprehensive course in Pennsylvania 
history, with special attention to the economic resources of the commonwealth. 
Credit, Two hours. 

SOCIAL STUDIES 

A combination of courses in Political Science, Economics, Sociology and 
History comprise the field of Social Studies as defined by the Pennsylvania 
Department of Public Instruction, Bureau of Teacher Education and Certi- 
fication. 

REQUIREMENTS 

Major: with emphasis in Political Science; 

Eighteen semester hours in Political Science, 
Six semester hours in Economics, 
Six semester hours in Sociology, 
Twelve semester hours in History. 

Major: with emphasis in Economics; 

Eighteen semester hours in Economics, 
Six semester hours in Political Science, 
Six semester hours in Sociology, O 
Twelve semester hours in History. 



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Major: with emphasis in Sociology; 

Eighteen semester hours in Sociology, 
Six semester hours in Political Science, 
Six semester hours in Economics, 
Twelve semester hours in History. 

Minor: Nine semester hours in History, 

Three semester hours in Economics, 
Three semester hours in Political Science, 
Three semester hours in Sociology. 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 

101, 102. Introduction to Political Science. An investigation of the 
nature, scope and methods of political science; its relationship to and depend- 
ence on other social sciences; divisions of the field; basic concepts such as 
state, government, law, sovereignty, constitution, representation, electorate 
and political parties. Credit, Two hours each semester. 

201, 202. American Federal Government. Colonial and Revolutionary 
sources; Federal Constitution, origin of parties, party organization, election, 
actual working of the Federal and State governments, with special consider- 
ation of the Inter-State Commerce Commission, Federal Reserve Board. 
Lectures, Library reading, and recitations. Credit, Three hours each semester. 

301. State and Local Government. Embraces a study of the position 
of the State in the Federal Union; popular control in state and local govern- 
ment; state and local politics; the state legislature, the state judiciary, the 
governor, and local rural government. Credit, Two hours. 

302. Municipal Government. The different methods of city govern- 
ment, including the commission and city manager systems and problems 
incident to city administration in America and Europe. Lectures, recitations, 
and collateral reading. Credit, Two hours. 

401. Comparative Government. A study of the various governments 
of the nations of the world, showing their similarities and differences. Lectures, 
recitations, and collateral reading. Prerequisite: Pol. Sci. 201, 202. Credit, 
Three hours. 

402. Political Parties and Public Opinion. An analytical study of the 
nature and functions of various political parties. Party membership, organi- 
zation, and activities discussed with particular regard to creative factors. The 
factors determining the attitude, the formation and expression of public 
opinion, the influencing of public opinion by propaganda as used by pressure 
groups. Credit, Three hours. 

403. 404. Public Administration and Management. Deals with 
principles of administration; the organization of administrative agencies; the 
relations of staff, auxiliary, and line functions; the financing of administrative 
agencies; the place of personnel management; the interrelations of national, 
state and local agencies — conflict and cooperation; the problems of investiga- 
tion, inspection, and audit; the establishment of administrative standards 
and the control of administrative agencies in the public interest. Credit, Three 
hours each semester. 



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ECONOMICS 

211, 212. Principles of Economics. A study of the fundamental con- 
cepts, institutions, and principles of economics as they appear in the pro- 
duction, consumption, and distribution of wealth. Credit, Three hours each 
semester. 

221, 222. Economic Measurements. The statistics of production and 
of its effects on both unit and aggregate levels of economic activity. Credit, 
Three hours each semester. 

311. Principles of Money and Banking. A study of the development 
and theory of money, credit and banking. This course deals with monetary 
standards, a history of currency, principles of note issue, and introductory 
study of the money markets, gold movements, foreign exchange, the structure 
and operation of commercial banks and contemporary business credit practices. 
It also treats of central banking, the Federal Reserve System, transfer and 
collection of credit items, federal fiscal policies, banking supervision and 
regulation, and the control of credit. Credit, Three hours. 

312. Public Finance. The management of government revenues and 
expenditures; emphasis is on American practices and policies. Credit, Three 
hours. 

417. International Economics. A study of the policies and practices 
of the various government in their international dealings; the effect of these 
on individual national economies. Credit, Three hours. 

418. Applied Economics. A more detailed study of the economic 
problems met in Economics 211, 212, together with an evaluation of possible 
solutions. Credit, Three hours. 



SOCIOLOGY 

101, 102. Principles of Sociology. An introduction to the basic socio- 
logical concepts with concentration on the principles underlying the pheno- 
mena in the fields of Family, Housing, Population, Education, Health, Race 
Relations and Crime. Credit, Two hours each semester. 

201. Social Problems. An investigation of the difficulties which underlie 
the ills of modern society. Credit, Two hours. 

202. Social Pathology. Studies the various approaches toward a 
solution of the problems encountered in Sociology 201. Credit, Two hours. 

203. Introduction to Anthropology. Elementary examinations of the 
findings of scientists in the fields of Anthropology and Archaeology with 
accent on their applicability to sociological research into primitive races and 
social groups; culture diffusion, domestication of animals, cultural acquisitions 
and progress. Credit, Two hours. 

204. Rural, Urban Sociology. A study of scientific analysis of the 
farming and non-farming rural areas, the neighborhood, the community, the 
suburb, the city and the metropolitan area. The meaning and value and 
limitations of the ecological approach to the understanding of sociological 
generalizations. Credit, Two hours. 



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SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 



205, 206. The Christian Concept of Society. A philosophical and 
scientific approach to the concept and background of the organic nature of 
society, state and government in a Christian framework. Credit, Two hours 
each semester. 

305. Society and Government. A detailed explanation of the meaning, 
genesis and development of influential concepts in Sociology and Political 
Science. Derivation and historical synthesis of familiar expressions, authority, 
liberty, law, common welfare, political liberty, coercion, majority, democracy, 
and equality, with emphasis on the contributions of Aristotle, Augustine, 
Mannegold, Gregory, Saint Thomas, Luther, Calvin. Implications evidenced 
in Communism, Fascism, Nazism, and Democracy. Credit, Three hours. 

306. The Family. The history of marriage and the family; various 
concrete forms of marriage and family; functions and organization of the 
family; disorganization and reconstruction; marital adjustment and counsel- 
ing. Credit, Three hours. 

310, 311. Christian Social Thought. An evaluation of current prob- 
lems in economic-social life in the light of the Catholic pattern for the proper 
direction of industrial relations. Emphasis on education and the Christian 
family as necessary conditions for a just society, according to the plans of 
Leo XIII and Pius XI. Credit, Two hours each semester. 

340. Social Psychology. Foundations of social behavior; mechanisms 
of social adjustment; application of psychological principles of practical 
social problems. Credit, Three hours. 

351. Social Statistics. An exposition of the basic tools used in sociological 
research; aimed at giving an understanding and appreciation of the facts 
behind sociological data. Credit, Two hours. 

351. The Christian State. A study of the Christian type state advocated 
by Christian Social Philosophy, with particular emphasis laid upon operational 
patterns. Contrasts between the Christian state and contractual forms of 
state are established. Prerequisite: 205-206. Credit, Two hours. 

352. General Welfare Patterns. A presentation of desirable operational 
patterns for the promotion of the general welfare, with particular attention 
paid to the means of activating the proposals set forth in Rerum Novarum 
and Quadragesimo Anno, Prerequisite: 351. Credit, Two hours. 

401. Population Problems. Population theories, expansive, restrictive; 
contribution of Malthus; adjustment of people to social institutions. Pre- 
requisite: 101, 102. Credit, Three hours. 

402. Criminology. Crime as a social phenomenon; criminals and 
environment; responsibility; retribution; protections. Credit, Three hours. 

407, 408. History of Social Thought. Contributions of ancient and 
medieval cultures to the field of social, economic, political and religious 
thinking; their influences on later thought. Modern Social and political con- 
cepts; the development and consequent contributions of scientific sociology. 
Credit, Two hours each semester. 

411, 412. Christian Democracy. A new social-economic movement 
inspired by traditional Christian principles. New fields for a thoughtful attack 
on low economic standards of living; a positive approach to social welfare as 
an antidote to Totalitarianism, Communism and Socialist Collectivism. 
Credit, Two hours each semester. 



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413, 414. Evolution of Society. An evaluation of social progress, begin- 
ning with the social culture of Babylon and other ancient civilizations, through 
Biblical times, and continuing to the present day. Detailed attention is paid 
to the culture of the Middle Ages and to the social lags later produced by 
industrialism. Emphasis is laid upon the many contributions to proper social 
progress made by Catholic social thought. Credit, Two hours each semester. 

SCIENCES 

The Pennsylvania Department of Public Instruction, Bureau of Teacher 
Education and Certification, issues teaching certificates in Biological Sciences, 
Physical Sciences, Science, and General Science. 

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 

REQUIREMENTS 

Major: Thirty-two semester hours are required. 
Minor: Eighteen or twenty semester hours are required. 

101. General Botany. The characteristics common to plants with 
respect to morphology, physiology, reproduction and development. Lecture, 
Four hours. Laboratory, Four hours. Credit, Four hours. 

102. General Zoology. The characteristics common to animals with 
respect to morphology, physiology, reproduction and development. Labora- 
tory study of a series of representative animals. Lecture, Four hours. Lab- 
oratory, Four hours. Credit, Four hours. 

201. Comparative Anatomy. A comparative study of the anatomy, 
development and classification of the vertebrates. Two four-hour periods of 
lecture and laboratory. Credit, Four hours. 

202. Vertebrate Zoology. This course deals with the anatomy and 
phylogeny of the principal vertebrate groups, with emphasis on the cat. 
Two four-hour periods of lecture and laboratory. Credit, Four hours. 

211. Plant Physiology. A course in the dynamic activity of plants 
through a study of individual processes. Two four-hour periods of lecture 
and laboratory. Credit, Four hours. 

212. Local Flora. Two four-hour periods of lecture and laboratory. 

Field trips. Credit, Four hours. 

301. Invertebrate Zoology. A survey of the principal lower animals. 
Two four-hour periods of lecture and laboratory. Credit, Four hours. 

307. Genetics. A study of the principles and laws of heredity as applied 
to both plants and animals. Lecture, Three hours. Credit, Three hours. 

308. Elementary Physiology. This course is primarily intended for 
non-Biology students. It cannot be applied toward a major or minor in the 
Department of Biological Sciences. Lecture, Three hours. Laboratory, Four 
hours. Credit, Four hours. 

310. Animal Histology. A study of the microscopic structure of animals, 
together with practice in methods of preserving materials and making slides. 
Two four-hour periods of lecture and laboratory. Credit, Four hours. 



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SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 



351. General Bacteriology. The fundamental principles of bacteriology 
including an introduction to yeasts and molds. Two three-hour periods of 
lecture and laboratory. Credit, Four hours. 

401. Embryology. A comparative study of animal development with 
emphasis on the experimental approach. Two four-hour periods of lecture 
and laboratory. Credit, Four hours. 

402. Animal Physiology. A comparative study of physiological prob- 
lems as applied to all types of animals. Two four-hour periods of lecture and 
laboratory. Credit, Four hours. 



CHEMISTRY 

REQUIREMENTS 

Major: Thirty-two semester hours are required for a major in chemistry. 
All students must take 111, 112, 211, 212, 301, 302, 411, 412, 413, 
414. All chemistry majors must complete Math. 207, Physics 202, 
Biology 101 or 102. 

Minor: At least twenty semester hours in the following courses are required 
for a minor in chemistry: 111, 112, 211, 212, 301, 302. 

Ill, 112. General Chemistry. The fundamental theories and facts of 
chemistry are presented from the standpoint of the structure of matter and 
the way in which structure determines behavior. Lecture, Four hours. Labora- 
tory, Four hours. Credit, Four hours each semester. 

211. Quantitative Analysis. Rigorous training in stoichiometric rela- 
tionship and in the application of equilibrium principles, with laboratory 
experience in the principal methods of gravimetric and volumetric analysis. 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 111, 112. Lecture, Three hours. Laboratory, Eight 
hours. Credit, Four hours. 

212. Qualitative Analysis. Theoretical and practical study of the 
methods of separating and identifying the more common anions and cations. 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 211. Lecture, Three hours. Laboratory, Eight hours. 
Credit, Four hours. 

301, 302. Organic Chemistry. The theoretical background is developed 
from the standpoint of the electronic structure of molecules and the accom- 
panying energy considerations. The preparation, properties, and uses of 
representative organic compounds are then discussed in considerable detail. 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 211, 212. Lecture, Four hours. Laboratory, Six hours. 
Credit, Four hours each semester. 

411, 412. Physical Chemistry. A study of the structure and properties 
of the various states of matter; thermodynamics and thermochemistry. 
Prerequisites: Physics 212, Chemistry 212, Mathematics 207. Lecture, Four 
hours. Credit, Three hours each semester. 

413, 414. Physical Chemistry. Laboratory portion of Chemistry 411, 
412. Laboratory, Four hours. Credit, One hour each semester. 



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DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



PHYSICS 

REQUIREMENTS 

Major: Thirty-two semester hours in the following courses are required for 
a major in Physics: 201, 202, 301, 302, 303, 401, 402, 501, 502. 
Majors in Physics must complete Chemistry 111, 112, and Math- 
ematics 207. 

Minor: Twenty semester hours in the following courses are required for a 
minor in Physics: 201, 202, 301, 302, 303, 401, 402. Minors in 
Physics must complete Chemistry 111, 112, and Mathematics 207. 

201, 202. General Physics. A general course designed to give the 
student a basic knowledge of the mechanics and properties of matter, heat, 
wave motion, sound, magnetism, electricity and light. Prerequisite: Math. 
105, 106. Lecture, Four hours. Laboratory, Three hours. Credit, Eight hours. 

301. Heat. A study of heat energy and work, with particular emphasis 
on the fundamentals of kinetic theory and thermodynamics. Prerequisite: 
Physics 201, 202. Lecture, Three hours. Laboratory, Four hours. Credit, 
Four hours. 

302. Light. Geometrical and physical optics, photometry, spectroscopy, 
and the general properties of radiant energy. Prerequisite: Physics 201, 202. 
Lecture, Three hours. Laboratory, Four hours. Credit, Four hours. 

303. Mechanics. Statics, Kinematics and Dynamics of a particle and of 
rigid bodies in the plane and in space. Lagrange's equations. Introduction to 
the special theory of relativity. Lecture, Four hours. Credit, Four hours. 

401. Electricity and Magnetism. An introduction to the fundamental 
principles of electric and magnetic fields. Prerequisite: Physics 201, 202, 
Mathematics 207. Credit, Four hours. 

402. Electronics. A continuation of Physics 401, with particular atten- 
tion to the principles and design of electron tubes and circuits. Prerequisite: 
Physics 401. Lecture, Three hours. Laboratory, Four hours. Credit, Four hours. 

501, 502. Physics. Introduction to theoretical physics. Advanced work 
in mechanics, dynamics, hydrodynamics, thermodynamics, electrostatics, 
electromagnetics, optics, statistical mechanics, and quantum theory. Pre- 
requisites: Mathematics 208 and two years of college Physics. Credit, Four 
hours. 

MATHEMATICS 

REQUIREMENTS 

Major: Thirty-two semester hours are required for a major in mathematics 
in the following courses: 103, 104, 106, 207, 208, 407, 408, 451, 452. 

Minor: A minimum of eighteen semester hours are required for a minor in 
mathematics including: 103, 104, 106, 207, 208. 

101. College Algebra. A survey of algebra intended for students who 
are not Mathematic majors. Credit, Three hours. 



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SCHiOOL OF EDUCATION 



*■» 



102. Trigonometry. The definitions of trigonometric functions; their 
geometric basis; their relations. Trigonometric identities and equations. 
Inverse functions. Solution of right and oblique triangles. Credit, Three hours. 

103. Algebra and Trigonometry. This intensified course combines 
the material of Mathematics 101 with an introduction to trigonometry. 
Credit, Four hours. 

104. Trigonometry and Analytic Geometry. A continuation of 
Mathematics 103. Completes the study of trigonometry and proceeds to 
coordinate systems, the point, line and plane in space, conic sections and the 
general equation of the second degree. Prerequisite: Mathematics 103. Credit, 
Four hours. 

106. Calculus I. Survey of basic analytic geometry; introduction to 
differential and integral calculus. Credit, Four hours. 

207. Calculus II. Continuation of Calculus I. Credit, Four hours. 

208. Elementary Differential Equations. Linear differential equa- 
tions of the first and second degree. Equations of higher order. Operator 
methods. Series solutions. Applications. Credit, Four hours. 

407. Higher Algebra. Selected topics in algebra. Determinants. 
Complex numbers. Theory of equations. Credit, Three hours. 

408. Advanced Euclidean Geometry. Homothetic figures; anhar- 
monic division; symmedians of a triangle; the nine-point circle. Credit, 
Three hours. 

451, 452. Differential Equations. A study of the more common types 
of ordinary and partial equations, with applications to geometry and the 
physical sciences. Prerequisite: Mathematics 208. Credit, Three hours each 
semester. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Physical Education (Men). R. O. T. C. is required for physically able 
male students. See courses listed under the Departments of Military and Air 
Science and Tactics on next page. 

Physical Education (Women). Physical activities for physically able 
female students. Credit, One hour each semester. 



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DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



MILITARY DIVISION 

RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS, DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 

Pittsburgh 19, Pennsylvania 

Colonel Russell W. Schmelz, ARTY, RA Coordinator 

FACULTY 

Department of Military Science and Tactics 

Colonel Russell W. Schmelz, ARTY, RA Head of Department, Professor 

B.S. in E.E. Iowa State College 1926. Adv. O.C. FAS 1947. 

5 Campaigns Europe. Federal and Reserve Service 26 years. 

Lieutenant Colonel Charles F. Moore, ARTY, USAR Assistant Professor 

B.S. in Educ. Purdue University 1926. M.S. in Econ. Purdue University 1936. 
Adv. O.C. FAS, 1947. Abn. Tng. TIS, 1948. 

6 Campaigns EAME, Japan Occupation, 3 Campaigns Korea. Federal 
and Reserve Service 26 years. 

Major Alfred C. Bieri, ARTY, RA Assistant Professor 

B.S. Colorado State A&M College. Adv. O.C. FAS 1949. 
5 Campaigns Europe. Federal Service 11 years. 

Captain William C. French, ARTY, USAR Assistant Professor 

B.S. University of Pittsburgh. OCS FAS 1942. 

3 Campaigns Europe-Africa. Federal and Reserve Service 9 years. 

WOJG James T. Doherty, USA Instructor 

LL.B. University of Balitmore 1938. TIS 1944. AAAS 1946. 
Middle East 2J^ years. Federal Service 12 years. 

WOJG Robert A. Simpson, ARTY, RA Instructor 

FAI & S 1940. SNCOC-FAS 1946. 
Federal Service 23 years. 

Master Sergeant Harold F. Showalter, ORD, RA Instructor 

MSFAS 1940. SNCOC-FAS 1946. FTVC 1946. 

4 Campaigns Europe. Federal Service 22 years. 

Master Sergeant Leslie J. Walker, Jr., ARTY, RA Instructor 

TI&E School, Carlisle Bks. 1947. 

Korean Occupation, 3 Campaigns Korea. Federal Service 7 years. * 

Sergeant First Class Kenneth B. Campbell, QM, RA Instructor 

33 months Asiatic-Pacific. Federal Service 8 years. 

Sergeant First Class Walter Leskowat, AG, RA Instructor 

B.S. University of Pittsburgh 1950. 

1 Campaign Asiatic-Pacific. Federal and Reserve Service 9 years. 

Sergeant First Class George T. Tyberg, ARTY, RA Instructor 

O.C.S. 1942. 

3 Campaigns Europe. Federal Service 8 years. 

Sergeant Donald G. Freeman, ARTY, RA Instructor 

Darmstadt QMS 1948. Ord. Sch. 1946. 
Federal Service 7 years. 



Sixty-four 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 



Department of Air Science and Tactics 

Lt. Colonel Sam R. Oglesby, Jr., USAF Head of Department, Professor 

Air Force Flying School 1941. Spartanburg Junior College 1989. 
6 Campaigns Europe. Federal Service 12 years. 

Major Richard M. Colegrove, USAF Assistant Professor 

B.S. in Econ. Duquesne University 1938. LL.B. Duquesne University 1937. 
Air Service Command School 1942. Air University 1951. 
6 Campaigns Europe. Federal Service 10 years. 

Major Milton P. Cook, USAF Assistant Professor 

A.B. University of Michigan 1940. LL.B. University of Virginia 1949. 
Air University 1951. 
3 Campaigns Asiatic-Pacific. Federal Service 11 years. 

Captain Ralph H. Durham, USAF Assistant Professor 

Air Force Flying School 1944. B.S. Texas A & M 1948. 
2 Campaigns Asiatic-Pacific. Federal Service 9 years. 

Captain Jack H. Hague, USAF Assistant Professor 

Air Force Flying School 1942. B.S. in Ed. Ohio University 1947. 
M.S. Ohio University 1950. Air University 1951. 
8 Campaigns Europe. Federal Service 10 years. 

Captain William P. Thompson, USAF Assistant Professor 

Air Force Flying School 1943, Air University 1946. 
Univ. of Alabama AF ROTC 1948. 

2 Campaigns Southwest Pacific. Federal Service 11 years. 

Master Sergeant George D'Aloiso, USAF Instructor 

Administrative School 1950. Air University 1951 

1 Campaign Asiatic-Pacific. European Theater 8 years. 
Federal Service 8 years. 

Master Sergeant Marion A. Miller, USAF Instructor 

Air Force Flying School 1940. Classification School 1948. 
Asiatic-Pacific 2 years. Federal Service 16 years. 

Technical Sergeant James G. Acey, USAF Instructor 

AF Engineering & Operations School 1940. 

North Atlantic Theater 3 years. Federal Service 10 years. 

Technical Sergeant Joseph Knoneberg, USAF Instructor 

European Intelligence School 1948. Air University 1951. 

Asiatic-Pacific 6 months. Europe 3 years. Federal Service 10 years. 

Technical Sergeant Thomas S. Ireland, USAF Instructor 

Newfoundland Base Command 2 years. Federal Service 11 years. 



Sixty-five 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

The military service maintains Departments of Military Science and Air 
Science and Tactics of the Reserve _ Officers Training Corps at Duquesne 
University for Field Artillery and Air Force Administration and Logistics 
or Flight Operations. Duquesne University's ROTC Field Artillery unit is 
unique inasmuch as it is the only Field Artillery unit in Pennsylvania and the 
only unit in the Pittsburgh area leading to a commission in a combat arm of 
the Armed Services. 

The Mission of the Departments. The Reserve Officers Training 
Corps has two missions. The first is to produce junior officers who have the 
qualities and attributes essential to their progressive and continued develop- 
ment as officers in the United States Army and Air Force. The second is to lay 
the foundations of intelligent citizenship within the student and to give him 
such basic military training as will be of benefit to himself and to the military 
service if he becomes a member thereof. Special emphasis is placed upon 
"Leadership" to assist Duquesne men in meeting any situation in life with 
success and honor. The development of physical fitness, good posture and 
military bearing is stressed. 

Organization. The Staff and Faculty of the Departments are detailed 
from the Army and the Air Force. The Federal Government furnishes the 
equipment and supplies used in the Departments, including uniforms and text 
books. Courses are prescribed and methods of instruction followed which will 

five the student the breadth of vision desired in the officers of the Armed 
orces and will give him practical knowledge in the performance of military 
duties. Students enrolled in the Reserve Officers Training Corps are designated 
ROTC Cadets. Cadets are not members of the military service and are not 
subject to military law or the Articles of War but are subject to the reg- 
ulations prescribed by the University. 

Basic and Advanced Course. There are two courses in each Depart- 
ment, each consisting of two years. The Basic Course corresponds to the 
Freshman and Sophomore years. These^ two years in one of the Departments 
are required of all non- veteran students in the courses of the College of Liberal 
Arts and Sciences, School of Business Administration, School of Education 
and School of Music. Veteran students are given credit for one or two years 
of the Basic Course for honorably terminated active service as determined 
by the Professor of Military or Air Science and Tactics. 

The Advanced Course corresponds to the Junior and Senior years.* This 
course is elective by the student and selective by the Professors of Military 
and Air Science and Tactics. Students who enroll in a course are expected 
to complete the two years. The Army or Air Force authorities may in certain 
cases on recommendation of the President authorize a student to drop the 
course. 

Commission. Graduates of the Advanced Course are awarded commis- 
sions in the Reserve Corps of the^ United States Army or United States Air 
Force. An opportunity for commission in the Regular Army or Air Force is 
open to those students whose records entitle them to be designated as Dis- 
tinguished Military Students. Regular commissions are also ( awarded to 
officers of the Reserve Forces who are successful in a competitive tour of 
active duty following graduation in the U. S. Army, or by direct appointment 
while on active duty in the U. S. Air Force. 



Sixty-six 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 



Academic Credit. Credit toward graduation of two hours per semester 
is awarded for the Basic Course. The academic credit for the Advanced 
Course is three hours per semester. This counts as elective credit in the 
requirements for the degree in most courses of each school in which the Basic 
Course is required. 

Eligibility. For the Basic Course a student must be a citizen of the 
United States, able to pass a physical examination and between fourteen (14) 
and twenty three (23) years of age. For the Advanced Course satisfactory 
completion of the Basic Course, approval of the President of the University 
and recommendation of the Professor of Military Science and Tactics or of 
the Professor of Air Science and Tactics, are required. The number of students 
who may be accepted for the Advanced Course is established by a quota 
allotted to the University by the services. Qualified veterans may be accepted 
into the Advanced Course directly. Credit toward advanced standing is 
allowed for work completed at other Senior ROTC units and under prescribed 
regulations for that completed at Junior ROTC units. Students who are 
conscientious objectors, present or former members of subversive organiza- 
tions or who have been convicted of serious offenses by a court are not eligible. 

Uniform and Allowances. The complete uniform of the same pattern 
and material as the Army or Air Force Officer's uniform, depending upon the 
branch of service in which enrolled, including the overcoat and shoes, is 
furnished by the Government for all basic students. The University draws 
commutation for and furnishes Advanced Course students with a tailored 
uniform including trench coat. The uniform is given to the student by the 
University upon being commissioned. 

A monetary allowance of ninety cents (90j0 per day up to 595 days, 
totalling 3553.50, is paid in monthly payments to students while pursuing 
the Advanced Course. 

Summer Camp. Each Advanced Course student attends one summer 
camp. This camp is of six weeks duration. It is usually attended between 
the first and second years of the Advanced Course. Under exceptional cir- 
cumstances authority may be obtained to permit attendance after completing 
the Basic Course or after completing the second year of the Advanced Course. 
The camp affords application of the subjects studied during the previous 
school years, including qualification in arms. A comprehensive athletic 
program utilizing the golf and tennis courts, ball diamonds, swimming pools 
and other facilities of the post is conducted. Evening social and recreational 
activities are conducted on the post. Rail transportation to and from camp, 
all living expenses andany necessary medical care is furnished by the Govern- 
ment. Students are paid the regular service pay of the first grade while at 
camp. 

Rifle Team. A University Rifle Team is sponsored by the Departments 
of Military and Air Science. All ROTC Cadets are eligible to compete for 
places on the team. The rifle team is recognized as a minor sport and its 
members are eligible for the award of the University letter. The team competes 
in matches with other colleges. Duquesne ROTC teams have achieved na- 
tional recognition. 

Honor Societies. The Departments sponsor the Pershing Rifles (a 
National Honor Military Society), the Scabbard and Blade (National Hono- 
rary Military Fraternity), and the William J. McKee Squadron of the Arnold 
Air Society (National Honorary Air Force Society). 



Sixty-seven 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



CURRICULA 
Department of Military Science and Tactics 

Basic Course 

101, 102. Military Science. Leadership to include drill and exercise 

of command. Basic military subjects including Military Organization; Maps 
and Aerial Photographs; Individual Weapons and Marksmanship; First Aid 
and Hygiene; Military Problems of the United States; Military Policy of the 
United States; Evolution of Warfare. Three hours per week, 2 credits per 
semester. 

201, 202. Military Science. Artillery. Continuation of leadership, 
stressing development of poise and confidence in command positions and 
small unit combat exercises; sixty hours of elementary tactics and technique 
of Field Artillery. Three hours per week, 2 credits per semester. 

Advanced Course 

301, 302. Military Science. Artillery. Continuation of leadership 
with warrants in the cadet corps and including command of units. More 
advanced Field Artillery Tactics and Technique including Battery Executive; 
Tactics; Gunnery; Surveying; Communications; Weapons and Marksman- 
ship including rifle firing on range. Five hours per week, 3 credits per semester. 

401,402. Military Science. Artillery. Continuation of leadership with 
commissions in the cadet corps and assignment to command and staff positions 
with cadet batteries and assignments in instructing in classes and at drills. 
More advanced general military subjects including Military Law; Military 
Administration; Military Teaching Methods and Psychological Warfare; 
Foundations of National Power; Advanced Tactics and Technique of Field 
Artillery including the Military team; Gunnery; Surveying; Fire Direction 
Center; Supply and Evacuation; Command and Staff; Military Intelligence 
and new developments. Five hours per week, 3 credits per semester. 

Completion of this course will fit the student to assume duties of a battery 
officer in a field artillery unit. 



Department of Air Science and Tactics 

Basic Course 

101, 102. Air Science. Leadership to include drill and exercise of 
command. Sixty hours of World Political Geography, a study of the areas 
and resources of the various states organized as political units, together with 
a study of the people who live in these areas. Three hours per week, 2 credits 
per semester. 

201, 202. Air Science. Continuation of leadership, drill and exercise of 
command. Organization for the Defense of the United States; Maps, Aerial 
Photographs and Aerial Navigation; Aerodynamics and Propulsion; Meteor- 
ology and Navigation; Applied Air Power; and Personal Maintenance. Three 
hours per week, 2 credits per semester. 



Sixty-eight 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 



Advanced Course 

301, 302. Air Science. Continuation of leadership with warrants in 
the cadet corps and supervision of units. Global problems as illustrated in 
World War II; Logistics; Air Operations; ninety hours in Air Administration 
and Logistics or Flight Operations. Five hours per week, 3 credits per semester. 

i 
Summer Camp. Air Force. Tentatively scheduled at Langley Air 
Force Base, Virginia. 

401, 402. Air Science. Continuation of leadership with commissions 
in the cadet corps and assignments of instructing classes. Applied Fields of 
Officer Orientation, USAF Inspector General's Department, Military Law 
and Boards; Military Teaching Methods, and Air Force Management. Fifty 
hours of Air Administration and Logistics or Flight Operations. Five hours 
per week, 3 credits per semester. 

Completion of this course will qualify the student to assume adminis- 
trative or logistical assignments as a 2nd Lieutenant at a USAF Base or 
Tactical Organization. 



Sixty-nine 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



LIST OF GRADUATES 
BACHELOR OF EDUCATION 

Summer 1951 

Astorina, Dominick A Slovan 

Bahler, Edward C Pittsburgh 

Baker, Sister M. Kostka . . . ; Baden 

Beganskas, Sister M. Germaine Pittsburgh 

Bell, Sister M. Renee Pittsburgh 

Bumbernick, Sister M. Grace Pittsburgh 

Capano, Sister M. Claudia Allison Park 

Carr, James W Coraopolis 

Clair, Sister M. Christopher Millvale 

Collins, Sister M. Edith. Perrysville 

Dybas, Sister M. Esperentia Braddock 

Feldbauer, Sister M. Caritas Wilkinsburg 

Grafas, Sister M. Amabilis Pittsburgh 

Hayes, Daniel P Pittsburgh 

Hellman, Sister M. Redempta. Pittsburgh 

Hemberger, Sister M. Bernardine Perrysville 

Henry, Sister M. Columba Pittsburgh 

Hohmann, Dorothea M Pittsburgh 

Jaronski, Sister M. Chrysantha Pittsburgh 

Jucius, Sister M. Paschal Pittsburgh 

Killmeyer, Sister M. Herman J Allison Park 

Kluk, William W Pittsburgh 

Kohler, William N West Mifflin 

Kolash, Sister M. Urban Pittsburgh 

Kosmacki, Francis V Pittsburgh 

Kruk, Sister M. Vincenta Pittsburgh 

Legutko, Sister M. Carmella Pittsburgh 

Mazur, Sister M. Eusebia Pittsburgh 

McCarthy, Sister Ida M Greensburg 

McKee, Margaret W Pittsburgh 

Mehelich, Charles J Verona 

Milinkevicia, Sister M. Carissima Pittsburgh 

Modrak, Sister M. Alma Pittsburgh 

Montville, Sister M. Antonia Pittsburgh 

Murray, John M Pittsburgh 

Neumont, Kathleen A Pittsburgh 

Pasinska, Sister M. Theresilla Pittsburgh 

Paul, Sister M. Marita. Allison Park 

Platukas, Sister M. Francita Pittsburgh 

Raddick, Michael Pittsburgh 

Rombach, Sister M. Solana Pittsburgh 

Shearer, Sister M. Clarita Wheeling, W. Va. 

Walls, Sister M. Alverna Pittsburgh 

Weigand, Sister M. Evodia Pittsburgh 

Worrell, Louis P Clairton 

Wosko, Sister M. Agnes Pittsburgh 

Yaskovich, Harold Rankin 

Zalapukis, Sister M. Salome Pittsburgh 

Zielachowski, Sister M. Claudia Pittsburgh 



Seventy 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 



January 1952 

Aleks, Sister M. Laura Pittsburgh 

Angelini, Sister Frances R Allison Park 

Bubnis, Sister M. Geraldine Pittsburgh 

Ciolli, Dolores T Pittsburgh 

Dieringer, Earl J., Jr Turtle Creek 

Dillon, John J Pittsburgh 

DiRocco, Anthony J West Homestead 

Druktenis, Sister M. Theophane Pittsburgh 

Genevie, Louis E Homestead 

George, John L New Kensington 

Hanis, Sister M. Verene Perrysville 

Herrle, Edward J Pittsburgh 

Hill, Sister M. Sigmund Allison Park 

Jones, Paul R Pittsburgh 

Kersting, Sister M. Paula Allison Park 

Klein, Elizabeth M Pittsburgh 

Kolich, Joseph R Monessen 

Malarik, Sister M. Erhard Perrysville 

McClung, Leroy C Charleroi 

McCool, jSister M. Dorothea Pittsburgh 

Mertz, Sister M. Virginia Allison Park 

Neuwirth, Marilyn Pittsburgh 

O'Brien, Philip Pittsburgh 

Pivak, Lourdine M Pittsburgh 

Pranaitis, Sister M. Thomasine Pittsburgh 

Ross, Joseph L East Pittsburgh 

Ruggire, Sister M. Angelica Allison Park 

Rumshock, Emily G Irwin 

Scherer, Sister Louis M Baden 

Socan, Mary E Clairton 

Steimer, Lois J Pittsburgh 

Stipetic, John J Pittsburgh 

Suhayda, Lydia B Aliquippa 

Sventy, Sister M. Aquiline Perrysville 

Taus, Sister M. Ancilla Allison Park 

Tisony, Sister M. Elvira Perrysville 

Utaris, Sister M. Georgine Pittsburgh 

Vanarsdale, John C, Jr Bridgeville 

June 1952 

Amistadi, Augusta Langeloth 

Amorosa, James T Webster 

Astrauskas, Sister M. Bernadette Pittsburgh 

Babich, Nicholas S Aliquippa 

Bagley, Nancy Jo Pittsburgh 

Baker, Catherine T McKees Rocks 

Barnyak, John, Jr Duquesne 

Beattie, Hazelle McKeesport 

Bell, Mary F.. Pittsburgh 

Bennett, Patricia L East Pittsburgh 

Berry, Sister M. Vincent M Baden 

Blazicek, Sister M. Sylvia Perrysville 

Brenner, Marven M Pittsburgh 

Brunosky, Frank Lopez 



Seventy-ont 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



Burger, Cecilia B Beaver Falls 

Caputo, Charles C Braddock 

Cole, Virginia Clare Pittsburgh 

Colker, Coleman P Pittsburgh 

Conte, Angela Marie Pittsburgh 

Corabi, Mary Ann Washington 

Curlionis, Sister M. Aurelia Pittsburgh 

D'Alesandro, John Zack Pittsburgh 

Domina, Rita M.. Pittsburgh 

Fedoush, Sister Miriam Michael Greensburg 

Finberg, Gerald L Lawrence, Mass. 

Gebauer, Louis H Pittsburgh 

Giangrossi, Calvin M Glassmere 

Goldberg, Arthur Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Gribben, Sister Immaculate Heart Wheeling, W. Va. 

Guzzo, Paul A. Pittsburgh 

Hague, Catherine A Pittsburgh 

Hahn, Ralph E Ellsworth 

Hanzes, Sister M. Generosa Perrysville 

Harrington, Thomas B Pittsburgh 

Hill, Margaret Julia McKees Rocks 

Holub, John J Rankin 

Home, Charles B Pittsburgh 

Hulings, Melva B Canonsburg 

Jakielo, Bernard E Pittsburgh 

Jaskelevicia, Sister M. Agnella Pittsburgh 

Kalata, Sister M. Beata Perrysville 

Kelemenic, Gloria Gary, Ind. 

Kennedy, James J Pittsburgh 

Kirk, Patricia L Pittsburgh 

Kleinman, Sister Dolorosa Baden 

Kovacev, Steve Pittsburgh 

Kubic, Margaret T Donora 

Kuchta, Margaret M Whitaker 

LaFrankie, Robert L Elizabeth 

Lazzari, Yvonne E East Monongahela 

Luther, June C. . Munhall 

Maloney, Catherine M Pittsburgh 

Mariano, Fred J Rankin 

Matava, Joseph T Donora 

Mattiko, Lawrence A West Mifflin 

Matulia, Frank R Pittsburgh 

Maurizi, Dominic J East McKeespoft 

McCabe, Marian L Butler 

McKenna, Florence M Pittsburgh 

McShane, Mercedes A Pittsburgh 

Metalonis, Sister M. Anne Pittsburgh 

Mitsch, Ruthanne Pittsburgh 

Naujelis, Sister Mary E Pittsburgh 

Nelson, Calvin E Pittsburgh 

Nye, Walter W Noblestown 

O'Brien, James G Pittsburgh 

O'Hanlon, Joan E Pittsburgh 

O'Neill, Sister M. of St. Francis Wheeling, W. Va. 

Pacacha, Carl T Duquesne 

Paesano, Anthony V Follansbee, W. Va. 

Phillips, James R Pittsburgh 



Seventy-two 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 



Podolsky, Malvern P Pittsburgh 

Quinn, John E Pittsburgh 

Radosevich, Frances Pittsburgh 

Ray, Lois T Pittsburgh 

Raysich, Charles J Pittsburgh 

Reed, Janet C Pittsburgh 

Regina, Joseph T. Braddock 

Rehak, Sister M. Miriam Perrysville 

Reno, Joanne F Glenshaw 

Rowe, Sister M. Vivian Allison Park 

Ryan, Sister M. Agnes Allison Park 

Rybka, Sister M. Terence Pittsburgh 

Sappie, Clare V Pittsburgh 

Sarno, Nicholas A Pittsburgh 

Schrenk, Sister M. Georgia Carnegie 

Serena, Lawrence J Duquesne 

Sheehan, Robert C Pittsburgh 

Sherwood, David J Pittsburgh 

Sichi, Ernest G Beaver 

Socan, Mary E Clairton 

Solan, Andrew H Monessen 

Solomon, Robert J Munhall 

Sommer, Lois A Pittsburgh 

Sprys, George H Pittsburgh 

Stanich, Gene R Chisholm, Minn. 

Susky, Lois M. Donora 

Tirpak, Sister Firmin M Perrysville 

Tomcho, Sister M. Vitalia Uniontown 

Tonti, Norman E Pittsburgh 

Tosi, Norma Clarksville 

Trimer, Sister M. Ignatius Pittsburgh 

Ujevich, Milo M Aliquippa 

Utlak, Sister M. Michael Uniontown 

Vaise, Sister M. Consolata Pittsburgh 

Valcho, Alfred S Homestead 

Vasil, John J Pittsburgh 

Walsh, Mary T Pittsburgh 

Walters, Sister M. Rosaria Pittsburgh 

Wawrzeniak, Virginia G Glassport 

Wettstein, Norman A Pittsburgh 

Wilson, Sister M. Annunciata Pittsburgh 

Yurenovich, Evelyn M Sharon 



Seventy-three 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



LIST OF STUDENTS 

Seniors— Full-Time— 1951-1952 

Allen, Edward Pittsburgh 

Amistadi, Augusta Largeloth 

Amorosa, James T Webster 

Babich, Nick S Aliquippa 

Bagley, Nancy Pittsburgh 

Baker, Catherine Pittsburgh 

Barnyak, John, Jr , Duquesne 

Bell, Mary F Pittsburgh 

Boni, Dorothy J Willock 

Brenner, Marven M Pittsburgh 

Brown, Robert H McKeesport 

Brunosky, Frank Lopez 

Burger, Cecilia B Beaver Falls 

Caputo, Charles C Braddock 

Ciolli, Dolores T Pittsburgh 

Cirilano, Mary A Coraopolis 

Cole, Virginia C Pittsburgh 

Cokler, Colman P Pittsburgh 

Collins, Mary M Pittsburgh 

Conte, Angela M Pittsburgh 

Corabi, Mary Ann Washington 

Covert, Merle E New Kensington 

Dreevey, William J. Monessen 

Cubelic, Charles R Pittsburgh 

D'Alesandro, Zack J., Jr Pittsburgh 

Dielsi, Joseph L Pittsburgh 

Dieringer, Earl J., Jr Pittsburgh 

Dillon, John J Pittsburgh 

DiMarco, Tullio J Bridgeville 

DiRocco, Anthony J Homestead 

Dittman, Frank H Pittsburgh 

Donatelli, Sam N Pittsburgh 

Dushaw, Marjorie G Pittsburgh 

Finberg, Gerald L Pittsburgh 

Fischer, Sister M. Margarette Lawrence, Mass. 

Gebauer, Louis H Pittsburgh 

Genevie, Louis E Homestead 

George, John L New Kensington 

Giangrossi, Calvin M Glassmere 

Goldberg, Arthur Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Grimes, James F Pittsburgh 

Guzzo, Paul A Pittsburgh 

Hague, Catherine Pittsburgh 

Hahn, Ralph E Pittsburgh 

Harrington, Thomas Pittsburgh 

Herrle, Edward J Pittsburgh 

Hleba, Andrew, Sr Duquesne 

Holub, John J Rankin 

Hoppel, Sister M. Alexius Pittsburgh 

Home, Charles B Pittsburgh 

Hulings, Melva L Canonsburg 

Jakielo, Bernard E Pittsburgh 

Jones, Paul R Pittsburgh 



Stvtnty-four 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 



Keenan, Louise A Pittsburgh 

Keleminic, Gloria Gary, Ind. 

Kennedy, James J Pittsburgh 

Kirk, Patricia L Pittsburgh 

Klein, Elizabeth M Pittsburgh 

Kolich, Joseph R. Monessen 

Kovacev, Steve Pittsburgh 

Kubik, Margaret T Donora 

Kuchta, Margaret M Whitaker 

LaFrankie, Robert L.. Elizabeth 

Leon, Sister M. Ludwina Pittsburgh 

Lucke, Sherwood G Pittsburgh 

Luther, Cecilia J Munhall 

McCabe, Marian L Butler 

McClung, Leroy C Charleroi 

McCool, Sister M. Dorothea Pittsburgh 

McKenna, Florence M Pittsburgh 

McLaughlin, Marianne. „ Pittsburgh 

McShane, Ann M. . , Pittsburgh 

Madden, Jeremiah J Crafton 

Maffei, Joseph P. Pittsburgh 

Maloney, Catherine M Pittsburgh 

Mariano, Fred J Rankin 

Matava, Joseph T Donora 

Mattiko, Lawrence A West Mifflin 

Matulia, Frank R Trafford 

Maurizi, Dominick McKeesport 

Metelionis, Sister M. Anne Pittsburgh 

Mitsch, Ruthanne Pittsburgh 

Nelson, Calvin E Pittsburgh 

Neuwirth, Marilyn B Pittsburgh 

Nye, Walter W Noblestown 

O'Brien, James. Pittsburgh 

O'Brien, Philip Pittsburgh 

O'Hanlon, Joan E Pittsburgh 

Pacacha, Frank T , Duquesne 

Paesano, Anthony V Follansbee, W. Va. 

Pecoraro, Louis J. Ambridge 

Pelusi, Anita Pittsburgh 

Phillips, James R Furnace 

Pivak, Lourdine M Pittsburgh 

Podolsky, Malvern P . Pittsburgh 

Ptashnik, Sister M. Tarcisia Pittsburgh 

Quinn, John E Pittsburgh 

Radosevich, Frances Pittsburgh 

Ray, Lois T Pittsburgh 

Raysich, Charles J Pittsburgh 

Reed, Janet C Pittsburgh 

Regina, Joseph L Braddock 

Ross, Joseph L East Pittsburgh 

Sappie, Clare V Pittsburgh 

Sarno, Nicholas A Pittsburgh 

Schubert, Richard T , Pittsburgh 

Schunker, Ann W Pittsburgh 

Serena, Lawrence J. . Duquesne 

Sheehan, Robert C , , Pittsburgh 

Sherwood, David J Pittsburgh 



Seventy-fivt 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



Sichi, Ernest G Clairton 

Smith, Eugene R Pittsburgh 

Socan, Mary E Clairton 

Solan, Andrew H Monessen 

Sommer, Lois A Pittsburgh 

Sprys, George H , Pittsburgh 

Stanich, Gene R Pittsburgh 

Steimer, Lois J Pittsburgh 

Stipetic, John J Pittsburgh 

Suhayda, Lydia B Aliquippa 

Susky, Lois M Donora 

Tonti, Norman E Pittsburgh 

Tosi, Norma Clarksville 

Ujevich, Milo M Aliquippa 

Valcho, Alfred S Homestead 

Vanarsdale, John C, Jr Carnegie 

Vasil, John J Pittsburgh 

Wagner, George J Pittsburgh 

Walsh, Mary T Pittsburgh 

Walters, Sister M. Rosaria Pittsburgh 

Watt, James Pittsburgh 

Wettstein, Norman A Pittsburgh 

Yurenovich, Evelyn M Sharon 

Juniors— Full-Time— 1951-1952 

Amoroso, Marie Jean Pittsburgh 

Bailey, Allan Vern East Liverpool, Ohio 

Belak, Mero Anthony Donora 

Berry, Iva Adaline New Eagle 

Beyer, John A., Jr Pittsburgh 

Bono, Frank Samuel Leechburg 

Bornyak, Martha Jean Nanty Glo 

Brash, David F., Jr Pittsburgh 

Braun, Ralph F Pittsburgh 

Bruni, James F Pittsburgh 

Bruno, John J Rillton 

Bumbaugh, James W Pittsburgh 

Cantelmi, Ralph G Beaver Falls 

Capul, Joan Marie Clairton 

Clay, Margaret A Pittsburgh 

Coccilone, Frank D Monessen 

Cordic, Martha A Pittsburgh 

Croasman, John T Pittsburgh 

Cummings, John P Pittsburgh 

Czar, Anna Mae Pittsburgh 

DeCampli, Camilla Perrysville 

Dixon, Noranne B Pittsburgh 

Domina, Rita Marie Pittsburgh 

Domyan, Ann L Pittsburgh 

Ference, Robert A Pittsburgh 

Ferraro, Frances M Pittsburgh 

Flading, Gloria A McKeesport 

Francetic, Paul E McKeesport 

Frederick, Frank A Mt. Pleasant 

Garay, Stephen E Sharon 

Gorman, Gerald P Pittsburgh 



Seventy~six 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 



Gorman, Patricia V Pittsburgh 

Gray, Shirley Mae Homestead 

Guffey, Cecil W., Jr Clairton 

Heim, John P Pittsburgh 

Heinle, Mary E New Kensington 

Held, James G Pittsburgh 

Howley, Mary L Pittsburgh 

Indovina, Phillip J Pittsburgh 

Jaconetta, Rudolph C Pittsburgh 

Johnson, Margaret G Pittsburgh 

Jordanoff, Patsy Diane Pittsburgh 

Joyce, Joseph W Pittsburgh 

Kobosky, Bernard J Canonsburg 

Kotva, Constance M Pittsburgh 

Lacey, Rosemary C Pittsburgh 

Lanzotti, Isoline Pittsburgh 

Lappe, Mary V Pittsburgh 

Lawson, Robert R Pittsburgh 

Lazzari, Yvonne E Monongahela 

Lease, Walter T., Jr. . . . Pittsburgh 

Leger, Sister M. Claudia Pittsburgh 

McGrath, Alanna V Pittsburgh 

Manker, Joseph O., Jr Pittsburgh 

Manning, Richard A Pittsburgh 

Marchitello, Daniel J Rankin 

Marino, James R New Kensington 

Martin, Thomas A Pittsburgh 

Matsinger, Margaret M Pittsburgh 

Matulia, Patricia A Pittsburgh 

Medonis, Robert X ; Pittsburgh 

Micklos, Victor J Rankin 

Milchick, Walter W East Pittsburgh 

Moloney, Cora D Pittsburgh 

Mullen, Leo A Pittsburgh 

Mullen, Sherry Clairton 

Mulvihill, Kathleen D Pittsburgh 

Napolitan, John J Braddock 

Norris, Mary J Pittsburgh 

O'Carroll, John P Pittsburgh 

Owings, Keith T Weirton, W. Va. 

Pagano, Donald R Swissvale 

Petrozza, Vincent Duquesne 

Pohl, Elmer R Pittsburgh 

Popovich, Lawrence J. . Rankin 

Ragan, Paul J Duquesne 

Rendo, Edward J Creighton 

Reno, Joanne F Glenshaw 

Rice, Dolores A Clarion 

Schcosky, Edward F Braddock 

Schikowski, Charles B Lyndhurst, Ohio 

Sluser, Theodore F Arnold 

Smith, Dale E Pittsburgh 

Stenger, Dencia M Pittsburgh 

Tambellini, Ann M Pittsburgh 

Thomas, Edward F McKeesport 

Tumminello, Josephine Pittsburgh 

Vujaklia, Peter N Sharpsburg 



Seventy-seven 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



Wawrzeniak, Virginia G Glassport 

White, Sister M. Ancilla Pittsburgh 

Wolf, Edward G Jeannette 

Zalice, Lillian B Rankin 

Zawadzki, Edward A Pittsburgh 

Zilka, Philip S Monessen 

Sophomores— Full-Time— 1951-1952 

Aul, Robert C Pittsburgh 

Banks, Elizabeth Pittsburgh 

Bieltz, Anthony H Pittsburgh 

Bieranowski, Florence M Pittsburgh 

Bitterice, John M New Kensington 

Bohan, Walter Dayton, Ohio 

Brady, Virginia M Pittsburgh 

Breinig, Mary F Pittsburgh 

Brown, Ann Elizabeth Pittsburgh 

Buraczewski, Michael J Charleroi 

Bursich, Joseph M Allison Park 

Cantelmo, Joan F Pittsburgh 

Capozzoli, Anthony Bridgeville 

Casper, Betty M Pittsburgh 

Charlton, Ella M Pittsburgh 

Chuprinski, John J Mt. Carmel 

Cinicola, John L Pittsburgh 

Conner, Robert C Pittsburgh 

Connolly, Festy J Munhall 

Corkan, James H Pittsburgh 

Corrado, Ronald D Bellwood 

Davis, Mary A Pittsburgh 

Demczak, Stephen Carnegie 

Dempsky, Barbara L Pittsburgh 

Dudek, William J Pittsburgh 

Emanuel, James L Turtle Creek 

Fuehr, Elmer H Pittsburgh 

Gable, Geraldine M Pittsburgh 

Galterio, Angeline G Coraopolis 

Galterio, Gloria A Coraopolis 

Galuska, Joseph S Pittsburgh 

Gargani, Roland J Pittsburgh 

Garman, Sandra L Pittsburgh 

Gessner, Shirley Pittsburgh 

Gregory, Ruth M Pittsburgh 

Hatcher, Helen A Pittsburgh 

Herzog, Marilyn M Glenshaw 

Ivas, Ellen M Cleveland, Ohio 

Johns, Margaret M Pittsburgh 

Johnson, Fletcher J Englewood, N. J. 

Jurik, Richard A. .... . Bentleyville 

Kaseta, Sister M. Lillian Pittsburgh 

Kelly, Agnesan Duquesne 

Koepfinger, Adesta M Coraopolis 

Kolesar, John J Pittsburgh 

Krut, Ellen J. Pittsburgh 

Labovitz, Beatrice Pittsburgh 

Lackner, Shirley A Pittsburgh 



Seventv-eieht 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 



Lauer, Robert R Pittsburgh 

Lepiane, Helen Pittsburgh 

Love, Donald Aliquippa 

Lyman, Frank J Pittsburgh 

McClam, Janet V Braddock 

McGonigle, Rosemary E Pittsburgh 

McHale, Thomas J. F New York, N. Y. 

McNamara, Maureen Pittsburgh 

Macioce, Rita L Pittsburgh 

Marino, Marietta C Pittsburgh 

Mirakian, Peter E Pittsburgh 

Mongeluzzo, Joseph V Pittsburgh 

Mrkonic, Dorothy McKeesport 

Ondrey, Joseph W McKeesport 

Petrossi, Louis N Pittsburgh 

Petty, Kenneth B Clairton 

Phifer, Burtdeli E.. Pittsburgh 

Philbin, Martin F Pittsburgh 

Pivak, Loisann Pittsburgh 

Prezgay, William F Farrell 

Quinn, Elizabeth Elizabeth 

Reiliy, John A Pittsburgh 

Rieland, Joseph V Pittsburgh 

Roberson, Vivian A Pittsburgh 

Savage, Mary A , Pittsburgh 

Scanlon, Eugene F Pittsburgh 

Scanlon, Robert G Braddock 

Schlafhauser, Alice B Pittsburgh 

Schlafhauser, Wilma M Pittsburgh 

Schoemer, Donna R Pittsburgh 

Serdi, Frances E Clairton 

Sereda, Vincent P Pittsburgh 

Siconolfi, Albina M Pittsburgh 

Smith, Patricia A Pittsburgh 

Sodini, Kathleen M Pittsburgh 

Squiller, Johanna M Bairdford 

Starsnic, Paul F Etna 

Turchan, Norman R Pittsburgh 

Valenti, Edward P Tarentum 

Viola, Dolores M Pittsburgh 

Wagner, James K Pittsburgh 

Walker, Barbara Clairton 

Walters, Ann E Pittsburgh 

Werner, Elizabeth A Pittsburgh 

Whelan, Carol L Bridgeport, Conn. 

Woss, Geraldine M Gary, Ind. 

Zelin, Sister M. Coronata Pittsburgh 

Freshman— Full-Time— 1951 - 1952 

Baker, Thomas B Pittsburgh 

Brown, Chattie Mae Pittsburgh 

Brown, Wilhelmina D Pittsburgh 

Buchko, Thomas M Duquesne 

Casatelli, Palma L Pittsburgh 

Chemsak, Mary J McKeesport 

Chieruzzi, Franklin R Tarentum 



Seventy-nine 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



Cipriani, Rosemary Pittsburgh 

Claus, Loretta Pittsburgh 

Dongiovanni, Savero Pittsburgh 

Drabnis, Theresa M Pittsburgh 

Drwal, Edward J Boswell 

Fascetti, Leonore C Pittsburgh 

Gearschaw, Lydia E Bairdford 

Gismondi, Leonore C Scottdale 

Goetz, Charles R Monessen 

Goetz, Daniel A Monessen 

Greco, Geraldine Pittsburgh 

Gresmak, Phyllis L Worthington 

Gross, Nancy J Pittsburgh 

Harris, Virginia Pittsburgh 

Hess, Carol L , Pittsburgh 

Hoenig, Sister Jerome Marie Millvale 

Husnick, Frederick Farrell 

Karenbauer, Sister M. Camilla Pittsburgh 

Klepser, Joan M Coraopolis 

Kotala, Edward M Aliquippa 

Krall, Karyl G Pittsburgh 

LaValley, Joan M Pittsburgh 

LeClair, Thomas J Chippewa Falls, Wis. 

Loughery, Elizabeth Pittsburgh 

McBurney, Joseph Pittsburgh 

McCallan, Sister M. Frances M Millvale 

McDonald, Rita Ann Pittsburgh 

McGreevy, Mary J Wilmerding 

McLane, Donald C Homestead 

Megeath, Susan C Pittsburgh 

Nichold, Margaret W Pittsburgh 

Noe, Carol J Pittsburgh 

Pacacha, Frank V Duquesne 

Pacekonis, Sister M. Irene Pittsburgh 

Petrauskas, Grace Pittsburgh 

Pierce, Sister M. Blaine Millvale 

Plivelic, Mary L McKeesport 

Rehula, Emma J Charleroi 

Ricketts, Richard J Pottstown 

Russo, Violet M Pittsburgh 

Saffer, Patricia Pittsburgh 

Sandmaier, Sister M. Sharon Millvale 

Santamarie, Anthony C Braddock 

Smith, Beatrice Pittsburgh 

Snyder, Sister M. Alicia Millvale 

Sokolovich, Zora Monaca 

Spindler, Helen E Pittsburgh 

Stepien, Mary J Pittsburgh 

Truel, Robert Pittsburgh 

Turak, Sister M. Rachelle Pittsburgh 

Urban, Aldona Pittsburgh 

Welch, Mary A Pittsburgh 

Part Time Students— 1951-1952 

Addison, Sister M. of St. Augustine Wheeling, W. Va. 

Adjukiewicz, Sister M. Annette Allison Park 



Eighty 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 



Aeling, Sister M. Carol Pittsburgh 

Aleks, Sister M. Laura Pittsburgh 

Angelini, Sister M. Thomas Pittsburgh 

Angiulli, Sister M. Johanna Pittsburgh 

Apton, Sister M. Vincenta.^ Pittsburgh 

Arroyo, Sister M. Carmencita Pittsburgh 

Astrauskas, Sister M. Bernadette Pittsburgh 

Astrauskas, Sister M. Lucy Pittsburgh 

Augustine, Sister M. Mark Millvale 

Backa, Sister M. Lois Pittsburgh 

Baguet, Jacqueline B. Pittsburgh 

Baird, Victor H., Jr. Emsworth 

Bajek, Sister M. Beatrice Coraopolis 

Bajtos, Sister M. Mathias Perrysville 

Bakey, Sister M. Andrew Marie Allison Park 

Baksi, Sister M. Michael Pittsburgh 

Balombiny, Frances W Duquesne 

Baranik, Sister M. Imelda Arnold 

Baron, Sister M. Carol A Pittsburgh 

Barr, Sister M. Rose Julia Pittsburgh 

Basis, Sister M. Demar Allison Park 

Bassetti, Sister M. Carmella Baden 

Becker, Sister Alice M Greensburg 

Behary, Sister M. Edmund Perrysville 

Beitler, Sister M. Dolorata Allison Park 

Bell, Sister M. Rene Wheeling, W. Va. 

Bendoraitis, Sister M. Giles. ._ Pittsburgh 

Benedik, Sister M. Rose of Lima Perrysville 

Bennett, Patricia L East Pittsburgh 

Benton, Stephen S Pittsburgh 

Benyak, Sister M. John Francis Pittsburgh 

Beres, John P Pittsburgh 

Berie, Sister M. Constance Pittsburgh 

Berie, Sister M. Wilfred. Pittsburgh 

Bernott, Sister M. Gregoria Pittsburgh 

Bernott, Sister M. Marcelline Pittsburgh 

Bevilacqua, Sister M. Lucia Millvale 

Bilcheck, Sister M. Justine Munhall 

Bires, Sister M. Georgine Perrysville 

Black, Sister M. Jane de Chantal Carnegie 

Black, Sister M. Jerome Pittsburgh 

Blazek, Barbara. Pittsburgh 

Blacizek, Sister M. Sylvia Perrysville 

Blodis, Sister M. Miriam Pittsburgh 

Boccella, Angela I Pittsburgh 

Bodnar, Sister M. Innocence Pittsburgh 

Boehm, Martin J Pittsburgh 

Boes, Sister M. Flavia Allison Park 

Bogotay, George W. . . . Pittsburgh 

Bojarski, Sister M. Denis Allison Park 

Bolton, John F Pittsburgh 

Bonaj, Sister M. Leo. Perrysville 

Boonie, Sister M. Teresina Allison Park 

Boyer, Sister M. Clara L Pittsburgh 

Boyko, Sister M. Barbara Pittsburgh 

Boyle, Sister M. Michael Pittsburgh 

Bracht, Sister M. Aelred Allison Park 



Eighty-one 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



Brady, Kathleen A Pittsburgh 

Brandt, Sister M. Giles . . Greensburg 

Brandt, Sister M. Rose F Millvale 

Brannon, Sister Catherine A Allison Park 

Bransky, Sister Teresa M Perrysville 

Braukas, Sister M. Chrysostom Pittsburgh 

Breznay, Sister M. Stephen Perrysville 

Briggs, Sister M. Callista Millvale 

Brill, Sister M. Geralda Perrysville 

Bronchain, Sister M. Adrian Pittsburgh 

Brosteaux, Sister Marie Elsie Pittsburgh 

Brown, Sister M. Emmanuel Pittsburgh 

Bruck, Sister M. Alfreda Parkersburg, W. Va. 

Bruzga, Sister M. Kathleen Pittsburgh 

Bubnis, Sister M. Geraldine Pittsburgh 

Buday, Sister M. Anastasia Elizabeth 

Bucci, Sister M. Delphine Pittsburgh 

Budnicky, Mary Pittsburgh 

Bumbernick, Sister M. Geniga Pittsburgh 

Burgart, Sister M. Marita Wheeling, W. Va. 

Burgo, Sister M. Modesta Millvale 

Burke, Sister M. Charlotte Coraopolis 

Burke, Sister M. Magnifica Millvale 

Burkhart, Sister M. Jane Pittsburgh 

Bury, Sister M. Chrysantha Pittsburgh 

Bushlow, Sister M. Eucharia Coraopolis 

Buswink, Sister M. Ona Pittsburgh 

Butrim, Sister M. Felicita Pittsburgh 

Byrne, Sister M. Karen Allison Park 

Byrne, Mark R Pittsburgh 

Calabrese, Louis C McKees Rocks 

Caldwell, Sister M. Dolores Pittsburgh 

Camilletti, Sister M. Thomas Wheeling, W. Va. 

Campbell, Esther R Oakmont 

Carben, Evelyn M Butler 

Carcase, Edward Clairton 

Carlson, Clarence Pittsburgh 

Carlson, Sister M. Clarice Allison Park 

Carney, Regis R New Kensington 

Carney, Sister M. Lambert Perrysville 

Casellas, Sister M. Bernadita , Millvale 

Casper, Betty M Pittsburgh 

Cerny, Charles W Pittsburgh 

Chernitsky, Anna C Perrysville 

Chervenak, Sister M. Austin Perrysville 

Chandik, Sister M. Stanislaus Perrysville 

Charlton, Ella Pittsburgh 

Cigas, Sister M. Bernardine Perrysville 

Clarke, Sister M. Ursula Allison Park 

Clifford, Sister M. Vincent F Ambridge 

Cogley, Sister M. Alberta Wheeling, W. Va. 

Cole, Sister M. Anne Wheeling, W. Va. 

Colombo, Jean Wheeling, W. Va. 

Conant, Sister M. Celine Pittsburgh 

Connally, Sister M. Bartholomew Pittsburgh 

Conniff, Sister M. Blanche Wheeling, W. Va. 

Connolly, Sister M. Marcia Allison Park 



Eighty-two 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 



Conroy, Sister M. Colman Pittsburgh 

Corbett, Sister Maria Joseph Wheeling, W. Va. 

Coughlin, Sister M. Ellen Teresa Wheeling, W. Va. 

Cremin, Sister M, Philip Wheeling, W. Va. 

Curlionis, Sister M. Aurelia Pittsburgh 

Curlonis, Sister M. Florence Pittsburgh 

Curry, Sister M. Denise Allison Park 

Czarnecka, Sister M. Grace Pittsburgh 

Daher, Sister M. Elizabeth Pittsburgh 

Daher, Sister M. Isabella Pittsburgh 

Dailyda, Sister M. Bernard Pittsburgh 

Dainus, Sister M. Agnes Pittsburgh 

Dargis, Sister M. Marita Pittsburgh 

Dauber, Sister M. Damien Pittsburgh 

Davidson, Garnette E McKeesport 

Davis, Ethel V Pittsburgh 

Dawson, Sister Martin de Porres Wheeling, W. Va. 

DeCarlo, Mary Alice Pittsburgh 

Deck, Sister M. Rosemond Allison Park 

Dean, Sister M. Margaret J.. Allison Park 

Deet, William J . . Pittsburgh 

DeFinis, Sister M. Dominica Perrysville 

Delej, Sister M. Victorine Perrysville 

Deley, Sister M. Anita Perrysville 

DeMichaela, Joseph P Rillton 

DeNardis, Sister M. Roseann Allison Park 

Derganz, Sister Teresa Mary Mill vale 

Doktorik, Sister M. Meinrad Perrysville 

Dolbow, Sister M. Michaeline Wheeling, W. Va. 

Dolmovich, Sister M. Miriam J Allison Park 

Domenico, Sister M. Esther Pittsburgh 

Domyan, Ann L East Pittsburgh 

Donatelli, Eugenia Pittsburgh 

Donnellan, Sister M. Aquin Pittsburgh 

Douds, Cathryn M McKees Rocks 

Dovidaitis, Sister M. Marguerite Pittsburgh 

Doyle, Sister M. Honora Pittsburgh 

Drolet, Sister M. Dorothea Millvale 

Drop, Sister M. Audry Perrysville 

Druktenis, Sister M. Theophane Pittsburgh 

Dudas, Sister M. Cecilia Pittsburgh 

Dulska, Sister M. Emiliana Pittsburgh 

Durovics, Sister M. Celine Uniontown 

Dzombak, Doris J Pittsburgh 

Dzuban, Sister M. Modesta Perrysville 

Eichenlaus, Sister M. Janice Allison Park 

Eichorn, Sister Marie Celine Pittsburgh 

Emmerling, Mary J Pittsburgh 

Eskra, Sister M. Teresita Pittsburgh 

Evans, Sister M. Cecilia Pittsburgh 

Fahnestock, Sister M. Mariella. Millvale 

Fairweather, Nazelle McKeesport 

Fantaski, Sister M. Johnette Allison Park 

Fantauzzi, Sister M. Frances Cabrini Millvale 

Fantuzzo, Sister M. Jeanette Pittsburgh 

Farls, Joseph, Jr Freedom 

Farrall, Sister Jane C Pittsburgh 



Eighty-three 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



Fearon, Sister M. Judith . . Wheeling, W. Va. 

Fedoush, Sister Miriam H Greensburg 

Feelo, Joyce A Republic 

Filak, Sister M. Adele Pittsburgh 

Fischer, Sister M. Margaretta Millvale 

Fisher, Sister M. Ancilia Millvale 

Flaherty, Sister M. Francella Pittsburgh 

Fleckenstein, Sister M. Teresa Wheeling, W. Va. 

Fleming, Sister M. Gabriel Allison Park 

Flynn, Sister M. Grace Pittsburgh 

Flynn, Sister M. Monica Wheeling, W. Va. 

Freaney, Sister Margaret Mary Wheeling, W. Va. 

Fudala, Sister M. Concepta Perrysville 

Gabriel, Margaret Mary Perrysville 

Gambol, Sister M. Charlotte Perrysville 

Garrigan, Sister M. Veronica Pittsburgh 

Garstecka, Sister M. Cherubine Coraopolis 

Gaus, Sister M. Augustine Wheeling, W. Va. 

Gaziano, Sister M. Carmella Pittsburgh 

Gernat, Sister M. Thomasine McKeesport 

Gesuale, Sister M. Cabrini Pittsburgh 

Gibbons, Sister M. Elaine Greensburg 

Gibson, Sister M. Anna David Greensburg 

Gibson, Sister M. Rose Barbara Allison Park 

Giel, Sister M. Lorraine Allison Park 

Gionnatti, Sister M. Philip Marie Wheeling, W. Va. 

Gleeson, Sister M. Walter Pittsburgh 

Glowacka, Sister M. Virginette Pittsburgh 

Goertler, Sister M. Bernadette Millvale 

Goles, Sister Mary John McKeesport 

Golonka, Sister M. Annunciata Pittsburgh 

Graham, Sara T Monongahela 

Graibus, Sister M. Alexander Pittsburgh 

Greaser, Sister Mary Agnes Wheeling, W. Va. 

Green, Mary J Pittsburgh 

Green, Sister M. Zita Millvale 

Greene, Sister M. Michael Millvale 

Griffith, Sister M. Antony Wheeling, W. Va. 

Grimes, Sister M. Ursula New Kensington 

Groetch, Sister Rose Bernadette Baden 

Grondziouski, Sister M. Damien Pittsburgh 

Grottendieck, Sister M. Eleanor Wheeling, W. Va. 

Gusic, Sister M. Perpetua McKeesport 

Habowska, Sister M. Florian Coraopolis 

Haggerty, Sister M. of St. Michael Wheeling, W. Va. 

Haggerty, Sister M. Regina Cecilia Wheeling, W. Va. 

Hamar, Andrew Duquesne 

Hanchak, Sister M. Dorothy Perrysville 

Hanis, Sister M. Verene Perrysville 

Hanlon, Sister M. Kieran Millvale 

Hanrahan, Sister M. Patrick Wheeling, W. Va. 

Hanzes, Sister M. Generosa Wheeling, W. Va. 

Hasenkopf, Sister M. Eugenia Pittsburgh 

Heisel, Sister M. Gemma Allison Park 

Heiser, Sister M. Myra. . . ; Millvale 

Helmbrecht, Sister Marie Christine Millvale 

Hennessey, Sister M. John F.. Millvale 



Eighty-jour 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 



Herder, Thelma J Clairton 

Hesidence, Sister M. Paschal Millvale 

Heyl, Sister M. Laurentia Millvale 

Hill, Sister John M Millvale 

Hill, Sister Miriam Joseph Wheeling, W. Va. 

Hill, Sister M. Sigmund Allison Park 

Hoak, Ethel McKeesport 

Hluhany, Sister M. Patricia Perrysville 

Hirsch, Sister M. Domitilla. Allison Park 

Hochendonner, Sister M. Felicia Millvale 

Hoffman, Sister M. Bertha Marie Millvale 

Hoffman, Sister M. Susanne Millvale 

Honey gosky, Sister M. Paulette Perrysville 

Hoppel, Sister M. Alexius Pittsburgh 

Horvat, Sister M. Nivard Pittsburgh 

Hoscik, Sigmund Pittsburgh 

Hotovcin, Sister M. Madelline Perrysville 

Houston, Marion Venetia 

Houston, Sister Ann Therese Allison Park 

Hovan, Sister M. James. Perrysville 

Howard, Sister M. Martin Millvale 

Hoye, Sister M. Macrina. Wheeling, W. Va. 

Hoyt, Sister M. Rose Marie Perrysville 

Hoza, Sister M. Veronica Perrysville 

Hromi, John D Homestead 

Humenik, Lillian H Pittsburgh 

Hupert, Sister M. Celesta . Pittsburgh 

Hylarzewski, Sister M. Clarisse Pittsburgh 

Ibitz, Mary M Pittsburgh 

Jablonska, Sister M. Gonzaga Pittsburgh 

Jacobs, Sister M. Anita Pittsburgh 

Jagmin, Sister Mary de Sales Pittsburgh 

Javabage, Sister M. Pius Pittsburgh 

Jancek, Sister M. Augusta Perrysville 

Janeck, Sister M. Bertille. Perrysville 

Janiszewski, Sister M. Benedict Pittsburgh 

Jansauska, Sister M. Lorraine Pittsburgh 

Jankoviak, Sister M. Daniel Perrysville 

Januch, Sister M. Dolores Perrysville 

Jaskelevicia, Sister M. Agnella Pittsburgh 

Jaskiewicz, Sister M. Gregory Pittsburgh 

Jepson, Sister M. Theresa Pittsburgh 

Johnson, Mildred E Wheeling, W. Va. 

Jones, Sister Joseph C Allison Park 

Jones, Roberta W Homestead 

Joscak, Sister M. Albert Pittsburgh 

Joyce, Sister M. Laurence Millvale 

Jurko, Sister M. Leonilla Perrysville 

Kadelak, Sister M. Renita Millvale 

Kadis, Sister M. Clarita Pittsburgh 

Kadyszewska, Sister M. Conrad Coraopolis 

Kadyszewski, Sister M. Jane Coraopolis 

Kahr, Kathryn H Pittsburgh 

Kalchthaler, Sister M. Howard Millvale 

Kaleta, Sister M. Beata Perrysville 

Kalbron, Sister M. Gregory. Pittsburgh 

Kalvinskas, Sister M. Evangelista Pittsburgh 



Eighty- five 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



Kanapack, Sister M. Raphael Pittsburgh 

Karosky, Sister M. deSales Pittsburgh 

Kasper, Sister M. Adela Allison Park 

Kavalauska, Sister M. Roseanne Pittsburgh 

Kavoulakis, Michael J Canonsburg 

Kazouskas, Sister M. Tharsilla Pittsburgh 

Keenan, Sister Mary of the Holy Spirit Wheeling, W. Va. 

Kekich, Sister M. Clement Allison Park 

Kelly, Anna Wheeling, W. Va. 

Kelly, Clo Anne Duquesne 

Kenna, Sister M. Regis Pittsburgh 

Kernan, Sister M. Maureen Pittsburgh 

Kersting, Sister M. Paula Pittsburgh 

Keserauskas, Sister M. Loretta Pittsburgh 

Kiley, Sister M. Venard Pittsburgh 

Kilkeary, Sister M. Coleman Carnegie 

Killmeyer, Sister Herman J Allison Park 

King, Sister M. Demetria Pittsburgh 

Kiserauskis, Sister M. Barbara Pittsburgh 

Klawinski, Sister M. Alexander Coraopolis 

Klebba, Sister M. Gertrude Pittsburgh 

Kleinman, Sister M. Dolorosa Baden 

Koban, Sister M. Miriam Therese Perrysviile 

Koch, Mary E Dravosburg 

Koch, Saradee . Pittsburgh 

Koczan, Sister M. Lucy Perrysviile 

Kohut, William Homestead 

Koluder, Sister M. Marcia Pittsburgh 

Kondrach, Sister M. Leonora Munhall 

Kopco, Sister M. Eulalia Perrysviile 

Kopp, Sister M. Clara Allison Park 

Kosco, Sister M. de Lourdes Perrysviile 

Kotz, Sister M. Yolanda Pittsburgh 

Kracinobsky, Sister M. Ligorius Perrysviile 

Krafton, Sister M. Sylvia. Pittsburgh 

Krah, Elwood W Pittsburgh 

Kraujalis, Sister M. Celestine Pittsburgh 

Krebs, Sister M. Helene . Allison Park 

Kremenik, Sister M. Loyola Perrysviile 

Krsyten, Sister Miriam Joseph Perrysviile 

Krueger, Sister M. Victoria Sharpsburg 

Krug, Sister James L Pittsburgh 

Krynicky, Sister M. Augustine Uniontown 

Kubilus, Sister M. Jean Perrysviile 

Kueder, Sister M. Elenita Pittsburgh 

Kunzler, Sister M. Claudia Pittsburgh 

Kuzma, Sister M. Theophane Perrysviile 

Kvederic, Sister M. Louis Pittsburgh 

Lab, Sister M. Louis Allison Park 

Laing, Sister M. Edith Wheeling, W. Va. 

Langhart, Sister Theresa Marie Pittsburgh 

Larkin, Helene A Pittsburgh 

Laughery, Dorothy R McKeesport 

Lauth, Sister M. Venard Pittsburgh 

Lazar, Sister M. Anne . Pittsburgh 

Lehman, Sister M. Fidelis Perrysviile 

Leitem, Sister M. Monica Millvale 



Eighty-six 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 



Les, Sister M. Ursula Pittsburgh 

Lesnik, Sister M. Eleanore Perrysville 

Lhota, Sister M. Maria Millvale 

Lijek, Sister M. Adolorata Pittsburgh 

Limbacher, Sister M. Jerome Pittsburgh 

Lipke, Sister Hilda Marie Pittsburgh 

Lipke, Sister M. Josette Pittsburgh 

Lisi, Sister M. Innocent Perrysville 

Locke, Sister M. Florence Pittsburgh 

Lonsway, Angela Washington 

Lovett, Sister M. Adeline Pittsburgh 

Lowers, Mayme L Coraopolis 

Luchetta, Sister M. Ann R Allison Park 

Luffy, Sister M. Maura Allison Park 

Lussier, Madeleine F. . . . Pittsburgh 

Lutz, Sister Ida Mary Allison Park 

McBreen, Sister M. Rose Immaculate Wheeling, W. Va. 

McCaffrey, Sister M. Damian Baden 

McCaffery, Nora H Crafton 

McChesney, Sister M. Callista Greensburg 

McClay, Patricia A Pittsburgh 

McCusker, Sister M. Roger Millvale 

McDonagh, Sister M. Anne Baden 

McGonigal, Sister M. Alice Wheeling, W. Va. 

McFadden, Edward R Pittsburgh 

McGrath, Elizabeth R Pittsburgh 

McGuire, Elizabeth Baden 

McMahon, Sister M. Anita Wheeling, W. Va. 

McMaster, Clara Pittsburgh 

McMaster, Sister M. Rita Wheeling, W. Va. 

McPherson, Lorna P Pittsburgh 

Mach, Francis W Duquesne 

Maciag, Sister M. Angela Coraopolis 

Mack, Sister M. Kathleen Perrysville 

Mackey, Jennie M Washington 

Mader, Sister M. Charlene Pittsburgh 

Magill, Rita A Pittsburgh 

Maher, Sister M. Paulette St. Mary's 

Maher, Sister M. Pauline. St. Mary's 

Makowski, Sister M. Christine Pittsburgh 

Makowski, Sister M. Daniel Pittsburgh 

Malacki, Sister M. Marilyn Perrysville 

Malady, Ethel Hoge Canonsburg 

Malarik, Sister M. Erhard Perrysville 

Manda, Sister Marie Baptist Baden 

Manning, Sister Margaret T. Baden 

Maoring, Sister Anna Veronica Parkersburg, W. Va. 

Marchetti, Sister M. Natalie Allison Park 

Marguglio, Sister M. Bianca Pittsburgh 

Marquis, Sister M. Theresita New Kensington 

Maruca, Angela M Sewickley 

Masullo, Michael A Pittsburgh 

Matico, John J Duquesne 

Matulaiqs, Sister M. Mechtildis Pittsburgh 

Matyschak, Sister M. Damien Arnold 

Matz, Sister M. Lina Pittsburgh 

Maxwell, Sister M. Maureen Pittsburgh 



Eighty-seven 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



Means, Juanita . Wilmington, N. C. 

Megela, Sister M. Rosalie Munhall 

Menhorn, Sister M. Kevin. Perrysville 

Merliunas, Sister M. Seraphine Pittsburgh 

Melaro, Marie Oakmont 

Mertz, Sister M. Virginia. Pittsburgh 

Meszesan, Sister M. Patricia McKeesport 

Metzger, Sister M. Shelia Pittsburgh 

Miedlar, Sister M. Rosalie Coraopolis 

Mikrut, Sister M. Alexia Coraopolis 

Miller, Sister M. Phyllis Allison Park 

Miltenis, Sister M. Immaculata Pittsburgh 

Minosky, Sister M. Thaddea Perrysville 

Minutolo, Dorothy Oakmont 

Misko, Sister M. John Berchmans Perrysville 

Mongillo, Sister M. Florence Pittsburgh 

Mooring, Sister M. Anna V Parkersburg, W. Va. 

Montville, Sister M. Therese Pittsburgh 

Moran, Sister Laetitia Marie Wheeling, W. Va. 

Moran, Sister M. Pius Perrysville 

Morgenroth, Rev. Anton M Pittsburgh 

Morris, Charlotte Meade Aliquippa 

Morris, Sister M. Timothy Millvale 

Morrison, Sister Judith Ann Allison Park 

Mosco, Sister M. Jolenta Millvale 

Mossesso, Sister M. Victor Millvale 

Moyta, Sister M. Jerome Braddock 

Mrena, Sister M. Almerida Perrysville 

Muehlbauer, Sister M. De Lourdes Millvale 

Mulac, Sister M. Georgine Niles, Ohio 

Mulloley, Catherine Wheeling, W. Va. 

Muransky, Sister M. Peter Claver Perrysville 

Murf, Sister M. Annunciata Perrysville 

Murkowsky, Sister M. Rose Pittsburgh 

Murkowsky, Sister M. Therese Pittsburgh 

Murray, James R Homestead 

Namey, Elias, Jr Arnold 

Napier, Frank L Pittsburgh 

Narewska, Sister M. Cantius Coraopolis 

Naujelis, Sister M. Elizabeth Pittsburgh 

Navitsky, Sister M. Conrad Pittsburgh 

Neff, Sister M. Lucina Allison Park 

Neigh, Sister M. Barbara Millvale 

Newman, Helen G McKeesport 

Nickel, Sister Bernard M Allison Park 

Nork, Sister M. Paulette . Pittsburgh 

Norvaisis, Sister M. Rosalie Allison Park 

Novak, Sister M. Frances Braddock 

Nypaver, Sister M. Lawrence Perrysville 

0' Boyle, Sister M. Philomena Pittsburgh 

O'Brien, Sister Mary of St. Joseph Wheeling, W. Va. 

Obringer, Sister M. Barbara Allison Park 

Obringer, Sister Rita Marie Allison Park 

O'Connor, Sister M. Eileen Wheeling, W. Va. 

O'Dea, Sister Margaret Rose Pittsburgh 

Oehling, Sister M. Georgeann Millvale 

O'Keefe, Sister M. Aloysia Carnegie 



Eighty-eight 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 



Olivier, Mary E ; McKees Rocks 

Olson, Sister M. Francine . .^ Perrysville 

Olszewska, Sister M. Antonia Pittsburgh 

O'Mahoney, Sister M. Merici Pittsburgh 

O'Neill, Sister Frances De Sales Wheeling, W. Va. 

O'Neil, Sister M. Vincent Perrysville 

Oravec, Sister M. Veronica Allison Park 

Oravitz, Sister M. De Lellis Allison Park 

Orosky, Sister M. Timothy Perrysville 

Pacekonis, Sister M. Irene Pittsburgh 

Paesani, Sister M. Clare A Carnegie 

Palko, Herberta Pittsburgh 

Palliotte, Sister M. Margaret Allison Park 

Palm, Sister Mary Olga Millvale 

Pape, Sister M. Antonice Millvale 

Patrick, Sister M. Jacinta Perrysville 

Paul, Sister M. Paulette Allison Park 

Pauvlinch, Sister M. Carol A Allison Park 

Pavlik, Sister Anna M Perrysville 

Pavlik, Sister M. Immaculata Perrysville 

Pawlak, Sister M. Clara Pittsburgh 

Pawlicki, Sister M. Florence Pittsburgh 

Pcolar, Sister M. Rosine Perrysville 

Pecori, Louise McKees Rocks 

Peiffer, Sister M. Agnita Baden 

Pendleton, Jean A Pittsburgh 

Petraitis, Sister M. Albina Pittsburgh 

Petruska, Sister M. Celestine Pittsburgh 

Phillipi, Sister M. Linus Allison Park 

Pigossi, Vivien C Bridgeville 

Pires, Sister Joseph Mary Allison Park 

Pisarcik, Sister M. Florence Perrysville 

Plusquellec, Patricia L Pittsburgh 

Podlucky, Sister M. Margaret A Perrysville 

Poiarkoff, Mary A Aliquippa 

Polasky, Sister M. Loretta Perrysville 

Poliak, Sister M. Celesta Niles, Ohio 

Polizzi, Sister Marcella M Pittsburgh 

Polosky, Sister M. Evelyn Wheeling, W. Va. 

Popies, Lorraine. . Braddock 

Porter, Sister Maria Goretti Wheeling, W. Va. 

Porto, Inez Pittsburgh 

Potter, Lydia Pittsburgh 

Powell, Sister M. Bernadette Pittsburgh 

Pozek, Sister M. Marita Perrysville 

Pranaitis, Sister M. Thomasine Pittsburgh 

Ptashnik, Sister M. Tarcisia Pittsburgh 

Puchot, Sister M. Fabian Parkersburg, W. Va. 

Puhl, Sister M. Helene. Pittsburgh 

Puishis, Sister M. Valeria Pittsburgh 

Puishis, Sister M. Victoria Pittsburgh 

Quakers, Sister M. Virginette Allison Park 

Quinn, Sister M. Michelle Millvale 

Racas, Sister M. Miriam Pittsburgh 

Rachkaitis, Sister M. Ennamuel Pittsburgh 

Rafferty, Thomas W Pittsburgh 

Raible, Sister M. Agnes Allison Park 



Eighty-nine 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



Rainaldi, Sister Marie C , Pittsburgh 

Ransil, Sister M. Michele Allison Park 

Ransil, Sister Rose Bernard Allison Park 

Rattay, Sister M. Theonilla Perrysville 

Reachard, Sister M. Jean P Pittsburgh 

Rebar, Sister M. Vianney Allison Park 

Reckley, Sister M. Virginia Pittsburgh 

Rechtorik, Sister M. Bernice Perrysville 

Reis, Sister M. Genevieve Millvale 

Rehak, Sister M. Miriam Perrysville 

Reilly, Sister M. Jane F Pittsburgh 

Reisinger, Sister M. Alberta Pittsburgh 

Reinehr, Sister Paul Clara Allison Park 

Reiss, Sister Emma Joseph Allison Park 

Reynolds, Mary Elizabeth Pittsburgh 

Ritzel, Sister M. Aquina Pittsburgh 

Rodavich, Sister Maria Allison Park 

Roach, Sister M. Clarice Perrysville 

Rodman, Sister M. Florita Allison Park 

Roman, Sister M. Marlene Perrysville 

Rooney, Sister M. Agna Pittsburgh 

Rosenberger, Sister M. Benita Pittsburgh 

Rossetti, Dorothy M Pittsburgh 

Roth, Sister M. Catherine Allison Park 

Rotthoff, Sister M. Cecilia Millvale 

Rouda, Sister M. Marilyn Millvale 

Rowe, Sister M. Vivien Allison Park 

Rudolph, Sister M. Celesta Allison Park 

Rudzianska, Sister M. Raphael Pittsburgh 

Ruggire, Sister M. Angelica Allison Park 

Ruhe, Sister M. Jeanine Allison Park 

Ruhe, Sister M. Marietta Allison Park 

Rumshock, Emily G Irwin 

Ryan, Sister M. Agnes Allison Park 

Rybka, Sister M. Terence Pittsburgh 

Sagan, Sister M. Audrey Pittsburgh 

Samas, Sister M. Martina Pittsburgh 

Scanlon, Sister M. Patrick Wheeling, W. Va. 

Schacht, Sister M. Pierre Millvale 

Schatzel, Sister M. Amelia Pittsburgh 

Schehl, Sister M. Vincent Millvale 

Scherer, Sister Louis Mary Pittsburgh 

Schiff, Sister M. Veronica Pittsburgh 

Schutty, Sister M. Wilma Millvale 

Schlafhauser, Wilma M Pittsburgh 

Schlag, Sister Eva Marie Wheeling, W. Va. 

Schnoes, Sister M. Karen Pittsburgh 

Schratz, Sister M. Marcellus Pittsburgh 

Schreck, Sister Jane F Pittsburgh 

Schrenk, Sister M. Georgia Pittsburgh 

Scott, Sister M. Florence Pittsburgh 

Scully, Eleanor M Charleroi 

Sedary, Sister M. Rosaria Perrysville 

Sedlacek, Sister M. Roseanne Perrysville 

Sedlmeyer, Sister Bernard M Pittsburgh 

Seese, Sister Mildred A Allison Park 

Seikel, Sister M. Aurea Pittsburgh 



Ninety 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 



Sell, Sister M. Aidan Pittsburgh 

Sell, Sister Miriam D. Pittsburgh 

Seman, Sister M. Judith. Perrysville 

Seminatore, Sister M. Christina Allison Park 

Semmelbeck, Sister M. Marcia Wheeling, W. Va. 

Sevachko, Sister M. Dolores Uniontown 

Shade, Sister M. Patrice Millvale 

Shadis, Sister M. Theodora. Pittsburgh 

Shaunnessy, Sister Hilda Marie Pittsburgh 

Short, Sister M. Stella. ... Pittsburgh 

Shortley, Sister M. Rosine Pittsburgh 

Siebauer, Sister M. Boniface Pittsburgh 

Simaitis, Sister M. Ruth Pittsburgh 

Singer, Lois Mary McKees Rocks 

Sinnott, Sister Eileen Marie Wheeling, W. Va. 

Siratavic, Sister M. Beatrice Pittsburgh 

Sirinskas, Sister M. Colette Pittsburgh 

Skovran, Sister M. Edward Pittsburgh 

Skulis, Sister M. Augusta Pittsburgh 

Snyder, Sister Maru Eva Millvale 

Sofko, Sister Flora Marie Perrysville 

Soller, Sister M. Rosalyn Pittsburgh 

Solomon, Robert J Munhall 

Sonnefeld, Sister M. Georgene Wheeling, W. Va. 

Spainhour, Sister M. Albert Wheeling, W. Va. 

Spenger, Sister M. Terence Pittsburgh 

Sotomayer, Sister Marie Allison Park 

Spisak, Sister M. Leonita Perrysville 

Spisak, Sister Mary Edwin Perrysville 

Sprys, Theodore J Pittsburgh 

Squibb, Sister M. Martin Pittsburgh 

St. John, Sister M. Chantal Parkersburg, W. Va. 

Stach, Sister M. Alberta. Perrysville 

Stanley, Sister M. Francis X Allison Park 

Staud, Sister M. Luke Wheeling, W. Va. 

Stefanick, Alvira Pittsburgh 

Stein, Sister M. Claudia Pittsburgh 

Stevens, Sister M. Pauline Wheeling, W. Va. 

Stofcik, Sister M. Stella Perrysville 

Stoffregen, Sarah M Pottsville 

Stone, George E., Jr Pittsburgh 

Straiter, Sister M. Caroline Pittsburgh 

Strittmatter, Sister M. Rachel Baden 

Stroyer, Sister M. Michael Pittsburgh 

Stubenport, Sister Joseph M Pittsburgh 

Stublaver, Sister M. Valeria Johnstown 

Stuffle, Patricia A Munhall 

Stulpings, Sister M. Xavier Pittsburgh 

Stuthers, Sister M. Elaine Pittsburgh 

Sukits, Sister M. John Pittsburgh 

Sullivan, Sister Ida C Pittsburgh 

Sullivan, Maureen Pittsburgh 

Sullivan, Sister M. Lawrence Wheeling, W. Va. 

Suravcius, Sister M. Corinne Pittsburgh 

Sventy, Sister M. Aquiline Perrysville 

Svezeny, Sister M. Estelle Pittsburgh 

Szolis, Sister M. Gabrielle Pittsburgh 



Ninety-one 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



Tancraitor, Sister M. Maxine Allison Park 

Taus, Sister M. Ancilla Allison Park 

Templin, Sister M. Barbara Wheeling, W. Va. 

Terek, Sister M. Elaine Perrysville 

Thaner, Sister M. Damian Pittsburgh 

Therasse, Sister M. Rene Perrysville 

Therasse, Sister M. Aloysia Perrysville 

Thompson, Bettie J Columbus, S. C. 

Thornton, Paul H., Jr.. v ; Aspinwall 

Tierney, Sister M. Angelini Pittsburgh 

Tirpak, Sister Firmin M Perrysville 

Tishon, Barbara M Whitaker 

Tisony, Sister M. Elvira Perrysville 

Tobias, Sister Veneranda Perrysville 

Tomcho, Sister M. Vitalia Munhall 

Trimer, Sister M. Ignatius Pittsburgh 

Trojanowska, Sister M. Magdalen Pittsburgh 

Tuzik, Sister M. Concepta Pittsburgh 

Ubinger, Gertrude Pittsburgh 

Uhrinak, Sister M. Anaclete Perrysville 

Ujalsky, Sister M. Robertine. Perrysville 

Urban, Sister M. Joan of Arc Pittsburgh 

Utaris, Sister M. Georgine Pittsburgh 

Utlak, Sister M. Michael Munhall 

Vaise, Sister M. Consolata Pittsburgh 

Valteris, Sister M. Leonida Pittsburgh 

Vandenburg, Sister M. Rene Allison Park 

Vandzura, Sister M. Adalbert Perrysville 

Varga, Joseph L Pittsburgh 

Vask, Sister M. Dolores Pittsburgh 

Verbiscar, Sister Marie Pittsburgh 

Vertulia, Sister M. Sharon Allison Park 

Vey, Dorothy A Avalon 

Virtes, Sister M. Rupert. Perrysville 

Voytek, Sister M. Claudia Perrysville 

Wachter, Sister M. Terrence Allison Park 

Wagner, Sister M. Avila Millvale 

Wagner, Sister M. Gabriella Wheeling, W. Va. 

Wagner, Sister M. Jean Marie Wheeling, W. Va. 

Wagner, Sister M. Philip Neri Allison Park 

Wagner, Sister M. Susanne Allison Park 

Walker, Sister M. Edwin Allison Park 

Walsh, Sister Ruth Ann Millvale 

Walsh, William F Pittsburgh 

Walter, Sister M. Anthony Allison Park 

Wasikowski, Sister M. Josephine Pittsburgh 

Watkins, Donald K Midway 

Weatherly, Sister M. Pius Allison Park 

Webb, John P Turtle Creek 

Weber, Margaret B Canonsburg 

Weet, Sister M. LaRue Allison Park 

Weis, Sister M. Rosalie Millvale 

Weise, Sister M. Eleanora Millvale 

Wellinger, Sister M. Brendan Pittsburgh 

Welsh, Nell B Braddock 

Wheeler, Sister M. Philip Pittsburgh 

Will, Sister Louis Mary Allison Park 



Nintty-two 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 



Williams, John R Pittsburgh 

Wills, Matilda K i McKeesport 

Wilson, Sister M. Annunciata Pittsburgh 

Wingertsahn, Gerard R Pittsburgh 

Winschel, Sister M. Carolyn Allison Park 

Wintill, Sister M. Colette Pittsburgh 

Wolicki, Sister Stephen M Allison Park 

Yester, Sister M. Roselyn Pittsburgh 

Young, Sister M. Muriel .. Allison Park 

Yurgelaitis, Sister M. Assisia Perrysville 

Yurik, Sister M. Christine Pittsburgh 

Zajacz, Sister M. Anselm Pittsburgh 

Zamojska, Sister M. Gonzaga Coraopolis 

Zamojski, Sister M. Josephine Coraopolis 

Zavicek, Sister M. Christopher Perrysville 

Zawrotney, Sister M. Gerard Pittsburgh 

Zeigler, Sister Rose F Baden 

Zeitler, Sister M. Agnes Pittsburgh 

Zluky, Sister M. De Paul Perrysville 

Zolbrod, Paul G Pittsburgh 

Zvirbilis, Sister M. Marietta Pittsburgh 



Ninety-three 



Duquesne University 



College of Liberal Abts and Sciences 

School of Law 

School of Business Administbation 

School of Phabmacy 

School of Music 

School of Education 

School of Nubsing 

Gbaduate School 



Bulletins of the above schools are published separately 
and may be obtained on request from the 

DIRECTOR OF ADMISSIONS 

Duquesne University 

PITTSBURGH 19, PA. GRant 1-4635 



The 
DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 

BULLETIN 



<© 



Announcement of the 

SCHOOL OF NURSING 

1952-1953 




DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 
PITTSBURGH 19, PENNA. 



The 

DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 

BULLETIN 

VOLUME XL APRIL 1952 NUMBER 6 

Announcement of the 

SCHOOL OF NURSING 

For the Session 

1952-1953 




SCHOOL OF NURSING 
DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 
PITTSBURGH 19, PENNSYLVANIA 



VOLUME XL APRIL 19S2 NUMBER 6 



CALENDAR 

1952-1953 

SUMMER SESSION 

June 12, 13, 14, Thursday, Friday from 9:00-4:00; Saturday until Noon 

Registration, Eight Weeks Session, Day and Evening 

June 16, Monday Eight Weeks Session begins 

June 26, 27, 28, Thursday, Friday from 9:00-4:00; Saturday until Noon 

Registration, Six Weeks Day Session 

June 30, Monday Six Weeks Session begins 

July 3, Thursday Latest date to apply for degrees: August Candidates 

July 4, Friday Holiday 

July 12, Saturday Class Day 

July 19, Saturday Graduate Nurse Qualifying Examinations 

August 8, Friday Summer Sessions end: Commencement 

FIRST SEMESTER 

September 3, 4, 5, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday Placement Tests: 

Basic Collegiate Students 

September 8, 9, Monday, Tuesday from 1:00-4:00 Registration 

September 8, 9, Monday, Tuesday from 4:30-7:30 Registration: Evening School 
September 10, 11, 12, 13, Wednesday to Friday from 9:00-4:00; 

Saturday until Noon Registration 

September 15, Monday First Semester begins 

September 27, Saturday Latest date for change of schedule, etc. 

October 2, Thursday A.C.E. Psychological and Cooperative English Tests 

October 18, Saturday Graduate Nurse Qualifying Examinations 

October 25, Saturday Latest date for removal of E, I, X grades 

October 25, Saturday Latest date to apply for degrees: January Candidates 

November 1, Saturday .•••:• Holiday 

November 5, Wednesday . . Mid-Semester Examinations begin 

November 26, Wednesday {after last class) Thanksgiving Vacation begins 

December 1, Monday Classes resumed 

December 8, Monday Holiday 

December 20, Saturday {after last class) Christmas Vacation begins 

January 5, Monday Classes resumed 

January 15, Thursday Final Examinations begin 

January 24, Saturday Final Examinations: Saturday Classes 

SECOND SEMESTER 

February 2, 3, Monday, Tuesday from 1:00-4:00 . ....... .^ Registration 

February 2, 3, Monday, Tuesday from 4:30-7:30 Registration: Evening School 
February 4, 5, 6, 7, Wednesday to Friday from 9:00-4:00; 

Saturday until Noon Registration 

February 9, Monday Second Semester begins 

February 14, Saturday Placement Tests: Basic Collegiate Students 

February 21, Saturday Latest date for change of schedule, etc. 

February 21, Saturday Latest date to apply for degrees: June Candidates 

February 26, Thursday .. A.C.E. Psychological and Cooperative English Tests 

March 14, Saturday Graduate Nurse Qualifying Examinations 

March 21, Saturday Latest date for removal of E, I, X grades 

April 1, Wednesday {after last class) Easter Vacation begins 

April 7, Tuesday Classes resumed 

April 8, Wednesday Mid-Semester Examinations begin 

May 14, Thursday Holiday 

May 30, Saturday .•••:• Holiday 

June 1, Monday Final Examinations begin 

June 6, Saturday Final Examinations: Saturday Classes 

June 7, Sunday Baccalaureate Services and Commencement Exercises 

Registration is conducted during the days listed in the above calendar. 
Only by rare exception, by consent of the Dean, and on payment of a penalty, 
will late registration be permitted. 






SCHOOL OF NURSING 



CONTENTS 



Calendar Rear of Title Page 

The University Personnel 4 



Faculty 6 



General Statement 



The School of Nursing General Statement 13 



Programs 14 



Information on Admission 26 



Academic Regulations 30 



Tuition and Fees 34 



Courses of Instruction 39 



Three 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



THE UNIVERSITY PERSONNEL 
OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 



Most Reverend John Francis Dearden, D.D. 
Chancellor 

Very Reverend Vernon F. Gallagher, C.S.Sp., Ph.D. 

President 

Reverend J. Gerald Walsh, C.S.Sp., Ph.D. 
Vice-President 

Reverend Joseph R. Kletzel, C.S.Sp., M.A. 
Secretary 

Reverend Sebastian J. Schiffgens, C.S.Sp., B.A. 
Treasurer 

Maurice J. Murphy, D.Ed. 
Registrar 

Reverend William J. Holt, C.S.Sp., B.A. 
Director of Student Welfare 

Reverend James F. McNamara, C.S.Sp., B.A. 
Dean of Men 

Elizabeth K. Wingerter, M.A. 
Dean of Women 

Margaret Eleanor McCann, B.S. (Library Science) 

Librarian 

Reverend Salvator J. Federici, C.S.Sp., Ph.D. 
Director of Admissions 

Reverend Joseph F. Rengers, C.S.Sp., B.A. 
University Chaplain 

Colonel Russell W. Schmelz, U.S.A. 
Coordinator of Military and Air Science and Tactics 

Robert B. Challinor, M.D. 
Director of Student Health 



Four 



S CHOOL OF NURSING 






COMMITTEES 

UNIVERSITY COUNCIL 
Rev. J. Gerald Walsh, C.S.Sp Chairman 



C. Gerald Bropht 

Albert B. Wright 

Rev. Joseph R. Kletzel, C.S.Sp. 

Hugh C. Muldoon 

Rev. William R. Hurnet, C.S.Sp. 



Rev. George A. Harcar, C.S.Sp. 
Ruth D. Johnson 
Colonel Russell W. Schmelz 
Maurice J. Murphy 
Margaret Eleanor McCann 



COMMITTEE ON ADMISSIONS AND STUDENT STANDING 

Maurice J. Murphy Chairman 

Rev. Salvator J. Federici, C.S.Sp. Gerald L. Zimmerman 
Rev. James A. Phalen, C.S.Sp. Rev. William R. Hurney, C.S.Sp. 
Joseph A. Zapotocky Helen M. Kleyle 

Alice C. Feehan 



COMMITTEE ON SCHOLARSHIPS 






Rev. Salvator J. Federici, C.S.Sp.. . . 
Maurice J. Murphy 
Rev. John P. Gallagher, C.S.Sp. 
Vartkes H. Simonian 
Michael V. Ference 



Chairman 



Vincent P. Viscomi 
Vito Grieco 
Victor Plushkat 
Regina Fusan 



COMMITTEE ON EXAMINATIONS 

University 

College of Arts and Sciences Tobias D. Dunkelberger, Chairman 

School of Business Administration John T. Morris 

School of Pharmacy Joseph A. Zapotocky 

School of Music Brunhilde Dorsch 

School of Education Aaron M. Snyder 

School of Nursing Alice C. Feehan 



COMMITTEE ON STUDENT WELFARE 

Rev. William J. Holt, C.S.Sp Chairman 

Rev. Joseph F. Rengers, C.S.Sp. Elizabeth K. Wingerter 

Rev. James F. McNamara, C.S.Sp. Robert B. Challinor, M.D. 



Five 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 

FACULTY 
1952-1953 

ADMINISTRATION 

Rev. Vernon F. Gallagher, C.S.Sp., Ph.D President of the University 

Mary W. Tobin, R.N., B.S., M.A Dean Emeritus of the School of Nursing 

Ruth D. Johnson, Ph.B., R.N., M.A Dean of the School of Nursing 

Margaret Fitzurka Secretary of the School of Nursing 

TEACHING STAFF 

Ruth D. Johnson, Ph.B., R.N., M.A Dean of the School of Nursing t 

Professor of Nursing Education 

Grace Frauens, A.B., R.N., M.S Associate Professor of Nursing Education, 

Director of Public Health Nursing Program 

Alice C. Feehan, R.N., B.S., M.Ed Associate Professor of Nursing Education, 

Director of Basic Collegiate Program 

Regina E. Fusan, R.N., B.S Instructor in Nursing Education 

Sister M. Inez, R.N., B.S Assistant Professor of Nursing Education, 

Director of Nurses, Mercy School of Nursing, 

Director of Clinical Experience, 

Basic Collegiate Program 

Sister M. Boniface, R.N., B.S., M.Ed Instructor in Nursing Education, 

Educational Director, Mercy School of Nursing 

Sister M. Placide, R.N., B.S Director of Nursing Service, Mercy Hospital 

Frances H. Williams, R.N., B.S Director of Nursing Service, 

Western State Psychiatric Institute and Clinic 

Beatrice Elizabeth Ritter, R.N., B.S., M.A Director of Nursing, 

Gallinger Municipal Hospital, Washington, D.C. 

Alice K. De Benneville, R.N., B.S Director, Visiting Nurse Association 

of Allegheny County 

Ethel Russell, R.N., B.S., M.A Lecturer in Public Health Nursing, 

Educational Director, Visiting Nurse Association of Allegheny County 

Louise M. Carlson Anderson, R.N., B.S., M.Ed. . Lecturer in Nursing Education 

Mary F. Arnold, A.B., M.P.H Lecturer in Public Health Nursing 

Grace Beers, R.N., B.S Lecturer in Public Health Nursing 

Merle Bundy, A.B., M.D., M.P.H Lecturer in Public Health Nursing 

Wilda Camery, R.N., M.A Lecturer in Public Health Nursing 



Six 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 



David N. Kuhn, B.S., M.P.H Lecturer in Public Health Nursing 

Evelyn J. Leatham, B.S., M.A Lecturer in Public Health Nursing 

Mary Ellen Patno, B.S., M.S Lecturer in Public Health Nursing 

Lora B. Pine, B.S., M.A., M.S.S Lecturer in Public Health Nursing 

Janet Slease, M.S Lecturer in Public Health Nursing 

Paul Francis Wehrle, B.S., M.D Lecturer in Public Health Nursing 

Alberta Wilson, R.N., M.S Lecturer in Public Health Nursing 

Note: Liberal Arts and General Education subjects are pursued under the direction 
of instructors in the College and the School of Education. 

MEDICINE AND SURGERY 

W. W. G. Machlachlan, M.D., and Assistants Lecturers in Medicine 

H. H. Donaldson, M.D., and Assistants Lecturers in Surgery 

Sister M. Dorothy, R.N., B.S Instructor in Medical and Surgical Nursing 

Agnes Rehak, R.N., B.S Instructor in Medical and Surgical Nursing 

Lucy Stetter, R.N., B.S Instructor in Medical and Surgical Nursing 

Sister M. Etheldreda, R.N., B.S Supervisor, Medical Nursing 

Sister Anna Marie, R.N Supervisor, Medical Nursing 

Sister M. Alexia, R.N Supervisor, Medical Nursing 

Sister M. Daniel, R.N Supervisor, Medical and Surgical Nursing 

Sister M. Leonard, R.N., B.S Supervisor, Medical and Surgical Nursing 

Sister M. Anna Regina, R.N Supervisor, Surgical Nursing 

Sister Mary John, R.N Supervisor, Surgical Nursing 

Sister Mary Louise, R.N Supervisor, Surgical Nursing 

Sister M. Felicia, R.N Supervisor, Surgical Nursing 

Sister M. Irma, R.N Supervisor, Surgical Nursing 

Sister M. Charlotte, R.N Supervisor, Operating Room 

Frances Day, R.N., B.S Clinical Instructor, Operating Room Nursing 

Mary Hilka, R.N., B.S Clinical Instructor, Medical Nursing 

Laverne Oddi, R.N Clinical Instructor, Medical Nursing 

Joan Brady, R.N Clinical Instructor, Medical Nursing 

Sister M. Jean, R.N., B.S Clinical Instructor, Surgical Nursing 

Kathryn Gannon, R.N., B.S Clinical Instructor, Surgical Nursing 

Dolores Chuff, R.N., B.S Clinical Instructor, Surgical Nursing 

Marie Vasiloff, R.N Clinical Instructor, Surgical Nursing 

Dolores Jackson, R.N., B.S. . . Clinical Instructor, Medical and Surgical Nursing 



Seven 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



OBSTETRICS 

R. A. D. Gillis, M.D., and Assistants Lecturers in Obstetrics 

Sister M. Gaudentia, R.N Instructor and Supervisor, Obstetrical Nursing 

Sister M. Laurita, R.N., B.S Supervisor, Obstetrical Nursing 

Anna M. Kraft, R.N., B.S Clinical Instructor, Obstetrical Nursing 

PEDIATRICS 

Norman C. Miller, M.D., and Assistants Lecturers in Pediatrics 

Sister Sara Marie, R.N., B.S Instructor and Supervisor, Pediatric Nursing 

Rita Stritzinger, R.N., B.S Clinical Instructor, Pediatric Nursing 

Ann Hunt, B.S Instructor, Child Nutrition 

SPECIAL 

Mae Robinson, R.N., B.S Faculty Member, Public Health Nursing 

Clinical Supervisor, Out-Patient Department 

Mart Poiarkoff, R.N., B.S Instructor in Nursing Arts 

Sister M. Gonzaga, B.S Supervisor, Dietary Department 

Sister M. Innocent, R.N., B.S Supervisor, Emergency Room 

Sister M. Ignatius, R.N Supervisor, Service Department 

Sister M. Eugene, R.N Night Supervisor 

Sister M. Richard, M.A Instructor, Medical Social Problems 

Sister M. Gonzales, M.A., Ph.G Instructor, Pharmacology 

Mary Isabelle Langdon, B.S Instructor, Nutrition and Foods 

Irene Toth, B.S. Instructor, Diet Therapy 

Sister M. Agnita, M.A Librarian 



Eight 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 

PITTSBURGH 19, PA. 

GENERAL STATEMENT 

LOCATION 

The University, an urban institution serving the needs of an 
industrial city and surrounding communities in Western Penn- 
sylvania, is situated upon an eminence overlooking Pittsburgh's 
Golden Triangle. The campus on which most of the University 
buildings are located surrounds the Administration Building at 
Bluff and Colbert Streets in downtown Pittsburgh. The School 
of Law and the School of Business Administration are off-campus 
in the Fitzsimons Building at 331 Fourth Avenue, in the heart 
of the financial district. 

The University is easily reached by any of the railroad, bus, 
or trolley lines leading into downtown Pittsburgh. 

HISTORICAL STATEMENT 

In 1878 the Fathers of the Congregation of the Holy Ghost 
and the Immaculate Heart of Mary established a College of Arts 
and Letters which was incorporated in 1881 as the Pittsburgh 
Catholic College of the Holy Ghost. 

In 1911 a university charter was obtained and the Pittsburgh 
Catholic College became Duquesne University, with authority 
to grant degrees in the Arts and Sciences, Law, Medicine, 
Dentistry and Pharmacy. This charter was further extended in 
1930 to include degrees in Education and Music, and in 1937 
to include degrees in Nursing. 

The present schools of the University, all offering courses 
leading to degrees, are the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, 
the School of Law, the School of Business Administration, the 
School of Pharmacy, the School of Music, the School of Education, 
the School of Nursing, and the Graduate School. 

The student body now numbers over 4,000 each year. 

Women students are admitted to all departments of the 
University. 

PHILOSOPHY AND OBJECTIVES 

Duquesne University is a Catholic institution of higher learn- 
ing. It believes that education is concerned with man in his 
entirety, body and soul. It believes that education consists in 
the preservation, transmission and improvement of the material 



Nini 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



and temporal order through its elevation, regulation and perfec- 
tion, in accordance with the example and teaching of Christ and 
His Church. It believes that the product of education is the 
man of true character, who thinks, judges and acts constantly 
and consistently in accordance with right reason with a view to 
his ultimate end. 

The University has as its responsibility the conservation, 
interpretation and transmission of knowledge and ideas and 
values, the quest of truth through scholarly research and the 
preparation for vocational and avocational fields by intelligent 
and thorough training in the principles underlying these fields. 
The general aim is to facilitate through the media of instruction 
and related collegiate activities the development of purposeful 
character, intellectual accomplishment, emotional and social 
maturity and professional efficiency. 

The University attains this aim in the Colleges (Schools) by 
guiding the student through a cultural core program, through a 
concentrated study of a major field of interest, through an 
organized program of co-curricular and extra-curricular activi- 
ties and through established personnel services. 

The University aims specifically to assist the student in: 

1. The development of a sound philosophy of life through 
an understanding of spiritual and physical, intellectual 
and moral, social and aesthetic aims and values. 

2. The development of a well-balanced personality. 

3. The development of a broader understanding of our 
culture. 

4. The development of scholarship and continuous profes- 
sional growth. 

5. The development of a constant evaluation of himself as 
an individual and as a member of the community. 

6. The development of a genuine American attitude. 



Ten 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 



ACCREDITATION— MEMBERSHIP— AFFILIATION 

The University is accredited by the Pennsylvania Depart- 
ment of Public Instruction and by the Association of Colleges 
and Secondary Schools of the Middle States. 

It is also a member of the American Council on Education, 
the Association of American Colleges, the National Catholic 
Educational Association, the Catholic Educational Association 
of Pennsylvania, the National Educational Association, the 
Pennsylvania Education Association, the American Association 
of Collegiate Registrars. 

The University is affiliated with the Catholic University of 
America. 

The College and the Schools of the University hold member- 
ships in numerous educational societies and associations. 



CAMPUS FACILITIES 

THE LIBRARY 

The Duquesne University Library contains about fifty- 
thousand volumes, besides numerous classified but uncataloged 
pamphlets. Under the supervision of librarians, the students 
nave access to the shelves and are permitted to withdraw from 
the library any volume except those reserved for special reasons. 
The Library receives from various sources gifts and bequests. 

The Downtown Library in the Fitzsimons Building is sup- 
plied from the main University Library. 

The John E. Laughlin Memorial Library of the School of 
Law, located in the Fitzsimons Building, numbers over ten 
thousand volumes. 

The University Library is open, with some exceptions, from 
8:30 a.m. to 9:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, and from 8:30 
a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Saturday. 

THE UNIVERSITY CHAPEL 

The University Chapel adjoins the Administration Building. 
Masses are said at appointed hours throughout the week. Several 
Masses are offered on Sunday for the convenience of the students 
residing on the campus. Special devotions are conducted on 
feast days. 



Eleven 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



THE CAMPUS THEATRE 

The Campus Theatre also adjoins the Administration Build- 
ing. Its seating capacity is 350. Assembly programs and other 
activities are held in this theatre. 



BOOKSTORE 

The University Bookstore is located in the rear of the 
Administration Building facing the campus. 



DORMITORIES AND CAFETERIA 

Limited dormitory facilities are provided on the campus for 
out-of-town students. The University operates a cafeteria for 
the convenience of all students. Off-campus rooms in private 
homes are under the supervision of the Dean of Men. 



ATHLETICS 

The University is represented in intercollegiate athletic com- 
petition in basketball, golf, tennis and baseball. 

The instructors in physical education supervise intramural 
programs in various competitive sports. All physically able 
students participate in these programs. 



THE GUIDANCE BUREAU 

The Guidance Bureau contains the offices of the Director of 
Student Welfare, the Dean of Men, the Dean of Women, the 
University Chaplain, the University Physician, the University 
Dispensary, the Director of Testing, the Department of Psy- 
chology, the Speech Clinic. The Bureau makes available to 
students in all Schools of the University spiritual, physical and 
vocational guidance. 



Twelve 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 



THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

HISTORY AND ACCREDITATION 

The School of Nursing was originally a unit in the College 
of Liberal Arts and Sciences, as it has been the policy of the 
University to establish its schools under control of some already 
organized school. On March 15, 1937, the Department of 
Nursing Education was given the status of a separate school 
with a dean in charge. On December 3, 1937, the State Council 
on Education of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania approved 
the school and authorized Duquesne University to confer the 
degree of Bachelor of Science in Nursing and the degree of 
Bachelor of Science in Nursing Education upon graduates in 
course of the appropriate curriculum. 

The Public Health Nursing program of study was approved 
by the Education Committee of the National Organization for 
Public Health Nursing at its meeting of October 23, 1938. 

The School of Nursing was admitted to active membership 
in the Association of Collegiate Schools of Nursing on the basis 
of its advanced professional program in April, 1939. 

The Post-Graduate Programs and the Public Health Nursing 
Program were approved by the National Nursing Accrediting 
Service in October, 1949. 

The Basic Collegiate Program is approved by the State 
Board of Nurse Examiners. 

The School of Nursing continues as an integral part of the 
University and has all the resources of the University at its 
disposal. Thus the student may avail herself of the facilities 
and offerings of any department to enrich her background of 
knowledge and experience. Those subjects which pertain directly 
to the field of Nursing are offered only in the School of Nursing. 



PURPOSE AND ORGANIZATION 

The School of Nursing, as an integral part of the University, 
accepts as its own the aims and objectives set forth as those 
of the University itself. 

Recognizing the importance of all the faculties of the indivi- 
dual in the realization of professional effectiveness, the School 
of Nursing has included in its programs for both the graduate 
nurse and for the student who wishes to become a nurse both 



Thirteen 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



cultural and professional courses to the end that she will develop 
a sound philosophy of life, that she will gain understanding for 
living as a responsible person in the community, that she will 
develop a true appreciation and understanding of professional 
nursing, and that she will make an effective contribution in her 
professional field. 

The programs in the School of Nursing are organized on the 
bachelor's level under two divisions: 

1. Programs for Graduate Nurses. 

2. The Basic Collegiate Program. 

1. PROGRAMS FOR GRADUATE NURSES 

The School of Nursing offers, on the bachelor's level, four 
curricula of study for the graduate of a three year nursing 
course who wishes to increase her personal, professional and 
cultural understanding by additional study at the University. 
The student must fulfill the requirements of one of these cur- 
ricula: 

I. General Nursing (The Supplemental Program). 
II. Management and Teaching in the Clinical Unit. 

III. Teaching of Nursing Arts in Schools of Nursing. 

IV. Public Health Nursing. 

Admission to the individual programs will be based on the 
student's academic record, her background of professional 
experience, and her standard of performance on the graduate 
nurse qualifying examination. Each student will be individually 
advised as to the program she should follow in terms of her 
needs and in terms of her professional preparation and experience. 

I. GENERAL NURSING (The Supplemental Program) 

The General Nursing Program leads to the degree of Bachelor 
of Science in Nursing and is designed to help the student gain 
both a deeper and broader understanding of the comprehensive 
concept of nursing and a meaningful cultural background in 

Fourteen 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 



order that she may have a sound foundation for professional 
nursing competence, for later specialization on the master's level 
and for effective participation in advancing professional and 
community affairs. Both by course sequence and by simultan- 
eous study of cultural and professional subjects, the student 
should gain a deeper understanding of herself and of those who 
come under her care and direction as well as a fundamental 
understanding of the content and methods essential for com- 
prehensive nursing care. 

The directed field experiences in this program will enable the 
student to put into practice, both in the hospital and in the 
community, this comprehensive nursing care. In addition to 
the experience in individual-centered care, experience will be 
obtained in the general ward management essential to effective 
total nursing of the individual patient. 

Upon completion of this program the student will be pre- 
pared on the professional level for staff nursing positions in 
hospitals and for head nurse positions. 

Students enrolled in this program who have had two or more 
years of graduate nurse experience and who have demonstrated 
ability in nursing and potentialities of leadership may be per- 
mitted upon request and upon recommendation of the faculty 
to enroll during the senior year in courses preparing for clinical 
teaching and teaching in nursing arts. A quality point average 
of 2.0 will be required for admission to such courses and these 
courses will be in addition to the regular requirements of the 
supplemental nursing program. 



Fifteen 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



Curriculum 
GENERAL NURSING (The Supplemental Program) 

Sent. Hours 
Cat. No. Title Credit 

Professional Courses 29 

N. 401 Social Influence and Professional 

Progress 2 

N. 402 Growth and Development 2 

N. 403 Interpersonal Relations 2 

N. 404 Community Resources 2 

N. 405 Principles and Methods of Teaching 

as applied to Nursing 2 

N. 406 Comprehensive Concept of Nursing. 4 

N. 411 Management of the Clinical Unit. . . 2 

N. 412 Field Experience I 

(Comprehensive Nursing) 3 

N. 414 Field Experience II 

(Public Health Nursing) 6 

N. Ed. 431 Nutritional Planning 2 

N. Ed. 440 Field of Professional Social Work as 

Related to Nursing 2 

Natural Science 6-10 

Chem. 207,208 Principles of Chemistry 6 

Phys. 207,208 Principles of Physics 6 

Biol. 151 Bacteriology 4 

Biol. 308 Physiology 4 

Psychology and Education 9 

Psych. 220 General Psychology 3 

Psych. 310 Educational Psychology 3 

Psych. 464 Mental Hygiene 3 

Sociology 4 

Soc. 101, 102 Principles of Sociology 4 

Philosophy 6 

Phil. 101 Logic 3 

Phil. 202 Ethics 3 

Religion (Catholic Students) ' 4 

Rel. 101, 102 Fundamentals of Theology 2 

Rel. 201, 202 Nature of God 2 

English 12 

Eng. 101, 102 English Composition 6 

Eng. 201, 202 English Literature 6 

History 4 

Hist. 103, 104 History of American Democracy ... 4 

Electives 

Number of electives will vary for each student according 
to credit allowed for basic professional experience. 



Sixteen 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 



II. MANAGEMENT AND TEACHING IN THE CLINICAL UNIT 

The program in Management and Teaching in the Clinical 
Unit is offered for graduate nurses who have a background of 
experience in either teaching or supervision, although these 
graduates may avail themselves of the privilege of enrolling in 
the General Nursing program. This program will aid the student 
in increasing her personal and professional effectiveness in her 
present field through study in courses fundamental to personal 
development, to social understanding, and to better under- 
standing of her immediate professional responsibilities. 

Field experience in this program includes observation and 
some practice in total patient care and in Management and 
Clinical Teaching. The student's past experience and present 
needs will determine the details of the general plan of the field 
experience. 

The degree earned upon completion of this program is the 
Bachelor of Science in Nursing Education. 



Curriculum 

MANAGEMENT AND TEACHING IN THE CLINICAL UNIT 

Sent. Hours 

Cat. No. Title Credit 

Professional Courses 21 

N. 401 Social Influence and Professional 

Progress 2 

N. 402 Growth and Development 2 

N. 403 Interpersonal Relations 2 

N. 404 Community Resources 2 

N. 411 Management of the Clinical Unit... 2 

N.Ed. 421 Teaching in the Clinical Unit 3 

N. Ed. 422 Field Experience (Management and 

Teaching) 3 

N. Ed. 505 Orientation to Organization and 

Administration in Schools of 

Nursing 2 

N.Ed. 513 Nursing Seminar 3 

Natural Science 6-10 

Chem. 207,208 Principles of Chemistry 6 

Phys. 207,208 Principles of Physics 6 

Biol. 151 Bacteriology 4 

Biol. 308 Physiology 4 



Seventeen 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



Psychology and Education 

Psych. 220 General Psychology 3 

Psych. 310 Educational Psychology 3 

Psych. 464 Mental Hygiene 3 

Sociology 

Soc. 101, 102 Principles of Sociology 4 

N. Ed. 440 Field of Professional Social Work as 

Related to Nursing 2 

Philosophy 

Phil. 101 Logic 3 

Phil. 202 Ethics 3 

Religion (Catholic Students) 

Rel. 101, 102 Fundamentals of Theology 2 

Rel. 201,202 Nature of God 2 

English 

Eng. 101, 102 English Composition 6 

Eng. 201,202 English Literature 6 

History 

Hist. 103, 104 History of American Democracy ... 4 

Electives 

Number of electives will vary for each student according 
to credit allowed for basic professional experience. 



12 



III. TEACHING OF NURSING ARTS IN SCHOOLS OF NURSING 

The program in Teaching of Nursing Arts in Schools of 
Nursing is offered for graduate nurses who have a background 
of experience in either teaching or supervision, although these 
graduates may avail themselves of the privilege of enrolling in 
the General Nursing program. This program will aid the student 
in increasing her personal and professional effectiveness in her 
present field through study in courses fundamental to personal 
development, to social understanding, and to better under- 
standing of her immediate professional responsibilities. 

Experience in Practice Teaching will be required of students 
enrolled in this program. This will include observation of 
teaching, individual and group conferences, and actual teaching 
under supervision. 

The degree earned upon completion of this program is the 
Bachelor of Science in Nursing Education. 



Eighteen 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 



Curriculum 

TEACHING OF NURSING ARTS IN SCHOOLS OF NURSING 

Sem. Hours 
Cat. No. Title Credit 

Professional Courses 22 

N. 401 Social Influence and Professional 

Progress 2 

N. 402 Growth and Development 2 

N. 403 Interpersonal Relations 2 

N. 404 Community Resources 2 

N. 411 Management of the Clinical Unit... 2 

N.Ed. 413 Teaching of Nursing Arts 3 

N.Ed. 421 Teaching in the Clinical Unit 3 

N.Ed. 428 Practice Teaching 3 

(This experience will be under the 
direction of the University in co- 
operation with local hospital schools 
of nursing.) 
N. Ed. 513 Nursing Seminar 3 

Natural Science 10 

Chem. 207, 208 Principles of Chemistry 6 

Biol. 151 Bacteriology 4 

Biol. 308 Physiology 4 

Phys. 207,208 Principles of Physics 6 

Psychology and Education 9 

Psych. 220 General Psychology 3 

Psych. 310 Educational Psychology 3 

Psych. 464 Mental Hygiene 3 

Sociology 6 

Soc. 101, 102 Principles of Sociology 4 

N. Ed. 440 Field of Professional Social Work as 

Related to Nursing 2 

Philosophy 6 

Phil. 101 Logic 3 

Phil. 202 Ethics 3 

Religion (Catholic Students) 4 

Rel. 101, 102 Fundamentals of Theology 2 

Rel. 201,202 Nature of God 2 

English 12 

Eng. 101,102 English Composition 6 

Eng. 201,202 English Literature 6 

History 4 

Hist. 103, 104 History of American Democracy ... 4 

Electives 

Number of electives will vary for each student according 
to credit allowed for basic professional experience. 



Nineteen 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



IV. PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING 

The School of Nursing offers two programs of study to the 
qualified graduate nurse who wishes to prepare herself for the 
position of staff nurse in the general field of public health nursing. 
One program leads to the Certificate in Public Health Nursing 
and the other leads to the Bachelor of Science degree in Nursing 
Education with a Major in Public Health Nursing. 

The Certificate program requires approximately two sem- 
esters and one summer session devoted to academic study and 
a period of field experience. The program for the Bachelor of 
Science degree requires four to five semesters of academic study 
and a period of field experience. 

Field work is given in approved public health nursing agencies 
which provide supervised experience in the various phases of 
generalized public health nursing service. The amount and kind 
of field work required in either program of study depends upon 
the student's background of experience. The period is usually 
from two to four months, depending upon the needs of the 
individual student. The field experience requirement must be 
met, at least in part, prior to the last semester of theory. 

In order to qualify for a degree or a certificate, the student 
should have completed all public health nursing courses within 
the five-year period preceding the date upon which the degree 
is granted. A student who has not completed the courses within 
this period may request an extension of time. Addition of time 
is dependent upon validation of credits earned prior to the 
five-year period. 

It is desirable that the required courses in English Com- 
position, General Psychology, and Principles of Sociology be 
completed prior to admission to the following Public Health 
Nursing courses: Nursing Education 431, 432, 433, 435, 436, 
437, 440. Full-time students whose credentials are otherwise 
satisfactory may be admitted to public health nursing courses, 
but the courses named above must be incorporated in the 
program beginning with the first semester. Part-time students 
must complete a minimum of three credits in English Com- 
position, two to three credits in General Psychology, and a 
minimum of two credits in Sociology prior to admission to 
public health nursing courses. 



Twenty 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 






Curriculum 

Public Health Nursing 

Leading to a Certificate in Public Health Nursing 

Sem. Hours 

Cat. No. Title Credit 

N. 402 Growth and Development 2 

N.Ed. 431 Nutritional Planning 2 

N.Ed. 432 Introduction to Public Health. 2 

N. Ed. 433 Principles of Communicable Disease 

Control 2 

N.Ed. 435 Principles of Public Health Nursing 2 

N. Ed. 436 Organization and Administration in 

Public Health Nursing 2 

N. Ed. 437 Public Health Nursing Services I. . . 2 

N. Ed. 438 Public Health Nursing Services II. . 2 

N.Ed. 439 Public Health Nursing Services III. 2 

N. Ed. 440 Field of Professional Social Work as 

Related to Nursing 2 

N. Ed. 442 Teaching in Public Health Nursing. 2 

N. Ed. 443, 444 Field Experience 6-12 

Eng. 101, 102 English Composition 6 

Soc. 101, 102 Principles of Sociology 4 

Psych. 220 General Psychology 3 

Psych. 310 Educational Psychology 3 

Psych. 464 Mental Hygiene 3 

Curriculum 

Public Health Nursing 
Leading to a Bachelor of Science Degree 

The degree of Bachelor of Science is given upon the satis- 
factory completion of 126 credit hours subject to the require- 
ments listed below. 

Sem. Hours 

Cat. No. Title Credit 

Professional Courses 30-36 

N. 402 Growth and Development 2 

N. Ed. 431 Nutritional Planning 2 

N. Ed. 432 Introduction to Public Health. 2 

N. Ed. 433 Principles of Communicable Disease 

Control 2 

N. Ed. 435 Principles of Public Health Nursing 2 

N. Ed. 436 Org. & Adm. in Public Health Nursing 2 

N. Ed. 437 Public Health Nursing Services I. . . 2 

N. Ed. 438 Public Health Nursing Services II. . 2 

N.Ed. 439 Public Health Nursing Services III. 2 

N. Ed. 440 Field of Professional Social Work as 

Related to Nursing 2 

N. Ed. 442 Teaching in Public Health Nursing. 2 

N.Ed. 443,444 Field Experience 6-12 



Twtnty-ont 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



Natural Science 4-6 

Chem. 207, 208 Principles of Chemistry or 6 

Biol. 151 Bacteriology or 4 

Phys. 207, 208 Principles of Physics 6 

Sociology :••.••• 4-6 

Soc. 101, 102 Principles of Sociology 4 

Soc. 201 Social Problems 2 

Psychology and Education 9-11 

Psych. 220 General Psychology 3 

Psych. 310 Educational Psychology 3 

Ed. 410 Audio-Visual Aids 2 

Psych. 464 Mental Hygiene 3 

English 12 

Eng. 101,102 English Composition 6 

Eng. 201, 202 English Literature 6 

History. 4-6 

Hist. 103, 104 History of American Democracy ... 4 
Hist. 412 History of Pennsylvania 2 

Philosophy 6 

Phil. 101 Logic 3 

Phil. 202 Ethics 3 

Religion (Catholic Students) 4 

Rel. 101,102 Fundamentals of Theology 2 

Rel. 201,202 Nature of God 2 

Electives 

Number of Electives will vary according to credit allowed 
for basic professional experience. 



♦Suggested electives for Nursing and Nursing Education programs are 
as follows: 



Ed. 


351 


Statistics-Measurements 
English 




Eng. 


205 


Voice and Its Use 




Eng. 


206 


Principles of Public Speaking 




Soc. 


202 


Social Pathology 




Soc. 


306 


The Family 




Chem. 


301, 302 


Organic Chemistry 
Modern Languages 




Phys. 


207, 208 


Principles of Physics 




Soc. 


307, 308 


Crime and Society 




Econ. 


211,212 


Principles of Economics 




Ed. 


120 


Introduction to Teaching 




Ed. 


410 


Audio- Visual Aids 




Psych. 


330 


Child Psychology 




N.Ed. 


419 


Advanced Medical and Surgical Nursing 




N.Ed. 




Courses in Public Health Nursing 




Hist. 


101, 102 


History of Civilization 




Twenty' 


two 







SCHOOL OF NURSING 



•Suggested electives for Public Health Nursing program are as follows: 

N. 401 Social Influence and Professional Progress 

N. 403 Interpersonal Relations 

N. Ed. 446 Current Readings in Public Health Nursing 

Biol. 308 Physiology 

Econ. 211,212 Principles of Economics 

Ed. 120 Introduction to Teaching 

Ed. 210 History of Education 

Eng. 205 Voice and Its Use 

Eng. 206 Principles of Public Speaking 

Hist. 101, 102 History of Civilization 

Psych. 320 Adolescent Psychology 

Psych. 330 Child Psychology 

Soc. 202 Social Pathology 

Soc. 306 The Family 

Soc. 407, 408 History of Social Thought 

*The number of electives will vary for each student according to credit 
allowed for basic professional experience. 



2. THE BASIC COLLEGIATE PROGRAM 

The program for the high school graduate who wishes to 
study nursing in the Basic Collegiate Program is designed to 
help her: 

1. To gain a background of knowledge both cultural and 
scientific so that in her professional study and application 
she may have a foundation for complete nursing care of 
the whole patient. 

2. To gain an understanding of her responsibilities as a 
mature person to both the community and her profession. 



Ttventy-thrtt 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



Cat. No. 



Eng. 


101, 


102 


Nursing 


208 




Phil. 




101 


Chem. 


207, 


208 


Nursing 


103, 


104 


Soc. 


101, 


102 


Nursing 


107 




Rel. 


101, 


102 


Phy. Ed. 






Mus. Ed. 


121, 


122 


Eng. 


201, 


202 


Phil. 


202 




Biol. 




308 


Psych. 


220 




Hist. 


103, 


104 


Nursing 




111 


Biol. 


151 




Psych. 




464 


Nursing 




110 


Rel. 


201, 


202 


Phy. Ed. 






Mus. Ed. 


221, 


222 



Curriculum 
The Basic Collegiate Program 

FIRST YEAR 

Credit 
Course I Sem. II Sem. 

English Composition 3 3 

History of Nursing 2 

Logic 3 

Principles of Chemistry 3 3 

Anatomy 3 3 

Principles of Sociology 2 2 

Principles of Health 2 

Fundamentals of Theology 1 1 

Physical Education or 

Eurhythmies 1 1 

17 16 

SECOND YEAR 

English Literature 3 3 

Ethics 3 

Physiology 4 

General Psychology 3 

History of American Democracy 2 2 

Professional Adjustments 1 1 

Bacteriology 4 

Mental Hygiene 3 

Introduction to Nursing 2 

Nature of God 1 1 

Physical Education or 

Eurhythmies 1 1 

17 17 



THIRD, FOURTH, AND FIFTH YEAR 
Clinical Experience 

This includes theoretical courses in all subjects in correlation with clinical 
experience. 

Nursing Arts, General and Specialized Medical and Surgical Conditions, 
including Operating Room, Dietetics, Obstetrics, and Pediatrics will be given 
at Mercy Hospital School of Nursing and Mercy Hospital. Special affiliations 
for the following nursing experiences are: 

Psychiatry — 3 months — Western State Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Public Health Nursing — 2 months — The Visiting Nurses Association 
of Allegheny County. 



Turtnty-four 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 



Nursing in Communicable Diseases and Tuberculosis Nursing — 

10 weeks — Gallinger Municipal Hospital, Washington, D. C. 

Expenses of clinical experience: 

Mercy School of Nursing and Affiliating Fields: $280.00*— This includes 
room, board, laundry, uniforms, books, and fees. 

Public Health Nursing — The student is responsible for her own maintenance 
during this experience. 

Out of Town Affiliations — The student is responsible for transportation to 
and from the affiliating field. 

School Pin — The student is required to purchase the School Pin at the end 
of her course. 

•Subject to change. 



COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION IN 
THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Comprehensive examinations, covering the entire field of 
major study, must be passed successfully by every candidate 
before she may be recommended for a degree. Two general forms 
of comprehensive examination are given: that prepared in order 
to test the graduate nurse enrolled in the School of Nursing 
requires the student to demonstrate that she has a grasp not 
only of the factual content of her major field but that she has 
developed as well an ability to correlate her knowledge with 
allied fields; that prepared in order to test the student enrolled 
under the Basic Collegiate Program is similar, except that it 
requires in addition that the student show her ability to integrate 
her knowledge and be guided by it in planning a procedure for 
an actual case. 

The examinations are given in one session, with no time limit 
prescribed, but require approximately four hours. They are 
held in April, each student being notified of the exact time and 
place in a personal communication from the dean's office. 



Twtnty-five 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



INFORMATION ON ADMISSION 

CATEGORIES OF STUDENTS 

Students at Duquesne University are classified as matricu- 
lated and non-matriculated. A matriculated student is one who 
has satisfied all of the requirements for admission to the degree 
program of his choice and is pursuing courses in which he is 
qualified to earn credit for the degree. Registrants who are so 
classified may be full-time or part-time students in either the 
day or evening division of the University. Non-matriculated 
students are mature persons who are not interested in pursuing 
courses for a degree and who have not met the requirements 
for matriculation. 

A student who is enrolled as a non-matriculated or special 
student, must have the approval of the dean who is responsible 
for the courses to be pursued. In such case the entrance require- 
ments may be waived, but the courses will not carry credit 
toward a degree. Only in an exceptional case is a non-matric- 
ulated student permitted to attend regular day school classes. 

Students carrying less than twelve hours credit per semester 
are part-time students. 

Students carrying a schedule of courses each semester which 
will enable them to qualify for a degree in the regular time are 
full-time students. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

Admission of Regular students: A candidate for admission 
must be of good moral character. He should submit at least one 
recommendation of character signed by a person of established 
reputation. 

The candidate must be a graduate of an approved high school, 
in the upper three-fifths of his class. Those who place in the 
lower two-fifths are automatically subject to an entrance ex- 
amination. 

The candidate should present twelve units from the following 
fields: English, Social Studies, Language, Mathematics, Science 
and four units in electives for which the high school offers credit 
toward graduation, or the genuine equivalent. 

The candidate's application must be approved by the Univer- 
sity Committee on Admissions. 

The committee must be satisfied that the applicant is 
equipped to pursue her college studies with profit. In arriving at 



Twenty-six 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 



a decision the committee considers the applicant's character and 
general ability and examines the quality of previous achievement 
shown by the high school record. A personal interview may be 
requested. 

Should the committee decide that the quality of the appli- 
cant's high school work makes success in college doubtful, a 
special entrance examination may be given by the University 
Faculties. This examination will include the scholastic aptitude 
and achievement tests of the American Council on Education. 

Admission of Transfer Students: Students of approved colleges 
and universities may be admitted to advanced standing if their 
credentials so warrant. They must be in good standing and 
eligible to continue their studies at the institution previously 
attended. They must have been granted an honorable dismissal. 
A general average equivalent to the grade C at Duquesne is 
required of transfer students. Advance credit may be allowed for 
those courses which are the equivalent of the courses in the 
chosen Duquesne curriculum. No credit will be allowed in any 
subject in which a grade lower than C was obtained. 

Advanced standing is conditional until the student completes 
a minimum of one semester's work (15 semester hours). If her 
work proves unsatisfactory, the student will be requested to 
withdraw. 

ENTRANCE CREDITS 

Entrance Credits are stated in High School Units. A High 
School Unit represents a year's study in an approved standard 
secondary school, so planned as to constitute approximately one- 
fourth of a full year of work for a pupil of normal ability. To 
count as a unit, the recitation period shall aggregate approxi- 
mately not less than 120 sixty-minute hours. 



FRESHMAN DAYS AND PLACEMENT TESTS 

All entering Freshmen are required to be present for Fresh- 
man Days Activities which take place the week preceding the 
beginning of the first semester. These activities consist in general 
orientation conferences and in the completion of a group of 
placement tests. Failure to take the placement tests at the 
regular time will incur a penalty of $5.00 for individual tests. 
Registration for the first semester courses must be completed 
in this week. 



Twenly-seven 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION TO 
THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

The requirements for admission to the School of Nursing are 
the same as for the other undergraduate schools of the University, 
except for the following: 

Requirements for Admission to the Basic Collegiate Program 

The candidate's high school record must be approved by 
the State. 

As evidence of State approval the candidate's high school 
record must be evaluated by the Pennsylvania Department of 
Public Instruction at Harrisburg. A Memorandum of Credit will 
be issued by the Department of Public Instruction to candidates 
who have completed an approved four-year High School course. 
This memorandum is obtained by the Admissions Department. 
Before completion of the nursing course the student must obtain 
a Certificate of High School Study from the Department of 
Public Instruction. The fee for this certificate is ?2.00. 

An approved four-year high school course must comprise two 
years of social science including American history or problems 
of democracy, one year of mathematics (algebra or geometry), 
one year of science (chemistry, physics, or biology), four years 
of English, and additional work to make a total of at least 72 
counts or 16 units. Not more than 2 units may be allowed in 
commercial subjects. Applicants who cannot satisfy the require- 
ments by furnishing certified records from accredited schools may 
make up the deficiency by passing the examinations given for 
this purpose by the Pre-Professional Credentials Bureau of 
Pennsylvania. These examinations are held during January, 
May, and August in Pittsburgh, Philadelphia, Harrisburg, 
Reading, Scranton, Hollidaysburg, and Erie. Eighteen counts 
earned by examination are accepted as equivalent to one year's 
high school work. 

Further information regarding these examinations, the method 
of securing admission, fees, dates, etc., may be obtained by writ- 
ing to the Pre-Professional Credentials Bureau at Harrisburg. 

Requirements for Admission to the Graduate Nurse Programs 

In addition to the University admission requirements, the 
graduate nurse must meet the following professional require- 
ments: 

The applicant must present evidence of having satisfactorily 
completed a basic course in nursing. This course must make 



Twenty-eight 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 



her eligible for registration in the State in which she is graduated 
and must meet the approval of the School of Nursing. She must 
be a registered nurse. Furthermore, she must be recommended 
for entrance by the head of the nursing school from which she 
was graduated. 

The credentials of each candidate will be evaluated indivi- 
dually. Advanced standing will be determined both by the 
quality of the student's basic nursing program and by the 
competence evidenced on the Graduate Nurse Qualifying 
Examination to be taken by each full-time student during the 
first semester and by part-time students before 16 credits have 
been earned. In areas of deficiency, as evidenced both in exam- 
ination and in the basic nursing course, students will be assisted 
in reaching the desired competency. Not more than 60 semester 
hours of academic credit will be granted by Duquesne University 
upon this evaluation. The minimum number of semester hours 
required for the bachelor's degree is 126. 

Graduate nurse students will be required to take also the 
A. C. E. Psychological and Cooperative English Tests on the 
date signified in the University calendar. 

ROUTINE OF MATRICULATION 
Regular Students 

1. Applicants should address the Director of Admissions to 
obtain the necessary application blanks. 

2. The applicant will complete the personal application and 
return it to the Director of Admissions, 801 Bluff St., Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania. She will have her high school complete the creden- 
tials form which must be mailed directly to the Director of 
Admissions. 

3. Upon receipt of all credentials an evaluation will be made. 
The applicant will then be notified of her status, and if admitted 
will be provided with information on registration. A deposit of 
twenty dollars is required within two weeks of notification of 
acceptance, in order to assure the applicant of the reservation 
of a place in class. For further information see Tuition and Fees. 

Transfer Students 

1. Applicant should address the Director of Admissions to 
obtain the necessary form. 

2. The applicant will complete the form and return it to the 
Director of Admissions, 801 Bluff St., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 



Twenty-nine 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



3. The applicant must notify all colleges or universities pre- 
viously attended to mail directly to the Director of Admissions, 
Duquesne University, official transcripts of record. 

4. Upon receipt of all credentials an evaluation will be made; 
the applicant will then be notified of her admission status and 
provided with information concerning registration. A deposit of 
twenty dollars is required within two weeks of notification of 
acceptance, in order to assure the applicant of the reservation 
of a place in class. For further information see Tuition and Fees. 

REGISTRATION INFORMATION 

A registration period precedes each semester and summer 
session. (See University Calendar.) All schools register students 
during this period. Late registration, permitted for the first two 
weeks of a semester or the first week of the regular summer 
session, carries a penalty of 35.00. General regulations con- 
cerning registration are: 

1. Registration for all day students is held on the campus. 

2. The student's schedule is prepared in conference with the 
dean. 

3. Tuition and fees for the semester are payable at regis- 
tration time. 

4. Admission to any class is allowed only to those who have 
officially registered for that class. 

Students are not permitted to change their schedules of 
courses without the permission of their dean. A student who 
withdraws from a course without proper authorization receives a 
grade of F for the course. Change of schedule is permitted, without 
fee, only during the registration period. For a serious reason, 
change of schedule may be permitted during the same period 
that late registrations are accepted. 

ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 

The following regulations govern all undergraduate students 
of the University. The University reserves the right to change 
any provision or requirement during the term of residence of 
any student; and to compel the withdrawal of any student whose 
conduct at any time is not satisfactory to the University. 

1. Class Attendance: In order to secure credit in any course in 
which she is registered, a student must attend classroom and 



Thirty 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 



laboratory exercises regularly and promptly. A student who 
cuts classes or is habitually tardy may be dropped from the 
class and given a failing grade. 

2. Examinations: 

a. Entrance examinations are given at the beginning of each 
semester for those applicants of whom they are required. 

b. Mid-semester examinations are held on the dates assigned. 

c. Final examinations are given at the end of each semester 
and summer session. No student is excused from taking 
final examinations. 

d. Condition examinations, the date for which is announced 
in the university calendar, are given toward the end of 
the first month of each semester, in order to give students 
who have received the marks of E or X for courses taken 
during the preceding semester the opportunity to remove 
these deficiencies. An E grade can be changed by re- 
examination to only D or F. The fee for such examinations 
is?5.00. 

3. Grading: The University grading system adopted February 21, 
1929, and amended September 19, 1938, is the only method of 
rating recognized by the University. The system is as follows: 

A — Excellent 

B— Good 

C — Average 

D — Below Average — lowest passing grade 

E — Conditioned: eligible for re-examination 

F — Failure: course must be repeated 

I — Incomplete: grade is deferred because of incomplete 
work 

X— Absent from final examination 

W — Official Withdrawal 

P — Pass — used in certain courses without quality points. 

The temporary grades E, I, and X must be removed within 
the first thirty school days of the next succeeding semester. 
It is the student's responsibility to make arrangements with 
her dean for the removal of these temporary marks. An E 
grade can be changed by re-examination to only D or F. 
If not removed within the specified time an E or X grade 
becomes an F grade for the course. 



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DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



4. Unit of Credit: The unit of credit is the semester hour. One 
semester hour of credit is granted for the successful completion 
of one hour per week of lecture or recitation, or at least two 
hours per week of laboratory work for one semester. Inasmuch 
as the minimum number of weeks in a semester is sixteen, 
an equivalent definition of the semester hour is sixteen hours 
of class or the equivalent in laboratory work. 

5. Quality Points: Among the requirements for graduation is a 
quality point average of at least 1.0. The quality point system 
operates as follows: 

(a) For the credits of work carried, quality points are awarded 
according to the grade received : for a grade of A, the 
number of credits are multiplied by 3; for a grade of B, 
by 2; for a grade of C, by 1; for a grade of D, by 0; and 
for a grade of F, by minus 1, until the F has been removed 
by repeating the course successfully. The marks E, I, and 
X, being temporary indications rather than grades, and 
W and P are independent of the quality point system. 

(b) A student's quality point average can be calculated at 
the end of an academic period by dividing her total 
number of quality points by the total number of semester 
hours of credit she has obtained. 

The only exception to this rule is for credits earned in the 
course in Physical Education. 

6. Scholastic Standing: 

(a) Dismissal: A student, to be permitted to continue a 
course of study, must pass in two-thirds of the hours of 
credit carried in each semester, and must maintain a 
auality point average of at least 0.67. Failure to satisfy 
this minimum scholastic requirement will result in the 
dismissal of the student for low scholarship. 

(b) Probation: A student who fails in one-third or less of the 
hours of credit carried in each semester, or whose quality 
point average falls below 1.0, is placed on probation for 
the next semester. Students on probation may be required 
to carry a reduced schedule. 

7. Classifications of Students: Students will be ranked in the 
several classes as follows: 

Freshmen: Those having completed less than 30 semester 
hours. 



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Sophomores'. Those having completed 31 to 60 semester 
hours. 

Juniors: Those having completed 61 to 90 semester 

hours. 

Seniors: Those having completed 91 semester hours. 

GRADUATION 

1. General Requirements: The candidate for a degree must be of 
good moral character; must have paid all indebtedness to the 
University; must have personally made formal application 
for the degree at the Office of the Registrar prior to the date 
listed in the University Calendar; must be present at the 
Baccalaureate and Commencement Exercises. 

2. Scholastic Requirements: The candidate for a degree must 
have satisfied all entrance requirements; must have com- 
pleted successfully all the required courses of her degree 
program; must have no grade lower than D; must have 
completed the last year's work (a minimum of thirty semester 
hours of credit) in residence; must have passed the qualifying 
and comprehensive examinations as required in her program. 

3. Quality Point Requirements: The candidate for a degree must 
have a minimum quality point average of 1.0. 

4. Degrees awarded with honor: Degrees are awarded with special 
mention cum laude or magna cum laude to students who have 
completed the regular course with unusual distinction. Upon 
recommendation of the faculty, this mention may be raised 
to summa cum laude. 



THE SCHOOL YEAR 

The school year, which occupies 32 weeks exclusive of vaca- 
tions, is divided into a First Semester and a Second Semester 
of 16 weeks each. 

During a regular semester, classes are in session five days 
a week. 

Evening and Saturday classes are offered throughout both 
semesters. 

Special Summer Sessions are held during the months of June, 
July, and August. These courses are taught by regular faculty 



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members or by visiting instructors. The dates of these sessions 
and the courses being offered are listed in the separately-published 
Summer Schedule, obtainable from the Director of Admissions. 

Evening, Saturday, and Summer classes meet the need of 
a) students who wish to remove deficiencies in courses; b) grad- 
uates and undergraduates who are fulfilling requirements for 
degrees by part-time study; c) teachers who are working for 
certification. 

TUITION AND FEES 

The University reserves the right to change the fees herein stated at any 
time without notice. Whenever a change is made it will become effective at 
the beginning of the succeeding academic year. 

Matriculation Deposit $20.00 

The matriculation deposit of twenty dollars is 
payable within two weeks from the date of notifica- 
tion of acceptance to the University. The purpose 
of this fee is to assure the student of a reservation 
of a place in a class. This deposit will be credited 
against the student's tuition and fees at the time 
of registration for the semester in which the stu- 
dent's application has been approved. This deposit 
is not refundable. 

Tuition, per Semester Hour Credit $12.00 

The total tuition for the semester is payable at 
the time of registration, unless other arrangements 
are made through the Deferred Tuition Office. 

Activities Fee, per Semester $10.00 

This fee gives access to intercollegiate and 
intramural sports activities, concerts, dramatic 
presentations and other events throughout the 
scholastic year. It entitles the student to copies 
of the weekly newspaper. This fee is payable by 
all students carrying twelve or more credits in the 
regular semesters. 

Library Fee, per Semester $ 5.00 

This fee gives library privileges, and is payable 
each semester by all fulltime students of the 
university, and by those taking 12 or more credits 
in the Summer Sessions. 



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Library Fee, Part-time Students $ 2.00 

This fee is payable by all students carrying less than 
twelve credits in any semester or summer session. 

Registration Fee $ 1.00 

A fee of ?1.00 is required of every student at each 
registration period. 

Student Health Fee, per Semester $ 1.00 

This fee includes a physical examination at entrance, 
and advice and emergency treatment at the univer- 
sity dispensary. 

Graduate Nurse Qualifying Examination Fee $ 4.00 

Auditor's Fees, per Semester Hour $12.00 

The fees for auditors are the same as those for 
regularly matriculated students. 

Late Registration Fee $ 5.00 

This fee is charged to all students registering later 
than the last day of the regular registration period. 

Late Examination Fee $ 5.00 

This fee is charged to all students taking an exam- 
ination at any other than the regularly scheduled 
time. 

Condition Examination Fee $ 5.00 

This fee is charged for each condition and special 
examination for removal of E and X grades. It is 
payable in advance. 

Change of Course Fee $ 1.00 

Student Publication Fee, per year $ 1.00 

Payable by all part-time students in the regular 
sessions. The fee entitles them to a copy of the 
weekly "Duquesne Duke". 

Laboratory Fees: Students enrolled in the following courses 
will pay laboratory fees, not subject to refund, as indicated : 



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Laboratory Fees $ 2.50 

Nursing 103, 104 

Laboratory Fees $12.50 

Biology 151, 251, 308 

Laboratory Fees $17.50 

Chemistry 111, 112, 205, 206, 207, 208, 301, 302 

Graduation Fees — Bachelor's Degree $15.00 

REFUNDS FOR WITHDRAWALS 

Students who withdraw from the University for a satisfactory 
reason within eight weeks after the opening of the semester are 
entitled to a proportionate refund provided that they notify 
their dean at the time of the withdrawal. Fees are not refundable. 

Refunds are made in accordance with the following schedule: 

Withdrawal Refund 

1st Week 90% 

2nd Week t 70% 

3rd Week 60% 

4th Week 50% 

5th Week 30% 

6th Week 20% 

7th Week 10% 

8th Week 5% 

No refund will be made in the case of students who are 
registered on probation or who are requested to withdraw as a 
result of faculty action. 

The Refund Schedule for Summer Sessions (six or eight weeks 
session) is as follows: 

Withdrawal Refund 

1st Week 60% 

2nd Week 20% 

There are no refunds after the second week of a Summer 
Session. Fees are not refundable. 



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INFORMATION ON TOTAL EXPENSE 

Undergraduate tuition is charged at the rate of ?12.00 per 
semester hour credit. To the cost of tuition must be added the 
fixed fees chargeable to all students in the University, such as 
the Activities Fee, the Medical Fee, Registration Fee, and any 
fees attached to given courses. The student who carries the 
normal semester load of 16 credits must anticipate a tuition- 
and-fees charge of approximately $200. An additional expense 
of approximately $20.00 will be realized for books and supplies. 



HOW EXPENSES MAY BE PAID 

All expenses are due and payable on the day of registration. 
Upon application, however, at the Office of Deferred Tuition, 
a student may arrange to pay part of her expenses down and the 
remainder, which is subject to a service charge, in regular 
monthly installments during the semester. 



RESIDENCE 

A limited number of residences are maintained by the 
University on campus for the convenience of out-of-town 
students. Reservations for room space are made on a semester 
basis through the Dean of Men or the Dean of Women. A 
deposit of $10.00, payable to Duquesne University, must ac- 
company each room application. 

The deposit will be held as a breakage deposit until the 
satisfactory termination of the student's lease. Deductible from 
the deposit are any damages to room contents or buildings and 
a pro rata general breakage. 

A student who is prevented, for any reason, from occupying 
the room reserved will be released and the deposit refunded if 
the Dean of Men or the Dean of Women is notified in writing 
at least two weeks prior to the date of registration. 

Room rent is payable in advance. Rooms may be assigned 
upon receipt of the room deposit but possession is not given 
until the rent is paid in full. 

Non-commuting students are not permitted to live ofF- 
campus without permission of the Dean of Men or the Dean of 
Women. 



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DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



STUDENT AID 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

The University offers a definite number of competitive exam- 
ination scholarships. Eligible for the examinations, which are 
held annually in April, are students who will be, according to 
certification by their principal, graduated in the upper third of 
their high school class. All scholarships are awarded for two 
years, but are potentially four-year awards, provided that the 
requirements for continuance of the award are fulfilled. Informa- 
tion concerning them may be had by addressing the Committee 
on Scholarships. 

The University Alumni Association makes available annually 
a $100.00 Scholarship to a competent and deserving student in 
the School of Nursing. Application for this Scholarship is made 
to the Dean of the School of Nursing. 

The School of Nursing Alumnae Association makes available 
annually a $100.00 Scholarship to a competent and deserving 
student in the Basic Collegiate Program in Nursing. Application 
for this Scholarship is made to the Dean of the School of Nursing. 

STUDENT EMPLOYMENT 

The University makes available limited student employment 
for students who are in need of financial assistance and who, at 
the same time, maintain a satisfactory scholastic average and 
give evidence of good character. Opportunities for employment 
exist on and about the campus. Information may be had by 
addressing the Committee on Student Welfare. 

STUDENT LOAN 

The University has available a limited sum of money in 
various student loan funds, which each year is loaned to under- 
graduate students who have completed at least thirty semester 
hours credit at the University, and who meet the requirements 
of good scholarship, good character, and need of financial 
assistance. These loans are granted only for the purpose of the 
payment of tuition. They are made available through the 
University Student Loan Fund. Information may be had by 
addressing the Committee on Student Welfare. 



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SCHOOL OF NURSING 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

ENGLISH— COMPOSITION AND LITERATURE 

101, 102. English Composition. Major emphasis placed on actual 
practice in writing. A rapid review of English grammar and 
rhetoric will be provided. Credit, Three hours each semester. 

201, 202. English Literature. A course designed to provide the 
student with a general knowledge of English literature, to 
familiarize her with the writers of prose and poetry, and to place 
their works against the historical, social, and philosophical back- 
ground of their times. The continuity of the periods is established 
by a study of Romanticism and Classicism, and of Christian and 
non-Christian modes of thought. Credit, Three hours each sem- 
ester. 

GENERAL EDUCATION 

410. Audio-Visual Aids. An evaluation of numerous forms of audio- 
visual aids. Each student is required to compile a source book 
of sensory aids for her teaching field. Credit, Two hours. Ference. 

HISTORY 

101, 102. History of Civilization. A general survey of World History 
emphasizing the development of the main elements in the make- 
up of Western Civilization. Credit, Three hours each semester. 

103, 104. History of American Democracy. A political history of the 
United States describing the steps in the formation of our de- 
mocracy during the Colonial Period through the formation of 
the Constitution and its practical development to the New Deal. 
Credit, Two hours each semester. 

412. History of Pennsylvania. A comprehensive course in Penn- 
sylvania history, with special attention to the economic resources 
of the commonwealth. Credit, Two hours. Mrs. Barr. 

NURSING 
The Basic Collegiate Program 

103, 104. Anatomy. The study of the structure and significance of 
the various organs and systems of the human body. Laboratory 
work includes the dissection of laboratory animals, the study of 
tissue slides, the human skeleton and demonstration-dissection 
of various organs. Credit, Three hours each semester. Miss 
Feehan. 



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DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



107. Principles of Health. This course deals with the principles of 
healthful living. Credit, Two hours. Miss Fusan. 

110. Introduction to Nursing. This course is designed to orient the 
young student nurse to the hospital, to the patient and to the 
care of the patient's environment. It emphasizes the basic prin- 
ciples and technique underlying the elementary practice of 
nursing. Credit, Two hours. Miss Feehan. 

111. Professional Adjustments I. This course is designed to assist 
the student in her orientation to the professional aspects of 
nursing. Such a course should and will assist her in meeting 
new problems and in establishing correct relationships in her 
early nursing experience. Credit, One hour. Miss Fusan. 

208. History of Nursing. A survey of the history of nursing, 
from early medieval, to modern times. Credit, Two hours. 
Miss Fusan. 

300. Nursing Arts. A course designed to assist the student in 
the development of basic skills of nursing based on sound 
scientific principles of nursing and total patient care. Lecture, 
recitation, and supervised practice in the classroom and clinical 
situation. Credit, Four hours. 

301. Pharmacology I. A study of the methods used for measur- 
ing drugs, calculating dosages and making solutions. It stresses 
the nurse's responsibility for drug administration. Credit, One 
hour. 

302. Pharmacology II. A course planned to acquaint the student 
with the nature, action, therapeutic uses, dosage, toxicology, 
technique of administration and preparation of commonly used 
drugs. Credit, Two hours. 

303. Nutrition, Foods and Cookery. A study of the principles of 
nutrition and food preparation for individual dietary needs. 
Lecture and Laboratory. Credit, Three hours. Mount Mercy 
College Staff. 

304. Medical and Surgical Nursing. This course is designed to help 
the student gain an understanding of the care of the patient with 
medical or surgical conditions. Causes, symptoms, treatment 
and control of diseased conditions are studied along with the 
integration of allied subjects. Advanced nursing procedures are 
included as a part of this course with emphasis on the care of 
the patient as a whole. Credit, Seven hours. 



Forty 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 



305. Supervised Experience in Medical and Surgical Nursing. Students 
are assigned to the various clinical units of the hospital for 
supervised practice in the care of male and female patients with 
medical and surgical conditions. Planned clinical teaching pro- 
grams, including nursing care studies, ward conferences, indivi- 
dual conferences and incidental teaching, continue throughout 
this experience. Credit, Seven hours. 

306. Operating Room Technique. A course designed to develop an 
understanding of aseptic nursing procedures and principles. 
Credit, One hour. 

307. Experience in Operating Room. Supervised practice in assisting 
with surgical operations; preparation of supplies and equipment. 
Planned clinical teaching programs, including nursing care study, 
ward conferences, individual conferences and incidental teaching, 
continue throughout this experience. Credit, One hour. 

308. Diet Therapy. A study of the applications of underlying 
principles of nutrition in health and diseased conditions. Credit, 
Two hours. 

309. Experience in Diet Therapy. Supervised practice in the plan- 
ning, calculating and serving of therapeutic diets. Planned 
clinical teaching programs, including nursing care study, ward 
conferences, individual conferences and incidental teaching, 
continue throughout this experience. Credit, Two hours. 

310. Social Aspects of Illness. The aim of this course is to give the 
student an awareness of the social component in medical care. 
Adverse social conditions are noted as causes, aggravators, or 
results of much illness. Credit, One hour. 

311. Maternity Nursing. A course designed to develop the ability 
to give total nursing care to the patient throughout the complete 
maternity cycle. Credit, Three hours. 

312. Experience in Maternity Nursing. Supervised practice in all 
phases of maternal and new-born care. Planned clinical teaching 
programs, including nursing care study, ward conferences, 
individual conferences and incidental teaching, continue through- 
out this experience. Credit, Three hours. 

313. Nursing of Children. This course is designed to develop the 
ability to give complete care to the child in health or disease. 
Growth and development is included as an integral part of this 
study. Credit, Three hours. 



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DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



314. Experience in Nursing of Children. Supervised practice in all 
phases of child care. Play activities and patient teaching experi- 
ence are stressed. Planned clinical teaching programs, including 
nursing care study, ward conferences, individual conferences and 
incidental teaching, continue throughout this experience. Credit, 
Three hours. 

450. Communicable Disease Nursing. A course designed to assist 
the student in gaining an understanding of the principles of 
control, symptoms and treatment of communicable diseases. 
Credit, One hour. 

451. Communicable Disease Nursing Experience. Supervised prac- 
tice given at Gallinger Municipal Hospital, Washington, D. C, 
in the complete care of the patient with a communicable disease. 
Planned clinical teaching programs, including nursing care study, 
ward conferences, individual conferences and incidental teaching, 
continue throughout this experience. Credit, One hour. 

452. Tuberculosis Nursing. A course designed to assist the student 
in gaining an understanding of symptoms, treatment and control 
of tuberculosis. Credit, Two hours. 

453. Experience in Tuberculosis Nursing. Supervised practice at 
Gallinger Municipal Hospital, Washington, D. C, in the com- 
plete care of patients with tuberculosis. Planned clinical teaching 
programs, including nursing care study, ward conferences, 
individual conferences and incidental teaching, continue through- 
out this experience. Credit, Two hours. 

454. Principles of Psychiatric Nursing. A study of psychiatric nurs- 
ing including the community significance of mental disorder, 
personality development and maladjustment. Lectures, demon- 
strations, and field trips. Credit, Three hours. Western Psychi- 
atric Institute and Clinic Staff. 

* 

455. Practice in Psychiatric Nursing Experience. Supervised practice 
in the application of principles of nursing in the care of the 
psychiatric patient. Group conferences, demonstrations and 
nursing care study. Credit, Three hours. Western Psychiatric 
Institute and Clinic Staff. 

456. Public Health Nursing. Through an affiliation with the 
Visiting Nurse Association of Allegheny County the student has 
an opportunity to gain an experience in community nursing. 
Concurrent with this experience the student receives instruction 
in the principles of Public Health Nursing. Field trips, demon- 
strations and conferences. Credit, Four hours. 



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SCHOOL OF NURSING 



457. Professional Adjustments II. This course is designed to assist 
the student in gaining an understanding of the place of profes- 
sional nursing in society and to direct the young nurse into 
participation in professional and community activities as well 
as to help her in planning for the future. Credit, Two hours. 



Programs for Graduate Nurses 

401. Social Influence and Professional Progress. In this course the 
recent developments in all branches of the profession of nursing 
will be considered. The social movements effecting these changes 
and influencing future professional progress will be concurrently 
considered as each field is presented and evaluated. This course 
will be conducted by discussion and lectures. Credit, Two hours. 
Mrs. Anderson. 

402. Growth and Development. This course deals with the develop- 
mental aspects of health, the mental, social, spiritual develop- 
ment of the individual and the behaviour characteristics of the 
ascending age levels as a guide for the understanding of both 
normal and atypical persons. Credit, Two hours. 

403. Interpersonal Relations. This course provides for a study of 
the personality factors and behaviour patterns which influence 
individual adjustment and successful interactive relations with 
others. Credit, Two hours. 

404. Community Resources. This course deals with resources for 
disease prevention, treatment and rehabilitation in the fields of 
health and welfare. Use of facilities and the interrelationships 
of hospital, agency and community are studied. Credit, Two 
hours. Miss Frauens. 

405. Principles and Methods of Teaching as Applied to Nursing. This 
course deals with the philosophy, principles and methods of 
teaching and their application to the teaching of individuals and 
groups by the nurse in hospital and community situations. 
Credit, Two hours. Miss Feehan. 

406. Comprehensive Concept of Nursing. Through study in this 
course the student should gain a more comprehensive under- 
standing of nursing as it relates to the total care of the patient 
in the community and in the hospital in the areas ranging from 
prevention to rehabilitation. Principles of public health nursing 
will be applied throughout the study of nursing. Use of the out- 
patient service, the team concept of planning, in both the com- 
munity and the hospital, and rehabilitation adjustment will be 



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DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



studied. Round table discussion. Credit, Four hours. Miss 
Fusan and Miss Frauens. 

409. Health Education. A study of the principles underlying per- 
sonal health. Through individual projects an appreciation of 
community health is developed. The responsibility for health 
programs in schools of nursing in relation to both student and 
patient is given definite attention. Credit, Two hours. Miss Fusan. 

411. Management of the Clinical Unit. This course will present the 
principles of efficient management and democratic administration 
of the clinical unit in the hospital. It will include a discussion of 
ordering and using equipment and supplies, work schedules, 
uses and methods of compiling time studies, methods of deter- 
mining the adequacy of nursing care and other problems of ward 
management. Opportunity will be given to any student who 
desires to work on a specific research problem in relation to ward 
management. This carries an extra credit hour. Credit, Two or 
Three hours. Miss Feehan. 

412. Field Experience I. In the first two-thirds of this experience 
the student will have the opportunity, under direction and in 
the hospital, to put into practice the comprehensive nursing 
designed in Nursing 406. It will include correlated experience in 
the out-patient department and the ward unit, observation in 
the Public Health Nursing field together with the related pre 
and post conferences, and planning for referral. The last third 
of the course will be devoted to practice in ward management. 
Concurrent individual and group conferences will be included. 
Credit, Three hours. Miss Fusan, Miss Frauens, Miss Robinson 
and the unit clinical instructor. 

413. Teaching of Nursing Arts. Through study in this course the 
student should gain a more comprehensive understanding of 
nursing and of education. The application of the philosophy 
and principles of education to the teaching of nursing will be a 
fundamental consideration. The student should gain under- 
standing of the analysis of nursing procedures and of the writing 
of procedures. Through theory and demonstration she should 
learn how to teach the nursing skills in both the classroom and 
the ward. The objective evaluation of the student's progress will 
be given consideration. Credit, Three hours. Miss Johnson. 

414. Field Experience II. Practical experience under supervision in 
an approved Public Health Nursing agency which provides 
family health service. Credit, Six hours. 



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419. Medical and Surgical Nursing. A content course based on 
a background of scientific knowledge intended to teach the 
total nursing care of patients with medical and surgical diseases. 
Stress will be placed on prevention, etiology, symptoms, treat- 
ment and nursing care of each disease. Credit, Three hours. 
Miss Fusan. 

421. Teaching in the Clinical Unit. For students engaged in or 
preparing for clinical teaching in Schools of Nursing. It includes 
a study of the principles and an analysis of the component tools 
used in the education of the student in the clinical field. Students 
are required to analyze and construct integrated programs of 
teaching. Credit, Three hours. Miss Feehan. 

422. Field Experience in Supervision. This experience will be ob- 
tained in local Schools of Nursing arranged under the direction 
of the University. For prerequisites student is directed to consult 
the particular course in which she is enrolled. Credit, Three hours. 
Miss Fusan. 

428. Practice Teaching. This experience will be obtained in local 
schools of nursing arranged under the direction of the University. 
For prerequisites the student is directed to consult the particular 
course in which she is enrolled. Miss Fusan. 

430. Public Health Aspects in Nursing. This course furnishes a 
background of Public Health principles to be utilized in the 
whole care of the patient and a knowledge and understanding 
of health and community resources essential to patient health 
and rehabilitation. Credit, Two hours. Miss Frauens. 

431. Nutritional Planning. A study of the role of nutrition in 
attaining and maintaining good health throughout life. Consider- 
ation is given to the application of nutrition principles in family 
health teaching, and to the planning of food budgets to meet 
nutritional needs for various income groups. Credit, Two hours. 
Mrs. Leatham. 

432. Introduction to Public Health. A study of the philosophy and 
development of public health programs. Consideration is given 
to official and voluntary services at all levels of government. 
The course includes an introduction to public health statistics. 
Credit, Two hours. Miss Frauens and Special Lecturers. 

433. Principles of Communicable Disease Control. A study of the 
cause, source, mode of transmission, clinical course, prevalence, 
and methods of recognition and control of the communicable 
diseases, including tuberculosis and the venereal diseases. Pre- 



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DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



ventive measures for individual as well as community protection 
are emphasized. Credit, Two hours. Dr. Bundy. 

435. Principles of Public Health Nursing. A course dealing with 
the history and development of public health nursing — its 
scope, objectives and functions in the field of public health 
nursing to meet community needs. Credit, Two hours. Miss 
Frauens. 

436. Organization and Administration in Public Health Nursing. 

The principles of organization and administration as applied to 
public health nursing services in the various types of agencies 
and the role of the nurse in program planning and evaluation. 
Prerequisite Nursing Education 443. Credit, Two hours. Miss 
Wilson. 

437. Public Health Nursing Services I. This course deals with the 
functions of the nurse in maternal, infant and pre-school health 
programs. Credit, Two hours. Mrs. Russell. 

438. Public Health Nursing Services II. This course is a continu- 
ation of Nursing Education 437 and deals with the functions of 
the nurse in school health services. Prerequisite: Nursing 
Education 435, 437. Credit, Two hours. Miss Frauens. 

439. Public Health Nursing Services III. This course is a continu- 
ation of Nursing Education 438 and deals with adult health, 
including cancer, tuberculosis, degenerative diseases, diabetes, 
and industrial health. Prerequisite: Nursing Education 438, 
Credit, Two hours. Miss Beers. 

440. Field of Professional Social Work as Related to Nursing. A study 
of how the social worker and the nurse can work together 
for more effective service to the individual, with a brief survey 
of the field and function of public and private social work 
in our society. Credit, Two hours. Mrs. Pine. 

442. Teaching in Public Health Nursing. A course designed to give 
an understanding of the fundamental principles of teaching and 
their application by the public health nurse in teaching indivi- 
duals and groups in the various phases of the generalized public 
health nursing program. Prerequisites Nursing Education 435, 
437, 438, 443. Credit, Two hours. Miss Camery. 

443, 444. Field Experience. Practical experience under supervision 
in an approved generalized public health nursing agency. Length 
of experience, and type of experience will be adjusted to the 
needs of the individual student. Credit, Six to Twelve hours. 



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SCHOOL OF NURSING 



446. Current Readings in Public Health Nursing. Assigned readings 
in current professional literature. Credit, One or Two hours. 
Miss Frauens. 

503. Curriculum Construction. This course deals with the funda- 
mental principles of curriculum construction. These in turn are 
considered in relation to the nursing curriculum through an 
analysis of the present curriculum guide and in terms of present 
trends in nursing. The student will learn how to set up the 
machinery for curriculum study. She will learn how to formulate 
a program of studies for the entire period of the student's school 
of nursing experience as well as for an individual service. She 
will plan the rotation of students through all the services in a 
three year program and will have the opportunity to consider 
the adaptation of her plans to the collegiate program in nursing. 
The installation of a curriculum will also be considered. Credit* 
Four hours. Miss Johnson. 

505. Orientation to Organization and Administration in Schools of 
Nursing. This is an orientation course; it is not intended to 
prepare students for the position of director. It is designed to 
help the student in supervision and in teaching to understand in 
general the organizational and administrative set-up in the 
School of Nursing so that as a supervisor or teacher she may 
assume a just and understanding share in the effective realization 
of the School's purpose and that of her department as part of 
the whole. Credit, Two hours. Miss Johnson. 

513. Nursing Seminar. By the conference method the principles 
and methods of achieving comprehensive professional nursing 
will be studied. This course is designed for those students who 
are permitted to enroll in Nursing Education and the content 
will be adapted to the preparation and experience of the students. 
Credit, Three hours. Miss Fusan. 

PHILOSOPHY AND PSYCHOLOGY 

101. Logic. This course is required of all students throughout the 
University. It offers fundamental training in dialectics, exclud- 
ing epistemology. Credit, Three hours. 

202. Ethics. This course is required of all students throughout 
the University. It proposes a consideration of the nature and 
principles of morality as determined by the norm of right reason. 
Credit, Three hours. 

220. General Psychology. The essential laws and principles of 
human behavior. Methods of psychology; fundamental native 



Forty-seven 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



reactions; emotional life; mental life, including imagination, 
thinking, reasoning, concepts, and judgments; sensations; per- 
ceptions; adjustment; and personality. This course is the founda- 
tion for other courses in psychology. Credit, Three hours. 

310. Educational Psychology. Psychology of learning, instinctive 
behavior, habit, conditioning, motivation, types of learning, and 
factors affecting the learning process. Prerequisite: Psych. 220. 
Credit, Three hours. 

464. Mental Hygiene. Mental disease; its psychological cause, 
proper measures for prevention. Mental health; elements of the 
wholesome personality; practical steps for development; hygienic 
adjustment to the conflicts of life. Credit, Three hours. Holt. 



RELIGION 

In the first and second years, courses in Religion must be 
taken by all Catholic students. Non-Catholic students may, but 
are not obliged to, attend. 

101, 102. Fundamental Theology. This course prepares the students 
for the study of Theology. It includes an investigation of the 
nature of Religion and the demonstration of the objective 
existence of such a branch of knowledge. It further includes a 
demonstration of the fact that Christ is God and that the true 
version of religion is still being unanimously taught by His 
Church exactly as Christ Himself taught it. Credit, One hour 
each semester. 

201, 202. Nature of God. This is a course in Rational Theology 
designed especially to arm the layman against the atheism and 
agnosticism of our times. Emphasis is placed on the student's 
coming to see for himself that what the Church teaches about 
the nature of God is not merely a matter of belief but sheerly a 
matter of fact. Credit, One hour each semester. 

301, 302. Nature of Man. This is a course in Rational Theology 
designed especially to arm the layman against the errors of our 
time concerning the nature and dignity of Man. The theory of 
evolution is shown to be untenable on strictly scientific grounds. 
Considerable emphasis is laid on understanding the teaching of 
the Church on the nature of the human being and on the Soul 
as the "form" of the body. A thorough explanation is given of 
the teaching of the Church on both original and personal sin 
and likewise of its teaching on what awaits man after death. 
Credit, One hour each semester. 



Forty-eight 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 



SOCIOLOGY 

101, 102. Principles of Sociology. An introduction to the basic 
sociological concepts, with concentration on the principles under- 
lying the phenomena in the fields of Family, Housing, Popula- 
tion, Education, Health, Race Relations, and Crime. Credit, 
Two hours each semester. 

201. Social Problems. An investigation of the difficulties which 
underlie the ills of modern society. Credit, Two hours. 

202. Social Pathology. A study of various approaches toward a 
solution of the problems encountered in Sociology 201. Credit, 
Two hours. 

SCIENCE 

111, 112. General Chemistry. A study of metals and non-metals; 
principles, theories and calculations. Class, Four hours; Labora- 
tory, Three hours. Credit, Four hours each semester. 

207, 208. Principles of Physics. A cultural course suited to the 
needs of the college student who seeks familiarity with the laws 
of the physical world. Lectures and demonstrations. (Introduc- 
tory survey not intended for science majors.) Credit, Three 
hours each semester. Kozora. 

207, 208. Principles of Chemistry. A cultural course designed to 
give the college student a general acquaintance with the subject 
as a whole. Recitation with lectures, demonstrations and labora- 
tory. This course does not carry credit toward a chemistry major. 
Lecture, Three hours. Laboratory, Two hours each semester. 
Credit, Three hours each semester. Moroney. 

151. Bacteriology. A one-semester course in the fundamentals of 
Bacteriology for non-majors. Credit, Four hours. Jones. 

308. Elementary Physiology. This course is primarily intended for 
non-Biology students. It cannot be applied towards a degree in 
the Department of Biological Sciences. Lecture, Three hours. 
Laboratory, Four hours. Credit, Four hours. 



Forty-nine 



Duquesne University 



College of Liberal Arts and Sciences 

School of Law 

School of Business Administration 

School of Pharmacy 

School of Music 

School of Education 

School of Nursing 

Graduate School 



Bulletins of the above schools are published separately 
and may be obtained on request from the 

DIRECTOR OF ADMISSIONS 

Duquesne University 

PITTSBURGH 19, PA. GRant 1-4635 



The 
DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 

BULLETIN 

Announcement of the 

SCHOOL OF MUSIC 

1952-1953 




DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 

PITTSBURGH 19, PENNA. 



The 

DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 

BULLETIN 

VOLUME XL APRIL 1952 NUMBER 7 

Announcement of the 

SCHOOL OF MUSIC 

For the Session 

1952-1953 




SCHOOL OF MUSIC OFFICE 
DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 
PITTSBURGH 19, PENNSYLVANIA 



VOLUME XL APRIL 1952 NUMBER 7 



CALENDAR 

1952-1953 

SUMMER SESSION 

June 12, 13, 14, Thursday, Friday from 9:00-4:00; Saturday until Noon 

Registration, Eight Weeks Session, Day and Evening 

June 16, Monday Eight Weeks Session begins 

June 26, 27, 28, Thursday, Friday from 9:00-4:00; Saturday until Noon 

Registration, Six Weeks Day Session 

June 30, Monday Six Weeks Session begins 

July 3, Thursday Latest date to apply for degrees: August Candidates 

July 4, Friday Holiday 

July 12, Saturday Class Day 

August 8, Friday Summer Sessions end: Commencement 

1952-1953 

FIRST SEMESTER 

September 8, 9, Monday, Tuesday from 1:00-4:00 Registration 

September 8, 9, Monday, Tuesday from 4:30-7:30 Registration: Evening School 
September 10, 11, 12, 13, Wednesday to Friday from 9:00-4:00; 

Saturday until Noon Registration 

September 15, Monday First Semester begins 

September 27, Saturday Latest date for change of schedule, etc. 

October 25, Saturday Latest date for removal of E, I, X grades 

October 25, Saturday Latest date to apply for degrees: January Candidates 

November 1, Saturday Holiday 

November 5, Wednesday Mid-Semester Examinations begin 

November 26, Wednesday {after last class) Thanksgiving Vacation begins 

December 1, Monday Classes resumed 

December 8, Monday Holiday 

December 20, Saturday {after last class) Christmas Vacation begins 

January 5, Monday Classes resumed 

January 15, Thursday Final Examinations begin 

January 24, Saturday Final Examinations: Saturday Classes 

1952-1953 

SECOND SEMESTER 

February 2, 3, Monday, Tuesday from 1:00-4:00 . Registration 

February 2, 3, Monday, Tuesday from 4:30-7:30 Registration: Evening School 
February 4, 5, 6, 7, Wednesday to Friday from 9:00-4:00; 

Saturday until Noon Registration 

February 9, Monday Second Semester begins 

February 21, Saturday Latest date for change of schedule, etc. 

February 21, Saturday Latest date to apply for degrees: June Candidates 

March 21, Saturday Latest date for removal of E, I, X grades 

April 1, Wednesday {after last class) Easter Vacation begins 

April 7, Tuesday Classes resumed 

April 8, Wednesday Mid-Semester Examinations begin 

May 14, Thursday Holiday 

May 30, Saturday .•••:• Holiday 

June 1, Monday Final Examinations begin 

June 6, Saturday Final Examinations: Saturday Classes 

June 7, Sunday Baccalaureate Services and Commencement Exercises 

Registration is conducted during the days listed in the above calendar. 
Only by rare exception, by consent of the Dean, and on payment of a penalty, 
will late registration be permitted. 



CONTENTS 

Page 

Calendar Rear of title page 

The University Personnel 4 

Faculty 5 

General Statement 7 

Information on Admission 12 

Information on Registration 14 

Academic Regulations IS 

The School Year 18 

Tuition and Fees 18 

Information on Total Expense 22 

Scholarships, Student Aid 23 

Departments 27 

Curricula 29 

Courses of Instruction 36 

Departments of Military Science and Tactics (R.O.T.C.) 49 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



THE UNIVERSITY PERSONNEL 
OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 



Most Reverend John Francis Dearden, D.D. 
Chancellor 

Very Reverend Vernon F. Gallagher, C.S.Sp., Ph.D. 

President 

Reverend J. Gerald Walsh, C.S.Sp., Ph.D. 
Vice-President 

Reverend Joseph R. Kletzel, C.S.Sp., M.A. 
Secretary 

Reverend Sebastian J. Schiffgens, C.S.Sp., B.A. 
Treasurer 

Maurice J. Murphy, D.Ed. 
Registrar 

Reverend William J. Holt, C.S.Sp., B.A. 
Director of Student Welfare 

Reverend James F. McNamara, C.S.Sp., B.A. 
Dean of Men 

Elizabeth K. Wingerter, M.A. 
Dean of Women 

Margaret Eleanor McCann, B.S. (Library Science) 

Librarian 

Reverend Salvator J. Federici, C.S.Sp., Ph.D. 
Director of Admissions 

Reverend Joseph F. Rengers, C.S.Sp., B.A. 
University Chaplain 

Colonel Russell W. Schmelz, U.S.A. 
Coordinator of Military and Air Science and Tactics 

Robert B. Challinor, M.D. 
Director of Student Health 



Four 



SCHOOL OF MUSIC 



SCHOOL OF MUSIC 

FACULTY 
1952-1953 

ADMINISTRATION 

Rev. William R. Hurney, C.S.Sp., B.A Dean of the School of Music 

James L. Scarazzo, B.A Secretary to the Dean 

TEACHING STAFF 

Max Adams Instructor in Bassoon 

Conservatory of Music, Leipzig 

2204 Rockledge St., Pittsburgh, Pa. CEdar 1-3928 

Lois Barber Instructor in Piano 

B.A. in Music, Carnegie Inst, of Technology, 1942 

501 Crestline Drive, Pittsburgh, Pa. Fleldbrook 1-9304 

Herman F. Clement Instructor in String Bass 

129 Sycamore St., Pittsburgh, Pa. EVerglade 1-5660 

Mrs. Brunhilde Dorsch Assistant Professor of Eurhythmies 

B.A. Carnegie Institute of Technology, 1935 
M.S. in Ed. Duquesne University, 1939 

2428 Pioneer Ave., Pittsburgh 26, Pa. LEhigh 1-4714 

Ebba L. Houggy Associate Professor of Music Education 

Supervisor of Practice Teaching in Public School Music 
B.Ed. Duquesne University, 1938 

1112 Broadway, East McKeesport, Pa. Valley 4118 

James Hunter Assistant Professor of Music Theory 

B.A. in Music, Carnegie Institute of Technology, 1943 
M.A. in Music, Duquesne University, 1946 

527 S. Braddock Ave., Pittsburgh, Pa. PEnhurst 1-1153 

Eugene Kingsley Instructor in Voice 

Student of Voice under Adrian Freni, Sidney Dietch, and 

Hunter Kimball. Drew University, 1931-1934. 
Soloist, Pittsburgh Opera Society 

153 Oliver Ave., Emsworth, Pittsburgh, Pa. JUniper 1-6265-R 

Stephen Konvolinka Instructor in Trombone 

3231 Latonia Ave., Pittsburgh, Pa. LEhigh 1-4506 

Jay L. Longdon Instructor in Violin, Theory 

B.A. in Music, Carnegie Institute of Technology, 1943 
Graduate Work, University of Pittsburgh 

214 Parker Drive, Mt. Lebanon, Pa. Fleldbrook 1-5220 

Hugh MacDonald Associate Professor of Piano, Organ 

Ecole Normalle, Paris, 1931 

Student of Piano and Composition under Sigismund Stojowski, Salim 
Palmgren, Pierre Mayer, and Alfred Cortot. Student of Organ under 
Marcel Dupre. 

1105 Bluff St., Pittsburgh 19, Pa. COurt 1-6394 

Josephine McGrail Professor of Voice 

B.A., Carnegie Institute of Technology, 1928 
Graduate Study, Carnegie Institute of Technology 

833 Marshall Ave., Pittsburgh 14, Pa. ATlantic 1-6874 



Five 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



Arno Mariotti . Instructor in Oboe 

Curtis Institute of Music, Philadelphia 
Member Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra 

5421 Kentucky Ave., Pittsburgh 32, Pa. MUseum 1-4875 

James F. Morrow Instructor in Trumpet 

Duquesne University, 1928 

268 Arden Road, Pittsburgh 16, Pa. LOcust 1-0264 

Karl Neumann. .'.-#• Instructor in 'Cello 

Doctorate University of Prague, 1926 
Member Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra 

629 Clyde St., Pittsburgh, Pa. MUseum 1-5657 

Arthur A. Harbert Instructor in Percussion 

1128 South Duquesne Ave., Duquesne, Pa. COurt 1-6757 

Victor Plushkat Instructor in French Horn, Director of University Band 

Student of French Horn under Mario Grilli, Vincent Capasso, 

and Arkadia Yegutkin 
Director, YMCA Orchestra, Pittsburgh 
Solo Horn, Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra 

8427 California Ave., Pittsburgh 12, Pa. Linden 1-5758 

Mart Reilly ._ . . Instructor in Organ 

B.S. in Sacred Music, Duquesne University, 1934 

602 Grandview Ave., Pittsburgh 11, Pa. EVerglade 1-0256 

Louis V. Rocereto Instructor in Clarinet 

B.S. in P.S.M., Duquesne University, 1947 

56 Woodhaven Drive, Mt. Lebanon, Pittsburgh, Pa. LEhigh 1-7792 

Philip Sieburg . Instructor in Flute 

Chicago School of Music 

Member Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra 

244 Robinson St., Pittsburgh, Pa. JUniper 1-1977-W 

Paul Sladek Associate Professor of Composition, Violin 

Student of Gottfried Feist and David Hochstein 
Author of numerous compositions for violin 

5108 Bayard St., Pittsburgh, Pa. MAyflower 1-0608 

Henry Stevenson Instructor in Piano and Music Theory 

B. Mus., Duquesne University, 1948 
M.A., Duquesne University, 1950 

100 Wilson Ave., Washington, Pa. Washington 4092 

Elba Stockmann Professor of Piano, Music Literature 

Graduate, Royal Academy of Music, Berlin, 1915 

Student of Piano with Leopold Godowsky and Ernst von Dohnanyi 

B.S. in Music, Duquesne University, 1929 

M.A. in Music, Duquesne University, 1939 

Iroquois Apartments, Pittsburgh, Pa. SChenley 1-8506 

Note: Liberal Arts and General Education subjects are pursued under the direction 
of instructors in the College and the School of Education. 



Six 



SCHOOL OF MUSIC 



DUOUESNE UNIVERSITY 

PITTSBURGH 19, PA. 
GENERAL STATEMENT 

HISTORICAL NOTE — INCORPORATION 

In 1878 the Fathers of the Congregation of the Holy Ghost 
and the Immaculate Heart of Mary established a College of 
Arts and Letters which was incorporated in 1882 as the Pitts- 
burgh Catholic College of the Holy Ghost with authority to 
grant degrees in the Arts and Sciences. 

In 1911 the College and University Council of the Common- 
wealth of Pennsylvania approved the amendment in favor of 
the corporate title "Duquesne University" and the Charter 
extension to University status with authority to grant degrees 
in Arts and Sciences, Law, Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmacy. 
The Charter was further extended in 1930 to include programs 
and degrees in Music and Education, and in 1937 to include 
programs and degrees in Nursing. 

The present Schools of the University, all offering courses 
leading to degrees, are the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, 
the School of Law, the School of Business Administration, the 
School of Pharmacy, the School of Music, the School of Edu- 
cation, the School of Nursing, and the Graduate School. 

The University is a coeducational institution and admits 
women to all divisions. 

The student body numbers approximately 4,000 each year. 



LOCATION 

The University, an urban institution serving the needs of an 
industrial city and surrounding communities in Western Penn- 
sylvania, is situated upon an eminence overlooking Pittsburgh's 
Golden Triangle. The campus on which most of the University 
buildings are located surrounds the Administration Building at 
Bluff and Colbert Streets in downtown Pittsburgh. The School 
of Law and the School of Business Administration are off-campus 
in the Fitzsimons Building at 331 Fourth Avenue, in the heart 
of the financial district. 

The University is easily reached by any of the railroad, bus, 
or trolley lines leading into downtown Pittsburgh. 



Seven 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



PHILOSOPHY AND OBJECTIVES 

Duquesne University is a Catholic institution of higher 
learning. It believes that education is concerned with man in 
his entirety, body and soul. It believes that education consists 
in the preservation, transmission and improvement of the 
material and temporal order through its elevation, regulation 
and perfection, in accordance with the example and teaching of 
Christ and His Church. It believes that the product of education 
is the man of true character, who thinks, judges and acts con- 
stantly and consistently in accordance with right reason with a 
view to his ultimate end. 

The University has as its responsibility the conservation, 
interpretation and transmission of knowledge and ideas and 
values, the quest of truth through scholarly research, and the 
preparation for vocational and avocational fields by intelligent 
and thorough training in the principles underlying these fields. 
The general aim is to facilitate through the media of instruction 
and related collegiate activities the development of purposeful 
character, intellectual accomplishment, emotional and social 
maturity and professional efficiency. 

The University attains this aim in the Colleges (Schools) by 
guiding the student through a cultural core program, through a 
concentrated study of a major field of interest, through an 
organized program of co-curricular and extra-curricular activities, 
and through established personnel services. 

The University aims specifically to assist the student in: 

1. The development of a sound philosophy of life through 
an understanding of spiritual and physical, intellectual 
and moral, social and aesthetic aims and values. 

* 

2. The development of a well-balanced personality. 

3. The development of a broader understanding of our 
culture. 

4. The development of scholarship and continuous pro- 
fessional growth. 

5. The development of a constant evaluation of himself as 
an individual and as a member of the community. 

6. The development of a genuine American attitude. 



Eight 



SCHOOL OF MUSIC 



ACCREDITATION — MEMBERSHIP 

The University is accredited by the State Council on Educa- 
tion of the Pennsylvania Department of Public Instruction, and 
by the Middle States Association of Colleges and Secondary 
Schools. 

It is a member of the American Council on Education, the 
Association of American Colleges, the American Association of 
Urban Universities, the National Catholic Educational Associa- 
tion, the Catholic Educational Association of Pennsylvania, the 
National Education Association, the Pennsylvania State Edu- 
cation Association, and the American Association of Collegiate 
Registrars. 

The University is affiliated with the Catholic University of 
America. 

The Colleges (Schools) of the University hold memberships 
in numerous educational societies and associations. 



THE LIBRARY 

The Duquesne University Library contains about fifty- 
thousand volumes, besides numerous classified but uncataloged 
pamphlets. Under the supervision of librarians, the students 
have access to the shelves and are permitted to withdraw from 
the library any volume except those reserved for special reasons. 
The Library receives from various sources gifts and bequests. 

The Downtown Library in the Fitzsimons Building is sup- 
plied from the main University Library. 

The John E. Laughlin Memorial Library of the School of 
Law, located in the Fitzsimons Building, numbers over ten 
thousand volumes. 

The University Library is open, with some exceptions, from 
8:30 a.m. to 9:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, and from 8:30 
a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Saturday. 

THE UNIVERSITY CHAPEL 

The University Chapel adjoins the Administration Building. 
Masses are said at appointed hours throughout the week. Several 
Masses are offered on Sunday for the convenience of the students 
residing on the campus. Special devotions are conducted on 
feast days. 



i ■ m i i in 



Nint 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC 
HISTORICAL NOTE 

In 1926 the University opened the School of Music and 
established a four year course leading to the degree of Bachelor 
of Music. 

In September 1929 a program of Public School Music was 
inaugurated. 

In 1930 the program in Public School Music received the 
approval of the State Council of Education, Department of 
Public Instruction, Harrisburg. 

LOCATION 

The School of Music is located on the University Campus 
in the Music Hall, 47 Hooper Street. 

PHILOSOPHY AND OBJECTIVES 

In accord with the educational philosophy and objectives of 
the University, the School of Music aims to assist the student 
in the development of the natural and supernatural virtues. The 
general aim is to provide through the media of instruction and 
related collegiate activity the facilitation of purposeful character, 
intellectual accomplishment, emotional and social maturity, and 
professional efficiency. 

The School of Music endeavors to give its students a broad 
literary and artistic training in addition to the knowledge of 
music and the technical proficiency that are rightly expected of 
its graduates. Within certain limits courses are arranged especially 
to fit the needs of individual students. Music students take 
courses in the liberal arts and education in the regular classes 
with the students enrolled in those departments. In this way 
the School of Music fulfills its responsibility in that it aims 
toward developing in students a truly cultured personality. In 
keeping this ideal before the student, the School of Music has 
as its objectives: 

1. The development of spiritual and religious aims and values for 
the betterment of the individual's own life and for the advance- 
ment of these spiritual and religious aims and values in others. 

2. The development of a wholesome personality for the enrichment 
of his own life and for the guidance of others toward wholesome 
personalities. 



Ten 



S CHOOL OF MUSIC 



3. The development of a broader understanding of our culture in 
order to advance this understanding in others. 

4. The development of an expert understanding of the process of 
living, growing and learning, and of competency in acting upon 
this understanding in teaching situations and other practical 
situations. 

5. The development of an understanding of and practice in the 
democratic process in all areas of living. 

6. The development of a good foundation in a special area of 
knowledge and desire for continuous professional growth. 

7. The development of scholarship through a constant willingness 
to use the resources and methods of critical inquiry in the fields 
of human knowledge relevant to the student's responsibility as 
a professional worker and as an individual. 

8. The development of a constant evaluation of himself as an 
individual. 

9. The development of an appreciation of all things beautiful. 

10. The development of a sound philosophy of life consonant with 
man's material and spiritual destiny. 



ACCREDITATION — MEMBERSHIP 

The School of Music is approved by the Pennsylvania 
Department of Public Instruction. 

It has membership in the Music Educators' National Con- 
ference, the National Catholic Music Educators' Association, 
In-and-About Pittsburgh Music Educators' Society, and the 
Musart Club of Pittsburgh. 

The faculty members hold memberships in various associ- 
ations and organizations. 



FACILITIES 

The University Theatre, used for recitals and other public 
performances, has a seating capacity of 350. 

Two pipe organs, one in the University Chapel and another 
in the School of Music, are used for teaching and for practice. 
All the instruments of the symphony orchestra are included in 
the School's equipment. There is a complete standard piano, 
voice and violin library and an extensive library of orchestral 
and ensemble music. 



Eleven 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



INFORMATION ON ADMISSION 
CATEGORIES OF STUDENTS 

Students at Duquesne University are classified as matricu- 
lated and non-matriculated. A matriculated student is one who 
has satisfied all of the requirements for admission to the degree 
program of his choice and is pursuing courses in which he is 
qualified to earn credit for the degree. Registrants who are so 
classified may be full-time or part-time students in either the 
day or evening division of the University. Non-matriculated 
students are mature persons who are not interested in pursuing 
courses for a degree and who have not met the requirements 
for matriculation. 

A student who is enrolled as a non-matriculated or special 
student, must have the approval of the dean who is responsible 
for the courses to be pursued. In such case the entrance require- 
ments may be waived, but the courses will not carry credit 
toward a degree. Only in an exceptional case is a non-matric- 
ulated student permitted to attend regular day school classes. 

Students carrying less than twelve hours credit per semester 

are part-time students. 

Students carrying a schedule of courses each semester which 
will enable them to qualify for a degree in the regular time are 

full-time students. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

Admission of Regular students: A candidate for admission 
must be of good moral character. He should submit at least one 
recommendation of character signed by a person of established 
reputation. 

The candidate must be a graduate of an approved high school, 
in the upper three-fifths of his class. Those who place in the 
lower two-fifths are automatically subject to an entrance ex- 
amination. 

The candidate should present twelve units from the following 
fields: English, Social Studies, Language, Mathematics, Science 
and four units in electives for which the high school offers credit 
toward graduation, or the genuine equivalent. 

The candidate's application must be approved by the Univer- 
sity Committee on Admissions. 



Twelve 



SCHOOL OF MUSIC 



The committee must be satisfied that the applicant is equipped 
to pursue his college studies with profit. In arriving at a decision 
the committee considers the applicant's character and general 
ability and examines the quality of previous achievement shown 
by the high school record. A personal interview and a special 
examination may be required. 

Should the committee decide that the quality of the appli- 
cant's high school work makes success in college doubtful, a 
special entrance examination may be given by the University 
Faculties. This examination will include the scholastic aptitude 
and achievement tests of the American Council on Education. 
In addition, all candidates must present themselves to the Dean 
of the School of Music for a personal interview, to determine 
their proficiency in music. Entering freshmen should have the 
equivalent of five years of instruction in instrumental or vocal 
training. Using the study of piano as an example, this training 
should provide familiarity with and proficiency in the Bach 
Preludes and Inventions, the earlier sonatas of Haydn, Mozart, 
and Beethoven, or works of comparable caliber. Ability to 
recognize and play all major and minor scales must be pre- 
supposed. For other instruments and voice, progress of like char- 
acter must be displayed. 

Admission of Transfer Students: Students of approved colleges 
and universities will be admitted to advanced standing if their 
credentials so warrant. They must be in good standing and 
eligible to continue their studies at the institution previously 
attended. They must have been granted an honorable dismissal. 
A general average equivalent to the grade C at Duquesne is 
required of an applicant wishing to transfer. Advanced credit may 
be allowed for those courses which are the equivalent of the 
courses in the chosen Duquesne curriculum. No credit will be 
allowed in any subject with a grade lower than C. 

Advanced standing is conditional until the student completes 
a minimum of one semester's work (15 semester hours). If his 
work proves unsatisfactory, the student will be requested to 
withdraw. 

FRESHMEN DAYS AND PLACEMENT TESTS 

All entering Freshmen are required to be present for Fresh- 
man Days Activities which take place the week preceding the 
beginning of the first semester. These activities consist in general 
orientation conferences and in the completion of a group of 
placement tests. Failure to take the placement tests at the 
regular time will incur a penalty of $5.00 for individual tests. 



Thirteen 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



Registration for the first semester courses must be completed 
in this week. 

ROUTINE OF MATRICULATION 
Regular Students 

1. Applicants should address the Director of Admissions to 
obtain the necessary application blanks. 

2. The applicant will complete the personal application and 
return it to the Director of Admissions, 801 Bluff St., Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania. He will have his high school complete the creden- 
tials form which must be mailed directly to the Director of 
Admissions. 

3. Upon receipt of these application papers an evaluation 
will be made by the Committee on Admissions; the applicant 
will then be notified of his admission status and provided with 
information on registration. A deposit of twenty dollars is 
required within two weeks of notification of an acceptance, in 
order to assure the applicant of the reservation of a place in 
a class. For further information see Tuition and Fees. 



Transfer Students 

1. Applicant should address the Director of Admissions to 
obtain the necessary form. 

2. The applicant will complete the form and return it to the 
Director of Admissions, 801 Bluff St., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 

3. The applicant must notify all colleges or universities pre- 
viously attended to mail directly to the Director of Admissions, 
Duquesne University, official transcripts of record. 

4. Upon receipt of all credentials an evaluation will be made; 
the applicant will then be notified of his admission status and 
provided with information concerning registration. A deposit of 
twenty dollars is required within two weeks of notification of 
an acceptance, in order to assure the applicant of the reservation 
of a place in a class. For further information see Tuition and 
Fees. 

REGISTRATION INFORMATION 

A registration period precedes each semester and summer 
session. (See University Calendar.) All schools register students 
during this period. Late registration, permitted for the first two 
weeks of a semester, carries a penalty of $5.00. General reg- 
ulations concerning registration are: 



Fourteen 



SCHOOL OF MUSIC 



1. Registration for all day students is held on the campus. 

2. The student's schedule is prepared in conference with the 
dean. 

3. Tuition and fees for the semester are payable at regis- 
tration time. 

4. Admission to any class is allowed only to those who have 
officially registered for that class. 

Students are not permitted to change their schedules of 
courses without the permission of their dean. A student who 
withdraws from a course without proper authorization receives 
a grade of F for the course. Change of schedule is permitted, 
without fee, only during the registration period. For a serious 
reason, change of schedule may be permitted during the same 
period that late registrations are accepted. 

ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 

The following regulations govern all undergraduate students 
of the University. The University reserves the right to change 
any provision or requirement during the term of residence of 
any student; and to compel the withdrawal of any student whose 
conduct at any time is not satisfactory to the University. 

1. Class Attendance: Students are not permitted to absent them- 
selves without good reason. 

2. Examinations'. 

a. Entrance examinations are given at the beginning of each 
semester for those applicants for admission who were not 
graduated in the upper three-fifths of their high school 
class. 

b. Mid-Semester examinations are given during the eighth week 
of each semester. 

c. Final examinations are given at the end of each semester 
and summer session. No student is excused from taking 
final examinations. 

d. Condition examinations, the date for which is announced 
in the university calendar, are given toward the end of 
the first month of each semester, in order to give students 
who have received the marks of E or X for courses taken 
during the preceding semester the opportunity to remove 
these deficiencies. An E grade can be changed by re- 
examination to only D or F. The fee for such examinations 

is J5.00. 

v 



Fifteen 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



3. Grading: The university grading system, adopted February 

21, 1929, and amended September 19, 1938, is the only 
method of rating recognized by the university. The system 
is as follows: 

A — Excellent 

B— Good 

C — Average 

D — Below Average — lowest passing grade 

E — Conditioned: eligible for re-examination 

F — Failure: course must be repeated 

I — Incomplete: grade is deferred because of incomplete 

work 
X — Absent from final examination 
W — Official Withdrawal 
P — Pass — used in certain courses without quality points. 

4. Unit of Credit: The unit of credit is the semester hour. One 
semester hour of credit is granted for the successful completion 
of one hour per week of lecture or recitation, or at least two 
hours per week of laboratory work for one semester. Inasmuch 
as the minimum number of weeks in a semester is sixteen, 
an equivalent definition of the semester hour is sixteen hours 
of class or the equivalent in laboratory work. 

5. Quality Points: Among the requirements for graduation is a 
quality point average of at least 1.0. The quality point system 
operates as follows: 

(a) For the credits of work carried, quality points are awarded 
according to the grade received: for a grade of A, the 
number of credits are multiplied by 3; for a grade of B, 
by 2; for a grade of C, by 1; for a grade of D, by 0; and 
for a grade of F, by minus 1, until the F has been removed 
by repeating the course successfully. The marks E, I,' and 
X, being temporary indications rather than grades, and 
W and P are independent of the quality point system. 

(b) A student's quality point average can be calculated at 
the end of an academic period by dividing his total 
number of quality points by the total number of semester 
hours of credit he has obtained. 

6. Scholastic Standings : 

(a) Dismissal: A student, to be permitted to continue a 
course of study, must pass in two-thirds of the hours of 
credit carried in each semester, and must maintain a 



Sixteen 



SCHOOL OF MUSIC 



quality point average of at least 0.67. Failure to satisfy 
this minimum scholastic requirement will result in the 
dismissal of the student for low scholarship. 

(b) Probation: A student who fails in one third or less of the 
hours of credit carried in each semester, or whose quality 
point average falls below 1.0, is placed on probation for 
the next semester. Students on probation may be required 
to carry a reduced schedule. 

7. Classification of Students: Students will be ranked in the several 
classes as follows: 
Freshmen: Those having completed less than 30 semester 

hours. 
Sophomores: Those having completed 31 to 60 semester hours. 
Juniors: Those having completed 61 to 90 semester hours. 

Seniors: Those having completed 91 semester hours. 

GRADUATION 

1. General Requirements: The candidate for a degree must be of 
good moral character; must have paid all indebtedness to the 
University; must have made formal application for the degree 
at the office of the Registrar prior to the date listed in the 
University Calendar; must be present at the Baccalaureate 
and Commencement Exercises. 

2. Scholastic Requirements: The candidate for a degree must have 
satisfied all entrance requirements; must have completed suc- 
cessfully all the required courses of his degree program; must 
have no grade lower than D; must have completed the last 
year's work (a minimum of thirty semester hours of credit) 
in residence. 

3. Quality Point Requirement: The candidate for a degree must 
have a minimum total number of quality points equivalent 
to the number of semester hours credit required for the 
Bachelor's degree; or a minimum quality point average of 1.0. 

4. Degrees awarded with honor: Degrees are awarded with special 
mention cum laude or magna cum laude to students who have 
completed the regular course with unusual distinction. Upon 
recommendation of the faculty, this mention may be raised 
to summa cum laude. 

HONORS 

Seibert Medal: This medal is awarded at the end of each school 
year to the senior who has made the most progress in musical 
attainment. 



Seventeen 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



THE SCHOOL YEAR 

The school year, which occupies 32 weeks exclusive of vaca- 
tions, is divided into a First Semester and a Second Semester 
of 16 weeks each. 

CLASSES AND SESSIONS 

Regular Classes: Classes are in session five days a week during 
the school year. 

Saturday Classes: A number of classes are offered on Saturdays 
in music and other courses required in the degree program. There 
are no evening classes in music. 

Summer Session: A summer session of six weeks is offered annually 
in music subjects. 

Requirements for admission to the Saturday classes as a 
candidate for a degree are the same as those for admission to 
regular classes. Mature students, however, not candidates for 
degrees, may be admitted to those special courses, which, in the 
judgment of the dean, they are equipped to pursue with profit. 
In such cases the entrance requirements may be waived, but the 
courses pursued carry no credit. 

The courses offered on Saturday are selected from the cur- 
ricula of the university and are taught by regular faculty mem- 
bers. These special courses may carry reduced credit if the time 
schedule does not permit the full course to be given. 

The purpose of the special courses is to afford teachers and 
others who cannot avail themselves of the time of the regular 
courses in the university an opportunity to pursue work toward 
a degree. 



TUITION AND FEES 

The University reserves the right to change the fees herein 
stated at any time without notice. Whenever a change is made 
it will become effective at the beginning of the succeeding 
academic year. 

Matriculation Deposit $20.00 

The matriculation deposit of twenty dollars is 
payable within two weeks from the date of notifica- 
tion of acceptance to the University. The purpose 



Eighteen 



SCHOOL OF MUSIC 



of this fee is to assure the student of a reservation 
of a place in a class. This deposit will be credited 
against the student's tuition and fees at the time 
of registration for the semester in which the stu- 
dent's application has been approved. This deposit 
is not refundable. 

Tuition, per Semester Hour Credit $12.00 

The total tuition for the semester is payable at 
the time of registration, unless other arrangements 
are made through the Deferred Tuition Office. 

Activities Fee, per Semester $10.00 

This fee gives access to intercollegiate and 
intramural sports activities, concerts, dramatic 
presentations and other events throughout the 
scholastic year. It entitles the student to copies 
of the weekly newspaper, and the monthly maga- 
zine. This fee is payable by all students carrying 
twelve or more credits in the regular semesters. 

Library Fee, per Semester $ 5.00 

This fee gives library privileges, and is payable 
each semester by all fulltime students of the 
university, and by those taking 12 or more credits 
in the Summer Sessions. 

Library Fee, Part-time Students $ 2.00 

This fee is payable by all students carrying less than 
twelve credits in any semester or summer session. 

Registration Fee $ 1.00 

A fee of J1.00 is required of every student at each 
registration period. 

Student Health Fee, per Semester $ 1.00 

This fee includes a physical examination at entrance, 
and advice and emergency treatment at the univer- 
sity dispensary. 

Auditor's Fees, per Semester Hour $12.00 

The fees for auditors are the same as those for 
regularly matriculated students. 

Late Registration Fee $ 5.00 

This fee is charged to all students registering later 
than the last day of the regular registration period. 



Nineteen 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



Condition Examination Fee $ 5.00 

This fee is charged for each condition and special 
examination for removal of E and X grades. It is 
payable in advance. 

Change of Course Fee $ 1.00 

Student Publication Fee, per year $ 1.00 

Payable by all part-time students in the regular 
sessions. The fee entitles them to a copy of each 
issue of the student newspaper. 

Graduation Fees — Bachelor's Degree $15.00 

Laboratory Fees $ 2.00 

This fee is charged to all students registered in the 
following courses: 343, Primary Methods 

344, Secondary Methods 
Laboratory fees are not refundable. 

Practice Teaching Fee $25.00 

This fee is charged to all students who register for 
practice teaching. 

Instruction in Voice or Instrument, per Semester $50.00 

This fee is charged to all students carrying twelve 
or more credits, for instruction in major study. 
One hour per week. 

Instruction in Minor Study, per Semester $20.00 

This fee is charged to all students for instruction 
in minor instrument or voice. One-half hour per 
week. 

Private Instruction Fee, per Semester $60.00 

This fee is charged to students carrying less than 
twelve credits, for one hour per week of instruction 
in voice or instrument. 

Private Instruction Fee, per Semester $37.50 

This fee is charged to students carrying less than 
twelve credits, for one-half hour per week of in- 
struction in voice or instrument. 



Twenty 



SCHOOL OF MUSIC 



Private Instruction Fee, Summer Session one hour, $30.00 

one-half hour, $15.00 

These fees are charged to students studying voice 
or instrument in the six-weeks Summer Session. 
One lesson per week. 

Instruction in Voice, per Semester $25.00 

This fee is charged to all students carrying twelve 
or more credits in each of the first four semesters 
in the Lower Division of the Vocal Conservatory 
Department, for one-half hour per week of instruc- 
tion in major study, voice. 

Instruction in Voice, per Semester $50.00 

This fee is charged to all students carrying twelve 
or more credits in each of the last four semesters 
in the Upper Division of the Vocal Conservatory 
Department, for one hour per week of instruction 
in major study, voice. 

Vocal Workshop Fee, per Semester $25.00 

This charge is made (1) to all students registered 
in the Vocal Conservatory Department; (2) to all 
students registering for all or any of the subjects 
listed under the Vocal Workshop heading; (3) to 
all students registered for Vocal Performance 001. 

■ • 

Us© of School Instrument, per Semester $ 5.00 

This fee entitles the student to the use of an instru- 
ment, if available, for minor study. Ordinarily, 
students are expected to provide their own in- 
struments. 



Use of Organ, per hour $ 25 

This charge is made for practice time on the two 
organs of the university. 

Practice Room Privilege, per Semester $ 1.50 



This fee is charged to all students who use the 



School practice facilities. 

Locker Fee, per Semester $ 1.50 

A limited number of lockers is available for the 
use of Music students. A refund of 50 cents is made 
upon return of the key. 



Twenty-ont 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



REFUNDS FOR WITHDRAWALS 

Students who withdraw from the university for a satisfactory 
reason within eight weeks after the opening of the semester are 
entitled to a proportionate refund of tuition provided that they 
notify their dean at the time of the withdrawal. Fees are not 
refundable. 

Refunds are made in accordance with the following schedule. 

Withdrawal Refund 

1st Week 90% 

2nd Week 70% 

3rd Week 60% 

4th Week 50% 

5th Week 30% 

6th Week 20% 

7th Week 10% 

8th Week 5% 

No refund will be made in the case of students who are 
registered on probation or who are requested to withdraw as a 
result of faculty action. 

The Refund Schedule for Summer Sessions (six or eight weeks 
session) is as follows: 

Withdrawal Refund 

1st Week 60% 

2nd Week 20% 

There are no refunds after the second week of a Summer 
Session. Fees are not refundable. 



INFORMATION ON TOTAL EXPENSE 

Undergraduate tuition is charged at the rate of $12.00 per 
semester hour credit. In addition, the student in the School of 
Music pays a fee of 250.00 for private instruction on his major 
instrument, or in voice, and a fee of $20.00 for private instruction 
in his minor study. There must also be added the fixed fees 
chargeable to all students in the university, such as the Activities 
Fee, the Medical Fee, Registration Fee, and any fees attached 
to given courses. The student who carries the normal semester 
load of 16 credits must anticipate a tuition-and-fees charge of 
about $275.00. An additional expense of approximately $20.00 
will be realized for books and supplies. 



Twenty-two 



SCHOOL OF MUSIC 



HOW EXPENSES MAY BE PAID 

All expenses are due and payable on the day of registration. 
Upon application, however, at the Office of Deferred Tuition, 
a student may arrange to pay part of his expenses down and the 
remainder, which is subject to a service charge, in regular 
monthly installments during the semester. 

STUDENT AID 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

The University offers a definite number of competitive exam- 
ination scholarships. Eligible for the examinations, which are 
held annually in April, are students who will be, according to 
certification by their principal, graduated in the upper third of 
their high school class. All scholarships are awarded for two 
years, but are potentially four-year awards, provided that the 
requirements for continuance of the award are fulfilled. Informa- 
tion concerning them may be had by addressing the Committee 
on Scholarships. 

The University Alumni Association makes available annually 
a $100.00 scholarship to a competent and deserving student in 
the School of Music. The award is based upon student need and 
promise of success. Application for this scholarship must be 
made to the Dean of the School of Music. 

STUDENT EMPLOYMENT 

The University makes available limited student employment 
for students who are in need of financial assistance and who, at 
the same time, maintain a satisfactory scholastic average and 
give evidence of good character. Opportunities for employment 
exist on and about the campus. Information may be had by 
addressing the Committee on Student Welfare. 

STUDENT LOAN 

The University has available a limited sum of money in 
various student loan funds, which each year is loaned to under- 
graduate students who have completed at least thirty semester 
hours credit at the University, and who meet the requirements 
of good scholarship, need of financial assistance and good char- 
acter. These loans are granted only for the purpose of the pay- 
ment of tuition. They are made available through the University 
Student Loan Fund. Information may be had by addressing the 
Committee on Student Welfare. 



Twenty-three 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



STUDENT SERVICE AND ACTIVITY 
RESIDENCE 

A limited number of residences are maintained by the 
University on campus for the convenience of out-of-town 
students. Reservations for room space are made on a semester 
basis through the Dean of Men or the Dean of Women. A 
deposit of 310.00, payable to Duquesne University, must ac- 
company each room application. 

The deposit will be held as a breakage deposit until the 
satisfactory termination of the student's lease. Deductible from 
the deposit are any damages to room contents or buildings and 
a pro rata general breakage. 

A student who is prevented, for any reason, from occupying 
the room reserved will be released and the deposit refunded if 
the Dean of Men or the Dean of Women is notified in writing 
at least two weeks prior to the date of registration. 

Room rent is payable in advance. Rooms may be assigned 
upon receipt of the room deposit but possession is not given 
until the rent is paid in full. 

Non-commuting students are not permitted to live off- 
campus without permission of the Dean of Men or the Dean of 
Women. 

RECREATION 

The Student Lounge Building houses a lounge and various 
rooms for student meetings and gatherings. 

The University Gymnasium and the athletic field are avail- 
able for recreational use. 

Because the University is situated in the central area of the 
city, many opportunities for wholesome recreation exist. The 
campus is convenient to legitimate theatres, concert halls, and 
museums. 

HEALTH SERVICE 

The Office of the University Physician and the Dispensary 
are located on the second floor of the Guidance Building. 

A physical examination is administered by the University 
Physician to all students on matriculation at the University. 

Daily medical service is available through the Physician and 
two full-time Nurses in the Dispensary. 



Twenty-jour 



SCHOOL OF MUSIC 



Serious emergency treatment is available at Mercy Hospital 
which is adjacent to the campus. 

BOOKSTORE 

The University Bookstore is located on the lower floor of the 
Administration Building. Students may obtain textbooks and 
supplies at this store. Other related services are also available. 

CAFETERIA 

The University Cafeteria is located on the lower floor of 
Canevin Hall. Students may avail themselves of its facilities 
and services. The Cafeteria is also available for special activities. 

THEATRE 

The Campus Theatre with a seating capacity of 350 is avail- 
able for programs sponsored by the students. Student concerts, 
dramatic presentations and other events are held in this theatre. 

University and School Assembly programs are conducted in 
this hall. On occasion, professional speakers in the vocational 
and avocational fields address the student body here. 

STUDENT PUBLICATION 

The official weekly student publication of the University is 

the "Duquesne Duke". Though edited and published by the 

students in the Department of Journalism, all students and their 

organizations may participate in the contribution of literary and 

news items. 

ATHLETIC ACTIVITIES 

The instructors in physical education supervise intramural 
programs in various athletic activities. All physically able 
students participate in these programs. 

The University is represented in intercollegiate athletic com- 
petition in basketball, golf, tennis, and baseball. The University, 
a member of the National Collegiate Athletic Association, abides 
by the published policies of this organization. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

The University fosters group life of students in societies, 
clubs, fraternities and sororities. All such organizations are con- 
ducted on the student government plan under the supervision 
of the Committee on Student Welfare. Among the groups named 
below those starred with an asterisk are organizations of students 
in the School of Music. 



Twenty-five 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



The Student Council, the chief student organization on the 
campus, cooperates with the Committee on Student Welfare in 
all matters pertaining to student government and activity. 

Societies, Clubs, Associations: American Chemical Society, 
American Pharmaceutical Association, Bureau of Market Re- 
search, Debate Society, Journalism Society, Society for the 
Advancement of Management, Arnold Air Society, History 
Club, International Relations Club, Bridge Club, Monogram 
Club, Evening Dukes and Duchesses, Intrafraternity Council, 
Pan-Hellenic Council, Women's Residence Council, National 
Federation of Catholic College Students, * Music Educators' 
National Conference, * National Catholic Music Educators' 
Association, * In-and-About Pittsburgh Club * Musart Club, 
* New Friends of Music Club, Men's Holy Name Society, 
Women's Sodality, Pershing Rifles, Scabbard and Blade, Social 
Science Council, Red Masquers, Women's Athletic Association. 

Fraternities, Sororities: Alpha Epsilon, Alpha Phi Alpha, 
Alpha Phi Delta, Alpha Phi Omicron, Alpha Tau Delta, Beta 
Alpha Phi, * Delta Mu Delta, Delta Phi Sigma, Delta Sigma 
Theta, Epsilon Eta Phi, * Gamma Sigma Gamma, Phi Kappa, 
Kappa Sigma, Lamda Kappa Sigma, Phi Alpha, Rho Chi, 
Psi Chi, Sigma Alpha Kappa, Sigma Lambda Phi, Sigma Phi, 
Sigma Tau Delta, Sigma Phi Delta. 

GUIDANCE BUREAU 

The Guidance Bureau is located in the Guidance Building, 
904-906 Vickroy Street, on the campus. This Bureau houses the 
offices of the Director of Student Welfare, the Dean of Men, 
the Dean of Women, the University Chaplain, the University 
Physician, the Dispensary, the Director of Testing, the Depart- 
ment of Psychology, and the Speech Clinic. 

The Guidance Bureau is responsible for the extended advise- 
ment services of students in the University. This student 
service includes personal, religious, moral, educational, voca- 
tional, social, and medical services, as well as special corrective 
and remedial services. Administrative personnel and faculty 
advisors refer students to the Bureau for supplementary advise- 
ment. 

The Vocational Reading Room on the first floor is solely for 
the use of students desirous of obtaining more information on 
vocations and careers. 

The Bureau makes available to all students special vocational 
guidance and counselling. 



Twenty-six 



SCHOOL OF MUSIC 



SCHOOL OF MUSIC PROGRAMS 
ADMISSION 

In addition to the University requirements for admission to 
the Undergraduate Schools, the School of Music requires: (1) 
that the applicant present himself for an interview in the office 
of the Dean of the School of Music; (2) that the applicant be 
prepared for an audition before a faculty committee. 

Courses are arranged by the student in consultation with the 
Dean at each registration period. Substitution of comparable 
courses for several of those listed below may be authorized by 
the dean in exceptional cases. A minimum of 128 credits is 
required for graduation. 

DEPARTMENTS 

The School of Music is divided into two departments: the 
Department of Conservatory Music and the Department of 
Public School Music. 

Conservatory Music 

The Department of Conservatory Music offers a program for 
those who desire a cultural training in the field of music. It 
includes preparation for those who wish to become professional 
musicians or private teachers, and training for all other phases 
of the art. The courses offered lead to the degree of Bachelor 
of Music. Five specialized fields of study are offered: Piano, 
Orchestra, Instruments, Organ, Composition, and Voice. 

Public School Music 

The Department of Public School Music offers a program in 
Music Education for those who wish to become teachers and 
supervisors of music in the public and non-public schools. The 
courses offered lead to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Public 
School Music. In the senior year, the required student-teaching 
is completed under the direction of a critic teacher. This is 
further complemented by regular visits of the Supervisor of 
student-teaching and by individual follow-up courses. A group 
conference of the student-teachers and the Supervisor is held at 
least once each week. 

Certification: Upon the completion of the four-year course, 
the graduate obtains the application form for the provisional 
college certificate from the School office. When the form is 



Twenty-seven 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



filled out and returned to the office, it is sent to the Teacher 
Education and Certification Bureau in Harrisburg, which issues 
the College Certificate, a license to teach in the State of Pennsyl- 
vania. It is valid for three years only. 

Permanent Certification: This provisional certificate is made 
permanent upon the completion of three years of teaching in 
the schools of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania if the holder 
of the certificate (1) has earned the rating of "middle or better" 
by the Superintendent under whose direction this teaching period 
has been fulfilled, and (2) has within this period completed six 
semester hours of approved courses in the appropriate field. 

Advantages'. Each student receives careful personal instruction 
in each course and close general supervision in all his work. His 
individual development is carefully observed and aided. The 
student electing the teacher-supervisor course will have oppor- 
tunity of acquiring intimate acquaintance with the largest 
possible amount of teaching material. 

As a member of the University Symphony Orchestra, the 
University Concert Band, the Woodwind and String Ensembles, 
and the University Concert Choir, the student receives the 
necessary ensemble routine. Confidence and proficiency in solo 
work are obtained by participation in public concerts and recitals 
and by semi-annual appearances before all members of the 
faculty. 

Placement: Graduates of the Department of Public School 
Music register with the Teachers' Placement Bureau in the 
School of Education before graduation. 

GRADUATE MUSIC 

The Department of Music Conservatory and the Depart- 
ment of Public School Music in the Graduate School offer 
programs leading to the degrees of Master of Arts and of Master 
of Science in Public School Music respectively. Information on 
these programs may be obtained by addressing the Dean of the 
Graduate School, Duquesne University. 



Ttotnty-eight 



SCHOOL OF MUSIC 



A. CONSERVATORY PROGRAM (Instrumental) 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

Credit 
Dept. Cat. No. Title I Sem.II Sem. 

Eng. 101, 102 English Composition 3 3 

Hist. 101, 102 History of Civilization 3 3 

Hist. 103, 104 Hist. Am. Democracy 2 2 

Mod. Lang. 101, 102 Elementary Language 3 3 

Music 101,102 Major Instrument, or Voice. . . 2 2 

Music 111,112 Minor Instrument 

Music 121, 122 Eurhythmies 1 1 

Music 141,142 Sight Singing 1 2 2 

16 16 

NOTE: Qualified students may earn an extra credit each semester by assign- 
ment to the symphony orchestra, band, or woodwind ensemble. 

Physically eligible male freshmen who have not had military experi- 
ence will be required to join the R.O.T.C, in which two credits 
per semester may be earned. A minimum of four semesters is required. 

Catholic Students are required to take four credit hours in Religion, 
one hour per semester. The required courses are Religion 101, 102, 
201, 202. 



Dept. 


Cat. No. 


Eng. 


201, 202 


Phil. 


101 


Mod. Lang. 


201, 202 


Music 


201, 202 


Music 


211,212 


Music 


221, 222 


Music 


241, 242 


Music 


231, 232 


Music 


251, 252 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Credit 
Title I Sem.II Sem. 

Literature 3 3 

Logic 3 

Intermediate Language 3 3 

Major Instrument, or Voice. . . 2 2 

Minor Instrument 

Eurhythmies 1 1 

Sight Singing II 2 2 

Harmony 1 2 2 

Hist, and Apprec. of Music 1.2 2 

Elective 2 

17 18 



Twenty-nine 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



Dept. 


Cat. No. 


Phil. 


202 


Music 


301, 302 


Music 


321, 322 


Music 


331, 332 


Music 


351, 352 


Music 


357, 358 


Music 


361, 362 


Music 


381, 382 


Music 


477, 478 



JUNIOR YEAR 

Credit 
Title I Sem.II Sen, 

Ethics 3 

Major Instrument, or Voice . 2 2 

Eurhythmies 1 1 

Harmony II 2 2 

Hist, and Apprec. of Music II 2 2 

Analysis 1 1 

Voice Class 1 1 

Instrumental Class 1 1 

Conducting 1 1 

Elective 3 3 

14 17 



SENIOR YEAR 

Credit 
Dept. Cat. No. Title I Sem.II Sent. 

Music 401, 402 Major Instrument, or Voice.. .2 * 2 

Music 431, 432 Counterpoint 2 2 

Music 435, 436 Original Composition 4 4 

Music 455,456 Orchestration 1 1 

Music 481,482 Instrumental Class 1 1 

Electives 6 6 

16 16 



Thirty 



SCHOOL OF MUSIC 



B. CONSERVATORY MUSIC (Vocal) 



Dept. 

Eng. 

Hist. 

Mod. Lang. 

*Rel. 

Music 

Music 

Music 

Voc.W. 

Voc.W. 

VocW. 

Voc.W. 

Voc.W. 



Cat. No. 
101, 102 



FRESHMAN YEAR 

Title 



Credit 
I Sem.II Sent. 



103 
101 
101 
101 
111 
121 
141 
103 
105 
107 



104 
102 
102 
102 
112 
122 
142 
104 
106 



108 



English Composition 3 

Hist. Am. Democracy 2 

Elementary Italian 3 

Fundamental Theology 1 

Major Instrument, Voice 1 

Minor Instrument 



Eurythmics 

Solfeggio 

Concert and Opera Repertoire 
Dramatic and Dance Technic. 
Principles of Vocal Technic and 

Interpretation 

Dramatic and Choral Rehearsal 



3 
2 
3 
1 
1 

1 
1 
1 
1 



15 15 



NOTE: Physically eligible male freshmen who have not had military experi- 
ence will be required to join the R.O.T.C., in which two credits per 
semester may be earned. A minimum of four semesters is required. 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Credit 
Title I Sem.II Sem. 

Logic and Ethics 3 3 

Elementary French 3 3 

Nature of God 1 1 

Major Instrument, Voice 1 1 

Minor Instrument 

Eurythmics 1 1 

Harmony 1 2 2 

Hist, and Appreciation of 

Music 1 2 2 

Solfeggio 1 1 

Concert and Opera Repertoire 1 1 

Dramatic and Dance Technic. 1 1 

Dramatic and Choral Rehearsal 1 1 



Dept. 


Cat. No. 


Phil. 


101, 102 


Mod. Lang 


. 101, 102 


*Rel. 


201, 202 


Music 


201, 202 


Music 


211,212 


Music 


221, 222 


Music 


231, 232 


Music 


251, 252 


Voc.W. 


241, 242 


Voc.W. 


203, 204 


Voc.W. 


205, 206 


Voc.W. 


207, 208 



17 17 

* The courses in Religion 101, 102, 201, 202 are required for all Catholic 
students. Non-Catholic students, if they do not elect to take the religion 
courses, may select in substitution courses offered by the School of Music 
or the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences equivalent in credit and approved 
by the department head. 



Thirty-one 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



Dept. Cat. No. 

Hist. 101, 102 
Mod.Lang. 101, 102 

Music 301, 302 

Music -321, 322 

Music 331, 332 

Music 351, 352 



Voc.W. 
Voc.W. 
Voc.W. 



303, 304 
305, 306 
307, 308 



JUNIOR YEAR 

Credit 
Title I Sem.II Sem. 

History of Civilization 3 3 

Elementary German 3 3 

Major Instrument Voice 1 1 

Eurythmics 1 1 

Harmony II 2 2 

Hist, and Appreciation of 

Music II 2 2 

Concert and Opera Repertoire 1 1 

English Diction 1 1 

Rehearsal and Performance. 3 3 



Dept. 


Cat. No. 


Eng. 


201, 202 


Mod.Lang 


. 201, 202 


Music 


401, 402 


Music 


477, 478 


Music 


357, 358 


Voc.W. 


403, 404 


Voc.W. 


405, 406 


Voc.W. 


407, 408 


Voc.W. 


409, 410 



17 17 

SENIOR YEAR 

Credit 
Title I Sem.II Sem. 

Literature 3 3 

Intermediate German 3 3 

Major Instrument, Voice 1 1 

Conducting (choral only) 1 1 

Analysis 1 1 

Concert Repertoire 1 1 

Program Building 1 1 

Rehearsal and Performance. 3 3 

Solo Vocal Ensemble 1 1 



15 15 



DEPARTMENTAL OBJECTIVES 



The aims of the program of the Vocal Conservatory Department are in 
harmony with those of the School of Music and of Duquesne University at 
large. The basic course is arranged to accord with these and is supplemented 
by a Vocal Workshop, a laboratory training specifically designed to equip 
the student for professional excellence as a performer, a singing artist, and 
to enable him to earn his living in his chosen field. Taking into account that 
the singer may find opportunity in Opera, Concert, Oratorio or Operetta, and 
through the media of television, radio, or the world of entertainment, this 
course sets up a practical means to introduce him to the skills and experiences 
he will require. 

Briefly stated, these skills are: 

(1) Vocal and musical proficiency of a high order, toward which the 
general training offered by the School of Music is directed. 

(2) Ability to act, to appreciate and express dramatic values in music, 
to be magnetic as a performer, and to present an attractive and appealing 
picture in any type of performing appearance. To develop in these respects, 
the singer needs training in acting and in stage movement, supplied by the 
Vocal Workshop course in Dramatic and Dance Technic. 



Thirty-two 



SCHOOL OF MUSIC 



(3) Acquaintance with the repertoire of concert and opera, which may 
be gained in the repertoire classes of the Vocal Workshop, classes which are 
offered in correlation with the Italian, French and German courses of the 
Modern Language Department of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. 

(4) A training in English diction imparted in private vocal instruction, 
and in the Vocal Workshop course in English Diction, gracing equally the 
singer's performance of art music and of the commercial repertoire. 

(5) An extensive experience in performance, privately in repertoire 
classes, opera and operetta rehearsals, and publicly in recitals both formal 
and informal, in oratorio, and in repeated appearances in full opera and 
operetta production, until performance itself is second nature. 

(6) The full power to convince and inspire, the God-given birthright of 
the singer, the latent ability which flowers rapidly and fully when stimulated 
by a proper and sufficiently varied training and informed by a true culture. 

Departmental Prerequisites 

Prerequisites for entrance into the Vocal Conservatory Department are: 
Superior vocal material; good scholastic standing in previous educational 
institutions; prior musical training or musical talent of outstanding character 
according to the determination of the department head. 

At the end of the second year, a judgment will be passed by the depart- 
ment head and the faculty of the School of Music to determine whether a 
student has made a sufficiently outstanding gain in vocal and musical pro- 
ficiency to warrant his moving on into the advanced training of the performer. 
In this connection, it should be noted that though this program is primarily 
intended for the training of the performer, most of its contents will also 
singularly qualify the student for a future as a teacher of singing. A limited 
number of persons will be permitted to enter the Junior year to qualify in 
the teaching field, for which the qualifications will be almost as stringent as 
those for performance, the distinction between teacher and performer being 
based more on the temperament and predilection of the student than upon 
his innate or developed ability. 



Departmental Requirements 

Requirements for graduation for both teacher and performer in the Vocal 
Conservatory Department are the satisfactory performance of a full length 
solo recital; and for the performer, the preparation and performance of at 
least one major and one minor role in full opera or operetta production. Total 
credits required for the degree are: 

34 in Music (including 6 credits in the 

Major Instrument or Voice) 
38 in Vocal Workshop 
56 in the College of Arts 



Total 128 

The student is advised that he may be subject to committee action by 
the Committee on Student Standing for unsatisfactory attendance or co- 
operation in additionally scheduled rehearsals and performances, as these are 
deemed absolutely imperative for his full development. 



Thirty-three 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



B. PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC PROGRAM 



Dept. 


Cat. No. 


Eng. 


101, 102 


Phil. 


101 


Hist. 


103, 104 


Psych. 


220 


Music 


121, 122 


Music 


141, 142 


Music 


143, 144 


Music 


101, 102 


Music 


111, 112 



FRESHMAN YEAR 

Credit 
Title I Sem.II Sent. 

English Composition 3 3 

Logic 3 

Hist. Am. Democracy 2 2 

General Psychology 3 

Eurhythmies 1 1 

Sight Singing 1 2 2 

Chorus 1 1 

Major Instrument, or Voice. . . 2 2 

Minor Instrument 

Electives 2 2 

16 16 



Dept. 


Cat. No. 


Eng. 


201, 202 


Gen. Ed. 


120 


Psych. 


310 


Mus.Ed. 


325 


Music 


221, 222 


Music 


231, 232 


Music 


241, 242 


Music 


243, 244 


Music 


251, 252 


Music 


201, 202 


Music 


211,212 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Credit 
Title I Sem. II Setn* 

Literature 3 3 

Introduction to Teaching 3 

Educational Psychology 3 

Rote Songs 2 

Eurhythmies 1 ' 1 

Harmony 1 2 2 

Sight Singing II 2 2 

Chorus 1 1 

Hist, and Apprec. of Music 1.2 2 

Major Instrument, or Voice. . . 2 2 

Minor Instrument 

16 18 



Thirty four 



SCHOOL OF MUSIC 



Dept. 


Cat. No. 


Mus.Ed. 


343 


Mus.Ed. 


344 


Phil. 


202 


Music 


331, 332 


Music 


343, 344 


Music 


351, 352 


Music 


357, 358 


Music 


361, 362 


Music 


381, 382 


Music 


301, 302 


Music 


477, 478 


Gen. Ed. 


210 



JUNIOR YEAR 

Credit 
Title I Sent. 1 1 Sem. 

Methods — Elem. and Inter 2 

Methods — High School 2 

Ethics 3 

Harmony II 2 2 

Chorus 1 1 

Hist, and Apprec. of Music II 2 2 

Analysis 1 1 

Voice Class 1 1 

Instrumental Class 1 1 

Major Instrument, or Voice. . . 2 2 

Conducting 1 1 

History of Education 3 

16 16 



Deft. 


Cat. No. 


Gen.Ed. 


410 


Hist. 


412 


Mus.Ed. 


463 


Mus.Ed. 


466 


Mus.Ed. 


497, 498 


Music 


431, 432 


Music 


443, 444 


Music 


455, 456 


Music 


481, 482 


Music 


401, 402 


Ed. Psych. 


464 



SENIOR YEAR 

Credit 
Title I Sem.II Sem. 

Sensory Aids 2 

History of Pennsylvania 2 

Methods of Music Appreciation 2 

Community Music 2 

Practice Teaching 6 

Counterpoint 2 2 

Chorus 1 1 

Orchestration 1 1 

Instrumental Class 1 1 

Major Instrument, or Voice. 2 2 

Mental Hygiene 3 

15 16 



Thirty-five 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

ENGLISH— COMPOSITION AND LITERATURE 

101, 102. English Composition. Major emphasis placed on actual 
practice in writing. A rapid review of English grammar and 
rhetoric will be provided. Credits Six hours. The College Faculty. 

201, 202. English Literature. A course designed to provide the 
student with a general knowledge of English literature, to 
familiarize him with the writers of prose and poetry, and to place 
their works against the historical, social, and philosophical back- 
ground of their times. The continuity of the periods is established 
by a study of Romanticism and Classicism, and of Christian and 
non-Christian modes of thought. Credit, Six hours. The College 
Faculty. 

EDUCATION 

120. Introduction to Teaching. An orientation course presenting 
the requirements, advantages, and opportunities, along with the 
responsibilities of those in the teaching profession. Required for 
all types of state certification. Credit, Three semester hours. 
Kleyle. 

210. History of Education. A critical review of the history and 
philosophy of education from the pre-Christian era to the 
present day. Presented as a background course for all professional 
courses in education. Credit, Three hours. Leonard. 

410. Audio-Visual Aids. An evaluation of numerous forms of audio- 
visual aids. Each student is required to compile a source book 
of sensory aids for his teaching field. Credit, Two semester hours. 
Ference. 

HISTORY 

101, 102. History of Civilization. A general survey of World History 
emphasizing the development of the main elements in the make- 
up of Western Civilization. Credit, Six hours. The College Faculty. 

103, 104. History of American Democracy. A political history of the 
United States describing the steps in the formation of our de- 
mocracy during the Colonial Period through the formation of 
the Constitution and its practical development to the New Deal. 
Credit, Four hours. The College Faculty. 

412. History of Pennsylvania A comprehensive course in Pennsyl- 
vania history, with special attention to the economic resources 
of the commonwealth. Credit, Two hours. Barr. 



Thirty-six 



SCHOOL OF MUSIC 



LITURGICAL MUSIC 

(All courses Elective) 

123, 124. Principles of Gregorian Chant. Gregorian Notation, ton- 
ality, rhythm, accentuation, and expression. Complete Method 
of Gregorian Chant: Sunol, O.S.B. Credit, Two hours. Reilly. 

223, 224. Principles of Gregorian Chant. Gregorian Hymns, their 
nature, place and execution. Simple and ornate melodies. Move- 
ment, Common tones — liturgical recitatives. Melismatic chants. 
Notes on Gregorian Paleography. Text: Liber Usualis. Complete 
Method of Gregorian Chant: Sunol, O.S.B. Prerequisite: Music 
123, 124. Credit, Two hours. Reilly. 

347, 348. Liturgy for Church Organists. A survey of the general 
ceremonies in the "Missa Cantata" and the "Missa Solemnis." 
Comprising also a general knowledge of the ecclesiastical year 
and such other ceremonies as Vespers and Benediction, cere- 
monies of Holy Week. Credit, Two hours. 

367, 368. Accompaniment of Plain Chant. Transposition (at the 
organ), improvisation of short interludes in diatonic style, notes 
on Gregorian paleography and on Church liturgy. Credit, Four 
hours. Reilly. 

463, 464. Liturgical Music. (Polyphonic and Modern). Gregorian 
accompaniment. Diatonic harmony. Transposition (at the organ); 
improvisation of short interludes in diatonic style. Credit, Four 
hours. Reilly. 

MODERN LANGUAGES 

FRENCH 

101, 102. Elementary French. Pronunciation, reading, dictation, 
grammar, exercises and translation. Credit, Six hours. The College 
Faculty. 

201, 202. Intermediate French. An intensified continuation of the 
work of French 101, 102. Greater stress is placed on grammar, 
composition and translation. Credit, Six hours. The College 
Faculty. 

GERMAN 

101, 102. Elementary German. Elementary phonetics as a guide 
to pronunciation. Grammar. Exercises and translation of simple 
prose. Credit, Six hours. The College Faculty. 

201, 202. Intermediate German. Review of German grammar with 
supplementary translation, both written and oral. Reading of 
modern German prose. Credit, Six hours. The College Faculty. 



Thirty-seven 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



SPANISH 

101, 102. Elementary Spanish. Pronunciation, reading, dictation, 
grammar exercises, translation — Pequena Encyclopedia. Credit, 
Six hours. The College Faculty. 

201, 202. Intermediate Spanish. Grammar continued. Translation, 
written and oral, easy composition, irregular verbs systematically 
studied; practice in understanding the spoken language. Exercises. 
Credit, Six hours. The College Faculty. 

Note: Proficient students may register for advanced courses in 
language. Consult the college bulletin. 



MUSIC 

101, 102, 201, 202; 301, 302; 401, 402. Major Instrument. The study 
of voice, piano, organ, string or wind instruments, throughout all 
semesters. Private instruction of one hour per week is afforded 
each student. Daily practice of at least one hour is required. 
Students are examined on entrance, to determine proficiency. 
After completing 102, all students are required toperform once 
each semester before a jury of the faculty. Credit, Two hours per 
semester. Staff. 

Ill, 112; 211, 212. Complementary Instrument. All students must 
choose a secondary instrument upon entrance. Those who do not 
elect piano as a major, must study it as their complementary 
instrument. One-half hour of private instruction is given in all 
secondary instruments for four semesters. Students may be 
required to continue this study in the Junior and Senior years, 
by taking 311, 312; 411, 412. No academic credit is allowed for 
complementary instrument. Staff. 

121, 122. Eurhythmies. Fundamentals of Rhythmic Movement. 
The study of musical rhythm by means of physical movement. 
The fundamentals of musical rhythm: pulse, note-values, also 
the expressive qualities of music, such as tempo, dynamics and 
phrasing are realized and expressed through body movement. 
Credit, Two hours. Mrs. Dorsch. 

141, 142. Sight Singing, Ear Training, Dictation. Development of 
the auditive faculties; application of sol-fa syllables as an aid in 
developing accuracy and fluency in sight-reading; notation of 
melodies and rhythm. Credit, Four hours. Stockmann. 



Thirty-eight 



SCHOOL OF MUSIC 



143, 144; 243, 244; 343, 344; 443, 444. Ensemble. All students are 
required to participate in the chorus each semester. (Vocal 
Ensemble). In addition, all students of instruments other than 
piano are required to attend rehearsals of the school orchestra 
and band. When adequate proficiency is attained, these students 
are incorporated in the orchestra and band. Piano students are 
given ensemble experience by assignments to accompany other 
instrumentalists, and by performance with smaller ensemble 
groups. Credit, One hour each semester. Staff. 

221, 222. Eurhythmies— Rhythmic Problems. A further study of 
musical rhythm with particular reference to rhythmic problems 
such as syncopation, augmentation, and diminution, irregular 
measures and musical form. Prerequisites: 121, 122. Credit, Two 
hours. Mrs. Dorsch. 

231, 232. Harmony. This course attempts to acquaint the student 
with the material used in musical composition. Study of the 
underlying rudiments of music. Formation of scales, intervals, 
triads, chords. Inversions of the chords, seventh chords. Credit, 
Four hours. 

241, 242. Sight Singing, Ear Training, Dictation. Continuation of 
Music 141, 142. Credit, Four hours. Stockmann. 

251, 252. History and Appreciation of Music. Survey of the de- 
velopment of music, from earliest times to Beethoven. Illustrated 
lectures by means of recordings, Credit, Four hours. 

311, 312. Complementary Instrument. Continuation of the study of 
a second instrument. No credit. Staff. 

321, 322. Eurhythmies — Improvisation for Rhythmic Movement. The 

application of Dalcroze Eurhythmies to the creative study of the 
keyboard. This course enables the student to improvise simple 
melodies at the piano, to harmonize folk-melodies at sight 
effectively and to accompany rhythmic movement and creative 
projects as developed in the schools. Prerequisites: 121, 122; 
221, 222. Credit, Two hours. Mrs. Dorsch. 

331, 332. Advanced Harmony. Inversion of the seventh chords. 
Altered chords. Suspensions. Modulations. Simple ornamental 
devices. Assigned melodies and basses. The study of the use at 
the piano of figured basses; accompanying melodies; creating 
short musical phrases. Credit, Four hours. Hunter. 

351, 352. History and Appreciation of Music. Continuation of Music 
251, 252; music from time of Beethoven to the present day. 
Illustrated lectures by means of recordings. Prerequisite: Music 
251, 252. Credit, Four hours. MacDonald. 



Thirty-nine 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



357, 358. Analysis of Form. The classical forms of composition as 
exemplified by the sonatas and symphonies of Beethoven are 
analyzed from the standpoint of form and tonality, to acquaint 
the student with the means of developing musical ideas into 
extended compositions. Credit, Two hours. 

361, 362. Voice Class. The student in these classes is looked upon 
as a future teacher in the public schools. Theories and methods 
of teaching. Care of the vocal organ. Value of the vocal in tone 
production. The naturalness and simplicity of correct singing is 
impressed upon all students. Credit, Two hours. Kingsley. 

381, 382. Instrumental Class. In addition to his major instrument, 
each student as a member of a small group studies the various 
instruments of the orchestra to acquire technique in their use, 
as well as to handle the problems of instrumental teaching and 
supervision. The first semester (381) is devoted to the study of 
the wind instruments, and the second (382) to the brass. Credit, 
Two hours. Plushkat. 

411, 412. Complementary Instrument. Continuation of the study of 
a second instrument. No credit. Staff. 

431, 432. Counterpoint. The examination of the active scale steps, 
simple melody, writing, the joining of two voices. Two-part 
motive development. Three-part motive development, canon, and 
fugue. This course provides the student with the opportunity to 
practice writing in the more elemental forms of musical com- 
position. Credit, Four hours. Hunter. 

435, 436. Original Composition. For conservatory students electing 
composition major. Original work in instrumental and vocal 
forms, solo and accompaniment is stressed. Private Instruction 
Fee. Credit, Eight hours. Hunter. 

> 

455, 456. Orchestration. Endeavors to develop skill in orchestral 
instrumentation, which is the art of arranging music for the 
orchestra. This implies an intimate knowledge of the range, 
quality, and varied capabilities of all orchestral instruments and 
is developed by the study of representative scores of the Masters. 
Credit, Two hours. Hunter. 

477, 478. Conducting and Techniques of Instrument. Presents the 
elements of conducting technique and reading of scores in relation 
to the materials and problems of orchestra and chorus, supple- 
mented by practical experience in conducting the orchestra and 
chorus. Credit, Two hours. Plushkat. 



Forty 



SCHOOL OF MUSI C 



481, 482. Instrumental Class. Strings. Continuation of 381, 382, 
with the same division of study according to semesters. Credit, 
Two hours. Longdon. 

MUSIC METHODS 

325. Rote Songs. A study and analysis of the song materials suit- 
able for use in the Nursery, Kindergarten, and Primary grades. 
This will include a study of the vocal problems encountered, 
methods of song presentation and demonstration of teaching on 
the part of the students themselves. Text required: Songs of 
Childhood. Music Education Series, Book I. Eleanor Smith. 
Credit, Two hours. Mrs. Houggy. 

343. Methods — Elementary and Intermediate. A study of the method 
by which the child proceeds from the purely imitative stage to 
a knowledge of staff-notation and independent sight singing. This 
is done through analysis of materials, methods of presentation, 
development of techniques to be used in the first six grades. The 
Observation Method analyzed. Prerequisites: 121, 122; 141, 142; 
221, 222. Credit, Two hours. Mrs. Houggy. 

344. Methods — High School. The application in the Junior and 
Senior High School of the teaching techniques developed in the 
Elementary grades. A consideration of the materials, methods 
of procedure, techniques and skills suitable to each phase of 
music activity. Prerequisites: 121, 122; 141, 142; 221, 222; 343. 
Credit, Two hours. Mrs. Houggy. 

463. Methods of Music Appreciation. The development of Music 
Appreciation in the Elementary Grades through the media of 
song material, the annotation and improvisation of melodies, 
recordings, percussion orchestra, program building, etc. Applied 
to the Secondary Division, this becomes a study of the best 
correlation of materials and techniques suitable to the psychologi- 
cal age of the child. Credit, Two hours. Mrs. Houggy. 

466. Community Music. The analysis and study of the value of 
music as an active community interest in the rural and urban 
centers of the United States. The application of this study to 
local rural and urban centers with a view toward the development 
of the student as a potential leader in his own particular com- 
munity. Credit, Two hours. Mrs. Houggy. 

497, 498. Practice Teaching. A plan of cooperation with the local 
Public School system, whereby students are given practical teach- 
ing experience under supervision both in the Elementary and 



Forty-one 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



Secondary Schools. This experience is supplemented by con- 
ferences both general and specific. Practice Teaching fee $25.00. 
Prerequisites: 121, 122; 141, 142; 221, 222; 321, 322, 343, 344. 
Credit, Six hours. Mrs. Houggy. 

VOCAL WORKSHOP 

193, 104. Concert and Opera Repertoire. Survey of the song literature 
of the Renaissance period, and in particular of the Italian art 
song; and of recital repertoire from the eighteenth century. 
Lecture and solo performance, One hour. Introduction to 
operatic repertoire. Perusal, analysis and interpretation of one 
entire Italian score, and of one operetta; solo performance of 

i < 5 excerpts in the classroom, One hour. Credit, One hour each 

*Z ? t semester. 

Iji — r— 

§ u a 4* ment; reading of lines and presentation of dramatic scenes; 



105, 106. Dramatic and Dance Technic. Stage positions, stage move- 

|ua t ment; reading of lines and presentation of dramatic scenes; 

h J a 5 orientation to performance, One hour. The principles of modern 

J< w * dance applied to the body-building necessary for the singer's 

DO J" tone production and stage movement, One hour. Credit, One 

h 2 u. < hour each semester. 

w ^ 107. Principles of Vocal Technic and Interpretation. The theory of 

a E if y tone production, setting forth for the singer the physiological, 

O S S 3 psychological and acoustical bases of vocal freedom. Principles 

u o O * of phrasing. Exposition of melodic, metrical and speech accent, 

O ""* a 5 and of broad principles of musical form. Application to Italian 

x O -> 2 anc * E n g nsn recitative, to representative items of art song 

* z 5 £ presented in English, and to contemporary vocal literature. 

q O o a Lecture, Two hours. Credit, One hour. 



> lu S 108. Dramatic and Choral Rehearsal. Application of elementary 

< £ J 3 stage technic to singing performance (material drawn from 

O d u. u. operetta, musical comedy and other contemporary sources); 

> w O preparation for recital appearance, One hour. Rehearsal of 

chorus for current production of opera or operetta, One. hour. 

Credit, One hour. Supplementary rehearsal and performance 

required as scheduled. 

141, 142. Solfeggio. Sight-singing presented from the point of view 
of musical proficiency for the singer. Development of interval 
sense from the half-step through all the major, minor and perfect 
intervals; and of the perception of recurring melody patterns. 
Scale building and chord building. Reading of diatonic melodies 
in major and minor. Use of conductor's beat and development 
of sense of metrical accent and measurement. Development of 
sense of tonality by orientation to the tonic and dominant. 
Class, Two hours. Credit, One hour each semester. 



Fotiy'two 



SCHOOL OF MUSIC 



203, 204. Concert and Opera Repertoire. Songs of Schubert, sung in 
English and analyzed for phrase design, modulation of keys, 
musical form and dramatic and musical import. Lecture, dis- 
cussion, solo and group performance, One hour. Perusal, analysis 
and interpretation of one entire French score. Development of 
sense of dramatic accent, of the relationship of recitative to 
aria and appropriate styles thereof; and of scenes and vocal 
ensembles to the entire work. Discussion, group and solo 
performance in the classroom, One hour. Credit, One hour each 
semester. 

205, 206. Dramatic and Dance Technic. Class instruction in panto- 
mime, characterization, make-up; and in the development of 
sense of motivation and of emotional depth, One hour. Dance 
Technic continued, One hour. Credit, One hour each semester. 

207, 208. Dramatic and Choral Rehearsal. Application of singing and 
dramatic technic to scenes from the scores studied in opera 
repertoire classes, and to scenes from operetta. Development 
of sense of timing, of playing with other actors, and of emotional 
sincerity, One hour. Rehearsal of chorus for current production 
of opera or operetta, One hour. Supplementary rehearsal and 
performance required as scheduled. Credit, One hour each 
semester. 

241, 242. Solfeggio. Development of interval sense in augmented 
and diminished intervals, and in chordal melodies and cadence 
patterns. Appreciation and musical performance of concord and 
discord in part singing. Development of sense of measurement 
and accent in the divided beat, dotted and tied notes, and 
syncopation. Development of the sense of tonality by orientation 
to every step of the major and minor scales. Reading of chordal 
melodies based on principal and secondary triads and on the 
dominant seventh; and of melodies containing chromatic alter- 
ation and simple modulation. Part singing. Class, Two hours. 
Credit, One hour each semester. 

303, 304. Concert and Opera Repertoire. Representative items of art 
song. Massenet, Delibes, Bizet, Liszt and others, sung in French; 
Schubert, Schumann, sung in German. Discussion, solo and 
group performance. One hour. Perusal, analysis and classroom 
performance of one entire German operatic score. Analysis and 
consideration of contrasting features of Italian, French and 
German operatic style, with attention to the musical aspects of 
the characters of operas in each school, and to the relationship 
of arias and scenes to the entire work; and with reference to the 
style of musical literature at large. One hour. Credit, One hour 
each semester. 



Forty 'three 



DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



305, 306. English Diction. Correction, clarification and refinement 
of enunciation and articulation. Coloring, rhythm, and phrasing 
of spoken lines of poetry or prose. Class, Two hours. Credit, 
One hour each semester. 

307, 308, 407, 408. Rehearsal and Performance. The rehearsal of 
major and minor roles for full operatic and operetta produc- 
tion. Development of the power to characterize; and of projection 
and authority in performance; and of authentic musical and 
dramatic style. Five hours. Rehearsal of chorus for current 
production of opera or operetta. One hour. Supplementary 
rehearsal and performance required as scheduled. Credit, Three 
hours each semester. 

341, 342. Solfeggio. Fluent reading and singing of wide intervals 
and of patterns containing sequences of intervals. Chordal 
melody patterns on seventh chords with alterations, in varied 
rhythmic patterns. Rhythmical precision and continuity in 
melodies figured with sixteenths and triplets, and in complexities 
of simple and compound time. Advanced appreciation of modu- 
lation. Prerequisite: Vocal Workshop 242 or equivalent. Class, 
Two hours. Credit, One hour each semester. 

403, 404. Concert Repertoire. Representative items of art song. Faure, 
Chausson, Debussy and others, sung in French; Brahms, Strauss, 
Wolf and others, sung in German. The development of the 
ability to give song readings of discrimination and intensity. 
Discussion, solo and group performance, Two hours weekly. 
Credit, One hour each semester. 



405, 406. Program Building. Survey of periods and styles of song 
literature. Building of song groups and finally of an entire 
program with consideration of chronology, tempo, length and 
i form; and of rhythmic and emotional characteristics of songs; 

and in relation to the voice, vocal attainment and temperament 
of the performer. Full length solo recital required. Class, Two 
hours. Credit, One hour each semester. 

409, 410. Solo Vocal Ensemble. The careful study and rehearsal 
of duets, trios and quartettes, and other small ensembles 
requiring highly developed musical and vocal attainment from 
each performer. Material chosen from oratorio, opera and other 
sources. Class, Two hours. Credit, One hour each semester. 

411, 412. Opera Repertoire. The verismo, Puccini, Mascagni, Leon- 
cavallo and others, the buffa, Rossini, Donizetti, and others. 
Perusal, analysis and classroom performance of entire scenes and 
excerpts. Prerequisite: Music 304, 322, 332; Vocal Workshop 



Forty-four 



SCHOOL OF MUSIC 



204, 308; Modern Language (Italian) 102; or the equivalent. 
Class, Two hours. Credit, One hour each semester. 

413, 414. Opera Repertoire. Massenet, Carpentier, Thome, Thomas. 
Perusal, analysis and classroom performance of entire scores and 
excerpts. Prerequisite: Music 304, 322, 332; Vocal Workshop 
242, 204, 308; Modern Language (French) 102; or equivalent. 
Class, Two hours. Credit, One hour each semester. 

441, 442. Solfeggio. Fluent reading and singing of melodies in the 
elaborated polyphonic style. Analysis of harmonic background 
of vocal music and its effect on tone coloring. Development of 
sense of absolute interval, introduction to reading of atonal and 
polytonal music and to music containing polyrhythms. Pre- 
requisite: Vocal Workshop 342 or equivalent. Class, Two hours. 
Credit, One hour each semester. 

471, 472. Methods of Teaching Solfeggio. Determination and syn- 
thesis of elementary and advanced teaching problems in respect 
to theory, ear-training, eye-training, tonal associations and 
rhythmic principles. Analysis and comparison of existing teach- 
ing materials. Basis for developing ingenuity and versatility in 
teaching approach. Syllabus for three-year course. Application 
to individual student and to groups. Prerequisite: Vocal Work- 
shop 342 and Music 212 and 332 or equivalent. Lecture and 
discussion, Two hours. Credit, One hour each semester. 

473, 474. Methods of Teaching Voice. Preparation for teaching sing- 
ing to individuals, in studio or institution. Method of auditions; 
classification of voices; categorising of vocal faults. Practical 
and phychological approach in teaching principles of tone pro- 
duction, musicianship and interpretation. Listing and classifying 
of teaching materials and repertoire for first three years of study. 
Principles of professional and business practice. Prerequisite: 
Four years of Vocal Conservatory program or equivalent. This 
course may be made available to a few qualified Senior students 
by special approval of the department head. Lecture and dis- 
cussion, Two hours. Credit, One hour each semester. 

475, 476. Advanced Principles of Vocal Interpretation. Explanation, 
illustration and performance of breadth, lyricism, bravura and 
declamando; of mesa di voce, mezza voce and other dynamic 
effects; of classical, romantic, impressionistic and folk styles; of 
national schools and their characteristics; of contrasted and com- 
bined elements of poetry, theatre, lyricism and musical design. 
Prerequisite: Four years of Vocal Conservatory Program or the 
equivalent. Class, Two hours. Credit, One hour each semester. 



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DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



445. Opera Repertoire. Verdi. II Trovatore, Aida, Rigoletto, or 
substitute such as La Forza del Destino. Perusal, analysis and 
classroom performance of entire scores. Prerequisite: Four years 
of voice, music, language and Vocal Workshop, or the equivalent. 
Class, Two hours. Credit, One hour. 

446. Opera Repertoire. Wagner. Lohengrin, Tannhauser. Perusal, 
analysis and classroom performance of entire scores and excerpts. 
Prerequisite: Four years of Vocal Conservatory Program or the 
equivalent. Class, Two hours. Credit, One hour. 

447. Concert Repertoire. Survey of songs of Schumann and 
Brahms, with a glance at the cultural and sociological back- 
ground, and literary and musical sources and derivations. Pre- 
requisite: Four years of voice, music, language and Vocal 
Workshop or equivalent. Credit, One hour. 

448. Concert Repertoire. Survey of songs of Richard Strauss and 
Hugo Wolf as in 447. Prerequisite : Four years of voice, music, 
language and Vocal Workshop or the equivalent. Lecture and 
classroom performance. Two hours. Credit, One hour. 

449. Concert Repertoire. Survey of songs of Chausson and Debussy 
as in 447. Prerequisite: Four years of voice, music, language and 
Vocal Workshop or the equivalent. Lecture and classroom 
performance. Two hours. Credit, One hour. 

001. Vocal Performance. A course permitting the student to enjoy 
the privilege of rehearsal and performance in operatic produc- 
tions, and in choral performances, both as choral member and 
as soloist, on a non-credit basis as part of the adult education 
program of the University. The opportunity is open to profes- 
sional and non-professional performer alike, and to all students 
registered in the University. 

101, 102; 201, 202. Major Instrument (Vocal Conservatory Depart- 
ment). The study of voice throughout the first four semesters. 
Private instruction of one half hour per week is afforded each 
student, supplemented by Vocal Workshop classes in tone 
production, interpretation and repertoire. Daily practice of at 
least one hour is required. Students are examined on entrance, 
to determine potential abilities as performers. Solo performances 
in public and semi-public recital required. After completing the 
second semester, all students are required to perform once each 
semester before a jury of the faculty. Credit, One hour per 
semester. 



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SCHOOL OF MUSIC 



301, 302; 401, 402. Major Instrument (Vocal Conservatory Depart- 
ment). The study of voice throughout the last four semesters. 
Private instruction of one hour per week is afforded each student, 
supplemented by Vocal Workshop classes in repertoire, rehearsal, 
diction and program building. Daily practice of at least two 
hours is required. Solo performances in recital, oratorio, opera 
and operetta are afforded and required. The performance of a 
solo recital is also required. Credit, One hour per semester. 

405, 406. Major Instrument (Vocal Conservatory Department). 
Advanced vocal coaching. For students who have completed at 
least four years of voice training and three years of Music, 
Language and Vocal Workshop courses or the equivalent. 
Private instruction of one hour per week is afforded. Credit, 
One hour per semester. 



PHILOSOPHY AND PSYCHOLOGY 

101. Logic. This course is required of all students throughout the 
University. It offers fundamental training in dialectics, exclud- 
ing epistemology. Credit, Three hours. The Department. 

202. Ethics. This course is required of all students throughout the 
University. It proposes a consideration of the nature and 
principles of morality as determined by the norm of right reason. 
Credit, Three hours. The Department. 

220. General Psychology. The essential laws and principles of 
human behavior. Methods of psychology; fundamental native 
reactions; emotional life; mental life, including imagination, 
thinking, reasoning, concepts and judgments; sensations; per- 
ceptions; adjustment; and personality. This course is the founda- 
tion for other courses in psychology. Credit, Three hours. The 
College Faculty. 

310. Educational Psychology. Psychology of learning, instinctive 
behavior, habit, conditioning, motivation, types of learning, and 
factors affecting the learning process. Prerequisite: Psych. 220. 
Credit, Three hours. Education Faculty. 

464. Mental Hygiene. Mental disease; its psychological causes; 
proper measures for prevention. Mental health; elements of the 
wholesome personality; practical steps for development; hygienic 
adjustment to the conflicts of life. Credit, Three hours. Holt. 



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DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 



RELIGION 

In the first and second years, courses in Religion must be 
taken by all Catholic students. Non-Catholic students may, but 
are not obliged to, attend. 

101, 102. Fundamental Theology. This course prepares the students 
for the study of Theology. It includes an investigation of the 
nature of Religion and the demonstration of the objective 
existence of such a brand of knowledge. It further includes a 
demonstration of the fact that Christ is God and that the true 
version of religion is still being unanimously taught by His 
Church exactly as Christ Himself taught it. Credit, One hour 
each semester. 

201, 202. Nature of God. This is a course in Rational Theology 
designed especially to arm the layman against the atheism and 
agnosticism of our times. Emphasis is placed on the student's 
coming to see for himself that what the Church teaches about 
the nature of God is not merely a matter of belief but sheerly a 
matter of fact. Credit, One hour each semester. 



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SCHOOL OF MUSIC 



DIVISION OF MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS 

RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS, DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY 

Pittsburgh 19, Pennsylvania 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

The Armed Forces maintain Departments of Military and Air Science 
and Tactics of the Reserve Officers Training Corps (ROTC) at Duquesne 
University for Field Artillery and Air Force Administration and Logistics. 

The Mission of the Departments. The Reserve Officers Training 
Corps has two missions. The first is to produce junior officers who have the 
qualities and attributes essential to their progressive and continued develop- 
ment as officers in the United States Army and Air Force. The second is to 
lay the foundations of intelligent citizenship within the student and to give 
him such basic military training as will be of benefit to himself and to the 
military service if he becomes a member thereof. Special emphasis is placed 
upon "Leadership" to assist Duquesne men in meeting any situation in life 
with success and honor. The development of physical fitness, good posture 
and military bearing is stressed. 

Basic and Advanced Course. There are two courses in each Depart- 
ment, each consisting of two years. The Basic Course corresponds to the 
Freshman and Sophomore years and is one of the requirements for graduation 
of physically qualified male students. The Advanced Course corresponds to 
the Junior and Senior years; is elective by the student and selective by the 
Professors of Military and Air Science and Tactics. Students who enroll in 
the Advanced Course are required to complete two years. 

Uniform and Allowances. The complete uniform of the same pattern 
and material as the Army officers uniform and including the overcoat and 
shoes is furnished by the Government for all basic students. The University 
draws commutation for and furnishes Advanced Course students with a 
tailored uniform including trench coat. The uniform is given to the student 
by the University on graduation. 

A monetary allowance of ninety cents (90^) per day for up to 595 days, 
totalling 3553.50 is paid in monthly payments to students while pursuing the 
Advanced Course. 

Commission. Graduates of the Advanced Course are awarded com- 
missions in the Reserve Corps of the United States Army or United States 
Air Force. An opportunity for commission in the Regular Army or Air Force 
is open to those students whose records entitle them to be designated as 
Distinguished Military Students. Regular commissions are also awarded to 
officers of the Reserve Forces who are successful in a competitive tour of 
active duty following graduation in the U. S. Army, or by direct appointment 
while on active duty in the U. S. Air Force. 

Academic Credit. Credits toward a degree are granted for ROTC 
courses as follows: Basic Course, 3 hours per week, 2 credits per semester. 
Advanced Course, 5 hours per week, 3 credits per semester. 



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Duquesne University 



College of Liberal Arts and Sciences 

School op Law 

School of Business Administration 

School of Pharmacy 

School of Music 

School of Education 

School of Nursing 

Graduate School 



Bulletins of the above schools are published separately 
and may be obtained on request from the 

DIRECTOR OF ADMISSIONS 

Duquesne University 

PITTSBURGH 19, PA. GRant 1-4635 



°£fice of +ho r> 

U *W. Penna. i 5219 















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